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Sample records for investigate microbial metabolism

  1. Summer investigations into the metabolic diversity of the microbial world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breznak, J.; Dworkin, M.

    1993-05-17

    The philosophy of the course described here is to underscore the essence of microbiology which is diversity>: diversity of morphology and cellular development, behavior, and metabolic and physiological functions. Emphasis is on microbes other than those customarily covered in conventional microbiology courses and includes: the archaebacteria, extremophiles, and array of obligate anaerobes, various phototrophs, and those microbes exhibiting complex developmental cycles. Also included are microbes carrying out a variety of transformations of organic and inorganic compounds, as well as those which normally occur in symbiotic association with other microbes or with higher forms of life.

  2. Investigation of the microbial metabolism of carbon dioxide and hydrogen in the kangaroo foregut by stable isotope probing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godwin, Scott; Kang, Alicia; Gulino, Lisa-Maree; Manefield, Mike; Gutierrez-Zamora, Maria-Luisa; Kienzle, Marco; Ouwerkerk, Diane; Dawson, Kerri; Klieve, Athol V

    2014-09-01

    Kangaroos ferment forage material in an enlarged forestomach analogous to the rumen, but in contrast to ruminants, they produce little or no methane. The objective of this study was to identify the dominant organisms and pathways involved in hydrogenotrophy in the kangaroo forestomach, with the broader aim of understanding how these processes are able to predominate over methanogenesis. Stable isotope analysis of fermentation end products and RNA stable isotope probing (RNA-SIP) were used to investigate the organisms and biochemical pathways involved in the metabolism of hydrogen and carbon dioxide in the kangaroo forestomach. Our results clearly demonstrate that the activity of bacterial reductive acetogens is a key factor in the reduced methane output of kangaroos. In in vitro fermentations, the microbial community of the kangaroo foregut produced very little methane, but produced a significantly greater proportion of acetate derived from carbon dioxide than the microbial community of the bovine rumen. A bacterial operational taxonomic unit closely related to the known reductive acetogen Blautia coccoides was found to be associated with carbon dioxide and hydrogen metabolism in the kangaroo foregut. Other bacterial taxa including members of the genera Prevotella, Oscillibacter and Streptococcus that have not previously been reported as containing hydrogenotrophic organisms were also significantly associated with metabolism of hydrogen and carbon dioxide in the kangaroo forestomach.

  3. Investigations into the metabolic diversity of microorganisms as part of microbial diversity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leadbetter, Jared [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2016-07-25

    DOE funds supported a key portion of the MBL Microbial Diversity (Woods Hole) program across 6 complete summers. The initial 4 years of the funded period were overseen by two co-Directors, Daniel Buckley (Cornell) and Steve Zinder (Cornell), who then completed their term. The final 2 summers were overseen by 2 new co-Directors, Jared R. Leadbetter (Caltech) and Dianne Newman (Caltech). The 6 funded summer iterations of the course included the incorporation of new themes such as single cell approaches applied to natural microbial communities (cell separation and sorting, genome amplification from single cells, and the use of Nano-SIMS to examine assimilation of carbon and nitrogen from isotopically labeled substrates into single cells), genetics and genomics on bacteria freshly isolated during the course of the programs, quantitative systems biology, and modern quantitative light microscopy.

  4. Thermodynamic Driving Force of Hydrogen on Rumen Microbial Metabolism: A Theoretical Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lingen, Henk J; Plugge, Caroline M; Fadel, James G; Kebreab, Ermias; Bannink, André; Dijkstra, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen is a key product of rumen fermentation and has been suggested to thermodynamically control the production of the various volatile fatty acids (VFA). Previous studies, however, have not accounted for the fact that only thermodynamic near-equilibrium conditions control the magnitude of reaction rate. Furthermore, the role of NAD, which is affected by hydrogen partial pressure (PH2), has often not been considered. The aim of this study was to quantify the control of PH2 on reaction rates of specific fermentation pathways, methanogenesis and NADH oxidation in rumen microbes. The control of PH2 was quantified using the thermodynamic potential factor (FT), which is a dimensionless factor that corrects a predicted kinetic reaction rate for the thermodynamic control exerted. Unity FT was calculated for all glucose fermentation pathways considered, indicating no inhibition of PH2 on the production of a specific type of VFA (e.g., acetate, propionate and butyrate) in the rumen. For NADH oxidation without ferredoxin oxidation, increasing PH2 within the rumen physiological range decreased FT from unity to zero for different NAD+ to NADH ratios and pH of 6.2 and 7.0, which indicates thermodynamic control of PH2. For NADH oxidation with ferredoxin oxidation, increasing PH2 within the rumen physiological range decreased FT from unity at pH of 7.0 only. For the acetate to propionate conversion, FT increased from 0.65 to unity with increasing PH2, which indicates thermodynamic control. For propionate to acetate and butyrate to acetate conversions, FT decreased to zero below the rumen range of PH2, indicating full thermodynamic suppression. For methanogenesis by archaea without cytochromes, FT differed from unity only below the rumen range of PH2, indicating no thermodynamic control. This theoretical investigation shows that thermodynamic control of PH2 on individual VFA produced and associated yield of hydrogen and methane cannot be explained without considering NADH

  5. Thermodynamic Driving Force of Hydrogen on Rumen Microbial Metabolism: A Theoretical Investigation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henk J van Lingen

    Full Text Available Hydrogen is a key product of rumen fermentation and has been suggested to thermodynamically control the production of the various volatile fatty acids (VFA. Previous studies, however, have not accounted for the fact that only thermodynamic near-equilibrium conditions control the magnitude of reaction rate. Furthermore, the role of NAD, which is affected by hydrogen partial pressure (PH2, has often not been considered. The aim of this study was to quantify the control of PH2 on reaction rates of specific fermentation pathways, methanogenesis and NADH oxidation in rumen microbes. The control of PH2 was quantified using the thermodynamic potential factor (FT, which is a dimensionless factor that corrects a predicted kinetic reaction rate for the thermodynamic control exerted. Unity FT was calculated for all glucose fermentation pathways considered, indicating no inhibition of PH2 on the production of a specific type of VFA (e.g., acetate, propionate and butyrate in the rumen. For NADH oxidation without ferredoxin oxidation, increasing PH2 within the rumen physiological range decreased FT from unity to zero for different NAD+ to NADH ratios and pH of 6.2 and 7.0, which indicates thermodynamic control of PH2. For NADH oxidation with ferredoxin oxidation, increasing PH2 within the rumen physiological range decreased FT from unity at pH of 7.0 only. For the acetate to propionate conversion, FT increased from 0.65 to unity with increasing PH2, which indicates thermodynamic control. For propionate to acetate and butyrate to acetate conversions, FT decreased to zero below the rumen range of PH2, indicating full thermodynamic suppression. For methanogenesis by archaea without cytochromes, FT differed from unity only below the rumen range of PH2, indicating no thermodynamic control. This theoretical investigation shows that thermodynamic control of PH2 on individual VFA produced and associated yield of hydrogen and methane cannot be explained without

  6. Microbial Metabolism in Serpentinite Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo-Medina, M.; Brazelton, W. J.; Twing, K. I.; Kubo, M.; Hoehler, T. M.; Schrenk, M. O.

    2013-12-01

    Serpentinization is the process in which ultramafic rocks, characteristic of the upper mantle, react with water liberating mantle carbon and reducing power to potenially support chemosynthetic microbial communities. These communities may be important mediators of carbon and energy exchange between the deep Earth and the surface biosphere. Our work focuses on the Coast Range Ophiolite Microbial Observatory (CROMO) in Northern California where subsurface fluids are accessible through a series of wells. Preliminary analyses indicate that the highly basic fluids (pH 9-12) have low microbial diversity, but there is limited knowledge about the metabolic capabilities of these communties. Metagenomic data from similar serpentine environments [1] have identified Betaproteobacteria belonging to the order Burkholderiales and Gram-positive bacteria from the order Clostridiales as key components of the serpentine microbiome. In an effort to better characterize the microbial community, metabolism, and geochemistry at CROMO, fluids from two representative wells (N08B and CSWold) were sampled during recent field campaigns. Geochemical characterization of the fluids includes measurements of dissolved gases (H2, CO, CH4), dissolved inorganic and organic carbon, volatile fatty acids, and nutrients. The wells selected can be differentiated in that N08B had higher pH (10-11), lower dissolved oxygen, and cell counts ranging from 105-106 cells mL-1 of fluid, with an abundance of the betaproteobacterium Hydrogenophaga. In contrast, fluids from CSWold have slightly lower pH (9-9.5), DO, and conductivity, as well as higher TDN and TDP. CSWold fluid is also characterized for having lower cell counts (~103 cells mL-1) and an abundance of Dethiobacter, a taxon within the phylum Clostridiales. Microcosm experiments were conducted with the purpose of monitoring carbon fixation, methanotrophy and metabolism of small organic compounds, such as acetate and formate, while tracing changes in fluid

  7. Investigation of metabolic encephalopathy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cycle defects is the X-linked recessive disorder, ornithine ... life, or if the child is fed the compounds that they are unable .... as learning difficulties, drowsiness and avoidance of ... Table 2. Laboratory investigation of suspected metabolic encephalopathy. Laboratory .... Clinical approach to treatable inborn metabolic diseases:.

  8. Methylobacterium genome sequences: a reference blueprint to investigate microbial metabolism of C1 compounds from natural and industrial sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuilleumier, Stéphane; Chistoserdova, Ludmila; Lee, Ming-Chun; Bringel, Françoise; Lajus, Aurélie; Zhou, Yang; Gourion, Benjamin; Barbe, Valérie; Chang, Jean; Cruveiller, Stéphane; Dossat, Carole; Gillett, Will; Gruffaz, Christelle; Haugen, Eric; Hourcade, Edith; Levy, Ruth; Mangenot, Sophie; Muller, Emilie; Nadalig, Thierry; Pagni, Marco; Penny, Christian; Peyraud, Rémi; Robinson, David G; Roche, David; Rouy, Zoé; Saenampechek, Channakhone; Salvignol, Grégory; Vallenet, David; Wu, Zaining; Marx, Christopher J; Vorholt, Julia A; Olson, Maynard V; Kaul, Rajinder; Weissenbach, Jean; Médigue, Claudine; Lidstrom, Mary E

    2009-01-01

    Methylotrophy describes the ability of organisms to grow on reduced organic compounds without carbon-carbon bonds. The genomes of two pink-pigmented facultative methylotrophic bacteria of the Alpha-proteobacterial genus Methylobacterium, the reference species Methylobacterium extorquens strain AM1 and the dichloromethane-degrading strain DM4, were compared. The 6.88 Mb genome of strain AM1 comprises a 5.51 Mb chromosome, a 1.26 Mb megaplasmid and three plasmids, while the 6.12 Mb genome of strain DM4 features a 5.94 Mb chromosome and two plasmids. The chromosomes are highly syntenic and share a large majority of genes, while plasmids are mostly strain-specific, with the exception of a 130 kb region of the strain AM1 megaplasmid which is syntenic to a chromosomal region of strain DM4. Both genomes contain large sets of insertion elements, many of them strain-specific, suggesting an important potential for genomic plasticity. Most of the genomic determinants associated with methylotrophy are nearly identical, with two exceptions that illustrate the metabolic and genomic versatility of Methylobacterium. A 126 kb dichloromethane utilization (dcm) gene cluster is essential for the ability of strain DM4 to use DCM as the sole carbon and energy source for growth and is unique to strain DM4. The methylamine utilization (mau) gene cluster is only found in strain AM1, indicating that strain DM4 employs an alternative system for growth with methylamine. The dcm and mau clusters represent two of the chromosomal genomic islands (AM1: 28; DM4: 17) that were defined. The mau cluster is flanked by mobile elements, but the dcm cluster disrupts a gene annotated as chelatase and for which we propose the name "island integration determinant" (iid). These two genome sequences provide a platform for intra- and interspecies genomic comparisons in the genus Methylobacterium, and for investigations of the adaptive mechanisms which allow bacterial lineages to acquire methylotrophic

  9. Methylobacterium genome sequences: a reference blueprint to investigate microbial metabolism of C1 compounds from natural and industrial sources.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Vuilleumier

    Full Text Available Methylotrophy describes the ability of organisms to grow on reduced organic compounds without carbon-carbon bonds. The genomes of two pink-pigmented facultative methylotrophic bacteria of the Alpha-proteobacterial genus Methylobacterium, the reference species Methylobacterium extorquens strain AM1 and the dichloromethane-degrading strain DM4, were compared.The 6.88 Mb genome of strain AM1 comprises a 5.51 Mb chromosome, a 1.26 Mb megaplasmid and three plasmids, while the 6.12 Mb genome of strain DM4 features a 5.94 Mb chromosome and two plasmids. The chromosomes are highly syntenic and share a large majority of genes, while plasmids are mostly strain-specific, with the exception of a 130 kb region of the strain AM1 megaplasmid which is syntenic to a chromosomal region of strain DM4. Both genomes contain large sets of insertion elements, many of them strain-specific, suggesting an important potential for genomic plasticity. Most of the genomic determinants associated with methylotrophy are nearly identical, with two exceptions that illustrate the metabolic and genomic versatility of Methylobacterium. A 126 kb dichloromethane utilization (dcm gene cluster is essential for the ability of strain DM4 to use DCM as the sole carbon and energy source for growth and is unique to strain DM4. The methylamine utilization (mau gene cluster is only found in strain AM1, indicating that strain DM4 employs an alternative system for growth with methylamine. The dcm and mau clusters represent two of the chromosomal genomic islands (AM1: 28; DM4: 17 that were defined. The mau cluster is flanked by mobile elements, but the dcm cluster disrupts a gene annotated as chelatase and for which we propose the name "island integration determinant" (iid.These two genome sequences provide a platform for intra- and interspecies genomic comparisons in the genus Methylobacterium, and for investigations of the adaptive mechanisms which allow bacterial lineages to acquire

  10. Summer investigations into the metabolic diversity of the microbial world. Progress report, May 5, 1992--April 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breznak, J.; Dworkin, M.

    1993-05-17

    The philosophy of the course described here is to underscore the essence of microbiology which is diversity>: diversity of morphology and cellular development, behavior, and metabolic and physiological functions. Emphasis is on microbes other than those customarily covered in conventional microbiology courses and includes: the archaebacteria, extremophiles, and array of obligate anaerobes, various phototrophs, and those microbes exhibiting complex developmental cycles. Also included are microbes carrying out a variety of transformations of organic and inorganic compounds, as well as those which normally occur in symbiotic association with other microbes or with higher forms of life.

  11. Metabolic heterogeneity in clonal microbial populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takhaveev, Vakil; Heinemann, Matthias

    2018-02-21

    In the past decades, numerous instances of phenotypic diversity were observed in clonal microbial populations, particularly, on the gene expression level. Much less is, however, known about phenotypic differences that occur on the level of metabolism. This is likely explained by the fact that experimental tools probing metabolism of single cells are still at an early stage of development. Here, we review recent exciting discoveries that point out different causes for metabolic heterogeneity within clonal microbial populations. These causes range from ecological factors and cell-inherent dynamics in constant environments to molecular noise in gene expression that propagates into metabolism. Furthermore, we provide an overview of current methods to quantify the levels of metabolites and biomass components in single cells. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Microbial Metabolism and Inhibition Studies of Phenobarbital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    techniques, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), mass spectrometry (MS) ... Keywords: Microbial metabolism, Phenobarbital, Inhibition studies, Rhizopus stolonifer, CYP 2C9, .... 24 h of incubation 0.5 ml of drug solution was ... mode, positive: spray voltage, 3.5 KV: ... Rhizopus stolonifer showed an extra peak at.

  13. Enhancing microbial production of biofuels by expanding microbial metabolic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ping; Chen, Xingge; Li, Peng

    2017-09-01

    Fatty acid, isoprenoid, and alcohol pathways have been successfully engineered to produce biofuels. By introducing three genes, atfA, adhE, and pdc, into Escherichia coli to expand fatty acid pathway, up to 1.28 g/L of fatty acid ethyl esters can be achieved. The isoprenoid pathway can be expanded to produce bisabolene with a high titer of 900 mg/L in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Short- and long-chain alcohols can also be effectively biosynthesized by extending the carbon chain of ketoacids with an engineered "+1" alcohol pathway. Thus, it can be concluded that expanding microbial metabolic pathways has enormous potential for enhancing microbial production of biofuels for future industrial applications. However, some major challenges for microbial production of biofuels should be overcome to compete with traditional fossil fuels: lowering production costs, reducing the time required to construct genetic elements and to increase their predictability and reliability, and creating reusable parts with useful and predictable behavior. To address these challenges, several aspects should be further considered in future: mining and transformation of genetic elements related to metabolic pathways, assembling biofuel elements and coordinating their functions, enhancing the tolerance of host cells to biofuels, and creating modular subpathways that can be easily interconnected. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. EVA Suit Microbial Leakage Investigation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this project is to collect microbial samples from various EVA suits to determine how much microbial contamination is typically released during...

  15. Engineering microbial fatty acid metabolism for biofuels and biochemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marella, Eko Roy; Holkenbrink, Carina; Siewers, Verena

    2017-01-01

    microbial catalysis. This review summarizes the recent advances in the engineering of microbial metabolism for production of fatty acid-derived products. We highlight the efforts in engineering the central carbon metabolism, redox metabolism, controlling the chain length of the products, and obtaining...

  16. Microbial community assembly and metabolic function during mammalian corpse decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metcalf, J. L.; Xu, Z. Z.; Weiss, S.; Lax, S.; Van Treuren, W.; Hyde, E. R.; Song, S. J.; Amir, A.; Larsen, P.; Sangwan, N.; Haarmann, D.; Humphrey, G. C.; Ackermann, G.; Thompson, L. R.; Lauber, C.; Bibat, A.; Nicholas, C.; Gebert, M. J.; Petrosino, J. F.; Reed, S. C.; Gilbert, J. A.; Lynne, A. M.; Bucheli, S. R.; Carter, D. O.; Knight, R.

    2015-12-10

    Vertebrate corpse decomposition provides an important stage in nutrient cycling in most terrestrial habitats, yet microbially mediated processes are poorly understood. Here we combine deep microbial community characterization, community-level metabolic reconstruction, and soil biogeochemical assessment to understand the principles governing microbial community assembly during decomposition of mouse and human corpses on different soil substrates. We find a suite of bacterial and fungal groups that contribute to nitrogen cycling and a reproducible network of decomposers that emerge on predictable time scales. Our results show that this decomposer community is derived primarily from bulk soil, but key decomposers are ubiquitous in low abundance. Soil type was not a dominant factor driving community development, and the process of decomposition is sufficiently reproducible to offer new opportunities for forensic investigations.

  17. Microbial community assembly and metabolic function during mammalian corpse decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, Jessica L; Xu, Zhenjiang Zech; Weiss, Sophie; Lax, Simon; Van Treuren, Will; Hyde, Embriette R.; Song, Se Jin; Amir, Amnon; Larsen, Peter; Sangwan, Naseer; Haarmann, Daniel; Humphrey, Greg C; Ackermann, Gail; Thompson, Luke R; Lauber, Christian; Bibat, Alexander; Nicholas, Catherine; Gebert, Matthew J; Petrosino, Joseph F; Reed, Sasha C.; Gilbert, Jack A; Lynne, Aaron M; Bucheli, Sibyl R; Carter, David O; Knight, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Vertebrate corpse decomposition provides an important stage in nutrient cycling in most terrestrial habitats, yet microbially mediated processes are poorly understood. Here we combine deep microbial community characterization, community-level metabolic reconstruction, and soil biogeochemical assessment to understand the principles governing microbial community assembly during decomposition of mouse and human corpses on different soil substrates. We find a suite of bacterial and fungal groups that contribute to nitrogen cycling and a reproducible network of decomposers that emerge on predictable time scales. Our results show that this decomposer community is derived primarily from bulk soil, but key decomposers are ubiquitous in low abundance. Soil type was not a dominant factor driving community development, and the process of decomposition is sufficiently reproducible to offer new opportunities for forensic investigations.

  18. Gut Microbial Glycerol Metabolism as an Endogenous Acrolein Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianbo Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Acrolein is a highly reactive electrophile causing toxic effects, such as DNA and protein adduction, oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, immune dysfunction, and membrane damage. This Opinion/Hypothesis provides an overview of endogenous and exogenous acrolein sources, acrolein’s mode of action, and its metabolic fate. Recent reports underpin the finding that gut microbial glycerol metabolism leading to the formation of reuterin is an additional source of endogenous acrolein. Reuterin is an antimicrobial multicomponent system consisting of 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde, its dimer and hydrate, and also acrolein. The major conclusion is that gut microbes can metabolize glycerol to reuterin and that this transformation occurs in vivo. Given the known toxicity of acrolein, the observation that acrolein is formed in the gut necessitates further investigations on functional relevance for gut microbiota and the host.

  19. Metaproteomics: extracting and mining proteome information to characterize metabolic activities in microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Paul E; Giannone, Richard J; Xiong, Weili; Hettich, Robert L

    2014-06-17

    Contemporary microbial ecology studies usually employ one or more "omics" approaches to investigate the structure and function of microbial communities. Among these, metaproteomics aims to characterize the metabolic activities of the microbial membership, providing a direct link between the genetic potential and functional metabolism. The successful deployment of metaproteomics research depends on the integration of high-quality experimental and bioinformatic techniques for uncovering the metabolic activities of a microbial community in a way that is complementary to other "meta-omic" approaches. The essential, quality-defining informatics steps in metaproteomics investigations are: (1) construction of the metagenome, (2) functional annotation of predicted protein-coding genes, (3) protein database searching, (4) protein inference, and (5) extraction of metabolic information. In this article, we provide an overview of current bioinformatic approaches and software implementations in metaproteome studies in order to highlight the key considerations needed for successful implementation of this powerful community-biology tool. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  20. Does canine inflammatory bowel disease influence gut microbial profile and host metabolism?

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Jia; Verbrugghe, Adronie; Louren?o, Marta; Janssens, Geert P. J.; Liu, Daisy J. X.; Van de Wiele, Tom; Eeckhaut, Venessa; Van Immerseel, Filip; Van de Maele, Isabel; Niu, Yufeng; Bosch, Guido; Junius, Greet; Wuyts, Brigitte; Hesta, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    Background Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) refers to a diverse group of chronic gastrointestinal diseases, and gut microbial dysbiosis has been proposed as a modulating factor in its pathogenesis. Several studies have investigated the gut microbial ecology of dogs with IBD but it is yet unclear if this microbial profile can alter the nutrient metabolism of the host. The aim of the present study was to characterize the faecal bacterial profile and functionality as well as to determine host me...

  1. [Improving industrial microbial stress resistance by metabolic engineering: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ruiyan; Li, Yin

    2010-09-01

    Metabolic engineering is a technologic platform for industrial strain improvement and aims not only at modifying microbial metabolic fluxes, but also improving the physiological performance of industrial microbes. Microbes will meet multiple stresses in industrial processes. Consequently, elicited gene responses might result in a decrease in overall cell fitness and the efficiency of biotransformation. Thus, it is crucial to develop robust and productive microbial strains that can be integrated into industrial-scale bioprocesses. In this review, we focus on the progress of these novel methods and strategies for engineering stress-tolerance phenotypes referring to rational metabolic engineering and inverse metabolic engineering in recent years. In addition, we also address problems existing in this area and future research needs of microbial physiological functionality engineering.

  2. Unravelling core microbial metabolisms in the hypersaline microbial mats of Shark Bay using high-throughput metagenomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruvindy, Rendy; White III, Richard Allen; Neilan, Brett Anthony; Burns, Brendan Paul

    2015-05-29

    Modern microbial mats are potential analogues of some of Earth’s earliest ecosystems. Excellent examples can be found in Shark Bay, Australia, with mats of various morphologies. To further our understanding of the functional genetic potential of these complex microbial ecosystems, we conducted for the first time shotgun metagenomic analyses. We assembled metagenomic nextgeneration sequencing data to classify the taxonomic and metabolic potential across diverse morphologies of marine mats in Shark Bay. The microbial community across taxonomic classifications using protein-coding and small subunit rRNA genes directly extracted from the metagenomes suggests that three phyla Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria and Bacteriodetes dominate all marine mats. However, the microbial community structure between Shark Bay and Highbourne Cay (Bahamas) marine systems appears to be distinct from each other. The metabolic potential (based on SEED subsystem classifications) of the Shark Bay and Highbourne Cay microbial communities were also distinct. Shark Bay metagenomes have a metabolic pathway profile consisting of both heterotrophic and photosynthetic pathways, whereas Highbourne Cay appears to be dominated almost exclusively by photosynthetic pathways. Alternative non-rubisco-based carbon metabolism including reductive TCA cycle and 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate pathways is highly represented in Shark Bay metagenomes while not represented in Highbourne Cay microbial mats or any other mat forming ecosystems investigated to date. Potentially novel aspects of nitrogen cycling were also observed, as well as putative heavy metal cycling (arsenic, mercury, copper and cadmium). Finally, archaea are highly represented in Shark Bay and may have critical roles in overall ecosystem function in these modern microbial mats.

  3. Microbial heterotrophic metabolic rates constrain the microbial carbon pump

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Robinson, C.; Ramaiah, N.

    (2008). 10. P.A. del Giorgio, J. J. Cole, in MicrobialEcologyoftheOceans D. L. Kirchman Ed. (JohnWiley & Sons, Inc. NewYork ed. 1. 2000),pp. 289–325. 11. A. B. Burd etal., DeepSeaRes.II 57, 1557 (2010). 12. S. Martinez-García, E. Fernández, M.... R.A. Straza, D. L. Kirchman, Aquat.Microb.Ecol. 62, 267(2011). 16. O. Hoegh-Guldberg, J. F. Bruno, Science 328,1523 (2010). 17. J. Piontek, M. Lunau, N. Handel, C. Borchard, M.Wurst,A. Engel, Biogeosciences 7, 1615 (2010). 18. J. K.Apple, P.A. del...

  4. Microbial investigations of deep geological compartments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barsotti, V.; Sergeant, C.; Vesvres, M.H.; Joulian, C.; Coulon, S.; Le Marrec, C.; Garrido, F.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Deep sedimentary rocks are now considered to contain a significant part of the total bacterial population, but are microbiologically unexplored. The drilling down to the base of the Triassic (1980 meters deep) in the geological formations of the eastern Paris Basin performed by ANDRA (EST433) in 2008 provides us a good opportunity to explore the deep biosphere. We conditioned and sub-sampled on the coring site, in as aseptic conditions as possible, the nine cores: two in the Callovo-Oxfordian clay, two in the Dogger, five in the Triassic compartments. In addition to storage at atmospheric pressure, a portion of the five Triassic samples was placed in a 190 bars pressurized bars chamber to investigate the influence of the conservation pressure factor on the found microflora. In parallel, in order to evaluate a potential bacterial contamination of the core by the drilling fluids, samples of mud just before each sample drilling were taken and analysed. The microbial exploration we started can be divided in two parts: - A cultural approach in different culture media for six metabolic groups to try to find microbial cells still viable. This type of experiment is difficult because of the small proportion of cultivable species, especially in these extreme environmental samples. - A molecular approach by direct extraction of genomic DNA from the geological samples to explore a larger biodiversity. Here, the limits are the difficulties to extract DNA from these low biomass containing rocks. The five Triassic samples were partly crushed in powder and inoculated in the six culture media with four NaCl concentrations, because this type of rock is known as saline or hyper-saline, and incubated at three temperatures: 30 deg. C, 55 deg. C under agitation and 70 deg. C. First results will be presented. The direct extraction of DNA needs a complete method optimisation to adapt existent procedures (using commercial kit and classical

  5. Gut Microbial Glycerol Metabolism as an Endogenous Acrolein Source

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jianbo; Sturla, Shana; Lacroix, Christophe; Schwab, Clarissa

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acrolein is a highly reactive electrophile causing toxic effects, such as DNA and protein adduction, oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, immune dysfunction, and membrane damage. This Opinion/Hypothesis provides an overview of endogenous and exogenous acrolein sources, acrolein’s mode of action, and its metabolic fate. Recent reports underpin the finding that gut microbial glycerol metabolism leading to the formation of reuterin is an additional source of endogenous acrole...

  6. Microbial Development and Metabolic Engineering | Bioenergy | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diversity Our genetically engineered microbes utilize a variety of feedstock including cellulose, xylan , syngas, simple sugars, organic acids, and carbon dioxide (CO2). We have modified the metabolic pathways

  7. Microbial diversity and metabolic networks in acid mine drainage habitats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celia eMendez-Garcia

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Acid mine drainage (AMD emplacements are low-complexity natural systems. Low-pH conditions appear to be the main factor underlying the limited diversity of the microbial populations thriving in these environments, although temperature, ionic composition, total organic carbon and dissolved oxygen are also considered to significantly influence their microbial life. This natural reduction in diversity driven by extreme conditions was reflected in several studies on the microbial populations inhabiting the various micro-environments present in such ecosystems. Early studies based on the physiology of the autochthonous microbiota and the growing success of omics technologies have enabled a better understanding of microbial ecology and function in low-pH mine outflows; however, complementary omics-derived data should be included to completely describe their microbial ecology. Furthermore, recent updates on the distribution of eukaryotes and ultra-micro-archaea demand their inclusion in the microbial characterisation of AMD systems. In this review, we present a complete overview of the bacterial, archaeal (including ultra-micro-archaeal and eukaryotic diversity in these ecosystems and include a thorough depiction of the metabolism and element cycling in AMD habitats. We also review different metabolic network structures at the organismal level, which is necessary to disentangle the role of each member of the AMD communities described thus far.

  8. Microbial Dark Matter Investigations: How Microbial Studies Transform Biological Knowledge and Empirically Sketch a Logic of Scientific Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Guillaume; Pathmanathan, Jananan S; Lannes, Romain; Lopez, Philippe; Bapteste, Eric

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Microbes are the oldest and most widespread, phylogenetically and metabolically diverse life forms on Earth. However, they have been discovered only 334 years ago, and their diversity started to become seriously investigated even later. For these reasons, microbial studies that unveil novel microbial lineages and processes affecting or involving microbes deeply (and repeatedly) transform knowledge in biology. Considering the quantitative prevalence of taxonomically and functionally unassigned sequences in environmental genomics data sets, and that of uncultured microbes on the planet, we propose that unraveling the microbial dark matter should be identified as a central priority for biologists. Based on former empirical findings of microbial studies, we sketch a logic of discovery with the potential to further highlight the microbial unknowns. PMID:29420719

  9. Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent Viruses Compensate for Microbial Metabolism in Virus-Host Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Tianliang; Li, Hongyun; Zhang, Xiaobo

    2017-07-11

    Viruses are believed to be responsible for the mortality of host organisms. However, some recent investigations reveal that viruses may be essential for host survival. To date, it remains unclear whether viruses are beneficial or harmful to their hosts. To reveal the roles of viruses in the virus-host interactions, viromes and microbiomes of sediment samples from three deep-sea hydrothermal vents were explored in this study. To exclude the influence of exogenous DNAs on viromes, the virus particles were purified with nuclease (DNase I and RNase A) treatments and cesium chloride density gradient centrifugation. The metagenomic analysis of viromes without exogenous DNA contamination and microbiomes of vent samples indicated that viruses had compensation effects on the metabolisms of their host microorganisms. Viral genes not only participated in most of the microbial metabolic pathways but also formed branched pathways in microbial metabolisms, including pyrimidine metabolism; alanine, aspartate, and glutamate metabolism; nitrogen metabolism and assimilation pathways of the two-component system; selenocompound metabolism; aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis; and amino sugar and nucleotide sugar metabolism. As is well known, deep-sea hydrothermal vent ecosystems exist in relatively isolated environments which are barely influenced by other ecosystems. The metabolic compensation of hosts mediated by viruses might represent a very important aspect of virus-host interactions. IMPORTANCE Viruses are the most abundant biological entities in the oceans and have very important roles in regulating microbial community structure and biogeochemical cycles. The relationship between virus and host microbes is broadly thought to be that of predator and prey. Viruses can lyse host cells to control microbial population sizes and affect community structures of hosts by killing specific microbes. However, viruses also influence their hosts through manipulation of bacterial metabolism. We found

  10. Microbial Regulation of Glucose Metabolism and Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke Crommen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes is a combined disease, resulting from a hyperglycemia and peripheral and hepatic insulin resistance. Recent data suggest that the gut microbiota is involved in diabetes development, altering metabolic processes including glucose and fatty acid metabolism. Thus, type 2 diabetes patients show a microbial dysbiosis, with reduced butyrate-producing bacteria and elevated potential pathogens compared to metabolically healthy individuals. Furthermore, probiotics are a known tool to modulate the microbiota, having a therapeutic potential. Current literature will be discussed to elucidate the complex interaction of gut microbiota, intestinal permeability and inflammation leading to peripheral and hepatic insulin resistance. Therefore, this review aims to generate a deeper understanding of the underlying mechanism of potential microbial strains, which can be used as probiotics.

  11. Microbial Metabolism and Inhibition Studies of Phenobarbital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: Screening scale studies were performed with eight cultures for their ability to metabolize phenobarbital, an antiepileptic, sedative, hypnotic and substrate for CYP 2C9 and 2C19. Methods: The transformation of phenobarbital was confirmed and characterized by fermentation techniques, high performance liquid ...

  12. Arsenic and selenium in microbial metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, John F.; Basu, Partha; Santini, Joanne M.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2006-01-01

    Arsenic and selenium are readily metabolized by prokaryotes, participating in a full range of metabolic functions including assimilation, methylation, detoxification, and anaerobic respiration. Arsenic speciation and mobility is affected by microbes through oxidation/reduction reactions as part of resistance and respiratory processes. A robust arsenic cycle has been demonstrated in diverse environments. Respiratory arsenate reductases, arsenic methyltransferases, and new components in arsenic resistance have been recently described. The requirement for selenium stems primarily from its incorporation into selenocysteine and its function in selenoenzymes. Selenium oxyanions can serve as an electron acceptor in anaerobic respiration, forming distinct nanoparticles of elemental selenium that may be enriched in (76)Se. The biogenesis of selenoproteins has been elucidated, and selenium methyltransferases and a respiratory selenate reductase have also been described. This review highlights recent advances in ecology, biochemistry, and molecular biology and provides a prelude to the impact of genomics studies.

  13. Metabolomic applications to decipher gut microbial metabolic influence in health and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francois-Pierre eMartin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Dietary preferences and nutrients composition have been shown to influence human and gut microbial metabolism, which ultimately has specific effects on health and diseases’ risk. Increasingly, results from molecular biology and microbiology demonstrate the key role of the gut microbiota metabolic interface to the overall mammalian host’s health status. There is therefore raising interest in nutrition research to characterize the molecular foundations of the gut microbial mammalian cross-talk at both physiological and biochemical pathway levels. Tackling these challenges can be achieved through systems biology approaches, such as metabolomics, to underpin the highly complex metabolic exchanges between diverse biological compartments, including organs, systemic biofluids and microbial symbionts. By the development of specific biomarkers for prediction of health and disease, metabolomics is increasingly used in clinical applications as regard to disease aetiology, diagnostic stratification and potentially mechanism of action of therapeutical and nutraceutical solutions. Surprisingly, an increasing number of metabolomics investigations in pre-clinical and clinical studies based on proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry (MS provided compelling evidence that system wide and organ-specific biochemical processes are under the influence of gut microbial metabolism. This review aims at describing recent applications of metabolomics in clinical fields where main objective is to discern the biochemical mechanisms under the influence of the gut microbiota, with insight into gastrointestinal health and diseases diagnostics and improvement of homeostasis metabolic regulation.

  14. The Role of Microbial Amino Acid Metabolism in Host Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelien P. J. G. Neis

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Disruptions in gut microbiota composition and function are increasingly implicated in the pathogenesis of obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The functional output of the gut microbiota, including short-chain fatty acids and amino acids, are thought to be important modulators underlying the development of these disorders. Gut bacteria can alter the bioavailability of amino acids by utilization of several amino acids originating from both alimentary and endogenous proteins. In turn, gut bacteria also provide amino acids to the host. This could have significant implications in the context of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus, conditions associated with elevated systemic concentrations of certain amino acids, in particular the aromatic and branched-chain amino acids. Moreover, several amino acids released by gut bacteria can serve as precursors for the synthesis of short-chain fatty acids, which also play a role in the development of obesity. In this review, we aim to compile the available evidence on the contribution of microbial amino acids to host amino acid homeostasis, and to assess the role of the gut microbiota as a determinant of amino acid and short-chain fatty acid perturbations in human obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  15. Effects of introducing heterologous pathways on microbial metabolism with respect to metabolic optimality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Hyun Uk; Kim, Byoungjin; Seung, Do Young

    2014-01-01

    reactions are more frequently introduced into various microbial hosts. The genome-scale metabolic simulations of Escherichia coli strains engineered to produce 1,4-butanediol, 1,3-propanediol, and amorphadiene suggest that microbial metabolism shows much different responses to the introduced heterologous...... reactions in a strain-specific manner than typical gene knockouts in terms of the energetic status (e.g., ATP and biomass generation) and chemical production capacity. The 1,4-butanediol and 1,3-propanediol producers showed greater metabolic optimality than the wild-type strains and gene knockout mutants...... for the energetic status, while the amorphadiene producer was metabolically less optimal. For the optimal chemical production capacity, additional gene knockouts were most effective for the strain producing 1,3-propanediol, but not for the one producing 1,4-butanediol. These observations suggest that strains having...

  16. Metagenomic approach reveals microbial diversity and predictive microbial metabolic pathways in Yucha, a traditional Li fermented food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiachao; Wang, Xiaoru; Huo, Dongxue; Li, Wu; Hu, Qisong; Xu, Chuanbiao; Liu, Sixin; Li, Congfa

    2016-08-31

    Yucha is a typical traditional fermented food of the Li population in the Hainan province of China, and it is made up of cooked rice and fresh fish. In the present study, metagenomic approach and culture-dependent technology were applied to describe the diversity of microbiota and identify beneficial microbes in the Yucha. At the genus level, Lactobacillus was the most abundant genus (43.82% of the total reads), followed by Lactococcus, Enterococcus, Vibrio, Weissella, Pediococcus, Enterobacter, Salinivibrio, Acinetobacter, Macrococcus, Kluyvera and Clostridium; this result was confirmed by q-PCR. PCoA based on Weighted UniFrac distances showed an apparent clustering pattern for Yucha samples from different locations, and Lactobacillus sakei, Lactobacillus saniviri and Staphylococcus sciuri represented OTUs according to the major identified markers. At the microbial functional level, it was observed that there was an enrichment of metabolic functional features, including amino acid and carbohydrate metabolism, which implied that the microbial metabolism in the Yucha samples tended to be vigorous. Accordingly, we further investigated the correlation between the predominant microbes and metabolic functional features. Thirteen species of Lactobacillus (147 strains) were isolated, and Lactobacillus plantarum (60 isolates) and Lactobacillus pentosus (34 isolates) were isolated from every sample.

  17. Investigating the impact of microbial interactions with geologic media on geophysical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Caroline Ann

    The goals of this study were to investigate the effect of: (1) microbial metabolic byproducts, microbial growth, and biofilm formation on the low frequency electrical properties of porous media, (2) biofilm formation on acoustic wave properties, and (3) the natural electrical (self-potential) signatures associated with an in-situ biological permeable reactive barrier (PRB). The results suggest: (1) increases in electrolytic conductivity are consistent with increased concentrations of organic acids and biosurfactants; (2) mineral weathering promoted by organic acids causes increases in electrolytic conductivity, concomitant with increases in major cation concentrations; (3) interfacial conductivity generally parallels microbial cell concentrations and biofilm formation; (4) variations in microbial growth and biofilms causes spatiotemporal heterogeneity in the elastic properties of porous media; (5) SP signatures associated with the injection of groundwater into an in-situ biological PRB are dominated by diffusion potentials induced by the injections. The results suggest that electrolytic conductivity may be useful as an indicator of metabolism, while interfacial conductivity may be used as proxy indicator for microbial growth and biofilm formation in porous media. In addition, acoustic measurements may provide diagnostic spatiotemporal data for the validation of bioclogging models/simulations. Collectively, this study provides further evidence that geophysical measurements are sensitive to microbial-induced changes to geologic media, and may be useful for the detection and monitoring of subsurface microbial growth, activity, and distribution such as in microbial enhanced oil recovery, assessing biofilm barriers used for contaminant remediation, or as sealants for reservoirs in CO2 sequestration studies.

  18. Coupling Spatiotemporal Community Assembly Processes to Changes in Microbial Metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, Emily B.; Crump, Alex R.; Resch, Charles T.; Fansler, Sarah; Arntzen, Evan; Kennedy, David W.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Stegen, James C.

    2016-12-16

    Community assembly processes govern shifts in species abundances in response to environmental change, yet our understanding of assembly remains largely decoupled from ecosystem function. Here, we test hypotheses regarding assembly and function across space and time using hyporheic microbial communities as a model system. We pair sampling of two habitat types through hydrologic fluctuation with null modeling and multivariate statistics. We demonstrate that dual selective pressures assimilate to generate compositional changes at distinct timescales among habitat types, resulting in contrasting associations of Betaproteobacteria and Thaumarchaeota with selection and with seasonal changes in aerobic metabolism. Our results culminate in a conceptual model in which selection from contrasting environments regulates taxon abundance and ecosystem function through time, with increases in function when oscillating selection opposes stable selective pressures. Our model is applicable within both macrobial and microbial ecology and presents an avenue for assimilating community assembly processes into predictions of ecosystem function.

  19. Soil Microbial Community Contribution to Small Headwater Stream Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapcott, J. E.; Gooderham, J. P.; Barmuta, L. A.; Davies, P. E.

    2005-05-01

    The temporal dynamics of sediment respiration were examined in seven small headwater streams in forested catchments in 2004. A strong seasonal response was observed with higher respiration rates in depositional zones than in gravel runs. The data were also examined in the context of proportional habitat distributions that highlighted the importance of high flow events in shaping whole stream metabolic budgets. This study specifically examines the question of terrestrial soil respiration contribution to whole stream metabolism by the controlled inundation of terrestrial soils. The experiment included six experimentally inundated terrestrial zones, six terrestrial controls, and six in-stream depositional zones. Sediment bacterial respiration was measured using 14C leucine incorporation and cotton strip bioassays were also employed to provide an indicative measure of sediment microbial activity. Despite high variability and exhibiting significantly lower bacterial activity than in-stream sediments, modelling using flow data and habitat mapping illustrated the important contribution of terrestrial soil respiration to the whole stream metabolic budgets of small headwater streams. In addition, microbial community composition examined using phospholipid fatty acid analysis clearly differentiated between terrestrial and aquatic communities. Freshly inundated terrestrial communities remained similar to un-inundated controls after 28 days.

  20. Mechanistic links between gut microbial community dynamics, microbial functions and metabolic health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Connie WY; Lam, Yan Y; Holmes, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Gut microbes comprise a high density, biologically active community that lies at the interface of an animal with its nutritional environment. Consequently their activity profoundly influences many aspects of the physiology and metabolism of the host animal. A range of microbial structural components and metabolites directly interact with host intestinal cells and tissues to influence nutrient uptake and epithelial health. Endocrine, neuronal and lymphoid cells in the gut also integrate signals from these microbial factors to influence systemic responses. Dysregulation of these host-microbe interactions is now recognised as a major risk factor in the development of metabolic dysfunction. This is a two-way process and understanding the factors that tip host-microbiome homeostasis over to dysbiosis requires greater appreciation of the host feedbacks that contribute to regulation of microbial community composition. To date, numerous studies have employed taxonomic profiling approaches to explore the links between microbial composition and host outcomes (especially obesity and its comorbidities), but inconsistent host-microbe associations have been reported. Available data indicates multiple factors have contributed to discrepancies between studies. These include the high level of functional redundancy in host-microbiome interactions combined with individual variation in microbiome composition; differences in study design, diet composition and host system between studies; and inherent limitations to the resolution of rRNA-based community profiling. Accounting for these factors allows for recognition of the common microbial and host factors driving community composition and development of dysbiosis on high fat diets. New therapeutic intervention options are now emerging. PMID:25469018

  1. Metabolic modelling of polyhydroxyalkanoate copolymers production by mixed microbial cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reis Maria AM

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper presents a metabolic model describing the production of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA copolymers in mixed microbial cultures, using mixtures of acetic and propionic acid as carbon source material. Material and energetic balances were established on the basis of previously elucidated metabolic pathways. Equations were derived for the theoretical yields for cell growth and PHA production on mixtures of acetic and propionic acid as functions of the oxidative phosphorylation efficiency, P/O ratio. The oxidative phosphorylation efficiency was estimated from rate measurements, which in turn allowed the estimation of the theoretical yield coefficients. Results The model was validated with experimental data collected in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR operated under varying feeding conditions: feeding of acetic and propionic acid separately (control experiments, and the feeding of acetic and propionic acid simultaneously. Two different feast and famine culture enrichment strategies were studied: (i either with acetate or (ii with propionate as carbon source material. Metabolic flux analysis (MFA was performed for the different feeding conditions and culture enrichment strategies. Flux balance analysis (FBA was used to calculate optimal feeding scenarios for high quality PHA polymers production, where it was found that a suitable polymer would be obtained when acetate is fed in excess and the feeding rate of propionate is limited to ~0.17 C-mol/(C-mol.h. The results were compared with published pure culture metabolic studies. Conclusion Acetate was more conducive toward the enrichment of a microbial culture with higher PHA storage fluxes and yields as compared to propionate. The P/O ratio was not only influenced by the selected microbial culture, but also by the carbon substrate fed to each culture, where higher P/O ratio values were consistently observed for acetate than propionate. MFA studies suggest that when mixtures of

  2. Investigations on abundance and activity of microbial sponge symbionts using quantitative real - time PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumala, Lars; Hentschel, Ute; Bayer, Kristina

    Marine sponges are hosts to dense and diverse microbial consortia that are likely to play a key role in the metabolic processes of the host sponge due to their enormous abundance. Common symbioses between nitrogen transforming microorganisms and sponges indicate complex nitrogen cycling within...... the host. Of particular interest is determining the community structure and function of microbial symbionts in order to gain deeper insight into host-symbiont interactions. We investigated the abundance and activity of microbial symbionts in two Mediterranean sponge species using quantitative real-time PCR....... An absolute quantification of functional genes and transcripts in archaeal and bacterial symbionts was conducted to determine their involvement in nitrification and denitrification, comparing the low microbial abundance (LMA) sponge Dysidea avara with the high microbial abundance (HMA) representative Aplysina...

  3. Microbial production of antioxidant food ingredients via metabolic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuheng; Jain, Rachit; Yan, Yajun

    2014-04-01

    Antioxidants are biological molecules with the ability to protect vital metabolites from harmful oxidation. Due to this fascinating role, their beneficial effects on human health are of paramount importance. Traditional approaches using solvent-based extraction from food/non-food sources and chemical synthesis are often expensive, exhaustive, and detrimental to the environment. With the advent of metabolic engineering tools, the successful reconstitution of heterologous pathways in Escherichia coli and other microorganisms provides a more exciting and amenable alternative to meet the increasing demand of natural antioxidants. In this review, we elucidate the recent progress in metabolic engineering efforts for the microbial production of antioxidant food ingredients - polyphenols, carotenoids, and antioxidant vitamins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Balancing cellular redox metabolism in microbial electrosynthesis and electro fermentation - A chance for metabolic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kracke, Frauke; Lai, Bin; Yu, Shiqin; Krömer, Jens O

    2018-01-01

    More and more microbes are discovered that are capable of extracellular electron transfer, a process in which they use external electrodes as electron donors or acceptors for metabolic reactions. This feature can be used to overcome cellular redox limitations and thus optimizing microbial production. The technologies, termed microbial electrosynthesis and electro-fermentation, have the potential to open novel bio-electro production platforms from sustainable energy and carbon sources. However, the performance of reported systems is currently limited by low electron transport rates between microbes and electrodes and our limited ability for targeted engineering of these systems due to remaining knowledge gaps about the underlying fundamental processes. Metabolic engineering offers many opportunities to optimize these processes, for instance by genetic engineering of pathways for electron transfer on the one hand and target product synthesis on the other hand. With this review, we summarize the status quo of knowledge and engineering attempts around chemical production in bio-electrochemical systems from a microbe perspective. Challenges associated with the introduction or enhancement of extracellular electron transfer capabilities into production hosts versus the engineering of target compound synthesis pathways in natural exoelectrogens are discussed. Recent advances of the research community in both directions are examined critically. Further, systems biology approaches, for instance using metabolic modelling, are examined for their potential to provide insight into fundamental processes and to identify targets for metabolic engineering. Copyright © 2017 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Influence of Wastewater Discharge on the Metabolic Potential of the Microbial Community in River Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong; Sharp, Jonathan O; Drewes, Jörg E

    2016-01-01

    To reveal the variation of microbial community functions during water filtration process in river sediments, which has been utilized widely in natural water treatment systems, this study investigates the influence of municipal wastewater discharge to streams on the phylotype and metabolic potential of the microbiome in upstream and particularly various depths of downstream river sediments. Cluster analyses based on both microbial phylogenetic and functional data collectively revealed that shallow upstream sediments grouped with those from deeper subsurface downstream regions. These sediment samples were distinct from those found in shallow downstream sediments. Functional genes associated with carbohydrate, xenobiotic, and certain amino acid metabolisms were overrepresented in upstream and deep downstream samples. In contrast, the more immediate contact with wastewater discharge in shallow downstream samples resulted in an increase in the relative abundance of genes associated with nitrogen, sulfur, purine and pyrimidine metabolisms, as well as restriction-modification systems. More diverse bacterial phyla were associated with upstream and deep downstream sediments, mainly including Actinobacteria, Planctomycetes, and Firmicutes. In contrast, in shallow downstream sediments, genera affiliated with Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria were enriched with putative functions that included ammonia and sulfur oxidation, polyphosphate accumulation, and methylotrophic bacteria. Collectively, these results highlight the enhanced capabilities of microbial communities residing in deeper stream sediments for the transformation of water contaminants and thus provide a foundation for better design of natural water treatment systems to further improve the removal of contaminants.

  6. Influence of Wastewater Discharge on the Metabolic Potential of the Microbial Community in River Sediments

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Dong

    2015-09-24

    To reveal the variation of microbial community functions during water filtration process in river sediments, which has been utilized widely in natural water treatment systems, this study investigates the influence of municipal wastewater discharge to streams on the phylotype and metabolic potential of the microbiome in upstream and particularly various depths of downstream river sediments. Cluster analyses based on both microbial phylogenetic and functional data collectively revealed that shallow upstream sediments grouped with those from deeper subsurface downstream regions. These sediment samples were distinct from those found in shallow downstream sediments. Functional genes associated with carbohydrate, xenobiotic, and certain amino acid metabolisms were overrepresented in upstream and deep downstream samples. In contrast, the more immediate contact with wastewater discharge in shallow downstream samples resulted in an increase in the relative abundance of genes associated with nitrogen, sulfur, purine and pyrimidine metabolisms, as well as restriction–modification systems. More diverse bacterial phyla were associated with upstream and deep downstream sediments, mainly including Actinobacteria, Planctomycetes, and Firmicutes. In contrast, in shallow downstream sediments, genera affiliated with Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria were enriched with putative functions that included ammonia and sulfur oxidation, polyphosphate accumulation, and methylotrophic bacteria. Collectively, these results highlight the enhanced capabilities of microbial communities residing in deeper stream sediments for the transformation of water contaminants and thus provide a foundation for better design of natural water treatment systems to further improve the removal of contaminants. © 2015, Springer Science+Business Media New York.

  7. Impact of metabolism and growth phase on the hydrogen isotopic composition of microbial fatty acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzelmann, Sandra M.; Villanueva, Laura; Sinke-Schoen, Danielle; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Schouten, Stefan; van der Meer, Marcel T. J.

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms are involved in all elemental cycles and therefore it is important to study their metabolism in the natural environment. A recent technique to investigate this is the hydrogen isotopic composition of microbial fatty acids, i.e., heterotrophic microorganisms produce fatty acids enriched in deuterium (D) while photoautotrophic and chemoautotrophic microorganisms produce fatty acids depleted in D compared to the water in the culture medium (growth water). However, the impact of factors other than metabolism have not been investigated. Here, we evaluate the impact of growth phase compared to metabolism on the hydrogen isotopic composition of fatty acids of different environmentally relevant microorganisms with heterotrophic, photoautotrophic and chemoautotrophic metabolisms. Fatty acids produced by heterotrophs are enriched in D compared to growth water with εlipid/water between 82 and 359‰ when grown on glucose or acetate, respectively. Photoautotrophs (εlipid/water between −149 and −264‰) and chemoautotrophs (εlipid/water between −217 and −275‰) produce fatty acids depleted in D. Fatty acids become, in general, enriched by between 4 and 46‰ with growth phase which is minor compared to the influence of metabolisms. Therefore, the D/H ratio of fatty acids is a promising tool to investigate community metabolisms in nature. PMID:26005437

  8. Metabolic and demographic feedbacks shape the emergent spatial structure and function of microbial communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Estrela

    Full Text Available Microbes are predominantly found in surface-attached and spatially structured polymicrobial communities. Within these communities, microbial cells excrete a wide range of metabolites, setting the stage for interspecific metabolic interactions. The links, however, between metabolic and ecological interactions (functional relationships, and species spatial organization (structural relationships are still poorly understood. Here, we use an individual-based modelling framework to simulate the growth of a two-species surface-attached community where food (resource is traded for detoxification (service and investigate how metabolic constraints of individual species shape the emergent structural and functional relationships of the community. We show that strong metabolic interdependence drives the emergence of mutualism, robust interspecific mixing, and increased community productivity. Specifically, we observed a striking and highly stable emergent lineage branching pattern, generating a persistent lineage mixing that was absent when the metabolic exchange was removed. These emergent community properties are driven by demographic feedbacks, such that aid from neighbouring cells directly enhances focal cell growth, which in turn feeds back to neighbour fecundity. In contrast, weak metabolic interdependence drives conflict (exploitation or competition, and in turn greater interspecific segregation. Together, these results support the idea that species structural and functional relationships represent the net balance of metabolic interdependencies.

  9. Shifts in coastal sediment oxygenation cause pronounced changes in microbial community composition and associated metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broman, Elias; Sjöstedt, Johanna; Pinhassi, Jarone; Dopson, Mark

    2017-08-09

    A key characteristic of eutrophication in coastal seas is the expansion of hypoxic bottom waters, often referred to as 'dead zones'. One proposed remediation strategy for coastal dead zones in the Baltic Sea is to mix the water column using pump stations, circulating oxygenated water to the sea bottom. Although microbial metabolism in the sediment surface is recognized as key in regulating bulk chemical fluxes, it remains unknown how the microbial community and its metabolic processes are influenced by shifts in oxygen availability. Here, coastal Baltic Sea sediments sampled from oxic and anoxic sites, plus an intermediate area subjected to episodic oxygenation, were experimentally exposed to oxygen shifts. Chemical, 16S rRNA gene, metagenomic, and metatranscriptomic analyses were conducted to investigate changes in chemistry fluxes, microbial community structure, and metabolic functions in the sediment surface. Compared to anoxic controls, oxygenation of anoxic sediment resulted in a proliferation of bacterial populations in the facultative anaerobic genus Sulfurovum that are capable of oxidizing toxic sulfide. Furthermore, the oxygenated sediment had higher amounts of RNA transcripts annotated as sqr, fccB, and dsrA involved in sulfide oxidation. In addition, the importance of cryptic sulfur cycling was highlighted by the oxidative genes listed above as well as dsvA, ttrB, dmsA, and ddhAB that encode reductive processes being identified in anoxic and intermediate sediments turned oxic. In particular, the intermediate site sediments responded differently upon oxygenation compared to the anoxic and oxic site sediments. This included a microbial community composition with more habitat generalists, lower amounts of RNA transcripts attributed to methane oxidation, and a reduced rate of organic matter degradation. These novel data emphasize that genetic expression analyses has the power to identify key molecular mechanisms that regulate microbial community responses

  10. Does canine inflammatory bowel disease influence gut microbial profile and host metabolism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jia; Verbrugghe, Adronie; Lourenço, Marta; Janssens, Geert P J; Liu, Daisy J X; Van de Wiele, Tom; Eeckhaut, Venessa; Van Immerseel, Filip; Van de Maele, Isabel; Niu, Yufeng; Bosch, Guido; Junius, Greet; Wuyts, Brigitte; Hesta, Myriam

    2016-06-16

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) refers to a diverse group of chronic gastrointestinal diseases, and gut microbial dysbiosis has been proposed as a modulating factor in its pathogenesis. Several studies have investigated the gut microbial ecology of dogs with IBD but it is yet unclear if this microbial profile can alter the nutrient metabolism of the host. The aim of the present study was to characterize the faecal bacterial profile and functionality as well as to determine host metabolic changes in IBD dogs. Twenty-three dogs diagnosed with IBD and ten healthy control dogs were included. Dogs with IBD were given a clinical score using the canine chronic enteropathy clinical activity index (CCECAI). Faecal short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) and ammonia concentrations were measured and quantitative PCR was performed. The concentration of plasma amino acids, acylcarnitines, serum folate, cobalamin, and indoxyl sulfate was determined. No significant differences in the abundance of a selection of bacterial groups and fermentation metabolites were observed between the IBD and control groups. However, significant negative correlations were found between CCECAI and the faecal proportion of Lactobacillus as well as between CCECAI and total SCFA concentration. Serum folate and plasma citrulline were decreased and plasma valine was increased in IBD compared to control dogs. Increased plasma free carnitine and total acylcarnitines were observed in IBD compared with control dogs, whereas short-chain acylcarnitines (butyrylcarnitine + isobutyrylcarnitine and, methylmalonylcarnitine) to free carnitine ratios decreased. Dogs with IBD had a higher 3-hydroxyisovalerylcarnitine + isovalerylcarnitine to leucine ratio compared to control dogs. Canine IBD induced a wide range of changes in metabolic profile, especially for the plasma concentrations of short-chain acylcarnitines and amino acids, which could have evolved from tissue damage and alteration in host metabolism. In

  11. Structural and metabolic responses of microbial community to sewage-borne chlorpyrifos in constructed wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dan; Wang, Chuan; Zhang, Liping; Xu, Dong; Liu, Biyun; Zhou, Qiaohong; Wu, Zhenbin

    2016-06-01

    Long-term use of chlorpyrifos poses a potential threat to the environment that cannot be ignored, yet little is known about the succession of substrate microbial communities in constructed wetlands (CWs) under chlorpyrifos stress. Six pilot-scale CW systems receiving artificial wastewater containing 1mg/L chlorpyrifos were established to investigate the effects of chlorpyrifos and wetland vegetation on the microbial metabolism pattern of carbon sources and community structure, using BIOLOG and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) approaches. Based on our samples, BIOLOG showed that Shannon diversity (H') and richness (S) values distinctly increased after 30days when chlorpyrifos was added. At the same time, differences between the vegetated and the non-vegetated systems disappeared. DGGE profiles indicated that H' and S had no significant differences among four different treatments. The effect of chlorpyrifos on the microbial community was mainly reflected at the physiological level. Principal component analysis (PCA) of both BIOLOG and DGGE showed that added chlorpyrifos made a difference on test results. Meanwhile, there was no difference between the vegetation and no-vegetation treatments after addition of chlorpyrifos at the physiological level. Moreover, the vegetation had no significant effect on the microbial community at the genetic level. Comparisons were made between bacteria in this experiment and other known chlorpyrifos-degrading bacteria. The potential chlorpyrifos-degrading ability of bacteria in situ may be considerable. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. MbT-Tool: An open-access tool based on Thermodynamic Electron Equivalents Model to obtain microbial-metabolic reactions to be used in biotechnological process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Pablo Granda; Gras, Anna; Ginovart, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Modelling cellular metabolism is a strategic factor in investigating microbial behaviour and interactions, especially for bio-technological processes. A key factor for modelling microbial activity is the calculation of nutrient amounts and products generated as a result of the microbial metabolism. Representing metabolic pathways through balanced reactions is a complex and time-consuming task for biologists, ecologists, modellers and engineers. A new computational tool to represent microbial pathways through microbial metabolic reactions (MMRs) using the approach of the Thermodynamic Electron Equivalents Model has been designed and implemented in the open-access framework NetLogo. This computational tool, called MbT-Tool (Metabolism based on Thermodynamics) can write MMRs for different microbial functional groups, such as aerobic heterotrophs, nitrifiers, denitrifiers, methanogens, sulphate reducers, sulphide oxidizers and fermenters. The MbT-Tool's code contains eighteen organic and twenty inorganic reduction-half-reactions, four N-sources (NH4 (+), NO3 (-), NO2 (-), N2) to biomass synthesis and twenty-four microbial empirical formulas, one of which can be determined by the user (CnHaObNc). MbT-Tool is an open-source program capable of writing MMRs based on thermodynamic concepts, which are applicable in a wide range of academic research interested in designing, optimizing and modelling microbial activity without any extensive chemical, microbiological and programing experience.

  13. MbT-Tool: An open-access tool based on Thermodynamic Electron Equivalents Model to obtain microbial-metabolic reactions to be used in biotechnological process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Araujo Granda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Modelling cellular metabolism is a strategic factor in investigating microbial behaviour and interactions, especially for bio-technological processes. A key factor for modelling microbial activity is the calculation of nutrient amounts and products generated as a result of the microbial metabolism. Representing metabolic pathways through balanced reactions is a complex and time-consuming task for biologists, ecologists, modellers and engineers. A new computational tool to represent microbial pathways through microbial metabolic reactions (MMRs using the approach of the Thermodynamic Electron Equivalents Model has been designed and implemented in the open-access framework NetLogo. This computational tool, called MbT-Tool (Metabolism based on Thermodynamics can write MMRs for different microbial functional groups, such as aerobic heterotrophs, nitrifiers, denitrifiers, methanogens, sulphate reducers, sulphide oxidizers and fermenters. The MbT-Tool's code contains eighteen organic and twenty inorganic reduction-half-reactions, four N-sources (NH4+, NO3−, NO2−, N2 to biomass synthesis and twenty-four microbial empirical formulas, one of which can be determined by the user (CnHaObNc. MbT-Tool is an open-source program capable of writing MMRs based on thermodynamic concepts, which are applicable in a wide range of academic research interested in designing, optimizing and modelling microbial activity without any extensive chemical, microbiological and programing experience.

  14. Rumen microbial communities influence metabolic phenotypes in lambs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego P. Morgavi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The rumen microbiota is an essential part of ruminants forging their nutrition and health. Despite its importance, it is not fully understood how various groups of rumen microbes affect host-microbe relationships and functions. The aim of the study was to simultaneously explore the rumen microbiota and the metabolic phenotype of lambs for identifying host-microbe associations and potential biomarkers of digestive functions. Twin lambs, separated in two groups after birth were exposed to practices (isolation and gavage with rumen fluid with protozoa or protozoa-depleted that differentially restricted the acquisition of microbes. Rumen microbiota, fermentation parameters, digestibility and growth were monitored for up to 31 weeks of age. Microbiota assembled in isolation from other ruminants lacked protozoa and had low bacterial and archaeal diversity whereas digestibility was not affected. Exposure to adult sheep microbiota increased bacterial and archaeal diversity independently of protozoa presence. For archaea, Methanomassiliicoccales displaced Methanosphaera. Notwithstanding, protozoa induced differences in functional traits such as digestibility and significantly shaped bacterial community structure, notably Ruminococcaceae and Lachnospiraceae lower up to 6 folds, Prevotellaceae lower by ~40%, and Clostridiaceae and Veillonellaceae higher up to 10 folds compared to microbiota without protozoa. An orthogonal partial least squares-discriminant analysis of urinary metabolome matched differences in microbiota structure. Discriminant metabolites were mainly involved in amino acids and protein metabolic pathways while a negative interaction was observed between methylotrophic methanogens Methanomassiliicoccales and trimethylamine N-oxide. These results stress the influence of gut microbes on animal phenotype and show the potential of metabolomics for monitoring rumen microbial functions.

  15. Compartmentalized metabolic network reconstruction of microbial communities to determine the effect of agricultural intervention on soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Yela, Astrid Catalina; Gómez-Cano, Fabio; Zambrano, María Mercedes; Husserl, Johana; Danies, Giovanna; Restrepo, Silvia; González-Barrios, Andrés Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Soil microbial communities are responsible for a wide range of ecological processes and have an important economic impact in agriculture. Determining the metabolic processes performed by microbial communities is crucial for understanding and managing ecosystem properties. Metagenomic approaches allow the elucidation of the main metabolic processes that determine the performance of microbial communities under different environmental conditions and perturbations. Here we present the first compartmentalized metabolic reconstruction at a metagenomics scale of a microbial ecosystem. This systematic approach conceives a meta-organism without boundaries between individual organisms and allows the in silico evaluation of the effect of agricultural intervention on soils at a metagenomics level. To characterize the microbial ecosystems, topological properties, taxonomic and metabolic profiles, as well as a Flux Balance Analysis (FBA) were considered. Furthermore, topological and optimization algorithms were implemented to carry out the curation of the models, to ensure the continuity of the fluxes between the metabolic pathways, and to confirm the metabolite exchange between subcellular compartments. The proposed models provide specific information about ecosystems that are generally overlooked in non-compartmentalized or non-curated networks, like the influence of transport reactions in the metabolic processes, especially the important effect on mitochondrial processes, as well as provide more accurate results of the fluxes used to optimize the metabolic processes within the microbial community. PMID:28767679

  16. Compartmentalized metabolic network reconstruction of microbial communities to determine the effect of agricultural intervention on soils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Camila Alvarez-Silva

    Full Text Available Soil microbial communities are responsible for a wide range of ecological processes and have an important economic impact in agriculture. Determining the metabolic processes performed by microbial communities is crucial for understanding and managing ecosystem properties. Metagenomic approaches allow the elucidation of the main metabolic processes that determine the performance of microbial communities under different environmental conditions and perturbations. Here we present the first compartmentalized metabolic reconstruction at a metagenomics scale of a microbial ecosystem. This systematic approach conceives a meta-organism without boundaries between individual organisms and allows the in silico evaluation of the effect of agricultural intervention on soils at a metagenomics level. To characterize the microbial ecosystems, topological properties, taxonomic and metabolic profiles, as well as a Flux Balance Analysis (FBA were considered. Furthermore, topological and optimization algorithms were implemented to carry out the curation of the models, to ensure the continuity of the fluxes between the metabolic pathways, and to confirm the metabolite exchange between subcellular compartments. The proposed models provide specific information about ecosystems that are generally overlooked in non-compartmentalized or non-curated networks, like the influence of transport reactions in the metabolic processes, especially the important effect on mitochondrial processes, as well as provide more accurate results of the fluxes used to optimize the metabolic processes within the microbial community.

  17. Investigation of microbial-mineral interactions by Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawicki, J.A.; Brown, D.A.

    1998-01-01

    Moessbauer spectroscopy was used to investigate the reactions of microbes with iron minerals in aqueous solutions and as components of rocks in banded iron formations and granite. A microbial biofilm that formed on a wall of an excavated granite vault in a deep underground laboratory initiated this research. At the aerobic face of the biofilm, iron was found in a form of ferrihydrite; in the anaerobic face against the rock, iron was found as very small siderite particles. Laboratory incubations of the biofilm microbial consortium showed different mineral species could be formed. When the microbial consortium from the biofilm was incubated with magnetite grains, up to about 10% of the iron was altered in three weeks to hematite. The ability of the consortium to precipitate iron both as Fe 2+ and Fe 3+ in close proximity may have a bearing on the deposition of banded iron formations. These reactions could also be important in microbially induced corrosion

  18. Integrative investigation of metabolic and transcriptomic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Önsan Z İlsen

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background New analysis methods are being developed to integrate data from transcriptome, proteome, interactome, metabolome, and other investigative approaches. At the same time, existing methods are being modified to serve the objectives of systems biology and permit the interpretation of the huge datasets currently being generated by high-throughput methods. Results Transcriptomic and metabolic data from chemostat fermentors were collected with the aim of investigating the relationship between these two data sets. The variation in transcriptome data in response to three physiological or genetic perturbations (medium composition, growth rate, and specific gene deletions was investigated using linear modelling, and open reading-frames (ORFs whose expression changed significantly in response to these perturbations were identified. Assuming that the metabolic profile is a function of the transcriptome profile, expression levels of the different ORFs were used to model the metabolic variables via Partial Least Squares (Projection to Latent Structures – PLS using PLS toolbox in Matlab. Conclusion The experimental design allowed the analyses to discriminate between the effects which the growth medium, dilution rate, and the deletion of specific genes had on the transcriptome and metabolite profiles. Metabolite data were modelled as a function of the transcriptome to determine their congruence. The genes that are involved in central carbon metabolism of yeast cells were found to be the ORFs with the most significant contribution to the model.

  19. Microbial population heterogeneity versus bioreactor heterogeneity: evaluation of Redox Sensor Green as an exogenous metabolic biosensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baert, Jonathan; Delepierre, Anissa; Telek, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Microbial heterogeneity in metabolic performances has attracted a lot of attention, considering its potential impact on industrial bioprocesses. However, little is known about the impact of extracellular perturbations (i.e. bioreactor heterogeneity) on cell-to-cell variability in metabolic...

  20. Metabolic network modeling of microbial interactions in natural and engineered environmental systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavio ePerez-Garcia

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We review approaches to characterize metabolic interactions within microbial communities using Stoichiometric Metabolic Network (SMN models for applications in environmental and industrial biotechnology. SMN models are computational tools used to evaluate the metabolic engineering potential of various organisms. They have successfully been applied to design and optimize the microbial production of antibiotics, alcohols and amino acids by single strains. To date however, such models have been rarely applied to analyze and control the metabolism of more complex microbial communities. This is largely attributed to the diversity of microbial community functions, metabolisms and interactions. Here, we firstly review different types of microbial interaction and describe their relevance for natural and engineered environmental processes. Next, we provide a general description of the essential methods of the SMN modeling workflow including the steps of network reconstruction, simulation through Flux Balance Analysis (FBA, experimental data gathering, and model calibration. Then we broadly describe and compare four approaches to model microbial interactions using metabolic networks, i.e. i lumped networks, ii compartment per guild networks, iii bi-level optimization simulations and iv dynamic-SMN methods. These approaches can be used to integrate and analyze diverse microbial physiology, ecology and molecular community data. All of them (except the lumped approach are suitable for incorporating species abundance data but so far they have been used only to model simple communities of two to eight different species. Interactions based on substrate exchange and competition can be directly modeled using the above approaches. However, interactions based on metabolic feedbacks, such as product inhibition and synthropy require extensions to current models, incorporating gene regulation and compounding accumulation mechanisms. SMN models of microbial

  1. Water type and irrigation time effects on microbial metabolism of a soil cultivated with Bermuda-grass Tifton 85

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    Sandra Furlan Nogueira

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the microbial metabolism in Bermuda-grass Tifton 85 areas after potable-water and effluent irrigation treatments. The experiment was carried out in Lins/SP with samples taken in the rainy and dry seasons (2006 after one year and three years of irrigation management, and set up on an entirely randomized block design with four treatments: C (control, without irrigation or fertilization, PW (potable water + 520 kg of N ha-1 year-1; TE3 and TE0 (treated effluent + 520 kg of N ha-1 year-1 for three years and one year, respectively. The parameters determined were: microbial biomass carbon, microbial activity, and metabolic quotient. Irrigation with wastewater after three years indicated no alteration in soil quality for C and ET3; for PW, a negative impact on soil quality (microbial biomass decrease suggested that water-potable irrigation in Lins is not an adequate option. Microbial activity alterations observed in TE0 characterize a priming effect.

  2. GENOME-BASED MODELING AND DESIGN OF METABOLIC INTERACTIONS IN MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhakrishnan Mahadevan

    2012-10-01

    With the advent of genome sequencing, omics technologies, bioinformatics and genome-scale modeling, researchers now have unprecedented capabilities to analyze and engineer the metabolism of microbial communities. The goal of this review is to summarize recent applications of genome-scale metabolic modeling to microbial communities. A brief introduction to lumped community models is used to motivate the need for genome-level descriptions of individual species and their metabolic interactions. The review of genome-scale models begins with static modeling approaches, which are appropriate for communities where the extracellular environment can be assumed to be time invariant or slowly varying. Dynamic extensions of the static modeling approach are described, and then applications of genome-scale models for design of synthetic microbial communities are reviewed. The review concludes with a summary of metagenomic tools for analyzing community metabolism and an outlook for future research.

  3. Unique Microbial Diversity and Metabolic Pathway Features of Fermented Vegetables From Hainan, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Qiannan; Jiang, Shuaiming; Chen, Jieling; Ma, Chenchen; Huo, Dongxue; Shao, Yuyu; Zhang, Jiachao

    2018-01-01

    Fermented vegetables are typically traditional foods made of fresh vegetables and their juices, which are fermented by beneficial microorganisms. Herein, we applied high-throughput sequencing and culture-dependent technology to describe the diversities of microbiota and identify core microbiota in fermented vegetables from different areas of Hainan Province, and abundant metabolic pathways in the fermented vegetables were simultaneously predicted. At the genus level, Lactobacillus bacteria were the most abundant. Lactobacillus plantarum was the most abundant species, followed by Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus pentosaceus, and Weissella cibaria. These species were present in each sample with average absolute content values greater than 1% and were thus defined as core microbiota. Analysis results based on the alpha and beta diversities of the microbial communities showed that the microbial profiles of the fermented vegetables differed significantly based on the regions and raw materials used, and the species of the vegetables had a greater effect on the microbial community structure than the region from where they were harvested. Regarding microbial functional metabolism, we observed an enrichment of metabolic pathways, including membrane transport, replication and repair and translation, which implied that the microbial metabolism in the fermented vegetables tended to be vigorous. In addition, Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus fermentum were calculated to be major metabolic pathway contributors. Finally, we constructed a network to better explain correlations among the core microbiota and metabolic pathways. This study facilitates an understanding of the differences in microbial profiles and fermentation pathways involved in the production of fermented vegetables, establishes a basis for optimally selecting microorganisms to manufacture high-quality fermented vegetable products, and lays the foundation for better utilizing tropical microbial

  4. Unique Microbial Diversity and Metabolic Pathway Features of Fermented Vegetables From Hainan, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiannan Peng

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Fermented vegetables are typically traditional foods made of fresh vegetables and their juices, which are fermented by beneficial microorganisms. Herein, we applied high-throughput sequencing and culture-dependent technology to describe the diversities of microbiota and identify core microbiota in fermented vegetables from different areas of Hainan Province, and abundant metabolic pathways in the fermented vegetables were simultaneously predicted. At the genus level, Lactobacillus bacteria were the most abundant. Lactobacillus plantarum was the most abundant species, followed by Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus pentosaceus, and Weissella cibaria. These species were present in each sample with average absolute content values greater than 1% and were thus defined as core microbiota. Analysis results based on the alpha and beta diversities of the microbial communities showed that the microbial profiles of the fermented vegetables differed significantly based on the regions and raw materials used, and the species of the vegetables had a greater effect on the microbial community structure than the region from where they were harvested. Regarding microbial functional metabolism, we observed an enrichment of metabolic pathways, including membrane transport, replication and repair and translation, which implied that the microbial metabolism in the fermented vegetables tended to be vigorous. In addition, Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus fermentum were calculated to be major metabolic pathway contributors. Finally, we constructed a network to better explain correlations among the core microbiota and metabolic pathways. This study facilitates an understanding of the differences in microbial profiles and fermentation pathways involved in the production of fermented vegetables, establishes a basis for optimally selecting microorganisms to manufacture high-quality fermented vegetable products, and lays the foundation for better utilizing

  5. Variation in antibiotic-induced microbial recolonization impacts on the host metabolic phenotypes of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swann, Jonathan R; Tuohy, Kieran M; Lindfors, Peter; Brown, Duncan T; Gibson, Glenn R; Wilson, Ian D; Sidaway, James; Nicholson, Jeremy K; Holmes, Elaine

    2011-08-05

    The interaction between the gut microbiota and their mammalian host is known to have far-reaching consequences with respect to metabolism and health. We investigated the effects of eight days of oral antibiotic exposure (penicillin and streptomycin sulfate) on gut microbial composition and host metabolic phenotype in male Han-Wistar rats (n = 6) compared to matched controls. Early recolonization was assessed in a third group exposed to antibiotics for four days followed by four days recovery (n = 6). Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of the intestinal contents collected at eight days showed a significant reduction in all bacterial groups measured (control, 10(10.7) cells/g feces; antibiotic-treated, 10(8.4)). Bacterial suppression reduced the excretion of mammalian-microbial urinary cometabolites including hippurate, phenylpropionic acid, phenylacetylglycine and indoxyl-sulfate whereas taurine, glycine, citrate, 2-oxoglutarate, and fumarate excretion was elevated. While total bacterial counts remained notably lower in the recolonized animals (10(9.1) cells/g faeces) compared to the controls, two cage-dependent subgroups emerged with Lactobacillus/Enterococcus probe counts dominant in one subgroup. This dichotomous profile manifested in the metabolic phenotypes with subgroup differences in tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolites and indoxyl-sulfate excretion. Fecal short chain fatty acids were diminished in all treated animals. Antibiotic treatment induced a profound effect on the microbiome structure, which was reflected in the metabotype. Moreover, the recolonization process was sensitive to the microenvironment, which may impact on understanding downstream consequences of antibiotic consumption in human populations.

  6. Towards the understanding of microbial metabolism in relation to microbial enhanced oil recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halim, Amalia Yunita; Nielsen, Sidsel Marie; Nielsen, Kristian Fog

    2017-01-01

    In this study, Bacillus licheniformis 421 was used as a model organism to understand the effects of microbial cell growth and metabolite production under anaerobic conditions in relation to microbial enhanced oil recovery. The bacterium was able to grow anaerobically on different carbon compounds...

  7. Metabolic engineering for the microbial production of isoprenoids: Carotenoids and isoprenoid-based biofuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Xing Niu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Isoprenoids are the most abundant and highly diverse group of natural products. Many isoprenoids have been used for pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals, flavors, cosmetics, food additives and biofuels. Carotenoids and isoprenoid-based biofuels are two classes of important isoprenoids. These isoprenoids have been produced microbially through metabolic engineering and synthetic biology efforts. Herein, we briefly review the engineered biosynthetic pathways in well-characterized microbial systems for the production of carotenoids and several isoprenoid-based biofuels.

  8. An integrated study to analyze soil microbial community structure and metabolic potential in two forest types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuguang; Cong, Jing; Lu, Hui; Yang, Caiyun; Yang, Yunfeng; Zhou, Jizhong; Li, Diqiang

    2014-01-01

    Soil microbial metabolic potential and ecosystem function have received little attention owing to difficulties in methodology. In this study, we selected natural mature forest and natural secondary forest and analyzed the soil microbial community and metabolic potential combing the high-throughput sequencing and GeoChip technologies. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA sequencing showed that one known archaeal phylum and 15 known bacterial phyla as well as unclassified phylotypes were presented in these forest soils, and Acidobacteria, Protecobacteria, and Actinobacteria were three of most abundant phyla. The detected microbial functional gene groups were related to different biogeochemical processes, including carbon degradation, carbon fixation, methane metabolism, nitrogen cycling, phosphorus utilization, sulfur cycling, etc. The Shannon index for detected functional gene probes was significantly higher (PThe regression analysis showed that a strong positive (Pthe soil microbial functional gene diversity and phylogenetic diversity. Mantel test showed that soil oxidizable organic carbon, soil total nitrogen and cellulose, glucanase, and amylase activities were significantly linked (Pthe relative abundance of corresponded functional gene groups. Variance partitioning analysis showed that a total of 81.58% of the variation in community structure was explained by soil chemical factors, soil temperature, and plant diversity. Therefore, the positive link of soil microbial structure and composition to functional activity related to ecosystem functioning was existed, and the natural secondary forest soil may occur the high microbial metabolic potential. Although the results can't directly reflect the actual microbial populations and functional activities, this study provides insight into the potential activity of the microbial community and associated feedback responses of the terrestrial ecosystem to environmental changes.

  9. Kinetic modeling of microbially-driven redox chemistry of radionuclides in subsurface environments: Coupling transport, microbial metabolism and geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WANG,YIFENG; PAPENGUTH,HANS W.

    2000-05-04

    Microbial degradation of organic matter is a driving force in many subsurface geochemical systems, and therefore may have significant impacts on the fate of radionuclides released into subsurface environments. In this paper, the authors present a general reaction-transport model for microbial metabolism, redox chemistry, and radionuclide migration in subsurface systems. The model explicitly accounts for biomass accumulation and the coupling of radionuclide redox reactions with major biogeochemical processes. Based on the consideration that the biomass accumulation in subsurface environments is likely to achieve a quasi-steady state, they have accordingly modified the traditional microbial growth kinetic equation. They justified the use of the biogeochemical models without the explicit representation of biomass accumulation, if the interest of modeling is in the net impact of microbial reactions on geochemical processes. They then applied their model to a scenario in which an oxic water flow containing both uranium and completing organic ligands is recharged into an oxic aquifer in a carbonate formation. The model simulation shows that uranium can be reduced and therefore immobilized in the anoxic zone created by microbial degradation.

  10. Kinetic modeling of microbially-driven redox chemistry of radionuclides in subsurface environments: Coupling transport, microbial metabolism and geochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yifeng; Papenguth, Hans W.

    2000-01-01

    Microbial degradation of organic matter is a driving force in many subsurface geochemical systems, and therefore may have significant impacts on the fate of radionuclides released into subsurface environments. In this paper, the authors present a general reaction-transport model for microbial metabolism, redox chemistry, and radionuclide migration in subsurface systems. The model explicitly accounts for biomass accumulation and the coupling of radionuclide redox reactions with major biogeochemical processes. Based on the consideration that the biomass accumulation in subsurface environments is likely to achieve a quasi-steady state, they have accordingly modified the traditional microbial growth kinetic equation. They justified the use of the biogeochemical models without the explicit representation of biomass accumulation, if the interest of modeling is in the net impact of microbial reactions on geochemical processes. They then applied their model to a scenario in which an oxic water flow containing both uranium and completing organic ligands is recharged into an oxic aquifer in a carbonate formation. The model simulation shows that uranium can be reduced and therefore immobilized in the anoxic zone created by microbial degradation

  11. Succession of the functional microbial communities and the metabolic functions in maize straw composting process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Huawei; Wang, Liuhong; Hassan, Muhammad; Xie, Bing

    2018-05-01

    Illumina MiSeq sequencing and phylogenetic investigation of communities by reconstruction of unobserved states (PICRUSt) were applied to study the dynamic changes and effects of microbial community structures as well as the metabolic function of bacterial community in maize straw composting process. Results showed that humic acid contents in loosely combined humus (HA1) and stably combined humus (HA2) increased after composting and Staphylococcus, Cellulosimicrobium and Ochrobactrum possibly participated in the transformation of the process. The bacterial communities differed in different stages of the composting. Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria were reported the dominant phyla throughout the process and the relative abundance of the dominant phyla varied significantly (p composting. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Nitrification-driven forms of nitrogen metabolism in microbial mat communities thriving along an ammonium-enriched subsurface geothermal stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizawa, Manabu; Koba, Keisuke; Makabe, Akiko; Yoshida, Naohiro; Kaneko, Masanori; Hirao, Shingo; Ishibashi, Jun-ichiro; Yamanaka, Toshiro; Shibuya, Takazo; Kikuchi, Tohru; Hirai, Miho; Miyazaki, Junichi; Nunoura, Takuro; Takai, Ken

    2013-07-01

    We report here the concurrence and interaction among forms of nitrogen metabolism in thermophilic microbial mat communities that developed in an ammonium-abundant subsurface geothermal stream. First, the physical and chemical conditions of the stream water at several representative microbial mat habitats (including upper, middle and downstream sites) were characterized. A thermodynamic calculation using these physical and chemical conditions predicted that nitrification consisting of ammonia and nitrite oxidations would provide one of the largest energy yields of chemolithotrophic metabolisms. Second, near-complete prokaryotic 16S rRNA gene clone analysis was conducted for representative microbial mat communities at the upper, middle and downstream sites. The results indicated a dynamic shift in the 16S rRNA gene phylotype composition through physical and chemical variations of the stream water. The predominant prokaryotic components varied from phylotypes related to hydrogeno (H2)- and thio (S)-trophic Aquificales, thermophilic methanotrophs and putative ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA) located upstream (72 °C) to the phylotypes affiliated with putative AOA and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) located at the middle and downstream sites (65 and 57 °C, respectively). In addition, the potential in situ metabolic activities of different forms of nitrogen metabolism were estimated through laboratory experiments using bulk microbial mat communities. Finally, the compositional and isotopic variation in nitrogen compounds was investigated in the stream water flowing over the microbial mats and in the interstitial water inside the mats. Although the stream water was characterized by a gradual decrease in the total ammonia concentration (ΣNH3: the sum of ammonia and ammonium concentrations) and a gradual increase in the total concentration of nitrite and nitrate (NO2- + NO3-), the total inorganic nitrogen concentration (TIN: the sum of ΣNH3, NO2- and NO3- concentrations

  13. Nanoscale zero-valent iron/persulfate enhanced upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor for dye removal: Insight into microbial metabolism and microbial community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Fei; Zhong, Xiaohan; Xia, Dongsheng; Yin, Xianze; Li, Fan; Zhao, Dongye; Ji, Haodong; Liu, Wen

    2017-03-01

    This study investigated the efficiency of nanoscale zero-valent iron combined with persulfate (NZVI/PS) for enhanced degradation of brilliant red X-3B in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor, and examined the effects of NZVI/PS on anaerobic microbial communities during the treatment process. The addition of NZVI (0.5 g/L) greatly enhanced the decolourization rate of X-3B from 63.8% to 98.4%. The Biolog EcoPlateTM technique was utilized to examine microbial metabolism in the reactor, and the Illumina MiSeq high-throughput sequencing revealed 22 phyla and 88 genera of the bacteria. The largest genera (Lactococcus) decreased from 33.03% to 7.94%, while the Akkermansia genera increased from 1.69% to 20.23% according to the abundance in the presence of 0.2 g/L NZVI during the biological treatment process. Meanwhile, three strains were isolated from the sludge in the UASB reactors and identified by 16 S rRNA analysis. The distribution of three strains was consistent with the results from the Illumina MiSeq high throughput sequencing. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results indicated that Fe(0) was transformed into Fe(II)/Fe(III) during the treatment process, which are beneficial for the microorganism growth, and thus promoting their metabolic processes and microbial community.

  14. Nanoscale zero-valent iron/persulfate enhanced upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor for dye removal: Insight into microbial metabolism and microbial community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Fei; Zhong, Xiaohan; Xia, Dongsheng; Yin, Xianze; Li, Fan; Zhao, Dongye; Ji, Haodong; Liu, Wen

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the efficiency of nanoscale zero-valent iron combined with persulfate (NZVI/PS) for enhanced degradation of brilliant red X-3B in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor, and examined the effects of NZVI/PS on anaerobic microbial communities during the treatment process. The addition of NZVI (0.5 g/L) greatly enhanced the decolourization rate of X-3B from 63.8% to 98.4%. The Biolog EcoPlateTM technique was utilized to examine microbial metabolism in the reactor, and the Illumina MiSeq high-throughput sequencing revealed 22 phyla and 88 genera of the bacteria. The largest genera (Lactococcus) decreased from 33.03% to 7.94%, while the Akkermansia genera increased from 1.69% to 20.23% according to the abundance in the presence of 0.2 g/L NZVI during the biological treatment process. Meanwhile, three strains were isolated from the sludge in the UASB reactors and identified by 16 S rRNA analysis. The distribution of three strains was consistent with the results from the Illumina MiSeq high throughput sequencing. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results indicated that Fe(0) was transformed into Fe(II)/Fe(III) during the treatment process, which are beneficial for the microorganism growth, and thus promoting their metabolic processes and microbial community. PMID:28300176

  15. Characterization of microbial metabolism of Syrah grape products in an in vitro colon model using targeted and non-targeted analytical approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Aura, Anna-Marja; Mattila, Ismo; Hyötyläinen, Tuulia; Gopalacharyulu, Peddinti; Cheynier, Veronique; Souquet, Jean-Marc; Bes, Magali; Le Bourvellec, Carine; Guyot, Sylvain; Orešič, Matej

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Syrah red grapes are used in the production of tannin-rich red wines. Tannins are high molecular weight molecules, proanthocyanidins (PAs), and poorly absorbed in the upper intestine. In this study, gut microbial metabolism of Syrah grape phenolic compounds was investigated. Methods Syrah grape pericarp was subjected to an enzymatic in vitro digestion model, and red wine and grape skin PA fraction were prepared. Microbial conversion was screened using an in vitro colon model with faec...

  16. Kinetic modeling of cell metabolism for microbial production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Rafael S; Hartmann, Andras; Vinga, Susana

    2016-02-10

    Kinetic models of cellular metabolism are important tools for the rational design of metabolic engineering strategies and to explain properties of complex biological systems. The recent developments in high-throughput experimental data are leading to new computational approaches for building kinetic models of metabolism. Herein, we briefly survey the available databases, standards and software tools that can be applied for kinetic models of metabolism. In addition, we give an overview about recently developed ordinary differential equations (ODE)-based kinetic models of metabolism and some of the main applications of such models are illustrated in guiding metabolic engineering design. Finally, we review the kinetic modeling approaches of large-scale networks that are emerging, discussing their main advantages, challenges and limitations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Genome-based Modeling and Design of Metabolic Interactions in Microbial Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan; Henson, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    Biotechnology research is traditionally focused on individual microbial strains that are perceived to have the necessary metabolic functions, or the capability to have these functions introduced, to achieve a particular task. For many important applications, the development of such omnipotent microbes is an extremely challenging if not impossible task. By contrast, nature employs a radically different strategy based on synergistic combinations of different microbial species that collectively achieve the desired task. These natural communities have evolved to exploit the native metabolic capabilities of each species and are highly adaptive to changes in their environments. However, microbial communities have proven difficult to study due to a lack of suitable experimental and computational tools. With the advent of genome sequencing, omics technologies, bioinformatics and genome-scale modeling, researchers now have unprecedented capabilities to analyze and engineer the metabolism of microbial communities. The goal of this review is to summarize recent applications of genome-scale metabolic modeling to microbial communities. A brief introduction to lumped community models is used to motivate the need for genome-level descriptions of individual species and their metabolic interactions. The review of genome-scale models begins with static modeling approaches, which are appropriate for communities where the extracellular environment can be assumed to be time invariant or slowly varying. Dynamic extensions of the static modeling approach are described, and then applications of genome-scale models for design of synthetic microbial communities are reviewed. The review concludes with a summary of metagenomic tools for analyzing community metabolism and an outlook for future research.

  18. Investigating Microbial Biofilm Formations on Crustal Rock Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiser, M.; D'Angelo, T.; Carr, S. A.; Orcutt, B.

    2017-12-01

    Ocean crust hosts microbial life that, in some cases, alter the component rocks as a means of obtaining energy. Variations in crust lithology, included trace metal and mineral content, as well as the chemistry of the fluids circulating through them, provide substrates for some microbes to metabolize, leading to formation of biofilm community structures. Microbes have different parameters for the situations in which they will form biofilms, but they must have some source of energy in excess at the site of biofilm formation for them to become stationary and form the carbohydrate-rich structures connecting the cells to one another and the substrate. Generally, the requirements for microbes to form biofilms on crustal minerals are unclear. We designed two experiments to test (1) mineral preference and biofilm formation rates by natural seawater microbial communities, and (2) biofilm development as a function of phosphate availability for an organism isolated from subseafloor ocean crust. In Experiment 1, we observed that phyric basalt groundmass is preferentially colonized over aphyric basalt or metal sulfides in a shallow water and oxic seawater environment. In experiment 2, tests of the anaerobic heterotroph Thalassospira bacteria isolated from oceanic crustal fluids showed that they preferentially form biofilms, lose motility, and increase exponentially in number over time in higher-PO4 treatments (50 micromolar), including with phosphate-doped basalts, than in treatments with low phosphate concentrations (0.5 micromolar) often found in crustal fluids. These observations suggest phosphate as a main driver of biofilm formation in subsurface crust. Overall, these data suggest that the drivers of microbial biofilm formation on crustal substrates are selective to the substrate conditions, which has important implications for estimating the global biomass of life harbored in oceanic crust.

  19. Metabolic-flux dependent regulation of microbial physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litsios, Athanasios; Ortega, Álvaro D; Wit, Ernst C; Heinemann, Matthias

    2018-04-01

    According to the most prevalent notion, changes in cellular physiology primarily occur in response to altered environmental conditions. Yet, recent studies have shown that changes in metabolic fluxes can also trigger phenotypic changes even when environmental conditions are unchanged. This suggests that cells have mechanisms in place to assess the magnitude of metabolic fluxes, that is, the rate of metabolic reactions, and use this information to regulate their physiology. In this review, we describe recent evidence for metabolic flux-sensing and flux-dependent regulation. Furthermore, we discuss how such sensing and regulation can be mechanistically achieved and present a set of new candidates for flux-signaling metabolites. Similar to metabolic-flux sensing, we argue that cells can also sense protein translation flux. Finally, we elaborate on the advantages that flux-based regulation can confer to cells. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. The Importance of Transition Metals in the Expanding Network of Microbial Metabolism in the Archean Eon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, E. K.; Jelen, B. I.; Giovannelli, D.; Prabhu, A.; Raanan, H.; Falkowski, P. G.

    2017-12-01

    Deep time changes in Earth surface redox conditions, particularly due to global oxygenation, has impacted the availability of different metals and substrates that are central in biology. Oxidoreductase proteins are molecular nanomachines responsible for all biological electron transfer processes across the tree of life. These enzymes largely contain transition metals in their active sites. Microbial metabolic pathways form a global network of electron transfer, which expanded throughout the Archean eon. Older metabolisms (sulfur reduction, methanogenesis, anoxygenic photosynthesis) accessed negative redox potentials, while later evolving metabolisms (oxygenic photosynthesis, nitrification/denitrification, aerobic respiration) accessed positive redox potentials. The incorporation of different transition metals facilitated biological innovation and the expansion of the network of microbial metabolism. Network analysis was used to examine the connections between microbial taxa, metabolic pathways, crucial metallocofactors, and substrates in deep time by incorporating biosignatures preserved in the geologic record. Nitrogen fixation and aerobic respiration have the highest level of betweenness among metabolisms in the network, indicating that the oldest metabolisms are not the most central. Fe has by far the highest betweenness among metals. Clustering analysis largely separates High Metal Bacteria (HMB), Low Metal Bacteria (LMB), and Archaea showing that simple un-weighted links between taxa, metabolism, and metals have phylogenetic relevance. On average HMB have the highest betweenness among taxa, followed by Archaea and LMB. There is a correlation between the number of metallocofactors and metabolic pathways in representative bacterial taxa, but Archaea do not follow this trend. In many cases older and more recently evolved metabolisms were clustered together supporting previous findings that proliferation of metabolic pathways is not necessarily chronological.

  1. Photochemical alteration of organic carbon draining permafrost soils shifts microbial metabolic pathways and stimulates respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Collin P; Nalven, Sarah G; Crump, Byron C; Kling, George W; Cory, Rose M

    2017-10-03

    In sunlit waters, photochemical alteration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) impacts the microbial respiration of DOC to CO 2 . This coupled photochemical and biological degradation of DOC is especially critical for carbon budgets in the Arctic, where thawing permafrost soils increase opportunities for DOC oxidation to CO 2 in surface waters, thereby reinforcing global warming. Here we show how and why sunlight exposure impacts microbial respiration of DOC draining permafrost soils. Sunlight significantly increases or decreases microbial respiration of DOC depending on whether photo-alteration produces or removes molecules that native microbial communities used prior to light exposure. Using high-resolution chemical and microbial approaches, we show that rates of DOC processing by microbes are likely governed by a combination of the abundance and lability of DOC exported from land to water and produced by photochemical processes, and the capacity and timescale that microbial communities have to adapt to metabolize photo-altered DOC.The role of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) photo-alteration in the microbial respiration of DOC to CO 2 is unclear. Here, the authors show that the impact of this mechanism depends on whether photo-alteration of DOC produces or removes molecules used by native microbial communities prior to light exposure.

  2. Microbial physiology-based model of ethanol metabolism in subsurface sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Qusheng; Roden, Eric E.

    2011-07-01

    A biogeochemical reaction model was developed based on microbial physiology to simulate ethanol metabolism and its influence on the chemistry of anoxic subsurface environments. The model accounts for potential microbial metabolisms that degrade ethanol, including those that oxidize ethanol directly or syntrophically by reducing different electron acceptors. Out of the potential metabolisms, those that are active in the environment can be inferred by fitting the model to experimental observations. This approach was applied to a batch sediment slurry experiment that examined ethanol metabolism in uranium-contaminated aquifer sediments from Area 2 at the U.S. Department of Energy Field Research Center in Oak Ridge, TN. According to the simulation results, complete ethanol oxidation by denitrification, incomplete ethanol oxidation by ferric iron reduction, ethanol fermentation to acetate and H 2, hydrogenotrophic sulfate reduction, and acetoclastic methanogenesis: all contributed significantly to the degradation of ethanol in the aquifer sediments. The assemblage of the active metabolisms provides a frame work to explore how ethanol amendment impacts the chemistry of the environment, including the occurrence and levels of uranium. The results can also be applied to explore how diverse microbial metabolisms impact the progress and efficacy of bioremediation strategies.

  3. Metabolic engineering of microbial competitive advantage for industrial fermentation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, A Joe; Lam, Felix H; Hamilton, Maureen; Consiglio, Andrew; MacEwen, Kyle; Brevnova, Elena E; Greenhagen, Emily; LaTouf, W Greg; South, Colin R; van Dijken, Hans; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2016-08-05

    Microbial contamination is an obstacle to widespread production of advanced biofuels and chemicals. Current practices such as process sterilization or antibiotic dosage carry excess costs or encourage the development of antibiotic resistance. We engineered Escherichia coli to assimilate melamine, a xenobiotic compound containing nitrogen. After adaptive laboratory evolution to improve pathway efficiency, the engineered strain rapidly outcompeted a control strain when melamine was supplied as the nitrogen source. We additionally engineered the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Yarrowia lipolytica to assimilate nitrogen from cyanamide and phosphorus from potassium phosphite, and they outcompeted contaminating strains in several low-cost feedstocks. Supplying essential growth nutrients through xenobiotic or ecologically rare chemicals provides microbial competitive advantage with minimal external risks, given that engineered biocatalysts only have improved fitness within the customized fermentation environment. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  4. Diagnosis of In Situ Metabolic State and Rates of Microbial Metabolism During In Situ Uranium Bioremediation with Molecular Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovley, Derek R. [University of Massachusetts, Amherst

    2012-11-28

    The goal of these projects was to develop molecule tools to tract the metabolic activity and physiological status of microorganisms during in situ uranium bioremediation. Such information is important in able to design improved bioremediation strategies. As summarized below, the research was highly successful with new strategies developed for estimating in situ rates of metabolism and diagnosing the physiological status of the predominant subsurface microorganisms. This is a first not only for groundwater bioremediation studies, but also for subsurface microbiology in general. The tools and approaches developed in these studies should be applicable to the study of microbial communities in a diversity of soils and sediments.

  5. Impact of anti-acidification microbial consortium on carbohydrate metabolism of key microbes during food waste composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Caihong; Li, Mingxiao; Qi, Hui; Zhang, Yali; Liu, Dongming; Xia, Xunfeng; Pan, Hongwei; Xi, Beidou

    2018-07-01

    This study investigated the effect of anti-acidification microbial consortium (AAMC), which act synergistically for rapid bioconversion of organic acids on carbohydrate metabolism of key microbes in the course of food waste (FW) composting by metaproteomics. AAMC was inoculated to the composting mass and compared with treatment with alkaline compounds and the control without any amendment. Inoculating AAMC could effectively accelerate carbohydrate degradation process and improve composting efficiency. Carbohydrate metabolic network profiles showed the inoculation with AAMC could increase significantly the types of enzymes catalysing the degradation of lignin, cellulose and hemicellulose. Furthermore, AAMC inoculum could increase not only diversities of microbes producing key enzymes in metabolism pathways of acetic and propionic acids, but also the amounts of these key enzymes. The increase of diversities of microbes could disperse the pressure from acidic adversity on microorganisms which were capable to degrade acetic and propionic acids. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Detection of Metabolism Function of Microbial Community of Corpses by Biolog-Eco Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, X Y; Wang, J F; Zhu, G H; Ma, M Y; Lai, Y; Zhou, H

    2016-06-01

    To detect the changes of microbial community functional diversity of corpses with different postmortem interval (PMI) and to evaluate forensic application value for estimating PMI. The cultivation of microbial community from the anal swabs of a Sus scrofa and a human corpse placed in field environment from 0 to 240 h after death was performed using the Biolog-Eco Microplate and the variations of the absorbance values were also monitored. Combined with the technology of forensic pathology and flies succession, the metabolic characteristics and changes of microbial community on the decomposed corpse under natural environment were also observed. The diversity of microbial metabolism function was found to be negatively correlated with the number of maggots in the corpses. The freezing processing had the greatest impact on average well color development value at 0 h and the impact almost disappeared after 48 h. The diversity of microbial metabolism of the samples became relatively unstable after 192 h. The principal component analysis showed that 31 carbon sources could be consolidated for 5 principal components (accumulative contribution ratio >90%).The carbon source tsquare-analysis showed that N -acetyl- D -glucosamine and L -serine were the dominant carbon sources for estimating the PMI (0=240 h) of the Sus scrofa and human corpse. The Biolog-Eco method can be used to reveal the metabolic differences of the carbon resources utilization of the microbial community on the corpses during 0-240 h after death, which could provide a new basis for estimating the PMI. Copyright© by the Editorial Department of Journal of Forensic Medicine

  7. Does canine inflammatory bowel disease influence gut microbial profile and host metabolism?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Jia; Verbrugghe, Adronie; Lourenço, Marta; Janssens, Geert P.J.; Liu, Daisy J.X.; Wiele, Van de Tom; Eeckhaut, Venessa; Immerseel, Van Filip; Maele, Van de Isabel; Niu, Yufeng; Bosch, Guido; Junius, Greet; Wuyts, Brigitte; Hesta, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) refers to a diverse group of chronic gastrointestinal diseases, and gut microbial dysbiosis has been proposed as a modulating factor in its pathogenesis. Several studies have investigated the gut microbial ecology of dogs with IBD but it is yet unclear

  8. Use of genome-scale microbial models for metabolic engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patil, Kiran Raosaheb; Åkesson, M.; Nielsen, Jens

    2004-01-01

    Metabolic engineering serves as an integrated approach to design new cell factories by providing rational design procedures and valuable mathematical and experimental tools. Mathematical models have an important role for phenotypic analysis, but can also be used for the design of optimal metaboli...... network structures. The major challenge for metabolic engineering in the post-genomic era is to broaden its design methodologies to incorporate genome-scale biological data. Genome-scale stoichiometric models of microorganisms represent a first step in this direction....

  9. Genome-resolved metagenomics reveals that sulfur metabolism dominates the microbial ecology of rising hydrothermal plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantharaman, K.; Breier, J. A., Jr.; Jain, S.; Reed, D. C.; Dick, G.

    2015-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal plumes occur when hot fluids from hydrothermal vents replete with chemically reduced elements and compounds like sulfide, methane, hydrogen, ammonia, iron and manganese mix with cold, oxic seawater. Chemosynthetic microbes use these reduced chemicals to power primary production and are pervasive throughout the deep sea, even at sites far removed from hydrothermal vents. Although neutrally-buoyant hydrothermal plumes have been well-studied, rising hydrothermal plumes have received little attention even though they represent an important interface in the deep-sea where microbial metabolism and particle formation processes control the transformation of important elements and impact global biogeochemical cycles. In this study, we used genome-resolved metagenomic analyses and thermodynamic-bioenergetic modeling to study the microbial ecology of rising hydrothermal plumes at five different hydrothermal vents spanning a range of geochemical gradients at the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) in the Western Pacific Ocean. Our analyses show that differences in the geochemistry of hydrothermal vents do not manifest in microbial diversity and community composition, both of which display only minor variance across ELSC hydrothermal plumes. Microbial metabolism is dominated by oxidation of reduced sulfur species and supports a diversity of bacteria, archaea and viruses that provide intriguing insights into metabolic plasticity and virus-mediated horizontal gene transfer in the microbial community. The manifestation of sulfur oxidation genes in hydrogen and methane oxidizing organisms hints at metabolic opportunism in deep-sea microbes that would enable them to respond to varying redox conditions in hydrothermal plumes. Finally, we infer that the abundance, diversity and metabolic versatility of microbes associated with sulfur oxidation impart functional redundancy that could allow it to persist in the dynamic settings of hydrothermal plumes.

  10. Aerobic microbial metabolism of condensed thiophenes found in petroleum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kropp, K. G.

    1997-01-01

    The aerobic microbial degradation of 21 condensed thiophenes found in petroleum or synthetic fuels have been studied, motivated by recent research which showed that resistance to biodegradation increases with increasing methyl-substitution. The specific objective was to identify metabolites in pure cultures of aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading Pseudomonas spp. incubated in mineral medium in the presence of an aromatic growth substrate and a condensed thiophene. Over 80 metabolites of the condensed thiophenes were identified using gas chromatography analysis with an atomic emission detector. Among the metabolites identified were sulfoxides, sulfones, hydroxy- and carboxyl-substituted benzothiophenes, hydroxy-substituted dibenzothiophenes, substituted benzothiophene-2,3-diones, and 3-hydroxy-2-formylbenzothiophenes

  11. Visualization of Metabolic Interaction Networks in Microbial Communities Using VisANT 5.0.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian R Granger

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of metabolic networks in microbial communities poses an unresolved visualization and interpretation challenge. We address this challenge in the newly expanded version of a software tool for the analysis of biological networks, VisANT 5.0. We focus in particular on facilitating the visual exploration of metabolic interaction between microbes in a community, e.g. as predicted by COMETS (Computation of Microbial Ecosystems in Time and Space, a dynamic stoichiometric modeling framework. Using VisANT's unique metagraph implementation, we show how one can use VisANT 5.0 to explore different time-dependent ecosystem-level metabolic networks. In particular, we analyze the metabolic interaction network between two bacteria previously shown to display an obligate cross-feeding interdependency. In addition, we illustrate how a putative minimal gut microbiome community could be represented in our framework, making it possible to highlight interactions across multiple coexisting species. We envisage that the "symbiotic layout" of VisANT can be employed as a general tool for the analysis of metabolism in complex microbial communities as well as heterogeneous human tissues. VisANT is freely available at: http://visant.bu.edu and COMETS at http://comets.bu.edu.

  12. Visualization of Metabolic Interaction Networks in Microbial Communities Using VisANT 5.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, Brian R; Chang, Yi-Chien; Wang, Yan; DeLisi, Charles; Segrè, Daniel; Hu, Zhenjun

    2016-04-01

    The complexity of metabolic networks in microbial communities poses an unresolved visualization and interpretation challenge. We address this challenge in the newly expanded version of a software tool for the analysis of biological networks, VisANT 5.0. We focus in particular on facilitating the visual exploration of metabolic interaction between microbes in a community, e.g. as predicted by COMETS (Computation of Microbial Ecosystems in Time and Space), a dynamic stoichiometric modeling framework. Using VisANT's unique metagraph implementation, we show how one can use VisANT 5.0 to explore different time-dependent ecosystem-level metabolic networks. In particular, we analyze the metabolic interaction network between two bacteria previously shown to display an obligate cross-feeding interdependency. In addition, we illustrate how a putative minimal gut microbiome community could be represented in our framework, making it possible to highlight interactions across multiple coexisting species. We envisage that the "symbiotic layout" of VisANT can be employed as a general tool for the analysis of metabolism in complex microbial communities as well as heterogeneous human tissues. VisANT is freely available at: http://visant.bu.edu and COMETS at http://comets.bu.edu.

  13. Functional Gene Diversity and Metabolic Potential of the Microbial Community in an Estuary-Shelf Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Microbes play crucial roles in various biogeochemical processes in the ocean, including carbon (C, nitrogen (N, and phosphorus (P cycling. Functional gene diversity and the structure of the microbial community determines its metabolic potential and therefore its ecological function in the marine ecosystem. However, little is known about the functional gene composition and metabolic potential of bacterioplankton in estuary areas. The East China Sea (ECS is a dynamic marginal ecosystem in the western Pacific Ocean that is mainly affected by input from the Changjiang River and the Kuroshio Current. Here, using a high-throughput functional gene microarray (GeoChip, we analyzed the functional gene diversity, composition, structure, and metabolic potential of microbial assemblages in different ECS water masses. Four water masses determined by temperature and salinity relationship showed different patterns of functional gene diversity and composition. Generally, functional gene diversity [Shannon–Weaner’s H and reciprocal of Simpson’s 1/(1-D] in the surface water masses was higher than that in the bottom water masses. The different presence and proportion of functional genes involved in C, N, and P cycling among the bacteria of the different water masses showed different metabolic preferences of the microbial populations in the ECS. Genes involved in starch metabolism (amyA and nplT showed higher proportion in microbial communities of the surface water masses than of the bottom water masses. In contrast, a higher proportion of genes involved in chitin degradation was observed in microorganisms of the bottom water masses. Moreover, we found a higher proportion of nitrogen fixation (nifH, transformation of hydroxylamine to nitrite (hao and ammonification (gdh genes in the microbial communities of the bottom water masses compared with those of the surface water masses. The spatial variation of microbial functional genes was significantly correlated

  14. Rumen microbial communities influence metabolic phenotypes in lambs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgavi, Diego P.; Rahahao-Paris, Estelle; Popova, Milka

    2015-01-01

    and the metabolic phenotype of lambs for identifying host-microbe associations and potential biomarkers of digestive functions. Twin lambs, separated in two groups after birth were exposed to practices (isolation and gavage with rumen fluid with protozoa or protozoa-depleted) that differentially restricted...

  15. Microbial metabolic potential for carbon degradation and nutrient (nitrogen and phosphorus) acquisition in an ombrotrophic peatland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xueju; Tfaily, Malak M; Green, Stefan J; Steinweg, J Megan; Chanton, Patrick; Imvittaya, Aopeau; Chanton, Jeffrey P; Cooper, William; Schadt, Christopher; Kostka, Joel E

    2014-06-01

    This study integrated metagenomic and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic approaches to investigate microbial metabolic potential for organic matter decomposition and nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) acquisition in soils of an ombrotrophic peatland in the Marcell Experimental Forest (MEF), Minnesota, USA. This analysis revealed vertical stratification in key enzymatic pathways and taxa containing these pathways. Metagenomic analyses revealed that genes encoding laccases and dioxygenases, involved in aromatic compound degradation, declined in relative abundance with depth, while the relative abundance of genes encoding metabolism of amino sugars and all four saccharide groups increased with depth in parallel with a 50% reduction in carbohydrate content. Most Cu-oxidases were closely related to genes from Proteobacteria and Acidobacteria, and type 4 laccase-like Cu-oxidase genes were >8 times more abundant than type 3 genes, suggesting an important and overlooked role for type 4 Cu-oxidase in phenolic compound degradation. Genes associated with sulfate reduction and methanogenesis were the most abundant anaerobic respiration genes in these systems, with low levels of detection observed for genes of denitrification and Fe(III) reduction. Fermentation genes increased in relative abundance with depth and were largely affiliated with Syntrophobacter. Methylocystaceae-like small-subunit (SSU) rRNA genes, pmoA, and mmoX genes were more abundant among methanotrophs. Genes encoding N2 fixation, P uptake, and P regulons were significantly enriched in the surface peat and in comparison to other ecosystems, indicating N and P limitation. Persistence of inorganic orthophosphate throughout the peat profile in this P-limiting environment indicates that P may be bound to recalcitrant organic compounds, thus limiting P bioavailability in the subsurface. Comparative metagenomic analysis revealed a high metabolic potential for P transport and starvation, N2 fixation, and

  16. Microbial arsenic metabolism: New twists on an old poison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, J.F.; Basu, P.; Oremland, R.S.

    2010-01-01

    Phylogenetically diverse microorganisms metabolize arsenic despite its toxicity and are part of its robust iogeochemical cycle. Respiratory arsenate reductase is a reversible enzyme, functioning in some microbes as an arsenate reductase but in others as an arsenite oxidase. As(III) can serve as an electron donor for anoxygenic photolithoautotrophy and chemolithoautotrophy. Organoarsenicals, such as the feed additive roxarsone, can be used as a source of energy, releasing inorganic arsenic.

  17. Characterization and Modeling Of Microbial Carbon Metabolism In Thawing Permafrost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, D. E.; Phelps, T. J.; Xu, X.; Carroll, S.; Jagadamma, S.; Shakya, M.; Thornton, P. E.; Elias, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    Increased annual temperatures in the Arctic are warming the surface and subsurface, resulting in thawing permafrost. Thawing exposes large pools of buried organic carbon to microbial degradation, increasing greenhouse gas generation and emission. Most global-scale land-surface models lack depth-dependent representations of carbon conversion and GHG transport; therefore they do not adequately describe permafrost thawing or microbial mineralization processes. The current work was performed to determine how permafrost thawing at moderately elevated temperatures and anoxic conditions would affect CO2 and CH4 generation, while parameterizing depth-dependent GHG production processes with respect to temperature and pH in biogeochemical models. These enhancements will improve the accuracy of GHG emission predictions and identify key biochemical and geochemical processes for further refinement. Three core samples were obtained from discontinuous permafrost terrain in Fairbanks, AK with a mean annual temperature of -3.3 °C. Each core was sectioned into surface/near surface (0-0.8 m), active layer (0.8-1.6 m), and permafrost (1.6-2.2 m) horizons, which were homogenized for physico-chemical characterization and microcosm construction. Surface samples had low pH values (6.0), low water content (18% by weight), low organic carbon (0.8%), and high C:N ratio (43). Active layer samples had higher pH values (6.4), higher water content (34%), more organic carbon (1.4%) and a lower C:N ratio (24). Permafrost samples had the highest pH (6.5), highest water content (46%), high organic carbon (2.5%) and the lowest C:N ratio (19). Most organic carbon was quantified as labile or intermediate pool versus stable pool in each sample, and all samples had low amounts of carbonate. Surface layer microcosms, containing 20 g sediment in septum-sealed vials, were incubated under oxic conditions, while similar active and permafrost layer samples were anoxic. These microcosms were incubated at -2

  18. Genome-centric resolution of microbial diversity, metabolism and interactions in anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanwonterghem, Inka; Jensen, Paul D; Rabaey, Korneel; Tyson, Gene W

    2016-09-01

    Our understanding of the complex interconnected processes performed by microbial communities is hindered by our inability to culture the vast majority of microorganisms. Metagenomics provides a way to bypass this cultivation bottleneck and recent advances in this field now allow us to recover a growing number of genomes representing previously uncultured populations from increasingly complex environments. In this study, a temporal genome-centric metagenomic analysis was performed of lab-scale anaerobic digesters that host complex microbial communities fulfilling a series of interlinked metabolic processes to enable the conversion of cellulose to methane. In total, 101 population genomes that were moderate to near-complete were recovered based primarily on differential coverage binning. These populations span 19 phyla, represent mostly novel species and expand the genomic coverage of several rare phyla. Classification into functional guilds based on their metabolic potential revealed metabolic networks with a high level of functional redundancy as well as niche specialization, and allowed us to identify potential roles such as hydrolytic specialists for several rare, uncultured populations. Genome-centric analyses of complex microbial communities across diverse environments provide the key to understanding the phylogenetic and metabolic diversity of these interactive communities. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Genome-driven evolutionary game theory helps understand the rise of metabolic interdependencies in microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zomorrodi, Ali R; Segrè, Daniel

    2017-11-16

    Metabolite exchanges in microbial communities give rise to ecological interactions that govern ecosystem diversity and stability. It is unclear, however, how the rise of these interactions varies across metabolites and organisms. Here we address this question by integrating genome-scale models of metabolism with evolutionary game theory. Specifically, we use microbial fitness values estimated by metabolic models to infer evolutionarily stable interactions in multi-species microbial "games". We first validate our approach using a well-characterized yeast cheater-cooperator system. We next perform over 80,000 in silico experiments to infer how metabolic interdependencies mediated by amino acid leakage in Escherichia coli vary across 189 amino acid pairs. While most pairs display shared patterns of inter-species interactions, multiple deviations are caused by pleiotropy and epistasis in metabolism. Furthermore, simulated invasion experiments reveal possible paths to obligate cross-feeding. Our study provides genomically driven insight into the rise of ecological interactions, with implications for microbiome research and synthetic ecology.

  20. Soil microbial metabolic quotient (qCO2) of twelve ecosystems of Mt. Kilimanjaro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabst, Holger; Gerschlauer, Friederike; Kiese, Ralf; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2014-05-01

    Soil organic carbon, microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and the metabolic quotient qCO2 - as sensitive and important parameters for soil fertility and C turnover - are strongly affected by land-use changes all over the world. These effects are particularly distinct upon conversion of natural to agricultural ecosystems due to very fast carbon (C) and nutrient cycles and high vulnerability, especially in the tropics. In this study, we used an elevational gradient on Mt. Kilimanjaro to investigate the effects of land-use change and elevation on Corg, MBC and qCO2. Down to a soil depth of 18 cm we compared 4 natural (Helichrysum, Erica forest, Podocarpus forest, Ocotea forest), 5 seminatural (disturbed Podocarpus forest, disturbed Ocotea forest, lower montane forest, grassland, savannah), 1 sustainably used (homegarden) and 2 intensively used ecosystems (coffee plantation, maize field) on an elevation gradient from 950 to 3880 m a.s.l.. Using an incubation device, soil CO2-efflux of 18 cm deep soil cores was measured under field moist conditions and mean annual temperature. MBC to Corg ratios varied between 0.7 and 2.3%. qCO2 increased with magnitude of the disturbance, albeit this effect decreased with elevation. Following the annual precipitation of the ecosystems, both, Corg and MBC showed a hum-shaped distribution with elevation, whereas their maxima were between 2500 and 3000 m a.s.l.. Additionaly, Corg and MBC contents were significantly reduced in intensively used agricultural systems. We conclude that the soil microbial biomass and its activity in Mt. Kilimanjaro ecosystems are strongly altered by land-use. This effect is more distinct in lower than in higher elevated ecosystems and strongly dependent on the magnitude of disturbance.

  1. Mineralogical controls on surface colonization by sulfur-metabolizing microbial communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. A.; Bennett, P.

    2012-12-01

    When characterizing microbial diversity and the microbial ecosystem of the shallow subsurface the mineral matrix is generally assumed to be homogenous and unreactive. We report here experimental evidence that microorganisms colonize rock surfaces according to the rock's chemistry and the organism's metabolic requirements and tolerances. We investigated this phenomenon using laboratory biofilm reactors with both a pure culture of sulfur-oxidizing Thiothrix unzii and a mixed environmental sulfur-metabolizing community from Lower Kane, Cave, WY, USA. Reactors contained rock and mineral chips (calcite, albite, microcline, quartz, chert, Madison Limestone (ML), Madison Dolostone (MD), and basalt) amended with one of the two inoculants. Biomass of attached microorganisms on each mineral surface was quantified. The 16S rRNA of attached microbial communities were compared using Roche FLX and Titanium 454 next generation pyrosequencing. A primary controlling factor on taxonomy of attached microorganisms in both pure and mixed culture experiments was mineral buffering capacity. In mixed culture experiments acid-buffering carbonates were preferentially colonized by neutrophilic sulfur-oxidizing microorganisms (~18% to ~27% of microorganisms), while acidophilic sulfur-oxidizing microorganisms colonized non-buffering quartz exclusively (~46% of microorganisms). The nutrient content of the rock was a controlling factor on biomass accumulation, with neutrophilic organisms selecting between carbonate surfaces of equivalent buffer capacities according to the availability of phosphate. Dry biomass on ML was 17.8 ± 2.3 mg/cm2 and MD was 20.6 ± 6.8 mg/cm2; while nutrient poor calcite accumulated 2.4 ± 0.3 mg/cm2. Biomass accumulation was minimal on non-buffering nutrient-limited surfaces. These factors are countered by the competitive exclusion of some populations. A pure culture of T. unzii preferentially colonizes carbonates while a very closely related Thiothrix spp is excluded

  2. A Status Report on the Global Research in Microbial Metabolic Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joe, Min Ho; Lim, Sang Yong; Kim, Dong Ho

    2008-09-15

    Biotechnology industry is now a global 'Mega-Trend' and metabolic engineering technology has important role is this area. Therefore, many countries has made efforts in this field to produce top value added bio-products efficiently using microorganisms. It has been applied to increase the production of chemicals that are already produced by the host organism, to produce desired chemical substances from less expensive feedstock, and to generate products that are new to the host organism. Recent experimental advances, the so-called '-omics' technologies, mainly functional genomics, proteomics and metabolomics, have enabled wholesale generation of new genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic data. This report provides the insights of the integrated view of metabolism generated by metabolic engineering for biotechnological applications of microbial metabolic engineering.

  3. A Status Report on the Global Research in Microbial Metabolic Engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joe, Min Ho; Lim, Sang Yong; Kim, Dong Ho

    2008-09-01

    Biotechnology industry is now a global 'Mega-Trend' and metabolic engineering technology has important role is this area. Therefore, many countries has made efforts in this field to produce top value added bio-products efficiently using microorganisms. It has been applied to increase the production of chemicals that are already produced by the host organism, to produce desired chemical substances from less expensive feedstock, and to generate products that are new to the host organism. Recent experimental advances, the so-called '-omics' technologies, mainly functional genomics, proteomics and metabolomics, have enabled wholesale generation of new genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic data. This report provides the insights of the integrated view of metabolism generated by metabolic engineering for biotechnological applications of microbial metabolic engineering

  4. A Status Report on the Global Research in Microbial Metabolic Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joe, Min Ho; Lim, Sang Yong; Kim, Dong Ho

    2008-09-15

    Biotechnology industry is now a global 'Mega-Trend' and metabolic engineering technology has important role is this area. Therefore, many countries has made efforts in this field to produce top value added bio-products efficiently using microorganisms. It has been applied to increase the production of chemicals that are already produced by the host organism, to produce desired chemical substances from less expensive feedstock, and to generate products that are new to the host organism. Recent experimental advances, the so-called '-omics' technologies, mainly functional genomics, proteomics and metabolomics, have enabled wholesale generation of new genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic data. This report provides the insights of the integrated view of metabolism generated by metabolic engineering for biotechnological applications of microbial metabolic engineering.

  5. Investigating substrate use efficiency across different microbial physiologies in soil-extracted, solubilized organic matter (SESOM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyle, K. T.; Martinez, C. E.

    2017-12-01

    Recent experimental work has elevated the importance of microbial processing for the stabilization of fresh carbon inputs within the soil mineral matrix. Enhancing our understanding of soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics therefore requires a better understanding of how efficiently microbial metabolism can process low molecular weight carbon substrates (carbon use efficiency, CUE) under environmentally relevant conditions. One approach to better understanding microbial uptake rates and CUE is the ecophysiological study of soil isolates in liquid media culture consisting of soil-extracted solubilized organic matter (SESOM). We are using SESOM from an Oa horizon under hemlock hardwood vegetation in upstate New York as liquid media for the growth of 12 isolates from the Oa and B horizon of the same site. Here we seek to test the uptake rates as well as CUE of 5 different low molecular weight substrates spanning compound class and nominal oxidation state (glucose, acetate, formate, glycine, valine) by isolates differing in phylogeny and physiology. The use of a spike of each of the 13C-labeled substrates into SESOM, along with a 0.2 μm filtration step, allows accurate partitioning of labeled carbon between biomass, gaseous CO2 as well as the exometabolome. Coupled UHPLC-MS measurements are being used to identify and determine uptake rates of over 80 potential C substrates present in the extract as well as our labeled substrate of interest along the course of the isolate growth curve. This work seeks to utilize a gradient in substrate class as well as microbial physiologies to inform our understanding of C and N cycling under relevant soil solution conditions. Future experiments may also use labeled biomass from stationary phase to investigate the stabilization potential of anabolic products formed from each substrate with a clay fraction isolated from the same site.

  6. Effect of silver nanoparticles on growth performance, metabolism and microbial profile of broiler chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pineda, Lane Manalili; Chwalibog, André; Sawosz, Ewa

    2012-01-01

    and intestinal content were collected to evaluate the effects of AgNano on plasma concentration of immunoglobulins and the intestinal microflora, respectively. The provision of water solutions containing different concentrations of AgNano had no effect on postnatal growth performance and the energy metabolism...... (IgG) in the blood plasma of broilers supplemented with AgNano decreased at day 36 (p = 0.012). The results demonstrated that AgNano affects N utilisation and plasma IgG concentration; however, it does not influence the microbial populations in the digestive tract, the energy metabolism and growth...

  7. Metal availability and the expanding network of microbial metabolisms in the Archaean eon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Eli K.; Jelen, Benjamin I.; Giovannelli, Donato; Raanan, Hagai; Falkowski, Paul G.

    2017-09-01

    Life is based on energy gained by electron-transfer processes; these processes rely on oxidoreductase enzymes, which often contain transition metals in their structures. The availability of different metals and substrates has changed over the course of Earth's history as a result of secular changes in redox conditions, particularly global oxygenation. New metabolic pathways using different transition metals co-evolved alongside changing redox conditions. Sulfur reduction, sulfate reduction, methanogenesis and anoxygenic photosynthesis appeared between about 3.8 and 3.4 billion years ago. The oxidoreductases responsible for these metabolisms incorporated metals that were readily available in Archaean oceans, chiefly iron and iron-sulfur clusters. Oxygenic photosynthesis appeared between 3.2 and 2.5 billion years ago, as did methane oxidation, nitrogen fixation, nitrification and denitrification. These metabolisms rely on an expanded range of transition metals presumably made available by the build-up of molecular oxygen in soil crusts and marine microbial mats. The appropriation of copper in enzymes before the Great Oxidation Event is particularly important, as copper is key to nitrogen and methane cycling and was later incorporated into numerous aerobic metabolisms. We find that the diversity of metals used in oxidoreductases has increased through time, suggesting that surface redox potential and metal incorporation influenced the evolution of metabolism, biological electron transfer and microbial ecology.

  8. Methane Metabolizing Microbial Communities in the Cold Seep Areas in the Northern Continental Shelf of South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, F.; Liang, Q.

    2016-12-01

    Marine sediment contains large amount of methane, estimated approximately 500-2500 gigatonnes of dissolved and hydrated methane carbon stored therein, mainly in continental margins. In localized specific areas named cold seeps, hydrocarbon (mainly methane) containing fluids rise to the seafloor, and support oases of ecosystem composed of various microorganisms and faunal assemblages. South China Sea (SCS) is surrounded by passive continental margins in the west and north and convergent margins in the south and east. Thick organic-rich sediments have accumulated in the SCS since the late Mesozoic, which are continuing sources to form gas hydrates in the sediments of SCS. Here, Microbial ecosystems, particularly those involved in methane transformations were investigated in the cold seep areas (Qiongdongnan, Shenhu, and Dongsha) in the northern continental shelf of SCS. Multiple interdisciplinary analytic tools such as stable isotope probing, geochemical analysis, and molecular ecology, were applied for a comprehensive understanding of the microbe mediated methane transformation in this project. A variety of sediments cores have been collected, the geochemical profiles and the associated microbial distribution along the sediment cores were recorded. The major microbial groups involved in the methane transformation in these sediment cores were revealed, known methane producing and oxidizing archaea including Methanosarcinales, anaerobic methane oxidizing groups ANME-1, ANME-2 and their niche preference in the SCS sediments were found. In-depth comparative analysis revealed the presence of SCS-specific archaeal subtypes which probably reflected the evolution and adaptation of these methane metabolizing microbes to the SCS environmental conditions. Our work represents the first comprehensive analysis of the methane metabolizing microbial communities in the cold seep areas along the northern continental shelf of South China Sea, would provide new insight into the

  9. A bioenergetics-kinetics coupled modeling study on subsurface microbial metabolism in a field biostimulation experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Q.; Zheng, Z.; Zhu, C.

    2006-12-01

    Microorganisms in nature conserve energy by catalyzing various geochemical reactions. To build a quantitative relationship between geochemical conditions and metabolic rates, we propose a bioenergetics-kinetics coupled modeling approach. This approach describes microbial community as a metabolic network, i.e., fermenting microbes degrade organic substrates while aerobic respirer, nitrate reducer, metal reducer, sulfate reducer, and methanogen consume the fermentation products. It quantifies the control of substrate availability and biological energy conservation on the metabolic rates using thermodynamically consistent rate laws. We applied this simulation approach to study the progress of microbial metabolism during a field biostimulation experiment conducted in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the experiment, ethanol was injected into a monitoring well and groundwater was sampled to monitor changes in the chemistry. With time, concentrations of ethanol and SO42- decreased while those of NH4+, Fe2+, and Mn2+ increased. The simulation results fitted well to the observation, indicating simultaneous ethanol degradation and terminal electron accepting processes. The rates of aerobic respiration and denitrification were mainly controlled by substrate concentrations while those of ethanol degradation, sulfate reduction, and methanogenesis were controlled dominantly by the energy availability. The simulation results suggested two different microbial growth statuses in the subsurface. For the functional groups with significant growth, variations with time in substrate concentrations demonstrated a typical S curve. For the groups without significant growth, initial decreases in substrate concentrations were linear with time. Injecting substrates followed by monitoring environmental chemistry therefore provides a convenient approach to characterize microbial growth in the subsurface where methods for direct observation are currently unavailable. This research was funded by the

  10. Electronic Nose Technology to Measure Soil Microbial Activity and Classify Soil Metabolic Status

    OpenAIRE

    Fabrizio De Cesare; Elena Di Mattia; Simone Pantalei; Emiliano Zampetti; Vittorio Vinciguerra; Antonella Macagnano

    2011-01-01

    The electronic nose (E-nose) is a sensing technology that has been widely used to monitor environments in the last decade. In the present study, the capability of an E-nose, in combination with biochemical and microbiological techniques, of both detecting the microbial activity and estimating the metabolic status of soil ecosystems, was tested by measuring on one side respiration, enzyme activities and growth of bacteria in natural but simplified soil ecosystems over 23 days of incubation thr...

  11. Microbial metabolism alters pore water chemistry and increases consolidation of oil sands tailings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkell, Nicholas; Kuznetsov, Petr; Kuznetsova, Alsu; Foght, Julia M; Siddique, Tariq

    2015-01-01

    Tailings produced during bitumen extraction from surface-mined oil sands ores (tar sands) comprise an aqueous suspension of clay particles that remain dispersed for decades in tailings ponds. Slow consolidation of the clays hinders water recovery for reuse and retards volume reduction, thereby increasing the environmental footprint of tailings ponds. We investigated mechanisms of tailings consolidation and revealed that indigenous anaerobic microorganisms altered porewater chemistry by producing CO and CH during metabolism of acetate added as a labile carbon amendment. Entrapped biogenic CO decreased tailings pH, thereby increasing calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) cations and bicarbonate (HCO) concentrations in the porewater through dissolution of carbonate minerals. Soluble ions increased the porewater ionic strength, which, with higher exchangeable Ca and Mg, decreased the diffuse double layer of clays and increased consolidation of tailings compared with unamended tailings in which little microbial activity was observed. These results are relevant to effective tailings pond management strategies. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  12. 2004 Molecular Basis of Microbial One-Carbon Metabolism Gordon Conference - August 1-6, 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph A. Krzycki

    2005-09-15

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on 2004 Molecular Basis of Microbial One-Carbon Metabolism Gordon Conference - August 1-6, 2004 was held at Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, MA from August 1-6, 2004. The Conference was well-attended with 117 participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. In designing the formal speakers program, emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field. There was a conscious effort to stimulate lively discussion about the key issues in the field today. Time for formal presentations was limited in the interest of group discussions. In order that more scientists could communicate their most recent results, poster presentation time was scheduled. Attached is a copy of the formal schedule and speaker program and the poster program. In addition to these formal interactions, 'free time' was scheduled to allow informal discussions. Such discussions are fostering new collaborations and joint efforts in the field.

  13. Genome-scale modelling of microbial metabolism with temporal and spatial resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, Michael A

    2015-12-01

    Most natural microbial systems have evolved to function in environments with temporal and spatial variations. A major limitation to understanding such complex systems is the lack of mathematical modelling frameworks that connect the genomes of individual species and temporal and spatial variations in the environment to system behaviour. The goal of this review is to introduce the emerging field of spatiotemporal metabolic modelling based on genome-scale reconstructions of microbial metabolism. The extension of flux balance analysis (FBA) to account for both temporal and spatial variations in the environment is termed spatiotemporal FBA (SFBA). Following a brief overview of FBA and its established dynamic extension, the SFBA problem is introduced and recent progress is described. Three case studies are reviewed to illustrate the current state-of-the-art and possible future research directions are outlined. The author posits that SFBA is the next frontier for microbial metabolic modelling and a rapid increase in methods development and system applications is anticipated. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  14. Metagenomic analysis of an ecological wastewater treatment plant's microbial communities and their potential to metabolize pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcom, Ian N; Driscoll, Heather; Vincent, James; Leduc, Meagan

    2016-01-01

    Pharmaceuticals and other micropollutants have been detected in drinking water, groundwater, surface water, and soil around the world. Even in locations where wastewater treatment is required, they can be found in drinking water wells, municipal water supplies, and agricultural soils. It is clear conventional wastewater treatment technologies are not meeting the challenge of the mounting pressures on global freshwater supplies. Cost-effective ecological wastewater treatment technologies have been developed in response. To determine whether the removal of micropollutants in ecological wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is promoted by the plant-microbe interactions, as has been reported for other recalcitrant xenobiotics, biofilm microbial communities growing on the surfaces of plant roots were profiled by whole metagenome sequencing and compared to the microbial communities residing in the wastewater. In this study, the concentrations of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) were quantified in each treatment tank of the ecological WWTP treating human wastewater at a highway rest stop and visitor center in Vermont. The concentrations of detected PPCPs were substantially greater than values reported for conventional WWTPs likely due to onsite recirculation of wastewater. The greatest reductions in PPCPs concentrations were observed in the anoxic treatment tank where Bacilli dominated the biofilm community. Benzoate degradation was the most abundant xenobiotic metabolic category identified throughout the system. Collectively, the microbial communities residing in the wastewater were taxonomically and metabolically more diverse than the immersed plant root biofilm. However, greater heterogeneity and higher relative abundances of xenobiotic metabolism genes was observed for the root biofilm.

  15. Changes in Microbial Energy Metabolism Measured by Nanocalorimetry during Growth Phase Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robador, Alberto; LaRowe, Douglas E.; Finkel, Steven E.; Amend, Jan P.; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    2018-01-01

    Calorimetric measurements of the change in heat due to microbial metabolic activity convey information about the kinetics, as well as the thermodynamics, of all chemical reactions taking place in a cell. Calorimetric measurements of heat production made on bacterial cultures have recorded the energy yields of all co-occurring microbial metabolic reactions, but this is a complex, composite signal that is difficult to interpret. Here we show that nanocalorimetry can be used in combination with enumeration of viable cell counts, oxygen consumption rates, cellular protein content, and thermodynamic calculations to assess catabolic rates of an isolate of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and infer what fraction of the chemical energy is assimilated by the culture into biomass and what fraction is dissipated in the form of heat under different limiting conditions. In particular, our results demonstrate that catabolic rates are not necessarily coupled to rates of cell division, but rather, to physiological rearrangements of S. oneidensis MR-1 upon growth phase transitions. In addition, we conclude that the heat released by growing microorganisms can be measured in order to understand the physiochemical nature of the energy transformation and dissipation associated with microbial metabolic activity in conditions approaching those found in natural systems. PMID:29449836

  16. Microbial catabolic activities are naturally selected by metabolic energy harvest rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Cabaleiro, Rebeca; Ofiţeru, Irina D; Lema, Juan M; Rodríguez, Jorge

    2015-12-01

    The fundamental trade-off between yield and rate of energy harvest per unit of substrate has been largely discussed as a main characteristic for microbial established cooperation or competition. In this study, this point is addressed by developing a generalized model that simulates competition between existing and not experimentally reported microbial catabolic activities defined only based on well-known biochemical pathways. No specific microbial physiological adaptations are considered, growth yield is calculated coupled to catabolism energetics and a common maximum biomass-specific catabolism rate (expressed as electron transfer rate) is assumed for all microbial groups. Under this approach, successful microbial metabolisms are predicted in line with experimental observations under the hypothesis of maximum energy harvest rate. Two microbial ecosystems, typically found in wastewater treatment plants, are simulated, namely: (i) the anaerobic fermentation of glucose and (ii) the oxidation and reduction of nitrogen under aerobic autotrophic (nitrification) and anoxic heterotrophic and autotrophic (denitrification) conditions. The experimentally observed cross feeding in glucose fermentation, through multiple intermediate fermentation pathways, towards ultimately methane and carbon dioxide is predicted. Analogously, two-stage nitrification (by ammonium and nitrite oxidizers) is predicted as prevailing over nitrification in one stage. Conversely, denitrification is predicted in one stage (by denitrifiers) as well as anammox (anaerobic ammonium oxidation). The model results suggest that these observations are a direct consequence of the different energy yields per electron transferred at the different steps of the pathways. Overall, our results theoretically support the hypothesis that successful microbial catabolic activities are selected by an overall maximum energy harvest rate.

  17. Starter Culture Selection for Making Chinese Sesame-Flavored Liquor Based on Microbial Metabolic Activity in Mixed-Culture Fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qun; Ling, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Selection of a starter culture with excellent viability and metabolic activity is important for inoculated fermentation of traditional food. To obtain a suitable starter culture for making Chinese sesame-flavored liquor, the yeast and bacterium community structures were investigated during spontaneous and solid-state fermentations of this type of liquor. Five dominant species in spontaneous fermentation were identified: Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia membranaefaciens, Issatchenkia orientalis, Bacillus licheniformis, and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. The metabolic activity of each species in mixed and inoculated fermentations of liquor was investigated in 14 different cocultures that used different combinations of these species. The relationships between the microbial species and volatile metabolites were analyzed by partial least-squares (PLS) regression analysis. We found that S. cerevisiae was positively correlated to nonanal, and B. licheniformis was positively associated with 2,3-butanediol, isobutyric acid, guaiacol, and 4-vinyl guaiacol, while I. orientalis was positively correlated to butyric acid, isovaleric acid, hexanoic acid, and 2,3-butanediol. These three species are excellent flavor producers for Chinese liquor. Although P. membranaefaciens and B. amyloliquefaciens were not efficient flavor producers, the addition of them alleviated competition among the other three species and altered their growth rates and flavor production. As a result, the coculture of all five dominant species produced the largest amount of flavor compounds. The result indicates that flavor producers and microbial interaction regulators are important for inoculated fermentation of Chinese sesame-flavored liquor. PMID:24814798

  18. Metatranscriptomic analysis of diverse microbial communities reveals core metabolic pathways and microbiome-specific functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yue; Xiong, Xuejian; Danska, Jayne; Parkinson, John

    2016-01-12

    Metatranscriptomics is emerging as a powerful technology for the functional characterization of complex microbial communities (microbiomes). Use of unbiased RNA-sequencing can reveal both the taxonomic composition and active biochemical functions of a complex microbial community. However, the lack of established reference genomes, computational tools and pipelines make analysis and interpretation of these datasets challenging. Systematic studies that compare data across microbiomes are needed to demonstrate the ability of such pipelines to deliver biologically meaningful insights on microbiome function. Here, we apply a standardized analytical pipeline to perform a comparative analysis of metatranscriptomic data from diverse microbial communities derived from mouse large intestine, cow rumen, kimchi culture, deep-sea thermal vent and permafrost. Sequence similarity searches allowed annotation of 19 to 76% of putative messenger RNA (mRNA) reads, with the highest frequency in the kimchi dataset due to its relatively low complexity and availability of closely related reference genomes. Metatranscriptomic datasets exhibited distinct taxonomic and functional signatures. From a metabolic perspective, we identified a common core of enzymes involved in amino acid, energy and nucleotide metabolism and also identified microbiome-specific pathways such as phosphonate metabolism (deep sea) and glycan degradation pathways (cow rumen). Integrating taxonomic and functional annotations within a novel visualization framework revealed the contribution of different taxa to metabolic pathways, allowing the identification of taxa that contribute unique functions. The application of a single, standard pipeline confirms that the rich taxonomic and functional diversity observed across microbiomes is not simply an artefact of different analysis pipelines but instead reflects distinct environmental influences. At the same time, our findings show how microbiome complexity and availability of

  19. [Effects of nitrogen application rate on faba bean fusarium wilt and rhizospheric microbial metabolic functional diversity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yan; Yang, Zhi-xian; Dong, Kun; Tang, Li; Zheng, Yi; Hu, Guo-bin

    2013-04-01

    A field plot experiment was conducted to study the effects of different nitrogen (N) application rates on the microbial functional diversity in faba bean rhizosphere and the relationships between the microbial functional diversity and the occurrence of faba bean fusarium wilt. Four nitrogen application rates were installed, i. e. , N0(0 kg hm-2 , N1 (56. 25 kg hm-2) , N2(112. 5 kg hm-2), and N3 (168.75 kg hm-2), and Biolog microbial analysis system was applied to study the damage of faba bean fusarium wilt and the rhizospheric microbial metabolic functional diversity. Applying N (N1 N2, and N3) decreased the disease index of faba bean fusarium wilt and the quantity of Fusarium oxysporum significantly, and increased the quantities of bacteria and actinomyces and the ratios of bacteria/fungi and actinomyces/fungi significantly, with the peak values of bacteria and actinomyces, bacteria/fungi, and actinomyces/fungi, and the lowest disease index and F. oxysporum density in N2. As compared with N0, applying N increased the AWCD value significantly, but the effects of different N application rates on the ability of rhizospheric microbes in utilizing six types of carbon sources had definite differences. Under the application of N, the utilization rates of carbohydrates, carboxylic acids, and amino acids by the rhizospheric microbes were higher. Principal component analysis demonstrated that applying N changed the rhizospheric microbial community composition obviously, and the carbohydrates, carboxylic acids, and amino acids were the sensitive carbon sources differentiating the changes of the microbial community induced by N application. Applying N inhibited the utilization of carbohydrates and carboxylic acids but improved the utilization of amino acids and phenolic acids by the rhizospheric microbes, which could be one of the main reasons of applying N being able to reduce the harm of faba bean fusarium wilt. It was suggested that rationally applying N could increase the

  20. Analysis of the functional gene structure and metabolic potential of microbial community in high arsenic groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Jiang, Zhou; Wang, Yanhong; Deng, Ye; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Yuan, Tong; Liu, Han; Wei, Dazhun; Zhou, Jizhong

    2017-10-15

    Microbial functional potential in high arsenic (As) groundwater ecosystems remains largely unknown. In this study, the microbial community functional composition of nineteen groundwater samples was investigated using a functional gene array (GeoChip 5.0). Samples were divided into low and high As groups based on the clustering analysis of geochemical parameters and microbial functional structures. The results showed that As related genes (arsC, arrA), sulfate related genes (dsrA and dsrB), nitrogen cycling related genes (ureC, amoA, and hzo) and methanogen genes (mcrA, hdrB) in groundwater samples were correlated with As, SO 4 2- , NH 4 + or CH 4 concentrations, respectively. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) results indicated that some geochemical parameters including As, total organic content, SO 4 2- , NH 4 + , oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) and pH were important factors shaping the functional microbial community structures. Alkaline and reducing conditions with relatively low SO 4 2- , ORP, and high NH 4 + , as well as SO 4 2- and Fe reduction and ammonification involved in microbially-mediated geochemical processes could be associated with As enrichment in groundwater. This study provides an overall picture of functional microbial communities in high As groundwater aquifers, and also provides insights into the critical role of microorganisms in As biogeochemical cycling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The woodrat gut microbiota as an experimental system for understanding microbial metabolism of dietary toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin D. Kohl

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The microbial communities inhabiting the alimentary tracts of mammals, particularly those of herbivores, are estimated to be one of the densest microbial reservoirs on Earth. The significance of these gut microbes in influencing the physiology, ecology and evolution of their hosts is only beginning to be realized. To understand the microbiome of herbivores with a focus on nutritional ecology, while evaluating the roles of host evolution and environment in sculpting microbial diversity, we have developed an experimental system consisting of the microbial communities of several species of herbivorous woodrats (genus Neotoma that naturally feed on a variety of dietary toxins. We designed this system to investigate the long-standing, but experimentally neglected hypothesis that ingestion of toxic diets by herbivores is facilitated by the gut microbiota. Like several other rodent species, the woodrat stomach has a sacculated, nongastric foregut portion. We have documented a dense and diverse community of microbes in the woodrat foregut, with several genera potentially capable of degrading dietary toxins and/or playing a role in stimulating hepatic detoxification enzymes of the host. The biodiversity of these gut microbes appears to be a function of host evolution, ecological experience and diet, such that dietary toxins increase microbial diversity in hosts with experience with these toxins while novel toxins depress microbial diversity. These microbial communities are critical to the ingestion of a toxic diet as reducing the microbial community with antibiotics impairs the host’s ability to feed on dietary toxins. Furthermore, the detoxification capacity of gut microbes can be transferred from Neotoma both intra and interspecifically to naïve animals that lack ecological and evolutionary history with these toxins. In addition to advancing our knowledge of complex host-microbes interactions, this system holds promise for identifying microbes that

  2. Effects of Conservation Tillage on Topsoil Microbial Metabolic Characteristics and Organic Carbon within Aggregates under a Rice (Oryza sativa L.) –Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Cropping System in Central China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tian-Qi; Cao, Cou-Gui; Li, Cheng-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Investigating microbial metabolic characteristics and soil organic carbon (SOC) within aggregates and their relationships under conservation tillage may be useful in revealing the mechanism of SOC sequestration in conservation tillage systems. However, limited studies have been conducted to investigate the relationship between SOC and microbial metabolic characteristics within aggregate fractions under conservation tillage. We hypothesized that close relationships can exist between SOC and microbial metabolic characteristics within aggregates under conservation tillage. In this study, a field experiment was conducted from June 2011 to June 2013 following a split-plot design of a randomized complete block with tillage practices [conventional intensive tillage (CT) and no tillage (NT)] as main plots and straw returning methods [preceding crop residue returning (S, 2100−2500 kg C ha−1) and removal (NS, 0 kg C ha-1)] as subplots with three replications. The objective of this study was to reveal the effects of tillage practices and residue-returning methods on topsoil microbial metabolic characteristics and organic carbon (SOC) fractions within aggregates and their relationships under a rice–wheat cropping system in central China. Microbial metabolic characteristics investigated using the Biolog system was examined within two aggregate fractions (>0.25 and 0.25 aggregate, and 0.25 mm aggregate (11.3%), and 0.25 mm aggregate, and 0.25 mm aggregate, and tillage (NT and S) increased microbial metabolic activities and Shannon index in >0.25 and directly improved SOC by promoting DOC in >0.25 mm aggregate in the upper (0−5 cm) soil layer under conservation tillage systems, as well as directly and indirectly by promoting DOC and MBC in tillage increased SOC in aggregates in the topsoil by improving microbial metabolic activities. PMID:26731654

  3. Microbial pathways in colonic sulfur metabolism and links with health and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franck eCarbonero

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Sulfur is both crucial to life and a potential threat to health. While colonic sulfur metabolism mediated by eukaryotic cells is relatively well studied, much less is known about sulfur metabolism within gastrointestinal microbes. Sulfated compounds in the colon are either of inorganic (e.g., sulfates, sulfites or organic (e.g., dietary amino acids and host mucins origin. The most extensively studied of the microbes involved in colonic sulfur metabolism are the sulfate-reducing bacteria, which are common colonic inhabitants. Many other microbial pathways are likely to shape colonic sulfur metabolism as well as the composition and availability of sulfated compounds, and these interactions need to be examined in more detail. Hydrogen sulfide is the sulfur derivative that has attracted the most attention in the context of colonic health, and the extent to which it is detrimental or beneficial remains in debate. Several lines of evidence point to sulfate-reducing bacteria or exogenous hydrogen sulfide as potential players in the etiology of intestinal disorders, inflammatory bowel diseases and colorectal cancer in particular. Generation of hydrogen sulfide via pathways other than dissimilatory sulfate reduction may be as, or more, important than those involving the sulfate-reducing bacteria. We suggest here that a novel axis of research is to assess the effects of hydrogen sulfide in shaping colonic microbiome structure. Clearly, in-depth characterization of the microbial pathways involved in colonic sulfur metabolism is necessary for a better understanding of its contribution to colonic disorders and development of therapeutic strategies.

  4. Soil Metabolome and Metabolic Fate: Microbial Insights into Freshwater Tidal Wetland Redox Biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy Chowdhury, T.; Bramer, L.; Hoyt, D. W.; Kim, Y. M.; Metz, T. O.; McCue, L. A.; Jansson, J.; Bailey, V. L.

    2017-12-01

    Earth System Models predict climate extremes that will impact regional and global hydrology. Aquatic-terrestrial transition zones like wetlands will experience the immediate consequence of climate change as shifts in the magnitude and dynamics of hydrologic flow. Such fluctuating hydrology can alter the structure and function of the soil microbial populations that in turn will alter the nature and rate of biogeochemical transformations and significantly impact the carbon balance of the ecosystem. We tested the impacts of shifting hydrology on the soil microbiome and the role of antecedent moisture condition on redox active microbial processes in soils sampled from a tidal freshwater wetland system in the lower Columbia River, WA, USA. Our objectives were to characterize changes in the soil microbial community composition in response to soil moisture legacy effects, and to elucidate relationships between community response, geochemical signatures and metabolite profiles in this soil. The 16S rRNA gene sequencing showed significant decreases in bacterial abundance capable of anaerobic metabolism in response to drying, but quickly recovered to the antecedent moisture condition, as observed by redox processes. Metabolomics and biogeochemical process rates generated evidence for moisture-driven redox conditions as principal controls on the community and metabolic function. Fluctuating redox conditions altered terminal electron acceptor and donor availability and recovery strengths of these pools in soil such that a disproportionate release of carbon dioxide stemmed from alternative anaerobic degradation processes like sulfate and iron reduction in compared to methanogenesis. Our results show that anoxic conditions impact microbial communities in both permanently and temporarily saturated conditions and that rapid change in hydrology can increase substrate availability for both aerobic and anaerobic decomposition processes, including methanogenesis.

  5. Marked Response in Microbial Community and Metabolism in the Ileum and Cecum of Suckling Piglets After Early Antibiotics Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao Yu

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In modern swine husbandry systems, antibiotics have been used as growth promoters for piglets during suckling or weaning period. However, while early colonization of intestinal microbiota has been regarded crucial for the host’s later life performance and well-being, little is known about the impact of antibiotics on intestinal microbiota in suckling piglets. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of early antibiotics exposure on gut microbiota and microbial metabolism of suckling piglets. Sixteen litters of suckling piglets were fed a creep feed diet with (Antibiotic or without (Control antibiotics from postnatal days 7–23 (n = 8. The ileal and cecal digesta were obtained for microbial composition and microbial metabolites analysis. The results showed that the antibiotics significantly altered the bacterial community composition by decreasing (P < 0.05 the diversity and richness in the ileum. The antibiotics significantly reduced the abundance of Lactobacillus in both the ileum and cecum, increased the abundance of Streptococcus, unclassified Enterococcaceae, unclassified Fusobacteriales, and Corynebacterium in the ileum, and the abundance of unclassified Ruminococcaceae and unclassified Erysipelotrichaceae in the cecum. The antibiotics decreased (P < 0.05 ileal lactate concentration and cecal concentration of total short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs. But the antibiotics enhanced protein fermentation (P < 0.05 in the ileum and cecum, as ileal concentrations of putrescine and cadaverine, and cecal concentrations of isobutyrate, isovalerate, putrescine, cadaverine, spermine, and spermidine were significantly increased (P < 0.05. These results indicated that early antibiotics exposure significantly altered the microbial composition of suckling piglets toward a vulnerable and unhealthy gut environment. The findings provide a new insight on the antibiotics impact on neonates and may provide new framework for designing alternatives to the

  6. Sulfur metabolizing microbes dominate microbial communities in Andesite-hosted shallow-sea hydrothermal systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yao; Zhao, Zihao; Chen, Chen-Tung Arthur; Tang, Kai; Su, Jianqiang; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2012-01-01

    To determine microbial community composition, community spatial structure and possible key microbial processes in the shallow-sea hydrothermal vent systems off NE Taiwan's coast, we examined the bacterial and archaeal communities of four samples collected from the water column extending over a redoxocline gradient of a yellow and four from a white hydrothermal vent. Ribosomal tag pyrosequencing based on DNA and RNA showed statistically significant differences between the bacterial and archaeal communities of the different hydrothermal plumes. The bacterial and archaeal communities from the white hydrothermal plume were dominated by sulfur-reducing Nautilia and Thermococcus, whereas the yellow hydrothermal plume and the surface water were dominated by sulfide-oxidizing Thiomicrospira and Euryarchaeota Marine Group II, respectively. Canonical correspondence analyses indicate that methane (CH(4)) concentration was the only statistically significant variable that explains all community cluster patterns. However, the results of pyrosequencing showed an essential absence of methanogens and methanotrophs at the two vent fields, suggesting that CH(4) was less tied to microbial processes in this shallow-sea hydrothermal system. We speculated that mixing between hydrothermal fluids and the sea or meteoric water leads to distinctly different CH(4) concentrations and redox niches between the yellow and white vents, consequently influencing the distribution patterns of the free-living Bacteria and Archaea. We concluded that sulfur-reducing and sulfide-oxidizing chemolithoautotrophs accounted for most of the primary biomass synthesis and that microbial sulfur metabolism fueled microbial energy flow and element cycling in the shallow hydrothermal systems off the coast of NE Taiwan.

  7. Sulfur metabolizing microbes dominate microbial communities in Andesite-hosted shallow-sea hydrothermal systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Zhang

    Full Text Available To determine microbial community composition, community spatial structure and possible key microbial processes in the shallow-sea hydrothermal vent systems off NE Taiwan's coast, we examined the bacterial and archaeal communities of four samples collected from the water column extending over a redoxocline gradient of a yellow and four from a white hydrothermal vent. Ribosomal tag pyrosequencing based on DNA and RNA showed statistically significant differences between the bacterial and archaeal communities of the different hydrothermal plumes. The bacterial and archaeal communities from the white hydrothermal plume were dominated by sulfur-reducing Nautilia and Thermococcus, whereas the yellow hydrothermal plume and the surface water were dominated by sulfide-oxidizing Thiomicrospira and Euryarchaeota Marine Group II, respectively. Canonical correspondence analyses indicate that methane (CH(4 concentration was the only statistically significant variable that explains all community cluster patterns. However, the results of pyrosequencing showed an essential absence of methanogens and methanotrophs at the two vent fields, suggesting that CH(4 was less tied to microbial processes in this shallow-sea hydrothermal system. We speculated that mixing between hydrothermal fluids and the sea or meteoric water leads to distinctly different CH(4 concentrations and redox niches between the yellow and white vents, consequently influencing the distribution patterns of the free-living Bacteria and Archaea. We concluded that sulfur-reducing and sulfide-oxidizing chemolithoautotrophs accounted for most of the primary biomass synthesis and that microbial sulfur metabolism fueled microbial energy flow and element cycling in the shallow hydrothermal systems off the coast of NE Taiwan.

  8. Nitrogen metabolism and microbial production of dairy cows fed sugarcane and nitrogen compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalves,Geógenes da Silva; Pedreira,Marcio dos Santos; Pereira,Mara Lúcia Albuquerque; Santos,Dimas Oliveira; Souza,Dicastro Dias de; Porto Junior,Antonio Ferraz

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of dairy cow diets containing two different sources of urea on nitrogen metabolism and microbial synthesis. Eight crossbred cows were confined and distributed in two 4x4 Latin: FS - soybean meal (control), conventional urea (UC) 100%; ULL 44 UC = 56% / 44% ULL, ULL 88 UC = 12% / 88% ULL. Diets were offered to animals during 21 days with 14 days of adaptation. The N intake, retained nitrogen balance, nitrogen excretion in milk, urine, feces and ...

  9. Metabolic commensalism and competition in a two-species microbial consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bjarke Bak; Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Heydorn, Arne

    2002-01-01

    We analyzed metabolic interactions and the importance of specific structural relationships in a benzyl alcohol-degrading microbial consortium comprising two species, Pseudomonas putida strain R1 and Acinetobacter strain C6, both of which are able to utilize benzyl alcohol as their sole carbon...... alcohol, which apparently gives Acinetobacter strain C6 a growth advantage, probably because it converts benzyl alcohol to benzoate with a higher yield per time unit than P. putida R1. In biofilms, however, the organisms establish structured, surface-attached consortia, in which heterogeneous ecological...... niches develop, and under these conditions competition for the primary carbon source is not the only determinant of biomass and population structure....

  10. The JBEI quantitative metabolic modeling library (jQMM): a python library for modeling microbial metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkel, Garrett W.; Ghosh, Amit; Kumar, Vinay S.

    2017-01-01

    analysis, new methods for the effective use of the ever more readily available and abundant -omics data (i.e. transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics) are urgently needed.Results: The jQMM library presented here provides an open-source, Python-based framework for modeling internal metabolic fluxes......, it introduces the capability to use C-13 labeling experimental data to constrain comprehensive genome-scale models through a technique called two-scale C-13 Metabolic Flux Analysis (2S-C-13 MFA). In addition, the library includes a demonstration of a method that uses proteomics data to produce actionable...... insights to increase biofuel production. Finally, the use of the jQMM library is illustrated through the addition of several Jupyter notebook demonstration files that enhance reproducibility and provide the capability to be adapted to the user's specific needs.Conclusions: jQMM will facilitate the design...

  11. Effect of Microbial Interaction on Urea Metabolism in Chinese Liquor Fermentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Qun; Lin, Jianchun; Cui, Kaixiang; Du, Rubin; Zhu, Yang; Xu, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Urea is the primary precursor of the carcinogen ethyl carbamate in fermented foods. Understanding urea metabolism is important for controlling ethyl carbamate production. Using Chinese liquor as a model system, we used metatranscriptome analysis to investigate urea metabolism in spontaneous food

  12. Characterization of the microbial community composition and the distribution of Fe-metabolizing bacteria in a creek contaminated by acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Weimin; Xiao, Enzong; Krumins, Valdis; Dong, Yiran; Xiao, Tangfu; Ning, Zengping; Chen, Haiyan; Xiao, Qingxiang

    2016-10-01

    A small watershed heavily contaminated by long-term acid mine drainage (AMD) from an upstream abandoned coal mine was selected to study the microbial community developed in such extreme system. The watershed consists of AMD-contaminated creek, adjacent contaminated soils, and a small cascade aeration unit constructed downstream, which provide an excellent contaminated site to study the microbial response in diverse extreme AMD-polluted environments. The results showed that the innate microbial communities were dominated by acidophilic bacteria, especially acidophilic Fe-metabolizing bacteria, suggesting that Fe and pH are the primary environmental factors in governing the indigenous microbial communities. The distribution of Fe-metabolizing bacteria showed distinct site-specific patterns. A pronounced shift from diverse communities in the upstream to Proteobacteria-dominated communities in the downstream was observed in the ecosystem. This location-specific trend was more apparent at genus level. In the upstream samples (sampling sites just below the coal mining adit), a number of Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria such as Alicyclobacillus spp., Metallibacterium spp., and Acidithrix spp. were dominant, while Halomonas spp. were the major Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria observed in downstream samples. Additionally, Acidiphilium, an Fe(III)-reducing bacterium, was enriched in the upstream samples, while Shewanella spp. were the dominant Fe(III)-reducing bacteria in downstream samples. Further investigation using linear discriminant analysis (LDA) effect size (LEfSe), principal coordinate analysis (PCoA), and unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) clustering confirmed the difference of microbial communities between upstream and downstream samples. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) and Spearman's rank correlation indicate that total organic carbon (TOC) content is the primary environmental parameter in structuring the indigenous microbial communities

  13. Investigation on liver fast metabolism with CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebener, K.H.; Schmitt, W.G.H.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of the density of normal and diffusely diseased liver parenchyma show a significant difference only in fatty liver. A linear relationship between the fat content and physical density has been demonstrated. Computed tomographic densitometry of liver tissue correlates well with physical in vitro measurements of fat content and is sufficiently accurate for clinical use. Other types of liver diseases cannot be differentiated by densitometry, Lipolisis in fatty liver in chronic alcoholism alcohol withdrawal has been investigated. It has been found that a rate of decrease of the fatty degeneration of the liver equals to 1 percent/day. Fatty degeneration of the liver in acute pancreatitis and other diseases have been also investigated. CT densitometry of the liver should be considered as a useful routine clinical method to determine the fat content of liver. (author)

  14. Investigation on liver fast metabolism with CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huebener, K.H.; Schmitt, W.G.H. (Heidelberg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Pathologisches Inst.)

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of the density of normal and diffusely diseased liver parenchyma show a significant difference only in fatty liver. A linear relationship between the fat content and physical density has been demonstrated. Computed tomographic densitometry of liver tissue correlates well with physical in vitro measurements of fat content and is sufficiently accurate for clinical use. Other types of liver diseases cannot be differentiated by densitometry, Lipolisis in fatty liver in chronic alcoholism alcohol withdrawal has been investigated. It has been found that a rate of decrease of the fatty degeneration of the liver equals to 1 percent/day. Fatty degeneration of the liver in acute pancreatitis and other diseases have been also investigated. CT densitometry of the liver should be considered as a useful routine clinical method to determine the fat content of liver.

  15. Advances in metabolic engineering in the microbial production of fuels and chemicals from C1 gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Christopher M; Minton, Nigel P

    2018-04-01

    The future sustainable production of chemicals and fuels from non-petrochemical sources, while at the same time reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, represent two of society's greatest challenges. Microbial chassis able to grow on waste carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) can provide solutions to both. Ranging from the anaerobic acetogens, through the aerobic chemoautotrophs to the photoautotrophic cyanobacteria, they are able to convert C1 gases into a range of chemicals and fuels which may be enhanced and extended through appropriate metabolic engineering. The necessary improvements will be facilitated by the increasingly sophisticated gene tools that are beginning to emerge as part of the Synthetic Biology revolution. These tools, in combination with more accurate metabolic and genome scale models, will enable C1 chassis to deliver their full potential. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Investigations on ileal microbial flora in weaning piglets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klüss, J.; Akkermans, A.D.L.; Konstantinov, S.R.; Kwella, M.; Kuhla, S.; Souffrant, W.B.

    2003-01-01

    To characterize ileal microbial flora in weaning piglets a slaughter trial was conducted. 224 German Landrace piglets of both genders were allocated to four different feeding regimes (with or without avilamycin, 3 resp. 8 % crude fibre content). At predefined times pre- and postweaning piglets were

  17. Computational design of auxotrophy-dependent microbial biosensors for combinatorial metabolic engineering experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepper, Naama; Shlomi, Tomer

    2011-01-21

    Combinatorial approaches in metabolic engineering work by generating genetic diversity in a microbial population followed by screening for strains with improved phenotypes. One of the most common goals in this field is the generation of a high rate chemical producing strain. A major hurdle with this approach is that many chemicals do not have easy to recognize attributes, making their screening expensive and time consuming. To address this problem, it was previously suggested to use microbial biosensors to facilitate the detection and quantification of chemicals of interest. Here, we present novel computational methods to: (i) rationally design microbial biosensors for chemicals of interest based on substrate auxotrophy that would enable their high-throughput screening; (ii) predict engineering strategies for coupling the synthesis of a chemical of interest with the production of a proxy metabolite for which high-throughput screening is possible via a designed bio-sensor. The biosensor design method is validated based on known genetic modifications in an array of E. coli strains auxotrophic to various amino-acids. Predicted chemical production rates achievable via the biosensor-based approach are shown to potentially improve upon those predicted by current rational strain design approaches. (A Matlab implementation of the biosensor design method is available via http://www.cs.technion.ac.il/~tomersh/tools).

  18. Hydrodynamic chronoamperometry for probing kinetics of anaerobic microbial metabolism--case study of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prévoteau, Antonin; Geirnaert, Annelies; Arends, Jan B A; Lannebère, Sylvain; Van de Wiele, Tom; Rabaey, Korneel

    2015-07-01

    Monitoring in vitro the metabolic activity of microorganisms aids bioprocesses and enables better understanding of microbial metabolism. Redox mediators can be used for this purpose via different electrochemical techniques that are either complex or only provide non-continuous data. Hydrodynamic chronoamperometry using a rotating disc electrode (RDE) can alleviate these issues but was seldom used and is poorly characterized. The kinetics of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii A2-165, a beneficial gut microbe, were determined using a RDE with riboflavin as redox probe. This butyrate producer anaerobically ferments glucose and reduces riboflavin whose continuous monitoring on a RDE provided highly accurate kinetic measurements of its metabolism, even at low cell densities. The metabolic reaction rate increased linearly over a broad range of cell concentrations (9 × 10(4) to 5 × 10(7) cells.mL(-1)). Apparent Michaelis-Menten kinetics was observed with respect to riboflavin (KM = 6 μM; kcat = 5.3 × 10(5) s(-1), at 37 °C) and glucose (KM = 6 μM; kcat = 2.4 × 10(5) s(-1)). The short temporal resolution allows continuous monitoring of fast cellular events such as kinetics inhibition with butyrate. Furthermore, we detected for the first time riboflavin reduction by another potential probiotic, Butyricicoccus pullicaecorum. The ability of the RDE for fast, accurate, simple and continuous measurements makes it an ad hoc tool for assessing bioprocesses at high resolution.

  19. Microbial metaproteomics for characterizing the range of metabolic functions and activities of human gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Weili; Abraham, Paul E; Li, Zhou; Pan, Chongle; Hettich, Robert L

    2015-10-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract is a complex, dynamic ecosystem that consists of a carefully tuned balance of human host and microbiota membership. The microbiome is not merely a collection of opportunistic parasites, but rather provides important functions to the host that are absolutely critical to many aspects of health, including nutrient transformation and absorption, drug metabolism, pathogen defense, and immune system development. Microbial metaproteomics provides the ability to characterize the human gut microbiota functions and metabolic activities at a remarkably deep level, revealing information about microbiome development and stability as well as their interactions with their human host. Generally, microbial and human proteins can be extracted and then measured by high performance MS-based proteomics technology. Here, we review the field of human gut microbiome metaproteomics, with a focus on the experimental and informatics considerations involved in characterizing systems ranging from low-complexity model gut microbiota in gnotobiotic mice, to the emerging gut microbiome in the GI tract of newborn human infants, and finally to an established gut microbiota in human adults. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Effect of Temperature on Precipitation Rate of Calcium Carbonate Produced through Microbial Metabolic Process of Bio Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prima Yane Putri

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Concrete is the most widely used construction material in civil engineering. But plain concrete is a brittle material and has little resistance to cracking. The cracking in concrete promotes deterioration such as the corrosion of reinforcing rebar, therefore, repair in filling the crack is often carried out. Recently, repair methods using bio-based materials associated with microbial metabolic processes leading to precipitation of calcium carbonate have been intensively studied. In this study, influencing factors on the precipitation rate depending on the constituents of bio-based material comprising yeast, glucose and calcium acetate mixed in tris buffer solution was examined for improving the rate of initial reactions. In addition, effect of temperature change on the amount of calcium carbonate precipitation was also investigated. The precipitates were identified by X-ray diffraction. It was shown that the increase of temperature lead to a change on calcium carbonate precipitation and caused the pH decrease under 7.0.

  1. Methane-metabolizing microbial communities in sediments of the Haima cold seep area, northwest slope of the South China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Mingyang; Fan, Xibei; Zhuang, Guangchao; Liang, Qianyong; Wang, Fengping

    2017-09-01

    Cold seeps are widespread chemosynthetic ecosystems in the deep-sea environment, and cold seep microbial communities of the South China Sea are poorly constrained. Here we report on the archaeal communities, particularly those involved in methane metabolization, in sediments of a newly discovered cold seep (named 'Haima') on the northwest slope of the South China Sea. Archaeal diversity, abundance and distribution were investigated in two piston cores collected from a seep area (QDN-14B) and a non-seep control site (QDN-31B). Geochemical investigation of the QDN-14B core identified an estimated sulfate-methane transition zone (Estimated SMTZ) at 300-400 cm below sea floor (cmbsf), where a high abundance of anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANME) occurred, as revealed by analysis of the 16S rRNA gene and the gene (mcrA) encoding the α-subunit of the key enzyme methyl-coenzyme M reductase. ANME-2a/b was predominant in the upper and middle layers of the estimated SMTZ, whereas ANME-1b outcompeted ANME-2 in the sulfate-depleted bottom layers of the estimated SMTZ and the methanogenic zone. Fine-scale phylogenetic analysis further divided the ANME-1b group into three subgroups with different distribution patterns: ANME-1bI, ANME-1bII and ANME-1bIII. Multivariate analyses indicated that dissolved inorganic carbon and sulfate may be important factors controlling the composition of the methane-metabolizing community. Our study on ANME niche separation and interactions with other archaeal groups improves our understanding of the metabolic diversity and flexibility of ANME, and the findings further suggest that ANME subgroups may have evolved diversified/specified metabolic capabilities other than syntrophic anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled with sulfate reduction in marine sediments. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Effects of Pheretima Guillelmi Cultivation Time on Microbial Community Diversity and Characteristics of Carbon Metabolism in Vegetable Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHENG Xian-qing

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the effect of different biological tillage time (Pheretima guillelmi on soil microbial community metabolic functions in different soil depths, we set a location test in vegetable field at Chongming Island in Shanghai to analyze the changes of soil microbial community and carbon utilization abilities (Average well- color development, AWCD by using biolog eco-plate method. The three-year results showed that: Bio-tillage significantly improved microbial community activity, and with the increase of tillage years, biological tillage could make the average AWCD 3 to 7 times higher. The Simpson index and Shannon index of the biological tillage treatments were significantly higher than that of the control. The cumulative increase of 0~5 cm soil layer was 49 and 6.28 respectively, and the cumulative increase of 5~20 cm soil layer was 31 and 2.55 respectively. Earthworm bio-tillage significantly increased the soil microbial metabolic ability of 6 kinds of carbon sources, and increased the carbohydrate metabolism activity. In this study, earthworm bio-tillage is an effective way to increase the microbial activity of microbial soil.

  3. Using isotopic tracers to assess the impact of tillage and straw management on the microbial metabolic network in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Groenigen, K.; Forristal, D.; Jones, M. B.; Schwartz, E.; Hungate, B. A.; Dijkstra, P.

    2013-12-01

    By decomposing soil organic matter, microbes gain energy and building blocks for biosynthesis and release CO2 to the atmosphere. Therefore, insight into the effect of management practices on microbial metabolic pathways and C use efficiency (CUE; microbial C produced per substrate C utilized) may help to predict long term changes in soil C stocks. We studied the effects of reduced (RT) and conventional tillage (CT) on the microbial central C metabolic network, using soil samples from a 12-year-old field experiment in an Irish winter wheat cropping system. Each year after harvest, straw was removed from half of the RT and CT plots or incorporated into the soil in the other half, resulting in four treatment combinations. We added 1-13C and 2,3-13C pyruvate and 1-13C and U-13C glucose as metabolic tracer isotopomers to composite soil samples taken at two depths (0-15 cm and 15-30 cm) from each treatment and used the rate of position-specific respired 13CO2 to parameterize a metabolic model. Model outcomes were then used to calculate CUE of the microbial community. We found that the composite samples differed in CUE, but the changes were small, with values ranging between 0.757-0.783 across treatments and soil depth. Increases in CUE were associated with a decrease in tricarboxylic acid cycle and reductive pentose phosphate pathway activity and increased consumption of metabolic intermediates for biosynthesis. Our results indicate that RT and straw incorporation promote soil C storage without substantially changing CUE or any of the microbial metabolic pathways. This suggests that at our site, RT and straw incorporation promote soil C storage mostly through direct effects such as increased soil C input and physical protection from decomposition, rather than by feedback responses of the microbial community.

  4. Investigating the Swimming of Microbial Pathogens Using Digital Holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, K L; Findlay, R C; Walrad, P B; Wilson, L G

    2016-01-01

    To understand much of the behaviour of microbial pathogens, it is necessary to image living cells, their interactions with each other and with host cells. Species such as Escherichia coli are difficult subjects to image: they are typically microscopic, colourless and transparent. Traditional cell visualisation techniques such as fluorescent tagging or phase-contrast microscopy give excellent information on cell behaviour in two dimensions, but no information about cells moving in three dimensions. We review the use of digital holographic microscopy for three-dimensional imaging at high speeds, and demonstrate its use for capturing the shape and swimming behaviour of three important model pathogens: E. coli, Plasmodium spp. and Leishmania spp.

  5. Genome-enabled Modeling of Microbial Biogeochemistry using a Trait-based Approach. Does Increasing Metabolic Complexity Increase Predictive Capabilities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, E.; Karaoz, U.; Molins, S.; Bouskill, N.; Anantharaman, K.; Beller, H. R.; Banfield, J. F.; Steefel, C. I.; Brodie, E.

    2015-12-01

    The biogeochemical functioning of ecosystems is shaped in part by genomic information stored in the subsurface microbiome. Cultivation-independent approaches allow us to extract this information through reconstruction of thousands of genomes from a microbial community. Analysis of these genomes, in turn, gives an indication of the organisms present and their functional roles. However, metagenomic analyses can currently deliver thousands of different genomes that range in abundance/importance, requiring the identification and assimilation of key physiologies and metabolisms to be represented as traits for successful simulation of subsurface processes. Here we focus on incorporating -omics information into BioCrunch, a genome-informed trait-based model that represents the diversity of microbial functional processes within a reactive transport framework. This approach models the rate of nutrient uptake and the thermodynamics of coupled electron donors and acceptors for a range of microbial metabolisms including heterotrophs and chemolithotrophs. Metabolism of exogenous substrates fuels catabolic and anabolic processes, with the proportion of energy used for cellular maintenance, respiration, biomass development, and enzyme production based upon dynamic intracellular and environmental conditions. This internal resource partitioning represents a trade-off against biomass formation and results in microbial community emergence across a fitness landscape. Biocrunch was used here in simulations that included organisms and metabolic pathways derived from a dataset of ~1200 non-redundant genomes reflecting a microbial community in a floodplain aquifer. Metagenomic data was directly used to parameterize trait values related to growth and to identify trait linkages associated with respiration, fermentation, and key enzymatic functions such as plant polymer degradation. Simulations spanned a range of metabolic complexities and highlight benefits originating from simulations

  6. IMGMD: A platform for the integration and standardisation of In silico Microbial Genome-scale Metabolic Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chao; Xu, Nan; Dong, Chuan; Ye, Yuannong; Zou, Xuan; Chen, Xiulai; Guo, Fengbiao; Liu, Liming

    2017-04-07

    Genome-scale metabolic models (GSMMs) constitute a platform that combines genome sequences and detailed biochemical information to quantify microbial physiology at the system level. To improve the unity, integrity, correctness, and format of data in published GSMMs, a consensus IMGMD database was built in the LAMP (Linux + Apache + MySQL + PHP) system by integrating and standardizing 328 GSMMs constructed for 139 microorganisms. The IMGMD database can help microbial researchers download manually curated GSMMs, rapidly reconstruct standard GSMMs, design pathways, and identify metabolic targets for strategies on strain improvement. Moreover, the IMGMD database facilitates the integration of wet-lab and in silico data to gain an additional insight into microbial physiology. The IMGMD database is freely available, without any registration requirements, at http://imgmd.jiangnan.edu.cn/database.

  7. Hydrodynamic chronoamperometry for probing kinetics of anaerobic microbial metabolism - case study of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prévoteau, Antonin; Geirnaert, Annelies; Arends, Jan B. A.; Lannebère, Sylvain; van de Wiele, Tom; Rabaey, Korneel

    2015-07-01

    Monitoring in vitro the metabolic activity of microorganisms aids bioprocesses and enables better understanding of microbial metabolism. Redox mediators can be used for this purpose via different electrochemical techniques that are either complex or only provide non-continuous data. Hydrodynamic chronoamperometry using a rotating disc electrode (RDE) can alleviate these issues but was seldom used and is poorly characterized. The kinetics of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii A2-165, a beneficial gut microbe, were determined using a RDE with riboflavin as redox probe. This butyrate producer anaerobically ferments glucose and reduces riboflavin whose continuous monitoring on a RDE provided highly accurate kinetic measurements of its metabolism, even at low cell densities. The metabolic reaction rate increased linearly over a broad range of cell concentrations (9 × 104 to 5 × 107 cells.mL-1). Apparent Michaelis-Menten kinetics was observed with respect to riboflavin (KM = 6 μM kcat = 5.3×105 s-1, at 37 °C) and glucose (KM = 6 μM kcat = 2.4 × 105 s-1). The short temporal resolution allows continuous monitoring of fast cellular events such as kinetics inhibition with butyrate. Furthermore, we detected for the first time riboflavin reduction by another potential probiotic, Butyricicoccus pullicaecorum. The ability of the RDE for fast, accurate, simple and continuous measurements makes it an ad hoc tool for assessing bioprocesses at high resolution.

  8. Investigating Microbial Habitats in Hydrothermal Chimneys using Ti-Thermocouple Arrays: Microbial Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagé, A.; Tivey, M. K.; Stakes, D. S.; Bradley, A. M.; Seewald, J. S.; Wheat, C. G.; Reysenbach, A.

    2004-12-01

    In order to examine the changes that occur in the microbial community composition as a deep-sea hydrothermal vent chimney develops, we deployed Ti-thermocouple arrays over high temperature vents at two active sites of the Guaymas Basin Southern Trough. Chimney material that precipitated around the arrays was recovered after 4 and 72 days. Chimney material that precipitated prior to deployment of the arrays was also recovered at one of the sites (Busted Shroom). Culture-independent analysis based on the small subunit rRNA sequence (cloning and DGGE) was used to determine the microbial diversity associated with subsamples of each chimney. The original Busted Shroom chimney (BSO) was dominated by members of the Crenarchaeota Marine Group I, a group of cosmopolitan marine Archaea, ɛ -Proteobacteria, and γ -Proteobacteria, two divisions of Bacteria that are common to deep-sea vents. The 4 days old Busted Shroom chimney (BSD1) was dominated by members of the Methanocaldococcaceae, hyperthermophilic methanogens, and the 72 days old chimney (BSD2) by members of the Methanosarcinaceae, mesophilic and thermophilic methanogens. At the second site, Toadstool, the 72 days old chimney material that had precipitated around the array (TS) revealed the dominance of sequences from uncultured marine Archaea, the DHVE group I and II, and from the ɛ -Proteobacteria. Additionally, sequences belonging to the Methanocaldococcaceae and Desulfurococcaceae were recovered next to thermocouples that were at temperatures of 109° C (at Busted Shroom) and 116° C (at Toadstool), respectively. These temperatures are higher than the upper limit for growth of cultured representatives from each family.

  9. Characterization of microbial metabolism of Syrah grape products in an in vitro colon model using targeted and non-targeted analytical approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aura, Anna-Marja; Mattila, Ismo; Hyötyläinen, Tuulia; Gopalacharyulu, Peddinti; Cheynier, Veronique; Souquet, Jean-Marc; Bes, Magali; Le Bourvellec, Carine; Guyot, Sylvain; Orešič, Matej

    2013-03-01

    Syrah red grapes are used in the production of tannin-rich red wines. Tannins are high molecular weight molecules, proanthocyanidins (PAs), and poorly absorbed in the upper intestine. In this study, gut microbial metabolism of Syrah grape phenolic compounds was investigated. Syrah grape pericarp was subjected to an enzymatic in vitro digestion model, and red wine and grape skin PA fraction were prepared. Microbial conversion was screened using an in vitro colon model with faecal microbiota, by measurement of short-chain fatty acids by gas chromatography (GC) and microbial phenolic metabolites using GC with mass detection (GC-MS). Red wine metabolites were further profiled using two-dimensional GC mass spectrometry (GCxGC-TOFMS). In addition, the effect of PA structure and dose on conversion efficiency was investigated by GC-MS. Red wine exhibited a higher degree of C1-C3 phenolic acid formation than PA fraction or grape pericarp powders. Hydroxyphenyl valeric acid (flavanols and PAs as precursors) and 3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxybenzoic acid (anthocyanin as a precursor) were identified from the red wine metabolite profile. In the absence of native grape pericarp or red wine matrix, the isolated PAs were found to be effective in the dose-dependent inhibition of microbial conversions and short-chain fatty acid formation. Metabolite profiling was complementary to targeted analysis. The identified metabolites had biological relevance, because the structures of the metabolites resembled fragments of their grape phenolic precursors or were in agreement with literature data.

  10. Reply to 'Comment on kinetic modeling of microbially-driven redox chemistry of subsurface environments: coupling transport, microbial metabolism and geochemistry' by J. Griffioen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, K. S.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2000-01-01

    Our paper, 'Kinetic modeling of microbially-driven redox chemistry of subsurface environments: coupling transport, microbial metabolism and geochemistry' (Hunter et al., 1998), presents a theoretical exploration of biogeochemical reaction networks and their importance to the biogeochemistry of groundwater systems. As with any other model, the kinetic reaction-transport model developed in our paper includes only a subset of all physically, biologically and chemically relevant processes in subsurface environments. It considers aquifer systems where the primary energy source driving microbial activity is the degradation of organic matter. In addition to the primary biodegradation pathways of organic matter (i.e. respiration and fermentation), the redox chemistry of groundwaters is also affected by reactions not directly involving organic matter oxidation. We refer to the latter as secondary reactions. By including secondary redox reactions which consume reduced reaction products (e.g., Mn2+, FeS, H2S), and in the process compete with microbial heterotrophic populations for available oxidants (i.e. O2, NO3-, Mn(IV), Fe(III), SO42-), we predict spatio-temporal distributions of microbial activity which differ significantly from those of models which consider only the biodegradation reactions. That is, the secondary reactions have a significant impact on the distributions of the rates of heterotrophic and chemolithotrophic metabolic pathways. We further show that secondary redox reactions, as well as non-redox reactions, significantly influence the acid-base chemistry of groundwaters. The distributions of dissolved inorganic redox species along flowpaths, however, are similar in simulations with and without secondary reactions (see Figs. 3(b) and 7(b) in Hunter et al., 1998), indicating that very different biogeochemical reaction dynamics may lead to essentially the same chemical redox zonation of a groundwater system.

  11. Unusual metabolic diversity of hyperalkaliphilic microbial communities associated with subterranean serpentinization at The Cedars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shino; Ishii, Shun'ichi; Hoshino, Tatsuhiko; Rietze, Amanda; Tenney, Aaron; Morrill, Penny L; Inagaki, Fumio; Kuenen, J Gijs; Nealson, Kenneth H

    2017-11-01

    Water from The Cedars springs that discharge from serpentinized ultramafic rocks feature highly basic (pH=~12), highly reducing (E h serpentinizing system, was dominated by several bacterial taxa from the phyla OD1 ('Parcubacteria') and Chloroflexi. Members of the GPS1 community had, for the most part, the smallest genomes reported for their respective taxa, and encoded only archaeal (A-type) ATP synthases or no ATP synthases at all. Furthermore, none of the members encoded respiration-related genes and some of the members also did not encode key biosynthesis-related genes. In contrast, BS5, fed by shallow water, appears to have a community driven by hydrogen metabolism and was dominated by a diverse group of Proteobacteria similar to those seen in many terrestrial serpentinization sites. Our findings indicated that the harsh ultrabasic geological setting supported unexpectedly diverse microbial metabolic strategies and that the deep-water-fed springs supported a community that was remarkable in its unusual metagenomic and genomic constitution.

  12. The effect of gluten on the host-microbial metabolism assessed by urinary metabolomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roager, Henrik Munch; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz; Gøbel, Rikke Juul

    A gluten-free diet clearly improves the life of patients with celiac disease, but the scientific evidence supporting possible health benefits of a gluten-free diet for non-celiac adults is limited. Therefore, as urine reflects the host and gut microbial metabolism, the study aimed to assess...... a gluten-rich (21.6±5.7g/day) or a gluten-poor (~1g/day) diet for 8 weeks, crossing over to the other diet after 6 weeks washout. Urine samples were standardised collected at the beginning and end of each diet intervention period and were analysed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid...... the long-term metabolic effect of gluten on the urine metabolome of non-celiac individuals by a cross-over intervention study (gluten-poor and gluten rich, respectively) using a non-targeted metabolomics approach. Fifty-one non-celiac adult participants (30 female, 21 male) were randomized to either...

  13. In situ metabolism in halite endolithic microbial communities of the hyperarid Atacama Desert

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso F Davila

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Atacama Desert of northern Chile is one of the driest regions on Earth, with areas that exclude plants and where soils have extremely low microbial biomass. However, in the driest parts of the desert there are microorganisms that colonize the interior of halite nodules in fossil continental evaporites, where they are sustained by condensation of atmospheric water triggered by the salt substrate. Using a combination of in situ observations of variable chlorophyll fluorescence and controlled laboratory experiments, we show that this endolithic community is capable of carbon fixation both through oxygenic photosynthesis and potentially ammonia oxidation. We also present evidence that photosynthetic activity is finely tuned to moisture availability and solar insolation and can be sustained for days, and perhaps longer, after a wetting event. This is the first demonstration of in situ active metabolism in the hyperarid core of the Atacama Desert, and it provides the basis for proposing a self-contained, endolithic community that relies exclusively on non-rainfall sources of water. Our results contribute to an increasing body of evidence that even in hyperarid environments active metabolism, adaptation and growth can occur in highly specialized microhabitats.

  14. Microbial food webs and metabolic state across oligotrophic waters of the Mediterranean Sea during summer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Christaki

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The abundance and activity of the major members of the heterotrophic microbial community – from viruses to ciliates – were studied along a longitudinal transect across the Mediterranean Sea in the summer of 2008. The Mediterranean Sea is characterized by a west to-east gradient of deepening of DCM (deep chlorophyll maximum and increasing oligotrophy reflected in gradients of biomass and production. However, within this well documented longitudinal trend, hydrological mesoscale features exist and likely influence microbial dynamics. Here we present data from a W-E transect of 17 stations during the period of summer stratification. Along the transect the production and fate of organic matter was investigated at three selected sites each one located in the centre of an anticyclonic eddy: in the Algero-Provencal Basin (St. A, the Ionian Basin (St. B, and the Levantine Basin (St. C. The 3 geographically distant eddies showed low values of the different heterotrophic compartments of the microbial food web, and except for viruses in site C, all integrated (0–150 m stocks were higher in reference stations located in the same basin outside the eddies. During our study the 3 eddies showed equilibrium between GPP (Gross Primary Production and DCR (Dark Community Respiration. Integrated PPp (Particulate Primary Production values at A, B and C varied from ~140 to ~190 mg C m−2.

  15. Metabolic Potential and Activity in Fluids of the Coast Range Ophiolite Microbial Observatory, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehler, T.; Som, S.; Schrenk, M.; McCollom, T.; Cardace, D.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic potential and activity associated with hydrogen and carbon monoxide were characterized in fluids sampled from the the Coast Range Ophiolite Microbial Observatory (CROMO). CROMO consists of two clusters of science-dedicated wells drilled to varying depths up to 35m in the actively serpentinizing, Jurassic-age Coast Range Ophiolite of Northern California, along with a suite of pre-existing monitoring wells at the same site. Consistent with the fluid chemistry observed in other serpentinizing systems, CROMO fluids are highly alkaline, with pH up to 12.5, high in methane, with concentrations up 1600 micromolar, and low in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), with concentrations of 10's to 100's of micromolar. CROMO is conspicuous for fluid H2 concentrations that are consistently sub-micromolar, orders of magnitude lower than is typical of other systems. However, higher H2 concentrations (10's -100's of micromolar) at an earlier stage of fluid chemical evolution are predicted by, or consistent with: thermodynamic models for fluid chemistry based on parent rock composition equivalent to local peridotite and with water:rock ratio constrained by observed pH; the presence of magnetite at several wt% in CROMO drill cores; and concentrations of formate and carbon monoxide that would require elevated H2 if formed in equilibrium with H2 and DIC. Calculated Gibbs energy changes for reaction of H2 and CO in each of several metabolisms, across the range of fluid composition encompassed by the CROMO wells, range from bioenergetically feasible (capable of driving ATP synthesis) to thermodynamically unfavorable. Active consumption relative to killed controls was observed for both CO and H2 during incubation of fluids from the pre-existing monitoring wells; in incubations of freshly cored solids, consumption was only observed in one sample set (corresponding to the lowest pH) out of three. The specific metabolisms by which H2 and CO are consumed remain to be determined.

  16. Investigating cholesterol metabolism and ageing using a systems biology approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, A E; Mooney, K M; Wilkinson, S J; Pickles, N A; Mc Auley, M T

    2017-08-01

    CVD accounted for 27 % of all deaths in the UK in 2014, and was responsible for 1·7 million hospital admissions in 2013/2014. This condition becomes increasingly prevalent with age, affecting 34·1 and 29·8 % of males and females over 75 years of age respectively in 2011. The dysregulation of cholesterol metabolism with age, often observed as a rise in LDL-cholesterol, has been associated with the pathogenesis of CVD. To compound this problem, it is estimated by 2050, 22 % of the world's population will be over 60 years of age, in culmination with a growing resistance and intolerance to pre-existing cholesterol regulating drugs such as statins. Therefore, it is apparent research into additional therapies for hypercholesterolaemia and CVD prevention is a growing necessity. However, it is also imperative to recognise this complex biological system cannot be studied using a reductionist approach; rather its biological uniqueness necessitates a more integrated methodology, such as that offered by systems biology. In this review, we firstly discuss cholesterol metabolism and how it is affected by diet and the ageing process. Next, we describe therapeutic strategies for hypercholesterolaemia, and finally how the systems biology paradigm can be utilised to investigate how ageing interacts with complex systems such as cholesterol metabolism. We conclude by emphasising the need for nutritionists to work in parallel with the systems biology community, to develop novel approaches to studying cholesterol metabolism and its interaction with ageing.

  17. Effect of Microbial Interaction on Urea Metabolism in Chinese Liquor Fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qun; Lin, Jianchun; Cui, Kaixiang; Du, Rubin; Zhu, Yang; Xu, Yan

    2017-12-20

    Urea is the primary precursor of the carcinogen ethyl carbamate in fermented foods. Understanding urea metabolism is important for controlling ethyl carbamate production. Using Chinese liquor as a model system, we used metatranscriptome analysis to investigate urea metabolism in spontaneous food fermentation processes. Saccharomyces cerevisiae was dominant in gene transcription for urea biosynthesis and degradation. Lysinibacillus sphaericus was dominant for urea degradation. S. cerevisiae degraded 18% and L. sphaericus degraded 13% of urea in their corresponding single cultures, whereas they degraded 56% of urea in coculture after 12 h. Compared to single cultures, transcription of CAR1, DAL2, and argA, which are related to urea biosynthesis, decreased by 51, 36, and 69% in coculture, respectively. Transcription of DUR1 and ureA, which are related to urea degradation, increased by 227 and 70%, respectively. Thus, coexistence of the two strains promoted degradation of urea via transcriptional regulation of genes related to urea metabolism.

  18. Imaging microbial metal metabolism in situ under conditions of the deep-sea hydrothermal vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oger, P. M.; Daniel, I.; Simionovici, A.; Picard, A.

    2006-12-01

    High-pressure biotopes are the most widely spread biotopes on Earth. They represent one possible location for the origin of life. They also share striking similarities with extraterrestrial biotopes such as those postulated for Europe or Mars. In absence of light, dissimilatory reduction of metals (DMR) is fueling the ecosystem. Monitoring the metabolism of the deep-sea hydrothermal vent microbial fauna under P, T and chemical conditions relevant to their isolation environment can be difficult because of the confinement and because most spectroscopic probes do not sense metallic ions in solution. We demonstrated the possibility to use Xray spectroscopy to monitor the speciation of metallic species in solution. Experiments were performed at The ESRF using Selenium (Se) detoxification by Agrobacterium tumefaciens as an analog of DMR. The reduction of Se from selenite to the metal was monitored by a combiantion of two Xray spectroscopic techniques (XANES and μXRF). Cells were incubated in the low pressure DAC in growth medium supplemented with 5mM Selenite and incubated under pressures up to 60 Mpa at 30°C for 24h. The evolution of the speciation can be easily monitored and the concentration of each Se species determined from the Xray spectra by linear combinations of standard spectra. Selenite is transformed by the bacterium into a mixture of metal Se and methylated Se after 24 hours. Se detoxification is observed in situ up to at least 25 MPa. The technique, developped for Se can be adapted to monitor other elements more relevant to DMR such as As, Fe or S, which should allow to monitor in situ under controlled pressure and temperature the metabolism of vent organisms. It is also amenable to the monitoring of toxic metals. Xray spectroscopy and the lpDAC are compatible with other spectroscopic techniques, such as Raman, UV or IR spectroscopies, allowing to probe other metabolic activities. Hence, enlarging the range of metabolic information that can be obtained in

  19. Investigation Of The Microbial-Induced Corrosion Potential Of Soils ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Investigation of sulphate-reducing bacteria induced corrosion potential of soils along 18-inch 45km Tebidaba/Brass underground oil pipeline in Southern Ijaw LGA of Bayelsa State, Nigeria, is carried out experimentally. The analysis involves determination of some physico-chemical parameters of soils in the pipeline route, ...

  20. Exploring the under-investigated "microbial dark matter" of drinking water treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Antonia; Sandionigi, Anna; Rizzi, Ermanno; Bernasconi, Marzia; Vicario, Saverio; Galimberti, Andrea; Cocuzza, Clementina; Labra, Massimo; Casiraghi, Maurizio

    2017-03-14

    Scientists recently reported the unexpected detection of unknown or poorly studied bacterial diversity in groundwater. The ability to uncover this neglected biodiversity mainly derives from technical improvements, and the term "microbial dark matter" was used to group taxa poorly investigated and not necessarily monophyletic. We focused on such under-investigated microbial dark matter of drinking water treatment plant from groundwater, across carbon filters, to post-chlorination. We tackled this topic using an integrated approach where the efficacy of stringent water filtration (10000 MWCO) in recovering even the smallest environmental microorganisms was coupled with high-throughput DNA sequencing to depict an informative spectrum of the neglected microbial diversity. Our results revealed that the composition of bacterial communities varies across the plant system: Parcubacteria (OD1) superphylum is found mainly in treated water, while groundwater has the highest heterogeneity, encompassing non-OD1 candidate phyla (Microgenomates, Saccharibacteria, Dependentiae, OP3, OP1, BRC1, WS3). Carbon filters probably act as substrate for microorganism growth and contribute to seeding water downstream, since chlorination does not modify the incoming bacterial community. New questions arise about the role of microbial dark matter in drinking water. Indeed, our results suggest that these bacteria might play a central role in the microbial dynamics of drinking water.

  1. Microbial Metabolic Roles in Bedrock Degradation and the Genesis of Biomineral and Biopattern Biosignatures in Caves and Mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boston, P. J.

    2016-12-01

    In subsurface environments like natural or anthropogenic caves (aka mines), microorganisms facilitate considerable bedrock degradation under a variety of circumstances. Mobilization of materials from these processes frequently produces distinctive biominerals, identifiable biotextures, and unique biopatterns. Microbial activities can even determine the form of speleothems (secondary mineral cave decorations), thus providing highly conspicuous macroscopic biosignatures. It is critical to understand microbial-mineral interactions, recognizing that while the lithology controls important aspects of the environment, in turn, the geochemistry is greatly affected by the biology. Microbial communities can contribute to the actual formation of cavities (speleogenesis), and subsequent enlargement of caves and vugs and the mineral deposits that enrich many subterranean spaces. A major challenge is to quantify such influences. Genetic analysis is revealing a vast but highly partitioned biodiversity in the overall rock fracture habitat of Earth's crust especially in caves and mines where the three phases of matter (solid rock, fluids, and gases) typically interact producing high niche richness. Lessons learned from the microbial/geochemical systems that we have studied include: 1) significant similarities in metabolic functions between different geochemical systems, 2) ubiquity of metal oxidation for energy, 3) ubiquity of biofilms, some highly mineralized, 4) highly interdependent, multi-species communities that can only transform materials in consortia, 5) complex ecological succession including characteristic pioneer species, 6) often very slow growth rates in culture, 7) prevalence of very small cell sizes, ( 100 - 500 nm diam.), 8) mineral reprecipitation of mobilized materials, often dependent on the presence of live microbial communities to produce initial amorphous compounds followed by gradual crystallization, and 9) resultant in situ self-fossilization. Microbial

  2. Effect of Bioprocessing on the In Vitro Colonic Microbial Metabolism of Phenolic Acids from Rye Bran Fortified Breads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koistinen, Ville M; Nordlund, Emilia; Katina, Kati

    2017-01-01

    in an in vitro colon model, the metabolites were analyzed using two different methods applying mass spectrometry. While phenolic acids were released more extensively from the bioprocessed bran bread and ferulic acid had consistently higher concentrations in the bread type during fermentation, there were only......Cereal bran is an important source of dietary fiber and bioactive compounds, such as phenolic acids. We aimed to study the phenolic acid metabolism of native and bioprocessed rye bran fortified refined wheat bread and to elucidate the microbial metabolic route of phenolic acids. After incubation...

  3. Genetic and metabolic engineering for microbial production of poly-γ-glutamic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Mingfeng; Feng, Jun; Sirisansaneeyakul, Sarote; Song, Cunjiang; Chisti, Yusuf

    2018-05-28

    Poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) is a natural biopolymer of glutamic acid. The repeating units of γ-PGA may be derived exclusively from d-glutamic acid, or l-glutamic acid, or both. The monomer units are linked by amide bonds between the α-amino group and the γ-carboxylic acid group. γ-PGA is biodegradable, edible and water-soluble. It has numerous existing and emerging applications in processing of foods, medicines and cosmetics. This review focuses on microbial production of γ-PGA via genetically and metabolically engineered recombinant bacteria. Strategies for improving production of γ-PGA include modification of its biosynthesis pathway, enhancing the production of its precursor (glutamic acid), and preventing loss of the precursor to competing byproducts. These and other strategies are discussed. Heterologous synthesis of γ-PGA in industrial bacterial hosts that do not naturally produce γ-PGA is discussed. Emerging trends and the challenges affecting the production of γ-PGA are reviewed. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Diversity, metabolism and microbial ecology of butyrate-producing bacteria from the human large intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Petra; Flint, Harry J

    2009-05-01

    Butyrate-producing bacteria play a key role in colonic health in humans. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of the diversity, metabolism and microbial ecology of this functionally important group of bacteria. Human colonic butyrate producers are Gram-positive firmicutes, but are phylogenetically diverse, with the two most abundant groups related to Eubacterium rectale/Roseburia spp. and to Faecalibacterium prausnitzii. Five different arrangements have been identified for the genes of the central pathway involved in butyrate synthesis, while in most cases butyryl-CoA : acetate CoA-transferase, rather than butyrate kinase, appears to perform the final step in butyrate synthesis. Mechanisms have been proposed recently in non-gut Clostridium spp. whereby butyrate synthesis can result in energy generation via both substrate-level phosphorylation and proton gradients. Here we suggest that these mechanisms also apply to the majority of butyrate producers from the human colon. The roles of these bacteria in the gut community and their influence on health are now being uncovered, taking advantage of the availability of cultured isolates and molecular methodologies. Populations of F. prausnitzii are reported to be decreased in Crohn's disease, for example, while populations of Roseburia relatives appear to be particularly sensitive to the diet composition in human volunteer studies.

  5. Elevated CO2 shifts the functional structure and metabolic potentials of soil microbial communities in a C4 agroecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Jinbo; He, Zhili; Shi, Shengjing; Kent, Angela; Deng, Ye; Wu, Liyou; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Zhou, Jizhong

    2015-03-20

    Atmospheric CO2 concentration is continuously increasing, and previous studies have shown that elevated CO2 (eCO2) significantly impacts C3 plants and their soil microbial communities. However, little is known about effects of eCO2 on the compositional and functional structure, and metabolic potential of soil microbial communities under C4 plants. Here we showed that a C4 maize agroecosystem exposed to eCO2 for eight years shifted the functional and phylogenetic structure of soil microbial communities at both soil depths (0-5 cm and 5-15 cm) using EcoPlate and functional gene array (GeoChip 3.0) analyses. The abundances of key genes involved in carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) cycling were significantly stimulated under eCO2 at both soil depths, although some differences in carbon utilization patterns were observed between the two soil depths. Consistently, CO2 was found to be the dominant factor explaining 11.9% of the structural variation of functional genes, while depth and the interaction of depth and CO2 explained 5.2% and 3.8%, respectively. This study implies that eCO2 has profound effects on the functional structure and metabolic potential/activity of soil microbial communities associated with C4 plants, possibly leading to changes in ecosystem functioning and feedbacks to global change in C4 agroecosystems.

  6. Microbial metagenomes from three aquifers in the Fennoscandian shield terrestrial deep biosphere reveal metabolic partitioning among populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaofen; Holmfeldt, Karin; Hubalek, Valerie; Lundin, Daniel; Åström, Mats; Bertilsson, Stefan; Dopson, Mark

    2016-05-01

    Microorganisms in the terrestrial deep biosphere host up to 20% of the earth's biomass and are suggested to be sustained by the gases hydrogen and carbon dioxide. A metagenome analysis of three deep subsurface water types of contrasting age (from 86% coverage. The populations were dominated by Proteobacteria, Candidate divisions, unclassified archaea and unclassified bacteria. The estimated genome sizes of the biosphere. The data were finally used to create a combined metabolic model of the deep terrestrial biosphere microbial community.

  7. [Advances in metabolic engineering for the microbial production of naturally occurring terpenes-limonene and bisabolene: a mini review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Yaru; Hu, Zhihui; Xiao, Dongguang; Yu, Aiqun

    2018-01-25

    Limonene (C₁₀H₁₆) and bisabolene (C₁₅H₂₄) are both naturally occurring terpenes in plants. Depending on the number of C₅ units, limonene and bisabolene are recognized as representative monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes, respectively. Limonene and bisabolene are important pharmaceutical and nutraceutical products used in the prevention and treatment of cancer and many other diseases. In addition, they can be used as starting materials to produce a range of commercially valuable products, such as pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals, cosmetics, and biofuels. The low abundance or yield of limonene and bisabolene in plants renders their isolation from plant sources non-economically viable. Isolation of limonene and bisabolene from plants also suffers from low efficiency and often requires harsh reaction conditions, prolonged reaction times, and expensive equipment cost. Recently, the rapid developments in metabolic engineering of microbes provide a promising alternative route for producing these plant natural products. Therefore, producing limonene and bisabolene by engineering microbial cells into microbial factories is becoming an attractive alternative approach that can overcome the bottlenecks, making it more sustainable, environmentally friendly and economically competitive. Here, we reviewed the status of metabolic engineering of microbes that produce limonene and bisabolene including microbial hosts, key enzymes, metabolic pathways and engineering of limonene/bisabolene biosynthesis. Furthermore, key challenges and future perspectives were discussed.

  8. Gut Microbial Metabolism of Polyphenols from Black Tea and Red Wine/Grape Juice Is Source-Specific and Colon-Region Dependent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorsten, van F.A.; Peters, S.; Gross, G.; Gomez-Roldan, V.; Klinkenberg, M.; Vos, de Ric; Vaughan, E.E.; Duynhoven, van J.P.M.; Possemiers, S.; Wiele, van der T.; Jacobs, D.M.

    2012-01-01

    The colonic microbial degradation of a polyphenol-rich black tea extract (BTE) and red wine/grape juice extract (RWGE) was compared in a five-stage in vitro gastrointestinal model (TWINSHIME). Microbial metabolism of BTE and RWGE polyphenols in the TWINSHIME was studied subsequently in single- and

  9. An Open-Ended Investigative Microbial Ecology Laboratory for Introductory Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones-Held, Susan; Paoletti, Robert; Glick, David; Held, Michael E.

    2010-01-01

    In this article we describe a multi-week investigative laboratory in microbial ecology/diversity and nitrogen cycling that we have used in our introductory biology course. This module encourages active student involvement in experimental design, using the scientific literature and quantitative analysis of large data sets. Students analyze soil…

  10. Microbial communities from different subsystems in biological heap leaching system play different roles in iron and sulfur metabolisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yunhua; Liu, Xueduan; Ma, Liyuan; Liang, Yili; Niu, Jiaojiao; Gu, Yabing; Zhang, Xian; Hao, Xiaodong; Dong, Weiling; She, Siyuan; Yin, Huaqun

    2016-08-01

    The microbial communities are important for minerals decomposition in biological heap leaching system. However, the differentiation and relationship of composition and function of microbial communities between leaching heap (LH) and leaching solution (LS) are still unclear. In this study, 16S rRNA gene sequencing was used to assess the microbial communities from the two subsystems in ZiJinShan copper mine (Fujian province, China). Results of PCoA and dissimilarity test showed that microbial communities in LH samples were significantly different from those in LS samples. The dominant genera of LH was Acidithiobacillus (57.2 ∼ 87.9 %), while Leptospirillum (48.6 ∼ 73.7 %) was predominant in LS. Environmental parameters (especially pH) were the major factors to influence the composition and structure of microbial community by analysis of Mantel tests. Results of functional test showed that microbial communities in LH utilized sodium thiosulfate more quickly and utilized ferrous sulfate more slowly than those in LS, which further indicated that the most sulfur-oxidizing processes of bioleaching took place in LH and the most iron-oxidizing processes were in LS. Further study found that microbial communities in LH had stronger pyrite leaching ability, and iron extraction efficiency was significantly positively correlated with Acidithiobacillus (dominated in LH), which suggested that higher abundance ratio of sulfur-oxidizing microbes might in favor of minerals decomposition. Finally, a conceptual model was designed through the above results to better exhibit the sulfur and iron metabolism in bioleaching systems.

  11. Microbial population analysis improves the evidential value of faecal traces in forensic investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaak, Frederike C A; de Graaf, Mei-Lan M; Weterings, Rob; Kuiper, Irene

    2017-01-01

    The forensic science community has a growing interest in microbial population analysis, especially the microbial populations found inside and on the human body. Both their high abundance, microbes outnumber human cells by a factor 10, and their diversity, different sites of the human body harbour different microbial communities, make them an interesting tool for forensics. Faecal material is a type of trace evidence which can be found in a variety of criminal cases, but is often being ignored in forensic investigations. Deriving a human short tandem repeat (STR) profile from a faecal sample can be challenging. However, the microbial communities within faecal material can be of additional criminalistic value in linking a faecal trace to the possible donor. We present a microarray technique in which the faecal microbial community is used to differentiate between faecal samples and developed a decision model to predict the possible common origin of questioned samples. The results show that this technique may be a useful additional tool when no or only partial human STR profiles can be generated.

  12. Dynamics of Panax ginseng Rhizospheric Soil Microbial Community and Their Metabolic Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial communities of 1- to 6-year ginseng rhizosphere soils were characterized by culture-independent approaches, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD, and amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA. Culture-dependent method (Biolog was used to investigate the metabolic function variance of microbe living in rhizosphere soil. Results showed that significant genetic and metabolic function variance were detected among soils, and, with the increasing of cultivating years, genetic diversity of bacterial communities in ginseng rhizosphere soil tended to be decreased. Also we found that Verrucomicrobia, Acidobacteria, and Proteobacteria were the dominants in rhizosphere soils, but, with the increasing of cultivating years, plant disease prevention or plant growth promoting bacteria, such as Pseudomonas, Burkholderia, and Bacillus, tended to be rare.

  13. Colonization Habitat Controls Biomass, Composition, and Metabolic Activity of Attached Microbial Communities in the Columbia River Hyporheic Corridor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stern, Noah; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew; Stegen, James C.; Arntzen, Evan; Kennedy, David W.; Larget, Bret R.; Roden, Eric E.; Kostka, Joel E.

    2017-06-09

    Hydrologic exchange plays a critical role in biogeochemical cycling within the hyporheic zone (the interface between river water and groundwater) of riverine ecosystems. Such exchange may set limits on the rates of microbial metabolism and impose deterministic selection on microbial communities that adapt to dynamically changing dissolved organic carbon (DOC) sources. This study examined the response of attached microbial communities (in situcolonized sand packs) from groundwater, hyporheic, and riverbed habitats within the Columbia River hyporheic corridor to “cross-feeding” with either groundwater, river water, or DOC-free artificial fluids. Our working hypothesis was that deterministic selection duringin situcolonization would dictate the response to cross-feeding, with communities displaying maximal biomass and respiration when supplied with their native fluid source. In contrast to expectations, the major observation was that the riverbed colonized sand had much higher biomass and respiratory activity, as well as a distinct community structure, compared with those of the hyporheic and groundwater colonized sands. 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing revealed a much higher proportion of certain heterotrophic taxa as well as significant numbers of eukaryotic algal chloroplasts in the riverbed colonized sand. Significant quantities of DOC were released from riverbed sediment and colonized sand, and separate experiments showed that the released DOC stimulated respiration in the groundwater and piezometer colonized sand. These results suggest that the accumulation and degradation of labile particulate organic carbon (POC) within the riverbed are likely to release DOC, which may enter the hyporheic corridor during hydrologic exchange, thereby stimulating microbial activity and imposing deterministic selective pressure on the microbial community composition.

    IMPORTANCEThe influence of river water

  14. Genome-Enabled Modeling of Biogeochemical Processes Predicts Metabolic Dependencies that Connect the Relative Fitness of Microbial Functional Guilds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodie, E.; King, E.; Molins, S.; Karaoz, U.; Steefel, C. I.; Banfield, J. F.; Beller, H. R.; Anantharaman, K.; Ligocki, T. J.; Trebotich, D.

    2015-12-01

    Pore-scale processes mediated by microorganisms underlie a range of critical ecosystem services, regulating carbon stability, nutrient flux, and the purification of water. Advances in cultivation-independent approaches now provide us with the ability to reconstruct thousands of genomes from microbial populations from which functional roles may be assigned. With this capability to reveal microbial metabolic potential, the next step is to put these microbes back where they belong to interact with their natural environment, i.e. the pore scale. At this scale, microorganisms communicate, cooperate and compete across their fitness landscapes with communities emerging that feedback on the physical and chemical properties of their environment, ultimately altering the fitness landscape and selecting for new microbial communities with new properties and so on. We have developed a trait-based model of microbial activity that simulates coupled functional guilds that are parameterized with unique combinations of traits that govern fitness under dynamic conditions. Using a reactive transport framework, we simulate the thermodynamics of coupled electron donor-acceptor reactions to predict energy available for cellular maintenance, respiration, biomass development, and enzyme production. From metagenomics, we directly estimate some trait values related to growth and identify the linkage of key traits associated with respiration and fermentation, macromolecule depolymerizing enzymes, and other key functions such as nitrogen fixation. Our simulations were carried out to explore abiotic controls on community emergence such as seasonally fluctuating water table regimes across floodplain organic matter hotspots. Simulations and metagenomic/metatranscriptomic observations highlighted the many dependencies connecting the relative fitness of functional guilds and the importance of chemolithoautotrophic lifestyles. Using an X-Ray microCT-derived soil microaggregate physical model combined

  15. New transposon tools tailored for metabolic engineering of Gram-negative microbial cell factories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban eMartínez-García

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Re-programming microorganisms to modify their existing functions and/or to bestow bacteria with entirely new-to-Nature tasks have largely relied so far on specialized molecular biology tools. Such endeavors are not only relevant in the burgeoning metabolic engineering arena, but also instrumental to explore the functioning of complex regulatory networks from a fundamental point of view. À la carte modification of bacterial genomes thus calls for novel tools to make genetic manipulations easier. We propose the use of a series of new broad-host-range mini-Tn5 vectors, termed pBAMDs, for the delivery of gene(s into the chromosome of Gram-negative bacteria and for generating saturated mutagenesis libraries in gene function studies. These delivery vectors endow the user with the possibility of easy cloning and subsequent insertion of functional cargoes with three different antibiotic resistance markers (kanamycin, streptomycin, and gentamicin. After validating the pBAMD vectors in the environmental bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440, their use was also illustrated by inserting the entire poly(3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB synthesis pathway from Cupriavidus necator in the chromosome of a phosphotransacetylase mutant of Escherichia coli. PHB is a completely biodegradable polyester with a number of industrial applications that make it attractive as a potential replacement of oil-based plastics. The non-selective nature of chromosomal insertions of the biosynthetic genes was evidenced by a large landscape of PHB synthesis levels in independent clones. One clone was selected and further characterized as a microbial cell factory for PHB accumulation, and it achieved polymer accumulation levels comparable to those of a plasmid-bearing recombinant. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the new mini-Tn5 vectors can be used to confer interesting phenotypes in Gram-negative bacteria that would be very difficult to engineer through direct manipulation of the

  16. New Transposon Tools Tailored for Metabolic Engineering of Gram-Negative Microbial Cell Factories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martínez-García, Esteban; Aparicio, Tomás; Lorenzo, Víctor de; Nikel, Pablo I.

    2014-01-01

    Re-programming microorganisms to modify their existing functions and/or to bestow bacteria with entirely new-to-Nature tasks have largely relied so far on specialized molecular biology tools. Such endeavors are not only relevant in the burgeoning metabolic engineering arena but also instrumental to explore the functioning of complex regulatory networks from a fundamental point of view. À la carte modification of bacterial genomes thus calls for novel tools to make genetic manipulations easier. We propose the use of a series of new broad-host-range mini-Tn5-vectors, termed pBAMDs, for the delivery of gene(s) into the chromosome of Gram-negative bacteria and for generating saturated mutagenesis libraries in gene function studies. These delivery vectors endow the user with the possibility of easy cloning and subsequent insertion of functional cargoes with three different antibiotic-resistance markers (kanamycin, streptomycin, and gentamicin). After validating the pBAMD vectors in the environmental bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440, their use was also illustrated by inserting the entire poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) synthesis pathway from Cupriavidus necator in the chromosome of a phosphotransacetylase mutant of Escherichia coli. PHB is a completely biodegradable polyester with a number of industrial applications that make it attractive as a potential replacement of oil-based plastics. The non-selective nature of chromosomal insertions of the biosynthetic genes was evidenced by a large landscape of PHB synthesis levels in independent clones. One clone was selected and further characterized as a microbial cell factory for PHB accumulation, and it achieved polymer accumulation levels comparable to those of a plasmid-bearing recombinant. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the new mini-Tn5-vectors can be used to confer interesting phenotypes in Gram-negative bacteria that would be very difficult to engineer through direct manipulation of the structural genes.

  17. New Transposon Tools Tailored for Metabolic Engineering of Gram-Negative Microbial Cell Factories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez-García, Esteban; Aparicio, Tomás; Lorenzo, Víctor de; Nikel, Pablo I., E-mail: pablo.nikel@cnb.csic.es [Systems and Synthetic Biology Program, Centro Nacional de Biotecnología (CNB-CSIC), Madrid (Spain)

    2014-10-28

    Re-programming microorganisms to modify their existing functions and/or to bestow bacteria with entirely new-to-Nature tasks have largely relied so far on specialized molecular biology tools. Such endeavors are not only relevant in the burgeoning metabolic engineering arena but also instrumental to explore the functioning of complex regulatory networks from a fundamental point of view. À la carte modification of bacterial genomes thus calls for novel tools to make genetic manipulations easier. We propose the use of a series of new broad-host-range mini-Tn5-vectors, termed pBAMDs, for the delivery of gene(s) into the chromosome of Gram-negative bacteria and for generating saturated mutagenesis libraries in gene function studies. These delivery vectors endow the user with the possibility of easy cloning and subsequent insertion of functional cargoes with three different antibiotic-resistance markers (kanamycin, streptomycin, and gentamicin). After validating the pBAMD vectors in the environmental bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440, their use was also illustrated by inserting the entire poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) synthesis pathway from Cupriavidus necator in the chromosome of a phosphotransacetylase mutant of Escherichia coli. PHB is a completely biodegradable polyester with a number of industrial applications that make it attractive as a potential replacement of oil-based plastics. The non-selective nature of chromosomal insertions of the biosynthetic genes was evidenced by a large landscape of PHB synthesis levels in independent clones. One clone was selected and further characterized as a microbial cell factory for PHB accumulation, and it achieved polymer accumulation levels comparable to those of a plasmid-bearing recombinant. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the new mini-Tn5-vectors can be used to confer interesting phenotypes in Gram-negative bacteria that would be very difficult to engineer through direct manipulation of the structural genes.

  18. Carbon isotopic patterns of amino acids associated with various microbial metabolic pathways and physiological conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P. L.; Hsiao, K. T.; Lin, L. H.

    2017-12-01

    Amino acids represent one of the most important categories of biomolecule. Their abundance and isotopic patterns have been broadly used to address issues related to biochemical processes and elemental cycling in natural environments. Previous studies have shown that various carbon assimilative pathways of microorganisms (e.g. autotrophy, heterotrophy and acetotrophy) could be distinguished by carbon isotopic patterns of amino acids. However, the taxonomic and catabolic coverage are limited in previous examination. This study aims to uncover the carbon isotopic patterns of amino acids for microorganisms remaining uncharacterized but bearing biogeochemical and ecological significance in anoxic environments. To fulfill the purpose, two anaerobic strains were isolated from riverine wetland and mud volcano in Taiwan. One strain is a sulfate reducing bacterium (related to Desulfovibrio marrakechensis), which is capable of utilizing either H2 or lactate, and the other is a methanogen (related to Methanolobus profundi), which grows solely with methyl-group compounds. Carbon isotope analyses of amino acids were performed on cells grown in exponential and stationary phase. The isotopic patterns were similar for all examined cultures, showing successive 13C depletion along synthetic pathways. No significant difference was observed for the methanogen and lactate-utilizing sulfate reducer harvested in exponential and stationary phases. In contrast, the H2-utilizing sulfate reducer harvested in stationary phase depleted and enriched 13C in aspartic acid and glycine, respectively when compared with that harvested in exponential phase. Such variations might infer the change of carbon flux during synthesis of these two amino acids in the reverse TCA cycle. In addition, the discriminant function analysis for all available data from culture studies further attests the capability of using carbon isotope patterns of amino acids in identifying microbial metabolisms.

  19. Quantitative Raman Spectroscopy to monitor microbial metabolism in situ under pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, A.; Daniel, I.; Oger, P.

    2006-12-01

    at least 65 MPa. No ethanol was detected at 100 MPa. From these data, the pressure at which ethanol fermentation stops in yeast was calculated to be 87±7 MPa. These results indicate that the activity of one or several enzymes of the glycolytic pathway is enhanced at low pressure. At higher pressure, they become progressively repressed, and are completely inhibited above 87 MPa. Our in situ monitoring constitutes a direct demonstration of yeast metabolism in situ under pressure up to 100 MPa. Our data agree with previous ex-situ data by Abe and Horikoshi (4). However, we observed that ethanol production is not completely inhibited around 50 MPa as predicted, but could be detected at significantly higher pressures (up to 87 MPa). QSR is a powerful method to monitor microbial activities, since almost any organic molecule with a carbon chain ranging from 1 to 6 carbon can be detected and quantified. The only limitation of QSR is that the Raman spectrum of the molecule exhibits at least one peak not masked by the spectrum of the growth medium. 1 Pelletier M J Appl Spectr 57:20A-42A, 2003 2 Daniel I, Oger P, Picard A, Cardon H and Chervin J-C (submitted to Rev Sci Instr) 3 Picard A, Daniel I, Montagnac G and Oger P (submitted to Extremophiles) 4 Abe F and Horikoshi K Extremophiles 1: 89-93, 1997

  20. The relationship between microbial metabolic activity and biocorrosion of carbon steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzierzewicz, Z; Cwalina, B; Chodurek, E; Wilczok, T

    1997-12-01

    The effect of metabolic activity (expressed by generation time, rate of H2S production and the activity of hydrogenase and adenosine phosphosulphate (APS)-reductase enzymes) of the 8 wild strains of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans and of their resistance to metal ions (Hg2+, Cu2+, Mn2+, Zn2+, Ni2+, Cr3+) on the rate of corrosion of carbon steel was studied. The medium containing lactate as the carbon source and sulphate as the electron acceptor was used for bacterial metabolic activity examination and in corrosive assays. Bacterial growth inhibition by metal ions was investigated in the sulphate-free medium. The rate of H2S production was approximately directly proportional to the specific activities of the investigated enzymes. These activities were inversely proportional to the generation time. The rate of microbiologically induced corrosion (MIC) of carbon steel was directly proportional to bacterial resistance to metal ions (correlation coefficient r = 0.95). The correlation between the MIC rate and the activity of enzymes tested, although weaker, was also observed (r = 0.41 for APS-reductase; r = 0.69 for hydrogenase; critical value rc = 0.30, p = 0.05, n = 40).

  1. Anaerobic 4-hydroxyproline utilization: Discovery of a new glycyl radical enzyme in the human gut microbiome uncovers a widespread microbial metabolic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yolanda Y; Martínez-Del Campo, Ana; Balskus, Emily P

    2018-02-06

    The discovery of enzymes responsible for previously unappreciated microbial metabolic pathways furthers our understanding of host-microbe and microbe-microbe interactions. We recently identified and characterized a new gut microbial glycyl radical enzyme (GRE) responsible for anaerobic metabolism of trans-4-hydroxy-l-proline (Hyp). Hyp dehydratase (HypD) catalyzes the removal of water from Hyp to generate Δ 1 -pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C). This enzyme is encoded in the genomes of a diverse set of gut anaerobes and is prevalent and abundant in healthy human stool metagenomes. Here, we discuss the roles HypD may play in different microbial metabolic pathways as well as the potential implications of this activity for colonization resistance and pathogenesis within the human gut. Finally, we present evidence of anaerobic Hyp metabolism in sediments through enrichment culturing of Hyp-degrading bacteria, highlighting the wide distribution of this pathway in anoxic environments beyond the human gut.

  2. Establishment and metabolic analysis of a model microbial community for understanding trophic and electron accepting interactions of subsurface anaerobic environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zamin K

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Communities of microorganisms control the rates of key biogeochemical cycles, and are important for biotechnology, bioremediation, and industrial microbiological processes. For this reason, we constructed a model microbial community comprised of three species dependent on trophic interactions. The three species microbial community was comprised of Clostridium cellulolyticum, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, and Geobacter sulfurreducens and was grown under continuous culture conditions. Cellobiose served as the carbon and energy source for C. cellulolyticum, whereas D. vulgaris and G. sulfurreducens derived carbon and energy from the metabolic products of cellobiose fermentation and were provided with sulfate and fumarate respectively as electron acceptors. Results qPCR monitoring of the culture revealed C. cellulolyticum to be dominant as expected and confirmed the presence of D. vulgaris and G. sulfurreducens. Proposed metabolic modeling of carbon and electron flow of the three-species community indicated that the growth of C. cellulolyticum and D. vulgaris were electron donor limited whereas G. sulfurreducens was electron acceptor limited. Conclusions The results demonstrate that C. cellulolyticum, D. vulgaris, and G. sulfurreducens can be grown in coculture in a continuous culture system in which D. vulgaris and G. sulfurreducens are dependent upon the metabolic byproducts of C. cellulolyticum for nutrients. This represents a step towards developing a tractable model ecosystem comprised of members representing the functional groups of a trophic network.

  3. Investigation on biochemical compositional changes during the microbial fermentation process of Fu brick tea by LC-MS based metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jie; Hu, Feng-Lin; Wang, Wei; Wan, Xiao-Chun; Bao, Guan-Hu

    2015-11-01

    Fu brick tea (FBT) is a unique post-fermented tea product which is fermented with fungi during the manufacturing process. In this study, we investigated the biochemical compositional changes occurring during the microbial fermentation process (MFP) of FBT based on non-targeted LC-MS, which was a comprehensive and unbiased methodology. Our data analysis took a two-phase approach: (1) comparison of FBT with other tea products using PCA analysis to exhibit the characteristic effect of MFP on the formation of Fu brick tea and (2) comparison of tea samples throughout the MFP of FBT to elucidate the possible key metabolic pathways produced by the fungi. Non-targeted LC-MS analysis clearly distinguished FBT with other tea samples and highlighted some interesting metabolic pathways during the MFP including B ring fission catechin. Our study demonstrated that those fungi had a significant influence on the biochemical profiles in the FBT and consequently contributed to its unique quality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Microbial Metabolism in Soil at Subzero Temperatures: Adaptation Mechanisms Revealed by Position-Specific 13C Labeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezekiel K. Bore

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Although biogeochemical models designed to simulate carbon (C and nitrogen (N dynamics in high-latitude ecosystems incorporate extracellular parameters, molecular and biochemical adaptations of microorganisms to freezing remain unclear. This knowledge gap hampers estimations of the C balance and ecosystem feedback in high-latitude regions. To analyze microbial metabolism at subzero temperatures, soils were incubated with isotopomers of position-specifically 13C-labeled glucose at three temperatures: +5 (control, -5, and -20°C. 13C was quantified in CO2, bulk soil, microbial biomass, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC after 1, 3, and 10 days and also after 30 days for samples at -20°C. Compared to +5°C, CO2 decreased 3- and 10-fold at -5 and -20°C, respectively. High 13C recovery in CO2 from the C-1 position indicates dominance of the pentose phosphate pathway at +5°C. In contrast, increased oxidation of the C-4 position at subzero temperatures implies a switch to glycolysis. A threefold higher 13C recovery in microbial biomass at -5 than +5°C points to synthesis of intracellular compounds such as glycerol and ethanol in response to freezing. Less than 0.4% of 13C was recovered in DOC after 1 day, demonstrating complete glucose uptake by microorganisms even at -20°C. Consequently, we attribute the fivefold higher extracellular 13C in soil than in microbial biomass to secreted antifreeze compounds. This suggests that with decreasing temperature, intracellular antifreeze protection is complemented by extracellular mechanisms to avoid cellular damage by crystallizing water. The knowledge of sustained metabolism at subzero temperatures will not only be useful for modeling global C dynamics in ecosystems with periodically or permanently frozen soils, but will also be important in understanding and controlling the adaptive mechanisms of food spoilage organisms.

  5. 2012 Molecular Basis of Microbial One-Carbon Metabolism Gordon Research Conferences and Gordon Research Seminar, August 4-10,2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, Thomas

    2012-08-10

    The 2012 Gordon Conference will present and discuss cutting-edge research in the field of microbial metabolism of C1 compounds. The conference will feature the roles and application of C1 metabolism in natural and synthetic systems at scales from molecules to ecosystems. The conference will stress molecular aspects of the unique metabolism exhibited by autotrophic bacteria, methanogens, methylotrophs, aerobic and anaerobic methanotrophs, and acetogens.

  6. A review of metabolic and enzymatic engineering strategies for designing and optimizing performance of microbial cell factories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda K. Fisher

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Microbial cell factories (MCFs are of considerable interest to convert low value renewable substrates to biofuels and high value chemicals. This review highlights the progress of computational models for the rational design of an MCF to produce a target bio-commodity. In particular, the rational design of an MCF involves: (i product selection, (ii de novo biosynthetic pathway identification (i.e., rational, heterologous, or artificial, (iii MCF chassis selection, (iv enzyme engineering of promiscuity to enable the formation of new products, and (v metabolic engineering to ensure optimal use of the pathway by the MCF host. Computational tools such as (i de novo biosynthetic pathway builders, (ii docking, (iii molecular dynamics (MD and steered MD (SMD, and (iv genome-scale metabolic flux modeling all play critical roles in the rational design of an MCF. Genome-scale metabolic flux models are of considerable use to the design process since they can reveal metabolic capabilities of MCF hosts. These can be used for host selection as well as optimizing precursors and cofactors of artificial de novo biosynthetic pathways. In addition, recent advances in genome-scale modeling have enabled the derivation of metabolic engineering strategies, which can be implemented using the genomic tools reviewed here as well.

  7. Bacterial communities associated with Shinkaia crosnieri from the Iheya North, Okinawa Trough: Microbial diversity and metabolic potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Zeng, Zhi-gang; Chen, Shuai; Sun, Li

    2018-04-01

    Shinkaia crosnieri is a galatheid crab endemic to the deep-sea hydrothermal systems in the Okinawa Trough. In this study, we systematically analyzed and compared the diversity and metabolic potentials of the microbial communities in different tissues (setae, gill, and intestine) of S. crosnieri by high-throughput sequencing technology and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Sequence analysis based on the V3-V4 regions of the 16S rRNA gene obtained 408,079 taxon tags, which covered 15 phyla, 22 classes, 32 orders, 42 families, and 25 genera. Overall, the microbial communities in all tissues were dominated by Epsilonproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria, of which Epsilonproteobacteria was the largest class and accounted for 85.24% of the taxon tags. In addition, 20 classes of bacteria were discovered for the first time to be associated with S. crosnieri and no archaea were detected. Comparative analysis showed that (i) bacteria from different tissues fell into different groups by β-diversity analysis, (ii) bacterial communities in intestine were similar to that in gill and much more diverse than that in setae, and the sulfur-oxidizing genus Sulfurovum was markedly enriched in intestine and gill. Furthermore, bacteria potentially involved in methane, nitrogen, and metal metabolisms were detected in all samples. The key genes of aprA/dsrA and pmoA involved in sulfate reducing and methane oxidization, respectively, were detected in the gill and gut communities for the first time, and pmoA was significantly more abundant in gill and setae than in intestine. These results provide the first comparative and relatively complete picture of the diversity and metabolic potentials of the bacteria in different tissues of S. crosnieri. These results also indicate that the composition of the microbial communities in hydrothermal fauna changes with time, suggesting the importance of environmental influence.

  8. Microbial Communities and Their Predicted Metabolic Functions in Growth Laminae of a Unique Large Conical Mat from Lake Untersee, East Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunmin Koo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we report the distribution of microbial taxa and their predicted metabolic functions observed in the top (U1, middle (U2, and inner (U3 decadal growth laminae of a unique large conical microbial mat from perennially ice-covered Lake Untersee of East Antarctica, using NextGen sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and bioinformatics tools. The results showed that the U1 lamina was dominated by cyanobacteria, specifically Phormidium sp., Leptolyngbya sp., and Pseudanabaena sp. The U2 and U3 laminae had high abundances of Actinobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Proteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes. Closely related taxa within each abundant bacterial taxon found in each lamina were further differentiated at the highest taxonomic resolution using the oligotyping method. PICRUSt analysis, which determines predicted KEGG functional categories from the gene contents and abundances among microbial communities, revealed a high number of sequences belonging to carbon fixation, energy metabolism, cyanophycin, chlorophyll, and photosynthesis proteins in the U1 lamina. The functional predictions of the microbial communities in U2 and U3 represented signal transduction, membrane transport, zinc transport and amino acid-, carbohydrate-, and arsenic- metabolisms. The Nearest Sequenced Taxon Index (NSTI values processed through PICRUSt were 0.10, 0.13, and 0.11 for U1, U2, and U3 laminae, respectively. These values indicated a close correspondence with the reference microbial genome database, implying high confidence in the predicted metabolic functions of the microbial communities in each lamina. The distribution of microbial taxa observed in each lamina and their predicted metabolic functions provides additional insight into the complex microbial ecosystem at Lake Untersee, and lays the foundation for studies that will enhance our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the formation of these unique mat structures and their evolutionary significance.

  9. Synchrotron-based micro and nanotomographic investigations of soil aggregate microbial and pore structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemner, K. M.; O'Brien, S.; Whiteside, M. D.; Sholto-Douglas, D.; Antipova, O.; Bailey, V.; Boyanov, M.; Dohnalkova, A.; Gursoy, D.; Kovarik, L.; Lai, B.; Roehrig, C.; Vogt, S.

    2017-12-01

    Soil is a highly complex network of pore spaces, minerals, and organic matter (e.g., roots, fungi, and bacteria), making it physically heterogeneous over nano- to macro-scales. Such complexity arises from feedbacks between physical processes and biological activity that generate a dynamic, self-organizing 3D complex. Since we first demonstrated the utility of synchrotron-based transmission tomography to image internal soil aggregate structure [Kemner et al., 1998], we and many other researchers have made use of and have advanced the application of this technique. However, our understanding of how microbes and microbial metabolism are distributed throughout soil aggregates is limited, because no technique is available to image the soil pore network and the life that inhabits it. X-ray transmission microtomography can provide highly detailed 3D renderings of soil structure but cannot distinguish cells from other electron-light material such as air or water. However, the use of CdSe quantum dots (QDs) as a reporter of bacterial presence enables us to overcome this constraint, instilling bacterial cells with enough contrast to detect them and their metabolic functions in their opaque soil habitat, with hard x-rays capable of penetrating 3D soil structures at high resolution. Previous transmission tomographic imaging of soil aggregates with high energy synchrotron x-rays has demonstrated 700 nm3 voxel spatial resolution. These and recent results from nanotomographic x-ray transmission imaging of soil aggregates with 30 nm3 voxel resolution will be presented. In addition, results of submicron voxel-sized x-ray fluorescence 3D imaging to determine microbial distributions within soil aggregates and the critical role to be played by the upgrade of the Advanced Photon Source for 100-1000X increases in hard x-ray brilliance will also be presented. *Kemner, et al., SPIE 3449, 45-53, 1998

  10. Experimental Investigation Of Microbially Induced Corrosion Of Test Samples And Effect Of Self-assembled Hydrophobic Monolayers. Exposure Of Test Samples To Continuous Microbial Cultures, Chemical Analysis, And Biochemical Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Laurinavichius, K S

    1998-01-01

    Experimental Investigation Of Microbially Induced Corrosion Of Test Samples And Effect Of Self-assembled Hydrophobic Monolayers. Exposure Of Test Samples To Continuous Microbial Cultures, Chemical Analysis, And Biochemical Studies

  11. Molecular Basis of Microbial One-Carbon Metabolism 2008 Gordon Research Conference (July 20-25, 2008)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen W. Ragsdale

    2009-08-12

    One-carbon (C-1) compounds play a central role in microbial metabolism. C-1 compounds include methane, carbon monoxide, CO2, and methanol as well as coenzyme-bound one-carbon compounds (methyl-B12, CH3-H4folate, etc). Such compounds are of broad global importance because several C-1 compounds (e.g., CH4) are important energy sources, some (e.g., CO2 and CH4) are potent greenhouse gases, and others (e.g., CH2Cl2) are xenobiotics. They are central in pathways of energy metabolism and carbon fixation by microbes and many are of industrial interest. Research on the pathways of one-carbon metabolism has added greatly to our understanding of evolution, structural biology, enzyme mechanisms, gene regulation, ecology, and applied biology. The 2008 meeting will include recent important findings in the following areas: (a) genomics, metagenomics, and proteomic studies that have expanded our understanding of autotrophy and C-1 metabolism and the evolution of these pathways; (b) redox regulation of carbon cycles and the interrelationship between the carbon cycle and other biogeochemical cycles (sulfur, nitrogen, oxygen); (c) novel pathways for carbon assimilation; (d) biotechnology related to C-1 metabolism; (e) novel enzyme mechanisms including channeling of C-1 intermediates during metabolism; and (f) the relationship between metal homeostasis and the global carbon cycle. The conference has a diverse and gender-balanced slate of speakers and session leaders. The wide variety of disciplines brought to the study of C-1 metabolism make the field an excellent one in which to train young researchers.

  12. Investigations of the microbial transformation of cortisol to prednisolone in urine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredehöft, Michael; Baginski, Rainer; Parr, Maria-Kristina; Thevis, Mario; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2012-03-01

    Doping control samples are normally collected under non-sterile conditions and sometimes, storage and transportation are influenced by parameters such as the temperature. Therefore, microbial contamination and subsequent alteration of a sample's composition are possible. Studies regarding sample collection in cattle breeding have already shown enzymatic transformation of endogenous testosterone to boldenone causing false-positive findings. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether positive doping cases with the synthetic corticosteroids prednisolone and prednisone may result from microbial transformation of the endogenous corticosteroids cortisol and cortisone, respectively. A method comprising parameters such as pH values and screening results for synthetic glucocorticosteroids as well as incubation experiments followed by liquid chromatographic and mass spectrometric analysis was employed to test for contaminating germs with Δ(1)-dehydrogenase activity. Over 700 urine samples comprising inpatient and doping control specimens were investigated. In none of them, 1,2-dehydrogenating activity was confirmed. These findings are in accordance with other studies. However, the problem of microbial alteration of doping control specimens with special respect to 1,2-dehydrogenation must not be underestimated. Article from a special issue on steroids and microorganisms. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Investigation of extractive microbial transformation in nonionic surfactant micelle aqueous solution using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yingying; Qian, Chen; Wang, Zhilong; Xu, Jian-He; Yang, Rude; Qi, Hanshi

    2010-01-01

    Extractive microbial transformation of L-phenylacetylcarbinol (L-PAC) in nonionic surfactant Triton X-100 micelle aqueous solution was investigated by response surface methodology. Based on the Box-Behnken design, a mathematical model was developed for the predication of mutual interactions between benzaldehyde, Triton X-100, and glucose on L-PAC production. It indicated that the negative or positive effect of nonionic surfactant strongly depended on the substrate concentration. The model predicted that the optimal concentration of benzaldehyde, Triton X-100, and glucose was 1.2 ml, 15 g, and 2.76 g per 100 ml, respectively. Under the optimal condition, the maximum L-PAC production was 27.6 mM, which was verified by a time course of extractive microbial transformation. A discrete fed-batch process for verification of cell activity was also presented.

  14. Environmental spread of microbes impacts the development of metabolic phenotypes in mice transplanted with microbial communities from humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Li; Bahl, Martin Iain; Roager, Henrik Munch

    2017-01-01

    Microbiota transplantation to germ-free animals is a powerful method to study involvement of gut microbes in the aetiology of metabolic syndrome. Owing to large interpersonal variability in gut microbiota, studies with broad coverage of donors are needed to elucidate the establishment of human......, thereby allowing us to explore the extent of microbial spread between cages in a well-controlled environment. Despite high group-wise similarity between obese and control human microbiotas, transplanted mice in the four isolators developed distinct gut bacterial composition and activity, body mass gain......, and insulin resistance. Spread of microbes between cages within isolators interacted with establishment of the transplanted microbiotas in mice, and contributed to the transmission of metabolic phenotypes. Our findings highlight the impact of donor variability and reveal that inter-individual spread...

  15. Microbial metabolisms in a 2.5-km-deep ecosystem created by hydraulic fracturing in shales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daly, Rebecca A.; Borton, Mikayla A.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Hoyt, David W.; Kountz, Duncan J.; Wolfe, Richard A.; Welch, Susan A.; Marcus, Daniel N.; Trexler, Ryan V.; MacRae, Jean D.; Krzycki, Joseph A.; Cole, David R.; Mouser, Paula J.; Wrighton, Kelly C.

    2016-09-05

    Hydraulic fracturing is the industry standard for extracting hydrocarbons from shale formations. Attention has been paid to the economic benefits and environmental impacts of this process, yet the biogeochemical changes induced in the deep subsurface are poorly understood. Recent single-gene investigations revealed that halotolerant microbial communities were enriched after hydraulic fracturing. Here the reconstruction of 31 unique genomes coupled to metabolite data from the Marcellus and Utica shales revealed that methylamine cycling supports methanogenesis in the deep biosphere. Fermentation of injected chemical additives also sustains long-term microbial persistence, while sulfide generation from thiosulfate represents a poorly recognized corrosion mechanism in shales. Extensive links between viruses and microbial hosts demonstrate active viral predation, which may contribute to the release of labile cellular constituents into the extracellular environment. Our analyses show that hydraulic fracturing provides the organismal and chemical inputs for colonization and persistence in the deep terrestrial subsurface.

  16. The Influence of Tallow on Rumen Metabolism, Microbial Biomass Synthesis and Fatty Acid Composition of Bacteria and Protozoa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weisbjerg, Martin Riis; Børsting, Christian Friis; Hvelplund, Torben

    1992-01-01

    Rumen metabolism, microbial biomass synthesis and microbial long chain fatty acid composition were studied in lactating cows fed at two levels of dry matter intake (L, 8.6 kg DM and H, 12.6 kg DM) with 0, 4 and 6% added tallow at the low feed level (L0, L4 and L6) and 0, 2, 4 and 6% at the high...... feed level (H0, H2, H4 and H6). Fibre digestibility was not significantly affected by tallow addition. Increasing tallow level in the diet decreased the total VFA concentration, the ratio of acetic acid to propionic acid and the ammonia concentration in the rumen. Crude fat and fatty acid content...... in bacterial and protozoal dry matter increased with increased tallow level, especially due to an increase in fatty acids originating from the feeds. Microbial synthesis in the rumen and flow of amino acids to the duodenum was highest for medium fat intake at the high feed level....

  17. Host genes related to paneth cells and xenobiotic metabolism are associated with shifts in human ileum-associated microbial composition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianyi Zhang

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to integrate human clinical, genotype, mRNA microarray and 16 S rRNA sequence data collected on 84 subjects with ileal Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis or control patients without inflammatory bowel diseases in order to interrogate how host-microbial interactions are perturbed in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD. Ex-vivo ileal mucosal biopsies were collected from the disease unaffected proximal margin of the ileum resected from patients who were undergoing initial intestinal surgery. Both RNA and DNA were extracted from the mucosal biopsy samples. Patients were genotyped for the three major NOD2 variants (Leufs1007, R702W, and G908R and the ATG16L1T300A variant. Whole human genome mRNA expression profiles were generated using Agilent microarrays. Microbial composition profiles were determined by 454 pyrosequencing of the V3-V5 hypervariable region of the bacterial 16 S rRNA gene. The results of permutation based multivariate analysis of variance and covariance (MANCOVA support the hypothesis that host mucosal Paneth cell and xenobiotic metabolism genes play an important role in host microbial interactions.

  18. D/H Ratios in Lipids as a Tool to Elucidate Microbial Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijker, Reto S.; Sessions, Alex L.

    2016-04-01

    Large D/H fractionations have been observed in the lipids and growth water of most organisms studied today. These fractionations have generally been assumed to be constant across most biota because they originate solely from isotope effects imposed by the highly conserved lipid biosynthetic pathway. Recent data is illustrating this conclusion as incomplete. Lipids from field and laboratory samples exhibit huge variations in D/H fractionation. In environmental samples, lipids vary in δD by up to 300 ‰ and in laboratory cultures the documented variation is up to 500 ‰ within the same organism. Remarkably, the isotope fractionation appears to be correlated with the type of metabolism employed by the host organism. However, the underlying biochemical mechanisms leading to these isotopic variations are not yet fully understood. Because the largest proportion of H-bound C in fatty acids is derived directly from NADPH during biosynthesis, the original hypothesis was that large differences in the isotopic composition of NADPH, generated by different central metabolic pathways, were the primary source of D/H variation in lipids. However, recent observations indicate that this cannot be the whole story and lead us to the conclusion that additional processes must affect the isotope composition of NADPH. These processes may include the isotopic exchange of NADPH with water as well as fractionation of NADPH by transhydrogenases, interconverting NADH to NADPH by exhibiting large isotope effects. In this project, our objective is to ascertain whether D/H fractionation and these biochemical processes are correlated. We investigate correlations between cellular NADPH/NADP+ as well as NADH/NAD+ pool sizes and the D/H fractionation in a set of different microorganisms and will present the trends here. Our results will contribute to a more comprehensive understanding of the basic biological regulations over D/H fractionation and potentially enables their use as tracers and

  19. Microbial transformation of biomacromolecules in a membrane bioreactor: implications for membrane fouling investigation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongbo Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The complex characteristics and unclear biological fate of biomacromolecules (BMM, including colloidal and soluble microbial products (SMP, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS and membrane surface foulants (MSF, are crucial factors that limit our understanding of membrane fouling in membrane bioreactors (MBRs. FINDINGS: In this study, the microbial transformation of BMM was investigated in a lab-scale MBR by well-controlled bioassay tests. The results of experimental measurements and mathematical modeling show that SMP, EPS, and MSF had different biodegradation behaviors and kinetic models. Based on the multi-exponential G models, SMP were mainly composed of slowly biodegradable polysaccharides (PS, proteins (PN, and non-biodegradable humic substances (HS. In contrast, EPS contained a large number of readily biodegradable PN, slowly biodegradable PS and HS. MSF were dominated by slowly biodegradable PS, which had a degradation rate constant similar to that of SMP-PS, while degradation behaviors of MSF-PN and MSF-HS were much more similar to those of EPS-PN and EPS-HS, respectively. In addition, the large-molecular weight (MW compounds (>100 kDa in BMM were found to have a faster microbial transformation rate compared to the small-MW compounds (<5 kDa. The parallel factor (PARAFAC modeling of three-dimensional fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM spectra showed that the tryptophan-like PN were one of the major fractions in the BMM and they were more readily biodegradable than the HS. Besides microbial mineralization, humification and hydrolysis could be viewed as two important biotransformation mechanisms of large-MW compounds during the biodegradation process. SIGNIFICANCE: The results of this work can aid in tracking the origin of membrane foulants from the perspective of the biotransformation behaviors of SMP, EPS, and MSF.

  20. Investigating the role for adaptation of the microbial community to transform trace organic chemicals during managed aquifer recharge

    KAUST Repository

    Alidina, Mazahirali; Li, Dong; Drewes, Jorg

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate whether adaptation by pre-exposure to trace organic chemicals (TOrCs) was necessary for microbial transformation during managed aquifer recharge (MAR). Two pairs of laboratory-scale soil columns, each

  1. MicroScope—an integrated microbial resource for the curation and comparative analysis of genomic and metabolic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallenet, David; Belda, Eugeni; Calteau, Alexandra; Cruveiller, Stéphane; Engelen, Stefan; Lajus, Aurélie; Le Fèvre, François; Longin, Cyrille; Mornico, Damien; Roche, David; Rouy, Zoé; Salvignol, Gregory; Scarpelli, Claude; Thil Smith, Adam Alexander; Weiman, Marion; Médigue, Claudine

    2013-01-01

    MicroScope is an integrated platform dedicated to both the methodical updating of microbial genome annotation and to comparative analysis. The resource provides data from completed and ongoing genome projects (automatic and expert annotations), together with data sources from post-genomic experiments (i.e. transcriptomics, mutant collections) allowing users to perfect and improve the understanding of gene functions. MicroScope (http://www.genoscope.cns.fr/agc/microscope) combines tools and graphical interfaces to analyse genomes and to perform the manual curation of gene annotations in a comparative context. Since its first publication in January 2006, the system (previously named MaGe for Magnifying Genomes) has been continuously extended both in terms of data content and analysis tools. The last update of MicroScope was published in 2009 in the Database journal. Today, the resource contains data for >1600 microbial genomes, of which ∼300 are manually curated and maintained by biologists (1200 personal accounts today). Expert annotations are continuously gathered in the MicroScope database (∼50 000 a year), contributing to the improvement of the quality of microbial genomes annotations. Improved data browsing and searching tools have been added, original tools useful in the context of expert annotation have been developed and integrated and the website has been significantly redesigned to be more user-friendly. Furthermore, in the context of the European project Microme (Framework Program 7 Collaborative Project), MicroScope is becoming a resource providing for the curation and analysis of both genomic and metabolic data. An increasing number of projects are related to the study of environmental bacterial (meta)genomes that are able to metabolize a large variety of chemical compounds that may be of high industrial interest. PMID:23193269

  2. Metabolic Effects of a 24-Week Energy-Restricted Intervention Combined with Low or High Dairy Intake in Overweight Women: An NMR-Based Metabolomics Investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Hong; Lorenzen, J.K.; Astrup, A.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effect of a 24-week energy-restricted intervention with low or high dairy intake (LD or HD) on the metabolic profiles of urine, blood and feces in overweight/obese women by NMR spectroscopy combined with ANOVA-simultaneous component analysis (ASCA). A significant effect of dairy...... metabolism and gut microbial activity. In addition, a significant time effect on the blood metabolome was attributed to a decrease in blood lipid and lipoprotein levels due to the energy restriction. For the fecal metabolome, a trend for a diet effect was found and a series of metabolites, such as acetate...

  3. Effect of Lineage-Specific Metabolic Traits of Lactobacillus reuteri on Sourdough Microbial Ecology

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Xiaoxi B.; Gänzle, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    This study determined the effects of specific metabolic traits of Lactobacillus reuteri on its competitiveness in sourdoughs. The competitiveness of lactobacilli in sourdough generally depends on their growth rate; acid resistance additionally contributes to competitiveness in sourdoughs with long fermentation times. Glycerol metabolism via glycerol dehydratase (gupCDE) accelerates growth by the regeneration of reduced cofactors; glutamate metabolism via glutamate decarboxylase (gadB) increas...

  4. Microbial metabolism and community structure in response to bioelectrochemically enhanced remediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lu; Huggins, Tyler; Jin, Song; Zuo, Yi; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2014-04-01

    This study demonstrates that electrodes in a bioelectrochemical system (BES) can potentially serve as a nonexhaustible electron acceptor for in situ bioremediation of hydrocarbon contaminated soil. The deployment of BES not only eliminates aeration or supplement of electron acceptors as in contemporary bioremediation but also significantly shortens the remediation period and produces sustainable electricity. More interestingly, the study reveals that microbial metabolism and community structure distinctively respond to the bioelectrochemically enhanced remediation. Tubular BESs with carbon cloth anode (CCA) or biochar anode (BCA) were inserted into raw water saturated soils containing petroleum hydrocarbons for enhancing in situ remediation. Results show that total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) removal rate almost doubled in soils close to the anode (63.5-78.7%) than that in the open circuit positive controls (37.6-43.4%) during a period of 64 days. The maximum current density from the BESs ranged from 73 to 86 mA/m(2). Comprehensive microbial and chemical characterizations and statistical analyses show that the residual TPH has a strongly positive correlation with hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms (HDM) numbers, dehydrogenase activity, and lipase activity and a negative correlation with soil pH, conductivity, and catalase activity. Distinctive microbial communities were identified at the anode, in soil with electrodes, and soil without electrodes. Uncommon electrochemically active bacteria capable of hydrocarbon degradation such as Comamonas testosteroni, Pseudomonas putida, and Ochrobactrum anthropi were selectively enriched on the anode, while hydrocarbon oxidizing bacteria were dominant in soil samples. Results from genus or phylum level characterizations well agree with the data from cluster analysis. Data from this study suggests that a unique constitution of microbial communities may play a key role in BES enhancement of petroleum hydrocarbons

  5. Bacillus licheniformis affects the microbial community and metabolic profile in the spontaneous fermentation of Daqu starter for Chinese liquor making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Wu, Qun; Jiang, Xuejian; Wang, Zhiqiang; Tang, Jingli; Xu, Yan

    2017-06-05

    Chinese liquor is produced from spontaneous fermentation starter (Daqu) that provides the microbes, enzymes and flavors for liquor fermentation. To improve the flavor character of Daqu, we inoculated Bacillus licheniformis and studied the effect of this strain on the community structure and metabolic profile in Daqu fermentation. The microbial relative abundance changed after the inoculation, including the increase in Bacillus, Clavispora and Aspergillus, and the decrease in Pichia, Saccharomycopsis and some other genera. This variation was also confirmed by pure culture and coculture experiments. Seventy-three metabolites were identified during Daqu fermentation process. After inoculation, the average content of aromatic compounds were significantly enriched from 0.37mg/kg to 0.90mg/kg, and the average content of pyrazines significantly increased from 0.35mg/kg to 5.71mg/kg. The increase in pyrazines was positively associated with the metabolism of the inoculated Bacillus and the native genus Clavispora, because they produced much more pyrazines in their cocultures. Whereas the increase in aromatic compounds might be related to the change of in situ metabolic activity of several native genera, in particular, Aspergillus produced more aromatic compounds in cocultures with B. licheniformis. It indicated that the inoculation of B. licheniformis altered the flavor character of Daqu by both its own metabolic activity and the variation of in situ metabolic activity. Moreover, B. licheniformis inoculation influenced the enzyme activity of Daqu, including the significant increase in amylase activity (from 1.3gstarch/g/h to 1.7gstarch/g/h), and the significant decrease in glucoamylase activity (from 627.6mgglucose/g/h to 445.6mgglucose/g/h) and esterase activity (from 28.1mgethylcaproate/g/100h to 17.2mgethylcaproate/g/100h). These effects of inoculation were important factors for regulating the metabolism of microbial communities, hence for improving the flavor profile

  6. Shifts in coastal sediment oxygenation cause pronounced changes in microbial community composition and associated metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broman, Elias; Sjöstedt, Johanna; Pinhassi, Jarone

    2017-01-01

    . In particular, the intermediate site sediments responded differently upon oxygenation compared to the anoxic and oxic site sediments. This included a microbial community composition with more habitat generalists, lower amounts of RNA transcripts attributed to methane oxidation, and a reduced rate of organic...... efforts, depend largely on the oxygenation history of sites. Furthermore, it was shown that re-oxygenation efforts to remediate dead zones could ultimately be facilitated by in situ microbial molecular mechanisms involved in removal of toxic H2S and the potent greenhouse gas methane....

  7. Hepatic Metabolism of Perfluorinated Carboxylic Acids and Polychlorotrifluoroethylene: A Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Investigation in vito

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-06

    L. Narayanan. and B. M. Jamot. ’Effects of Peulluoro-n- octanoic Acid , Perfluoro-n-decanoic Acid , and Clofibrate on Hepatic Phosphorus Metabolism in...pathways and examined the impact of perfluorocarboxylic acid exposure. This investigative strategy will delineate the metabolic effices exerted by...Perfluorinated Carboxylic Acids and Polychlorotrifluoroethylene: A Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Investigation in Vivo Principal Investigator: Nicholas V. Reo

  8. Microbial Metabolism. Part 10. Metabolites of 7,8 Dimethoxyflavone and 5-Methoxyflavone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial transformation of 7, 8-dimethoxyflavone (1) by Mucor ramannianus (ATCC 9628) produced five metabolites: 7, 8-dimethoxy-4'-hydroxyflavone (2), 3', 4'-dihydroxy-7, 8-dimethoxyflavone (3), 7, 3'-dihydroxy-8-methoxyflavone (4), 7, 4'-dihydroxy-8-methoxyflavone (5) and 8-methoxy-7, 3', 4'-trihy...

  9. Frozen in Time? Microbial strategies for survival and carbon metabolism over geologic time in a Pleistocene permafrost chronosequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackelprang, R.; Douglas, T. A.; Waldrop, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    Permafrost soils have received tremendous interest due to their importance as a global carbon store with the potential to be thawed over the coming centuries. Instead of being 'frozen in time,' permafrost contains active microbes. Most metagenomic studies have focused on Holocene aged permafrost. Here, we target Pleistocene aged ice and carbon rich permafrost (Yedoma), which can differ in carbon content and stage of decay. Our aim was to understand how microbes in the permafrost transform organic matter over geologic time and to identify physiological and biochemical adaptations that enable long-term survival. We used next-generation sequencing to characterize microbial communities along a permafrost age gradient. Samples were collected from the Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL) Permafrost Tunnel near Fox, AK, which penetrates a hillside providing access to permafrost ranging in age from 12 to 40 kyr. DNA was extracted directly from unthawed samples. 16S rRNA amplicon (16S) and shotgun metagenome sequencing revealed significant age-driven differences. First, microbial diversity declines with permafrost age, likely due to long-term exposure to environmental stresses and a reduction in metabolic resources. Second, we observed taxonomic differences among ages, with an increasing abundance of Firmicutes (endospore-formers) in older samples, suggesting that dormancy is a common survival strategy in older permafrost. Ordination of 16S and metagenome data revealed age-based clustering. Genes differing significantly between age categories included those involved in lipopolysaccharide assembly, cold-response, and carbon processing. These data point to the physiological adaptations to long-term frozen conditions and to the metabolic processes utilized in ancient permafrost. In fact, a gene common in older samples is involved in cadaverine production, which could potentially explain the putrefied smell of Pleistocene aged permafrost. Coupled with soil

  10. Modeling Late-State Serpentinization on Enceladus and Implications for Methane-Utilizing Microbial Metabolisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, R.; Cardace, D.

    2017-12-01

    Modeling investigations of Enceladus and other icy-satellites have included physicochemical properties (Sohl et al., 2010; Glein et al., 2015; Neveu et al., 2015), geophysical prospects of serpentinization (Malamud and Prialnik, 2016; Vance et al., 2016), and aqueous geochemistry across different antifreeze fluid-rock scenarios (Neveu et al., 2017). To more effectively evaluate the habitability of Enceladus, in the context of recent observations (Waite et al., 2017), we model the potential bioenergetic pathways that would be thermodynamically favorable at the interface of hydrothermal water-rock reactions resulting from late stage serpentinization (>90% serpentinized), hypothesized on Enceladus. Building on previous geochemical model outputs of Enceladus (Neveu et al., 2017), and bioenergetic modeling (as in Amend and Shock, 2001; Cardace et al., 2015), we present a model of late stage serpentinization possible at the water-rock interface of Enceladus, and report changing activities of chemical species related to methane utilization by microbes over the course of serpentinization using the Geochemist's Workbench REACT code [modified Extended Debye-Hückel (Helgeson, 1969) using the thermodynamic database of SUPCRT92 (Johnson et al., 1992)]. Using a model protolith speculated to exist at Enceladus's water-rock boundary, constrained by extraterrestrial analog analytical data for subsurface serpentinites of the Coast Range Ophiolite (Lower Lake, CA, USA) mélange rocks, we deduce evolving habitability conditions as the model protolith reacts with feasible, though hypothetical, planetary ocean chemistries (from Glien et al., 2015, and Neveu et al., 2017). Major components of modeled oceans, Na-Cl, Mg-Cl, and Ca-Cl, show shifts in the feasibility of CO2-CH4-H2 driven microbial habitability, occurring early in the reaction progress, with methanogenesis being bioenergetically favored. Methanotrophy was favored late in the reaction progress of some Na-Cl systems and in the

  11. Recent advances in engineering propionyl-CoA metabolism for microbial production of value-added chemicals and biofuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srirangan, Kajan; Bruder, Mark; Akawi, Lamees; Miscevic, Dragan; Kilpatrick, Shane; Moo-Young, Murray; Chou, C Perry

    2017-09-01

    Diminishing fossil fuel reserves and mounting environmental concerns associated with petrochemical manufacturing practices have generated significant interests in developing whole-cell biocatalytic systems for the production of value-added chemicals and biofuels. Although acetyl-CoA is a common natural biogenic precursor for the biosynthesis of numerous metabolites, propionyl-CoA is unpopular and non-native to most organisms. Nevertheless, with its C3-acyl moiety as a discrete building block, propionyl-CoA can serve as another key biogenic precursor to several biological products of industrial importance. As a result, engineering propionyl-CoA metabolism, particularly in genetically tractable hosts with the use of inexpensive feedstocks, has paved an avenue for novel biomanufacturing. Herein, we present a systematic review on manipulation of propionyl-CoA metabolism as well as relevant genetic and metabolic engineering strategies for microbial production of value-added chemicals and biofuels, including odd-chain alcohols and organic acids, bio(co)polymers and polyketides. [Formula: see text].

  12. Investigating the possibility of Microbial Production of Mannitol from Waste Bread

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vajihe Sadeqi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available According to the significant role of sugar alcohols (Polyols in food industries, in the present study the possibility of microbial production of mannitol from bread waste was studied. Microbial growth and amylase production were investigated by five Iranian native strains of Bacillus spp in starch agar and broth. The best strain was selected, and its growth curve was determined. Leuconostoc mesentroides PTCC 1059 was used as a control strain to convert fructose to mannitol. In order to determine the ability of selected strains in converting waste breads into mannitol sugar, a culture medium was prepared from waste of Lavash and Baguette breads. Afterward, the ability to convert starch into fructose by Chemical analysis glucose test was used, and then bio-conversion analysis of fructose to mannitol by HPLC analysis was investigated. HPLC results showed that the Bacillus subtilis and Leuconostoc mesentroides PTCC 1059 had the ability of producing mannitol at a rate of 4.8g/L from fructose 5%, 0.15 g/L from Lavash bread 5%, and 0.2g/L from Baguette bread.

  13. Investigation of the in vitro metabolism of the analgesic flupirtine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Methling, K.; Reszka, P.; Lalk, M.; Vrána, Oldřich; Scheuch, E.; Siegmund, W.; Terhaag, B.; Bednarski, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 3 (2009), s. 479-493 ISSN 0090-9556 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500040581 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : flupirtine * analgesic * metabolism Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.743, year: 2009

  14. Are pathogenic bacteria just looking for food? Metabolism and microbial pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohmer, Laurence; Hocquet, Didier; Miller, Samuel I.

    2011-01-01

    It is interesting to speculate that the evolutionary drive of microbes to develop pathogenic characteristics was to access the nutrient resources that animals provided. Environments in animals that pathogens colonize have also driven the evolution of new bacterial characteristics to maximize these new nutritional opportunities. This review focuses on genomic and functional aspects of pathogen metabolism that allow efficient utilization of nutrient resources provided by animals. Similar to genes encoding specific virulence traits, some genes encoding metabolic functions have been horizontally acquired by pathogens to provide a selective advantage in host tissues. Selective advantage in host tissues can also be gained in some circumstances by loss of function due to mutations that alter metabolic capabilities. Greater understanding of bacterial metabolism within host tissues should be important for increased understanding of host-pathogen interactions and the development of future therapeutic strategies. PMID:21600774

  15. Influence of Wastewater Discharge on the Metabolic Potential of the Microbial Community in River Sediments

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Dong; Sharp, Jonathan O.; Drewes, Jorg

    2015-01-01

    , sulfur, purine and pyrimidine metabolisms, as well as restriction–modification systems. More diverse bacterial phyla were associated with upstream and deep downstream sediments, mainly including Actinobacteria, Planctomycetes, and Firmicutes. In contrast

  16. A review on the bioenergetics of anaerobic microbial metabolism close to the thermodynamic limits and its implications for digestion applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Ling; Yang, Peixian; Singh, Shubham; Zhuang, Huichuan; Xu, Linji; Chen, Wen-Hsing; Dolfing, Jan; Li, Dong; Zhang, Yan; Zeng, Huiping; Chu, Wei; Lee, Po-Heng

    2018-01-01

    The exploration of the energetics of anaerobic digestion systems can reveal how microorganisms cooperate efficiently for cell growth and methane production, especially under low-substrate conditions. The establishment of a thermodynamically interdependent partnership, called anaerobic syntrophy, allows unfavorable reactions to proceed. Interspecies electron transfer and the concentrations of electron carriers are crucial for maintaining this mutualistic activity. This critical review summarizes the functional microorganisms and syntroph partners, particularly in the metabolic pathways and energy conservation of syntrophs. The kinetics and thermodynamics of propionate degradation to methane, reversibility of the acetate oxidation process, and estimation of microbial growth are summarized. The various routes of interspecies electron transfer, reverse electron transfer, and Poly-β-hydroxyalkanoate formation in the syntrophic community are also reviewed. Finally, promising and critical directions of future research are proposed. Fundamental insight in the activities and interactions involved in AD systems could serve as a guidance for engineered systems optimization and upgrade. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Nucleic acid-based approaches to investigate microbial-related cheese quality defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eO Sullivan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe microbial profile of cheese is a primary determinant of cheese quality. Microorganisms can contribute to aroma and taste defects, form biogenic amines, cause gas and secondary fermentation defects, and can contribute to cheese pinking and mineral deposition issues. These defects may be as a result of seasonality and the variability in the composition of the milk supplied, variations in cheese processing parameters, as well as the nature and number of the non-starter microorganisms which come from the milk or other environmental sources. Such defects can be responsible for production and product recall costs and thus represent a significant economic burden for the dairy industry worldwide. Traditional non-molecular approaches are often considered biased and have inherently slow turnaround times. Molecular techniques can provide early and rapid detection of defects that result from the presence of specific spoilage microbes and, ultimately, assist in enhancing cheese quality and reducing costs. Here we review the DNA-based methods that are available to detect/quantify spoilage bacteria, and relevant metabolic pathways, in cheeses and, in the process, highlight how these strategies can be employed to improve cheese quality and reduce the associated economic burden on cheese processors.

  18. Arabinoxylo-Oligosaccharides and Inulin Impact Inter-Individual Variation on Microbial Metabolism and Composition, Which Immunomodulates Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Abbeele, Pieter; Taminiau, Bernard; Pinheiro, Iris; Duysburgh, Cindy; Jacobs, Heidi; Pijls, Loek; Marzorati, Massimo

    2018-02-07

    Fecal batch fermentations coupled to cocultures of epithelial cells and macrophages were used to compare how arabinoxylo-oligosaccharides (AXOS) and inulin modulate gut microbial activity and composition of three different human donors and subsequently the epithelial permeability and immune response. Both inulin and AXOS decreased the pH during incubation (-1.5 pH units), leading to increased productions of acetate, propionate, and butyrate. Differences in terms of metabolites production could be linked to specific microbial alterations at genus level upon inulin/AXOS supplementation (i.e., Bifidobacterium, Bacteroides, Prevotella and unclassified Erysipelotrichaceae), as shown by 16S-targeted Illumina sequencing. Both products stimulated gut barrier and immune function with increases in TEER, NF-KB, IL-10, and IL-6. Ingredients with different structures selectively modulate the microbiota of a specific donor leading to differential changes at metabolic level. The extent of this effect is donor specific and is linked to a final specific modulation of the host's immune system.

  19. The Oxidative Metabolism of Fossil Hydrocarbons and Sulfide Minerals by the Lithobiontic Microbial Community Inhabiting Deep Subterrestrial Kupferschiefer Black Shale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Włodarczyk

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Black shales are one of the largest reservoirs of fossil organic carbon and inorganic reduced sulfur on Earth. It is assumed that microorganisms play an important role in the transformations of these sedimentary rocks and contribute to the return of organic carbon and inorganic sulfur to the global geochemical cycles. An outcrop of deep subterrestrial ~256-million-year-old Kupferschiefer black shale was studied to define the metabolic processes of the deep biosphere important in transformations of organic carbon and inorganic reduced sulfur compounds. This outcrop was created during mining activity 12 years ago and since then it has been exposed to the activity of oxygen and microorganisms. The microbial processes were described based on metagenome and metaproteome studies as well as on the geochemistry of the rock. The microorganisms inhabiting the subterrestrial black shale were dominated by bacterial genera such as Pseudomonas, Limnobacter, Yonghaparkia, Thiobacillus, Bradyrhizobium, and Sulfuricaulis. This study on black shale was the first to detect archaea and fungi, represented by Nitrososphaera and Aspergillus genera, respectively. The enzymatic oxidation of fossil aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons was mediated mostly by chemoorganotrophic bacteria, but also by archaea and fungi. The dissimilative enzymatic oxidation of primary reduced sulfur compounds was performed by chemolithotrophic bacteria. The geochemical consequences of microbial activity were the oxidation and dehydrogenation of kerogen, as well as oxidation of sulfide minerals.

  20. Metabolic and phylogenetic analysis of microbial communities during phytoremediation of soil contaminated with weathered hydrocarbons and heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmroth, Marja R T; Koskinen, Perttu E P; Kaksonen, Anna H; Münster, Uwe; Pichtel, John; Puhakka, Jaakko A

    2007-12-01

    In the current study, the microbial ecology of weathered hydrocarbon and heavy metal contaminated soil undergoing phytoremediation was studied. The relationship of functional diversity, measured as carbon source utilisation in Biolog plates and extracellular enzymatic activities, and genetic diversity of bacteria was evaluated. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was used for community analyses at the species level. Bulk soil and rhizosphere soil from pine and poplar plantations were analysed separately to determine if the plant rhizosphere impacted hydrocarbon degradation. Prevailing microbial communities in the field site were both genetically and metabolically diverse. Furthermore, both tree rhizosphere and fertilisation affected the compositions of these communities and increased activities of extracellular aminopeptidases. In addition, the abundance of alkane hydroxylase and naphthalene dioxygenase genes in the communities was low, but the prevalence of these genes was increased by the addition of bioavailable hydrocarbons. Tree rhizosphere communities had greater hydrocarbon degradation potential than those of bulk soil. Hydrocarbon utilising communities were dominated generally by the species Ralstonia eutropha and bacteria belonging to the genus Burkholderia. Despite the presence of viable hydrocarbon-degrading microbiota, decomposition of hydrocarbons from weathered hydrocarbon contaminated soil over four years, regardless of the presence of vegetation, was low in unfertilised soil. Compost addition enhanced the removal of hydrocarbons.

  1. Investigating microbial colonization in actively forming hydrothermal deposits using thermocouple arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tivey, M. K.; Reysenbach, A. L.; Hirsch, M.; Steinberg, J.; Flores, G. E.

    2010-12-01

    Investigations of microbial colonization of very young hydrothermal deposits were carried out in 2009 at hydrothermal vents in the Lau Basin (SW Pacific), and in Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California, with a test deployment at the Rainbow vent field on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge in 2008. Our method entailed razing active chimneys and placing arrays of temperature probes (8 titanium-encased probes with their tips placed within a titanium cage) over the active flow. The chimneys that grew back through each array, encasing the temperature probe tips, were recovered after 2 to 15 days, along with temperature records. Molecular phylogenetic methods are being used to reveal the members of the microbial communities that developed in each chimney of known age and thermal history. A total of 15 array deployments were made at 10 vents in 6 different vent fields. Similar morphology beehives (with porous fine-grained interiors and steep temperature gradients across the outermost more-consolidated “wall”) formed at 2 of the 3 vents in Guaymas Basin (in 2 and 5 days at one vent and 3 and 15 days at a second), and at one vent each in the Kilo Moana (in 3 days), Tahi Moana (in 2.5 days), and Tui Malila (in 3 and 8 days) vent fields in the Lau Basin. In contrast, open conduit, thin walled chimneys grew within arrays at the Mariner vent field, Lau Basin, at 3 different vents (in 3 days at one vent, in 3 and 11 days at a second vent, and in 13 days at a third vent). A lower temperature (Archaea showed very little change in diversity over time, with members of the genera Thermococcus and Methanocaldococcus present in all samples analyzed, irrespective of location and timing of sampling. This is very different from a 72-hour test array deployment done in 2008 at Rainbow vent field, where the deposited soft material was colonized only by the sulfate-reducing archaeum, Archaeoglobus. These samples (8 beehives, 4 open conduit smokers, one diffuser spire, from chimneys of known composition

  2. MetaMetaDB: a database and analytic system for investigating microbial habitability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-chia Yang

    Full Text Available MetaMetaDB (http://mmdb.aori.u-tokyo.ac.jp/ is a database and analytic system for investigating microbial habitability, i.e., how a prokaryotic group can inhabit different environments. The interaction between prokaryotes and the environment is a key issue in microbiology because distinct prokaryotic communities maintain distinct ecosystems. Because 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA sequences play pivotal roles in identifying prokaryotic species, a system that comprehensively links diverse environments to 16S rRNA sequences of the inhabitant prokaryotes is necessary for the systematic understanding of the microbial habitability. However, existing databases are biased to culturable prokaryotes and exhibit limitations in the comprehensiveness of the data because most prokaryotes are unculturable. Recently, metagenomic and 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing approaches have generated abundant 16S rRNA sequence data that encompass unculturable prokaryotes across diverse environments; however, these data are usually buried in large databases and are difficult to access. In this study, we developed MetaMetaDB (Meta-Metagenomic DataBase, which comprehensively and compactly covers 16S rRNA sequences retrieved from public datasets. Using MetaMetaDB, users can quickly generate hypotheses regarding the types of environments a prokaryotic group may be adapted to. We anticipate that MetaMetaDB will improve our understanding of the diversity and evolution of prokaryotes.

  3. MetaMetaDB: a database and analytic system for investigating microbial habitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ching-chia; Iwasaki, Wataru

    2014-01-01

    MetaMetaDB (http://mmdb.aori.u-tokyo.ac.jp/) is a database and analytic system for investigating microbial habitability, i.e., how a prokaryotic group can inhabit different environments. The interaction between prokaryotes and the environment is a key issue in microbiology because distinct prokaryotic communities maintain distinct ecosystems. Because 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences play pivotal roles in identifying prokaryotic species, a system that comprehensively links diverse environments to 16S rRNA sequences of the inhabitant prokaryotes is necessary for the systematic understanding of the microbial habitability. However, existing databases are biased to culturable prokaryotes and exhibit limitations in the comprehensiveness of the data because most prokaryotes are unculturable. Recently, metagenomic and 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing approaches have generated abundant 16S rRNA sequence data that encompass unculturable prokaryotes across diverse environments; however, these data are usually buried in large databases and are difficult to access. In this study, we developed MetaMetaDB (Meta-Metagenomic DataBase), which comprehensively and compactly covers 16S rRNA sequences retrieved from public datasets. Using MetaMetaDB, users can quickly generate hypotheses regarding the types of environments a prokaryotic group may be adapted to. We anticipate that MetaMetaDB will improve our understanding of the diversity and evolution of prokaryotes.

  4. Metabolic enzyme cost explains variable trade-offs between microbial growth rate and yield.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meike T Wortel

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Microbes may maximize the number of daughter cells per time or per amount of nutrients consumed. These two strategies correspond, respectively, to the use of enzyme-efficient or substrate-efficient metabolic pathways. In reality, fast growth is often associated with wasteful, yield-inefficient metabolism, and a general thermodynamic trade-off between growth rate and biomass yield has been proposed to explain this. We studied growth rate/yield trade-offs by using a novel modeling framework, Enzyme-Flux Cost Minimization (EFCM and by assuming that the growth rate depends directly on the enzyme investment per rate of biomass production. In a comprehensive mathematical model of core metabolism in E. coli, we screened all elementary flux modes leading to cell synthesis, characterized them by the growth rates and yields they provide, and studied the shape of the resulting rate/yield Pareto front. By varying the model parameters, we found that the rate/yield trade-off is not universal, but depends on metabolic kinetics and environmental conditions. A prominent trade-off emerges under oxygen-limited growth, where yield-inefficient pathways support a 2-to-3 times higher growth rate than yield-efficient pathways. EFCM can be widely used to predict optimal metabolic states and growth rates under varying nutrient levels, perturbations of enzyme parameters, and single or multiple gene knockouts.

  5. Influence of diet and microbial activity in the digestive tract on digestibility, and nitrogen and energy metabolism in rats and pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eggum, B O; Thorbek, G; Beames, R M

    1982-01-01

    -55 kg. Measurements were made on the influence of microbial activity in the digestive tract on digestibility and nitrogen and energy metabolism. Dietary inclusion of the antibiotic Nebacitin was the method used to reduce the microbial population. 2. The microbial activity in the hind-gut (mumol ATP....../g air-dry contents) of antibiotic-treated rats was reduced to approximately one-tenth of that of untreated rats. 3. Live-weight gain was not significantly affected in either species by a reduction in the microbial activity, in spite of a reduction in dry matter digestibility in animals with reduced...... microflora. 4. For rats on low-crude-fibre diets, a reduction in microflora reduced digestibility of all nutrients and energy and metabolizability of digestible energy by approximately 5.4%. All differences were highly significant. On high-crude-fibre diets the decrease was approximately 5.9%. In pigs...

  6. Investigating microbial transformations of soil organic matter: synthesizing knowledge from disparate fields to guide new experimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, S. A.; Tiemann, L. K.; Ballantyne, F., IV; Lehmeier, C. A.; Min, K.

    2015-04-01

    Discerning why some soil organic matter (SOM) leaves soil profiles relatively quickly while other compounds, especially at depth, can be retained for decades to millennia is challenging for a multitude of reasons. Simultaneous with soil-specific advances, multiple other disciplines have enhanced their knowledge bases in ways potentially useful for future investigations of SOM decay. In this article, we highlight observations highly relevant for those investigating SOM decay and retention but often emanating from disparate fields and residing in literature seldom cited in SOM research. We focus on recent work in two key areas. First, we turn to experimental approaches using natural and artificial aquatic environments to investigate patterns of microbially mediated OM transformations as environmental conditions change, and highlight how aquatic microbial responses to environmental change can reveal processes likely important to OM decay and retention in soils. Second, we emphasize the importance of establishing intrinsic patterns of decay kinetics for purified substrates commonly found in soils to develop baseline rates. These decay kinetics - which represent the upper limit of the reaction rates - can then be compared to substrate decay kinetics observed in natural samples, which integrate intrinsic decay reaction rates and edaphic factors essential to the site under study but absent in purified systems. That comparison permits the site-specific factors to be parsed from the fundamental decay kinetics, an important advance in our understanding of SOM decay (and thus persistence) in natural systems. We then suggest ways in which empirical observations from aquatic systems and purified substrate-enzyme reaction kinetics can be used to advance recent theoretical efforts in SOM-focused research. Finally, we suggest how the observations in aquatic and purified substrate-enzyme systems could be used to help unravel the puzzles presented by oft-observed patterns of SOM

  7. Probiotic modulation of symbiotic gut microbial-host metabolic interactions in a humanized microbiome mouse model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, F.P.J.; Wang, Y.; Sprenger, N.; Yap, K.S.; Rezzi, S.; Ramadan, Z.; Peré-Trepat, E.; Rochat, F.; Cherbut, C.; Bladeren, van P.J.; Fay, L.B.; Kochhar, S.; LindOn, J.C.; Holmes, E.; Nicholson, J.K.

    2008-01-01

    The transgenomic metabolic effects of exposure to either Lactobacillus paracasei or Lactobacillus rhamnosus probiotics have been measured and mapped in humanized extended genome mice (germ-free mice colonized with human baby flora). Statistical analysis of the compartmental fluctuations in diverse

  8. ReacKnock: identifying reaction deletion strategies for microbial strain optimization based on genome-scale metabolic network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zixiang Xu

    Full Text Available Gene knockout has been used as a common strategy to improve microbial strains for producing chemicals. Several algorithms are available to predict the target reactions to be deleted. Most of them apply mixed integer bi-level linear programming (MIBLP based on metabolic networks, and use duality theory to transform bi-level optimization problem of large-scale MIBLP to single-level programming. However, the validity of the transformation was not proved. Solution of MIBLP depends on the structure of inner problem. If the inner problem is continuous, Karush-Kuhn-Tucker (KKT method can be used to reformulate the MIBLP to a single-level one. We adopt KKT technique in our algorithm ReacKnock to attack the intractable problem of the solution of MIBLP, demonstrated with the genome-scale metabolic network model of E. coli for producing various chemicals such as succinate, ethanol, threonine and etc. Compared to the previous methods, our algorithm is fast, stable and reliable to find the optimal solutions for all the chemical products tested, and able to provide all the alternative deletion strategies which lead to the same industrial objective.

  9. Investigations on microbial leaching of zircon by means of spark source mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, S.; Dietze, H.J.; Bullmann, M.; Iske, U.

    1985-01-01

    Spark source mass spectrometry is a useful method for chemical element analysis of geological and biological samples. This sensitive technique (detection limit down to the ppb-range) is used to analyze leaching processes by means of several microorganisms. The problem of microbial leaching of chemical resistent materials was tested under laboratory condition with regard to possible analytical and technical applications. Leaching of metalls with chemolithotrophic and heterotrophic, organic acids producing microorganisms has been investigated with zircon from Baltic Shield containing 0.7% rare earth elements and 1.67% hafnium. When zircon is leached with strains of Thiobacillus ferroxidans the rare earth elements, Hf, Th, and U mostly (about 80%) can be recovered. (author)

  10. Microbial ecology of soda lakes: investigating sulfur and nitrogen cycling at Mono Lake, CA, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbanks, D.; Phillips, A. A.; Wells, M.; Bao, R.; Fullerton, K. M.; Stamps, B. W.; Speth, D. R.; Johnson, H.; Sessions, A. L.

    2017-12-01

    Soda lakes represent unique ecosystems characterized by extremes of pH, salinity and distinct geochemical cycling. Despite these extreme conditions, soda lakes are important repositories of biological adaptation and have a highly functional microbial system. We investigated the biogeochemical cycling of sulfur and nitrogen compounds in Mono Lake, California, located east of the Sierra Nevada mountains. Mono lake is characterized by hyperalkaline, hypersaline and high sulfate concentrations and can enter prolonged periods of meromixis due to freshwater inflow. Typically, the microbial sulfur cycle is highly active in soda lakes with both oxidation and reduction of sulfur compounds. However, the biological sulfur cycle is connected to many other main elemental cycles such as carbon, nitrogen and metals. Here we investigated the interaction between sulfur and nitrogen cycling in Mono lake using a combination of molecular, isotopic, and geochemical observations to explore the links between microbial phylogenetic composition and functionality. Metagenomic and 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing were determined at two locations and five depths in May 2017. 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing analysis revealed organisms capable of both sulfur and nitrogen cycling. The relative abundance and distribution of functional genes (dsrA, soxAB, nifH, etc) were also determined. These genetic markers indicate the potential in situ relevance of specific carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur pathways in the water column prior to the transition to meromictic stratification. However, genes for sulfide oxidation, denitrification, and ammonification were present. Genome binning guided by the most abundant dsrA sequences, GC content, and abundance with depth identified a Thioalkalivibrio paradoxus bin containing genes capable of sulfur oxidation, denitrification, and nitrate reduction. The presence of a large number of sulfur and nitrogen cycling genes associated with Thioalkalivibrio paradoxus

  11. Investigation of the rumen microbial community responsible for degradation of a putative toxin in Acacia angustissima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, E.M.C.; Blackall, L.L.; Mcsweeney, C.S.; Krause, D.O.

    2005-01-01

    Acacia angustissima has been proposed as a protein supplement in countries where availability of high quality fodder for grazing animals is a problem due to extreme, dry climates. While A. angustissima thrives in harsh environments and provides valuable nutrients required by ruminants, it has also been found to contain anti-nutritive factors that currently preclude its widespread application. A number of non-protein amino acids have been identified in the leaves of A. angustissima and in the past these have been linked to toxicity in ruminants. The non-protein amino acid 4-n-acetyl-2,4-diaminobutyric acid (ADAB) had been determined to be the major non-protein amino acid in the leaves of A. angustissima. Thus, in this study, the aim was to identify microorganisms from the rumen environment capable of degrading ADAB. Using an ADAB-containing plant extract, a mixed enrichment culture was obtained that exhibited substantial ADAB-degrading ability. Attempts to isolate an ADAB-degrading micro-organism were carried out, but no isolates were able to degrade ADAB in pure culture. The mixed microbial community of the ADAB-degrading enrichment culture was further examined through the use of pure-culture-independent techniques. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was employed to investigate the diversity within this sample. In addition two bacterial 16S rDNA clone libraries were constructed in an attempt to further elucidate the members of the microbial population. The clone libraries were constructed from serial dilutions of the enrichment culture, a 10 -5 dilution where complete degradation of ADAB occurred, and a 10 -7 dilution where ADAB degradation did not occur. Through the comparison of these two libraries it was hypothesized that clones belonging to the Firmicutes phylum were involved in ADAB degradation. A FISH probe, ADAB1268, was then designed to target these clones and was applied to the enrichment cultures to investigate their relative abundance within the

  12. Effect of lineage-specific metabolic traits of Lactobacillus reuteri on sourdough microbial ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaoxi B; Gänzle, Michael G

    2014-09-01

    This study determined the effects of specific metabolic traits of Lactobacillus reuteri on its competitiveness in sourdoughs. The competitiveness of lactobacilli in sourdough generally depends on their growth rate; acid resistance additionally contributes to competitiveness in sourdoughs with long fermentation times. Glycerol metabolism via glycerol dehydratase (gupCDE) accelerates growth by the regeneration of reduced cofactors; glutamate metabolism via glutamate decarboxylase (gadB) increases acid resistance by generating a proton motive force. Glycerol and glutamate metabolisms are lineage-specific traits in L. reuteri; therefore, this study employed glycerol dehydratase-positive sourdough isolates of human-adapted L. reuteri lineage I, glutamate decarboxylase-positive strains of rodent-adapted L. reuteri lineage II, as well as mutants with deletions in gadB or gupCDE. The competitivenesses of the strains were quantified by inoculation of wheat and sorghum sourdoughs with defined strains, followed by propagation of doughs with a 10% inoculum and 12-h or 72-h fermentation cycles. Lineage I L. reuteri strains dominated sourdoughs propagated with 12-h fermentation cycles; lineage II L. reuteri strains dominated sourdoughs propagated with 72-h fermentation cycles. L. reuteri 100-23ΔgadB was outcompeted by its wild-type strain in sourdoughs fermented with 72-h fermentation cycles; L. reuteri FUA3400ΔgupCDE was outcompeted by its wild-type strain in sourdoughs fermented with both 12-h and 72-h fermentation cycles. Competition experiments with isogenic pairs of strains resulted in a constant rate of strain displacement of the less competitive mutant strain. In conclusion, lineage-specific traits of L. reuteri determine the competitiveness of this species in sourdough fermentations. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Unique Microbial Diversity and Metabolic Pathway Features of Fermented Vegetables From Hainan, China

    OpenAIRE

    Qiannan Peng; Shuaiming Jiang; Jieling Chen; Chenchen Ma; Dongxue Huo; Yuyu Shao; Jiachao Zhang; Jiachao Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Fermented vegetables are typically traditional foods made of fresh vegetables and their juices, which are fermented by beneficial microorganisms. Herein, we applied high-throughput sequencing and culture-dependent technology to describe the diversities of microbiota and identify core microbiota in fermented vegetables from different areas of Hainan Province, and abundant metabolic pathways in the fermented vegetables were simultaneously predicted. At the genus level, Lactobacillus bacteria we...

  14. Inhibition of microbial metabolism in anaerobic lagoons by selected sulfonamides, tetracyclines, lincomycin, and tylosin tartrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftin, Keith A.; Henny, Cynthia; Adams, Craig D.; Surampali, Rao; Mormile, Melanie R.

    2005-01-01

    Antibiotics are used to maintain healthy livestock and to promote weight gain in concentrated animal feed operations. Antibiotics rarely are metabolized completely by livestock and, thus, are often present in livestock waste and in waste-treatment lagoons. The introduction of antibiotics into anaerobic lagoons commonly used for swine waste treatment has the potential for negative impacts on lagoon performance, which relies on a consortium of microbes ranging from fermentative microorganisms to methanogens. To address this concern, the effects of eight common veterinary antibiotics on anaerobic activity were studied. Anaerobic microcosms, prepared from freshly collected lagoon slurries, were amended with individual antibiotics at 10 mg/L for the initial screening study and at 1, 5, and 25 mg/L for the dose-response study. Monitored metabolic indicators included hydrogen, methane, and volatile fatty acid concentrations as well as chemical oxygen demand. The selected antibiotics significantly inhibited methane production relative to unamended controls, thus indicating that antibiotics at concentrations commonly found in swine lagoons can negatively impact anaerobic metabolism. Additionally, historical antibiotic usage seems to be a potential factor in affecting methane production. Specifically, less inhibition of methane production was noted in samples taken from the lagoon with a history of multiple-antibiotic use.

  15. Inhibition of microbial metabolism in anaerobic lagoons by selected sulfonamides, tetracyclines, lincomycin, and tylosin tartrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftin, Keith A; Henny, Cynthia; Adams, Craig D; Surampali, Rao; Mormile, Melanie R

    2005-04-01

    Antibiotics are used to maintain healthy livestock and to promote weight gain in concentrated animal feed operations. Antibiotics rarely are metabolized completely by livestock and, thus, are often present in livestock waste and in waste-treatment lagoons. The introduction of antibiotics into anaerobic lagoons commonly used for swine waste treatment has the potential for negative impacts on lagoon performance, which relies on a consortium of microbes ranging from fermentative microorganisms to methanogens. To address this concern, the effects of eight common veterinary antibiotics on anaerobic activity were studied. Anaerobic microcosms, prepared from freshly collected lagoon slurries, were amended with individual antibiotics at 10 mg/L for the initial screening study and at 1, 5, and 25 mg/L for the dose-response study. Monitored metabolic indicators included hydrogen, methane, and volatile fatty acid concentrations as well as chemical oxygen demand. The selected antibiotics significantly inhibited methane production relative to unamended controls, thus indicating that antibiotics at concentrations commonly found in swine lagoons can negatively impact anaerobic metabolism. Additionally, historical antibiotic usage seems to be a potential factor in affecting methane production. Specifically, less inhibition of methane production was noted in samples taken from the lagoon with a history of multiple-antibiotic use.

  16. Framework for network modularization and Bayesian network analysis to investigate the perturbed metabolic network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Hyun

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-scale metabolic network models have contributed to elucidating biological phenomena, and predicting gene targets to engineer for biotechnological applications. With their increasing importance, their precise network characterization has also been crucial for better understanding of the cellular physiology. Results We herein introduce a framework for network modularization and Bayesian network analysis (FMB to investigate organism’s metabolism under perturbation. FMB reveals direction of influences among metabolic modules, in which reactions with similar or positively correlated flux variation patterns are clustered, in response to specific perturbation using metabolic flux data. With metabolic flux data calculated by constraints-based flux analysis under both control and perturbation conditions, FMB, in essence, reveals the effects of specific perturbations on the biological system through network modularization and Bayesian network analysis at metabolic modular level. As a demonstration, this framework was applied to the genetically perturbed Escherichia coli metabolism, which is a lpdA gene knockout mutant, using its genome-scale metabolic network model. Conclusions After all, it provides alternative scenarios of metabolic flux distributions in response to the perturbation, which are complementary to the data obtained from conventionally available genome-wide high-throughput techniques or metabolic flux analysis.

  17. Framework for network modularization and Bayesian network analysis to investigate the perturbed metabolic network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Uk; Kim, Tae Yong; Lee, Sang Yup

    2011-01-01

    Genome-scale metabolic network models have contributed to elucidating biological phenomena, and predicting gene targets to engineer for biotechnological applications. With their increasing importance, their precise network characterization has also been crucial for better understanding of the cellular physiology. We herein introduce a framework for network modularization and Bayesian network analysis (FMB) to investigate organism's metabolism under perturbation. FMB reveals direction of influences among metabolic modules, in which reactions with similar or positively correlated flux variation patterns are clustered, in response to specific perturbation using metabolic flux data. With metabolic flux data calculated by constraints-based flux analysis under both control and perturbation conditions, FMB, in essence, reveals the effects of specific perturbations on the biological system through network modularization and Bayesian network analysis at metabolic modular level. As a demonstration, this framework was applied to the genetically perturbed Escherichia coli metabolism, which is a lpdA gene knockout mutant, using its genome-scale metabolic network model. After all, it provides alternative scenarios of metabolic flux distributions in response to the perturbation, which are complementary to the data obtained from conventionally available genome-wide high-throughput techniques or metabolic flux analysis.

  18. Microbial quality of reclaimed water for urban reuses: Probabilistic risk-based investigation and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhipi-Shrestha, Gyan; Hewage, Kasun; Sadiq, Rehan

    2017-01-15

    Although Canada has abundant freshwater resources, many cities still experience seasonal water shortage. Supply-side and demand-side management is a core strategy to address this water shortage. Under this strategy, reclaimed water, which the Canadian public is willing to use for non-potable purposes, is an option. However, no universal guidelines exist for reclaimed water use. Despite the federal government's long-term goal to develop guidelines for many water reuse applications, guidelines have only been prescribed for reclaimed water use in toilet and urinal flushing in Canada. At the provincial level, British Columbia (BC) has promulgated guidelines for wide applications of reclaimed water but only at broad class levels. This research has investigated and proposed probabilistic risk-based recommended values for microbial quality of reclaimed water in various non-potable urban reuses. The health risk was estimated by using quantitative microbial risk assessment. Two-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations were used in the analysis to include variability and uncertainty in input data. The proposed recommended values are based on the indicator organism E. coli. The required treatment levels for reuse were also estimated. In addition, the recommended values were successfully applied to three wastewater treatment effluents in the Okanagan Valley, BC, Canada. The health risks associated with other bacterial pathogens (Campylobacter jejuni and Salmonella spp.), virus (adenovirus, norovirus, and rotavirus), and protozoa (Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia spp.), were also estimated. The estimated risks indicate the effectiveness of the E. coli-based water quality recommended values. Sensitivity analysis shows the pathogenic E. coli ratio and morbidity are the most sensitive input parameters for all water reuses. The proposed recommended values could be further improved by using national or regional data on water exposures, disease burden per case, and the susceptibility

  19. Profiling of Indigenous Microbial Community Dynamics and Metabolic Activity During Enrichment in Molasses-Supplemented Crude Oil-Brine Mixtures for Improved Understanding of Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halim, Amalia Yunita; Pedersen, Dorthe Skou; Nielsen, Sidsel Marie

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic incubations using crude oil and brine from a North Sea reservoir were conducted to gain increased understanding of indigenous microbial community development, metabolite production, and the effects on the oil–brine system after addition of a complex carbon source, molasses, with or with...... of molasses has potential as microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) strategy in North Sea oil reservoirs.......Anaerobic incubations using crude oil and brine from a North Sea reservoir were conducted to gain increased understanding of indigenous microbial community development, metabolite production, and the effects on the oil–brine system after addition of a complex carbon source, molasses....... The microbial growth caused changes in the crude oil–brine system: formation of oil emulsions, and reduction of interfacial tension (IFT). Reduction in IFT was associated with microbes being present at the oil–brine interphase. These findings suggest that stimulation of indigenous microbial growth by addition...

  20. Profiling of Indigenous Microbial Community Dynamics and Metabolic Activity During Enrichment in Molasses-Supplemented Crude Oil-Brine Mixtures for Improved Understanding of Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, Amalia Yunita; Pedersen, Dorthe Skou; Nielsen, Sidsel Marie; Lantz, Anna Eliasson

    2015-06-01

    Anaerobic incubations using crude oil and brine from a North Sea reservoir were conducted to gain increased understanding of indigenous microbial community development, metabolite production, and the effects on the oil-brine system after addition of a complex carbon source, molasses, with or without nitrate to boost microbial growth. Growth of the indigenous microbes was stimulated by addition of molasses. Pyrosequencing showed that specifically Anaerobaculum, Petrotoga, and Methanothermococcus were enriched. Addition of nitrate favored the growth of Petrotoga over Anaerobaculum. The microbial growth caused changes in the crude oil-brine system: formation of oil emulsions, and reduction of interfacial tension (IFT). Reduction in IFT was associated with microbes being present at the oil-brine interphase. These findings suggest that stimulation of indigenous microbial growth by addition of molasses has potential as microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) strategy in North Sea oil reservoirs.

  1. Suppression of microbial metabolic pathways inhibits the generation of the human body odor component diacetyl by Staphylococcus spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Hara

    Full Text Available Diacetyl (2,3-butanedione is a key contributor to unpleasant odors emanating from the axillae, feet, and head regions. To investigate the mechanism of diacetyl generation on human skin, resident skin bacteria were tested for the ability to produce diacetyl via metabolism of the main organic acids contained in human sweat. L-lactate metabolism by Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis produced the highest amounts of diacetyl, as measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. Glycyrrhiza glabra root extract (GGR and α-tocopheryl-L-ascorbate-2-O-phosphate diester potassium salt (EPC-K1, a phosphate diester of α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid, effectively inhibited diacetyl formation without bactericidal effects. Moreover, a metabolic flux analysis revealed that GGR and EPC-K1 suppressed diacetyl formation by inhibiting extracellular bacterial conversion of L-lactate to pyruvate or by altering intracellular metabolic flow into the citrate cycle, respectively, highlighting fundamentally distinct mechanisms by GGR and EPC-K1 to suppress diacetyl formation. These results provide new insight into diacetyl metabolism by human skin bacteria and identify a regulatory mechanism of diacetyl formation that can facilitate the development of effective deodorant agents.

  2. Suppression of microbial metabolic pathways inhibits the generation of the human body odor component diacetyl by Staphylococcus spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Takeshi; Matsui, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Hironori

    2014-01-01

    Diacetyl (2,3-butanedione) is a key contributor to unpleasant odors emanating from the axillae, feet, and head regions. To investigate the mechanism of diacetyl generation on human skin, resident skin bacteria were tested for the ability to produce diacetyl via metabolism of the main organic acids contained in human sweat. L-lactate metabolism by Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis produced the highest amounts of diacetyl, as measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. Glycyrrhiza glabra root extract (GGR) and α-tocopheryl-L-ascorbate-2-O-phosphate diester potassium salt (EPC-K1), a phosphate diester of α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid, effectively inhibited diacetyl formation without bactericidal effects. Moreover, a metabolic flux analysis revealed that GGR and EPC-K1 suppressed diacetyl formation by inhibiting extracellular bacterial conversion of L-lactate to pyruvate or by altering intracellular metabolic flow into the citrate cycle, respectively, highlighting fundamentally distinct mechanisms by GGR and EPC-K1 to suppress diacetyl formation. These results provide new insight into diacetyl metabolism by human skin bacteria and identify a regulatory mechanism of diacetyl formation that can facilitate the development of effective deodorant agents.

  3. Methods for the Isolation of Genes Encoding Novel PHA Metabolism Enzymes from Complex Microbial Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jiujun; Nordeste, Ricardo; Trainer, Maria A; Charles, Trevor C

    2017-01-01

    Development of different PHAs as alternatives to petrochemically derived plastics can be facilitated by mining metagenomic libraries for diverse PHA cycle genes that might be useful for synthesis of bio-plastics. The specific phenotypes associated with mutations of the PHA synthesis pathway genes in Sinorhizobium meliloti and Pseudomonas putida, allows the use of powerful selection and screening tools to identify complementing novel PHA synthesis genes. Identification of novel genes through their function rather than sequence facilitates the functional proteins that may otherwise have been excluded through sequence-only screening methodology. We present here methods that we have developed for the isolation of clones expressing novel PHA metabolism genes from metagenomic libraries.

  4. Corn silage in dairy cow diets to reduce ruminal methanogenesis: effects on the rumen metabolically active microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lettat, A; Hassanat, F; Benchaar, C

    2013-08-01

    Methane produced by the methanogenic Archaea that inhabit the rumen is a potent greenhouse gas and represents an energy loss for the animal. Although several strategies have been proposed to mitigate enteric CH4 production, little is known about the effects of dietary changes on the microbial consortia involved in ruminal methanogenesis. Thus, the current study aimed to examine how the metabolically active microbes are affected when dairy cows were fed diets with increasing proportions of corn silage (CS). For this purpose, 9 ruminally cannulated lactating dairy cows were used in a replicated 3 × 3 Latin square design and fed a total mixed ration (60:40 forage:concentrate ratio on a dry matter basis) with the forage portion being either alfalfa silage (0% CS), corn silage (100% CS), or a 50:50 mixture (50% CS). Enteric CH4 production was determined using respiration chambers and total rumen content was sampled for the determination of fermentation characteristics and molecular biology analyses (cDNA-based length heterogeneity PCR, quantitative PCR). The cDNA-based length heterogeneity PCR targeting active microbes revealed similar bacterial communities in cows fed 0% CS and 50% CS diets, whereas important differences were observed between 0% CS and 100% CS diets, including a reduction in the bacterial richness and diversity in cows fed 100% CS diet. As revealed by quantitative PCR, feeding the 100% CS diet increased the number of total bacteria, Prevotella spp., Archaea, and methanogenic activity, though it reduced protozoal number. Meanwhile, increasing the CS proportion in the diet increased propionate concentration but decreased ruminal pH, CH4 production (L/kg of dry matter intake), and concentrations of acetate and butyrate. Based on these microbial and fermentation changes, and because CH4 production was reduced by feeding 100% CS diet, this study shows that the use of cDNA-based quantitative PCR to estimate archaeal growth and activity is not reliable

  5. Polyphenols as enzyme inhibitors in different degraded peat soils: Implication for microbial metabolism in rewetted peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, Dominik; Roth, Cyril; Gelbrecht, Jörg; Fenner, Nathalie; Reuter, Hendrik

    2015-04-01

    Recently, more than 30,000 ha of drained minerotrophic peatlands (= fens) in NE Germany were rewetted to restore their ecological functions. Due to an extended drainage history, a re-establishment of their original state is not expected in the short-term. Elevated concentrations of dissolved organic carbon, ammonium and phosphate have been measured in the soil porewater of the upper degraded peat layers of rewetted fens at levels of one to three orders higher than the values in pristine systems; an indicator of increased microbial activity in the upper degraded soil layers. On the other hand there is evidence that the substrate availability within the degraded peat layer is lowered since the organic matter has formerly been subject to intense decomposition over the decades of drainage and intense agricultural use of the areas. Previously however, it was suggested that inhibition of hydrolytic enzymes by polyphenolic substances is suspended during aeration of peat soils mainly due to the decomposition of the inhibiting polyphenols by oxidising enzymes such as phenol oxidase. Accordingly we hypothesised a lack of enzyme inhibiting polyphenols in degraded peat soils of rewetted fens compared to less decomposed peat of more natural fens. We collected both peat samples at the soil surface (0-20 cm) and fresh roots of dominating vascular plants and mosses (as peat parent material) from five formerly drained rewetted sites and five more natural sites of NE Germany and NW Poland. Less decomposed peat and living roots were used to obtain an internal standard for polyphenol analysis and to run enzyme inhibition tests. For all samples we determined the total phenolic contents and in addition we distinguished between the contents of hydrolysable and condensed tannic substances. From a methodical perspective the advantage of internal standards compared to the commercially available standards cyanidin chloride and tannic acid became apparent. Quantification with cyanidin or

  6. Formate as an energy source for microbial metabolism in chemosynthetic zones of hydrothermal ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windman, Todd; Zolotova, Natalya; Schwandner, Florian; Shock, Everett L

    2007-12-01

    Formate, a simple organic acid known to support chemotrophic hyperthermophiles, is found in hot springs of varying temperature and pH. However, it is not yet known how metabolic strategies that use formate could contribute to primary productivity in hydrothermal ecosystems. In an effort to provide a quantitative framework for assessing the role of formate metabolism, concentration data for dissolved formate and many other solutes in samples from Yellowstone hot springs were used, together with data for coexisting gas compositions, to evaluate the overall Gibbs energy for many reactions involving formate oxidation or reduction. The result is the first rigorous thermodynamic assessment of reactions involving formate oxidation to bicarbonate and reduction to methane coupled with various forms of iron, nitrogen, sulfur, hydrogen, and oxygen for hydrothermal ecosystems. We conclude that there are a limited number of reactions that can yield energy through formate reduction, in contrast to numerous formate oxidation reactions that can yield abundant energy for chemosynthetic microorganisms. Because the energy yields are so high, these results challenge the notion that hydrogen is the primary energy source of chemosynthetic microbes in hydrothermal ecosystems.

  7. Weedy lignocellulosic feedstock and microbial metabolic engineering. Advancing the generation of 'Biofuel'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandel, Anuj K. [Jawaharlal Nehru Technological Univ., Hyderabad (India). Centre of Biotechnology; Singh, Om V. [Pittsburgh Univ., Bradford, PA (United States). Div. of Biological and Health Sciences

    2011-03-15

    Lignocellulosic materials are the most abundant renewable organic resources ({proportional_to}200 billion tons annually) on earth that are readily available for conversion to ethanol and other value-added products, but they have not yet been tapped for the commercial production of fuel ethanol. The lignocellulosic substrates include woody substrates such as hardwood (birch and aspen, etc.) and softwood (spruce and pine, etc.), agro residues (wheat straw, sugarcane bagasse, corn stover, etc.), dedicated energy crops (switch grass, and Miscanthus etc.), weedy materials (Eicchornia crassipes, Lantana camara etc.), and municipal solid waste (food and kitchen waste, etc.). Despite the success achieved in the laboratory, there are limitations to success with lignocellulosic substrates on a commercial scale. The future of lignocellulosics is expected to lie in improvements of plant biomass, metabolic engineering of ethanol, and cellulolytic enzyme-producing microorganisms, fullest exploitation of weed materials, and process integration of the individual steps involved in bioethanol production. Issues related to the chemical composition of various weedy raw substrates for bioethanol formation, including chemical composition-based structural hydrolysis of the substrate, need special attention. This area could be opened up further by exploring genetically modified metabolic engineering routes in weedy materials and in biocatalysts that would make the production of bioethanol more efficient. (orig.)

  8. Comparative analysis of fecal microbiota and intestinal microbial metabolic activity in captive polar bears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Clarissa; Gänzle, Michael

    2011-03-01

    The composition of the intestinal microbiota depends on gut physiology and diet. Ursidae possess a simple gastrointestinal system composed of a stomach, small intestine, and indistinct hindgut. This study determined the composition and stability of fecal microbiota of 3 captive polar bears by group-specific quantitative PCR and PCR-DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) using the 16S rRNA gene as target. Intestinal metabolic activity was determined by analysis of short-chain fatty acids in feces. For comparison, other Carnivora and mammals were included in this study. Total bacterial abundance was approximately log 8.5 DNA gene copies·(g feces)-1 in all 3 polar bears. Fecal polar bear microbiota was dominated by the facultative anaerobes Enterobacteriaceae and enterococci, and the Clostridium cluster I. The detection of the Clostridium perfringens α-toxin gene verified the presence of C. perfringens. Composition of the fecal bacterial population was stable on a genus level; according to results obtained by PCR-DGGE, dominant bacterial species fluctuated. The total short-chain fatty acid content of Carnivora and other mammals analysed was comparable; lactate was detected in feces of all carnivora but present only in trace amounts in other mammals. In comparison, the fecal microbiota and metabolic activity of captive polar bears mostly resembled the closely related grizzly and black bears.

  9. Single-cell genomics reveal metabolic strategies for microbial growth and survival in an oligotrophic aquifer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkins, Michael J.; Kennedy, David W.; Castelle, Cindy; Field, Erin; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Konopka, Allan

    2014-02-09

    Bacteria from the genus Pedobacter are a major component of microbial assemblages at Hanford Site and have been shown to significantly change in abundance in response to the subsurface intrusion of Columbia River water. Here we employed single cell genomics techniques to shed light on the physiological niche of these microorganisms. Analysis of four Pedobacter single amplified genomes (SAGs) from Hanford Site sediments revealed a chemoheterotrophic lifestyle, with the potential to exist under both aerobic and microaerophilic conditions via expression of both aa3­-type and cbb3-type cytochrome c oxidases. These SAGs encoded a wide-range of both intra-and extra­-cellular carbohydrate-active enzymes, potentially enabling the degradation of recalcitrant substrates such as xylan and chitin, and the utilization of more labile sugars such as mannose and fucose. Coupled to these enzymes, a diversity of transporters and sugar-binding molecules were involved in the uptake of carbon from the extracellular local environment. The SAGs were enriched in TonB-dependent receptors (TBDRs), which play a key role in uptake of substrates resulting from degradation of recalcitrant carbon. CRISPR-Cas mechanisms for resisting viral infections were identified in all SAGs. These data demonstrate the potential mechanisms utilized for persistence by heterotrophic microorganisms in a carbon-limited aquifer, and hint at potential linkages between observed Pedobacter abundance shifts within the 300 Area subsurface and biogeochemical shifts associated with Columbia River water intrusion.

  10. Current trends and future requirements for the mass spectrometric investigation of microbial, mammalian and plant metabolomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, Warwick B

    2008-01-01

    The functional levels of biological cells or organisms can be separated into the genome, transcriptome, proteome and metabolome. Of these the metabolome offers specific advantages to the investigation of the phenotype of biological systems. The investigation of the metabolome (metabolomics) has only recently appeared as a mainstream scientific discipline and is currently developing rapidly for the study of microbial, plant and mammalian metabolomes. The metabolome pipeline or workflow encompasses the processes of sample collection and preparation, collection of analytical data, raw data pre-processing, data analysis and data storage. Of these processes the collection of analytical data will be discussed in this review with specific interest shown in the application of mass spectrometry in the metabolomics pipeline. The current developments in mass spectrometry platforms (GC–MS, LC–MS, DIMS and imaging MS) and applications of specific interest will be highlighted. The current limitations of these platforms and applications will be discussed with areas requiring further development also highlighted. These include the detectable coverage of the metabolome, the identification of metabolites and the process of converting raw data to biological knowledge. (review article)

  11. Climate Coping: Investigating Metabolic Responses in Crocosphaera watsonii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, K.

    2016-02-01

    Climate change causes chemical alterations in the open oceans, such as warming which leads to stratification, affecting nutrient ratios. Changes in nutrient ratios result in species shifts and a change in phytoplankton physiology, affecting all marine life. Unicellular diazotrophic microorganisms play a vital role in our open ocean ecosystems. These organisms do so by implementing metabolic processes that contribute to various availability of nutrients including; nitrogen and carbon. The open ocean diazotrophs are represented by multiple strains of Crocosphaera watsonii. The specific aim of this study was to determine whether the phenotype in small and large strain C. watsonii differs, in response to exposure to altered temperature gradients, measured as changes in cell density, photosynthetic efficiency, and EPS production. Triplicate cultures of C. watsonii WH8501 and C. watsonii WH0003 were inoculated into 60 ml of sterile Vineyard Sound SO media at a 1:10 ratio. Each culture was grown under; warm light levels (˜63 µ E m-2 s-1) on a 14:10 day/night cycle at temperatures of 27oC or 29oC. C. watsonii WH8501 cultures were harvested on Day 11, and C. watsonii WH0003 cultures were harvested on Day 9. To evaluate cell growth, fluorescence measurements were taken daily. Aliquots of experimental cultures were evaluated for cell density using flow-cytrometry, photosynthetic efficiency using FIRe fluorescence, and EPS production using a TEP determination assay. Proteins were extracted and analyzed by LC-MS-MS mass spectrometry. There was a correlation between temperature and EPS production for the two strains, C. watsonii WH8501 had a significantly higher growth rate when grown at 29oC, and a lower growth rate at 27oC compared to C. watsonii WH0003. Cultures grown at 27oC produced more EPS than those grown at 29oC. However, overall C. watsonii WH0003 produced more EPS than C. watsonii WH8501. We an increase in the yield of photosystem II (Fv/Fm) in C. watsonii WH0003 vs

  12. Effects of Secondary Plant Metabolites on Microbial Populations: Changes in Community Structure and Metabolic Activity in Contaminated Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Musilova

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Secondary plant metabolites (SPMEs play an important role in plant survival in the environment and serve to establish ecological relationships between plants and other organisms. Communication between plants and microorganisms via SPMEs contained in root exudates or derived from litter decomposition is an example of this phenomenon. In this review, the general aspects of rhizodeposition together with the significance of terpenes and phenolic compounds are discussed in detail. We focus specifically on the effect of SPMEs on microbial community structure and metabolic activity in environments contaminated by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs. Furthermore, a section is devoted to a complex effect of plants and/or their metabolites contained in litter on bioremediation of contaminated sites. New insights are introduced from a study evaluating the effects of SPMEs derived during decomposition of grapefruit peel, lemon peel, and pears on bacterial communities and their ability to degrade PCBs in a long-term contaminated soil. The presented review supports the “secondary compound hypothesis” and demonstrates the potential of SPMEs for increasing the effectiveness of bioremediation processes.

  13. Massively multiplexed microbial identification using resequencing DNA microarrays for outbreak investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leski, T. A.; Ansumana, R.; Jimmy, D. H.; Bangura, U.; Malanoski, A. P.; Lin, B.; Stenger, D. A.

    2011-06-01

    Multiplexed microbial diagnostic assays are a promising method for detection and identification of pathogens causing syndromes characterized by nonspecific symptoms in which traditional differential diagnosis is difficult. Also such assays can play an important role in outbreak investigations and environmental screening for intentional or accidental release of biothreat agents, which requires simultaneous testing for hundreds of potential pathogens. The resequencing pathogen microarray (RPM) is an emerging technological platform, relying on a combination of massively multiplex PCR and high-density DNA microarrays for rapid detection and high-resolution identification of hundreds of infectious agents simultaneously. The RPM diagnostic system was deployed in Sierra Leone, West Africa in collaboration with Njala University and Mercy Hospital Research Laboratory located in Bo. We used the RPM-Flu microarray designed for broad-range detection of human respiratory pathogens, to investigate a suspected outbreak of avian influenza in a number of poultry farms in which significant mortality of chickens was observed. The microarray results were additionally confirmed by influenza specific real-time PCR. The results of the study excluded the possibility that the outbreak was caused by influenza, but implicated Klebsiella pneumoniae as a possible pathogen. The outcome of this feasibility study confirms that application of broad-spectrum detection platforms for outbreak investigation in low-resource locations is possible and allows for rapid discovery of the responsible agents, even in cases when different agents are suspected. This strategy enables quick and cost effective detection of low probability events such as outbreak of a rare disease or intentional release of a biothreat agent.

  14. A Web-Based Comparative Genomics Tutorial for Investigating Microbial Genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Strong

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available As the number of completely sequenced microbial genomes continues to rise at an impressive rate, it is important to prepare students with the skills necessary to investigate microorganisms at the genomic level. As a part of the core curriculum for first-year graduate students in the biological sciences, we have implemented a web-based tutorial to introduce students to the fields of comparative and functional genomics. The tutorial focuses on recent computational methods for identifying functionally linked genes and proteins on a genome-wide scale and was used to introduce students to the Rosetta Stone, Phylogenetic Profile, conserved Gene Neighbor, and Operon computational methods. Students learned to use a number of publicly available web servers and databases to identify functionally linked genes in the Escherichia coli genome, with emphasis on genome organization and operon structure. The overall effectiveness of the tutorial was assessed based on student evaluations and homework assignments. The tutorial is available to other educators at http://www.doe-mbi.ucla.edu/~strong/m253.php.

  15. [Effects of heavy metals pollution on soil microbial communities metabolism and soil enzyme activities in coal mining area of Tongchuan, Shaanxi Province of Northwest China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xing-Liang; Gu, Jie; Chen, Zhi-Xue; Gao, Hua; Qin, Qing-Jun; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Wei-Juan

    2012-03-01

    This paper studied the metabolism of soil microbes, functions of soil microbial communities, and activities of soil enzymes in a coal mining area of Tongchuan. In the coal mining area, the concentrations of soil Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb were significantly higher than those in the non-mining area, of which, Cd contributed most to the heavy metals pollution. By adopting Biolog method combining with principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis, it was found that the metabolic characteristics of different soil microbial communities varied significantly with increasing soil heavy metals pollution, and the variation was mainly manifested in the metabolic patterns of carbon sources such as saccharides and amino acids. In slightly and moderately polluted soils, the utilization of carbon sources by soil microbial communities was activated; while in heavily polluted soils, the carbon sources utilization was inhibited. The activities of soil urease, protease, alkaline phosphatase, and catalase all tended to decline with intensifying soil heavy metals pollution. The soil urease, protease, alkaline phosphatase, and catalase activities in the coal mining area were 50.5%-65.1%, 19.1%-57.1%, 87.2%-97.5%, and 77.3%-86.0% higher than those in the non-mining area, respectively. The activities of soil sucrase and cellulase were activated in slightly and moderately polluted soils, but inhibited in heavily polluted soils.

  16. Bioethanol a Microbial Biofuel Metabolite; New Insights of Yeasts Metabolic Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled A. Selim

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Scarcity of the non-renewable energy sources, global warming, environmental pollution, and raising the cost of petroleum are the motive for the development of renewable, eco-friendly fuels production with low costs. Bioethanol production is one of the promising materials that can subrogate the petroleum oil, and it is considered recently as a clean liquid fuel or a neutral carbon. Diverse microorganisms such as yeasts and bacteria are able to produce bioethanol on a large scale, which can satisfy our daily needs with cheap and applicable methods. Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia stipitis are two of the pioneer yeasts in ethanol production due to their abilities to produce a high amount of ethanol. The recent focus is directed towards lignocellulosic biomass that contains 30–50% cellulose and 20–40% hemicellulose, and can be transformed into glucose and fundamentally xylose after enzymatic hydrolysis. For this purpose, a number of various approaches have been used to engineer different pathways for improving the bioethanol production with simultaneous fermentation of pentose and hexoses sugars in the yeasts. These approaches include metabolic and flux analysis, modeling and expression analysis, followed by targeted deletions or the overexpression of key genes. In this review, we highlight and discuss the current status of yeasts genetic engineering for enhancing bioethanol production, and the conditions that influence bioethanol production.

  17. Investigation of the selenium metabolism in cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunøe, Kristoffer; Gabel-Jensen, Charlotte; Stürup, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to compare different selenium species for their ability to induce cell death in different cancer cell lines, while investigating the underlying chemistry by speciation analysis. A prostate cancer cell line (PC-3), a colon cancer cell line (HT-29) and a leukaemia cell line...... (Jurkat E6-1) were incubated with five selenium compounds representing inorganic as well as organic Se compounds in different oxidation states. Selenomethionine (SeMet), Se-methylselenocysteine (MeSeCys), methylseleninic acid (MeSeA), selenite and selenate in the concentration range 5-100 mu M were...... incubated with cells for 24 h and the induction of cell death was measured using flow cytometry. The amounts of total selenium in cell medium, cell lysate and the insoluble fractions was determined by ICP-MS. Speciation analysis of cellular fractions was performed by reversed phase, anion exchange and size...

  18. [Investigation of the safety of microbial biotechnological products and their hygienic regulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omel'ianets', T H; Kovalenko, N K; Holovach, T M

    2008-01-01

    Peculiarities of influence of microbial preparations based on microorganisms of different taxonomic groups on the warm-blooded organisms are considered, that is necessary to take into account when developing the strategy of toxico-hygienic studying of these preparations and when substanting hygienic standards in industrial objects and in the environment. The possibility to simplify the methodical scheme of the toxicological estimation and the hygienic regulation of microbial preparations on the basis of soil nitrogen-fixing microorganisms is discussed.

  19. Distance-dependent varieties of microbial community structure and metabolic functions in the rhizosphere of Sedum alfredii Hance during phytoextraction of a cadmium-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wenhao; Zhang, Taoxiang; Lin, Sen; Ni, Wuzhong

    2017-06-01

    The recovery of microbial community and activities is crucial to the remediation of contaminated soils. Distance-dependent variations of microbial community composition and metabolic characteristics in the rhizospheric soil of hyperaccumulator during phytoextraction are poorly understood. A 12-month phytoextraction experiment with Sedum alfredii in a Cd-contaminated soil was conducted. A pre-stratified rhizobox was used for separating sub-layer rhizospheric (0-2, 2-4, 4-6, 6-8, 8-10 mm from the root mat)/bulk soils. Soil microbial structure and function were analyzed by phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) and MicroResp™ methods. The concentrations of total and specified PLFA biomarkers and the utilization rates for the 14 substrates (organic carbon) in the 0-2-mm sub-layer rhizospheric soil were significantly increased, as well as decreased with the increase in the distance from the root mat. Microbial structure measured by the ratios of different groups of PLFAs such as fungal/bacterial, monounsaturated/saturated, ratios of Gram-positive to Gram-negative (GP/GN) bacterial, and cyclopropyl/monoenoic precursors and 19:0 cyclo/18:1ω7c were significantly changed in the 0-2-mm soil. The PLFA contents and substrate utilization rates were negatively correlated with pH and total, acid-soluble, and reducible fractions of Cd, while positively correlated with labile carbon. The dynamics of microbial community were likely due to root exudates and Cd uptake by S. alfredii. This study revealed the stimulations and gradient changes of rhizosphere microbial community through phytoextraction, as reduced Cd concentration, pH, and increased labile carbons are due to the microbial community responses.

  20. In vitro investigation of cytochrome P450-mediated metabolism of dietary flavonoids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinholt, Vibeke; Offord, E.A.; Brouwer, C.

    2002-01-01

    Human and mouse liver microsomes And membranes isolated from Escherichia coli, which expressed cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2, 3A4 2C9 or 2D6, were used to investigate CYP-mediated metabolism of five selected dietary flavonoids. In human and mouse liver microsomes kaempferol, apigenin and naringenin...... were hydroxylated at the 3'-position to yield their corresponding analogs quercetin, luteolin and eriodietyol, whereas hesperetin and tamarixetin were demethylated at the 4'-position to yield eriodictyol and quercetin. respectively, Microsomal flavonoid metabolism as potently inhibited by the CYP1A2...... inhibitors. fluvoxamine and alpha-naphthoflavone. Recombinant CYP1A2 as capable of metabolizing all five investigated flavonoids. CYP3A4 recombinant protein did not catalyze hesperetin demethylation. but showed similar metabolic profiles for the remaining compounds, as did human microsomes and recombinant...

  1. Metabolic versatility of Gram-positive microbial isolates from contaminated river sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narancic, Tanja; Djokic, Lidija; Kenny, Shane T.; O’Connor, Kevin E.; Radulovic, Vanja; Nikodinovic-Runic, Jasmina; Vasiljevic, Branka

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Thirty-four isolated Gram-positive bacteria could degrade wide range of aromatic pollutants. ► Nine isolates could grow in the presence of extremely high levels of heavy metals. ► Twelve isolates accumulated polyphosphate, 3 polyhydroxybutyrate, 4 exopolysaccharides. ► The incidence of multiple antibiotic resistance markers among isolates was low. - Abstract: Gram-positive bacteria from river sediments affected by the proximity of a petrochemical industrial site were isolated and characterized with respect to their ability to degrade a wide range of aromatic compounds. In this study we identified metabolically diverse Gram-positive bacteria capable of growth on wide range aromatic compounds in the presence of heavy metals and with the ability to accumulate biopolymers. Thirty-four isolates that were able to use 9 or more common aromatic pollutants, such as benzene, biphenyl, naphthalene etc. as a sole source of carbon and energy included members of Bacillus, Arthrobacter, Rhodococcus, Gordonia, Streptomyces, and Staphylococcus genus. Rhodococcus sp. TN105, Gordonia sp. TN103 and Arthrobacter sp. TN221 were identified as novel strains. Nine isolates were able to grow in the presence of one or more metals (mercury, cadmium, nickel) at high concentration (100 mM). Seven isolates could degrade 15 different aromatic compounds and could grow in the presence of one or more heavy metals. Two of these isolates were resistant to multiple antibiotics including erythromycin and nalidixic acid. One third of isolates could accumulate at least one biopolymer. Twelve isolates (mainly Bacillus sp. and Arthrobacter sp.) accumulated polyphosphate, 3 Bacillus sp. accumulated polyhydroxybutyrate, while 4 isolates could accumulate exopolysaccharides.

  2. Clinical Metabolomics: The New Metabolic Window for Inborn Errors of Metabolism Investigations in the Post-Genomic Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebani, Abdellah; Abily-Donval, Lenaig; Afonso, Carlos; Marret, Stéphane; Bekri, Soumeya

    2016-01-01

    Inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) represent a group of about 500 rare genetic diseases with an overall estimated incidence of 1/2500. The diversity of metabolic pathways involved explains the difficulties in establishing their diagnosis. However, early diagnosis is usually mandatory for successful treatment. Given the considerable clinical overlap between some inborn errors, biochemical and molecular tests are crucial in making a diagnosis. Conventional biological diagnosis procedures are based on a time-consuming series of sequential and segmented biochemical tests. The rise of “omic” technologies offers holistic views of the basic molecules that build a biological system at different levels. Metabolomics is the most recent “omic” technology based on biochemical characterization of metabolites and their changes related to genetic and environmental factors. This review addresses the principles underlying metabolomics technologies that allow them to comprehensively assess an individual biochemical profile and their reported applications for IEM investigations in the precision medicine era. PMID:27447622

  3. The Investigation of Decontamination Effects of Ozone Gas on Microbial Load and Essential Oil of Several Medicinal Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razieh VALI ASILL

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Today, Ozone as a disinfectant method, without putting on the harmful effects on human and plant products, it is alternative common methods for disinfection of plant material. The research as a factorial experiment was conducted on the basis of randomized complete block design with three replications and the effects of Ozone gas on decreasing the microbial load of some important medicinal plants include: Peppermint (Mentha piperita, Summer savory (Satureja hortensis, Indian valerian(Valeriana wallichii, Meliss (Melissa officinalis and Iranian thyme (Zataria multiflora were investigated. Medicinal plants leaves were treated with Ozone gas concentration 0.3, 0.6 and 0.9 ml/L at times of 10 and 30 then total count, coliform and mold and yeast of the samples were studied. The result showed that Ozone gas decreases microbial load of medicinal plants samples. But Ozone gas and Ozone gas in medicinal plants interaction effect had no effect on essential oil content. The lowest and the highest of microbial load were detected in samples treated with concentration of 0.9 ml/L of Ozone gas and control respectively. The highest and the lowest of microbial load were observed in Iranian thyme and Indian valerian respectively. Also result showed that Ozone gas treatment for 30 min had the greatest of effect in reducing the microbial load and 0.9 ml/L Ozone gas concentration had the lowest of microbial load. Results of this survey reflect that the use of Ozone as a method of disinfection for medicinal plants is a decontamination.

  4. Investigation of protein and lipid metabolism in thyroid pathology using whole-body radiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorobets, V.F.; Matveenko, E.G.

    1987-01-01

    Radiometry of the whole body and its organs was employed to study certain aspects of protein-aminoacid and lipid metabolism in patients with thyroid diseases. Metabolism of human serum 131 I-albumin was studied in 12 patients with neurocirculatory dystonia, in 13 patients with diffuse toxic goiter (in 10 before and after drug therapy) and in 9 controls. 75 Se-methionine aminoacid metabolism was investigated in 9 patients with toxic thyroid adenoma and in 13 controls. The body cell mass was determined in 82 patients with thyrotoxicosis by a measurable amount of 40 K. These data were compared with those of 249 healthy persons. An increase in catabolism of labeled albumin, intensification of labeled methionine metabolism at the tissue level, signs of a decrease in the total amount of metabolic albumin in the body were revealed. Intensification of protein metabolism resulted in a decrease in the body cell mass of these patients. After adequate therapy the above indices of protein metabolism in patients with thyrotoxicosis returned to normal. The assimilation of fatty acids and neutral fat was disturbed both in thyrotoxicosis and hypothyroidism

  5. An Investigation on Physicochemical and Microbial Water Quality of Swimming Pools in Yazd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Dehvari

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Disrespect of health regulations and proper disinfection of water and swimming pools is effective in incidence of health problems and transfer of infectious diseases to swimmers. The aim of this research was to investigate water of swimming pools in Yazd city and compare the results with national standards. Methods: In this study, 11 active covered swimming pools of Yazd city were sampled as census. Parameters of temperature, pH, amount of free and Combined chlorine residual, turbidity, alkalinity, hardness, the population of heterotrophic bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, fecal streptococci, and fecal coliforms were studied. Sampling has been conducted every two weaks for 3 months and samples were analyzed under standard procedures. Results: In this research, amount of pH in 84.73%, free residual chlorine in 44.18%, Combined residual chlorine in 72.45%, alkalinity in19.82%, turbidity in 86.36%, hardness in 57.18% and temperature in 13.73% Samples were desirable. The fecal streptococci bacteria was not shown in all the swimming pools and population of heterotrophic bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and fecal coliforms in 56.73%, 93.27%, 79.36% and 91.45% cases were desirable, respectively. Statistical analysis indicated that there is a direct relationship between Water turbidity and population of heterotraphic bacteria. Conclusion: According to the results, the parameters of heterotrophic bacteria population, also the alkalinity and temperature had the least compliant with the standards that shows the necessity for continuous monitoring of physical, chemical and microbial parameters and also control of filtration and disinfection of water condition of swimming pools.

  6. Investigation and Taguchi Optimization of Microbial Fuel Cell Salt Bridge Dimensional Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Dhrupad; Barua, Parimal Bakul; Dey, Nabendu; Nath, Sumitro; Thakuria, Mrinmay; Mallick, Synthia

    2018-01-01

    One major problem of two chamber salt bridge microbial fuel cells (MFCs) is the high resistance offered by the salt bridge to anion flow. Many researchers who have studied and optimized various parameters related to salt bridge MFC, have not shed much light on the effect of salt bridge dimensional parameters on the MFC performance. Therefore, the main objective of this research is to investigate the effect of length and cross sectional area of salt bridge and the effect of solar radiation and atmospheric temperature on MFC current output. An experiment has been designed using Taguchi L9 orthogonal array, taking length and cross sectional area of salt bridge as factors having three levels. Nine MFCs were fabricated as per the nine trial conditions. Trials were conducted for 3 days and output current of each of the MFCs along with solar insolation and atmospheric temperature were recorded. Analysis of variance shows that salt bridge length has significant effect both on mean (with 53.90% contribution at 95% CL) and variance (with 56.46% contribution at 87% CL), whereas the effect of cross sectional area of the salt bridge and the interaction of these two factors is significant on mean only (with 95% CL). Optimum combination was found at 260 mm salt bridge length and 506.7 mm2 cross sectional area with 4.75 mA of mean output current. The temperature and solar insolation data when correlated with each of the MFCs average output current, revealed that both external factors have significant impact on MFC current output but the correlation coefficient varies from MFC to MFC depending on salt bridge dimensional parameters.

  7. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are More Common in People With Type 1 Diabetes Metabolic Syndrome Your Child's Weight Healthy Eating Endocrine System Blood Test: Basic Metabolic Panel (BMP) Activity: Endocrine System Growth Disorders Diabetes Center Thyroid Disorders Your Endocrine System Movie: Endocrine ...

  8. Carbon monoxide as a metabolic energy source for extremely halophilic microbes: implications for microbial activity in Mars regolith.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Gary M

    2015-04-07

    Carbon monoxide occurs at relatively high concentrations (≥800 parts per million) in Mars' atmosphere, where it represents a potentially significant energy source that could fuel metabolism by a localized putative surface or near-surface microbiota. However, the plausibility of CO oxidation under conditions relevant for Mars in its past or at present has not been evaluated. Results from diverse terrestrial brines and saline soils provide the first documentation, to our knowledge, of active CO uptake at water potentials (-41 MPa to -117 MPa) that might occur in putative brines at recurrent slope lineae (RSL) on Mars. Results from two extremely halophilic isolates complement the field observations. Halorubrum str. BV1, isolated from the Bonneville Salt Flats, Utah (to our knowledge, the first documented extremely halophilic CO-oxidizing member of the Euryarchaeota), consumed CO in a salt-saturated medium with a water potential of -39.6 MPa; activity was reduced by only 28% relative to activity at its optimum water potential of -11 MPa. A proteobacterial isolate from hypersaline Mono Lake, California, Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii MLHE-1, also oxidized CO at low water potentials (-19 MPa), at temperatures within ranges reported for RSL, and under oxic, suboxic (0.2% oxygen), and anoxic conditions (oxygen-free with nitrate). MLHE-1 was unaffected by magnesium perchlorate or low atmospheric pressure (10 mbar). These results collectively establish the potential for microbial CO oxidation under conditions that might obtain at local scales (e.g., RSL) on contemporary Mars and at larger spatial scales earlier in Mars' history.

  9. Mineralization of PAHs in coal-tar impacted aquifer sediments and associated microbial community structure investigated with FISH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, S W; Ong, S K; Moorman, T B [Iowa State University, Ames, IA (USA)

    2007-11-15

    The microbial community structure and mineralization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in a coal-tar contaminated aquifer were investigated spatially using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and in laboratory-scale incubations of the aquifer sediments. DAPI-detected microbial populations in the contaminated sediments were three orders of magnitude greater than nearby uncontaminated sediments, suggesting growth on coal-tar constituents in situ. Actinobacteria, {beta}- and {gamma}-Proteobacteria, and Flavobacteria dominated the in situ aerobic (> 1 mg l{sup -1} dissolved oxygen) microbial community, whereas sulfate-reducing bacteria comprised 37% of the microbial community in the sulfidogenic region of the aquifer. Rapid mineralization of naphthalene and phenanthrene were observed in aerobic laboratory microcosms and resulted in significant enrichment of {beta}- and {gamma}-Proteobacteria potentially explaining their elevated presence in situ. Nitrate- and sulfate-limited mineralization of naphthalene in laboratory microcosms occurred to a small degree in aquifer sediments from locations where groundwater chemistry indicated nitrate- and sulfate-reduction, respectively. The results of this study suggest that FISH may be a useful tool for providing a link between laboratory microcosms and groundwater measurements made in situ necessary to better demonstrate the potential for natural attenuation at complex PAH contaminated sites.

  10. Microbial metabolism and activity in terms of nitrate removal in bioelectrochemical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Baocheng; Feng, Huajun; Ding, Yangcheng; Zheng, Xin; Wang, Meizhen; Li, Na; Shen, Dongsheng; Zhang, Haiyang

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Influence of current on biofilm formation in BES was investigated. • Biofilm formation activity supplying with organic differed with inorganic. • Discussed the influence of signaling molecule and EPS on biofilm formation. -- Abstract: Bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) are a promising technology for generating energy while treating wastewater. By utilizing the electron transfer between the anode and cathode, nitrate can be effectively removed from the BES. Our previous studies show that the carbon source and C/N ratio influences nitrate removal performance. The study presented here investigates how biofilm formation, nitrate removal and signaling molecule release are related in the BESs fed with glucose, starch and HCO 3 − . The results indicate that increasing the current can benefit signaling molecule (DSF) release and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) excretion, which improves biofilm formation. However, when the current exceeds the optimum value, the influence becomes adverse. Nitrate removal was also improved with increased current, though different carbon sources showed different trends. The highest nitrate removal efficiency of 1.23 ± 0.27, 1.38 ± 0.09, 1.80 ± 0.02 mmol L −1 d −1 for the BESs fed with glucose, starch and HCO 3 − were achieved, respectively. This paper studied the bacterial habits in a BES to better acquire and regulate the reaction process, with the aim of achieving good pollutant removal performance

  11. Life under ice: Investigating microbial-related biogeochemical cycles in the seasonally-covered Great Lake Onego, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Camille; Ariztegui, Daniel; Victor, Frossard; Emilie, Lyautey; Marie-Elodie, Perga; Life Under Ice Scientific Team

    2016-04-01

    The Great European lakes Ladoga and Onego are important resources for Russia in terms of drinking water, energy, fishing and leisure. Because their northern location (North of Saint Petersburgh), these lakes are usually ice-covered during winter. Due to logistical reasons, their study has thus been limited to the ice-free periods, and very few data are available for the winter season. As a matter of fact, comprehension of large lakes behaviour in winter is very limited as compared to the knowledge available from small subpolar lakes or perennially ice-covered polar lakes. To tackle this issue, an international consortium of scientists has gathered around the « life under ice » project to investigate physical, chemical and biogeochemical changes during winter in Lake Onego. Our team has mainly focused on the characterization and quantification of biological processes, from the water column to the sediment, with a special focus on methane cycling and trophic interactions. A first « on-ice » campaign in March 2015 allowed the sampling of a 120 cm sedimentary core and the collection of water samples at multiple depths. The data resulting from this expedition will be correlated to physical and chemical parameters collected simultaneously. A rapid biological activity test was applied immediately after coring in order to test for microbial activity in the sediments. In situ adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) measurements were carried out in the core and taken as an indication of living organisms within the sediments. The presence of ATP is a marker molecule for metabolically active cells, since it is not known to form abiotically. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA) were extracted from these samples, and quantified. Quantitative polymerase chain reactions (PCR) were performed on archaeal and bacterial 16S rRNA genes used to reconstruct phylogenies, as well as on their transcripts. Moreover, functional genes involved in the methane and nitrogen cycles

  12. Tracing biofouling to the structure of the microbial community and its metabolic products: a study of the three-stage MBR process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Dawen; Fu, Yuan; Ren, Nanqi

    2013-11-01

    The biofouling characteristics of a sequential anoxic/aerobic-membrane bioreactor (A/O MBR) were analyzed during the three-stage process (fast-slow-fast transmembrane pressure (TMP) increasing). The results indicated: during the stage 1 (before day 1), the microbial communities in the activated sludge (AS), cake sludge (CS) and biofilm (BF) were similar to each other, and the adsorption of microbes and the metabolic products was the main factor that led to TMP increase; during the stage 2 (between day 1 and day 7), the cake layer begun to form and the TMP continued to rise gradually at a reduced rate compared to stage 1, at this point a characteristic microbial community colonized the CS with microorganisms such as Saprospiraceae and Comamonadaceae thriving on the membrane surface (BF) probably due to greater nutrient availability, and the predominance of these species in the microbial population led to the accumulation of biofouling metabolic products in the CS, which resulted in membrane fouling and the associated rise in TMP; during the final stage (after day 7), the biofilm had matured, and the activity of anaerobes stimulated cake compaction. The statistical analysis showed a correlation between the TMP changing rate and the carbonhydrates of soluble microbial products (SMPc) content in the CS. When the SMPc concentration rose slowly there was a low level of biofouling. However, when the SMPc accumulating rate was greater, it resulted in the more severe biofouling associated with the TMP jump. Furthermore, the correlation coefficient for the TMP increase and protein concentrations of extracellular polymeric substances (EPSp) in the CS was highly significant. The cluster analysis suggested that the AS microbial community remained stable during the three TMP change stages, while the CS and BF community were changed accompanied with the TMP change. The interaction between the microbial communities and the metabolic products lead to the significant correlation

  13. Microbial biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Yu; Chen, Wilfred; Mulchandani, Ashok

    2006-01-01

    A microbial biosensor is an analytical device that couples microorganisms with a transducer to enable rapid, accurate and sensitive detection of target analytes in fields as diverse as medicine, environmental monitoring, defense, food processing and safety. The earlier microbial biosensors used the respiratory and metabolic functions of the microorganisms to detect a substance that is either a substrate or an inhibitor of these processes. Recently, genetically engineered microorganisms based on fusing of the lux, gfp or lacZ gene reporters to an inducible gene promoter have been widely applied to assay toxicity and bioavailability. This paper reviews the recent trends in the development and application of microbial biosensors. Current advances and prospective future direction in developing microbial biosensor have also been discussed

  14. Studies about behavior of microbial degradation of organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtsuka, Makiko

    2003-02-01

    Some of TRU waste include organic compounds, thus these organic compounds might be nutrients for microbial growth at disposal site. This disposal system might be exposed to high alkali condition by cement compounds as engineering barrier material. In the former experimental studies, it has been supposed that microbial exist under pH = 12 and the microbial activity acclimated to high alkali condition are able to degrade asphalt under anaerobic condition. Microbes are called extremophile that exist in cruel habitat as high alkali or reductive condition. We know less information about the activity of extremophile, though any recent studies reveal them. In this study, the first investigation is metabolic pathway as microbial activity, the second is microbial degradation of aromatic compounds in anaerobic condition, and the third is microbial activity under high alkali. Microbial metabolic pathway consist of two systems that fulfill their function each other. One system is to generate energy for microbial activities and the other is to convert substances for syntheses of organisms' structure materials. As these systems are based on redox reaction between substances, it is made chart of the microbial activity region using pH, Eh, and depth as parameter, There is much report that microbe is able to degrade aromatic compounds under aerobic or molecular O 2 utilizing condition. For degradation of aromatic compounds in anaerobic condition, supplying electron acceptor is required. Co-metabolism and microbial consortia has important role, too. Alcalophile has individual transporting system depending Na + and acidic compounds contained in cell wall. Generating energy is key for survival and growth under high alkali condition. Co-metabolism and microbial consortia are effective for microbial degradation of aromatic compounds under high alkali and reductive condition, and utilizable electron acceptor and degradable organic compounds are required for keeping microbial activity and

  15. Investigation of microbial adaptation to salinity variation for treatment of reverse osmosis concentrate by membrane bioreactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jang, Duksoo; Moon, Chungman; Ahn, Kyuhong

    2014-01-01

    quantitative study on a microbial adaptation strategy for variations on salt concentration (0–20 g/L), lab-scale membrane bioreactors (7L working volume) with polypropylene hollow fiber membrane module (pore size 0.4 μm) were used with different adaptation strategies: instant and stepwise mode. The performance...

  16. Food Safety in the Domestic Environment: An Interdisciplinary Investigation of Microbial Hazards During Food Preparation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, A.R.H.; Jong, de A.E.I.; Asselt, van E.D.; Jonge, de R.; Frewer, L.J.; Nauta, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    It has been established that, to a considerable extent, the domestic hygiene practices adopted by consumers can result in a greater or lesser microbial load in prepared meals. In the research presented here, an interdisciplinary study is reported in which interviews, observations of consumers

  17. Investigation of the microbial communities colonizing prepainted steel used for roofing and walling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Tran T; Jamil, Ili; Pianegonda, Nicole A; Blanksby, Stephen J; Barker, Philip J; Manefield, Mike; Rice, Scott A

    2017-04-01

    Microbial colonization of prepainted steel, commonly used in roofing applications, impacts their aesthetics, durability, and functionality. Understanding the relevant organisms and the mechanisms by which colonization occurs would provide valuable information that can be subsequently used to design fouling prevention strategies. Here, next-generation sequencing and microbial community finger printing (T-RFLP) were used to study the community composition of microbes colonizing prepainted steel roofing materials at Burrawang, Australia and Kapar, Malaysia over a 52-week period. Community diversity was low and was dominated by Bacillus spp., cyanobacteria, actinobacteria, Cladosporium sp., Epicoccum nigrum, and Teratosphaeriaceae sp. Cultivation-based methods isolated approximately 20 different fungi and bacteria, some of which, such as E. nigrum and Cladosporium sp., were represented in the community sequence data. Fluorescence in situ hybridization imaging showed that fungi were the most dominant organisms present. Analysis of the sequence and T-RFLP data indicated that the microbial communities differed significantly between locations and changed significantly over time. The study demonstrates the utility of molecular ecology tools to identify and characterize microbial communities associated with the fouling of painted steel surfaces and ultimately can enable the targeted development of control strategies based on the dominant species responsible for fouling. © 2016 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Legacy effects of continuous chloropicrin-fumigation for 3-years on soil microbial community composition and metabolic activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Shuting; Liu, Xiaojiao; Jiang, Qipeng; Shen, Guihua; Ding, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Chloropicrin is widely used to control ginger wilt in China, which have an enormous impact on soil microbial diversity. However, little is known on the possible legacy effects on soil microbial community composition with continuous fumigation over different years. In this report, we used high

  19. Development and Implementation of Novel Genetic Tools for Investigation of FungalSecondary Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Dorte Koefoed

    to produce secondary metabolites.In this study I have examined parts of the secondary metabolism in all three fungi, using dierentapproaches. For A. nidulans we have constructed an entire genome-wide polyketide synthase (PKS) deletionlibrary, which has linked the known compounds austinol and dehydroaustinol...... as a host for examination ofsecondary metabolism by heterologous expression of secondary metabolite genes from A. niger, A. aculeatus,and A. terreus.In A. niger I have investigated the products of all 37 putative PKSs by heterologous expression of the genesin A. nidulans. This approach identied the products...... to be silenced.For investigation of secondary metabolism in fungi with no available genetic tools, I have applied twodierent approaches: heterologous expression of secondary metabolite genes in A. nidulans and/or plasmidbasedgene expression in the native fungus. Heterologous expression in A. nidulans was used...

  20. Metabolic investigation of host/pathogen interaction using MS2-infected Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain Rishi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA viruses are responsible for a variety of illnesses among people, including but not limited to the common cold, the flu, HIV, and ebola. Developing new drugs and new strategies for treating diseases caused by these viruses can be an expensive and time-consuming process. Mathematical modeling may be used to elucidate host-pathogen interactions and highlight potential targets for drug development, as well providing the basis for optimizing patient treatment strategies. The purpose of this work was to determine whether a genome-scale modeling approach could be used to understand how metabolism is impacted by the host-pathogen interaction during a viral infection. Escherichia coli/MS2 was used as the host-pathogen model system as MS2 is easy to work with, harmless to humans, but shares many features with eukaryotic viruses. In addition, the genome-scale metabolic model of E. coli is the most comprehensive model at this time. Results Employing a metabolic modeling strategy known as "flux balance analysis" coupled with experimental studies, we were able to predict how viral infection would alter bacterial metabolism. Based on our simulations, we predicted that cell growth and biosynthesis of the cell wall would be halted. Furthermore, we predicted a substantial increase in metabolic activity of the pentose phosphate pathway as a means to enhance viral biosynthesis, while a break down in the citric acid cycle was predicted. Also, no changes were predicted in the glycolytic pathway. Conclusions Through our approach, we have developed a technique of modeling virus-infected host metabolism and have investigated the metabolic effects of viral infection. These studies may provide insight into how to design better drugs. They also illustrate the potential of extending such metabolic analysis to higher order organisms, including humans.

  1. Investigating the legacy effect of drought on microbial responses to drying and rewetting along a Texan precipitation gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Lettice; Leizeaga, Ainara; Hawkes, Christine; Rousk, Johannes

    2017-04-01

    Hydrological regimes will intensify due to climate change, thus increasing the duration and intensity of drought and rainfall events. Rewetting of dry soil is known to stimulate dramatic CO2 releases. A clear understanding of the mechanisms that determine the dynamics of CO2 loss upon rewetting is therefore required to characterise ecosystem C-budgets and predict responses to climate change. Laboratory studies have identified two distinct responses upon rewetting; bacterial growth either increases linearly immediately, with maximal respiration also occurring immediately and decreasing exponentially with time ("Type 1"), or bacterial growth increases exponentially after a period of near-zero growth, with a sustained period of elevated respiration, sometimes followed by a secondary increase in respiration coinciding with the onset of bacterial growth ("Type 2"). A shift from a Type 1 to a Type 2 response has been observed with increasing duration and intensity of drying prior to rewetting. The size of the surviving microbial community after drying, relative to resources available after rewetting, is suggested to dictate whether a Type 1 or 2 response occurs, with more 'harsh' (i.e. longer or more severe) drying reducing microbial biomass such that carbon available upon rewetting is sufficient to support exponential growth (leading to Type 2 response). However, this is yet to be tested in intact ecosystems. We investigated the legacy of drought on microbial responses to drying and rewetting using grassland soils from a natural precipitation gradient in Texas. Mean annual precipitation spanned a 500 mm range (400-900 mm year-1) across the 400 km gradient, while mean annual temperature was constant. Soil properties (pH, SOM) did not vary systematically across the gradient, with differences reflecting land-use history rather than rainfall. Air dried soils from 18 sites were rewetted to 50 % water holding capacity with bacterial growth, fungal growth and respiration

  2. Investigation on Microbial Dissolution of Uranium (VI) from Autunite Mineral - 13421

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sepulveda, Paola; Katsenovich, Yelena; Lagos, Leonel [Applied Research Center, Florida International University. 10555 West Flagler St. Suite 2100, Miami Fl 33175 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Precipitating autunite minerals by polyphosphate injection was identified as a feasible remediation strategy for sequestering uranium in contaminated groundwater and soil in situ at the Hanford Site. Autunite stability under vadose and saturated zone environmental conditions can help to determine the long-term effectiveness of this remediation strategy. The Arthrobacter bacteria are one of the most common groups in soils and are found in large numbers in Hanford soil as well as other subsurface environments contaminated with radionuclides. Ubiquitous in subsurface microbial communities, these bacteria can play a significant role in the dissolution of minerals and the formation of secondary minerals. The main objective of this investigation was to study the bacterial interactions under oxidizing conditions with uranium (VI); study the potential role of bicarbonate, which is an integral complexing ligand for U(VI) and a major ion in groundwater compositions; and present data from autunite dissolution experiments using Arthrobacter strain G968, a less U(VI)-tolerant strain. Sterile 100 mL glass mixed reactors served as the major bioreactor for initial experimentation. These autunite-containing bioreactors were injected with bacterial cells after the autunite equilibrated with the media solution amended with 0 mM, 3 mM 5 mM and 10 mM concentrations of bicarbonate. G968 Arthrobacter cells in the amount of 10{sup 6} cells/mL were injected into the reactors after 27 days, giving time for the autunite to reach steady state. Abiotic non-carbonate controls were kept without bacterial inoculation to provide a control for the biotic samples. Samples of the solution were analyzed for dissolved U(VI) by means of kinetic phosphorescence analyzer KPA-11 (Chemcheck Instruments, Richland, WA). Analysis showed that as [HCO{sub 3}{sup -}] increases, a diminishing trend on the effect of bacteria on autunite leaching is observed. Viability of cells was conducted after 24 hours of cell

  3. Investigation on Microbial Dissolution of Uranium (VI) from Autunite Mineral - 13421

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sepulveda, Paola; Katsenovich, Yelena; Lagos, Leonel

    2013-01-01

    Precipitating autunite minerals by polyphosphate injection was identified as a feasible remediation strategy for sequestering uranium in contaminated groundwater and soil in situ at the Hanford Site. Autunite stability under vadose and saturated zone environmental conditions can help to determine the long-term effectiveness of this remediation strategy. The Arthrobacter bacteria are one of the most common groups in soils and are found in large numbers in Hanford soil as well as other subsurface environments contaminated with radionuclides. Ubiquitous in subsurface microbial communities, these bacteria can play a significant role in the dissolution of minerals and the formation of secondary minerals. The main objective of this investigation was to study the bacterial interactions under oxidizing conditions with uranium (VI); study the potential role of bicarbonate, which is an integral complexing ligand for U(VI) and a major ion in groundwater compositions; and present data from autunite dissolution experiments using Arthrobacter strain G968, a less U(VI)-tolerant strain. Sterile 100 mL glass mixed reactors served as the major bioreactor for initial experimentation. These autunite-containing bioreactors were injected with bacterial cells after the autunite equilibrated with the media solution amended with 0 mM, 3 mM 5 mM and 10 mM concentrations of bicarbonate. G968 Arthrobacter cells in the amount of 10 6 cells/mL were injected into the reactors after 27 days, giving time for the autunite to reach steady state. Abiotic non-carbonate controls were kept without bacterial inoculation to provide a control for the biotic samples. Samples of the solution were analyzed for dissolved U(VI) by means of kinetic phosphorescence analyzer KPA-11 (Chemcheck Instruments, Richland, WA). Analysis showed that as [HCO 3 - ] increases, a diminishing trend on the effect of bacteria on autunite leaching is observed. Viability of cells was conducted after 24 hours of cell incubation with

  4. Metagenomic investigation of the microbial diversity in a chrysotile asbestos mine pit pond, Lowell, Vermont, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather E. Driscoll

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Here we report on a metagenomics investigation of the microbial diversity in a serpentine-hosted aquatic habitat created by chrysotile asbestos mining activity at the Vermont Asbestos Group (VAG Mine in northern Vermont, USA. The now-abandoned VAG Mine on Belvidere Mountain in the towns of Eden and Lowell includes three open-pit quarries, a flooded pit, mill buildings, roads, and >26 million metric tons of eroding mine waste that contribute alkaline mine drainage to the surrounding watershed. Metagenomes and water chemistry originated from aquatic samples taken at three depths (0.5 m, 3.5 m, and 25 m along the water column at three distinct, offshore sites within the mine's flooded pit (near 44°46′00.7673″, −72°31′36.2699″; UTM NAD 83 Zone 18 T 0695720 E, 4960030 N. Whole metagenome shotgun Illumina paired-end sequences were quality trimmed and analyzed based on a translated nucleotide search of NCBI-NR protein database and lowest common ancestor taxonomic assignments. Our results show strata within the pit pond water column can be distinguished by taxonomic composition and distribution, pH, temperature, conductivity, light intensity, and concentrations of dissolved oxygen. At the phylum level, metagenomes from 0.5 m and 3.5 m contained a similar distribution of taxa and were dominated by Actinobacteria (46% and 53% of reads, respectively, Proteobacteria (45% and 38%, respectively, and Bacteroidetes (7% in both. The metagenomes from 25 m showed a greater diversity of phyla and a different distribution of reads than the two upper strata: Proteobacteria (60%, Actinobacteria (18%, Planctomycetes, (10%, Bacteroidetes (5% and Cyanobacteria (2.5%, Armatimonadetes (<1%, Verrucomicrobia (<1%, Firmicutes (<1%, and Nitrospirae (<1%. Raw metagenome sequence data from each sample reside in NCBI's Short Read Archive (SRA ID: SRP056095 and are accessible through NCBI BioProject PRJNA277916.

  5. A deuterium and carbon nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic investigation of blood flow and carbohydrate metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosch, C.S.E.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study is the development and application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic techniques for this study of whole tissue metabolism, tissue perfusion and blood flow. The feasibility of spin imaging deuterium-enriched tissue water is demonstrated in cat brain in vivo and in situ. The potential application of D 2 O administration to deuterium-flow-imaging is considered. NMR investigations of hepatic carbohydrate metabolism were performed in rat liver in vivo and in situ. A coaxial, double-surface-coil, double-resonance probe was developed for carbon detection while decoupling neighboring proton scalar interactions ( 13 C-[ 1 H]) in hepatic tissue within the living animal. Hormonal and substrate regulation of hepatic glucose and glycogen metabolism was investigated by monitoring the metabolic fate of an administered c-dose of [1- 13 C]glucose. Label flux was directed primarily into newly-synthesized 13 C-labeled glycogen. A multiple resonance ( 1 H, 13 C, 31 P) liver perfusion probe was designed for complimentary carbohydrate metabolic studies in rat liver in vitro. A description of the 13 C-[ 1 H]/ 31 P NMR perfusion probe is given. The surgical technique used for liver excision and peripheral life-support apparatus required to maintain hepatic function are also detailed

  6. Investigating the Microbial Degradation Potential in Oil Sands Fluid Fine Tailings Using Gamma Irradiation: A Metagenomic Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanMensel, Danielle; Chaganti, Subba Rao; Boudens, Ryan; Reid, Thomas; Ciborowski, Jan; Weisener, Christopher

    2017-08-01

    Open-pit mining of the Athabasca oil sands has generated large volumes of waste termed fluid fine tailings (FFT), stored in tailings ponds. Accumulation of toxic organic substances in the tailings ponds is one of the biggest concerns. Gamma irradiation (GI) treatment could accelerate the biodegradation of toxic organic substances. Hence, this research investigates the response of the microbial consortia in GI-treated FFT materials with an emphasis on changes in diversity and organism-related stimuli. FFT materials from aged and fresh ponds were used in the study under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Variations in the microbial diversity in GI-treated FFT materials were monitored for 52 weeks and significant stimuli (p tailings biogeochemistry and the impacts of GI treatment on microorganisms as an effect for targeting toxic organics. The outcomes of this study highlight the potential for this approach to accelerate stabilization and reclamation end points. Graphical Abstract.

  7. Microbial investigations in Opalinus clay from Mont Terri and in Callovo-Oxfordian argillite from Meuse/Haute-Marne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulain, S.

    2006-12-01

    The subject of this Ph.D. thesis deals with research achieved in the context of the Axis 2 of the law Bataille voted on December 30, 1991 about the possibility of building a deep geological repository for medium or high activity and long living nuclear waste. Nearby such a site, some microorganisms may influence the mobility of radionuclides coming from the waste canisters. This work consisted in looking for autochthonous microorganisms in the Opalinus clay formation from Mont Terri (Switzerland) and in the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite from Meuse/Haute-Marne (France). Microbial Investigations in these unknown unperturbed environments suggested very low microbial densities in the clayey sediments. However, new bacterial species could be isolated from those samples. In addition, a part of the allochthonous population, which has been introduced by air and human activity, could be identified in the Meuse/Haute-Marne underground research laboratory. (author)

  8. The effect of feed rations containing high moisture crimped corn ensiled with microbial inoculant or chemical additive on milk production and metabolism of dairy cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    László Könyves

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The study evaluated the effects of crimped corn preserved either with organic acids or with a microbial inoculant on a range of metabolic and production indicators of dairy cows. Two hundred and sixty in-calf, second and third parity cows were selected into pairs on basis of age, parity, milk production in previous lactation, days in milk and body condition score with the greatest possible conformity within pairs. Cow pairs were assigned into a 2-period crossover experiment (2 × 45 days and kept in separate groups within the same shed. Dietary treatments were TMR with crimped corn preserved with either organic acids (treatment K or microbial inoculant (treatment B. Ten superbly matched cow-pairs were selected to form nucleus pairs for metabolic studies. The preservatives had no effect on the nutrient content of crimped corn. Crimped corn preserved with the microbial inoculant were found mouldy, predominantly with Mucor sp. at a number high enough to inhibit the growth of lactic acid bacteria, and had significantly higher pH and ammonium concentration compared to the chemical treatment. The milk yield of treatment K cows was significantly higher than that of treatment B cows with identical feed intake. Blood beta-hydroxy-butyrate concentration was lower and blood aspartate amino transferase activity higher with treatment K compared to treatment B. Results of this study suggest the superiority of total mixed rations containing chemically preserved crimped corn in terms of ammonia and microbiological indicators of crimped corn, significantly higher milk yield, and balanced energy metabolism.

  9. [Investigation of microbial contamination of the air and equipment of a biological waste water purification station].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alikbaeva, L A; Figurovskiĭ, A P; Vasil'ev, O D; Ermolaev-Makovskiĭ, M A; Merkur'eva, M A

    2010-01-01

    The paper describes the results of a study of ambient air microbiological pollution in the working premises and equipment surfaces in the main shops of the biological waste water purification station of a cardboard-polygraphic plant. The findings suggest that there is high microbial contamination of the working environment, which should be born in mind on developing measures to optimize working conditions and on studying morbidity rates among the workers.

  10. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lin), which signals cells to increase their anabolic activities. Metabolism is a complicated chemical process, so it's not ... how those enzymes or hormones work. When the metabolism of body chemicals is ... Hyperthyroidism (pronounced: hi-per-THIGH-roy-dih-zum). Hyperthyroidism ...

  11. Investigations on the metabolism of metals in decapod crustaceas in relation with moulting cycles and reproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.-L.M.

    1975-07-01

    A study of the metabolism of metals was carried out in decapod crustaceas; it showed that it was subject to cyclic variations during the life of the animals, closely correlated with growth moults. The metabolism of metals was also considered in its relations with reproduction, especially oogenesis and spermatogenesis, and embryonic development. In relation with moult, various factors playing a role on metal metabolism were investigated: role of metals in the organism, fasting and nutrition cycles and biochemical reserves, physico-chemical form of the metal and ultrastructure of uptake surfaces. The histological and histochemical aspects of the uptake of a number of metals were studied as well as inter-metallic and inter-organic relationships [fr

  12. Use of radiation and radioisotopes for investigating metabolic diseases of animals in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arora, S P [National Dairy Research Inst., Karnal (India). Div. of Dairy Cattle Nutrition and Physiology

    1980-03-01

    In the last decade, radioisotopes have been used to investigate certain metabolic diseases of animals and radiation is being utilized to produce parasitic vaccines to vaccinate animals. Some studies in which radioisotopes have been used to investigate certain metabolic disorders are reviewed. In experiments where radioimmunoassay technique for the estimation of hormones, has been utilized, the results reveal that the animals on low level of nutrition show greater oestrous cycle lengths or even long anoestrous periods. On the other hand, irradiation has been used as a tool to produce vaccines as well as degradation of certain dietary molecules for increased utilization. A number of studies wherein /sup 35/S and /sup 15/N isotopes have been used, reveal that sulphur supplementation is essential for optimum utilization of nitrogen in the ratio of 1:10. There are certain antimetabolites in feed ingredients which affect endocrine function. Evidence indicates that high nitrate forages disturb thyroid function when sup(131)I is used to elucidate its secretion rate. Similarly certain toxic substances such as tannins have been shown to affect protein metabolism and phosphorus utilization when sup(32)P isotope is used in such studies. The use of radioisotopes has also been helpful to investigate the cause of ''Degnala'' disease prevalent in village cattle in certain states of India. With the help of sup(75)Se it has been possible to trace the metabolic disturbances which lead to the onset of this disease. Another deficiency disease, hyperkeratosis, has been shown to be caused not only because of vitamin A deficiency, but also because of zinc deficiency. The latter helps in the mobilization of a normal quantity of vitamin A from the liver into the blood vitamin A pool. There is wide scope for use of radioisotopes to investigate other metabolic diseases prevalent in livestock in this country.

  13. Use of radiation and radioisotopes for investigating metabolic diseases of animals in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arora, S.P.

    1980-01-01

    In the last one decade, radioisotopes are being used to investigate certain metabolic diseases of animals and radiations are being utilized to produce parasitic vaccines to vaccinate animals. Some studies in which radioisotopes have been used to investigate certain metabolic disorders are reviewed. In experiments, where radioimmunoassay technique for the estimation of hormones, has been utilized, the results reveal that the animals on low plane of nutrition show greater oestrous cycle lengths or even long anoestrous periods. On the other hand, irradiation has been used as a tool to produce vaccines as well as degradation of certain dietary molecules for increased utilization. A number of studies wherein 35 S and 15 N isotopes have been used, reveal that sulphur supplementation is essential for optimum utilization of nitrogen in the ratio of 1:10. There are certain antimetabolites in feed ingredients which affect endocrine function. Evidence indicates that high nitrate forages disturb thyroid function when sup(131)I is used to elucidate its secretion rate. Similarly certain toxic substances such as tannins have been shown to affect protein metabolism and phosphorus utilization when sup(32)P isotope is used in such studies. The use of radioisotopes have also been helpful to investigate the cause of ''Degnala'' disease prevalent in village cattle in certain states of India. With the help of sup(75)Se it has been possible to trace out the metabolic disturbances which lead to the onset of this disease. Another deficiency disease, hyperkeratosis, has been shown to be caused not only because of Vitamin A deficiency, but also because of zinc deficiency. The latter helps in the mobilization of normal quantity of vitamin A from the liver into the blood vitamin A pool. There is wide scope to use radioisotopes to investigate other metabolic diseases prevalent in livestock in this country. (auth.)

  14. Culture-dependent and -independent investigations of microbial diversity on urinary catheters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Yijuan; Moser, Claus Ernst; Abu Al-Soud, Waleed

    2012-01-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infection is caused by bacteria, which ascend the catheter along its external or internal surface to the bladder and subsequently develop into biofilms on the catheter and uroepithelium. Antibiotic-treated bacteria and bacteria residing in biofilm can be difficult...... to culture. In this study we used culture-based and 16S rRNA gene-based culture-independent methods (fingerprinting, cloning, and pyrosequencing) to determine the microbial diversity of biofilms on 24 urinary catheters. Most of the patients were catheterized for...

  15. IMG-ABC: new features for bacterial secondary metabolism analysis and targeted biosynthetic gene cluster discovery in thousands of microbial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjithomas, Michalis; Chen, I-Min A; Chu, Ken; Huang, Jinghua; Ratner, Anna; Palaniappan, Krishna; Andersen, Evan; Markowitz, Victor; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Ivanova, Natalia N

    2017-01-04

    Secondary metabolites produced by microbes have diverse biological functions, which makes them a great potential source of biotechnologically relevant compounds with antimicrobial, anti-cancer and other activities. The proteins needed to synthesize these natural products are often encoded by clusters of co-located genes called biosynthetic gene clusters (BCs). In order to advance the exploration of microbial secondary metabolism, we developed the largest publically available database of experimentally verified and predicted BCs, the Integrated Microbial Genomes Atlas of Biosynthetic gene Clusters (IMG-ABC) (https://img.jgi.doe.gov/abc/). Here, we describe an update of IMG-ABC, which includes ClusterScout, a tool for targeted identification of custom biosynthetic gene clusters across 40 000 isolate microbial genomes, and a new search capability to query more than 700 000 BCs from isolate genomes for clusters with similar Pfam composition. Additional features enable fast exploration and analysis of BCs through two new interactive visualization features, a BC function heatmap and a BC similarity network graph. These new tools and features add to the value of IMG-ABC's vast body of BC data, facilitating their in-depth analysis and accelerating secondary metabolite discovery. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. Assessing the bias linked to DNA recovery from biofiltration woodchips for microbial community investigation by fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrol, Léa; Malhautier, Luc; Poly, Franck; Lepeuple, Anne-Sophie; Fanlo, Jean-Louis

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we explored methodological aspects of nucleic acid recovery from microbial communities involved in a gas biofilter filled with pine bark woodchips. DNA was recovered indirectly in two steps, comparing different methods: cell dispersion (crushing, shaking, and sonication) and DNA extraction (three commercial kits and a laboratory protocol). The objectives were (a) to optimize cell desorption from the packing material and (b) to compare the 12 combinations of desorption and extraction methods, according to three relevant criteria: DNA yield, DNA purity, and community structure representation by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Cell dispersion was not influenced by the operational parameters tested for shaking and blending, while it increased with time for sonication. DNA extraction by the laboratory protocol provided the highest DNA yields, whereas the best DNA purity was obtained by a commercial kit designed for DNA extraction from soil. After successful PCR amplification, the 12 methods did not generate the same bias in microbial community representation. Eight combinations led to high diversity estimation, independently of the experimental procedure. Among them, six provided highly similar DGGE profiles. Two protocols generated a significantly dissimilar community profile, with less diversity. This study highlighted the crucial importance of DNA recovery bias evaluation.

  17. Investigating the role for adaptation of the microbial community to transform trace organic chemicals during managed aquifer recharge

    KAUST Repository

    Alidina, Mazahirali

    2014-06-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate whether adaptation by pre-exposure to trace organic chemicals (TOrCs) was necessary for microbial transformation during managed aquifer recharge (MAR). Two pairs of laboratory-scale soil columns, each receiving a different primary substrate, were utilized to simulate the dominant bulk organic carbon present in MAR systems receiving wastewater effluent of varying quality and having undergone different degrees of pre-treatment, as well as organic carbon prevalent at different stages of subsurface travel. Each pair of columns consisted of duplicate set-ups receiving the same feed solution with only one pre-exposed to a suite of eight TOrCs for approximately ten months. Following the pre-exposure period, a spiking experiment was conducted in which the non-exposed columns also received the same suite of TOrCs. TOrC attenuation was quantified for the pre- and non-exposed columns of each pair during the spiking experiment. The microbial community structure and function of these systems were characterized by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene and metagenomics, respectively. Biotransformation rather than sorption was identified as the dominant removal mechanism for almost all the TOrCs (except triclocarban). Similar removal efficiencies were observed between pre-exposed and non-exposed columns for most TOrCs. No obvious differences in microbial community structure were revealed between pre- and non-exposed columns. Using metagenomics, biotransformation capacity potentials of the microbial community present were also similar between pre- and non-exposed columns of each pair. Overall, the pre-exposure of MAR systems to TOrCs at ng/L levels did not affect their attenuation and had no obvious influence on the resulting microbial community structure and function. Thus, other factors such as bioavailability of the primary substrate play a greater role regarding biotransformation of TOrCs. These results indicate that MAR systems adapted to a

  18. Investigating the role for adaptation of the microbial community to transform trace organic chemicals during managed aquifer recharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alidina, Mazahirali; Li, Dong; Drewes, Jörg E

    2014-06-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate whether adaptation by pre-exposure to trace organic chemicals (TOrCs) was necessary for microbial transformation during managed aquifer recharge (MAR). Two pairs of laboratory-scale soil columns, each receiving a different primary substrate, were utilized to simulate the dominant bulk organic carbon present in MAR systems receiving wastewater effluent of varying quality and having undergone different degrees of pre-treatment, as well as organic carbon prevalent at different stages of subsurface travel. Each pair of columns consisted of duplicate set-ups receiving the same feed solution with only one pre-exposed to a suite of eight TOrCs for approximately ten months. Following the pre-exposure period, a spiking experiment was conducted in which the non-exposed columns also received the same suite of TOrCs. TOrC attenuation was quantified for the pre- and non-exposed columns of each pair during the spiking experiment. The microbial community structure and function of these systems were characterized by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene and metagenomics, respectively. Biotransformation rather than sorption was identified as the dominant removal mechanism for almost all the TOrCs (except triclocarban). Similar removal efficiencies were observed between pre-exposed and non-exposed columns for most TOrCs. No obvious differences in microbial community structure were revealed between pre- and non-exposed columns. Using metagenomics, biotransformation capacity potentials of the microbial community present were also similar between pre- and non-exposed columns of each pair. Overall, the pre-exposure of MAR systems to TOrCs at ng/L levels did not affect their attenuation and had no obvious influence on the resulting microbial community structure and function. Thus, other factors such as bioavailability of the primary substrate play a greater role regarding biotransformation of TOrCs. These results indicate that MAR systems adapted to a

  19. Hepatic Metabolism of Perfluorinated Carboxylic Acids: A Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Investigation in Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-17

    Reo, C. M. Goecke, L. Narayanan, and B. M. Jarnot. "Effects of Perfluoro-n- octanoic Acid , Perfluoro-n-decanoic Acid , and Clofibrate on Hepatic...SUBTITLE 7C 5. FUNDING NUMBERS" Hepatic Metabolism of Perfluorinated Carboxylic Acids : A Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Investigation in Vivo G-AFOSR-90-0148 6...octanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluoro-n-decanoic acid (PFDA). These Air Force chemicals belong to a class of CU’. compounds known as peroxisome

  20. Ischaemic memory imaging using metabolic radiopharmaceuticals: overview of clinical settings and ongoing investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshinaga, Keiichiro [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Molecular Imaging, Sapporo (Japan); Naya, Masanao [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Sapporo (Japan); Shiga, Tohru; Suzuki, Eriko; Tamaki, Nagara [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    ''Ischaemic memory'' is defined as a prolonged functional and/or biochemical alteration remaining after a particular episode of severe myocardial ischaemia. The biochemical alteration has been reported as metabolic stunning. Metabolic imaging has been used to detect the footprint left by previous ischaemic episodes evident due to delayed recovery of myocardial metabolism (persistent dominant glucose utilization with suppression of fatty acid oxidation). β-Methyl-p-[{sup 123}I]iodophenylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) is a single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) radiotracer widely used for metabolic imaging in clinical settings in Japan. In patients with suspected coronary artery disease but no previous myocardial infarction, BMIPP has shown acceptable diagnostic accuracy. In particular, BMIPP plays an important role in the identification of prior ischaemic insult in patients arriving at emergency departments with acute chest pain syndrome. Recent data also show the usefulness of {sup 123}I-BMIPP SPECT for predicting cardiovascular events in patients undergoing haemodialysis. Similarly, SPECT or PET imaging with {sup 18}F-FDG injected during peak exercise or after exercise under fasting conditions shows an increase in FDG uptake in postischaemic areas. This article will overview the roles of ischaemic memory imaging both under established indications and in ongoing investigations. (orig.)

  1. Ischaemic memory imaging using metabolic radiopharmaceuticals: overview of clinical settings and ongoing investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshinaga, Keiichiro; Naya, Masanao; Shiga, Tohru; Suzuki, Eriko; Tamaki, Nagara

    2014-01-01

    ''Ischaemic memory'' is defined as a prolonged functional and/or biochemical alteration remaining after a particular episode of severe myocardial ischaemia. The biochemical alteration has been reported as metabolic stunning. Metabolic imaging has been used to detect the footprint left by previous ischaemic episodes evident due to delayed recovery of myocardial metabolism (persistent dominant glucose utilization with suppression of fatty acid oxidation). β-Methyl-p-[ 123 I]iodophenylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) is a single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) radiotracer widely used for metabolic imaging in clinical settings in Japan. In patients with suspected coronary artery disease but no previous myocardial infarction, BMIPP has shown acceptable diagnostic accuracy. In particular, BMIPP plays an important role in the identification of prior ischaemic insult in patients arriving at emergency departments with acute chest pain syndrome. Recent data also show the usefulness of 123 I-BMIPP SPECT for predicting cardiovascular events in patients undergoing haemodialysis. Similarly, SPECT or PET imaging with 18 F-FDG injected during peak exercise or after exercise under fasting conditions shows an increase in FDG uptake in postischaemic areas. This article will overview the roles of ischaemic memory imaging both under established indications and in ongoing investigations. (orig.)

  2. Ischaemic memory imaging using metabolic radiopharmaceuticals: overview of clinical settings and ongoing investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga, Keiichiro; Naya, Masanao; Shiga, Tohru; Suzuki, Eriko; Tamaki, Nagara

    2014-02-01

    "Ischaemic memory" is defined as a prolonged functional and/or biochemical alteration remaining after a particular episode of severe myocardial ischaemia. The biochemical alteration has been reported as metabolic stunning. Metabolic imaging has been used to detect the footprint left by previous ischaemic episodes evident due to delayed recovery of myocardial metabolism (persistent dominant glucose utilization with suppression of fatty acid oxidation). β-Methyl-p-[(123)I]iodophenylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) is a single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) radiotracer widely used for metabolic imaging in clinical settings in Japan. In patients with suspected coronary artery disease but no previous myocardial infarction, BMIPP has shown acceptable diagnostic accuracy. In particular, BMIPP plays an important role in the identification of prior ischaemic insult in patients arriving at emergency departments with acute chest pain syndrome. Recent data also show the usefulness of (123)I-BMIPP SPECT for predicting cardiovascular events in patients undergoing haemodialysis. Similarly, SPECT or PET imaging with (18)F-FDG injected during peak exercise or after exercise under fasting conditions shows an increase in FDG uptake in postischaemic areas. This article will overview the roles of ischaemic memory imaging both under established indications and in ongoing investigations.

  3. Investigating design criteria to build a performing microbial fuel cell running on swine liquid manure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, D.Y.; Hogue, R.; Dube, P.; Jeanne, T.; Levesque, A. [Inst. de recherche et de developpement en agroenvironnement Inc, Quebec City, PQ (Canada); Theriault, R.; Kaliaguine, S. [Laval Univ., Quebec City, PQ (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This paper reported on a study that examined the bacterial and electro-chemical phenomena that takes place in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) operating on swine liquid manure as fuel. An MFC converts the available energy in a bioconvertible substrate directly into electricity while decreasing its chemical oxygen demand (COD). In this study, a first single chamber MFC operating on swine liquid manure was constructed based on a literature review. Various support media filling the anodic chamber were tested in an effort to optimize the surface area on which bacteria may develop according to the hypothesis that large bacteria concentration will improve energy production and reduce treatment time. Bacterial communities extracted from the selected support media were analyzed using molecular technologies such as DNA extraction, PCR amplification, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, cloning and sequencing. The analyses showed that only a few bacteria species coming from raw liquid manure were responsible for electrical activities.

  4. Surveillance of microbial indicators and physicochemical parameters to investigate pollution status of Lahore canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir, A.; Kanwal, F.; Mateen, B.

    2011-01-01

    The Lahore canal is an important watershed in Lahore. The present study was conducted to monitor pollution load of Lahore canal. Surface water was collected from the middle of the canal at four different sites, and analysed for physicochemical parameters (temperature, pH, EC, DO, BOD/sub 5/, turbidity, nitrates, phosphates) and microbial load (bacteria (TVC), total coliform and fungi). Water quality parameters were monitored from May to August at four sites along 17Km long patch. Surface water was collected in the middle of the canal. The results were compared with IWQ guidelines proposed by WWF, Pakistan. Pollution load of Lahore Canal revealed an alarming situation. Water can be used for the irrigation purpose, but only with advanced treatment. (author)

  5. Strong linkage between active microbial communities and microbial carbon usage in a deglaciated terrain of the High Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M.; Gyeong, H. R.; Lee, Y. K.

    2017-12-01

    Soil microorganisms play pivotal roles in ecosystem development and carbon cycling in newly exposed glacier forelands. However, little is known about carbon utilization pattern by metabolically active microbes over the course of ecosystem succession in these nutrient-poor environments. We investigated RNA-based microbial community dynamics and its relation to microbial carbon usage along the chronosequence of a High Arctic glacier foreland. Among microbial taxa surveyed (bacteria, archaea and fungi), bacteria are among the most metabolically active taxa with a dominance of Cyanobacteria and Actinobacteria. There was a strong association between microbial carbon usage and active Actinobacterial communities, suggesting that member of Actinobacteria are actively involved in organic carbon degradation in glacier forelands. Both bacterial community and microbial carbon usage are converged towards later stage of succession, indicating that the composition of soil organic carbon plays important roles in structuring bacterial decomposer communities during ecosystem development.

  6. The Dark Side of the Mushroom Spring Microbial Mat: Life in the Shadow of Chlorophototrophs. II. Metabolic Functions of Abundant Community Members Predicted from Metagenomic Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Vera; Hügler, Michael; Ward, David M; Bryant, Donald A

    2017-01-01

    Microbial mat communities in the effluent channels of Octopus and Mushroom Springs within the Lower Geyser Basin of Yellowstone National Park have been extensively characterized. Previous studies have focused on the chlorophototrophic organisms of the phyla Cyanobacteria and Chloroflexi . However, the diversity and metabolic functions of the other portion of the community in the microoxic/anoxic region of the mat are poorly understood. We recently described the diverse but extremely uneven microbial assemblage in the undermat of Mushroom Spring based on 16S rRNA amplicon sequences, which was dominated by Roseiflexus members, filamentous anoxygenic chlorophototrophs. In this study, we analyzed the orange-colored undermat portion of the community of Mushroom Spring mats in a genome-centric approach and discuss the metabolic potentials of the major members. Metagenome binning recovered partial genomes of all abundant community members, ranging in completeness from ~28 to 96%, and allowed affiliation of function with taxonomic identity even for representatives of novel and Candidate phyla. Less complete metagenomic bins correlated with high microdiversity. The undermat portion of the community was found to be a mixture of phototrophic and chemotrophic organisms, which use bicarbonate as well as organic carbon sources derived from different cell components and fermentation products. The presence of rhodopsin genes in many taxa strengthens the hypothesis that light energy is of major importance. Evidence for the usage of all four bacterial carbon fixation pathways was found in the metagenome. Nitrogen fixation appears to be limited to Synechococcus spp. in the upper mat layer and Thermodesulfovibrio sp. in the undermat, and nitrate/nitrite metabolism was limited. A closed sulfur cycle is indicated by biological sulfate reduction combined with the presence of genes for sulfide oxidation mainly in phototrophs. Finally, a variety of undermat microorganisms have genes for

  7. The Dark Side of the Mushroom Spring Microbial Mat: Life in the Shadow of Chlorophototrophs. II. Metabolic Functions of Abundant Community Members Predicted from Metagenomic Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Thiel

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Microbial mat communities in the effluent channels of Octopus and Mushroom Springs within the Lower Geyser Basin of Yellowstone National Park have been extensively characterized. Previous studies have focused on the chlorophototrophic organisms of the phyla Cyanobacteria and Chloroflexi. However, the diversity and metabolic functions of the other portion of the community in the microoxic/anoxic region of the mat are poorly understood. We recently described the diverse but extremely uneven microbial assemblage in the undermat of Mushroom Spring based on 16S rRNA amplicon sequences, which was dominated by Roseiflexus members, filamentous anoxygenic chlorophototrophs. In this study, we analyzed the orange-colored undermat portion of the community of Mushroom Spring mats in a genome-centric approach and discuss the metabolic potentials of the major members. Metagenome binning recovered partial genomes of all abundant community members, ranging in completeness from ~28 to 96%, and allowed affiliation of function with taxonomic identity even for representatives of novel and Candidate phyla. Less complete metagenomic bins correlated with high microdiversity. The undermat portion of the community was found to be a mixture of phototrophic and chemotrophic organisms, which use bicarbonate as well as organic carbon sources derived from different cell components and fermentation products. The presence of rhodopsin genes in many taxa strengthens the hypothesis that light energy is of major importance. Evidence for the usage of all four bacterial carbon fixation pathways was found in the metagenome. Nitrogen fixation appears to be limited to Synechococcus spp. in the upper mat layer and Thermodesulfovibrio sp. in the undermat, and nitrate/nitrite metabolism was limited. A closed sulfur cycle is indicated by biological sulfate reduction combined with the presence of genes for sulfide oxidation mainly in phototrophs. Finally, a variety of undermat

  8. Metagenomic analysis revealed highly diverse microbial arsenic metabolism genes in paddy soils with low-arsenic contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Ke-Qing; Li, Li-Guan; Ma, Li-Ping; Zhang, Si-Yu; Bao, Peng; Zhang, Tong; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2016-01-01

    Microbe-mediated arsenic (As) metabolism plays a critical role in global As cycle, and As metabolism involves different types of genes encoding proteins facilitating its biotransformation and transportation processes. Here, we used metagenomic analysis based on high-throughput sequencing and constructed As metabolism protein databases to analyze As metabolism genes in five paddy soils with low-As contents. The results showed that highly diverse As metabolism genes were present in these paddy soils, with varied abundances and distribution for different types and subtypes of these genes. Arsenate reduction genes (ars) dominated in all soil samples, and significant correlation existed between the abundance of arr (arsenate respiration), aio (arsenite oxidation), and arsM (arsenite methylation) genes, indicating the co-existence and close-relation of different As resistance systems of microbes in wetland environments similar to these paddy soils after long-term evolution. Among all soil parameters, pH was an important factor controlling the distribution of As metabolism gene in five paddy soils (p = 0.018). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study using high-throughput sequencing and metagenomics approach in characterizing As metabolism genes in the five paddy soil, showing their great potential in As biotransformation, and therefore in mitigating arsenic risk to humans. - Highlights: • Use metagenomics to analyze As metabolism genes in paddy soils with low-As content. • These genes were ubiquitous, abundant, and associated with diverse microbes. • pH as an important factor controlling their distribution in paddy soil. • Imply combinational effect of evolution and selection on As metabolism genes. - Metagenomics was used to analyze As metabolism genes in paddy soils with low-As contents. These genes were ubiquitous, abundant, and associated with diverse microbes.

  9. Microbial Murders Crime Scene Investigation: An Active Team-Based Learning Project that Enhances Student Enthusiasm and Comprehension of Clinical Microbial Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, J Jordan

    2017-01-01

    Microbial disease knowledge is a critical component of microbiology courses and is beneficial for many students' future careers. Microbiology courses traditionally cover core concepts through lectures and labs, but specific instruction on microbial diseases varies greatly depending on the instructor and course. A common project involves students researching and presenting a disease to the class. This method alone is not very effective, and course evaluations have consistently indicated that students felt they lacked adequate disease knowledge; therefore, a more hands-on and interactive disease project was developed called Microbial Murders. For this team-based project, a group of students chooses a pathogen, researches the disease, creates a "mugshot" of the pathogen, and develops a corresponding "crime scene," where a hypothetical patient has died from the microbe. Each group gives a presentation introducing the microbial pathogen, signs/symptoms, treatments, and overall characteristics. The students then visit each other's crime scenes to match the pathogen with the correct crime scene by critically thinking through the clues. This project has shown remarkable success. Surveys indicate that 73% of students thought the project helped them understand the material and 84% said it was worth their time. Student participation, excitement, understanding, and application of microbial disease knowledge have increased and are evident through an increase in course evaluations and in student assessment scores. This project is easy to implement and can be used in a wide variety of biology, microbiology, or health classes for any level (middle school through college).

  10. On the use of antibiotics to reduce rhizoplane microbial populations in root physiology and ecology investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, D. R.; Ferro, A.; Ritchie, K.; Bugbee, B. G.

    1995-01-01

    No straightforward method exists for separating the proportion of ion exchange and respiration due to rhizoplane microbial organisms from that of root ion exchange and respiration. We examined several antibiotics that might be used for the temporary elimination of rhizoplane bacteria from hydroponically grown wheat roots (Triticum aestivum cv. Veery 10). Each antibiotic was tested for herbicidal activity and plate counts were used to enumerate bacteria and evaluate antibiotic kinetics. Only lactam antibiotics (penicillins and cephalosporins) did not reduce wheat growth rates. Aminoglycosides, the pyrimidine trimethoprim, colistin and rifampicin reduced growth rates substantially. Antibiotics acted slowly, with maximum reductions in rhizoplane bacteria occurring after more than 48 h of exposure. Combinations of nonphytotoxic antibiotics reduced platable rhizoplane bacteria by as much as 98%; however, this was generally a reduction from about 10(9) to 10(6) colony forming units per gram of dry root mass, so that many viable bacteria remained on root surfaces. We present evidence which suggests that insufficient bacterial biomass exists on root surfaces of nonstressed plants grown under well-aerated conditions to quantitatively interfere with root nitrogen absorption measurements.

  11. Investigation of microbial diversity in a desert Mars-like environment: Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS), Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Direito, Maria Susana; Staats, Martijn; Foing, Bernard H.; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Roling, Wilfred

    The Utah Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) harbours geo-morphology and geo-processes analogues to the planet Mars. Soil samples were collected during the EuroGeoMars campaign (from 24 January to 1 March 2009) from different locations and depths [1]. Samples were distributed among scientific collaborator institutes for analysis of microbial diversity, amino acid content and degradation, content of PAH or larger organic molecules, and respective soil properties. Our sample analysis had the objective of characterizing the microbial communities in this Mars analogue: DNA isolation, PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) using primers for DNA amplification of Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene fragments, DGGE (Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis) and clone library construction with the final aim of sequencing. Results indicate that life is present in all the three domains of life (Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya), while the most diversity was found in the domain Bacteria. Microorgan-isms are heterogeneously present and their identities are currently investigated. The obtained information will be later related to the other scientific analysis in order to obtain a better understanding of this Mars analogue site, which in turn will provide important information for the search for life on Mars. [1] Foing, B.H. et al . (2009). Exogeolab lander/rover instruments and EuroGeoMars MDRS campaign. LPI, 40, 2567.

  12. Computational investigation of the flow field contribution to improve electricity generation in granular activated carbon-assisted microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Li, Jian; Battaglia, Francine; He, Zhen

    2016-11-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) offer an alternative approach to treat wastewater with less energy input and direct electricity generation. To optimize MFC anodic performance, adding granular activated carbon (GAC) has been proved to be an effective way, most likely due to the enlarged electrode surface for biomass attachment and improved mixing of the flow field. The impact of a flow field on the current enhancement within a porous anode medium (e.g., GAC) has not been well understood before, and thus is investigated in this study by using mathematical modeling of the multi-order Butler-Volmer equation with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques. By comparing three different CFD cases (without GAC, with GAC as a nonreactive porous medium, and with GAC as a reactive porous medium), it is demonstrated that adding GAC contributes to a uniform flow field and a total current enhancement of 17%, a factor that cannot be neglected in MFC design. However, in an actual MFC operation, this percentage could be even higher because of the microbial competition and energy loss issues within a porous medium. The results of the present study are expected to help with formulating strategies to optimize MFC with a better flow pattern design.

  13. Recent advances in microbial production of fuels and chemicals using tools and strategies of systems metabolic engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cho, Changhee; Choi, So Young; Luo, Zi Wei

    2015-01-01

    The advent of various systems metabolic engineering tools and strategies has enabled more sophisticated engineering of microorganisms for the production of industrially useful fuels and chemicals. Advances in systems metabolic engineering have been made in overproducing natural chemicals...... and producing novel non-natural chemicals. In this paper, we review the tools and strategies of systems metabolic engineering employed for the development of microorganisms for the production of various industrially useful chemicals belonging to fuels, building block chemicals, and specialty chemicals......, in particular focusing on those reported in the last three years. It was aimed at providing the current landscape of systems metabolic engineering and suggesting directions to address future challenges towards successfully establishing processes for the bio-based production of fuels and chemicals from renewable...

  14. Recent advances in microbial production of fuels and chemicals using tools and strategies of systems metabolic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Changhee; Choi, So Young; Luo, Zi Wei; Lee, Sang Yup

    2015-11-15

    The advent of various systems metabolic engineering tools and strategies has enabled more sophisticated engineering of microorganisms for the production of industrially useful fuels and chemicals. Advances in systems metabolic engineering have been made in overproducing natural chemicals and producing novel non-natural chemicals. In this paper, we review the tools and strategies of systems metabolic engineering employed for the development of microorganisms for the production of various industrially useful chemicals belonging to fuels, building block chemicals, and specialty chemicals, in particular focusing on those reported in the last three years. It was aimed at providing the current landscape of systems metabolic engineering and suggesting directions to address future challenges towards successfully establishing processes for the bio-based production of fuels and chemicals from renewable resources. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Microbial protein synthesis and nitrogen metabolism in cows bred on tropical pasture and fed on cassava root and corn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ádler Carvalho da Silva

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Current experiment evaluated the effect of replacement of full corn meal by dehydrated ground cassava roots at levels 0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% in experimental supplements for lactating cows grazing on irrigated and fertilized tropical pastures. Ten Holstein cows were divided into two 5 x 5 Latin squares, with average initial 150 days of lactation, milk production 22±3.30 kg day-1 at the beginning of experiment and initial body weight of 603±65 kg. Cows were maintained on pasture consisting of elephant grass (Pennisetum purpureum, Schum cultivar Pioneiro, intercropped with Tifton 85 (Cynodon nlemfuensis, fertilized with 600 kg nitrogen per hectare year-1. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05 between the substitution levels of corn meal by ground and dehydrated cassava root in the concentrate on the synthesis of microbial protein with an estimated average of 1,288.49 g day-1 and efficiency in the synthesis of microbial protein per kilogram of TDN with estimated average of 91.30 g kg-1 TDN. Nitrogen equilibrium showed an estimated average of 218.79 g day-1 of retained nitrogen. The microbial protein synthesis and nitrogen balance were not affected by treatments.

  16. Zirconia Dental Implants: Investigation of Clinical Parameters, Patient Satisfaction, and Microbial Contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holländer, Jens; Lorenz, Jonas; Stübinger, Stefan; Hölscher, Werner; Heidemann, Detlef; Ghanaati, Shahram; Sader, Robert

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, dental implants made from zirconia have been further developed and are considered a reliable treatment method for replacing missing teeth. The aim of this study was to analyze dental implants made from zirconia regarding their clinical performance compared with natural teeth (control). One hundred six zirconia implants in 38 adults were analyzed in a clinical study after 1 year of loading. The plaque index (PI), bleeding on probing (BOP), probing pocket depth (PPD), probing attachment level (PAL), and creeping or recession (CR/REC) of the gingiva were detected and compared with natural control teeth (CT). Furthermore, the papilla index (PAP), Periotest values (PTV), microbial colonization of the implant/dental sulcus fluid, and patient satisfaction were assessed. The survival rate was 100%. No statistical significance was observed between implants and teeth regarding BOP, PPD, and PAL. A statistical significance was detected regarding PI and CR/REC with significantly less plaque accumulation and recession in the study group. Mean PAP was 1.76 ± 0.55, whereas the mean PTV was -1.31 ± 2.24 (range from -5 to +6). A non-statistically significant higher colonization of periodontitis/peri-implantitis bacteria was observed in the implant group. The questionnaire showed that the majority of the patients were satisfied with the overall treatment. One-piece zirconia dental implants exhibited similar clinical results (BOP, PPD, and PAL) compared with natural teeth in regard to adhesion of plaque (PI) and creeping attachment (CR/REC); zirconia implants performed even better. The favorable results for PAL and CR/REC reflect the comparable low affinity of zirconia for plaque adhesion. Patient satisfaction indicated a high level of acceptance for zirconia implants. However, a long-term follow-up is needed to support these findings.

  17. Investigating depression-like and metabolic parameters in a chronic low-grade inflammation model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, C. W.; Elfving, B.; Lund, S.

    2012-01-01

    that elevated markers of inflammation predict a poor response to treatment. Furthermore, increasing evidences show that metabolic abnormalities such as obesity and diabetes mellitus type 2 are associated with a low-grade inflammation. Objectives: The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of a systemic...... levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-1, IL-6) together with the expression of enzymes involved in the tryptophan-kynurenine pathway, will be analyzed in specific brain regions using real-time qPCR. Body weight and food intake was measured once a week, while fasting glucose and insulin...

  18. Evaluation of some feedstuffs with special emphasis on the effect of nitrate and other non-protein nitrogen fractions on ruminal microbial metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolic, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    Green herbage grown under widely different conditions was examined for nitrate content. The mean value was 0.14% (range 0.01-0.32%) NO 3 -N in the dry matter (DM). It was concluded that the cut green fodder would induce high levels of blood methaemoglobin when fed to ruminants in mixed diets. Nevertheless, experiments in vitro indicated that relatively small amounts of dietary nitrate induced considerable microbial nitrate reducing activity in rumen contents. Moreover, nitrate reduction to ammonia was accompanied by alterations in microbial sulphur and energy metabolism. A technique for determining organic matter digestibility (OMD) in vitro was standardized and used to evaluate the potential nutritive value of some fruit wastes. Studies on apple pomace silage indicated that added urea did not significantly increase the silage protein content but remained as a potential source of non-protein nitrogen for rumen microorganisms. Apple pomace ensiled alone or preferably with other ingredients was acceptable to sheep and cattle, particularly as a supplement to their winter rations. (author). 27 refs, 2 figs, 5 tabs

  19. MicroScope-an integrated resource for community expertise of gene functions and comparative analysis of microbial genomic and metabolic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Médigue, Claudine; Calteau, Alexandra; Cruveiller, Stéphane; Gachet, Mathieu; Gautreau, Guillaume; Josso, Adrien; Lajus, Aurélie; Langlois, Jordan; Pereira, Hugo; Planel, Rémi; Roche, David; Rollin, Johan; Rouy, Zoe; Vallenet, David

    2017-09-12

    The overwhelming list of new bacterial genomes becoming available on a daily basis makes accurate genome annotation an essential step that ultimately determines the relevance of thousands of genomes stored in public databanks. The MicroScope platform (http://www.genoscope.cns.fr/agc/microscope) is an integrative resource that supports systematic and efficient revision of microbial genome annotation, data management and comparative analysis. Starting from the results of our syntactic, functional and relational annotation pipelines, MicroScope provides an integrated environment for the expert annotation and comparative analysis of prokaryotic genomes. It combines tools and graphical interfaces to analyze genomes and to perform the manual curation of gene function in a comparative genomics and metabolic context. In this article, we describe the free-of-charge MicroScope services for the annotation and analysis of microbial (meta)genomes, transcriptomic and re-sequencing data. Then, the functionalities of the platform are presented in a way providing practical guidance and help to the nonspecialists in bioinformatics. Newly integrated analysis tools (i.e. prediction of virulence and resistance genes in bacterial genomes) and original method recently developed (the pan-genome graph representation) are also described. Integrated environments such as MicroScope clearly contribute, through the user community, to help maintaining accurate resources. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  20. A liquid chromatography – tandem mass spectrometry method to measure a selected panel of uremic retention solutes derived from endogenous and colonic microbial metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loor, Henriette de; Poesen, Ruben [KU Leuven – University of Leuven, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Laboratory of Nephrology, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium); De Leger, Wout; Dehaen, Wim [KU Leuven – University of Leuven, Department of Chemistry, Division of Molecular Design and Synthesis, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium); Augustijns, Patrick [KU Leuven – University of Leuven, Department of Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences, Drug Delivery and Disposition, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium); Evenepoel, Pieter [KU Leuven – University of Leuven, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Laboratory of Nephrology, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium); University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Nephrology and Renal Transplantation, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium); Meijers, Björn, E-mail: bjorn.meijers@uzleuven.be [KU Leuven – University of Leuven, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Laboratory of Nephrology, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium); University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Nephrology and Renal Transplantation, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium)

    2016-09-14

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with an increased risk of mortality and cardiovascular disease, which is, at least partly, mediated by the accumulation of so-called uremic retention solutes. Although there has been an increasing interest in the behavior of these solutes, derived from both the endogenous and colonic microbial metabolism, methods to simultaneously and accurately measure a broad panel of relevant uremic retention solutes remain scarce. We developed a highly sensitive ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method. A high throughput sample preparation was used with extraction of analytes from 50 μl serum using Ostro plate technology. For most solutes, stable isotopes labelled metabolites were used as internal standards. Chromatography was achieved using an Acquity UPLC CSH Fluoro Phenyl column. The total run time was 8 min, the mobile phase was a gradient of 0.1% formic acid in Milli-Q water and pure methanol at a flow rate of 0.5 ml min{sup −1}. Detection was performed using a tandem mass spectrometer with alternated positive and negative electrospray ionization. Calibration curves were linear for all solutes. Precision was assessed according to the NCCLS EP5-T guideline, being below 15% for all metabolites. Mean recoveries were between 83 and 104% for all metabolites. The validated method was successfully applied in a cohort of 488 patients with CKD. We developed and validated a sensitive and robust UPLC-MS/MS method for quantification of 15 uremic retention solutes derived from endogenous and colonic microbial metabolism. This method allows for studying the behavior and relevance of these solutes in patients with CKD. - Highlights: • Simultaneous quantification of fifteen relevant uremic retention solutes. • Comprehensive validation, highly sensitive and high through-put LC-MSMS method. • Comparison of different blood tubes. • Freeze-thaw stability. • Successful implementation in a

  1. Measuring maximum and standard metabolic rates using intermittent-flow respirometry: a student laboratory investigation of aerobic metabolic scope and environmental hypoxia in aquatic breathers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosewarne, P J; Wilson, J M; Svendsen, J C

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic rate is one of the most widely measured physiological traits in animals and may be influenced by both endogenous (e.g. body mass) and exogenous factors (e.g. oxygen availability and temperature). Standard metabolic rate (SMR) and maximum metabolic rate (MMR) are two fundamental physiological variables providing the floor and ceiling in aerobic energy metabolism. The total amount of energy available between these two variables constitutes the aerobic metabolic scope (AMS). A laboratory exercise aimed at an undergraduate level physiology class, which details the appropriate data acquisition methods and calculations to measure oxygen consumption rates in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, is presented here. Specifically, the teaching exercise employs intermittent flow respirometry to measure SMR and MMR, derives AMS from the measurements and demonstrates how AMS is affected by environmental oxygen. Students' results typically reveal a decline in AMS in response to environmental hypoxia. The same techniques can be applied to investigate the influence of other key factors on metabolic rate (e.g. temperature and body mass). Discussion of the results develops students' understanding of the mechanisms underlying these fundamental physiological traits and the influence of exogenous factors. More generally, the teaching exercise outlines essential laboratory concepts in addition to metabolic rate calculations, data acquisition and unit conversions that enhance competency in quantitative analysis and reasoning. Finally, the described procedures are generally applicable to other fish species or aquatic breathers such as crustaceans (e.g. crayfish) and provide an alternative to using higher (or more derived) animals to investigate questions related to metabolic physiology. © 2016 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  2. Investigation of (/sup 18/F)2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose for the measure of myocardial glucose metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phelps, M.E.; Hoffman, E.J.; Selin, C.; Huang, S.C.; Robinson, G.; MacDonald, N.; Schelbert, H.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1978-12-01

    Fluorine-18-labeled 2-deoxyglucose (FDG) was studied as a glucose analog for the measure of myocardial glucose metabolism. Myocardial uptake and retention, blood clearance, species dependence (dog, monkey, man), and effect of diet on uptake were investigated. Normal myocardial uptake of FDG was 3 to 4% of injected dose in dog and monkey, and 1 to 4% in man, compared with brain uptakes of 1.5 to 3% in dog, 5 to 6% in monkey, and 4 to 8% in man. The myocardial metabolic rate (MR) for glucose in the nonfasting (glycolytic) state was 2.8 times that in the fasting (ketogenic) state. Human subjects showed higher myocardial uptake after a normal meal than after a meal containing mostly free fatty acids (FFA). Blood clearance was rapid with initial clearance t/sub 1/2/ of 0.2 to 0.3 min, followed by a t/sub 1/2/ of 8.4 +- 1.2 min in dog and 11.6 +- 1.1 min in man. A small third component had half-times of 59 +- 10 min and 88 +- 4 min in dog and man, respectively. With the ECAT positron tomograph, high image-contrast ratios were found between heart and blood (dog 3.5/1, man 14/1), heart and lung (dog 9/1, man 20/1), and heart and liver (dog 15/1, man 10/1). The FDG was taken up rapidly by the myocardium without any significant tissue clearance over a 4-hr period. The FDG exhibited excellent imaging properties. Average counting rates of 12K, 20K, and 40K c/min-mCi injected are obtained in human subjects with high, medium, and low resolutions of the ECAT tomograph. Determination of glucose and FFA MR in vivo with EACT provides a method for investigation and assessment of changing aerobic and anaerobic metabolic rates in ischemic heart disease in man.

  3. Investigation of [18F]2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose for the measure of myocardial glucose metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phelps, M.E.; Hoffman, E.J.; Selin, C.; Huang, S.C.; Robinson, G.; MacDonald, N.; Schelbert, H.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1978-01-01

    Fluorine-18-labeled 2-deoxyglucose (FDG) was studied as a glucose analog for the measure of myocardial glucose metabolism. Myocardial uptake and retention, blood clearance, species dependence (dog, monkey, man), and effect of diet on uptake were investigated. Normal myocardial uptake of FDG was 3 to 4% of injected dose in dog and monkey, and 1 to 4% in man, compared with brain uptakes of 1.5 to 3% in dog, 5 to 6% in monkey, and 4 to 8% in man. The myocardial metabolic rate (MR) for glucose in the nonfasting (glycolytic) state was 2.8 times that in the fasting (ketogenic) state. Human subjects showed higher myocardial uptake after a normal meal than after a meal containing mostly free fatty acids (FFA). Blood clearance was rapid with initial clearance t/sub 1/2/ of 0.2 to 0.3 min, followed by a t/sub 1/2/ of 8.4 +- 1.2 min in dog and 11.6 +- 1.1 min in man. A small third component had half-times of 59 +- 10 min and 88 +- 4 min in dog and man, respectively. With the ECAT positron tomograph, high image-contrast ratios were found between heart and blood (dog 3.5/1, man 14/1), heart and lung (dog 9/1, man 20/1), and heart and liver (dog 15/1, man 10/1). The FDG was taken up rapidly by the myocardium without any significant tissue clearance over a 4-hr period. The FDG exhibited excellent imaging properties. Average counting rates of 12K, 20K, and 40K c/min-mCi injected are obtained in human subjects with high, medium, and low resolutions of the ECAT tomograph. Determination of glucose and FFA MR in vivo with EACT provides a method for investigation and assessment of changing aerobic and anaerobic metabolic rates in ischemic heart disease in man

  4. An investigation of microbial diversity in crude oil & seawater injection systems and microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) of linepipe steels under different exposure conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlAbbas, Faisal Mohammed

    members of Halothiobacillaceae. In the seawater injection sample, the dominant bacterial phylotypes included members of the Rhodobacterales, Flavobacteriales and Oceanospirillales. Interestingly, common bacterial phylotypes that are related to Thermotogaceae were identified in all investigated samples. The impact of the identified microbial communities on MIC of pipeline system was presented. On the implications front, the influence of field SRB (Desulfomicrobium sp. and Clostridiales.) on the corrosion process was complex. The bacterial activities, metabolic reactions and by-products contributed to the corrosion process. Based on the observations and results, corrosion involves multiple synergistic mechanisms. The MIC vulnerability of X52 was higher than X80 due to microstructural effects. On the other hand, the field IRB consortium (Shewanella oneidensis sp. and Brevibacillus sp.) exhibited inhibitory action on the corrosion process. The maximum corrosion rate was ˜4 mpy in the biotic system and ˜18 mpy in the abiotic system. Corrosion mechanisms were proposed to explain the protective behavior of the IRB consortium. On the special effects front, the influence of remnant magnetic fields (3000 Gauss strength) on MIC by a SRB consortium was investigated. The results confirm substantial increases of bacteria cell attachment, biofilm mass, corrosion and pitting penetration rates under magnetized biotic compared to nonmagnetized biotic conditions. The significant enhancement of MIC under magnetized biotic conditions has been attributed to the synergetic interaction between SRB cells and associated metabolic products with magnetic fields. The effect of magnetic fields on the thermodynamics and kinetics of the bacterial cell attachment and the electrochemical process has been presented. On the mitigation front, this work presented a pioneer study on the inhibition effects of azadirachtin (Neem) extracts of SRB influenced corrosion. The results revealed that Neem extracts

  5. Investigations of potential microbial methanogenic and carbon monoxide utilization pathways in ultra-basic reducing springs associated with present-day continental serpentinization: the Tablelands, NL, CAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penny Lea Morrill

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-basic reducing springs at continental sites of serpentinization act as portals into the biogeochemistry of a subsurface environment with H2 and CH4 present. Very little, however, is known about the carbon substrate utilization, energy sources, and metabolic pathways of the microorganisms that live in this ultra-basic environment. The potential for microbial methanogenesis with bicarbonate, formate, acetate, and propionate precursors and carbon monoxide (CO utilization pathways were tested in laboratory experiments by adding substrates to water and sediment from the Tablelands, NL, CAD, a site of present-day continental serpentinization. Microbial methanogenesis was not observed after bicarbonate, formate, acetate, or propionate addition. CO was consumed in the live experiments but not in the killed controls and the residual CO in the live experiments became enriched in 13 C. The average isotopic enrichment factor resulting from this microbial utilization of CO was estimated to be 11.2 ± 0.2‰. Phospholipid fatty acid concentrations and δ13C values suggest limited incorporation of carbon from CO into microbial lipids. This indicates that in our experiments, CO was used primarily as an energy source, but not for biomass growth. Environmental DNA sequencing of spring fluids collected at the same time as the addition experiments yielded a large proportion of Hydrogenophaga-related sequences, which is consistent with previous metagenomic data indicating the potential for these taxa to utilize CO.

  6. Investigations of potential microbial methanogenic and carbon monoxide utilization pathways in ultra-basic reducing springs associated with present-day continental serpentinization: the Tablelands, NL, CAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrill, Penny L; Brazelton, William J; Kohl, Lukas; Rietze, Amanda; Miles, Sarah M; Kavanagh, Heidi; Schrenk, Matthew O; Ziegler, Susan E; Lang, Susan Q

    2014-01-01

    Ultra-basic reducing springs at continental sites of serpentinization act as portals into the biogeochemistry of a subsurface environment with H2 and CH4 present. Very little, however, is known about the carbon substrate utilization, energy sources, and metabolic pathways of the microorganisms that live in this ultra-basic environment. The potential for microbial methanogenesis with bicarbonate, formate, acetate, and propionate precursors and carbon monoxide (CO) utilization pathways were tested in laboratory experiments by adding substrates to water and sediment from the Tablelands, NL, CAD, a site of present-day continental serpentinization. Microbial methanogenesis was not observed after bicarbonate, formate, acetate, or propionate addition. CO was consumed in the live experiments but not in the killed controls and the residual CO in the live experiments became enriched in (13)C. The average isotopic enrichment factor resulting from this microbial utilization of CO was estimated to be 11.2 ± 0.2‰. Phospholipid fatty acid concentrations and δ(13)C values suggest limited incorporation of carbon from CO into microbial lipids. This indicates that in our experiments, CO was used primarily as an energy source, but not for biomass growth. Environmental DNA sequencing of spring fluids collected at the same time as the addition experiments yielded a large proportion of Hydrogenophaga-related sequences, which is consistent with previous metagenomic data indicating the potential for these taxa to utilize CO.

  7. Effects of wastewater treatment plant effluent inputs on planktonic metabolic rates and microbial community composition in the Baltic Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaquer-Sunyer, Raquel; Reader, Heather E.; Muthusamy, Saraladevi

    2016-01-01

    ) contribute to eutrophication as they are important sources of nitrogen to coastal areas. Here, we evaluated the effects of wastewater treatment plant effluent inputs on Baltic Sea planktonic communities in four experiments. We tested for effects of effluent inputs on chlorophyll a content, bacterial....... An increase in BP and decrease in CR could be caused by high lability of the DOM that can support secondary bacterial production, without an increase in respiration. Increases in bacterial production and simultaneous decreases of primary production lead to more carbon being consumed in the microbial loop...

  8. Mineral absorption and excretion as affected by microbial phytase and their effect on energy metabolism in young piglets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kies, A.K.; Gerrits, W.J.J.; Schrama, J.W.; Heetkamp, M.J.W.; Linden, van der K.L.; Zandstra, T.; Verstegen, M.W.A.

    2005-01-01

    Positive effects of dietary phytase supplementation on pig performance are observed not only when phosphorus is limiting. Improved energy utilization might be one explanation. Using indirect calorimetry, phytase-induced changes in energy metabolism were evaluated in young piglets with adequate

  9. Use Of Amino Acid Racemization To Investigate The Metabolic Activity Of ?Dormant? Microorganisms In Siberian Permafrost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsapin, A.; McDonald, G.

    2002-12-01

    Permafrost occupies a significant part of North America and Eurasia, and accounts for around 20% of Earth?s land surface. Permafrost represents a temperature-stable environment that allows the prolonged survival of microbial lineages at subzero temperatures. Microorganisms from ancient permafrost have been revived and isolated in pure cultures. Permafrost is a unique environment serving as a "natural gene bank", with many species frozen in time (i.e. preserved in an unchanging evolutionary state). Permafrost presents a golden niche for future biotechnology, and is also a unique environment for studying longevity and survivability microorganisms (pro- and eukaryotes). Permafrost, alone among cold environments, offers a sedimentary column in which, in one borehole made in the thick permafrost, we can observe in the preserved genetic material the history of biological evolution during the last several hundred thousand or maybe even a few million years. A thorough study of the phylogenetic relationships of organisms at each depth, as well as comparisons between different depths of permafrost, using molecular evolution techniques, will give us a unique window into the process of evolution of microbial communities over geologic time. The longevity of (micro)organisms in cold environments is of great interest to astrobiology since cryospheres are common phenomena in the solar system, particularly on satellites, comets and asteroids, and on some of the planets. Recent data from the Mars Global Surveyor mission suggest the possibility of permafrost or perhaps even liquid water under the Martian surface. The probability of finding life on Mars, if it exists, is probably higher in such environments. In addition, the evaluation of the possibility of transfer of living organisms between planets via impact ejecta needs the information on the maximum time over which microorganisms in cold environments can remain dormant and subsequently revive and reproduce. Our strategy for the

  10. Microbial and geochemical investigations of dissolved organic carbon and microbial ecology of native waters from the Biscayne and Upper Floridan Aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisle, John T.; Harvey, Ron W.; Aiken, George R.; Metge, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater resources in the United States are under ever-increasing demands for potable, irrigation, and recreational uses. Additionally, aquifer systems are being used or targeted for use as storage areas for treated surface waters and (or) groundwaters via injection (for example, aquifer storage and recovery). To date, the influence that the nutrients, including carbon, in the injected water have on native microbial communities and the biogeochemistry in the subsurface zones used for storage of the injectate has not been determined. In this report, we describe a series of experiments that establishes a baseline dataset for the quantity and quality of organic and inorganic carbon and nutrients in the Biscayne Aquifer (BA) and Upper Floridan Aquifer (UFA) in south Florida. The most significant differences between the BA (26 meters below surface) and UFA (366 meters below surface) are the average specific conductance (0.552 and 6.12 microsiemens per centimeter, respectively), dissolved oxygen (1.6 and 0 milligrams per liter, respectively), and oxidation-reduction potential (40.3 and -358 millivolts, respectively). The dissolved organic carbon from the BA is characterized by carbon originating from terrestrial sources and microbial activities, while the UFA has a distinctive microbial signature. Acetate and lactate are the dominant carbon constituents in both aquifers. Additionally, components of the dissolved organic carbon from the UFA have a total trihalomethane-formation potential that is approximately threefold greater than the maximum contaminat level of 80 micrograms per liter established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The average native bacterial abundances in the aquifers are similar with 4.69x10^4 cells per milliliter in the BA and 1.33x10^4 cells per milliliter in the UFA. The average bacteriophage abundances are also similar with 1.15x10^5 virus-like particles in the BA and 1.92x10^5 virus-like particles in the UFA. Interestingly, ciliated

  11. Chemical Investigations of Marine Filamentous and Zoosporic Fungi and Studies in Marine Microbial Chemical Ecology

    OpenAIRE

    Jenkins, Kelly M.

    1998-01-01

    The natural products chemistry of marine microorganisms is an emerging area of organic chemistry with the aim of discovering novel secondary metabolites exhibiting both biomedical and ecological activities. While marine bacteria have proven to be a productive source of new natural products, there are many groups of marine microorganisms which have not been fully investigated. In particular, marine fungi represent an untapped and potentially novel source of bioactive secondary metabolites. Whi...

  12. Enteric short-chain fatty acids: microbial messengers of metabolism, mitochondria, and mind: implications in autism spectrum disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derrick F. MacFabe

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Clinical observations suggest that gut and dietary factors transiently worsen and, in some cases, appear to improve behavioral symptoms in a subset of persons with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs, but the reason for this is unclear. Emerging evidence suggests ASDs are a family of systemic disorders of altered immunity, metabolism, and gene expression. Pre- or perinatal infection, hospitalization, or early antibiotic exposure, which may alter gut microbiota, have been suggested as potential risk factors for ASD. Can a common environmental agent link these disparate findings? This review outlines basic science and clinical evidence that enteric short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs, present in diet and also produced by opportunistic gut bacteria following fermentation of dietary carbohydrates, may be environmental triggers in ASD. Of note, propionic acid, a major SCFA produced by ASD-associated gastrointestinal bacteria (clostridia, bacteroides, desulfovibrio and also a common food preservative, can produce reversible behavioral, electrographic, neuroinflammatory, metabolic, and epigenetic changes closely resembling those found in ASD when administered to rodents. Major effects of these SCFAs may be through the alteration of mitochondrial function via the citric acid cycle and carnitine metabolism, or the epigenetic modulation of ASD-associated genes, which may be useful clinical biomarkers. It discusses the hypothesis that ASDs are produced by pre- or post-natal alterations in intestinal microbiota in sensitive sub-populations, which may have major implications in ASD cause, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment.

  13. Metabolic and microbial community dynamics during the hydrolytic and acidogenic fermentation in a leach-bed process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straeuber, Heike; Kleinsteuber, Sabine [UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig (Germany). Dept. of Bioenergy; UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig (Germany). Dept. of Environmental Microbiology; Schroeder, Martina [UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig (Germany). Dept. of Bioenergy

    2012-12-15

    Biogas production from lignocellulosic feedstock not competing with food production can contribute to a sustainable bioenergy system. The hydrolysis is the rate-limiting step in the anaerobic digestion of solid substrates such as straw. Hence, a detailed understanding of the metabolic processes during the steps of hydrolysis and acidogenesis is required to improve process control strategies. The fermentation products formed during the acidogenic fermentation of maize silage as a model substrate in a leach-bed process were determined by gas and liquid chromatography. The bacterial community dynamics was monitored by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. The community profiles were correlated with the process data using multivariate statistics. The batch process comprised three metabolic phases characterized by different fermentation products. The bacterial community dynamics correlated with the production of the respective metabolites. In phase 1, lactic and acetic acid fermentations dominated. Accordingly, bacteria of the genera Lactobacillus and Acetobacter were detected. In phase 2, the metabolic pathways shifted to butyric acid fermentation, accompanied by the production of hydrogen and carbon dioxide and a dominance of the genus Clostridium. In phase 3, phylotypes affiliated with Ruminococcaceae and Lachnospiraceae prevailed, accompanied by the formation of caproic and acetic acids, and a high gas production rate. A clostridial butyric type of fermentation was predominant in the acidogenic fermentation of maize silage, whereas propionic-type fermentation was marginal. As the metabolite composition resulting from acidogenesis affects the subsequent methanogenic performance, process control should focus on hydrolysis/acidogenesis when solid substrates are digested. (orig.)

  14. Molecular microbial and chemical investigation of the bioremediation of two-phase olive mill waste using laboratory-scale bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morillo, J A; Aguilera, M; Antízar-Ladislao, B; Fuentes, S; Ramos-Cormenzana, A; Russell, N J; Monteoliva-Sánchez, M

    2008-05-01

    Two-phase olive mill waste (TPOMW) is a semisolid effluent that is rich in contaminating polyphenols and is produced in large amounts by the industry of olive oil production. Laboratory-scale bioreactors were used to investigate the biodegradation of TPOMW by its indigenous microbiota. The effect of nutrient addition (inorganic N and P) and aeration of the bioreactors was studied. Microbial changes were investigated by PCR-temperature time gradient electrophoresis (TTGE) and following the dynamics of polar lipid fatty acids (PLFA). The greatest decrease in the polyphenolic and organic matter contents of bioreactors was concomitant with an increase in the PLFA fungal/bacterial ratio. Amplicon sequences of nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) and 16S rDNA allowed identification of fungal and bacterial types, respectively, by comparative DNA sequence analyses. Predominant fungi identified included members of the genera Penicillium, Candida, Geotrichum, Pichia, Cladosporium, and Aschochyta. A total of 14 bacterial genera were detected, with a dominance of organisms that have previously been associated with plant material. Overall, this work highlights that indigenous microbiota within the bioreactors through stimulation of the fungal fraction, is able to degrade the polyphenolic content without the inoculation of specific microorganisms.

  15. Investigation of Fat Metabolism during Antiobesity Interventions by Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arunima Pola

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The focus of current treatments for obesity is to reduce the body weight or visceral fat, which requires longer duration to show effect. In this study, we investigated the short-term changes in fat metabolism in liver, abdomen, and skeletal muscle during antiobesity interventions including Sibutramine treatment and diet restriction in obese rats using magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and blood chemistry. Sibutramine is an antiobesity drug that results in weight loss by increasing satiety and energy expenditure. The Sibutramine-treated rats showed reduction of liver fat and intramyocellular lipids on day 3. The triglycerides (TG decreased on day 1 and 3 compared to baseline (day 0. The early response/nonresponse in different fat depots will permit optimization of treatment for better clinical outcome rather than staying with a drug for longer periods.

  16. Investigation of 18F-2-deoxyglucose for the measure of myocardial glucose metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phelps, M.E.; Hoffman, E.J.; Selin, C.; Huang, S.C.; Robinson, G.; MacDonald, N.; Schelbert, H.R.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1977-01-01

    18 F labeled 2-deoxyglucose ( 18 FDG) was studied as a glucose analog. Myocardial uptake and retention, blood clearance, species (dog, monkey, man) dependence and effect of diet on uptake were investigated. Normal myocardial uptake of 18 FDG was 3 to 4% in dog and monkey and 1 to 4% of injected dose in man compared to brain uptake of 2% in dog, 5 to 6% in monkey and 4 to 8% in man. The metabolic rate (MR) for glucose in non-fasting (glycolytic state) was 2.8 times greater than in fasting (ketogenic state). Human subjects showed higher myocardial uptake after a normal meal than after meal containing mostly free fatty acids (FFA). Blood clearance was rapid with initial clearance t 1 / 2 of 0.2 to 0.3 min followed by a t 1 / 2 of 8.4 +- 1.2 min in dog and 11.6 +- 1.1 min in man. A small third component had a t 1 / 2 of 59 +- 10 min and 88 +- 4 min in dog and man, respectively. High image contrast ratios between heart and blood (dog 3.5/1; man 14/1), heart and lung (dog 9/1; man 20/1), heart and liver (dog 15/1; man 10/1) were found with the ECAT positron tomograph. 18 FDG was found to be rapidly taken up by the myocardium without any significant tissue clearance over a 4 hour period. 18 FDG is transported, phosphorylated to 18 FDG-6-PO 4 and trapped in myocardial cells in the same manner as has been found for brain and exhibits excellent imaging properties. Determination of glucose and FFA MR in vivo with ECT provides a method for investigation and assessment of changing aerobic and anaerobic metabolic rates in ischemic heart disease in man

  17. Investigation the effect of ionizing radiation on the level of microbial contamination and usefulness of selected raw materials and cosmetics of new generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migdal, W.; Owczarczyk, H.B.; Malec-Czechowska, K.

    1997-01-01

    The results of investigations the electron beam irradiation on the microbial contamination of selected new generation cosmetics and raw products used in cosmetic industry are reported. The radiation doses applied were not higher than 6.0 kGy. The levels of microbial contamination were determined in irradiated and non-irradiated samples by standard methods routinely used. The results obtained show that radiation can be successfully used for decontamination of cosmetics and some of their raw materials, without changing the quality and applicability of the product. (author)

  18. Investigation and visualization of internal flow through particle aggregates and microbial flocs using particle image velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Feng; Lam, Kit Ming; Li, Xiao-yan

    2013-05-01

    An advanced particle-tracking and flow-visualization technology, particle image velocimetry (PIV), was utilized to investigate the hydrodynamic properties of large aggregates in water. The laser-based PIV system was used together with a settling column to capture the streamlines around two types of aggregates: latex particle aggregates and activated sludge (AS) flocs. Both types of the aggregates were highly porous and fractal with fractal dimensions of 2.13±0.31 for the latex particle aggregates (1210-2144 μm) and 1.78±0.24 for the AS flocs (1265-3737 μm). The results show that PIV is a powerful flow visualization technique capable of determining flow field details at the micrometer scale around and through settling aggregates and flocs. The PIV streamlines provided direct experimental proof of internal flow through the aggregate interiors. According to the PIV images, fluid collection efficiency ranged from 0.052 to 0.174 for the latex particle aggregates and from 0.008 to 0.126 for AS flocs. AS flocs are apparently less permeable than the particle aggregates, probably due to the extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) produced by bacteria clogging the pores within the flocs. The internal permeation of fractal aggregates and bio-flocs would enhance flocculation between particles and material transport into the aggregates. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Dynamic investigation of nutrient consumption and injection strategy in microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) by means of large-scale experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhiyong; Zhu, Weiyao; Sun, Gangzheng; Blanckaert, Koen

    2015-08-01

    Microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) depends on the in situ microbial activity to release trapped oil in reservoirs. In practice, undesired consumption is a universal phenomenon but cannot be observed effectively in small-scale physical simulations due to the scale effect. The present paper investigates the dynamics of oil recovery, biomass and nutrient consumption in a series of flooding experiments in a dedicated large-scale sand-pack column. First, control experiments of nutrient transportation with and without microbial consumption were conducted, which characterized the nutrient loss during transportation. Then, a standard microbial flooding experiment was performed recovering additional oil (4.9 % Original Oil in Place, OOIP), during which microbial activity mostly occurred upstream, where oil saturation declined earlier and steeper than downstream in the column. Subsequently, more oil remained downstream due to nutrient shortage. Finally, further research was conducted to enhance the ultimate recovery by optimizing the injection strategy. An extra 3.5 % OOIP was recovered when the nutrients were injected in the middle of the column, and another additional 11.9 % OOIP were recovered by altering the timing of nutrient injection.

  20. Effective survival of immobilized Lactobacillus casei during ripening and heat treatment of probiotic dry-fermented sausages and investigation of the microbial dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidira, Marianthi; Karapetsas, Athanasios; Galanis, Alex; Kanellaki, Maria; Kourkoutas, Yiannis

    2014-02-01

    The aim was the assessment of immobilized Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393 on wheat in the production of probiotic dry-fermented sausages and the investigation of the microbial dynamics. For comparison, sausages containing either free L. casei ATCC 393 or no starter culture were also prepared. During ripening, the numbers of lactobacilli exceeded 7 log cfu/g, while a drastic decrease was observed in enterobacteria, staphylococci and pseudomonas counts. Microbial diversity was further studied applying a PCR-DGGE protocol. Members of Lactobacillus, Leuconostoc, Lactococcus, Carnobacterium, Brochothrix, Bacillus and Debaryomyces were the main microbial populations detected. Microbiological and strain-specific multiplex PCR analysis confirmed that the levels of L. casei ATCC 393 in the samples after 66 days of ripening were above the minimum concentration for conferring a probiotic effect (≥ 6 log cfu/g). However, after heat treatment, this strain was detected at the above levels, only in sausages containing immobilized cells. © 2013.

  1. Metaproteome analysis to determine the metabolically active part of a thermophilic microbial community producing biogas from agricultural biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanreich, Angelika; Heyer, Robert; Benndorf, Dirk; Rapp, Erdmann; Pioch, Markus; Reichl, Udo; Klocke, Michael

    2012-07-01

    Complex consortia of microorganisms are responsible for biogas production. A lot of information about the taxonomic structure and enzymatic potential of such communities has been collected by a variety of gene-based approaches, yet little is known about which of all the assumable metabolic pathways are active throughout the process of biogas formation. To tackle this problem, we established a protocol for the metaproteomic analysis of samples taken from biogas reactors fed with agricultural biomass. In contrast to previous studies where an anaerobic digester was fed with synthetic wastewater, the complex matrix in this study required the extraction of proteins with liquid phenol and the application of paper bridge loading for 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Proteins were subjected to nanoHPLC (high-performance liquid chromatography) coupled to tandem mass spectrometry for characterization. Several housekeeping proteins as well as methanogenesis-related enzymes were identified by a MASCOT search and de novo sequencing, which proved the feasibility of our approach. The establishment of such an approach is the basis for further metaproteomic studies of biogas-producing communities. In particular, the apparent status of metabolic activities within the communities can be monitored. The knowledge collected from such experiments could lead to further improvements of biogas production.

  2. Sensitive and substrate-specific detection of metabolically active microorganisms in natural microbial consortia using community isotope arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourlousse, Dieter M; Kurisu, Futoshi; Tobino, Tomohiro; Furumai, Hiroaki

    2013-05-01

    The goal of this study was to develop and validate a novel fosmid-clone-based metagenome isotope array approach - termed the community isotope array (CIArray) - for sensitive detection and identification of microorganisms assimilating a radiolabeled substrate within complex microbial communities. More specifically, a sample-specific CIArray was used to identify anoxic phenol-degrading microorganisms in activated sludge treating synthetic coke-oven wastewater in a single-sludge predenitrification-nitrification process. Hybridization of the CIArray with DNA from the (14) C-phenol-amended sample indicated that bacteria assimilating (14) C-atoms, presumably directly from phenol, under nitrate-reducing conditions were abundant in the reactor, and taxonomic assignment of the fosmid clone end sequences suggested that they belonged to the Gammaproteobacteria. The specificity of the CIArray was validated by quantification of fosmid-clone-specific DNA in density-resolved DNA fractions from samples incubated with (13) C-phenol, which verified that all CIArray-positive probes stemmed from microorganisms that assimilated isotopically labeled carbon. This also demonstrated that the CIArray was more sensitive than DNA-SIP, as the former enabled positive detection at a phenol concentration that failed to yield a 'heavy' DNA fraction. Finally, two operational taxonomic units distantly related to marine Gammaproteobacteria were identified to account for more than half of 16S rRNA gene clones in the 'heavy' DNA library, corroborating the CIArray-based identification. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Evolution of microbial activity in a mediterranean ecosystem submitted to chronic gamma irradiation. Investigation of nitrogen transfer with isotopic tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castet, R.

    1987-07-01

    A mediterranean ecosystem located on the site of Cadarache (France) has been experimentally by irradiated over the past fifteen years. The potential effects of ionizing radiations for different doses of its ecological system has been studied. The objective of the work was to demonstrate the level of soil microbial population and its activity. Chronic exposures reduced the biomass and the dehydrogenase activity by a factor of 50% and increased the amount of nitrate in the soil. To measure the direct impact of irradiations on soil microorganisms, we have irradiated soil sample in laboratory at 0.1; 0.5; 1 kGy, and observed its evolution during a period of six weeks thereafter. We have a reduction of the dehydrogenase activity and an increase of nitrate being proportionaly to the dose delivered. Using nitrogen labelled, we state that this high rate of nitrate production is due to an inhibition of the organization of this form of nitrogen. Conversely, the ammonification and the nitrification are not affected. Also, for anaerobic conditions created by glucose, the nitrate labelled (15N) permitted us to show that in untreated soil, 45% of nitrate was reduced to nitrogen gas by denitrification and 24% of nitrate was reduced to ammonium by dissimilation in the irradiated soil. These experiments show that gamma irradiations are of great interest for studying soil microorganisms. As of now, very little is known on the effects of this kind of stress for attention and need to be pursued on such ecosystems. Further investigations call [fr

  4. Investigating the effect of aqueous extracts of basil and savory on antioxidant activity, microbial and sensory properties of probiotic yogurt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosiyani, Zohreh Ghaleh; Pourahmad, Rezvan; Eshaghi, Mohammad Reza

    2017-01-01

    The low viability of probiotics causes the short shelf life of fermented products. Therefore compounds which prolong the viability of probiotic bacteria can increase or at least maintain the health- benefiting properties of these products. On the other hand, the addition of antioxidants is one of the methods to increase the shelf life of food products which has recently become more prevalent. In this respect, herbal extracts which are a good source of antioxidants can be appropriate alternative. The aim of this study was  to evaluate the effect of adding basil and savory extracts on antioxidant activity, and on the microbial and organoleptic characteristics of probiotic yogurt. The effect of adding basil extract (8% and 10%) and savory extract (6% and 8%) separately to low fat yogurt (1.5% fat) containing Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei was investigated. The samples were stored at 4°C. The viability of Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei, antioxidant activ- ity and sensory properties of probiotic yogurt were evaluated on the 1st, 7th, 14th and 21st days. Basil and savory extracts significantly increased the viability of probiotic bacteria (p 0.05). During storage, there was no significant difference between the organoleptic scores of the samples (p > 0.05), but the taste score did increase significantly (p yogurt.

  5. Investigation on Abnormal Iron Metabolism and Related Inflammation in Parkinson Disease Patients with Probable RBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yang; Yu, Shu-Yang; Zuo, Li-Jun; Piao, Ying-Shan; Cao, Chen-Jie; Wang, Fang; Chen, Ze-Jie; Du, Yang; Lian, Teng-Hong; Liu, Gai-Fen; Wang, Ya-Jie; Chan, Piu; Chen, Sheng-Di; Wang, Xiao-Min; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate potential mechanisms involving abnormal iron metabolism and related inflammation in Parkinson disease (PD) patients with probable rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (PRBD). Methods Total 210 PD patients and 31 controls were consecutively recruited. PD patients were evaluated by RBD Screening Questionnaire (RBDSQ) and classified into PRBD and probable no RBD (NPRBD) groups. Demographics information were recorded and clinical symptoms were evaluated by series of rating scales. Levels of iron and related proteins and inflammatory factors in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum were detected. Comparisons among control, NPRBD and PRBD groups and correlation analyses between RBDSQ score and levels of above factors were performed. Results (1)The frequency of PRBD in PD patients is 31.90%. (2)PRBD group has longer disease duration, more advanced disease stage, severer motor symptoms and more non-motor symptoms than NPRBD group. (3)In CSF, levels of iron, transferrin, NO and IL–1β in PRBD group are prominently increased. RBDSQ score is positively correlated with the levels of iron, transferrin, NO and IL–1β in PD group. Iron level is positively correlated with the levels of NO and IL–1β in PD group. (4)In serum, transferrin level is prominently decreased in PRBD group. PGE2 level in PRBD group is drastically enhanced. RBDSQ score exhibits a positive correlation with PGE2 level in PD group. Conclusions PRBD is common in PD patients. PRBD group has severer motor symptoms and more non-motor symptoms. Excessive iron in brain resulted from abnormal iron metabolism in central and peripheral systems is correlated with PRBD through neuroinflammation. PMID:26431210

  6. Investigating the effects of statins on cellular lipid metabolism using a yeast expression system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Leszczynska

    Full Text Available In humans, defects in lipid metabolism are associated with a number of severe diseases such as atherosclerosis, obesity and type II diabetes. Hypercholesterolemia is a primary risk factor for coronary artery disease, the major cause of premature deaths in developed countries. Statins are inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR, the key enzyme of the sterol synthesis pathway. Since yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae harbours many counterparts of mammalian enzymes involved in lipid-synthesizing pathways, conclusions drawn from research with this single cell eukaryotic organism can be readily applied to higher eukaryotes. Using a yeast strain with deletions of both HMG1 and HMG2 genes (i.e. completely devoid of HMGR activity with introduced wild-type or mutant form of human HMGR (hHMGR gene we investigated the effects of statins on the lipid metabolism of the cell. The relative quantification of mRNA demonstrated a different effect of simvastatin on the expression of the wild-type and mutated hHMGR gene. GC/MS analyses showed a significant decrease of sterols and enhanced conversion of squalene and sterol precursors into ergosterol. This was accompanied by the mobilization of ergosterol precursors localized in lipid particles in the form of steryl esters visualized by confocal microscopy. Changes in the level of ergosterol and its precursors in cells treated with simvastatin depend on the mutation in the hHMGR gene. HPLC/MS analyses indicated a reduced level of phospholipids not connected with the mevalonic acid pathway. We detected two significant phenomena. First, cells treated with simvastatin develop an adaptive response compensating the lower activity of HMGR. This includes enhanced conversion of sterol precursors into ergosterol, mobilization of steryl esters and increased expression of the hHMGR gene. Second, statins cause a substantial drop in the level of glycerophospholipids.

  7. Methanosarcina Play an Important Role in Anaerobic Co-Digestion of the Seaweed Ulva lactuca: Taxonomy and Predicted Metabolism of Functional Microbial Communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie A FitzGerald

    Full Text Available Macro-algae represent an ideal resource of third generation biofuels, but their use necessitates a refinement of commonly used anaerobic digestion processes. In a previous study, contrasting mixes of dairy slurry and the macro-alga Ulva lactuca were anaerobically digested in mesophilic continuously stirred tank reactors for 40 weeks. Higher proportions of U. lactuca in the feedstock led to inhibited digestion and rapid accumulation of volatile fatty acids, requiring a reduced organic loading rate. In this study, 16S pyrosequencing was employed to characterise the microbial communities of both the weakest (R1 and strongest (R6 performing reactors from the previous work as they developed over a 39 and 27-week period respectively. Comparing the reactor communities revealed clear differences in taxonomy, predicted metabolic orientation and mechanisms of inhibition, while constrained canonical analysis (CCA showed ammonia and biogas yield to be the strongest factors differentiating the two reactor communities. Significant biomarker taxa and predicted metabolic activities were identified for viable and failing anaerobic digestion of U. lactuca. Acetoclastic methanogens were inhibited early in R1 operation, followed by a gradual decline of hydrogenotrophic methanogens. Near-total loss of methanogens led to an accumulation of acetic acid that reduced performance of R1, while a slow decline in biogas yield in R6 could be attributed to inhibition of acetogenic rather than methanogenic activity. The improved performance of R6 is likely to have been as a result of the large Methanosarcina population, which enabled rapid removal of acetic acid, providing favourable conditions for substrate degradation.

  8. Methanosarcina Play an Important Role in Anaerobic Co-Digestion of the Seaweed Ulva lactuca: Taxonomy and Predicted Metabolism of Functional Microbial Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzGerald, Jamie A; Allen, Eoin; Wall, David M; Jackson, Stephen A; Murphy, Jerry D; Dobson, Alan D W

    2015-01-01

    Macro-algae represent an ideal resource of third generation biofuels, but their use necessitates a refinement of commonly used anaerobic digestion processes. In a previous study, contrasting mixes of dairy slurry and the macro-alga Ulva lactuca were anaerobically digested in mesophilic continuously stirred tank reactors for 40 weeks. Higher proportions of U. lactuca in the feedstock led to inhibited digestion and rapid accumulation of volatile fatty acids, requiring a reduced organic loading rate. In this study, 16S pyrosequencing was employed to characterise the microbial communities of both the weakest (R1) and strongest (R6) performing reactors from the previous work as they developed over a 39 and 27-week period respectively. Comparing the reactor communities revealed clear differences in taxonomy, predicted metabolic orientation and mechanisms of inhibition, while constrained canonical analysis (CCA) showed ammonia and biogas yield to be the strongest factors differentiating the two reactor communities. Significant biomarker taxa and predicted metabolic activities were identified for viable and failing anaerobic digestion of U. lactuca. Acetoclastic methanogens were inhibited early in R1 operation, followed by a gradual decline of hydrogenotrophic methanogens. Near-total loss of methanogens led to an accumulation of acetic acid that reduced performance of R1, while a slow decline in biogas yield in R6 could be attributed to inhibition of acetogenic rather than methanogenic activity. The improved performance of R6 is likely to have been as a result of the large Methanosarcina population, which enabled rapid removal of acetic acid, providing favourable conditions for substrate degradation.

  9. Genome resolved analysis of a premature infant gut microbial community reveals a Varibaculum cambriense genome and a shift towards fermentation-based metabolism during the third week of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Christopher T; Sharon, Itai; Thomas, Brian C; Castelle, Cindy J; Morowitz, Michael J; Banfield, Jillian F

    2013-12-17

    The premature infant gut has low individual but high inter-individual microbial diversity compared with adults. Based on prior 16S rRNA gene surveys, many species from this environment are expected to be similar to those previously detected in the human microbiota. However, the level of genomic novelty and metabolic variation of strains found in the infant gut remains relatively unexplored. To study the stability and function of early microbial colonizers of the premature infant gut, nine stool samples were taken during the third week of life of a premature male infant delivered via Caesarean section. Metagenomic sequences were assembled and binned into near-complete and partial genomes, enabling strain-level genomic analysis of the microbial community.We reconstructed eleven near-complete and six partial bacterial genomes representative of the key members of the microbial community. Twelve of these genomes share >90% putative ortholog amino acid identity with reference genomes. Manual curation of the assembly of one particularly novel genome resulted in the first essentially complete genome sequence (in three pieces, the order of which could not be determined due to a repeat) for Varibaculum cambriense (strain Dora), a medically relevant species that has been implicated in abscess formation.During the period studied, the microbial community undergoes a compositional shift, in which obligate anaerobes (fermenters) overtake Escherichia coli as the most abundant species. Other species remain stable, probably due to their ability to either respire anaerobically or grow by fermentation, and their capacity to tolerate fluctuating levels of oxygen. Metabolic predictions for V. cambriense suggest that, like other members of the microbial community, this organism is able to process various sugar substrates and make use of multiple different electron acceptors during anaerobic respiration. Genome comparisons within the family Actinomycetaceae reveal important differences

  10. Effect of nanosilver on metabolism in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss): An investigation using different respirometric approches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murray, Laura; Rennie, Michael D.; Svendsen, Jon Christian

    2017-01-01

    Nanosilver (nAg) has been incorporated into many consumer products, including clothing and washing machines, because of its antimicrobial properties. Consequently, the potential for its release into aquatic environments is of significant concern. Documented toxic effects on fish include altered.......60 ± 5.13 μg/L) for 28 d, after which their standard metabolic rate (SMR), forced maximum metabolic rate (MMRf), and spontaneous maximum metabolic rate (MMRs) were measured. There was no effect observed in SMR, MMRf, or MMRs, suggesting that nAg is unlikely to directly affect fish metabolism. On average...

  11. Involvement of gut microbial fermentation in the metabolic alterations occurring in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids-depleted mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carpentier Yvon A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backround Western diet is characterized by an insufficient n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA consumption which is known to promote the pathogenesis of several diseases. We have previously observed that mice fed with a diet poor in n-3 PUFA for two generations exhibit hepatic steatosis together with a decrease in body weight. The gut microbiota contributes to the regulation of host energy metabolism, due to symbiotic relationship with fermentable nutrients provided in the diet. In this study, we have tested the hypothesis that perturbations of the gut microbiota contribute to the metabolic alterations occurring in mice fed a diet poor in n-3 PUFA for two generations (n-3/- mice. Methods C57Bl/6J mice fed with a control or an n-3 PUFA depleted diet for two generations were supplemented with prebiotic (inulin-type Fructooligosaccharides, FOS, 0.20 g/day/mice during 24 days. Results n-3/-mice exhibited a marked drop in caecum weight, a decrease in lactobacilli and an increase in bifidobacteria in the caecal content as compared to control mice (n-3/+ mice. Dietary supplementation with FOS for 24 days was sufficient to increase caecal weight and bifidobacteria count in both n-3/+ and n-3/-mice. Moreover, FOS increased lactobacilli content in n-3/-mice, whereas it decreased their level in n-3/+ mice. Interestingly, FOS treatment promoted body weight gain in n-3/-mice by increasing energy efficiency. In addition, FOS treatment decreased fasting glycemia and lowered the higher expression of key factors involved in the fatty acid catabolism observed in the liver of n-3/-mice, without lessening steatosis. Conclusions the changes in the gut microbiota composition induced by FOS are different depending on the type of diet. We show that FOS may promote lactobacilli and counteract the catabolic status induced by n-3 PUFA depletion in mice, thereby contributing to restore efficient fat storage.

  12. Novel mode of microbial energy metabolism: organic carbon oxidation coupled to dissimilatory reduction of iron or manganese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovley, D R; Phillips, E J

    1988-06-01

    A dissimilatory Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-reducing microorganism was isolated from freshwater sediments of the Potomac River, Maryland. The isolate, designated GS-15, grew in defined anaerobic medium with acetate as the sole electron donor and Fe(III), Mn(IV), or nitrate as the sole electron acceptor. GS-15 oxidized acetate to carbon dioxide with the concomitant reduction of amorphic Fe(III) oxide to magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)). When Fe(III) citrate replaced amorphic Fe(III) oxide as the electron acceptor, GS-15 grew faster and reduced all of the added Fe(III) to Fe(II). GS-15 reduced a natural amorphic Fe(III) oxide but did not significantly reduce highly crystalline Fe(III) forms. Fe(III) was reduced optimally at pH 6.7 to 7 and at 30 to 35 degrees C. Ethanol, butyrate, and propionate could also serve as electron donors for Fe(III) reduction. A variety of other organic compounds and hydrogen could not. MnO(2) was completely reduced to Mn(II), which precipitated as rhodochrosite (MnCO(3)). Nitrate was reduced to ammonia. Oxygen could not serve as an electron acceptor, and it inhibited growth with the other electron acceptors. This is the first demonstration that microorganisms can completely oxidize organic compounds with Fe(III) or Mn(IV) as the sole electron acceptor and that oxidation of organic matter coupled to dissimilatory Fe(III) or Mn(IV) reduction can yield energy for microbial growth. GS-15 provides a model for how enzymatically catalyzed reactions can be quantitatively significant mechanisms for the reduction of iron and manganese in anaerobic environments.

  13. Inbreeding effects on standard metabolic rate investigated at cold, benign and hot temperatures in Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Palle; Overgaard, Johannes; Loeschcke, Volker

    2014-01-01

    in replicated lines of inbred and outbred Drosophila melanogaster at stressful low, benign and stressful high temperatures. The lowest measurements of metabolic rate in our study are always associated with the low activity period of the diurnal cycle and these measurements therefore serve as good estimates...... of standard metabolic rate. Due to the potentially added costs of genetic stress in inbred lines we hypothesized that inbred individuals have increased metabolic rate compared to outbred controls and that this is more pronounced at stressful temperatures due to synergistic inbreeding by environment...... interactions. Contrary to our hypothesis we found no significant difference in metabolic rate between inbred and outbred lines and no interaction between inbreeding and temperature. Inbreeding however effected the variance; the variance in metabolic rate was higher between the inbred lines compared...

  14. Investigation of the metabolism of ergot alkaloids in cell culture by fourier transformation mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulac, Dennis; Grote, Anna-Karina; Kleigrewe, Karin; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich

    2011-07-27

    Ergot alkaloids are known toxic secondary metabolites of the fungus Claviceps purpurea occurring in various grains, especially rye products. The liver is responsible for converting the ergot alkaloids into metabolites; however, the toxic impact of these end products of metabolism is still unknown. The aim of this study was to analyze the metabolism of ergot alkaloids in colon and liver cell lines (HT-29, HepG2), as well as in human primary renal cells (RPTEC). It was shown that cells in vitro are able to metabolize ergot alkaloids, forming a variety of metabolic compounds. Significant differences between the used cell types could be identified, and a suitable model system was established using HT-29 cells, performing an intensive metabolism to hydroxylated metabolites. The formed substances were analyzed by coupling of high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and Fourier transformation mass spectrometry (HPLC-FLD-FTMS) as a powerful tool to identify known and unknown metabolites.

  15. Prospective randomized investigation for evaluation of postoperative changes in the microbial climate of paranasal mucosa by the use of different dissoluting techniques during postoperative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maune, S; Johannssen, V; Sahly, H; Werner, J A; Salhy, H

    1999-09-01

    Endonasal dissolution by the use of NaCl-solution is a common postoperative treatment of the nasal mucosa after endonasal surgery. These procedure involve for example endonasal shower and sterilized solutions. The contamination of nasal shower in case of unprofessional cleaning after treatment was an argument against this technique in earlier discussions. The danger of such an infection should be avoided by the use of sterilized solution. Therefore the dependence of nasal microbial climate on different nasal dissoluting techniques was investigated by the use of such named endonasal shower (Siemens und Co, Bad Ems, Germany) in comparison with sterilized solution (Rhinomer, Zyma SA, Nyon, France). Microbial cultures were investigated of 80 patients after endonasal surgery (53 m, 27 f; 31 +/- 21 age). Surgery was done for the treatment of chronic polypous sinusitis. Pre-, intra- and postoperative samples were taken in 640 cases to proceed microbial cultures. Material was transferred with the use of a Port-A-Cul-transport medium and preparation of the microbial cultures was done during the first four hours. As a result 895 bacterial clones were cultivated. These consisted of 87% aerob and 13% anaerob bacteria. Staphylococcus aureus (39%) and members of the family of Enterobactericae (30%) were the most common microbes. There was neither an evidence for postoperative microbes on the nasal mucosa nor a correlation between the dissoluting technique and the postoperative outcome. The use of sterilized solutions for the postoperative care of endonasal mucosa does not cause an additional worthful effect on neither the postoperative microbial climate nor the outcome in comparison to endonasal shower.

  16. Something new from something old? Fracking stimulated microbial processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrighton, K. C.; Daly, R. A.; Hoyt, D.; Trexler, R.; McRae, J.; Wilkins, M.; Mouser, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing, colloquially known as "fracking", is employed for effective gas and oil recovery in deep shales. This process injects organisms and liquids from the surface into the deep subsurface (~2500 m), exposing microorganisms to high pressures, elevated temperatures, chemical additives, and brine-level salinities. Here we use assembly-based metagenomics to create a metabolic blueprint from an energy-producing Marcellus shale well over a 328-day period. Using this approach we ask the question: What abiotic and biotic factors drive microbial metabolism and thus biogeochemical cycling during natural gas extraction? We found that after 49 days, increased salinity in produced waters corresponded to a shift in the microbial community, with only organisms that encode salinity adaptations detected. We posit that organic compatible solutes, produced by organisms adapting to increased salinity, fuels a methylamine-driven ecosystem in fractured shale. This metabolic network ultimately results in biogenic methane production from members of Methanohalophilus and Methanolobus. Proton NMR validated these genomic hypotheses, with mono-methylamine being highest in the input material, but detected throughout the sampling. Beyond abiotic constraints, our genomic investigations revealed that viruses can be linked to key members of the microbial community, potentially releasing methylamine osmoprotectants and impacting bacterial strain variation. Collectively our results indicate that adaptation to high salinity, metabolism in the absence of oxidized electron acceptors, and viral predation are controlling factors mediating microbial community metabolism during hydraulic fracturing of the deep subsurface.

  17. Investigating genotype-phenotype relationships in Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolic network through stoichiometric modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brochado, Ana Rita

    processes. Metabolism is an extensively studied and characterised subcellular system, for which several modeling approaches have been proposed over the last 20 years. Nowadays, stoichiometric modeling of metabolism is done at the genome scale and it has diverse applications, many of them for helping....... This chapter aims at providing the reader with relevant state-of-the-art information concerning Systems Biology, Genome-Scale Metabolic Modeling and Metabolic Engineering. Particular attention is given to the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the eukaryotic model organism used thought the thesis.......A holistic view of the cell is fundamental for gaining insights into genotype to phenotype relationships. Systems Biology is a discipline within Biology, which uses such holistic approach by focusing on the development and application of tools for studying the structure and dynamics of cellular...

  18. Social jetlag, obesity and metabolic disorder: investigation in a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, M J; Moffitt, T E; Gregory, A M; Goldman-Mellor, S; Nolan, P M; Poulton, R; Caspi, A

    2015-05-01

    Obesity is one of the leading causes of preventable death worldwide. Circadian rhythms are known to control both sleep timing and energy homeostasis, and disruptions in circadian rhythms have been linked with metabolic dysfunction and obesity-associated disease. In previous research, social jetlag, a measure of chronic circadian disruption caused by the discrepancy between our internal versus social clocks, was associated with elevated self-reported body mass index, possibly indicative of a more generalized association with obesity and metabolic dysfunction. We studied participants from the population-representative Dunedin Longitudinal Study (N=1037) to determine whether social jetlag was associated with clinically assessed measurements of metabolic phenotypes and disease indicators for obesity-related disease, specifically, indicators of inflammation and diabetes. Our analysis was restricted to N=815 non-shift workers in our cohort. Among these participants, we found that social jetlag was associated with numerous clinically assessed measures of metabolic dysfunction and obesity. We distinguished between obese individuals who were metabolically healthy versus unhealthy, and found higher social jetlag levels in metabolically unhealthy obese individuals. Among metabolically unhealthy obese individuals, social jetlag was additionally associated with elevated glycated hemoglobin and an indicator of inflammation. The findings are consistent with the possibility that 'living against our internal clock' may contribute to metabolic dysfunction and its consequences. Further research aimed at understanding that the physiology and social features of social jetlag may inform obesity prevention and have ramifications for policies and practices that contribute to increased social jetlag, such as work schedules and daylight savings time.

  19. Investigation of the Relationship Between Molluscum Pendulum and Impairment of Carbohydrate Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Kemal

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: High blood sugar level, insulin resistance and dyslipidemia are accepted to be indicators of impaired carbohydrate metabolism. The potential role of these markers as well as the serum levels of insulin growth factor (IGF-1 and insulin growth factor binding protein (IGFBP-3 in the pathogenesis of molluscum pendulum were investigated in this study. Materials and methods: Forty-five molluscum pendulum patients and 45 age-, sex- and body mass index-matched healthy individuals as controls were enrolled in the study. Evaluation included dermatological examination, measurement of insulin resistance using HOMA-IR method, lipid profile, fasting blood glucose, postprandial blood glucose, fasting insulin, postprandial insulin, serum IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 levels. Results: Postprandial blood glucose, fasting insulin, postprandial insulin and Homeostazis Model Assesment (HOMA-IR levels of molluscum pendulum patients were statistically higher than those of controls (p=0.037, p=0.027, p=0.03, p=0.021 respectively, whereas serum IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 levels were significantly lower than those of controls (p=0.008, p=0.001. There was no difference in fasting glucose and lipid profile between the two groups. Three patients (6.7% had DM and one patient (13.3% had impaired glucose tolerance. Only one participant from the control group (2,2% had impaired glucose tolerance. The number of molluscum pendulum lesions correlated with fasting glucose, postprandial glucose, fasting insulin, postprandial insulin, HOMA-IR, total cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Conclusion: Molluscum pendulum patients should have blood glucose and insulin resistance measurements done and be followed up for DM. Patients with multiple lesions need to be evaluated for lipid problems. We suggest that serum IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 levels have no role in the pathogenesis of molluscum pendulum. (Turk­derm 2011; 45: 188-92

  20. Investigation of the microbial metabolism of carbon dioxide and hydrogen in the kangaroo foregut by stable isotope probing

    OpenAIRE

    Godwin, Scott; Kang, Alicia; Gulino, Lisa-Maree; Manefield, Mike; Gutierrez-Zamora, Maria-Luisa; Kienzle, Marco; Ouwerkerk, Diane; Dawson, Kerri; Klieve, Athol V

    2014-01-01

    Kangaroos ferment forage material in an enlarged forestomach analogous to the rumen, but in contrast to ruminants, they produce little or no methane. The objective of this study was to identify the dominant organisms and pathways involved in hydrogenotrophy in the kangaroo forestomach, with the broader aim of understanding how these processes are able to predominate over methanogenesis. Stable isotope analysis of fermentation end products and RNA stable isotope probing (RNA-SIP) were used to ...

  1. Effect of forage conservation method on ruminal lipid metabolism and microbial ecology in lactating cows fed diets containing a 60:40 forage-to-concentrate ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halmemies-Beauchet-Filleau, A; Kairenius, P; Ahvenjärvi, S; Crosley, L K; Muetzel, S; Huhtanen, P; Vanhatalo, A; Toivonen, V; Wallace, R J; Shingfield, K J

    2013-04-01

    The effect of forage conservation method on ruminal lipid metabolism and microbial ecology was examined in 2 complementary experiments in cows. Treatments comprised fresh chopped grass, barn-dried hay, or untreated (UTS) or formic acid-treated silage (FAS) prepared from the same grass sward. Preparation of conserved forages coincided with the collection of samples from cows offered fresh grass. In the first experiment, 5 multiparous Finnish Ayrshire cows (229 d in milk) were used to compare the effects of feeding diets based on grass followed by hay during 2 consecutive 14-d periods separated by a 5-d transition during which extensively wilted grass was fed. In the second experiment, 5 multiparous Finnish Ayrshire cows (53 d in milk) were assigned to 1 of 2 blocks and allocated treatments according to a replicated 3×3 Latin square design with 14-d periods to compare the effects of hay, UTS, and FAS. Cows received 7 or 9 kg/d of the same concentrate in experiments 1 and 2, respectively. Conservation of grass by drying, but not ensiling, decreased forage fatty acid content primarily due to losses of 18:2n-6 and 18:3n-3. Compared with grass, feeding hay had no effect on dry matter intake (DMI), rumen pH, or fermentation characteristics, other than increasing ammonia content, but lowered whole-tract organic matter and fiber digestibility (experiment 1). Relative to hay, silage increased DMI, rumen volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentrations, and molar proportions of butyrate, and decreased molar acetate proportions (experiment 2). Compared with UTS, FAS increased DMI, had no effect on rumen ammonia or VFA concentrations, but tended to lower rumen pH and the molar ratio of lipogenic to glucogenic VFA. Conservation method had no substantial effect on ruminal or whole-tract digestibility coefficients. Compared with fresh grass and silages, hay decreased lipolysis and biohydrogenation (BH) of dietary unsaturates in the rumen, resulting in similar flows of 18:2n-6 and 18:3n-3

  2. MICROBIAL MATS - A JOINT VENTURE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANGEMERDEN, H

    Microbial mats characteristically are dominated by a few functional groups of microbes: cyanobacteria, colorless sulfur bacteria, purple sulfur bacteria, and sulfate-reducing bacteria. Their combined metabolic activities result in steep environmental microgradients, particularly of oxygen and

  3. Effects of dietary resistant starch content on metabolic status, milk composition, and microbial profiling in lactating sows and on offspring performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, H; Lu, H; Almeida, V V; Ward, M G; Adeola, O; Nakatsu, C H; Ajuwon, K M

    2017-02-01

    In the present study, the effects of dietary resistant starch (RS) content on serum metabolite and hormone concentrations, milk composition, and faecal microbial profiling in lactating sows, as well as on offspring performance was investigated. Sixteen sows were randomly allotted at breeding to two treatments containing low- and high-RS contents from normal and high-amylose corn varieties, respectively, and each treatment had eight replicates (sows). Individual piglet body weight (BW) and litter size were recorded at birth and weaning. Milk samples were obtained on day 10 after farrowing for composition analysis. On day 2 before weaning, blood and faecal samples were collected to determine serum metabolite and hormone concentrations and faecal microbial populations, respectively. Litter size at birth and weaning were not influenced (p > 0.05) by the sow dietary treatments. Although feeding the RS-rich diet to sows reduced (p = 0.004) offspring birth BW, there was no difference in piglet BW at weaning (p > 0.05). High-RS diet increased (p content, and tended (p = 0.09) to increase milk fat content in lactating sows. Feeding the RS-rich diet to sows increased (p bacterial population diversity. These results indicate that high-RS diets induce fatty acid mobilization and a greater intestinal bacterial richness in lactating sows, as well as a greater nutrient density in maternal milk, without affecting offspring performance at weaning. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  4. Effect of nanosilver on metabolism in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss): An investigation using different respirometric approches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murray, Laura; Rennie, Michael D.; Svendsen, Jon Christian

    2017-01-01

    gene expression, gill damage, and impaired gas exchange, as well as mortality at high nAg concentrations. The present study reports the effects of nAg on the metabolism of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Fish were exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations (0.28 ± 0.02 μg/L) and higher (47.......60 ± 5.13 μg/L) for 28 d, after which their standard metabolic rate (SMR), forced maximum metabolic rate (MMRf), and spontaneous maximum metabolic rate (MMRs) were measured. There was no effect observed in SMR, MMRf, or MMRs, suggesting that nAg is unlikely to directly affect fish metabolism. On average......, MMRs tended to be greater than MMRf, and most MMRs occurred when room lighting increased. The timing of MMRf chase protocols was found to affect both MMRf and SMR estimates, in that chasing fish before respirometric experiments caused higher MMRf estimates and lower SMR estimates. Although compounded...

  5. Investigating tumor perfusion and metabolism using multiple hyperpolarized 13C compounds: HP001, pyruvate and urea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Morze, Cornelius; Larson, Peder E.Z.; Hu, Simon

    2012-01-01

    The metabolically inactive hyperpolarized agents HP001 (bis-1,1-(hydroxymethyl)-[1-13C]cyclopropane-d8) and urea enable a new type of perfusion magnetic resonance imaging based on a direct signal source that is background-free. The addition of perfusion information to metabolic information obtained...... (T1=95 s ex vivo, 32 s in vivo at 3 T) using a pulse sequence with balanced steady-state free precession and ramped flip angle over time for efficient utilization of the hyperpolarized magnetization and three-dimensional echo-planar spectroscopic imaging of urea copolarized with [1-13C...... of separate dynamic HP001 imaging and copolarized pyruvate/urea imaging were compared. A strong and significant correlation (R=0.73, P=.02) detected between the urea and HP001 data confirmed the value of copolarizing urea with pyruvate for simultaneous assessment of perfusion and metabolism....

  6. Genetic Investigation of Tricarboxylic Acid Metabolism during the Plasmodium falciparum Life Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hangjun Ke

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available New antimalarial drugs are urgently needed to control drug-resistant forms of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Mitochondrial electron transport is the target of both existing and new antimalarials. Herein, we describe 11 genetic knockout (KO lines that delete six of the eight mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle enzymes. Although all TCA KOs grew normally in asexual blood stages, these metabolic deficiencies halted life-cycle progression in later stages. Specifically, aconitase KO parasites arrested as late gametocytes, whereas α-ketoglutarate-dehydrogenase-deficient parasites failed to develop oocysts in the mosquitoes. Mass spectrometry analysis of 13C-isotope-labeled TCA mutant parasites showed that P. falciparum has significant flexibility in TCA metabolism. This flexibility manifested itself through changes in pathway fluxes and through altered exchange of substrates between cytosolic and mitochondrial pools. Our findings suggest that mitochondrial metabolic plasticity is essential for parasite development.

  7. Genetic investigation of tricarboxylic acid metabolism during the Plasmodium falciparum life cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Hangjun; Lewis, Ian A; Morrisey, Joanne M; McLean, Kyle J; Ganesan, Suresh M; Painter, Heather J; Mather, Michael W; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo; Llinás, Manuel; Vaidya, Akhil B

    2015-04-07

    New antimalarial drugs are urgently needed to control drug-resistant forms of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Mitochondrial electron transport is the target of both existing and new antimalarials. Herein, we describe 11 genetic knockout (KO) lines that delete six of the eight mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes. Although all TCA KOs grew normally in asexual blood stages, these metabolic deficiencies halted life-cycle progression in later stages. Specifically, aconitase KO parasites arrested as late gametocytes, whereas α-ketoglutarate-dehydrogenase-deficient parasites failed to develop oocysts in the mosquitoes. Mass spectrometry analysis of (13)C-isotope-labeled TCA mutant parasites showed that P. falciparum has significant flexibility in TCA metabolism. This flexibility manifested itself through changes in pathway fluxes and through altered exchange of substrates between cytosolic and mitochondrial pools. Our findings suggest that mitochondrial metabolic plasticity is essential for parasite development. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Investigation of cerebral metabolism by positron CT in Japanese following musical stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakasugi, Naotoshi

    1994-01-01

    Cerebral metabolic responses to Japanese and Western instrumental music were examined using 11 C-glucose and positron CT. Eight right-handed subjects were studied in both Japanese and Western music-stimulated states. Biaural musical stimulation with a Japanese instrument, the 'shakuhachi', produced diffuse metabolic changes in the left temporal lobe in all subjects. Biaural musical stimulation with a Western instrument, the 'violin', produced metabolic changes in the right temporal lobe in 3 subjects, changes in the left in 4, and changes on both sides in one. It was considered previously that all musical stimulation led to hypermetabolism in the right hemisphere of human beings. However, the present results indicated that Japanese music produced activation of the left hemisphere in Japanese. On the other hand, Western music produced right hemispheric hypermetabolism in Japanese with no emotion. The laterality of the hemisphere stimulated by Western music was apparently incidentally changed according to the state of mind the Japanese subjects. (author)

  9. Microbial ecology in the age of genomics and metagenomics: concepts, tools, and recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianping

    2006-06-01

    Microbial ecology examines the diversity and activity of micro-organisms in Earth's biosphere. In the last 20 years, the application of genomics tools have revolutionized microbial ecological studies and drastically expanded our view on the previously underappreciated microbial world. This review first introduces the basic concepts in microbial ecology and the main genomics methods that have been used to examine natural microbial populations and communities. In the ensuing three specific sections, the applications of the genomics in microbial ecological research are highlighted. The first describes the widespread application of multilocus sequence typing and representational difference analysis in studying genetic variation within microbial species. Such investigations have identified that migration, horizontal gene transfer and recombination are common in natural microbial populations and that microbial strains can be highly variable in genome size and gene content. The second section highlights and summarizes the use of four specific genomics methods (phylogenetic analysis of ribosomal RNA, DNA-DNA re-association kinetics, metagenomics, and micro-arrays) in analysing the diversity and potential activity of microbial populations and communities from a variety of terrestrial and aquatic environments. Such analyses have identified many unexpected phylogenetic lineages in viruses, bacteria, archaea, and microbial eukaryotes. Functional analyses of environmental DNA also revealed highly prevalent, but previously unknown, metabolic processes in natural microbial communities. In the third section, the ecological implications of sequenced microbial genomes are briefly discussed. Comparative analyses of prokaryotic genomic sequences suggest the importance of ecology in determining microbial genome size and gene content. The significant variability in genome size and gene content among strains and species of prokaryotes indicate the highly fluid nature of prokaryotic

  10. Shifts in the metabolic function of a benthic estuarine microbial community following a single pulse exposure to silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echavarri-Bravo, Virginia; Paterson, Lynn; Aspray, Thomas J.; Porter, Joanne S.; Winson, Michael K.; Thornton, Barry; Hartl, Mark G.J.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) as a biocidal agent and their potential accumulation in sediments may threaten non-target natural environmental bacterial communities. In this study a microcosm approach was established to investigate the effects of well characterized OECD AgNPs (NM-300) on the function of the bacterial community inhabiting marine estuarine sediments (salinity 31‰). The results showed that a single pulse of NM-300 AgNPs (1 mg L −1 ) that led to sediment concentrations below 6 mg Ag kg −1 dry weight inhibited the bacterial utilization of environmentally relevant carbon substrates. As a result, the functional diversity changed, but recovered after 120 h under the experimental conditions. This microcosm study suggests that AgNPs under environmentally relevant experimental conditions can negatively affect bacterial function and provides an insight into the understanding of the bacterial community response and resilience to AgNPs exposure, important for informing relevant regulatory measures. - Highlights: • AgNPs affected the bacterial community function in estuarine marine sediments. • AgNPs inhibited the bacterial utilization of environmentally relevant substrates. • Heterotrophic bacterial groups showed resilience to AgNPs after 120 h exposure. • AgNPs did not affect the bacterial community structure in sediments. - AgNPs inhibited the bacterial utilization of environmentally relevant substrates and caused temporary shifts in the bacterial functional diversity in marine estuarine sediments

  11. Hepatic Metabolism of Perfluorinated Carboxylic Acids and Polycholorotrifluoroethylene: A Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Investigation in Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-14

    I14JAN93 Annual Technical Report 15DEC91-1ý+JAN9 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Hepatic Metabolism of Perfluorinated Carboxylic Acids and G-FS...13. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words) This report describes our studies of the effects of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorodecanolc acid (PFDA) on...metabolism. 31 p NMR was used to examine the effects of PFDA. PFOA. and clofibrate (C LOF) in both rats and guinea pigs. A unique effect is revealed in

  12. Yeast cell metabolism investigated by CO{_2} production and soft X-ray irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masini, A.; Batani, D.; Previdi, F.; Milani, M.; Pozzi, A.; Turcu, E.; Huntington, S.; Takeyasu, H.

    1999-01-01

    Results obtained using a new technique for studying cell metabolism are presented. The technique, consisting in CO2 production monitoring, has been applied to Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells. Also the cells were irradiated using the soft X-ray laser-plasma source at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory with the aim of producing a damage of metabolic processes at the wall level, responsible for fermentation, without great interference with respiration, taking place in mitochondria, and DNA activity. The source was calibrated with PIN diodes and X-ray spectrometers and used Teflon stripes as target, emitting X-rays at about 0.9 keV, with a very low penetration in biological material. X-ray doses delivered to the different cell compartments were calculated following a Lambert-Bouguet-Beer law. Immediately after irradiation, the damage to metabolic activity was measured again by monitoring CO2 production. Results showed a general reduction in gas production by irradiated samples, together with non-linear and non-monotone response to dose. There was also evidence of oscillations in cell metabolic activity and of X-ray induced changes in oscillation frequency.

  13. Longitudinal Investigation into Genetics in the Conservation of Metabolic Phenotypes in Danish and Chinese Twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Shuxia; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Duan, Haiping

    2016-01-01

    twin study on long-term stability of metabolic phenotypes in Danish and Chinese twins identified a common pattern of high genetic control over phenotype conservation, and at the same time revealed population-specific patterns of genetic and common environmental regulation on the variance as well...

  14. Investigating host-pathogen behavior and their interaction using genome-scale metabolic network models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhukhan, Priyanka P; Raghunathan, Anu

    2014-01-01

    Genome Scale Metabolic Modeling methods represent one way to compute whole cell function starting from the genome sequence of an organism and contribute towards understanding and predicting the genotype-phenotype relationship. About 80 models spanning all the kingdoms of life from archaea to eukaryotes have been built till date and used to interrogate cell phenotype under varying conditions. These models have been used to not only understand the flux distribution in evolutionary conserved pathways like glycolysis and the Krebs cycle but also in applications ranging from value added product formation in Escherichia coli to predicting inborn errors of Homo sapiens metabolism. This chapter describes a protocol that delineates the process of genome scale metabolic modeling for analysing host-pathogen behavior and interaction using flux balance analysis (FBA). The steps discussed in the process include (1) reconstruction of a metabolic network from the genome sequence, (2) its representation in a precise mathematical framework, (3) its translation to a model, and (4) the analysis using linear algebra and optimization. The methods for biological interpretations of computed cell phenotypes in the context of individual host and pathogen models and their integration are also discussed.

  15. Flux-Enabled Exploration of the Role of Sip1 in galactose yeast metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shymansky, Christopher M.; Wang, George; Baidoo, Edward E. K.

    2017-01-01

    13C metabolic flux analysis (13C MFA) is an important systems biology technique that has been used to investigate microbial metabolism for decades. The heterotrimer Snf1 kinase complex plays a key role in the preference Saccharomyces cerevisiae exhibits for glucose over galactose, a phenomenon kn...

  16. Investigations on the role of hemoglobin in sulfide metabolism by intact human red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Christopher L; Savitsky, Anton; Feelisch, Martin; Cortese-Krott, Miriam M

    2018-03-01

    In addition to their role as oxygen transporters, red blood cells (RBCs) contribute to cardiovascular homeostasis by regulating nitric oxide (NO) metabolism via interaction of hemoglobin (Hb) with nitrite and NO itself. RBCs were proposed to also participate in sulfide metabolism. Although Hb is known to react with sulfide, sulfide metabolism by intact RBCs has not been characterized so far. Therefore we explored the role of Hb in sulfide metabolism in intact human RBCs. We find that upon exposure of washed RBCs to sulfide, no changes in oxy/deoxyhemoglobin (oxy/deoxyHb) are observed by UV-vis and EPR spectroscopy. However, sulfide reacts with methemoglobin (metHb), forming a methemoglobin-sulfide (metHb-SH) complex. Moreover, while metHb-SH is stable in cell-free systems even in the presence of biologically relevant thiols, it gradually decomposes to produce oxyHb, inorganic polysulfides and thiosulfate in intact cells, as detected by EPR and mass spectrometry. Taken together, our results demonstrate that under physiological conditions RBCs are able to metabolize sulfide via intermediate formation of a metHb-SH complex, which subsequently decomposes to oxyHb. We speculate that decomposition of metHb-SH is preceded by an inner-sphere electron transfer, forming reduced Hb (which binds oxygen to form oxyHb) and thiyl radical (a process we here define as "reductive sulfhydration"), which upon release, gives rise to the oxidized products, thiosulfate and polysulfides. Thus, not only is metHb an efficient scavenger and regulator of sulfide in blood, intracellular sulfide itself may play a role in keeping Hb in the reduced oxygen-binding form and, therefore, be involved in RBC physiology and function. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. An Integrated Metagenomics/Metaproteomics Investigation of the Microbial Communities and Enzymes in Solid-state Fermentation of Pu-erh tea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming; Zhang, Dong-lian; Su, Xiao-qin; Duan, Shuang-mei; Wan, Jin-qiong; Yuan, Wen-xia; Liu, Ben-ying; Ma, Yan; Pan, Ying-hong

    2015-01-01

    Microbial enzymes during solid-state fermentation (SSF), which play important roles in the food, chemical, pharmaceutical and environmental fields, remain relatively unknown. In this work, the microbial communities and enzymes in SSF of Pu-erh tea, a well-known traditional Chinese tea, were investigated by integrated metagenomics/metaproteomics approach. The dominant bacteria and fungi were identified as Proteobacteria (48.42%) and Aspergillus (94.98%), through pyrosequencing-based analyses of the bacterial 16S and fungal 18S rRNA genes, respectively. In total, 335 proteins with at least two unique peptides were identified and classified into 28 Biological Processes and 35 Molecular Function categories using a metaproteomics analysis. The integration of metagenomics and metaproteomics data demonstrated that Aspergillus was dominant fungus and major host of identified proteins (50.45%). Enzymes involved in the degradation of the plant cell wall were identified and associated with the soft-rotting of tea leaves. Peroxiredoxins, catalase and peroxidases were associated with the oxidation of catechins. In conclusion, this work greatly advances our understanding of the SSF of Pu-erh tea and provides a powerful tool for studying SSF mechanisms, especially in relation to the microbial communities present. PMID:25974221

  18. Investigations on the effect of forage source, grinding, and urea supplementation on ruminal fermentation and microbial protein flow in a semi-continuous rumen simulation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Bastian; Boguhn, Jeannette; Rodehutscord, Markus

    2011-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare the effect of maize silage and grass silage on microbial fermentation and protein flow in a semi-continuous rumen simulation system (Rusitec) when milling screen size (MSS) during grinding was varied. Oven-dried silages were milled through screens of 1, 4 or 9 mm pore size and incubated for 48 h in a Rusitec system. Furthermore, the effect of N supplementation to maize silage (MSS: 4 mm) was investigated and single dose vs. continuous infusion of urea-N were compared. Degradation of organic matter (OM), crude protein (CP), fibre fractions and non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) as well as short-chain fatty acid production differed significantly between forage sources. Urea-N supplementation improved the degradation of NSC, but not that of fibre fractions in maize silage. The way of urea supply had only marginal effects on fermentation characteristics. An increase in MSS, and consequently in mean feed particle size, led to an improvement in the degradation of OM, CP and NSC, but efficiency of microbial net protein synthesis (EMPS; mg microbial N flow/g degraded OM) and the microbial amino acid profile were less affected. EMPS was higher in grass silage than in maize silage and was improved by urea-N supplementation in maize silage. This study indicates that fermentation of NSC as well as EMPS during incubation of maize silage was limited by availability of NH3-N. Furthermore, an increase in MSS above 1 mm seems to improve fermentation of silages in the Rusitec system.

  19. Survey of iodine metabolism in man illustrated by an iodide load investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassoee, C.-F.; Langaasdalen, H.

    1977-12-01

    The first part of this report deals with the human metabolism of iodine, its sources, serum iodine, uptake in the thyroid, hormonal thyroid secretion and iodine excretion. The thyroid hormones are discussed as is the regulating of the iodine metabolism. The second part consists of a study performed on six healthy persons over two days. These were given 5mg iodine in aqueous solution rally and series of blood tests taken. Two persons were also given 100mg and 200mg respectively per day for 3weeks. The results are tabulated and discussed. In the third and final section the radiation hygiene aspects are treated. The basis is the uptake of large amounts of I - 131 from radioactive fallout. Carcinogenesis and hypothyroidism following this are discussed and therapy and iodine prophylaxis are described. (JIW)

  20. Investigation of the metabolism of 125I orthohippuric acid (sodium salt) in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boegl, W.; Stockhausen, K.; Censori, M.; Jahn, M.; Sander, B.

    1977-07-01

    100 μCi Iodine-125-labeled Orthoiodohippurate (sodium salt) were applied i.v. to two Wistar rats. Urine and faeces were collected during several days over periods of 24 hours in a metabolic cage. The urine was analysed both directly and after separation of the radioactive substances with an adsorbtive resin by means of TLC and HPLC. The faeces were extracted and then separated like the urine. The two main metabolites of I-125 Orthoiodohippurate (Hipp) were I-125 Orthoiodobenzoic acid (Benz) and J-125 Iodide (I). The mixture of metabolites in the first 24 hours urine urine was composed of: approximately 20% Benz, appeoximately 70% Hipp, approximately 10% I. During the following days, this composition showed a few changes. The most appropriate method for analyzing proved to be the direct HPLC of the metabolic urine and faeces extract. (orig./MG) [de

  1. Investigating the Cellular and Metabolic Responses of World-Class Canoeists Training: A Sportomics Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Santos Coelho

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available (1 Background: We have been using the Sportomics approach to evaluate biochemical and hematological changes in response to exercise. The aim of this study was to evaluate the metabolic and hematologic responses of world-class canoeists during a training session; (2 Methods: Blood samples were taken at different points and analyzed for their hematological properties, activities of selected enzymes, hormones, and metabolites; (3 Results: Muscle stress biomarkers were elevated in response to exercise which correlated with modifications in the profile of white blood cells, where a leukocyte rise was observed after the canoe session. These results were accompanied by an increase in other exercise intensity parameters such as lactatemia and ammonemia. Adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol increased during the exercise sessions. The acute rise in both erythrocytes and white blood profile were probably due to muscle cell damage, rather than hepatocyte integrity impairment; (4 Conclusion: The cellular and metabolic responses found here, together with effective nutrition support, are crucial to understanding the effects of exercise in order to assist in the creation of new training and recovery planning. Also we show that Sportomics is a primal tool for training management and performance improvement, as well as to the understanding of metabolic response to exercise.

  2. Investigation of cerebral metabolism by positron CT in Japanese following musical stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakasugi, Naotoshi (Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1994-02-01

    Cerebral metabolic responses to Japanese and Western instrumental music were examined using [sup 11]C-glucose and positron CT. Eight right-handed subjects were studied in both Japanese and Western music-stimulated states. Biaural musical stimulation with a Japanese instrument, the 'shakuhachi', produced diffuse metabolic changes in the left temporal lobe in all subjects. Biaural musical stimulation with a Western instrument, the 'violin', produced metabolic changes in the right temporal lobe in 3 subjects, changes in the left in 4, and changes on both sides in one. It was considered previously that all musical stimulation led to hypermetabolism in the right hemisphere of human beings. However, the present results indicated that Japanese music produced activation of the left hemisphere in Japanese. On the other hand, Western music produced right hemispheric hypermetabolism in Japanese with no emotion. The laterality of the hemisphere stimulated by Western music was apparently incidentally changed according to the state of mind the Japanese subjects. (author).

  3. Positron emission tomographic scan investigations of Huntington's disease: cerebral metabolic correlates of cognitive function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berent, S.; Giordani, B.; Lehtinen, S.; Markel, D.; Penney, J.B.; Buchtel, H.A.; Starosta-Rubinstein, S.; Hichwa, R.; Young, A.B.

    1988-01-01

    Fifteen drug-free patients with early to mid-stage Huntington's disease (HD) were evaluated with positron emission tomographic (PET) scans of 18 F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose uptake and quantitative measures of neurological function, learning, memory, and general intelligence. In comparison with a group of normal volunteers, the HD patients showed lower metabolism in both caudate (p less than 0.001) and putamen (p less than 0.001) on PET scans. A significant and positive relationship was found between neuropsychological measures of verbal learning and memory and caudate metabolism in the patient group but not in the normal group. Visual-spatial learning did not reflect a similar pattern, but performance intelligence quotient was positively related to both caudate and putamen metabolism in the HD group. Vocabulary level was unrelated to either brain structure. Discussion focuses on these and other observed brain-behavior relationships and on the implications of these findings for general behaviors such as those involved in coping and adaptation

  4. Investigations on the effects of ''Ecstasy'' on cerebral glucose metabolism: an 18-FDG PET study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreckenberger, M.; Sabri, O.; Arning, C.; Tuttass, T.; Schulz, G.; Kaiser, H.J.; Wagenknecht, G.; Buell, U.; Gouzoulis-Mayfrank, E.; Sass, H.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to determine the acute effects of the 'Ecstasy' analogue MDE (3,4-methylendioxyethamphetamine) on the cerebral glucose metabolism (rMRGlu) of healthy volunteers. Method: In a randomised double-blind trial, 16 healthy volunteers without a history of drug abuse were examined with 18-FDG PET 110-120 minutes after oral administration of 2 mg/kg MDE (n=8) or placebo (n=8). Beginning two minutes prior to radiotracer injection, a constant cognitive stimulation was maintained for 32 minutes using a word repetition paradigm in order to ensure constant and comparable mental conditions during cerebral 18-FDG uptake. Individual brain anatomy was represented using T1-weighted 3D flash MRI, followed by manual regionalisation into 108 regions-of-interest and PET/MRI overlay. Absolute quantification of rMRGlu and comparison of glucose metabolism under MDE versus placebo were performed using Mann-Whitney U-test. Results: Absolute global MRGlu was not significantly changed under MDE versus placebo (MDE: 41,8±11,1 μmol/min/100 g, placebo: 50,1±18,1 μmol/min/100 g, p=0,298). The normalised regional metabolic data showed a significantly decreased rMRGlu in the bilateral frontal cortex: Left frontal posterior (-7.1%, p [de

  5. In situ investigation of tubular microbial fuel cells deployed in an aeration tank at a municipal wastewater treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fei; Ge, Zheng; Grimaud, Julien; Hurst, Jim; He, Zhen

    2013-05-01

    To examine the feasibility of integrating microbial fuel cells (MFCs) into an activated sludge process, three MFCs with different ion exchange membranes and/or cathode catalysts were installed in an aeration tank to treat primary effluent. Both contaminant treatment and electricity generation were studied during the operation for more than 400 days. The effects of membrane/catalysts on MFC performance were not observed, likely due to the low removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) (tank, unless the key problems such as biofouling are solved. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Biodiversity of the microbial mat of the Garga hot spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozanov, Alexey Sergeevich; Bryanskaya, Alla Victorovna; Ivanisenko, Timofey Vladimirovich; Malup, Tatyana Konstantinovna; Peltek, Sergey Evgenievich

    2017-12-28

    Microbial mats are a good model system for ecological and evolutionary analysis of microbial communities. There are more than 20 alkaline hot springs on the banks of the Barguzin river inflows. Water temperature reaches 75 °C and pH is usually 8.0-9.0. The formation of microbial mats is observed in all hot springs. Microbial communities of hot springs of the Baikal rift zone are poorly studied. Garga is the biggest hot spring in this area. In this study, we investigated bacterial and archaeal diversity of the Garga hot spring (Baikal rift zone, Russia) using 16S rRNA metagenomic sequencing. We studied two types of microbial communities: (i) small white biofilms on rocks in the points with the highest temperature (75 °C) and (ii) continuous thick phototrophic microbial mats observed at temperatures below 70 °C. Archaea (mainly Crenarchaeota; 19.8% of the total sequences) were detected only in the small biofilms. The high abundance of Archaea in the sample from hot springs of the Baikal rift zone supplemented our knowledge of the distribution of Archaea. Most archaeal sequences had low similarity to known Archaea. In the microbial mats, primary products were formed by cyanobacteria of the genus Leptolyngbya. Heterotrophic microorganisms were mostly represented by Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria in all studied samples of the microbial mats. Planctomycetes, Chloroflexi, and Chlorobi were abundant in the middle layer of the microbial mats, while heterotrophic microorganisms represented mostly by Firmicutes (Clostridia, strict anaerobes) dominated in the bottom part. Besides prokaryotes, we detect some species of Algae with help of detection their chloroplasts 16 s rRNA. High abundance of Archaea in samples from hot springs of the Baikal rift zone supplemented our knowledge of the distribution of Archaea. Most archaeal sequences had low similarity to known Archaea. Metagenomic analysis of microbial communities of the microbial mat of Garga hot spring showed that

  7. Investigations with tritium-labelled glycerol of the triglyceride metabolism in patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonhardt, W.; Julius, U.; Koch, R.; Schulze, J.

    1980-01-01

    Triglycerides, being components of lipoproteins, are secreted by the liver into the blood and climinated from the blood by adipose and muscle tissue. The kinetics of this metabolic pathway were studied after injection of tritium-labelled glycerol which is incorporated into triglycerides by the liver. The serum triglyceride radioactivity-time curve was analysed with a computer. 99 examinations showed a decrease of the fractional turnover rate and an increase of the turnover rate with the triglyceride level. The test enables to decide whether an increased triglyceride concentration is caued by overproduction or by disturbed climination. (author)

  8. Microbial network of the carbonate precipitation process induced by microbial consortia and the potential application to crack healing in concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiaguang; Zhou, Aijuan; Liu, Yuanzhen; Zhao, Bowei; Luan, Yunbo; Wang, Sufang; Yue, Xiuping; Li, Zhu

    2017-11-06

    Current studies have employed various pure-cultures for improving concrete durability based on microbially induced carbonate precipitation (MICP). However, there have been very few reports concerned with microbial consortia, which could perform more complex tasks and be more robust in their resistance to environmental fluctuations. In this study, we constructed three microbial consortia that are capable of MICP under aerobic (AE), anaerobic (AN) and facultative anaerobic (FA) conditions. The results showed that AE consortia showed more positive effects on inorganic carbon conversion than AN and FA consortia. Pyrosequencing analysis showed that clear distinctions appeared in the community structure between different microbial consortia systems. Further investigation on microbial community networks revealed that the species in the three microbial consortia built thorough energetic and metabolic interaction networks regarding MICP, nitrate-reduction, bacterial endospores and fermentation communities. Crack-healing experiments showed that the selected cracks of the three consortia-based concrete specimens were almost completely healed in 28 days, which was consistent with the studies using pure cultures. Although the economic advantage might not be clear yet, this study highlights the potential implementation of microbial consortia on crack healing in concrete.

  9. Zebrafish as a Model System for Investigating the Compensatory Regulation of Ionic Balance during Metabolic Acidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lletta Lewis

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Zebrafish (Danio rerio have become an important model for integrative physiological research. Zebrafish inhabit a hypo-osmotic environment; to maintain ionic and acid-base homeostasis, they must actively take up ions and secrete acid to the water. The gills in the adult and the skin at larval stage are the primary sites of ionic regulation in zebrafish. The uptake of ions in zebrafish is mediated by specific ion transporting cells termed ionocytes. Similarly, in mammals, ion reabsorption and acid excretion occur in specific cell types in the terminal region of the renal tubules (distal convoluted tubule and collecting duct. Previous studies have suggested that functional regulation of several ion transporters/channels in the zebrafish ionocytes resembles that in the mammalian renal cells. Additionally, several mechanisms involved in regulating the epithelial ion transport during metabolic acidosis are found to be similar between zebrafish and mammals. In this article, we systemically review the similarities and differences in ionic regulation between zebrafish and mammals during metabolic acidosis. We summarize the available information on the regulation of epithelial ion transporters during acidosis, with a focus on epithelial Na+, Cl− and Ca2+ transporters in zebrafish ionocytes and mammalian renal cells. We also discuss the neuroendocrine responses to acid exposure, and their potential role in ionic compensation. Finally, we identify several knowledge gaps that would benefit from further study.

  10. The use of cultured hepatocytes to investigate the metabolism of drugs and mechanisms of drug hepatotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Lechón, M J; Ponsoda, X; Bort, R; Castell, J V

    2001-01-01

    Hepatotoxins can be classified as intrinsic when they exert their effects on all individuals in a dose-dependent manner, and as idiosyncratic when their effects are the consequence of an abnormal metabolism of the drug by susceptible individuals (metabolic idiosyncrasy) or of an immune-mediated injury to hepatocytes (allergic hepatitis). Some xenobiotics are electrophilic, and others are biotransformed by the liver into highly reactive metabolites that are usually more toxic than the parent compound. This activation process is the key to many hepatotoxic phenomena. Mitochondria are a frequent target of hepatotoxic drugs, and the alteration of their function has immediate effects on the energy balance of cells (depletion of ATP). Lipid peroxidation, oxidative stress, alteration of Ca(2+) homeostasis, and covalent binding to cell macromolecules are the molecular mechanisms that are frequently involved in the toxicity of xenobiotics. Against these potential hazards, cells have their own defence mechanisms (for example, glutathione, DNA repair, suicide inactivation). Ultimately, toxicity is the balance between bioactivation and detoxification, which determines whether a reactive metabolite elicits a toxic effect. The ultimate goal of in vitro experiments is to generate the type of scientific information needed to identify compounds that are potentially toxic to man. For this purpose, both the design of the experiments and the interpretation of the results are critical.

  11. Investigations on the transport and metabolism of high density lipoprotein cholesteryl esters in African green monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorci-Thomas, M.G.

    1984-01-01

    The metabolic fate of circulating high density lipoprotein cholesteryl esters was studied in African green monkeys to determine the significance of the lipid transfer reaction on the catabolism of lipoprotein cholesteryl esters. A method of doubly labeling both moieties of lipoprotein cholesteryl esters with [ 3 He]cholesteryl oleate and cholesteryl [ 14 C]oleate was developed for the purpose of studying plasma cholesteryl ester metabolism in vivo. In these studies the total plasma [ 3 He]cholesterol turnover resulted in production rates, which ranged from 10-17 mg/kg day, similar to previously reported values in African green monkeys and in normal lipoproteinemic humans. In contrast to the production rates calculated from the decay of plasma 3 He-radioactivity, the production rates calculated from lipoproteins labeled with cholesteryl [ 14 C]oleate were approximately 2-3 times greater. In addition to these studies, a plasma cholesteryl ester transacylation activity was demonstrated in vitro when HDL containing doubly labeled cholesteryl esters were incubated with fresh plasma. These results demonstrated that high density lipoprotein cholesteryl esters undergo transacylation in vitro, resulting in release and reesterification of free [ 3 H]cholesterol

  12. Metabolite secretion in microorganisms: the theory of metabolic overflow put to the test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinu, Farhana R.; Granucci, Ninna; Daniell, James

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Microbial cells secrete many metabolites during growth, including important intermediates of the central carbon metabolism. This has not been taken into account by researchers when modeling microbial metabolism for metabolic engineering and systems biology studies. Materials and Meth...

  13. Microbial community and treatment ability investigation in AOAO process for the optoelectronic wastewater treatment using PCR-DGGE biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsi-Jien; Lin, Yi-Zi; Fanjiang, Jen-Mao; Fan, Chihhao

    2013-04-01

    This study aimed to explore the microbial community variation and treatment ability of a full-scale anoxic-aerobic-anoxic-aerobic (AOAO) process used for optoelectronic wastewater treatment. The sludge samples in the biological treatment units were collected and subsequently subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis identification and the wastewater components such as BOD5 and NH3-N were evaluated during the processes. The group specific primers selected were targeting at the kingdom Bacteria, the Acidobacterium, the α-proteobacteria, the β-proteobacteria ammonia oxidizers, Actinobacteria and methyllotrophs, and the 16S rDNA clone libraries were established. Ten different clones were obtained using the Bacteria primers and eight different clones were obtained using the β-proteobacteria ammonia oxidizer primers. Over 95 % of BOD5 and 90 % of NH3-N were removed from the system. The microbial community analysis showed that the Janthinobacterium sp. An8 and Nitrosospira sp. were the dominant species throughout the AOAO process. Across the whole clone library, six clones showed closely related to Janthinobacterium sp. and these species seemed to be the dominant species with more than 50 % occupancy of the total population. Nitrosospira sp. was the predominant species within the β-proteobacteria and occupied more than 30 % of the total population in the system. These two strains were the novel species specific to the AOAO process for optoelectronic treatment, and they were found strongly related to the system capability of removing aquatic contaminants by inspecting the wastewater concentration variation across the system.

  14. Biotechnological Aspects of Microbial Extracellular Electron Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Souichiro

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular electron transfer (EET) is a type of microbial respiration that enables electron transfer between microbial cells and extracellular solid materials, including naturally-occurring metal compounds and artificial electrodes. Microorganisms harboring EET abilities have received considerable attention for their various biotechnological applications, in addition to their contribution to global energy and material cycles. In this review, current knowledge on microbial EET and its application to diverse biotechnologies, including the bioremediation of toxic metals, recovery of useful metals, biocorrosion, and microbial electrochemical systems (microbial fuel cells and microbial electrosynthesis), were introduced. Two potential biotechnologies based on microbial EET, namely the electrochemical control of microbial metabolism and electrochemical stimulation of microbial symbiotic reactions (electric syntrophy), were also discussed. PMID:26004795

  15. Investigation into the acute effects of total and partial energy restriction on postprandial metabolism among overweight/obese participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoni, Rona; Johnston, Kelly L; Collins, Adam L; Robertson, M Denise

    2016-03-28

    The intermittent energy restriction (IER) approach to weight loss involves short periods of substantial (75-100 %) energy restriction (ER) interspersed with normal eating. This study aimed to characterise the early metabolic response to these varying degrees of ER, which occurs acutely and prior to weight loss. Ten (three female) healthy, overweight/obese participants (36 (SEM 5) years; 29·0 (sem 1·1) kg/m2) took part in this acute three-way cross-over study. Participants completed three 1-d dietary interventions in a randomised order with a 1-week washout period: isoenergetic intake, partial 75 % ER and total 100 % ER. Fasting and postprandial (6-h) metabolic responses to a liquid test meal were assessed the following morning via serial blood sampling and indirect calorimetry. Food intake was also recorded for two subsequent days of ad libitum intake. Relative to the isoenergetic control, postprandial glucose responses were increased following total ER (+142 %; P=0·015) and to a lesser extent after partial ER (+76 %; P=0·051). There was also a delay in the glucose time to peak after total ER only (P=0·024). Both total and partial ER interventions produced comparable reductions in postprandial TAG responses (-75 and -59 %, respectively; both Pobese participants. Further investigations are required to establish how metabolism adapts over time to the repeated perturbations experienced during IER, as well as the implications for long-term health.

  16. Investigation of the metabolic consequences of impregnating spinach leaves with trehalose and applying a pulsed electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dymek, Katarzyna; Panarese, Valentina; Herremans, Els; Cantre, Dennis; Schoo, Rick; Toraño, Javier Sastre; Schluepmann, Henriette; Wadso, Lars; Verboven, Pieter; Nicolai, Bart M; Dejmek, Petr; Gómez Galindo, Federico

    2016-12-01

    The impregnation of leafy vegetables with cryoprotectants using a combination of vacuum impregnation (VI) and pulsed electric fields (PEF) has been proposed by our research group as a method of improving their freezing tolerance and consequently their general quality after thawing. In this study, we have investigated the metabolic consequences of the combination of these unit operations on spinach. The vacuum impregnated spinach leaves showed a drastic decrease in the porosity of the extracellular space. However, at maximum weight gain, randomly located air pockets remained, which may account for oxygen-consuming pathways in the cells being active after VI. The metabolic activity of the impregnated leaves showed a drastic increase that was further enhanced by the application of PEF to the impregnated tissue. Impregnating the leaves with trehalose by VI led to a significant accumulation of trehalose-6-phosphate (T6P), however, this was not further enhanced by PEF. It is suggested that the accumulation of T6P in the leaves may increase metabolic activity, and increase tissue resistance to abiotic stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Investigations of the metabolic behaviour of lespenephryl with the aid of radiopharmaceutical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murisasco, A.; Paulin, A.

    Some phases of the effect mechanisms of the two existing pharmaceutical forms of LESPENEPHRYL (R), were examined applying LESPENEPHRYL (R) labelled with tritium and non-labelled LESPENEPHRYL (R) in order to find out its points of affect with the help of the isotope method. The tests were carried out at rabbits and man, determining 1) the intestinal resorption and the excretion in the urin quantitatively 2) the distribution in the organism after intravenous injection 3) the effects on the renal function with the help of the isotopic-glomerular and tubular clearance-measurement 4) the kinetic distribution of the substance in animal organism in order to explain the metabolic behaviour better. Before starting the tests, problems of labelling, cleansing, and durability of tritium-labelled LESPENEPHRYL (R) were dealt with. (orig./MG) [de

  18. An investigation into the activation and deactivation of chlorinated hydrocarbons to genotoxins in metabolically competent human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, A T; Ellard, S; Parry, E M; Parry, J M

    1996-05-01

    We have investigated the induction of micronuclei by 15 chlorinated hydrocarbons in the cytochalasin B-blocked micronucleus assay utilizing genetically engineered cell lines. The human lymphoblastoid cell line AHH-1, with native cytochrome CYP1A1 activity, the MCL-5 cell line, which stably expresses cDNAs encoding human CYP1A2, 2A6, 3A4, 2E1 and microsomal epoxide hydrolase, and the h2E1 cell line, containing a cDNA for CYP2E1, were used in this study. We have demonstrated the induction of kinetochore-positive micronuclei by two chlorinated solvents, 2,3-dichlorobutane and 1,1, 2-trichloroethane, in the metabolically competent cell lines MCL-5 and h2E1. The MCL-5 and h2E1 cell lines have in addition shown the capacity to produce metabolites in the presence of methylene chloride, carbon tetrachloride, 1,2,3-trichloropropane, tetrachloroethylene, toluene and n-hexane, wich yield elevated micronucleus frequencies compared with the parental cell line AHH-1. Hexachloroethane failed to induce micronuclei in any of the cell lines and 1,2-dichloroethane and 1-chlorohexane induced micronuclei without the requirement for metabolic activation in all three cell lines. The MCL-5 cell line exhibited reduced micronucleus frequencies compared with the AHH-1 and h2E1 cell lines following exposure to 1,2-dichloroethylene, 1,3-dichloropropane, 1,1, 1-trichloroethane and 1,2,3-trichloropropane. The methodology used has shown the ability of metabolically competent cell lines expressing cDNAs encoding the cytochrome P450 isoenzymes to metabolize halogenated hydrocarbons to genotoxic species, including both clastogens and aneugens. The biotransformation of chemicals to aneugenic species has not previously been demonstrated.

  19. Nano-scale investigation of the association of microbial nitrogen residues with iron (hydr)oxides in a forest soil O-horizon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiluweit, Marco; Bougoure, Jeremy J.; Zeglin, Lydia H.; Myrold, David D.; Weber, Peter K.; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Kleber, Markus; Nico, Peter S.

    2012-10-01

    Amino sugars in fungal cell walls (such as chitin) represent an important source of nitrogen (N) in many forest soil ecosystems. Despite the importance of this material in soil nitrogen cycling, comparatively little is known about abiotic and biotic controls on and the timescale of its turnover. Part of the reason for this lack of information is the inaccessibility of these materials to classic bulk extraction methods. To address this issue, we used advanced visualization tools to examine transformation pathways of chitin-rich fungal cell wall residues as they interact with microorganisms, soil organic matter and mineral surfaces. Our goal was to document initial micro-scale dynamics of the incorporation of 13C- and 15N-labeled chitin into fungi-dominated microenvironments in O-horizons of old-growth forest soils. At the end of a 3-week incubation experiment, high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging of hyphae-associated soil microstructures revealed a preferential association of 15N with Fe-rich particles. Synchrotron-based scanning transmission X-ray spectromicroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS) of the same samples showed that thin organic coatings on these soil microstructures are enriched in aliphatic C and amide N on Fe (hydr)oxides, suggesting a concentration of microbial lipids and proteins on these surfaces. A possible explanation for the results of our micro-scale investigation of chemical and spatial patterns is that amide N from chitinous fungal cell walls was assimilated by hyphae-associated bacteria, resynthesized into proteinaceous amide N, and subsequently concentrated onto Fe (hydr)oxide surfaces. If confirmed in other soil ecosystems, such rapid association of microbial N with hydroxylated Fe oxide surfaces may have important implications for mechanistic models of microbial cycling of C and N.

  20. Final Scientific/Technical Report, DE-FG02-06ER64171, Integrated Nucleic Acid System for In-Field Monitoring of Microbial Community Dynamics and Metabolic Activity – Subproject to Co-PI Eric E. Roden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric E. Roden

    2009-07-08

    This report summarizes research conducted in conjunction with a project entitled “Integrated Nucleic Acid System for In-Field Monitoring of Microbial Community Dynamics and Metabolic Activity”, which was funded through the Integrative Studies Element of the former NABIR Program (now the Environmental Remediation Sciences Program) within the Office of Biological and Environmental Research. Dr. Darrell Chandler (originally at Argonne National Laboratory, now with Akonni Biosystems) was the overall PI/PD for the project. The overall project goals were to (1) apply a model iron-reducer and sulfate-reducer microarray and instrumentation systems to sediment and groundwater samples from the Scheibe et al. FRC Area 2 field site, UMTRA sediments, and other DOE contaminated sites; (2) continue development and expansion of a 16S rRNA/rDNA¬-targeted probe suite for microbial community dynamics as new sequences are obtained from DOE-relevant sites; and (3) address the fundamental molecular biology and analytical chemistry associated with the extraction, purification and analysis of functional genes and mRNA in environmental samples. Work on the UW subproject focused on conducting detailed batch and semicontinuous culture reactor experiments with uranium-contaminated FRC Area 2 sediment. The reactor experiments were designed to provide coherent geochemical and microbiological data in support of microarray analyses of microbial communities in Area 2 sediments undergoing biostimulation with ethanol. A total of four major experiments were conducted (one batch and three semicontinuous culture), three of which (the batch and two semicontinuous culture) provided samples for DNA microarray analysis. A variety of other molecular analyses (clone libraries, 16S PhyloChip, RT-PCR, and T-RFLP) were conducted on parallel samples from the various experiments in order to provide independent information on microbial community response to biostimulation.

  1. Microbial Reduction of Fe(III) and SO42- and Associated Microbial Communities in the Alluvial Aquifer Groundwater and Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Hoon; Lee, Bong-Joo

    2017-11-25

    Agricultural demands continuously increased use of groundwater, causing drawdown of water table and need of artificial recharge using adjacent stream waters. River water intrusion into groundwater can alter the geochemical and microbiological characteristics in the aquifer and subsurface. In an effort to investigate the subsurface biogeochemical activities before operation of artificial recharge at the test site, established at the bank of Nakdong River, Changwon, South Korea, organic carbon transported from river water to groundwater was mimicked and the effect on the indigenous microbial communities was investigated with the microcosm incubations of the groundwater and subsurface sediments. Laboratory incubations indicated microbial reduction of Fe(III) and sulfate. Next-generation Illumina MiSeq sequences of V4 region of 16S rRNA gene provided that the shifts of microbial taxa to Fe(III)-reducing and/or sulfate-reducing microorganisms such as Geobacter, Albidiferax, Desulfocapsa, Desulfuromonas, and Desulfovibrio were in good correlation with the sequential flourishment of microbial reduction of Fe(III) and sulfate as the incubations progressed. This suggests the potential role of dissolved organic carbons migrated with the river water into groundwater in the managed aquifer recharge system on the indigenous microbial community composition and following alterations of subsurface biogeochemistry and microbial metabolic activities.

  2. Novel Approaches to Investigate One-Carbon Metabolism and Related B-Vitamins in Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Amy; McNulty, Helene; Hughes, Catherine F.; Strain, J. J.; Ward, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension, a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke, is the world’s leading cause of preventable, premature death. A common polymorphism (677C→T) in the gene encoding the folate metabolizing enzyme methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is associated with increased blood pressure, and there is accumulating evidence demonstrating that this phenotype can be modulated, specifically in individuals with the MTHFR 677TT genotype, by the B-vitamin riboflavin, an essential co-factor for MTHFR. The underlying mechanism that links this polymorphism, and the related gene-nutrient interaction, with hypertension is currently unknown. Previous research has shown that 5-methyltetrahydrofolate, the product of the reaction catalysed by MTHFR, appears to be a positive allosteric modulator of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and may thus increase the production of nitric oxide, a potent vasodilator. Blood pressure follows a circadian pattern, peaking shortly after wakening and falling during the night, a phenomenon known as ‘dipping’. Any deviation from this pattern, which can only be identified using ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM), has been associated with increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. This review will consider the evidence linking this polymorphism and novel gene-nutrient interaction with hypertension and the potential mechanisms that might be involved. The role of ABPM in B-vitamin research and in nutrition research generally will also be reviewed. PMID:27845713

  3. Novel Approaches to Investigate One-Carbon Metabolism and Related B-Vitamins in Blood Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy McMahon

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension, a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke, is the world’s leading cause of preventable, premature death. A common polymorphism (677C→T in the gene encoding the folate metabolizing enzyme methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR is associated with increased blood pressure, and there is accumulating evidence demonstrating that this phenotype can be modulated, specifically in individuals with the MTHFR 677TT genotype, by the B-vitamin riboflavin, an essential co-factor for MTHFR. The underlying mechanism that links this polymorphism, and the related gene-nutrient interaction, with hypertension is currently unknown. Previous research has shown that 5-methyltetrahydrofolate, the product of the reaction catalysed by MTHFR, appears to be a positive allosteric modulator of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS and may thus increase the production of nitric oxide, a potent vasodilator. Blood pressure follows a circadian pattern, peaking shortly after wakening and falling during the night, a phenomenon known as ‘dipping’. Any deviation from this pattern, which can only be identified using ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM, has been associated with increased cardiovascular disease (CVD risk. This review will consider the evidence linking this polymorphism and novel gene-nutrient interaction with hypertension and the potential mechanisms that might be involved. The role of ABPM in B-vitamin research and in nutrition research generally will also be reviewed.

  4. Mass Spectrometric Methodologies for Investigating the Metabolic Signatures of Parkinson's Disease: Current Progress and Future Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Emily L; Koelmel, Jeremy P; Yost, Richard A; Okun, Michael S; Vedam-Mai, Vinata; Garrett, Timothy J

    2018-03-06

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder resulting from the loss of dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra as well as degeneration of motor and nonmotor basal ganglia circuitries. Typically known for classical motor deficits (tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia), early stages of the disease are associated with a large nonmotor component (depression, anxiety, apathy, etc.). Currently, there are no definitive biomarkers of PD, and the measurement of dopamine metabolites does not allow for detection of prodromal PD nor does it aid in long-term monitoring of disease progression. Given that PD is increasingly recognized as complex and heterogeneous, involving several neurotransmitters and proteins, it is of importance that we advance interdisciplinary studies to further our knowledge of the molecular and cellular pathways that are affected in PD. This approach will possibly yield useful biomarkers for early diagnosis and may assist in the development of disease-modifying therapies. Here, we discuss preanalytical factors associated with metabolomics studies, summarize current mass spectrometric methodologies used to evaluate the metabolic signature of PD, and provide future perspectives of the rapidly developing field of MS in the context of PD.

  5. Microbial chlorination of organic matter in forest soil: investigation using 36Cl-chloride and its methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohlenová, J; Gryndler, M; Forczek, S T; Fuksová, K; Handova, V; Matucha, M

    2009-05-15

    Chloride, which comes into the forest ecosystem largely from the sea as aerosol (and has been in the past assumed to be inert), causes chlorination of soil organic matter. Studies of the chlorination showed that the content of organically bound chlorine in temperate forest soils is higher than that of chloride, and various chlorinated compounds are produced. Our study of chlorination of organic matter in the fermentation horizon of forest soil using radioisotope 36Cl and tracer techniques shows that microbial chlorination clearly prevails over abiotic, chlorination of soil organic matter being enzymatically mediated and proportional to chloride content and time. Long-term (>100 days) chlorination leads to more stable chlorinated substances contained in the organic layer of forest soil (overtime; chlorine is bound progressively more firmly in humic acids) and volatile organochlorines are formed. Penetration of chloride into microorganisms can be documented by the freezing/thawing technique. Chloride absorption in microorganisms in soil and in litter residues in the fermentation horizon complicates the analysis of 36Cl-chlorinated soil. The results show that the analytical procedure used should be tested for every soil type under study.

  6. Fecal microbial composition associated with variation in feed efficiency in pigs depends on diet and sex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuren, Lisanne M.G.; Calus, Mario P.L.; Jansman, Aalfons J.M.; Bergsma, Rob; Knol, Egbert F.; Gilbert, Hélène; Zemb, Olivier

    2018-01-01

    Dietary fiber content and composition affect microbial composition and activity in the gut, which in turn influence energetic contribution of fermentation products to the metabolic energy supply in pigs. This may affect feed efficiency (FE) in pigs. The present study investigated the relationship

  7. Hepatic Metabolism of Perfluorinated Carboxylic Acids and Polychlorotrifluoroethylene: A Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Investigation in Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-05

    Goecke, L. Narayanan, and B. M. Jarnot. "Effects of Perfluoro-n- octanoic Acid , Perfluoro-n-decanoic Acid , and Clofibrate on Hepatic Phosphorus L...Carboxylic Acids and 4Polychiorotrifluoroethylene: A Nuclear Magnetic Resonance G-AFOSR-90-0148 Investigation in Vivo ,IIC 6. AUTHOR(S a Nicholas V. Reo...Maxim um 200 words) This report outlines our research progress regarding toxicological investigations of perifluoro- n-octanoic acid (PFOA) and

  8. Does iron inhibit cryptoendolithic microbial communities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, C. G.; Vestal, J. R.; Friedmann, E. I. (Principal Investigator)

    1988-01-01

    Photosynthetic activity of three cryptoendolithic microbial communities was studied under controlled conditions in the laboratory. In two of these communities, the dominant organisms were lichens, collected from Linnaeus Terrace and from Battleship Promontory. The third community, dominated by cyanobacteria, was collected from Battleship Promontory. Both sites are in the ice-free valleys of southern Victoria Land. Previous efforts have shown how physical conditions can influence metabolic activity in endolithic communities (Kappen and Friedmann 1983; Kappen, Friedmann, and Garty 1981; Vestal, Federle, and Friedmann 1984). Biological activity can also be strongly influenced by the chemical environment. Inorganic nutrients such as nitrate, ammonia, and phosphate are often limiting factors, so their effects on photosynthetic carbon-14 bicarbonate incorporation were investigated. Iron and manganese are two metals present in Linnaeus Terrace and Battleship Promontory sandstones, and their effects on photosynthesis were also studied. The results may add to our understanding of biogeochemical interactions within this unique microbial community.

  9. Investigating Stream Metabolism and Nutrient Dynamics in Contrasting Ecosystems: The Role of Hydrologic Compartments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Pinzon, R.; Riveros-Iregui, D. A.; Covino, T. P.

    2015-12-01

    The interactions between mobile and less mobile hydrologic compartments affect the quality and quantity of water in streams and aquifers, and the cycling of dissolved carbon and nutrients. As new laboratory and field techniques become available, new questions and challenges emerge, including: What do we measure, where, and for how long to fully characterize a system? and, What is the ideal cost-maintenance-benefit relationship that we should strive for to maximize knowledge gained in different field settings? We recently performed a series of field experiments to measure aquatic metabolism and nutrient dynamics in two highly contrasting hydrologic systems, i.e., 1) a wetland-stream alpine, tropical system in Colombia (South America) and 2) a dryland river continuum (1st - 5th stream orders) in New Mexico. In this presentation we discuss how multiple lines of evidence can support the analysis of key aquatic processes and how co-interpretation provides a more complete picture of stream complexity. For this analysis, we deployed YSI EXO2 and 6920 sondes, Turner Designs C-sense and C6 sensors, and Onset HOBO water quality data loggers. Parameters measured by these instruments include conductivity, temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, turbidity, pCO2, chlorophyll-a, phycocyanin, fluorescein, CDOM, brighteners and water depth. We also injected conservative tracers (i.e., NaCl and NaBr) and the bioreactive tracer resazurin in both experimental sites, and NO3 in the dryland river continuum. NO3 was measured in-situ with Satlantic Submersible Ultraviolet Nitrate Analyzers (SUNA) sensors and in the laboratory using Ion Chromatograph techniques using stream grab samples. Our results highlight the role of both residence times and chemical fluxes in regulating the effective processing of carbon and nutrients. Our results also demonstrate that stream stimuli from controlled experiments are ideal for maximizing the information content derived from short (hours to days) and mid

  10. Biochar affects soil organic matter cycling and microbial functions but does not alter microbial community structure in a paddy soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jing; Wang, Jingyuan; Dippold, Michaela; Gao, Yang; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2016-06-15

    The application of biochar (BC) in conjunction with mineral fertilizers is one of the most promising management practices recommended to improve soil quality. However, the interactive mechanisms of BC and mineral fertilizer addition affecting microbial communities and functions associated with soil organic matter (SOM) cycling are poorly understood. We investigated the SOM in physical and chemical fractions, microbial community structure (using phospholipid fatty acid analysis, PLFA) and functions (by analyzing enzymes involved in C and N cycling and Biolog) in a 6-year field experiment with BC and NPK amendment. BC application increased total soil C and particulate organic C for 47.4-50.4% and 63.7-74.6%, respectively. The effects of BC on the microbial community and C-cycling enzymes were dependent on fertilization. Addition of BC alone did not change the microbial community compared with the control, but altered the microbial community structure in conjunction with NPK fertilization. SOM fractions accounted for 55% of the variance in the PLFA-related microbial community structure. The particulate organic N explained the largest variation in the microbial community structure. Microbial metabolic activity strongly increased after BC addition, particularly the utilization of amino acids and amines due to an increase in the activity of proteolytic (l-leucine aminopeptidase) enzymes. These results indicate that microorganisms start to mine N from the SOM to compensate for high C:N ratios after BC application, which consequently accelerate cycling of stable N. Concluding, BC in combination with NPK fertilizer application strongly affected microbial community composition and functions, which consequently influenced SOM cycling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Microbial Community Profiles in Wastewaters from Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems Technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Jałowiecki

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the potential of community-level physiological profiles (CLPPs methodology as an assay for characterization of the metabolic diversity of wastewater samples and to link the metabolic diversity patterns to efficiency of select onsite biological wastewater facilities. Metabolic fingerprints obtained from the selected samples were used to understand functional diversity implied by the carbon substrate shifts. Three different biological facilities of onsite wastewater treatment were evaluated: fixed bed reactor (technology A, trickling filter/biofilter system (technology B, and aerated filter system (the fluidized bed reactor, technology C. High similarities of the microbial community functional structures were found among the samples from the three onsite wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs, as shown by the diversity indices. Principal components analysis (PCA showed that the diversity and CLPPs of microbial communities depended on the working efficiency of the wastewater treatment technologies. This study provided an overall picture of microbial community functional structures of investigated samples in WWTPs and discerned the linkages between microbial communities and technologies of onsite WWTPs used. The results obtained confirmed that metabolic profiles could be used to monitor treatment processes as valuable biological indicators of onsite wastewater treatment technologies efficiency. This is the first step toward understanding relations of technology types with microbial community patterns in raw and treated wastewaters.

  12. Methodical investigations on the determination of metabolic lysine requirements in broiler chickens. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergner, H.; Nguyen Thi Nhan; Wilke, A.

    1987-01-01

    For the estimation of lysine requirement 128 male broiler chickens were used at an age of 7 to 21 days posthatching. They received a lysine-deficient diet composed of wheat and wheat gluten. To this basal diet L-lysine-HCL was supplemented successively resulting in 8 lysine levels ranging from 5.8 to 23.3 g lysine per kg dry matter (DM) (2.2 to 8.7 g lysine per 16 g N). At the end of the two-week feeding period of the experimental diets 14 C-lysine was injected intravenously 1.5 and 5.5 hours after feed withdrawal. During the following 4 hours the exretion of CO 2 and 14 CO 2 was measured. The highest daily gain of 21.5 g was observed in animals fed 13.3 g lysine-kg DM. Lysine concentrations exceeding 18.3 g/kg DM depressed body weight gain. The CO 2 excretion was not influenced by lysine intake. 14 CO 2 excretion was low with diets low in lysine content and increased 3 to 4 times with diets meeting the lysine requirement. Based on measurements 1.5 to 5.5 hours after feed withdrawal the saturation value for lysine was reached at 13.3 g/kg DM. This value was lowered (10.8 g/kg DM), however, if the estimation was carried out 5.5 to 9.5 hours after feed withdrawal. These results suggest a higher metabolic lysine requirement during the earlier period after feed intake. Both, reduced weight gain and non linearity in 14 CO 2 excretion in diets exceeding a lysine content of 18.3 g/kg DM indicate a limited capacity of the organism to degrade excessive lysine. According to the results a lysine requirement betwen 10.8 and 13.3 g/kg DM (27% CP and 660 EFU/sub hen//kg DM) was estimated for broiler chickens 3 weeks posthatching. (author)

  13. Imaging investigation of metabolic and endocrine bone disease of vertebral density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Yuezeng; Tian Xiali; Li Jingxue

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To probe vertebral density of metabolic and endocrine bone disease imaging features, characterize the regional distribution of bone trabecular in sandwich spine. Methods: Thirty-six patients who had the bone density abnormality appearance in radiograms were collected in this study. Twelve patients with sandwich spine were performed lumbar CT scan. Thirty-two healthy volunteers as control group were performed lumbar CT scan too. CT values of two groups were measured from different portions of vertebral body, and then were analysed. Twenty two patients were performed dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). One patient was performed bone histomorphometry. Results: Abnormal density included decreased and increased density. Decreased density was found in different portions of all patients, which divided into general and regional type. Increased density was obviously in vertebrae, including diffusely increased density and sandwich spine. The mean CT values of superior, middle and inferior portions of sandwich vertebral body were (259.94±18.08), (182.96±34.85), (270.34±19.40) HU. The mean CT values of both superior and inferior portions of sandwich vertebral body were higher than that of control group. The mean CT values of superior and inferior portions of sandwich spine were higher than that of middle portion. The difference of mean CT values between superior and inferior portions had no statistical significance. The difference of CT values among the regions of superior and inferior portions had no statistical significance (F=0.457, 0.462, P>0.05). The difference of CT values among the regions of middle portion had statistical significance(F=4.539, P<0.05). The DXA measurement of sandwich spine showed high, normal and low BMD. Conclusion: The sandwich spine is useful to measure superior and inferior portions of sandwich vertebral body if QCT would be performed. Sandwich spine sign can be used as an imaging index of state evaluation. Increased density in

  14. Metabolic therapy for temporal lobe epilepsy in a dish: investigating mechanisms of ketogenic diet using electrophysiological recordings in hippocampal slices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahito Kawamura

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The hippocampus is prone to epileptic seizures and is a key brain region and experimental platform for investigating mechanisms associated with the abnormal neuronal excitability that characterizes a seizure. Accordingly, the hippocampal slice is a common in vitro model to study treatments that may prevent or reduce seizure activity. The ketogenic diet is a metabolic therapy used to treat epilepsy in adults and children for nearly 100 years; it can reduce or eliminate even severe or refractory seizures. New insights into its underlying mechanisms have been revealed by diverse types of electrophysiological recordings in hippocampal slices. Here we review these reports and their relevant mechanistic findings. We acknowledge that a major difficulty in using hippocampal slices is the inability to reproduce precisely the in vivo condition of ketogenic diet feeding in any in vitro preparation, and progress has been made in this in vivo/in vitro transition. Thus far at least three different approaches are reported to reproduce relevant diet effects in the hippocampal slices: (1 direct application of ketone bodies, (2 mimicking the ketogenic diet condition during a whole-cell patch-clamp technique, and (3 reduced glucose incubation of hippocampal slices from ketogenic diet–fed animals. Significant results have been found with each of these methods and provide options for further study into short- and long-term mechanisms including ATP-sensitive potassium channels, vesicular glutamate transporter, pannexin channels and adenosine receptors underlying ketogenic diet and other forms of metabolic therapy.

  15. Investigation on the Metabolic Regulation of pgi gene knockout Escherichia coli by Enzyme Activities and Intracellular Metabolite Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor ‘Aini, A. R.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available An integrated analysis of the cell growth characteristics, enzyme activities, intracellular metabolite concentrations was made to investigate the metabolic regulation of pgi gene knockout Escherichia coli based on batch culture and continuous culture which was performed at the dilution rate of 0.2h-1. The enzymatic study identified that pathways of pentose phosphate, ED pathway and glyoxylate shunt were all active in pgi mutant. The glycolysis enzymes i.e glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, fructose diphosphatase, pyruvate kinase, triose phosphate isomerase were down regulated implying that the inactivation of pgi gene reduced the carbon flux through glycolytic pathway. Meanwhile, the pentose phosphate pathway was active as a major route for intermediary carbohydrate metabolism instead of glycolysis. The pentose phosphate pathway generates most of the major reducing co-factor NADPH as shown by the increased of NADPH/NADP+ ratio in the mutant when compared with the parent strain. The fermentative enzymes such as acetate kinase and lactate dehydrogenase were down regulated in the mutant. Knockout of pgi gene results in the significant increase in the intracellular concentration of glucose-6-phosphate and decrease in the concentration of oxaloacetate. The slow growth rate of the mutant was assumed to be affected by the accumulation of glucose-6-phosphate and imbalance of NADPH reoxidation.

  16. Metabolic Therapy for Temporal Lobe Epilepsy in a Dish: Investigating Mechanisms of Ketogenic Diet using Electrophysiological Recordings in Hippocampal Slices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Masahito Jr.; Ruskin, David N.; Masino, Susan A.

    2016-01-01

    The hippocampus is prone to epileptic seizures and is a key brain region and experimental platform for investigating mechanisms associated with the abnormal neuronal excitability that characterizes a seizure. Accordingly, the hippocampal slice is a common in vitro model to study treatments that may prevent or reduce seizure activity. The ketogenic diet is a metabolic therapy used to treat epilepsy in adults and children for nearly 100 years; it can reduce or eliminate even severe or refractory seizures. New insights into its underlying mechanisms have been revealed by diverse types of electrophysiological recordings in hippocampal slices. Here we review these reports and their relevant mechanistic findings. We acknowledge that a major difficulty in using hippocampal slices is the inability to reproduce precisely the in vivo condition of ketogenic diet feeding in any in vitro preparation, and progress has been made in this in vivo/in vitro transition. Thus far at least three different approaches are reported to reproduce relevant diet effects in the hippocampal slices: (1) direct application of ketone bodies; (2) mimicking the ketogenic diet condition during a whole-cell patch-clamp technique; and (3) reduced glucose incubation of hippocampal slices from ketogenic diet–fed animals. Significant results have been found with each of these methods and provide options for further study into short- and long-term mechanisms including Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels, vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT), pannexin channels and adenosine receptors underlying ketogenic diet and other forms of metabolic therapy. PMID:27847463

  17. A Nested Case-Control Study of Metabolically Defined Body Size Phenotypes and Risk of Colorectal Cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Murphy

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is positively associated with colorectal cancer. Recently, body size subtypes categorised by the prevalence of hyperinsulinaemia have been defined, and metabolically healthy overweight/obese individuals (without hyperinsulinaemia have been suggested to be at lower risk of cardiovascular disease than their metabolically unhealthy (hyperinsulinaemic overweight/obese counterparts. Whether similarly variable relationships exist for metabolically defined body size phenotypes and colorectal cancer risk is unknown.The association of metabolically defined body size phenotypes with colorectal cancer was investigated in a case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC study. Metabolic health/body size phenotypes were defined according to hyperinsulinaemia status using serum concentrations of C-peptide, a marker of insulin secretion. A total of 737 incident colorectal cancer cases and 737 matched controls were divided into tertiles based on the distribution of C-peptide concentration amongst the control population, and participants were classified as metabolically healthy if below the first tertile of C-peptide and metabolically unhealthy if above the first tertile. These metabolic health definitions were then combined with body mass index (BMI measurements to create four metabolic health/body size phenotype categories: (1 metabolically healthy/normal weight (BMI < 25 kg/m2, (2 metabolically healthy/overweight (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2, (3 metabolically unhealthy/normal weight (BMI < 25 kg/m2, and (4 metabolically unhealthy/overweight (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2. Additionally, in separate models, waist circumference measurements (using the International Diabetes Federation cut-points [≥80 cm for women and ≥94 cm for men] were used (instead of BMI to create the four metabolic health/body size phenotype categories. Statistical tests used in the analysis were all two-sided, and a p-value of <0.05 was

  18. Initial investigation of glucose metabolism in mouse brain using enriched 17 O-glucose and dynamic 17 O-MRS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowiak, Robert; Reichardt, Wilfried; Kurzhunov, Dmitry; Schuch, Christian; Leupold, Jochen; Krafft, Axel Joachim; Reisert, Marco; Lange, Thomas; Fischer, Elmar; Bock, Michael

    2017-08-01

    In this initial work, the in vivo degradation of 17 O-labeled glucose was studied during cellular glycolysis. To monitor cellular glucose metabolism, direct 17 O-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was used in the mouse brain at 9.4 T. Non-localized spectra were acquired with a custom-built transmit/receive (Tx/Rx) two-turn surface coil and a free induction decay (FID) sequence with a short TR of 5.4 ms. The dynamics of labeled oxygen in the anomeric 1-OH and 6-CH 2 OH groups was detected using a Hankel-Lanczos singular value decomposition (HLSVD) algorithm for water suppression. Time-resolved 17 O-MRS (temporal resolution, 42/10.5 s) was performed in 10 anesthetized (1.25% isoflurane) mice after injection of a 2.2 M solution containing 2.5 mg/g body weight of differently labeled 17 O-glucose dissolved in 0.9% physiological saline. From a pharmacokinetic model fit of the H 2 17 O concentration-time course, a mean apparent cerebral metabolic rate of 17 O-labeled glucose in mouse brain of CMR Glc  = 0.07 ± 0.02 μmol/g/min was extracted, which is of the same order of magnitude as a literature value of 0.26 ± 0.06 μmol/g/min reported by 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). In addition, we studied the chemical exchange kinetics of aqueous solutions of 17 O-labeled glucose at the C1 and C6 positions with dynamic 17 O-MRS. In conclusion, the results of the exchange and in vivo experiments demonstrate that the C6- 17 OH label in the 6-CH 2 OH group is transformed only glycolytically by the enzyme enolase into the metabolic end-product H 2 17 O, whereas C1- 17 OH ends up in water via direct hydrolysis as well as glycolysis. Therefore, dynamic 17 O-MRS of highly labeled 17 O-glucose could provide a valuable non-radioactive alternative to FDG PET in order to investigate glucose metabolism. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Metaproteomics: Harnessing the power of high performance mass spectrometry to identify the suite of proteins that control metabolic activities in microbial communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettich, Robert L.; Pan, Chongle; Chourey, Karuna; Giannone, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The availability of extensive genome information for many different microbes, including unculturable species in mixed communities from environmental samples, has enabled systems-biology interrogation by providing a means to access genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic information. To this end, metaproteomics exploits the power of high performance mass spectrometry for extensive characterization of the complete suite of proteins expressed by a microbial community in an environmental sample. PMID:23469896

  20. The maturing of microbial ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Thomas M

    2006-09-01

    A.J. Kluyver and C.B. van Niel introduced many scientists to the exceptional metabolic capacity of microbes and their remarkable ability to adapt to changing environments in The Microbe's Contribution to Biology. Beyond providing an overview of the physiology and adaptability of microbes, the book outlined many of the basic principles for the emerging discipline of microbial ecology. While the study of pure cultures was highlighted, provided a unifying framework for understanding the vast metabolic potential of microbes and their roles in the global cycling of elements, extrapolation from pure cultures to natural environments has often been overshadowed by microbiologists inability to culture many of the microbes seen in natural environments. A combination of genomic approaches is now providing a culture-independent view of the microbial world, revealing a more diverse and dynamic community of microbes than originally anticipated. As methods for determining the diversity of microbial communities become increasingly accessible, a major challenge to microbial ecologists is to link the structure of natural microbial communities with their functions. This article presents several examples from studies of aquatic and terrestrial microbial communities in which culture and culture-independent methods are providing an enhanced appreciation for the microbe's contribution to the evolution and maintenance of life on Earth, and offers some thoughts about the graduate-level educational programs needed to enhance the maturing field of microbial ecology.

  1. Deep subsurface microbial processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovley, D.R.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1995-01-01

    Information on the microbiology of the deep subsurface is necessary in order to understand the factors controlling the rate and extent of the microbially catalyzed redox reactions that influence the geophysical properties of these environments. Furthermore, there is an increasing threat that deep aquifers, an important drinking water resource, may be contaminated by man's activities, and there is a need to predict the extent to which microbial activity may remediate such contamination. Metabolically active microorganisms can be recovered from a diversity of deep subsurface environments. The available evidence suggests that these microorganisms are responsible for catalyzing the oxidation of organic matter coupled to a variety of electron acceptors just as microorganisms do in surface sediments, but at much slower rates. The technical difficulties in aseptically sampling deep subsurface sediments and the fact that microbial processes in laboratory incubations of deep subsurface material often do not mimic in situ processes frequently necessitate that microbial activity in the deep subsurface be inferred through nonmicrobiological analyses of ground water. These approaches include measurements of dissolved H2, which can predict the predominant microbially catalyzed redox reactions in aquifers, as well as geochemical and groundwater flow modeling, which can be used to estimate the rates of microbial processes. Microorganisms recovered from the deep subsurface have the potential to affect the fate of toxic organics and inorganic contaminants in groundwater. Microbial activity also greatly influences 1 the chemistry of many pristine groundwaters and contributes to such phenomena as porosity development in carbonate aquifers, accumulation of undesirably high concentrations of dissolved iron, and production of methane and hydrogen sulfide. Although the last decade has seen a dramatic increase in interest in deep subsurface microbiology, in comparison with the study of

  2. Iron metabolism in experimental rickets. Pt. 2. Pharmacological investigations on ferrokinetics in rat rickets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronicka, E.

    1975-01-01

    Investigations of ferrokinetics were performed using 59 Fe isotope in experimental rickets. It was found that rickets does not cause in rats detectable changes in plasma iron turnover and in the half-time of iron clearance from the plasma. Only a transient impairment of iron utilization by the erythrocytes of rats with rickets was observed. In the blood cell counts no differences were revealed. Besides that a lower weight of the liver and a higher weight of the spleen were observed in rats with rickets as compared with controls. These organs showed a different degree of 59 Fe deposition after a single intravenous dose between both groups. No differences were found in the liver iron stores expressed as the level of non-heme iron. On the basis of the obtained results and data from the literature the author suggests the possibility of changes in the absorption of iron by the reticulo-endothelial system in rickets. In severe osseous changes caused by rickets a transient inhibition of erythropoiesis is possible. (author)

  3. Investigating the Burden of Chronic Pain: An Inflammatory and Metabolic Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly T. Sibille

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Chronic pain is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, predominated by cardiovascular disease and cancer. Investigating related risk factor measures may elucidate the biological burden of chronic pain. Objectives. We hypothesized that chronic pain severity would be positively associated with the risk factor composite. Methods. Data from 12,982 participants in the 6th Tromsø study were analyzed. Questionnaires included demographics, health behaviors, medical comorbidities, and chronic pain symptoms. The risk factor composite was comprised of body mass index, fibrinogen, C-reactive protein, and triglycerides. Chronic pain severity was characterized by frequency, intensity, time/duration, and total number of pain sites. Results. Individuals with chronic pain had a greater risk factor composite than individuals without chronic pain controlling for covariates and after excluding inflammation-related health conditions (p<0.001. A significant “dose-response” relationship was demonstrated with pain severity (p<0.001. In individuals with chronic pain, the risk factor composite varied by health behavior, exercise, lower levels and smoking, and higher levels. Discussion. The risk factor composite was higher in individuals with chronic pain, greater with increasing pain severity, and influenced by health behaviors. Conclusions. Identification of a biological composite sensitive to pain severity and adaptive/maladaptive behaviors would have significant clinical and research utility.

  4. Investigation of the role of the enzymes of xenobiotic metabolism in the resistance of insects to insecticides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonova, I.N.; Nedel'kina, S.V.; Naumova, N.B.; Salganik, R.I.

    1986-01-01

    The activity of three enzyme systems of xenobiotic metabolism: cytochrome P-450-dependent monooxygenases, nonspecific esterases, and glutathione S-transferases, was investigated on a sensitive strain (S) of the housefly M. domestica L. and strains resistant to tetrametrin (R/sub tetr/), permetrin (R/sub perm/), mecarbenyl (R/sub mec/), and chlorophos (R/sub chlor/). In the strains R/sub tetr/ and R/sub mec/, in comparison with strain S, an increase of 2.7 and 2.3-fold, respectively, in the activity of microsomal monooxygenases was observed. The position of the maxima of the CO-differential spectra of cytochrome P-450 in all the investigated resistant strains, with the exception of R/sub chlor/, is shifted by 1-2 nm in the shortwave direction. The activity of glutathione S-transferases in the strain R/sub tetr/ proved elevated in comparison with the strain S. The data of an investigation of the total esterase activity and the data of starch gel electrophoresis are evidence of quantitative and qualitative differences between the strains. For all the resistant strains except for R/sub mec/, supplementary zones of esterase activity appear. The data obtained are discussed in connection with the resistance of the insects to insecticides

  5. Investigation into endogenous N metabolism in 15N-labelled pigs. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergner, H.; Bergner, U.; Adam, K.

    1984-01-01

    4 male castrated pigs (55-65 kg) either received a wheat-fish meal diet (1 and 2) or a wheat-horse bean diet (3 and 4) without straw meal supplement (1 and 3) or with a supplement of 20% dry matter (2 and 4). In order to investigate whether a 15 N labelling of the pigs is also possible with a protein excess in the ration, the animals received 24.8 g (1 and 2) and 11.6 g crude protein/kg/sup 0.75/ live weight (3 and 4). During a 10-day 15 N-labelling 385 mg 15 N excess ( 15 N') per kg/sup 0.75/ were applied with 15 N labelling the following quotas of the applied 15 N amount were incorporated: 1 = 10.2%, 2 = 7.2%, 3 = 18.7%, 4 = 14.4%. 15 N excretion in both TCA fractions of feces showed a highly significant positive correlation to the increasing content of crude fibre in the 4 diets. The immediate 15 N incorporation into the TCA-precipitable fraction of feces proves that 15 N enters the large intestine endogenously and serves bacterial protein synthesis. 3 days after the last 15 application the pigs were killed. The values of atom-% 15 N' were determined in the TCA-precipitable blood plasma and in the TCA-precipitable fraction of the liver. The other examined organs and tissues showed smaller differences between the test animals. The results show that the 15 N labelling of tissues and organs of pigs is also possible at a high level of protein supply by means of an oral application of [ 15 N] ammonia salts. (author)

  6. Functional bacteria and process metabolism of the Denitrifying Sulfur conversion-associated Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal (DS-EBPR) system: An investigation by operating the system from deterioration to restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Gang; Wu, Di; Hao, Tianwei; Mackey, Hamish Robert; Wei, Li; Wang, Haiguang; Chen, Guanghao

    2016-05-15

    A sulfur conversion-associated Enhanced Biological Phosphorus (P) Removal (EBPR) system is being developed to cater for the increasing needs to treat saline/brackish wastewater resulting from seawater intrusion into groundwater and sewers and frequent use of sulfate coagulants during drinking water treatment, as well as to meet the demand for eutrophication control in warm climate regions. However, the major functional bacteria and metabolism in this emerging biological nutrient removal system are still poorly understood. This study was thus designed to explore the functional microbes and metabolism in this new EBPR system by manipulating the deterioration, failure and restoration of a lab-scale system. This was achieved by changing the mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) concentration to monitor and evaluate the relationships among sulfur conversion (including sulfate reduction and sulfate production), P removal, variation in microbial community structures, and stoichiometric parameters. The results show that the stable Denitrifying Sulfur conversion-associated EBPR (DS-EBPR) system was enriched by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (SOB). These bacteria synergistically participated in this new EBPR process, thereby inducing an appropriate level of sulfur conversion crucial for achieving a stable DS-EBPR performance, i.e. maintaining sulfur conversion intensity at 15-40 mg S/L, corresponding to an optimal sludge concentration of 6.5 g/L. This range of sulfur conversion favors microbial community competition and various energy flows from internal polymers (i.e. polysulfide or elemental sulfur (poly-S(2-)/S(0)) and poly-β-hydroxyalkanoates (PHA)) for P removal. If this range was exceeded, the system might deteriorate or even fail due to enrichment of glycogen-accumulating organisms (GAOs). Four methods of restoring the failed system were investigated: increasing the sludge concentration, lowering the salinity or doubling the COD

  7. Microbial transformation of xenobiotics for environmental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microbial transformation of xenobiotics for environmental bioremediation. ... anaerobic and reductive biotransformation by co-metabolic processes and an overview of ... of xenobiotic compounds in context to the modern day biotechnology.

  8. Microbial food web components, bulk metabolism, and single-cell physiology of piconeuston in surface microlayers of high-altitude lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo eSarmento

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Sharp boundaries in the physical environment are usually associated with abrupt shifts in organism’s abundance, activity and diversity. Aquatic surface microlayers (SML form a steep gradient between two contrasted environments, the atmosphere and surface waters, where they regulate the gas exchange between both environments. They usually harbor an abundant and active microbial life: the neuston. Few ecosystems are subjected to such a high UVR regime as high altitude lakes during summer. Here, we measured bulk estimates of heterotrophic activity, community structure and single-cell physiological properties by flow cytometry in 19 high-altitude remote Pyrenean lakes and compared the biological processes in the SML with those in the underlying surface waters. Phototrophic picoplankton (PPP populations, were generally present in high abundances and in those lakes containing PPP populations with phycoerythrin (PE, total PPP abundance was higher at the SML. Heterotrophic nanoflagellates (HNF were also more abundant in the SML. Bacteria in the SµL had lower leucine incorporation rates, lower percentages of live cells, and higher numbers of highly-respiring cells, likely resulting in a lower growth efficiency. No simple and direct linear relationships could be found between microbial abundances or activities and environmental variables, but factor analysis revealed that, despite their physical proximity, microbial life in SML and underlying waters was governed by different and independent processes. Overall, we demonstrate that piconeuston in high altitude lakes has specific features different from those of the picoplankton, and that they are highly affected by potential stressful environmental factors, such as high UVR radiation.

  9. Investigation of microbial community structure in constructed mangrove microcosms receiving wastewater-borne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ya-fen; Wu, Yan; Pi, Na; Tam, Nora Fung-yee

    2014-01-01

    The study aims to examine relationships between microbial community structure and mixed pollutants of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in constructed wetland microcosms, planted with Excoecaria agallocha or Kandelia obovata, two common mangrove plant species, and under two tidal regimes, everyday tidal (Te) and no tidal flooding (Tn). Results showed both microbial community structure and the retained amounts of pollutants were significantly determined by tidal regime, while the effect of plant species was small. Higher amounts of PAHs but lower amounts of PBDEs were always retained in sediments under Te than Tn regimes. Accordingly, temporal and vertical distributions of microbial community structure differed greatly between the two tidal regimes. Redundancy analysis further revealed significant correlation between a subgroup of the mixed PAHs and PBDEs with variation in microbial community structure. The findings will help to propose specific strategies to improve the bioremediation efficiency of constructed wetland. - Highlights: • We found synchronous degradation of PAHs and PBDEs in constructed mangrove microcosms. • Retained amounts of PAHs and PBDEs were determined mainly by tidal regime. • Tidal regime in turn significantly determined microbial community structure. • Variations of microbial EL-FAME profiles were more affected by PBDEs than PAHs. • Bap and BDE-154 were two most influential pollutants on microbial community structure. - Sedimentary microbial community structure was significantly determined by tidal regime, which in turn determined retained amounts of PAHs and PBDEs in constructed mangrove microcosms

  10. Microbial quality of a marine tidal pool

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Genthe, Bettina

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the source of microbial pollution to a tidal pool was investigated. Both adjacent seawater which could contribute to possible faecal pollution and potential direct bather pollution were studied. The microbial quality of the marine...

  11. Primary chronic osteomyelitis of the jaw--a microbial investigation using cultivation and DNA analysis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frid, Paula; Tornes, Knut; Nielsen, Øyunn; Skaug, Nils

    2009-05-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the infectious etiology of primary chronic osteomyelitis (PCO) of the jaw using an extraoral sampling approach and molecular methods. In this pilot study, bone biopsies from the mandibles of 5 patients with PCO were sampled with an extraoral sterile approach. Cultivation and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were performed. Two of the biopsies yielded growth of Propionebacterium acnes. One biopsy also demonstrated Staphylococcus capitis. The biopsies with bacterial growth were also positive for the same bacteria by PCR analysis. No specific bacterial etiology was demonstrated. However, the results of bacterial cultivation and PCR analysis were in agreement. Based on these findings, the molecular procedure used in this study can be considered to be suitable for identification of bacterial specimens in mandibular biopsies. Further studies are needed with larger patient populations to confirm these findings.

  12. Biodegradation of different petroleum hydrocarbons by free and immobilized microbial consortia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Tiantian; Pi, Yongrui; Bao, Mutai; Xu, Nana; Li, Yiming; Lu, Jinren

    2015-12-01

    The efficiencies of free and immobilized microbial consortia in the degradation of different types of petroleum hydrocarbons were investigated. In this study, the biodegradation rates of naphthalene, phenanthrene, pyrene and crude oil reached about 80%, 30%, 56% and 48% under the optimum environmental conditions of free microbial consortia after 7 d. We evaluated five unique co-metabolic substances with petroleum hydrocarbons, α-lactose was the best co-metabolic substance among glucose, α-lactose, soluble starch, yeast powder and urea. The orthogonal biodegradation analysis results showed that semi-coke was the best immobilized carrier followed by walnut shell and activated carbon. Meanwhile, the significance of various factors that contribute to the biodegradation of semi-coke immobilized microbial consortia followed the order of: α-lactose > semi-coke > sodium alginate > CaCl2. Moreover, the degradation rate of the immobilized microbial consortium (47%) was higher than that of a free microbial consortium (26%) under environmental conditions such as the crude oil concentration of 3 g L(-1), NaCl concentration of 20 g L(-1), pH at 7.2-7.4 and temperature of 25 °C after 5 d. SEM and FTIR analyses revealed that the structure of semi-coke became more porous and easily adhered to the microbial consortium; the functional groups (e.g., hydroxy and phosphate) were identified in the microbial consortium and were changed by immobilization. This study demonstrated that the ability of microbial adaptation to the environment can be improved by immobilization which expands the application fields of microbial remediation.

  13. Direct fed microbial supplementation repartitions host energy to the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, R; Croom, J; Ali, R A; Ballou, A L; Smith, C D; Ashwell, C M; Hassan, H M; Chiang, C-C; Koci, M D

    2012-08-01

    Direct fed microbials and probiotics are used to promote health in livestock and poultry; however, their mechanism of action is still poorly understood. We previously reported that direct fed microbial supplementation in young broilers reduced ileal respiration without changing whole-body energy expenditure. The current studies were conducted to further investigate the effects of a direct fed microbial on energy metabolism in different tissues of broilers. One hundred ninety-two 1-d-old broiler chicks (16 chicks/pen) were randomly assigned to 2 dietary groups: standard control starter diet (CSD) and CSD plus direct fed microbial (DFMD; 0.3%) with 6 pens/treatment. Body weight, feed consumption, whole-body energy expenditure, organ mass, tissue respiration rates, and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) ATP concentrations were measured to estimate changes in energy metabolism. No differences in whole body energy expenditure or BW gain were observed; however, decreased ileal O(2) respiration (P energy consumption by PBMC corresponded with an altered immune response, broilers were immunized with sheep red blood cells (SRBC) and assayed for differences in their humoral response. The DFMD-fed broilers had a faster rate of antigen specific IgG production (P direct fed microbial used in this study resulted in energy re-partitioning to the immune system and an increase in antibody production independent of changes in whole body metabolism or growth performance.

  14. Synthesising acid mine drainage to maintain and exploit indigenous mining micro-algae and microbial assemblies for biotreatment investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orandi, Sanaz; Lewis, David M

    2013-02-01

    The stringent regulations for discharging acid mine drainage (AMD) has led to increased attention on traditional or emerging treatment technologies to establish efficient and sustainable management for mine effluents. To assess new technologies, laboratory investigations on AMD treatment are necessary requiring a consistent supply of AMD with a stable composition, thus limiting environmental variability and uncertainty during controlled experiments. Additionally, biotreatment systems using live cells, particularly micro-algae, require appropriate nutrient availability. Synthetic AMD (Syn-AMD) meets these requirements. However, to date, most of the reported Syn-AMDs are composed of only a few selected heavy metals without considering the complexity of actual AMD. In this study, AMD was synthesised based on the typical AMD characteristics from a copper mine where biotreatment is being considered using indigenous AMD algal-microbes. Major cations (Ca, Na, Cu, Zn, Mg, Mn and Ni), trace metals (Al, Fe, Ag, Na, Co, Mo, Pb and Cr), essential nutrients (N, P and C) and high SO(4) were incorporated into the Syn-AMD. This paper presents the preparation of chemically complex Syn-AMD and the challenges associated with combining metal salts of varying solubility that is not restricted to one particular mine site. The general approach reported and the particular reagents used can produce alternative Syn-AMD with varying compositions. The successful growth of indigenous AMD algal-microbes in the Syn-AMD demonstrated its applicability as appropriate generic media for cultivation and maintenance of mining microorganisms for future biotreatment studies.

  15. Anti-Microbial Activity and Spectro-Chemical Investigation of Ink Extracts of Sepiella inermis (Van Hasselt 1835

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasal VASANTHARAJA

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The crude petroleum ether and methanol ink extracts of Sepiella inermis were tested for their antimicrobial activity against human pathogenic fungi and bacteria by disc diffusion method. Spectral analysis was carried out by UV-VIS spectrophotometer, FT-IR, Raman IR and GC-MS. Of the two solvent extracts, only methanol extract was active and no activity was detected in petroleum ether extract. The human pathogenic fungus Candida albicans and bacterium Proteus vulgaris were found to be highly sensitive, with an inhibition zone of 20 and 19 mm respectively. GC-MS of methanol ink extract revealed sixteen compounds belonging to the derivatives of dihydroxy indole-2-carboxylic acid and dihydroxyindole. These investigations proved that methanol ink extract of Sepiella inermis possess significant antimicrobial property against both fungus and gram –ve bacteria. Since ink of sepia is available abundantly as a waste material, studies focused on isolation and characterization of bioactive substances pave the way for new antimicrobial compounds.

  16. Diet simplification selects for high gut microbial diversity and strong fermenting ability in high-altitude pikas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huan; Qu, Jiapeng; Li, Tongtong; Wirth, Stephan; Zhang, Yanming; Zhao, Xinquan; Li, Xiangzhen

    2018-06-03

    The gut microbiota in mammals plays a key role in host metabolism and adaptation. However, relatively little is known regarding to how the animals adapts to extreme environments through regulating gut microbial diversity and function. Here, we investigated the diet, gut microbiota, short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) profiles, and cellulolytic activity from two common pika (Ochotona spp.) species in China, including Plateau pika (Ochotona curzoniae) from the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau and Daurian pika (Ochotona daurica) from the Inner Mongolia Grassland. Despite a partial diet overlap, Plateau pikas harbored lower diet diversity than Daurian pikas. Some bacteria (e.g., Prevotella and Ruminococcus) associated with fiber degradation were enriched in Plateau pikas. They harbored higher gut microbial diversity, total SCFA concentration, and cellulolytic activity than Daurian pikas. Interestingly, cellulolytic activity was positively correlated with the gut microbial diversity and SCFAs. Gut microbial communities and SCFA profiles were segregated structurally between host species. PICRUSt metagenome predictions demonstrated that microbial genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism and energy metabolism were overrepresented in the gut microbiota of Plateau pikas. Our results demonstrate that Plateau pikas harbor a stronger fermenting ability for the plant-based diet than Daurian pikas via gut microbial fermentation. The enhanced ability for utilization of plant-based diets in Plateau pikas may be partly a kind of microbiota adaptation for more energy requirements in cold and hypoxic high-altitude environments.

  17. Microbial diversity in sediment ecosystems (evaporites domes, microbial mats and crusts of hypersaline Laguna Tebenquiche, Salar de Atacama, Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Beatriz Fernandez

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We combined nucleic acid-based molecular methods, biogeochemical measurements and physicochemical characteristics to investigate microbial sedimentary ecosystems of Laguna Tebenquiche, Atacama Desert, Chile. Molecular diversity and biogeochemistry of hypersaline microbial mats, rhizome-associated concretions and an endoevaporite were compared with: The V4 hypervariable region of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified by pyrosequencing to analyze the total microbial diversity (i.e., bacteria and archaea in bulk samples and, in addition, in detail on a millimeter scale in one microbial mat and in one evaporite. Archaea were more abundant than bacteria. Euryarchaeota was one of the most abundant phyla in all samples, and particularly dominant (97% of total diversity in the most lithified ecosystem, the evaporite. Most of the euryarchaeal OTUs could be assigned to the class Halobacteria or anaerobic and methanogenic archaea. Planctomycetes potentially also play a key role in mats and rhizome-associated concretions, notably the aerobic organoheterotroph members of the class Phycisphaerae. In addition to cyanobacteria, members of Chromatiales and possibly the candidate family Chlorotrichaceae contributed to photosynthetic carbon fixation. Other abundant uncultured taxa such as the candidate division MSBL1, the uncultured MBGB and the phylum Acetothermia potentially play an important metabolic role in these ecosystems. Lithifying microbial mats contained calcium carbonate precipitates, whereas endoevoporites consisted of gypsum and halite. Biogeochemical measurements revealed that based on depth profiles of O2 and sulfide, metabolic activities were much higher in the non-lithifying mat (peaking in the least lithified systems than in lithifying mats with the lowest activity in endoevaporites. This trend in decreasing microbial activity reflects the increase in salinity, which may play an important role in the biodiversity.

  18. A pilot study to investigate effects of inulin on Caco-2 cells through in vitro metabolic fingerprinting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, R.-J.A.N.; Wessels, E.C.H.H.; Sandt, J.J.M. van de; Venema, K.; Schaafsma, G.; Greef, J. van der; Nesselrooij, J.H.J. van

    2003-01-01

    Metabolic fingerprints are novel measurement tools to evaluate the biochemical status of a living organism by using 1H NMR and multivariate data analysis (MVDA). In this way, a quick evaluation of changes in health or diseased state can be made, reflected in alterations of metabolic patterns.

  19. Hand Hygiene Practices and Microbial Investigation of Hand Contact Swab among Physiotherapists in an Ebola Endemic Region: Implications for Public Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibeneme, S; Maduako, V; Ibeneme, G C; Ezuma, A; Ettu, T U; Onyemelukwe, N F; Limaye, D; Fortwengel, G

    2017-01-01

    Hand hygiene practices (HHP), as a critical component of infection prevention/control, were investigated among physiotherapists in an Ebola endemic region. A standardized instrument was administered to 44 randomly selected physiotherapists (23 males and 21 females), from three tertiary hospitals in Enugu, Nigeria. Fifteen participants (aged 22-59 years) participated in focus group discussions (FGDs) and comprised 19 participants in a subsequent laboratory study. After treatment, the palms/fingers of physiotherapists were swabbed and cultured, then incubated aerobically overnight at 37°C, and examined for microbial growths. An antibiogram of the bacterial isolates was obtained. The majority (34/77.3%) of physiotherapists were aware of the HHP protocol, yet only 15/44.1% rated self-compliance at 71-100%. FGDs identified forgetfulness/inadequate HHP materials/infrastructure as the major barriers to HHP. Staphylococcus aureus were the most prevalent organisms, prior to (8/53.33%) and after (4/26.67%) HPP, while Pseudomonas spp. were acquired thereafter. E. coli were the most antibiotic resistant microbes but were completely removed after HHP. Ciprofloxacin and streptomycin were the most effective antibiotics. Poor implementation of HPP was observed due to inadequate materials/infrastructure/poor behavioral orientation. Possibly, some HPP materials were contaminated; hence, new microbes were acquired. Since HPP removed the most antibiotic resistant microbes, it might be more effective in infection control than antibiotic medication.

  20. Hand Hygiene Practices and Microbial Investigation of Hand Contact Swab among Physiotherapists in an Ebola Endemic Region: Implications for Public Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ibeneme

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hand hygiene practices (HHP, as a critical component of infection prevention/control, were investigated among physiotherapists in an Ebola endemic region. Method. A standardized instrument was administered to 44 randomly selected physiotherapists (23 males and 21 females, from three tertiary hospitals in Enugu, Nigeria. Fifteen participants (aged 22–59 years participated in focus group discussions (FGDs and comprised 19 participants in a subsequent laboratory study. After treatment, the palms/fingers of physiotherapists were swabbed and cultured, then incubated aerobically overnight at 37°C, and examined for microbial growths. An antibiogram of the bacterial isolates was obtained. Results. The majority (34/77.3% of physiotherapists were aware of the HHP protocol, yet only 15/44.1% rated self-compliance at 71–100%. FGDs identified forgetfulness/inadequate HHP materials/infrastructure as the major barriers to HHP. Staphylococcus aureus were the most prevalent organisms, prior to (8/53.33% and after (4/26.67% HPP, while Pseudomonas spp. were acquired thereafter. E. coli were the most antibiotic resistant microbes but were completely removed after HHP. Ciprofloxacin and streptomycin were the most effective antibiotics. Conclusion. Poor implementation of HPP was observed due to inadequate materials/infrastructure/poor behavioral orientation. Possibly, some HPP materials were contaminated; hence, new microbes were acquired. Since HPP removed the most antibiotic resistant microbes, it might be more effective in infection control than antibiotic medication.

  1. Hand Hygiene Practices and Microbial Investigation of Hand Contact Swab among Physiotherapists in an Ebola Endemic Region: Implications for Public Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maduako, V.; Ibeneme, G. C.; Ezuma, A.; Ettu, T. U.; Onyemelukwe, N. F.; Fortwengel, G.

    2017-01-01

    Background Hand hygiene practices (HHP), as a critical component of infection prevention/control, were investigated among physiotherapists in an Ebola endemic region. Method A standardized instrument was administered to 44 randomly selected physiotherapists (23 males and 21 females), from three tertiary hospitals in Enugu, Nigeria. Fifteen participants (aged 22–59 years) participated in focus group discussions (FGDs) and comprised 19 participants in a subsequent laboratory study. After treatment, the palms/fingers of physiotherapists were swabbed and cultured, then incubated aerobically overnight at 37°C, and examined for microbial growths. An antibiogram of the bacterial isolates was obtained. Results The majority (34/77.3%) of physiotherapists were aware of the HHP protocol, yet only 15/44.1% rated self-compliance at 71–100%. FGDs identified forgetfulness/inadequate HHP materials/infrastructure as the major barriers to HHP. Staphylococcus aureus were the most prevalent organisms, prior to (8/53.33%) and after (4/26.67%) HPP, while Pseudomonas spp. were acquired thereafter. E. coli were the most antibiotic resistant microbes but were completely removed after HHP. Ciprofloxacin and streptomycin were the most effective antibiotics. Conclusion Poor implementation of HPP was observed due to inadequate materials/infrastructure/poor behavioral orientation. Possibly, some HPP materials were contaminated; hence, new microbes were acquired. Since HPP removed the most antibiotic resistant microbes, it might be more effective in infection control than antibiotic medication. PMID:28691027

  2. Investigation of the role of the calvin cycle and C1 metabolism during HCHO metabolism in gaseous HCHO-treated petunia under light and dark conditions using 13C-NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Huiqun; Zhang, Wei; Tang, Lijuan; Han, Shuang; Wang, Xinjia; Zhou, Shengen; Li, Kunzhi; Chen, Limei

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that formaldehyde (HCHO) absorbed by plants can be assimilated through the Calvin cycle or C1 metabolism. Our previous study indicated that Petunia hybrida could effectively eliminate HCHO from HCHO-polluted air. To understand the roles of C1 metabolism and the Calvin cycle during HCHO metabolism and detoxification in petunia plants treated with gaseous H(13)CHO under light and dark conditions. Aseptically grown petunia plants were treated with gaseous H(13)CHO under dark and light conditions. The metabolites generated from HCHO detoxification in petunia were investigated using (13)C-NMR. [2-(13)C]glycine (Gly) was generated via C1 metabolism and [U-(13)C]glucose (Gluc) was produced through the Calvin cycle simultaneously in petunia treated with low-level gaseous H(13)CHO under light conditions. Generation of [2-(13)C]Gly decreased whereas [U-(13) C]Gluc and [U-(13)C]fructose (Fruc) production increased greatly under high-level gaseous H(13)CHO stress in the light. In contrast, [U-(13)C]Gluc and [U-(13)C] Fruc production decreased greatly and [2-(13)C]Gly generation increased significantly under low-level and high-level gaseous H(13)CHO stress in the dark. C1 metabolism and the Calvin cycle contributed differently to HCHO metabolism and detoxification in gaseous H(13CHO-treated petunia plants. As the level of gaseous HCHO increased, the role of C1 metabolism decreased and the role of the Calvin cycle increased under light conditions. However, opposite changes were observed in petunia plants under dark conditions. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Omics-Based Strategies in Precision Medicine: Toward a Paradigm Shift in Inborn Errors of Metabolism Investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdellah Tebani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The rise of technologies that simultaneously measure thousands of data points represents the heart of systems biology. These technologies have had a huge impact on the discovery of next-generation diagnostics, biomarkers, and drugs in the precision medicine era. Systems biology aims to achieve systemic exploration of complex interactions in biological systems. Driven by high-throughput omics technologies and the computational surge, it enables multi-scale and insightful overviews of cells, organisms, and populations. Precision medicine capitalizes on these conceptual and technological advancements and stands on two main pillars: data generation and data modeling. High-throughput omics technologies allow the retrieval of comprehensive and holistic biological information, whereas computational capabilities enable high-dimensional data modeling and, therefore, accessible and user-friendly visualization. Furthermore, bioinformatics has enabled comprehensive multi-omics and clinical data integration for insightful interpretation. Despite their promise, the translation of these technologies into clinically actionable tools has been slow. In this review, we present state-of-the-art multi-omics data analysis strategies in a clinical context. The challenges of omics-based biomarker translation are discussed. Perspectives regarding the use of multi-omics approaches for inborn errors of metabolism (IEM are presented by introducing a new paradigm shift in addressing IEM investigations in the post-genomic era.

  4. Omics-Based Strategies in Precision Medicine: Toward a Paradigm Shift in Inborn Errors of Metabolism Investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebani, Abdellah; Afonso, Carlos; Marret, Stéphane; Bekri, Soumeya

    2016-09-14

    The rise of technologies that simultaneously measure thousands of data points represents the heart of systems biology. These technologies have had a huge impact on the discovery of next-generation diagnostics, biomarkers, and drugs in the precision medicine era. Systems biology aims to achieve systemic exploration of complex interactions in biological systems. Driven by high-throughput omics technologies and the computational surge, it enables multi-scale and insightful overviews of cells, organisms, and populations. Precision medicine capitalizes on these conceptual and technological advancements and stands on two main pillars: data generation and data modeling. High-throughput omics technologies allow the retrieval of comprehensive and holistic biological information, whereas computational capabilities enable high-dimensional data modeling and, therefore, accessible and user-friendly visualization. Furthermore, bioinformatics has enabled comprehensive multi-omics and clinical data integration for insightful interpretation. Despite their promise, the translation of these technologies into clinically actionable tools has been slow. In this review, we present state-of-the-art multi-omics data analysis strategies in a clinical context. The challenges of omics-based biomarker translation are discussed. Perspectives regarding the use of multi-omics approaches for inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) are presented by introducing a new paradigm shift in addressing IEM investigations in the post-genomic era.

  5. Investigations to determine whether viable microorganisms are required during intestinal lactose hydrolysis of fermented milk products by microbial ß-galactosidase using gnotobiotic Göttingen minipigs

    OpenAIRE

    Winchenbach, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    The most common reason worldwide for the indigestibility of milk is the lack of ß-galactosidases in the small intestine, leading to the malabsorbtion of lactose. Fermented dairy products are very often much better tolerated than raw (not fermented) milk, because of the microbial ß-galactosidases they contain. The aim of this thesis was to elucidate the question as to weather lactose hydrolysis in the small intestine requires the presence of living bacteria (with their microbial ß-galac...

  6. Global microbialization of coral reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Andreas F; Fairoz, Mohamed F M; Kelly, Linda W; Nelson, Craig E; Dinsdale, Elizabeth A; Edwards, Robert A; Giles, Steve; Hatay, Mark; Hisakawa, Nao; Knowles, Ben; Lim, Yan Wei; Maughan, Heather; Pantos, Olga; Roach, Ty N F; Sanchez, Savannah E; Silveira, Cynthia B; Sandin, Stuart; Smith, Jennifer E; Rohwer, Forest

    2016-04-25

    Microbialization refers to the observed shift in ecosystem trophic structure towards higher microbial biomass and energy use. On coral reefs, the proximal causes of microbialization are overfishing and eutrophication, both of which facilitate enhanced growth of fleshy algae, conferring a competitive advantage over calcifying corals and coralline algae. The proposed mechanism for this competitive advantage is the DDAM positive feedback loop (dissolved organic carbon (DOC), disease, algae, microorganism), where DOC released by ungrazed fleshy algae supports copiotrophic, potentially pathogenic bacterial communities, ultimately harming corals and maintaining algal competitive dominance. Using an unprecedented data set of >400 samples from 60 coral reef sites, we show that the central DDAM predictions are consistent across three ocean basins. Reef algal cover is positively correlated with lower concentrations of DOC and higher microbial abundances. On turf and fleshy macroalgal-rich reefs, higher relative abundances of copiotrophic microbial taxa were identified. These microbial communities shift their metabolic potential for carbohydrate degradation from the more energy efficient Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway on coral-dominated reefs to the less efficient Entner-Doudoroff and pentose phosphate pathways on algal-dominated reefs. This 'yield-to-power' switch by microorganism directly threatens reefs via increased hypoxia and greater CO2 release from the microbial respiration of DOC.

  7. Microbial additives in the composting process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noelly de Queiroz Ribeiro

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Composting is the process of natural degradation of organic matter carried out by environmental microorganisms whose metabolic activities cause the mineralization and partial humification of substances in the pile. This compost can be beneficially applied to the soil as organic fertilizer in horticulture and agriculture. The number of studies involving microbial inoculants has been growing, and they aim to improve processes such as composting. However, the behavior of these inoculants and other microorganisms during the composting process have not yet been described. In this context, this work aimed to investigate the effects of using a microbial inoculum that can improve the composting process and to follow the bacterial population dynamics throughout the process using the high-resolution melt (HRM technique. To do so, we analysed four compost piles inoculated with Bacillus cereus, Bacillus megaterium, B. cereus + B. megaterium and a control with no inoculum. The analyses were carried out using samples collected at different stages of the process (5th to 110th days. The results showed that the bacterial inocula influenced the process of composting, altering the breakdown of cellulose and hemicelluloses and causing alterations to the temperature and nitrogen levels throughout the composting process. The use of a universal primer (rDNA 16S allowed to follow the microbial succession during the process. However, the design of a specific primer is necessary to follow the inoculum throughout the composting process with more accuracy.

  8. First Investigation of Microbial Community Composition in the Bridge (Gadeok Channel) between the Jinhae-Masan Bay and the South Sea of Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jiyoung; Lim, Jae-Hyun; Park, Junhyung; Youn, Seok-Hyun; Oh, Hyun-Ju; Kim, Ju-Hyoung; Kim, Myung Kyum; Cho, Hyeyoun; Yoon, Joo-Eun; Kim, Soyeon; Markkandan, Kesavan; Park, Ki-Tae; Kim, Il-Nam

    2018-02-01

    Microbial community composition varies based on seasonal dynamics (summer: strongly stratified water column; autumn: weakly stratified water column; winter: vertically homogeneous water column) and vertical distributions (surface, middle, and bottom depths) in the Gadeok Channel, which is the primary passage to exchange waters and materials between the Jinhae-Masan Bay and the South Sea waters. The microbial community composition was analyzed from June to December 2016 using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The community was dominated by the phyla Proteobacteria (45%), Bacteroidetes (18%), Cyanobacteria (15%), Verrucomicrobia (6%), and Actinobacteria (6%). Alphaproteobacteria (29%) was the most abundant microbial class, followed by Flavobacteria (15%) and Gammaproteobacteria (15%) in all samples. The composition of the microbial communities was found to vary vertically and seasonally. The orders Flavobacteriales and Stramenopiles showed opposing seasonal patterns; Flavobacteriales was more abundant in August and December while Stramenopiles showed high abundance in June and October at all depths. The genus Synechococcus reached extremely high abundance (14%) in the June surface water column, but was much less abundant in December water columns. Clustering analysis showed that there was a difference in the microbial community composition pattern between the strongly stratified season and well-mixed season. These results indicate that the seasonal dynamics of physicochemical and hydrologic conditions throughout the water column are important parameters in shaping the microbial community composition in the Gadeok Channel.

  9. Microbial diversity arising from thermodynamic constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Großkopf, Tobias; Soyer, Orkun S

    2016-01-01

    The microbial world displays an immense taxonomic diversity. This diversity is manifested also in a multitude of metabolic pathways that can utilise different substrates and produce different products. Here, we propose that these observations directly link to thermodynamic constraints that inherently arise from the metabolic basis of microbial growth. We show that thermodynamic constraints can enable coexistence of microbes that utilise the same substrate but produce different end products. We find that this thermodynamics-driven emergence of diversity is most relevant for metabolic conversions with low free energy as seen for example under anaerobic conditions, where population dynamics is governed by thermodynamic effects rather than kinetic factors such as substrate uptake rates. These findings provide a general understanding of the microbial diversity based on the first principles of thermodynamics. As such they provide a thermodynamics-based framework for explaining the observed microbial diversity in different natural and synthetic environments. PMID:27035705

  10. Microbial diversity arising from thermodynamic constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Großkopf, Tobias; Soyer, Orkun S

    2016-11-01

    The microbial world displays an immense taxonomic diversity. This diversity is manifested also in a multitude of metabolic pathways that can utilise different substrates and produce different products. Here, we propose that these observations directly link to thermodynamic constraints that inherently arise from the metabolic basis of microbial growth. We show that thermodynamic constraints can enable coexistence of microbes that utilise the same substrate but produce different end products. We find that this thermodynamics-driven emergence of diversity is most relevant for metabolic conversions with low free energy as seen for example under anaerobic conditions, where population dynamics is governed by thermodynamic effects rather than kinetic factors such as substrate uptake rates. These findings provide a general understanding of the microbial diversity based on the first principles of thermodynamics. As such they provide a thermodynamics-based framework for explaining the observed microbial diversity in different natural and synthetic environments.

  11. The biodiversity of microbial cytochromes P450.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Steven L; Lamb, David C; Jackson, Colin J; Warrilow, Andrew G; Kelly, Diane E

    2003-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 (CYP) superfamily of genes and proteins are well known for their involvement in pharmacology and toxicology, but also increasingly for their importance and diversity in microbes. The extent of diversity has only recently become apparent with the emergence of data from whole genome sequencing projects and the coming years will reveal even more information on the diversity in microbial eukaryotes. This review seeks to describe the historical development of these studies and to highlight the importance of the genes and proteins. CYPs are deeply involved in the development of strategies for deterrence and attraction as well as detoxification. As such, there is intense interest in pathways of secondary metabolism that include CYPs in oxidative tailoring of antibiotics, sometimes influencing potency as bioactive compounds. Further to this is interest in CYPs in metabolism of xenobiotics for use as carbon sources for microbial growth and as biotransformation agents or in bioremediation. CYPs are also current and potential drug targets; compounds inhibiting CYP are antifungal and anti-protozoan agents, and potentially similar compounds may be useful against some bacterial diseases such as tuberculosis. Of note is the diversity of CYP requirements within an organism, ranging from Escherichia coli that has no CYPs as in many bacteria, to Mycobacterium smegmatis that has 40 representing 1% of coding genes. The basidiomycete fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium surprised all when it was found to contain a hundred or more CYPs. The functional genomic investigation of these orphan CYPs is a major challenge for the future.

  12. Synthetic microbial ecology and the dynamic interplay between microbial genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolinšek, Jan; Goldschmidt, Felix; Johnson, David R

    2016-11-01

    Assemblages of microbial genotypes growing together can display surprisingly complex and unexpected dynamics and result in community-level functions and behaviors that are not readily expected from analyzing each genotype in isolation. This complexity has, at least in part, inspired a discipline of synthetic microbial ecology. Synthetic microbial ecology focuses on designing, building and analyzing the dynamic behavior of ‘ecological circuits’ (i.e. a set of interacting microbial genotypes) and understanding how community-level properties emerge as a consequence of those interactions. In this review, we discuss typical objectives of synthetic microbial ecology and the main advantages and rationales of using synthetic microbial assemblages. We then summarize recent findings of current synthetic microbial ecology investigations. In particular, we focus on the causes and consequences of the interplay between different microbial genotypes and illustrate how simple interactions can create complex dynamics and promote unexpected community-level properties. We finally propose that distinguishing between active and passive interactions and accounting for the pervasiveness of competition can improve existing frameworks for designing and predicting the dynamics of microbial assemblages.

  13. Microbial Propionic Acid Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Axayacatl Gonzalez-Garcia

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Propionic acid (propionate is a commercially valuable carboxylic acid produced through microbial fermentation. Propionic acid is mainly used in the food industry but has recently found applications in the cosmetic, plastics and pharmaceutical industries. Propionate can be produced via various metabolic pathways, which can be classified into three major groups: fermentative pathways, biosynthetic pathways, and amino acid catabolic pathways. The current review provides an in-depth description of the major metabolic routes for propionate production from an energy optimization perspective. Biological propionate production is limited by high downstream purification costs which can be addressed if the target yield, productivity and titre can be achieved. Genome shuffling combined with high throughput omics and metabolic engineering is providing new opportunities, and biological propionate production is likely to enter the market in the not so distant future. In order to realise the full potential of metabolic engineering and heterologous expression, however, a greater understanding of metabolic capabilities of the native producers, the fittest producers, is required.

  14. Magnetic resonance diffusion and relaxation characterization of water in the unfrozen vein network in polycrystalline ice and its response to microbial metabolic products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jennifer R.; Brox, Timothy I.; Vogt, Sarah J.; Seymour, Joseph D.; Skidmore, Mark L.; Codd, Sarah L.

    2012-12-01

    Polycrystalline ice, as found in glaciers and the ice sheets of Antarctica, is a low porosity porous media consisting of a complicated and dynamic pore structure of liquid-filled intercrystalline veins within a solid ice matrix. In this work, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance measurements of relaxation rates and molecular diffusion, useful for probing pore structure and transport dynamics in porous systems, were used to physically characterize the unfrozen vein network structure in ice and its response to the presence of metabolic products produced by V3519-10, a cold tolerant microorganism isolated from the Vostok ice core. Recent research has found microorganisms that can remain viable and even metabolically active within icy environments at sub-zero temperatures. One potential mechanism of survival for V3519-10 is secretion of an extracellular ice binding protein that binds to the prism face of ice crystals and inhibits ice recrystallization, a coarsening process resulting in crystal growth with ice aging. Understanding the impact of ice binding activity on the bulk vein network structure in ice is important to modeling of frozen geophysical systems and in development of ice interacting proteins for biotechnology applications, such as cryopreservation of cell lines, and manufacturing processes in food sciences. Here, we present the first observations of recrystallization inhibition in low porosity ice containing V3519-10 extracellular protein extract as measured with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

  15. Microbial products II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pape, H; Rehm, H J [eds.

    1986-01-01

    The present volume deals mainly with compounds which have been detected as natural microbial products. Part 1 of this volume introduces the general aspects of the overproduction of metabolites and the concepts and genetics of secondary metabolism. Compounds such as nucleosides, nucleotides, coenzymes, vitamins and lipids are dealt with in part 2. Part 3 then is devoted to products and antibiotics with uses im medicine, veterinary medicine, plant protection and metabolites with antitumor activity. Several secondary metabolites have found uses in human and animal health care. With 244 figs., 109 tabs.

  16. Microbial syntrophy: interaction for the common good.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Brandon E L; Henneberger, Ruth; Huber, Harald; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine

    2013-05-01

    Classical definitions of syntrophy focus on a process, performed through metabolic interaction between dependent microbial partners, such as the degradation of complex organic compounds under anoxic conditions. However, examples from past and current scientific discoveries suggest that a new, simple but wider definition is necessary to cover all aspects of microbial syntrophy. We suggest the term 'obligately mutualistic metabolism', which still focuses on microbial metabolic cooperation but also includes an ecological aspect: the benefit for both partners. By the combined metabolic activity of microorganisms, endergonic reactions can become exergonic through the efficient removal of products and therefore enable a microbial community to survive with minimal energy resources. Here, we explain the principles of classical and non-classical syntrophy and illustrate the concepts with various examples. We present biochemical fundamentals that allow microorganism to survive under a range of environmental conditions and to drive important biogeochemical processes. Novel technologies have contributed to the understanding of syntrophic relationships in cultured and uncultured systems. Recent research highlights that obligately mutualistic metabolism is not limited to certain metabolic pathways nor to certain environments or microorganisms. This beneficial microbial interaction is not restricted to the transfer of reducing agents such as hydrogen or formate, but can also involve the exchange of organic, sulfurous- and nitrogenous compounds or the removal of toxic compounds. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Microbial Species and Functional Diversity in Rice Rhizosphere of High-yield Special Ecological Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAN Li-yuan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Taoyuan, Yunnan Province is a special eco-site which keeps the highest yield records of rice cultivation in small planting areas. Soil microbial species and functional diversity were evaluated using cultivation method and BIOLOG ecoplates. The results showed that the microbial community of the high yield region was more abundant, and the total microbial population was 2 times of the control, furthermore, the areas belonged to the healthy "bacteria" soil, which was showed as bacteria > actinomycetes > fungi. Bacteria were the dominant populations in the rhizosphere of high yielding rice field, and the yield formation of rice was not correlated with the depth of soil layers. In order to obtain more species diversity information, Shannon diversity index H, Shannon evenness index E and Simpson index D were analyzed, and the results showed that microbial community diversity and evenness were not the main differences between the high and general yield areas. Then, the functional diversity of soil microbial community was investigated through the average well color development(AWCD and diversity index analyses. The results of AWCD analysis indicated that the metabolic activity of soil microbial community in high yield paddy soils were stronger than the control. Moreover, the difference range from large to small showed as tillering stage > harvest period > seedling period > rotation period, the stronger the rice growth, the greater the difference between the high yield region and the control. At tillering stage and harvest stage, due to the vigorous plant growth, the root exudates were rich, and the microbial communities of high yield paddy soils showed a strong metabolic activity and strong ability to use carbon sources. The results of Shannon, Simpson and McIntosh indices analysis indicated that common microbial species was not a key factor affecting the yield of rice. Tillering stage was a key period for the growth of high yield rice, and many

  18. Investigation on behavior of bacteria in reservoir for microbial enhanced oil recovery; Biseibutsuho (MEOR) no tameno yusonai saikin katsudo ni kansuru chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, K.; Tanaka, S.; Otsuka, M.; Nakaya, K. [Kansai Research Institute, Kyoto (Japan). Lifescience Research Center; Maezumi, S.; Yazawa, N. [Japan National Oil Corp., Tokyo (Japan). Technology Research Center; Hong, C.; Chida, T.; Enomoto, H. [Tohoku University, Miyagi (Japan). Graduate School of Engineering

    2000-07-01

    Behavior of bacteria activated in reservoir though molasses-injection-tests, was investigated using the restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis with the polymerase chain reaction (PCR-RFLP) method, for elucidating potential bacteria to suppress in situ growth of microbes to be injected into the reservoir in the microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) process. As a result, some bacteria belonging to Enterobacteriaceae species or their close relative species were grown predominantly in the reservoir, among bacteria inhibiting in the ground-water. The foregoing indicates that behavior of these bacteria in reservoir must be taken into consideration when giving a full account of behavior of microbes to be injected into the reservoir to put the MEOR process into operation. Potential proliferation using molasses to activate those bacteria was also estimated on the laboratory tests, to clarify the growth of microbes to be injected into the reservoir to operate the MEOR process. In consequence, it became clear that these bacteria have a potential growth exceeding 10{sup 8} CFU/ml, utilizing molasses. These facts indicated that microbes to be injected into the reservoir at the MEOR field tests are necessary to grow more excellently than bacteria inhabiting in the ground-water. In addition, as flow, the injection fluid is influenced by reservoir heterogeneity caused by injection of molasses, it was inferred that microbes to be injected into the reservoir at the MEOR field process are also necessary to grow more remarkably than bacteria inhabiting in the reservoir brine at high permeability zones and bacteria inhabiting in th