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Sample records for inversion recovery imaging

  1. Spinal cord imaging using averaged magnetization inversion recovery acquisitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, Matthias; Bieri, Oliver

    2018-04-01

    To establish a novel approach for fast high-resolution spinal cord (SC) imaging using averaged magnetization inversion recovery acquisitions (AMIRA). The AMIRA concept is based on an inversion recovery (IR) prepared, segmented, and time-limited cine balanced steady state free precession sequence. Typically, for the fastest SC imaging without any signal averaging, eight consecutive images in time with an in-plane resolution of 0.67 × 0.67 mm 2 and 6 mm to 8 mm slice thickness are acquired in 51 s. AMIRA does not require parallel acquisition techniques. AMIRA measures eight images of remarkable tissue contrast variation between spinal cord gray (GM) and white matter (WM) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Following the AMIRA concept, averaging the first IR contrast images not only improves the signal-to-noise ratio but also offers a surprising enhancement of the contrast-to-noise ratio between GM and WM, whereas averaging the last images considerably improves the contrast-to-noise ratio between WM and CSF. These observations are supported by quantitative data. The AMIRA concept provides 2D spinal cord imaging with multiple tissue contrasts and enhanced contrast-to-noise ratios with a typical 0.67 × 0.67 mm 2 in-plane resolution and a slice thickness between 4 mm and 8 mm acquired in only 1 to 2 min per slice. Magn Reson Med 79:1870-1881, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  2. Detection and characterization with short TI inversion recovery MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komata, Kaori

    1994-01-01

    Short TI inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging (STIR-MRI) with spin echo (SE) T1- and T2-weighted images of the pelvis was investigated to evaluate its usefulness in detecting and characterizing endometriosis. Thirty-one women suspected of having the disease were studied in detail. MR findings with and without STIR-MRI were correlated with the results of laparotomy (27 women) and laparoscopy (4 women). Surgery revealed endometriosis in 29 women (17 ovarian chocolate cysts, 22 intestinal adhesions, 14 cul-de-sac obliterations and 12 adenomyosis). The other two women did not have endometriosis (uterine prolapse in one and submucosal leiomyoma in one). An ovarian chocolate cyst was diagnosed when a T1-elongated lesion showed shading, loculus or a low intensity rim on SE MR images, and a low intensity rim on STIR-MRI. Only 12 of the 17 chocolate cysts and neither of the two hemorrhagic corpus lutein cysts were correctly diagnosed on SE MR images, whereas 18 of these 19 cysts were correctly diagnosed because of the low intensity rim on STIR-MRI. In the pathological analysis, the rim was found to be a fibrous capsule and there were many macrophages which phagocytized hemosiderin. For the assessment of ovarian chocolate cysts, accuracy improved from 63.2% to 94.7%. As for the adhesion between the intestine and the uterus, specificity improved from 61.9% to 90.5% and accuracy improved from 67.7% to 93.5% when STRI-MRI was used. For the assessment of the cul-de-sac obliteration, accuracy improved from 67.7% to 83.8% although χ 2 analysis showed no significance. The major factors for the improved accuracy with STIR-MRI are the decrease of the motion artifact owing to the suppression of the fat signal, decreased chemical shift artifact and accurate differentiation of fat from hemorrhagic component. Therefore, STIR-MRI is a useful and reliable procedure and should be used together with SE T1-, T2-weighted images for the assessment of endometriosis. (author)

  3. Detection and characterization with short TI inversion recovery MR imaging

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    Komata, Kaori (Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan))

    1994-10-01

    Short TI inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging (STIR-MRI) with spin echo (SE) T1- and T2-weighted images of the pelvis was investigated to evaluate its usefulness in detecting and characterizing endometriosis. Thirty-one women suspected of having the disease were studied in detail. MR findings with and without STIR-MRI were correlated with the results of laparotomy (27 women) and laparoscopy (4 women). Surgery revealed endometriosis in 29 women (17 ovarian chocolate cysts, 22 intestinal adhesions, 14 cul-de-sac obliterations and 12 adenomyosis). The other two women did not have endometriosis (uterine prolapse in one and submucosal leiomyoma in one). An ovarian chocolate cyst was diagnosed when a T1-elongated lesion showed shading, loculus or a low intensity rim on SE MR images, and a low intensity rim on STIR-MRI. Only 12 of the 17 chocolate cysts and neither of the two hemorrhagic corpus lutein cysts were correctly diagnosed on SE MR images, whereas 18 of these 19 cysts were correctly diagnosed because of the low intensity rim on STIR-MRI. In the pathological analysis, the rim was found to be a fibrous capsule and there were many macrophages which phagocytized hemosiderin. For the assessment of ovarian chocolate cysts, accuracy improved from 63.2% to 94.7%. As for the adhesion between the intestine and the uterus, specificity improved from 61.9% to 90.5% and accuracy improved from 67.7% to 93.5% when STRI-MRI was used. For the assessment of the cul-de-sac obliteration, accuracy improved from 67.7% to 83.8% although [chi][sup 2] analysis showed no significance. The major factors for the improved accuracy with STIR-MRI are the decrease of the motion artifact owing to the suppression of the fat signal, decreased chemical shift artifact and accurate differentiation of fat from hemorrhagic component. Therefore, STIR-MRI is a useful and reliable procedure and should be used together with SE T1-, T2-weighted images for the assessment of endometriosis. (author).

  4. Quantitative Magnetization Transfer Imaging in Human Brain at 3 T via Selective Inversion Recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Dortch, Richard D.; Li, Ke; Gochberg, Daniel F.; Welch, E. Brian; Dula, Adrienne N.; Tamhane, Ashish A.; Gore, John C.; Smith, Seth A.

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative magnetization transfer imaging yields indices describing the interactions between free water protons and immobile, macromolecular protons—including the macromolecular to free pool size ratio (PSR) and the rate of magnetization transfer between pools kmf. This study describes the first implementation of the selective inversion recovery quantitative magnetization transfer method on a clinical 3.0-T scanner in human brain in vivo. Selective inversion recovery data were acquired at 1...

  5. Effect of inversion time on the precision of myocardial late gadolinium enhancement quantification evaluated with synthetic inversion recovery MR imaging

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    Varga-Szemes, Akos; Schoepf, U.J.; De Cecco, Carlo N.; Fuller, Stephen R.; Suranyi, Pal [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Geest, Rob J. van der [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Spottiswoode, Bruce S. [Siemens Medical Solutions, Chicago, IL (United States); Muscogiuri, Giuseppe [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Bambino Gesu Children' s Hospital IRCCS, Department of Imaging, Rome (Italy); Wichmann, Julian L. [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Mangold, Stefanie [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Maurovich-Horvat, Pal; Merkely, Bela [Semmelweis University, MTA-SE Cardiovascular Imaging Research Group, Heart and Vascular Center, Budapest (Hungary); Litwin, Sheldon E. [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Charleston, SC (United States); Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging-North East Netherlands, Department of Radiology, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2017-08-15

    To evaluate the influence of inversion time (TI) on the precision of myocardial late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) quantification using synthetic inversion recovery (IR) imaging in patients with myocardial infarction (MI). Fifty-three patients with suspected prior MI underwent 1.5-T cardiac MRI with conventional magnitude (MagIR) and phase-sensitive IR (PSIR) LGE imaging and T1 mapping at 15 min post-contrast. T1-based synthetic MagIR and PSIR images were calculated with a TI ranging from -100 to +150 ms at 5-ms intervals relative to the optimal TI (TI{sub 0}). LGE was quantified using a five standard deviation (5SD) and full width at half-maximum (FWHM) thresholds. Measurements were compared using one-way analysis of variance. The MagIR{sub sy} technique provided precise assessment of LGE area at TIs ≥ TI{sub 0}, while precision was decreased below TI{sub 0}. The LGE area showed significant differences at ≤ -25 ms compared to TI{sub 0} using 5SD (P < 0.001) and at ≤ -65 ms using the FWHM approach (P < 0.001). LGE measurements did not show significant difference over the analysed TI range in the PSIR{sub sy} images using either of the quantification methods. T1 map-based PSIR{sub sy} images provide precise quantification of MI independent of TI at the investigated time point post-contrast. MagIR{sub sy}-based MI quantification is precise at TI{sub 0} and at longer TIs while showing decreased precision at TI values below TI{sub 0}. (orig.)

  6. Optimization of selective inversion recovery magnetization transfer imaging for macromolecular content mapping in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dortch, Richard D; Bagnato, Francesca; Gochberg, Daniel F; Gore, John C; Smith, Seth A

    2018-03-24

    To optimize a selective inversion recovery (SIR) sequence for macromolecular content mapping in the human brain at 3.0T. SIR is a quantitative method for measuring magnetization transfer (qMT) that uses a low-power, on-resonance inversion pulse. This results in a biexponential recovery of free water signal that can be sampled at various inversion/predelay times (t I/ t D ) to estimate a subset of qMT parameters, including the macromolecular-to-free pool-size-ratio (PSR), the R 1 of free water (R 1f ), and the rate of MT exchange (k mf ). The adoption of SIR has been limited by long acquisition times (≈4 min/slice). Here, we use Cramér-Rao lower bound theory and data reduction strategies to select optimal t I /t D combinations to reduce imaging times. The schemes were experimentally validated in phantoms, and tested in healthy volunteers (N = 4) and a multiple sclerosis patient. Two optimal sampling schemes were determined: (i) a 5-point scheme (k mf estimated) and (ii) a 4-point scheme (k mf assumed). In phantoms, the 5/4-point schemes yielded parameter estimates with similar SNRs as our previous 16-point scheme, but with 4.1/6.1-fold shorter scan times. Pair-wise comparisons between schemes did not detect significant differences for any scheme/parameter. In humans, parameter values were consistent with published values, and similar levels of precision were obtained from all schemes. Furthermore, fixing k mf reduced the sensitivity of PSR to partial-volume averaging, yielding more consistent estimates throughout the brain. qMT parameters can be robustly estimated in ≤1 min/slice (without independent measures of ΔB 0 , B1+, and T 1 ) when optimized t I -t D combinations are selected. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  7. Evaluation of myelination and myelination disorders with turbo inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging

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    Daldrup, H.E.; Schuierer, G.; Link, T.M.; Moeller, H.; Bick, U.; Peters, P.E. [Institute of Clinical Radiology, Westfaelische Wilhelms Universitaet, D-48149 Muenster (Germany); Kurlemann, G. [Department of Pediatrics, Westfaelische Wilhelms Universitaet, D-48149 Muenster (Germany)

    1997-12-01

    The aim of our work was to determine the efficacy of turbo inversion recovery spin echo (TIRSE) pulse sequences in differentiating patients with normal and abnormal myelination. Twenty neurological normal children (aged 5 months to 12 years) as well as 65 children presenting clinically with neurologic developmental deficits (aged 2 months to 10 years) were examined using TIRSE, T1-weighted SE, and T2-weighted turbo SE pulse sequences. Contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) between myelinated white and gray matter was compared for the different pulse sequences. In addition, two readers analyzed all images qualitatively by consensus. The CNR values were significantly higher on TIRSE images as compared with conventional images (p < 0.05). Forty-two neurologically abnormal patients displayed a normal myelination on all sequences, whereas 23 showed an abnormal myelination. The TIRSE sequence provided a sensitive and specific depiction of an abnormal myelination in all of these patients. The TIRSE sequence provided additional information to conventional pulse sequences in determining myelination disorders in children, especially in children older than 2 years. (orig.) With 9 figs., 25 refs.

  8. MR imaging with fluid attenuated inversion recovery sequence of childhood adrenoleukodystrophy : comparison with T2 weighted spin echo imaging

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    Hwang, Asiry; Seo, Jeong-Jin; Jeong, Gwang Woo; Chung, Tae Woong; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Kang, Heoung Keun; Kook, Hoon; Woo, Young Jong; Hwang, Tai Joo [Chonnam Univ. Medical School, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of FLAIR(Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery) MR imaging in childhood adrenoleukodystrophy by comparing with those of T2-weighted FSE imaging, and to correlate MRI findings with clinical manifestations. Axial FLAIR images(TR/TE/TI=10004/123/2200) and T2-weighted FSE images(TR/TE=4000/104) of brain in six male patients(age range : 6-17 years, mean age : 10.2 years) with biochemically confirmed adrenoleukodystrophy were compared visually by two radiologists for detection, conspicuity, and the extent of lesion. Quantitatively, we compared lesion/CSF contrast, lesion/CSF contrast to noise ratio(CNR), lesion/white matter(WM) contrast, and lesion/WM CNR between FLAIR and T2 weighted image. We correlated MR findings with clinical manifestations of neurologic symptoms and evaluated whether MRI could detect white matter lesions in neurologically asymptomatic patients. Visual detection of lesions was better with FLAIR images in 2 of the 6 cases and it was equal in the remainders. Visual conspicuity and detection of the extent of lesion were superior on FLAIR images than T2-weighted images in all 6 cases. In the quantitative assessment of lesions, FLAIR was superior to T2-weighted image for lesion/CSF contrast and lesion/CSF CNR, but was inferior to T2 weighted image for lesion/WM contrast and lesion/WM CNR. In one case, FLAIR images distinguished the portion of encephalomalacic change from lesions. MR findings of adrenoleukodystrophy were correlated with clinical manifestations in symptomatic 4 cases, and also detected white matter lesions in asymptomatic 2 cases. MR imaging with FLAIR sequence provided images that were equal or superior to T2-weighted images in the evaluation of childhood adrenoleukodystrophy. MRI findings were well correlated with clinical manifestations and could detect white matter lesions in neurologically asymptomatic adrenoleukodystrophy patients.

  9. Spinal cord microstructure integrating phase-sensitive inversion recovery and diffusional kurtosis imaging

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    Panara, V.; Navarra, R; Caulo, M. [University ' ' G. d' Annunzio' ' , Department of Neuroscience, Imaging and Clinical Sciences, Chieti (Italy); University ' ' G. d' Annunzio' ' , ITAB Institute of Advanced Biomedical Technologies, Chieti (Italy); Mattei, P.A. [University ' ' G. d' Annunzio' ' , ITAB Institute of Advanced Biomedical Technologies, Chieti (Italy); University ' ' G. d' Annunzio' ' , Department of Medicine and Science of Aging, Ophthalmology Clinic, Chieti (Italy); Piccirilli, E. [University ' ' G. d' Annunzio' ' , ITAB Institute of Advanced Biomedical Technologies, Chieti (Italy); Cotroneo, A.R.; Uncini, A. [University ' ' G. d' Annunzio' ' , Department of Neuroscience, Imaging and Clinical Sciences, Chieti (Italy); Papinutto, N.; Henry, R.G. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Neurology, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2017-08-15

    The aim of this prospective study was to determine the feasibility in terms of repeatability and reproducibility of diffusional kurtosis imaging (DKI) for microstructural assessment of the normal cervical spinal cord (cSC) using a phase-sensitive inversion recovery (PSIR) sequence as the anatomical reference for accurately defining white-matter (WM) and gray-matter (GM) regions of interests (ROIs). Thirteen young healthy subjects were enrolled to undergo DKI and PSIR sequences in the cSC. The repeatability and reproducibility of kurtosis metrics and fractional anisotropy (FA) were calculated in GM, WM, and cerebral-spinal-fluid (CSF) ROIs drawn by two independent readers on PSIR images of three different levels (C1-C4). The presence of statistically significant differences in DKI metrics for levels, ROIs (GM, WM, and CSF) repeatability, reproducibility, and inter-reader agreement was evaluated. Intra-class correlation coefficients between the two readers ranged from good to excellent (0.75 to 0.90). The inferior level consistently had the highest concordance. The lower values of scan-rescan variability for all DKI parameters were found for the inferior level. Statistically significant differences in kurtosis values were not found in the lateral white-matter bundles of the spinal cord. The integration of DKI and PSIR sequences in a clinical MR acquisition to explore the regional microstructure of the cSC in healthy subjects is feasible, and the results obtainable are reproducible. Further investigation will be required to verify the possibility to translate this method to a clinical setting to study patients with SC involvement especially in the absence of MRI abnormalities on standard sequences. (orig.)

  10. Quantitative magnetization transfer imaging of rodent glioma using selective inversion recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Junzhong; Li, Ke; Zu, Zhongliang; Li, Xia; Gochberg, Daniel F; Gore, John C

    2014-03-01

    Magnetization transfer (MT) provides an indirect means to detect noninvasively variations in macromolecular contents in biological tissues, but, so far, there have been only a few quantitative MT (qMT) studies reported in cancer, all of which used off-resonance pulsed saturation methods. This article describes the first implementation of a different qMT approach, selective inversion recovery (SIR), for the characterization of tumor in vivo using a rodent glioma model. The SIR method is an on-resonance method capable of fitting qMT parameters and T1 relaxation time simultaneously without mapping B0 and B1 , which is very suitable for high-field qMT measurements because of the lower saturation absorption rate. The results show that the average pool size ratio (PSR, the macromolecular pool versus the free water pool) in rat 9 L glioma (5.7%) is significantly lower than that in normal rat gray matter (9.2%) and white matter (17.4%), which suggests that PSR is potentially a sensitive imaging biomarker for the assessment of brain tumor. Despite being less robust, the estimated MT exchange rates also show clear differences from normal tissues (19.7 Hz for tumors versus 14.8 and 10.2 Hz for gray and white mater, respectively). In addition, the influence of confounding effects, e.g. B1 inhomogeneity, on qMT parameter estimates is investigated with numerical simulations. These findings not only help to better understand the changes in the macromolecular contents of tumors, but are also important for the interpretation of other imaging contrasts, such as chemical exchange saturation transfer of tumors. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Arterial hyperintensity on BLADE fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images (FLAIR) in hyperacute territorial infarction: comparison with conventional FLAIR

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    Kwag, Eujean; Lim, Soo Mee; Park, Ji Eun; Chae, In Hye [Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Mokdong Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    To evaluate the utility of BLADE fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images (FLAIR) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging compared to conventional FLAIR for the detection of arterial hyperintensity (AH) in hyperacute territorial infarction. We retrospectively analysed MR images of patients with hyperacute (<6 h) territorial infarction over a 9-month study period. Special attention was paid to the presence or absence of AH in the frontal, parietal and temporal lobes and the number of AHs in the sylvian fissure. We also evaluated the presence of three kinds of artefacts on BLADE FLAIR and conventional FLAIR images. AH was seen in 41 (91 %) patients with conventional FLAIR and 45 (100 %) patients with BLADE FLAIR images. More instances of AH were detected in the frontal, parietal and temporal lobes and within the sylvian fissure using BLADE FLAIR. Motion artefacts, pulsation artefacts from the sigmoid sinus and incomplete cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) nulling that reduced image quality were observed more frequently on conventional FLAIR images than on BLADE FLAIR images. BLADE FLAIR sequences are more sensitive than conventional FLAIR for the detection of AH in hyperacute territorial infarctions and provide better image quality by reducing artefacts. They may be used in place of conventional FLAIR for patients with hyperacute stroke. (orig.)

  12. Comparison of diffusion-weighted images using short inversion time inversion recovery or chemical shift selective pulse as fat suppression in patients with breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazama, Toshiki; Nasu, Katsuhiro; Kuroki, Yoshifumi; Nawano, Shigeru; Ito, Hisao

    2009-01-01

    Fat suppression is essential for diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in the body. However, the chemical shift selective (CHESS) pulse often fails to suppress fat signals in the breast. The purpose of this study was to compare DWI using CHESS and DWI using short inversion time inversion recovery (STIR) in terms of fat suppression and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value. DWI using STIR, DWI using CHESS, and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images were obtained in 32 patients with breast carcinoma. Uniformity of fat suppression, ADC, signal intensity, and visualization of the breast tumors were evaluated. In 44% (14/32) of patients there was insufficient fat suppression in the breasts on DWI using CHESS, whereas 0% was observed on DWI using STIR (P<0.0001). The ADCs obtained for DWI using STIR were 4.3% lower than those obtained for DWI using CHESS (P<0.02); there was a strong correlation of the ADC measurement (r=0.93, P<0.001). DWI using STIR may be excellent for fat suppression; and the ADC obtained in this sequence was well correlated with that obtained with DWI using CHESS. DWI using STIR may be useful when the fat suppression technique in DWI using CHESS does not work well. (author)

  13. Demonstration of the postcommissural fibres of the fornix in short-inversion time inversion-recovery imaging on a high-field system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeki, N.; Kansaku, K.; Higuchi, Y.; Yamaura, A. [Dept. of Neurological Surgery, Chiba University School of Medicine (Japan); Kawano, K.; Iijima, T. [Electrotechnical Lab., Tsukuba (Japan); Inoue, N. [GE Yokagawa Medical Systems, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    Short-inversion time inversion-recovery (STIR) imaging using a 3 tesla system was assessed to reveal the postcommissural fibres (PF) of the fornix, which have rarely been highlighted neuroradiologically in the clinical setting. We studied 27 normal subjects. Sequence parameters were TR/TE/TI 8000/52/150 ms. STIR was expected to take advantage of the high signal-to-noise ratio of a high-field system, due to the long repetition time. PF were identifiable in axial and coronal slices in all cases. They were bordered anteriorly and superiorly by the anterior commissure and posteriorly and inferiorly by the mamillary body. Behind the anterior commissure, they ran in an arch-shaped posterior and inferior course in the hypothalamic nuclei and joined the mamillary body anterolaterally. They usually extended through three 3-mm slices (with 1 mm interslice gap) in anteroposterior and vertical dimensions. Little variation was observed in their course or size. Demonstration of the PF would provide a more detailed correlation of human neuroanatomy to hypothalamic function and individualised understanding of hypothalamic pathology and influence therapy. (orig.)

  14. Fast fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery imaging: first experience with a 3D version in epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieshmann, U.C.; Symms, M.R.; Bartlett, P.A.; Shorvon, S.D.; Barker, G.J.; Stevens, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    We developed a 3D version of fast fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery imaging (FLAIR) which provides images with a slice thickness of 1.5 mm. We present our initial experience with 3D fast FLAIR in patients with epilepsy. We compared 3D fast FLAIR (slice thickness 1.5 mm), 2D fast FLAIR (slice thickness 5 mm) and a 3D spoiled GRASS (IRSPGR) sequence (slice thickness 1.5 mm) in 10 patients with lesional epilepsy (head injury 1, hippocampal sclerosis 2, low-grade glioma 2, dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumour 2, polymicrogyria 1, perinatal infarct 1 and presumed thrombosed aneurysm 1). Both 2D and 3D fast FLAIR sequences yielded higher conspicuity for lesions than the T1-weighted IRSPGR sequence, except in the patient with polymicrogyria. The extent of the lesion, in particular that of low-grade tumours, was best assessed on 3D fast FLAIR images. 3D fast FLAIR may be a useful additional tool especially for imaging low-grade tumours. (orig.)

  15. Triple-layer appearance of Brodmann area 4 at thin-section double inversion-recovery MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eung Yeop; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Chang, Jong-Hee; Yoo, Eunhye; Lee, Jae-Wook; Park, Hae-Jeong

    2009-02-01

    To investigate whether thin-section axial double inversion-recovery (DIR) brain magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at 3.0 T can help distinguish the primary motor cortex (PMC), or Brodmann area 4, from other selected cortical regions, including the primary sensory cortex (PSC), or Brodmann areas 1-3, on the basis of the presence of a "triple-layer" appearance. This prospective study was approved by the institutional review board; informed consent was obtained from patients. This study included 191 patients (94 female, age range, 5-80 years; 97 male, age range, 5-76 years) with normal findings at 3.0-T MR imaging. The presence or absence of a triple-layer appearance within selected cortical regions on DIR images was graded independently by two neuroradiologists as definitely present (grade 2), probably present (grade 1), or definitely absent (grade 0). Ten additional patients with tumors underwent DIR imaging and intraoperative cortical mapping for further validation of the PMC. A myelin-stained brain specimen image in a patient not imaged with DIR was correlated with a representative set of DIR images. A triple-layer appearance was found in the PMC bilaterally in 184 of 191 patients; grade 0 was assigned in only seven patients, who were all younger than 10 years. Grades were significantly lower in patients younger than 10 years than in others (P .0018). Interobserver agreement was excellent (weighted kappa = 0.843). The PMC determined on DIR images was confirmed with cortical mapping in all 10 patients with tumors. Triple-layer appearance was not present in the other cortical regions examined, including the PSC (P < .01). The triple-layer appearance on DIR images corresponded to the myelin band within the PMC present on the myelin-stained specimen image. A triple-layer appearance was found in the PMC at thin-section 3.0-T DIR imaging but not in other examined brain regions and therefore might be useful as an adjunct sign for identification of motor regions.

  16. Short tau inversion recovery in breast diffusion-weighted imaging: signal-to-noise ratio and apparent diffusion coefficients using a breast phantom in comparison with spectral attenuated inversion recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Tsukasa; Urikura, Atsushi; Shirata, Kensei; Nakaya, Yoshihiro; Endo, Masahiro; Terashima, Shingo; Hosokawa, Yoichiro

    2018-04-01

    This study aimed to compare the signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) and apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) obtained using two fat suppression techniques in breast diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) of a phantom. The breast phantom comprised agar gels with four different concentrations of granulated sugar (samples 1, 2, 3, and 4). DWI with short tau inversion recovery (STIR-DWI) and that with spectral attenuated inversion recovery (SPAIR-DWI) were performed using 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging, and the obtained SNRs and ADCs were compared. ADCs were also compared between the right and left breast phantoms. For samples 3 and 4, SNRs obtained using STIR-DWI were lower than those obtained using SPAIR-DWI. For samples 2, 3, and 4, overall ADCs obtained using STIR-DWI were significantly higher than those obtained using SPAIR-DWI (p phantoms than SPAIR-DWI. SNRs and ADCs obtained using STIR-DWI are influenced by the T 1 value; a shorter T 1 value decreases SNRs, overestimates ADCs, and induces the measurement error in ADCs. STIR-DWI showed a larger difference in ADCs between the right and left phantoms than SPAIR-DWI.

  17. Differential diagnosis of vertebral compression fracture using in-phase/opposed-phase and short TI inversion recovery imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogura, Akio; Hayakawa, Katsumi; Maeda, Fumie; Saeki, Fumito; Syukutani, Ai; Shibutani, Sachiko; Kuroda, Emi (Dept. of Radiology, Kyoto City Hospital, Kyoto (Japan)), email: a-ogura@mbox.kyoto-inet.or.jp

    2012-05-15

    Background: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is highly useful for detecting diseases of the bone marrow. The sensitivity for detecting compression fracture is very high, but specificity is low for differential diagnosis between malignant and benign cases. Purpose: To evaluate the usefulness of in-phase/opposed-phase and short TI inversion recovery (STIR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of bone marrow for differentiation between benign and malignant vertebral compression fractures. Material and Methods: A retrospective review of 66 patients with 70 vertebral compression fractures was performed. The signal intensity ratio (SIR) defined as SIR (opposed/in) was calculated from in-phase/opposed-phase MR images, and the signal intensity ratio as SIR (STIR) was calculated from STIR MR images. The relationships between values of SIR (opposed/in) and SIR (STIR) and the differential diagnosis of malignant vs. benign fractures were considered. Results: When SIR (opposed/in) was less than 1.0, bone marrow was benign. The bone marrow was malignant when both SIR (opposed/in) was greater than 1.0 and SIR (STIR) was less than 2.0. Conclusion: In cases of acute compression fracture, malignant bone marrow showed SIR(STIR) values less than 2.0 and SIR (in/opposed) greater than 1.0. In contrast, benign bone marrow showed SIR (STIR) values greater than 2.5. For chronic compression fracture, malignant bone marrow showed SIR (in/opposed) greater than 1.0. Bone marrow was benign in all cases with SIR (in/opposed) less than 1.0

  18. Free water elimination diffusion tractography: A comparison with conventional and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery, diffusion tensor imaging acquisitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Andrew R; Kecskemeti, Steven R; Alexander, Andrew L

    2015-12-01

    White matter tractography reconstructions using conventional diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) near cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces are often adversely affected by CSF partial volume effects (PVEs). This study evaluates the ability of free water elimination (FWE) DTI methods to minimize the PVE of CSF for deterministic tractography applications. Ten healthy individuals were scanned with "traditional," FLAIR (fluid-attenuated inversion recovery), and FWE DTI scans. The fornix, corpus callosum, and cingulum bundles were reconstructed using deterministic tractography. The FWE DTI scan was performed twice to separately match total acquisition time (long FWE) and number of measurements (encoding directions, short FWE) to the FLAIR and "traditional" DTI scans. PVE resolution was determined based on reconstructed tract volume. All reconstructions underwent blinded review for anatomical correctness, symmetry, and completeness. Reconstructions of the fornix demonstrated that the FWE and FLAIR scans produce more complete, anatomically plausible reconstructions than "traditional" DTI. Additionally, the tract reconstructions using FWE-DTI were significantly larger than when FLAIR was used with DTI (P acquisitions did not significantly (P ≥ 0.31) differ from one another for any of the reconstructed tracts. The FWE diffusion model overcomes CSF PVE without the time, SNR, and volumetric coverage penalties inherent to FLAIR DTI. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Comparison of 3D double inversion recovery and 2D STIR FLAIR MR sequences for the imaging of optic neuritis: pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodel, Jerome; Bocher, Anne-Laure; Pruvo, Jean-Pierre; Leclerc, Xavier [Hopital Roger Salengro, Department of Neuroradiology, Lille (France); Outteryck, Olivier; Zephir, Helene; Vermersch, Patrick [Hopital Roger Salengro, Department of Neurology, Lille (France); Lambert, Oriane [Fondation Ophtalmologique Rothschild, Department of Neuroradiology, Paris (France); Benadjaoud, Mohamed Amine [Radiation Epidemiology Team, Inserm, CESP Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, U1018, Villejuif (France); Chechin, David [Philips Medical Systems, Suresnes (France)

    2014-12-15

    We compared the three-dimensional (3D) double inversion recovery (DIR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence with the coronal two-dimensional (2D) short tau inversion recovery (STIR) fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) for the detection of optic nerve signal abnormality in patients with optic neuritis (ON). The study group consisted of 31 patients with ON (44 pathological nerves) confirmed by visual-evoked potentials used as the reference. MRI examinations included 2D coronal STIR FLAIR and 3D DIR with 3-mm coronal reformats to match with STIR FLAIR. Image artefacts were graded for each portion of the optic nerves. Each set of MR images (2D STIR FLAIR, DIR reformats and multiplanar 3D DIR) was examined independently and separately for the detection of signal abnormality. Cisternal portion of optic nerves was better delineated with DIR (p < 0.001), while artefacts impaired analysis in four patients with STIR FLAIR. Inter-observer agreement was significantly improved (p < 0.001) on 3D DIR (κ = 0.96) compared with STIR FLAIR images (κ = 0.60). Multiplanar DIR images reached the best performance for the diagnosis of ON (95 % sensitive and 94 % specific). Our study showed a high sensitivity and specificity of 3D DIR compared with STIR FLAIR for the detection of ON. These findings suggest that the 3D DIR sequence may be more useful in patients suspected of ON. (orig.)

  20. Evaluation of Possible Prognostic Factors of Fulminant Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis (ADEM) on Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) and Diffusion-Weighted Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donmez, F.Y.; Aslan, H.; Coskun, M. (Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent Univ., Ankara (Turkey))

    2009-04-15

    Background: Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) may be a rapidly progressive disease with different clinical outcomes. Purpose: To investigate the radiological findings of fulminant ADEM on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images, and to correlate these findings with clinical outcome. Material and Methods: Initial and follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans in eight patients were retrospectively evaluated for distribution of lesions on FLAIR images and presence of hemorrhage or contrast enhancement. DWI of the patients was evaluated as to cytotoxic versus vasogenic edema. The clinical records were analyzed, and MRI results and clinical outcome were correlated. Results: Four of the eight patients died, three had full recovery, and one had residual cortical blindness. The distribution of the hyperintense lesions on FLAIR sequence was as follows: frontal (37.5%), parietal (50%), temporal (37.5%), occipital (62.5%), basal ganglia (50%), pons (37.5%), mesencephalon (37.5%), and cerebellum (50%). Three of the patients who died had brainstem involvement. Two patients had a cytotoxic edema, one of whom died, and the other developed cortical blindness. Six patients had vasogenic edema: three of these patients had a rapid progression to coma and died; three of them recovered. Conclusion: DWI is not always helpful for evaluating the evolution or predicting the outcome of ADEM. However, extension of the lesions, particularly brainstem involvement, may have an influence on the prognosis.

  1. Evaluation of Possible Prognostic Factors of Fulminant Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis (ADEM) on Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) and Diffusion-Weighted Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donmez, F.Y.; Aslan, H.; Coskun, M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) may be a rapidly progressive disease with different clinical outcomes. Purpose: To investigate the radiological findings of fulminant ADEM on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images, and to correlate these findings with clinical outcome. Material and Methods: Initial and follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans in eight patients were retrospectively evaluated for distribution of lesions on FLAIR images and presence of hemorrhage or contrast enhancement. DWI of the patients was evaluated as to cytotoxic versus vasogenic edema. The clinical records were analyzed, and MRI results and clinical outcome were correlated. Results: Four of the eight patients died, three had full recovery, and one had residual cortical blindness. The distribution of the hyperintense lesions on FLAIR sequence was as follows: frontal (37.5%), parietal (50%), temporal (37.5%), occipital (62.5%), basal ganglia (50%), pons (37.5%), mesencephalon (37.5%), and cerebellum (50%). Three of the patients who died had brainstem involvement. Two patients had a cytotoxic edema, one of whom died, and the other developed cortical blindness. Six patients had vasogenic edema: three of these patients had a rapid progression to coma and died; three of them recovered. Conclusion: DWI is not always helpful for evaluating the evolution or predicting the outcome of ADEM. However, extension of the lesions, particularly brainstem involvement, may have an influence on the prognosis

  2. Non-contrast-enhanced hepatic MR angiography: Do two-dimensional parallel imaging and short tau inversion recovery methods shorten acquisition time without image quality deterioration?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Kotaro; Isoda, Hiroyoshi; Okada, Tomohisa; Kamae, Toshikazu; Arizono, Shigeki; Hirokawa, Yuusuke; Shibata, Toshiya; Togashi, Kaori

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study whether shortening the acquisition time for selective hepatic artery visualization is feasible without image quality deterioration by adopting two-dimensional (2D) parallel imaging (PI) and short tau inversion recovery (STIR) methods. Materials and methods: Twenty-four healthy volunteers were enrolled. 3D true steady-state free-precession imaging with a time spatial labeling inversion pulse was conducted using 1D or 2D-PI and fat suppression by chemical shift selective (CHESS) or STIR methods. Three groups of different scan conditions were assigned and compared: group A (1D-PI factor 2 and CHESS), group B (2D-PI factor 2 x 2 and CHESS), and group C (2D-PI factor 2 x 2 and STIR). The artery-to-liver contrast was quantified, and the quality of artery visualization and overall image quality were scored. Results: The mean scan time was 9.5 ± 1.0 min (mean ± standard deviation), 5.9 ± 0.8 min, and 5.8 ± 0.5 min in groups A, B, and C, respectively, and was significantly shorter in groups B and C than in group A (P < 0.01). The artery-to-liver contrast was significantly better in group C than in groups A and B (P < 0.01). The scores for artery visualization and overall image quality were worse in group B than in groups A and C. The differences were statistically significant (P < 0.05) regarding the arterial branches of segments 4 and 8. Between group A and group C, which had similar scores, there were no statistically significant differences. Conclusion: Shortening the acquisition time for selective hepatic artery visualization was feasible without deterioration of the image quality by the combination of 2D-PI and STIR methods. It will facilitate using non-contrast-enhanced MRA in clinical practice.

  3. Comparison of increased venous contrast in ischemic stroke using phase-sensitive MR imaging with perfusion changes on flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery at 3 Tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Eijiro; Kanasaki, Yoshiko; Fujii, Shinya; Ogawa, Toshihide; Tanaka, Takuro; Hirata, Yoshiharu

    2011-01-01

    Background Increased venous contrast in ischemic stroke using susceptibility-weighted imaging has been widely reported, although few reports have compared increased venous contrast areas with perfusion change areas. Purpose To compare venous contrast on phase-sensitive MR images (PSI) with perfusion change on flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) images, and to discuss the clinical use of PSI in ischemic stroke. Material and Methods Thirty patients with clinically suspected acute infarction of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory within 7 days of onset were evaluated. Phase-sensitive imaging (PSI), flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) were obtained using 3 Tesla scanner. Two neuroradiologists independently reviewed the MR images, as well as the PSI, DWI, and FAIR images. They were blinded to the clinical data and to each other's findings. The abnormal area of each image was ultimately identified after both neuroradiologists reached consensus. We analyzed areas of increased venous contrast on PSI, perfusion changes on FAIR images and signal changes on DWI for each case. Results Venous contrast increased on PSI and hypoperfusion was evident on FAIR images from 22 of the 30 patients (73%). The distribution of the increased venous contrast was the same as that of the hypoperfused areas on FAIR images in 16 of these 22. The extent of these lesions was larger than that of lesions visualized by on DWI in 18 of the 22 patients. Hypointense signals reflecting hemorrhage and no increased venous contrast on PSI and hyperperfusion on FAIR images were found in six of the remaining eight patients (20%). Findings on PSI were normal and hypoperfusion areas were absent on FAIR images of two patients (7%). Conclusion Increased venous contrast on PSI might serve as an index of misery perfusion and provide useful information

  4. An Inversion Recovery NMR Kinetics Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Travis J.; Kershaw, Allan D.; Li, Vincent; Wu, Xinping

    2011-01-01

    A convenient laboratory experiment is described in which NMR magnetization transfer by inversion recovery is used to measure the kinetics and thermochemistry of amide bond rotation. The experiment utilizes Varian spectrometers with the VNMRJ 2.3 software, but can be easily adapted to any NMR platform. The procedures and sample data sets in this article will enable instructors to use inversion recovery as a laboratory activity in applied NMR classes and provide research students with a conveni...

  5. Inverse regression for ridge recovery II: Numerics

    OpenAIRE

    Glaws, Andrew; Constantine, Paul G.; Cook, R. Dennis

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the application of sufficient dimension reduction (SDR) to a noiseless data set derived from a deterministic function of several variables. In this context, SDR provides a framework for ridge recovery. In this second part, we explore the numerical subtleties associated with using two inverse regression methods---sliced inverse regression (SIR) and sliced average variance estimation (SAVE)---for ridge recovery. This includes a detailed numerical analysis of the eigenvalues of th...

  6. Fast fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) magnetic resonance imaging of the brain: a comparison of multi-shot echo-planar and fast spin-echo techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sargent, M.A.; Poskitt, K.J.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate fast spin-echo and multi-shot echo-planar fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences in paediatric brain imaging. Materials and methods. Matched images from 32 patients with suspected tumour or white matter disease were independently evaluated by two paediatric neuroradiologists. The observer preferences for image quality and lesion detection were analysed for differences between fast spin-echo FLAIR and multi-shot echo-planar FLAIR. Diagnostic quality was compared with that of fast spin-echo T2-weighted images. Results. Images of a diagnostic quality equivalent to that of fast spin-echo T2-weighted images were achieved with both FLAIR techniques. Grey and white matter differentiation and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) nulling were significantly better on fast spin-echo FLAIR sequences. CSF flow artefact was reduced on multi-shot echo-planar FLAIR. There was no difference in lesion detection. Fast spin-echo FLAIR images were visually preferred at the expense of longer imaging time. Conclusion. Fast FLAIR techniques are complementary to fast spin-echo T2-weighted sequences in imaging of the paediatric brain. We find that the fast spin-echo FLAIR sequence is preferable to the multi-shot echo-planar technique. (orig.). With 5 figs., 2 tabs

  7. A comparison of inner ear imaging features at different time points of sudden sensorineural hearing loss with three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Honglei; Ou, Yongkang; Fu, Jia; Zhang, Ya; Xiong, Hao; Xu, Yaodong

    2015-10-01

    It has been reported that about half of patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) show high signals in the affected inner ear on three-dimensional, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging (3D-FLAIR MRI). These signals may reflect minor hemorrhage or an increased concentration of protein in the inner ear, which has passed through blood vessels with increased permeability. Our objective was to compare the positive ratio of the high signal in affected inner ears at different time points to determine the suitable imaging time point for 3D-FLAIR MRI in SSNHL. 3D-FLAIR MRI images were taken at three times, precontrast and approximately 10 min and 4 h after intravenous injection of a single dose of gadodiamide (Gd) (0.1 mmol/kg), in 46 patients with SNHL. We compared the positive findings of the high signals in the inner ear of patients with SNHL as well as the signal intensity ratio (SIR) between the affected cochleae and unaffected cochleae at three time points. The positive ratios of the high signals in the affected inner ear at the time points of precontrast and 10 min and 4 h after the intravenous Gd injection were 26.1, 32.6, and 41.3%, respectively. The high signal intensity ratios of affected inner ears at the three time points were 1.28, 1.31, and 1.48, respectively. The difference between the positive ratios precontrast and at 10 min after the intravenous Gd injection was statistically significant (P = 0.006); the differences between the positive ratios at 4 h after the intravenous Gd injection and precontrast and between the ratios at 4 h and 10 min after the intravenous Gd injection were not statistically significant. The time effects of the median value of SIR were not significant (P = 0.064). We do not recommend 4 h after intravenous Gd injection as a time point to image the inner ear in SNHL. We believe that imaging precontrast and at 10 min after the intravenous Gd injection are suitable time points.

  8. In vivo measurement of longitudinal relaxation time of human blood by inversion-recovery fast gradient-echo MR imaging at 3T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Kazuki; Nagasaka, Tatsuo; Shidahara, Miho; Machida, Yoshio; Tamura, Hajime

    2012-01-01

    Accurate longitudinal relaxation time (T 1 ) of arterial blood is important in evaluating blood flow in tissue by arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Few studies have reported the T 1 of human arterial blood in vivo, especially using 3-tesla MR imaging. T 1 values of human venous blood in vivo have been reported, but they differ from those measured in vitro. We aimed to evaluate the accurate T 1 of human arterial blood in vivo. We measured T 1 values of blood in 10 healthy volunteers in vivo using an inversion-recovery fast gradient-echo sequence and 3-tesla MR imaging unit. We also measured hematocrit (Hct) values of venous blood samples. After nonselective application of the inversion pulse using a body coil, we obtained MR imaging signals of arterial blood in the abdominal aorta. Similarly, we measured the signals of venous blood in the internal jugular vein. Inversion times varied between 200 and 5000 ms for imaging of the abdominal aorta and 200 and 2500 ms for imaging of the jugular vein. We also acquired signals without the inversion pulse. We estimated T 1 values from the data by nonlinear least squares fitting of a 3-parameter model. The T 1 value (mean±standard deviation) of arterial blood was 1779±80 ms and of venous blood, 1694±77 ms. The average Hct value was 0.47. The R 1 (=1/T 1 ) of arterial blood was related to the Hct value as: R 1 =(0.59±0.16)Hct + (0.29±0.07) (mean±standard error) s -1 . For the venous blood, R 1 =(0.70±0.11)Hct + (0.27±0.05) s -1 . We observed a T 1 of human arterial blood in vivo of 1779±80 ms at a mean hematocrit value of 0.47 as determined by 3T MR imaging; an even longer T 1 value is expected with a hematocrit value less than 0.47. (author)

  9. Abnormal hyperintensity within the subarachnoid space evaluated by fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery MR imaging: a spectrum of central nervous system diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, M.; Sakuma, H.; Takeda, K.; Yagishita, A.; Yamamoto, T.

    2003-01-01

    A variety of central nervous system (CNS) diseases are associated with abnormal hyperintensity within the subarachnoid space (SAS) by fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) MR imaging. Careful attention to the SAS can provide additional useful information that may not be available with conventional MR sequences. The purpose of this article is to provide a pictorial essay about CNS diseases and FLAIR images with abnormal hyperintensity within the SAS. We present several CNS diseases including subarachnoid hemorrhage, meningitis, leptomeningeal metastases, acute infarction, and severe arterial occlusive diseases such as moya-moya disease. We also review miscellaneous diseases or normal conditions that may exhibit cerebrospinal fluid hyperintensity on FLAIR images. Although the detection of abnormal hyperintensity suggests the underlying CNS diseases and narrows differential diagnoses, FLAIR imaging sometimes presents artifactual hyperintensity within the SAS that can cause the misinterpretation of normal SAS as pathologic conditions; therefore, radiologists should be familiar with such artifactual conditions as well as pathologic conditions shown as hyperintensity by FLAIR images. This knowledge is helpful in establishing the correct diagnosis. (orig.)

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of pelvic entheses - a systematic comparison between short tau inversion recovery (STIR) and T1-weighted, contrast-enhanced, fat-saturated sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klang, Eyal; Aharoni, Dvora; Rimon, Uri; Eshed, Iris [Tel Aviv University, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Hermann, Kay-Geert [Department of Radiology, Charite University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Herman, Amir [Sheba Medical Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Tel-Hashomer (Israel); Tel Aviv University, The Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Shazar, Nachshon [Sheba Medical Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Tel-Hashomer (Israel)

    2014-04-15

    To assess the contribution of contrast material in detecting and evaluating enthesitis of pelvic entheses by MRI. Sixty-seven hip or pelvic 1.5-T MRIs (30:37 male:female, mean age: 53 years) were retrospectively evaluated for the presence of hamstring and gluteus medius (GM) enthesitis by two readers (a resident and an experienced radiologist). Short tau inversion recovery (STIR) and T1-weighted pre- and post-contrast (T1+Gd) images were evaluated by each reader at two sessions. A consensus reading of two senior radiologists was regarded as the gold standard. Clinical data was retrieved from patients' referral form and medical files. Cohen's kappa was used for intra- and inter-observer agreement calculation. Diagnostic properties were calculated against the gold standard reading. A total of 228 entheses were evaluated. Gold standard analysis diagnosed 83 (36 %) enthesitis lesions. Intra-reader reliability for the experienced reader was significantly (p = 0.0001) higher in the T1+Gd images compared to the STIR images (hamstring: k = 0.84/0.45, GM: k = 0.84/0.47). Sensitivity and specificity increased from 0.74/0.8 to 0.87/0.9 in the STIR images and T1+Gd sequences. Intra-reader reliability for the inexperienced reader was lower (p > 0.05). Evidence showing that contrast material improves the reliability, sensitivity, and specificity of detecting enthesitis supports its use in this setting. (orig.)

  11. Comparison of T1-weighted fast spin-echo and T1-weighted fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images of the lumbar spine at 3.0 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavdas, Eleftherios; Vlychou, Marianna; Arikidis, Nikos; Kapsalaki, Eftychia; Roka, Violetta; Fezoulidis, Ioannis V. (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital of Larissa, Medical School of Thessaly, Mezourlo (Greece)), e-mail: mvlychou@med.uth.gr

    2010-04-15

    Background: T1-weighted fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequence has been reported to provide improved contrast between lesions and normal anatomical structures compared to T1-weighted fast spin-echo (FSE) imaging at 1.5T regarding imaging of the lumbar spine. Purpose: To compare T1-weighted FSE and fast T1-weighted FLAIR imaging in normal anatomic structures and degenerative and metastatic lesions of the lumbar spine at 3.0T. Material and Methods: Thirty-two consecutive patients (19 females, 13 males; mean age 44 years, range 30-67 years) with lesions of the lumbar spine were prospectively evaluated. Sagittal images of the lumbar spine were obtained using T1-weighted FSE and fast T1-weighted FLAIR sequences. Both qualitative and quantitative analyses measuring the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and relative contrast (ReCon) between degenerative and metastatic lesions and normal anatomic structures were conducted, comparing these sequences. Results: On quantitative evaluation, SNRs of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), nerve root, and fat around the root of fast T1-weighted FLAIR imaging were significantly lower than those of T1-weighted FSE images (P<0.001). CNRs of normal spinal cord/CSF and disc herniation/ CSF for fast T1-weighted FLAIR images were significantly higher than those for T1-weighted FSE images (P<0.001). ReCon of normal spinal cord/CSF, disc herniation/CSF, and vertebral lesions/CSF for fast T1-weighted FLAIR images were significantly higher than those for T1-weighted FSE images (P<0.001). On qualitative evaluation, it was found that CSF nulling and contrast at the spinal cord (cauda equina)/CSF interface for T1-weighted FLAIR images were significantly superior compared to those for T1-weighted FSE images (P<0.001), and the disc/spinal cord (cauda equina) interface was better for T1-weighted FLAIR images (P<0.05). Conclusion: The T1-weighted FLAIR sequence may be considered as the preferred lumbar spine imaging

  12. All that glitters is not gold: Increased Signal in the Subarachnoid Space on Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery Imaging after gadolinium injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Avila Duarte

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A 61-year-old woman arrived at the emergency department of the Hospital Nossa Senhora das Graças, Canoas, southern Brazil, with suspected ischemic stroke. After clinical and laboratory examination, the clinical diagnosis of ischemic stroke was made, without fulfilling criteria for thrombolysis. The patient had no history of renal failure. Three days later, she performed a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI examination that confirmed the suspected diagnosis. This examination was performed without sedation or supplemental oxygen. Brain MRI was performed after gadolinium injection, using fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR imaging, T1-weighted image, diffusion-weighted imaging, and T2-weighted image sequences that revealed signs of subacute watershed stroke in the left cerebral hemisphere (Figures 1, 2 and 3. There was a hyperintense cerebrospinal fluid (CSF in the subarachnoid space (SAS on FLAIR imaging, a finding that has been reported in many  pathologic conditions1 such as superior sagittal thrombosis, subarachnoid hemorrhage², meningitis,  meningeal carcinomatosis,  next to tumors, status epilepticus and stroke.3-7 It has also been reported in otherwise healthy patients undergoing anesthesia with supplemental oxygen.8 The exact mechanism by which CSF diffuses into the SAS in patients with or without renal insufficiency is not completely explained. Some authores have suggested that in patients with renal failure, the gadolinium may shift across an osmotic gradient at the circumventricular organs in the setting of proctracted elevation of plasma concentrations.9 We believe that the cause of this imaging phenomenon of hyperintense signal of the CSF in the SAS which has already been noted in patients with compromised cerebral perfusion, including cases of acute ischemic stroke, was due to the recent stroke.10-11 Keywords: Flair hyperintensity, MRI, stroke, Gadolinium

  13. Assessment of myocardial infarction in mice by Late Gadolinium Enhancement MR imaging using an inversion recovery pulse sequence at 9.4T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herlihy Amy H

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To demonstrate the feasibility of using an inversion recovery pulse sequence and to define the optimal inversion time (TI to assess myocardial infarction in mice by late gadolinium enhancement (LGE MRI at 9.4T, and to obtain the maximal contrast between the infarcted and the viable myocardium. Methods MRI was performed at 9.4T in mice, two days after induction of myocardial infarction (n = 4. For cardiovascular MR imaging, a segmented magnetization-prepared fast low angle shot (MP-FLASH sequence was used with varied TIs ranging from 40 to 420 ms following administration of gadolinium-DTPA at 0.6 mmol/kg. Contrast-to-noise (CNR and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR were measured and compared for each myocardial region of interest (ROI. Results The optimal TI, which corresponded to a minimum SNR in the normal myocardium, was 268 ms ± 27.3. The SNR in the viable myocardium was significantly different from that found in the infarcted myocardium (17.2 ± 2.4 vs 82.1 ± 10.8; p = 0.006 leading to a maximal relative SI (Signal Intensity between those two areas (344.9 ± 60.4. Conclusion Despite the rapid heart rate in mice, our study demonstrates that LGE MRI can be performed at 9.4T using a protocol similar to the one used for clinical MR diagnosis of myocardial infarction.

  14. Cerebrospinal Fluid Enhancement on Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery Images After Carotid Artery Stenting with Neuroprotective Balloon Occlusions: Hemodynamic Instability and Blood–Brain Barrier Disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogami, Ryo; Nakahara, Toshinori; Hamasaki, Osamu; Araki, Hayato; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: A rare complication of carotid artery stenting (CAS), prolonged reversible neurological symptoms with delayed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space enhancement on fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images, is associated with blood–brain barrier (BBB) disruption. We prospectively identified patients who showed CSF space enhancement on FLAIR images. Methods: Nineteen patients—5 acute-phase and 14 scheduled—underwent 21 CAS procedures. Balloon catheters were navigated across stenoses, angioplasty was performed using a neuroprotective balloon, and stents were placed with after dilation under distal balloon protection. CSF space hyperintensity or obscuration on FLAIR after versus before CAS indicated CSF space enhancement. Correlations with clinical factors were examined. Results: CSF space was enhanced on FLAIR in 12 (57.1%) cases. Postprocedural CSF space enhancement was significantly related to age, stenosis rate, acute-stage procedure, and total occlusion time. All acute-stage CAS patients showed delayed enhancement. Only age was associated with delayed CSF space enhancement in scheduled CAS patients. Conclusions: Ischemic intolerance for severe carotid artery stenosis and temporary neuroprotective balloon occlusion, causing reperfusion injury, seem to be the main factors that underlie BBB disruption with delayed CSF space enhancement shortly after CAS, rather than sudden poststenting hemodynamic change. Our results suggest that factors related to hemodynamic instability or ischemic intolerance seem to be associated with post-CAS BBB vulnerability. Patients at risk for hemodynamic instability or with ischemic intolerance, which decrease BBB integrity, require careful management to prevent intracranial hemorrhagic and other post-CAS complications.

  15. Temporal pole signal abnormality on MR imaging in temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis: a fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrete Junior, Henrique; Abdala, Nitamar; Szjenfeld, Jacob; Nogueira, Roberto Gomes; Lin, Katia; Caboclo, Luis Otavio; Centeno, Ricardo Silva; Sakamoto, Americo Ceiki; Yacubian, Elza Marcia Targas

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency and regional involvement of temporal pole signal abnormality (TPA) in patients with hippocampal sclerosis (HS) using fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) MR imaging, and to correlate this feature with history. Method: Coronal FLAIR images of the temporal pole were assessed in 120 patients with HS and in 30 normal subjects, to evaluate gray-white matter demarcation. Results: Ninety (75%) of 120 patients had associated TPA. The HS side made difference regarding the presence of TPA, with a left side prevalence (p=0.04, χ 2 test). The anteromedial zone of temporal pole was affected in 27 (30%) out of 90 patients. In 63 (70%) patients the lateral zone were also affected. Patients with TPA were younger at seizure onset (p=0.018), but without association with duration of epilepsy. Conclusion: Our FLAIR study show temporal pole signal abnormality in 3/4 of patients with HS, mainly seen on the anteromedial region, with a larger prevalence when the left hippocampus was involved. (author)

  16. Temporal pole signal abnormality on MR imaging in temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis: a fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrete, Henrique; Abdala, Nitamar; Lin, Kátia; Caboclo, Luís Otávio; Centeno, Ricardo Silva; Sakamoto, Américo Ceiki; Szjenfeld, Jacob; Nogueira, Roberto Gomes; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2007-09-01

    To determine the frequency and regional involvement of temporal pole signal abnormality (TPA) in patients with hippocampal sclerosis (HS) using fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) MR imaging, and to correlate this feature with history. Coronal FLAIR images of the temporal pole were assessed in 120 patients with HS and in 30 normal subjects, to evaluate gray-white matter demarcation. Ninety (75%) of 120 patients had associated TPA. The HS side made difference regarding the presence of TPA, with a left side prevalence (p=0.04, chi2 test). The anteromedial zone of temporal pole was affected in 27 (30%) out of 90 patients. In 63 (70%) patients the lateral zone were also affected. Patients with TPA were younger at seizure onset (p=0.018), but without association with duration of epilepsy. Our FLAIR study show temporal pole signal abnormality in 3/4 of patients with HS, mainly seen on the anteromedial region, with a larger prevalence when the left hippocampus was involved.

  17. Comparison of a T1-weighted inversion-recovery-, gradient-echo- and spin-echo sequence for imaging of the brain at 3.0 Tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stehling, C.; Niederstadt, T.; Kraemer, S.; Kugel, H.; Schwindt, W.; Heindel, W.; Bachmann, R.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The increased T1 relaxation times at 3.0 Tesla lead to a reduced T1 contrast, requiring adaptation of imaging protocols for high magnetic fields. This prospective study assesses the performance of three techniques for T1-weighted imaging (T1w) at 3.0 T with regard to gray-white differentiation and contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR). Materials and Methods: Thirty-one patients were examined at a 3.0 T system with axial T1 w inversion recovery (IR), spin-echo (SE) and gradient echo (GE) sequences and after contrast enhancement (CE) with CE-SE and CE-GE sequences. For qualitative analysis, the images were ranked with regard to artifacts, gray-white differentiation, image noise and overall diagnostic quality. For quantitative analysis, the CNR was calculated, and cortex and basal ganglia were compared with the white matter. Results: In the qualitative analysis, IR was judged superior to SE and GE for gray-white differentiation, image noise and overall diagnostic quality, but inferior to the GE sequence with regard to artifacts. CE-GE proved superior to CE-SE in all categories. In the quantitative analysis, CNR of the based ganglia was highest for IR, followed by GE and SE. For the CNR of the cortex, no significant difference was found between IR (16.9) and GE (15.4) but both were superior to the SE (9.4). The CNR of the cortex was significantly higher for CE-GE compared to CE-SE (12.7 vs. 7.6, p<0.001), but the CNR of the basal ganglia was not significantly different. Conclusion: For unenhanced T1w imaging at 3.0 T, the IR technique is, despite increased artifacts, the method of choice due to its superior gray-white differentiation and best overall image quality. For CE-studies, GE sequences are recommended. For cerebral imaging, SE sequences give unsatisfactory results at 3.0 T. (orig.)

  18. Evaluation of focus laterality in temporal lobe epilepsy: a quantitative study comparing double inversion-recovery MR imaging at 3T with FDG-PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Emiko; Okada, Tomohisa; Kanagaki, Mitsunori; Yamamoto, Akira; Fushimi, Yasutaka; Matsumoto, Riki; Takaya, Shigetoshi; Ikeda, Akio; Kunieda, Takeharu; Kikuchi, Takayuki; Paul, Dominik; Miyamoto, Susumu; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Togashi, Kaori

    2013-12-01

    To quantitatively compare the diagnostic capability of double inversion-recovery (DIR) with F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) for detection of seizure focus laterality in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). This study was approved by the institutional review board, and written informed consent was obtained. Fifteen patients with TLE and 38 healthy volunteers were enrolled. All magnetic resonance (MR) images were acquired using a 3T-MRI system. Voxel-based analysis (VBA) was conducted for FDG-PET images and white matter segments of DIR images (DIR-WM) focused on the whole temporal lobe (TL) and the anterior part of the temporal lobe (ATL). Distribution of hypometabolic areas on FDG-PET and increased signal intensity areas on DIR-WM were evaluated, and their laterality was compared with clinically determined seizure focus laterality. Correct diagnostic rates of laterality were evaluated, and agreement between DIR-WM and FDG-PET was assessed using κ statistics. Increased signal intensity areas on DIR-WM were located at the vicinity of the hypometabolic areas on FDG-PET, especially in the ATL. Correct diagnostic rates of seizure focus laterality for DIR-WM (0.80 and 0.67 for the TL and the ATL, respectively) were slightly higher than those for FDG-PET (0.67 and 0.60 for the TL and the ATL, respectively). Agreement of laterality between DIR-WM and FDG-PET was substantial for the TL and almost perfect for the ATL (κ = 0.67 and 0.86, respectively). High agreement in localization between DIR-WM and FDG-PET and nearly equivalent detectability of them show us an additional role of MRI in TLE. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  19. Sensory neuronopathy involves the spinal cord and brachial plexus: a quantitative study employing multiple-echo data image combination (MEDIC) and turbo inversion recovery magnitude (TIRM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Yi-Fang; Tang, Wei-Jun; Li, Yu-Xin; Geng, Dao-Ying [Fudan University, Department of Radiology, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai (China); Zhu, Dong-Qing; Chen, Xiang-Jun [Fudan University, Department of Neurology, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai (China); Zee, Chi-Shing [University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Sensory neuronopathy (SNN) is a distinctive subtype of peripheral neuropathies, specifically targeting dorsal root ganglion (DRG). We utilized MRI to demonstrate the imaging characteristics of DRG, spinal cord (SC), and brachial plexus at C7 level in SNN. We attempted multiple-echo data image combination (MEDIC) and turbo inversion recovery magnitude (TIRM) methods in nine patients with sensory neuronopathy and compared with those in 16 disease controls and 20 healthy volunteers. All participants underwent MRI for the measurement of DRG, posterior column (PC), lateral column, and spinal cord area (SCA) at C7 level. DRG diameters were obtained through its largest cross section, standardized by dividing sagittal diameter of mid-C7 vertebral canal. We also made comparisons of standardized anteroposterior diameter (APD) and left-right diameters of SC and PC in these groups. Signal intensity and diameter of C7 spinal nerve were assessed on TIRM. Compared to control groups, signal intensities of DRG and PC were higher in SNN patients when using MEDIC, but the standardized diameters were shorter in either DRG or PC. Abnormal PC signal intensities were identified in eight out of nine SNN patients (89 %) with MEDIC and five out of nine (56 %) with T2-weighted images. SCA, assessed with MEDIC, was smaller in SNN patients than in the other groups, with significant reduction of its standardized APD. C7 nerve root diameters, assessed with TIRM, were decreased in SNN patients. MEDIC and TIRM sequences demonstrate increased signal intensities and decreased area of DRG and PC, and decreased diameter of nerve roots in patients with SNN, which can play a significant role in early diagnosis. (orig.)

  20. Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery Vascular Hyperintensities-Diffusion-Weighted Imaging Mismatch Identifies Acute Stroke Patients Most Likely to Benefit From Recanalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrand, Laurence; Tisserand, Marie; Turc, Guillaume; Edjlali, Myriam; Calvet, David; Trystram, Denis; Roca, Pauline; Naggara, Olivier; Mas, Jean-Louis; Méder, Jean-Francois; Baron, Jean-Claude; Oppenheim, Catherine

    2016-02-01

    Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery vascular hyperintensities (FVH) beyond the boundaries of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) lesion (FVH-DWI mismatch) have been proposed as an alternative to perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI)-DWI mismatch. We aimed to establish whether FVH-DWI mismatch can identify patients most likely to benefit from recanalization. FVH-DWI mismatch was assessed in 164 patients with proximal middle cerebral artery occlusion before intravenous thrombolysis. PWI-DWI mismatch (PWITmax>6sec/DWI>1.8) was assessed in the 104 patients with available PWI data. We tested the associations between 24-hours complete recanalization on magnetic resonance angiography and 3-month favorable outcome (modified Rankin Scale score ≤2), stratified on FVH-DWI (or PWI-DWI) status. FVH-DWI mismatch was present in 121/164 (74%) patients and recanalization in 50/164 (30%) patients. The odds ratio for favorable outcome with recanalization was 16.2 (95% confidence interval, 5.7-46.5; Pmismatch and 2.6 (95% confidence interval, 0.6-12.1; P=0.22) in those without FVH-DWI mismatch (P=0.048 for interaction). Recanalization was associated with favorable outcome in patients with PWI-DWI mismatch (odds ratios, 9.9; 95% confidence interval, 3.1-31.3; P=0.0001) and in patients without PWI-DWI mismatch (odds ratios, 7.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-44.1; P=0.047), P=0.76 for interaction. The FVH-DWI mismatch may rapidly identify patients with proximal occlusion most likely to benefit from recanalization. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Revisiting the relationship of three-dimensional fluid attenuation inversion recovery imaging and hearing outcomes in adults with idiopathic unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Wen-Huei [School of Medicine, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, 11221, Taiwan (China); Department of Otolaryngology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, 11217, Taiwan (China); Wu, Hsiu-Mei [School of Medicine, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, 11221, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, 11217, Taiwan (China); Wu, Hung-Yi [Department of Radiology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, 11217, Taiwan (China); Tu, Tzong-Yang; Shiao, An-Suey [School of Medicine, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, 11221, Taiwan (China); Department of Otolaryngology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, 11217, Taiwan (China); Castillo, Mauricio [Department of Radiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599-7510 (United States); Hung, Sheng-Che, E-mail: hsz829@gmail.com [School of Medicine, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, 11221, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, 11217, Taiwan (China); Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, 11221, Taiwan (China)

    2016-12-15

    Background and purpose: Three-dimensional fluid attenuation inversion recovery (3D FLAIR) may demonstrate high signal in the inner ears of patients with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL), but the correlations of this finding with outcomes are still controversial. Here we compared 4 3D MRI sequences with the outcomes of patients with ISSNHL. Materials and methods: 77 adult patients with ISSNHL underwent MRI with pre contrast FLAIR, fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition images (FIESTA-C), post contrast T1WI and post contrast FLAIR. The extent and degree of high signal in both cochleas were evaluated in all patients, and asymmetry ratios between the affected ears and the normal ones were calculated. The relationships among MRI findings, including extent and asymmetry of abnormal cochlear high signals, degree of FLAIR enhancement, and clinical information, including age, vestibular symptoms, baseline hearing loss, and final hearing outcomes were analyzed. Results: 54 patients (28 men; age, 52.1 ± 15.5 years) were included in our study. Asymmetric cochlear signal intensities were more frequently observed in pre contrast and post contrast FLAIR (79.6% and 68.5%) than in FIESTA-C (61.1%) and T1WI (51.9%) (p < 0.001). Age, baseline hearing loss, extent of high signal and asymmetry ratios of pre contrast and post contrast FLAIR were all correlated with final hearing outcomes. In multivariate analysis, age and the extent of high signals were the most significant predictors of final hearing outcomes. Conclusion: 3D FLAIR provides a higher sensitivity in detecting the asymmetric cochlear signal abnormality. The more asymmetric FLAIR signals and presence of high signals beyond cochlea indicated a poorer prognosis.

  2. Dynamic and steady-state oxygen-dependent lung relaxometry using inversion recovery ultra-fast steady-state free precession imaging at 1.5 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, Grzegorz; Pusterla, Orso; Santini, Francesco; Bieri, Oliver

    2018-02-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of oxygen-dependent relaxometry in human lung using an inversion recovery ultra-fast steady-state free precession (IR-ufSSFP) technique. Electrocardiogram-triggered pulmonary relaxometry with IR-ufSSFP was performed in 7 healthy human subjects at 1.5 T. The data were acquired under both normoxic and hyperoxic conditions. In a single breath-hold of less than 9 seconds, 30 transient state IR-ufSSFP images were acquired, yielding longitudinal (T1) and transversal (T2) relaxometry parameter maps using voxel-wise nonlinear fitting. Possible spatial misalignments between consecutive IR-ufSSFP parameter maps were corrected using elastic image registration. Furthermore, dynamic relaxometry oxygen wash-in and wash-out scans were performed in one volunteer. From this, T 1 -related wash-in and wash-out time constants (τ wi , τ wo ) were calculated voxel-wise on registered maps using an exponential fitting model. For healthy lung, observed T1 values were 1399 ± 77 and 1290 ± 76 ms under normoxic and hyperoxic conditions, respectively. Oxygen-related reduction of T1 was statistically significant in every volunteer. No statistically significant change, however, was observed in T2, with normoxic and hyperoxic T2 values of 55 ± 16 and 56 ± 17 ms, respectively. The observed average τ wi was 87.0 ± 28.7 seconds, whereas the average τ wo was 73.5 ± 21.6 seconds. IR-ufSSFP allows fast, steady-state, and dynamic oxygen-dependent relaxometry of the human lung. Magn Reson Med 79:839-845, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  3. Clinical characteristics of unknown symptom onset stroke patients with and without diffusion-weighted imaging and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery mismatch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomalla, Götz; Boutitie, Florent; Fiebach, Jochen B; Simonsen, Claus Z; Pedraza, Salvador; Lemmens, Robin; Nighoghossian, Norbert; Roy, Pascal; Muir, Keith W; Ebinger, Martin; Ford, Ian; Cheng, Bastian; Galinovic, Ivana; Cho, Tae-Hee; Puig, Josep; Thijs, Vincent; Endres, Matthias; Fiehler, Jens; Gerloff, Christian

    2018-01-01

    Background Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) mismatch was suggested to identify stroke patients with unknown time of symptom onset likely to be within the time window for thrombolysis. Aims We aimed to study clinical characteristics associated with DWI-FLAIR mismatch in patients with unknown onset stroke. Methods We analyzed baseline MRI and clinical data from patients with acute ischemic stroke proven by DWI from WAKE-UP, an investigator-initiated, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of MRI-based thrombolysis in stroke patients with unknown time of symptom onset. Clinical characteristics were compared between patients with and without DWI-FLAIR mismatch. Results Of 699 patients included, 418 (59.8%) presented with DWI-FLAIR mismatch. A shorter delay between last seen well and symptom recognition (p = 0.0063), a shorter delay between symptom recognition and arrival at hospital (p = 0.0025), and history of atrial fibrillation (p = 0.19) were predictors of DWI-FLAIR mismatch in multivariate analysis. All other characteristics were comparable between groups. Conclusions There are only minor differences in measured clinical characteristics between unknown symptom onset stroke patients with and without DWI-FLAIR mismatch. DWI-FLAIR mismatch as an indicator of stroke onset within 4.5 h shows no relevant association with commonly collected clinical characteristics of stroke patients. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov . Unique identifier: NCT01525290; URL: https://www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu . Unique identifier: 2011-005906-32.

  4. Quantitative assessment of hepatic function: modified look-locker inversion recovery (MOLLI) sequence for T1 mapping on Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced liver MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jeong Hee [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Min; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Paek, Munyoung [Siemens Healthcare, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    To determine whether multislice T1 mapping of the liver using a modified look-locker inversion recovery (MOLLI) sequence on gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used as a quantitative tool to estimate liver function and predict the presence of oesophageal or gastric varices. Phantoms filled with gadoxetic acid were scanned three times using MOLLI sequence to test repeatability. Patients with chronic liver disease or liver cirrhosis who underwent gadoxetic acid-enhanced liver MRI including MOLLI sequence at 3 T were included (n = 343). Pre- and postcontrast T1 relaxation times of the liver (T1liver), changes between pre- and postcontrast T1liver (ΔT1liver), and adjusted postcontrast T1liver (postcontrast T1liver-T1spleen/T1spleen) were compared among Child-Pugh classes. In 62 patients who underwent endoscopy, all T1 parameters and spleen sizes were correlated with varices. Phantom study showed excellent repeatability of MOLLI sequence. As Child-Pugh scores increased, pre- and postcontrast T1liver were significantly prolonged (P < 0.001), and ΔT1liver and adjusted postcontrast T1liver decreased (P< 0.001). Adjusted postcontrast T1liver and spleen size were independently associated with varices (R{sup 2} = 0.29, P < 0.001). T1 mapping of the liver using MOLLI sequence on gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI demonstrated potential in quantitatively estimating liver function, and adjusted postcontrast T1liver was significantly associated with varices. (orig.)

  5. DWI-ASPECTS (Diffusion-Weighted Imaging-Alberta Stroke Program Early Computed Tomography Scores) and DWI-FLAIR (Diffusion-Weighted Imaging-Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery) Mismatch in Thrombectomy Candidates: An Intrarater and Interrater Agreement Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahed, Robert; Lecler, Augustin; Sabben, Candice; Khoury, Naim; Ducroux, Célina; Chalumeau, Vanessa; Botta, Daniele; Kalsoum, Erwah; Boisseau, William; Duron, Loïc; Cabral, Dominique; Koskas, Patricia; Benaïssa, Azzedine; Koulakian, Hasmik; Obadia, Michael; Maïer, Benjamin; Weisenburger-Lile, David; Lapergue, Bertrand; Wang, Adrien; Redjem, Hocine; Ciccio, Gabriele; Smajda, Stanislas; Desilles, Jean-Philippe; Mazighi, Mikaël; Ben Maacha, Malek; Akkari, Inès; Zuber, Kevin; Blanc, Raphaël; Raymond, Jean; Piotin, Michel

    2018-01-01

    We aimed to study the intrarater and interrater agreement of clinicians attributing DWI-ASPECTS (Diffusion-Weighted Imaging-Alberta Stroke Program Early Computed Tomography Scores) and DWI-FLAIR (Diffusion-Weighted Imaging-Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery) mismatch in patients with acute ischemic stroke referred for mechanical thrombectomy. Eighteen raters independently scored anonymized magnetic resonance imaging scans of 30 participants from a multicentre thrombectomy trial, in 2 different reading sessions. Agreement was measured using Fleiss κ and Cohen κ statistics. Interrater agreement for DWI-ASPECTS was slight (κ=0.17 [0.14-0.21]). Four raters (22.2%) had a substantial (or higher) intrarater agreement. Dichotomization of the DWI-ASPECTS (0-5 versus 6-10 or 0-6 versus 7-10) increased the interrater agreement to a substantial level (κ=0.62 [0.48-0.75] and 0.68 [0.55-0.79], respectively) and more raters reached a substantial (or higher) intrarater agreement (17/18 raters [94.4%]). Interrater agreement for DWI-FLAIR mismatch was moderate (κ=0.43 [0.33-0.57]); 11 raters (61.1%) reached a substantial (or higher) intrarater agreement. Agreement between clinicians assessing DWI-ASPECTS and DWI-FLAIR mismatch may not be sufficient to make repeatable clinical decisions in mechanical thrombectomy. The dichotomization of the DWI-ASPECTS (0-5 versus 0-6 or 0-6 versus 7-10) improved interrater and intrarater agreement, however, its relevance for patients selection for mechanical thrombectomy needs to be validated in a randomized trial. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Third Harmonic Imaging using a Pulse Inversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Joachim; Du, Yigang; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2011-01-01

    The pulse inversion (PI) technique can be utilized to separate and enhance harmonic components of a waveform for tissue harmonic imaging. While most ultrasound systems can perform pulse inversion, only few image the 3rd harmonic component. PI pulse subtraction can isolate and enhance the 3rd...

  7. Inverse regression for ridge recovery I: Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Glaws, Andrew T.; Constantine, Paul G.; Cook, R. Dennis

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the application of sufficient dimension reduction (SDR) to a deterministic function of several variables. In this context, SDR provides a framework for ridge recovery. A ridge function is a function of a few linear combinations of the variables---i.e., a composition of a nonlinear function with a low-dimensional linear transformation. We connect the key feature of SDR---the dimension reduction subspace---to ridge structure in functions, which provides a subspace-based perspecti...

  8. Convex blind image deconvolution with inverse filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xiao-Guang; Li, Fang; Zeng, Tieyong

    2018-03-01

    Blind image deconvolution is the process of estimating both the original image and the blur kernel from the degraded image with only partial or no information about degradation and the imaging system. It is a bilinear ill-posed inverse problem corresponding to the direct problem of convolution. Regularization methods are used to handle the ill-posedness of blind deconvolution and get meaningful solutions. In this paper, we investigate a convex regularized inverse filtering method for blind deconvolution of images. We assume that the support region of the blur object is known, as has been done in a few existing works. By studying the inverse filters of signal and image restoration problems, we observe the oscillation structure of the inverse filters. Inspired by the oscillation structure of the inverse filters, we propose to use the star norm to regularize the inverse filter. Meanwhile, we use the total variation to regularize the resulting image obtained by convolving the inverse filter with the degraded image. The proposed minimization model is shown to be convex. We employ the first-order primal-dual method for the solution of the proposed minimization model. Numerical examples for blind image restoration are given to show that the proposed method outperforms some existing methods in terms of peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR), structural similarity (SSIM), visual quality and time consumption.

  9. Degenerative disc disease of the lumbar spine: a prospective comparison of fast T1-weighted fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and T1-weighted turbo spin echo MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdem, L. Oktay; Erdem, C. Zuhal; Acikgoz, Bektas; Gundogdu, Sadi

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To compare fast T1-weighted fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and T1-weighted turbo spin-echo (TSE) imaging of the degenerative disc disease of the lumbar spine. Materials and methods: Thirty-five consecutive patients (19 females, 16 males; mean age 41 years, range 31-67 years) with suspected degenerative disc disease of the lumbar spine were prospectively evaluated. Sagittal images of the lumbar spine were obtained using T1-weighted TSE and fast T1-weighted FLAIR sequences. Two radiologists compared these sequences both qualitatively and quantitatively. Results: On qualitative evaluation, CSF nulling, contrast at the disc-CSF interface, the disc-spinal cord (cauda equina) interface, and the spinal cord (cauda equina)-CSF interface of fast T1-weighted FLAIR images were significantly higher than those for T1-weighted TSE images (P < 0.001). On quantitative evaluation of the first 15 patients, signal-to-noise ratios of cerebrospinal fluid of fast T1-weighted FLAIR imaging were significantly lower than those for T1-weighted TSE images (P < 0.05). Contrast-to-noise ratios of spinal cord/CSF and normal bone marrow/disc for fast T1-weighted FLAIR images were significantly higher than those for T1-weighted TSE images (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Results in our study have shown that fast T1-weighted FLAIR imaging may be a valuable imaging modality in the armamentarium of lumbar spinal T1-weighted MR imaging, because the former technique has definite superior advantages such as CSF nulling, conspicuousness of the normal anatomic structures and changes in the lumbar spinal discogenic disease and image contrast and also almost equally acquisition times

  10. Anterior temporal lobe white matter abnormal signal (ATLAS) as an indicator of seizure focus laterality in temporal lobe epilepsy: comparison of double inversion recovery, FLAIR and T2W MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morimoto, Emiko; Kanagaki, Mitsunori; Okada, Tomohisa; Yamamoto, Akira; Togashi, Kaori [Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Mori, Nobuyuki [Tenri Hospital, Department of Radiology, Tenri, Nara (Japan); Matsumoto, Riki; Ikeda, Akio; Takahashi, Ryosuke [Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Kyoto (Japan); Mikuni, Nobuhiro [Sapporo Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Kunieda, Takeharu; Miyamoto, Susumu [Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Kyoto (Japan); Paul, Dominik [Siemens AG Healthcare Sector, Erlangen (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    To investigate the diagnostic capability of anterior temporal lobe white matter abnormal signal (ATLAS) for determining seizure focus laterality in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) by comparing different MR sequences. This prospective study was approved by the institutional review board and written informed consent was obtained. Three 3D sequences (double inversion recovery (DIR), fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and T2-weighted imaging (T2WI)) and two 2D sequences (FLAIR and T2WI) were acquired at 3 T. Signal changes in the anterior temporal white matter of 21 normal volunteers were evaluated. ATLAS laterality was evaluated in 21 TLE patients. Agreement of independent evaluations by two neuroradiologists was assessed using {kappa} statistics. Differences in concordance between ATLAS laterality and clinically defined seizure focus laterality were analysed using McNemar's test with multiple comparisons. Pre-amygdala high signals (PAHS) were detected in all volunteers only on 3D-DIR. Inter-evaluator agreement was moderate to almost perfect for each sequence. Correct diagnosis of seizure laterality was significantly more frequent on 3D-DIR than on any other sequences (P {<=} 0.031 for each evaluator). The most sensitive sequence for detecting ATLAS laterality was 3D-DIR. ATLAS laterality on 3D-DIR can be a good indicator for determining seizure focus localization in TLE. (orig.)

  11. Anterior temporal lobe white matter abnormal signal (ATLAS) as an indicator of seizure focus laterality in temporal lobe epilepsy: comparison of double inversion recovery, FLAIR and T2W MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morimoto, Emiko; Kanagaki, Mitsunori; Okada, Tomohisa; Yamamoto, Akira; Togashi, Kaori; Mori, Nobuyuki; Matsumoto, Riki; Ikeda, Akio; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Mikuni, Nobuhiro; Kunieda, Takeharu; Miyamoto, Susumu; Paul, Dominik

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the diagnostic capability of anterior temporal lobe white matter abnormal signal (ATLAS) for determining seizure focus laterality in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) by comparing different MR sequences. This prospective study was approved by the institutional review board and written informed consent was obtained. Three 3D sequences (double inversion recovery (DIR), fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and T2-weighted imaging (T2WI)) and two 2D sequences (FLAIR and T2WI) were acquired at 3 T. Signal changes in the anterior temporal white matter of 21 normal volunteers were evaluated. ATLAS laterality was evaluated in 21 TLE patients. Agreement of independent evaluations by two neuroradiologists was assessed using κ statistics. Differences in concordance between ATLAS laterality and clinically defined seizure focus laterality were analysed using McNemar's test with multiple comparisons. Pre-amygdala high signals (PAHS) were detected in all volunteers only on 3D-DIR. Inter-evaluator agreement was moderate to almost perfect for each sequence. Correct diagnosis of seizure laterality was significantly more frequent on 3D-DIR than on any other sequences (P ≤ 0.031 for each evaluator). The most sensitive sequence for detecting ATLAS laterality was 3D-DIR. ATLAS laterality on 3D-DIR can be a good indicator for determining seizure focus localization in TLE. (orig.)

  12. Extent of myocardium at risk for left anterior descending artery, right coronary artery, and left circumflex artery occlusion depicted by contrast-enhanced steady state free precession and T2-weighted short tau inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordlund, David; Heiberg, Einar; Carlsson, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Background - Contrast-enhanced steady state free precession (CE-SSFP) and T2-weighted short tau inversion recovery (T2-STIR) have been clinically validated to estimate myocardium at risk (MaR) by cardiovascular magnetic resonance while using myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed...... tomography as reference standard. Myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography has been used to describe the coronary perfusion territories during myocardial ischemia. Compared with myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography, cardiovascular magnetic resonance offers...... superior image quality and practical advantages. Therefore, the aim was to describe the main coronary perfusion territories using CE-SSFP and T2-STIR cardiovascular magnetic resonance data in patients after acute ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction. Methods and Results - CE-SSFP and T2-STIR data...

  13. Role of three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (3D FLAIR) and proton density magnetic resonance imaging for the detection and evaluation of lesion extent of focal cortical dysplasia in patients with refractory epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saini, Jitender; Kesavadas, Chandrasekharan; Thomas, Bejoy; Singh, Atampreet; Rathore, Chathurbhuj; Radhakrishnan, Ashalatha; Radhakrishnan, Kurupath; Bahuleyan, Biji

    2010-01-01

    Background: Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is often associated with epilepsy. Identification of FCD can be difficult due to subtle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes. Though fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequence detects the majority of these lesions, smaller lesions may go unnoticed while larger lesions may be poorly delineated. Purpose: To determine the ability of a specialized epilepsy protocol in visualizing and delineating the extent of FCD. Material and Methods: We compared the imaging findings in nine patients with cortical malformation who underwent routine epilepsy MR imaging as well as a specialized epilepsy protocol. All imaging was done on a 1.5T MR unit. The specialized epilepsy protocol included 3D FLAIR in the sagittal plane as well as proton density (PD) and high-resolution T2-weighted (T2W) images in the transverse plane. Results: In all nine patients, the specialized protocol identified lesion anatomy better. In three patients in whom routine MRI was normal, the specialized epilepsy protocol including 3D FLAIR helped in identifying the lesions. One of these patients underwent surgery, and histo-pathology revealed a cortical dysplasia. In one patient, lesion characterization was improved, while in the remaining patients the extent of the FCD was more clearly demonstrated in the 3D FLAIR and PD images. Statistical analysis of images for cortical thickness, cortical signal intensity, adjacent white matter abnormalities, and gray-white matter junction showed significant statistical difference in the ability of 3D FLAIR to assess these aspects over conventional images. PD images were also found superior to the routine epilepsy protocol in assessment of cortical signal, adjacent white matter, and gray-white matter junction. Conclusion: Specialized MRI sequences and techniques should be performed whenever there is a high suspicion of cortical dysplasia, especially when they remain occult on conventional MR protocols. These techniques

  14. Staging of malignant lymphoma with three-station black-blood fast short-inversion time inversion recovery (STIR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Yasuo; Tajika, Kenji; Uchiyama, Nachiko; Takahama, Katsuya; Dan, Kazuo; Kumazaki, Tatsuo

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the usefulness of three-station black-blood fast short-inversion time inversion recovery (STIR) imaging in detecting and staging malignant lymphoma. Seventeen patients with malignant lymphoma were examined with a 1.5T imager. The findings and stagings determined with three-station black-blood fast STIR imaging were compared with reference standards (e.g., computed tomography [CT] findings and clinical stagings). Three-station black-blood fast STIR imaging provided a fat-suppressed T2-weighted imaging contrast with fewer flow artifacts and revealed nodal involvement as well as bone marrow and spleen involvement to an extent comparable with CT. Especially notable was the excellent specificity (94%) of this imaging technique. Regarding disease staging, significant agreement was observed between clinical staging (k=0.60) and staging as evaluated by three-station black-blood fast STIR, although the detection of lymphadenopathy in the thorax was relatively poor. The average time required for this imaging was approximately 30 min. Three-station black-blood fast STIR MR imaging may be useful as a staging tool for malignant lymphoma because this imaging technique reveals lymphoma lesions, which determine the staging, without radiation exposure or the use of contrast agents.

  15. Application of inversions to lossless image compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnavut, Ziya

    1997-04-01

    Linear prediction schemes, such as that of the Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG), are simple and normally produces a residual sequence with lower zero-order entry. Occasionally the entropy of the prediction error becomes greater than that of the original image. Such situations frequently occur when the image data have discrete gray levels located within certain intervals. To alleviate this problem, various authors have suggested different preprocessing methods. However, the techniques reported require two passes. We extend the definition of Lehmer-type inversions (Lehmer 1950 and 1964) from permutations to multiset permutations and present a one-pass algorithm based on inversions of a multiset permutation. We obtain comparable results when we apply JPEG and even better results when we apply some other linear prediction schemes on a preprocessed image, which is treated as multiset permutation.

  16. The usefulness of diffusion-weighted/fluid-attenuated inversion recovery imaging in the diagnostics and timing of lacunar and nonlacunar stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witkowski, Grzegorz; Sienkiewicz-Jarosz, Halina [Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology, 1st Department of Neurology, Warsaw (Poland); Piliszek, Agnieszka; Ryglewicz, Danuta [Central Clinical Hospital of the Ministry of Interior, Department of Radiology, Warsaw (Poland); Skierczynska, Agnieszka; Poniatowska, Renata [Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology, Department of Radiology, Warsaw (Poland); Dorobek, Malgorzata; Filipek-Gliszczynska, Anna [Central Clinical Hospital of the Ministry of Interior, Department of Neurology, Warsaw (Poland); Walecki, Jerzy [Polish Academy of Science, Mossakowski Medical Research Centre, Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-10-15

    The DWI/FLAIR mismatch is a potential radiological marker for the timing of stroke onset. The aim of the study was to assess if the DWI/FLAIR mismatch can help to identify patients with both lacunar and nonlacunar acute ischemic stroke within 4.5 h of onset. A retrospective study was performed in which the authors analysed data from 86 ischemic lacunar and nonlacunar stroke patients with a known time of symptom onset, imaged within the first 24 h from stroke onset (36 patients <4.5 h, 14 patients 4.5-6 h, 15 patients 6-12 h, and 21 patients 12-24 h). Patients underwent the admission CT and MR scan. The presence of lesions was assessed in correlation with the duration of the stroke. The time from stroke onset to neuroimaging was significantly shorter in patients with an ischemic lesion visible only in the DWI (mean 2.78 h, n = 24) as compared to patients with signs of ischemia also in other modalities (mean 8.6 h, n = 62) (p = 0.0001, Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA). The DWI/FLAIR mismatch was characterised by a global sensitivity of 58 %, specificity 94 %, PPV 87.5 %, and NPV 76 % in identifying patients in the 4.5 h thrombolysis time window. For lacunar strokes (n = 20), these parameters were as follows: sensitivity 50 %, specificity 92.8 %, PPV 75 %, and NPV 81.2 %. The presence of acute ischemic lesions only in DWI can help to identify both lacunar and nonlacunar stroke patients who are in the 4.5 h time window for intravenous thrombolysis with high specificity. (orig.)

  17. Evaluation of ADC measurements among solid pancreatic masses by respiratory-triggered diffusion-weighted MR imaging with inversion-recovery fat-suppression technique at 3.0T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xiu-Zhong; Yun, Hong; Zeng, Meng-Su; Wang, He; Sun, Fei; Rao, Sheng-Xiang; Ji, Yuan

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this paper was to investigate the value of apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) for differential diagnosis among solid pancreatic masses using respiratory triggered diffusion-weighted MR imaging with inversion-recovery fat-suppression technique (RT-IR-DWI) at 3.0 T. 20 normal volunteers and 72 patients (Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma [PDCA, n=30], mass-forming pancreatitis [MFP, n=15], solid pseudopapillary neoplasm [SPN, n=12], and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor[PNET, n=15]) underwent RT-IR-DWI (b values: 0 and 600 s/mm(2)) at 3.0 T. Results were correlated with histopathologic data and follow-up imaging. ADC values among different types of pancreatic tissue were statistically analyzed and compared. Statistical difference was noticed in ADC values among normal pancreas, MFP, PDCA, SPN and PNET by ANOVA (pPDCA, MFP and SPN. There was noticeable statistical difference in ADC values among PDCA, MFP and normal pancreas by Least Significant Difference (LSD) (pPDCA (p=0.0300×10(-4)) and normal pancreas (p=0.0007×10(-4)). ADC of PNET was statistically lower than that of normal pancreas (p=0.0360) and higher than that of MFP (p=9.3000×10(-4)). ADC measurements using RT-IR-DWI at 3.0T may aid to disclose the histopathological pattern of normal pancreas and solid pancreatic masses, which may be helpful in characterizing solid pancreatic lesions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Image-domain full waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Sanzong

    2013-08-20

    The main difficulty with the data-domain full waveform inversion (FWI) is that it tends to get stuck in the local minima associated with the waveform misfit function. This is because the waveform misfit function is highly nonlinear with respect to changes in velocity model. To reduce this nonlinearity, we define the image-domain objective function to minimize the difference of the suboffset-domain common image gathers (CIGs) obtained by migrating the observed data and the calculated data. The derivation shows that the gradient of this new objective function is the combination of the gradient of the conventional FWI and the image-domain differential semblance optimization (DSO). Compared to the conventional FWI, the imagedomain FWI is immune to cycle skipping problems by smearing the nonzero suboffset images along wavepath. It also can avoid the edge effects and the gradient artifacts that are inherent in DSO due to the falsely over-penalized focused images. This is achieved by subtracting the focused image associated with the calculated data from the unfocused image associated with the observed data in the image-domain misfit function. The numerical results of the Marmousi model show that image-domain FWI is less sensitive the initial model than the conventional FWI. © 2013 SEG.

  19. Comparison of Cartesian and radial acquisition on short-tau inversion recovery (STIR) sequences in breast MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Santucci, Domiziana; Lee, Sheila S.; Hartman, Heidi; Walgampaya, Shyama; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Ramalho, Miguel; Dale, Brian M.; Semelka, Richard C.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare two short-tau inversion recovery (STIR) sequences, Cartesian and radial (BLADE) acquisitions, for breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations. Materials and Methods: Ninety-six women underwent 1.5 T breast MRI exam (48 Cartesian and 48 BLADE). Qualitative analysis including image artifacts, image quality, fat-suppression, chest-wall depiction, lesion detection, lymph node depiction and overall impression were evaluated by...

  20. Tissue Border Enhancement by inversion recovery MRI at 7.0 Tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costagli, Mauro; Tiberi, Gianluigi; Kelley, Douglas A.C.; Symms, Mark R.; Biagi, Laura; Tosetti, Michela; Stara, Riccardo; Cosottini, Mirco; Maggioni, Eleonora; Barba, Carmen; Guerrini, Renzo

    2014-01-01

    This contribution presents a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisition technique named Tissue Border Enhancement (TBE), whose purpose is to produce images with enhanced visualization of borders between two tissues of interest without any post-processing. The technique is based on an inversion recovery sequence that employs an appropriate inversion time to produce images where the interface between two tissues of interest is hypo-intense; therefore, tissue borders are clearly represented by dark lines. This effect is achieved by setting imaging parameters such that two neighboring tissues of interest have magnetization with equal magnitude but opposite sign; therefore, the voxels containing a mixture of each tissue (that is, the tissue interface) possess minimal net signal. The technique was implemented on a 7.0 T MRI system. This approach can assist the definition of tissue borders, such as that between cortical gray matter and white matter; therefore, it could facilitate segmentation procedures, which are often challenging on ultra-high-field systems due to inhomogeneous radiofrequency distribution. TBE allows delineating the contours of structural abnormalities, and its capabilities were demonstrated with patients with focal cortical dysplasia, gray matter heterotopia, and polymicrogyria. This technique provides a new type of image contrast and has several possible applications in basic neuroscience, neurogenetic research, and clinical practice, as it could improve the detection power of MRI in the characterization of cortical malformations, enhance the contour of small anatomical structures of interest, and facilitate cortical segmentation. (orig.)

  1. Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery vascular hyperintensities in predicting cerebral hyperperfusion after intracranial arterial stenting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Chih-Cheng; Chen, David Yen-Ting; Tseng, Ying-Chi; Lee, Kun-Yu; Chiang, Chen-Hua; Chen, Chi-Jen [Taipei Medical University, Department of Radiology, Shuang-Ho Hospital, New Taipei City (China); Taipei Medical University, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei (China); Yan, Feng-Xian [Taipei Medical University, Department of Radiology, Shuang-Ho Hospital, New Taipei City (China)

    2017-08-15

    No reliable imaging sign predicting cerebral hyperperfusion after intracranial arterial stenting (IAS) had been described in the literature. This study evaluated the effect of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery vascular hyperintensities (FVHs), also called hyperintense vessel sign on T2-weighted fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (T2-FLAIR) MR images, in predicting significant increase in cerebral blood flow (CBF) defined by arterial spin labeling (ASL) after IAS. We reviewed ASL CBF images and T2-FLAIR MR images before (D0), 1 day after (D1), and 3 days after (D3) IAS of 16 patients. T1-weighted MR images were used as cerebral maps for calculating CBF. The changes in CBF values after IAS were calculated in and compared among stenting and nonstenting vascular territories. An increase more than 50% of CBF was considered as hyperperfusion. The effect of FVHs in predicting hyperperfusion was calculated. The D1 CBF value was significantly higher than the D0 CBF value in stenting vascular, contralateral anterior cerebral artery, contralateral middle cerebral artery, and contralateral posterior cerebral artery (PCA) territories (all P <.05). The D1 and D3 CBF values were significantly higher than the D0 CBF value in overall vascular (P <.001), overall nonstenting vascular (P <.001), and ipsilateral PCA (P <.05) territories. The rate of more than 50% increases in CBF was significantly higher in patients who exhibited asymmetric FVHs than in those who did not exhibit these findings. FVHs could be a critical predictor of a significant increase in CBF after IAS. (orig.)

  2. Towards Exascale Seismic Imaging and Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tromp, J.; Bozdag, E.; Lefebvre, M. P.; Smith, J. A.; Lei, W.; Ruan, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Post-petascale supercomputers are now available to solve complex scientific problems that were thought unreachable a few decades ago. They also bring a cohort of concerns tied to obtaining optimum performance. Several issues are currently being investigated by the HPC community. These include energy consumption, fault resilience, scalability of the current parallel paradigms, workflow management, I/O performance and feature extraction with large datasets. In this presentation, we focus on the last three issues. In the context of seismic imaging and inversion, in particular for simulations based on adjoint methods, workflows are well defined.They consist of a few collective steps (e.g., mesh generation or model updates) and of a large number of independent steps (e.g., forward and adjoint simulations of each seismic event, pre- and postprocessing of seismic traces). The greater goal is to reduce the time to solution, that is, obtaining a more precise representation of the subsurface as fast as possible. This brings us to consider both the workflow in its entirety and the parts comprising it. The usual approach is to speedup the purely computational parts based on code optimization in order to reach higher FLOPS and better memory management. This still remains an important concern, but larger scale experiments show that the imaging workflow suffers from severe I/O bottlenecks. Such limitations occur both for purely computational data and seismic time series. The latter are dealt with by the introduction of a new Adaptable Seismic Data Format (ASDF). Parallel I/O libraries, namely HDF5 and ADIOS, are used to drastically reduce the cost of disk access. Parallel visualization tools, such as VisIt, are able to take advantage of ADIOS metadata to extract features and display massive datasets. Because large parts of the workflow are embarrassingly parallel, we are investigating the possibility of automating the imaging process with the integration of scientific workflow

  3. Fast spine echo and fast fluid attenuated inversion recovery sequences in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paolillo, Andrea; Giugni, Elisabetta; Bozzao, Alessandro; Bastianello, Stefano

    1997-01-01

    Fast spin echo (FSE) and fast fluid attenuated inversion recovery (fast-FLAIR) sequences, were compared with conventional spin echo (CSE) in quantitating multiple sclerosis (MS) lesion burden. For each sequence, the total number and volume of MS lesions were calculated in 38 remitting multiple sclerosis patients using a semiautomated lesion detection program. Conventional spin echo, fast spin echo, and fast fluid attenuated inversion recovery image were reported on randomly and at different times by two expert observers. Interobserver differences, the time needed to quantitative multiple sclerosis lesions and lesion signal intensity (contrast-to-noise ratio and overall contrast) were considered. The lesions were classified by site into infratentorial, white matter and cortical/subcortical. A total of 2970 lesions with a volume of 961.7 cm 3 was calculated on conventional spin echo images. Fast spin echo images depicted fewer (16.6%; p < .005) and smaller (24.9%; p < .0001) lesions and the differences were statistically significant. Despite an overall nonsignificant reduction for fast-FLAIR images (-5% and 4.8% for lesion number and volume, respectively), significantly lower values (lesion number: p < 0.1; volume: p < .04)were observed for infratentorial lesions, while significantly higher values were seen for cortical/subcortical lesions (lesion number: p < .01; volume: p < .02). A higher lesion/white matter contrast (p < .002), a significant time saving for lesion burden quantitation (p < .05) and very low interobserver variability were found in favor of fast-FLAIR. Our data suggest that, despite the limitations regarding infratentorial lesions, fast-FLAIR sequences are indicated in R studies because of their good identification of cortical/subcortical lesions, almost complete interobserver agreement, higher contrast-to-noise ratio and limited time needed for semiautomated quantitation

  4. Fast STIR (Short TI Inversion Recovery) imaging of the spine. The assessment of the role for the depiction of intramedullary spinal cord lesions and the usefulness of the additional transverse images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, Ryosuke; Kan, Tomoko; Hirose, Tomohiro; Hara, Tadashi; Shibata, Toyomichi; Ueno, Makoto; Takagi, Takehisa; Kohno, Shigene

    2002-01-01

    It is known that the fast STIR images of the spine achieve more excellent lesion contrast than the usual fast spin echo (FSE) T2-weighted images, because the elongation of T1 and T2 relaxation time of the lesion additively contribute to the contrast. The fast STIR images showed advantages in the depiction of acute and chronic lesion of multiple sclerosis and tolerable disadvantages in the depiction of other lesions, such as spondylotic myelopathy or syringomyelia. Transverse images showed less usefulness than sagittal images except for their superior gray-to-white matter contrast. Fast STIR imaging can replace FSE T2-weighted imaging in the study of restricted patients' population. (author)

  5. Aftermath of Ankle Inversion Injuries: Spectrum of MR Imaging Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Timothy M; Martinez-Salazar, Edgar Leonardo; Torriani, Martin

    2017-02-01

    Acute and chronic ankle inversion injuries are a common source of pain and a diagnostic challenge. Several studies have shown a variety of injury patterns after inversion injury both in acute and chronic settings. Although traditional assessment with clinical examination and radiographs is generally accepted for inversion injuries, MR imaging is a useful tool to detect occult injuries and in patients with chronic symptoms. This article examines a range of MR imaging findings that may be present in patients with lateral ankle pain following an acute or chronic inversion injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Rapid T1 quantification based on 3D phase sensitive inversion recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warntjes, Marcel JB; Kihlberg, Johan; Engvall, Jan

    2010-01-01

    In Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging fibrotic myocardium can be distinguished from healthy tissue using the difference in the longitudinal T 1 relaxation after administration of Gadolinium, the so-called Late Gd Enhancement. The purpose of this work was to measure the myocardial absolute T 1 post-Gd from a single breath-hold 3D Phase Sensitivity Inversion Recovery sequence (PSIR). Equations were derived to take the acquisition and saturation effects on the magnetization into account. The accuracy of the method was investigated on phantoms and using simulations. The method was applied to a group of patients with suspected myocardial infarction where the absolute difference in relaxation of healthy and fibrotic myocardium was measured at about 15 minutes post-contrast. The evolution of the absolute R 1 relaxation rate (1/T 1 ) over time after contrast injection was followed for one patient and compared to T 1 mapping using Look-Locker. Based on the T 1 maps synthetic LGE images were reconstructed and compared to the conventional LGE images. The fitting algorithm is robust against variation in acquisition flip angle, the inversion delay time and cardiac arrhythmia. The observed relaxation rate of the myocardium is 1.2 s -1 , increasing to 6 - 7 s -1 after contrast injection and decreasing to 2 - 2.5 s -1 for healthy myocardium and to 3.5 - 4 s -1 for fibrotic myocardium. Synthesized images based on the T 1 maps correspond very well to actual LGE images. The method provides a robust quantification of post-Gd T 1 relaxation for a complete cardiac volume within a single breath-hold

  7. Rapid T1 quantification based on 3D phase sensitive inversion recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warntjes Marcel JB

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging fibrotic myocardium can be distinguished from healthy tissue using the difference in the longitudinal T1 relaxation after administration of Gadolinium, the so-called Late Gd Enhancement. The purpose of this work was to measure the myocardial absolute T1 post-Gd from a single breath-hold 3D Phase Sensitivity Inversion Recovery sequence (PSIR. Equations were derived to take the acquisition and saturation effects on the magnetization into account. Methods The accuracy of the method was investigated on phantoms and using simulations. The method was applied to a group of patients with suspected myocardial infarction where the absolute difference in relaxation of healthy and fibrotic myocardium was measured at about 15 minutes post-contrast. The evolution of the absolute R1 relaxation rate (1/T1 over time after contrast injection was followed for one patient and compared to T1 mapping using Look-Locker. Based on the T1 maps synthetic LGE images were reconstructed and compared to the conventional LGE images. Results The fitting algorithm is robust against variation in acquisition flip angle, the inversion delay time and cardiac arrhythmia. The observed relaxation rate of the myocardium is 1.2 s-1, increasing to 6 - 7 s-1 after contrast injection and decreasing to 2 - 2.5 s-1 for healthy myocardium and to 3.5 - 4 s-1 for fibrotic myocardium. Synthesized images based on the T1 maps correspond very well to actual LGE images. Conclusions The method provides a robust quantification of post-Gd T1 relaxation for a complete cardiac volume within a single breath-hold.

  8. Contrast-enhanced FLAIR (fluid-attenuated inversion recovery for evaluating mild traumatic brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Chin Kim

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate whether adding a contrast-enhanced fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR sequence to routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can detect additional abnormalities in the brains of symptomatic patients with mild traumatic brain injury. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifty-four patients with persistent symptoms following mild closed head injury were included in our retrospective study (M ∶ F =  32 ∶ 22, mean age: 59.8 ± 16.4, age range: 26-84 years. All MRI examinations were obtained within 14 days after head trauma (mean: 3.2 ± 4.1 days, range: 0.2-14 days. Two neuroradiologists recorded (1 the presence of traumatic brain lesions on MR images with and without contrast-enhanced FLAIR images and (2 the pattern and location of meningeal enhancement depicted on contrast-enhanced FLAIR images. The number of additional traumatic brain lesions diagnosed with contrast-enhanced FLAIR was recorded. Correlations between meningeal enhancement and clinical findings were also evaluated. RESULTS: Traumatic brain lesions were detected on routine image sequences in 25 patients. Three additional cases of brain abnormality were detected with the contrast-enhanced FLAIR images. Meningeal enhancement was identified on contrast-enhanced FLAIR images in 9 cases while the other routine image sequences showed no findings of traumatic brain injury. Overall, the additional contrast-enhanced FLAIR images revealed more extensive abnormalities than routine imaging in 37 cases (p<0.001. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, subdural hematoma and posttraumatic loss of consciousness showed a significant association with meningeal enhancement on contrast-enhanced FLAIR images, with odds ratios 13.068 (95% confidence interval 2.037 to 83.852, and 15.487 (95% confidence interval 2.545 to 94.228, respectively. CONCLUSION: Meningeal enhancement on contrast-enhanced FLAIR images can help detect traumatic brain lesions as well as additional abnormalities

  9. Inverse synthetic aperture radar imaging principles, algorithms and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chen , Victor C

    2014-01-01

    Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging: Principles, Algorithms and Applications is based on the latest research on ISAR imaging of moving targets and non-cooperative target recognition (NCTR). With a focus on the advances and applications, this book will provide readers with a working knowledge on various algorithms of ISAR imaging of targets and implementation with MATLAB. These MATLAB algorithms will prove useful in order to visualize and manipulate some simulated ISAR images.

  10. Inversion recovery single-shot TurboFLASH for assessment of myocardial infarction at 3 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauner, Kerstin U; Muehling, Olaf; Wintersperger, Bernd J; Winnik, Eva; Reiser, Maximilian F; Huber, Armin

    2007-06-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of imaging myocardial infarction with a single-shot inversion recovery turbofast low-angle shot (SS IR turboFLASH) sequence at 3.0 Tesla in comparison with an established segmented inversion recovery turboFLASH sequence at 1.5 Tesla. Fifteen patients with myocardial infarction were examined at a 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance (MR) System (Avanto, Siemens, Medical Solutions) and at a 3.0 Tesla MR system (TIM Trio, Siemens, Medical Solutions). Imaging delayed enhancement was started 15 minutes after application of contrast material. A SS IR turboFLASH was performed at 3.0 Tesla and compared with a segmented IR turboFLASH sequence at 1.5 and at 3.0 Tesla. The IR turboFLASH sequence at 1.5 Tesla served as reference method. Infarct volumes, contrast/noise ratio (CNR) of infarcted and normal myocardium were compared with the reference method. The Single-Shot IR turboFLASH technique allows imaging 9 slices during a single breath-hold. The CNR between infarction and normal myocardium of the reference method was 6.4 at 1.5 Tesla. The mean value of CNR of the IR turboFLASH sequence was 7.3 at 3.0 Tesla for the single-shot technique and 14.1 at 3.0 Tesla for the segmented technique. No significant difference was found for the CNR values of the reference technique at 1.5 Tesla and the single-shot technique at 3.0 Tesla, however for the comparison of the segmented technique at 1.5 and at 3 Tesla (P = 0.0001). The correlation coefficients of the infarct volumes, determined with the Single-Shot IR turboFLASH and the segmented IR turboFLASH technique at 3.0 compared with the reference method, were r = 0.95 (P < 0.0001) and r = 0.95 (P < 0.0001). The loss of CNR, which is caused by replacement of the segmented technique by the single-shot technique, is completely compensated by the approximately 2-fold CNR increase at the higher field strength. The IR turboFLASH technique at 3.0 Tesla IR can be used as a single-shot technique

  11. Inversion improves the recognition of facial expression in thatcherized images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psalta, Lilia; Andrews, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    The Thatcher illusion provides a compelling example of the face inversion effect. However, the marked effect of inversion in the Thatcher illusion contrasts to other studies that report only a small effect of inversion on the recognition of facial expressions. To address this discrepancy, we compared the effects of inversion and thatcherization on the recognition of facial expressions. We found that inversion of normal faces caused only a small reduction in the recognition of facial expressions. In contrast, local inversion of facial features in upright thatcherized faces resulted in a much larger reduction in the recognition of facial expressions. Paradoxically, inversion of thatcherized faces caused a relative increase in the recognition of facial expressions. Together, these results suggest that different processes explain the effects of inversion on the recognition of facial expressions and on the perception of the Thatcher illusion. The grotesque perception of thatcherized images is based on a more orientation-sensitive representation of the face. In contrast, the recognition of facial expression is dependent on a more orientation-insensitive representation. A similar pattern of results was evident when only the mouth or eye region was visible. These findings demonstrate that a key component of the Thatcher illusion is to be found in orientation-specific encoding of the features of the face.

  12. Onion-peeling inversion of stellarator images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, K. C.; Diaz-Pacheco, R. R.; Kornbluth, Y.; Volpe, F. A.; Wei, Y.

    2016-11-01

    An onion-peeling technique is developed for inferring the emissivity profile of a stellarator plasma from a two-dimensional image acquired through a CCD or CMOS camera. Each pixel in the image is treated as an integral of emission along a particular line-of-sight. Additionally, the flux surfaces in the plasma are partitioned into discrete layers, each of which is assumed to have uniform emissivity. If the topology of the flux surfaces is known, this construction permits the development of a system of linear equations that can be solved for the emissivity of each layer. We present initial results of this method applied to wide-angle visible images of the Columbia Neutral Torus (CNT) stellarator plasma.

  13. Consensus recommendations for MS cortical lesion scoring using double inversion recovery MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geurts, J J G; Roosendaal, S D; Calabrese, M

    2011-01-01

    Different double inversion recovery (DIR) sequences are currently used in multiple sclerosis (MS) research centers to visualize cortical lesions, making it difficult to compare published data. This study aimed to formulate consensus recommendations for scoring cortical lesions in patients with MS...

  14. Image Companding and Inverse Halftoning using Deep Convolutional Neural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Hou, Xianxu; Qiu, Guoping

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce deep learning technology to tackle two traditional low-level image processing problems, companding and inverse halftoning. We make two main contributions. First, to the best knowledge of the authors, this is the first work that has successfully developed deep learning based solutions to these two traditional low-level image processing problems. This not only introduces new methods to tackle well-known image processing problems but also demonstrates the power of dee...

  15. Signal recovery in imaging photoplethysmography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holton, Benjamin D; Mannapperuma, Kavan; Lesniewski, Peter J; Thomas, John C

    2013-01-01

    Imaging photoplethysmography is an emerging technique for the extraction of biometric information from people using video recordings. The focus is on extracting the cardiac heart rate of the subject by analysing the luminance of the colour video signal and identifying periodic components. Advanced signal processing is needed to recover the information required. In this paper, independent component analysis (ICA), principal component analysis, auto- and cross-correlation are investigated and compared with respect to their effectiveness in extracting the relevant information from video recordings. Results obtained are compared with those recorded by a modern commercial finger pulse oximeter. It is found that ICA produces the most consistent results. (paper)

  16. Signal recovery in imaging photoplethysmography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holton, Benjamin D; Mannapperuma, Kavan; Lesniewski, Peter J; Thomas, John C

    2013-11-01

    Imaging photoplethysmography is an emerging technique for the extraction of biometric information from people using video recordings. The focus is on extracting the cardiac heart rate of the subject by analysing the luminance of the colour video signal and identifying periodic components. Advanced signal processing is needed to recover the information required. In this paper, independent component analysis (ICA), principal component analysis, auto- and cross-correlation are investigated and compared with respect to their effectiveness in extracting the relevant information from video recordings. Results obtained are compared with those recorded by a modern commercial finger pulse oximeter. It is found that ICA produces the most consistent results.

  17. Adding Image Constraints to Inverse Kinematics for Human Motion Capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaume-i-Capó, Antoni; Varona, Javier; González-Hidalgo, Manuel; Perales, Francisco J.

    2009-12-01

    In order to study human motion in biomechanical applications, a critical component is to accurately obtain the 3D joint positions of the user's body. Computer vision and inverse kinematics are used to achieve this objective without markers or special devices attached to the body. The problem of these systems is that the inverse kinematics is "blinded" with respect to the projection of body segments into the images used by the computer vision algorithms. In this paper, we present how to add image constraints to inverse kinematics in order to estimate human motion. Specifically, we explain how to define a criterion to use images in order to guide the posture reconstruction of the articulated chain. Tests with synthetic images show how the scheme performs well in an ideal situation. In order to test its potential in real situations, more experiments with task specific image sequences are also presented. By means of a quantitative study of different sequences, the results obtained show how this approach improves the performance of inverse kinematics in this application.

  18. Robust seismic images amplitude recovery using curvelets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moghaddam, Peyman P.; Herrmann, Felix J.; Stolk, C.C.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we recover the amplitude of a seismic image by approximating the normal (demigration-migration) operator. In this approximation, we make use of the property that curvelets remain invariant under the action of the normal operator. We propose a seismic amplitude recovery method that

  19. Diagnosis of acute ischaemic stroke with fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and diffusion-weighted sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oppenheim, C.; Dormont, D.; Lehericy, S.; Marsault, C.; Logak, M.; Manai, R.; Samson, Y.; Rancurel, G.

    2000-01-01

    We evaluated the feasibility and use of diffusion-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery pulse sequences performed as an emergency for patients with acute ischaemic stroke. A 5-min MRI session was designed as an emergency diagnostic procedure for patients admitted with suspected acute ischaemic stroke. We reviewed routine clinical implementation of the procedure, and its sensitivity and specificity for acute ischaemic stroke over the first 8 months. We imaged 91 patients (80 min to 48 h following the onset of stroke). Clinical deficit had resolved in less than 3 h in 15 patients, and the remaining 76 were classified as stroke (59) or stroke-like (17) after hospital discharge. Sensitivity of MRI for acute ischaemic stroke was 98 %, specificity 100 %. MRI provided an immediate and accurate picture of the number, site, size and age of ischaemic lesions in stroke and simplified diagnosis in stroke-like episodes. The feasibility and high diagnostic accuracy of emergency MRI in acute stroke strongly support its routine use in a stroke centre. (orig.)

  20. Coherent source imaging and dynamic support tracking for inverse scattering using compressive MUSIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Okkyun; Kim, Jong Min; Yoo, Jaejoon; Jin, Kyunghwan; Ye, Jong Chul

    2011-09-01

    The goal of this paper is to develop novel algorithms for inverse scattering problems such as EEG/MEG, microwave imaging, and/or diffuse optical tomograpahy, and etc. One of the main contributions of this paper is a class of novel non-iterative exact nonlinear inverse scattering theory for coherent source imaging and moving targets. Specifically, the new algorithms guarantee the exact recovery under a very relaxed constraint on the number of source and receivers, under which the conventional methods fail. Such breakthrough was possible thanks to the recent theory of compressive MUSIC and its extension using support correction criterion, where partial support are estimated using the conventional compressed sensing approaches, then the remaining supports are estimated using a novel generalized MUSIC criterion. Numerical results using coherent sources in EEG/MEG and dynamic targets confirm that the new algorithms outperform the conventional ones.

  1. Temporal pole signal abnormality on MR imaging in temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis: a fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery study; Anormalidade de sinal na imagem por RM do polo temporal na epilepsia do lobo temporal com esclerose hipocampal: um estudo pela sequencia inversao recuperacao com supressao da agua livre (FLAIR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrete Junior, Henrique; Abdala, Nitamar; Szjenfeld, Jacob; Nogueira, Roberto Gomes [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP-EPM), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem; Lin, Katia; Caboclo, Luis Otavio; Centeno, Ricardo Silva; Sakamoto, Americo Ceiki; Yacubian, Elza Marcia Targas [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP-EPM), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Neurologia e Neurocirurgia

    2007-09-15

    Objective: To determine the frequency and regional involvement of temporal pole signal abnormality (TPA) in patients with hippocampal sclerosis (HS) using fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) MR imaging, and to correlate this feature with history. Method: Coronal FLAIR images of the temporal pole were assessed in 120 patients with HS and in 30 normal subjects, to evaluate gray-white matter demarcation. Results: Ninety (75%) of 120 patients had associated TPA. The HS side made difference regarding the presence of TPA, with a left side prevalence (p=0.04, {chi}{sup 2} test). The anteromedial zone of temporal pole was affected in 27 (30%) out of 90 patients. In 63 (70%) patients the lateral zone were also affected. Patients with TPA were younger at seizure onset (p=0.018), but without association with duration of epilepsy. Conclusion: Our FLAIR study show temporal pole signal abnormality in 3/4 of patients with HS, mainly seen on the anteromedial region, with a larger prevalence when the left hippocampus was involved. (author)

  2. Usefulness of turbo-fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (tFLAIR) sequence in diagnosing meningioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Teruhiko; Miki, Hitoshi; Takeguchi, Takashi; Kikuchi, Keiichi; Mochizuki, Teruhito; Ikezoe, Junpei

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively the usefulness of turbo-fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (tFLAIR) in diagnosing meningioma in comparison with the T2-weighted turbo spin echo (T2W-TSE) sequence. Forty-eight patients diagnosed with meningioma were studied. In the qualitative study, we evaluated tumor delineation, contrast (Co) of tumor-to-CSF (cerebrospinal fluid), Co of tumor-to-brain parenchyma, Co of peripheral edema-to-brain parenchyma, and detectability of tumor margin. In quantitative study-1, using signal intensity (SI), we measured SI and calculated Co-SI of tumor-to-gray matter, Co-SI of tumor-to-white matter, Co-SI of peripheral edema-to-white matter, and Co-SI of tumor-to-CSF. In quantitative study-2, using film density, we measured density (De) on hard-copy film images and calculated Co-De for the same items as in quantitative study-1. In the qualitative study, tFLAIR was superior to T2W-TSE in tumor delineation, Co of tumor-to-CSF, Co of tumor-to-brain parenchyma, and Co of peripheral edema-to-brain parenchyma. In quantitative study-1, tFLAIR was superior to T2W-TSE in Co-SI of tumor-to-CSF, however, T2W-TSE was superior to tFLAIR in Co-SI of tumor-to-white matter. In quantitative study-2, tFLAIR was superior to T2W-TSE in all Co-De. tFLAIR was superior to T2W-TSE in the depiction of meningioma. (author)

  3. Usefulness of turbo-fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (tFLAIR) sequence in diagnosing meningioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Teruhiko; Miki, Hitoshi; Takeguchi, Takashi; Kikuchi, Keiichi; Mochizuki, Teruhito; Ikezoe, Junpei [Ehime Univ., Shigenobu (Japan). School of Medicine

    2003-04-01

    We evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively the usefulness of turbo-fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (tFLAIR) in diagnosing meningioma in comparison with the T2-weighted turbo spin echo (T2W-TSE) sequence. Forty-eight patients diagnosed with meningioma were studied. In the qualitative study, we evaluated tumor delineation, contrast (Co) of tumor-to-CSF (cerebrospinal fluid), Co of tumor-to-brain parenchyma, Co of peripheral edema-to-brain parenchyma, and detectability of tumor margin. In quantitative study-1, using signal intensity (SI), we measured SI and calculated Co-SI of tumor-to-gray matter, Co-SI of tumor-to-white matter, Co-SI of peripheral edema-to-white matter, and Co-SI of tumor-to-CSF. In quantitative study-2, using film density, we measured density (De) on hard-copy film images and calculated Co-De for the same items as in quantitative study-1. In the qualitative study, tFLAIR was superior to T2W-TSE in tumor delineation, Co of tumor-to-CSF, Co of tumor-to-brain parenchyma, and Co of peripheral edema-to-brain parenchyma. In quantitative study-1, tFLAIR was superior to T2W-TSE in Co-SI of tumor-to-CSF, however, T2W-TSE was superior to tFLAIR in Co-SI of tumor-to-white matter. In quantitative study-2, tFLAIR was superior to T2W-TSE in all Co-De. tFLAIR was superior to T2W-TSE in the depiction of meningioma. (author)

  4. Imaging lower mantle heterogeneities by asymptotic waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, J. Y. T.; Zhan, Z.

    2017-12-01

    Tomographic images from full waveform inversions (FWI) are starting to reveal fine details of Earth structures. However, the constructions of mesh and kernels for broadband waveforms based on full numerical methods are still computationally expensive, and choices of initial models are critical. Here we propose an asymptotic waveform inversion (AWI) technique based on an asymptotic forward method, which are much faster than full numerical methods. While the asymptotic approach does not work for full seismograms or arbitrarily complex medium, it demonstrates high accuracy for important seismic phases (e.g., P and S) for typical/enhanced velocity anomalies considered in Earth's middle and lower mantle. This allows us to use, instead of gradient-based optimization, direct/Monte Carlo search of the model space and provides more realistic uncertainty estimates. This new AWI method can be applied to image subducted slabs and large low shear wave velocity provinces (LLSVPs) in lower mantle with broadband waveforms.

  5. Linearized inversion frameworks toward high-resolution seismic imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Aldawood, Ali

    2016-09-01

    Seismic exploration utilizes controlled sources, which emit seismic waves that propagate through the earth subsurface and get reflected off subsurface interfaces and scatterers. The reflected and scattered waves are recorded by recording stations installed along the earth surface or down boreholes. Seismic imaging is a powerful tool to map these reflected and scattered energy back to their subsurface scattering or reflection points. Seismic imaging is conventionally based on the single-scattering assumption, where only energy that bounces once off a subsurface scatterer and recorded by a receiver is projected back to its subsurface position. The internally multiply scattered seismic energy is considered as unwanted noise and is usually suppressed or removed from the recorded data. Conventional seismic imaging techniques yield subsurface images that suffer from low spatial resolution, migration artifacts, and acquisition fingerprint due to the limited acquisition aperture, number of sources and receivers, and bandwidth of the source wavelet. Hydrocarbon traps are becoming more challenging and considerable reserves are trapped in stratigraphic and pinch-out traps, which require highly resolved seismic images to delineate them. This thesis focuses on developing and implementing new advanced cost-effective seismic imaging techniques aiming at enhancing the resolution of the migrated images by exploiting the sparseness of the subsurface reflectivity distribution and utilizing the multiples that are usually neglected when imaging seismic data. I first formulate the seismic imaging problem as a Basis pursuit denoise problem, which I solve using an L1-minimization algorithm to obtain the sparsest migrated image corresponding to the recorded data. Imaging multiples may illuminate subsurface zones, which are not easily illuminated by conventional seismic imaging using primary reflections only. I then develop an L2-norm (i.e. least-squares) inversion technique to image

  6. Three-dimensional phase-sensitive inversion recovery sequencing in the evaluation of left ventricular myocardial scars in ischemic and non-ischemic cardiomyopathy: Comparison to three-dimensional inversion recovery sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kido, Tomoyuki, E-mail: tomozo0421@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Kido, Teruhito; Nakamura, Masashi; Kawaguchi, Naoto; Nishiyama, Yoshiko [Department of Radiology, Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Ogimoto, Akiyoshi [Department of Cardiovascular Internal Medicine, Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Miyagawa, Masao; Mochizuki, Teruhito [Department of Radiology, Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • We evaluate 3D PSIR compared with 3D IR for the detection of myocardial scars. • In image quality, there was no significant difference between IR and PSIR. • A quantitative analysis of LGE volume shows a strong correlation between PSIR and IR. • PSIR detected greater LGE volume in non-ischemic cardiomyopathy patients than IR. • PSIR may have a specific role in scar evaluation of non-ischemic cardiomyopathy. - Abstract: Background: Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a useful technique for detecting myocardial fibrosis. LGE images are typically acquired using the inversion recovery (IR) method. Recently, phase-sensitive inversion recovery (PSIR) technology has been developed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate free-breathing 3D PSIR sequencing in comparison with breath-held 3D IR sequencing for the detection of myocardial fibrosis. Methods: One hundred twenty-three patients with suspected ischemic cardiac disease (n = 27) or non-ischemic cardiomyopathy (hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, n = 29; dilated cardiomyopathy, n = 22; sarcoidosis, n = 21; arrhythmia, n = 9; myocarditis, n = 4; amyloidosis, n = 3; and others, n = 8) were evaluated by LGE–MRI, which was performed first with the IR sequence and then with the PSIR sequence, using a 3 T MRI scanner. Image quality was scored by two independent readers using a four-point scale. The 3D LGE volume was analyzed quantitatively and compared between both sequencing methods. Results: There was no significant difference in overall image quality (p = 0.19). LGE was detected in 73 patients, who were evaluated visually. Ultimately, 58 patients with acceptable image quality were enrolled in further quantitative analyses (volume assessment). Although quantification of LGE volume revealed a strong correlation between both methods, larger LGE volumes were detected with PSIR compared to IR in patients suspected of non-ischemic cardiomyopathy (39.5 ± 25.9 cm{sup 3} for

  7. The linearized inversion of the generalized interferometric multiple imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Aldawood, Ali

    2016-09-06

    The generalized interferometric multiple imaging (GIMI) procedure can be used to image duplex waves and other higher order internal multiples. Imaging duplex waves could help illuminate subsurface zones that are not easily illuminated by primaries such as vertical and nearly vertical fault planes, and salt flanks. To image first-order internal multiple, the GIMI framework consists of three datuming steps, followed by applying the zero-lag cross-correlation imaging condition. However, the standard GIMI procedure yields migrated images that suffer from low spatial resolution, migration artifacts, and cross-talk noise. To alleviate these problems, we propose a least-squares GIMI framework in which we formulate the first two steps as a linearized inversion problem when imaging first-order internal multiples. Tests on synthetic datasets demonstrate the ability to localize subsurface scatterers in their true positions, and delineate a vertical fault plane using the proposed method. We, also, demonstrate the robustness of the proposed framework when imaging the scatterers or the vertical fault plane with erroneous migration velocities.

  8. Image-domain full waveform inversion: Field data example

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Sanzong

    2014-08-05

    The main difficulty with the data-domain full waveform inversion (FWI) is that it tends to get stuck in the local minima associated with the waveform misfit function. This is the result of cycle skipping which degrades the low-wavenumber update in the absence of low-frequencies and long-offset data. An image-domain objective function is defined as the normed difference between the predicted and observed common image gathers (CIGs) in the subsurface offset domain. This new objective function is not constrained by cycle skipping at the far subsurface offsets. To test the effectiveness of this method, we apply it to marine data recorded in the Gulf of Mexico. Results show that image-domain FWI is less sensitive to the initial model and the absence of low-frequency data compared with conventional FWI. The liability, however, is that it is almost an order of magnitude more expensive than standard FWI.

  9. Comparison of Cartesian and radial acquisition on short-tau inversion recovery (STIR sequences in breast MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domiziana Santucci

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare two short-tau inversion recovery (STIR sequences, Cartesian and radial (BLADE acquisitions, for breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI examinations. Materials and Methods: Ninety-six women underwent 1.5 T breast MRI exam (48 Cartesian and 48 BLADE. Qualitative analysis including image artifacts, image quality, fat-suppression, chest-wall depiction, lesion detection, lymph node depiction and overall impression were evaluated by three blinded readers. Signal to noise ratios (SNRs were calculated. Cronbach's alpha test was used to assess inter-observer agreement. Subanalyses of image quality, chest-wall depiction and overall impression in 15 patients with implants and image quality in 31 patients with clips were correlated using Pearson test. Wilcoxon rank sum test and t-test were performed. Results: Motion artifacts were present in 100% and in 0% of the Cartesian and the BLADE exams, respectively. Chemical-shift artifacts were present in 8% of the Cartesian exams. Flow artifacts were more frequent on BLADE. BLADE sequence was statistically superior to Cartesian for all qualitative features (p < 0.05 except for fat-suppression (p = 0.054. In the subanalysis, BLADE was superior for implants and clips (p < 0.05. SNR was statistically greater for BLADE (48.35 vs. 16.17. Cronbach ranged from 0.502 to 0.813. Conclusion: BLADE appears to be superior to Cartesian acquisition of STIR imaging as measured by improved image quality, fewer artifacts, and improved chest wall and lymph node depiction.

  10. Multiscale Seismic Inversion in the Data and Image Domains

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Sanzong

    2015-12-01

    I present a general methodology for inverting seismic data in either the data or image domains. It partially overcomes one of the most serious problems with current waveform inversion methods, which is the tendency to converge to models far from the actual one. The key idea is to develop a multiscale misfit function that is composed of both a simplified version of the data and one associated with the complex part of the data. Misfit functions based on simple data are characterized by many fewer local minima so that a gradient optimization method can make quick progress in getting to the general vicinity of the actual model. Once we are near the actual model, we then use the gradient based on the more complex data. Below, we describe two implementations of this multiscale strategy: wave equation traveltime inversion in the data domain and generalized differential semblance optimization in the image domain. • Wave Equation Traveltime Inversion in the Data Domain (WT): The main difficulty with iterative waveform inversion is that it tends to get stuck in local minima associated with the waveform misfit function. To mitigate this problem and avoid the need to fit amplitudes in the data, we present a waveequation method that inverts the traveltimes of reflection events, and so is less prone to the local minima problem. Instead of a waveform misfit function, the penalty function is a crosscorrelation of the downgoing direct wave and the upgoing reflection wave at the trial image point. The time lag which maximizes the crosscorrelation amplitude represents the reflection-traveltime residual that is back-projected along the reflection wavepath to update the velocity. Shot- and angle-domain crosscorrelation functions are introduced to estimate the reflection-traveltime residual by semblance analysis and scanning. In theory, only the traveltime information is inverted and there is no need to precisely fit the amplitudes or assume a high-frequency approximation. Results

  11. Diagnostic accuracy of short-time inversion recovery sequence in Graves' ophthalmopathy before and after prednisone treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tortora, Fabio; Belfiore, Maria Paola; Romano, Francesco; Cappabianca, Salvatore; Cirillo, Sossio [' ' F. Magrassi-A. Lanzara' ' Second University, Naples (Italy). Dept. of Clinical and Experimental Medicine and Surgery; Prudente, Mariaevelina [Second University, Naples (Italy). Medicine Dept.; Vita Salute San Raffaele Univ., Milan (Italy). Dept. of Neuroradiology; Cirillo, Mario [Second University, Naples (Italy). Neuroradiological Services; Elefante, Andrea [Federic II Univ., Naples (Italy). Neuroradilogical Dept.; Carella, Carlo [Polidiagnostic Center Check-Up, Salerno (Italy)

    2014-05-15

    In Graves' Ophthalmopathy, it is important to distinguish active inflammatory phase, responsive to immunosuppressive treatment, from fibrotic unresponsive inactive one. The purpose of this study is, first, to identify the relevant orbital magnetic resonance imaging signal intensities before treatment, so to classify patients according to their clinical activity score (CAS), discriminating inactive (CAS < 3) from active Graves' Ophthalmopathy (GO) (CAS > 3) subjects and, second, to follow post-steroid treatment disease. An observational study was executed on 32 GO consecutive patients in different phases of disease, based on clinical and orbital Magnetic Resonance Imaging parameters, compared to 32 healthy volunteers. Orbital Magnetic Resonance Imaging was performed on a 1.5 tesla Magnetic Resonance Unit by an experienced neuroradiologist blinded to the clinical examinations. In pre-therapy patients, compared to controls, a medial rectus muscle statistically significant signal intensity ratio (SIR) in short-time inversion recovery (STIR) (long TR/TE) sequence was found, as well as when comparing patients before and after treatment, both medial and inferior rectus muscle SIR resulted significantly statistically different in STIR. These increased outcomes explain the inflammation oedematous phase of disease, moreover after steroid administration, compared to controls; patients presented lack of that statistically significant difference, thus suggesting treatment effectiveness. In our study, we proved STIR signal intensities increase in inflammation oedematous phase, confirming STIR sequence to define active phase of disease with more sensibility and reproducibility than CAS alone and to evaluate post-therapy involvement. (orig.)

  12. Diagnostic accuracy of short-time inversion recovery sequence in Graves' Ophthalmopathy before and after prednisone treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortora, Fabio; Prudente, Mariaevelina; Cirillo, Mario; Elefante, Andrea; Belfiore, Maria Paola; Romano, Francesco; Cappabianca, Salvatore; Carella, Carlo; Cirillo, Sossio

    2014-05-01

    In Graves' Ophthalmopathy, it is important to distinguish active inflammatory phase, responsive to immunosuppressive treatment, from fibrotic unresponsive inactive one. The purpose of this study is, first, to identify the relevant orbital magnetic resonance imaging signal intensities before treatment, so to classify patients according to their clinical activity score (CAS), discriminating inactive (CAS  3) subjects and, second, to follow post-steroid treatment disease. An observational study was executed on 32 GO consecutive patients in different phases of disease, based on clinical and orbital Magnetic Resonance Imaging parameters, compared to 32 healthy volunteers. Orbital Magnetic Resonance Imaging was performed on a 1.5 tesla Magnetic Resonance Unit by an experienced neuroradiologist blinded to the clinical examinations. In pre-therapy patients, compared to controls, a medial rectus muscle statistically significant signal intensity ratio (SIR) in short-time inversion recovery (STIR) (long TR/TE) sequence was found, as well as when comparing patients before and after treatment, both medial and inferior rectus muscle SIR resulted significantly statistically different in STIR. These increased outcomes explain the inflammation oedematous phase of disease, moreover after steroid administration, compared to controls; patients presented lack of that statistically significant difference, thus suggesting treatment effectiveness. In our study, we proved STIR signal intensities increase in inflammation oedematous phase, confirming STIR sequence to define active phase of disease with more sensibility and reproducibility than CAS alone and to evaluate post-therapy involvement.

  13. Diagnostic accuracy of short-time inversion recovery sequence in Graves' ophthalmopathy before and after prednisone treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tortora, Fabio; Belfiore, Maria Paola; Romano, Francesco; Cappabianca, Salvatore; Cirillo, Sossio

    2014-01-01

    In Graves' Ophthalmopathy, it is important to distinguish active inflammatory phase, responsive to immunosuppressive treatment, from fibrotic unresponsive inactive one. The purpose of this study is, first, to identify the relevant orbital magnetic resonance imaging signal intensities before treatment, so to classify patients according to their clinical activity score (CAS), discriminating inactive (CAS 3) subjects and, second, to follow post-steroid treatment disease. An observational study was executed on 32 GO consecutive patients in different phases of disease, based on clinical and orbital Magnetic Resonance Imaging parameters, compared to 32 healthy volunteers. Orbital Magnetic Resonance Imaging was performed on a 1.5 tesla Magnetic Resonance Unit by an experienced neuroradiologist blinded to the clinical examinations. In pre-therapy patients, compared to controls, a medial rectus muscle statistically significant signal intensity ratio (SIR) in short-time inversion recovery (STIR) (long TR/TE) sequence was found, as well as when comparing patients before and after treatment, both medial and inferior rectus muscle SIR resulted significantly statistically different in STIR. These increased outcomes explain the inflammation oedematous phase of disease, moreover after steroid administration, compared to controls; patients presented lack of that statistically significant difference, thus suggesting treatment effectiveness. In our study, we proved STIR signal intensities increase in inflammation oedematous phase, confirming STIR sequence to define active phase of disease with more sensibility and reproducibility than CAS alone and to evaluate post-therapy involvement. (orig.)

  14. Recovery of material parameters of soft hyperelastic tissue by an inverse spectral technique

    KAUST Repository

    Gou, Kun

    2012-07-01

    An inverse spectral method is developed for recovering a spatially inhomogeneous shear modulus for soft tissue. The study is motivated by a novel use of the intravascular ultrasound technique to image arteries. The arterial wall is idealized as a nonlinear isotropic cylindrical hyperelastic body. A boundary value problem is formulated for the response of the arterial wall within a specific class of quasistatic deformations reflective of the response due to imposed blood pressure. Subsequently, a boundary value problem is developed via an asymptotic construction modeling intravascular ultrasound interrogation which generates small amplitude, high frequency time harmonic vibrations superimposed on the static finite deformation. This leads to a system of second order ordinary Sturm-Liouville boundary value problems that are then employed to reconstruct the shear modulus through a nonlinear inverse spectral technique. Numerical examples are demonstrated to show the viability of the method. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Gradient echo single scan inversion recovery: application to proton and fluorine relaxation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavuluri, KowsalyaDevi; Ramanathan, K V

    2016-02-01

    Single scan longitudinal relaxation measurement experiments enable rapid estimation of the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1 ) as the time series of spin relaxation is encoded spatially in the sample at different slices resulting in an order of magnitude saving in time. We consider here a single scan inversion recovery pulse sequence that incorporates a gradient echo sequence. The proposed pulse sequence provides spectra with significantly enhanced signal to noise ratio leading to an accurate estimation of T1 values. The method is applicable for measuring a range of T1 values, thus indicating the possibility of routine use of the method for several systems. A comparative study of different single scan methods currently available is presented, and the advantage of the proposed sequence is highlighted. The possibility of the use of the method for the study of cross-correlation effects for the case of fluorine in a single shot is also demonstrated. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Power laws and inverse motion modelling: application to turbulence measurements from satellite images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo D. Mininni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of tackling the ill-posed inverse problem of motion estimation from image sequences, we propose to introduce prior knowledge on flow regularity given by turbulence statistical models. Prior regularity is formalised using turbulence power laws describing statistically self-similar structure of motion increments across scales. The motion estimation method minimises the error of an image observation model while constraining second-order structure function to behave as a power law within a prescribed range. Thanks to a Bayesian modelling framework, the motion estimation method is able to jointly infer the most likely power law directly from image data. The method is assessed on velocity fields of 2-D or quasi-2-D flows. Estimation accuracy is first evaluated on a synthetic image sequence of homogeneous and isotropic 2-D turbulence. Results obtained with the approach based on physics of fluids outperform state-of-the-art. Then, the method analyses atmospheric turbulence using a real meteorological image sequence. Selecting the most likely power law model enables the recovery of physical quantities, which are of major interest for turbulence atmospheric characterisation. In particular, from meteorological images we are able to estimate energy and enstrophy fluxes of turbulent cascades, which are in agreement with previous in situ measurements.

  17. Second harmonic inversion for ultrasound contrast harmonic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasovic, Mirza; Danilouchkine, Mike; Faez, Telli; van Neer, Paul L. M. J.; Cachard, Christian; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.; Basset, Olivier; de Jong, Nico

    2011-06-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are small micro-bubbles that behave nonlinearly when exposed to an ultrasound wave. This nonlinear behavior can be observed through the generated higher harmonics in a back-scattered echo. In past years several techniques have been proposed to detect or image harmonics produced by UCAs. In these proposed works, the harmonics generated in the medium during the propagation of the ultrasound wave played an important role, since these harmonics compete with the harmonics generated by the micro-bubbles. We present a method for the reduction of the second harmonic generated during nonlinear-propagation-dubbed second harmonic inversion (SHI). A general expression for the suppression signals is also derived. The SHI technique uses two pulses, p' and p'', of the same frequency f0 and the same amplitude P0 to cancel out the second harmonic generated by nonlinearities of the medium. Simulations show that the second harmonic is reduced by 40 dB on a large axial range. Experimental SHI B-mode images, from a tissue-mimicking phantom and UCAs, show an improvement in the agent-to-tissue ratio (ATR) of 20 dB compared to standard second harmonic imaging and 13 dB of improvement in harmonic power Doppler.

  18. Second harmonic inversion for ultrasound contrast harmonic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasovic, Mirza; Danilouchkine, Mike; Faez, Telli; Van Neer, Paul L M J; Van der Steen, Antonius F W; De Jong, Nico; Cachard, Christian; Basset, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are small micro-bubbles that behave nonlinearly when exposed to an ultrasound wave. This nonlinear behavior can be observed through the generated higher harmonics in a back-scattered echo. In past years several techniques have been proposed to detect or image harmonics produced by UCAs. In these proposed works, the harmonics generated in the medium during the propagation of the ultrasound wave played an important role, since these harmonics compete with the harmonics generated by the micro-bubbles. We present a method for the reduction of the second harmonic generated during nonlinear-propagation-dubbed second harmonic inversion (SHI). A general expression for the suppression signals is also derived. The SHI technique uses two pulses, p' and p'', of the same frequency f 0 and the same amplitude P 0 to cancel out the second harmonic generated by nonlinearities of the medium. Simulations show that the second harmonic is reduced by 40 dB on a large axial range. Experimental SHI B-mode images, from a tissue-mimicking phantom and UCAs, show an improvement in the agent-to-tissue ratio (ATR) of 20 dB compared to standard second harmonic imaging and 13 dB of improvement in harmonic power Doppler.

  19. Time reversal imaging, Inverse problems and Adjoint Tomography}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagner, J.; Larmat, C. S.; Capdeville, Y.; Kawakatsu, H.; Fink, M.

    2010-12-01

    With the increasing power of computers and numerical techniques (such as spectral element methods), it is possible to address a new class of seismological problems. The propagation of seismic waves in heterogeneous media is simulated more and more accurately and new applications developed, in particular time reversal methods and adjoint tomography in the three-dimensional Earth. Since the pioneering work of J. Claerbout, theorized by A. Tarantola, many similarities were found between time-reversal methods, cross-correlations techniques, inverse problems and adjoint tomography. By using normal mode theory, we generalize the scalar approach of Draeger and Fink (1999) and Lobkis and Weaver (2001) to the 3D- elastic Earth, for theoretically understanding time-reversal method on global scale. It is shown how to relate time-reversal methods on one hand, with auto-correlations of seismograms for source imaging and on the other hand, with cross-correlations between receivers for structural imaging and retrieving Green function. Time-reversal methods were successfully applied in the past to acoustic waves in many fields such as medical imaging, underwater acoustics, non destructive testing and to seismic waves in seismology for earthquake imaging. In the case of source imaging, time reversal techniques make it possible an automatic location in time and space as well as the retrieval of focal mechanism of earthquakes or unknown environmental sources . We present here some applications at the global scale of these techniques on synthetic tests and on real data, such as Sumatra-Andaman (Dec. 2004), Haiti (Jan. 2010), as well as glacial earthquakes and seismic hum.

  20. Iterative electromagnetic Born inversion applied to earth conductivity imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alumbaugh, David Lee [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-08-01

    This thesis investigates the use of a fast imaging technique to deduce the spatial conductivity distribution in the earth from low frequency (< 1 MHz), cross well electromagnetic (EM) measurements. The theory embodied in this work is the extension of previous strategies and is based on the Born series approximation to solve both the forward and inverse problem. Nonlinear integral equations are employed to derive the series expansion which accounts for the scattered magnetic fields that are generated by inhomogeneities embedded in either a homogenous or a layered earth. A sinusoidally oscillating, vertically oriented magnetic dipole is employed as a source, and it is assumed that the scattering bodies are azimuthally symmetric about the source dipole axis. The use of this model geometry reduces the 3-D vector problem to a more manageable 2-D scalar form. The validity of the cross well EM method is tested by applying the imaging scheme to two sets of field data. Images of the data collected at the Devine, Texas test site show excellent correlation with the well logs. Unfortunately there is a drift error present in the data that limits the accuracy of the results. A more complete set of data collected at the Richmond field station in Richmond, California demonstrates that cross well EM can be successfully employed to monitor the position of an injected mass of salt water. Both the data and the resulting images clearly indicate the plume migrates toward the north-northwest. The plausibility of these conclusions is verified by applying the imaging code to synthetic data generated by a 3-D sheet model.

  1. Intraoperative ultrasound using phase inversion harmonic imaging: first experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölscher, Thilo; Ozgur, Burak; Singel, Soren; Wilkening, Wilko G; Mattrey, Robert F; Sang, Hoi

    2007-04-01

    To study the feasibility of intraoperative ultrasound using the phase inversion harmonic imaging (PIHI) technique. Eight patients with intracranial middle cerebral artery aneurysms and five patients with arteriovenous malformations were studied after written informed consent. A first ultrasound study was performed through the intact dura mater after cranial trepanation to assess the pathology, its feeding artery, and downstream segments. A second ultrasound study was performed immediately after intervention to monitor the success of the procedure. All patients were studied using a Siemens Sonoline Antares ultrasound machine (Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc., Malvern, PA) before and after intravenous administration of an ultrasound contrast agent (Optison; GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI). Other than conventional brightness mode, PIHI is sensitive to the nonlinear acoustic response of tissue, and especially to ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles. The latter enables contrast-specific vascular imaging. PIHI provided anatomically detailed information. In combination with an ultrasound contrast agent, angiography-like views of the vascular pathologies, including their surrounding vessels, could be obtained. Flow velocities in afferent and downstream vascular segments, as well as inside the pathology, could be assessed. Flow dynamics inside the aneurysm sac or the arteriovenous malformation could be studied in real-time. Postintervention, contrast-enhanced PIHI could be used to immediately monitor the success of the surgical procedure. PIHI enables intraoperative visualization and morphological assessment of neurovascular pathologies, such as middle cerebral artery aneurysms or arteriovenous malformations. In combination with an ultrasound contrast agent, the flow dynamics of these lesions can be displayed in real-time.

  2. Importance of contrast-enhanced fluid-attenuated inversion reconvery magnetic resonance imaging in various intracranial pathologic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Kyoung; Lee, Eun Ja; Kim, Sung Won; Lee, Yong Seok [Dept. of Radiology, Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Goyang(Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Intracranial lesions may show contrast enhancement through various mechanisms that are closely associated with the disease process. The preferred magnetic resonance sequence in contrast imaging is T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) at most institutions. However, lesion enhancement is occasionally inconspicuous on T1WI. Although fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences are commonly considered as T2-weighted imaging with dark cerebrospinal fluid, they also show mild T1-weighted contrast, which is responsible for the contrast enhancement. For several years, FLAIR imaging has been successfully incorporated as a routine sequence at our institution for contrast-enhanced (CE) brain imaging in detecting various intracranial diseases. In this pictorial essay, we describe and illustrate the diagnostic importance of CE-FLAIR imaging in various intracranial pathologic conditions.

  3. Value of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences in early MRI of the brain in neonates with a perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sie, L.T.L.; Knaap, M.S. van der [Vrije Univ. Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Neurology; Barkhof, F.; Valk, J. [Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Pathology and Gastroenterology; Lafeber, H.N. [Univ. Hospital ' Vrije Universiteit' , Amsterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Neonatology

    2000-10-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the usefulness of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences in comparison with conventional spin-echo and inversion MR imaging in neonates for evaluation of myelination and for detection of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. We reviewed early MR scans of 18 neonates with suspected hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. Myelination could be evaluated with confidence using conventional MR imaging in all but 2 infants; however, the presence of myelin was very difficult to assess on FLAIR images. Overall, 53 lesions or groups of lesions were identified. The FLAIR technique was more sensitive in 11 of the lesions; especially (pre)cystic lesions could be identified much better and more cysts were found. Conventional MR imaging failed to identify 2 of the lesions and was more sensitive in 14 of the lesions; especially punctate hemorrhages and lesions in basal ganglia or thalami could be better determined. The FLAIR technique missed 3 of these lesions. In the remaining 28 lesions conventional MR and FLAIR images were equally diagnostic. The FLAIR technique and conventional MR imaging are complementary in detecting early sequelae of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in neonates. The FLAIR technique is not suitable for assessing myelination of the neonatal brain; therefore, FLAIR cannot replace conventional MR imaging. (orig.)

  4. Novel inversion method for land mine imaging and detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindoni, Orazio I.; Cohoon, David K.

    2000-08-01

    We have developed, using both partial differential equation approaches and integral equation formulations, a precise method to invert acoustic or electromagnetic scattering data from macroscopic concealed objects. Our approach makes use of the ideas associated with our exact solution of partial differential equations as described in our paper where we were able to collapse the number of equations by elimination of transcendentals therefore preserving the absolute mathematical precision inherent in the partial differential equation formulation. Our mathematical method, as a consequence, has not encountered the traditional loss of precision when inverting the scattered data. The unrestricted wavelength range allows us to penetrate any material which may surround the object and differentiate between the object and the media. For this reason we have applied our inversion scheme to landmine detection as we can penetrate and differentiate under both wet and dry conditions. Also, we are able to account, under certain conditions, for dielectric nonlinearities of material in the concealed object. Therefore, we are able to build in density dependent false colors a 3D grid representative of both the media and of the embedded object including the internal structure of the object. We have surveyed the literature on the subject of recovery of physical location of concealed objects and we have found that most of the present applications such as land mine detection, and we have found that most of the present applications have shortcomings due to the physical changes that are present in the surrounding media or the discontinuities of physical properties of the media. For all the above reasons we believe that we may have the most versatile and mathematically precise approach to the solution of this problem.

  5. Sparsity-based acoustic inversion in cross-sectional multiscale optoacoustic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Yiyong; Tzoumas, Stratis; Nunes, Antonio; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Rosenthal, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: With recent advancement in hardware of optoacoustic imaging systems, highly detailed cross-sectional images may be acquired at a single laser shot, thus eliminating motion artifacts. Nonetheless, other sources of artifacts remain due to signal distortion or out-of-plane signals. The purpose of image reconstruction algorithms is to obtain the most accurate images from noisy, distorted projection data. Methods: In this paper, the authors use the model-based approach for acoustic inversion, combined with a sparsity-based inversion procedure. Specifically, a cost function is used that includes the L1 norm of the image in sparse representation and a total variation (TV) term. The optimization problem is solved by a numerically efficient implementation of a nonlinear gradient descent algorithm. TV–L1 model-based inversion is tested in the cross section geometry for numerically generated data as well as for in vivo experimental data from an adult mouse. Results: In all cases, model-based TV–L1 inversion showed a better performance over the conventional Tikhonov regularization, TV inversion, and L1 inversion. In the numerical examples, the images reconstructed with TV–L1 inversion were quantitatively more similar to the originating images. In the experimental examples, TV–L1 inversion yielded sharper images and weaker streak artifact. Conclusions: The results herein show that TV–L1 inversion is capable of improving the quality of highly detailed, multiscale optoacoustic images obtained in vivo using cross-sectional imaging systems. As a result of its high fidelity, model-based TV–L1 inversion may be considered as the new standard for image reconstruction in cross-sectional imaging

  6. Examination of intra-gastrointestinal tract signal elimination in MRCP. Combined use of positive contrast agent and fast inversion recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Joji; Kawamura, Yoshihiko

    1999-01-01

    To examine the effects of removing the gastrointestinal signal in MRCP, investigations were carried out on the combined use of intestine-positive contrast medium FerriSeltz with Ferric ammonium citrate as the main component and high-speed imaging using fast inversion recovery. The contrast effect was significantly elevated to 9.90±1.77 after administration, compared with 5.3±2.45 before administration (p<0.001). The enhancement effect also was significantly elevated to 14.45±3.18 after administration, compared with 3.50±3.10 before administration (p<0.001). These results were obtained because the null point of FerriSeltz aqueous solution (5.97 mmol/1) was in the range of about 150-200 ms. With the present method, adequate suppression of the signal intensity of the digestive tract was obtained relatively easily on MRCP, and the technique was found to be effective. (author)

  7. Noninvasive investigation of exocrine pancreatic function: Feasibility of cine dynamic MRCP with a spatially selective inversion-recovery pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasokawa, Kazuya; Ito, Katsuyoshi; Tamada, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Akira; Hayashida, Minoru; Tanimoto, Daigo; Higaki, Atsushi; Noda, Yasufumi; Kido, Ayumu

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the feasibility of noncontrast-enhanced cine dynamic magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) with a spatially selective inversion-recovery (IR) pulse for evaluating exocrine pancreatic function in comparison with the N-benzoyl-L-tyrosyl-p-aminobenzoic acid (BT-PABA) test as a pancreatic exocrine function test. Twenty subjects with or without chronic pancreatitis were included. MRCP with a spatially selective IR pulse was repeated every 15 seconds for 5 minutes to acquire a total of 20 images (cine-dynamic MRCP). The median and mean frequency of the observation (the number of times) and the moving distance (mean secretion grading scores) of pancreatic juice inflow on cine-dynamic MRCP were compared with a BT-PABA test. The urinary PABA excretion rate (%) had significant positive correlations with both the mean secretion grade (r = 0.66, P = 0.002) and frequency of secretory inflow (r = 0.62, P = 0.004) in cine dynamic MRCP. Both the mean frequency of observations of pancreatic secretory inflow (1.4 ± 1.6 times vs. 14.3 ± 4.2 times, P Cine dynamic MRCP with a spatially selective IR pulse may have potential for estimating the pancreatic exocrine function noninvasively as a substitute for the BT-PABA test. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Imaging anisotropic layering with Bayesian inversion of multiple data types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodin, T.; Leiva, J.; Romanowicz, B.; Maupin, V.; Yuan, H.

    2016-07-01

    Azimuthal anisotropy is a powerful tool to reveal information about both the present structure and past evolution of the mantle. Anisotropic images of the upper mantle are usually obtained by analysing various types of seismic observables, such as surface wave dispersion curves or waveforms, SKS splitting data, or receiver functions. These different data types sample different volumes of the earth, they are sensitive to different length scales, and hence are associated with different levels of uncertainties. They are traditionally interpreted separately, and often result in incompatible models. We present a Bayesian inversion approach to jointly invert these different data types. Seismograms for SKS and P phases are directly inverted using a cross-convolution approach, thus avoiding intermediate processing steps, such as numerical deconvolution or computation of splitting parameters. Probabilistic 1-D profiles are obtained with a transdimensional Markov chain Monte Carlo scheme, in which the number of layers, as well as the presence or absence of anisotropy in each layer, are treated as unknown parameters. In this way, seismic anisotropy is only introduced if required by the data. The algorithm is used to resolve both isotropic and anisotropic layering down to a depth of 350 km beneath two seismic stations in North America in two different tectonic settings: the stable Canadian shield (station FFC) and the tectonically active southern Basin and Range Province (station TA-214A). In both cases, the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary is clearly visible, and marked by a change in direction of the fast axis of anisotropy. Our study confirms that azimuthal anisotropy is a powerful tool for detecting layering in the upper mantle.

  9. Iterative algorithms for the input and state recovery from the approximate inverse of strictly proper multivariable systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liwen; Xu, Qiang

    2018-02-01

    This paper proposes new iterative algorithms for the unknown input and state recovery from the system outputs using an approximate inverse of the strictly proper linear time-invariant (LTI) multivariable system. One of the unique advantages from previous system inverse algorithms is that the output differentiation is not required. The approximate system inverse is stable due to the systematic optimal design of a dummy feedthrough D matrix in the state-space model via the feedback stabilization. The optimal design procedure avoids trial and error to identify such a D matrix which saves tremendous amount of efforts. From the derived and proved convergence criteria, such an optimal D matrix also guarantees the convergence of algorithms. Illustrative examples show significant improvement of the reference input signal tracking by the algorithms and optimal D design over non-iterative counterparts on controllable or stabilizable LTI systems, respectively. Case studies of two Boeing-767 aircraft aerodynamic models further demonstrate the capability of the proposed methods.

  10. Imaging network level language recovery after left PCA stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Rajani; Long, Charltien; Purcell, Jeremy J; Faria, Andreia V; Lindquist, Martin; Jarso, Samson; Race, David; Davis, Cameron; Posner, Joseph; Wright, Amy; Hillis, Argye E

    2016-05-11

    The neural mechanisms that support aphasia recovery are not yet fully understood. Our goal was to evaluate longitudinal changes in naming recovery in participants with posterior cerebral artery (PCA) stroke using a case-by-case analysis. Using task based and resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and detailed language testing, we longitudinally studied the recovery of the naming network in four participants with PCA stroke with naming deficits at the acute (0 week), sub acute (3-5 weeks), and chronic time point (5-7 months) post stroke. Behavioral and imaging analyses (task related and resting state functional connectivity) were carried out to elucidate longitudinal changes in naming recovery. Behavioral and imaging analysis revealed that an improvement in naming accuracy from the acute to the chronic stage was reflected by increased connectivity within and between left and right hemisphere "language" regions. One participant who had persistent moderate naming deficit showed weak and decreasing connectivity longitudinally within and between left and right hemisphere language regions. These findings emphasize a network view of aphasia recovery, and show that the degree of inter- and intra- hemispheric balance between the language-specific regions is necessary for optimal recovery of naming, at least in participants with PCA stroke.

  11. Albedo recovery for hyperspectral image classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Kun; Wang, Haibo; Xie, Yuange; Zhang, Chutong; Min, Yufang

    2017-07-01

    Image intensity value is determined by both the albedo component and the shading component. The albedo component describes the physical nature of different objects at the surface of the earth, and land-cover classes are different from each other because of their intrinsic physical materials. We, therefore, recover the intrinsic albedo feature of the hyperspectral image to exploit the spatial semantic information. Then, we use the support vector machine (SVM) to classify the recovered intrinsic albedo hyperspectral image. The SVM tries to maximize the minimum margin to achieve good generalization performance. Experimental results show that the SVM with the intrinsic albedo feature method achieves a better classification performance than the state-of-the-art methods in terms of visual quality and three quantitative metrics.

  12. Improved microseismic event locations through large-N arrays and wave-equation imaging and inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witten, B.; Shragge, J. C.

    2016-12-01

    The recent increased focus on small-scale seismicity, Mw < 4 has come about primarily for two reasons. First, there is an increase in induced seismicity related to injection operations primarily for wastewater disposal and hydraulic fracturing for oil and gas recovery and for geothermal energy production. While the seismicity associated with injection is sometimes felt, it is more often weak. Some weak events are detected on current sparse arrays; however, accurate location of the events often requires a larger number of (multi-component) sensors. This leads to the second reason for an increased focus on small magnitude seismicity: a greater number of seismometers are being deployed in large N-arrays. The greater number of sensors decreases the detection threshold and therefore significantly increases the number of weak events found. Overall, these two factors bring new challenges and opportunities. Many standard seismological location and inversion techniques are geared toward large, easily identifiable events recorded on a sparse number of stations. However, with large-N arrays we can detect small events by utilizing multi-trace processing techniques, and increased processing power equips us with tools that employ more complete physics for simultaneously locating events and inverting for P- and S-wave velocity structure. We present a method that uses large-N arrays and wave-equation-based imaging and inversion to jointly locate earthquakes and estimate the elastic velocities of the earth. The technique requires no picking and is thus suitable for weak events. We validate the methodology through synthetic and field data examples.

  13. Feasibility of ASL spinal bone marrow perfusion imaging with optimized inversion time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Dong; Zha, Yunfei; Yan, Liyong; Wang, Kejun; Gong, Wei; Lin, Hui

    2015-11-01

    To assess the correlation between flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in the measurement of spinal bone marrow (SBM) perfusion; in addition, to assess for an optimized inversion time (TI) as well as the reproducibility of SBM FAIR perfusion. The optimized TI of a FAIR SBM perfusion experiment was carried out on 14 volunteers; two adjacent vertebral bodies were selected from each volunteer to measure the change of signal intensity (ΔM) and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of FAIR perfusion MRI with five different TIs. Then, reproducibility of FAIR data from 10 volunteers was assessed by the reposition SBM FAIR experiments. Finally, FAIR and DCE-MRI were performed on 27 subjects. The correlation between the blood flow on FAIR (BFASL ) and perfusion-related parameters on DCE-MRI was evaluated. The maximum value of ΔM and SNR were 36.39 ± 12.53 and 2.38 ± 0.97, respectively; both were obtained when TI was near 1200 msec. There were no significant difference between the two successive measurements of SBM BFASL perfusion (P = 0.879), and the within-subject coefficients of variation (wCV) of the measurements was 3.28%. The BFASL showed a close correlation with K(trans) (P FAIR perfusion scan protocol has good reproducibility, and as blood flow measurement on FAIR is reliable and closely related with the parameters on DCE-MRI, FAIR is feasible for measuring SBM blood flow. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Clinical value of periventricular low-intensity areas detected by fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR). Relationships between perinatal vital parameter and neonatal MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadowaki, Sachiko; Iwata, Osuke; Tamura, Masanori [Nagano Children' s Hospital, Toyoshina (Japan)] (and others)

    2002-01-01

    A follow-up study was performed to assess the correlation among the incidence of periventricular low intensities (PVLI) on MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) FLAIR (fluid attenuated inversion recovery) imaging, clinical evidence of perinatal insults that may cause white matter damage, and the outcome of the infants. We evaluated periventricular white matter lesions of 329 neonates whose MRI were obtained before two months corrected age. The detective rate of periventricular abnormalities on FLAIR imaging was significantly higher than that of T1-T2 weighted imaging. The most typical lesion detected on FLAIR imaging was periventricular low intensities (PVLI), frequently observed in the neonates with a history of preterm labour, very low birth weight, birth asphyxia and severe respiratory failure. Although we could not characterize the risk factors of PVLI, the incidence of PVLI had a strong correlation with the scores of motor and developmental tests at 12 and 36-months corrected age. In conclusion, FLAIR imaging, detecting the border zone damage of white matter, would be a strong tool to pick out neonates at high risk of neurological disturbances from those without clinical evidence of neurological insults in the neonatal period. (author)

  15. Accelerated Computing in Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Real-Time Imaging Using Nonlinear Inverse Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Schaetz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To develop generic optimization strategies for image reconstruction using graphical processing units (GPUs in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and to exemplarily report on our experience with a highly accelerated implementation of the nonlinear inversion (NLINV algorithm for dynamic MRI with high frame rates. Methods. The NLINV algorithm is optimized and ported to run on a multi-GPU single-node server. The algorithm is mapped to multiple GPUs by decomposing the data domain along the channel dimension. Furthermore, the algorithm is decomposed along the temporal domain by relaxing a temporal regularization constraint, allowing the algorithm to work on multiple frames in parallel. Finally, an autotuning method is presented that is capable of combining different decomposition variants to achieve optimal algorithm performance in different imaging scenarios. Results. The algorithm is successfully ported to a multi-GPU system and allows online image reconstruction with high frame rates. Real-time reconstruction with low latency and frame rates up to 30 frames per second is demonstrated. Conclusion. Novel parallel decomposition methods are presented which are applicable to many iterative algorithms for dynamic MRI. Using these methods to parallelize the NLINV algorithm on multiple GPUs, it is possible to achieve online image reconstruction with high frame rates.

  16. Inverse scattering and refraction corrected reflection for breast cancer imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiskin, J.; Borup, D.; Johnson, S.; Berggren, M.; Robinson, D.; Smith, J.; Chen, J.; Parisky, Y.; Klock, John

    2010-03-01

    Reflection ultrasound (US) has been utilized as an adjunct imaging modality for over 30 years. TechniScan, Inc. has developed unique, transmission and concomitant reflection algorithms which are used to reconstruct images from data gathered during a tomographic breast scanning process called Warm Bath Ultrasound (WBU™). The transmission algorithm yields high resolution, 3D, attenuation and speed of sound (SOS) images. The reflection algorithm is based on canonical ray tracing utilizing refraction correction via the SOS and attenuation reconstructions. The refraction correction reflection algorithm allows 360 degree compounding resulting in the reflection image. The requisite data are collected when scanning the entire breast in a 33° C water bath, on average in 8 minutes. This presentation explains how the data are collected and processed by the 3D transmission and reflection imaging mode algorithms. The processing is carried out using two NVIDIA® Tesla™ GPU processors, accessing data on a 4-TeraByte RAID. The WBU™ images are displayed in a DICOM viewer that allows registration of all three modalities. Several representative cases are presented to demonstrate potential diagnostic capability including: a cyst, fibroadenoma, and a carcinoma. WBU™ images (SOS, attenuation, and reflection modalities) are shown along with their respective mammograms and standard ultrasound images. In addition, anatomical studies are shown comparing WBU™ images and MRI images of a cadaver breast. This innovative technology is designed to provide additional tools in the armamentarium for diagnosis of breast disease.

  17. Full waveform inversion using oriented time-domain imaging method for vertical transverse isotropic media

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Zhendong

    2017-07-11

    Full waveform inversion for reection events is limited by its linearized update re-quirements given by a process equivalent to migration. Unless the background velocity model is reasonably accurate, the resulting gradient can have an inaccurate update direction leading the inversion to converge what we refer to as local minima of the objective function. In our approach, we consider mild lateral variation in the model, and thus, use a gradient given by the oriented time-domain imaging method. Specifically, we apply the oriented time-domain imaging on the data residual to obtain the geometrical features of the velocity perturbation. After updating the model in the time domain, we convert the perturbation from the time domain to depth using the average velocity. Considering density is constant, we can expand the conventional 1D impedance inversion method to 2D or 3D velocity inversion within the process of full waveform inversion. This method is not only capable of inverting for velocity, but it is also capable of retrieving anisotropic parameters relying on linearized representations of the reection response. To eliminate the cross-talk artifacts between different parameters, we utilize what we consider being an optimal parametrization for this step. To do so, we extend the prestack time-domain migration image in incident angle dimension to incorporate angular dependence needed by the multiparameter inversion. For simple models, this approach provides an efficient and stable way to do full waveform inversion or modified seismic inversion and makes the anisotropic inversion more practicable. The proposed method still needs kinematically accurate initial models since it only recovers the high-wavenumber part as conventional full waveform inversion method does. Results on synthetic data of isotropic and anisotropic cases illustrate the benefits and limitations of this method.

  18. Characterization of myocardial T1-mapping bias caused by intramyocardial fat in inversion recovery and saturation recovery techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kellman, Peter; Bandettini, W Patricia; Mancini, Christine

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Quantitative measurement of T1 in the myocardium may be used to detect both focal and diffuse disease processes such as interstitial fibrosis or edema. A partial volume problem exists when a voxel in the myocardium also contains fat. Partial volume with fat occurs at tissue boundaries...... imaging protocols using balanced steady state free precession are considered. In-vivo imaging with T1-mapping, water/fat separated imaging, and late enhancement imaging was performed on subjects with chronic myocardial infarction. RESULTS: In n = 17 subjects with chronic myocardial infarction, lipomatous...... agreement with simulation of the specific imaging protocols. CONCLUSIONS: Measurement of the myocardial T1 by widely used balanced steady state free precession mapping methods is subject to bias when there is a mixture of water and fat in the myocardium. Intramyocardial fat is frequently present...

  19. Quantification of gadolinium-DTPA concentrations for different inversion times using an IR-turbo flash pulse sequence: a study on optimizing multislice perfusion imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritz-Hansen, T; Rostrup, Egill; Ring, P B

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to optimize an inversion-recovery (IR) turbo fast low-angle shot (FLASH) for multislice imaging by evaluating the accuracy of calculated the relaxation-rate (R1) for different inversion times (TI). This is important for tracer kinetic modeling because it requires...... a system responding linearly to input. R1 are linearly related to changes in the concentration of gadolinium (Gd)-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), and R1 is a parameter that can be derived from the magnetic resonance (MR) signal. The accuracy of calculated R1 using an IR turbo fast low-angle shot...

  20. 2-D traveltime and waveform inversion for improved seismic imaging: Naga Thrust and Fold Belt, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Priyank; Zelt, Colin A.; Bally, Albert W.; Dasgupta, Rahul

    2008-05-01

    Exploration along the Naga Thrust and Fold Belt in the Assam province of Northeast India encounters geological as well as logistic challenges. Drilling for hydrocarbons, traditionally guided by surface manifestations of the Naga thrust fault, faces additional challenges in the northeast where the thrust fault gradually deepens leaving subtle surface expressions. In such an area, multichannel 2-D seismic data were collected along a line perpendicular to the trend of the thrust belt. The data have a moderate signal-to-noise ratio and suffer from ground roll and other acquisition-related noise. In addition to data quality, the complex geology of the thrust belt limits the ability of conventional seismic processing to yield a reliable velocity model which in turn leads to poor subsurface image. In this paper, we demonstrate the application of traveltime and waveform inversion as supplements to conventional seismic imaging and interpretation processes. Both traveltime and waveform inversion utilize the first arrivals that are typically discarded during conventional seismic processing. As a first step, a smooth velocity model with long wavelength characteristics of the subsurface is estimated through inversion of the first-arrival traveltimes. This velocity model is then used to obtain a Kirchhoff pre-stack depth-migrated image which in turn is used for the interpretation of the fault. Waveform inversion is applied to the central part of the seismic line to a depth of ~1 km where the quality of the migrated image is poor. Waveform inversion is performed in the frequency domain over a series of iterations, proceeding from low to high frequency (11-19 Hz) using the velocity model from traveltime inversion as the starting model. In the end, the pre-stack depth-migrated image and the waveform inversion model are jointly interpreted. This study demonstrates that a combination of traveltime and waveform inversion with Kirchhoff pre-stack depth migration is a promising approach

  1. Testing an inversion method for estimating electron energy fluxes from all-sky camera images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Partamies

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available An inversion method for reconstructing the precipitating electron energy flux from a set of multi-wavelength digital all-sky camera (ASC images has recently been developed by tomografia. Preliminary tests suggested that the inversion is able to reconstruct the position and energy characteristics of the aurora with reasonable accuracy. This study carries out a thorough testing of the method and a few improvements for its emission physics equations.

    We compared the precipitating electron energy fluxes as estimated by the inversion method to the energy flux data recorded by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP satellites during four passes over auroral structures. When the aurorae appear very close to the local zenith, the fluxes inverted from the blue (427.8nm filtered ASC images or blue and green line (557.7nm images together give the best agreement with the measured flux values. The fluxes inverted from green line images alone are clearly larger than the measured ones. Closer to the horizon the quality of the inversion results from blue images deteriorate to the level of the ones from green images. In addition to the satellite data, the precipitating electron energy fluxes were estimated from the electron density measurements by the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR. These energy flux values were compared to the ones of the inversion method applied to over 100 ASC images recorded at the nearby ASC station in Longyearbyen. The energy fluxes deduced from these two types of data are in general of the same order of magnitude. In 35% of all of the blue and green image inversions the relative errors were less than 50% and in 90% of the blue and green image inversions less than 100%.

    This kind of systematic testing of the inversion method is the first step toward using all-sky camera images in the way in which global UV images have recently been used to estimate the energy fluxes. The

  2. Testing an inversion method for estimating electron energy fluxes from all-sky camera images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Partamies

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available An inversion method for reconstructing the precipitating electron energy flux from a set of multi-wavelength digital all-sky camera (ASC images has recently been developed by tomografia. Preliminary tests suggested that the inversion is able to reconstruct the position and energy characteristics of the aurora with reasonable accuracy. This study carries out a thorough testing of the method and a few improvements for its emission physics equations. We compared the precipitating electron energy fluxes as estimated by the inversion method to the energy flux data recorded by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP satellites during four passes over auroral structures. When the aurorae appear very close to the local zenith, the fluxes inverted from the blue (427.8nm filtered ASC images or blue and green line (557.7nm images together give the best agreement with the measured flux values. The fluxes inverted from green line images alone are clearly larger than the measured ones. Closer to the horizon the quality of the inversion results from blue images deteriorate to the level of the ones from green images. In addition to the satellite data, the precipitating electron energy fluxes were estimated from the electron density measurements by the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR. These energy flux values were compared to the ones of the inversion method applied to over 100 ASC images recorded at the nearby ASC station in Longyearbyen. The energy fluxes deduced from these two types of data are in general of the same order of magnitude. In 35% of all of the blue and green image inversions the relative errors were less than 50% and in 90% of the blue and green image inversions less than 100%. This kind of systematic testing of the inversion method is the first step toward using all-sky camera images in the way in which global UV images have recently been used to estimate the energy fluxes. The advantages of ASCs, compared to the space-born imagers, are

  3. Inversion of quasi-3D DC resistivity imaging data using artificial ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the applicability of artificial neural networks in inverting quasi-3D DC resistivity imaging data. An electrical resistivity imaging survey was carried out along seven parallel lines using a dipole–dipole array to confirm the validation of the results of an inversion using an artificial neural ...

  4. MRI in multiple sclerosis of the spinal cord: evaluation of fast short-tan inversion-recovery and spin-echo sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietemann, J.L.; Thibaut-Menard, A.; Neugroschl, C.; Gillis, C.; Abu Eid, M.; Bogorin, A.; Warter, J.M.; Tranchant, C.

    2000-01-01

    We compared the sensitivity of T2-weighted spin-echo (FSE) and fast short-tau inversion-recovery (fSTIR) sequences in detection of multiple sclerosis of the spinal cord in 100 consecutive patients with clinically confirmed multiple sclerosis (MS); 86 patients underwent also brain MRI. In all, 310 focal lesions were detected on fSTIR and 212 on T2-weighted FSE, spinal cord lesions were seen better on fSTIR images, with a higher contrast between the lesion and the normal spinal cord. In 24 patients in whom cord plaques were shown with both sequences, the cranial study was normal or inconclusive. Assessment of spinal plaques can be particularly important when MRI of the brain is inconclusive, and in there situations fSTIR can be helpful. (orig.)

  5. Three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequence for visualisation of subthalamic nucleus for deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Young Jin [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Inje University, Department of Radiology, Busan Paik Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Joon; Kim, Ho Sung; Choi, Choong Gon; Jung, Seung Chai [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung Kyo [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chong Sik; Chung, Sun J. [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, So Hyun [Department of Radiology, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Gyoung Ro [Philips HealthCare Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an accepted treatment for advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). However, targeting the STN is difficult due to its relatively small size and variable location. The purpose of this study was to assess which of the following sequences obtained with the 3.0 T MR system can accurately delineate the STN: coronal 3D fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), 2D T2*-weighted fast-field echo (T2*-FFE) and 2D T2-weighted turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequences. We included 20 consecutive patients with PD who underwent 3.0 T MR for DBS targeting. 3D FLAIR, 2D T2*-FFE and T2-TSE images were obtained for all study patients. Image quality and demarcation of the STN were analysed using 4-point scales, and contrast ratio (CR) of the STN and normal white matter was calculated. The Friedman test was used to compare the three sequences. In qualitative analysis, the 2D T2*-FFE image showed more artefacts than 3D FLAIR or 2D T2-TSE, but the difference did not reach statistical significance. 3D FLAIR images showed significantly superior demarcation of the STN compared with 2D T2*-FFE and T2-TSE images (P < 0.001, respectively). The CR of 3D FLAIR was significantly higher than that of 2D T2*-FFE or T2-TSE images in multiple comparison correction (P < 0.001), but there was no significant difference in the CR between 2D T2*-FFE and T2-TSE images. Coronal 3D FLAIR images showed the most accurate demarcation of the STN for DBS targeting among coronal 3D FLAIR, 2D T2*-FFE and T2-TSE images. (orig.)

  6. Three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequence for visualisation of subthalamic nucleus for deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heo, Young Jin; Kim, Sang Joon; Kim, Ho Sung; Choi, Choong Gon; Jung, Seung Chai; Lee, Jung Kyo; Lee, Chong Sik; Chung, Sun J.; Cho, So Hyun; Lee, Gyoung Ro

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an accepted treatment for advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). However, targeting the STN is difficult due to its relatively small size and variable location. The purpose of this study was to assess which of the following sequences obtained with the 3.0 T MR system can accurately delineate the STN: coronal 3D fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), 2D T2*-weighted fast-field echo (T2*-FFE) and 2D T2-weighted turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequences. We included 20 consecutive patients with PD who underwent 3.0 T MR for DBS targeting. 3D FLAIR, 2D T2*-FFE and T2-TSE images were obtained for all study patients. Image quality and demarcation of the STN were analysed using 4-point scales, and contrast ratio (CR) of the STN and normal white matter was calculated. The Friedman test was used to compare the three sequences. In qualitative analysis, the 2D T2*-FFE image showed more artefacts than 3D FLAIR or 2D T2-TSE, but the difference did not reach statistical significance. 3D FLAIR images showed significantly superior demarcation of the STN compared with 2D T2*-FFE and T2-TSE images (P < 0.001, respectively). The CR of 3D FLAIR was significantly higher than that of 2D T2*-FFE or T2-TSE images in multiple comparison correction (P < 0.001), but there was no significant difference in the CR between 2D T2*-FFE and T2-TSE images. Coronal 3D FLAIR images showed the most accurate demarcation of the STN for DBS targeting among coronal 3D FLAIR, 2D T2*-FFE and T2-TSE images. (orig.)

  7. Combined imaging and velocity estimation by Joint Migration Inversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staal, X.R.

    2015-01-01

    Seismic imaging projects aim to reveal the structure of the earths crust from seismic data. These projects typically include three separate processing steps, being: • attenuation of multiple reflections in the seismic data. • estimating seismic wave propagation velocities from the seismic data. •

  8. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Inverse Methods in Electromagnetic Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Brand, Hans; Cram, Leonard; Gjessing, Dag; Jordan, Arthur; Keydel, Wolfgang; Schwierz, Günther; Vogel, Martin

    1985-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an increased interest in the use of polarization effects for radar and electromagnetic imaging problems (References 1, 2, and 3). The problem of electro­ magnetic imaging can be divided into the following areas: (1) Propagation of the Stokes' vector from the transmitter to the target region through various atmospheric conditions (rain, dust, fog, clouds, turbulence, etc.). (2) Scattering of the Stokes' vector from the object. (3) Scattering of the Stokes' vector from the rough surface, terrain, and the volume scattering. (4) Propagation of the Stokes' vector from the target region to the receiver. (5) The characteristics of the receiver relating the Stokes' vector to the output. The propagation characteristics of the Stokes' vector through various media can be described by the equation of transfer. Even though the scalar equation of transfer has been studied extensively in the past, the vector equation of transfer has not received as much attention. In recent years, however, a...

  9. Optimal inversion of the Anscombe transformation in low-count Poisson image denoising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkitalo, Markku; Foi, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    The removal of Poisson noise is often performed through the following three-step procedure. First, the noise variance is stabilized by applying the Anscombe root transformation to the data, producing a signal in which the noise can be treated as additive Gaussian with unitary variance. Second, the noise is removed using a conventional denoising algorithm for additive white Gaussian noise. Third, an inverse transformation is applied to the denoised signal, obtaining the estimate of the signal of interest. The choice of the proper inverse transformation is crucial in order to minimize the bias error which arises when the nonlinear forward transformation is applied. We introduce optimal inverses for the Anscombe transformation, in particular the exact unbiased inverse, a maximum likelihood (ML) inverse, and a more sophisticated minimum mean square error (MMSE) inverse. We then present an experimental analysis using a few state-of-the-art denoising algorithms and show that the estimation can be consistently improved by applying the exact unbiased inverse, particularly at the low-count regime. This results in a very efficient filtering solution that is competitive with some of the best existing methods for Poisson image denoising.

  10. Ultrasonic wavefield inversion and migration in complex heterogeneous structures: 2D numerical imaging and nondestructive testing experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Luan T; Modrak, Ryan T

    2018-01-01

    Delaminations, cracks and other defects in engineered structures often lie close to the theoretical resolution limit for ultrasonic waves. While ultrasonic waveform tomography has succeeded in detecting such features, recovery is difficult because it requires computationally expensive high-frequency numerical wave simulations and an accurate understanding of large-scale background variations of the engineered structure. Without such knowledge, small defects may be incorrectly imaged or go undetected altogether. To reduce computational cost and improve detection of small defects, a useful approach is to divide the waveform tomography procedure into two steps: first, a low-frequency model-building step aimed at recovering background structure, and second, a high-frequency imaging step targeting defects. The first is naturally formulated as waveform inversion for wavespeed parameters and the second as time reversal migration for reflectivity. Through synthetic test cases, we show that the two-step workflow appears more promising in most cases than a single-step inversion. In particular, we find that new workflow succeeds in the challenging scenario where the defect lies along preexisting layer interface in a composite bridge deck and in related experiments involving noisy data or inaccurate source parameters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Contributions of an adiabatic initial inversion pulse and K-space Re-ordered by inversion-time at each slice position (KRISP) to control of CSF artifacts and visualization of the brain in FLAIR magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curati, Walter L.; Oatridge, Angela; Herlihy, Amy H.; Hajnal, Joseph V.; Puri, Basant K.; Bydder, Graeme M

    2001-05-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to compare the performance of three fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) pulse sequences for control of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood flow artifacts in imaging of the brain. The first of these sequences had an initial sinc inversion pulse which was followed by conventional k-space mapping. The second had an initial sinc inversion pulse followed by k-space re-ordered by inversion time at each slice position (KRISP) and the third had an adiabatic initial inversion pulse followed by KRISP. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten patients with established disease were studied with all three pulse sequences. Seven were also studied with the adiabatic KRISP sequence after contrast enhancement. Their images were evaluated for patient motion artifact, CSF and blood flow artifact as well as conspicuity of the cortex, meninges, ventricular system, brainstem and cerebellum. The conspicuity of lesions and the degree of enhancement were also evaluated. RESULTS: Both the sinc and adiabatic KRISP FLAIR sequences showed better control of CSF and blood flow artifacts than the conventional FLAIR sequence. In addition the adiabatic KRISP FLAIR sequence showed better control of CSF artifact at the inferior aspect of the posterior fossa. The lesion conspicuity was similar for each of the FLAIR sequences as was the degree of contrast enhancement to that shown with a T{sub 1}weighted spin echo sequence. CONCLUSION: The KRISP FLAIR sequence controls high signal artifacts from CSF flow and blood flow and the adiabatic pulse controls high signal artifacts due to inadequate inversion of the CSF magnetization at the periphery of the head transmitter coil. The KRISP FLAIR sequence also improves cortical and meningeal definition as a result of an edge enhancement effect. The effects are synergistic and can be usefully combined in a single pulse sequence. Curati, W.L. et al. (2001)

  12. On an inverse source problem for enhanced oil recovery by wave motion maximization in reservoirs

    KAUST Repository

    Karve, Pranav M.

    2014-12-28

    © 2014, Springer International Publishing Switzerland. We discuss an optimization methodology for focusing wave energy to subterranean formations using strong motion actuators placed on the ground surface. The motivation stems from the desire to increase the mobility of otherwise entrapped oil. The goal is to arrive at the spatial and temporal description of surface sources that are capable of maximizing mobility in the target reservoir. The focusing problem is posed as an inverse source problem. The underlying wave propagation problems are abstracted in two spatial dimensions, and the semi-infinite extent of the physical domain is negotiated by a buffer of perfectly-matched-layers (PMLs) placed at the domain’s truncation boundary. We discuss two possible numerical implementations: Their utility for deciding the tempo-spatial characteristics of optimal wave sources is shown via numerical experiments. Overall, the simulations demonstrate the inverse source method’s ability to simultaneously optimize load locations and time signals leading to the maximization of energy delivery to a target formation.

  13. Comparison of two canopy reflectance models inversion for mapping forest crown closure using imaging spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeng, Y.; Schaepman, M.E.; Huang, H.A.; Bruin, de S.; Clevers, J.G.P.W.

    2008-01-01

    We compare the inversion of two canopy reflectance models to estimate forest crown closure (CC) using an EO-1 Hyperion image: the Kuusk¿Nilson forest reflectance and transmittance (FRT) model, and the Li¿Strahler geometric¿optical model. For predicting CC on a per-pixel basis, the FRT model

  14. Temporal pole signal abnormality on MR imaging in temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis: a fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery study Anormalidade de sinal na imagem por RM do pólo temporal na epilepsia do lobo temporal com esclerose hipocampal: um estudo pela seqüência inversão recuperação com supressão da água livre (FLAIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Carrete Junior

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency and regional involvement of temporal pole signal abnormality (TPA in patients with hippocampal sclerosis (HS using fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR MR imaging, and to correlate this feature with history. METHOD: Coronal FLAIR images of the temporal pole were assessed in 120 patients with HS and in 30 normal subjects, to evaluate gray-white matter demarcation. RESULTS: Ninety (75% of 120 patients had associated TPA. The HS side made difference regarding the presence of TPA, with a left side prevalence (p=0.04, chi2 test. The anteromedial zone of temporal pole was affected in 27 (30% out of 90 patients. In 63 (70% patients the lateral zone were also affected. Patients with TPA were younger at seizure onset (p=0.018, but without association with duration of epilepsy. CONCLUSION: Our FLAIR study show temporal pole signal abnormality in 3/4 of patients with HS, mainly seen on the anteromedial region, with a larger prevalence when the left hippocampus was involved.OBJETIVO: Determinar a freqüência e o envolvimento regional da anormalidade de sinal do pólo temporal (APT em pacientes com esclerose hipocampal (EH utilizando seqüência inversão recuperação com supressão da água (FLAIR por RM, e correlacioná-la com a história. MÉTODO: Foram analisadas as imagens coronais FLAIR dos pólos temporais de 120 pacientes com EH e de 30 indivíduos normais, para avaliar a demarcação entre substâncias branca e cinzenta. RESULTADOS: Noventa (75% dos 120 pacientes tinham APT associada. Houve prevalência do lado esquerdo (p=0.04, chi2 teste na relação entre APT e o lado da EH. A zona ântero-medial estava acometida em 27 (30% destes pacientes. Em 63 (70% pacientes também a zona lateral estava acometida. Pacientes com APT apresentaram início da epilepsia quando mais jovens (p=0.018, porém sem associação com a sua duração. CONCLUSÃO: A seqüência FLAIR mostra haver ATP em 3/4 dos pacientes com EH

  15. Mixed Higher Order Variational Model for Image Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengfei Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel mixed higher order regularizer involving the first and second degree image derivatives is proposed in this paper. Using spectral decomposition, we reformulate the new regularizer as a weighted L1-L2 mixed norm of image derivatives. Due to the equivalent formulation of the proposed regularizer, an efficient fast projected gradient algorithm combined with monotone fast iterative shrinkage thresholding, called, FPG-MFISTA, is designed to solve the resulting variational image recovery problems under majorization-minimization framework. Finally, we demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed regularization scheme by the experimental comparisons with total variation (TV scheme, nonlocal TV scheme, and current second degree methods. Specifically, the proposed approach achieves better results than related state-of-the-art methods in terms of peak signal to ratio (PSNR and restoration quality.

  16. Qualitative and quantitative comparison of contrast-enhanced fluid-attenuated inversion recovery, magnetization transfer spin echo, and fat-saturation T1-weighted sequences in infectious meningitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azad, Rajiv; Tayal, Mohit; Azad, Sheenam; Sharma, Garima; Srivastava, Rajendra Kumar [SGRR Institute of Medical and Health Sciences, Patel Nagar, Dehradun (India)

    2017-11-15

    To compare the contrast-enhanced fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (CE-FLAIR), the CE T1-weighted (CE-T1W) sequence with fat suppression (FS) and magnetization transfer (MT) for early detection and characterization of infectious meningitis. Fifty patients and 10 control subjects were evaluated with the CE-FLAIR and the CE-T1W sequences with FS and MT. Qualitative assessment was done by two observers for presence and grading of abnormal leptomeningeal enhancement. Quantitative assessment included computation of net meningeal enhancement, using single pixel signal intensity software. A newly devised FLAIR based scoring system, based on certain imaging features including ventricular dilatation, ependymal enhancement, infarcts and subdural effusions was used to indicate the etiology. Data were analysed using the Student's t test, Cohen's Kappa coefficient, Pearson's correlation coefficient, the intraclass correlation coefficient, one way analysis of variance, and Fisher's exact test with Bonferroni correction as the post hoc test. The CE-FLAIR sequence demonstrated a better sensitivity (100%), diagnostic accuracy (95%), and a stronger correlation with the cerebrospinal fluid, total leukocyte count (r = 0.75), protein (r = 0.77), adenosine deaminase (r = 0.81) and blood glucose (r = -0.6) values compared to the CE-T1W sequences. Qualitative grades and quantitative meningeal enhancement on the CE-FLAIR sequence were also significantly greater than those on the other sequences. The FLAIR based scoring system yielded a diagnostic accuracy of 91.6% and a sensitivity of 96%. A strong inverse Pearson's correlation (r = -0.95) was found between the assigned score and patient's Glasgow Coma Scale at the time of admission. The CE-FLAIR sequence is better suited for evaluating infectious meningitis and could be included as a part of the routine MR imaging protocol.

  17. Qualitative and quantitative comparison of contrast-enhanced fluid-attenuated inversion recovery, magnetization transfer spin echo, and fat-saturation T1-weighted sequences in infectious meningitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azad, Rajiv; Tayal, Mohit; Azad, Sheenam; Sharma, Garima; Srivastava, Rajendra Kumar

    2017-01-01

    To compare the contrast-enhanced fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (CE-FLAIR), the CE T1-weighted (CE-T1W) sequence with fat suppression (FS) and magnetization transfer (MT) for early detection and characterization of infectious meningitis. Fifty patients and 10 control subjects were evaluated with the CE-FLAIR and the CE-T1W sequences with FS and MT. Qualitative assessment was done by two observers for presence and grading of abnormal leptomeningeal enhancement. Quantitative assessment included computation of net meningeal enhancement, using single pixel signal intensity software. A newly devised FLAIR based scoring system, based on certain imaging features including ventricular dilatation, ependymal enhancement, infarcts and subdural effusions was used to indicate the etiology. Data were analysed using the Student's t test, Cohen's Kappa coefficient, Pearson's correlation coefficient, the intraclass correlation coefficient, one way analysis of variance, and Fisher's exact test with Bonferroni correction as the post hoc test. The CE-FLAIR sequence demonstrated a better sensitivity (100%), diagnostic accuracy (95%), and a stronger correlation with the cerebrospinal fluid, total leukocyte count (r = 0.75), protein (r = 0.77), adenosine deaminase (r = 0.81) and blood glucose (r = -0.6) values compared to the CE-T1W sequences. Qualitative grades and quantitative meningeal enhancement on the CE-FLAIR sequence were also significantly greater than those on the other sequences. The FLAIR based scoring system yielded a diagnostic accuracy of 91.6% and a sensitivity of 96%. A strong inverse Pearson's correlation (r = -0.95) was found between the assigned score and patient's Glasgow Coma Scale at the time of admission. The CE-FLAIR sequence is better suited for evaluating infectious meningitis and could be included as a part of the routine MR imaging protocol

  18. Robust inverse scattering full waveform seismic tomography for imaging complex structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurhandoko, Bagus Endar B.; Sukmana, Indriani; Wibowo, Satryo; Deny, Agus; Kurniadi, Rizal; Widowati, Sri; Mubarok, Syahrul; Susilowati; Kaswandhi

    2012-01-01

    Seismic tomography becomes important tool recently for imaging complex subsurface. It is well known that imaging complex rich fault zone is difficult. In this paper, The application of time domain inverse scattering wave tomography to image the complex fault zone would be shown on this paper, especially an efficient time domain inverse scattering tomography and their run in cluster parallel computer which has been developed. This algorithm is purely based on scattering theory through solving Lippmann Schwienger integral by using Born's approximation. In this paper, it is shown the robustness of this algorithm especially in avoiding the inversion trapped in local minimum to reach global minimum. A large data are solved by windowing and blocking technique of memory as well as computation. Parameter of windowing computation is based on shot gather's aperture. This windowing technique reduces memory as well as computation significantly. This parallel algorithm is done by means cluster system of 120 processors from 20 nodes of AMD Phenom II. Benchmarking of this algorithm is done by means Marmoussi model which can be representative of complex rich fault area. It is shown that the proposed method can image clearly the rich fault and complex zone in Marmoussi model even though the initial model is quite far from the true model. Therefore, this method can be as one of solution to image the very complex mode.

  19. Postprandial changes in secretory flow of pancreatic juice in the main pancreatic duct: evaluation with cine-dynamic MRCP with a spatially selective inversion-recovery (IR) pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasokawa, Kazuya; Ito, Katsuyoshi; Tamada, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Akira; Hayashida, Minoru; Torigoe, Teruyuki; Tanimoto, Daigo; Higaki, Atsushi; Noda, Yasufumi; Kido, Ayumu [Kawasaki Medical School, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan)

    2016-12-15

    To evaluate the influence of oral ingestion on the secretory flow dynamics of physiological pancreatic juice within the main pancreatic duct in healthy subjects by using cine-dynamic MRCP with spatially-selective inversion-recovery (IR) pulse non-invasively. Thirty-eight healthy subjects were investigated. MRCP with spatially-selective IR pulse was repeated every 15 s for 5 min to acquire a total of 20 images (cine-dynamic MRCP). A set of 20 MRCP images was repeatedly obtained before and after liquid oral ingestion every 7 min (including 2-min interval) for 40 min (a total of seven sets). Secretion grade of pancreatic juice on cine-dynamic MRCP was compared before and after oral ingestion using the nonparametric Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Median secretion grades of pancreatic juice at 5 min (score = 2.15), 12 min (score = 1.95) and 19 min (score = 2.05) after ingestion were significantly higher than that before ingestion (score = 1.40) (P = 0.004, P = 0.032, P = 0.045, respectively). Secretion grade of pancreatic juice showed a maximum peak of 2.15 at 5 min after ingestion. Thereafter, the secretion grade of pancreatic juice tended to gradually decline. Non-invasive cine-dynamic MRCP using spatially-selective IR pulse showed potential for evaluating postprandial changes in the secretory flow dynamics of pancreatic juice as a physiological reaction. (orig.)

  20. Information Recovery Algorithm for Ground Objects in Thin Cloud Images by Fusing Guide Filter and Transfer Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HU Gensheng

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Ground object information of remote sensing images covered with thin clouds is obscure. An information recovery algorithm for ground objects in thin cloud images is proposed by fusing guide filter and transfer learning. Firstly, multi-resolution decomposition of thin cloud target images and cloud-free guidance images is performed by using multi-directional nonsubsampled dual-tree complex wavelet transform. Then the decomposed low frequency subbands are processed by using support vector guided filter and transfer learning respectively. The decomposed high frequency subbands are enhanced by using modified Laine enhancement function. The low frequency subbands output by guided filter and those predicted by transfer learning model are fused by the method of selection and weighting based on regional energy. Finally, the enhanced high frequency subbands and the fused low frequency subbands are reconstructed by using inverse multi-directional nonsubsampled dual-tree complex wavelet transform to obtain the ground object information recovery images. Experimental results of Landsat-8 OLI multispectral images show that, support vector guided filter can effectively preserve the detail information of the target images, domain adaptive transfer learning can effectively extend the range of available multi-source and multi-temporal remote sensing images, and good effects for ground object information recover are obtained by fusing guide filter and transfer learning to remove thin cloud on the remote sensing images.

  1. Imaging earth's interior: Tomographic inversions for mantle P-wave velocity structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pulliam, R.J.

    1991-07-01

    A formalism is developed for the tomographic inversion of seismic travel time residuals. The travel time equations are solved both simultaneously, for velocity model terms and corrections to the source locations, and progressively, for each set of terms in succession. The methods differ primarily in their treatment of source mislocation terms. Additionally, the system of equations is solved directly, neglecting source terms. The efficacy of the algorithms is explored with synthetic data as we perform simulations of the general procedure used to produce tomographic images of Earth's mantle from global earthquake data. The patterns of seismic heterogeneity in the mantle that would be returned reliably by a tomographic inversion are investigated. We construct synthetic data sets based on real ray sampling of the mantle by introducing spherical harmonic patterns of velocity heterogeneity and perform inversions of the synthetic data.

  2. Imaging earth`s interior: Tomographic inversions for mantle P-wave velocity structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pulliam, Robert Jay [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1991-07-01

    A formalism is developed for the tomographic inversion of seismic travel time residuals. The travel time equations are solved both simultaneously, for velocity model terms and corrections to the source locations, and progressively, for each set of terms in succession. The methods differ primarily in their treatment of source mislocation terms. Additionally, the system of equations is solved directly, neglecting source terms. The efficacy of the algorithms is explored with synthetic data as we perform simulations of the general procedure used to produce tomographic images of Earth`s mantle from global earthquake data. The patterns of seismic heterogeneity in the mantle that would be returned reliably by a tomographic inversion are investigated. We construct synthetic data sets based on real ray sampling of the mantle by introducing spherical harmonic patterns of velocity heterogeneity and perform inversions of the synthetic data.

  3. Geometric shapes inversion method of space targets by ISAR image segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Chao-ying; Xing, Xiao-yu; Yin, Hong-cheng; Li, Chen-guang; Zeng, Xiang-yun; Xu, Gao-gui

    2017-11-01

    The geometric shape of target is an effective characteristic in the process of space targets recognition. This paper proposed a method of shape inversion of space target based on components segmentation from ISAR image. The Radon transformation, Hough transformation, K-means clustering, triangulation will be introduced into ISAR image processing. Firstly, we use Radon transformation and edge detection to extract space target's main body spindle and solar panel spindle from ISAR image. Then the targets' main body, solar panel, rectangular and circular antenna are segmented from ISAR image based on image detection theory. Finally, the sizes of every structural component are computed. The effectiveness of this method is verified using typical targets' simulation data.

  4. Microseismic imaging using a source-independent full-waveform inversion method

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hanchen

    2016-09-06

    Using full waveform inversion (FWI) to locate microseismic and image microseismic events allows for an automatic process (free of picking) that utilizes the full wavefield. However, waveform inversion of microseismic events faces incredible nonlinearity due to the unknown source location (space) and function (time). We develop a source independent FWI of microseismic events to invert for the source image, source function and the velocity model. It is based on convolving reference traces with the observed and modeled data to mitigate the effect of an unknown source ignition time. The adjoint-state method is used to derive the gradient for the source image, source function and velocity updates. The extended image for source wavelet in z axis is extracted to check the accuracy of the inverted source image and velocity model. Also the angle gather is calculated to see if the velocity model is correct. By inverting for all the source image, source wavelet and the velocity model, the proposed method produces good estimates of the source location, ignition time and the background velocity for part of the SEG overthrust model.

  5. Generalized INverse imaging (GIN): ultrafast fMRI with physiological noise correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyacioğlu, Rasim; Barth, Markus

    2013-10-01

    An ultrafast functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technique, called generalized inverse imaging (GIN), is proposed, which combines inverse imaging with a phase constraint-leading to a less underdetermined reconstruction-and physiological noise correction. A single 3D echo planar imaging (EPI) prescan is sufficient to obtain the necessary coil sensitivity information and reference images that are used to reconstruct standard images, so that standard analysis methods are applicable. A moving dots stimulus paradigm was chosen to assess the performance of GIN. We find that the spatial localization of activation for GIN is comparable to an EPI protocol and that maximum z-scores increase significantly. The high temporal resolution of GIN (50 ms) and the acquisition of the phase information enable unaliased sampling and regression of physiological signals. Using the phase time courses obtained from the 32 channels of the receiver coils as nuisance regressors in a general linear model results in significant improvement of the functional activation, rendering the acquisition of external physiological signals unnecessary. The proposed physiological noise correction can in principle be used for other fMRI protocols, such as simultaneous multislice acquisitions, which acquire the phase information sufficiently fast and sample physiological signals unaliased. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Tree-structured method for LUT inverse halftoning and for image halftoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mese, Murat; Vaidyanathan, P P

    2002-01-01

    Recently, the authors proposed a Look Up Table (LUT) based method for inverse halftoning of images. The LUT for inverse halftoning is obtained from the histogram gathered from a few sample halftone images and corresponding original images. Many of the entries in the LUT are unused because the corresponding binary patterns hardly occur in commonly encountered halftones. These are called nonexistent patterns. In this paper, we propose a tree structure which will reduce the storage requirements of an LUT by avoiding nonexistent patterns. We will demonstrate the performance on error diffused images and ordered dither images. Then, we introduce LUT based halftoning and tree-structured LUT (TLUT) halftoning. Even though TLUT method is more complex than LUT halftoning, it produces better halftones and requires much less storage than LUT halftoning.We will demonstrate how error diffusion characteristics can be achieved with this method. Afterwards, our algorithm will bet rained on halftones obtained by Direct Binary Search (DBS).The complexity of TLUT halftoning is higher than error diffusion algorithm but much lower than DBS algorithm. Also, the halftone quality of TLUT halftoning increases if the size of TLUT gets bigger. Thus, halftone image quality between error diffusion and DBS will be achieved depending on the size of tree-structure in TLUT algorithm.

  7. Full Waveform Inversion of Diving & Reflected Waves based on Scale Separation for Velocity and Impedance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brossier, Romain; Zhou, Wei; Operto, Stéphane; Virieux, Jean

    2015-04-01

    Full Waveform Inversion (FWI) is an appealing method for quantitative high-resolution subsurface imaging (Virieux et al., 2009). For crustal-scales exploration from surface seismic, FWI generally succeeds in recovering a broadband of wavenumbers in the shallow part of the targeted medium taking advantage of the broad scattering-angle provided by both reflected and diving waves. In contrast, deeper targets are often only illuminated by short-spread reflections, which favor the reconstruction of the short wavelengths at the expense of the longer ones, leading to a possible notch in the intermediate part of the wavenumber spectrum. To update the velocity macromodel from reflection data, image-domain strategies (e.g., Symes & Carazzone, 1991) aim to maximize a semblance criterion in the migrated domain. Alternatively, recent data-domain strategies (e.g., Xu et al., 2012, Ma & Hale, 2013, Brossier et al., 2014), called Reflection FWI (RFWI), inspired by Chavent et al. (1994), rely on a scale separation between the velocity macromodel and prior knowledge of the reflectivity to emphasize the transmission regime in the sensitivity kernel of the inversion. However, all these strategies focus on reflected waves only, discarding the low-wavenumber information carried out by diving waves. With the current development of very long-offset and wide-azimuth acquisitions, a significant part of the recorded energy is provided by diving waves and subcritical reflections, and high-resolution tomographic methods should take advantage of all types of waves. In this presentation, we will first review the issues of classical FWI when applied to reflected waves and how RFWI is able to retrieve the long wavelength of the model. We then propose a unified formulation of FWI (Zhou et al., 2014) to update the low wavenumbers of the velocity model by the joint inversion of diving and reflected arrivals, while the impedance model is updated thanks to reflected wave only. An alternate inversion of

  8. Electromagnetic inversion for environmental site characterization: Data quality versus image resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alumbaugh, D.L.; Newman, G.A.

    1997-01-01

    Non-linear electromagnetic inversion schemes have been developed to produce 2D and 3D images of subsurface conductivity structure from electromagnetic geophysical data. The solutions are obtained by successive linearized model updates where full forward modeling is employed at each iteration to compute model sensitivities and predicted data. Regularization is applied to the problem to provide stability. The use of the inversion is demonstrated on a data set collected with the Apex Parametrics MaxMin I-8S over a section of conductive waste at the Idaho National Laboratory's Cold Test Pit. The out-of -phase data are of very good quality while the in-phase are rather noisy due to slight mispositioning errors. A resolution study on synthetic data indicates that the error present in the in-phase data causes images of far lower resolution with more artifacts than if the in-phase and out-of-phase components are of similar quality. Better resolution images result if the data are weighted proportional to frequency; this gives each frequency equal importance. The loss of resolution due to poor quality in-phase data is demonstrated in a 3D inversion of the MaxMin data which shows both artifacts forming outside of the area known to contain the buried waste, as well as an inability to resolve depths

  9. Micro-seismic imaging using a source function independent full waveform inversion method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hanchen; Alkhalifah, Tariq

    2018-03-01

    At the heart of micro-seismic event measurements is the task to estimate the location of the source micro-seismic events, as well as their ignition times. The accuracy of locating the sources is highly dependent on the velocity model. On the other hand, the conventional micro-seismic source locating methods require, in many cases manual picking of traveltime arrivals, which do not only lead to manual effort and human interaction, but also prone to errors. Using full waveform inversion (FWI) to locate and image micro-seismic events allows for an automatic process (free of picking) that utilizes the full wavefield. However, full waveform inversion of micro-seismic events faces incredible nonlinearity due to the unknown source locations (space) and functions (time). We developed a source function independent full waveform inversion of micro-seismic events to invert for the source image, source function and the velocity model. It is based on convolving reference traces with these observed and modeled to mitigate the effect of an unknown source ignition time. The adjoint-state method is used to derive the gradient for the source image, source function and velocity updates. The extended image for the source wavelet in Z axis is extracted to check the accuracy of the inverted source image and velocity model. Also, angle gathers is calculated to assess the quality of the long wavelength component of the velocity model. By inverting for the source image, source wavelet and the velocity model simultaneously, the proposed method produces good estimates of the source location, ignition time and the background velocity for synthetic examples used here, like those corresponding to the Marmousi model and the SEG/EAGE overthrust model.

  10. Micro-seismic imaging using a source function independent full waveform inversion method

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hanchen

    2018-03-26

    At the heart of micro-seismic event measurements is the task to estimate the location of the source micro-seismic events, as well as their ignition times. The accuracy of locating the sources is highly dependent on the velocity model. On the other hand, the conventional micro-seismic source locating methods require, in many cases manual picking of traveltime arrivals, which do not only lead to manual effort and human interaction, but also prone to errors. Using full waveform inversion (FWI) to locate and image micro-seismic events allows for an automatic process (free of picking) that utilizes the full wavefield. However, full waveform inversion of micro-seismic events faces incredible nonlinearity due to the unknown source locations (space) and functions (time). We developed a source function independent full waveform inversion of micro-seismic events to invert for the source image, source function and the velocity model. It is based on convolving reference traces with these observed and modeled to mitigate the effect of an unknown source ignition time. The adjoint-state method is used to derive the gradient for the source image, source function and velocity updates. The extended image for the source wavelet in Z axis is extracted to check the accuracy of the inverted source image and velocity model. Also, angle gathers is calculated to assess the quality of the long wavelength component of the velocity model. By inverting for the source image, source wavelet and the velocity model simultaneously, the proposed method produces good estimates of the source location, ignition time and the background velocity for synthetic examples used here, like those corresponding to the Marmousi model and the SEG/EAGE overthrust model.

  11. Do Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery Vascular Hyperintensities Represent Good Collaterals before Reperfusion Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdjoub, E; Turc, G; Legrand, L; Benzakoun, J; Edjlali, M; Seners, P; Charron, S; Ben Hassen, W; Naggara, O; Meder, J-F; Mas, J-L; Baron, J-C; Oppenheim, C

    2018-01-01

    In acute ischemic stroke, whether FLAIR vascular hyperintensities represent good or poor collaterals remains controversial. We hypothesized that extensive FLAIR vascular hyperintensities correspond to good collaterals, as indirectly assessed by the hypoperfusion intensity ratio. We included 244 consecutive patients eligible for reperfusion therapy with MCA stroke and pretreatment MR imaging with both FLAIR and PWI. The FLAIR vascular hyperintensity score was based on ASPECTS, ranging from 0 (no FLAIR vascular hyperintensity) to 7 (FLAIR vascular hyperintensities abutting all ASPECTS cortical areas). The hypoperfusion intensity ratio was defined as the ratio of the time-to-maximum >10-second over time-to-maximum >6-second lesion volumes. The median hypoperfusion intensity ratio was used to dichotomize good (low hypoperfusion intensity ratio) versus poor (high hypoperfusion intensity ratio) collaterals. We then studied the association between FLAIR vascular hyperintensity extent and hypoperfusion intensity ratio. Hypoperfusion was present in all patients, with a median hypoperfusion intensity ratio of 0.35 (interquartile range, 0.19-0.48). The median FLAIR vascular hyperintensity score was 4 (interquartile range, 3-5). The FLAIR vascular hyperintensities were more extensive in patients with good collaterals (hypoperfusion intensity ratio ≤0.35) than with poor collaterals (hypoperfusion intensity ratio >0.35; P for Trend = .016). The FLAIR vascular hyperintensity score was independently associated with good collaterals ( P for Trend = .002). In patients eligible for reperfusion therapy, FLAIR vascular hyperintensity extent was associated with good collaterals, as assessed by the pretreatment hypoperfusion intensity ratio. The ASPECTS assessment of FLAIR vascular hyperintensities could be used to rapidly identify patients more likely to benefit from reperfusion therapy. © 2018 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  12. Hemangiomas and focal nodular hyperplasia images in contrast-enhanced, wide-band phase-inversion harmonic power Doppler imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janica, Jacek; Serwatka, Wojciech; Polaków, Jerzy; Ustymowicz, Andrzej; Łebkowska, Urszula; Kordecki, Kazimierz; Walecki, Jerzy; Polaków, Piotr; Dobrzycki, Sławomir

    2004-06-01

    Contrast-enhanced, wide-band, phase inversion power Doppler sonography in the depiction of vasculature in hemangioma and focal nodular hyperplasia. Fifty-one patients with liver lesions (40 FNHs,37 hemangiomas) were prospectively evaluated with conventional, color, power Doppler sonography, tissue harmonic, phase-inversion sonography and helical CT. Levovist was the standard contrast agent used and all examinations were performed on Siemens SONOLINE Elegra equipped with Ensemble Contrast Imaging (ECI) software. Color and power Doppler scans were frequently not specific for these highly vasularized lesions. Images were not suggestive in 15 out of 40 FNHs and not positive in all of 37 hemangiomas). If peripheral enhancement in form of puddle enhancement, 'bloo pools' or rimlike followed by a slow centripetal fill-in is regarded as a positive finding for hemangiomas all lesions were depicted confidently with wide-band, phase inversion, contrast enhanced power Doppler scans. Moreover, all typical vascularity features of FNHs confluence firstly the feeding artery then centrifugal spread of contrast later forming wheel like pattern was obvious in all cases of diagnosed FNHs. Contrast-enhanced, wide-band, PI ,power Doppler imaging is useful method for diagnosing the vascularity of FNHs and hemangiomas. Not only it overcomes the low prediction rate which was the main obstacle for routine use of sonography but it is cheap, portable, and free also from contrast media and radiation.

  13. Efficient algorithms for robust recovery of images from compressed data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Duc-Son; Venkatesh, Svetha

    2013-12-01

    Compressed sensing (CS) is an important theory for sub-Nyquist sampling and recovery of compressible data. Recently, it has been extended to cope with the case where corruption to the CS data is modeled as impulsive noise. The new formulation, termed as robust CS, combines robust statistics and CS into a single framework to suppress outliers in the CS recovery. To solve the newly formulated robust CS problem, a scheme that iteratively solves a number of CS problems--the solutions from which provably converge to the true robust CS solution--is suggested. This scheme is, however, rather inefficient as it has to use existing CS solvers as a proxy. To overcome limitations with the original robust CS algorithm, we propose in this paper more computationally efficient algorithms by following latest advances in large-scale convex optimization for nonsmooth regularization. Furthermore, we also extend the robust CS formulation to various settings, including additional affine constraints, l1-norm loss function, mix-norm regularization, and multitasking, so as to further improve robust CS and derive simple but effective algorithms to solve these extensions. We demonstrate that the new algorithms provide much better computational advantage over the original robust CS method on the original robust CS formulation, and effectively solve more sophisticated extensions where the original methods simply cannot. We demonstrate the usefulness of the extensions on several imaging tasks.

  14. Ultrasonic computed tomography based on full-waveform inversion for bone quantitative imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Simon; Monteiller, Vadim; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Lasaygues, Philippe

    2017-09-01

    We introduce an ultrasonic quantitative imaging method for long bones based on full-waveform inversion. The cost function is defined as the difference in the L 2-norm sense between observed data and synthetic results at a given iteration of the iterative inversion process. For simplicity, and in order to reduce the computational cost, we use a two-dimensional acoustic approximation. The inverse problem is solved iteratively based on a quasi-Newton technique called the Limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno method. We show how the technique can be made to work fine for benchmark models consisting of a single cylinder, and then five cylinders, the latter case including significant multiple diffraction effects. We then show pictures obtained for a tibia-fibula bone pair model. Convergence is fast, typically in 15 to 30 iterations in practice in each frequency band used. We discuss the so-called ‘cycle skipping’ effect that can occur in such full waveform inversion techniques and make them remain trapped in a local minimum of the cost function. We illustrate strategies that can be used in practice to avoid this. Future work should include viscoelastic materials rather than acoustic, and real data instead of synthetic data.

  15. Practical waveform inversion in anisotropic media: The natural combination of the data and image objectives

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2016-09-06

    Addressing anisotropy in full wavenumber inversion (FWI) is crucial to obtaining credible models, and it is extremely challenging considering the multi parameter nature of the inversion. A successful FWI in anisotropic media takes into account the sensitivity of the data (or the wave) to the long and short wavelength components of the anisotropic parameters. Considering the low sensitivity of FWI to the anellipticity parameter ? when parametrizing the acoustic transversely isotropic model with the horizontal velocity, η and ε, we develop a combined FWI and reflection waveform inversion (RWI) to invert for the anisotropic parameters that influence surface seismic data. This practical waveform inversion (PWI) separates the parameters to their resolvable scales, with information accessed from the data fitting (FWI) and the image focusing (RWI) objectives. With this parametrization, the RWI role is to obtain a smooth ηmodel, as well as velocity, while FWI focusses on the scattering potential of the horizontal velocity. The parameter η is used to produce the Born scattered wavefield for the RWI part and eventually fit the amplitude for the imperfect physics in the FWI part.

  16. Resistivity imaging of Aluto-Langano geothermal field using 3-D magnetotelluric inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkose, Biruk Abera; Mizunaga, Hideki

    2018-03-01

    Magnetotelluric (MT) method is a widely used geophysical method in geothermal exploration. It is used to image subsurface resistivity structures from shallow depths up to several kilometers of depth. Resistivity imaging using MT method in high-enthalpy geothermal systems is an effective tool to identify conductive clay layers that cover the geothermal systems and to detect a potential reservoir. A resistivity model is vital for deciding the location of pilot and production sites at the early stages of a geothermal project. In this study, a 3-D resistivity model of Aluto-Langano geothermal field was constructed to map structures related to a geothermal resource. The inversion program, ModEM was used to recover the 3-D resistivity model of the study area. The 3-D inversion result revealed the three main resistivity structures: a high-resistivity surface layer related to unaltered volcanic rocks at shallow depth, underlain by a conductive zone associated with the presence of conductive clay minerals, predominantly smectite. Beneath the conductive layer, the resistivity increases gradually to higher values related to the formation of high-temperature alteration minerals such as chlorite and epidote. The resistivity model recovered from 3-D inversion in Aluto-Langano corresponds very well to the conceptual model for high-enthalpy volcanic geothermal systems. The conductive clay cap is overlying the resistive propylitic upflow zone as confirmed by the geothermal wells in the area.

  17. An inverse method for crack characterization from ultrasonic B-Scan images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faur, M.; Roy, O.; Benoist, PH. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Direction des Technologies Avancees; Oksman, J. [Ecole Superieure d`Electricite, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Morisseau, PH. [Intercontrol, 94 - Rungis (France)

    1996-12-31

    Concern has been expressed about the capabilities of performing non destructive evaluation (NDE) of flaws located near to the outer surface in nuclear pressurized water reactor (PWR) vessels. The ultrasonic examination of PWR is accomplished from the inside with ultrasonic focused transducers working in the pulse echo mode. By recording the echoes as a function of time, the Ascan representation may be obtained. Many ultrasonic flaw detectors used for NDE are based on the simple Ascan concept involving measuring a time interval called `time of flight`. By combining the Ascan concept synchronized transducer scanning, one can produce Bscan images that are two dimensional descriptions of the flaw interaction with the ultrasonic field. In the following, the flaw is assumed to be an axially oriented crack (the most serious flaw to be found in a pressurized component). In the case of the outer surface cracks (OSC`s), analyzing and interpreting ultrasonic Ascan images become difficult because of the various reflections of the ultrasonic beam on the crack and on the outer surface (the so-called corner effect). Methods for automatic interpretation of ultrasonic experimental data are currently under investigation. In this paper, we present an inverse method for determining the geometrical characteristics of OSC`s from ultrasonic Bscan images. The direct model used for the inversion procedure predicts synthetic Bscan images of ultrasonic examination of blocks containing planar defects interrogated by focused probes. (authors). 9 refs.

  18. An inverse method for crack characterization from ultrasonic B-Scan images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faur, M.; Roy, O.; Benoist, PH.; Morisseau, PH.

    1996-01-01

    Concern has been expressed about the capabilities of performing non destructive evaluation (NDE) of flaws located near to the outer surface in nuclear pressurized water reactor (PWR) vessels. The ultrasonic examination of PWR is accomplished from the inside with ultrasonic focused transducers working in the pulse echo mode. By recording the echoes as a function of time, the Ascan representation may be obtained. Many ultrasonic flaw detectors used for NDE are based on the simple Ascan concept involving measuring a time interval called 'time of flight'. By combining the Ascan concept synchronized transducer scanning, one can produce Bscan images that are two dimensional descriptions of the flaw interaction with the ultrasonic field. In the following, the flaw is assumed to be an axially oriented crack (the most serious flaw to be found in a pressurized component). In the case of the outer surface cracks (OSC's), analyzing and interpreting ultrasonic Ascan images become difficult because of the various reflections of the ultrasonic beam on the crack and on the outer surface (the so-called corner effect). Methods for automatic interpretation of ultrasonic experimental data are currently under investigation. In this paper, we present an inverse method for determining the geometrical characteristics of OSC's from ultrasonic Bscan images. The direct model used for the inversion procedure predicts synthetic Bscan images of ultrasonic examination of blocks containing planar defects interrogated by focused probes. (authors)

  19. Two-step inversion with a logarithmic transformation for microwave breast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meaney, Paul M; Geimer, Shireen D; Paulsen, Keith D

    2017-08-01

    The authors have developed a new two-step microwave tomographic image reconstruction process specifically designed to incorporate logarithmic transformed microwave imaging algorithms as a means of significantly improving spatial resolution and target property recovery. Log transform eliminates the need for a priori information, but spatial filtering often integrated as part of the regularization required to stabilize image recovery, generally smooths image features and reduces object definition. The new implementation begins with this smoothed image as the first step, but then utilizes it as the starting estimate for a second step which continues the iterative process with a standard weighted Euclidean distance regularization. The penalty term of the latter restricts the new image to a multi-dimensional location close to the original but allows the algorithm to optimize the image without excessive smoothing. The overall approach is based on a Gauss-Newton iterative scheme which incorporates a log transformation as a way of making the reconstruction more linear. It has been shown to be robust and not require a priori information as a condition for convergence, but does produce somewhat smoothed images as a result of associated regularization. The new two-step process utilizes the previous technique to generate a smoothed initial estimate and then uses the same reconstruction process with a weighted Euclidean distance penalty term. A simple and repeatable method has been implemented to determine the weighting factor without significant computational burden. The reconstructions are assessed according to conventional parameter estimation metrics. We apply the approach to phantom experiments using large, high contrast canonical shapes followed by a set of images recovered from an actual patient exam. The image improvements are substantial in regards to improved property recovery and feature delineation without inducing unwanted artifacts. Analysis of the residual vector

  20. The natural combination of full and image-based waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2015-06-01

    Integrating migration velocity analysis and full waveform inversion can help reduce the high non-linearity of the classic full waveform inversion objective function. The combination of inverting for the long and short wavelength components of the velocity model using a dual objective function that is sensitive to both components is still very expensive and have produced mixed results. We develop an approach that includes both components integrated to complement each other. We specifically utilize the image to generate reflections in our synthetic data only when the velocity model is not capable of producing such reflections. As a result, we get the migration velocity analysis working when we need it, and we mitigate its influence when the velocity model produces accurate reflections (possibly first for the low frequencies). This is achieved using a novel objective function that includes both objectives. Applications to a layered model and the Marmousi model demonstrate the main features of the approach. © 2015 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers.

  1. Isotope specific resolution recovery image reconstruction in high resolution PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotasidis, Fotis A; Angelis, Georgios I; Anton-Rodriguez, Jose; Matthews, Julian C; Reader, Andrew J; Zaidi, Habib

    2014-05-01

    Measuring and incorporating a scanner-specific point spread function (PSF) within image reconstruction has been shown to improve spatial resolution in PET. However, due to the short half-life of clinically used isotopes, other long-lived isotopes not used in clinical practice are used to perform the PSF measurements. As such, non-optimal PSF models that do not correspond to those needed for the data to be reconstructed are used within resolution modeling (RM) image reconstruction, usually underestimating the true PSF owing to the difference in positron range. In high resolution brain and preclinical imaging, this effect is of particular importance since the PSFs become more positron range limited and isotope-specific PSFs can help maximize the performance benefit from using resolution recovery image reconstruction algorithms. In this work, the authors used a printing technique to simultaneously measure multiple point sources on the High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT), and the authors demonstrated the feasibility of deriving isotope-dependent system matrices from fluorine-18 and carbon-11 point sources. Furthermore, the authors evaluated the impact of incorporating them within RM image reconstruction, using carbon-11 phantom and clinical datasets on the HRRT. The results obtained using these two isotopes illustrate that even small differences in positron range can result in different PSF maps, leading to further improvements in contrast recovery when used in image reconstruction. The difference is more pronounced in the centre of the field-of-view where the full width at half maximum (FWHM) from the positron range has a larger contribution to the overall FWHM compared to the edge where the parallax error dominates the overall FWHM. Based on the proposed methodology, measured isotope-specific and spatially variant PSFs can be reliably derived and used for improved spatial resolution and variance performance in resolution recovery image reconstruction. The

  2. Isotope specific resolution recovery image reconstruction in high resolution PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotasidis, Fotis A.; Angelis, Georgios I.; Anton-Rodriguez, Jose; Matthews, Julian C.; Reader, Andrew J.; Zaidi, Habib

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Measuring and incorporating a scanner-specific point spread function (PSF) within image reconstruction has been shown to improve spatial resolution in PET. However, due to the short half-life of clinically used isotopes, other long-lived isotopes not used in clinical practice are used to perform the PSF measurements. As such, non-optimal PSF models that do not correspond to those needed for the data to be reconstructed are used within resolution modeling (RM) image reconstruction, usually underestimating the true PSF owing to the difference in positron range. In high resolution brain and preclinical imaging, this effect is of particular importance since the PSFs become more positron range limited and isotope-specific PSFs can help maximize the performance benefit from using resolution recovery image reconstruction algorithms. Methods: In this work, the authors used a printing technique to simultaneously measure multiple point sources on the High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT), and the authors demonstrated the feasibility of deriving isotope-dependent system matrices from fluorine-18 and carbon-11 point sources. Furthermore, the authors evaluated the impact of incorporating them within RM image reconstruction, using carbon-11 phantom and clinical datasets on the HRRT. Results: The results obtained using these two isotopes illustrate that even small differences in positron range can result in different PSF maps, leading to further improvements in contrast recovery when used in image reconstruction. The difference is more pronounced in the centre of the field-of-view where the full width at half maximum (FWHM) from the positron range has a larger contribution to the overall FWHM compared to the edge where the parallax error dominates the overall FWHM. Conclusions: Based on the proposed methodology, measured isotope-specific and spatially variant PSFs can be reliably derived and used for improved spatial resolution and variance performance in resolution

  3. Postprandial changes in secretory flow of pancreatic juice in the main pancreatic duct: evaluation with cine-dynamic MRCP with a spatially selective inversion-recovery (IR) pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasokawa, Kazuya; Ito, Katsuyoshi; Tamada, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Akira; Hayashida, Minoru; Torigoe, Teruyuki; Tanimoto, Daigo; Higaki, Atsushi; Noda, Yasufumi; Kido, Ayumu

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the influence of oral ingestion on the secretory flow dynamics of physiological pancreatic juice within the main pancreatic duct in healthy subjects by using cine-dynamic MRCP with spatially-selective inversion-recovery (IR) pulse non-invasively. Thirty-eight healthy subjects were investigated. MRCP with spatially-selective IR pulse was repeated every 15 s for 5 min to acquire a total of 20 images (cine-dynamic MRCP). A set of 20 MRCP images was repeatedly obtained before and after liquid oral ingestion every 7 min (including 2-min interval) for 40 min (a total of seven sets). Secretion grade of pancreatic juice on cine-dynamic MRCP was compared before and after oral ingestion using the nonparametric Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Median secretion grades of pancreatic juice at 5 min (score = 2.15), 12 min (score = 1.95) and 19 min (score = 2.05) after ingestion were significantly higher than that before ingestion (score = 1.40) (P = 0.004, P = 0.032, P = 0.045, respectively). Secretion grade of pancreatic juice showed a maximum peak of 2.15 at 5 min after ingestion. Thereafter, the secretion grade of pancreatic juice tended to gradually decline. Non-invasive cine-dynamic MRCP using spatially-selective IR pulse showed potential for evaluating postprandial changes in the secretory flow dynamics of pancreatic juice as a physiological reaction. • Secretion grade of pancreatic juice at cine-dynamic MRCP after ingestion was evaluated. • Secretion grade was significantly increased within 19 min after liquid meal ingestion. • Secretion grade showed maximum peak of 2.15 at 5 min after ingestion. • Postprandial changes in pancreatic juice flow can be assessed by cine-dynamic MRCP.

  4. Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery Hypointensity of the Pulvinar Nucleus of Patients with Alzheimer Disease: Its Possible Association with Iron Accumulation as Evidenced by the T2 Map

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Won Jin; Roh, Hong Gee; Choi, Jin Woo; Kim, Hee Jin; Han, Seol Heui

    2012-01-01

    We hypothesized that prominent pulvinar hypointensity in brain MRI represents the disease process due to iron accumulation in Alzheimer disease (AD). We aimed to determine whether or not the pulvinar signal intensity (SI) on the fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences at 3.0T MRI differs between AD patients and normal subjects, and also whether the pulvinar SI is correlated with the T2 map, an imaging marker for tissue iron, and a cognitive scale. Twenty one consecutive patients with AD and 21 age-matched control subjects were prospectively included in this study. The pulvinar SI was assessed on the FLAIR image. We measured the relative SI ratio of the pulvinar to the corpus callosum. The T2 values were calculated from the T2 relaxometry map. The differences between the two groups were analyzed, by using a Student t test. The correlation between the measurements was assessed by the Pearson's correlation test. As compared to the normal white matter, the FLAIR signal intensity of the pulvinar nucleus was significantly more hypointense in the AD patients than in the control subjects (p < 0.01). The pulvinar T2 was shorter in the AD patients than in the control subjects (51.5 ± 4.95 ms vs. 56.5 ± 5.49 ms, respectively, p = 0.003). The pulvinar SI ratio was strongly correlated with the pulvinar T2 (r = 0.745, p < 0.001). When controlling for age, only the pulvinar-to-CC SI ratio was positively correlated with that of the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score (r = 0.303, p < 0.050). Conversely, the pulvinar T2 was not correlated with the MMSE score (r = 0.277, p = 0.080). The FLAIR hypointensity of the pulvinar nucleus represents an abnormal iron accumulation in AD and may be used as an adjunctive finding for evaluating AD.

  5. Adaptive illumination through spatial modulation of light intensity and image inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellini, P.; Cecchini, S.; Stroppa, L.; Paone, N.

    2013-05-01

    The paper introduces the concept of spatial modulation of light intensity in the context of vision-based quality control, with the aim to improve image quality, measurable by indices such as image contrast and Tenengrad, so as to enhance the level of confidence of the diagnosis performed by image processing. The proposed technique is based on the projection of spatially modulated light intensity distribution by a digital light projector that allows an arbitrary light distribution to be projected on the target. The projected spatial distribution of light is determined by implementing an algorithm based on image inversion: the image acquired by the camera under uniform illumination is inverted and it is then used to modulate the light spatial distribution for projection. The process is repeated iteratively with the purpose to enhance image quality until convergence. The technique proves particularly valuable to avoid saturation from reflecting surfaces, which are often found in industrial practice. The procedure is tested and validated both by a numerical model and by an experimental validation, referring to a significant problem for the washing machine manufacturing industry. The use of image quality estimators confirms the effectiveness of the method.

  6. Adaptive illumination through spatial modulation of light intensity and image inversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellini, P; Cecchini, S; Stroppa, L; Paone, N

    2013-01-01

    The paper introduces the concept of spatial modulation of light intensity in the context of vision-based quality control, with the aim to improve image quality, measurable by indices such as image contrast and Tenengrad, so as to enhance the level of confidence of the diagnosis performed by image processing. The proposed technique is based on the projection of spatially modulated light intensity distribution by a digital light projector that allows an arbitrary light distribution to be projected on the target. The projected spatial distribution of light is determined by implementing an algorithm based on image inversion: the image acquired by the camera under uniform illumination is inverted and it is then used to modulate the light spatial distribution for projection. The process is repeated iteratively with the purpose to enhance image quality until convergence. The technique proves particularly valuable to avoid saturation from reflecting surfaces, which are often found in industrial practice. The procedure is tested and validated both by a numerical model and by an experimental validation, referring to a significant problem for the washing machine manufacturing industry. The use of image quality estimators confirms the effectiveness of the method. (paper)

  7. Micro-seismic Imaging Using a Source Independent Waveform Inversion Method

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hanchen

    2016-04-18

    Micro-seismology is attracting more and more attention in the exploration seismology community. The main goal in micro-seismic imaging is to find the source location and the ignition time in order to track the fracture expansion, which will help engineers monitor the reservoirs. Conventional imaging methods work fine in this field but there are many limitations such as manual picking, incorrect migration velocity and low signal to noise ratio (S/N). In traditional surface survey imaging, full waveform inversion (FWI) is widely used. The FWI method updates the velocity model by minimizing the misfit between the observed data and the predicted data. Using FWI to locate and image microseismic events allows for an automatic process (free of picking) that utilizes the full wavefield. Use the FWI technique, and overcomes the difficulties of manual pickings and incorrect velocity model for migration. However, the technique of waveform inversion of micro-seismic events faces its own problems. There is significant nonlinearity due to the unknown source location (space) and function (time). We have developed a source independent FWI of micro-seismic events to simultaneously invert for the source image, source function and velocity model. It is based on convolving reference traces with the observed and modeled data to mitigate the effect of an unknown source ignition time. The adjoint-state method is used to derive the gradient for the source image, source function and velocity updates. To examine the accuracy of the inverted source image and velocity model the extended image for source wavelet in z-axis is extracted. Also the angle gather is calculated to check the applicability of the migration velocity. By inverting for the source image, source wavelet and the velocity model simultaneously, the proposed method produces good estimates of the source location, ignition time and the background velocity in the synthetic experiments with both parts of the Marmousi and the SEG

  8. Regularization and Bayesian methods for inverse problems in signal and image processing

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannelli , Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this book is on "ill-posed inverse problems". These problems cannot be solved only on the basis of observed data. The building of solutions involves the recognition of other pieces of a priori information. These solutions are then specific to the pieces of information taken into account. Clarifying and taking these pieces of information into account is necessary for grasping the domain of validity and the field of application for the solutions built.  For too long, the interest in these problems has remained very limited in the signal-image community. However, the community has si

  9. Effect of a novel histamine subtype-3 receptor inverse agonist and modafinil on EEG power spectra during sleep deprivation and recovery sleep in male volunteers.

    OpenAIRE

    James, LM; Iannone, R; Palcza, J; Renger, JJ; Calder, N; Cerchio, K; Gottesdiener, K; Hargreaves, R; Murphy, MG; Boyle, J; Dijk, DJ

    2011-01-01

    Rationale Histamine and dopamine contribute to the maintenance of wakefulness. Objective This study aims to conduct an exploratory analysis of the effects of 10 and 50 mg of MK-0249, a novel histamine subtype-3 receptor inverse agonist, and 200 mg of modafinil, a presumed dopaminergic compound, on EEG power spectra during sleep deprivation and subsequent recovery sleep. Methods A total of 25 healthy men were recruited to a double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over design. EEG power spectra,...

  10. Young's Modulus evaluation using Particle Image Velocimetry and Finite Element Inverse Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhaes, R. R.; Braga, R. A.; Barbosa, B. H. G.

    2015-07-01

    Most of the conventional design solutions using the Finite Element Method (FEM) have the material's properties defined. This is necessary to set those properties from commercial software library to run the simulations. However, some material's properties are not standardized which can provide unreliable results due to wrong input data to the simulations. In this case, non-destructive mechanical tests for measuring deformations can be used to generate displacements values in order to provide the material behavior through FEM inverse analysis methods. This paper is focused on using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) together with the Particle-Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm and the FEM inverse analysis to investigate Young's Modulus of the material ASTM A36 steel. The displacements of a cantilever beam were measured by means of PIV association to the speckle patterns provided by a laser beam. The results indicated Young's Modulus estimation error around 5% compared to the original material properties. It shows the potentiality of PIV associated to PSO in order to determine the mechanical properties of steel via the FEM inverse analysis in a robust and low cost procedure.

  11. Inverse methods for 3D quantitative optical coherence elasticity imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Li; Wijesinghe, Philip; Hugenberg, Nicholas; Sampson, David D.; Munro, Peter R. T.; Kennedy, Brendan F.; Oberai, Assad A.

    2017-02-01

    In elastography, quantitative elastograms are desirable as they are system and operator independent. Such quantification also facilitates more accurate diagnosis, longitudinal studies and studies performed across multiple sites. In optical elastography (compression, surface-wave or shear-wave), quantitative elastograms are typically obtained by assuming some form of homogeneity. This simplifies data processing at the expense of smearing sharp transitions in elastic properties, and/or introducing artifacts in these regions. Recently, we proposed an inverse problem-based approach to compression OCE that does not assume homogeneity, and overcomes the drawbacks described above. In this approach, the difference between the measured and predicted displacement field is minimized by seeking the optimal distribution of elastic parameters. The predicted displacements and recovered elastic parameters together satisfy the constraint of the equations of equilibrium. This approach, which has been applied in two spatial dimensions assuming plane strain, has yielded accurate material property distributions. Here, we describe the extension of the inverse problem approach to three dimensions. In addition to the advantage of visualizing elastic properties in three dimensions, this extension eliminates the plane strain assumption and is therefore closer to the true physical state. It does, however, incur greater computational costs. We address this challenge through a modified adjoint problem, spatially adaptive grid resolution, and three-dimensional decomposition techniques. Through these techniques the inverse problem is solved on a typical desktop machine within a wall clock time of 20 hours. We present the details of the method and quantitative elasticity images of phantoms and tissue samples.

  12. Robust Imaging Methodology for Challenging Environments: Wave Equation Dispersion Inversion of Surface Waves

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jing

    2017-12-22

    A robust imaging technology is reviewed that provide subsurface information in challenging environments: wave-equation dispersion inversion (WD) of surface waves for the shear velocity model. We demonstrate the benefits and liabilities of the method with synthetic seismograms and field data. The benefits of WD are that 1) there is no layered medium assumption, as there is in conventional inversion of dispersion curves, so that the 2D or 3D S-velocity model can be reliably obtained with seismic surveys over rugged topography, and 2) WD mostly avoids getting stuck in local minima. The synthetic and field data examples demonstrate that WD can accurately reconstruct the S-wave velocity distributions in laterally heterogeneous media if the dispersion curves can be identified and picked. The WD method is easily extended to anisotropic media and the inversion of dispersion curves associated with Love wave. The liability is that is almost as expensive as FWI and only recovers the Vs distribution to a depth no deeper than about 1/2~1/3 wavelength.

  13. Electromagnetic Time-Reversal Imaging and Tracking Techniques for Inverse Scattering and Wireless Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouda, Ahmed E.

    differential TR. This technique provides real-time tracking and exhibits superior clutter rejection at minimal processing costs. It also exploits the distinctive features of time-reversal such as statistical stability and superresolution. Next, we develop an UWB inverse scattering technique for extended targets, with continuous permittivity and/or conductivity fluctuations, based on Bayesian compressive sensing. Bayesian inversion provides means for estimating the confidence level of the inversion, and for adaptively optimizing subsequent measurements. This technique is applied to a wide range of problems of practical interest such as underground crosshole sensing, medical imaging, and rough surface reconstruction. Finally, we develop new TR-based wireless communication techniques for UWB multiple-input single-output (MISO) and multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) systems. We contrast relative strengths and limitations of those techniques for different scenarios of operation.

  14. Seismic Imaging and Inversion: Application of Linear Theory (2012), Cambridge University Press, co-authored with Bob Stolt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weglein, Arthur B.; Stolt, Bob H.

    2012-03-01

    Extracting information from seismic data requires knowledge of seismic wave propagation and reflection. The commonly used method involves solving linearly for a reflectivity at every point within the Earth, but this book follows an alternative approach which invokes inverse scattering theory. By developing the theory of seismic imaging from basic principles, the authors relate the different models of seismic propagation, reflection and imaging - thus providing links to reflectivity-based imaging on the one hand and to nonlinear seismic inversion on the other. The comprehensive and physically complete linear imaging foundation developed presents new results at the leading edge of seismic processing for target location and identification. This book serves as a fundamental guide to seismic imaging principles and algorithms and their foundation in inverse scattering theory and is a valuable resource for working geoscientists, scientific programmers and theoretical physicists.

  15. Fast Iris Segmentation by Rotation Average Analysis of Intensity-Inversed Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Jiang, Lin-Hua

    Iris recognition is a reliable and accurate biometric technique used in modern personnel identification system. Segmentation of the effective iris region is the base of iris feature encoding and recognition. In this paper, a novel method is presented for fast iris segmentation. There are two steps to finish the iris segmentation. The first step is iris location, which is based on rotation average analysis of intensity-inversed image and non-linear circular regression. The second step is eyelid detection. A new method to detect the eyelids utilizing a simplified mathematical model of arc with three free parameters is implemented for quick fitting. Comparatively, the conventional model with four parameters is less optimal. Experiments were carried out on both self-collected images and CASIA database. The results show that our method is fast and robust in segmenting the effective iris region with high tolerance of noise and scaling.

  16. Generalized Uncertainty Quantification for Linear Inverse Problems in X-ray Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, Michael James [Clarkson Univ., Potsdam, NY (United States)

    2014-04-25

    In industrial and engineering applications, X-ray radiography has attained wide use as a data collection protocol for the assessment of material properties in cases where direct observation is not possible. The direct measurement of nuclear materials, particularly when they are under explosive or implosive loading, is not feasible, and radiography can serve as a useful tool for obtaining indirect measurements. In such experiments, high energy X-rays are pulsed through a scene containing material of interest, and a detector records a radiograph by measuring the radiation that is not attenuated in the scene. One approach to the analysis of these radiographs is to model the imaging system as an operator that acts upon the object being imaged to produce a radiograph. In this model, the goal is to solve an inverse problem to reconstruct the values of interest in the object, which are typically material properties such as density or areal density. The primary objective in this work is to provide quantitative solutions with uncertainty estimates for three separate applications in X-ray radiography: deconvolution, Abel inversion, and radiation spot shape reconstruction. For each problem, we introduce a new hierarchical Bayesian model for determining a posterior distribution on the unknowns and develop efficient Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods for sampling from the posterior. A Poisson likelihood, based on a noise model for photon counts at the detector, is combined with a prior tailored to each application: an edge-localizing prior for deconvolution; a smoothing prior with non-negativity constraints for spot reconstruction; and a full covariance sampling prior based on a Wishart hyperprior for Abel inversion. After developing our methods in a general setting, we demonstrate each model on both synthetically generated datasets, including those from a well known radiation transport code, and real high energy radiographs taken at two U. S. Department of Energy

  17. Crustal structure of the northern Menderes Massif, western Turkey, imaged by joint gravity and magnetic inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessner, Klaus; Gallardo, Luis A.; Wedin, Francis; Sener, Kerim

    2016-10-01

    In western Anatolia, the Anatolide domain of the Tethyan orogen is exposed in one of the Earth's largest metamorphic core complexes, the Menderes Massif. The Menderes Massif experienced a two-stage exhumation: tectonic denudation in the footwall of a north-directed Miocene extensional detachment, followed by fragmentation by E-W and NW-SE-trending graben systems. Along the northern boundary of the core complex, the tectonic units of the Vardar-Izmir-Ankara suture zone overly the stage one footwall of the core complex, the northern Menderes Massif. In this study, we explore the structure of the upper crust in the northern Menderes Massif with cross-gradient joint inversion of gravity and aeromagnetic data along a series of 10-km-deep profiles. Our inversions, which are based on gravity and aeromagnetic measurements and require no geological and petrophysical constraints, reveal the salient features of the Earth's upper crust. We image the northern Menderes Massif as a relatively homogenous domain of low magnetization and medium to high density, with local anomalies related to the effect of interspersed igneous bodies and shallow basins. In contrast, both the northern and western boundaries of the northern Menderes Massif stand out as domains where dense mafic, metasedimentary and ultramafic domains with a weak magnetic signature alternate with low-density igneous complexes with high magnetization. With our technique, we are able to delineate Miocene basins and igneous complexes, and map the boundary between intermediate to mafic-dominated subduction-accretion units of the suture zone and the underlying felsic crust of the Menderes Massif. We demonstrate that joint gravity and magnetic inversion are not only capable of imaging local and regional changes in crustal composition, but can also be used to map discontinuities of geodynamic significance such as the Vardar-Izmir-Ankara suture and the West Anatolia Transfer Zone.

  18. Microseismic Image-domain Velocity Inversion: Case Study From The Marcellus Shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shragge, J.; Witten, B.

    2017-12-01

    Seismic monitoring at injection wells relies on generating accurate location estimates of detected (micro-)seismicity. Event location estimates assist in optimizing well and stage spacings, assessing potential hazards, and establishing causation of larger events. The largest impediment to generating accurate location estimates is an accurate velocity model. For surface-based monitoring the model should capture 3D velocity variation, yet, rarely is the laterally heterogeneous nature of the velocity field captured. Another complication for surface monitoring is that the data often suffer from low signal-to-noise levels, making velocity updating with established techniques difficult due to uncertainties in the arrival picks. We use surface-monitored field data to demonstrate that a new method requiring no arrival picking can improve microseismic locations by jointly locating events and updating 3D P- and S-wave velocity models through image-domain adjoint-state tomography. This approach creates a complementary set of images for each chosen event through wave-equation propagation and correlating combinations of P- and S-wavefield energy. The method updates the velocity models to optimize the focal consistency of the images through adjoint-state inversions. We demonstrate the functionality of the method using a surface array of 192 three-component geophones over a hydraulic stimulation in the Marcellus Shale. Applying the proposed joint location and velocity-inversion approach significantly improves the estimated locations. To assess event location accuracy, we propose a new measure of inconsistency derived from the complementary images. By this measure the location inconsistency decreases by 75%. The method has implications for improving the reliability of microseismic interpretation with low signal-to-noise data, which may increase hydrocarbon extraction efficiency and improve risk assessment from injection related seismicity.

  19. Sonographic evaluation of breast nodules: comparison of conventional, real-time compound, and pulse-inversion harmonic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Bo Kyoung; Oh, Yu Whan; Kim, Hyung Rae; Kim, Hong Weon; Kang, Chang Ho; Lee, Nam Joon; Kim, Jung Hyuk; Park, Bum Jin; Cho, Kyu Ran; Lee, June Young; Bae, Jeoung Won; Lee, Ki Yeoul

    2002-01-01

    To compare the use of conventional, real-time compound, and pulse-inversion harmonic imaging in the evaluation of breast nodules. Fifty-two breast nodules were included in this study, conducted between May and December 2000, in which conventional, real-time compound, and pulse-inversion harmonic images were obtained in the same plane. Three radiologists, each blinded to the interpretations of the other two, evaluated the findings, characterizing the lesions and ranking the three techniques from grade 1, the worst, to grade 3, the best. Lesion conspicuity was assessed, and lesions were also characterized in terms of their margin, clarity of internal echotexture, and clarity of posterior echo pattern. The three techniques were compared using Friedman's test, and interobserver agreement in image interpretation was assessed by means of the intraclass correlation coefficient. With regard to lesion conspicuity, margin, and internal echotexture of the nodules, real-time compound imaging was the best technique (p < 0.05); in terms of posterior echo pattern, the best was pulse-inversion harmonic imaging (p < 0.05). Real-time compound and pulse inversion harmonic imaging were better than conventional sonography in all evaluative aspects. Interobserver agreement was greater than moderate. Real-time compound and pulse-inversion harmonic imaging procedures are superior to conventional sonography in terms of both lesion conspicuity and the further characterization of breast nodules. Real-time compound imaging is the best technique for evaluation of the margin and internal echotexture of nodules, while pulse-inversion harmonic imaging is very effective for the evaluation of the posterior echo patterns

  20. Regional Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) at 7 Tesla correlates with amyloid beta in hippocampus and brainstem of cognitively normal elderly subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, Simon J.; Liu, Xinyang; Gietl, Anton F.; Wyss, Michael; Steininger, Stefanie C.; Gruber, Esmeralda; Treyer, Valerie; Meier, Irene B.; Kälin, Andrea M.; Leh, Sandra E.; Buck, Alfred; Nitsch, Roger M.; Pruessmann, Klaas P.; Hock, Christoph; Unschuld, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Accumulation of amyloid beta (Aβ) may occur during healthy aging and is a risk factor for Alzheimer Disease (AD). While individual Aβ-accumulation can be measured non-invasively using Pittsburgh Compund-B positron emission tomography (PiB-PET), Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) is a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) sequence, capable of indicating heterogeneous age-related brain pathologies associated with tissue-edema. In the current study cognitively normal elderly subjects were investigated for regional correlation of PiB- and FLAIR intensity. Methods: Fourteen healthy elderly subjects without known history of cognitive impairment received 11C-PiB-PET for estimation of regional Aβ-load. In addition, whole brain T1-MPRAGE and FLAIR-MRI sequences were acquired at high field strength of 7 Tesla (7T). Volume-normalized intensities of brain regions were assessed by applying an automated subcortical segmentation algorithm for spatial definition of brain structures. Statistical dependence between FLAIR- and PiB-PET intensities was tested using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rho), followed by Holm–Bonferroni correction for multiple testing. Results: Neuropsychological testing revealed normal cognitive performance levels in all participants. Mean regional PiB-PET and FLAIR intensities were normally distributed and independent. Significant correlation between volume-normalized PiB-PET signals and FLAIR intensities resulted for Hippocampus (right: rho = 0.86; left: rho = 0.84), Brainstem (rho = 0.85) and left Basal Ganglia vessel region (rho = 0.82). Conclusions: Our finding of a significant relationship between PiB- and FLAIR intensity mainly observable in the Hippocampus and Brainstem, indicates regional Aβ associated tissue-edema in cognitively normal elderly subjects. Further studies including clinical populations are necessary to clarify the relevance of our findings for estimating individual risk for age-related neurodegenerative

  1. Regional Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR at 7 Tesla correlates with Amyloid beta in Hippocampus and Brainstem of cognitively normal elderly subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon J Schreiner

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Accumulation of amyloid beta (Aβ may occur during healthy aging and is a risk factor for Alzheimer Disease (AD. While individual Aβ-accumulation can be measured non-invasively using Pittsburgh compound-B positron-emission-tomography (PiB-PET, Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR is a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI sequence, capable of indicating heterogeneous age-related brain pathologies associated with tissue-edema. In the current study cognitively normal elderly subjects were investigated for regional correlation of PiB- and FLAIR- intensity. Methods: 14 healthy elderly subjects without known history of cognitive impairment received 11C-PiB-PET for estimation of regional Aβ-load. In addition, whole brain T1-MPRAGE and FLAIR-MRI sequences were acquired at high field strength of 7 Tesla (7T. Volume-normalized intensities of brain regions were assessed by applying an automated subcortical segmentation algorithm for spatial definition of brain structures. Statistical dependence between FLAIR- and PiB-PET intensities was tested using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rho, followed by Holm-Bonferroni correction for multiple testing. Results: Neuropsychological testing revealed normal cognitive performance levels in all participants. Mean regional PiB-PET and FLAIR intensities were normally distributed and independent. Significant correlation between volume-normalized PiB-PET signals and FLAIR intensities resulted for Hippocampus (right:rho=0.86; left:rho=0.84, Brainstem (rho=0.85 and left Basal Ganglia vessel region (rho=0.82. Conclusions: Our finding of a significant relationship between PiB- and FLAIR-intensity mainly observable in the Hippocampus and Brainstem, indicates regional Aβ associated tissue-edema in cognitively normal elderly subjects. Further studies including clinical populations are necessary to clarify the relevance of our findings for estimating individual risk for age-related neurodegenerative

  2. Personalized mapping of the deep brain with a white matter attenuated inversion recovery (WAIR) sequence at 1.5-tesla: Experience based on a series of 156 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerroug, A; Gabrillargues, J; Coll, G; Vassal, F; Jean, B; Chabert, E; Claise, B; Khalil, T; Sakka, L; Feschet, F; Durif, F; Boyer, L; Coste, J; Lemaire, J-J

    2016-08-01

    Deep brain mapping has been proposed for direct targeting in stereotactic functional surgery, aiming to personalize electrode implantation according to individual MRI anatomy without atlas or statistical template. We report our clinical experience of direct targeting in a series of 156 patients operated on using a dedicated Inversion Recovery Turbo Spin Echo sequence at 1.5-tesla, called White Matter Attenuated Inversion Recovery (WAIR). After manual contouring of all pertinent structures and 3D planning of trajectories, 312 DBS electrodes were implanted. Detailed anatomy of close neighbouring structures, whether gray nuclei or white matter regions, was identified during each planning procedure. We gathered the experience of these 312 deep brain mappings and elaborated consistent procedures of anatomical MRI mapping for pallidal, subthalamic and ventral thalamic regions. We studied the number of times the central track anatomically optimized was selected for implantation of definitive electrodes. WAIR sequence provided high-quality images of most common functional targets, successfully used for pure direct stereotactic targeting: the central track corresponding to the optimized primary anatomical trajectory was chosen for implantation of definitive electrodes in 90.38%. WAIR sequence is anatomically reliable, enabling precise deep brain mapping and direct stereotactic targeting under routine clinical conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Normal Inverse Gaussian Model-Based Image Denoising in the NSCT Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Jia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of image denoising is to retain useful details while removing as much noise as possible to recover an original image from its noisy version. This paper proposes a novel normal inverse Gaussian (NIG model-based method that uses a Bayesian estimator to carry out image denoising in the nonsubsampled contourlet transform (NSCT domain. In the proposed method, the NIG model is first used to describe the distributions of the image transform coefficients of each subband in the NSCT domain. Then, the corresponding threshold function is derived from the model using Bayesian maximum a posteriori probability estimation theory. Finally, optimal linear interpolation thresholding algorithm (OLI-Shrink is employed to guarantee a gentler thresholding effect. The results of comparative experiments conducted indicate that the denoising performance of our proposed method in terms of peak signal-to-noise ratio is superior to that of several state-of-the-art methods, including BLS-GSM, K-SVD, BivShrink, and BM3D. Further, the proposed method achieves structural similarity (SSIM index values that are comparable to those of the block-matching 3D transformation (BM3D method.

  4. Utilization of thermal infrared image for inversion of winter wheat yield and biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wen-Yong; Zhang, Lu-Da; Hu, Zhen-Fang; Shamaila, Z; Zeng, Ai-Jun; Song, Jian-Li; Liu, Ya-Jia; Wolfram, S; Joachim, M; He, Xiong-Kui

    2011-06-01

    The present paper utilizes thermal infrared image for inversion of winter wheat yield and biomass with different technology of irrigation (drip irrigation, sprinkler irrigation, flood irrigation). It is the first time that thermal infrared image is used for predicting the winter wheat yield and biomass. The temperature of crop and background was measured by thermal infrared image. It is necessary to get the crop background separation index (CBSI(L), CBSI(H)), which can be used for distinguishing the crop value from the image. CBSI(L) and CBSI(H) (the temperature when the leaves are wet adequately; the temperature when the stomata of leaf is closed completely) are the threshold values. The temperature of crop ranged from CBSI(L) to CBSI(H). Then the ICWSI was calculated based on relevant theoretical method. The value of stomata leaf has strong negative correlation with ICWSI proving the reliable value of ICWSI. In order to construct the high accuracy simulation model, the samples were divided into two parts. One was used for constructing the simulation model, the other for checking the accuracy of the model. Such result of the model was concluded as: (1) As for the simulation model of soil moisture, the correlation coefficient (R2) is larger than 0.887 6, the average of relative error (Er) ranges from 13.33% to 16.88%; (2) As for the simulation model of winter wheat yield, drip irrigation (0.887 6, 16.89%, -0.12), sprinkler irrigation (0.970 0, 14.85%, - 0.12), flood irrigation (0.969 0, 18.87%, -0.18), with the values of R2, Er and CRM listed in the parentheses followed by the individual term. (3) As for winter wheat biomass, drip irrigation (0.980 0, 13.70%, -0.13), sprinkler irrigation (0.95, 13.15%, -0.14), flood irrigation (0.970 0, 14.48%, -0.13), and the values in the parentheses are demonstrated the same as above. Both the CRM and Er are shown to be very low values, which points to the accuracy and reliability of the model investigated. The accuracy of model

  5. A comparative study of minimum norm inverse methods for MEG imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leahy, R.M.; Mosher, J.C.; Phillips, J.W.

    1996-07-01

    The majority of MEG imaging techniques currently in use fall into the general class of (weighted) minimum norm methods. The minimization of a norm is used as the basis for choosing one from a generally infinite set of solutions that provide an equally good fit to the data. This ambiguity in the solution arises from the inherent non- uniqueness of the continuous inverse problem and is compounded by the imbalance between the relatively small number of measurements and the large number of source voxels. Here we present a unified view of the minimum norm methods and describe how we can use Tikhonov regularization to avoid instabilities in the solutions due to noise. We then compare the performance of regularized versions of three well known linear minimum norm methods with the non-linear iteratively reweighted minimum norm method and a Bayesian approach.

  6. Suppression of tissue harmonics for pulse-inversion contrast imaging using time reversal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couture, Olivier; Aubry, Jean-François; Montaldo, Gabriel; Tanter, Mickael; Fink, Mathias

    2008-10-07

    Pulse-inversion (PI) sequences are sensitive to the nonlinear echoes from microbubbles allowing an improvement in the blood-to-tissue contrast. However, at larger mechanical indices, this contrast is reduced by harmonics produced during nonlinear propagation. A method for tissue harmonics cancellation exploiting time reversal is experimentally implemented using a 128-channel 12-bit emitter receiver. The probe calibration is performed by acquiring the nonlinear echo of a wire in water. These distorted pulses are time-reversed, optimized and used for the PI imaging of a tissue phantom. Compared to normal (straight) pulses, the time-reversed distorted pulses reduced the tissue signal in PI by 11 dB. The second harmonic signals from microbubbles flowing in a wall-less vessel were unaffected by the correction. This technique can thus increase the blood-to-tissue contrast ratio while keeping the pressure and the number of pulses constant.

  7. Spectral-spatial classification combined with diffusion theory based inverse modeling of hyperspectral images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paluchowski, Lukasz A.; Bjorgan, Asgeir; Nordgaard, Hâvard B.; Randeberg, Lise L.

    2016-02-01

    Hyperspectral imagery opens a new perspective for biomedical diagnostics and tissue characterization. High spectral resolution can give insight into optical properties of the skin tissue. However, at the same time the amount of collected data represents a challenge when it comes to decomposition into clusters and extraction of useful diagnostic information. In this study spectral-spatial classification and inverse diffusion modeling were employed to hyperspectral images obtained from a porcine burn model using a hyperspectral push-broom camera. The implemented method takes advantage of spatial and spectral information simultaneously, and provides information about the average optical properties within each cluster. The implemented algorithm allows mapping spectral and spatial heterogeneity of the burn injury as well as dynamic changes of spectral properties within the burn area. The combination of statistical and physics informed tools allowed for initial separation of different burn wounds and further detailed characterization of the injuries in short post-injury time.

  8. An investigation of RSN frequency spectra using ultra-fast generalized inverse imaging (GIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasim eBoyacioglu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available With the advancements in MRI hardware, pulse sequences and reconstruction techniques, many low TR sequences are becoming more and more popular within the fMRI community. In this study, we have investigated the spectral characteristics of resting state networks (RSNs with a newly introduced ultra fast fMRI technique, called Generalized Inverse Imaging (GIN. The high temporal resolution of GIN (TR=50 ms enables to sample cardiac signals without aliasing into a separate frequency band from the BOLD fluctuations. Respiration related signal changes are, on the other hand, removed from the data without the need for external physiological recordings. We have observed that the variance over the subjects is higher than the variance over RSNs.

  9. Suppression of tissue harmonics for pulse-inversion contrast imaging using time reversal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couture, Olivier; Aubry, Jean-Francois; Montaldo, Gabriel; Tanter, Mickael; Fink, Mathias [Laboratoire Ondes et Acoustique, ESPCI, 10 rue Vauquelin, 75005 Paris (France)], E-mail: olicou@gmail.com

    2008-10-07

    Pulse-inversion (PI) sequences are sensitive to the nonlinear echoes from microbubbles allowing an improvement in the blood-to-tissue contrast. However, at larger mechanical indices, this contrast is reduced by harmonics produced during nonlinear propagation. A method for tissue harmonics cancellation exploiting time reversal is experimentally implemented using a 128-channel 12-bit emitter receiver. The probe calibration is performed by acquiring the nonlinear echo of a wire in water. These distorted pulses are time-reversed, optimized and used for the PI imaging of a tissue phantom. Compared to normal (straight) pulses, the time-reversed distorted pulses reduced the tissue signal in PI by 11 dB. The second harmonic signals from microbubbles flowing in a wall-less vessel were unaffected by the correction. This technique can thus increase the blood-to-tissue contrast ratio while keeping the pressure and the number of pulses constant.

  10. Psychological and Cortisol Responses to and Recovery From Exposure to a Body Image Threat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larkin Lamarche

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The majority of body image research has failed to measure what occurs beyond the immediate presentation of a body image threat, or after a body image threat is no longer present. This is particularly true for physiological outcomes. The present study examined psychological and cortisol responses to, and recovery from, a body composition assessment as a social-evaluative body image threat. Women (N = 64 were randomized into either a control or threat group. Participants completed a measure of social physique anxiety and provided a sample of saliva (to assess cortisol at baseline, and immediately following and 20 min following their condition. The threat group reported higher social physique anxiety following the threat in comparison with both baseline levels and recovery levels. Cortisol was higher immediately following the threat in comparison with baseline levels. Findings support the inclusion of a recovery time point in body image research to provide a more complete picture of the psychobiology of body image experiences.

  11. Eddy current imaging. Limits of the born approximation and advantages of an exact solution to the inverse problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamman, E.; Zorgati, R.

    1995-01-01

    Eddy current non-destructive testing is used by EDF to detect flaws affecting conductive objects such as steam generator tubes. With a view to obtaining ever more accurate information on equipment integrity, thereby facilitating diagnosis, studies aimed at using measurements to reconstruct an image of the flaw have been proceeding now for about ten years. In this context, our approach to eddy current imaging is based on inverse problem formalism. The direct problem, involving a mathematical model linking measurements provided by a probe with variables characterizing the defect, is dealt with elsewhere. Using the model results, we study the possibility of inverting it, i.e. of reconstructing an image of the flaw from the measurements. We first give an overview of the different inversion techniques, representative of the state of the art and all based on linearization of the inverse problem by means of the Born approximation. The model error resulting from an excessive Born approximation nevertheless severely limits the quantity of the images which can be obtained. In order to counteract this often critical error and extend the eddy current imaging application field, we have to del with the non-linear inverse problem. A method derived from recent research is proposed and implemented to ensure consistency with the exact model. Based on an 'optimization' type approach and provided with a convergence theorem, the method is highly efficient. (authors). 17 refs., 7 figs., 1 append

  12. Resolution limits of migration and linearized waveform inversion images in a lossy medium

    KAUST Repository

    Schuster, Gerard T.

    2017-03-10

    The vertical-and horizontal-resolution limits Delta x(lossy) and Delta z(lossy) of post-stack migration and linearized waveform inversion images are derived for lossy data in the far-field approximation. Unlike the horizontal resolution limit Delta x proportional to lambda z/L in a lossless medium which linearly worsens in depth z, Delta x(lossy) proportional to z(2)/QL worsens quadratically with depth for a medium with small Q values. Here, Q is the quality factor, lambda is the effective wavelength, L is the recording aperture, and loss in the resolution formulae is accounted for by replacing lambda with z/Q. In contrast, the lossy vertical-resolution limit Delta z(lossy) only worsens linearly in depth compared to Delta z proportional to lambda for a lossless medium. For both the causal and acausal Q models, the resolution limits are linearly proportional to 1/Q for small Q. These theoretical predictions are validated with migration images computed from lossy data.

  13. Inversion of CO and NOx emissions using the adjoint of the IMAGES model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-F. Müller

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We use ground-based observations of CO mixing ratios and vertical column abundances together with tropospheric NO2 columns from the GOME satellite instrument as constraints for improving the global annual emission estimates of CO and NOx for the year 1997. The agreement between concentrations calculated by the global 3-dimensional CTM IMAGES and the observations is optimized using the adjoint modelling technique, which allows to invert for CO and NOx fluxes simultaneously, taking their chemical interactions into account. Our analysis quantifies a total of 39 flux parameters, comprising anthropogenic and biomass burning sources over large continental regions, soil and lightning emissions of NOx, biogenic emissions of CO and non-methane hydrocarbons, as well as the deposition velocities of both CO and NOx. Comparison between observed, prior and optimized CO mixing ratios at NOAA/CMDL sites shows that the inversion performs well at the northern mid- and high latitudes, and that it is less efficient in the Southern Hemisphere, as expected due to the scarsity of measurements over this part of the globe. The inversion, moreover, brings the model much closer to the measured NO2 columns over all regions. Sensitivity tests show that anthropogenic sources exhibit weak sensitivity to changes of the a priori errors associated to the bottom-up inventory, whereas biomass burning sources are subject to a strong variability. Our best estimate for the 1997 global top-down CO source amounts to 2760 Tg CO. Anthropogenic emissions increase by 28%, in agreement with previous inverse modelling studies, suggesting that the present bottom-up inventories underestimate the anthropogenic CO emissions in the Northern Hemisphere. The magnitude of the optimized NOx global source decreases by 14% with respect to the prior, and amounts to 42.1 Tg N, out of which 22.8 Tg N are due to anthropogenic sources. The NOx emissions increase over Tropical regions, whereas they decrease

  14. Detection and Modeling of Temperature Inversion in the Atmosphere Using Modis Images (case Study: Kermanshah)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachar, H.; Mobasheri, M. R.; Abkar, A. A.; Rahim Zadegan, M.

    2015-12-01

    Increase of temperature with height in the troposphere is called temperature inversion. Parameters such as strength and depth are characteristics of temperature inversion. Inversion strength is defined as the temperature difference between the surface and the top of the inversion and the depth of inversion is defined as the height of the inversion from the surface. The common approach in determination of these parameters is the use of Radiosonde where these measurements are too sparse. The main objective of this study is detection and modeling the temperature inversion using MODIS thermal infrared data. There are more than 180 days per year in which the temperature inversion conditions are present in Kermanshah city. Kermanshah weather station was selected as the study area. 90 inversion days was selected from 2007 to 2008 where the sky was clear and the Radiosonde data were available. Brightness temperature for all thermal infrared bands of MODIS was calculated for these days. Brightness temperature difference between any of the thermal infrared bands of MODIS and band 31 was found to be sensitive to strength and depth of temperature inversion. Then correlation coefficients between these pairs and the inversion depth and strength both calculated from Radiosonde were evaluated. The results showed poor linear correlation. This was found to be due to the change of the atmospheric water vapor content and the relatively weak temperature inversion strength and depth occurring in Kermanshah. The polynomial mathematical models and Artificial intelligence algorithms were deployed for detection and modeling the temperature inversion. A model with the lowest terms and highest possible accuracy was obtained. The Model was tested using 20 independent test data. Results indicate that the inversion strength can be estimated with RMSE of 0.84° C and R2 of 0.90. Also inversion depth can be estimated with RMSE of 54.56 m and R2 of 0.86.

  15. Inverse method for effects characterization from ultrasonic b-scan images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faur, M.

    1999-02-01

    In service inspections of French nuclear pressure water reactor vessels are carried out automatically in complete immersion from the inside by means of ultrasonic focused probes working in the pulse echo mode. Concern has been expressed about the capabilities of performing non destructive evaluation of the Outer Surface Defects (OSD), i.e. defects located in the vicinity of the outer surface of the inspected components. OSD are insonified by both a direct field that passes through the inner surface (water/steel) of the component containing the defect and a secondary field reflected from the outer surface. Consequently, the Bscan images, containing the signatures of such defects, are complicated and their interpretation is a difficult task. This work deals with extraction of the maximum available information for characterizing OSD from ultrasonic Bscan images. Our main objectives are to obtain the type of OSD and their geometric parameters by means of two specific inverse methods. The first method is used for the identification of the geometrical parameters of the equivalent planar OSD from segmented Bscan images. Ultrasonic equivalent defect sizing model-based methods may be used to size a defect in a material by obtaining a best-fit simple equivalent shape that matches the ultrasonic observed data. We illustrate the application of such an equivalent sizing OSD method that is based on a simplified direct model. The major drawback of this identification method, as used to date, is that only a part of the useful information contained into original Bscan image, i.e. segmented Bscan image, is used for defect characterization. Moreover, it requires the availability of defect classification information (i.e. if the defect is volumetric or planer, e. g. a crack or a lack of fusion), which, generally, may be as difficult to obtain as the defect parameters themselves. Therefore, we propose a parameter estimation method for extracting complementary information on the defect

  16. Tracking lung tissue motion and expansion/compression with inverse consistent image registration and spirometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, Gary E.; Song, Joo Hyun; Lu, Wei; Naqa, Issam El; Low, Daniel A.

    2007-01-01

    Breathing motion is one of the major limiting factors for reducing dose and irradiation of normal tissue for conventional conformal radiotherapy. This paper describes a relationship between tracking lung motion using spirometry data and image registration of consecutive CT image volumes collected from a multislice CT scanner over multiple breathing periods. Temporal CT sequences from 5 individuals were analyzed in this study. The couch was moved from 11 to 14 different positions to image the entire lung. At each couch position, 15 image volumes were collected over approximately 3 breathing periods. It is assumed that the expansion and contraction of lung tissue can be modeled as an elastic material. Furthermore, it is assumed that the deformation of the lung is small over one-fifth of a breathing period and therefore the motion of the lung can be adequately modeled using a small deformation linear elastic model. The small deformation inverse consistent linear elastic image registration algorithm is therefore well suited for this problem and was used to register consecutive image scans. The pointwise expansion and compression of lung tissue was measured by computing the Jacobian of the transformations used to register the images. The logarithm of the Jacobian was computed so that expansion and compression of the lung were scaled equally. The log-Jacobian was computed at each voxel in the volume to produce a map of the local expansion and compression of the lung during the breathing period. These log-Jacobian images demonstrate that the lung does not expand uniformly during the breathing period, but rather expands and contracts locally at different rates during inhalation and exhalation. The log-Jacobian numbers were averaged over a cross section of the lung to produce an estimate of the average expansion or compression from one time point to the next and compared to the air flow rate measured by spirometry. In four out of five individuals, the average log

  17. Microwave Imaging of Three-Dimensional Targets by Means of an Inexact-Newton-Based Inversion Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Estatico

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A microwave imaging method previously developed for tomographic inspection of dielectric targets is extended to three-dimensional objects. The approach is based on the full vector equations of the electromagnetic inverse scattering problem. The ill-posedness of the problem is faced by the application of an inexact-Newton method. Preliminary reconstruction results are reported.

  18. A prospective comparison study of fast T1 weighted fluid attenuation inversion recovery and T1 weighted turbo spin echo sequence at 3 T in degenerative disease of the cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, K; Bydder, G M

    2014-09-01

    This study compared T1 fluid attenuation inversion recovery (FLAIR) and T1 turbo spin echo (TSE) sequences for evaluation of cervical spine degenerative disease at 3 T. 72 patients (44 males and 28 females; mean age of 39 years; age range, 27-75 years) with suspected cervical spine degenerative disease were prospectively evaluated. Sagittal images of the spine were obtained using T1 FLAIR and T1 TSE sequences. Two experienced neuroradiologists compared the sequences qualitatively and quantitatively. On qualitative evaluation, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) nulling and contrast at cord-CSF, disc-CSF and disc-cord interfaces were significantly higher on fast T1 FLAIR images than on T1 TSE images (p degenerative disease, owing to higher cord-CSF, disc-cord and disc-CSF contrast. However, intrinsic cord contrast is low on T1 FLAIR images. T1 FLAIR is more promising and sensitive than T1 TSE for evaluation of degenerative spondyloarthropathy and may provide a foundation for development of MR protocols for early detection of degenerative and neoplastic diseases.

  19. Recovery of surface mass redistribution from a joint inversion of GPS and GRACE data - A methodology and results from the Australian and other continents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, S. C.; Tangdamrongsub, N.; Razeghi, S. M.

    2017-12-01

    We present a methodology to invert a regional set of vertical displacement data from Global Positioning System (GPS) to determine surface mass redistribution. It is assumed that GPS deformation is a result of the Earth's elastic response to the surface mass load of hydrology, atmosphere, and ocean. The identical assumption is made when global geopotential change data from Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) are used to determine surface mass changes. We developed an algorithm to estimate the spectral information of displacements from "regional" GPS data through regional spherical (Slepian) basis functions and apply the load Love numbers to estimate the mass load. We rigorously examine all systematic errors caused by various truncations (spherical harmonic series and Slepian series) and the smoothing constraint applied to the GPS-only inversion. We demonstrate the technique by processing 16 years of daily vertical motions determined from 114 GPS stations in Australia. The GPS inverted surface mass changes are validated against GRACE data, atmosphere and ocean models, and a land surface model. Seasonal and inter-annual terrestrial mass variations from GPS are in good agreement with GRACE data and the water storage models. The GPS recovery compares better with the water storage model around the smaller coastal basins of Australia than two different GRACE solutions. The sub-monthly mass changes from GPS provide meaningful results agreeing with atmospheric mass changes in central Australia. Finally, we integrate GPS data from different continents with GRACE in the least-square normal equations and solve for the global surface mass changes by jointly inverting GPS and GRACE data. We present the results of surface mass changes from the GPS-only inversion and from the joint GPS-GRACE inversion.

  20. Single image super-resolution based on compressive sensing and improved TV minimization sparse recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishnukumar, S.; Wilscy, M.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a single image Super-Resolution (SR) method based on Compressive Sensing (CS) and Improved Total Variation (TV) Minimization Sparse Recovery. In the CS framework, low-resolution (LR) image is treated as the compressed version of high-resolution (HR) image. Dictionary Training and Sparse Recovery are the two phases of the method. K-Singular Value Decomposition (K-SVD) method is used for dictionary training and the dictionary represents HR image patches in a sparse manner. Here, only the interpolated version of the LR image is used for training purpose and thereby the structural self similarity inherent in the LR image is exploited. In the sparse recovery phase the sparse representation coefficients with respect to the trained dictionary for LR image patches are derived using Improved TV Minimization method. HR image can be reconstructed by the linear combination of the dictionary and the sparse coefficients. The experimental results show that the proposed method gives better results quantitatively as well as qualitatively on both natural and remote sensing images. The reconstructed images have better visual quality since edges and other sharp details are preserved.

  1. Recovery of Background Structures in Nanoscale Helium Ion Microscope Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carasso, Alfred S; Vladár, András E

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses a two step enhancement technique applicable to noisy Helium Ion Microscope images in which background structures are not easily discernible due to a weak signal. The method is based on a preliminary adaptive histogram equalization, followed by 'slow motion' low-exponent Lévy fractional diffusion smoothing. This combined approach is unexpectedly effective, resulting in a companion enhanced image in which background structures are rendered much more visible, and noise is significantly reduced, all with minimal loss of image sharpness. The method also provides useful enhancements of scanning charged-particle microscopy images obtained by composing multiple drift-corrected 'fast scan' frames. The paper includes software routines, written in Interactive Data Language (IDL),(1) that can perform the above image processing tasks.

  2. Iterative Self-Dual Reconstruction on Radar Image Recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Charles; Medeiros, Fatima; Ushizima, Daniela; Bezerra, Francisco; Marques, Regis; Mascarenhas, Nelson

    2010-05-21

    Imaging systems as ultrasound, sonar, laser and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) are subjected to speckle noise during image acquisition. Before analyzing these images, it is often necessary to remove the speckle noise using filters. We combine properties of two mathematical morphology filters with speckle statistics to propose a signal-dependent noise filter to multiplicative noise. We describe a multiscale scheme that preserves sharp edges while it smooths homogeneous areas, by combining local statistics with two mathematical morphology filters: the alternating sequential and the self-dual reconstruction algorithms. The experimental results show that the proposed approach is less sensitive to varying window sizes when applied to simulated and real SAR images in comparison with standard filters.

  3. Shortened Modified Look-Locker Inversion recovery (ShMOLLI for clinical myocardial T1-mapping at 1.5 and 3 T within a 9 heartbeat breathhold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greiser Andreas

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background T1 mapping allows direct in-vivo quantitation of microscopic changes in the myocardium, providing new diagnostic insights into cardiac disease. Existing methods require long breath holds that are demanding for many cardiac patients. In this work we propose and validate a novel, clinically applicable, pulse sequence for myocardial T1-mapping that is compatible with typical limits for end-expiration breath-holding in patients. Materials and methods The Shortened MOdified Look-Locker Inversion recovery (ShMOLLI method uses sequential inversion recovery measurements within a single short breath-hold. Full recovery of the longitudinal magnetisation between sequential inversion pulses is not achieved, but conditional interpretation of samples for reconstruction of T1-maps is used to yield accurate measurements, and this algorithm is implemented directly on the scanner. We performed computer simulations for 100 msIn-vivo myocardial T1-mapping using this method and the previous gold-standard (MOLLI was performed in 10 healthy volunteers at 1.5T and 3T, 4 volunteers with contrast injection at 1.5T, and 4 patients with recent myocardial infarction (MI at 3T. Results We found good agreement between the average ShMOLLI and MOLLI estimates for T1 In-vivo, ShMOLLI measurements required 9.0 ± 1.1 s (MOLLI = 17.6 ± 2.9 s. Average healthy myocardial T1 s by ShMOLLI at 1.5T were 966 ± 48 ms (mean ± SD and 1166 ± 60 ms at 3T. In MI patients, the T1 in unaffected myocardium (1216 ± 42 ms was similar to controls at 3T. Ischemically injured myocardium showed increased T1 = 1432 ± 33 ms (p in-vivo variability within ShMOLLI T1-maps was only 14% (1.5T or 18% (3T higher than the MOLLI maps, but the MOLLI acquisitions were twice longer than ShMOLLI acquisitions. Conclusion ShMOLLI is an efficient method that generates immediate, high-resolution myocardial T1-maps in a short breath-hold with high precision. This technique provides a valuable

  4. Algorithms for image recovery calculation in extended single-shot phase-shifting digital holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Shin-ya; Hirata, Ryo

    2018-02-01

    The single-shot phase-shifting method of image recovery using an inclined reference wave has the advantages of reducing the effects of vibration, being capable of operating in real time, and affording low-cost sensing. In this method, relatively low reference angles compared with that in the conventional method using phase shift between three or four pixels has been required. We propose an extended single-shot phase-shifting technique which uses the multiple-step phase-shifting algorithm and the corresponding multiple pixels which are the same as that of the period of an interference fringe. We have verified the theory underlying this recovery method by means of Fourier spectral analysis and its effectiveness by evaluating the visibility of the image using a high-resolution pattern. Finally, we have demonstrated high-contrast image recovery experimentally using a resolution chart. This method can be used in a variety of applications such as color holographic interferometry.

  5. Algorithms for image recovery calculation in extended single-shot phase-shifting digital holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Shin-ya; Hirata, Ryo

    2018-04-01

    The single-shot phase-shifting method of image recovery using an inclined reference wave has the advantages of reducing the effects of vibration, being capable of operating in real time, and affording low-cost sensing. In this method, relatively low reference angles compared with that in the conventional method using phase shift between three or four pixels has been required. We propose an extended single-shot phase-shifting technique which uses the multiple-step phase-shifting algorithm and the corresponding multiple pixels which are the same as that of the period of an interference fringe. We have verified the theory underlying this recovery method by means of Fourier spectral analysis and its effectiveness by evaluating the visibility of the image using a high-resolution pattern. Finally, we have demonstrated high-contrast image recovery experimentally using a resolution chart. This method can be used in a variety of applications such as color holographic interferometry.

  6. Information recovery in propagation-based imaging with decoherence effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froese, Heinrich; Lötgering, Lars; Wilhein, Thomas

    2017-05-01

    During the past decades the optical imaging community witnessed a rapid emergence of novel imaging modalities such as coherent diffraction imaging (CDI), propagation-based imaging and ptychography. These methods have been demonstrated to recover complex-valued scalar wave fields from redundant data without the need for refractive or diffractive optical elements. This renders these techniques suitable for imaging experiments with EUV and x-ray radiation, where the use of lenses is complicated by fabrication, photon efficiency and cost. However, decoherence effects can have detrimental effects on the reconstruction quality of the numerical algorithms involved. Here we demonstrate propagation-based optical phase retrieval from multiple near-field intensities with decoherence effects such as partially coherent illumination, detector point spread, binning and position uncertainties of the detector. Methods for overcoming these systematic experimental errors - based on the decomposition of the data into mutually incoherent modes - are proposed and numerically tested. We believe that the results presented here open up novel algorithmic methods to accelerate detector readout rates and enable subpixel resolution in propagation-based phase retrieval. Further the techniques are straightforward to be extended to methods such as CDI, ptychography and holography.

  7. Image denoising via collaborative support-agnostic recovery

    KAUST Repository

    Behzad, Muzammil

    2017-06-20

    In this paper, we propose a novel patch-based image denoising algorithm using collaborative support-agnostic sparse reconstruction. In the proposed collaborative scheme, similar patches are assumed to share the same support taps. For sparse reconstruction, the likelihood of a tap being active in a patch is computed and refined through a collaboration process with other similar patches in the similarity group. This provides a very good patch support estimation, hence enhancing the quality of image restoration. Performance comparisons with state-of-the-art algorithms, in terms of PSNR and SSIM, demonstrate the superiority of the proposed algorithm.

  8. Imaging the North American continent using waveform inversion of global and USArray data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, A. J.; Lebedev, S.

    2014-09-01

    The deployment of USArray during the last decade has produced dense sampling of the central part of the North American continent with broadband seismic data. Regional tomography is now mapping the deep structure of the continent in great detail, in particular beneath the western US where USArray initiated. At the scale of the entire continent, however, the resolution of seismic imaging is uneven, much poorer away from the footprint of the array than beneath it. Important questions regarding the deep structure, lateral extent and evolution of the North American Craton, most of it not covered by USArray, thus remain difficult to answer. Here we present a new model of the upper mantle beneath North America constrained by waveform fits of 717 thousand vertical-component, broadband seismograms, of which over 228 thousand are from the Transportable Array component of USArray, a few tens of thousands from other USArray-affiliated stations, and the rest from global networks and arrays. Automated, multimode waveform inversion was used to extract structural information from surface and S waveforms, yielding resolving power from the crust down to the transition zone. Our unprecedentedly large waveform dataset, with highly complementary USArray and global-network subsets within it, produces improved resolution for a variety of features in North American upper mantle, compared to other available models. The internal structure of the North American Craton is resolved in detail. The lithosphere beneath the 1 Ga failed Mid-Continental Rift shows wavespeeds not as high as beneath surrounding cratons; it was probably altered. The sharp northern boundaries of the cratonic lithosphere closely follow the coastlines, with North America's and Greenland's lithospheric roots clearly separate. Sharp velocity gradients in western Canada indicate that the craton boundary at depth closely follows the Rocky Mountain Front at the surface. High velocities between the Great Bear Arc and Beaufort

  9. Imaging subsurface density structure in Luynnier volcanic field, Saudi Arabia, using 3D gravity inversion technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboud, Essam; El-shrief, Adel; Alqahtani, Faisal; Mogren, Saad

    2017-04-01

    On 19 May, 2009, an earthquake of magnitude (M=5.4) shocked the most volcanically active recent basaltic fields, Luynnier volcanic field, northwestern Saudi Arabia. This event was the largest recorded one since long time ago. Government evacuated the surrounding residents around the epicenter for over 3 months away from any future volcanic activity. The seismic event caused damages to buildings in the village around the epicenter and resulted in surface fissure trending in NNW-SSE direction with about 8 km length. Seismologists from Saudi Geological Survey (SGS) worked out on locating the epicenter and the cause of this earthquake. They collected seismic data from Saudi Geological Surveys Station Network as well as installed broadband seismic stations around the region of the earthquake. They finally concluded that the main cause of the M=5.4 event is dike intrusion at depth of about 5 km (not reached to the surface). In the present work, we carried out detailed ground/airborne gravity survey around the surficial fissure to image the subsurface volcanic structure where about 380 gravity stations were recorded covering the main fissure in an area of 600 km2. Gravity data was analyzed using CET edge detection tools and 3D inversion technique. The results revealed that, there is a magma chamber/body beneath the surface at 5-20 km depth and the main reason for the M=5.4 earthquake is tectonic settings of the Red Sea. Additionally, the area is characterized by set of faults trending in NW direction, parallel to the Red Sea, and most of the volcanic cones were located on faults/contacts implying that, they are structurally controlled. The 8-km surficial crack is extended SE underneath the surface.

  10. Music algorithm for imaging of a sound-hard arc in limited-view inverse scattering problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Won-Kwang

    2017-07-01

    MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) algorithm for a non-iterative imaging of sound-hard arc in limited-view inverse scattering problem is considered. In order to discover mathematical structure of MUSIC, we derive a relationship between MUSIC and an infinite series of Bessel functions of integer order. This structure enables us to examine some properties of MUSIC in limited-view problem. Numerical simulations are performed to support the identified structure of MUSIC.

  11. An Analytical Approach for Fast Recovery of the LSI Properties in Magnetic Particle Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Jabbari Asl

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Linearity and shift invariance (LSI characteristics of magnetic particle imaging (MPI are important properties for quantitative medical diagnosis applications. The MPI image equations have been theoretically shown to exhibit LSI; however, in practice, the necessary filtering action removes the first harmonic information, which destroys the LSI characteristics. This lost information can be constant in the x-space reconstruction method. Available recovery algorithms, which are based on signal matching of multiple partial field of views (pFOVs, require much processing time and a priori information at the start of imaging. In this paper, a fast analytical recovery algorithm is proposed to restore the LSI properties of the x-space MPI images, representable as an image of discrete concentrations of magnetic material. The method utilizes the one-dimensional (1D x-space imaging kernel and properties of the image and lost image equations. The approach does not require overlapping of pFOVs, and its complexity depends only on a small-sized system of linear equations; therefore, it can reduce the processing time. Moreover, the algorithm only needs a priori information which can be obtained at one imaging process. Considering different particle distributions, several simulations are conducted, and results of 1D and 2D imaging demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  12. A full vectorial contrast source inversion scheme for three-dimensional acoustic imaging of both compressibility and density profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dongen, Koen W A; Wright, William M D

    2007-03-01

    Imaging the two acoustic medium parameters density and compressibility requires the use of both the acoustic pressure and velocity wave fields, described via integral equations. Imaging is based on solving for the unknown medium parameters using known measured scattered wave fields, and it is difficult to solve this ill-posed inverse problem directly using a conjugate gradient inversion scheme. Here, a contrast source inversion method is used in which the contrast sources, defined via the product of changes in compressibility and density with the pressure and velocity wave fields, respectively, are computed iteratively. After each update of the contrast sources, an update of the medium parameters is obtained. Total variation as multiplicative regularization is used to minimize blurring in the reconstructed contrasts. The method successfully reconstructed three-dimensional contrast profiles based on changes in both density and compressibility, using synthetic data both with and without 50% white noise. The results were compared with imaging based only on the pressure wave field, where speed of sound profiles were solely based on changes in compressibility. It was found that the results improved significantly by using the full vectorial method when changes in speed of sound depended on changes in both compressibility and density.

  13. Persistent body image disturbance following recovery from eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshkevari, Ertimiss; Rieger, Elizabeth; Longo, Matthew R; Haggard, Patrick; Treasure, Janet

    2014-05-01

    Individuals with an eating disorder experience the rubber hand illusion (RHI) significantly more strongly than healthy controls on both perceptual (proprioceptive drift) and subjective (self-report embodiment questionnaire) measures. This heightened sensitivity to visual information about the body, and/or reduced somatosensory information processing about the body, suggest an increased malleability of the bodily self. The aim of the present study was to explore whether this is a state phenomenon or a persisting individual trait that outlasts the period of acute eating disorder. The RHI and self-report measures of eating disorder psychopathology (EDI-3 subscales of Drive for Thinness, Bulimia, Body Dissatisfaction, Interoceptive Deficits, and Emotional Dysregulation; DASS-21; and the Self-Objectification Questionnaire) were administered to 78 individuals with an eating disorder, 28 individuals recovered from an eating disorder, and 61 healthy controls. Proprioceptive drift in recovered individuals was intermediate between the acutely ill and HC groups. Subjective report of the strength of the illusion in recovered individuals was similar to acutely ill individuals. These results suggest that increased malleability of the bodily self persists, at least partially, following recovery and may be a trait phenomenon in people with eating disorders. Those with a lifetime history of an eating disorder may have heightened sensitivity to visual information about the body and reduced somatosensory information processing of the body. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Buried Man-made Structure Imaging using 2-D Resistivity Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson Bery, Andy; Nordiana, M. M.; El Hidayah Ismail, Noer; Jinmin, M.; Nur Amalina, M. K. A.

    2018-04-01

    This study is carried out with the objective to determine the suitable resistivity inversion method for buried man-made structure (bunker). This study was carried out with two stages. The first stage is suitable array determination using 2-D computerized modeling method. One suitable array is used for the infield resistivity survey to determine the dimension and location of the target. The 2-D resistivity inversion results showed that robust inversion method is suitable to resolve the top and bottom part of the buried bunker as target. In addition, the dimension of the buried bunker is successfully determined with height of 7 m and length of 20 m. The location of this target is located at -10 m until 10 m of the infield resistivity survey line. The 2-D resistivity inversion results obtained in this study showed that the parameters selection is important in order to give the optimum results. These parameters are array type, survey geometry and inversion method used in data processing.

  15. Submucous Myoma Induces Uterine Inversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Li Chen

    2006-06-01

    Conclusion: Nonpuerperal inversion of the uterus is rarely encountered by gynecologists. Diagnosis of uterine inversion is often not easy and imaging studies might be helpful. Surgical treatment is the method of choice in nonpuerperal uterine inversion.

  16. A source-channel coding approach to digital image protection and self-recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarreshtedari, Saeed; Akhaee, Mohammad Ali

    2015-07-01

    Watermarking algorithms have been widely applied to the field of image forensics recently. One of these very forensic applications is the protection of images against tampering. For this purpose, we need to design a watermarking algorithm fulfilling two purposes in case of image tampering: 1) detecting the tampered area of the received image and 2) recovering the lost information in the tampered zones. State-of-the-art techniques accomplish these tasks using watermarks consisting of check bits and reference bits. Check bits are used for tampering detection, whereas reference bits carry information about the whole image. The problem of recovering the lost reference bits still stands. This paper is aimed at showing that having the tampering location known, image tampering can be modeled and dealt with as an erasure error. Therefore, an appropriate design of channel code can protect the reference bits against tampering. In the present proposed method, the total watermark bit-budget is dedicated to three groups: 1) source encoder output bits; 2) channel code parity bits; and 3) check bits. In watermark embedding phase, the original image is source coded and the output bit stream is protected using appropriate channel encoder. For image recovery, erasure locations detected by check bits help channel erasure decoder to retrieve the original source encoded image. Experimental results show that our proposed scheme significantly outperforms recent techniques in terms of image quality for both watermarked and recovered image. The watermarked image quality gain is achieved through spending less bit-budget on watermark, while image recovery quality is considerably improved as a consequence of consistent performance of designed source and channel codes.

  17. Photonics-based broadband radar for high-resolution and real-time inverse synthetic aperture imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fangzheng; Guo, Qingshui; Wang, Ziqian; Zhou, Pei; Zhang, Guoqiang; Sun, Jun; Pan, Shilong

    2017-07-10

    A photonics-based radar with generation and de-chirp processing of broadband linear frequency modulated continuous-wave (LFMCW) signal in optical domain is proposed for high-resolution and real-time inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging. In the proposed system, a broadband LFMCW signal is generated by a photonic frequency quadrupler based on a single integrated electro-optical modulator, and the echoes reflected from the targets are de-chirped to a low frequency signal by a microwave photonic frequency mixer. The proposed radar can operate at a high frequency with a large bandwidth, and thus achieve an ultra-high range resolution for ISAR imaging. Thanks to the wideband photonic de-chirp technique, the radar receiver could apply low-speed analog-to-digital conversion and mature digital signal processing, which makes real-time ISAR imaging possible. A K-band photonics-based radar with an instantaneous bandwidth of 8 GHz (18-26 GHz) is established and its performance for ISAR imaging is experimentally investigated. Results show that a recorded two-dimensional imaging resolution of ~2 cm × ~2 cm is achieved with a sampling rate of 100 MSa/s in the receiver. Besides, fast ISAR imaging with 100 frames per second is verified. The proposed radar is an effective solution to overcome the limitations on operation bandwidth and processing speed of current radar imaging technologies, which may enable applications where high-resolution and real-time radar imaging is required.

  18. Three-dimensional imaging of buried objects in very lossy earth by inversion of VETEM data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, T.J.; Aydiner, A.A.; Chew, W.C.; Wright, D.L.; Smith, D.V.

    2003-01-01

    The very early time electromagnetic system (VETEM) is an efficient tool for the detection of buried objects in very lossy earth, which allows a deeper penetration depth compared to the ground-penetrating radar. In this paper, the inversion of VETEM data is investigated using three-dimensional (3-D) inverse scattering techniques, where multiple frequencies are applied in the frequency range from 0-5 MHz. For small and moderately sized problems, the Born approximation and/or the Born iterative method have been used with the aid of the singular value decomposition and/or the conjugate gradient method in solving the linearized integral equations. For large-scale problems, a localized 3-D inversion method based on the Born approximation has been proposed for the inversion of VETEM data over a large measurement domain. Ways to process and to calibrate the experimental VETEM data are discussed to capture the real physics of buried objects. Reconstruction examples using synthesized VETEM data and real-world VETEM data are given to test the validity and efficiency of the proposed approach.

  19. Inversion of quasi-3D DC resistivity imaging data using artificial ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    efficient. The number of nodes, hidden layers, and efficient values for learning rate and momentum coefficient have been studied. Although a significant correlation between results of the neural network and the conventional robust inversion technique was found, the ANN results show more details of the subsurface structure ...

  20. Nonlinear Microwave Imaging for Breast-Cancer Screening Using Gauss–Newton's Method and the CGLS Inversion Algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubæk, Tonny; Meaney, P. M.; Meincke, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Breast-cancer screening using microwave imaging is emerging as a new promising technique as a supplement to X-ray mammography. To create tomographic images from microwave measurements, it is necessary to solve a nonlinear inversion problem, for which an algorithm based on the iterative Gauss-Newton...... method has been developed at Dartmouth College. This algorithm determines the update values at each iteration by solving the set of normal equations of the problem using the Tikhonov algorithm. In this paper, a new algorithm for determining the iteration update values in the Gauss-Newton algorithm...... algorithm is compared to the Gauss-Newton algorithm with Tikhonov regularization and is shown to reconstruct images of similar quality using fewer iterations....

  1. Lung region extraction based on the model information and the inversed MIP method by using chest CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Toshihiro; Miguchi, Ryosuke; Okumura, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Shinji; Matsumoto, Mitsuomi; Tateno, Yukio; Iinuma, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Toru.

    1997-01-01

    We developed a lung region extraction method based on the model information and the inversed MIP method in the Lung Cancer Screening CT (LSCT). Original model is composed of typical 3-D lung contour lines, a body axis, an apical point, and a convex hull. First, the body axis. the apical point, and the convex hull are automatically extracted from the input image Next, the model is properly transformed to fit to those of input image by the affine transformation. Using the same affine transformation coefficients, typical lung contour lines are also transferred, which correspond to rough contour lines of input image. Experimental results applied for 68 samples showed this method quite promising. (author)

  2. Effect of a novel histamine subtype-3 receptor inverse agonist and modafinil on EEG power spectra during sleep deprivation and recovery sleep in male volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Lynette M; Iannone, Robert; Palcza, John; Renger, John J; Calder, Nicole; Cerchio, Kristine; Gottesdiener, Keith; Hargreaves, Richard; Murphy, M Gail; Boyle, Julia; Dijk, Derk-Jan

    2011-06-01

    Histamine and dopamine contribute to the maintenance of wakefulness. This study aims to conduct an exploratory analysis of the effects of 10 and 50 mg of MK-0249, a novel histamine subtype-3 receptor inverse agonist, and 200 mg of modafinil, a presumed dopaminergic compound, on EEG power spectra during sleep deprivation and subsequent recovery sleep. A total of 25 healthy men were recruited to a double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over design. EEG power spectra, an electrophysiological marker of changes in sleepiness and vigilance, were obtained at the beginning of wake maintenance tests at two-hourly intervals throughout a night and day of sleep deprivation, which is an established model of excessive sleepiness. After placebo, sleep deprivation was associated with enhancements in delta and theta and reductions in alpha and beta activity. Following dosing at 02:00 h, MK-0249 and modafinil reduced delta and theta activity and enhanced alpha and beta activity, compared to placebo. During recovery sleep initiated at 21:00 h, latency to sleep onset and number of awakenings were not different from placebo for any of the active treatments. Wake after sleep onset and stage 1% was increased and total sleep time, SWS% and REM% were reduced after both doses of MK-0249. Compared to placebo, MK-0249, the 50-mg dose in particular, reduced activity in some delta and theta/alpha frequencies and enhanced beta activity during NREM sleep and REM sleep. After modafinil, no changes were observed for power spectra during sleep. Both MK-0249 and modafinil exert effects on the EEG which are consistent with wake promotion.

  3. Real-Time Inverse Optimal Neural Control for Image Based Visual Servoing with Nonholonomic Mobile Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos López-Franco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an inverse optimal neural controller for a nonholonomic mobile robot with parameter uncertainties and unknown external disturbances. The neural controller is based on a discrete-time recurrent high order neural network (RHONN trained with an extended Kalman filter. The reference velocities for the neural controller are obtained with a visual sensor. The effectiveness of the proposed approach is tested by simulations and real-time experiments.

  4. Combination of diffusion tensor and functional magnetic resonance imaging during recovery from the vegetative state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández-Espejo Davinia

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rate of recovery from the vegetative state (VS is low. Currently, little is known of the mechanisms and cerebral changes that accompany those relatively rare cases of good recovery. Here, we combined functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI to study the evolution of one VS patient at one month post-ictus and again twelve months later when he had recovered consciousness. Methods fMRI was used to investigate cortical responses to passive language stimulation as well as task-induced deactivations related to the default-mode network. DTI was used to assess the integrity of the global white matter and the arcuate fasciculus. We also performed a neuropsychological assessment at the time of the second MRI examination in order to characterize the profile of cognitive deficits. Results fMRI analysis revealed anatomically appropriate activation to speech in both the first and the second scans but a reduced pattern of task-induced deactivations in the first scan. In the second scan, following the recovery of consciousness, this pattern became more similar to that classically described for the default-mode network. DTI analysis revealed relative preservation of the arcuate fasciculus and of the global normal-appearing white matter at both time points. The neuropsychological assessment revealed recovery of receptive linguistic functioning by 12-months post-ictus. Conclusions These results suggest that the combination of different structural and functional imaging modalities may provide a powerful means for assessing the mechanisms involved in the recovery from the VS.

  5. Entropy, Information Theory, Information Geometry and Bayesian Inference in Data, Signal and Image Processing and Inverse Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mohammad-Djafari

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The main content of this review article is first to review the main inference tools using Bayes rule, the maximum entropy principle (MEP, information theory, relative entropy and the Kullback–Leibler (KL divergence, Fisher information and its corresponding geometries. For each of these tools, the precise context of their use is described. The second part of the paper is focused on the ways these tools have been used in data, signal and image processing and in the inverse problems, which arise in different physical sciences and engineering applications. A few examples of the applications are described: entropy in independent components analysis (ICA and in blind source separation, Fisher information in data model selection, different maximum entropy-based methods in time series spectral estimation and in linear inverse problems and, finally, the Bayesian inference for general inverse problems. Some original materials concerning the approximate Bayesian computation (ABC and, in particular, the variational Bayesian approximation (VBA methods are also presented. VBA is used for proposing an alternative Bayesian computational tool to the classical Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC methods. We will also see that VBA englobes joint maximum a posteriori (MAP, as well as the different expectation-maximization (EM algorithms as particular cases.

  6. Morphology enabled dipole inversion (MEDI) from a single-angle acquisition: comparison with COSMOS in human brain imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tian; Liu, Jing; de Rochefort, Ludovic; Spincemaille, Pascal; Khalidov, Ildar; Ledoux, James Robert; Wang, Yi

    2011-09-01

    Magnetic susceptibility varies among brain structures and provides insights into the chemical and molecular composition of brain tissues. However, the determination of an arbitrary susceptibility distribution from the measured MR signal phase is a challenging, ill-conditioned inverse problem. Although a previous method named calculation of susceptibility through multiple orientation sampling (COSMOS) has solved this inverse problem both theoretically and experimentally using multiple angle acquisitions, it is often impractical to carry out on human subjects. Recently, the feasibility of calculating the brain susceptibility distribution from a single-angle acquisition was demonstrated using morphology enabled dipole inversion (MEDI). In this study, we further improved the original MEDI method by sparsifying the edges in the quantitative susceptibility map that do not have a corresponding edge in the magnitude image. Quantitative susceptibility maps generated by the improved MEDI were compared qualitatively and quantitatively with those generated by calculation of susceptibility through multiple orientation sampling. The results show a high degree of agreement between MEDI and calculation of susceptibility through multiple orientation sampling, and the practicality of MEDI allows many potential clinical applications. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Bilateral mesial temporal sclerosis: MRI with high-resolution fast spin-echo and fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oppenheim, C.; Dormont, D.; Lehericy, S.; Marsault, C.; Hasboun, D.; Bazin, B.; Samson, S.; Baulac, M.

    1999-01-01

    We report a retrospective analysis of MRI in 206 patients with intractable seizures and describe the findings in bilateral mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) on fast spin-echo (FSE) and fast fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (fFLAIR) sequences. Criteria for MTS were atrophy, signal change and loss of the digitations of the head of the hippocampus. In patients with bilateral MRI signs of MTS, correlation with clinical electro, volumetric MRI data and neuropsychological tests, when available, was performed. Bilateral MTS was observed in seven patients. Bilateral loss of the digitations and signal change of fFLAIR was seen in all seven. In three, bilateral atrophy was obvious. In two patients, mild bilateral atrophy was observed and in two others, the hippocampi were: asymmetrical, with obvious atrophy on only one side. Volumetric data confirmed bilateral symmetrical atrophy in five patients, and volumes were at the lowest of the normal range in other two. The EEG showed temporal abnormalities in all patients, unilateral in five and bilateral in two. All patients had memory impairment and neuropsychological data confirmed visual and verbal memory deficits; two patients failed the Wada test on both sides. High-resolution T2-weighted FSE and fFLAIR sequences allow diagnosis of bilateral MTS, which has important therapeutic and prognostic implications. (orig.)

  8. Background Temperature Images of Mesoscale Ocean Features from Laplace and Laplace-Fourier Domain Seismic Waveform Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacic, T. M.; Jun, H.; Shin, C.; Rosado, H.

    2016-02-01

    2-D temperature images of the ocean with resolution within a few tens of meters in distance and depth can be recovered from conventional marine multichannel seismic (MCS; low frequency acoustic) data via full waveform inversion (FWI), as demonstrated by several research groups in recent years. A primary limitation with FWI is that the more computationally efficient local inversion methods require an accurate estimate of the background sound speed in the material as a starting point to avoid converging to a local, rather than global, solution. In the ocean, expendable instruments are often used to obtain 1-D temperature and sound speed profiles; in typical MCS data collection, however, expendables are deployed just once per day, resulting in only one hydrographic profile every few hundred kilometers. In addition, the band-limited nature of seismic data, which typically lacks reliable frequencies below 5 Hz, makes it inherently challenging to extract the long wavelength sound speed directly from seismic data. Laplace domain inversion (LDI) developed by Changsoo Shin and colleagues requires only a simple starting model to produce smooth background sound speed models without requiring prior information about the medium. It works by transforming input data to the Laplace domain and then examining the zero frequency component of the damped wavefield to extract a smooth sound speed model. Laplace-Fourier domain inversion extends the technique to include additional frequencies below 5 Hz. This ability to use frequencies below those effectively propagated by the seismic source is what enables LDI to produce the smooth background trend from the data. We applied LDI to five synthetic data sets based on simplified models of oceanographic features and recovered smoothed versions of our synthetic models, demonstrating the viability of this method for creating sound speed profiles suitable for use as starting models for other FWI methods that produce more detailed models.

  9. Nonlinear 1D and 2D waveform inversions of SS precursors and their applications in mantle seismic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokht, R.; Gu, Y. J.; Sacchi, M. D.

    2016-12-01

    Seismic velocities and the topography of mantle discontinuities are crucial for the understanding of mantle structure, dynamics and mineralogy. While these two observables are closely linked, the vast majority of high-resolution seismic images are retrieved under the assumption of horizontally stratified mantle interfaces. This conventional correction-based process could lead to considerable errors due to the inherent trade-off between velocity and discontinuity depth. In this study, we introduce a nonlinear joint waveform inversion method that simultaneously recovers discontinuity depths and seismic velocities using the waveforms of SS precursors. Our target region is the upper mantle and transition zone beneath Northeast Asia. In this region, the inversion outcomes clearly delineate a westward dipping high-velocity structure in association with the subducting Pacific plate. Above the flat part of the slab west of the Japan sea, our results show a shear wave velocity reduction of 1.5% in the upper mantle and 10-15 km depression of the 410 km discontinuity beneath the Changbaishan volcanic field. We also identify the maximum correlation between shear velocity and transition zone thickness at an approximate slab dip of 30 degrees, which is consistent with previously reported values in this region.To validate the results of the 1D waveform inversion of SS precursors, we discretize the mantle beneath the study region and conduct a 2D waveform tomographic survey using the same nonlinear approach. The problem is simplified by adopting the discontinuity depths from the 1D inversion and solving only for perturbations in shear velocities. The resulting models obtained from the 1D and 2D approaches are self-consistent. Low-velocities beneath the Changbai intraplate volcano likely persist to a depth of 500 km. Collectively, our seismic observations suggest that the active volcanoes in eastern China may be fueled by a hot thermal anomaly originating from the mantle transition

  10. Determination of Dynamics of Plant Plasma Membrane Proteins with Fluorescence Recovery and Raster Image Correlation Spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Laňková, Martina; Humpolíčková, Jana; Vosolsobě, S.; Cit, Zdeněk; Lacek, Jozef; Čovan, Martin; Čovanová, Milada; Hof, Martin; Petrášek, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 2 (2016), s. 290-299 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/11/2476; GA ČR(CZ) GPP501/12/P951 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : raster image correlation spectroscopy * fluorescence recovery after photobleaching * auxin influx Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology; CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry (UFCH-W) Impact factor: 1.891, year: 2016

  11. Imaging of the Volcanic Island of Basse-Terre by Joint Inversion of Surface Wave, Travel Time and Gravimetric Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnoud, A.; Coutant, O.; Bouligand, C.

    2016-12-01

    We aim at jointly inverting surface wave dispersion curves, earthquake travel times and gravimetric data to image the 3D structure of the volcanic island of Basse-Terre in Guadeloupe (Lesser Antilles). Imaging the 3D structure of this island is challenging, in particular due to the rough topography, the difficult access associated with the dense vegetation and the high level of seismic noise associated with tropical climate. The joint inversion of different types of data allows to derive a model compatible with all datasets, improving the resolution of the resulting model, due to the intrinsic sensitivities of the methods and to the different data coverages. Surface wave dispersion curves were obtained from ambient noise cross-correlations and provide seismic velocities with a good resolution in the upper 4 to 6 km. Travel times from the Lesser Antilles earthquake catalogue (CDSA/IPGP, Massin et al. 2013, Massin et al. 2014) are also included to improve the resolution at depth. Five datasets of terrestrial gravimetric data covering the whole island are available (Coron et al. 1975, Barthes et al. 1984, Gunawan 2005, Matthieu et al. 2011, Barnoud et al. 2016), constraining mostly the shallow lateral density variations. However coupling such datasets is not straightforward as it requires defining a coupling, a discretization and an inversion scheme adapted to the three methods. Our problem is coupled via the surface wave data and a P-wave velocity/density relationship (Carlson & Raskin 1984). We regularize the inverse problem using a Bayesian formalism (Tarantola & Valette 1982) and we discuss the advantages and limitations of two approaches to model the velocities of the subsurface: 1) a grid of nodes regularly spaced and 2) a Lagrangian interpolation on Gauss-Chebychev colocation nodes, equivalent to the use of a base of Chebychev polynomials (Boyd 2001). This work leads to the first 3D seismic velocity model of the island of Basse-Terre and therefore constitute a

  12. Rotation Estimation for Wide-Angle Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To present focused ISAR imaging results in the homogenous range and cross-range domain, an integrated scheme is proposed to estimate both the targets equivalent rotational velocity (RV and rotational center (RC. The RV estimation is improved by radial projection combined with keystone processing, and then the RC is estimated through image entropy minimization. Finally, delicate imaging results may be obtained for wide-angle scenarios. Experiment results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  13. Approximate inverse for the common offset acquisition geometry in 2D seismic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grathwohl, Christine; Kunstmann, Peer; Quinto, Eric Todd; Rieder, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    We explore how the concept of approximate inverse can be used and implemented to recover singularities in the sound speed from common offset measurements in two space dimensions. Numerical experiments demonstrate the performance of the method. We gratefully acknowledge financial support by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) through CRC 1173. Quinto additionally thanks the Otto Mønsteds Fond and U.S. National Science Foundation (under grants DMS 1311558 and DMS 1712207) for their support. He thanks colleagues at DTU and KIT for their warm hospitality while this research was being done.

  14. Resolution-recovery-embedded image reconstruction for a high-resolution animal SPECT system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeraatkar, Navid; Sajedi, Salar; Farahani, Mohammad Hossein; Arabi, Hossein; Sarkar, Saeed; Ghafarian, Pardis; Rahmim, Arman; Ay, Mohammad Reza

    2014-11-01

    The small-animal High-Resolution SPECT (HiReSPECT) is a dedicated dual-head gamma camera recently designed and developed in our laboratory for imaging of murine models. Each detector is composed of an array of 1.2 × 1.2 mm(2) (pitch) pixelated CsI(Na) crystals. Two position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (H8500) are coupled to each head's crystal. In this paper, we report on a resolution-recovery-embedded image reconstruction code applicable to the system and present the experimental results achieved using different phantoms and mouse scans. Collimator-detector response functions (CDRFs) were measured via a pixel-driven method using capillary sources at finite distances from the head within the field of view (FOV). CDRFs were then fitted by independent Gaussian functions. Thereafter, linear interpolations were applied to the standard deviation (σ) values of the fitted Gaussians, yielding a continuous map of CDRF at varying distances from the head. A rotation-based maximum-likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) method was used for reconstruction. A fast rotation algorithm was developed to rotate the image matrix according to the desired angle by means of pre-generated rotation maps. The experiments demonstrated improved resolution utilizing our resolution-recovery-embedded image reconstruction. While the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) radial and tangential resolution measurements of the system were over 2 mm in nearly all positions within the FOV without resolution recovery, reaching around 2.5 mm in some locations, they fell below 1.8 mm everywhere within the FOV using the resolution-recovery algorithm. The noise performance of the system was also acceptable; the standard deviation of the average counts per voxel in the reconstructed images was 6.6% and 8.3% without and with resolution recovery, respectively. Copyright © 2014 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Cerebral Hemodynamic and White Matter Changes of Type 2 Diabetes Revealed by Multi-TI Arterial Spin Labeling and Double Inversion Recovery Sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yelong Shen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes has been reported to affect the microvasculature and lead to cerebral small vessel disease (SVD. Past studies using arterial spin labeling (ASL at single post-labeling delay reported reduced cerebral blood flow (CBF in patients with type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this study was to characterize cerebral hemodynamic changes of type 2 diabetes using a multi-inversion-time 3D GRASE pulsed ASL (PASL sequence to simultaneously measure CBF and bolus arrival time (BAT. Thirty-six patients with type 2 diabetes (43–71 years, 17 male and 36 gender- and age-matched control subjects underwent MRI scans at 3 T. Mean CBF/BAT values were computed for gray and white matter (GM and WM of each subject, while a voxel-wise analysis was performed for comparison of regional CBF and BAT between the two groups. In addition, white matter hyperintensities (WMHs were detected by a double inversion recovery (DIR sequence with relatively high sensitivity and spatial resolution. Mean CBF of the WM, but not GM, of the diabetes group was significantly lower than that of the control group (p < 0.0001. Regional CBF decreases were detected in the left middle occipital gyrus (p = 0.0075, but failed to reach significance after correction of partial volume effects. BAT increases were observed in the right calcarine fissure (p < 0.0001, left middle occipital gyrus (p < 0.0001, and right middle occipital gyrus (p = 0.0011. Within the group of diabetic patients, BAT in the right middle occipital gyrus was positively correlated with the disease duration (r = 0.501, p = 0.002, BAT in the left middle occipital gyrus was negatively correlated with the binocular visual acuity (r = −0.408, p = 0.014. Diabetic patients also had more WMHs than the control group (p = 0.0039. Significant differences in CBF, BAT, and more WMHs were observed in patients with diabetes, which may be related to impaired vision and risk of SVD of type 2 diabetes.

  16. The Exploration, Discovery, Recovery, and Preservation of Endangered Electronic Scientific Records, the Lunar Orbiter Image Recovery Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingo, D. R.; Harper, M.

    2017-12-01

    In 1966 and 1967 NASA sent five photo reconnaissance satellites to the Moon to scout out sites for the first Apollo landings. This was the first mission in human history to extensively map the Moon to one meter resolution. The Lunar Orbiter spacecraft obtained photographs via 70 millimeter film in high resolution (one meter), and medium resolution (7-8) meter. Each mission took approximately 200 medium and high resolution photographs. These were processed in an on board film laboratory and then scanned via a 6.5 micron light beam.. These images were then transmitted to the Earth as analog waveforms double modulated as a vestigial sideband (VSB) and Frequency Modulation With Feedback (FMFB). The spacecraft transmissions were received at NASA's Deep Space Network at Goldstone (DSS-12), Madrid (DSS-61) and Woomera (DSS-41). The signals received were shifted to a 10 MHz intermediate frequency spectrum which was then written to 2"analog instrumentation tape drives (Ampex-FR-900's). In parallel the signals were demodulated and displayed on a kinescope, which then was photographed using a 35mm camera, and the 35mm film was then rephotographed, processed, and printed for initial analysis by the landing site selection team. The magnetic tape based analog sigals preserved the higher dynamic range of the spacecraft 70mm film, and this was then digitized utilizing digitizer and fed to a Univac 1170 computer for analysis of rock height, slope angles, and geologic context. After the Apollo missions these tapes were largely forgotten. In 2007, retired NASA archivist Nancy Evans, who had saved the last surviving Ampex FR-900's donated the drives to the Lunar Orbiter Image Recovery Project. The project obtained the 1474 hours of original tapes from NASA JPL, and at NASA Ames refurbished the drives. Additionally, the demodulator system was recreated from archived documentation using modern techniques. The project digitized the 1474 tapes, processed the 20 terabyes of raw data. The

  17. Authentication and recovery of medical diagnostic image using dual reversible digital watermarking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiaohong; Chen, Zhigang; Zeng, Feng; Zhang, Yaoping; Mao, Yimin

    2013-03-01

    This paper proposes a new region-based tampering detection and recovering method that utilizes both reversible digital watermarking and quad-tree decomposition for medical diagnostic image's authentication. Firstly, the quad-tree decomposition is used to divide the original image into blocks with high homogeneity, and then we computer pixels' linear interpolation as each block's recovery feature. Secondly, these recovery features as the first layer watermarking information is embedded by using simple invertible integer transformation. In order to enhance the proposed method's security, the logistic chaotic map is exploited to choose each block's reference pixel. The second layer watermark comprises by the quad-tree information and essential parameters for extraction are embedded by LSB replacement. In the authentication phase, the embedded watermark is extracted and the source image is recovered, and the similar linear interpolation technique is utilized to get each block's feature. Therefore, the tampering detection and localization can be achieved through comparing the extracted feature with the recomputed one, and the extracted feature can be used to recover those tampered regions with high similarity to their original state. Experimental results show that, compared with previous similar existing scheme, the proposed method not only achieves high embedding capacity and good visual quality of marked and restored image, but also has more accuracy for tampering detection.

  18. Monitoring and evaluating recovery from natural disasters using remote sensing - towards creating guidelines on the use of satellite images in the context of disaster recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, K.; Brown, D.; Spence, R.; Chenvidyakarn, T.; Adams, B.; Bevington, J.; Platt, S.; Chuenpagdee, R.; Juntarashote, K.; Khan, A.

    2009-04-01

    The use of high-resolution optical satellite images is being investigated for evaluating and monitoring recovery after natural disasters. Funded by EPSRC, UK, the aim of the RECOVERY project is to develop indicators of recovery that can exploit the wealth of data now available, including those from satellite imagery, internet-based statistics and advanced field survey techniques. The final output will be a set of guidelines that suggests how remote sensing can be used to help monitor and evaluate the recovery process after natural disasters. The final guideline that will be produced at the end of the two year project, which started in February 2008, will be freely available to aid agencies and anyone that is interested. Currently there is no agreed standard approach for evaluating the effectiveness of recovery aid, although international frameworks such as PDNA (Post-Disaster Needs Assessment, United Nations Development Program, European Commission and World Bank) is currently being developed, and TRIAMS (Tsunami Recovery and Impact Assessment and Monitoring System, by UNDP and WHO) is being implemented to monitor the recovery from the Indian Ocean Tsunami. The RECOVERY project consists of three phases. Phase 1 was completed by September 2008 and focused on user needs survey, developing the recovery indicators and satellite image data identification/acquisition. The user needs survey was conducted to identify whether there were any indicators that the aid community would like to see prioritised. The survey result suggested that most indicators are equally important. Based on this result and also referring to the TRIAMS framework, a comprehensive list of indicators were developed which belong to six large categories, i.e. housing, infrastructure, services, livelihood, environment, social/security, risk reduction. For the RECOVERY project, two case study sites have been identified, i.e. the village of Baan Nam Khem on the west coast of Thailand, which was heavily

  19. Sparse recovery of undersampled intensity patterns for coherent diffraction imaging at high X-ray energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddali, S; Calvo-Almazan, I; Almer, J; Kenesei, P; Park, J-S; Harder, R; Nashed, Y; Hruszkewycz, S O

    2018-03-21

    Coherent X-ray photons with energies higher than 50 keV offer new possibilities for imaging nanoscale lattice distortions in bulk crystalline materials using Bragg peak phase retrieval methods. However, the compression of reciprocal space at high energies typically results in poorly resolved fringes on an area detector, rendering the diffraction data unsuitable for the three-dimensional reconstruction of compact crystals. To address this problem, we propose a method by which to recover fine fringe detail in the scattered intensity. This recovery is achieved in two steps: multiple undersampled measurements are made by in-plane sub-pixel motion of the area detector, then this data set is passed to a sparsity-based numerical solver that recovers fringe detail suitable for standard Bragg coherent diffraction imaging (BCDI) reconstruction methods of compact single crystals. The key insight of this paper is that sparsity in a BCDI data set can be enforced by recognising that the signal in the detector, though poorly resolved, is band-limited. This requires fewer in-plane detector translations for complete signal recovery, while adhering to information theory limits. We use simulated BCDI data sets to demonstrate the approach, outline our sparse recovery strategy, and comment on future opportunities.

  20. Improving Atomic Force Microscopy Imaging by a Direct Inverse Asymmetric PI Hysteresis Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Wang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A modified Prandtl–Ishlinskii (PI model, referred to as a direct inverse asymmetric PI (DIAPI model in this paper, was implemented to reduce the displacement error between a predicted model and the actual trajectory of a piezoelectric actuator which is commonly found in AFM systems. Due to the nonlinearity of the piezoelectric actuator, the standard symmetric PI model cannot precisely describe the asymmetric motion of the actuator. In order to improve the accuracy of AFM scans, two series of slope parameters were introduced in the PI model to describe both the voltage-increase-loop (trace and voltage-decrease-loop (retrace. A feedforward controller based on the DIAPI model was implemented to compensate hysteresis. Performance of the DIAPI model and the feedforward controller were validated by scanning micro-lenses and standard silicon grating using a custom-built AFM.

  1. Improving atomic force microscopy imaging by a direct inverse asymmetric PI hysteresis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Yu, Peng; Wang, Feifei; Chan, Ho-Yin; Zhou, Lei; Dong, Zaili; Liu, Lianqing; Li, Wen Jung

    2015-02-03

    A modified Prandtl-Ishlinskii (PI) model, referred to as a direct inverse asymmetric PI (DIAPI) model in this paper, was implemented to reduce the displacement error between a predicted model and the actual trajectory of a piezoelectric actuator which is commonly found in AFM systems. Due to the nonlinearity of the piezoelectric actuator, the standard symmetric PI model cannot precisely describe the asymmetric motion of the actuator. In order to improve the accuracy of AFM scans, two series of slope parameters were introduced in the PI model to describe both the voltage-increase-loop (trace) and voltage-decrease-loop (retrace). A feedforward controller based on the DIAPI model was implemented to compensate hysteresis. Performance of the DIAPI model and the feedforward controller were validated by scanning micro-lenses and standard silicon grating using a custom-built AFM.

  2. Elastic Velocity Updating through Image-Domain Tomographic Inversion of Passive Seismic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witten, B.; Shragge, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic monitoring at injection sites (e.g., CO2sequestration, waste water disposal, hydraulic fracturing) has become an increasingly important tool for hazard identification and avoidance. The information obtained from this data is often limited to seismic event properties (e.g., location, approximate time, moment tensor), the accuracy of which greatly depends on the estimated elastic velocity models. However, creating accurate velocity models from passive array data remains a challenging problem. Common techniques rely on picking arrivals or matching waveforms requiring high signal-to-noise data that is often not available for the magnitude earthquakes observed over injection sites. We present a new method for obtaining elastic velocity information from earthquakes though full-wavefield wave-equation imaging and adjoint-state tomography. The technique exploits images of the earthquake source using various imaging conditions based upon the P- and S-wavefield data. We generate image volumes by back propagating data through initial models and then applying a correlation-based imaging condition. We use the P-wavefield autocorrelation, S-wavefield autocorrelation, and P-S wavefield cross-correlation images. Inconsistencies in the images form the residuals, which are used to update the P- and S-wave velocity models through adjoint-state tomography. Because the image volumes are constructed from all trace data, the signal-to-noise in this space is increased when compared to the individual traces. Moreover, it eliminates the need for picking and does not require any estimation of the source location and timing. Initial tests show that with reasonable source distribution and acquisition array, velocity anomalies can be recovered. Future tests will apply this methodology to other scales from laboratory to global.

  3. MT data inversion and sensitivity analysis to image electrical structure of Zagros collision zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layegh Haghighi, T.; Montahaei, M.; Oskooi, B.

    2018-01-01

    Magnetotelluric (MT) data from 46 stations on a 470-km-long profile across the Zagros fold-thrust belt (ZFTB) that marks the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone were inverted to derive 2-D electrical resistivity structure between Busher on the coast of Persian Gulf and Posht-e-Badam, 160 km north east of Yazd. The model includes prominent anomalies in the upper and lower crust, beneath the brittle-ductile transition depth and mostly related to the fluid distribution and sedimentary layers beneath the profile. The conductivities and dimensions of the fault zone conductors (FZCs) and high conductivity zones (HCZs) as the major conductive anomalies in a fault zone conceptual model vary significantly below the different faults accommodated in this region. The enhanced conductivity below the site Z30 correlates well with the main Zagros thrust (MZT), located at the western boundary of Sanandaj-Sirjan zone (SSZ) and known as the transition between the two continents. The depth extent of the huge conductor beneath the south west of the profile, attributed to the thick sedimentary columns of the Arabian crust, cannot be resolved due to the smearing effect of the smoothness constraint employed in the regularized inversion procedure and the sensitivity of MT data to the conductance of the subsurface. We performed different tests to determine the range of 2-D models consistent with the data. Our approach was based on synthetic studies, comprising of hypothesis testing and the use of a priori information throughout the inversion procedure as well as forward modeling. We conclude that the minimum depth extent of the conductive layer beneath the southwest of the profile can be determined as approximately deeper than 15 km and also the screening effect of the conductive overburden is highly intense in this model and prevents the deep structures from being resolved properly.

  4. Imaging through scattering microfluidic channels by digital holography for information recovery in lab on chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, V; Paturzo, M; Gennari, O; Finizio, A; Ferraro, P

    2013-10-07

    We tackle the problem of information recovery and imaging through scattering microfluidic chips by means of digital holography (DH). In many cases the chip can become opalescent due to residual deposits settling down the inner channel faces, biofilm formation, scattering particle uptake by the channel cladding or its damaging by corrosive substances, or even by condensing effect on the exterior channels walls. In these cases white-light imaging is severely degraded and no information is obtainable at all about the flowing samples. Here we investigate the problem of counting and estimating velocity of cells flowing inside a scattering chip. Moreover we propose and test a method based on the recording of multiple digital holograms to retrieve improved phase-contrast images despite the strong scattering effect. This method helps, thanks to DH, to recover information which, otherwise, would be completely lost.

  5. Recovery of 3D volume from 2-tone images of novel objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, C; Cavanagh, P

    1998-07-01

    In 2-tone images (e.g., Dallenbach's cow), only two levels of brightness are used to convey image structure-dark object regions and shadows are turned to black and light regions are light regions are turned white. Despite a lack of shading, hue and texture information, many 2-tone images of familiar objects and scenes are accurately interpreted, even by naive observers. Objects frequently appear fully volumetric and are distinct from their shadows. If perceptual interpretation of 2-tone images is accomplished via bottom-up processes on the basis of geometrical structure projected to the image (e.g., volumetric parts, contour and junction information) novel objects should appear volumetric as readily as their familiar counterparts. We demonstrate that accurate volumetric representations are rarely extracted from 2-tone images of novel objects, even when these objects are constructed from volumetric primitives such as generalized cones (Marr, D., Nishihara, H.K., 1978. Proceedings of the Royal Society London 200, 269-294; Biederman, I. 1985. Computer Vision, Graphics, and Image Processing 32, 29-73), or from the rearranged components of a familiar object which is itself recognizable as a 2-tone image. Even familiar volumes such as canonical bricks and cylinders require scenes with redundant structure (e.g., rows of cylinders) or explicit lighting (a lamp in the image) for recovery of global volumetric shape. We conclude that 2-tone image perception is not mediated by bottom-up extraction of geometrical features such as junctions or volumetric parts, but may rely on previously stored representations in memory and a model of the illumination of the scene. The success of this top-down strategy implies it is available for general object recognition in natural scenes.

  6. Accurate Characterization of Ion Transport Properties in Binary Symmetric Electrolytes Using In Situ NMR Imaging and Inverse Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethurajan, Athinthra Krishnaswamy; Krachkovskiy, Sergey A; Halalay, Ion C; Goward, Gillian R; Protas, Bartosz

    2015-09-17

    We used NMR imaging (MRI) combined with data analysis based on inverse modeling of the mass transport problem to determine ionic diffusion coefficients and transference numbers in electrolyte solutions of interest for Li-ion batteries. Sensitivity analyses have shown that accurate estimates of these parameters (as a function of concentration) are critical to the reliability of the predictions provided by models of porous electrodes. The inverse modeling (IM) solution was generated with an extension of the Planck-Nernst model for the transport of ionic species in electrolyte solutions. Concentration-dependent diffusion coefficients and transference numbers were derived using concentration profiles obtained from in situ (19)F MRI measurements. Material properties were reconstructed under minimal assumptions using methods of variational optimization to minimize the least-squares deviation between experimental and simulated concentration values with uncertainty of the reconstructions quantified using a Monte Carlo analysis. The diffusion coefficients obtained by pulsed field gradient NMR (PFG-NMR) fall within the 95% confidence bounds for the diffusion coefficient values obtained by the MRI+IM method. The MRI+IM method also yields the concentration dependence of the Li(+) transference number in agreement with trends obtained by electrochemical methods for similar systems and with predictions of theoretical models for concentrated electrolyte solutions, in marked contrast to the salt concentration dependence of transport numbers determined from PFG-NMR data.

  7. Contrast inversion in electrostatic force microscopy imaging of trapped charges: tip-sample distance and dielectric constant dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riedel, C; AlegrIa, A; Colmenero, J [Departamento de Fisica de Materiales UPV/EHU, Facultad de Quimica, Apartado 1072, 20080 San Sebastian (Spain); Arinero, R [Institut d' Electronique du Sud (IES), UMR CNRS 5214, Universite Montpellier II, CC 082, Place E Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier Cedex (France); Saenz, J J, E-mail: riedel@ies.univ-montp2.fr [Donostia International Physics Center, Paseo Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain)

    2011-08-26

    We present a numerical and analytical study of the behavior of both electrostatic force and force gradient created by a charge trapped below the surface of a dielectric on an atomic force microscope tip as a function of the dielectric constant and tip-sample distance. As expected, the force decreases monotonously when the dielectric constant increases. However, a maximum in the dielectric constant dependence of the force gradient is found. This maximum occurs in the typical experimental parameters' range and depends on the tip-sample distance and the sample thickness. The analytical study permits us to understand the physical origin of this phenomenon and is in good agreement with the numerical simulation for small tip-sample distances. We also report a study exemplifying a possible contrast inversion in electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) signals while scanning, at different heights, two charges trapped in a sample having heterogeneous dielectric domains. In addition to this particular contrast inversion effect, this study can be considered as a way to gain insight into the mechanisms of EFM image formation as a function of the dielectric constant and tip-sample.

  8. Isotope specific resolution recovery image reconstruction in high resolution PET imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Kotasidis Fotis A.; Kotasidis Fotis A.; Angelis Georgios I.; Anton-Rodriguez Jose; Matthews Julian C.; Reader Andrew J.; Reader Andrew J.; Zaidi Habib; Zaidi Habib; Zaidi Habib

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Measuring and incorporating a scanner specific point spread function (PSF) within image reconstruction has been shown to improve spatial resolution in PET. However due to the short half life of clinically used isotopes other long lived isotopes not used in clinical practice are used to perform the PSF measurements. As such non optimal PSF models that do not correspond to those needed for the data to be reconstructed are used within resolution modeling (RM) image reconstruction usuall...

  9. Patch-Ordering as a Regularization for Inverse Problems in Image Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Vaksman, Gregory; Zibulevsky, Michael; Elad, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Recent work in image processing suggests that operating on (overlapping) patches in an image may lead to state-of-the-art results. This has been demonstrated for a variety of problems including denoising, inpainting, deblurring, and super-resolution. The work reported in [1,2] takes an extra step forward by showing that ordering these patches to form an approximate shortest path can be leveraged for better processing. The core idea is to apply a simple filter on the resulting 1D smoothed sign...

  10. Three-dimensional photoacoustic imaging and inversion for accurate quantification of chromophore distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Martina; Malone, Emma; Lucka, Felix; Ellwood, Rob; An, Lu; Arridge, Simon; Beard, Paul; Cox, Ben

    2017-03-01

    Photoacoustic tomography can, in principle, provide quantitatively accurate, high-resolution, images of chromophore distributions in 3D in vivo. However, achieving this goal requires not only dealing with the optical fluence-related spatial and spectral distortion but also having access to high quality, calibrated, measurements and using image reconstruction algorithms free from inaccurate assumptions. Furthermore, accurate knowledge of experimental parameters, such as the positions of the ultrasound detectors and the illumination pattern, is necessary for the reconstruction step. A meticulous and rigorous experimental phantom study was conducted to show that highly-resolved 3D estimation of chromophore distributions can be achieved: a crucial step towards in vivo implementation. The phantom consisted of four 580 μm diameter tubes with different ratios of copper sulphate and nickel sulphate as hemoglobin analogues, submersed in a background medium of intralipid and india ink. The optical absorption, scattering, photostability, and Grüneisen parameter were characterised for all components independently. A V-shaped imaging scanner enabled 3D imaging with the high resolution, high sensitivity, and wide bandwidth characteristic of Fabry-Pérot ultrasound sensors, but without the limited-view disadvantage of single-plane scanners. The optical beam profile and position were determined experimentally. Nine wavelengths between 750 and 1110 nm were used. The images of the chromophore concentrations were obtained using a model-based, two-step, procedure, that did not require image segmentation. First, the acoustic reconstruction was solved with an iterative time-reversal algorithm to obtain images of the initial acoustic pressure at each of the nine wavelengths for an 18×17×13 mm3 volume with 50μm voxels. Then, 3D high resolution estimates of the chromophore concentrations were obtained by using a diffusion model of light transport in an iterative nonlinear optimisation

  11. Visualizing the blind brain: brain imaging of visual field defects from early recovery to rehabilitation techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marika eUrbanski

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Visual field defects (VFDs are one of the most common consequences observed after brain injury, especially after a stroke in the posterior cerebral artery territory. Less frequently, tumours, traumatic brain injury, brain surgery or demyelination can also determine various visual disabilities, from a decrease in visual acuity to cerebral blindness. VFD is a factor of bad functional prognosis as it compromises many daily life activities (e.g., obstacle avoidance, driving, and reading and therefore the patient’s quality of life. Spontaneous recovery seems to be limited and restricted to the first six months, with the best chance of improvement at one month. The possible mechanisms at work could be partly due to cortical reorganization in the visual areas (plasticity and/or partly to the use of intact alternative visual routes, first identified in animal studies and possibly underlying the phenomenon of blindsight. Despite processes of early recovery, which is rarely complete, and learning of compensatory strategies, the patient’s autonomy may still be compromised at more chronic stages. Therefore, various rehabilitation therapies based on neuroanatomical knowledge have been developed to improve VFDs. These use eye-movement training techniques (e.g., visual search, saccadic eye movements, reading training, visual field restitution (the Vision Restoration Therapy, VRT, or perceptual learning. In this review, we will focus on studies of human adults with acquired VFDs, which have used different imaging techniques (Positron Emission Tomography: PET, Diffusion Tensor Imaging: DTI, functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: fMRI, MagnetoEncephalography: MEG or neurostimulation techniques (Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation: TMS; transcranial Direct Current Stimulation, tDCS to show brain activations in the course of spontaneous recovery or after specific rehabilitation techniques.

  12. Isotope specific resolution recovery image reconstruction in high resolution PET imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kotasidis, Fotis A.; Angelis, Georgios I.; Anton-Rodriguez, Jose; Matthews, Julian C.; Reader, Andrew J.; Zaidi, Habib

    Purpose: Measuring and incorporating a scanner-specific point spread function (PSF) within image reconstruction has been shown to improve spatial resolution in PET. However, due to the short half-life of clinically used isotopes, other long-lived isotopes not used in clinical practice are used to

  13. Distributed image coding for digital image recovery from the print-scan channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadani, Ramin; Mukherjee, Debargha

    2010-03-01

    A printed digital photograph is difficult to reuse because the digital information that generated the print may no longer be available. This paper describes a method for approximating the original digital image by combining a scan of the printed photograph with digital auxiliary information kept together with the print. We formulate and solve the approximation problem using a Wyner-Ziv coding framework. During encoding, the Wyner-Ziv auxiliary information consists of a small amount of digital data composed of a number of sampled luminance pixel blocks and a number of sampled color pixel values to enable subsequent accurate registration and color-reproduction during decoding. The registration and color information is augmented by an additional amount of digital data encoded using Wyner-Ziv coding techniques that recovers residual errors and lost high spatial frequencies. The decoding process consists of scanning the printed photograph, together with a two step decoding process. The first decoding step, using the registration and color auxiliary information, generates a side-information image which registers and color corrects the scanned image. The second decoding step uses the additional Wyner-Ziv layer together with the side-information image to provide a closer approximation of the original, reducing residual errors and restoring the lost high spatial frequencies. The experimental results confirm the reduced digital storage needs when the scanned print assists in the digital reconstruction.

  14. Utilizing data grid architecture for the backup and recovery of clinical image data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Brent J; Zhou, M Z; Documet, J

    2005-01-01

    Grid Computing represents the latest and most exciting technology to evolve from the familiar realm of parallel, peer-to-peer and client-server models. However, there has been limited investigation into the impact of this emerging technology in medical imaging and informatics. In particular, PACS technology, an established clinical image repository system, while having matured significantly during the past ten years, still remains weak in the area of clinical image data backup. Current solutions are expensive or time consuming and the technology is far from foolproof. Many large-scale PACS archive systems still encounter downtime for hours or days, which has the critical effect of crippling daily clinical operations. In this paper, a review of current backup solutions will be presented along with a brief introduction to grid technology. Finally, research and development utilizing the grid architecture for the recovery of clinical image data, in particular, PACS image data, will be presented. The focus of this paper is centered on applying a grid computing architecture to a DICOM environment since DICOM has become the standard for clinical image data and PACS utilizes this standard. A federation of PACS can be created allowing a failed PACS archive to recover its image data from others in the federation in a seamless fashion. The design reflects the five-layer architecture of grid computing: Fabric, Resource, Connectivity, Collective, and Application Layers. The testbed Data Grid is composed of one research laboratory and two clinical sites. The Globus 3.0 Toolkit (Co-developed by the Argonne National Laboratory and Information Sciences Institute, USC) for developing the core and user level middleware is utilized to achieve grid connectivity. The successful implementation and evaluation of utilizing data grid architecture for clinical PACS data backup and recovery will provide an understanding of the methodology for using Data Grid in clinical image data backup for

  15. Analysis of MUSIC-type imaging functional for single, thin electromagnetic inhomogeneity in limited-view inverse scattering problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Chi Young; Jeon, Kiwan; Park, Won-Kwang

    2015-06-01

    This study analyzes the well-known MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) algorithm to identify unknown support of thin penetrable electromagnetic inhomogeneity from scattered field data collected within the so-called multi-static response matrix in limited-view inverse scattering problems. The mathematical theories of MUSIC are partially discovered, e.g., in the full-view problem, for an unknown target of dielectric contrast or a perfectly conducting crack with the Dirichlet boundary condition (Transverse Magnetic-TM polarization) and so on. Hence, we perform further research to analyze the MUSIC-type imaging functional and to certify some well-known but theoretically unexplained phenomena. For this purpose, we establish a relationship between the MUSIC imaging functional and an infinite series of Bessel functions of integer order of the first kind. This relationship is based on the rigorous asymptotic expansion formula in the existence of a thin inhomogeneity with a smooth supporting curve. Various results of numerical simulation are presented in order to support the identified structure of MUSIC. Although a priori information of the target is needed, we suggest a least condition of range of incident and observation directions to apply MUSIC in the limited-view problem.

  16. Optimization of Contrast-to-Tissue Ratio by Adaptation of Transmitted Ternary Signal in Ultrasound Pulse Inversion Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Ménigot

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound contrast imaging has provided more accurate medical diagnoses thanks to the development of innovating modalities like the pulse inversion imaging. However, this latter modality that improves the contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR is not optimal, since the frequency is manually chosen jointly with the probe. However, an optimal choice of this command is possible, but it requires precise information about the transducer and the medium which can be experimentally difficult to obtain, even inaccessible. It turns out that the optimization can become more complex by taking into account the kind of generators, since the generators of electrical signals in a conventional ultrasound scanner can be unipolar, bipolar, or tripolar. Our aim was to seek the ternary command which maximized the CTR. By combining a genetic algorithm and a closed loop, the system automatically proposed the optimal ternary command. In simulation, the gain compared with the usual ternary signal could reach about 3.9 dB. Another interesting finding was that, in contrast to what is generally accepted, the optimal command was not a fixed-frequency signal but had harmonic components.

  17. New inverse planning technology for image-guided cervical cancer brachytherapy: Description and evaluation within a clinical frame

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trnkova, Petra; Poetter, Richard; Baltas, Dimos; Karabis, Andreas; Fidarova, Elena; Dimopoulos, Johannes; Georg, Dietmar; Kirisits, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To test the feasibility of a new inverse planning technology based on the Hybrid Inverse treatment Planning and Optimisation (HIPO) algorithm for image-guided cervical cancer brachytherapy in comparison to conventional manual optimisation as applied in recent clinical practice based on long-term intracavitary cervical cancer brachytherapy experience. Materials and methods: The clinically applied treatment plans of 10 tandem/ring (T/R) and 10 cases with additional needles (T/R + N) planned with PLATO v14.3 were included. Standard loading patterns were manually optimised to reach an optimal coverage with 7 Gy per fraction to the High Risk CTV and to fulfil dose constraints for organs at risk. For each of these patients an inverse plan was retrospectively created with Oncentra GYN v0.9.14. Anatomy based automatic source activation was based on the topography of target and organs. The HIPO algorithm included individual gradient and modification restrictions for the T/R and needle dwell times to preserve the spatial high-dose distribution as known from the long-term clinical experience in the standard cervical cancer brachytherapy and with manual planning. Results: HIPO could achieve a better target coverage (V100) for all T/R and 7 T/R + N patients. Changes in the shape of the overdose volume (V200/400) were limited. The D 2cc per fraction for bladder, rectum and sigmoid colon was on average lower by 0.2 Gy, 0.4 Gy, 0.2 Gy, respectively, for T/R patients and 0.6 Gy, 0.3 Gy, 0.3 Gy for T/R + N patients (a decrease from 4.5 to 4 Gy per fraction means a total dose reduction of 5 Gy EQD2 for a 4-fraction schedule). In general the dwell times in the additional needles were lower compared to manual planning. The sparing factors were always better for HIPO plans. Additionally, in 7 T/R and 7 T/R + N patients all three D 0.1cc , D 1cc and D 2cc for vagina wall were lower and a smaller area of vagina was covered by the reference dose in HIPO plans. Overall loading

  18. Pre-scaled two-parameter Gauss-Newton image reconstruction to reduce property recovery imbalance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meaney, Paul M.; Yagnamurthy, Navin K.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2002-01-01

    Gauss-Newton image reconstruction in microwave imaging can be formulated in terms of a single complex quantity, the wave number squared (k 2 ), with the understanding that the relative permittivity and conductivity images can be extracted afterwards through a simple constitutive relationship. However, this approach ignores the fact that the magnitude of the average real and imaginary components can be considerably out of balance depending on the operating frequency and tissue characteristics which can inadvertently imbalance the process in favour of one parameter over the other. In an effort to achieve property recovery which is balanced, we introduce a pre-scaling procedure at the property update stage of the reconstruction. Utilization of this concept in conjunction with our two-step regularization process for both simulation and phantom experiments demonstrates that the penalty term weighting parameters for the optimal mean-squared property errors for the two recovered distributions (relative permittivity and conductivity) together with that yielding the lowest least-squared electric field error coincide only when the scaling is applied. The scheme provides a means for simultaneous optimization of the two permittivity and conductivity images. (author)

  19. Prediction of language and neurologic recovery after cerebral infarction with SPECT imaging using N-isopropyl-p-(I-123) iodoamphetamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bushnell, D.L.; Gupta, S.; Mlcoch, A.G.; Barnes, W.E.

    1989-01-01

    Fourteen patients (10 with left-sided and 4 with right-sided cerebral infarction) were prospectively studied with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using N-isopropyl-p-(I-123) iodoamphetamine (IMP, SPECTamine) to determine its usefulness in predicting neurologic/language recovery after cerebral infarction. All neuro-SPECT imaging was performed within 30 days after infarction. Detailed assessment of neurologic and/or language recovery (after 3 months) was carried out prospectively in each patient. Patients with smaller volume IMP defects in the region of infarction demonstrated significantly better neurologic and language recovery than patients with large IMP defects. Analysis of the IMP ''redistribution'' phenomenon failed to demonstrate definitively a relationship with clinical recovery. It was concluded that the volume of the IMP defect can aid in predicting recovery potential after cerebral infarction

  20. Imaging architecture of the Jakarta Basin, Indonesia with transdimensional inversion of seismic noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saygin, E.; Cummins, P. R.; Cipta, A.; Hawkins, R.; Pandhu, R.; Murjaya, J.; Masturyono, Irsyam, M.; Widiyantoro, S.; Kennett, B. L. N.

    2016-02-01

    In order to characterize the subsurface structure of the Jakarta Basin, Indonesia, a dense portable seismic broad-band network was operated by The Australian National University (ANU) and the Indonesian Agency for Meteorology, Climatology and Geophysics (BMKG) between October 2013 and February 2014. Overall 96 locations were sampled through successive deployments of 52 seismic broad-band sensors at different parts of the city. Oceanic and anthropogenic noises were recorded as well as regional and teleseismic earthquakes. We apply regularized deconvolution to the recorded ambient noise of the vertical components of available station pairs, and over 3000 Green's functions were retrieved in total. Waveforms from interstation deconvolutions show clear arrivals of Rayleigh fundamental and higher order modes. The traveltimes that were extracted from group velocity filtering of fundamental mode Rayleigh wave arrivals, are used in a 2-stage Transdimensional Bayesian method to map shear wave structure of subsurface. The images of S wave speed show very low velocities and a thick basin covering most of the city with depths up to 1.5 km. These low seismic velocities and the thick basin beneath the city potentially cause seismic amplification during a subduction megathrust or other large earthquake close to the city of Jakarta.

  1. Discriminating phytoplankton functional types (PFTs) in the coastal ocean using the inversion algorithm PHYDOTax and airborne imaging spectrometer data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, S. L.; Schafer, C. B.; Broughton, J.; Guild, L. S.; Kudela, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    There is a need in the Biological Oceanography community to discriminate among phytoplankton groups within the bulk chlorophyll pool to understand energy flow through ecosystems, to track the fate of carbon in the ocean, and to detect and monitor-for harmful algal blooms (HABs). The ocean color community has responded to this demand with the development of phytoplankton functional type (PFT) discrimination algorithms. These PFT algorithms fall into one of three categories depending on the science application: size-based, biogeochemical function, and taxonomy. The new PFT algorithm Phytoplankton Detection with Optics (PHYDOTax) is an inversion algorithm that discriminates taxon-specific biomass to differentiate among six taxa found in the California Current System: diatoms, dinoflagellates, haptophytes, chlorophytes, cryptophytes, and cyanophytes. PHYDOTax was developed and validated in Monterey Bay, CA for the high resolution imaging spectrometer, Spectroscopic Aerial Mapping System with On-board Navigation (SAMSON - 3.5 nm resolution). PHYDOTax exploits the high spectral resolution of an imaging spectrometer and the improved spatial resolution that airborne data provides for coastal areas. The objective of this study was to apply PHYDOTax to a relatively lower resolution imaging spectrometer to test the algorithm's sensitivity to atmospheric correction, to evaluate capability with other sensors, and to determine if down-sampling spectral resolution would degrade its ability to discriminate among phytoplankton taxa. This study is a part of the larger Hyperspectral Infrared Imager (HyspIRI) airborne simulation campaign which is collecting Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) imagery aboard NASA's ER-2 aircraft during three seasons in each of two years over terrestrial and marine targets in California. Our aquatic component seeks to develop and test algorithms to retrieve water quality properties (e.g. HABs and river plumes) in both marine and in

  2. Discriminating Phytoplankton Functional Types (PFTs) in the Coastal Ocean Using the Inversion Algorithm Phydotax and Airborne Imaging Spectrometer Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, Sherry L.; Schafer, Chris; Broughton, Jennifer; Guild, Liane S.; Kudela, Raphael M.

    2013-01-01

    There is a need in the Biological Oceanography community to discriminate among phytoplankton groups within the bulk chlorophyll pool to understand energy flow through ecosystems, to track the fate of carbon in the ocean, and to detect and monitor-for harmful algal blooms (HABs). The ocean color community has responded to this demand with the development of phytoplankton functional type (PFT) discrimination algorithms. These PFT algorithms fall into one of three categories depending on the science application: size-based, biogeochemical function, and taxonomy. The new PFT algorithm Phytoplankton Detection with Optics (PHYDOTax) is an inversion algorithm that discriminates taxon-specific biomass to differentiate among six taxa found in the California Current System: diatoms, dinoflagellates, haptophytes, chlorophytes, cryptophytes, and cyanophytes. PHYDOTax was developed and validated in Monterey Bay, CA for the high resolution imaging spectrometer, Spectroscopic Aerial Mapping System with On-board Navigation (SAMSON - 3.5 nm resolution). PHYDOTax exploits the high spectral resolution of an imaging spectrometer and the improved spatial resolution that airborne data provides for coastal areas. The objective of this study was to apply PHYDOTax to a relatively lower resolution imaging spectrometer to test the algorithm's sensitivity to atmospheric correction, to evaluate capability with other sensors, and to determine if down-sampling spectral resolution would degrade its ability to discriminate among phytoplankton taxa. This study is a part of the larger Hyperspectral Infrared Imager (HyspIRI) airborne simulation campaign which is collecting Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) imagery aboard NASA's ER-2 aircraft during three seasons in each of two years over terrestrial and marine targets in California. Our aquatic component seeks to develop and test algorithms to retrieve water quality properties (e.g. HABs and river plumes) in both marine and in

  3. Estimate of the melanin content in human hairs by the inverse Monte-Carlo method using a system for digital image analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashkatov, A N; Genina, Elina A; Kochubei, V I; Tuchin, Valerii V

    2006-01-01

    Based on the digital image analysis and inverse Monte-Carlo method, the proximate analysis method is deve-loped and the optical properties of hairs of different types are estimated in three spectral ranges corresponding to three colour components. The scattering and absorption properties of hairs are separated for the first time by using the inverse Monte-Carlo method. The content of different types of melanin in hairs is estimated from the absorption coefficient. It is shown that the dominating type of melanin in dark hairs is eumelanin, whereas in light hairs pheomelanin dominates. (special issue devoted to multiple radiation scattering in random media)

  4. Complex surface deformation monitoring and mechanism inversion over Qingxu-Jiaocheng, China with multi-sensor SAR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Chaoying; Zhang, Qin; Yang, Chengsheng

    2018-02-01

    Qingxu-Jiaocheng, China has been suffering severe land subsidence along with the development of ground fissure, which are controlled by local fault and triggered by groundwater withdrawal. With multi-sensor SAR images, we study the spatiotemporal evolution of ground deformation over Qingxu-Jiaocheng with an IPTA InSAR technique and assess the role of groundwater withdrawal to the observed deformation. Discrete GPS measurements are applied to verify the InSAR results. The RMSE of the differences between InSAR and GPS, i.e. ALOS and GPS and Envisat and GPS, are 5.7 mm and 6.3 mm in the LOS direction, respectively. The east-west and vertical components of the observed deformation from 2007 to 2010 are decomposed by using descending-track Envisat and ascending-track ALOS interferograms, indicating that the east-west component cannot be neglected when the deformation is large or the ground fissure is active. Four phases of land subsidence in the study region are successfully retrieved, and its spatiotemporal evolution is quantitatively analyzed. Lastly, a flat lying sill model with distributed contractions is implemented to model the InSAR deformation over Qingxu-Jiaocheng, which manifests that the ground deformation is mainly caused by groundwater withdrawal. This research provides new insights into the land subsidence monitoring and its mechanism inversion over Qingxu-Jiaocheng region.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging in neurologic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Kee Hyun; Han, Man Chung; Wan, Chu Wan; Myung, Ho Jin; Choi, Kil Soo; Ahn, Chang Beom; Oh, Chang Hyun; Cho, Zang Hee

    1985-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with 0.15 Tesla resistive magnet developed by Korea Advanced Institute of Science were performed in 27 patients with various neurologic diseases and compared with x-ray computed tomography (CT). The purpose of the paper is to evaluate the image quality, the diagnostic value and limitation, and the optimal pulse sequence of MR imagings with a resistive magnet. The MR images were obtained by using a variety of pulse sequence with spin echo technique including saturation recovery. T2-weighted spin echo, and/or inversion recovery with various pulse repetition (TR) and echo delay (TE) times. The MR imaging demonstrated the capability of detecting the lesions shown on CT in al cases and also detected an additional finding in one case (multiple sclerosis) which was not seen on CT. The MR imaging appeared to be more useful than CT in the evaluation of syringomyelia of spinal cord and white matter disease, while it failed to demonstrated small calcific lesion or inflammatory nodule (less than 1 cm) shown on CT and has shown somewhat poor contrast resolution in the case of meingloma. The spatial resolution of saturation recovery images was similar or superior to CT, whereas the contrast resolution of saturation recovery was inferior to CT. While the saturation recovery images have shown false negative findings in 5 patients (19%), the inversion recovery and T2-weighted spin echo have shown consistently positive findings. The inversive recovery and T2-weighted spin echo images demonstrated better contrast discrimination between normal and pathologic conditions than the saturation recovery images, but somewhat poorer spatial resolution. Authors suggest that the MR images of both the saturation recovery with 300/30 and T2-weighted spin echo with 1000/90 be used as a routine procedure and additional inversion recovery of 1300/300/30 sequence as a option if white matter disease is suspected

  6. Determination of Dynamics of Plant Plasma Membrane Proteins with Fluorescence Recovery and Raster Image Correlation Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laňková, Martina; Humpolíčková, Jana; Vosolsobě, Stanislav; Cit, Zdeněk; Lacek, Jozef; Čovan, Martin; Čovanová, Milada; Hof, Martin; Petrášek, Jan

    2016-04-01

    A number of fluorescence microscopy techniques are described to study dynamics of fluorescently labeled proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, and whole organelles. However, for studies of plant plasma membrane (PM) proteins, the number of these techniques is still limited because of the high complexity of processes that determine the dynamics of PM proteins and the existence of cell wall. Here, we report on the usage of raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) for studies of integral PM proteins in suspension-cultured tobacco cells and show its potential in comparison with the more widely used fluorescence recovery after photobleaching method. For RICS, a set of microscopy images is obtained by single-photon confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Fluorescence fluctuations are subsequently correlated between individual pixels and the information on protein mobility are extracted using a model that considers processes generating the fluctuations such as diffusion and chemical binding reactions. As we show here using an example of two integral PM transporters of the plant hormone auxin, RICS uncovered their distinct short-distance lateral mobility within the PM that is dependent on cytoskeleton and sterol composition of the PM. RICS, which is routinely accessible on modern CLSM instruments, thus represents a valuable approach for studies of dynamics of PM proteins in plants.

  7. Gravity packaging final waste recovery based on gravity separation and chemical imaging control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifazi, Giuseppe; Serranti, Silvia; Potenza, Fabio; Luciani, Valentina; Di Maio, Francesco

    2017-02-01

    Plastic polymers are characterized by a high calorific value. Post-consumer plastic waste can be thus considered, in many cases, as a typical secondary solid fuels according to the European Commission directive on End of Waste (EoW). In Europe the practice of incineration is considered one of the solutions for waste disposal waste, for energy recovery and, as a consequence, for the reduction of waste sent to landfill. A full characterization of these products represents the first step to profitably and correctly utilize them. Several techniques have been investigated in this paper in order to separate and characterize post-consumer plastic packaging waste fulfilling the previous goals, that is: gravity separation (i.e. Reflux Classifier), FT-IR spectroscopy, NIR HyperSpectralImaging (HSI) based techniques and calorimetric test. The study demonstrated as the proposed separation technique and the HyperSpectral NIR Imaging approach allow to separate and recognize the different polymers (i.e. PolyVinyl Chloride (PVC), PolyStyrene (PS), PolyEthylene (PE), PoliEtilene Tereftalato (PET), PolyPropylene (PP)) in order to maximize the removal of the PVC fraction from plastic waste and to perform the full quality control of the resulting products, can be profitably utilized to set up analytical/control strategies finalized to obtain a low content of PVC in the final Solid Recovered Fuel (SRF), thus enhancing SRF quality, increasing its value and reducing the "final waste". Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Holographic particle image velocimetry: signal recovery from under-sampled CCD data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coupland, J. M.

    2004-04-01

    Holographic particle image velocimetry (HPIV) has now been demonstrated by several research groups as a method to make three-component velocity measurements from a three-dimensional fluid flow field. More recently digital HPIV has become a hot topic with the promise of near-real-time measurements without the often cumbersome optics and wet processing associated with traditional holographic methods. It is clear, however, that CCD cameras have a limited number of pixels and are not capable of resolving more than a small fraction of the interference pattern that is recorded by a typical particulate hologram. In this paper, we consider under-sampling of the interference pattern to reduce the information content and to allow recordings to be made on a CCD sensor. We describe the basic concept of model fitting to under-sampled data and demonstrate signal recovery through computer simulation. A three-dimensional analysis shows that in general, periodic sampling strategies can result in multiple particle images in the reconstruction. It is shown, however, that the significance of these peaks is reduced in the case of high numerical aperture (NA) reconstruction and can be virtually eliminated by dithering the position of sampling apertures.

  9. COST Action TU1208 - Working Group 3 - Electromagnetic modelling, inversion, imaging and data-processing techniques for Ground Penetrating Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajewski, Lara; Giannopoulos, Antonios; Sesnic, Silvestar; Randazzo, Andrea; Lambot, Sébastien; Benedetto, Francesco; Economou, Nikos

    2017-04-01

    opportunity of testing and validating, against reliable data, their electromagnetic-modelling, inversion, imaging and processing algorithms. One of the most interesting dataset comes from the IFSTTAR Geophysical Test Site, in Nantes (France): this is an open-air laboratory including a large and deep area, filled with various materials arranged in horizontal compacted slices, separated by vertical interfaces and water-tighted in surface; several objects as pipes, polystyrene hollows, boulders and masonry are embedded in the field. Data were collected by using nine different GPR systems and at different frequencies ranging from 200 MHz to 1 GHz. Moreover, some sections of this test site were modelled by using gprMax and the commercial software CST Microwave Studio. Hence, both experimental and synthetic data are available. Further interesting datasets were collected on roads, bridges, concrete cells, columns - and more. (v) WG3 contributed to the TU1208 Education Pack, an open educational package conceived to teach GPR in University courses. (vi) WG3 was very active in offering training activities. The following courses were successfully organised: Training School (TS) "Microwave Imaging and Diagnostics" (in cooperation with the European School of Antennas; 1st edition: Madonna di Campiglio, Italy, March 2014, 2nd edition: Taormina, Italy, October 2016); TS "Numerical modelling of Ground Penetrating Radar using gprMax" (Thessaloniki, Greece, November 2015); TS "Electromagnetic Modelling Techniques for Ground Penetrating Radar" (Split, Croatia, November 2016). Moreover, WG3 organized a workshop on "Electromagnetic modelling with the Finite-Difference Time-Domain technique" (Nantes, France, February 2014) and a workshop on "Electromagnetic modelling and inversion techniques for GPR" (Davos, Switzerland, April 2016) within the 2016 European Conference on Antennas and Propagation (EuCAP). Acknowledgement: The Authors are deeply grateful to COST (European COoperation in Science and

  10. Novel Application of Time-Spatial Labeling Inversion Pulse Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Diagnosis of External Hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakae, Shunsuke; Murayama, Kazuhiro; Adachi, Kazuhide; Kumai, Tadashi; Abe, Masato; Hirose, Yuichi

    2018-01-01

    Although a subdural fluid collection frequently is observed, diagnostic methods that differentiate between the subdural collection caused by external hydrocephalus and that caused by subdural hygroma have not been established. Here, we report a case of external hydrocephalus caused by Gliadel-induced eosinophilic meningitis that has been previously reported in only 1 case and can be diagnosed by time-spatial labeling inversion pulse magnetic resonance imaging (time-SLIP MRI). A tumor located in the left temporal was detected incidentally in an 81-year-old man by examination of a head injury. The tumor was surgically resected and diagnosed as a high-grade glioma during the surgery; Gliadel wafers subsequently were implanted. Three weeks after the resection, the patient showed disturbed consciousness, and computed tomography revealed a subdural fluid collection. The out-flow of cerebrospinal through the resection cavity was detected by time-SLIP MRI. Cerebrospinal tests indicated high white blood cell counts and high protein levels, with more than 90% of the white blood cell count comprising eosinophils. Therefore, we suspected that the subdural fluid collection was caused by external hydrocephalus because of Gliadel-induced eosinophilic meningitis. We surgically removed the Gliadel wafers and subsequently performed a surgery to insert a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Histologic examination indicated eosinophilic accumulation around the Gliadel wafers. The patient's symptoms improved after the insertion of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. In the present case, time-SLIP MRI was a useful and noninvasive method for diagnosing external hydrocephalus which was caused by eosinophilic meningitis because of Gliadel-induced eosinophilic meningitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Dual-Element Transducer with Phase-Inversion for Wide Depth of Field in High-Frequency Ultrasound Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Seob Jeong

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In high frequency ultrasound imaging (HFUI, the quality of focusing is deeply related to the length of the depth of field (DOF. In this paper, a phase-inversion technique implemented by a dual-element transducer is proposed to enlarge the DOF. The performance of the proposed method was numerically demonstrated by using the ultrasound simulation program called Field-II. A simulated dual-element transducer was composed of a disc- and an annular-type elements, and its aperture was concavely shaped to have a confocal point at 6 mm. The area of each element was identical in order to provide same intensity at the focal point. The outer diameters of the inner and the outer elements were 2.1 mm and 3 mm, respectively. The center frequency of each element was 40 MHz and the f-number (focal depth/aperture size was two. When two input signals with 0° and 180° phases were applied to inner and outer elements simultaneously, a multi-focal zone was generated in the axial direction. The total −6 dB DOF, i.e., sum of two −6 dB DOFs in the near and far field lobes, was 40% longer than that of the conventional single element transducer. The signal to noise ratio (SNR was increased by about two times, especially in the far field. The point and cyst phantom simulation were conducted and their results were identical to that of the beam pattern simulation. Thus, the proposed scheme may be a potential method to improve the DOF and SNR in HFUI.

  12. Global seismic attenuation imaging using full-waveform inversion: a comparative assessment of different choices of misfit functionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaoǧlu, Haydar; Romanowicz, Barbara

    2018-02-01

    We present the results of synthetic tests that aim at evaluating the relative performance of three different definitions of misfit functionals in the context of 3-D imaging of shear wave attenuation in the earth's upper mantle at the global scale, using long-period full-waveform data. The synthetic tests are conducted with simple hypothetical upper-mantle models that contain Qμ anomalies centred at different depths and locations, with or without additional seismic velocity anomalies. To build synthetic waveform data sets, we performed simulations of 50 events in the hypothetical (target) models, using the spectral element method, filtered in the period range 60-400 s. The selected events are chosen among 273 events used in the development of radially anisotropic model SEMUCB-WM1 and recorded at 495 stations worldwide. The synthetic Z-component waveforms correspond to paths and time intervals (fundamental mode and overtone Rayleigh waves) that exist in the real waveform data set. The inversions for shear attenuation structure are carried out using a Gauss-Newton optimization scheme in which the gradient and Hessian are computed using normal mode perturbation theory. The three different misfit functionals considered are based on time domain waveform (WF) and waveform envelope (E-WF) differences, as well as spectral amplitude ratios (SA), between observed and predicted waveforms. We evaluate the performance of the three misfit functional definitions in the presence of seismic noise and unresolved S-wave velocity heterogeneity and discuss the relative importance of physical dispersion effects due to 3-D Qμ structure. We observed that the performance of WF is poorer than the other two misfit functionals in recovering attenuation structure, unless anelastic dispersion effects are taken into account in the calculation of partial derivatives. WF also turns out to be more sensitive to seismic noise than E-WF and SA. Overall, SA performs best for attenuation imaging. Our

  13. Inverse photoemission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namatame, Hirofumi; Taniguchi, Masaki

    1994-01-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy is regarded as the most powerful means since it can measure almost perfectly the occupied electron state. On the other hand, inverse photoelectron spectroscopy is the technique for measuring unoccupied electron state by using the inverse process of photoelectron spectroscopy, and in principle, the similar experiment to photoelectron spectroscopy becomes feasible. The development of the experimental technology for inverse photoelectron spectroscopy has been carried out energetically by many research groups so far. At present, the heightening of resolution of inverse photoelectron spectroscopy, the development of inverse photoelectron spectroscope in which light energy is variable and so on are carried out. But the inverse photoelectron spectroscope for vacuum ultraviolet region is not on the market. In this report, the principle of inverse photoelectron spectroscopy and the present state of the spectroscope are described, and the direction of the development hereafter is groped. As the experimental equipment, electron guns, light detectors and so on are explained. As the examples of the experiment, the inverse photoelectron spectroscopy of semimagnetic semiconductors and resonance inverse photoelectron spectroscopy are reported. (K.I.)

  14. Efficient Tensor Completion for Color Image and Video Recovery: Low-Rank Tensor Train.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengua, Johann A; Phien, Ho N; Tuan, Hoang Duong; Do, Minh N

    2017-05-01

    This paper proposes a novel approach to tensor completion, which recovers missing entries of data represented by tensors. The approach is based on the tensor train (TT) rank, which is able to capture hidden information from tensors thanks to its definition from a well-balanced matricization scheme. Accordingly, new optimization formulations for tensor completion are proposed as well as two new algorithms for their solution. The first one called simple low-rank tensor completion via TT (SiLRTC-TT) is intimately related to minimizing a nuclear norm based on TT rank. The second one is from a multilinear matrix factorization model to approximate the TT rank of a tensor, and is called tensor completion by parallel matrix factorization via TT (TMac-TT). A tensor augmentation scheme of transforming a low-order tensor to higher orders is also proposed to enhance the effectiveness of SiLRTC-TT and TMac-TT. Simulation results for color image and video recovery show the clear advantage of our method over all other methods.

  15. Application of image processing on struvite recovery from swine wastewater by using the fluidized bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhi-Long; Deng, Yujun; Ye, Xin; Lou, Yaoyin; Chen, Shaohua

    2018-01-01

    Fluidized granulation is one of the common methods used in wastewater treatment and resource recovery with harvesting millimeter-scale large particles. Presently, effective methods are lacking to measure the fluidized granules ranging from micro- to millimeter scales, with the consequence of ineffectively controlling and optimizing the granulation process. In this work, recovering struvite (MgNH 4 PO 4 ·6H 2 O) from swine wastewater by using a fluidized bed was taken as an example. Image processing was applied to analyze the properties of different types of struvite granules, including morphology, particle size distribution, number density and mass concentration. Four stages of the struvite crystal evolution were therefore defined: aggregation, aggregate compaction, cluster-agglomerating and coating growth. These stages could occur simultaneously or sequentially. Up-flow rates of 30-80 mm/s in the fluidized bed sustained 600-876 g/L granular solids. Results revealed that the coating-growth granules were formed with compact aggregates or cluster-agglomerating granules as the nuclei. The growth rates for the different types of particles, including population growth, mass increase and particle size enlargement, were determined. In final, a schematic illustration for struvite granulation process is also presented.

  16. Contrast source inversion (CSI) method to cross-hole radio-imaging (RIM) data - Part 2: A complex synthetic example and a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongxing; Smith, Richard S.

    2018-03-01

    We present two examples of using the contrast source inversion (CSI) method to invert synthetic radio-imaging (RIM) data and field data. The synthetic model has two isolated conductors (one perfect conductor and one moderate conductor) embedded in a layered background. After inversion, we can identify the two conductors on the inverted image. The shape of the perfect conductor is better resolved than the shape of the moderate conductor. The inverted conductivity values of the two conductors are approximately the same, which demonstrates that the conductivity values cannot be correctly interpreted from the CSI results. The boundaries and the tilts of the upper and the lower conductive layers on the background can also be inferred from the results, but the centre parts of conductive layers in the inversion results are more conductive than the parts close to the boreholes. We used the straight-ray tomographic imaging method and the CSI method to invert the RIM field data collected using the FARA system between two boreholes in a mining area in Sudbury, Canada. The RIM data include the amplitude and the phase data collected using three frequencies: 312.5 kHz, 625 kHz and 1250 kHz. The data close to the ground surface have high amplitude values and complicated phase fluctuations, which are inferred to be contaminated by the reflected or refracted electromagnetic (EM) fields from the ground surface, and are removed for all frequencies. Higher-frequency EM waves attenuate more quickly in the subsurface environment, and the locations where the measurements are dominated by noise are also removed. When the data are interpreted with the straight-ray method, the images differ substantially for different frequencies. In addition, there are some unexpected features in the images, which are difficult to interpret. Compared with the straight-ray imaging results, the inversion results with the CSI method are more consistent for different frequencies. On the basis of what we learnt

  17. Neurological and functional recovery in acute transverse myelitis patients with inpatient rehabilitation and magnetic resonance imaging correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, A; Kumar, S N; Taly, A B

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to observe neurological and functional recovery in patients with acute transverse myelitis (ATM) with inpatient rehabilitation and correlate with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes. The study was conducted with 43 ATM patients (19 males) admitted in the tertiary university research hospital from July 2012 to June 2014. Detailed MRI findings were noted. Neurological status was assessed using the ASIA impairment scale (AIS) and functional recovery was assessed using the Barthel Index score (BI) and Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM). Patients showed significant neurological and functional recovery with inpatient rehabilitation using AIS, BI and SCIM scales when admission and discharge scores were compared (P<0.001). Thirty-one patients (72.1%) had rostral level in the cervical region according to MR imaging, but clinically, 17 patients had tetraplegia, whereas 26 patients had lower-limb weakness only. No definitive pattern or correlation was found between level (MRI or clinical) and neurological status (AIS). The neurological outcome in patients with ATM cannot be predicted on the basis of imaging findings. There is a great variation in the imaging level and clinical presentation. Patients show significant improvement with inpatient rehabilitation even with poor functional ability in acute and sub-acute phase of illness.

  18. Can mental imagery functional magnetic resonance imaging predict recovery in patients with disorders of consciousness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Dominik; Markl, Alexandra; Yu, Tao; Kotchoubey, Boris; Lang, Simone; Müller, Friedemann

    2013-10-01

    To determine the potential prognostic value of using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to identify patients with disorders of consciousness, who show potential for recovery. Observational study. Unit for acute rehabilitation care. Patients (N=22) in a vegetative state (VS; n=10) and minimally conscious state (MCS; n=12) during the first 200 days after the initial incident. Not applicable. Further course on the Coma Recovery Scale-Revised. Participants performed a mental imagery fMRI paradigm. They were asked to alternately imagine playing tennis and navigating through their home. In 14 of the 22 examined patients (VS, n=5; MCS, n=9), a significant activation of the regions of interest (ROIs) of the mental imagery paradigm could be found. All 5 patients with activation of a significant blood oxygen level dependent signal, who were in a VS at the time of the fMRI examination, reached at least an MCS at the end of the observation period. In contrast, 5 participants in a VS who failed to show activation in ROIs, did not (sensitivity 100%, specificity 100%). Six of 9 patients in an MCS with activation in ROIs emerged from an MCS. Of 3 patients in an MCS who did not show activation, 2 patients stayed in an MCS and 1 patient emerged from the MCS (sensitivity 85%, specificity 40%). The fMRI paradigm mental imagery displays a high concordance with the further clinical course of patients in a VS. All 5 patients in a VS who showed significant activation of ROIs had a favorable further course until the end of the observation period. We therefore propose the term "functional minimally conscious state" for these patients. They may benefit from rehabilitation treatment. In cases where no significant activation was seen, the method has no prognostic value. Prediction of the clinical course of patients in an MCS by fMRI was considerably less accurate than in patients in a VS. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  19. Poststroke aphasia recovery assessed with functional magnetic resonance imaging and a picture identification task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Eaton, Kenneth; Ball, Angel L; Banks, Christi; Vannest, Jennifer; Allendorfer, Jane B; Page, Stephen; Holland, Scott K

    2011-01-01

    Stroke patients often display deficits in language function, such as correctly naming objects. Our aim was to evaluate the reliability and the patterns of poststroke language recovery using a picture identification task during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) at 4 T. Four healthy subjects and 4 subjects with left middle cerebral artery stroke with chronic (>1 year) aphasia were enrolled in the study. In each subject, 10 fMRI scans were performed over a 10-week period using a picture-identification task. The active condition involved presenting subject with a panel of 4 figures (eg, drawings of 4 animals) every 6 seconds and asking the subject to indicate which figure matched the written name in the center. The control condition was a same/different judgment task with pairs of geometric figures (squares, octagons, or combination) presented every 6 seconds. Thirty-second active/control blocks were repeated 5 times each, and responses were recorded. The stoke subjects and controls had similar demographic characteristics, including age (46 vs 53 years), personal handedness (Edinburg Handedness Inventory, 89 vs 95), familial handedness (93 vs 95), and years of education (14.3 vs 14.8). For the active condition, the controls performed better than the stroke subjects (97.7% vs 89.1%; P R positive blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) activations in frontal and temporal language areas and symmetric retrosplenial and posterior cingulate areas and symmetric negative BOLD activations in bilateral frontotemporal language networks. In contrast, the stroke subjects exhibited positive BOLD activations predominantly in peristroke areas and negative BOLD activations in the unaffected (right) hemisphere. Both groups displayed high activation reliability (as measured by the intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC]) in the left frontal and temporal language areas, although in the stroke subjects the ICC in the frontal regions was spread over a much larger peristroke

  20. GPR impedance inversion for imaging and characterization of buried archaeological remains: A case study at Mudu city cite in Suzhou, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Shi, Zhanjie; Wang, Bangbing; Yu, Tianxiang

    2018-01-01

    As a method with high resolution, GPR has been extensively used in archaeological surveys. However, conventional GPR profile can only provide limited geometry information, such as the shape or location of the interface, but can't give the distribution of physical properties which could help identify the historical remains more directly. A common way for GPR to map parameter distribution is the common-midpoint velocity analysis, but it provides limited resolution. Another research hotspot, the full-waveform inversion, is unstable and relatively dependent on the initial model. Coring method could give direct information in drilling site, while the accurate result is only limited in several boreholes. In this paper, we propose a new scheme to enhance imaging and characterization of archaeological targets by fusion of GPR and coring data. The scheme mainly involves the impedance inversion of conventional common-offset GPR data, which uses well log to compensate GPR data and finally obtains a high-resolution estimation of permittivity. The core analysis result also contributes to interpretation of the inversion result. To test this method, we did a case study at Mudu city site in Suzhou, China. The results provide clear images of the ancient city's moat and wall subsurface and improve the characterization of archaeological targets. It is shown that this method is effective and feasible for archaeological exploration.

  1. Shear-wave seismic reflection imaging and impedance inversion for a near-surface point-bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, N. W.; Morrison, M.; Lorenzo, J. M.; Odom, B.; Clift, P. D.; Olson, E.; Gostic, A.

    2017-12-01

    Imaging and inversion of SH-waves are useful to detect, map, and quantitatively characterize near-surface point-bar strata. We conduct a horizontally-polarized (SH) reflection survey across and along a near-surface (9 - 40 m) downstream point-bar. We invert for shear-impedance profiles and correlate our interpretation to electrical conductivity (EC) logs in adjacent wells to study the internal architecture and lithology of point-bars. We acquire two common-midpoint (CMP) SH-wave seismic reflection lines at False River (Point Coupee Parish, Louisiana). A 104 m long seismic line (L1) is oriented orthogonal (NW - SE) to point-bar strike. A second line (L2) is 48 m long and set parallel to point-bar strike (NE - SW). Two EC wells lie 33 m apart. Both wells are parallel with respect to the L1 survey and offset from it by 15 m. EC log measurements range from 1 - 25 m depth. Interference of Love-waves prevents seismic imaging at depths less than 9 m. The L1 and L2 data sets are inverted for shear-impedance using a model-based band-limited impedance (BLIMP) algorithm that incorporates a low-frequency velocity model. This model is also used for the depthing processing. The L1 cross-section shows coherent dipping reflection events ( 4 - 7º) from 0.15 - 0.35 s (10 - 40 m). The corresponding shear-impedance profile also reveals coherent and dipping impedance contrasts that grow in magnitude with increasing depth. The L2 cross-section shows comparatively less dip ( 1º) as well as sharper and shallower continuity of reflection events (0.1 - 0.28 s TWT or 9 - 25 m). Depth-converted (TVD) seismic amplitudes and impedance values correlate to near-surface point-bar geology via superposition of log data. The first well (W5) shows distinct EC local maxima (+50 - 70 mS/m) at 14.5 and 15.5 m depth that correlate well with the seismic amplitudes and impedance values from both L1 and L2 data sets. The second well (W7) shows comparatively lower local maxima (+40 - 60 mS/m) but at greater

  2. Iterative inversion of global magnetospheric ion distributions using energetic neutral atom (ENA images recorded by the NUADU/TC2 instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Lu

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A method has been developed for extracting magnetospheric ion distributions from Energetic Neutral Atom (ENA measurements made by the NUADU instrument on the TC-2 spacecraft. Based on a constrained linear inversion, this iterative technique is suitable for use in the case of an ENA image measurement, featuring a sharply peaked spatial distribution. The method allows for magnetospheric ion distributions to be extracted from a low-count ENA image recorded over a short integration time (5 min. The technique is demonstrated through its application to a set of representative ENA images recorded in energy Channel~2 (hydrogen: 50–81 keV, oxygen: 138–185 keV of the NUADU instrument during a geomagnetic storm. It is demonstrated that this inversion method provides a useful tool for extracting ion distribution information from ENA data that are characterized by high temporal and spatial resolution. The recovered ENA images obtained from inverted ion fluxes match most effectively the measurements made at maximum ENA intensity.

  3. Clinical evaluation of pulmonary perfusion MRI using FAIR (flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery)-HASTE (Half-Fourier Single-Shot TurboSE) method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Togami, Izumi; Sasai, Nobuya; Tsunoda, Masatoshi; Sei, Tetsurou; Sato, Shuhei; Yabuki, Takayuki; Hiraki, Yoshio

    2002-01-01

    The FAIR-HASTE method is a kind of noninvasive perfusion MR imaging obtained without the use of contrast media. By subtracting a flow-insensitive image from a flow-sensitive image, contrast enhancement of inflowing blood achieved. In the present study, we applied pulmonary perfusion FAIR-HASTE sequence for 23 patients with various pulmonary diseases, and compared the findings with those by pulmonary perfusion scintigraphy and Gadolinium perfusion MRI. Pulmonary perfusion imaging with the FAIR-HASTE method was possible in all clinical cases, and the findings corresponded well to those obtained by perfusion MRI using contrast media or pulmonary scintigraphy. The FAIR-HASTE method is a promising method for the evaluation of pulmonary perfusion. (author)

  4. The value of qualitative and quantitative assessment of lesion to cerebral cortex signal ratio on double inversion recovery sequence in the differentiation of demyelinating plaques from non-specific T2 hyperintensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamcan, Salih; Battal, Bilal; Akgun, Veysel; Sari, Sebahattin; Tasar, Mustafa [Gulhane Military Medical School, Department of Radiology, Etlik, Ankara (Turkey); Oz, Oguzhan; Tasdemir, Serdar [Gulhane Military Medical School, Department of Neurology, Ankara (Turkey); Bozkurt, Yalcin [Golcuk Military Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kocaeli (Turkey)

    2017-02-15

    To assess the usefulness of the visual assessment and to determine diagnostic value of the lesion-to-cerebral cortex signal ratio (LCSR) measurement in the differentiation of demyelinating plaques and non-specific T2 hyperintensities on double inversion recovery (DIR) sequence. DIR and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences of 25 clinically diagnosed multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and 25 non-MS patients with non-specific T2-hyperintense lesions were evaluated visually and LCSRs were measured by two observers independently. On DIR sequence, the calculated mean LCSR ± SD for demyelinating plaques and non-specific T2-hyperintense lesions were 1.60 ± 0.26 and 0.75 ± 0.19 for observer1, and 1.61 ± 0.27 and 0.74 ± 0.19 for observer2. LCSRs of demyelinating plaques were significantly higher than other non-specific T2-hyperintense lesions on DIR sequence. By using the visual assessment demyelinating plaques were differentiated from non-specific T2-hyperintensities with 92.8 % sensitivity, 97.5 % specificity and 95.1 % accuracy for observer1 and 92.8 % sensitivity, 95 % specificity and 93.9 % accuracy for observer2. Visual assessment and LCSR measurement on DIR sequence seems to be useful for differentiating demyelinating MS plaques from supratentorial non-specific T2 hyperintensities. This feature can be used for diagnosis of MS particularly in patients with only supratentorial T2-hyperintense lesions who are categorized as radiologically possible MS. (orig.)

  5. Hounsfield unit recovery in clinical cone beam CT images of the thorax acquired for image guided radiation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thing, Rune Slot; Bernchou, Uffe; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive artefact correction method for clinical cone beam CT (CBCT) images acquired for image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) on a commercial system is presented. The method is demonstrated to reduce artefacts and recover CT-like Hounsfield units (HU) in reconstructed CBCT images of five...... lung cancer patients. Projection image based artefact corrections of image lag, detector scatter, body scatter and beam hardening are described and applied to CBCT images of five lung cancer patients. Image quality is evaluated through visual appearance of the reconstructed images, HU...

  6. Saturation-recovery metabolic‐exchange rate imaging with hyperpolarized [1‐13C] pyruvate using spectral‐spatial excitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulte, Rolf F.; Sperl, Jonathan I.; Weidl, Eliane

    2013-01-01

    ‐recovery” scheme with the detected signal content being determined by forward conversion of the available pyruvate. In case of repetitive excitations, the polarization is preserved using smaller flip angles for pyruvate. Metabolic exchange rates are determined spatially resolved from the metabolite images using...... a simplified two‐site exchange model. This novel contrast is an important step toward more quantitative metabolic imaging. Goal of this work was to derive, analyze, and implement this “saturation‐recovery metabolic exchange rate imaging” and demonstrate its capabilities in four rats bearing subcutaneous tumors...

  7. Inverse Limits

    CERN Document Server

    Ingram, WT

    2012-01-01

    Inverse limits provide a powerful tool for constructing complicated spaces from simple ones. They also turn the study of a dynamical system consisting of a space and a self-map into a study of a (likely more complicated) space and a self-homeomorphism. In four chapters along with an appendix containing background material the authors develop the theory of inverse limits. The book begins with an introduction through inverse limits on [0,1] before moving to a general treatment of the subject. Special topics in continuum theory complete the book. Although it is not a book on dynamics, the influen

  8. Imaging the complex geometry of a magma reservoir using FEM-based linear inverse modeling of InSAR data: application to Rabaul Caldera, Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronchin, Erika; Masterlark, Timothy; Dawson, John; Saunders, Steve; Martì Molist, Joan

    2017-06-01

    We test an innovative inversion scheme using Green's functions from an array of pressure sources embedded in finite-element method (FEM) models to image, without assuming an a-priori geometry, the composite and complex shape of a volcano deformation source. We invert interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data to estimate the pressurization and shape of the magma reservoir of Rabaul caldera, Papua New Guinea. The results image the extended shallow magmatic system responsible for a broad and long-term subsidence of the caldera between 2007 February and 2010 December. Elastic FEM solutions are integrated into the regularized linear inversion of InSAR data of volcano surface displacements in order to obtain a 3-D image of the source of deformation. The Green's function matrix is constructed from a library of forward line-of-sight displacement solutions for a grid of cubic elementary deformation sources. Each source is sequentially generated by removing the corresponding cubic elements from a common meshed domain and simulating the injection of a fluid mass flux into the cavity, which results in a pressurization and volumetric change of the fluid-filled cavity. The use of a single mesh for the generation of all FEM models avoids the computationally expensive process of non-linear inversion and remeshing a variable geometry domain. Without assuming an a-priori source geometry other than the configuration of the 3-D grid that generates the library of Green's functions, the geodetic data dictate the geometry of the magma reservoir as a 3-D distribution of pressure (or flux of magma) within the source array. The inversion of InSAR data of Rabaul caldera shows a distribution of interconnected sources forming an amorphous, shallow magmatic system elongated under two opposite sides of the caldera. The marginal areas at the sides of the imaged magmatic system are the possible feeding reservoirs of the ongoing Tavurvur volcano eruption of andesitic products on the

  9. Inverse method for effects characterization from ultrasonic b-scan images; Caracterisation des defauts par une methode d'inversion lors d'un controle ultrasonore. Application au controle des defauts en paroi externe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faur, M. [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France)

    1999-02-01

    In service inspections of French nuclear pressure water reactor vessels are carried out automatically in complete immersion from the inside by means of ultrasonic focused probes working in the pulse echo mode. Concern has been expressed about the capabilities of performing non destructive evaluation of the Outer Surface Defects (OSD), i.e. defects located in the vicinity of the outer surface of the inspected components. OSD are insonified by both a direct field that passes through the inner surface (water/steel) of the component containing the defect and a secondary field reflected from the outer surface. Consequently, the Bscan images, containing the signatures of such defects, are complicated and their interpretation is a difficult task. This work deals with extraction of the maximum available information for characterizing OSD from ultrasonic Bscan images. Our main objectives are to obtain the type of OSD and their geometric parameters by means of two specific inverse methods. The first method is used for the identification of the geometrical parameters of the equivalent planar OSD from segmented Bscan images. Ultrasonic equivalent defect sizing model-based methods may be used to size a defect in a material by obtaining a best-fit simple equivalent shape that matches the ultrasonic observed data. We illustrate the application of such an equivalent sizing OSD method that is based on a simplified direct model. The major drawback of this identification method, as used to date, is that only a part of the useful information contained into original Bscan image, i.e. segmented Bscan image, is used for defect characterization. Moreover, it requires the availability of defect classification information (i.e. if the defect is volumetric or planer, e. g. a crack or a lack of fusion), which, generally, may be as difficult to obtain as the defect parameters themselves. Therefore, we propose a parameter estimation method for extracting complementary information on the defect

  10. Gravity gradiometry and seismic interpretation integration using spatially guided fuzzy c-means clustering inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapstine, Thomas D.

    Gravity gradiometry has been used as a geophysical tool to image salt structure in hydrocarbon exploration. The knowledge of the location, orientation, and spatial extent of salt bodies helps characterize possible petroleum prospects. Imaging around and underneath salt bodies can be challenging given the petrophysical properties and complicated geometry of salt. Methods for imaging beneath salt using seismic data exist but are often iterative and expensive, requiring a refinement of a velocity model at each iteration. Fortunately, the relatively strong density contrast between salt and background density structure pro- vides the opportunity for gravity gradiometry to be useful in exploration, especially when integrated with other geophysical data such as seismic. Quantitatively integrating multiple geophysical data is not trivial, but can improve the recovery of salt body geometry and petrophysical composition using inversion. This thesis provides two options for quantitatively integrating seismic, AGG, and petrophysical data that may aid the imaging of salt bodies. Both methods leverage and expand upon previously developed deterministic inversion methods. The inversion methods leverage seismically derived information, such as horizon slope and salt body interpretation, to constrain the inversion of airborne gravity gradiometry data (AGG) to arrive at a density contrast model. The first method involves constraining a top of salt inversion using slope in a seismic image. The second method expands fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering inversion to include spatial control on clustering based on a seismically derived salt body interpretation. The effective- ness of the methods are illustrated on a 2D synthetic earth model derived from the SEAM Phase 1 salt model. Both methods show that constraining the inversion of AGG data using information derived from seismic images can improve the recovery of salt.

  11. Diffusion tensor imaging during recovery from severe traumatic brain injury and relation to clinical outcome: A longitudinal study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidaros, A.; Engberg, A.W.; Sidaros, K.

    2008-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been proposed as a sensitive biomarker of traumatic white matter injury, which could potentially serve as a tool for prognostic assessment and for studying microstructural changes during recovery from traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, there is a lack...... peduncle and in corpus callosum, λ∥ and λ⊥ both increased during the scan interval and, particularly in patients with unfavourable outcome, fractional anisotropy remained depressed. No significant DTI parameter changes over time were found in controls, or in CSF of patients. These findings support that DTI...... is a clinically relevant biomarker in TBI, which may have prognostic value and also might serve as a tool for revealing changes in the neural tissue during recovery. © Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved....

  12. Tomographic imaging of Central Java, Indonesia: Preliminary result of joint inversion of the MERAMEX and MCGA earthquake data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohadi, Supriyanto; Widiyantoro, Sri; Nugraha, Andri Dian; Masturyono

    2013-01-01

    The realization of local earthquake tomography is usually conducted by removing distant events outside the study region, because these events may increase errors. In this study, tomographic inversion has been conducted using the travel time data of local and regional events in order to improve the structural resolution, especially for deep structures. We used the local MERapi Amphibious EXperiments (MERAMEX) data catalog that consists of 292 events from May to October 2004. The additional new data of regional events in the Java region were taken from the Meteorological, Climatological, and Geophysical Agency (MCGA) of Indonesia, which consist of 882 events, having at least 10 recording phases at each seismographic station from April 2009 to February 2011. We have conducted joint inversions of the combined data sets using double-difference tomography to invert for velocity structures and to conduct hypocenter relocation simultaneously. The checkerboard test results of Vp and Vs structures demonstrate a significantly improved spatial resolution from the shallow crust down to a depth of 165 km. Our tomographic inversions reveal a low velocity anomaly beneath the Lawu - Merapi zone, which is consistent with the results from previous studies. A strong velocity anomaly zone with low Vp, low Vs and low Vp/Vs is also identified between Cilacap and Banyumas. We interpret this anomaly as a fluid content material with large aspect ratio or sediment layer. This anomaly zone is in a good agreement with the existence of a large dome containing sediment in this area as proposed by previous geological studies. A low velocity anomaly zone is also detected in Kebumen, where it may be related to the extensional oceanic basin toward the land

  13. High resolution imaging of lithospheric structures beneath the Pyrenees by full waveform inversion of shortperiod teleseismic P waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Chevrot, Sébastien; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Monteiller, Vadim; Durochat, Clément

    2016-04-01

    Thanks to the deployment of permanent and temporary broadband arrays, coverage and data quality have dramatically improved in the last decade, especially for regional-scale studies. In addition, owing to the progress of high-performance resources and numerical simulation techniques, waveform inversion approaches nowadays become a viable alternative to classical asymptotic ray based tomographic approaches. Exploiting full waveforms in seismic tomography requires an efficient and precise method to solve the elastic wave equation in 3D inhomogeneous media. Since resolution of waveform inversion is limited by the seismic wavelength as well as the wavefield sampling density, it is crucial to exploit short-period teleseismic waves recorded by dense regional arrays. However, modeling the propagation of short-period body waves in heterogeneous media is still very challenging, even on the largest modern supercomputers. For this reason, we have developed a hybrid method that couples a global wave propagation method in a 1D Earth to a 3D spectral-element method in a regional domain. This hybrid method restricts the costly 3D computations to inside the regional domain, which dramatically decreases the computational cost, allows us to compute teleseismic wavefields down to 1s period, thus accounting for the complexities that affect the propagation of seismic waves in the regional domain. We present the first application of this new waveform inversion approach to broadband data coming from two dense transects deployed during the PYROPE experiment across the Pyrenees mountains. We obtain the first high-resolution lithospheric section of compressional and shear velocities across an orogenic belt. The tomographic model provides clear evidence for the under-thrusting of the thinned Iberian crust beneath the European plate and for the important role of rift-inherited mantle structures during the formation of the Pyrenees.

  14. Mechanism study of recovery from aphasia with 99Tcm-ECD SPECT brain imaging after oral reading test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jian; Xu Hao; Wang Hong; Chen Zhuoming; Wu Qiulian

    2007-01-01

    Objective: There may be two mechanisms for recovery from aphasia----repair of dam- aged left hemisphere language network and(or) activation of compensatory areas in right hemisphere. It is, however, still controversial on which mechanism plays a more important role. The goal of this study was to compare the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) between baseline and during oral reading in aphasic patients who had shown definite recovery from a focal lesion in left hemisphere. It also aimed at exploring the role of the two hemispheres in recovery from aphasia, thus providing theoretic basis for rehabilitation therapy. Methods: Baseline and oral reading 99 Tc m -ethylcysteinate dimer (ECD) brain SPECT imaging were performed in 7 patients with aphasia separately in one-day interval. Semi-quantitative analysis of rCBF was conducted on 26 symmetrical ROIs in bilateral hemispheres on the transverse slices. The rCBF was estimated by the ratio of the counts per pixel of each ROI to the average counts per pixel of the whole encephalon. The change in blood flow was represented by the difference in rCBF between oral reading and baseline. Results: The activated perfusion pattern of brain region was different in all 7 aphasic patients. In 5 of the 7 patients, whose reading capacity were relatively preserved, the brain perfusion pattern was mainly left lateralized, while the other two patients who had poor performance in reading showed bilateral activation foci with fight-sided dominance. Conclusion: Oral reading activated SPECT brain imaging may be a useful tool for monitoring the progress of speech recovery in the treatment of aphasic patients. (authors)

  15. Wireless remote control of clinical image workflow: using a PDA for off-site distribution and disaster recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Documet, Jorge; Liu, Brent J; Documet, Luis; Huang, H K

    2006-07-01

    This paper describes a picture archiving and communication system (PACS) tool based on Web technology that remotely manages medical images between a PACS archive and remote destinations. Successfully implemented in a clinical environment and also demonstrated for the past 3 years at the conferences of various organizations, including the Radiological Society of North America, this tool provides a very practical and simple way to manage a PACS, including off-site image distribution and disaster recovery. The application is robust and flexible and can be used on a standard PC workstation or a Tablet PC, but more important, it can be used with a personal digital assistant (PDA). With a PDA, the Web application becomes a powerful wireless and mobile image management tool. The application's quick and easy-to-use features allow users to perform Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) queries and retrievals with a single interface, without having to worry about the underlying configuration of DICOM nodes. In addition, this frees up dedicated PACS workstations to perform their specialized roles within the PACS workflow. This tool has been used at Saint John's Health Center in Santa Monica, California, for 2 years. The average number of queries per month is 2,021, with 816 C-MOVE retrieve requests. Clinical staff members can use PDAs to manage image workflow and PACS examination distribution conveniently for off-site consultations by referring physicians and radiologists and for disaster recovery. This solution also improves radiologists' effectiveness and efficiency in health care delivery both within radiology departments and for off-site clinical coverage.

  16. Training image analysis for model error assessment and dimension reduction in Bayesian-MCMC solutions to inverse problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koepke, C.; Irving, J.

    2015-12-01

    Bayesian solutions to inverse problems in near-surface geophysics and hydrology have gained increasing popularity as a means of estimating not only subsurface model parameters, but also their corresponding uncertainties that can be used in probabilistic forecasting and risk analysis. In particular, Markov-chain-Monte-Carlo (MCMC) methods have attracted much recent attention as a means of statistically sampling from the Bayesian posterior distribution. In this regard, two approaches are commonly used to improve the computational tractability of the Bayesian-MCMC approach: (i) Forward models involving a simplification of the underlying physics are employed, which offer a significant reduction in the time required to calculate data, but generally at the expense of model accuracy, and (ii) the model parameter space is represented using a limited set of spatially correlated basis functions as opposed to a more intuitive high-dimensional pixel-based parameterization. It has become well understood that model inaccuracies resulting from (i) can lead to posterior parameter distributions that are highly biased and overly confident. Further, when performing model reduction as described in (ii), it is not clear how the prior distribution for the basis weights should be defined because simple (e.g., Gaussian or uniform) priors that may be suitable for a pixel-based parameterization may result in a strong prior bias when used for the weights. To address the issue of model error resulting from known forward model approximations, we generate a set of error training realizations and analyze them with principal component analysis (PCA) in order to generate a sparse basis. The latter is used in the MCMC inversion to remove the main model-error component from the residuals. To improve issues related to prior bias when performing model reduction, we also use a training realization approach, but this time models are simulated from the prior distribution and analyzed using independent

  17. 2D and 3D imaging of the metamorphic carbonates at Omalos plateau/polje, Crete, Greece by employing independent and joint inversion on resistivity and seismic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pangratis Pangratis

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A geophysical survey carried out at Omalos plateau in Chania, Western Crete, Greece employed seismic as well as electrical tomography methods in order to image karstic structures and the metamorphic carbonates (Tripali unit and Plattenkalk group which are covered by post-Mesozoic deposits (terra rossa, clays, sands and gravels. The geoelectrical sections image the metamorphic carbonates which exhibit a highly irregular relief. At the central part of the plateau the thickness of post-Mesozoic deposits (terra rossa, clays, sands and gravels ranges from 40-130 m. A 3D resistivity image was generated by inverting resistivity data collected on a grid to the south west at the Omalos plateau. The 3D resistivity image delineated a karstic structure at a depth of 25 to 55 m. On the same grid the depth to the top of the karstified carbonates ranges from 25-70 m. This is also verified on the resistivity sections and seismic velocity sections along lines 5 and 7 of the above mentioned grid which are derived from the cross-gradients joint inversion.

  18. Statistical Modeling of Radiometric Error Propagation in Support of Hyperspectral Imaging Inversion and Optimized Ground Sensor Network Design

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Klempner, Scott

    2008-01-01

    .... Error modeling and propagation methodology is developed for each link in the imaging chain, and representative values are determined for the purpose of exercising the model and observing the system...

  19. Multiparameter full waveform inversion of multicomponent ocean-bottom-cable data from the Valhall field. Part 2: imaging compressive-wave and shear-wave velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieux, Vincent; Brossier, Romain; Operto, Stéphane; Virieux, Jean

    2013-09-01

    Multiparameter elastic full waveform inversion (FWI) is a promising technology that allows inferences to be made on rock and fluid properties, which thus narrows the gap between seismic imaging and reservoir characterization. Here, we assess the feasibility of 2-D vertical transverse isotropic visco-elastic FWI of wide-aperture multicomponent ocean-bottom-cable data from the Valhall oil field. A key issue is to design a suitable hierarchical data-driven and model-driven FWI workflow, the aim of which is to reduce the nonlinearity of the FWI. This nonlinearity partly arises because the shear (S) wavespeed can have a limited influence on seismic data in marine environments. In a preliminary stage, visco-acoustic FWI of the hydrophone component is performed to build a compressional (P)-wave velocity model, a density model and a quality-factor model, which provide the necessary background models for the subsequent elastic inversion. During the elastic FWI, the P and S wavespeeds are jointly updated in two steps. First, the hydrophone data are inverted to mainly update the long-to-intermediate wavelengths of the S wavespeeds from the amplitude-versus-offset variations of the P-P reflections. This S-wave velocity model is used as an improved starting model for the subsequent inversion of the better-resolving data recorded by the geophones. During these two steps, the P-wave velocity model is marginally updated, which supports the relevance of the visco-acoustic FWI results. Through seismic modelling, we show that the resulting visco-elastic model allows several P-to-S converted phases recorded on the horizontal-geophone component to be matched. Several elastic quantities, such as the Poisson ratio, and the ratio and product between the P and S wavespeeds, are inferred from the P-wave and S-wave velocity models. These attributes provide hints for the interpretation of an accumulation of gas below lithological barriers.

  20. Evaluation of early visual recovery in pituitary macroadenomas after endoscopic endonasal transphenoidal surgery: Quantitative assessment with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anik, Ihsan; Anik, Yonca; Koc, Kenan; Ceylan, Savas; Genc, Hamza; Altintas, Ozgul; Ozdamar, Dilek; Baykal Ceylan, Duygu

    2011-04-01

    Visual field analyses reflect the degree of the compression to the optic nerve that results the structural damage of the nerve. These structural damages can be evaluated by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), which assesses the structural integrity of white matter tracts. Thus, we evaluated the quantitative assessment of early visual recovery in patients with pituitary macroadenomas, corresponding DTI with visual field analyses. Seventy-two patients who had pituitary macroadenomas with visual field defects were included in the study retrospectively. All patients were operated on by pure endoscopic transphenoidal approach. Visual field assessment using Humphrey field analyzer and DTI with 3T magnet were performed in the preoperative and postoperative second day and sixth month. Mean symptom duration was 14.7 ± 10.5 weeks in the full recovery group patients, 50.1 ± 29.1 weeks in partial recovery patients, and 92.4 ± 15.4 weeks in the ones with no recovery. There was a significant difference at p < 0.001 among the groups. On visual field analysis, the visual lost was mostly recognized at upper temporal levels preoperatively. Visual field findings of both eyes were improved in 80% of the patients. Among these, 25% revealed full recovery, 55.6% partial recovery, and 19.4% did not demonstrate significant changes. DTI assessments of affected sides revealed preoperative fractional anisotropy (FA) values below 0.400 and mean diffusivity (MD) values over 1,400 × 10(-6) mm(2) s(-1) were related with no visual improvement in the postoperative 6 months period. The percentage increase of mean FA values of the affected areas postoperatively were found to be 21.9% in totally responded patients, 20.6% in partial responded patients, and 9.8% in patients that did not respond. There is a correlation between DTI-derived FA values of the optic nerves and visual parameters. DTI assessments of the affected sides with FA and MD values may help to estimate the response

  1. Using inverse electrocardiography to image myocardial infarction--reflecting on the 2007 PhysioNet/Computers in Cardiology Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawoud, Fady; Wagner, Galen S; Moody, George; Horácek, B Milan

    2008-01-01

    The goal of the 2007 PhysioNet/Computers in Cardiology Challenge was to try to establish how well it is possible to characterize the location and extent of old myocardial infarcts using electrocardiographic evidence supplemented by anatomical imaging information. A brief overview of the challenge and how different challengers approached the competition is provided, followed by detailed response of the first author to integrate electrophysiologic and anatomical data. The first author used the provided 120-electrode body-surface potential mapping data and magnetic resonance imaging heart and torso images to calculate epicardial potentials on customized ventricular geometries. A method was developed to define the location and extent of scar tissue based on the morphology of computed epicardial electrograms. Negative Q-wave deflection followed by R-wave on the left ventricular surface seemed to correspond with the location of the scar as determined by the gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging gold standard in the supplied data sets. The method shows promising results as a noninvasive imaging tool to quantitatively characterize chronic infarcts and warrants further investigation on a larger patient data set.

  2. Compartmentalization of the Coso East Flank geothermal field imaged by 3-D full-tensor MT inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Nathaniel J.; Kaven, Joern; Davatzes, Nicholas C.; Newman, Gregory A.

    2017-01-01

    Previous magnetotelluric (MT) studies of the high-temperature Coso geothermal system in California identified a subvertical feature of low resistivity (2–5 Ohm m) and appreciable lateral extent (>1 km) in the producing zone of the East Flank field. However, these models could not reproduce gross 3-D effects in the recorded data. We perform 3-D full-tensor inversion and retrieve a resistivity model that out-performs previous 2-D and 3-D off-diagonal models in terms of its fit to the complete 3-D MT data set as well as the degree of modelling bias. Inclusion of secondary Zxx and Zyy data components leads to a robust east-dip (60†) to the previously identified conductive East Flank reservoir feature, which correlates strongly with recently mapped surface faults, downhole well temperatures, 3-D seismic reflection data, and local microseismicity. We perform synthetic forward modelling to test the best-fit dip of this conductor using the response at a nearby MT station. We interpret the dipping conductor as a fractured and fluidized compartment, which is structurally controlled by an unmapped blind East Flank fault zone.

  3. Compartmentalization of the Coso East Flank geothermal field imaged by 3-D full-tensor MT inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Nathaniel J.; Kaven, Joern Ole; Davatzes, Nicholas; Newman, Gregory A.

    2017-02-01

    Previous magnetotelluric (MT) studies of the high-temperature Coso geothermal system in California identified a subvertical feature of low resistivity (2-5 Ohm m) and appreciable lateral extent (>1 km) in the producing zone of the East Flank field. However, these models could not reproduce gross 3-D effects in the recorded data. We perform 3-D full-tensor inversion and retrieve a resistivity model that out-performs previous 2-D and 3-D off-diagonal models in terms of its fit to the complete 3-D MT data set as well as the degree of modelling bias. Inclusion of secondary Zxx and Zyy data components leads to a robust east-dip (60†) to the previously identified conductive East Flank reservoir feature, which correlates strongly with recently mapped surface faults, downhole well temperatures, 3-D seismic reflection data, and local microseismicity. We perform synthetic forward modelling to test the best-fit dip of this conductor using the response at a nearby MT station. We interpret the dipping conductor as a fractured and fluidized compartment, which is structurally controlled by an unmapped blind East Flank fault zone.

  4. A Combined Micro-CT Imaging/Microfluidic Approach for Understating Methane Recovery in Coal Seam Gas Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostaghimi, P.; Armstrong, R. T.; Gerami, A.; Lamei Ramandi, H.; Ebrahimi Warkiani, M.

    2015-12-01

    Coal seam methane is a form of natural gas stored in coal beds and is one of the most important unconventional resources of energy. The flow and transport in coal beds occur in a well-developed system of natural fractures that are also known as cleats. We use micro-Computed Tomography (CT) imaging at both dry and wet conditions to resolve the cleats below the resolution of the image. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) is used for calibration of micro-CT data. Using soft lithography technique, the cleat system is duplicated on a silicon mould. We fabricate a microfluidic chip using Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to study both imbibition and drainage in generated coal structures for understating gas and water transport in coal seam reservoirs. First, we use simple patterns observed on coal images to analyse the effects of wettability, cleat size and distribution on flow behaviour. Then, we study transport in a coal by injecting both distilled water and decane with a rate of 1 microliter/ min into the fabricated cleat structure (Figure 1), initially saturated with air. We repeat the experiment for different contact angles by plasma treating the microfluidic chip, and results show significant effects of wettability on the displacement efficiency. The breakthrough time in the imbibition setup is significantly longer than in the drainage. Using rapid video capturing, and high resolution microscopy, we measure the saturation of displacing fluid with respect to time. By measuring gas and liquid recovery in the outlet at different saturation, we predict relative permeability of coal. This work has important applications for optimising gas recovery and our results can serve as a benchmark in the verification of multiphase numerical models used in coal seam gas industry.

  5. Rank-1 accelerated illumination recovery in scanning diffractive imaging by transparency estimation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hau-Tieng

    2014-08-07

    Illumination retrieval in scanning diffractive imaging a.k.a. ptychography is challenging when the specimen is weakly scattering or surrounded by empty space. We describe a rank-1 acceleration method for weakly scattering or piecewise smooth specimens.

  6. Biodistribution and dosimetry in humans of two inverse agonists to image cannabinoid CB1 receptors using positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, Garth E.; Hirvonen, Jussi; Liow, Jeih-San; Seneca, Nicholas; Morse, Cheryl L.; Pike, Victor W.; Innis, Robert B.; Tauscher, Johannes T.; Schaus, John M.; Phebus, Lee; Felder, Christian C.; Halldin, Christer

    2010-01-01

    Cannabinoid subtype 1 (CB 1 ) receptors are found in nearly every organ in the body, may be involved in several neuropsychiatric and metabolic disorders, and are therefore an active target for pharmacotherapy and biomarker development. We recently reported brain imaging of CB 1 receptors with two PET radioligands: 11 C-MePPEP and 18 F-FMPEP-d 2 . Here we describe the biodistribution and dosimetry estimates for these two radioligands. Seven healthy subjects (four men and three women) underwent whole-body PET scans for 120 min after injection with 11 C-MePPEP. Another seven healthy subjects (two men and five women) underwent whole-body PET scans for 300 min after injection with 18 F-FMPEP-d 2 . Residence times were acquired from regions of interest drawn on tomographic images of visually identifiable organs for both radioligands and from radioactivity excreted in urine for 18 F-FMPEP-d 2 . The effective doses of 11 C-MePPEP and 18 F-FMPEP-d 2 are 4.6 and 19.7 μSv/MBq, respectively. Both radioligands demonstrated high uptake of radioactivity in liver, lung, and brain shortly after injection and accumulated radioactivity in bone marrow towards the end of the scan. After injection of 11 C-MePPEP, radioactivity apparently underwent hepatobiliary excretion only, while radioactivity from 18 F-FMPEP-d 2 showed both hepatobiliary and urinary excretion. 11 C-MePPEP and 18 F-FMPEP-d 2 yield an effective dose similar to other PET radioligands labeled with either 11 C or 18 F. The high uptake in brain confirms the utility of these two radioligands to image CB 1 receptors in brain, and both may also be useful to image CB 1 receptors in the periphery. (orig.)

  7. Deep structure of Pyrenees range (SW Europe) imaged by joint inversion of gravity and teleseismic delay time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufréchou, G.; Tiberi, C.; Martin, R.; Bonvalot, S.; Chevrot, S.; Seoane, L.

    2018-04-01

    We present a new model of the lithosphere and asthenosphere structure down to 300 km depth beneath the Pyrenees from the joint inversion of recent gravity and teleseismic data. Unlike previous studies, crustal correction were not applied on teleseismic data in order (i) to preserve the consistency between gravity data, which are mainly sensitive to the density structure of the crust.lithosphere, and travel time data, and (ii) to avoid the introduction of biases resulting from crustal reductions. The density model down to 100 km depth is preferentially used here to discuss the lithospheric structure of the Pyrenees, whereas the asthenospheric structure from 100 km to 300 km depth is discussed from our velocity model. The absence of a high density anomaly in our model between 30-100 km depth (except the Labourd density anomaly) in the northern part of the Pyrenees seems to preclude eclogitization of the subducted Iberian crust at the scale of the entire Pyrenean range. Local eclogitization of the deep Pyrenean crust beneath the western part of the Axial Zone (West of Andorra) associated with the positive Central density anomaly is proposed. The Pyrenean lithosphere in density and velocity models appears segmented from East to West. No clear relation between the along-strike segmentation and mapped major faults is visible in our models. The Pyrenees' lithosphere segments are associated to different seismicity pattern in the Pyrenees suggesting a possible relation between the deep structure of the Pyrenees and its seismicity in the upper crust. The concentration of earthquakes localized just straight up the Central density anomaly can result of the subsidence and/or delamination of an eclogitized Pyrenean deep root. The velocity model in the asthenosphere is similar to previous studies. The absence of a high-velocity anomaly in the upper mantle and transition zone (i.e. 125 to 225 km depth) seems to preclude the presence of a detached oceanic lithosphere beneath the

  8. Pseudo waveform inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Chang Soo; Park, Keun Pil [Korea Inst. of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Jung Hee; Hyun, Byung Koo; Shin, Sung Ryul [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    The seismic reflection exploration technique which is one of the geophysical methods for oil exploration became effectively to image the subsurface structure with rapid development of computer. However, the imagining of subsurface based on the conventional data processing is almost impossible to obtain the information on physical properties of the subsurface such as velocity and density. Since seismic data are implicitly function of velocities of subsurface, it is necessary to develop the inversion method that can delineate the velocity structure using seismic topography and waveform inversion. As a tool to perform seismic inversion, seismic forward modeling program using ray tracing should be developed. In this study, we have developed the algorithm that calculate the travel time of the complex geologic structure using shooting ray tracing by subdividing the geologic model into blocky structure having the constant velocity. With the travel time calculation, the partial derivatives of travel time can be calculated efficiently without difficulties. Since the current ray tracing technique has a limitation to calculate the travel times for extremely complex geologic model, our aim in the future is to develop the powerful ray tracer using the finite element technique. After applying the pseudo waveform inversion to the seismic data of Korea offshore, we can obtain the subsurface velocity model and use the result in bring up the quality of the seismic data processing. If conventional seismic data processing and seismic interpretation are linked with this inversion technique, the high quality of seismic data processing can be expected to image the structure of the subsurface. Future research area is to develop the powerful ray tracer of ray tracing which can calculate the travel times for the extremely complex geologic model. (author). 39 refs., 32 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Feasibility of Diffusion Tensor Imaging for Assessing Functional Recovery in Rats with Olfactory Ensheathing Cell Transplantation After Contusive Spinal Cord Injury (SCI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Mengchao; Gao, Zhengchao; Li, Xiaohui; Zhao, Feng; Guo, Lei; Liu, Jiantao; He, Xijing

    2017-06-17

    BACKGROUND Olfactory ensheathing cell transplantation is a promising treatment for spinal cord injury. Diffusion tensor imaging has been applied to assess various kinds of spinal cord injury. However, it has rarely been used to evaluate the beneficial effects of olfactory ensheathing cell transplantation. This study aimed to explore the feasibility of diffusion tensor imaging in the evaluation of functional recovery in rats with olfactory ensheathing cell transplantation after contusive spinal cord injury. MATERIAL AND METHODS Immunofluorescence staining was performed to determine the purity of olfactory ensheathing cells. Rats received cell transplantation at week 1 after injury. Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan score was used to assess the functional recovery. Magnetic resonance imaging was applied weekly, including diffusion tensor imaging. Diffusion tensor tractography was reconstructed to visualize the repair process. RESULTS The results showed that olfactory ensheathing cell transplantation increased the functional and histological recovery and restrained the secondary injury process after the initial spinal cord injury. The fractional anisotropy values in rats with cell transplantation were significantly higher than those in the control group, while the apparent diffusion coefficient values were significantly lower. Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan score was positively and linearly correlated with fractional anisotropy value, and it was negatively and linearly correlated with apparent diffusion coefficient value. CONCLUSIONS These findings suggest that diffusion tensor imaging parameters are sensitive biomarker indices for olfactory ensheathing cell transplantation interventions, and diffusion tensor imaging scan can reflect the functional recovery promoted by the olfactory ensheathing cell transplantation after contusive spinal cord injury.

  10. New Hybrid Variational Recovery Model for Blurred Images with Multiplicative Noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dong, Yiqiu; Zeng, Tieyong

    2013-01-01

    of the solution and the stability of the algorithm. A split-Bregman algorithm is adopted to solve the constrained minimisation problem in the new hybrid model efficiently. Numerical tests for simultaneous deblurring and denoising of the images subject to multiplicative noise are then reported. Comparison......A new hybrid variational model for recovering blurred images in the presence of multiplicative noise is proposed. Inspired by previous work on multiplicative noise removal, an I-divergence technique is used to build a strictly convex model under a condition that ensures the uniqueness...

  11. Acute inversion injury of the ankle without radiological abnormalities: assessment with high-field MR imaging and correlation of findings with clinical outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langner, Inga; Frank, Matthias; Hinz, Peter; Ekkernkamp, Axel [Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-University Greifswald, Department of Trauma and Orthopedic Surgery, Emergency Department, Greifswald (Germany); Kuehn, Jens Peter; Hosten, Norbert; Langner, Soenke [Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-University Greifswald, Institute for Diagnostic Radiology and Neuroradiology, Greifswald (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    Acute inversion injuries of the ankle are the most common sports accidents, accounting for approximately 10% of emergency room admissions. In up to 85%, an injury of the lateral collateral ligaments is observed. Classically, the assessment of these injuries has relied on clinical examination and radiographs, including stress views. The aim of our study was to correlate prospectively the findings of high-field 3 T MRI in acute ankle distortion with clinical outcome. During a 6-month period, 38 patients were prospectively included. MRI was performed within 48 h of trauma and clinical examination using a protocol consisting of axial T2-weighted and coronal and sagittal T1-weighted images and a sagittal proton density (PDw) sequence. Each ligament injury was graded on a three-point scale. Functional outcome was evaluated using the AOFAS ankle-hindfoot scale. In 24/38 patients (63.12%), ligament injury was observed. In 22/24 cases, this was an injury of the lateral ligaments and in 2/24 cases of the medial ligaments. Injury of the syndesmosis occurred in three patients, a bone bruise in four, and an osteochondral lesion in three cases. Patients with an injury of two or more ligaments or a bone bruise had a lower AOFAS score and returned to sports activities and full weight-bearing later (P < 0.01). MR imaging at 3 Tesla is an independent predictor for clinical outcome. Therefore MRI may be beneficial in those cases where the findings influence further treatment. (orig.)

  12. Acute inversion injury of the ankle without radiological abnormalities: assessment with high-field MR imaging and correlation of findings with clinical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langner, Inga; Frank, Matthias; Hinz, Peter; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Kuehn, Jens Peter; Hosten, Norbert; Langner, Soenke

    2011-01-01

    Acute inversion injuries of the ankle are the most common sports accidents, accounting for approximately 10% of emergency room admissions. In up to 85%, an injury of the lateral collateral ligaments is observed. Classically, the assessment of these injuries has relied on clinical examination and radiographs, including stress views. The aim of our study was to correlate prospectively the findings of high-field 3 T MRI in acute ankle distortion with clinical outcome. During a 6-month period, 38 patients were prospectively included. MRI was performed within 48 h of trauma and clinical examination using a protocol consisting of axial T2-weighted and coronal and sagittal T1-weighted images and a sagittal proton density (PDw) sequence. Each ligament injury was graded on a three-point scale. Functional outcome was evaluated using the AOFAS ankle-hindfoot scale. In 24/38 patients (63.12%), ligament injury was observed. In 22/24 cases, this was an injury of the lateral ligaments and in 2/24 cases of the medial ligaments. Injury of the syndesmosis occurred in three patients, a bone bruise in four, and an osteochondral lesion in three cases. Patients with an injury of two or more ligaments or a bone bruise had a lower AOFAS score and returned to sports activities and full weight-bearing later (P < 0.01). MR imaging at 3 Tesla is an independent predictor for clinical outcome. Therefore MRI may be beneficial in those cases where the findings influence further treatment. (orig.)

  13. Abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging seen acutely following mild traumatic brain injury: correlation with neuropsychological tests and delayed recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, David G.; Jackson, Alan; Mason, Damon L.; Berry, Elizabeth; Hollis, Sally; Yates, David W.

    2004-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) is a common reason for hospital attendance and is associated with significant delayed morbidity. We studied a series of 80 persons with MTBI. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and neuropsychological testing were used in the acute phase and a questionnaire for post-concussion syndrome (PCS) and return to work status at 6 months. In 26 subjects abnormalities were seen on MRI, of which 5 were definitely traumatic. There was weak correlation with abnormal neuropsychological tests for attention in the acute period. There was no significant correlation with a questionnaire for PCS and return to work status. Although non-specific abnormalities are frequently seen, standard MRI techniques are not helpful in identifying patients with MTBI who are likely to have delayed recovery. (orig.)

  14. SHARC II Image of Fomalhaut at 350 μ m, and Dust Column Density Map from Multiwavelength Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, K. A.; Velusamy, T.; Dowell, C. D.; Beichman, C. A.

    2004-12-01

    We have imaged the circumstellar disk of Fomalhaut at 350 μ m wavelength, using observations made with the new SHARC II camera at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory on 2004 Sep 18. The spatial resolution of the raw images (9 arcsec) has been enhanced by a factor of about two using the HiRes deconvolution procedure. We find that at this wavelength and signal to noise ratio ( ˜ 12), the observed morphology is that of a simple inclined ring (i ˜ 69 deg), with no other apparent structure. We have combined our 350 μ m data with Spitzer images at 24, 70, and 160 μ m in order to estimate the 2-dimensional spatial variation of relative column density in the disk, as seen in a pole-on projection, using our DISKFIT procedure. The estimate, referred to as a ``tau map," is based on the following physical assumptions: (1) the wavelength variation of opacity is the same throughout the disk, (2) the radial variation of dust temperature is dictated by the energy balance of individual grains in the stellar radiation field, and (3) the vertical scale height of the disk follows a power-law radial variation. The resulting tau map confirms that the observations at all 4 wavelengths are consistent with a simple ring whose column density is azimuthally uniform. The estimated inner and outer radii are 120 and 210 AU, respectively, and the estimated opening angle is 7 deg. In this solution, the star is slightly displaced from the center of the ring, causing additional heating of the southwest quadrant; this accounts for the observed wavelength-dependence of the brightness asymmetry of the ansae that has been reported by others. Also apparent in the inner part of the estimated tau map is a much more diffuse component whose column density decreases inward towards the star; it is the manifestation of the central compact source visible in the 24 μ m data, and represents hot dust interior to the ring. The implications of these results with regard to the possible existence of orbiting

  15. Multiparameter full waveform inversion of multicomponent ocean-bottom-cable data from the Valhall field. Part 1: imaging compressional wave speed, density and attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieux, Vincent; Brossier, Romain; Operto, Stéphane; Virieux, Jean

    2013-09-01

    Multiparameter full waveform inversion (FWI) is a challenging quantitative seismic imaging method for lithological characterization and reservoir monitoring. The difficulties in multiparameter FWI arise from the variable influence of the different parameter classes on the phase and amplitude of the data, and the trade-off between these. In this framework, choosing a suitable parametrization of the subsurface and designing the suitable FWI workflow are two key methodological issues in non-linear waveform inversion. We assess frequency-domain visco-acoustic FWI to reconstruct the compressive velocity (VP), the density (ρ) or the impedance (IP) and the quality factor (QP), from the hydrophone component, using a synthetic data set that is representative of the Valhall oil field in the North Sea. We first assess which of the (VP, ρ) and (VP, IP) parametrizations provides the most reliable FWI results when dealing with wide-aperture data. Contrary to widely accepted ideas, we show that the (VP, ρ) parametrization allows a better reconstruction of both the VP, ρ and IP parameters, first because it favours the broad-band reconstruction of the dominant VP parameter, and secondly because the trade-off effects between velocity and density at short-to-intermediate scattering angles can be removed by multiplication, to build an impedance model. This allows for the matching of the reflection amplitudes, while the broad-band velocity model accurately describes the kinematic attributes of both the diving waves and reflections. Then, we assess different inversion strategies to recover the quality factor QP, in addition to parameters VP and ρ. A difficulty related to attenuation estimation arises because, on the one hand the values of QP are on average one order of magnitude smaller than those of VP and ρ, and on the other hands model perturbations relative to the starting models can be much higher for QP than for VP and ρ during FWI. In this framework, we show that an

  16. Noninvasive Multimodal Imaging to Predict Recovery of Locomotion after Extended Limb Ischemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason S Radowsky

    Full Text Available Acute limb ischemia is a common cause of morbidity and mortality following trauma both in civilian centers and in combat related injuries. Rapid determination of tissue viability and surgical restoration of blood flow are desirable, but not always possible. We sought to characterize the response to increasing periods of hind limb ischemia in a porcine model such that we could define a period of critical ischemia (the point after which irreversible neuromuscular injury occurs, evaluate non-invasive methods for characterizing that ischemia, and establish a model by which we could predict whether or not the animal's locomotion would return to baselines levels post-operatively. Ischemia was induced by either application of a pneumatic tourniquet or vessel occlusion (performed by clamping the proximal iliac artery and vein at the level of the inguinal ligament. The limb was monitored for the duration of the procedure with both 3-charge coupled device (3CCD and infrared (IR imaging for tissue oxygenation and perfusion, respectively. The experimental arms of this model are effective at inducing histologically evident muscle injury with some evidence of expected secondary organ damage, particularly in animals with longer ischemia times. Noninvasive imaging data shows excellent correlation with post-operative functional outcomes, validating its use as a non-invasive means of viability assessment, and directly monitors post-occlusive reactive hyperemia. A classification model, based on partial-least squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA of imaging variables only, successfully classified animals as "returned to normal locomotion" or "did not return to normal locomotion" with 87.5% sensitivity and 66.7% specificity after cross-validation. PLSDA models generated from non-imaging data were not as accurate (AUC of 0.53 compared the PLSDA model generated from only imaging data (AUC of 0.76. With some modification, this limb ischemia model could also serve as a

  17. Phase recovery and lensless imaging by iterative methods in optical, X-ray and electron diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, J C H; Weierstall, U; Howells, M

    2002-05-15

    Thomas Young's quantitative analysis of interference effects provided the confidence needed to revive the wave theory of light, and firmly established the concept of phase in optics. Phase plays a similarly fundamental role in matter-wave interferometry, for which the field-emission electron microscope provides ideal instrumentation. The wave-particle duality is vividly demonstrated by experimental 'Young's fringes' using coherent electron beams under conditions in which the flight time is less than the time between particle emission. A brief historical review is given of electron interferometry and holography, including the Aharonov-Bohm effect and the electron Sagnac interferometer. The simultaneous development of phase-contrast imaging at subnanometre spatial resolution has greatly deepened our understanding of atomic processes in biology, materials science and condensed-matter physics, while electron holography has become a routine tool for the mapping of electrostatic and magnetic fields in materials on a nanometre scale. The encoding of phase information in scattered farfield intensities is discussed, and non-interferometric, non-crystallographic methods for phase retrieval are reviewed in relationship to electron holography. Examples of phase measurement and diffraction-limited imaging using the hybrid input-output iterative algorithm are given, including simulations for soft X-ray imaging, and new experimental results for coherent electron and visible-light scattering. Image reconstruction is demonstrated from experimental electron and visible-light Fraunhofer diffraction patterns. The prospects this provides for lensless imaging using particles for which no lenses exist (such as neutrons, condensates, coherent atom beams and X-rays) are discussed. These new interactions can be expected to provide new information, perhaps, for example, in biology, with the advantage of less damage to samples.

  18. Joint inversion of ambient noise surface wave and gravity data to image the upper crustal structure of the Tanlu fault zone to the southeast of Hefei, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K.; Gu, N.; Zhang, H.; Zhou, G.

    2017-12-01

    The Tanlu fault is a major fault located in the eastern China, which stretches 2400 km long from Tancheng in the north to Lujiang in the south. It is generally believed that the Tanlu fault zone was formed in Proterozoic era and underwent a series of complicated processes since then. To understand the upper crustal structure around the southern segment of the Tanlu fault zone, in 2017 we deployed 53 short period seismic stations around the fault zone to the southeast of Hefei, capital city of Anhui province. The temporary array continuously recorded the data for about one month from 17 March to 26 April 2017. The seismic array spans an area of about 30km x 30Km with an average station spacing of about 5-6km. The vertical component data were used for extracting Rayleigh wave phase and group velocity dispersion data for the period of 0.2 to 5 seconds. To improve imaging the upper crustal structure of the fault zone, we jointly inverted the surface wave dispersion data and the gravity data because they have complementary strengths. To combine surface wave dispersion data and gravity observations into a single inversion framework, we used an empirical relationship between seismic velocity and density of Maceira and Ammon (2009). By finding the optimal relative weighting between two data types, we are able to find a shear wave velocity (Vs) model that fits both data types. The joint inversion can resolve the upper crustal fault zone structure down to about 7 km in depth. The Vs model shows that in this region the Tanlu fault is associated with high velocity anomalies, corresponding well to the Feidong complex seen on the surface. This indicates that the Tanlu fault zone may provide a channel for the intrusion of hot materials.

  19. Clinical evaluation of reducing acquisition time on single-photon emission computed tomography image quality using proprietary resolution recovery software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Matthew D; Waddington, Wendy W; Dickson, John C; Prakash, Vineet; Ell, Peter J; Bomanji, Jamshed B

    2013-11-01

    A three-dimensional model-based resolution recovery (RR) reconstruction algorithm that compensates for collimator-detector response, resulting in an improvement in reconstructed spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images, was tested. The software is said to retain image quality even with reduced acquisition time. Clinically, any improvement in patient throughput without loss of quality is to be welcomed. Furthermore, future restrictions in radiotracer supplies may add value to this type of data analysis. The aims of this study were to assess improvement in image quality using the software and to evaluate the potential of performing reduced time acquisitions for bone and parathyroid SPECT applications. Data acquisition was performed using the local standard SPECT/CT protocols for 99mTc-hydroxymethylene diphosphonate bone and 99mTc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile parathyroid SPECT imaging. The principal modification applied was the acquisition of an eight-frame gated data set acquired using an ECG simulator with a fixed signal as the trigger. This had the effect of partitioning the data such that the effect of reduced time acquisitions could be assessed without conferring additional scanning time on the patient. The set of summed data sets was then independently reconstructed using the RR software to permit a blinded assessment of the effect of acquired counts upon reconstructed image quality as adjudged by three experienced observers. Data sets reconstructed with the RR software were compared with the local standard processing protocols; filtered back-projection and ordered-subset expectation-maximization. Thirty SPECT studies were assessed (20 bone and 10 parathyroid). The images reconstructed with the RR algorithm showed improved image quality for both full-time and half-time acquisitions over local current processing protocols (Pquality compared with local processing protocols and has been introduced into

  20. Imaging the lithospheric structure of the Central Andes from the joint inversion of multiple seismic data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Kevin Michael

    A lingering question in Cordilleran tectonics is how high plateaus form in the absence of continental collision. The type example of an active Cordilleran high plateau is found in the Central Andes of Peru, Bolivia, Argentina, and Chile. Along this section of the South American Cordillera, tectonics are primarily driven by subduction of the oceanic Nazca Plate beneath the continental South American Plate. Extending over 1,800 km along the active continental margin, the Central Andean Plateau (CAP) reaches a maximum width of around 400 km with several peaks in excess of 6 km. Numerous morphotectonic subdivisions of the CAP highlight the complex along-strike variability of the Plateau providing a natural laboratory for investigating the relative contribution of tectonic processes involved in building and maintaining Cordilleran high plateaus. The scale of this problem extends far beyond the scope of any one geoscientific discipline requiring a multidisciplinary approach. Our contribution to this scientific problem and the focus of the work presented in this dissertation is to better understand the current lithospheric and uppermost mantle structure along the CAP. This is achieved by integrating recent advances in seismic imaging techniques with a growing availability of high-quality seismic data into three distinct studies across the South American continent. In the first study, we present a shear-wave velocity model for the crust below the Altiplano-Puna Volcanic Complex (APVC). The target of this study is to constrain the crustal volume of a large magma reservoir inferred to exist below the APVC. When combined with geological and petrological constraints, the large-volume magma reservoir imaged in this study suggests a significant magmatic contribution to the growth of the Plateau in excess of one kilometer over the last ten million years. In addition to the tectonic contributions of this work, we introduce a new method of jointly inverting surface-wave dispersion

  1. Mid-term follow-up of patients with transposition of the great arteries after atrial inversion operation using two- and three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogel, Mark A.; Weinberg, Paul M.; Hubbard, Anne

    2002-01-01

    Background: Older patients with transposition of the great arteries who have undergone an atrial inversion procedure (ATRIAL-INV) are difficult to image by echocardiography. The surgical baffles are spatially complex. Objective: To test the hypothesis that two- and three-dimensional MRI can elucidate the spatially complex anatomy in this patient population. Materials and methods; Twelve patients with ATRIAL-INV, ages 16±4.5 years, underwent routine T1-weighted spin-echo axial imaging to obtain a full cardiac volumetric data set. Postprocessing created three-dimensional shaded surface displays and allowed for multiplanar reconstruction. Routine transthoracic echocardiography was available on all patients. Results: Three-dimensional reconstruction enabled complete spatial conceptualization of the venous pathways, and allowed for precise localization of a narrowed region in the upper limb of the systemic venous pathway found in two patients. This was subsequently confirmed on angiography. Routine MRI was able to image the full extent of the venous pathways in all 12 patients. Routine transthoracic echocardiography was able to visualize proximal portions of the venous pathways in eight (67%), the distal upper limb in five (42%), and the distal lower limb in four (33%) patients, and it was able to visualize the outflow tracts in all patients. Conclusion: Three-dimensional reconstruction adds important spatial information, which can be especially important in stenotic regions. Routine MRI is superior to transthoracic echocardiography in delineation of the systemic and pulmonary venous pathway anatomy of ATRIAL-INV patients at mid-term follow-up. Although transesophageal echocardiography is an option, it is more invasive. (orig.)

  2. Positron Emission Tomography Imaging Demonstrates Correlation between Behavioral Recovery and Correction of Dopamine Neurotransmission after Gene Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leriche, L.; Besret, L.; Gregoire, M.C.; Deglon, N.; Hantraye, Ph.; Leriche, L.; Besret, L.; Gregoire, M.C.; Deglon, N.; Hantraye, Ph.; Bjorklund, T.; Breysse, N.; Carlsson, T.; Kirik, D.; Dolle, F.; Mandel, R.J.; Kirik, D.

    2009-01-01

    In vivo gene transfer using viral vectors is an emerging therapy for neuro-degenerative diseases with a clinical impact recently demonstrated in Parkinson's disease patients. Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors, in particular, provide an excellent tool for long-term expression of therapeutic genes in the brain. Here we used the [ 11 C]raclopride [(S)-(-)-3, 5-dichloro-N-((1-ethyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)methyl)-2-hydroxy- 6-methoxybenzamide] micro-positron emission tomography (PET) technique to demonstrate that delivery of the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and GTP-cyclohydrolase 1 (GCH1) enzymes using an rAAV5 vector normalizes the increased [ 11 C]raclopride binding in hemi-parkinsonian rats. Importantly, we show in vivo by micro-PET imaging and postmortem by classical binding assays performed in the very same animals that the changes in [ 11 C]raclopride after viral vector-based enzyme replacement therapy is attributable to a decrease in the affinity of the tracer binding to the D2 receptors, providing evidence for reconstitution of a functional pool of endogenous dopamine in the striatum. Moreover, the extent of the normalization in this non-invasive imaging measure was highly correlated with the functional recovery in motor behavior. The PET imaging protocol used in this study is fully adaptable to humans and thus can serve as an in vivo imaging technique to follow TH+GCH1 gene therapy in PD patients and provide an additional objective measure to a potential clinical trial using rAAV vectors to deliver L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine in the brain. (authors)

  3. Sparse recovery of undersampled intensity patterns for coherent diffraction imaging at high X-ray energies

    OpenAIRE

    Maddali, Siddharth; Calvo-Almazan, Irene; Almer, Jonathan; Kenesei, Peter; Park, Jun-Sang; Harder, Ross; Nashed, Youssef; Hruszkewycz, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    Coherent X-ray photons with energies higher than 50 keV offer new possibilities for imaging nanoscale lattice distortions in bulk crystalline materials using Bragg peak phase retrieval methods. However, the compression of reciprocal space at high energies typically results in poorly resolved fringes on an area detector, rendering the diffraction data unsuitable for the three-dimensional reconstruction of compact crystals. To address this problem, we propose a method by which to recover fine f...

  4. [Imaging techniques for studying functional recovery following a stroke: I. Methodological aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Cabrer, P; Agulla, J; Argibay, B; Brea, D; Campos, F; Castillo, J

    2011-03-16

    Many patients that survive stroke have to face serious functional disabilities for the rest of their lives, which is a personal drama for themselves and their relatives, and an elevated charge for society. Thus functional recovery following stroke should be a key objective for the development of new therapeutic approaches. In this series of two works we review the strategies and tools available nowadays for the evaluation of multiple aspects related to brain function (both in humans and research animals), and how they are helping neuroscientist to better understand the processes of restoration and reorganization of brain function that are triggered following stroke. We have mainly focused on magnetic resonance applications, probably the most versatile neuroimaging technique available nowadays, and that everyday surprises us with new and exciting applications. But we tackle other alternative and complementary techniques, since a multidisciplinary approach allows a wider perspective over the underlying mechanisms behind tissue repair, plastic reorganization of the brain and compensatory mechanisms that are triggered after stroke. The first of the works of this series is focused on methodological aspects that will help us to understand how it is possible to assess brain function based on different physical and physiological principles. In the second work we will focus on different practical issues related to the application of the techniques here discussed.

  5. [Imaging techniques for studying functional recovery following a stroke: II. Complementary techniques].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Cabrer, Pedro; Agulla, Jesús; Rodríguez-González, Raquel; Sobrino, Tomás; Castillo, José

    2011-04-01

    Many patients that survive stroke have to face serious functional disabilities for the rest of their lives, which is a personal drama for themselves and their relatives, and an elevated charge for society. Thus, functional recovery after stroke must be a key aspect of the development of new therapeutic approaches. This is the second of a series of two works on which we review the strategies and tools available nowadays for the assessment of multiple aspects related to brain function (both in humans and research animals) and that are helping neuroscientist to better understand the processes of functional restoration and reorganization of the brain, that are triggered following stroke. We have assumed that a multidisciplinary approach is able to provide us with a wider perspective of the underlying mechanisms behind tissue repair, plastic reorganization of the brain and compensatory mechanisms, that can be triggered after stroke. In the second of the works of this series we are focusing in a series of techniques, complementary to the already discussed in the first work, and that are based on MR. These techniques are discussed separately from those ones, because they tackle with aspects not directly related to brain function, although they somehow do in indirect ways, or because they are based on physicochemical or physiological principles different from those discussed on the first work of this series.

  6. Automated analysis of images acquired with electronic portal imaging device during delivery of quality assurance plans for inversely optimized arc therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredh, Anna; Korreman, Stine; Rosenschöld, Per Munck af

    2010-01-01

    This work presents an automated method for comprehensively analyzing EPID images acquired for quality assurance of RapidArc treatment delivery. In-house-developed software has been used for the analysis and long-term results from measurements on three linacs are presented....

  7. Automated recovery of three-dimensional models of plant shoots from multiple color images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pound, Michael P; French, Andrew P; Murchie, Erik H; Pridmore, Tony P

    2014-12-01

    Increased adoption of the systems approach to biological research has focused attention on the use of quantitative models of biological objects. This includes a need for realistic three-dimensional (3D) representations of plant shoots for quantification and modeling. Previous limitations in single-view or multiple-view stereo algorithms have led to a reliance on volumetric methods or expensive hardware to record plant structure. We present a fully automatic approach to image-based 3D plant reconstruction that can be achieved using a single low-cost camera. The reconstructed plants are represented as a series of small planar sections that together model the more complex architecture of the leaf surfaces. The boundary of each leaf patch is refined using the level-set method, optimizing the model based on image information, curvature constraints, and the position of neighboring surfaces. The reconstruction process makes few assumptions about the nature of the plant material being reconstructed and, as such, is applicable to a wide variety of plant species and topologies and can be extended to canopy-scale imaging. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach on data sets of wheat (Triticum aestivum) and rice (Oryza sativa) plants as well as a unique virtual data set that allows us to compute quantitative measures of reconstruction accuracy. The output is a 3D mesh structure that is suitable for modeling applications in a format that can be imported in the majority of 3D graphics and software packages. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Development of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging/spectroscopy for improved petroleum recovery. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrufet, M.A.; Flumerfelt, F.W.; Walsh, M.P.; Watson, A.T.

    1994-04-01

    The overall objectives of this program are to develop and apply Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (NMRI) and CT X-Ray Scanning methods for determining rock, fluid, and petrophysical properties and for fundamental studies of multiphase flow behavior in porous media. Specific objectives are divided into four subtasks: (1) development of NMRI and CT scanning for the determination of rock-fluid and petrophysical properties; (2) development of NMRI and CT scanning for characterizing conventional multiphase displacement processes; (3) development of NMR and CT scanning for characterizing dispersed phase processes; and (4) miscible displacement studies.

  9. Removal of jitter noise in 3D shape recovery from image focus by using Kalman filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hoon-Seok; Muhammad, Mannan Saeed; Choi, Tae-Sun

    2018-02-01

    In regard to Shape from Focus, one critical factor impacting system application is mechanical vibration of the translational stage causing jitter noise along the optical axis. This noise is not detectable by simply observing the image. However, when focus measures are applied, inaccuracies in the depth occur. In this article, jitter noise and focus curves are modeled by Gaussian distribution and quadratic function, respectively. Then Kalman filter is designed and applied to eliminate this noise in the focus curves, as a post-processing step after the focus measure application. Experiments are implemented with simulated objects and real objects to show usefulness of proposed algorithm. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Developments in the recovery of colour in fine art prints using spatial image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzi, A.; Parraman, C.

    2010-06-01

    Printmakers have at their disposal a wide range of colour printing processes. The majority of artists will utilise high quality materials with the expectation that the best materials and pigments will ensure image permanence. However, as many artists have experienced, this is not always the case. Inks, papers and materials can deteriorate over time. For artists and conservators who need to restore colour or tone to a print could benefit from the assistance of spatial colour enhancement tools. This paper studies two collections from the same edition of fine art prints that were made in 1991. The first edition has been kept in an archive and not exposed to light. The second edition has been framed and exposed to light for about 18 years. Previous experiments using colour enhancement methods [9,10] have involved a series of photographs that had been taken under poor or extreme lighting conditions, fine art works, scanned works. There are a range of colour enhancement methods: Retinex, RSR, ACE, Histogram Equalisation, Auto Levels, which are described in this paper. In this paper we will concentrate on the ACE algorithm and use a range of parameters to process the printed images and describe these results.

  11. Developments in the recovery of colour in fine art prints using spatial image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizzi, A; Parraman, C

    2010-01-01

    Printmakers have at their disposal a wide range of colour printing processes. The majority of artists will utilise high quality materials with the expectation that the best materials and pigments will ensure image permanence. However, as many artists have experienced, this is not always the case. Inks, papers and materials can deteriorate over time. For artists and conservators who need to restore colour or tone to a print could benefit from the assistance of spatial colour enhancement tools. This paper studies two collections from the same edition of fine art prints that were made in 1991. The first edition has been kept in an archive and not exposed to light. The second edition has been framed and exposed to light for about 18 years. Previous experiments using colour enhancement methods [9,10] have involved a series of photographs that had been taken under poor or extreme lighting conditions, fine art works, scanned works. There are a range of colour enhancement methods: Retinex, RSR, ACE, Histogram Equalisation, Auto Levels, which are described in this paper. In this paper we will concentrate on the ACE algorithm and use a range of parameters to process the printed images and describe these results.

  12. Cerebral Ischemia versus MS in Young Adults Clinical Imaging Diagnosis Difficulties and Recovery Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Any DOCU-AXELERAD

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Ischemia in young adults is often the result of non-atherosclerotic vasculopathies, cardiac embolism or clotting disorders. One third of young adults ischemic stroke etiology remains undetermined. Materials and methods: We present the case of a patient aged 42, diagnosed with probable MS without cardiovascular or metabolic risk factors, presented to our clinic for decrease of force at right limbs and recent dysarthria. Results and discussion: The history revealed recurrent episodes of right hemi-body numbness and vertigo labeled as relapse in MS. Patient is non smoker, does not take oral contraceptives and has no history of cerebrovascular disease in the family. Extensive imaging and laboratory investigations confirms the ischemic clinical picture, carotid Doppler ultrasound showing significant stenosis of the bulbo-left carotid. The patient is guided to the cardiovascular surgery clinic for specialized treatment. Two weeks postoperatively we apply a kinetic-therapy program. Conclusion: Uncertain imaging and lack of vascular and metabolic risk factors do not preclude ischemia in young adults.

  13. Balanced SSFP-like steady-state imaging using small-tip fast recovery with a spectral prewinding pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hao; Fessler, Jeffrey A; Noll, Douglas C; Nielsen, Jon-Fredrik

    2016-02-01

    Small-tip fast recovery (STFR) imaging has been proposed recently as a potential alternative to balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP). STFR relies on a tailored "tip-up" radio-frequency pulse to achieve comparable signal level as bSSFP, but with reduced banding artifacts and transient oscillations, and is compatible with magnetization-preparation pulses. Previous STFR implementations used two-dimensional or three-dimensional pulses spatially tailored to the accumulated phase calculated from a B0 field map, making the steady-state STFR signal contain some T2* weighting. Here, we propose to replace the spatially tailored pulse with a recently introduced spectrally selective "pre-winding" pulse that is precomputed to a target frequency range. The proposed "spectral-STFR" sequence produces T2/T1-weighted images similar to bSSFP, but with reduced banding and potentially other benefits. We investigated the steady-state signal properties of spectral-STFR using simulations, and phantom and human volunteer experiments. Our simulation and experimental results showed that the spectral-STFR sequence has similar signal level and tissue contrast as bSSFP, but has a wider passband and more consistent banding profiles across different tissues (e.g., less hyperintense signal at band edges for low flip angles). Care is needed in designing the spectral radio-frequency pulse to ensure that the small tip angle approximation holds during radio-frequency transmission. Spectral-STFR has similar tissue contrast as bSSFP but a wider passband and more consistent cerebrospinal fluid/brain tissue contrast across the passband. The spectral-STFR sequence is a potential alternative to bSSFP in some applications. Compared to a spatially tailored STFR sequence, spectral-STFR can be precomputed, is easier to implement in practice, and potentially has more uniform image contrast and minimal T2* weighting. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. The value of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging in predicting postoperative recovery in patients with cervical spondylosis myelopathy: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Pan, Jun; Nisar, Majid; Zeng, Huan Bei; Dai, Li Fang; Lou, Chao; Zhu, Si Pin; Dai, Bing; Xiang, Guang Heng

    2016-03-01

    This meta-analysis was designed to elucidate whether preoperative signal intensity changes could predict the surgical outcomes of patients with cervical spondylosis myelopathy on the basis of T1-weighted and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging images. We searched the Medline database and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for this purpose and 10 studies meeting our inclusion criteria were identified. In total, 650 cervical spondylosis myelopathy patients with (+) or without (-) intramedullary signal changes on their T2-weighted images were examined. Weighted mean differences and 95% confidence intervals were used to summarize the data. Patients with focal and faint border changes in the intramedullary signal on T2 magnetic resonance imaging had similar Japanese Orthopaedic Association recovery ratios as those with no signal changes on the magnetic resonance imaging images of the spinal cord did. The surgical outcomes were poorer in the patients with both T2 intramedullary signal changes, especially when the signal changes were multisegmental and had a well-defined border and T1 intramedullary signal changes compared with those without intramedullary signal changes. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging including T1 and T2 imaging can thus be used to predict postoperative recovery in cervical spondylosis myelopathy patients.

  15. Bayesian Approach to Inverse Problems

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    Many scientific, medical or engineering problems raise the issue of recovering some physical quantities from indirect measurements; for instance, detecting or quantifying flaws or cracks within a material from acoustic or electromagnetic measurements at its surface is an essential problem of non-destructive evaluation. The concept of inverse problems precisely originates from the idea of inverting the laws of physics to recover a quantity of interest from measurable data.Unfortunately, most inverse problems are ill-posed, which means that precise and stable solutions are not easy to devise. Regularization is the key concept to solve inverse problems.The goal of this book is to deal with inverse problems and regularized solutions using the Bayesian statistical tools, with a particular view to signal and image estimation

  16. T-wave inversions related to left ventricular basal hypertrophy and myocardial fibrosis in non-apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: A cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiuyu, E-mail: cxy0202@126.com [Department of Radiology, State Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Disease, Fuwai Hospital, National Center for Cardiovascular Diseases, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100037 (China); Zhao, Shihua, E-mail: zhaoshihua0202@126.com [Department of Radiology, State Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Disease, Fuwai Hospital, National Center for Cardiovascular Diseases, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100037 (China); Zhao, Tao, E-mail: taozhao0202@126.com [Department of Radiology, State Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Disease, Fuwai Hospital, National Center for Cardiovascular Diseases, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100037 (China); Lu, Minjie, E-mail: lmjkan@126.com [Department of Radiology, State Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Disease, Fuwai Hospital, National Center for Cardiovascular Diseases, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100037 (China); Yin, Gang, E-mail: gangyin0202@126.com [Department of Radiology, State Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Disease, Fuwai Hospital, National Center for Cardiovascular Diseases, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100037 (China); Jiang, Shiliang, E-mail: jiangsl-2011@163.com [Department of Radiology, State Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Disease, Fuwai Hospital, National Center for Cardiovascular Diseases, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100037 (China); Prasad, Sanjay, E-mail: s.prasad@rbht.nhs.uk [NIHR Biomedical Research Unit, Royal Brompton Hospital Sydney Street, London, SW3 6NP (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-15

    Objectives: To investigate the relationship between T-wave inversions and left ventricular (LV) segmental hypertrophy and myocardial fibrosis assessed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) in patients with non-apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Methods: 196 consecutive patients with non-apical HCM underwent late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) CMR and 12-lead electrocardiogram. The distribution and magnitude of LV segmental hypertrophy and LGE were assessed according to the AHA 17-segment model and analyzed in relation to T-wave inversions. Results: Of 196 HCM patients, 144 (73%) exhibited T-wave inversions. 144 (73%) patients had evidence of myocardial fibrosis as defined by LGE, and the prevalence of LGE was significantly higher in patients with T-wave inversions compared with those without T-wave inversions (78% vs. 59%, P = 0.008). T-wave inversions were related to basal anterior and basal anteroseptal LGE (20% vs. 10%, P = 0.04 and 68% vs. 46%, P = 0.005, respectively). In addition, T-wave inversions were associated with greater basal anteroseptal and basal inferior wall thickness (19.5 ± 4.7 mm vs. 16.7 ± 4.5 mm, P < 0.001 and 10.9 ± 3.3 mm vs. 9.6 ± 3.0 mm, P = 0.01, respectively). By logistic regression analysis, basal anteroseptal wall thickness and LGE were independent determinants of T-wave inversions (P = 0.005, P = 0.01, respectively). Conclusions: T-wave inversions in HCM are associated with LGE and wall thickness of the left ventricular basal segments. Moreover, basal anteroseptal wall thickness and LGE are independent determinants of T-wave inversions.

  17. T-wave inversions related to left ventricular basal hypertrophy and myocardial fibrosis in non-apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: A cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Xiuyu; Zhao, Shihua; Zhao, Tao; Lu, Minjie; Yin, Gang; Jiang, Shiliang; Prasad, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the relationship between T-wave inversions and left ventricular (LV) segmental hypertrophy and myocardial fibrosis assessed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) in patients with non-apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Methods: 196 consecutive patients with non-apical HCM underwent late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) CMR and 12-lead electrocardiogram. The distribution and magnitude of LV segmental hypertrophy and LGE were assessed according to the AHA 17-segment model and analyzed in relation to T-wave inversions. Results: Of 196 HCM patients, 144 (73%) exhibited T-wave inversions. 144 (73%) patients had evidence of myocardial fibrosis as defined by LGE, and the prevalence of LGE was significantly higher in patients with T-wave inversions compared with those without T-wave inversions (78% vs. 59%, P = 0.008). T-wave inversions were related to basal anterior and basal anteroseptal LGE (20% vs. 10%, P = 0.04 and 68% vs. 46%, P = 0.005, respectively). In addition, T-wave inversions were associated with greater basal anteroseptal and basal inferior wall thickness (19.5 ± 4.7 mm vs. 16.7 ± 4.5 mm, P < 0.001 and 10.9 ± 3.3 mm vs. 9.6 ± 3.0 mm, P = 0.01, respectively). By logistic regression analysis, basal anteroseptal wall thickness and LGE were independent determinants of T-wave inversions (P = 0.005, P = 0.01, respectively). Conclusions: T-wave inversions in HCM are associated with LGE and wall thickness of the left ventricular basal segments. Moreover, basal anteroseptal wall thickness and LGE are independent determinants of T-wave inversions

  18. Improvement of incidental recovery performances on console by the use of synthesis images in the monitoring phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oudiz, A.; Sicard, Y.; Siebert, S.; Thebault, M.H.

    1988-10-01

    In all industrial processes, the present day tendency in control room design is towards an ever increasing computerization. In particular, the design projects for new control interfaces in nuclear power station control rooms offer the possibility of optimizing suitability of control means to team capacities. In many situations the operator is still the decision maker (despite the high degree of plant automation), the aim is not to dispense with him but rather to come to a more complete understanding of his needs so as to assist him in his complex task. Our problem assumes, however, that we are able to solve a preliminary question, namely what will be the operator's behaviour when using a control tool of our design. Simulation enables us to get round this preliminary question inherent to all new designs. In our case, we simulate a process by means of calculation methods, and test prototype control interfaces, while observing how the operator adapts to this new tool - this once he has passed beyond the trainee stage. Comparison of the different analyses for each prototype enables the design criteria for future interfaces to be defined. This paper describes the method used for interface comparison, summarizes our previous works published elsewhere and describes the results of a comparison between incidental recovery activities carried out on desk with and without use of monitor orientated synthesis images

  19. Saturation Recovery Myocardial T1Mapping with a Composite Radiofrequency Pulse on a 3T MR Imaging System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Kosuke; Oda, Seitaro; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Nakaura, Takeshi; Matsubara, Takatoshi; Goto, Makoto; Okuaki, Tomoyuki; Yuki, Hideaki; Nagayama, Yasunori; Kidoh, Masafumi; Hirata, Kenichiro; Iyama, Yuij; Taguchi, Narumi; Hatemura, Masahiro; Hashida, Masahiro; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2018-01-10

    To evaluate the effect of a composite radiofrequency (RF) pulse on saturation recovery (SR) myocardial T 1 mapping using a 3T MR system. Phantom and in vivo studies were performed with a clinical 3T MR scanner. Accuracy and reproducibility of the SR T 1 mapping using conventional and composite RF pulses were first compared in phantom experiments. An in vivo study was performed of 10 healthy volunteers who were imaged with conventional and composite RF pulse methods twice each. In vivo reproducibility of myocardial T 1 value and the inter-segment variability were assessed. The phantom study revealed significant differences in the mean T 1 values between the two methods, and the reproducibility for the composite RF pulse was significantly smaller than that for the conventional RF pulse. For both methods, the correlations of the reference and measured T 1 values were excellent (r 2 = 0.97 and 0.98 for conventional and composite RF pulses, respectively). The in vivo study showed that the mean T 1 value for composite RF pulse was slightly lower than that for conventional RF pulse, but this difference was not significant (P = 0.06). The inter-segment variability for the composite RF pulse was significantly smaller than that for conventional RF pulse (P composite RF pulses (r = 0.83 and 0.29, respectively). SR T 1 mapping using composite RF pulse provides accurate quantification of T 1 values and can lessen measurement variability and enable reproducible T 1 measurements.

  20. An algorithm for total variation regularized photoacoustic imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dong, Yiqiu; Görner, Torsten; Kunis, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Recovery of image data from photoacoustic measurements asks for the inversion of the spherical mean value operator. In contrast to direct inversion methods for specific geometries, we consider a semismooth Newton scheme to solve a total variation regularized least squares problem. During the iter......Recovery of image data from photoacoustic measurements asks for the inversion of the spherical mean value operator. In contrast to direct inversion methods for specific geometries, we consider a semismooth Newton scheme to solve a total variation regularized least squares problem. During...... the iteration, each matrix vector multiplication is realized in an efficient way using a recently proposed spectral discretization of the spherical mean value operator. All theoretical results are illustrated by numerical experiments....

  1. Sub-basalt Imaging of Hydrocarbon-Bearing Mesozoic Sediments Using Ray-Trace Inversion of First-Arrival Seismic Data and Elastic Finite-Difference Full-Wave Modeling Along Sinor-Valod Profile of Deccan Syneclise, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, Karabi; Behera, Laxmidhar

    2018-03-01

    Imaging below the basalt for hydrocarbon exploration is a global problem because of poor penetration and significant loss of seismic energy due to scattering, attenuation, absorption and mode-conversion when the seismic waves encounter a highly heterogeneous and rugose basalt layer. The conventional (short offset) seismic data acquisition, processing and modeling techniques adopted by the oil industry generally fails to image hydrocarbon-bearing sub-trappean Mesozoic sediments hidden below the basalt and is considered as a serious problem for hydrocarbon exploration in the world. To overcome this difficulty of sub-basalt imaging, we have generated dense synthetic seismic data with the help of elastic finite-difference full-wave modeling using staggered-grid scheme for the model derived from ray-trace inversion using sparse wide-angle seismic data acquired along Sinor-Valod profile in the Deccan Volcanic Province of India. The full-wave synthetic seismic data generated have been processed and imaged using conventional seismic data processing technique with Kirchhoff pre-stack time and depth migrations. The seismic image obtained correlates with all the structural features of the model obtained through ray-trace inversion of wide-angle seismic data, validating the effectiveness of robust elastic finite-difference full-wave modeling approach for imaging below thick basalts. Using the full-wave modeling also allows us to decipher small-scale heterogeneities imposed in the model as a measure of the rugose basalt interfaces, which could not be dealt with ray-trace inversion. Furthermore, we were able to accurately image thin low-velocity hydrocarbon-bearing Mesozoic sediments sandwiched between and hidden below two thick sequences of high-velocity basalt layers lying above the basement.

  2. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, a two-stage recovery of left ventricular systolic and diastolic function as determined by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahtarovski, Kiril Aleksov; Iversen, Kasper Karmark; Christensen, Thomas Emil

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC) is an entity mimicking acute myocardial infarction, characterized by transient severe systolic heart failure. Echocardiographic studies suggest that diastolic dysfunction is present in TTC at presentation; however, no reports exist regarding the time course...... of left ventricular (LV) recovery. This study describes the recovery of LV systolic and diastolic function in TTC. We hypothesized that, in TTC, there is diastolic dysfunction at admission, and that recovery is delayed compared with systolic function. METHODS AND RESULTS: We enrolled (consecutively 2010......-12) 16 patients (mean age 66, range 39-84 years) diagnosed with TTC and 20 healthy matched controls. We performed cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) at admission, pre-discharge, and 3-month follow-up. Diastolic function was assessed by LV peak filling rate (LVPFR) and left atrial (LA) emptying...

  3. Image reconstruction of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) on a pebble bed reactor (PBR) using expectation maximization and exact inversion algorithms: Comparison study by means of numerical phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razali, Azhani Mohd; Abdullah, Jaafar

    2015-01-01

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) is a well-known imaging technique used in medical application, and it is part of medical imaging modalities that made the diagnosis and treatment of disease possible. However, SPECT technique is not only limited to the medical sector. Many works are carried out to adapt the same concept by using high-energy photon emission to diagnose process malfunctions in critical industrial systems such as in chemical reaction engineering research laboratories, as well as in oil and gas, petrochemical and petrochemical refining industries. Motivated by vast applications of SPECT technique, this work attempts to study the application of SPECT on a Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) using numerical phantom of pebbles inside the PBR core. From the cross-sectional images obtained from SPECT, the behavior of pebbles inside the core can be analyzed for further improvement of the PBR design. As the quality of the reconstructed image is largely dependent on the algorithm used, this work aims to compare two image reconstruction algorithms for SPECT, namely the Expectation Maximization Algorithm and the Exact Inversion Formula. The results obtained from the Exact Inversion Formula showed better image contrast and sharpness, and shorter computational time compared to the Expectation Maximization Algorithm

  4. Image reconstruction of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) on a pebble bed reactor (PBR) using expectation maximization and exact inversion algorithms: Comparison study by means of numerical phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razali, Azhani Mohd, E-mail: azhani@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Abdullah, Jaafar, E-mail: jaafar@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my [Plant Assessment Technology (PAT) Group, Industrial Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, 43000 Kajang (Malaysia)

    2015-04-29

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) is a well-known imaging technique used in medical application, and it is part of medical imaging modalities that made the diagnosis and treatment of disease possible. However, SPECT technique is not only limited to the medical sector. Many works are carried out to adapt the same concept by using high-energy photon emission to diagnose process malfunctions in critical industrial systems such as in chemical reaction engineering research laboratories, as well as in oil and gas, petrochemical and petrochemical refining industries. Motivated by vast applications of SPECT technique, this work attempts to study the application of SPECT on a Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) using numerical phantom of pebbles inside the PBR core. From the cross-sectional images obtained from SPECT, the behavior of pebbles inside the core can be analyzed for further improvement of the PBR design. As the quality of the reconstructed image is largely dependent on the algorithm used, this work aims to compare two image reconstruction algorithms for SPECT, namely the Expectation Maximization Algorithm and the Exact Inversion Formula. The results obtained from the Exact Inversion Formula showed better image contrast and sharpness, and shorter computational time compared to the Expectation Maximization Algorithm.

  5. Image reconstruction of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) on a pebble bed reactor (PBR) using expectation maximization and exact inversion algorithms: Comparison study by means of numerical phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razali, Azhani Mohd; Abdullah, Jaafar

    2015-04-01

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) is a well-known imaging technique used in medical application, and it is part of medical imaging modalities that made the diagnosis and treatment of disease possible. However, SPECT technique is not only limited to the medical sector. Many works are carried out to adapt the same concept by using high-energy photon emission to diagnose process malfunctions in critical industrial systems such as in chemical reaction engineering research laboratories, as well as in oil and gas, petrochemical and petrochemical refining industries. Motivated by vast applications of SPECT technique, this work attempts to study the application of SPECT on a Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) using numerical phantom of pebbles inside the PBR core. From the cross-sectional images obtained from SPECT, the behavior of pebbles inside the core can be analyzed for further improvement of the PBR design. As the quality of the reconstructed image is largely dependent on the algorithm used, this work aims to compare two image reconstruction algorithms for SPECT, namely the Expectation Maximization Algorithm and the Exact Inversion Formula. The results obtained from the Exact Inversion Formula showed better image contrast and sharpness, and shorter computational time compared to the Expectation Maximization Algorithm.

  6. Fourier reconstruction with sparse inversions

    OpenAIRE

    Zwartjes, P.M.

    2005-01-01

    In seismic exploration an image of the subsurface is generated from seismic data through various data processing algorithms. When the data is not acquired on an equidistantly spaced grid, artifacts may result in the final image. Fourier reconstruction is an interpolation technique that can reduce these artifacts by generating uniformly sampled data from such non-uniformly sampled data. The method works by estimating via least-squares inversion the Fourier coefficients that describe the non-un...

  7. Look-up table (LUT) method for inverse halftoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mese, M; Vaidyanathan, P P

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we propose look-up table (LUT) based methods for inverse halftoning of images. The LUT for inverse halftoning is obtained from the histogram gathered from a few sample halftone images and corresponding original images. The method is extremely fast (no filtering is required) and the PSNR and visual image quality achieved is comparable to the best methods known for inverse halftoning. The LUT inverse halftoning method does not depend on the specific properties of the halftoning method, and can be applied to any halftoning method. Then, an algorithm for template selection for LUT inverse halftoning is introduced. We demonstrate the performance of the LUT inverse halftoning algorithm on error diffused images and ordered dithered images. We also extend LUT inverse halftoning to color halftones.

  8. Global 3-D imaging of mantle electrical conductivity based on inversion of observatory C-responses - I. An approach and its verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuvshinov, Alexey; Semenov, Alexey

    2012-06-01

    We present a novel frequency-domain inverse solution to recover the 3-D electrical conductivity distribution in the mantle. The solution is based on analysis of local C-responses. It exploits an iterative gradient-type method - limited-memory quasi-Newton method - for minimizing the penalty function consisting of data misfit and regularization terms. The integral equation code is used as a forward engine to calculate responses and data misfit gradients during inversion. An adjoint approach is implemented to compute misfit gradients efficiently. Further improvements in computational load come from parallelizing the scheme with respect to frequencies, and from setting the most time-consuming part of the forward calculations - calculation of Green's tensors - apart from the inversion loop. Convergence, performance, and accuracy of our 3-D inverse solution are demonstrated with a synthetic numerical example. A companion paper applies the strategy set forth here to real data.

  9. Quantitative MR imaging of individual muscle involvement in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kan, H.E.; Scheenen, T.W.J.; Wohlgemuth, M.; Klomp, D.W.J.; Loosbroek-Wagemans, I.C.W.; Padberg, G.W.A.M.; Heerschap, A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to implement a quantitative MR imaging method for the determination of muscular and fat content in individual skeletal muscles of patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). Turbo Inversion Recovery Magnitude (TIRM) and multiecho MR images were acquired

  10. The reliability of magnetic resonance imaging in traumatic brain injury lesion detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, B.H.J.; Andriessen, T.M.J.C.; Goraj, B.M.; Vos, P.E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study compares inter-rater-reliability, lesion detection and clinical relevance of T2-weighted imaging (T2WI), Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR), T2*-gradient recalled echo (T2*-GRE) and Susceptibility Weighted Imaging (SWI) in Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). Methods: Three

  11. Cell therapy in reperfused acute myocardial infarction does not improve the recovery of perfusion in the infarcted myocardium: a cardiac MR imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbers, Lourens F H J; Nijveldt, Robin; Beek, Aernout M; Hirsch, Alexander; van der Laan, Anja M; Delewi, Ronak; van der Vleuten, Pieter A; Tio, René A; Tijssen, Jan G P; Hofman, Mark B M; Piek, Jan J; Zijlstra, Felix; van Rossum, Albert C

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the effects of cell therapy on myocardial perfusion recovery after treatment of acute myocardial infarction (MI) with primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). In this HEBE trial substudy, which was approved by the institutional review board (trial registry number ISRCTN95796863), the authors assessed the effects of intracoronary infusion with bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BMMCs) or peripheral blood-derived mononuclear cells (PBMCs) on myocardial perfusion recovery by using cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) imaging after revascularization. In 152 patients with acute MI treated with PCI, cardiac MR imaging was performed after obtaining informed consent-before randomization to BMMC, PBMC, or standard therapy (control group)-and repeated at 4-month follow-up. Cardiac MR imaging consisted of cine, rest first-pass perfusion, and late gadolinium enhancement imaging. Perfusion was evaluated semiquantitatively with signal intensity-time curves by calculating the relative upslope (percentage signal intensity change). The relative upslope was calculated for the MI core, adjacent border zone, and remote myocardium. Perfusion differences among treatment groups or between baseline and follow-up were assessed with the Wilcoxon signed rank or Mann-Whitney U test. At baseline, myocardial perfusion differed between the MI core (median, 6.0%; interquartile range [IQR], 4.1%-8.0%), border zone (median, 8.4%; IQR, 6.4%-10.2%), and remote myocardium (median, 12.2%; IQR, 10.5%-15.9%) (P < .001 for all), with equal distribution among treatment groups. These interregional differences persisted at follow-up (P < .001 for all). No difference in perfusion recovery was found between the three treatment groups for any region. After revascularization of ST-elevation MI, cell therapy does not augment the recovery of resting perfusion in either the MI core or border zone. © RSNA, 2014.

  12. Inverse problems of geophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanovskaya, T.B.

    2003-07-01

    This report gives an overview and the mathematical formulation of geophysical inverse problems. General principles of statistical estimation are explained. The maximum likelihood and least square fit methods, the Backus-Gilbert method and general approaches for solving inverse problems are discussed. General formulations of linearized inverse problems, singular value decomposition and properties of pseudo-inverse solutions are given

  13. Fuzzy Inverse Compactness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halis Aygün

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce definitions of fuzzy inverse compactness, fuzzy inverse countable compactness, and fuzzy inverse Lindelöfness on arbitrary -fuzzy sets in -fuzzy topological spaces. We prove that the proposed definitions are good extensions of the corresponding concepts in ordinary topology and obtain different characterizations of fuzzy inverse compactness.

  14. Transcranial magnetic motor evoked potentials and magnetic resonance imaging findings in paraplegic dogs with recovery of motor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siedenburg, Johannes S; Wang-Leandro, Adriano; Amendt, Hanna-Luise; Rohn, Karl; Tipold, Andrea; Stein, Veronika M

    2018-03-22

    Transcranial magnetic motor evoked potentials (TMMEP) are associated with severity of clinical signs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in dogs with spinal cord disease. That in initially paraplegic dogs with thoracolumbar intervertebral disc herniation (IVDH), MRI findings before surgery and TMMEPs obtained after decompressive surgery are associated with long-term neurological status and correlate with each other. Seventeen client-owned paraplegic dogs with acute thoracolumbar IVDH. Prospective observational study. TMMEPs were obtained from pelvic limbs and MRI (3T) of the spinal cord was performed at initial clinical presentation. Follow-up studies were performed ≤ 2 days after reappearance of motor function and 3 months later. Ratios of compression length, intramedullary hyperintensities' length (T2-weighted hyperintensity length ratio [T2WLR]), and lesion extension (T2-weighted-lesion extension ratio) in relation to the length of the 2nd lumbar vertebral body were calculated. TMMEPs could be elicited in 10/17 (59%) dogs at 1st and in 16/17 (94%) dogs at 2nd follow-up. Comparison of TMMEPs of 1st and 2nd follow-up showed significantly increased amplitudes (median from 0.19 to 0.45 mV) and decreased latencies (from 69.38 to 40.26 ms; P = .01 and .001, respectively). At 2nd follow-up latencies were significantly associated with ambulatory status (P = .024). T2WLR obtained before surgery correlated with latencies at 2nd follow-up (P = .04). TMMEP reflect motor function recovery after severe spinal cord injury. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  15. Stochastic joint inversion of geoelectrical cross-well data for salt tracer test monitoring to image the hydraulic conductivity field of heterogenous aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revil, A.; Jardani, A.; Dupont, J.

    2012-12-01

    The assessment of hydraulic conductivity of heterogeneous aquifers is a difficult task using traditional hydrogeological methods (e.g., steady state or transient pumping tests) due to their low spatial resolution associated with a low density of available piezometers. Geophysical measurements performed at the ground surface and in boreholes provide additional information for increasing the resolution and accuracy of the inverted hydraulic conductivity. We use a stochastic joint inversion of Direct Current (DC) resistivity and Self-Potential (SP) data plus in situ measurement of the salinity in a downstream well during a synthetic salt tracer experiment to reconstruct the hydraulic conductivity field of an heterogeneous aquifer. The pilot point parameterization is used to avoid over-parameterization of the inverse problem. Bounds on the model parameters are used to promote a consistent Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling of the hydrogeological parameters of the model. To evaluate the effectiveness of the inversion process, we compare several scenarios where the geophysical data are coupled or not to the hydrogeological data to map the hydraulic conductivity. We first test the effectiveness of the inversion of each type of data alone, and then we combine the methods two by two. We finally combine all the information together to show the value of each type of geophysical data in the joint inversion process because of their different sensitivity map. The results of the inversion reveal that the self-potential data improve the estimate of hydraulic conductivity especially when the self-potential data are combined to the salt concentration measurement in the second well or to the time-lapse electrical resistivity data. Various tests are also performed to quantify the uncertainty in the inversion when for instance the semi-variogram is not known and its parameters should be inverted as well.

  16. Sampling of finite elements for sparse recovery in large scale 3D electrical impedance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javaherian, Ashkan; Moeller, Knut; Soleimani, Manuchehr

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes a method to improve performance of sparse recovery inverse solvers in 3D electrical impedance tomography (3D EIT), especially when the volume under study contains small-sized inclusions, e.g. 3D imaging of breast tumours. Initially, a quadratic regularized inverse solver is applied in a fast manner with a stopping threshold much greater than the optimum. Based on assuming a fixed level of sparsity for the conductivity field, finite elements are then sampled via applying a compressive sensing (CS) algorithm to the rough blurred estimation previously made by the quadratic solver. Finally, a sparse inverse solver is applied solely to the sampled finite elements, with the solution to the CS as its initial guess. The results show the great potential of the proposed CS-based sparse recovery in improving accuracy of sparse solution to the large-size 3D EIT. (paper)

  17. Sampling of finite elements for sparse recovery in large scale 3D electrical impedance tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaherian, Ashkan; Soleimani, Manuchehr; Moeller, Knut

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes a method to improve performance of sparse recovery inverse solvers in 3D electrical impedance tomography (3D EIT), especially when the volume under study contains small-sized inclusions, e.g. 3D imaging of breast tumours. Initially, a quadratic regularized inverse solver is applied in a fast manner with a stopping threshold much greater than the optimum. Based on assuming a fixed level of sparsity for the conductivity field, finite elements are then sampled via applying a compressive sensing (CS) algorithm to the rough blurred estimation previously made by the quadratic solver. Finally, a sparse inverse solver is applied solely to the sampled finite elements, with the solution to the CS as its initial guess. The results show the great potential of the proposed CS-based sparse recovery in improving accuracy of sparse solution to the large-size 3D EIT.

  18. MR imaging of rhabdomyolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagoria, R.J.; Karstaedt, N.; Koubek, T.D.

    1986-01-01

    The use of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in two cases of rhabdomyolysis, one resulting from prolonged muscle compression and one from electrical burns, is described. The involved muscles were clearly demonstrated with MR. Recognition and assessment of the extent of rhabdomyolysis are important since life-threatening sequelae including severe metabolic disorders are possible. In one case, spin-echo and inversion-recovery MR imaging provided greater detail of muscle abnormalities than did 99mTc-pyrophosphate radionuclide scanning. Both cases illustrate the usefulness of MR in evaluation of skeletal muscle disorders

  19. MR imaging of rhabdomyolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagoria, R.J.; Karstaedt, N.; Koubek, T.D.

    1986-03-01

    The use of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in two cases of rhabdomyolysis, one resulting from prolonged muscle compression and one from electrical burns, is described. The involved muscles were clearly demonstrated with MR. Recognition and assessment of the extent of rhabdomyolysis are important since life-threatening sequelae including severe metabolic disorders are possible. In one case, spin-echo and inversion-recovery MR imaging provided greater detail of muscle abnormalities than did 99mTc-pyrophosphate radionuclide scanning. Both cases illustrate the usefulness of MR in evaluation of skeletal muscle disorders.

  20. Bilinear Inverse Problems: Theory, Algorithms, and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Shuyang

    We will discuss how several important real-world signal processing problems, such as self-calibration and blind deconvolution, can be modeled as bilinear inverse problems and solved by convex and nonconvex optimization approaches. In Chapter 2, we bring together three seemingly unrelated concepts, self-calibration, compressive sensing and biconvex optimization. We show how several self-calibration problems can be treated efficiently within the framework of biconvex compressive sensing via a new method called SparseLift. More specifically, we consider a linear system of equations y = DAx, where the diagonal matrix D (which models the calibration error) is unknown and x is an unknown sparse signal. By "lifting" this biconvex inverse problem and exploiting sparsity in this model, we derive explicit theoretical guarantees under which both x and D can be recovered exactly, robustly, and numerically efficiently. In Chapter 3, we study the question of the joint blind deconvolution and blind demixing, i.e., extracting a sequence of functions [special characters omitted] from observing only the sum of their convolutions [special characters omitted]. In particular, for the special case s = 1, it becomes the well-known blind deconvolution problem. We present a non-convex algorithm which guarantees exact recovery under conditions that are competitive with convex optimization methods, with the additional advantage of being computationally much more efficient. We discuss several applications of the proposed framework in image processing and wireless communications in connection with the Internet-of-Things. In Chapter 4, we consider three different self-calibration models of practical relevance. We show how their corresponding bilinear inverse problems can be solved by both the simple linear least squares approach and the SVD-based approach. As a consequence, the proposed algorithms are numerically extremely efficient, thus allowing for real-time deployment. Explicit theoretical

  1. Solving inverse problems of optical microlithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granik, Yuri

    2005-05-01

    The direct problem of microlithography is to simulate printing features on the wafer under given mask, imaging system, and process characteristics. The goal of inverse problems is to find the best mask and/or imaging system and/or process to print the given wafer features. In this study we will describe and compare solutions of inverse mask problems. Pixel-based inverse problem of mask optimization (or "layout inversion") is harder than inverse source problem, especially for partially-coherent systems. It can be stated as a non-linear constrained minimization problem over complex domain, with large number of variables. We compare method of Nashold projections, variations of Fienap phase-retrieval algorithms, coherent approximation with deconvolution, local variations, and descent searches. We propose electrical field caching technique to substantially speedup the searching algorithms. We demonstrate applications of phase-shifted masks, assist features, and maskless printing.

  2. Longitudinal in vivo magnetic resonance imaging studies in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis : effect of a neurotrophic treatment on cortical lesion development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duckers, H.J.; Muller, H J; Verhaagen, J; Nicolay, K; Gispen, Willem Hendrik

    Proton magnetic resonance imaging enables non-invasive monitoring of lesion formation in multiple sclerosis and has an important role in assessing the potential effects of therapy. T2-weighted and short tau inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging were used to assess the effect of a

  3. Diffusion-Weighted Imaging of the Head and Neck: Influence of Fat-Suppression Technique and Multishot 2D Navigated Interleaved Acquisitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Y J; Choi, B S; Jeong, H-K; Sunwoo, L; Jung, C; Kim, J H

    2018-01-01

    DWI of the head and neck can reveal valuable information, but the effects of fat suppression and multishot acquisition on image quality have not been thoroughly investigated. We aimed to comprehensively compare the quality of head and neck DWI at 3T using 2 fat-suppression techniques, STIR, and spectral presaturation with inversion recovery, which were used with both single- and multishot EPI. Sixty-five study participants underwent 3 DWI sequences of single-shot EPI-STIR, single-shot EPI-spectral presaturation with inversion recovery, and multishot EPI-spectral presaturation with inversion recovery of the head and neck. In multiple anatomic regions, 2 independent readers assessed 5-point visual scores for fat-suppression uniformity and image distortion, and 1 reader measured the contrast-to-noise ratio and ADC. The mean visual score for fat-suppression uniformity was higher in single-shot EPI-STIR than in other sequences (all regions except for the orbital region, P < .05). The mean visual score for image distortion was higher in multishot EPI-spectral presaturation with inversion recovery than in single-shot EPI sequences (all regions, P < .001). Contrast-to-noise ratio was mostly lower in single-shot EPI-STIR than in other sequences ( P < .001), and ADC was significantly higher in multishot EPI-spectral presaturation with inversion recovery than in single-shot EPI sequences ( P ≤ .001). Overall, multishot EPI-spectral presaturation with inversion recovery provided the best image quality, with relatively homogeneous fat suppression, less image distortion than single-shot EPI sequences, and higher contrast-to-noise ratio than single-shot EPI-STIR. The measured ADC values can be higher in multishot EPI-spectral presaturation with inversion recovery, which necessitates cautious application of the previously reported ADC values to clinical settings. © 2018 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  4. Validation of OSIRIS Ozone Inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudnason, P.; Evans, W. F.; von Savigny, C.; Sioris, C.; Halley, C.; Degenstein, D.; Llewellyn, E. J.; Petelina, S.; Gattinger, R. L.; Odin Team

    2002-12-01

    The OSIRIS instrument onboard the Odin satellite, that was launched on February 20, 2001, is a combined optical spectrograph and infrared imager that obtains profil sets of atmospheric spectra from 280 to 800 nm when Odin scans the terrestrial limb. It has been possible to make a preliminary analysis of the ozone profiles using the Chappuis absorption feature. Three algorithms have been developed for ozone profile inversions from these limb spectra sets. We have dubbed these the Gattinger, Von Savigny-Flittner and DOAS methods. These are being evaluated against POAM and other satellite data. Based on performance, one of these will be selected for the operational algorithm. The infrared imager data have been used by Degenstein with the tomographic inversion procedure to derive ozone concentrations above 60 km. This paper will present some of these initial observations and indicate the best algorithm potential of OSIRIS to make spectacular advances in the study of terrestrial ozone.

  5. Iterative optimization in inverse problems

    CERN Document Server

    Byrne, Charles L

    2014-01-01

    Iterative Optimization in Inverse Problems brings together a number of important iterative algorithms for medical imaging, optimization, and statistical estimation. It incorporates recent work that has not appeared in other books and draws on the author's considerable research in the field, including his recently developed class of SUMMA algorithms. Related to sequential unconstrained minimization methods, the SUMMA class includes a wide range of iterative algorithms well known to researchers in various areas, such as statistics and image processing. Organizing the topics from general to more

  6. NON-INVASIVE INVERSE PROBLEM IN CIVIL ENGINEERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Havelka

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution we focus on recovery of spatial distribution of material parameters utilizing only non-invasive boundary measurements. Such methods has gained its importance as imaging techniques in medicine, geophysics or archaeology. We apply similar principles for non-stationary heat transfer in civil engineering. In oppose to standard technique which rely on external loading devices, we assume the natural fluctuation of temperature throughout day and night can provide sufficient information to recover the underlying material parameters. The inverse problem was solved by a modified regularised Gauss-Newton iterative scheme and the underlying forward problem is solved with a finite element space-time discretisation. We show a successful reconstruction of material parameters on a synthetic example with real measurements. The virtual experiment also reveals the insensitivity to practical precision of sensor measurements.

  7. Further technical development in magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, I.R.; Dubowitz, L.M.S.; Pennock, J.M.; Bydder, G.M.

    1988-01-01

    Further technical developments implemented in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain in children are described. These include the use of longer data collection periods, T2-dependent field echoes, susceptibility mapping, short inversion time inversion recovery sequences, very long echo time spin-echo sequences, and phase mapping techniques to detect tissue perfusion. These techniques are illustrated in selected cases and have increased the range of options available in MR examinations of children. (author)

  8. The Effect of Electromagnetic Field Treatment on Recovery from Ischemic Stroke in a Rat Stroke Model: Clinical, Imaging, and Pathological Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Segal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability. Effects of stroke include significant deficits in sensory-motor skills and cognitive abilities. At present, there are limited effective interventions for postacute stroke patients. In this preliminary research we studied a new noninvasive, very low intensity, low frequency, electromagnetic field treatment (VLIFE, targeting a neural network, on an in vivo stroke rat model. Eighteen rats were divided into three groups: sham (M1 and two treatment groups which were exposed to VLIFE treatment for 4 weeks, one using theta waves (M2 and another using beta waves (M3; all groups were followed up for an additional month. Results indicate that the M2 and M3 treated groups showed recovery of sensorimotor functional deficits, as demonstrated by Modified Neurological Severity Score and forelimb placement tests. Brain MRI imaging results show a decrease in perilesional edema and lateral ventricle widening in the treated groups. Fiber tracts’ imaging, following VLIFE treatment, showed a higher white matter integrity compared to control. Histological findings support neural regeneration processes. Our data suggest that VLIFE treatment, targeting a specific functional neural network by frequency rather than location, promotes neuronal plasticity after stroke and, as a result, improves clinical recovery. Further studies will investigate the full potential of the treatment.

  9. Multiples waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Dongliang

    2013-01-01

    To increase the illumination of the subsurface and to eliminate the dependency of FWI on the source wavelet, we propose multiples waveform inversion (MWI) that transforms each hydrophone into a virtual point source with a time history equal to that of the recorded data. These virtual sources are used to numerically generate downgoing wavefields that are correlated with the backprojected surface-related multiples to give the migration image. Since the recorded data are treated as the virtual sources, knowledge of the source wavelet is not required, and the subsurface illumination is greatly enhanced because the entire free surface acts as an extended source compared to the radiation pattern of a traditional point source. Numerical tests on the Marmousi2 model show that the convergence rate and the spatial resolution of MWI is, respectively, faster and more accurate then FWI. The potential pitfall with this method is that the multiples undergo more than one roundtrip to the surface, which increases attenuation and reduces spatial resolution. This can lead to less resolved tomograms compared to conventional FWI. The possible solution is to combine both FWI and MWI in inverting for the subsurface velocity distribution.

  10. 3rd Annual Workshop on Inverse Problem

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This proceeding volume is based on papers presented on the Third Annual Workshop on Inverse Problems which was organized by the Department of Mathematical Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology and University of Gothenburg, and took place in May 2013 in Stockholm. The purpose of this workshop was to present new analytical developments and numerical techniques for solution of inverse problems for a wide range of applications in acoustics, electromagnetics, optical fibers, medical imaging, geophysics, etc. The contributions in this volume reflect these themes and will be beneficial to researchers who are working in the area of applied inverse problems.

  11. Generation of hybrid sinograms for the recovery of kV-CT images with metal artifacts for helical tomotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Hosang; Park, Dahl; Kim, Wontaek; Ki, Yongkan; Kim, Yong Ho; Lee, Ju Hye; Kim, Dongwon; Youn, Hanbean; Nam, Jiho; Lee, Jayoung; Kim, Ho Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The overall goal of this study is to restore kilovoltage computed tomography (kV-CT) images which are disfigured by patients’ metal prostheses. By generating a hybrid sinogram that is a combination of kV and megavoltage (MV) projection data, the authors suggest a novel metal artifact-reduction (MAR) method that retains the image quality to match that of kV-CT and simultaneously restores the information of metal prostheses lost due to photon starvation. Methods: CT projection data contain information about attenuation coefficients and the total length of the attenuation. By normalizing raw kV projections with their own total lengths of attenuation, mean attenuation projections were obtained. In the same manner, mean density projections of MV-CT were obtained by the normalization of MV projections resulting from the forward projection of density-calibrated MV-CT images with the geometric parameters of the kV-CT device. To generate the hybrid sinogram, metal-affected signals of the kV sinogram were identified and replaced by the corresponding signals of the MV sinogram following a density calibration step with kV data. Filtered backprojection was implemented to reconstruct the hybrid CT image. To validate the authors’ approach, they simulated four different scenarios for three heads and one pelvis using metallic rod inserts within a cylindrical phantom. Five inserts describing human body elements were also included in the phantom. The authors compared the image qualities among the kV, MV, and hybrid CT images by measuring the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), the densities of all inserts, and the spatial resolution. In addition, the MAR performance was compared among three existing MAR methods and the authors’ hybrid method. Finally, for clinical trials, the authors produced hybrid images of three patients having dental metal prostheses to compare their MAR performances with those of the kV, MV, and three existing MAR

  12. MRI of the brain stem using fluid attenuated inversion recivery pulse sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Coene, B.; Hajnal, J.V.; Pennock, J.M.; Bydder, G.M.

    1993-01-01

    Heavily T2-weighted fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences with inversion times of 2000-2500 ms and echo times of 130-200 ms were used to image the brain stem of a normal adult and five patients. These sequences produce high signal from many white matter tracts and display high lesion contrast. The corticospinal and parietopontine tracts, lateral and medial lemnisci, superior and inferior cerebellar peduncles, medial longitudinal fasciculi, thalamo-olivary tracts the cuneate and gracile fasiculi gave high signal and were directly visualised. The oculomotor and trigeminal nerves were demonstrated within the brain stem. Lesions not seen with conventional T2-weighted spin echo sequences were seen with high contrast in patients with infarction, multiple sclerosis, sarcoidosis, chunt obstruction and metastatic tumour. The anatomical detail and high lesion contrast given by the FLAIR pulse sequence appear likely to be of value in diagnosis of disease in the brain stem. (orig.)

  13. Improved perfusion quantification in FAIR imaging by offset correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidaros, Karam; Andersen, Irene Klærke; Gesmar, Henrik

    2001-01-01

    Perfusion quantification using pulsed arterial spin labeling has been shown to be sensitive to the RF pulse slice profiles. Therefore, in Flow-sensitive Alternating-Inversion Recovery (FAIR) imaging the slice selective (ss) inversion slab is usually three to four times thicker than the imaging...... slice. However, this reduces perfusion sensitivity due to the increased transit delay of the incoming blood with unperturbed spins. In the present article, the dependence of the magnetization on the RF pulse slice profiles is inspected both theoretically and experimentally. A perfusion quantification...... model is presented that allows the use of thinner ss inversion slabs by taking into account the offset of RF slice profiles between ss and nonselective inversion slabs. This model was tested in both phantom and human studies. Magn Reson Med 46:193-197, 2001...

  14. A compressed sensing based 3D resistivity inversion algorithm for hydrogeological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Shashi; Kambhammettu, B. V. N. P.; Peddinti, Srinivasa Rao; Adinarayana, J.

    2018-04-01

    Image reconstruction from discrete electrical responses pose a number of computational and mathematical challenges. Application of smoothness constrained regularized inversion from limited measurements may fail to detect resistivity anomalies and sharp interfaces separated by hydro stratigraphic units. Under favourable conditions, compressed sensing (CS) can be thought of an alternative to reconstruct the image features by finding sparse solutions to highly underdetermined linear systems. This paper deals with the development of a CS assisted, 3-D resistivity inversion algorithm for use with hydrogeologists and groundwater scientists. CS based l1-regularized least square algorithm was applied to solve the resistivity inversion problem. Sparseness in the model update vector is introduced through block oriented discrete cosine transformation, with recovery of the signal achieved through convex optimization. The equivalent quadratic program was solved using primal-dual interior point method. Applicability of the proposed algorithm was demonstrated using synthetic and field examples drawn from hydrogeology. The proposed algorithm has outperformed the conventional (smoothness constrained) least square method in recovering the model parameters with much fewer data, yet preserving the sharp resistivity fronts separated by geologic layers. Resistivity anomalies represented by discrete homogeneous blocks embedded in contrasting geologic layers were better imaged using the proposed algorithm. In comparison to conventional algorithm, CS has resulted in an efficient (an increase in R2 from 0.62 to 0.78; a decrease in RMSE from 125.14 Ω-m to 72.46 Ω-m), reliable, and fast converging (run time decreased by about 25%) solution.

  15. Screening of mixed surfactant systems: Phase behavior studies and CT imaging of surfactant-enhanced oil recovery experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llave, F.M.; Gall, B.L.; Lorenz, P.B.; Cook, I.M.; Scott, L.J.

    1993-11-01

    A systematic chemical screening study was conducted on selected anionic-nonionic and nonionic-nonionic systems. The objective of the study was to evaluate and determine combinations of these surfactants that would exhibit favorable phase behavior and solubilization capacity. The effects of different parameters including (a) salinity, (b) temperature, (c) alkane carbon number, (c) hydrophilic/lipophilic balance (HLB) of nonionic component, and (d) type of surfactant on the behavior of the overall chemical system were evaluated. The current work was conducted using a series of ethoxylated nonionic surfactants in combinations of several anionic systems with various hydrocarbons. Efforts to correlate the behavior of these mixed systems led to the development of several models for the chemical systems tested. The models were used to compare the different systems and provided some guidelines for formulating them to account for variations in salinity, oil hydrocarbon number, and temperature. The models were also evaluated to determine conformance with the results from experimental measurements. The models provided good agreement with experimental results. X-ray computed tomography (CT) was used to study fluid distributions during chemical enhanced oil recovery experiments. CT-monitored corefloods were conducted to examine the effect of changing surfactant slug size injection on oil bank formation and propagation. Reducing surfactant slug size resulted in lower total oil production. Oil recovery results, however, did not correlate with slug size for the low-concentration, alkaline, mixed surfactant system used in these tests. The CT measurements showed that polymer mobility control and core features also affected the overall oil recovery results.

  16. A Sparse Bayesian Imaging Technique for Efficient Recovery of Reservoir Channels With Time-Lapse Seismic Measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Sana, Furrukh

    2016-06-01

    Subsurface reservoir flow channels are characterized by high-permeability values and serve as preferred pathways for fluid propagation. Accurate estimation of their geophysical structures is thus of great importance for the oil industry. The ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) is a widely used statistical technique for estimating subsurface reservoir model parameters. However, accurate reconstruction of the subsurface geological features with the EnKF is challenging because of the limited measurements available from the wells and the smoothing effects imposed by the \\\\ell _{2} -norm nature of its update step. A new EnKF scheme based on sparse domain representation was introduced by Sana et al. (2015) to incorporate useful prior structural information in the estimation process for efficient recovery of subsurface channels. In this paper, we extend this work in two ways: 1) investigate the effects of incorporating time-lapse seismic data on the channel reconstruction; and 2) explore a Bayesian sparse reconstruction algorithm with the potential ability to reduce the computational requirements. Numerical results suggest that the performance of the new sparse Bayesian based EnKF scheme is enhanced with the availability of seismic measurements, leading to further improvement in the recovery of flow channels structures. The sparse Bayesian approach further provides a computationally efficient framework for enforcing a sparse solution, especially with the possibility of using high sparsity rates through the inclusion of seismic data.

  17. Inverse Kinematics using Quaternions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Knud; Erleben, Kenny; Engell-Nørregård, Morten

    In this project I describe the status of inverse kinematics research, with the focus firmly on the methods that solve the core problem. An overview of the different methods are presented Three common methods used in inverse kinematics computation have been chosen as subject for closer inspection....

  18. Inverse logarithmic potential problem

    CERN Document Server

    Cherednichenko, V G

    1996-01-01

    The Inverse and Ill-Posed Problems Series is a series of monographs publishing postgraduate level information on inverse and ill-posed problems for an international readership of professional scientists and researchers. The series aims to publish works which involve both theory and applications in, e.g., physics, medicine, geophysics, acoustics, electrodynamics, tomography, and ecology.

  19. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging driven growth modeling for radiotherapy target definition in glioblastoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Morten B; Guldberg, Trine L; Harbøll, Anja

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The clinical target volume (CTV) in radiotherapy is routinely based on gadolinium contrast enhanced T1 weighted (T1w + Gd) and T2 weighted fluid attenuated inversion recovery (T2w FLAIR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences which have been shown to over- or underestimate...

  20. Joint inversion of seismic and gravity data for imaging seismic velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle beneath Utah, United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syracuse, E. M.; Zhang, H.; Maceira, M.

    2017-10-01

    We present a method for using any combination of body wave arrival time measurements, surface wave dispersion observations, and gravity data to simultaneously invert for three-dimensional P- and S-wave velocity models. The simultaneous use of disparate data types takes advantage of the differing sensitivities of each data type, resulting in a comprehensive and higher resolution three-dimensional geophysical model. In a case study for Utah, we combine body wave first arrivals mainly from the USArray Transportable Array, Rayleigh wave group and phase velocity dispersion data, and Bouguer gravity anomalies to invert for crustal and upper mantle structure of the region. Results show clear delineations, visible in both P- and S-wave velocities, between the three main tectonic provinces in the region. Without the inclusion of the surface wave and gravity constraints, these delineations are less clear, particularly for S-wave velocities. Indeed, checkerboard tests confirm that the inclusion of the additional datasets dramatically improves S-wave velocity recovery, with more subtle improvements to P-wave velocity recovery, demonstrating the strength of the method in successfully recovering seismic velocity structure from multiple types of constraints.

  1. Inverse osmotic process for radioactive laundry waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebara, Katsuya; Takahashi, Sankichi; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu; Yusa, Hideo; Hyakutake, Hiroshi.

    1977-01-01

    Purpose: To effectively recover the processing amount reduced in a continuous treatment. Method: Laundry waste containing radioactive substances discharged from a nuclear power plant is processed in an inverse osmotic process while adding starch digesting enzymes such as amylase and takadiastase, as well as soft spherical bodies such as sponge balls of a particle diameter capable of flowing in the flow of the liquid wastes along the inverse osmotic membrane pipe and having such a softness and roundness as not to damage the inverse osmotic membrane. This process can remove the floating materials such as thread dusts or hairs deposited on the membrane surface by the action of the soft elastic balls and remove paste or the like through decomposition by the digesting enzymes. Consequently, effective recovery can be attained for the reduced processing amount. (Furukawa, Y.)

  2. Feasibility of 3.0 T diffusion-weighted nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of functional recovery of rats with complete spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duo Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion tensor imaging is a sensitive way to reflect axonal necrosis and degeneration, glial cell regeneration and demyelination following spinal cord injury, and to display microstructure changes in the spinal cord in vivo. Diffusion tensor imaging technology is a sensitive method to diagnose spinal cord injury fiber tractography visualizes the white matter fibers, and directly displays the structural integrity and resultant damage of the fiber bundle. At present, diffusion tensor imaging is restricted to brain examinations, and is rarely applied in the evaluation of spinal cord injury. This study aimed to explore the fractional anisotropy and apparent diffusion coefficient of diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging and the feasibility of diffusion tensor tractography in the evaluation of complete spinal cord injury in rats. The results showed that the average combined scores were obviously decreased after spinal cord transection in rats, and then began to increase over time. The fractional anisotropy scores after spinal cord transection in rats were significantly lower than those in normal rats (P <0.05 the apparent diffusion coefficient was significantly increased compared with the normal group (P < 0.05. Following spinal cord transection, fractional anisotropy scores were negatively correlated with apparent diffusion coefficient values (r = -0.856, P < 0.01, and positively correlated with the average combined scores (r = 0.943, P < 0.01, while apparent diffusion coefficient values had a negative correlation with the average combined scores (r = -0.949, P < 0.01. Experimental findings suggest that, as a non-invasive examination, diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging can provide qualitative and quantitative information about spinal cord injury. The fractional anisotropy score and apparent diffusion coefficient have a good correlation with the average combined scores, which reflect functional recovery after spinal cord injury.

  3. Disaster Debris Recovery Database - Recovery

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The US EPA Disaster Debris Recovery Database (DDRD) promotes the proper recovery, recycling, and disposal of disaster debris for emergency responders at the federal,...

  4. Real-time 6DoF pose recovery from X-ray images using library-based DRR and hybrid optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, S; Tuysuzoglu, A; Wang, Z J; Liao, R

    2016-06-01

    Real-time 6 degrees of freedom (6DoF) pose recovery and tracking from X-ray images is a key enabling technology for many interventional imaging applications. However, real-time 2D/3D registration is a very challenging problem because of the heavy computation in iterative digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) generation. In this paper, we propose a real-time 2D/3D registration framework using library-based DRRs to achieve high computational efficiency. The proposed method pre-computes a library of canonical DRRs and reconstructs library-based DRRs (libDRRs) during registration without online rendering. The transformation parameters are decoupled to 2 geometry-relevant and 4 geometry-irrelevant ones so that canonical DRRs only need to cover the variation of 2 geometry-relevant parameters, making it practical to be pre-computed and stored. The 2D/3D registration using libDRRs is then solved as a hybrid optimization problem, i.e., continuous in geometry-irrelevant parameters while discrete in geometry-relevant parameters. On 5 fluoroscopic sequences with 246 frames acquired during animal studies with a transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) probe in the field of view, 6DoF tracking of the TEE probe using the proposed method achieved a mean target registration error in the projection direction (mTREproj) of 0.81 mm, a success rate of 100 % (defined as mTREproj [Formula: see text]2.5 mm), and a registration frame rate of 23.1 fps on a pure CPU-based implementation executed in a single thread. Using libDRRs with a hybrid optimization can significantly improve the computational efficiency (up to tenfold) for 6DoF pose recovery and tracking with little degradation in robustness and accuracy, compared to conventional intensity-based 2D/3D registration using ray casting DRRs with a continuous optimization.

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the brainstem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Shigeyuki; Yagishita, Toshiyuki; Hirayama, Keizo; Arimizu, Noboru; Ikehira, Hiroo; Fukuda, Nobuo; Tateno, Yukio.

    1986-01-01

    NMR imaging of the brainstem region from 12 asymptomatic individuals were reviewed in addition to these of 12 patients with various symptoms of small brainstem lesions. Abnormalities consisted of 3 cases of multiple sclerosis, 1 case of neuro-Behcet disease, 5 cases of infarction and hematoma and 3 cases of degenerative disease. NMR transverse imaging using inversion recovery sequence was able to locate many of the normal intra-axial brainstem nuclei, the red nucleus, the substantia nigra, the pontine nuclei, the pontine reticular nuclei, the facial nerve nucleus and so on in an about half of 12 asymptomatic individuals. The remarkable gray-white matter differentiation was obtained on NMR imaging using inversion recovery sequence and enabled the internal structures to be visualized within the brainstem. In addition, the midsagittal imaging provided an excellent demonstration of anatomical relationships of the brainstem and surrounding structures. In the diencephalic region, the mamillary body, the anterior commissure and the optic chiasma were also demonstrated on the midsagittal imaging. The lesions within the brainstem were vaguely shown on X-ray computed tomography in 6 of 12 patients but NMR imaging using inversion recovery or spin echo sequence provided more detailed data and revealed clear small lesions, such as the demyelinated plaques of multiple sclerosis and lacunar infarcts in 9 of 12 patients. Especially, in 2 of 3 multiple sclerosis patients, the plaques of the brainstem were definitely identified on NMR imaging only and the accurate localized lesion which was responsible for the facial myokymia or the Foville syndrome was identified. These studies results show that on NMR imaging using several pulse sequences, it is possible to examine the atrophic or hypertrophic findings of the brainstem internal structures and compare the localization of the lesions with clinical symptoms accurately. (J.P.N.)

  6. Estimation of elastic modulus of reinforcement corrosion products using inverse analysis of digital image correlation measurements for input in corrosion-induced cracking model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pease, Bradley Justin; Michel, Alexander; Thybo, Anna Emilie A.

    2012-01-01

    A combined experimental and numerical approach for estimating the elastic modulus of reinforcement corrosion products is presented. Deformations between steel and mortar were measured using digital image correlation during accelerated corrosion testing at 100 μA/cm2 (~1.16 mm/year). Measured defo...

  7. Comment on paper entitled, "An inversion of Freedman's 'image pulse' model in air". Acoust. Soc. Am. 119(2), 965-975 (2006).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickling, Robert; Gaunaurd, Guillermo C

    2006-08-01

    Echolocation (i.e., perceiving objects using acoustic echoes) is well-known in underwater detection and to a lesser extent in robot guidance and machine perception. The paper by Tsakiris and McKerrow is concerned with machine perception in air using Freedman's asymptotic model, which was originally developed to predict the backscattering multiple-echo effect observed in sonar detection. This effect was subsequently shown to be due to the elastic response of underwater targets. Freedman's model can be used in air because the acoustic target is assumed to be rigid. Also, the model's prediction of multiple echoes can be used to obtain information about the shape of the target. This is the so-called inversion of the Freedman model by Tsakiris and McKerrow. In their paper, various simple bodies are tested in air using ultrasound and it is shown that the model provides relatively poor information about body shape. Several explanations are given. However, one explanation is not considered, namely that the model itself is not satisfactory. First, there is poor agreement with exact backscattering theory. Second, deriving information about target shape from the multiple echoes predicted by the model is a highly questionable procedure. Both these aspects are examined here.

  8. Gravity inversion code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhard, N.R.

    1979-01-01

    The gravity inversion code applies stabilized linear inverse theory to determine the topography of a subsurface density anomaly from Bouguer gravity data. The gravity inversion program consists of four source codes: SEARCH, TREND, INVERT, and AVERAGE. TREND and INVERT are used iteratively to converge on a solution. SEARCH forms the input gravity data files for Nevada Test Site data. AVERAGE performs a covariance analysis on the solution. This document describes the necessary input files and the proper operation of the code. 2 figures, 2 tables

  9. Inverse halftoning algorithm using edge-based lookup table approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kuo-Liang; Wu, Shih-Tung

    2005-10-01

    The inverse halftoning algorithm is used to reconstruct a gray image from an input halftone image. Based on the recently published lookup table (LUT) technique, this paper presents a novel edge-based LUT method for inverse halftoning which improves the quality of the reconstructed gray image. The proposed method first uses the LUT-based inverse halftoning method as a preprocessing step to transform the given halftone image to a base gray image, and then the edges are extracted and classified from the base gray image. According to these classified edges, a novel edge-based LUT is built up to reconstruct the gray image. Based on a set of 30 real training images with both low-and high-frequency contents, experimental results demonstrated that the proposed method achieves a better image quality when compared to the currently published two methods, by Chang et al. and Meşe and Vaidyanathan.

  10. Relaxation time T1, T2 and proton density images in NMR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwaoka, Hideto; Hirata, Takaaki; Matsuura, Hiroyuki

    1987-01-01

    Pure T 1 , T 2 and proton density (ρ) images can be computed from three or more different NMR images. Computed images can be useful for several reasons: a) they are objective, since they are independent of pulse sequence and scan parameters. b) arbitrary composite images can be synthesized from computed images. c) biochemical information can be obtained from relaxation times, so quantitative diagnosis is possible using T 1 and T 2 images. For these reasons, several methods of producing computed images have been tried. However, with these methods, there are several practical problems such as large systematic error and long total scan time. This paper describes how several sets of NMR pulse sequences and scan parameters were investigated, keeping total scan time constant, to find which of them gave computed images with best resolution and minimum systematic error for a given scan time. Pulse sequences and scan parameters were optimized to yield minimum variance of computed images, using the law of error propagation, for a given range of T 1 , T 2 and ρ. We found that theoretically the combination Inversion Recovery 3 Spin Echo and Saturation Recovery 4 Spin Echo pulse sequence gave the best compromise between scan time and resolution. The effect of slice profile and errors in RF pulses - causes of systematic error - were analyzed in order to find ways to remove or reduce them. Using this method computed T 1 , T 2 and ρ images were obtained for the human head and for various phantoms. Computed values agreed closely with values measured using analytical methods. We conclude from these results that the combination Inversion Recovery 3 Spin Echo and Saturation Recovery 4 Spin Echo pulse sequence gives the best compromise between scan time, resolution and error. (author)

  11. Sharp spatially constrained inversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vignoli, Giulio G.; Fiandaca, Gianluca G.; Christiansen, Anders Vest C A.V.C.

    2013-01-01

    We present sharp reconstruction of multi-layer models using a spatially constrained inversion with minimum gradient support regularization. In particular, its application to airborne electromagnetic data is discussed. Airborne surveys produce extremely large datasets, traditionally inverted...... by using smoothly varying 1D models. Smoothness is a result of the regularization constraints applied to address the inversion ill-posedness. The standard Occam-type regularized multi-layer inversion produces results where boundaries between layers are smeared. The sharp regularization overcomes...... inversions are compared against classical smooth results and available boreholes. With the focusing approach, the obtained blocky results agree with the underlying geology and allow for easier interpretation by the end-user....

  12. Inverse planning IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenwald, J.-C.

    2008-01-01

    The lecture addressed the following topics: Optimizing radiotherapy dose distribution; IMRT contributes to optimization of energy deposition; Inverse vs direct planning; Main steps of IMRT; Background of inverse planning; General principle of inverse planning; The 3 main components of IMRT inverse planning; The simplest cost function (deviation from prescribed dose); The driving variable : the beamlet intensity; Minimizing a 'cost function' (or 'objective function') - the walker (or skier) analogy; Application to IMRT optimization (the gradient method); The gradient method - discussion; The simulated annealing method; The optimization criteria - discussion; Hard and soft constraints; Dose volume constraints; Typical user interface for definition of optimization criteria; Biological constraints (Equivalent Uniform Dose); The result of the optimization process; Semi-automatic solutions for IMRT; Generalisation of the optimization problem; Driving and driven variables used in RT optimization; Towards multi-criteria optimization; and Conclusions for the optimization phase. (P.A.)

  13. Biodistribution and dosimetry in humans of two inverse agonists to image cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptors using positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry, Garth E. [National Institute of Mental Health, Molecular Imaging Branch, Bethesda, MD (United States); Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Stockholm (Sweden); Hirvonen, Jussi; Liow, Jeih-San; Seneca, Nicholas; Morse, Cheryl L.; Pike, Victor W.; Innis, Robert B. [National Institute of Mental Health, Molecular Imaging Branch, Bethesda, MD (United States); Tauscher, Johannes T.; Schaus, John M.; Phebus, Lee; Felder, Christian C. [Lilly Research Laboratories, Lilly Corporate Center, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Halldin, Christer [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-08-15

    Cannabinoid subtype 1 (CB{sub 1}) receptors are found in nearly every organ in the body, may be involved in several neuropsychiatric and metabolic disorders, and are therefore an active target for pharmacotherapy and biomarker development. We recently reported brain imaging of CB{sub 1} receptors with two PET radioligands: {sup 11}C-MePPEP and {sup 18}F-FMPEP-d{sub 2}. Here we describe the biodistribution and dosimetry estimates for these two radioligands. Seven healthy subjects (four men and three women) underwent whole-body PET scans for 120 min after injection with {sup 11}C-MePPEP. Another seven healthy subjects (two men and five women) underwent whole-body PET scans for 300 min after injection with {sup 18}F-FMPEP-d{sub 2}. Residence times were acquired from regions of interest drawn on tomographic images of visually identifiable organs for both radioligands and from radioactivity excreted in urine for {sup 18}F-FMPEP-d{sub 2}. The effective doses of {sup 11}C-MePPEP and {sup 18}F-FMPEP-d{sub 2} are 4.6 and 19.7 {mu}Sv/MBq, respectively. Both radioligands demonstrated high uptake of radioactivity in liver, lung, and brain shortly after injection and accumulated radioactivity in bone marrow towards the end of the scan. After injection of {sup 11}C-MePPEP, radioactivity apparently underwent hepatobiliary excretion only, while radioactivity from {sup 18}F-FMPEP-d{sub 2} showed both hepatobiliary and urinary excretion. {sup 11}C-MePPEP and {sup 18}F-FMPEP-d{sub 2} yield an effective dose similar to other PET radioligands labeled with either {sup 11}C or {sup 18}F. The high uptake in brain confirms the utility of these two radioligands to image CB{sub 1} receptors in brain, and both may also be useful to image CB{sub 1} receptors in the periphery. (orig.)

  14. Elastic Wavespeed Images of Northern Chile Subduction Zone from the Joint Inversion of Body and Surface Waves: Structure of the Andean Forearc and the Double Seismic Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comte, D.; Carrizo, D.; Roecker, S. W.; Peyrat, S.; Arriaza, R.; Chi, R. K.; Baeza, S.

    2015-12-01

    Partly in anticipation of an imminent megathrust earthquake, a significant amount of seismic data has been collected over the past several years in northern Chile by local deployments of seismometers. In this study we generate elastic wavespeed images of the crust and upper mantle using a combination of body wave arrival times and surface wave dispersion curves. The body wave data set consists of 130000 P and 108000 S wave arrival times generated by 12000 earthquakes recorded locally over a period of 25 years by networks comprising about 360 stations. The surface wave data set consists of Rayleigh wave dispersion curves determined from ambient noise recorded by 60 broad band stations from three different networks over a period of three years. Transit time biases due to an uneven distribution of noise were estimated using a technique based on that of Yao and van der Hilst (2009) and found to be as high as 5% for some station pairs. We jointly invert the body and surface wave observations to both improve the overall resolution of the crustal images and reduce the trade-off between shallow and deep structures in the images of the subducted slab. Of particular interest in these images are three regions of anomalous Vp/Vs: (1) An extensive zone of low Vp/Vs (1.68) correlates with trench-parallel magmatic belts emplaced in the upper continental crust. In the region of the coast and continental slope, low Vp/Vs corresponds to batholithic structures in the Jurassic-Cretaceous magmatic arc. Between the central depression and Domeyko Cordillera, low Vp/Vs correlates with the distribution of magmatic arcs of Paleocene-Oligocene and Eocene-Oligocene age. Low Vp/Vs also correlates with the location of the Mejillones Peninsula. (2) A region of high Vp/Vs occurs in what is most likely the serpentinized wedge of the subduction zone. (3) An additional zone of low Vp/Vs is located in the middle of the double seismic zone at depths of 90-110 km. This region may exist all along the

  15. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance T2-STIR Imaging is Unable to Discriminate Between Intramyocardial Haemorrhage and Microvascular Obstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søvsø Szocska Hansen, Esben; Pedersen, Steen Fjord; Pedersen, Steen Bønløkke

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have used cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) and T2-weighted short tau inversion recovery (T2-STIR) imaging to detect intramyocardial haemorrhage (IMH) as a measure of ischemic/reperfusion injury. We investigated the ability of T2-STIR to differentiate between microvascular...

  16. Estimation of elastic modulus of reinforcement corrosion products using inverse analysis of digital image correlation measurements for input in corrosion-induced cracking model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pease, Bradley Justin; Michel, Alexander; Thybo, Anna Emilie A.

    2012-01-01

    A combined experimental and numerical approach for estimating the elastic modulus of reinforcement corrosion products is presented. Deformations between steel and mortar were measured using digital image correlation during accelerated corrosion testing at 100 μA/cm2 (~1.16 mm/year). Measured...... deformations were compared to a numerical corrosion model that considers electrochemical, transport, and mechanical processes, including penetration of corrosion products into a ‘corrosion-accommodating region,’ provided by the mortar’s capillary porosity, directly surrounding the steel. Comparing model...

  17. Obstacle recovery device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terai, Fujio; Furuya, Masaaki; Ugai, Masaru.

    1992-01-01

    The device of the present invention comprises a fiber scope for taking a recovery operation portion and an obstacle into a field of vision and photographing the state of the operation in the recovery operation portion and a display section for displaying the photographed image at a remote place. Concretely, the monitor of a remote operation section displays an image photographed by the fiber scope. A operation unit attached with a forceps and a fiber scope are brought closer, for example, to a fuel assembly in a reactor in the recovery operation portion. Then, the obstacle intruded into a minute space between fuels is recovered by the forceps while displaying state of the operation on the monitor of the remote operation section. Such a device certainly recover and remove a minute obstacle present in such a circumstance that a man's hand can not access, by the operation conducted under visual confirmation. (I.S.)

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of a brain abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oikawa, Akihiro; Kagawa, Mizuo; Yatoh, Seiji; Izawa, Masahiro; Ujiie, Hiroshi; Sakaguchi, Jun; Onda, Hideaki; Kitamura, Kohichi

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 13 patients with brain abscesses, and the alternation of MRI findings, as correlated with the progression of brain-abscess formation, was reviewed. In the cerebritis stage, spin-echo images showed a high intensity, and inversion-recovery images, a low intensity, due to inflammation and edema. The spin-echo images were very sensitive in delineating the brain edema; however, it was difficult to distinguish the inflammation from the surrounding edema. In the capsule stage, due to the accumulation of purulent material, the central necrotic area was demonstrated as a low-intensity area, while the capsule of the abscess was revealed as an iso-intensity ring on the inversion-recovery images. The central necrotic area also decreased in intensity on spin-echo images in the later period of this stage. With contrast enhancement (Gd-DTPA), the SR image showed the capsule as a high-intensity ring. MRI was found to be a useful method for estimating the process of the formation of a brain abscess. (author)

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of a brain abscess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oikawa, Akihiro; Kagawa, Mizuo; Yatoh, Seiji; Izawa, Masahiro; Ujiie, Hiroshi; Sakaguchi, Jun; Onda, Hideaki; Kitamura, Kohichi

    1988-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 13 patients with brain abscesses, and the alternation of MRI findings, as correlated with the progression of brain-abscess formation, was reviewed. In the cerebritis stage, spin-echo images showed a high intensity, and inversion-recovery images, a low intensity, due to inflammation and edema. The spin-echo images were very sensitive in delineating the brain edema; however, it was difficult to distinguish the inflammation from the surrounding edema. In the capsule stage, due to the accumulation of purulent material, the central necrotic area was demonstrated as a low-intensity area, while the capsule of the abscess was revealed as an iso-intensity ring on the inversion-recovery images. The central necrotic area also decreased in intensity on spin-echo images in the later period of this stage. With contrast enhancement (Gd-DTPA), the SR image showed the capsule as a high-intensity ring. MRI was found to be a useful method for estimating the process of the formation of a brain abscess.

  20. Three-dimensional surface microtopography recovery from a multifocus image sequence using an omnidirectional modified Laplacian operator with adaptive window size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yingzhong; Hu, Huijuan; Cui, Haoyang; Yang, Shouchen; Qi, Ji; Xu, Zhiming; Li, Long

    2017-08-01

    Optical microscopy enables the observation of highly magnified objects and material structures on microsurfaces, but it can only acquire 2D images. In order to observe areal features more accurately and intuitively, 3D surface microtopography recovery has been applied to form a 3D surface model of an object from its 2D image sequence. In the 3D reconstruction of the focus evaluation operator, we have the gray variance operator, the gray-scale difference absolute sum operator, the Roberts gradient operator, the Tenengrad gradient operator, the improved Laplace operator, etc. There are two problems with these operators: one is that there is no difference between (x,y) and the gray scale of the pixel in the diagonal direction in the field and the other is that the window size of the focus evaluation operator is fixed, e.g., 3×3, 5×5, etc. Thus, the size of the window for each pixel in the image is the same, and the small window may not cover enough field information while being vulnerable to noise. Large windows can cover more information, but they may result in a smoothing phenomenon, which affects the accuracy of the model. Different pixels around the field have different pixel colors when the size of the window is not the same. Therefore, this paper proposes a modified omnidirectional Laplacian operator with an adaptive window to automatically adjust the size of the window according to the color difference within the window. This also takes into consideration the pixels in the diagonal direction. In addition, very comprehensive verification experiments proved the conclusions.

  1. FEM-based linear inverse modeling using a 3D source array to image magma chambers with free geometry. Application to InSAR data from Rabaul Caldera (PNG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronchin, Erika; Masterlark, Timothy; Dawson, John; Saunders, Steve; Martí Molist, Joan

    2015-04-01

    spatial distribution of sources find correspondence in the petrography of the volcanic products described in literature and in the dynamics of the single and twin eruptions that characterize the caldera. As many other volcanoes, Rabaul caldera is an active and dangerous volcanic system whose dynamics still need to be understood to effectively predict the behavior of future eruptions. The good results obtained from the application of the method to Rabaul caldera show that the proposed linear inversion based on the FEM array of sources is suitable to generate models of magmatic systems. The method can image in space and time the complex free geometry of the source that generates the deformation, widening our understanding of deformational sources and their dynamics. This takes source modeling a step towards more realistic source models.

  2. Visible foliar injury and infrared imaging show that daylength affects short-term recovery after ozone stress in Trifolium subterraneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollsnes, Ane V; Eriksen, Aud Berglen; Otterholt, Eli; Kvaal, Knut; Oxaal, Unni; Futsaether, Cecilia M

    2009-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone is a major air pollutant affecting plants worldwide. Plants in northern regions can display more ozone injury than plants at lower latitudes despite lower ozone levels. Larger ozone influx and shorter nights have been suggested as possible causes. However, the effects of the dim light present during northern summer nights have not been investigated. Young Trifolium subterraneum plants kept in environmentally controlled growth rooms under long day (10 h bright light, 14 h dim light) or short day (10 h bright light, 14 h darkness) conditions were exposed to 6 h of 70 ppb ozone during daytime for three consecutive days. Leaves were visually inspected and imaged in vivo using thermal imaging before and after the daily exposure. In long-day-treated plants, visible foliar injury within 1 week after exposure was more severe. Multivariate statistical analyses showed that the leaves of ozone-exposed long-day-treated plants were also warmer with more homogeneous temperature distributions than exposed short day and control plants, suggesting reduced transpiration. Temperature disruptions were not restricted to areas displaying visible damage and occurred even in leaves with only slight visible injury. Ozone did not affect the leaf temperature of short-day-treated plants. As all factors influencing ozone influx were the same for long- and short-day-treated plants, only the dim nocturnal light could account for the different ozone sensitivities. Thus, the twilight summer nights at high latitudes may have a negative effect on repair and defence processes activated after ozone exposure, thereby enhancing sensitivity.

  3. Generalized Recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov Jensen, Christian; Lando, David; Heje Pedersen, Lasse

    of Ross (2015). Our characterization is simple and intuitive, linking recovery to the relation between the number of time periods on the number of states. When recovery is feasible, our model is easy to implement, allowing a closed-form linearized solution. We implement our model empirically, testing...... the predictive power of the recovered expected return, crash risk, and other recovered statistics....

  4. Backup & Recovery

    CERN Document Server

    Preston, W

    2009-01-01

    Packed with practical, freely available backup and recovery solutions for Unix, Linux, Windows, and Mac OS X systems -- as well as various databases -- this new guide is a complete overhaul of Unix Backup & Recovery by the same author, now revised and expanded with over 75% new material.

  5. Solving inverse problems through a smooth formulation of multiple-point geostatistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melnikova, Yulia

    In oil and gas sector accurate reservoir description play a crucial role in problems associated with recovery of hydrocarbons, risk estimation and predicting reservoir performance. Knowledge on reservoir properties can be inferred from measurements typically made at the surface by solving...... be inferred, for instance, from a conceptual geological model termed a training image.The main motivation for this study was the challenge posed by history matching, an inverse problem aimed at estimating rock properties from production data. We addressed two main difficulties of the history matching problem...... have proposed a smooth formulation of training-image based priors, which was inspired by the Frequency Matching method developed by our group earlier. The proposed smooth generalization, that integrates data and multiple-point statistics in a probabilistic framework, allows us to find solution by use...

  6. Inverse scale space decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Marie Foged; Benning, Martin; Schönlieb, Carola-Bibiane

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the inverse scale space flow as a decomposition method for decomposing data into generalised singular vectors. We show that the inverse scale space flow, based on convex and even and positively one-homogeneous regularisation functionals, can decompose data represented...... by the application of a forward operator to a linear combination of generalised singular vectors into its individual singular vectors. We verify that for this decomposition to hold true, two additional conditions on the singular vectors are sufficient: orthogonality in the data space and inclusion of partial sums...... of the subgradients of the singular vectors in the subdifferential of the regularisation functional at zero. We also address the converse question of when the inverse scale space flow returns a generalised singular vector given that the initial data is arbitrary (and therefore not necessarily in the range...

  7. MR imaging techniques in neuroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Makoto

    1999-01-01

    Recently developed MR imaging techniques, including fast spin echo, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery, T 1 -weighted fast gradient echo, and Gd-enhanced 3D MR angiography, are reviewed. In fast spin echo sequences, blur, pseudo edge enhancement, edge enhancing effect, and ghost may appear depending on T 2 -weighting and discreteness in the k-space. Contrast modifications, such as signal attenuation by off-resonance RF pulses, bright fat on late echoes, low sensitivity to diffusion-mediated susceptibility effects, and delay of the T 1 recovery, are also discussed. Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery is a ''moderately'' T 2 -weighted sequence with suppression of the CSF signal. With a relatively short repetition time, signal suppression is remarkable in the lesions with relatively long T 1 values, so that a very long repetition time more than 10 s is recommended. On T 1 -weighted spoiled fast gradient-echo sequences, the enhancement effect of parenchymal lesions by gadopentetate dimeglumine is insufficient compared with a T 1 -weighted spin echo sequence. IR-prepared fast gradient-echo sequences, such as MP-RAGE, may solve this problem to some degree, although their T 1 magnetization is difficult to estimate. On Gd-enhanced 3D MR angiography, k-space order, spatial resolution, temporal resolution, and background suppression are crucial to obtain sufficient images. They should be optimized for accurate evaluation of internal carotid artery lesions according to AHA guidelines. (author)

  8. Multiple-image encryption via lifting wavelet transform and XOR operation based on compressive ghost imaging scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianye; Meng, Xiangfeng; Yang, Xiulun; Wang, Yurong; Yin, Yongkai; Peng, Xiang; He, Wenqi; Dong, Guoyan; Chen, Hongyi

    2018-03-01

    A multiple-image encryption method via lifting wavelet transform (LWT) and XOR operation is proposed, which is based on a row scanning compressive ghost imaging scheme. In the encryption process, the scrambling operation is implemented for the sparse images transformed by LWT, then the XOR operation is performed on the scrambled images, and the resulting XOR images are compressed in the row scanning compressive ghost imaging, through which the ciphertext images can be detected by bucket detector arrays. During decryption, the participant who possesses his/her correct key-group, can successfully reconstruct the corresponding plaintext image by measurement key regeneration, compression algorithm reconstruction, XOR operation, sparse images recovery, and inverse LWT (iLWT). Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations validate the feasibility of the proposed method.

  9. Novel Assessment of Cerebrospinal Fluid Dynamics by Time-Spatial Labeling Inversion Pulse Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients with Chiari Malformation Type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtonari, Tatsuya; Nishihara, Nobuharu; Ota, Shinzo; Tanaka, Akio

    2018-04-01

    We investigated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics at the craniocervical junction (CCJ) using Time-SLIP magnetic resonance imaging to demonstrate the significance of ventral and dorsal combined CSF dynamics in assessing CSF flow disturbance in patients with Chiari malformation type I. Fifteen examinations were performed in 9 cases of CM-I (3 female patients; mean age, 24.7 years; age range, 11-46 years) before or after craniocervical decompression. The longitudinal maximum movement of the caudal edge of tagged midsagittal CSF at the CCJ was measured as length of motion (LOM), and total on the ventral and dorsal sides was defined as total LOM. In 8 conditions, where it was concluded that no craniocervical decompression was necessary or where symptoms improved following craniocervical decompression based on the clinical symptoms, total LOM was 49.8 ± 13.1 mm. In contrast, in the 7 cases where craniocervical decompression was mandatory, total LOM was 23.2 ± 9.2 mm. Significant differences were identified between the 2 groups. Total LOM dynamics, because it corresponded to the necessity of craniocervical decompression based on patients' symptoms. Time-SLIP MRI enabled clinicians to use novel dynamic indices, such as CSF motions, in addition to the conventional findings acquired by MRI. In particular, it was essential to examine combined ventral and dorsal CSF dynamics in assessing CSF patency at the CCJ in patients with CM-I. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Inverse problems in vision and 3D tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Mohamad-Djafari, Ali

    2013-01-01

    The concept of an inverse problem is a familiar one to most scientists and engineers, particularly in the field of signal and image processing, imaging systems (medical, geophysical, industrial non-destructive testing, etc.) and computer vision. In imaging systems, the aim is not just to estimate unobserved images, but also their geometric characteristics from observed quantities that are linked to these unobserved quantities through the forward problem. This book focuses on imagery and vision problems that can be clearly written in terms of an inverse problem where an estimate for the image a

  11. Image quality at synthetic brain magnetic resonance imaging in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, So Mi; Cho, Seung Hyun; Kim, Won Hwa; Kim, Hye Jung [Kyungpook National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Young Hun; Cheon, Jung-Eun; Kim, In-One [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyun-Hae [Ewha Womans University Mokdong Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); You, Sun-Kyoung [Chungnam National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sook-Hyun [Kyungpook National University Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Moon Jung [GE Healthcare, MR Applications and Workflow, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-11-15

    The clinical application of the multi-echo, multi-delay technique of synthetic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) generates multiple sequences in a single acquisition but has mainly been used in adults. To evaluate the image quality of synthetic brain MR in children compared with that of conventional images. Twenty-nine children (median age: 6 years, range: 0-16 years) underwent synthetic and conventional imaging. Synthetic (T2-weighted, T1-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery [FLAIR]) images with settings matching those of the conventional images were generated. The overall image quality, gray/white matter differentiation, lesion conspicuity and image degradations were rated on a 5-point scale. The relative contrasts were assessed quantitatively and acquisition times for the two imaging techniques were compared. Synthetic images were inferior due to more pronounced image degradations; however, there were no significant differences for T1- and T2-weighted images in children <2 years old. The quality of T1- and T2-weighted images were within the diagnostically acceptable range. FLAIR images showed greatly reduced quality. Gray/white matter differentiation was comparable or better in synthetic T1- and T2-weighted images, but poorer in FLAIR images. There was no effect on lesion conspicuity. Synthetic images had equal or greater relative contrast. Acquisition time was approximately two-thirds of that for conventional sequences. Synthetic T1- and T2-weighted images were diagnostically acceptable, but synthetic FLAIR images were not. Lesion conspicuity and gray/white matter differentiation were comparable to conventional MRI. (orig.)

  12. Dynamic PCr and pH imaging of human calf muscles during exercise and recovery using (31) P gradient-Echo MRI at 7 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Albrecht Ingo; Meyerspeer, Martin; Robinson, Simon Daniel; Goluch, Sigrun; Wolzt, Michael; Fiedler, Georg Bernd; Bogner, Wolfgang; Laistler, Elmar; Krššák, Martin; Moser, Ewald; Trattnig, Siegfried; Valkovič, Ladislav

    2016-06-01

    Simultaneous acquisition of spatially resolved (31) P-MRI data for evaluation of muscle specific energy metabolism, i.e., PCr and pH kinetics. A three-dimensional (3D) gradient-echo sequence for multiple frequency-selective excitations of the PCr and Pi signals in an interleaved sampling scheme was developed and tested at 7 Tesla (T). The pH values were derived from the chemical shift-induced phase difference between the resonances. The achieved spatial resolution was ∼2 mL with image acquisition time below 6 s. Ten healthy volunteers were studied performing plantar flexions during the delay between (31) P-MRI acquisitions, yielding a temporal resolution of 9-10 s. Signal from anatomically matched regions of interest had sufficient signal-to-noise ratio to allow single-acquisition PCr and pH quantification. The Pi signal was clearly detected in voxels of actively exercising muscles. The PCr depletions were in gastrocnemius 42 ± 14% (medialis), 48 ± 17% (lateralis) and in soleus 20 ± 11%. The end exercise pH values were 6.74 ± 0.18 and 6.65 ± 0.27 for gastrocnemius medialis and lateralis, respectively, and 6.96 ± 0.12 for soleus muscle. Simultaneous acquisition of PCr and Pi images with high temporal resolution, suitable for measuring PCr and pH kinetics in exercise-recovery experiments, was demonstrated at 7T. This study presents a fast alternative to MRS for quantifying energy metabolism of posterior muscle groups of the lower leg. Magn Reson Med 75:2324-2331, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Serial Diffusion Tensor Imaging In Vivo Predicts Long-Term Functional Recovery and Histopathology in Rats following Different Severities of Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Samir P.; Smith, Taylor D.; VanRooyen, Jenna L.; Powell, David; Cox, David H.; Sullivan, Patrick G.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The current study demonstrates the feasibility of using serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in vivo to quantify temporally spinal cord injury (SCI) pathology in adult female Sprague-Dawley rats that were scanned prior to a moderate or severe upper lumbar contusion SCI. Injured rats were behaviorally tested for hind limb locomotion (Basso, Beattie, Bresnahan [BBB] scores) weekly for 4 weeks and scanned immediately after each session, ending with terminal gait analyses prior to euthanasia. As a measure of tissue integrity, fractional anisotropy (FA) values were significantly lower throughout the spinal cord in both injury cohorts at all time-points examined versus pre-injury. Moreover, FA values were significantly lower following severe versus moderate SCI at all time-points, and FA values at the injury epicenters at all time-points were significantly correlated with both spared white and gray matter volumes, as well as lesion volumes. Critically, quantified FA values at subacute (24 h) and all subsequent time-points were highly predictive of terminal behavior, reflected in significant correlations with both weekly BBB scores and terminal gait parameters. Critically, the finding that clinically relevant subacute (24 h) FA values accurately predict long-term functional recovery may obviate long-term studies to assess the efficacy of therapeutics tested experimentally or clinically. In summary, this study demonstrates a reproducible serial MRI procedure to predict the long-term impact of contusion SCI on both behavior and histopathology using subacute DTI metrics obtained in vivo to accurately predict multiple terminal outcome measures, which can be particularly valuable when comparing experimental interventions. PMID:26650623

  14. Baseline magnetic resonance imaging of the optic nerve provides limited predictive information on short-term recovery after acute optic neuritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Berg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In acute optic neuritis, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI may help to confirm the diagnosis as well as to exclude alternative diagnoses. Yet, little is known on the value of optic nerve imaging for predicting clinical symptoms or therapeutic outcome. PURPOSE: To evaluate the benefit of optic nerve MRI for predicting response to appropriate therapy and recovery of visual acuity. METHODS: Clinical data as well as visual evoked potentials (VEP and MRI results of 104 patients, who were treated at the Department of Neurology with clinically definite optic neuritis between December 2010 and September 2012 were retrospectively reviewed including a follow up within 14 days. RESULTS: Both length of the Gd enhancing lesion (r = -0.38; p = 0.001 and the T2 lesion (r = -0.25; p = 0.03 of the optic nerve in acute optic neuritis showed a medium correlation with visual acuity after treatment. Although visual acuity pre-treatment was little but nonsignificantly lower if Gd enhancement of the optic nerve was detected via orbital MRI, improvement of visual acuity after adequate therapy was significantly better (0.40 vs. 0.24; p = 0.04. Intraorbitally located Gd enhancing lesions were associated with worse visual improvement compared to canalicular, intracranial and chiasmal lesions (0.35 vs. 0.54; p = 0.02. CONCLUSION: Orbital MRI is a broadly available, valuable tool for predicting the improvement of visual function. While the accurate individual prediction of long-term outcomes after appropriate therapy still remains difficult, lesion length of Gd enhancement and T2 lesion contribute to its prediction and a better short-term visual outcome may be associated with detection and localization of Gd enhancement along the optic nerve.

  15. Inversion assuming weak scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xenaki, Angeliki; Gerstoft, Peter; Mosegaard, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    due to the complex nature of the field. A method based on linear inversion is employed to infer information about the statistical properties of the scattering field from the obtained cross-spectral matrix. A synthetic example based on an active high-frequency sonar demonstrates that the proposed...

  16. Locative Inversion in English

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekhuis, H.

    2005-01-01

    This article aims at reformulating in more current terms Hoekstra and Mulder’s (1990) analysis of the Locative Inversion (LI) construction. The new proposal is crucially based on the assumption that Small Clause (SC) predicates agree with their external argument in phi-features, which may be

  17. Generation of nuclear magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckmann, N.X.

    1986-01-01

    Two generation techniques of nuclear magnetic resonance images, the retro-projection and the direct transformation method are studied these techniques are based on the acquisition of NMR signals which phases and frequency components are codified in space by application of magnetic field gradients. The construction of magnet coils is discussed, in particular a suitable magnet geometry with polar pieces and air gap. The obtention of image contrast by T1 and T2 relaxation times reconstructed from generated signals using sequences such as spin-echo, inversion-recovery and stimulated echo, is discussed. The mathematical formalism of matrix solution for Bloch equations is also presented. (M.C.K.)

  18. Bayesian seismic AVO inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buland, Arild

    2002-07-01

    A new linearized AVO inversion technique is developed in a Bayesian framework. The objective is to obtain posterior distributions for P-wave velocity, S-wave velocity and density. Distributions for other elastic parameters can also be assessed, for example acoustic impedance, shear impedance and P-wave to S-wave velocity ratio. The inversion algorithm is based on the convolutional model and a linearized weak contrast approximation of the Zoeppritz equation. The solution is represented by a Gaussian posterior distribution with explicit expressions for the posterior expectation and covariance, hence exact prediction intervals for the inverted parameters can be computed under the specified model. The explicit analytical form of the posterior distribution provides a computationally fast inversion method. Tests on synthetic data show that all inverted parameters were almost perfectly retrieved when the noise approached zero. With realistic noise levels, acoustic impedance was the best determined parameter, while the inversion provided practically no information about the density. The inversion algorithm has also been tested on a real 3-D dataset from the Sleipner Field. The results show good agreement with well logs but the uncertainty is high. The stochastic model includes uncertainties of both the elastic parameters, the wavelet and the seismic and well log data. The posterior distribution is explored by Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation using the Gibbs sampler algorithm. The inversion algorithm has been tested on a seismic line from the Heidrun Field with two wells located on the line. The uncertainty of the estimated wavelet is low. In the Heidrun examples the effect of including uncertainty of the wavelet and the noise level was marginal with respect to the AVO inversion results. We have developed a 3-D linearized AVO inversion method with spatially coupled model parameters where the objective is to obtain posterior distributions for P-wave velocity, S

  19. Calculation of the inverse data space via sparse inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Saragiotis, Christos

    2011-01-01

    The inverse data space provides a natural separation of primaries and surface-related multiples, as the surface multiples map onto the area around the origin while the primaries map elsewhere. However, the calculation of the inverse data is far from trivial as theory requires infinite time and offset recording. Furthermore regularization issues arise during inversion. We perform the inversion by minimizing the least-squares norm of the misfit function by constraining the $ell_1$ norm of the solution, being the inverse data space. In this way a sparse inversion approach is obtained. We show results on field data with an application to surface multiple removal.

  20. Joint Inversion of Fracture Model Properties for CO2 Storage Monitoring or Oil Recovery History Matching Inversion conjointe des propriétés d’un modèle de fractures pour le monitoring d’un stockage de CO2 ou le calage d’un historique de production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verscheure M.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available For oil recovery or CO2 storage, “reservoirs” are commonly used to designate geological structures where oil can be found or CO2 can be stored. All reservoirs present a heterogeneity in terms of rock type and properties (such as porosity and permeability. In addition, some of these reservoirs present fractures and faults. Fractured reservoirs are an important part of the oil reserves in the world (Middle East, Gulf of Mexico, etc. and some of them are important reservoirs in terms of oil volume and productivity in spite of the fractures. In addition, studies of reservoirs for geologic storage of CO2 have shown the existence of diffuse fractures and faults and their strong impacts on flow. A key point in fractured reservoirs is to understand the geometry and hydraulic conductivity of the network formed by the fractures. This requires the construction of a reservoir model that integrates all available conceptual knowledge and quantitative data. The topic of the present paper deals with a new methodology able to perform the history matching of a fractured reservoir model by adapting the sub-seismic fault properties and positions. The main difficulty of this work is to generate a sub-seismic fault network whose fault positions can be easily modified while respecting the statistical fault model. The sub-seismic fault model we have chosen allows us to obtain a sub-seismic fault network that is consistent with the seismic fault network and that succeeds in capturing the specific spatial organization of the faults. In a first step, the geometry of the seismic fault network is characterized using fractal methods. Sub-seismic faults are then generated according to a stochastic algorithm. Finally, the geometry of this discrete fracture network is optimized in order to match the hydrodynamic data about the reservoir. The optimization algorithm modifies the sub-seismic fault positions, leading to the history matching of the reservoir model. Fractal

  1. Time elapsed after contrast injection is crucial to determine infarct transmurality and myocardial functional recovery after an acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Palomares, José F; Ortiz-Pérez, José T; Lee, Daniel C; Bucciarelli-Ducci, Chiara; Tejedor, Paula; Bonow, Robert O; Wu, Edwin

    2015-05-30

    In acute myocardial infarction (MI), late Gadolinium enhancement (LGE) has been proposed to include the infarcted myocardium and area at risk. However, little information is available on the optimal timing after contrast injection to differentiate these 2 areas. Our aim was to determine in acute and chronic MI whether imaging time after contrast injection influences the LGE size that better predicts infarct size and functional recovery. Subjects were evaluated by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) the first week (n = 60) and 3 months (n = 47) after a percutaneously revascularized STEMI. Inversion-recovery single-shot (ss-IR) imaging was acquired at multiple time points following contrast administration and compared to segmented inversion-recovery (seg-IR) sequences. Inversion time was properly adjusted and images were blinded, randomized and measured for LGE volumes. In acute MI, LGE volume decreased over several minutes (p = 0.005) with the greatest volume occurring at 3 minutes and the smallest at 25 minutes post-contrast injection; however, LGE volume remained constant over time in chronic MI (p = 0.886). Depending on the imaging time, in acute phase, a change in the transmurality index was also observed. A transmural infarction (>75%) at 25 minutes better predicted the absence of improvement in the wall motion score index (WMSI), a higher increase in left ventricular volumes and a lower ejection fraction compared to 10 minutes. A change was observed in LGE volume in the minutes following contrast administration in acute but not in chronic MI. Infarct transmurality 25 minutes post-contrast injection better predicted infarct size and functional recovery at follow-up.

  2. Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Images for the website main pages and all configurations. The upload and access points for the other images are: Website Template RSW images BSCW Images HIRENASD...

  3. Acquired lesions of the corpus callosum: MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchino, A.; Takase, Y.; Nomiyama, K.; Egashira, R.; Kudo, S. [Saga Medical School, Department of Radiology, Saga (Japan)

    2006-04-15

    In this pictorial review, we illustrate acquired diseases or conditions of the corpus callosum that may be found by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the brain, including infarction, bleeding, diffuse axonal injury, multiple sclerosis, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, Marchiafava-Bignami disease, glioblastoma, gliomatosis cerebri, lymphoma, metastasis, germinoma, infections, metabolic diseases, transient splenial lesion, dilated Virchow-Robin spaces, wallerian degeneration after hemispheric damage and focal splenial gliosis. MR imaging is useful for the detection and differential diagnosis of corpus callosal lesions. Due to the anatomical shape and location of the corpus callosum, both coronal and sagittal fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images are most useful for visualizing lesions of this structure. (orig.)

  4. Acquired lesions of the corpus callosum: MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchino, A.; Takase, Y.; Nomiyama, K.; Egashira, R.; Kudo, S.

    2006-01-01

    In this pictorial review, we illustrate acquired diseases or conditions of the corpus callosum that may be found by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the brain, including infarction, bleeding, diffuse axonal injury, multiple sclerosis, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, Marchiafava-Bignami disease, glioblastoma, gliomatosis cerebri, lymphoma, metastasis, germinoma, infections, metabolic diseases, transient splenial lesion, dilated Virchow-Robin spaces, wallerian degeneration after hemispheric damage and focal splenial gliosis. MR imaging is useful for the detection and differential diagnosis of corpus callosal lesions. Due to the anatomical shape and location of the corpus callosum, both coronal and sagittal fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images are most useful for visualizing lesions of this structure. (orig.)

  5. The method of approximate inverse theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Schuster, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Inverse problems arise whenever one tries to calculate a required quantity from given measurements of a second quantity that is associated to the first one. Besides medical imaging and non-destructive testing, inverse problems also play an increasing role in other disciplines such as industrial and financial mathematics. Hence, there is a need for stable and efficient solvers. The book is concerned with the method of approximate inverse which is a regularization technique for stably solving inverse problems in various settings such as L2-spaces, Hilbert spaces or spaces of distributions. The performance and functionality of the method is demonstrated on several examples from medical imaging and non-destructive testing such as computerized tomography, Doppler tomography, SONAR, X-ray diffractometry and thermoacoustic computerized tomography. The book addresses graduate students and researchers interested in the numerical analysis of inverse problems and regularization techniques or in efficient solvers for the...

  6. Measurement of T1 by echo-planar imaging and the construction of computer-generated images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansfield, P.; Guilfoyle, D.N.; Ordidge, R.J.; Coupland, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    The high-speed echo-planar imaging (EPI) technique is used to obtain rapid T 1 and spin density measurements by a two-point method. It is shown that neglect of edge effects in the slice selection procedure leads to significant systematic errors in T 1 . T 1 maps for two young patients, obtained at 4.0 MHz, are presented. The T 1 and spin density values obtained are used to produce computer-generated images in inversion recovery simulations. These results demonstrate marked improvement in image contrast without paying the time penalty incurred in real experiments, thereby greatly increasing patient throughput potential. (author)

  7. Electrochemically driven emulsion inversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johans, Christoffer; Kontturi, Kyoesti

    2007-01-01

    It is shown that emulsions stabilized by ionic surfactants can be inverted by controlling the electrical potential across the oil-water interface. The potential dependent partitioning of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was studied by cyclic voltammetry at the 1,2-dichlorobenzene|water interface. In the emulsion the potential control was achieved by using a potential-determining salt. The inversion of a 1,2-dichlorobenzene-in-water (O/W) emulsion stabilized by SDS was followed by conductometry as a function of added tetrapropylammonium chloride. A sudden drop in conductivity was observed, indicating the change of the continuous phase from water to 1,2-dichlorobenzene, i.e. a water-in-1,2-dichlorobenzene emulsion was formed. The inversion potential is well in accordance with that predicted by the hydrophilic-lipophilic deviation if the interfacial potential is appropriately accounted for

  8. Unwrapped phase inversion with an exponential damping

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2015-07-28

    Full-waveform inversion (FWI) suffers from the phase wrapping (cycle skipping) problem when the frequency of data is not low enough. Unless we obtain a good initial velocity model, the phase wrapping problem in FWI causes a result corresponding to a local minimum, usually far away from the true solution, especially at depth. Thus, we have developed an inversion algorithm based on a space-domain unwrapped phase, and we also used exponential damping to mitigate the nonlinearity associated with the reflections. We construct the 2D phase residual map, which usually contains the wrapping discontinuities, especially if the model is complex and the frequency is high. We then unwrap the phase map and remove these cycle-based jumps. However, if the phase map has several residues, the unwrapping process becomes very complicated. We apply a strong exponential damping to the wavefield to eliminate much of the residues in the phase map, thus making the unwrapping process simple. We finally invert the unwrapped phases using the back-propagation algorithm to calculate the gradient. We progressively reduce the damping factor to obtain a high-resolution image. Numerical examples determined that the unwrapped phase inversion with a strong exponential damping generated convergent long-wavelength updates without low-frequency information. This model can be used as a good starting model for a subsequent inversion with a reduced damping, eventually leading to conventional waveform inversion.

  9. Channelling versus inversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gale, A.S.; Surlyk, Finn; Anderskouv, Kresten

    2013-01-01

    Evidence from regional stratigraphical patterns in Santonian−Campanian chalk is used to infer the presence of a very broad channel system (5 km across) with a depth of at least 50 m, running NNW−SSE across the eastern Isle of Wight; only the western part of the channel wall and fill is exposed. W......−Campanian chalks in the eastern Isle of Wight, involving penecontemporaneous tectonic inversion of the underlying basement structure, are rejected....

  10. Intersections, ideals, and inversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasco, D.W.

    1998-01-01

    Techniques from computational algebra provide a framework for treating large classes of inverse problems. In particular, the discretization of many types of integral equations and of partial differential equations with undetermined coefficients lead to systems of polynomial equations. The structure of the solution set of such equations may be examined using algebraic techniques.. For example, the existence and dimensionality of the solution set may be determined. Furthermore, it is possible to bound the total number of solutions. The approach is illustrated by a numerical application to the inverse problem associated with the Helmholtz equation. The algebraic methods are used in the inversion of a set of transverse electric (TE) mode magnetotelluric data from Antarctica. The existence of solutions is demonstrated and the number of solutions is found to be finite, bounded from above at 50. The best fitting structure is dominantly one dimensional with a low crustal resistivity of about 2 ohm-m. Such a low value is compatible with studies suggesting lower surface wave velocities than found in typical stable cratons

  11. Intersections, ideals, and inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasco, D.W.

    1998-10-01

    Techniques from computational algebra provide a framework for treating large classes of inverse problems. In particular, the discretization of many types of integral equations and of partial differential equations with undetermined coefficients lead to systems of polynomial equations. The structure of the solution set of such equations may be examined using algebraic techniques.. For example, the existence and dimensionality of the solution set may be determined. Furthermore, it is possible to bound the total number of solutions. The approach is illustrated by a numerical application to the inverse problem associated with the Helmholtz equation. The algebraic methods are used in the inversion of a set of transverse electric (TE) mode magnetotelluric data from Antarctica. The existence of solutions is demonstrated and the number of solutions is found to be finite, bounded from above at 50. The best fitting structure is dominantly onedimensional with a low crustal resistivity of about 2 ohm-m. Such a low value is compatible with studies suggesting lower surface wave velocities than found in typical stable cratons.

  12. Inverse transition radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauer, L.C.; Romea, R.D.; Kimura, W.D.

    1997-01-01

    A new method for laser acceleration is proposed based upon the inverse process of transition radiation. The laser beam intersects an electron-beam traveling between two thin foils. The principle of this acceleration method is explored in terms of its classical and quantum bases and its inverse process. A closely related concept based on the inverse of diffraction radiation is also presented: this concept has the significant advantage that apertures are used to allow free passage of the electron beam. These concepts can produce net acceleration because they do not satisfy the conditions in which the Lawson-Woodward theorem applies (no net acceleration in an unbounded vacuum). Finally, practical aspects such as damage limits at optics are employed to find an optimized set of parameters. For reasonable assumptions an acceleration gradient of 200 MeV/m requiring a laser power of less than 1 GW is projected. An interesting approach to multi-staging the acceleration sections is also presented. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  13. FLAIR images of brain diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segawa, Fuminori; Kinoshita, Masao; Kishibayashi, Jun; Kamada, Kazuhiko; Sunohara, Nobuhiko.

    1994-01-01

    The present study was designed to assess the usefulness of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images in diagnosing brain diseases. The subjects were 20 patients with multiple cerebral infarction, multiple sclerosis, temporal epilepsy, or brain trauma, and 20 other healthy adults. FLAIR images, with a long repetitive time of 6000 msec and a long inversion time of 1400-1600 msec, showed low signal intensity in the cerebrospinal fluid in the lateral ventricles and the cerebral sulci, and high signal intensity in brain tissues. Signal intensity on FLAIR images correlated well with T2 relaxation times under 100 msec. For multiple sclerosis and cerebral infarction, cystic lesions, which were shown on T2-weighted images with long relaxation times over 100 msec, appeared as low-signal areas; and the lesions surrounding the cystic lesions appeared as high-signal areas. For temporal lobe epilepsy, the hippocampus was visualized as a high-signal area. Hippocampal lesions were demonstrated better with FLAIR images than with conventional T2-weighted and proton-density images. In a patient with cerebral trauma, FLAIR images revealed the lobulated structure with the residual cortex shown as a high signal area. The lesions surrounding the cystic change were imaged as high signal areas. These structural changes were demonstrated better with FLAIR images than with conventional T2-weighted sequences. FLAIR images were useful in detecting white matter lesions surrounding the lateral ventricles and cortical and subcortical lesions near the brain surface, which were unclear on conventional T2-weighted and proton-density images. (N.K.)

  14. Recovery Spirituality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest Kurtz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is growing interest in Alcoholics Anonymous (A.A. and other secular, spiritual, and religious frameworks of long-term addiction recovery. The present paper explores the varieties of spiritual experience within A.A., with particular reference to the growth of a wing of recovery spirituality promoted within A.A. It is suggested that the essence of secular spirituality is reflected in the experience of beyond (horizontal and vertical transcendence and between (connection and mutuality and in six facets of spirituality (Release, Gratitude, Humility, Tolerance, Forgiveness, and a Sense of Being-at-home shared across religious, spiritual, and secular pathways of addiction recovery. The growing varieties of A.A. spirituality (spanning the “Christianizers” and “Seculizers” reflect A.A.’s adaptation to the larger diversification of religious experience and the growing secularization of spirituality across the cultural contexts within which A.A. is nested.

  15. Left ventricular function and functional recovery early and late after myocardial infarction: a prospective pilot study comparing two-dimensional strain, conventional echocardiography, and radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carasso, Shemy; Agmon, Yoram; Roguin, Ariel; Keidar, Zohar; Israel, Ora; Hammerman, Haim; Lessick, Jonathan

    2013-11-01

    Visual left ventricular (LV) wall motion scoring is well established for the assessment of LV function, yet it is subjective, circumstantial, and relative and requires long training. Quantification of myocardial shortening (strain) using two-dimensional speckle-tracking is potentially less subjective. In this study, quantifiable LV contraction (two-dimensional strain) was prospectively cross-related with wall motion score (WMS) and radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) score in 20 patients (mean age, 54 ± 9 years) with acute myocardial infarctions, early and late after percutaneous revascularization. Echocardiography and rest MPI were performed 3 to 5 days after acute myocardial infarction. Echocardiography was repeated at 4 months. Peak segmental and global endocardial longitudinal strain (LS) and circumferential strain (CS) were measured, and principal strain was calculated. Volumes, WMS, MPI scores, and strain were assessed independently. Two-dimensional strain, visual WMS, and radionuclide MPI score correlated closely. Strain thresholds for abnormal WMS were 11.7% for early LS, 18.2% for early CS, 13.9% for late LS, and 19.1% for late CS. Late principal strain correlated better with WMS and MPI score than either LS or CS. CS varied minimally over time, while LS improved in most segments. Higher early CS (>15%) was predictive of segmental functional recovery. MPI score correlated better with late rather than early strain, probably because early resting perfusion defects represent permanent damage. In this pilot study, strain correlated with echocardiographic WMS and the extent of ischemia (MPI score) early and late after revascularization in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Longitudinal and circumferential strain uncoupling was observed. LS appeared to be more sensitive to acute ischemia, whereas CS correlated better with improvement after revascularization. Copyright © 2013 American Society of Echocardiography. Published by Mosby, Inc. All

  16. [Functional respiratory imaging after neostigmine- or sugammadex-enhanced recovery from neuromuscular blockade in the anesthetised rat: a randomised controlled pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepens, Tom; Cammu, Guy; Maes, Sabine; Desmedt, Benny; Vos, Wim; Deseure, Kristof

    Reductions in diaphragm activity are associated with the postoperative development of atelectasis. Neostigmine reversal is also associated with increased atelectasis. We assessed the effects of neostigmine, sugammadex, and spontaneous reversal on regional lung ventilation and airway flow. Six Sprague-Dawley rats were paralysed with rocuronium and mechanically ventilated until recovery of the train-of-four ratio to 0.5. We administered neostigmine (0.06mg.kg -1 ), sugammadex (15mg.kg -1 ), or saline (n=2 per group). Computed tomography scans were obtained during the breathing cycle. Three-dimensional models of lung lobes were generated using functional respiratory imaging technology, and lobar volumes were calculated during the breathing cycle. The diaphragmatic surface was segmented for the end-expiratory and end-inspiratory scans. The total change in volume was reported by the lung volume change from the end-expiratory scan to the end-inspiratory scan. Chest wall movement was defined as the lung volume change minus the volume change that resulted from diaphragm excursion. The two rats that received neostigmine exhibited a smaller relative contribution of diaphragm movement to the total change in lung volume compared with the two rats that received sugammadex or saline (chest wall contribution (%): 26.69 and 25.55 for neostigmine; -2.77 and 15.98 for sugammadex; 18.82 and 10.30 for saline). This pilot study in rats demonstrated an increased relative contribution of chest wall expansion after neostigmine compared with sugammadex or saline. This smaller relative contribution of diaphragm movement may be explained by a neostigmine-induced decrease in phrenic nerve activity or by remaining occupied acetylcholine receptors after neostigmine. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. Generalized Recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov Jensen, Christian; Lando, David; Heje Pedersen, Lasse

    We characterize when physical probabilities, marginal utilities, and the discount rate can be recovered from observed state prices for several future time periods. Our characterization makes no assumptions of the probability distribution, thus generalizing the time-homogeneous stationary model...... of Ross (2015). Our characterization is simple and intuitive, linking recovery to the relation between the number of time periods and the number of states. When recovery is feasible, our model is easy to implement, allowing a closed-form linearized solution. We implement our model empirically, testing...

  18. Generalized Recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christian Skov; Lando, David; Pedersen, Lasse Heje

    We characterize when physical probabilities, marginal utilities, and the discount rate can be recovered from observed state prices for several future time periods. Our characterization makes no assumptions of the probability distribution, thus generalizing the time-homogeneous stationary model...... of Ross (2015). Our characterization is simple and intuitive, linking recovery to the relation between the number of time periods on the number of states. When recovery is feasible, our model is easy to implement, allowing a closed-form linearized solution. We implement our model empirically, testing...

  19. Generalized Recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christian Skov; Lando, David; Pedersen, Lasse Heje

    We characterize when physical probabilities, marginal utilities, and the discount rate can be recovered from observed state prices for several future time periods. We make no assumptions of the probability distribution, thus generalizing the time-homogeneous stationary model of Ross (2015......). Recovery is feasible when the number of maturities with observable prices is higher than the number of states of the economy (or the number of parameters characterizing the pricing kernel). When recovery is feasible, our model is easy to implement, allowing a closed-form linearized solution. We implement...... our model empirically, testing the predictive power of the recovered expected return and other recovered statistics....

  20. Fast and slow recovery phases of goldfish behavior after transection of the optic nerve revealed by a computer image processing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, S; Devadas, M; Okada, K; Shimada, Y; Ohkawa, M; Muramoto, K; Takizawa, N; Matsukawa, T

    1999-01-01

    As the goldfish is a common experimental animal for vision research, including psychophysical behavior, it is very important to quantitatively score fish behavior. We have previously developed a computer image processing system which can acquire the positional coordinates of goldfish moving freely in an aquarium and determine turning directions (go straight, right or left turn). In the present study, an algorithm to determine tilting angles of moving goldfish was constructed. We also made histograms for quantifying the interaction between pairs of goldfish (two-point distance). By using these histograms, we estimated the time-course of behavioral regeneration after optic nerve transection in goldfish. Control goldfish showed an equal percentage of right or left turns and maintained an upright position in a dorsoventral axis. When the optic nerve of a goldfish was unilaterally sectioned, the goldfish showed predominant turning and slight tilting toward the intact eye. The abnormal turning and tilting behaviors lasted for 10-14 days and then gradually decreased, returning to control behaviors by one month after the unilateral transection. When the optic nerve of a single goldfish was bilaterally sectioned, it did not show any preferential turning and tilting behavior, which is similar to what was observed in control goldfish. However, the trace maps showed that, after bilateral sectioning, fish preferred to cross the center of the tank, which was unlike control fish. In control pairs, one goldfish chased the other with a fixed small range of two-point distances. However, in pairs of goldfish with bilateral transection of the optic nerve, the blind goldfish behaved independently of each other, with a long two-point distance. The long two-point distance of the blind goldfish lasted for at least two months and then slowly returned to control two-point distance by four months after bilateral transection. Such fast and slow recovery in goldfish behaviors evoked after

  1. Interferometric inversion for passive imaging and navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    digital TV or cellular communication signals in order to perform 1) source geolocation from a moving platform, and conversely 2) navigation of the moving...navigation. First, we analyze the potential of using commercial digital TV or cellular communication signals in order to perform 1) source geolocation from...applica- tions among others in adversarial channel estimation when the incident pulse is unknown. In this reporting period, we considered the situation of

  2. Function representation with circle inversion map systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boreland, Bryson; Kunze, Herb

    2017-01-01

    The fractals literature develops the now well-known concept of local iterated function systems (using affine maps) with grey-level maps (LIFSM) as an approach to function representation in terms of the associated fixed point of the so-called fractal transform. While originally explored as a method to achieve signal (and 2-D image) compression, more recent work has explored various aspects of signal and image processing using this machinery. In this paper, we develop a similar framework for function representation using circle inversion map systems. Given a circle C with centre õ and radius r, inversion with respect to C transforms the point p˜ to the point p˜', such that p˜ and p˜' lie on the same radial half-line from õ and d(õ, p˜)d(õ, p˜') = r2, where d is Euclidean distance. We demonstrate the results with an example.

  3. On some inverse problems in nuclear physics

    OpenAIRE

    Belashev, B. Z.; Suleymanov, M. K.

    2001-01-01

    Some inverse problems in high-energy physics, neutron diffraction and NMR spectroscopy are discussed. To solve them, the Fourier integrated transformation method and the Maximum Entropy Technique (MENT) were used. The integrated images of experimental distributions are shown to be informative when determining the space-time parameters of a particle generation zone and when analysing blurred spectra. The efficiency of the above methods was checked by comparing relevant results with the results...

  4. Inverse Scattering in a Multipath Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cuccaro

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution an inverse scattering problem is ad- dressed in a multipath environment. In particular, multipath is created by known ”extra” point-like scatterers (passive elements expressely deployed between the scene under in- vestigation and the source/measurement domains. Through a back-projection imaging scheme, the role of the passive elements on the achievable performance is shown and com- pared to the free-space case.

  5. Limits to Nonlinear Inversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosegaard, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    For non-linear inverse problems, the mathematical structure of the mapping from model parameters to data is usually unknown or partly unknown. Absence of information about the mathematical structure of this function prevents us from presenting an analytical solution, so our solution depends on our...... ability to produce efficient search algorithms. Such algorithms may be completely problem-independent (which is the case for the so-called 'meta-heuristics' or 'blind-search' algorithms), or they may be designed with the structure of the concrete problem in mind. We show that pure meta...

  6. Stratigraphic inversion of pre-stack multicomponent data; Inversion stratigraphique multicomposante avant sommation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agullo, Y.

    2005-09-15

    This thesis present the extension of mono-component seismic pre-stack data stratigraphical inversion method to multicomponent data, with the objective of improving the determination of reservoir elastic parameters. In addiction to the PP pressure waves, the PS converted waves proved their interest for imaging under gas clouds; and their potential is highly significant for the characterization of lithologies, fluids, fractures... Nevertheless the simultaneous use ol PP and PS data remains problematic because of their different the time scales. To jointly use the information contained in PP and PS data, we propose a method in three steps first, mono-component stratigraphic inversions of PP then PS data; second, estimation of the PP to PS time conversion law; third, multicomponent stratigraphic inversion. For the second point, the estimation of the PP to PS conversion law is based on minimizing the difference between the S impedances obtained from PP and PS mono-component stratigraphic inversion. The pre-stack mono-component stratigraphic inversions was adapted to the case of multicomponent data by leaving each type of data in its own time scale in order to avoid the distortion of the seismic wavelet. The results obtained on a realistic synthetic PP-PS case show on one hand that determining PP to PS conversion law (from the mono-component inversion results) is feasible, and on the other hand that the joint inversion of PP and PS data with this conversion law improves the results compared to the mono-component inversion ones. Although this is presented within the framework of the PP and PS multi-component data, the developed methodology adapts directly to PP and SS data for example. (author)

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal lesions in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okazawa, Hitoshi; Inoue, Kiyoharu; Yoshikawa, Koki; Mannen, Toru

    1986-01-01

    We were able to detect spinal lesions by MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) in three cases of multiple sclerosis with suspected cervical spinal lesions. In two cases MRI was examined during relapse. MRI revealed marked swelling of the spinal cord. The lesions had low MRI-signal intensity in inversion-recovery images and high signal intensity in T 2 -weighted spin-echo images. As symptoms improved, a later MRI revealed that the spinal cord became thinner and signal intensity normalized. Prolongation of T 1 relaxation time is said to be useful in evaluating lesion activity, but from our observations, T 2 -weighted images were more effective in detecting the earliest lesions of multiple sclerosis. We thought the MRI changes were due to edema because the time course of proton relaxation time resembled that in the experimental studies of brain edema reported previously and because in one case the swelling of the spinal cord and high signal areas on spin-echo image disappeared so rapidly in response to anti-edema therapy. In the last case MRI was examined in the remission phase. Although the spinal cord was almost normal in size, skip lesions of low signal intensity on the inversion-recovery image were detected, and we were still able to find high signal areas on spin-echo image. We supposed these might be lesions full of foamy cells, but further investigation is necessary to clarify the meaning of MRI in remission phase. (author)

  8. Interferogram analysis using the Abel inversion technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusof Munajat; Mohamad Kadim Suaidi

    2000-01-01

    High speed and high resolution optical detection system were used to capture the image of acoustic waves propagation. The freeze image in the form of interferogram was analysed to calculate the transient pressure profile of the acoustic waves. The interferogram analysis was based on the fringe shift and the application of the Abel inversion technique. An easier approach was made by mean of using MathCAD program as a tool in the programming; yet powerful enough to make such calculation, plotting and transfer of file. (Author)

  9. Improve Image Quality of Transversal Relaxation Time PROPELLER and FLAIR on Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauf, N.; Alam, D. Y.; Jamaluddin, M.; Samad, B. A.

    2018-03-01

    The Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging technique that uses the interaction between the magnetic field and the nuclear spins. MRI can be used to show disparity of pathology by transversal relaxation time (T2) weighted images. Some techniques for producing T2-weighted images are Periodically Rotated Overlapping Parallel Lines with Enhanced Reconstruction (PROPELLER) and Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR). A comparison of T2 PROPELLER and T2 FLAIR parameters in MRI image has been conducted. And improve Image Quality the image by using RadiAnt DICOM Viewer and ENVI software with method of image segmentation and Region of Interest (ROI). Brain images were randomly selected. The result of research showed that Time Repetition (TR) and Time Echo (TE) values in all types of images were not influenced by age. T2 FLAIR images had longer TR value (9000 ms), meanwhile T2 PROPELLER images had longer TE value (100.75 - 102.1 ms). Furthermore, areas with low and medium signal intensity appeared clearer by using T2 PROPELLER images (average coefficients of variation for low and medium signal intensity were 0.0431 and 0.0705, respectively). As for areas with high signal intensity appeared clearer by using T2 FLAIR images (average coefficient of variation was 0.0637).

  10. Multi-modal and targeted imaging improves automated mid-brain segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plassard, Andrew J.; D'Haese, Pierre F.; Pallavaram, Srivatsan; Newton, Allen T.; Claassen, Daniel O.; Dawant, Benoit M.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2017-02-01

    The basal ganglia and limbic system, particularly the thalamus, putamen, internal and external globus pallidus, substantia nigra, and sub-thalamic nucleus, comprise a clinically relevant signal network for Parkinson's disease. In order to manually trace these structures, a combination of high-resolution and specialized sequences at 7T are used, but it is not feasible to scan clinical patients in those scanners. Targeted imaging sequences at 3T such as F-GATIR, and other optimized inversion recovery sequences, have been presented which enhance contrast in a select group of these structures. In this work, we show that a series of atlases generated at 7T can be used to accurately segment these structures at 3T using a combination of standard and optimized imaging sequences, though no one approach provided the best result across all structures. In the thalamus and putamen, a median Dice coefficient over 0.88 and a mean surface distance less than 1.0mm was achieved using a combination of T1 and an optimized inversion recovery imaging sequences. In the internal and external globus pallidus a Dice over 0.75 and a mean surface distance less than 1.2mm was achieved using a combination of T1 and FGATIR imaging sequences. In the substantia nigra and sub-thalamic nucleus a Dice coefficient of over 0.6 and a mean surface distance of less than 1.0mm was achieved using the optimized inversion recovery imaging sequence. On average, using T1 and optimized inversion recovery together produced significantly improved segmentation results than any individual modality (p<0.05 wilcox sign-rank test).

  11. A Frequency Matching Method: Solving Inverse Problems by Use of Geologically Realistic Prior Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Katrine; Frydendall, Jan; Cordua, Knud Skou

    2012-01-01

    The frequency matching method defines a closed form expression for a complex prior that quantifies the higher order statistics of a proposed solution model to an inverse problem. While existing solution methods to inverse problems are capable of sampling the solution space while taking into account...... solution model to an inverse problem by using a priori information based on multiple point statistics learned from training images. We demonstrate the applicability of the suggested method on a synthetic tomographic crosshole inverse problem....

  12. Elastic versus acoustic inversion for marine surveys

    KAUST Repository

    Mora, Peter

    2018-04-24

    Full Wavefield Inversion (FWI) is a powerful and elegant approach for seismic imaging that is on the way to becoming the method of choice when processing exploration or global seismic data. In the case of processing marine survey data, one may be tempted to assume acoustic FWI is sufficient given that only pressure waves exist in the water layer. In this paper, we pose the question as to whether or not in theory – at least for a hard water bottom case – it should be possible to resolve the shear modulus or S-wave velocity in a marine setting using large offset data. We therefore conduct numerical experiments with idealized marine data calculated with the elastic wave equation. We study two cases, FWI of data due to a diffractor model, and FWI of data due to a fault model. We find that at least in idealized situation, elastic FWI of hard waterbottom data is capable of resolving between the two Lamé parameters λ and μ. Another numerical experiment with a soft waterbottom layer gives the same result. In contrast, acoustic FWI of the synthetic elastic data results in a single image of the first Lamé parameter λ which contains severe artefacts for diffraction data and noticable artefacts for layer reflection data. Based on these results, it would appear that at least, inversions of large offset marine data should be fully elastic rather than acoustic unless it has been demonstrated that for the specific case in question (offsets, model and water depth, practical issues such as soft sediment attenuation of shear waves or computational time), that an acoustic only inversion provides a reasonably good quality of image comparable to that of an elastic inversion. Further research with real data is required to determine the degree to which practical issues such as shear wave attenuation in soft sediments may affect this result.

  13. Functional neuroimaging of recovery from motor conversion disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dogonowski, A M; Andersen, K W; Sellebjerg, F

    2018-01-01

    A patient with motor conversion disorder presented with a functional paresis of the left hand. After exclusion of structural brain damage, she was repeatedly examined with whole-brain functional magnetic resonance imaging, while she performed visually paced finger-tapping tasks. The dorsal premotor......-based activation that gradually diminished with recovery. The inverse dynamics of premotor and medial prefrontal activity over time were found during unimanual finger-tapping with the affected and non-affected hand as well as during bimanual finger-tapping. These observations suggest that reduced premotor...... that an excessive 'veto' signal generated in medial prefrontal cortex along with decreased premotor activity might constitute the functional substrate of conversion disorder. This notion warrants further examination in a larger group of affected patients....

  14. Inverse plasma equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, H.R.; Dory, R.A.; Holmes, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    We illustrate in some detail a 2D inverse-equilibrium solver that was constructed to analyze tokamak configurations and stellarators (the latter in the context of the average method). To ensure that the method is suitable not only to determine equilibria, but also to provide appropriately represented data for existing stability codes, it is important to be able to control the Jacobian, tilde J is identical to delta(R,Z)/delta(rho, theta). The form chosen is tilde J = J 0 (rho)R/sup l/rho where rho is a flux surface label, and l is an integer. The initial implementation is for a fixed conducting-wall boundary, but the technique can be extended to a free-boundary model

  15. A passive inverse filter for Green's function retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallot, Thomas; Catheline, Stefan; Roux, Philippe; Campillo, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Passive methods for the recovery of Green's functions from ambient noise require strong hypotheses, including isotropic distribution of the noise sources. Very often, this distribution is nonisotropic, which introduces bias in the Green's function reconstruction. To minimize this bias, a spatiotemporal inverse filter is pro