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Sample records for inverse phase precursor

  1. Unwrapped phase inversion with an exponential damping

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2015-07-28

    Full-waveform inversion (FWI) suffers from the phase wrapping (cycle skipping) problem when the frequency of data is not low enough. Unless we obtain a good initial velocity model, the phase wrapping problem in FWI causes a result corresponding to a local minimum, usually far away from the true solution, especially at depth. Thus, we have developed an inversion algorithm based on a space-domain unwrapped phase, and we also used exponential damping to mitigate the nonlinearity associated with the reflections. We construct the 2D phase residual map, which usually contains the wrapping discontinuities, especially if the model is complex and the frequency is high. We then unwrap the phase map and remove these cycle-based jumps. However, if the phase map has several residues, the unwrapping process becomes very complicated. We apply a strong exponential damping to the wavefield to eliminate much of the residues in the phase map, thus making the unwrapping process simple. We finally invert the unwrapped phases using the back-propagation algorithm to calculate the gradient. We progressively reduce the damping factor to obtain a high-resolution image. Numerical examples determined that the unwrapped phase inversion with a strong exponential damping generated convergent long-wavelength updates without low-frequency information. This model can be used as a good starting model for a subsequent inversion with a reduced damping, eventually leading to conventional waveform inversion.

  2. Multiscale Phase Inversion of Seismic Data

    KAUST Repository

    Fu, Lei

    2017-12-02

    We present a scheme for multiscale phase inversion (MPI) of seismic data that is less sensitive to the unmodeled physics of wave propagation and a poor starting model than standard full waveform inversion (FWI). To avoid cycle-skipping, the multiscale strategy temporally integrates the traces several times, i.e. high-order integration, to produce low-boost seismograms that are used as input data for the initial iterations of MPI. As the iterations proceed, higher frequencies in the data are boosted by using integrated traces of lower order as the input data. The input data are also filtered into different narrow frequency bands for the MPI implementation. At low frequencies, we show that MPI with windowed reflections approximates wave equation inversion of the reflection traveltimes, except no traveltime picking is needed. Numerical results with synthetic acoustic data show that MPI is more robust than conventional multiscale FWI when the initial model is far from the true model. Results from synthetic viscoacoustic and elastic data show that MPI is less sensitive than FWI to some of the unmodeled physics. Inversion of marine data shows that MPI is more robust and produces modestly more accurate results than FWI for this data set.

  3. Multiscale phase inversion of seismic marine data

    KAUST Repository

    Fu, Lei

    2017-08-17

    We test the feasibility of applying multiscale phase inversion (MPI) to seismic marine data. To avoid cycle-skipping, the multiscale strategy temporally integrates the traces several times, i.e. high-order integration, to produce low-boost seismograms that are used as input data for the initial iterations of MPI. As the iterations proceed, higher frequencies in the data are boosted by using integrated traces of lower order as the input data. Results with synthetic data and field data from the Gulf of Mexico produce robust and accurate results if the model does not contain strong velocity contrasts such as salt-sediment interfaces.

  4. Eigenvectors phase correction in inverse modal problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Guandong; Rahmatalla, Salam

    2017-12-01

    The solution of the inverse modal problem for the spatial parameters of mechanical and structural systems is heavily dependent on the quality of the modal parameters obtained from the experiments. While experimental and environmental noises will always exist during modal testing, the resulting modal parameters are expected to be corrupted with different levels of noise. A novel methodology is presented in this work to mitigate the errors in the eigenvectors when solving the inverse modal problem for the spatial parameters. The phases of the eigenvector component were utilized as design variables within an optimization problem that minimizes the difference between the calculated and experimental transfer functions. The equation of motion in terms of the modal and spatial parameters was used as a constraint in the optimization problem. Constraints that reserve the positive and semi-positive definiteness and the inter-connectivity of the spatial matrices were implemented using semi-definite programming. Numerical examples utilizing noisy eigenvectors with augmented Gaussian white noise of 1%, 5%, and 10% were used to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed method. The results showed that the proposed method is superior when compared with a known method in the literature.

  5. Unwrapped phase inversion for near surface seismic data

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2012-11-04

    The Phase-wrapping is one of the main obstacles of waveform inversion. We use an inversion algorithm based on the instantaneous-traveltime that overcomes the phase-wrapping problem. With a high damping factor, the frequency-dependent instantaneous-traveltime inversion provides the stability of refraction tomography, with higher resolution results, and no arrival picking involved. We apply the instantaneous-traveltime inversion to the synthetic data generated by the elastic time-domain modeling. The synthetic data is a representative of the near surface seismic data. Although the inversion algorithm is based on the acoustic wave equation, the numerical examples show that the instantaneous-traveltime inversion generates a convergent velocity model, very similar to what we see from traveltime tomography.

  6. Frequency-domain waveform inversion using the unwrapped phase

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2011-01-01

    Phase wrapping in the frequency-domain (or cycle skipping in the time-domain) is the major cause of the local minima problem in the waveform inversion. The unwrapped phase has the potential to provide us with a robust and reliable waveform inversion, with reduced local minima. We propose a waveform inversion algorithm using the unwrapped phase objective function in the frequency-domain. The unwrapped phase, or what we call the instantaneous traveltime, is given by the imaginary part of dividing the derivative of the wavefield with respect to the angular frequency by the wavefield itself. As a result, the objective function is given a traveltime-like function, which allows us to smooth it and reduce its nonlinearity. The gradient of the objective function is computed using the back-propagation algorithm based on the adjoint-state technique. We apply both our waveform inversion algorithm using the unwrapped phase and the conventional waveform inversion and show that our inversion algorithm gives better convergence to the true model than the conventional waveform inversion. © 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  7. Frequency-domain waveform inversion using the phase derivative

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2013-09-26

    Phase wrapping in the frequency domain or cycle skipping in the time domain is the major cause of the local minima problem in the waveform inversion when the starting model is far from the true model. Since the phase derivative does not suffer from the wrapping effect, its inversion has the potential of providing a robust and reliable inversion result. We propose a new waveform inversion algorithm using the phase derivative in the frequency domain along with the exponential damping term to attenuate reflections. We estimate the phase derivative, or what we refer to as the instantaneous traveltime, by taking the derivative of the Fourier-transformed wavefield with respect to the angular frequency, dividing it by the wavefield itself and taking the imaginary part. The objective function is constructed using the phase derivative and the gradient of the objective function is computed using the back-propagation algorithm. Numerical examples show that our inversion algorithm with a strong damping generates a tomographic result even for a high ‘single’ frequency, which can be a good initial model for full waveform inversion and migration.

  8. Etude sur la prédiction de l'inversion de phase Phase Inversion Behavior for Liquid Dispersions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Decarre S.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available En écoulement diphasique eau-huile dans lequel une des phases est dispersée dans l'autre, il peut se produire sous certaine condition d'écoulement une inversion de phase, la phase continue devenant dispersée. Ce phénomène, qui contrôle la nature de la phase mouillant la paroi de la conduite dans laquelle s'écoulent les phases, a des conséquences importantes sur la corrosion et sur la perte de charge. Nous présentons un modèle d'inversion, basé sur une approche thermodynamique, valable pour tous les régimes d'écoulement. Les données expérimentales utilisées pour la validation du modèle sont issues d'une étude bibliographique. En écoulement laminaire, cette approche conduit à des résultats similaires à ceux du modèle de Yeh. Pour la plupart des données disponibles, ce modèle prédit bien la fraction critique pour laquelle l'inversion de phase se produit. In two phase oil-water dispersed flow, a phase inversion may occur whereby the continuous phase becomes dispersed. This phenomenon which controls the nature of the phase in contact with the pipe has a great importance on the corrosion and on the pressure drop. A model for the phase inversion is presented, it is based on a thermodynamic approach, and it is valid for all flow regimes. Experimental data from the litterature are used to validate the model. In laminar flow, this approach gives similar results to those obtained by Yeh. For most data, the model agrees well with the experimental data.

  9. Pre-design mixer-settler based on phase inversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widiatmo, Djarot S.W

    1998-01-01

    The mixer settler was designed to extract uranium from organic phase by n-Dodecane and to separate heavy metal from liquid waste. The mixer settler was designed to save solvent without reducing the extraction efficiency. Extraction efficiency depend on : two phase dispersion on mixing, the type of droplet formation and completeness phase separation. The mixer settler has three main part i.e. mixer chamber, droplet formation device and phase inversion column. Mixer chamber was operated in laminar mixing, the total flow rate 200 ml.second -1 . The mixer chamber dimensions was 5 cm diameter and 7 cm height. It was completed with paddle mixer 3 cm diameter, 1 cm height and the speed rotation was 300 rpm. The droplet formation device was perforated plate 5 cm diameter with 1 mm holes. Phase Inversion column dimensions was 5 cm diameter and 50 cm height. (author)

  10. Nonlinear 1D and 2D waveform inversions of SS precursors and their applications in mantle seismic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokht, R.; Gu, Y. J.; Sacchi, M. D.

    2016-12-01

    Seismic velocities and the topography of mantle discontinuities are crucial for the understanding of mantle structure, dynamics and mineralogy. While these two observables are closely linked, the vast majority of high-resolution seismic images are retrieved under the assumption of horizontally stratified mantle interfaces. This conventional correction-based process could lead to considerable errors due to the inherent trade-off between velocity and discontinuity depth. In this study, we introduce a nonlinear joint waveform inversion method that simultaneously recovers discontinuity depths and seismic velocities using the waveforms of SS precursors. Our target region is the upper mantle and transition zone beneath Northeast Asia. In this region, the inversion outcomes clearly delineate a westward dipping high-velocity structure in association with the subducting Pacific plate. Above the flat part of the slab west of the Japan sea, our results show a shear wave velocity reduction of 1.5% in the upper mantle and 10-15 km depression of the 410 km discontinuity beneath the Changbaishan volcanic field. We also identify the maximum correlation between shear velocity and transition zone thickness at an approximate slab dip of 30 degrees, which is consistent with previously reported values in this region.To validate the results of the 1D waveform inversion of SS precursors, we discretize the mantle beneath the study region and conduct a 2D waveform tomographic survey using the same nonlinear approach. The problem is simplified by adopting the discontinuity depths from the 1D inversion and solving only for perturbations in shear velocities. The resulting models obtained from the 1D and 2D approaches are self-consistent. Low-velocities beneath the Changbai intraplate volcano likely persist to a depth of 500 km. Collectively, our seismic observations suggest that the active volcanoes in eastern China may be fueled by a hot thermal anomaly originating from the mantle transition

  11. Frequency-wavenumber domain phase inversion along reflection wavepaths

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Han

    2014-12-01

    A background velocity model containing the correct low-wavenumber information is desired for both the quality of the migration image and the success of waveform inversion. To achieve this goal, the velocity is updated along the reflection wavepaths, rather than along both the reflection ellipses and transmission wavepaths as in conventional FWI. This method allows for reconstructing the low-wavenumber part of the background velocity model, even in the absence of long offsets and low-frequency component of the data. Moreover, in gradient-based iterative updates, instead of forming the data error conventionally, we propose to exploit the phase mismatch between the observed and the calculated data. The phase mismatch emphasizes a kinematic error and varies quasi-linearly with respect to the velocity error. The phase mismatch is computed (1) in the frequency-wavenumber (f-k) domain replacing the magnitudes of the calculated common shot gather by those of the observed one, and (2) in the temporal-spatial domain to form the difference between the transformed calculated common-shot gather and the observed one. The background velocity model inverted according to the proposed methods can serve as an improved initial velocity model for conventional waveform inversion. Tests with synthetic and field data show both the benefits and limitations of this method.

  12. Background velocity inversion by phase along reflection wave paths

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Han

    2014-08-05

    A background velocity model containing the correct lowwavenumber information is desired for both the quality of the migration image and the success of waveform inversion. We propose to invert for the low-wavenumber part of the velocity model by minimizing the phase difference between predicted and observed reflections. The velocity update is exclusively along the reflection wavepaths and, unlike conventional FWI, not along the reflection ellipses. This allows for reconstructing the smoothly varying parts of the background velocity model. Tests with synthetic data show both the benefits and limitations of this method.

  13. How to master vanadium oxide stoichiometry and phase formation? Insights in the aqueous precursor chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Peys, Nick

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this work was to obtain fundamental insights in the aqueous vanadium precursor chemistry and in their relation to the vanadium oxide stoichiometry=phase formation, obtained via a solution deposition route.

  14. Chromatid Painting for Chromosomal Inversion Detection, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a novel approach to the detection of chromosomal inversions. Transmissible chromosome aberrations (translocations and inversions) have profound genetic...

  15. Phase inversion of ionomer-stabilized emulsions to form high internal phase emulsions (HIPEs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Xu, Zhiguang; Cai, Zengxiao; Guo, Qipeng

    2015-06-28

    Herein, we report the phase inversion of ionomer-stabilized emulsions to form high internal phase emulsions (HIPEs) induced by salt concentration and pH changes. The ionomers are sulfonated polystyrenes (SPSs) with different sulfonation degrees. The emulsion types were determined by conductivity measurements, confocal microscopy and optical microscopy, and the formation of HIPE organogels was verified by the tube-inversion method and rheological measurements. SPSs with high sulfonation degrees (water-soluble) and low sulfonation degrees (water-insoluble) can stabilize oil-in-water emulsions; these emulsions were transformed into water-in-oil HIPEs by varying salt concentrations and/or changing the pH. SPS, with a sulfonation degree of 11.6%, is the most efficient, and as low as 0.2 (w/v)% of the organic phase is enough to stabilize the HIPEs. Phase inversion of the oil-in-water emulsions occurred to form water-in-oil HIPEs by increasing the salt concentration in the aqueous phase. Two phase inversion points from oil-in-water emulsions to water-in-oil HIPEs were observed at pH 1 and 13. Moreover, synergetic effects between the salt concentration and pH changes occurred upon the inversion of the emulsion type. The organic phase can be a variety of organic solvents, including toluene, xylene, chloroform, dichloroethane, dichloromethane and anisole, as well as monomers such as styrene, butyl acrylate, methyl methacrylate and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate. Poly(HIPEs) were successfully prepared by the polymerization of monomers as the continuous phase in the ionomer-stabilized HIPEs.

  16. Precursor-Less Coating of Nanoparticles in the Gas Phase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pfeiffer, T.V.; Kedia, P.; Messing, M.E.; Valvo, M.; Schmidt-Ott, A.

    2015-01-01

    This article introduces a continuous, gas-phase method for depositing thin metallic coatings onto (nano)particles using a type of physical vapor deposition (PVD) at ambient pressure and temperature. An aerosol of core particles is mixed with a metal vapor cloud formed by spark ablation by passing

  17. Intraoperative ultrasound using phase inversion harmonic imaging: first experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölscher, Thilo; Ozgur, Burak; Singel, Soren; Wilkening, Wilko G; Mattrey, Robert F; Sang, Hoi

    2007-04-01

    To study the feasibility of intraoperative ultrasound using the phase inversion harmonic imaging (PIHI) technique. Eight patients with intracranial middle cerebral artery aneurysms and five patients with arteriovenous malformations were studied after written informed consent. A first ultrasound study was performed through the intact dura mater after cranial trepanation to assess the pathology, its feeding artery, and downstream segments. A second ultrasound study was performed immediately after intervention to monitor the success of the procedure. All patients were studied using a Siemens Sonoline Antares ultrasound machine (Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc., Malvern, PA) before and after intravenous administration of an ultrasound contrast agent (Optison; GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI). Other than conventional brightness mode, PIHI is sensitive to the nonlinear acoustic response of tissue, and especially to ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles. The latter enables contrast-specific vascular imaging. PIHI provided anatomically detailed information. In combination with an ultrasound contrast agent, angiography-like views of the vascular pathologies, including their surrounding vessels, could be obtained. Flow velocities in afferent and downstream vascular segments, as well as inside the pathology, could be assessed. Flow dynamics inside the aneurysm sac or the arteriovenous malformation could be studied in real-time. Postintervention, contrast-enhanced PIHI could be used to immediately monitor the success of the surgical procedure. PIHI enables intraoperative visualization and morphological assessment of neurovascular pathologies, such as middle cerebral artery aneurysms or arteriovenous malformations. In combination with an ultrasound contrast agent, the flow dynamics of these lesions can be displayed in real-time.

  18. Level 1.5 Almucantar Inversion Products Phase Functions

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — AERONET inversion code provides aerosoloptical properties in the total atmospheric column derived from the direct and diffuse radiation measured byAERONETCimel...

  19. Level 2.0 Almucantar Inversion Products Phase Functions

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — AERONET inversion code provides aerosoloptical properties in the total atmospheric column derived from the direct and diffuse radiation measured byAERONETCimel...

  20. Chromatid Painting for Chromosomal Inversion Detection, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose the continued development of a novel approach to the detection of chromosomal inversions. Transmissible chromosome aberrations (translocations and...

  1. Level 2.0 Almucantar Inversion Products (except phase functions)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — AERONET inversion code provides aerosoloptical properties in the total atmospheric column derived from the direct and diffuse radiation measured byAERONETCimel...

  2. Level 1.5 Almucantar Inversion Products (except phase functions)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — AERONET inversion code provides aerosoloptical properties in the total atmospheric column derived from the direct and diffuse radiation measured byAERONETCimel...

  3. Precursor-Less Coating of Nanoparticles in the Gas Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias V. Pfeiffer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces a continuous, gas-phase method for depositing thin metallic coatings onto (nanoparticles using a type of physical vapor deposition (PVD at ambient pressure and temperature. An aerosol of core particles is mixed with a metal vapor cloud formed by spark ablation by passing the aerosol through the spark zone using a hollow electrode configuration. The mixing process rapidly quenches the vapor, which condenses onto the core particles at a timescale of several tens of milliseconds in a manner that can be modeled as bimodal coagulation. Gold was deposited onto core nanoparticles consisting of silver or polystyrene latex, and silver was deposited onto gold nanoparticles. The coating morphology depends on the relative surface energies of the core and coating materials, similar to the growth mechanisms known for thin films: a coating made of a substance having a high surface energy typically results in a patchy coverage, while a coating material with a low surface energy will normally “wet” the surface of a core particle. The coated particles remain gas-borne, allowing further processing.

  4. Crystallization Kinetics in Liquid Crystals with Hexagonal Precursor Phases by Calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmaja, Sunkara; Ajita, Narayanan; Srinivasulu, Maddasani; Girish, Sriram Ramchandra; Pisipati, Venkata Gopala Krishna Murthy; Potukuchi, Dakshina Murthy

    2010-09-01

    Design and characterization of Schiff based liquid crystalline nO.m compounds exhibiting hexagonal smectic phases are reported. Crystallization kinetics investigations are carried out in the liquid crystals (LCs) exhibiting hexagonal ordered orthogonal and tilted precursor LC phases by calorimetry. The Avrami theory is referred and results are analyzed. Influence of molecular ordering, structure, and dimensionality of the LC precursor phase on kinetics is studied. Effect of shape and flexibility of the molecule for nucleation and growth processes is investigated. Varying rate of kinetics reflects upon the transit of the system from constant type to independent type of nucleation. The trends in the Avrami parameter b and exponent n suggest sporadic nucleation. Crystal growth is interpreted as heterogeneous permeation of layered domains (or aggregates) formed by needle shaped calamitic molecules. Calorimetric observations at different crystallization temperatures CT and hold time t infer diffusion mediated crystallization

  5. Crystallization kinetics in liquid crystals with hexagonal precursor phases by calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padmaja, Sunkara; Ajita, Narayanan; Potukuchi, Dakshina Murthy [Dept. of Physics, Jawaharlal Nehru Technological Univ., Kakinada (India); Srinivasulu, Maddasani; Girish, Sriram Ramchandra [Liquid Crystal Research Centre, Koneru Lakshmaiah Coll. of Engineering, Vaddeswaram (India); Pisipati, Venkata Gopala Krishna Murthy [Dept. of Chemistry, Manipal Inst. of Tech. (India)

    2010-08-15

    Design and characterization of Schiff based liquid crystalline nO.m compounds exhibiting hexagonal smectic phases are reported. Crystallization kinetics investigations are carried out in the liquid crystals (LCs) exhibiting hexagonal ordered orthogonal and tilted precursor LC phases by calorimetry. The Avrami theory is referred and results are analyzed. Influence of molecular ordering, structure, and dimensionality of the LC precursor phase on kinetics is studied. Effect of shape and flexibility of the molecule for nucleation and growth processes is investigated. Varying rate of kinetics reflects upon the transit of the system from constant type to independent type of nucleation. The trends in the Avrami parameter b and exponent n suggest sporadic nucleation. Crystal growth is interpreted as heterogeneous permeation of layered domains (or aggregates) formed by needle shaped calamitic molecules. Calorimetric observations at different crystallization temperatures CT and hold time t infer diffusion mediated crystallization. (orig.)

  6. Solution of the Cox-Thompson inverse scattering problem using finite set of phase shifts

    CERN Document Server

    Apagyi, B; Scheid, W

    2003-01-01

    A system of nonlinear equations is presented for the solution of the Cox-Thompson inverse scattering problem (1970 J. Math. Phys. 11 805) at fixed energy. From a given finite set of phase shifts for physical angular momenta, the nonlinear equations determine related sets of asymptotic normalization constants and nonphysical (shifted) angular momenta from which all quantities of interest, including the inversion potential itself, can be calculated. As a first application of the method we use input data consisting of a finite set of phase shifts calculated from Woods-Saxon and box potentials representing interactions with diffuse or sharp surfaces, respectively. The results for the inversion potentials, their first moments and asymptotic properties are compared with those provided by the Newton-Sabatier quantum inversion procedure. It is found that in order to achieve inversion potentials of similar quality, the Cox-Thompson method requires a smaller set of phase shifts than the Newton-Sabatier procedure.

  7. Hybrid Perovskite Thin-Film Photovoltaics: In Situ Diagnostics and Importance of the Precursor Solvate Phases

    KAUST Repository

    Munir, Rahim

    2016-11-07

    Solution-processed hybrid perovskite semiconductors attract a great deal of attention, but little is known about their formation process. The one-step spin-coating process of perovskites is investigated in situ, revealing that thin-film formation is mediated by solid-state precursor solvates and their nature. The stability of these intermediate phases directly impacts the quality and reproducibility of thermally converted perovskite films and their photovoltaic performance.

  8. Application of the unwrapped phase inversion to land data without source estimation

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2015-08-19

    Unwrapped phase inversion with a strong damping was developed to solve the phase wrapping problem in frequency-domain waveform inversion. In this study, we apply the unwrapped phase inversion to band-limited real land data, for which the available minimum frequency is quite high. An important issue of the data is a strong ambiguity of source-ignition time (or source shift) shown in a seismogram. A source-estimation approach does not fully address the issue of source shift, since the velocity model and the source wavelet are updated simultaneously and interact with each other. We suggest a source-independent unwrapped phase inversion approach instead of relying on source-estimation from this land data. In the source-independent approach, the phase of the modeled data converges not to the exact phase value of the observed data, but to the relative phase value (or the trend of phases); thus it has the potential to solve the ambiguity of source-ignition time in a seismogram and work better than the source-estimation approach. Numerical examples show the validation of the source-independent unwrapped phase inversion, especially for land field data having an ambiguity in the source-ignition time.

  9. OBSERVATIONS OF MAGNETIC FLUX-ROPE OSCILLATION DURING THE PRECURSOR PHASE OF A SOLAR ERUPTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, G. P.; Wang, J. X.; Zhang, J.

    2016-01-01

    Based on combined observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) spectrometer with the coronal emission line of Fe xxi at 1354.08 Å and SDO /AIA images in multiple passbands, we report the finding of the precursor activity manifested as the transverse oscillation of a sigmoid, which is likely a pre-existing magnetic flux rope (MFR), that led to the onset of an X class flare and a fast halo coronal mass ejection (CME) on 2014 September 10. The IRIS slit is situated at a fixed position that is almost vertical to the main axis of the sigmoid structure that has a length of about 1.8 × 10 5 km. This precursor oscillation lasts for about 13 minutes in the MFR and has velocities in the range of [−9, 11] km s −1 and a period of ∼280 s. Our analysis, which is based on the temperature, density, length, and magnetic field strength of the observed sigmoid, indicates that the nature of the oscillation is a standing wave of fast magnetoacoustic kink mode. We further find that the precursor oscillation is excited by the energy released through an external magnetic reconnection between the unstable MFR and the ambient magnetic field. It is proposed that this precursor activity leads to the dynamic formation of a current sheet underneath the MFR that subsequently reconnects to trigger the onset of the main phase of the flare and the CME.

  10. Two-dimensional unwrapped phase inversion with damping and a Gaussian filter

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2014-01-01

    Phase wrapping is one of main causes of the local minima problem in waveform inversion. However, the unwrapping process for 2D phase maps that includes singular points (residues) is complicated and does not guarantee unique solutions. We employ an exponential damping to eliminate the residues in the 2D phase maps, which makes the 2D phase unwrapping process easy and produce a unique solution. A recursive inversion process using the damped unwrapped phase provides an opportunity to invert for smooth background updates first, and higher resolution updates later as we reduce the damping. We also apply a Gaussian filter to the gradient to mitigate the edge artifacts resulting from the narrow shape of the sensitivity kernels at high damping. Numerical examples demonstrate that our unwrapped phase inversion with damping and a Gaussian filter produces good convergent results even for a 3Hz single frequency of Marmousi dataset and with a starting model far from the true model.

  11. Nucleation and Epitaxy-Mediated Phase Transformation of a Precursor Cadmium Carbonate Phase at the Calcite/Water Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riechers, Shawn L.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.

    2017-02-24

    Mineral nucleation can be catalyzed by the presence of mineral substrates; however, the mechanisms of heterogeneous nucleation remain poorly understood. A combination of in situ time-sequenced measurements and nano-manipulation experiments were performed using atomic force microscopy (AFM) to probe the mechanisms of heteroepitaxial nucleation of otavite (CdCO3) on calcite (CaCO3) single crystals that exposed the (10-14) surface. Otavite and calcite are isostructural carbonates that display a 4% lattice mismatch, based on their (10-14) surface areas. AFM observations revealed a two-stage process in the nucleation of cadmium carbonate surface precipitates. As evidenced by changes in height, shape, growth behavior, and friction signal of the precipitates, a precursor phase was observed to initially form on the surface and subsequently undergo an epitaxy-mediated phase transformation to otavite, which then grew epitaxially. Nano-manipulation experiments, in which the applied force was increased progressively until precipitates were removed from the surface, showed that adhesion of the precursor phase to the substrate was distinctively weaker than that of the epitaxial phase, consistent with that of an amorphous phase. These findings demonstrate for the first time that heterogeneous mineral nucleation can follow a non-classical pathway like that found in homogenous aqueous conditions.

  12. Taming waveform inversion non-linearity through phase unwrapping of the model and objective functions

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2012-09-25

    Traveltime inversion focuses on the geometrical features of the waveform (traveltimes), which is generally smooth, and thus, tends to provide averaged (smoothed) information of the model. On other hand, general waveform inversion uses additional elements of the wavefield including amplitudes to extract higher resolution information, but this comes at the cost of introducing non-linearity to the inversion operator, complicating the convergence process. We use unwrapped phase-based objective functions in waveform inversion as a link between the two general types of inversions in a domain in which such contributions to the inversion process can be easily identified and controlled. The instantaneous traveltime is a measure of the average traveltime of the energy in a trace as a function of frequency. It unwraps the phase of wavefields yielding far less non-linearity in the objective function than that experienced with conventional wavefields, yet it still holds most of the critical wavefield information in its frequency dependency. However, it suffers from non-linearity introduced by the model (or reflectivity), as reflections from independent events in our model interact with each other. Unwrapping the phase of such a model can mitigate this non-linearity as well. Specifically, a simple modification to the inverted domain (or model), can reduce the effect of the model-induced non-linearity and, thus, make the inversion more convergent. Simple numerical examples demonstrate these assertions.

  13. Template-assisted mineral formation via an amorphous liquid phase precursor route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Fairland F.

    The search for alternative routes to synthesize inorganic materials has led to the biomimetic route of producing ceramics. In this method, materials are manufactured at ambient temperatures and in aqueous solutions with soluble additives and insoluble matrix, similar to the biological strategy for the formation of minerals by living organisms. Using this approach, an anionic polypeptide additive was used to induce an amorphous liquid-phase precursor to either calcium carbonate or calcium phosphate. This precursor was then templated on either organic or inorganic substrates. Non-equilibrium morphologies, such as two-dimensional calcium carbonate films, one-dimensional calcium carbonate mesostructures and "molten" calcium phosphate spherulites were produced, which are not typical of the traditional (additive-free) solution grown crystals in the laboratory. In the study of calcium carbonate, the amorphous calcium carbonate mineral formed via the liquid-phase precursor, either underwent a dissolution-recrystallization event or a pseudo-solid-state transformation to produce different morphologies and polymorphs of the mineral. Discrete or aggregate calcite crystals were formed via the dissolution of the amorphous phase to allow the reprecipitation of the stable crystal. Non-equilibrium morphologies, e.g., films, mesotubules and mesowires were templated using organic and inorganic substrates and compartments. These structures were generated via an amorphous solid to crystalline solid transformation. Single crystalline tablets and mesowires of aragonite, which are reported to be found only in nature as skeletal structures of marine organisms, such as mollusk nacre and echinoderm teeth, were successfully synthesized. These biomimetic structures were grown via the polymer-induced liquid-phase precursor route in the presence of magnesium. Only low magnesium-bearing calcite was formed in the absence of the polymer. A similar approach of using a polymeric additive was

  14. Refraction traveltime tomography with irregular topography using the unwrapped phase inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2013-01-01

    Traveltime tomography has long served as a stable and efficient tool for velocity estimation, especially for the near surface. It, however, suffers from some of limitations associated with ray tracing and high-frequency traveltime in velocity inversion zones and ray shadow regions. We develop a tomographic approach based on traveltime solutions obtained by tracking the phase (instantaneous traveltime) of the wavefield solution of the Helmholtz wave equation. Since the instantaneous-traveltime does not suffer from phase wrapping, the inversion algorithm using the instantaneous-traveltime has the potential to generate robust inversion results. With a high damping factor, the instantaneous-traveltime inversion provides refraction tomography similar results, but from a single frequency. Despite the Helmholtz-based solver implementation, the tomographic inversion handles irrgular topography. The numerical examples show that our inversion algorithm generates a convergent smooth velocity model, which looks very much like a tomographic result. Next, we plan to apply the instantaneous-traveltime inversion algorithm to real seismic data acquired from the near surface with irregular topography.

  15. Understanding the influence of alendronate on the morphology and phase transformation of apatitic precursor nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guiling; Huang, Rong; Li, Zhicheng; Yang, Xianyan; Chen, Xiaoyi; Xia, Wei; Sun, Xiaoliang; Yang, Guojing; Gao, Changyou; Gou, Zhongru

    2012-08-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) are a class of synthetic pyrophosphate analogs that can prevent the loss of bone mass, given orally to treat postmenopuasal osteoporosis. It is not clear yet if the benefits of BPs include the possibility of affecting bone apatitic precursors transition for bone consolidation except for encouraging osteoclasts to undergo apoptosis. Furthermore, the complexity of the in vivo system makes it difficult to isolate and study such extracellular topographical cues that trigger bone turnover response. Herein, we proposed a wet-chemical approach employing alendronate sodium (AS) as a guide of hydroxyapatite (HA) precursor growth and conversion which was initiated from the nucleantion of octacalcium phosphate (OCP) in a cell membrane-mimicking surfactant micelle aqueous system. The nanocrystal clusters of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) and OCP nanocryatals were readily precipitated within a relatively narrow AS concentration range (2-8 μM). However, such low concentrations of AS seemed to stabilize the more acidic phases, and to delay the transformation into HA, to an extent which increased on increasing AS concentration. In contrast, at a slight higher concentrations (16-32 μM), AS promoted HA precipitation after ageing for 1h. It was found that the effect of AS on the phase selectivity of apatitic precursors was concentration-dependent within a prolonged ageing time stage (0.5-168 h). The AS-assisted reactions in vitro offer an expedient way to understand the underlying implementarity between bone and BPs for bone consolidation, and to improve our understanding of benefit of BP dosages on bone turnover and trauma healing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Bioconversion of a L-carnitin precursor in a one- or two-phase system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bare, G; Jacques, P; Hubert, J B; Rikir, R; Thonart, P

    1991-01-01

    The ability of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to bioconvert stereo-selectively octyl-4-chloroacetoacetate (OCA) into the corresponding chiral alcohol, precursor of L-carnitin, an important physiological agent, was investigated. In a monophasic system with free cells, more than 90% of OCA (0.018 M) bioconversion have been reached after 6 h (enantiomeric excess for the R form, eeR:97%). Immobilized cells in alginate beads were less efficient in conversion of OCA than free cells. In a two-phase system with free cells, the level of reduction of OCA (0.018 M) reached 85% after 48 h. With a medium containing a higher OCA concentration (0.270 M), 41% of this product were bioconverted after the same period. On the other hand, immobilized cells did not show any significant bioconversion of OCA in two-phase reactors. The limiting factor of these reactors in the regeneration of the cofactors involved in the OCA reduction.

  17. Nucleon-alpha particle interactions from inversion of scattering phase shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, N.; Amos, K.; Apagyi, B.; Lun, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    Scattering amplitudes have been extracted from (elastic scattering) neutron-alpha (n-α) differential cross sections below threshold using the constraint that the scattering function is unitary. Real phase shifts have been obtained therefrom. A modification to the Newton iteration method has been used to solve the nonlinear equation that specifies the phase of the scattering amplitude in terms of the complete (0 to 180 deg) cross section since the condition for a unique and convergent solution by an exact iterated fixed point method, the 'Martin' condition, is not satisfied. The results compare well with those found using standard optical model search procedures. Those optical model phase shifts, from both n - α and p - α (proton-alpha) calculations in which spin-orbit effects were included, were used in the second phase of this study, namely to determine the scattering potentials by inversion of that phase shift data. A modified Newton-Sabatier scheme to solve the inverse scattering problem has been used to obtain inversion potentials (both central and spin-orbit) for nucleon energies in the range 1 to 24 MeV. The inversion interactions differ noticeably from the Woods-Saxon forms used to give the input phase shifts. Not only do those inversion potentials when used in Schroedinger equations reproduce the starting phase shifts but they are also very smooth, decay rapidly, and are as feasible as the optical model potentials of others to be the local form for interactions deduced by folding realistic two-nucleon g matrices with the density matrix elements of the alpha particle. 23 refs., 8 tabs., 9 figs

  18. Effect of precursor mass on product phase composition in plasma dynamic synthesis of tungsten carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatrova, K. N.; Sivkov, A. A.; Shanenkov, I. I.; Saigash, A. S.

    2017-05-01

    An interest in WC1-x cubic tungsten carbide results from its catalytic properties similar to those of platinum group metals and the synergistic effect between WC1-x and Pt in reactions of hydrogen evolution and hydrogen oxidation. However, according to the phase diagram of the W-C system, the cubic phase WC1-x only exists in a narrow range of temperature stability (about 2798-3058 K), which makes it difficult for being obtained. To date, there are different methods for synthesizing tungsten carbide powder with a low content of cubic phase that complicates the study of WC1-x properties. A direct plasma dynamic synthesis is known as one of the promising methods to produce WC1-x. The aim of this work is to find the optimal amount of tungsten precursor to obtain cubic tungsten carbide with a high purity by plasma dynamic method. The synthesized products were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The XRD patterns showed that the main phase was cubic tungsten carbide with negligible content of hexagonal tungsten carbide W2C and pure tungsten W. According to a quantitative analysis of synthesized products, which were obtained using masses of initial tungsten equal to 1.0, 0.7, 0.6 and 0.5 gram, the yield of WC1-x phase was 84, 89, 95 and 92 wt%, respectively. The results of TEM displayed that the synthesized powders consist of crystallites, having the size less than 100 nm (WC1-x), and a carbon matrix. This carbon was not detected in XRD due to its presence as an amorphous phase.

  19. Phase continuity and inversion in polystyrene/poly(methyl methacrylate) blends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chuai, Chengzhi; Almdal, K.; Lyngaae-Jørgensen, Jørgen

    2003-01-01

    , blend composition, processing variables (mixing time and annealing) and diblock copolymer addition on the formation of bi-continuous phase structure (BPS) in PS/PMMA blends. The experimental results were compared with the volume fraction of phase inversion calculated with various semi-empirical models......Dual-phase continuity and phase inversion of polystyrene (PS)/poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) blends processed in a twin-screw extruder was investigated using a selective extraction technique and scanning electron microscopy. Emphasis was placed on investigating the effects of viscosity ratio....... The results showed that the formation of a BPS strongly depends on the blend composition and the viscosity ratio of the constituent components. Furthermore, BPS was found in a wide volume fraction interval. Increasing the mixing time and the addition of diblock copolymer, both led to a narrowing range...

  20. Inverse phase-transfer catalysis: probing its mechanism with competitive transacylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fife, W.K.; Xin, Y.

    1987-02-18

    The utility of two-phase water-organic solvent media for organic synthesis is widely recognized. Nearly all reported examples of this methodology involve transport of a reactant from the water phase into the organic phase where it encounters a second reactant to effect reaction. This process commonly known as phase-transfer catalysis (PTC) is the subject of numerous reports and reviews. The literature includes a few examples of a complementary synthetic procedure in which an organic solvent soluble reagent is activated by conversion to an ionic intermediate and transported to the aqueous phase for reaction. The recent report by Mathias and Vaidya describes a new example of this virtually unexplored methodology, which they have named inverse phase-transfer catalysis (IPTC). They report here some preliminary results from their continuing investigation of multiple-phase systems as media for organic reactions which provide significant new insight into the IPTC process.

  1. Effect of silica nanoparticles on the phase inversion of liquid-liquid dispersions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asadabadi, Maliheh Raji; Abolghasemi, Hossein; Nasab, Payman Davoodi; Maragheh, Mohammad Ghannadi

    2013-01-01

    The effect of silica nanoparticles on phase inversion of liquid-liquid dispersions in a stirred vessel was investigated. The studied systems were toluene dispersed in water and vice versa. In the first set of experiments, phase inversion behavior of systems without Silica nanoparticles was evaluated and subsequent experiments were conducted in the presence of the nanoparticles. For this purpose, Silica nanoparticles of different concentrations (0.01, 0.03, 0.05, 0.07 wt%) were dispersed in water. The nanofluid stability was examined using an ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrophotometer. The results indicated that increase in silica nanoparticle concentrations up to 0.07 wt% led to increase in agitation speed of phase inversion 43-53.5% and 38.5-45% in the case of O/W and W/O dispersions, respectively. Consequently, the tendency of dispersions to inversion diminished as nanoparticle concentrations increased. Finally, 0.05 wt% of silica nanoparticle was selected as the optimum on the range studied

  2. Population inversion of two atoms under the phase decoherence in the multiphoton process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Dongxia; Sa Chuerfu; Mu Qier

    2011-01-01

    By means of the quantum theory, the population inversion of two atoms in the system of two two-level atoms coupled to a light field in the Binomial Optical Field are investigated in the presence of phase decoherence in the multiphoton Tavis-Cumming Model. The influences of the phase decoherence coefficient, the parameters η of the binomial optical field, the maximum number of photons and the number of the transitional photons on the properties of the population inversion of two atoms have been discussed. The results show that the phase decoherence reduced the oscillation amplitude of the population inversion of two atoms and destroyed the atomic quantum characteristic. Changing the number of the transitional photons, evolved cycle and evolved intensity the population inversion of two atoms can be changed. The phenomena of collapse and revival disappear as photon number increase. When the binomial optical state changes from a coherent state to a Fock state, the oscillation frequency of the atomic population reduces gradually, the phenomena of collapse and revival vanishes gradually. (authors)

  3. Regional W-Phase Source Inversion for Moderate to Large Earthquakes in China and Neighboring Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xu; Duputel, Zacharie; Yao, Zhenxing

    2017-12-01

    Earthquake source characterization has been significantly speeded up in the last decade with the development of rapid inversion techniques in seismology. Among these techniques, the W-phase source inversion method quickly provides point source parameters of large earthquakes using very long period seismic waves recorded at teleseismic distances. Although the W-phase method was initially developed to work at global scale (within 20 to 30 min after the origin time), faster results can be obtained when seismological data are available at regional distances (i.e., Δ ≤ 12°). In this study, we assess the use and reliability of regional W-phase source estimates in China and neighboring areas. Our implementation uses broadband records from the Chinese network supplemented by global seismological stations installed in the region. Using this data set and minor modifications to the W-phase algorithm, we show that reliable solutions can be retrieved automatically within 4 to 7 min after the earthquake origin time. Moreover, the method yields stable results down to Mw = 5.0 events, which is well below the size of earthquakes that are rapidly characterized using W-phase inversions at teleseismic distances.

  4. Unconventional Topological Phase Transition in Two-Dimensional Systems with Space-Time Inversion Symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Junyeong; Yang, Bohm-Jung

    2017-04-01

    We study a topological phase transition between a normal insulator and a quantum spin Hall insulator in two-dimensional (2D) systems with time-reversal and twofold rotation symmetries. Contrary to the case of ordinary time-reversal invariant systems, where a direct transition between two insulators is generally predicted, we find that the topological phase transition in systems with an additional twofold rotation symmetry is mediated by an emergent stable 2D Weyl semimetal phase between two insulators. Here the central role is played by the so-called space-time inversion symmetry, the combination of time-reversal and twofold rotation symmetries, which guarantees the quantization of the Berry phase around a 2D Weyl point even in the presence of strong spin-orbit coupling. Pair creation and pair annihilation of Weyl points accompanying partner exchange between different pairs induces a jump of a 2D Z2 topological invariant leading to a topological phase transition. According to our theory, the topological phase transition in HgTe /CdTe quantum well structure is mediated by a stable 2D Weyl semimetal phase because the quantum well, lacking inversion symmetry intrinsically, has twofold rotation about the growth direction. Namely, the HgTe /CdTe quantum well can show 2D Weyl semimetallic behavior within a small but finite interval in the thickness of HgTe layers between a normal insulator and a quantum spin Hall insulator. We also propose that few-layer black phosphorus under perpendicular electric field is another candidate system to observe the unconventional topological phase transition mechanism accompanied by the emerging 2D Weyl semimetal phase protected by space-time inversion symmetry.

  5. Unconventional Topological Phase Transition in Two-Dimensional Systems with Space-Time Inversion Symmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Junyeong; Yang, Bohm-Jung

    2017-04-14

    We study a topological phase transition between a normal insulator and a quantum spin Hall insulator in two-dimensional (2D) systems with time-reversal and twofold rotation symmetries. Contrary to the case of ordinary time-reversal invariant systems, where a direct transition between two insulators is generally predicted, we find that the topological phase transition in systems with an additional twofold rotation symmetry is mediated by an emergent stable 2D Weyl semimetal phase between two insulators. Here the central role is played by the so-called space-time inversion symmetry, the combination of time-reversal and twofold rotation symmetries, which guarantees the quantization of the Berry phase around a 2D Weyl point even in the presence of strong spin-orbit coupling. Pair creation and pair annihilation of Weyl points accompanying partner exchange between different pairs induces a jump of a 2D Z_{2} topological invariant leading to a topological phase transition. According to our theory, the topological phase transition in HgTe/CdTe quantum well structure is mediated by a stable 2D Weyl semimetal phase because the quantum well, lacking inversion symmetry intrinsically, has twofold rotation about the growth direction. Namely, the HgTe/CdTe quantum well can show 2D Weyl semimetallic behavior within a small but finite interval in the thickness of HgTe layers between a normal insulator and a quantum spin Hall insulator. We also propose that few-layer black phosphorus under perpendicular electric field is another candidate system to observe the unconventional topological phase transition mechanism accompanied by the emerging 2D Weyl semimetal phase protected by space-time inversion symmetry.

  6. Numerical Investigation on the Effects of a Precursor Wetting Film on the Displacement of Two Immiscible Phases Along a Channel

    KAUST Repository

    Bao, Kai

    2015-10-08

    A set of numerical experiments has been conducted to study the effect of a precursor fluid layer on the motion of two phase system in a channel. This system is characterized by coupled Cahn-Hillard and Navier-Stokes system together with slip boundary conditions. The solution of the governing equation involves first the solution of Cahn-Hillard equation with semi-implicit and Mixed finite element discritization with a convex splitting scheme. The Navier-Stokes equations are then solved with a P2-P0 mixed finite element method. Three cases have been investigated; in the first the effect of different wettability scenarios with no precursor layer has been investigated. In the second scenario, the effect of the precursor layer for different wettability conditions is investigated. In the third case, the effect of the thickness of the precursor layer is investigated. It is found that, wettability conditions have considerable effect on the flow of the considered two-phase system. Furthermore the existence of the precursor layer has additional influence on the breakthrough of the phases.

  7. EEG phase reset due to auditory attention: an inverse time-scale approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, Yin Fen; Strauss, Daniel J

    2009-01-01

    We propose a novel tool to evaluate the electroencephalograph (EEG) phase reset due to auditory attention by utilizing an inverse analysis of the instantaneous phase for the first time. EEGs were acquired through auditory attention experiments with a maximum entropy stimulation paradigm. We examined single sweeps of auditory late response (ALR) with the complex continuous wavelet transform. The phase in the frequency band that is associated with auditory attention (6–10 Hz, termed as theta–alpha border) was reset to the mean phase of the averaged EEGs. The inverse transform was applied to reconstruct the phase-modified signal. We found significant enhancement of the N100 wave in the reconstructed signal. Analysis of the phase noise shows the effects of phase jittering on the generation of the N100 wave implying that a preferred phase is necessary to generate the event-related potential (ERP). Power spectrum analysis shows a remarkable increase of evoked power but little change of total power after stabilizing the phase of EEGs. Furthermore, by resetting the phase only at the theta border of no attention data to the mean phase of attention data yields a result that resembles attention data. These results show strong connections between EEGs and ERP, in particular, we suggest that the presentation of an auditory stimulus triggers the phase reset process at the theta–alpha border which leads to the emergence of the N100 wave. It is concluded that our study reinforces other studies on the importance of the EEG in ERP genesis

  8. Research Note: Full-waveform inversion of the unwrapped phase of a model

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2013-12-06

    Reflections in seismic data induce serious non-linearity in the objective function of full- waveform inversion. Thus, without a good initial velocity model that can produce reflections within a half cycle of the frequency used in the inversion, convergence to a solution becomes difficult. As a result, we tend to invert for refracted events and damp reflections in data. Reflection induced non-linearity stems from cycle skipping between the imprint of the true model in observed data and the predicted model in synthesized data. Inverting for the phase of the model allows us to address this problem by avoiding the source of non-linearity, the phase wrapping phenomena. Most of the information related to the location (or depths) of interfaces is embedded in the phase component of a model, mainly influenced by the background model, while the velocity-contrast information (responsible for the reflection energy) is mainly embedded in the amplitude component. In combination with unwrapping the phase of data, which mitigates the non-linearity introduced by the source function, I develop a framework to invert for the unwrapped phase of a model, represented by the instantaneous depth, using the unwrapped phase of the data. The resulting gradient function provides a mechanism to non-linearly update the velocity model by applying mainly phase shifts to the model. In using the instantaneous depth as a model parameter, we keep track of the model properties unfazed by the wrapping phenomena. © 2013 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers.

  9. Humidity-dependent phase state of SOA particles from biogenic and anthropogenic precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Saukko

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The physical phase state (solid, semi-solid, or liquid of secondary organic aerosol (SOA particles has important implications for a number of atmospheric processes. We report the phase state of SOA particles spanning a wide range of oxygen to carbon ratios (O / C, used here as a surrogate for SOA oxidation level, produced in a flow tube reactor by photo-oxidation of various atmospherically relevant surrogate anthropogenic and biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs. The phase state of laboratory-generated SOA was determined by the particle bounce behavior after inertial impaction on a polished steel substrate. The measured bounce fraction was evaluated as a function of relative humidity and SOA oxidation level (O / C measured by an Aerodyne high resolution time of flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF AMS.

    The main findings of the study are: (1 biogenic and anthropogenic SOA particles are found to be amorphous solid or semi-solid based on the measured bounced fraction (BF, which was typically higher than 0.6 on a 0 to 1 scale. A decrease in the BF is observed for most systems after the SOA is exposed to relative humidity of at least 80% RH, corresponding to a RH at impaction of 55%. (2 Long-chain alkanes have a low BF (indicating a "liquid-like", less viscous phase particles at low oxidation levels (BF < 0.2 ± 0.05 for O / C = 0.1. However, BF increases substantially upon increasing oxidation. (3 Increasing the concentration of sulphuric acid (H2SO4 in solid SOA particles (here tested for longifolene SOA causes a decrease in BF levels. (4 In the majority of cases the bounce behavior of the various SOA systems did not show correlation with the particle O / C. Rather, the molar mass of the gas-phase VOC precursor showed a positive correlation with the resistance to the RH-induced phase change of the formed SOA particles.

  10. Applied catastrophic phase inversion: a continuous non-centrifugal phase separation step in biphasic whole-cell biocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glonke, Sebastian; Sadowski, Gabriele; Brandenbusch, Christoph

    2016-11-01

    Biphasic whole-cell biotransformations are known to be efficient alternatives to common chemical synthesis routes, especially for the production of, e.g. apolar enantiopure organic compounds. They provide high stereoselectivity combined with high product concentrations owing to the presence of an organic phase serving as substrate reservoir and product sink. Industrial implementation suffers from the formation of stable Pickering emulsions caused by the presence of cells. State-of-the-art downstream processing includes inefficient strategies such as excessive centrifugation, use of de-emulsifiers or thermal stress. In contrast, using the catastrophic phase inversion (CPI) phenomenon (sudden switch of emulsion type caused by addition of dispersed phase), Pickering-type emulsions can be destabilized efficiently. Within this work a model system using bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (BEHP) as organic phase in combination with E. coli, JM101 was successfully separated using a continuous mixer settler setup. Compared to the state-of-the-art centrifugal separations, this process allows complete phase separation with no detectable water content or cells in the organic phase with no utilities/additives required. Furthermore, the concentration of the product is not affected by the separation. It is therefore a simple applicable method that can be used for separation of stable Pickering-type emulsions based on the knowledge of the point of inversion.

  11. Impact of amorphous precursor phases on magnesium isotope signatures of Mg-calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavromatis, Vasileios; Purgstaller, Bettina; Dietzel, Martin; Buhl, Dieter; Immenhauser, Adrian; Schott, Jacques

    2017-04-01

    Various marine calcifiers form exoskeletons via an amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) precursor phase and magnesium plays an important role in the temporary stabilization of this metastable phase. Thus, the use of Mg isotope ratios of marine biogenic carbonates as a proxy to reconstruct past seawater chemistry calls for a detailed understanding of the mechanisms controlling Mg isotope signatures during the formation and transformation of ACC to the final crystalline carbonate mineral. For this purpose we have investigated the Mg isotope fractionation between (Ca,Mg)CO3 solids and aqueous fluids at 25 °C and pH = 8.3 during (i) the direct precipitation of crystalline Mg-calcite and (ii) the formation of Mg-rich ACC (Mg-ACC) and its transformation to Mg-calcite. The outcome documents that the small Mg isotope fractionation between Mg-ACC and reactive fluid (ΔMg26ACC-fluid = - 1.0 ± 0.1 ‰) is not preserved during the transformation of the ACCs into Mg-calcite. Following a pronounced isotopic shift accompanying the transformation of Mg-ACC into Mg-calcite, Δ26Mgcalcite-fluid progressively decreases with reaction progress from ∼ - 3.0 ‰ to - 3.6 ‰, reflecting both the approach of isotopic equilibrium and the increase of calcite Mg content (to near 20 mol % Mg). In contrast the crystalline Mg-calcite precipitated directly from the reacting fluid, i.e. lacking a discernable formation of an amorphous precursor, exhibits only small temporal variations in Δ26Mgcalcite-fluid which overall is affected by the precipitation kinetics. The values found in this study at the onset of Mg-ACC precipitation for Mg isotope fractionation between Mg-ACC and the fluid (ΔMg26ACC-fluid = - 1.0 ‰) and between Mg-ACC and Mg2+(aq) (Δ (aq) 26Mg ACC-Mg2+ = + 2.0 ‰) are consistent with the formation of a hydrated Ca nanoporous solid accommodating Mg bicarbonate/carbonate species in combination with hydrated magnesium. This material crossed by percolating channels filled with the

  12. Micron-Sized Pored Membranes Based on Polyvinylidene Difluoride Hexafluoropropylene Prepared by Phase Inversion Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Hofmann

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, micron-sized pored membranes, based on the co-polymer polyvinylidene difluoride hexafluoropropylene (PVdF-HFP were prepared via phase inversion techniques. The aim of the approach was to find less harmful and less toxic solvents to fabricate such films. Therefore, the Hansen solubility approach was used to identify safer and less toxic organic solvents for the phase inversion process, relative to present solvent mixtures, based on acetone, dimethyl formamide, dimethyl acetamide or methanol. With this approach, it was possible to identify cyclopentanone, ethylene glycol and benzyl alcohol as suitable solvents for the membrane preparation process. Physicochemical and mechanical properties were analyzed and compared, which revealed a uniform membrane structure through the cross section. Differences were observed at the top surface, in dependence of both preparation approaches, which are described in detail.

  13. 3D Multisource Full‐Waveform Inversion using Dynamic Random Phase Encoding

    KAUST Repository

    Boonyasiriwat, Chaiwoot

    2010-10-17

    We have developed a multisource full‐waveform inversion algorithm using a dynamic phase encoding strategy with dual‐randomization—both the position and polarity of simultaneous sources are randomized and changed every iteration. The dynamic dual‐randomization is used to promote the destructive interference of crosstalk noise resulting from blending a large number of common shot gathers into a supergather. We compare our multisource algorithm with various algorithms in a numerical experiment using the 3D SEG/EAGE overthrust model and show that our algorithm provides a higher‐quality velocity tomogram than the other methods that use only monorandomization. This suggests that increasing the degree of randomness in phase encoding should improve the quality of the inversion result.

  14. Characteristics of inversion operation on Fermilab phase controlled pulsed power supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trendler, R.C.

    1977-01-01

    A well known property of phase controlled rectifiers with pulsed inductive loads is the ability to advance firing angles from full rectification (positive voltage) to full inversion (negative voltage). Though these properties have been effectively used in the Main Ring power supplies, they have not been extensively utilized for beam line magnet power supplies. Modifications to permit advancing phase angle sufficiently to permit inversion were made on TransRex 500 kW power supplies and Ling 55 kW power supplies. The objective of these modifications was to rapidly reduce the current in magnet loads to zero upon command. The modifications required and the performance of the power supplies are discussed

  15. Role of Precursor-Conversion Chemistry in the Crystal-Phase Control of Catalytically Grown Colloidal Semiconductor Quantum Wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fudong; Buhro, William E

    2017-12-26

    Crystal-phase control is one of the most challenging problems in nanowire growth. We demonstrate that, in the solution-phase catalyzed growth of colloidal cadmium telluride (CdTe) quantum wires (QWs), the crystal phase can be controlled by manipulating the reaction chemistry of the Cd precursors and tri-n-octylphosphine telluride (TOPTe) to favor the production of either a CdTe solute or Te, which consequently determines the composition and (liquid or solid) state of the Bi x Cd y Te z catalyst nanoparticles. Growth of single-phase (e.g., wurtzite) QWs is achieved only from solid catalysts (y ≪ z) that enable the solution-solid-solid growth of the QWs, whereas the liquid catalysts (y ≈ z) fulfill the solution-liquid-solid growth of the polytypic QWs. Factors that affect the precursor-conversion chemistry are systematically accounted for, which are correlated with a kinetic study of the composition and state of the catalyst nanoparticles to understand the mechanism. This work reveals the role of the precursor-reaction chemistry in the crystal-phase control of catalytically grown colloidal QWs, opening the possibility of growing phase-pure QWs of other compositions.

  16. Inverse boundary design of a radiative smelting furnace with ablative phase change phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farzan, H.; Hosseini Sarvari, S.M.; Mansouri, S.H.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The ablation phenomenon in a reverberatory smelting furnace is simulated numerically. • The results are verified by comparing with exact analytic solution. • Inverse design problem is solved to construct the desired melting rate. • The conjugate gradient method is used to solve the inverse phase change problem. - Abstract: An inverse analysis is employed to control the time rate of heaters in a 2-D smelting furnace to provide the specified radiative heat flux across the design surface to establish a desired melting rate. The design surface in the smelting furnace is the melting surface of the metal concentrate bank, and the melting process is considered to occur as an ablation phenomenon. The net radiation method is used to determine the radiation exchange between the elements of the furnace surfaces and the melting surface. The conjugate gradient method is employed to minimize the objective function, which is the sum of square residuals between the estimated and the desired heat fluxes over the design surface. It is shown that the proposed inverse technique is reliable and accurate for predicting the heater power distribution.

  17. EXAFS Phase Retrieval Solution Tracking for Complex Multi-Component System: Synthesized Topological Inverse Computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jay Min; Yang, Dong-Seok; Bunker, Grant B

    2013-01-01

    Using the FEFF kernel A(k,r), we describe the inverse computation from χ(k)-data to g(r)-solution in terms of a singularity regularization method based on complete Bayesian statistics process. In this work, we topologically decompose the system-matched invariant projection operators into two distinct types, (A + AA + A) and (AA + AA + ), and achieved Synthesized Topological Inversion Computation (STIC), by employing a 12-operator-closed-loop emulator of the symplectic transformation. This leads to a numerically self-consistent solution as the optimal near-singular regularization parameters are sought, dramatically suppressing instability problems connected with finite precision arithmetic in ill-posed systems. By statistically correlating a pair of measured data, it was feasible to compute an optimal EXAFS phase retrieval solution expressed in terms of the complex-valued χ(k), and this approach was successfully used to determine the optimal g(r) for a complex multi-component system.

  18. A FTIR study water in membrane of nitrocellulose prepared by phase inversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benosmane, N.; Boutemeur, B.; Hamdi, M.

    2004-01-01

    Full text.Cellulose derivates were the first biopolymers used to produce synthesis membranes for technical applications, in this study the state of water in asymmetric membrane of nitrocellulose, prepared by the phase inversion process, was investigated using infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), after membrane preparation by the wet inversion process in acetone, the spectre FTIR of wet asymmetric membrane of nitrocellulose after immersion in water (after one week) is compared to the spectre of dried asymmetric membrane of nitrocellulose, the difference in spectre of dried and wet membrane indicate a weakly hydrogen-bonded to the polymer hydroxyl groups between water and hydroxyl groups in surface of membrane, the results demonstrate the amount of water species present in the surface of asymmetric membrane and heterogeneous of surface

  19. GOSAT CO2 Inversion Inter-comparison Experiment Phase-II and multi-year global fluxes inferred from the NIES flux inversion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, H.; Houweling, S.; Yokota, T.; Maksyutov, S. S.

    2016-12-01

    The atmospheric inversion technique infers surface fluxes of traces gases from atmospheric measurements and is used to gain insight into how anthropogenic activities modify the stocks and flows of carbon over the globe. To gain further process-level understanding of these modifications, it is important to evaluate, understand, and subsequently reduce the uncertainties in the flux estimation process. To assess the role of transport model uncertainties, the TransCom inversion inter-comparison studies were held in the late 1990s. More recently, after the advent of satellites dedicated to GHG monitoring, the GOSAT inversion inter-comparison (Phase-I) was carried out. The latter evaluated the full uncertainty of GOSAT-based CO2 flux estimation by allowing the study participants to use the inversion system and GOSAT column-mean CO2 (XCO2) retrieval dataset of their choice. The second phase of the GOSAT inversion inter-comparison explores differences between existing inversion systems and evaluates their contribution to the uncertainty in the estimated CO2 fluxes. For this purpose, the participants are asked to use a common input dataset that consists of a single GOSAT XCO2 retrieval dataset and an a priori flux dataset. The second phase study takes advantage of a five-year-long analysis period (2009-2014) during which GOSAT XCO2 retrievals are continually available, to assess the robustness of inversion-derived estimates of the impact of major weather anomalies (heat waves, droughts, and heavy precipitations, etc.) on carbon fluxes. Here, the latest on this study is reported. As an example of the results that will be generated in this experiment, we will present multi-year GOSAT CO2 fluxes from the NIES CO2 flux inversion system. The inversion uses NIES GOSAT SWIR Level 2 and ACOS B3.5 XCO2 retrievals covering the period June 2009 to early 2014 and ObsPack GVplus surface CO2 data. We evaluate how the CO2fluxes vary with respect to the handling of the observations

  20. Application of inverse models and XRD analysis to the determination of Ti-17 beta-phase Coefficients of Thermal Expansion

    OpenAIRE

    Fréour , Sylvain; Gloaguen , David; François , Marc; Guillén , Ronald

    2006-01-01

    International audience; The scope of this work is the determination of the coefficients of thermal expansion of the Ti-17 beta-phase. A rigorous inverse thermo-elastic self-consistent scale transition inicro-mechanical model extended to multi-phase materials was used. The experimental data required for the application of the inverse method were obtained from both the available literature and especially dedicated X-ray diffraction lattice strain measurements performed on the studied (alpha + b...

  1. Biolubricant induced phase inversion and superhydrophobicity in rubber-toughened biopolymer/organoclay nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Ilker S.; Steele, Adam; Martorana, Philip; Loth, Eric; Robinson, Scott J.; Stevenson, Darren

    2009-08-01

    We present a simple technique to fabricate rubber-toughened biopolymer/organoclay nanocomposite coatings with highly water repellent surface wetting characteristics and strong adhesion to metal surfaces. The technique combines the principles of phase inversion and atomization of multicomponent polymer/organoclay suspensions containing a biolubricant as the nonsolvent. The biolubricant was a blend of cyclomethicone/dimethiconol oil with fruit kernel oils. The ternary system of cellulose nitrate/solvent/biolubricant was blended with rubber dispersed organoclay nanofluids. Natural, synthetic, and fluoroacrylic latex rubbers were used for the purpose. Self-cleaning superhydrophobic coatings were obtained from synthetic and fluoroacrylic rubbers whereas natural rubber containing formulations resulted in sticky superhydrophobic coatings.

  2. An inverse voter model for co-evolutionary networks: Stationary efficiency and phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Chenping; Kong Hui; Li Li; Gu Zhiming; Xiong Shijie

    2011-01-01

    In some co-evolutionary networks, the nodes always flip their states between two opposite ones, changing the types of the links to others correspondingly. Meanwhile, the link-rewiring and state-flipping processes feed back each other, and only the links between the nodes in the opposite states are productive in generating flow for the network. We propose an inverse voter model to depict the basic features of them. New phase transitions from full efficiency to deficiency state are found by both the analysis and simulations starting from the random graphs and small-world networks. We suggest a new way to measure the efficiency of networks.

  3. Thermophysical properties estimation of paraffin/graphite composite phase change material using an inverse method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lachheb, Mohamed; Karkri, Mustapha; Albouchi, Fethi; Mzali, Foued; Nasrallah, Sassi Ben

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Preparation of paraffin/graphite composites by uni-axial compression technique. • Measurement of thermophysical properties of paraffin/graphite using the periodic method. • Measurement of the experimental densities of paraffin/graphite composites. • Prediction of the effective thermal conductivity using analytical models. - Abstract: In this paper, two types of graphite were combined with paraffin in an attempt to improve thermal conductivity of paraffin phase change material (PCM): Synthetic graphite (Timrex SFG75) and graphite waste obtained from damaged Tubular graphite Heat Exchangers. These paraffin/graphite phase change material (PCM) composites are prepared by the cold uniaxial compression technique and the thermophysical properties were estimated using a periodic temperature method and an inverse technique. Results showed that the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity are greatly influenced by the graphite addition

  4. Cohesive phase-field fracture and a PDE constrained optimization approach to fracture inverse problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tupek, Michael R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-06-30

    In recent years there has been a proliferation of modeling techniques for forward predictions of crack propagation in brittle materials, including: phase-field/gradient damage models, peridynamics, cohesive-zone models, and G/XFEM enrichment techniques. However, progress on the corresponding inverse problems has been relatively lacking. Taking advantage of key features of existing modeling approaches, we propose a parabolic regularization of Barenblatt cohesive models which borrows extensively from previous phase-field and gradient damage formulations. An efficient explicit time integration strategy for this type of nonlocal fracture model is then proposed and justified. In addition, we present a C++ computational framework for computing in- put parameter sensitivities efficiently for explicit dynamic problems using the adjoint method. This capability allows for solving inverse problems involving crack propagation to answer interesting engineering questions such as: 1) what is the optimal design topology and material placement for a heterogeneous structure to maximize fracture resistance, 2) what loads must have been applied to a structure for it to have failed in an observed way, 3) what are the existing cracks in a structure given various experimental observations, etc. In this work, we focus on the first of these engineering questions and demonstrate a capability to automatically and efficiently compute optimal designs intended to minimize crack propagation in structures.

  5. Phase transitions during formation of Ag nanoparticles on In{sub 2}S{sub 3} precursor layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yang, E-mail: yang.liu@helmholtz-berlin.de; Fu, Yanpeng; Dittrich, Thomas; Sáez-Araoz, Rodrigo; Schmid, Martina; Hinrichs, Volker; Lux-Steiner, Martha Ch.; Fischer, Christian-Herbert

    2015-09-01

    Phase transitions have been investigated for silver deposition onto In{sub 2}S{sub 3} precursor layers by spray chemical vapor deposition from a trimethylphosphine (hexafluoroacetylacetonato) silver (Ag(hfacac)(PMe{sub 3})) solution. The formation of Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs) on top of the semiconductor layer set on concomitant with the formation of AgIn{sub 5}S{sub 8}. The increase of the diameter of Ag NPs was accompanied by the evolution of orthorhombic AgInS{sub 2}. The formation of Ag{sub 2}S at the interface between Ag NPs and the semiconductor layer was observed. Surface photovoltage spectroscopy indicated charge separation and electronic transitions in the ranges of corresponding band gaps. The phase transition approach is aimed to be applied for the formation of plasmonic nanostructures on top of extremely thin semiconducting layers. - Highlights: • Silver nanoparticles were deposited onto In{sub 2}S{sub 3} precursor layer by spray pyrolysis. • The silver nanoparticle size and density could be controlled by deposition time. • Phase transitions during deposition and material properties were investigated. • The layers still show semiconducting properties after phase transitions. • Plasmonic absorption enhancement has been demonstrated.

  6. Epigenetic Switch Driven by DNA Inversions Dictates Phase Variation in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is an important epigenetic mechanism for phenotypic diversification in all forms of life. We previously described remarkable cell-to-cell heterogeneity in epigenetic pattern within a clonal population of Streptococcus pneumoniae, a leading human pathogen. We here report that the epigenetic diversity is caused by extensive DNA inversions among hsdSA, hsdSB, and hsdSC, three methyltransferase hsdS genes in the Spn556II type-I restriction modification (R-M locus. Because hsdSA encodes the sequence recognition subunit of this type-I R-M DNA methyltransferase, these site-specific recombinations generate pneumococcal cells with variable HsdSA alleles and thereby diverse genome methylation patterns. Most importantly, the DNA methylation pattern specified by the HsdSA1 allele leads to the formation of opaque colonies, whereas the pneumococci lacking HsdSA1 produce transparent colonies. Furthermore, this HsdSA1-dependent phase variation requires intact DNA methylase activity encoded by hsdM in the Spn556II (renamed colony opacity determinant or cod locus. Thus, the DNA inversion-driven ON/OFF switch of the hsdSA1 allele in the cod locus and resulting epigenetic switch dictate the phase variation between the opaque and transparent phenotypes. Phase variation has been well documented for its importance in pneumococcal carriage and invasive infection, but its molecular basis remains unclear. Our work has discovered a novel epigenetic cause for this significant pathobiology phenomenon in S. pneumoniae. Lastly, our findings broadly represents a significant advancement in our understanding of bacterial R-M systems and their potential in shaping epigenetic and phenotypic diversity of the prokaryotic organisms because similar site-specific recombination systems widely exist in many archaeal and bacterial species.

  7. Inverse analyses of effective diffusion parameters relevant for a two-phase moisture model of cementitious materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Addassi, Mouadh; Johannesson, Björn; Wadsö, Lars

    2018-01-01

    Here we present an inverse analyses approach to determining the two-phase moisture transport properties relevant to concrete durability modeling. The purposed moisture transport model was based on a continuum approach with two truly separate equations for the liquid and gas phase being connected...

  8. Determination of the earthquake source parameters using W-Phase inversion method and its uses for tsunami modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesumastuti, Lintang; Marsono, Agus; Yatimantoro, Tatok; Pribadi, Sugeng

    2017-07-01

    This study performed W-Phase inversion for eight events with large magnitude (M>7) that occured in Indonesia for the period of 2006-2016 by using global data obtained from IRIS DMC (Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology Data Management Center). The results of W-Phase inversion; both moment magnitude and focal mechanism were generally similar with the Global CMT (Centroid Moment Tensor) solutions. The result shows that maximum deviation of moment magnitude was 0,09 and the average of magnitudo deviation was 0.03625. Comparison of moment magnitude (Mw) indicates that seismic moments from Global CMT and W-Phase inversion are larger than that from body waves, especially for the 2010 Mentawai earthquake. Tsunami simulation was performed using two different source parameters and sea floor deformation, from Global CMT and W-Phase inversion to get arrival times and heights on the coasts to be validated by observation tide gauge data from IOC (Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission). The simulation shows that these two models; Global CMT and W-Phase inversion yields similar tsunami arrival times and heights on the coasts, but they have a bit difference with the observation data for some tide gauge station.

  9. Influence of processing temperature and precursor composition on phase region of solution processed methylammonium lead iodide perovskite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, A. K.; Hodges, D.; Misra, R. D. K.

    2017-09-01

    Solution processed organic-inorganic metal halide perovskite and its derivatives are promising in the development of efficient thin film photovoltaic devices. In the context of increasing the efficiency and sustainability of perovskite solar cells (PSC) devices, we have attempted to experimentally develop phase diagram for solution processed methyl ammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3 (MAPbI3)) perovskite. The phase diagram emphasized the role of processing parameters (precursor composition and crystallization temperature) on the crystallographic functionality and optical band gap of perovskite. The phase dynamics of low dimensional perovskite, which has emerged as a potential candidate for absorber layer in perovskite solar cells (PSC) with higher stability in ambient conditions is also discussed. We observed that crystallization via non-equilibrium annealing introduced lattice strain in perovskite which affected the crystallographic properties of perovskite. A highly crystalline perovskite, with large grain size was obtained by optimizing the crystallization parameters and precursor composition together with nucleation of perovskite crystal and its growth dynamics.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of polystyrene coated iron oxide nanoparticles and asymmetric assemblies by phase inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Xie, Yihui

    2014-09-02

    Films with a gradient concentration of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are reported, based on a phase inversion membrane process. Nanoparticles with ∼13 nm diameter were prepared by coprecipitation in aqueous solution and stabilized by oleic acid. They were further functionalized by ATRP leading to grafted polystyrene brush. The final nanoparticles of 33 nm diameter were characterized by TGA, FTIR spectroscopy, GPC, transmission electron microscopy, and dynanmic light scattering. Asymmetric porous nanoparticle assemblies were then prepared by solution casting and immersion in water. The nanocomposite film production with functionalized nanoparticles is fast and technically scalable. The morphologies of films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, demonstrating the presence of sponge-like structures and finger-like cavities when 50 and 13 wt % casting solutions were, respectively, used. The magnetic properties were evaluated using vibrating sample magnetometer.

  11. On the critical behavior of the inverse susceptibility of a model of structural phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisanova, E.S.; Ivanov, S.I.

    2013-01-01

    An exactly solvable lattice model describing structural phase transitions in an anharmonic crystal with long-range interaction is considered in the neighborhoods of the quantum and classical critical points at the corresponding upper critical dimensions. In a broader neighborhood of the critical region the inverse susceptibility of the model is exactly calculated in terms of the Lambert W-function and graphically presented as a function of the deviation from the critical point and the upper critical dimension. For quantum and classical systems with real physical dimensions (chains, thin layers and three-dimensional systems) the exact results are compared with the asymptotic ones on the basis of some numerical data for their ratio. Relative errors are also provided

  12. The inverse transformation of angular spectrum propagation algorithm and its application to phase retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lisheng; Jiang, Zhenhua; Wang, Tingfeng; Guo, Jin

    2015-03-01

    An angular spectrum propagation (ASP) algorithm with a scaling parameter to simulate optical diffraction propagation through optical systems is studied. The alterable observation size is obtained by adding the scaling parameter to the Collins formula. A directly mathematical inverse transformation of the ASP algorithm (IASP) is proposed to calculate the source optical field from the known observation optical field, and the results are proved more precise. The IASP algorithm is applied to execute the phase retrieval to derive the aberrations of optical systems from intensity profiles measured in the observation plane. The derived aberrations are fitted by Zernike polynomials under the constraint that the wavefront aberrations are smooth. Numerical simulations are performed to test the accuracy of this method.

  13. FPGA-based Low Latency Inverse QRD Architecture for Adaptive Beamforming in Phased Array Radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Irfan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to facilitate the adaptive beamforming which is one of the most challenging task in phased array radars receivers. Recursive least square (RLS is considered as the most well suited adaptive algorithm for the applications where beamforming is mandatory, because of its good numerical properties and convergence rate. In this paper, some RLS variants are discussed and the most numerically suitable algorithm Inverse QRD is selected for efficient adaptive beamforming. A novel architecture for IQRD RLS is also presented, which offers low latency and low area occupation for Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA implementation. This approach reduces the computations by utilizing the standard pipelining methodology. Hence, efficient adder and multipliers and LUT based solution for square root and division, has highly enhanced the performance of the algorithm. The proposed IQRD RLS architecture has been coded in Verilog and analyze its performance in terms of throughput, hardware resources and efficiency.

  14. Microencapsulation of a hydrophilic model molecule through vibration nozzle and emulsion phase inversion technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorati, Rossella; Genta, Ida; Modena, Tiziana; Conti, Bice

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the present work was to evaluate and discuss vibration nozzle microencapsulation (VNM) technology combined to lyophilization, for the microencapsulation of a hydrophilic model molecule into a hydrophilic polymer. Fluorescein-loaded alginate microparticles prepared by VNM and emulsion phase inversion microencapsulation (EPIM) were lyophilized. Morphology, particle size distribution, lyophilized microspheres stability upon rehydration, drug loading and in vitro release were evaluated. Well-formed microspheres were obtained by the VNM technique, with higher yields of production (93.3-100%) and smaller particle size (d50138.10-158.00) than the EPIM microspheres. Rehydration upon lyophilization occurred in 30 min maintaining microsphere physical integrity. Fluorescein release was always faster from the microspheres obtained by VNM (364 h) than from those obtained by EPIM (504 h). The results suggest that VNM is a simple, easy to be scaled-up process suitable for the microencapsulation hydrophilic drugs.

  15. Solvothermal synthesis of uniform hexagonal-phase ZnS nanorods using a single-source molecular precursor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yongcai; Wang Guiyun; Hu Xiaoya; Chen Weiwei

    2006-01-01

    Pure and uniform hexagonal-phase ZnS nanorods with quantum confinement effect were synthesized by solvothermal decomposition of an air-stable, easily obtained single-source molecular precursor (zinc diethyldithiocarbamate, Zn-(DDTC) 2 ) in hydrazine hydrate aqueous solutions at 150-200 deg. C, and characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and UV-vis absorption spectra. The possible formation mechanism of one-dimensional ZnS nanostructure in the present system was also briefly discussed

  16. Preparation of multishell ICF target plastic-foam cushion materials by thermally induced phase-inversion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, A.T.; Moreno, D.K.; Marsters, R.G.

    1981-01-01

    Homogenous, low-density plastic foams for ICF targets have been prepared by thermally induced phase inversion processes. Uniform, open cell foams have been obtained by the rapid freezing of water solutions of modified cellulose polymers with densities in the range of 5 mg/cm 3 to 0.7 mg/cm 3 and respective average cell sizes of 2 to 40 micrometers. In addition, low-density, microcellular foams have been prepared from the hydrocarbon polymer poly(4-methyl-l-pentene) via a similar phase inversion process using homogenous solutions in organic solvents. These foams have densities from 2 to 5 mg/cm 3 and average cell sizes of 20 micrometers. The physical-chemical aspects of the thermally induced phase inversion process is presented

  17. Differential diagnosis of vertebral compression fracture using in-phase/opposed-phase and short TI inversion recovery imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogura, Akio; Hayakawa, Katsumi; Maeda, Fumie; Saeki, Fumito; Syukutani, Ai; Shibutani, Sachiko; Kuroda, Emi (Dept. of Radiology, Kyoto City Hospital, Kyoto (Japan)), email: a-ogura@mbox.kyoto-inet.or.jp

    2012-05-15

    Background: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is highly useful for detecting diseases of the bone marrow. The sensitivity for detecting compression fracture is very high, but specificity is low for differential diagnosis between malignant and benign cases. Purpose: To evaluate the usefulness of in-phase/opposed-phase and short TI inversion recovery (STIR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of bone marrow for differentiation between benign and malignant vertebral compression fractures. Material and Methods: A retrospective review of 66 patients with 70 vertebral compression fractures was performed. The signal intensity ratio (SIR) defined as SIR (opposed/in) was calculated from in-phase/opposed-phase MR images, and the signal intensity ratio as SIR (STIR) was calculated from STIR MR images. The relationships between values of SIR (opposed/in) and SIR (STIR) and the differential diagnosis of malignant vs. benign fractures were considered. Results: When SIR (opposed/in) was less than 1.0, bone marrow was benign. The bone marrow was malignant when both SIR (opposed/in) was greater than 1.0 and SIR (STIR) was less than 2.0. Conclusion: In cases of acute compression fracture, malignant bone marrow showed SIR(STIR) values less than 2.0 and SIR (in/opposed) greater than 1.0. In contrast, benign bone marrow showed SIR (STIR) values greater than 2.5. For chronic compression fracture, malignant bone marrow showed SIR (in/opposed) greater than 1.0. Bone marrow was benign in all cases with SIR (in/opposed) less than 1.0

  18. Inversion of Love wave phase velocity using smoothness-constrained least-squares technique; Heikatsuka seiyakutsuki saisho jijoho ni yoru love ha iso sokudo no inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, S. [Nippon Geophysical Prospecting Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    Smoothness-constrained least-squares technique with ABIC minimization was applied to the inversion of phase velocity of surface waves during geophysical exploration, to confirm its usefulness. Since this study aimed mainly at the applicability of the technique, Love wave was used which is easier to treat theoretically than Rayleigh wave. Stable successive approximation solutions could be obtained by the repeated improvement of velocity model of S-wave, and an objective model with high reliability could be determined. While, for the inversion with simple minimization of the residuals squares sum, stable solutions could be obtained by the repeated improvement, but the judgment of convergence was very hard due to the smoothness-constraint, which might make the obtained model in a state of over-fitting. In this study, Love wave was used to examine the applicability of the smoothness-constrained least-squares technique with ABIC minimization. Applicability of this to Rayleigh wave will be investigated. 8 refs.

  19. Trimethyl(phenylsilane — a precursor for gas phase processes of SiCx:H film deposition: Synthesis and characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeniya N. Ermakova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The technique of synthesis and purification of trimethyl(phenylsilane PhSiMe3, allowing to obtain the product with high yield. Individuality of the product was confirmed by elemental analysis for C, H, Si was developed. IR, UV and 1H NMR-spectroscopic studies were used to define its spectral characteristics. Complex thermal analysis and thermogravimetry defined thermoanalytical behavior of PhSiMe3 in an inert atmosphere. Tensimetric studies have shown that the compound has sufficient volatility and thermal stability for use as a precursor in the process of chemical vapor deposition (CVD. The composition and temperature limits of the possible crystalline phase complexes in equilibrium with the gas phase of different composition has been determined by method of thermodynamic modeling. Calculated CVD diagrams allow us to select the optimal conditions of film deposition. The possibility of using trimethyl(phenylsilane in CVD processes for producing dielectric films of hydrogenated silicon carbide has been demonstrated.

  20. Investigation of the effect of different parameters on the phase inversion temperature O/W nanoemulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kaviani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Nanoemulsions are a kind of emulsions that can be transparent, translucent (size range 50-200 nm or “milky” (up to 500 nm. Nanoemulsions are adequatly effective for transfer of active component through skin which facilitate the entrance of the active component . The transparent nature of the system and lack of the thickener and fluidity are among advantages of nanoemulsion. Materials and Methods: In this study, a nanoemulsion of lemon oil in water was prepared by the phase inversion temperature (PIT emulsification method in which the tween 40 was used as surfactant. The effect of concentration of NaCl in aqueous phase, pH and weight percent of surfactant and aqueous on the PIT and droplet size were investigated. Results: The results showed that with increasing of concentration of NaCl from 0.05 M to 1 M, PIT decrease from 72 to 50. The average droplet sizes, for 0.1, 0.5 and 1 M of NaCl in 25 ºC are 497.3, 308.1 and 189.9 nm, respectively and the polydispersity indexes are 0.348, 0.334 and 0.307, respectively. Conclusion: Considering the characteristics of nanoemulsions such as being transparent, endurance of solution and droplet size can provide suitable reaction environment for polymerization process used in making hygienic and medical materials.

  1. Rapid T1 quantification based on 3D phase sensitive inversion recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warntjes, Marcel JB; Kihlberg, Johan; Engvall, Jan

    2010-01-01

    In Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging fibrotic myocardium can be distinguished from healthy tissue using the difference in the longitudinal T 1 relaxation after administration of Gadolinium, the so-called Late Gd Enhancement. The purpose of this work was to measure the myocardial absolute T 1 post-Gd from a single breath-hold 3D Phase Sensitivity Inversion Recovery sequence (PSIR). Equations were derived to take the acquisition and saturation effects on the magnetization into account. The accuracy of the method was investigated on phantoms and using simulations. The method was applied to a group of patients with suspected myocardial infarction where the absolute difference in relaxation of healthy and fibrotic myocardium was measured at about 15 minutes post-contrast. The evolution of the absolute R 1 relaxation rate (1/T 1 ) over time after contrast injection was followed for one patient and compared to T 1 mapping using Look-Locker. Based on the T 1 maps synthetic LGE images were reconstructed and compared to the conventional LGE images. The fitting algorithm is robust against variation in acquisition flip angle, the inversion delay time and cardiac arrhythmia. The observed relaxation rate of the myocardium is 1.2 s -1 , increasing to 6 - 7 s -1 after contrast injection and decreasing to 2 - 2.5 s -1 for healthy myocardium and to 3.5 - 4 s -1 for fibrotic myocardium. Synthesized images based on the T 1 maps correspond very well to actual LGE images. The method provides a robust quantification of post-Gd T 1 relaxation for a complete cardiac volume within a single breath-hold

  2. Rapid T1 quantification based on 3D phase sensitive inversion recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warntjes Marcel JB

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging fibrotic myocardium can be distinguished from healthy tissue using the difference in the longitudinal T1 relaxation after administration of Gadolinium, the so-called Late Gd Enhancement. The purpose of this work was to measure the myocardial absolute T1 post-Gd from a single breath-hold 3D Phase Sensitivity Inversion Recovery sequence (PSIR. Equations were derived to take the acquisition and saturation effects on the magnetization into account. Methods The accuracy of the method was investigated on phantoms and using simulations. The method was applied to a group of patients with suspected myocardial infarction where the absolute difference in relaxation of healthy and fibrotic myocardium was measured at about 15 minutes post-contrast. The evolution of the absolute R1 relaxation rate (1/T1 over time after contrast injection was followed for one patient and compared to T1 mapping using Look-Locker. Based on the T1 maps synthetic LGE images were reconstructed and compared to the conventional LGE images. Results The fitting algorithm is robust against variation in acquisition flip angle, the inversion delay time and cardiac arrhythmia. The observed relaxation rate of the myocardium is 1.2 s-1, increasing to 6 - 7 s-1 after contrast injection and decreasing to 2 - 2.5 s-1 for healthy myocardium and to 3.5 - 4 s-1 for fibrotic myocardium. Synthesized images based on the T1 maps correspond very well to actual LGE images. Conclusions The method provides a robust quantification of post-Gd T1 relaxation for a complete cardiac volume within a single breath-hold.

  3. Analytical description of photon beam phase spaces in inverse Compton scattering sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Curatolo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We revisit the description of inverse Compton scattering sources and the photon beams generated therein, emphasizing the behavior of their phase space density distributions and how they depend upon those of the two colliding beams of electrons and photons. The main objective is to provide practical formulas for bandwidth, spectral density, brilliance, which are valid in general for any value of the recoil factor, i.e. both in the Thomson regime of negligible electron recoil, and in the deep Compton recoil dominated region, which is of interest for gamma-gamma colliders and Compton sources for the production of multi-GeV photon beams. We adopt a description based on the center of mass reference system of the electron-photon collision, in order to underline the role of the electron recoil and how it controls the relativistic Doppler/boost effect in various regimes. Using the center of mass reference frame greatly simplifies the treatment, allowing us to derive simple formulas expressed in terms of rms momenta of the two colliding beams (emittance, energy spread, etc. and the collimation angle in the laboratory system. Comparisons with Monte Carlo simulations of inverse Compton scattering in various scenarios are presented, showing very good agreement with the analytical formulas: in particular we find that the bandwidth dependence on the electron beam emittance, of paramount importance in Thomson regime, as it limits the amount of focusing imparted to the electron beam, becomes much less sensitive in deep Compton regime, allowing a stronger focusing of the electron beam to enhance luminosity without loss of mono-chromaticity. A similar effect occurs concerning the bandwidth dependence on the frequency spread of the incident photons: in deep recoil regime the bandwidth comes out to be much less dependent on the frequency spread. The set of formulas here derived are very helpful in designing inverse Compton sources in diverse regimes, giving a

  4. Inversion of Surface Wave Phase Velocities for Radial Anisotropy to an Depth of 1200 km

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Z.; Beghein, C.; Yuan, K.

    2012-12-01

    This study aims to evaluate three dimensional radial anisotropy to an depth of 1200 km. Radial anisotropy describes the difference in velocity between horizontally polarized Rayleigh waves and vertically polarized Love waves. Its presence in the uppermost 200 km mantle has well been documented by different groups, and has been regarded as an indicator of mantle convection which aligns the intrinsically anisotropic minerals, largely olivine, to form large scale anisotropy. However, there is no global agreement on whether anisotropy exists in the region below 200 km. Recent models also associate a fast vertically polarized shear wave with vertical upwelling mantle flow. The data used in this study is the globally isotropic phase velocity models of fundamental and higher mode Love and Rayleigh waves (Visser, 2008). The inclusion of higher mode surface wave phase velocity provides sensitivities to structure at depth that extends to below the transition zone. While the data is the same as used by Visser (2008), a quite different parameterization is applied. All the six parameters - five elastic parameters A, C, F, L, N and density - are now regarded as independent, which rules out possible biased conclusions induced by scaling relation method used in several previous studies to reduce the number of parameters partly due to limited computing resources. The data need to be modified by crustal corrections (Crust2.0) as we want to look at the mantle structure only. We do this by eliminating the perturbation in surface wave phase velocity caused by the difference in crustal structure with respect to the referent model PREM. Sambridge's Neighborhood Algorithm is used to search the parameter space. The introduction of such a direct search technique pales the traditional inversion method, which requires regularization or some unnecessary priori restriction on the model space. On the contrary, the new method will search the full model space, providing probability density

  5. Phase development of the ZrO 2-ZnO system during the thermal treatments of amorphous precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štefanić, Goran; Musić, Svetozar; Ivanda, Mile

    2009-04-01

    Thermal behavior of the amorphous precursors of the ZrO 2-ZnO system on the ZrO 2-rich side of the concentration range, co-precipitated from aqueous solutions of the corresponding salts, was monitored using X-ray powder diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis. The crystallization temperature of the amorphous precursors increased with an increase in the ZnO content, from 457 °C (0 mol% ZnO) to 548 °C (25 mol% ZnO). Maximum solubility of Zn 2+ ions in the ZrO 2 lattice (˜25 mol%) occurred in the metastable products obtained upon crystallization of the amorphous precursors. Raman spectroscopy indicates that the incorporation of Zn 2+ ions can partially stabilize only the tetragonal ZrO 2. A precise determination of unit-cell parameters of the t-ZrO 2-type solid solutions, using both Rietveld and Le Bail refinements of the powder diffraction patterns, shows that the increase in the Zn 2+ content causes a decrease in c-ax, which in a solid solution with a Zn 2+ content above 20 mol% approaches very closely a-ax. The thermal treatment of the crystallization products (up to 1000 °C) leads to a rapid decrease in the terminal solid solubility limit of Zn 2+ ions in the ZrO 2 lattice that is followed by the partial evaporation of zinc, the formation of and increase in phases structurally closely related to zincite and monoclinic ZrO 2. The results of micro-structural analysis indicate that the presence of ZnO promotes the sintering of the ZrO 2 crystallization products.

  6. Finger-like voids induced by viscous fingering during phase inversion of alumina/PES/NMP suspensions

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Bo

    2012-07-01

    The formation mechanism of phase-inversion ceramic hollow fibre membranes has not been well understood. In this paper, we report on the formation of finger-like macrovoids during non-solvent-induced phase inversion of alumina/PES/NMP suspensions. A membrane structure without such finger-like macrovoids was observed when the suspension was slowly immersed into pure ethanol or a mixture of 70. wt% NMP and 30. wt% water, whereas finger-like macrovoids occurred when the suspension was slid into the non-solvents at higher speeds. We found that the formation process of finger-like macrovoids could be fully or partially reversed when nascent membranes were taken out from water shortly after immersion, depending on the duration of the immersion. Splitting of the fingers during the formation of the macrovoids was also observed during the phase inversion of two alumina/PES/NMP suspensions. These experimental observations were not predicted by current theories of finger-like macrovoid formation in polymer membranes, but appear to mimic the well-known viscous fingering phenomenon. We therefore propose that in the phase inversion of ceramic suspensions, the viscous fingering phenomenon is an important mechanism in the formation of finger-like voids. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  7. Reactive phase inversion for manufacture of asymmetric poly (ether imide sulfone) membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Jalal, Taghreed

    2014-12-01

    Poly (ether imide sulfone) membranes were manufactured by combining phase inversion and functionalization reaction between epoxy groups and amine modified polyether oligomers (Jeffamine) or TiO2 nanoparticles. Polysilsesquioxanes containing epoxy functionalities were in-situ grown in the casting solution and made available for further reaction with amines in the coagulation/annealing baths. The membranes were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy, porosimetry and water flux measurements. Water permeances up to 1500 l m-2 h-1 bar-1 were obtained with sharp pore size distribution and a pore diameter peak at 66 nm, confirmed by porosimetry, which allowed 99.2% rejection of γ-globulin. Water flux recovery of 77.5% was achieved after filtration with proteins. The membranes were stable in 50:50 dimethylformamide/water, 50:50 N-methyl pyrrolidone/water and 100% tetrahydrofuran. The possibility of using similar concept for homogeneous and stable attachment of nanoparticles on the membrane surface was demonstrated.

  8. Porous asymmetric SiO2-g-PMMA nanoparticles produced by phase inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Munirasu, Selvaraj

    2014-07-22

    A new kind of asymmetric organic-inorganic porous structure has been proposed. Asymmetric lattices of polymer grafted silica nanoparticles were manufactured by casting and phase inversion in water. Silica nanoparticles were first functionalized with 3-(dimethylethoxysilyl)propyl-2-bromoisobutyrate, followed by grafting of poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) segments, performed by atom-transfer radical polymerization. Mechanically stable self-standing films were prepared by casting a dispersion of functionalized nanoparticles in different solvents and immersion in water. The resulting asymmetrically porous morphology and nanoparticle assembly was characterized by scanning electron and atomic force microscopy. The PMMA functionalized SiO2 hybrid material in acetone or acetone/dioxane led to the best-assembled structures. Porous asymmetric membranes were prepared by adding free PMMA and PMMA terminated with hydrophilic hydroxyl group. Nitrogen flow of 2800 L m-2 h -1 was measured at 1.3 bar demonstrating the porosity and potential application for membrane technology. © 2014 Springer Science+Business Media New York.

  9. Tuning of Block Copolymer Membrane Morphology through Water Induced Phase Inversion Technique

    KAUST Repository

    Madhavan, Poornima

    2016-06-01

    surface and pore walls of PS-b-P4VP block copolymer membranes and then investigated the biocidal activity of the silver nanoparticles grown membranes. Finally, a novel photoresponsive nanostructured triblock copolymer membranes were developed by phase inversion technique. In addition, the photoresponsive behavior on irradiation with light and their membrane flux and retention properties were studied.

  10. Simulating a multi-phase tephra fall event: inversion modelling for the 1707 Hoei eruption of Mount Fuji, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magill, Christina; Mannen, Kazutaka; Connor, Laura; Bonadonna, Costanza; Connor, Charles

    2015-09-01

    Fuji Volcano last erupted in ad 1707 depositing approximately 40 mm of tephra in the area that is now central Tokyo. New high-resolution data describe 17 eruptive phases occurring over a period of 16 days (Miyaji et al., J Volcanol Geotherm Res 207(3-4):113-129, 2011). Inversion techniques were used in order to best replicate geological data and eyewitness accounts, and to estimate eruption source parameters. Inversion results based on data from individual eruptive phases suggest a total erupted mass of 2.09 × 1012 kg. Comparatively, results based on a single data set describing the entire eruption sequence suggest a total mass of 1.69 × 1012 kg. Values for total erupted mass determined by inversion were compared to those calculated using various curve fitting approaches. An exponential (two-segment) method, taking into account missing distal data, was found to be most compatible with inversion results, giving an erupted mass of 2.52 × 1012 kg when combining individual phases and 1.59 × 1012 kg when utilising a single data set describing the Hoei sequence. Similarly, a Weibull fitting method determined a total erupted mass of 1.54 × 1012 kg for the single data set and compared favourably with inversion results when enough data were available. Partitioning extended eruption scenarios into multiple phases and including detailed geological data close to the eruption source, more accurately replicated the observed deposit by taking into account subtleties such as lobes deposited during transient increases in eruption rate and variations in wind velocity or direction throughout the eruption.

  11. Spinal cord microstructure integrating phase-sensitive inversion recovery and diffusional kurtosis imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panara, V.; Navarra, R; Caulo, M. [University ' ' G. d' Annunzio' ' , Department of Neuroscience, Imaging and Clinical Sciences, Chieti (Italy); University ' ' G. d' Annunzio' ' , ITAB Institute of Advanced Biomedical Technologies, Chieti (Italy); Mattei, P.A. [University ' ' G. d' Annunzio' ' , ITAB Institute of Advanced Biomedical Technologies, Chieti (Italy); University ' ' G. d' Annunzio' ' , Department of Medicine and Science of Aging, Ophthalmology Clinic, Chieti (Italy); Piccirilli, E. [University ' ' G. d' Annunzio' ' , ITAB Institute of Advanced Biomedical Technologies, Chieti (Italy); Cotroneo, A.R.; Uncini, A. [University ' ' G. d' Annunzio' ' , Department of Neuroscience, Imaging and Clinical Sciences, Chieti (Italy); Papinutto, N.; Henry, R.G. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Neurology, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2017-08-15

    The aim of this prospective study was to determine the feasibility in terms of repeatability and reproducibility of diffusional kurtosis imaging (DKI) for microstructural assessment of the normal cervical spinal cord (cSC) using a phase-sensitive inversion recovery (PSIR) sequence as the anatomical reference for accurately defining white-matter (WM) and gray-matter (GM) regions of interests (ROIs). Thirteen young healthy subjects were enrolled to undergo DKI and PSIR sequences in the cSC. The repeatability and reproducibility of kurtosis metrics and fractional anisotropy (FA) were calculated in GM, WM, and cerebral-spinal-fluid (CSF) ROIs drawn by two independent readers on PSIR images of three different levels (C1-C4). The presence of statistically significant differences in DKI metrics for levels, ROIs (GM, WM, and CSF) repeatability, reproducibility, and inter-reader agreement was evaluated. Intra-class correlation coefficients between the two readers ranged from good to excellent (0.75 to 0.90). The inferior level consistently had the highest concordance. The lower values of scan-rescan variability for all DKI parameters were found for the inferior level. Statistically significant differences in kurtosis values were not found in the lateral white-matter bundles of the spinal cord. The integration of DKI and PSIR sequences in a clinical MR acquisition to explore the regional microstructure of the cSC in healthy subjects is feasible, and the results obtainable are reproducible. Further investigation will be required to verify the possibility to translate this method to a clinical setting to study patients with SC involvement especially in the absence of MRI abnormalities on standard sequences. (orig.)

  12. Characterizing Arctic mixed-phase cloud structure and its relationship with humidity and temperature inversion using ARM NSA observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Shaoyue; Dong, Xiquan; Xi, Baike; Li, J.-L. F.

    2015-08-01

    In this study, the characteristics of the Arctic mixed-phase cloud (AMC) have been investigated using data collected at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement North Slope Alaska site from October 2006 to September 2009. AMC has an annual occurrence frequency of 42.3%, which includes 18.7% of single-layered AMCs and 23.6% for multiple layers. Two cloud base heights (CBHs) are defined from ceilometer and micropulse lidar (MPL) measurements. For single-layered AMC, the ceilometer-derived CBH represents the base of the liquid-dominant layer near the cloud top, while MPL-derived CBH represents base of the lower ice-dominant layer. The annual mean CBHs from ceilometer and MPL measurements are 1.0 km and 0.6 km, respectively, with the largest difference ( 1.0 km) occurring from December to March and the smallest difference in September. The humidity inversion occurrence decreases with increasing humidity inversion intensity (stronger in summer than in winter). During the winter months, AMC occurrences increase from 15% to 35% when the inversion intensity increases from 0.1 to 0.9 g/kg. On the contrary, despite a higher frequency of strong humidity inversion in summer, AMC occurrences are nearly invariant for different inversion intensities. On average, humidity and temperature inversion frequencies of occurrence above an AMC are 5 and 8 times, respectively, as high as those below an AMC. The strong inversion occurrences for both humidity and temperature above an AMC provide the moisture sources from above for the formation and maintenance of AMCs. This result helps to reconcile the persistency of AMCs even when the Arctic surface is covered by snow and ice.

  13. Transitional phase inversion of crude oil emulsions by solid particles; Inversao transicional de emulsoes de petroleo com particulas solidas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Troner A. de; Scheer, Agnes P.; Soares, Cristyan R.; Luz Junior, Luiz Fernando de Lima [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Oliveira, Marcia Cristina K. de [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2008-07-01

    In petroleum production water-in-oil emulsions (W/O) can be found, due to simultaneous flowing of the oil and formation water. This emulsions provide an increase in the viscosity; that can be reduced for the phase inversion in oil-in-water emulsions (O/W), resulting in pressure drop and consequently cost production reduction. The petroleum emulsions W/O were prepared at 60 deg C, with 50% v/v of saline water containing 50 g.L{sup -1} of NaCl. The hydrophilic solids content was varied between 0,5% and 8%, mass fraction, related to the water. The quantity of solids needed to phase inversion of the emulsion was measured by conductivimetry. The stability of the emulsions was verified, at 60 deg C, for the time determination in order to have two phases in four hours, checking the viability for production; and during 24 hours, checking the viability for transportation. Under dynamics conditions, was also noted the stability at 20 deg C, for reproduce the flowing condition. Two of the hydrophilic particles tested in the transitional phase inversion of petroleum emulsions presented better results in quantity and stability. Preliminaries rheological properties measurements were carried out adjusting the temperature of the sample in the range of 30 deg C to 12 deg C a shear rate from 20s{sup -1} to 250s {sup -1}, viscosity decrease was observed until two orders of magnitude. (author)

  14. Isomorphs in the phase diagram of a model liquid without inverse power law repulsion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veldhorst, Arnold Adriaan; Bøhling, Lasse; Dyre, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    scattering function are calculated. The results are shown to reflect a hidden scale invariance; despite its exponential repulsion the Buckingham potential is well approximated by an inverse power-law plus a linear term in the region of the first peak of the radial distribution function. As a consequence...... the dynamics of the viscous Buckingham liquid is mimicked by a corresponding model with purely repulsive inverse-power-law interactions. The results presented here closely resemble earlier results for Lennard-Jones type liquids, demonstrating that the existence of strong correlations and isomorphs does...... not depend critically on the mathematical form of the repulsion being an inverse power law....

  15. Facile synthesis of stereoregular carbon fiber precursor polymers by template assisted solid phase polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Santhana Krishnan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Predominantly isotactic stereoregular polyacrylonitrile copolymers (PAC were prepared by solid phase polymerization techniques using hexagonal crystalline metal salts as template compounds. Stereoregular distributions of the prepared polymer were studied using high resolution 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (13C NMR spectra. The extent of isotacticity was directly determined from the peak intensity of the methine carbon (CH. The triad tacticity from the intensities of methine carbon peaks were examined by statistical methods. It was found that the PAC was predominantly isotactic in stereoregularity, and its sequence distribution obeys Bernoulli statistics. The optimum polymerization conditions ensuring isotactic content over 50% were disclosed experimentally. The chemical composition of PAC was confirmed with 1H NMR data. The obtained polyacrylonitrile copolymers were also characterized for molecular parameters such as viscosity average molecular weight (Mv, number average molecular weight (Mn, weight average molecular weight (Mw and polydispersity index.

  16. Comparison of three solid phase extraction sorbents for the isolation of THM precursors from manitoban surface waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, C D; Wiens, R; Gorczyca, B; Gough, K M

    2017-02-01

    Three prepackaged solid phase extraction (SPE) cartridges: two modified styrene divinylbenzene, Bond Elut ENV and Bond Elut PPL (Varian), and one N-vinylpyrrolidone (Strata-X, Phenomenex), were assessed for isolation of THM precursors from three surface waters in Manitoba, Canada. The dissolved organic matter (DOM) from the La Salle River (LR), Lake Winnipegosis (LW) and the Waterhen River (WR) were fractionated into hydrophobic (HPO) and hydrophilic (HPI) parts. ENV isolated less DOM (LR = 46.6 ± 1.5%; LW = 36.2 ± 1.4%; WR = 28.6 ± 2.2%) compared to PPL (LR = 50.2 ± 4.4%; LW = 47.9 ± 2.2%; WR = 37.3 ± 2.8%) and Strata (LR = 46.4% ± 1.0; LW = 51.6 ± 0.3%; WR = 31.9 ± 3.9%). The HPO fraction isolated by each SPE was characterized using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrochemical imaging. The FTIR spectra confirmed the HPO fractions were typical of humic-material and largely resembled fulvic acids; however, the PPL and Strata HPO isolates contained slightly more polysaccharides. The THM formation potential (THMFP) confirmed that the HPO fraction formed more THMs than the HPI. The HPO fraction isolated using ENV was found to have the lowest THMFP of all three SPEs in each waterbody; however, the specific THMFP (μgTHM/mgDOM) results indicated that ENV isolated THM precursors more effectively, as the Strata and PPL isolated a greater amount of non-THM forming material. All three SPE showed significant potential for implementation at water treatment plants as a simple tool to monitor THM precursors in source waters, enabling operators to adapt processes to improve drinking water quality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Significant Volume Expansion as a Precursor to Ablation and Micropattern Formation in Phase Change Material Induced by Intense Terahertz Pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Kotaro; Kato, Kosaku; Takano, Keisuke; Saito, Yuta; Tominaga, Junji; Nakano, Takashi; Isoyama, Goro; Nakajima, Makoto

    2018-02-13

    With rapid advances occurring in terahertz (THz) radiation generation techniques, the interaction between matter and intense THz fields has become an important research topic. Among different types of THz radiation sources, the free electron laser (FEL) is a promising experimental tool that is expected to pave the way for new forms of material processing, control of phase transitions, and serve as a test bench for extreme operating conditions in high-speed small-size electrical and magnetic devices through the exploitation of strong THz electrical and magnetic fields without the presence of interband electronic excitation. In the current work, we irradiated Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 phase change memory material with intense THz pulse trains from an FEL and observed THz-induced surface changes due to damage as a precursor to ablation and the formation of fine surface undulations whose spatial period is comparable to or slightly smaller than the wavelength of the excitation THz pulses in the material. The formation of undulations as well as the fact that no significant thermal effect was observed below the volume expansion threshold suggests that THz-induced effects mainly contributed to the observed changes. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first experimental observation of THz-induced undulations (so-called "LIPSS"), which are of potential importance for laser material processing.

  18. Statistical Inversion of Absolute Permeability in Single-phase Darcy Flow

    KAUST Repository

    Strauss, Thilo

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we formulate the permeability inverse problem in the Bayesian framework using total variation (TV) and fp (0 < p δ 2) regularization prior. We use the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method for sampling the posterior distribution to solve the ill-posed inverse problem. We present simulations to estimate the distribution for each pixel for the image reconstruction of the absolute permeability.

  19. Preparation of silver thin films using liquid-phase precursors by metal organic chemical vapor deposition and their conversion to silver selenide films by selenium vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hong-Ki; Jeong, Han-Cheol; Kim, Kyung Soo; Yoon, Seok Hwan; Lee, Seung Soo; Seo, Kook Won; Shim, Il-Wun

    2005-01-01

    A series of new Ag precursors containing β-diketonate and neutral phosphite ligands were synthesized and characterized by various spectroscopic methods. These volatile precursors in liquid phase were thermally stable and quite useful in the preparation of silver thin films through bubbler-type chemical vapor deposition (CVD). In a typical case of silver (I) 1,1,1-trifluoro-2,4-pentanedionate triethyl phosphite adduct ((tfac)AgP(OEt) 3 ) precursor, very pure silver thin films were obtained under relatively mild conditions without any appreciable amount of F, O, and P impurities. These thin films were easily converted to β-orthorhombic silver selenide by simple selenium vapor deposition method. In scanning electron microscopic analyses, the average particle size of the latter was found to increase to about 1.26 μm after gas-phase selenization reaction

  20. Hemangiomas and focal nodular hyperplasia images in contrast-enhanced, wide-band phase-inversion harmonic power Doppler imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janica, Jacek; Serwatka, Wojciech; Polaków, Jerzy; Ustymowicz, Andrzej; Łebkowska, Urszula; Kordecki, Kazimierz; Walecki, Jerzy; Polaków, Piotr; Dobrzycki, Sławomir

    2004-06-01

    Contrast-enhanced, wide-band, phase inversion power Doppler sonography in the depiction of vasculature in hemangioma and focal nodular hyperplasia. Fifty-one patients with liver lesions (40 FNHs,37 hemangiomas) were prospectively evaluated with conventional, color, power Doppler sonography, tissue harmonic, phase-inversion sonography and helical CT. Levovist was the standard contrast agent used and all examinations were performed on Siemens SONOLINE Elegra equipped with Ensemble Contrast Imaging (ECI) software. Color and power Doppler scans were frequently not specific for these highly vasularized lesions. Images were not suggestive in 15 out of 40 FNHs and not positive in all of 37 hemangiomas). If peripheral enhancement in form of puddle enhancement, 'bloo pools' or rimlike followed by a slow centripetal fill-in is regarded as a positive finding for hemangiomas all lesions were depicted confidently with wide-band, phase inversion, contrast enhanced power Doppler scans. Moreover, all typical vascularity features of FNHs confluence firstly the feeding artery then centrifugal spread of contrast later forming wheel like pattern was obvious in all cases of diagnosed FNHs. Contrast-enhanced, wide-band, PI ,power Doppler imaging is useful method for diagnosing the vascularity of FNHs and hemangiomas. Not only it overcomes the low prediction rate which was the main obstacle for routine use of sonography but it is cheap, portable, and free also from contrast media and radiation.

  1. Nanostructured Double Hydrophobic Poly(Styrene-b-Methyl Methacrylate) Block Copolymer Membrane Manufactured Via Phase Inversion Technique

    KAUST Repository

    Karunakaran, Madhavan

    2016-03-11

    In this paper, we demonstrate the formation of nanostructured double hydrophobic poly(styrene-b-methyl methacrylate) (PS-b-PMMA) block copolymer membranes via state-of-the-art phase inversion technique. The nanostructured membrane morphologies are tuned by different solvent and block copolymer compositions. The membrane morphology has been investigated using FESEM, AFM and TEM. Morphological investigation shows the formation of both cylindrical and lamellar structures on the top surface of the block copolymer membranes. The PS-b-PMMA having an equal block length (PS160K-b-PMMA160K) exhibits both cylindrical and lamellar structures on the top layer of the asymmetric membrane. All membranes fabricated from PS160K-b-PMMA160K shows an incomplete pore formation in both cylindrical and lamellar morphologies during the phase inversion process. However, PS-b-PMMA (PS135K-b-PMMA19.5K) block copolymer having a short PMMA block allowed us to produce open pore structures with ordered hexagonal cylindrical pores during the phase inversion process. The resulting PS-b-PMMA nanostructured block copolymer membranes have pure water flux from 105-820 l/m2.h.bar and 95% retention of PEG50K

  2. Evidence for negative thermal expansion in the superconducting precursor phase SmFeAsO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, H. D.; Sarte, P. M.; Conner, B. S.; Balicas, L.; Wiebe, C. R.; Chen, X. H.; Wu, T.; Wu, G.; Liu, R. H.; Chen, H.; Fang, D. F.

    2018-03-01

    The fluorine-doped rare-earth iron oxypnictide series SmFeAsO1‑x F x (0 ≤slant x ≤slant 0.10) was investigated with high resolution powder x-ray scattering. In agreement with previous studies (Margadonna et al 2009 Phys. Rev. B. 79 014503), the parent compound SmFeAsO exhibits a tetragonal-to-orthorhombic structural distortion at T{S}   =  130 K which is rapidly suppressed by x ≃ 0.10 deep within the superconducting dome. The change in unit cell symmetry is followed by a previously unreported magnetoelastic distortion at 120 K. The temperature dependence of the thermal expansion coefficient αV reveals a rich phase diagram for SmFeAsO: (i) a global minimum at 125 K corresponds to the opening of a spin-density wave instability as measured by pump-probe femtosecond spectroscopy (Mertelj et al 2010 Phys. Rev. B 81 224504) whilst (ii) a global maximum at 110 K corresponds to magnetic ordering of the Sm and Fe sublattices as measured by magnetic x-ray scattering (Nandi et al 2011 Phys. Rev. B 84 055419). At much lower temperatures than T{N} , SmFeAsO exhibits a significant negative thermal expansion on the order of  ‑40 ppm · K‑1 in contrast to the behaviour of other rare-earth oxypnictides such as PrFeAsO (Kimber et al 2008 Phys. Rev. B 78 140503) and the actinide oxypnictide NpFeAsO (Klimczuk et al 2012 Phys. Rev. B 85 174506) where the onset of αV < 0 only appears in the vicinity of magnetic ordering. Correlating this feature with the temperature and doping dependence of the resistivity and the unit cell parameters, we interpret the negative thermal expansion as being indicative of the possible condensation of itinerant electrons accompanying the opening of a SDW gap, consistent with transport measurements (Tropeano et al 2009 Supercond. Sci. Technol. 22 034004).

  3. Superluminal pulse propagation and amplification without inversion of microwave radiation via four-wave mixing in superconducting phase quantum circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amini Sabegh, Z; Vafafard, A; Maleki, M A; Mahmoudi, M

    2015-01-01

    We study the interaction of the microwave fields with an array of superconducting phase quantum circuits. It is shown that the different four-level configurations i.e. cascade, N-type, diamond, Y-type and inverted Y-type systems can be obtained in the superconducting phase quantum circuits by keeping the third order of the Josephson junction potential expansion whereas by dropping the third order term, just the cascade configuration can be established. We study the propagation and amplification of a microwave field in a four-level cascade quantum system, which is realized in an array of superconducting phase quantum circuits. We find that by increasing the microwave pump tones feeding the system, the normal dispersion switches to the anomalous and the gain-assisted superluminal microwave propagation is obtained in an array of many superconducting phase quantum circuits. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the stimulated microwave field is generated via four-wave mixing without any inversion population in the energy levels of the system (amplification without inversion) and the group velocity of the generated pulse can be controlled by the external oscillating magnetic fluxes. We also show that in some special set of parameters, the absorption-free superluminal generated microwave propagation is obtained in superconducting phase quantum circuit system. (letter)

  4. Improvement of Bi-2223/Ag tape performances through the control of the Pb-rich phases present in the precursors powders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, X.P.; Grivel, Jean-Claude; Li, M.Y.

    2004-01-01

    Precursor powders containing different lead-rich phases: (a) Ca2PbO4, (b) Pb-3(Sr,Bi)(3)Ca2CuOy (3321), were prepared by controlling the calcination temperature and atmosphere. Monofilament tapes were fabricated using those two powders. It has been found that both the microstructure and critical...... current depended strongly on the nature of the lead-rich phase. Tapes fabricated using the precursor with the Ca2PbO4 phase (tape T1) had a much lower optimum sintering temperature and a narrower temperature window than tapes fabricated using the precursor with the 3321 phase (tape T2). The critical...... current density J(c), of tape T2 is improved by a factor 1.5-2. SEM results show that a large fraction of secondary phases with big particle size was formed in the fully reacted tape TI, which might degrade the critical current of these tapes. On the contrary, little and small secondary phases were formed...

  5. Moisture and dynamical interactions maintaining decoupled Arctic mixed-phase stratocumulus in the presence of a humidity inversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Solomon

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Observations suggest that processes maintaining subtropical and Arctic stratocumulus differ, due to the different environments in which they occur. For example, specific humidity inversions (specific humidity increasing with height are frequently observed to occur near cloud top coincident with temperature inversions in the Arctic, while they do not occur in the subtropics. In this study we use nested LES simulations of decoupled Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratocumulus (AMPS clouds observed during the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program's Indirect and SemiDirect Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC to analyze budgets of water components, potential temperature, and turbulent kinetic energy. These analyses quantify the processes that maintain decoupled AMPS, including the role of humidity inversions. Key structural features include a shallow upper entrainment zone at cloud top that is located within the temperature and humidity inversions, a mixed layer driven by cloud-top cooling that extends from the base of the upper entrainment zone to below cloud base, and a lower entrainment zone at the base of the mixed layer. The surface layer below the lower entrainment zone is decoupled from the cloud mixed-layer system. Budget results show that cloud liquid water is maintained in the upper entrainment zone near cloud top (within a temperature and humidity inversion due to a down gradient transport of water vapor by turbulent fluxes into the cloud layer from above and direct condensation forced by radiative cooling. Liquid water is generated in the updraft portions of the mixed-layer eddies below cloud top by buoyant destabilization. These processes cause at least 20% of the cloud liquid water to extend into the inversion. The redistribution of water vapor from the top of the humidity inversion to its base maintains the cloud layer, while the mixed layer-entrainment zone system is continually losing total water. In this decoupled system, the humidity inversion is

  6. Analysis of precursors of tropical cyclogenesis during different phases of the solar cycle and their correlation with the Dst geomagnetic index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Marni; Mendoza, Blanca; Gimeno, Luis

    2015-10-01

    Three tropical cyclogenesis precursors, (absolute vorticity, relative humidity, vertical shear)and, the combined Genesis Potential Index are investigated in order to analyse their behaviour during three different phases(descending, minimum and ascending) of the solar cycle. The correlation between these tropical cyclogenesis precursors and the Dst geomagnetic index is also assessed, with the main finding being that the correlations between both the Genesis Potential Index and the vertical shear with the Dst index are statistically significant. This result suggests that the relationship between geomagnetic activity and tropical cyclones might be modulated by the influence of geomagnetic activity on the vertical wind shear.

  7. Phase Equilibrium and Diffusion of Solvents in Polybutadiene: A Capillary-Column Inverse Gas Chromatography Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cai, W.D.; Ramesh, N.; Tihminlioglu, F.; Danner, R.P.; Duda, J.L.; de Haan, A.B.

    2002-01-01

    The capillary-column inverse gas chromatography method was used to measure the diffusion and partition coefficients of ethylbenzene, styrene, and acrylonitrile in polybutadiene (PBD) at infinite dilution of the solvents. Experiments were performed over a temperature range of 50-125 °C. At

  8. Molecular precursors for the phase-change material germanium-antimony-telluride, Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} (GST)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmgarth, Nicole; Zoerner, Florian; Engelhardt, Felix; Edelmann, Frank T. [Chemisches Institut, Otto-von-Guericke-Universitaet Magdeburg (Germany); Liebing, Phil [Laboratorium fuer Anorganische Chemie, ETH Zuerich (Switzerland); Burte, Edmund P.; Silinskas, Mindaugas [Institut fuer Mikro- und Sensorsysteme, Otto-von-Guericke-Universitaet Magdeburg (Germany)

    2017-10-04

    This review provides an overview of the precursor chemistry that has been developed around the phase-change material germanium-antimony-telluride, Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} (GST). Thin films of GST can be deposited by employing either chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or atomic layer deposition (ALD) techniques. In both cases, the success of the layer deposition crucially depends on the proper choice of suitable molecular precursors. Previously reported processes mainly relied on simple alkoxides, alkyls, amides and halides of germanium, antimony, and tellurium. More sophisticated precursor design provided a number of promising new aziridinides and guanidinates. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. The inversion layer of electric fields and electron phase-space-hole structure during two-dimensional collisionless magnetic reconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Lijen; Lefebvre, Bertrand; Torbert, Roy B.; Daughton, William S.

    2011-01-01

    Based on two-dimensional fully kinetic simulations that resolve the electron diffusion layer in undriven collisionless magnetic reconnection with zero guide field, this paper reports the existence and evolution of an inversion layer of bipolar electric fields, its corresponding phase-space structure (an electron-hole layer), and the implication to collisionless dissipation. The inversion electric field layer is embedded in the layer of bipolar Hall electric field and extends throughout the entire length of the electron diffusion layer. The electron phase-space hole structure spontaneously arises during the explosive growth phase when there exist significant inflows into the reconnection layer, and electrons perform meandering orbits across the layer while being cyclotron-turned toward the outflow directions. The cyclotron turning of meandering electrons by the magnetic field normal to the reconnection layer is shown to be a primary factor limiting the current density in the region where the reconnection electric field is balanced by the gradient (along the current sheet normal) of the off-diagonal electron pressure-tensor.

  10. COUPLED FREE AND DISSOLVED PHASE TRANSPORT: NEW SIMULATION CAPABILITIES AND PARAMETER INVERSION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The vadose zone free-phase simulation capabilities of the US EPA Hydrocarbon Spill Screening Model (HSSM) (Weaver et al., 1994) have been linked with the 3-D multi-species dissolved-phase contaminant transport simulator MT3DMS (Zheng and Wang, 1999; Zheng, 2005). The linkage pro...

  11. Significant enhancement of the quantum yield of CdTe nanocrystals synthesized in aqueous phase by controlling the pH and concentrations of precursor solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Liang; Qian Huifeng; Fang Nenghu; Ren Jicun

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we systematically investigated the aqueous synthesis conditions of CdTe nanocrystals (QDs), and found that the pH value and the concentrations of precursors significantly affected the photoluminescence quantum yield (QY) of CdTe QDs. When the concentration of precursors (Cd) was 1.25 mM, and the pH of Cd precursors solution was about 8.0, CdTe QDs with high QY up to 40-67% were successfully prepared in aqueous phase. Moreover, these high luminescent QDs showed excellent stabilities in aqueous phases, and their luminescence was nearly independent of the pH of the colloid solution. The XPS and XRD characterizations implied that the high luminescence of the QDs synthesized at lower pH was possibly attributed to the formation of the thicker shell (cadmium-3-mercaptopropionic acid complexes) on particles surface, which not only decreased the traps on QDs surface, but also acted as a steric barrier to control the kinetics of QDs growth and led to the formation of a better surface structure. Our modification of conventional aqueous synthesis dramatically improved the QY of the prepared CdTe QDs, and it will become an attractive alternative to the synthesis of QDs in organic phase

  12. A new phase modulated binomial-like selective-inversion sequence for solvent signal suppression in NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Johnny; Zheng, Gang; Price, William S

    2017-02-01

    A new 8-pulse Phase Modulated binomial-like selective inversion pulse sequence, dubbed '8PM', was developed by optimizing the nutation and phase angles of the constituent radio-frequency pulses so that the inversion profile resembled a target profile. Suppression profiles were obtained for both the 8PM and W5 based excitation sculpting sequences with equal inter-pulse delays. Significant distortions were observed in both profiles because of the offset effect of the radio frequency pulses. These distortions were successfully reduced by adjusting the inter-pulse delays. With adjusted inter-pulse delays, the 8PM and W5 based excitation sculpting sequences were tested on an aqueous lysozyme solution. The 8 PM based sequence provided higher suppression selectivity than the W5 based sequence. Two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy experiments were also performed on the lysozyme sample with 8PM and W5 based water signal suppression. The 8PM based suppression provided a spectrum with significantly increased (~ doubled) cross-peak intensity around the suppressed water resonance compared to the W5 based suppression. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Detection of hepatic VX2 tumors in rabbits: comparison of conventional US and phase- inversion harmonic US during the liver- specific late phase of contrast enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Min; Youk, Ji Hyun; Lee, Young Hwan; Kim, Young Kon; Kim, Chong Soo; Li, Chun Ai

    2003-01-01

    To compare phase-inversion sonography during the liver-specific phase of contrast enhancement using a microbubble contrast agent with conventional B-mode sonography for the detection of VX2 liver tumors. Twenty-three rabbits, 18 of which had VX2 liver tumor implants, received a bolus injection of 0.6 g of Levovist (200 mg/ml). During the liver-specific phase of this agent, they were evaluated using both conventional sonography and contrast-enhanced phase-inversion harmonic imaging (CEPIHI). Following sacrifice of the animals, pathologic analysis was performed and the reference standard thus obtained. The conspicuity, size and number of the tumors before and after contrast administration, as determined by a sonographer, were compared between the two modes and with the pathologic findings. CE-PIHI demonstrated marked hepatic parenchymal enhancement in all rabbits. For VX2 tumors detected at both conventional US and CE- PIHI, conspicuity was improved by contrast-enhanced PIHI. On examination of gross specimens, 52 VX2 tumors were identified. Conventional US correctly detected 18 of the 52 (34.6%), while PIHI detected 35 (67.3%) (p < 0.05). In particular, conventional US detected only three (8.3%) of the 36 tumors less than 10 mm in diameter, but CE-PIHI detected 19 such tumors (52.8%) (p < 0.05). Compared to conventional sonography, PIHI performed during the liver-specific phase after intravenous injection of Levovist is markedly better at detecting VX2 liver tumors

  14. The study of membrane formation via phase inversion method by cloud point and light scattering experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arahman, Nasrul; Maimun, Teuku; Mukramah, Syawaliah

    2017-01-01

    The composition of polymer solution and the methods of membrane preparation determine the solidification process of membrane. The formation of membrane structure prepared via non-solvent induced phase separation (NIPS) method is mostly determined by phase separation process between polymer, solvent, and non-solvent. This paper discusses the phase separation process of polymer solution containing Polyethersulfone (PES), N-methylpirrolidone (NMP), and surfactant Tetronic 1307 (Tet). Cloud point experiment is conducted to determine the amount of non-solvent needed on induced phase separation. Amount of water required as a non-solvent decreases by the addition of surfactant Tet. Kinetics of phase separation for such system is studied by the light scattering measurement. With the addition of Tet., the delayed phase separation is observed and the structure growth rate decreases. Moreover, the morphology of fabricated membrane from those polymer systems is analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The images of both systems show the formation of finger-like macrovoids through the cross-section.

  15. Fabrication and characterization of anode-supported micro-tubular solide oxide fuel cell by phase inversion method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Cong

    Nowadays, the micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cells (MT-SOFCs), especially the anode supported MT-SOFCs have been extensively developed to be applied for SOFC stacks designation, which can be potentially used for portable power sources and vehicle power supply. To prepare MT-SOFCs with high electrochemical performance, one of the main strategies is to optimize the microstructure of the anode support. Recently, a novel phase inversion method has been applied to prepare the anode support with a unique asymmetrical microstructure, which can improve the electrochemical performance of the MT-SOFCs. Since several process parameters of the phase inversion method can influence the pore formation mechanism and final microstructure, it is essential and necessary to systematically investigate the relationship between phase inversion process parameters and final microstructure of the anode supports. The objective of this study is aiming at correlating the process parameters and microstructure and further preparing MT-SOFCs with enhanced electrochemical performance. Non-solvent, which is used to trigger the phase separation process, can significantly influence the microstructure of the anode support fabricated by phase inversion method. To investigate the mechanism of non-solvent affecting the microstructure, water and ethanol/water mixture were selected for the NiO-YSZ anode supports fabrication. The presence of ethanol in non-solvent can inhibit the growth of the finger-like pores in the tubes. With the increasing of the ethanol concentration in the non-solvent, a relatively dense layer can be observed both in the outside and inside of the tubes. The mechanism of pores growth and morphology obtained by using non-solvent with high concentration ethanol was explained based on the inter-diffusivity between solvent and non-solvent. Solvent and non-solvent pair with larger Dm value is benefit for the growth of finger-like pores. Three cells with different anode geometries was

  16. Analytical and preparative resolution of enantiomers of prostaglandin precursors and prostaglandins by liquid chromatography on derivatized cellulose chiral stationary phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, L; Weyker, C

    1990-07-06

    Analytical methods were developed for the separation of the enantiomers of four cyclopentenone precursors of prostaglandins. The resolution obtained is correlated with the chemical environment around the chiral center of the cyclopentenones. The analytical methods were scaled up to preparative loadings and the chromatographic parameters were varied to determine their effect on the preparative separations. The correlation between analytical resolution and preparative resolution was also investigated. In addition to the precursors, the preparative resolution of the enantiomers of a synthetic prostaglandin analogue was investigated.

  17. Phase formation of V2O5.xNb2O5 compounds via gels and freeze-dried precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langbein, Hubert; Mayer-Uhma, Tobias

    2009-01-01

    An X-ray powder diffraction study of the phase formation in the system V 2 O 5 /Nb 2 O 5 is performed. Freeze-dried ammonium vanadate and ammonium oxalato niobate, alkoxide-derived xerogels and a mixture of active oxides are used as precursors to compare the resulting phase composition. Thermal decomposition of the freeze-dried precursor is monitored with DTA/TG and mass spectrometry. In the quasi-binary system V 2 O 5 -Nb 2 O 5 metastable VNbO 5 , V 4 Nb 18 O 55 , VNb 9 O 25 and solid solutions of V 2 O 5 in TT-Nb 2 O 5 as also thermodynamically stable VNb 9 O 25 exist. The thermal decomposition of freeze-dried vanadate-oxalatoniobate solution allows the synthesis of all these phases in a relative simple manner. Structural relationships between an intermediate phase and the product, or, in the case of solid-state reactions, between one of the starting oxide and the product, favour the desired reaction. Therefore, the structure of a former phase influences or directs the structure of the product similar to a topotactic reaction

  18. ACBC to Balcite: Bioinspired Synthesis of a Highly Substituted High-Temperature Phase from an Amorphous Precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittaker, Michael L.; Joester, Derk (NWU)

    2017-04-28

    Energy-efficient synthesis of materials locked in compositional and structural states far from equilibrium remains a challenging goal, yet biomineralizing organisms routinely assemble such materials with sophisticated designs and advanced functional properties, often using amorphous precursors. However, incorporation of organics limits the useful temperature range of these materials. Herein, the bioinspired synthesis of a highly supersaturated calcite (Ca0.5Ba0.5CO3) called balcite is reported, at mild conditions and using an amorphous calcium–barium carbonate (ACBC) (Ca1- x Ba x CO3·1.2H2O) precursor. Balcite not only contains 50 times more barium than the solubility limit in calcite but also displays the rotational disorder on carbonate sites that is typical for high-temperature calcite. It is significantly harder (30%) and less stiff than calcite, and retains these properties after heating to elevated temperatures. Analysis of balcite local order suggests that it may require the formation of the ACBC precursor and could therefore be an example of nonclassical nucleation. These findings demonstrate that amorphous precursor pathways are powerfully enabling and provide unprecedented access to materials far from equilibrium, including high-temperature modifications by room-temperature synthesis.

  19. The joint inversion of phase dispersion curves and receiver functions at the margin of East European Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrapkiewicz, Kajetan; Wilde-Piórko, Monika; Polkowski, Marcin

    2017-04-01

    For the first time a joint inversion of Rayleigh-wave phase velocity dispersion curves and P receiver functions has been applied to study the south-western margin of East European Craton (EEC) in Poland. The area of investigation lies in the vicinity of Trans-European Suture Zone (TESZ) regarded as the most prominent lithospheric boundary in Europe separating the Precambrian EEC from assemblage of Phanerozoic-accreted terranes (e.g. Pharaoh, 1999). While the sedimentary and crystalline crust of EEC's margin has been precisely recognized with the borehole and refraction data compilation (Grad et al., 2016), the structure of lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) underneath remains poorly understood. To address this issue, the passive seismic experiment „13 BB Star" (2013-2016) was carried out in northern Poland - just at the margin of EEC. For each station of „13 BB Star" network we obtained a credible 1-D shear-wave velocity model with linearized damped least-squares inversion (Herrmann, 2013) down to the depth of 250 km. The joint inversion of receiver functions and surface-wave dispersion curves has proved to be a natural approach when inferring the nature of cratonic LAB (e.g. Bodin et al., 2014). It's sensitive to both absolute velocities and sharp discontinuities and thus provides a better vertical resolution compared to surface wave data alone. The results indicate the presence of steady 4 per cent grow in the shear-wave velocity between 120 and 180 km depth and gradual 6 per cent drop over 180-220 km depth range. The latter may be interpreted as the LAB with depth and absolute-velocity change similar to those reported for other cratons (Kind et al., 2012). National Science Centre Poland provided financial support for this work by NCN grant DEC-2011/02/A/ST10/00284.

  20. Membranes Prepared by Self-assembly and Chelation Assisted Phase Inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Xie, Yihui

    2017-05-19

    We combine self-assembly in solution, complexation with metallic salts and phase separation induced by solvent-non-solvent exchange to prepare nanostructured membranes for separation in the nanofiltration range. The method was applied to synthesized poly(acrylic acid)-b-polysulfone-b-poly(acrylic acid) copolymers dissolved in a selective solvent mixture and immersed in aqueous Cu2+ or Ag+ solutions.

  1. Mapping the upper mantle beneath North American continent with joint inversion of surface-wave phase and amplitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, K.; Hamada, K.

    2017-12-01

    A new 3-D S-wave model of the North American upper mantle is constructed from a large number of inter-station phase and amplitude measurements of surface waves. A fully nonlinear waveform fitting method by Hamada and Yoshizawa (2015, GJI) is applied to USArray for measuring inter-station phase speeds and amplitude ratios of the fundamental-mode Rayleigh and Love waves. We employed the seismic events from 2007 - 2014 with Mw 6.0 or greater, and collected a large-number of inter-station phase speed data (about 130,000 for Rayleigh and 85,000 for Love waves) and amplitude ratio data (about 75,000 for Rayleigh waves) in a period range from 30 to 130 s for fundamental-mode surface waves. Typical inter-station distances are mostly in a range between 300 and 800 km, which can be of help in enhancing the lateral resolution of a regional tomography model. We first invert Rayleigh-wave phase speeds and amplitudes simultaneously for phase speed maps as well as local amplification factors at receiver locations. The isotropic 3-D S-wave model constructed from these phase speed maps incorporating both phase and amplitude data exhibits better recovery of the strength of velocity perturbations. In particular, local tectonic features characterized by strong velocity gradients, such as Rio Grande Rift, Colorado Plateau and New Madrid Seismic Zone, are more enhanced than conventional models derived from phase information only. The results indicate that surface-wave amplitude, which is sensitive to the second derivative of phase speeds, can be of great help in retrieving small-scale heterogeneity in the upper mantle. We also obtain a radial anisotropy model from the simultaneous inversions of Rayleigh and Love waves (without amplitude information). The model has shown faster SH wave speed anomalies than SV above the depth of 100 km, particularly in tectonically active regions in the western and central U.S., representing the effects of current and former tectonic processes on

  2. Production of low-density poly (4-methyl-1-pentene) foam via phase inversion from binary solvent/nonsovent systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simandl, R.F.; Robinson, D.N.; Bolinger, W.L.; Davis, W.E.

    1991-11-01

    Phase inversion from durene/naphthalene, durene/tmpdo, and durene/hexadecanol binary solvent/nonsolvent systems produced well interconnected, radiographically homogeneous, open-celled poly (4- methyl-1-pentene) or pmp foams. These foams ranged in density from 5 to 50 mg/cm{sup 2}. Foam homogeneity and casting efficiency were dependent on casting scheme, durene quality, solvent-to-nonsolvent ratio, and quench temperature. Foam density tracked linearly with dissolved-polymer content. Homogeneous, ultralow-density (5 to 6 mg/cm{sup 3}) foams were produced by using a 49/51 durene/naphthalene solvent eutectic. Foam hardness or firmness tracked somewhat linearly with foam density. Foams with densities above 20 mg/cm{sup 3} were too fragile to handle without damage.

  3. Decoupling control of a five-phase fault-tolerant permanent magnet motor by radial basis function neural network inverse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Liu, Guohai; Xu, Dezhi; Xu, Liang; Xu, Gaohong; Aamir, Nazir

    2018-05-01

    This paper proposes a new decoupled control for a five-phase in-wheel fault-tolerant permanent magnet (IW-FTPM) motor drive, in which radial basis function neural network inverse (RBF-NNI) and internal model control (IMC) are combined. The RBF-NNI system is introduced into original system to construct a pseudo-linear system, and IMC is used as a robust controller. Hence, the newly proposed control system incorporates the merits of the IMC and RBF-NNI methods. In order to verify the proposed strategy, an IW-FTPM motor drive is designed based on dSPACE real-time control platform. Then, the experimental results are offered to verify that the d-axis current and the rotor speed are successfully decoupled. Besides, the proposed motor drive exhibits strong robustness even under load torque disturbance.

  4. A global inversion-symmetry-broken phase inside the pseudogap region of YBa2Cu3Oy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, L.; Belvin, C. A.; Liang, R.; Bonn, D. A.; Hardy, W. N.; Armitage, N. P.; Hsieh, D.

    2017-03-01

    The phase diagram of cuprate high-temperature superconductors features an enigmatic pseudogap region that is characterized by a partial suppression of low-energy electronic excitations. Polarized neutron diffraction, Nernst effect, terahertz polarimetry and ultrasound measurements on YBa2Cu3Oy suggest that the pseudogap onset below a temperature T* coincides with a bona fide thermodynamic phase transition that breaks time-reversal, four-fold rotation and mirror symmetries respectively. However, the full point group above and below T* has not been resolved and the fate of this transition as T* approaches the superconducting critical temperature Tc is poorly understood. Here we reveal the point group of YBa2Cu3Oy inside its pseudogap and neighbouring regions using high-sensitivity linear and second-harmonic optical anisotropy measurements. We show that spatial inversion and two-fold rotational symmetries are broken below T* while mirror symmetries perpendicular to the Cu-O plane are absent at all temperatures. This transition occurs over a wide doping range and persists inside the superconducting dome, with no detectable coupling to either charge ordering or superconductivity. These results suggest that the pseudogap region coincides with an odd-parity order that does not arise from a competing Fermi surface instability and exhibits a quantum phase transition inside the superconducting dome.

  5. Desalination membranes from functional block copolymer via non-solvent induced phase inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Hyemin; Poelma, Justin; Leibfarth, Frank; Hawker, Craig; Bang, Joona

    2012-02-01

    Commercially available reverse osmosis (RO) and forward osmosis (FO) membranes are most commonly derived from materials such as polysulfone, polyimide, and cellulose acetate. While these membranes have improved the efficiency of the desalination process, they suffer from mechanical and chemical stability, fouling issues, and low fluxes. In this study, we combine a well-established membrane formation method, non-solvent-induced phase separation, with the self-assembly of a functional amphiphilic block copolymersAn amine and acid functional polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene oxide-co-allyl glycidyl ether) were chosen for the membranes. Membranes were formed by casting a concentrated polymer solution (12 to 25 wt% polymer) on PET fabric followed by immersion in a non-solvent bath. Scanning electron microscopy revealed an asymmetric porous structure consisting of a dense skin layer on top of a highly porous layer. Membrane performance was investigating using an FO test cell under the seawater condition.

  6. Magnetic properties of nanocrystalline ε-Fe{sub 3}N and Co{sub 4}N phases synthesized by newer precursor route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theerthagiri, J.; Dalavi, Shankar B. [Department of Chemistry, Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Pilani, K.K. Birla, Goa Campus, Zuari Nagar, Goa 403726 (India); Manivel Raja, M. [Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Hyderabad 500058 (India); Panda, R.N., E-mail: rnp@goa.bits-pilani.ac.in [Department of Chemistry, Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Pilani, K.K. Birla, Goa Campus, Zuari Nagar, Goa 403726 (India)

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Nanocrystalline ε-Fe{sub 3}N and Co{sub 4}N nitride phases are synthesized first time by newer chemical routes. The ε-Fe{sub 3}N phase crystallizes in hexagonal structure with unit cell parameters, a = 4.76 Å and c = 4.41 Å. The Co{sub 4}N phase crystallizes in face centred cubic (fcc) structure with unit cell parameters, a = 3.55 Å. The estimated crystallite size for ε-Fe{sub 3}N and Co{sub 4}N phases are 29 nm and 22 nm, respectively. The values of saturation magnetization for ε-Fe{sub 3}N and Co{sub 4}N phases are found to be 28.1 emu/g and 123.6 emu/g respectively. The reduction of magnetic moments in ultrafine materials compared to bulk materials has been explained by fine particle size and surface effects. We have synthesized the high moment ε-Fe{sub 3}N and Co{sub 4}N nitride with reduced coercivity which may find applications as soft magnetic materials. - Highlights: • Nanocrystalline ε-Fe{sub 3}N and Co{sub 4}N nitride phases are synthesized. • The ε-Fe{sub 3}N and Co{sub 4}N crystallizes in hexagonal and fcc structure respectively. • The observed magnetic parameters indicate soft magnetic properties. • The magnetic properties have been explained on the basis of fine particle magnetism. - Abstract: Nanocrystalline ε-Fe{sub 3}N and Co{sub 4}N nitride phases are synthesized first time by using tris(1,2-diaminoethane)iron(II) chloride and tris(1,2-diaminoethane)cobalt(III) chloride precursors, respectively. To prepare ε-Fe{sub 3}N and Co{sub 4}N nitride phases, the synthesized precursors were mixed with urea in 1:12 ratio and heat treated at various temperatures in the range of 450–900 °C under the ultrapure nitrogen gas atmosphere. The precursors are confirmed by FT-IR study. The ε-Fe{sub 3}N phase crystallizes in hexagonal structure with unit cell parameters, a = 4.76 Å and c = 4.41 Å. The Co{sub 4}N phase crystallizes in face centred cubic (fcc) structure with unit cell parameters, a = 3.55 Å. The

  7. Evidence of a global inversion-symmetry-broken phase in the pseudogap region of YBa2Cu3Oy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, David

    The temperature versus doping phase diagram of the cuprate high-temperature superconductors features an enigmatic pseudogap region that is characterized by a partial suppression of low energy electronic excitations. Identifying the complete set of symmetries underlying the pseudogap region is imperative to understanding its microscopic nature and relationship to superconductivity. In this talk I will describe the results of highly symmetry sensitive optical second harmonic generation experiments on YBa2Cu3Oy across a wide temperature and doping range using a recently developed nonlinear optical rotational anisotropy technique. I will show evidence of a global inversion-symmetry-broken order that onsets at the pseudogap temperature and persists inside the superconducting dome in the overdoped regime, but shows no coupling to either charge density wave or superconducting order parameters. I will then discuss how these results relate to previous polarized neutron diffraction, Nernst effect and THz polarimetry data on YBa2Cu3Oy. Finally, I will show evidence of a remarkably similar phenomenon occurring in doped Sr2IrO4, a strongly spin-orbit coupled analog of La2CuO4, hinting at a robust connection between this hidden order and pseudogap physics that extends beyond the cuprates. Supported by funding from ARO, NSF, Moore Foundation, CIFAR and NSERC.

  8. Preparation of microporous Cellulose/Poly(vinylidene fluoride-hexafluoropropylene) membrane for lithium ion batteries by phase inversion method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghar, Muhammad Rehman; Zhang, Yao; Wu, Aiming; Yan, Xiaohui; Shen, Shuiyun; Ke, Changchun; Zhang, Junliang

    2018-03-01

    In this work, a porous and honeycomb-structured Cellulose/Poly (vinylidene fluoride-hexafluoropropylene) (PVDF-HFP) membrane is prepared via a facile and ecofriendly phase inversion method by using glycerol as pore forming agent. Cellulose acetate, the source of cellulose, is easily converted into cellulose by hydrolysis in the presence of lithium hydroxide. Owing to the unique microstructure, the Cellulose/PVDF-HFP membrane offers several advantages, including high porosity, elevated electrolyte uptake, high ion conductivity, and wide electrochemical window (5.35 V). Compared with conventional polypropylene (PP) separator and PVDF-HFP membrane, the membrane developed in this work enables higher discharge capacity, higher lithium-ion transference number (0.89) and improved rate performance, which is able to maintain a high discharge capacity of 136 mAh g-1 at 8 C, using LiCoO2 as cathode and Li metal as anode. In addition, the Cellulose/PVDF-HFP membrane based batteries exhibit superior cycling performance that can maintain 91.7% capacity after 100 cycles at 0.2 C. The characterization and battery test results demonstrate that the membrane is highly compatible with lithium ion batteries.

  9. Inverse effect of morphotropic phase boundary on the magnetostriction of ferromagnetic Tb1-xGdxCo2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chao; Ren, Shuai; Bao, Huixin; Yang, Sen; Yao, Yonggang; Ji, Yuanchao; Ren, Xiaobing; Matsushita, Yoshitaka; Katsuya, Yoshio; Tanaka, Masahiko; Kobayashi, Keisuke

    2014-03-01

    The morphotropic phase boundary (MPB) has been utilized extensively in ferroelectrics and recently has attracted interest in ferromagnets [S. Yang, H. Bao, C. Zhou, Y. Wang, X. Ren, Y. Matsushita, Y. Katsuya, M. Tanaka, K. Kobayashi, X. Song, and J. Gao, Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 197201 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.104.197201; R. Bergstrom, M. Wuttig, J. Cullen, P. Zavalij, R. Briber, C. Dennis, V. O. Garlea, and M. Laver, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 017203 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.017203] for obtaining enhanced large field-induced strain. Here we report that the MPB can also lead to weakening (the inverse effect as compared to the known MPB materials) of field-induced strain, as exhibited in the Tb1-xGdxCo2 system. With synchrotron x-ray diffractometry, the structure symmetry of TbCo2-rich compositions is detected to be rhombohedral below TC and that of GdCo2-rich compositions is tetragonal. The MPB composition Tb0.1Gd0.9Co2, corresponding to the two phases (rhombohedral and tetragonal) of coexistence, shows the exotic minimum (near zero) magnetostriction as well as the largest magnetic susceptibility among all samples. Further analysis suggests that whether MPB can enhance or weaken magnetostriction is determined by the degree of magnetic ordering of two end members that form ferromagnetic MPBs, which was not considered previously. Our work not only reveals a new type of ferromagnetic MPB, but also provides a new recipe for designing functional high-susceptibility and low-strain magnetic materials.

  10. Dual-Element Transducer with Phase-Inversion for Wide Depth of Field in High-Frequency Ultrasound Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Seob Jeong

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In high frequency ultrasound imaging (HFUI, the quality of focusing is deeply related to the length of the depth of field (DOF. In this paper, a phase-inversion technique implemented by a dual-element transducer is proposed to enlarge the DOF. The performance of the proposed method was numerically demonstrated by using the ultrasound simulation program called Field-II. A simulated dual-element transducer was composed of a disc- and an annular-type elements, and its aperture was concavely shaped to have a confocal point at 6 mm. The area of each element was identical in order to provide same intensity at the focal point. The outer diameters of the inner and the outer elements were 2.1 mm and 3 mm, respectively. The center frequency of each element was 40 MHz and the f-number (focal depth/aperture size was two. When two input signals with 0° and 180° phases were applied to inner and outer elements simultaneously, a multi-focal zone was generated in the axial direction. The total −6 dB DOF, i.e., sum of two −6 dB DOFs in the near and far field lobes, was 40% longer than that of the conventional single element transducer. The signal to noise ratio (SNR was increased by about two times, especially in the far field. The point and cyst phantom simulation were conducted and their results were identical to that of the beam pattern simulation. Thus, the proposed scheme may be a potential method to improve the DOF and SNR in HFUI.

  11. Transient compounds of high alkaline earth metals with custom-made organic ligands as potential precursors for the gas phase separator of high temperature ceramic superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teske, M.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this work was the representation of new transient custom-made metal/organic compounds of the high alkaline earth metals Ca, Sr and Ba as potential precursors for the gas phase separation (chemical vapour deposition, CVD) of high temperature ceramic superconductors. There is a report on the synthesis and comprehensive characterisation of representatives of the class of compounds of substituted metallocenes and the B diketone compounds of these metals. Some selected compounds were examined as regards their suitability for CVD. The main task was the examination of the effect of structural and electronic parameters of ligands on the properties of the compounds, where the volatility was to the fore. (orig./MM) [de

  12. Intermediate Phase Study on YBCO Films Coated by Precursor Solutions With F/Ba Atomic Ratio of 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, W.; Feng, F.; Zhao, Y.

    2016-01-01

    infrared studies. The intermediate phase evolution prior to the end of the sintering stage is also investigated by X-ray diffractometry and scanning electron microscopy. Liquid-like structures are observed, which are proposed to be responsible for the film densification in the early stage of YBCO formation...

  13. Slow photon amplification of gas-phase ethanol photo-oxidation in titania inverse opal photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jovic, Vedran, E-mail: vjov001@aucklanduni.ac.nz [School of Chemical Sciences, Science Centre, Building 301, 23 Symonds Street, Auckland 92019 (New Zealand); Idriss, Hicham, E-mail: IdrissH@sabic.com [Corporate Research and Development (CRD), Saudi Basic Industries Corporation (SABIC) at KAUST (Saudi Arabia); Waterhouse, Geoffrey I.N., E-mail: g.waterhouse@auckland.ac.nz [School of Chemical Sciences, Science Centre, Building 301, 23 Symonds Street, Auckland 92019 (New Zealand); The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology (New Zealand); Dodd Walls Centre for Photonic and Quantum Technologies (New Zealand)

    2016-11-10

    Here we describe the successful fabrication of six titania inverse opal (TiO{sub 2} IO) photocatalysts with fcc[1 1 1] pseudo photonic band gaps (PBGs) tuned to span the UV–vis region. Photocatalysts were fabricated by a colloidal crystal templating and sol-gel approach – a robust and highly applicable bottom-up scheme which allowed for precise control over the geometric and optical properties of the TiO{sub 2} IO photocatalysts. Optical properties of the TiO{sub 2} IO thin films were investigated in detail by UV–vis transmittance and reflectance measurements. The PBG along the fcc[1 1 1] direction in the TiO{sub 2} IOs was dependent on the inter-planar spacing in the [1 1 1] direction, the incident angle of light and the refractive index of the medium filling the macropores in the IOs, in agreement with a modified Bragg’s law expression. Calculated photonic band structures for the photocatalysts revealed a PBG along the Γ → L direction at a/λ ∼ 0.74, in agreement with the experimental optical data. By coupling the low frequency edge of the PBG along the [1 1 1] direction with the electronic absorption edge of anatase TiO{sub 2}, a two-fold enhancement in the rate of gas phase ethanol photo-oxidation in air was achieved. This enhancement appears to be associated with a ‘slow photon’ effect that acts to both enhance TiO{sub 2} absorption and inhibit spontaneous emission (i.e. suppress electron-hole pair recombination).

  14. Changes in the ultra-low frequency wave field during the precursor phase to the Sichuan earthquake: DEMETER observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Walker

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic phenomena observed in association with increases in seismic activity have been studied for several decades. These phenomena are generated during the precursory phases of an earthquake as well as during the main event. Their occurrence during the precursory phases may be used in short-term prediction of a large earthquake. In this paper, we examine ultra-low frequency (ULF electric field data from the DEMETER satellite during the period leading up to the Sichuan earthquake. It is shown that there is an increase in ULF wave activity observed as DEMETER passes in the vicinity of the earthquake epicentre. This increase is most obvious at lower frequencies. Examination of the ULF spectra shows the possible occurrence of geomagnetic pearl pulsations, resulting from the passage of atmospheric gravity waves generated in the vicinity of the earthquake epicentre.

  15. Influence of Pb-rich phases of precursor powder on microstructural evolution in the silver-sheathed (Bi,Pb)2Sr2Ca2Cu3Ox superconducting tapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, X.P.; Grivel, Jean-Claude; Li, M.Y.

    2010-01-01

    using precursor powders containing different Pb-rich phases. Sintering was carried out at a fixed temperature of 830 °C in 8.5% O2. The phase transitions, structure changes and texture evolution in (Bi,Pb)-2223/Ag tapes were carefully analyzed, and the evolution of different Pb-rich phases, such as Ca2......The influence of Pb-rich phases of precursor powder on microstructural evolution during the first heat treatment of the silver-sheathed (Bi,Pb)2Sr2Ca2Cu3Ox ((Bi,Pb)-2223/Ag) superconducting tapes was studied by means of in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Three monofilament tapes were fabricated......PbO4 and Pb3Sr2.5Bi0.5Ca2CuOy (3321), was discussed. It was found that tapes fabricated using the precursor with the (Bi,Pb)-2212 phase exhibited higher (Bi,Pb)-2223 formation rate than tapes fabricated using the precursors with Pb-rich phases. Texture evolution indicates that texture of the (Bi...

  16. Thermoset precursor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Y.

    1983-04-01

    This invention pertains to a distinctive thermoset precursor which is prepared by mixing a resin composition (A) which can be hardened by ionizing radiation, and a resin composition (B) which can be hardened by heat but cannot be hardened by, or is resistant to, ionizing radiation, and by coating or impregnating a molding or other substrate with a sheet or film of this mixture and irradiating this with an ionizing radiation. The principal components of composition (A) and (B) can be the following: (1) an acrylate or methacrylate and an epoxy resin and an epoxy resin hardener; (2) an unsaturated polyester resin and epoxy resin and an epoxy resin hardener; (3) a diacrylate or dimethacrylate or polyethylene glycol and an epoxy resin; (4) an epoxy acrylates or epoxy methacrylate obtained by the addition reaction of epoxy resin and acrylic or methacrylic acid

  17. Ureaplasma antigenic variation beyond MBA phase variation: DNA inversions generating chimeric structures and switching in expression of the MBA N-terminal paralogue UU172.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Carl-Ulrich R; Rosengarten, Renate; Spergser, Joachim

    2011-02-01

    Phase variation of the major ureaplasma surface membrane protein, the multiple-banded antigen (MBA), with its counterpart, the UU376 protein, was recently discussed as a result of DNA inversion occurring at specific inverted repeats. Two similar inverted repeats to the ones within the mba locus were found in the genome of Ureaplasma parvum serovar 3; one within the MBA N-terminal paralogue UU172 and another in the adjacent intergenic spacer region. In this report, we demonstrate on both genomic and protein level that DNA inversion at these inverted repeats leads to alternating expression between UU172 and the neighbouring conserved hypothetical ORF UU171. Sequence analysis of this phase-variable 'UU172 element' from both U. parvum and U. urealyticum strains revealed that it is highly conserved among both species and that it also includes the orthologue of UU144. A third inverted repeat region in UU144 is proposed to serve as an additional potential inversion site from which chimeric genes can evolve. Our results indicate that site-specific recombination events in the genome of U. parvum serovar 3 are dynamic and frequent, leading to a broad spectrum of antigenic variation by which the organism may evade host immune responses. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. A study on the characteristics of temperature inversions in active and break phases of Indian summer monsoon

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Muraleedharan, P.M.; Mohankumar, K.; Sivakumar, K.U.

    The thermal inversion characteristics during active and break cycles of two consecutive and contrasting monsoon years were studied using GPS radiosonde profiles in Goa (15 degrees 46′ N; 73 degrees 08′ E), located on the west coast of India...

  19. A versatile low temperature synthetic route to Zintl phase precursors: Na4Si4, Na4Ge4 and K4Ge4 as examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xuchu; Xu, Fen; Atkins, Tonya M; Goforth, Andrea M; Neiner, Doinita; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Kauzlarich, Susan M

    2009-12-14

    Na(4)Si(4) and Na(4)Ge(4) are ideal chemical precursors for inorganic clathrate structures, clusters, and nanocrystals. The monoclinic Zintl phases, Na(4)Si(4) and Na(4)Ge(4), contain isolated homo-tetrahedranide [Si(4)](4-) and [Ge(4)](4-) clusters surrounded by alkali metal cations. In this study, a simple scalable route has been applied to prepare Zintl phases of composition Na(4)Si(4) and Na(4)Ge(4) using the reaction between NaH and Si or Ge at low temperature (420 degrees C for Na(4)Si(4) and 270 degrees C for Na(4)Ge(4)). The method was also applied to K(4)Ge(4), using KH and Ge as raw materials, to show the versatility of this approach. The influence of specific reaction conditions on the purity of these Zintl phases has been studied by controlling five factors: the method of reagent mixing (manual or ball milled), the stoichiometry between raw materials, the reaction temperature, the heating time and the gas flow rate. Moderate ball-milling and excess NaH or KH facilitate the formation of pure Na(4)Si(4), Na(4)Ge(4) or K(4)Ge(4) at 420 degrees C (Na(4)Si(4)) or 270 degrees C (both M(4)Ge(4) compounds, M = Na, K). TG/DSC analysis of the reaction of NaH and Ge indicates that ball milling reduces the temperature for reaction and confirms the formation temperature. This method provides large quantities of high quality Na(4)Si(4) and Na(4)Ge(4) without the need for specialized laboratory equipment, such as Schlenk lines, niobium/tantalum containers, or an arc welder, thereby expanding the accessibility and chemical utility of these phases by making them more convenient to prepare. This new synthetic method may also be extended to lithium-containing Zintl phases (LiH is commercially available) as well as to alkali metal-tetrel Zintl compounds of other compositions, e.g. K(4)Ge(9).

  20. Thermal behavior and phase transformation of ZrO2–10%SiO2 precursor powder prepared by a co-precipitation route without adding stability agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Hsueh-Liang; Hwang, Weng-Sing; Wang, Cheng-Li; Wang, Moo-Chin; Lee, Kuen-Chan; Huang, Hong-Hsin; Lee, Huey-Er

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The precursor powders contained about 68.3 wt% ZrO 2 , which corresponds to ZrO 2 ·1/8 H 2 O. • The exothermic peak temperature of tetragonal ZrO 2 formation occurred at 1014 K. • The activation energy of ZrO 2 –10%SiO 2 precursors crystallization is 993.7 kJ/mol. • Only the tetragonal ZrO 2 formed when the precursor calcined at 1173–1373 K for 2 h. • As calcined at 1473 K for 2 h, tetragonal ZrO 2 fully converted to monoclinic ZrO 2 . - Abstract: Thermal behavior and phase transformation of ZrO 2 –10%SiO 2 precursor powder prepared by a co-precipitation route without adding stability agent has been studied using different thermal analysis/thermogravimetry (DTA/TG), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), nano beam electron diffraction (NBED), high-resolution TEM (HRTEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS). The TG results show that four weight loss regions were from 298 to 443 K, 443 to 743 K, 743 to 793 K and 793 to 1400 K. The DTA result shows that the ZrO 2 freeze-dried precursor powders crystallization at 1014 K. The activation energy of 993.7 kJ/mol was obtained for tetragonal ZrO 2 crystallization using a non-isothermal process. The XRD result shows that only a single phase of tetragonal ZrO 2 appears when the freeze-dried precursor powders after calcination between 1173 and 1373 K for 2 h. Moreover, when calcined at 1473 K for 2 h, the phase transformation from tetragonal ZrO 2 fully converted to monoclinic ZrO 2 occurred

  1. The origins of microstructure in phase inversion coatings or membranes: Snapshots of the transient from time-sectioning cryo-SEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Sai Sivasankaran

    2001-11-01

    Time-sectioning cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM) is a unique method of visualizing how the microstructure of liquid coatings evolves during processing. Time-sectioning means rapidly freezing (nearly) identical specimens at successively later stages of the process; doing this requires that coating and drying be well controlled in the dry phase inversion process, and solvents exchange likewise in the wet phase inversion process. With control, frozen specimens are fractured, etched by limited sublimation, sputter-coated, and imaged at temperatures of ca -175°C. The coatings examined were of cellulose acetate, of high and low molecular weights, and polysulfone in mixed solvents and nonsolvents: acetone and water with cellulose acetate undergoing dry phase inversion; and tetrahydrofuran, dimethylacetamide, ethanol with polysulfone undergoing dry-wet phase inversion. All coatings, cast on silicon substrates, were initially homogeneous. The initial compositions of the high and low molecular weight cellulose acetate ternary solutions were "off-critical" and "near-critical", respectively, connoting their proximities to the critical or plait point of the phase diagram. The initial composition of the polysulfone quaternary solution was located near the binodal of the pseudo-ternary phase diagram. It appeared that as the higher molecular weight cellulose acetate coating dries, it nucleates and grows polymer-poor droplets that coalesce into a bicontinuous structure underlying a thin, dense skin. Bicontinuity of structure was verified by stereomicroscopy of the dry sample. The lower molecular weight cellulose acetate coating phase-separates, seemingly spinodally, directly into a bicontinuous structure whose polymer-rich network, stressed by frustrated in-plane shrinkage, ruptures far beneath the skin in some locales to form macrovoids. When, after partial drying, the polysulfone coating was immersed in a bath of water, a nonsolvent, it appeared to swell in

  2. Annual rhythms of demand-feeding activity in sea bass: evidence of a seasonal phase inversion of the diel feeding pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Vázquez, F J; Azzaydi, M; Martínez, F J; Zamora, S; Madrid, J A

    1998-11-01

    Seasonal changes in the phasing of diel feeding rhythms were investigated in sea bass held under natural conditions. Demand-feeding behavior was continuously monitored over a complete annual cycle in 10 groups of 15 fish maintained in an outdoors laboratory subjected to natural fluctuations of photoperiod (from 9.5h to 15h) and water temperature (from 13.2 degrees C to 27.4 degrees C). A double seasonal phase inversion was detected in all groups: fish that were diurnal in summer and in autumn changed to nocturnal in winter and returned to being diurnal in spring. Diurnal sea bass displayed a positive and stable phase relationship between the peak of the feeding phase and the daily acrophase of water temperature (phi l = 0.72h +/- 0.33h) and between the peak of the feeding phase and sunset (phi s = 2.94h +/- 0.53h), but both phi l and phi s became negative when sea bass shifted to nocturnalism in winter. The percentage of diurnal feeding behavior peaked in June (94.1%) and dropped in February (29.1%), following a cyclic dynamic modulated by both monthly photoperiod and water temperature. These results contribute to better understanding of the dual phasing behavior of sea bass, which exhibits diurnal or nocturnal behavior according to the time of the year so that flexibility in phasing may be advantageous for the fish to cope with seasonal changes in their environment.

  3. Single-Step Fabrication Using a Phase Inversion Method of Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) Activated Carbon Air Cathodes for Microbial Fuel Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Wulin

    2014-10-14

    Air cathodes used in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) need to have high catalytic activity for oxygen reduction, but they must also be easy to manufacture, inexpensive, and watertight. A simple one-step, phase inversion process was used here to construct an inexpensive MFC cathode using a poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) binder and an activated carbon catalyst. The phase inversion process enabled cathode preparation at room temperatures, without the need for additional heat treatment, and it produced for the first time a cathode that did not require a separate diffusion layer to prevent water leakage. MFCs using this new type of cathode produced a maximum power density of 1470 ± 50 mW m–2 with acetate as a substrate, and 230 ± 10 mW m–2 with domestic wastewater. These power densities were similar to those obtained using cathodes made using more expensive materials or more complex procedures, such as cathodes with a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) binder and a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) diffusion layer, or a Pt catalyst. Even though the PVDF cathodes did not have a diffusion layer, they withstood up to 1.22 ± 0.04 m of water head (∼12 kPa) without leakage, compared to 0.18 ± 0.02 m for cathodes made using PTFE binder and PDMS diffusion layer. The cost of PVDF and activated carbon ($3 m–2) was less than that of the stainless steel mesh current collector ($12 m–2). PVDF-based AC cathodes therefore are inexpensive, have excellent performance in terms of power and water leakage, and they can be easily manufactured using a single phase inversion process at room temperature.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of a liquid Eu precursor (EuCppm2) allowing for valence control of Eu ions doped into GaN by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, Brandon; Koizumi, Atsushi; Nunokawa, Takumi; Wakamatsu, Ryuta; Lee, Dong-gun; Saitoh, Yasuhisa; Timmerman, Dolf; Kuboshima, Yoshinori; Mogi, Takayuki; Higashi, Shintaro; Kikukawa, Kaoru; Ofuchi, Hironori; Honma, Tetsuo; Fujiwara, Yasufumi

    2017-01-01

    A liquid Eu precursor, bis(normal-propyl-tetramethylcyclopentadienyl)europium has been synthesized. This precursor exists as a liquid at temperatures higher than 49 °C, has a moderately high vapor pressure, contains no oxygen in its molecular structure, and can be distilled to high purity. These properties make it ideal for doping using a chemical vapor or atomic layer deposition method, and provide a degree of control previously unavailable. As a precursor the Eu exists in the divalent valance state, however, once doped into GaN by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy, the room-temperature photoluminescence of the Eu-doped GaN exhibited the typical red emission due to the intra-4f shell transition of trivalent Eu. After variation of the growth temperature, it was found that divalent Eu could be stabilized in the GaN matrix. By tuning the Fermi level through donor doping, the ratio of Eu 2+ to Eu 3+ could be controlled. The change in valence state of the Eu ions was confirmed using X-ray absorption near-edge structure. - Highlights: • A liquid Eu precursor was synthesized and its properties were characterized. • Precursor has a low melting point and a moderately high vapor pressure. • Does not contain oxygen in its molecular structure. • Eu can changed its valance state when incorporated into GaN. • Valence state of Eu in GaN can be controlled by donor doping.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of a liquid Eu precursor (EuCp{sup pm}{sub 2}) allowing for valence control of Eu ions doped into GaN by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Brandon, E-mail: bmitchell@wcupa.edu [Department of Physics, West Chester University, West Chester, PA, 19383 (United States); Division of Materials and Manufacturing Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan); Koizumi, Atsushi; Nunokawa, Takumi; Wakamatsu, Ryuta; Lee, Dong-gun; Saitoh, Yasuhisa; Timmerman, Dolf [Division of Materials and Manufacturing Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan); Kuboshima, Yoshinori; Mogi, Takayuki; Higashi, Shintaro; Kikukawa, Kaoru [Kojundo Chemical Laboratory Co., Ltd., 5-1-28 Chiyoda, Sakado, Saitama, 350-0284 (Japan); Ofuchi, Hironori; Honma, Tetsuo [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI/SPring-8), 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo, 679-5198 (Japan); Fujiwara, Yasufumi, E-mail: fujiwara@mat.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp [Division of Materials and Manufacturing Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan)

    2017-06-01

    A liquid Eu precursor, bis(normal-propyl-tetramethylcyclopentadienyl)europium has been synthesized. This precursor exists as a liquid at temperatures higher than 49 °C, has a moderately high vapor pressure, contains no oxygen in its molecular structure, and can be distilled to high purity. These properties make it ideal for doping using a chemical vapor or atomic layer deposition method, and provide a degree of control previously unavailable. As a precursor the Eu exists in the divalent valance state, however, once doped into GaN by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy, the room-temperature photoluminescence of the Eu-doped GaN exhibited the typical red emission due to the intra-4f shell transition of trivalent Eu. After variation of the growth temperature, it was found that divalent Eu could be stabilized in the GaN matrix. By tuning the Fermi level through donor doping, the ratio of Eu{sup 2+} to Eu{sup 3+} could be controlled. The change in valence state of the Eu ions was confirmed using X-ray absorption near-edge structure. - Highlights: • A liquid Eu precursor was synthesized and its properties were characterized. • Precursor has a low melting point and a moderately high vapor pressure. • Does not contain oxygen in its molecular structure. • Eu can changed its valance state when incorporated into GaN. • Valence state of Eu in GaN can be controlled by donor doping.

  6. Osmotic-induced phase inversion of multiple W/O/W into a W/O emulsion: rheological study of an inverted W/O emulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fredro-Kumbaradzi, Emilija; Simov, Angel; Popovska-Pavlovska, Frederika

    1995-01-01

    Osmotic induced phase inversion of a W/O/W emulsion due to the presence of NaCl in the internal aqueous phase is discussed in this paper. Visco metric measurements of the obtained W/O emulsion were also carried out in order to determine its rheological properties as well as its stability during storage. Pseudo plastic flow and negative thixotropy behavior were observed under different shearing conditions. Negative thixotropy behavior, which is most likely a result of emulsion dispersion status changes, increased with increased program time, holding time at the maximum shear rate, and max. shear rate, but decreased with repeated time of shear. Changes in the flow curves under different shear conditions were not very significant. Also, no significant changes in the rheological behavior were noticed during four weeks storage of the inverted emulsion samples at room temperature. Thus, the inverted emulsion of a W/O type is a relatively stable system. (Author)

  7. Inverse photoemission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namatame, Hirofumi; Taniguchi, Masaki

    1994-01-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy is regarded as the most powerful means since it can measure almost perfectly the occupied electron state. On the other hand, inverse photoelectron spectroscopy is the technique for measuring unoccupied electron state by using the inverse process of photoelectron spectroscopy, and in principle, the similar experiment to photoelectron spectroscopy becomes feasible. The development of the experimental technology for inverse photoelectron spectroscopy has been carried out energetically by many research groups so far. At present, the heightening of resolution of inverse photoelectron spectroscopy, the development of inverse photoelectron spectroscope in which light energy is variable and so on are carried out. But the inverse photoelectron spectroscope for vacuum ultraviolet region is not on the market. In this report, the principle of inverse photoelectron spectroscopy and the present state of the spectroscope are described, and the direction of the development hereafter is groped. As the experimental equipment, electron guns, light detectors and so on are explained. As the examples of the experiment, the inverse photoelectron spectroscopy of semimagnetic semiconductors and resonance inverse photoelectron spectroscopy are reported. (K.I.)

  8. Magnetotelluric Transfer Functions: Phase Tensor and Tipper Vector above a Simple Anisotropic Three-Dimensional Conductivity Anomaly and Implications for 3D Isotropic Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löwer, Alexander; Junge, Andreas

    2017-05-01

    The influence of anisotropic conductivity structures on magnetotelluric transfer functions is not easy to analyse in its entire complexity. In this study, we investigate the spatial and frequency-dependent behaviour of phase tensors and tipper vectors above a 3D anisotropic conductivity anomaly. The anomaly consists of a simple cubic block embedded in a homogeneous half space. Using a 3D FD code, we compare an isotropic, 2 anisotropic models with an anisotropy factor of 10 and one anisotropic model with the anisotropy factor of 100. The results show characteristic differences between the isotropic and anisotropic cases. For the anisotropic anomalies, the tipper vectors are parallel over the entire area despite the 3D geometry of the anomalous body. The size of the tipper vectors depends on the position of the site relative to the anomaly's boundaries and the direction of the anisotropic strike. Above the anomalous anisotropic body, the main diagonal elements of the phase tensor show the well-known split. Outside the anomaly, the phase tensor principal axis rotates according to the site position in contrast to the constant tipper direction. The 3D inversion of the forward data using an isotropic 3D code (ModEM) yields a very good fit for all cases. Whereas the inversion result matches the isotropic model, wave-like structures with high conductivity contrast occur for the anisotropic models. These structures extend far beyond the extension of the original anomalous body. Thus, the study reveals important indications of the existence of anisotropic conductivity structures for observed magnetotelluric transfer functions.

  9. Thermal behavior and phase transformation of ZrO{sub 2}–10%SiO{sub 2} precursor powder prepared by a co-precipitation route without adding stability agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Hsueh-Liang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 Ta-Hsueh Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Hwang, Weng-Sing [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 Ta-Hsueh Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Institute of Nanotechnology and Microsystems Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 Ta-Hsueh Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Wang, Cheng-Li [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 Ta-Hsueh Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Wang, Moo-Chin, E-mail: mcwang@kmu.edu.tw [Department of Fragrance and Cosmetic Science, Kaohsiung Medical University, 100 Shih-Chuan 1st Road, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Lee, Kuen-Chan [Department of Fragrance and Cosmetic Science, Kaohsiung Medical University, 100 Shih-Chuan 1st Road, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Huang, Hong-Hsin [Department of Electrical Engineering, Cheng Shiu University, 840 Cheng Ching Road, Niaosong, Kaohsiung 83347, Taiwan (China); Lee, Huey-Er, E-mail: huerle@kmu.edu.tw [School of Dentistry, College of Dental Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, 100 Shih-Chuan 1st Road, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Kaohsiung Medical University, 100 Tzyou 1st Road, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • The precursor powders contained about 68.3 wt% ZrO{sub 2}, which corresponds to ZrO{sub 2}·1/8 H{sub 2}O. • The exothermic peak temperature of tetragonal ZrO{sub 2} formation occurred at 1014 K. • The activation energy of ZrO{sub 2}–10%SiO{sub 2} precursors crystallization is 993.7 kJ/mol. • Only the tetragonal ZrO{sub 2} formed when the precursor calcined at 1173–1373 K for 2 h. • As calcined at 1473 K for 2 h, tetragonal ZrO{sub 2} fully converted to monoclinic ZrO{sub 2}. - Abstract: Thermal behavior and phase transformation of ZrO{sub 2}–10%SiO{sub 2} precursor powder prepared by a co-precipitation route without adding stability agent has been studied using different thermal analysis/thermogravimetry (DTA/TG), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), nano beam electron diffraction (NBED), high-resolution TEM (HRTEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS). The TG results show that four weight loss regions were from 298 to 443 K, 443 to 743 K, 743 to 793 K and 793 to 1400 K. The DTA result shows that the ZrO{sub 2} freeze-dried precursor powders crystallization at 1014 K. The activation energy of 993.7 kJ/mol was obtained for tetragonal ZrO{sub 2} crystallization using a non-isothermal process. The XRD result shows that only a single phase of tetragonal ZrO{sub 2} appears when the freeze-dried precursor powders after calcination between 1173 and 1373 K for 2 h. Moreover, when calcined at 1473 K for 2 h, the phase transformation from tetragonal ZrO{sub 2} fully converted to monoclinic ZrO{sub 2} occurred.

  10. The effect of subtalar inversion/eversion on the dynamic function of the tibialis anterior, soleus, and gastrocnemius during the stance phase of gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruoli; Gutierrez-Farewik, Elena M

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how gait deviation in one plane (i.e. excessive subtalar inversion/eversion) can affect the dynamic function of the tibialis anterior, gastrocnemius, and soleus to accelerate the subtalar, ankle, knee and hip joints, as well as the body center of mass. Induced acceleration analysis was performed based on a subject-specific three-dimensional linkage model configured by stance phase gait data and driven by one unit of muscle force. Eight healthy adult subjects were examined in gait analysis. The subtalar inversion/eversion was modeled by offsetting up to 20° from the normal subtalar angle while other configurations remained unaltered. This study showed that the gastrocnemius, soleus and tibialis anterior generally functioned as their anatomical definition in normal gait, but counterintuitive function was occasionally found in the bi-articular gastrocnemius. The plantarflexors play important roles in the body support and forward progression. Excessive subtalar eversion was found to enlarge the plantarflexors and tibialis anterior's function. Induced acceleration analysis demonstrated its ability to isolate the contributions of individual muscle to a given factor, and as a means of studying effect of pathological gait on the dynamic muscle functions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Three-dimensional phase-sensitive inversion recovery sequencing in the evaluation of left ventricular myocardial scars in ischemic and non-ischemic cardiomyopathy: Comparison to three-dimensional inversion recovery sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kido, Tomoyuki, E-mail: tomozo0421@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Kido, Teruhito; Nakamura, Masashi; Kawaguchi, Naoto; Nishiyama, Yoshiko [Department of Radiology, Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Ogimoto, Akiyoshi [Department of Cardiovascular Internal Medicine, Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Miyagawa, Masao; Mochizuki, Teruhito [Department of Radiology, Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • We evaluate 3D PSIR compared with 3D IR for the detection of myocardial scars. • In image quality, there was no significant difference between IR and PSIR. • A quantitative analysis of LGE volume shows a strong correlation between PSIR and IR. • PSIR detected greater LGE volume in non-ischemic cardiomyopathy patients than IR. • PSIR may have a specific role in scar evaluation of non-ischemic cardiomyopathy. - Abstract: Background: Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a useful technique for detecting myocardial fibrosis. LGE images are typically acquired using the inversion recovery (IR) method. Recently, phase-sensitive inversion recovery (PSIR) technology has been developed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate free-breathing 3D PSIR sequencing in comparison with breath-held 3D IR sequencing for the detection of myocardial fibrosis. Methods: One hundred twenty-three patients with suspected ischemic cardiac disease (n = 27) or non-ischemic cardiomyopathy (hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, n = 29; dilated cardiomyopathy, n = 22; sarcoidosis, n = 21; arrhythmia, n = 9; myocarditis, n = 4; amyloidosis, n = 3; and others, n = 8) were evaluated by LGE–MRI, which was performed first with the IR sequence and then with the PSIR sequence, using a 3 T MRI scanner. Image quality was scored by two independent readers using a four-point scale. The 3D LGE volume was analyzed quantitatively and compared between both sequencing methods. Results: There was no significant difference in overall image quality (p = 0.19). LGE was detected in 73 patients, who were evaluated visually. Ultimately, 58 patients with acceptable image quality were enrolled in further quantitative analyses (volume assessment). Although quantification of LGE volume revealed a strong correlation between both methods, larger LGE volumes were detected with PSIR compared to IR in patients suspected of non-ischemic cardiomyopathy (39.5 ± 25.9 cm{sup 3} for

  12. Inverse Limits

    CERN Document Server

    Ingram, WT

    2012-01-01

    Inverse limits provide a powerful tool for constructing complicated spaces from simple ones. They also turn the study of a dynamical system consisting of a space and a self-map into a study of a (likely more complicated) space and a self-homeomorphism. In four chapters along with an appendix containing background material the authors develop the theory of inverse limits. The book begins with an introduction through inverse limits on [0,1] before moving to a general treatment of the subject. Special topics in continuum theory complete the book. Although it is not a book on dynamics, the influen

  13. Inverse planning IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenwald, J.-C.

    2008-01-01

    The lecture addressed the following topics: Optimizing radiotherapy dose distribution; IMRT contributes to optimization of energy deposition; Inverse vs direct planning; Main steps of IMRT; Background of inverse planning; General principle of inverse planning; The 3 main components of IMRT inverse planning; The simplest cost function (deviation from prescribed dose); The driving variable : the beamlet intensity; Minimizing a 'cost function' (or 'objective function') - the walker (or skier) analogy; Application to IMRT optimization (the gradient method); The gradient method - discussion; The simulated annealing method; The optimization criteria - discussion; Hard and soft constraints; Dose volume constraints; Typical user interface for definition of optimization criteria; Biological constraints (Equivalent Uniform Dose); The result of the optimization process; Semi-automatic solutions for IMRT; Generalisation of the optimization problem; Driving and driven variables used in RT optimization; Towards multi-criteria optimization; and Conclusions for the optimization phase. (P.A.)

  14. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy and inverse photoemission spectroscopy of [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester in gas and solid phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akaike, Kouki; Nishi, Toshio; Ouchi, Yukio; Seki, Kazuhiko; Kanai, Kaname; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Tsutsumi, Jun'ya; Sato, Naoki

    2008-01-01

    The electronic structure of [6,6]-phenyl-C 61 -butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) was studied using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy of vapor and thin film and inverse photoemission spectroscopy of thin film. The threshold ionization energy of PCBM was found to be 7.17±0.04 eV in gas phase and 5.96±0.02 eV in solid phase. The threshold electron affinity was 3.9±0.1 eV in solid phase. These values are 0.4-0.6 eV smaller than C 60 . The density functional theory calculations gave consistent results with these trends and suggested that the electron donation from the side chain to C 60 backbone raised the C 60 -backbone-derived π orbitals of PCBM. The polarization energy of PCBM is 1.21 eV, which is almost the same as C 60 but is about 0.5 eV smaller than the value of typical aromatic hydrocarbons

  15. Preparation of basil seed mucilage aerogels loaded with paclitaxel nanoparticles by the combination of phase inversion technique and gas antisolvent process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Ghoreishi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective(S: In this work, paclitaxel (PX, a promising anticancer drug, was loaded in the basil seed mucilage (BSM aerogels by implementation of supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2 technology. Then, the effects of operating conditions were studied on the PX mean particle size (MPS, particle size distribution (PSD and drug loading efficiency (DLE. Methods: The employed SC-CO2 process in this research is the combination of phase inversion technique and gas antisolvent (GAS process. The effect of DMSO/water ratio (4 and 6 (v/v, pressure (10-20 MPa, CO2 addition rate (1–3 mL/min and ethanol concentration (5-10% were studied on MPS, PSD and DLE. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and Zetasizer were used for particle analysis. DLE was investigated by utilizing the high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Results: Nanoparticles of paclitaxel (MPS of 82–131 nm depending on process variables with narrow PSD were successfully loaded in BSM aerogel with DLE of 28–52%. Experimental results indicated that higher DMSO/water ratio, ethanol concentration, pressure and CO2 addition rate reduced MPS and DLE. Conclusions: A modified semi batch SC-CO2 process based on the combination of gas antisolvent process and phase inversion methods using DMSO as co-solvent and ethanol as a secondary solvent was developed for the loading of an anticancer drug, PX, in ocimum basilicum mucilage aerogel. The experimental results determined that the mean particle size, particle size distribution, and drug loading efficiency be controlled with operating conditions.

  16. Comparison of increased venous contrast in ischemic stroke using phase-sensitive MR imaging with perfusion changes on flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery at 3 Tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Eijiro; Kanasaki, Yoshiko; Fujii, Shinya; Ogawa, Toshihide; Tanaka, Takuro; Hirata, Yoshiharu

    2011-01-01

    Background Increased venous contrast in ischemic stroke using susceptibility-weighted imaging has been widely reported, although few reports have compared increased venous contrast areas with perfusion change areas. Purpose To compare venous contrast on phase-sensitive MR images (PSI) with perfusion change on flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) images, and to discuss the clinical use of PSI in ischemic stroke. Material and Methods Thirty patients with clinically suspected acute infarction of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory within 7 days of onset were evaluated. Phase-sensitive imaging (PSI), flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) were obtained using 3 Tesla scanner. Two neuroradiologists independently reviewed the MR images, as well as the PSI, DWI, and FAIR images. They were blinded to the clinical data and to each other's findings. The abnormal area of each image was ultimately identified after both neuroradiologists reached consensus. We analyzed areas of increased venous contrast on PSI, perfusion changes on FAIR images and signal changes on DWI for each case. Results Venous contrast increased on PSI and hypoperfusion was evident on FAIR images from 22 of the 30 patients (73%). The distribution of the increased venous contrast was the same as that of the hypoperfused areas on FAIR images in 16 of these 22. The extent of these lesions was larger than that of lesions visualized by on DWI in 18 of the 22 patients. Hypointense signals reflecting hemorrhage and no increased venous contrast on PSI and hyperperfusion on FAIR images were found in six of the remaining eight patients (20%). Findings on PSI were normal and hypoperfusion areas were absent on FAIR images of two patients (7%). Conclusion Increased venous contrast on PSI might serve as an index of misery perfusion and provide useful information

  17. Tuning of normal and inverse magnetocaloric effect in Sm0.35Pr0.15Sr0.5MnO3 phase separated manganites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giri, S.K.; Dasgupta, Papri; Poddar, A.; Nath, T.K.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: ΔS M vs. T plots of nano (left) and bulk (right) samples at different magnetic fields. - Highlights: • Bulk to nano show first order FM → PM phase transition at low magnetic field. • Bulk sample exhibits normal and inverse MCE around T C and after T g , respectively. • The value of ΔS M at T C is almost three times larger than at T g . • The value of ΔS M also decreases with reduction of particles sizes. • The bulk sample also exhibits a large RCP of 43.5 J/kg for a magnetic field of 1 T. - Abstract: Magnetic and magnetocaloric properties of Sm 0.35 Pr 0.15 Sr 0.5 MnO 3 polycrystalline manganite (bulk and nanometric samples) are investigated in detail. It has been observed that all the particle sizes (bulk to nano) show first order ferromagnetic → paramagnetic phase transition at low magnetic field. Ferromagnetic transition temperature also decreases with decreasing the particle size. This suggests that ferromagnetism is weakened and the first order magnetic phase transition is softened. We have investigated the magnetocaloric effect (MCE) of both bulk and nanometric samples around their spin glass-like transition temperature, T g and Curie temperature, T C . It has been found that bulk sample exhibits both normal (i.e., negative ΔS M ) and inverse (i.e., positive ΔS M ) MCE around T C and after T g , respectively. The value of ΔS M (+3.17 J kg −1 K −1 ) at T C is almost three times larger than at T g (ΔS M = −0.52 J kg −1 K −1 ) for a magnetic field change of 7 T. The bulk sample also exhibits a large relative cooling power (RCP) of 43.5 J/kg for a magnetic field of 1 T. The corresponding adiabatic temperature change of bulk sample is observed to be ∼1.5 K for a magnetic field change of 3 T. The value of ΔS M also decreases with reduction of particles sizes. The temperature width of ΔS M broadens with decreasing particle size. The value of ΔS M and the adiabatic temperature change vary with temperature and it

  18. Flexible, inversion-based Matlab implementation of the Radon transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Ryan; Jeffrey Gu, Yu

    2013-03-01

    This study reviews the theory, programming designs and merits of two new Matlab-based routines for the forward and inverse Radon transform. These routines offer users flexible choices of integration path functions to take advantage of improved Radon-domain identification and isolation of seismic phases. Least-squares inversion of frequency components and judicious choices of regularization techniques enables additional noise suppression and signal enhancement in the Radon domain. The forward Radon transform routine has the added benefit of spatial interpolation for irregularly sampled data. The accuracy and applicability of these two new routines are demonstrated using data sets containing long-period SS precursors and high-frequency receiver functions. With minimal modifications these two highly portable, carefully documented Radon-transform routines could be easily adapted for a broad range of applications.

  19. Magnéli phases Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7} and Ti{sub 8}O{sub 15} and their carbon nanocomposites via the thermal decomposition-precursor route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conze, S., E-mail: susan.conze@ikts.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technologies and Systems IKTS, Winterbergstr. 28, 01277 Dresden (Germany); Veremchuk, I. [Max-Planck-Institut für Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Nöthnitzer Straße 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Reibold, M. [Technical University of Dresden, Zum Triebenberg 50, 01328 Dresden (Zaschendorf) (Germany); Matthey, B.; Michaelis, A. [Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technologies and Systems IKTS, Winterbergstr. 28, 01277 Dresden (Germany); Grin, Yu. [Max-Planck-Institut für Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Nöthnitzer Straße 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Kinski, I. [Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technologies and Systems IKTS, Winterbergstr. 28, 01277 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    A new synthetic approach for producing nano-powders of the Magnéli phases Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7}, Ti{sub 8}O{sub 15} and their carbon nanocomposites by thermal decomposition-precursor route is proposed. The formation mechanism of the single-phase carbon nanocomposites (Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7}/C and Ti{sub 8}O{sub 15}/C) from metal–organic precursors is studied using FT-IR, elemental analysis, TG, STA-MS and others. The synthesis parameters and conditions were optimized to prepare the target oxides with the desired microstructure and physical properties. The electrical and transport properties of Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7}/C and Ti{sub 8}O{sub 15}/C are investigated. These nano-materials are n-type semiconductors with relatively low thermal conductivity in contrast to the bulk species. The nanostructured carbon nanocomposites of Magnéli phases achieve a low thermal conductivity close to 1 W/m K at RT. The maximum ZT{sub 570} {sub °C} values are 0.04 for Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7}/C powder nanocomposite and 0.01 for Ti{sub 8}O{sub 15}/C bulk nanocomposite. - Graphical abstract: From the precursor to the produced titanium oxide pellet and its microstructure (SEM, TEM micrographs) as well as results of phase and thermoelectric analyses. - Highlights: • Magnéli phases Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7}/Ti{sub 8}O{sub 15} via thermal decomposition-precursor route is proposed. • The formation mechanism of the nanocomposites Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7}/C and Ti{sub 8}O{sub 15}/C are investigated. • Microstructure of Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7}/C and Ti{sub 8}O{sub 15}/C are examined. • The electrical and transport properties of Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7}/C and Ti{sub 8}O{sub 15}/C are investigated. • The maximum figure of mertit ZT{sub 570} {sub °C} of Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7}/C and Ti{sub 8}O{sub 15}/C are 0.01 and 0.04.

  20. LiFAP-based PVdF-HFP microporous membranes by phase-inversion technique with Li/LiFePO{sub 4} cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aravindan, V.; Vickraman, P. [Gandhigram Rural University, Department of Physics, Gandhigram (India); Sivashanmugam, A.; Thirunakaran, R.; Gopukumar, S. [Central Electrochemical Research Institute, Electrochemical Energy Systems Division, Karaikudi (India)

    2009-12-15

    Polyvinylidenefluoride-hexafluoropropylene-based (PVdF-HFP-based) gel and composite microporous membranes (GPMs and CPMs) were prepared by phase-inversion technique in the presence 10 wt% of AlO(OH){sub n} nanoparticles. The prepared membranes were gelled with 0.5-M LiPF{sub 3}(CF{sub 2}CF{sub 3}){sub 3} (lithium fluoroalkylphosphate, LiFAP) in EC:DEC (1:1 v/v) and subjected to various characterizations; the AC impedance study shows that CPMs exhibit higher conductivity than GPMs. Mechanical stability measurements on these systems reveal that CPMs exhibit Young's modulus higher than that of bare and GPMs and addition of nanoparticles drastically improves the elongation break was also noted. Transition of the host from {alpha} to {beta} phase after the loading of nanosized filler was confirmed by XRD and Raman studies. Physico-chemical properties, like liquid uptake, porosity, surface area, and activation energy, of the membranes were calculated and results are summarized. Cycling performance of Li/CPM/LiFePO{sub 4} coin cell was fabricated and evaluated at C/10 rate and delivered a discharge capacity of 157 and 148 mAh g {sup -1} respectively for first and tenth cycles. (orig.)

  1. Forming Intermediate Phase on the Surface of PbI2Precursor Films by Short-Time DMSO Treatment for High-Efficiency Planar Perovskite Solar Cells via Vapor-Assisted Solution Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haibin; Ding, Xihong; Xu, Pan; Hayat, Tasawar; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Yao, Jianxi; Ding, Yong; Dai, Songyuan

    2018-01-17

    Morphology regulation is vital to obtain high-performance perovskite films. Vapor-assisted deposition provides a simple approach to prepare perovskite films with controlled vapor-solid reaction. However, dense PbI 2 precursor films with large crystal grains make it difficult for organic molecules to diffuse and interact with inner PbI 2 frame. Here, a surface modification process is developed to optimize the surface layer morphology of PbI 2 precursor films and lower the resistance of the induced period in crystallization. The vapor optimization time is shortened to several seconds, and the intermediate phase forms on the surface layer of PbI 2 films. We achieve porous PbI 2 surface with smaller grains through dimethyl sulfoxide vapor treatment, which promotes the migration and reaction rate between CH 3 NH 3 I vapor and PbI 2 layer. The PbI 2 precursor films undergo dramatic morphological evolution due to the formed intermediate phase on PbI 2 surface layer. Taking advantage of the proposed surface modification process, we achieve high-quality uniform perovskite films with larger crystal grains and without residual PbI 2 . The repeatable perovskite solar cells (PSCs) with modified films exhibit power conversion efficiency of up to 18.43% for planar structure. Moreover, the devices show less hysteresis because of improved quality and reduced defect states of the films. Our work expands the application of morphology control through forming intermediate phase and demonstrates an effective way to enhance the performance of the PSCs.

  2. Mechanism of formation of perovskite phase and dielectric properties of Pb(Zn,Mg)1/3Nb2/3O3 ceramics prepared by columbite precursor routes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, H.M.; Cho, S.R.; Lee, K.M.

    1995-01-01

    The mechanism of formation of the perovskite phase and the dielectric properties of Pb(Zn,Mg) 1/3 Nb 2/3 O 3 (PZMN) ceramics were examined using two different types of columbite precursors, (Mg,Zn)Nb 2 O 6 (MZN) and MgNb 2 O 6 + ZnNb 2 O 6 (MN + ZN). The formation of perovskite phase in the PbO + MN + ZN system is characterized by an initial rapid formation of Mg-rich perovskite phase, followed by a sluggish formation of Zn-rich perovskite phase. On the other hand, due to the formation of pyrochlore phase of mixed divalent cations Pb 2-x (Zn,Mg) y Nb 2-y O 7-x-3y/2 , the pyrochlore/perovskite transformation in the PbO + MZN system proceeded uniformly with a spatial homogeneity. Further analysis suggested that the formation of perovskite phase is a diffusion-controlled process. The degree of diffuseness of the rhombohedral/cubic phase transition (DPT) is higher in the PbO + MN + ZN system than in the PbO + MZN specimen for T > T max (temperature of the dielectric permittivity maximum), indicating a broadened compositional distribution of the B-site cations in the PbO + MN + ZN system

  3. Poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) phase inversion coating as a diffusion layer to enhance the cathode performance in microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Wulin

    2014-12-01

    A low cost poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVDF-HFP) phase inversion coating was developed as a cathode diffusion layer to enhance the performance of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). A maximum power density of 1430 ± 90 mW m-2 was achieved at a PVDF-HFP loading of 4.4 mg cm-2 (4:1 polymer:carbon black), with activated carbon as the oxygen reduction cathode catalyst. This power density was 31% higher than that obtained with a more conventional platinum (Pt) catalyst on carbon cloth (Pt/C) cathode with a poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) diffusion layer (1090 ± 30 mW m-2). The improved performance was due in part to a larger oxygen mass transfer coefficient of 3 × 10-3 cm s-1 for the PVDF-HFP coated cathode, compared to 1.7 × 10-3 cm s -1 for the carbon cloth/PTFE-based cathode. The diffusion layer was resistant to electrolyte leakage up to water column heights of 41 ± 0.5 cm (4.4 mg cm-2 loading of 4:1 polymer:carbon black) to 70 ± 5 cm (8.8 mg cm-2 loading of 4:1 polymer:carbon black). This new type of PVDF-HFP/carbon black diffusion layer could reduce the cost of manufacturing cathodes for MFCs. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Development of the fabrication of ultra-low density ploy (4-methyl-1-pentene) (PMP) foams by thermal induced phase-inversion technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lin; Wang Chaoyang; Luo Xuan; Du Kai; Tu Haiyan; Fan Hong; Luo Qing; Yuan Guanghui; Huang Lizhen

    2003-01-01

    By thermally induced phase-inversion technique, ploy (4-methyl-1-pentene) (PMP) foams are successfully prepared; the density and pore size are 3-80 mg/cm 3 and 1-20 μm respectively. Durene/naphthalene (60/40) is confirmed as the suitable solvent/nonsolvent binary system. The PMP's thermal properties are characterized by TG-DSC system. It is found that the foams thermal properties depend on the density. The thermal analysis method is utilized to measure the gelation of PMP in the binary solvent/nonsolvent system. The range of gelation temperature is preliminarily determined. The influence of mixture system composition and the cooling rate during the making of foams is discussed. TG-DSC is applied to determine the thermal properties of low-density PMP foams prepared in the laboratory. And the effect of density change on the thermal stability of foams are studied. The thermal analysis data play a great role in improving the foam quality. (authors)

  5. Identified EM Earthquake Precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kenneth, II; Saxton, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    Many attempts have been made to determine a sound forecasting method regarding earthquakes and warn the public in turn. Presently, the animal kingdom leads the precursor list alluding to a transmission related source. By applying the animal-based model to an electromagnetic (EM) wave model, various hypotheses were formed, but the most interesting one required the use of a magnetometer with a differing design and geometry. To date, numerous, high-end magnetometers have been in use in close proximity to fault zones for potential earthquake forecasting; however, something is still amiss. The problem still resides with what exactly is forecastable and the investigating direction of EM. After a number of custom rock experiments, two hypotheses were formed which could answer the EM wave model. The first hypothesis concerned a sufficient and continuous electron movement either by surface or penetrative flow, and the second regarded a novel approach to radio transmission. Electron flow along fracture surfaces was determined to be inadequate in creating strong EM fields, because rock has a very high electrical resistance making it a high quality insulator. Penetrative flow could not be corroborated as well, because it was discovered that rock was absorbing and confining electrons to a very thin skin depth. Radio wave transmission and detection worked with every single test administered. This hypothesis was reviewed for propagating, long-wave generation with sufficient amplitude, and the capability of penetrating solid rock. Additionally, fracture spaces, either air or ion-filled, can facilitate this concept from great depths and allow for surficial detection. A few propagating precursor signals have been detected in the field occurring with associated phases using custom-built loop antennae. Field testing was conducted in Southern California from 2006-2011, and outside the NE Texas town of Timpson in February, 2013. The antennae have mobility and observations were noted for

  6. Precursors and BRST symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Jan; Freivogel, Ben; Kabir, Laurens; Lokhande, Sagar F.

    2017-07-01

    In the AdS/CFT correspondence, bulk information appears to be encoded in the CFT in a redundant way. A local bulk field corresponds to many different non-local CFT operators (precursors). We recast this ambiguity in the language of BRST symmetry, and propose that in the large N limit, the difference between two precursors is a BRST exact and ghost-free term. This definition of precursor ambiguities has the advantage that it generalizes to any gauge theory. Using the BRST formalism and working in a simple model with global symmetries, we re-derive a precursor ambiguity appearing in earlier work. Finally, we show within this model that the obtained ambiguity has the right number of parameters to explain the freedom to localize precursors within different spatial regions of the boundary order by order in the large N expansion.

  7. GAS-PHASE SYNTHESIS OF PRECURSORS OF INTERSTELLAR GLYCINE: A COMPUTATIONAL STUDY OF THE REACTIONS OF ACETIC ACID WITH HYDROXYLAMINE AND ITS IONIZED AND PROTONATED DERIVATIVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrientos, Carmen; Redondo, Pilar; Largo, Laura; Rayon, Victor M.; Largo, Antonio, E-mail: alargo@qf.uva.es [Departamento de Quimica Fisica y Quimica Inorganica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, 47005 Valladolid (Spain)

    2012-04-01

    A computational study of the reactions of hydroxylamine and its ionized and protonated derivatives with acetic acid is provided. The reaction of neutral hydroxylamine with acetic acid, despite being clearly exothermic, involves a very large energy barrier. The reaction of ionized hydroxylamine with acetic acid is also clearly exothermic, but again a significant energy barrier is found (around 24 kcal mol{sup -1} at the CCSD(T) level). The reaction of the most stable protonated isomer of hydroxylamine, NH{sub 3}OH{sup +}, with acetic acid also involves a high barrier (more than 27 kcal mol{sup -1} at the CCSD(T) level). Only the higher energy isomer, NH{sub 2}OH{sup +}{sub 2}, leads to a sensibly lower energy barrier (about 2.3 kcal mol{sup -1} at the CCSD(T) level). Nevertheless, an estimate of the reaction coefficient at low temperatures such as those reigning in the interstellar medium gives very low values. Therefore, it seems that precursors of interstellar glycine could not be efficiently produced from the reactions of hydroxylamine-derived ions with acetic acid.

  8. Neural Precursors Exhibit Distinctly Different Patterns of Cell Migration Upon Transplantation During Either the Acute or Chronic Phase of EAE: A Serial MR Imaging Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muja, Naser; Cohen, Mikhal E.; Zhang, Jiangyang; Kim, Heechul; Gilad, Assaf A.; Walczak, Piotr; Ben-Hur, Tamir; Bulte, Jeff W.M.

    2011-01-01

    As the complex pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis contributes to spatiotemporal variations in the trophic micromilieu of the central nervous system, the optimal intervention period for cell-replacement therapy must be systematically defined. We applied serial, 3D high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging to transplanted neural precursor cells (NPCs) labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine, and compared the migration pattern of NPCs in acute inflamed (n = 10) versus chronic demyelinated (n = 9) brains of mice induced with experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE). Serial in vivo and ex-vivo 3D magnetic resonance imaging revealed that NPCs migrated 2.5 ± 1.3 mm along the corpus callosum in acute EAE. In chronic EAE, cell migration was slightly reduced (2.3 ± 1.3 mm) and only occurred in the lateral side of transplantation. Surprisingly, in 6/10 acute EAE brains, NPCs were found to migrate in a radial pattern along RECA-1+ cortical blood vessels, in a pattern hitherto only reported for migrating glioblastoma cells. This striking radial biodistribution pattern was not detected in either chronic EAE or disease-free control brains. In both acute and chronic EAE brain, Iba1+ microglia/macrophage number was significantly higher in central nervous system regions containing migrating NPCs. The existence of differential NPC migration patterns is an important consideration for implementing future translational studies in multiple sclerosis patients with variable disease. PMID:21305597

  9. Synthesis of morphology-controlled carbon hollow particles by carbonization of resorcinol-formaldehyde precursor microspheres and applications in lithium-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Haijiao, E-mail: seaboyfang@163.com [Modern Manufacture Engineering Center, Heilongjiang Institute of Science and Technology, 150027 (China); Xu Huifang, E-mail: xuhf@hit.edu.cn [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, 150001 (China); Zhao Can [Modern Manufacture Engineering Center, Heilongjiang Institute of Science and Technology, 150027 (China)

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Resorcinol-formaldehyde hollow particles could be obtained by inverse suspension method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The morphologies of RF carbon precursor particles could be controlled by adjusting the pH values of the RF precursor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The prepared carbon hollow particles, which derived from resorcinol-formaldehyde, exhibited microporous properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The RF carbon microcapsules displayed excellent power property and cycle durability. - Abstract: The morphology-controlled carbon hollow particles, derived from resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) particles, were prepared by using an (oil phase) O/(water phase) W/(oil phase) O inverse-emulsion system which was formed by adding RF precursor (water phase) to n-hexane (oil phase) with Span-80 as surfactant and the following carbonization. This simple method led to the formation of various morphologies of RF carbon precursor particles such as hollow spheres, bowl-like hollow structures, microcapsules, or solid microspheres by adjusting the pH values of the RF precursor. The synthesized carbon particles exhibited porous characters with the surface area of 659 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} and the total pore volume of 0.44 cm{sup 3} g{sup -1}. Additionally, the electrochemical behavior of the typical RF carbon particles in lithium-ion batteries revealed that the RF carbon microcapsules displayed a high initial discharge capacity of 1059 mAh g{sup -1} and stabilized at about 330 mAh g{sup -1}, indicating its excellent power property and cycle durability.

  10. Electrochemically driven emulsion inversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johans, Christoffer; Kontturi, Kyoesti

    2007-01-01

    It is shown that emulsions stabilized by ionic surfactants can be inverted by controlling the electrical potential across the oil-water interface. The potential dependent partitioning of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was studied by cyclic voltammetry at the 1,2-dichlorobenzene|water interface. In the emulsion the potential control was achieved by using a potential-determining salt. The inversion of a 1,2-dichlorobenzene-in-water (O/W) emulsion stabilized by SDS was followed by conductometry as a function of added tetrapropylammonium chloride. A sudden drop in conductivity was observed, indicating the change of the continuous phase from water to 1,2-dichlorobenzene, i.e. a water-in-1,2-dichlorobenzene emulsion was formed. The inversion potential is well in accordance with that predicted by the hydrophilic-lipophilic deviation if the interfacial potential is appropriately accounted for

  11. Earthquakes: hydrogeochemical precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Manga, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Earthquake prediction is a long-sought goal. Changes in groundwater chemistry before earthquakes in Iceland highlight a potential hydrogeochemical precursor, but such signals must be evaluated in the context of long-term, multiparametric data sets.

  12. Amphibian tachykinin precursor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianxu; Liu, Tongguang; Xu, Xueqing; Wang, Xu; Wu, Min; Yang, Hailong; Lai, Ren

    2006-12-01

    The precursor of amphibian tachykinin has not been found although more than 30 tachykinins have been isolated from amphibians since 1964. In this report, two tachykinin-like peptides are identified from the skin secretions of the frog, Odorrana grahami. Their amino acid sequences are DDTEDLANKFIGLM-NH(2) (named tachykinin OG1) and DDASDRAKKFYGLM-NH(2) that is the same with ranamargarin found in Rana margaretae, respectively, with a conserved FXGLM-NH(2) C-terminal consensus motif. By cDNA cloning, their precursors were screened from the skin cDNA library of O. grahami. The precursors are composed of 61 amino acid (aa) residues including a signal peptide followed by an acidic spacer peptide and one copy of mature tachykinin-like peptide. Their overall structure is different from structures of other tachykinin precursors such as human protachykinin 1 precursor containing 143 aa including one copy of substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA), and ascidian tachykinin 1 precursor containing 164 aa including two copies of tachykinin-like peptides. The current results demonstrate that the biosynthesis mode of tachykinins in amphibians is different from other animals.

  13. Optimization of precursor powders for manufacturing Bi-2223/Ag tapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, C H [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang (China); Yoo, J M [Materials Engineering Department, Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, 66 Sangnam-Dong, Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Ko, J W [Materials Engineering Department, Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, 66 Sangnam-Dong, Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Chung, H S [Department of Molecular Science and Technology, Ajou University (Korea, Republic of); Qiao, G W [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang (China)

    2003-01-01

    The phase assemblage and particle sizes of precursor powders have been optimized in a sequence for fabricating Ag/BSCCO-2223 composite tapes. Firstly, an optimal calcination temperature was determined based on the experimental results. Then, the precursors calcined at the optimal temperature were ball-milled for different dwell times to obtain varied particle sizes. The effects of both the phase assemblages and particle sizes of the precursor powder on the phase formation, microstructure and transport J{sub c} of Bi-2223/Ag tapes have been investigated. The results show that the precursor phase assemblage has a large impact on the reaction routes, microstructure, and J{sub c} property. Meanwhile, a fine powder is beneficial for the grain growth, alignment, and J{sub c} enhancement in fully reacted tapes. The best J{sub c} was achieved in the tape made from the powder after optimizing the phase assemblage and particle size.

  14. Crystallization Experiments in the MgO-CO2-H2O system: Role of Amorphous Magnesium Carbonate Precursors in Magnesium Carbonate Hydrated Phases and Morphologies in Low Temperature Hydrothermal Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giampouras, Manolis; Garcia-Ruiz, Juan Manuel; Garrido, Carlos J.

    2017-04-01

    Numerous forms of hydrated or basic magnesium carbonates occur in the complex MgO-CO2-H2O system. Mineral saturation states from low temperature hydrothermal fluids in Semail Ophiolite (Oman), Prony Bay (New Caledonia) and Lost City hydrothermal field (mid-Atlantic ridge) strongly indicate the presence of magnesium hydroxy-carbonate hydrates (e.g. hydromagnesite) and magnesium hydroxides (brucite). Study of formation mechanisms and morphological features of minerals forming in the MgO-CO2-H2O system could give insights into serpentinization-driven, hydrothermal, alkaline environments, which are related to early Earth conditions. Temperature, hydration degree, pH and fluid composition are crucial factors regarding the formation, coexistence and transformation of such mineral phases. The rate of supersaturation, on the other hand, is a fundamental parameter to understand nucleation and crystal growth processes. All these parameters can be examined in a solution using different crystallization techniques. In the present study, we applied different crystallization techniques to synthesize and monitor the crystallization of Mg-bearing carbonates and hydroxides under abiotic conditions. Various crystallization techniques (counter-diffusion, vapor diffusion and unseeded solution mixing) were used to screen the formation conditions of each phase, transformation processes and structural development. Mineral and textural characterization of the different synthesized phases were carried out by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy coupled to dispersive energy spectroscopy (FE-SEM-EDS). Experimental investigation of the effect of pH level and silica content under variable reactant concentrations revealed the importance of Amorphous Magnesium Carbonate (AMC) in the formation of hydroxy-carbonate phases (hydromagnesite and dypingite). Micro-structural resemblance between AMC precursors and later stage crystalline phases highlights the

  15. Precursor Additive Manufacturing Inventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, C.; Bourell, D.

    2018-03-01

    Most modern Additive Manufacturing (AM) processes were invented and commercialized in a short period of time spanning 1984-2000. This paper reports on AM processes invented in the 1974-1987 time period, known as precursor AM processes. The critical difference between the two periods is public knowledge and utilization of distributed computing.

  16. Recent developments in metalorganic precursors for metalorganic chemical vapour deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. C.; Rushworth, S. A.; Auld, J.

    1995-01-01

    Volatile metalorganic compounds are finding an increasing application in the deposition of metals and semiconductors by metalorganic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD). In this paper, the use of some new precursor systems in the growth of selected metals and alloys is reviewed with emphasis being placed on precursor chemistry in the gas phase and at the growth surface.

  17. Morphological, Structural, and Optical Properties of Single-Phase Cu(In,GaSe2 Thin Films from the Selenization of Thermally Evaporated InSe/Cu/GaSe Precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis B. Dejene

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The relatively small band gap values (~1 eV of CuInSe2 thin films limit the conversion efficiencies of completed CuInSe2/CdS/ZnO solar cell devices. In the case of traditional two-stage growth techniques, limited success has been achieved to homogeneously increase the band gap by substituting indium with gallium. In this study, thermal evaporation of InSe/Cu/Gase precursors was exposed to an elemental Se vapour under defined conditions. This technique produced large-grained, single-phase Cu(In,GaSe2 thin films with a high degree of in-depth compositional uniformity. The selenization temperature, ramp time, reaction period, and the effusion cell temperature with respect to the Cu(In,GaSe2 films were optimized in this study. The homogeneous incorporation of Ga into CuInSe2 led to a systematic shift in the lattice spacing parameters and band gap of the absorber films. Under optimized conditions, gallium in cooperation resulted only in a marginal decrease in the grain size, X-ray diffraction studies confirmed single-phase Cu(In,GaSe2 material, and X-ray photoluminescence spectroscopy in-depth profiling revealed a uniform distribution of the elements through the entire depth of the alloy. From these studies optimum selenization conditions were determined for the deposition of homogeneous Cu(In,GaSe2 thin films with optimum band gap values between 1.01 and 1.21 eV.

  18. A Study on Thermal Properties and α( hcp) → β( bcc) Phase Transformation Energetics in Ti-5 mass% Ta-1.8 mass% Nb Alloy Using Inverse Drop Calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, Madhusmita; Raju, S.; Jeyaganesh, B.; Mythili, R.; Saroja, S.

    2010-12-01

    Accurate measurements of enthalpy increment ( H T - H 298.15) values have been made on a Ti-5 mass% Ta-1.8 mass% Nb alloy using the inverse drop calorimetry technique in the temperature range from 463 K to 1457 K. The measured enthalpy increment values show a steady increase with temperature in both α- hcp and β- bcc solid solution regions. It is found that both the onset as well the completion of the α → β phase change are demonstrated by a marked deviation of the enthalpy increment behavior from the otherwise smooth variation encountered in the respective low-temperature α- and high-temperature β-phase domains. The transformation start ( T s) and finish ( T f) temperatures of the α → β phase change are found to be (1072±10) K and (1156±10) K, respectively. In the actual α → β phase transformation region, the variation of the enthalpy with the progress of transformation is found to follow a sigmoidal shape which is in line with the diffusive nature of the phase transformation. An estimation of the total enthalpy change associated with the α → β phase transformation (Δ° H tr) has been made by assuming a simple diffusion limited kinetic model for the phase change. The net enthalpy change for the α → β transformation is found to be 76 J · g-1. The measured temperature variation of the enthalpy increment in both α- and β-phase regimes are fitted to simple analytical functional forms to obtain temperature-dependent estimates of the specific heat, C P . The total specific heat change associated with the α → β phase transformation {Δ^{circ}{CP^{α}}^{→{β}}} is estimated to be 904 J · kg-1 · K-1.

  19. Facile and green synthesis of (La0.95Eu0.05)2O2S red phosphors with sulfate-ion pillared layered hydroxides as a new type of precursor: controlled hydrothermal processing, phase evolution and photoluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuejiao; Li, Ji-Guang; Zhu, Qi; Li, Xiaodong; Sun, Xudong; Sakka, Yoshio

    2014-02-01

    This study presents a facile and green route for the synthesis of (La 0.95 Eu 0.05 ) 2 O 2 S red phosphors of controllable morphologies, with the sulfate-type layered hydroxides of Ln 2 (OH) 4 SO 4 ·2H 2 O (Ln = La and Eu) as a new type of precursor. The technique takes advantage of the fact that the precursor has had the exact Ln:S molar ratio of the targeted phosphor, thus saving the hazardous sulfurization reagents indispensable to traditional synthesis. Controlled hydrothermal processing at 120 °C yielded phase-pure Ln 2 (OH) 4 SO 4 ·2H 2 O crystallites in the form of either nanoplates or microprisms, which can both be converted into Ln 2 O 2 S phosphor via a Ln 2 O 2 SO 4 intermediate upon annealing in flowing H 2 at a minimum temperature of ∼ 700 °C. The nanoplates collapse into relatively rounded Ln 2 O 2 S particles while the microprisms retain well their initial morphologies at 1 200 °C, thus yielding two types of red phosphors. Photoluminescence excitation (PLE) studies found two distinct charge transfer (CT) excitation bands of O 2- → Eu 3+ at ∼ 270 nm and S 2- → Eu 3+ at ∼ 340 nm for the Ln 2 O 2 S phosphors, with the latter being stronger and both significantly stronger than the intrinsic intra- f transitions of Eu 3+ . The two types of phosphors share high similarities in the positions of PLE/PL (photoluminescence) bands and both show the strongest red emission at 627 nm ( 5 D 0 → 7 F 2 transition of Eu 3+ ) under S 2- → Eu 3+ CT excitation at 340 nm. The PLE/PL intensities show clear dependence on particle morphology and calcination temperature, which were investigated in detail. Fluorescence decay analysis reveals that the 627 nm red emission has a lifetime of ∼ 0.5 ms for both types of the phosphors.

  20. Facile and green synthesis of (La0.95Eu0.052O2S red phosphors with sulfate-ion pillared layered hydroxides as a new type of precursor: controlled hydrothermal processing, phase evolution and photoluminescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuejiao Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a facile and green route for the synthesis of (La0.95Eu0.052O2S red phosphors of controllable morphologies, with the sulfate-type layered hydroxides of Ln2(OH4SO4centerdot2H2O (Ln = La and Eu as a new type of precursor. The technique takes advantage of the fact that the precursor has had the exact Ln:S molar ratio of the targeted phosphor, thus saving the hazardous sulfurization reagents indispensable to traditional synthesis. Controlled hydrothermal processing at 120 °C yielded phase-pure Ln2(OH4SO4centerdot2H2O crystallites in the form of either nanoplates or microprisms, which can both be converted into Ln2O2S phosphor via a Ln2O2SO4 intermediate upon annealing in flowing H2 at a minimum temperature of ~ 700 °C. The nanoplates collapse into relatively rounded Ln2O2S particles while the microprisms retain well their initial morphologies at 1 200 °C, thus yielding two types of red phosphors. Photoluminescence excitation (PLE studies found two distinct charge transfer (CT excitation bands of O2− → Eu3+ at ~ 270 nm and S2− → Eu3+ at ~ 340 nm for the Ln2O2S phosphors, with the latter being stronger and both significantly stronger than the intrinsic intra-f transitions of Eu3+. The two types of phosphors share high similarities in the positions of PLE/PL (photoluminescence bands and both show the strongest red emission at 627 nm (5D0 → 7F2 transition of Eu3+ under S2− → Eu3+ CT excitation at 340 nm. The PLE/PL intensities show clear dependence on particle morphology and calcination temperature, which were investigated in detail. Fluorescence decay analysis reveals that the 627 nm red emission has a lifetime of ~ 0.5 ms for both types of the phosphors.

  1. Inverse problems of geophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanovskaya, T.B.

    2003-07-01

    This report gives an overview and the mathematical formulation of geophysical inverse problems. General principles of statistical estimation are explained. The maximum likelihood and least square fit methods, the Backus-Gilbert method and general approaches for solving inverse problems are discussed. General formulations of linearized inverse problems, singular value decomposition and properties of pseudo-inverse solutions are given

  2. Fuzzy Inverse Compactness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halis Aygün

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce definitions of fuzzy inverse compactness, fuzzy inverse countable compactness, and fuzzy inverse Lindelöfness on arbitrary -fuzzy sets in -fuzzy topological spaces. We prove that the proposed definitions are good extensions of the corresponding concepts in ordinary topology and obtain different characterizations of fuzzy inverse compactness.

  3. Mountain Building in Central and Western Tien Shan Orogen: Insight from Joint Inversion of Surface Wave Phase Velocities and Body Wave Travel Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S.; Yang, Y.; Wang, K.

    2017-12-01

    The Tien Shan orogeny, situated in central Asia about 2000 km away from the collision boundary between Indian plate and Eurasian plate, is one of the highest, youngest, and most active intracontinental mountain belts on the earth. It first formed during the Paleozoic times and became reactivated at about 20Ma. Although many studies on the dynamic processes of the Tien Shan orogeny have been carried out before, its tectonic rejuvenation and uplift mechanism are still being debated. A high-resolution model of crust and mantle beneath Tien Shan is critical to discern among competing models for the mountain building. In this study, we collect and process seismic data recorded by several seismic arrays in the central and western Tien Shan region to generate surface wave dispersion curves at 6-140 s period using ambient noise tomography (ANT) and two-plane surface wave tomography (TPWT) methods. Using these dispersion curves, we construct a high-resolution 3-D image of shear wave velocity (Vs) in the crust and upper mantle up to 300 km depth. Our current model constrained only by surface waves shows that, under the Tien Shan orogenic belt, a strong low S-wave velocity anomaly exists in the uppermost mantle down to the depth of 200km, supporting the model that the hot upper mantle is upwelling under the Tien Shan orogenic belt, which may be responsible for the mountain building. To the west of central Tien Shan across the Talas-Fergana fault, low S-wave velocity anomalies in the upper mantle become much weaker and finally disappear beneath the Fergana basin. Because surface waves are insensitive to the structures below 300 km, body wave arrival times will be included for a joint inversion with surface waves to generate S-wave velocity structure from the surface down to the mantle transition zone. The joint inversion of both body and surface waves provide complementary constraints on structures at different depths and helps to achieve a more realistic model compared with

  4. Study of structural phase transformation and hysteresis behavior of inverse-spinel α-ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by co-precipitation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabagh, Shadab; Chaudhary, Kashif; Haider, Zuhaib; Ali, Jalil

    2018-03-01

    Substitution of cobalt (Co2+) ions in cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) with copper (Cu2+) and aluminum (Al3+) ions allows variations in their electric and magnetic properties which can be optimized for specific applications. In this article, synthesis of inverse-spinel Co1-xCuxFe2-xAlxO4 (0.0 ≤ x ≤ 0.8) nanoparticles by substituting Cu2+ and Al3+ ions in CoFe2O4 via co-precipitation method is reported. By controlling copper and aluminum (Cu-Al) substituent ratio, the magnetic moment and coercivity of synthesized cobalt ferrite nanoparticles is optimized. The role of substituents on the structure, particle size, morphology, and magnetic properties of nano-crystalline ferrite is investigated. The Co1-xCuxFe2-xAlxO4 (0.0 ≤ x≤ 0.8) nanoparticles with crystallite size in the range of 23.1-26.5 nm are observed, 26.5 nm for x = 0.0-23.1 nm for x = 0.8. The inverse-spinel structure of synthesized Co1-xCuxFe2-xAlxO4 (0.0 ≤ x ≤ 0.8) nano-particles is confirmed by characteristic vibrational bands at tetrahedral and octahedral sites using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. A decreases in coercive field and magnetic moment is observed as Cu-Al contents are increased (x = 0.0-0.8). The positive anisotropy of synthesized particles Co1-xCuxFe2-xAlxO4 (0.0 ≤ x ≤ 0.8) is obtained in the range 1.96 × 105 J/m3 for x = 0.0 to 0.29 × 105 J/m3 for x = 0.8.

  5. Solving inverse problems of optical microlithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granik, Yuri

    2005-05-01

    The direct problem of microlithography is to simulate printing features on the wafer under given mask, imaging system, and process characteristics. The goal of inverse problems is to find the best mask and/or imaging system and/or process to print the given wafer features. In this study we will describe and compare solutions of inverse mask problems. Pixel-based inverse problem of mask optimization (or "layout inversion") is harder than inverse source problem, especially for partially-coherent systems. It can be stated as a non-linear constrained minimization problem over complex domain, with large number of variables. We compare method of Nashold projections, variations of Fienap phase-retrieval algorithms, coherent approximation with deconvolution, local variations, and descent searches. We propose electrical field caching technique to substantially speedup the searching algorithms. We demonstrate applications of phase-shifted masks, assist features, and maskless printing.

  6. Precursor of color superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitazawa, M. [Kyoto Univ., Dept. of Physics, Kyoto (Japan); Koide, T.; Kunihiro, T. [Kyoto Univ., Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto (Japan); Nemoto, Y. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, RIKEN BNL Research Center, Upton, NY (United States)

    2002-09-01

    We investigate possible precursory phenomena of color superconductivity in quark matter at finite temperature T with use of a simple Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. It is found that the fluctuating pair field exists with a prominent strength even well above the critical temperature T{sub c}. We show that the collective pair field has a complex energy located in the second Riemann sheet, which approaches the origin as T is lowered to T{sub c}. We discuss the possible relevance of the precursor to the observables to be detected in heavy ion collisions. (author)

  7. Precursor composites for oxygen dispersion hardened silver sheathed superconductor composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podtburg, Eric R.

    1999-01-01

    An oxide superconductor composite having improved texture and durability. The oxide superconductor composite includes an oxide superconductor phase substantially surrounded with/by a noble metal matrix, the noble metal matrix comprising a metal oxide in an amount effective to form metal oxide domains that increase hardness of the composite. The composite is characterized by a degree of texture at least 10% greater than a comparable oxide superconductor composite lacking metal oxide domains. An oxide superconducting composite may be prepared by oxidizing the precursor composite under conditions effective to form solute metal oxide domains within the silver matrix and to form a precursor oxide in the precursor alloy phase; subjecting the oxidized composite to a softening anneal under conditions effective to relieve stress within the noble metal phase; and converting the oxide precursor into an oxide superconductor.

  8. Ionospheric precursors to scintillation activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul S.J. Spencer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Ionospheric scintillation is the rapid fluctuation of both phase and amplitude of trans-ionospheric radio waves due to small scale electron density irregularities in the ionosphere. Prediction of the occurrence of scintillation at L band frequencies is needed to mitigate the disruption of space-based communication and navigation systems. The purpose of this paper is to present a method of using tomographic inversions of the ionospheric electron density obtained from ground-based GPS data to infer the location and strength of the post-sunset plasma drift vortex. This vortex is related to the pre-reversal enhancement in the eastwards electric field which has been correlated to the subsequent occurrence of scintillation.

  9. Study of structural phase transformation and hysteresis behavior of inverse-spinel α-ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by co-precipitation method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadab Dabagh

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Substitution of cobalt (Co2+ ions in cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4 with copper (Cu2+ and aluminum (Al3+ ions allows variations in their electric and magnetic properties which can be optimized for specific applications. In this article, synthesis of inverse-spinel Co1−xCuxFe2−xAlxO4 (0.0 ≤ x ≤ 0.8 nanoparticles by substituting Cu2+ and Al3+ ions in CoFe2O4 via co-precipitation method is reported. By controlling copper and aluminum (Cu-Al substituent ratio, the magnetic moment and coercivity of synthesized cobalt ferrite nanoparticles is optimized. The role of substituents on the structure, particle size, morphology, and magnetic properties of nano-crystalline ferrite is investigated. The Co1−xCuxFe2−xAlxO4 (0.0 ≤ x≤ 0.8 nanoparticles with crystallite size in the range of 23.1–26.5 nm are observed, 26.5 nm for x = 0.0–23.1 nm for x = 0.8. The inverse-spinel structure of synthesized Co1−xCuxFe2−xAlxO4 (0.0 ≤ x ≤ 0.8 nano-particles is confirmed by characteristic vibrational bands at tetrahedral and octahedral sites using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. A decreases in coercive field and magnetic moment is observed as Cu-Al contents are increased (x = 0.0–0.8. The positive anisotropy of synthesized particles Co1−xCuxFe2−xAlxO4 (0.0 ≤ x ≤ 0.8 is obtained in the range 1.96 × 105 J/m3 for x = 0.0 to 0.29 × 105 J/m3 for x = 0.8. Keywords: Co-precipitation method, XRD, Spinel ferrites, VSM, TEM

  10. Alternative group V precursors for CVD applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, R. M.; Klingert, J. K.

    1991-01-01

    The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques used to grow III/V semiconductors films, such as metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE), hydride VPE, chemical beam epitaxy (CBE) and gas source molecular beam epitaxy (GS-MBE), all use hydrides (AsH 3 and PH 3) as the Group V source. However, the hydrides are extremely toxic gases which are stored under high pressure (200-2000 psi). To reduce the safety hazards associated with these gases, alternative Group V precursors have been investigated. Organoarsenic and phosphorous compounds have received the most attention as replacements for AsH 3 and PH 3 because they are typically low vapor pressure liquids, and thus present significantly lower exposure risks than the hydrides. For AsH 3 these have included the methyl, ethyl and butyl-based derivatives RnAsH 3- n, with varying degrees ( n = 1-3) of hydrogen atom substitution. In this paper the growth properties, thermochemistry and toxicity of the various alkylarsine precursors are compared with arsine. Data are presented on the impact of the thermochemistry of these compounds on film electrical properties, and on the effects of precursor composition and purity on overall film quality. The suitability of alternative As-precursors for device applications is demonstrated, and selection criteria are presented for the most effective alkylarsine compound for a particular CVD growth process.

  11. Biochemical Removal of HAP Precursors from Coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, Gregory J

    1997-05-12

    Column biooxidation tests with Kentucky coal confirmed results of earlier shake flask tests showing significant removal from the coal of arsenic, selenium, cobalt, manganese, nickel and cadmium. Rates of pyrite biooxidation in Kentucky coal were only slightly more than half the rates found previously for Indiana and Pittsburgh coals. Removal of pyrite from Pittsburgh coal by ferric ion oxidation slows markedly as ferrous ions accumulate in solution, requiring maintenance of high redox potentials in processes designed for removal of pyrite and hazardous air pollutant (HAP) precursors by circulation of ferric solutions through coal. The pyrite oxidation rates obtained in these tests were used by Unifield Engineering to support the conceptual designs for alternative pyrite and HAP precursor bioleaching processes for the phase 2 pilot plant. Thermophilic microorganisms were tested to determine if mercury could be mobilized from coal under elevated growth temperatures. There was no evidence for mercury removal from coal under these conditions. However, the activity of the organisms may have liberated mercury physically. It is also possible that the organisms dissolved mercury and it readsorbed to the clay preferentially. Both of these possibilities are undergoing further testing. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's (INEEL) slurry column reactor was operated and several batches of feed coal, product coal, waste solids and leach solutions were submitted to LBL for HAP precursor analysis. Results to date indicate significant removal of mercury, arsenic and other HAP precursors in the combined physical-biological process.

  12. Superconductivity in Pb inverse opal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliev, Ali E.; Lee, Sergey B.; Zakhidov, Anvar A.; Baughman, Ray H.

    2007-01-01

    Type-II superconducting behavior was observed in highly periodic three-dimensional lead inverse opal prepared by infiltration of melted Pb in blue (D = 160 nm), green (D = 220 nm) and red (D = 300 nm) opals and followed by the extraction of the SiO 2 spheres by chemical etching. The onset of a broad phase transition (ΔT = 0.3 K) was shifted from T c = 7.196 K for bulk Pb to T c = 7.325 K. The upper critical field H c2 (3150 Oe) measured from high-field hysteresis loops exceeds the critical field for bulk lead (803 Oe) fourfold. Two well resolved peaks observed in the hysteresis loops were ascribed to flux penetration into the cylindrical void space that can be found in inverse opal structure and into the periodic structure of Pb nanoparticles. The red inverse opal shows pronounced oscillations of magnetic moment in the mixed state at low temperatures, T 0.9T c has been observed for all of the samples studied. The magnetic field periodicity of resistivity modulation is in good agreement with the lattice parameter of the inverse opal structure. We attribute the failure to observe pronounced modulation in magneto-resistive measurement to difficulties in the precision orientation of the sample along the magnetic field

  13. Wave-equation dispersion inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jing

    2016-12-08

    We present the theory for wave-equation inversion of dispersion curves, where the misfit function is the sum of the squared differences between the wavenumbers along the predicted and observed dispersion curves. The dispersion curves are obtained from Rayleigh waves recorded by vertical-component geophones. Similar to wave-equation traveltime tomography, the complicated surface wave arrivals in traces are skeletonized as simpler data, namely the picked dispersion curves in the phase-velocity and frequency domains. Solutions to the elastic wave equation and an iterative optimization method are then used to invert these curves for 2-D or 3-D S-wave velocity models. This procedure, denoted as wave-equation dispersion inversion (WD), does not require the assumption of a layered model and is significantly less prone to the cycle-skipping problems of full waveform inversion. The synthetic and field data examples demonstrate that WD can approximately reconstruct the S-wave velocity distributions in laterally heterogeneous media if the dispersion curves can be identified and picked. The WD method is easily extended to anisotropic data and the inversion of dispersion curves associated with Love waves.

  14. Precursor Mediated Synthesis of Nanostructured Silicas: From Precursor-Surfactant Ion Pairs to Structured Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Hesemann

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of nanostructured anionic-surfactant-templated mesoporous silica (AMS recently appeared as a new strategy for the formation of nanostructured silica based materials. This method is based on the use of anionic surfactants together with a co-structure-directing agent (CSDA, mostly a silylated ammonium precursor. The presence of this CSDA is necessary in order to create ionic interactions between template and silica forming phases and to ensure sufficient affinity between the two phases. This synthetic strategy was for the first time applied in view of the synthesis of surface functionalized silica bearing ammonium groups and was then extended on the formation of materials functionalized with anionic carboxylate and bifunctional amine-carboxylate groups. In the field of silica hybrid materials, the “anionic templating” strategy has recently been applied for the synthesis of silica hybrid materials from cationic precursors. Starting from di- or oligosilylated imidazolium and ammonium precursors, only template directed hydrolysis-polycondensation reactions involving complementary anionic surfactants allowed accessing structured ionosilica hybrid materials. The mechanistic particularity of this approach resides in the formation of precursor-surfactant ion pairs in the hydrolysis-polycondensation mixture. This review gives a systematic overview over the various types of materials accessed from this cooperative ionic templating approach and highlights the high potential of this original strategy for the formation of nanostructured silica based materials which appears as a complementary strategy to conventional soft templating approaches.

  15. Analysis of RAE-1 inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedland, D. A.; Degonia, P. K.

    1974-01-01

    The RAE-1 spacecraft inversion performed October 31, 1972 is described based upon the in-orbit dynamical data in conjunction with results obtained from previously developed computer simulation models. The computer simulations used are predictive of the satellite dynamics, including boom flexing, and are applicable during boom deployment and retraction, inter-phase coast periods, and post-deployment operations. Attitude data, as well as boom tip data, were analyzed in order to obtain a detailed description of the dynamical behavior of the spacecraft during and after the inversion. Runs were made using the computer model and the results were analyzed and compared with the real time data. Close agreement between the actual recorded spacecraft attitude and the computer simulation results was obtained.

  16. Determination of pore size distributions in capillary-channeled polymer fiber stationary phases by inverse size-exclusion chromatography and implications for fast protein separations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengxin; Marcus, R Kenneth

    2014-07-18

    Capillary-channeled polymer (C-CP) fibers have been utilized as liquid chromatography stationary phases, primarily for biomacromolecule separations on the analytical and preparative scales. The collinear packing of the eight-channeled C-CP fibers provides for very efficient flow, allowing operation at high linear velocity (u>100mm s(-1)) and low backpressure (chromatography (iSEC) has been employed to determine the pore size distribution (PSD) within C-CP fibers. A diversity of test species (from metal ions to large proteins) was used as probes under non-retaining conditions to obtain a response curve reflecting the apparent partition coefficient (Kd) versus hydrodynamic radii (rm). A mean pore radius (rp) of 4.2nm with standard deviation (sp) of ±1.1nm was calculated by fitting the Kd versus rm data to model equations with a Gaussian pore size distribution, and a pore radius of 4.0±0.1nm was calculated based on a log-normal distribution. The derived mean pore radius is much smaller than traditional support materials, with the standard deviation showing a relatively uniform pore distribution. van Deemter plots were analyzed to provide practical confirmation of the structural implications. Large molecules (e.g., proteins) that are fully excluded from pores have no significant C-terms in the van Deemter plots whereas small molecules that can access the pore volumes display appreciable C-terms, as expected. Fitting of retention data to the Knox equation suggests that the columns operate with a characteristic particle diameter (dp) of ∼53μm. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Inverse Kinematics using Quaternions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Knud; Erleben, Kenny; Engell-Nørregård, Morten

    In this project I describe the status of inverse kinematics research, with the focus firmly on the methods that solve the core problem. An overview of the different methods are presented Three common methods used in inverse kinematics computation have been chosen as subject for closer inspection....

  18. Inverse logarithmic potential problem

    CERN Document Server

    Cherednichenko, V G

    1996-01-01

    The Inverse and Ill-Posed Problems Series is a series of monographs publishing postgraduate level information on inverse and ill-posed problems for an international readership of professional scientists and researchers. The series aims to publish works which involve both theory and applications in, e.g., physics, medicine, geophysics, acoustics, electrodynamics, tomography, and ecology.

  19. Stochastic Gabor reflectivity and acoustic impedance inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariri Naghadeh, Diako; Morley, Christopher Keith; Ferguson, Angus John

    2018-02-01

    To delineate subsurface lithology to estimate petrophysical properties of a reservoir, it is possible to use acoustic impedance (AI) which is the result of seismic inversion. To change amplitude to AI, removal of wavelet effects from the seismic signal in order to get a reflection series, and subsequently transforming those reflections to AI, is vital. To carry out seismic inversion correctly it is important to not assume that the seismic signal is stationary. However, all stationary deconvolution methods are designed following that assumption. To increase temporal resolution and interpretation ability, amplitude compensation and phase correction are inevitable. Those are pitfalls of stationary reflectivity inversion. Although stationary reflectivity inversion methods are trying to estimate reflectivity series, because of incorrect assumptions their estimations will not be correct, but may be useful. Trying to convert those reflection series to AI, also merging with the low frequency initial model, can help us. The aim of this study was to apply non-stationary deconvolution to eliminate time variant wavelet effects from the signal and to convert the estimated reflection series to the absolute AI by getting bias from well logs. To carry out this aim, stochastic Gabor inversion in the time domain was used. The Gabor transform derived the signal’s time–frequency analysis and estimated wavelet properties from different windows. Dealing with different time windows gave an ability to create a time-variant kernel matrix, which was used to remove matrix effects from seismic data. The result was a reflection series that does not follow the stationary assumption. The subsequent step was to convert those reflections to AI using well information. Synthetic and real data sets were used to show the ability of the introduced method. The results highlight that the time cost to get seismic inversion is negligible related to general Gabor inversion in the frequency domain. Also

  20. Phase-inversion tape-casting preparation and significant performance enhancement of Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95- La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3-δ dual-phase asymmetric membrane for oxygen separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Hua; Cheng, Shiyang; Gao, Jianfeng

    2014-01-01

    The dual-phase Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95–La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3−δ asymmetric membrane was prepared via a phase-inversion tape-casting method. The membrane consisted of a thicker porous support layer and a thinner dense layer. When the dense side of the membrane was coated with a La0.6Sr0.4CoO3−δ catalytic...... activation layer, the oxygen permeation flux was markedly increased by a factor of 4.1–5.6, reaching 0.45 mL cm−2 min−1 at 900 °C. The flux increase can be attributed to enhanced surface oxygen exhange kinetics....

  1. Non-monotonic growth rates of sawtooth precursors evidenced with a new method on ASDEX Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezinet, D.; Igochine, V.; Weiland, M.; Yu, Q.; Gude, A.; Meshcheriakov, D.; Sertoli, M.; the Asdex Upgrade Team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes a new method to derive, from soft x-ray (SXR) tomography, robust estimates of the core displacement, growth rate and frequency of a 1/1 sawtooth crash precursor. The method is valid for very peaked SXR profiles and is robust against both the inversion algorithm and the presence of tungsten in a rotating plasma. Three typical ASDEX Upgrade crashes are then analysed. In all cases a postcursor is observed, suggesting incomplete reconnection. Despite different dynamics, in all three cases the growth rate of the core displacement shows similar features. First, it is not constant, supporting the idea of non-linear growth. Second, it can be divided into clearly identified phases with quasi-constant growth rates, suggesting sudden change of growth regime rather than smooth transitions. Third, its evolution is non-monotonic, with phases of accelerated growth followed by damped phases. This damping is interpreted for two cases respectively as an effect of fast ions and of mode coupling, based on the result of a MHD simulation. The mode frequency is observed in all cases to be closely related to the plasma bulk rotation profile, with little or no visible effect of the electron diamagnetic drift frequency. The onset criterion could not be clearly identified and it is shown that the role of the pressure gradient is not as expected from a naive extrapolation of the linear stability theory.

  2. Aactor GT - Development of an inverse gas-turbine that uses renewable energy sources and industrial waste heat - Phase 2; Aactor GT - Entwicklung einer Inversen Gasturbine 'Aactor' zur Nutzung erneuerbarer Energie und industrieller Abwaerme. Phase 2 - Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, M.

    2009-09-15

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results of the second phase of the development of a small-scale gas turbine that can use lean gas. The aim of this project phase - the design of a project development unit (PDU) for a micro-turbine with a nominal grid feeding power of 2.4 kWe is discussed. Parallel to this work, peripheral components such as burner and recovery device shall also be designed, produced and tested in the laboratories of the Swiss Center for Appropriate Technology and Social Ecology. The burner is specially designed for the combustion of lean gases. The goals of the following project phase, including the production and field-testing of the unit are discussed. On the basis of this PDU, a prototype lean gas micro-turbine with 9 kWe electrical generation power is to be derived. Project goals, work done and results obtained are reviewed, as is further work to be done.

  3. Effect of sonochemical synthesized TiO2 nanoparticles and coagulation bath temperature on morphology, thermal stability and pure water flux of asymmetric cellulose acetate membranes prepared via phase inversion method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abedini Reza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, asymmetric pure CA and CA/ TiO2 composite membranes were prepared via phase inversion by dispersing TiO2 nanopaticles in the CA casting solutions induced by immersion precipitation in water coagulation bath. TiO2 nanoparticles, which were synthesized by the sonochemical method, were added into the casting solution with different concentrations. Effects of TiO2 nanoparticles concentration (0 wt. %, 5wt.%, 10wt.%, 15wt.%, 20wt.% and 25wt.% and coagulation bath temperature (CBT= 25°C, 50°C and 75°C on morphology, thermal stability and pure water flux (PWF of the prepared membranes were studied and discussed. Increasing TiO2 concentration in the casting solution film along with higher CBT resulted in increasing the membrane thickness, water content (WC, membrane porosity and pure water flux (PWF, also these changes facilitate macrovoids formation. Thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA shows that thermal stability of the composite membranes were improved by the addition of TiO2 nanopaticles. Also TGA results indicated that increasing CBT in each TiO2 concentration leads to the decreasing of decomposition temperature (Td of hybrid membranes.

  4. Gravity inversion code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhard, N.R.

    1979-01-01

    The gravity inversion code applies stabilized linear inverse theory to determine the topography of a subsurface density anomaly from Bouguer gravity data. The gravity inversion program consists of four source codes: SEARCH, TREND, INVERT, and AVERAGE. TREND and INVERT are used iteratively to converge on a solution. SEARCH forms the input gravity data files for Nevada Test Site data. AVERAGE performs a covariance analysis on the solution. This document describes the necessary input files and the proper operation of the code. 2 figures, 2 tables

  5. Inverse scattering with supersymmetric quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baye, Daniel; Sparenberg, Jean-Marc

    2004-01-01

    The application of supersymmetric quantum mechanics to the inverse scattering problem is reviewed. The main difference with standard treatments of the inverse problem lies in the simple and natural extension to potentials with singularities at the origin and with a Coulomb behaviour at infinity. The most general form of potentials which are phase-equivalent to a given potential is discussed. The use of singular potentials allows adding or removing states from the bound spectrum without contradicting the Levinson theorem. Physical applications of phase-equivalent potentials in nuclear reactions and in three-body systems are described. Derivation of a potential from the phase shift at fixed orbital momentum can also be performed with the supersymmetric inversion by using a Bargmann-type approximation of the scattering matrix or phase shift. A unique singular potential without bound states can be obtained from any phase shift. A limited number of bound states depending on the singularity can then be added. This inversion procedure is illustrated with nucleon-nucleon scattering

  6. Sharp spatially constrained inversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vignoli, Giulio G.; Fiandaca, Gianluca G.; Christiansen, Anders Vest C A.V.C.

    2013-01-01

    We present sharp reconstruction of multi-layer models using a spatially constrained inversion with minimum gradient support regularization. In particular, its application to airborne electromagnetic data is discussed. Airborne surveys produce extremely large datasets, traditionally inverted...... by using smoothly varying 1D models. Smoothness is a result of the regularization constraints applied to address the inversion ill-posedness. The standard Occam-type regularized multi-layer inversion produces results where boundaries between layers are smeared. The sharp regularization overcomes...... inversions are compared against classical smooth results and available boreholes. With the focusing approach, the obtained blocky results agree with the underlying geology and allow for easier interpretation by the end-user....

  7. Submucous Myoma Induces Uterine Inversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Li Chen

    2006-06-01

    Conclusion: Nonpuerperal inversion of the uterus is rarely encountered by gynecologists. Diagnosis of uterine inversion is often not easy and imaging studies might be helpful. Surgical treatment is the method of choice in nonpuerperal uterine inversion.

  8. Nanostructured manganese oxides as highly active water oxidation catalysts: a boost from manganese precursor chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Prashanth W; Indra, Arindam; Littlewood, Patrick; Schwarze, Michael; Göbel, Caren; Schomäcker, Reinhard; Driess, Matthias

    2014-08-01

    We present a facile synthesis of bioinspired manganese oxides for chemical and photocatalytic water oxidation, starting from a reliable and versatile manganese(II) oxalate single-source precursor (SSP) accessible through an inverse micellar molecular approach. Strikingly, thermal decomposition of the latter precursor in various environments (air, nitrogen, and vacuum) led to the three different mineral phases of bixbyite (Mn2 O3 ), hausmannite (Mn3 O4 ), and manganosite (MnO). Initial chemical water oxidation experiments using ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN) gave the maximum catalytic activity for Mn2 O3 and MnO whereas Mn3 O4 had a limited activity. The substantial increase in the catalytic activity of MnO in chemical water oxidation was demonstrated by the fact that a phase transformation occurs at the surface from nanocrystalline MnO into an amorphous MnOx (1oxidizing agent. Photocatalytic water oxidation in the presence of [Ru(bpy)3 ](2+) (bpy=2,2'-bipyridine) as a sensitizer and peroxodisulfate as an electron acceptor was carried out for all three manganese oxides including the newly formed amorphous MnOx . Both Mn2 O3 and the amorphous MnOx exhibit tremendous enhancement in oxygen evolution during photocatalysis and are much higher in comparison to so far known bioinspired manganese oxides and calcium-manganese oxides. Also, for the first time, a new approach for the representation of activities of water oxidation catalysts has been proposed by determining the amount of accessible manganese centers. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP) Precursor Material Calcine Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cozzi, A.D.

    1999-01-01

    As a result of the end of the Cold War, approximately 50 metric tons of plutonium are no longer needed and have been identified for disposition. A ceramic waste form is the chosen option for immobilization of the excess plutonium. The plutonium ceramic form then will be encased in high-level waste glass using can-in-canister technology for final disposition. The precursor materials are the non-radioactive components that are added to the plutonium feed stream to form the desired phases in the immobilization product. The precursor materials are blended and calcined prior to being mixed with the plutonium feed stream. The purpose of the calcine step is to remove any physical or chemical water retained in the precursors and convert any hydroxides or carbonates to the oxides. Initially, a temperature of 750 degrees C for a period of one hour was chosen for the calcining of the precursors. In this effort, several different calcine temperatures were investigated to evaluate the effect on initial phase formation (in the calcined precursors), thermal expansion of the pressed pellets during heating, and mineralogy and porosity of the final product

  10. Phase structure and luminescence properties of Eu3+-doped TiO2 nanocrystals synthesized by Ar/O2 radio frequency thermal plasma oxidation of liquid precursor mists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ji-Guang; Wang, Xiaohui; Watanabe, Kenji; Ishigaki, Takamasa

    2006-01-26

    Eu3+-doped TiO2 luminescent nanocrystals have been synthesized in this work via Ar/O2 thermal plasma oxidizing mists of liquid precursors containing titanium tetra-n-butoxide and europium(III) nitrate, with varied O2 input in the plasma sheath (10-90 L/min) and Eu3+ addition in the precursor solution (Eu/(Ti + Eu) = 0-5 atom%). The resultant nanopowders are mixtures of the anatase (30-36 nm) and rutile (64-83 nm) polymorphs in the studied range, but the rutile fraction increases steadily at a higher Eu3+ addition, as revealed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy, because of the creation of oxygen vacancies in the TiO2 gas clusters by substitutional Eu3+ doping. The amount of Eu3+ that can be doped into a TiO2 lattice was limited up to 0.5 atom%, above which Eu2Ti2O7 pyrochlore was formed in the final products. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) observation indicates that the particles are dense and have sizes ranging from several nanometers up to 180 nm. Efficient nonradiative energy transfer from the TiO2 host to Eu3+ ions, which was seldom reported in the wet-chemically derived nanoparticles or thin films of the current system, was confirmed by combined studies of excitation, UV-vis (ultraviolet-visible), and PL (photoluminescence) spectroscopy. As a consequence of this, bright red emissions were observed from the plasma-generated nanopowders either by exciting the TiO2 host with UV light shorter than 405 nm or by directly exciting Eu3+ at a wavelength beyond the absorption edge (405 nm) of TiO2.

  11. Fast nonlinear susceptibility inversion with variational regularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milovic, Carlos; Bilgic, Berkin; Zhao, Bo; Acosta-Cabronero, Julio; Tejos, Cristian

    2018-01-10

    Quantitative susceptibility mapping can be performed through the minimization of a function consisting of data fidelity and regularization terms. For data consistency, a Gaussian-phase noise distribution is often assumed, which breaks down when the signal-to-noise ratio is low. A previously proposed alternative is to use a nonlinear data fidelity term, which reduces streaking artifacts, mitigates noise amplification, and results in more accurate susceptibility estimates. We hereby present a novel algorithm that solves the nonlinear functional while achieving computation speeds comparable to those for a linear formulation. We developed a nonlinear quantitative susceptibility mapping algorithm (fast nonlinear susceptibility inversion) based on the variable splitting and alternating direction method of multipliers, in which the problem is split into simpler subproblems with closed-form solutions and a decoupled nonlinear inversion hereby solved with a Newton-Raphson iterative procedure. Fast nonlinear susceptibility inversion performance was assessed using numerical phantom and in vivo experiments, and was compared against the nonlinear morphology-enabled dipole inversion method. Fast nonlinear susceptibility inversion achieves similar accuracy to nonlinear morphology-enabled dipole inversion but with significantly improved computational efficiency. The proposed method enables accurate reconstructions in a fraction of the time required by state-of-the-art quantitative susceptibility mapping methods. Magn Reson Med, 2018. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  12. Inverse scale space decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Marie Foged; Benning, Martin; Schönlieb, Carola-Bibiane

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the inverse scale space flow as a decomposition method for decomposing data into generalised singular vectors. We show that the inverse scale space flow, based on convex and even and positively one-homogeneous regularisation functionals, can decompose data represented...... by the application of a forward operator to a linear combination of generalised singular vectors into its individual singular vectors. We verify that for this decomposition to hold true, two additional conditions on the singular vectors are sufficient: orthogonality in the data space and inclusion of partial sums...... of the subgradients of the singular vectors in the subdifferential of the regularisation functional at zero. We also address the converse question of when the inverse scale space flow returns a generalised singular vector given that the initial data is arbitrary (and therefore not necessarily in the range...

  13. Preparation of superconductor precursor powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Raghunath; Blaugher, Richard D.

    1995-01-01

    A process for the preparation of a precursor metallic powder composition for use in the subsequent formation of a superconductor. The process comprises the steps of providing an electrodeposition bath comprising an electrolyte medium and a cathode substrate electrode, and providing to the bath one or more soluble salts of one or more respective metals, such as nitrate salts of thallium, barium, calcium, and copper, which are capable of exhibiting superconductor properties upon subsequent appropriate treatment. The bath is continually energized to cause the metallic particles formed at the electrode to drop as a powder from the electrode into the bath, and this powder, which is a precursor powder for superconductor production, is recovered from the bath for subsequent treatment. The process permits direct inclusion of thallium in the preparation of the precursor powder, and yields an amorphous product mixed on an atomic scale to thereby impart inherent high reactivity. Superconductors which can be formed from the precursor powder include pellet and powder-in-tube products.

  14. Trending analysis of precursor events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Norio

    1998-01-01

    The Accident Sequence Precursor (ASP) Program of United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (U.S.NRC) identifies and categorizes operational events at nuclear power plants in terms of the potential for core damage. The ASP analysis has been performed on yearly basis and the results have been published in the annual reports. This paper describes the trends in initiating events and dominant sequences for 459 precursors identified in the ASP Program during the 1969-94 period and also discusses a comparison with dominant sequences predicted in the past Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) studies. These trends were examined for three time periods, 1969-81, 1984-87 and 1988-94. Although the different models had been used in the ASP analyses for these three periods, the distribution of precursors by dominant sequences show similar trends to each other. For example, the sequences involving loss of both main and auxiliary feedwater were identified in many PWR events and those involving loss of both high and low coolant injection were found in many BWR events. Also, it was found that these dominant sequences were comparable to those determined to be dominant in the predictions by the past PRAs. As well, a list of the 459 precursors identified are provided in Appendix, indicating initiating event types, unavailable systems, dominant sequences, conditional core damage probabilities, and so on. (author)

  15. Synthesis of labelled ecdysone precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haag, T.; Hetru, C.; Nakatani, Y.; Luu, B.; Meister, M.; Pichat, L.; Audinot, M.

    1985-01-01

    High specific activity tritiated 3β,14α-dihydroxy-5β-cholest-7-en-6-one, has been prepared using a precursor which permits rapid and easy labelling. This compound is converted to ecdysone under in vitro conditions by insect prothoracic glands, a well known site of ecdysone biosynthesis. (author)

  16. Inversion of GPS meteorology data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hocke

    Full Text Available The GPS meteorology (GPS/MET experiment, led by the Universities Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR, consists of a GPS receiver aboard a low earth orbit (LEO satellite which was launched on 3 April 1995. During a radio occultation the LEO satellite rises or sets relative to one of the 24 GPS satellites at the Earth's horizon. Thereby the atmospheric layers are successively sounded by radio waves which propagate from the GPS satellite to the LEO satellite. From the observed phase path increases, which are due to refraction of the radio waves by the ionosphere and the neutral atmosphere, the atmospheric parameter refractivity, density, pressure and temperature are calculated with high accuracy and resolution (0.5–1.5 km. In the present study, practical aspects of the GPS/MET data analysis are discussed. The retrieval is based on the Abelian integral inversion of the atmospheric bending angle profile into the refractivity index profile. The problem of the upper boundary condition of the Abelian integral is described by examples. The statistical optimization approach which is applied to the data above 40 km and the use of topside bending angle profiles from model atmospheres stabilize the inversion. The retrieved temperature profiles are compared with corresponding profiles which have already been calculated by scientists of UCAR and Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL, using Abelian integral inversion too. The comparison shows that in some cases large differences occur (5 K and more. This is probably due to different treatment of the upper boundary condition, data runaways and noise. Several temperature profiles with wavelike structures at tropospheric and stratospheric heights are shown. While the periodic structures at upper stratospheric heights could be caused by residual errors of the ionospheric correction method, the periodic temperature fluctuations at heights below 30 km are most likely caused by atmospheric waves (vertically

  17. Molecular seismology: an inverse problem in nanobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinow, Peter; Boczko, Erik M

    2007-05-07

    The density profile of an elastic fiber like DNA will change in space and time as ligands associate with it. This observation affords a new direction in single molecule studies provided that density profiles can be measured in space and time. In fact, this is precisely the objective of seismology, where the mathematics of inverse problems have been employed with success. We argue that inverse problems in elastic media can be directly applied to biophysical problems of fiber-ligand association, and demonstrate that robust algorithms exist to perform density reconstruction in the condensed phase.

  18. Récuperation d'horloge d'un signal OTDM à 640 Gbit/s transmis sur 50 km par boucle à verrouillage de phase opto-électronique utilisant un dispositif en Niobate de Lithium à inversion de domaines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomez, F.; Ware, Agis C.; Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo

    2008-01-01

    L'extraction d'horloge d'un signal OTDM à 640 Gbit/s, transmis sur 50 km, à partir d'une boucle à verrouillage de phase utilisant l'effet non-linéaire de mélange à trois ondes dans un composant de niobate de lithium à inversion de domaines a été mise en oeuvre.......L'extraction d'horloge d'un signal OTDM à 640 Gbit/s, transmis sur 50 km, à partir d'une boucle à verrouillage de phase utilisant l'effet non-linéaire de mélange à trois ondes dans un composant de niobate de lithium à inversion de domaines a été mise en oeuvre....

  19. Inorganic chemistry in a nanoreactor: Au/TiO2 nanocomposites by photolysis of a single-source precursor in miniemulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heutz, Niels A; Dolcet, Paolo; Birkner, Alexander; Casarin, Maurizio; Merz, Klaus; Gialanella, Stefano; Gross, Silvia

    2013-11-07

    An original synthetic route, based on the combination of a single-source precursor, UV-photodegradation and inverse w/o miniemulsion, is used to prepare Au nanoparticles (NPs) dispersed on titania. The source of the nanocomposite materials is the photolabile single-source precursor AuCl4(NH4)7[Ti2(O2)2(cit)(Hcit)]2·12H2O, which is suspended in a w/o miniemulsion consisting of different surfactant/hydrocarbon/water formulations (surfactant: sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) or Triton X-100) and subsequently irradiated with a UV lamp to promote its decomposition in the confined space of the droplets. Gold NPs that form at room temperature are found to be crystalline, while titanium dioxide occurs as an amorphous phase. Moreover, the average crystallite size of gold NPs ranges between 20 and 24 nm when using SDS and between 26 and 40 nm in the case of Triton X-100, after 4 and 8 hours of irradiation time, respectively. Scanning and transmission electron microscopies (SEM and TEM) are used to get information about the nanocomposite morphology and nanostructure, revealing that gold NPs are uniformly distributed on the titanium oxide surface. Furthermore, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) outcomes, besides confirming the formation of both metallic gold and titania, provide information about the high dispersion of Au NPs on the TiO2 surface. In fact, the Au : Ti atomic ratio is found to be 0.45-1.5 (1 : 2-1.5 : 1), which is higher than the value determined by starting from the precursor stoichiometry (0.25). Catalytic testing in the oxidation of 2-propanol shows that decomposition of the precursor in a miniemulsion provides a nanocomposite with enhanced activity compared to the decomposition in the aqueous phase.

  20. Inverse design of multicomponent assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñeros, William D.; Lindquist, Beth A.; Jadrich, Ryan B.; Truskett, Thomas M.

    2018-03-01

    Inverse design can be a useful strategy for discovering interactions that drive particles to spontaneously self-assemble into a desired structure. Here, we extend an inverse design methodology—relative entropy optimization—to determine isotropic interactions that promote assembly of targeted multicomponent phases, and we apply this extension to design interactions for a variety of binary crystals ranging from compact triangular and square architectures to highly open structures with dodecagonal and octadecagonal motifs. We compare the resulting optimized (self- and cross) interactions for the binary assemblies to those obtained from optimization of analogous single-component systems. This comparison reveals that self-interactions act as a "primer" to position particles at approximately correct coordination shell distances, while cross interactions act as the "binder" that refines and locks the system into the desired configuration. For simpler binary targets, it is possible to successfully design self-assembling systems while restricting one of these interaction types to be a hard-core-like potential. However, optimization of both self- and cross interaction types appears necessary to design for assembly of more complex or open structures.

  1. Inversion assuming weak scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xenaki, Angeliki; Gerstoft, Peter; Mosegaard, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    due to the complex nature of the field. A method based on linear inversion is employed to infer information about the statistical properties of the scattering field from the obtained cross-spectral matrix. A synthetic example based on an active high-frequency sonar demonstrates that the proposed...

  2. Locative Inversion in English

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekhuis, H.

    2005-01-01

    This article aims at reformulating in more current terms Hoekstra and Mulder’s (1990) analysis of the Locative Inversion (LI) construction. The new proposal is crucially based on the assumption that Small Clause (SC) predicates agree with their external argument in phi-features, which may be

  3. Bayesian seismic AVO inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buland, Arild

    2002-07-01

    A new linearized AVO inversion technique is developed in a Bayesian framework. The objective is to obtain posterior distributions for P-wave velocity, S-wave velocity and density. Distributions for other elastic parameters can also be assessed, for example acoustic impedance, shear impedance and P-wave to S-wave velocity ratio. The inversion algorithm is based on the convolutional model and a linearized weak contrast approximation of the Zoeppritz equation. The solution is represented by a Gaussian posterior distribution with explicit expressions for the posterior expectation and covariance, hence exact prediction intervals for the inverted parameters can be computed under the specified model. The explicit analytical form of the posterior distribution provides a computationally fast inversion method. Tests on synthetic data show that all inverted parameters were almost perfectly retrieved when the noise approached zero. With realistic noise levels, acoustic impedance was the best determined parameter, while the inversion provided practically no information about the density. The inversion algorithm has also been tested on a real 3-D dataset from the Sleipner Field. The results show good agreement with well logs but the uncertainty is high. The stochastic model includes uncertainties of both the elastic parameters, the wavelet and the seismic and well log data. The posterior distribution is explored by Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation using the Gibbs sampler algorithm. The inversion algorithm has been tested on a seismic line from the Heidrun Field with two wells located on the line. The uncertainty of the estimated wavelet is low. In the Heidrun examples the effect of including uncertainty of the wavelet and the noise level was marginal with respect to the AVO inversion results. We have developed a 3-D linearized AVO inversion method with spatially coupled model parameters where the objective is to obtain posterior distributions for P-wave velocity, S

  4. Pseudo waveform inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Chang Soo; Park, Keun Pil [Korea Inst. of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Jung Hee; Hyun, Byung Koo; Shin, Sung Ryul [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    The seismic reflection exploration technique which is one of the geophysical methods for oil exploration became effectively to image the subsurface structure with rapid development of computer. However, the imagining of subsurface based on the conventional data processing is almost impossible to obtain the information on physical properties of the subsurface such as velocity and density. Since seismic data are implicitly function of velocities of subsurface, it is necessary to develop the inversion method that can delineate the velocity structure using seismic topography and waveform inversion. As a tool to perform seismic inversion, seismic forward modeling program using ray tracing should be developed. In this study, we have developed the algorithm that calculate the travel time of the complex geologic structure using shooting ray tracing by subdividing the geologic model into blocky structure having the constant velocity. With the travel time calculation, the partial derivatives of travel time can be calculated efficiently without difficulties. Since the current ray tracing technique has a limitation to calculate the travel times for extremely complex geologic model, our aim in the future is to develop the powerful ray tracer using the finite element technique. After applying the pseudo waveform inversion to the seismic data of Korea offshore, we can obtain the subsurface velocity model and use the result in bring up the quality of the seismic data processing. If conventional seismic data processing and seismic interpretation are linked with this inversion technique, the high quality of seismic data processing can be expected to image the structure of the subsurface. Future research area is to develop the powerful ray tracer of ray tracing which can calculate the travel times for the extremely complex geologic model. (author). 39 refs., 32 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Calculation of the inverse data space via sparse inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Saragiotis, Christos

    2011-01-01

    The inverse data space provides a natural separation of primaries and surface-related multiples, as the surface multiples map onto the area around the origin while the primaries map elsewhere. However, the calculation of the inverse data is far from trivial as theory requires infinite time and offset recording. Furthermore regularization issues arise during inversion. We perform the inversion by minimizing the least-squares norm of the misfit function by constraining the $ell_1$ norm of the solution, being the inverse data space. In this way a sparse inversion approach is obtained. We show results on field data with an application to surface multiple removal.

  6. Source-independent elastic waveform inversion using a logarithmic wavefield

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2012-01-01

    The logarithmic waveform inversion has been widely developed and applied to some synthetic and real data. In most logarithmic waveform inversion algorithms, the subsurface velocities are updated along with the source estimation. To avoid estimating the source wavelet in the logarithmic waveform inversion, we developed a source-independent logarithmic waveform inversion algorithm. In this inversion algorithm, we first normalize the wavefields with the reference wavefield to remove the source wavelet, and then take the logarithm of the normalized wavefields. Based on the properties of the logarithm, we define three types of misfit functions using the following methods: combination of amplitude and phase, amplitude-only, and phase-only. In the inversion, the gradient is computed using the back-propagation formula without directly calculating the Jacobian matrix. We apply our algorithm to noise-free and noise-added synthetic data generated for the modified version of elastic Marmousi2 model, and compare the results with those of the source-estimation logarithmic waveform inversion. For the noise-free data, the source-independent algorithms yield velocity models close to true velocity models. For random-noise data, the source-estimation logarithmic waveform inversion yields better results than the source-independent method, whereas for coherent-noise data, the results are reversed. Numerical results show that the source-independent and source-estimation logarithmic waveform inversion methods have their own merits for random- and coherent-noise data. © 2011.

  7. Precursor polymer compositions comprising polybenzimidazole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klaehn, John R.; Peterson, Eric S.; Orme, Christopher J.

    2015-07-14

    Stable, high performance polymer compositions including polybenzimidazole (PBI) and a melamine-formaldehyde polymer, such as methylated, poly(melamine-co-formaldehyde), for forming structures such as films, fibers and bulky structures. The polymer compositions may be formed by combining polybenzimidazole with the melamine-formaldehyde polymer to form a precursor. The polybenzimidazole may be reacted and/or intertwined with the melamine-formaldehyde polymer to form the polymer composition. For example, a stable, free-standing film having a thickness of, for example, between about 5 .mu.m and about 30 .mu.m may be formed from the polymer composition. Such films may be used as gas separation membranes and may be submerged into water for extended periods without crazing and cracking. The polymer composition may also be used as a coating on substrates, such as metal and ceramics, or may be used for spinning fibers. Precursors for forming such polymer compositions are also disclosed.

  8. Channelling versus inversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gale, A.S.; Surlyk, Finn; Anderskouv, Kresten

    2013-01-01

    Evidence from regional stratigraphical patterns in Santonian−Campanian chalk is used to infer the presence of a very broad channel system (5 km across) with a depth of at least 50 m, running NNW−SSE across the eastern Isle of Wight; only the western part of the channel wall and fill is exposed. W......−Campanian chalks in the eastern Isle of Wight, involving penecontemporaneous tectonic inversion of the underlying basement structure, are rejected....

  9. Intersections, ideals, and inversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasco, D.W.

    1998-01-01

    Techniques from computational algebra provide a framework for treating large classes of inverse problems. In particular, the discretization of many types of integral equations and of partial differential equations with undetermined coefficients lead to systems of polynomial equations. The structure of the solution set of such equations may be examined using algebraic techniques.. For example, the existence and dimensionality of the solution set may be determined. Furthermore, it is possible to bound the total number of solutions. The approach is illustrated by a numerical application to the inverse problem associated with the Helmholtz equation. The algebraic methods are used in the inversion of a set of transverse electric (TE) mode magnetotelluric data from Antarctica. The existence of solutions is demonstrated and the number of solutions is found to be finite, bounded from above at 50. The best fitting structure is dominantly one dimensional with a low crustal resistivity of about 2 ohm-m. Such a low value is compatible with studies suggesting lower surface wave velocities than found in typical stable cratons

  10. Intersections, ideals, and inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasco, D.W.

    1998-10-01

    Techniques from computational algebra provide a framework for treating large classes of inverse problems. In particular, the discretization of many types of integral equations and of partial differential equations with undetermined coefficients lead to systems of polynomial equations. The structure of the solution set of such equations may be examined using algebraic techniques.. For example, the existence and dimensionality of the solution set may be determined. Furthermore, it is possible to bound the total number of solutions. The approach is illustrated by a numerical application to the inverse problem associated with the Helmholtz equation. The algebraic methods are used in the inversion of a set of transverse electric (TE) mode magnetotelluric data from Antarctica. The existence of solutions is demonstrated and the number of solutions is found to be finite, bounded from above at 50. The best fitting structure is dominantly onedimensional with a low crustal resistivity of about 2 ohm-m. Such a low value is compatible with studies suggesting lower surface wave velocities than found in typical stable cratons.

  11. Inverse transition radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauer, L.C.; Romea, R.D.; Kimura, W.D.

    1997-01-01

    A new method for laser acceleration is proposed based upon the inverse process of transition radiation. The laser beam intersects an electron-beam traveling between two thin foils. The principle of this acceleration method is explored in terms of its classical and quantum bases and its inverse process. A closely related concept based on the inverse of diffraction radiation is also presented: this concept has the significant advantage that apertures are used to allow free passage of the electron beam. These concepts can produce net acceleration because they do not satisfy the conditions in which the Lawson-Woodward theorem applies (no net acceleration in an unbounded vacuum). Finally, practical aspects such as damage limits at optics are employed to find an optimized set of parameters. For reasonable assumptions an acceleration gradient of 200 MeV/m requiring a laser power of less than 1 GW is projected. An interesting approach to multi-staging the acceleration sections is also presented. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  12. Limits to Nonlinear Inversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosegaard, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    For non-linear inverse problems, the mathematical structure of the mapping from model parameters to data is usually unknown or partly unknown. Absence of information about the mathematical structure of this function prevents us from presenting an analytical solution, so our solution depends on our...... ability to produce efficient search algorithms. Such algorithms may be completely problem-independent (which is the case for the so-called 'meta-heuristics' or 'blind-search' algorithms), or they may be designed with the structure of the concrete problem in mind. We show that pure meta...

  13. Developing a Method for Resolving NOx Emission Inventory Biases Using Discrete Kalman Filter Inversion, Direct Sensitivities, and Satellite-Based Columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    An inverse method was developed to integrate satellite observations of atmospheric pollutant column concentrations and direct sensitivities predicted by a regional air quality model in order to discern biases in the emissions of the pollutant precursors.

  14. MHD precursor to disruption in Iran tokamak 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alireza, Hojabri; Fatemeh, Hajakbari; Alireza, Hojabri; Mahmmod, Ghoranneviss; Fatemeh, Hajakbari

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the major disruptions occurring in low-q(a) discharges in Iran Tokamak 1, and to compare the theoretical and experimental results for the rate of island growth. The study of precursor phase of disruption can be predicted and avoided using suitable control systems. In this paper are described the stability analysis and the observed growth rates indicating that the rotating modes are tearing modes. (authors)

  15. Nuclear critical opalescence, a precursor to pion condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ericson, M.; Delorme, J.

    1978-03-01

    It is shown that pion condensation in nuclei, a long range phenomenon, has a precursor in the disordered phase, the local ordering of spins which becomes of infinite range at the critical point. A new physical effect arising from this short range order is predicted, namely the enhancement of the static nuclear pion field near the critical momentum. This phenomenon is strongly reminiscent of the critical opalescence observed in the scattering of neutrons by antiferromagnetic subtances

  16. Boron nitride ceramics from molecular precursors: synthesis, properties and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Samuel; Salameh, Chrystelle; Miele, Philippe

    2016-01-21

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) attracts considerable interest because its structure is similar to that of carbon graphite while it displays different properties which are of interest for environmental and green technologies. The polar nature of the B-N bond in sp(2)-bonded BN makes it a wide band gap insulator with different chemistry on its surface and particular physical and chemical properties such as a high thermal conductivity, a high temperature stability, a high resistance to corrosion and oxidation and a strong UV emission. It is chemically inert and nontoxic and has good environmental compatibility. h-BN also has enhanced physisorption properties due to the dipolar fields near its surface. Such properties are closely dependent on the processing method. Bottom-up approaches consist of transforming molecular precursors into non-oxide ceramics with retention of the structural units inherent to the precursor molecule. The purpose of the present review is to give an up-to-date overview on the most recent achievements in the preparation of h-BN from borazine-based molecular single-source precursors including borazine and 2,4,6-trichloroborazine through both vapor phase syntheses and methods in the liquid/solid state involving polymeric intermediates, called the Polymer-Derived Ceramics (PDCs) route. In particular, the effect of the chemistry, composition and architecture of the borazine-based precursors and derived polymers on the shaping ability as well as the properties of h-BN is particularly highlighted.

  17. Premarital precursors of marital infidelity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Elizabeth S; Rhoades, Galena Kline; Stanley, Scott M; Markman, Howard J; Williams, Tamara; Melton, Jessica; Clements, Mari L

    2008-06-01

    Premarital precursors of infidelity were evaluated in a sample of 72 couples (N = 144) who were taking part in a longitudinal study of marriage. Premarital self-report and observational data were compared for couples who experienced infidelity and those who did not experience infidelity in the first years of marriage. Couples in which the male engaged in marital infidelity were characterized, premaritally, by significantly lower male sexual satisfaction, lower male positive communication, and higher female invalidation, whereas couples in which the female went on to engage in infidelity were characterized, premaritally, by significantly lower levels of female positive communication, higher levels of male and female negative communication, and higher levels of male and female invalidation. Implications of the findings for future research on the prediction and prevention of infidelity are discussed.

  18. Stabilization of Inverse Miniemulsions by Silyl-Protected Homopolymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Wald

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Inverse (water-in-oil miniemulsions are an important method to encapsulate hydrophilic payloads such as oligonucleotides or peptides. However, the stabilization of inverse miniemulsions usually requires block copolymers that are difficult to synthesize and/or cannot be easily removed after transfer from a hydrophobic continuous phase to an aqueous continuous phase. We describe here a new strategy for the synthesis of a surfactant for inverse miniemulsions by radical addition–fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT polymerization, which consists in a homopolymer with triisopropylsilyl protecting groups. The protecting groups ensure the efficient stabilization of the inverse (water-in-oil, w/o miniemulsions. Nanocapsules can be formed and the protecting group can be subsequently cleaved for the re-dispersion of nanocapsules in an aqueous medium with a minimal amount of additional surfactant.

  19. Inverse plasma equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, H.R.; Dory, R.A.; Holmes, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    We illustrate in some detail a 2D inverse-equilibrium solver that was constructed to analyze tokamak configurations and stellarators (the latter in the context of the average method). To ensure that the method is suitable not only to determine equilibria, but also to provide appropriately represented data for existing stability codes, it is important to be able to control the Jacobian, tilde J is identical to delta(R,Z)/delta(rho, theta). The form chosen is tilde J = J 0 (rho)R/sup l/rho where rho is a flux surface label, and l is an integer. The initial implementation is for a fixed conducting-wall boundary, but the technique can be extended to a free-boundary model

  20. Thin films by metal-organic precursor plasma spray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, Douglas L.; Sailer, Robert A.; Payne, Scott; Leach, James; Molz, Ronald J.

    2009-01-01

    While most plasma spray routes to coatings utilize solids as the precursor feedstock, metal-organic precursor plasma spray (MOPPS) is an area that the authors have investigated recently as a novel route to thin film materials. Very thin films are possible via MOPPS and the technology offers the possibility of forming graded structures by metering the liquid feed. The current work employs metal-organic compounds that are liquids at standard temperature-pressure conditions. In addition, these complexes contain chemical functionality that allows straightforward thermolytic transformation to targeted phases of interest. Toward that end, aluminum 3,5-heptanedionate (Al(hd) 3 ), triethylsilane (HSi(C 2 H 5 ) 3 or HSiEt 3 ), and titanium tetrakisdiethylamide (Ti(N(C 2 H 5 ) 2 ) 4 or Ti(NEt 2 ) 4 ) were employed as precursors to aluminum oxide, silicon carbide, and titanium nitride, respectively. In all instances, the liquids contain metal-heteroatom bonds envisioned to provide atomic concentrations of the appropriate reagents at the film growth surface, thus promoting phase formation (e.g., Si-C bond in triethylsilane, Ti-N bond in titanium amide, etc.). Films were deposited using a Sulzer Metco TriplexPro-200 plasma spray system under various experimental conditions using design of experiment principles. Film compositions were analyzed by glazing incidence x-ray diffraction and elemental determination by x-ray spectroscopy. MOPPS films from HSiEt 3 showed the formation of SiC phase but Al(hd) 3 -derived films were amorphous. The Ti(NEt 2 ) 4 precursor gave MOPPS films that appear to consist of nanosized splats of TiOCN with spheres of TiO 2 anatase. While all films in this study suffered from poor adhesion, it is anticipated that the use of heated substrates will aid in the formation of dense, adherent films.

  1. 1994 Accident sequence precursor program results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belles, R.J.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A.

    1996-01-01

    The Accident Sequence Precursor (ASP) Program involves the systematic review and evaluation of operational events that have occurred at light-water reactors to identify and categorize precursors to potential severe core damage accident sequences. The results of the ASP Program are published in an annual report. The most recent report, which contains the analyses of the precursors for 1994, is NUREG/CR-4674, Vols. 21 and 22, Precursors to Potential Severe Core Damage Accidents: 1994, A Status Report, published in December 1995. This article provides an overview of the ASP review and evaluation process and a summary of the results for 1994. 12 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  2. Holocaust inversion and contemporary antisemitism.

    OpenAIRE

    Klaff, Lesley D

    2014-01-01

    One of the cruellest aspects of the new antisemitism is its perverse use of the Holocaust as a stick to beat 'the Jews'. This article explains the phenomenon of 'Holocaust Inversion', which involves an 'inversion of reality' (the Israelis are cast as the 'new' Nazis and the Palestinians as the 'new' Jews) and an 'inversion of morality' (the Holocaust is presented as a moral lesson for, or even a moral indictment of, 'the Jews'). Holocaust inversion is a form of soft-core Holocaust denial, yet...

  3. Inverse feasibility problems of the inverse maximum flow problems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A linear time method to decide if any inverse maximum flow (denoted General Inverse Maximum Flow problems (IMFG)) problem has solution is deduced. If IMFG does not have solution, methods to transform IMFG into a feasible problem are presented. The methods consist of modifying as little as possible the restrictions to ...

  4. Inverse feasibility problems of the inverse maximum flow problems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    199–209. c Indian Academy of Sciences. Inverse feasibility problems of the inverse maximum flow problems. ADRIAN DEACONU. ∗ and ELEONOR CIUREA. Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Faculty of Mathematics and Informatics, Transilvania University of Brasov, Brasov, Iuliu Maniu st. 50,. Romania.

  5. Biodegradable mesoporous delivery system for biomineralization precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hong-Ye; Niu, Li-Na; Sun, Jin-Long; Huang, Xue-Qing; Pei, Dan-Dan; Huang, Cui; Tay, Franklin R

    2017-01-01

    Scaffold supplements such as nanoparticles, components of the extracellular matrix, or growth factors have been incorporated in conventional scaffold materials to produce smart scaffolds for tissue engineering of damaged hard tissues. Due to increasing concerns on the clinical side effects of using large doses of recombinant bone-morphogenetic protein-2 in bone surgery, it is desirable to develop an alternative nanoscale scaffold supplement that is not only osteoinductive, but is also multifunctional in that it can perform other significant bone regenerative roles apart from stimulation of osteogenic differentiation. Because both amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) and silica are osteoinductive, a biodegradable, nonfunctionalized, expanded-pore mesoporous silica nanoparticle carrier was developed for loading, storage, and sustained release of a novel, biosilicification-inspired, polyamine-stabilized liquid precursor phase of ACP for collagen biomineralization and for release of orthosilicic acid, both of which are conducive to bone growth. Positively charged poly(allylamine)-stabilized ACP (PAH-ACP) could be effectively loaded and released from nonfunctionalized expanded-pore mesoporous silica nanoparticles (pMSN). The PAH-ACP released from loaded pMSN still retained its ability to infiltrate and mineralize collagen fibrils. Complete degradation of pMSN occurred following unloading of their PAH-ACP cargo. Because PAH-ACP loaded pMSN possesses relatively low cytotoxicity to human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, these nanoparticles may be blended with any osteoconductive scaffold with macro- and microporosities as a versatile scaffold supplement to enhance bone regeneration.

  6. Precursor of pion condensation: The softening of the quasi-elastic peak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberico, W.M.; Ericson, M.; Molinari, A.

    1980-01-01

    The phase transition of pion condensation is heralded in the disordered phase by an increase in the life time of the fluctuations for the staggered magnetization. This precursor phenomenon entails, in ordinary nuclei, a showing down of the nuclear quasi-elastic response when observed with spin-sensitive probes. (orig.)

  7. PRECOMBUSTION REMOVAL OF HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANT PRECURSORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2000-10-09

    In response to growing environmental concerns reflected in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA), the United States Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored several research and development projects in late 1995 as part of an initiative entitled Advanced Environmental Control Technologies for Coal-Based Power Systems. The program provided cost-shared support for research and development projects that could accelerate the commercialization of affordable, high-efficiency, low-emission, coal-fueled electric generating technologies. Clean coal technologies developed under this program would serve as prototypes for later generations of technologies to be implemented in the industrial sector. In order to identify technologies with the greatest potential for commercial implementation, projects funded under Phase I of this program were subject to competitive review by DOE before being considered for continuation funding under Phase II. One of the primary topical areas identified under the DOE initiative relates to the development of improved technologies for reducing the emissions of air toxics. Previous studies have suggested that many of the potentially hazardous air pollutant precursors (HAPPs) occur as trace elements in the mineral matter of run-of-mine coals. As a result, these elements have the potential to be removed prior to combustion at the mine site by physical coal cleaning processes (i.e., coal preparation). Unfortunately, existing coal preparation plants are generally limited in their ability to remove HAPPs due to incomplete liberation of the mineral matter and high organic associations of some trace elements. In addition, existing physical coal cleaning plants are not specifically designed or optimized to ensure that high trace element rejections may be achieved.

  8. Inverse problem in hydrogeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, Jesús; Alcolea, Andrés; Medina, Agustín; Hidalgo, Juan; Slooten, Luit J.

    2005-03-01

    The state of the groundwater inverse problem is synthesized. Emphasis is placed on aquifer characterization, where modelers have to deal with conceptual model uncertainty (notably spatial and temporal variability), scale dependence, many types of unknown parameters (transmissivity, recharge, boundary conditions, etc.), nonlinearity, and often low sensitivity of state variables (typically heads and concentrations) to aquifer properties. Because of these difficulties, calibration cannot be separated from the modeling process, as it is sometimes done in other fields. Instead, it should be viewed as one step in the process of understanding aquifer behavior. In fact, it is shown that actual parameter estimation methods do not differ from each other in the essence, though they may differ in the computational details. It is argued that there is ample room for improvement in groundwater inversion: development of user-friendly codes, accommodation of variability through geostatistics, incorporation of geological information and different types of data (temperature, occurrence and concentration of isotopes, age, etc.), proper accounting of uncertainty, etc. Despite this, even with existing codes, automatic calibration facilitates enormously the task of modeling. Therefore, it is contended that its use should become standard practice. L'état du problème inverse des eaux souterraines est synthétisé. L'accent est placé sur la caractérisation de l'aquifère, où les modélisateurs doivent jouer avec l'incertitude des modèles conceptuels (notamment la variabilité spatiale et temporelle), les facteurs d'échelle, plusieurs inconnues sur différents paramètres (transmissivité, recharge, conditions aux limites, etc.), la non linéarité, et souvent la sensibilité de plusieurs variables d'état (charges hydrauliques, concentrations) des propriétés de l'aquifère. A cause de ces difficultés, le calibrage ne peut êtreséparé du processus de modélisation, comme c'est le

  9. Face inversion increases attractiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leder, Helmut; Goller, Juergen; Forster, Michael; Schlageter, Lena; Paul, Matthew A

    2017-07-01

    Assessing facial attractiveness is a ubiquitous, inherent, and hard-wired phenomenon in everyday interactions. As such, it has highly adapted to the default way that faces are typically processed: viewing faces in upright orientation. By inverting faces, we can disrupt this default mode, and study how facial attractiveness is assessed. Faces, rotated at 90 (tilting to either side) and 180°, were rated on attractiveness and distinctiveness scales. For both orientations, we found that faces were rated more attractive and less distinctive than upright faces. Importantly, these effects were more pronounced for faces rated low in upright orientation, and smaller for highly attractive faces. In other words, the less attractive a face was, the more it gained in attractiveness by inversion or rotation. Based on these findings, we argue that facial attractiveness assessments might not rely on the presence of attractive facial characteristics, but on the absence of distinctive, unattractive characteristics. These unattractive characteristics are potentially weighed against an individual, attractive prototype in assessing facial attractiveness. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Multiples waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Dongliang

    2013-01-01

    To increase the illumination of the subsurface and to eliminate the dependency of FWI on the source wavelet, we propose multiples waveform inversion (MWI) that transforms each hydrophone into a virtual point source with a time history equal to that of the recorded data. These virtual sources are used to numerically generate downgoing wavefields that are correlated with the backprojected surface-related multiples to give the migration image. Since the recorded data are treated as the virtual sources, knowledge of the source wavelet is not required, and the subsurface illumination is greatly enhanced because the entire free surface acts as an extended source compared to the radiation pattern of a traditional point source. Numerical tests on the Marmousi2 model show that the convergence rate and the spatial resolution of MWI is, respectively, faster and more accurate then FWI. The potential pitfall with this method is that the multiples undergo more than one roundtrip to the surface, which increases attenuation and reduces spatial resolution. This can lead to less resolved tomograms compared to conventional FWI. The possible solution is to combine both FWI and MWI in inverting for the subsurface velocity distribution.

  11. Iron nanoparticles prepared from natural ferrihydrite precursors: kinetics and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural ferrihydrite was used as the precursors for the preparation of the nanocrystalline alpha-Fe powder using heat treatment in hydrogen atmosphere. Transformation temperatures were estimated from the temperature dependences of magnetic moment. Structure and phase composition of the precursors and the final powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Magnetic properties were characterized according to hysteresis loop parameters. The kinetics of the transformation was described using Avrami relation applied on the data of the isothermal time dependence of magnetic moment measurements and subsequently the activation enthalpy of transformation was estimated using Arrhenius plots of their parameters. Comparison of the changes of activation enthalpies derived from a different temperature ranges indicates effects of different processes on formation of alpha-Fe nanoparticles.

  12. nanoparticles synthesized by citrate precursor m

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Abstract. Ni0.5M0.5Fe2O4 (M = Co, Cu) ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized using citrate precursor method. The citrate precursor was annealed at temperatures 400oC, 450oC, 500oC and 550oC. The annealed powders were characterized using X-ray diffractometer. (XRD) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM).

  13. Rapid synthesis of macrocycles from diol precursors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wingstrand, Magnus; Madsen, Charlotte Marie; Clausen, Mads Hartvig

    2009-01-01

    A method for the formation of synthetic macrocycles with different ring sizes from diols is presented. Reacting a simple diol precursor with electrophilic reagents leads to a cyclic carbonate, sulfite or phosphate in a single step in 25-60% yield. Converting the cyclization precursor to a bis-ele...

  14. Coin tossing and Laplace inversion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MS received 5 May 1999; revised 3 April 2000. Abstract. An analysis of exchangeable sequences of coin tossings leads to inversion formulae for Laplace transforms of probability measures. Keywords. Laplace inversion; moment problem; exchangeable probabilities. 1. Introduction. There is an intimate relationship between ...

  15. Inverse problems for Maxwell's equations

    CERN Document Server

    Romanov, V G

    1994-01-01

    The Inverse and Ill-Posed Problems Series is a series of monographs publishing postgraduate level information on inverse and ill-posed problems for an international readership of professional scientists and researchers. The series aims to publish works which involve both theory and applications in, e.g., physics, medicine, geophysics, acoustics, electrodynamics, tomography, and ecology.

  16. The interrelationships of mathematical precursors in kindergarten.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirino, Paul T

    2011-04-01

    This study evaluated the interrelations among cognitive precursors across quantitative, linguistic, and spatial attention domains that have been implicated for math achievement in young children. The dimensionality of the quantity precursors was evaluated in 286 kindergarteners via latent variable techniques, and the contribution of precursors from each domain was established for small sums addition. Results showed a five-factor structure for the quantity precursors, with the major distinction being between nonsymbolic and symbolic tasks. The overall model demonstrated good fit and strong predictive power (R(2)=55%) for addition number combinations. Linguistic and spatial attention domains showed indirect relationships with outcomes, with their effects mediated by symbolic quantity measures. These results have implications for the measurement of mathematical precursors and yield promise for predicting future math performance. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Algebraic properties of generalized inverses

    CERN Document Server

    Cvetković‐Ilić, Dragana S

    2017-01-01

    This book addresses selected topics in the theory of generalized inverses. Following a discussion of the “reverse order law” problem and certain problems involving completions of operator matrices, it subsequently presents a specific approach to solving the problem of the reverse order law for {1} -generalized inverses. Particular emphasis is placed on the existence of Drazin invertible completions of an upper triangular operator matrix; on the invertibility and different types of generalized invertibility of a linear combination of operators on Hilbert spaces and Banach algebra elements; on the problem of finding representations of the Drazin inverse of a 2x2 block matrix; and on selected additive results and algebraic properties for the Drazin inverse. In addition to the clarity of its content, the book discusses the relevant open problems for each topic discussed. Comments on the latest references on generalized inverses are also included. Accordingly, the book will be useful for graduate students, Ph...

  18. A rainbow inverse problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calvez V.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We consider the radiative transfer equation (RTE with reflection in a three-dimensional domain, infinite in two dimensions, and prove an existence result. Then, we study the inverse problem of retrieving the optical parameters from boundary measurements, with help of existing results by Choulli and Stefanov. This theoretical analysis is the framework of an attempt to model the color of the skin. For this purpose, a code has been developed to solve the RTE and to study the sensitivity of the measurements made by biophysicists with respect to the physiological parameters responsible for the optical properties of this complex, multi-layered material. On étudie l’équation du transfert radiatif (ETR dans un domaine tridimensionnel infini dans deux directions, et on prouve un résultat d’existence. On s’intéresse ensuite à la reconstruction des paramètres optiques à partir de mesures faites au bord, en s’appuyant sur des résultats de Choulli et Stefanov. Cette analyse sert de cadre théorique à un travail de modélisation de la couleur de la peau. Dans cette perspective, un code à été développé pour résoudre l’ETR et étudier la sensibilité des mesures effectuées par les biophysiciens par rapport aux paramètres physiologiques tenus pour responsables des propriétés optiques de ce complexe matériau multicouche.

  19. Fast breeder reactor kinetics. An inverse problem - 135

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seleznev, E.F.; Belov, A.A.; Mushkaterov, A.A.; Matveenko, I.P.; Zhukov, A.M.; Raskatch, K.F.

    2010-01-01

    An analysis of solution of the spatial reactor kinetics neutron-transfer equation using a fast reactor as an example is presented in this paper. To solve the spatial reactor kinetics equation in three-dimensional geometry in multi-energy group-diffusion approximation, a program calculated module TIMER was created. The number of groups of delayed neutron precursor concentrations varies from 6 to 8. When solving a transient neutron-transfer problem, two specific tasks are distinguished. The first of them is a direct problem wherein the neutron flux density and its derivatives such as reactor power etc. are determined at each time step. The second (inverse) problem exists for the point-kinetics equation where the reactor reactivity is calculated using the known dependence of reactor power on time. The paper presented focuses on solution of the inverse problem using experiment calculations for BFS-105 critical assembly. (authors)

  20. Ionospheric parameters as the precursors of disturbed geomagnetic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagoveshchensky, D. V.; Sergeeva, M. A.; Kozlovsky, A.

    2017-12-01

    Geomagnetic storms and substorms are the principal elements of the disturbed Space Weather conditions. The aim of the study was to reveal the ionospheric precursors that can be used to forecast geomagnetic disturbance beginning. To study the ionospheric processes before, during and after magnetic storms and substorms data from Sodankylä Geophysical Observatory was used (geomagnetic coordinates: 64.1oN, 119.2oE). In earlier works the Main Effect (ME) was revealed for substorms. It consists of the following steps: (a) the increase of critical frequency foF2 from its quiet median before and during the substorm growth phase, four-five hours before To moment that is the moment of the expansion phase onset, (b) the foF2 decrease to the level lower than its median just after To and until Te that is the moment of the end of the expansion phase, (c) the issue ;a; repeated during the recovery phase (d) two bell-shape spikes in the cutoff frequency values foEs: first spike occurs three hours before To, second spike - during the expansion phase within the interval between To and Te. In the present work it is shown that ME manifestations can be used as precursors of magnetic substorms at high-latitudes (geomagnetic latitudes 50oN-65oN). In particular, the foF2 growth some hours before To can be used as a precursor of substorm development. The first foEs bell-shaped spike also can be used for short-term forecasting, two-three hours in advance of a substorm. Furthermore, the storms between 2008 and 2012 were studied. It was revealed that the similar ME also takes place in the case of magnetic storms but within the different time scale. More specifically, the first ME maximum in foF2 values occurs one-two days before the storm beginning and can be used as its precursor. In addition, the foEs spike takes place approximately ten hours before a storm and also can be used for the prediction of the storm beginning.

  1. Synthesis and structures of metal chalcogenide precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Duraj, Stan A.; Eckles, William E.; Andras, Maria T.

    1990-01-01

    The reactivity of early transition metal sandwich complexes with sulfur-rich molecules such as dithiocarboxylic acids was studied. Researchers recently initiated work on precursors to CuInSe2 and related chalcopyrite semiconductors. Th every high radiation tolerance and the high absorption coefficient of CuInSe2 makes this material extremely attractive for lightweight space solar cells. Their general approach in early transition metal chemistry, the reaction of low-valent metal complexes or metal powders with sulfur and selenium rich compounds, was extended to the synthesis of chalcopyrite precursors. Here, the researchers describe synthesis, structures, and and routes to single molecule precursors to metal chalcogenides.

  2. Superconductivity without inversion symmetry in CePt3Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frigeri, P.A.; Agterberg, D.F.; Koga, A.; Sigrist, M.

    2005-01-01

    Based on symmetry arguments by Anderson, the following conditions are necessary for the formation of Cooper pairs: spin-singlet pairing relies on time-reversal symmetry, while spin-triplet pairing requires parity in addition. The rather general formulation of this rule has led to the common belief that the lack of an inversion center in a material would prevent spin-triplet pairing indiscriminately. In this presentation, we discuss symmetry aspects of superconductivity in a class of systems without inversion symmetry which is connected with spin-orbit coupling. We can show that, not only spin singlet pairing, but also certain spin triplet states remain unaffected by the loss of inversion symmetry. Moreover, the absence of an inversion center reduces the effect of paramagnetic limiting for spin-singlet pairing states in an external magnetic field. Based on this symmetry analysis, we examine the recently discovered heavy Fermion superconductor CePt 3 Si, where a missing inversion plane leads to the well-known Rashba-type of spin-orbit coupling. In particular, the problem of the pairing symmetry will be addressed as well as several properties of the superconducting phase which appears close to a quantum phase transition between a paramagnetic and antiferromagnetic phase. The same kind of analysis will also be done for another example UIr

  3. Spectroscopy Study of Synthetic Forsterite Obtained from Zeolite Precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subotić, B.

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Important ceramics materials are prepared from aluminosilicate based precursors using novel methods, offering at the same time a better control over many important properties. Forsterite, due to its good refractoriness with melting point at 2163 K, excellent electrical insulation properties even at high temperatures, low dielectric permittivity, thermal expansion and chemical stability, is a material of interest to engineers and designers especially as an active medium for tuneable laser and is also a material of interest to SOFC (Solid oxide fuel cells manufacturers. The aim of this study is to investigate the synthesis of crystalline forsterite using different zeolite precursors previously activated by ball milling. Synthetic forsterite was synthesized from different zeolite precursors and MgO combining highenergy ball milling and thermal treatment of the mixture under determined conditions of time and temperature for each operation. In this research are studied the solid-state phase transformations taking place at temperatures below 1273 K. The obtained products were characterized using different spectroscopy techniques in comparison with surface analysis method and X-ray diffraction.

  4. Bayesian Approach to Inverse Problems

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    Many scientific, medical or engineering problems raise the issue of recovering some physical quantities from indirect measurements; for instance, detecting or quantifying flaws or cracks within a material from acoustic or electromagnetic measurements at its surface is an essential problem of non-destructive evaluation. The concept of inverse problems precisely originates from the idea of inverting the laws of physics to recover a quantity of interest from measurable data.Unfortunately, most inverse problems are ill-posed, which means that precise and stable solutions are not easy to devise. Regularization is the key concept to solve inverse problems.The goal of this book is to deal with inverse problems and regularized solutions using the Bayesian statistical tools, with a particular view to signal and image estimation

  5. Testing earthquake source inversion methodologies

    KAUST Repository

    Page, Morgan T.

    2011-01-01

    Source Inversion Validation Workshop; Palm Springs, California, 11-12 September 2010; Nowadays earthquake source inversions are routinely performed after large earthquakes and represent a key connection between recorded seismic and geodetic data and the complex rupture process at depth. The resulting earthquake source models quantify the spatiotemporal evolution of ruptures. They are also used to provide a rapid assessment of the severity of an earthquake and to estimate losses. However, because of uncertainties in the data, assumed fault geometry and velocity structure, and chosen rupture parameterization, it is not clear which features of these source models are robust. Improved understanding of the uncertainty and reliability of earthquake source inversions will allow the scientific community to use the robust features of kinematic inversions to more thoroughly investigate the complexity of the rupture process and to better constrain other earthquakerelated computations, such as ground motion simulations and static stress change calculations.

  6. Parameter estimation and inverse problems

    CERN Document Server

    Aster, Richard C; Thurber, Clifford H

    2005-01-01

    Parameter Estimation and Inverse Problems primarily serves as a textbook for advanced undergraduate and introductory graduate courses. Class notes have been developed and reside on the World Wide Web for faciliting use and feedback by teaching colleagues. The authors'' treatment promotes an understanding of fundamental and practical issus associated with parameter fitting and inverse problems including basic theory of inverse problems, statistical issues, computational issues, and an understanding of how to analyze the success and limitations of solutions to these probles. The text is also a practical resource for general students and professional researchers, where techniques and concepts can be readily picked up on a chapter-by-chapter basis.Parameter Estimation and Inverse Problems is structured around a course at New Mexico Tech and is designed to be accessible to typical graduate students in the physical sciences who may not have an extensive mathematical background. It is accompanied by a Web site that...

  7. Statistical perspectives on inverse problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kim Emil

    of the interior of an object from electrical boundary measurements. One part of this thesis concerns statistical approaches for solving, possibly non-linear, inverse problems. Thus inverse problems are recasted in a form suitable for statistical inference. In particular, a Bayesian approach for regularisation...... problem is given in terms of probability distributions. Posterior inference is obtained by Markov chain Monte Carlo methods and new, powerful simulation techniques based on e.g. coupled Markov chains and simulated tempering is developed to improve the computational efficiency of the overall simulation......Inverse problems arise in many scientific disciplines and pertain to situations where inference is to be made about a particular phenomenon from indirect measurements. A typical example, arising in diffusion tomography, is the inverse boundary value problem for non-invasive reconstruction...

  8. On important precursor of singular optics (tutorial)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyanskii, Peter V.; Felde, Christina V.; Bogatyryova, Halina V.; Konovchuk, Alexey V.

    2018-01-01

    The rise of singular optics is usually associated with the seminal paper by J. F. Nye and M. V. Berry [Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A, 336, 165-189 (1974)]. Intense development of this area of modern photonics has started since the early eighties of the XX century due to invention of the interfrence technique for detection and diagnostics of phase singularities, such as optical vortices in complex speckle-structured light fields. The next powerful incentive for formation of singular optics into separate area of the science on light was connectected with discovering of very practical technique for creation of singular optical beams of various kinds on the base of computer-generated holograms. In the eghties and ninetieth of the XX century, singular optics evolved, almost entirely, under the approximation of complete coherency of light field. Only at the threshold of the XXI century, it has been comprehended that the singular-optics approaches can be fruitfully expanded onto partially spatially coherent, partially polarized and polychromatic light fields supporting singularities of new kinds, that has been resulted in establishing of correlation singular optics. Here we show that correlation singular optics has much deeper roots, ascending to "pre-singular" and even pre-laser epoch and associated with the concept of partial coherence and polarization. It is remarcable that correlation singular optics in its present interpretation has forestalled the standard coherent singular optics. This paper is timed to the sixtieth anniversary of the most profound precursor of modern correlation singular optics [J. Opt. Soc. Am., 47, 895-902 (1957)].

  9. Gas phase thermochemistry of organogermanium compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engel, John P. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1993-12-07

    A variety of silyl- and alkyl-germylene precursors have been synthesized and subsequently pyrolyzed in the gas phase. Arrhenius parameters were obtained employing a pulsed-stirred flow reactor for these unimolecular decompositions. These precursors are divided into two major categories by mechanism of germylene extrusion: α-elimination precursors and germylacetylenes. The extrusion of germylenes from germylacetylene precursors is of primary interest. A mechanism is proposed employing a germacyclopropene intermediate. Evidence supporting this mechanism is presented. In the process of exploring germylacetylenes as germylene precursors, an apparent dyatropic rearrangement between germanium and silicon was observed. This rearrangement was subsequently explored.

  10. Computation of inverse magnetic cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, D.

    1981-10-01

    Inverse cascades of magnetic quantities for turbulent incompressible magnetohydrodynamics are reviewed, for two and three dimensions. The theory is extended to the Strauss equations, a description intermediate between two and three dimensions appropriate to tokamak magnetofluids. Consideration of the absolute equilibrium Gibbs ensemble for the system leads to a prediction of an inverse cascade of magnetic helicity, which may manifest itself as a major disruption. An agenda for computational investigation of this conjecture is proposed

  11. Thermal measurements and inverse techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Orlande, Helcio RB; Maillet, Denis; Cotta, Renato M

    2011-01-01

    With its uncommon presentation of instructional material regarding mathematical modeling, measurements, and solution of inverse problems, Thermal Measurements and Inverse Techniques is a one-stop reference for those dealing with various aspects of heat transfer. Progress in mathematical modeling of complex industrial and environmental systems has enabled numerical simulations of most physical phenomena. In addition, recent advances in thermal instrumentation and heat transfer modeling have improved experimental procedures and indirect measurements for heat transfer research of both natural phe

  12. Coin tossing and Laplace inversion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of a probability measure " on Е0Y 1К via the obvious change of variables e└t И xX An inversion formula for " in terms of its moments yields an inversion formula for # in terms of the values of its Laplace transform at n И 0Y 1Y 2Y ... and vice versa. In our discussion we allow " (respectively #) to have positive mass at 0 ...

  13. Biochemical Removal of HAP Precursors From Coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, G.; Tucker, L.; Richards, J.

    1997-07-01

    This project addresses DOE`s interest in advanced concepts for controlling emissions of air toxics from coal-fired utility boilers. We are determining the feasibility of developing a biochemical process for the precombustion removal of substantial percentages of 13 inorganic hazardous air pollutant (HAP) precursors from coal. These HAP precursors are Sb, As, Be, Cd, Cr, Cl, Co, F, Pb, Hg, Mn, Ni, and Se. Although rapid physical coal cleaning is done routinely in preparation plants, biochemical processes for removal of HAP precursors from coal potentially offer advantages of deeper cleaning, more specificity, and less coal loss. Compared to chemical processes for coal cleaning, biochemical processes potentially offer lower costs and milder process conditions. Pyrite oxidizing bacteria, most notably Thiobacillusferrooxidans, are being evaluated in this project for their ability to remove HAP precursors from U.S. coals.

  14. Precursor Parameter Identification for IGBT Prognostics

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Precursor parameters have been identified to enable development of a prognostic approach for insulated gate bipolar transistors (IGBT). The IGBT were subjected to...

  15. Probabilistic precursor analysis - an application of PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hari Prasad, M.; Gopika, V.; Sanyasi Rao, V.V.S.; Vaze, K.K.

    2011-01-01

    Incidents are inevitably part of the operational life of any complex industrial facility, and it is hard to predict how various contributing factors combine to cause the outcome. However, it should be possible to detect the existence of latent conditions that, together with the triggering failure(s), result in abnormal events. These incidents are called precursors. Precursor study, by definition, focuses on how a particular event might have adversely developed. This paper focuses on the events which can be analyzed to assess their potential to develop into core damage situation and looks into extending Probabilistic Safety Assessment techniques to precursor studies and explains the benefits through a typical case study. A preliminary probabilistic precursor analysis has been carried out for a typical NPP. The major advantages of this approach are the strong potential for augmenting event analysis which is currently carried out purely on deterministic basis. (author)

  16. Biochemical Removal of HAP Precursors From Coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, G.; Tucker, L.; Richards, J.

    1997-07-01

    This project addresses DOE's interest in advanced concepts for controlling emissions of air toxics from coal-fired utility boilers. We are determining the feasibility of developing a biochemical process for the precombustion removal of substantial percentages of 13 inorganic hazardous air pollutant (HAP) precursors from coal. These HAP precursors are Sb, As, Be, Cd, Cr, Cl, Co, F, Pb, Hg, Mn, Ni, and Se. Although rapid physical coal cleaning is done routinely in preparation plants, biochemical processes for removal of HAP precursors from coal potentially offer advantages of deeper cleaning, more specificity, and less coal loss. Compared to chemical processes for coal cleaning, biochemical processes potentially offer lower costs and milder process conditions. Pyrite oxidizing bacteria, most notably Thiobacillusferrooxidans, are being evaluated in this project for their ability to remove HAP precursors from U.S. coals

  17. Precursor analyses for German nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babst, Siegfried; Gaenssmantel, Gerhard; Stueck, Reinhard

    2009-01-01

    Precursor analysis is an internationally recognized method for quantifying the safety-relevance of operational events in nuclear power plants. Precursors are operational events in nuclear power plants which had no serious impact, but which could have led to serious impacts, if additional malfunctions had occurred. Examples of such operational events are component failures or transients, for example, the loss of main feedwater. On the basis of the probabilities for the occurrence of additional malfunctions or initiating events precursor analyses determine the probability with which these additional malfunctions during the event occurred would have led to core damage. This conditional probability is a measure for the safety relevance of the operational event occurred. Events, for which the probability of core damages is > 10 -6 , are internationally classified as ''precursor''. (orig.)

  18. EDITORIAL: Inverse Problems in Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Robert M.; Lesnic, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Presented here are 11 noteworthy papers selected from the Fifth International Conference on Inverse Problems in Engineering: Theory and Practice held in Cambridge, UK during 11-15 July 2005. The papers have been peer-reviewed to the usual high standards of this journal and the contributions of reviewers are much appreciated. The conference featured a good balance of the fundamental mathematical concepts of inverse problems with a diverse range of important and interesting applications, which are represented here by the selected papers. Aspects of finite-element modelling and the performance of inverse algorithms are investigated by Autrique et al and Leduc et al. Statistical aspects are considered by Emery et al and Watzenig et al with regard to Bayesian parameter estimation and inversion using particle filters. Electrostatic applications are demonstrated by van Berkel and Lionheart and also Nakatani et al. Contributions to the applications of electrical techniques and specifically electrical tomographies are provided by Wakatsuki and Kagawa, Kim et al and Kortschak et al. Aspects of inversion in optical tomography are investigated by Wright et al and Douiri et al. The authors are representative of the worldwide interest in inverse problems relating to engineering applications and their efforts in producing these excellent papers will be appreciated by many readers of this journal.

  19. Coercivities of hot-deformed magnets processed from amorphous and nanocrystalline precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Xin; Sepehri-Amin, H.; Ohkubo, T.; Hioki, K.; Hattori, A.; Hono, K.

    2017-01-01

    Hot-deformed magnets have been processed from amorphous and nanocrystalline precursors and their hard magnetic properties and microstructures have been investigated in order to explore the optimum process route. The hot-deformed magnets processed from an amorphous precursor exhibited the coercivity of 1.40 T that is higher than that processed from nanocrystalline powder, ∼1.28 T. The average grain size was larger in the magnets processed from amorphous precursor. Detailed microstructure analyses by aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy revealed that the Nd + Pr concentrations in the intergranular phases were higher in the hot-deformed magnet processed from the amorphous precursor, which is considered to lead to the enhanced coercivity due to a stronger pinning force against magnetic domain wall motion.

  20. Planar half-cell shaped precursor body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The invention relates to a half-cell shaped precursor body of either anode type or cathode type, the half-cell shaped precursor body being prepared to be free sintered to form a sintered or pre-sintered half-cell being adapted to be stacked in a solid oxide fuel cell stack. The obtained half......-cell has an improved planar shape, which remains planar also after a sintering process and during temperature fluctuations....

  1. MMPM - Mars MetNet Precursor Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harri, A.-M.; Schmidt, W.; Pichkhadze, K.; Linkin, V.; Vazquez, L.; Uspensky, M.; Polkko, J.; Genzer, M.; Lipatov, A.; Guerrero, H.; Alexashkin, S.; Haukka, H.; Savijarvi, H.; Kauhanen, J.

    2008-09-01

    We are developing a new kind of planetary exploration mission for Mars - MetNet in situ observation network based on a new semi-hard landing vehicle called the Met-Net Lander (MNL). The eventual scope of the MetNet Mission is to deploy some 20 MNLs on the Martian surface using inflatable descent system structures, which will be supported by observations from the orbit around Mars. Currently we are working on the MetNet Mars Precursor Mission (MMPM) to deploy one MetNet Lander to Mars in the 2009/2011 launch window as a technology and science demonstration mission. The MNL will have a versatile science payload focused on the atmospheric science of Mars. Detailed characterization of the Martian atmospheric circulation patterns, boundary layer phenomena, and climatology cycles, require simultaneous in-situ measurements by a network of observation posts on the Martian surface. The scientific payload of the MetNet Mission encompasses separate instrument packages for the atmospheric entry and descent phase and for the surface operation phase. The MetNet mission concept and key probe technologies have been developed and the critical subsystems have been qualified to meet the Martian environmental and functional conditions. Prototyping of the payload instrumentation with final dimensions was carried out in 2003-2006.This huge development effort has been fulfilled in collaboration between the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI), the Russian Lavoschkin Association (LA) and the Russian Space Research Institute (IKI) since August 2001. Currently the INTA (Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial) from Spain is also participating in the MetNet payload development. To understand the behavior and dynamics of the Martian atmosphere, a wealth of simultaneous in situ observations are needed on varying types of Martian orography, terrain and altitude spanning all latitudes and longitudes. This will be performed by the Mars MetNet Mission. In addition to the science aspects the

  2. Chromatid Painting for Chromosomal Inversion Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a novel approach to the detection of chromosomal inversions. Transmissible chromosome aberrations (translocations and inversions) have profound genetic...

  3. Inversion of Auditory Spectrograms, Traditional Spectrograms, and Other Envelope Representations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Decorsière, Remi Julien Blaise; Søndergaard, Peter Lempel; MacDonald, Ewen

    2015-01-01

    Envelope representations such as the auditory or traditional spectrogram can be defined by the set of envelopes from the outputs of a filterbank. Common envelope extraction methods discard information regarding the fast fluctuations, or phase, of the signal. Thus, it is difficult to invert, or re...... to the framework is proposed, which leads to a more accurate inversion of traditional spectrograms...

  4. High bit rate optical transmission using midspan spectral inversion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    also known under (Optical Phase. Conjugation "OPC") compensates at the same time the chromatic dispersion and the. SPM [8-13]. The principle of MSSI is the spectral inversion of the spectrum of optical signal, and it is placed in the middle of the transmission span [7-8]. In the first half of the span, the signal disperses, thus.

  5. Inverse Spin Hall Effect in SNS Josephson Junctions

    OpenAIRE

    Mal'shukov, A. G.; Sadjina, Severin; Brataas, Arne

    2009-01-01

    We consider DC supercurrents in SNS junctions. Spin-orbit coupling in combination with Zeeman fields can induce an effective vector potential in the normal conductor. As a consequence, an out-of-plane spin-density varying along the transverse direction causes a longitudinal phase difference between the superconducting terminals. The resulting equilibrium phase coherent supercurrent is analogue to the non-equilibrium inverse spin Hall effect in normal conductors. We explicitly compute the effe...

  6. Kinetics of shoot inversion-induced ethylene production in Pharbitis nil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, T. K.; Cline, M. G.

    1986-01-01

    Shoot inversion promotes a significant increase in ethylene production in the inverted part of the Pharbitis nil main shoot. The latent period for shoot inversion-induced ethylene production is ca. 2.75 h. Our results indicate that the shoot-inversion ethylene response is not persistent and can be terminated and rapidly reinitiated by appropriate alteration of the orientation of the main shoot regardless of prolonged previous exposures of the shoot to various orientations. The time course of the production of ACC (1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid), the immediate precursor of ethylene, follows a pattern similar to that of ethylene during the various alterations of shoot orientation. Excised stem segments and intact stems are capable of induction, inhibition, and reinduction of ethylene evolution. Ethylene production reported here for shoot inversion does not result from segmenting (wounding) of the tissue.

  7. Fixed energy potentials through an auxiliary inverse eigenvalue problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pálmai, Tamás; Apagyi, Barnabás

    2012-01-01

    An inverse scattering method based on an auxiliary inverse Sturm–Liouville problem recently proposed by Horváth and Apagyi (2008 Mod. Phys. Lett. B 22 2137) is examined in various aspects and developed further to (re)construct spherically symmetric fixed energy potentials of compact support realized in the three-dimensional Schrödinger equation. The method is generalized to obtain a family of inverse procedures characterized by two parameters originating, respectively, from the Liouville transformation and the solution of the inverse Sturm–Liouville problem. Both parameters affect the bound states arising in the auxiliary inverse spectral problem and one of them enables us to reduce their number which is assessed by a simple method. Various solution techniques of the underlying moment problem are proposed including the exact Cauchy matrix inversion method, usage of spurious bound state and assessment of the number of bound states. Examples include (re)productions of potentials from phase shifts known theoretically or derived from scattering experiments. (paper)

  8. Inverse comptonization vs. thermal synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenimore, E.E.; Klebesadel, R.W.; Laros, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    There are currently two radiation mechanisms being considered for gamma-ray bursts: thermal synchrotron and inverse comptonization. They are mutually exclusive since thermal synchrotron requires a magnetic field of approx. 10 12 Gauss whereas inverse comptonization cannot produce a monotonic spectrum if the field is larger than 10 11 and is too inefficient relative to thermal synchrotron unless the field is less than 10 9 Gauss. Neither mechanism can explain completely the observed characteristics of gamma-ray bursts. However, we conclude that thermal synchrotron is more consistent with the observations if the sources are approx. 40 kpc away whereas inverse comptonization is more consistent if they are approx. 300 pc away. Unfortunately, the source distance is still not known and, thus, the radiation mechanism is still uncertain

  9. Inverse comorbidity in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thormann, Anja; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Laursen, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    discovery rate and investigated each of eight pre-specified comorbidity categories: psychiatric, cerebrovascular, cardiovascular, lung, and autoimmune comorbidities, diabetes, cancer, and Parkinson's disease. Results A total of 8947 MS-cases and 44,735 controls were eligible for inclusion. We found...... This study showed a decreased risk of cancers and pulmonary diseases after onset of MS. Identification of inverse comorbidity and of its underlying mechanisms may provide important new entry points into the understanding of MS.......Background Inverse comorbidity is disease occurring at lower rates than expected among persons with a given index disease. The objective was to identify inverse comorbidity in MS. Methods We performed a combined case-control and cohort study in a total nationwide cohort of cases with clinical onset...

  10. Inverse photoemission of uranium oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roussel, P.; Morrall, P.; Tull, S.J.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the itinerant-localised bonding role of the 5f electrons in the light actinides will afford an insight into their unusual physical and chemical properties. In recent years, the combination of core and valance band electron spectroscopies with theoretic modelling have already made significant progress in this area. However, information of the unoccupied density of states is still scarce. When compared to the forward photoemission techniques, measurements of the unoccupied states suffer from significantly less sensitivity and lower resolution. In this paper, we report on our experimental apparatus, which is designed to measure the inverse photoemission spectra of the light actinides. Inverse photoemission spectra of UO 2 and UO 2.2 along with the corresponding core and valance electron spectra are presented in this paper. UO 2 has been reported previously, although through its inclusion here it allows us to compare and contrast results from our experimental apparatus to the previous Bremsstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy and Inverse Photoemission Spectroscopy investigations

  11. Inverse source problems in elastodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Gang; Hu, Guanghui; Kian, Yavar; Yin, Tao

    2018-04-01

    We are concerned with time-dependent inverse source problems in elastodynamics. The source term is supposed to be the product of a spatial function and a temporal function with compact support. We present frequency-domain and time-domain approaches to show uniqueness in determining the spatial function from wave fields on a large sphere over a finite time interval. The stability estimate of the temporal function from the data of one receiver and the uniqueness result using partial boundary data are proved. Our arguments rely heavily on the use of the Fourier transform, which motivates inversion schemes that can be easily implemented. A Landweber iterative algorithm for recovering the spatial function and a non-iterative inversion scheme based on the uniqueness proof for recovering the temporal function are proposed. Numerical examples are demonstrated in both two and three dimensions.

  12. Optimization for nonlinear inverse problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyadzhiev, G.; Brandmayr, E.; Pinat, T.; Panza, G.F.

    2007-06-01

    The nonlinear inversion of geophysical data in general does not yield a unique solution, but a single model, representing the investigated field, is preferred for an easy geological interpretation of the observations. The analyzed region is constituted by a number of sub-regions where the multi-valued nonlinear inversion is applied, which leads to a multi-valued solution. Therefore, combining the values of the solution in each sub-region, many acceptable models are obtained for the entire region and this complicates the geological interpretation of geophysical investigations. In this paper are presented new methodologies, capable to select one model, among all acceptable ones, that satisfies different criteria of smoothness in the explored space of solutions. In this work we focus on the non-linear inversion of surface waves dispersion curves, which gives structural models of shear-wave velocity versus depth, but the basic concepts have a general validity. (author)

  13. Inverse methods in hydrologic optics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard R. Gordon

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Methods for solving the hydrologic-optics inverse problem, i.e., estimating the inherent optical properties of a water body based solely on measurements of the apparent optical properties, are reviewed in detail. A new method is developed for the inverse problem in water bodies in which fluorescence is important. It is shown that in principle, given profiles of the spectra of up- and downwelling irradiance, estimation of the coefficient of inelastic scattering from any wave band to any other wave band can be effected.

  14. Inverse Interval Matrix: A Survey

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rohn, Jiří; Farhadsefat, R.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 22, - (2011), s. 704-719 E-ISSN 1081-3810 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/09/1957; GA ČR GC201/08/J020 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : interval matrix * inverse interval matrix * NP-hardness * enclosure * unit midpoint * inverse sign stability * nonnegative invertibility * absolute value equation * algorithm Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.808, year: 2010 http://www.math.technion.ac.il/iic/ela/ela-articles/articles/vol22_pp704-719.pdf

  15. Size Estimates in Inverse Problems

    KAUST Repository

    Di Cristo, Michele

    2014-01-06

    Detection of inclusions or obstacles inside a body by boundary measurements is an inverse problems very useful in practical applications. When only finite numbers of measurements are available, we try to detect some information on the embedded object such as its size. In this talk we review some recent results on several inverse problems. The idea is to provide constructive upper and lower estimates of the area/volume of the unknown defect in terms of a quantity related to the work that can be expressed with the available boundary data.

  16. -Dimensional Fractional Lagrange's Inversion Theorem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A. Abd El-Salam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Using Riemann-Liouville fractional differential operator, a fractional extension of the Lagrange inversion theorem and related formulas are developed. The required basic definitions, lemmas, and theorems in the fractional calculus are presented. A fractional form of Lagrange's expansion for one implicitly defined independent variable is obtained. Then, a fractional version of Lagrange's expansion in more than one unknown function is generalized. For extending the treatment in higher dimensions, some relevant vectors and tensors definitions and notations are presented. A fractional Taylor expansion of a function of -dimensional polyadics is derived. A fractional -dimensional Lagrange inversion theorem is proved.

  17. Lu2O3-SiO2-ZrO2 Coatings for Environmental Barrier Application by Solution Precursor Plasma Spraying and Influence of Precursor Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darthout, Émilien; Quet, Aurélie; Braidy, Nadi; Gitzhofer, François

    2014-02-01

    As environmental barrier coatings are subjected to thermal stress in gas turbine engines, the introduction of a secondary phase as zircon (ZrSiO4) is likely to increase the stress resistance of Lu2Si2O7 coatings generated by induction plasma spraying using liquid precursors. In a first step, precursor chemistry effect is investigated by the synthesis of ZrO2-SiO2 nanopowders by induction plasma nanopowder synthesis technique. Tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) as silicon precursor and zirconium oxynitrate and zirconium ethoxide as zirconium precursors are mixed in ethanol and produce a mixture of tetragonal zirconia and amorphous silica nanoparticles. The use of zirconium ethoxide precursor results in zirconia particles with diameter below 50 nm because of exothermic thermal decomposition of the ethoxide and its high boiling point with respect to solvent, while larger particles are formed when zirconium oxynitrate is employed. The formation temperature of zircon from zirconia and silica oxides is found at 1425 °C. Second, coatings are synthesized in Lu2O3-ZrO2-SiO2 system. After heat treatment, the doping effect of lutetium on zirconia grains totally inhibits the zircon formation. Dense coatings are obtained with the use of zirconium ethoxide because denser particles with a homogeneous diameter distribution constitute the coating.

  18. Coupled channels Marchenko inversion for nucleon-nucleon potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohlhoff, H.; Geramb, H.V. von

    1994-01-01

    Marchenko inversion is used to determine local energy independent but channel dependent potential matrices from optimum sets of experimental phase shifts. 3 SD 1 and 3 PF 2 channels of nucleon-nucleon systems contain in their off-diagonal potential matrices explicitly the tensor force for T = 0 and 1 isospin. We obtain, together with single channels, complete sets of quantitative nucleon-nucleon potential results which are ready for application in nuclear structure and reaction analyses. The historic coupled channels inversion result of Newton and Fulton is revisited. (orig.)

  19. From chelating precursors to La0.05Sr0.95CoO3-y oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, L.; Guo, F.; Lin, J.

    1999-01-01

    Several La 0.05 Sr 0.95 CoO 3-y (LSCO-95) powders were synthesized by means of a chelated complex-based precursor approach, which involved pyrolysis of chelating precursors and subsequent calcination of the resulting oxides. This paper focuses on the coordination effects of the precursors on the formation of the crystalline phases of the LSCO-95 oxide, showing that when the precursor is composed of EDTA-metal complexes, the perovskite-type oxide LSCO-95, an electronic-ionic mixed conducting ceramic material, can be achieved. In contrast, those LSCO-95 powders obtained initially from the pyrolysis of the precursors containing other coordination ligands possess only the undesirable hexagonal structure

  20. Bound volatile precursors in genotypes in the pedigree of 'Marion' blackberry (Rubus sp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xiaofen; Finn, Chad E; Qian, Michael C

    2010-03-24

    Glycosidically bound volatiles and precursors in genotypes representing the pedigree for 'Marion' blackberry were investigated over two growing seasons. The volatile precursors were isolated using a C18 solid-phase extraction column. After enzymatic hydrolysis, the released volatiles were analyzed using stir bar sorptive extraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and direct microvial insert thermal desorption GC-MS. The most abundant volatile precursors in the genotypes were alcohols, followed by shikimic acid derivatives. High amounts of furanone glycosides were also detected, while norisoprenoids only existed in a small amount in blackberries. The volatile precursor composition in the genotypes in the 'Marion' pedigree was very similar to their free volatile distribution. 'Logan' and 'Olallie' predominantly had bound norisoprenoids. Wild 'Himalaya' predominated with terpene alcohol and furaneol glycosides, whereas 'Santiam' and 'Chehalem' contained a high level of terpene alcohol glycosides. A similar inheritance pattern was also observed for some volatile precursors in the genotypes in the 'Marion' pedigree. A high content of linalool, hydroxylinalool, and alpha-ionol glycosides in 'Olallie' and a low content in 'Chehalem' resulted in a moderate level in their offspring 'Marion', while a low content of (E)-linalool oxide precursor in 'Olallie' and a high content in 'Chehalem' also resulted in a moderate level in 'Marion'. However, the concentration of furaneol glycosides in 'Marion' exceeded that of its two parents.

  1. Advanced Precursor Reaction Processing for Cu(InGa)(SeS)2 Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafarman, William N. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States)

    2015-10-12

    This project “Advanced Precursor Reaction Processing for Cu(InGa)(SeS)2 Solar Cells”, completed by the Institute of Energy Conversion (IEC) at the University of Delaware in collaboration with the Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Florida, developed the fundamental understanding and technology to increase module efficiency and improve the manufacturability of Cu(InGa)(SeS)2 films using the precursor reaction approach currently being developed by a number of companies. Key results included: (1) development of a three-step H2Se/Ar/H2S reaction process to control Ga distribution through the film and minimizes back contact MoSe2 formation; (2) Ag-alloying to improve precursor homogeneity by avoiding In phase agglomeration, faster reaction and improved adhesion to allow wider reaction process window; (3) addition of Sb, Bi, and Te interlayers at the Mo/precursor junction to produce more uniform precursor morphology and improve adhesion with reduced void formation in reacted films; (4) a precursor structure containing Se and a reaction process to reduce processing time to 5 minutes and eliminate H2Se usage, thereby increasing throughput and reducing costs. All these results were supported by detailed characterization of the film growth, reaction pathways, thermodynamic assessment and device behavior.

  2. Potential of secondary resources as aluminium-silicate precursors for geopolymer synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valcke, S.L.A.; Pipilikaki, P.; Fischer, H.R.

    2015-01-01

    Secondary resources containing (catcium) atuminium-silicate phases, e.g., fly ash, slag or bottom ash are used as precursor for binders such as geopolymers. Because secondary resources can be highly variable in terms of their potential to dissolve and form reaction products, analytical methods are

  3. Experimental Determination of the Formation Enthalpy of Calcium Cobaltate from Sol–Gel Precursors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holgate, Tim C.; Wu, NingYu; Van Nong, Ngo

    2017-01-01

    for thermoelectric efficiency, there remains a gap in the knowledge, both experimental and theoretical, of the thermodynamics of the system. Presented herein is an analysis of the heat of formation of the Ca3Co4O9 phase from sol–gel precursors using a highly sensitive differential scanning calorimeter, as well...

  4. High-frequency precursors to P-wave arrivals in New Zealand : implications for slab structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilst, R.D. van der; Snieder, R.K.

    1996-01-01

    This report revisits the very early high-frequency slab phases from earthquakes in the Kermadec slab (between −25°S and −37°S) that arrive as a precursor to the P wave onset at stations in New Zealand. The analysis of short-period digital records for station SNZO (South Karori New Zealand) for the

  5. Formation and transformation of a short range ordered iron carbonate precursor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dideriksen, Knud; Frandsen, Cathrine; Bovet, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    structural order. Moreover, PDF peak positions differ from those for known iron carbonates and hydroxides. Mössbauer spectra also deviate from those expected for known iron carbonates and suggest a less crystalline structure. These data show that a previously unidentified iron carbonate precursor phase...

  6. Patterning hierarchy in direct and inverse opal crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, Lidiya; Hatton, Benjamin; Kolle, Mathias; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2012-06-25

    Biological strategies for bottom-up synthesis of inorganic crystalline and amorphous materials within topographic templates have recently become an attractive approach for fabricating complex synthetic structures. Inspired by these strategies, herein the synthesis of multi-layered, hierarchical inverse colloidal crystal films formed directly on topographically patterned substrates via evaporative deposition, or "co-assembly", of polymeric spheres with a silicate sol-gel precursor solution and subsequent removal of the colloidal template, is described. The response of this growing composite colloid-silica system to artificially imposed 3D spatial constraints of various geometries is systematically studied, and compared with that of direct colloidal crystal assembly on the same template. Substrates designed with arrays of rectangular, triangular, and hexagonal prisms and cylinders are shown to control crystallographic domain nucleation and orientation of the direct and inverse opals. With this bottom-up topographical approach, it is demonstrated that the system can be manipulated to either form large patterned single crystals, or crystals with a fine-tuned extent of disorder, and to nucleate distinct colloidal domains of a defined size, location, and orientation in a wide range of length-scales. The resulting ordered, quasi-ordered, and disordered colloidal crystal films show distinct optical properties. Therefore, this method provides a means of controlling bottom-up synthesis of complex, hierarchical direct and inverse opal structures designed for altering optical properties and increased functionality. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Statistical and Computational Inverse Problems

    CERN Document Server

    Kaipio, Jari

    2005-01-01

    Develops the statistical approach to inverse problems with an emphasis on modeling and computations. The book discusses the measurement noise modeling and Bayesian estimation, and uses Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods to explore the probability distributions. It is for researchers and advanced students in applied mathematics.

  8. Coin Tossing and Laplace Inversion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An analysis of exchangeable sequences of coin tossings leads to inversion formulae for Laplace transforms of probability measures. Author Affiliations. J C Gupta1 2. Indian Statistical Institute, New Delhi 110 016, India; 32, Mirdha Tola, Budaun 243 601, India. Dates. Manuscript received: 5 May 1999; Manuscript revised: 3 ...

  9. Givental Graphs and Inversion Symmetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunin-Barkovskiy, P.; Shadrin, S.; Spitz, L.

    2013-01-01

    Inversion symmetry is a very non-trivial discrete symmetry of Frobenius manifolds. It was obtained by Dubrovin from one of the elementary Schlesinger transformations of a special ODE associated to a Frobenius manifold. In this paper, we review the Givental group action on Frobenius manifolds in

  10. Adjoint modeling for acoustic inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hursky, Paul; Porter, Michael B.; Cornuelle, B. D.; Hodgkiss, W. S.; Kuperman, W. A.

    2004-02-01

    The use of adjoint modeling for acoustic inversion is investigated. An adjoint model is derived from a linearized forward propagation model to propagate data-model misfit at the observation points back through the medium to the medium perturbations not being accounted for in the model. This adjoint model can be used to aid in inverting for these unaccounted medium perturbations. Adjoint methods are being applied to a variety of inversion problems, but have not drawn much attention from the underwater acoustic community. This paper presents an application of adjoint methods to acoustic inversion. Inversions are demonstrated in simulation for both range-independent and range-dependent sound speed profiles using the adjoint of a parabolic equation model. Sensitivity and error analyses are discussed showing how the adjoint model enables calculations to be performed in the space of observations, rather than the often much larger space of model parameters. Using an adjoint model enables directions of steepest descent in the model parameters (what we invert for) to be calculated using far fewer modeling runs than if a forward model only were used.

  11. Generalization of the Rabi population inversion dynamics in the sub-one-cycle pulse limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doslic, N.

    2006-01-01

    We consider the population inversion in a two-level system generated by a sub-one-cycle pulse excitation. Specifically, we explore the effect that the time derivative of the pulse envelope has on the Rabi dynamics. Our analysis is based on a combination of analytical, perturbative, and nonperturbative treatments and is complemented by numerical simulations. We find a shortening of the Rabi inversion period and show that complete inversion is unobtainable under resonant, ultrashort pulse conditions. The impact of nonresonant and carrier-envelope phase-dependent effects on the dynamics of two-level and multilevel systems is studied numerically, and conditions for complete population inversion are derived

  12. Ultrafast magnetic vortex core switching driven by the topological inverse Faraday effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Katsuhisa; Ohe, Jun-ichiro; Tatara, Gen

    2012-09-21

    We present a theoretical discovery of an unconventional mechanism of inverse Faraday effect which acts selectively on topological magnetic structures. The effect, topological inverse Faraday effect, is induced by the spin Berry's phase of the magnetic structure when a circularly polarized light is applied. Thus a spin-orbit interaction is not necessary unlike that in the conventional inverse Faraday effect. We demonstrate by numerical simulation that topological inverse Faraday effect realizes ultrafast switching of a magnetic vortex within a switching time of 150 ps without magnetic field.

  13. Report on Fukushima Daiichi NPP precursor events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The main questions to be answered by this report were: The Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident, could it have been prevented? If there is a next severe accident, may it be prevented? To answer the first question, the report addressed several aspects. First, the report investigated whether precursors to the Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident existed in the operating experience; second, the reasons why these precursors did not evolve into a severe accident. Third, whether lessons learned from these precursor events were adequately considered by member countries; and finally, if the operating experience feedback system needs to be improved, based on the previous analysis. To address the second question which is much more challenging, the report considered precursor events identified through a search and analysis of the IRS database and also precursors events based on risk significance. Both methods can point out areas where further work may be needed, even if it depends heavily on design and site-specific factors. From the operating experience side, more efforts are needed to ensure timely and full implementation of lessons learnt from precursor events. Concerning risk considerations, a combined use of risk precursors and operating experience may drive to effective changes to plants to reduce risk. The report also contains a short description and evaluation of selected precursors that are related to the course of the Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident. The report addresses the question whether operating experience feedback can be effectively used to identify plant vulnerabilities and minimize potential for severe core damage accidents. Based on several of the precursor events national or international in-depth evaluations were started. The vulnerability of NPPs due to external and internal flooding has clearly been addressed. In addition to the IRS based investigation, the WGRISK was asked to identify important precursor events based on risk significance. These precursors have

  14. Workflows for Full Waveform Inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Christian; Krischer, Lion; Afanasiev, Michael; van Driel, Martin; May, Dave A.; Rietmann, Max; Fichtner, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Despite many theoretical advances and the increasing availability of high-performance computing clusters, full seismic waveform inversions still face considerable challenges regarding data and workflow management. While the community has access to solvers which can harness modern heterogeneous computing architectures, the computational bottleneck has fallen to these often manpower-bounded issues that need to be overcome to facilitate further progress. Modern inversions involve huge amounts of data and require a tight integration between numerical PDE solvers, data acquisition and processing systems, nonlinear optimization libraries, and job orchestration frameworks. To this end we created a set of libraries and applications revolving around Salvus (http://salvus.io), a novel software package designed to solve large-scale full waveform inverse problems. This presentation focuses on solving passive source seismic full waveform inversions from local to global scales with Salvus. We discuss (i) design choices for the aforementioned components required for full waveform modeling and inversion, (ii) their implementation in the Salvus framework, and (iii) how it is all tied together by a usable workflow system. We combine state-of-the-art algorithms ranging from high-order finite-element solutions of the wave equation to quasi-Newton optimization algorithms using trust-region methods that can handle inexact derivatives. All is steered by an automated interactive graph-based workflow framework capable of orchestrating all necessary pieces. This naturally facilitates the creation of new Earth models and hopefully sparks new scientific insights. Additionally, and even more importantly, it enhances reproducibility and reliability of the final results.

  15. Inverse problems for partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Isakov, Victor

    2017-01-01

    This third edition expands upon the earlier edition by adding nearly 40 pages of new material reflecting the analytical and numerical progress in inverse problems in last 10 years. As in the second edition, the emphasis is on new ideas and methods rather than technical improvements. These new ideas include use of the stationary phase method in the two-dimensional elliptic problems and of multi frequencies\\temporal data to improve stability and numerical resolution. There are also numerous corrections and improvements of the exposition throughout. This book is intended for mathematicians working with partial differential equations and their applications, physicists, geophysicists, and financial, electrical, and mechanical engineers involved with nondestructive evaluation, seismic exploration, remote sensing, and various kinds of tomography. Review of the second edition: "The first edition of this excellent book appeared in 1998 and became a standard reference for everyone interested in analysis and numerics of...

  16. Sol-gel precursors and products thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Scott C.; DiSalvo, Jr., Francis J.; Weisner, Ulrich B.

    2017-02-14

    The present invention provides a generalizable single-source sol-gel precursor capable of introducing a wide range of functionalities to metal oxides such as silica. The sol-gel precursor facilitates a one-molecule, one-step approach to the synthesis of metal-silica hybrids with combinations of biological, catalytic, magnetic, and optical functionalities. The single-source precursor also provides a flexible route for simultaneously incorporating functional species of many different types. The ligands employed for functionalizing the metal oxides are derived from a library of amino acids, hydroxy acids, or peptides and a silicon alkoxide, allowing many biological functionalities to be built into silica hybrids. The ligands can coordinate with a wide range of metals via a carboxylic acid, thereby allowing direct incorporation of inorganic functionalities from across the periodic table. Using the single-source precursor a wide range of functionalized nanostructures such as monolith structures, mesostructures, multiple metal gradient mesostructures and Stober-type nanoparticles can be synthesized. ##STR00001##

  17. Janus microgels produced from functional precursor polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiffert, Sebastian; Romanowsky, Mark B; Weitz, David A

    2010-09-21

    Micrometer-sized Janus particles of many kinds can be formed using droplet microfluidics, but in existing methods, the microfluidic templating is strongly coupled to the material synthesis, since droplet solidification occurs through rapid polymerization right after droplet formation. This circumstance limits independent control of the material properties and the morphology of the resultant particles. In this paper, we demonstrate a microfluidic technique to produce functional Janus microgels from prefabricated, cross-linkable precursor polymers. This approach separates the polymer synthesis from the particle gelation, thus allowing the microfluidic droplet templating and the functionalization of the matrix polymer to be performed and controlled in two independent steps. We use microfluidic devices to emulsify semidilute solutions of cross-linkable, chemically modified or unmodified poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) precursors and solidify the drops via polymer-analogous gelation. The resultant microgel particles exhibit two distinguishable halves which contain most of the modified precursors, and the unmodified matrix polymer separates these materials. The spatial distribution of the modified precursors across the particles can be controlled by the flow rates during the microfluidic experiments. We also form hollow microcapsules with two different sides (Janus shells) using double emulsion droplets as templates, and we produce Janus microgels that are loaded with a ferromagnetic additive which allows remote actuation of the microgels.

  18. Precursor Dependent Structural Properties and Antibacterial Activity ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    71

    The antibacterial activity of the synthesized CuO were studied against human pathogens like Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) bacterial strains which are proved to be efficient and precursor dependent. The minimum inhibitory concentration of CuO against E. coli and S. aureus were found to.

  19. Julian del Casal Precursor of Modernism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onelio Olivera Blanco

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with Modernism as literary school at the end of the XIX century, and its most important representatives. The authors give some elements that in their opinion could be taken into consideration so as to consider Julián del Casal as the legitimate precursor of this literary school in the Hispano-American literature.

  20. Effect of Chlorine precursor in surface and cataytic properties of Fe/TiO2 Catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    López, Tessi; Pecchi, Gina; Moreno, Abel; García Fierro, José Luis; Gómez, R.; Reyes, P.

    2002-01-01

    Titania-supported iron (1wt%) catalysts were prepared by the sol-gel method using different gelation pH (3 and 9), metal precursors (FeCl2 and FeCl3) and calcination temperatures (873 and 1073K). Characterization data of calcined catalysts revealed that in all samples the dominant iron species is Fe3+ and the crystalline phase of the TiO2 substrate depends on the gelation pH and the metal precursor used. It was found that in the Fe/TiO2 ex-FeCl3 samples an important part of the iron ions beca...

  1. Preparation of plutonium-bearing ceramics via mechanically activated precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizhevskaya, S. V.; Stefanovsky, S. V.

    2000-07-01

    The problem of excess weapons plutonium disposition is suggested to be solved by means of its incorporation in stable ceramics with high chemical durability and radiation resistivity. The most promising host phases for plutonium as well as uranium and neutron poisons (gadolinium, hafnium) are zirconolite, pyrochlore, zircon, zirconia [1,2], and murataite [3]. Their production requires high temperatures and a fine-grained homogeneous precursor to reach final waste form with high quality and low leachability. Currently various routes to homogeneous products preparation such as sol-gel technology, wet-milling, and grinding in a ball or planetary mill are used. The best result demonstrates sol-gel technology but this route is very complicated. An alternative technology for preparation of ceramic precursors is the treatment of the oxide batch with high mechanical energy [4]. Such a treatment produces combination of mechanical (fine milling with formation of various defects, homogenization) and chemical (split bonds with formation of active centers—free radicals, ion-radicals, etc.) effects resulting in higher reactivity of the activated batch.

  2. Validation of OSIRIS Ozone Inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudnason, P.; Evans, W. F.; von Savigny, C.; Sioris, C.; Halley, C.; Degenstein, D.; Llewellyn, E. J.; Petelina, S.; Gattinger, R. L.; Odin Team

    2002-12-01

    The OSIRIS instrument onboard the Odin satellite, that was launched on February 20, 2001, is a combined optical spectrograph and infrared imager that obtains profil sets of atmospheric spectra from 280 to 800 nm when Odin scans the terrestrial limb. It has been possible to make a preliminary analysis of the ozone profiles using the Chappuis absorption feature. Three algorithms have been developed for ozone profile inversions from these limb spectra sets. We have dubbed these the Gattinger, Von Savigny-Flittner and DOAS methods. These are being evaluated against POAM and other satellite data. Based on performance, one of these will be selected for the operational algorithm. The infrared imager data have been used by Degenstein with the tomographic inversion procedure to derive ozone concentrations above 60 km. This paper will present some of these initial observations and indicate the best algorithm potential of OSIRIS to make spectacular advances in the study of terrestrial ozone.

  3. Inverse problem in transformation optics

    OpenAIRE

    Novitsky, Andrey V.

    2011-01-01

    The straightforward method of transformation optics implies that one starts from the coordinate transformation and determines the Jacobian matrix, the fields and material parameters of the cloak. However, the coordinate transformation appears as an optional function: it is not necessary to know it. We offer the solution of some sort of inverse problem: starting from the fields in the invisibility cloak we directly derive the permittivity and permeability tensors of the cloaking shell. This ap...

  4. Fourier reconstruction with sparse inversions

    OpenAIRE

    Zwartjes, P.M.

    2005-01-01

    In seismic exploration an image of the subsurface is generated from seismic data through various data processing algorithms. When the data is not acquired on an equidistantly spaced grid, artifacts may result in the final image. Fourier reconstruction is an interpolation technique that can reduce these artifacts by generating uniformly sampled data from such non-uniformly sampled data. The method works by estimating via least-squares inversion the Fourier coefficients that describe the non-un...

  5. The Inverse of Banded Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    for reducing this burden, to Washington Headquarters Services, Directorate for Information Operations and Reports, 1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite ...numbers of summed or subtracted terms in computing the inverse of a term of an upper (lower) triangular matrix are the generalized order-k Fibonacci ... Fibonacci numbers are the usual Fibonacci numbers, that is, f 2m = Fm (mth Fibonacci number). When also k = 3, c1 = c2 = c3 = 1, then the generalized order-3

  6. Inverse-magnetron mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pakulin, V.N.

    1979-01-01

    Considered is the operation of a typical magnetron mass spectrometer with an internal ion source and that of an inverse magnetron mass spectrometer with an external ion source. It is found that for discrimination of the same mass using the inverse design of mass spectrometers it is possible to employ either r 2 /r 1 times lesser magnetic fields at equal accelerating source-collector voltages, or r 2 /r 1 higher accelerating voltages at equal magnetic fields, as compared to the typical design (r 1 and r 2 being radii of the internal and external electrodes of the analyser, respectively). The design of an inverse-magnetron mass spectrometer is described. The mass analyzer is formed by a cylindrical electrode of 3 mm diameter and a coaxial tubular cylinder of 55 mm diameter. External to the analyzer is an ionizing chamber at the pressure of up to 5x10 -6 torr. The magnetic field along the chamber axis produced by a solenoid was 300 Oe. At the accelerating voltage of 100 V and mass 28, the spectrometer has a resolution of 30 at a half-peak height

  7. Thermodynamic approach to the synthesis of silicon carbide using tetramethylsilane as the precursor at high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seong-Min; Kim, Kyung-Hun; Yoon, Young Joon; Lee, Myung-Hyun; Seo, Won-Seon

    2012-10-01

    Tetramethylsilane (TMS) is commonly used as a precursor in the production of SiC(β) films at relatively low temperatures. However, because TMS contains much more C than Si, it is difficult to produce solid phase SiC at high temperatures. In an attempt to develop a more efficient TMS-based SiC(α) process, computational thermodynamic simulations were performed under various temperatures, working pressures and TMS/H2 ratios. The findings indicate that each solid phase has a different dependency on the H2 concentration. Consequently, a high H2 concentration results in the formation of a single, solid phase SiC region at high temperatures. Finally, TMS appears to be useful as a precursor for the high temperature production of SiC(α).

  8. Inverse problems for difference equations with quadratic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inverse problems for difference equations with quadratic Eigenparameter dependent boundary conditions. Sonja Currie, Anne D. Love. Abstract. This paper inductively investigates an inverse problem for difference boundary value problems with boundary conditions that depend quadratically on the eigenparameter.

  9. Magnetic catalysis and inverse magnetic catalysis in QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, N.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the effects of strong magnetic fields on the QCD phase structure at vanishing density by solving the gluon and quark gap equations. The chiral crossover temperature as well as the chiral condensate is computed. For asymptotically large magnetic fields we find magnetic catalysis, while we find inverse magnetic catalysis for intermediate magnetic fields. Moreover, for large magnetic fields the chiral phase transition for massless quarks turns into a crossover. The underlying mechanisms are then investigated analytically within a few simplifications of the full numerical analysis. We find that a combination of gluon screening effects and the weakening of the strong coupling is responsible for the phenomenon of inverse catalysis seen in lattice studies. In turn, the magnetic catalysis at large magnetic field is already indicated by simple arguments based on dimensionality. (author)

  10. Fast computation of the inverse CMH model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Umesh D.; Della Torre, Edward

    2001-12-01

    A fast computational method based on differential equation approach for inverse Della Torre, Oti, Kádár (DOK) model has been extended for the inverse Complete Moving Hysteresis (CMH) model. A cobweb technique for calculating the inverse CMH model is also presented. The two techniques differ from the point of view of flexibility, accuracy, and computation time. Simulation results of the inverse computation for both methods are presented.

  11. LA INVERSION INMOBILIARIA INDIRECTA EN ESPANA.

    OpenAIRE

    Joan MONTLLOR-SERRATS; Anna M. PANOSA-GUBAU

    2013-01-01

    En este articulo se revisan los instrumentos de inversion indirecta inmobiliaria en Espana, desde la creacion en 1992 de los Fondos y Sociedades de Inversion inmobiliaria (FII y SII) hasta la creacion de la primera Sociedad de inversion del mercado inmobiliario (SOCIMI) en 2013. Se analizan las caracteristicas de los mismos y asimismo los motivos por los cuales estas figuras de inversion no han tenido mucha demanda hasta el momento, en comparacion con los REITs (Real Estate Investment Trusts)...

  12. Codimension zero laminations are inverse limits

    OpenAIRE

    Lozano Rojo, Álvaro

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to investigate the relation between inverse limit of branched manifolds and codimension zero laminations. We give necessary and sufficient conditions for such an inverse limit to be a lamination. We also show that codimension zero laminations are inverse limits of branched manifolds. The inverse limit structure allows us to show that equicontinuous codimension zero laminations preserves a distance function on transversals.

  13. High-pressure synthesis of CuBa2Ca3Cu4O10+δ superconductor from precursors prepared by a polymerized complex method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoba, Tomoya; Bizen, Takeshi; Suzuki, Tsuneo; Nakayama, Tadachika; Suematsu, Hisayuki; Niihara, Koichi; Katsumata, Tetsuhiro; Inaguma, Yoshiyuki

    2011-01-01

    Samples of a CuBa 2 Ca 3 Cu 4 O 10+ δ superconductor were synthesized under a high pressure of 5 GPa at 1100-1200degC for 30 min using precursors produced by solid-state reaction and polymerized complex methods. Compared with the precursors prepared by the solid-state reaction method, the precursors produced by the polymerized complex method have low grain sizes. The superconductive transition temperature of the samples prepared using precursors made by the polymerized complex method was found to be 113 K. The volume fractions of the superconducting phase in the samples prepared using precursors made by the solid-state reaction and polymerized complex methods were 49 and 36%, respectively. From these results, precursors made by the polymerized complex method can be used in the high-pressure synthesis of superconductors similarly to those made by the solid-state reaction method. (author)

  14. Understanding Animal Detection of Precursor Earthquake Sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garstang, Michael; Kelley, Michael C

    2017-08-31

    We use recent research to provide an explanation of how animals might detect earthquakes before they occur. While the intrinsic value of such warnings is immense, we show that the complexity of the process may result in inconsistent responses of animals to the possible precursor signal. Using the results of our research, we describe a logical but complex sequence of geophysical events triggered by precursor earthquake crustal movements that ultimately result in a sound signal detectable by animals. The sound heard by animals occurs only when metal or other surfaces (glass) respond to vibrations produced by electric currents induced by distortions of the earth's electric fields caused by the crustal movements. A combination of existing measurement systems combined with more careful monitoring of animal response could nevertheless be of value, particularly in remote locations.

  15. Investigations on precursor measures for aeroelastic flutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatramani, J.; Sarkar, Sunetra; Gupta, Sayan

    2018-04-01

    Wind tunnel experiments carried out on a pitch-plunge aeroelastic system in the presence of fluctuating flows reveal that flutter instability is presaged by a regime of intermittency. It is observed that as the flow speed gradually increases towards the flutter speed, there appears intermittent bursts of periodic oscillations which become more frequent as the wind speed increases and eventually the dynamics transition into fully developed limit cycle oscillations, marking the onset of flutter. The signature from these intermittent oscillations are exploited to develop measures that forewarn a transition to flutter and can serve as precursors. This study investigates a suite of measures that are obtained directly from the time history of measurements and are hence model independent. The dependence of these precursors on the size of the measured data set and the time required for their computation is investigated. These measures can be useful in structural health monitoring of aeroelastic structures.

  16. Metabolic Precursors to Amphetamine and Methamphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, J D

    1993-12-01

    Analysis and interpretation of amphetamine results is a challenging process made difficult by a number of factors. One of the complications comes from determination of the origin of amphetamine or methamphetamine in a sample. Given the relatively rare occasions that either of these two drugs are prescribed, legal prescription of one of these drugs is seldom a reason for positive findings. A number of other precursor compounds are metabolized by the body to amphetamine or methamphetamine, many of which could be used for legitimate reasons. Fourteen different metabolic precursors of amphetamine or methamphetamine are included in this review. They are amphetaminil, benzphetamine, clobenzorex, deprenyl, dimethylamphetamine, ethylamphetamine, famprofazone, fencamine, fenethylline, fenproporex, furfenorex, mefenorex, mesocarb, and prenylamine. Medical use, metabolism, analysis, and interpretation are described to afford sufficient information to evaluate the possible involvement of these drugs in positive amphetamine or methamphetamine results. Copyright © 1993 Central Police University.

  17. Inversion: A Most Useful Kind of Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrovsky, Vladimir

    1992-01-01

    The transformation assigning to every point its inverse with respect to a circle with given radius and center is called an inversion. Discusses inversion with respect to points, circles, angles, distances, space, and the parallel postulate. Exercises related to these topics are included. (MDH)

  18. Phaseless tomographic inverse scattering in Banach spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estatico, C.; Fedeli, A.; Pastorino, M.; Randazzo, A.; Tavanti, E.

    2016-10-01

    In conventional microwave imaging, a hidden dielectric object under test is illuminated by microwave incident waves and the field it scatters is measured in magnitude and phase in order to retrieve the dielectric properties by solving the related non-homogenous Helmholtz equation or its Lippmann-Schwinger integral formulation. Since the measurement of the phase of electromagnetic waves can be still considered expensive in real applications, in this paper only the magnitude of the scattering wave fields is measured in order to allow a reduction of the cost of the measurement apparatus. In this respect, we firstly analyse the properties of the phaseless scattering nonlinear forward modelling operator in its integral form and we provide an analytical expression for computing its Fréchet derivative. Then, we propose an inexact Newton method to solve the associated nonlinear inverse problems, where any linearized step is solved by a Lp Banach space iterative regularization method which acts on the dual space Lp* . Indeed, it is well known that regularization in special Banach spaces, such us Lp with 1 < p < 2, allows to promote sparsity and to reduce Gibbs phenomena and over-smoothness. Preliminary results concerning numerically computed field data are shown.

  19. Phaseless tomographic inverse scattering in Banach spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estatico, C.; Fedeli, A.; Pastorino, M.; Randazzo, A.; Tavanti, E.

    2016-01-01

    In conventional microwave imaging, a hidden dielectric object under test is illuminated by microwave incident waves and the field it scatters is measured in magnitude and phase in order to retrieve the dielectric properties by solving the related non-homogenous Helmholtz equation or its Lippmann-Schwinger integral formulation. Since the measurement of the phase of electromagnetic waves can be still considered expensive in real applications, in this paper only the magnitude of the scattering wave fields is measured in order to allow a reduction of the cost of the measurement apparatus. In this respect, we firstly analyse the properties of the phaseless scattering nonlinear forward modelling operator in its integral form and we provide an analytical expression for computing its Fréchet derivative. Then, we propose an inexact Newton method to solve the associated nonlinear inverse problems, where any linearized step is solved by a L p Banach space iterative regularization method which acts on the dual space L p* . Indeed, it is well known that regularization in special Banach spaces, such us L p with 1 < p < 2, allows to promote sparsity and to reduce Gibbs phenomena and over-smoothness. Preliminary results concerning numerically computed field data are shown. (paper)

  20. A.C. impedance, XRD, DSC, SEM and charge/discharge studies on Al2O3, TiO2, SiO2 dispersoid LiPF6/PVC/PVdF-co-HFP composite polymer electrolytes by phase inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickraman, P.; Gopukumar, S.

    2017-07-01

    The PVC/PVdF-co-HFP composite polymer electrolyte membranes (CPEMs) by varying blend ratios 1:1, 1:2, and 2:1 with fixed content of Al2O3, TiO2 and SiO2 having soaked in 0.5 M LiPF6 in EC/DEC (1:1) v/v) have been prepared by phase inversion. CPEMs of higher ionic conductivity (not dependent on electrolyte uptake as observed in our study) ASA4 (3.61×10-4 Scm-1), TSA3 (1.53×10-4 Scm-1), and SSA3 (4.81×10-4 Scm-1) have been only chosen for XRD, DSC, SEM and electrochemical studies. In XRD, crystalline peaks (phases) of PVdF have been noted with/without change in intensity as well as FWHM which correspond to type of filler interaction with host matrix. In DSC, it is observed that shifts in baseline, melting endotherms, and area under the endotherms indicating the thermal hist ory of PVC (Tg = 82 ° C) and melting of VdF crystallites varied with nature of the filler dispersoid. In SEM, the coagulated fibrils of the polymer coiled with the sponge like structure has been mapped. The charge/discharge studies are carried out on these CPEMs at C/10 rate in the voltage range 2.8 V - 4.2 V, and it is noted that the TSA3 showed better cycling performance with good capacity retention i.e., 50 cycles with 66% capacity retention than ASA4 of 28 cycles with 65% and SSA3 of 5 cycles with 56%. In the present study Coulombic efficiency is concerned only for first cycle and it is noted that the TSA3 showed 71% than 66% and 62% respectively for SSA3 and ASA4.

  1. PRECURSORS OF EARTHQUAKES: VLF SIGNALSIONOSPHERE IONOSPHERE RELATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa ULAS

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available lot of people have died because of earthquakes every year. Therefore It is crucial to predict the time of the earthquakes reasonable time before it had happed. This paper presents recent information published in the literature about precursors of earthquakes. The relationships between earthquakes and ionosphere are targeted to guide new researches in order to study further to find novel prediction methods.

  2. Radiation response of rodent neural precursor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limoli, C.L.; Fike, J.R.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Therapeutic irradiation of the brain can cause cognitive dysfunction that is not treatable or well understood. Several lines of evidence from our laboratory suggest that radiation induced inhibition of neurogenesis in the hippocampus may be involved. To understand the mechanisms underlying these observations, we initiated studies using neural precursor cells isolated from the adult rat hippocampus. Cells were cultured exponentially and analyzed for acute (0-24h) and chronic (3-33 day) changes in apoptosis and oxidative stress following exposure to X-rays. Oxidative stress was measured using a dye sensitive to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis was measured using annexin V binding; each endpoint was quantified by fluorescent automated cell sorting (FACS). Following exposure to X-rays, neural precursor cells exhibit a dose-responsive increase in the level of ROS and apoptosis over acute and chronic time frames. ROS and apoptosis were maximal at 12h, increasing 35 and 37% respectively over that of unirradiated controls. ROS and apoptosis peaked again at 24h, increasing 31 and 21% respectively over controls. Chronic levels of ROS and apoptosis were persistently elevated in a dose-dependent manner. ROS showed significant increases (34-180%) over a 3-4 week interval, while increases in apoptosis were less dramatic, rising 45% by week one before dropping to background. Irradiation of rat neural precursor cells was associated with an increase in p53 protein levels, and the activation of G1/S and G2/M checkpoints. These data suggest that the apoptotic and ROS responses may be tied to p53 dependent regulation of cell cycle control and stress activated pathways. We propose that oxidative stress plays a critical role in the radiation response of neural precursor cells, and discuss how this might contribute to the inhibition of neurogenesis and the cognitive impairment observed in the irradiated CNS

  3. Delayed neutron emission, theory and precursor systematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahnsen, T.; Pappas, A.C.; Tunaal, T.

    1968-01-01

    Information on the properties of observed delayed neutron precursor and emitters is reviewed. As far as possible emphasis is laid on charge, mass, half-life, β-energetics, neutron-branching, levels, spin and neutron energy spectra. The theory of delayed neutron emission given by Bohr and Wheeler and later refined is presented and analysed with respect to its potentialities and limitations. Even if the theory gives a good general picture of the process itself, it has not been possible to develop it to such detail as would be necessary for satisfactory delayed neutron precursor systematics. Consequently, the systematics which are available today are based mainly on energetics as criteria, and suggest a wide range (in charge and mass) of precursors, much wider than anticipated, earlier or even now, from those that have already been identified. Nevertheless systematics have their use in a search for precursors and have in recent years resulted in a substantial increase in the member of known species. The process is analysed step by step (i.e. matrix element, Fermi function, level density, spin distribution, ''the energy and the angular momentum paths'', and neutron-to-total width). Improvements are suggested that would give rise to a more realistic treatment, and outlines are given for guiding future work. Emphasis is put onto that experimental and theoretical information which must be obtained before a satisfactory and advanced theoretical treatment can be obtained. Some attempts made along these lines are presented. Their importance in the estimate of P n values and shapes of neutron spectra are shown and discussed. For the latter the more different factors (i.e. |M| 2 , ω(E,J), Γ n / Γ tot , J, π, levels, etc.) are considered, the more evidence is obtained for a ''piling up'' of the neutron spectrum towards low energies. Finally the importance is stressed of detailed delayed neutron studies for considering nuclear structure phenomena. (author)

  4. Delayed Neutron Emission, Theory and Precursor Systematica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahnsen, T.; Pappas, A.C.; Tunaal, T.

    1968-01-01

    Information on the properties of observed delayed neutron precursor; and emitters is reviewed. As far as possible emphasis is laid on charge, mass, half-life, β-energetics, neutron-branching, levels, spin and neutron energy spectra. The theory of delayed neutron emission given by Bohr and Wheeler and later refined is presented and analysed with respect to its potentialities and limitations. Even if the theory gives a good general picture of the process itself, it has not been possible to develop it to such detail as would be necessary for satisfactory delayed neutron precursor systematics. Consequently, the systematics which are available today are based mainly on energetics as criteria, and suggest a wide range (in charge and mass) of precursors, much wider than anticipated, earlier or even now, from those that have already been identified. Nevertheless systematics have their use in a search for precursors and have in recent years resulted in a substantial increase in the member of known species. The process is analysed step by step (i.e. matrix element, Fermi function, level density, spin distribution, the energy and the angular momentum paths , and neutron-to-total width). Improvements are suggested that would give rise to a more realistic treatment, and outlines are given for guiding future work. Emphasis is put onto that experimental and theoretical information which must be obtained before a satisfactory and advanced theoretical treatment can be obtained. Some attempts made along these lines are presented. Their importance in the estimate of Pn values and shapes of neutron spectra are shown and discussed. For the latter the more different factors (i.e. |M| 2 , ω(E, J), Γ n /Γ tot , J, π, levels, etc.) are considered, the more evidence is obtained for a 'piling up' of the neutron spectrum towards low energies. Finally the importance is stressed of detailed delayed neutron studies for considering nuclear structure phenomena. (author)

  5. Understanding the inverse magnetocaloric effect through a simple theoretical model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranke, P.J. von, E-mail: von.ranke@uol.com.b [Instituto de Fisica Armando Dias Tavares-Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Sao Francisco Xavier, 524, Rio de Janeiro 20550-013 (Brazil); Alho, B.P.; Nobrega, E.P.; Oliveira, N.A. de [Instituto de Fisica Armando Dias Tavares-Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Sao Francisco Xavier, 524, Rio de Janeiro 20550-013 (Brazil)

    2009-10-15

    We investigated the inverse magnetocaloric effect using a theoretical magnetic model formed by two coupled magnetic lattices to describe a ferrimagnetic system. The influence of the compensation temperature, and the ferrimagnetic-paramagnetic phase transition on the magnetocaloric effect was analyzed. Also, a relation between the area under the magnetocaloric curve and the net magnetic moment of a ferrimagnetic system was established in this work.

  6. Cellular Kinetics of Perivascular MSC Precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William C. W. Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs and MSC-like multipotent stem/progenitor cells have been widely investigated for regenerative medicine and deemed promising in clinical applications. In order to further improve MSC-based stem cell therapeutics, it is important to understand the cellular kinetics and functional roles of MSCs in the dynamic regenerative processes. However, due to the heterogeneous nature of typical MSC cultures, their native identity and anatomical localization in the body have remained unclear, making it difficult to decipher the existence of distinct cell subsets within the MSC entity. Recent studies have shown that several blood-vessel-derived precursor cell populations, purified by flow cytometry from multiple human organs, give rise to bona fide MSCs, suggesting that the vasculature serves as a systemic reservoir of MSC-like stem/progenitor cells. Using individually purified MSC-like precursor cell subsets, we and other researchers have been able to investigate the differential phenotypes and regenerative capacities of these contributing cellular constituents in the MSC pool. In this review, we will discuss the identification and characterization of perivascular MSC precursors, including pericytes and adventitial cells, and focus on their cellular kinetics: cell adhesion, migration, engraftment, homing, and intercellular cross-talk during tissue repair and regeneration.

  7. Interstellar shock waves with magnetic precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draine, B.T.

    1980-01-01

    The structure of steady, radiative, one-dimensional shock waves in partially ionized gas with a transverse magnetic field B 0 is investigated. Under a broad range of conditions applicable to the interstellar medium it is found that such shocks may be preceded by a magnetic precursor which heats and compresses the medium ahead of the front where the neutral gas undergoes a discontinuous change of state; indeed, if B 0 is sufficiently large, a shock can exist with no discontinuities in hydrodynamical variables. Within this magnetic precursor both ions and electrons stream through the neutral fluid with velocities which may be a significant fraction of the shock speed. The physical processes operative in such shocks are examined, including the effects of charged dust grains in dense molecular clouds. Numerical examples are shown for v/sub s/ = 10 km s -1 shocks propagating into diffuse H I or H 2 . Shocks with magnetic precursors may have important consequences for the interstellar medium, some of which are briefly considered

  8. Ionospheric precursors for crustal earthquakes in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Perrone

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Crustal earthquakes with magnitude 6.0>M≥5.5 observed in Italy for the period 1979–2009 including the last one at L'Aquila on 6 April 2009 were considered to check if the earlier obtained relationships for ionospheric precursors for strong Japanese earthquakes are valid for the Italian moderate earthquakes. The ionospheric precursors are based on the observed variations of the sporadic E-layer parameters (h'Es, fbEs and foF2 at the ionospheric station Rome. Empirical dependencies for the seismo-ionospheric disturbances relating the earthquake magnitude and the epicenter distance are obtained and they have been shown to be similar to those obtained earlier for Japanese earthquakes. The dependences indicate the process of spreading the disturbance from the epicenter towards periphery during the earthquake preparation process. Large lead times for the precursor occurrence (up to 34 days for M=5.8–5.9 tells about a prolong preparation period. A possibility of using the obtained relationships for the earthquakes prediction is discussed.

  9. HI-SCALE Nanoparticle Composition and Precursors Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, James [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Stark, Harald [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States); Browne, Eleanor [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Hanson, David [Augsburg College, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2017-06-15

    From 21 August to 27 September, 2016, during the second Intensive Operational Period (IOP) of the Holistic Interactions of Shallow Clouds, Aerosols, and Land-Ecoystems (HI-SCALE) field campaign, a suite of instruments were placed in the Guest Instrument Facility (GIF) at the Central Facility of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in Lamont, Oklahoma. The goal of these measurements was to fully characterize the formation and evolution of atmospheric aerosol particles through measurements of gas-phase precursor and ambient nanoparticle composition. Specifically, we sought to: 1. investigate the role of acid-base chemistry in new-particle growth through measurements of ammonia and amines as well as organic and inorganic acids in both atmospheric nanoparticles and the gas phase; 2. investigate the contribution of other surface-area or volume-controlled processes to nanoparticle formation and growth, such as the uptake of extremely low volatility organic compounds (ELVOCs); 3. evaluate the performance of a new instrument being developed with funding from the DOE Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program for measuring gas-phase amines and related compounds; and 4. together with colleagues measuring on the ground and onboard the ARM Gulfstream-1 (G-1) aircraft during HI-SCALE, create a comprehensive data set related to new particle formation and growth that can be used in modeling efforts by the research team as well as DOE collaborators.

  10. MetNet Precursor - Network Mission to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harri, Arri-Matti

    2010-05-01

    We are developing a new kind of planetary exploration mission for Mars - MetNet in situ observation network based on a new semi-hard landing vehicle called the Met-Net Lander (MNL). The first MetNet vehicle, MetNet Precursor, slated for launch in 2011. The MetNet development work started already in 2001. The actual practical Precursor Mission development work started in January 2009 with participation from various space research institutes and agencies. The scientific rationale and goals as well as key mission solutions will be discussed. The eventual scope of the MetNet Mission is to deploy some 20 MNLs on the Martian surface using inflatable descent system structures, which will be supported by observations from the orbit around Mars. Currently we are working on the MetNet Mars Precursor Mission (MMPM) to deploy one MetNet Lander to Mars in the 2011 launch window as a technology and science demonstration mission. The MNL will have a versatile science payload focused on the atmospheric science of Mars. Time-resolved in situ Martian meteorological measurements acquired by the Viking, Mars Pathfinder and Phoenix landers and remote sensing observations by the Mariner 9, Viking, Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Odyssey and the Mars Express orbiters have provided the basis for our current understanding of the behavior of weather and climate on Mars. However, the available amount of data is still scarce and a wealth of additional in situ observations are needed on varying types of Martian orography, terrain and altitude spanning all latitudes and longitudes to address microscale and mesoscale atmospheric phenomena. Detailed characterization of the Martian atmospheric circulation patterns and climatological cycles requires simultaneous in situ atmospheric observations. The scientific payload of the MetNet Mission encompasses separate instrument packages for the atmospheric entry and descent phase and for the surface operation phase. The MetNet mission concept and key probe

  11. Study on how the content of selenium in the precursors influences the properties of CuInSe2 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiao; Zhao, Ming; Zhuang, Daming; Sun, Rujun; Zhang, Leng; Wei, Yaowei; Lv, Xunyan; Wu, Yixuan; Ren, Guoan

    2018-03-01

    The sputtering with post-selenization technique is a promising process for large-scale manufacturing of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) thin films, where the composition of precursors is important to obtaining CIGS thin films with high quality. We use the CuInSe2 thin film as an example to discuss how the content of selenium in the precursors influences the properties of CuInSe2 thin films. Our results show that the selenium content in the CuInSex precursors strongly influences the grain size, the tomography, phase, elemental distribution and the carrier mobility of the CuInSe2 thin films. Decreasing the selenium content in the precursors can increase the grain size of CuInSe2 and the carrier mobility. On the contrary, increasing the selenium content in the precursors can decrease the roughness of surface and the phase separation.

  12. Annotation of novel neuropeptide precursors in the migratory locust based on transcript screening of a public EST database and mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Loof Arnold

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For holometabolous insects there has been an explosion of proteomic and peptidomic information thanks to large genome sequencing projects. Heterometabolous insects, although comprising many important species, have been far less studied. The migratory locust Locusta migratoria, a heterometabolous insect, is one of the most infamous agricultural pests. They undergo a well-known and profound phase transition from the relatively harmless solitary form to a ferocious gregarious form. The underlying regulatory mechanisms of this phase transition are not fully understood, but it is undoubtedly that neuropeptides are involved. However, neuropeptide research in locusts is hampered by the absence of genomic information. Results Recently, EST (Expressed Sequence Tag databases from Locusta migratoria were constructed. Using bioinformatical tools, we searched these EST databases specifically for neuropeptide precursors. Based on known locust neuropeptide sequences, we confirmed the sequence of several previously identified neuropeptide precursors (i.e. pacifastin-related peptides, which consolidated our method. In addition, we found two novel neuroparsin precursors and annotated the hitherto unknown tachykinin precursor. Besides one of the known tachykinin peptides, this EST contained an additional tachykinin-like sequence. Using neuropeptide precursors from Drosophila melanogaster as a query, we succeeded in annotating the Locusta neuropeptide F, allatostatin-C and ecdysis-triggering hormone precursor, which until now had not been identified in locusts or in any other heterometabolous insect. For the tachykinin precursor, the ecdysis-triggering hormone precursor and the allatostatin-C precursor, translation of the predicted neuropeptides in neural tissues was confirmed with mass spectrometric techniques. Conclusion In this study we describe the annotation of 6 novel neuropeptide precursors and the neuropeptides they encode from the

  13. Microstructural Evolution of Inverse Bainite in a Hypereutectoid Low-Alloy Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Rangasayee; Wang, Yiyu; Li, Leijun

    2017-12-01

    Microstructural evolution of inverse bainite during isothermal bainite transformation of a hypereutectoid low-alloy steel at 773 K (500 °C) was investigated through a series of interrupted isothermal experiments using a quench dilatometer. Microstructural characterization revealed that the inverse bainitic transformation starts by the nucleation of cementite (Fe3C) from parent austenite as a midrib in the bainitic microstructure. The inverse bainite becomes "degenerated" to typical upper bainite at prolonged transformation times. Crystallographic orientation relationships between the individual phases of inverse bainite microstructure were found to obey { _{γ } || _{θ } } { _{α } || _{θ } } { _{γ } || _{α } } 111_{γ } || { \\overline{2} 21} _{θ } } { 110} _{α } || { \\overline{2} 21} _{θ } } { 111} _{γ } || { 110 } _{α } {111} _{γ } || {211} _{θ } {110} _{α } || {211} _{θ } Furthermore, the crystallographic orientation deviations between the individual phases of inverse bainite microstructure suggest that the secondary carbide nucleation occurs from the inverse bainitic ferrite. Thermodynamic driving force calculations provide an explanation for the observed nucleation sequence in inverse bainite. The degeneracy of inverse bainite microstructure to upper bainite at prolonged transformation times is likely due to the effects of cementite midrib dissolution at the early stage and secondary carbide coarsening at the later stage.

  14. A hybrid algorithm for solving inverse problems in elasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barabasz Barbara

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper offers a new approach to handling difficult parametric inverse problems in elasticity and thermo-elasticity, formulated as global optimization ones. The proposed strategy is composed of two phases. In the first, global phase, the stochastic hp-HGS algorithm recognizes the basins of attraction of various objective minima. In the second phase, the local objective minimizers are closer approached by steepest descent processes executed singly in each basin of attraction. The proposed complex strategy is especially dedicated to ill-posed problems with multimodal objective functionals. The strategy offers comparatively low computational and memory costs resulting from a double-adaptive technique in both forward and inverse problem domains. We provide a result on the Lipschitz continuity of the objective functional composed of the elastic energy and the boundary displacement misfits with respect to the unknown constitutive parameters. It allows common scaling of the accuracy of solving forward and inverse problems, which is the core of the introduced double-adaptive technique. The capability of the proposed method of finding multiple solutions is illustrated by a computational example which consists in restoring all feasible Young modulus distributions minimizing an objective functional in a 3D domain of a photo polymer template obtained during step and flash imprint lithography.

  15. Inverse problem in transformation optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novitsky, Andrey

    2011-01-01

    . We offer the solution of some sort of inverse problem: starting from the fields in the invisibility cloak we directly derive the permittivity and permeability tensors of the cloaking shell. This approach can be useful for finding material parameters for the specified electromagnetic fields......The straightforward method of transformation optics implies that one starts from the coordinate transformation and determines the Jacobian matrix, the fields and material parameters of the cloak. However, the coordinate transformation appears as an optional function: it is not necessary to know it...... in the cloaking shell without knowing the coordinate transformation....

  16. Iterative optimization in inverse problems

    CERN Document Server

    Byrne, Charles L

    2014-01-01

    Iterative Optimization in Inverse Problems brings together a number of important iterative algorithms for medical imaging, optimization, and statistical estimation. It incorporates recent work that has not appeared in other books and draws on the author's considerable research in the field, including his recently developed class of SUMMA algorithms. Related to sequential unconstrained minimization methods, the SUMMA class includes a wide range of iterative algorithms well known to researchers in various areas, such as statistics and image processing. Organizing the topics from general to more

  17. Radiated energy calculation in free electron lasers without inversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oganesyan, K.B.

    2017-01-01

    The equations of particle motion in the free electron lasers without inversion are derived using the Hamiltonian formalism. In small signal regime the uncoupled one dimensional phase equation is derived in the form of pendulum equation. For the practical estimations the same equation along with the equation of particle energy change are solved using perturbation theory and the expressions for gain in FEL regime and particle angle dependence of energy at the exit of first undulator are obtained. Results for gain, particle phase and energy change depending on beam parameters and device are presented

  18. Spontaneous inversion of nystagmus without a positional change in the horizontal canal variant of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Yasuo; Ichimura, Akihide; Otsuka, Koji; Hagiwara, Akira; Inagaki, Taro; Shimizu, Shigetaka; Nagai, Noriko; Itani, Shigeto; Suzuki, Mamoru

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the neuro-otological findings, including nystagmus, and the clinical course of patients with the horizontal canal variant of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (HC-BPPV), who showed spontaneous inversion of nystagmus without a positional change. Furthermore, we speculated on the possible mechanism of spontaneous inversion of nystagmus without a positional change. The characteristics of spontaneous inversion of positional nystagmus without a positional change were analyzed in 7 patients with HC-BPPV. All patients were diagnosed as having HC-BPPV. During the positional test, the spontaneous inversion of nystagmus was observed in the same head position in all patients. Spontaneous inversion was observed on both sides in 5 patients, and only on 1 side in 2 patients. All patients presented with geotropic nystagmus in the first phase, and ageotropic nystagmus in the second phase. The coexistence of cupulolithiasis and canalolithiasis appears to be a possible mechanism of the spontaneous inversion of positional nystagmus.

  19. Material State Awareness for Composites Part I: Precursor Damage Analysis Using Ultrasonic Guided Coda Wave Interferometry (CWI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Subir; Banerjee, Sourav

    2017-12-16

    Detection of precursor damage followed by the quantification of the degraded material properties could lead to more accurate progressive failure models for composite materials. However, such information is not readily available. In composite materials, the precursor damages-for example matrix cracking, microcracks, voids, interlaminar pre-delamination crack joining matrix cracks, fiber micro-buckling, local fiber breakage, local debonding, etc.-are insensitive to the low-frequency ultrasonic guided-wave-based online nondestructive evaluation (NDE) or Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) (~100-~500 kHz) systems. Overcoming this barrier, in this article, an online ultrasonic technique is proposed using the coda part of the guided wave signal, which is often neglected. Although the first-arrival wave packets that contain the fundamental guided Lamb wave modes are unaltered, the coda wave packets however carry significant information about the precursor events with predictable phase shifts. The Taylor-series-based modified Coda Wave Interferometry (CWI) technique is proposed to quantify the stretch parameter to compensate the phase shifts in the coda wave as a result of precursor damage in composites. The CWI analysis was performed on five woven composite-fiber-reinforced-laminate specimens, and the precursor events were identified. Next, the precursor damage states were verified using high-frequency Scanning Acoustic Microscopy (SAM) and optical microscopy imaging.

  20. Reconstructing the Hopfield network as an inverse Ising problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Haiping

    2010-01-01

    We test four fast mean-field-type algorithms on Hopfield networks as an inverse Ising problem. The equilibrium behavior of Hopfield networks is simulated through Glauber dynamics. In the low-temperature regime, the simulated annealing technique is adopted. Although performances of these network reconstruction algorithms on the simulated network of spiking neurons are extensively studied recently, the analysis of Hopfield networks is lacking so far. For the Hopfield network, we found that, in the retrieval phase favored when the network wants to memory one of stored patterns, all the reconstruction algorithms fail to extract interactions within a desired accuracy, and the same failure occurs in the spin-glass phase where spurious minima show up, while in the paramagnetic phase, albeit unfavored during the retrieval dynamics, the algorithms work well to reconstruct the network itself. This implies that, as an inverse problem, the paramagnetic phase is conversely useful for reconstructing the network while the retrieval phase loses all the information about interactions in the network except for the case where only one pattern is stored. The performances of algorithms are studied with respect to the system size, memory load, and temperature; sample-to-sample fluctuations are also considered.

  1. Reconstructing the Hopfield network as an inverse Ising problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haiping

    2010-03-01

    We test four fast mean-field-type algorithms on Hopfield networks as an inverse Ising problem. The equilibrium behavior of Hopfield networks is simulated through Glauber dynamics. In the low-temperature regime, the simulated annealing technique is adopted. Although performances of these network reconstruction algorithms on the simulated network of spiking neurons are extensively studied recently, the analysis of Hopfield networks is lacking so far. For the Hopfield network, we found that, in the retrieval phase favored when the network wants to memory one of stored patterns, all the reconstruction algorithms fail to extract interactions within a desired accuracy, and the same failure occurs in the spin-glass phase where spurious minima show up, while in the paramagnetic phase, albeit unfavored during the retrieval dynamics, the algorithms work well to reconstruct the network itself. This implies that, as an inverse problem, the paramagnetic phase is conversely useful for reconstructing the network while the retrieval phase loses all the information about interactions in the network except for the case where only one pattern is stored. The performances of algorithms are studied with respect to the system size, memory load, and temperature; sample-to-sample fluctuations are also considered.

  2. LHC Report: 2 inverse femtobarns!

    CERN Multimedia

    Mike Lamont for the LHC Team

    2011-01-01

    The LHC is enjoying a confluence of twos. This morning (Friday 5 August) we passed 2 inverse femtobarns delivered in 2011; the peak luminosity is now just over 2 x1033 cm-2s-1; and recently fill 2000 was in for nearly 22 hours and delivered around 90 inverse picobarns, almost twice 2010's total.   In order to increase the luminosity we can increase of number of bunches, increase the number of particles per bunch, or decrease the transverse beam size at the interaction point. The beam size can be tackled in two ways: either reduce the size of the injected bunches or squeeze harder with the quadrupole magnets situated on either side of the experiments. Having increased the number of bunches to 1380, the maximum possible with a 50 ns bunch spacing, a one day meeting in Crozet decided to explore the other possibilities. The size of the beams coming from the injectors has been reduced to the minimum possible. This has brought an increase in the peak luminosity of about 50% and the 2 x 1033 cm...

  3. Inverse problems in systems biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engl, Heinz W; Lu, James; Müller, Stefan; Flamm, Christoph; Schuster, Peter; Kügler, Philipp

    2009-01-01

    Systems biology is a new discipline built upon the premise that an understanding of how cells and organisms carry out their functions cannot be gained by looking at cellular components in isolation. Instead, consideration of the interplay between the parts of systems is indispensable for analyzing, modeling, and predicting systems' behavior. Studying biological processes under this premise, systems biology combines experimental techniques and computational methods in order to construct predictive models. Both in building and utilizing models of biological systems, inverse problems arise at several occasions, for example, (i) when experimental time series and steady state data are used to construct biochemical reaction networks, (ii) when model parameters are identified that capture underlying mechanisms or (iii) when desired qualitative behavior such as bistability or limit cycle oscillations is engineered by proper choices of parameter combinations. In this paper we review principles of the modeling process in systems biology and illustrate the ill-posedness and regularization of parameter identification problems in that context. Furthermore, we discuss the methodology of qualitative inverse problems and demonstrate how sparsity enforcing regularization allows the determination of key reaction mechanisms underlying the qualitative behavior. (topical review)

  4. Photoelectron yield spectroscopy and inverse photoemission spectroscopy evaluations of p-type amorphous silicon carbide films prepared using liquid materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Tatsuya, E-mail: mtatsuya@jaist.ac.jp, E-mail: mtakashi@jaist.ac.jp [Center for Nano Materials and Technology, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST), 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan); Masuda, Takashi, E-mail: mtatsuya@jaist.ac.jp, E-mail: mtakashi@jaist.ac.jp; Inoue, Satoshi; Shimoda, Tatsuya [Green Device Research Center, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1211 (Japan); Yano, Hiroshi; Iwamuro, Noriyuki [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tennoudai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan)

    2016-05-15

    Phosphorus-doped amorphous silicon carbide films were prepared using a polymeric precursor solution. Unlike conventional polymeric precursors, this polymer requires neither catalysts nor oxidation for its synthesis and cross-linkage, providing semiconducting properties in the films. The valence and conduction states of resultant films were determined directly through the combination of inverse photoemission spectroscopy and photoelectron yield spectroscopy. The incorporated carbon widened energy gap and optical gap comparably in the films with lower carbon concentrations. In contrast, a large deviation between the energy gap and the optical gap was observed at higher carbon contents because of exponential widening of the band tail.

  5. Inverse problems and inverse scattering of plane waves

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh Roy, Dilip N

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this text is to present the theory and mathematics of inverse scattering, in a simple way, to the many researchers and professionals who use it in their everyday research. While applications range across a broad spectrum of disciplines, examples in this text will focus primarly, but not exclusively, on acoustics. The text will be especially valuable for those applied workers who would like to delve more deeply into the fundamentally mathematical character of the subject matter.Practitioners in this field comprise applied physicists, engineers, and technologists, whereas the theory is almost entirely in the domain of abstract mathematics. This gulf between the two, if bridged, can only lead to improvement in the level of scholarship in this highly important discipline. This is the book''s primary focus.

  6. An inverse-scattering approach to the physics of transition metals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A method is developed for the deduction of a transition metal ion potential from a knowledge of the phase-shift. The method used is based the distorted plane – wave scattering approximation for the deduction of non singular potentials from scattering phase shifts in an inverse scattering approach. The resulting electron ...

  7. Period doubling cascades of limit cycles in cardiac action potential models as precursors to chaotic early Afterdepolarizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kügler, Philipp; Bulelzai, M A K; Erhardt, André H

    2017-04-04

    Early afterdepolarizations (EADs) are pathological voltage oscillations during the repolarization phase of cardiac action potentials (APs). EADs are caused by drugs, oxidative stress or ion channel disease, and they are considered as potential precursors to cardiac arrhythmias in recent attempts to redefine the cardiac drug safety paradigm. The irregular behaviour of EADs observed in experiments has been previously attributed to chaotic EAD dynamics under periodic pacing, made possible by a homoclinic bifurcation in the fast subsystem of the deterministic AP system of differential equations. In this article we demonstrate that a homoclinic bifurcation in the fast subsystem of the action potential model is neither a necessary nor a sufficient condition for the genesis of chaotic EADs. We rather argue that a cascade of period doubling (PD) bifurcations of limit cycles in the full AP system paves the way to chaotic EAD dynamics across a variety of models including a) periodically paced and spontaneously active cardiomyocytes, b) periodically paced and non-active cardiomyocytes as well as c) unpaced and spontaneously active cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, our bifurcation analysis reveals that chaotic EAD dynamics may coexist in a stable manner with fully regular AP dynamics, where only the initial conditions decide which type of dynamics is displayed. EADs are a potential source of cardiac arrhythmias and hence are of relevance both from the viewpoint of drug cardiotoxicity testing and the treatment of cardiomyopathies. The model-independent association of chaotic EADs with period doubling cascades of limit cycles introduced in this article opens novel opportunities to study chaotic EADs by means of bifurcation control theory and inverse bifurcation analysis. Furthermore, our results may shed new light on the synchronization and propagation of chaotic EADs in homogeneous and heterogeneous multicellular and cardiac tissue preparations.

  8. Non radioactive precursor import into chloroplasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombardo, V.A.; Ottado, J.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Eukaryotic cells have a subcellular organization based on organelles. Protein transport to these organelles is quantitatively important because the majority of cellular proteins are codified in nuclear genes and then delivered to their final destination. Most of the chloroplast proteins are translated on cytoplasmic ribosomes as larger precursors with an amino terminal transit peptide that is necessary and sufficient to direct the precursor to the chloroplast. Once inside the organelle the transit peptide is cleaved and the mature protein adopts its folded form. In this work we developed a system for the expression and purification of the pea ferredoxin-NADP + reductase precursor (preFNR) for its import into chloroplasts in non radioactive conditions. We constructed a preFNR fused in its carboxy terminus to a 6 histidines peptide (preFNR-6xHis) that allows its identification using a commercial specific antibody. The construction was expressed, purified, processed and precipitated, rendering a soluble and active preFNR-6xHis that was used in binding and import into chloroplasts experiments. The reisolated chloroplasts were analyzed by SDS-PAGE, electro-blotting and revealed by immuno-detection using either colorimetric or chemiluminescent reactive. We performed also import experiments labeling preFNR and preFNR-6xHis with radioactive methionine as controls. We conclude that preFNR-6xHis is bound and imported into chloroplasts as the wild type preFNR and that both colorimetric or chemiluminescent detection methods are useful to avoid the manipulation of radioactive material. (author)

  9. An agent-oriented hierarchic strategy for solving inverse problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smołka Maciej

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the complex, agent-oriented hierarchic memetic strategy (HMS dedicated to solving inverse parametric problems. The strategy goes beyond the idea of two-phase global optimization algorithms. The global search performed by a tree of dependent demes is dynamically alternated with local, steepest descent searches. The strategy offers exceptionally low computational costs, mainly because the direct solver accuracy (performed by the hp-adaptive finite element method is dynamically adjusted for each inverse search step. The computational cost is further decreased by the strategy employed for solution inter-processing and fitness deterioration. The HMS efficiency is compared with the results of a standard evolutionary technique, as well as with the multi-start strategy on benchmarks that exhibit typical inverse problems’ difficulties. Finally, an HMS application to a real-life engineering problem leading to the identification of oil deposits by inverting magnetotelluric measurements is presented. The HMS applicability to the inversion of magnetotelluric data is also mathematically verified.

  10. The α-chymotrypsin and its hydrophobic derivatives in inverse micelles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitre, Franck

    1993-01-01

    The α-chymotrypsin is among the most used enzymes, notably and particularly in medicine for therapeutic treatments as well as in biochemistry to determine the amine acid sequence of proteins. This research thesis addresses the study of interactions between a micro-emulsion system and an enzymatic system, and more particularly the behaviour of α-chymotrypsin in AOT inverse micelles. After a brief description of the inverse micellar system and of previously obtained results on the solubilisation of α-chymotrypsin in inverse micelles, the author reports the study of the inverse micellar phase in presence of α-chymotrypsin at the vicinity of the maximum solubility. Various techniques are used for this purpose: UV-visible absorption spectrophotometry, conductometry, and X ray scattering. Then, the author describes the chemical modification of α-chymotrypsin, and reports the study of structural as well as reaction modifications introduced during the solubilisation of α-chymotrypsin modified in inverse micelles [fr

  11. Statistical Inversion of Seismic Noise Inversion statistique du bruit sismique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adler P. M.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available A systematic investigation of wave propagation in random media is presented. Spectral analysis, inversion of codas and attenuation of the direct wave front are studied for synthetic data obtained in isotropic or anisotropic, 2D or 3D media. A coda inversion process is developed and checked on two sets of real data. In both cases, it is possible to compare the correlation lengths obtained by inversion to characteristic lengths measured on seismic logs, for the full scale seismic survey, or on a thin section, for the laboratory experiment. These two experiments prove the feasibility and the efficiency of the statistical inversion of codas. Correct characteristic lengths can be obtained which cannot be determined by another method. Le problème de la géophysique est la recherche d'informations concernant le sous-sol, dans des signaux sismiques enregistrés en surface ou dans des puits. Ces informations sont habituellement recherchées sous forme déterministe, c'est-à-dire sous la forme de la donnée en chaque point d'une valeur du paramètre étudié. Notre point de vue est différent puisque notre objectif est de déduire certaines propriétés statistiques du milieu, supposé hétérogène, à partir des sismogrammes enregistrés après propagation. Il apparaît alors deux moyens de remplir l'objectif fixé. Le premier est l'analyse spectrale des codas ; cette analyse permet de déterminer les tailles moyennes des hétérogénéités du sous-sol. La deuxième possibilité est l'étude de l'atténuation du front direct de l'onde, qui conduit aussi à la connaissance des longueurs caractéristiques du sous-sol ; contrairement à la première méthode, elle ne semble pas pouvoir être transposée efficacement à des cas réels. Dans la première partie, on teste numériquement la proportionnalité entre le facteur de rétrodiffraction, relié aux propriétés statistiques du milieu, et le spectre des codas. Les distributions de vitesse, à valeur

  12. Solution for Ill-Posed Inverse Kinematics of Robot Arm by Network Inversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takehiko Ogawa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of controlling a robot arm with multiple joints, the method of estimating the joint angles from the given end-effector coordinates is called inverse kinematics, which is a type of inverse problems. Network inversion has been proposed as a method for solving inverse problems by using a multilayer neural network. In this paper, network inversion is introduced as a method to solve the inverse kinematics problem of a robot arm with multiple joints, where the joint angles are estimated from the given end-effector coordinates. In general, inverse problems are affected by ill-posedness, which implies that the existence, uniqueness, and stability of their solutions are not guaranteed. In this paper, we show the effectiveness of applying network inversion with regularization, by which ill-posedness can be reduced, to the ill-posed inverse kinematics of an actual robot arm with multiple joints.

  13. Inverse problem in neutron reflection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Xiao-Lin; Felcher, G.P.; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    1991-05-01

    Reflectance and transmittance of neutrons from a thin film deposited on a bulk substrate are derived from solution of Schroedinger wave equation in the material medium with an optical potential. A closed-form solution for the complex reflectance and transmittance is obtained in an approximation where the curvature of the scattering length density profile in the film is small. This closed-form solution reduces to all the known approximations in various limiting cases and is shown to be more accurate than the existing approximations. The closed-form solution of the reflectance is used as a starting point for an inversion algorithm whereby the reflectance data are inverted by a matrix iteration scheme to obtain the scattering length density distribution in the film. A preliminary test showed that the inverted profile is accurate for the linear scattering length density distribution but falls short in the case of an exponential distribution. 30 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  14. Dry Powder Precursors of Cubic Liquid Crystalline Nanoparticles (cubosomes)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spicer, Patrick T.; Small, William B.; Small, William B.; Lynch, Matthew L.; Burns, Janet L.

    2002-01-01

    Cubosomes are dispersed nanostructured particles of cubic phase liquid crystal that have stimulated significant research interest because of their potential for application in controlled-release and drug delivery. Despite the interest, cubosomes can be difficult to fabricate and stabilize with current methods. Most of the current work is limited to liquid phase processes involving high shear dispersion of bulk cubic liquid crystalline material into sub-micron particles, limiting application flexibility. In this work, two types of dry powder cubosome precursors are produced by spray-drying: (1) starch-encapsulated monoolein is produced by spray-drying a dispersion of cubic liquid crystalline particles in an aqueous starch solution and (2) dextran-encapsulated monoolein is produced by spray-drying an emulsion formed by the ethanol-dextran-monoolein-water system. The encapsulants are used to decrease powder cohesion during drying and to act as a soluble colloidal stabilizer upon hydration of the powders. Both powders are shown to form (on average) 0.6 μm colloidally-stable cubosomes upon addition to water. However, the starch powders have a broader particle size distribution than the dextran powders because of the relative ease of spraying emulsions versus dispersions. The developed processes enable the production of nanostructured cubosomes by end-users rather than just specialized researchers and allow tailoring of the surface state of the cubosomes for broader application

  15. Utilization of Mineral Wools as Alkali-Activated Material Precursor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juho Yliniemi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Mineral wools are the most common insulation materials in buildings worldwide. However, mineral wool waste is often considered unrecyclable because of its fibrous nature and low density. In this paper, rock wool (RW and glass wool (GW were studied as alkali-activated material precursors without any additional co-binders. Both mineral wools were pulverized by a vibratory disc mill in order to remove the fibrous nature of the material. The pulverized mineral wools were then alkali-activated with a sodium aluminate solution. Compressive strengths of up to 30.0 MPa and 48.7 MPa were measured for RW and GW, respectively, with high flexural strengths measured for both (20.1 MPa for RW and 13.2 MPa for GW. The resulting alkali-activated matrix was a composite-type in which partly-dissolved fibers were dispersed. In addition to the amorphous material, sodium aluminate silicate hydroxide hydrate and magnesium aluminum hydroxide carbonate phases were identified in the alkali-activated RW samples. The only crystalline phase in the GW samples was sodium aluminum silicate. The results of this study show that mineral wool is a very promising raw material for alkali activation.

  16. Wake Vortex Inverse Model User's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, David; Delisi, Donald

    2008-01-01

    NorthWest Research Associates (NWRA) has developed an inverse model for inverting landing aircraft vortex data. The data used for the inversion are the time evolution of the lateral transport position and vertical position of both the port and starboard vortices. The inverse model performs iterative forward model runs using various estimates of vortex parameters, vertical crosswind profiles, and vortex circulation as a function of wake age. Forward model predictions of lateral transport and altitude are then compared with the observed data. Differences between the data and model predictions guide the choice of vortex parameter values, crosswind profile and circulation evolution in the next iteration. Iterations are performed until a user-defined criterion is satisfied. Currently, the inverse model is set to stop when the improvement in the rms deviation between the data and model predictions is less than 1 percent for two consecutive iterations. The forward model used in this inverse model is a modified version of the Shear-APA model. A detailed description of this forward model, the inverse model, and its validation are presented in a different report (Lai, Mellman, Robins, and Delisi, 2007). This document is a User's Guide for the Wake Vortex Inverse Model. Section 2 presents an overview of the inverse model program. Execution of the inverse model is described in Section 3. When executing the inverse model, a user is requested to provide the name of an input file which contains the inverse model parameters, the various datasets, and directories needed for the inversion. A detailed description of the list of parameters in the inversion input file is presented in Section 4. A user has an option to save the inversion results of each lidar track in a mat-file (a condensed data file in Matlab format). These saved mat-files can be used for post-inversion analysis. A description of the contents of the saved files is given in Section 5. An example of an inversion input

  17. Magnetic behavior of Mg-Al-Zn-Fe mixed oxides from precursors layered double hydroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliva, M.I., E-mail: marcosivanoliva@gmail.com [Facultad de Matematica, Astronomia y Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, M. Allende y H. de la Torre Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); IFFAM AF (CONICET - FaMAF UNC), M. Allende y H. de la Torre Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Heredia, A. [CITeQ - Facultad R. Cordoba, Universidad Tecnologica Nacional Maestro Lopez esq. Cruz Roja Argentina, CP 5016 Cordoba (Argentina); Zandalazini, C.I. [Centro Laser de Ciencias Moleculares. INFIQC-FCQ-Grupo de Ciencia de Materiales-FaMAF-Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Ciudad Universitaria, CP5000 Cordoba, Argentina CONICET (Argentina); Crivello, M. [CITeQ - Facultad R. Cordoba, Universidad Tecnologica Nacional Maestro Lopez esq. Cruz Roja Argentina, CP 5016 Cordoba (Argentina); Corchero, E. [Facultad de Matematica, Astronomia y Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, M. Allende y H. de la Torre Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina)

    2012-08-15

    Mixed oxides of Mg-Al-Zn-Fe were obtained by calcination of layered double hydroxides (LDH) prepared by coprecipitation reaction with hydrothermal treatment. The structural characterization of precursors and oxides was carried out by X rays diffraction, showing increases of ZnO phase with the increase of the zinc content. Magnetic behavior was studied by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and by a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) showing both paramagnetic and super paramagnetic behavior depending on both particles size and composition.

  18. Precursors of aluminum-rich chondrules from the Axtell (CV3) meteorite

    OpenAIRE

    Srinivasan, G.; Huss, G. R.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1997-01-01

    Aluminum-rich chondrules are less refractory and have lower ^(26)Al abundance compared to Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) [1-3]. The presence of hibonite grains in a Sharps Al-rich chondrule [2], and of a spinel-fassaite fragment in an Allende ferromagnesian chondrule [4] suggest CAIs as plausible precursors of Al-rich chondrules. To investigate this possibility we have determined major ,-minor-, and rare-earth-element (REE) concentration in dominant mineral phases in CAIs and ...

  19. Application of numerical inverse method in calculation of composition-dependent interdiffusion coefficients in finite diffusion couples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yuanrong; Chen, Weimin; Zhong, Jing

    2017-01-01

    The previously developed numerical inverse method was applied to determine the composition-dependent interdiffusion coefficients in single-phase finite diffusion couples. The numerical inverse method was first validated in a fictitious binary finite diffusion couple by pre-assuming four standard ...

  20. Accommodating chromosome inversions in linkage analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gary K; Slaten, Erin; Ophoff, Roel A; Lange, Kenneth

    2006-08-01

    This work develops a population-genetics model for polymorphic chromosome inversions. The model precisely describes how an inversion changes the nature of and approach to linkage equilibrium. The work also describes algorithms and software for allele-frequency estimation and linkage analysis in the presence of an inversion. The linkage algorithms implemented in the software package Mendel estimate recombination parameters and calculate the posterior probability that each pedigree member carries the inversion. Application of Mendel to eight Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain pedigrees in a region containing a common inversion on 8p23 illustrates its potential for providing more-precise estimates of the location of an unmapped marker or trait gene. Our expanded cytogenetic analysis of these families further identifies inversion carriers and increases the evidence of linkage.

  1. Optimization and inverse problems in electromagnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Wiak, Sławomir

    2003-01-01

    From 12 to 14 September 2002, the Academy of Humanities and Economics (AHE) hosted the workshop "Optimization and Inverse Problems in Electromagnetism". After this bi-annual event, a large number of papers were assembled and combined in this book. During the workshop recent developments and applications in optimization and inverse methodologies for electromagnetic fields were discussed. The contributions selected for the present volume cover a wide spectrum of inverse and optimal electromagnetic methodologies, ranging from theoretical to practical applications. A number of new optimal and inverse methodologies were proposed. There are contributions related to dedicated software. Optimization and Inverse Problems in Electromagnetism consists of three thematic chapters, covering: -General papers (survey of specific aspects of optimization and inverse problems in electromagnetism), -Methodologies, -Industrial Applications. The book can be useful to students of electrical and electronics engineering, computer sci...

  2. Full-Physics Inverse Learning Machine for Satellite Remote Sensing Retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyola, D. G.

    2017-12-01

    The satellite remote sensing retrievals are usually ill-posed inverse problems that are typically solved by finding a state vector that minimizes the residual between simulated data and real measurements. The classical inversion methods are very time-consuming as they require iterative calls to complex radiative-transfer forward models to simulate radiances and Jacobians, and subsequent inversion of relatively large matrices. In this work we present a novel and extremely fast algorithm for solving inverse problems called full-physics inverse learning machine (FP-ILM). The FP-ILM algorithm consists of a training phase in which machine learning techniques are used to derive an inversion operator based on synthetic data generated using a radiative transfer model (which expresses the "full-physics" component) and the smart sampling technique, and an operational phase in which the inversion operator is applied to real measurements. FP-ILM has been successfully applied to the retrieval of the SO2 plume height during volcanic eruptions and to the retrieval of ozone profile shapes from UV/VIS satellite sensors. Furthermore, FP-ILM will be used for the near-real-time processing of the upcoming generation of European Sentinel sensors with their unprecedented spectral and spatial resolution and associated large increases in the amount of data.

  3. Identifiability Scaling Laws in Bilinear Inverse Problems

    OpenAIRE

    Choudhary, Sunav; Mitra, Urbashi

    2014-01-01

    A number of ill-posed inverse problems in signal processing, like blind deconvolution, matrix factorization, dictionary learning and blind source separation share the common characteristic of being bilinear inverse problems (BIPs), i.e. the observation model is a function of two variables and conditioned on one variable being known, the observation is a linear function of the other variable. A key issue that arises for such inverse problems is that of identifiability, i.e. whether the observa...

  4. Lectures on the inverse scattering method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakharov, V.E.

    1983-06-01

    In a series of six lectures an elementary introduction to the theory of inverse scattering is given. The first four lectures contain a detailed theory of solitons in the framework of the KdV equation, together with the inverse scattering theory of the one-dimensional Schroedinger equation. In the fifth lecture the dressing method is described, while the sixth lecture gives a brief review of the equations soluble by the inverse scattering method. (author)

  5. Inverse kinematics of OWI-535 robotic arm

    OpenAIRE

    DEBENEC, PRIMOŽ

    2015-01-01

    The thesis aims to calculate the inverse kinematics for the OWI-535 robotic arm. The calculation of the inverse kinematics determines the joint parameters that provide the right pose of the end effector. The pose consists of the position and orientation, however, we will focus only on the second one. Due to arm limitations, we have created our own type of the calculation of the inverse kinematics. At first we have derived it only theoretically, and then we have transferred the derivation into...

  6. Automatic Flight Controller With Model Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, George; Smith, G. Allan

    1992-01-01

    Automatic digital electronic control system based on inverse-model-follower concept being developed for proposed vertical-attitude-takeoff-and-landing airplane. Inverse-model-follower control places inverse mathematical model of dynamics of controlled plant in series with control actuators of controlled plant so response of combination of model and plant to command is unity. System includes feedback to compensate for uncertainties in mathematical model and disturbances imposed from without.

  7. Soft leptogenesis in the inverse seesaw model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garayoa, Julia; Concepion Gonzalez-Garcia, Maria; Rius, Nuria

    2007-02-01

    We consider leptogenesis induced by soft supersymmetry breaking terms (``soft leptogenesis''), in the context of the inverse seesaw mechanism. In this model there are lepton number (L) conserving and L-violating soft supersymmetry-breaking B-terms involving the singlet sneutrinos which, together with the — generically small — L-violating parameter responsible of the neutrino mass, give a small mass splitting between the four singlet sneutrino states of a single generation. In combination with the trilinear soft supersymmetry breaking terms they also provide new CP violating phases needed to generate a lepton asymmetry in the singlet sneutrino decays. We obtain that in this scenario the lepton asymmetry is proportional to the L-conserving soft supersymmetry-breaking B-term, and it is not suppressed by the L-violating parameters. Consequently we find that, as in the standard see-saw case, this mechanism can lead to sucessful leptogenesis only for relatively small value of the relevant soft bilinear coupling. The right-handed neutrino masses can be sufficiently low to elude the gravitino problem. Also the corresponding Yukawa couplings involving the lightest of the right-handed neutrinos are constrained to be ∑|Y1k|2lesssim10-7 which generically implies that the neutrino mass spectrum has to be strongly hierarchical.

  8. Direct and Inverse Problems in Statistical Wavefields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, Emil

    2002-01-01

    In this report account is presented of research carried out during the period September 1, 1999-August 31, 2002 under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy, grant DE-FG02-90ER14119. The research covered several areas of modern optical physics, particularly propagation of partially coherent light and its interaction with deterministic and with random media, spectroscopy with partially coherent light, polarization properties of statistical wave fields, effects of moving diffusers on coherence and on the spectra of light transmitted and scattered by them, reciprocity inequalities involving spatial and angular correlations of partially coherent beams, spreading of partially coherent beams in-random media, inverse source problems, computed and diffraction tomography and partially coherent solitons. We have discovered a new phenomenon in an emerging field of physical optics, known as singular optics; specifically we found that the spectrum of light changes drastically in the neighborhood of points where the intensity has zero value and where, consequently, the phase becomes singular, We noted some potential applications of this phenomenon. The results of our investigations were reported in 39 publications. They are listed on pages 3 to 5. Summaries of these publications are given on pages 6-13. Scientists who have participated in this research are listed on page 14

  9. Inverse problem for the mean-field monomer-dimer model with attractive interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contucci, Pierluigi; Luzi, Rachele; Vernia, Cecilia

    2017-01-01

    The inverse problem method is tested for a class of monomer-dimer statistical mechanics models that contain also an attractive potential and display a mean-field critical point at a boundary of a coexistence line. The inversion is obtained by analytically identifying the parameters in terms of the correlation functions and via the maximum-likelihood method. The precision is tested in the whole phase space and, when close to the coexistence line, the algorithm is used together with a clustering method to take care of the underlying possible ambiguity of the inversion. (paper)

  10. Inversion of the total cross sections for electron-molecule and electron-atom scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lun, D.R.; Amos, K.; Allen, L.J.

    1994-01-01

    Inverse scattering theory has been applied to construct the interaction potentials from total cross sections as a function of energy for electrons scattered off of atoms and molecules. The underlying potentials are assumed to be real and energy independent and are evaluated using the Eikonal approximation and with real phase shifts determined from the total cross sections. The inversion potentials have been determined using either a high energy limit approximation or by using a fixed energy inversion method at select energies. These procedures have been used to analyse e - - CH 4 , e - - SiH 4 , e - -Kr and e - -Xe scattering data in particular. 14 refs., 1 tabs., 3 figs

  11. Inverse problem for the mean-field monomer-dimer model with attractive interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contucci, Pierluigi; Luzi, Rachele; Vernia, Cecilia

    2017-05-01

    The inverse problem method is tested for a class of monomer-dimer statistical mechanics models that contain also an attractive potential and display a mean-field critical point at a boundary of a coexistence line. The inversion is obtained by analytically identifying the parameters in terms of the correlation functions and via the maximum-likelihood method. The precision is tested in the whole phase space and, when close to the coexistence line, the algorithm is used together with a clustering method to take care of the underlying possible ambiguity of the inversion.

  12. Time-reversal and Bayesian inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debski, Wojciech

    2017-04-01

    Probabilistic inversion technique is superior to the classical optimization-based approach in all but one aspects. It requires quite exhaustive computations which prohibit its use in huge size inverse problems like global seismic tomography or waveform inversion to name a few. The advantages of the approach are, however, so appealing that there is an ongoing continuous afford to make the large inverse task as mentioned above manageable with the probabilistic inverse approach. One of the perspective possibility to achieve this goal relays on exploring the internal symmetry of the seismological modeling problems in hand - a time reversal and reciprocity invariance. This two basic properties of the elastic wave equation when incorporating into the probabilistic inversion schemata open a new horizons for Bayesian inversion. In this presentation we discuss the time reversal symmetry property, its mathematical aspects and propose how to combine it with the probabilistic inverse theory into a compact, fast inversion algorithm. We illustrate the proposed idea with the newly developed location algorithm TRMLOC and discuss its efficiency when applied to mining induced seismic data.

  13. Chromatid Painting for Chromosomal Inversion Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose the continued development of a novel approach to the detection of chromosomal inversions. Transmissible chromosome aberrations (translocations and...

  14. Imaging lower mantle heterogeneities by asymptotic waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, J. Y. T.; Zhan, Z.

    2017-12-01

    Tomographic images from full waveform inversions (FWI) are starting to reveal fine details of Earth structures. However, the constructions of mesh and kernels for broadband waveforms based on full numerical methods are still computationally expensive, and choices of initial models are critical. Here we propose an asymptotic waveform inversion (AWI) technique based on an asymptotic forward method, which are much faster than full numerical methods. While the asymptotic approach does not work for full seismograms or arbitrarily complex medium, it demonstrates high accuracy for important seismic phases (e.g., P and S) for typical/enhanced velocity anomalies considered in Earth's middle and lower mantle. This allows us to use, instead of gradient-based optimization, direct/Monte Carlo search of the model space and provides more realistic uncertainty estimates. This new AWI method can be applied to image subducted slabs and large low shear wave velocity provinces (LLSVPs) in lower mantle with broadband waveforms.

  15. Numerical investigation of the inverse blackbody radiation problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xin Tan, Guo-zhen Yang, Ben-yuan Gu

    1994-01-01

    A numerical algorithm for the inverse blackbody radiation problem, which is the determination of the temperature distribution of a thermal radiator (TDTR) from its total radiated power spectrum (TRPS), is presented, based on the general theory of amplitude-phase retrieval. With application of this new algorithm, the ill-posed nature of the Fredholm equation of the first kind can be largely overcome and a convergent solution to high accuracy can be obtained. By incorporation of the hybrid input-output algorithm into our algorithm, the convergent process can be substantially expedited and the stagnation problem of the solution can be averted. From model calculations it is found that the new algorithm can also provide a robust reconstruction of the TDTR from the noise-corrupted data of the TRPS. Therefore the new algorithm may offer a useful approach to solving the ill-posed inverse problem. 18 refs., 9 figs

  16. Tunable Intrinsic Plasmons due to Band Inversion in Topological Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Furu; Zhou, Jianhui; Xiao, Di; Yao, Yugui

    2017-12-01

    Band inversion has led to rich physical effects in both topological insulators and topological semimetals. It has been found that the inverted band structure with the Mexican-hat dispersion could enhance the interband correlation leading to a strong intrinsic plasmon excitation. Its frequency ranges from several meV to tens of meV and can be effectively tuned by the external fields. The electron-hole asymmetric term splits the peak of the plasmon excitation into double peaks. The fate and properties of this plasmon excitation can also act as a probe to characterize the topological phases even in lightly doped systems. We numerically demonstrate the impact of band inversion on plasmon excitations in magnetically doped thin films of three-dimensional strong topological insulators, V- or Cr-doped (Bi ,Sb )2Te3 , which support the quantum anomalous Hall states. Our work thus sheds some new light on the potential applications of topological materials in plasmonics.

  17. Kininogens: More than cysteine protease inhibitors and kinin precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalmanach, Gilles; Naudin, Clément; Lecaille, Fabien; Fritz, Hans

    2010-11-01

    Two kininogens are found in mammalian sera: HK (high molecular weight kininogen) and LK (low molecular weight kininogen) with the exception of the rat which encompasses a third kininogen, T-Kininogen (TK). Kininogens are multifunctional glycosylated molecules related to cystatins (clan IH, family I25). They harbor three cystatin domains but only two of them are tight-binding inhibitors of cysteine cathepsins. HK and LK, but not TK, are precursors of potent peptide hormones, the kinins, which are released proteolytically by tissue and plasma kallikreins. Besides these classical features novel functions of kininogens have been recently discovered; they are described in the second part of this review. HKa, which corresponds to the kinin-free two-chain HK and its isolated domain D5 (kininostatin), possesses angiostatic and pro-apoptotic properties, inhibits the proliferation of endothelial cells and participates in the regulation of angiogenesis. Moreover, some HK-derived peptides display potent and broad-spectrum microbicidal properties against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and thus may offer a promising alternative to conventional antibiotic therapy. Of seminal interest, a kininogen-derived peptide inhibits activation of the contact phase system of coagulation and protects mice with invasive Streptococcus pyogenes infection from pulmonary lesions. On the other hand, TK is a biomarker of aging at the end of lifespan of elderly rats. However, although TK has been initially identified as an acute phase reactant, and earlier known as alpha-l-acute phase globulin, the increase of TK in liver and plasma is not known to relate to any inflammatory event during the senescence process. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Transdimensional, hierarchical, Bayesian inversion of ambient seismic noise: Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowder, E.; Rawlinson, N.; Cornwell, D. G.

    2017-12-01

    We present models of crustal velocity structure in southeastern Australia using a novel, transdimensional and hierarchical, Bayesian inversion approach. The inversion is applied to long-time ambient noise cross-correlations. The study area of SE Australia is thought to represent the eastern margin of Gondwana. Conflicting tectonic models have been proposed to explain the formation of eastern Gondwana and the enigmatic geological relationships in Bass Strait, which separates Tasmania and the mainland. A geologically complex area of crustal accretion, Bass Strait may contain part of an exotic continental block entrained in colliding crusts. Ambient noise data recorded by an array of 24 seismometers is used to produce a high resolution, 3D shear wave velocity model of Bass Strait. Phase velocity maps in the period range 2-30 s are produced and subsequently inverted for 3D shear wave velocity structure. The transdimensional, hierarchical Bayesian, inversion technique is used. This technique proves far superior to linearised inversion. The inversion model is dynamically parameterised during the process, implicitly controlled by the data, and noise is treated as an inversion unknown. The resulting shear wave velocity model shows three sedimentary basins in Bass Strait constrained by slow shear velocities (2.4-2.9 km/s) at 2-10 km depth. These failed rift basins from the breakup of Australia-Antartica appear to be overlying thinned crust, where typical mantle velocities of 3.8-4.0 km/s occur at depths greater than 20 km. High shear wave velocities ( 3.7-3.8 km/s) in our new model also match well with regions of high magnetic and gravity anomalies. Furthermore, we use both Rayleigh and Love wave phase data to to construct Vsv and Vsh maps. These are used to estimate crustal radial anisotropy in the Bass Strait. We interpret that structures delineated by our velocity models support the presence and extent of the exotic Precambrian micro-continent (the Selwyn Block) that was

  19. Laterally constrained inversion for CSAMT data interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruo; Yin, Changchun; Wang, Miaoyue; Di, Qingyun

    2015-10-01

    Laterally constrained inversion (LCI) has been successfully applied to the inversion of dc resistivity, TEM and airborne EM data. However, it hasn't been yet applied to the interpretation of controlled-source audio-frequency magnetotelluric (CSAMT) data. In this paper, we apply the LCI method for CSAMT data inversion by preconditioning the Jacobian matrix. We apply a weighting matrix to Jacobian to balance the sensitivity of model parameters, so that the resolution with respect to different model parameters becomes more uniform. Numerical experiments confirm that this can improve the convergence of the inversion. We first invert a synthetic dataset with and without noise to investigate the effect of LCI applications to CSAMT data, for the noise free data, the results show that the LCI method can recover the true model better compared to the traditional single-station inversion; and for the noisy data, the true model is recovered even with a noise level of 8%, indicating that LCI inversions are to some extent noise insensitive. Then, we re-invert two CSAMT datasets collected respectively in a watershed and a coal mine area in Northern China and compare our results with those from previous inversions. The comparison with the previous inversion in a coal mine shows that LCI method delivers smoother layer interfaces that well correlate to seismic data, while comparison with a global searching algorithm of simulated annealing (SA) in a watershed shows that though both methods deliver very similar good results, however, LCI algorithm presented in this paper runs much faster. The inversion results for the coal mine CSAMT survey show that a conductive water-bearing zone that was not revealed by the previous inversions has been identified by the LCI. This further demonstrates that the method presented in this paper works for CSAMT data inversion.

  20. Budget of ozone and precursors over Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roemer, M.G.M.; Bosman, R.; Thijsse, T.; Builtjes, P.J.H.; Esser, P. [IMW-TNO, Delft (Netherlands); Beck, J.P. [RIVM-LLO, Bilthoven (Netherlands); Vosbeek, M. [KEMA, Arnhem (Netherlands)

    1997-12-31

    A three dimensional model for the European boundary layer (the LOTOS model) was used to calculate the budget of ozone and precursors over Europe. For two summer months (July and August) in 1990 the net chemical production of ozone is about 21 Tg/m. By dry deposition 17 Tg/m is lost and transport accounts for a net export of 4 Tg/m into the free troposphere. Large differences in chemical ozone production occur for different regions in Europe. Though the ozone efficiency in terms of ozone produced per NO{sub x} molecule oxidised is much lower in western Europe than elsewhere in Europe the ozone chemically produced per unit area is the highest in western Europe due to the high NO{sub x} emission in this region. (orig.)

  1. Ancient engineers' inventions precursors of the present

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, Cesare

    2017-01-01

    This book describes the inventions and designs of ancient engineers who are the precursors of the present. The period ranges mainly from 300 B.C. to 1600 A.D. with several exceptions. Many of the oldest inventions are documented by archaeological finds, often very little known, mainly from Pompeii, Herculaneum and Stabiae and reveal a surprising modernity in their conception. Most of the inventions presented in the first four parts of the book were conceived up to the late Roman Empire and may be considered as milestones, each in their respective field. The fifth part concentrates on more recent centuries. The sixth part deals with some building construction techniques. Generally, for each of the presented inventions, three elements of research and reference are provided: written documents (the classics), iconic references (coins, bas-reliefs, etc.) and archaeological findings. The authors did not write this book for engineers only; hence they describe all the devices without assuming wide technical knowledge...

  2. Mars MetNet Precursor Mission Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harri, A.-M.; Aleksashkin, S.; Guerrero, H.; Schmidt, W.; Genzer, M.; Vazquez, L.; Haukka, H.

    2013-09-01

    We are developing a new kind of planetary exploration mission for Mars in collaboration between the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI), Lavochkin Association (LA), Space Research Institute (IKI) and Institutio Nacional de Tecnica Aerospacial (INTA). The Mars MetNet mission is based on a new semi-hard landing vehicle called MetNet Lander (MNL). The scientific payload of the Mars MetNet Precursor [1] mission is divided into three categories: Atmospheric instruments, Optical devices and Composition and structure devices. Each of the payload instruments will provide significant insights in to the Martian atmospheric behavior. The key technologies of the MetNet Lander have been qualified and the electrical qualification model (EQM) of the payload bay has been built and successfully tested.

  3. Preparation of boron nitride fiber by organic precursor method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingying Zhou

    Full Text Available In this paper, boron nitride polymer precursor was made by boric acid, melamine, twelve sodium alkyl sulfate as raw materials and pure water as medium which is heated to 70 °C. Boron nitride precursor polymer was soluble in formic acid solution. The boron nitride precursor can be electrostatically spun at the voltage in 23 kV and the distance between the positive and negative poles is 15 cm. The formed fiber is very uniform. The properties of the precursors were analyzed through electron microscope, infrared spectrum, X-ray and ultraviolet spectrum. The aim of the job is to got the precursor of BN and spun it. Keywords: Melamine, Boric acid, Boron nitride precursor, Electrostatic spinning

  4. Precursor conditions related to Zimbabwe's summer droughts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nangombe, Shingirai; Madyiwa, Simon; Wang, Jianhong

    2018-01-01

    Despite the increasing severity of droughts and their effects on Zimbabwe's agriculture, there are few tools available for predicting these droughts in advance. Consequently, communities and farmers are more exposed, and policy makers are always ill prepared for such. This study sought to investigate possible cycles and precursor meteorological conditions prior to drought seasons that could be used to predict impending droughts in Zimbabwe. The Single Z-Index was used to identify and grade drought years between 1951 and 2010 according to rainfall severity. Spectral analysis was used to reveal the cycles of droughts for possible use of these cycles for drought prediction. Composite analysis was used to investigate circulation and temperature anomalies associated with severe and extreme drought years. Results indicate that severe droughts are more highly correlated with circulation patterns and embedded weather systems in the Indian Ocean and equatorial Pacific Ocean than any other area. This study identified sea surface temperatures in the average period June to August, geopotential height and wind vector in July to September period, and air temperature in September to November period as precursors that can be used to predict a drought occurrence several months in advance. Therefore, in addition to sea surface temperature, which was identified through previous research for predicting Zimbabwean droughts, the other parameters identified in this study can aid in drought prediction. Drought cycles were established at 20-, 12.5-, 3.2-, and 2.7-year cycles. The spectral peaks, 12.5, 3.2, and 2.7, had a similar timescale with the luni-solar tide, El Niño Southern Oscillation and Quasi Biennial Oscillation, respectively, and hence, occurrence of these phenomena have a possibility of indicating when the next drought might be.

  5. Inverse problems and uncertainty quantification

    KAUST Repository

    Litvinenko, Alexander

    2013-12-18

    In a Bayesian setting, inverse problems and uncertainty quantification (UQ)— the propagation of uncertainty through a computational (forward) model—are strongly connected. In the form of conditional expectation the Bayesian update becomes computationally attractive. This is especially the case as together with a functional or spectral approach for the forward UQ there is no need for time- consuming and slowly convergent Monte Carlo sampling. The developed sampling- free non-linear Bayesian update is derived from the variational problem associated with conditional expectation. This formulation in general calls for further discretisa- tion to make the computation possible, and we choose a polynomial approximation. After giving details on the actual computation in the framework of functional or spectral approximations, we demonstrate the workings of the algorithm on a number of examples of increasing complexity. At last, we compare the linear and quadratic Bayesian update on the small but taxing example of the chaotic Lorenz 84 model, where we experiment with the influence of different observation or measurement operators on the update.

  6. Package inspection using inverse diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAulay, Alastair D.

    2008-08-01

    More efficient cost-effective hand-held methods of inspecting packages without opening them are in demand for security. Recent new work in TeraHertz sources,1 millimeter waves, presents new possibilities. Millimeter waves pass through cardboard and styrofoam, common packing materials, and also pass through most materials except those with high conductivity like metals which block light and are easily spotted. Estimating refractive index along the path of the beam through the package from observations of the beam passing out of the package provides the necessary information to inspect the package and is a nonlinear problem. So we use a generalized linear inverse technique that we first developed for finding oil by reflection in geophysics.2 The computation assumes parallel slices in the packet of homogeneous material for which the refractive index is estimated. A beam is propagated through this model in a forward computation. The output is compared with the actual observations for the package and an update computed for the refractive indices. The loop is repeated until convergence. The approach can be modified for a reflection system or to include estimation of absorption.

  7. MODEL SELECTION FOR SPECTROPOLARIMETRIC INVERSIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asensio Ramos, A.; Manso Sainz, R.; Martínez González, M. J.; Socas-Navarro, H.; Viticchié, B.; Orozco Suárez, D.

    2012-01-01

    Inferring magnetic and thermodynamic information from spectropolarimetric observations relies on the assumption of a parameterized model atmosphere whose parameters are tuned by comparison with observations. Often, the choice of the underlying atmospheric model is based on subjective reasons. In other cases, complex models are chosen based on objective reasons (for instance, the necessity to explain asymmetries in the Stokes profiles) but it is not clear what degree of complexity is needed. The lack of an objective way of comparing models has, sometimes, led to opposing views of the solar magnetism because the inferred physical scenarios are essentially different. We present the first quantitative model comparison based on the computation of the Bayesian evidence ratios for spectropolarimetric observations. Our results show that there is not a single model appropriate for all profiles simultaneously. Data with moderate signal-to-noise ratios (S/Ns) favor models without gradients along the line of sight. If the observations show clear circular and linear polarization signals above the noise level, models with gradients along the line are preferred. As a general rule, observations with large S/Ns favor more complex models. We demonstrate that the evidence ratios correlate well with simple proxies. Therefore, we propose to calculate these proxies when carrying out standard least-squares inversions to allow for model comparison in the future.

  8. Inverse Problems and Uncertainty Quantification

    KAUST Repository

    Litvinenko, Alexander

    2014-01-06

    In a Bayesian setting, inverse problems and uncertainty quantification (UQ) - the propagation of uncertainty through a computational (forward) modelare strongly connected. In the form of conditional expectation the Bayesian update becomes computationally attractive. This is especially the case as together with a functional or spectral approach for the forward UQ there is no need for time- consuming and slowly convergent Monte Carlo sampling. The developed sampling- free non-linear Bayesian update is derived from the variational problem associated with conditional expectation. This formulation in general calls for further discretisa- tion to make the computation possible, and we choose a polynomial approximation. After giving details on the actual computation in the framework of functional or spectral approximations, we demonstrate the workings of the algorithm on a number of examples of increasing complexity. At last, we compare the linear and quadratic Bayesian update on the small but taxing example of the chaotic Lorenz 84 model, where we experiment with the influence of different observation or measurement operators on the update.

  9. Inverse problem in radionuclide transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, C.

    1988-01-01

    The disposal of radioactive waste must comply with the performance objectives set forth in 10 CFR 61 for low-level waste (LLW) and 10 CFR 60 for high-level waste (HLW). To determine probable compliance, the proposed disposal system can be modeled to predict its performance. One of the difficulties encountered in such a study is modeling the migration of radionuclides through a complex geologic medium for the long term. Although many radionuclide transport models exist in the literature, the accuracy of the model prediction is highly dependent on the model parameters used. The problem of using known parameters in a radionuclide transport model to predict radionuclide concentrations is a direct problem (DP); whereas the reverse of DP, i.e., the parameter identification problem of determining model parameters from known radionuclide concentrations, is called the inverse problem (IP). In this study, a procedure to solve IP is tested, using the regression technique. Several nonlinear regression programs are examined, and the best one is recommended. 13 refs., 1 tab

  10. Reverse Universal Resolving Algorithm and inverse driving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Inverse interpretation is a semantics based, non-standard interpretation of programs. Given a program and a value, an inverse interpreter finds all or one of the inputs, that would yield the given value as output with normal forward evaluation. The Reverse Universal Resolving Algorithm is a new v...

  11. Third Harmonic Imaging using a Pulse Inversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Joachim; Du, Yigang; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2011-01-01

    The pulse inversion (PI) technique can be utilized to separate and enhance harmonic components of a waveform for tissue harmonic imaging. While most ultrasound systems can perform pulse inversion, only few image the 3rd harmonic component. PI pulse subtraction can isolate and enhance the 3rd...

  12. Metaheuristic optimization of acoustic inverse problems.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leijen, A.V.; Rothkrantz, L.; Groen, F.

    2011-01-01

    Swift solving of geoacoustic inverse problems strongly depends on the application of a global optimization scheme. Given a particular inverse problem, this work aims to answer the questions how to select an appropriate metaheuristic search strategy, and how to configure it for optimal performance.

  13. Inverse Filtering Techniques in Speech Analysis | Nwachuku ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    inverse filtering' has been applied. The unifying features of these techniques are presented, namely: 1. a basis in the source-filter theory of speech production, 2. the use of a network whose transfer function is the inverse of the transfer function of ...

  14. Simultaneous inversion of airborne electromagnetic data for resistivity and magnetic permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beard, L.P.; Nyquist, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    Where the magnetic permeability of rock or soil exceeds that of free space, the effect on airborne electromagnetic systems is to produce a frequency-independent shift in the in-phase response of the system while altering the quadrature response only slightly. The magnitude of the in-phase shift increases as (1) the relative magnetic permeability is increased, (2) the amount of magnetic material is increased, and (3) the airborne sensor gets nearer the earth's surface. Over resistive, magnetic ground, the shift may be evinced by negative in-phase measurements at low frequencies; but over more conductive ground, the same shift may go unnoticed because of the large positive in-phase response. If the airborne sensor is flown at low levels, the magnitude of the shift may be large enough to affect automatic inversion routines that do not take this shift into account, producing inaccurate estimated resistivities, usually overestimates. However, layered-earth inversion algorithms that incorporate magnetic permeability as an additional inversion parameter may improve the resistivity estimates. The authors demonstrate this improvement using data collected over hazardous waste sites near Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA. Using resistivity inversion without magnetic permeability, the waste sites are almost invisible to the sensors. When magnetic permeability is included as an inversion parameter, the sites are detected, both by improved resistivity estimates and by estimated magnetic permeability

  15. Applying the polarity rapid assessment method to characterize nitrosamine precursors and to understand their removal by drinking water treatment processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xiaobin; Bei, Er; Li, Shixiang; Ouyang, Yueying; Wang, Jun; Chen, Chao; Zhang, Xiaojian; Krasner, Stuart W; Suffet, I H Mel

    2015-12-15

    Some N-nitrosamines (NAs) have been identified as emerging disinfection by-products during water treatment. Thus, it is essential to understand the characteristics of the NA precursors. In this study, the polarity rapid assessment method (PRAM) and the classical resin fractionation method were studied as methods to fractionate the NA precursors during drinking water treatment. The results showed that PRAM has much higher selectivity for NA precursors than the resin approach. The normalized N-nitrosodimethylamine formation potential (NDMA FP) and N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) FP of four resin fractions was at the same level as the average yield of the bulk organic matter whereas that of the cationic fraction by PRAM showed 50 times the average. Thus, the cationic fraction was shown to be the most important NDMA precursor contributor. The PRAM method also helped understand which portions of the NA precursor were removed by different water treatment processes. Activated carbon (AC) adsorption removed over 90% of the non-polar PRAM fraction (that sorbs onto the C18 solid phase extraction [SPE] cartridge) of NDMA and NDEA precursors. Bio-treatment removed 80-90% of the cationic fraction of PRAM (that is retained on the cation exchange SPE cartridge) and 40-60% of the non-cationic fractions. Ozonation removed 50-60% of the non-polar PRAM fraction of NA precursors and transformed part of them into the polar fraction. Coagulation and sedimentation had very limited removal of various PRAM fractions of NA precursors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Inverse m-matrices and ultrametric matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Dellacherie, Claude; San Martin, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    The study of M-matrices, their inverses and discrete potential theory is now a well-established part of linear algebra and the theory of Markov chains. The main focus of this monograph is the so-called inverse M-matrix problem, which asks for a characterization of nonnegative matrices whose inverses are M-matrices. We present an answer in terms of discrete potential theory based on the Choquet-Deny Theorem. A distinguished subclass of inverse M-matrices is ultrametric matrices, which are important in applications such as taxonomy. Ultrametricity is revealed to be a relevant concept in linear algebra and discrete potential theory because of its relation with trees in graph theory and mean expected value matrices in probability theory. Remarkable properties of Hadamard functions and products for the class of inverse M-matrices are developed and probabilistic insights are provided throughout the monograph.

  17. Fast wavelet based sparse approximate inverse preconditioner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, W.L. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Incomplete LU factorization is a robust preconditioner for both general and PDE problems but unfortunately not easy to parallelize. Recent study of Huckle and Grote and Chow and Saad showed that sparse approximate inverse could be a potential alternative while readily parallelizable. However, for special class of matrix A that comes from elliptic PDE problems, their preconditioners are not optimal in the sense that independent of mesh size. A reason may be that no good sparse approximate inverse exists for the dense inverse matrix. Our observation is that for this kind of matrices, its inverse entries typically have piecewise smooth changes. We can take advantage of this fact and use wavelet compression techniques to construct a better sparse approximate inverse preconditioner. We shall show numerically that our approach is effective for this kind of matrices.

  18. Recurrent Neural Network for Computing Outer Inverse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Živković, Ivan S; Stanimirović, Predrag S; Wei, Yimin

    2016-05-01

    Two linear recurrent neural networks for generating outer inverses with prescribed range and null space are defined. Each of the proposed recurrent neural networks is based on the matrix-valued differential equation, a generalization of dynamic equations proposed earlier for the nonsingular matrix inversion, the Moore-Penrose inversion, as well as the Drazin inversion, under the condition of zero initial state. The application of the first approach is conditioned by the properties of the spectrum of a certain matrix; the second approach eliminates this drawback, though at the cost of increasing the number of matrix operations. The cases corresponding to the most common generalized inverses are defined. The conditions that ensure stability of the proposed neural network are presented. Illustrative examples present the results of numerical simulations.

  19. Forward modeling. Route to electromagnetic inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groom, R.; Walker, P. [PetRos EiKon Incorporated, Ontario (Canada)

    1996-05-01

    Inversion of electromagnetic data is a topical subject in the literature, and much time has been devoted to understanding the convergence properties of various inverse methods. The relative lack of success of electromagnetic inversion techniques is partly attributable to the difficulties in the kernel forward modeling software. These difficulties come in two broad classes: (1) Completeness and robustness, and (2) convergence, execution time and model simplicity. If such problems exist in the forward modeling kernel, it was demonstrated that inversion can fail to generate reasonable results. It was suggested that classical inversion techniques, which are based on minimizing a norm of the error between data and the simulated data, will only be successful when these difficulties in forward modeling kernels are properly dealt with. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Spontaneous Rotational Inversion in Phycomyces

    KAUST Repository

    Goriely, Alain

    2011-03-01

    The filamentary fungus Phycomyces blakesleeanus undergoes a series of remarkable transitions during aerial growth. During what is known as the stagea IV growth phase, the fungus extends while rotating in a counterclockwise manner when viewed from above (stagea IVa) and then, while continuing to grow, spontaneously reverses to a clockwise rotation (stagea IVb). This phase lasts for 24-48Ah and is sometimes followed by yet another reversal (stageAIVc) before the overall growth ends. Here, we propose a continuum mechanical model of this entire process using nonlinear, anisotropic, elasticity and show how helical anisotropy associated with the cell wall structure can induce spontaneous rotation and, under appropriate circumstances, the observed reversal of rotational handedness. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  1. Developments in inverse photoemission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheils, W.; Leckey, R.C.G.; Riley, J.D.

    1996-01-01

    In the 1950's and 1960's, Photoemission Spectroscopy (PES) established itself as the major technique for the study of the occupied electronic energy levels of solids. During this period the field divided into two branches: X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy (XPS) for photon energies greater than ∼l000eV, and Ultra-violet Photoemission Spectroscopy (UPS) for photon energies below ∼100eV. By the 1970's XPS and UPS had become mature techniques. Like XPS, BIS (at x-ray energies) does not have the momentum-resolving ability of UPS that has contributed much to the understanding of the occupied band structures of solids. BIS moved into a new energy regime in 1977 when Dose employed a Geiger-Mueller tube to obtain density of unoccupied states data from a tantalum sample at a photon energy of ∼9.7eV. At similar energies, the technique has since become known as Inverse Photoemission Spectroscopy (IPS), in acknowledgment of its complementary relationship to UPS and to distinguish it from the higher energy BIS. Drawing on decades of UPS expertise, IPS has quickly moved into areas of interest where UPS has been applied; metals, semiconductors, layer compounds, adsorbates, ferromagnets, and superconductors. At La Trobe University an IPS facility has been constructed. This presentation reports on developments in the experimental and analytical techniques of IPS that have been made there. The results of a study of the unoccupied bulk and surface bands of GaAs are presented

  2. Neuro-fuzzy inverse model control structure of robotic manipulators utilized for physiotherapy applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Fahmy

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new neuro-fuzzy controller for robot manipulators. First, an inductive learning technique is applied to generate the required inverse modeling rules from input/output data recorded in the off-line structure learning phase. Second, a fully differentiable fuzzy neural network is developed to construct the inverse dynamics part of the controller for the online parameter learning phase. Finally, a fuzzy-PID-like incremental controller was employed as Feedback servo controller. The proposed control system was tested using dynamic model of a six-axis industrial robot. The control system showed good results compared to the conventional PID individual joint controller.

  3. Role of Elemental Sulfur in Forming Latent Precursors of H2S in Wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastrzembski, Jillian A; Allison, Rachel B; Friedberg, Elle; Sacks, Gavin L

    2017-12-06

    The level of hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) can increase during abiotic storage of wines, and potential latent sources of H 2 S are still under investigation. We demonstrate that elemental sulfur (S 0 ) residues on grapes not only can produce H 2 S during fermentation but also can form precursors capable of generating additional H 2 S after bottle storage for 3 months. H 2 S could be released from S 0 -derived precursors by addition of a reducing agent (TCEP), but not by addition of strong brine to induce release of H 2 S from metal sulfide complexes. The size of the TCEP-releasable pool varied among yeast strains. Using the TCEP assay, multiple polar S 0 -derived precursors were detected following normal-phase preparative chromatography. Using reversed-phase liquid chromatography and high-resolution mass spectrometry, we detected an increase in the levels of diglutathione trisulfane (GSSSG) and glutathione disulfide (GSSG) in S 0 -fermented red wine and an increase in the levels of glutathione S-sulfonate (GSSO 3 - ) and tetrathionate (S 4 O 6 2- ) in S 0 -fermented white wine as compared to controls. GSSSG, but not S 4 O 6 2- , was shown to evolve H 2 S in the presence of TCEP. Pathways for the formation of GSSSG, GSSG, GSSO 3 - , and S 4 O 6 2- from S 0 are proposed.

  4. Synthesis and optical properties of Mg-Al layered double hydroxides precursor powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Hsuan; Chu, Hsueh-Liang; Hwang, Weng-Sing; Wang, Moo-Chin; Ko, Horng-Huey

    2017-12-01

    The synthesis and optical properties of Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) precursor powders were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), high-resolution TEM (HRTEM), UV-transmission spectrometer, and fluorescence spectrophotometer. The FT-IR results show that the intense absorption at around 1363-1377 cm-1 can be assigned to the antisymmetric ν3 mode of interlayer carbonate anions because the LDH phase contains some CO32-. The XRD results show that all of the Mg-Al LDH precursor powders contain only a single phase of [Mg0.833Al0.167(OH)2](CO3)0.083.(H2O)0.75 but have broad and weak intensities of peaks. All of Mg-Al LDHs precursor powders before calcination have the same photoluminescence (PL) spectra. Moreover, these spectra were excited at λex = 235 nm, and the broad emission band was in the range 325-650 nm. In the range, there were relatively strong intensity at around 360, 407 and 510 nm, respectively.

  5. Synthesis and optical properties of Mg-Al layered double hydroxides precursor powders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Hsuan Lin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis and optical properties of Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH precursor powders were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, selected area electron diffraction (SAED, high-resolution TEM (HRTEM, UV-transmission spectrometer, and fluorescence spectrophotometer. The FT-IR results show that the intense absorption at around 1363–1377 cm-1 can be assigned to the antisymmetric ν3 mode of interlayer carbonate anions because the LDH phase contains some CO32-. The XRD results show that all of the Mg-Al LDH precursor powders contain only a single phase of [Mg0.833Al0.167(OH2](CO30.083·(H2O0.75 but have broad and weak intensities of peaks. All of Mg-Al LDHs precursor powders before calcination have the same photoluminescence (PL spectra. Moreover, these spectra were excited at λex = 235 nm, and the broad emission band was in the range 325-650 nm. In the range, there were relatively strong intensity at around 360, 407 and 510 nm, respectively.

  6. Enumeration of minimal stoichiometric precursor sets in metabolic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Ricardo; Wannagat, Martin; Klein, Cecilia C; Acuña, Vicente; Marchetti-Spaccamela, Alberto; Milreu, Paulo V; Stougie, Leen; Sagot, Marie-France

    2016-01-01

    What an organism needs at least from its environment to produce a set of metabolites, e.g. target(s) of interest and/or biomass, has been called a minimal precursor set. Early approaches to enumerate all minimal precursor sets took into account only the topology of the metabolic network (topological precursor sets). Due to cycles and the stoichiometric values of the reactions, it is often not possible to produce the target(s) from a topological precursor set in the sense that there is no feasible flux. Although considering the stoichiometry makes the problem harder, it enables to obtain biologically reasonable precursor sets that we call stoichiometric. Recently a method to enumerate all minimal stoichiometric precursor sets was proposed in the literature. The relationship between topological and stoichiometric precursor sets had however not yet been studied. Such relationship between topological and stoichiometric precursor sets is highlighted. We also present two algorithms that enumerate all minimal stoichiometric precursor sets. The first one is of theoretical interest only and is based on the above mentioned relationship. The second approach solves a series of mixed integer linear programming problems. We compared the computed minimal precursor sets to experimentally obtained growth media of several Escherichia coli strains using genome-scale metabolic networks. The results show that the second approach efficiently enumerates minimal precursor sets taking stoichiometry into account, and allows for broad in silico studies of strains or species interactions that may help to understand e.g. pathotype and niche-specific metabolic capabilities. sasita is written in Java, uses cplex as LP solver and can be downloaded together with all networks and input files used in this paper at http://www.sasita.gforge.inria.fr.

  7. Eruption precursors: Manifestations and strategies for detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Michael; Pritchard, Matthew

    2017-04-01

    The past several decades have seen a rapid increase in volcano monitoring and modeling capabilities. Diverse arrays of instrument networks can detect a variety of pre-, co-, and post-eruptive phenomena, and remote sensing observations are available across a range of spatial, temporal, and spectral resolutions. A growing class of models, based on the physics of magmatic systems, are making use of these expanding datastreams, providing probabilistic assessments of such parameters as magma supply, volatile content, and eruption duration. To what extent, however, do these developments heighten our ability to identify eruption precursors? The advent of better data and new models provides an opportunity to reexamine our understanding of pre-eruption unrest, as well as our ability to detect and recognize it as such. An idealized model of the buildup to a volcanic eruption might include magma ascent from a deep source region and accumulation in the mid- to upper crust in the preceding months to years. The process might be manifested by surface inflation and deep long-period earthquakes, and accompanied by an increase in CO2 emissions. As magma continues to accumulate, distal volcano-tectonic earthquakes may result as stress builds on nearby faults, H2S emissions may increase as sulfur in a shallow reservoir is hydrolyzed by groundwater, and fumarole and spring temperatures may increase and show changes in chemistry. In the days to hours before an eruption, sudden changes in the rate and style of earthquakes (including repeating earthquakes and tremor) and deformation may occur as the magma reservoir ruptures and magma moves laterally or vertically. Phreatic eruptions might result as ascending magma comes into contact with groundwater, and SO2 emissions might increase as the path between the magma and surface dries out. How often does such a sequence actually occur? Relatively few volcanoes are comprehensively monitored prior to obvious expressions of unrest, so this is not

  8. Brominated graphene as a versatile precursor for multifunctional grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Heather; Rubio, Noelia; Shaffer, Milo S P

    2018-01-07

    A non-destructive and versatile chemical reduction method was used to dissolve and subsequently brominate few-layer graphene sheets (FLGs); the direct covalent attachment of bromine to the graphene framework was demonstrated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The brominated few-layer graphenes (FLG-Br) provide a convenient, stable, liquid-phase precursor, suitable for the synthesis of a variety of directly functionalised graphenes. As an example, the FLG-Br species was used to initiate atom transfer radical polymerisation (ATRP), to obtain poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-grafted graphene (FLG-PMMA), which was six times more dispersible in acetone than controls. In addition, the FLG-Br is active for nucleophilic substitution reactions, as illustrated by the preparation of methoxypolyethylene glycol (mPEG)- and OH-substituted derivatives. The products were characterised by thermogravimetric analysis coupled with mass spectrometry (TGA-MS), XPS and Raman spectroscopy. Grafting ratios (GR) for these polymer-grafted materials varied between 6 and 25%; even at these GRs, all graphene derivatives showed increased solubility in organic solvents.

  9. Operational experience feedback with precursor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koncar, M.; Ferjancic, M.; Muehleisen, A.; Vojnovic, D.

    2003-01-01

    Experience of practical operation is a valuable source of information for improving the safety and reliability of nuclear power plants. Operational experience feedback (Olef) system manages this aspect of NPP operation. The traditional ways of investigating operational events, such as the root cause analysis (RCA), are predominantly qualitative. RCA as a part of the Olef system provides technical guidance and management expectations in the conduct of assessing the root cause to prevent recurrence, covering the following areas: conditions preceding the event, sequence of events, equipment performance and system response, human performance considerations, equipment failures, precursors to the event, plant response and follow-up, radiological considerations, regulatory process considerations and safety significance. The root cause of event is recognized when there is no known answer on question 'why has it happened?' regarding relevant condition that may have affected the event. At that point the Olef is proceeding by actions taken in response to events, utilization, dissemination and exchange of operating experience information and at the end reviewing the effectiveness of the Olef. Analysis of the event and the selection of recommended corrective/preventive actions for implementation and prioritization can be enhanced by taking into account the information and insights derived from Pasa-based analysis. A Pasa based method, called probabilistic precursor event analysis (PPE A) provides a complement to the RCA approach by focusing on how an event might have developed adversely, and implies the mapping of an operational event on a probabilistic risk model of the plant in order to obtain a quantitative assessment of the safety significance of the event PSA based event analysis provides, due to its quantitative nature, appropriate prioritization of corrective actions. PPEA defines requirements for PSA model and code, identifies input requirements and elaborates following

  10. Convex blind image deconvolution with inverse filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xiao-Guang; Li, Fang; Zeng, Tieyong

    2018-03-01

    Blind image deconvolution is the process of estimating both the original image and the blur kernel from the degraded image with only partial or no information about degradation and the imaging system. It is a bilinear ill-posed inverse problem corresponding to the direct problem of convolution. Regularization methods are used to handle the ill-posedness of blind deconvolution and get meaningful solutions. In this paper, we investigate a convex regularized inverse filtering method for blind deconvolution of images. We assume that the support region of the blur object is known, as has been done in a few existing works. By studying the inverse filters of signal and image restoration problems, we observe the oscillation structure of the inverse filters. Inspired by the oscillation structure of the inverse filters, we propose to use the star norm to regularize the inverse filter. Meanwhile, we use the total variation to regularize the resulting image obtained by convolving the inverse filter with the degraded image. The proposed minimization model is shown to be convex. We employ the first-order primal-dual method for the solution of the proposed minimization model. Numerical examples for blind image restoration are given to show that the proposed method outperforms some existing methods in terms of peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR), structural similarity (SSIM), visual quality and time consumption.

  11. Forward and Inverse Dynamics of the Biped PASIBOT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Corral

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the supporting foot slippage of the biped robot PASIBOT and develops its forward and inverse dynamics for simple and double support phases. To address the slippage phenomenon, we consider an additional degree of freedom at the supporting foot and also distinguish between static and kinetic friction conditions. The inverse and forward dynamics, accounting for support foot slippage, are encoded in MATLAB. The algorithm predicts the motion of the biped from the torque function given by the biped's sole motor. Thus, the algorithm becomes an indispensable tool for studying transient states of the biped (for example, the torques required for starting and braking, as well as defining the conditions that prevent or control slippage. Since the developed code is parametric, its output can greatly assist in the design, optimization and control of PASIBOT and similar biped robots. The topology, kinematics and inverse dynamics of the one-degree-of-freedom biped PASIBOT have been previously described, but without regard to slippage between the supporting foot and the ground.

  12. PRECOMBUSTION REMOVAL OF HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANT PRECURSORS; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unknown

    2000-01-01

    In response to growing environmental concerns reflected in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA), the United States Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored several research and development projects in late 1995 as part of an initiative entitled Advanced Environmental Control Technologies for Coal-Based Power Systems. The program provided cost-shared support for research and development projects that could accelerate the commercialization of affordable, high-efficiency, low-emission, coal-fueled electric generating technologies. Clean coal technologies developed under this program would serve as prototypes for later generations of technologies to be implemented in the industrial sector. In order to identify technologies with the greatest potential for commercial implementation, projects funded under Phase I of this program were subject to competitive review by DOE before being considered for continuation funding under Phase II. One of the primary topical areas identified under the DOE initiative relates to the development of improved technologies for reducing the emissions of air toxics. Previous studies have suggested that many of the potentially hazardous air pollutant precursors (HAPPs) occur as trace elements in the mineral matter of run-of-mine coals. As a result, these elements have the potential to be removed prior to combustion at the mine site by physical coal cleaning processes (i.e., coal preparation). Unfortunately, existing coal preparation plants are generally limited in their ability to remove HAPPs due to incomplete liberation of the mineral matter and high organic associations of some trace elements. In addition, existing physical coal cleaning plants are not specifically designed or optimized to ensure that high trace element rejections may be achieved

  13. MMPM - Mission implementation of Mars MetNet Precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harri, A.-M.

    2009-04-01

    We are developing a new kind of planetary exploration mission for Mars - MetNet in situ observation network based on a new semi-hard landing vehicle called the Met-Net Lander (MNL). The key technical aspects and solutions of the mission will be discussed. The eventual scope of the MetNet Mission is to deploy some 20 MNLs on the Martian surface using inflatable descent system structures, which will be supported by observations from the orbit around Mars. Currently we are working on the MetNet Mars Precursor Mission (MMPM) to deploy one MetNet Lander to Mars in the 2009/2011 launch window as a technology and science demonstration mission. The MNL will have a versatile science payload focused on the atmospheric science of Mars. Detailed characterization of the Martian atmospheric circulation patterns, boundary layer phenomena, and climatology cycles, require simultaneous in-situ measurements by a network of observation posts on the Martian surface. The scientific payload of the MetNet Mission encompasses separate instrument packages for the atmospheric entry and descent phase and for the surface operation phase. The MetNet mission concept and key probe technologies have been developed and the critical subsystems have been qualified to meet the Martian environmental and functional conditions. This development effort has been fulfilled in collaboration between the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI), the Russian Lavoschkin Association (LA) and the Russian Space Research Institute (IKI) since August 2001. Currently the INTA (Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial) from Spain is also participating in the MetNet payload development.

  14. Synthesis of Nanoparticles of the Giant Dielectric Material, CaCu3Ti4O12 from a Precursor Route

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, P.; Dwarakanath, K.; Varma, K. B. R.; Kutty, T. R. N.

    2013-01-01

    A complex oxalate precursor, CaCu3(TiO)4(C2O4)8.9H2O, was synthesized and the precipitate that obtained was confirmed to be monophasic by the wet chemical analyses, X-ray diffraction, FTIR absorption and TG, DTA analyses. The thermal decomposition of this oxalate precursor led to the formation of phase-pure calcium copper titanate, CaCu3Ti4O12, at 680oC. The bright field TEM micrographs revealed that the size of the as synthesized crystallites to be in the 30 to 80 nm range. The powders so ob...

  15. Nanoparticles of the giant dielectric material, CaCu3Ti4O12 from a precursor route

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, P.; Dwarakanath, K.; Varma, K. B. R.; Kutty, T. R. N.

    2013-01-01

    A method of preparing the nanoparticles of CaCu3Ti4O12 (CCTO) with the crystallite size varying from 30 to 200 nm is optimized at a temperature as low as 680 1C from the exothermic thermal decomposition of an oxalate precursor, CaCu3(TiO)4(C2O4)8 ? 9H2O. The phase singularity of the complex oxalate precursor is confirmed by the wet chemical analyses, X-ray diffraction, FT-IR and TGA,DTA analyses. The UV Vis reflectance and ESR spectra of CCTO powders indicate that the Cu(II) coordination chan...

  16. Using Cell-Phone Tower Signals for Detecting the Precursors of Fog

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, N.; Gao, H. O.

    2018-01-01

    In the last decade, published research has indicated the potential of commercial microwave links that comprise the data transmission infrastructure of cellular communication networks as an environmental monitoring technology. Different weather phenomena cause interference in the wireless communication links that can therefore essentially act as a low-cost sensor network, already deployed worldwide, for atmospheric monitoring. In this study we focus on the attenuation effect caused in commercial microwave networks due to gradients in the atmospheric refractive index with altitude as a result of the combination of temperature inversions and falls in the atmospheric humidity trapped beneath them. These conditions, when combined with high relative humidity near ground level, are precursors to the creation of fog. The current work utilizes this novel approach to demonstrate the potential for detecting these preconditions of fog, a phenomenon associated with severe visibility limitations that can lead to dangerous accidents, injuries, and loss of lives.

  17. Review on hydroxylamine, a precursor to amino-acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire, Jean Louis

    2015-08-01

    Does life on earth come from interstellar space (IS)?It has been recently demonstrated that part of the terrestrial water is of IS origin [Cleeves et al. Science 2014]. This raises the question whether materials like amino-acids or their pre-biotic molecular precursors could have been formed and brought to earth in the same way than water. Another question is whether these molecules were formed in the gas phase or through reactions on the surface/volume of ice-covered grains. This may then have occurred in the vicinity of proto-stellar cores or deep into a pristine dense molecular clouds at very low temperatures.As far as bio-related molecules are concerned, chemistry with nitrogen-bearing molecules (like NH3 and NO) is involved. I review recent experimental work showing that hydroxylamine (NH2OH) could be formed either by surface or by volume reactions in conditions close to those prevailing in dense media. They use either electron-UV irradiation of water-ammonia ices [Zheng & Kaiser JCPA 2010] or successive hydrogenation of solid nitric oxide[Congiu, Fedoseev & al. ApJL.2012] or the simple oxidation of ammonia [He, Vidali, Lemaire & Garrod, ApJ, 2015] or the reaction of ammonia with hydroxyl radicals in a rare gas matrix [Zins & Krim, 2014, 69th ISMS]. A step further, the synthesis of the simplest amino-acids, glycine (NH2CH2COOH) and L- or D-alanine (NH2CH3CHCOOH) has already been obtained via reactions in the gas phase involving NH2OH+ [Blagojevic & al. MNRAS 2003].In addition to several earlier models demonstrating that the formation of all these molecules is possible in the gas phase, a new recent three-phase gas-grain chemical kinetics model of hot cores [Garrod ApJ 2013] shows that the results of ammonia oxidation we obtain are plausible by surface/volume reactions.Although none of the aforementioned molecules (except glycine in a sample of cometary origin) has been yet detected in the IS, they all are considered by many observers and modelers as likely

  18. A geometric approach to joint inversion with applications to contaminant source zone characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghasi, Alireza; Mendoza-Sanchez, Itza; Miller, Eric L; Ramsburg, C Andrew; Abriola, Linda M

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new joint inversion approach to shape-based inverse problems. Given two sets of data from distinct physical models, the main objective is to obtain a unified characterization of inclusions within the spatial domain of the physical properties to be reconstructed. Although our proposed method generally applies to many types of inverse problems, the main motivation here is to characterize subsurface contaminant source zones by processing down-gradient hydrological data and cross-gradient electrical resistance tomography observations. Inspired by Newton's method for multi-objective optimization, we present an iterative inversion scheme in which descent steps are chosen to simultaneously reduce both data-model misfit terms. Such an approach, however, requires solving a non-smooth convex problem at every iteration, which is computationally expensive for a pixel-based inversion over the whole domain. Instead, we employ a parametric level set technique that substantially reduces the number of underlying parameters, making the inversion computationally tractable. The performance of the technique is examined and discussed through the reconstruction of source zone architectures that are representative of dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) contaminant release in a statistically homogenous sandy aquifer. In these examples, the geometric configuration of the DNAPL mass is considered along with additional information about its spatial variability within the contaminated zone, such as the identification of low and high saturation regions. Comparison of the reconstructions with the true DNAPL architectures highlights the superior performance of the model-based technique and joint inversion scheme. (paper)

  19. Hybrid Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings Using Powder and Solution Precursor Feedstock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, S. V.; Sivakumar, G.; Raghuveer, T.; Dusane, R. O.

    2014-04-01

    A novel approach of hybridizing the conventional atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) technique with the solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS) route to achieve thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) with tailored configurations is presented. Such a hybrid process can be conveniently adopted for forming composite, multi-layered and graded coatings employing simultaneous and/or sequential feeding of solution precursor as well as powder feedstock, yielding distinct TBC microstructures that bear promise to further extend coating durability. TBC specimens generated using conventional APS technique, the SPPS method and through APS-SPPS hybrid processing have been comprehensively characterized for microstructure, phase constitution, hardness and thermal cycling life, and the results were compared to demonstrate the advantages that can ensue from hybrid processing.

  20. Simulating Precursor Radial Velocity Surveys for Future Exoplanet Direct Imaging Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Patrick; Plavchan, Peter; Crepp, Justin; Dulz, Shannon; Stark, Chris; Kane, Steven

    2018-01-01

    Future direct imaging missions such as WFIRST, HabEx, and LUVOIR aim to catalog and characterize Earth-analogs around nearby stars. The observing strategy and science yield and are strongly dependent on the frequency of Earth-like planets, and precursor knowledge of which stars specifically host suitable planetary systems. Ground-based radial velocity surveys can potentially identify targets and optimal observations times at a fraction of the cost of blind direct imaging surveys. We present the first phases of simulations of such a survey. We consider multiple telescopes, including their locations, weather conditions, observation time limitations, and instrument sensitivities. Multiple target selection optimization algorithms are considered. We calculate realistic radial velocity uncertainties based upon the known stellar properties of nearby direct imaging targets including effective temperature, metallicity, and surface gravity. We next inject and recover the masses and orbital parameters of real and simulated planets, estimating the effectiveness of a precursor radial velocity survey for direct imaging yield optimization.

  1. Microwave-assisted synthesis of WS2 nanowires through tetrathiotungstate precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravas Kumar Panigrahi and Amita Pathak

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten disulfide (WS2 nanowires have been synthesized through a microwave-assisted chemical route that uses tungstic acid, elemental sulfur and monoethanolamine as starting reagents for obtaining a precursor solution of tetrathiotungstate ions. Acidification of the precursor solution yields amorphous precipitates, which lead to the formation of nanowires of WS2 with thickness of about 5–10 nm when heated at 750 °C under argon atmosphere for 1.5 h. Phase and the microstructure of the prepared powders have been investigated through x-ray powder diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, respectively. Optical absorption of the WS2 powders reveals a red shift of the exciton bands compared to bulk WS2.

  2. Precursor type affecting surface properties and catalytic activity of sulfated zirconia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarubica Aleksandra R.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Zirconium-hydroxide precursor samples are synthesized from Zr-hydroxide, Zr-nitrate, and Zr-alkoxide, by precipitation/impregnation, as well as by a modified sol-gel method. Precursor samples are further sulphated for the intended SO4 2- content of 4 wt.%, and calcined at 500-700oC. Differences in precursors’ origin and calcination temperature induce the incorporation of SO4 2- groups into ZrO2 matrices by various mechanisms. As a result, different amounts of residual sulphates are coupled with other structural, as well as surface properties, resulting in various catalytic activities of sulphated zirconia samples. Catalyst activity and selectivity are a complex synergistic function of tetragonal phase fraction, sulphates contents, textural and surface characteristics. Superior activity of SZ of alkoxide origin can be explained by a beneficial effect of meso-pores owing to a better accommodation of coke deposits.

  3. A novel precursor in preparation and characterization of nickel oxide nanoparticles via thermal decomposition approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salavati-Niasari, Masoud; Mir, Noshin; Davar, Fatemeh

    2010-01-01

    In order to raise the need of co-surfactant in the synthesis of NiO nanoparticles, [bis(2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehydato)nickel(II)] complex was employed as a novel precursor in thermal decomposition process using oleylamine (C 18 H 37 N) as surfactant. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy. Also the novel precursor thermally was treated in solid state reaction in different temperature, 400, 500, and 600 o C. Synthesized nickel oxide nanoparticles have a cubic phase with average size of 15-20 nm.

  4. NiTiO3 powders obtained by polymeric precursor method: Synthesis and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, K.P.; Cavalcante, L.S.; Simoes, A.Z.; Varela, J.A.; Longo, E.; Leite, E.R.

    2009-01-01

    Nickel titanate (NiTiO 3 ) powders were synthesized by the polymeric precursor method after thermal treatment at different temperatures for 2 h in air atmosphere. The decomposition of the precursors was monitored by differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis. The NiTiO 3 powders presented a reduction in the specific surface area and increase of the average particle size with the evolution of the temperature. The structural evolution of NiTiO 3 phase was accompanied by X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy. By scanning electron microscopy was revealed the agglomerated nature of very fine particles of NiTiO 3 powders annealed from 600 to 1000 deg. C

  5. 3rd Annual Workshop on Inverse Problem

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This proceeding volume is based on papers presented on the Third Annual Workshop on Inverse Problems which was organized by the Department of Mathematical Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology and University of Gothenburg, and took place in May 2013 in Stockholm. The purpose of this workshop was to present new analytical developments and numerical techniques for solution of inverse problems for a wide range of applications in acoustics, electromagnetics, optical fibers, medical imaging, geophysics, etc. The contributions in this volume reflect these themes and will be beneficial to researchers who are working in the area of applied inverse problems.

  6. Inverse Raman effect: applications and detection techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, L.J. Jr.

    1980-08-01

    The processes underlying the inverse Raman effect are qualitatively described by comparing it to the more familiar phenomena of conventional and stimulated Raman scattering. An experession is derived for the inverse Raman absorption coefficient, and its relationship to the stimulated Raman gain is obtained. The power requirements of the two fields are examined qualitatively and quantitatively. The assumption that the inverse Raman absorption coefficient is constant over the interaction length is examined. Advantages of the technique are discussed and a brief survey of reported studies is presented

  7. Inverse Raman effect: applications and detection techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, L.J. Jr.

    1980-08-01

    The processes underlying the inverse Raman effect are qualitatively described by comparing it to the more familiar phenomena of conventional and stimulated Raman scattering. An experession is derived for the inverse Raman absorption coefficient, and its relationship to the stimulated Raman gain is obtained. The power requirements of the two fields are examined qualitatively and quantitatively. The assumption that the inverse Raman absorption coefficient is constant over the interaction length is examined. Advantages of the technique are discussed and a brief survey of reported studies is presented.

  8. Multiparameter Optimization for Electromagnetic Inversion Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Elkattan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic (EM methods have been extensively used in geophysical investigations such as mineral and hydrocarbon exploration as well as in geological mapping and structural studies. In this paper, we developed an inversion methodology for Electromagnetic data to determine physical parameters of a set of horizontal layers. We conducted Forward model using transmission line method. In the inversion part, we solved multi parameter optimization problem where, the parameters are conductivity, dielectric constant, and permeability of each layer. The optimization problem was solved by simulated annealing approach. The inversion methodology was tested using a set of models representing common geological formations.

  9. Population inversion in a stationary recombining plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, M.

    1980-01-01

    Population inversion, which occurs in a recombining plasma when a stationary He plasma is brought into contact with a neutral gas, is examined. With hydrogen as a contact gas, noticeable inversion between low-lying levels of H as been found. The overpopulation density is of the order of 10 8 cm -3 , which is much higher then that (approx. =10 5 cm -3 ) obtained previously with He as a contact gas. Relations between these experimental results and the conditions for population inversion are discussed with the CR model

  10. Inverse design methods for radiative transfer systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daun, K.J.; Howell, J.R.

    2005-01-01

    Radiant enclosures used in industrial processes have traditionally been designed by trial-and-error, a technique that usually demands considerable time to find a solution of limited quality. As an alternative, designers have recently adopted optimization and inverse methodologies to solve design problems involving radiative transfer; the optimization methodology solves the inverse problem implicitly by transforming it into a multivariable minimization problem, while the inverse design methodology solves the problem explicitly using regularization. This paper presents the details of both methodologies, and demonstrates them by solving for the optimal heater settings in an industrially relevant radiant enclosure design problem

  11. The factorization method for inverse problems

    CERN Document Server

    Kirsch, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    The factorization method is a relatively new method for solving certain types of inverse scattering problems and problems in tomography. Aimed at students and researchers in Applied Mathematics, Physics and Engineering, this text introduces the reader to this promising approach for solving important classes of inverse problems. The wide applicability of this method is discussed by choosing typical examples, such as inverse scattering problems for the scalar Helmholtz equation, ascattering problem for Maxwell's equation, and a problem in impedance and optical tomography. The last section of the

  12. Geoacoustic inversion using combustive sound source signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potty, Gopu R; Miller, James H; Wilson, Preston S; Lynch, James F; Newhall, Arthur

    2008-09-01

    Combustive sound source (CSS) data collected on single hydrophone receiving units, in water depths ranging from 65 to 110 m, during the Shallow Water 2006 experiment clearly show modal dispersion effects and are suitable for modal geoacoustic inversions. CSS shots were set off at 26 m depth in 100 m of water. The inversions performed are based on an iterative scheme using dispersion-based short time Fourier transform in which each time-frequency tiling is adaptively rotated in the time-frequency plane, depending on the local wave dispersion. Results of the inversions are found to compare favorably to local core data.

  13. Enumeration of minimal stoichiometric precursor sets in metabolic networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andrade, R.; Wannagat, M.; Coimbra Klein, C.; Acuna, V.; Marchetti Spaccamela, A.; Vieira Milreu, P.; Stougie, L.; Sagot, M.-F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: What an organism needs at least from its environment to produce a set of metabolites, e.g. target(s) of interest and/or biomass, has been called a minimal precursor set. Early approaches to enumerate all minimal precursor sets took into account only the topology of the metabolic network

  14. The electromagnetic Brillouin precursor in one-dimensional photonic crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uitham, R.; Hoenders, B. J.

    2008-01-01

    We have calculated the electromagnetic Brillouin precursor that arises in a one-dimensional photonic crystal that consists of two homogeneous slabs which each have a single electron resonance. This forerunner is compared with the Brillouin precursor that arises in a homogeneous double-electron

  15. Geometrizing configurations. Heinrich Hertz and his mathematical precursors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lützen, Jesper

    1999-01-01

    A comparison between the methods used by Heinrich hertz and his mathematician precursors such as Liouville, Lipschitz and Darboux in order to apply differential geometry in mechanics......A comparison between the methods used by Heinrich hertz and his mathematician precursors such as Liouville, Lipschitz and Darboux in order to apply differential geometry in mechanics...

  16. Assimilation of NAD(+) precursors in Candida glabrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Biao; Pan, Shih-Jung; Zupancic, Margaret L; Cormack, Brendan P

    2007-10-01

    The yeast pathogen Candida glabrata is a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) auxotroph and its growth depends on the environmental supply of vitamin precursors of NAD(+). C. glabrata salvage pathways defined in this article allow NAD(+) to be synthesized from three compounds - nicotinic acid (NA), nicotinamide (NAM) and nicotinamide riboside (NR). NA is salvaged through a functional Preiss-Handler pathway. NAM is first converted to NA by nicotinamidase and then salvaged by the Preiss-Handler pathway. Salvage of NR in C. glabrata occurs via two routes. The first, in which NR is phosphorylated by the NR kinase Nrk1, is independent of the Preiss-Handler pathway. The second is a novel pathway in which NR is degraded by the nucleosidases Pnp1 and Urh1, with a minor role for Meu1, and ultimately converted to NAD(+) via the nicotinamidase Pnc1 and the Preiss-Handler pathway. Using C. glabrata mutants whose growth depends exclusively on the external NA or NR supply, we also show that C. glabrata utilizes NR and to a lesser extent NA as NAD(+) sources during disseminated infection.

  17. Identification, Selection, and Enrichment of Cardiomyocyte Precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Ferrarini Zanetti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The large-scale production of cardiomyocytes is a key step in the development of cell therapy and tissue engineering to treat cardiovascular diseases, particularly those caused by ischemia. The main objective of this study was to establish a procedure for the efficient production of cardiomyocytes by reprogramming mesenchymal stem cells from adipose tissue. First, lentiviral vectors expressing neoR and GFP under the control of promoters expressed specifically during cardiomyogenesis were constructed to monitor cell reprogramming into precardiomyocytes and to select cells for amplification and characterization. Cellular reprogramming was performed using 5′-azacytidine followed by electroporation with plasmid pOKS2a, which expressed Oct4, Sox2, and Klf4. Under these conditions, GFP expression began only after transfection with pOKS2a, and less than 0.015% of cells were GFP+. These GFP+ cells were selected for G418 resistance to find molecular markers of cardiomyocytes by RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. Both genetic and protein markers of cardiomyocytes were present in the selected cells, with some variations among them. Cell doubling time did not change after selection. Together, these results indicate that enrichment with vectors expressing GFP and neoR under cardiomyocyte-specific promoters can produce large numbers of cardiomyocyte precursors (CMPs, which can then be differentiated terminally for cell therapy and tissue engineering.

  18. Earth Observing System precursor data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Grant R.; Eidenshink, Jeff C.; Sheffield, K. W.; Myers, Jeffrey S.

    1993-08-01

    The Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) is archiving and processing precursor data from airborne and spaceborne instruments such as the thermal infrared multispectral scanner (TIMS), the NS-001 and thematic mapper simulators (TMS), and the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR). The instrument data are being used to construct data sets that simulate the spectral and spatial characteristics of the advanced spaceborne thermal emission and reflection radiometer (ASTER) and the moderate resolution imaging spectrometer (MODIS) flight instruments scheduled to be flown on the EOS-AM spacecraft. Ames Research Center has developed and is flying a MODIS airborne simulator (MAS), which provides coverage in both MODIS and ASTER bands. A simulation of an ASTER data set over Death Valley, California has been constructed using a combination of TMS and TIMS data, along with existing digital elevation models that were used to develop the topographic information. MODIS data sets are being simulated by using MAS for full-band site coverage at high resolution and AVHRR for global coverage at 1 km resolution.

  19. Enzymatic synthesis of vitamin B6 precursor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prlainović Nevena Ž.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available 3-Cyano-4-ethoxymethyl-6-methyl-2-pyridone is an important precursor in the synthesis of vitamin B6, obtained in the addition reaction between 2-cyanoacetamide and 1-ethoxy-2,4-pentanedione catalyzed by lipase from Candida rugosa (triacylglycerol ester hydrolases, EC 3.1.1.3. This work shows new experimental data and mathematical modeling of lipase catalyzed synthesis of 3-cyano-4-ethoxymethyl-6-methyl-2-pyridone, starting from 1-ethoxy-2,4-pentanedione and 2-cyanoacetamide. Kinetic measurements were done at 50 oC with enzyme concentration of 1.2 % w/v. Experimental results were fitted with two kinetic models: the ordered bi-ter and ping-pong bi-ter model, and the initial rates of the reaction were found to correlate best with a ping-pong bi-ter mechanism with inhibition by 2-cyanoacetamide. Obtained specificity constants indicated that lipase from C. rugosa had higher affinity towards 1-ethoxy-2,4-pentanedione and less bulky substrates. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172013, br. III 46010 and br. 172049

  20. Precursors to suicidality and violence on antidepressants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bielefeldt, Andreas Ø; Danborg, Pia B; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To quantify the risk of suicidality and violence when selective serotonin and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors are given to adult healthy volunteers with no signs of a mental disorder. DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Harms related to suici......OBJECTIVE: To quantify the risk of suicidality and violence when selective serotonin and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors are given to adult healthy volunteers with no signs of a mental disorder. DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Harms related...... to suicidality, hostility, activation events, psychotic events and mood disturbances. SETTING: Published trials identified by searching PubMed and Embase and clinical study reports obtained from the European and UK drug regulators. PARTICIPANTS: Double-blind, placebo-controlled trials in adult healthy volunteers...... that reported on suicidality or violence or precursor events to suicidality or violence. RESULTS: A total of 5787 publications were screened and 130 trials fulfilled our inclusion criteria. The trials were generally uninformative; 97 trials did not report the randomisation method, 75 trials did not report any...

  1. Pair fireball precursors of neutron star mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Brian D.; Zivancev, Charles

    2016-10-01

    If at least one neutron star (NS) is magnetized in a binary NS merger, then the orbital motion of the conducting companion during the final inspiral induces a strong voltage and current along the magnetic field lines connecting the NSs. If a modest fraction η of the extracted electromagnetic power extracted accelerates relativistic particles, the resulting gamma-ray emission a compact volume will result in the formation of an electron-positron pair fireball. Applying a steady-state pair wind model, we quantify the detectability of the precursor fireball with gamma-ray satellites. For η ˜ 1 the gamma-ray detection horizon of Dmax ≈ 10(Bd/1014 G)3/4 Mpc is much closer than the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO)/Virgo horizon of 200 Mpc, unless the NS surface magnetic field strength is very large, B_d ≲ 10^{15} G. Given the quasi-isotropic nature of the emission, mergers with weaker NS fields could contribute a nearby population of short gamma-ray bursts. Power not dissipated close to the binary is carried to infinity along the open field lines by a large-scale Poynting flux. Reconnection within this outflow, well outside of the pair photosphere, provides a potential site for non-thermal emission, such as a coherent millisecond radio burst.

  2. BOOK REVIEW: Inverse Problems. Activities for Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2003-06-01

    This book is a valuable introduction to inverse problems. In particular, from the educational point of view, the author addresses the questions of what constitutes an inverse problem and how and why we should study them. Such an approach has been eagerly awaited for a long time. Professor Groetsch, of the University of Cincinnati, is a world-renowned specialist in inverse problems, in particular the theory of regularization. Moreover, he has made a remarkable contribution to educational activities in the field of inverse problems, which was the subject of his previous book (Groetsch C W 1993 Inverse Problems in the Mathematical Sciences (Braunschweig: Vieweg)). For this reason, he is one of the most qualified to write an introductory book on inverse problems. Without question, inverse problems are important, necessary and appear in various aspects. So it is crucial to introduce students to exercises in inverse problems. However, there are not many introductory books which are directly accessible by students in the first two undergraduate years. As a consequence, students often encounter diverse concrete inverse problems before becoming aware of their general principles. The main purpose of this book is to present activities to allow first-year undergraduates to learn inverse theory. To my knowledge, this book is a rare attempt to do this and, in my opinion, a great success. The author emphasizes that it is very important to teach inverse theory in the early years. He writes; `If students consider only the direct problem, they are not looking at the problem from all sides .... The habit of always looking at problems from the direct point of view is intellectually limiting ...' (page 21). The book is very carefully organized so that teachers will be able to use it as a textbook. After an introduction in chapter 1, sucessive chapters deal with inverse problems in precalculus, calculus, differential equations and linear algebra. In order to let one gain some insight

  3. From iron(III) precursor to magnetite and vice versa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotic, M.; Jurkin, T.; Music, S.

    2009-01-01

    The syntheses of nanosize magnetite particles by wet-chemical oxidation of Fe 2+ have been extensively investigated. In the present investigation the nanosize magnetite particles were synthesised without using the Fe(II) precursor. This was achieved by γ-irradiation of water-in-oil microemulsion containing only the Fe(III) precursor. The corresponding phase transformations were monitored. Microemulsions (pH ∼ 12.5) were γ-irradiated at a relatively high dose rate of ∼22 kGy/h. Upon 1 h of γ-irradiation the XRD pattern of the precipitate showed goethite and unidentified low-intensity peaks. Upon 6 h of γ-irradiation, reductive conditions were achieved and substoichiometric magnetite (∼Fe 2.71 O 4 ) particles with insignificant amount of goethite particles found in the precipitate. Hydrated electrons (e aq - ), organic radicals and hydrogen gas as radiolytic products were responsible for the reductive dissolution of iron oxide in the microemulsion and the reduction Fe 3+ → Fe 2+ . Upon 18 h of γ-irradiation the precipitate exhibited dual behaviour, it was a more oxidised product than the precipitate obtained after 6 h of γ-irradiation, but it contained magnetite particles in a more reduced form (∼Fe 2.93 O 4 ). It was presumed that the reduction and oxidation processes existed as concurrent competitive processes in the microemulsion. After 18 h of γ-irradiation the pH of the medium shifted from the alkaline to the acidic range. The high dose rate of ∼22 kGy/h was directly responsible for this shift to the acidic range. At a slightly acidic pH a further reduction of Fe 3+ → Fe 2+ resulted in the formation of more stoichiometric magnetite particles, whereas the oxidation conditions in the acidic medium permitted the oxidation Fe 2+ → Fe 3+ . The Fe 3+ was much less soluble in the acidic medium and it hydrolysed and recrystallised as goethite. The γ-irradiation of the microemulsion for 25 h at a lower dose rate of 16 kGy/h produced pure

  4. Tuning the bimetallic amide-imide precursor system to make paramagnetic GaMnN nanopowders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drygas, Mariusz [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Energy and Fuels, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Janik, Jerzy F., E-mail: janikj@agh.edu.pl [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Energy and Fuels, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Musial, Michal [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Energy and Fuels, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Gosk, Jacek [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Physics, Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warszawa (Poland); Twardowski, Andrzej, E-mail: andrzej.twardowski@fuw.edu.pl [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Physics, Pasteura 5, 02-093 Warszawa (Poland)

    2016-09-01

    A bimetallic molecular system made of gallium (III) tris(dimethyl)amide Ga(NMe{sub 2}){sub 3} and manganese (II) bis(trimethylsilyl)amide Mn[N(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 2} (Me = CH{sub 3}, fixed initial Mn-content 10 at.%) was subjected to ammonolysis in refluxing/liquid ammonia. Upon isolation at room temperature, the amide-imide mixed metal precursor was pyrolyzed at elevated temperatures under an ammonia flow by two different routes. Route 1 consisted of a direct nitridation at high temperatures of 500, 700 or 900 °C. In route 2, a low temperature pyrolysis at 150 °C was applied prior to nitridation at the same final temperatures as in route 1. All nanopowders were characterized by XRD diffraction, FT-IR spectroscopy, and SEM/EDX microscopy and analysis. Thorough magnetization measurements in function of magnetic field and temperature were carried out with a SQUID magnetometer. In all samples, the paramagnetic phase of GaMnN was accompanied by an antiferromagnetic by-product linked to a Mn-containing species from decomposition and oxidation of Mn-precursor excess. The Mn-contents in the crystalline GaMnN, i.e., Mn-incorporated in GaN crystal lattice, were of the order of 2–3 at.% mostly independent on the nitridation route whereas the latter had a pronounced effect on amounts of the antiferromagnetic by-product. - Highlights: • New bimetallic precursor system for conversion to GaN/Mn nanopowders was designed. • Two conversion routes were applied with precursor nitridation at 500, 700 or 900 °C. • Prepared nanopowders were thoroughly characterized including magnetic measurements. • The major product was the gallium nitride Mn-doped phase GaMnN with 2–3 at.% of Mn.

  5. Heeding the waveform inversion nonlinearity by unwrapping the model and data

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2012-01-01

    Unlike traveltime inversion, waveform inversion provides relatively higher-resolution inverted models. This feature, however, comes at the cost of introducing complex nonlinearity to the inversion operator complicating the convergence process. We use unwrapped-phase-based objective functions to reduce such nonlinearity in a domain in which the high-frequency component is given by the traveltime inversion. Such information is packaged in a frequency-dependent attribute (or traveltime) that can be easily manipulated at different frequencies. It unwraps the phase of the wavefield yielding far less nonlinearity in the objective function than those experienced with the conventional misfit objective function, and yet it still holds most of the critical waveform information in its frequency dependency. However, it suffers from nonlinearity introduced by the model (or reflectivity), as events interact with each other (something like cross talk). This stems from the sinusoidal nature of the band-limited reflectivity model. Unwrapping the phase for such a model can mitigate this nonlinearity as well. Specifically, a simple modification to the inverted domain (or model), can reduce the effect of the model-induced nonlinearity and, thus, make the inversion more convergent. Simple examples are used to highlight such features.

  6. Sensitivity analyses of acoustic impedance inversion with full-waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Gang; da Silva, Nuno V.; Wu, Di

    2018-04-01

    Acoustic impedance estimation has a significant importance to seismic exploration. In this paper, we use full-waveform inversion to recover the impedance from seismic data, and analyze the sensitivity of the acoustic impedance with respect to the source-receiver offset of seismic data and to the initial velocity model. We parameterize the acoustic wave equation with velocity and impedance, and demonstrate three key aspects of acoustic impedance inversion. First, short-offset data are most suitable for acoustic impedance inversion. Second, acoustic impedance inversion is more compatible with the data generated by density contrasts than velocity contrasts. Finally, acoustic impedance inversion requires the starting velocity model to be very accurate for achieving a high-quality inversion. Based upon these observations, we propose a workflow for acoustic impedance inversion as: (1) building a background velocity model with travel-time tomography or reflection waveform inversion; (2) recovering the intermediate wavelength components of the velocity model with full-waveform inversion constrained by Gardner’s relation; (3) inverting the high-resolution acoustic impedance model with short-offset data through full-waveform inversion. We verify this workflow by the synthetic tests based on the Marmousi model.

  7. Full traveltime inversion in source domain

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Lu

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents a new method of source-domain full traveltime inversion (FTI). The objective of this study is automatically building near-surface velocity using the early arrivals of seismic data. This method can generate the inverted velocity that can kinetically best match the reconstructed plane-wave source of early arrivals with true source in source domain. It does not require picking first arrivals for tomography, which is one of the most challenging aspects of ray-based tomographic inversion. Besides, this method does not need estimate the source wavelet, which is a necessity for receiver-domain wave-equation velocity inversion. Furthermore, we applied our method on one synthetic dataset; the results show our method could generate a reasonable background velocity even when shingling first arrivals exist and could provide a good initial velocity for the conventional full waveform inversion (FWI).

  8. n-Colour self-inverse compositions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    colour self-inverse composition. This introduces four new sequences which satisfy the same recurrence relation with different initial conditions like the famous Fibonacci and Lucas sequences. For these new sequences explicit formulas, recurrence ...

  9. Inverse Doppler Effects in Broadband Acoustic Metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, S L; Zhao, X P; Liu, S; Shen, F L; Li, L L; Luo, C R

    2016-08-31

    The Doppler effect refers to the change in frequency of a wave source as a consequence of the relative motion between the source and an observer. Veselago theoretically predicted that materials with negative refractions can induce inverse Doppler effects. With the development of metamaterials, inverse Doppler effects have been extensively investigated. However, the ideal material parameters prescribed by these metamaterial design approaches are complex and also challenging to obtain experimentally. Here, we demonstrated a method of designing and experimentally characterising arbitrary broadband acoustic metamaterials. These omni-directional, double-negative, acoustic metamaterials are constructed with 'flute-like' acoustic meta-cluster sets with seven double meta-molecules; these metamaterials also overcome the limitations of broadband negative bulk modulus and mass density to provide a region of negative refraction and inverse Doppler effects. It was also shown that inverse Doppler effects can be detected in a flute, which has been popular for thousands of years in Asia and Europe.

  10. n-Colour self-inverse compositions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    inverse composition. This introduces four new sequences which satisfy the same recurrence relation with different initial conditions like the famous Fibonacci and Lucas sequences. For these new sequences explicit formulas, recurrence relations ...

  11. Parametric optimization of inverse trapezoid oleophobic surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavalli, Andrea; Bøggild, Peter; Okkels, Fridolin

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a comprehensive and versatile approach to the parametric shape optimization of oleophobic surfaces. We evaluate the performance of inverse trapezoid microstructures in terms of three objective parameters: apparent contact angle, maximum sustainable hydrostatic pressure...

  12. An inverse method for radiation transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favorite, J. A. (Jeffrey A.); Sanchez, R. (Richard)

    2004-01-01

    Adjoint functions have been used with forward functions to compute gradients in implicit (iterative) solution methods for inverse problems in optical tomography, geoscience, thermal science, and other fields, but only once has this approach been used for inverse solutions to the Boltzmann transport equation. In this paper, this approach is used to develop an inverse method that requires only angle-independent flux measurements, rather than angle-dependent measurements as was done previously. The method is applied to a simplified form of the transport equation that does not include scattering. The resulting procedure uses measured values of gamma-ray fluxes of discrete, characteristic energies to determine interface locations in a multilayer shield. The method was implemented with a Newton-Raphson optimization algorithm, and it worked very well in numerical one-dimensional spherical test cases. A more sophisticated optimization method would better exploit the potential of the inverse method.

  13. The inverse square law of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, A.H.

    1987-01-01

    The inverse square law of gravitation is very well established over the distances of celestial mechanics, while in electrostatics the law has been shown to be followed to very high precision. However, it is only within the last century that any laboratory experiments have been made to test the inverse square law for gravitation, and all but one has been carried out in the last ten years. At the same time, there has been considerable interest in the possibility of deviations from the inverse square law, either because of a possible bearing on unified theories of forces, including gravitation or, most recently, because of a possible additional fifth force of nature. In this article the various lines of evidence for the inverse square law are summarized, with emphasis upon the recent laboratory experiments. (author)

  14. Bayesian inversion of refraction seismic traveltime data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryberg, T.; Haberland, Ch

    2018-03-01

    We apply a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (McMC) formalism to the inversion of refraction seismic, traveltime data sets to derive 2-D velocity models below linear arrays (i.e. profiles) of sources and seismic receivers. Typical refraction data sets, especially when using the far-offset observations, are known as having experimental geometries which are very poor, highly ill-posed and far from being ideal. As a consequence, the structural resolution quickly degrades with depth. Conventional inversion techniques, based on regularization, potentially suffer from the choice of appropriate inversion parameters (i.e. number and distribution of cells, starting velocity models, damping and smoothing constraints, data noise level, etc.) and only local model space exploration. McMC techniques are used for exhaustive sampling of the model space without the need of prior knowledge (or assumptions) of inversion parameters, resulting in a large number of models fitting the observations. Statistical analysis of these models allows to derive an average (reference) solution and its standard deviation, thus providing uncertainty estimates of the inversion result. The highly non-linear character of the inversion problem, mainly caused by the experiment geometry, does not allow to derive a reference solution and error map by a simply averaging procedure. We present a modified averaging technique, which excludes parts of the prior distribution in the posterior values due to poor ray coverage, thus providing reliable estimates of inversion model properties even in those parts of the models. The model is discretized by a set of Voronoi polygons (with constant slowness cells) or a triangulated mesh (with interpolation within the triangles). Forward traveltime calculations are performed by a fast, finite-difference-based eikonal solver. The method is applied to a data set from a refraction seismic survey from Northern Namibia and compared to conventional tomography. An inversion test

  15. An Inversion Recovery NMR Kinetics Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Travis J.; Kershaw, Allan D.; Li, Vincent; Wu, Xinping

    2011-01-01

    A convenient laboratory experiment is described in which NMR magnetization transfer by inversion recovery is used to measure the kinetics and thermochemistry of amide bond rotation. The experiment utilizes Varian spectrometers with the VNMRJ 2.3 software, but can be easily adapted to any NMR platform. The procedures and sample data sets in this article will enable instructors to use inversion recovery as a laboratory activity in applied NMR classes and provide research students with a conveni...

  16. Population inversion in recombining hydrogen plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukane, Utaro; Yokota, Toshiaki; Oda, Toshiatsu.

    1978-11-01

    The collisional-radiative model is applied to a recombining hydrogen plasma in order to investigate the plasma condition in which the population inversion between the energy levels of hydrogen can be generated. The population inversion is expected in a plasma where the three body recombination has a large contribution to the recombining processes and the effective recombination rate is beyond a certain value for a given electron density and temperature. Calculated results are presented in figures and tables. (author)

  17. Approximation of Bayesian Inverse Problems for PDEs

    OpenAIRE

    Cotter, S. L.; Dashti, M.; Stuart, A. M.

    2010-01-01

    Inverse problems are often ill posed, with solutions that depend sensitively on data.n any numerical approach to the solution of such problems, regularization of some form is needed to counteract the resulting instability. This paper is based on an approach to regularization, employing a Bayesian formulation of the problem, which leads to a notion of well posedness for inverse problems, at the level of probability measures. The stability which results from this well posedness may be used as t...

  18. On the Inversion of the Lidar Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-11-01

    sectitns briefly review the major inversion methods to date and a fourth section describes the development of the modified inversion method. All four...can be seeu when It is understood ’in terms of its ,physical significance. Equation 17 states that the normalized integrated backscatter has a limit. In...still give significant errors. 4.0 VALIDATION OF AGILE In this chapter, evidence of the success of AGILE will be reviewed and compared with Klett’s

  19. Inverse regression for ridge recovery II: Numerics

    OpenAIRE

    Glaws, Andrew; Constantine, Paul G.; Cook, R. Dennis

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the application of sufficient dimension reduction (SDR) to a noiseless data set derived from a deterministic function of several variables. In this context, SDR provides a framework for ridge recovery. In this second part, we explore the numerical subtleties associated with using two inverse regression methods---sliced inverse regression (SIR) and sliced average variance estimation (SAVE)---for ridge recovery. This includes a detailed numerical analysis of the eigenvalues of th...

  20. Biosynthesis and characterization of silver nanoparticles prepared from two novel natural precursors by facile thermal decomposition methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudarzi, Mojgan; Mir, Noshin; Mousavi-Kamazani, Mehdi; Bagheri, Samira; Salavati-Niasari, Masoud

    2016-09-01

    In this work, two natural sources, including pomegranate peel extract and cochineal dye were employed for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles. The natural silver complex from pomegranate peel extract resulted in nano-sized structures through solution-phase method, but this method was not efficient for cochineal dye-silver precursor and the as-formed products were highly agglomerated. Therefore, an alternative facile solid-state approach was investigated as for both natural precursors and the results showed successful production of well-dispersed nanoparticles with narrow size distribution for cochineal dye-silver precursor. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX), and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM).

  1. The formation of CuInSe{sub 2}-based thin-film solar cell absorbers from alternative low-cost precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jost, S.

    2008-01-18

    This work deals with real-time investigations concerning the crystallisation process of CuInSe{sub 2}-based thin-film solar cell absorbers while annealing differently produced and composed ''low-cost'' precursors. Various types of precursors have been investigated concerning their crystallisation behaviour. Three groups of experiments have been performed: (i) Investigations concerning the crystallisation process of the quaternary chalcopyrite Cu(In,Al)Se{sub 2} and Cu(In,Al)S{sub 2}, (ii) investigations concerning the formation process of the compound semiconductor CuInSe{sub 2} from electroplated precursors, and (iii) investigations concerning the crystallisation of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} using precursors with thermally evaporated indium. A specific sample surrounding has been constructed, which enables to perform time-resolved angle-dispersive X-ray powder diffraction experiments during the annealing process of precursor samples. A thorough analysis of subsequently recorded diffraction patterns using the Rietveld method provides a detailed knowledge about the semiconductor crystallisation process while annealing. Based on these fundamental investigations, conclusions have been drawn concerning an adaptation of the precursor deposition process in order to optimise the final solar cell results. The investigations have shown, that one class of electroplated precursors shows a crystallisation behaviour identical to the one known for vacuum-deposited precursors. The investigations concerning the crystallisation process of the quaternary chalcopyrite Cu(In,Al)Se{sub 2} revealed, that the chalcopyrite forms from the ternary selenide (Al,In){sub 2}Se{sub 3} and Cu{sub 2}Se at elevated process temperatures. This result is used to explain the separation of the absorber layer into an aluminum-rich and an indium-rich chalcopyrite phase, which has been observed at processed Cu(In,Al)Se{sub 2} absorbers from several research groups. In addition, differences

  2. Functional Nanoporous Polymers from Block Copolymer Precursors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Fengxiao

    has also been generated to obtain nanoporous polymers with functional coatings on pore walls. Vapor phase polymerization of pyrrole is performed to incorporate an ultra thin film of polypyrrole into nanoporous 1,2-PB. The preliminary test shows that nanoporous 1,2-PB gains conductivity. Generally...

  3. Virtual Seismic Observation (VSO) with Sparsity-Promotion Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiezhao, B.; Ning, J.; Jianwei, M.

    2017-12-01

    Large station interval leads to low resolution images, sometimes prevents people from obtaining images in concerned regions. Sparsity-promotion inversion, a useful method to recover missing data in industrial field acquisition, can be lent to interpolate seismic data on none-sampled sites, forming Virtual Seismic Observation (VSO). Traditional sparsity-promotion inversion suffers when coming up with large time difference in adjacent sites, which we concern most and use shift method to improve it. The procedure of the interpolation is that we first employ low-pass filter to get long wavelength waveform data and shift the waveforms of the same wave in different seismograms to nearly same arrival time. Then we use wavelet-transform-based sparsity-promotion inversion to interpolate waveform data on none-sampled sites and filling a phase in each missing trace. Finally, we shift back the waveforms to their original arrival times. We call our method FSIS (Filtering, Shift, Interpolation, Shift) interpolation. By this way, we can insert different virtually observed seismic phases into none-sampled sites and get dense seismic observation data. For testing our method, we randomly hide the real data in a site and use the rest to interpolate the observation on that site, using direct interpolation or FSIS method. Compared with directly interpolated data, interpolated data with FSIS can keep amplitude better. Results also show that the arrival times and waveforms of those VSOs well express the real data, which convince us that our method to form VSOs are applicable. In this way, we can provide needed data for some advanced seismic technique like RTM to illuminate shallow structures.

  4. Inverse scattering theory foundations of tomography with diffracting wavefields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devaney, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    The underlying mathematical models employed in reflection and transmission computed tomography using diffracting wavefields (called diffraction tomography) are reviewed and shown to have a rigorous basis in inverse scattering theory. In transmission diffraction tomography the underlying wave model is shown to be the Rytov approximation to the complex phase of the wavefield transmitted by the object being probed while in reflection diffraction tomography the underlying wave model is shown to be the Born approximation to the backscattered wavefield from the object. In both cases the goal of the reconstruction process is the determination of the objects's complex index of refraction as a function of position r/sup →/ and, possibly, the frequency ω of the probing wavefield. By use of these approximations the reconstruction problem for both transmission and reflection diffraction tomography can be cast into the simple and elegant form of linearized inverse scattering theory. Linearized inverse scattering theory is shown to lead directly to generalized projection-slice theorems for both reflection and transmission diffraction tomography that provide a simple mathematical relationship between the object's complex index of refraction (the unknown) and the data (the complex phase of the transmitted wave or the complex amplitude of the reflected wave). The conventional projection-slice theorem of X-ray CT is shown to result from the generalized projection-slice theorem for transmission diffraction tomography in the limit of vanishing wavelength (in the absence of wave effects). Fourier based and back-projection type reconstruction algorithms are shown to be directly derivable from the generalized projection-slice theorems

  5. Atmospheric inverse modeling via sparse reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Hase

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Many applications in atmospheric science involve ill-posed inverse problems. A crucial component of many inverse problems is the proper formulation of a priori knowledge about the unknown parameters. In most cases, this knowledge is expressed as a Gaussian prior. This formulation often performs well at capturing smoothed, large-scale processes but is often ill equipped to capture localized structures like large point sources or localized hot spots. Over the last decade, scientists from a diverse array of applied mathematics and engineering fields have developed sparse reconstruction techniques to identify localized structures. In this study, we present a new regularization approach for ill-posed inverse problems in atmospheric science. It is based on Tikhonov regularization with sparsity constraint and allows bounds on the parameters. We enforce sparsity using a dictionary representation system. We analyze its performance in an atmospheric inverse modeling scenario by estimating anthropogenic US methane (CH4 emissions from simulated atmospheric measurements. Different measures indicate that our sparse reconstruction approach is better able to capture large point sources or localized hot spots than other methods commonly used in atmospheric inversions. It captures the overall signal equally well but adds details on the grid scale. This feature can be of value for any inverse problem with point or spatially discrete sources. We show an example for source estimation of synthetic methane emissions from the Barnett shale formation.

  6. Atmospheric inverse modeling via sparse reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hase, Nils; Miller, Scot M.; Maaß, Peter; Notholt, Justus; Palm, Mathias; Warneke, Thorsten

    2017-10-01

    Many applications in atmospheric science involve ill-posed inverse problems. A crucial component of many inverse problems is the proper formulation of a priori knowledge about the unknown parameters. In most cases, this knowledge is expressed as a Gaussian prior. This formulation often performs well at capturing smoothed, large-scale processes but is often ill equipped to capture localized structures like large point sources or localized hot spots. Over the last decade, scientists from a diverse array of applied mathematics and engineering fields have developed sparse reconstruction techniques to identify localized structures. In this study, we present a new regularization approach for ill-posed inverse problems in atmospheric science. It is based on Tikhonov regularization with sparsity constraint and allows bounds on the parameters. We enforce sparsity using a dictionary representation system. We analyze its performance in an atmospheric inverse modeling scenario by estimating anthropogenic US methane (CH4) emissions from simulated atmospheric measurements. Different measures indicate that our sparse reconstruction approach is better able to capture large point sources or localized hot spots than other methods commonly used in atmospheric inversions. It captures the overall signal equally well but adds details on the grid scale. This feature can be of value for any inverse problem with point or spatially discrete sources. We show an example for source estimation of synthetic methane emissions from the Barnett shale formation.

  7. An application of sparse inversion on the calculation of the inverse data space of geophysical data

    KAUST Repository

    Saragiotis, Christos

    2011-07-01

    Multiple reflections as observed in seismic reflection measurements often hide arrivals from the deeper target reflectors and need to be removed. The inverse data space provides a natural separation of primaries and surface-related multiples, as the surface multiples map onto the area around the origin while the primaries map elsewhere. However, the calculation of the inverse data is far from trivial as theory requires infinite time and offset recording. Furthermore regularization issues arise during inversion. We perform the inversion by minimizing the least-squares norm of the misfit function and by constraining the 1 norm of the solution, being the inverse data space. In this way a sparse inversion approach is obtained. We show results on field data with an application to surface multiple removal. © 2011 IEEE.

  8. A new continuous two-step molecular precursor route to rare-earth oxysulfides Ln2O2S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Crom, N.; Devillers, M.

    2012-01-01

    A continuous two-step molecular precursor pathway is designed for the preparation of rare-earth oxysulfides Ln 2 O 2 S (Ln=Y, La, Pr, Nd, Sm–Lu). This new route involves a first oxidation step leading to the rare-earth oxysulfate Ln 2 O 2 SO 4 which is subsequently reduced to the rare-earth oxysulfide Ln 2 O 2 S by switching to a H 2 –Ar atmosphere. The whole process occurs at a temperature significantly lower than usual solid state synthesis (T≤650 °C) and avoids the use of dangerous sulfur-based gases, providing a convenient route to the synthesis of the entire series of Ln 2 O 2 S. The molecular precursors consist in heteroleptic dithiocarbamate complexes [Ln(Et 2 dtc) 3 (phen)] and [Ln(Et 2 dtc) 3 (bipy)] (Et 2 dtc=N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate; phen=1,10-phenanthroline; bipy=2,2′-bipyridine) and were synthesized by a new high yield and high purity synthesis route. The nature of the molecular precursor determines the minimum synthesis temperature and influences therefore the purity of the final Ln 2 O 2 S crystalline phase. - Graphical abstract: A continuous two-step molecular precursor pathway was designed for the preparation of rare-earth oxysulfides Ln 2 O 2 S (Ln=Y, La, Pr, Nd, Sm–Lu), starting from heteroleptic dithiocarbamate complexes. The influence of the nature of the molecular precursor on the minimum synthesis temperature and on the purity of the final Ln 2 O 2 S crystalline phase is discussed. Highlights: ► A new high yield and high purity synthesis route of rare earth dithiocarbamates is described. ► These compounds are used as precursors in a continuous process leading to rare-earth oxysulfides. ► The oxysulfides are obtained under much more moderate conditions than previously described.

  9. Bismuth(III) dialkyldithiophosphates: Facile single source precursors for the preparation of bismuth sulfide nanorods and bismuth phosphate thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswal, Jasmine B.; Garje, Shivram S.; Nuwad, Jitendra; Pillai, C.G.S.

    2013-01-01

    Two different phase pure materials (Bi 2 S 3 and Bi 2 P 4 O 13 ) have been prepared under different conditions using the same single source precursors. Solvothermal decomposition of the complexes, Bi(S 2 P(OR) 2 ) 3 [where, R=Methyl (Me) (1), Ethyl (Et) (2), n-Propyl (Pr n ) (3) and iso-Propyl (Pr i ) (4)] in ethylene glycol gave orthorhombic bismuth sulfide nanorods, whereas aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD) of the same precursors deposited monoclinic bismuth tetraphosphate (Bi 2 P 4 O 13 ) thin films on glass substrates. Surface study of the thin films using SEM illustrated the formation of variety of nanoscale morphologies (spherical-, wire-, pendent-, doughnut- and flower-like) at different temperatures. AFM studies were carried out to evaluate quality of the films in terms of uniformity and roughness. Thin films of average roughness as low as 1.4 nm were deposited using these precursors. Photoluminescence studies of Bi 2 P 4 O 13 thin films were also carried out. - Graphical abstract: Solvothermal decomposition of bismuth(III) dialkyldithiophosphates in ethylene glycol gave Bi 2 S 3 nanoparticles, whereas aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition of these single source precursors deposited Bi 2 P 4 O 13 thin films. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Preparation of phase pure orthorhombic Bi 2 S 3 nanorods and monoclinic Bi 2 P 4 O 13 thin films. • Use of single source precursors for deposition of bismuth phosphate thin films. • Use of solvothermal decomposition and AACVD methods. • Morphology controlled synthesis of Bi 2 P 4 O 13 thin films. • Bi 2 S 3 nanorods and Bi 2 P 4 O 13 thin films using same single source precursors

  10. Magnetic reconnection and precursor effect in coaxial discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masoud, M.M.; Soliman, H.M.; El-Khalafawy, T.A.

    1988-01-01

    A precursor pulse was observed ahead of the plasma sheath produced by a coaxial electrode discharge system. The velocity of the precursor pulse was 4x10 7 cmS -1 and the velocity of the plasma sheath was 6x10 6 cmS -1 . The precursor pulse was unaffected when an axial magnetic field of 6 K.G. was applied to the propagation chamber, while the plasma sheath velocity increased and downstream structure were changed. The precursor pulse was split, sometimes, into two or more peaks, had the same shape and structure of the original one. The rest gas was heated up to 20 e.V. when the precursor pulse was destructed. The precursor pulse propagation mechanism and parameters showed that it had a solitary wave structure and behaviour. A reversed magnetic field was detected, when the plasma sheath had diamagnetic properties, where magnetic reconnection took place. Magnetic reconnection was responsible for energy transfiguration and wave generation. This was due to acceleration mechanism of charged particles occurred by the induced electric field at the moment of magnetic reconnection. The detected induced electric field had a high field intensity and fast rise time pulse. Several instabilities were referred to magnetic reconnection and the precursor pulse observed was a result of such instabilities

  11. Large scale synthesis of nanostructured zirconia-based compounds from freeze-dried precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, A.; Villanueva, R.; Vie, D.; Murcia-Mascaros, S.; Martínez, E.; Beltrán, A.; Sapiña, F.; Vicent, M.; Sánchez, E.

    2013-01-01

    Nanocrystalline zirconia powders have been obtained at the multigram scale by thermal decomposition of precursors resulting from the freeze-drying of aqueous acetic solutions. This technique has equally made possible to synthesize a variety of nanostructured yttria or scandia doped zirconia compositions. SEM images, as well as the analysis of the XRD patterns, show the nanoparticulated character of those solids obtained at low temperature, with typical particle size in the 10-15 nm range when prepared at 673 K. The presence of the monoclinic, the tetragonal or both phases depends on the temperature of the thermal treatment, the doping concentration and the nature of the dopant. In addition, Rietveld refinement of the XRD profiles of selected samples allows detecting the coexistence of the tetragonal and the cubic phases for high doping concentration and high thermal treatment temperatures. Raman experiments suggest the presence of both phases also at relatively low treatment temperatures.

  12. An inverse dynamics model for the analysis, reconstruction and prediction of bipedal walking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, Hubertus F.J.M.; Grootenboer, H.J.; de Jongh, Henk J.; Huijing, P.A.J.B.M.; de Vries, J.

    1995-01-01

    Walking is a constrained movement which may best be observed during the double stance phase when both feet contact the floor. When analyzing a measured movement with an inverse dynamics model, a violation of these constrains will always occur due to measuring errors and deviations of the segments

  13. Synthesis and characterization of inverse spinels, intercalation materials for Li-ion batteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Landschoot, N.

    2006-01-01

    Chapter 2 describes the solid-state synthesis of LiNiVO4 and LiCoVO4. The materials are prepared at 800C and are phase pure, as shown by X-ray diffraction and have the inverse spinel structure. Due to the solid-state synthesis the particle size is quite large and the particle size distribution is

  14. Ceramic Nanofibers by Electrospinning of Precursor Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-29

    antimony n-butoxide to form aluminum antimonide , and indium methoxyethoxide and antimony n- butoxide to form indium antimonide and a variety of nitride...reactivity towards metal oxides. Additionally, residual aluminum chloride catalyst may increase the reactivity. In the gas phase, the carbonizing...currently in the possession of our lab, such as tetraethyl orthosilicate and tetraethxoxygermane to form silicon germanide, aluminum n-butoxide and

  15. Compressive Phase Contrast Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maia, Filipe; MacDowell, Alastair; Marchesini, Stefano; Padmore, Howard A.; Parkinson, Dula Y.; Pien, Jack; Schirotzek, Andre; Yang, Chao

    2010-01-01

    When x-rays penetrate soft matter, their phase changes more rapidly than their amplitude. Interference effects visible with high brightness sources creates higher contrast, edge enhanced images. When the object is piecewise smooth (made of big blocks of a few components), such higher contrast datasets have a sparse solution. We apply basis pursuit solvers to improve SNR, remove ring artifacts, reduce the number of views and radiation dose from phase contrast datasets collected at the Hard X-Ray Micro Tomography Beamline at the Advanced Light Source. We report a GPU code for the most computationally intensive task, the gridding and inverse gridding algorithm (non uniform sampled Fourier transform).

  16. [Felice Fontana precursor of neurosciences (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disertori, B; Piazza, M

    1981-01-01

    The A.A. insert the life and work of the naturalist and chemist Felice Fontana, born in Pomarolo (Trentino), in the frame of 18th century sciences, beside other great names of that century like Carolus Linnaeus, Réaumur, von Haller, Spallanzani, Morgagni, Priestley and Lavoisier. In the field of general biology, the discovery of nucleus and nucleolus and consequently the discovery of the eukaryotic cell, as we say in our days, in his, as well as the one of anabiosis. The A.A. enucleate and analyse the contributions of Fontana to the neurosciences; he has discovered the axon and the myelinic sheath half century before Remak and Purknije; he found out that the white matter of the brain is made of fibres alike those of nerves and the grey matter is made of globules (i.e. cells) mixed up with fibres; he discovered in the retina a part of coming out from the brain; he described the transversal bands of fibres of the skeletal muscles; he was the first to introduce into physiology the law of "all and nothing"; he attributed the irritability to the whole animal life; he identified the pupillar reflexes to the light, the reflex of accommodation, the consensual reflex, the psycho-emotive mydriasis and at last the myosis of sleep. He made experimental searches about nerves and recognised their regeneration, he enumerated various pathological intracranial masses, he made an important anatomopathological research about hydatid cyst in the brain of the sheep affected by "capostorno" and madness, he demonstrated their parasitical nature (he said that the hydated cysts were covered inside by small animals), he come out to formulate the hypothesis that some neuropsychiatric diseases of man can depend from similar aetiology. He declared that passions may have pathological effects (psyco-somatic aetiology), but he has also drawned the attention against the danager of aprioristical generalisation of neurogenical causes in all diseases. The A.A. give to Fontana the palm of precursor

  17. Large scale synthesis of nanostructured zirconia-based compounds from freeze-dried precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gómez, A.; Villanueva, R.; Vie, D.; Murcia-Mascaros, S.; Martínez, E.; Beltrán, A.; Sapiña, F.; Vicent, M.; Sánchez, E.

    2013-01-01

    Nanocrystalline zirconia powders have been obtained at the multigram scale by thermal decomposition of precursors resulting from the freeze-drying of aqueous acetic solutions. This technique has equally made possible to synthesize a variety of nanostructured yttria or scandia doped zirconia compositions. SEM images, as well as the analysis of the XRD patterns, show the nanoparticulated character of those solids obtained at low temperature, with typical particle size in the 10–15 nm range when prepared at 673 K. The presence of the monoclinic, the tetragonal or both phases depends on the temperature of the thermal treatment, the doping concentration and the nature of the dopant. In addition, Rietveld refinement of the XRD profiles of selected samples allows detecting the coexistence of the tetragonal and the cubic phases for high doping concentration and high thermal treatment temperatures. Raman experiments suggest the presence of both phases also at relatively low treatment temperatures. - Graphical abstract: Zr 1−x A x O 2−x/2 (A=Y, Sc; 0≤x≤0.12) solid solutions have been prepared as nanostructured powders by thermal decomposition of precursors obtained by freeze-drying, and this synthetic procedure has been scaled up to the 100 g scale. Highlights: ► Zr 1−x A x O 2−x/2 (A=Y, Sc; 0≤x≤0.12) solid solutions have been prepared as nanostructured powders. ► The synthetic method involves the thermal decomposition of precursors obtained by freeze-drying. ► The temperature of the thermal treatment controls particle sizes. ► The preparation procedure has been scaled up to the 100 g scale. ► This method is appropriate for the large-scale industrial preparation of multimetallic systems.

  18. Effect of different precursors in the chemical synthesis of ZnO nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusatti, M.; Barroso, G.S.; Souza, D.A.R.; Rosario, J.A.; Lima, R.B.; Silva, L.A.; Riella, H.G.; Kuhnen, N.C.; Campos, C.E.M.

    2010-01-01

    This work aims to evaluate the effect of ZnCl 2 and Zn(NO 3 ) 2 .6H 2 O precursors in the synthesis of ZnO nanocrystals. The materials were obtained at a temperature of 90 deg C by a simple solochemical route. The resulting samples were characterized with respect to the determination of the formed phases, particle size and morphology, using the techniques of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These characterization techniques confirmed that the sample obtained with Zn(NO 3 ) 2. 6H 2 O has hexagonal crystal structure of ZnO and dimensions in the nanoscale. However, the material formed with ZnCl 2 was composed of a mixture of the ZnO phase and another correspondent to the Zn 5 (OH) 8 Cl 2 .H 2 O phase. For both precursors, the predominant morphology of the obtained ZnO nanocrystals is rod- like structure.(author)

  19. Effect of different precursors in the chemical synthesis of ZnO nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gusatti, M.; Barroso, G.S.; Souza, D.A.R.; Rosario, J.A.; Lima, R.B.; Silva, L.A.; Riella, H.G.; Kuhnen, N.C. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (DEQA/UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica e de Alimentos; Campos, C.E.M. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (DF/UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica

    2010-07-01

    This work aims to evaluate the effect of ZnCl{sub 2} and Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}.6H{sub 2}O precursors in the synthesis of ZnO nanocrystals. The materials were obtained at a temperature of 90 deg C by a simple solochemical route. The resulting samples were characterized with respect to the determination of the formed phases, particle size and morphology, using the techniques of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These characterization techniques confirmed that the sample obtained with Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2.}6H{sub 2}O has hexagonal crystal structure of ZnO and dimensions in the nanoscale. However, the material formed with ZnCl{sub 2} was composed of a mixture of the ZnO phase and another correspondent to the Zn{sub 5}(OH){sub 8}Cl{sub 2}.H{sub 2}O phase. For both precursors, the predominant morphology of the obtained ZnO nanocrystals is rod- like structure.(author)

  20. Fabrication and characterization of cerium-doped barium titanate inverse opal by sol-gel method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Yi; Zhu Yihua; Yang Xiaoling; Li Chunzhong; Zhou Jinghong

    2007-01-01

    Cerium-doped barium titanate inverted opal was synthesized from barium acetate contained cerous acetate and tetrabutyl titanate in the interstitial spaces of a polystyrene (PS) opal. This procedure involves infiltration of precursors into the interstices of the PS opal template followed by hydrolytic polycondensation of the precursors to amorphous barium titanate and removal of the PS opal by calcination. The morphologies of opal and inverse opal were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The pores were characterized by mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) investigation showed the doping structure of cerium, barium and titanium. And powder X-ray diffraction allows one to observe the influence of doping degree on the grain size. The lattice parameters, crystal size and lattice strain were calculated by the Rietveld refinement method. The synthesis of cerium-doped barium titanate inverted opals provides an opportunity to electrically and optically engineer the photonic band structure and the possibility of developing tunable three-dimensional photonic crystal devices. - Graphical abstract: Cerium-doped barium titanate inverted opal was synthesized from barium acetate acid contained cerous acetate and tetrabutyl titanate in the interstitial spaces of a PS opal, which involves infiltration of precursors into the interstices of the PS opal template and removal of the PS opal by calcination