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Sample records for investigating heterogeneous protein

  1. Heterogeneity in recombinant protein production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schalén, Martin; Johanson, Ted; Lundin, Luisa

    2012-01-01

    contribute to make a population in a fermenter heterogeneous, resulting in cell-to-cell variation in physiological parameters of the microbial culture. Our study aims at investigating how population heterogeneity and recombinant protein production is affected by environmental gradients in bioreactors....... For this purpose, a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, that functions as a protein production reporter, has been developed. A heterologous protein has been tagged with a fluorescent protein providing a way to measure the amount of heterologous protein produced by the cells on single cell level. Gradients...... are simulated in small bioreactors and the population heterogeneity can be visualised by analysing single cells with flow cytometry. This can give new insights to cell physiology and recombinant protein production at the industrial scale....

  2. Sequence heterogeneity accelerates protein search for targets on DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shvets, Alexey A.; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2015-01-01

    The process of protein search for specific binding sites on DNA is fundamentally important since it marks the beginning of all major biological processes. We present a theoretical investigation that probes the role of DNA sequence symmetry, heterogeneity, and chemical composition in the protein search dynamics. Using a discrete-state stochastic approach with a first-passage events analysis, which takes into account the most relevant physical-chemical processes, a full analytical description of the search dynamics is obtained. It is found that, contrary to existing views, the protein search is generally faster on DNA with more heterogeneous sequences. In addition, the search dynamics might be affected by the chemical composition near the target site. The physical origins of these phenomena are discussed. Our results suggest that biological processes might be effectively regulated by modifying chemical composition, symmetry, and heterogeneity of a genome

  3. Protein and antigenic heterogeneity among isolates of Bacillus piliformis.

    OpenAIRE

    Riley, L K; Besch-Williford, C; Waggie, K S

    1990-01-01

    Protein and antigenic heterogeneity among isolates of Bacillus piliformis, the etiologic agent of Tyzzer's disease, were investigated. The seven isolates utilized in this study were originally isolated from naturally infected animals of different animal species and diverse geographical locations. Isolates were propagated in mammalian cell lines, and bacterial extracts were prepared. Protein and antigenic profiles were compared among isolates, using Coomassie blue-stained polyacrylamide gels a...

  4. Heterogeneous nucleation of protein crystals on fluorinated layered silicate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keita Ino

    Full Text Available Here, we describe an improved system for protein crystallization based on heterogeneous nucleation using fluorinated layered silicate. In addition, we also investigated the mechanism of nucleation on the silicate surface. Crystallization of lysozyme using silicates with different chemical compositions indicated that fluorosilicates promoted nucleation whereas the silicates without fluorine did not. The use of synthesized saponites for lysozyme crystallization confirmed that the substitution of hydroxyl groups contained in the lamellae structure for fluorine atoms is responsible for the nucleation-inducing property of the nucleant. Crystallization of twelve proteins with a wide range of pI values revealed that the nucleation promoting effect of the saponites tended to increase with increased substitution rate. Furthermore, the saponite with the highest fluorine content promoted nucleation in all the test proteins regardless of their overall net charge. Adsorption experiments of proteins on the saponites confirmed that the density of adsorbed molecules increased according to the substitution rate, thereby explaining the heterogeneous nucleation on the silicate surface.

  5. Laboratory investigations of effective flow behavior in unsaturated heterogeneous sands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildenschild, Dorthe; Høgh Jensen, Karsten

    1999-01-01

    Two-dimensional unsaturated flow and transport through heterogeneous sand was investigated under controlled laboratory conditions. The unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of five homogeneous sands and three heterogeneous systems composed of these five sands was measured using a steady state flux...... controlled method. The heterogeneous sand systems were established in a laboratory tank for three realizations of random distributions of the homogeneous sands comprising a system of 207 grid cells. The water flux was controlled at the upper boundary, while a suction was applied at the lower boundary...... realizations of the heterogeneous sand were quite similar, thus suggesting that this type of heterogeneous flow system can be treated as an equivalent homogeneous medium characterized by effective parameters....

  6. Monte Carlo Simulation of Protein Adsorption on Energetically Heterogeneous Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Danwanichakul, Panu

    2014-01-01

    The modified triangular-well potential model was applied to incorporate the effect of surface energy on the adsorption of particles or proteins on energetically heterogeneous surfaces. The method is convenient in simulating the adsorption on heterogeneous surface of which different region possesses different free energy. Spherical particles with attractive forces were added on the surface and underwent surface diffusion before they were quenched in place. It was seen that the ratio of surface...

  7. Investigation on generalized Variational Nodal Methods for heterogeneous nodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yongping; Wu, Hongchun; Li, Yunzhao; Cao, Liangzhi; Shen, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • We developed two heterogeneous nodal methods based on the Variational Nodal Method. • Four problems were solved to evaluate the two heterogeneous nodal methods. • The function expansion method is good at treating continuous-changing heterogeneity. • The finite sub-element method is good at treating discontinuous-changing heterogeneity. - Abstract: The Variational Nodal Method (VNM) is generalized for heterogeneous nodes and applied to four kinds of problems including Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) core problem with continuous cross section profile, Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) control rod cusping effect problem, PWR whole-core pin-by-pin problem, and heterogeneous PWR core problem without fuel-coolant homogenization in each pin cell. Two approaches have been investigated for the treatment of the nodal heterogeneity in this paper. To concentrate on spatial heterogeneity, diffusion approximation was adopted for the angular variable in neutron transport equation. To provide demonstrative numerical results, the codes in this paper were developed in slab geometry. The first method, named as function expansion (FE) method, expands nodal flux by orthogonal polynomials and the nodal cross sections are also expressed as spatial depended functions. The second path, named as finite sub-element (FS) method, takes advantage of the finite-element method by dividing each node into numbers of homogeneous sub-elements and expanding nodal flux into the combination of linear sub-element trial functions. Numerical tests have been carried out to evaluate the ability of the two nodal (coarse-mesh) heterogeneous VNMs by comparing with the fine-mesh homogeneous VNM. It has been demonstrated that both heterogeneous approaches can handle heterogeneous nodes. The FE method is good at continuous-changing heterogeneity as in the MSR core problem, while the FS method is good at discontinuous-changing heterogeneity such as the PWR pin-by-pin problem and heterogeneous PWR core

  8. Investigating the effect of heterogeneity on infill wells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Bagheri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In recent years, improving oil recovery (IOR has become an important subject for the petroleum industry. One IOR method is infill drilling, which improves hydrocarbon recovery from virgin zones of the reservoir. Determining the appropriate location for the infill wells is very challenging and greatly depends on different factors such as the reservoir heterogeneity. This study aims to investigate the effect of reservoir heterogeneity on the location of infill well. In order to characterize the effect of heterogeneity on infill well locations, some geostatistical methods, e.g., sequential gaussian simulation, have been applied to generate various heterogeneity models. In particular, different correlation ranges (R were used to observe the effect of heterogeneity. Results revealed that an increase in correlation ranges will lead to (1 a higher field oil production total, and (2 a faster expansion of the drainage radius which consequently reduced the need for infill wells. The results of this study will help engineers to appropriately design infill drilling schemes.

  9. Probabilistic protein function prediction from heterogeneous genome-wide data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Nariai

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Dramatic improvements in high throughput sequencing technologies have led to a staggering growth in the number of predicted genes. However, a large fraction of these newly discovered genes do not have a functional assignment. Fortunately, a variety of novel high-throughput genome-wide functional screening technologies provide important clues that shed light on gene function. The integration of heterogeneous data to predict protein function has been shown to improve the accuracy of automated gene annotation systems. In this paper, we propose and evaluate a probabilistic approach for protein function prediction that integrates protein-protein interaction (PPI data, gene expression data, protein motif information, mutant phenotype data, and protein localization data. First, functional linkage graphs are constructed from PPI data and gene expression data, in which an edge between nodes (proteins represents evidence for functional similarity. The assumption here is that graph neighbors are more likely to share protein function, compared to proteins that are not neighbors. The functional linkage graph model is then used in concert with protein domain, mutant phenotype and protein localization data to produce a functional prediction. Our method is applied to the functional prediction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes, using Gene Ontology (GO terms as the basis of our annotation. In a cross validation study we show that the integrated model increases recall by 18%, compared to using PPI data alone at the 50% precision. We also show that the integrated predictor is significantly better than each individual predictor. However, the observed improvement vs. PPI depends on both the new source of data and the functional category to be predicted. Surprisingly, in some contexts integration hurts overall prediction accuracy. Lastly, we provide a comprehensive assignment of putative GO terms to 463 proteins that currently have no assigned function.

  10. Spectroscopic investigation of protein corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Poonam

    Nanotechnology has revolutionalized the landscape of modern science and technology, including materials, electronics, therapeutics, bioimaging, sensing, and the environment. Research in the past decade has examined the fate of nanomaterials in vitro and in vivo, as well as the interactions between nanoparticles and biological and ecosystems using primarily toxicological and ecotoxicological approaches. However, due to the versatility in the physical and physicochemical properties of nanoparticles, and due to the vast complexity of their hosting systems, the solubility, transformation, and biocompatibility of nanomaterials are still poorly understood. Nanotechnology has been undergoing tremendous development in recent decades, driven by realized perceived applications of nanomaterials in electronics, therapeutics, imaging, sensing, environmental remediation, and consumer products. Nanoparticles on entering the blood stream undergo an identity change, they become coated with proteins. There are different kind of proteins present in blood. Proteins compete for getting coated over the surface of nanoparticle and this whole entity of proteins coated over nanoparticle surface is called Protein Corona. Proteins tightly bound to the surface of nanoparticle form hard corona and the ones loosely bound on the outer surface form soft corona. This dissertation is aimed at spectroscopic investigation of Protein Corona. Chapter I of this dissertation offers a comprehensive review of the literature based on nanomaterials with the focus on carbon based nanomaterilas and introduction to Protein Corona. Chapter II is based different methods used for Graphene Synthesis,different types of defects and doping. In Chapter III influence of defects on Graphene Protein Corona was investigated. Chapter IV is based on the study of Apoptosis induced cell death by Gold and silver nanoparticles. In vitro study of effect of Protein Corona on toxicity of cells was done.

  11. An investigation of the heterogeneous nucleation of calcite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    House, W.A.; Tutton, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    The heterogeneous precipitation kinetics of calcite from dilute calcium bicarbonate solutions onto pyrex glass seeds is investigated by using a modified form of the Davies and Jones equation. The rate constant is evaluated from experiments using calcite seeds and it is demonstrated that the growth rate does not increase in proportion to the increase in surface area accompanying precipitation. The number of heteronucleated particles is estimated by assuming a constant density of growth sites on the different calcite surfaces. A comparison is made between the specific surface areas of calcite obtained by the calcium-45 isotopic exchange method and other values. (orig.)

  12. Investigation of mixture heterogeneity by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smakhtin, L.A.; Kurinov, A.D.; Shokel', E.S.; Merkulov, A.V.

    1981-01-01

    Instrumental methods of activation analysis have been developed to study the distribution of heterogeneity of Co, Na, Cu, Tb additives in ferrite charge and Sn in silicon oxide. Reasons have been examined for arising systematic errors during neutron-activation estimation of a heterogeneity coefficient. Ways are proposed to eliminate them [ru

  13. A new heterogeneous family of telomerically encoded Cryptosporidium proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzid, Maha; Hunter, Paul R; McDonald, Vincent; Elwin, Kristin; Chalmers, Rachel M; Tyler, Kevin M

    2013-01-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is predominantly caused by two closely related species of protozoan parasites the zoonotic Cryptosporidium parvum and anthroponotic Cryptosporidium hominis which diverge phenotypically in respect to host range and virulence. Using comparative genomics we identified two genes displaying overt heterogeneity between species. Although initial work suggested both were species specific, Cops-1 for C. parvum and Chos-1 for C. hominis, subsequent study identified an abridged ortholog of Cops-1 in C. hominis. Cops-1 and Chos-1 showed limited, but significant, similarity to each other and share common features: (i) telomeric location: Cops-1 is the last gene on chromosome 2, whilst Chos-1 is the first gene on chromosome 5, (ii) encode circa 50-kDa secreted proteins with isoelectric points above 10, (iii) are serine rich, and (iv) contain internal nucleotide repeats. Importantly, Cops-1 sequence contains specific SNPs with good discriminatory power useful epidemiologically. C. parvum-infected patient sera recognized a 50-kDa protein in antigen preparations of C. parvum but not C. hominis, consistent with Cops-1 being antigenic for patients. Interestingly, anti-Cops-1 monoclonal antibody (9E1) stained oocyst content and sporozoite surface of C. parvum only. This study provides a new example of protozoan telomeres as rapidly evolving contingency loci encoding putative virulence factors. PMID:23467513

  14. Enhancing Accuracy in Molecular Weight Determination of Highly Heterogeneously Glycosylated Proteins by Native Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Guanbo; de Jong, Rob N; van den Bremer, Ewald T J; Parren, Paul W H I; Heck, Albert J R

    2017-01-01

    The determination of molecular weights (MWs) of heavily glycosylated proteins is seriously hampered by the physicochemical characteristics and heterogeneity of the attached carbohydrates. Glycosylation impacts protein migration during sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis

  15. Low protein and micronutrient intakes in heterogeneous older population samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyväkorpi, S K; Pitkälä, K H; Puranen, T M; Björkman, M P; Kautiainen, H; Strandberg, T E; Soini, H; Suominen, M H

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition is associated with comorbidities and functional decline among older people. Less is known about nutrient intakes across heterogeneous older populations. We examined nutritional status and nutrient intakes in different samples of older people representing broad spectrum of healthy and frail populations. We evaluated adequacy of their energy, protein and micronutrient intakes in comparison to recommendations. Cross-sectional study combined five datasets: home-dwelling older people participating in nutrition education and cooking classes (NC) [n=54], participants from Helsinki Businessmen Study [n=68], home-dwelling people with Alzheimer disease (AD) [n=99] and their spousal caregivers (n=97), participants from Porvoo Sarcopenia and Nutrition Trial (n=208), and residents of Helsinki assisted living facilities (ALF) [n=374]. Nutritional status was assessed using Mini Nutritional Assessment and nutrient intakes retrieved from 1 to 3 day food records. Those suffering most from mobility limitation and cognitive decline had the poorest nutritional status (pnutrition interventions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Small angle neutron scattering contrast variation reveals heterogeneities of interactions in protein gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banc, A; Charbonneau, C; Dahesh, M; Appavou, M-S; Fu, Z; Morel, M-H; Ramos, L

    2016-06-28

    We propose a quantitative approach to probe the spatial heterogeneities of interactions in macromolecular gels, based on a combination of small angle X-ray (SAXS) and neutrons (SANS) scattering. We investigate the structure of model gluten protein gels and show that the gels display radically different SAXS and SANS profiles when the solvent is (at least partially) deuterated. The detailed analysis of the SANS signal as a function of the solvent deuteration demonstrates heterogeneities of sample deuteration at different length scales. The progressive exchange between the protons (H) of the proteins and the deuteriums (D) of the solvent is inhomogeneous and 60 nm large zones that are enriched in H are evidenced. In addition, at low protein concentration, in the sol state, solvent deuteration induces a liquid/liquid phase separation. Complementary biochemical and structure analyses show that the denser protein phase is more protonated and specifically enriched in glutenin, the polymeric fraction of gluten proteins. These findings suggest that the presence of H-rich zones in gluten gels would arise from the preferential interaction of glutenin polymers through a tight network of non-exchangeable intermolecular hydrogen bonds.

  17. Preliminary Investigations of Challenges in Dynamic Integration of Heterogeneous Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makaziwe Makamba

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The progress of technology prompted the proliferation of services. Services are distinct, loosely coupled units of functionalities that are self-contained. These services are however developed by various vendors without following appropriate standards. However, the need for interoperability and reusability prompts the need for service integration. Service integration is not a new arena but emphasis is mostly on homogeneous services. However, the challenge lies on the integration of heterogeneous services to enforce reusability and maximize Total Cost of Deployment (TCD and Total Cost of Ownership (TCO at organization level. The issue of service integration has become critical, due to the increase of these diverse services as they have different platforms, architecture and use different programming languages. The current methods of integrating heterogeneous services are manual integration methods. Therefore, the challenge with the current methods is time consumption, lack of flexibility, cost (TCO and TCD, total time to development, because the process is manual. In this paper, we explore the challenges regarding dynamic integration of heterogeneous services and identify key issues that need to be addressed, in order to develop a successful mechanism that will enable dynamic integration of heterogeneous services.

  18. Heterogeneity of the Abnormal Prion Protein (PrPSc) of the Chandler Scrapie Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Kazuo; Iwamaru, Yoshifumi; Masujin, Kentaro; Imamura, Morikazu; Mohri, Shirou; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2013-02-18

    The pathological prion protein, PrPSc, displays various sizes of aggregates. In this study, we investigated the conformation, aggregation stability and proteinase K (PK)-sensitivity of small and large PrPSc aggregates of mouse-adapted prion strains. We showed that small PrPSc aggregates, previously thought to be PK-sensitive, are resistant to PK digestion. Furthermore, we showed that small PrPSc aggregates of the Chandler scrapie strain have greater resistance to PK digestion and aggregation-denaturation than large PrPSc aggregates of this strain. We conclude that this strain consists of heterogeneous PrPSc.

  19. Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Various Proteins of Wheat in Heterogeneous Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Hasanov

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Enzymatic hydrolysis of different proteins isolated from wheat flour by neutral proteinase (neutraza "Novozymes" was studied. It was shown, that hydrolysis of alkaline proteins was 10-11 times higher as compared with albumin from wheat, 3-4 times higher than alcohol soluble proteins and 2-2.5 times higher than globulins. It was found that, hydrothermal treatment of wheat flour decreased the rate of protein hydrolysis. The rate of hydrolysis of native alkaline soluble proteins was 4-6 times higher than denaturized proteins. The rate of hydrolysis of denatured water-soluble proteins is 3-5 times higher as compared with native protein (albumin. It was shown that product of thermal degradation of raw materials also influence on the rate of protein hydrolysis.

  20. Classification and purification of proteins of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles by RNA-binding specificities.

    OpenAIRE

    Swanson, M S; Dreyfuss, G

    1988-01-01

    Several proteins of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) particles display very high binding affinities for different ribonucleotide homopolymers. The specificity of some of these proteins at high salt concentrations and in the presence of heparin allows for their rapid one-step purification from HeLa nucleoplasm. We show that the hnRNP C proteins are poly(U)-binding proteins and compare their specificity to that of the previously described cytoplasmic poly(A)-binding protein. Thes...

  1. Is dynamic heterogeneity of water in presence of a protein ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Rotational and translational dynamic heterogeneities (DHs) of ambient aqueous solutions of trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) and tetramethylurea (TMU) at several solute concentrations have been inves- tigated and compared. Motional characteristics of water molecules at solute interfaces and in bulk solutions.

  2. Applicable or non-applicable: investigations of clinical heterogeneity in systematic reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E. Chess

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical heterogeneity can be defined as differences in participant characteristics, types or timing of outcome measurements and intervention characteristics. Clinical heterogeneity in systematic reviews has the possibility to significantly affect statistical heterogeneity leading to inaccurate conclusions and misled decision making. The aim of this study is to identify to what extent investigators are assessing clinical heterogeneity in both Cochrane and non-Cochrane systematic reviews. Methods The most recent 100 systematic reviews from the top five journals in medicine—JAMA, Archives of Internal Medicine, British Medical Journal, The Lancet, and PLOS Medicine—and the 100 most recently published and/or updated systematic reviews from Cochrane were collected. Various defined items of clinical heterogeneity were extracted from the included reviews. Investigators used chi-squared tests, logarithmic modeling and linear regressions to determine if the presence of such items served as a predictor for clinical heterogeneity when comparing Cochrane to non-Cochrane reviews. Extracted variables include number of studies, number of participants, presence of quantitative synthesis, exploration of clinical heterogeneity, heterogeneous characteristics explored, basis and methods used for investigating clinical heterogeneity, plotting/visual aids, author contact, inferences from clinical heterogeneity investigation, reporting assessment, and the presence of a priori or post-hoc analysis. Results A total of 317 systematic reviews were considered, of which 199 were in the final analysis. A total of 81 % of Cochrane reviews and 90 % of non-Cochrane reviews explored characteristics that are considered aspects of clinical heterogeneity and also described the methods they planned to use to investigate the influence of those characteristics. Only 1 % of non-Cochrane reviews and 8 % of Cochrane reviews explored the clinical

  3. Investigating clinical heterogeneity in systematic reviews: a methodologic review of guidance in the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagnier Joel J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While there is some consensus on methods for investigating statistical and methodological heterogeneity, little attention has been paid to clinical aspects of heterogeneity. The objective of this study is to summarize and collate suggested methods for investigating clinical heterogeneity in systematic reviews. Methods We searched databases (Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, and CONSORT, to December 2010 and reference lists and contacted experts to identify resources providing suggestions for investigating clinical heterogeneity between controlled clinical trials included in systematic reviews. We extracted recommendations, assessed resources for risk of bias, and collated the recommendations. Results One hundred and one resources were collected, including narrative reviews, methodological reviews, statistical methods papers, and textbooks. These resources generally had a low risk of bias, but there was minimal consensus among them. Resources suggested that planned investigations of clinical heterogeneity should be made explicit in the protocol of the review; clinical experts should be included on the review team; a set of clinical covariates should be chosen considering variables from the participant level, intervention level, outcome level, research setting, or others unique to the research question; covariates should have a clear scientific rationale; there should be a sufficient number of trials per covariate; and results of any such investigations should be interpreted with caution. Conclusions Though the consensus was minimal, there were many recommendations in the literature for investigating clinical heterogeneity in systematic reviews. Formal recommendations for investigating clinical heterogeneity in systematic reviews of controlled trials are required.

  4. Investigating clinical heterogeneity in systematic reviews: a methodologic review of guidance in the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnier, Joel J; Moher, David; Boon, Heather; Beyene, Joseph; Bombardier, Claire

    2012-07-30

    While there is some consensus on methods for investigating statistical and methodological heterogeneity, little attention has been paid to clinical aspects of heterogeneity. The objective of this study is to summarize and collate suggested methods for investigating clinical heterogeneity in systematic reviews. We searched databases (Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, and CONSORT, to December 2010) and reference lists and contacted experts to identify resources providing suggestions for investigating clinical heterogeneity between controlled clinical trials included in systematic reviews. We extracted recommendations, assessed resources for risk of bias, and collated the recommendations. One hundred and one resources were collected, including narrative reviews, methodological reviews, statistical methods papers, and textbooks. These resources generally had a low risk of bias, but there was minimal consensus among them. Resources suggested that planned investigations of clinical heterogeneity should be made explicit in the protocol of the review; clinical experts should be included on the review team; a set of clinical covariates should be chosen considering variables from the participant level, intervention level, outcome level, research setting, or others unique to the research question; covariates should have a clear scientific rationale; there should be a sufficient number of trials per covariate; and results of any such investigations should be interpreted with caution. Though the consensus was minimal, there were many recommendations in the literature for investigating clinical heterogeneity in systematic reviews. Formal recommendations for investigating clinical heterogeneity in systematic reviews of controlled trials are required.

  5. Intraclonal protein expression heterogeneity in recombinant CHO cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren Pilbrough

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic glycoproteins have played a major role in the commercial success of biotechnology in the post-genomic era. But isolating recombinant mammalian cell lines for large-scale production remains costly and time-consuming, due to substantial variation and unpredictable stability of expression amongst transfected cells, requiring extensive clone screening to identify suitable high producers. Streamlining this process is of considerable interest to industry yet the underlying phenomena are still not well understood. Here we examine an antibody-expressing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO clone at single-cell resolution using flow cytometry and vectors, which couple light and heavy chain transcription to fluorescent markers. Expression variation has traditionally been attributed to genetic heterogeneity arising from random genomic integration of vector DNA. It follows that single cell cloning should yield a homogeneous cell population. We show, in fact, that expression in a clone can be surprisingly heterogeneous (standard deviation 50 to 70% of the mean, approaching the level of variation in mixed transfectant pools, and each antibody chain varies in tandem. Phenotypic variation is fully developed within just 18 days of cloning, yet is not entirely explained by measurement noise, cell size, or the cell cycle. By monitoring the dynamic response of subpopulations and subclones, we show that cells also undergo slow stochastic fluctuations in expression (half-life 2 to 11 generations. Non-genetic diversity may therefore play a greater role in clonal variation than previously thought. This also has unexpected implications for expression stability. Stochastic gene expression noise and selection bias lead to perturbations from steady state at the time of cloning. The resulting transient response as clones reestablish their expression distribution is not ordinarily accounted for but can contribute to declines in median expression over timescales of up to 50

  6. The Investigation of Structure Heterogeneous Joint Welds in Pipelines

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    Lyubimova Lyudmila

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Welding joints of dissimilar steels don’t withstand design life. One of the important causes of premature destructions can be the acceleration of steel structural degradation due to cyclic mechanical and thermal gradients. Two zones of tube from steel 12H18N9T, exhibiting the structural instability at early stages of the decomposition of a supersaturated solid austenite solution, were subjected to investigation. Methods of x-ray spectral and structure analysis, micro hardnessmetry were applied for the research. Made the following conclusions, inside and outside tube wall surfaces of hazardous zones in welding joint have different technological and resource characteristics. The microhardness very sensitive to changes of metal structure and can be regarded as integral characteristic of strength and ductility. The welding processes are responsible for the further fibering of tube wall structure, they impact to the characteristics of hot-resistance and long-term strength due to development of ring cracks in the welding joint of pipeline. The monitoring of microhardness and structural phase conversions can be used for control by changes of mechanical properties in result of post welding and reductive heat treatment of welding joints.

  7. Enhancing Accuracy in Molecular Weight Determination of Highly Heterogeneously Glycosylated Proteins by Native Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guanbo; de Jong, Rob N; van den Bremer, Ewald T J; Parren, Paul W H I; Heck, Albert J R

    2017-05-02

    The determination of molecular weights (MWs) of heavily glycosylated proteins is seriously hampered by the physicochemical characteristics and heterogeneity of the attached carbohydrates. Glycosylation impacts protein migration during sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) analysis. Standard electrospray ionization (ESI)-mass spectrometry does not provide a direct solution as this approach is hindered by extensive interference of ion signals caused by closely spaced charge states of broadly distributed glycoforms. Here, we introduce a native tandem MS-based approach, enabling charge-state resolution and charge assignment of protein ions including those that escape mass analysis under standard MS conditions. Using this method, we determined the MW of two model glycoproteins, the extra-cellular domains of the highly and heterogeneously glycosylated proteins CD38 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), as well as the overall MW and binding stoichiometries of these proteins in complex with a specific antibody.

  8. Investigation on the turnover of plant proteins. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, R.; Winkler, E.; Jung, K.; Huebner, G.

    1981-01-01

    Based on kinetic analyses of amino acid and protein turnover by means of compartment models the synthesis and degradation of the soluble proteins in etiolated epicotyl segments of Pisum sativum L. as well as their dependence on the herbicide 2'-methyl-4'-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) were determined quantitatively. The segments were incubated for 10 h in a medium containing 14 C-leucine and subsequently placed in an inactive medium. The radioactivity in the soluble proteins and in the amino acid fraction was followed up for a total of 24 h. A 3-pool model in which the total measurable amino acid pool was divided into a direct precursor pool for protein synthesis and into a degradation pool was best suited to interpret the data. The turnover rate for the soluble proteins of untreated epicotyl segments was determined to be 0.058 h -1 ; at an MCPA concentration of 10 -4 M this value was nearly doubled. An increased proteolytic activity in the epicotyl segments ran parallel to the change of the turnover rate in dependence on MCPA concentration. The heterogeneity of the soluble protein with respect to the turnover rate was investigated by means of 3 H/ 14 C double labelling for individual protein fractions separated by gel electrophoresis. The results obtained in this way were comparable with those of the total pool turnover. (author)

  9. Proteomic and genomic analysis reveals novel Campylobacter jejuni outer membrane proteins and potential heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleanor Watson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane proteins play important roles in the interaction of bacteria with their environment including nutrient acquisition, adhesion and invasion, and antibiotic resistance. In this study we identified 47 proteins within the Sarkosyl-insoluble fraction of Campylobacter jejuni 81-176, using LC–ESI-MS/MS. Comparative analysis of outer membrane protein sequences was visualised to reveal protein distribution within a panel of Campylobacter spp., identifying several C. jejuni-specific proteins. Smith–Waterman analyses of C. jejuni homologues revealed high sequence conservation amongst a number of hypothetical proteins, sequence heterogeneity of other proteins and several proteins which are absent in a proportion of strains.

  10. Specific Adhesion of Lipid Membranes Can Simultaneously Produce Two Types of Lipid and Protein Heterogeneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shindell, Orrin; Micah, Natalie; Ritzer, Max; Gordon, Vernita

    2015-03-01

    Living cells adhere to one another and their environment. Adhesion is associated with re-organization of the lipid and protein components of the cell membrane. The resulting heterogeneities are functional structures involved in biological processes. We use artificial lipid membranes that contain a single type of binding protein. Before adhesion, the lipid, protein, and dye components in the membrane are well-mixed and constitute a single disordered-liquid phase (Ld) . After adhesion, two distinct types of heterogeneities coexist in the adhesion zone: a central domain of ordered lipid phase that excludes both binding proteins and membrane dye, and a peripheral domain of disordered lipid phase that is densely packed with adhesion proteins and enriched in membrane dye relative to the non-adhered portion of the vesicle. Thus, we show that adhesion that is mediated by only one type of protein can organize the lipid and protein components of the membranes into heterogeneities that resemble those found in biology, for example the immune synapse.

  11. Heterogeneities in confined water and protein hydration water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanley, H E; Kumar, P; Han, S; Mazza, M G; Stokely, K; Buldyrev, S V [Center for Polymer Studies and Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Franzese, G [Departament de Fisica Fonamental, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Mallamace, F [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Messina, Villaggio S Agata, CP 55, I-98166 Messina (Italy); Xu, L, E-mail: hes@bu.ed [World Premier International (WPI) Research Center, Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2009-12-16

    We report recent efforts to understand a broad range of experiments on confined water and protein hydration water, many initiated by a collaboration between workers at the University of Messina and MIT-the editors of this special issue. Preliminary calculations are not inconsistent with one tentative interpretation of these experiments as resulting from the system passing from the high-temperature high-pressure 'HDL' side of the Widom line (where the liquid might display non-Arrhenius behavior) to the low-temperature low-pressure 'LDL' side of the Widom line (where the liquid might display Arrhenius behavior). The Widom line-defined to be the line in the pressure-temperature plane where the correlation length has its maximum-arises if there is a critical point. Hence, interpreting the Messina-MIT experiments in terms of a Widom line is of potential relevance to testing, experimentally, the hypothesis that water displays a liquid-liquid critical point.

  12. Resolving breast cancer heterogeneity by searching reliable protein cancer biomarkers in the breast fluid secretome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mannello, Ferdinando; Ligi, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    One of the major goals in cancer research is to find and evaluate the early presence of biomarkers in human fluids and tissues. To resolve the complex cell heterogeneity of a tumor mass, it will be useful to characterize the intricate biomolecular composition of tumor microenvironment (the so called cancer secretome), validating secreted proteins as early biomarkers of cancer initiation and progression. This approach is not broadly applicable because of the paucity of well validated and FDA-approved biomarkers and because most of the candidate biomarkers are mainly organ-specific rather than tumor-specific. For these reasons, there is an urgent need to identify and validate a panel of biomarker combinations for early detection of human tumors. This is especially important for breast cancer, the cancer spread most worldwide among women. It is well known that patients with early diagnosed breast cancer live longer, require less extensive treatment and fare better than patients with more aggressive and/or advanced disease. In the frame of searching breast cancer biomarkers (especially using nipple aspirate fluid mirroring breast microenvironment), studies have highlighted an optimal combination of well-known biomarkers: uPA + PAI-1 + TF. When individually investigated they did not show perfect accuracy in predicting the presence of breast cancer, whereas the triple combination has been demonstrated to be highly predictive of pre-cancer and/or cancerous conditions, approaching 97-100% accuracy. Despite the heterogeneous composition of breast cancer and the difficulties to find specific breast cancer biomolecules, the noninvasive analysis of the nipple aspirate fluid secretome may significantly improve the discovery of promising biomarkers, helping also the differentiation among benign and invasive breast diseases, opening new frontiers in early oncoproteomics

  13. Intrafocal heterogeneity of ERG protein expression and gene fusion pattern in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Ja Hee; Park, Jeong Hwan; Lee, Cheol; Moon, Kyung Chul

    2017-10-01

    Prostate cancer is considered to be highly heterogeneous, with various morphologic features and biologic behaviors. The TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion is the most frequently observed genetic aberration in prostate cancer. The aim of this study was to elucidate the intrafocal heterogeneity of ERG gene fusion status. ERG immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed in samples from 168 prostate cancer patients who had undergone radical prostatectomy, and 40 cases showing ERG-positive IHC staining were selected for tissue microarray (TMA) construction. Two to six representative cores were selected from each tumor focus. In the cases with heterogeneous ERG IHC staining intensity, the areas showing different intensities were separately selected. Using the TMA blocks, IHC and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) were conducted to evaluate the heterogeneity of ERG protein expression and ERG fusion gene patterns, respectively, in a single tumor focus. Heterogeneity of ERG IHC staining was defined as the simultaneous presence of negative and positive cores in the same tumor focus. Heterogeneity of ERG FISH was defined by the presence of cores with positive and negative FISH signals or cores with break-apart and interstitial deletion FISH signals in the same tumor focus. A total of 202 TMA cores were isolated from 40 ERG-positive cases. Of the 202 total cores, 19 were negative for ERG IHC staining, and 46 showed 1+, 52 showed 2+, and 85 showed 3+ ERG staining intensity. Eleven cores were negative for ERG FISH signal, 119 cores showed ERG break-apart FISH signals, and the remaining 72 cores revealed interstitial deletion. Intrafocal heterogeneity of ERG IHC staining was found in 20% (8/40) of cases, and intrafocal heterogeneity of ERG gene fusion pattern was found in 32.5% (13/40) of cases. In summary, this study showed significantly frequent intrafocal heterogeneity of ERG protein expression, gene fusion status and fusion pattern. This heterogeneity can be caused by the development

  14. Optimizing ssNMR experiments for dilute proteins in heterogeneous mixtures at high magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeill, Seth A; Gor'kov, Peter L; Struppe, Jochem; Brey, William W; Long, Joanna R

    2007-12-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy at high magnetic fields is proving to be an effective technique in structural biology, particularly for proteins which are not amenable to traditional X-ray and solution NMR approaches. Several parameters can be selected to provide optimal sensitivity, improve sample stability, and ensure biological relevance for ssNMR measurements on protein samples. These include selection of sample conditions, NMR probe design, and design of pulse experiments. Here, we demonstrate and evaluate several engineering and experimental approaches for pursuing measurements on dilute proteins in heterogeneous mixtures. Copyright © 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Conformational Heterogeneity in Antibody-Protein Antigen Recognition IMPLICATIONS FOR HIGH AFFINITY PROTEIN COMPLEX FORMATION

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Addis, P. W.; Hall, c. J.; Bruton, S.; Veverka, Václav; Wilkinson, I. C.; Muskett, F. W.; Renshaw, P. S.; Prosser, C. E.; Carrington, B.; Lawson, A. D. G.; Griffin, R.; Taylor, R. J.; Waters, L. C.; Henry, A. J.; Carr, M. D.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 289, č. 10 (2014), s. 7200-7210 ISSN 0021-9258 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : NMR * antibody * protein-protein interaction * protein conformation Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.573, year: 2014

  16. Heterogeneous nucleation of hydroxyapatite on protein: structural effect of silk sericin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Akari; Ohtsuki, Chikara; Miyazaki, Toshiki; Kamitakahara, Masanobu; Ogata, Shin-ichi; Yamazaki, Masao; Furutani, Yoshiaki; Kinoshita, Hisao; Tanihara, Masao

    2005-01-01

    Acidic proteins play an important role during mineral formation in biological systems, but the mechanism of mineral formation is far from understood. In this paper, we report on the relationship between the structure of a protein and hydroxyapatite deposition under biomimetic conditions. Sericin, a type of silk protein, was adopted as a suitable protein for studying structural effect on hydroxyapatite deposition, since it forms a hydroxyapatite layer on its surface in a metastable calcium phosphate solution, and its structure has been reported. Sericin effectively induced hydroxyapatite nucleation when it has high molecular weight and a β sheet structure. This indicates that the specific structure of a protein can effectively induce heterogeneous nucleation of hydroxyapatite in a biomimetic solution, i.e. a metastable calcium phosphate solution. This finding is useful in understanding biomineralization, as well as for the design of organic polymers that can effectively induce hydroxyapatite nucleation. PMID:16849195

  17. The heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) interacts with dengue virus core protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C J; Luh, H W; Wang, S H; Lin, H J; Lee, S C; Hu, S T

    2001-09-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K), a component of hnRNP particles, is involved in several steps of gene expression regulation. Dengue (DEN) virus, a member of the Flaviviridae, is the primary cause of illnesses such as dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever, and dengue shock syndrome. In mature DEN virus particles, the core protein is a structural protein that forms a nucleocapsid complex with genomic RNA. Very little of its biologic functions is known. Here, using an in vitro binding assay and coimmunoprecipitation analysis, we report a protein-protein interaction between the DEN virus core protein and hnRNP K. The C-terminal hydrophilic region of the DEN virus core protein, spanning amino acid residues 73 to 100, is required for such interaction. Results of glutathione-S transferase binding assays indicated that the core protein-hnRNP K interaction might be abolished in the presence of hnRNP K cognate nucleic acids. Furthermore, in a cotransfection experiment, the repressive effect of hnRNP K on C/EBPbeta-mediated transcription activation could be reversed by full-length DEN virus core protein but not by a truncated form containing amino acids 1-72. Our results suggest that, on DEN virus infection, the multiple functions of cellular hnRNP K may be affected by the virus core protein.

  18. Multiscale investigation of random heterogeneous media in materials and earth sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goupee, Andrew J.

    This dissertation is concerned with three major areas pertaining to the characterization and analysis of heterogeneous materials. The first is focused on the modeling of heterogeneous materials with random microstructure and understanding their thermomechanical properties as well as developing a methodology for the multiscale thermoelastic analysis of random heterogeneous materials. Realistic random microstructures are generated for computational analyses using random morphology description functions. The simulated microstructures closely resemble actual micrographs of random heterogeneous materials. The simulated random microstructures are characterized using statistical techniques and their homogenized material properties computed using the asymptotic expansion homogenization method. The failure response of random media is investigated via a direct micromechanical failure analysis which utilizes stresses at the microstructural level coupled with appropriate phase material failure models to generate initial failure envelopes. The homogenized material properties and failure envelopes are employed to perform accurate coupled macroscale and microscale analyses of random heterogeneous material components. The second area addressed in this dissertation involves the transient multiscale analysis of two-phase functionally graded materials within the framework of linearized thermoelasticity. The two-phase material microstructures, which are created using a morphology description function, have smoothly varying microstructure morphologies that depend on the volume fractions of the constituent phases. The multiscale problem is analyzed using asymptotic expansion homogenization coupled with the finite element method. Model problems are studied to illustrate the versatility of the multiscale analysis procedure which incorporates a direct micromechanical failure analysis to accurately compute the factors of safety for functionally graded components. The last area of this

  19. Investigation of heterogeneous solid acid catalyst performance on low grade feedstocks for biodiesel production: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansir, Nasar; Taufiq-Yap, Yun Hin; Rashid, Umer; Lokman, Ibrahim M.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Solid acid catalysts are proficient to esterifying high free fatty acid feedstocks to biodiesel. • Heterogeneous catalysts have the advantage of easy separation and reusability. • Heterogeneous basic catalysts have limitations due to high FFA of low cost feedstocks. • Solid catalysts having acid and base sites reveal better catalyst for biodiesel production. - Abstract: The conventional fossil fuel reserves are continually declining worldwide and therefore posing greater challenges to the future of the energy sources. Biofuel alternatives were found promising to replace the diminishing fossil fuels. However, conversion of edible vegetable oils to biodiesel using homogeneous acids and base catalysts is now considered as indefensible for the future particularly due to food versus fuel competition and other environmental problems related to catalyst system and feedstock. This review has discussed the progression in research and growth related to heterogeneous catalysts used for biodiesel production for low grade feedstocks. The heterogeneous base catalysts have revealed effective way to produce biodiesel, but it has the limitation of being sensitive to high free fatty acid (FFA) or low grade feedstocks. Alternatively, solid acid catalysts are capable of converting the low grade feedstocks to biodiesel in the presence of active acid sites. The paper presents a comprehensive review towards the investigation of solid acid catalyst performance on low grade feedstock, their category, properties, advantages, limitations and possible remedy to their drawbacks for biodiesel production.

  20. Identification of Two Protein-Signaling States Delineating Transcriptionally Heterogeneous Human Medulloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walderik W. Zomerman

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The brain cancer medulloblastoma consists of different transcriptional subgroups. To characterize medulloblastoma at the phosphoprotein-signaling level, we performed high-throughput peptide phosphorylation profiling on a large cohort of SHH (Sonic Hedgehog, group 3, and group 4 medulloblastomas. We identified two major protein-signaling profiles. One profile was associated with rapid death post-recurrence and resembled MYC-like signaling for which MYC lesions are sufficient but not necessary. The second profile showed enrichment for DNA damage, as well as apoptotic and neuronal signaling. Integrative analysis demonstrated that heterogeneous transcriptional input converges on these protein-signaling profiles: all SHH and a subset of group 3 patients exhibited the MYC-like protein-signaling profile; the majority of the other group 3 subset and group 4 patients displayed the DNA damage/apoptotic/neuronal signaling profile. Functional analysis of enriched pathways highlighted cell-cycle progression and protein synthesis as therapeutic targets for MYC-like medulloblastoma. : Using peptide phosphorylation profiling, Zomerman et al. identify two medulloblastoma phosphoprotein-signaling profiles that have prognostic value and are potentially targetable. They find that these profiles extend across transcriptome-based subgroup borders. This suggests that diverse genetic information converges on common protein-signaling pathways and highlights protein-signaling as a unique information layer. Keywords: medulloblastoma, protein-signaling, protein synthesis, MYC, TP53, proteome, phosphoproteome

  1. Resolution of Disulfide Heterogeneity in Nogo Receptor 1 Fusion Proteins by Molecular Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P Weinreb; D Wen; F Qian; C Wildes; E Garber; L Walus; M Jung; J Wang; J Relton; et al.

    2011-12-31

    NgRI (Nogo-66 receptor) is part of a signalling complex that inhibits axon regeneration in the central nervous system. Truncated soluble versions of NgRI have been used successfully to promote axon regeneration in animal models of spinal-cord injury, raising interest in this protein as a potential therapeutic target. The LRR (leucine-rich repeat) regions in NgRI are flanked by N- and C-terminal disulfide-containing 'cap' domains (LRRNT and LRRCT respectively). In the present work we show that, although functionally active, the NgRI(310)-Fc fusion protein contains mislinked and heterogeneous disulfide patterns in the LRRCT domain, and we report the generation of a series of variant molecules specifically designed to prevent this heterogeneity. Using these variants we explored the effects of modifying the NgRI truncation site or the spacing between the NgRI and Fc domains, or replacing cysteines within the NgRI or IgG hinge regions. One variant, which incorporates replacements of Cys{sup 266} and Cys{sup 309} with alanine residues, completely eliminated disulfide scrambling while maintaining functional in vitro and in vivo efficacy. This modified NgRI-Fc molecule represents a significantly improved candidate for further pharmaceutical development, and may serve as a useful model for the optimization of other IgG fusion proteins made from LRR proteins.

  2. Investigating Comparative Advantages of Advance Demand Information in Presence of Heterogeneous Demand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Bisheng; Larsen, Christian

    to that there are different customer classes with distinct demand behaviour. It is assumed that the inventory system is operated by a base stock policy and there two customer classes that must be served from the inventory. One customer class, Class 1, do not provide any advance demand information at all, while the other......The paper studies aspects of advance demand information and heterogeneous demand in a mathematical model of an inventory system. The concept advance demand information is that customers ahead in time of actual demand place their orders. The concept heterogeneous demand refers......, Class 2 does. There are given mathematical expressions of the service measure order fill rate offered to each class. The aim is to do an investigation of the magnitude of discrepancy in service between these two customer classes....

  3. Quantitative Evaluation of Protein Heterogeneity within Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bilali, Nabil; Duron, Johanne; Gingras, Diane; Lippé, Roger

    2017-05-15

    Several virulence genes have been identified thus far in the herpes simplex virus 1 genome. It is also generally accepted that protein heterogeneity among virions further impacts viral fitness. However, linking this variability directly with infectivity has been challenging at the individual viral particle level. To address this issue, we resorted to flow cytometry (flow virometry), a powerful approach we recently employed to analyze individual viral particles, to identify which tegument proteins vary and directly address if such variability is biologically relevant. We found that the stoichiometry of the U L 37, ICP0, and VP11/12 tegument proteins in virions is more stable than the VP16 and VP22 tegument proteins, which varied significantly among viral particles. Most interestingly, viruses sorted for their high VP16 or VP22 content yielded modest but reproducible increases in infectivity compared to their corresponding counterparts containing low VP16 or VP22 content. These findings were corroborated for VP16 in short interfering RNA experiments but proved intriguingly more complex for VP22. An analysis by quantitative Western blotting revealed substantial alterations of virion composition upon manipulation of individual tegument proteins and suggests that VP22 protein levels acted indirectly on viral fitness. These findings reaffirm the interdependence of the virion components and corroborate that viral fitness is influenced not only by the genome of viruses but also by the stoichiometry of proteins within each virion. IMPORTANCE The ability of viruses to spread in animals has been mapped to several viral genes, but other factors are clearly involved, including virion heterogeneity. To directly probe whether the latter influences viral fitness, we analyzed the protein content of individual herpes simplex virus 1 particles using an innovative flow cytometry approach. The data confirm that some viral proteins are incorporated in more controlled amounts, while

  4. Heterogeneity of a labeled tumor surface protein from a murine lung carcinoma demonstrated by two-dimensional electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisinger, R.W. (Univ. of Tennessee, Oak Ridge); Kennel, S.J.

    1981-03-01

    Heterogeneity of a tumor surface protein (designated TSP-180) has been demonstrated by two-dimensional electrophoresis. Line 1 carcinoma cells derived from a spontaneous alveolar carcinoma of BALB/c mice were labeled externally with /sup 125/I by use of lactoperoxidase or metabolically with (/sup 3/H)-leucine before cell proteins were solubilized with Triton X-100 detergent. Immunoprecipitates prepared with heterologous antisera allowed comparison of two-dimensional patterns of line 1 surface proteins labeled with /sup 125/I or /sup 3/H. The isoelectric point of /sup 125/I-labeled TSP-180 was heterogeneous and varied between 6.1 and 6.3. Treatment with neuraminidase shifted the pI values to between 5.9 and 6.1 and reduced, but did not eliminate, the banding heterogeneity. These data show that charge heterogeneity due to sialization, as well as other factors, exists in TSP-180.

  5. Semi-supervised drug-protein interaction prediction from heterogeneous biological spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zheng; Wu, Ling-Yun; Zhou, Xiaobo; Wong, Stephen T C

    2010-09-13

    Predicting drug-protein interactions from heterogeneous biological data sources is a key step for in silico drug discovery. The difficulty of this prediction task lies in the rarity of known drug-protein interactions and myriad unknown interactions to be predicted. To meet this challenge, a manifold regularization semi-supervised learning method is presented to tackle this issue by using labeled and unlabeled information which often generates better results than using the labeled data alone. Furthermore, our semi-supervised learning method integrates known drug-protein interaction network information as well as chemical structure and genomic sequence data. Using the proposed method, we predicted certain drug-protein interactions on the enzyme, ion channel, GPCRs, and nuclear receptor data sets. Some of them are confirmed by the latest publicly available drug targets databases such as KEGG. We report encouraging results of using our method for drug-protein interaction network reconstruction which may shed light on the molecular interaction inference and new uses of marketed drugs.

  6. Improved success of sparse matrix protein crystallization screening with heterogeneous nucleating agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil S Thakur

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Crystallization is a major bottleneck in the process of macromolecular structure determination by X-ray crystallography. Successful crystallization requires the formation of nuclei and their subsequent growth to crystals of suitable size. Crystal growth generally occurs spontaneously in a supersaturated solution as a result of homogenous nucleation. However, in a typical sparse matrix screening experiment, precipitant and protein concentration are not sampled extensively, and supersaturation conditions suitable for nucleation are often missed.We tested the effect of nine potential heterogenous nucleating agents on crystallization of ten test proteins in a sparse matrix screen. Several nucleating agents induced crystal formation under conditions where no crystallization occurred in the absence of the nucleating agent. Four nucleating agents: dried seaweed; horse hair; cellulose and hydroxyapatite, had a considerable overall positive effect on crystallization success. This effect was further enhanced when these nucleating agents were used in combination with each other.Our results suggest that the addition of heterogeneous nucleating agents increases the chances of crystal formation when using sparse matrix screens.

  7. Well-Controlled Cell-Trapping Systems for Investigating Heterogeneous Cell-Cell Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Koki; Abe, Yuta; Inoue, Kosuke; Osaki, Toshihisa; Kawano, Ryuji; Miki, Norihisa; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2018-03-01

    Microfluidic systems have been developed for patterning single cells to study cell-cell interactions. However, patterning multiple types of cells to understand heterogeneous cell-cell interactions remains difficult. Here, it is aimed to develop a cell-trapping device to assemble multiple types of cells in the well-controlled order and morphology. This device mainly comprises a parylene sheet for assembling cells and a microcomb for controlling the cell-trapping area. The cell-trapping area is controlled by moving the parylene sheet on an SU-8 microcomb using tweezers. Gentle downward flow is used as a driving force for the cell-trapping. The assembly of cells on a parylene sheet with round and line-shaped apertures is demonstrated. The cell-cell contacts of the trapped cells are then investigated by direct cell-cell transfer of calcein via connexin nanopores. Finally, using the device with a system for controlling the cell-trapping area, three different types of cells in the well-controlled order are assembled. The correct cell order rate obtained using the device is 27.9%, which is higher than that obtained without the sliding parylene system (0.74%). Furthermore, the occurrence of cell-cell contact between the three cell types assembled is verified. This cell-patterning device will be a useful tool for investigating heterogeneous cell-cell interactions. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Use of the potentiometric titration method to investigate heterogeneous systems including phosphorylated complexones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tereshin, G.S.; Kharitonova, L.K.; Kuznetsova, O.B.

    1979-01-01

    Heterogeneous systems Y(NO 3 ) 3 (YCl 3 )-Hsub(n)L-KNO 3 (KCl)-H 2 O are investigated by potentiometric titration (with coulomb-meter generation of oH - ions). Hsub(n)L is one of the following: oxyethylidendiphosphonic; aminobenzilidendiphosphonic; glycine-bis-methyl-phosphonic; nitrilotrimethylphosphonic (H 6 L) and ethylenediaminetetramethylphosphonic acids. The range of the exsistence of YHsub(nL3)LxyH 2 O has been determined. The possibility of using potentiometric titration for investigating heterogeneous systems is demonstrated by the stUdy of the system Y(NO 3 ) 3 -H 6 L-KOH-H 2 o by the method of residual concentration. The two methods have shown that at pH 3 LxyH 2 O; at pH=6, KYH 2 Lxy'H 2 O, and at pH=7, K 2 YHLxy''H 2 O. The complete solubility products of nitrilotrimethylphosphonates are evaluated

  9. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein B1 protein impairs DNA repair mediated through the inhibition of DNA-dependent protein kinase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwanaga, Kentaro; Sueoka, Naoko; Sato, Akemi; Hayashi, Shinichiro; Sueoka, Eisaburo

    2005-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein B1, an RNA binding protein, is overexpressed from the early stage of lung cancers; it is evident even in bronchial dysplasia, a premalignant lesion. We evaluated the proteins bound with hnRNP B1 and found that hnRNP B1 interacted with DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) complex, and recombinant hnRNP B1 protein dose-dependently inhibited DNA-PK activity in vitro. To test the effect of hnRNP B1 on DNA repair, we performed comet assay after irradiation, using normal human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells treated with siRNA for hnRNP A2/B1: reduction of hnRNP B1 treated with siRNA for hnRNP A2/B1 induced faster DNA repair in normal HBE cells. Considering these results, we assume that overexpression of hnRNP B1 occurring in the early stage of carcinogenesis inhibits DNA-PK activity, resulting in subsequent accumulation of erroneous rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks, causing tumor progression

  10. Determination of Dynamical Heterogeneity from Dynamic Neutron-Scattering of Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vural, Derya; Smith, Jeremy C; Glyde, Henry R

    2018-03-23

    Motional displacements of hydrogen (H) in proteins can be measured using incoherent neutron-scattering methods. These displacements can also be calculated numerically using data from molecular dynamics simulations. An enormous amount of data on the average mean-square motional displacement (MSD) of H as a function of protein temperature, hydration, and other conditions has been collected. H resides in a wide spectrum of sites in a protein. Some H are tightly bound to molecular chains, and the H motion is dictated by that of the chain. Other H are quite independent. As a result, there is a distribution of motions and MSDs of H within a protein that is denoted dynamical heterogeneity. The goal of this paper is to incorporate a distribution of MSDs into models of the H incoherent intermediate scattering function, I(Q,t), that is calculated and observed. The aim is to contribute information on the distribution as well as on the average MSD from comparison of the models with simulations and experiment. For example, we find that simulations of I(Q,t) in lysozyme are well reproduced if the distribution of MSDs is bimodal with two broad peaks rather than a single broad peak. Copyright © 2018 Biophysical Society. All rights reserved.

  11. Investigating melting induced mantle heterogeneities in plate driven mantle convection models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, M.; Davies, H.; Panton, J.

    2017-12-01

    Observations from geochemistry and seismology continue to suggest a range of complex heterogeneity in Earth's mantle. In the deep mantle, two large low velocity provinces (LLVPs) have been regularly observed in seismic studies, with their longevity, composition and density compared to the surrounding mantle debated. The cause of these observed LLVPs is equally uncertain, with previous studies advocating either thermal or thermo-chemical causes. There is also evidence that these structures could provide chemically distinct reservoirs within the mantle, with recent studies also suggesting there may be additional reservoirs in the mantle, such as bridgmanite-enriched ancient mantle structures (BEAMS). One way to test these hypotheses is using computational models of the mantle, with models that capture the full 3D system being both complex and computationally expensive. Here we present results from our global mantle model TERRA. Using our model, we can track compositional variations in the convecting mantle that are generated by self-consistent, evolving melting zones. Alongside the melting, we track trace elements and other volatiles which can be partitioned during melting events, and expelled and recycled at the surface. Utilising plate reconstruction models as a boundary condition, the models generate the tectonic features observed at Earth's surface, while also organising the lower mantle into recognisable degree-two structures. This results in our models generating basaltic `oceanic' crusts which are then brought into the mantle at tectonic boundaries, providing additional chemical heterogeneity in the mantle volume. Finally, by utilising thermodynamic lookup tables to convert the final outputs from the model to seismic structures, together with resolution filters for global tomography models, we are able to make direct comparisons between our results and observations. By varying the parameters of the model, we investigate a range of current hypotheses for

  12. Investigating the heterogeneous freezing behavior of supercooled droplets containing different amounts of SNOMAX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedermeier, D.; Budke, C.; Koop, T.; Hartmann, S.; Augustin, S.; Stratmann, F.; Wex, H.

    2013-12-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation, a fundamental process for ice formation in the atmosphere, has been observed to occur in clouds at temperatures higher than -20 °C (Kanitz et al., 2011). However, laboratory studies showed that mineral dust particles, which are the most abundant atmospheric ice nuclei (IN), are ice active at lower temperature (Murray et al., 2012). Biological particles such as bacteria nucleate ice at higher temperatures similar to those observed in the atmosphere. But their atmospheric relevance is controversially discussed (Hartmann et al., 2013; Hoose et al., 2010). In order to achieve a better understanding, fundamental processes underlying ice nucleation on bacteria should be investigated. Within the Ice Nuclei research UnIT (INUIT), the ice nucleating ability of SNOMAX, which contains non-viable Pseudomonas syringae bacteria as well as their fragments, was quantified using different measurement devices featuring different measurement techniques. Here, results determined with the Bielefeld Ice Nucleation ARraY (BINARY, Budke et al., 2013) and the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS, Hartmann et al., 2011) are presented exemplarily. Within these devices, droplets with different amounts of SNOMAX were exposed to supercooling temperatures until they froze (BINARY: cooling rate: 1K/min; LACIS: residence time of supercooled droplets at a certain temperature: ~0.2s). Frozen fractions were determined in a temperature range of ca. -4 to -20 °C. These fractions increase steeply and, in part, level off at values lower than 100% (i.e., they reach a plateau value indicating the number of SNOMAX IN per droplet) depending on the SNOMAX concentration. With increasing amount of SNOMAX per droplet, the frozen fraction curve is shifted to higher temperature and the plateau value increases, reaching 100% for the highest SNOMAX concentrations. It has been suggested that ice nucleation active (INA) macromolecules, i.e. protein complexes in the case of

  13. Quantile regression analysis of the rational addiction model: investigating heterogeneity in forward-looking behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laporte, Audrey; Karimova, Alfia; Ferguson, Brian

    2010-09-01

    The time path of consumption from a rational addiction (RA) model contains information about an individual's tendency to be forward looking. In this paper, we use quantile regression (QR) techniques to investigate whether the tendency to be forward looking varies systematically with the level of consumption of cigarettes. Using panel data, we find that the forward-looking effect is strongest relative to the addiction effect in the lower quantiles of cigarette consumption, and that the forward-looking effect declines and the addiction effect increases as we move toward the upper quantiles. The results indicate that QR can be used to illuminate the heterogeneity in individuals' tendency to be forward looking even after controlling for factors such as education. QR also gives useful information about the differential impact of policy variables, most notably workplace smoking restrictions, on light and heavy smokers. Copyright (c) 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. The Significance of Protein Components in Heterogeneous Eggs for Embrionic Development and Larvas Persistence of Cyprinidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zalepukhin Valeriy Vladimirovich

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous heterogeneity of females and their eggs is one of the most important factors of annual generation’s formation in nature-spawn and incubative centers. Its assessment is significant for comprehending the notion of biochemical changes in proximate prespawn period. Between the shares of egg’s biochemical composition of Cyprinidae species only protein and b-lipoproteids levels are incovering constant and authentic correlations with embrionic development and larval survival in the conditions of artificial reproduction. The promotion of protein’s level to 20 – 24 % (in wet weigth in percolating eggs positively affects the fertilization and larvae vitality. This trend is fair for the domesticated and nature-spawn fish. The same significance is important for the b-lipoproteids level in ovular eggs of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella Val.. The optimal concentration is 100-200 mg % in wet weight.

  15. Modeling heterogeneous (co)variances from adjacent-SNP groups improves genomic prediction for milk protein composition traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebreyesus, Grum; Lund, Mogens Sandø; Buitenhuis, Albert Johannes

    2017-01-01

    Accurate genomic prediction requires a large reference population, which is problematic for traits that are expensive to measure. Traits related to milk protein composition are not routinely recorded due to costly procedures and are considered to be controlled by a few quantitative trait loci...... of large effect. The amount of variation explained may vary between regions leading to heterogeneous (co)variance patterns across the genome. Genomic prediction models that can efficiently take such heterogeneity of (co)variances into account can result in improved prediction reliability. In this study, we...... developed and implemented novel univariate and bivariate Bayesian prediction models, based on estimates of heterogeneous (co)variances for genome segments (BayesAS). Available data consisted of milk protein composition traits measured on cows and de-regressed proofs of total protein yield derived for bulls...

  16. Characterization of Soil Heterogeneity Across Scales in an Intensively Investigated Soil Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Matthew; Gimenez, Daniel; Nemes, Attila; Dathe, Annette; French, Helen; Bloem, Esther; Koestel, John; Jarvis, Nick

    2016-04-01

    Heterogeneous water flow in undisturbed soils is a natural occurrence that is complex to model due to potential changes in hydraulic properties in soils over changes in space. The use of geophysical methods, such as Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), can provide a minimally-invasive approximation of the spatial heterogeneity of the soil. This spatial distribution can then be combined with measured hydraulic properties to inform a model. An experiment was conducted on an Intensively Investigated Soil Volume (IISV), with dimensions of 2m x 1m x 0.8m, located in an agricultural field that is part of the Gryteland catchment in Ås, Norway. The location of the IISV was determined through surface ERT runs at two sequential resolutions. The first run was used to find an area of higher apparent electrical resistivity in a 23.5 x 11.5 m area with 0.5 m spacing. The second run measured apparent electrical resistivity in a 4.7 x 1 m area with 0.1 m spacing, from which the final IISV volume was derived. Distinct features found in the higher resolution run of the IISV, including a recent tire track from a harvester, were used as a spatial reference point for the installation of 20 pairs of TDR probes and tensiometers. The instruments measured water content, temperature and pressure potential at 10 minute intervals and ran continuously for a period of two weeks. After completion of the data collection the IISV was intensively sampled, with 30 samples taken for bulk density, 62 for hydraulic property measurements, and 20 to be used for both CT scanning and hydraulic property measurements. The measurement of hydraulic properties is ongoing and retention will be measured in the 0 - 100 cm range on a sand table, and from 100 - approx. 900 cm with an automated evaporation method. The formation of spatial clusters to represent the soil heterogeneity as relatively homogeneous units based on mesoscale properties like apparent electrical resistivity, bulk density, texture, in

  17. Investigating the Heterogeneity in Women's Preferences for Breast Screening: Does the Communication of Risk Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vass, Caroline M; Rigby, Dan; Payne, Katherine

    2018-02-01

    The relative benefits and risks of screening programs for breast cancer have been extensively debated. To quantify and investigate heterogeneity in women's preferences for the benefits and risks of a national breast screening program (NBSP) and to understand the effect of risk communication format on these preferences. An online discrete choice experiment survey was designed to elicit preferences from female members of the public for an NBSP described by three attributes (probability of detecting a cancer, risk of unnecessary follow-up, and out-of-pocket screening costs). Survey respondents were randomized to one of two surveys, presenting risk either as percentages only or as icon arrays and percentages. Respondents were required to choose between two hypothetical NBSPs or no screening in 11 choice sets generated using a Bayesian D-efficient design. The trade-offs women made were analyzed using heteroskedastic conditional logit and scale-adjusted latent class models. A total of 1018 women completed the discrete choice experiment (percentages-only version = 507; icon arrays and percentages version = 511). The results of the heteroskedastic conditional logit model suggested that, on average, women were willing-to-accept 1.72 (confidence interval 1.47-1.97) additional unnecessary follow-ups and willing-to-pay £79.17 (confidence interval £66.98-£91.35) for an additional cancer detected per 100 women screened. Latent class analysis indicated substantial heterogeneity in preferences with six latent classes and three scale classes providing the best fit. The risk communication format received was not a predictor of scale class or preference class membership. Most women were willing to trade-off the benefits and risks of screening, but decision makers seeking to improve uptake should consider the disparate needs of women when configuring services. Copyright © 2018 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  18. Investigating cultural heterogeneity in San Pedro de Atacama, northern Chile, through biogeochemistry and bioarchaeology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudson, Kelly J; Torres-Rouff, Christina

    2009-04-01

    Individuals living in the San Pedro de Atacama oases and the neighboring upper Loa River Valley of northern Chile experienced the collapse of an influential foreign polity, environmental decline, and the appearance of a culturally distinct group during the Late Intermediate Period (ca. AD 1,100-1,400). We investigate cultural heterogeneity at the Loa site of Caspana through analyses of strontium and oxygen isotopes, cranial modification styles, and mortuary behavior, integrating biological aspects of identity, particularly geographic origins, with cultural aspects of identity manifested in body modification and mortuary behavior. We test the hypothesis that the Caspana population (n = 66) represents a migrant group, as supported by archeological and ethnographic evidence, rather than a culturally distinct local group. For Caspana archeological human tooth enamel, mean (87)Sr/(86)Sr = 0.70771 +/- 0.00038 (1sigma, n = 30) and mean delta(18)O(c(V-PDB)) = -3.9 +/- 0.6 per thousand (1sigma, n = 16); these isotopic data suggest that only one individual lived outside the region. Material culture suggests that the individuals buried at Caspana shared some cultural affinity with the San Pedro oases while maintaining distinct cultural traditions. Finally, cranial modification data show high frequencies of head shaping [92.4% (n = 61/65)] and an overwhelming preference for annular modification [75.4% (n = 46/61)], contrasting sharply with practices in the San Pedro area. Based on multiple lines of evidence, we argue that, rather than representing a group of altiplano migrants, the Caspana population existed in the region for some time. However, cranial modification styles and mortuary behavior that are markedly distinct from patterns in surrounding areas raise the possibility of cultural heterogeneity and cultural fissioning.

  19. Effect of tissue heterogeneity on the choice of operating mode of an X-ray tube in X-ray diagnostic investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stavitskij, R.V.; Gurevich, L.A.; Khasidashvili, I.Sh.

    1986-01-01

    Equivalent thickness of different parts of human body of different constitutions was established according to changes of exposure dose behind pulmonary and bone heterogeneity necessary for creation of X-ray diagnostic equipment. Heterogeneity was estimated using correction factor (heterogeneity factor), indicating the relation of exposure doses behind homogeneous and heterogeneous objects of equal thickness. Dosimetry was conducted to establish heterogeneity factor. Equivalent thickness was established experimentally during investigations of pulmonary and bone tissues depending on X-ray tube voltage

  20. Numerical investigation of temperature distribution in a confined heterogeneous geothermal reservoir due to injection-production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganguly, Sayantan; Tan, Lippong; Date, Abhijit; Mohan Kumar, M.S.

    The present study deals with the modeling of transient temperature distribution in a heterogeneous geothermal reservoir in response to the injection-production process. The heterogeneous geothermal aquifer considered here is a confined aquifer with homogeneous layers of finite length and overlain

  1. High-throughput simultaneous analysis of RNA, protein, and lipid biomarkers in heterogeneous tissue samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, Vladimír; Smith, Ryan C; Xue, Jiyan; Kurtz, Marc M; Liu, Rong; Legrand, Cheryl; He, Xuanmin; Yu, Xiang; Wong, Peggy; Hinchcliffe, John S; Tanen, Michael R; Lazar, Gloria; Zieba, Renata; Ichetovkin, Marina; Chen, Zhu; O'Neill, Edward A; Tanaka, Wesley K; Marton, Matthew J; Liao, Jason; Morris, Mark; Hailman, Eric; Tokiwa, George Y; Plump, Andrew S

    2011-11-01

    With expanding biomarker discovery efforts and increasing costs of drug development, it is critical to maximize the value of mass-limited clinical samples. The main limitation of available methods is the inability to isolate and analyze, from a single sample, molecules requiring incompatible extraction methods. Thus, we developed a novel semiautomated method for tissue processing and tissue milling and division (TMAD). We used a SilverHawk atherectomy catheter to collect atherosclerotic plaques from patients requiring peripheral atherectomy. Tissue preservation by flash freezing was compared with immersion in RNAlater®, and tissue grinding by traditional mortar and pestle was compared with TMAD. Comparators were protein, RNA, and lipid yield and quality. Reproducibility of analyte yield from aliquots of the same tissue sample processed by TMAD was also measured. The quantity and quality of biomarkers extracted from tissue prepared by TMAD was at least as good as that extracted from tissue stored and prepared by traditional means. TMAD enabled parallel analysis of gene expression (quantitative reverse-transcription PCR, microarray), protein composition (ELISA), and lipid content (biochemical assay) from as little as 20 mg of tissue. The mean correlation was r = 0.97 in molecular composition (RNA, protein, or lipid) between aliquots of individual samples generated by TMAD. We also demonstrated that it is feasible to use TMAD in a large-scale clinical study setting. The TMAD methodology described here enables semiautomated, high-throughput sampling of small amounts of heterogeneous tissue specimens by multiple analytical techniques with generally improved quality of recovered biomolecules.

  2. Experimental Investigation of the Influence of Small Scale Geological Heterogeneity on Capillary Trapping of CO2 Using Engineered Beadpacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan Krishnamurthy, P.; Trevisan, L.; Meckel, T. A.

    2017-12-01

    During geologic CO2 sequestration, most of the storage domain far from the injection sites is likely to be dominated by buoyancy and capillary forces. Under such flow regimes, small scale geological heterogeneities have been shown to dampen plume migration rates and cause trapping beneath capillary barriers. To understand the impact of such heterogeneities on CO2 trapping processes experimentally, many core-scale and lab scale flow studies have been conducted. Reservoir cores are limited by the scale of investigation possible and most lab experiments are conducted in macroheterogeneous media constructed by arranging homogeneous units to represent heterogeneity. However, most natural sedimentary facies display heterogeneity at a hierarchy of scales, and heterogeneity at the mesoscale (mm to decimeters) goes unrepresented in laboratory experiments due to the difficulty in reproducibility. This work presents results from buoyancy driven migration experiments conducted at the meter scale using glass beads packed in a quasi 2D glass cell and complementary reduced physics simulations. We demonstrate a novel automated technique to build beadpacks with 2D heterogeneous sedimentary features in a reproducible manner. A fluid pair that mimics the phase density and viscosity contrasts, and interfacial tension of CO2-Brine at reservoir pressures and temperatures is employed for the flow experiments. Light transmission technique is used for visualization, and to calibrate and quantify saturation of the trapped non-wetting fluid during the experiments. Invasion Percolation is used to simulate the buoyancy driven flow. With the ability to generate different types of heterogeneous structures in a reproducible manner, and by comparing experiments and simulations, a systematic investigation of the effect of heterogeneity on capillary trapping becomes possible.

  3. Heterogeneous fixation of N2: Investigation of a novel mechanism for formation of NO

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Ying; Jensen, Anker Degn; Glarborg, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Formation of NO initiated by heterogeneous fixation of N2 during pyrolysis is investigated experimentally and theoretically. The experiments were conducted with beech wood as well as with the pure biomass components cellulose, xylan, and lignin. The NO formation during char oxidation was recorded...... as function of pyrolysis atmosphere (N2 or Ar), pyrolysis temperature (700–1050 °C), and oxidizing atmosphere (O2 in N2 or Ar). The results confirm earlier reports that biomass char may be enriched in N during pyrolysis at 900 °C and above. The N-uptake involves re-capture of N-volatiles as well as uptake...... of N2. During char oxidation, the captured N is partly oxidized to NO, resulting in increased NO formation. The NO yield from oxidation of beech wood char made in N2 increases with pyrolysis temperature, and is about a factor of two higher at 1050 °C than the corresponding yield from chars made in Ar...

  4. Experimental and theoretical investigation of stratospheric ozone depletion in the northern hemisphere caused by heterogeneous chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storvold, Rune

    Stratospheric ozone is of crucial importance for life on Earth. This thin layer protects us from the ultraviolet solar radiation and also works as a greenhouse gas that helps maintaining our climate. Large changes in thickness and vertical distribution of the ozone abundance may have detrimental effects on life on Earth. But even small changes could have considerable impact on UV irradiance, bio-production and cancer rates. During the last decade record low spring time vertical column amounts of stratospheric ozone have been observed over Northern Europe. However, this decrease is not as severe as the depletion observed over Antarctica and at mid-latitudes in the Southern Hemisphere. The discovery of the spring time stratospheric ozone depletion first in Antarctica and later in the Arctic has triggered international research efforts on stratospheric ozone chemistry and the possible effects of human activities on the ozone layer. Ground-based differential optical absorption spectroscopy measurements of NO2 and ozone have been performed over Fairbanks (65°N) and Ny-Ålesund (79°N) during the 1994-95 season. In this work we present improvements to ground based differential optical spectroscopy measurements by improving dark current corrections and spectral fitting of spectrographic photo diode array detector measurements. We have also improved the retrieval of vertical column amounts from diffuse light measurements by improving the corrections for seasonal changes in absorber air mass. This is particularly important at high latitudes. We used these data together with local weather and ozone sounding data, and with trace gas and aerosol data measured by other ground based instruments and by instruments deployed on satellites. This comprehensive dataset was used to investigate the performance of two current state of the art chemical transport models with and without the presence of heterogeneous chemistry. These are the University of Cambridge SLIMCAT model and the

  5. Investigation of heterogeneous ice nucleation in pollen suspensions and washing water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreischmeier, Katharina; Budke, Carsten; Koop, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Biological particles such as pollen often show ice nucleation activity at temperatures higher than -20 °C. Immersion freezing experiments of pollen washing water demonstrate comparable ice nucleation behaviour as water containing the whole pollen bodies (Pummer et al., 2012). It was suggested that polysaccharide molecules leached from the grains are responsible for the ice nucleation. Here, heterogeneous ice nucleation in birch pollen suspensions and their washing water was investigated by two different experimental methods. The optical freezing array BINARY (Bielefeld Ice Nucleation ARraY) allows the direct observation of freezing of microliter-sized droplets. The IN spectra obtained from such experiments with birch pollen suspensions over a large concentration range indicate several different ice nucleation active species, two of which are present also in the washing water. The latter was probed also in differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) experiments of emulsified sub-picoliter droplets. Due to the small droplet size in the emulsion samples and at small concentration of IN in the washing water, such DSC experiments can exhibit the ice nucleation behaviour of a single nucleus. The two heterogeneous freezing signals observed in the DSC thermograms can be assigned to two different kinds of ice nuclei, confirming the observation from the BINARY measurements, and also previous studies on Swedish birch pollen washing water (Augustin et al., 2012). The authors gratefully acknowledge funding by the German Research Foundation (DFG) through the project BIOCLOUDS (KO 2944/1-1) and through the research unit INUIT (FOR 1525) under KO 2944/2-1. We particularly thank our INUIT partners for fruitful collaboration and sharing of ideas and IN samples. S. Augustin, H. Wex, D. Niedermeier, B. Pummer, H. Grothe, S. Hartmann, L. Tomsche, T. Clauss, J. Voigtländer, K. Ignatius, and F. Stratmann, Immersion freezing of birch pollen washing water, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 13, 10989

  6. Pore-scale investigation on the response of heterotrophic respiration to moisture conditions in heterogeneous soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Zhifeng; Liu, Chongxuan; Todd-Brown, Katherine E.; Liu, Yuanyuan; Bond-Lamberty, Ben; Bailey, Vanessa L.

    2016-11-15

    The relationship between microbial respiration rate and soil moisture content is an important property for understanding and predicting soil organic carbon degradation, CO2 production and emission, and their subsequent effects on climate change. This paper reports a pore-scale modeling study to investigate the response of heterotrophic respiration to moisture conditions in soils and to evaluate various factors that affect this response. X-ray computed tomography was used to derive soil pore structures, which were then used for pore-scale model investigation. The pore-scale results were then averaged to calculate the effective respiration rates as a function of water content in soils. The calculated effective respiration rate first increases and then decreases with increasing soil water content, showing a maximum respiration rate at water saturation degree of 0.75 that is consistent with field and laboratory observations. The relationship between the respiration rate and moisture content is affected by various factors, including pore-scale organic carbon bioavailability, the rate of oxygen delivery, soil pore structure and physical heterogeneity, soil clay content, and microbial drought resistivity. Simulations also illustrates that a larger fraction of CO2 produced from microbial respiration can be accumulated inside soil cores under higher saturation conditions, implying that CO2 flux measured on the top of soil cores may underestimate or overestimate true soil respiration rates under dynamic moisture conditions. Overall, this study provides mechanistic insights into the soil respiration response to the change in moisture conditions, and reveals a complex relationship between heterotrophic microbial respiration rate and moisture content in soils that is affected by various hydrological, geochemical, and biophysical factors.

  7. Spatial Dependence and Heterogeneity in Bayesian Factor Analysis : A Cross-National Investigation of Schwartz Values

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stakhovych, Stanislav; Bijmolt, Tammo H. A.; Wedel, Michel

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we present a Bayesian spatial factor analysis model. We extend previous work on confirmatory factor analysis by including geographically distributed latent variables and accounting for heterogeneity and spatial autocorrelation. The simulation study shows excellent recovery of the

  8. "For Most of Us Africans, We Don't Just Speak": A Qualitative Investigation into Collaborative Heterogeneous PBL Group Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singaram, Veena S.; van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.; Stevens, Fred; Dolmans, Diana H. J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Collaborative approaches such as Problem Based Learning (PBL) may provide the opportunity to bring together diverse students but their efficacy in practice and the complications that arise due to the mixed ethnicity needs further investigation. This study explores the key advantages and problems of heterogeneous PBL groups from the students' and…

  9. Spatially heterogeneous dynamics investigated via a time-dependent four-point density correlation function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lacevic, N.; Starr, F. W.; Schrøder, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Relaxation in supercooled liquids above their glass transition and below the onset temperature of "slow" dynamics involves the correlated motion of neighboring particles. This correlated motion results in the appearance of spatially heterogeneous dynamics or "dynamical heterogeneity." Traditional...... two-point time-dependent density correlation functions, while providing information about the transient "caging" of particles on cooling, are unable to provide sufficiently detailed information about correlated motion and dynamical heterogeneity. Here, we study a four-point, time-dependent density......-q behavior of S4(q,t) provides an estimate of the range of correlated particle motion. We find that xi4(t) has a maximum as a function of time t, and that the value of the maximum of xi4(t) increases steadily from less than one particle diameter to a value exceeding nine particle diameters in the temperature...

  10. Investigation of strain heterogeneities by laser scanning extensometry in strain ageing materials: application to zirconium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graff, S.; Forest, S.; Strudel, J.L. [Centre des Materiaux / UMR 7633, Ecole des Mines de Paris / CNRS, BP 87, 91003 Evry (France); Dierke, H.; Neuhauser, H. [Institut fur Physik der Kondensierten Materie, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Prioul, C. [MSSMAT, Ecole Centrale Paris, Grande Voie des Vignes, 92295 Chatenay-Malabry (France); Bechade, J.L. [SRMA, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2005-07-01

    Laser scanning extensometry was used to detect and characterize propagating plastic instabilities such as the Luders bands at the millimeter scale. Spatio-temporal plastic heterogeneities are due to either static or dynamic strain ageing (SSA and DSA) phenomena. Regarding zirconium alloys, different type of heterogeneities were observed: their features strongly depended on mechanical test conditions. In one case, they appeared to be non propagating but preserved along the stress-strain curve and were associated with SSA effects such as stress peaks after relaxation periods or after unloading steps with waiting times. In other case, they appeared as non propagating but were not associated with SSA effects. (authors)

  11. Carboxyl terminus heterogeneity of type IV fimbrial subunit protein of Pasteurella multocida isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivachandra, Sathish Bhadravati; Kumar, Abhinendra; Yogisharadhya, Revanaiah; Ramakrishnan, M A; Viswas, K N

    2013-12-01

    Pasteurella multocida, a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen, known to affect a wide range of domestic as well as wild animal and avian species throughout the world by causing either systemic or localized infections termed as 'pasteurellosis'. P. multocida isolates are known to possess type IV fimbriae (pili) as one of the major virulence factors based on their role in adhesion to host surfaces and subsequent pathogenesis. In the present study, ptfA gene of Indian P. multocida isolates (n = 8) originated from different animal (buffalo, sheep, goat, pig) and avian host species (chicken, turkey, duck, quail) were amplified, cloned, sequenced and compared with available ptfA/fimbrial protein sequences in GenBank/publications (n = 22) to understand its variability with respect to geography/host/serogroup/disease specific patterns. Multiple sequence alignment revealed highly conserved N-terminus α-1 helix region and heterogeneous C-terminus (68-137 aa) comprised of β-strand regions (β1, β2, β3, β4) with conserved two pairs of cysteine residues. Interestingly, an existence of absolute homogeneity among the P. multocida isolates that caused haemorrhagic septicaemia in bovines and septicaemic pasteurellosis in sheep and goats was noticed. Pig isolates had 99.3% homogeneity. On contrary, more diversity (35.8%) was observed among isolates that caused fowl cholera in avians irrespective of identical capsular/somatic serogroup and similar host species. Phylogenetic analysis based on nucleotide sequences of ptfA gene revealed formation of mixed clusters with isolates representing different disease conditions as well as serogroups irrespective of country of origin which indicated the possible role of cross-species transmission among different animal/avian species. The study indicated highly conserved and host specific fimbriae among animal species than relatively divergent fimbriae among avian species.

  12. Spatial Dependence and Heterogeneity in Bayesian Factor Analysis: A Cross-National Investigation of Schwartz Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stakhovych, Stanislav; Bijmolt, Tammo H. A.; Wedel, Michel

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we present a Bayesian spatial factor analysis model. We extend previous work on confirmatory factor analysis by including geographically distributed latent variables and accounting for heterogeneity and spatial autocorrelation. The simulation study shows excellent recovery of the model parameters and demonstrates the consequences…

  13. Secreted heat shock protein 90 promotes prostate cancer stem cell heterogeneity

    OpenAIRE

    Nolan, Krystal D.; Kaur, Jasmine; Isaacs, Jennifer S.

    2016-01-01

    Heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90), a highly conserved molecular chaperone, is frequently upregulated in tumors, and remains an attractive anti-cancer target. Hsp90 is also found extracellularly, particularly in tumor models. Although extracellular Hsp90 (eHsp90) action is not well defined, eHsp90 targeting attenuates tumor invasion and metastasis, supporting its unique role in tumor progression. We herein investigated the potential role of eHsp90 as a modulator of cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) in...

  14. Development of high-speed laser diagnostics for the investigation of scalar heterogeneities in engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cundy, Michael E.

    The development of advanced engine concepts are, to a large extent, hindered by the lack of suitable multidimensional optical diagnostics that can measure heterogeneities in engines. The combustion process is a complex function of species concentration, temperature, pressure, and flow fields. Fine-tuning the combustion process for efficient combustion with low emissions therefore requires detailed knowledge of these parameters as they vary with space and time. Novel optical diagnostic techniques which probe relevant quantities can either be used to address a specific problem, as with misfires and partial burns in a spark ignition direct-injection (SIDI) stratified charge (SC) gasoline engines; to develop models, such as boundary layer temperature field measurements; or serve both purposes. For these two examples, there are currently no diagnostics which meet the needs of engine developers and modelers, which motivated the current work. Investigations of misfires and partial burns can benefit from novel and improved fuel concentration and combustion progress diagnostics. A high-speed, planar, quantitative fuel concentration diagnostic technique based on laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of biacetyl was utilized in unison with a spark plug absorption probe to aid in the understanding of both approaches. The LIF diagnostic was improved by using a dual laser approach which increased the signal to noise ratio. Also, its ability to track flame fronts and observe outgassing from engine crevices was demonstrated. The suitability of the spark plug absorption probe for use in an SIDI SO engine was demonstrated. Next, a simplified combustion progress diagnostic using LIF of hydroxyl radicals was demonstrated, which avoids the cost and complexity associated with conventional approaches. Lastly, a novel, high speed, high resolution LIF diagnostic called two color toluene thermometry was developed to quantitatively measure boundary layer temperature fields. Calibration

  15. Monte Carlo Investigation on the Effect of Heterogeneities on Strut Adjusted Volume Implant (SAVI) Dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Craig

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer for women with more than 225,000 new cases diagnosed in the United States in 2012 (ACS, 2012). With the high prevalence, comes an increased emphasis on researching new techniques to treat this disease. Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) has been used as an alternative to whole breast irradiation (WBI) in order to treat occult disease after lumpectomy. Similar recurrence rates have been found using ABPI after lumpectomy as with mastectomy alone, but with the added benefit of improved cosmetic and psychological results. Intracavitary brachytherapy devices have been used to deliver the APBI prescription. However, inability to produce asymmetric dose distributions in order to avoid overdosing skin and chest wall has been an issue with these devices. Multi-lumen devices were introduced to overcome this problem. Of these, the Strut-Adjusted Volume Implant (SAVI) has demonstrated the greatest ability to produce an asymmetric dose distribution, which would have greater ability to avoid skin and chest wall dose, and thus allow more women to receive this type of treatment. However, SAVI treatments come with inherent heterogeneities including variable backscatter due to the proximity to the tissue-air and tissue-lung interfaces and variable contents within the cavity created by the SAVI. The dose calculation protocol based on TG-43 does not account for heterogeneities and thus will not produce accurate dosimetry; however Acuros, a model-based dose calculation algorithm manufactured by Varian Medical Systems, claims to accurately account for heterogeneities. Monte Carlo simulation can calculate the dosimetry with high accuracy. In this thesis, a model of the SAVI will be created for Monte Carlo, specifically using MCNP code, in order to explore the affects of heterogeneities on the dose distribution. This data will be compared to TG-43 and Acuros calculated dosimetry to explore their accuracy.

  16. "For most of us Africans, we don't just speak": a qualitative investigation into collaborative heterogeneous PBL group learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singaram, Veena S; van der Vleuten, Cees P M; Stevens, Fred; Dolmans, Diana H J M

    2011-08-01

    Collaborative approaches such as Problem Based Learning (PBL) may provide the opportunity to bring together diverse students but their efficacy in practice and the complications that arise due to the mixed ethnicity needs further investigation. This study explores the key advantages and problems of heterogeneous PBL groups from the students' and teachers' opinions. Focus groups were conducted with a stratified sample of second year medical students and their PBL teachers. We found that students working in heterogeneous groupings interact with students with whom they don't normally interact with, learn a lot more from each other because of their differences in language and academic preparedness and become better prepared for their future professions in multicultural societies. On the other hand we found students segregating in the tutorials along racial lines and that status factors disempowered students and subsequently their productivity. Among the challenges was also that academic and language diversity hindered student learning. In light of these the recommendations were that teachers need special diversity training to deal with heterogeneous groups and the tensions that arise. Attention should be given to create 'the right mix' for group learning in diverse student populations. The findings demonstrate that collaborative heterogeneous learning has two sides that need to be balanced. On the positive end we have the 'ideology' behind mixing diverse students and on the negative the 'practice' behind mixing students. More research is needed to explore these variations and their efficacy in more detail.

  17. A method for investigating protein-protein interactions related to Salmonella typhimurium pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chowdhury, Saiful M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Shi, Liang [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Yoon, Hyunjin [Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States); Ansong, Charles [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rommereim, Leah M. [Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States); Norbeck, Angela D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Auberry, Kenneth J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Moore, R. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Adkins, Joshua N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Heffron, Fred [Oregon Health and Science Univ., Portland, OR (United States); Smith, Richard D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2009-02-10

    We successfully modified an existing method to investigate protein-protein interactions in the pathogenic bacterium Salmonella typhimurium (STM). This method includes i) addition of a histidine-biotin-histidine tag to the bait proteins via recombinant DNA techniques; ii) in vivo cross-linking with formaldehyde; iii) tandem affinity purification of bait proteins under fully denaturing conditions; and iv) identification of the proteins cross-linked to the bait proteins by liquid-chromatography in conjunction with tandem mass-spectrometry. In vivo cross-linking stabilized protein interactions permitted the subsequent two-step purification step conducted under denaturing conditions. The two-step purification greatly reduced nonspecific binding of non-cross-linked proteins to bait proteins. Two different negative controls were employed to reduce false-positive identification. In an initial demonstration of this approach, we tagged three selected STM proteins- HimD, PduB and PhoP- with known binding partners that ranged from stable (e.g., HimD) to transient (i.e., PhoP). Distinct sets of interacting proteins were identified with each bait protein, including the known binding partners such as HimA for HimD, as well as anticipated and unexpected binding partners. Our results suggest that novel protein-protein interactions may be critical to pathogenesis by Salmonella typhimurium. .

  18. Methods of reconstitution to investigate membrane protein function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrzypek, Ruth; Iqbal, Shagufta; Callaghan, Richard

    2018-02-16

    Membrane proteins are notoriously difficult to investigate in isolation. The focus of this chapter is the key step following extraction and purification of membrane proteins; namely reconstitution. The process of reconstitution re-inserts proteins into a lipid bilayer that partly resembles their native environment. This native environment is vital to the stability of membrane proteins, ensuring that they undergo vital conformational transitions and maintain optimal interaction with their substrates. Reconstitution may take many forms and these have been classified into two broad categories. Symmetric systems enable unfettered access to both sides of a bilayer. Compartment containing systems contain a lumen and are ideally suited to measurement of transport processes. The investigator is encouraged to ascertain what aspects of protein function will be undertaken and to apply the most advantageous reconstitution system or systems. It is important to note that the process of reconstitution is not subject to defined protocols and requires empirical optimisation to specific targets. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Biochemical investigation of protein export in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, S J; Randall, L L

    1989-01-01

    Export of proteins from the bacterial cytoplasm to a final destination in the periplasm and outer membrane is one example of the fundamental process occurring in all cells whereby polypeptides are transferred across biological membranes. Investigations on a variety of different systems have indicated similarities in the mechanism of this process. In the cases of bacterial protein export and the transfer of polypeptides across the endoplasmic reticulum in eukaryotic cells the processes are so similar that understanding gleaned from studies of the one is usually directly applicable to the other. The study of protein export in E. coli has two advantages over that of eukaryotic secretion. Not only is there the possibility of doing sophisticated genetic experiments, but also one can carry out biochemical investigations in vivo, a facility not so readily available with eukaryotic organisms. Such studies have, for example, shown that membrane translocation can occur both cotranslationally and post-translationally, that export requires protonmotive force, that some component of the export apparatus prevents the exported protein from assuming its native structure in the cytosol, and that there are probably at least two functions for the leader sequence, one in targeting the protein to the export pathway and one in translocation across the membrane.

  20. Antigenic heterogeneity of capsid protein VP1 in foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV serotype Asia1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alam SM

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available SM Sabbir Alam,1 Ruhul Amin,1 Mohammed Ziaur Rahman,2 M Anwar Hossain,1 Munawar Sultana11Department of Microbiology, University of Dhaka, Dhaka, Bangladesh; 2International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Dhaka, BangladeshAbstract: Foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV, with its seven serotypes, is a highly contagious virus infecting mainly cloven-hoofed animals. The serotype Asia1 occurs mainly in Asian regions. An in-silico approach was taken to reveal the antigenic heterogeneities within the capsid protein VP1 of Asia1. A total of 47 VP1 sequences of Asia1 isolates from different countries of South Asian regions were selected, retrieved from database, and were aligned. The structure of VP1 protein was modeled using a homology modeling approach. Several antigenic sites were identified and mapped onto the three-dimensional protein structure. Variations at these antigenic sites were analyzed by calculating the protein variability index and finding mutation combinations. The data suggested that vaccine escape mutants have derived from only few mutations at several antigenic sites. Five antigenic peptides have been identified as the least variable epitopes, with just fewer amino acid substitutions. Only a limited number of serotype Asia1 antigenic variants were found to be circulated within the South Asian region. This emphasizes a possibility of formulating synthetic vaccines for controlling foot-and-mouth disease by Asia1 serotypes.Keywords: protein modeling, antigenic sites, sequence variation

  1. Laser induced temperature jump investigations of fast protein folding dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Linlin

    Protein folding has a large parameter space, diverse mechanism, and multipath kinetics. However, there are some common features many proteins share in their folding processes: all seem to fold at the rates much faster than the random conformation search, and all fold into the structures which have the highly regular motifs like alpha-helices, beta-sheets and turns. Understanding how fast proteins can fold is one of the central issues in solving the protein folding problem. Ultrafast folding kinetics had not been accessible until a few sub-millisecond probes were invented and applied lately. We constructed a laser induced temperature jump spectrometer which is a great utility in identifying the local structure and tertiary contact formation of proteins on the time scale from 10 -8 to 10-3 s with time resolution of 10 -9 s. With this spectrometer we studied the fast folding mini-protein, TrpCage and a few short stable beta-hairpins, the TrpZip series. Studying TrpCage was a major breakthrough it was a pioneer protein model which brought experiment and simulation very close: its structures measured by NMR and predicted by the molecular dynamics were amazingly alike. Our kinetic results showed that it folds in 4 mus at room temperature which turned out to be the fastest ever known for protein-like molecules. Also this folding time constant is consistent with what was later on simulated by distributed computation. TrpZips are among the smallest and stablest polypeptide chains which form secondary structures. They are slightly different from each other based on structural stability and by forming various types of beta-hairpins which are the minimum units of beta tertiary structure. The beta-hairpins form in the time range of 1--10 mus that confirms the theory that loop formation is controlled by the diffusion process (˜mus). We also investigated the kinetics of the protein chain collapse, a very controversial problem. By comparing the collapse of the foldable 104

  2. H-BLAST: a fast protein sequence alignment toolkit on heterogeneous computers with GPUs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Weicai; Chen, Ying; Zhang, Yongdong; Xu, Yuesheng

    2017-04-15

    The sequence alignment is a fundamental problem in bioinformatics. BLAST is a routinely used tool for this purpose with over 118 000 citations in the past two decades. As the size of bio-sequence databases grows exponentially, the computational speed of alignment softwares must be improved. We develop the heterogeneous BLAST (H-BLAST), a fast parallel search tool for a heterogeneous computer that couples CPUs and GPUs, to accelerate BLASTX and BLASTP-basic tools of NCBI-BLAST. H-BLAST employs a locally decoupled seed-extension algorithm for better performance on GPUs, and offers a performance tuning mechanism for better efficiency among various CPUs and GPUs combinations. H-BLAST produces identical alignment results as NCBI-BLAST and its computational speed is much faster than that of NCBI-BLAST. Speedups achieved by H-BLAST over sequential NCBI-BLASTP (resp. NCBI-BLASTX) range mostly from 4 to 10 (resp. 5 to 7.2). With 2 CPU threads and 2 GPUs, H-BLAST can be faster than 16-threaded NCBI-BLASTX. Furthermore, H-BLAST is 1.5-4 times faster than GPU-BLAST. https://github.com/Yeyke/H-BLAST.git. yux06@syr.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  3. Experimental Investigation of Heterogeneous Power Systems on the Basis of Lyophobic Liquids and Porous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. D. Borman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of non-traditional ways for energy accumulation (absorption is a reserve to increase efficiency of accumulating and damping devices. The work is aimed at experimental and theoretical verification of possibility to create the accumulating and energy damping devices based on the heterogeneous systems (HS. The HS includes a couple i.e. a porous body (silochromes with pore diameter from 20 nm to 360 nm and a lyophobic (non-wetting liquid (Wood's alloy. The paper briefly presents provisions of the theory of processes in HS based on the kinetics of percolation transition that allows us to calculate power, power and temporary characteristics of devices and prove the methods for choosing the couples for HS with the specified characteristics. It explains effect of hysteresis function of changing liquid volume that fills a porous body and outflows from it under the differential pressure, as well as conditions to realize effect of non-outflowing liquid after removal of the differential pressure thanks to which energy accumulation in HS is possible. The stand diagram, device parameters to study static and dynamic processes in HS, and measurement system characteristics are provided. Research results of static processes to fill (outflow pores of various silochromes with Wood's alloy are presented. It is shown that among considered HS the most efficient one is the HS possessing S-120 silochrome, hexamethyldisilazane-modified. The certain filling pores specific energy of HS made 71 J/g, while the outflow specific energy was 28 J/g. The paper presents a scheme of device model damping a force impact on the support. Test results of spring and hydraulic dampers and the model, as well, with HS based on silochromes with various lyophobic liquids are given. High HS efficiency that allows the 4 times less impact value is shown. Further researches concern a development of engineering techniques to design and optimize the HS parameters and a choice of the most

  4. RETRACTED ARTICLE: Investigation on heterogeneous nucleation of MgAl2O4 in Al-Mg alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghayeghi, R.; Kapranos, P.

    2015-05-01

    This work investigates the mechanisms of grain refinement of Al-Mg alloys through ultrasonic treatment and varying Mg content. MgAl2O4 particles display an equiaxed and faceted morphology with {111} planes and when exposed to {111} of α-Al, can act as heterogeneous and potent nuclei for aluminium. Intensive vibrations by ultrasonic treatment lead to significant grain refinement through effective dispersion of MgAl2O4 particles. The equiaxed and faceted morphology of MgAl2O4 along with a well-defined cube-on-cube orientation relationship (1bar 11)[110] MgAl2O4//(1bar 11)[110] α-Al, provide improved refinement. Furthermore, multiplication of solidification sites by the ultrasonic pulses enhances heterogeneous nucleation. The resulting improved grain refinement relates in all probability to the increased nucleation sites, due to grain multiplications and wetting of impurities, the lowering of surface tension due to the segregation of magnesium to the surface of liquid aluminium, the appropriate growth restriction factor and the low lattice mismatch coupled with strong dispersion of oxides.The filtration test confirms these particles as potent refiners.

  5. 3DM: systematic analysis of heterogeneous superfamily data to discover protein functionalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, R.K.P.; Joosten, H.J.; Berkel, van W.J.H.; Leferink, N.G.H.; Rooijen, E.; Ittmann, E.; Zimmeren, van F.; Jochens, H.; Bornscheuer, U.; Vriend, G.; Martins Dos Santos, V.A.P.; Schaap, P.J.

    2010-01-01

    Ten years of experience with molecular class-specific information systems (MCSIS) such as with the hand-curated G protein-coupled receptor database (GPCRDB) or the semiautomatically generated nuclear receptor database has made clear that a wide variety of questions can be answered when

  6. Quaternary structure heterogeneity of oligomeric proteins: a SAXS and SANS study of the dissociation products of Octopus vulgaris hemocyanin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Spinozzi

    Full Text Available Octopus vulgaris hemocyanin shows a particular self-assembling pattern, characterized by a hierarchical organization of monomers. The highest molecular weight aggregate is a decamer, the stability of which in solution depends on several parameters. Different pH values, buffer compositions, H₂O/D₂O ratios and Hofmeister's salts result in modifications of the aggregation state of Octopus vulgaris hemocyanin. The new QUAFIT method, recently applied to derive the structure of the decameric and the monomeric assembly from small-angle scattering data, is used here to model the polydisperse system that results from changing the solution conditions. A dataset of small-angle X-rays and neutron scattering curves is analysed by QUAFIT to derive structure, composition and concentration of different assemblies present in solution. According to the hierarchy of the association/dissociation processes and the possible number of different aggregation products in solution, each sample has been considered as a heterogeneous mixture composed of the entire decamer, the dissociated "loose" monomer and all the intermediate dissociation products. Scattering curves corresponding to given experimental conditions are well fitted by using a linear combination of single particle form factors. QUAFIT has proved to be a method of general validity to describe solutions of proteins that, even after purification processes, result to be intrinsically heterogeneous.

  7. Protein plasticity driven by disorder and collapse governs the heterogeneous binding of CytR to DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munshi, Sneha; Gopi, Soundhararajan; Subramanian, Sandhyaa; Campos, Luis A; Naganathan, Athi N

    2018-03-10

    The amplitude of thermodynamic fluctuations in biological macromolecules determines their conformational behavior, dimensions, nature of phase transitions and effectively their specificity and affinity, thus contributing to fine-tuned molecular recognition. Unique among large-scale conformational changes in proteins are temperature-induced collapse transitions in intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). Here, we show that CytR DNA-binding domain, an IDP that folds on binding DNA, undergoes a coil-to-globule transition with temperature in the absence of DNA while exhibiting energetically decoupled local and global structural rearrangements, and maximal thermodynamic fluctuations at the optimal bacterial growth temperature. The collapse is shown to be a continuous transition through a combination of statistical-mechanical modeling and all-atom implicit solvent simulations. Surprisingly, CytR binds single-site cognate DNA with negative cooperativity, described by Hill coefficients less than one, resulting in a graded binding response. We show that heterogeneity arising from varying binding-competent CytR conformations or orientations at the single-molecular level contributes to negative binding cooperativity at the level of bulk measurements due to the conflicting requirements of collapse transition, large fluctuations and folding-upon-binding. Our work reports strong evidence for functionally driven thermodynamic fluctuations in determining the extent of collapse and disorder with implications in protein search efficiency of target DNA sites and regulation.

  8. Real-time protein NMR spectroscopy and investigation of assisted protein folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Balbach, Jochen

    2015-10-01

    During protein-folding reactions toward the native structure, short-lived intermediate states can be populated. Such intermediates expose hydrophobic patches and can self-associate leading to non-productive protein misfolding. A major focus of current research is the characterization of short-lived intermediates and how molecular chaperones enable productive folding. Real-time NMR spectroscopy, together with the development of advanced methods, is reviewed here and the potential these methods have to characterize intermediate states as well as interactions with molecular chaperone proteins at single-residue resolution is highlighted. Various chaperone interactions can guide the protein-folding reaction and thus are important for protein structure formation, stability, and activity of their substrates. Chaperone-assisted protein folding, characterization of intermediates, and their molecular interactions using real-time NMR spectroscopy will be discussed. Additionally, recent advances in NMR methods employed for characterization of high-energy intermediates will be discussed. Real-time NMR combines high resolution with kinetic information of protein reactions, which can be employed not only for protein-folding studies and the characterization of folding intermediates but also to investigate the molecular mechanisms of assisted protein folding. Real-time NMR spectroscopy remains an effective tool to reveal structural details about the interaction between chaperones and transient intermediates. Methodologically, it provides in-depth understanding of how kinetic intermediates and their thermodynamics contribute to the protein-folding reaction. This review summarizes the most recent advances in this field. This article is part of a Special Issue titled Proline-directed Foldases: Cell Signaling Catalysts and Drug Targets. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Protein corona and nanoparticles: how can we investigate on?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pederzoli, Francesca; Tosi, Giovanni; Vandelli, Maria Angela; Belletti, Daniela; Forni, Flavio; Ruozi, Barbara

    2017-11-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) represent one of the most promising tools for drug-targeting and drug-delivery. However, a deeper understanding of the complex dynamics that happen after their in vivo administration is required. Particularly, plasma proteins tend to associate to NPs, forming a new surface named the 'protein corona' (PC). This surface is the most exposed as the 'visible side' of NPs and therefore, can have a strong impact on NP biodistribution, targeting efficacy and also toxicity. The PC consists of two poorly delimited layers, known as 'hard corona' (HC) and 'soft corona' (SC), that are affected by the complexity of the environment and the formed protein-surface equilibrium during in vivo blood circulation. The HC corona is formed by proteins strongly associated to the NPs, while the SC is an outer layer consisting of loosely bound proteins. Several studies attempted to investigate the HC, which is easier to be isolated, but yielded poor reproducibility, due to varying experimental conditions. As a consequence, full mapping of the HC for different NPs is still lacking. Moreover, the current knowledge on the SC, which may play a major role in the 'first' interaction of NPs once in vivo, is very limited, mainly due to the difficulties in preserving it after purification. Therefore, multi-disciplinary approaches leading to the obtainment of a major number of information about the PC and its properties is strongly needed to fully understand its impact and to better support a more safety and conscious application of nanotechnology in medicine. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2017, 9:e1467. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1467 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Experimental investigation of interactions between proteins and carbon nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Bishwambhar

    The global market for nanomaterials based products is forecasted to reach $1 trillion per annum per annum for 2015. Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) exhibit unique physicochemical properties with potential to impact diverse aspects of society through applications in electronics, renewable energy, and medicine. While the research and proposed applications of ENMs continue to grow rapidly, the health and safety of ENMs still remains a major concern to the public as well as to policy makers and funding agencies. It is now widely accepted that focused efforts are needed for identifying the list of physicochemical descriptors of ENM before they can be evaluated for nanotoxicity and biological response. This task is surprisingly challenging, as many physicochemical properties of ENMs are closely inter related and cannot be varied independently (e.g. increasing the size of an ENM can introduce additional defects). For example, varying toxic response may ensue due to different methods of nanomaterial preparation, dissimilar impurities and defects. Furthermore, the inadvertent coating of proteins on ENM surface in any biological milieu results in the formation of the so-called "protein/bio-corona" which can in turn alter the fate of ENMs and their biological response. Carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) such as carbon nanotubes, graphene, and graphene oxide are widely used ENMs. It is now known that defects in CNMs play an important role not only in materials properties but also in the determination of how materials interact at the nano-bio interface. In this regard, this work investigates the influence of defect-induced hydrophilicity on the bio-corona formation using micro Raman, photoluminescence, infrared spectroscopy, electrochemistry, and molecular dynamics simulations. Our results show that the interaction of proteins (albumin and fibrinogen) with CNMs is strongly influenced by charge transfer between them, inducing protein unfolding which enhances conformational entropy and

  11. Prediction of protein folds: extraction of new features, dimensionality reduction, and fusion of heterogeneous classifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanty, Pradip; Pal, Nikhil R

    2009-03-01

    Here, we consider a two-level (four classes in level 1 and 27 folds in level 2) protein fold determination problem. We propose several new features and use some existing features including frequencies of adjacent residues, frequencies of residues separated by one residue, and triplets (trio) of amino acid compositions (AACs). The dimensionality of the trio AAC features is drastically reduced using a neural network based novel online feature selection scheme. We also propose new sets of features called trio potential computed using the hydrophobicity values considering only the selected trio AACs. We demonstrate that the proposed features including the selected trio AACs and trio potential have good discriminating power for protein fold determination. As machine learning tools, we use multilayer perceptron network, radial basis function network, and support vector machine. To improve the recognition accuracies further, we use fusion of different classifiers using the same set of features as well as different sets of features. The effectiveness of our schemes is demonstrated with a benchmark structural classification of proteins (SCOP) dataset. Our system achieves 84.9% test accuracy for the SCOP structural class (four classes) determination and 68.6% test accuracy for the fold recognition with 27 folds. In order to demonstrate the consistency of feature sets and fusion schemes, we also perform the fivefold cross-validation experiments.

  12. Investigation of the pH-dependence of dye-doped protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nudelman, Roman; Gloukhikh, Ekaterina; Rekun, Antonina; Richter, Shachar

    2016-11-01

    Proteins can dramatically change their conformation under environmental conditions such as temperature and pH. In this context, Glycoprotein's conformational determination is challenging. This is due to the variety of domains which contain rich chemical characters existing within this complex. Here we demonstrate a new, straightforward and efficient technique that uses the pH-dependent properties of dyes-doped Pig Gastric Mucin (PGM) for predicting and controlling protein-protein interaction and conformation. We utilize the PGM as natural host matrix which is capable of dynamically changing its conformational shape and adsorbing hydrophobic and hydrophilic dyes under different pH conditions and investigate and control the fluorescent properties of these composites in solution. It is shown at various pH conditions, a large variety of light emission from these complexes such as red, green and white is obtained. This phenomenon is explained by pH-dependent protein folding and protein-protein interactions that induce different emission spectra which are mediated and controlled by means of dye-dye interactions and surrounding environment. This process is used to form the technologically challenging white light-emitting liquid or solid coating for LED devices. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  13. Free-Propagator Reweighting Integrator for Single-Particle Dynamics in Reaction-Diffusion Models of Heterogeneous Protein-Protein Interaction Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret E. Johnson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a new algorithm for simulating reaction-diffusion equations at single-particle resolution. Our algorithm is designed to be both accurate and simple to implement, and to be applicable to large and heterogeneous systems, including those arising in systems biology applications. We combine the use of the exact Green’s function for a pair of reacting particles with the approximate free-diffusion propagator for position updates to particles. Trajectory reweighting in our free-propagator reweighting (FPR method recovers the exact association rates for a pair of interacting particles at all times. FPR simulations of many-body systems accurately reproduce the theoretically known dynamic behavior for a variety of different reaction types. FPR does not suffer from the loss of efficiency common to other path-reweighting schemes, first, because corrections apply only in the immediate vicinity of reacting particles and, second, because by construction the average weight factor equals one upon leaving this reaction zone. FPR applications include the modeling of pathways and networks of protein-driven processes where reaction rates can vary widely and thousands of proteins may participate in the formation of large assemblies. With a limited amount of bookkeeping necessary to ensure proper association rates for each reactant pair, FPR can account for changes to reaction rates or diffusion constants as a result of reaction events. Importantly, FPR can also be extended to physical descriptions of protein interactions with long-range forces, as we demonstrate here for Coulombic interactions.

  14. An investigation into heterogeneity in a single vein-type uranium ore deposit: Implications for nuclear forensics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keatley, A.C.; Scott, T.B.; Davis, S.; Jones, C.P.; Turner, P.

    2015-01-01

    Minor element composition and rare earth element (REE) concentrations in nuclear materials are important as they are used within the field of nuclear forensics as an indicator of sample origin. However recent studies into uranium ores and uranium ore concentrates (UOCs) have shown significant elemental and isotopic heterogeneity from a single mine site such that some sites have shown higher variation within the mine site than that seen between multiple sites. The elemental composition of both uranium and gangue minerals within ore samples taken along a single mineral vein in South West England have been measured and reported here. The analysis of the samples was undertaken to determine the extent of the localised variation in key elements. Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) was used to analyse the gangue mineralogy and measure major element composition. Minor element composition and rare earth element (REE) concentrations were measured by Electron Probe Microanalysis (EPMA). The results confirm that a number of key elements, REE concentrations and patterns used for origin location do show significant variation within mine. Furthermore significant variation is also visible on a meter scale. In addition three separate uranium phases were identified within the vein which indicates multiple uranium mineralisation events. In light of these localised elemental variations it is recommended that representative sampling for an area is undertaken prior to establishing the REE pattern that may be used to identify the originating mine for an unknown ore sample and prior to investigating impact of ore processing on any arising REE patterns. - Highlights: • Demonstrating significant variation at meter scale distances. • Importance of understanding heterogeneity in aid of nuclear forensics interpretation. • Understanding local features prior to determining feed through of elements to UOCs. • Key elements, REE concentrations and patterns show significant variation

  15. αB-Crystallin. A Hybrid Solid-State/Solution-State NMR Investigation Reveals Structural Aspects of the Heterogeneous Oligomer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jehle, Stefan [Freie Univ., Berlin (Germany); Leibniz Inst. for Molecular Pharmacology, Berlin (Germany); van Rossum, Barth [Leibniz Inst. for Molecular Pharmacology, Berlin (Germany); Stout, Joseph R. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Noguchi, Satoshi M. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Falber, Katja [Leibniz Inst. for Molecular Pharmacology, Berlin (Germany); Rehbein, Kristina [Leibniz Inst. for Molecular Pharmacology, Berlin (Germany); Oschkinat, Hartmut [Freie Univ., Berlin (Germany); Leibniz Inst. for Molecular Pharmacology, Berlin (Germany); Klevit, Rachel E. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Rajagopal, Ponni [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2008-11-14

    Atomic-level structural information on αB-Crystallin (αB), a prominent member of the small heat-shock protein family, has been a challenge to obtain due its polydisperse oligomeric nature. We show that magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR can be used to obtain high-resolution information on an ~580-kDa human αB assembled from 175-residue 20-kDa subunits. An ~100-residue α-crystallin domain is common to all small heat-shock proteins, and solution-state NMR was performed on two different α- crystallin domain constructs isolated from αB. In vitro, the chaperone-like activities of full-length αB and the isolated α-crystallin domain are identical. Chemical shifts of the backbone and Cβ resonances have been obtained for residues 64–162 (α-crystallin domain plus part of the C-terminus) in αB and the isolated α-crystallin domain by solid-state and solution-state NMR, respectively. Both sets of data strongly predict six β-strands in the α-crystallin domain. A majority of residues in the α-crystallin domain have similar chemical shifts in both solid-state and solution-state, indicating similar structures for the domain in its isolated and oligomeric forms. Sites of intersubunit interaction are identified from chemical shift differences that cluster to specific regions of the α-crystallin domain. Multiple signals are observed for the resonances of M68 in the oligomer, identifying the region containing this residue as existing in heterogeneous environments within αB. Evidence for a novel dimerization motif in the human α-crystallin domain is obtained by a comparison of (i) solid-state and solution-state chemical shift data and (ii) 1H–15N heteronuclear single quantum coherence spectra as a function of pH. The isolated α-crystallin domain undergoes a dimer–monomer transition over the pH range 7.5–6.8. This steep pHdependent switch may be important for αB to function optimally (e.g., to preserve the filament integrity

  16. Cysteine Specific Targeting of the Functionally Distinct Peroxiredoxin and Glutaredoxin Proteins by the Investigational Disulfide BNP7787

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aulma R. Parker

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Glutaredoxin (Grx, peroxiredoxin (Prx, and thioredoxin (Trx are redoxin family proteins that catalyze different types of chemical reactions that impact cell growth and survival through functionally distinct intracellular pathways. Much research is focused on understanding the roles of these redoxin proteins in the development and/or progression of human diseases. Grx and Prx are overexpressed in human cancers, including human lung cancers. BNP7787 is a novel investigational agent that has been evaluated in previous clinical studies, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC studies. Herein, data from activity assays, mass spectrometry analyses, and X-ray crystallographic studies indicate that BNP7787 forms mixed disulfides with select cysteine residues on Grx and Prx and modulates their function. Studies of interactions between BNP7787 and Trx have been conducted and reported separately. Despite the fact that Trx, Grx, and Prx are functionally distinct proteins that impact oxidative stress, cell proliferation and disease processes through different intracellular pathways, BNP7787 can modify each protein and appears to modulate function through mechanisms that are unique to each target protein. Tumor cells are often genomically heterogeneous containing subpopulations of cancer cells that often express different tumor-promoting proteins or that have multiple dysregulated signaling pathways modulating cell proliferation and drug resistance. A multi-targeted agent that simultaneously modulates activity of proteins important in mediating cell proliferation by functionally distinct intracellular pathways could have many potentially useful therapeutic applications.

  17. Investigation of the Josephin Domain protein-protein interaction by molecular dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco A Deriu

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA 3, the most common form of SCA, is a neurodegenerative rare disease characterized by polyglutamine tract expansion and self-assembly of Ataxin3 (At3 misfolded proteins into highly organized fibrillar aggregates. The At3 N-terminal Josephin Domain (JD has been suggested as being responsible for mediating the initial phase of the At3 double-step fibrillogenesis. Several issues concerning the residues involved in the JD's aggregation and, more generally, the JD clumping mechanism have not been clarified yet. In this paper we present an investigation focusing on the JD protein-protein interaction by means of molecular modeling. Our results suggest possible aminoacids involved in JD contact together with local and non-local effects following JD dimerization. Surprisingly, JD conformational changes following the binding may involve ubiquitin binding sites and hairpin region even though they do not pertain to the JD interaction surfaces. Moreover, the JD binding event has been found to alter the hairpin open-like conformation toward a closed-like arrangement over the simulated timescale. Finally, our results suggest that the JD aggregation might be a multi-step process, with an initial fast JD-JD binding mainly driven by Arg101, followed by slower structural global rearrangements involving the exposure to the solvent of Leu84-Trp87, which might play a role in a second step of JD aggregation.

  18. Numerical Investigation of the Main Characteristics of Heat and Mass Transfer while Heating the Heterogeneous Water Droplet in the Hot Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskunov, Maxim V.; Shcherbinina, Anastasia A.; Vysokomornaya, Olga V.

    2016-02-01

    The processes of heat and evaporation of heterogeneous water droplet with solid (by the example of carbon) inclusion in hot (from 800 K to 1500 K) gases were investigated by the developed models of heat and mass transfer. We defined the limited conditions, characteristics of the droplet and the gas medium which are sufficient for implementing the "explosive" destruction of heterogeneous droplet due to intensive vaporization on an inner interface, and intensive evaporation of liquid from an external (free) droplet surface. The values of the main characteristic of the process (period from start of heating to "explosive" destruction) obtained in response to using various heat and mass transfer models were compared.

  19. Heterogeneous Association of Alzheimer's Disease-Linked Amyloid-β and Amyloid-β Protein Precursor with Synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willén, Katarina; Sroka, Agnieszka; Takahashi, Reisuke H; Gouras, Gunnar K

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is increasingly viewed as a disease of synapses. Loss of synapses correlates better with cognitive decline than amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, the hallmark neuropathological lesions of AD. Soluble forms of amyloid-β (Aβ) have emerged as mediators of synapse dysfunction. Aβ binds to, accumulates, and aggregates in synapses. However, the anatomical and neurotransmitter specificity of Aβ and the amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) in AD remain poorly understood. In addition, the relative roles of Aβ and AβPP in the development of AD, at pre- versus post-synaptic compartments and axons versus dendrites, respectively, remain unclear. Here we use immunogold electron microscopy and confocal microscopy to provide evidence for heterogeneity in the localization of Aβ/AβPP. We demonstrate that Aβ binds to a subset of synapses in cultured neurons, with preferential binding to glutamatergic compared to GABAergic neurons. We also highlight the challenge of defining pre- versus post-synaptic localization of this binding by confocal microscopy. Further, endogenous Aβ42 accumulates in both glutamatergic and GABAergic AβPP/PS1 transgenic primary neurons, but at varying levels. Moreover, upon knock-out of presenilin 1 or inhibition of γ-secretase AβPP C-terminal fragments accumulate both pre- and post-synaptically; however earlier pre-synaptically, consistent with a higher rate of AβPP processing in axons. A better understanding of the synaptic and anatomical selectivity of Aβ/AβPP in AD can be important for the development of more effective new therapies for this major disease of aging.

  20. Heterogeneous Association of Alzheimer’s Disease-Linked Amyloid-β and Amyloid-β Protein Precursor with Synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willén, Katarina; Sroka, Agnieszka; Takahashi, Reisuke H.; Gouras, Gunnar K.

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is increasingly viewed as a disease of synapses. Loss of synapses correlates better with cognitive decline than amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, the hallmark neuropathological lesions of AD. Soluble forms of amyloid-β (Aβ) have emerged as mediators of synapse dysfunction. Aβ binds to, accumulates, and aggregates in synapses. However, the anatomical and neurotransmitter specificity of Aβ and the amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) in AD remain poorly understood. In addition, the relative roles of Aβ and AβPP in the development of AD, at pre- versus post-synaptic compartments and axons versus dendrites, respectively, remain unclear. Here we use immunogold electron microscopy and confocal microscopy to provide evidence for heterogeneity in the localization of Aβ/AβPP. We demonstrate that Aβ binds to a subset of synapses in cultured neurons, with preferential binding to glutamatergic compared to GABAergic neurons. We also highlight the challenge of defining pre- versus post-synaptic localization of this binding by confocal microscopy. Further, endogenous Aβ42 accumulates in both glutamatergic and GABAergic AβPP/PS1 transgenic primary neurons, but at varying levels. Moreover, upon knock-out of presenilin 1 or inhibition of γ-secretase AβPP C-terminal fragments accumulate both pre- and post-synaptically; however earlier pre-synaptically, consistent with a higher rate of AβPP processing in axons. A better understanding of the synaptic and anatomical selectivity of Aβ/AβPP in AD can be important for the development of more effective new therapies for this major disease of aging. PMID:28869466

  1. Molecular Insights into the Coding Region Determinant-binding Protein-RNA Interaction through Site-directed Mutagenesis in the Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein-K-homology Domains*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Mark; van Rensburg, Gerrit; Li, Wai-Ming; Mehmood, Kashif; Mackedenski, Sebastian; Chan, Ching-Man; King, Dustin T.; Miller, Andrew L.; Lee, Chow H.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of its four heterogeneous nuclear RNP-K-homology (KH) domains to physically associate with oncogenic mRNAs is a major criterion for the function of the coding region determinant-binding protein (CRD-BP). However, the particular RNA-binding role of each of the KH domains remains largely unresolved. Here, we mutated the first glycine to an aspartate in the universally conserved GXXG motif of the KH domain as an approach to investigate their role. Our results show that mutation of a single GXXG motif generally had no effect on binding, but the mutation in any two KH domains, with the exception of the combination of KH3 and KH4 domains, completely abrogated RNA binding in vitro and significantly retarded granule formation in zebrafish embryos, suggesting that any combination of at least two KH domains cooperate in tandem to bind RNA efficiently. Interestingly, we found that any single point mutation in one of the four KH domains significantly impacted CRD-BP binding to mRNAs in HeLa cells, suggesting that the dynamics of the CRD-BP-mRNA interaction vary over time in vivo. Furthermore, our results suggest that different mRNAs bind preferentially to distinct CRD-BP KH domains. The novel insights revealed in this study have important implications on the understanding of the oncogenic mechanism of CRD-BP as well as in the future design of inhibitors against CRD-BP function. PMID:25389298

  2. NMR elucidation of monomer-dimer transition and conformational heterogeneity in histone-like DNA binding protein of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Nancy; Raikwal, Nisha; Pandey, Himanshu; Agarwal, Nipanshu; Arora, Ashish; Poluri, Krishna Mohan; Kumar, Dinesh

    2017-12-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonizes under harsh acidic/oxidative stress conditions of human gastrointestinal tract and can survive there for infinitely longer durations of host life. The bacterium expresses several harbinger proteins to facilitate its persistent colonization under such conditions. One such protein in H. pylori is histone-like DNA binding protein (Hup), which in its homo-dimeric form binds to DNA to perform various DNA dependent cellular activities. Further, it also plays an important role in protecting the genomic DNA from oxidative stress and acidic denaturation. Legitimately, if the binding of Hup to DNA is suppressed, it will directly impact on the survival of the bacterium, thus making Hup a potential therapeutic target for developing new anti-H. pylori agents. However, to inhibit the binding of Hup to DNA, it is necessary to gain detailed insights into the molecular and structural basis of Hup-dimerization and its binding mechanism to DNA. As a first step in this direction, we report here the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) assignments and structural features of Hup at pH 6.0. The study revealed the occurrence of dynamic equilibrium between its monomer and dimer conformations. The dynamic equilibrium was found to shifting towards dimer both at low temperature and low pH; whereas DNA binding studies evidenced that the protein binds to DNA in its dimeric form. These preliminary investigations correlate very well with the diverse functionality of protein and will form the basis for future studies aiming to develop novel anti-H. pylori agents employing structure-based-rational drug discovery approach. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Isofocusing and immunological investigations on cephalopod lens proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brahma, S.K.; Lancieri, M.

    1979-01-01

    Soluble lens proteins from Octopus vulgaris, Sepia officinalis, and Loligo vulgaris were analyzed by thin-layer isoelectric focusing and compared by various immunochemical methods using antibodies directed against total soluble lens protein antigens from the said three species. The results show

  4. AESOP: A Python Library for Investigating Electrostatics in Protein Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Reed E S; Mohan, Rohith R; Gorham, Ronald D; Kieslich, Chris A; Morikis, Dimitrios

    2017-05-09

    Electric fields often play a role in guiding the association of protein complexes. Such interactions can be further engineered to accelerate complex association, resulting in protein systems with increased productivity. This is especially true for enzymes where reaction rates are typically diffusion limited. To facilitate quantitative comparisons of electrostatics in protein families and to describe electrostatic contributions of individual amino acids, we previously developed a computational framework called AESOP. We now implement this computational tool in Python with increased usability and the capability of performing calculations in parallel. AESOP utilizes PDB2PQR and Adaptive Poisson-Boltzmann Solver to generate grid-based electrostatic potential files for protein structures provided by the end user. There are methods within AESOP for quantitatively comparing sets of grid-based electrostatic potentials in terms of similarity or generating ensembles of electrostatic potential files for a library of mutants to quantify the effects of perturbations in protein structure and protein-protein association. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Vectors for multi-color bimolecular fluorescence complementation to investigate protein-protein interactions in living plant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuang Lin-Yun

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The investigation of protein-protein interactions is important for characterizing protein function. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC has recently gained interest as a relatively easy and inexpensive method to visualize protein-protein interactions in living cells. BiFC uses "split YFP" tags on proteins to detect interactions: If the tagged proteins interact, they may bring the two split fluorophore components together such that they can fold and reconstitute fluorescence. The sites of interaction can be monitored using epifluorescence or confocal microscopy. However, "conventional" BiFC can investigate interactions only between two proteins at a time. There are instances when one may wish to offer a particular "bait" protein to several "prey" proteins simultaneously. Preferential interaction of the bait protein with one of the prey proteins, or different sites of interaction between the bait protein and multiple prey proteins, may thus be observed. Results We have constructed a series of gene expression vectors, based upon the pSAT series of vectors, to facilitate the practice of multi-color BiFC. The bait protein is tagged with the C-terminal portion of CFP (cCFP, and prey proteins are tagged with the N-terminal portions of either Venus (nVenus or Cerulean (nCerulean. Interaction of cCFP-tagged proteins with nVenus-tagged proteins generates yellow fluorescence, whereas interaction of cCFP-tagged proteins with nCerulean-tagged proteins generates blue fluorescence. Additional expression of mCherry indicates transfected cells and sub-cellular structures. Using this system, we have determined in both tobacco BY-2 protoplasts and in onion epidermal cells that Agrobacterium VirE2 protein interacts with the Arabidopsis nuclear transport adapter protein importin α-1 in the cytoplasm, whereas interaction of VirE2 with a different importin α isoform, importin α-4, occurs predominantly in the nucleus. Conclusion Multi

  6. Parametric imaging of {sup 18}F-fluoro-3-deoxy-3-l-fluorothymidine PET data to investigate tumour heterogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veronese, M. [University of Padova, Department of Information Engineering (DEI), Padova (Italy); King' s College London, Department of Neuroimaging, Institute of Psychiatry, London (United Kingdom); Rizzo, G.; Bertoldo, A. [University of Padova, Department of Information Engineering (DEI), Padova (Italy); Aboagye, E.O. [Imperial College London, Comprehensive Cancer Imaging Centre, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-15

    [{sup 18}F]Fluoro-3'-deoxy-3'-l-fluorothymidine ([{sup 18}F]FLT) is a tissue proliferation marker which has been widely validated as a tumour-specific imaging tracer for PET. [{sup 18}F]FLT uptake in breast cancer is generally quantified at the region level or through first-order statistical descriptors (mean or maximum value), approaches that ignore the known complexity and heterogeneity of cancer tissues. Our aims were: (1) to validate a robust and reproducible voxel-wise approach to the quantification of [{sup 18}F]FLT PET data in breast cancer patients, and (2) to exploit the entire distribution of the [{sup 18}F]FLT retention estimates and their variability in the tumour region for the prediction of early treatment response. The dataset was derived from 15 patients with stage II-IV breast cancer, scanned twice before chemotherapy and once 1 week after therapy. Using RECIST criteria (after 60 days) nine patients were categorized as responders or nonresponders to treatment. Kinetic modelling (compartmental modelling, Patlak analysis and spectral analysis with iterative filter), tissue-to-plasma ratio and standardized uptake value were applied at the voxel level. Test-retest estimates were used to assess reproducibility and reliability of the [{sup 18}F]FLT uptake values before and after therapy for responder/nonresponder prediction. All the methods provided a measure of [{sup 18}F]FLT uptake that was reliable and reproducible with ICC >0.94. Moreover, a very strong correlation was found among the methods (R {sup 2} > 0.81). All the methods provided a limited number of outliers (<20 % in tumour), with the exception of compartmental modelling (>25 %) which was therefore excluded from the prediction analysis. Differences between before and after therapy in mean voxel-wise uptake in tumour did not allow a complete responder/nonresponder classification. In contrast, considering the full estimate distributions within the tumour (changes in median and mode

  7. An investigation into the frequency of Language Related Episodes in the EFL learners’ Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Dyadic Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser Ghafoori

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study attempted to compare the relative frequency of the occurrence of Language Related Episodes (LREs in the dyadic talks of pairs who were homogeneous and heterogeneous in terms of English proficiency.  LREs are those parts of the conversations where the interlocutors explicitly focus on linguistic form. The study was carried out with 60 Iranian university students of teaching English as a foreign language (TEFL who were divided into two groups of homogeneous and heterogeneous pairs based on their scores in a standardized English proficiency test (FCE.  The pairs were required to collaborate and talk to carry out nine writing tasks. The participants’ talks while they were doing the pair work were recorded and transcribed, and the relative frequency of LREs for each pair talk was found.  The frequency values for the two groups were compared through the independent samples t-test, and it was found that the heterogeneous pairs had significantly more LREs in their dyadic interactions.  The results of the study were explained in relation to Vygotsky’s sociocultural theory, and several pedagogical implications were finally offered.

  8. Investigating the Role of Helicobacter pylori PriA Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Aparna; Blaskovic, Dusan; Joo, Jungsoo; Yang, Zhen; Jackson, Sharon H; Coleman, William G; Yan, Ming

    2016-08-01

    In bacteria, PriA protein, a conserved DEXH-type DNA helicase, plays a central role in replication restart at stalled replication forks. Its unique DNA binding property allows it to recognize and stabilize stalled forks and the structures derived from them. PriA plays a very critical role in replication fork stabilization and DNA repair in E. coli and N. gonorrhoeae. In our in vivo expression technology screen, priA gene was induced in vivo when Helicobacter pylori infects mouse stomach. We decided to elucidate the role of H. pylori PriA protein in survival in mouse stomach, survival in gastric epithelial cells and macrophage cells, DNA repair, acid stress, and oxidative stress. The priA null mutant strain was unable to colonize mice stomach mucosa after long-term infections. Mouse colonization was observed after 1 week of infection, but the levels were much lower than the wild-type HpSS1 strain. PriA protein was found to be important for intracellular survival of epithelial cell-/macrophage cell-ingested H. pylori. Also, a priA null mutant was more sensitive to DNA-damaging agents and was much more sensitive to acid and oxidative stress as compared to the wild-type strain. These data suggest that the PriA protein is needed for survival and persistence of H. pylori in mice stomach mucosa. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Investigation of dietary fiber, protein, vitamin E and other nutritional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    banana flowers contained abundant dietary fiber (4.96-5.74 g/100g) and proteins (1.62-2.07 g/100 g). The major amino acids are glycine, ... as organic material and fertilizer in plantations in China until today (Yang et al., 2003). ..... banana flowers than in banana peel, in contrast to previous reports (Lima et al., 2008).

  10. A proteomic investigation of soluble olfactory proteins in Anopheles gambiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Mastrobuoni

    Full Text Available Odorant-binding proteins (OBPs and chemosensory proteins (CSPs are small soluble polypeptides that bind semiochemicals in the lymph of insect chemosensilla. In the genome of Anopheles gambiae, 66 genes encode OBPs and 8 encode CSPs. Here we monitored their expression through classical proteomics (2D gel-MS analysis and a shotgun approach. The latter method proved much more sensitive and therefore more suitable for tiny biological samples as mosquitoes antennae and eggs. Females express a larger number and higher quantities of OBPs in their antennae than males (24 vs 19. OBP9 is the most abundant in the antennae of both sexes, as well as in larvae, pupae and eggs. Of the 8 CSPs, 4 were detected in antennae, while SAP3 was the only one expressed in larvae. Our proteomic results are in fairly good agreement with data of RNA expression reported in the literature, except for OBP4 and OBP5, that we could not identify in our analysis, nor could we detect in Western Blot experiments. The relatively limited number of soluble olfactory proteins expressed at relatively high levels in mosquitoes makes further studies on the coding of chemical messages at the OBP level more accessible, providing for few specific targets. Identification of such proteins in Anopheles gambiae might facilitate future studies on host finding behavior in this important disease vector.

  11. Structural investigation of membrane proteins by electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moscicka, Katarzyna Beata

    2009-01-01

    Biological membranes are vital components of all living systems, forming the boundaries of cells and their organelles. They consist of a lipid bilayer and embedded proteins, which are nanomachines that fulfill key functions such as energy conversion, solute transport, secretion, and signal

  12. Investigation into ramie whisker reinforced arylated soy protein composites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kumar, R

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Reinforced Arylated Soy Protein Composites Rakesh Kumar1,2*, Lina Zhang2 1CSIR MSM, Port Elizabeth 6000, South Africa 2Department of Chemistry, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072, China Abstract Whiskers were prepared from ramie fibers and were... of synthetic fibers and matrices the reuse of classical fibers reinforced composites are not possible. To get rid from these types of composites we use landfill disposable systems. Due to increasing population, lots of nonbiodegradable wastes are generated...

  13. A systematic investigation of the stability of green fluorescent protein fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janczak, Monika; Bukowski, Michał; Górecki, Andrzej; Dubin, Grzegorz; Dubin, Adam; Wladyka, Benedykt

    2015-01-01

    X-ray crystallography provides important insights into structure-function relationship in biomolecules. However, protein crystals are usually hard to obtain which hinders our understanding of multiple important processes. Crystallization requires large amount of protein sample, whereas recombinant proteins are often unstable or insoluble. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion is one of the approaches to increase protein synthesis, solubility and stability, facilitating crystallization. In this study we analyze the influence of the linker length, composition and the position of GFP relative to the fusion partner on the fusion protein production and stability. To this end, multiple constructs of enzymatically impaired variant of PemKSa toxin from Staphylococcus aureus CH91 fused to GFP were generated. Fusion protein production in Escherichia coli was evaluated. The proteins were purified and their stability tested. PemKSa-α14aa-GFP fusion provided best production and stability. Obtained results demonstrate the importance of optimization of fusion protein construct, including linker selection and the order of fusion partners, in obtaining high quantities of stable protein for crystallization.

  14. Investigation of the connection between the quality of protein, protein level and endogenous N excretion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, R.; Gebhardt, G.

    1979-01-01

    The influence of various protein qualities as well as of different levels of protein on the amount of endogenous N excretion, metabolic fecal nitrogen (MFN) and endogenous urinary N (EUN) was determined in growing albino rats. The test rations were labelled with admixtures of 15 N-DL-methionine and 15 N-DL-lysine, respectively, or contained feed protein enriched with 15 N. EUN and MFN and their sum (the N maintenance requirement) showed the influence of the respective protein source and its dependence on the protein level. The endogenous N excretions showed an opposite tendency to the N balance; for high-quality protein feedstuffs with a high N balance (e.g. dried eggs) they are lower than for protein sources of inferior quality, with a low N-balance only (e.g. wheat gluten). Presumably this interaction of retention and maintenance is due to the complementary effect of exogenous and endogenous amino acids in the N and amino acid pool, respectively. Provided that the N dose and the live weight of the animals are comparable, the N balance appears to be more suitable as parameter for the description of the protein quality and the calculation of the protein utilisation than N retention, as the sum of N balance and the values of MFN and EUN (depending on the feedstuffs and the N level). (author)

  15. Characterization of the C-protein from posterior latissimus dorsi muscle of the adult chicken: heterogeneity within a single sarcomere

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    Specific isoforms of myofibrillar proteins are expressed in different muscles and in various fiber types within a single muscle. We have isolated and characterized monoclonal antibodies against C-proteins from slow tonic (anterior latissimus dorsi, ALD) and fast twitch (pectoralis major) muscles of the chicken. Although the antibody against "fast" C-protein (MF-1) did not bind to the "slow" isoform and the antibody to the "slow" C-protein (ALD-66) did not bind to the "fast" isoform, we observ...

  16. Copper and Zinc Interactions with Cellular Prion Proteins Change Solubility of Full-Length Glycosylated Isoforms and Induce the Occurrence of Heterogeneous Phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Brim

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are characterized biochemically by protein aggregation of infectious prion isoforms (PrPSc, which result from the conformational conversion of physiological prion proteins (PrPC. PrPC are variable post-translationally modified glycoproteins, which exist as full length and as aminoterminally truncated glycosylated proteins and which exhibit differential detergent solubility. This implicates the presence of heterogeneous phenotypes, which overlap as protein complexes at the same molecular masses. Although the biological function of PrPC is still enigmatic, evidence reveals that PrPC exhibits metal-binding properties, which result in structural changes and decreased solubility. In this study, we analyzed the yield of PrPC metal binding affiliated with low solubility and changes in protein banding patterns. By implementing a high-speed centrifugation step, the interaction of zinc ions with PrPC was shown to generate large quantities of proteins with low solubility, consisting mainly of full-length glycosylated PrPC; whereas unglycosylated PrPC remained in the supernatants as well as truncated glycosylated proteins which lack of octarepeat sequence necessary for metal binding. This effect was considerably lower when PrPC interacted with copper ions; the presence of other metals tested exhibited no effect under these conditions. The binding of zinc and copper to PrPC demonstrated differentially soluble protein yields within distinct PrPC subtypes. PrPC-Zn2+-interaction may provide a means to differentiate glycosylated and unglycosylated subtypes and offers detailed analysis of metal-bound and metal-free protein conversion assays.

  17. Copper and Zinc Interactions with Cellular Prion Proteins Change Solubility of Full-Length Glycosylated Isoforms and Induce the Occurrence of Heterogeneous Phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brim, Svetlana; Groschup, Martin H.; Kuczius, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Prion diseases are characterized biochemically by protein aggregation of infectious prion isoforms (PrPSc), which result from the conformational conversion of physiological prion proteins (PrPC). PrPC are variable post-translationally modified glycoproteins, which exist as full length and as aminoterminally truncated glycosylated proteins and which exhibit differential detergent solubility. This implicates the presence of heterogeneous phenotypes, which overlap as protein complexes at the same molecular masses. Although the biological function of PrPC is still enigmatic, evidence reveals that PrPC exhibits metal-binding properties, which result in structural changes and decreased solubility. In this study, we analyzed the yield of PrPC metal binding affiliated with low solubility and changes in protein banding patterns. By implementing a high-speed centrifugation step, the interaction of zinc ions with PrPC was shown to generate large quantities of proteins with low solubility, consisting mainly of full-length glycosylated PrPC; whereas unglycosylated PrPC remained in the supernatants as well as truncated glycosylated proteins which lack of octarepeat sequence necessary for metal binding. This effect was considerably lower when PrPC interacted with copper ions; the presence of other metals tested exhibited no effect under these conditions. The binding of zinc and copper to PrPC demonstrated differentially soluble protein yields within distinct PrPC subtypes. PrPC–Zn2+-interaction may provide a means to differentiate glycosylated and unglycosylated subtypes and offers detailed analysis of metal-bound and metal-free protein conversion assays. PMID:27093554

  18. Model investigation of NO3 secondary organic aerosol (SOA) source and heterogeneous organic aerosol (OA) sink in the western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, J. L.; Sackinger, K.

    2012-09-01

    The relative importance of NO3-initiated source and heterogeneous sink of organic aerosol in the western United States is investigated using the WRF/Chem regional weather and chemistry model. The model is run for the four individual months, representing the four seasons, of January, May, August, and October, to produce hourly spatial maps of surface concentrations of NO3, organic aerosol (OA), and reactive organic gases (ROG, a sum of alkene species tracked in the lumped chemical mechanism employed). These "baseline" simulations are used in conjunction with literature data on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass yields, average organic aerosol composition, and reactive uptake coefficients for NO3 on organic surfaces to predict SOA source and OA heterogeneous loss rates due to reactions initiated by NO3. We find both source and sink rates maximized downwind of urban centers, therefore with a varying location that depends on wind direction. Both source and sink terms are maximum in summer, and SOA source dominates over OA loss by approximately three orders of magnitude, with large day-to-day variability. The NO3 source of SOA (peak production rates of 0.4-3.0 μg kg-1 h-1) is found to be significantly larger than the heterogeneous sink of OA via NO3 surface reactions (peak loss rates of 0.5-8 × 10-4 μg kg-1 h-1).

  19. Model investigation of NO3 secondary organic aerosol (SOA source and heterogeneous organic aerosol (OA sink in the western United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sackinger

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The relative importance of NO3-initiated source and heterogeneous sink of organic aerosol in the western United States is investigated using the WRF/Chem regional weather and chemistry model. The model is run for the four individual months, representing the four seasons, of January, May, August, and October, to produce hourly spatial maps of surface concentrations of NO3, organic aerosol (OA, and reactive organic gases (ROG, a sum of alkene species tracked in the lumped chemical mechanism employed. These "baseline" simulations are used in conjunction with literature data on secondary organic aerosol (SOA mass yields, average organic aerosol composition, and reactive uptake coefficients for NO3 on organic surfaces to predict SOA source and OA heterogeneous loss rates due to reactions initiated by NO3. We find both source and sink rates maximized downwind of urban centers, therefore with a varying location that depends on wind direction. Both source and sink terms are maximum in summer, and SOA source dominates over OA loss by approximately three orders of magnitude, with large day-to-day variability. The NO3 source of SOA (peak production rates of 0.4–3.0 μg kg−1 h−1 is found to be significantly larger than the heterogeneous sink of OA via NO3 surface reactions (peak loss rates of 0.5–8 × 10−4 μg kg−1 h−1.

  20. Investigation of Heterogeneous N2O5 Uptake and ClNO2 Yield at a Rural and a Mountain-top Site in Northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z.; Tham, Y. J.; Wang, W.; LI, Q.; Yun, H.; Wang, X.; Xue, L.; Wang, T.

    2017-12-01

    Dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) is a reactive intermediate in the atmospheric oxidation of nitrogen oxides (NOx), and its heterogeneous reaction plays key roles in the chemical transformation and removal of NOx, as well as the production of nitrate and nitryl chloride (ClNO2) that affects the radical budget and photochemical ozone formation. Ambient measurements at a rural site and a mountain top site in northern China in the summer of 2014 revealed significant ClNO2 mixing ratios (up to 2.1 ppbv) produced by fast heterogeneous N2O5 uptake on atmospheric aerosols. Frequently intercepted ClNO2-laden plumes at the mountain site indicate significant ClNO2 production occurred in the nocturnal residual layer, and could help explain the sustained ClNO2 peaks after sunrise observed in the ground site in the region. The meteorological and chemical analysis suggested that elevated ClNO2 plumes were mostly associated with nocturnal buoyant emission from point combustion sources, such as power and industry plants. The uptake coefficients (γ) of N2O5 and yields (ϕ) of ClNO2 were then derived for different plumes observed at the ground and mountain sites, and the factors affecting the variability of γ and ϕ under different conditions were also investigated. The uptake coefficients and yields obtained in this study in northern China will be compared with other observations in the world, and also compared to the existing parameterizations based on aerosol compositions. The contribution of fast N2O5 heterogeneous reaction to the nocturnal NOx processing and nitrate aerosol formation will be further examined, to better understand the impacts of heterogeneous reactive nitrogen chemistry on air quality in northern China.

  1. Microscopic Investigation of Reversible Nanoscale Surface Size Dependent Protein Conjugation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Carpenter

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Aβ1-40 coated 20 nm gold colloidal nanoparticles exhibit a reversible color change as pH is externally altered between pH 4 and 10. This reversible process may contain important information on the initial reversible step reported for the fibrillogenesis of Aβ (a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease. We examined this reversible color change by microscopic investigations. AFM images on graphite surfaces revealed the morphology of Aβ aggregates with gold colloids. TEM images clearly demonstrate the correspondence between spectroscopic features and conformational changes of the gold colloid.

  2. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins H, H', and F are members of a ubiquitously expressed subfamily of related but distinct proteins encoded by genes mapping to different chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B; Rasmussen, H H; Vorum, H

    1995-01-01

    and keratinocytes. In normal human keratinocytes, the expression level of H was unaffected by treatment with several substances tested including two second messengers and seven cytokines. Likewise the expression level of F was independent of these substances, although it was strikingly down-regulated by long term......Molecular cDNA cloning, two-dimensional gel immunoblotting, and amino acid microsequencing identified three sequence-unique and distinct proteins that constitute a subfamily of ubiquitously expressed heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins corresponding to hnRNPs H, H', and F. These proteins share...... for ribohomopolymer binding studies. Each qRRM repeat bound poly(rG), while only the NH2-terminal qRRM bound poly(rC) and poly(rU). None of the repeats bound detectable amounts of poly(rA). The expression levels of hnRNPs H and F were differentially regulated in pairs of normal and transformed fibroblasts...

  3. The effect of Polyscias filicifolia bailey biomass tincture on the protein synthesis process in the heterogeneous system from the isolated pig heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kašauskas, Artūras; Mongirdienė, Aušra

    2013-01-01

    An insufficient supply of oxygen to the heart influences the process of protein synthesis. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the Polyscias filicifolia Bailey biomass tincture on the protein synthesis process in a heterogeneous translation system from the isolated pig heart. The effect of anoxia was evaluated after 20- and 90-minute anoxia. With the aim to determine the effect of Polyscias, the pig hearts were perfused with a buffer containing the Polyscias filicifolia Bailey biomass tincture. To determine the rate and the level of translation, the incorporation of [(14)C]-leucine into translational products in a cell-free system was measured. The protein synthesis level decreased by 23%-42% when the translation system containing cytosol from the anoxic heart was used. When the translation system containing a ribosomal fraction after 20-minutes anoxia was used, the protein synthesis level was the same as in the control. In the case of 90-minute anoxia, it decreased by 16%. The protein synthesis rate and the level in the translation system containing cytosol from the heart after 20-minute anoxic perfusion with the buffer containing Polyscias was the same as in the control. A decrease in the protein synthesis rate and the level after 20-minute anoxia was determined by changes in cytosol. On the other hand, 90-minute anoxia caused changes in cytosol and the ribosomal fraction. The Polyscias filicifolia Bailey biomass tincture restored the protein synthesis process acting on the components of the translation system in cytosol and the ribosomal fraction.

  4. Investigation of the interaction of β-methylamino-L-alanine with eukaryotic and prokaryotic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Main, Brendan J; Italiano, Carly J; Rodgers, Kenneth J

    2017-12-12

    There is a strong body of evidence linking the non-protein amino acid (NPAA) β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) to the development of a number of neurodegenerative diseases. BMAA has been found globally, is produced by a number of organisms including cyanobacteria, diatoms, and dinoflagellates; and has been shown to biomagnify through trophic levels. The role of BMAA in neurodegenerative disease is highlighted by its presence in the brains of a number of neurodegenerative disease patients, where it was found in a protein-bound form. We have previously shown that BMAA is bound to cell proteins, and results in the upregulation of the unfolded protein response, an endoplasmic reticulum stress response activated by the presence of misfolded proteins within the cell. Structurally aberrant proteins are features of a number of neurodegenerative diseases, and further investigation of how BMAA interacts with proteins is crucial to our understanding of its toxicity. Here we use radiolabelled BMAA to investigate the interaction and binding of BMAA to eukaryotic and prokaryotic proteins. We found differences in the presence and distribution of protein-bound BMAA between E. coli and neuroblastoma cells, with an increase in binding over time only seen in the eukaryotic cells. We also found that BMAA was unable to bind to pure proteins, or cell lysate in native or denaturing conditions, indicating that biological processing is required for BMAA to bind to proteins.

  5. αB-Crystallin: A Hybrid Solid-Solution State NMR Investigation Reveals Structural Aspects of the Heterogeneous Oligomer

    OpenAIRE

    Jehle, Stefan; van Rossum, Barth; Stout, Joseph R.; Noguchi, Satoshi R.; Falber, Katja; Rehbein, Kristina; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Klevit, Rachel E.; Rajagopal, Ponni

    2008-01-01

    Atomic level structural information on αB-Crystallin (αB), a prominent member of the small Heat Shock Protein (sHSP) family has been a challenge to obtain due its polydisperse, oligomeric nature. We show that magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR can be used to obtain high-resolution information on ∼ 580 kDa human αB assembled from 175-residue, 20 kDa subunits. An ∼100-residue α-crystallin domain is common to all sHSPs and solution-state NMR was performed on two different α-crystallin domain c...

  6. Evolutionary rate heterogeneity between multi- and single-interface hubs across human housekeeping and tissue-specific protein interaction network: Insights from proteins' and its partners' properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Kakali; Acharya, Debarun; Podder, Soumita; Ghosh, Tapash Chandra

    2017-12-02

    Integrating gene expression into protein-protein interaction network (PPIN) leads to the construction of tissue-specific (TS) and housekeeping (HK) sub-networks, with distinctive TS- and HK-hubs. All such hub proteins are divided into multi-interface (MI) hubs and single-interface (SI) hubs, where MI hubs evolve slower than SI hubs. Here we explored the evolutionary rate difference between MI and SI proteins within TS- and HK-PPIN and observed that this difference is present only in TS, but not in HK-class. Next, we explored whether proteins' own properties or its partners' properties are more influential in such evolutionary discrepancy. Statistical analyses revealed that this evolutionary rate correlates negatively with protein's own properties like expression level, miRNA count, conformational diversity and functional properties and with its partners' properties like protein disorder and tissue expression similarity. Moreover, partial correlation and regression analysis revealed that both proteins' and its partners' properties have independent effects on protein evolutionary rate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. MICROFLUIDIC MIXERS FOR THE INVESTIGATION OF PROTEIN FOLDING USING SYNCHROTRON RADIATION CIRCULAR DICHROISM SPECTROSCOPY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kane, A; Hertzog, D; Baumgartel, P; Lengefeld, J; Horsley, D; Schuler, B; Bakajin, O

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to design, fabricate and optimize microfluidic mixers to investigate the kinetics of protein secondary structure formation with Synchrotron Radiation Circular Dichroism (SRCD) spectroscopy. The mixers are designed to rapidly initiate protein folding reaction through the dilution of denaturant. The devices are fabricated out of fused silica, so that they are transparent in the UV. We present characterization of mixing in the fabricated devices, as well as the initial SRCD data on proteins inside the mixers

  8. Investigations on (photo) reactions of cosmetic UV filters towards skin proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Stiefel, Constanze

    2014-01-01

    Although UV filters are important, widespread used cosmetic ingredients, their reaction potential towards skin proteins has hardly been studied so far. Therefore, the aim of the present thesis was to investigate the reactivity of widespread UV filter substances towards skin proteins using increasingly complex protein and skin model systems and different analytical techniques. At first, the development of a rapid high-performance thin-layer chromatographic (HPTLC) screening method on an ami...

  9. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) as a Tool to Investigate Hypoxia-Induced Protein-Protein Interaction in Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schützhold, Vera; Fandrey, Joachim; Prost-Fingerle, Katrin

    2018-01-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is widely used as a method to investigate protein-protein interactions in living cells. A FRET pair donor fluorophore in close proximity to an appropriate acceptor fluorophore transfers emission energy to the acceptor, resulting in a shorter lifetime of the donor fluorescence. When the respective FRET donor and acceptor are fused with two proteins of interest, a reduction in donor lifetime, as detected by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), can be taken as proof of close proximity between the fluorophores and therefore interaction between the proteins of interest. Here, we describe the usage of time-domain FLIM-FRET in hypoxia-related research when we record the interaction of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) subunits HIF-1α and HIF-1β in living cells in a temperature- and CO 2 -controlled environment under the microscope.

  10. Targeting population heterogeneity for optimal cell factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heins, Anna-Lena; Carlqvist, Magnus; Helmark, S.

    the heterogeneity level of the population. To further investigate these phenomena and gain a deeper understanding of population heterogeneity, Saccharomyces cerevisiae growth reporter strains based on the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) were constructed which enabled us to perform single cell level......, substrates, and pH are typically observed in many industrial scale fermentation processes. Consequently, the microbial cells experience rapid changes in environmental conditions as they circulate throughout the reactor, which might pose stress on the cells and affect their metabolism and consequently affect...

  11. "For most of us Africans, we don't just speak": a qualitative investigation into collaborative heterogeneous PBL group learning.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singaram, V.S.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der; Stevens, F.; Dolmans, D.H.

    2011-01-01

    Collaborative approaches such as Problem Based Learning (PBL) may provide the opportunity to bring together diverse students but their efficacy in practice and the complications that arise due to the mixed ethnicity needs further investigation. This study explores the key advantages and problems of

  12. A nanobody-based toolset to investigate the role of protein localization and dispersal in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmansa, Stefan; Alborelli, Ilaria; Bieli, Dimitri; Caussinus, Emmanuel; Affolter, Markus

    2017-04-11

    The role of protein localization along the apical-basal axis of polarized cells is difficult to investigate in vivo, partially due to lack of suitable tools. Here, we present the GrabFP system, a collection of four nanobody-based GFP-traps that localize to defined positions along the apical-basal axis. We show that the localization preference of the GrabFP traps can impose a novel localization on GFP-tagged target proteins and results in their controlled mislocalization. These new tools were used to mislocalize transmembrane and cytoplasmic GFP fusion proteins in the Drosophila wing disc epithelium and to investigate the effect of protein mislocalization. Furthermore, we used the GrabFP system as a tool to study the extracellular dispersal of the Decapentaplegic (Dpp) protein and show that the Dpp gradient forming in the lateral plane of the Drosophila wing disc epithelium is essential for patterning of the wing imaginal disc.

  13. Heterogeneous network architectures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Henrik Lehrmann

    2006-01-01

    and it is discussed that it is advantageous to heterogeneous networks and illustrated by a number of examples. Modeling and simulation is a well-known way of doing performance evaluation. An approach to event-driven simulation of communication networks is presented and mixed complexity modeling, which can simplify......Future networks will be heterogeneous! Due to the sheer size of networks (e.g., the Internet) upgrades cannot be instantaneous and thus heterogeneity appears. This means that instead of trying to find the olution, networks hould be designed as being heterogeneous. One of the key equirements here...... is flexibility. This thesis investigates such heterogeneous network architectures and how to make them flexible. A survey of algorithms for network design is presented, and it is described how using heuristics can increase the speed. A hierarchical, MPLS based network architecture is described...

  14. Mechanical properties of milk sphingomyelin bilayer membranes in the gel phase: Effects of naturally complex heterogeneity, saturation and acyl chain length investigated on liposomes using AFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Et-Thakafy, Oumaima; Delorme, Nicolas; Guyomarc'h, Fanny; Lopez, Christelle

    2018-01-01

    Sphingomyelin (SM) molecules are major lipid components of plasma membranes that are involved in functional domains. Among natural SMs, that found in milk (milk-SM) exhibits important acyl chain heterogeneities in terms of length and saturation, which could affect the biophysical properties and biological functions of the milk fat globule membrane or of liposome carriers. In this study, the thermotropic and mechanical properties of milk-SM, synthetic C16:0-SM, C24:0-SM and the binary mixtures C16:0-SM/C24:0-SM (50:50% mol) and C24:0-SM/C24:1-SM (95:5% mol) bilayer membranes were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry and atomic force microscopy, respectively. Results showed that acyl chain length, heterogeneity and unsaturation affected i) the temperature of phase transition of SM bilayers, and ii) the mechanical properties of liposome (diametermembranes in the gel phase, e.g. the Young modulus E and the bending rigidity k C . This study increases our knowledge about the key role of naturally complex lipid compositions in tailoring the physical properties of biological membranes. It could be also used in liposomes development e.g. to select the suitable lipid composition according to usage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. ToF-SIMS investigations of adsorbed proteins on dental titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wald, J.; Ziegler, C. [Department of Physics and Research Centre OPTIMAS, University of Kaiserslautern (Germany); Institute for Surface and Thin Film Analysis (IFOS) GmbH and Research Centre OPTIMAS, Kaiserslautern (Germany); Mueller, C. [Department of Physics and Research Centre OPTIMAS, University of Kaiserslautern (Germany); Wahl, M.; Kopnarski, M. [Institute for Surface and Thin Film Analysis (IFOS) GmbH and Research Centre OPTIMAS, Kaiserslautern (Germany); Hoth-Hannig, W.; Hannig, M. [Department of Operative Dentistry and Periodontology, University Hospital of the Saarland, Homburg (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    Two model proteins, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and lysozyme (LSZ), were used to study adsorption behavior on dental titanium by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Protein films were prepared as single component layers and as mixtures of the two proteins. Additionally, the behavior of consecutive adsorption of both proteins was investigated. The obtained data were analyzed by means of principal component analysis (PCA). Dental titanium samples with a layer consisting of simply one protein could be separated from each other by selecting amino acid related peaks and using PCA or samples coated with a mixture of both proteins, the differentiation was also possible. The partial displacement of LSZ molecules by BSA was shown in the case of simultaneous adsorption. The consecutive adsorption of BSA and subsequently LSZ resulted in layers with a bigger amount of LSZ than of BSA compared to the layers obtained by simultaneous adsorption. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  16. Disentangling the Pure Time Effect From Site and Preference Heterogeneity Effects in Benefit Transfer: An Empirical Investigation of Transferability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fetene, Gebeyehu Manie; Olsen, Søren Bøye; Bonnichsen, Ole

    2013-01-01

    Two identical open-ended contingent valuation surveys assessing willingness-topay for better protection against flooding were administered in 2005 and 2010 at the same site.The 2010 survey was administered to the same respondents as those interviewed in 2005 as well as to new participants....... This experimental design allows us to separate the pure temporal dimension from the spatial and social dimensions of transferability, thereby permitting an investigation of the temporal reliability associated with a transfer of value estimates over a 5-year time horizon. Having isolated the pure effect of time...

  17. Investigation of atomic level patterns in protein--small ligand interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Shape complementarity and non-covalent interactions are believed to drive protein-ligand interaction. To date protein-protein, protein-DNA, and protein-RNA interactions were systematically investigated, which is in contrast to interactions with small ligands. We investigate the role of covalent and non-covalent bonds in protein-small ligand interactions using a comprehensive dataset of 2,320 complexes. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show that protein-ligand interactions are governed by different forces for different ligand types, i.e., protein-organic compound interactions are governed by hydrogen bonds, van der Waals contacts, and covalent bonds; protein-metal ion interactions are dominated by electrostatic force and coordination bonds; protein-anion interactions are established with electrostatic force, hydrogen bonds, and van der Waals contacts; and protein-inorganic cluster interactions are driven by coordination bonds. We extracted several frequently occurring atomic-level patterns concerning these interactions. For instance, 73% of investigated covalent bonds were summarized with just three patterns in which bonds are formed between thiol of Cys and carbon or sulfur atoms of ligands, and nitrogen of Lys and carbon of ligands. Similar patterns were found for the coordination bonds. Hydrogen bonds occur in 67% of protein-organic compound complexes and 66% of them are formed between NH- group of protein residues and oxygen atom of ligands. We quantify relative abundance of specific interaction types and discuss their characteristic features. The extracted protein-organic compound patterns are shown to complement and improve a geometric approach for prediction of binding sites. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: We show that for a given type (group of ligands and type of the interaction force, majority of protein-ligand interactions are repetitive and could be summarized with several simple atomic-level patterns. We summarize

  18. Investigating the composition of organic aerosol resulting from cyclohexene ozonolysis: low molecular weight and heterogeneous reaction products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Hamilton

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The composition of organic aerosol formed from the gas phase ozonolysis of cyclohexene has been investigated in a smog chamber experiment. Comprehensive gas chromatography with time of flight mass spectrometric detection was used to determine that dicarboxylic acids and corresponding cyclic anhydrides dominated the small gas phase reaction products found in aerosol sampled during the first hour after initial aerosol formation. Structural analysis of larger more polar molecules was performed using liquid chromatography with ion trap tandem mass spectrometry. This indicated that the majority of identified organic mass was in dimer form, built up from combinations of the most abundant small acid molecules, with frequent indication of the inclusion of adipic acid. Trimers and tetramers potentially formed via similar acid combinations were also observed in lower abundances. Tandem mass spectral data indicated dimers with either acid anhydride or ester functionalities as the linkage between monomers. High-resolution mass spectrometry identified the molecular formulae of the most abundant dimer species to be C10H16O6, C11H18O6, C10H14O8 and C11H16O8 and could be used in some cases to reduce uncertainty in exact chemical structure determination by tandem MS.

  19. From Mars Meteorites to Laboratory Investigations: Understanding Heterogeneous Photochemical Transformations Using Oxygen Triple Isotope Anomalies of Carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, R.; Smirnova, V.; Jackson, T. L.; Mang, L.; Thiemens, M. H.

    2016-12-01

    The planet Mars is unique in our solar system with a positive O-isotope anomaly observed in its bulk silicate and carbonates minerals ranging from 0.3 to 0.6 ‰. The carbonate isotopic signature can be used to reveal its origin, past history and atmosphere-hydrosphere-geosphere-interactions. Ozone is a powerful natural tracer of photochemical processes in Earth's atmosphere. It possess the highest enrichment in heavy isotopes δ17O ≈ δ18O (70-150‰) and oxygen isotopic anomaly (Δ17O = 30-40‰). The oxygen isotopic anomaly from ozone is transferred to other oxygen carrying molecules in the atmosphere through different mechanisms. Laboratory experiments were conducted with the JSC-Mars Simulant and iron oxide to investigate how this anomaly can be transferred to water and minerals under conditions similar to present day Mars. Three sets of laboratory experiments (O3-H2O-UV-minerals; O2-H2O-UV-minerals; O3-H2O-minerals) were performed. The oxygen triple isotopic analysis of product mineral carbonates formed from adsorbed CO2 reaction showed an oxygen isotopic anomaly (Δ17O = 0.4-3‰). The oxygen triple isotopic composition of water at photochemical equilibrium shifted towards ozone with Δ17O = 9‰ indicating reaction of ozone with water vapor via electronically excited oxygen atoms and transfer of the anomaly via hydroxyl radicals. HOx (HO, HO2) are extremely reactive and have very short life time (bearing minerals through surficial reactions. Series of experiments were performed to constrain the amount of H2O required to preserve the oxygen isotope anomaly observed in carbonate minerals in the Martian meteorites. These observation will help refine Mars photochemistry models and also to constrain the past hydrological cycle and its coupling with the regolith. The observed inverse correlation between ozone and water vapor also suggests a dynamic role of hydroxyl radical chemistry in the atmosphere of Mars.

  20. Surface Induced Dissociation Coupled with High Resolution Mass Spectrometry Unveils Heterogeneity of a 211 kDa Multicopper Oxidase Protein Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Mowei; Yan, Jing; Romano, Christine A.; Tebo, Bradley M.; Wysocki, Vicki H.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana

    2018-01-01

    Manganese oxidation is an important biogeochemical process that is largely regulated by bacteria through enzymatic reactions. However, the detailed mechanism is poorly understood due to challenges in isolating and characterizing these unknown enzymes. A manganese oxidase, Mnx, from Bacillus sp. PL-12 has been successfully overexpressed in active form as a protein complex with a molecular mass of 211 kDa. We have recently used surface induced dissociation (SID) and ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) to release and detect folded subcomplexes for determining subunit connectivity and quaternary structure. The data from the native mass spectrometry experiments led to a plausible structural model of this multicopper oxidase, which has been difficult to study by conventional structural biology methods. It was also revealed that each Mnx subunit binds a variable number of copper ions. Becasue of the heterogeneity of the protein and limited mass resolution, ambiguities in assigning some of the observed peaks remained as a barrier to fully understanding the role of metals and potential unknown ligands in Mnx. In this study, we performed SID in a modified Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer. The high mass accuracy and resolution offered by FTICR unveiled unexpected artificial modifications on the protein that had been previously thought to be iron bound species based on lower resolution spectra. Additionally, isotopically resolved spectra of the released subcomplexes revealed the metal binding stoichiometry at different structural levels. This method holds great potential for in-depth characterization of metalloproteins and protein-ligand complexes. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. Investigating CFTR and KCa3.1 Protein/Protein Interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène Klein

    Full Text Available In epithelia, Cl- channels play a prominent role in fluid and electrolyte transport. Of particular importance is the cAMP-dependent cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl- channel (CFTR with mutations of the CFTR encoding gene causing cystic fibrosis. The bulk transepithelial transport of Cl- ions and electrolytes needs however to be coupled to an increase in K+ conductance in order to recycle K+ and maintain an electrical driving force for anion exit across the apical membrane. In several epithelia, this K+ efflux is ensured by K+ channels, including KCa3.1, which is expressed at both the apical and basolateral membranes. We show here for the first time that CFTR and KCa3.1 can physically interact. We first performed a two-hybrid screen to identify which KCa3.1 cytosolic domains might mediate an interaction with CFTR. Our results showed that both the N-terminal fragment M1-M40 of KCa3.1 and part of the KCa3.1 calmodulin binding domain (residues L345-A400 interact with the NBD2 segment (G1237-Y1420 and C- region of CFTR (residues T1387-L1480, respectively. An association of CFTR and F508del-CFTR with KCa3.1 was further confirmed in co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrating the formation of immunoprecipitable CFTR/KCa3.1 complexes in CFBE cells. Co-expression of KCa3.1 and CFTR in HEK cells did not impact CFTR expression at the cell surface, and KCa3.1 trafficking appeared independent of CFTR stimulation. Finally, evidence is presented through cross-correlation spectroscopy measurements that KCa3.1 and CFTR colocalize at the plasma membrane and that KCa3.1 channels tend to aggregate consequent to an enhanced interaction with CFTR channels at the plasma membrane following an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration. Altogether, these results suggest 1 that the physical interaction KCa3.1/CFTR can occur early during the biogenesis of both proteins and 2 that KCa3.1 and CFTR form a dynamic complex, the formation of which

  2. Investigating the dynamics of recombinant protein secretion from a microalgal host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauersen, Kyle J; Huber, Isabel; Wichmann, Julian; Baier, Thomas; Leiter, Andreas; Gaukel, Volker; Kartushin, Viktor; Rattenholl, Anke; Steinweg, Christian; von Riesen, Lena; Posten, Clemens; Gudermann, Frank; Lütkemeyer, Dirk; Mussgnug, Jan H; Kruse, Olaf

    2015-12-10

    Production of recombinant proteins with microalgae represents an alternative platform over plant- or bacterial-based expression systems for certain target proteins. Secretion of recombinant proteins allows accumulation of the target product physically separate from the valuable algal biomass. To date, there has been little investigation into the dynamics of recombinant protein secretion from microalgal hosts-the culture parameters that encourage secreted product accumulation and stability, while encouraging biomass production. In this work, the efficiency of recombinant protein production was optimized by adjusting cultivation parameters for a strain of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii previously engineered to secrete a functional recombinant Lolium perenne ice binding protein (LpIBP), which has applications as a frozen food texturing and cryopreservation additive, into its culture medium. Three media and several cultivation styles were investigated for effects on secreted LpIBP titres and culture growth. A combination of acetate and carbon dioxide feeding with illumination resulted in the highest overall biomass and recombinant protein titres up to 10mgL(-1) in the culture medium. Pure photoautotrophic production was possible using two media types, with recombinant protein accumulation in all cultivations correlating to culture cell density. Two different cultivation systems were used for scale-up to 10L cultivations, one of which produced yields of secreted recombinant protein up to 12mgL(-1) within six cultivation days. Functional ice recrystallization inhibition (IRI) of the LpIBP from total concentrated extracellular protein extracts was demonstrated in a sucrose solution used as a simplified ice cream model. IRI lasted up to 7 days, demonstrating the potential of secreted products from microalgae for use as food additives. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Epigenetics targeted protein-vorinostat nanomedicine inducing apoptosis in heterogeneous population of primary acute myeloid leukemia cells including refractory and relapsed cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Parwathy; Kavalakatt, Anu; Malarvizhi, Giridharan Loghanathan; Vasanthakumari, Divya Rani Vikraman Nair; Retnakumari, Archana Payickattu; Sidharthan, Neeraj; Pavithran, Keechilat; Nair, Shantikumar; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2014-05-01

    Aberrant epigenetics play a key role in the onset and progression of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Herein we report in silico modelling based development of a novel, protein-vorinostat nanomedicine exhibiting selective and superior anti-leukemic activity against heterogeneous population of AML patient samples (n=9), including refractory and relapsed cases, and three representative cell lines expressing CD34(+)/CD38(-) stem cell phenotype (KG-1a), promyelocytic phenotype (HL-60) and FLT3-ITD mutation (MV4-11). Nano-vorinostat having ~100nm size exhibited enhanced cellular uptake rendering significantly lower IC50 in AML cell lines and patient samples, and induced enhanced HDAC inhibition, oxidative injury, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis compared to free vorinostat. Most importantly, nanomedicine showed exceptional single-agent activity against the clonogenic proliferative capability of bone marrow derived leukemic progenitors, while remaining non-toxic to healthy bone marrow cells. Collectively, this epigenetics targeted nanomedicine appears to be a promising therapeutic strategy against various French-American-British (FAB) classes of AML. Through the use of a protein-vorinostat agent, exceptional single-agent activity was demonstrated against the clonogenic proliferative capability of bone marrow derived leukemic progenitors, while remaining non-toxic to healthy bone marrow cells. The studied epigenetics targeted nanomedicine approach is a promising therapeutic strategy against various French-American-British classes of acute myeloid leukemia. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Investigation of whey protein concentration by ultrafiltration elements designed for water treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kukučka Miroslav Đ.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Suitability of polysulfone ultrafiltration membranes (UFM commercial designed for water treatment have been investigated for separation of protein (PR from sweet whey. Ultrafiltration (UF of whey originated from dairy has been realized by self-made pilot plant which has been in service about one year. Influence of two whey temperatures (9 oC and 30 oC on efficiency of protein concentration has been examined. Application of investigated UF elements has given whey protein concentrate (WPC with 5 to 6 times excess amount of protein content in regard to starting one. In the same time the prevalent content of lactose has been removed to permeate. Better results have been occurred during the cold whey filtration. Besides the fact that molecular weight cut-off (MWCO of investigated membranes were 50-100 kDa, results showed very successful concentrating of whey proteins of dominantly lower molar weights than 50-100 kDa. Investigated membranes are beneficial for design and construction of UF plants for exploitation in small dairies.

  5. Heterogeneous reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura Neto, C. de; Nair, R.P.K.

    1979-08-01

    The microscopic study of a cell is meant for the determination of the infinite multiplication factor of the cell, which is given by the four factor formula: K(infinite) = n(epsilon)pf. The analysis of an homogeneous reactor is similar to that of an heterogeneous reactor, but each factor of the four factor formula can not be calculated by the formulas developed in the case of an homogeneous reactor. A great number of methods was developed for the calculation of heterogeneous reactors and some of them are discussed. (Author) [pt

  6. Proteomic Investigation of Falciparum and Vivax Malaria for Identification of Surrogate Protein Markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Sandipan; Renu, Durairaj; Srivastava, Rajneesh; Gollapalli, Kishore; Taur, Santosh; Jhaveri, Tulip; Dhali, Snigdha; Chennareddy, Srinivasarao; Potla, Ankit; Dikshit, Jyoti Bajpai; Srikanth, Rapole; Gogtay, Nithya; Thatte, Urmila; Patankar, Swati; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to analyze alterations in the human serum proteome as a consequence of infection by malaria parasites Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax to obtain mechanistic insights about disease pathogenesis, host immune response, and identification of potential protein markers. Serum samples from patients diagnosed with falciparum malaria (FM) (n = 20), vivax malaria (VM) (n = 17) and healthy controls (HC) (n = 20) were investigated using multiple proteomic techniques and results were validated by employing immunoassay-based approaches. Specificity of the identified malaria related serum markers was evaluated by means of analysis of leptospirosis as a febrile control (FC). Compared to HC, 30 and 31 differentially expressed and statistically significant (p<0.05) serum proteins were identified in FM and VM respectively, and almost half (46.2%) of these proteins were commonly modulated due to both of the plasmodial infections. 13 proteins were found to be differentially expressed in FM compared to VM. Functional pathway analysis involving the identified proteins revealed the modulation of different vital physiological pathways, including acute phase response signaling, chemokine and cytokine signaling, complement cascades and blood coagulation in malaria. A panel of identified proteins consists of six candidates; serum amyloid A, hemopexin, apolipoprotein E, haptoglobin, retinol-binding protein and apolipoprotein A-I was used to build statistical sample class prediction models. By employing PLS-DA and other classification methods the clinical phenotypic classes (FM, VM, FC and HC) were predicted with over 95% prediction accuracy. Individual performance of three classifier proteins; haptoglobin, apolipoprotein A-I and retinol-binding protein in diagnosis of malaria was analyzed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. The discrimination of FM, VM, FC and HC groups on the basis of differentially expressed serum proteins demonstrates

  7. Proteomic investigation of falciparum and vivax malaria for identification of surrogate protein markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandipan Ray

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to analyze alterations in the human serum proteome as a consequence of infection by malaria parasites Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax to obtain mechanistic insights about disease pathogenesis, host immune response, and identification of potential protein markers. Serum samples from patients diagnosed with falciparum malaria (FM (n = 20, vivax malaria (VM (n = 17 and healthy controls (HC (n = 20 were investigated using multiple proteomic techniques and results were validated by employing immunoassay-based approaches. Specificity of the identified malaria related serum markers was evaluated by means of analysis of leptospirosis as a febrile control (FC. Compared to HC, 30 and 31 differentially expressed and statistically significant (p<0.05 serum proteins were identified in FM and VM respectively, and almost half (46.2% of these proteins were commonly modulated due to both of the plasmodial infections. 13 proteins were found to be differentially expressed in FM compared to VM. Functional pathway analysis involving the identified proteins revealed the modulation of different vital physiological pathways, including acute phase response signaling, chemokine and cytokine signaling, complement cascades and blood coagulation in malaria. A panel of identified proteins consists of six candidates; serum amyloid A, hemopexin, apolipoprotein E, haptoglobin, retinol-binding protein and apolipoprotein A-I was used to build statistical sample class prediction models. By employing PLS-DA and other classification methods the clinical phenotypic classes (FM, VM, FC and HC were predicted with over 95% prediction accuracy. Individual performance of three classifier proteins; haptoglobin, apolipoprotein A-I and retinol-binding protein in diagnosis of malaria was analyzed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves. The discrimination of FM, VM, FC and HC groups on the basis of differentially expressed serum proteins demonstrates

  8. Protein oligomerization equilibria and kinetics investigated by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy: a mathematical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, David M; Levitus, Marcia

    2014-10-30

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a technique that is increasingly being used to investigate protein oligomerization equilibria and dynamics. Each individual FCS decay is characterized by its amplitude and a characteristic diffusion time, both of which are sensitive to the degree of dissociation of the protein. Here, we provide a mathematical treatment that relates these observables with the parameters of interest: the equilibrium constants of the different protein dissociation steps and their corresponding dissociation and association kinetic rate constants. We focused on the two most common types of protein homooligomers (dimers and tetramers) and on the experimental variables relevant for the design of the experiment (protein concentration, fractional concentration of labeled protein). The analysis of the theoretical expectations for proteins with different dissociation constants is a key aspect of experiment design and data analysis and cannot be performed without a physically accurate treatment of the system. In particular, we show that the analysis of FCS data using some commonly used empirical models may result in a serious misinterpretation of the experimental results.

  9. Comparative Investigation of Normal Modes and Molecular Dynamics of Hepatitis C NS5B Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asafi, M. S.; Yildirim, A.; Tekpinar, M.

    2016-04-01

    Understanding dynamics of proteins has many practical implications in terms of finding a cure for many protein related diseases. Normal mode analysis and molecular dynamics methods are widely used physics-based computational methods for investigating dynamics of proteins. In this work, we studied dynamics of Hepatitis C NS5B protein with molecular dynamics and normal mode analysis. Principal components obtained from a 100 nanoseconds molecular dynamics simulation show good overlaps with normal modes calculated with a coarse-grained elastic network model. Coarse-grained normal mode analysis takes at least an order of magnitude shorter time. Encouraged by this good overlaps and short computation times, we analyzed further low frequency normal modes of Hepatitis C NS5B. Motion directions and average spatial fluctuations have been analyzed in detail. Finally, biological implications of these motions in drug design efforts against Hepatitis C infections have been elaborated.

  10. Protein and Peptide Composition of Male Accessory Glands of Apis mellifera Drones Investigated by Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorshkov, Vladimir; Blenau, Wolfgang; Koeniger, Gudrun; Römpp, Andreas; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Spengler, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    In honeybees, reproductive females usually mate early in their life with more than 10 males in free flight, often within 10 minutes, and then store male gametes for up to five years. Because of the extreme polyandry and mating in free flight special adaptations in males are most likely. We present here the results of an investigation of the protein content of four types of male reproductive glands from the Western honeybee (Apis mellifera) drone, namely seminal vesicles (secretion in ejaculate), as well as bulbus, cornua and mucus glands (secretions for the mating plug). Using high resolution and accuracy mass spectrometry and a combination of database searching and de novo sequencing techniques it was possible to identify 50 different proteins in total, inside all mentioned glands, except in the mucus gland. Most of the proteins are unique for a specific gland type, only one of them (H9KEY1/ATP synthase subunit O) was found in three glands, and 7 proteins were found in two types of glands. The identified proteins represent a wide variety of biological functions and can be assigned to several physiological classes, such as protection, energy generation, maintaining optimal conditions, associated mainly with vesicula seminalis; signaling, cuticle proteins, icarpin and apolipoproteins located mainly in the bulbus and cornua glands; and some other classes. Most of the discovered proteins were not found earlier during investigation of semen, seminal fluid and tissue of reproductive glands of the bee drone. Moreover, we provide here the origin of each protein. Thus, the presented data might shed light on the role of each reproductive gland. PMID:25955586

  11. Protein and Peptide Composition of Male Accessory Glands of Apis mellifera Drones Investigated by Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorshkov, Vladimir; Blenau, Wolfgang; Koeniger, Gudrun; Römpp, Andreas; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Spengler, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    In honeybees, reproductive females usually mate early in their life with more than 10 males in free flight, often within 10 minutes, and then store male gametes for up to five years. Because of the extreme polyandry and mating in free flight special adaptations in males are most likely. We present here the results of an investigation of the protein content of four types of male reproductive glands from the Western honeybee (Apis mellifera) drone, namely seminal vesicles (secretion in ejaculate), as well as bulbus, cornua and mucus glands (secretions for the mating plug). Using high resolution and accuracy mass spectrometry and a combination of database searching and de novo sequencing techniques it was possible to identify 50 different proteins in total, inside all mentioned glands, except in the mucus gland. Most of the proteins are unique for a specific gland type, only one of them (H9KEY1/ATP synthase subunit O) was found in three glands, and 7 proteins were found in two types of glands. The identified proteins represent a wide variety of biological functions and can be assigned to several physiological classes, such as protection, energy generation, maintaining optimal conditions, associated mainly with vesicula seminalis; signaling, cuticle proteins, icarpin and apolipoproteins located mainly in the bulbus and cornua glands; and some other classes. Most of the discovered proteins were not found earlier during investigation of semen, seminal fluid and tissue of reproductive glands of the bee drone. Moreover, we provide here the origin of each protein. Thus, the presented data might shed light on the role of each reproductive gland.

  12. A Molecular Biological and Biochemical Investigation on Mycobacterium tuberculosis MutT Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsiu-Lin; Su, Ho-Ting; Wu, Chung-Hsiun Herbert; Tsai-Wu, Jyy-Jih

    2014-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a vicious microbe co-existing with the infected host. This pathogen exploited opportunities to spread during periods of urbanization and social upheaval, and got retreated with improved hygiene. This investigation was designed to clone and characterize M. tuberculosis mutT gene, a homologue of a DNA repair protein in Escherichia coli. The aim was to depict the possible role of this homologue in the virulent microbe. A DNA fragment of the mutT gene was amplified with PCR from the genomic DNA of strain H37Rv M. tuberculosis. The expression vector was transformed into E. coli strains BL21 (DE3) and MK602 (DE3) (mutT-). The protein activity assay was performed by biochemical methods. M. tuberculosis MutT shares 23% identity with the E. coli MutT protein. The mutT gene DNA fragment was subcloned into the expression vector pET28a(+) and the recombinant plasmid was overexpressed in E. coli. Purified and refolded M. tuberculosis MutT possesses a dGTPase activity, which is one of the most well-known preference nucleotidase activities of MutT in E. coli. This study also showed that the dGTPase activity of M. tuberculosis MutT was enhanced by magnesium and inhibited by Ni(2+) or EDTA. Endogenous MutT protein in M. tuberculosis lysate displayed a smear pattern in the Western blot, suggesting instability of this protein in the bacteria similar to the important proteins, such as P53 protein, tightly regulated by protein degradation. The cloned M. tuberculosis mutT gene and MutT protein were characterized. M. tuberculosis MutT has a dGTPase activity, which is one of the most well-known preference nucleotidase activities of MutT in E. coli. These findings provide further understanding about the vicious bacterium.

  13. Sedimentation velocity analysis of heterogeneous protein-protein interactions: sedimentation coefficient distributions c(s) and asymptotic boundary profiles from Gilbert-Jenkins theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dam, Julie; Schuck, Peter

    2005-07-01

    Interacting proteins in rapid association equilibrium exhibit coupled migration under the influence of an external force. In sedimentation, two-component systems can exhibit bimodal boundaries, consisting of the undisturbed sedimentation of a fraction of the population of one component, and the coupled sedimentation of a mixture of both free and complex species in the reaction boundary. For the theoretical limit of diffusion-free sedimentation after infinite time, the shapes of the reaction boundaries and the sedimentation velocity gradients have been predicted by Gilbert and Jenkins. We compare these asymptotic gradients with sedimentation coefficient distributions, c(s), extracted from experimental sedimentation profiles by direct modeling with superpositions of Lamm equation solutions. The overall shapes are qualitatively consistent and the amplitudes and weight-average s-values of the different boundary components are quantitatively in good agreement. We propose that the concentration dependence of the area and weight-average s-value of the c(s) peaks can be modeled by isotherms based on Gilbert-Jenkins theory, providing a robust approach to exploit the bimodal structure of the reaction boundary for the analysis of experimental data. This can significantly improve the estimates for the determination of binding constants and hydrodynamic parameters of the complexes.

  14. Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum TP0136 protein is heterogeneous among isolates and binds cellular and plasma fibronectin via its NH2-terminal end.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Wujian; Molini, Barbara J; Lukehart, Sheila A; Giacani, Lorenzo

    2015-03-01

    Adherence-mediated colonization plays an important role in pathogenesis of microbial infections, particularly those caused by extracellular pathogens responsible for systemic diseases, such as Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum (T. pallidum), the agent of syphilis. Among T. pallidum adhesins, TP0136 is known to bind fibronectin (Fn), an important constituent of the host extracellular matrix. To deepen our understanding of the TP0136-Fn interaction dynamics, we used two naturally-occurring sequence variants of the TP0136 protein to investigate which region of the protein is responsible for Fn binding, and whether TP0136 would adhere to human cellular Fn in addition to plasma Fn and super Fn as previously reported. Fn binding assays were performed with recombinant proteins representing the two full-length TP0136 variants and their discrete regions. As a complementary approach, we tested inhibition of T. pallidum binding to Fn by recombinant full-length TP0136 proteins and fragments, as well as by anti-TP0136 immune sera. Our results show that TP0136 adheres more efficiently to cellular Fn than to plasma Fn, that the TP0136 NH2-terminal conserved region of the protein is primarily responsible for binding to plasma Fn but that binding sites for cellular Fn are also present in the protein's central and COOH-terminal regions. Additionally, message quantification studies show that tp0136 is highly transcribed during experimental infection, and that its message level increases in parallel to the host immune pressure on the pathogen, which suggests a possible role for this protein in T. pallidum persistence. In a time where syphilis incidence is high, our data will help in the quest to identify suitable targets for development of a much needed vaccine against this important disease.

  15. Proteomic Investigation of Ram Spermatozoa and the Proteins Conferred by Seminal Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini, Taylor; Leahy, Tamara; Soleilhavoup, Clement; Tsikis, Guillaume; Labas, Valerie; Combes-Soia, Lucie; Harichaux, Gregoire; Rickard, Jessica P; Druart, Xavier; de Graaf, Simon P

    2016-10-07

    Sperm proteomes have emerged for several species; however, the extent of species similarity is unknown. Sheep are an important agricultural species for which a comprehensive sperm proteome has not been produced. In addition, potential proteomic factors from seminal plasma that may contribute to improved fertility after cervical insemination are yet to be explored. Here we use liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to investigate the proteome of ejaculated ram spermatozoa, with quantitative comparison to epididymal spermatozoa. We also present a comparison to published proteomes of five other species. We identified 685 proteins in ejaculated ram spermatozoa, with the most abundant proteins involved in metabolic pathways. Only 5% of ram sperm proteins were not detected in other species, which suggest highly conserved structures and pathways. Of the proteins present in both epididymal and ejaculated ram spermatozoa, 7% were more abundant in ejaculated spermatozoa. Only two membrane-bound proteins were detected solely in ejaculated sperm lysates: liver enriched gene 1 (LEG1/C6orf58) and epidermal growth factor-like repeats and discoidin I-like domains 3 (EDIL3). This is the first evidence that despite its relatively complex proteomic composition, seminal plasma exposure leads to few novel proteins binding tightly to the ram sperm plasma membrane.

  16. Investigation of the molecular level interactions between mucins and food proteins: Spectroscopic, tribological and rheological studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celebioglu, Hilal Yilmaz

    The thesis investigated the structure and molecular-level interaction of β-lactoglobulin (BLG) and mucins, representing major components of the dairy products and saliva/digestion systems, respectively. Mucins are long glycoprotein molecules responsible for the gel nature of the mucous layer covers...... submaxillary mucin (BSM), a major salivary protein, were studied using high and low field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), and Circular Dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The zeta potentials of the proteins were also measured to provide information on the role of electrostatic forces...

  17. An Investigation of Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Sonochemistry for Destruction of Hazardous Waste - Final Report - 09/15/1996 - 09/14/2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, Inez

    2000-09-14

    During the last 20 years, various legislative acts have mandated the reduction and elimination of water and land pollution. In order to fulfill these mandates, effective control and remediation methods must be developed and implemented. The drawbacks of current hazardous waste control methods motivate the development of new technology, and the need for new technology is further driven by the large number of polluted sites across the country. This research explores the application and optimization of ultrasonic waves as a novel method by which aqueous contaminants are degraded. The primary objective of the investigation is to acquire a deeper fundamental knowledge of acoustic cavitation and cavitation chemistry, and in doing so, to ascertain how ultrasonic irradiation can be more effectively applied to environmental problems. Special consideration is given to the types of problems and hazardous chemical substrates found specifically at Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The experimental work is divided into five broad tasks, to be completed over a period of three years. The first task is to explore the significance of physical variables during sonolysis, such as ultrasonic frequency. The second aim is an understanding of sonochemical degradation kinetics and by-products, complemented by information from the detection of reactive intermediates with electron paramagnetic resonance. The sonolytic decomposition studies will focus on polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Investigation of activated carbon regeneration during ultrasonic irradiation extends sonochemical applications in homogeneous systems to heterogeneous systems of environmental interest. Lastly, the physics and hydrodynamics of cavitation bubbles and bubble clouds will be correlated with sonochemical effects by performing high-speed photographic studies of acoustically cavitating aqueous solutions. The most important benefit will be fundamental information which will allow a more optimal application of

  18. Investigating the influence of lithologic heterogeneity on gas hydrate formation and methane recycling at the base of the gas hydrate stability zone in channelized systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daigle, Hugh; Nole, Michael; Cook, Ann; Malinverno, Alberto

    2017-12-14

    In marine environments, gas hydrate preferentially accumulates in coarse-grained sediments. At the meso- to micro-scale, however, hydrate distribution in these coarse-grained units is often heterogeneous. We employ a methane hydrate reservoir simulator coupling heat and mass transfer as well as capillary effects to investigate how capillary controls on methane solubility affect gas and hydrate accumulations in reservoirs characterized by graded bedding and alternating sequences of coarse-grained sands and fine-grained silt and clay. Simulations bury a channelized reservoir unit encased in homogeneous, fine-grained material characterized by small pores (150 nm) and low permeability (~1 md in the absence of hydrate). Pore sizes within each reservoir bed between vary between coarse sand and fine silt. Sands have a median pore size of 35 microns and a lognormal pore size distribution. We also investigate how the amount of labile organic carbon (LOC) affects hydrate growth due to microbial methanogenesis within the sediments. In a diffusion-dominated system, methane movies into reservoir layers along spatial gradients in dissolved methane concentration. Hydrate grows in such a way as to minimize these concentration gradients by accumulating slower in finer-grained reservoir layers and faster in coarser-grained layers. Channelized, fining-upwards sediment bodies accumulate hydrate first along their outer surfaces and thence inward from top to bottom. If LOC is present in thin beds within the channel, higher saturations of hydrate will be distributed more homogeneously throughout the unit. When buried beneath the GHSZ, gas recycling can occur only if enough hydrate is present to form a connected gas phase upon dissociation. Simulations indicate that this is difficult to achieve for diffusion-dominated systems, especially those with thick GHSZs and/or small amounts of LOC. However, capillary-driven fracturing behavior may be more prevalent in settings with thick GHSZs.

  19. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE PROTONATION STATES OF HUMAN LACTOFERRIN IRON-BINDING PROTEIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilia Anghel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the protonation states of ionizable groups of human lactoferrin in various conformations were investigated theoretically, at physiological pH (7.365. These calculations show that the transition of the protein from a conformation to another one is accompanied by changes in the protonation state of specific amino acid residues. Analysis of the pKa calculatons underlined the importance of participation of two arginines and one lysine in the opening / closing of the protein. In addition, it was found that the mechanism of iron release depends on the protonation state of TYR-192. Protonated state of this residue in the closed form of lactoferrin will trigger the opening of protein and release of iron ions.

  20. Controlled in meso phase crystallization--a method for the structural investigation of membrane proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kubicek

    Full Text Available We investigated in meso crystallization of membrane proteins to develop a fast screening technology which combines features of the well established classical vapor diffusion experiment with the batch meso phase crystallization, but without premixing of protein and monoolein. It inherits the advantages of both methods, namely (i the stabilization of membrane proteins in the meso phase, (ii the control of hydration level and additive concentration by vapor diffusion. The new technology (iii significantly simplifies in meso crystallization experiments and allows the use of standard liquid handling robots suitable for 96 well formats. CIMP crystallization furthermore allows (iv direct monitoring of phase transformation and crystallization events. Bacteriorhodopsin (BR crystals of high quality and diffraction up to 1.3 Å resolution have been obtained in this approach. CIMP and the developed consumables and protocols have been successfully applied to obtain crystals of sensory rhodopsin II (SRII from Halobacterium salinarum for the first time.

  1. Investigational BET bromodomain protein inhibitors in early stage clinical trials for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Thorsten; Gardin, Claude

    2017-07-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous group of malignancies driven by genetic mutations and deregulated epigenetic control. Relapse/refractory disease remains frequent in younger patients and even more so in older patients, including treatment with epigenetic drugs in this age group, mainly with hypomethylating agents. New treatment strategies are urgently needed. The recent discovery that epigenetic readers of the bromodomain (BRD) and extraterminal (BET) protein family, are crucial for AML maintenance by transcription of oncogenic c-MYC lead to rapid development of BET inhibitors entering clinical trials. Areas covered: We provide a critical overview using main sources for the use of BET inhibitors in AML treatment. Limits of this treatment approach including resistance mechanisms and future directions including development of new generation BET inhibitors and combination strategies with other drugs are detailed. Expert opinion: BET inhibitors were expected to overcome limits of conventional treatment in patients as impressive in vitro data emerged recently in well-characterized AML subsets, including those associated with poor risk characteristics in the clinic. Nevertheless single activity of BET inhibitors appears to be modest and resistance mechanisms were already identified. BET inhibitors with alternative mechanisms of action and/or combination strategies with epigenetic drugs should be tested.

  2. Investigation of selection methods im mutation breeding of barley for protein quantity and quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulonska, E.; Gaul, H.; Baumer, M.; Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung m.b.H., Gruenbach

    1975-01-01

    This mutation breeding programme is investigating the qualification of micro-mutations for the selection of improved protein quality and quantity. Normally, improvement of protein content in micro-mutations is rather small. Therefore, it is important to develop methods and conditions of selection being (a) capable of measuring these small deviations in protein content and quality, and (b) simple to use. In two experiments carried out in 1971 and 1972 nitrogen fertilization was found to be the most important factor in the improvement of selection conditions. There is a highly significant negative correlation between crude protein content and the standard deviation; i.e. the higher the content of crude protein, the lower the variation coefficient. This in turn leads to an increase of genetic variation necessary for better selection progress. Nitrogen fertilization, especially during ear emergence, covers environmental influences - e.g., planting space, sowing rate, growing in different plots (6, 3, 2, 1 rows or in half-ear hills) - to a great extent. Thus, by applying high doses of nitrogen dressings comparable results can be achieved. In an overall selection experiment (testing the entire crossing and mutation material available at Weihenstephan in a stepwise selection from 1971 to 1973) and two selection experiments conducted in 1971 to 1973 with micro-mutants - variety Nota, 4 times X-rayed and the naked barley strain 1606 treated once with EMS - significant selection results were found. (author)

  3. Structural investigation of ribonuclease A conformational preferences using high pressure protein crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurpiewska, Katarzyna, E-mail: kurpiews@chemia.uj.edu.pl [Jagiellonian University, Faculty of Chemistry, Department of Crystal Chemistry and Crystal Physics, Protein Crystallography Group, Ingardena 3, 30-060 Kraków (Poland); Dziubek, Kamil; Katrusiak, Andrzej [Adam Mickiewicz University, Faculty of Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Umultowska 89b, 61-61 Poznań (Poland); Font, Josep [School of Medical Science, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Ribò, Marc; Vilanova, Maria [Universitat de Girona, Laboratorid’Enginyeria de Proteïnes, Departament de Biologia, Facultat de Ciències, Campus de Montilivi, 17071 Girona (Spain); Lewiński, Krzysztof [Jagiellonian University, Faculty of Chemistry, Department of Crystal Chemistry and Crystal Physics, Protein Crystallography Group, Ingardena 3, 30-060 Kraków (Poland)

    2016-04-01

    Highlights: • A unique crystallographic studies of wild-type and mutated form of the same protein under high pressure. • Compressibility of RNase A molecule is significantly affected by a single amino acid substitution. • High pressure protein crystallography helps understanding protein flexibility and identify conformational substrates. - Abstract: Hydrostatic pressure in range 0.1–1.5 GPa is used to modify biological system behaviour mostly in biophysical studies of proteins in solution. Due to specific influence on the system equilibrium high pressure can act as a filter that enables to identify and investigate higher energy protein conformers. The idea of the presented experiments is to examine the behaviour of RNase A molecule under high pressure before and after introduction of destabilizing mutation. For the first time crystal structures of wild-type bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A and its markedly less stable variant modified at position Ile106 were determined at different pressures. X-ray diffraction experiments at high pressure showed that the secondary structure of RNase A is well preserved even beyond 0.67 GPa at room temperature. Detailed structural analysis of ribonuclease A conformation observed under high pressure revealed that pressure influences hydrogen bonds pattern, cavity size and packing of molecule.

  4. Heterogeneity of Dutch rainfall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witter, J.V.

    1984-01-01

    Rainfall data for the Netherlands have been used in this study to investigate aspects of heterogeneity of rainfall, in particular local differences in rainfall levels, time trends in rainfall, and local differences in rainfall trend. The possible effect of urbanization and industrialization on the

  5. In silico investigation of lactoferrin protein characterizations for the prediction of anti-microbial properties

    OpenAIRE

    Sohrabi, Seyyed Mohsen; Niazi, Ali; Chahardoli, Mahmood; Hortamani, Ali; Setoodeh, Payam

    2014-01-01

    Lactoferrin (Lf) is an iron-binding multi-functional glycoprotein which has numerous physiological functions such as iron transportation, anti-microbial activity and immune response. In this study, different in silico approaches were exploited to investigate Lf protein properties in a number of mammalian species. Results showed that the iron-binding site, DNA and RNA-binding sites, signal peptides and transferrin motifs in the Lf structure were highly conserved. Examined sequences showed thre...

  6. A Molecular Biological and Biochemical Investigation on Mycobacterium tuberculosis MutT Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Hsiu-Lin; Su, Ho-Ting; Wu, Chung-Hsiun Herbert; Tsai-Wu, Jyy-Jih

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a vicious microbe co-existing with the infected host. This pathogen exploited opportunities to spread during periods of urbanization and social upheaval, and got retreated with improved hygiene. Objectives: This investigation was designed to clone and characterize M. tuberculosis mutT gene, a homologue of a DNA repair protein in Escherichia coli. The aim was to depict the possible role of this homologue in the virulent microbe. Materials and Methods: ...

  7. A spectroscopic investigation of the photophysical behaviour of 9-aminoacridine hydrochloride hydrate in presence of organic amines in homogeneous and heterogeneous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitra, Piyali [Chemical Sciences Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Chakraborty, Brotati [Department of Chemistry, Adamas Institute of Technology, Barasat-Barrackpore Road, Barbaria, P.O. Jagannathpur, North 24 Parganas, Pin 700126 (India); Basu, Samita, E-mail: samita.basu@saha.ac.in [Chemical Sciences Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2014-05-01

    Photoinduced interactions of 9-aminoacridine hydrochloride hydrate (9AA-HCl) with aromatic and aliphatic amines, N,N'-dimethylaniline (DMA) and triethylamine (TEA) respectively have been investigated in homogeneous water–acetonitrile (1:1) mixture as well as in heterogeneous cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) micellar media using UV–vis absorption, steady-state as well as time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopies and laser flash photolysis technique associated with a weak external magnetic field (MF). Differential modes of fluorescence quenching of 9AA-HCl with DMA and TEA corroborated with absorption studies reveal their disparity in the mechanism of interactions. Excited state proton transfer (ESPT) and photoinduced electron transfer (PET) are the phenomenon that have been found to be involved in with DMA, whereas with TEA ground-state complex formation, ground-state proton transfer and PET are prevalent. Discrepancy in pH of the interfacial and hydrophobic regions of CTAB facilitates the partitioning of the protonated and neutral forms of 9AA-HCl leading to differential occupational sites of the acceptor and donor moieties in the micellar medium, thus making the study more intriguing. Another important aspect of the present study is the use of MF to confirm the occurrence of PET, authenticate the spin-state of the intermediates thus formed and also to resolve the process of PET and ESPT. - Highlights: • Ground-state complex is formed between 9AAH{sup +} and TEA. • The mechanism of fluorescence quenching is dynamic in case of DMA system. • MFE discriminate the occurrence of PET occurring simultaneously with ESPT. • Inhomogeneous pH distribution in CTAB facilitates partitioning of 9AA and 9AAH{sup +}. • ESPT and PET involve in DMA system, whereas in TEA system ground-state PT and PET involve.

  8. Interconnecting heterogeneous database management systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gligor, V. D.; Luckenbaugh, G. L.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that there is still a great need for the development of improved communication between remote, heterogeneous database management systems (DBMS). Problems regarding the effective communication between distributed DBMSs are primarily related to significant differences between local data managers, local data models and representations, and local transaction managers. A system of interconnected DBMSs which exhibit such differences is called a network of distributed, heterogeneous DBMSs. In order to achieve effective interconnection of remote, heterogeneous DBMSs, the users must have uniform, integrated access to the different DBMs. The present investigation is mainly concerned with an analysis of the existing approaches to interconnecting heterogeneous DBMSs, taking into account four experimental DBMS projects.

  9. Investigating the Chaperone Properties of a Novel Heat Shock Protein, Hsp70.c, from Trypanosoma brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adélle Burger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The neglected tropical disease, African Trypanosomiasis, is fatal and has a crippling impact on economic development. Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70 is an important molecular chaperone that is expressed in response to stress and Hsp40 acts as its co-chaperone. These proteins play a wide range of roles in the cell and they are required to assist the parasite as it moves from a cold blooded insect vector to a warm blooded mammalian host. A novel cytosolic Hsp70, from Trypanosoma brucei, TbHsp70.c, contains an acidic substrate binding domain and lacks the C-terminal EEVD motif. The ability of a cytosolic Hsp40 from Trypanosoma brucei J protein 2, Tbj2, to function as a co-chaperone of TbHsp70.c was investigated. The main objective was to functionally characterize TbHsp70.c to further expand our knowledge of parasite biology. TbHsp70.c and Tbj2 were heterologously expressed and purified and both proteins displayed the ability to suppress aggregation of thermolabile MDH and chemically denatured rhodanese. ATPase assays revealed a 2.8-fold stimulation of the ATPase activity of TbHsp70.c by Tbj2. TbHsp70.c and Tbj2 both demonstrated chaperone activity and Tbj2 functions as a co-chaperone of TbHsp70.c. In vivo heat stress experiments indicated upregulation of the expression levels of TbHsp70.c.

  10. Structural investigations of the Bacillus subtilis SPP1 phage G39P helicase inhibitor loading protein

    CERN Document Server

    Bailey, S

    2002-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis SPPI phage encoded protein G39P is a loader and inhibitor of the phage G40P replicative helicase involved in the initiation of phage DNA replication. The 2.4A crystal structure of a C-terminal truncated variant of G39P was solved using multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion exploiting the anomalous signal of seleno- methionine substituted protein. Inspection of the electron density maps revealed the asymmetric unit contained three independent G39P monomers, composed of 3 alpha-helices and their connecting loops. However, the model only accounted for the first 67 residues of the protein, as there was no interpretable electron density for residues 68 to 112. A preliminary NMR investigation revealed the C-terminal region of the protein had rapid internal motion and formed no well-defined stable fold that involved immobilized side chains. This is consistent with the X-ray analysis that displayed no electron density for these residues. A detailed comparison of NMR spectra from the C-termina...

  11. Investigating the Impact of Surface Heterogeneity on the Convective Boundary Layer Over Urban Areas Through Coupled Large-Eddy Simulation and Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Anthony; Kleissl, Jan P.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.

    2011-01-01

    Large-eddy Simulation (LES) was used to study convective boundary layer (CBL) flow through suburban regions with both large and small scale heterogeneities in surface temperature. Constant remotely sensed surface temperatures were applied at the surface boundary at resolutions of 10 m, 90 m, 200 m, and 1 km. Increasing the surface resolution from 1 km to 200 m had the most significant impact on the mean and turbulent flow characteristics as the larger scale heterogeneities became resolved. While previous studies concluded that scales of heterogeneity much smaller than the CBL inversion height have little impact on the CBL characteristics, we found that further increasing the surface resolution (resolving smaller scale heterogeneities) results in an increase in mean surface heat flux, thermal blending height, and potential temperature profile. The results of this study will help to better inform sub-grid parameterization for meso-scale meteorological models. The simulation tool developed through this study (combining LES and high resolution remotely sensed surface conditions) is a significant step towards future studies on the micro-scale meteorology in urban areas.

  12. Investigation of protein detection parameters using nanofunctionalized organic field-effect transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammock, Mallory L; Knopfmacher, Oren; Naab, Benjamin D; Tok, Jeffrey B-H; Bao, Zhenan

    2013-05-28

    Biodetection using organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) is gaining increasing interest for applications as diverse as food security, environmental monitoring, and medical diagnostics. However, there still lacks a comprehensive, empirical study on the fundamental limits of OFET sensors. In this paper, we present a thorough study of the various parameters affecting biosensing using an OFET decorated with gold nanoparticle (AuNP) binding sites. These parameters include the spacing between receptors, pH of the buffer, and ionic strength of the buffer. To this end, we employed the thrombin protein and its corresponding DNA binding aptamer to form our model detection system. We demonstrate a detection limit of 100 pM for this protein with high selectivity over other proteases in situ. We describe herein a feasible approach for protein detection with OFETs and a thorough investigation of parameters governing biodetection events using OFETs. Our obtained results should provide important guidelines to tailor the sensor's dynamic range to suit other desired OFET-based biodetection applications.

  13. Investigation of protein and lipid metabolism in thyroid pathology using whole-body radiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorobets, V.F.; Matveenko, E.G.

    1987-01-01

    Radiometry of the whole body and its organs was employed to study certain aspects of protein-aminoacid and lipid metabolism in patients with thyroid diseases. Metabolism of human serum 131 I-albumin was studied in 12 patients with neurocirculatory dystonia, in 13 patients with diffuse toxic goiter (in 10 before and after drug therapy) and in 9 controls. 75 Se-methionine aminoacid metabolism was investigated in 9 patients with toxic thyroid adenoma and in 13 controls. The body cell mass was determined in 82 patients with thyrotoxicosis by a measurable amount of 40 K. These data were compared with those of 249 healthy persons. An increase in catabolism of labeled albumin, intensification of labeled methionine metabolism at the tissue level, signs of a decrease in the total amount of metabolic albumin in the body were revealed. Intensification of protein metabolism resulted in a decrease in the body cell mass of these patients. After adequate therapy the above indices of protein metabolism in patients with thyrotoxicosis returned to normal. The assimilation of fatty acids and neutral fat was disturbed both in thyrotoxicosis and hypothyroidism

  14. Investigating protein folding and unfolding in electrospray nanodrops upon rapid mixing using theta-glass emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Daniel N; Williams, Evan R

    2015-01-20

    Theta-glass emitters are used to rapidly mix two solutions to induce either protein folding or unfolding during nanoelectrospray (nanoESI). Mixing acid-denatured myoglobin with an aqueous ammonium acetate solution to increase solution pH results in protein folding during nanoESI. A reaction time and upper limit to the droplet lifetime of 9 ± 2 μs is obtained from the relative abundance of the folded conformer in these rapid mixing experiments compared to that obtained from solutions at equilibrium and a folding time constant of 7 μs. Heme reincorporation does not occur, consistent with the short droplet lifetime and the much longer time constant for this process. Similar mixing experiments with acid-denatured cytochrome c and the resulting folding during nanoESI indicate a reaction time of between 7 and 25 μs depending on the solution composition. The extent of unfolding of holo-myoglobin upon rapid mixing with theta-glass emitters is less than that reported previously ( Fisher et al. Anal. Chem. 2014 , 86 , 4581 - 4588 ), a result that is attributed to the much smaller, ∼1.5 μm, average o.d. tips used here. These results indicate that the time frame during which protein folding or unfolding can occur during nanoESI depends both on the initial droplet size, which can be varied by changing the emitter tip diameter, and on the solution composition. This study demonstrates that protein folding or unfolding processes that occur on the ∼10 μs time scale can be readily investigated using rapid mixing with theta-glass emitters combined with mass spectrometry.

  15. Investigation of the reactions of histone protein hydroperoxides and their role in DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luxford, C.; Dean, R.T.; Davies, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    Free radical attack on DNA results in base changes, cross-linking and strand cleavage leading to mutations if unrepaired. Histone proteins are intimately involved in DNA packaging and are excellent candidates for investigating DNA damage arising from protein-OOH-derived radicals. This study aimed (i) to investigate the formation of hydroperoxide on the linker histone H1 via radical reactions in the presence of O 2 ; (ii) to examine the radicals formed from transition metal ion-catalyzed breakdown of histone H1-OOH and (iii) to determine whether histone H1-OOH-derived radicals can damage DNA and free bases. (i) Histone H1 solutions were γ-irradiated ( 60 Co source) in the presence of O 2 and histone H1-OOH concentrations determined using a manual iodometric assay. Formation ( histone H1-OOH was dose-dependent and, in the absence of light or transition metal ions these hydroperoxides were found to be very stable (half life of 24 hours at 4degC ). (ii) Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and spin trapping was used t investigate the Cu + -catalyzed breakdown of histone H1-OOH to form histone H1 protein side chain and -backbone carbon-centred radicals. Further EPR/spin trapping experiments showed that histone H1-OOH-derived radicals can oxidise pyrimidine bases (eg. uridine with the resultant trapping of three radical species; two pyrimidine radicals, C5-yl and Ct yl adducts (via addition of histone H1-OOH-derived radicals to the C5-C6 double bond o the pyrimidine ring) and an acyl radical adduct, whose origin is currently unknown. (iii) Damage to DNA and 2'-deoxyguanosine after reaction of histone H1-OOH-derive radicals were detected and quantified using HPLC (with EC and UV detection). We have identified 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) as a significant product ( histone H1-OOH-derived oxidative DNA modification. Increasing histone H1-OOH concentrations resulted in a concomitant increase in the amount of 8-oxodG formed. Our studies show

  16. Combining laboratory results, numerical modeling, and in situ measurements to investigate the relative contributions of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation to ice formation in the tropical tropopause layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, E. J.; Karcher, B.; Ueyama, R.; Pfister, L.; Bui, T. V.; Diskin, G. S.; DiGangi, J. P.; Woods, S.; Lawson, P.; Froyd, K. D.; Murphy, D. M.

    2017-12-01

    Laboratory experiments over the past decade have advanced our understanding of the physical state and ice nucleation efficacy of aerosols with atmospherically-relevant compositions at low temperatures. We use these laboratory results along with measurements of upper-tropospheric aerosol composition to develop a parameterization if the ice nuclei number, and activity dependence on ice supersaturation and temperature in the cold tropical tropopause layer (TTL, 13-18 km). We show that leading candidates for aerosol types serving as effective ice nuclei are glassy organic-containing aerosols, crystalline ammonium sulfate, and mineral dust. We apply the low-temperature heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterization in a detailed model of TTL transport and cirrus formation. The model treats heterogeneous ice nucleation and homogeneous freezing of aqueous aerosols, deposition growth and sublimation of ice crystals, and sedimentation of ice crystals. The model is driven by meteorological fields with high-frequency waves superimposed, and simulated cirrus microphysical properties are statistically compared with recent measurements of TTL cirrus microphysical properties and ice supersaturation from recent high-altitude aircraft campaigns. We show that effective ice nuclei concentrations on the order of 50-100/L can dominate over homogeneous freezing production of TTL cirrus ice crystals. Glassy organic-containing aerosols or crystalline ammonium sulfate could conceivably provide more abundant sources of ice nuclei, but the simulations indicate that high concentrations of effective IN would prevent observed occurrence of large supersaturations and high ice concentrations. We will also show the impact of heterogeneous ice nuclei on TTL cirrus microphysical properties and occurrence frequencies.

  17. Molecular dynamics investigations of BioH protein substrate specificity for biotin synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Qiao; Cui, Ying-Lu; Zheng, Qing-Chuan; Zhang, Hong-Xing

    2016-05-01

    BioH, an enzyme of biotin synthesis, plays an important role in fatty acid synthesis which assembles the pimelate moiety. Pimeloyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) methyl ester, which is long known to be a biotin precursor, is the physiological substrate of BioH. Azelayl methyl ester, which has a longer chain than pimeloyl methyl ester, conjugated to ACP is also indeed accepted by BioH with very low rate of hydrolysis. To date, the substrate specificity for BioH and the molecular origin for the experimentally observed rate changes of hydrolysis by the chain elongation have remained elusive. To this end, we have investigated chain elongation effects on the structures by using the fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations combined with binding free energy calculations. The results indicate that the substrate specificity is determined by BioH together with ACP. The added two methylenes would increase the structural flexibility by protein motions at the interface of ACP and BioH, instead of making steric clashes with the side chains of the BioH hydrophobic cavity. On the other hand, the slower hydrolysis of azelayl substrate is suggested to be associated with the loose of contacts between BioH and ACP, and with the lost electrostatic interactions of two ionic/hydrogen bonding networks at the interface of the two proteins. The present study provides important insights into the structure-function relationships of the complex of BioH with pimeloyl-ACP methyl ester, which could contribute to further understanding about the mechanism of the biotin synthetic pathway, including the catalytic role of BioH.

  18. Investigating the importance of Delaunay-based definition of atomic interactions in scoring of protein-protein docking results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Rahim; Sadeghi, Mehdi; Mirzaie, Mehdi

    2016-05-01

    The approaches taken to represent and describe structural features of the macromolecules are of major importance when developing computational methods for studying and predicting their structures and interactions. This study attempts to explore the significance of Delaunay tessellation for the definition of atomic interactions by evaluating its impact on the performance of scoring protein-protein docking prediction. Two sets of knowledge-based scoring potentials are extracted from a training dataset of native protein-protein complexes. The potential of the first set is derived using atomic interactions extracted from Delaunay tessellated structures. The potential of the second set is calculated conventionally, that is, using atom pairs whose interactions were determined by their separation distances. The scoring potentials were tested against two different docking decoy sets and their performances were compared. The results show that, if properly optimized, the Delaunay-based scoring potentials can achieve higher success rate than the usual scoring potentials. These results and the results of a previous study on the use of Delaunay-based potentials in protein fold recognition, all point to the fact that Delaunay tessellation of protein structure can provide a more realistic definition of atomic interaction, and therefore, if appropriately utilized, may be able to improve the accuracy of pair potentials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Sensitizing curium luminescence through an antenna protein to investigate biological actinide transport mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturzbecher-Hoehne, Manuel; Goujon, Christophe; Deblonde, Gauthier J-P; Mason, Anne B; Abergel, Rebecca J

    2013-02-20

    Worldwide stocks of actinides and lanthanide fission products produced through conventional nuclear spent fuel are increasing continuously, resulting in a growing risk of environmental and human exposure to these toxic radioactive metal ions. Understanding the biomolecular pathways involved in mammalian uptake, transport and storage of these f-elements is crucial to the development of new decontamination strategies and could also be beneficial to the design of new containment and separation processes. To start unraveling these pathways, our approach takes advantage of the unique spectroscopic properties of trivalent curium. We clearly show that the human iron transporter transferrin acts as an antenna that sensitizes curium luminescence through intramolecular energy transfer. This behavior has been used to describe the coordination of curium within the two binding sites of the protein and to investigate the recognition of curium-transferrin complexes by the cognate transferrin receptor. In addition to providing the first protein-curium spectroscopic characterization, these studies prove that transferrin receptor-mediated endocytosis is a viable mechanism of intracellular entry for trivalent actinides such as curium and provide a new tool utilizing the specific luminescence of curium for the determination of other biological actinide transport mechanisms.

  20. Root cause investigation of deviations in protein chromatography based on mechanistic models and artificial neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang; Briskot, Till; Hahn, Tobias; Baumann, Pascal; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2017-09-15

    In protein chromatography, process variations, such as aging of column or process errors, can result in deviations of the product and impurity levels. Consequently, the process performance described by purity, yield, or production rate may decrease. Based on visual inspection of the UV signal, it is hard to identify the source of the error and almost unfeasible to determine the quantity of deviation. The problem becomes even more pronounced, if multiple root causes of the deviation are interconnected and lead to an observable deviation. In the presented work, a novel method based on the combination of mechanistic chromatography models and the artificial neural networks is suggested to solve this problem. In a case study using a model protein mixture, the determination of deviations in column capacity and elution gradient length was shown. Maximal errors of 1.5% and 4.90% for the prediction of deviation in column capacity and elution gradient length respectively demonstrated the capability of this method for root cause investigation. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Plastic protein microarray to investigate the molecular pathways of magnetic nanoparticle-induced nanotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yingshuai; Li Xuelian; Bao Shujuan; Lu Zhisong; Li Changming; Li Qing

    2013-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) (about 15 nm) were synthesized via a hydrothermal method and characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, x-ray diffraction, and vibrating sample magnetometer. The molecular pathways of SPIONs-induced nanotoxicity was further investigated by protein microarrays on a plastic substrate from evaluation of cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and cell apoptosis. The experimental results reveal that 50 μg ml −1 or higher levels of SPIONs cause significant loss of cell viability, considerable generation of ROS and cell apoptosis. It is proposed that high level SPIONs could induce cell apoptosis via a mitochondria-mediated intrinsic pathway by activation of caspase 9 and caspase 3, an increase of the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, and down-regulation of HSP70 and HSP90 survivor factors. (paper)

  2. Plastic protein microarray to investigate the molecular pathways of magnetic nanoparticle-induced nanotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yingshuai; Li, Xuelian; Bao, Shujuan; Lu, Zhisong; Li, Qing; Li, Chang Ming

    2013-05-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) (about 15 nm) were synthesized via a hydrothermal method and characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, x-ray diffraction, and vibrating sample magnetometer. The molecular pathways of SPIONs-induced nanotoxicity was further investigated by protein microarrays on a plastic substrate from evaluation of cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and cell apoptosis. The experimental results reveal that 50 μg ml-1 or higher levels of SPIONs cause significant loss of cell viability, considerable generation of ROS and cell apoptosis. It is proposed that high level SPIONs could induce cell apoptosis via a mitochondria-mediated intrinsic pathway by activation of caspase 9 and caspase 3, an increase of the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, and down-regulation of HSP70 and HSP90 survivor factors.

  3. The routine use of C-reactive protein in forensic investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, B S; Thomsen, Jørgen Lange

    2007-01-01

    with special reference to the cause of death and survival time, Forensic Sci. Int. 130 (2002) 160-166; L. Uhlin-Hansen, C-reactive protein (CRP), a comparison of pre- and post-mortem blood levels, Forensic Sci. Int. 124 (2001) 32-35]. We have analysed the routine use of CRP in non-selected cases. Scarcity...... of blood available for analysis is a common problem in forensic investigation, and in response to this we have developed a method using liver as a source. In 50 consecutive autopsy cases, we have evaluated method, validated results and discussed their interpretation. In three cases the analysis......, and liver is a good post-mortem alternative when blood is not available. We conclude that CRP measurements are easy, viable and inexpensive in a forensic setting, and that the number of cases with CRP elevation is high in a non-selected forensic material. In cases of doubt, marked elevation of CRP...

  4. Protein supplements and adolescent athletes: A pilot study investigating the risk knowledge, motivations and prevalence of use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehouse, Gavin; Lawlis, Tanya

    2017-11-01

    Protein-based sports supplements are among the more common types of nutrition supplements consumed by athletes; however, there is currently limited data investigating the knowledge, motivations and occurrence of use among the adolescent population (13-18 years). This pilot study looks to obtain initial data regarding the use of protein supplements in this population. This study investigates the understanding and occurrence of protein supplement use in 87 adolescent athletes based in an Australian capital city who compete in a variety of sports. Sources of information, regularity of use, purchasing habits, associated risk knowledge and supplement beliefs were examined using a self-reported, written questionnaire. A total of 60% (n = 52) of athletes reported using protein supplements, with a positive relationship between age and use (P supplement consumption, with the most common risk reported as 'I don't know' (22%). Coaches were found to initiate protein supplement use more than other figures in the athlete's life (50%) and were the primary source of information regarding supplements (58%). It was found that 19% of adolescent athletes obtained information about protein supplements from the Internet, and 17% of all consumers purchase their supplements online. The evident lack of knowledge regarding protein supplements demonstrates a necessity for further education of athletes, coaches and families regarding the responsible purchasing and use of protein supplements in the current landscape of sports nutrition. Future research should further explore the role of the Internet in protein supplement purchase and education. © 2017 Dietitians Association of Australia.

  5. Characterization of Caco-2 cells stably expressing the protein-based zinc probe eCalwy-5 as a model system for investigating intestinal zinc transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maares, Maria; Keil, Claudia; Thomsen, Susanne; Günzel, Dorothee; Wiesner, Burkhard; Haase, Hajo

    2018-01-29

    Intestinal zinc resorption, in particular its regulation and mechanisms, are not yet fully understood. Suitable intestinal cell models are needed to investigate zinc uptake kinetics and the role of labile zinc in enterocytes in vitro. Therefore, a Caco-2 cell clone was produced, stably expressing the genetically encoded zinc biosensor eCalwy-5. The aim of the present study was to reassure the presence of characteristic enterocyte-specific properties in the Caco-2-eCalwy clone. Comparison of Caco-2-WT and Caco-2-eCalwy cells revealed only slight differences regarding subcellular localization of the tight junction protein occludin and alkaline phosphatase activity, which did not affect basic integrity of the intestinal barrier or the characteristic brush border membrane morphology. Furthermore, introduction of the additional zinc-binding protein in Caco-2 cells did not alter mRNA expression of the major intestinal zinc transporters (zip4, zip5, znt-1 and znt-5), but increased metallothionein 1a-expression and cellular resistance to higher zinc concentrations. Moreover, this study examines the effect of sensor expression level on its saturation with zinc. Fluorescence cell imaging indicated considerable intercellular heterogeneity in biosensor-expression. However, FRET-measurements confirmed that these differences in expression levels have no effect on fractional zinc-saturation of the probe. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Investigating the fate of activated sludge extracellular proteins in sludge digestion using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chul; Helm, Richard F; Novak, John T

    2008-12-01

    The fate of activated sludge extracellular proteins in sludge digestion was investigated using three different cation-associated extraction methods and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Extraction methods used were the cation exchange resin (CER) method for extracting calcium (Ca2+) and magnesium (Mg2+), sulfide extraction for removing iron, and base treatment (pH 10.5) for dissolving aluminum. Extracellular polymeric substances extracted were then subjected to SDS-PAGE, and the resultant protein profiles were examined before and after sludge digestion. The SDS-PAGE results showed that three methods led to different SDS-PAGE profiles for both undigested and digested sludges. The results further revealed that CER-extracted proteins remained mainly undegraded in anaerobic digestion, but were degraded in aerobic digestion. While the fate of sulfide- and base-extracted proteins was not clear for aerobic digestion, their changes in anaerobic digestion were elucidated. Most sulfide-extracted proteins were removed by anaerobic digestion, while the increase in protein band intensity and diversity was observed for base-extracted proteins. These results suggest that activated sludge flocs contain different fractions of proteins that are distinguishable by their association with certain cations and that each fraction undergoes different fates in anaerobic and aerobic digestion. The proteins that were resistant to degradation and generated during anaerobic digestion were identified by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Protein identification results and their putative roles in activated sludge and anaerobic digestion are discussed in this study.

  7. Investigation of two blood proteins binding to Cantharidin and Norcantharidin by multispectroscopic and chemometrics methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Rong; Cheng, Zhengjun, E-mail: ncczj1112@126.com; Li, Tian; Jiang, Xiaohui

    2015-01-15

    The interactions of Cantharidin/Norcantharidin (CTD/NCTD) with two blood proteins, i.e., bovine serum albumin (BSA) and bovine hemoglobin (BHb), have been investigated by the fluorescence, UV–vis absorption, and FT-IR spectra under imitated physiological condition. The binding characteristics between CTD/NCTD and BSA/BHb were determined by fluorescence emission and resonance light scattering (RLS) spectra. The quenching mechanism of two blood proteins with CTD/NCTD is a static quenching. Moreover, the experimental data were further analyzed based on multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) technique to obtain the concentration profiles and pure spectra for three species (BSA/BHb, CTD/NCTD and CTD/NCTD–BSA/BHb complexes) which existed in the interaction procedure. The number of binding sites n and binding constants K{sub b} were calculated at various temperatures. The thermodynamic parameters (such as, ΔG, ΔH, and ΔS) for BSA–CTD/NCTD and BHb–CTD/NCTD systems were calculated by the Van’t Hoff equation and also discussed. The distance r between CTD/NCTD and BSA/BHb were evaluated according to Förster no-radiation energy transfer theory. The results of Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), synchronous fluorescence and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra showed that the conformations of BSA/BHb altered with the addition of CTD/NCTD. In addition, the effects of common ions on the binding constants of BSA–CTD/NCTD and BHb–CTD/NCTD systems were also discussed.

  8. Combining Surface Analytical and Computational Techniques to Investigate Orientation Effects of Immobilized Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Elisa Turla

    Controlling how proteins are immobilized (e.g. controlling their orientation and conformation) is essential for developing and optimizing the performance of in vitro protein-binding devices, such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The objective of this work is to develop new methodologies to study proteins and complex mixtures of proteins immobilized onto surfaces. The focus of this study was to control and characterize the orientation of protein G B1, an IgG antibody-binding domain of protein G, on well-defined surfaces as well as measure the effect of protein G B1 orientation on IgG antibody binding using a variety of surface analytical and computational techniques. The surface sensitivity of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) was used to distinguish between different proteins and their orientation by monitoring the changes in intensity of characteristic amino acid mass fragments. Amino acids distributed asymmetrically were used to calculate peak intensity ratios from ToF-SIMS data to determine the orientation of five different cysteine mutants of protein G B1 covalently attached to a maleimide surface. To study the effect of protein orientation on antibody binding, we formed multilayer protein films by binding IgG to protein G B1 films. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) detected protein coverages of 69-130 ng/cm2 (theoretical mass of a monolayer of protein G B1 is 110-160 ng/cm2). QCM-D and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis revealed that packing density along with orientation affected the antibody binding process. Spectra from ToF-SIMS using large Ar gas cluster ion sources distinguished between different proteins in multilayer protein systems. A Monte Carlo algorithm was developed to predict protein orientation on surfaces. Two distinct orientations of protein G B1 adsorbed onto a hydrophobic surface were found and characterized as two mutually exclusive sets of amino acids on the outermost

  9. Analysis of O-glycan heterogeneity in IgA1 myeloma proteins by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry: implications for IgA nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Renfrow, MB; Mackay, CL; Chalmers, MJ

    2007-01-01

    deficiency in IgA1 proteins occurs randomly or preferentially at specific sites. We have previously demonstrated the first direct localization of multiple O-glycosylation sites on a single IgA1 myeloma protein by use of activated ion-electron capture dissociation (AI-ECD) Fourier transform ion cyclotron...

  10. Heterogeneity in ess transcriptional organization and variable contribution of the Ess/Type VII protein secretion system to virulence across closely related Staphylocccus aureus strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneuper, Holger; Cao, Zhen Ping; Twomey, Kate B; Zoltner, Martin; Jäger, Franziska; Cargill, James S; Chalmers, James; van der Kooi - Pol, Magda; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Ryan, Robert P; Hunter, William N; Palmer, Tracy

    The Type VII protein secretion system, found in Gram-positive bacteria, secretes small proteins, containing a conserved W-x-G amino acid sequence motif, to the growth medium. Staphylococcus aureus has a conserved Type VII secretion system, termed Ess, which is dispensable for laboratory growth but

  11. Analyzing Protein Micro-Heterogeneity in Chicken Ovalbumin by High-Resolution Native Mass Spectrometry Exposes Qualitatively and Semi-Quantitatively 59 Proteoforms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Y.; Barendregt, A.; Kamerling, J.P.; Heck, A.J.R.

    2013-01-01

    Taking chicken Ovalbumin as a prototypical example of a eukaryotic protein we use high-resolution native electrospray ionization mass spectrometry on a modified Exactive Orbitrap mass analyzer to qualitatively and semiquantitatively dissect 59 proteoforms in the natural protein. This variety is

  12. Investigating the Efficacy of Nonlinear Dimensionality Reduction Schemes in Classifying Gene- and Protein-Expression Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, George; Rodriguez, Carlos; Madabhushi, Anant

    2008-01-01

    The recent explosion in procurement and availability of high-dimensional gene- and protein-expression profile datasets for cancer diagnostics has necessitated the development of sophisticated machine learning tools with which to analyze them. While some investigators are focused on identifying informative genes and proteins that play a role in specific diseases, other researchers have attempted instead to use patients based on their expression profiles to prognosticate disease status. A major limitation in the ability to accurate classify these high-dimensional datasets stems from the ‘curse of dimensionality’, occurring in situations where the number of genes or peptides significantly exceeds the total number of patient samples. Previous attempts at dealing with this issue have mostly centered on the use of a dimensionality reduction (DR) scheme, Principal Component Analysis (PCA), to obtain a low-dimensional projection of the high-dimensional data. However, linear PCA and other linear DR methods, which rely on Euclidean distances to estimate object similarity, do not account for the inherent underlying nonlinear structure associated with most biomedical data. While some researchers have begun to explore nonlinear DR methods for computer vision problems such as face detection and recognition, to the best of our knowledge, few such attempts have been made for classification and visualization of high-dimensional biomedical data. The motivation behind this work is to identify the appropriate DR methods for analysis of high-dimensional gene- and protein-expression studies. Towards this end, we empirically and rigorously compare three nonlinear (Isomap, Locally Linear Embedding, Laplacian Eigenmaps) and three linear DR schemes (PCA, Linear Discriminant Analysis, Multidimensional Scaling) with the intent of determining a reduced subspace representation in which the individual object classes are more easily discriminable. Owing to the to the inherent nonlinear

  13. Using Affinity Chromatography to Investigate Novel Protein-Protein Interactions in an Undergraduate Cell and Molecular Biology Lab Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanger, Kenneth D.

    2009-01-01

    Inquiry-driven lab exercises require students to think carefully about a question, carry out an investigation of that question, and critically analyze the results of their investigation. Here, we describe the implementation and assessment of an inquiry-based laboratory exercise in which students obtain and analyze novel data that contribute to our…

  14. Synovial fluid protein adsorption on polymer-based artificial hip joint material investigated by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie M. Fröhlich

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available UHMW-PE (ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene, most frequently used material in acetabular cup replacement, is affected by the interaction with its surrounding synovial fluid. It is assumed that protein layer formation is of high importance for lubrication, however alters polymer characteristics. This study investigates in vitro protein adsorption on gamma-irradiated and Vitamin E doped UHMW-PE using synovia as modeling system. SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry imaging showed adsorption of high abundance proteins in a mass range between 2 and 200 kDa. Protein layer formation was observed on planar UHMW-PE material, whereas morphologically modified UHMW-PE regions were highly affected by protein aggregation.

  15. Protein-protein interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byron, Olwyn; Vestergaard, Bente

    2015-01-01

    Responsive formation of protein:protein interaction (PPI) upon diverse stimuli is a fundament of cellular function. As a consequence, PPIs are complex, adaptive entities, and exist in structurally heterogeneous interplays defined by the energetic states of the free and complexed protomers......, are reported. The aim is to depict how the elucidation of the interplay of structures requires the interplay of methods....

  16. Infrared Absorption Intensity Analysis as a New Tool for Investigation of Salt Effect on Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Heng; Xu, Yan-yan; Weng, Yu-xiang

    2009-12-01

    The native protein structures in buffer solution are maintained by the electrostatic force as well as the hydrophobic force, salt ions play an important role in maintaining the protein native structures, and their effect on the protein stability has attracted tremendous interests. Infrared spectroscopy has been generally used in molecular structure analysis due to its fingerprint resolution for different species including macromolecules as proteins. However spectral intensities have received much less attention than the vibrational frequencies. Here we report that the spectral intensities of protein amide I band, the finger prints for the protein secondary structures, are very sensitive to the local electric field known as Onsager reaction field caused by salt ions. IR absorbance thermal titrations have been conducted for a series of samples including simple water soluble amino acids, water soluble monomeric protein cytochrome c and dimeric protein DsbC and its single-site mutant G49R. We found that at lower temperature range (10-20 °C), there exists a thermal activated salting-in process, where the IR intensity increases with a rise in the temperature, corresponding to the ions binding of the hydrophobic surface of protein. This process is absent for the amino acids. When further raising the temperature, the IR intensity decreases, this is interpreted as the thermal activated breaking of the ion-protein surface binding. Applying Van't Hoff plot to the thermal titration curves, the thermodynamic parameters such as ΔH and ΔS for salting-in and ion unbinding processes can be derived for various protein secondary structural components, revealing quantitatively the extent of hydrophobic interaction as well as the strength of the ion-protein binding.

  17. Value of eight-amino-acid matches in predicting the allergenicity status of proteins: an empirical bioinformatic investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ThirumalaiswamySekhar Arvind

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The use of biotechnological techniques to introduce novel proteins into food crops (transgenic or GM crops has motivated investigation into the properties of proteins that favor their potential to elicit allergic reactions. As part of the allergenicity assessment, bioinformatic approaches are used to compare the amino-acid sequence of candidate proteins with sequences in a database of known allergens to predict potential cross reactivity between novel food proteins and proteins to which people have become sensitized. Two criteria commonly used for these queries are searches over 80-amino-acid stretches for >35% identity, and searches for 8-amino-acid contiguous matches. We investigated the added value provided by the 8-amino-acid criterion over that provided by the >35%-identity-over-80-amino-acid criterion, by identifying allergens pairs that only met the former criterion, but not the latter criterion. We found that the allergen-sequence pairs only sharing 8-amino-acid identity, but not >35% identity over 80 amino acids, were unlikely to be cross reactive allergens. Thus, the common search for 8-amino-acid identity between novel proteins and known allergens appears to be of little additional value in assessing the potential allergenicity of novel proteins.

  18. Investigation of phonon-like excitation in hydrated protein powders by neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Xiang-Qiang (Rosie); Mamontov, Eugene; O'Neill, Hugh; Zhang, Qiu; Kolesnikov, Alexander

    2013-03-01

    Detecting the phonon dispersion relations in proteins is essential for understanding the intra-protein dynamical behavior. Such study has been attempted by X-ray in recent years. However, for such detections, neutrons have significant advantages in resolution and time-efficiency compare to X-rays. Traditionally the collective motions of atoms in protein molecules are hard to detect using neutrons, because of high incoherent scattering background from intrinsic hydrogen atoms in the protein molecules. The recent availability of a fully deuterated green fluorescent protein (GFP) synthesized by the Bio-deuteration Lab at ORNL opens new possibilities to probe collective excitations in proteins using inelastic neutron scattering. Using a direct time-of-flight Fermi chopper neutron spectrometer, we obtained a full map of the meV phonon-like excitations in the fully deuterated protein. The Q range of the observed excitations corresponds to the length scale close to the size of the secondary structures of proteins and reflects the collective intra-protein motions. Our results show that hydration of GFP seems to harden, not soften, the collective motions. This result is counterintuitive but in agreement with the observations by previous neutron scattering experiments. Sample preparation was supported by facilities operated by the Center for Structural Molecular Biology at ORNL which is supported by the U.S. DOE, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research Project ERKP291.

  19. Electrochemical and spectroscopic investigations of immobilized de novo designed heme proteins on metal electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrecht, Tim; Li, WW; Ulstrup, Jens

    2005-01-01

    On the basis of rational design principles, template-assisted four-helix-bundle proteins that include two histidines for coordinative binding of a heme were synthesized. Spectroscopic and thermodynamic characterization of the proteins in solution reveals the expected bis-histidine coordinated heme...... methods. For all proteins, immobilization causes a decrease in protein stability and a loosening of the helix packing, as reflected by a partial dissociation of a histidine ligand in the ferrous state and very low redox potentials. For the covalently attached MOP-C, the overall interfacial redox process...

  20. Investigation of non-corrin cobalt(II)-containing sites in protein structures of the Protein Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abriata, Luciano Andres

    2013-04-01

    Protein X-ray structures with non-corrin cobalt(II)-containing sites, either natural or substituting another native ion, were downloaded from the Protein Data Bank and explored to (i) describe which amino acids are involved in their first ligand shells and (ii) analyze cobalt(II)-donor bond lengths in comparison with previously reported target distances, CSD data and EXAFS data. The set of amino acids involved in Co(II) binding is similar to that observed for catalytic Zn(II) sites, i.e. with a large fraction of carboxylate O atoms from aspartate and glutamate and aromatic N atoms from histidine. The computed Co(II)-donor bond lengths were found to depend strongly on structure resolution, an artifact previously detected for other metal-donor distances. Small corrections are suggested for the target bond lengths to the aromatic N atoms of histidines and the O atoms of water and hydroxide. The available target distance for cysteine (Scys) is confirmed; those for backbone O and other donors remain uncertain and should be handled with caution in refinement and modeling protocols. Finally, a relationship between both Co(II)-O bond lengths in bidentate carboxylates is quantified.

  1. Steady-State Fluorescence Anisotropy to Investigate Flavonoids Binding to Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, Christine M.; Strollo, Christen M.

    2007-01-01

    The steady-state fluorescence anisotropy is employed to study the binding of protein of a model protein, human serum albumin, to a commonly used flavonoid, quercetin. The experiment describes the thermodynamics, as well as the biochemical interactions of such binding effectively.

  2. Investigating interactions between phospholipase B-Like 2 and antibodies during Protein A chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Benjamin; Grosskopf, Vanessa; Wang, Xiangdan; Yang, Jihong; Walker, Don; Yu, Christopher; McDonald, Paul

    2016-03-18

    Purification processes for therapeutic antibodies typically exploit multiple and orthogonal chromatography steps in order to remove impurities, such as host-cell proteins. While the majority of host-cell proteins are cleared through purification processes, individual host-cell proteins such as Phospholipase B-like 2 (PLBL2) are more challenging to remove and can persist into the final purification pool even after multiple chromatography steps. With packed-bed chromatography runs using host-cell protein ELISAs and mass spectrometry analysis, we demonstrated that different therapeutic antibodies interact to varying degrees with host-cell proteins in general, and PLBL2 specifically. We then used a high-throughput Protein A chromatography method to further examine the interaction between our antibodies and PLBL2. Our results showed that the co-elution of PLBL2 during Protein A chromatography is highly dependent on the individual antibody and PLBL2 concentration in the chromatographic load. Process parameters such as antibody resin load density and pre-elution wash conditions also influence the levels of PLBL2 in the Protein A eluate. Furthermore, using surface plasmon resonance, we demonstrated that there is a preference for PLBL2 to interact with IgG4 subclass antibodies compared to IgG1 antibodies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Synergistic Inhibition of Protein Fibrillation by Proline and Sorbitol: Biophysical Investigations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinjan Choudhary

    Full Text Available We report here interesting synergistic effects of proline and sorbitol, two well-known chemical chaperones, in the inhibition of fibrillation of two proteins, insulin and lysozyme. A combination of many biophysical techniques has been used to understand the structural morphology and modes of interaction of the chaperones with the proteins during fibrillation. Both the chaperones establish stronger polar interactions in the elongation and saturation stages of fibrillation compared to that in the native stage. However, when presented as a mixture, we also see contribution of hydrophobic interactions. Thus, a co-operative adjustment of polar and hydrophobic interactions between the chaperones and the protein surface seems to drive the synergistic effects in the fibrillation process. In insulin, this synergy is quantitatively similar in all the stages of the fibrillation process. These observations would have significant implications for understanding protein folding concepts, in general, and for designing combination therapies against protein fibrillation, in particular.

  4. High pressure as a tool for investigating protein-ligand interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchal, S; Lange, R; Tortora, P; Balny, C

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, the application of pressure on biological systems has gained increasing interest. Pressure-induced destabilization of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions is currently exploited to study conformational protein stability and macromolecular assemblies of proteins. Due to links between severe human pathologies and ordered protein oligomerization into aggregates, which have become apparent, a better knowledge of the molecular and structural determinants that ensure the packing efficiency and stability of such complexes has taken on special importance. Here, we report the effect of pressure on the property of human ataxin-3 of aggregation. The results indicate the importance of its polyglutamine chain length in the stability and the tendency of the protein to form spheroids. Partial unfolding of the protein leading to solvent exposure of hydrophobic domains appears to be a prerequisite in the aggregation process of ataxin-3

  5. High pressure as a tool for investigating protein-ligand interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchal, S [INSERM U128, IFR 122, 1919 route de Mende, F-34293 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Lange, R [INSERM U128, IFR 122, 1919 route de Mende, F-34293 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Tortora, P [Dipartimento di Biotecnologie e Bioscienze, Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 2, I-20126 Milan (Italy); Balny, C [INSERM U128, IFR 122, 1919 route de Mende, F-34293 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France)

    2004-04-14

    In recent years, the application of pressure on biological systems has gained increasing interest. Pressure-induced destabilization of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions is currently exploited to study conformational protein stability and macromolecular assemblies of proteins. Due to links between severe human pathologies and ordered protein oligomerization into aggregates, which have become apparent, a better knowledge of the molecular and structural determinants that ensure the packing efficiency and stability of such complexes has taken on special importance. Here, we report the effect of pressure on the property of human ataxin-3 of aggregation. The results indicate the importance of its polyglutamine chain length in the stability and the tendency of the protein to form spheroids. Partial unfolding of the protein leading to solvent exposure of hydrophobic domains appears to be a prerequisite in the aggregation process of ataxin-3.

  6. Investigation on oxidative stress of nitric oxide synthase interacting protein from Clonorchis sinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Meng; Xu, Qingxia; Xu, Yanquan; Li, Shan; Wang, Xiaoyun; Sheng, Jiahe; Wu, Zhongdao; Huang, Yan; Yu, Xinbing

    2016-01-01

    Numerous evidences indicate that excretory-secretory products (ESPs) from liver flukes trigger the generation of free radicals that are associated with the initial pathophysiological responses in host cells. In this study, we first constructed a Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis, Cs)-infected BALB/c mouse model and examined relative results respectively at 3, 5, 7, and 9 weeks postinfection (p.i.). Quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR indicated that the transcriptional level of both endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) gradually decreased with lastingness of infection, while the transcriptional level of inducible NOS (iNOS) significantly increased. The level of malondialdehyde (MDA) in sera of infected mouse significantly increased versus the healthy control group. These results showed that the liver of C. sinensis-infected mouse was in a state with elevated levels of oxidation stress. Previously, C. sinensis NOS interacting protein coding gene (named CsNOSIP) has been isolated and recombinant CsNOSIP (rCsNOSIP) has been expressed in Escherichia coli, which has been confirmed to be a component present in CsESPs and confirmed to play important roles in immune regulation of the host. In the present paper, we investigated the effects of rCsNOSIP on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activated RAW264.7, a murine macrophage cell line. We found that endotoxin-free rCsNOSIP significantly promoted the levels of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) after pretreated with rCsNOSIP, while the level of SOD decreased. Furthermore, rCsNOSIP could also increase the level of lipid peroxidation MDA. Taken together, these results suggested that CsNOSIP was a key molecule which was involved in the production of nitric oxide (NO) and its reactive intermediates, and played an important role in oxidative stress during C. sinensis infection.

  7. [Review on landscape heterogeneity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yutao; Yu, Xinxiao; Guang, Wenbin

    2002-04-01

    On the base of precedent studies, the occurring mechanism, classification, measurement methods, and the important role of landscape heterogeneity in landscape ecology were reviewed. The inner and outer uncertain factors result in landscape heterogeneity. Landscape heterogeneity has close relations with landscape stability, landscape design, architecture, management and disturbance, scale and ecological diversity in ecology. Complexity of landscape heterogeneity research, non-system of measurement indices and methods, difficulties and limitations of landscape heterogeneity modelling were all discussed respectively. In addition, it is suggested that the theory and methods of ecological complexity should be used to improve landscape heterogeneity research.

  8. Thermodynamic investigations of protein's behaviour with ionic liquids in aqueous medium studied by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharmoria, Pankaj; Kumar, Arvind

    2016-05-01

    While a number of reports appear on ionic liquids-proteins interactions, their thermodynamic behaviour using suitable technique like isothermal titration calorimetry is not systematically presented. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a key technique which can directly measure the thermodynamic contribution of IL binding to protein, particularly the enthalpy, heat capacities and binding stoichiometry. Ionic liquids (ILs), owing to their unique and tunable physicochemical properties have been the central area of scientific research besides graphene in the last decade, and growing unabated. Their encounter with proteins in the biological system is inevitable considering their environmental discharge though most of them are recyclable for a number of cycles. In this article we will cover the thermodynamics of proteins upon interaction with ILs as osmolyte and surfactant. The up to date literature survey of IL-protein interactions using isothermal titration calorimetry will be discussed and parallel comparison with the results obtained for such studies with other techniques will be highlighted to demonstrate the accuracy of ITC technique. Net stability of proteins can be obtained from the difference in the free energy (ΔG) of the native (folded) and denatured (unfolded) state using the Gibbs-Helmholtz equation (ΔG=ΔH-TΔS). Isothermal titration calorimetry can directly measure the heat changes upon IL-protein interactions. Calculation of other thermodynamic parameters such as entropy, binding constant and free energy depends upon the proper fitting of the binding isotherms using various fitting models. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The Investigation of Virginiamycin-Added Fungal Fermentation on the Size and Immunoreactivity of Heat-Sensitive Soy Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyan Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The usage of soy protein for young monogastric animals is restricted due to potential allergens and high molecular weight. The investigation of fungi fermentation effect on soy protein has been interrupted by substrate sterilization. Virginiamycin at 0.05% was added together with Aspergillus oryzae for solid state fermentation (SSF in unsterilized soy meal (SM. When compared to A. oryzae SSF alone, virginiamycin did not cause the interference of fungal fermentation but elucidated the protein degradation. SDS-PAGE results showed that both α and α′ subunits of β-conglycinin were degraded significantly. In addition, western blot results showed that the immunoreactive signals of soy protein were considerably reduced in virginiamycin-added fermentation with unsterilized SM. Furthermore, fungal fermentation increased total protein and essential amino acid contents, suggesting the value enhancement of SM products. Taken together, this study demonstrated for the first time that virginiamycin could help investigate fermentation effect on heat-sensitive soy protein. Fermented SM has several potential applications in feed industry.

  10. An Essential Protein Repair Enzyme: Investigation of the Molecular Recognition Mechanism of Methionine Sulfoxide Reductase A

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    18 Wild Type Staphylococcal Nuclease and Staph Nuclease T62P (SN T62P...Determination of Apparent Kd…………………………………………………...27 4 Protein-ligand Interactions of MsrA, ANS, and Reduced Staph Nuclease Peptide...28 Protein-ligand Interactions of MsrA, ANS, and Oxidized Staph Nuclease Peptide…..................………………………………....32 Protein-ligand

  11. Variants of beta-microglobulin cleaved at lysine-58 retain the main conformational features of the native protein but are more conformationally heterogeneous and unstable at physiological temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mimmi, Maria C; Jørgensen, Thomas J D; Pettirossi, Fabio

    2006-01-01

    -58 is removed. We find that the solution stability of both variants, especially of beta2-microglobulin from which lysine-58 is removed, is much reduced compared to wild-type beta2-microglobulin and is strongly dependent on temperature and protein concentration. 1H-NMR spectroscopy and amide hydrogen......Cleavage of the small amyloidogenic protein beta2-microglobulin after lysine-58 renders it more prone to unfolding and aggregation. This is important for dialysis-related beta2-microglobulin amyloidosis, since elevated levels of cleaved beta2-microglobulin may be found in the circulation...

  12. Neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulation: a conjugate approach to investigate the dynamics of electron transfer proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bizzarri, Anna Rita

    2004-01-01

    The neutron scattering technique is a relevant tool for studying the dynamical properties of electron transfer proteins. Macromolecular motions ranging in wide temporal and spatial windows can be investigated by separately analysing elastic, inelastic and quasielastic incoherent neutron scattering. The dynamical behaviour of the solvent surrounding a macromolecule can also be analysed. Neutron scattering is particularly rewarding when used in combination with molecular dynamics simulations. From the simulated atomic trajectories, physical quantities directly related to the neutron scattering technique can be calculated and compared with the corresponding experimental data. This article briefly introduces both the neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulation methods applied to proteins, and reviews the biophysical studies of some electron transfer proteins. Both experimental and molecular dynamics results for these proteins and the surrounding solvent are also discussed in connection with their electron transfer properties. Possible developments are briefly outlined. (topical review)

  13. Design of heterogeneous catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frey, Anne Mette

    The title of my PhD thesis is “Design of Heterogeneous Catalysts”. Three reactions have been investigated: the methanation reaction, the Fischer-Tropsch reaction, and the NH3-based selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO. The experimental work performed in connection with the methanation reaction...... hydrogenation. For both systems a maximum in catalytic activity was found for some of the bimetallic catalysts being superior to the monometallic catalysts. This resulted in volcano curves for all investigated systems. In the Fischer-Tropsch reaction promotion of cobalt catalysts with manganese was studied...... well, and the best catalyst prepared had a C5+ yield almost a factor of two higher than a standard air calcined Co catalyst. In the NH3-SCR reaction it is desirable to develop an active and stable catalyst for NOx removal in automotive applications, since the traditionally used vanadium-based catalyst...

  14. Theoretical Investigation of the Feasibility of PTD-Mediated Translocation of Proteins Across Artificial Membranes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kharkyanen, Valeriy N

    2006-01-01

    ...: The recent discovery of the ability of protein transduction domains (PTDs) and their synthetic analogues to transport high-molecular weight compounds through biological or artificial membranes is very promising for many applications...

  15. Investigation of the pH‐dependence of dye‐doped protein–protein interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Nudelman, Roman; Gloukhikh, Ekaterina; Rekun, Antonina; Richter, Shachar

    2016-01-01

    Proteins can dramatically change their conformation under environmental conditions such as temperature and pH. In this context, Glycoprotein's conformational determination is challenging. This is due to the variety of domains which contain rich chemical characters existing within this complex. Here we demonstrate a new, straightforward and efficient technique that uses the pH‐dependent properties of dyes‐doped Pig Gastric Mucin (PGM) for predicting and controlling protein–protein interaction ...

  16. Proteomics investigation reveals cell death-associated proteins of basidiomycete fungus Trametes versicolor treated with Ferruginol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Han; Yeh, Ting-Feng; Chu, Fang-Hua; Hsu, Fu-Lan; Chang, Shang-Tzen

    2015-01-14

    Ferruginol has antifungal activity against wood-rot fungi (basidiomycetes). However, specific research on the antifungal mechanisms of ferruginol is scarce. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and fluorescent image analysis were employed to evaluate the differential protein expression of wood-rot fungus Trametes versicolor treated with or without ferruginol. Results from protein identification of tryptic peptides via liquid chromatography–electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC–ESI-MS/MS) analyses revealed 17 protein assignments with differential expression. Downregulation of cytoskeleton β-tubulin 3 indicates that ferruginol has potential to be used as a microtubule-disrupting agent. Downregulation of major facilitator superfamily (MFS)–multiple drug resistance (MDR) transporter and peroxiredoxin TSA1 were observed, suggesting reduction in self-defensive capabilities of T. versicolor. In addition, the proteins involved in polypeptide sorting and DNA repair were also downregulated, while heat shock proteins and autophagy-related protein 7 were upregulated. These observations reveal that such cellular dysfunction and damage caused by ferruginol lead to growth inhibition and autophagic cell death of fungi.

  17. Investigating Structure and Dynamics of Proteins in Amorphous Phases Using Neutron Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Monica Castellanos

    Full Text Available In order to increase shelf life and minimize aggregation during storage, many biotherapeutic drugs are formulated and stored as either frozen solutions or lyophilized powders. However, characterizing amorphous solids can be challenging with the commonly available set of biophysical measurements used for proteins in liquid solutions. Therefore, some questions remain regarding the structure of the active pharmaceutical ingredient during freezing and drying of the drug product and the molecular role of excipients. Neutron scattering is a powerful technique to study structure and dynamics of a variety of systems in both solid and liquid phases. Moreover, neutron scattering experiments can generally be correlated with theory and molecular simulations to analyze experimental data. In this article, we focus on the use of neutron techniques to address problems of biotechnological interest. We describe the use of small-angle neutron scattering to study the solution structure of biological molecules and the packing arrangement in amorphous phases, that is, frozen glasses and freeze-dried protein powders. In addition, we discuss the use of neutron spectroscopy to measure the dynamics of glassy systems at different time and length scales. Overall, we expect that the present article will guide and prompt the use of neutron scattering to provide unique insights on many of the outstanding questions in biotechnology. Keywords: Neutron scattering, Protein structure, Protein dynamics, Freeze-dried proteins, Glasses, Frozen protein solutions, Molecular dynamics

  18. Interfacial Protein-Protein Associations

    OpenAIRE

    Langdon, Blake B.; Kastantin, Mark; Walder, Robert; Schwartz, Daniel K.

    2013-01-01

    While traditional models of protein adsorption focus primarily on direct protein-surface interactions, recent findings suggest that protein-protein interactions may play a central role. Using high-throughput intermolecular resonance energy transfer (RET) tracking, we directly observed dynamic, protein-protein associations of bovine serum albumin on poly(ethylene glycol) modified surfaces. The associations were heterogeneous and reversible, and associating molecules resided on the surface for ...

  19. Organizational heterogeneity of vertebrate genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Frenkel

    Full Text Available Genomes of higher eukaryotes are mosaics of segments with various structural, functional, and evolutionary properties. The availability of whole-genome sequences allows the investigation of their structure as "texts" using different statistical and computational methods. One such method, referred to as Compositional Spectra (CS analysis, is based on scoring the occurrences of fixed-length oligonucleotides (k-mers in the target DNA sequence. CS analysis allows generating species- or region-specific characteristics of the genome, regardless of their length and the presence of coding DNA. In this study, we consider the heterogeneity of vertebrate genomes as a joint effect of regional variation in sequence organization superimposed on the differences in nucleotide composition. We estimated compositional and organizational heterogeneity of genome and chromosome sequences separately and found that both heterogeneity types vary widely among genomes as well as among chromosomes in all investigated taxonomic groups. The high correspondence of heterogeneity scores obtained on three genome fractions, coding, repetitive, and the remaining part of the noncoding DNA (the genome dark matter--GDM allows the assumption that CS-heterogeneity may have functional relevance to genome regulation. Of special interest for such interpretation is the fact that natural GDM sequences display the highest deviation from the corresponding reshuffled sequences.

  20. Vibrational and structural investigation of SOUL protein single crystals by using micro-Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Barbara; Giarola, Marco; Mariotto, Gino; Ambrosi, Emmanuele; Monaco, Hugo L.

    2010-05-01

    Protein SOUL is a new member of the recently discovered putative heme-binding protein family called SOUL/HEBP and, to date, no structural information exists for this protein. Here, micro-Raman spectroscopy is used to study the vibrational properties of single crystals obtained from recombinant protein SOUL by means of two different optimization routes. This spectroscopic approach offers the valuable advantage of the in-situ collection of experimental data from protein crystals, placed onto a hanging-drop plate, under the same conditions used to grow the crystals. By focusing on the regions of amides I and III bands, some secondary structure characteristic features have been recognized. Moreover, some side-chain marker bands were observed in the Raman spectra of SOUL crystals and the unambiguous assignment of these peaks inferred by comparing the experimental Raman spectra of pure amino acids and their Raman intensities computed using quantum chemical calculations. Our comparative analysis allows to get a deeper understanding of the side-chain environments and of the interactions involving these specific amino acids in the two different SOUL crystals.

  1. Qualitative and quantitative changes in phospholipids and proteins investigated by spectroscopic techniques in animal depression model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depciuch, J.; Sowa-Kucma, M.; Nowak, G.; Papp, M.; Gruca, P.; Misztak, P.; Parlinska-Wojtan, M.

    2017-04-01

    Depression becomes nowadays a high mortality civilization disease with one of the major causes being chronic stress. Raman, Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) and Ultraviolet-Visible (UV-vis) spectroscopies were used to determine the changes in the quantity and structure of phospholipids and proteins in the blood serum of rats subjected to chronic mild stress, which is a common animal depression model. Moreover, the efficiency of the imipramine treatment was evaluated. It was found that chronic mild stress not only damages the structure of the phospholipids and proteins, but also decreases their level in the blood serum. A 5 weeks imipramine treatment did increase slightly the quantity of proteins, leaving the damaged phospholipids unchanged. Structural information from phospholipids and proteins was obtained by UV-vis spectroscopy combined with the second derivative of the FTIR spectra. Indeed, the structure of proteins in blood serum of stressed rats was normalized after imipramine therapy, while the impaired structure of phospholipids remained unaffected. These findings strongly suggest that the depression factor, which is chronic mild stress, may induce permanent (irreversible) damages into the phospholipid structure identified as shortened carbon chains. This study shows a possible new application of spectroscopic techniques in the diagnosis and therapy monitoring of depression.

  2. Structure and function of proteins investigated by crystallographic and spectroscopic time-resolved methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purwar, Namrta

    Biomolecules play an essential role in performing the necessary functions for life. The goal of this thesis is to contribute to an understanding of how biological systems work on the molecular level. We used two biological systems, beef liver catalase (BLC) and photoactive yellow protein (PYP). BLC is a metalloprotein that protects living cells from the harmful effects of reactive oxygen species by converting H2O2 into water and oxygen. By binding nitric oxide (NO) to the catalase, a complex was generated that mimics the Cat-H2O2 adduct, a crucial intermediate in the reaction promoted by the catalase. The Cat-NO complex is obtained by using a convenient NO generator (1-(N,N-diethylamino)diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate). Concentrations up to 100˜200 mM are reached by using a specially designed glass cavity. With this glass apparatus and DEANO, sufficient NO occupation is achieved and structure determination of the catalase with NO bound to the heme iron becomes possible. Structural changes upon NO binding are minute. NO has a slightly bent geometry with respect to the heme normal, which results in a substantial overlap of the NO orbitals with the iron-porphyrin molecular orbitals. From the structure of the iron-NO complex, conclusions on the electronic properties of the heme iron can be drawn that ultimately lead to an insight into the catalytic properties of this enzyme. Enzyme kinetics is affected by additional parameters such as temperature and pH. Additionally, in crystallography, the absorbed X-ray dose may impair protein function. To address the effect of these parameters, we performed time-resolved crystallographic experiments on a model system, PYP. By collecting multiple time-series on PYP at increasing X-ray dose levels, we determined a kinetic dose limit up to which kinetically meaningful X-ray data sets can be collected. From this, we conclude that comprehensive time-series spanning up to 12 orders of magnitude in time can be collected from a single PYP

  3. Investigation of Pokemon-regulated proteins in hepatocellular carcinoma using mass spectrometry-based multiplex quantitative proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Xin; Jin, Yibao; Gao, Xiang; Liu, Feng; Gao, Dan; Jiang, Yuyang; Liu, Hongxia

    2013-01-01

    Pokemon is a transcription regulator involved in embryonic development, cellular differentiation and oncogenesis. It is aberrantly overexpressed in multiple human cancers including Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and is considered as a promising biomarker for HCC. In this work, the isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteomics strategy was used to investigate the proteomic profile associated with Pokemon in human HCC cell line QGY7703 and human hepatocyte line HL7702. Samples were labeled with four-plex iTRAQ reagents followed by two-dimensional liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry analysis. A total of 24 differentially expressed proteins were selected as significant. Nine proteins were potentially up-regulated by Pokemon while 15 proteins were potentially down-regulated and many proteins were previously identified as potential biomarkers for HCC. Gene ontology (GO) term enrichment revealed that the listed proteins were mainly involved in DNA metabolism and biosynthesis process. The changes of glucose-6-phosphate 1-dehydrogenase (G6PD, up-regulated) and ribonucleoside-diphosphate reductase large sub-unit (RIM1, down-regulated) were validated by Western blotting analysis and denoted as Pokemon's function of oncogenesis. We also found that Pokemon potentially repressed the expression of highly clustered proteins (MCM3, MCM5, MCM6, MCM7) which played key roles in promoting DNA replication. Altogether, our results may help better understand the role of Pokemon in HCC and promote the clinical applications.

  4. Stable isotope labeling method for the investigation of protein haptenation by electrophilic skin sensitizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Erika; Boyd, Pete; Aleksic, Maja; Cubberley, Richard; O'Connor, David; Skipp, Paul

    2014-11-01

    The risk of contact sensitization is a major consideration in the development of new formulations for personal care products. However, developing a mechanistic approach for non-animal risk assessment requires further understanding of haptenation of skin proteins by sensitizing chemicals, which is the molecular initiating event causative of skin sensitization. The non-stoichiometric nature of protein haptenation results in relatively low levels of modification, often of low abundant proteins, presenting a major challenge for their assignment in complex biological matrices such as skin. Instrumental advances over the last few years have led to a considerable increase in sensitivity of mass spectrometry (MS) techniques. We have combined these advancements with a novel dual-labeling/LC-MS(E) approach to provide an in-depth direct comparison of human serum albumin (HSA), 2,4-dinitro-1-chlorobenzene (DNCB), 5-chloro-2-methyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one (MCI), trans-cinnamaldehyde, and 6-methyl coumarin. These data have revealed novel insights into the differences in protein haptenation between sensitizers with different reaction mechanisms and sensitizing potency; the extreme sensitizers DNCB and MCI were shown to modify a greater number of nucleophilic sites than the moderate sensitizer cinnamaldehyde; and the weak/non-sensitizer 6-methyl coumarin was restricted to only a single nucleophilic residue within HSA. The evaluation of this dual labeling/LC-MS(E) approach using HSA as a model protein has also demonstrated that this strategy could be applied to studying global haptenation in complex mixtures of skin-related proteins by different chemicals. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Investigation of the protein osteocalcin of Camelops hesternus: Sequence, structure and phylogenetic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humpula, James F.; Ostrom, Peggy H.; Gandhi, Hasand; Strahler, John R.; Walker, Angela K.; Stafford, Thomas W.; Smith, James J.; Voorhies, Michael R.; George Corner, R.; Andrews, Phillip C.

    2007-12-01

    Ancient DNA sequences offer an extraordinary opportunity to unravel the evolutionary history of ancient organisms. Protein sequences offer another reservoir of genetic information that has recently become tractable through the application of mass spectrometric techniques. The extent to which ancient protein sequences resolve phylogenetic relationships, however, has not been explored. We determined the osteocalcin amino acid sequence from the bone of an extinct Camelid (21 ka, Camelops hesternus) excavated from Isleta Cave, New Mexico and three bones of extant camelids: bactrian camel ( Camelus bactrianus); dromedary camel ( Camelus dromedarius) and guanaco ( Llama guanacoe) for a diagenetic and phylogenetic assessment. There was no difference in sequence among the four taxa. Structural attributes observed in both modern and ancient osteocalcin include a post-translation modification, Hyp 9, deamidation of Gln 35 and Gln 39, and oxidation of Met 36. Carbamylation of the N-terminus in ancient osteocalcin may result in blockage and explain previous difficulties in sequencing ancient proteins via Edman degradation. A phylogenetic analysis using osteocalcin sequences of 25 vertebrate taxa was conducted to explore osteocalcin protein evolution and the utility of osteocalcin sequences for delineating phylogenetic relationships. The maximum likelihood tree closely reflected generally recognized taxonomic relationships. For example, maximum likelihood analysis recovered rodents, birds and, within hominins, the Homo-Pan-Gorilla trichotomy. Within Artiodactyla, character state analysis showed that a substitution of Pro 4 for His 4 defines the Capra-Ovis clade within Artiodactyla. Homoplasy in our analysis indicated that osteocalcin evolution is not a perfect indicator of species evolution. Limited sequence availability prevented assigning functional significance to sequence changes. Our preliminary analysis of osteocalcin evolution represents an initial step towards a

  6. Apparatus for the investigation of high-temperature, high-pressure gas-phase heterogeneous catalytic and photo-catalytic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvino, Jason F; Bennett, Trystan; Kler, Rantej; Hudson, Rohan J; Aupoil, Julien; Nann, Thomas; Golovko, Vladimir B; Andersson, Gunther G; Metha, Gregory F

    2017-05-01

    A high-temperature, high-pressure, pulsed-gas sampling and detection system has been developed for testing new catalytic and photocatalytic materials for the production of solar fuels. The reactor is fitted with a sapphire window to allow the irradiation of photocatalytic samples from a lamp or solar simulator light source. The reactor has a volume of only 3.80 ml allowing for the investigation of very small quantities of a catalytic material, down to 1 mg. The stainless steel construction allows the cell to be heated to 350 °C and can withstand pressures up to 27 bar, limited only by the sapphire window. High-pressure sampling is made possible by a computer controlled pulsed valve that delivers precise gas flow, enabling catalytic reactions to be monitored across a wide range of pressures. A residual gas analyser mass spectrometer forms a part of the detection system, which is able to provide a rapid, real-time analysis of the gas composition within the photocatalytic reaction chamber. This apparatus is ideal for investigating a number of industrially relevant reactions including photocatalytic water splitting and CO 2 reduction. Initial catalytic results using Pt-doped and Ru nanoparticle-doped TiO 2 as benchmark experiments are presented.

  7. Apparatus for the investigation of high-temperature, high-pressure gas-phase heterogeneous catalytic and photo-catalytic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvino, Jason F.; Bennett, Trystan; Kler, Rantej; Hudson, Rohan J.; Aupoil, Julien; Nann, Thomas; Golovko, Vladimir B.; Andersson, Gunther G.; Metha, Gregory F.

    2017-05-01

    A high-temperature, high-pressure, pulsed-gas sampling and detection system has been developed for testing new catalytic and photocatalytic materials for the production of solar fuels. The reactor is fitted with a sapphire window to allow the irradiation of photocatalytic samples from a lamp or solar simulator light source. The reactor has a volume of only 3.80 ml allowing for the investigation of very small quantities of a catalytic material, down to 1 mg. The stainless steel construction allows the cell to be heated to 350 °C and can withstand pressures up to 27 bar, limited only by the sapphire window. High-pressure sampling is made possible by a computer controlled pulsed valve that delivers precise gas flow, enabling catalytic reactions to be monitored across a wide range of pressures. A residual gas analyser mass spectrometer forms a part of the detection system, which is able to provide a rapid, real-time analysis of the gas composition within the photocatalytic reaction chamber. This apparatus is ideal for investigating a number of industrially relevant reactions including photocatalytic water splitting and CO2 reduction. Initial catalytic results using Pt-doped and Ru nanoparticle-doped TiO2 as benchmark experiments are presented.

  8. Dynamic fracture of heterogeneous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stout, M.G.; Liu, C.; Addessio, F.L.; Williams, T.O.; Bennett, J.G.; Haberman, K.S.; Asay, B.W.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project was to investigate the fundamental aspects of the process of dynamic fracture propagation in heterogeneous materials. The work focused on three important, but poorly understood, aspects of dynamic fracture for materials with a heterogeneous microstructure. These were: the appropriateness of using a single-parameter asymptotic analysis to describe dynamic crack-tip deformation fields, the temperature rises at the tip and on the flanks of a running crack, and the constitutive modeling of damage initiation and accumulation.

  9. PerturbationAnalyzer: a tool for investigating the effects of concentration perturbation on protein interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Li, Peng; Xu, Wenjian; Peng, Yuxing; Bo, Xiaochen; Wang, Shengqi

    2010-01-15

    The propagation of perturbations in protein concentration through a protein interaction network (PIN) can shed light on network dynamics and function. In order to facilitate this type of study, PerturbationAnalyzer, which is an open source plugin for Cytoscape, has been developed. PerturbationAnalyzer can be used in manual mode for simulating user-defined perturbations, as well as in batch mode for evaluating network robustness and identifying significant proteins that cause large propagation effects in the PINs when their concentrations are perturbed. Results from PerturbationAnalyzer can be represented in an intuitive and customizable way and can also be exported for further exploration. PerturbationAnalyzer has great potential in mining the design principles of protein networks, and may be a useful tool for identifying drug targets. PerturbationAnalyzer can be accessed from the Cytoscape web site http://www.cytoscape.org/plugins/index.php or http://biotech.bmi.ac.cn/PerturbationAnalyzer. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  10. Investigating the Causal Relationship of C-Reactive Protein with 32 Complex Somatic and Psychiatric Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prins, Bram P; Abbasi, Ali; Wong, Anson

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: C-reactive protein (CRP) is associated with immune, cardiometabolic, and psychiatric traits and diseases. Yet it is inconclusive whether these associations are causal. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We performed Mendelian randomization (MR) analyses using two genetic risk scores (GRSs) as inst...

  11. Differential dissociation micromethod for the investigation of binding of metandrostenolone (Nerobol) to plasma proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojadzsieva, Milka; Kocsar, Laszlo; Kremmer, Tibor

    1985-01-01

    A micromethod was developed to determine the binding of anabolic streoids to plasma proteins. The new procedure combines precipitation with ammonium sulphate and differential dissociation. The binding parameters (association constant, specific binding capacity) are calculated on the basis of dissociation curves of sup(3)H-metandrostenolone from the precipitated sexual binding globuline. (L.E.)

  12. Differential dissociation micromethod for the investigation of binding of metandrostenolone (Nerobol) to plasma proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bojadzsieva, M.; Kocsar, L. (Orszagos Frederic Joliot-Curie Sugarbiologiai es Sugaregeszseguegyi Kutato Intezet, Budapest (Hungary)); Kremmer, T. (Orszagos Onkologiai Intezet, Budapest (Hungary))

    1985-01-01

    A micromethod was developed to determine the binding of anabolic steroids to plasma proteins. The new procedure combines precipitation with ammonium sulphate and differential dissociation. The binding parameters (association constant, specific binding capacity) are calculated on the basis of dissociation curves of sup(3)H-metandrostenolone from the precipitated sexual binding globuline.

  13. Single particle electron microscopy in combination with mass spectrometry to investigate novel complexes of membrane proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arteni, Ana A.; Nowaczyk, Marc; Lax, Julia; Rögner, Matthias; Boekema, Egbert J.; Kouril, R.; Rogner, M.

    2005-01-01

    Large data sets of molecular projections of the membrane proteins Photosystem I and Photosystem II from cyanobacteria were analyzed by single particle electron microscopy (EM). Analysis resulted in the averaging of 2D projections from the purified complexes but also in the simultaneous detection and

  14. Olefin cross-metathesis on proteins: investigation of allylic chalcogen effects and guiding principles in metathesis partner selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuya A; Chalker, Justin M; Davis, Benjamin G

    2010-12-01

    Olefin metathesis has recently emerged as a viable reaction for chemical protein modification. The scope and limitations of olefin metathesis in bioconjugation, however, remain unclear. Herein we report an assessment of various factors that contribute to productive cross-metathesis on protein substrates. Sterics, substrate scope, and linker selection are all considered. It was discovered during this investigation that allyl chalcogenides generally enhance the rate of alkene metathesis reactions. Allyl selenides were found to be exceptionally reactive olefin metathesis substrates, enabling a broad range of protein modifications not previously possible. The principles considered in this report are important not only for expanding the repertoire of bioconjugation but also for the application of olefin metathesis in general synthetic endeavors.

  15. Investigation of isolation conditions and ion-exchange purification of protein coagulation components from common bean seed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antov Mirjana G.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of an extraction procedure of protein coagulants from common bean seed regarding concentration of NaCl and pH was performed. High values of protein concentration and coagulation activity in crude extract (9.19 g/l and 23.9%, respectively were obtained when the extraction was performed using 0.5 mol/l NaCl and water as solvent, which represents an advantage for economic and environmental reasons. Crude extract of common bean seed was purified by precipitation at two different percentages of (NH42SO4 saturation, followed by batch ion-exchange chromatography. The highest obtained coagulation activity, 45%, was determined in fraction that was eluated at 1.75 mol/l NaCl from resin loaded with proteins precipitated upon 80-100% (NH42SO4 saturation. High values of coagulation activity showed by some eluates suggest their application as natural coagulant for water purification. .

  16. The Heterogeneity of Mutational Tolerance in a Protein is Dependent on the Strength of Selective Pressure Correlating with Sectors of Co-evolving Residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiffler, Michael; Ranganathan, Rama

    2011-03-01

    Proteins are capable of tolerating mutations at many positions while still maintaining fold and function. Previous studies have failed to consider how tolerance to random mutagenesis might depend on the strength of selective pressure. To examine this, we measured the fitness of every single point mutation of TEM-1 beta-lactamase across a range of ampicillin concentrations utilizing a novel application of deep-sequencing. We found that the relative mutational robustness between positions varied considerably with respect to ampicillin concentration: at a low ampicillin concentration only a few positions are intolerant of mutations, while at a higher ampicillin concentration many additional positions are as equally intolerant of mutations. Using an analytic method termed statistical coupling analysis (SCA) to measure the co-variation between all positions in a sequence alignment of beta-lactamases revealed sectors of co-evolving positions associated with groups of residues having increased sensitivity to mutagenesis at either low or high ampicillin concentrations. Our findings suggest that nature has ``designed'' proteins to be robust to random mutagenesis by loading the constraints for fitness on discrete networks of co-evolving positions depending on the strength of selective pressure.

  17. First-principle and experiment investigation of MoS2@SnO2 nano-heterogeneous structures with enhanced humidity sensing performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Xiang; Yu, Ke; Li, Honglin; Tang, Zheng; Guo, Bangjun; Li, Jinzhu; Fu, Hao; Zhang, Qingfeng; Zhu, Ziqiang

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we report the First-principle investigation and synthesis of MoS2@SnO2 heterostructure as high-performance humidity sensor by a two-step hydrothermal method. The first-principles calculations were performed to explain water molecule adsorption mechanism by applying density of state model to simulate the interaction between water molecule and sensing base material. The higher specific surface and the lower adsorption energy theoretically predicted the improvement on humidity sensing performance, which was confirmed by experiments testing. The MoS2@SnO2 heterostructure exhibited promoted humidity sensing characteristics on response time of 53 s and recovery time of 21 s, while switching the humidity between 11% relative humidity (RH) and 95% RH. The corresponding humidity sensing mechanisms of MoS2@SnO2 were elaborately interpreted. This work could bring forward a new design method on practical humidity sensing devices with an excellent stability and fast response by using MoS2@SnO2 heterostructure.

  18. Genetic Contribution to Alcohol Dependence: Investigation of a Heterogeneous German Sample of Individuals with Alcohol Dependence, Chronic Alcoholic Pancreatitis, and Alcohol-Related Cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Treutlein

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the genetic contribution to alcohol dependence (AD using genome-wide association data from three German samples. These comprised patients with: (i AD; (ii chronic alcoholic pancreatitis (ACP; and (iii alcohol-related liver cirrhosis (ALC. Single marker, gene-based, and pathway analyses were conducted. A significant association was detected for the ADH1B locus in a gene-based approach (puncorrected = 1.2 × 10−6; pcorrected = 0.020. This was driven by the AD subsample. No association with ADH1B was found in the combined ACP + ALC sample. On first inspection, this seems surprising, since ADH1B is a robustly replicated risk gene for AD and may therefore be expected to be associated also with subgroups of AD patients. The negative finding in the ACP + ALC sample, however, may reflect genetic stratification as well as random fluctuation of allele frequencies in the cases and controls, demonstrating the importance of large samples in which the phenotype is well assessed.

  19. Monetary policy, banking and heterogeneous agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolski, M.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of heterogeneous expectations on monetary policy performance has gained a lot of attention in the recent years. It proved to be an important factor that, under some circumstances, may even destabilize the economy (Massaro, 2012). This paper investigates the phenomenon of heterogeneous

  20. Investigating the deep internal structure and the heterogeneous margins of the enigmatic Demerara plateau using deep penetrating seismic methods: first results of the MARGATS cruise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graindorge, David; Walter, Roest; Klingelhoefer, Frauke; Loncke, Lies; Basile, Christophe; Poetisi, Ewald; Deverchère, Jacques; Frédéric Lebrun, Jean; Heuret, Arnauld; Perrot, Julie; Apprioual, Ronan; Crozon, Jacques; Fabre, Maud; Fernagu, Philippe; Guyavarch, Pierre; Prunier, Christophe

    2017-04-01

    The MARGATS scientific cruise was carried out from October 20th to November 16th 2016 on board the R/V L'Atalante, in the Exclusive Economic Zones of Suriname and French Guiana. This cruise is part of a program dedicated to geological investigations of the continental margin, including the Demerara plateau, following the GUYAPLAC (2003), IGUANES (2013) and DRADEMcruises (2016). The aim of MARGATS was to image the internal structure of the Demerara plateau and its different margins using coincident deep penetrating wide angle refraction and multi channel reflection seismic (MCS) methods. During the MARGATS experiment 171 OBSs were deployed distributed along 4 wide-angle lines. Along each wide angle line we also recorded coincident MCS data using a 3 km 480 channel streamer. The dataset was completed by three MCS lines along the eastern part of the Demerara plateau. MCS MAR007 line which is coincident with line OBS MAR-3 was extended on land by a set of 13 land stations deployed along the Maroni River. This line, together with MCS MAR001 and the coincident OBS MAR-1 line reveal the highly homogeneous deep structure of the internal part of the plateau. MCS MAR005 line, which is coincident with OBS MAR-2, MCS MAR006 line coincident with OBS MAR-4, MCS MAR002, MCS MAR003 and MCS MAR004 help to elucidate the structural complexity of the northern transform margin and the eastern divergent margin of the plateau. These new datasets will be highly complementary to the DRADEM dredges results which provide evidence for huge vertical displacements along the transform margin. This EGU session will be the first opportunity to reveal the exceptional quality of the seismic data, after the initial processing steps and the new emergent results conditioning our understanding of the Demarara plateau and its margins.

  1. Investigation of basement membrane proteins in a case of granular cell ameloblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapthanasupkul, Puangwan; Poomsawat, Sopee; Chindasombatjaroen, Jira

    2012-01-01

    Granular cell ameloblastoma is a rare, benign neoplasm of the odontogenic epithelium. A case of massive granular cell ameloblastoma in a 44-year-old Thai female is reported. Histopathological features displayed a follicular type of ameloblastoma with an accumulation of granular cells residing within the tumor follicles. After treatment by partial mandibulectomy, the patient showed a good prognosis without recurrence in a 2-year follow-up. To characterize the granular cells in ameloblastoma, we examined the expression of basement membrane (BM) proteins, including collagen type IV, laminins 1 and 5 and fibronectin using immunohistochemistry. Except for the granular cells, the tumor cells demonstrated a similar expression of BM proteins compared to follicular and plexiform ameloblastomas in our previous study, whereas the granular cells showed strong positivity to laminins 1 and 5 and fibronectin. The increased fibronectin expression in granular cells suggests a possibility of age-related transformation of granular cells in ameloblastoma. PMID:22361945

  2. Comparative study of protein dynamics in hydrated powders and in solutions: A neutron scattering investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marconi, M.; Cornicchi, E.; Onori, G.; Paciaroni, A.

    2008-01-01

    Neutron scattering spectroscopy on a time-of-flight spectrometer has been exploited to reveal the vibrational and relaxational spectral contributions of lysozyme in hydrated powder and solution states. The inelastic component of the dynamical structure factor seems to be quite similar for lysozyme in both the solid- and the liquid-state samples, particularly for energies higher than ∼4 meV. After the subtraction of this component, the quasielastic contribution is evaluated. In the case of hydrated lysozyme powder the quasielastic scattering follows a two-power law with a ballistic Gaussian decrease above ∼2 meV. The quasielastic scattering of lysozyme in solution exhibits a rather similar trend but a much larger intensity. This may be related to the increase of both the number and the amplitudes of the confined diffusive processes related to protein side-chains motions at the protein surface

  3. Investigation of the protective effect of whey proteins on lactococcal phages during heat treatment at various pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geagea, Hany; Gomaa, Ahmed I; Remondetto, Gabriel; Moineau, Sylvain; Subirade, Muriel

    2015-10-01

    The incorporation of whey protein concentrates (WPC) into cheese is a risky process due to the potential contamination with thermo-resistant phages of lactic acid bacteria (LAB). Furthermore, whey proteins can protect phages during heat treatment, thereby increasing the above risk. The main objective of this work was to understand this protective effect in order to better control LAB phages and maximize whey recycling in the cheese industry. First, the inactivation of a previously characterized thermo-resistant lactococcal virulent phage (P1532) was investigated at 95 °C in WPC, in individual whey components β-lactoglobulin, α-lactalbumin, and bovine serum albumin as well as under different heat and pH conditions. The structural changes of the tested proteins were also monitored by transmission FTIR spectroscopy. Phage inactivation results indicated that the protective effect of whey proteins was pH and time dependent at 95 °C and was not restricted to one component. FTIR spectra suggest that the protection is related to protein molecular structures and to the level of protein aggregates, which was more pronounced in acidic conditions. Moreover, the molecular structure of the three proteins tested was differently influenced by pH and the duration of the heat treatment. This work confirms the protective effect of WPC on phages during heat treatment and offers the first hint to explain such phenomenon. Finding the appropriate treatment of WPC to reduce the phage risk is one of the keys to improving the cheese manufacturing process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Surface Plasmon Resonance Investigations of Bioselective Element Based on the Recombinant Protein A for Immunoglobulin Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhmachuk, A.; Gorbatiuk, O.; Rachkov, A.; Dons'koi, B.; Khristosenko, R.; Ushenin, I.; Peshkova, V.; Soldatkin, A.

    2017-02-01

    The developed surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor based on the recombinant Staphylococcal protein A with an additional cysteine residue (SPA-Cys) used as a biorecognition component showed a good selectivity and sensitivity for the immunoglobulin detection. The developed biosensor with SPA-Cys-based bioselective element can also be used as a first step of immunosensor creation. The successful immobilization of SPA-Cys on the nanolayer gold sensor surface of the SPR spectrometer was performed. The efficiency of blocking nonspecific sorption sites on the sensor surface with milk proteins, gelatin, BSA, and HSA was studied, and a rather high efficiency of using gelatin was confirmed. The SPR biosensor selectively interacted with IgG and did not interact with the control proteins. The linear dependence of the sensor response on the IgG concentration in the range from 2 to 10 μg/ml was shown. Using the calibration curve, the IgG concentration was measured in the model samples. The determined concentrations are in good agreement ( r 2 = 0.97) with the given concentration of IgG.

  5. New environment-sensitive multichannel DNA fluorescent label for investigation of the protein-DNA interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra A Kuznetsova

    Full Text Available Here, we report the study of a new multichannel DNA fluorescent base analogue 3-hydroxychromone (3HC to evaluate its suitability as a fluorescent reporter probe of structural transitions during protein-DNA interactions and its comparison with the current commercially available 2-aminopurine (aPu, pyrrolocytosine (Cpy and 1,3-diaza-2-oxophenoxazine (tCO. For this purpose, fluorescent base analogues were incorporated into DNA helix on the opposite or on the 5'-side of the damaged nucleoside 5,6-dihydrouridine (DHU, which is specifically recognized and removed by Endonuclease VIII. These fluorophores demonstrated different sensitivities to the DNA helix conformational changes. The highest sensitivity and the most detailed information about the conformational changes of DNA induced by protein binding and processing were obtained using the 3HC probe. The application of this new artificial fluorescent DNA base is a very useful tool for the studies of complex mechanisms of protein-DNA interactions. Using 3HC biosensor, the kinetic mechanism of Endonuclease VIII action was specified.

  6. New environment-sensitive multichannel DNA fluorescent label for investigation of the protein-DNA interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Alexandra A; Kuznetsov, Nikita A; Vorobjev, Yuri N; Barthes, Nicolas P F; Michel, Benoît Y; Burger, Alain; Fedorova, Olga S

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the study of a new multichannel DNA fluorescent base analogue 3-hydroxychromone (3HC) to evaluate its suitability as a fluorescent reporter probe of structural transitions during protein-DNA interactions and its comparison with the current commercially available 2-aminopurine (aPu), pyrrolocytosine (Cpy) and 1,3-diaza-2-oxophenoxazine (tCO). For this purpose, fluorescent base analogues were incorporated into DNA helix on the opposite or on the 5'-side of the damaged nucleoside 5,6-dihydrouridine (DHU), which is specifically recognized and removed by Endonuclease VIII. These fluorophores demonstrated different sensitivities to the DNA helix conformational changes. The highest sensitivity and the most detailed information about the conformational changes of DNA induced by protein binding and processing were obtained using the 3HC probe. The application of this new artificial fluorescent DNA base is a very useful tool for the studies of complex mechanisms of protein-DNA interactions. Using 3HC biosensor, the kinetic mechanism of Endonuclease VIII action was specified.

  7. Heterogeneity in Desiccated Solutions: Implications for Biostabilization

    OpenAIRE

    Ragoonanan, Vishard; Aksan, Alptekin

    2007-01-01

    Biopreservation processes such as freezing and drying inherently introduce heterogeneity. We focused on exploring the mechanisms responsible for heterogeneity in isothermal, diffusively dried biopreservation solutions that contain a model protein. The biopreservation solutions used contained trehalose (a sugar known for its stabilization effect) and salts (LiCl, NaCl, MgCl2, and CaCl2). Performing Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis on the desiccated droplets, spatial distributio...

  8. MARGATS cruise: investigation of the deep internal structure and the heterogeneous margins of the Demerara plateau reveals a polyphased volcanic history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graindorge, D.; Museur, T.; Roest, W. R.; Klingelhoefer, F.; Loncke, L.; Basile, C.; Poetisi, E.; Deverchere, J.; Heuret, A.; Jean-Frederic, L.; Perrot, J.

    2017-12-01

    The MARGATS scientific cruise was carried out from October 20th to November 16th 2016 on board the R/V L'Atalante, offshore Suriname and French Guiana. This cruise is part of a program dedicated to the geological investigation of the continental margin, including the Demerara plateau, following the GUYAPLAC (2003), IGUANES (2013) and DRADEM (2016) cruises. The aim of MARGATS was to image the internal structure of the Demerara plateau and its different margins using coincident deep penetrating wide angle refraction and multi channel reflection seismic (MCS) methods. During the MARGATS experiment 171 OBS deployments were distributed along 4 wide-angle lines. Along each wide-angle line we also recorded coincident MCS data using a 3 km long 480 channel streamer. The dataset was completed by three MCS lines along the eastern part of the Demerara plateau. MCS MAR007 line which is coincident with line OBS MAR-3 was extended on land by 13 land stations deployed along the Maroni River. This line, together with MCS MAR001 and the coincident OBS MAR-1 line reveal the highly homogeneous deep structure of the internal part of the plateau. MCS MAR005 line, which is coincident with OBS MAR-2, MCS MAR006 line coincident with OBS MAR-4, MCS MAR002, MCS MAR003 and MCS MAR004 helps to elucidate the structural complexity of the northern transform margin and the eastern divergent margin of the plateau. These new datasets are highly complementary to the DRADEM dredge results which provide evidence for mid Jurassic volcanic rocks along the plateau and significant vertical displacements along the transform margin. These results allow to interpret the plateau as the remains of a huge jurassic volcanic divergent margin along the Central Atlantic ocean to the west, possibly remobilized during the cretaceous opening of the Equatorial Atlantic ocean as an highly oblique margin to the north and a divergent margin to the east in persistent presence of volcanism. This AGU session will be a great

  9. Investigation of molecular mechanisms of action of chelating drugs on protein-lipid model membranes by X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikova, N. N.; Zheludeva, S. I.; Koval'chuk, M. V.; Stepina, N. D.; Erko, A. I.; Yur'eva, E. A.

    2009-01-01

    Protein-lipid films based on the enzyme alkaline phosphatase were subjected to the action of chelating drugs, which are used for accelerating the removal of heavy metals from the human body, and the elemental composition of the resulting films was investigated. Total-reflection X-ray fluorescence measurements were performed at the Berlin Electron Storage Ring Company for Synchrotron Radiation (BESSY) in Germany. A comparative estimation of the protective effect of four drugs (EDTA, succimer, xydiphone, and mediphon) on membrane-bound enzymes damaged by lead ions was made. The changes in the elemental composition of the protein-lipid films caused by high doses of chelating drugs were investigated. It was shown that state-of-the-art X-ray techniques can, in principle, be used to develop new methods for the in vitro evaluation of the efficiency of drugs, providing differential data on their actions.

  10. Investigation of the functional role of CSLD proteins in plant cell wall deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Erik Etlar [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2017-11-21

    The overall goal of this research proposal was to characterize the molecular machinery responsible for polarized secretion of cell wall components in Arabidopsis thaliana. We have used the polarized expansion that occurs during root hair cell growth to identify membrane trafficking pathways involved in polarized secretion of cell wall components to the expanding tips of these cells, and we have recently shown that CSLD3 is preferentially targeted to the apical plasma membranes in root hair cells, where it plays essential roles during cell wall deposition in these cells. The specific aims of the project are designed to answer the following objective: Identification of the cell wall polysaccharide class that CSLD proteins synthesize.

  11. Single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer shows uniformity in TATA binding protein-induced DNA bending and heterogeneity in bending kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Rebecca H; Goodrich, James A; Kugel, Jennifer F

    2012-09-25

    TATA binding protein (TBP) is a key component of the eukaryotic RNA polymerase II transcription machinery that binds to TATA boxes located in the core promoter regions of many genes. Structural and biochemical studies have shown that when TBP binds DNA, it sharply bends the DNA. We used single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) to study DNA bending by human TBP on consensus and mutant TATA boxes in the absence and presence of TFIIA. We found that the state of the bent DNA within populations of TBP-DNA complexes is homogeneous; partially bent intermediates were not observed. In contrast to the results of previous ensemble studies, TBP was found to bend a mutant TATA box to the same extent as the consensus TATA box. Moreover, in the presence of TFIIA, the extent of DNA bending was not significantly changed, although TFIIA did increase the fraction of DNA molecules bound by TBP. Analysis of the kinetics of DNA bending and unbending revealed that on the consensus TATA box two kinetically distinct populations of TBP-DNA complexes exist; however, the bent state of the DNA is the same in the two populations. Our smFRET studies reveal that human TBP bends DNA in a largely uniform manner under a variety of different conditions, which was unexpected given previous ensemble biochemical studies. Our new observations led to us to revise the model for the mechanism of DNA binding by TBP and for how DNA bending is affected by TATA sequence and TFIIA.

  12. Selective and extensive 13C labeling of a membrane protein for solid-state NMR investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, M.; Jakes, K.

    1999-01-01

    The selective and extensive 13C labeling of mostly hydrophobic amino acid residues in a 25 kDa membrane protein, the colicin Ia channel domain, is reported. The novel 13C labeling approach takes advantage of the amino acid biosynthetic pathways in bacteria and suppresses the synthesis of the amino acid products of the citric acid cycle. The selectivity and extensiveness of labeling significantly simplify the solid-state NMR spectra, reduce line broadening, and should permit the simultaneous measurement of multiple structural constraints. We show the assignment of most 13C resonances to specific amino acid types based on the characteristic chemical shifts, the 13C labeling pattern, and the amino acid composition of the protein. The assignment is partly confirmed by a 2D homonuclear double-quantum-filter experiment under magic-angle spinning. The high sensitivity and spectral resolution attained with this 13C-labeling protocol, which is termed TEASE for ten-amino acid selective and extensive labeling, are demonstrated

  13. Investigating the efficacy of nonlinear dimensionality reduction schemes in classifying gene and protein expression studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, George; Rodriguez, Carlos; Madabhushi, Anant

    2008-01-01

    The recent explosion in procurement and availability of high-dimensional gene- and protein-expression profile datasets for cancer diagnostics has necessitated the development of sophisticated machine learning tools with which to analyze them. A major limitation in the ability to accurate classify these high-dimensional datasets stems from the 'curse of dimensionality', occurring in situations where the number of genes or peptides significantly exceeds the total number of patient samples. Previous attempts at dealing with this issue have mostly centered on the use of a dimensionality reduction (DR) scheme, Principal Component Analysis (PCA), to obtain a low-dimensional projection of the high-dimensional data. However, linear PCA and other linear DR methods, which rely on Euclidean distances to estimate object similarity, do not account for the inherent underlying nonlinear structure associated with most biomedical data. The motivation behind this work is to identify the appropriate DR methods for analysis of high-dimensional gene- and protein-expression studies. Towards this end, we empirically and rigorously compare three nonlinear (Isomap, Locally Linear Embedding, Laplacian Eigenmaps) and three linear DR schemes (PCA, Linear Discriminant Analysis, Multidimensional Scaling) with the intent of determining a reduced subspace representation in which the individual object classes are more easily discriminable.

  14. X-ray fluorescence methods for investigations of lipid/protein membrane models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikova, Natalia N; Yurieva, Eleonora A; Zheludeva, Svetlana I; Kovalchuk, Michail V; Stepina, Nina D; Tolstikhina, Alla L; Gaynutdinov, Ratmir V; Urusova, Dariya V; Matkovskaya, Tatiana A; Rubtsov, Alexandr M; Lopina, Olga D; Erko, Alexsey I; Konovalov, Oleg V

    2005-07-01

    The protective effect of the bisphosphonate drug xydiphone (K,Na-ethidronate) on membrane-bound enzyme damaged by lead ions has been studied. A protein/lipid film of Ca-ATPase/phosphatedylethanolamine deposited on a silicon substrate was used as a model system. The position of lead ions within the molecular film before and after the xydiphone treatment was determined using the total-reflection X-ray fluorescence method. This technique is based on the simultaneous measurement of the X-ray reflection and the yield of the fluorescence radiation excited by X-ray inelastic scattering. The possibility of directly locating lead ions is the main advantage of this approach. Xydiphone has been found to effectively eliminate lead ions that have been incorporated into Ca-ATPase molecules during a preliminary incubation in lead acetate solution. The lead ions that were bound at the sites of the Ca-ATPase attachment to the phospholipid monolayer have proved to be inaccessible for xydiphone. A preliminary incubation of Ca-ATPase in the xydiphone solution precluded the incorporation of lead ions into the protein.

  15. Application of spectral deconvolution and inverse mechanistic modelling as a tool for root cause investigation in protein chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brestrich, Nina; Hahn, Tobias; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2016-03-11

    In chromatographic protein purification, process variations, aging of columns, or processing errors can lead to deviations of the expected elution behavior of product and contaminants and can result in a decreased pool purity or yield. A different elution behavior of all or several involved species leads to a deviating chromatogram. The causes for deviations are however hard to identify by visual inspection and complicate the correction of a problem in the next cycle or batch. To overcome this issue, a tool for root cause investigation in protein chromatography was developed. The tool combines a spectral deconvolution with inverse mechanistic modelling. Mid-UV spectral data and Partial Least Squares Regression were first applied to deconvolute peaks to obtain the individual elution profiles of co-eluting proteins. The individual elution profiles were subsequently used to identify errors in process parameters by curve fitting to a mechanistic chromatography model. The functionality of the tool for root cause investigation was successfully demonstrated in a model protein study with lysozyme, cytochrome c, and ribonuclease A. Deviating chromatograms were generated by deliberately caused errors in the process parameters flow rate and sodium-ion concentration in loading and elution buffer according to a design of experiments. The actual values of the three process parameters and, thus, the causes of the deviations were estimated with errors of less than 4.4%. Consequently, the established tool for root cause investigation is a valuable approach to rapidly identify process variations, aging of columns, or processing errors. This might help to minimize batch rejections or contribute to an increased productivity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. LabVIEW-operated novel nanoliter osmometer for ice binding protein investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braslavsky, Ido; Drori, Ran

    2013-02-04

    Ice-binding proteins (IBPs), including antifreeze proteins, ice structuring proteins, thermal hysteresis proteins, and ice recrystallization inhibition proteins, are found in cold-adapted organisms and protect them from freeze injuries by interacting with ice crystals. IBPs are found in a variety of organism, including fish(1), plants(2, 3), arthropods(4, 5), fungi(6), and bacteria(7). IBPs adsorb to the surfaces of ice crystals and prevent water molecules from joining the ice lattice at the IBP adsorption location. Ice that grows on the crystal surface between the adsorbed IBPs develops a high curvature that lowers the temperature at which the ice crystals grow, a phenomenon referred to as the Gibbs-Thomson effect. This depression creates a gap (thermal hysteresis, TH) between the melting point and the nonequilibrium freezing point, within which ice growth is arrested(8-10), see Figure 1. One of the main tools used in IBP research is the nanoliter osmometer, which facilitates measurements of the TH activities of IBP solutions. Nanoliter osmometers, such as the Clifton instrument (Clifton Technical Physics, Hartford, NY,) and Otago instrument (Otago Osmometers, Dunedin, New Zealand), were designed to measure the osmolarity of a solution by measuring the melting point depression of droplets with nanoliter volumes. These devices were used to measure the osmolarities of biological samples, such as tears(11), and were found to be useful in IBP research. Manual control over these nanoliter osmometers limited the experimental possibilities. Temperature rate changes could not be controlled reliably, the temperature range of the Clifton instrument was limited to 4,000 mOsmol (about -7.5 °C), and temperature recordings as a function of time were not an available option for these instruments. We designed a custom-made computer-controlled nanoliter osmometer system using a LabVIEW platform (National Instruments). The cold stage, described previously(9, 10), contains a metal

  17. Fluorinated ionic liquids for protein drug delivery systems: Investigating their impact on the structure and function of lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Márcia; Vieira, Nicole S M; Rebelo, Luís Paulo N; Araújo, João M M; Pereiro, Ana B; Archer, Margarida

    2017-06-30

    Since the approval of recombinant human insulin by FDA in 1982, more than 200 proteins are currently available for pharmaceutical use to treat a wide range of diseases. However, innovation is still required to develop effective approaches for drug delivery. Our aim is to investigate the potential use of fluorinated ionic liquids (FILs) as drug delivery systems (DDS) for therapeutic proteins. Some initial parameters need to be assessed before further studies can proceed. This work evaluates the impact of FILs on the stability, function, structure and aggregation state of lysozyme. Different techniques were used for this purpose, which included differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF), spectrophotometric assays, circular dichroism (CD), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM/TEM). Ionic liquids composed of cholinium-, imidazolium- or pyridinium- derivatives were combined with different anions and analysed at different concentrations in aqueous solutions (below and above the critical aggregation concentration, CAC). The results herein presented show that the addition of ionic liquids had no significant effect on the stability and hydrolytic activity of lysozyme. Moreover, a distinct behaviour was observed in DLS experiments for non-surfactant and surfactant ionic liquids, with the latter encapsulating the protein at concentrations above the CAC. These results encourage us to further study ionic liquids as promising tools for DDS of protein drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Investigation of the Maillard Reaction between Polysaccharides and Proteins from Longan Pulp and the Improvement in Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Miao-Miao; Yi, Yang; Wang, Hong-Xun; Huang, Fei

    2017-06-05

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the Maillard reaction between polysaccharides and proteins from longan pulp and the effects of reaction on their in vitro activities. The polysaccharide-protein mixtures of fresh longan pulp (LPPMs) were co-prepared by an alkali extraction-acid precipitation method. They were then dry-heated under controlled conditions for monitoring the characterization of the Maillard reaction by the measurement of the free amino group content, ultraviolet-visible spectrum, Fourier transform infrared spectrum and molecular weight distribution. All the physicochemical analyses indicated the development of the Maillard reaction between polysaccharides and proteins. The in vitro activity evaluation indicated that the Maillard reaction could effectively enhance the antioxidant, antitumor and immunostimulating activities of LPPMs. The enhancement of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity and ferric reducing antioxidant power displayed both a positive correlation with the reaction time ( p Maillard-type intermacromolecular interaction is suggested to be an effective and controllable method for improving the functional activities of polysaccharides and proteins from longan pulp.

  19. Investigation of the Influence of Protein-Losing Enteropathy on Monoclonal Antibody Pharmacokinetics in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yujie; Li, Tommy R; Balthasar, Joseph P

    2017-11-01

    Protein losing enteropathy (PLE), which is characterized by substantial loss of plasma proteins into the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, is a complication of a variety of GI diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease. Clinical studies have found that the clearance of monoclonal antibodies (mAb) is often increased in subjects with diseases known to cause PLE; however, direct relationships between PLE and mAb pharmacokinetics have not been demonstrated. This study employed a murine model of colitis to examine the influence of PLE on mAb pharmacokinetics. Mice were given dextran sodium sulfate (DSS, 2% w/v) supplemented tap water as drinking source for 6 days to induce colitis and PLE. Mice were then intravenously injected with 8C2, a murine IgG1 mAb. 8C2 plasma concentrations were measured up to 14 days post injection. Fecal alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT) clearance was measured as biomarker for PLE. DSS-treated mice developed PLE of clinically relevant severity. They also showed a transient increase in 8C2 plasma clearance and a decrease in 8C2 plasma exposure. The area under the 8C2 plasma concentration-time curve for the length of the study (AUC 0-14d ) reduced from 1368 ± 255 to 594 ± 224 day μg/ml following DSS treatment (p = 0.001). A quantitative relationship between A1AT clearance and 8C2 clearance was obtained via population pharmacokinetic modeling. DSS treatment substantially increased 8C2 clearance and reduced 8C2 exposure. Increased mAb plasma clearance was highly correlated with A1AT fecal clearance, suggesting the possible utility of A1AT fecal clearance as a mechanistic biomarker to predict the pharmacokinetics of therapeutic antibodies.

  20. Immunophenotype Heterogeneity in Nasal Glomangiopericytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Handra-Luca

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nasal glomangiopericytoma is rare. The immunophenotype is heterogeneous, more frequently smooth-muscle-actin and CD34-positive. We report expression patterns for several vascular-related proteins such as CD99, CD146, Bcl2, and WT1 as well as for treatment-related proteins such as mTOR and EGFR in a nasal glomangiopericytoma. The patient (woman, 86 years presented with a left nasal tumefaction. The resected specimen (1.5-cm showed a glomangiopericytoma. Tumor cells expressed smooth-muscle-actin, CD31, CD34, and progesterone receptor. They also expressed the vascular-cell-related proteins Bcl2, CD99, CD146, and WT1, as well as mTOR and EGFR. Nasal glomangiopericytomas show immunohistochemical heterogeneity for vascular-related markers, suggesting a possible extensive pericytic differentiation. The expression of potential targets for drug treatments such as mTOR and EGFR may impact on the clinical follow-up of these tumors occurring at advanced ages, which may require complex surgery.

  1. Immunochemical investigation of allergenic residues in experimental and commercially-available wines fined with egg white proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uberti, Francesca; Danzi, Roberta; Stockley, Creina; Peñas, Elena; Ballabio, Cinzia; Di Lorenzo, Chiara; Tarantino, Chiara; Restani, Patrizia

    2014-09-15

    Proteinaceous egg whites are widely used as a fining agent during the production of red wines. Residues of egg white in the final wine could present a risk for individuals allergic to eggs. This study investigated the presence of allergenic residues in both red and white wines fined with egg whites. Experimental and commercially available wines fined with egg whites, with or without subsequent bentonite fining, were studied. Unfined wines were used as negative controls. The physicochemical characteristics of each wine were determined to assess their possible role in enhancing or hindering the elimination of allergenic residues from wine. The amount of egg white protein residues was investigated both by a specifically developed/validated ELISA test and by immunoblotting. Both immunochemical tests used the same anti-total egg white protein antibody and were highly sensitive to the allergen. No egg white protein was detected in the wines studied in either immunochemical test, irrespective of the physicochemical characteristics of the wine, the type and dosage of the fining agent and the oenological process used. The risk of adverse reactions in egg-allergic individuals should therefore be considered negligible, but the exemption from labelling should be allowed only when the absence of residues is confirmed by analytical controls. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Using WRF-Chem to investigate the impact of night time nitrate radical chemistry and N2O5 heterogeneous chemistry on the chemical composition of the UK troposphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer-Nicholls, S.; Lowe, D.; Utembe, S.; McFiggans, G.

    2012-04-01

    of two flight periods: one during July 2010; the other during January 2011. We have run five model scenarios for both these periods: a base case, with standard emissions and chemistry; two scenarios with standard chemistry, but with halved and doubled NOx transport emissions respectively; and two scenarios with standard emissions, but one without N2O5 heterogeneous chemistry, and the other with the Cl- reaction pathway disabled. We will present results from the application of WRF-Chem to model the regional chemical composition of the atmosphere about the UK. Sensitivities to changing emission profiles and the impact of N2O5 heterogeneous chemistry will be discussed. Preliminary comparisons between model results and aircraft data will be shown. The strengths and weaknesses of our modelling approach, in particular the gains and drawbacks of using a fully coupled online model for use in this campaign, will be highlighted. The wider impacts of the processes investigated on the regional climate and air quality will be further discussed. Allan, B., et. al. (2000); J. Geophys. Res., 105, doi: 10.1046/j.1365-2370.2000.00208. Bertram, T. H., Thornton, J. A. (2009); Atmos. Chem. Phys., 9, 8351-8363, doi: 10.5194/acp-9-8351-2009 Grell, G., et. al. (2005); Atmos. Environ., 39, 6957- 6975. doi: 10.1016/j.atmosenv.2005.04.027 Topping, D., Lowe, D. & McFiggans, G. (2012); Geosci. Model Dev., 5, 1-13. doi:10.5194/gmd-5-1-2012 Watson, L., et. al. (2008); Atmos. Environ., 42, 7196- 7204, doi: 10.1016/j.atmosenv.2008.07.034 Zaveri, R. A., et. al. (2008); J. Geophys. Res., 113, doi:10.1029/2007JD008782

  3. Targeting population heterogeneity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae batch fermentation for optimal cell factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heins, Anna-Lena; Lencastre Fernandes, Rita; Lundin, L.

    and affect their metabolism and consequently affect the heterogeneity level of the population. To further investigate these phenomena and gain a deeper understanding of population heterogeneity, Saccharomyces cerevisiae growth reporter strains based on the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) were......)). Significant gradients of e.g. dissolved oxygen, substrates, and pH are typically observed in many industrial scale fermentation processes. Consequently, the microbial cells experience rapid changes in environmental conditions as they circulate throughout the reactor, which might pose stress on the cells...

  4. Heterogeneity of capillary spacing in the hypertrophied plantaris muscle from young-adult and old rats.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Degens, H.; Morse, C.I.; Hopman, M.T.E.

    2009-01-01

    Heterogeneity of capillary spacing may affect tissue oxygenation. The determinants of heterogeneity of capillary spacing are, however, unknown. To investigate whether 1) impaired angiogenesis and increased heterogeneity of capillary spacing delays development of hypertrophy during aging and 2)

  5. Investigation into the Effects of Boron on Liver Tissue Protein Carbonyl, MDA, and Glutathione Levels in Endotoxemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balabanlı, Barbaros; Balaban, Tuba

    2015-10-01

    Endotoxin has been known to cause the formation and damage of free radical. The importance of boron for human life is increasing each passing day, and its consuming fields are continuing to expand due to the advances in science and technology. Therefore, in our study, we intended to investigate into the effects of boron on liver tissue oxidative events. Eighteen male Wistar albino rats were randomly separated into three equal groups in the experiments; control group, boron + endotoxin group, and endotoxin group. Dissolved in distilled water, boric acid (100 mg/kg) was administered to boron + endotoxin group via gavage procedure for 28 days. Only distilled water was administered to control and endotoxin groups via gavage procedure for 28 days. Then 4 mg/kg endotoxin (LPS; Escherichia coli 0111:B4) was intraperitoneally (ip) administered to boron + endotoxin and endotoxin groups on the 28th day. Sterile saline was injected into control group on the 28th day (ip). Malondialdehyde (MDA), which is the end product of lipid peroxidation in liver tissues, protein carbonyl compounds (PC), which are protein oxidization markers, and glutathione (GSH) levels were measured spectrophotometrically. The results were compared with Mann-Whitney U test. When boron + endotoxin group is compared with endotoxin group, PC levels of endotoxin group showed a significant increase. When GSH levels are compared, GSH level in boron + endotoxin group decreased according to endotoxin group. Variations among all groups in MDA levels were found to be statistically insignificant. We are of the opinion that endotoxin affects the proteins by forming free radicals, and boron may also cause the structural and/or functional changes in proteins in order to protect proteins from oxidization.

  6. Molecular ingredients of heterogeneous catalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somorjai, G.A.

    1982-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a review and status report to those in theoretical chemistry of the rapidly developing surface science of heterogeneous catalysis. The art of catalysis is developing into science. This profound change provides one with opportunities not only to understand the molecular ingredients of important catalytic systems but also to develop new and improved catalyst. The participation of theorists to find answers to important questions is sorely needed for the sound development of the field. It is the authors hope that some of the outstanding problems of heterogeneous catalysis that are identified in this paper will be investigated. For this purpose the paper is divided into several sections. The brief Introduction to the methodology and recent results of the surface science of heterogeneous catalysis is followed by a review of the concepts of heterogeneous catalysis. Then, the experimental results that identified the three molecular ingredients of catalysis, structure, carbonaceous deposit and the oxidation state of surface atoms are described. Each section is closed with a summary and a list of problems that require theoretical and experimental scrutiny. Finally attempts to build new catalyst systems and the theoretical and experimental problems that appeared in the course of this research are described

  7. Molecular ingredients of heterogeneous catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somorjai, G.A.

    1982-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a review and status report to those in theoretical chemistry of the rapidly developing surface science of heterogeneous catalysis. The art of catalysis is developing into science. This profound change provides one with opportunities not only to understand the molecular ingredients of important catalytic systems but also to develop new and improved catalyst. The participation of theorists to find answers to important questions is sorely needed for the sound development of the field. It is the authors hope that some of the outstanding problems of heterogeneous catalysis that are identified in this paper will be investigated. For this purpose the paper is divided into several sections. The brief Introduction to the methodology and recent results of the surface science of heterogeneous catalysis is followed by a review of the concepts of heterogeneous catalysis. Then, the experimental results that identified the three molecular ingredients of catalysis, structure, carbonaceous deposit and the oxidation state of surface atoms are described. Each section is closed with a summary and a list of problems that require theoretical and experimental scrutiny. Finally attempts to build new catalyst systems and the theoretical and experimental problems that appeared in the course of this research are described.

  8. Investigating the Bacterial Inactivation Potential of Purified Okra (Hibiscus esculentus Seed Proteins in Water Purification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred N. Jones

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The ability of purified okra protein (POP as coagulant and as disinfectant material in comparison with aluminium sulphate (AS in water treatment was assessed. A laboratory jar test experiments and Colilert-18/Quanti-Tray method of bacterial analysis were conducted using POP as coagulant in treating river water. The results show an excellent dual performance function of POP against the conventional coagulant, AS in drinking water treatment. It was observed that a marked inactivation of approximately 100% of faecal and E-coli count in raw water was achieved with POP and zero regrowth of bacteria after 72-hour post treatment. However, there was regrowth in total coliform count as a result of the presence of other microbes other than E-coli and faecal coliform in the system. In all cases AS showed a reduced performance against the two indicator organisms achieving only 93% with remarkable regrowth of E-coli and faecal coliform after prolonged storage time in the clarified water. Turbidity removal was also noted to be approximately similar, 92% across all coagulants tested. Therefore, the use of POP in water treatment could improve access to clean water in developing countries and could help in reducing the import of water treatment chemicals.

  9. A roadmap for investigating the role of the prion protein in depression associated with neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckman, Danielle; Linden, Rafael

    2016-03-03

    The physiological properties of the native, endogenous prion protein (PrP(C)) is a matter of concern, due to its pleiotropic functions and links to neurodegenerative disorders and cancer. In line with our hypothesis that the basic function of PrP(C) is to serve as a cell surface scaffold for the assembly of signaling modules, multiple interactions have been identified of PrP(C) with signaling molecules, including neurotransmitter receptors. We recently reported evidence that PrP(C) may modulate monoaminergic neurotransmission, as well as depressive-like behavior in mice. Here, we discuss how those results, together with a number of other studies, including our previous demonstration that both inflammatory and behavioral stress modulate PrP(C) content in neutrophils, suggest a distributed role of PrP(C) in clinical depression and inflammation associated with neurodegenerative diseases. An overarching understanding of the multiple interventions of PrP(C) upon physiological events may both shed light on the pathogenesis of, as well as help the identification of novel therapeutic targets for clinical depression, Prion and Alzheimer's Diseases.

  10. HER2 Status and Its Heterogeneity in Gastric Carcinoma of Vietnamese Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dang Anh Thu Phan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 is related to the pathogenesis and poor outcome of numerous types of carcinomas, including gastric carcinoma. Gastric cancer patients with HER2 positivity have become potential candidates for targeted therapy with trastuzumab. Methods We investigated 208 gastric cancer specimens using immunohistochemistry (IHC, fluorescence in situ hybridization and dual in situ hybridization (ISH. We also investigated the concordance between IHC and ISH. The correlation between HER2 status and various clinicopathological findings was also investigated. Results In total, 15.9% (33/208 and 24.5% (51/208 of gastric cancers showed HER2 gene amplification and protein overexpression, respectively. A high level of concordance between ISH and IHC analyses (91.3%, κ = 0.76 was found. A significant correlation between HER2 status and intestinal-type (p < .05 and differentiated carcinomas (p < .05 was also noted. The HER2 heterogeneity was high in gastric cancers; we found 68.8% phenotypic heterogeneity and 57.6% genotypic heterogeneity. Heterogeneity in HER2 protein expression and gene amplification showed a close association with diffuse histologic type and IHC 2+. Conclusions HER2 protein overexpression and gene amplification were detected in 24.5% and 15.9% of gastric cancer specimens, respectively. Intestinal-type showed a higher level of HER2 protein overexpression and gene amplification than diffuse type. HER2 status also showed a significant relationship with well- and moderately-differentiated carcinomas. The ratio of phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity of HER2 was high in gastric carcinomas and was associated with HER2 IHC 2+ and diffuse histologic type.

  11. Contractual heterogeneity in strategic alliances.

    OpenAIRE

    Reuer, Jeffrey J.; Ariño, Africa

    2002-01-01

    We investigate firms' alliance design choices by examining alliances as multifaceted contractual forms. The analysis explores the contractual heterogeneity underlying alternative governance structures for alliances, the bundling of different contractual provisions, and the dimensionality of the contractual completeness construct. The empirical evidence indicates that the complexity of collaborative agreements ­in terms of the number and stringency of provisions­ is greater for alliances that ...

  12. Investigations of ultrafast ligand rebinding to heme and heme proteins using temperature and strong magnetic field perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenyu

    This thesis is written to summarize investigations of the mechanisms that underlie the kinetics of diatomic ligand rebinding to the iron atom of the heme group, which is chelated inside heme proteins. The family of heme proteins is a major object of studies for several branches of scientific research activity. Understanding the ligand binding mechanisms and pathways is one of the major goals for biophysics. My interests mainly focus on the physics of this ligand binding process. Therefore, to investigate the problem, isolated from the influence of the protein matrix, Fe-protophorphyrin IX is chosen as the prototype system in my studies. Myoglobin, the most extensively and intensively studied protein, is another ideal system that allows coupling the protein polypeptide matrix into the investigation. A technique to synchro-lock two laser pulse trains electronically is applied to our pump-probe spectroscopic studies. Based on this technique, a two color, fs/ps pump-probe system is developed which extends the temporal window for our investigation to 13ns and fills a gap existing in previous pump-probe investigations. In order to apply this newly-developed pump-probe laser system to implement systematic studies on the kinetics of diatomic ligand (NO, CO, O2) rebinding to heme and heme proteins, several experimental setups are utilized. In Chapter 1, the essential background knowledge, which helps to understand the iron-ligand interaction, is briefly described. In Chapter 2, in addition to a description of the preparation protocols of protein samples and details of the method for data analysis, three home-made setups are described, which include: a picosecond laser regenerative amplifier, a pump-probe application along the bore (2-inch in diameter) of a superconducting magnet and a temperature-controllable cryostat for spinning sample cell. Chapter 3 presents high magnetic field studies of several heme-ligand or protein-ligand systems. Pump-probe spectroscopy is used to

  13. Pharmacoinformatics approach for investigation of alternative potential hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein 5B inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirza MU

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Muhammad Usman Mirza,1 Noor-Ul-Huda Ghori,2 Nazia Ikram,3 Abdur Rehman Adil,4 Sadia Manzoor3 1Centre for Research in Molecular Medicine (CRiMM, The University of Lahore, Lahore, 2Atta-ur-Rehman School of Applied Biosciences (ASAB, National University of Science and Technology, Islamabad, 3Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology (IMBB, The University of Lahore, Lahore, Pakistan; 4Centre for Excellence in Molecular Biology (CEMB, The University of Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan Abstract: Hepatitis C virus (HCV is one of the major viruses affecting the world today. It is a highly variable virus, having a rapid reproduction and evolution rate. The variability of genomes is due to hasty replication catalyzed by nonstructural protein 5B (NS5B which is also a potential target site for the development of anti-HCV agents. Recently, the US Food and Drug Administration approved sofosbuvir as a novel oral NS5B inhibitor for the treatment of HCV. Unfortunately, it is much highlighted for its pricing issues. Hence, there is an urgent need to scrutinize alternate therapies against HCV that are available at affordable price and do not have associated side effects. Such a need is crucial especially in underdeveloped countries. The search for various new bioactive compounds from plants is a key part of pharmaceutical research. In the current study, we applied a pharmacoinformatics-based approach for the identification of active plant-derived compounds against NS5B. The results were compared to docking results of sofosbuvir. The lead compounds with high-binding ligands were further analyzed for pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters based on in silico absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity (ADMET profile. The results showed the potential alternative lead compounds that can be developed into commercial drugs having high binding energy and promising ADMET properties. Keywords: hepatitis C, NS5B inhibitors, molecular docking, Auto

  14. A UK national survey of investigations for beta-lactam hypersensitivity - heterogeneity in practice and a need for national guidelines - on behalf of British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology (BSACI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, A G; Nasser, S M; Krishna, M T

    2013-08-01

    Beta lactams (BL) are the most widely prescribed antibiotics in the UK and the commonest cause of hypersensitivity reactions. There are no UK guidelines for BL testing and the most relevant guidelines were devised by the European Network for Drug Allergy (ENDA) on behalf of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. Delivery of allergy services differs across Europe, so this survey was designed to investigate how closely UK practice adhered to these guidelines. An online survey, using surveymonkey.com software, was sent to all consultants offering an allergy service in the UK and who were members of either BSACI or 'Travellers' (Immunology consultant group). The response rate was 48% (n=81/165) and BL allergy testing was undertaken by 78% of respondents. All responders requested SsIgE, although four responders stated they rarely requested. Skin testing was undertaken by 87% of respondents who perform beta lactam testing with 17% undertaking skin prick testing (SPT) only, 77% SPT followed by intra-dermal testing (IDT) if the former were negative or indeterminate and 6% SPT and IDT in all cases. The drugs, doses and protocols for skin testing varied considerably. Drug provocation testing was undertaken by 87% of respondents who undertake beta lactam testing with significant heterogeneity in protocols. Respondents that investigated ≤ 20 patients per year demonstrated lower adherence to ENDA recommendations compared to those who saw > 20. Following positive testing, 79% advised avoidance of all penicillins only and the remainder advised additional drug avoidance. This survey revealed variation in the investigation and management of BL hypersensitivity in the UK with some centres reporting procedures that could potentially put patients at risk of anaphylaxis if allergy was falsely excluded. This survey highlights an urgent need for evidence based national guidelines and standardisation of practice. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. DESIGN AND HETEROGENEOUS ENGINEERING:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nickelsen, Niels Christian; Binder, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    theory of ‘following traces’, ‘heterogeneous engineering’ and ‘programs and anti-programs’ will be useful for the study of designers, but their potential has not been fully explored. Thorough investigation of texts of design work as well as an empirical case from a rubber valve plant in Denmark leads us......This paper seeks a vocabulary to study designers at work. The paper draws on STS studies of scientists and laboratories. A number of studies are explored in order to identify different points of attention in studies of science and in studies of design. It is argued that the notions in actor network...... to the notions of “mind”. Designing is argued to be successful when it takes place as mindful interrelating between numbers of entities of different kinds. The subjectivity and “biographical trajectory” of the designer are argued to be of particular interest in order to understand design work. The notion of mind...

  16. A Molecular Dynamics Investigation of the Physical-Chemical Properties of Calicivirus Capsid Protein Adsorption to Fomites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeler, David; Matysiak, Silvina

    2013-03-01

    Any inanimate object with an exposed surface bears the possibility of hosting a virus and may therefore be labeled a fomite. This research hopes to distinguish which chemical-physical differences in fomite surface and virus capsid protein characteristics cause variations in virus adsorption through an alignment of in silico molecular dynamics simulations with in vitro measurements. The impact of surface chemistry on the adsorption of the human norovirus (HNV)-surrogate calicivirus capsid protein 2MS2 has been simulated for monomer and trimer structures and is reported in terms of protein-self assembled monolayer (SAM) binding free energy. The coarse-grained MARTINI forcefield was used to maximize spatial and temporal resolution while minimizing computational load. Future work will investigate the FCVF5 and SMSVS4 calicivirus trimers and will extend beyond hydrophobic and hydrophilic SAM surface chemistry to charged SAM surfaces in varying ionic concentrations. These results will be confirmed by quartz crystal microbalance experiments conducted by Dr. Wigginton at the University of Michigan. This should provide a novel method for predicting the transferability of viruses that cannot be studied in vitro such as dangerous foodborne and nosocomially-acquired viruses like HNV.

  17. Are Heterogeneous or Homogeneous Groups More Beneficial to Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schullery, Nancy M.; Schullery, Stephen E.

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the relative benefits to the student of working in homogeneous versus heterogeneous classroom groups. Correlation analysis of 18 desirable outcomes versus 8 personality-based heterogeneity variables reveals that heterogeneity associates with advantages as well as disadvantages. Ways in which group composition might be…

  18. Effects of Population Heterogeneity on Accuracy of DIF Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveri, María Elena; Ercikan, Kadriye; Zumbo, Bruno D.

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneity within English language learners (ELLs) groups has been documented. Previous research on differential item functioning (DIF) analyses suggests that accurate DIF detection rates are reduced greatly when groups are heterogeneous. In this simulation study, we investigated the effects of heterogeneity within linguistic (ELL) groups on…

  19. Spectroscopic and molecular modeling investigation on the binding of a synthesized steroidal amide to protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hua-xin, E-mail: h.x.zhang@yeah.net; Liu, E.

    2014-09-15

    Owing to the various valuable biological activities, steroidal amides have become a hot topic in steroidal pharmaceutical chemistry. In this paper, an anti-tumor steroid derivate (DAAO) was synthesized and identified. The interaction between DAAO and human serum albumin (HSA) was studied by fluorescence spectra, circular dichroism (CD) spectra, molecular modeling and molecular probe techniques. The results suggested that DAAO had reacted with HSA through hydrogen bonds and van der Waals power. The formation of DAAO–HSA complex at ground state led to static quenching of HSA's fluorescence. The number of binding sites, binding constants, enthalpy change (ΔH{sup θ}), Gibbs free energy change (ΔG{sup θ}) and entropy change (ΔS{sup θ}) were calculated at different temperatures based on fluorescence quenching theory and classic equation. Molecular modeling investigation indicated that DAAO was more inclined to absorb on Sudlow's site I in subdomain IIA of HSA molecule on grounds of the lowest energy principle and steric hindrance effect. The binding location was further confirmed by fluorescence probe experiment using warfarin (site I probe) for displacement. Furthermore, the conformational changes of HSA in presence of DAAO were investigated by CD spectra. The results could provide new evidence explaining the relationship between the chemical structure and biological activity and may be useful for understanding the anti-cancer mechanism of steroidal drug. - Highlights: • A designed steroidal amide compound (DAAO) was synthesized by introducing amido bonds into a steroid nucleus. • DAAO binds to Sudlow's site I in HSA through hydrogen bonds and van der Waals power. • The interaction was a spontaneous and exothermic process with modest degree of reversibility. • The secondary structure of HSA and the microenvironment of TRP214 altered. • Amido bond in steroid nucleus (–NH–CO–) plays important role in stabling the structure of

  20. Heterogeneous cellular networks

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Rose Qingyang

    2013-01-01

    A timely publication providing coverage of radio resource management, mobility management and standardization in heterogeneous cellular networks The topic of heterogeneous cellular networks has gained momentum in industry and the research community, attracting the attention of standardization bodies such as 3GPP LTE and IEEE 802.16j, whose objectives are looking into increasing the capacity and coverage of the cellular networks. This book focuses on recent progresses,  covering the related topics including scenarios of heterogeneous network deployment, interference management i

  1. Investigations into the Sarcomeric Protein and Ca2+-Regulation Abnormalities Underlying Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Cats (Felix catus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew E. Messer

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM is the most common single gene inherited cardiomyopathy. In cats (Felix catus HCM is even more prevalent and affects 16% of the outbred population and up to 26% in pedigree breeds such as Maine Coon and Ragdoll. Homozygous MYBPC3 mutations have been identified in these breeds but the mutations in other cats are unknown. At the clinical and physiological level feline HCM is closely analogous to human HCM but little is known about the primary causative mechanism. Most identified HCM causing mutations are in the genes coding for proteins of the sarcomere. We therefore investigated contractile and regulatory proteins in left ventricular tissue from 25 cats, 18 diagnosed with HCM, including a Ragdoll cat with a homozygous MYBPC3 R820W, and 7 non-HCM cats in comparison with human HCM (from septal myectomy and donor heart tissue. Myofibrillar protein expression was normal except that we observed 20–44% MyBP-C haploinsufficiency in 5 of the HCM cats. Troponin extracted from 8 HCM and 5 non-HCM cat hearts was incorporated into thin filaments and studied by in vitro motility assay. All HCM cat hearts had a higher (2.06 ± 0.13 fold Ca2+-sensitivity than non-HCM cats and, in all the HCM cats, Ca2+-sensitivity was not modulated by troponin I phosphorylation. We were able to restore modulation of Ca2+-sensitivity by replacing troponin T with wild-type protein or by adding 100 μM Epigallocatechin 3-gallate (EGCG. These fundamental regulatory characteristics closely mimic those seen in human HCM indicating a common molecular mechanism that is independent of the causative mutation. Thus, the HCM cat is a potentially useful large animal model.

  2. Investigations into the Sarcomeric Protein and Ca2+-Regulation Abnormalities Underlying Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Cats (Felix catus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messer, Andrew E.; Chan, Jasmine; Daley, Alex; Copeland, O'Neal; Marston, Steven B.; Connolly, David J.

    2017-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common single gene inherited cardiomyopathy. In cats (Felix catus) HCM is even more prevalent and affects 16% of the outbred population and up to 26% in pedigree breeds such as Maine Coon and Ragdoll. Homozygous MYBPC3 mutations have been identified in these breeds but the mutations in other cats are unknown. At the clinical and physiological level feline HCM is closely analogous to human HCM but little is known about the primary causative mechanism. Most identified HCM causing mutations are in the genes coding for proteins of the sarcomere. We therefore investigated contractile and regulatory proteins in left ventricular tissue from 25 cats, 18 diagnosed with HCM, including a Ragdoll cat with a homozygous MYBPC3 R820W, and 7 non-HCM cats in comparison with human HCM (from septal myectomy) and donor heart tissue. Myofibrillar protein expression was normal except that we observed 20–44% MyBP-C haploinsufficiency in 5 of the HCM cats. Troponin extracted from 8 HCM and 5 non-HCM cat hearts was incorporated into thin filaments and studied by in vitro motility assay. All HCM cat hearts had a higher (2.06 ± 0.13 fold) Ca2+-sensitivity than non-HCM cats and, in all the HCM cats, Ca2+-sensitivity was not modulated by troponin I phosphorylation. We were able to restore modulation of Ca2+-sensitivity by replacing troponin T with wild-type protein or by adding 100 μM Epigallocatechin 3-gallate (EGCG). These fundamental regulatory characteristics closely mimic those seen in human HCM indicating a common molecular mechanism that is independent of the causative mutation. Thus, the HCM cat is a potentially useful large animal model. PMID:28642712

  3. Practical considerations for investigation of protein conformational dynamics by {sup 15}N R{sub 1ρ} relaxation dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walinda, Erik [Kyoto University, Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Morimoto, Daichi; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Sugase, Kenji, E-mail: sugase@moleng.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Kyoto University, Department of Molecular Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that proteins are not static entities and that their function often critically depends on accurate sampling of multiple conformational states in aqueous solution. Accordingly, the development of methods to study conformational states in proteins beyond their ground-state structure (“excited states”) has crucial biophysical importance. Here we investigate experimental schemes for optimally probing chemical exchange processes in proteins on the micro- to millisecond timescale by {sup 15}N R{sub 1ρ} relaxation dispersion. The schemes use selective Hartmann–Hahn cross-polarization (CP) transfer for excitation, and derive peak integrals from 1D NMR spectra (Korzhnev et al. in J Am Chem Soc 127:713–721, 2005; Hansen et al. in J Am Chem Soc 131:3818–3819, 2009). Simulation and experiment collectively show that in such CP-based schemes care has to be taken to achieve accurate suppression of undesired off-resonance coherences, when using weak spin-lock fields. This then (i) ensures that relaxation dispersion profiles in the absence of chemical exchange are flat, and (ii) facilitates extraction of relaxation dispersion profiles in crowded regions of the spectrum. Further improvement in the quality of the experimental data is achieved by recording the free-induction decays in an interleaved manner and including a heating-compensation element. The reported considerations will particularly benefit the use of CP-based R{sub 1ρ} relaxation dispersion to analyze conformational exchange processes in larger proteins, where resonance line overlap becomes the main limiting factor.

  4. investigating acid production by Streptococcus mutans with a surface-displayed pH-sensitive green fluorescent protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihong Guo

    Full Text Available Acidogenicity and aciduricity are the main virulence factors of the cavity-causing bacterium Streptococcus mutans. Monitoring at the individual cell level the temporal and spatial distribution of acid produced by this important oral pathogen is central for our understanding of these key virulence factors especially when S. mutans resides in multi-species microbial communities. In this study, we explored the application of pH-sensitive green fluorescent proteins (pHluorins to investigate these important features. Ecliptic pHluorin was functionally displayed on the cell surface of S. mutans as a fusion protein with SpaP. The resulting strain (O87 was used to monitor temporal and spatial pH changes in the microenvironment of S. mutans cells under both planktonic and biofilm conditions. Using strain O87, we revealed a rapid pH drop in the microenviroment of S. mutans microcolonies prior to the decrease in the macro-environment pH following sucrose fermentation. Meanwhile, a non-uniform pH distribution was observed within S. mutans biofilms, reflecting differences in microbial metabolic activity. Furthermore, strain O87 was successfully used to monitor the S. mutans acid production profiles within dual- and multispecies oral biofilms. Based on these findings, the ecliptic pHluorin allows us to investigate in vivo and in situ acid production and distribution by the cariogenic species S. mutans.

  5. Neurobiological heterogeneity in ADHD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Zeeuw, P.

    2011-01-01

    Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a highly heterogeneous disorder clinically. Symptoms take many forms, from subtle but pervasive attention problems or dreaminess up to disruptive and unpredictable behavior. Interestingly, early neuroscientific work on ADHD assumed either a

  6. In-vitro Investigations of Skin Closure using Diode Laser and Protein Solder Containing Gold Nanoshells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Sadegh Nourbakhsh

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Laser tissue soldering is a new technique for repair of various tissues including the skin, liver, articular cartilage and nerves and is a promising alternative to suture. To overcome the problems of thermal damage to surrounding tissues and low laser penetration depth, some exogenous chromophores such as gold nanoshells, a new class of nanoparticles consisting of a dielectric core surrounded by a thin metal shell, are used. The aims of this study were to use two different concentrations of gold nanoshells as the exogenous material for skin tissue soldering and also to examine the effects of laser soldering parameters on the properties of the repaired skin. Material and Methods: Two mixtures of albumin solder and different concentrations of gold nanoshells were prepared. A full thickness incision of 2×20 mm2 was made on the surface and after placing 50 μl of the solder mixture on the incision, an 810 nm diode laser was used to irradiate it at different power densities. The changes of tensile strength, σt, due to temperature rise, number of scan (Ns, and scan velocity (Vs were investigated. Results: The results showed that the tensile strength of the repaired skin increased with increasing irradiance for both gold nanoshell concentrations. In addition, at constant laser irradiance (I, the tensile strength of the repaired incision increased with increasing Ns and decreasing Vs. In our case, this corresponded to st = 1610 g/cm2 at I ~ 60 Wcm-2, T ~ 65ºC, Ns = 10 and Vs = 0.2 mms-1. Discussion and Conclusion: Gold nanoshells can be used as an indocyanine green dye (ICG alterative for laser tissue soldering.  Although by increasing the laser power density, the tensile strength of the repaired skin increases, an optimum power density must be considered due to the resulting increase in tissue temperature.

  7. A protein diet score, including plant and animal protein, investigating the association with HbA1c and eGFR - the PREVIEW project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Grith; Sluik, Diewertje; Ritz, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Higher-protein diets have been advocated for body-weight regulation for the past few decades. However, the potential health risks of these diets are still uncertain. We aimed to develop a protein score based on the quantity and source of protein, and to examine the association of the score...... with glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Analyses were based on three population studies included in the PREVIEW project (PREVention of diabetes through lifestyle Intervention and population studies in Europe and around the World): NQplus, Lifelines, and the Young Finns...... Study. Cross-sectional data from food-frequency questionnaires (n = 76,777 subjects) were used to develop a protein score consisting of two components: 1) percentage of energy from total protein, and 2) plant to animal protein ratio. An inverse association between protein score and HbA1c (slope -0...

  8. Simulation study on heterogeneous variance adjustment for observations with different measurement error variance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pitkänen, Timo; Mäntysaari, Esa A; Nielsen, Ulrik Sander

    2013-01-01

    of variance correction is developed for the same observations. As automated milking systems are becoming more popular the current evaluation model needs to be enhanced to account for the different measurement error variances of observations from automated milking systems. In this simulation study different...... models and different approaches to account for heterogeneous variance when observations have different measurement error variances were investigated. Based on the results we propose to upgrade the currently applied models and to calibrate the heterogeneous variance adjustment method to yield same genetic......The Nordic Holstein yield evaluation model describes all available milk, protein and fat test-day yields from Denmark, Finland and Sweden. In its current form all variance components are estimated from observations recorded under conventional milking systems. Also the model for heterogeneity...

  9. Gradient simulation experiments for targeting population heterogeneity in continuous Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heins, Anna-Lena; Lencastre Fernandes, Rita; Lundin, L.

    of population heterogeneity, a Saccharomyces cerevisiae growth reporter strain based on the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) was constructed which allows to perform single cell analysis, and thereby created the possibility to map population heterogeneity. A factorial design experiment of the growth...... experience rapid changes in environmental conditions as they circulate throughout the reactor, which might pose stress on the cells, affect their metabolism and consequently affect the level of heterogeneity of the population. To further investigate these phenomena and gain a deeper understanding...... of the growth rate reporter strain was performed and the physiological changes were analysed on a single cell level. From the simulation experiment it could be demonstrated that glucose had a clear influence on subpopulation distribution....

  10. Protein and Peptide Gas-phase Structure Investigation Using Collision Cross Section Measurements and Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar

    Protein and peptide gas-phase structure analysis provides the opportunity to study these species outside of their explicit environment where the interaction network with surrounding molecules makes the analysis difficult [1]. Although gas-phase structure analysis offers a unique opportunity to study the intrinsic behavior of these biomolecules [2-4], proteins and peptides exhibit very low vapor pressures [2]. Peptide and protein ions can be rendered in the gas-phase using electrospray ionization (ESI) [5]. There is a growing body of literature that shows proteins and peptides can maintain solution structures during the process of ESI and these structures can persist for a few hundred milliseconds [6-9]. Techniques for monitoring gas-phase protein and peptide ion structures are categorized as physical probes and chemical probes. Collision cross section (CCS) measurement, being a physical probe, is a powerful method to investigate gas-phase structure size [3, 7, 10-15]; however, CCS values alone do not establish a one to one relation with structure(i.e., the CCS value is an orientationally averaged value [15-18]. Here we propose the utility of gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX) as a second criterion of structure elucidation. The proposed approach incudes extensive MD simulations to sample biomolecular ion conformation space with the production of numerous, random in-silico structures. Subsequently a CCS can be calculated for these structures and theoretical CCS values are compared with experimental values to produce a pool of candidate structures. Utilizing a chemical reaction model based on the gas-phase HDX mechanism, the HDX kinetics behavior of these candidate structures are predicted and compared to experimental results to nominate the best in-silico structures which match (chemically and physically) with experimental observations. For the predictive approach to succeed, an extensive technique and method development is essential. To combine CCS

  11. Investigation of a Potential Scintigraphic Tracer for Imaging Apoptosis: Radioiodinated Annexin V-Kunitz Protease Inhibitor Fusion Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Hsiu Liao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiolabeled annexin V (ANV has been widely used for imaging cell apoptosis. Recently, a novel ANV-Kunitz-type protease inhibitor fusion protein, ANV-6L15, was found to be a promising probe for improved apoptosis detection based on its higher affinity to phosphatidylserine (PS compared to native ANV. The present paper investigates the feasibility of apoptosis detection using radioiodinated ANV-6L15. Native ANV and ANV-6L15 were labeled with iodine-123 and iodine-125 using Iodogen method. The binding between the radioiodinated proteins and erythrocyte ghosts or chemical-induced apoptotic cells was examined. ANV-6L15 can be radioiodinated with high yield (40%−60% and excellent radiochemical purity (>95%. 123I-ANV-6L15 exhibited a higher binding ratio to erythrocyte ghosts and apoptotic cells compared to 123I-ANV. The biodistribution of 123I-ANV-6L15 in mice was also characterized. 123I-ANV-6L15 was rapidly cleared from the blood. High uptake in the liver and the kidneys may limit the evaluation of apoptosis in abdominal regions. Our data suggest that radiolabled ANV-6L15 may be a better scintigraphic tracer than native ANV for apoptosis detection.

  12. Bio-templated CdSe quantum dots green synthesis in the functional protein, lysozyme, and biological activity investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Qisui; Li, Song; Liu, Peng; Min, Xinmin

    2012-01-01

    Bifunctional fluorescence (CdSe Quantum Dots) – protein (Lysozyme) nanocomposites were synthesized at room temperature by a protein-directed, solution-phase, green-synthetic method. Fluorescence (FL) and absorption spectra showed that CdSe QDs were prepared successfully with Lyz. The average particle size and crystalline structure of QDs were investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. With attenuated total reflection-fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectra and thermogravimetric (TG) analysis, it was confirmed that there is interaction between QDs and amide I, amide II groups in Lyz. FL polarization was measured and FL imaging was done to monitor whether QDs could be responsible for possible changes in the conformation and activity of Lyz. Interestingly, the results showed Lyz still retain the biological activity after formation of QDs, but the secondary structure of the Lyz was changed. And the advantage of this synthesis method is producing excellent fluorescent QDs with specifically biological function. -- Highlights: ► Lysozyme-directed green synthesis of CdSe quantum dots. ► Lysozyme still retain the biological activity after formation of CdSe. ► The method is the production of fluorescent QDs with highly specific and functions.

  13. SANS investigation of the Self-organization behavior in Synthetic Resilin Gels: A Perfect Rubber-like protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, N.K.; Tran, N.D.; Roy Choudhury, N.; Hill, A.J.; Elvin, C.; Knott, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Elastic proteins are observed in a wide range of biological systems, from plants to invertebrates to humans, where they have evolved to fulfill precise biological function. The elasticity of resilins is exploited by animals in locomotion, through storing energy, especially in jumping and flight. Resilins are composed of naturally occurring protein polymers in which biological control of the polypeptide sequence made a material with mechanical and resilience characteristics superior to any synthetic and non-peptide natural polymer. We have successfully cloned, expressed and in vitro crosslinked insect pro-resilin to prepare resilin like polypeptide (Jaano-Resilin) with unusual viscoelastic characteristics with resilience characteristics more than 95% in preferred swollen gel state. The molecular basis of the unusual resilience characteristics of the resilin-gel is unknown but of significant scientific interest. In this research investigation Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) has be employed to explore the self-organisation behaviour of crosslinked resilin gel in equilibrium-swollen condition over a wide range of temperature (5 to 80 degrees C). The effect of drying and re-swelling on the organisational behaviour has been established. We also evaluate the viscoelastic characteristic of this resilin elastomer gels over a wide range of experimental conditions. The correlation between self-organisation and unique resilience behaviour will also be discussed. (authors)

  14. Green heterogeneous wireless networks

    CERN Document Server

    Ismail, Muhammad; Nee, Hans-Peter; Qaraqe, Khalid A; Serpedin, Erchin

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on the emerging research topic "green (energy efficient) wireless networks" which has drawn huge attention recently from both academia and industry. This topic is highly motivated due to important environmental, financial, and quality-of-experience (QoE) considerations. Specifically, the high energy consumption of the wireless networks manifests in approximately 2% of all CO2 emissions worldwide. This book presents the authors’ visions and solutions for deployment of energy efficient (green) heterogeneous wireless communication networks. The book consists of three major parts. The first part provides an introduction to the "green networks" concept, the second part targets the green multi-homing resource allocation problem, and the third chapter presents a novel deployment of device-to-device (D2D) communications and its successful integration in Heterogeneous Networks (HetNets). The book is novel in that it specifically targets green networking in a heterogeneous wireless medium, which re...

  15. Cooking temperature is a key determinant of in vitro meat protein digestion rate: investigation of underlying mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bax, Marie-Laure; Aubry, Laurent; Ferreira, Claude; Daudin, Jean-Dominique; Gatellier, Philippe; Rémond, Didier; Santé-Lhoutellier, Véronique

    2012-03-14

    The present study aimed to evaluate the digestion rate and nutritional quality of pig muscle proteins in relation to different meat processes (aging, mincing, and cooking). Under our experimental conditions, aging and mincing had little impact on protein digestion. Heat treatments had different temperature-dependent effects on the meat protein digestion rate and degradation potential. At 70 °C, the proteins underwent denaturation that enhanced the speed of pepsin digestion by increasing enzyme accessibility to protein cleavage sites. Above 100 °C, oxidation-related protein aggregation slowed pepsin digestion but improved meat protein overall digestibility. The digestion parameters defined here open new insights on the dynamics governing the in vitro digestion of meat protein. However, the effect of cooking temperature on protein digestion observed in vitro needs to be confirmed in vivo.

  16. Laser-optical investigation of the effect of diamond nanoparticles on the structure and functional properties of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perevedentseva, Elena V; Su, F.Y.; Su, T.H.; Lin, Y.C.; Cheng, C.L.; Karmenyan, A V; Priezzhev, A V; Lugovtsov, Andrei E

    2011-01-01

    Adsorption of such blood plasma proteins as albumin and g-globulin on diamond nanoparticles of size around 5 nm and around 100 nm is observed and studied using laser-optical methods. The adsorption of blood plasma proteins at physiological pH 7.4 is found weaker than that of enzyme protein lysozyme. The observed variations in the Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectra of proteins may be due to structural transformations of the adsorbed protein. Using the lysozyme as a test protein we show that the protein adsorption leading to observable changes in the FTIR spectrum (the band of Amide I) also induces a significant decrease in the protein functional activity. It is also found that the influence of ∼5-nm diamond nanoparticles on the protein structure and functions is more significant than that of ∼100-nm nanodiamonds. (application of lasers and laser-optical methods in life sciences)

  17. Isotopes in heterogeneous catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Hargreaves, Justin SJ

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to review the current, state-of-the-art application of isotopic methods to the field of heterogeneous catalysis. Isotopic studies are arguably the ultimate technique in in situ methods for heterogeneous catalysis. In this review volume, chapters have been contributed by experts in the field and the coverage includes both the application of specific isotopes - Deuterium, Tritium, Carbon-14, Sulfur-35 and Oxygen-18 - as well as isotopic techniques - determination of surface mobility, steady state transient isotope kinetic analysis, and positron emission profiling.

  18. [Investigations on the relation between differentiation and the composition of soluble protein of tissue cultures and leaves of daucus carota].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, K H; Pauler, B

    1969-12-01

    The correlations between differentiation, the amino acid composition of total protein and of soluble protein, and the disc electrophoretic distribution of soluble protein of carrot tissue cultures and of carrot plants (leaves) were studied. In spite of pronounced and characteristic changes in the electrophoretic distribution of the components of soluble protein in various developmental stages of both bioassays, no significant differences in the amino acid composition of protein were observed. With progressive development of whole carrot plants and of carrot tissue cultures, the number of protein bands on disc electropherogramms increased.

  19. DbPTM 3.0: an informative resource for investigating substrate site specificity and functional association of protein post-translational modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Cheng-Tsung; Huang, Kai-Yao; Su, Min-Gang; Lee, Tzong-Yi; Bretaña, Neil Arvin; Chang, Wen-Chi; Chen, Yi-Ju; Chen, Yu-Ju; Huang, Hsien-Da

    2013-01-01

    Protein modification is an extremely important post-translational regulation that adjusts the physical and chemical properties, conformation, stability and activity of a protein; thus altering protein function. Due to the high throughput of mass spectrometry (MS)-based methods in identifying site-specific post-translational modifications (PTMs), dbPTM (http://dbPTM.mbc.nctu.edu.tw/) is updated to integrate experimental PTMs obtained from public resources as well as manually curated MS/MS peptides associated with PTMs from research articles. Version 3.0 of dbPTM aims to be an informative resource for investigating the substrate specificity of PTM sites and functional association of PTMs between substrates and their interacting proteins. In order to investigate the substrate specificity for modification sites, a newly developed statistical method has been applied to identify the significant substrate motifs for each type of PTMs containing sufficient experimental data. According to the data statistics in dbPTM, >60% of PTM sites are located in the functional domains of proteins. It is known that most PTMs can create binding sites for specific protein-interaction domains that work together for cellular function. Thus, this update integrates protein-protein interaction and domain-domain interaction to determine the functional association of PTM sites located in protein-interacting domains. Additionally, the information of structural topologies on transmembrane (TM) proteins is integrated in dbPTM in order to delineate the structural correlation between the reported PTM sites and TM topologies. To facilitate the investigation of PTMs on TM proteins, the PTM substrate sites and the structural topology are graphically represented. Also, literature information related to PTMs, orthologous conservations and substrate motifs of PTMs are also provided in the resource. Finally, this version features an improved web interface to facilitate convenient access to the resource.

  20. Heterogeneous continuous-time random walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebenkov, Denis S.; Tupikina, Liubov

    2018-01-01

    We introduce a heterogeneous continuous-time random walk (HCTRW) model as a versatile analytical formalism for studying and modeling diffusion processes in heterogeneous structures, such as porous or disordered media, multiscale or crowded environments, weighted graphs or networks. We derive the exact form of the propagator and investigate the effects of spatiotemporal heterogeneities onto the diffusive dynamics via the spectral properties of the generalized transition matrix. In particular, we show how the distribution of first-passage times changes due to local and global heterogeneities of the medium. The HCTRW formalism offers a unified mathematical language to address various diffusion-reaction problems, with numerous applications in material sciences, physics, chemistry, biology, and social sciences.

  1. Exploring heterogeneous market hypothesis using realized volatility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Wen Cheong; Isa, Zaidi; Mohd Nor, Abu Hassan Shaari

    2013-04-01

    This study investigates the heterogeneous market hypothesis using high frequency data. The cascaded heterogeneous trading activities with different time durations are modelled by the heterogeneous autoregressive framework. The empirical study indicated the presence of long memory behaviour and predictability elements in the financial time series which supported heterogeneous market hypothesis. Besides the common sum-of-square intraday realized volatility, we also advocated two power variation realized volatilities in forecast evaluation and risk measurement in order to overcome the possible abrupt jumps during the credit crisis. Finally, the empirical results are used in determining the market risk using the value-at-risk approach. The findings of this study have implications for informationally market efficiency analysis, portfolio strategies and risk managements.

  2. Protein Internal Dynamics Associated With Pre-System Glass Transition Temperature Endothermic Events: Investigation of Insulin and Human Growth Hormone by Solid State Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Rui; Grobelny, Pawel J; Bogner, Robin H; Pikal, Michael J

    2016-11-01

    Lyophilized proteins are generally stored below their glass transition temperature (T g ) to maintain long-term stability. Some proteins in the (pure) solid state showed a distinct endotherm at a temperature well below the glass transition, designated as a pre-T g endotherm. The pre-T g endothermic event has been linked with a transition in protein internal mobility. The aim of this study was to investigate the internal dynamics of 2 proteins, insulin and human growth hormone (hGH), both of which exhibit the pre-T g endothermic event with onsets at 50°C-60°C. Solid state hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange of both proteins was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy over a temperature range from 30°C to 80°C. A distinct sigmoidal transition in the extent of H/D exchange had a midpoint of 56.1 ± 1.2°C for insulin and 61.7 ± 0.9°C for hGH, suggesting a transition to greater mobility in the protein molecules at these temperatures. The data support the hypothesis that the pre-T g event is related to a transition in internal protein mobility associated with the protein dynamical temperature. Exceeding the protein dynamical temperature is expected to activate protein internal motion and therefore may have stability consequences. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Why does heterogeneity matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    K.B. Pierce

    2007-01-01

    This is a review of the book "Ecosystem function in heterogeneous landscapes" published in 2005. The authors are G. Lovett, C. Jones, M.G. Turner, and K.C. Weathers. It was published by Springer, New York. The book is a synthesis of the 10th Gary conference held at the Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook, New York, in 2003.

  4. Heterogeneity and option pricing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benninga, Simon; Mayshar, Joram

    2000-01-01

    An economy with agents having constant yet heterogeneous degrees of relative risk aversion prices assets as though there were a single decreasing relative risk aversion pricing representative agent. The pricing kernel has fat tails and option prices do not conform to the Black-Scholes formula.

  5. Heterogeneous computing in economics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dziubinski, Matt P.; Grassi, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    This paper shows the potential of heterogeneous computing in solving dynamic equilibrium models in economics. We illustrate the power and simplicity of C++ Accelerated Massive Parallelism (C++ AMP) recently introduced by Microsoft. Starting from the same exercise as Aldrich et al. (J Econ Dyn...

  6. Investigation the Response of Some Proteins That Involved in Cachexia Syndrome to Acute Resistance Exercise in Healthy Elderly People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meysam Gholamali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the response of plasma Myostatin and insulin growth factor like-1 (IGF-1, as two most important proteins that involved in Cachexia syndrome, to acute resistance exercise in healthy elderly people. Methods & Materials: Twelve healthy older men (Age=67±1.3 years, BMI=25±1.4 kg/m2 volunteered for participation in this study. 72 hours after the determination of muscular maximal strength (by 1-RM test, subjects participated in acute resistance exercises via 75% 1-RM. In this research, two blood samples were collected at before and immediately after the exercise from Antecubital vein. Plasma Myostatin and serum levels of IGF-1 were measured by ELISA methods. Paired T-Test used for statical analyses of research data. Significant level was set at P≤0.05. Results: The results of this study showed that plasma Myostatin significantly decreased in response to resistance exercise (P=0.0001. Also the serum levels of IGF-1 increased significantly in response to resistance exercise (P=0.0001. In turn, the results reveled that the IGF-1 to Myostatin ratio increased significantly in response to resistance exercise (P=0.001. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that resistance exercise through increases of IGF-1 and decreases of Myostatin causes increment of IGF-1 to Myostatin ratio. According to the results of this study it seems prescription of resistance exercise could positive changes in proteins that involved in Cachexia syndrome in elderly people. Presumably, through this way we can prevent from Cachexia and its many physiological and physical related dysfunctions in theses people. Although more study is needed to clear its mechanisms.

  7. Protein structural changes in keratin fibers induced by chemical modification using 2-iminothiolane hydrochloride: a Raman spectroscopic investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzuhara, Akio

    2005-11-01

    For the purpose of investigating in detail the influence of chemical modification using 2-iminothiolane hydrochloride (2-IT) on keratin fibers, the structure of cross-sections at various depths of white human hair, treated with 2-IT and then oxidized, was directly analyzed without isolating the cuticle and cortex, using Raman spectroscopy. In particular, the beta-sheet and/or random coil content (beta/R) and the alpha-helix (alpha) content in human hair fibers were estimated by amide I band analysis. The S-S band intensity, amide III (unordered) band intensity, and beta/R content existing from the cuticle region to the center of cortex region of virgin white human hair remarkably increased by performing the chemical modification using 2-IT. On the other hand, not only the S-S band intensity, but also S-O band intensity existing throughout the cortex region of the bleached (damaged) white human hair increased by performing chemical modification using 2-IT. In particular, beta/R content existing throughout the cortex region of the bleached white human hair decreased, while the skeletal C-C stretch (alpha) band intensity at 935 cm(-1) and the alpha content remarkably increased. This indicates a secondary structural change from the random coil form to the alpha-helix form in the proteins existing throughout the cortex region. From these experiments, we concluded that the formation of new disulfide (-SS-) groups resulting from chemical modification using 2-IT induced the secondary structural changes of proteins existing throughout the cortex region. Copyright 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  8. Heterogeneous Materials I and Heterogeneous Materials II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowles, K M

    2004-01-01

    In these two volumes the author provides a comprehensive survey of the various mathematically-based models used in the research literature to predict the mechanical, thermal and electrical properties of hetereogeneous materials, i.e., materials containing two or more phases such as fibre-reinforced polymers, cast iron and porous ceramic kiln furniture. Volume I covers linear properties such as linear dielectric constant, effective electrical conductivity and elastic moduli, while Volume II covers nonlinear properties, fracture and atomistic and multiscale modelling. Where appropriate, particular attention is paid to the use of fractal geometry and percolation theory in describing the structure and properties of these materials. The books are advanced level texts reflecting the research interests of the author which will be of significant interest to research scientists working at the forefront of the areas covered by the books. Others working more generally in the field of materials science interested in comparing predictions of properties with experimental results may well find the mathematical level quite daunting initially, as it is apparent that the author assumes a level of mathematics consistent with that taught in final year undergraduate and graduate theoretical physics courses. However, for such readers it is well worth persevering because of the in-depth coverage to which the various models are subjected, and also because of the extensive reference lists at the back of both volumes which direct readers to the various source references in the scientific literature. Thus, for the wider materials science scientific community the two volumes will be a valuable library resource. While I would have liked to see more comparison with experimental data on both ideal and 'real' heterogeneous materials than is provided by the author and a discussion of how to model strong nonlinear current--voltage behaviour in systems such as zinc oxide varistors, my overall

  9. Investigating the Relationship between Test-Taker Background Characteristics and Test Performance in a Heterogeneous English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) Test Population: A Factor Analytic Approach. Research Report. ETS RR-15-25

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, Venessa F.; Yoo, Hanwook

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the heterogeneity in the English-as-a-second-language (ESL) test population by modeling the relationship between test-taker background characteristics and test performance as measured by the "TOEFL iBT"® using a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) with covariate approach. The background characteristics studied…

  10. Proteomic investigation of Vibrio alginolyticus challenged Caenorhabditis elegans revealed regulation of cellular homeostasis proteins and their role in supporting innate immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durai, Sellegounder; Singh, Nirpendra; Kundu, Suman; Balamurugan, Krishnaswamy

    2014-08-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans has been the preferred model system for many investigators to study pathogenesis. In the present investigation, regulation of C. elegans proteome was explored against V. alginolyticus infection using quantitative proteomics approach. Proteins were separated using 2D-DIGE and the differentially regulated proteins were identified using PMF and MALDI TOF/TOF analysis. The results thus obtained were validated using Western blotting for candidate proteins. The corresponding transcriptional regulation was quantified subsequently using real-time PCR. Interaction network for candidate proteins was predicted using search tool for the retrieval of interacting genes/proteins (STRING) and functional validation was performed using respective mutant strains. Out of the 25 proteins identified, 21 proteins appeared to be upregulated while four were downregulated. Upregulated proteins included those involved in stress-response (PDI-2, HSP-6), immune-response (protein kinase -18, GST-8) and energy-production (ATP-2) while proteins involved in structural maintenance (IFB-2) and lipid metabolism (SODH-1) were downregulated. The roles of these players in the host system during Vibrio infection was analyzed in vivo using wild type and mutant C. elegans. Survival assays using mutants lacking pdi-2, ire-1, and xbp-1 displayed enhanced susceptibility to V. alginolyticus. Cellular stress generated by V. alginolyticus was determined using ROS assay. This is the first report of proteome changes in C. elegans against V. alginolyticus challenge and highlights the significance of unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway during bacterial infection. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Investigation of protein distribution in solid lipid particles and its impact on protein release using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophersen, Philip C.; Birch, Ditlev; Saarinen, Jukka

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to gain new insights into protein distribution in solid lipid microparticles (SLMs) and subsequent release mechanisms using a novel label-free chemical imaging method, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. Lysozyme-loaded SLMs were prepared using...... in the solid lipid matrix, which required full lipolysis of the entire matrix to release lysozyme completely. Therefore, SLMs with lysozyme incorporated in an aqueous solution released lysozyme much faster than with lysozyme incorporated as a solid. In conclusion, CARS microscopy was an efficient and non......-destructive method for elucidating the distribution of lysozyme in SLMs. The interpretation of protein distribution and release during lipolysis enabled elucidation of protein release mechanisms. In future, CARS microscopy analysis could facilitate development of a wide range of protein-lipid matrices with tailor...

  12. Dietary intake of total, animal, and vegetable protein and risk of type 2 diabetes in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-NL study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluijs, Ivonne; Beulens, Joline W J; van der A, Daphne L; Spijkerman, Annemieke M W; Grobbee, Diederick E; van der Schouw, Yvonne T

    2010-01-01

    Dietary recommendations are focused mainly on relative dietary fat and carbohydrate content in relation to diabetes risk. Meanwhile, high-protein diets may contribute to disturbance of glucose metabolism, but evidence from prospective studies is scarce. We examined the association among dietary total, vegetable, and animal protein intake and diabetes incidence and whether consuming 5 energy % from protein at the expense of 5 energy % from either carbohydrates or fat was associated with diabetes risk. A prospective cohort study was conducted among 38,094 participants of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-NL study. Dietary protein intake was measured with a validated food frequency questionnaire. Incident diabetes was verified against medical records. During 10 years of follow-up, 918 incident cases of diabetes were documented. Diabetes risk increased with higher total protein (hazard ratio 2.15 [95% CI 1.77-2.60] highest vs. lowest quartile) and animal protein (2.18 [1.80-2.63]) intake. Adjustment for confounders did not materially change these results. Further adjustment for adiposity measures attenuated the associations. Vegetable protein was not related to diabetes. Consuming 5 energy % from total or animal protein at the expense of 5 energy % from carbohydrates or fat increased diabetes risk. Diets high in animal protein are associated with an increased diabetes risk. Our findings also suggest a similar association for total protein itself instead of only animal sources. Consumption of energy from protein at the expense of energy from either carbohydrates or fat may similarly increase diabetes risk. This finding indicates that accounting for protein content in dietary recommendations for diabetes prevention may be useful.

  13. Conformational Flexibility of Proteins Involved in Ribosome Biogenesis: Investigations via Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dritan Siliqi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The dynamism of proteins is central to their function, and several proteins have been described as flexible, as consisting of multiple domains joined by flexible linkers, and even as intrinsically disordered. Several techniques exist to study protein structures, but small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS has proven to be particularly powerful for the quantitative analysis of such flexible systems. In the present report, we have used SAXS in combination with X-ray crystallography to highlight their usefulness at characterizing flexible proteins, using as examples two proteins involved in different steps of ribosome biogenesis. The yeast BRCA2 and CDKN1A-interactig protein, Bcp1, is a chaperone for Rpl23 of unknown structure. We showed that it consists of a rigid, slightly elongated protein, with a secondary structure comprising a mixture of alpha helices and beta sheets. As an example of a flexible molecule, we studied the SBDS (Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond Syndrome protein that is involved in the cytoplasmic maturation of the 60S subunit and constitutes the mutated target in the Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome. In solution, this protein coexists in an ensemble of three main conformations, with the N- and C-terminal ends adopting different orientations with respect to the central domain. The structure observed in the protein crystal corresponds to an average of those predicted by the SAXS flexibility analysis.

  14. Hierarchical structure of the energy landscape of proteins revisited by time series analysis. II. Investigation of explicit solvent effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alakent, Burak; Camurdan, Mehmet C.; Doruker, Pemra

    2005-10-01

    Time series analysis tools are employed on the principal modes obtained from the Cα trajectories from two independent molecular-dynamics simulations of α-amylase inhibitor (tendamistat). Fluctuations inside an energy minimum (intraminimum motions), transitions between minima (interminimum motions), and relaxations in different hierarchical energy levels are investigated and compared with those encountered in vacuum by using different sampling window sizes and intervals. The low-frequency low-indexed mode relationship, established in vacuum, is also encountered in water, which shows the reliability of the important dynamics information offered by principal components analysis in water. It has been shown that examining a short data collection period (100ps) may result in a high population of overdamped modes, while some of the low-frequency oscillations (memory: future conformations are less dependent on previous conformations due to the lowering of energy barriers in hierarchical levels of the energy landscape. In short-time dynamics (sight contradicts. However, this comes about because water enhances the transitions between minima and forces the protein to reduce its already inherent inability to maintain oscillations observed in vacuum. Some of the frequencies lower than 10cm-1 are found to be overdamped, while those higher than 20cm-1 are slightly increased. As for the long-time dynamics in water, it is found that random-walk motion is maintained for approximately 200ps (about five times of that in vacuum) in the low-indexed modes, showing the lowering of energy barriers between the higher-level minima.

  15. Investigation of the somaclonal and mutagen induced variability in barley by the application of protein and DNA markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atanassov, A.; Todorovska, E.; Trifonova, A.; Petrova, M.; Marinova, E.; Gramatikova, M.; Valcheva, D.; Zaprianov, S.; Mersinkov, N.

    1998-01-01

    Barley, Hordeum vulgare L., is one of the most important crop species for Bulgaria. The characterisation of the genetic pool is of great necessity for the Bulgarian barley breeding programme which is directed toward improving quantitative and qualitative traits. Molecular markers [protein, restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)] have been applied to characterise the Bulgarian barley cultivars and their regenerants. The changes in DNA loci coding for 26S, 5.8S and 18S rRNA repeats, C hordein locus and mitochondrial DNA organisation have been investigated. The potential for ribosomal DNA length polymorphism in Bulgarian barley cultivars appear to be limited to three different repeat lengths (10.2, 9.5 and 9.0kb) and three plant rDNA phenotypes. Polymorphism was not observed in ribosomal DNA repeat units in somaclonal variants. Variation concerning C hordein electrophoretic pattern was observed in one line from cultivar Jubiley. Analysis of the HorI locus reveals RFLPs in sequences coding for C hordeins in this line. Mitochondrial molecular markers are convenient for detection of DNA polymorphisms in the variant germplasm as well as for the somaclonal variants derived from it. Two lines from Ruen revealed polymorphic bands after hybridisation with mitochondrial DNA probe. RAPD assays have been carried out by using 20 different 10-mer primers. Heritable polymorphism in several tissue culture derived (TCD) lines was observed. RAPD assay is a sensitive and representative approach to distinguish the variability created by tissue culture and mutagenesis

  16. A Versatile Strategy for Production of Membrane Proteins with Diverse Topologies: Application to Investigation of Bacterial Homologues of Human Divalent Metal Ion and Nucleoside Transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Cheng; Hao, Zhenyu; Huysmans, Gerard; Lesiuk, Amelia; Bullough, Per; Wang, Yingying; Bartlam, Mark; Phillips, Simon E; Young, James D; Goldman, Adrian; Baldwin, Stephen A; Postis, Vincent L G

    2015-01-01

    Membrane proteins play key roles in many biological processes, from acquisition of nutrients to neurotransmission, and are targets for more than 50% of current therapeutic drugs. However, their investigation is hampered by difficulties in their production and purification on a scale suitable for structural studies. In particular, the nature and location of affinity tags introduced for the purification of recombinant membrane proteins can greatly influence their expression levels by affecting their membrane insertion. The extent of such effects typically depends on the transmembrane topologies of the proteins, which for proteins of unknown structure are usually uncertain. For example, attachment of oligohistidine tags to the periplasmic termini of membrane proteins often interferes with folding and drastically impairs expression in Escherichia coli. To circumvent this problem we have employed a novel strategy to enable the rapid production of constructs bearing a range of different affinity tags compatible with either cytoplasmic or periplasmic attachment. Tags include conventional oligohistidine tags compatible with cytoplasmic attachment and, for attachment to proteins with a periplasmic terminus, either tandem Strep-tag II sequences or oligohistidine tags fused to maltose binding protein and a signal sequence. Inclusion of cleavage sites for TEV or HRV-3C protease enables tag removal prior to crystallisation trials or a second step of purification. Together with the use of bioinformatic approaches to identify members of membrane protein families with topologies favourable to cytoplasmic tagging, this has enabled us to express and purify multiple bacterial membrane transporters. To illustrate this strategy, we describe here its use to purify bacterial homologues of human membrane proteins from the Nramp and ZIP families of divalent metal cation transporters and from the concentrative nucleoside transporter family. The proteins are expressed in E. coli in a

  17. Micromechanics of heterogeneous materials

    CERN Document Server

    Buryachenko, Valeriy

    2007-01-01

    Here is an accurate and timely account of micromechanics, which spans materials science, mechanical engineering, applied mathematics, technical physics, geophysics, and biology. The book features rigorous and unified theoretical methods of applied mathematics and statistical physics in the material science of microheterogeneous media. Uniquely, it offers a useful demonstration of the systematic and fundamental research of the microstructure of the wide class of heterogeneous materials of natural and synthetic nature.

  18. Heterogeneous policies, heterogeneous technologies: The case of renewable energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolli, Francesco; Vona, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates empirically the effect of market regulation and renewable energy policies on innovation activity in different renewable energy technologies. For the EU countries and the years 1980 to 2007, we built a unique dataset containing information on patent production in eight different technologies, proxies of market regulation and technology-specific renewable energy policies. Our main finding is that, compared to privatisation and unbundling, reducing entry barriers is a more significant driver of renewable energy innovation, but that its effect varies across technologies and is stronger in technologies characterised by potential entry of small, independent power producers. In addition, the inducement effect of renewable energy policies is heterogeneous and more pronounced for wind, which is the only technology that is mature and has high technological potential. Finally, ratification of the Kyoto protocol, which determined a more stable and less uncertain policy framework, amplifies the inducement effect of both energy policy and market liberalisation. - Highlights: • We study the effect of market regulation and energy policy on renewable technologies. • Reducing entry barriers is a significant driver of renewable energy innovation. • The Kyoto protocol amplifies the effect of both energy policy and liberalisation. • These effects are heterogeneous across technologies and stronger for wind.

  19. Creation of model proteins to investigate the mechanism of aggregation of expanded-polyglutamine proteins. Insertion of polyglutamine tracts into the ß-lactamase BlaP

    OpenAIRE

    Scarafone, Natacha

    2012-01-01

    Polyglutamine (polyQ) diseases are characterized by the formation of intranuclear amyloid-like aggregates by proteins containing an expansion of a polyQ tract above a threshold length. These insoluble aggregates and/or some of their soluble precursors are thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of the diseases. The only known common point between the causative proteins is the expanded polyQ tract, suggesting that their aggregation critically depends on the expansion of the polyQ tract abov...

  20. Preliminary structural investigations of the Eut-L shell protein of the ethanolamine ammonia-lyase metabolosome of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolakakis, Kiel; Ohtaki, Akashi; Newton, Keith; Chworos, Arkadiusz; Sagermann, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Preliminary X-ray analysis of crystals of the bacterial microcompartment shell protein Eut-L from Escherichia coli is reported. The ethanolamine ammonia-lyase microcompartment is composed of five different shell proteins that have been proposed to assemble into symmetrically shaped polyhedral particles of varying sizes. Here, preliminary X-ray analysis of crystals of the bacterial microcompartment shell protein Eut-L from Escherichia coli is reported. Cloning, overexpression and purification resulted in highly pure protein that crystallized readily under many different conditions. In all cases the protein forms thin hexagonal plate-shaped crystals belonging to space group P3 that are of unusually high stability against different solvent conditions. The crystals diffracted to a resolution of 2.0 Å using synchrotron radiation but proved to be radiation-sensitive. Preparations of heavy-atom-derivatized crystals for use in determining the three-dimensional structure are under way

  1. Evaluation of Neisseria Gonorrhoeae Opacity (Opa) Protein Loops as Targets for Passive Vaccination and Investigation of the Role of Opa Proteins During Infection of a Female Host

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-24

    The disease gonorrhea can vary from asymptomatic to severe, however most infections with N. gonorrhoeae are uncomplicated lower urogenital tract ... infection , presumably to the HV regions, with detectable antibodies in serum and genital secretions from men and women with uncomplicated urogenital tract ...of CEACAMs during lower urogenital tract infection of women and indicate that another function for Opa proteins, perhaps complement resistance, may

  2. Identification of Novel G Protein-Coupled Receptor 143 Ligands as Pharmacologic Tools for Investigating X-Linked Ocular Albinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Filippo, Elisabetta; Manga, Prashiela; Schiedel, Anke C

    2017-06-01

    GPR143 regulates melanosome biogenesis and organelle size in pigment cells. The mechanisms underlying receptor function remain unclear. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are excellent pharmacologic targets; thus, we developed and applied a screening approach to identify potential GPR143 ligands and chemical modulators. GPR143 interacts with β-arrestin; we therefore established a β-arrestin recruitment assay to screen for compounds that modulate activity. Because GPR143 is localized intracellularly, screening with the wild-type receptor would be restricted to agents absorbed by the cell. For the screen we used a mutant receptor, which shows similar basal activity as the wild type but traffics to the plasma membrane. We tested two compound libraries and investigated validated hits for their effects on melanocyte pigmentation. GPR143, which showed high constitutive activity in the β-arrestin assay, was inhibited by several compounds. The three validated inhibitors (pimozide, niclosamide, and ethacridine lactate) were assessed for impact on melanocytes. Pigmentation and expression of tyrosinase, a key melanogenic enzyme, were reduced by all compounds. Because GPR143 appears to be constitutively active, these compounds may turn off its activity. X-linked ocular albinism type I, characterized by developmental eye defects, results from GPR143 mutations. Identifying pharmacologic agents that modulate GPR143 activity will contribute significantly to our understanding of its function and provide novel tools with which to study GPCRs in melanocytes and retinal pigment epithelium. Pimozide, one of three GPR143 inhibitors identified in this study, maybe be a good lead structure for development of more potent compounds and provide a platform for design of novel therapeutic agents.

  3. Heterogeneous Policies, Heterogeneous Technologies: The Case of Renewable Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolli, Francesco; Vona, Francesco

    2014-07-01

    This paper investigates empirically the effect of market regulation and renewable energy policies on innovation activity in different renewable energy technologies. For the EU countries and the years 1980 to 2007, we built a unique dataset containing information on patent production in eight different technologies, proxies of market regulation and technology-specific renewable energy policies. Our main findings show that lowering entry barriers is a more significant driver of renewable energy innovation than privatisation and un-bundling, but its effect varies across technologies, being stronger in technologies characterised by the potential entry of small, independent power producers. Additionally, the inducement effect of renewable energy policies is heterogeneous and more pronounced for wind, which is the only technology that is mature and has high technological potential. Finally, the ratification of the Kyoto protocol - determining a more stable and less uncertain policy framework - amplifies the inducement effect of both energy policy and market liberalisation. (authors)

  4. Pricing strategies under heterogeneous service requirements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mandjes, M.R.H.

    2003-01-01

    This paper analyzes a communication network with heterogeneous customers. We investigate priority queueing as a way to differentiate between these users. Customers join the network as long as their utility (which is a function of the queueing delay) is larger than the price of the service. We focus

  5. Pricing strategies under heterogeneous service requirements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mandjes, M.R.H.

    This paper analyzes a communication network, used by customers with heterogeneous service requirements. We investigate priority queueing as a way to establish service differentiation. It is assumed that there is an infinite population of customers, who join the network as long as their utility

  6. Proteomic Investigation of Protein Profile Changes and Amino Acid Residue Level Modification in Cooked Lamb Meat: The Effect of Boiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tzer-Yang; Morton, James D; Clerens, Stefan; Dyer, Jolon M

    2015-10-21

    Hydrothermal treatment (heating in water) is a common method of general food processing and preparation. For red-meat-based foods, boiling is common; however, how the molecular level effects of this treatment correlate to the overall food properties is not yet well-understood. The effects of differing boiling times on lamb meat and the resultant cooking water were here examined through proteomic evaluation. The longer boiling time was found to result in increased protein aggregation involving particularly proteins such as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, as well as truncation in proteins such as in α-actinin-2. Heat-induced protein backbone cleavage was observed adjacent to aspartic acid and asparagine residues. Side-chain modifications of amino acid residues resulting from the heating, including oxidation of phenylalanine and formation of carboxyethyllysine, were characterized in the cooked samples. Actin and myoglobin bands from the cooked meat per se remained visible on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, even after significant cooking time. These proteins were also found to be the major source of observed heat-induced modifications. This study provides new insights into molecular-level modifications occurring in lamb meat proteins during boiling and a protein chemistry basis for better understanding the effect of this common treatment on the nutritional and functional properties of red-meat-based foods.

  7. Spectroscopic and theoretical investigation of conformational changes of proteins by synthesized pyrimidine derivative and its sensitivity towards FRET application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Swadesh; Singharoy, Dipti; Bhattacharya, Subhash Chandra

    2018-04-01

    Interest in synthesizing and characterizing (IR, NMR and HRMS spectroscopic methods) a pyrimidine based Schiff-base ligand, 2-(2-(Anthracen-9-ylmethylene) hydrazinyl)-4,6-dimethyl pyrimidine (ANHP) has been developed for its application to ascertain the conformational change of protein and sensitivity towards fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) process. Location of ANHP in bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human serum albumin (HSA) proteins environment has been determined using different spectroscopic techniques. Weakly fluorescent ANHP have shown greater protein induced fluorescence enhancement (PIFE) in case of HSA than BSA, though in both cases energy transfer efficiency are almost same but difference in binding constant values encourages us to find the location of ANHP within the complex protein environment. From the FRET parameter and α-helicity change, it has been found that ANHP bound with Trp-214 of HSA and surface Trp-134 of BSA. Conformational changes of proteins have been observed more for HSA than BSA in presence of ANHP, which has confirmed the location of ANHP in both the protein environments. Coupled with experimental studies, molecular docking analysis has also been done to explain the locations and distance dependent FRET process of ANHP in both proteins.

  8. [Investigation of the abundance of proteins secreted by Fasciola hepatica, which is exposed to environmental change in experimental studies, with an advanced proteomic approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haçarız, Orçun; Baykal, Ahmet Tarık

    2014-06-01

    Investigation of the abundance of proteins secreted by Fasciola hepatica, which is exposed to environmental change after it is removed from the main host, with an advanced proteomic approach. Adult Fasciola hepatica parasites, obtained from the main host, were directly placed in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, at room temperature) and incubated at 37°C for 2 hours (after arrival at the Institute within 1 hour). After this, without applying extra procedures, such as washing the parasites, secreted parasite proteins in PBS were investigated using an advanced proteomic method [a mass spectrometry system with electrospray ionization and quadrupole time-of-flight source coupled to ultra performance liquid chromatography, nano UPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS] with a reviewed F. hepatica protein database (Universal Protein Resource; UniProt) and data-independent acquisition method. With the proteomic analysis of the PBS, after incubation with the parasites, cathepsin L protease 1, fatty acid-binding protein 1 and 2, thioredoxin peroxidase (TPx), and kunitz-type proteinase inhibitor were identified. The abundance of Fasciola hepatica TPx was approximately 2-6 times higher than that of the other proteins identified in this study (p<0.01). The stress on the parasite stem from environmental change could be associated with the stimulation of the secretion of TPx. The application of advanced proteomic approaches could provide useful data in the development of effective protective methods against the parasite.

  9. Investigating ER-Associated Degradation with RNAi Screening - and Searching for Model Proteins to Do It with

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Njal Winther

    for cellular homeostasis. The aim of this thesis has been to gain insight into ERAD. The experimental approach was RNAi screening, which is a fast and efficient method for initial evaluation of a large pool of genes. Since relatively few proteins routinely are used as ERAD substrates, the first goal...... to possess the required properties. RNAi screening was then performed to identify proteins of the ERAD machinery that was needed for the successful degradation of a HA-tagged version of the ATP13A2 mutant (HA-ATP13A2). After a validation phase, one of the identified proteins, Sec61α was verified as being...

  10. Heterogenous mismatch-repair status in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joost, Patrick; Veurink, Nynke; Holck, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Immunohistochemical staining for mismatch repair proteins is efficient and widely used to identify mismatch repair defective tumors. The tumors typically show uniform and widespread loss of MMR protein staining. We identified and characterized colorectal cancers with alternative......, heterogenous mismatch repair protein staining in order to delineate expression patterns and underlying mechanisms. METHODS: Heterogenous staining patterns that affected at least one of the mismatch repair proteins MLH1, PMS2, MSH2 and MSH6 were identified in 14 colorectal cancers. Based on alternative....... CONCLUSIONS: Heterogenous mismatch repair status can be demonstrated in colorectal cancer. Though rare, attention to this phenomenon is recommended since it corresponds to differences in mismatch repair status that are relevant for correct classification. VIRTUAL SLIDES: The virtual slide(s) for this article...

  11. Unravelling mononuclear phagocyte heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissmann, Frédéric; Gordon, Siamon; Hume, David A.; Mowat, Allan M.; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.

    2011-01-01

    When Ralph Steinman and Zanvil Cohn first described dendritic cells (DCs) in 1973 it took many years to convince the immunology community that these cells were truly distinct from macrophages. Almost four decades later, the DC is regarded as the key initiator of adaptive immune responses; however, distinguishing DCs from macrophages still leads to confusion and debate in the field. Here, Nature Reviews Immunology asks five experts to discuss the issue of heterogeneity in the mononuclear phagocyte system and to give their opinion on the importance of defining these cells for future research. PMID:20467425

  12. Heterogeneous logics of competition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mossin, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the article is to demonstrate that in order to understand competition as a socially organizing phenomenon, we should not examine competition in isolation, but as constellations of heterogeneous logics. More precisely, the article is based on two main theoretical points: (1) Logics...... of a presumed logic of competition within EU law, whereas the second part focuses on particular legal logics. In this respect, the so-called ‘real link criterion’ (determining the access to transnational social rights for certain groups of unemployed people) is given special attention. What is particularly...

  13. Heterogeneous Active Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Thomas; Klotsa, Daphne

    Active systems are composed of self-propelled (active) particles that locally convert energy into motion and exhibit emergent collective behaviors, such as fish schooling and bird flocking. Most works so far have focused on monodisperse, one-component active systems. However, real systems are heterogeneous, and consist of several active components. We perform molecular dynamics simulations of multi-component active matter systems and report on their emergent behavior. We discuss the phase diagram of dynamic states as well as parameters where we see mixing versus segregation.

  14. Information and Heterogeneous Beliefs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peter Ove; Qin, Zhenjiang

    2014-01-01

    and the maximum expected abnormal trading volume. Imperfect public information increases the gains-to-trade based on heterogeneously updated posterior beliefs. In an exchange economy, this leads to higher growth in the investors' certainty equivalents and, thus, a higher equilibrium interest rate, whereas the ex...... ante risk premium is unaffected by the informativeness of the public information system. Similar results are obtained in a production economy, but the impact on the ex ante cost of capital is dampened compared to the exchange economy due to welfare improving reductions in real investments to smooth...

  15. Investigation of protein FTT1103 electroactivity using carbon and mercury electrodes. Surface-inhibition approach for disulfide oxidoreductases using silver amalgam powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Večerková, Renata; Hernychová, Lenka; Dobeš, Petr; Vrba, Jiří; Josypčuk, Bohdan; Bartošík, Martin; Vacek, Jan

    2014-06-09

    Recently, it was shown that electrochemical methods can be used for analysis of poorly water-soluble proteins and for study of their structural changes and intermolecular (protein-ligand) interactions. In this study, we focused on complex electrochemical investigation of recombinant protein FTT1103, a disulfide oxidoreductase with structural similarity to well described DsbA proteins. This thioredoxin-like periplasmic lipoprotein plays an important role in virulence of bacteria Francisella tularensis. For electrochemical analyses, adsorptive transfer (ex situ) square-wave voltammetry with pyrolytic graphite electrode, and alternating-current voltammetry and constant-current chronopotentiometric stripping analysis with mercury electrodes, including silver solid amalgam electrode (AgSAE) were used. AgSAE was used in poorly water-soluble protein analysis for the first time. In addition to basic redox, electrocatalytic and adsorption/desorption characterization of FTT1103, electrochemical methods were also used for sensitive determination of the protein at nanomolar level and study of its interaction with surface of AgSA microparticles. Proposed electrochemical protocol and AgSA surface-inhibition approach presented here could be used in future for biochemical studies focused on proteins associated with membranes as well as on those with disulfide oxidoreductase activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Investigating effects of sample pretreatment on protein stability using size-exclusion chromatography and high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakow, Tobias; El Deeb, Sami; Hahne, Thomas; El-Hady, Deia Abd; AlBishri, Hassan M; Wätzig, Hermann

    2014-09-01

    In this study, size-exclusion chromatography and high-resolution atomic absorption spectrometry methods have been developed and evaluated to test the stability of proteins during sample pretreatment. This especially includes different storage conditions but also adsorption before or even during the chromatographic process. For the development of the size exclusion method, a Biosep S3000 5 μm column was used for investigating a series of representative model proteins, namely bovine serum albumin, ovalbumin, monoclonal immunoglobulin G antibody, and myoglobin. Ambient temperature storage was found to be harmful to all model proteins, whereas short-term storage up to 14 days could be done in an ordinary refrigerator. Freezing the protein solutions was always complicated and had to be evaluated for each protein in the corresponding solvent. To keep the proteins in their native state a gentle freezing temperature should be chosen, hence liquid nitrogen should be avoided. Furthermore, a high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry method was developed to observe the adsorption of proteins on container material and chromatographic columns. Adsorption to any container led to a sample loss and lowered the recovery rates. During the pretreatment and high-performance size-exclusion chromatography, adsorption caused sample losses of up to 33%. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Heterogeneous Beliefs, Public Information, and Option Markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Zhenjiang

    In an incomplete market setting with heterogeneous prior beliefs, I show that public information and strike price of option have substantial infl‡uence on asset pricing in option markets, by investigating an absolute option pricing model with negative exponential utility investors and normally...... a necessary nor sufficient condition for generating speculations in option markets. With heterogeneous beliefs, options are non-redundant assets which can facilitate side-betting and enable investors to take advantage of the disagreements and the differences in con…dence. This fact leads to a higher growth...

  18. Colloid straining within saturated heterogeneous porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porubcan, Alexis A; Xu, Shangping

    2011-02-01

    The transport of 0.46 μm, 2.94 μm, 5.1 μm and 6.06 μm latex particles in heterogeneous porous media prepared from the mixing of 0.78 mm, 0.46 mm and 0.23 mm quartz sands was investigated through column transport experiments. It was observed that the 0.46 μm particles traveled conservatively within the heterogeneous porous media, suggesting that under the experimental conditions employed in this research the strong repulsive interactions between the negatively charged latex particles and the clean quartz sands led to minimal colloid immobilization due to physicochemical filtration. The immobilization of the 2.94 μm, 5.1 μm and 6.06 μm latex particles was thus attributed to colloid straining. Experimental results showed that the straining of colloidal particles within heterogeneous sand mixtures increased when the fraction of finer sands increased. The mathematical model that was developed and tested based on results obtained using uniform sands (Xu et al., 2006) was found to be able to describe colloid straining within heterogeneous porous media. Examination of the relationship between the best-fit values of the clean-bed straining rate coefficients (k(0)) and the ratio of colloid diameter (d(p)) and sand grain size (d(g)) indicated that when number-average sizes were used to represent the size of the heterogeneous porous media, there existed a consistent relationship for both uniform sands and heterogeneous sand mixtures. Similarly, the use of the number-averaged sizes for the heterogeneous porous media produced a uniform relationship between the colloid straining capacity term (λ) and the ratio of d(p)/d(g) for all the sand treatments. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Imaging Mass Spectrometry for the Investigation of Proteins and Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnum, Kristin E.; Frappier, Sara L.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2008-07-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is an excellent technology for molecular imaging because of its high data dimensionality. MS can monitor thousands of individual molecular data channels measured as mass-to-charge (m/z). We describe the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) MS for the image analysis of proteins, peptides, lipids, drugs, and metabolites in tissues. We discuss the basic instrumentation and sample preparation methods needed to produce high-resolution images and high image reproducibility. Matrix-addition protocols are briefly discussed along with normal operating procedures, and selected biological and medical applications of MALDI imaging MS are described. We give examples of both two- and three-dimensional imaging, including normal mouse embryo implantation, sperm maturation in mouse epididymis, protein distributions in brain sections, protein alterations as a result of drug administration, and protein changes in brain due to neurodegeneration and tumor formation. Advantages of this technology and future challenges for its improvement are discussed.

  20. Specific binding of tubeimoside-2 with proteins in hepatocarcinoma HepG2 cells: investigation by molecular spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sun; Shi-Sheng, Sun; Ying-Yong, Zhao; Jun, Fan

    2012-07-01

    In this study, we compared different binding interactions of TBMS2 with proteins both in hepatocarcinoma HepG2 cells and in normal embryo hepatic L02 cells by using fluorescence, absorption, and CD spectroscopy. The fluorescence data revealed that the fluorescence intensity of proteins in the HepG2 and L02 cells decreased in the presence of TBMS2 by 30.79% and 12.01%, respectively. Binding constants and thermodynamic parameters were obtained for systems of TBMS2 with the two kinds of cell proteins. The results indicated that HepG2 cell proteins had a higher TBMS2 binding activity than those in the L02 cells. Analysis of the TBMS2 cytotoxic activities showed that TBMS2 could selectively induce apoptosis of HepG2 cells by binding to them, while its apoptotic effect on L02 cells was relatively weaker.

  1. Spatial coupling in heterogeneous catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, S. Y.; Surko, C. M.; Maple, M. B.

    1995-11-01

    Spatial coupling mechanisms are studied in the heterogeneous catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide over platinum at atmospheric pressure under oscillatory conditions. Experiments are conducted in a continuous flow reactor, and the reaction rate is monitored using both infrared imaging and thermocouples. The catalysts are in the form of platinum annular thin films on washer-shaped quartz substrates, and they provide highly repeatable oscillatory behavior. Oscillations are typically spatially synchronized with the entire catalyst ``flashing'' on and off uniformly. Spatial coupling is investigated by introducing various barriers which split the annular ring in half. Infrared images show that coupling through the gas phase dominates coupling via the diffusion of CO on the surface or heat diffusion through the substrate. The introduction of a localized heat perturbation to the catalyst surface does not induce a transition in the reaction rate. Thus, it is likely that the primary mode of communication is through the gas-phase diffusion of reactants.

  2. Thermoelectricity in Heterogeneous Nanofluidic Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Long; Wang, Qinggong

    2018-04-19

    Ionic fluids are essential to energy conversion, water desalination, drug delivery, and lab-on-a-chip devices. Ionic transport in nanoscale confinements and complex physical fields still remain elusive. Here, a nanofluidic system is developed using nanochannels of heterogeneous surface properties to investigate transport properties of ions under different temperatures. Steady ionic currents are observed under symmetric temperature gradients, which is equivalent to generating electricity using waste heat (e.g., electronic chips and solar panels). The currents increase linearly with temperature gradient and nonlinearly with channel size. Contributions to ion motion from temperatures and channel properties are evaluated for this phenomenon. The findings provide insights into the study of confined ionic fluids in multiphysical fields, and suggest applications in thermal energy conversion, temperature sensors, and chip-level thermal management. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Operando research in heterogeneous catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Groot, Irene

    2017-01-01

    This book is devoted to the emerging field of techniques for visualizing atomic-scale properties of active catalysts under actual working conditions, i.e. high gas pressures and high temperatures. It explains how to understand these observations in terms of the surface structures and dynamics and their detailed interplay with the gas phase. This provides an important new link between fundamental surface physics and chemistry, and applied catalysis. The book explains the motivation and the necessity of operando studies, and positions these with respect to the more traditional low-pressure investigations on the one hand and the reality of industrial catalysis on the other. The last decade has witnessed a rapid development of new experimental and theoretical tools for operando studies of heterogeneous catalysis. The book has a strong emphasis on the new techniques and illustrates how the challenges introduced by the harsh, operando conditions are faced for each of these new tools. Therefore, one can also read th...

  4. Heterogeneous broadband network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmann, Lars

    1995-11-01

    Although the vision for the future Integrated Broadband Communication Network (IBCN) is an all optical network, it is certain that for a long period to come, the network will remain very heterogeneous, with a mixture of different physical media (fiber, coax and twisted pair), transmission systems (PDH, SDH, ADSL) and transport protocols (TCP/IP, AAL/ATM, frame relay). In the current work towards the IBCN, the ATM concept is considered the generic network protocol for both public and private network, with the ability to use different underlying transmission protocols and, through adaptation protocols, provide the appropriate services (old as well as new) to the customer. One of the major difficulties of heterogeneous network is the restriction that is usually given by the lowest common denominator, e.g. in terms of single channel capacity. A possible way to overcome these limitations is by extending the ATM concept with a multilink capability, that allows us to use separate resources as one common. The improved flexibility obtained by this protocol extension further allows a real time optimization of network and call configuration, without any impact on the quality of service seen from the user. This paper describes an example of an ATM based multilink protocol that has been experimentally implemented within the RACE project 'STRATOSPHERIC'. The paper outlines the complexity of introducing an extra network functionality compared with the added value, such as an improved ability to recover an error due to a malfunctioning network component.

  5. Heterogeneity of reactive astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark A; Ao, Yan; Sofroniew, Michael V

    2014-04-17

    Astrocytes respond to injury and disease in the central nervous system (CNS) with a process referred to as reactive astrogliosis. Recent progress demonstrates that reactive astrogliosis is not a simple all-or-none phenomenon, but is a finely gradated continuum of changes that range from reversible alterations in gene expression and cell hypertrophy, to scar formation with permanent tissue rearrangement. There is now compelling evidence that reactive astrocytes exhibit a substantial potential for heterogeneity at multiple levels, including gene expression, cell morphology, topography (distance from lesions), CNS regions, local (among neighboring cells), cell signaling and cell function. Structural and functional changes are regulated in reactive astrocytes by many different potential signaling events that occur in a context dependent manner. It is noteworthy that different stimuli of astrocyte reactivity can lead to similar degrees of GFAP upregulation while causing substantially different changes in transcriptome profiles and cell function. Thus, it is not possible to equate simple and uniform measures such as cell hypertrophy and upregulation of GFAP expression with a single, uniform concept of astrocyte reactivity. Instead, it is necessary to recognize the considerable potential for heterogeneity and determine the functional implications of astrocyte reactivity in a context specific manner as regulated by specific signaling events. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Model of monopolistic competition with heterogeneous labor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filatov Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a tool for modelling monopolistic competition markets, based on Dixit-Stiglitz ideology but taking into account heterogeneity at labor market. We analyse several modifications of a two-sector general equilibrium model. In the basic one with two levels of workers qualification their shares are determined endogenously on the base of comparison between the higher wage of the skilled worker and heterogeneous education costs, also taking into account the labor mobility between the manufacture and agriculture sector. The model is generalized for the case of continuous distribution of labor qualification. The impact of the model parameters (ratio of fixed and variable costs, market size, heterogeneity in productivity, elasticity of substitution, etc. on the obtained equilibrium prices, quantities, wages, number and size of firms, social welfare is investigated.

  7. Effects of interferon gamma on Chlamydia trachomatis serovar A and L2 protein expression investigated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaw, A; Christiansen, Gunna; Birkelund, Svend

    1999-01-01

    ]methionine and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis with immobilized pH gradients in order to investigate changes in the protein expression of C. trachomatis serovar A and L2 caused by treatment with IFN-gamma. In contrast to what was observed in C. trachomatis L2, our results showed that, in C. trachomatis A, down...

  8. Photoionization and Electron Radical Recombination Dynamics in Photoactive Yellow Protein Investigated by Ultrafast Spectroscopy in the Visible and Near-Infrared Spectral Region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, J.; Paparelli, L.; Hospes, M.; Arents, J.; Kennis, J.T.; van Stokkum, I.H.M.; Hellingwerf, K.J.; Groot, M.L.

    2013-01-01

    Photoinduced ionization of the chromophore inside photoactive yellow protein (PYP) was investigated by ultrafast spectroscopy in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions. An absorption band that extended from around 550 to 850 nm was observed and ascribed to solvated electrons, ejected from

  9. Molecular spectroscopic investigation on fractionation-induced changes on biomacromolecule of co-products from bioethanol processing to explore protein metabolism in ruminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuewei; Yan, Xiaogang; Beltranena, Eduardo; Yu, Peiqiang

    2014-03-01

    Fractionation processing is an efficient technology which is capable to redesign/redevelop a new food or feed product with a specified chemical and nutrient profile. This processing technique was able to produce four different fractions (called "A", "B", "C", "D" fractions/treatments) with different nutrient profile form a co-product of bioethanol processing [wheat dried distillers grains with soluble (DDGS)]. To date, there is no study on the effect of fractionation processing on inherent molecular structure of different fractions and how the processing-induced structural change affect the metabolic characteristics of protein and nutrient availability. The objectives of this experiment were to: (1) investigate the effect of fractionation processing on changes of protein functional groups (amide I, amide II, and their ratio) and molecular structure (modeled α-helix, β-sheet, and their ratio), and (2) study the relationship between the fractionation processing-induced changes of protein molecular structure and nutrients availability as well as the metabolic characteristics of protein. The hypothesis of this study was that the fractionation processing changes the molecular structure and such changes affect the metabolic characteristics of protein. The protein molecular structure spectral profile of the fractions A, B, C and D were identified by Fourier-transform infrared attenuated total reflection spectroscopy (FT/IR-ATR). The results showed that the fractionation processing significantly affected the protein molecular spectral profiles. The differences in amide I to amide II peak area and height ratios were strongly significant (P fractions, ranging from 4.98 to 6.33 and 3.28 to 4.00, respectively. The difference in the modeled protein α-helix to β-sheet ratio was also strongly significant (P fractions. Multivariate molecular spectral analysis with cluster (CLA) and principal component analyses (PCA) showed that there are no clear distinguished clusters and

  10. Effect of point source and heterogeneity on the propagation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    This paper stands to investigate the possibility of propagation of SH waves due to a point source in a magnetoelastic monoclinic layer lying over a heterogeneous monoclinic half-space. The heterogeneity is caused by consideration of quadratic variation in rigidity. The methodology employed combines an efficient ...

  11. Large epidemic thresholds emerge in heterogeneous networks of heterogeneous nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Tang, Ming; Gross, Thilo

    2015-08-01

    One of the famous results of network science states that networks with heterogeneous connectivity are more susceptible to epidemic spreading than their more homogeneous counterparts. In particular, in networks of identical nodes it has been shown that network heterogeneity, i.e. a broad degree distribution, can lower the epidemic threshold at which epidemics can invade the system. Network heterogeneity can thus allow diseases with lower transmission probabilities to persist and spread. However, it has been pointed out that networks in which the properties of nodes are intrinsically heterogeneous can be very resilient to disease spreading. Heterogeneity in structure can enhance or diminish the resilience of networks with heterogeneous nodes, depending on the correlations between the topological and intrinsic properties. Here, we consider a plausible scenario where people have intrinsic differences in susceptibility and adapt their social network structure to the presence of the disease. We show that the resilience of networks with heterogeneous connectivity can surpass those of networks with homogeneous connectivity. For epidemiology, this implies that network heterogeneity should not be studied in isolation, it is instead the heterogeneity of infection risk that determines the likelihood of outbreaks.

  12. iTRAQ based investigation of plasma proteins in HIV infected and HIV/HBV coinfected patients - C9 and KLK are related to HIV/HBV coinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tao; Liu, Li; Wu, Ao; Zhang, Yujiao; Jia, Xiaofang; Yin, Lin; Lu, Hongzhou; Zhang, Lijun

    2017-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) share similar routes of transmission, and rapid progression of hepatic and immunodeficiency diseases has been observed in coinfected individuals. Our main objective was to investigate the molecular mechanism of HIV/HBV coinfections. We selected HIV infected and HIV/HBV coinfected patients with and without Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART). Low abundance proteins enriched using a multiple affinity removal system (MARS) were labeled with isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) kits and analyzed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The differential proteins were analyzed by Gene Ontology (GO) database. A total of 41 differential proteins were found in HIV/HBV coinfected patients as compared to HIV mono-infected patients with or without HAART treatment, including 7 common HBV-regulated proteins. The proteins involved in complement and coagulation pathways were significantly enriched, including plasma kallikrein (KLK) and complement component C9 (C9). C9 and KLK were verified to be down-regulated in HIV/HBV coinfected patients through ELISA analysis. The present iTRAQ based proteomic analyses identified 7 proteins that are related to HIV/HBV coinfection. HBV might influence hepatic and immune functions by deregulating complement and coagulation pathways. C9 and KLK could potentially be used as targets for the treatment of HIV/HBV coinfections. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Investigation and Comparison of Leishmania major Promastigote and Amastigote Protein Content by Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Soleimanifard

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available ntroduction & Objective: Leishmania is a protozoan of the trypanosomatidae family. This pro-tozoan has two stages in its life cycle, promastigote form in sand flies and amastigote form in macrophage of mammalian hosts. The purpose of this study was identification and compari-son of proteins of Leishmania amastigote and promastigote stages. Materials & Methods: The present study is a cross sectional study of two forms of Leishmania major. To culture promastigotes , L.major (MRHO/IR/75/ER from previously infected Balb/c mice was transferred to modified N.N.N medium with overlay of liquid BHI and then transferred to RPMI-1640 at 26oc ± 1 for mass production. After isolation and growth, pro-mastigotes were transferred to liquid cell culture medium RPMI-1640 with pH 5.5 and incu-bated at 5% CO2 at 37oc for 72 hours until promastigote to amastigote transformation. Elec-trophoresis was performed with SDS-PAGE method to find and compare the molecular weight of the antigens of two stages. Results: The molecular weights of the bands observed in both forms were as follows: 19, 36, 50, 63, 65, 80, 90, 94, 96, 110- 130 KDa. The proteins in the surface of only promastigote were 22, 28 and 46 KDa and special proteins in the surface of amastigote were 12 and 32 KDa. Conclusion : According to this study Leishmania parasite has stage specific proteins. Various studies have shown that axenic amastigotes and tissue amastigotes are similar in their protein content. Therefore, based on stage specific proteins ,effective drugs and vaccines can be de-signed against leishmaniasis. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2013; 20 (1:1-8

  14. Receiver Heterogeneity Helps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovács, Erika R.; Pedersen, Morten Videbæk; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneity amongst devices and desired service are commonly seen as a source of additional challenges for setting up an efficient multi-layer multicast service. In particular, devices requiring only the base layer can become a key bottleneck to the performance for other devices. This paper...... studies the case of a wireless multi-layer multicast setting and shows that the judicious use of network coding allows devices with different computational capabilities to trade-off processing complexity for an improved quality of service. As a consequence, individual devices can determine their required...... effort, while bringing significant advantages to the system as a whole. Network coding is used as a key element to reduce signaling in order to deliver the multicast service. More importantly, our proposed approach focuses on creating some structure in the transmitted stream by allowing inter...

  15. Applied heterogeneous catalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Page, A.J.F.

    1988-01-01

    This reference book explains the scientific principles of heterogeneous catalysis while also providing details on the methods used to develop commercially viable catalyst products. A section of the book presents reactor design engineering theory and practices for the profitable application of these catalysts in large-scale industrial processes. A description of the mechanisms and commercial applications of catalysis is followed by a review of catalytic reaction kinetics. There are five chapters on selecting catalyst agents, developing and preparing industrial catalysts, measuring catalyst properties, and analyzing the physico-chemical characteristics of solid catalyst particles. The final chapter reviews the elements of catalytic reactor design, with emphasis on flow regimes vs. reactor types, heat and mass transfer in reactor beds, single- and multi-phase flows, and the effects of thermodynamics and other catalyst properties on the process flow scheme

  16. A gradient-free method for the purification of infective dengue virus for protein-level investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Stephanie M; Nguyen, Celina T; Jewett, John C

    2016-09-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a mosquito-transmitted flavivirus that infects approximately 100 million people annually. Multi-day protocols for purification of DENV reduce the infective titer due to viral sensitivity to both temperature and pH. Herein we describe a 5-h protocol for the purification of all DENV serotypes, utilizing traditional gradient-free ultracentrifugation followed by selective virion precipitation. This protocol allows for the separation of DENV from contaminating proteins - including intact C6/36 densovirus, for the production of infective virus at high concentration for protein-level analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Advanced fluidic handling and use of two-phase flow for high throughput structural investigation of proteins on a microfluidic sample preparation platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lafleur, Josiane P.; Snakenborg, Detlef; Møller, M.

    2010-01-01

    Research on the structure of proteins can bring forth a wealth of information about biological function and can be used to better understand the processes in living cells. This paper reports a new microfluidic sample preparation system for the structural investigation of proteins by Small Angle X......-ray Scattering (SAXS). The system includes hardware and software features for precise fluidic control, synchrotron beamline control, UV absorbance measurements and automated data analysis. The precise fluidic handling capabilities are used to transport and precisely position samples as small as 500 n...

  18. Nanohole optical tweezers in heterogeneous mixture analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacohen, Noa; Ip, Candice J. X.; Laxminarayana, Gurunatha K.; DeWolf, Timothy S.; Gordon, Reuven

    2017-08-01

    Nanohole optical trapping is a tool that has been shown to analyze proteins at the single molecule level using pure samples. The next step is to detect and study single molecules with dirty samples. We demonstrate that using our double nanohole optical tweezing configuration, single particles in an egg white solution can be classified when trapped. Different sized molecules provide different signal variations in their trapped state, allowing the proteins to be statistically characterized. Root mean squared variation and trap stiffness are methods used on trapped signals to distinguish between the different proteins. This method to isolate and determine single molecules in heterogeneous samples provides huge potential to become a reliable tool for use within biomedical and scientific communities.

  19. Space Qualified Heterogeneous Processing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Space Micro proposes to develop a radiation hardened, monolithic, heterogeneous processor for space imaging and radar systems. High performance processors are needed...

  20. Automated microfluidic sample-preparation platform for high-throughput structural investigation of proteins by small-angle X-ray scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lafleur, Josiane P.; Snakenborg, Detlef; Nielsen, Søren Skou

    2011-01-01

    A new microfluidic sample-preparation system is presented for the structural investigation of proteins using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) at synchrotrons. The system includes hardware and software features for precise fluidic control, sample mixing by diffusion, automated X-ray exposure...... control, UV absorbance measurements and automated data analysis. As little as 15 l of sample is required to perform a complete analysis cycle, including sample mixing, SAXS measurement, continuous UV absorbance measurements, and cleaning of the channels and X-ray cell with buffer. The complete analysis...... cycle can be performed in less than 3 min. Bovine serum albumin was used as a model protein to characterize the mixing efficiency and sample consumption of the system. The N2 fragment of an adaptor protein (p120-RasGAP) was used to demonstrate how the device can be used to survey the structural space...

  1. Heterogeneity of an earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvinova, T.; Petrova, A.

    2009-04-01

    The study of magnetic anomaly field structure of the Barents Sea water area along seismic and extended profiles intersecting known fields is carried out. Geomagnetic and density sections down to 40 km depth are constructed. This allowed the estimation of heterogeneities of the Barents Sea water area deep structure. The analysis of geomagnetic and density sections along extended profiles showed the confinedness of oil-and-gas bearing provinces to deep permeable zones characterized by reduced magnetic and density features. Based on the analysis of permeable zones, regional diagnostic features similar to those obtained earlier in oil-and-gas bearing provinces in other regions, for example, in Timan-Pechora, Volga-Urals and Siberian, as well as in the Northern and Norwegian seas water areas, are revealed. The analysis of magnetic and gravity fields over the region area allowed the delineation of weakened zones as intersection areas of weakly magnetic areals with reduced density. Within the Barents Sea water area, permeable areas with lenticular-laminated structure of the upper and lower Earth's crust containing weakly magnetic areals with reduced rock density within the depth range of 8-12 and 15-20 km are revealed. Such ratio of magnetic and density heterogeneities in the Earth's crust is characteristic for zones with proved oil-and-gas content in the European part of the Atlantic Ocean water area. North Kildin field on 1 AR profile is confined to a trough with thick weakly magnetic stratum discontinuously traced to a depth of 6-10 km. At a depth of approximately 15 km, a lens of weakly magnetic and porous formations is observed. Ludlov field in the North Barents trough is confined to a zone of weakly magnetic rocks with reduced density traced to a depth of 8-9 km. Deeper, at Н=15 km, a lenticular areal of weakly magnetic formations with reduced density is observed. The profile transecting the Stockman field shows that it is located in the central part of a permeable

  2. Diet as a system: an observational study investigating a multi-choice system of moderately restricted low-protein diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccoli, Giorgina Barbara; Nazha, Marta; Capizzi, Irene; Vigotti, Federica Neve; Scognamiglio, Stefania; Consiglio, Valentina; Mongilardi, Elena; Bilocati, Marilisa; Avagnina, Paolo; Versino, Elisabetta

    2016-12-07

    There is no single, gold-standard, low-protein diet (LPD) for CKD patients; the best compliance is probably obtained by personalization. This study tests the hypothesis that a multiple choice diet network allows patients to attain a good compliance level, and that, in an open-choice system, overall results are not dependent upon the specific diet, but upon the clinical characteristics of the patients. Observational study: Three LPD options were offered to all patients with severe or rapidly progressive CKD: vegan diets supplemented with alpha-ketoacids and essential aminoacids; protein-free food in substitution of normal bread and pasta; other (traditional, vegan non supplemented and tailored). Dialysis-free follow-up and survival were analyzed by Kaplan Meier curves according to diet, comorbidity and age. Compliance and metabolic control were estimated in 147 subjects on diet at March 2015, with recent complete data, prescribed protein intake 0.6 g/Kg/day. Protein intake was assessed by Maroni Mitch formula. Four hundreds and forty nine patients followed a LPD in December, 2007- March, 2015 (90% moderately restricted LPDs, 0.6 g/Kg/day of protein, 10% at lower targets); age (median 70 (19-97)) and comorbidity (Charlson index: 7) characterized our population as being in line with the usual CKD European population. Median e-GFR at start of the diet was 20 mL/min, 33.2% of the patients were diabetics. Baseline data differ significantly across diets: protein-free schemas are preferred by older, high-comorbidity patients (median age 76 years, Charlson index 8, GFR 20.5 mL/min, Proteinuria: 0.3 g/day), supplemented vegan diets by younger patients with lower GFR and higher proteinuria (median age 65 years, Charlson index 6, GFR 18.9 mL/min; Proteinuria: 1.2 g/day); other diets are chosen by an intermediate population (median age 71 years, Charlson index 6; GFR 22.5 mL/min; Proteinuria: 0.9 g/day); (p <0.001 for age, Charlson index, proteinuria, GFR

  3. High-throughput investigation of single and binary protein adsorption isotherms in anion exchange chromatography employing multivariate analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Nicholas; Konstantinidis, Spyridon; Velayudhan, Ajoy

    2017-08-11

    The combination of multi-well plates and automated liquid handling is well suited to the rapid measurement of the adsorption isotherms of proteins. Here, single and binary adsorption isotherms are reported for BSA, ovalbumin and conalbumin on a strong anion exchanger over a range of pH and salt levels. The impact of the main experimental factors at play on the accuracy and precision of the adsorbed protein concentrations is quantified theoretically and experimentally. In addition to the standard measurement of liquid concentrations before and after adsorption, the amounts eluted from the wells are measured directly. This additional measurement corroborates the calculation based on liquid concentration data, and improves precision especially under conditions of weak or moderate interaction strength. The traditional measurement of multicomponent isotherms is limited by the speed of HPLC analysis; this analytical bottleneck is alleviated by careful multivariate analysis of UV spectra. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Investigation of the immunogenicity of a protein drug using equilibrium dialysis and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Qin C; Rodila, Ramona; Morgan, Sherry J; Humerickhouse, Rod A; El-Shourbagy, Tawakol A

    2005-09-01

    Biotherapeutics such as protein and peptide drugs have attracted significant attention in the medical community and pharmaceutical industry in recent years. Immunogenicity is one of the major concerns in the development and application of biotherapeutics. Although great efforts have been put forth in reducing immunogenicity, monitoring the free ("active") drug concentration and the antibody formation is critical for preclinical and clinical studies. Currently, it is still a challenging task to have a standardized test method monitoring immunogenicity when biotherapeutic compounds such as proteins and peptides are administrated. Combined with liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry detection, the equilibrium dialysis technique that is conventionally used for measuring the free and bound concentration of small organic molecules was extended to the application of measuring the free and bound concentrations of a protein drug with a relative molecular mass over 10,000 from plasma samples containing antibody. This novel approach could also be used for accurately measuring the antibody concentration when a reference standard of the antibody is available.

  5. Application of protein typing in molecular epidemiological investigation of nosocomial infection outbreak of aminoglycoside-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Min; Tang, Min; Ding, Yinghuan; Wu, Zecai; Xiang, Chengyu; Yang, Kui; Zhang, Zhang; Li, Baolin; Deng, Zhenghua; Liu, Jinbo

    2017-12-16

    Pseudomonas aeruginosan has emerged as an important pathogen elated to serious infections and nosocomial outbreaks worldwide. This study was conducted to understand the prevalence of aminoglycoside (AMG)-resistant P. aeruginosa in our hospital and to provide a scientific basis for control measures against nosocomial infections. Eighty-two strains of P. aeruginosa were isolated from clinical departments and divided into AMG-resistant strains and AMG-sensitive strains based on susceptibility test results. AMG-resistant strains were typed by drug resistance gene typing (DRGT) and protein typing. Five kinds of aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme (AME) genes were detected in the AMG-resistant group. AMG-resistant P. aeruginosa strains were classified into three types and six subtypes by DRGT. Four protein peaks, namely, 9900.02, 7600.04, 9101.25 and 10,372.87 Da, were significantly and differentially expressed between the two groups. AMG-resistant P. aeruginosa strains were also categorised into three types and six subtypes at the distance level of 10 by protein typing. AMG-resistant P. aeruginosa was cloned spread in our hospital; the timely implementation of nosocomial infection prevention and control strategies were needed in preventing outbreaks and epidemic of AMG-resistant P. aeruginosa. SELDI-TOF MS technology can be used for bacterial typing, which provides a new method of clinical epidemiological survey and nosocomial infection control.

  6. Heterogeneous calretinin expression in the avian cochlear nucleus angularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, S; Williams, A; MacLeod, K M

    2014-08-01

    Multiple calcium-binding proteins (CaBPs) are expressed at high levels and in complementary patterns in the auditory pathways of birds, mammals, and other vertebrates, but whether specific members of the CaBP family can be used to identify neuronal subpopulations is unclear. We used double immunofluorescence labeling of calretinin (CR) in combination with neuronal markers to investigate the distribution of CR-expressing neurons in brainstem sections of the cochlear nucleus in the chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus). While CR was homogeneously expressed in cochlear nucleus magnocellularis, CR expression was highly heterogeneous in cochlear nucleus angularis (NA), a nucleus with diverse cell types analogous in function to neurons in the mammalian ventral cochlear nucleus. To quantify the distribution of CR in the total NA cell population, we used antibodies against neuronal nuclear protein (NeuN), a postmitotic neuron-specific nuclear marker. In NA neurons, NeuN label was variably localized to the cell nucleus and the cytoplasm, and the intensity of NeuN immunoreactivity was inversely correlated with the intensity of CR immunoreactivity. The percentage of CR + neurons in NA increased from 31 % in embryonic (E)17/18 chicks, to 44 % around hatching (E21), to 51 % in postnatal day (P) 8 chicks. By P8, the distribution of CR + neurons was uniform, both rostrocaudal and in the tonotopic (dorsoventral) axis. Immunoreactivity for the voltage-gated potassium ion channel Kv1.1, used as a marker for physiological type, showed broad and heterogeneous postsynaptic expression in NA, but did not correlate with CR expression. These results suggest that CR may define a subpopulation of neurons within nucleus angularis.

  7. The biology of myelodysplastic syndromes: unity despite heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azra Raza

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS traditionally have been grouped together as a disease entity based on clinical phenomena seen in association. Despite the similarities, there is great heterogeneity among the syndromes. Recent insights have shown, however, that there exists a biologically cohesive theme that unifies and thereby validates the conceptual interconnectedness. The first suggestion that such a relationship existed where biology could directly explain the observed cytopenias was the finding of excessive premature apoptosis of hematopoietic cells in MDS marrows. This apoptosis was mediated by paracrine as well as autocrine factors implicating both the seed and the soil in the pathology of the disease. Pro-inflammatory cytokines in the marrow microenvironment were mainly the paracrine mediators of apoptosis, but how the clonal cells committed suicide because of autocrine stimulation had remained a mystery for more than a decade. It has been shown now that deregulation of ribosome biogenesis can initiate a stress response in the cell through the p53 signaling pathway. Congenital anemias had been associated with mutations in ribosomal protein genes. The surprise came with the investigation of 5q- syndrome patients where haplo-insufficiency of the ribosomal protein gene RPS14 was found to be the cause of this MDS subtype. Similar ribosomal deregulation was shown to be present in all varieties of MDS patients, serving as another unifying characteristic. In addition to these findings, there are other DNA-related abnormalities such as uniparental disomy, mutations in the TET2 gene, and epigenetic phenomena that are associated with and occur across all types of MDS. This paper summarizes the themes unifying this heterogeneous group of diseases.

  8. On Heterogeneous Covert Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindelauf, Roy; Borm, Peter; Hamers, Herbert

    Covert organizations are constantly faced with a tradeoff between secrecy and operational efficiency. Lindelauf, Borm and Hamers [13] developed a theoretical framework to determine optimal homogeneous networks taking the above mentioned considerations explicitly into account. In this paper this framework is put to the test by applying it to the 2002 Jemaah Islamiyah Bali bombing. It is found that most aspects of this covert network can be explained by the theoretical framework. Some interactions however provide a higher risk to the network than others. The theoretical framework on covert networks is extended to accommodate for such heterogeneous interactions. Given a network structure the optimal location of one risky interaction is established. It is shown that the pair of individuals in the organization that should conduct the interaction that presents the highest risk to the organization, is the pair that is the least connected to the remainder of the network. Furthermore, optimal networks given a single risky interaction are approximated and compared. When choosing among a path, star and ring graph it is found that for low order graphs the path graph is best. When increasing the order of graphs under consideration a transition occurs such that the star graph becomes best. It is found that the higher the risk a single interaction presents to the covert network the later this transition from path to star graph occurs.

  9. Heterogeneous burnable poisons:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leiva, Sergio; Agueda, Horacio; Russo, Diego

    1989-01-01

    The use of materials possessing high neutron absorption cross-section commonly known as 'burnable poisons' have its origin in BWR reactors with the purpose of improving the efficiency of the first fuel load. Later on, it was extended to PWR to compensate of initial reactivity without infringing the requirement of maintaining a negative moderator coefficient. The present tendency is to increase the use of solid burnable poisons to extend the fuel cycle life and discharge burnup. There are two concepts for the burnable poisons utilization: 1) heterogeneously distributions in the form of rods, plates, etc. and 2) homogeneous dispersions of burnable poisons in the fuel. The purpose of this work is to present the results of sinterability studies, performed on Al 2 O 3 -B 4 C and Al 2 O 3 -Gd 2 O 3 systems. Experiments were carried on pressing at room temperature mixtures of powders containing up to 5 wt % of B 4 C or Gd 2 O 3 in Al 2 O 3 and subsequently sintering at 1750 deg C in reducing atmosphere. Evaluation of density, porosity and microstructures were done and a comparison with previous experiences is shown. (Author) [es

  10. Heterogeneity: multilingualism and democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Jürgen Krumm

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Linguistic diversity and multilingualism on the part of individuals are aprerequisite and a constitutive condition of enabling people to live togetherin a world of growing heterogeneity. Foreign language teaching plays animportant part in democratic education because it can be seen as a trainingin respecting otherness and developing an intercultural, non-ethnocentricperception and attitude. This is all the more important because of the neces-sity of integrating children from migrant families into school life.My article argues that language education policy has to take this per-spective into account, i.e., of establishing a planned diversification so thatpupils (and their parents will not feel satisfied with learning English only,but also become motivated to learn languages of their own neighbourhood,such as migrant and minority languages. However, in order to make use ofthe linguistic resources in the classroom, relating it to the democratic impetusof foreign language education, it is necessary to revise existing languagepolicies and to develop a multilingual perspective for all educational institutions.

  11. Heterogeneity in the penumbra

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Zoppo, Gregory J; Sharp, Frank R; Heiss, Wolf-Dieter; Albers, Gregory W

    2011-01-01

    Original experimental studies in nonhuman primate models of focal ischemia showed flow-related changes in evoked potentials that suggested a circumferential zone of low regional cerebral blood flow with normal K+ homeostasis, around a core of permanent injury in the striatum or the cortex. This became the basis for the definition of the ischemic penumbra. Imaging techniques of the time suggested a homogeneous core of injury, while positing a surrounding ‘penumbral' region that could be salvaged. However, both molecular studies and observations of vascular integrity indicate a more complex and dynamic situation in the ischemic core that also changes with time. The microvascular, cellular, and molecular events in the acute setting are compatible with heterogeneity of the injury within the injury center, which at early time points can be described as multiple ‘mini-cores' associated with multiple ‘mini-penumbras'. These observations suggest the progression of injury from many small foci to a homogeneous defect over time after the onset of ischemia. Recent observations with updated imaging techniques and data processing support these dynamic changes within the core and the penumbra in humans following focal ischemia. PMID:21731034

  12. Heterogeneity of Morquio disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, M; Glössl, J; Grubisic, A; Spranger, J

    1986-04-01

    Further clinical heterogeneity of Morquio disease, mucopolysaccharidosis IV (MPS IV), is delineated by the observation of a 30-year-old man with unusually mild clinical manifestations. He is 156 cm tall, has comparatively mild skeletal abnormalities and fine corneal deposits. Keratosulfaturia is absent. N-Acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate (GalNAc-6-S) sulfatase (E.C. 3.1.6.-) was markedly reduced in his fibroblasts. The residual enzyme activity exhibited a pH profile comparable to that of patients with the "classical" form of the disorder. From our observation and a review of the literature it is concluded that Morquio disease can be divided in several subgroups: besides the severe ("classical") type A there exist an intermediate and a mild form that are also caused by a GalNAc-6-S sulfatase deficiency. A late-onset variant of Morquio disease, which is due to a deficiency of beta-galactosidase, has been classified as type B. In addition, patients with mild manifestation of the disease and normal activities in fibroblasts of GalNAc-6-S sulfatase and beta-galactosidase have been observed (type C). The genetic nature of the broad clinical variability of Morquio disease is incompletely understood: it is partially caused by different enzyme defects. Other factors thought to influence the clinical expression include the pH profile of the residual enzyme activity and an additional neuraminidase defect.

  13. Parsing Heterogeneous Striatal Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kae Nakamura

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The striatum is an input channel of the basal ganglia and is well known to be involved in reward-based decision making and learning. At the macroscopic level, the striatum has been postulated to contain parallel functional modules, each of which includes neurons that perform similar computations to support selection of appropriate actions for different task contexts. At the single-neuron level, however, recent studies in monkeys and rodents have revealed heterogeneity in neuronal activity even within restricted modules of the striatum. Looking for generality in the complex striatal activity patterns, here we briefly survey several types of striatal activity, focusing on their usefulness for mediating behaviors. In particular, we focus on two types of behavioral tasks: reward-based tasks that use salient sensory cues and manipulate outcomes associated with the cues; and perceptual decision tasks that manipulate the quality of noisy sensory cues and associate all correct decisions with the same outcome. Guided by previous insights on the modular organization and general selection-related functions of the basal ganglia, we relate striatal activity patterns on these tasks to two types of computations: implementation of selection and evaluation. We suggest that a parsing with the selection/evaluation categories encourages a focus on the functional commonalities revealed by studies with different animal models and behavioral tasks, instead of a focus on aspects of striatal activity that may be specific to a particular task setting. We then highlight several questions in the selection-evaluation framework for future explorations.

  14. Heterogeneity of postpartum depression: a latent class analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putnam, K.; Robertson-Blackmore, E.; Sharkey, K.; Payne, J.; Bergink, V.; Munk-Olsen, T.; Deligiannidis, K.; Altemus, M.; Newport, J.; Apter, G.; Devouche, E.; Vikorin, A.; Magnusson, P.; Lichtenstein, P.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Buist, A.; Bilszta, J.; O'Hara, M.; Stuart, S.; Brock, R.; Roza, S.; Tiemeier, H.; Guille, C.; Epperson, C.N.; Kim, D.; Schmidt, P.; Martinez, P.; Wisner, K.L.; Stowe, Z.; Jones, I.; Rubinow, D.; Sullivan, P.; Meltzer-Brody, S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Maternal depression in the postpartum period confers substantial morbidity and mortality, but the definition of postpartum depression remains controversial. We investigated the heterogeneity of symptoms with the aim of identifying clinical subtypes of postpartum depression. Methods: Data

  15. Heterogeneous Reaction gaseous chlorine nitrate and solid sodium chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timonen, Raimo S.; Chu, Liang T.; Leu, Ming-Taun

    1994-01-01

    The heterogeneous reaction of gaseous chlorine nitrate and solid sodium chloride was investigated over a temperature range of 220 - 300 K in a flow-tube reactor interfaced with a differentially pumped quadrupole mass spectrometer.

  16. Investigation of two novel biochemical markers of inflammation, matrix metalloproteinase and cathepsin generated fragments of C-reactive protein, in patients with ankylosing spondylitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøt-Arkil, Helene; Schett, Georg; Zhang, Chen

    2012-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammation of the spine and the sacroiliac joints. Current markers of inflammation, such as C-reactive protein (CRP), are reflecting the production of an acute phase reactant rather than tissue specific inflammation, but the use of CRP as a diagnostic an...... additional information on systemic inflammation as compared to that of full-length CRP. We investigated whether these CRP degradation products would provide additional diagnostic value in AS patients compared to full-length CRP....

  17. GenoLink: a graph-based querying and browsing system for investigating the function of genes and proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divo1 Jean-Louis

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A large variety of biological data can be represented by graphs. These graphs can be constructed from heterogeneous data coming from genomic and post-genomic technologies, but there is still need for tools aiming at exploring and analysing such graphs. This paper describes GenoLink, a software platform for the graphical querying and exploration of graphs. Results GenoLink provides a generic framework for representing and querying data graphs. This framework provides a graph data structure, a graph query engine, allowing to retrieve sub-graphs from the entire data graph, and several graphical interfaces to express such queries and to further explore their results. A query consists in a graph pattern with constraints attached to the vertices and edges. A query result is the set of all sub-graphs of the entire data graph that are isomorphic to the pattern and satisfy the constraints. The graph data structure does not rely upon any particular data model but can dynamically accommodate for any user-supplied data model. However, for genomic and post-genomic applications, we provide a default data model and several parsers for the most popular data sources. GenoLink does not require any programming skill since all operations on graphs and the analysis of the results can be carried out graphically through several dedicated graphical interfaces. Conclusion GenoLink is a generic and interactive tool allowing biologists to graphically explore various sources of information. GenoLink is distributed either as a standalone application or as a component of the Genostar/Iogma platform. Both distributions are free for academic research and teaching purposes and can be requested at academy@genostar.com. A commercial licence form can be obtained for profit company at info@genostar.com. See also http://www.genostar.org.

  18. Field heterogeneity: some basic issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip, J.R.

    1980-04-01

    Present-day soil-water physics enables useful quantitative predictions in the laboratory and in simple field situations. However, difficulties frequently arise for areas of appreciable size in the field. Two types of heterogeneity are distinguished: deterministic and stochastic. The first often demands an extension of established analyses and may involve important phenomena absent from the analogous homogeneous problem. Stochastic heterogeneity may involve many scales and is imperfectly known. The statistical properties may be stationary, but in more complicated cases, randomness may be embedded in (either known or unknown) systematic trends. Some aspects of unsaturated and generally unsteady flow in heterogeneous systems are reviewed: the mathematical nature of the flow equation; the concept of scale-heterogeneity; analytical and quasianalytical solutions. The enormity of the total problem of unsaturated unsteady flow in stochastic heterogeneous systems is illustrated through a dialectic of 8 successive stages of simplification. 37 references.

  19. Pressure dependence of dynamical heterogeneity in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teboul, Victor

    2008-01-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations we investigate the effect of pressure on the dynamical heterogeneity in water. We show that the effect of a pressure variation in water is qualitatively different from the effect of a temperature variation on the dynamical heterogeneity in the liquid. We observe a strong decrease of the aggregation of molecules of low mobility together with a decrease of the characteristic time associated with this aggregation. However, the aggregation of the most mobile molecules and the characteristic time of this aggregation are only slightly affected. In accordance with this result, the non-Gaussian parameter shows an important decrease with pressure while the characteristic time t* of the non-Gaussian parameter is only slightly affected. These results highlight then the importance of pressure variation investigations in low temperature liquids on approach to the glass transition

  20. Genes Integral to the Reproductive Function of Male Reproductive Tissues Drive Heterogeneity in Evolutionary Rates in Japanese Quail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finseth, Findley R.; Harrison, Richard G.

    2017-01-01

    Early comparative genomics studies originally uncovered a nonintuitive pattern; genes involved in reproduction appeared to evolve more rapidly than other classes of genes. Currently, the emerging consensus is that genes encoding reproductive proteins evolve under variable selective pressures, producing more heterogeneous divergence patterns than previously appreciated. Here, we investigate a facet of that heterogeneity and explore the factors that drive male reproductive tissue-based heterogeneity in evolutionary rates. In Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica), genes with enriched expression in the testes evolve much more rapidly than those enriched in the foam gland (FG), a novel gland that secretes an airy foam that males transfer to females during mating. We compared molecular evolutionary patterns among (1) genes with induced expression in breeding vs. wintering conditions for both tissues and (2) genes that encode foam proteins (FPs) vs. those with varying degrees of expression specificity in the FG. We report two major findings. First, genes upregulated in breeding condition testes evolve exceptionally rapidly, while those induced in breeding condition FGs evolve slowly. These differences hold even after correcting for hormonally-dependent gene expression and chromosomal location. Second, genes encoding FPs are extremely conserved in terms of gene identity and sequence. Together, these finding suggest that genes involved in the reproductive function of each tissue drive the marked rate of heterogeneity. PMID:29158338

  1. Optical metabolic imaging quantifies heterogeneous cell populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Alex J.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2015-01-01

    The genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity of cancers can contribute to tumor aggressiveness, invasion, and resistance to therapy. Fluorescence imaging occupies a unique niche to investigate tumor heterogeneity due to its high resolution and molecular specificity. Here, heterogeneous populations are identified and quantified by combined optical metabolic imaging and subpopulation analysis (OMI-SPA). OMI probes the fluorescence intensities and lifetimes of metabolic enzymes in cells to provide images of cellular metabolism, and SPA models cell populations as mixed Gaussian distributions to identify cell subpopulations. In this study, OMI-SPA is characterized by simulation experiments and validated with cell experiments. To generate heterogeneous populations, two breast cancer cell lines, SKBr3 and MDA-MB-231, were co-cultured at varying proportions. OMI-SPA correctly identifies two populations with minimal mean and proportion error using the optical redox ratio (fluorescence intensity of NAD(P)H divided by the intensity of FAD), mean NAD(P)H fluorescence lifetime, and OMI index. Simulation experiments characterized the relationships between sample size, data standard deviation, and subpopulation mean separation distance required for OMI-SPA to identify subpopulations. PMID:25780745

  2. Probing spatial heterogeneity in supercooled glycerol and temporal heterogeneity with single-molecule FRET in polyprolines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xia, Ted

    2010-01-01

    This thesis presents two lines of research. On the one hand, we investigate heterogeneity in supercooled glycerol by means of rheometry, small-angle neutron scattering, and fluorescence imaging. We find from the rheological experiments that supercooled glycerol can behave like weak solids at

  3. Cognitive resource management for heterogeneous cellular networks

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yongkang

    2014-01-01

    This Springer Brief focuses on cognitive resource management in heterogeneous cellular networks (Het Net) with small cell deployment for the LTE-Advanced system. It introduces the Het Net features, presents practical approaches using cognitive radio technology in accommodating small cell data relay and optimizing resource allocation and examines the effectiveness of resource management among small cells given limited coordination bandwidth and wireless channel uncertainty. The authors introduce different network characteristics of small cell, investigate the mesh of small cell access points in

  4. Quantitative changes in proteins responsible for flavonoid and anthocyanin biosynthesis in strawberry fruit at different ripening stages: A targeted quantitative proteomic investigation employing multiple reaction monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jun; Du, Lina; Li, Li; Kalt, Wilhelmina; Palmer, Leslie Campbell; Fillmore, Sherry; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, ZhaoQi; Li, XiHong

    2015-06-03

    To better understand the regulation of flavonoid and anthocyanin biosynthesis, a targeted quantitative proteomic investigation employing LC-MS with multiple reaction monitoring was conducted on two strawberry cultivars at three ripening stages. This quantitative proteomic workflow was improved through an OFFGEL electrophoresis to fractionate peptides from total protein digests. A total of 154 peptide transitions from 47 peptides covering 21 proteins and isoforms related to anthocyanin biosynthesis were investigated. The normalized protein abundance, which was measured using isotopically-labeled standards, was significantly changed concurrently with increased anthocyanin content and advanced fruit maturity. The protein abundance of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase; anthocyanidin synthase, chalcone isomerase; flavanone 3-hydroxylase; dihydroflavonol 4-reductase, UDP-glucose:flavonoid-3-O-glucosyltransferase, cytochrome c and cytochrome C oxidase subunit 2, was all significantly increased in fruit of more advanced ripeness. An interaction between cultivar and maturity was also shown with respect to chalcone isomerase. The good correlation between protein abundance and anthocyanin content suggested that a metabolic control point may exist for anthocyanin biosynthesis. This research provides insights into the process of anthocyanin formation in strawberry fruit at the level of protein concentration and reveals possible candidates in the regulation of anthocyanin formation during fruit ripening. To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms contributing to flavonoids and anthocyanin biosynthesis and regulation of strawberry fruit during ripening is challenging due to limited molecular biology tools and established hypothesis. Our targeted proteomic approach employing LC-MS/MS analysis and MRM technique to quantify proteins in relation to flavonoids and anthocyanin biosynthesis and regulation in strawberry fruit during fruit ripening is novel. The identification of peptides

  5. An investigation into the population abundance distribution of mRNAs, proteins, and metabolites in biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chuan; King, Ross D

    2009-08-15

    Distribution analysis is one of the most basic forms of statistical analysis. Thanks to improved analytical methods, accurate and extensive quantitative measurements can now be made of the mRNA, protein and metabolite from biological systems. Here, we report a large-scale analysis of the population abundance distributions of the transcriptomes, proteomes and metabolomes from varied biological systems. We compared the observed empirical distributions with a number of distributions: power law, lognormal, loglogistic, loggamma, right Pareto-lognormal (PLN) and double PLN (dPLN). The best-fit for mRNA, protein and metabolite population abundance distributions was found to be the dPLN. This distribution behaves like a lognormal distribution around the centre, and like a power law distribution in the tails. To better understand the cause of this observed distribution, we explored a simple stochastic model based on geometric Brownian motion. The distribution indicates that multiplicative effects are causally dominant in biological systems. We speculate that these effects arise from chemical reactions: the central-limit theorem then explains the central lognormal, and a number of possible mechanisms could explain the long tails: positive feedback, network topology, etc. Many of the components in the central lognormal parts of the empirical distributions are unidentified and/or have unknown function. This indicates that much more biology awaits discovery.

  6. Investigation of the Copper Binding Site And the Role of Histidine As a Ligand in Riboflavin Binding Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S.R.; Bencze, K.Z.; Russ, K.A.; Wasiukanis, K.; Benore-Parsons, M.; Stemmler, T.L.

    2009-05-26

    Riboflavin Binding Protein (RBP) binds copper in a 1:1 molar ratio, forming a distinct well-ordered type II site. The nature of this site has been examined using X-ray absorption and pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies, revealing a four coordinate oxygen/nitrogen rich environment. On the basis of analysis of the Cambridge Structural Database, the average protein bound copper-ligand bond length of 1.96 {angstrom}, obtained by extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), is consistent with four coordinate Cu(I) and Cu(II) models that utilize mixed oxygen and nitrogen ligand distributions. These data suggest a Cu-O{sub 3}N coordination state for copper bound to RBP. While pulsed EPR studies including hyperfine sublevel correlation spectroscopy and electron nuclear double resonance show clear spectroscopic evidence for a histidine bound to the copper, inclusion of a histidine in the EXAFS simulation did not lead to any significant improvement in the fit.

  7. Molecular Investigation of the Mechanism of Non-Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Proteins and the Predictive Algorithm for Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Timothy M; Wood, Geoffrey P F; Farkas, David; Sathish, Hasige A; Samra, Hardeep S; Trout, Bernhardt L

    2016-06-14

    A number of potential degradation routes can limit the shelf life of a biotherapeutic. While these are experimentally measurable, the tests to do so require a substantial investment in both time and material, resources rarely available early in the drug development process. To address the potential degradation route of non-enzymatic hydrolysis, we performed a molecular modeling analysis, together with an experimental study, to gain detailed insight into the reaction. On the basis of the mechanism, an algorithm for predicting the likely cleavage sites of a protein has been created. This algorithm measures four key properties during a molecular dynamics simulation, which relate to the key steps of the hydrolysis mechanism, in particular the rate-determining step (which can vary depending on the local environment). The first two properties include the secondary structure and the surface exposure of the amide bond, both of which help detect if the addition of the proton to the amide bond is possible. The second two properties relate to whether the side chain can cyclize and form a furane ring. These two properties are the orientation of the side chain relative to the amide bond and the number of hydrogen bonds between the side chain and the surrounding protein. Overall, the algorithm performs well at identifying reactive versus nonreactive bonds. The algorithm correctly classifies nearly 90% of all amide bonds following an aspartic or glutamic acid residue as reactive or nonreactive.

  8. An Investigation of Bacterial Protein Interactions as a Primary Research Project in a Sophomore-Level Molecular Biology Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean A. Cardinale

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Longer term research activities that may be incorporated in undergraduate courses are a powerful tool for promoting student interest and learning, developing cognitive process skills, and allowing undergraduates to experience real research activities in which they may not otherwise have the opportunity to participate. The challenge to doing so in lower-level courses is that students may have not fully grasped the scientific concepts needed to undertake such research endeavors, and that they may be discouraged if activities are perceived to be too challenging. The paper describes how a bacterial protein:protein interaction detection system was adapted and incorporated into the laboratory component of a sophomore-level Molecular Cell Biology course. The project was designed to address multiple learning objectives connecting course content to the laboratory activities, as well as teach basic molecular biology laboratory skills and procedures in the context of a primary research activity. Pre- and posttesting and student surveys both suggest that the laboratory curriculum resulted in significant learning gains, as well as being well received and valued by the students.

  9. An investigation of bacterial protein interactions as a primary research project in a sophomore-level molecular biology course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinale, Jean A

    2011-01-01

    Longer term research activities that may be incorporated in undergraduate courses are a powerful tool for promoting student interest and learning, developing cognitive process skills, and allowing undergraduates to experience real research activities in which they may not otherwise have the opportunity to participate. The challenge to doing so in lower-level courses is that students may have not fully grasped the scientific concepts needed to undertake such research endeavors, and that they may be discouraged if activities are perceived to be too challenging. The paper describes how a bacterial protein:protein interaction detection system was adapted and incorporated into the laboratory component of a sophomore-level Molecular Cell Biology course. The project was designed to address multiple learning objectives connecting course content to the laboratory activities, as well as teach basic molecular biology laboratory skills and procedures in the context of a primary research activity. Pre- and posttesting and student surveys both suggest that the laboratory curriculum resulted in significant learning gains, as well as being well received and valued by the students.

  10. Single-Cell Analysis of the Impact of Host Cell Heterogeneity on Infection with Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Xiu; Wang, Hailong; Han, Lingling; Wang, Mingzhen; Fang, Hui; Hao, Yao; Li, Jiadai; Zhang, Hu; Zheng, Congyi; Shen, Chao

    2018-05-01

    Viral infection and replication are affected by host cell heterogeneity, but the mechanisms underlying the effects remain unclear. Using single-cell analysis, we investigated the effects of host cell heterogeneity, including cell size, inclusion, and cell cycle, on foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection (acute and persistent infections) and replication. We detected various viral genome replication levels in FMDV-infected cells. Large cells and cells with a high number of inclusions generated more viral RNA copies and viral protein and a higher proportion of infectious cells than other cells. Additionally, we found that the viral titer was 10- to 100-fold higher in cells in G 2 /M than those in other cell cycle phases and identified a strong correlation between cell size, inclusion, and cell cycle heterogeneity, which all affected the infection and replication of FMDV. Furthermore, we demonstrated that host cell heterogeneity influenced the adsorption of FMDV due to differences in the levels of FMDV integrin receptors expression. Collectively, these results further our understanding of the evolution of a virus in a single host cell. IMPORTANCE It is important to understand how host cell heterogeneity affects viral infection and replication. Using single-cell analysis, we found that viral genome replication levels exhibited dramatic variability in foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV)-infected cells. We also found a strong correlation between heterogeneity in cell size, inclusion number, and cell cycle status and that all of these characteristics affect the infection and replication of FMDV. Moreover, we found that host cell heterogeneity influenced the viral adsorption as differences in the levels of FMDV integrin receptors' expression. This study provided new ideas for the studies of correlation between FMDV infection mechanisms and host cells. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  11. Antibodies directed to drug epitopes to investigate the structure of drug-protein photoadducts. Recognition of a common photobound substructure in tiaprofenic acid/ketoprofen cross-photoreactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahoz, A; Hernández, D; Miranda, M A; Pérez-Prieto, J; Morera, I M; Castell, J V

    2001-11-01

    Drug-induced photoallergy is an immune adverse reaction to the combined effect of drugs and light. From the mechanistic point of view, it first involves covalent binding of drug to protein resulting in the formation of a photoantigen. Hence, determination of the structures of drug-protein photoadducts is of great relevance to understand the molecular basis of photoallergy and cross-immunoreactivity among drugs. Looking for new strategies to investigate the covalent photobinding of drugs to proteins, we generated highly specific antibodies to drug chemical substructures. The availability of such antibodies has allowed us to discriminate between the different modes by which tiaprofenic acid (TPA), suprofen (SUP), and ketoprofen (KTP) photobind to proteins. The finding that the vast majority of the TPA photoadduct can be accounted for by means of antibody anti-benzoyl strongly supports the view that the drug binds preferentially via the thiophene ring, leaving the benzene ring more accessible. By contrast, selective recognition of SUP-protein photoadducts by antibody anti-thenoyl evidences a preferential coupling via the benzene ring leaving the thiophene moiety more distant from the protein matrix. In the case of KTP, photoadducts are exclusively recognized by antibody anti-benzoyl, indicating that the benzene ring is again more accessible. As a result of this research, we have been able to identify a common substructure that is present in TPA-albumin and KTP-albumin photoadducts. This is remarkable since, at a first sight, the greatest structural similarities can be found between TPA and SUP as they share the same benzoylthiophene chromophore. These findings can explain the previously reported observations of cross-reactivity to KTP (or TPA) in patients photosensitized to TPA (or KTP).

  12. Investigations of the influence of the content of crude plant protein in the ration on the utilisation of urea in dairy cattle. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voigt, J.; Piatkowski, B.; Krawielitzki, R.; Adam, K.

    1984-01-01

    The metabolism of 15 N-urea in dairy cows was investigated in dependence on the crude protein content of the rations. With the energy concentration remaining unchanged, the rations contained 10.7(I), 13.7(II) and 17.1(III)% plant crude protein and, after the supplementation of 150 g urea per animal and day, a total of 13.8, 16.7 and 20.2% crude protein in the dry matter. The urea was intraruminally infused during the feeding in the morning and the evening. In the morning feeding of each 1st measuring day it was labelled with 27.5 atom-% 15 N-excess ( 15 N'). The degree of labelling with 15 N' of the N fraction of rumen fluid, contents of the duodenum, feces and milk, precipitable with trichloric acetic acid (TCA) decreased with the rising protein level of the ration. This effect was bigger than could be expected considering the low 15 N' quota in the total N of the ration. In the sequence I..III, 52.7, 32.2 and 30.6% of the 15 N' amount taken in passed the duodenal re-entrant cannula in TCA-precipitable form within 72 hours after 15 N application. 33.3, 21.9 and 22.6% were apparently absorbed in the intestines as TCA-precipitable N within 120 h after the 15 N' application. In the same period 31.7, 43.1 and 72.8% of the 15 N' taken in were excreted in urine. 12.3, 9.6 and 5.8% of the applied 15 N' were found in milk protein. One can conclude that the utilization of urea N decreases with the rising level of crude protein in the ration and that, however, urea N is still biochemically utilized when there is an excess of plant N in the ration. (author)

  13. Computer Simulations of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Song-Ho; Chatterjee, Prathit; Ham, Sihyun

    2017-05-01

    The investigation of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) is a new frontier in structural and molecular biology that requires a new paradigm to connect structural disorder to function. Molecular dynamics simulations and statistical thermodynamics potentially offer ideal tools for atomic-level characterizations and thermodynamic descriptions of this fascinating class of proteins that will complement experimental studies. However, IDPs display sensitivity to inaccuracies in the underlying molecular mechanics force fields. Thus, achieving an accurate structural characterization of IDPs via simulations is a challenge. It is also daunting to perform a configuration-space integration over heterogeneous structural ensembles sampled by IDPs to extract, in particular, protein configurational entropy. In this review, we summarize recent efforts devoted to the development of force fields and the critical evaluations of their performance when applied to IDPs. We also survey recent advances in computational methods for protein configurational entropy that aim to provide a thermodynamic link between structural disorder and protein activity.

  14. Tumour heterogeneity promotes collective invasion and cancer metastatic dissemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallou, Adrien; Jennings, Joel; Kabla, Alexandre J

    2017-08-01

    Heterogeneity within tumour cell populations is commonly observed in most cancers. However, its impact on metastatic dissemination, one of the primary determinants of the disease prognosis, remains poorly understood. Working with a simplified numerical model of tumour spheroids, we investigated the impact of mechanical heterogeneity on the onset of tumour invasion into surrounding tissues. Our work establishes a positive link between tumour heterogeneity and metastatic dissemination, and recapitulates a number of invasion patterns identified in vivo , such as multicellular finger-like protrusions. Two complementary mechanisms are at play in heterogeneous tumours. A small proportion of stronger cells are able to initiate and lead the escape of cells, while collective effects in the bulk of the tumour provide the coordination required to sustain the invasive process through multicellular streaming. This suggests that the multicellular dynamics observed during metastasis is a generic feature of mechanically heterogeneous cell populations and might rely on a limited and generic set of attributes.

  15. Modulation of Calcium Oxalate Crystallization by Proteins and Small Molecules Investigated by In Situ Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, R.; Orme, C.; Cody, A. M.; Wierzbicki, A.; Hoyer, J.; Nancollas, G.; de Yoreo, J.

    2002-12-01

    Understanding the physical mechanisms by which biological inhibitors control nucleation and growth of inorganic crystals is a major focus of biomineral research. Calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM), which plays a functional role in plant physiology, is also a source of pathogenesis in humans where it causes kidney stone disease. Although a great deal of research has been carried out on the modulation COM by proteins and small molecules, the basic mechanism has not yet been understood. However, because the proteins that play a role in COM growth have been identified and sequenced, COM provides an excellent model system for research into biomineral growth. In this study, in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to monitor the COM surface under controlled growth conditions both from pure solutions and those doped with citrate and osteopontin (OPN) in order to determine their effects on surface morphology and growth dynamics at the molecular level. As with other solution-grown crystals such as calcite, COM grows on complex dislocation hillocks. In pure solution, while growth on the (010) face is isotropic, hillocks on the (-101) face exhibit anisotropic step kinetics. Steps of [-10-1] and orientation are clearly delineated with the [-10-1] being the fast growing direction. When citrate is added to the solution, both growth rate and morphology are drastically changed on (-101) face, especially along the [-10-1] direction. This results in isotropic disc-shaped hillocks a shape that is then reflected in the macroscopic growth habit. In contrast, no large growth changes were observed on the (010) facet. At the same time, molecular modeling predicts an excellent fit of the citrate ion into the (-101) plane and a poor fit to the (010) face. Here we propose a model that reconciles the step-specific interactions implied by the AFM results with the face-specific predictions of the calculations. Finally, we present the results of doping with aspartic acid as well as OPN, an

  16. Heterogeneity of rabbit platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpatkin, S.

    1978-01-01

    Rabbits were injected intravenously with a cohort platelet label, 75 Se-selenomethionine. Platelet-rich plasma was separated into five different platelet density fractions on each of seven days by repetitively centrifuging the same sample of platelet-rich plasma at increasing gravitational force. The heaviest platelet sediment fraction was enriched with larger platelets. The lightest platelet sediment fraction was enriched with smaller platelets. Incorporation of isotope into the heaviest platelet fraction was considerably greater than incorporation into the lightest platelet fraction. The mean platelet survival of the lightest two fractions was significantly shorter than that of the heaviest three fractions. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the platelet cell sap generally revealed 10 prominent protein bands for the heaviest platelet fractions. The lightest platelet fraction had six absent to markedly diminished platelet proteins. The data are compatible with two models, (1) heavy-large platelets are, on average, young platelets which become lighter-smaller platelets while losing platelet membranes and cell sap components with time. (2) Heavy-large platelets and light-small platelets are produced independently by specific megakarocytes. The heavy-large platelets incorporate more isotope that lighter-smaller platelets (possibly because of their megakarocyte precursor). However, they are released earlier into the circulation than lighter-smaller platelets and are therefore younger platelets. The light-smaller platelets which are released later into the circulation have a shorter survival. (author)

  17. Time-resolved methods in biophysics. 6. Time-resolved Laue crystallography as a tool to investigate photo-activated protein dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, Dominique; Schotte, Friedrich; Brunori, Maurizio; Vallone, Beatrice

    2007-10-01

    When polychromatic X-rays are shined onto crystalline material, they generate a Laue diffraction pattern. At third generation synchrotron radiation sources, a single X-ray pulse of approximately 100 ps duration is enough to produce interpretable Laue data from biomolecular crystals. Thus, by initiating biological turnover in a crystalline protein, structural changes along the reaction pathway may be filmed by ultra-fast Laue diffraction. Using laser-light as a trigger, transient species in photosensitive macromolecules can be captured at near atomic resolution with sub-nanosecond time-resolution. Such pump-probe Laue experiments have now reached an outstanding level of sophistication and have found a domain of excellence in the investigation of light-sensitive proteins undergoing cyclic photo-reactions and producing stiff crystals. The main theoretical concepts of Laue diffraction and the challenges associated with time-resolved experiments on biological crystals are recalled. The recent advances in the design of experiments are presented in terms of instrumental choices, data collection strategy and data processing, and some of the inherent difficulties of the method are highlighted. The discussion is based on the example of myoglobin, a protein that has traversed the whole history of pump-probe Laue diffraction, and for which a massive amount of data have provided considerable insight into the understanding of protein dynamics.

  18. Anomalous transport in heterogeneous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horbach, Jürgen; Siboni, Nima H.; Schnyder, Simon K.

    2017-08-01

    The diffusion dynamics of particles in heterogeneous media is studied using particle-based simulation techniques. A special focus is placed on systems where the transport of particles at long times exhibits anomalies such as subdiffusive or superdiffusive behavior. First, a two-dimensional model system is considered containing gas particles (tracers) that diffuse through a random arrangement of pinned, disk-shaped particles. This system is similar to a classical Lorentz gas. However, different from the original Lorentz model, soft instead of hard interactions are considered and we also discuss the case where the tracer particles interact with each other. We show that the modification from hard to soft interactions strongly affects anomalous-diffusive transport at high obstacle densities. Second, non-linear active micro-rheology in a glass-forming binary Yukawa mixture is investigated, pulling single particles through a deeply supercooled state by applying a constant force. Here, we observe superdiffusion in force direction and analyze its origin. Finally, we consider the Brownian dynamics of a particle which is pulled through a two-dimensional random force field. We discuss the similarities of this model with the Lorentz gas as well as active micro-rheology in glass-forming systems.

  19. Investigation of the Relationship between Lactococcal Host Cell Wall Polysaccharide Genotype and 936 Phage Receptor Binding Protein Phylogeny

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahony, Jennifer; Kot, Witold Piotr; Murphy, James

    2013-01-01

    Comparative genomics of 11 lactococcal 936-type phages combined with host range analysis allowed subgrouping of these phage genomes, particularly with respect to their encoded receptor binding proteins. The so-called pellicle or cell wall polysaccharide of Lactococcus lactis, which has been...... implicated as a host receptor of (certain) 936-type phages, is specified by a large gene cluster, which, among different lactococcal strains, contains highly conserved regions as well as regions of diversity. The regions of diversity within this cluster on the genomes of lactococcal strains MG1363, SK11, IL......1403, KF147, CV56, and UC509.9 were used for the development of a multiplex PCR system to identify the pellicle genotype of lactococcal strains used in this study. The resulting comparative analysis revealed an apparent correlation between the pellicle genotype of a given host strain and the host range...

  20. Is the pre-Tg DSC endotherm observed with solid state proteins associated with the protein internal dynamics? Investigation of bovine serum albumin by solid state hydrogen/deuterium exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Masayasu; Pikal, Michael J

    2013-10-01

    DSC thermograms of solid state pure proteins often show a distinct endotherm at a temperature far below the glass transition temperature of the system (Tg). We hypothesized this endotherm represents enthalpy recovery associated with an internal mobility transition of the protein molecule. Although the existence of an internal transition has been postulated, whether this endotherm is associated with such a transition has not previously been discussed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the origin of the pre-Tg endotherm in lyophilized bovine serum albumin (BSA). Due to strong glass behavior, the system Tg was determined by extrapolating Tg data of disaccharide/BSA formulations to zero saccharide. A small pre-Tg endotherm around 40-60 °C was observed in amorphous BSA equilibrated at 11%RH. The apparent activation energy suggested the endotherm was "α-mobility"-related. A solid state hydrogen/deuterium exchange study using FTIR was conducted over a temperature range spanning the endotherm. We found a fast phase, followed by essentially a plateau level which is highly temperature dependent in the 40-60 °C range, suggesting enhanced internal protein motion as the system passes through the temperature range of the endotherm. These results suggest the pre-Tg endotherm is associated with a protein internal mobility transition. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The water budget of heterogeneous areas : impact of soil and rainfall variability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, C.P.

    1995-01-01

    In this thesis the heterogeneity of the soil water budget components is investigated. Heterogeneity of soil hydraulic properties and rainfall rate are taken into account by using stochastic methods. The importance of lateral groundwater flow in causing heterogeneity of the water budget

  2. Simultaneous Multiplexed Measurement of RNA and Proteins in Single Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spyros Darmanis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Significant advances have been made in methods to analyze genomes and transcriptomes of single cells, but to fully define cell states, proteins must also be accessed as central actors defining a cell’s phenotype. Methods currently used to analyze endogenous protein expression in single cells are limited in specificity, throughput, or multiplex capability. Here, we present an approach to simultaneously and specifically interrogate large sets of protein and RNA targets in lysates from individual cells, enabling investigations of cell functions and responses. We applied our method to investigate the effects of BMP4, an experimental therapeutic agent, on early-passage glioblastoma cell cultures. We uncovered significant heterogeneity in responses to treatment at levels of RNA and protein, with a subset of cells reacting in a distinct manner to BMP4. Moreover, we found overall poor correlation between protein and RNA at the level of single cells, with proteins more accurately defining responses to treatment.

  3. Laboratory investigation of triple marking the parasitoid Gonatocerus ashmeadi (Hymenoptera: Mymaridae) with a fluorescent dye and two animal proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonatocerus ashmeadi Girault, a parasitoid of Homalodisca vitripennis (Germar), was used as a model insect to investigate triple marking a minute hymenopteran for potential use for monitoring dispersal patterns of natural enemies in the field. The triple mark contained egg albumin in chicken eggs, c...

  4. Investigation of metallodrug-protein interactions by size-exclusion chromatography coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szpunar, J.; Makarov, A.; Pieper, T.; Keppler, B.K.; Lobinski, R.

    1999-01-01

    The coupling of size-exclusion HPLC with ICP-MS was developed for the studies of the kinetics of metallodrug binding to human serum proteins. Two platinum- and three ruthenium-based drugs were investigated. Various SEC columns (of different lengths and with different packings) were compared for the separation of the protein-bound and unbound fractions of a metallodrug prior to on-line detection of the metal (Ru or Pt). The approach developed offers considerable advantages over the methods based on ultrafiltration followed by the off-line metal determination in terms of speed, simplicity, precision and selectivity regarding the molecular weight of the complexes involved. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  5. Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Investigation of the Structural Topology and Lipid Interactions of a Viral Fusion Protein Chimera Containing the Fusion Peptide and Transmembrane Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hongwei; Lee, Myungwoon; Liao, Shu-Yu; Hong, Mei

    2016-12-13

    The fusion peptide (FP) and transmembrane domain (TMD) of viral fusion proteins play important roles during virus-cell membrane fusion, by inducing membrane curvature and transient dehydration. The structure of the water-soluble ectodomain of viral fusion proteins has been extensively studied crystallographically, but the structures of the FP and TMD bound to phospholipid membranes are not well understood. We recently investigated the conformations and lipid interactions of the separate FP and TMD peptides of parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) fusion protein F using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance. These studies provide structural information about the two domains when they are spatially well separated in the fusion process. To investigate how these two domains are structured relative to each other in the postfusion state, when the ectodomain forms a six-helix bundle that is thought to force the FP and TMD together in the membrane, we have now expressed and purified a chimera of the FP and TMD, connected by a Gly-Lys linker, and measured the chemical shifts and interdomain contacts of the protein in several lipid membranes. The FP-TMD chimera exhibits α-helical chemical shifts in all the membranes examined and does not cause strong curvature of lamellar membranes or membranes with negative spontaneous curvature. These properties differ qualitatively from those of the separate peptides, indicating that the FP and TMD interact with each other in the lipid membrane. However, no 13 C- 13 C cross peaks are observed in two-dimensional correlation spectra, suggesting that the two helices are not tightly associated. These results suggest that the ectodomain six-helix bundle does not propagate into the membrane to the two hydrophobic termini. However, the loosely associated FP and TMD helices are found to generate significant negative Gaussian curvature to membranes that possess spontaneous positive curvature, consistent with the notion that the FP-TMD assembly may

  6. Homogeneous, Heterogeneous, and Enzymatic Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, S. Ted; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses three areas of catalysis: homegeneous, heterogeneous, and enzymatic. Explains fundamentals and economic impact of catalysis. Lists and discusses common industrial catalysts. Provides a list of 107 references. (MVL)

  7. Selective Oxidations using Nanostructured Heterogeneous Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mielby, Jerrik Jørgen

    The aim of this thesis is to investigate and develop new efficient methods to oxidise alcohols and amines using heterogeneous catalysts and either O2 or H2O2 as oxidants. From an economic and environmental point of view, these oxidants are ideal, because they are cheap and readily available and b...... stability, catalytic activity and selectivity for the gas-phase oxidation of bioethanol to acetaldehyde, which may become a favourable and green alternative to the ethylene route.......The aim of this thesis is to investigate and develop new efficient methods to oxidise alcohols and amines using heterogeneous catalysts and either O2 or H2O2 as oxidants. From an economic and environmental point of view, these oxidants are ideal, because they are cheap and readily available......, the chapter focuses on the use of supported metal catalysts for the selective oxidation of alcohols, which are currently dominated by the platinum group metals. Chapter 2 deals with the most important methods to characterise heterogeneous catalysts, including X-ray powder diffraction, physisorption analysis...

  8. Investigation of Filtration Membranes from the Dairy Protein Industry for Residual Fouling Using Infrared Spectroscopy and Chemometrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jannie Krog

    Ultrafiltration and microfiltration operations are applied intensively in the dairy and water cleaning industries. The main capacity limiting factors of such operations are the flux and efficiency decline by irreversible adsorption of foulants onto the membranes and the efficiency by which...... the reversible fouling can be removed/cleaned. The aim of this thesis is to investigate the residual fouling that is deposited on ultrafiltration and microfiltration membranes after usage. The membrane surfaces are investigated using infrared spectroscopy with an attenuated reflectance sampling unit...... fouling present at the center tube decreasing in concentration outwards in a flame-like shape. The relative concentration calculations are based on the height of the amide II peak (1500-1550 cm-1) which was chosen because it unlike the amide I band has no interference with adsorbed water and other...

  9. INVESTIGATION ON LACTOSE FERMENTING YEASTS ACTIVITY IN THE WHEY OBTAINED BY COAGULATION OF MILK PROTEINS BY BERRY COAGULANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena GREK

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of biochemical activity of lactose fermenting yeasts in the wort based on whey, obtained by thermo acid coagulation of milk by berry raw material (sterilized black currant paste are shown. The extraction of black currant’ valuable components occur in the protein foundation and colored whey, which can be used in the production of fermented beverages with high biological and nutrition value. It was found from the analysis of lactose fermenting yeasts’ biomass accommodation that the biggest growth of yeasts in the wort based on colored whey was in the samples which are fermented by Zygosaccharomyces lactis 868-K – the general amount of cells was (78.1...79.9∙106 CFU/ml for 48 hours. The optimal fermentation temperature (30…32 °C was established by the parameters of fermentation activity: accumulation of ethyl alcohol and carbon dioxide in the wort, the total amount of yeasts cells.The obtained results were used in the technology development of non-alcocholic beverages based on colored whey.

  10. Cigarette smokers develop altered erythrocyte membrane composition: an investigation unmasking the role of membrane bound integral protein GLUT 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikdar, Jyotirmoy; Seal, Paromita; Roy, Amartya; Haldar, Rajen

    2017-04-01

    Erythrocytes in cigarette smokers are prone to oxidative damage. Here, we sought to elucidate the facts behind modifications and possible defense system developed in erythrocyte of cigarette smokers. We observed significant increase in stomatocytes and spherocytes, and osmotic fragility of erythrocyte, along with reduced level of protein thiol and increased fluorescence anisotropy in isolated membrane. Denaturing gel electrophoresis indicated alterations in band 3, band 4.2 and band 4.5. Among those, Glut 1 (i.e. band 4.5), which transports glucose (insulin independent) and dehydroascorbate (DHA), was selectively chosen for its long history in reducing reactive oxygen species (ROS). The increased Glut 1 level in smokers was confirmed by immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry. Furthermore, smokers showed significantly higher glucose uptake in whole blood. The intracellular (Ic) ROS (as indicated by 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin) was significantly higher in smokers as evidenced by flow cytometric assay. Glucose and DHA alone or together significantly reduced IcROS at higher rate in smokers. However, in presence of Glut 1 specific blocker, phloretin, neither glucose nor DHA could reduce IcROS in both non-smokers and smokers. This confirms that Glut 1 by transporting glucose or DHA attenuates IcROS. Therefore, we conclude that erythrocytes, although altered morphologically, also develop a defense system by upregulating Glut 1 to combat with enhanced Ic oxidative insult in cigarette smokers.

  11. Residue Modification and Mass Spectrometry for the Investigation of Structural and Metalation Properties of Metallothionein and Cysteine-Rich Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, Gordon W; Stillman, Martin J

    2017-04-26

    Structural information regarding metallothioneins (MTs) has been hard to come by due to its highly dynamic nature in the absence of metal-thiolate cluster formation and crystallization difficulties. Thus, typical spectroscopic methods for structural determination are limited in their usefulness when applied to MTs. Mass spectrometric methods have revolutionized our understanding of protein dynamics, structure, and folding. Recently, advances have been made in residue modification mass spectrometry in order to probe the hard-to-characterize structure of apo- and partially metalated MTs. By using different cysteine specific alkylation reagents, time dependent electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and step-wise "snapshot" ESI-MS, we are beginning to understand the dynamics of the conformers of apo-MT and related species. In this review we highlight recent papers that use these and similar techniques for structure elucidation and attempt to explain in a concise manner the data interpretations of these complex methods. We expect increasing resolution in our picture of the structural conformations of metal-free MTs as these techniques are more widely adopted and combined with other promising tools for structural elucidation.

  12. High Content Analysis of Compositional Heterogeneities to Study GPCR Oligomerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walsh, Samuel McEwen

    In this thesis I demonstrate how the natural compositional heterogeneities of synthetic and living cell model systems can be used to quantitate the mechanics of G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) oligomerization with Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). The thesis is structured around three a...

  13. Almond or Mahaleb? Orthogonal Allergen Analysis During a Live Incident Investigation by ELISA, Molecular Biology, and Protein Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Michael J; Burns, Malcolm; Quaglia, Milena; Nixon, Gavin; Hopley, Christopher J; Gray, Kirstin M; Moore, Victoria; Singh, Malvinder; Cowen, Simon

    2018-01-01

    It is now well known that an incident investigated in the United Kingdom in 2015 of cumin alleged to be contaminated with almond, a risk for people with almond allergy, was caused by the Prunus species, Prunus mahaleb. In the United Kingdom, the Government Chemist offers a route of technical appeal from official findings in the food control system. Findings of almond in two official samples, cumin and paprika, which had prompted action to exclude the consignments from the food chain, were so referred. Herein are described the approaches deployed to resolve the analytical issues during the investigation of the incidents. The cross-reactivity of ELISA to Prunus species was confirmed, and although this is useful in screening for the genus, orthogonal techniques are required to identify the species and confirm its presence. Two novel PCR assays were developed: one specific for P. mahaleb and the other a screening method capable of identifying common Prunus DNA. Peptides unique to almond and mahaleb were identified, permitting LC-tandem MS and criteria were developed for peptide identification to forensic standards. This work enables a staged approach to be taken to any future incident thought to involve Prunus species and provides a template for the investigation of similar incidents.

  14. Field Heterogeneity: Some Basic Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, J. R.

    1980-04-01

    Present-day soil-water physics enables useful quantitative predictions in the laboratory and in simple field situations. Difficulties, however, frequently arise for areas of appreciable size in the field. Known and unknown heterogeneities, on many scales, may vitiate predictions based on theory for homogeneous, or very simple heterogeneous, systems. Two types of heterogeneity are distinguished, deterministic and stochastic. The first often demands an extension of established analyses and may involve important phenomena absent from the analogous homogeneous problem. Stochastic heterogeneity may involve many scales and is imperfectly known. The statistical properties may be stationary, but in more complicated cases, randomness may be embedded in (either known or unknown) systematic trends. Some aspects of unsaturated and generally unsteady flow in heterogeneous systems are reviewed: the mathematical nature of the flow equation; the concept of scale-heterogeneity; analytical and quasi-analytical solutions. The enormity of the total problem of unsaturated unsteady flows in stochastic heterogeneous systems is illustrated through a dialectic of eight successive stages of simplification. The concept of the autocorrelation function governing λ, the internal characteristic length, is introduced; and the problem posed in terms involving the distribution and autocorrelation functions of λ, the reduced potential and conductivity functions, and the initial and boundary conditions as the data, from which it is required to establish distribution functions of various descriptors of the flow. The solution to a grossly simplified example of horizontal absorption is presented. Mean apparent sorptivity decreases rapidly to about one fifth of the mean (and about half the minimum) sorptivity of the component soils. Variation about the mean is very great but decreases as absorption proceeds. The example epitomizes the failure of additivity of properties in stochastic heterogeneous

  15. Synchronization in networks with heterogeneous coupling delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Andreas; Radons, Günter; Bachrathy, Dániel; Orosz, Gábor

    2018-01-01

    Synchronization in networks of identical oscillators with heterogeneous coupling delays is studied. A decomposition of the network dynamics is obtained by block diagonalizing a newly introduced adjacency lag operator which contains the topology of the network as well as the corresponding coupling delays. This generalizes the master stability function approach, which was developed for homogenous delays. As a result the network dynamics can be analyzed by delay differential equations with distributed delay, where different delay distributions emerge for different network modes. Frequency domain methods are used for the stability analysis of synchronized equilibria and synchronized periodic orbits. As an example, the synchronization behavior in a system of delay-coupled Hodgkin-Huxley neurons is investigated. It is shown that the parameter regions where synchronized periodic spiking is unstable expand when increasing the delay heterogeneity.

  16. Measuring the effects of heterogeneity on distributed systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Toweissy, Mohamed; Zeineldine, Osman; Mukkamala, Ravi

    1991-01-01

    Distributed computer systems in daily use are becoming more and more heterogeneous. Currently, much of the design and analysis studies of such systems assume homogeneity. This assumption of homogeneity has been mainly driven by the resulting simplicity in modeling and analysis. A simulation study is presented which investigated the effects of heterogeneity on scheduling algorithms for hard real time distributed systems. In contrast to previous results which indicate that random scheduling may be as good as a more complex scheduler, this algorithm is shown to be consistently better than a random scheduler. This conclusion is more prevalent at high workloads as well as at high levels of heterogeneity.

  17. Transfer Printed Nanomembranes for Heterogeneously Integrated Membrane Photonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongjun Yang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous crystalline semiconductor nanomembrane (NM integration is investigated for single-layer and double-layer Silicon (Si NM photonics, III-V/Si NM lasers, and graphene/Si NM total absorption devices. Both homogeneous and heterogeneous integration are realized by the versatile transfer printing technique. The performance of these integrated membrane devices shows, not only intact optical and electrical characteristics as their bulk counterparts, but also the unique light and matter interactions, such as Fano resonance, slow light, and critical coupling in photonic crystal cavities. Such a heterogeneous integration approach offers tremendous practical application potentials on unconventional, Si CMOS compatible, and high performance optoelectronic systems.

  18. Experimental oral iron administration: Histological investigations and expressions of iron handling proteins in rat retina with aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Nag, Tapas Chandra; Jha, Kumar Abhiram; Dey, Sanjay Kumar; Kathpalia, Poorti; Maurya, Meenakshi; Gupta, Chandan Lal; Bhatia, Jagriti; Roy, Tara Sankar; Wadhwa, Shashi

    2017-12-01

    Iron is implicated in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The aim of this study was to see if long-term, experimental iron administration with aging modifies retinal and choroidal structures and expressions of iron handling proteins, to understand some aspects of iron homeostasis. Male Wistar rats were fed with ferrous sulphate heptahydrate (500mg/kg body weight/week, oral; elemental iron availability: 20%) from 2 months of age onward until they were 19.5 month-old. At 8, 14 and 20 months of age, they were sacrificed and serum and retinal iron levels were detected by HPLC. Oxidative stress was analyzed by TBARS method. The retinas were examined for cell death (TUNEL), histology (electron microscopy) and the expressions of transferrin, transferrin receptor-1 [TFR-1], H- and L-ferritin. In control animals, at any age, there was no difference in the serum and retinal iron levels, but the latter increased significantly in 14- and 20 month-old iron-fed rats, indicating that retinal iron accumulation proceeds with progression of aging (>14 months). The serum and retinal TBARS levels increased significantly with progression of aging in experimental but not in control rats. There was significant damage to choriocapillaris, accumulation of phagosomes in retinal pigment epithelium and increased incidence of TUNEL+ cells in outer nuclear layer and vacuolation in inner nuclear layer (INL) of 20 month-aged experimental rats, compared to those in age-matched controls. Vacuolations in INL could indicate a long-term effect of iron accumulation in the inner retina. These events paralleled the increased expression of ferritins and transferrin and a decrease in the expression of TFR-1 in iron-fed rats with aging, thereby maintaining iron homeostasis in the retina. As some of these changes mimic with those happening in eyes with AMD, this model can be utilized to understand iron-induced pathophysiological changes in AMD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Real-time investigation of mannosyltransferase function of a Xylella fastidiosa recombinant GumH protein using QCM-D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Claudia A; Pedroso, Mariele M; de Moraes, Marcela C; Souza, Dulce H F; Cass, Quezia B; Faria, Ronaldo C

    2011-05-20

    Xylella fastidiosa is a gram-negative bacterium that causes serious diseases in economically important crops, including grapevine, coffee, and citrus fruits. X. fastidiosa colonizes the xylem vessels of the infected plants, thereby blocking water and nutrient transport. The genome sequence of X. fastidiosa has revealed an operon containing nine genes possibly involved in the synthesis of an exopolisaccharide (EPS) named fastidian gum that can be related with the pathogenicity of this bacterium. The α-1,3-mannosyltransferase (GumH) enzyme from X. fastidiosa is involved in fastidian gum production. GumH is responsible for the transfer of mannose from guanosine diphosphate mannose (GDP-man) to the cellobiose-pyrophosphate-polyprenol carrier lipid (CPP-Lip) during the assembly and biosynthesis of EPS. In this work, a method for real-time detection of recombinant GumH enzymatic activity was successfully developed using a Quartz Crystal Microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). The QCM-D transducer was strategically modified with CPP-Lip by using a solid-supported lipid bilayer that makes use of a self-assembled monolayer of 1-undecanethiol. Monitoring the real-time CPP-Lip QCM-D transducer in the presence of GDP-man and GumH enzyme shows a mass increase, indicating the transfer of mannose. The real-time QCM-D determination of mannosyltransferase function was validated by a High Performance Liquid Chromatography (LC) method developed for determination of GDP produced by enzymatic reaction. LC results confirmed the activity of recombinant GumH protein, which is the first enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of the EPS from X. fastidiosa enzymatically characterized. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Investigation of Filtration Membranes from the Dairy Protein Industry for Residual Fouling Using Infrared Spectroscopy and Chemometrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jannie Krog

    investigation (Paper I) describes the concentration development over the membrane leaves as a function of the distance from the feed inlet and the distance from the center permeate tube. A non-homogenous concentration distribution of residual fouling was observed with the highest concentration of residual...... the result showed that the MCR model needed three factors to describe the system, one describing the membrane material (polyethersulfone, PES), and two describing the residual fouling that is present on the membrane. The MCR method improved the interpretation of the models considerably compared to e.g. PCA...

  1. Dealing with spatial heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsily, Gh.; Delay, F.; Gonçalvès, J.; Renard, Ph.; Teles, V.; Violette, S.

    2005-03-01

    Heterogeneity can be dealt with by defining homogeneous equivalent properties, known as averaging, or by trying to describe the spatial variability of the rock properties from geologic observations and local measurements. The techniques available for these descriptions are mostly continuous Geostatistical models, or discontinuous facies models such as the Boolean, Indicator or Gaussian-Threshold models and the Markov chain model. These facies models are better suited to treating issues of rock strata connectivity, e.g. buried high permeability channels or low permeability barriers, which greatly affect flow and, above all, transport in aquifers. Genetic models provide new ways to incorporate more geology into the facies description, an approach that has been well developed in the oil industry, but not enough in hydrogeology. The conclusion is that future work should be focused on improving the facies models, comparing them, and designing new in situ testing procedures (including geophysics) that would help identify the facies geometry and properties. A world-wide catalog of aquifer facies geometry and properties, which could combine site genesis and description with methods used to assess the system, would be of great value for practical applications. On peut aborder le problème de l'hétérogénéité en s'efforçant de définir une perméabilité équivalente homogène, par prise de moyenne, ou au contraire en décrivant la variation dans l'espace des propriétés des roches à partir des observations géologiques et des mesures locales. Les techniques disponibles pour une telle description sont soit continues, comme l'approche Géostatistique, soit discontinues, comme les modèles de faciès, Booléens, ou bien par Indicatrices ou Gaussiennes Seuillées, ou enfin Markoviens. Ces modèles de faciès sont mieux capables de prendre en compte la connectivité des strates géologiques, telles que les chenaux enfouis à forte perméabilité, ou au contraire les faci

  2. Fusion-protein-assisted protein crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobe, Bostjan; Ve, Thomas; Williams, Simon J

    2015-07-01

    Fusion proteins can be used directly in protein crystallization to assist crystallization in at least two different ways. In one approach, the `heterologous fusion-protein approach', the fusion partner can provide additional surface area to promote crystal contact formation. In another approach, the `fusion of interacting proteins approach', protein assemblies can be stabilized by covalently linking the interacting partners. The linker connecting the proteins plays different roles in the two applications: in the first approach a rigid linker is required to reduce conformational heterogeneity; in the second, conversely, a flexible linker is required that allows the native interaction between the fused proteins. The two approaches can also be combined. The recent applications of fusion-protein technology in protein crystallization from the work of our own and other laboratories are briefly reviewed.

  3. Preclinical investigation of the pharmacokinetics, metabolism, and protein and red blood cell binding of DRDE-07: a prophylactic agent against sulphur mustard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Verma

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available DRDE-07, a newly synthesized amifostine analog currently under clinical investigation in a phase I trial, is a potent antidote against sulfur mustard toxicity. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the pharmacokinetic profile of DRDE-07 in female Swiss Albino mice after a single oral dose of 400 or 600 mg/kg. The physicochemical properties of DRDE-07, including solubility, pKa, Log P, plasma protein binding and plasma/blood partitioning, were determined to support the pharmacokinetic characterization. DRDE-07 concentration was determined by an HPLC-UV method. The profile of plasma concentration versus time was analyzed using a non-compartmental model. Plasma protein binding was assessed using ultrafiltration. DRDE-07 appeared rapidly in plasma after oral administration with peak plasma levels (Cmax observed in less than 15 min. There was a rapid decline in the plasma levels followed by a smaller second peak about 90 min after dosing. The plasma protein binding of DRDE-07 was found to be less than 25% at all concentrations studied. Plasma clearance of DRDE-07 is expected to be ~1.5 fold higher than the blood clearance of DRDE-07. The probable metabolite of DRDE-07 was identified as phenyl-S-ethyl amine.

  4. Investigation of mercury-containing proteins by enriched stable isotopic tracer and size-exclusion chromatography hyphenated to inductively coupled plasma-isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Junwen; Feng Weiyue; Wang Meng; Zhang Fang; Li Bai; Wang Bing; Zhu Motao; Chai Zhifang

    2007-01-01

    In order to investigate trace mercury-containing proteins in maternal rat and their offspring, a method of enriched stable isotopic tracer ( 196 Hg and 198 Hg) combined with size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) coupled to inductively coupled plasma-isotope dilution mass spectrometry (ICP-IDMS) was developed. Prior to the analysis, 196 Hg- and 198 Hg-enriched methylmercury was administrated to the pregnant rats. Then the mercury-containing proteins in serum and brain cytosol of the dam and pup rats were separated by size-exclusion columns and the mercury was detected by ICP-MS. The ICP-MS spectrogram of the tracing samples showed significantly elevated 196 Hg and 198 Hg isotopic signals compared with the natural ones, indicating that the detection sensitivity could be increased by the tracer method. The contents of mercury in chromatographic fractions of the dam and pup rat brain cytosol were quantitatively estimated by post-column reverse ID-ICP-MS. The quantitative speciation differences of mercury in brain cytosol between the dam and pup rats were observed, indicating that such studies could be useful for toxicological estimation. Additionally, the isotopic ratio measurement of 198 Hg/ 202 Hg in the tracing samples could be used to identify the artifact mercury species caused in the analytical procedure. The study demonstrates that the tracer method combined with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-ICP-IDMS could provide reliably qualitative and quantitative information on mercury-containing proteins in organisms

  5. Surface aggregation of urinary proteins and aspartic acid-rich peptides on the faces of calcium oxalate monohydrate investigated by in situ force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, M L; Qiu, S R; Hoyer, J R; Casey, W H; Nancollas, G H; De Yoreo, J J

    2008-05-28

    The growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate in the presence of Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP), osteopontin (OPN), and the 27-residue synthetic peptides (DDDS){sub 6}DDD and (DDDG){sub 6}DDD [where D = aspartic acid and X = S (serine) or G (glycine)] was investigated via in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show that these three growth modulators create extensive deposits on the crystal faces. Depending on the modulator and crystal face, these deposits can occur as discrete aggregates, filamentary structures, or uniform coatings. These proteinaceous films can lead to either the inhibition or increase of the step speeds (with respect to the impurity-free system) depending on a range of factors that include peptide or protein concentration, supersaturation and ionic strength. While THP and the linear peptides act, respectively, to exclusively increase and inhibit growth on the (-101) face, both exhibit dual functionality on the (010) face, inhibiting growth at low supersaturation or high modulator concentration and accelerating growth at high supersaturation or low modulator concentration. Based on analyses of growth morphologies and dependencies of step speeds on supersaturation and protein or peptide concentration, we argue for a picture of growth modulation that accounts for the observations in terms of the strength of binding to the surfaces and steps and the interplay of electrostatic and solvent-induced forces at crystal surface.

  6. Treatment of Pesticides in Wastewater by Heterogeneous and Homogeneous Photocatalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Stan, Catalina Daniela; Cretescu, Igor; Pastravanu, Cristina; Poulios, Ioannis; Drăgan, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The effect of different heterogeneous and homogeneous photocatalytic systems on the oxidative degradation of mepiquat chloride in aqueous solutions was investigated. In the case of heterogeneous reactions, the influence of five factors was studied: the type of catalyst, photocatalyst concentration, pH, pesticide concentration, and the presence of H2O2 and/or Fe3+. For homogeneous catalysis, other factors were studied: the oxidising agent and the light source. Nearly complete degradation of me...

  7. Evaluation of C-ErbB-2 Overexpression and Her-2/neu Gene Copy Number Heterogeneity in Barrett’s Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel Walch

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Amplifiction of the Her-2/neu gene is accompanied by overexpression of its cell surface receptor product, c‐erbB‐2 protein. To investigate the degree of intratumoural heterogeneity we applied immunohistochemistry in primary Barrett’s adenocarcinoma (BCA (n = 6 and dysplasia adjacent to the carcinoma (n = 4. In addition, fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH was performed in primary BCA (n=5 and dysplastic areas (n=4. For an objective evaluation digital image analysis and laser scanning microscopy were used. Five of six BCA showed a marked intratumoural heterogeneous staining pattern ranging from areas in which the tumour cells were negative or faintly positive to tumour areas with a strong staining of the entire membrane. Among the two dysplastic areas also a heterogenous staining pattern was observed. FISH analysis revealed marked heterogeneity of intratumoural gene copy number changes in all BCA showing populations with different fractions of cells with polysomy, low level amplification and high level amplification. One dysplasia showed a minor population with Her‐2/neu signal clusters. In conclusion, we observed marked intratumoural heterogeneity of c‐erbB‐2 protein overexpression and Her‐2/neu gene copy number in the majority of the primary BCA analyzed. Digital image analysis and laser scanning microscopy were helpful in quantifying the variations in protein expression and DNA copy number in individual tumour cells. The observed heterogeneity could hamper the exact diagnostic determination of the c‐erbB‐2 status in small biopsies and possibly influence the effectiveness of a potential c‐erbB‐2 targeting therapy.

  8. Investigation of gammaE-crystallin target protein binding to bovine lens alpha-crystallin by small-angle neutron scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, M J; Artero, J B; Moulin, M; Callow, P; Carver, J A; Griffiths, P C; Haertlein, M; Harding, J J; Meek, K M; Timmins, P; Regini, J W

    2010-03-01

    alpha-Crystallin, one of the main constituent proteins in the crystalline lens, is an important molecular chaperone both within and outside the lens. Presently, the structural relationship between alpha-crystallin and its target proteins during chaperone action is poorly understood. It has been hypothesised that target proteins bind within a central cavity. Small-angle neutron-scattering (SANS) experiments in conjunction with isotopic substitution were undertaken to investigate the interaction of a target lens protein (gammaE-crystallin) with alpha-crystallin (alpha(H)) and to measure the radius of gyration (Rg) of the proteins and their binary complexes in solution under thermal stress. The size of the alpha(H) in D(2)O incubated at 65 degrees C increased from 69+/-3 to 81+/-5 A over 40 min, in good agreement with previously published small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and SANS measurements. Deuterated gammaE-crystallin in H(2)O buffer (gammaE(D)/H(2)O) and hydrogenous gammaE-crystallin in D(2)O buffer (gammaE(H)/D(2)O) free in solution were of insufficient size and/or too dilute to provide any measurable scattering over the angular range used, which was selected primarily to investigate gammaE:alpha(H) complexes. The evolution of the aggregation size/shape as an indicator of alpha(H) chaperone action was monitored by recording the neutron scattering in different H:D solvent contrasts under thermally stressed conditions (65 degrees C) for binary mixtures of alpha(H), gammaE(H), and gammaE(D). It was found that Rg(alpha(H):gammaE(D)/D(2)O)>Rg(alpha(H):gammaE(H)/D(2)O)>Rg(alpha(H)/D(2)O) and that Rg(alpha(H):gammaE(H)/D(2)O) approximately Rg(alpha(H)/D(2)O). The relative sizes observed for the complexes weighted by the respective scattering powers of the various components imply that gammaE-crystallin binds in a central cavity of the alpha-crystallin oligomer, during chaperone action. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Single Particle Studies of Heterogeneous Atmospheric Chemistry on Aluminum Oxide Particles in a Quadrupole Trap

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hunter, A

    2000-01-01

    ... on upper atmospheric chemical cycles and ozone. The experimental investigation employs a laboratory quadrupole trap electrodynamic levitation apparatus to study heterogeneous processes on single aluminum oxide particles representative...

  10. Evolving Self-Organized Behavior for Homogeneous and Heterogeneous UAV or UCAV Swarms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Price, Ian C

    2006-01-01

    This investigation uses a self-organization (SO) approach to enable cooperative search and destruction of retaliating targets with swarms of homogeneous and heterogeneous unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs...

  11. Variance heterogeneity analysis for detection of potentially interacting genetic loci: method and its limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Duijn Cornelia

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Presence of interaction between a genotype and certain factor in determination of a trait's value, it is expected that the trait's variance is increased in the group of subjects having this genotype. Thus, test of heterogeneity of variances can be used as a test to screen for potentially interacting single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. In this work, we evaluated statistical properties of variance heterogeneity analysis in respect to the detection of potentially interacting SNPs in a case when an interaction variable is unknown. Results Through simulations, we investigated type I error for Bartlett's test, Bartlett's test with prior rank transformation of a trait to normality, and Levene's test for different genetic models. Additionally, we derived an analytical expression for power estimation. We showed that Bartlett's test has acceptable type I error in the case of trait following a normal distribution, whereas Levene's test kept nominal Type I error under all scenarios investigated. For the power of variance homogeneity test, we showed (as opposed to the power of direct test which uses information about known interacting factor that, given the same interaction effect, the power can vary widely depending on the non-estimable direct effect of the unobserved interacting variable. Thus, for a given interaction effect, only very wide limits of power of the variance homogeneity test can be estimated. Also we applied Levene's approach to test genome-wide homogeneity of variances of the C-reactive protein in the Rotterdam Study population (n = 5959. In this analysis, we replicate previous results of Pare and colleagues (2010 for the SNP rs12753193 (n = 21, 799. Conclusions Screening for differences in variances among genotypes of a SNP is a promising approach as a number of biologically interesting models may lead to the heterogeneity of variances. However, it should be kept in mind that the absence of variance heterogeneity for

  12. Structure-Activity Investigation of a G Protein-Biased Agonist Reveals Molecular Determinants for Biased Signaling of the D2 Dopamine Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lani S. Chun

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The dopamine D2 receptor (D2R is known to elicit effects through activating two major signaling pathways mediated by either G proteins (Gi/o or β-arrestins. However, the specific role of each pathway in physiological or therapeutic activities is not known with certainty. One approach to the dissection of these pathways is through the use of drugs that can selectively modulate one pathway vs. the other through a mechanism known as functional selectivity or biased signaling. Our laboratory has previously described a G protein signaling-biased agonist, MLS1547, for the D2R using a variety of in vitro functional assays. To further evaluate the biased signaling activity of this compound, we investigated its ability to promote D2R internalization, a process known to be mediated by β-arrestin. Using multiple cellular systems and techniques, we found that MLS1547 promotes little D2R internalization, which is consistent with its inability to recruit β-arrestin. Importantly, we validated these results in primary striatal neurons where the D2R is most highly expressed suggesting that MLS1547 will exhibit biased signaling activity in vivo. In an effort to optimize and further explore structure-activity relationships (SAR for this scaffold, we conducted an iterative chemistry campaign to synthesize and characterize novel analogs of MLS1547. The resulting analysis confirmed previously described SAR requirements for G protein-biased agonist activity and, importantly, elucidated new structural features that are critical for agonist efficacy and signaling bias of the MLS1547 scaffold. One of the most important determinants for G protein-biased signaling is the interaction of a hydrophobic moiety of the compound with a defined pocket formed by residues within transmembrane five and extracellular loop two of the D2R. These results shed new light on the mechanism of biased signaling of the D2R and may lead to improved functionally-selective molecules.

  13. Nanoscale-Agglomerate-Mediated Heterogeneous Nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Hyeongyun; Wu, Alex; Kim, Moon-Kyung; Saigusa, Kosuke; Liu, Aihua; Miljkovic, Nenad

    2017-12-13

    Water vapor condensation on hydrophobic surfaces has received much attention due to its ability to rapidly shed water droplets and enhance heat transfer, anti-icing, water harvesting, energy harvesting, and self-cleaning performance. However, the mechanism of heterogeneous nucleation on hydrophobic surfaces remains poorly understood and is attributed to defects in the hydrophobic coating exposing the high surface energy substrate. Here, we observe the formation of high surface energy nanoscale agglomerates on hydrophobic coatings after condensation/evaporation cycles in ambient conditions. To investigate the deposition dynamics, we studied the nanoscale agglomerates as a function of condensation/evaporation cycles via optical and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), microgoniometric contact angle measurements, nucleation statistics, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The FESEM and EDS results indicated that the nanoscale agglomerates stem from absorption of sulfuric acid based aerosol particles inside the droplet and adsorption of volatile organic compounds such as methanethiol (CH 3 SH), dimethyl disulfide (CH 3 SSCH), and dimethyl trisulfide (CH 3 SSSCH 3 ) on the liquid-vapor interface during water vapor condensation, which act as preferential sites for heterogeneous nucleation after evaporation. The insights gained from this study elucidate fundamental aspects governing the behavior of both short- and long-term heterogeneous nucleation on hydrophobic surfaces, suggest previously unexplored microfabrication and air purification techniques, and present insights into the challenges facing the development of durable dropwise condensing surfaces.

  14. Voice over IP in Wireless Heterogeneous Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fathi, Hanane; Chakraborty, Shyam; Prasad, Ramjee

    The convergence of different types of traffic has preceded the convergence of systems and services in a wireless heterogeneous network. Voice and data traffic are usually treated separate in both 2G and 2.5G wireless networks. With advances in packet switching technology and especially with the d...... and to the discruption caused by the user mobility during the session. Voice over IP in Wireless Hetetrogeneous Networks thus investigates and proposes cross-layer techniques for realizing time-efficient control mechanisms for VoIP: signaling, mobility and security.......The convergence of different types of traffic has preceded the convergence of systems and services in a wireless heterogeneous network. Voice and data traffic are usually treated separate in both 2G and 2.5G wireless networks. With advances in packet switching technology and especially...... with the deployment of wireless heterogeneous systems, both speech and data traffic are carrried over wireless links by the same IP-based packet-switched infrastructure. However, this combination faces some challenges due to the inherent properties of the wireless network. The requirements for good quality Vo...

  15. Bet hedging in yeast by heterogeneous, age-correlated expression of a stress protectant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasha F Levy

    Full Text Available Genetically identical cells grown in the same culture display striking cell-to-cell heterogeneity in gene expression and other traits. A crucial challenge is to understand how much of this heterogeneity reflects the noise tolerance of a robust system and how much serves a biological function. In bacteria, stochastic gene expression results in cell-to-cell heterogeneity that might serve as a bet-hedging mechanism, allowing a few cells to survive through an antimicrobial treatment while others perish. Despite its clinical importance, the molecular mechanisms underlying bet hedging remain unclear. Here, we investigate the mechanisms of bet hedging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a new high-throughput microscopy assay that monitors variable protein expression, morphology, growth rate, and survival outcomes of tens of thousands of yeast microcolonies simultaneously. We find that clonal populations display broad distributions of growth rates and that slow growth predicts resistance to heat killing in a probabalistic manner. We identify several gene products that are likely to play a role in bet hedging and confirm that Tsl1, a trehalose-synthesis regulator, is an important component of this resistance. Tsl1 abundance correlates with growth rate and replicative age and predicts survival. Our results suggest that yeast bet hedging results from multiple epigenetic growth states determined by a combination of stochastic and deterministic factors.

  16. Uses and limitations of green fluorescent protein as a viability marker in Enterococcus faecalis: An observational investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogenkamp, Michel A; Crielaard, Wim; Krom, Bastiaan P

    2015-08-01

    Enterococci are capable of producing biofilms that are notoriously difficult to treat and remove, for instance in root canal infections. The tenacious nature of these organisms makes screening of known and novel antimicrobial compounds necessary. While traditionally growth and fluorescence-based screening methods have proven useful, these methods have their limitations when applied to enterococci (e.g. time consuming, no kinetic data, diffusion properties of the fluorescent dyes). The aim of this study was to develop and validate a GFP-based high-throughput screening system to assess the bactericidal activity of a broad range of antimicrobial agents on Enterococcus faecalis and its biofilms. The effect of antimicrobial compounds on cell viability and GFP fluorescence of enterococcal planktonic and biofilm cells was determined using colony forming unit counts, fluorescence spectrophotometry and real-time imaging devices. There was a linear correlation between cell viability and GFP fluorescence. The intensity of the GFP signal was effected by the extracellular pH. For a range of antimicrobials however, there was no correlation between these two parameters. In contrast, for oxidizing agents such as sodium hypochlorite, the antimicrobial of choice for root canal disinfection, there was a correlation between loss of fluorescence and loss of viability. To conclude, the use of a GFP-based system to monitor the antimicrobial activity of compounds on E. faecalis is possible despite significant limitations. This approach is useful for analysis of susceptibility to oxidizing agents. Using real-time measuring devices to follow GFP fluorescence it should be possible to investigate the mode of action and rate of diffusion of oxidizing agents in E. faecalis biofilm. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Heterogeneity in Preferences and Productivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gørtz, Mette

    This paper discusses the determinants of the retirement decision and the implications of retirement on economic well-being. The main contribution of the paper is to formulate the role of individual heterogeneity explicitly. We argue that individual heterogeneity in 1) productivity of market work...... choices of expenditure, household production and leisure for people in and around retirement. The unobserved individual heterogeneity factor is isolated by comparing cross-sectional evidence and panel data estimates of the effects of retirement on consumption and time allocation. Based on cross......-section data, we can identify a difference in consumption due to retirement status, but when the panel nature of the data is exploited, the effect of retirement on consumption is small and insignificant. Moreover, the analyses point at a large positive effect of retirement on household production. Our results...

  18. Dynamic heterogeneity in life histories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuljapurkar, Shripad; Steiner, Uli; Orzack, Steven Hecht

    2009-01-01

    describes the persistence of reproductive success during the life of an individual. Trajectories of reproductive stage determine survivorship, and we analyse the variance in lifespan within and between trajectories of reproductive stage. We show how stage-structured models can be used to predict realized......Longitudinal data on natural populations have been analysed using multistage models in which survival depends on reproductive stage, and individuals change stages according to a Markov chain. These models are special cases of stage-structured population models. We show that stage-structured models...... generate dynamic heterogeneity: life-history differences produced by stochastic stratum dynamics. We characterize dynamic heterogeneity in a range of species across taxa by properties of the Markov chain: the entropy, which describes the extent of heterogeneity, and the subdominant eigenvalue, which...

  19. Coordination Frictions and Job Heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kennes, John; le Maire, Christian Daniel

    This paper develops and extends a dynamic, discrete time, job to worker matching model in which jobs are heterogeneous in equilibrium. The key assumptions of this economic environment are (i) matching is directed and (ii) coordination frictions lead to heterogeneous local labor markets. We de- rive...... a number of new theoretical results, which are essential for the empirical application of this type of model to matched employer-employee microdata. First, we o¤er a robust equilibrium concept in which there is a continu- ous dispersion of job productivities and wages. Second, we show that our model can...... be readily solved with continuous exogenous worker heterogene- ity, where high type workers (high outside options and productivity) earn higher wages in high type jobs and are hired at least as frequently to the better job types as low type workers (low outside options and productivity). Third, we...

  20. Majority rule on heterogeneous networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambiotte, R

    2008-01-01

    We focus on the majority rule (MR) applied on heterogeneous networks. When the underlying topology is homogeneous, the system is shown to exhibit a transition from an ordered regime to a disordered regime when the noise is increased. When the network exhibits modular structures, in contrast, the system may also exhibit an asymmetric regime, where the nodes in each community reach an opposite average opinion. Finally, the node degree heterogeneity is shown to play an important role by displacing the location of the order-disorder transition and by making the system exhibit non-equipartition of the average spin

  1. Spatial heterogeneity increases diversity and stability in grassland bird communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovick, Torre J; Elmore, R Dwayne; Fuhlendorf, Samuel D; Engle, David M; Hamilton, Robert G

    2015-04-01

    Grasslands are inherently dynamic in space and time, evolving with frequent disturbance from fire and herbivores. As a consequence of human actions, many remaining grasslands have become homogenous, which has led to reduced ecosystem function, biodiversity loss, and decreased ecological services. Previous research has shown that restoring inherent heterogeneity to grasslands can increase avian diversity, but the amount of heterogeneity (i.e., number of patches or fire return interval) and the impact on avian community stability have yet to be investigated. We used a unique landscape-level design to examine avian response to interacting fire and grazing across multiple experimental landscapes that represented a gradient of fire- and grazing-dependent heterogeneity. We used seven landscapes (430-980 ha; x = 627 ha) with varying levels of patchiness ranging from annually burned (one single patch) with spring-only fires to a four-year fire return interval with spring and summer fires (eight patches). This design created a range of heterogeneity as a result of pyric herbivory, an ecological process in which fire and grazing are allowed to interact in space and time. We found that greater heterogeneity across experimental landscapes resulted in increased avian diversity and stability over time. An index of bird community change, quantified as the sum of the range of detrended correspondence analysis axis site scores, was nearly four times greater in the most homogenous experimental landscape when compared to the most heterogeneous experimental landscape. Species responses were consistently positively associated with increased heterogeneity at the landscape scale, and within-experimental-landscape responses were most often related to litter cover, litter accumulation, and vegetation height. We conclude that increased fire- and grazig-dependent heterogeneity can result in high variability in the bird community at finer, transect scales, but increased diversity and

  2. Influence of the polyol pathway on norepinephrine transporter reduction in diabetic cardiac sympathetic nerves: implications for heterogeneous accumulation of MIBG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiyono, Yasushi; Kajiyama, Satomi; Fujiwara, Hiromi; Kanegawa, Naoki; Saji, Hideo

    2005-01-01

    Cardiac scintigraphic studies using 123 I-labeled metaiodobenzylguanidine ([ 123 I]MIBG) have demonstrated heterogeneous myocardial accumulation of MIBG in diabetes. The accumulation has been found to correlate with a heterogeneous decrease in the expression of norepinephrine transporter (NET). In diabetic peripheral nerve tissue, polyol pathways are activated and cause nerve dysfunction and degeneration. However, there has been little research on the polyol pathway and cardiac sympathetic nerves. Therefore, to assess the influence of the polyol pathway on cardiac sympathetic nervous function, we investigated the regional accumulation of MIBG and NET protein expression in diabetic model rats treated with aldose reductase inhibitor (ARI) for the blockade of polyol pathways. Rats were given a single intravenous injection of streptozotocin (n=76, STZ-D rats). Starting the day after STZ injection, ARI was administered daily to 42 of the rats for 4 weeks (ARI-D rats). To assess the cardiac sympathetic nervous function, [ 125 I]MIBG autoradiographic experiments were carried out. Finally, NET protein expression was assessed with a saturation binding assay. The myocardial sorbitol concentration was significantly higher in STZ-D rats than in ARI-D rats. There was no heterogeneous accumulation of MIBG in ARI-D rats. There was a heterogeneous decrease of NET expression in STZ-D rats, but not in ARI-D or control rats. The gathered data indicate that the enhanced polyol pathway correlates with the decrease in regional cardiac sympathetic nervous function, and this impairment may lead to the reduction of NET protein in cardiac sympathetic nerves of the diabetic inferior wall. (orig.)

  3. Ultrasonic wave propagation in heterogeneous elastic and poroelastic media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jocker, J.

    2005-01-01

    The influence of small- and large-scale heterogeneities on an incident wavefield was investigated in ultrasonic experiments. The field generated by conventional piezoelectric transducers was investigated separately. It was confirmed that the far-field diffraction was correctly predicted by

  4. Expression and localization of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K in mouse ovaries and preimplantation embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ping [The International Peace Maternity and Child Health Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Wang, Ningling [Department of Assisted Reproduction, Shanghai Ninth People' s Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Lin, Xianhua; Jin, Li [The International Peace Maternity and Child Health Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Xu, Hong, E-mail: xuhong1168@126.com [The International Peace Maternity and Child Health Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Li, Rong [The International Peace Maternity and Child Health Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Huang, Hefeng, E-mail: huanghefg@hotmail.com [The International Peace Maternity and Child Health Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China)

    2016-02-26

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K), an evolutionarily conserved protein, is involved in several important cellular processes that are relevant to cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and cancer development. However, details of hnRNP K expression during mammalian oogenesis and preimplantation embryo development are lacking. The present study investigates the expression and cellular localization of K protein in the mouse ovaries and preimplantation embryos using immunostaining. We demonstrate, for the first time, that hnRNP K is abundantly expressed in the nuclei of mouse oocytes in primordial, primary and secondary follicles. In germ vesicle (GV)-stage oocytes, hnRNP K accumulates in the germinal vesicle in a spot distribution manner. After germinal vesicle breakdown, speckled hnRNP K is diffusely distributed in the cytoplasm. However, after fertilization, the K protein relocates into the female and male pronucleus and persists in the blastomere nuclei. Localization of K protein in the human ovary and ovarian granulosa cell tumor (GCT) was also investigated. Overall, this study provides important morphological evidence to better understand the possible roles of hnRNP K in mammalian oogenesis and early embryo development. - Highlights: • HnRNP K localizes in the nucleus of GV-stage oocyte in a punctate distribution. • HnRNP K strongly accumulates in zygotic pronuclei as condensed spots. • The localization of hnRNP K during oogenesis and embryogenesis is characteristic. • HnRNP K might have an important role in oogenesis and embryonic development.

  5. Expression and localization of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K in mouse ovaries and preimplantation embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Ping; Wang, Ningling; Lin, Xianhua; Jin, Li; Xu, Hong; Li, Rong; Huang, Hefeng

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K), an evolutionarily conserved protein, is involved in several important cellular processes that are relevant to cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and cancer development. However, details of hnRNP K expression during mammalian oogenesis and preimplantation embryo development are lacking. The present study investigates the expression and cellular localization of K protein in the mouse ovaries and preimplantation embryos using immunostaining. We demonstrate, for the first time, that hnRNP K is abundantly expressed in the nuclei of mouse oocytes in primordial, primary and secondary follicles. In germ vesicle (GV)-stage oocytes, hnRNP K accumulates in the germinal vesicle in a spot distribution manner. After germinal vesicle breakdown, speckled hnRNP K is diffusely distributed in the cytoplasm. However, after fertilization, the K protein relocates into the female and male pronucleus and persists in the blastomere nuclei. Localization of K protein in the human ovary and ovarian granulosa cell tumor (GCT) was also investigated. Overall, this study provides important morphological evidence to better understand the possible roles of hnRNP K in mammalian oogenesis and early embryo development. - Highlights: • HnRNP K localizes in the nucleus of GV-stage oocyte in a punctate distribution. • HnRNP K strongly accumulates in zygotic pronuclei as condensed spots. • The localization of hnRNP K during oogenesis and embryogenesis is characteristic. • HnRNP K might have an important role in oogenesis and embryonic development.

  6. Investigations on the effect of forage source, grinding, and urea supplementation on ruminal fermentation and microbial protein flow in a semi-continuous rumen simulation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Bastian; Boguhn, Jeannette; Rodehutscord, Markus

    2011-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare the effect of maize silage and grass silage on microbial fermentation and protein flow in a semi-continuous rumen simulation system (Rusitec) when milling screen size (MSS) during grinding was varied. Oven-dried silages were milled through screens of 1, 4 or 9 mm pore size and incubated for 48 h in a Rusitec system. Furthermore, the effect of N supplementation to maize silage (MSS: 4 mm) was investigated and single dose vs. continuous infusion of urea-N were compared. Degradation of organic matter (OM), crude protein (CP), fibre fractions and non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) as well as short-chain fatty acid production differed significantly between forage sources. Urea-N supplementation improved the degradation of NSC, but not that of fibre fractions in maize silage. The way of urea supply had only marginal effects on fermentation characteristics. An increase in MSS, and consequently in mean feed particle size, led to an improvement in the degradation of OM, CP and NSC, but efficiency of microbial net protein synthesis (EMPS; mg microbial N flow/g degraded OM) and the microbial amino acid profile were less affected. EMPS was higher in grass silage than in maize silage and was improved by urea-N supplementation in maize silage. This study indicates that fermentation of NSC as well as EMPS during incubation of maize silage was limited by availability of NH3-N. Furthermore, an increase in MSS above 1 mm seems to improve fermentation of silages in the Rusitec system.

  7. Analysis of active ricin and castor bean proteins in a ricin preparation, castor bean extract, and surface swabs from a public health investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schieltz, David M; McGrath, Sara C; McWilliams, Lisa G; Rees, Jon; Bowen, Michael D; Kools, John J; Dauphin, Leslie A; Gomez-Saladin, Eduardo; Newton, Bruce N; Stang, Heather L; Vick, Michael J; Thomas, Jerry; Pirkle, James L; Barr, John R

    2011-06-15

    In late February 2008, law enforcement officials in Las Vegas, Nevada, discovered in a hotel room, a copy of The Anarchist Cookbook, suspected castor beans and a "white powder" thought to be a preparation of ricin. Ricin is a deadly toxin from the seed of the castor bean plant (Ricinus communis). The United States regulates the possession, use, and transfer of ricin and it is the only substance considered a warfare agent in both the Chemical and the Biological Weapons Conventions. Six samples obtained from the hotel room were analyzed by laboratories at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention using a panel of biological and mass spectrometric assays. The biological assays (real time-PCR, time resolved fluorescence and cytotoxicity) provided presumptive evidence of active ricin in each of the samples. This initial screen was followed by an in-depth analysis using a novel, state-of-the-art mass spectrometry-based ricin functional assay and high sensitivity tandem mass spectrometry for protein identification. Mass spectrometric analysis positively identified ricin and confirmed that in each of the samples it was enzymatically active. The tandem mass spectrometry analysis used here is the most selective method available to detect ricin toxin. In each sample, ricin was unequivocally identified along with other R. communis plant proteins, including the highly homologous protein RCA120. Although database searches using tandem mass spectra acquired from the samples indicated that additional controlled substances were not present in these samples, the mass spectrometric results did provide extensive detail about the sample contents. To the best of our knowledge following a review of the available literature, this report describes the most detailed analysis of a white powder for a public health or forensic investigation involving ricin. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  8. Investigation of mercury-containing proteins by enriched stable isotopic tracer and size-exclusion chromatography hyphenated to inductively coupled plasma-isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi Junwen [Laboratory for Bio-Environmental Health Sciences of Nanoscale Materials and Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)]|[Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Feng Weiyue [Laboratory for Bio-Environmental Health Sciences of Nanoscale Materials and Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)]. E-mail: fengwy@mail.ihep.ac.cn; Wang Meng [Laboratory for Bio-Environmental Health Sciences of Nanoscale Materials and Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)]|[Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang Fang [Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Li Bai [Laboratory for Bio-Environmental Health Sciences of Nanoscale Materials and Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wang Bing; Zhu Motao [Laboratory for Bio-Environmental Health Sciences of Nanoscale Materials and Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)]|[Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Chai Zhifang [Laboratory for Bio-Environmental Health Sciences of Nanoscale Materials and Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)]|[Institute of Nuclear Technology, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China)]|[Institute of Nanochemistry and Nanosafety, Shanghai University, Shanghai (China)

    2007-01-30

    In order to investigate trace mercury-containing proteins in maternal rat and their offspring, a method of enriched stable isotopic tracer ({sup 196}Hg and {sup 198}Hg) combined with size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) coupled to inductively coupled plasma-isotope dilution mass spectrometry (ICP-IDMS) was developed. Prior to the analysis, {sup 196}Hg- and {sup 198}Hg-enriched methylmercury was administrated to the pregnant rats. Then the mercury-containing proteins in serum and brain cytosol of the dam and pup rats were separated by size-exclusion columns and the mercury was detected by ICP-MS. The ICP-MS spectrogram of the tracing samples showed significantly elevated {sup 196}Hg and {sup 198}Hg isotopic signals compared with the natural ones, indicating that the detection sensitivity could be increased by the tracer method. The contents of mercury in chromatographic fractions of the dam and pup rat brain cytosol were quantitatively estimated by post-column reverse ID-ICP-MS. The quantitative speciation differences of mercury in brain cytosol between the dam and pup rats were observed, indicating that such studies could be useful for toxicological estimation. Additionally, the isotopic ratio measurement of {sup 198}Hg/{sup 202}Hg in the tracing samples could be used to identify the artifact mercury species caused in the analytical procedure. The study demonstrates that the tracer method combined with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-ICP-IDMS could provide reliably qualitative and quantitative information on mercury-containing proteins in organisms.

  9. Resolution of structural heterogeneity in dynamic crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhong; Chan, Peter W Y; Moffat, Keith; Pai, Emil F; Royer, William E; Šrajer, Vukica; Yang, Xiaojing

    2013-06-01

    Dynamic behavior of proteins is critical to their function. X-ray crystallography, a powerful yet mostly static technique, faces inherent challenges in acquiring dynamic information despite decades of effort. Dynamic `structural changes' are often indirectly inferred from `structural differences' by comparing related static structures. In contrast, the direct observation of dynamic structural changes requires the initiation of a biochemical reaction or process in a crystal. Both the direct and the indirect approaches share a common challenge in analysis: how to interpret the structural heterogeneity intrinsic to all dynamic processes. This paper presents a real-space approach to this challenge, in which a suite of analytical methods and tools to identify and refine the mixed structural species present in multiple crystallographic data sets have been developed. These methods have been applied to representative scenarios in dynamic crystallography, and reveal structural information that is otherwise difficult to interpret or inaccessible using conventional methods.

  10. Metabolomic heterogeneity of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yidan Zhao

    Full Text Available Although multiple gene and protein expression have been extensively profiled in human pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH, the mechanism for the development and progression of pulmonary hypertension remains elusive. Analysis of the global metabolomic heterogeneity within the pulmonary vascular system leads to a better understanding of disease progression. Using a combination of high-throughput liquid-and-gas-chromatography-based mass spectrometry, we showed unbiased metabolomic profiles of disrupted glycolysis, increased TCA cycle, and fatty acid metabolites with altered oxidation pathways in the human PAH lung. The results suggest that PAH has specific metabolic pathways contributing to increased ATP synthesis for the vascular remodeling process in severe pulmonary hypertension. These identified metabolites may serve as potential biomarkers for the diagnosis of PAH. By profiling metabolomic alterations of the PAH lung, we reveal new pathogenic mechanisms of PAH, opening an avenue of exploration for therapeutics that target metabolic pathway alterations in the progression of PAH.

  11. Electronic Energy Transfer in Polarizable Heterogeneous Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Casper Steinmann; Kongsted, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    such couplings provide important insight into the strength of interaction between photo-active pigments in protein-pigment complexes. Recently, attention has been payed to how the environment modifies or even controls the electronic couplings. To enable such theoretical predictions, a fully polarizable embedding......-order multipole moments. We use this extended model to systematically examine three different ways of obtaining EET couplings in a heterogeneous medium ranging from use of the exact transition density to a point-dipole approximation. Several interesting observations are made including that explicit use...... of transition densities in the calculation of the electronic couplings - also when including the explicit environment contribution - can be replaced by a much simpler transition point charge description without comprising the quality of the model predictions....

  12. Chloride Transport in Heterogeneous Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, A.; Holt, R. M.

    2017-12-01

    The chloride mass balance (CMB) is a commonly-used method for estimating groundwater recharge. Observations of the vertical distribution of pore-water chloride are related to the groundwater infiltration rates (i.e. recharge rates). In CMB method, the chloride distribution is attributed mainly to the assumption of one dimensional piston flow. In many places, however, the vertical distribution of chloride will be influenced by heterogeneity, leading to horizontal movement of infiltrating waters. The impact of heterogeneity will be particularly important when recharge is locally focused. When recharge is focused in an area, horizontal movement of chloride-bearing waters, coupled with upward movement driven by evapotranspiration, may lead to chloride bulges that could be misinterpreted if the CMB method is used to estimate recharge. We numerically simulate chloride transport and evaluate the validity of the CMB method in highly heterogeneous systems. This simulation is conducted for the unsaturated zone of Ogallala, Antlers, and Gatuna (OAG) formations in Andrews County, Texas. A two dimensional finite element model will show the movement of chloride through heterogeneous systems. We expect to see chloride bulges not only close to the surface but also at depths characterized by horizontal or upward movement. A comparative study of focused recharge estimates in this study with available recharge data will be presented.

  13. A Heterogeneous Quantum Computer Architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fu, X.; Riesebos, L.; Lao, L.; Garcia Almudever, C.; Sebastiano, F.; Versluis, R.; Charbon, E.; Bertels, K.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a high level view of the heterogeneous quantum computer architecture as any future quantum computer will consist of both a classical and quantum computing part. The classical part is needed for error correction as well as for the execution of algorithms that contain both

  14. Heterogeneous Beliefs and Climate Catastrophes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiseleva, T.

    2016-01-01

    We study how heterogeneous beliefs about the causes and extent of global warming affect local mitigation and adaptation strategies and therefore global climate dynamics. Local policies are determined by expectations of policy makers about future climate. There are three types of expectations: strong

  15. Communicating to heterogeneous target groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karsten

    very often have to communicate to rather heterogeneous target groups that have little more in common than a certain geographical habitat. That goes against most schoolbook teaching in the field of communication, but is none the less the terms with which that kind of communication has to live...... will be able to make a much stronger case....

  16. Prices and heterogeneous search costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luis Moraga-Gonzalez, Jose; Sandor, Zsolt; Wildenbeest, Matthijs R.

    2017-01-01

    We study price formation in a model of consumer search for differentiated products in which consumers have heterogeneous search costs. We provide conditions under which a pure-strategy symmetric Nash equilibrium exists and is unique. Search costs affect two margins-the intensive search margin (or

  17. Languages as semiotically heterogenous systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendon, Adam

    2017-01-01

    The target article is consistent with seeing languages as semiotically heterogenous, using categorial, depictive, and analogic semiotic signs. "Gesture," used in the target article, is shown to be vague and not useful. Kendon's view, criticised in the target, is restated. His proposal for comparative semiotic analyses of how visible bodily action is used in utterance production is reexplained.

  18. Molecular Mechanism of Heterogeneous Catalysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 13; Issue 6. Molecular Mechanism of Heterogeneous Catalysis - The 2007 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. R S Swathi K L Sebastian. General Article Volume 13 Issue 6 June 2008 pp 548-560 ...

  19. Social capital and community heterogeneity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coffé, Hilde R.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Recent findings indicate that more pronounced community heterogeneity is associated with lower levels of social capital. These studies, however, concentrate on specific aspects in which people differ (such as income inequality or ethnic diversity). In the present paper, we introduce the

  20. Social Capital and Community Heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffe, Hilde

    2009-01-01

    Recent findings indicate that more pronounced community heterogeneity is associated with lower levels of social capital. These studies, however, concentrate on specific aspects in which people differ (such as income inequality or ethnic diversity). In the present paper, we introduce the number of parties in the local party system as a more…

  1. Does richness of Oligochaeta (Annelida follows a linear distribution with habitat structural heterogeneity in aquatic sediments?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio H. Ragonha

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sediment of aquatic environments supports several local communities, among them aquatic invertebrates. Habitat structural heterogeneity in sediments of aquatic ecosystems is related to a number of factors, including variability in the particle size of the substrate and availability of different food resources, the two structures that comprise the aquatic sediment. These structures are necessary for the stability of zoobenthic community, including the Oligochaeta assemblage, favoring richness as habitat heterogeneity increases. To analyze the habitat structural heterogeneity, we use these following structures: granulometric composition and organic matter composition, and we tested these structures together (habitat heterogeneity and separately (granulometric and organic matter heterogeneity. This study investigated the relationship between habitat structural heterogeneity and richness of the Oligochaeta assemblage. We hypothesized that there is a positive linear relationship between habitat structural heterogeneity and richness of Oligochaeta, and  predicted that the granulometric composition is more important than organic matter composition for increasing richness. There was no linear relationship between Oligochaeta richness and habitat heterogeneity; but the analysis showed an asymmetric triangular dispersion pattern, being granulometric heterogeneity more important than organic matter heterogeneity for richness of Oligochaeta. These results indicated that habitat structural heterogeneity was beneficial for richness of Oligochaeta until certain threshold and after this, the relationship between structural heterogeneity of habitats and richness of Oligochaeta is negative with decrease of diversity due to the filling of interstitial spaces which gradually reduces the ability to colonize these habitats.

  2. Ki67 Heterogeneity in Estrogen Receptor-Positive Breast Cancers: Which Tumor Type Has the Most Heterogeneity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himuro, Takanori; Horimoto, Yoshiya; Arakawa, Atsushi; Tanabe, Masahiko; Saito, Mitsue

    2016-04-01

    Heterogeneity of Ki67 expression, often seen in breast cancer, can make evaluation of the expression of this marker difficult and give rise to confusion when considering adjuvant treatments for patients. Herein, we investigated estrogen receptor-positive breast cancers to reveal the tumor characteristics associated with Ki67 heterogeneity. Surgical specimens from 85 invasive ductal carcinomas of no special type and 13 invasive lobular carcinomas were examined. We first calculated the differences between Ki67 expression in a hot spot and those in 4 random fields on the same slide. We then evaluated Ki67 heterogeneity within the tumor, based on these differences. Among clinicopathological factors, solid-tubular carcinoma, an architectural growth pattern subtype of invasive ductal carcinoma, correlated with high Ki67 heterogeneity (P Ki67 expression. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Computational Mechanics for Heterogeneous Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lechman, Jeremy B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Baczewski, Andrew David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bond, Stephen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Erikson, William W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lehoucq, Richard B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mondy, Lisa Ann [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Noble, David R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pierce, Flint [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Roberts, Christine [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); van Swol, Frank B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Yarrington, Cole [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2013-11-01

    The subject of this work is the development of models for the numerical simulation of matter, momentum, and energy balance in heterogeneous materials. These are materials that consist of multiple phases or species or that are structured on some (perhaps many) scale(s). By computational mechanics we mean to refer generally to the standard type of modeling that is done at the level of macroscopic balance laws (mass, momentum, energy). We will refer to the flow or flux of these quantities in a generalized sense as transport. At issue here are the forms of the governing equations in these complex materials which are potentially strongly inhomogeneous below some correlation length scale and are yet homogeneous on larger length scales. The question then becomes one of how to model this behavior and what are the proper multi-scale equations to capture the transport mechanisms across scales. To address this we look to the area of generalized stochastic process that underlie the transport processes in homogeneous materials. The archetypal example being the relationship between a random walk or Brownian motion stochastic processes and the associated Fokker-Planck or diffusion equation. Here we are interested in how this classical setting changes when inhomogeneities or correlations in structure are introduced into the problem. Aspects of non-classical behavior need to be addressed, such as non-Fickian behavior of the mean-squared-displacement (MSD) and non-Gaussian behavior of the underlying probability distribution of jumps. We present an experimental technique and apparatus built to investigate some of these issues. We also discuss diffusive processes in inhomogeneous systems, and the role of the chemical potential in diffusion of hard spheres is considered. Also, the relevance to liquid metal solutions is considered. Finally we present an example of how inhomogeneities in material microstructure introduce fluctuations at the meso-scale for a thermal conduction problem

  4. Surface heterogeneity of small asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Sho

    A rubble pile model of asteroid origin would predict averaged rather homogeneous surface of an asteroid. Previous spacecraft observations (mostly S-type asteroids) did not show large color/albedo variation on the surface. Vesta would be exceptional since HST observation suggested that its surface should be heterogeneous due to the impact excavation of the interior. As for a young asteroid (832) Karin (age being 5Ma), Sasaki et al. (2004) detected variation of infrared spectra which could be explained by the difference of the space weathering degree. They discussed the possibility of the survival of the old surface. However, the variation was not confirmed by later observation (Chapman et al., 2007; Vernazza et al., 2007). Recent observation of a small (550m) asteroid Itokawa by Hayabusa spacecraft revealed that Itokawa is heterogeneous in color and albedo although the overall rocky structure is considered as a rubble pile (Saito et al., 2006). The color difference can be explained by the difference of weathering degree (Ishiguro et al., 2008). The heterogeneity could be explained by mass movement caused by rapid rotation from YORP effect (Scheeres et al., 2007) or seismic shaking (Sasaki, 2006). Probably small silicate asteroids without significant regolith could have heterogeneous in color and albedo. On large asteroids (˜ a few 10km), regolith reaccumulation should have covered the underlying heterogeneity. References: Chapman, C. R. et al (2007) Icarus, 191, 323-329 Ishiguro, M. et al. (2008) MAPS, in press. Saito, J. et al. (2006) Science, 312, 1341-1344 Sasaki, S. (2006) in Spacecraft Reconnaissance of Asteroid and Comet Interiors Sasaki, T. et al (2004) Astrophys. J. 615, L161-L164 Scheeres, D. J. (2007) Icarus 188, 425-429 Vernazza, P. et al. (2007) Icarus 191, 330-336.

  5. Phenotypic heterogeneity in modeling cancer evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mahdipour-Shirayeh

    Full Text Available The unwelcome evolution of malignancy during cancer progression emerges through a selection process in a complex heterogeneous population structure. In the present work, we investigate evolutionary dynamics in a phenotypically heterogeneous population of stem cells (SCs and their associated progenitors. The fate of a malignant mutation is determined not only by overall stem cell and non-stem cell growth rates but also differentiation and dedifferentiation rates. We investigate the effect of such a complex population structure on the evolution of malignant mutations. We derive exactly calculated results for the fixation probability of a mutant arising in each of the subpopulations. The exactly calculated results are in almost perfect agreement with the numerical simulations. Moreover, a condition for evolutionary advantage of a mutant cell versus the wild type population is given in the present study. We also show that microenvironment-induced plasticity in invading mutants leads to more aggressive mutants with higher fixation probability. Our model predicts that decreasing polarity between stem and non-stem cells' turnover would raise the survivability of non-plastic mutants; while it would suppress the development of malignancy for plastic mutants. The derived results are novel and general with potential applications in nature; we discuss our model in the context of colorectal/intestinal cancer (at the epithelium. However, the model clearly needs to be validated through appropriate experimental data. This novel mathematical framework can be applied more generally to a variety of problems concerning selection in heterogeneous populations, in other contexts such as population genetics, and ecology.

  6. Structural Variation of Chondroitin Sulfate Chains Contributes to the Molecular Heterogeneity of Perineuronal Nets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Miyata

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Aggrecan, a chondroitin sulfate (CS proteoglycan, forms lattice-like extracellular matrix structures called perineuronal nets (PNNs. Neocortical PNNs primarily ensheath parvalbumin-expressing inhibitory neurons (parvalbumin, PV cells late in brain development. Emerging evidence indicates that PNNs promote the maturation of PV cells by enhancing the incorporation of homeobox protein Otx2 and regulating experience-dependent neural plasticity. Wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA, an N-acetylgalactosamine-specific plant lectin, binds to the CS chains of aggrecan and has been widely used to visualize PNNs. Although PNNs show substantial molecular heterogeneity, the importance of this heterogeneity in neural plasticity remains unknown. Here, in addition to WFA lectin, we used the two monoclonal antibodies Cat315 and Cat316, both of which recognize the glycan structures of aggrecan, to investigate the molecular heterogeneity of PNNs. WFA detected the highest number of PNNs in all cortical layers, whereas Cat315 and Cat316 labeled only a subset of PNNs. WFA+, Cat315+, and Cat316+ PNNs showed different laminar distributions in the adult visual cortex. WFA, Cat315 and Cat316 detected distinct, but partially overlapping, populations of PNNs. Based on the reactivities of these probes, we categorized PNNs into four groups. We found that two subpopulation of PNNs, one with higher and one with lower WFA-staining are differentially labeled by Cat316 and Cat315, respectively. CS chains recognized by Cat316 were diminished in mice deficient in an enzyme involved in the initiation of CS-biosynthesis. Furthermore, WFA+ and Cat316+ aggrecan were spatially segregated and formed microdomains in a single PNN. Otx2 co-localized with Cat316+ but not with WFA+ aggrecan in PNNs. Our results suggest that the heterogeneity of PNNs around PV cells may affect the functional maturation of these cells.

  7. Investigations of the influence of the content of crude plant protein in the ration on the utilisation of urea in dairy cattle. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarakanow, B.W.; Sommer, A.; Voigt, J.

    1984-01-01

    The rations contained 10.7 (I), 13.7 (II) and 17.1 (III)% plant crude protein and, after the supplementation of 150 g urea per animal and day, a total of 13.8 (I), 16.7 (II) and 20.2 (III)% crude protein in the dry matter. The starch content and the dry matter was 25.6, 19.6 and 13.4% from I to III. The urea was intraruminally infused during the feeding in the morning and the evening. In the morning feeding of each 1st measuring day it was labelled with 27.5 atom-% 15 N'. Samples were taken from the rumen up to 72 h after intake. 4, 8 and 12 hours after 15 N intake 100 ml rumen fluid contained 2.5, 3.3 and 3.0 (I), 3.1, 3.0 and 2.8 (II) and 4.1, 4.4 and 4.2 (III) g dry matter of the bacteria and 7.9, 9.0 and 5.9 (I), 3.8, 3.2 and 3.1 (II) and 2.1, 3.1 and 1.7 (III) g dry matter of the protozoa. In comparison to I the concentration of microbes in III decreased to 60-67%. The N level of the ration did not influence the N and carbohydrate content of the microbes as well as the amino acid composition of the microbial protein. Level and dynamics of 15 N incorporation differed between protozoa and bacteria. The latter were more intensively labelled and 15 N frequency increased more quickly. From I to III the maximum labelling degrees were 3.27, 3.09 and 1.98 for bacteria and 0.93, 0.82 and 0.80 atom-% 15 N excess. The apparent half life of 15 N on 10...12 h in the bacteria N and of 34...59 h in the protozoa N showed that 15 N metabolism in protozoa is distinctly slower. The 15 N frequency in the amino acids (AA) of the microbial protein revaled that urea N was included in the synthesis of all the 16 AA investigated, with big differences in the relative 15 N frequency in the AA both within the microbes and between the species of microbes. One can conclude that the decreasing utilization of 15 N from urea in comparison with that of the total N is caused by the reduction of the concentration of microbes in the rumen fluid and the relatively lower quota of the incorporation

  8. Investigating Molecular Structures of Bio-Fuel and Bio-Oil Seeds as Predictors To Estimate Protein Bioavailability for Ruminants by Advanced Nondestructive Vibrational Molecular Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Yajing; L Prates, Luciana; Yu, Peiqiang

    2017-10-18

    This study was conducted to (1) determine protein and carbohydrate molecular structure profiles and (2) quantify the relationship between structural features and protein bioavailability of newly developed carinata and canola seeds for dairy cows by using Fourier transform infrared molecular spectroscopy. Results showed similarity in protein structural makeup within the entire protein structural region between carinata and canola seeds. The highest area ratios related to structural CHO, total CHO, and cellulosic compounds were obtained for carinata seeds. Carinata and canola seeds showed similar carbohydrate and protein molecular structures by multivariate analyses. Carbohydrate molecular structure profiles were highly correlated to protein rumen degradation and intestinal digestion characteristics. In conclusion, the molecular spectroscopy can detect inherent structural characteristics in carinata and canola seeds in which carbohydrate-relative structural features are related to protein metabolism and utilization. Protein and carbohydrate spectral profiles could be used as predictors of rumen protein bioavailability in cows.

  9. [Carriage of Streptococcus pyogenes in primary school children: M-protein types, pyrogenic toxin genes, and investigation of the clonal relationships between the isolates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otlu, Barış; Karakurt, Cemşit; Bayındır, Yaşar; Kayabaş, Üner; Yakupoğulları, Yusuf; Gözükara Bağ, Harika

    2015-07-01

    M-protein and pyrogenic toxins are the most important virulence factors of Streptococcus pyogenes, and they play significant role in the pathophysiology of acute rheumatoid fever and scarlet fever, respectively. In this study, the pharyngeal carriage of S.pyogenes of the primary school children, clonal relationship of the strains, M-protein types, and the presence of pyrogenic toxin genes were aimed to be investigated. A total of 668 throat cultures obtained from children (age range: 6-16 years) in two primary schools in our region, were included in the study. The clonal relationships of the isolated group A streptococci (GAS) strains were investigated by DiversiLab assay (BioMérieux, France), and the clonal relatedness was confirmed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) method. M-protein (emm) typing was performed by DNA sequencing as suggested by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The genes encoding pyrogenic toxins, speA and speC, were investigated by an in-house multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. S.pyogenes was isolated from 134 (20.05%) of the throat samples. The GAS carriage rate of the students aged ≥10 was statistically higher than those 7-9 years age group (%22 vs %16.4, pprotein gene could be characterized only among 123 isolates by DNA sequencing, and 20 different emm types were detected. The most frequent emm type was emm1 (n=38, 30.9%) followed by emm12 (n=18, 14.6%), emm89 (n=10, 8.1%), emm118 (n=9, 7.3%), and emm4 (n=7, 5.7%). Pyrogenic toxin genes were found in 25 (18.6%) of the isolates, including speA in 11 isolates (8.2%) and speC in 12 isolates (8.9%) and both genes were detected in 2 isolates (1.5%). Sixty-two different Rep (Repetitive extragenic palindromic)-PCR profiles were detected in 134 S.pyogenes isolates by DiversiLab method. Thirteen different clusters were formed by a total of clonally related 36 isolates revealing a strain clustering ratio of 26.9%. Clonal relationship of all isolates in the same

  10. Effect of size, quaternary structure and translational error on the static and dynamic heterogeneity of beta-galactosidase and measurement of electrophoretic dynamic heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Douglas B; Haslam, Allison M; Silverstein, Harlyn J; Chikamatsu, Miki; Shadabi, Elnaz; Nichols, Ellert R

    2010-08-01

    Single enzyme molecule assays were performed using capillary electrophoresis-based protocols on beta-galactosidase from Lactobacillus delbrueckii, Lactobacillus reuteri, Lactobacillus helveticus and Bacillus circulans. The enzyme was found to show static heterogeneity with respect to catalytic rate and the variance in rate increased with protein size. This is consistent with the proposal that random errors in translation may be an important underlying component of enzyme heterogeneity. Additionally these enzymes were found to show static heterogeneity with respect to electrophoretic mobility. Comparison of wild-type and rpsL E. coli beta-galactosidase expressed in the presence and absence of streptomycin suggested that increases in error do not result in detectable increases in the dynamic heterogeneity of activity with increasing temperature. Finally, a method was developed to measure the dynamic heterogeneity in electrophoretic mobility.

  11. Investigation of challenges in dynamic integration of heterogeneous services

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Makamba, M

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The proliferation of service technology stimulated the increase usage of services. Services are distinct, loosely coupled units of functionalities that are self-contained. These services are developed by various vendors without following common...

  12. Combining Deterministic structures and stochastic heterogeneity for transport modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zech, Alraune; Attinger, Sabine; Dietrich, Peter; Teutsch, Georg

    2017-04-01

    Contaminant transport in highly heterogeneous aquifers is extremely challenging and subject of current scientific debate. Tracer plumes often show non-symmetric but highly skewed plume shapes. Predicting such transport behavior using the classical advection-dispersion-equation (ADE) in combination with a stochastic description of aquifer properties requires a dense measurement network. This is in contrast to the available information for most aquifers. A new conceptual aquifer structure model is presented which combines large-scale deterministic information and the stochastic approach for incorporating sub-scale heterogeneity. The conceptual model is designed to allow for a goal-oriented, site specific transport analysis making use of as few data as possible. Thereby the basic idea is to reproduce highly skewed tracer plumes in heterogeneous media by incorporating deterministic contrasts and effects of connectivity instead of using unimodal heterogeneous models with high variances. The conceptual model consists of deterministic blocks of mean hydraulic conductivity which might be measured by pumping tests indicating values differing in orders of magnitudes. A sub-scale heterogeneity is introduced within every block. This heterogeneity can be modeled as bimodal or log-normal distributed. The impact of input parameters, structure and conductivity contrasts is investigated in a systematic manor. Furthermore, some first successful implementation of the model was achieved for the well known MADE site.

  13. Investigation on the Protein Degradation, Free Fatty Acid Content and Area Fraction of Poosti Cheese, Iranian Traditional Cheese Ripened in Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojgan Hemmatian

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: In this study, the proteolysis and lipolysis of Poosti cheese produced from raw sheep milk in mountainous eastern regions of Iran were investigated during 90 days of ripening. Materials and Methods: Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis for proteolysis (SDS-PAGE and gas chromatography (GC for free fatty acids (FFAs were applied to investigate the intensity of lipid degradation. To evaluate the Poosti cheese microstructural changes, the area fraction parameter of the scanning electron microscopy (SEM micrographs was also calculated by the Image J software. Results: The most alteration in protein profile was occurred in the first month of aging for high activity of the proteolytic microorganisms in this period. The amount of free fatty acids was depended on their length due to the variety of involved mechanisms. In addition, the microstructural parameter was considerably affected by the aging as a consequence of the effect of salt on the activity of raw milk and skin micro flora. Conclusions: The decline in proteolysis rate during the last stage of aging could be correlated with the inhibitory effects of salt on the engaged microorganisms, and increase in the pore fraction of the microstructure during the first month of Poosti cheese aging could be due to casein rearrangement and gas release by the fermentative activity of microorganisms. Keywords: Proteolysis, Lipolysis, Poosti cheese, Raw sheep milk.

  14. Experimental investigation of egg ovalbumin scaling on heated stainless steel surface and scale-removal compared with that of whey protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Lv, Hui Ting; Deng, Ren Pan; Liao, Zhen Kai; Wu, Xue E; Chen, Xiao Dong

    2013-07-01

    Fouling and cleaning on a heat exchanger surface during milk processing have been studied extensively in the past due to their great importance in energy, product quality, and safety. However, little information is available for egg ovalbumin (OVA) fouling and cleaning behavior. In the present work, fouling and cleaning behaviors of OVA were investigated using a real-time monitoring system for heat transfer coefficient. A comparison was made between the behavior of whey protein concentrate (WPC) and that of OVA. WPC has been well studied which can be used as a benchmark. Ultrasonic cleaning was also applied to investigate the cleaning behavior of OVA fouling. Results have shown that OVA created more thermal resistance than WPC in the 2 h fouling process. It was also much more difficult to remove the OVA deposit than the WPC fouling. Different from what were observed from WPC deposit, there was no optimal cleaning rate for OVA deposit in the NaOH concentration range tested (0-2.0 wt%), while WPC fouling is known to have the highest cleaning rate around 0.5 wt% NaOH concentration at moderate temperatures. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Clinical heterogeneity in Fabry disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. N. Salogub

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fabry disease is an X-linked, lysosomal storage disease (OMIM: 301500, caused by α-galactosidase A deficiency, resulting in accumulation of its substrates, glycosphingolipids, primarily – globotriaosylceramide, in the lysosomes of multiple cell types with multi-system clinical manifestations, even within the same family, including abnormalities of the central and peripheral nervous system, kidneys, heart, gastrointestinal tract, lungs, organ of vision. Clinical heterogeneity is often the reason of the delayed diagnosis. Nowadays enzyme replacement therapy has proved its efficiency in the treatment of Fabry disease. Including Fabry disease in the differential diagnosis of a large range of disorders is important because of its wide clinical heterogeneity and the possibility of an earlier intervention with a beneficial treatment.

  16. Thermal properties of heterogeneous fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staicu, D.; Beauvy, M.

    1998-01-01

    Fresh or irradiated nuclear fuels are composites or solid solutions more or less heterogeneous, and their thermal conductivities are strongly dependent on the microstructure. The effective thermal conductivities of these heterogeneous solids must be determined for the modelling of the behaviour under irradiation. Different methods (analytical or numerical) published in the literature can be used for the calculation of this effective thermal conductivity. They are analysed and discussed, but finally only few of them are really useful because the assumptions selected are often not compatible with the complex microstructures observed in the fuels. Numerical calculations of the effective thermal conductivity of various fuels based on the microstructure information provided in our laboratory by optical microscopy or electron micro-probe analysis images, have been done for the validation of these methods. The conditions necessary for accurate results on effective thermal conductivity through these numerical calculations are discussed. (author)

  17. Replikasi Unidirectional pada Heterogen Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendro Nindito

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of diverse database technology in enterprise today can not be avoided. Thus, technology is needed to generate information in real time. The purpose of this research is to discuss a database replication technology that can be applied in heterogeneous database environments. In this study we use Windows-based MS SQL Server database to Linux-based Oracle database as the goal. The research method used is prototyping where development can be done quickly and testing of working models of the interaction process is done through repeated. From this research it is obtained that the database replication technolgy using Oracle Golden Gate can be applied in heterogeneous environments in real time as well.

  18. Renewal-anomalous-heterogeneous files

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flomenbom, Ophir

    2010-01-01

    Renewal-anomalous-heterogeneous files are solved. A simple file is made of Brownian hard spheres that diffuse stochastically in an effective 1D channel. Generally, Brownian files are heterogeneous: the spheres' diffusion coefficients are distributed and the initial spheres' density is non-uniform. In renewal-anomalous files, the distribution of waiting times for individual jumps is not exponential as in Brownian files, yet obeys: ψ α (t)∼t -1-α , 0 2 >, obeys, 2 >∼ 2 > nrml α , where 2 > nrml is the MSD in the corresponding Brownian file. This scaling is an outcome of an exact relation (derived here) connecting probability density functions of Brownian files and renewal-anomalous files. It is also shown that non-renewal-anomalous files are slower than the corresponding renewal ones.

  19. Dynamic heterogeneity and life histories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuljapurkar, Shripad; Steiner, Uli

    2010-01-01

    of dynamic models of observable phenotypes of individuals. Phenotypic change in turn determines variation among individuals in their fitness components over the life course. We refer to this dynamic accumulation of fitness differences as dynamic heterogeneity and illustrate it for an animal population...... in which longitudinal data are studied using multistate capture-mark-recapture models. Although our approach can be applied to any characteristic, for our empirical example we use reproduction as the phenotypic character to define stages. We indicate how our stage-structured model describes the nature...... of the variation among individual characteristics that is generated by dynamic heterogeneity. We conclude by discussing our ongoing and planned work on animals and humans. We also discuss the connections between our work and recent work on human mortality, disability and health, and life course theory....

  20. Biodiesel production using heterogeneous catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semwal, Surbhi; Arora, Ajay K; Badoni, Rajendra P; Tuli, Deepak K

    2011-02-01

    The production and use of biodiesel has seen a quantum jump in the recent past due to benefits associated with its ability to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG). There are large number of commercial plants producing biodiesel by transesterification of vegetable oils and fats based on base catalyzed (caustic) homogeneous transesterification of oils. However, homogeneous process needs steps of glycerol separation, washings, very stringent and extremely low limits of Na, K, glycerides and moisture limits in biodiesel. Heterogeneous catalyzed production of biodiesel has emerged as a preferred route as it is environmentally benign needs no water washing and product separation is much easier. The present report is review of the progress made in development of heterogeneous catalysts suitable for biodiesel production. This review shall help in selection of suitable catalysts and the optimum conditions for biodiesel production. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. REPLIKASI UNIDIRECTIONAL PADA HETEROGEN DATABASE

    OpenAIRE

    Hendro Nindito; Evaristus Didik Madyatmadja; Albert Verasius Dian Sano

    2013-01-01

    The use of diverse database technology in enterprise today can not be avoided. Thus, technology is needed to generate information in real time. The purpose of this research is to discuss a database replication technology that can be applied in heterogeneous database environments. In this study we use Windows-based MS SQL Server database to Linux-based Oracle database as the goal. The research method used is prototyping where development can be done quickly and testing of working models of the...

  2. DATABASE REPLICATION IN HETEROGENOUS PLATFORM

    OpenAIRE

    Hendro Nindito; Evaristus Didik Madyatmadja; Albert Verasius Dian Sano

    2014-01-01

    The application of diverse database technologies in enterprises today is increasingly a common practice. To provide high availability and survavibality of real-time information, a database replication technology that has capability to replicate databases under heterogenous platforms is required. The purpose of this research is to find the technology with such capability. In this research, the data source is stored in MSSQL database server running on Windows. The data will be replicated to MyS...

  3. Hyphal heterogeneity in Aspergillus niger

    OpenAIRE

    de Bekker, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Mycelial fungi use hyphae to colonize substrates. These hyphae secrete enzymes that convert complex polymers into breakdown products that can be taken up to serve as nutrients. Using GFP as a reporter it has been shown that exploring hyphae of Aspergillus niger are heterogenic with respect to expression of the glucoamylase gene glaA; some hyphae strongly express the glucoamylase gene glaA, while others express it lowly. This was a surprising finding considering the fact that all hyphae were e...

  4. Grade Retention and Unobserved Heterogeneity

    OpenAIRE

    Robert J. Gary-Bobo; Marion Gousse; Jean-Marc Robin

    2014-01-01

    We study the treatment effect of grade retention using a panel of French junior high-school students, taking unobserved heterogeneity and the endogeneity of grade repetitions into account. We specify a multistage model of human-capital accumulation with a finite number of types representing unobserved individual characteristics. Class-size and latent student-performance indices are assumed to follow finite mixtures of normal distributions. Grade retention may increase or decrea...

  5. Proteomic Investigation of Rhizoctonia solani AG 4 Identifies Secretome and Mycelial Proteins with roles in Plant Cell Wall Degradation and Virulence

    KAUST Repository

    Lakshman, Dilip

    2016-03-28

    Rhizoctonia solani AG 4 is a soilborne necrotrophic fungal plant pathogen that causes economically important diseases on agronomic crops worldwide. Here we used a proteomics approach to characterize both intracellular proteins and the secretome of R. solani AG 4 isolate Rs23A under several growth conditions; the secretome being highly important in pathogenesis. From over 500 total secretome and soluble intracellular protein spots from 2-D gels, 457 protein spots were analyzed and 318 proteins positively matched with fungal proteins of known function by comparison with available R. solani genome databases specific for anastomosis groups 1-IA, 1-IB, and 3. These proteins were categorized to possible cellular locations and functional groups; and for some proteins their putative roles in plant cell wall degradation and virulence. The majority of the secreted proteins were grouped to extracellular regions and contain hydrolase activity.

  6. Surface fluxes in heterogeneous landscape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bay Hasager, C.

    1997-01-01

    The surface fluxes in homogeneous landscapes are calculated by similarity scaling principles. The methodology is well establish. In heterogeneous landscapes with spatial changes in the micro scale range, i e from 100 m to 10 km, advective effects are significant. The present work focus on these effects in an agricultural countryside typical for the midlatitudes. Meteorological and satellite data from a highly heterogeneous landscape in the Rhine Valley, Germany was collected in the large-scale field experiment TRACT (Transport of pollutants over complex terrain) in 1992. Classified satellite images, Landsat TM and ERS SAR, are used as basis for roughness maps. The roughnesses were measured at meteorological masts in the various cover classes and assigned pixel by pixel to the images. The roughness maps are aggregated, i e spatially averaged, into so-called effective roughness lengths. This calculation is performed by a micro scale aggregation model. The model solves the linearized atmospheric flow equations by a numerical (Fast Fourier Transform) method. This model also calculate maps of friction velocity and momentum flux pixel wise in heterogeneous landscapes. It is indicated how the aggregation methodology can be used to calculate the heat fluxes based on the relevant satellite data i e temperature and soil moisture information. (au) 10 tabs., 49 ills., 223 refs.

  7. Receptor oligomerization in family B1 of G-protein-coupled receptors: focus on BRET investigations and the link between GPCR oligomerization and binding cooperativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roed, Sarah Norklit; Orgaard, Anne; Jorgensen, Rasmus; De Meyts, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    The superfamily of the seven transmembrane G-protein-coupled receptors (7TM/GPCRs) is the largest family of membrane-associated receptors. GPCRs are involved in the pathophysiology of numerous human diseases, and they constitute an estimated 30-40% of all drug targets. During the last two decades, GPCR oligomerization has been extensively studied using methods like bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) and today, receptor-receptor interactions within the GPCR superfamily is a well-established phenomenon. Evidence of the impact of GPCR oligomerization on, e.g., ligand binding, receptor expression, and signal transduction indicates the physiological and pharmacological importance of these receptor interactions. In contrast to the larger and more thoroughly studied GPCR subfamilies A and C, the B1 subfamily is small and comprises only 15 members, including, e.g., the secretin receptor, the glucagon receptor, and the receptors for parathyroid hormone (PTHR1 and PTHR2). The dysregulation of several family B1 receptors is involved in diseases, such as diabetes, chronic inflammation, and osteoporosis which underlines the pathophysiological importance of this GPCR subfamily. In spite of this, investigation of family B1 receptor oligomerization and especially its pharmacological importance is still at an early stage. Even though GPCR oligomerization is a well-established phenomenon, there is a need for more investigations providing a direct link between these interactions and receptor functionality in family B1 GPCRs. One example of the functional effects of GPCR oligomerization is the facilitation of allosterism including cooperativity in ligand binding to GPCRs. Here, we review the currently available data on family B1 GPCR homo- and heteromerization, mainly based on BRET investigations. Furthermore, we cover the functional influence of oligomerization on ligand binding as well as the link between oligomerization and binding cooperativity.

  8. A study protocol to investigate the relationship between dietary fibre intake and fermentation, colon cell turnover, global protein acetylation and early carcinogenesis: the FACT study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Croucher Lisa J

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of studies, notably EPIC, have shown a descrease in colorectal cancer risk associated with increased fibre consumption. Whilst the underlying mechanisms are likely to be multifactorial, production of the short-chain fatty-acid butyrate fro butyratye is frequently cited as a major potential contributor to the effect. Butyrate inhibits histone deacetylases, which work on a wide range of proteins over and above histones. We therefore hypothesized that alterations in the acetylated proteome may be associated with a cancer risk phenotype in the colorectal mucosa, and that such alterations are candidate biomarkers for effectiveness of fibre interventions in cancer prevention. Methods an design There are two principal arms to this study: (i a cross-sectional study (FACT OBS of 90 subjects recruited from gastroenterology clinics and; (ii an intervention trial in 40 subjects with an 8 week high fibre intervention. In both studies the principal goal is to investigate a link between fibre intake, SCFA production and global protein acetylation. The primary measure is level of faecal butyrate, which it is hoped will be elevated by moving subjects to a high fibre diet. Fibre intakes will be estimated in the cross-sectional group using the EPIC Food Frequency Questionnaire. Subsidiary measures of the effect of butyrate on colon mucosal function and pre-cancerous phenotype will include measures of apoptosis, apoptotic regulators cell cycle and cell division. Discussion This study will provide a new level of mechanistic data on alterations in the functional proteome in response to the colon microenvironment which may underwrite the observed cancer preventive effect of fibre. The study may yield novel candidate biomarkers of fibre fermentation and colon mucosal function. Trial Registration Trial Registration Number: ISRCTN90852168

  9. A study protocol to investigate the relationship between dietary fibre intake and fermentation, colon cell turnover, global protein acetylation and early carcinogenesis: the FACT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corfe, Bernard M; Williams, Elizabeth A; Bury, Jonathan P; Riley, Stuart A; Croucher, Lisa J; Lai, Daphne YL; Evans, Caroline A

    2009-01-01

    A number of studies, notably EPIC, have shown a descrease in colorectal cancer risk associated with increased fibre consumption. Whilst the underlying mechanisms are likely to be multifactorial, production of the short-chain fatty-acid butyrate fro butyratye is frequently cited as a major potential contributor to the effect. Butyrate inhibits histone deacetylases, which work on a wide range of proteins over and above histones. We therefore hypothesized that alterations in the acetylated proteome may be associated with a cancer risk phenotype in the colorectal mucosa, and that such alterations are candidate biomarkers for effectiveness of fibre interventions in cancer prevention. There are two principal arms to this study: (i) a cross-sectional study (FACT OBS) of 90 subjects recruited from gastroenterology clinics and; (ii) an intervention trial in 40 subjects with an 8 week high fibre intervention. In both studies the principal goal is to investigate a link between fibre intake, SCFA production and global protein acetylation. The primary measure is level of faecal butyrate, which it is hoped will be elevated by moving subjects to a high fibre diet. Fibre intakes will be estimated in the cross-sectional group using the EPIC Food Frequency Questionnaire. Subsidiary measures of the effect of butyrate on colon mucosal function and pre-cancerous phenotype will include measures of apoptosis, apoptotic regulators cell cycle and cell division. This study will provide a new level of mechanistic data on alterations in the functional proteome in response to the colon microenvironment which may underwrite the observed cancer preventive effect of fibre. The study may yield novel candidate biomarkers of fibre fermentation and colon mucosal function. Trial Registration Number: ISRCTN90852168

  10. Mango: combining and analyzing heterogeneous biological networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jennifer; Cho, Hyejin; Chou, Hui-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneous biological data such as sequence matches, gene expression correlations, protein-protein interactions, and biochemical pathways can be merged and analyzed via graphs, or networks. Existing software for network analysis has limited scalability to large data sets or is only accessible to software developers as libraries. In addition, the polymorphic nature of the data sets requires a more standardized method for integration and exploration. Mango facilitates large network analyses with its Graph Exploration Language, automatic graph attribute handling, and real-time 3-dimensional visualization. On a personal computer Mango can load, merge, and analyze networks with millions of links and can connect to online databases to fetch and merge biological pathways. Mango is written in C++ and runs on Mac OS, Windows, and Linux. The stand-alone distributions, including the Graph Exploration Language integrated development environment, are freely available for download from http://www.complex.iastate.edu/download/Mango. The Mango User Guide listing all features can be found at http://www.gitbook.com/book/j23414/mango-user-guide.

  11. Interference, heterogeneity and disease gene mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keats, B. [Louisiana State Univ. Medical Center, New Orleans, LA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The Human Genome Project has had a major impact on genetic research over the past five years. The number of mapped genes is now over 3,000 compared with approximately 1,600 in 1989 and only about 260 ten years before that. The realization that extensive variation could be detected in anonymous DNA segments greatly enhanced the potential for mapping by linkage analysis. Previously, linkage studies had depended on polymorphisms that could be detected in red blood cell antigens, proteins (revealed by electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing), and cytogenetic heteromorphisms. The identification of thousands of polymorphic DNA markers throughout the human genome has led to the construction of high density genetic linkage maps. These maps provide the data necessary to test hypotheses concerning differences in recombination rates and levels of interference. They are also important for disease gene mapping because the existence of these genes must be inferred from the phenotype. Showing linkage of a disease gene to a DNA marker is the first step towards isolating the disease gene, determining its protein product, and developing effective therapies. However, interpretation of results is not always straightforward. Factors such as etiological heterogeneity and undetected irregular segregation can lead to confusing linkage results and incorrect conclusions about the locations of disease genes. This paper will discuss these phenomena and present examples that illustrate the problems, as well as approaches to dealing with them. 23 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Effect of tissue heterogeneity