WorldWideScience

Sample records for inverse compton emission

  1. A likely inverse-Compton emission from the Type IIb SN 2013df

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, K. L.; Kong, A. K. H.

    2016-08-01

    The inverse-Compton X-ray emission model for supernovae has been well established to explain the X-ray properties of many supernovae for over 30 years. However, no observational case has yet been found to connect the X-rays with the optical lights as they should be. Here, we report the discovery of a hard X-ray source that is associated with a Type II-b supernova. Simultaneous emission enhancements have been found in both the X-ray and optical light curves twenty days after the supernova explosion. While the enhanced X-rays are likely dominated by inverse-Compton scatterings of the supernova’s lights from the Type II-b secondary peak, we propose a scenario of a high-speed supernova ejecta colliding with a low-density pre-supernova stellar wind that produces an optically thin and high-temperature electron gas for the Comptonization. The inferred stellar wind mass-loss rate is consistent with that of the supernova progenitor candidate as a yellow supergiant detected by the Hubble Space Telescope, providing an independent proof for the progenitor. This is also new evidence of the inverse-Compton emission during the early phase of a supernova.

  2. Spectral Evolution of Synchrotron and Inverse Compton Emission in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    emission peaks in the optical band (e.g., Nieppola et al. 2006). In order to under- stand the evolution of synchrotron and IC spectra of BL Lac objects, the X-ray spectral analysis with XMM–Newton X-ray observations of PKS 2155–304 and. S5 0716+7145 (see Zhang 2008, 2010 for details) was performed. Here, the results.

  3. NuSTAR observations of the bullet cluster: constraints on inverse compton emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wik, Daniel R.; Hornstrup, Allan; Molendi, S.

    2014-01-01

    component to describe the spectrum of the Bullet cluster, and instead argue that it is dominated at all energies by emission from purely thermal gas. The conservatively derived 90% upper limit on the IC flux of 1.1 × 10-12 erg s-1 cm-2 (50-100 keV), implying a lower limit on B ≳ 0.2 μG, is barely consistent......The search for diffuse non-thermal inverse Compton (IC) emission from galaxy clusters at hard X-ray energies has been undertaken with many instruments, with most detections being either of low significance or controversial. Because all prior telescopes sensitive at E > 10 keV do not focus light...... and have degree-scale fields of view, their backgrounds are both high and difficult to characterize. The associated uncertainties result in lower sensitivity to IC emission and a greater chance of false detection. In this work, we present 266 ks NuSTAR observations of the Bullet cluster, which is detected...

  4. Inverse comptonization vs. thermal synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenimore, E.E.; Klebesadel, R.W.; Laros, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    There are currently two radiation mechanisms being considered for gamma-ray bursts: thermal synchrotron and inverse comptonization. They are mutually exclusive since thermal synchrotron requires a magnetic field of approx. 10 12 Gauss whereas inverse comptonization cannot produce a monotonic spectrum if the field is larger than 10 11 and is too inefficient relative to thermal synchrotron unless the field is less than 10 9 Gauss. Neither mechanism can explain completely the observed characteristics of gamma-ray bursts. However, we conclude that thermal synchrotron is more consistent with the observations if the sources are approx. 40 kpc away whereas inverse comptonization is more consistent if they are approx. 300 pc away. Unfortunately, the source distance is still not known and, thus, the radiation mechanism is still uncertain

  5. THE γ-RAY SPECTRUM OF GEMINGA AND THE INVERSE COMPTON MODEL OF PULSAR HIGH-ENERGY EMISSION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2012-01-01

    We reanalyze the Fermi spectra of the Geminga and Vela pulsars. We find that the spectrum of Geminga above the break is well approximated by a simple power law without the exponential cutoff, making Geminga's spectrum similar to that of Crab. Vela's broadband γ-ray spectrum is equally well fit with both the exponential cutoff and the double power-law shapes. In the broadband double power-law fits, for a typical Fermi spectrum of a bright γ-ray pulsar, most of the errors accumulate due to the arbitrary parameterization of the spectral roll-off. In addition, a power law with an exponential cutoff gives an acceptable fit for the underlying double power-law spectrum for a very broad range of parameters, making such fitting procedures insensitive to the underlying Fermi photon spectrum. Our results have important implications for the mechanism of pulsar high-energy emission. A number of observed properties of γ-ray pulsars—i.e., the broken power-law spectra without exponential cutoffs and stretching in the case of Crab beyond the maximal curvature limit, spectral breaks close to or exceeding the maximal breaks due to curvature emission, patterns of the relative intensities of the leading and trailing pulses in the Crab repeated in the X-ray and γ-ray regions, presence of profile peaks at lower energies aligned with γ-ray peaks—all point to the inverse Compton origin of the high-energy emission from majority of pulsars.

  6. Time-independent inverse compton spectrum for photons from a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The general theoretical aspects of inverse Compton scattering was investigated and an equation for the timeindependent inverse Compton spectrum for photons from a plasma cloud of finite extent was derived. This was done by convolving the Kompaneets equation used for describing the evolution of the photon spectrum ...

  7. Multipass optical cavity for inverse Compton interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rollason, A.J. E-mail: a.j.rollason@keele.ac.uk; Fang, X.; Dugdale, D.E

    2004-07-01

    The recycling of laser beams in the focal region of non-resonant multipass optical cavities has been investigated as a means of providing a high intensity of photons for weak interaction experiments. Ray-tracing simulations and measurements with an Ar-ion laser have been carried out to examine the intensity profiles of the laser field in different 2-mirror geometries. In particular, the use of such cavities in the generation of X-rays by inverse Compton scattering is considered. X-ray yields are calculated for electron beams of 0.05, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.5 mm diameter yielding enhancement factors of 10-200 compared to a free space laser interaction.

  8. Resonant Inverse Compton Scattering Spectra from Highly Magnetized Neutron Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadiasingh, Zorawar; Baring, Matthew G.; Gonthier, Peter L.; Harding, Alice K.

    2018-02-01

    Hard, nonthermal, persistent pulsed X-ray emission extending between 10 and ∼150 keV has been observed in nearly 10 magnetars. For inner-magnetospheric models of such emission, resonant inverse Compton scattering of soft thermal photons by ultrarelativistic charges is the most efficient production mechanism. We present angle-dependent upscattering spectra and pulsed intensity maps for uncooled, relativistic electrons injected in inner regions of magnetar magnetospheres, calculated using collisional integrals over field loops. Our computations employ a new formulation of the QED Compton scattering cross section in strong magnetic fields that is physically correct for treating important spin-dependent effects in the cyclotron resonance, thereby producing correct photon spectra. The spectral cutoff energies are sensitive to the choices of observer viewing geometry, electron Lorentz factor, and scattering kinematics. We find that electrons with energies ≲15 MeV will emit most of their radiation below 250 keV, consistent with inferred turnovers for magnetar hard X-ray tails. More energetic electrons still emit mostly below 1 MeV, except for viewing perspectives sampling field-line tangents. Pulse profiles may be singly or doubly peaked dependent on viewing geometry, emission locale, and observed energy band. Magnetic pair production and photon splitting will attenuate spectra to hard X-ray energies, suppressing signals in the Fermi-LAT band. The resonant Compton spectra are strongly polarized, suggesting that hard X-ray polarimetry instruments such as X-Calibur, or a future Compton telescope, can prove central to constraining model geometry and physics.

  9. Inverse Compton X-ray signature of AGN feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, Martin A.; Nayakshin, Sergei

    2013-12-01

    Bright AGN frequently show ultrafast outflows (UFOs) with outflow velocities vout ˜ 0.1c. These outflows may be the source of AGN feedback on their host galaxies sought by galaxy formation modellers. The exact effect of the outflows on the ambient galaxy gas strongly depends on whether the shocked UFOs cool rapidly or not. This in turn depends on whether the shocked electrons share the same temperature as ions (one-temperature regime, 1T) or decouple (2T), as has been recently suggested. Here we calculate the inverse Compton spectrum emitted by such shocks, finding a broad feature potentially detectable either in mid-to-high energy X-rays (1T case) or only in the soft X-rays (2T). We argue that current observations of AGN do not seem to show evidence for the 1T component. The limits on the 2T emission are far weaker, and in fact it is possible that the observed soft X-ray excess of AGN is partially or fully due to the 2T shock emission. This suggests that UFOs are in the energy-driven regime outside the central few pc, and must pump considerable amounts of not only momentum but also energy into the ambient gas. We encourage X-ray observers to look for the inverse Compton components calculated here in order to constrain AGN feedback models further.

  10. Observation of redshifting and harmonic radiation in inverse Compton scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Y.; Pogorelsky, I.; Williams, O.; O'Shea, F.; Barber, S.; Gadjev, I.; Duris, J.; Musumeci, P.; Fedurin, M.; Korostyshevsky, A.; Malone, B.; Swinson, C.; Stenby, G.; Kusche, K.; Babzien, M.; Montemagno, M.; Jacob, P.; Zhong, Z.; Polyanskiy, M.; Yakimenko, V.; Rosenzweig, J.

    2015-06-01

    Inverse Compton scattering of laser photons by ultrarelativistic electron beam provides polarized x- to γ -ray pulses due to the Doppler blueshifting. Nonlinear electrodynamics in the relativistically intense linearly polarized laser field changes the radiation kinetics established during the Compton interaction. These are due to the induced figure-8 motion, which introduces an overall redshift in the radiation spectrum, with the concomitant emission of higher order harmonics. To experimentally analyze the strong field physics associated with the nonlinear electron-laser interaction, clear modifications to the angular and wavelength distributions of x rays are observed. The relativistic photon wave field is provided by the ps CO2 laser of peak normalized vector potential of 0.5 laser [M. Babzien et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 054802 (2006)]. The angular spectral characteristics are revealed using K -, L -edge, and high energy attenuation filters. The observation indicates existence of the electrons' longitudinal motion through frequency redshifting understood as the mass shift effect. Thus, the 3rd harmonic radiation has been observed containing on-axis x-ray component that is directly associated with the induced figure-8 motion. These are further supported by an initial evidence of off-axis 2nd harmonic radiation produced in a circularly polarized laser wave field. Total x-ray photon number per pulse, scattered by 65 MeV electron beam of 0.3 nC, at the interaction point is measured to be approximately 109 .

  11. Constraint on Parameters of Inverse Compton Scattering Model for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J. Astrophys. Astr. (2011) 32, 299–300 c Indian Academy of Sciences. Constraint on Parameters of Inverse Compton Scattering Model for PSR B2319+60. H. G. Wang. ∗. & M. Lv. Center for Astrophysics,Guangzhou University, Guangzhou, China. ∗ e-mail: cosmic008@yahoo.com.cn. Abstract. Using the multifrequency radio ...

  12. Inverse Compton Gamma Rays from Dark Matter Annihilation in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    As the e + e − − energy spectra have an exponential cut off at high energies, this may allow to discriminate some dark matter scenarios from other astrophysical sources. Finally, some more detailed study about the effect of inverse Compton scattering may help constrain the dark matter signature in the dSph galaxies.

  13. Observation of redshifting and harmonic radiation in inverse Compton scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Sakai

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Inverse Compton scattering of laser photons by ultrarelativistic electron beam provides polarized x- to γ-ray pulses due to the Doppler blueshifting. Nonlinear electrodynamics in the relativistically intense linearly polarized laser field changes the radiation kinetics established during the Compton interaction. These are due to the induced figure-8 motion, which introduces an overall redshift in the radiation spectrum, with the concomitant emission of higher order harmonics. To experimentally analyze the strong field physics associated with the nonlinear electron-laser interaction, clear modifications to the angular and wavelength distributions of x rays are observed. The relativistic photon wave field is provided by the ps CO_{2} laser of peak normalized vector potential of 0.5

  14. BOW TIES IN THE SKY. I. THE ANGULAR STRUCTURE OF INVERSE COMPTON GAMMA-RAY HALOS IN THE FERMI SKY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broderick, Avery E.; Shalaby, Mohamad [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Tiede, Paul [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, 31 Caroline Street North, Waterloo, ON, N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Pfrommer, Christoph [Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies, Schloss-Wolfsbrunnenweg 35, D-69118 Heidelberg (Germany); Puchwein, Ewald [Institute of Astronomy and Kavli Institute for Cosmology, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Chang, Philip [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 1900 E. Kenwood Boulevard, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Lamberts, Astrid [Theoretical Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Extended inverse Compton halos are generally anticipated around extragalactic sources of gamma rays with energies above 100 GeV. These result from inverse Compton scattered cosmic microwave background photons by a population of high-energy electron/positron pairs produced by the annihilation of the high-energy gamma rays on the infrared background. Despite the observed attenuation of the high-energy gamma rays, the halo emission has yet to be directly detected. Here, we demonstrate that in most cases these halos are expected to be highly anisotropic, distributing the upscattered gamma rays along axes defined either by the radio jets of the sources or oriented perpendicular to a global magnetic field. We present a pedagogical derivation of the angular structure in the inverse Compton halo and provide an analytic formalism that facilitates the generation of mock images. We discuss exploiting this fact for the purpose of detecting gamma-ray halos in a set of companion papers.

  15. Nuclear photon science with inverse compton photon beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Mamoru

    2007-01-01

    Recent developments of the synchrotron radiation facilities and intense lasers are now guiding us to a new research frontier with probes of a high energy GeV photon beam and an intense and short pulse MeV γ-ray beam. New directions of the science developments with photo-nuclear reactions are discussed. The inverse Compton γ-ray has two good advantages for searching for a microscopic quantum world; they are 1) good emittance and 2) high linear and circular polarizations. With these advantages, photon beams in the energy range from MeV to GeV are used for studying hadron structure, nuclear structure, astrophysics, materials science, as well as for applying medical science. (author)

  16. A Bulk Comptonization Model for the Prompt GRB Emission and its Relation to the Fermi GRB Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2010-01-01

    We present a model in which the GRB prompt emission at E E(sub peak) is due to bulk Comptonization by the relativistic blast wave motion of either its own synchrotron photons of ambient photons of the stellar configuration that gave birth to the GRB. The bulk Comptonization process then induces the production of relativistic electrons of Lorentz factor equal to that of the blast wave through interactions with its ambient protons. The inverse compton emission of these electrons produces a power law component that extends to multi GeV energies in good agreement with the LAT GRB observations.

  17. Inverse Compton gamma-rays from galactic dark matter annihilation. Anisotropy signatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Le; Sigl, Guenter; Miniati, Francesco

    2010-08-01

    High energy electrons and positrons from annihilating dark matter can imprint unique angular anisotropies on the diffuse gamma-ray flux by inverse Compton scattering off the interstellar radiation field. We develop a numerical tool to compute gamma-ray emission from such electrons and positrons diffusing in the smooth host halo and in substructure halos with masses down to 10 -6 M s un. We show that, unlike the total gamma-ray angular power spectrum observed by Fermi-LAT, the angular power spectrum from inverse Compton scattering is exponentially suppressed below an angular scale determined by the diffusion length of electrons and positrons. For TeV scale dark matter with a canonical thermal freeze-out cross section 3 x 10 -26 cm 3 /s, this feature may be detectable by Fermi-LAT in the energy range 100-300 GeV after more sophisticated foreground subtraction. We also find that the total flux and the shape of the angular power spectrum depends sensitively on the spatial distribution of subhalos in the Milky Way. Finally, the contribution from the smooth host halo component to the gamma-ray mean intensity is negligibly small compared to subhalos. (orig.)

  18. Inverse Compton gamma-rays from galactic dark matter annihilation. Anisotropy signatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Le; Sigl, Guenter [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Miniati, Francesco [ETH Zuerich (Switzerland). Physics Dept.

    2010-08-15

    High energy electrons and positrons from annihilating dark matter can imprint unique angular anisotropies on the diffuse gamma-ray flux by inverse Compton scattering off the interstellar radiation field. We develop a numerical tool to compute gamma-ray emission from such electrons and positrons diffusing in the smooth host halo and in substructure halos with masses down to 10{sup -6}M{sub s}un. We show that, unlike the total gamma-ray angular power spectrum observed by Fermi-LAT, the angular power spectrum from inverse Compton scattering is exponentially suppressed below an angular scale determined by the diffusion length of electrons and positrons. For TeV scale dark matter with a canonical thermal freeze-out cross section 3 x 10{sup -26} cm{sup 3}/s, this feature may be detectable by Fermi-LAT in the energy range 100-300 GeV after more sophisticated foreground subtraction. We also find that the total flux and the shape of the angular power spectrum depends sensitively on the spatial distribution of subhalos in the Milky Way. Finally, the contribution from the smooth host halo component to the gamma-ray mean intensity is negligibly small compared to subhalos. (orig.)

  19. Scaling laws in high-energy inverse compton scattering. II. Effect of bulk motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozawa, Satoshi; Kohyama, Yasuharu; Itoh, Naoki

    2010-01-01

    We study the inverse Compton scattering of the CMB photons off high-energy nonthermal electrons. We extend the formalism obtained by the previous paper to the case where the electrons have nonzero bulk motions with respect to the CMB frame. Assuming the power-law electron distribution, we find the same scaling law for the probability distribution function P 1,K (s) as P 1 (s) which corresponds to the zero bulk motions, where the peak height and peak position depend only on the power-index parameter. We solved the rate equation analytically. It is found that the spectral intensity function also has the same scaling law. The effect of the bulk motions to the spectral intensity function is found to be small. The present study will be applicable to the analysis of the x-ray and gamma-ray emission models from various astrophysical objects with nonzero bulk motions such as radio galaxies and astrophysical jets.

  20. Brilliant GeV gamma-ray flash from inverse Compton scattering in the QED regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Z.; Hu, R. H.; Lu, H. Y.; Yu, J. Q.; Wang, D. H.; Fu, E. G.; Chen, C. E.; He, X. T.; Yan, X. Q.

    2018-04-01

    An all-optical scheme is proposed for studying laser plasma based incoherent photon emission from inverse Compton scattering in the quantum electrodynamic regime. A theoretical model is presented to explain the coupling effects among radiation reaction trapping, the self-generated magnetic field and the spiral attractor in phase space, which guarantees the transfer of energy and angular momentum from electromagnetic fields to particles. Taking advantage of a prospective ∼ 1023 W cm‑2 laser facility, 3D particle-in-cell simulations show a gamma-ray flash with unprecedented multi-petawatt power and brightness of 1.7 × 1023 photons s‑1 mm‑2 mrad‑2/0.1% bandwidth (at 1 GeV). These results bode well for new research directions in particle physics and laboratory astrophysics exploring laser plasma interactions.

  1. Inverse Compton Light Source: A Compact Design Proposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deitrick, Kirsten Elizabeth

    In the last decade, there has been an increasing demand for a compact Inverse Compton Light Source (ICLS) which is capable of producing high-quality X-rays by colliding an electron beam and a high-quality laser. It is only in recent years when both SRF and laser technology have advanced enough that compact sources can approach the quality found at large installations such as the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. Previously, X-ray sources were either high flux and brilliance at a large facility or many orders of magnitude lesser when produced by a bremsstrahlung source. A recent compact source was constructed by Lyncean Technologies using a storage ring to produce the electron beam used to scatter the incident laser beam. By instead using a linear accelerator system for the electron beam, a significant increase in X-ray beam quality is possible, though even subsequent designs also featuring a storage ring offer improvement. Preceding the linear accelerator with an SRF reentrant gun allows for an extremely small transverse emittance, increasing the brilliance of the resulting X-ray source. In order to achieve sufficiently small emittances, optimization was done regarding both the geometry of the gun and the initial electron bunch distribution produced off the cathode. Using double-spoke SRF cavities to comprise the linear accelerator allows for an electron beam of reasonable size to be focused at the interaction point, while preserving the low emittance that was generated by the gun. An aggressive final focusing section following the electron beam's exit from the accelerator produces the small spot size at the interaction point which results in an X-ray beam of high flux and brilliance. Taking all of these advancements together, a world class compact X-ray source has been designed. It is anticipated that this source would far outperform the conventional bremsstrahlung and many other compact ICLSs, while coming closer to performing at the levels

  2. Inverse compton light source: a compact design proposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deitrick, Kirsten Elizabeth [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2017-05-01

    In the last decade, there has been an increasing demand for a compact Inverse Compton Light Source (ICLS) which is capable of producing high-quality X-rays by colliding an electron beam and a high-quality laser. It is only in recent years when both SRF and laser technology have advanced enough that compact sources can approach the quality found at large installations such as the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. Previously, X-ray sources were either high flux and brilliance at a large facility or many orders of magnitude lesser when produced by a bremsstrahlung source. A recent compact source was constructed by Lyncean Technologies using a storage ring to produce the electron beam used to scatter the incident laser beam. By instead using a linear accelerator system for the electron beam, a significant increase in X-ray beam quality is possible, though even subsequent designs also featuring a storage ring offer improvement. Preceding the linear accelerator with an SRF reentrant gun allows for an extremely small transverse emittance, increasing the brilliance of the resulting X-ray source. In order to achieve sufficiently small emittances, optimization was done regarding both the geometry of the gun and the initial electron bunch distribution produced off the cathode. Using double-spoke SRF cavities to comprise the linear accelerator allows for an electron beam of reasonable size to be focused at the interaction point, while preserving the low emittance that was generated by the gun. An aggressive final focusing section following the electron beam's exit from the accelerator produces the small spot size at the interaction point which results in an X-ray beam of high flux and brilliance. Taking all of these advancements together, a world class compact X-ray source has been designed. It is anticipated that this source would far outperform the conventional bremsstrahlung and many other compact ICLSs, while coming closer to performing at the

  3. Production of X-rays by inverse Compton effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mainardi, R.T.

    2005-01-01

    X-rays and gamma rays of high energy values can be produced by the scattering of low energy photons with high energy electrons, being this a process controlled by the Compton scattering. If a laser beam is used, the x-ray beam inherits the properties of intensity, monochromaticity and collimation from the laser. In this work we analyze the generation of intense x-ray beams of energies between 10 and 100 KeV to be used in a wide range of applications where a high intensity and high degrees of monochromaticity and polarization are important properties to improve image reduce doses and improve radiation treatments. To this purpose we evaluated, using relativistic kinematics the scattered beam properties in terms of the scattering angle. This arrangement is being considered in several worldwide laboratories as an alternative to synchrotron radiation and is referred to as 'table top synchrotron radiation', since it cost of installation is orders of magnitude smaller than a 'synchrotron radiation source'. The radiation beam might exhibit non-linear properties in its interaction with matter, in a similar way as a laser beam and we will investigate how to calibrate and evaluate TLD dosemeters properties, both in low and high intensity fields either mono or polyenergetic in wide spectral energy ranges. (Author)

  4. Simulation of inverse Compton scattering and its implications on the scattered linewidth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, N.; Terzić, B.; Krafft, G. A.; Petrillo, V.; Drebot, I.; Serafini, L.

    2018-03-01

    Rising interest in inverse Compton sources has increased the need for efficient models that properly quantify the behavior of scattered radiation given a set of interaction parameters. The current state-of-the-art simulations rely on Monte Carlo-based methods, which, while properly expressing scattering behavior in high-probability regions of the produced spectra, may not correctly simulate such behavior in low-probability regions (e.g. tails of spectra). Moreover, sampling may take an inordinate amount of time for the desired accuracy to be achieved. In this paper, we present an analytic derivation of the expression describing the scattered radiation linewidth and propose a model to describe the effects of horizontal and vertical emittance on the properties of the scattered radiation. We also present an improved version of the code initially reported in Krafft et al. [Phys. Rev. Accel. Beams 19, 121302 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevAccelBeams.19.121302], that can perform the same simulations as those present in cain and give accurate results in low-probability regions by integrating over the emissions of the electrons. Finally, we use these codes to carry out simulations that closely verify the behavior predicted by the analytically derived scaling law.

  5. Single shot, double differential spectral measurements of inverse Compton scattering in the nonlinear regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Sakai

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Inverse Compton scattering (ICS is a unique mechanism for producing fast pulses—picosecond and below—of bright photons, ranging from x to γ rays. These nominally narrow spectral bandwidth electromagnetic radiation pulses are efficiently produced in the interaction between intense, well-focused electron and laser beams. The spectral characteristics of such sources are affected by many experimental parameters, with intense laser effects often dominant. A laser field capable of inducing relativistic oscillatory motion may give rise to harmonic generation and, importantly for the present work, nonlinear redshifting, both of which dilute the spectral brightness of the radiation. As the applications enabled by this source often depend sensitively on its spectra, it is critical to resolve the details of the wavelength and angular distribution obtained from ICS collisions. With this motivation, we present an experimental study that greatly improves on previous spectral measurement methods based on x-ray K-edge filters, by implementing a multilayer bent-crystal x-ray spectrometer. In tandem with a collimating slit, this method reveals a projection of the double differential angular-wavelength spectrum of the ICS radiation in a single shot. The measurements enabled by this diagnostic illustrate the combined off-axis and nonlinear-field-induced redshifting in the ICS emission process. The spectra obtained illustrate in detail the strength of the normalized laser vector potential, and provide a nondestructive measure of the temporal and spatial electron-laser beam overlap.

  6. Inverse Compton Gamma Rays from Dark Matter Annihilation in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    didates for dark matter search due to their high mass-to-light (M/L) ratio. One of the most favored dark matter candidates is the lightest neutralino. (neutral χ particle) as predicted in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard. Model (MSSM). In this study, we model the gamma ray emission from dark matter annihilation coming ...

  7. Relativistic inverse Compton scattering of photons from the early universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malu, Siddharth; Datta, Abhirup; Colafrancesco, Sergio; Marchegiani, Paolo; Subrahmanyan, Ravi; Narasimha, D; Wieringa, Mark H

    2017-12-05

    Electrons at relativistic speeds, diffusing in magnetic fields, cause copious emission at radio frequencies in both clusters of galaxies and radio galaxies through non-thermal radiation emission called synchrotron. However, the total power radiated through this mechanism is ill constrained, as the lower limit of the electron energy distribution, or low-energy cutoffs, for radio emission in galaxy clusters and radio galaxies, have not yet been determined. This lower limit, parametrized by the lower limit of the electron momentum - p min - is critical for estimating the total energetics of non-thermal electrons produced by cluster mergers or injected by radio galaxy jets, which impacts the formation of large-scale structure in the universe, as well as the evolution of local structures inside galaxy clusters. The total pressure due to the relativistic, non-thermal population of electrons can be measured using the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect, and is critically dependent on p min , making the measurement of this non-thermal pressure a promising technique to estimate the electron low-energy cutoff. We present here the first unambiguous detection of this Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect for a non-thermal population of electrons in a radio galaxy jet/lobe, located at a significant distance away from the center of the Bullet cluster of galaxies.

  8. Analytical description of photon beam phase spaces in inverse Compton scattering sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Curatolo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We revisit the description of inverse Compton scattering sources and the photon beams generated therein, emphasizing the behavior of their phase space density distributions and how they depend upon those of the two colliding beams of electrons and photons. The main objective is to provide practical formulas for bandwidth, spectral density, brilliance, which are valid in general for any value of the recoil factor, i.e. both in the Thomson regime of negligible electron recoil, and in the deep Compton recoil dominated region, which is of interest for gamma-gamma colliders and Compton sources for the production of multi-GeV photon beams. We adopt a description based on the center of mass reference system of the electron-photon collision, in order to underline the role of the electron recoil and how it controls the relativistic Doppler/boost effect in various regimes. Using the center of mass reference frame greatly simplifies the treatment, allowing us to derive simple formulas expressed in terms of rms momenta of the two colliding beams (emittance, energy spread, etc. and the collimation angle in the laboratory system. Comparisons with Monte Carlo simulations of inverse Compton scattering in various scenarios are presented, showing very good agreement with the analytical formulas: in particular we find that the bandwidth dependence on the electron beam emittance, of paramount importance in Thomson regime, as it limits the amount of focusing imparted to the electron beam, becomes much less sensitive in deep Compton regime, allowing a stronger focusing of the electron beam to enhance luminosity without loss of mono-chromaticity. A similar effect occurs concerning the bandwidth dependence on the frequency spread of the incident photons: in deep recoil regime the bandwidth comes out to be much less dependent on the frequency spread. The set of formulas here derived are very helpful in designing inverse Compton sources in diverse regimes, giving a

  9. Intense inverse compton {gamma}-ray source from Duke storage ring FEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Madey, J.M.J. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)

    1995-12-31

    We suggest using FEL intracavity power in the Duke storage ring fortrays production via Inverse Compton Backscattering (ICB). The OK-4 FEL driven by the Duke storage ring will tens of watts of average lasing power in the UV/VUV range. Average intracavity power will be in kilowatt range and can be used to pump ICB source. The {gamma}-rays with maximum energy from 40 MeV to 200 MeV with intensity of 0.1-5 10{sup 10}{gamma} per second can be generated. In this paper we present expected parameters of {gamma}-ray beam parameters including its intensity and distribution. We discuss influence of e-beam parameters on collimated {gamma}-rays spectrum and optimization of photon-electron interaction point.

  10. The Mathematical Foundations of 3D Compton Scatter Emission Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. T. Truong

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The mathematical principles of tomographic imaging using detected (unscattered X- or gamma-rays are based on the two-dimensional Radon transform and many of its variants. In this paper, we show that two new generalizations, called conical Radon transforms, are related to three-dimensional imaging processes based on detected Compton scattered radiation. The first class of conical Radon transform has been introduced recently to support imaging principles of collimated detector systems. The second class is new and is closely related to the Compton camera imaging principles and invertible under special conditions. As they are poised to play a major role in future designs of biomedical imaging systems, we present an account of their most important properties which may be relevant for active researchers in the field.

  11. Development and characterization of a tunable ultrafast X-ray source via inverse-Compton-scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jochmann, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Ultrashort, nearly monochromatic hard X-ray pulses enrich the understanding of the dynamics and function of matter, e.g., the motion of atomic structures associated with ultrafast phase transitions, structural dynamics and (bio)chemical reactions. Inverse Compton backscattering of intense laser pulses from relativistic electrons not only allows for the generation of bright X-ray pulses which can be used in a pump-probe experiment, but also for the investigation of the electron beam dynamics at the interaction point. The focus of this PhD work lies on the detailed understanding of the kinematics during the interaction of the relativistic electron bunch and the laser pulse in order to quantify the influence of various experiment parameters on the emitted X-ray radiation. The experiment was conducted at the ELBE center for high power radiation sources using the ELBE superconducting linear accelerator and the DRACO Ti:sapphire laser system. The combination of both these state-of-the-art apparatuses guaranteed the control and stability of the interacting beam parameters throughout the measurement. The emitted X-ray spectra were detected with a pixelated detector of 1024 by 256 elements (each 26μm by 26μm) to achieve an unprecedented spatial and energy resolution for a full characterization of the emitted spectrum to reveal parameter influences and correlations of both interacting beams. In this work the influence of the electron beam energy, electron beam emittance, the laser bandwidth and the energy-anglecorrelation on the spectra of the backscattered X-rays is quantified. A rigorous statistical analysis comparing experimental data to ab-initio 3D simulations enabled, e.g., the extraction of the angular distribution of electrons with 1.5% accuracy and, in total, provides predictive capability for the future high brightness hard X-ray source PHOENIX (Photon electron collider for Narrow bandwidth Intense X-rays) and potential all optical gamma-ray sources. The results

  12. Spectral Evolution of Synchrotron and Inverse Compton Emission in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and the 0.5–10 keV fluxes for the IC component, and Fig. 2(c) the synchrotron and. IC 0.5–10 keV fluxes are plotted against the total (i.e., synchrotron plus IC) 0.5–10. keV fluxes, respectively. The results can be summarized as follows. The synchrotron spectra appear to harden with larger synchrotron fluxes, whereas the IC ...

  13. Inverse Compton Scattering as a Diagnostic Tool for the Measurement of Electron Beam Energies in Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critchley, A. D. J.

    2003-10-01

    The main emphasis of the diode research project at the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) UK is to produce small diameter radiographic spot sizes at high dose to improve the resolution of the transmission radiographs taken during hydrodynamic experiments. Experimental measurements of conditions within the diodes of Pulsed Power driven flash x-ray machines are vital to provide a benchmark for electromagnetic PIC codes such as LSP which are used to develop new diode designs. The potential use of inverse Compton scattering (ICS) as a diagnostic technique in the determination of electron energies within the diode has been investigated. The interaction of a laser beam with a beam of high-energy electrons will create an ICS spectrum of photons. Theoretically, one should be able to glean information on the energies and positions of the electrons from the energy spectrum and differential cross section of the scattered photons. The feasibility of fielding this technique on various diode designs has been explored, and an experimental setup with the greatest likelihood of success is proposed.

  14. X-ray generation by inverse Compton scattering at the superconducting RF test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Hirotaka, E-mail: hirotaka@post.kek.jp [KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba 305-0801, Ibaraki (Japan); Akemoto, Mitsuo; Arai, Yasuo; Araki, Sakae; Aryshev, Alexander; Fukuda, Masafumi; Fukuda, Shigeki; Haba, Junji; Hara, Kazufumi; Hayano, Hitoshi; Higashi, Yasuo; Honda, Yosuke; Honma, Teruya; Kako, Eiji; Kojima, Yuji; Kondo, Yoshinari; Lekomtsev, Konstantin; Matsumoto, Toshihiro; Michizono, Shinichiro; Miyoshi, Toshinobu [KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba 305-0801, Ibaraki (Japan); and others

    2015-02-01

    Quasi-monochromatic X-rays with high brightness have a broad range of applications in fields such as life sciences, bio-, medical applications, and microlithography. One method for generating such X-rays is via inverse Compton scattering (ICS). X-ray generation experiments using ICS were carried out at the superconducting RF test facility (STF) accelerator at KEK. A new beam line, newly developed four-mirror optical cavity system, and new X-ray detector system were prepared for experiments downstream section of the STF electron accelerator. Amplified pulsed photons were accumulated into a four-mirror optical cavity and collided with an incoming 40 MeV electron beam. The generated X-rays were detected using a microchannel plate (MCP) detector for X-ray yield measurements and a new silicon-on-insulator (SOI) detector system for energy measurements. The detected X-ray yield by the MCP detector was 1756.8±272.2 photons/(244 electron bunches). To extrapolate this result to 1 ms train length under 5 Hz operations, 4.60×10{sup 5} photons/1%-bandwidth were obtained. The peak X-ray energy, which was confirmed by the SOI detector, was 29 keV, and this is consistent with ICS X-rays.

  15. Compact FEL-driven inverse compton scattering gamma-ray source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Placidi, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Di Mitri, S., E-mail: simone.dimitri@elettra.eu [Elettra - Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., 34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Pellegrini, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Penn, G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2017-05-21

    Many research and applications areas require photon sources capable of producing gamma-ray beams in the multi-MeV energy range with reasonably high fluxes and compact footprints. Besides industrial, nuclear physics and security applications, a considerable interest comes from the possibility to assess the state of conservation of cultural assets like statues, columns etc., via visualization and analysis techniques using high energy photon beams. Computed Tomography scans, widely adopted in medicine at lower photon energies, presently provide high quality three-dimensional imaging in industry and museums. We explore the feasibility of a compact source of quasi-monochromatic, multi-MeV gamma-rays based on Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) from a high intensity ultra-violet (UV) beam generated in a free-electron laser by the electron beam itself. This scheme introduces a stronger relationship between the energy of the scattered photons and that of the electron beam, resulting in a device much more compact than a classic ICS for a given scattered energy. The same electron beam is used to produce gamma-rays in the 10–20 MeV range and UV radiation in the 10–15 eV range, in a ~4×22 m{sup 2} footprint system.

  16. Production of X-rays by inverse Compton effect; Produccion de rayos X por efecto Compton inverso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mainardi, R.T. [Facultad de Matematica, Astronomia y Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina)

    2005-07-01

    X-rays and gamma rays of high energy values can be produced by the scattering of low energy photons with high energy electrons, being this a process controlled by the Compton scattering. If a laser beam is used, the x-ray beam inherits the properties of intensity, monochromaticity and collimation from the laser. In this work we analyze the generation of intense x-ray beams of energies between 10 and 100 KeV to be used in a wide range of applications where a high intensity and high degrees of monochromaticity and polarization are important properties to improve image reduce doses and improve radiation treatments. To this purpose we evaluated, using relativistic kinematics the scattered beam properties in terms of the scattering angle. This arrangement is being considered in several worldwide laboratories as an alternative to synchrotron radiation and is referred to as 'table top synchrotron radiation', since it cost of installation is orders of magnitude smaller than a 'synchrotron radiation source'. The radiation beam might exhibit non-linear properties in its interaction with matter, in a similar way as a laser beam and we will investigate how to calibrate and evaluate TLD dosemeters properties, both in low and high intensity fields either mono or polyenergetic in wide spectral energy ranges. (Author)

  17. Conceptual design of magnetic spectrometer for inverse-Compton X-ray source in MeV region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinjian Tan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A novel magnetic spectrometer for Inverse-Compton X-ray source is proposed. Compton recoil electrons are generated by a lithium converter, and then confined by a complex collimator and spectrally resolved by a sector-shaped double-focusing magnet. A method of optimization for the converter is investigated, and the dependence of the best energy resolution on converting efficiency is quantitatively revealed. The configuration of the magnet is specially designed to cover a wide range of electron energy and to achieve a large collecting solid angle. The efficiency and relative energy resolution of the designed spectrometer, according to Monte-Carlo simulation using Geant4, are 10-4 e/p and about 5% respectively for 3 MeV photons.

  18. Compton backscattered annihilation line emission: A new diagnostic of accreting compact sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingenfelter, Richard E.; Hua, Xin-Min

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that Compton scattering of 511 keV electron-positron annihilation radiation produces a line like feature at approx. 170 keV from backscattered photons. Assuming a simple model of an accretion disk around a compact source, the spectrum is explored of the spectrum of Compton scattered annihilation line emission for a range of conditions. It is further shown that such Compton baskscattering of annihilation line emission from the inner edge of an accretion disk could account for the previously unidentified 170 keV line emission and high energy continuum observed from a variable, compact source, or sources, of annihilation radiation near the Galactic Center. Identification of the observed 170 keV line as an annihilation line reflection feature provides strong new evidence that the source of the emission is an accreting compact object. Further study of these features in existing spectra and in forthcoming GRO observation of these and other sources can provide unique new diagnostics of the innermost regions of accretion disks around compact objects.

  19. Development of double-scattering compton camera for gamma-ray emission imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Hee

    2012-02-15

    The Compton camera with its unique Compton kinematics-based electronic collimation method has attracted great interest as the most promising candidate for a future gamma-ray emission imaging device due to its various advantages over conventional imaging devices. In this thesis, the proper structure and detector configuration for high-energy gamma-ray emission imaging were determined. In addition, the imaging performance of the Compton camera was experimentally evaluated after constructing a proof-of-principle imaging system. The two, single- and double-scattering Compton cameras were modeled using the Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit, and their imaging sensitivities were calculated as a function of source energy. Above a certain source energy (> a few hundred keV, depending on the detector configuration), the double-scattering type showed higher imaging sensitivity than the single-scattering type, which difference widened with increasing source energy. As such, the double-scattering Compton camera was determined to be more suitable for high-energy gamma-ray emission imaging. The Si/Si/NaI(Tl) detector configuration was chosen, owing to the fact that it does not require a cooling system: this allowed for construction of a very compact imaging system. The performances of the double-scattering Compton camera's component detectors (two double-sided silicon strip detectors [DSSDs] as the scatter detectors; a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector as the absorber detector) were evaluated in terms of energy and timing resolution. According to these results, Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations were performed to determine the optimal geometrical configuration of the component detectors and to quantitatively evaluate the effect of the detector parameters on angular resolution. Also, a Compton-edge based energy-calibration method was developed and applied to the DSSDs. As a result, the energy calibration errors were significantly reduced, from 15.5% (356 keV peak of {sup 133}Ba

  20. DESIGN OF A GAMMA-RAY SOURCE BASED ON INVERSE COMPTON SCATTERING AT THE FAST SUPERCONDUCTING LINAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihalcea, D. [NICADD, DeKalb; Jacobson, B. [RadiaBeam Tech.; Murokh, A. [Fermilab; Piot, P. [Fermilab; Ruan, J. [Fermilab

    2016-10-10

    A watt-level average-power gamma-ray source is currently under development at the Fermilab Accelerator Science & Technology (FAST) facility. The source is based on the Inverse Compton Scattering of a high-brightness 300-MeV beam against a high-power laser beam circulating in an optical cavity. The back scattered gamma rays are expected to have photon energies up to 1.5 MeV. This paper discusses the optimization of the source, its performances, and the main challenges ahead.

  1. Development of a Watt-level gamma-ray source based on high-repetition-rate inverse Compton scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihalcea, D.; Murokh, A.; Piot, P.; Ruan, J.

    2017-07-01

    A high-brilliance (~1022 photon s-1 mm-2 mrad-2 /0.1%) gamma-ray source experiment is currently being planned at Fermilab (Eγ≃1.1 MeV). The source implements a high-repetition-rate inverse Compton scattering by colliding electron bunches formed in a ~300-MeV superconducting linac with a high-intensity laser pulse. This paper describes the design rationale along with some of technical challenges associated to producing high-repetition-rate collision. The expected performances of the gamma-ray source are also presented.

  2. Inverse Compton Scattered Merger-nova: Late X-Ray Counterpart of Gravitational-wave Signals from NS–NS/BH Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Shunke; Gao, He

    2018-01-01

    The recent observations of GW170817 and its electromagnetic (EM) counterparts show that double neutron star mergers could lead to rich and bright EM emissions. Recent numerical simulations suggest that neutron star and neutron star/black hole (NS–NS/BH) mergers would leave behind a central remnant surrounded by a mildly isotropic ejecta. The central remnant could launch a collimated jet and when the jet propagates through the ejecta, a mildly relativistic cocoon would be formed and the interaction between the cocoon and the ambient medium would accelerate electrons via external shock in a wide angle, so that the merger-nova photons (i.e., thermal emission from the ejecta) would be scattered into higher frequency via an inverse Compton (IC) process when they propagate through the cocoon shocked region. We find that the IC scattered component peaks at the X-ray band and it will reach its peak luminosity on the order of days (simultaneously with the merger-nova emission). With current X-ray detectors, such a late X-ray component could be detected out to 200 Mpc, depending on the merger remnant properties. It could serve as an important electromagnetic counterpart of gravitational-wave signals from NS–NS/BH mergers. Nevertheless, simultaneous detection of such a late X-ray signal and the merger-nova signal could shed light on the cocoon properties and the concrete structure of the jet.

  3. Soft X-ray generation via inverse compton scattering between high quality electron beam and high power laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masakazu Washio; Kazuyuki Sakaue; Yoshimasa Hama; Yoshio Kamiya; Tomoko Gowa; Akihiko Masuda; Aki Murata; Ryo Moriyama; Shigeru Kashiwagi; Junji Urakawa

    2007-01-01

    High quality beam generation project based on High-Tech Research Center Project, which has been approved by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology in 1999, has been conducted by advance research institute for science and engineering, Waseda University. In the project, laser photo-cathode RF-gun has been selected for the high quality electron beam source. RF cavities with low dark current, which were made by diamond turning technique, have been successfully manufactured. The low emittance electron beam was realized by choosing the modified laser injection technique. The obtained normalized emmitance was about 3 m.mrad at 100 pC of electron charge. The soft x-ray beam generation with the energy of 370 eV, which is in the energy region of so-called water window, by inverse Compton scattering has been performed by the collision between IR laser and the low emmitance electron beams. (Author)

  4. Two-colour X-gamma ray inverse Compton back-scattering source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drebot, I.; Petrillo, V.; Serafini, L.

    2017-10-01

    We present a simple and new scheme for producing two-colour Thomson/Compton radiation with the possibility of controlling separately the polarization of the two different colours, based on the interaction of one single electron beam with two light pulses that can come from the same laser setup or from two different lasers and that collide with the electrons at different angle. One of the most interesting cases for medical applications is to provide two X-ray pulses across the iodine K-edge at 33.2 keV. The iodine is used as contrast medium in various imaging techniques and the availability of two spectral lines accross the K-edge allows one to produce subtraction images with a great increase in accuracy.

  5. Resonant Compton Upscattering Models of Magnetar Hard X-ray Emission and Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baring, Matthew G.; Wadiasingh, Zorawar; Gonthier, Peter L.; Kust Harding, Alice

    2017-08-01

    Non-thermal quiescent X-ray emission extending between 10 keV and around 150 keV has been seen in about 10 magnetars by RXTE, INTEGRAL, Suzaku and Fermi-GBM. For inner magnetospheric models of such hard X-ray signals, resonant Compton upscattering is anticipated to be the most efficient process for generating the continuum radiation. This is because the scattering becomes resonant at the cyclotron frequency, and the effective cross section exceeds the classical Thomson value by over two orders of magnitude. We present angle-dependent hard X-ray upscattering model spectra for uncooled monoenergetic relativistic electrons injected in inner regions of pulsar magnetospheres. These spectra are integrated over closed field lines and obtained for different observing perspectives. The spectral cut-off energies are critically dependent on the observer viewing angles and electron Lorentz factor. We find that electrons with energies less than around 15 MeV will emit most of their radiation below 250 keV, consistent with the observed turnovers in magnetar hard X-ray tails. Moreover, electrons of higher energy still emit most of the radiation below around 1 MeV, except for quasi-equatorial emission locales for select pulses phases. In such cases, attenuation mechanisms such as pair creation will be prolific, thereby making it difficult to observe signals extending into the Fermi-LAT band. Our spectral computations use new state-of-the-art, spin-dependent formalism for the QED Compton scattering cross section in strong magnetic fields. The emission exhibits strong polarization above around 30 keV that is anticipated to be dependent on pulse phase, thereby defining science agendas for future hard X-ray polarimeters.

  6. Inverse Compton scattering X-ray source yield optimization with a laser path folding system inserted in a pre-existent RF linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaleil, A.; Le Flanchec, V.; Binet, A.; Nègre, J.P.; Devaux, J.F.; Jacob, V.; Millerioux, M.; Bayle, A.; Balleyguier, P. [CEA DAM DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Prazeres, R. [CLIO/LCP, Bâtiment 201, Université Paris-Sud, F-91450 Orsay (France)

    2016-12-21

    An inverse Compton scattering source is under development at the ELSA linac of CEA, Bruyères-le-Châtel. Ultra-short X-ray pulses are produced by inverse Compton scattering of 30 ps-laser pulses by relativistic electron bunches. The source will be able to operate in single shot mode as well as in recurrent mode with 72.2 MHz pulse trains. Within this framework, an optical multipass system that multiplies the number of emitted X-ray photons in both regimes has been designed in 2014, then implemented and tested on ELSA facility in the course of 2015. The device is described from both geometrical and timing viewpoints. It is based on the idea of folding the laser optical path to pile-up laser pulses at the interaction point, thus increasing the interaction probability. The X-ray output gain measurements obtained using this system are presented and compared with calculated expectations.

  7. Corrections for the effects of accidental coincidences, Compton scatter, and object size in positron emission mammography (PEM) imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond Raylman; Stanislaw Majewski; Randolph Wojcik; Andrew Weisenberger; Brian Kross; Vladimir Popov

    2001-06-01

    Positron emission mammography (PEM) has begun to show promise as an effective method for the detection of breast lesions. Due to its utilization of tumor-avid radiopharmaceuticals labeled with positron-emitting radionuclides, this technique may be especially useful in imaging of women with radiodense or fibrocystic breasts. While the use of these radiotracers affords PEM unique capabilities, it also introduces some limitations. Specifically, acceptance of accidental and Compton-scattered coincidence events can decrease lesion detectability. The authors studied the effect of accidental coincidence events on PEM images produced by the presence of 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose in the organs of a subject using an anthropomorphic phantom. A delayed-coincidence technique was tested as a method for correcting PEM images for the occurrence of accidental events. Also, a Compton scatter correction algorithm designed specifically for PEM was developed and tested using a compressed breast phantom.

  8. Generation of energy-tunable and ultra-short-pulse gamma rays via inverse Compton scattering in an electron storage ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Y.; Adachi, M.; Zen, H.; Tanikawa, T.; Yamamoto, N.; Hosaka, M.; Takashima, Y.; Soda, K.; Katoh, M.

    2011-10-01

    Inverse Compton-scattered gamma rays of tunable energy were generated by changing the collision angle between a laser and an electron beam of fixed energy at the electron storage ring, UVSOR-II. Analytic expressions were derived for energy and intensity of the gamma rays. The measured energy and intensity of the gamma rays agreed with the theoretical values, and the pulse width was calculated to be a few ps, under experimental conditions. It was shown that ultra-short gamma ray pulses with a pulse width of 150 fs can be generated by optimizing the size of the laser spot.

  9. Generation and application of soft-X-ray by means of inverse compton scattering between high quality election beam and IR laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washio, M.; Sakaue, K.; Hama, Y.; Kamiya, Y.; Moriyama, R.; Hezume, K.; Saito, T.; Kuroda, R.; Kashiwagi, S.; Ushida, K.; Hayano, H.; Urakawa, J.

    2006-01-01

    High quality beam generation project based on High-Tech Research Center Project, which has been approved by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology in 1999, has been conducted by advance research institute for science and engineering, Waseda University. In the project, laser photo-cathode RF-gun has been selected for the high quality electron beam source. RF cavities with low dark current, which were made by diamond turning technique, have been successfully manufactured. The low emittance electron beam was realized by choosing the modified laser injection technique. The obtained normalized emittance was about 3 mm·mrad at 100 pC of electron charge. The soft X-ray beam generation with the energy of 370 eV, which is in the energy region of so-called 'water window', by inverse Compton scattering has been performed by the collision between IR laser and the low emittance electron beams. (authors)

  10. Inverse modeling of biomass smoke emissions using the TOMS AI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S. Y.; Penner, J. E.; Torres, O.

    2003-12-01

    Results of inverse modeling of biomass smoke emissions using the TOMS AI and a three-dimensional transport model are presented. The IMPACT model with DAO meteorology data in 1997 are utilized to obtain aerosol spatial and temporal distributions. Two absorbing aerosol types are considered, including biomass smoke and mineral dust. First, a radiative transfer model is applied to generate the modeled AI. Then a Bayesian inverse technique is applied to optimize the difference between the modeled AI and the EP TOMS AI in the same period by regulating monthly a priori biomass smoke emissions, while the dust emissions are fixed. The modeled AI with a posteriori emissions generally is in better agreement with the EP TOMS AI. The annual global a posteriori source increases by about 13% for the year 1997 (6.31 Tg/yr BC) in the base scenario, with a larger adjustment of monthly regional emissions. Five sensitivity scenarios are carried out, including sensitivity to the a priori uncertainties, the height of the smoke layer, the cloud screening criteria of the daily EP TOMS AI, the adjustment of emissions in a lumped region outside of the major biomass burning regions, and the covariances between observations. Results suggest that a posteriori annual global emissions in the sensitivity scenarios are within 15% of that of the base scenario. However, the difference of annual a posteriori emissions between the sensitivity scenarios and the base scenario can be as large as 50% on regional scale. We are also applying the inverse model technique to the year 2000 to compare with biomass emissions deduced from an analysis based on burned areas.

  11. Inverse Modeling of Emissions and their Time Profiles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Resler, Jaroslav; Eben, Kryštof; Juruš, Pavel; Liczki, Jitka

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 4 (2010), s. 288-295 ISSN 1309-1042 R&D Projects: GA MŽP SP/1A4/107/07 Grant - others:COST(XE) ES0602 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : 4DVar * inverse modeling * diurnal time profile of emission * CMAQ adjoint * satellite observations Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology

  12. Constraints on the synchrotron self-Compton mechanism of TeV gamma ray emission from the Milagro TeV source MGRO J2019+37 within the pulsar wind nebula scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Lab; Bhattacharjee, Pijushpani

    2015-03-01

    Origin of the TeV gamma ray emission from MGRO J2019+37 discovered by the Milagro experiment is investigated within the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) scenario using multiwavelength information on sources suggested to be associated with this object. We find that the synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) mechanism of origin of the observed TeV gamma rays within the PWN scenario is severely constrained by the upper limit on the radio flux from the region around MGRO J2019+37 given by the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) as well as by the x-ray flux upper limit from SWIFT/XRT. Specifically, for the SSC mechanism to explain the observed TeV flux from MGRO J2019+37 without violating the GMRT and/or Swift/XRT flux upper limits in the radio and x-ray regions, respectively, the emission region must be extremely compact with the characteristic size of the emission region restricted to ≲ O (10-4 pc) for an assumed distance of ˜ few kpc to the source. This is at least four orders of magnitude less than the characteristic size of the emission region typically invoked in explaining the TeV emission through the SSC mechanism within the PWN scenario. On the other hand, inverse Compton (IC) scattering of the nebular high energy electrons on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons can, for reasonable ranges of values of various parameters, explain the observed TeV flux without violating the GMRT and/or SWIFT/XRT flux bounds.

  13. Compton backscattered 511 keV annihilation line emission and the 170 keV line from the Galactic center direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingenfelter, Richard E.; Hua, Xin-Min

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that Compton scattering of 511 keV electron-positron annihilation radiation produces a linelike reflection feature at 170 keV from backscattered photons. Assuming simple models of clouds and accretion disks around a compact source, the paper explores the spectrum of Compton-scattered annihilation line emission for a range of geometries, opacities, and observing angles, and finds that the linelike feature is produced under a wide variety of conditions. It is further shown that such Compton backscattering of slightly redshifted annihilation line emission from the inner edge of an accretion disk could account for the 170 keV line emission and higher energy continuum observed together with the 511 keV annihilation radiation from the direction of the Galactic center. Identification of the observed 170 keV line as a slightly redshifted annihilation line reflection feature provides strong new evidence that the source of this emission is a compact object surrounded by a disk of presumably accreting matter.

  14. Design and Mechanical Stability Analysis of the Interaction Region for the Inverse Compton Scattering Gamma-Ray Source Using Finite Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khizhanok, Andrei

    Development of a compact source of high-spectral brilliance and high impulse frequency gamma rays has been in scope of Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory for quite some time. Main goal of the project is to develop a setup to support gamma rays detection test and gamma ray spectroscopy. Potential applications include but not limited to nuclear astrophysics, nuclear medicine, oncology ('gamma knife'). Present work covers multiple interconnected stages of development of the interaction region to ensure high levels of structural strength and vibrational resistance. Inverse Compton scattering is a complex phenomenon, in which charged particle transfers a part of its energy to a photon. It requires extreme precision as the interaction point is estimated to be 20 microm. The slightest deflection of the mirrors will reduce effectiveness of conversion by orders of magnitude. For acceptable conversion efficiency laser cavity also must have >1000 finesse value, which requires a trade-off between size, mechanical stability, complexity, and price of the setup. This work focuses on advantages and weak points of different designs of interaction regions as well as in-depth description of analyses performed. This includes laser cavity amplification and finesse estimates, natural frequency mapping, harmonic analysis. Structural analysis is required as interaction must occur under high vacuum conditions.

  15. Evaluation of errors due to Compton scattering in gamma-ray emission imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruno, M.F.

    1983-12-01

    A set of computer simulation programs were developed to aid in the design of new instrumentation and in the design and evaluation of algorithms for scatter correction in positron emission computed tomography. 14 references, 15 figures, 3 tables

  16. Inverse modelling of European CH4 emissions during 2006-2012 using different inverse models and reassessed atmospheric observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamaschi, Peter; Karstens, Ute; Manning, Alistair J.; Saunois, Marielle; Tsuruta, Aki; Berchet, Antoine; Vermeulen, Alexander T.; Arnold, Tim; Janssens-Maenhout, Greet; Hammer, Samuel; Levin, Ingeborg; Schmidt, Martina; Ramonet, Michel; Lopez, Morgan; Lavric, Jost; Aalto, Tuula; Chen, Huilin; Feist, Dietrich G.; Gerbig, Christoph; Haszpra, László; Hermansen, Ove; Manca, Giovanni; Moncrieff, John; Meinhardt, Frank; Necki, Jaroslaw; Galkowski, Michal; O'Doherty, Simon; Paramonova, Nina; Scheeren, Hubertus A.; Steinbacher, Martin; Dlugokencky, Ed

    2018-01-01

    We present inverse modelling (top down) estimates of European methane (CH4) emissions for 2006-2012 based on a new quality-controlled and harmonised in situ data set from 18 European atmospheric monitoring stations. We applied an ensemble of seven inverse models and performed four inversion experiments, investigating the impact of different sets of stations and the use of a priori information on emissions. The inverse models infer total CH4 emissions of 26.8 (20.2-29.7) Tg CH4 yr-1 (mean, 10th and 90th percentiles from all inversions) for the EU-28 for 2006-2012 from the four inversion experiments. For comparison, total anthropogenic CH4 emissions reported to UNFCCC (bottom up, based on statistical data and emissions factors) amount to only 21.3 Tg CH4 yr-1 (2006) to 18.8 Tg CH4 yr-1 (2012). A potential explanation for the higher range of top-down estimates compared to bottom-up inventories could be the contribution from natural sources, such as peatlands, wetlands, and wet soils. Based on seven different wetland inventories from the Wetland and Wetland CH4 Inter-comparison of Models Project (WETCHIMP), total wetland emissions of 4.3 (2.3-8.2) Tg CH4 yr-1 from the EU-28 are estimated. The hypothesis of significant natural emissions is supported by the finding that several inverse models yield significant seasonal cycles of derived CH4 emissions with maxima in summer, while anthropogenic CH4 emissions are assumed to have much lower seasonal variability. Taking into account the wetland emissions from the WETCHIMP ensemble, the top-down estimates are broadly consistent with the sum of anthropogenic and natural bottom-up inventories. However, the contribution of natural sources and their regional distribution remain rather uncertain. Furthermore, we investigate potential biases in the inverse models by comparison with regular aircraft profiles at four European sites and with vertical profiles obtained during the Infrastructure for Measurement of the European Carbon

  17. Compton scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botto, D.J.; Pratt, R.H.

    1979-05-01

    The current status of Compton scattering, both experimental observations and the theoretical predictions, is examined. Classes of experiments are distinguished and the results obtained are summarized. The validity of the incoherent scattering function approximation and the impulse approximation is discussed. These simple theoretical approaches are compared with predictions of the nonrelativistic dipole formula of Gavrila and with the relativistic results of Whittingham. It is noted that the A/sup -2/ based approximations fail to predict resonances and an infrared divergence, both of which have been observed. It appears that at present the various available theoretical approaches differ significantly in their predictions and that further and more systematic work is required.

  18. Connecting Compton and Gravitational Compton Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holstein Barry R.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of Compton scattering—S + γ → S + γ—at MAMI and elsewhere has led to a relatively successful understanding of proton structure via its polarizabilities. The recent observation of gravitational radiation observed by LIGO has raised the need for a parallel understanding of gravitational Compton scattering—S + g → S + g—and we show here how it can be obtained from ordinary Compton scattering by use of the double copy theorem.

  19. Digital technique for inverse function obtaining and electron emission power distribution calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorokin, O.M.

    1984-01-01

    The way to obtain energy distribution of electron emission using the method of the inverse function, in which two amplitude pulse analyzers are Used, has been improved. One of them, the flowsheet of which is somewhat changed, is used to obtain the inverse function in the regime of tracing search of channel address of the set ordinate of voltammetric characteristics distribution, and second one - to obtain amplitude distribution of standard pulses, discriminated according to the law of inverse voltammetric characteristics. The distribution function as to the energy which is obtained as a result can have a statistical error of 1-2% at emission currents up to 10-100 electron/s

  20. WEAK HARD X-RAY EMISSION FROM TWO BROAD ABSORPTION LINE QUASARS OBSERVED WITH NuSTAR: COMPTON-THICK ABSORPTION OR INTRINSIC X-RAY WEAKNESS?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Alexander, D. M.; Hickox, R. [Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Harrison, F. A.; Fuerst, F.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Madsen, K. K. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Stern, D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Bauer, F. E. [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W. W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Christensen, F. E. [DTU Space-National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Comastri, A. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Fabian, A. C. [Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Farrah, D. [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Fiore, F. [Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monteporzio Catone (Italy); Hailey, C. J. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Matt, G. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Universita degli Studi Roma Tre, via della Vasca Navale 84, I-00146 Roma (Italy); Ogle, P. [IPAC, California Institute of Technology, Mail Code 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); and others

    2013-08-01

    We present Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) hard X-ray observations of two X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars, PG 1004+130 (radio loud) and PG 1700+518 (radio quiet). Many BAL quasars appear X-ray weak, probably due to absorption by the shielding gas between the nucleus and the accretion-disk wind. The two targets are among the optically brightest BAL quasars, yet they are known to be significantly X-ray weak at rest-frame 2-10 keV (16-120 times fainter than typical quasars). We would expect to obtain Almost-Equal-To 400-600 hard X-ray ({approx}> 10 keV) photons with NuSTAR, provided that these photons are not significantly absorbed (N{sub H} {approx}< 10{sup 24} cm{sup -2}). However, both BAL quasars are only detected in the softer NuSTAR bands (e.g., 4-20 keV) but not in its harder bands (e.g., 20-30 keV), suggesting that either the shielding gas is highly Compton-thick or the two targets are intrinsically X-ray weak. We constrain the column densities for both to be N{sub H} Almost-Equal-To 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 24} cm{sup -2} if the weak hard X-ray emission is caused by obscuration from the shielding gas. We discuss a few possibilities for how PG 1004+130 could have Compton-thick shielding gas without strong Fe K{alpha} line emission; dilution from jet-linked X-ray emission is one likely explanation. We also discuss the intrinsic X-ray weakness scenario based on a coronal-quenching model relevant to the shielding gas and disk wind of BAL quasars. Motivated by our NuSTAR results, we perform a Chandra stacking analysis with the Large Bright Quasar Survey BAL quasar sample and place statistical constraints upon the fraction of intrinsically X-ray weak BAL quasars; this fraction is likely 17%-40%.

  1. Validation of the Swiss methane emission inventory by atmospheric observations and inverse modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Henne

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric inverse modelling has the potential to provide observation-based estimates of greenhouse gas emissions at the country scale, thereby allowing for an independent validation of national emission inventories. Here, we present a regional-scale inverse modelling study to quantify the emissions of methane (CH4 from Switzerland, making use of the newly established CarboCount-CH measurement network and a high-resolution Lagrangian transport model. In our reference inversion, prior emissions were taken from the "bottom-up" Swiss Greenhouse Gas Inventory (SGHGI as published by the Swiss Federal Office for the Environment in 2014 for the year 2012. Overall we estimate national CH4 emissions to be 196 ± 18 Gg yr−1 for the year 2013 (1σ uncertainty. This result is in close agreement with the recently revised SGHGI estimate of 206 ± 33 Gg yr−1 as reported in 2015 for the year 2012. Results from sensitivity inversions using alternative prior emissions, uncertainty covariance settings, large-scale background mole fractions, two different inverse algorithms (Bayesian and extended Kalman filter, and two different transport models confirm the robustness and independent character of our estimate. According to the latest SGHGI estimate the main CH4 source categories in Switzerland are agriculture (78 %, waste handling (15 % and natural gas distribution and combustion (6 %. The spatial distribution and seasonal variability of our posterior emissions suggest an overestimation of agricultural CH4 emissions by 10 to 20 % in the most recent SGHGI, which is likely due to an overestimation of emissions from manure handling. Urban areas do not appear as emission hotspots in our posterior results, suggesting that leakages from natural gas distribution are only a minor source of CH4 in Switzerland. This is consistent with rather low emissions of 8.4 Gg yr−1 reported by the SGHGI but inconsistent with the much higher value of 32 Gg yr−1 implied by the

  2. Inversion of CO emissions over Beijing and its surrounding areas with ensemble Kalman filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, X.; Zhu, J.; Wang, Z. F.; Wang, M.; Gbaguidi, A.; Li, J.; Shao, M.; Tang, G. Q.; Ji, D. S.

    2013-12-01

    Inversion of the carbon monoxide (CO) emissions over Beijing and surrounding areas in the summer of 2010 is carried on the Nested Air Quality Prediction Modeling System (NAQPMS) in coupling with an ensemble Kalman filter. CO emission is estimated through integration of observations data obtained from 25 sites in Beijing and surrounding areas of which 13 sites selected as assimilation sites are used to perform a joint adjustment of both CO concentrations and emissions with hourly surface CO observations, and 12 other sites selected to validate the inversion emission inventory. As a result, estimated CO emissions (Tg year-1) for Beijing, Tianjin, Tangshan and Baoding are 4.11, 3.75, 3.17 and 4.08, respectively; higher than the a priori estimates in the Regional Emission inventory in Asia Version 1.1 (REAS V1.1) by 50%, 80%, 120% and 150% respectively. Obviously, the regional CO emissions are underestimated in REAS1.1, especially over Beijing and surrounding areas. Use of the inverse emission inventory reduces the bias of CO simulation by 64% at assimilation sites and 48% at validation sites.

  3. Estimating Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) emissions in China using atmospheric observations and inverse modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, X.; Thompson, R.; Saito, T.; Yokouchi, Y.; Li, S.; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Park, S.; Graziosi, F.; Stohl, A.

    2013-12-01

    With a global warming potential of around 22800 over a 100-year time horizon, sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) is one of the greenhouse gases regulated under the Kyoto Protocol. Global SF6 emissions have been increasing since circa the year 2000. The reason for this increase has been inferred to be due to rapidly increasing emissions in developing countries that are not obligated to report their annual emissions to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, notably China. In this study, SF6 emissions during the period 2006-2012 for China and other East Asian countries were determined using in-situ atmospheric measurements and inverse modeling. We performed various inversion sensitivity tests, which show the largest uncertainties in the a posteriori Chinese emissions are associated with the a priori emissions used and their uncertainty, the station network, as well as the meteorological input data. The overall relative uncertainty of the a posteriori emissions in China is estimated to be 17% in 2008. Based on sensitivity tests, we employed the optimal parameters in our inversion setup and performed yearly inversions for the study period. Inversion results show that the total a posteriori SF6 emissions from China increased from 1420 × 245 Mg/yr in 2006 to 2741 × 472 Mg/yr in 2009 and stabilized thereafter. The rapid increase in emissions reflected a fast increase in SF6 consumption in China, a result also found in bottom-up estimates. The a posteriori emission map shows high emissions concentrated in populated parts of China. During the period 2006-2012, emissions in northwestern and northern China peaked around the year 2009, while emissions in eastern, central and northeastern China grew gradually during almost the whole period. Fluctuating emissions are observed for southwestern China. These regional differences should be caused by changes of provincial SF6 usage and by shifts of usage among different sectors. Fig. 1. Footprint emission sensitivity

  4. Influence of Fossil Fuel Emissions on CO2 Flux Estimation by Atmospheric Inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, T.; Patra, P. K.; van der Laan-Luijkx, I. T.; Peters, W.

    2015-12-01

    Top-down approaches (or atmospheric inversions) using atmospheric transport models with CO2 observations are an effective way to estimate carbon fluxes at global and regional scales. CO2 flux estimation by Bayesian inversions require a priori knowledge of terrestrial biosphere and oceanic fluxes and fossil fuel (FF) CO2 emissions. In most inversion frameworks, FF CO2 is assumed to be a known quantity because FF CO2 based on world statistics are thought to be more reliable than natural CO2 fluxes. However different databases of FF CO2 emissions may have different temporal and spatial variations especially at locations where statistics are not so accurate. In this study, we use 3 datasets of fossil fuel emissions in inversion estimations and evaluate the sensitivity of the optimized CO2 fluxes to FF emissions with two different inverse models, JAMSTEC's ACTM and CarbonTracker Europe (CTE). Interannually varying a priori FF CO2 emissions were based on 1) CDIAC database, 2) EDGARv4.2 database, and 3) IEA database, with some modifications. Biosphere and oceanic fluxes were optimized. Except for FF emissions, other conditions were kept the same in our inverse experiments. The three a priori FF emissions showed ~5% (~0.3GtC/yr) differences in their global total emissions in the early 2000's and the differences reached ~9% (~0.9 GtC/yr) in 2010. This resulted in 0.5-1 GtC/yr (2001-2011) and 0.3-0.6 GtC/yr (2007-2011) differences in the estimated global total emissions for the ACTM and CTE inversions, respectively. Regional differences in the FF emissions were relatively large in East Asia (~0.5 GtC/yr for ACTM and ~0.3 GtC/yr for CTE) and Europe (~0.3 GtC/yr for ACTM). These a priori flux differences caused differences in the estimated biosphere fluxes for ACTM in East Asia and Europe and also their neighboring regions such as West Asia, Boreal Eurasia, and North Africa. The main differences in the biosphere fluxes for CTE were found in Asia and the Americas.

  5. Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) emissions in East Asia determined by inverse modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, X.; Thompson, R. L.; Saito, T.; Yokouchi, Y.; Kim, J.; Li, S.; Kim, K. R.; Park, S.; Graziosi, F.; Stohl, A.

    2014-05-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) has a global warming potential of around 22 800 over a 100-year time horizon and is one of the greenhouse gases regulated under the Kyoto Protocol. Around the year 2000 there was a reversal in the global SF6 emission trend, from a decreasing to an increasing trend, which was likely caused by increasing emissions in countries that are not obligated to report their annual emissions to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. In this study, SF6 emissions during the period 2006-2012 for all East Asian countries - including Mongolia, China, Taiwan, North Korea, South Korea and Japan - were determined by using inverse modeling and in situ atmospheric measurements. We found that the most important sources of uncertainty associated with these inversions are related to the choice of a priori emissions and their assumed uncertainty, the station network as well as the meteorological input data. Much lower uncertainties are due to seasonal variability in the emissions, inversion geometry and resolution, and the measurement calibration scale. Based on the results of these sensitivity tests, we estimate that the total SF6 emission in East Asia increased rapidly from 2404 ± 325 Mg yr-1 in 2006 to 3787 ± 512 Mg yr-1 in 2009 and stabilized thereafter. China contributed 60-72% to the total East Asian emission for the different years, followed by South Korea (8-16%), Japan (5-16%) and Taiwan (4-7%), while the contributions from North Korea and Mongolia together were less than 3% of the total. The per capita SF6 emissions are highest in South Korea and Taiwan, while the per capita emissions for China, North Korea and Japan are close to global average. During the period 2006-2012, emissions from China and from South Korea increased, while emissions from Taiwan and Japan decreased overall.

  6. Impact of transport model errors on the global and regional methane emissions estimated by inverse modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, R.; Bousquet, P.; Chevallier, F.; Fortems-Cheney, A.; Szopa, S.; Saunois, M.; Agusti-Panareda, A.; Bergmann, D.; Bian, H.; Cameron-Smith, P.; Chipperfield, M. P.; Gloor, E.; Houweling, S.; Kawa, S. R.; Krol, M.; Patra, P. K.; Prinn, R. G.; Rigby, M.; Saito, R.; Wilson, C.

    2013-10-01

    A modelling experiment has been conceived to assess the impact of transport model errors on methane emissions estimated in an atmospheric inversion system. Synthetic methane observations, obtained from 10 different model outputs from the international TransCom-CH4 model inter-comparison exercise, are combined with a prior scenario of methane emissions and sinks, and integrated into the three-component PYVAR-LMDZ-SACS (PYthon VARiational-Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique model with Zooming capability-Simplified Atmospheric Chemistry System) inversion system to produce 10 different methane emission estimates at the global scale for the year 2005. The same methane sinks, emissions and initial conditions have been applied to produce the 10 synthetic observation datasets. The same inversion set-up (statistical errors, prior emissions, inverse procedure) is then applied to derive flux estimates by inverse modelling. Consequently, only differences in the modelling of atmospheric transport may cause differences in the estimated fluxes. In our framework, we show that transport model errors lead to a discrepancy of 27 Tg yr-1 at the global scale, representing 5% of total methane emissions. At continental and annual scales, transport model errors are proportionally larger than at the global scale, with errors ranging from 36 Tg yr-1 in North America to 7 Tg yr-1 in Boreal Eurasia (from 23 to 48%, respectively). At the model grid-scale, the spread of inverse estimates can reach 150% of the prior flux. Therefore, transport model errors contribute significantly to overall uncertainties in emission estimates by inverse modelling, especially when small spatial scales are examined. Sensitivity tests have been carried out to estimate the impact of the measurement network and the advantage of higher horizontal resolution in transport models. The large differences found between methane flux estimates inferred in these different configurations highly question the consistency of

  7. Impact of transport model errors on the global and regional methane emissions estimated by inverse modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Locatelli

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A modelling experiment has been conceived to assess the impact of transport model errors on methane emissions estimated in an atmospheric inversion system. Synthetic methane observations, obtained from 10 different model outputs from the international TransCom-CH4 model inter-comparison exercise, are combined with a prior scenario of methane emissions and sinks, and integrated into the three-component PYVAR-LMDZ-SACS (PYthon VARiational-Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique model with Zooming capability-Simplified Atmospheric Chemistry System inversion system to produce 10 different methane emission estimates at the global scale for the year 2005. The same methane sinks, emissions and initial conditions have been applied to produce the 10 synthetic observation datasets. The same inversion set-up (statistical errors, prior emissions, inverse procedure is then applied to derive flux estimates by inverse modelling. Consequently, only differences in the modelling of atmospheric transport may cause differences in the estimated fluxes. In our framework, we show that transport model errors lead to a discrepancy of 27 Tg yr−1 at the global scale, representing 5% of total methane emissions. At continental and annual scales, transport model errors are proportionally larger than at the global scale, with errors ranging from 36 Tg yr−1 in North America to 7 Tg yr−1 in Boreal Eurasia (from 23 to 48%, respectively. At the model grid-scale, the spread of inverse estimates can reach 150% of the prior flux. Therefore, transport model errors contribute significantly to overall uncertainties in emission estimates by inverse modelling, especially when small spatial scales are examined. Sensitivity tests have been carried out to estimate the impact of the measurement network and the advantage of higher horizontal resolution in transport models. The large differences found between methane flux estimates inferred in these different configurations highly

  8. Impact of transport model errors on the global and regional methane emissions estimated by inverse modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Locatelli, R.; Bousquet, P.; Chevallier, F.; Fortems-Cheney, A.; Szopa, S.; Saunois, M.; Agusti-Panareda, A.; Bergmann, D.; Bian, H.; Cameron-Smith, P.; Chipperfield, M.P.; Gloor, E.; Houweling, S.; Kawa, S.R.; Krol, M.C.; Patra, P.K.; Prinn, R.G.; Rigby, M.; Saito, R.; Wilson, C.

    2013-01-01

    A modelling experiment has been conceived to assess the impact of transport model errors on methane emissions estimated in an atmospheric inversion system. Synthetic methane observations, obtained from 10 different model outputs from the international TransCom-CH4 model inter-comparison exercise,

  9. An extended Kalman-filter for regional scale inverse emission estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Brunner

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A Kalman-filter based inverse emission estimation method for long-lived trace gases is presented for use in conjunction with a Lagrangian particle dispersion model like FLEXPART. The sequential nature of the approach allows tracing slow seasonal and interannual changes rather than estimating a single period-mean emission field. Other important features include the estimation of a slowly varying concentration background at each measurement station, the possibility to constrain the solution to non-negative emissions, the quantification of uncertainties, the consideration of temporal correlations in the residuals, and the applicability to potentially large inversion problems. The method is first demonstrated for a set of synthetic observations created from a prescribed emission field with different levels of (correlated noise, which closely mimics true observations. It is then applied to real observations of the three halocarbons HFC-125, HFC-152a and HCFC-141b at the remote research stations Jungfraujoch and Mace Head for the quantification of emissions in Western European countries from 2006 to 2010. Estimated HFC-125 emissions are mostly consistent with national totals reported to UNFCCC in the framework of the Kyoto Protocol and show a generally increasing trend over the considered period. Results for HFC-152a are much more variable with estimated emissions being both higher and lower than reported emissions in different countries. The highest emissions of the order of 700–800 Mg yr−1 are estimated for Italy, which so far does not report HFC-152a emissions. Emissions of HCFC-141b show a continuing strong decrease as expected due to its controls in developed countries under the Montreal Protocol. Emissions from France, however, were still rather large, in the range of 700–1000 Mg yr−1 in the years 2006 and 2007 but strongly declined thereafter.

  10. Inverse modeling of biomass burning emissions using Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer aerosol index for 1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sophia; Penner, Joyce E.; Torres, Omar

    2005-11-01

    We present results from an inverse model study to determine biomass smoke emissions for the year 1997 by comparison of modeled aerosol index (AI) with that measured by the EP TOMS instrument. The IMPACT model with Data Assimilation Office (DAO) meteorology data in 1997 is utilized to obtain aerosol spatial and temporal distributions. Then a radiative transfer model is applied to generate the modeled AI. A Bayesian inverse technique is applied to optimize the difference between the modeled AI and the EP TOMS AI in the same period by regulating monthly a priori biomass smoke emissions in seven predefined regions. The modeled AI with a posteriori emissions is generally in better agreement with the EP TOMS AI. The a posteriori emissions from Indonesia increase by a factor of 8-10 over the a priori emissions due to the Indonesian fires in 1997. The annual total a posteriori source increases by about 13% for the year 1997 (6.31 Tg/yr black carbon and 67.27 Tg/yr smoke) in the base scenario, with a larger adjustment of monthly emissions. The sensitivity of this result to the a priori uncertainties, the height of the smoke layer, the cloud screening criteria, the inclusion of an adjustment of emissions outside the main biomass burning regions, and the inclusion of the covariances between observations in different locations is discussed in a set of sensitivity scenarios. The sensitivity scenarios suggest that the inverse model results are most sensitive to the assumed uncertainty for a priori emissions and the altitude of aerosol layer in the model and are less sensitive to other factors. In the scenario where the uncertainty of a priori emissions is increased to 100% (300% in Indonesia), the total annual black carbon emission is increased to 6.87 Tg/yr, and the smoke emission increases to 73.39 Tg/yr. The a posteriori emissions in Indonesia in the scenario with increased uncertainty are in better agreement with both the TOMS AI and with previous estimates for the

  11. Pyroelectric electron emissions and domain inversion of LiNbO3 single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong-Wook; Bourim, E.M.; Jeong, Soo-Hwan; Yoo, In K.

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the electron emissions from a congruent LiNbO 3 single crystal with variation in temperature. When there was a small gap between the crystal and detector (<2 mm), we observed abrupt drops in the emission current and polarization domain inversion of the crystal. The current burst was distributed in tree-like patterns that suggested plasma generation. A sufficient gap and a crystal with a high coercive field appear to be factors that allow reproducible electron emissions from pyroelectric materials

  12. TransCom N2O model inter-comparison - Part 2 : Atmospheric inversion estimates of N2O emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, R. L.; Ishijima, K.; Saikawa, E.; Corazza, M.; Karstens, U.; Patra, P. K.; Bergamaschi, P.; Chevallier, F.; Dlugokencky, E.; Prinn, R. G.; Weiss, R. F.; O'Doherty, S.; Fraser, P. J.; Steele, L. P.; Krummel, P. B.; Vermeulen, A.; Tohjima, Y.; Jordan, A.; Haszpra, L.; Steinbacher, M.; Van Der Laan, S.; Aalto, T.; Meinhardt, F.; Popa, Maria Elena|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/375806407; Moncrieff, J.; Bousquet, P.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines N2O emission estimates from five different atmospheric inversion frameworks based on chemistry transport models (CTMs). The five frameworks differ in the choice of CTM, meteorological data, prior uncertainties and inversion method but use the same prior emissions and observation

  13. TransCom N2O model inter-comparison, Part II : Atmospheric inversion estimates of N2O emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, R. L.; Ishijima, K.; Saikawa, E.; Corazza, M.; Karstens, U.; Patra, P. K.; Bergamaschi, P.; Chevallier, F.; Dlugokencky, E.; Prinn, R. G.; Weiss, R. F.; O'Doherty, S.; Fraser, P. J.; Steele, L. P.; Krummel, P. B.; Vermeulen, A.; Tohjima, Y.; Jordan, A.; Haszpra, L.; Steinbacher, M.; Van Der Laan, S.; Aalto, T.; Meinhardt, F.; Popa, Maria Elena; Moncrieff, J.; Bousquet, P.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines N2O emission estimates from 5 different atmospheric inversion frameworks. The 5 frameworks differ in the choice of atmospheric transport model, meteorological data, prior uncertainties and inversion method but use the same prior emissions and observation dataset. The mean

  14. Atmospheric inversion for cost effective quantification of city CO2 emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, L.; Broquet, G.; Ciais, P.; Bellassen, V.; Vogel, F.; Chevallier, F.; Xueref-Remy, I.; Wang, Y.

    2015-11-01

    Cities, currently covering only a very small portion (role for market- or policy-based mitigation actions. Here we propose a monitoring tool that could support the development of such procedures at the city scale. It is based on an atmospheric inversion method that exploits inventory data and continuous atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements from a network of stations within and around cities to estimate city CO2 emissions. We examine the cost-effectiveness and the performance of such a tool. The instruments presently used to measure CO2 concentrations at research stations are expensive. However, cheaper sensors are currently developed and should be useable for the monitoring of CO2 emissions from a megacity in the near-term. Our assessment of the inversion method is thus based on the use of several types of hypothetical networks, with a range of numbers of sensors sampling at 25 m a.g.l. The study case for this assessment is the monitoring of the emissions of the Paris metropolitan area (~ 12 million inhabitants and 11.4 Tg C emitted in 2010) during the month of January 2011. The performance of the inversion is evaluated in terms of uncertainties in the estimates of total and sectoral CO2 emissions. These uncertainties are compared to a notional ambitious target to diagnose annual total city emissions with an uncertainty of 5 % (2-sigma). We find that, with 10 stations only, which is the typical size of current pilot networks that are deployed in some cities, the uncertainty for the 1-month total city CO2 emissions is significantly reduced by the inversion by ~ 42 % but still corresponds to an annual uncertainty that is two times larger than the target of 5 %. By extending the network from 10 to 70 stations, the inversion can meet this requirement. As for major sectoral CO2 emissions, the uncertainties in the inverted emissions using 70 stations are reduced significantly over that obtained using 10 stations by 32 % for commercial and residential buildings, by

  15. Atmospheric inverse modeling with known physical bounds: an example from trace gas emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Miller

    2014-02-01

    the relative merits of each. This paper investigates the applicability of several approaches to bounded inverse problems. A common method of data transformations is found to unrealistically skew estimates for the examined example application. The method of Lagrange multipliers and two Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC methods yield more realistic and accurate results. In general, the examined MCMC approaches produce the most realistic result but can require substantial computational time. Lagrange multipliers offer an appealing option for large, computationally intensive problems when exact uncertainty bounds are less central to the analysis. A synthetic data inversion of US anthropogenic methane emissions illustrates the strengths and weaknesses of each approach.

  16. Inverse modelling of national and European CH4 emissions using the atmospheric zoom model TM5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Bergamaschi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A synthesis inversion based on the atmospheric zoom model TM5 is used to derive top-down estimates of CH4 emissions from individual European countries for the year 2001. We employ a model zoom over Europe with 1° × 1° resolution that is two-way nested into the global model domain (with resolution of 6° × 4°. This approach ensures consistent boundary conditions for the zoom domain and thus European top-down estimates consistent with global CH4 observations. The TM5 model, driven by ECMWF analyses, simulates synoptic scale events at most European and global sites fairly well, and the use of high-frequency observations allows exploiting the information content of individual synoptic events. A detailed source attribution is presented for a comprehensive set of 56 monitoring sites, assigning the atmospheric signal to the emissions of individual European countries and larger global regions. The available observational data put significant constraints on emissions from different regions. Within Europe, in particular several Western European countries are well constrained. The inversion results suggest up to 50-90% higher anthropogenic CH4 emissions in 2001 for Germany, France and UK compared to reported UNFCCC values (EEA, 2003. A recent revision of the German inventory, however, resulted in an increase of reported CH4 emissions by 68.5% (EEA, 2004, being now in very good agreement with our top-down estimate. The top-down estimate for Finland is distinctly smaller than the a priori estimate, suggesting much smaller CH4 emissions from Finnish wetlands than derived from the bottom-up inventory. The EU-15 totals are relatively close to UNFCCC values (within 4-30% and appear very robust for different inversion scenarios.

  17. Limits for an inverse bremsstrahlung origin of the diffuse Galactic soft gamma-ray emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pohl, M.

    1998-01-01

    RXTE, GINGA, and OSSE observations have revealed an intense low-energy gamma-ray continuum emission from the Galactic plane, which is commonly interpreted as evidence for the possible existence of a strong flux of low-energy cosmic ray electrons. In this Paper I discuss the scenario of a hadronic......-7 MeV emission from the Galactic plane, in concert with the constraints from pi(0)-decay gamma-ray emission at higher energies, are in serious conflict with an inverse bremsstrahlung origin of the Galactic soft gamma-ray emission for any physically plausible low-energy cosmic ray spectrum. While...... in case of energetic heavy nuclei the limits are violated by about an order of magnitude, for a large population of low-energy protons the implied gamma-ray line flux and pi(0)-decay continuum intensity are larger than the existing limits by at least a factor of 2....

  18. Quantifying Emission Controls of CO and NOx During the Victory Day Military Parade through Inverse Modelling with Ensemble Kalman Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H.; Tang, X.; Wang, Z.

    2016-12-01

    During the China Victory Day Parade in 2015, temporary emission control measures were conducted over Beijing and surrounding regions to guarantee the air quality of Beijing. This offers a great opportunity to explore the ability and limitations of the top-down emission estimation. In this study, we employed an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) in coupling with a Nested Air Quality Prediction Modeling System (NAQPMS) to establish a high temporal and spatial resolution emission inversion estimation scheme. The scheme enables to assimilated more than 400 surface observations of carbon monoxide (CO) and nitrogen dioxides (NO2) into a 5km×5km resolution model to inversely adjust the a priori emission inventory based on the Multi-resolution Emission Inventory for China (MEIC) for the base year of 2010. Fifty ensemble members and an offline hourly inverse analysis were employed during the four-week inverse period. Results suggested that the inverse estimation scheme significantly reduced the biases in the a prior emission inventory. Therefore, a new emission inventory was obtained and served as the base to compare with the inverse emission inventory during the China Victory Day Parade. Comparison between the new base emission inventory and the inverse emission inventory during the China Victory Day Parade revealed the temporal and spatial characters of the emission control measures over Beijing and surrounding areas. Significant emission reductions were found in Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei and surrounding areas. Meanwhile, NOx showed more reductions in areas around Beijing due to more rigorous vehicle control. This study highlighted the advantages and limitations of the EnKF-based emission estimation scheme. The uncertainties related to observation network, sampling strategy, and meteorological errors were also discussed.

  19. Implications of overestimated anthropogenic CO2 emissions on East Asian and global land CO2 flux inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, Tazu; Patra, Prabir K.

    2017-12-01

    Measurement and modelling of regional or country-level carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes are becoming critical for verification of the greenhouse gases emission control. One of the commonly adopted approaches is inverse modelling, where CO2 fluxes (emission: positive flux, sink: negative flux) from the terrestrial ecosystems are estimated by combining atmospheric CO2 measurements with atmospheric transport models. The inverse models assume anthropogenic emissions are known, and thus the uncertainties in the emissions introduce systematic bias in estimation of the terrestrial (residual) fluxes by inverse modelling. Here we show that the CO2 sink increase, estimated by the inverse model, over East Asia (China, Japan, Korea and Mongolia), by about 0.26 PgC year-1 (1 Pg = 1012 g) during 2001-2010, is likely to be an artifact of the anthropogenic CO2 emissions increasing too quickly in China by 1.41 PgC year-1. Independent results from methane (CH4) inversion suggested about 41% lower rate of East Asian CH4 emission increase during 2002-2012. We apply a scaling factor of 0.59, based on CH4 inversion, to the rate of anthropogenic CO2 emission increase since the anthropogenic emissions of both CO2 and CH4 increase linearly in the emission inventory. We find no systematic increase in land CO2 uptake over East Asia during 1993-2010 or 2000-2009 when scaled anthropogenic CO2 emissions are used, and that there is a need of higher emission increase rate for 2010-2012 compared to those calculated by the inventory methods. High bias in anthropogenic CO2 emissions leads to stronger land sinks in global land-ocean flux partitioning in our inverse model. The corrected anthropogenic CO2 emissions also produce measurable reductions in the rate of global land CO2 sink increase post-2002, leading to a better agreement with the terrestrial biospheric model simulations that include CO2-fertilization and climate effects.

  20. Inverse modelling of European N2O emissions. Assimilating observations from different networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corazza, M.; Bergamaschi, P.; Dentener, F. [European Commission Joint Research Centre, Institute for Environment and Sustainability, 21027 Ispra (Italy); Vermeulen, A.T.; Popa, E. [Energy research Centre of the Netherlands ECN, Petten (Netherlands); Aalto, T. [Finnish Meteorological Institute FMI, Helsinki (Finland); Haszpra, L. [Hungarian Meteorological Service, Budapest (Hungary); Meinhardt, F. [Umweltbundesamt UBA, Messstelle Schauinsland, Kirchzarten (Germany); O' Doherty, S. [School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol (United Kingdom); Thompson, R. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environment LSCE, Gif sur Yvette (France); Moncrieff, J. [Edinburgh University, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Steinbacher, M. [Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology Empa, Duebendorf (Switzerland); Jordan, A. [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Jena (Germany); Dlugokencky, E. [NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, Global Monitoring Division, Boulder, CO (United States); Bruehl, C. [Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz (Germany); Krol, M. [Wageningen University and Research Centre WUR, Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2010-07-01

    We describe the setup and first results of an inverse modelling system for atmospheric N2O, based on a four-dimensional variational (4DVAR) technique and the atmospheric transport zoom model TM5. We focus in this study on the European domain, utilizing a comprehensive set of quasi-continuous measurements over Europe, complemented by N2O measurements from the Earth System Research Laboratory of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA/ESRL) cooperative global air sampling network. Despite ongoing measurement comparisons among networks parallel measurements at a limited number of stations show that significant offsets exist among the different laboratories. Since the spatial gradients of N2O mixing ratios are of the same order of magnitude as these biases, the direct use of these biased datasets would lead to significant errors in the derived emissions. Therefore, in order to also use measurements with unknown offsets, a new bias correction scheme has been implemented within the TM5-4DVAR inverse modelling system, thus allowing the simultaneous assimilation of observations from different networks. The N2O bias corrections determined in the TM5-4DVAR system agree within 0.1 ppb (dry-air mole fraction) with the bias derived from the measurements at monitoring stations where parallel NOAA discrete air samples are available. The N2O emissions derived for the northwest European countries for 2006 show good agreement with the bottom-up emission inventories reported to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Moreover, the inverse model can significantly narrow the uncertainty range reported in N2O emission inventories, while the lack of measurements does not allow for better emission estimates in southern Europe. Several sensitivity experiments were performed to test the robustness of the results. It is shown that also inversions without detailed a priori spatio-temporal emission distributions are capable to reproduce major

  1. Compton current detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho Campos, J.S. de.

    1984-01-01

    The project and construction of a Compton current detector, with cylindrical geometry using teflon as dielectric material; for electromagnetic radiation in range energy between 10 KeV and 2 MeV are described. The measurements of Compton current in teflon were obtained using an electrometer. The Compton current was promoted by photon flux proceeding from X ray sources (MG 150 Muller device) and gamma rays of 60 Co. The theory elaborated to explain the experimental results is shown. The calibration curves for accumulated charge and current in detector in function of exposition rates were obtained. (M.C.K.) [pt

  2. Limits for an inverse bremsstrahlung origin of the diffuse Galactic soft gamma-ray emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pohl, M.

    1998-01-01

    origin of the soft Galactic gamma-ray continuum through inverse bremsstrahlung. A flux of low-energy cosmic rays strong enough to produce the observed spectrum of gamma-rays implies substantial gamma-ray emission at a few MeV through nuclear de-excitation. It is shown that the existing limits on excess 3......-7 MeV emission from the Galactic plane, in concert with the constraints from pi(0)-decay gamma-ray emission at higher energies, are in serious conflict with an inverse bremsstrahlung origin of the Galactic soft gamma-ray emission for any physically plausible low-energy cosmic ray spectrum. While......RXTE, GINGA, and OSSE observations have revealed an intense low-energy gamma-ray continuum emission from the Galactic plane, which is commonly interpreted as evidence for the possible existence of a strong flux of low-energy cosmic ray electrons. In this Paper I discuss the scenario of a hadronic...

  3. Estimating the Spatiotemporal Constraints and Uncertainties in a Mesoscale Inversion of Methane Emissions During SENEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousserez, N.; Henze, D. K.; Liu, Z.; Brioude, J. F.; Cui, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Our ability to properly interpret trace gas source inversions and to accurately assess their uncertainty is often hindered by, on one hand, the absence of a robust theoretical and computational framework to define the observational constraints, and, on the other hand, the necessity to rely on simplistic assumptions for the probability distributions in order to accommodate the high-dimensionality of the problems (e.g., Gaussian distributions for the prior emissions). In this study, we apply a novel dimension reduction technique to a mesoscale inversion of methane sources from shale production during the Southeast Nexus of Climate Change and Air Quality (SENEX) field campaign (June-July, 2013) that allows us to rigorously characterize the spatiotemporal emission patterns that are independently and most constrained by the observations. This information allows us to define an optimal reduced basis set of emissions, which is then incorporated into a Markov-Chain-Monte-Carlo (MCMC) sampling method. The latter approach enables to relax the Gaussian assumption for the prior distribution and to fully sample the posterior distribution of the estimated methane fluxes. Several prior distribution scenarios that are more representative of the true prior uncertainties in the methane fluxes over shale production facilities (e.g., log-normal, multi-modal) are tested in order to provide a better characterization of errors in the posterior fluxes arising from the simplified Gaussian framework generally adopted in mesoscale inversions.

  4. Estimates of European emissions of methyl chloroform using a Bayesian inversion method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maione, M.; Graziosi, F.; Arduini, J.; Furlani, F.; Giostra, U.; Blake, D. R.; Bonasoni, P.; Fang, X.; Montzka, S. A.; O'Doherty, S. J.; Reimann, S.; Stohl, A.; Vollmer, M. K.

    2014-09-01

    Methyl chloroform (MCF) is a man-made chlorinated solvent contributing to the destruction of stratospheric ozone and is controlled under the "Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer" and its amendments, which called for its phase-out in 1996 in developed countries and 2015 in developing countries. Long-term, high-frequency observations of MCF carried out at three European sites show a constant decline in the background mixing ratios of MCF. However, we observe persistent non-negligible mixing ratio enhancements of MCF in pollution episodes, suggesting unexpectedly high ongoing emissions in Europe. In order to identify the source regions and to give an estimate of the magnitude of such emissions, we have used a Bayesian inversion method and a point source analysis, based on high-frequency long-term observations at the three European sites. The inversion identified southeastern France (SEF) as a region with enhanced MCF emissions. This estimate was confirmed by the point source analysis. We performed this analysis using an 11-year data set, from January 2002 to December 2012. Overall, emissions estimated for the European study domain decreased nearly exponentially from 1.1 Gg yr-1 in 2002 to 0.32 Gg yr-1 in 2012, of which the estimated emissions from the SEF region accounted for 0.49 Gg yr-1 in 2002 and 0.20 Gg yr-1 in 2012. The European estimates are a significant fraction of the total semi-hemisphere (30-90° N) emissions, contributing a minimum of 9.8% in 2004 and a maximum of 33.7% in 2011, of which on average 50% are from the SEF region. On the global scale, the SEF region is thus responsible for a minimum of 2.6% (in 2003) and a maximum of 10.3% (in 2009) of the global MCF emissions.

  5. Nine years of global hydrocarbon emissions based on source inversion of OMI formaldehyde observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bauwens

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available As formaldehyde (HCHO is a high-yield product in the oxidation of most volatile organic compounds (VOCs emitted by fires, vegetation, and anthropogenic activities, satellite observations of HCHO are well-suited to inform us on the spatial and temporal variability of the underlying VOC sources. The long record of space-based HCHO column observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI is used to infer emission flux estimates from pyrogenic and biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs on the global scale over 2005–2013. This is realized through the method of source inverse modeling, which consists in the optimization of emissions in a chemistry-transport model (CTM in order to minimize the discrepancy between the observed and modeled HCHO columns. The top–down fluxes are derived in the global CTM IMAGESv2 by an iterative minimization algorithm based on the full adjoint of IMAGESv2, starting from a priori emission estimates provided by the newly released GFED4s (Global Fire Emission Database, version 4s inventory for fires, and by the MEGAN-MOHYCAN inventory for isoprene emissions. The top–down fluxes are compared to two independent inventories for fire (GFAS and FINNv1.5 and isoprene emissions (MEGAN-MACC and GUESS-ES. The inversion indicates a moderate decrease (ca. 20 % in the average annual global fire and isoprene emissions, from 2028 Tg C in the a priori to 1653 Tg C for burned biomass, and from 343 to 272 Tg for isoprene fluxes. Those estimates are acknowledged to depend on the accuracy of formaldehyde data, as well as on the assumed fire emission factors and the oxidation mechanisms leading to HCHO production. Strongly decreased top–down fire fluxes (30–50 % are inferred in the peak fire season in Africa and during years with strong a priori fluxes associated with forest fires in Amazonia (in 2005, 2007, and 2010, bushfires in Australia (in 2006 and 2011, and peat burning in Indonesia (in 2006 and 2009, whereas

  6. Nine years of global hydrocarbon emissions based on source inversion of OMI formaldehyde observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauwens, Maite; Stavrakou, Trissevgeni; Müller, Jean-François; De Smedt, Isabelle; Van Roozendael, Michel; van der Werf, Guido R.; Wiedinmyer, Christine; Kaiser, Johannes W.; Sindelarova, Katerina; Guenther, Alex

    2016-08-01

    As formaldehyde (HCHO) is a high-yield product in the oxidation of most volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by fires, vegetation, and anthropogenic activities, satellite observations of HCHO are well-suited to inform us on the spatial and temporal variability of the underlying VOC sources. The long record of space-based HCHO column observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) is used to infer emission flux estimates from pyrogenic and biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on the global scale over 2005-2013. This is realized through the method of source inverse modeling, which consists in the optimization of emissions in a chemistry-transport model (CTM) in order to minimize the discrepancy between the observed and modeled HCHO columns. The top-down fluxes are derived in the global CTM IMAGESv2 by an iterative minimization algorithm based on the full adjoint of IMAGESv2, starting from a priori emission estimates provided by the newly released GFED4s (Global Fire Emission Database, version 4s) inventory for fires, and by the MEGAN-MOHYCAN inventory for isoprene emissions. The top-down fluxes are compared to two independent inventories for fire (GFAS and FINNv1.5) and isoprene emissions (MEGAN-MACC and GUESS-ES). The inversion indicates a moderate decrease (ca. 20 %) in the average annual global fire and isoprene emissions, from 2028 Tg C in the a priori to 1653 Tg C for burned biomass, and from 343 to 272 Tg for isoprene fluxes. Those estimates are acknowledged to depend on the accuracy of formaldehyde data, as well as on the assumed fire emission factors and the oxidation mechanisms leading to HCHO production. Strongly decreased top-down fire fluxes (30-50 %) are inferred in the peak fire season in Africa and during years with strong a priori fluxes associated with forest fires in Amazonia (in 2005, 2007, and 2010), bushfires in Australia (in 2006 and 2011), and peat burning in Indonesia (in 2006 and 2009), whereas generally increased fluxes

  7. Inversion of CO and NOx emissions using the adjoint of the IMAGES model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-F. Müller

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We use ground-based observations of CO mixing ratios and vertical column abundances together with tropospheric NO2 columns from the GOME satellite instrument as constraints for improving the global annual emission estimates of CO and NOx for the year 1997. The agreement between concentrations calculated by the global 3-dimensional CTM IMAGES and the observations is optimized using the adjoint modelling technique, which allows to invert for CO and NOx fluxes simultaneously, taking their chemical interactions into account. Our analysis quantifies a total of 39 flux parameters, comprising anthropogenic and biomass burning sources over large continental regions, soil and lightning emissions of NOx, biogenic emissions of CO and non-methane hydrocarbons, as well as the deposition velocities of both CO and NOx. Comparison between observed, prior and optimized CO mixing ratios at NOAA/CMDL sites shows that the inversion performs well at the northern mid- and high latitudes, and that it is less efficient in the Southern Hemisphere, as expected due to the scarsity of measurements over this part of the globe. The inversion, moreover, brings the model much closer to the measured NO2 columns over all regions. Sensitivity tests show that anthropogenic sources exhibit weak sensitivity to changes of the a priori errors associated to the bottom-up inventory, whereas biomass burning sources are subject to a strong variability. Our best estimate for the 1997 global top-down CO source amounts to 2760 Tg CO. Anthropogenic emissions increase by 28%, in agreement with previous inverse modelling studies, suggesting that the present bottom-up inventories underestimate the anthropogenic CO emissions in the Northern Hemisphere. The magnitude of the optimized NOx global source decreases by 14% with respect to the prior, and amounts to 42.1 Tg N, out of which 22.8 Tg N are due to anthropogenic sources. The NOx emissions increase over Tropical regions, whereas they decrease

  8. Inverse Modelling of Global Methane Emissions: Past Achievement and Future Prospects of using Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houweling, S.; Pandey, S.; Segers, A.

    2017-12-01

    Methane is regarded as a suitable target for short-term climate mitigation, because of its relatively short atmospheric residence time compared to carbon dioxide and other long-lived greenhouse gases. However, to build climate policy on methane is complicated because of the uncertainties in its emission budget, reflected in the difficulty to predict its global growth rate. Several different and conflicting scenarios have been proposed in high profile journals to explain its recent evolution in the atmosphere. Since the early 2000s atmospheric methane is being measured by Earth orbiting satellites. Missions such as SCIAMACHY and GOSAT have largely increased the number of atmospheric methane measurements that are available for the quantification its emissions using inverse modelling techniques. In this presentation, we address the question what has been the role of satellite data in the discussion about the causes of the varying growth rate of methane, and what are the remaining limitations. This is the time when space borne remote sensing of methane is transitioning from exploratory scientific missions to monitoring missions, starting with the preoperational mission S5p TROPOMI to be launched in September 2017. In the meantime, also inverse modelling techniques are prepared for operational use in support of COP21 agreement to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. These developments bring new opportunities and challenges, which will be discussed.

  9. High-resolution inversion of OMI formaldehyde columns over the Southeast US to infer isoprene emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, J.; Zhu, L.; Travis, K.; Jacob, D.

    2017-12-01

    In the South East United States, biogenic isoprene fuels tropospheric ozone formation, and its oxidation products contribute significantly to organic aerosol. Bottom-up emission inventories rely on very limited isoprene emission and land-cover data, yielding uncertainties of a factor of 2 or more. Here, we use formaldehyde columns from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument in a high-resolution (0.25 x 0.325o) adjoint-based inversion to constrain isoprene emissions over the SE US during Aug-Sept of 2013. We find that the MEGANv2.1 inventory is biased high over most of the SE US. Our derived scaling factors show significant spatial variability, with the largest corrections applied to Louisiana and the Edwards Plateau in Texas. We test our inversion results against a comprehensive set of isoprene oxidation product observations from the NASA SEAC4RS flight campaign. The SEAC4RS data provides new confidence in the satellite retrievals and in mechanism linking isoprene oxidation to formaldehyde production. Finally, we relate the posterior scaling factors to the underlying land-type, and examine potential sources of observed biases.

  10. Two center electron emission in collisions of fast ions with H, and H{sub 2}: Interplay between interference and Compton profile effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misra, D. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Kumar, Ajay [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005 (India)]. E-mail: lokesh@tifr.res.in; Kadhane, U.R. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Fainstein, P.D. [Centro Atomico Bariloche, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina); Tribedi, L.C. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005 (India)

    2006-11-15

    Young type interference effect has been studied in case of particle induced ionization of H{sub 2}. Oscillations are derived by comparing the measured DDCS for H{sub 2} with the calculated DDCS for H. The effect of the Compton profiles of H{sub 2} and H on the interference structure is also studied. A theoretical model based on molecular distorted wave calculation explains the experimental results qualitatively.

  11. Top-down NOx and SO2 emissions simultaneously estimated from different OMI retrievals and inversion frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Z.; Henze, D. K.; Wang, J.; Xu, X.; Wang, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Quantifying emissions trends of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) is important for improving understanding of air pollution and the effectiveness of emission control strategies. We estimate long-term (2005-2016) global (2° x 2.5° resolution) and regional (North America and East Asia at 0.5° x 0.667° resolution) NOx emissions using a recently developed hybrid (mass-balance / 4D-Var) method with GEOS-Chem. NASA standard product and DOMINO retrievals of NO2 column are both used to constrain emissions; comparison of these results provides insight into regions where trends are most robust with respect to retrieval uncertainties, and highlights regions where seemingly significant trends are retrieval-specific. To incorporate chemical interactions among species, we extend our hybrid method to assimilate NO2 and SO2 observations and optimize NOx and SO2 emissions simultaneously. Due to chemical interactions, inclusion of SO2 observations leads to 30% grid-scale differences in posterior NOx emissions compared to those constrained only by NO2 observations. When assimilating and optimizing both species in pseudo observation tests, the sum of the normalized mean squared error (compared to the true emissions) of NOx and SO2 posterior emissions are 54-63% smaller than when observing/constraining a single species. NOx and SO2 emissions are also correlated through the amount of fuel combustion. To incorporate this correlation into the inversion, we optimize seven sector-specific emission scaling factors, including industry, energy, residential, aviation, transportation, shipping and agriculture. We compare posterior emissions from inversions optimizing only species' emissions, only sector-based emissions, and both species' and sector-based emissions. In situ measurements of NOx and SO2 are applied to evaluate the performance of these inversions. The impacts of the inversion on PM2.5 and O3 concentrations and premature deaths are also evaluated.

  12. The Compton generator revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siboni, S.

    2014-09-01

    The Compton generator, introduced in 1913 by the US physicist A H Compton as a relatively simple device to detect the Earth's rotation with respect to the distant stars, is analyzed and discussed in a general perspective. The paper introduces a generalized definition of the generator, emphasizing the special features of the original apparatus, and provides a suggestive interpretation of the way the device works. To this end, an intriguing electromagnetic analogy is developed, which turns out to be particularly useful in simplifying the calculations. Besides the more extensive description of the Compton generator in itself, the combined use of concepts and methods coming from different fields of physics, such as particle dynamics in moving references frames, continuum mechanics and electromagnetism, may be of interest to both teachers and graduate students.

  13. Integral emission factors for methane determined using urban flux measurements and local-scale inverse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, Andreas; Johnson, Mark; Molodovskaya, Marina; Ketler, Rick; Nesic, Zoran; Crawford, Ben; Giometto, Marco; van der Laan, Mike

    2013-04-01

    The most important long-lived greenhouse gas (LLGHG) emitted during combustion of fuels is carbon dioxide (CO2), however also traces of the LLGHGs methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) are released, the quantities of which depend largely on the conditions of the combustion process. Emission factors determine the mass of LLGHGs emitted per energy used (or kilometre driven for cars) and are key inputs for bottom-up emission modelling. Emission factors for CH4 are typically determined in the laboratory or on a test stand for a given combustion system using a small number of samples (vehicles, furnaces), yet associated with larger uncertainties when scaled to entire fleets. We propose an alternative, different approach - Can integrated emission factors be independently determined using direct micrometeorological flux measurements over an urban surface? If so, do emission factors determined from flux measurements (top-down) agree with up-scaled emission factors of relevant combustion systems (heating, vehicles) in the source area of the flux measurement? Direct flux measurements of CH4 were carried out between February and May, 2012 over a relatively densely populated, urban surface in Vancouver, Canada by means of eddy covariance (EC). The EC-system consisted of an ultrasonic anemometer (CSAT-3, Campbell Scientific Inc.) and two open-path infrared gas analyzers (Li7500 and Li7700, Licor Inc.) on a tower at 30m above the surface. The source area of the EC system is characterised by a relative homogeneous morphometry (5.3m average building height), but spatially and temporally varying emission sources, including two major intersecting arterial roads (70.000 cars drive through the 50% source area per day) and seasonal heating in predominantly single-family houses (natural gas). An inverse dispersion model (turbulent source area model), validated against large eddy simulations (LES) of the urban roughness sublayer, allows the determination of the spatial area that

  14. High Resolution Atmospheric Inversion of Urban CO2 Emissions During the Dormant Season of the Indianapolis Flux Experiment (INFLUX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauvaux, Thomas; Miles, Natasha L.; Deng, Aijun; Richardson, Scott J.; Cambaliza, Maria O.; Davis, Kenneth J.; Gaudet, Brian; Gurney, Kevin R.; Huang, Jianhua; O'Keefe, Darragh; hide

    2016-01-01

    Urban emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG) represent more than 70% of the global fossil fuel GHG emissions. Unless mitigation strategies are successfully implemented, the increase in urban GHG emissions is almost inevitable as large metropolitan areas are projected to grow twice as fast as the world population in the coming 15 years. Monitoring these emissions becomes a critical need as their contribution to the global carbon budget increases rapidly. In this study, we developed the first comprehensive monitoring systems of CO2 emissions at high resolution using a dense network of CO2 atmospheric measurements over the city of Indianapolis. The inversion system was evaluated over a 8-month period and showed an increase compared to the Hestia CO2 emission estimate, a state-of-the-art building-level emission product, with a 20% increase in the total emissions over the area (from 4.5 to 5.7 Metric Megatons of Carbon +/- 0.23 Metric Megatons of Carbon). However, several key parameters of the inverse system need to be addressed to carefully characterize the spatial distribution of the emissions and the aggregated total emissions.We found that spatial structures in prior emission errors, mostly undetermined, affect significantly the spatial pattern in the inverse solution, as well as the carbon budget over the urban area. Several other parameters of the inversion were sufficiently constrained by additional observations such as the characterization of the GHG boundary inflow and the introduction of hourly transport model errors estimated from the meteorological assimilation system. Finally, we estimated the uncertainties associated with remaining systematic errors and undetermined parameters using an ensemble of inversions. The total CO2 emissions for the Indianapolis urban area based on the ensemble mean and quartiles are 5.26 - 5.91 Metric Megatons of Carbon, i.e. a statistically significant difference compared to the prior total emissions of 4.1 to 4.5 Metric Megatons of

  15. Fast sampling algorithm for the simulation of photon Compton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brusa, D.; Salvat, F.

    1996-01-01

    A simple algorithm for the simulation of Compton interactions of unpolarized photons is described. The energy and direction of the scattered photon, as well as the active atomic electron shell, are sampled from the double-differential cross section obtained by Ribberfors from the relativistic impulse approximation. The algorithm consistently accounts for Doppler broadening and electron binding effects. Simplifications of Ribberfors' formula, required for efficient random sampling, are discussed. The algorithm involves a combination of inverse transform, composition and rejection methods. A parameterization of the Compton profile is proposed from which the simulation of Compton events can be performed analytically in terms of a few parameters that characterize the target atom, namely shell ionization energies, occupation numbers and maximum values of the one-electron Compton profiles. (orig.)

  16. Compton backscattering axial spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rad'ko, V.E.; Mokrushin, A.D.; Razumovskaya, I.V.

    1981-01-01

    Compton gamma backscattering axial spectrometer of new design with the 200 time larger aperture as compared with the known spectrometers at the equal angular resolution (at E=159 keV) is described. Collimator unit, radiation source and gamma detector are located in the central part of the spectrometer. The investigated specimen (of cylindrical form) and the so called ''black body'' used for absorption of photons, passed through the specimen are placed in the peripheric part. Both these parts have an imaginary symmetry axis that is why the spectrometer is called axial. 57 Co is used as the gamma source. The 122 keV spectral line which corresponds to the 83 keV backscattered photon serves as working line. Germanium disk detector of 10 mm diameter and 4 mm height has energy resolution not worse than 900 eV. The analysis of results of test measurements of compton water profile and their comparison with data obtained earlier show that only finity of detector resolution can essentially affect the form of Compton profile. It is concluded that the suggested variant of the spectrometer would be useful for determination of Compton profiles of chemical compounds of heavy elements [ru

  17. Compton profile of tantalum

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Compton profile of tantalum (Ta) has been measured using IGP type coaxial photon detector. The target atoms were excited by means of 59.54 keV -rays from Am-241. The measurements were carried out on a high purity thin elemental foil. The data were recoreded in a 4 K multichannel analyzer. These data duly ...

  18. Compton profile of tantalum

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tion and Compton scattering (Omega Scientific Publishers, New Delhi, 1990) p. 261. [9] N I Papanicolaou, N C Bacalis and D A Papaconstantopoulos, Phys. Status Solidi B137, 597. (1986). [10] B K Sharma, B L Ahuja, H Singh and F M Mohammad, Pramana – J. Phys. 40, 339 (1993). Pramana – J. Phys., Vol. 60, No.

  19. Potential of European 14CO2 observation network to estimate the fossil fuel CO2 emissions via atmospheric inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yilong; Broquet, Grégoire; Ciais, Philippe; Chevallier, Frédéric; Vogel, Felix; Wu, Lin; Yin, Yi; Wang, Rong; Tao, Shu

    2018-03-01

    Combining measurements of atmospheric CO2 and its radiocarbon (14CO2) fraction and transport modeling in atmospheric inversions offers a way to derive improved estimates of CO2 emitted from fossil fuel (FFCO2). In this study, we solve for the monthly FFCO2 emission budgets at regional scale (i.e., the size of a medium-sized country in Europe) and investigate the performance of different observation networks and sampling strategies across Europe. The inversion system is built on the LMDZv4 global transport model at 3.75° × 2.5° resolution. We conduct Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) and use two types of diagnostics to assess the potential of the observation and inverse modeling frameworks. The first one relies on the theoretical computation of the uncertainty in the estimate of emissions from the inversion, known as posterior uncertainty, and on the uncertainty reduction compared to the uncertainty in the inventories of these emissions, which are used as a prior knowledge by the inversion (called prior uncertainty). The second one is based on comparisons of prior and posterior estimates of the emission to synthetic true emissions when these true emissions are used beforehand to generate the synthetic fossil fuel CO2 mixing ratio measurements that are assimilated in the inversion. With 17 stations currently measuring 14CO2 across Europe using 2-week integrated sampling, the uncertainty reduction for monthly FFCO2 emissions in a country where the network is rather dense like Germany, is larger than 30 %. With the 43 14CO2 measurement stations planned in Europe, the uncertainty reduction for monthly FFCO2 emissions is increased for the UK, France, Italy, eastern Europe and the Balkans, depending on the configuration of prior uncertainty. Further increasing the number of stations or the sampling frequency improves the uncertainty reduction (up to 40 to 70 %) in high emitting regions, but the performance of the inversion remains limited over low

  20. Potential of European 14CO2 observation network to estimate the fossil fuel CO2 emissions via atmospheric inversions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Wang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Combining measurements of atmospheric CO2 and its radiocarbon (14CO2 fraction and transport modeling in atmospheric inversions offers a way to derive improved estimates of CO2 emitted from fossil fuel (FFCO2. In this study, we solve for the monthly FFCO2 emission budgets at regional scale (i.e., the size of a medium-sized country in Europe and investigate the performance of different observation networks and sampling strategies across Europe. The inversion system is built on the LMDZv4 global transport model at 3.75°  ×  2.5° resolution. We conduct Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs and use two types of diagnostics to assess the potential of the observation and inverse modeling frameworks. The first one relies on the theoretical computation of the uncertainty in the estimate of emissions from the inversion, known as posterior uncertainty, and on the uncertainty reduction compared to the uncertainty in the inventories of these emissions, which are used as a prior knowledge by the inversion (called prior uncertainty. The second one is based on comparisons of prior and posterior estimates of the emission to synthetic true emissions when these true emissions are used beforehand to generate the synthetic fossil fuel CO2 mixing ratio measurements that are assimilated in the inversion. With 17 stations currently measuring 14CO2 across Europe using 2-week integrated sampling, the uncertainty reduction for monthly FFCO2 emissions in a country where the network is rather dense like Germany, is larger than 30 %. With the 43 14CO2 measurement stations planned in Europe, the uncertainty reduction for monthly FFCO2 emissions is increased for the UK, France, Italy, eastern Europe and the Balkans, depending on the configuration of prior uncertainty. Further increasing the number of stations or the sampling frequency improves the uncertainty reduction (up to 40 to 70 % in high emitting regions, but the performance of the inversion

  1. Simulation for CZT Compton PET (Maximization of the efficiency for PET using Compton event)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Changyeon; Lee, Wonho; Lee, Taewoong

    2011-01-01

    Multiple interactions in positron emission tomography (PET) using scintillators are generally treated as noise events because each interacted position and energy of the multiple interactions cannot be obtained individually and the sequence of multiple scattering is not fully known. Therefore, the first interaction position, which is the crucial information for a PET image reconstruction, cannot be determined correctly. However, in the case of a pixelized semiconductor detector, such as CdZnTe, each specific position and energy information of multiple interactions can be obtained. Moreover, for the emission of two 511 keV radiations in PET, if one radiation deposits all the energy in one position (photoelectric effect) and the other radiation undergoes Compton scattering followed by the photoelectric effect, the sequence of Compton scattering followed by the photoelectric effect can be determined using the Compton scattering formula. Hence, the correct position of Compton scattering can be determined, and the Compton scattering effect, which is discarded in conventional PET systems can be recovered in the new system reported in this study. The PET system in this study, which was simulated using GATE 5.0 code, was composed of 20 mmx10 mmx10 mm CdZnTe detectors consisting of 1 mmx0.5 mmx2.5 mm pixels. The angular uncertainties caused by Doppler broadening, pixelization effect and energy broadening were estimated and compared. The pixelized effect was the main factor in increasing the angular uncertainty and was strongly dependent on the distance between the 1st and 2nd interaction positions. The effect of energy broadening to an angular resolution less than expected and that of Doppler broadening was minimal. The number of Compton events was double that of the photoelectric effect assuming full energy absorption. Therefore, the detection efficiency of this new PET system can be improved greatly because both the photoelectric effect and Compton scattering are utilized

  2. The first 1-year-long estimate of the Paris region fossil fuel CO2 emissions based on atmospheric inversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Staufer

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The ability of a Bayesian atmospheric inversion to quantify the Paris region's fossil fuel CO2 emissions on a monthly basis, based on a network of three surface stations operated for 1 year as part of the CO2-MEGAPARIS experiment (August 2010–July 2011, is analysed. Differences in hourly CO2 atmospheric mole fractions between the near-ground monitoring sites (CO2 gradients, located at the north-eastern and south-western edges of the urban area, are used to estimate the 6 h mean fossil fuel CO2 emission. The inversion relies on the CHIMERE transport model run at 2 km  ×  2 km horizontal resolution, on the spatial distribution of fossil fuel CO2 emissions in 2008 from a local inventory established at 1 km  ×  1 km horizontal resolution by the AIRPARIF air quality agency, and on the spatial distribution of the biogenic CO2 fluxes from the C-TESSEL land surface model. It corrects a prior estimate of the 6 h mean budgets of the fossil fuel CO2 emissions given by the AIRPARIF 2008 inventory. We found that a stringent selection of CO2 gradients is necessary for reliable inversion results, due to large modelling uncertainties. In particular, the most robust data selection analysed in this study uses only mid-afternoon gradients if wind speeds are larger than 3 m s−1 and if the modelled wind at the upwind site is within ±15° of the transect between downwind and upwind sites. This stringent data selection removes 92 % of the hourly observations. Even though this leaves few remaining data to constrain the emissions, the inversion system diagnoses that their assimilation significantly reduces the uncertainty in monthly emissions: by 9 % in November 2010 to 50 % in October 2010. The inverted monthly mean emissions correlate well with independent monthly mean air temperature. Furthermore, the inverted annual mean emission is consistent with the independent revision of the AIRPARIF inventory for the year

  3. Proximal methods for the resolution of inverse problems: application to positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pustelnik, N.

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this work is to propose reliable, efficient and fast methods for minimizing convex criteria, that are found in inverse problems for imagery. We focus on restoration/reconstruction problems when data is degraded with both a linear operator and noise, where the latter is not assumed to be necessarily additive.The reliability of the method is ensured through the use of proximal algorithms, the convergence of which is guaranteed when a convex criterion is considered. Efficiency is sought through the choice of criteria adapted to the noise characteristics, the linear operators and the image specificities. Of particular interest are regularization terms based on total variation and/or sparsity of signal frame coefficients. As a consequence of the use of frames, two approaches are investigated, depending on whether the analysis or the synthesis formulation is chosen. Fast processing requirements lead us to consider proximal algorithms with a parallel structure. Theoretical results are illustrated on several large size inverse problems arising in image restoration, stereoscopy, multi-spectral imagery and decomposition into texture and geometry components. We focus on a particular application, namely Positron Emission Tomography (PET), which is particularly difficult because of the presence of a projection operator combined with Poisson noise, leading to highly corrupted data. To optimize the quality of the reconstruction, we make use of the spatio-temporal characteristics of brain tissue activity. (author)

  4. A multiresolution spatial parametrization for the estimation of fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions via atmospheric inversions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, Jaideep; Lee, Jina; Lefantzi, Sophia; Yadav, Vineet [Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, CA; Michalak, Anna M. [Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, CA; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; McKenna, Sean Andrew [IBM Research, Mulhuddart, Dublin 15, Ireland

    2013-04-01

    The estimation of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions (ffCO2) from limited ground-based and satellite measurements of CO2 concentrations will form a key component of the monitoring of treaties aimed at the abatement of greenhouse gas emissions. To that end, we construct a multiresolution spatial parametrization for fossil-fuel CO2 emissions (ffCO2), to be used in atmospheric inversions. Such a parametrization does not currently exist. The parametrization uses wavelets to accurately capture the multiscale, nonstationary nature of ffCO2 emissions and employs proxies of human habitation, e.g., images of lights at night and maps of built-up areas to reduce the dimensionality of the multiresolution parametrization. The parametrization is used in a synthetic data inversion to test its suitability for use in atmospheric inverse problem. This linear inverse problem is predicated on observations of ffCO2 concentrations collected at measurement towers. We adapt a convex optimization technique, commonly used in the reconstruction of compressively sensed images, to perform sparse reconstruction of the time-variant ffCO2 emission field. We also borrow concepts from compressive sensing to impose boundary conditions i.e., to limit ffCO2 emissions within an irregularly shaped region (the United States, in our case). We find that the optimization algorithm performs a data-driven sparsification of the spatial parametrization and retains only of those wavelets whose weights could be estimated from the observations. Further, our method for the imposition of boundary conditions leads to a 10computational saving over conventional means of doing so. We conclude with a discussion of the accuracy of the estimated emissions and the suitability of the spatial parametrization for use in inverse problems with a significant degree of regularization.

  5. A Chandra Observation of the Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxy IRAS 19254-7245 (The Superantennae): X-Ray Emission from the Compton-Thick Active Galactic Nucleus and the Diffuse Starburst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Jianjun; Ptak, Andrew; Heckman, Timothy M.; Braito, Valentina; Reeves, James

    2012-01-01

    We present a Chandra observation of IRAS 19254-7245, a nearby ultraluminous infrared galaxy also known as the Superantennae. The high spatial resolution of Chandra allows us to disentangle for the first time the diffuse starburst (SB) emission from the embedded Compton-thick active galactic nucleus (AGN) in the southern nucleus. No AGN activity is detected in the northern nucleus. The 2-10 keV spectrum of the AGN emission is fitted by a flat power law (TAU = 1.3) and an He-like Fe Kalpha line with equivalent width 1.5 keV, consistent with previous observations. The Fe K line profile could be resolved as a blend of a neutral 6.4 keV line and an ionized 6.7 keV (He-like) or 6.9 keV (H-like) line. Variability of the neutral line is detected compared with the previous XMM-Newton and Suzaku observations, demonstrating the compact size of the iron line emission. The spectrum of the galaxy-scale extended emission excluding the AGN and other bright point sources is fitted with a thermal component with a best-fit kT of approximately 0.8 keV. The 2-10 keV luminosity of the extended emission is about one order of magnitude lower than that of the AGN. The basic physical and structural properties of the extended emission are fully consistent with a galactic wind being driven by the SB. A candidate ultraluminous X-ray source is detected 8 south of the southern nucleus. The 0.3 - 10 keV luminosity of this off-nuclear point source is approximately 6 x 10(exp 40) erg per second if the emission is isotropic and the source is associated with the Superantennae.

  6. High Energy Emissions from Young Stellar Objects A. C. Das1 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hard X-rays are largely generated by non-thermal Bremsstrahlung due to supra- thermal electrons from a part of continuous spectrum of electrons including high energetic relativistic particles that can be generated by the mechanism described above. These X-rays can also be produced by inverse Compton emissions of ...

  7. Top-down estimates of European CH4 and N2O emissions based on four different inverse models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergamaschi, P.; Corazza, M.; Karstens, U.; Athanassiadou, M.; Thompson, R.L.; Pison, I.; Manning, A.J.; Bousquet, P.; Segers, A.; Vermeulen, A.T.; Janssens-Maenhout, G.; Schmidt, M.; Ramonet, M.; Meinhardt, F.; Aalto, T.; Haszpra, L.; Moncrieff, J.; Popa, M.E.; Lowry, D.; Steinbacher, M.; Jordan, A.; O'Doherty, S.; Piacentino, S.; Dlugokencky, E.

    2015-01-01

    European CH4 and N2O emissions are estimated for 2006 and 2007 using four inverse modelling systems, based on different global and regional Eulerian and Lagrangian transport models. This ensemble approach is designed to provide more realistic estimates of the overall uncertainties in the derived

  8. Revealing important nocturnal and day-to-day variations in fire smoke emissions through a multiplatform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saide, Pablo E.; Peterson, David A.; Silva, Arlindo; Anderson, Bruce; Ziemba, Luke D.; Diskin, Glenn; Sachse, Glen; Hair, Johnathan; Butler, Carolyn; Fenn, Marta; Jimenez, Jose L.; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Perring, Anne E.; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Markovic, Milos Z.; Russell, Phil; Redemann, Jens; Shinozuka, Yohei; Streets, David G.; Yan, Fang; Dibb, Jack; Yokelson, Robert; Toon, O. Brian; Hyer, Edward; Carmichael, Gregory R.

    2015-05-01

    We couple airborne, ground-based, and satellite observations; conduct regional simulations; and develop and apply an inversion technique to constrain hourly smoke emissions from the Rim Fire, the third largest observed in California, USA. Emissions constrained with multiplatform data show notable nocturnal enhancements (sometimes over a factor of 20), correlate better with daily burned area data, and are a factor of 2-4 higher than a priori estimates, highlighting the need for improved characterization of diurnal profiles and day-to-day variability when modeling extreme fires. Constraining only with satellite data results in smaller enhancements mainly due to missing retrievals near the emissions source, suggesting that top-down emission estimates for these events could be underestimated and a multiplatform approach is required to resolve them. Predictions driven by emissions constrained with multiplatform data present significant variations in downwind air quality and in aerosol feedback on meteorology, emphasizing the need for improved emissions estimates during exceptional events.

  9. A multiresolution spatial parameterization for the estimation of fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions via atmospheric inversions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ray

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The characterization of fossil-fuel CO2 (ffCO2 emissions is paramount to carbon cycle studies, but the use of atmospheric inverse modeling approaches for this purpose has been limited by the highly heterogeneous and non-Gaussian spatiotemporal variability of emissions. Here we explore the feasibility of capturing this variability using a low-dimensional parameterization that can be implemented within the context of atmospheric CO2 inverse problems aimed at constraining regional-scale emissions. We construct a multiresolution (i.e., wavelet-based spatial parameterization for ffCO2 emissions using the Vulcan inventory, and examine whether such a~parameterization can capture a realistic representation of the expected spatial variability of actual emissions. We then explore whether sub-selecting wavelets using two easily available proxies of human activity (images of lights at night and maps of built-up areas yields a low-dimensional alternative. We finally implement this low-dimensional parameterization within an idealized inversion, where a sparse reconstruction algorithm, an extension of stagewise orthogonal matching pursuit (StOMP, is used to identify the wavelet coefficients. We find that (i the spatial variability of fossil-fuel emission can indeed be represented using a low-dimensional wavelet-based parameterization, (ii that images of lights at night can be used as a proxy for sub-selecting wavelets for such analysis, and (iii that implementing this parameterization within the described inversion framework makes it possible to quantify fossil-fuel emissions at regional scales if fossil-fuel-only CO2 observations are available.

  10. Inverse modeling of fossil fuel CO2 emissions at urban scale using OCO-2 retrievals of total column CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, X.; Lauvaux, T.; Kort, E. A.; Lin, J. C.; Oda, T.; Yang, E.; Wu, D.

    2016-12-01

    Rapid economic development has given rise to a steady increase of global carbon emissions, which have accumulated in the atmosphere for the past 200 years. Urbanization has concentrated about 70% of the global fossil-fuel CO2 emissions in large metropolitan areas distributed around the world, which represents the most significant anthropogenic contribution to climate change. However, highly uncertain quantifications of urban CO2 emissions are commonplace for numerous cities because of poorly-documented inventories of energy consumption. Therefore, accurate estimates of carbon emissions from global observing systems are a necessity if mitigation strategies are meant to be implemented at global scales. Space-based observations of total column averaged CO2 concentration (XCO2) provide a very promising and powerful tool to quantify urban CO2 fluxes. For the first time, measurements from the Orbiting Carbon Observatory 2 (OCO-2) mission are assimilated in a high resolution inverse modeling system to quantify fossil-fuel CO2 emissions of multiple cities around the globe. The Open-source Data Inventory for Anthropogenic CO2 (ODIAC) emission inventory is employed as a first guess, while the atmospheric transport is simulated using the WRF-Chem model at 1-km resolution. Emission detection and quantification is performed with an Ensemble Kalman Filter method. We demonstrate here the potential of the inverse approach for assimilating thousands of OCO-2 retrievals along tracks near metropolitan areas. We present the detection potential of the system with real-case applications near power plants and present inverse emissions using actual OCO-2 measurements on various urban landscapes. Finally, we will discuss the potential of OCO-2-like satellite instruments for monitoring temporal variations of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions over multiple years, which can provide valuable insights for future satellite observation strategies.

  11. Inversion Approach to Validate Mercury Emissions Based on Background Air Monitoring at the High Altitude Research Station Jungfraujoch (3580 m).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denzler, Basil; Bogdal, Christian; Henne, Stephan; Obrist, Daniel; Steinbacher, Martin; Hungerbühler, Konrad

    2017-03-07

    The reduction of emissions of mercury is a declared aim of the Minamata Convention, a UN treaty designed to protect human health and the environment from adverse effects of mercury. To assess the effectiveness of the convention in the future, better constraints about the current mercury emissions is a premise. In our study, we applied a top-down approach to quantify mercury emissions on the basis of atmospheric mercury measurements conducted at the remote high altitude monitoring station Jungfraujoch, Switzerland. We established the source-receptor relationships and by the means of atmospheric inversion we were able to quantify spatially resolved European emissions of 89 ± 14 t/a for elemental mercury. Our European emission estimate is 17% higher than the bottom-up emission inventory, which is within stated uncertainties. However, some regions with unexpectedly high emissions were identified. Stationary combustion, in particular in coal-fired power plants, is found to be the main responsible sector for increased emission estimates. Our top-down approach, based on measurements, provides an independent constraint on mercury emissions, helps to improve and refine reported emission inventories, and can serve for continued assessment of future changes in emissions independent from bottom-up inventories.

  12. Estimating Emissions and Environmental Fate of Di-(2-ethylhexyl) Phthalate in Yangtze River Delta, China: Application of Inverse Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Yu; Sun, Jianteng; Luo, Yuzhou; Pan, Lili; Deng, Xunfei; Wei, Zi; Zhu, Lizhong

    2016-03-01

    A georeferenced multimedia model was developed for evaluating the emissions and environmental fate of di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) in the Yangtze River Delta (YRD), China. Due to the lack of emission inventories, the emission rates were estimated using the observed concentrations in soil as inputs for the multimedia model solved analytically in an inverse manner. The estimated emission rates were then used to evaluate the environmental fate of DEHP with the regular multimedia modeling approach. The predicted concentrations in air, surface water, and sediment were all consistent with the ranges and spatial variations of observed data. The total emission rate of DEHP in YRD was 13.9 thousand t/year (95% confidence interval: 9.4-23.6), of which urban and rural sources accounted for 47% and 53%, respectively. Soil in rural areas and sediment stored 79% and 13% of the total mass, respectively. The air received 61% of the total emissions of DEHP but was only associated with 0.2% of the total mass due to fast degradation and intensive deposition. We suggest the use of an inverse modeling approach under a tiered risk assessment framework to assist future development and refinement of DEHP emission inventories.

  13. An analytical inversion method for determining regional and global emissions of greenhouse gases: Sensitivity studies and application to halocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stohl

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available A new analytical inversion method has been developed to determine the regional and global emissions of long-lived atmospheric trace gases. It exploits in situ measurement data from three global networks and builds on backward simulations with a Lagrangian particle dispersion model. The emission information is extracted from the observed concentration increases over a baseline that is itself objectively determined by the inversion algorithm. The method was applied to two hydrofluorocarbons (HFC-134a, HFC-152a and a hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC-22 for the period January 2005 until March 2007. Detailed sensitivity studies with synthetic as well as with real measurement data were done to quantify the influence on the results of the a priori emissions and their uncertainties as well as of the observation and model errors. It was found that the global a posteriori emissions of HFC-134a, HFC-152a and HCFC-22 all increased from 2005 to 2006. Large increases (21%, 16%, 18%, respectively from 2005 to 2006 were found for China, whereas the emission changes in North America (−9%, 23%, 17%, respectively and Europe (11%, 11%, −4%, respectively were mostly smaller and less systematic. For Europe, the a posteriori emissions of HFC-134a and HFC-152a were slightly higher than the a priori emissions reported to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC. For HCFC-22, the a posteriori emissions for Europe were substantially (by almost a factor 2 higher than the a priori emissions used, which were based on HCFC consumption data reported to the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP. Combined with the reported strongly decreasing HCFC consumption in Europe, this suggests a substantial time lag between the reported time of the HCFC-22 consumption and the actual time of the HCFC-22 emission. Conversely, in China where HCFC consumption is increasing rapidly according to the UNEP data, the a posteriori emissions are only about 40% of the a

  14. Quantification of the emissions of the ozone preceding by inverse modelization. Final report; Quantification des emissions des precurseurs de l'ozone par modelisation inverse. Rapport final

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granier, C.; Petron, G. [Institut Pierre Simon Laplace (IPSL), Service d' Aeronomie, 75 - Paris (France); Ciais, Ph.; Bousquet, Ph. [Institut Pierre Simon Laplace (IPSL), Lab. des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement, 75 - Paris (France)

    2007-07-01

    In the framework of this work, inverse methods have been developed and applied for two types of applications: climatological observations to optimize the monthly average of the observed compounds; the distribution of the carbon monoxide. The report presents the experimental methodologies, the used simulation and the results. (A.L.B.)

  15. Estimation of mercury emissions from forest fires, lakes, regional and local sources using measurements in Milwaukee and an inverse method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. de Foy

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Gaseous elemental mercury is a global pollutant that can lead to serious health concerns via deposition to the biosphere and bio-accumulation in the food chain. Hourly measurements between June 2004 and May 2005 in an urban site (Milwaukee, WI show elevated levels of mercury in the atmosphere with numerous short-lived peaks as well as longer-lived episodes. The measurements are analyzed with an inverse model to obtain information about mercury emissions. The model is based on high resolution meteorological simulations (WRF, hourly back-trajectories (WRF-FLEXPART and a chemical transport model (CAMx. The hybrid formulation combining back-trajectories and Eulerian simulations is used to identify potential source regions as well as the impacts of forest fires and lake surface emissions. Uncertainty bounds are estimated using a bootstrap method on the inversions. Comparison with the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Emission Inventory (NEI and Toxic Release Inventory (TRI shows that emissions from coal-fired power plants are properly characterized, but emissions from local urban sources, waste incineration and metal processing could be significantly under-estimated. Emissions from the lake surface and from forest fires were found to have significant impacts on mercury levels in Milwaukee, and to be underestimated by a factor of two or more.

  16. Estimation of mercury emissions from forest fires, lakes, regional and local sources using measurements in Milwaukee and an inverse method

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Foy, B.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Schauer, J. J.

    2012-10-01

    Gaseous elemental mercury is a global pollutant that can lead to serious health concerns via deposition to the biosphere and bio-accumulation in the food chain. Hourly measurements between June 2004 and May 2005 in an urban site (Milwaukee, WI) show elevated levels of mercury in the atmosphere with numerous short-lived peaks as well as longer-lived episodes. The measurements are analyzed with an inverse model to obtain information about mercury emissions. The model is based on high resolution meteorological simulations (WRF), hourly back-trajectories (WRF-FLEXPART) and a chemical transport model (CAMx). The hybrid formulation combining back-trajectories and Eulerian simulations is used to identify potential source regions as well as the impacts of forest fires and lake surface emissions. Uncertainty bounds are estimated using a bootstrap method on the inversions. Comparison with the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Emission Inventory (NEI) and Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) shows that emissions from coal-fired power plants are properly characterized, but emissions from local urban sources, waste incineration and metal processing could be significantly under-estimated. Emissions from the lake surface and from forest fires were found to have significant impacts on mercury levels in Milwaukee, and to be underestimated by a factor of two or more.

  17. Perfluorocarbons in the global atmosphere: b) Emission estimates using inversions of atmospheric observations of tetrafluoromethane, hexafluoroethane, and octafluoropropane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, A. L.; Muhle, J.; Rigby, M. L.; Miller, B. R.; Salameh, P. K.; Harth, C. M.; Greally, B. R.; O'Doherty, S. J.; Trudinger, C. M.; Porter, L. W.; Steele, P.; Krummel, P. B.; Petrenko, V. V.; Simmonds, P. G.; Fraser, P. J.; Prinn, R. G.; Weiss, R. F.

    2009-12-01

    The perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are long-lived potent greenhouse gases with mixing ratios that have been steadily increasing in the modern measurement record that extends from the 1970s. We present optimized emissions from 1973-present of three perfluorocarbons: tetrafluoromethane (CF4), hexafluoroethane (C2F6) and octafluoropropane (C3F8). The dominant sources of the PFCs are primary aluminum and semiconductor production. CF4 also has a significant pre-industrial abundance from the build-up of very small natural emissions. The inversions were performed with atmospheric measurements made by the Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE) network as well as using stored samples from the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO) Southern Hemisphere archive and from several Northern Hemisphere sources. Inverse estimates of surface flux were derived from the measurements using a discrete Kalman filter, the annual pulse method of Chen and Prinn (J. Geophys. Res., 111, D10307, doi:10.1029/2005JD006058), and a 2D 12-box chemical transport model. CF4 emissions have decreased from ~20 Gg/yr in 1981 to the present value of ~11 Gg/yr. Conversely, C2F6 and C3F8 exhibit an early increase in emissions, peaking much later around 2000 at ~3 Gg/yr and ~1 Gg/yr, respectively, and subsequently declining. The incongruity in the emission profiles is discussed in the context of different relative emissions of CF4 and the other measured PFCs from the two main sources, efforts by the aluminum industry to reduce the emission factor of CF4 (kg CF4 /ton Al), and published emission inventories. In all cases, over 90% of emissions are from the Northern Hemisphere.

  18. The application of inverse-dispersion and gradient methods to estimate ammonia emissions from a penguin colony

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theobald, Mark R.; Crittenden, Peter D.; Tang, Y. Sim; Sutton, Mark A.

    2013-12-01

    Penguin colonies represent some of the most concentrated sources of ammonia emissions to the atmosphere in the world. The ammonia emitted into the atmosphere can have a large influence on the nitrogen cycling of ecosystems near the colonies. However, despite the ecological importance of the emissions, no measurements of ammonia emissions from penguin colonies have been made. The objective of this work was to determine the ammonia emission rate of a penguin colony using inverse-dispersion modelling and gradient methods. We measured meteorological variables and mean atmospheric concentrations of ammonia at seven locations near a colony of Adélie penguins in Antarctica to provide input data for inverse-dispersion modelling. Three different atmospheric dispersion models (ADMS, LADD and a Lagrangian stochastic model) were used to provide a robust emission estimate. The Lagrangian stochastic model was applied both in ‘forwards’ and ‘backwards’ mode to compare the difference between the two approaches. In addition, the aerodynamic gradient method was applied using vertical profiles of mean ammonia concentrations measured near the centre of the colony. The emission estimates derived from the simulations of the three dispersion models and the aerodynamic gradient method agreed quite well, giving a mean emission of 1.1 g ammonia per breeding pair per day (95% confidence interval: 0.4-2.5 g ammonia per breeding pair per day). This emission rate represents a volatilisation of 1.9% of the estimated nitrogen excretion of the penguins, which agrees well with that estimated from a temperature-dependent bioenergetics model. We found that, in this study, the Lagrangian stochastic model seemed to give more reliable emission estimates in ‘forwards’ mode than in ‘backwards’ mode due to the assumptions made.

  19. Atmospheric observations and inverse modelling for quantifying emissions of point-source synthetic greenhouse gases in East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Tim; Manning, Alistair; Li, Shanlan; Kim, Jooil; Park, Sunyoung; Muhle, Jens; Weiss, Ray

    2017-04-01

    The fluorinated species carbon tetrafluoride (CF4; PFC-14), nitrogen trifluoride (NF3) and trifluoromethane (CHF3; HFC-23) are potent greenhouse gases with 100-year global warming potentials of 6,630, 16,100 and 12,400, respectively. Unlike the majority of CFC-replacements that are emitted from fugitive and mobile emission sources, these gases are mostly emitted from large single point sources - semiconductor manufacturing facilities (all three), aluminium smelting plants (CF4) and chlorodifluoromethane (HCFC-22) factories (HFC-23). In this work we show that atmospheric measurements can serve as a basis to calculate emissions of these gases and to highlight emission 'hotspots'. We use measurements from one Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE) long term monitoring sites at Gosan on Jeju Island in the Republic of Korea. This site measures CF4, NF3 and HFC-23 alongside a suite of greenhouse and stratospheric ozone depleting gases every two hours using automated in situ gas-chromatography mass-spectrometry instrumentation. We couple each measurement to an analysis of air history using the regional atmospheric transport model NAME (Numerical Atmospheric dispersion Modelling Environment) driven by 3D meteorology from the Met Office's Unified Model, and use a Bayesian inverse method (InTEM - Inversion Technique for Emission Modelling) to calculate yearly emission changes over seven years between 2008 and 2015. We show that our 'top-down' emission estimates for NF3 and CF4 are significantly larger than 'bottom-up' estimates in the EDGAR emissions inventory (edgar.jrc.ec.europa.eu). For example we calculate South Korean emissions of CF4 in 2010 to be 0.29±0.04 Gg/yr, which is significantly larger than the Edgar prior emissions of 0.07 Gg/yr. Further, inversions for several separate years indicate that emission hotspots can be found without prior spatial information. At present these gases make a small contribution to global radiative forcing, however, given

  20. Quantifying point source emissions with atmospheric inversions and aircraft measurements: the Aliso Canyon natural gas leak as a tracer experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourdji, S.; Yadav, V.; Karion, A.; Mueller, K. L.; Kort, E. A.; Conley, S.; Ryerson, T. B.; Nehrkorn, T.

    2017-12-01

    The ability of atmospheric inverse models to detect, spatially locate and quantify emissions from large point sources in urban domains needs improvement before inversions can be used reliably as carbon monitoring tools. In this study, we use the Aliso Canyon natural gas leak from October 2015 to February 2016 (near Los Angeles, CA) as a natural tracer experiment to assess inversion quality by comparison with published estimates of leak rates calculated using a mass balance approach (Conley et al., 2016). Fourteen dedicated flights were flown in horizontal transects downwind and throughout the duration of the leak to sample CH4 mole fractions and collect meteorological information for use in the mass-balance estimates. The same CH4 observational data were then used here in geostatistical inverse models with no prior assumptions about the leak location or emission rate and flux sensitivity matrices generated using the WRF-STILT atmospheric transport model. Transport model errors were assessed by comparing WRF-STILT wind speeds, wind direction and planetary boundary layer (PBL) height to those observed on the plane; the impact of these errors in the inversions, and the optimal inversion setup for reducing their influence was also explored. WRF-STILT provides a reasonable simulation of true atmospheric conditions on most flight dates, given the complex terrain and known difficulties in simulating atmospheric transport under such conditions. Moreover, even large (>120°) errors in wind direction were found to be tolerable in terms of spatially locating the leak rate within a 5-km radius of the actual site. Errors in the WRF-STILT wind speed (>50%) and PBL height have more negative impacts on the inversions, with too high wind speeds (typically corresponding with too low PBL heights) resulting in overestimated leak rates, and vice-versa. Coarser data averaging intervals and the use of observed wind speed errors in the model-data mismatch covariance matrix are shown to

  1. Cyclotron emission near stellar mass black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apparao, K. M. V.

    1984-01-01

    Cyclotron emission in the inner regions of an accretion disk around a matter accreting black hole can be appreciable. In the case of the X-ray source Cyg X-1, cyclotron emission may provide the soft photons needed for 'Comptonization' to produce high energy X-rays. The inverse correlation between the fluxes of high energy and low energy X-rays during the 'high' and 'low' states of Cyg X-1, may be understood as a result of the variation of the rate of accretion and the Compton scattering of the cyclotron photons. In the case of the X-ray source GX 339-4, the observed optical flux during the high states does not seem to be due to cyclotron emission, but probably due to reprocessing of high energy X-rays by the outer regions of the disk.

  2. Estimation of gaseous mercury emissions in Germany. Inverse modelling of source strengths at the contaminated industrial site BSL Werk Schkopau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krueger, O.; Ebinghaus, R.; Kock, H.H.; Richter-Politz, I.; Geilhufe, C.

    1998-12-31

    Anthropogenic emission sources of gaseous mercury at the contaminated industrial site BSL Werk Schkopau have been determined by measurements and numerical modelling applying a local dispersion model. The investigations are based on measurements from several field campaigns in the period of time between December 1993 and June 1994. The estimation of the source strengths was performed by inverse modelling using measurements as constraints for the dispersion model. Model experiments confirmed the applicability of the inverse modelling procedure for the source strength estimation at BSL Werk Schkopau. At the factory premises investigated, the source strengths of four source areas, among them three closed chlor-alkali productions, one partly removed acetaldehyde factory and additionaly one still producing chlor-alkali factory have been identified with an approximate total gaseous mercury emission of lower than 2.5 kg/day. (orig.)

  3. Top-down estimates of European CH4 and N2O emissions based on 5 different inverse models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergamaschi, P.; Corazza, M.; Segers, A. [EC Joint Research Centre JRC, Institute for Environment and Sustainability IES, Ispra (Italy); Vermeulen, A. [Energy research Centre of the Netherlands ECN, Petten (Netherlands); Manning, A.; Athanassiadou, M. [Met Office Exeter, Devon (United Kingdom); Thompson, R.; Pison, I.; Bousquet, P. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environment LSCE, Gif sur Yvette (France); Karstens, U. [Max-Planck-Institute for Biogeochemistry, Jena (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    Atmospheric measurements combined with inverse atmospheric models can provide independent top-down estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This is important in particular for N2O and CH4, for which considerable uncertainties of the bottom-up inventories exist (uncertainty estimates of bottom-up emissions reported to UNFCCC: CH4: {approx}30%; N2O >100% for annual country totals). According to UNFCCC inventories, CH4 and N2O contributed 'only' {approx}8% and {approx}7%, respectively, of total GHG emissions of EU-15 countries (2007). However, the reported reductions of total GHG emissions (1990-2007: -199 Tg CO2 eq) are mainly attributed to CH4 (-133 Tg CO2 eq) and N2O (-105 Tg CO2 eq)

  4. Monthly top-down NOx emissions for China (2005-2012): A hybrid inversion method and trend analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Zhen; Henze, Daven K.; Capps, Shannon L.; Wang, Yi; Xu, Xiaoguang; Wang, Jun; Keller, Martin

    2017-04-01

    We develop an approach combining mass balance and four-dimensional variational (4D-Var) methods to facilitate inversion of decadal-scale total nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) emissions. In 7 year pseudo-observation tests, hybrid posterior emissions have smaller normalized mean square error (NMSE) than that of mass balance when compared to true emissions in most cases and perform slightly better in detecting NOx emission magnitudes and trends. Using this hybrid method, OMI NO2 satellite observations and the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model, we find more than 30% increases of emissions over most of East China at the 0.5° × 0.667° grid cell level, leading to a 16% growth of emissions over all of China from 2005 to 2012, whereas emissions in several urban centers have decreased by 10-26% in the same period. From 2010 to 2012, a decline is found in the North China Plain, Hubei Province, and Pearl River Delta area, coinciding with China's enforcement of its twelfth "Five Year Plan." Changes in individual grid cell may be different from changes over the entire city or province, as exemplified by opposite trends in Beijing versus the Mentougou district of Beijing from 2005 to 2012. Also, NO2 columns do not necessarily have the same trend as NOx emissions due to their nonlinear response to emissions and the influence of meteorology, the latter alone which can cause up to 30% interannual changes in NO2 columns. Compared to recent bottom-up inventories, hybrid posterior emissions have the same seasonality, smaller emissions, and emission growth rate at the national scale.

  5. Recent results from the Compton Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelson, P.F.; Hansen, W.W. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The Compton Observatory is an orbiting astronomical observatory for gamma-ray astronomy that covers the energy range from about 30 keV to 30 GeV. The Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET), one of four instruments on-board, is capable of detecting and imaging gamma radiation from cosmic sources in the energy range from approximately 20 MeV to 30 GeV. After about one month of tests and calibration following the April 1991 launch, a 15-month all sky survey was begun. This survey is now complete and the Compton Observatory is well into Phase II of its observing program which includes guest investigator observations. Among the highlights from the all-sky survey discussed in this presentation are the following: detection of five pulsars with emission above 100 MeV; detection of more than 24 active galaxies, the most distant at redshift greater than two; detection of many high latitude, unidentified gamma-ray sources, some showing significant time variability; detection of at least two high energy gamma-ray bursts, with emission in one case extending to at least 1 GeV. EGRET has also detected gamma-ray emission from solar flares up to energies of at least 2 GeV and has observed gamma-rays from the Large Magellanic Cloud.

  6. Compton suppression gamma ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landsberger, S.; Iskander, F.Y.; Niset, M.; Heydorn, K.

    2002-01-01

    In the past decade there have been many studies to use Compton suppression methods in routine neutron activation analysis as well as in the traditional role of low level gamma ray counting of environmental samples. On a separate path there have been many new PC based software packages that have been developed to enhance photopeak fitting. Although the newer PC based algorithms have had significant improvements, they still suffer from being effectively used in weak gamma ray lines in natural samples or in neutron activated samples that have very high Compton backgrounds. We have completed a series of experiments to show the usefulness of Compton suppression. As well we have shown the pitfalls when using Compton suppression methods for high counting deadtimes as in the case of neutron activated samples. We have also investigated if counting statistics are the same both suppressed and normal modes. Results are presented in four separate experiments. (author)

  7. The URban Greenhouse gas Emissions assessment through inverse modeling (URGE) project: a pilot study in the Oslo area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisso, I. J.; Lopez-Aparicio, S.; Schneider, P.; Schmidbauer, N.; Vogt, M.

    2017-12-01

    Norway has set the target of cutting greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by at least 40% compared to 1990 levels by 2030. This goal will require the implementation of policy measures aiming at strong reductions of GHGs emissions, especially in the urban environment. The implementation of urban policy measures is still a challenging task and it requires control and verification for success. The URGE project aims at assessing the emission flux of GHGs including comprehensive uncertainty estimates based on inverse transport modelling techniques and optimized use of measurements. The final goal is to establish a coherent and consistent GHG urban emission inventory. This will be carried out in a case study in Oslo (Norway), where CO2 will be the priority compound. The overall outcome of the project will provide support in the development of strategies to effectively reduce GHG emissions in the urban environment. The overall goal will be reached through establishing the baseline urban CO2 emission inventory for Oslo; determining the optimal measurement locations based on transport modelling (with flexpart-wrf); designing and carrying out a pilot measurement campaign of the CO2-rich air downwind of the city plume combining state-of-the-art instruments (Picarro) and small sensors; assessing the feasibility of determining the background concentration surrounding the city with satellite measurements (OCO2); and providing optimised estimates of the emissions and their uncertainties via inverse modelling (source-receptor relationship). One of our main interests is the interoperability and exchange of information with similar activities in other urban areas. We will present the overall project and the preliminary results of the network design. We will discuss the data exchange formats, the algorithms and data structures that could be used for results and methodology intercomparisons as well as the suitability to apply the same techniques to other atmospheric compounds.

  8. Advanced Source Deconvolution Methods for Compton Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoglauer, Andreas

    The next generation of space telescopes utilizing Compton scattering for astrophysical observations is destined to one day unravel the mysteries behind Galactic nucleosynthesis, to determine the origin of the positron annihilation excess near the Galactic center, and to uncover the hidden emission mechanisms behind gamma-ray bursts. Besides astrophysics, Compton telescopes are establishing themselves in heliophysics, planetary sciences, medical imaging, accelerator physics, and environmental monitoring. Since the COMPTEL days, great advances in the achievable energy and position resolution were possible, creating an extremely vast, but also extremely sparsely sampled data space. Unfortunately, the optimum way to analyze the data from the next generation of Compton telescopes has not yet been found, which can retrieve all source parameters (location, spectrum, polarization, flux) and achieves the best possible resolution and sensitivity at the same time. This is especially important for all sciences objectives looking at the inner Galaxy: the large amount of expected sources, the high background (internal and Galactic diffuse emission), and the limited angular resolution, make it the most taxing case for data analysis. In general, two key challenges exist: First, what are the best data space representations to answer the specific science questions? Second, what is the best way to deconvolve the data to fully retrieve the source parameters? For modern Compton telescopes, the existing data space representations can either correctly reconstruct the absolute flux (binned mode) or achieve the best possible resolution (list-mode), both together were not possible up to now. Here we propose to develop a two-stage hybrid reconstruction method which combines the best aspects of both. Using a proof-of-concept implementation we can for the first time show that it is possible to alternate during each deconvolution step between a binned-mode approach to get the flux right and a

  9. Weak Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ales Psaker; Wolodymyr Melnitchouk; Anatoly Radyushkin

    2007-03-01

    We extend the analysis of the deeply virtual Compton scattering process to the weak interaction sector in the generalized Bjorken limit. The virtual Compton scattering amplitudes for the weak neutral and charged currents are calculated at the leading twist within the framework of the nonlocal light-cone expansion via coordinate space QCD string operators. Using a simple model, we estimate cross sections for neutrino scattering off the nucleon, relevant for future high intensity neutrino beam facilities.

  10. Statistical atmospheric inversion of local gas emissions by coupling the tracer release technique and local-scale transport modelling: a test case with controlled methane emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ars, Sébastien; Broquet, Grégoire; Yver Kwok, Camille; Roustan, Yelva; Wu, Lin; Arzoumanian, Emmanuel; Bousquet, Philippe

    2017-12-01

    This study presents a new concept for estimating the pollutant emission rates of a site and its main facilities using a series of atmospheric measurements across the pollutant plumes. This concept combines the tracer release method, local-scale atmospheric transport modelling and a statistical atmospheric inversion approach. The conversion between the controlled emission and the measured atmospheric concentrations of the released tracer across the plume places valuable constraints on the atmospheric transport. This is used to optimise the configuration of the transport model parameters and the model uncertainty statistics in the inversion system. The emission rates of all sources are then inverted to optimise the match between the concentrations simulated with the transport model and the pollutants' measured atmospheric concentrations, accounting for the transport model uncertainty. In principle, by using atmospheric transport modelling, this concept does not strongly rely on the good colocation between the tracer and pollutant sources and can be used to monitor multiple sources within a single site, unlike the classical tracer release technique. The statistical inversion framework and the use of the tracer data for the configuration of the transport and inversion modelling systems should ensure that the transport modelling errors are correctly handled in the source estimation. The potential of this new concept is evaluated with a relatively simple practical implementation based on a Gaussian plume model and a series of inversions of controlled methane point sources using acetylene as a tracer gas. The experimental conditions are chosen so that they are suitable for the use of a Gaussian plume model to simulate the atmospheric transport. In these experiments, different configurations of methane and acetylene point source locations are tested to assess the efficiency of the method in comparison to the classic tracer release technique in coping with the distances

  11. Statistical atmospheric inversion of local gas emissions by coupling the tracer release technique and local-scale transport modelling: a test case with controlled methane emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ars

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a new concept for estimating the pollutant emission rates of a site and its main facilities using a series of atmospheric measurements across the pollutant plumes. This concept combines the tracer release method, local-scale atmospheric transport modelling and a statistical atmospheric inversion approach. The conversion between the controlled emission and the measured atmospheric concentrations of the released tracer across the plume places valuable constraints on the atmospheric transport. This is used to optimise the configuration of the transport model parameters and the model uncertainty statistics in the inversion system. The emission rates of all sources are then inverted to optimise the match between the concentrations simulated with the transport model and the pollutants' measured atmospheric concentrations, accounting for the transport model uncertainty. In principle, by using atmospheric transport modelling, this concept does not strongly rely on the good colocation between the tracer and pollutant sources and can be used to monitor multiple sources within a single site, unlike the classical tracer release technique. The statistical inversion framework and the use of the tracer data for the configuration of the transport and inversion modelling systems should ensure that the transport modelling errors are correctly handled in the source estimation. The potential of this new concept is evaluated with a relatively simple practical implementation based on a Gaussian plume model and a series of inversions of controlled methane point sources using acetylene as a tracer gas. The experimental conditions are chosen so that they are suitable for the use of a Gaussian plume model to simulate the atmospheric transport. In these experiments, different configurations of methane and acetylene point source locations are tested to assess the efficiency of the method in comparison to the classic tracer release technique in coping

  12. multi-scale data assimilation approaches and error characterisation applied to the inverse modelling of atmospheric constituent emission fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koohkan, Mohammad Reza

    2012-01-01

    Data assimilation in geophysical sciences aims at optimally estimating the state of the system or some parameters of the system's physical model. To do so, data assimilation needs three types of information: observations and background information, a physical/numerical model, and some statistical description that prescribes uncertainties to each component of the system. In my dissertation, new methodologies of data assimilation are used in atmospheric chemistry and physics: the joint use of a 4D-Var with a sub-grid statistical model to consistently account for representativeness errors, accounting for multiple scale in the BLUE estimation principle, and a better estimation of prior errors using objective estimation of hyper-parameters. These three approaches will be specifically applied to inverse modelling problems focusing on the emission fields of tracers or pollutants. First, in order to estimate the emission inventories of carbon monoxide over France, in-situ stations which are impacted by the representativeness errors are used. A sub-grid model is introduced and coupled with a 4D-Var to reduce the representativeness error. Indeed, the results of inverse modelling showed that the 4D-Var routine was not fit to handle the representativeness issues. The coupled data assimilation system led to a much better representation of the CO concentration variability, with a significant improvement of statistical indicators, and more consistent estimation of the CO emission inventory. Second, the evaluation of the potential of the IMS (International Monitoring System) radionuclide network is performed for the inversion of an accidental source. In order to assess the performance of the global network, a multi-scale adaptive grid is optimised using a criterion based on degrees of freedom for the signal (DFS). The results show that several specific regions remain poorly observed by the IMS network. Finally, the inversion of the surface fluxes of Volatile Organic Compounds

  13. Developing a Method for Resolving NOx Emission Inventory Biases Using Discrete Kalman Filter Inversion, Direct Sensitivities, and Satellite-Based Columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    An inverse method was developed to integrate satellite observations of atmospheric pollutant column concentrations and direct sensitivities predicted by a regional air quality model in order to discern biases in the emissions of the pollutant precursors.

  14. Lasing without population inversion : towards X-ray continuous wave laser emission

    OpenAIRE

    Mompart Penina, Jordi

    2000-01-01

    This paper is devoted to lasing without population inversion in three and multi-level atomic configurations in interaction with a driving laser. First we discuss the interest and the current state-of-the-art of this phenomenon. Then, the basic physics of lasing without inversion is described in more detail and analyzed in terms of quantum interference between the dressed-states built up by the driving field. In addition, the quantum-jump formalism is used to introduce generalized Einstein B c...

  15. Observation of Nonlinear Compton Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotseroglou, T.

    2003-12-19

    This experiment tests Quantum Electrodynamics in the strong field regime. Nonlinear Compton scattering has been observed during the interaction of a 46.6 GeV electron beam with a 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} laser beam. The strength of the field achieved was measured by the parameter {eta} = e{var_epsilon}{sub rms}/{omega}mc = 0.6. Data were collected with infrared and green laser photons and circularly polarized laser light. The timing stabilization achieved between the picosecond laser and electron pulses has {sigma}{sub rms} = 2 ps. A strong signal of electrons that absorbed up to 4 infrared photons (or up to 3 green photons) at the same point in space and time, while emitting a single gamma ray, was observed. The energy spectra of the scattered electrons and the nonlinear dependence of the electron yield on the field strength agreed with the simulation over 3 orders of magnitude. The detector could not resolve the nonlinear Compton scattering from the multiple single Compton scattering which produced rates of scattered electrons of the same order of magnitude. Nevertheless, a simulation has studied this difference and concluded that the scattered electron rates observed could not be accounted for only by multiple ordinary Compton scattering; nonlinear Compton scattering processes are dominant for n {ge} 3.

  16. Inverse modelling of European N2O emissions: assimilating observations from different networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corazza, M.; Bergamaschi, P.; Vermeulen, A.T.; Krol, M.C.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the setup and first results of an inverse modelling system for atmospheric N2O, based on a four-dimensional variational (4DVAR) technique and the atmospheric transport zoom model TM5. We focus in this study on the European domain, utilizing a comprehensive set of quasi-continuous

  17. Quantification of the emissions of the ozone preceding by inverse modelization. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granier, C.; Petron, G.; Ciais, Ph.; Bousquet, Ph.

    2007-01-01

    In the framework of this work, inverse methods have been developed and applied for two types of applications: climatological observations to optimize the monthly average of the observed compounds; the distribution of the carbon monoxide. The report presents the experimental methodologies, the used simulation and the results. (A.L.B.)

  18. A robust method for inverse transport modeling of atmospheric emissions using blind outlier detection

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez-Camara, Marta; Bejar Haro, B.; Stohl, Andreas; Vetterli, M.

    2014-01-01

    Emissions of harmful substances into the atmosphere are a serious environmental concern. In order to understand and predict their effects, it is necessary to estimate the exact quantity and timing of the emissions, from sensor measurements taken at different locations. There exists a number of methods for solving this problem. However, these existing methods assume Gaussian additive errors, making them extremely sensitive to outlier measurements. We first show that the err...

  19. Applying an Inverse Model to Estimate Ammonia Emissions at Cattle Feedlots Using Three Different Observation-Based Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shonkwiler, K. B.; Ham, J. M.; Nash, C.

    2014-12-01

    Accurately quantifying emissions of ammonia (NH3) from confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs) is vital not only to the livestock industry, but essential to understanding nitrogen cycling along the Front Range of Colorado, USA, where intensive agriculture, urban sprawl, and pristine ecosystems (e.g., Rocky Mtn Nat'l Park) lie within 100-km of each other. Most observation-based techniques for estimating NH3 emissions can be expensive and highly technical. Many methods rely on concentration observations on location, which implicitly depends on weather conditions. A system for sampling NH3 using on-site weather data was developed to allow remote measurement of NH3 in a simple, cost-effective way. These systems use passive diffusive cartridges (Radiello, Sigma-Aldrich) that provide time-averaged concentrations representative of a typical two-week deployment. Cartridge exposure is robotically managed so they are only visible when winds are 1.4 m/s or greater from the direction of the CAFO. These concentration data can be coupled with stability parameters (measured on-site) in a simple inverse model to estimate emissions (FIDES, UMR Environnement et Grandes Cultures). Few studies have directly compared emissions estimates of NH3 using concentration data obtained from multiple measurement systems at different temporal and spatial scales. Therefore, in the summer and autumn of 2014, several conditional sampler systems were deployed at a 25,000-head cattle feedlot concomitant with an open-path infrared laser (GasFinder2, Boreal Laser Inc.) and a Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer (CRDS) (G1103, Picarro Inc.) which each measured instantaneous NH3 concentrations. This study will test the sampler technology by first comparing concentration data from the three different methods. In livestock research, it is common to estimate NH3 emissions by using such instantaneous data in a backward Lagrangian stochastic (bLs) model (WindTrax, Thunder Beach Sci.) Considering this, NH3 fluxes

  20. Ammonia emissions from a grazed field estimated by miniDOAS measurements and inverse dispersion modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Michael; Flechard, Chris; Fauvel, Yannick; Häni, Christoph; Sintermann, Jörg; Jocher, Markus; Menzi, Harald; Hensen, Arjan; Neftel, Albrecht

    2017-05-01

    Ammonia (NH3) fluxes were estimated from a field being grazed by dairy cattle during spring by applying a backward Lagrangian stochastic model (bLS) model combined with horizontal concentration gradients measured across the field. Continuous concentration measurements at field boundaries were made by open-path miniDOAS (differential optical absorption spectroscopy) instruments while the cattle were present and for 6 subsequent days. The deposition of emitted NH3 to clean patches on the field was also simulated, allowing both net and gross emission estimates, where the dry deposition velocity (vd) was predicted by a canopy resistance (Rc) model developed from local NH3 flux and meteorological measurements. Estimated emissions peaked during grazing and decreased after the cattle had left the field, while control on emissions was observed from covariance with temperature, wind speed and humidity and wetness measurements made on the field, revealing a diurnal emission profile. Large concentration differences were observed between downwind receptors, due to spatially heterogeneous emission patterns. This was likely caused by uneven cattle distribution and a low grazing density, where hotspots of emissions would arise as the cattle grouped in certain areas, such as around the water trough. The spatial complexity was accounted for by separating the model source area into sub-sections and optimising individual source area coefficients to measured concentrations. The background concentration was the greatest source of uncertainty, and based on a sensitivity/uncertainty analysis the overall uncertainty associated with derived emission factors from this study is at least 30-40 %.Emission factors can be expressed as 6 ± 2 g NH3 cow-1 day-1, or 9 ± 3 % of excreted urine-N emitted as NH3, when deposition is not simulated and 7 ± 2 g NH3 cow-1 day-1, or 10 ± 3 % of excreted urine-N emitted as NH3, when deposition is included in the gross emission model. The results suggest

  1. Can the cosmic x ray and gamma ray background be due to reflection of a steep power law spectrum and Compton scattering by relativistic electrons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zycki, Piotr T.; Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Svensson, Roland

    1991-01-01

    We reconsider the recent model for the origin in the cosmic X-ray and gamma-ray background by Rogers and Field. The background in the model is due to an unresolved population of AGNs. An individual AGN spectrum contains three components: a power law with the energy index of alpha = 1.1, an enhanced reflection component, and a component from Compton scattering by relativistic electrons with a low energy cutoff at some minimum Lorentz factor, gamma(sub min) much greater than 1. The MeV bump seen in the gamma-ray background is then explained by inverse Compton emission by the electrons. We show that the model does not reproduce the shape of the observed X-ray and gamma-ray background below 10 MeV and that it overproduces the background at larger energies. Furthermore, we find the assumptions made for the Compton component to be physically inconsistent. Relaxing the inconsistent assumptions leads to model spectra even more different from that of the observed cosmic background. Thus, we can reject the hypothesis that the high-energy cosmic background is due to the described model.

  2. Crick, Prof. Francis Harry Compton

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1985 Honorary. Crick, Prof. Francis Harry Compton O.M., FRS, Nobel Laureate (Medicine) - 1962. Date of birth: 8 June 1916. Date of death: 29 July 2004. Last known address: The Salk Institute for Biological, Studies, P.O. Box 85800, San Diego, CA 92186-5800, U.S.A.. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  3. Optimal Estimation of Sulfuryl Fluoride Emissions on Regional and Global Scales Using Advanced 3D Inverse Modeling and AGAGE Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gressent, A.; Muhle, J.; Rigby, M. L.; Lunt, M. F.; Ganesan, A.; Prinn, R. G.; Krummel, P. B.; Fraser, P. J.; Steele, P.; Weiss, R. F.; Harth, C. M.; O'Doherty, S.; Young, D.; Park, S.; Li, S.; Yao, B.; Reimann, S.; Vollmer, M. K.; Maione, M.; Arduini, I.; Lunder, C. R.

    2016-12-01

    Sulfuryl fluoride (SO2F2) is used increasingly as a fumigant to replace methyl bromide (CH3Br), which was regulated under the Montreal Protocol (1986). Mühle et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2009) showed that SO2F2 had been accumulating in the global atmosphere with a growth rate of 5±1% per year from 1978 to 2007. They also determined, using the 2D AGAGE box model, that SO2F2 has a total atmospheric lifetime of 36±11 years mainly driven by the oceanic uptake. In addition, the global warming potential of SO2F2 has been estimated to be ≈4780 for a 100-year time horizon (Papadimitriou et al., J. Phys. Chem., 2008), which is similar to the CFC-11 (CCl3F) GWP. Thus it is a potent greenhouse gas and its emissions are expected to continue to increase in the future. Here we report the first estimations of the SO2F2 emissions and its ocean sink from January 2006 to the end of 2015 on both the global scale using a 3D Eulerian chemical transport model (MOZART-4) solving a Main Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) inversion, and on the regional scale using a 3D Lagrangian dispersion model (NAME) via the reversible-jump trans-dimensional MCMC approach (Lunt et al., Geosci. Model Dev., 2016). The mole fractions calculated on the global scale are used as boundary conditions for emission calculations over the NAME regions in North America, Europe, East Asia and Australia. For this 10-year inversion we use observations from the AGAGE (Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment) starting with six stations in 2006, which are La Jolla (California), Mace Head (Ireland), Cape Grim (Australia), Ragged Point (Barbados), Trinidad Head (California) and Cape Matatula (Samoa). We then add observations from Gosan (South Korea) in 2007, Jungfraujoch (Switzerland) in 2008, Shandiangzi (China) and Ny-Alesund (Norway) in 2010, and Monte Cimone (Italy) in 2011, reducing the uncertainty associated with the regions located close to these stations. Results are compared to (i) the total global SO2F2 emissions

  4. BLAZAR FLARES FROM COMPTON DRAGGED SHELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golan, Omri; Levinson, Amir, E-mail: Levinson@wise.tau.ac.il [School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2015-08-10

    We compute the dynamics and emission of dissipative shells that are subject to a strong Compton drag, under simplifying assumptions about the dissipation mechanism. We show that under conditions prevailing in blazars, substantial deceleration is anticipated on sub-parsec and parsec scales in cases of rapid dissipation. Such episodes may be the origin of some of the flaring activity occasionally observed in gamma-ray blazars. The shape of the light curves thereby produced reflects the geometry of the emitting surface if the deceleration is very rapid, or the dynamics of the shell if the deceleration is delayed, or initially more gradual, owing, e.g., to continuous injection of energy and momentum.

  5. Coupling of Ag Nanoparticle with Inverse Opal Photonic Crystals as a Novel Strategy for Upconversion Emission Enhancement of NaYF4: Yb(3+), Er(3+) Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Bo; Yang, Zhengwen; Wang, Yida; Li, Jun; Yang, Jianzhi; Qiu, Jianbei; Song, Zhiguo

    2015-11-18

    Rare-earth-ion-doped upconversion (UC) nanoparticles have generated considerable interest because of their potential application in solar cells, biological labeling, therapeutics, and imaging. However, the applications of UC nanoparticles were still limited because of their low emission efficiency. Photonic crystals and noble metal nanoparticles are applied extensively to enhance the UC emission of rare earth ions. In the present work, a novel substrate consisting of inverse opal photonic crystals and Ag nanoparticles was prepared by the template-assisted method, which was used to enhance the UC emission of NaYF4: Yb(3+), Er(3+) nanoparticles. The red or green UC emissions of NaYF4: Yb(3+), Er(3+) nanoparticles were selectively enhanced on the inverse opal substrates because of the Bragg reflection of the photonic band gap. Additionally, the UC emission enhancement of NaYF4: Yb(3+), Er(3+) nanoparticles induced by the coupling of metal nanoparticle plasmons and photonic crystal effects was realized on the Ag nanoparticles included in the inverse opal substrate. The present results demonstrated that coupling of Ag nanoparticle with inverse opal photonic crystals provides a useful strategy to enhance UC emission of rare-earth-ion-doped nanoparticles.

  6. Compton echoes from nearby Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beniamini, Paz; Giannios, Dimitrios; Younes, George; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2018-03-01

    The recent discovery of gravitational waves from GW170817, associated with a short Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) at a distance of 40Mpc, has demonstrated that short GRBs can occur locally and at a reasonable rate. Furthermore, gravitational waves enable us to detect close by GRBs, even when we are observing at latitudes far from the jet's axis. We consider here Compton echoes, the scattered light from the prompt and afterglow emission. Compton echoes, an as yet undetected counterpart of GRBs, peak in X-rays and maintain a roughly constant flux for hundreds to thousands of years after the burst. Though too faint to be detected in typical cosmological GRBs, a fraction of close by bursts with a sufficiently large energy output in X-rays, and for which the surrounding medium is sufficiently dense, may indeed be observed in this way. The detection of a Compton echo could provide unique insight into the burst properties and the environment's density structure. In particular, it could potentially determine whether or not there was a successful jet that broke through the compact binary merger ejecta. We discuss here the properties and expectations from Compton echoes and suggest methods for detectability.

  7. Comparing Mass Balance and Adjoint-Based 4D-VAR Methods for Inverse Modeling of Nitrogen Dioxide Columns for Nitrogen Oxide Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, M.; Martin, R.; Henze, D. K.

    2016-12-01

    Nitrogen oxide (NOx ≡ NO + NO2) emission inventories can be improved through top-down constraints provided by inverse modeling of observed nitrogen dioxide (NO2) columns. Here we compare two methods of inverse modeling for emissions of NOx from synthetic NO2 columns generated from known emissions using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model and its adjoint. We treat the adjoint-based 4D-VAR approach for estimating top-down emissions as a benchmark against which to evaluate variations on the mass balance method. We find that the standard mass balance algorithm can be improved by using an iterative process and using finite difference to calculate the local sensitivity of a change in NO2 columns to a change in emissions, resulting in a factor of two reduction in inversion error. In a simplified case study to recover local emission perturbations, horizontal smearing effects due to NOx transport were better resolved by the adjoint-based approach than by mass balance. For more complex emission changes that reflect real world scenarios, the iterative finite difference mass balance and adjoint methods produce similar top-down inventories when inverting hourly synthetic observations, both reducing the a priori error by factors of 3-4. Inversions of data sets that simulate satellite observations from low Earth and geostationary orbits also indicate that both the mass balance and adjoint inversions produce similar results, reducing a priori error by a factor of 3. As the iterative finite difference mass balance method provides similar accuracy as the adjoint-based 4D-VAR method, it offers the ability to efficiently estimate top-down emissions using models that do not have an adjoint.

  8. Maximum Likelihood Compton Polarimetry with the Compton Spectrometer and Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, A. W.; Boggs, S. E.; Chiu, C. L.; Kierans, C. A.; Sleator, C.; Tomsick, J. A.; Zoglauer, A. C.; Chang, H.-K.; Tseng, C.-H.; Yang, C.-Y.; Jean, P.; von Ballmoos, P.; Lin, C.-H.; Amman, M.

    2017-10-01

    Astrophysical polarization measurements in the soft gamma-ray band are becoming more feasible as detectors with high position and energy resolution are deployed. Previous work has shown that the minimum detectable polarization (MDP) of an ideal Compton polarimeter can be improved by ˜21% when an unbinned, maximum likelihood method (MLM) is used instead of the standard approach of fitting a sinusoid to a histogram of azimuthal scattering angles. Here we outline a procedure for implementing this maximum likelihood approach for real, nonideal polarimeters. As an example, we use the recent observation of GRB 160530A with the Compton Spectrometer and Imager. We find that the MDP for this observation is reduced by 20% when the MLM is used instead of the standard method.

  9. Solid waves and acoustic emission first phase: Problems direct and inverse and equations elasto dynamics fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez Antola, R.

    2002-07-01

    The present work is the first of a series of three memoirs briefs, destinadas to revise the classic theoretical foundations that allow to understand the generation,la diffusion and the detection of the elastic waves in those been accustomed to from the point of view of the mechanics of the means continuos. The study is faced in the mark of the non destructive rehearsals, emphasizing aspects related with the rehearsals based on the acoustic emission of the material defects

  10. Nitrous oxide emissions from cropland: a procedure for calibrating the DayCent biogeochemical model using inverse modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafique, Rashad; Fienen, Michael N.; Parkin, Timothy B.; Anex, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    DayCent is a biogeochemical model of intermediate complexity widely used to simulate greenhouse gases (GHG), soil organic carbon and nutrients in crop, grassland, forest and savannah ecosystems. Although this model has been applied to a wide range of ecosystems, it is still typically parameterized through a traditional “trial and error” approach and has not been calibrated using statistical inverse modelling (i.e. algorithmic parameter estimation). The aim of this study is to establish and demonstrate a procedure for calibration of DayCent to improve estimation of GHG emissions. We coupled DayCent with the parameter estimation (PEST) software for inverse modelling. The PEST software can be used for calibration through regularized inversion as well as model sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. The DayCent model was analysed and calibrated using N2O flux data collected over 2 years at the Iowa State University Agronomy and Agricultural Engineering Research Farms, Boone, IA. Crop year 2003 data were used for model calibration and 2004 data were used for validation. The optimization of DayCent model parameters using PEST significantly reduced model residuals relative to the default DayCent parameter values. Parameter estimation improved the model performance by reducing the sum of weighted squared residual difference between measured and modelled outputs by up to 67 %. For the calibration period, simulation with the default model parameter values underestimated mean daily N2O flux by 98 %. After parameter estimation, the model underestimated the mean daily fluxes by 35 %. During the validation period, the calibrated model reduced sum of weighted squared residuals by 20 % relative to the default simulation. Sensitivity analysis performed provides important insights into the model structure providing guidance for model improvement.

  11. Study of the effective inverse photon efficiency using optical emission spectroscopy combined with cavity ring-down spectroscopy approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xingwei; Li, Cong; Wang, Yong; Wang, Zhiwei; Feng, Chunlei; Ding, Hongbin

    2015-09-01

    The hydrocarbon impurities formation is inevitable due to wall erosion in a long pulse high performance scenario with carbon-based plasma facing materials in fusion devices. The standard procedure to determine the chemical erosion yield in situ is by means of inverse photon efficiency D/XB. In this work, the conversion factor between CH4 flux and photon flux of CH A → X transition (effective inverse photon efficiency PE-1) was measured directly using a cascaded arc plasma simulator with argon/methane. This study shows that the measured PE-1 is different from the calculated D/XB. We compared the photon flux measured by optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and calculated by electron impact excitation of CH(X) which was diagnosed by cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS). It seems that charge exchange and dissociative recombination processes are the main channels of CH(A) production and removal which lead to the inconsistency of PE -1 and D/XB at lower temperature. Meanwhile, the fraction of excited CH(A) produced by dissociative recombination processes was investigated, and we found it increased with Te in the range from 4% to 13% at Te definition instead of D/XB since the electron impact excitation is not the only channel of CH(A) production. These results have an effect on evaluating the yield of chemical erosion in divertor of fusion device.

  12. Improving estimates of N2O emissions for western and central Europe using a Bayesian inversion approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, R. L.; Gerbig, C.; Roedenbeck, C.; Heimann, M.

    2009-04-01

    The nitrous oxide (N2O) mixing ratio has been increasing in the atmosphere since the industrial revolution, from 270 ppb in 1750 to 320 ppb in 2007 with a steady growth rate of around 0.26% since the early 1980's. The increase in N2O is worrisome for two main reasons. First, it is a greenhouse gas; this means that its atmospheric increase translates to an enhancement in radiative forcing of 0.16 ± 0.02 Wm-2 making it currently the fourth most important long-lived greenhouse gas and is predicted to soon overtake CFC's to become the third most important. Second, it plays an important role in stratospheric ozone chemistry. Human activities are the primary cause of the atmospheric N2O increase. The largest anthropogenic source of N2O is from the use of N-fertilizers in agriculture but fossil fuel combustion and industrial processes, such as adipic and nitric acid production, are also important. We present a Bayesian inversion approach for estimating N2O fluxes over central and western Europe using high frequency in-situ concentration data from the Ochsenkopf tall tower (50 °01′N, 11 °48′, 1022 masl). For the inversion, we employ a Lagrangian-type transport model, STILT, which provides source-receptor relationships at 10 km using ECMWF meteorological data. The a priori flux estimates used were from IER, for anthropogenic, and GEIA, for natural fluxes. N2O fluxes were retrieved monthly at 2 x 2 degree spatial resolution for 2007. The retrieved N2O fluxes showed significantly more spatial heterogeneity than in the a priori field and considerable seasonal variability. The timing of peak emissions was different for different regions but in general the months with the strongest emissions were May and August. Overall, the retrieved flux (anthropogenic and natural) was lower than in the a priori field.

  13. Direct and inverse modelling for environmental risk assessment and emission control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penenko, V.; Baklanov, A.; Tsvetova, E.; Mahura, A.

    2009-04-01

    A concept of environmental modelling and its applications for Siberian regions are presented. The regions are considered both as sources and receptors of pollution as elements of the global climatic system. A methodology has been developed to build the combined methods of forward and inverse modelling for the problems of the air quality, environmental risk assessment and control. It is based on variational principles and methods of adjoint sensitivity theory. This allows obtaining the optimal numerical schemes and universal algorithm of the forward-inverse modelling. Following the concept, the functionals (describing the generalised characteristics of the processes, data, and models) are considered together with the basic model components. To combine all these elements in the frames of forward and inverse relations, we suppose that each of them may contain uncertainty. In this case, it is naturally to formulate a weak-constraint variational principle for the augmented functional which contains the model description in the form of integral identity and the cost functional including the total measure of all uncertainties. The stationary conditions for the augmented functional with respect to the variations its functional arguments define the mutually agreed structure of numerical schemes for forward and adjoint problems, and sensitivity relations. For quantitative risk assessment the following characteristics are useful: (i) values of goal functionals and their variations in a form of sensitivity relations; (ii) risk and sensitivity functions to the variations of the sources. It is convenient to take the risk function multiplied by the source function as a distributed risk measure. The variational technique provides the backward propagation of information, contained in the target functionals, to parameters and sources of the models through the sensitivity and uncertainty functions. This gives a base for realisation of the feedback algorithms and methods of control

  14. Time stamp generation with inverse FIR filters for Positron Emission Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namias, Mauro

    2009-01-01

    Photon coincidence detection is the process by which Positron Emission Tomography (PET) works. This requires the determination of the time of impact of each coincident photon at the detector system, also known as time stamp. In this work, the timestamp was generated by means of digital time-domain deconvolution with FIR filters for a INa(Tl) based system. The detector deadtime was reduced from 350 ns to 175 ns while preserving the system's energy resolution and a direct relation between the amount of light collected and the temporal resolution was found.(author)

  15. The Compton polarimeter at ELSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doll, D.

    1998-06-01

    In order to measure the degree of transverse polarization of the stored electron beam in the Electron Stretcher Accelerator ELSA a compton polarimeter is built up. The measurement is based on the polarization dependent cross section for the compton scattering of circular polarized photons off polarized electrons. Using a high power laser beam and detecting the scattered photons a measuring time of two minutes with a statistical error of 5% is expected from numerical simulations. The design and the results of a computer controlled feedback system to enhance the laser beam stability at the interaction point in ELSA are presented. The detection of the scattered photons is based on a lead converter and a silicon-microstrip detector. The design and test results of the detector module including readout electronic and computer control are discussed. (orig.)

  16. Magnetic pair and Compton sectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartholomew, G.A.; Lee-Whiting, G.E.

    1979-01-01

    Most types of magnetic gamma-ray spectrometers are much less used than they were ten or fifteen years ago largely because of the increased use of solid-state detectors. The latter permit much greater rates of data accumulation and, in many cases, better resolutions than the former. Many of the best magnetic instruments have been discarded or dismantled. Pair and Compton spectrometers are no exception of this trend. Thus much of the material to be considered reviewed by the authors must be of an historical nature. Inclusion of a brief account of magnetic pair and Compton spectrometers may be useful, not only for historical completeness, but also to suggest circumstances in which these spectrometers may still have advantages. (Auth.)

  17. Compton profile of calcium fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayakumar, R.; Rajasekaran, L.; Ramamurthy, N.; Shivaramu

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The Compton profile of polycrystalline calcium fluoride is measured using 661.6 keV γ- radiation from a 137 Cs source. The experimental data are compared with HF-LCAO model calculation computed using CRYSTAL98 program, Hartree-Fock free atom theoretical values and with the other available experimental data. Experimental results are found to be in good agreement with the HF-LCAO model calculations and in qualitative agreement with Hartree-Fock free atom theoretical values

  18. Flame Structure and Chemiluminescence Emissions of Inverse Diffusion Flames under Sinusoidally Driven Plasma Discharges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Grazia De Giorgi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Reduction of nitric oxides (NOx in aircraft engines and in gas turbines by lean combustion is of great interest in the design of novel combustion systems. However, the stabilization of the flame under lean conditions is a main issue. In this context, the present work investigates the effects of sinusoidal dielectric barrier discharge (DBD on a lean inverse diffusive methane/air flame in a Bunsen-type burner under different actuation conditions. The flame appearance was investigated with fixed methane loading (mass flux, but with varying inner airflow rate. High-speed flame imaging was done by using an intensified (charge-coupled device CCD camera equipped with different optical filters in order to selectively record signals from the chemiluminescent species OH*, CH*, or CO2* to evaluate the flame behavior in presence of plasma actuation. The electrical power consumption was less than 33 W. It was evident that the plasma flame enhancement was significantly influenced by the plasma discharges, particularly at high inner airflow rates. The flame structure changes drastically when the dissipated plasma power increases. The flame area decreases due to the enhancement of mixing and chemical reactions that lead to a more anchored flame on the quartz exit with a reduction of the flame length.

  19. Evaluating Anthropogenic Carbon Emissions in the Urban Salt Lake Valley through Inverse Modeling: Combining Long-term CO2 Observations and an Emission Inventory using a Multiple-box Atmospheric Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catharine, D.; Strong, C.; Lin, J. C.; Cherkaev, E.; Mitchell, L.; Stephens, B. B.; Ehleringer, J. R.

    2016-12-01

    The rising level of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), driven by anthropogenic emissions, is the leading cause of enhanced radiative forcing. Increasing societal interest in reducing anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions call for a computationally efficient method of evaluating anthropogenic CO2 source emissions, particularly if future mitigation actions are to be developed. A multiple-box atmospheric transport model was constructed in conjunction with a pre-existing fossil fuel CO2 emission inventory to estimate near-surface CO2 mole fractions and the associated anthropogenic CO2 emissions in the Salt Lake Valley (SLV) of northern Utah, a metropolitan area with a population of 1 million. A 15-year multi-site dataset of observed CO2 mole fractions is used in conjunction with the multiple-box model to develop an efficient method to constrain anthropogenic emissions through inverse modeling. Preliminary results of the multiple-box model CO2 inversion indicate that the pre-existing anthropogenic emission inventory may over-estimate CO2 emissions in the SLV. In addition, inversion results displaying a complex spatial and temporal distribution of urban emissions, including the effects of residential development and vehicular traffic will be discussed.

  20. Compton Sources of Electromagnetic Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geoffrey Krafft,Gerd Priebe

    2011-01-01

    When a relativistic electron beam interacts with a high-field laser beam, intense and highly collimated electromagnetic radiation will be generated through Compton scattering. Through relativistic upshifting and the relativistic Doppler effect, highly energetic polarized photons are radiated along the electron beam motion when the electrons interact with the laser light. For example, X-ray radiation can be obtained when optical lasers are scattered from electrons of tens-of-MeV beam energy. Because of the desirable properties of the radiation produced, many groups around the world have been designing, building, and utilizing Compton sources for a wide variety of purposes. In this review article, we discuss the generation and properties of the scattered radiation, the types of Compton source devices that have been constructed to date, and the prospects of radiation sources of this general type. Due to the possibilities of producing hard electromagnetic radiation in a device that is small compared to the alternative storage ring sources, it is foreseen that large numbers of such sources may be constructed in the future.

  1. TA [2] Continuous, regional methane emissions estimates in northern Pennsylvania gas fields using atmospheric inversions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauvaux, Thomas [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2017-12-31

    Natural Gas (NG) production activities in the northeastern Marcellus shale have significantly increased in the last decade, possibly releasing large amounts of methane (CH4) into the atmosphere from the operations at the productions sites and during the processing and transmission steps of the natural gas chain. Based on an intensive aircraft survey, leakage rates from the NG production were quantified in May 2015 and found to be in the order of 0.5% of the total production, higher than reported by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) but below the usually observed leakage rates over the shale gases in the US. Thanks to the high production rates on average at each well, leakage rates normalized by production appeared to be low in the northeastern Marcellus shale. This result confirms that natural gas production using unconventional techniques in this region is emitting relatively less CH4 into the atmosphere than other shale reservoirs. The low emissions rate can be explained in part by the high productivity of wells drilled across the northeastern Marcellus region. We demonstrated here that atmospheric monitoring techniques can provide an independent quantification of NG leakage rates using aircraft measurements. The CH4 analyzers were successfully calibrated at four sites across the region, measuring continuously the atmospheric CH4 mixing ratios and isotopic 13Ch4. Our preliminary findings confirm the low leakage rates from tower data collected over September 2015 to November 2016 compared to the aircraft mass-balance estimates in may 2015. However, several episodes revealing large releases of natural gas over several weeks showed that temporal variations in the emissions of CH4 may increase the actual leakage rate over longer time periods.

  2. Development of TOF-PET using Compton scattering by plastic scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuramoto, M.; Nakamori, T.; Kimura, S.; Gunji, S.; Takakura, M.; Kataoka, J.

    2017-01-01

    We propose a time-of-flight (TOF) technique using plastic scintillators which have fast decay time of a few ns for positron emission tomography (PET). While the photoelectric absorption probability of the plastic for 511 keV gamma rays are extremely low due to its small density and effective atomic number, the cross section of Compton scattering is comparable to that of absorption by conventional inorganic scintillators. We thus propose TOF-PET using Compton scattering with plastic scintillators (Compton-PET), and performed fundamental experiments towards exploration of the Compton-PET capability. We demonstrated that the plastic scintillators achieved the better time resolution in comparison to LYSO(Ce) and GAGG(Ce) scintillators. In addition we evaluated the depth-of-interaction resolving capability with the plastic scintillators.

  3. Development of TOF-PET using Compton scattering by plastic scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuramoto, M., E-mail: kuramoto@maxwell.kj.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Yamagata University, Kojirakawa 1-4-12, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Nakamori, T., E-mail: nakamori@maxwell.kj.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Yamagata University, Kojirakawa 1-4-12, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Kimura, S.; Gunji, S.; Takakura, M. [Yamagata University, Kojirakawa 1-4-12, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Kataoka, J. [Waseda University, Okubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2017-02-11

    We propose a time-of-flight (TOF) technique using plastic scintillators which have fast decay time of a few ns for positron emission tomography (PET). While the photoelectric absorption probability of the plastic for 511 keV gamma rays are extremely low due to its small density and effective atomic number, the cross section of Compton scattering is comparable to that of absorption by conventional inorganic scintillators. We thus propose TOF-PET using Compton scattering with plastic scintillators (Compton-PET), and performed fundamental experiments towards exploration of the Compton-PET capability. We demonstrated that the plastic scintillators achieved the better time resolution in comparison to LYSO(Ce) and GAGG(Ce) scintillators. In addition we evaluated the depth-of-interaction resolving capability with the plastic scintillators.

  4. Development of TOF-PET using Compton scattering by plastic scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuramoto, M.; Nakamori, T.; Kimura, S.; Gunji, S.; Takakura, M.; Kataoka, J.

    2017-02-01

    We propose a time-of-flight (TOF) technique using plastic scintillators which have fast decay time of a few ns for positron emission tomography (PET). While the photoelectric absorption probability of the plastic for 511 keV gamma rays are extremely low due to its small density and effective atomic number, the cross section of Compton scattering is comparable to that of absorption by conventional inorganic scintillators. We thus propose TOF-PET using Compton scattering with plastic scintillators (Compton-PET), and performed fundamental experiments towards exploration of the Compton-PET capability. We demonstrated that the plastic scintillators achieved the better time resolution in comparison to LYSO(Ce) and GAGG(Ce) scintillators. In addition we evaluated the depth-of-interaction resolving capability with the plastic scintillators.

  5. Using LaX scintillator in a new low-background Compton telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, James M.; Bloser, Peter F.; Macri, John R.; McConnell, Mark L.

    2007-09-01

    The ability of Compton telescopes to perform imaging and spectroscopy in space depends directly on the speed and energy resolution of the calorimeter detectors in the telescope. The calorimeter detectors flown on space-borne or balloon-borne Compton telescopes have included NaI(Tl), CsI(Na), HPGe and liquid organic scintillator. By employing LaX scintillators for the calorimeter, one can take advantage of the unique speed and resolving power of the material to improve the instrument sensitivity and simultaneously enhance its spectroscopic performance and thus its imaging performance. We present a concept for a space-borne Compton telescope that employs LaX as a calorimeter and estimate the improvement in sensitivity over past realizations of Compton telescopes. With some preliminary laboratory measurements, we estimate that in key energy bands, typically corrupted with neutron-induced internal nuclear emissions, this design enjoys a twenty-fold improvement in background rejection.

  6. Time-dependent inversion estimates of global biomass-burning CO emissions using Measurement of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT) measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arellano, A.F.; Kasibhatla, P.S.; Giglio, L.; van der Werf, G.R.; Randerson, J.T; Collatz, G.J.

    2006-01-01

    We present an inverse-modeling analysis of CO emissions using column CO retrievals from the Measurement of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT) instrument and a global chemical transport model (GEOS-CHEM). We first focus on the information content of MOPITT CO column retrievals in terms of

  7. Resonant Compton cooling and annihilation line production in gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preece, R. D.; Harding, A. K.

    1992-01-01

    Attention is given to a synchrotron self-Compton emission model for gamma-ray bursts which produces narrow annihilation features for a variety of field strengths, primary electron injection energies, and injection rates. In this model, primary electrons are injected and cooled by synchrotron emission in a strong, homogeneous magnetic field, resulting in a pair cascade. Multiple resonant scattering with cyclotron photons efficiently traps and cools pairs in the ground state to an average energy where the Compton energy loss rate is zero, which is in agreement with previous estimates of a Compton temperature. The particle distributions in the ground state are determined by numerically solving the Fokker-Planck equation in the steady state. In the case of isotropic injection of primary electrons, a significant narrow-line feature appears in the overall emission. In the case of beamed injection, the annihilation line is broadened to the extent that it would not be observable.

  8. Evaluation of the inverse dispersion modelling method for estimating ammonia multi-source emissions using low-cost long time averaging sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loubet, Benjamin; Carozzi, Marco

    2015-04-01

    Tropospheric ammonia (NH3) is a key player in atmospheric chemistry and its deposition is a threat for the environment (ecosystem eutrophication, soil acidification and reduction in species biodiversity). Most of the NH3 global emissions derive from agriculture, mainly from livestock manure (storage and field application) but also from nitrogen-based fertilisers. Inverse dispersion modelling has been widely used to infer emission sources from a homogeneous source of known geometry. When the emission derives from different sources inside of the measured footprint, the emission should be treated as multi-source problem. This work aims at estimating whether multi-source inverse dispersion modelling can be used to infer NH3 emissions from different agronomic treatment, composed of small fields (typically squares of 25 m side) located near to each other, using low-cost NH3 measurements (diffusion samplers). To do that, a numerical experiment was designed with a combination of 3 x 3 square field sources (625 m2), and a set of sensors placed at the centre of each field at several heights as well as at 200 m away from the sources in each cardinal directions. The concentration at each sensor location was simulated with a forward Lagrangian Stochastic (WindTrax) and a Gaussian-like (FIDES) dispersion model. The concentrations were averaged over various integration times (3 hours to 28 days), to mimic the diffusion sampler behaviour with several sampling strategy. The sources were then inferred by inverse modelling using the averaged concentration and the same models in backward mode. The sources patterns were evaluated using a soil-vegetation-atmosphere model (SurfAtm-NH3) that incorporates the response of the NH3 emissions to surface temperature. A combination emission patterns (constant, linear decreasing, exponential decreasing and Gaussian type) and strengths were used to evaluate the uncertainty of the inversion method. Each numerical experiment covered a period of 28

  9. Multiplatform inversion of the 2013 Rim Fire smoke emissions using regional-scale modeling: important nocturnal fire activity, air quality, and climate impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saide, P. E.; Peterson, D. A.; da Silva, A. M., Jr.; Ziemba, L. D.; Anderson, B.; Diskin, G. S.; Sachse, G. W.; Hair, J. W.; Butler, C. F.; Fenn, M. A.; Jimenez, J. L.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Dibb, J. E.; Yokelson, R. J.; Toon, B.; Carmichael, G. R.

    2014-12-01

    Large wildfire events are increasingly recognized for their adverse effects on air quality and visibility, thus providing motivation for improving smoke emission estimates. The Rim Fire, one of the largest events in California's history, produced a large smoke plume that was sampled by the Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS) DC-8 aircraft with a full suite of in-situ and remote sensing measurements on 26-27 August 2013. We developed an inversion methodology which uses the WRF-Chem modeling system to constrain hourly fire emissions, using as initial estimates the NASA Quick Fire Emissions Dataset (QFED). This method differs from the commonly performed top-down estimates that constrain daily (or longer time scale) emissions. The inversion method is able to simultaneously improve the model fit to various SEAC4RS airborne measurements (e.g., organic aerosol, carbon monoxide (CO), aerosol extinction), ground based measurements (e.g., AERONET aerosol optical depth (AOD), CO), and satellite data (MODIS AOD) by modifying fire emissions and utilizing the information content of all these measurements. Preliminary results show that constrained emissions for a 6 day period following the largest fire growth are a factor 2-4 higher than the initial top-down estimates. Moreover, there is a tendency to increase nocturnal emissions by factors sometimes larger than 20, indicating that vigorous fire activity continued during the night. This deviation from a typical diurnal cycle is confirmed using geostationary satellite data. The constrained emissions also have a larger day-to-day variability than the initial emissions and correlate better to daily area burned estimates as observed by airborne infrared measurements (NIROPS). Experiments with the assimilation system show that performing the inversion using only satellite AOD data produces much smaller correction factors than when using all available data

  10. Narrowband Compton Scattering Yield Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rykovanov, Sergey; Seipt, Daniel; Kharin, Vasily

    2017-10-01

    Compton Scattering (CS) of laser light off high-energy electrons is a well-established source of X- and gamma-rays for applications in medicine, biology, nuclear and material sciences. Main advantage of CS photon sources is the possibility to generate narrow spectra as opposed to a broad continuum obtained when utilizing Bremsstrahlung. However, due to the low cross-section of the linear process, the total photon yield is quite low. The most straightforward way to increase the number of photon-electron beam scattering events is to increase the laser pulse intensity at the interaction point by harder focusing. This leads to an unfortunate consequence. Increase in the laser pulse normalized amplitude a0, leads to additional ponderomotive spectrum broadening of the scattered radiation. The ponderomotive broadening is caused by the v × B force, which slows the electron down near the peak of the laser pulse where the intensity is high, and can be neglected near the wings of the pulse, where the intensity is low. We show that laser pulse chirping, both nonlinear (laser pulse frequency ''following'' the envelope of the pulse) and linear, leads to compensation of the ponderomotive broadening and considerably enhances the yield of the nonlinear Compton sources. Work supported by the Helmholtz Association via Helmholtz Young Investigators Grant (VH-NG-1037).

  11. All-sky Compton imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Ballmoos, Peter; Boggs, Steven E.; Jean, Pierre; Zoglauer, Andreas

    2014-07-01

    The All-Sky Compton Imager (ASCI) is a mission concept for MeV Gamma-Ray astronomy. It consists of a compact array of cross-strip germanium detectors, shielded only by a plastic anticoicidence, and weighting less than 100 kg. Situated on a deployable structure at a distance of 10 m from the spacecraft orbiting at L2 or in a HEO, the ASCI not only avoids albedo- and spacecraft-induced background, but it benefits from a continuous all-sky exposure. The modest effective area is more than compensated by the 4 π field-of-view. Despite its small size, ASCI's γ-ray line sensitivity after its nominal lifetime of 3 years is ~ 10-6 ph cm-2 s-1 at 1 MeV for every γ-ray source in the sky. With its high spectral and 3-D spatial resolution, the ASCI will perform sensitive γray spectroscopy and polarimetry in the energy band 100 keV-10 MeV. The All-Sky Compton Imager is particularly well suited to the task of measuring the Cosmic Gamma-Ray Background - and simultaneously covering the wide range of science topics in gamma-ray astronomy.

  12. Constraint on Parameters of Inverse Compton Scattering Model for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ,28o,35o. 3. Results. Figure 1 presents the best fit regions at 68% confidence level for γ0 and ξ, which depend on α. The main results are summarized as follows: • γ0 and ξ are larger than ∼6000 and ∼90, respectively. The allowed ranges ...

  13. Inverse Compton Gamma Rays from Dark Matter Annihilation in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Electron spectrum as a function of electron energy for three different values of Mχ annihilating into b¯b final state. the annihilation cross sections are obtained from Ackermann et al. (2014). The DM annihilation takes place predominantly through some combination of the final states b¯b, tt, W. +. W. − or ZZ. The gamma ray ...

  14. High-Energy Emission at Shocks in Millisecond Pulsar Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kust Harding, Alice; Wadiasingh, Zorawar; Venter, Christo; Boettcher, Markus

    2016-04-01

    A large number of new Black Widow (BW) and Redback (RB) energetic millisecond pulsars have been discovered through radio searches of unidentified Fermi sources, increasing the known number of these systems from 4 to 28. We model the high-energy emission components from particles accelerated to several TeV in intrabinary shocks in BW and RB systems, and their predicted modulation at the binary orbital period. Synchrotron emission is expected at X-ray energies and such modulated emission has already been detected by Chandra and XMM. Inverse Compton emission from accelerated particles scattering the UV emission from the radiated companion star is expected in the Fermi and TeV bands. Detections or constraints on this emission will probe the unknown physics of pulsar winds.

  15. Fire emissions constrained by the synergistic use of formaldehyde and glyoxal SCIAMACHY columns in a two-compound inverse modelling framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrakou, T.; Muller, J.; de Smedt, I.; van Roozendael, M.; Vrekoussis, M.; Wittrock, F.; Richter, A.; Burrows, J.

    2008-12-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) and glyoxal (CHOCHO) are carbonyls formed in the oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by plants, anthropogenic activities, and biomass burning. They are also directly emitted by fires. Although this primary production represents only a small part of the global source for both species, yet it can be locally important during intense fire events. Simultaneous observations of formaldehyde and glyoxal retrieved from the SCIAMACHY satellite instrument in 2005 and provided by the BIRA/IASB and the Bremen group, respectively, are compared with the corresponding columns simulated with the IMAGESv2 global CTM. The chemical mechanism has been optimized with respect to HCHO and CHOCHO production from pyrogenically emitted NMVOCs, based on the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM) and on an explicit profile for biomass burning emissions. Gas-to-particle conversion of glyoxal in clouds and in aqueous aerosols is considered in the model. In this study we provide top-down estimates for fire emissions of HCHO and CHOCHO precursors by performing a two- compound inversion of emissions using the adjoint of the IMAGES model. The pyrogenic fluxes are optimized at the model resolution. The two-compound inversion offers the advantage that the information gained from measurements of one species constrains the sources of both compounds, due to the existence of common precursors. In a first inversion, only the burnt biomass amounts are optimized. In subsequent simulations, the emission factors for key individual NMVOC compounds are also varied.

  16. Constraining surface emissions of air pollutants using inverse modelling: method intercomparison and a new two-step two-scale regularization approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saide, Pablo (CGRER, Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research, Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)), e-mail: pablo-saide@uiowa.edu; Bocquet, Marc (Universite Paris-Est, CEREA Joint Laboratory Ecole des Ponts ParisTech and EDF RandD, Champs-sur-Marne (France); INRIA, Paris Rocquencourt Research Center (France)); Osses, Axel (Departamento de Ingeniera Matematica, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Centro de Modelamiento Matematico, UMI 2807/Universidad de Chile-CNRS, Santiago (Chile)); Gallardo, Laura (Centro de Modelamiento Matematico, UMI 2807/Universidad de Chile-CNRS, Santiago (Chile); Departamento de Geofisica, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile))

    2011-07-15

    When constraining surface emissions of air pollutants using inverse modelling one often encounters spurious corrections to the inventory at places where emissions and observations are colocated, referred to here as the colocalization problem. Several approaches have been used to deal with this problem: coarsening the spatial resolution of emissions; adding spatial correlations to the covariance matrices; adding constraints on the spatial derivatives into the functional being minimized; and multiplying the emission error covariance matrix by weighting factors. Intercomparison of methods for a carbon monoxide inversion over a city shows that even though all methods diminish the colocalization problem and produce similar general patterns, detailed information can greatly change according to the method used ranging from smooth, isotropic and short range modifications to not so smooth, non-isotropic and long range modifications. Poisson (non-Gaussian) and Gaussian assumptions both show these patterns, but for the Poisson case the emissions are naturally restricted to be positive and changes are given by means of multiplicative correction factors, producing results closer to the true nature of emission errors. Finally, we propose and test a new two-step, two-scale, fully Bayesian approach that deals with the colocalization problem and can be implemented for any prior density distribution

  17. Describing Compton scattering and two-quanta positron annihilation based on Compton profiles: Two models suited for the Monte Carlo method

    CERN Document Server

    Bohlen, TT; Patera, V; Sala, P R

    2012-01-01

    An accurate description of the basic physics processes of Compton scattering and positron annihilation in matter requires the consideration of atomic shell structure effects and, in specific, the momentum distributions of the atomic electrons. Two algorithms which model Compton scattering and two-quanta positron annihilation at rest accounting for shell structure effects are proposed. Two-quanta positron annihilation is a physics process which is of particular importance for applications such as positron emission tomography (PET). Both models use a detailed description of the processes which incorporate consistently Doppler broadening and binding effects. This together with the relatively low level of complexity of the models makes them particularly suited to be employed by fast sampling methods for Monte Carlo particle transport. Momentum distributions of shell electrons are obtained from parametrized one-electron Compton profiles. For conduction electrons, momentum distributions are derived in the framework...

  18. Comparison of four inverse modelling systems applied to the estimation of HFC-125, HFC-134a, and SF6 emissions over Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Dominik; Arnold, Tim; Henne, Stephan; Manning, Alistair; Thompson, Rona L.; Maione, Michela; O'Doherty, Simon; Reimann, Stefan

    2017-09-01

    Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) are used in a range of industrial applications and have largely replaced previously used gases (CFCs and HCFCs). HFCs are not ozone-depleting but have large global warming potentials and are, therefore, reported to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Here, we use four independent inverse models to estimate European emissions of the two HFCs contributing the most to global warming (HFC-134a and HFC-125) and of SF6 for the year 2011. Using an ensemble of inverse models offers the possibility to better understand systematic uncertainties in inversions. All systems relied on the same measurement time series from Jungfraujoch (Switzerland), Mace Head (Ireland), and Monte Cimone (Italy) and the same a priori estimates of the emissions, but differed in terms of the Lagrangian transport model (FLEXPART, NAME), inversion method (Bayesian, extended Kalman filter), treatment of baseline mole fractions, spatial gridding, and a priori uncertainties. The model systems were compared with respect to the ability to reproduce the measurement time series, the spatial distribution of the posterior emissions, uncertainty reductions, and total emissions estimated for selected countries. All systems were able to reproduce the measurement time series very well, with prior correlations between 0.5 and 0.9 and posterior correlations being higher by 0.05 to 0.1. For HFC-125, all models estimated higher emissions from Spain + Portugal than reported to UNFCCC (median higher by 390 %) though with a large scatter between individual estimates. Estimates for Germany (+140 %) and Ireland (+850 %) were also considerably higher than UNFCCC, whereas the estimates for France and the UK were consistent with the national reports. In contrast to HFC-125, HFC-134a emissions from Spain + Portugal were broadly consistent with UNFCCC, and emissions from Germany were only 30 % higher. The data suggest that the UK over-reports its HFC-134a emissions to

  19. Comparison of four inverse modelling systems applied to the estimation of HFC-125, HFC-134a, and SF6 emissions over Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Brunner

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs are used in a range of industrial applications and have largely replaced previously used gases (CFCs and HCFCs. HFCs are not ozone-depleting but have large global warming potentials and are, therefore, reported to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC. Here, we use four independent inverse models to estimate European emissions of the two HFCs contributing the most to global warming (HFC-134a and HFC-125 and of SF6 for the year 2011. Using an ensemble of inverse models offers the possibility to better understand systematic uncertainties in inversions. All systems relied on the same measurement time series from Jungfraujoch (Switzerland, Mace Head (Ireland, and Monte Cimone (Italy and the same a priori estimates of the emissions, but differed in terms of the Lagrangian transport model (FLEXPART, NAME, inversion method (Bayesian, extended Kalman filter, treatment of baseline mole fractions, spatial gridding, and a priori uncertainties. The model systems were compared with respect to the ability to reproduce the measurement time series, the spatial distribution of the posterior emissions, uncertainty reductions, and total emissions estimated for selected countries. All systems were able to reproduce the measurement time series very well, with prior correlations between 0.5 and 0.9 and posterior correlations being higher by 0.05 to 0.1. For HFC-125, all models estimated higher emissions from Spain + Portugal than reported to UNFCCC (median higher by 390 % though with a large scatter between individual estimates. Estimates for Germany (+140 % and Ireland (+850 % were also considerably higher than UNFCCC, whereas the estimates for France and the UK were consistent with the national reports. In contrast to HFC-125, HFC-134a emissions from Spain + Portugal were broadly consistent with UNFCCC, and emissions from Germany were only 30 % higher. The data suggest that the UK over

  20. Compton camera study for high efficiency SPECT and benchmark with Anger system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, M; Dauvergne, D; Létang, J M; Ley, J-L; Testa, É

    2017-11-09

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is at present one of the major techniques for non-invasive diagnostics in nuclear medicine. The clinical routine is mostly based on collimated cameras, originally proposed by Hal Anger. Due to the presence of mechanical collimation, detection efficiency and energy acceptance are limited and fixed by the system's geometrical features. In order to overcome these limitations, the application of Compton cameras for SPECT has been investigated for several years. In this study we compare a commercial SPECT-Anger device, the General Electric HealthCare Infinia system with a High Energy General Purpose (HEGP) collimator, and the Compton camera prototype under development by the French collaboration CLaRyS, through Monte Carlo simulations (GATE-GEANT4 Application for Tomographic Emission-version 7.1 and GEANT4 version 9.6, respectively). Given the possible introduction of new radio-emitters at higher energies intrinsically allowed by the Compton camera detection principle, the two detectors are exposed to point-like sources at increasing primary gamma energies, from actual isotopes already suggested for nuclear medicine applications. The Compton camera prototype is first characterized for SPECT application by studying the main parameters affecting its imaging performance: detector energy resolution and random coincidence rate. The two detector performances are then compared in terms of radial event distribution, detection efficiency and final image, obtained by gamma transmission analysis for the Anger system, and with an iterative List Mode-Maximum Likelihood Expectation Maximization (LM-MLEM) algorithm for the Compton reconstruction. The results show for the Compton camera a detection efficiency increased by a factor larger than an order of magnitude with respect to the Anger camera, associated with an enhanced spatial resolution for energies beyond 500 keV. We discuss the advantages of Compton camera application for

  1. Photoneutron production with the Laser-Compton backscattered photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyokawa, Hiroyuki; Ohgaki, Hideaki; Sugiyama, Suguru; Mikado, Tomohisa; Yamada, Kawakatsu; Suzuki, Ryoichi; Ohdaira, Toshiyuki; Sei, Norihiro; Chiwaki, Mitsukuni [Electrotechnical Laboratory, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1999-03-01

    A method to produce quasi-monoenergetic photoneutrons for detector calibration was examined. The photoneutrons were produced with a photo-induced neutron emission of a {sup 9}Be using the Laser-Compton backscattered photons. Because the photon energy is continuously tunable, neutrons with various energies are obtained. Yield of the neutrons was measured with a liquid scintillation detector at the photon energies from 1651 keV to 3019 keV. Neutron yield at around the threshold energy for the {sup 9}Be ({gamma}, n) reaction was measured by changing the photon energy in a 10 keV step. (author)

  2. Computer control in a compton scattering spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Ningzhuo; Chen Tao; Gong Zhufang; Yang Baozhong; Mo Haiding; Hua Wei; Bian Zuhe

    1995-01-01

    The authors introduced the hardware and software of computer autocontrol of calibration and data acquisition in a Compton Scattering spectrometer which consists of a HPGe detector, Amplifiers and a MCA

  3. Testing special relativity theory using Compton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contreras S, H.; Hernandez A, L.; Baltazar R, A.; Escareno J, E.; Mares E, C. A.; Hernandez V, C.; Vega C, H. R.

    2010-10-01

    The validity of the special relativity theory has been tested using the Compton scattering. Since 1905 several experiments has been carried out to show that time, mass, and length change with the velocity, in this work the Compton scattering has been utilized as a simple way to show the validity to relativity. The work was carried out through Monte Carlo calculations and experiments with different gamma-ray sources and a gamma-ray spectrometer with a 3 x 3 NaI (Tl) detector. The pulse-height spectra were collected and the Compton edge was observed. This information was utilized to determine the relationship between the electron's mass and energy using the Compton -knee- position, the obtained results were contrasted with two collision models between photon and electron, one model was built using the classical physics and another using the special relativity theory. It was found that calculations and experiments results fit to collision model made using the special relativity. (Author)

  4. Colour coherence in deep inelastic Compton scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebedev, A.I.; Vazdik, J.A. (Lebedev Physical Inst., Academy of Sciences, Moscow (USSR))

    1992-01-01

    MC simulation of Deep Inelastic Compton on proton - both QED and QCD - was performed on the basis of LUCIFER program for HERA energies. Charged hadron flow was calculated for string and independent fragmentation with different cuts on p{sub t} and x. It is shown that interjet colour coherence leads in the case of QCD Compton to the drag effects diminishing the hadron flow in the direction between quark jet and proton remnant jet. (orig.).

  5. Colour coherence in deep inelastic Compton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedev, A.I.; Vazdik, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    MC simulation of Deep Inelastic Compton on proton - both QED and QCD - was performed on the basis of LUCIFER program for HERA energies. Charged hadron flow was calculated for string and independent fragmentation with different cuts on p t and x. It is shown that interjet colour coherence leads in the case of QCD Compton to the drag effects diminishing the hadron flow in the direction between quark jet and proton remnant jet. (orig.)

  6. Compton camera study for high efficiency SPECT and benchmark with Anger system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, M.; Dauvergne, D.; Létang, J. M.; Ley, J.-L.; Testa, É.

    2017-12-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is at present one of the major techniques for non-invasive diagnostics in nuclear medicine. The clinical routine is mostly based on collimated cameras, originally proposed by Hal Anger. Due to the presence of mechanical collimation, detection efficiency and energy acceptance are limited and fixed by the system’s geometrical features. In order to overcome these limitations, the application of Compton cameras for SPECT has been investigated for several years. In this study we compare a commercial SPECT-Anger device, the General Electric HealthCare Infinia system with a High Energy General Purpose (HEGP) collimator, and the Compton camera prototype under development by the French collaboration CLaRyS, through Monte Carlo simulations (GATE—GEANT4 Application for Tomographic Emission—version 7.1 and GEANT4 version 9.6, respectively). Given the possible introduction of new radio-emitters at higher energies intrinsically allowed by the Compton camera detection principle, the two detectors are exposed to point-like sources at increasing primary gamma energies, from actual isotopes already suggested for nuclear medicine applications. The Compton camera prototype is first characterized for SPECT application by studying the main parameters affecting its imaging performance: detector energy resolution and random coincidence rate. The two detector performances are then compared in terms of radial event distribution, detection efficiency and final image, obtained by gamma transmission analysis for the Anger system, and with an iterative List Mode-Maximum Likelihood Expectation Maximization (LM-MLEM) algorithm for the Compton reconstruction. The results show for the Compton camera a detection efficiency increased by a factor larger than an order of magnitude with respect to the Anger camera, associated with an enhanced spatial resolution for energies beyond 500 keV. We discuss the advantages of Compton camera application

  7. Image reconstruction from limited angle Compton camera data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomitani, T.; Hirasawa, M.

    2002-01-01

    The Compton camera is used for imaging the distributions of γ ray direction in a γ ray telescope for astrophysics and for imaging radioisotope distributions in nuclear medicine without the need for collimators. The integration of γ rays on a cone is measured with the camera, so that some sort of inversion method is needed. Parra found an analytical inversion algorithm based on spherical harmonics expansion of projection data. His algorithm is applicable to the full set of projection data. In this paper, six possible reconstruction algorithms that allow image reconstruction from projections with a finite range of scattering angles are investigated. Four algorithms have instability problems and two others are practical. However, the variance of the reconstructed image diverges in these two cases, so that window functions are introduced with which the variance becomes finite at a cost of spatial resolution. These two algorithms are compared in terms of variance. The algorithm based on the inversion of the summed back-projection is superior to the algorithm based on the inversion of the summed projection. (author)

  8. Image reconstruction from limited angle Compton camera data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomitani, T.; Hirasawa, M.

    2002-06-01

    The Compton camera is used for imaging the distributions of γ ray direction in a γ ray telescope for astrophysics and for imaging radioisotope distributions in nuclear medicine without the need for collimators. The integration of γ rays on a cone is measured with the camera, so that some sort of inversion method is needed. Parra found an analytical inversion algorithm based on spherical harmonics expansion of projection data. His algorithm is applicable to the full set of projection data. In this paper, six possible reconstruction algorithms that allow image reconstruction from projections with a finite range of scattering angles are investigated. Four algorithms have instability problems and two others are practical. However, the variance of the reconstructed image diverges in these two cases, so that window functions are introduced with which the variance becomes finite at a cost of spatial resolution. These two algorithms are compared in terms of variance. The algorithm based on the inversion of the summed back-projection is superior to the algorithm based on the inversion of the summed projection.

  9. A Three-Dimensional Analysis of the Galactic Gamma-Ray Emission Resulting from Cosmic-Ray Interaction with the Interstellar Gas and Radiation Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodraski, Thomas J.; Dwek, Eli

    1998-01-01

    This final report outlines the progress of the contractor's support for the analysis of data under ADP (NRA 96-ADP-08; Proposal No. 167-96 adp). The primary task object was to construct a 3-D model for the distribution of high-energy (20 MeV-30 GeV) gamma-ray emission in the Galactic disk. Under this task the contractor was to utilize data from the EGRET instrument on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory, HI and CO surveys, radio-continuum surveys at 408 MHz, 1420 MHz, 5 GHz, and 19 GHz, the COBE Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) all-sky maps from I to 240 um, and ground-based B,V, J, H and K photometry. The respective contributions to the high-latitude gamma-ray emission from cosmic ray-matter interactions, inverse Compton scattering, and extra-galactic emission were to be determined.

  10. A 3-Dimensional Analysis of the Galactic Gamma-Ray Emission Resulting from Cosmic-Ray Interactions with the Interstellar Gas and Radiation Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodroski, Thomas J.; Dwek, Eli (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The contractor will provide support for the analysis of data under ADP (NRA 96-ADP- 09; Proposal No . 167-96adp). The primary task objective is to construct a 3-D model for the distribution of high-energy (20 MeV - 30 GeV) gamma-ray emission in the Galactic disk. Under this task the contractor will utilize data from the EGRET instrument on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory, H I and CO surveys, radio-continuum surveys at 408 MHz, 1420 MHz, 5 GHz, and 19 GHz, the COBE Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIME) all-sky maps from 1 to 240 p, and ground-based B, V, J, H, and K photometry. The respective contributions to the gamma-ray emission from cosmic ray/matter interactions, inverse Compton scattering, and extragalactic emission will be determined.

  11. A Three-Dimensional Analysis of the Galactic Gamma-Ray Emission Resulting from Cosmic-Ray Interactions with the Interstellar Gas and Radiation Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodroski, Thomas J.; Dwek, Eli

    2000-01-01

    The primary task objective is to construct a 3-D model for the distribution of high-energy (20 MeV - 30 GeV) gamma-ray emission in the Galactic disk. Under this task the contractor will utilize data from the EGRET instrument on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory, H I and CO surveys, radio-continuum surveys at 408 MHz, 1420 MHz, 5 GHz, and 19 GHz, the COBE Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) all-sky maps from 1 to 240 microns, and ground-based B, V, J, H, and K photometry. The respective contributions to the gamma-ray emission from cosmic ray/matter interactions, inverse Compton scattering, and extragalactic emission will be determined.

  12. A method for evaluating spatially-resolved NOx emissions using Kalman filter inversion, direct sensitivities, and space-based NO2 observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. V. Martin

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available An inverse modeling method was developed and tested for identifying possible biases in emission inventories using satellite observations. The relationships between emission inputs and modeled ambient concentrations were estimated using sensitivities calculated with the decoupled direct method in three dimensions (DDM-3D implemented within the framework of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ regional model. As a case study to test the approach, the method was applied to regional ground-level NOx emissions in the southeastern United States as constrained by observations of NO2 column densities derived from the Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY satellite instrument. A controlled "pseudodata" scenario with a known solution was used to establish that the methodology can achieve the correct solution, and the approach was then applied to a summer 2004 period where the satellite data are available. The results indicate that emissions biases differ in urban and rural areas of the southeast. The method suggested slight downward (less than 10% adjustment to urban emissions, while rural region results were found to be highly sensitive to NOx processes in the upper troposphere. As such, the bias in the rural areas is likely not solely due to biases in the ground-level emissions. It was found that CMAQ was unable to predict the significant level of NO2 in the upper troposphere that was observed during the NASA Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment (INTEX measurement campaign. The best correlation between satellite observations and modeled NO2 column densities, as well as comparison to ground-level observations of NO2, was obtained by performing the inverse while accounting for the significant presence of NO2 in the upper troposphere not captured by the regional model.

  13. Inverse modeling of pan-Arctic methane emissions at high spatial resolution: what can we learn from assimilating satellite retrievals and using different process-based wetland and lake biogeochemical models?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Tan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Understanding methane emissions from the Arctic, a fast-warming carbon reservoir, is important for projecting future changes in the global methane cycle. Here we optimized methane emissions from north of 60° N (pan-Arctic regions using a nested-grid high-resolution inverse model that assimilates both high-precision surface measurements and column-average SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartogrphY (SCIAMACHY satellite retrievals of methane mole fraction. For the first time, methane emissions from lakes were integrated into an atmospheric transport and inversion estimate, together with prior wetland emissions estimated with six biogeochemical models. In our estimates, in 2005, global methane emissions were in the range of 496.4–511.5 Tg yr−1, and pan-Arctic methane emissions were in the range of 11.9–28.5 Tg yr−1. Methane emissions from pan-Arctic wetlands and lakes were 5.5–14.2 and 2.4–14.2 Tg yr−1, respectively. Methane emissions from Siberian wetlands and lakes are the largest and also have the largest uncertainty. Our results indicate that the uncertainty introduced by different wetland models could be much larger than the uncertainty of each inversion. We also show that assimilating satellite retrievals can reduce the uncertainty of the nested-grid inversions. The significance of lake emissions cannot be identified across the pan-Arctic by high-resolution inversions, but it is possible to identify high lake emissions from some specific regions. In contrast to global inversions, high-resolution nested-grid inversions perform better in estimating near-surface methane concentrations.

  14. Estimating North American N2O emissions and the N fertilizer yield fraction using the Carbon Tracker-Lagrange regional inversion framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevison, C. D.; Andrews, A. E.; Thoning, K. W.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Sweeney, C.; Saikawa, E.; Miller, S. M.; Benmergui, J. S.; Fischer, M. L.

    2017-12-01

    North American nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions of 1.5 ± 0.2 Tg N/yr over 2008-2013 are estimated using the Carbon Tracker-Lagrange (CT-L) regional inversion framework. The estimated N2O emissions are largely consistent with the EDGAR global inventory and with the results of global atmospheric inversions, but offer more spatial and temporal detail and improved uncertainty quantification over North America. Emissions are strongest from the Midwestern corn/soybean belt, which accounts for about one fourth of the total North American N2O source. The emissions are maximum in spring/early summer, consistent with a nitrogen fertilizer-driven source, but also show a late winter spike suggestive of freeze-thaw effects. Interannual variability in emissions across the primary months of fertilizer application is positively correlated to mean soil moisture and precipitation. The inversion results, in combination with gridded N fertilizer datasets, are used to estimate the fraction of synthetic N fertilizer that is released as N2O. The estimated N2O flux from the Midwestern corn/soybean belt and the more northerly U.S./Canadian wheat belt corresponds to 3.6-4.5% and 1.4-3.5%, respectively, of total synthetic + organic N fertilizer applied to those regions. Consideration of additional N inputs from soybean N2 fixation reduces the N2O yield from the Midwestern corn/soybean belt to 2-2.6% of total N inputs. Figure 1. Posterior N2O flux integrated over the central Midwestern Corn/Soybean belt (38° to 43°N, 102° to 80°W, in grids where 5% or more of land area was planted in corn and/or soybean). Cases 1 (red) and 2 (blue) are defined based on different covariance matrix parameters, representing alternative scenarios of tighter prior/looser model-data mismatch and looser prior/tighter model-data mismatch. Both cases use a standard prior derived from a coarser resolution global inversion. Triangles show the approximate day when soil temperature climbs above 0°C and drops below 10

  15. Tracking city CO2 emissions from space using a high-resolution inverse modelling approach: a case study for Berlin, Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pillai

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Currently, 52 % of the world's population resides in urban areas and as a consequence, approximately 70 % of fossil fuel emissions of CO2 arise from cities. This fact, in combination with large uncertainties associated with quantifying urban emissions due to lack of appropriate measurements, makes it crucial to obtain new measurements useful to identify and quantify urban emissions. This is required, for example, for the assessment of emission mitigation strategies and their effectiveness. Here, we investigate the potential of a satellite mission like Carbon Monitoring Satellite (CarbonSat which was proposed to the European Space Agency (ESA to retrieve the city emissions globally, taking into account a realistic description of the expected retrieval errors, the spatiotemporal distribution of CO2 fluxes, and atmospheric transport. To achieve this, we use (i a high-resolution modelling framework consisting of the Weather Research Forecasting model with a greenhouse gas module (WRF-GHG, which is used to simulate the atmospheric observations of column-averaged CO2 dry air mole fractions (XCO2, and (ii a Bayesian inversion method to derive anthropogenic CO2 emissions and their errors from the CarbonSat XCO2 observations. We focus our analysis on Berlin, Germany using CarbonSat's cloud-free overpasses for 1 reference year. The dense (wide swath CarbonSat simulated observations with high spatial resolution (approximately 2 km  ×  2 km permits one to map the city CO2 emission plume with a peak enhancement of typically 0.8–1.35 ppm relative to the background. By performing a Bayesian inversion, it is shown that the random error (RE of the retrieved Berlin CO2 emission for a single overpass is typically less than 8–10 Mt CO2 yr−1 (about 15–20 % of the total city emission. The range of systematic errors (SEs of the retrieved fluxes due to various sources of error (measurement, modelling, and inventories is also

  16. Using Poisson-regularized inversion of Bremsstrahlung emission to extract full electron energy distribution functions from x-ray pulse-height detector data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, C.; Jandovitz, P.; Cohen, S. A.

    2018-02-01

    We measured Electron Energy Distribution Functions (EEDFs) from below 200 eV to over 8 keV and spanning five orders-of-magnitude in intensity, produced in a low-power, RF-heated, tandem mirror discharge in the PFRC-II apparatus. The EEDF was obtained from the x-ray energy distribution function (XEDF) using a novel Poisson-regularized spectrum inversion algorithm applied to pulse-height spectra that included both Bremsstrahlung and line emissions. The XEDF was measured using a specially calibrated Amptek Silicon Drift Detector (SDD) pulse-height system with 125 eV FWHM at 5.9 keV. The algorithm is found to out-perform current leading x-ray inversion algorithms when the error due to counting statistics is high.

  17. Using Poisson-regularized inversion of Bremsstrahlung emission to extract full electron energy distribution functions from x-ray pulse-height detector data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Swanson

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We measured Electron Energy Distribution Functions (EEDFs from below 200 eV to over 8 keV and spanning five orders-of-magnitude in intensity, produced in a low-power, RF-heated, tandem mirror discharge in the PFRC-II apparatus. The EEDF was obtained from the x-ray energy distribution function (XEDF using a novel Poisson-regularized spectrum inversion algorithm applied to pulse-height spectra that included both Bremsstrahlung and line emissions. The XEDF was measured using a specially calibrated Amptek Silicon Drift Detector (SDD pulse-height system with 125 eV FWHM at 5.9 keV. The algorithm is found to out-perform current leading x-ray inversion algorithms when the error due to counting statistics is high.

  18. The propagation of a strong x-ray pulse followed by pulse slowdown and compression, amplified spontaneous emission and lasing without inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Yuping; Liu Jicai; Gel' mukhanov, Faris, E-mail: jicai@theochem.kth.s [Department of Theoretical Chemistry, School of Biotechnology, Royal Institute of Technology, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2009-10-28

    We study self-seeded stimulated resonant x-ray Raman scattering and show a 20-fold compression of the strong XFEL pulse propagating through the resonant medium of atomic argon with the frequency (244.3 eV) tuned to the 2p{sub 3/2}-4s resonance. The strong x-ray pulse inverts the medium and produces an extensive ringing tail which widens the power spectrum. Newly created seed field triggers the Stokes channel 3s-2p{sub 3/2} of amplified spontaneous emission. The population inversions are quenched for longer propagation distances where lasing without inversion enhances the Stokes component. The pump pulse also generates weaker Stokes and anti-Stokes fields caused by four-wave mixing. The group velocity is decreased up to 78% of the speed of light in vacuum. (fast track communication)

  19. The propagation of a strong x-ray pulse followed by pulse slowdown and compression, amplified spontaneous emission and lasing without inversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yuping; Liu Jicai; Gel'mukhanov, Faris

    2009-01-01

    We study self-seeded stimulated resonant x-ray Raman scattering and show a 20-fold compression of the strong XFEL pulse propagating through the resonant medium of atomic argon with the frequency (244.3 eV) tuned to the 2p 3/2 -4s resonance. The strong x-ray pulse inverts the medium and produces an extensive ringing tail which widens the power spectrum. Newly created seed field triggers the Stokes channel 3s-2p 3/2 of amplified spontaneous emission. The population inversions are quenched for longer propagation distances where lasing without inversion enhances the Stokes component. The pump pulse also generates weaker Stokes and anti-Stokes fields caused by four-wave mixing. The group velocity is decreased up to 78% of the speed of light in vacuum. (fast track communication)

  20. Global Inverse Modeling of CH4 and δ13C-CH4 Measurements to Understand Recent Trends in Methane Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, S.; Butenhoff, C. L.; Rice, A. L.; Khalil, A. K.

    2017-12-01

    Methane (CH4) is the second most important greenhouse gas with a radiative forcing of 0.97 W/m2 including both direct and indirect effects and a global warming potential of 28 over a 100-year time horizon. After a decades-long period of decline beginning in the 1980s, the methane growth rate rebounded in 2007 for reasons that are of current debate. During this same growth period atmospheric methane became less enriched in the 13CH4 isotope suggesting the recent CH4 growth was caused by an increase in 13CH4-depleted biogenic emissions. Recent papers have attributed this growth to increasing emissions from wetlands, rice agriculture, and ruminants. In this work we provide additional insight into the recent behavior of atmospheric methane and global wetland emissions by performing a three-dimensional Bayesian inversion of surface CH4 and 13CH4/12CH4 ratios using NOAA Global Monitoring Division (GMD) "event-level" CH4 measurements and the GEOS-Chem chemical-transport model (CTM) at a horizontal grid resolution of 2ox2.5o. The spatial pattern of wetland emissions was prescribed using soil moisture and temperature from GEOS-5 meteorology fields and soil carbon pools from the Lund-Potsdam-Jena global vegetation model. In order to reduce the aggregation error caused by a potentially flawed distribution and to account for isotopic measurements that indicate northern high latitude wetlands are isotopically depleted in 13CH4 relative to tropical wetlands we separated our pattern into three latitudinal bands (90-30°N, 30°N-0, 0-90°S). Our preliminary results support previous claims that the recent increase in atmospheric methane is driven by increases in biogenic CH4 emissions. We find that while wetland emissions from northern high latitudes (90-30°N) remained relatively constant during this time, southern hemisphere wetland emissions rebounded from a decade-long decline and began to rise again in 2007 and have remained elevated to the present. Emissions from rice

  1. Time-dependent inversion estimates of global biomass-burning CO emissions using Measurement of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT) measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arellano, Avelino F.; Kasibhatla, Prasad S.; Giglio, Louis; van der Werf, Guido R.; Randerson, James T.; Collatz, G. James

    2006-05-01

    We present an inverse-modeling analysis of CO emissions using column CO retrievals from the Measurement of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT) instrument and a global chemical transport model (GEOS-CHEM). We first focus on the information content of MOPITT CO column retrievals in terms of constraining CO emissions associated with biomass burning and fossil fuel/biofuel use. Our analysis shows that seasonal variation of biomass-burning CO emissions in Africa, South America, and Southeast Asia can be characterized using monthly mean MOPITT CO columns. For the fossil fuel/biofuel source category the derived monthly mean emission estimates are noisy even when the error statistics are accurately known, precluding a characterization of seasonal variations of regional CO emissions for this source category. The derived estimate of CO emissions from biomass burning in southern Africa during the June-July 2000 period is significantly higher than the prior estimate (prior, 34 Tg; posterior, 13 Tg). We also estimate that emissions are higher relative to the prior estimate in northern Africa during December 2000 to January 2001 and lower relative to the prior estimate in Central America and Oceania/Indonesia during April-May and September-October 2000, respectively. While these adjustments provide better agreement of the model with MOPITT CO column fields and with independent measurements of surface CO from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory at background sites in the Northern Hemisphere, some systematic differences between modeled and measured CO fields persist, including model overestimation of background surface CO in the Southern Hemisphere. Characterizing and accounting for underlying biases in the measurement model system are needed to improve the robustness of the top-down estimates.

  2. Electronic structure and Compton profiles of tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lal Ahuja, Babu; Rathor, Ashish; Sharma, Vinit; Sharma, Yamini; Ramniklal Jani, Ashvin; Sharma, Balkrishna

    2008-01-01

    The energy bands, density of states and Compton profiles of tungsten have been computed using band structure methods, namely the spin-polarized relativistic Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker (SPR-KKR) approach as well as the linear combination of atomic orbitals with Hartree-Fock scheme and density functional theory. The full potential linearized augmented plane wave scheme to calculate these properties and the Fermi surface topology(except the momentum densities) have also been used to analyze the theoretical data on the electron momentum densities. The directional Compton profiles have been measured using a 100 mCi 241 Am Compton spectrometer. From the comparison, the measured anisotropies are found to be in good agreement with the SPR-KKR calculations. The band structure calculations are also compared with the available data. (orig.)

  3. Nucleon structure study by virtual compton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthot, J.; Bertin, P.Y.; Breton, V.; Fonvielle, H.; Hyde-Wright, C.; Quemener, G.; Ravel, O.; Braghieri, A.; Pedroni, P.; Boeglin, W.U.; Boehm, R.; Distler, M.; Edelhoff, R.; Friedrich, J.; Geiges, R.; Jennewein, P.; Kahrau, M.; Korn, M.; Kramer, H.; Krygier, K.W.; Kunde, V.; Liesenfeld, A.; Merle, K.; Neuhausen, R.; Offermann, E.A.J.M.; Pospischil, T.; Rosner, G.; Sauer, P.; Schmieden, H.; Schardt, S.; Tamas, G.; Wagner, A.; Walcher, T.; Wolf, S.

    1995-01-01

    We propose to study nucleon structure by Virtual Compton Scattering using the reaction p(e,e'p)γ with the MAMI facility. We will detect the scattered electron and the recoil proton in coincidence in the high resolution spectrometers of the hall A1. Compton events will be separated from the other channels (principally π 0 production) by missing-mass reconstruction. We plan to investigate this reaction near threshold. Our goal is to measure new electromagnetic observables which generalize the usual magnetic and electric polarizabilities. (authors). 9 refs., 18 figs., 7 tabs

  4. Compton scattering collision module for OSIRIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Gaudio, Fabrizio; Grismayer, Thomas; Fonseca, Ricardo; Silva, Luís

    2017-10-01

    Compton scattering plays a fundamental role in a variety of different astrophysical environments, such as at the gaps of pulsars and the stagnation surface of black holes. In these scenarios, Compton scattering is coupled with self-consistent mechanisms such as pair cascades. We present the implementation of a novel module, embedded in the self-consistent framework of the PIC code OSIRIS 4.0, capable of simulating Compton scattering from first principles and that is fully integrated with the self-consistent plasma dynamics. The algorithm accounts for the stochastic nature of Compton scattering reproducing without approximations the exchange of energy between photons and unbound charged species. We present benchmarks of the code against the analytical results of Blumenthal et al. and the numerical solution of the linear Kompaneets equation and good agreement is found between the simulations and the theoretical models. This work is supported by the European Research Council Grant (ERC- 2015-AdG 695088) and the Fundao para a Céncia e Tecnologia (Bolsa de Investigao PD/BD/114323/2016).

  5. Theorems of low energy in Compton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chahine, J.

    1984-01-01

    We have obtained the low energy theorems in Compton scattering to third and fouth order in the frequency of the incident photon. Next we calculated the polarized cross section to third order and the unpolarized to fourth order in terms of partial amplitudes not covered by the low energy theorems, what will permit the experimental determination of these partial amplitudes. (Author) [pt

  6. Compton profile of polycrystalline sodium chloride and sodium fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayakumar, R.; Shivaramu; Rajasekaran, L.; Ramamurthy, N.; Ford, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    We present here the Compton profile (CP) of polycrystalline sodium chloride and sodium fluoride. Our results consists of spherical average Compton profile based on measurements and calculation of spherical average Compton profile, directional Compton profile and their anisotropic effect using self-consistent Hartree-Fock wave functions employed on the linear combination of atomic orbital (HF-LCAO) approximation. The experimental results are compared with the HF-LCAO spherical average Compton profile and with tabulated Hartree-Fock free atom results. For both compounds the experimental results are found to be in good agreement with the HF-LCAO results and in qualitative agreement with Hartree-Fock free atom values

  7. Four-dimensional variational inversion of black carbon emissions during ARCTAS-CARB with WRFDA-Chem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Guerrette

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Biomass burning emissions of atmospheric aerosols, including black carbon, are growing due to increased global drought, and comprise a large source of uncertainty in regional climate and air quality studies. We develop and apply new incremental four-dimensional variational (4D-Var capabilities in WRFDA-Chem to find optimal spatially and temporally distributed biomass burning (BB and anthropogenic black carbon (BC aerosol emissions. The constraints are provided by aircraft BC concentrations from the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites in collaboration with the California Air Resources Board (ARCTAS-CARB field campaign and surface BC concentrations from the Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE network on 22, 23, and 24 June 2008. We consider three BB inventories, including Fire INventory from NCAR (FINN v1.0 and v1.5 and Quick Fire Emissions Database (QFED v2.4r8. On 22 June, aircraft observations are able to reduce the spread between a customized QFED inventory and FINNv1.0 from a factor of 3. 5 ( × 3. 5 to only × 2. 1. On 23 and 24 June, the spread is reduced from × 3. 4 to × 1. 4. The posterior corrections to emissions are heterogeneous in time and space, and exhibit similar spatial patterns of sign for both inventories. The posterior diurnal BB patterns indicate that multiple daily emission peaks might be warranted in specific regions of California. The US EPA's 2005 National Emissions Inventory (NEI05 is used as the anthropogenic prior. On 23 and 24 June, the coastal California posterior is reduced by × 2, where highway sources dominate, while inland sources are increased near Barstow by × 5. Relative BB emission variances are reduced from the prior by up to 35 % in grid cells close to aircraft flight paths and by up to 60 % for fires near surface measurements. Anthropogenic variance reduction is as high as 40 % and is similarly

  8. Science Flight Program of the Nuclear Compton Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggs, Steven

    This is the lead proposal for this program. We are proposing a 5-year program to perform the scientific flight program of the Nuclear Compton Telescope (NCT), consisting of a series of three (3) scientific balloon flights. NCT is a balloon-borne, wide-field telescope designed to survey the gamma-ray sky (0.2-5 MeV), performing high-resolution spectroscopy, wide-field imaging, and polarization measurements. NCT has been rebuilt as a ULDB payload under the current 2-year APRA grant. (In that proposal we stated our goal was to return at this point to propose the scientific flight program.) The NCT rebuild/upgrade is on budget and schedule to achieve flight-ready status in Fall 2013. Science: NCT will map the Galactic positron annihilation emission, shedding more light on the mysterious concentration of this emission uncovered by INTEGRAL. NCT will survey Galactic nucleosynthesis and the role of supernova and other stellar populations in the creation and evolution of the elements. NCT will map 26-Al and positron annihilation with unprecedented sensitivity and uniform exposure, perform the first mapping of 60-Fe, search for young, hidden supernova remnants through 44-Ti emission, and enable a host of other nuclear astrophysics studies. NCT will also study compact objects (in our Galaxy and AGN) and GRBs, providing novel measurements of polarization as well as detailed spectra and light curves. Design: NCT is an array of germanium gamma-ray detectors configured in a compact, wide-field Compton telescope configuration. The array is shielded on the sides and bottom by an active anticoincidence shield but is open to the 25% of the sky above for imaging, spectroscopy, and polarization measurements. The instrument is mounted on a zenith-pointed gondola, sweeping out ~50% of the sky each day. This instrument builds off the Compton telescope technique pioneered by COMPTEL on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. However, by utilizing modern germanium semiconductor strip detectors

  9. Compton-dragged Gamma-Ray Bursts Associated with Supernovae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzati; Ghisellini; Celotti; Rees

    2000-01-20

    It is proposed that the gamma-ray photons that characterize the prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts are produced through the Compton-drag process, which is caused by the interaction of a relativistic fireball with a very dense soft photon bath. If gamma-ray bursts are indeed associated with supernovae, then the exploding star can provide enough soft photons for radiative drag to be effective. This model accounts for the basic properties of gamma-ray bursts, i.e., the overall energetics, the peak frequency of the spectrum, and the fast variability, with an efficiency that can exceed 50%. In this scenario, there is no need for particle acceleration in relativistic collisionless shocks. Furthermore, although the Poynting flux may be important in accelerating the outflow, no magnetic field is required in the gamma-ray production. The drag also naturally limits the relativistic expansion of the fireball to Gamma less, similar104.

  10. High-energy scaling of Compton scattering light sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. V. Hartemann

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available No monochromatic (Δω_{x}/ω_{x}10^{20}   photons/(mm^{2}×mrad^{2}×s×0.1%   bandwidth], tunable light sources currently exist above 100 keV. Important applications that would benefit from such new hard x-ray and γ-ray sources include the following: nuclear resonance fluorescence spectroscopy and isotopic imaging, time-resolved positron annihilation spectroscopy, and MeV flash radiography. In this paper, the peak brightness of Compton scattering light sources is derived for head-on collisions and found to scale quadratically with the normalized energy, γ; inversely with the electron beam duration, Δτ, and the square of its normalized emittance, ε; and linearly with the bunch charge, eN_{e}, and the number of photons in the laser pulse, N_{γ}:   B[over ^]_{x}∝γ^{2}N_{e}N_{γ}/ε^{2}Δτ. This γ^{2} scaling shows that for low normalized emittance electron beams (1 nC, 1  mm·mrad, 100  MeV, and tabletop laser systems (1–10   J, 5 ps the x-ray peak brightness can exceed 10^{23}   photons/(mm^{2}×mrad^{2}×s×0.1%   bandwidth near ℏω_{x}=1   MeV; this is confirmed by three-dimensional codes that have been benchmarked against Compton scattering experiments performed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The interaction geometry under consideration is head-on collisions, where the x-ray flash duration is shown to be equal to that of the electron bunch, and which produce the highest peak brightness for compressed electron beams. Important nonlinear effects, including spectral broadening, are also taken into account in our analysis; they show that there is an optimum laser pulse duration in this geometry, of the order of a few picoseconds, in sharp contrast with the initial approach to laser-driven Compton scattering sources where femtosecond laser systems were thought to be mandatory. The analytical expression for the peak on-axis brightness derived here is a powerful tool to

  11. Interpretation of the galactic radio-continuum and gamma-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beuermann, K.P.

    1974-01-01

    An analysis is performed of the nonthermal radio-continuum and gamma-ray emission of the galactic disc, using a spiral-arm model of the Galaxy. The results for the 408 MHz brightness temperature and the >100 MeV gamma-ray line intensity as a function of galactic longitude at bsup(II)=0 deg are presented. The observational implications, as well as the uncertainties in the calculations, are briefly discussed. An estimate of the possible range of the inverse Compton contribution to the observed gamma-ray flux is made

  12. Predictions of Gamma-ray Emission from Globular Cluster Millisecond Pulsars Above 100 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venter, C.; de Jaker, O.C.; Clapson, A.C.

    2009-01-01

    The recent Fermi detection of the globular cluster (GC) 47 Tucanae highlighted the importance of modeling collective gamma-ray emission of millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in GCs. Steady flux from such populations is also expected in the very high energy (VHE) domain covered by ground-based Cherenkov telescopes. We present pulsed curvature radiation (CR) as well as unpulsed inverse Compton (IC) calculations for an ensemble of MSPs in the GCs 47 Tucanae and Terzan 5. We demonstrate that the CR from these GCs should be easily detectable for Fermi, while constraints on the total number of MSps and the nebular B-field may be derived using the IC flux components.

  13. Propagation of a strong x-ray pulse: Pulse compression, stimulated Raman scattering, amplified spontaneous emission, lasing without inversion, and four-wave mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yuping; Wang Chuankui; Liu Jicai; Gel'mukhanov, Faris

    2010-01-01

    We study the compression of strong x-ray pulses from x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) propagating through the resonant medium of atomic argon. The simulations are based on the three-level model with the frequency of the incident x-ray pulse tuned in the 2p 3/2 -4s resonance. The pulse propagation is accompanied by the self-seeded stimulated resonant Raman scattering (SRRS). The SRRS starts from two channels of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), 4s-2p 3/2 and 3s-2p 3/2 , which form the extensive ringing pattern and widen the power spectrum. The produced seed field triggers the Stokes ASE channel 3s-2p 3/2 . The population inversion is quenched for longer propagation distances where the ASE is followed by the lasing without inversion (LWI), which amplifies the Stokes component. Both ASE and LWI reshape the input pulse: The compressed front part of the pulse (up to 100 as) is followed by the long tail of the ringing and beating between the pump and Stokes frequencies. The pump pulse also generates weaker Stokes and anti-Stokes fields caused by four-wave mixing. These four spectral bands have fine structures caused by the dynamical Stark effect. A slowdown of the XFEL pulse up to 78% of the speed of light in vacuum is found because of a large nonlinear refractive index.

  14. Stochastic Electrodynamics and the Compton effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franca, H.M.; Barranco, A.V.

    1987-12-01

    Some of the main qualitative features of the Compton effect are tried to be described within the realm of Classical Stochastic Electrodynamics (SED). It is found indications that the combined action of the incident wave (frequency ω), the radiation reaction force and the zero point fluctuating electromagnetic fields of SED, are able to given a high average recoil velocity v/c=α/(1+α) to the charged particle. The estimate of the parameter α gives α ∼ ℎω/mc 2 where 2Πℎ is the constant and mc 2 is the rest energy of the particle. It is verified that this recoil is just that necessary to explain the frequency shift, observed in the scattered radiation as due to a classical double Doppler shift. The differential cross section for the radiation scattered by the recoiling charge using classical electromagnetism also calculated. The same expression as obtained by Compton in his fundamental work of 1923 is found. (author) [pt

  15. Compton effect in terms of spintronic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziya Saglam

    Full Text Available Compton effect with spin effect is studied. Although the incoming wave has been taken into account in the current loop model the final result is the same as before. Namely, the total angular momentum in z-direction before the collision will be equal to the total angular momentum after the collision. Let us take the z-component of the spin of the incident light as, (1, 0, −1 and the spin of the electron as, (½, −½. Applying the conservation of the z-component of the total angular momentum gives access to spin-flips. We find that the probability of spin-flip is 40%. We believe that this analysis will be helpful for deepening in the spintronic event better. Keywords: Compton effect, Spin-flip, Total angular momentum

  16. Angle-averaged Compton cross sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickel, G.H.

    1983-01-01

    The scattering of a photon by an individual free electron is characterized by six quantities: ..cap alpha.. = initial photon energy in units of m/sub 0/c/sup 2/; ..cap alpha../sub s/ = scattered photon energy in units of m/sub 0/c/sup 2/; ..beta.. = initial electron velocity in units of c; phi = angle between photon direction and electron direction in the laboratory frame (LF); theta = polar angle change due to Compton scattering, measured in the electron rest frame (ERF); and tau = azimuthal angle change in the ERF. We present an analytic expression for the average of the Compton cross section over phi, theta, and tau. The lowest order approximation to this equation is reasonably accurate for photons and electrons with energies of many keV.

  17. Angle-averaged Compton cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickel, G.H.

    1983-01-01

    The scattering of a photon by an individual free electron is characterized by six quantities: α = initial photon energy in units of m 0 c 2 ; α/sub s/ = scattered photon energy in units of m 0 c 2 ; β = initial electron velocity in units of c; phi = angle between photon direction and electron direction in the laboratory frame (LF); theta = polar angle change due to Compton scattering, measured in the electron rest frame (ERF); and tau = azimuthal angle change in the ERF. We present an analytic expression for the average of the Compton cross section over phi, theta, and tau. The lowest order approximation to this equation is reasonably accurate for photons and electrons with energies of many keV

  18. Deeply virtual Compton scattering off nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voutier, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) is the golden exclusive channel for the study of the partonic structure of hadrons, within the universal framework of generalized parton distributions (GPDs). This paper presents the aim and general ideas of the DVCS experimental program off nuclei at the Jefferson Laboratory. The benefits of the study of the coherent and incoherent channels to the understanding of the EMC (European Muon Collaboration) effect are discussed, along with the case of nuclear targets to access neutron GPDs.

  19. High-Energy Compton Scattering Light Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Hartemann, Fred V; Barty, C; Crane, John; Gibson, David J; Hartouni, E P; Tremaine, Aaron M

    2005-01-01

    No monochromatic, high-brightness, tunable light sources currently exist above 100 keV. Important applications that would benefit from such new hard x-ray sources include: nuclear resonance fluorescence spectroscopy, time-resolved positron annihilation spectroscopy, and MeV flash radiography. The peak brightness of Compton scattering light sources is derived for head-on collisions and found to scale with the electron beam brightness and the drive laser pulse energy. This gamma 2

  20. Laser Compton polarimetry of proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stillman, A.

    1995-01-01

    A need exists for non-destructive polarization measurements of the polarized proton beams in the AGS and, in the future, in RHIC. One way to make such measurements is to scatter photons from the polarized beams. Until now, such measurements were impossible because of the extremely low Compton scattering cross section from protons. Modern lasers now can provide enough photons per laser pulse not only to scatter from proton beams but also, at least in RHIC, to analyze their polarization

  1. Helium Compton Form Factor Measurements at CLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voutier, Eric J.-M. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et Cosmologie

    2013-07-01

    The distribution of the parton content of nuclei, as encoded via the generalized parton distributions (GPDs), can be accessed via the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) process contributing to the cross section for leptoproduction of real photons. Similarly to the scattering of light by a material, DVCS provides information about the dynamics and the spatial structure of hadrons. The sensitivity of this process to the lepton beam polarization allows to single-out the DVCS amplitude in terms of Compton form factors that contain GPDs information. The beam spin asymmetry of the $^4$He($\\vec {\\mathrm e}$,e$' \\gamma ^4$He) process was measured in the experimental Hall B of the Jefferson Laboratory to extract the real and imaginary parts of the twist-2 Compton form factor of the $^4$He nucleus. The experimental results reported here demonstrate the relevance of this method for such a goal, and suggest the dominance of the Bethe-Heitler amplitude to the unpolarized process in the kinematic range explored by the experiment.

  2. MAMAP – a new spectrometer system for column-averaged methane and carbon dioxide observations from aircraft: retrieval algorithm and first inversions for point source emission rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Bovensmann

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available MAMAP is an airborne passive remote sensing instrument designed to measure the dry columns of methane (CH4 and carbon dioxide (CO2. The MAMAP instrument comprises two optical grating spectrometers: the first observing in the short wave infrared band (SWIR at 1590–1690 nm to measure CO2 and CH4 absorptions, and the second in the near infrared (NIR at 757–768 nm to measure O2 absorptions for reference/normalisation purposes. MAMAP can be operated in both nadir and zenith geometry during the flight. Mounted on an aeroplane, MAMAP surveys areas on regional to local scales with a ground pixel resolution of approximately 29 m × 33 m for a typical aircraft altitude of 1250 m and a velocity of 200 km h−1. The retrieval precision of the measured column relative to background is typically ≲1% (1σ. MAMAP measurements are valuable to close the gap between satellite data, having global coverage but with a rather coarse resolution, on the one hand, and highly accurate in situ measurements with sparse coverage on the other hand. In July 2007, test flights were performed over two coal-fired power plants operated by Vattenfall Europe Generation AG: Jänschwalde (27.4 Mt CO2 yr−1 and Schwarze Pumpe (11.9 Mt CO2 yr−1, about 100 km southeast of Berlin, Germany. By using two different inversion approaches, one based on an optimal estimation scheme to fit Gaussian plume models from multiple sources to the data, and another using a simple Gaussian integral method, the emission rates can be determined and compared with emissions reported by Vattenfall Europe. An extensive error analysis for the retrieval's dry column results (XCO2 and XCH4 and for the two inversion methods has been performed. Both methods – the Gaussian plume model fit and the Gaussian integral method – are capable of deriving

  3. Electronic structure of hafnium: A Compton profile study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, we report the first-ever isotropic Compton profile of hafnium measured at an intermediate resolution, with 661.65 keV γ-radiation. To compare ... 0.38 a.u. The raw data were accumulated for about 350 h resulting in an integrated. Compton intensity of 2.6 × 107 photons in the Compton profile region. To extract ...

  4. Virtual Compton scattering off protons at moderately large momentum transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroll, P.

    1996-01-01

    The amplitudes for virtual Compton scattering off protons are calculated within the framework of the diquark model in which protons are viewed as being built up by quarks and diquarks. The latter objects are treated as quasi-elementary constituents of the proton. Virtual Compton scattering, electroproduction off protons and the Bethe-Heitler contamination are photon discussed for various kinematical situations. We particularly emphasize the role of the electron asymmetry for measuring the relative phases between the virtual Compton and the Bethe-Heitler amplitudes. It is also shown that the model is able to describe very well the experimental data for real Compton scattering off protons. (orig.)

  5. Induced Compton scattering effects in radiation transport approximations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, D.R. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    In this thesis the method of characteristics is used to solve radiation transport problems with induced Compton scattering effects included. The methods used to date have only addressed problems in which either induced Compton scattering is ignored, or problems in which linear scattering is ignored. Also, problems which include both induced Compton scattering and spatial effects have not been considered previously. The introduction of induced scattering into the radiation transport equation results in a quadratic nonlinearity. Methods are developed to solve problems in which both linear and nonlinear Compton scattering are important. Solutions to scattering problems are found for a variety of initial photon energy distributions

  6. Laser Compton polarimetry at JLab and MAMI. A status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diefenbach, J.; Imai, Y.; Han Lee, J.; Maas, F.; Taylor, S.

    2007-01-01

    For modern parity violation experiments it is crucial to measure and monitor the electron beam polarization continuously. In the recent years different high-luminosity concepts, for precision Compton backscattering polarimetry, have been developed, to be used at modern CW electron beam accelerator facilities. As Compton backscattering polarimetry is free of intrinsic systematic uncertainties, it can be a superior alternative to other polarimetry techniques such as Moeller and Mott scattering. State-of-the-art high-luminosity Compton backscattering designs currently in use and under development at JLab and Mainz are compared to each other. The latest results from the Mainz A4 Compton polarimeter are presented. (orig.)

  7. A Germanium Detector with Optimized Compton Veto for High Sensitivity at Low Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, S

    2011-11-30

    We have built a prototype germanium detector with a Compton veto that is optimized for high sensitivity in the low-energy range around {approx}100 keV. It is specifically designed to address the problem to directly detect plutonium gamma emissions in spent nuclear fuel by non-destructive assay. This is not possible with current detectors due to the large low-energy background of Compton-scattered high-energy radiation from the fission products, whose gamma flux is at least 6 to 7 orders of magnitude higher than the Pu signal. Our instrument is designed to assess the feasibility to selectively suppress the background in the low-energy region around {approx}100 keV with the strongest Pu X-ray and gamma emissions lines. It employs a thin Ge detector with a large Compton veto directly behind it to suppress the background from forward-scattered radiation by anti-coincidence vetoing. This report summarizes the design considerations and the performance of the instrument.

  8. Theoretical Compton profile anisotropies in molecules and solids. VI. Compton profile anisotropies and chemical binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matcha, R.L.; Pettitt, B.M.

    1979-03-15

    An interesting empirical relationship between zero point Compton profile anisotropies ..delta..J (0) and nuclear charges is noted. It is shown that, for alkali halide molecules AB, to a good approximation ..delta..J (0) =N ln(Z/sub b//Z/sub a/).

  9. Optimization of Compton Source Performance through Electron Beam Shaping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malyzhenkov, Alexander [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Yampolsky, Nikolai [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-26

    We investigate a novel scheme for significantly increasing the brightness of x-ray light sources based on inverse Compton scattering (ICS) - scattering laser pulses off relativistic electron beams. The brightness of ICS sources is limited by the electron beam quality since electrons traveling at different angles, and/or having different energies, produce photons with different energies. Therefore, the spectral brightness of the source is defined by the 6d electron phase space shape and size, as well as laser beam parameters. The peak brightness of the ICS source can be maximized then if the electron phase space is transformed in a way so that all electrons scatter off the x-ray photons of same frequency in the same direction, arriving to the observer at the same time. We describe the x-ray photon beam quality through the Wigner function (6d photon phase space distribution) and derive it for the ICS source when the electron and laser rms matrices are arbitrary.

  10. Cork quality estimation by using Compton tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Brunetti, A; Golosio, B; Luciano, P; Ruggero, A

    2002-01-01

    The quality control of cork stoppers is mandatory in order to guarantee the perfect conservation of the wine. Several techniques have been developed but until now the quality control was essentially related to the status of the external surface. Thus possible cracks or holes inside the stopper will be hidden. In this paper a new technique based on X-ray Compton tomography is described. It is a non-destructive technique that allows one to reconstruct and visualize the cross-section of the cork stopper analyzed, and so to put in evidence the presence of internal imperfections. Some results are reported and compared with visual classification.

  11. The development of a Compton lung densitometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loo, B.W.; Goulding, F.S.; Madden, N.W.; Simon, D.S.

    1988-11-01

    A field instrument is being developed for the non-invasive determination of absolute lung density using unique Compton backscattering techniques. A system consisting of a monoenergetic gamma-ray beam and a shielded high resolution high-purity-germanium (HPGe) detector in a close-coupled geometry is designed to minimize errors due to multiple scattering and uncontrollable attenuation in the chestwall. Results of studies on system performance with phantoms, the optimization of detectors, and the fabrication of a practical gamma-ray source are presented. 3 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Beam dynamics in Compton ring gamma sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene Bulyak

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Electron storage rings of GeV energy with laser pulse stacking cavities are promising intense sources of polarized hard photons which, via pair production, can be used to generate polarized positron beams. In this paper, the dynamics of electron bunches circulating in a storage ring and interacting with high-power laser pulses is studied both analytically and by simulation. Both the common features and the differences in the behavior of bunches interacting with an extremely high power laser pulse and with a moderate pulse are discussed. Also considerations on particular lattice designs for Compton gamma rings are presented.

  13. Cork quality estimation by using Compton tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti, Antonio; Cesareo, Roberto; Golosio, Bruno; Luciano, Pietro; Ruggero, Alessandro

    2002-11-01

    The quality control of cork stoppers is mandatory in order to guarantee the perfect conservation of the wine. Several techniques have been developed but until now the quality control was essentially related to the status of the external surface. Thus possible cracks or holes inside the stopper will be hidden. In this paper a new technique based on X-ray Compton tomography is described. It is a non-destructive technique that allows one to reconstruct and visualize the cross-section of the cork stopper analyzed, and so to put in evidence the presence of internal imperfections. Some results are reported and compared with visual classification.

  14. Study of Compton scattering influence in cardiac SPECT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munhoz, A.C.L.; Abe, R.; Zanardo, E.L.; Robilotta, C.C.

    1992-01-01

    The reduction effect from Compton fraction in the quality of and image is evaluated, with two ways of acquisition data: one, with the window of energetic analyser dislocated over the photopeak and the other, with two windows, one over the Compton contribution and the other, placed in the center over the photopeak. (C.G.C.)

  15. Simulation of Laser-Compton Cooling of Electron Beams

    OpenAIRE

    Ohgaki, T.

    2000-01-01

    We study a method of laser-Compton cooling of electron beams. Using a Monte Carlo code, we evaluate the effects of the laser-electron interaction for transverse cooling. The optics with and without chromatic correction for the cooling are examined. The laser-Compton cooling for JLC/NLC at E_0=2 GeV is considered.

  16. Noise evaluation of Compton camera imaging for proton therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Ortega, P G; Cerutti, F; Ferrari, A; Gillam, J E; Lacasta, C; Llosá, G; Oliver, J F; Sala, P R; Solevi, P; Rafecas, M

    2015-01-01

    Compton Cameras emerged as an alternative for real-time dose monitoring techniques for Particle Therapy (PT), based on the detection of prompt-gammas. As a consequence of the Compton scattering process, the gamma origin point can be restricted onto the surface of a cone (Compton cone). Through image reconstruction techniques, the distribution of the gamma emitters can be estimated, using cone-surfaces backprojections of the Compton cones through the image space, along with more sophisticated statistical methods to improve the image quality. To calculate the Compton cone required for image reconstruction, either two interactions, the last being photoelectric absorption, or three scatter interactions are needed. Because of the high energy of the photons in PT the first option might not be adequate, as the photon is not absorbed in general. However, the second option is less efficient. That is the reason to resort to spectral reconstructions, where the incoming γ energy is considered as a variable in the recons...

  17. Virtual compton scattering at low energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lhuillier, D.

    1997-09-01

    The work described in this PhD is a study of the Virtual Compton scattering (VCS) off the proton at low energy, below pion production threshold. Our experiment has been carried out at MAMI in the collaboration with the help of two high resolution spectrometers. Experimentally, the VCS process is the electroproduction of photons off a liquid hydrogen target. First results of data analysis including radiative corrections are presented and compared with low energy theorem prediction. VCS is an extension of the Real Compton Scattering. The virtuality of the incoming photon allows us to access new observables of the nucleon internal structure which are complementarity to the elastic form factors: the generalized polarizabilities (GP). They are function of the squared invariant mass of the virtual photo. The mass limit of these observables restore the usual electric and magnetic polarizabilities. Our experiment is the first measurement of the VCS process at a virtual photon mass equals 0.33 Ge V square. The experimental development presents the analysis method. The high precision needed in the absolute cross-section measurement required an accurate estimate of radiative corrections to the VCS. This new calculation, which has been performed in the dimensional regulation scheme, composes the theoretical part of this thesis. At low q', preliminary results agree with low energy theorem prediction. At higher q', substraction of low energy theorem contribution to extract GP is discussed. (author)

  18. A dual purpose Compton suppression spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Parus, J; Raab, W; Donohue, D

    2003-01-01

    A gamma-ray spectrometer with a passive and an active shield is described. It consists of a HPGe coaxial detector of 42% efficiency and 4 NaI(Tl) detectors. The energy output pulses of the Ge detector are delivered into the 3 spectrometry chains giving the normal, anti- and coincidence spectra. From the spectra of a number of sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs and sup 6 sup 0 Co sources a Compton suppression factor, SF and a Compton reduction factor, RF, as the parameters characterizing the system performance, were calculated as a function of energy and source activity and compared with those given in literature. The natural background is reduced about 8 times in the anticoincidence mode of operation, compared to the normal spectrum which results in decreasing the detection limits for non-coincident gamma-rays up to a factor of 3. In the presence of other gamma-ray activities, in the range from 5 to 11 kBq, non- and coincident, the detection limits can be decreased for some nuclides by a factor of 3 to 5.7.

  19. Proton compton scattering in the resonance region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Takanobu.

    1979-12-01

    Differential cross sections of the proton Compton scattering have been measured in the energy range between 400 and 1150 MeV at CMS angles of 130 0 , 100 0 and 70 0 . The recoil proton was detected with a magnetic spectrometer using multi-wire proportional chambers and wire spark chambers. In coincidence with the proton, the scattered photon was detected with a lead glass Cerenkov counter of the total absorption type with a lead plate converter, and horizontal and vertical scintillation counter hodoscopes. The background due to the neutral pion photoproduction, was subtracted by using the kinematic relations between the scattered photon and the recoil proton. Theoretical calculations based on an isobar model with two components, that is, the resonance plus background, were done, and the photon couplings of the second resonance region were determined firstly from the proton Compton data. The results are that the helicity 1/2 photon couplings of P 11 (1470) and S 11 (1535), and the helicity 3/2 photon coupling of D 13 (1520) are consistent with those determined from the single pion photoproduction data, but the helicity 1/2 photon coupling of D 13 (1520) has a somewhat larger value than that from the single pion photoproduction data. (author)

  20. Relativistic wave equations and compton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutanto, S.H.; Robson, B.A.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Recently an eight-component relativistic wave equation for spin-1/2 particles was proposed.This equation was obtained from a four-component spin-1/2 wave equation (the KG1/2 equation), which contains second-order derivatives in both space and time, by a procedure involving a linearisation of the time derivative analogous to that introduced by Feshbach and Villars for the Klein-Gordon equation. This new eight-component equation gives the same bound-state energy eigenvalue spectra for hydrogenic atoms as the Dirac equation but has been shown to predict different radiative transition probabilities for the fine structure of both the Balmer and Lyman a-lines. Since it has been shown that the new theory does not always give the same results as the Dirac theory, it is important to consider the validity of the new equation in the case of other physical problems. One of the early crucial tests of the Dirac theory was its application to the scattering of a photon by a free electron: the so-called Compton scattering problem. In this paper we apply the new theory to the calculation of Compton scattering to order e 2 . It will be shown that in spite of the considerable difference in the structure of the new theory and that of Dirac the cross section is given by the Klein-Nishina formula

  1. New Chandra observations of the jet in 3C273. 1. Softer X-ray than radio spectra and the X-ray emission mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jester, Sebastian; /Fermilab; Harris, D.E.; /Smithsonian Astrophys. Observ.; Marshall, H.L.; /MIT, MKI; Meisenheimer, K.; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron.

    2006-05-01

    The jet in 3C273 is a high-power quasar jet with radio, optical and X-ray emission whose size and brightness allow a detailed study of the emission processes acting in it. We present deep Chandra observations of this jet and analyze the spectral properties of the jet emission from radio through X-rays. We find that the X-ray spectra are significantly softer than the radio spectra in all regions of the bright part of the jet except for the first bright ''knot A'', ruling out a model in which the X-ray emission from the entire jet arises from beamed inverse-Compton scattering of cosmic microwave background photons in a single-zone jet flow. Within two-zone jet models, we find that a synchrotron origin for the jet's X-rays requires fewer additional assumptions than an inverse-Compton model, especially if velocity shear leads to efficient particle acceleration in jet flows.

  2. Inverse photoemission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namatame, Hirofumi; Taniguchi, Masaki

    1994-01-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy is regarded as the most powerful means since it can measure almost perfectly the occupied electron state. On the other hand, inverse photoelectron spectroscopy is the technique for measuring unoccupied electron state by using the inverse process of photoelectron spectroscopy, and in principle, the similar experiment to photoelectron spectroscopy becomes feasible. The development of the experimental technology for inverse photoelectron spectroscopy has been carried out energetically by many research groups so far. At present, the heightening of resolution of inverse photoelectron spectroscopy, the development of inverse photoelectron spectroscope in which light energy is variable and so on are carried out. But the inverse photoelectron spectroscope for vacuum ultraviolet region is not on the market. In this report, the principle of inverse photoelectron spectroscopy and the present state of the spectroscope are described, and the direction of the development hereafter is groped. As the experimental equipment, electron guns, light detectors and so on are explained. As the examples of the experiment, the inverse photoelectron spectroscopy of semimagnetic semiconductors and resonance inverse photoelectron spectroscopy are reported. (K.I.)

  3. Non-thermal Hard X-Ray Emission from Coma and Several Abell Clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, C

    2004-01-01

    We report results of hard X-Ray observations of the clusters Coma, Abell 496, Abell754, Abell 1060, Abell 1367, Abell2256 and Abell3558 using RXTE data from the NASA HEASARC public archive. Specifically we searched for clusters with hard x-ray emission that can be fitted by a power law because this would indicate that the cluster is a source of non-thermal emission. We are assuming the emission mechanism proposed by Vahk Petrosian where the inter cluster space contains clouds of relativistic electrons that by themselves create a magnetic field and emit radio synchrotron radiation. These relativistic electrons Inverse-Compton scatter Microwave Background photons up to hard x-ray energies. The clusters that were found to be sources of non-thermal hard x-rays are Coma, Abell496, Abell754 and Abell 1060

  4. Observations of GRB 990123 by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, M. S.; Band, D. L.; Kippen, R. M.; Preece, R. D.; Kouveliotou, C.; vanParadijs, J.; Share, G. H.; Murphy, R. J.; Matz, S. M.; Connors, A.

    1999-01-01

    GRB 990123 was the first burst from which simultaneous optical, X-ray, and gamma-ray emission was detected; its afterglow has been followed by an extensive set of radio, optical, and X-ray observations. We have studied the gamma-ray burst itself as observed by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory detectors. We find that gamma-ray fluxes are not correlated with the simultaneous optical observations and that the gamma-ray spectra cannot be extrapolated simply to the optical fluxes. The burst is well fitted by the standard four-parameter GRB function, with the exception that excess emission compared with this function is observed below approx. 15 keV during some time intervals. The burst is characterized by the typical hard-to-soft and hardness-intensity correlation spectral evolution patterns. The energy of the peak of the vf (sub v), spectrum, E (sub p), reaches an unusually high value during the first intensity spike, 1470 plus or minus 110 keV, and then falls to approx. 300 keV during the tail of the burst. The high-energy spectrum above approx. 1 MeV is consistent with a power law with a photon index of about -3. By fluence, GRB 990123 is brighter than all but 0.4% of the GRBs observed with BATSE (Burst and Transient Source Experiment), clearly placing it on the -3/2 power-law portion of the intensity distribution. However, the redshift measured for the afterglow is inconsistent with the Euclidean interpretation of the -3/2 power law. Using the redshift value of greater than or equal to 1.61 and assuming isotropic emission, the gamma-ray energy exceeds 10 (exp 54) ergs.

  5. The Open-source Data Inventory for Anthropogenic CO2, version 2016 (ODIAC2016: a global monthly fossil fuel CO2 gridded emissions data product for tracer transport simulations and surface flux inversions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Oda

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The Open-source Data Inventory for Anthropogenic CO2 (ODIAC is a global high-spatial-resolution gridded emissions data product that distributes carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion. The emissions spatial distributions are estimated at a 1  ×  1 km spatial resolution over land using power plant profiles (emissions intensity and geographical location and satellite-observed nighttime lights. This paper describes the year 2016 version of the ODIAC emissions data product (ODIAC2016 and presents analyses that help guide data users, especially for atmospheric CO2 tracer transport simulations and flux inversion analysis. Since the original publication in 2011, we have made modifications to our emissions modeling framework in order to deliver a comprehensive global gridded emissions data product. Major changes from the 2011 publication are (1 the use of emissions estimates made by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL by fuel type (solid, liquid, gas, cement manufacturing, gas flaring, and international aviation and marine bunkers; (2 the use of multiple spatial emissions proxies by fuel type such as (a nighttime light data specific to gas flaring and (b ship/aircraft fleet tracks; and (3 the inclusion of emissions temporal variations. Using global fuel consumption data, we extrapolated the CDIAC emissions estimates for the recent years and produced the ODIAC2016 emissions data product that covers 2000–2015. Our emissions data can be viewed as an extended version of CDIAC gridded emissions data product, which should allow data users to impose global fossil fuel emissions in a more comprehensive manner than the original CDIAC product. Our new emissions modeling framework allows us to produce future versions of the ODIAC emissions data product with a timely update. Such capability has become more significant given the CDIAC/ORNL's shutdown. The ODIAC data

  6. The Open-source Data Inventory for Anthropogenic CO2, version 2016 (ODIAC2016): a global monthly fossil fuel CO2 gridded emissions data product for tracer transport simulations and surface flux inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Tomohiro; Maksyutov, Shamil; Andres, Robert J.

    2018-01-01

    The Open-source Data Inventory for Anthropogenic CO2 (ODIAC) is a global high-spatial-resolution gridded emissions data product that distributes carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from fossil fuel combustion. The emissions spatial distributions are estimated at a 1 × 1 km spatial resolution over land using power plant profiles (emissions intensity and geographical location) and satellite-observed nighttime lights. This paper describes the year 2016 version of the ODIAC emissions data product (ODIAC2016) and presents analyses that help guide data users, especially for atmospheric CO2 tracer transport simulations and flux inversion analysis. Since the original publication in 2011, we have made modifications to our emissions modeling framework in order to deliver a comprehensive global gridded emissions data product. Major changes from the 2011 publication are (1) the use of emissions estimates made by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) by fuel type (solid, liquid, gas, cement manufacturing, gas flaring, and international aviation and marine bunkers); (2) the use of multiple spatial emissions proxies by fuel type such as (a) nighttime light data specific to gas flaring and (b) ship/aircraft fleet tracks; and (3) the inclusion of emissions temporal variations. Using global fuel consumption data, we extrapolated the CDIAC emissions estimates for the recent years and produced the ODIAC2016 emissions data product that covers 2000-2015. Our emissions data can be viewed as an extended version of CDIAC gridded emissions data product, which should allow data users to impose global fossil fuel emissions in a more comprehensive manner than the original CDIAC product. Our new emissions modeling framework allows us to produce future versions of the ODIAC emissions data product with a timely update. Such capability has become more significant given the CDIAC/ORNL's shutdown. The ODIAC data product could play an important

  7. Advanced PET using both Compton and photoelectric events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Changyeon; Lee, Wonho

    2012-01-01

    This study presents image reconstruction and evaluation of advanced positron emission tomography (PET) by using a simple backprojection and an maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) method. Advanced PET can use not only the photoelectric effect but also the Compton scattering effect for image reconstruction; hence, the detection efficiency should be inherently higher than that of conventional PET. By using a voxelized cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector, the detected position and deposited energy of the gamma ray were found precisely. With the position and energy information, the interaction sequence, which is one of the main factors to consider in the reconstruction of the source image, was identified correctly. The reconstruction algorithms were simple backprojection and MLEM methods, and three methods were used to evaluate the advanced PET compared with conventional PET, which uses the photoelectric effect only. The full widths at half maximum (FWHM) and the maximum counts of images reconstructed by using simple backprojection were calculated for comparison. Using an MLEM method, the FWHM and the relative standard deviation of the counts in the range of half of the FWHM around the maximum pixel were calculated at each iteration to evaluate the modalities quantitatively. For a 3D source phantom, the simple backprojection and the MLEM methods were applied to each modality, and the reconstructed images were compared with each other by using the relative standard deviation for each component of the reconstructed image and by using visual inspection.

  8. Compton-backscattered annihilation radiation from the Galactic Center region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D. M.; Lin, R. P.; Feffer, P.; Slassi, S.; Hurley, K.; Matteson, J.; Bowman, H. B.; Pelling, R. M.; Briggs, M.; Gruber, D.

    1993-01-01

    On 1989 May 22, the High Energy X-ray and Gamma-ray Observatory for Nuclear Emissions, a balloon-borne high-resolution germanium spectrometer with an 18-deg FOV, observed the Galactic Center (GC) from 25 to 2500 keV. The GC photon spectrum is obtained from the count spectrum by a model-independent method which accounts for the effects of passive material in the instrument and scattering in the atmosphere. Besides a positron annihilation line with a flux of (10.0 +/- 2.4) x 10 exp -4 photons/sq cm s and a full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of (2.9 + 1.0, -1.1) keV, the spectrum shows a peak centered at (163.7 +/- 3.4) keV with a flux of (1.55 +/- 0.47) x 10 exp -3 photons/sq cm s and a FWHM of (24.4 +/- 9.2) keV. The energy range 450-507 keV shows no positronium continuum associated with the annihilation line, with a 2-sigma upper limit of 0.90 on the positronium fraction. The 164 keV feature is interpreted as Compton backscatter of broadened and redshifted annihilation radiation, possibly from the source 1E 1740.7-2942.

  9. Light Higgs production at the Compton Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jikia, G.; Soeldner-Rembold, S.

    2000-01-01

    We have studied the production of a light Higgs boson with a mass of 120 GeV in photon-photon collisions at a Compton collider. The event generator for the backgrounds to a Higgs signal due to b-barb and c-barc heavy quark pair production in polarized γγ collisions is based on a complete next-to-leading order (NLO) perturbative QCD calculation. For J z = 0 the large double-logarithmic corrections up to four loops are also included. It is shown that the two-photon width of the Higgs boson can be measured with high statistical accuracy of about 2% for integrated γγ luminosity in the hard part of the spectrum of 40 fb -1 . As a result the total Higgs boson width can be calculated in a model independent way to an accuracy of about 14%

  10. Virtual Compton Scattering At High Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, C

    2000-01-01

    In this dissertation we develop a theoretical framework in the context of perturbative QuantumChromoDynamics (pQCD) for studying non-forward scattering processes. In particular, we investigate a non-forward unequal mass virtual Compton scattering amplitude by performing the general operator product expansion (OPE) and the formal renormalization group (RG) analysis. We discuss the general tensorial decomposition of the amplitude to obtain the invariant amplitudes in the non- forward kinematic region. We study the OPE to identify the relevant operators and their reduced matrix elements, as well as the corresponding Wilson coefficients. We find that the OPE now should be done in double moments with new moment variables. There are in the expansion new sets of leading twist operators which have overall derivatives. They mix under renormalization in a well- defined way. We compute the evolution kernels from which the anomalous dimensions for these operators can be extracted. We also obtain explicitly the lowest ord...

  11. Compton Ring with Laser Radiative Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulyak, E.; Urakawa, J.; Zimmermann, F.

    2013-10-01

    Proposed is an enhancement of laser radiative cooling by utilizing laser pulses of small spatial and temporal dimensions, which interact only with a fraction of an electron bunch circulating in a storage ring. The dynamics of such electron bunch when laser photons scatter off the electrons at a collision point placed in a section with nonzero dispersion is studied. In this case of `asymmetric cooling', the stationary energy spread is much smaller than under conditions of regular scattering where the laser spot size is larger than the electron beam; and the synchrotron oscillations are damped faster. Results of extensive simulations are presented for the performance optimization of Compton gamma-ray sources and damping rings.

  12. ECOSP: an enhanced Compton spectrometer proposal for fresco inspection

    CERN Document Server

    Tartari, A; Lodi-Rizzini, E; Bonifazzi, C

    2001-01-01

    This paper deals with a Compton scattering technique for non-destructive testing in the inspection of fresco substrates. The aim of the Enhanced Compton Spectrometer proposal is to consider the synergic effects of both the physical design of the apparatus and data processing management, in order to obtain an enhancement in the efficiency of photon collection and a minimization of statistical needs. To this end, the study of collimators devised to enhance the collection of photons which undergo a single scattering was explored. The pixel imaging obtained by collecting the total Compton scattered photons from a hidden layer was then examined in terms of a multivariate Principal Components Analysis approach.

  13. Inverse Limits

    CERN Document Server

    Ingram, WT

    2012-01-01

    Inverse limits provide a powerful tool for constructing complicated spaces from simple ones. They also turn the study of a dynamical system consisting of a space and a self-map into a study of a (likely more complicated) space and a self-homeomorphism. In four chapters along with an appendix containing background material the authors develop the theory of inverse limits. The book begins with an introduction through inverse limits on [0,1] before moving to a general treatment of the subject. Special topics in continuum theory complete the book. Although it is not a book on dynamics, the influen

  14. Compton scattering: the investigation of electron momentum distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, B.

    1977-01-01

    A collection of review papers is presented on Compton scattering. The history, theory, experimentation, multiple scattering, atoms, solids, chemistry, electron scattering, positron annihilation, and the reconstruction of the three-dimensional distributions are the topics considered. 88 references

  15. Deconvolution of shift-variant broadening for Compton scatter imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, Brian L.; Martin, Jeffrey B.; Roggemann, Michael C.

    1999-01-01

    A technique is presented for deconvolving shift-variant Doppler broadening of singly Compton scattered gamma rays from their recorded energy distribution. Doppler broadening is important in Compton scatter imaging techniques employing gamma rays with energies below roughly 100 keV. The deconvolution unfolds an approximation to the angular distribution of scattered photons from their recorded energy distribution in the presence of statistical noise and background counts. Two unfolding methods are presented, one based on a least-squares algorithm and one based on a maximum likelihood algorithm. Angular distributions unfolded from measurements made on small scattering targets show less evidence of Compton broadening. This deconvolution is shown to improve the quality of filtered backprojection images in multiplexed Compton scatter tomography. Improved sharpness and contrast are evident in the images constructed from unfolded signals

  16. Two Emission Mechanisms in the Fermi Bubbles: A Possible Signal of Annihilating Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, Dan; Slatyer, Tracy R.

    2013-09-01

    We study the variation of the spectrum of the Fermi Bubbles with Galactic latitude. Far from the Galactic plane (|b| > 30 degrees), the observed gamma-ray emission is nearly invariant with latitude, and is consistent with arising from inverse Compton scattering of the interstellar radiation field by cosmic-ray electrons with an approximately power-law spectrum. The same electrons in the presence of microgauss-scale magnetic fields can also generate the the observed microwave "haze". At lower latitudes (b < 20 degrees), in contrast, the spectrum of the emission correlated with the Bubbles possesses a pronounced spectral feature peaking at 1-4 GeV (in E^2 dN/dE) which cannot be generated by any realistic spectrum of electrons. Instead, we conclude that a second (non-inverse-Compton) emission mechanism must be responsible for the bulk of the low-energy, low-latitude emission. This second component is spectrally similar to the excess GeV emission previously reported from the Galactic Center (GC), and also appears spatially consistent with a luminosity per volume falling approximately as r^-2.4, where r is the distance from the GC. We argue that the spectral feature visible in the low-latitude Bubbles is the extended counterpart of the GC excess, now detected out to at least 2-3 kpc from the GC. The spectrum and angular distribution of the signal is consistent with that predicted from ~10 GeV dark matter particles annihilating to leptons, or from ~50 GeV dark matter particles annihilating to quarks, following a distribution similar to the canonical Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile. We also consider millisecond pulsars as a possible astrophysical explanation for the signal, as observed millisecond pulsars possess a spectral cutoff at approximately the required energy. Any such scenario would require a large population of unresolved millisecond pulsars extending at least 2-3 kpc from the GC.

  17. Compton suppression naa in the analysis of food and beverages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Y.A.; Ewa, I.O.B.; Umar, I.M.; Funtua, I.I.; Lanberger, S.; O'kelly, D.J.; Braisted, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    Applicability and performance of Compton suppression method in the analysis of food and beverages was re-established in this study. Using ''1''3''7Cs and ''6''0Co point sources Compton Suppression Factors (SF), Compton Reduction Factors (RF), Peak-to-Compton ratio (P/C), Compton Plateau (C p l), and Compton Edge (C e ) were determined for each of the two sources. The natural background reduction factors in the anticoincidence mode compared to the normal mode were evaluated. The reported R.F. values of the various Compton spectrometers for ''6''0Co source at energy 50-210 keV (backscattering region), 600 keV (Compton edge corresponding to 1173.2 keV gamma-ray) and 1110 keV (Compton edge corresponding to 1332.5 keV gamma-ray) were compared with that of the present work. Similarly the S.F. values of the spectrometers for ''1''3''7Cs source were compared at the backscattered energy region (S.F. b = 191-210 keV), Compton Plateau (S.F. p l = 350-370 keV), and Compton Edge (S.F. e = 471-470 keV) and all were found to follow a similar trend. We also compared peak reduction ratios for the two cobalt energies (1173.2 and 1332.5) with the ones reported in literature and two results agree well. Applicability of the method to food and beverages was put to test for twenty one major, minor, and trace elements (Ba, Sr, I, Br, Cu, V, Mg, Na, Cl, Mn, Ca, Sn,K, Cd, Zn, As, Sb, Ni, Cs, Fe, and Co) commonly found in food, milk, tea and tobacco. The elements were assayed using five National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) certified reference materials (Non-fat powdered milk, Apple leaves, Tomato leaves, and Citrus leaves). The results obtained shows good agreement with NIST certified values, indicating that the method is suitable for simultaneous determination of micro-nutrients, macro-nutrients and heavy elements in food and beverages without undue interference problems

  18. New reconstruction method for the advanced compton camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, Takashi; Ogawa, Koichi

    2007-01-01

    Conventional gammacameras employ a mechanical collimator, which reduces the number of photons detected by such cameras. To address this issue, a Compton camera has been proposed to improve the efficiency of data acquisition by employing electronic collimation. With regard to Compton cameras, the advanced Compton camera (ACC) which has been proposed by Tanimori et al. can restrict the source locations with the help of the recoil electrons that are emitted in the process of Compton scattering. However, the reconstruction methods employed in conventional Compton cameras are inefficient in reconstructing images from the data acquired with the ACC. In this paper, we propose a new reconstruction method that is designed specifically for the ACC. This method, which is an improved version of the source space tree algorithm (SSTA), permits the source distribution to be reconstructed accurately and efficiently. The SSTA is one of the reconstruction methods for conventional Compton cameras proposed by Rohe et al. Our proposed algorithm employs a set of lines that are defined at equiangular intervals in the reconstruction region and the specified voxels of interest that include the search points located on the above predefined lines at equally spaced intervals. The validity of our method is demonstrated by simulations involving the reconstruction of a point source and a disk source. (author)

  19. Use of a lowest intensity 241Am Compton spectrometer for the measurement of directional Compton profiles of ZnSe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahuja, B.L.; Heda, N.L.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we report on electron momentum densities in ZnSe using Compton scattering technique. For the directional measurements we have employed a newly developed 100 mCi 241 Am Compton spectrometer which is based on a small disc source with shortest geometry. For the theoretical calculations we have employed a self-consistent Hartree-Fock linear combination of atomic orbitals (HF-LCAO) approach. It is seen that the anisotropy in the measured Compton profiles is well reproduced by our HF-LCAO calculation and the other available pseudopotential data. The anisotropy in the Compton profiles is explained in terms of energy bands and bond length. - PACS numbers: 13.60.Fz, 78.70. Ck, 78.70.-g (orig.)

  20. Deeply virtual Compton scattering off 4He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattawy, M.

    2015-01-01

    The 4 He nucleus is of particular interest to study nuclear GPDs (Generalized Parton Distributions) as its partonic structure is described by only one chirally-even GPD. It is also a simple few-body system and has a high density that makes it the ideal target to investigate nuclear effects on partons. The experiment described in this thesis is JLab-E08-24, which was carried out in 2009 by the CLAS collaboration during the 'EG6' run. In this experiment, a 6 GeV longitudinally-polarized electron beam was scattered onto a 6 atm 4 He gaseous target. During this experiment, in addition to the CLAS detector, a Radial Time Projection Chamber (RTPC), to detect low-energy nuclear recoils, and an Inner Calorimeter (IC), to improve the detection of photons at very forward angles, were used. We carried out a full analysis on our 6 GeV dataset, showing the feasibility of measuring exclusive nuclear Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) reactions. The analysis included: the identification of the final-state particles, the DVCS event selection, the π 0 background subtraction. The beam-spin asymmetry was then extracted for both DVCS channels and compared to the ones of the free-proton DVCS reaction, and to theoretical predictions from two models. Finally, the real and the imaginary parts of the 4 He CFF (Compton Form Factor) HA have been extracted. Different levels of agreement were found between our measurements and the theoretical calculations. This thesis is organized as follows: In chapter 1, the available theoretical tools to study hadronic structure are presented, with an emphasis on the nuclear effects and GPDs. In chapter 2, the characteristics of the CLAS spectrometer are reviewed. In chapter 3, the working principle and the calibration aspects of the RTPC are discussed. In chapter 4, the identification of the final-state particles and the Monte-Carlo simulation are presented. In chapter 5, the selection of the DVCS events, the background subtraction, and

  1. New Compton densitometer for measuring pulmonary edema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loo, B.W.; Goulding, F.S.; Simon, D.S.

    1985-10-01

    Pulmonary edema is the pathological increase of extravascular lung water found most often in patients with congestive heart failure and other critically ill patients who suffer from intravenous fluid overload. A non-invasive lung density monitor that is accurate, easily portable, safe and inexpensive is needed for clinical evaluation of pulmonary edema. Other researchers who have employed Compton scattering techniques generally used systems of extended size and detectors with poor energy resolution. This has resulted in significant systematic biases from multiply-scattered photons and larger errors in counting statistics at a given radiation dose to the patient. We are proposing a patented approach in which only backscattered photons are measured with a high-resolution HPGe detector in a compact system geometry. By proper design and a unique data extraction scheme, effects of the variable chest wall on lung density measurements are minimized. Preliminary test results indicate that with a radioactive source of under 30 GBq, it should be possible to make an accurate lung density measurement in one minute, with a risk of radiation exposure to the patient a thousand times smaller than that from a typical chest x-ray. The ability to make safe, frequent lung density measurements could be very helpful for monitoring the course of P.E. at the hospital bedside or outpatient clinics, and for evaluating the efficacy of therapy in clinical research. 6 refs., 5 figs.

  2. INJECTION EFFICIENCY IN COMPTON RING NESTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. I. Gladkikh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available NESTOR is the hard X-ray source that is under commissioning at NSC KIPT. NESTOR based on the Compton scattering of laser photons on relativistic electrons. The structure of the facility can be represented as the following components: a linear accelerator, a transport channel, a storage ring, and a laser-optical system. Electrons are stored in the storage ring for energy of 40-200 MeV. Inevitable alignment errors of magnetic elements are strongly effect on the beam dynamics in the storage ring. These errors lead to a shift of the equilibrium orbit relative to the ideal one. Significant shift of the equilibrium orbit could lead to loss of the beam on physical apertures. Transverse sizes of electron and laser beams are only few tens of microns at the interaction point. The shift of electron beam at the interaction point could greatly complicate the operation adjustment of storage ring without sufficient beam position diagnostic system. This article presents the simulation results of the efficiency of electron beam accumulation in the NESTOR storage ring. Also, this article is devoted to electron beam dynamics due to alignment errors of magnetic element in the ring.

  3. Compton Composites Late in the Early Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick Mayer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Beginning roughly two hundred years after the big-bang, a tresino phase transition generated Compton-scale composite particles and converted most of the ordinary plasma baryons into new forms of dark matter. Our model consists of ordinary electrons and protons that have been bound into mostly undetectable forms. This picture provides an explanation of the composition and history of ordinary to dark matter conversion starting with, and maintaining, a critical density Universe. The tresino phase transition started the conversion of ordinary matter plasma into tresino-proton pairs prior to the the recombination era. We derive the appropriate Saha–Boltzmann equilibrium to determine the plasma composition throughout the phase transition and later. The baryon population is shown to be quickly modified from ordinary matter plasma prior to the transition to a small amount of ordinary matter and a much larger amount of dark matter after the transition. We describe the tresino phase transition and the origin, quantity and evolution of the dark matter as it takes place from late in the early Universe until the present.

  4. Gamma-ray Emission from Globular Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pak-Hin T. Tam

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few years, the data obtained using the Large Area Telescope (LAT aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has provided new insights on high-energy processes in globular clusters, particularly those involving compact objects such as MilliSecond Pulsars (MSPs. Gamma-ray emission in the 100 MeV to 10 GeV range has been detected from more than a dozen globular clusters in our galaxy, including 47 Tucanae and Terzan 5. Based on a sample of known gammaray globular clusters, the empirical relations between gamma-ray luminosity and properties of globular clusters such as their stellar encounter rate, metallicity, and possible optical and infrared photon energy densities, have been derived. The measured gamma-ray spectra are generally described by a power law with a cut-off at a few gigaelectronvolts. Together with the detection of pulsed γ-rays from two MSPs in two different globular clusters, such spectral signature lends support to the hypothesis that γ-rays from globular clusters represent collective curvature emission from magnetospheres of MSPs in the clusters. Alternative models, involving Inverse-Compton (IC emission of relativistic electrons that are accelerated close to MSPs or pulsar wind nebula shocks, have also been suggested. Observations at >100 GeV by using Fermi/LAT and atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes such as H.E.S.S.-II, MAGIC-II, VERITAS, and CTA will help to settle some questions unanswered by current data.

  5. Nonlinear Compton scattering in ultrashort laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackenroth, F.; Di Piazza, A.

    2011-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the photon emission spectra of an electron scattered by a laser pulse containing only very few cycles of the carrying electromagnetic field is presented. The analysis is performed in the framework of strong-field quantum electrodynamics, with the laser field taken into account exactly in the calculations. We consider different emission regimes depending on the laser intensity, placing special emphasis on the regime of one-cycle beams and of high laser intensities, where the emission spectra depend nonperturbatively on the laser intensity. In this regime, we, in particular, present an accurate stationary phase analysis of the integrals that are shown to determine the computed emission spectra. The emission spectra show significant differences with respect to those in a long pulsed or monochromatic laser field: The emission lines obtained here are much broader, and more important, no dressing of the electron mass is observed.

  6. Spectra of clinical CT scanners using a portable Compton spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duisterwinkel, H. A.; Abbema, J. K. van; Kawachimaru, R.; Paganini, L.; Graaf, E. R. van der; Brandenburg, S.; Goethem, M. J. van

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Spectral information of the output of x-ray tubes in (dual source) computer tomography (CT) scanners can be used to improve the conversion of CT numbers to proton stopping power and can be used to advantage in CT scanner quality assurance. The purpose of this study is to design, validate, and apply a compact portable Compton spectrometer that was constructed to accurately measure x-ray spectra of CT scanners. Methods: In the design of the Compton spectrometer, the shielding materials were carefully chosen and positioned to reduce background by x-ray fluorescence from the materials used. The spectrum of Compton scattered x-rays alters from the original source spectrum due to various physical processes. Reconstruction of the original x-ray spectrum from the Compton scattered spectrum is based on Monte Carlo simulations of the processes involved. This reconstruction is validated by comparing directly and indirectly measured spectra of a mobile x-ray tube. The Compton spectrometer is assessed in a clinical setting by measuring x-ray spectra at various tube voltages of three different medical CT scanner x-ray tubes. Results: The directly and indirectly measured spectra are in good agreement (their ratio being 0.99) thereby validating the reconstruction method. The measured spectra of the medical CT scanners are consistent with theoretical spectra and spectra obtained from the x-ray tube manufacturer. Conclusions: A Compton spectrometer has been successfully designed, constructed, validated, and applied in the measurement of x-ray spectra of CT scanners. These measurements show that our compact Compton spectrometer can be rapidly set-up using the alignment lasers of the CT scanner, thereby enabling its use in commissioning, troubleshooting, and, e.g., annual performance check-ups of CT scanners

  7. Spectra of clinical CT scanners using a portable Compton spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duisterwinkel, H A; van Abbema, J K; van Goethem, M J; Kawachimaru, R; Paganini, L; van der Graaf, E R; Brandenburg, S

    2015-04-01

    Spectral information of the output of x-ray tubes in (dual source) computer tomography (CT) scanners can be used to improve the conversion of CT numbers to proton stopping power and can be used to advantage in CT scanner quality assurance. The purpose of this study is to design, validate, and apply a compact portable Compton spectrometer that was constructed to accurately measure x-ray spectra of CT scanners. In the design of the Compton spectrometer, the shielding materials were carefully chosen and positioned to reduce background by x-ray fluorescence from the materials used. The spectrum of Compton scattered x-rays alters from the original source spectrum due to various physical processes. Reconstruction of the original x-ray spectrum from the Compton scattered spectrum is based on Monte Carlo simulations of the processes involved. This reconstruction is validated by comparing directly and indirectly measured spectra of a mobile x-ray tube. The Compton spectrometer is assessed in a clinical setting by measuring x-ray spectra at various tube voltages of three different medical CT scanner x-ray tubes. The directly and indirectly measured spectra are in good agreement (their ratio being 0.99) thereby validating the reconstruction method. The measured spectra of the medical CT scanners are consistent with theoretical spectra and spectra obtained from the x-ray tube manufacturer. A Compton spectrometer has been successfully designed, constructed, validated, and applied in the measurement of x-ray spectra of CT scanners. These measurements show that our compact Compton spectrometer can be rapidly set-up using the alignment lasers of the CT scanner, thereby enabling its use in commissioning, troubleshooting, and, e.g., annual performance check-ups of CT scanners.

  8. Evaluation of Position Resolution for a Prototype Whole-Body PET Detector Based on Suppressing Backgrounds by Compton Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujihara, Kento; Emoto, Yusaku; Ito, Hiroshi; Kaneko, Naomi; Kaneko, Hideyuki; Kawai, Hideyuki; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Mizuno, Takahiro

    2018-01-01

    Existing PET (Positron Emission Tomography) systems make clear images in demonstration (measuring small PET reagent in pure water), however images in real diagnosis become unclear. The authors suspected that this problem was caused by Compton scattering in a detector. When PET systems observe plural photomultiplier tube outputs, an original emission point is regarded as centroid of the outputs. However, even if plural emission in Compton scattering occur, these systems calculate original point in the same way as single emission. Therefore, the authors considered that rejecting Compton scattering events makes PET systems much better, and made prototype counter. Main components of the prototype counter are plate-like high-growth-rate (HGR) La-GPS scintillators and wavelength shifting fibers (WLSF). HGR crystals grow 10 times as fast as a mono-crystal (a normal mono-crystal grows at 2 - 3 mm an hour). Thus, it includes microbubble and its transparency get worth. Consequently, HGR crystals usually are not used in radiation measuring instruments. However, this time they are used on the purpose. Because of their low transparency, scintillation lights come out right above and right under of emission position. Therefore, Compton scattering events is rejected easily. The prototype detector has an effective area of 300 by 300 square mm. The detector consists of 24 layers. One layer consists of HGR La-GPS scintillator of 1 mm thickness. Top and bottom surface of scintillator were covered by dual sheets of WLSF with a diameter of 0.2 mm. Sheets of WLSF on top and bottom of the scintillator make a right angle with each other, and measure X- and Y-components. Z-component is measured by difference of WLSF outputs between top and bottom. If plural layers output signals, this counter regards the event as Compton scattering event, and reject the event. Even if only a layer output signals, the event is rejected when number output signals from WLSF is more than 1.5 times of single

  9. Evaluation of Position Resolution for a Prototype Whole-Body PET Detector Based on Suppressing Backgrounds by Compton Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FUJIHARA Kento

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Existing PET (Positron Emission Tomography systems make clear images in demonstration (measuring small PET reagent in pure water, however images in real diagnosis become unclear. The authors suspected that this problem was caused by Compton scattering in a detector. When PET systems observe plural photomultiplier tube outputs, an original emission point is regarded as centroid of the outputs. However, even if plural emission in Compton scattering occur, these systems calculate original point in the same way as single emission. Therefore, the authors considered that rejecting Compton scattering events makes PET systems much better, and made prototype counter. Main components of the prototype counter are plate-like high-growth-rate (HGR La-GPS scintillators and wavelength shifting fibers (WLSF. HGR crystals grow 10 times as fast as a mono-crystal (a normal mono-crystal grows at 2 – 3 mm an hour. Thus, it includes microbubble and its transparency get worth. Consequently, HGR crystals usually are not used in radiation measuring instruments. However, this time they are used on the purpose. Because of their low transparency, scintillation lights come out right above and right under of emission position. Therefore, Compton scattering events is rejected easily. The prototype detector has an effective area of 300 by 300 square mm. The detector consists of 24 layers. One layer consists of HGR La-GPS scintillator of 1 mm thickness. Top and bottom surface of scintillator were covered by dual sheets of WLSF with a diameter of 0.2 mm. Sheets of WLSF on top and bottom of the scintillator make a right angle with each other, and measure X- and Y-components. Z-component is measured by difference of WLSF outputs between top and bottom. If plural layers output signals, this counter regards the event as Compton scattering event, and reject the event. Even if only a layer output signals, the event is rejected when number output signals from WLSF is more than 1

  10. Gamma-ray detection and Compton camera image reconstruction with application to hadron therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frandes, M.

    2010-09-01

    A novel technique for radiotherapy - hadron therapy - irradiates tumors using a beam of protons or carbon ions. Hadron therapy is an effective technique for cancer treatment, since it enables accurate dose deposition due to the existence of a Bragg peak at the end of particles range. Precise knowledge of the fall-off position of the dose with millimeters accuracy is critical since hadron therapy proved its efficiency in case of tumors which are deep-seated, close to vital organs, or radio-resistant. A major challenge for hadron therapy is the quality assurance of dose delivery during irradiation. Current systems applying positron emission tomography (PET) technologies exploit gamma rays from the annihilation of positrons emitted during the beta decay of radioactive isotopes. However, the generated PET images allow only post-therapy information about the deposed dose. In addition, they are not in direct coincidence with the Bragg peak. A solution is to image the complete spectrum of the emitted gamma rays, including nuclear gamma rays emitted by inelastic interactions of hadrons to generated nuclei. This emission is isotropic, and has a spectrum ranging from 100 keV up to 20 MeV. However, the measurement of these energetic gamma rays from nuclear reactions exceeds the capability of all existing medical imaging systems. An advanced Compton scattering detection method with electron tracking capability is proposed, and modeled to reconstruct the high-energy gamma-ray events. This Compton detection technique was initially developed to observe gamma rays for astrophysical purposes. A device illustrating the method was designed and adapted to Hadron Therapy Imaging (HTI). It consists of two main sub-systems: a tracker where Compton recoiled electrons are measured, and a calorimeter where the scattered gamma rays are absorbed via the photoelectric effect. Considering a hadron therapy scenario, the analysis of generated data was performed, passing trough the complete

  11. X-band RF Photoinjector for Laser Compton X-ray and Gamma-ray Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, R. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Anderson, G. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Anderson, S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gibson, D. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Barty, C. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-05-06

    Extremely bright narrow bandwidth gamma-ray sources are expanding the application of accelerator technology and light sources in new directions. An X-band test station has been commissioned at LLNL to develop multi-bunch electron beams. This multi-bunch mode will have stringent requirements for the electron bunch properties including low emittance and energy spread, but across multiple bunches. The test station is a unique facility featuring a 200 MV/m 5.59 cell X-band photogun powered by a SLAC XL4 klystron driven by a Scandinova solid-state modulator. This paper focuses on its current status including the generation and initial characterization of first electron beam. Design and installation of the inverse-Compton scattering interaction region and upgrade paths will be discussed along with future applications.

  12. Compton scatter correction for planner scintigraphic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaan Steelandt, E.; Dobbeleir, A.; Vanregemorter, J. [Algemeen Ziekenhuis Middelheim, Antwerp (Belgium). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy

    1995-12-01

    A major problem in nuclear medicine is the image degradation due to Compton scatter in the patient. Photons emitted by the radioactive tracer scatter in collision with electrons of the surrounding tissue. Due to the resulting loss of energy and change in direction, the scattered photons induce an object dependant background on the images. This results in a degradation of the contrast of warm and cold lesions. Although theoretically interesting, most of the techniques proposed in literature like the use of symmetrical photopeaks can not be implemented on the commonly used gamma camera due to the energy/linearity/sensitivity corrections applied in the detector. A method for a single energy isotope based on existing methods with adjustments towards daily practice and clinical situations is proposed. It is assumed that the scatter image, recorded from photons collected within a scatter window adjacent to the photo peak, is a reasonable close approximation of the true scatter component of the image reconstructed from the photo peak window. A fraction `k` of the image using the scatter window is subtracted from the image recorded in the photo peak window to produce the compensated image. The principal matter of the method is the right value for the factor `k`, which is determined in a mathematical way and confirmed by experiments. To determine `k`, different kinds of scatter media are used and are positioned in different ways in order to simulate a clinical situation. For a secondary energy window from 100 to 124 keV below a photo peak window from 126 to 154 keV, a value of 0.7 is found. This value has been verified using both an antropomorph thyroid phantom and the Rollo contrast phantom.

  13. Polarization observables in Virtual Compton Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doria, Luca

    2007-10-15

    Virtual Compton Scattering (VCS) is an important reaction for understanding nucleon structure at low energies. By studying this process, the generalized polarizabilities of the nucleon can be measured. These observables are a generalization of the already known polarizabilities and will permit theoretical models to be challenged on a new level. More specifically, there exist six generalized polarizabilities and in order to disentangle them all, a double polarization experiment must be performed. Within this work, the VCS reaction p(e,e'p){gamma} was measured at MAMI using the A1 Collaboration three spectrometer setup with Q{sup 2}=0.33 (GeV/c){sup 2}. Using the highly polarized MAMI beam and a recoil proton polarimeter, it was possible to measure both the VCS cross section and the double polarization observables. Already in 2000, the unpolarized VCS cross section was measured at MAMI. In this new experiment, we could confirm the old data and furthermore the double polarization observables were measured for the first time. The data were taken in five periods between 2005 and 2006. In this work, the data were analyzed to extract the cross section and the proton polarization. For the analysis, a maximum likelihood algorithm was developed together with the full simulation of all the analysis steps. The experiment is limited by the low statistics due mainly to the focal plane proton polarimeter efficiency. To overcome this problem, a new determination and parameterization of the carbon analyzing power was performed. The main result of the experiment is the extraction of a new combination of the generalized polarizabilities using the double polarization observables. (orig.)

  14. Neutron diagnostics using compton suppression gamma-ray spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, S. P.; Kang, B. S. [Lab. Of Radiation Convergence Science, Dept. of Radiological Science, College of Medical Science, Konyang University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, C. S.; Cheon, M. S.; Cho, S. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Various neutron diagnostic systems such as a fission chamber, stilbene spectrometers, and a neutron activation system (NAS) have been installed at KSTAR for more accurate detection of neutron flux. Among the systems, the NAS is the most reliable and robust tool, and the measurement data of it generally are to be used for calibration of other systems. The Compton suppression gamma-ray spectrometer which can suppress the expected background, noise signal and Compton scattering was used to measure the gamma-rays of neutron activated samples. In this study, the encapsulated indium samples which are installed and irradiated by the neutrons released from the nuclear fusion reactions in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) was used and measured using Compton suppressed gamma-ray spectrometer to minimize the measurement error. From the experimental results, the statistical error was decreased by Compton suppression system. the statistical error of the measured sample activity in the Compton suppressed system is estimated to be about 2.3 %, and the statistical error of the measured sample activity in the non-suppressed system was estimated to be about 4.9 %. It was found that the system can reduce the measurement error effectively. It is confirmed that this system can be applied to ITER TBM and future nuclear fusion devices.

  15. The integration of improved Monte Carlo compton scattering algorithms into the Integrated TIGER Series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quirk, Thomas J. IV

    2004-01-01

    The Integrated TIGER Series (ITS) is a software package that solves coupled electron-photon transport problems. ITS performs analog photon tracking for energies between 1 keV and 1 GeV. Unlike its deterministic counterpart, the Monte Carlo calculations of ITS do not require a memory-intensive meshing of phase space; however, its solutions carry statistical variations. Reducing these variations is heavily dependent on runtime. Monte Carlo simulations must therefore be both physically accurate and computationally efficient. Compton scattering is the dominant photon interaction above 100 keV and below 5-10 MeV, with higher cutoffs occurring in lighter atoms. In its current model of Compton scattering, ITS corrects the differential Klein-Nishina cross sections (which assumes a stationary, free electron) with the incoherent scattering function, a function dependent on both the momentum transfer and the atomic number of the scattering medium. While this technique accounts for binding effects on the scattering angle, it excludes the Doppler broadening the Compton line undergoes because of the momentum distribution in each bound state. To correct for these effects, Ribbefor's relativistic impulse approximation (IA) will be employed to create scattering cross section differential in both energy and angle for each element. Using the parameterizations suggested by Brusa et al., scattered photon energies and angle can be accurately sampled at a high efficiency with minimal physical data. Two-body kinematics then dictates the electron's scattered direction and energy. Finally, the atomic ionization is relaxed via Auger emission or fluorescence. Future work will extend these improvements in incoherent scattering to compounds and to adjoint calculations.

  16. A Compton imaging algorithm for on-line monitoring in hadron therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillam, J. E.; Lacasta, C.; Torres-Espallardo, I.; Candela Juan, C.; Llosá, G.; Solevi, P.; Barrio, J.; Rafecas, M.

    2011-03-01

    Hadron therapy, a subject of study by the ENVISION project, promises to provide enhanced accuracy in the treatment of cancer. The Bragg-peak, characteristic of the hadron-beam structure provides larger dose to the tumor while being able to spare surrounding tissue - even tissues in the beam-path, beyond the tumor-site. However, increased dose gradients require more precise treatment, as small beam misalignment can result in dose to healthy, often delicate, surrounding tissue. The requirement for accuracy necessitates imaging during therapy, yet the lack of a transmitted beam makes this difficult. The particulate beam interacts with the target material producing neutrons, positron emitting isotopes and a broad spectra of gamma radiation. Photons from positron-annihilation allow in-beam PET to provide on-line measurements of dose deposition during therapy. However, ib-PET suffers from low statistics and lost projections due to low sensitivity and detector constraints respectively. Instead, Compton imaging of gamma radiation is proposed to provide on-line monitoring for hadron therapy. Compton imaging suffers similarly from low statistics, especially, as is the case here, when incident energy is unknown. To surmount this problem, a method of Compton image reconstruction is proposed and tested using simulated data, which reconstructs incident energy along with the spatial variation in emission density. Through incident energy estimation, a larger range of measurements are available for image-reconstruction - greatly increasing the sensitivity of the system. It is shown in this preliminary study that, even with few statistics, a reasonable estimate of the beam path is calculable.

  17. Compton-thick AGN at high and low redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akylas, A.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Corral, A.; Ranalli, P.; Lanzuisi, G.

    2017-10-01

    The most obscured sources detected in X-ray surveys, the Compton-thick AGN present great interest both because they represent the hidden side of accretion but also because they may signal the AGN birth. We analyse the NUSTAR observations from the serendipitous observations in order to study the Compton-thick AGN at the deepest possible ultra-hard band (>10 keV). We compare our results with our SWIFT/BAT findings in the local Universe, as well as with our results in the CDFS and COSMOS fields. We discuss the comparison with X-ray background synthesis models finding that a low fraction of Compton-thick sources (about 15 per cent of the obscured population) is compatible with both the 2-10keV band results and those at harder energies.

  18. Some Issues in Deeply-Virtual Compton Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji C.-R.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Compton scattering provides a unique tool for studying hadron structure. In contrast to elastic electron scattering, which provides information about the hadron’s structure in terms of form factors, Compton scattering is more versatile, as the basic process is the coupling of two electro-magnetic currents. Therefore, the hadronic structure can be described at high momentum transfer in the language of generalized parton distributions (GPDs, which code information about the light-front wave functions of the probed hadrons. In this paper we discuss some issues involved in the application of the GPD idea, in particular the effectivity of Compton scattering as a filter of the hadron structure.

  19. Electronic structure of lanthanum sesquioxide: A Compton scattering study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sonu; Sahariya, Jagrati; Arora, Gunjan; Ahuja, B. L.

    2014-10-01

    We present the first-ever experimental and theoretical momentum densities of La2O3. The Compton line shape is measured using a 20 Ci 137Cs Compton spectrometer at an intermediate resolution with full width at half maximum of 0.34 a.u. The experimental Compton profile is compared with the theoretical electron momentum densities computed using linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) method with density functional theory (DFT). It is seen that the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) within DFT reconciles better with the experiment than other DFT based approximations, validating the GGA approximation for rare-earth sesquioxides. The energy bands and density of states computed using LCAO calculations show its wide band gap nature which is in tune with the available reflectivity and photo-absorption data. In addition, Mulliken's population and charge density are also computed and discussed.

  20. Electronic structure of lanthanum sesquioxide: A Compton scattering study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Sonu [Department of Physics, M.L. Sukhadia University, Udaipur 313001, Rajasthan (India); Sahariya, Jagrati [Department of Physics, Manipal University Jaipur, Jaipur 303007, Rajasthan (India); Arora, Gunjan [Department of Physics, Geetanjali Institute of Technical Studies, Udaipur 313022, Rajasthan (India); Ahuja, B.L., E-mail: blahuja@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, M.L. Sukhadia University, Udaipur 313001, Rajasthan (India)

    2014-10-01

    We present the first-ever experimental and theoretical momentum densities of La{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The Compton line shape is measured using a 20 Ci {sup 137}Cs Compton spectrometer at an intermediate resolution with full width at half maximum of 0.34 a.u. The experimental Compton profile is compared with the theoretical electron momentum densities computed using linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) method with density functional theory (DFT). It is seen that the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) within DFT reconciles better with the experiment than other DFT based approximations, validating the GGA approximation for rare-earth sesquioxides. The energy bands and density of states computed using LCAO calculations show its wide band gap nature which is in tune with the available reflectivity and photo-absorption data. In addition, Mulliken's population and charge density are also computed and discussed.

  1. Further Study on Fast Cooling in Compton Storage Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Bulyak, Eugene; Zimmermann, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Compton sources of gamma-ray photons can produce ultimate intensity, but suffer from large recoils experienced by the circulating electrons scattering off the laser photons. We had proposed the asymmetric fast cooling which enables to mitigate the spread of energy in Compton rings. This report presents results of further study on the fast cooling: (1) A proper asymmetric setup of the scattering point results in significant reduction of the quantum losses of electrons in Compton rings with moderate energy acceptance. (2) Proposed pulsed mode of operation in synchrotron–dominated rings enhances overall performance of such gamma-ray sources. Theoretical results are in good accordance with the simulations. Performance of an existing storage ring equipped with a laser system is also evaluated.

  2. Inclusive and Exclusive Compton Processes in Quantum Chromodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Psaker, Ales [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2005-12-01

    In our work, we describe two types of Compton processes. As an example of an inclusive process, we consider the high-energy photoproduction of massive muon pairs off the nucleon. We analyze the process in the framework of the QCD parton model, in which the usual parton distributions emerge as a tool to describe the nucleon in terms of quark and gluonic degrees of freedom. To study its exclusive version, a new class of phenomenological functions is required, namely, generalized parton distributions. They can be considered as a generalization of the usual parton distributions measured in deeply inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering. Generalized parton distributions (GPDs) may be observed in hard exclusive reactions such as deeply virtual Compton scattering. We develop an extension of this particular process into the weak interaction sector. We also investigate a possible application of the GPD formalism to wide-angle real Compton scattering.

  3. The hydrogen anomaly problem in neutron Compton scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Erik B.

    2018-03-01

    Neutron Compton scattering (also called ‘deep inelastic scattering of neutrons’, DINS) is a method used to study momentum distributions of light atoms in solids and liquids. It has been employed extensively since the start-up of intense pulsed neutron sources about 25 years ago. The information lies primarily in the width and shape of the Compton profile and not in the absolute intensity of the Compton peaks. It was therefore not immediately recognized that the relative intensities of Compton peaks arising from scattering on different isotopes did not always agree with values expected from standard neutron cross-section tables. The discrepancies were particularly large for scattering on protons, a phenomenon that became known as ‘the hydrogen anomaly problem’. The present paper is a review of the discovery, experimental tests to prove or disprove the existence of the hydrogen anomaly and discussions concerning its origin. It covers a twenty-year-long history of experimentation, theoretical treatments and discussions. The problem is of fundamental interest, since it involves quantum phenomena on the subfemtosecond time scale, which are not visible in conventional thermal neutron scattering but are important in Compton scattering where neutrons have two orders of magnitude times higher energy. Different H-containing systems show different cross-section deficiencies and when the scattering processes are followed on the femtosecond time scale the cross-section losses disappear on different characteristic time scales for each H-environment. The last section of this review reproduces results from published papers based on quantum interference in scattering on identical particles (proton or deuteron pairs or clusters), which have given a quantitative theoretical explanation both regarding the H-cross-section reduction and its time dependence. Some new explanations are added and the concluding chapter summarizes the conditions for observing the specific quantum

  4. Analysis of materials in ducts by Compton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouveia, M.A.G.; Lopes, R.T.; Jesus, E.F.O. de; Camerini, C.S.

    2000-01-01

    This work presents the use of the Compton Scattering Technique as essay, for materials characterization in petroleum ducts. The essay have been accomplished in laboratory ambit, so that the presented results should be analyzed so that the system can come to be used in the field. The inspection was performed using Compton Scattering techniques, with two detectors aligned, in an angle of 90 degrees with a source of Cs-137 with energy of 662 keV. The results demonstrated the good capacity of the system to detect materials deposited in petroleum ducts during petroleum transportation. (author)

  5. A compact X-ray source based on Compton scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulyak, E.; Gladkikh, P.; Grigor' ev, Yu.; Guk, I.; Karnaukhov, I.; Khodyachikh, A.; Kononenko, S.; Mocheshnikov, N.; Mytsykov, A.; Shcherbakov, A. E-mail: shcherbakov@kipt.kharkov.ua; Tarasenko, A.; Telegin, Yu.; Zelinsky, A

    2001-07-21

    The main parameters of Kharkov electron storage ring N-100 with a beam energy range from 70 to 150 MeV are presented. The main results that were obtained in experimental researches are briefly described. The future of the N-100 upgrade to the development of the X-ray generator based on Compton back-scattering are presented. The electron beam energy range will be extended up to 250 MeV and the circumference of the storage ring will be 13.72 m. The lattice, parameters of the electron beam and the Compton back-scattering photons flux are described.

  6. Beam dynamics simulation in the X-ray Compton source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gladkikh, P.; Karnaukhov, I.; Telegin, Yu.; Shcherbakov, A. E-mail: shcherbakov@kipt.kharkov.ua; Zelinsky, A

    2002-05-01

    At the National Science Center 'Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology' the X-ray source based on Compton scattering has been developed. The computer code for simulation of electron beam dynamics with taking into account the Compton scattering effect based on Monte Carlo method is described in this report. The first results of computer simulation of beam dynamics with electron-photon interaction, parameters of electron and photon beams are presented. Calculations were carried out with the lattice of synchrotron light source SRS-800 Ukrainian Synchrotron Center.

  7. Beam dynamics simulation in the X-ray Compton source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladkikh, P.; Karnaukhov, I.; Telegin, Yu.; Shcherbakov, A.; Zelinsky, A.

    2002-01-01

    At the National Science Center 'Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology' the X-ray source based on Compton scattering has been developed. The computer code for simulation of electron beam dynamics with taking into account the Compton scattering effect based on Monte Carlo method is described in this report. The first results of computer simulation of beam dynamics with electron-photon interaction, parameters of electron and photon beams are presented. Calculations were carried out with the lattice of synchrotron light source SRS-800 Ukrainian Synchrotron Center

  8. A compact X-ray source based on Compton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulyak, E.; Gladkikh, P.; Grigor'ev, Yu.; Guk, I.; Karnaukhov, I.; Khodyachikh, A.; Kononenko, S.; Mocheshnikov, N.; Mytsykov, A.; Shcherbakov, A.; Tarasenko, A.; Telegin, Yu.; Zelinsky, A.

    2001-01-01

    The main parameters of Kharkov electron storage ring N-100 with a beam energy range from 70 to 150 MeV are presented. The main results that were obtained in experimental researches are briefly described. The future of the N-100 upgrade to the development of the X-ray generator based on Compton back-scattering are presented. The electron beam energy range will be extended up to 250 MeV and the circumference of the storage ring will be 13.72 m. The lattice, parameters of the electron beam and the Compton back-scattering photons flux are described

  9. Beam dynamics simulation in the X-ray Compton source

    CERN Document Server

    Gladkikh, P; Telegin, Yu P; Shcherbakov, A; Zelinsky, A

    2002-01-01

    At the National Science Center 'Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology' the X-ray source based on Compton scattering has been developed. The computer code for simulation of electron beam dynamics with taking into account the Compton scattering effect based on Monte Carlo method is described in this report. The first results of computer simulation of beam dynamics with electron-photon interaction, parameters of electron and photon beams are presented. Calculations were carried out with the lattice of synchrotron light source SRS-800 Ukrainian Synchrotron Center.

  10. Experimental and theoretical Compton profiles of Be, C and Al

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguiar, Julio C., E-mail: jaguiar@arn.gob.a [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Av. Del Libertador 8250, C1429BNP, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Instituto de Fisica ' Arroyo Seco' , Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, U.N.C.P.B.A., Pinto 399, 7000 Tandil (Argentina); Di Rocco, Hector O. [Instituto de Fisica ' Arroyo Seco' , Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, U.N.C.P.B.A., Pinto 399, 7000 Tandil (Argentina); Arazi, Andres [Laboratorio TANDAR, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. General Paz 1499, 1650 San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2011-02-01

    The results of Compton profile measurements, Fermi momentum determinations, and theoretical values obtained from a linear combination of Slater-type orbital (STO) for core electrons in beryllium; carbon and aluminium are presented. In addition, a Thomas-Fermi model is used to estimate the contribution of valence electrons to the Compton profile. Measurements were performed using monoenergetic photons of 59.54 keV provided by a low-intensity Am-241 {gamma}-ray source. Scattered photons were detected at 90{sup o} from the beam direction using a p-type coaxial high-purity germanium detector (HPGe). The experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical calculations.

  11. γ-ray compton profiles of liquid and crystalline aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Toshihisa; Itoh, Fumitake; Suzuki, Kenji

    1979-01-01

    Compton profiles of liquid and crystalline aluminum metal have been measured using 59.54 keV γ-rays emitted from 241 Am and Ge(Li) solid state detectors. The difference of the Compton profile between the liquid and crystalline aluminum has been found and can be qualitatively understood in terms of the change in the electronic density upon melting. The experimental profile of crystalline aluminum is in good agreement with the result of the LCAO band calculation, while the profile of liquid aluminum is in poor agreement with the free electron model and the Green function method. (author)

  12. Geometrical effects determinant of the Compton profile shape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartori, Renzo; Mainardi, R.T.

    1987-01-01

    The main purpose of this work is to evaluate the influence of the experimental set up on the shape of the Compton line. In any scattering experiment, the scattering angle is not well defined due to the collimators aperture and thus, a distribution of angles is found for each set up. This, in turn, produces the energies' distribution of the scattered photons around a mean value. This contribution has been evaluated and found it to be significant for several cases. In order to do this evaluation, a response function, that is numerically generated for each experimental set up and convoluted with the Compton profile, was defined. (Author) [es

  13. A counting silicon microstrip detector for precision compton polarimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Doll, D W; Hillert, W; Krüger, H; Stammschroer, K; Wermes, N

    2002-01-01

    A detector for the detection of laser photons backscattered off an incident high-energy electron beam for precision Compton polarimetry in the 3.5 GeV electron stretcher ring ELSA at Bonn University has been developed using individual photon counting. The photon counting detector is based on a silicon microstrip detector system using dedicated ASIC chips. The produced hits by the pair converted Compton photons are accumulated rather than individually read out. A transverse profile displacement can be measured with mu m accuracy rendering a polarization measurement of the order of 1% on the time scale of 10-15 min possible.

  14. Image reconstruction of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) on a pebble bed reactor (PBR) using expectation maximization and exact inversion algorithms: Comparison study by means of numerical phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razali, Azhani Mohd; Abdullah, Jaafar

    2015-01-01

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) is a well-known imaging technique used in medical application, and it is part of medical imaging modalities that made the diagnosis and treatment of disease possible. However, SPECT technique is not only limited to the medical sector. Many works are carried out to adapt the same concept by using high-energy photon emission to diagnose process malfunctions in critical industrial systems such as in chemical reaction engineering research laboratories, as well as in oil and gas, petrochemical and petrochemical refining industries. Motivated by vast applications of SPECT technique, this work attempts to study the application of SPECT on a Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) using numerical phantom of pebbles inside the PBR core. From the cross-sectional images obtained from SPECT, the behavior of pebbles inside the core can be analyzed for further improvement of the PBR design. As the quality of the reconstructed image is largely dependent on the algorithm used, this work aims to compare two image reconstruction algorithms for SPECT, namely the Expectation Maximization Algorithm and the Exact Inversion Formula. The results obtained from the Exact Inversion Formula showed better image contrast and sharpness, and shorter computational time compared to the Expectation Maximization Algorithm

  15. Image reconstruction of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) on a pebble bed reactor (PBR) using expectation maximization and exact inversion algorithms: Comparison study by means of numerical phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razali, Azhani Mohd, E-mail: azhani@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Abdullah, Jaafar, E-mail: jaafar@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my [Plant Assessment Technology (PAT) Group, Industrial Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, 43000 Kajang (Malaysia)

    2015-04-29

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) is a well-known imaging technique used in medical application, and it is part of medical imaging modalities that made the diagnosis and treatment of disease possible. However, SPECT technique is not only limited to the medical sector. Many works are carried out to adapt the same concept by using high-energy photon emission to diagnose process malfunctions in critical industrial systems such as in chemical reaction engineering research laboratories, as well as in oil and gas, petrochemical and petrochemical refining industries. Motivated by vast applications of SPECT technique, this work attempts to study the application of SPECT on a Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) using numerical phantom of pebbles inside the PBR core. From the cross-sectional images obtained from SPECT, the behavior of pebbles inside the core can be analyzed for further improvement of the PBR design. As the quality of the reconstructed image is largely dependent on the algorithm used, this work aims to compare two image reconstruction algorithms for SPECT, namely the Expectation Maximization Algorithm and the Exact Inversion Formula. The results obtained from the Exact Inversion Formula showed better image contrast and sharpness, and shorter computational time compared to the Expectation Maximization Algorithm.

  16. Image reconstruction of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) on a pebble bed reactor (PBR) using expectation maximization and exact inversion algorithms: Comparison study by means of numerical phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razali, Azhani Mohd; Abdullah, Jaafar

    2015-04-01

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) is a well-known imaging technique used in medical application, and it is part of medical imaging modalities that made the diagnosis and treatment of disease possible. However, SPECT technique is not only limited to the medical sector. Many works are carried out to adapt the same concept by using high-energy photon emission to diagnose process malfunctions in critical industrial systems such as in chemical reaction engineering research laboratories, as well as in oil and gas, petrochemical and petrochemical refining industries. Motivated by vast applications of SPECT technique, this work attempts to study the application of SPECT on a Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) using numerical phantom of pebbles inside the PBR core. From the cross-sectional images obtained from SPECT, the behavior of pebbles inside the core can be analyzed for further improvement of the PBR design. As the quality of the reconstructed image is largely dependent on the algorithm used, this work aims to compare two image reconstruction algorithms for SPECT, namely the Expectation Maximization Algorithm and the Exact Inversion Formula. The results obtained from the Exact Inversion Formula showed better image contrast and sharpness, and shorter computational time compared to the Expectation Maximization Algorithm.

  17. Design of a Compton camera for 3D prompt-{gamma} imaging during ion beam therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roellinghoff, F., E-mail: roelling@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Universite de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); Universite Lyon 1 and CNRS/IN2P3, UMR 5822, IPNL, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); INSA-Lyon Laboratory of Nondestructive Testing using Ionizing Radiation (CNDRI), F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Richard, M.-H., E-mail: mrichard@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Universite de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); Universite Lyon 1 and CNRS/IN2P3, UMR 5822, IPNL, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); INSA-Lyon Laboratory of Nondestructive Testing using Ionizing Radiation (CNDRI), F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Chevallier, M.; Constanzo, J.; Dauvergne, D. [Universite de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); Universite Lyon 1 and CNRS/IN2P3, UMR 5822, IPNL, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Freud, N. [INSA-Lyon Laboratory of Nondestructive Testing using Ionizing Radiation (CNDRI), F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Henriquet, P.; Le Foulher, F. [Universite de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); Universite Lyon 1 and CNRS/IN2P3, UMR 5822, IPNL, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Letang, J.M. [INSA-Lyon Laboratory of Nondestructive Testing using Ionizing Radiation (CNDRI), F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Montarou, G. [LPC, CNRS/IN2P3, Clermont-F. University (France); Ray, C.; Testa, E.; Testa, M. [Universite de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); Universite Lyon 1 and CNRS/IN2P3, UMR 5822, IPNL, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Walenta, A.H. [Uni-Siegen, FB Physik, Emmy-Noether Campus, D-57068 Siegen (Germany)

    2011-08-21

    We investigate, by means of Geant4 simulations, a real-time method to control the position of the Bragg peak during ion therapy, based on a Compton camera in combination with a beam tagging device (hodoscope) in order to detect the prompt gamma emitted during nuclear fragmentation. The proposed set-up consists of a stack of 2 mm thick silicon strip detectors and a LYSO absorber detector. The {gamma} emission points are reconstructed analytically by intersecting the ion trajectories given by the beam hodoscope and the Compton cones given by the camera. The camera response to a polychromatic point source in air is analyzed with regard to both spatial resolution and detection efficiency. Various geometrical configurations of the camera have been tested. In the proposed configuration, for a typical polychromatic photon point source, the spatial resolution of the camera is about 8.3 mm FWHM and the detection efficiency 2.5x10{sup -4} (reconstructable photons/emitted photons in 4{pi}). Finally, the clinical applicability of our system is considered and possible starting points for further developments of a prototype are discussed.

  18. An Iwasawa-Taniguchi Effect for Compton-thick Active Galactic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boorman, Peter G.; Gandhi, Poshak; Baloković, Mislav; Brightman, Murray; Harrison, Fiona; Ricci, Claudio; Stern, Daniel

    2018-04-01

    We present the first study of an Iwasawa-Taniguchi/`X-ray Baldwin' effect for Compton-thick active galactic nuclei (AGN). We report a statistically significant anti-correlation between the rest-frame equivalent width (EW) of the narrow core of the neutral Fe Kα fluorescence emission line, ubiquitously observed in the reflection spectra of obscured AGN, and the mid-infrared 12 μ m continuum luminosity (taken as a proxy for the bolometric AGN luminosity). Our sample consists of 72 Compton-thick AGN selected from pointed and deep-field observations covering a redshift range of z ˜ 0.0014 - 3.7. We employ a Monte Carlo-based fitting method, which returns a Spearman's Rank correlation coefficient of ρ = - 0.28 ± 0.12, significant to 98.7% confidence. The best fit found is log(EW_{Fe Kα }) ∝ -0.08± 0.04 log(L_{12 {μ } m}), which is consistent with multiple studies of the X-ray Baldwin effect for unobscured and mildly obscured AGN. This is an unexpected result, as the Fe Kα line is conventionally thought to originate from the same region as the underlying reflection continuum, which together constitute the reflection spectrum. We discuss the implications this could have if confirmed on larger samples, including a systematic underestimation of the line of sight X-ray obscuring column density and hence the intrinsic luminosities and growth rates for the most luminous AGN.

  19. First coincidences in pre-clinical Compton camera prototype for medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studen, A.; Burdette, D.; Chesi, E.; Cindro, V.; Clinthorne, N. H.; Dulinski, W.; Fuster, J.; Han, L.; Kagan, H.; Lacasta, C.; Llosá, G.; Marques, A. C.; Malakhov, N.; Meier, D.; Mikuž, M.; Park, S. J.; Roe, S.; Rogers, W. L.; Steinberg, J.; Weilhammer, P.; Wilderman, S. J.; Zhang, L.; Žontar, D.

    2004-09-01

    Compton collimated imaging may improve the detection of gamma rays emitted by radioisotopes used in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). We present a crude prototype consisting of a single 500μm thick, 256 pad silicon detector with pad size of 1.4×1.4mm2, combined with a 15×15×1cm3 NaI scintillator crystal coupled to a set of 20 photo multipliers. Emphasis is placed on the performance of the silicon detector and the associated read-out electronics, which has so far proved to be the most challenging part of the set-up. Results were obtained using the VATAGP3, 128 channel low-noise self-triggering ASIC as the silicon detector's front-end. The noise distribution (σ) of the spectroscopic outputs gave an equivalent noise charge (ENC) with a mean value of =137e with a spread of 10e, corresponding to an energy resolution of 1.15keV FWHM for the scattered electron energy. Threshold settings above 8.2keV were required for stable operation of the trigger. Coincident Compton scatter events in both modules were observed for photons emitted by 57Co source with principal gamma ray energies of 122 and 136keV.

  20. POLARIMETRY AND THE HIGH-ENERGY EMISSION MECHANISMS IN QUASAR JETS: THE CASE OF PKS 1136–135

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cara, Mihai; Perlman, Eric S.; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Cheung, Chi C.; Coppi, Paolo S.; Georganopoulos, Markos; Worrall, Diana M.; Birkinshaw, Mark; Sparks, William B.; Marshall, Herman L.; Stawarz, Lukasz; Begelman, Mitchell C.; O'Dea, Christopher P.; Baum, Stefi A.

    2013-01-01

    Since the discovery of kiloparsec-scale X-ray emission from quasar jets, the physical processes responsible for their high-energy emission have been poorly defined. A number of mechanisms are under active debate, including synchrotron radiation, inverse-Comptonized cosmic microwave background (IC/CMB) emission, and other Comptonization processes. In a number of cases, the optical and X-ray emission of jet regions are inked by a single spectral component, and in those, high-resolution multi-band imaging and polarimetry can be combined to yield a powerful diagnostic of jet emission processes. Here we report on deep imaging photometry of the jet of PKS 1136–135 obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope. We find that several knots are highly polarized in the optical, with fractional polarization Π > 30%. When combined with the broadband spectral shape observed in these regions, this is very difficult to explain via IC/CMB models, unless the scattering particles are at the lowest-energy tip of the electron energy distribution, with Lorentz factor γ ∼ 1, and the jet is also very highly beamed (δ ≥ 20) and viewed within a few degrees of the line of sight. We discuss both the IC/CMB and synchrotron interpretation of the X-ray emission in the light of this new evidence, presenting new models of the spectral energy distribution and also the matter content of this jet. The high polarizations do not completely rule out the possibility of IC/CMB optical-to-X-ray emission in this jet, but they do strongly disfavor the model. We discuss the implications of this finding, and also the prospects for future work

  1. Electronic properties and Compton profiles of silver iodide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    scattering correction upto triple scattering. The contribution from the higher-order scattering is expected within the statistical errors of the experiment. Further, as suggested by our group [26], we have also corrected the experimental profile for the bremsstrahlung (BS) background due to photo and Compton recoiled electrons.

  2. Generalized parton distributions and deep virtual Compton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasell, D.; Milner, R.; Takase, K.

    2001-01-01

    A brief description of generalized parton distributions is presented together with a discussion on studying such distributions via deep virtual Compton scattering. The kinematics, estimates of rates, and accuracies achievable for measuring DVCS utilizing a 5+50 GeV ep collider are also provided

  3. On a low intensity 241Am Compton spectrometer for measurement ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Phys. 111,. 163 (1999). [6] N I Papanicolaou, N C Bacalis and D A Papaconstantopoulos, Handbook of calcu- lated electron momentum distributions, Compton profiles and X-ray form factors of elemental solids (CRC Press, London, 1991). [7] V R Saunders, R Dovesi, C Roetti, R Orlando, C M Zicovich-Wilson, N M Harrison, ...

  4. Simple modification of Compton polarimeter to redirect synchrotron radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Benesch

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Synchrotron radiation produced as an electron beam passes through a bending magnet is a significant source of background in many experiments. Using modeling, we show that simple modifications of the magnet geometry can reduce this background by orders of magnitude in some circumstances. Specifically, we examine possible modifications of the four dipole magnets used in Jefferson Lab’s Hall A Compton polarimeter chicane. This Compton polarimeter has been a crucial part of experiments with polarized beams and the next generation of experiments will utilize increased beam energies, up to 11 GeV, requiring a corresponding increase in Compton dipole field to 1.5 T. In consequence, the synchrotron radiation (SR from the dipole chicane will be greatly increased. Three possible modifications of the chicane dipoles are studied; each design moves about 2% of the integrated bending field to provide a gentle bend in critical regions along the beam trajectory which, in turn, greatly reduces the synchrotron radiation within the acceptance of the Compton polarimeter photon detector. Each of the modifications studied also softens the SR energy spectrum at the detector sufficiently to allow shielding with 5 mm of lead. Simulations show that these designs are each capable of reducing the background signal due to SR by three orders of magnitude. The three designs considered vary in their need for vacuum vessel changes and in their effectiveness.

  5. Comprehensive study of observables in Compton scattering on the nucleon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grießhammer, Harald W.; McGovern, Judith A.; Phillips, Daniel R.

    2018-03-01

    We present an analysis of 13 observables in Compton scattering on the proton. Cross sections, asymmetries with polarised beam and/or targets, and polarisation-transfer observables are investigated for energies up to the Δ(1232) resonance to determine their sensitivity to the proton's dipole scalar and spin polarisabilities. The Chiral Effective Field Theory Compton amplitude we use is complete at N4LO, O(e2δ4), for photon energies ω˜ m_{π}, and so has an accuracy of a few per cent there. At photon energies in the resonance region, it is complete at NLO, O(e2δ0), and so its accuracy there is about 20%. We find that for energies from pion-production threshold to about 250 MeV, multiple asymmetries have significant sensitivity to presently ill-determined combinations of proton spin polarisabilities. We also argue that the broad outcomes of this analysis will be replicated in complementary theoretical approaches, e.g., dispersion relations. Finally, we show that below the pion-production threshold, 6 observables suffice to reconstruct the Compton amplitude, and above it 11 are required. Although not necessary for polarisability extractions, this opens the possibility to perform "complete" Compton-scattering experiments. An interactive Mathematica notebook, including results for the neutron, is available from judith.mcgovern@manchester.ac.uk.

  6. Electronic structure of hafnium: A Compton profile study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, we report the first-ever isotropic Compton profile of hafnium measured at an intermediate resolution, with 661.65 keV -radiation. To compare our experimental data, the theoretical computations have also been carried out within the framework of pseudopotential using CRYSTAL03 code and the ...

  7. New JLab/Hall A Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Defurne, Maxime [CEA, Centre de Saclay, IRFU/SPhN/LSN, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette, France

    2015-08-01

    New data points for unpolarized Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering cross sections have been extracted from the E00-110 experiment at Q2=1.9 GeV2 effectively doubling the statistics available in the valence region. A careful study of systematic uncertainties has been performed.

  8. Attenuation studies near K-absorption edges using Compton ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    journal of. April 2008 physics pp. 633–641. Attenuation studies near K-absorption edges using. Compton scattered 241Am gamma rays. K K ABDULLAH1, N RAMACHANDRAN2, K KARUNAKARAN NAIR3,. B R S BABU4, ANTONY JOSEPH4, RAJIVE .... A Linux-based package,. 634. Pramana – J. Phys., Vol. 70, No.

  9. Strong anisotropy in the low temperature Compton profiles of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Compton profiles of momentum distribution of conduction electrons in the orthorhombic phase of -Ga metal at low temperature are calculated in the band model for the three crystallographic directions (100), (010), and (001). Unlike the results at room temperature, previously reported by Lengeler, Lasser and Mair, the ...

  10. Electronic properties and Compton profiles of silver iodide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have carried out an extensive study of electronic properties of silver iodide in - and -phases. The theoretical Compton profiles, energy bands, density of states and anisotropies in momentum densities are computed using density functional theories. We have also employed full-potential linearized augmented ...

  11. Compton-thick AGN in the 3XMM spectral survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgantopoulos, I.; Corral, A.; Watson, M.; Rosen, S.

    2014-07-01

    In the framework of an ESA Prodex project, we have derived X-ray spectral fits for a large number (120,000) of 3XMM sources. We focus our study on the 120 square degrees that overlap with the SDSS survey. For about 1,100 AGN there are spectroscopic redsifts available. We automatically select candidate Compton-thick sources using simple spectral models. Various selection criteria are applied including a) a high equivalent width FeK line b) a flat spectrum with a photon index of 1.4 or lower at the 90% confidence level or at higher redshift an absorption turnover consistent with a column density of logNh=24. We find 30 candidate Compton-thick sources. More detailed spectral models are applied trying to secure the Compton-thick nature of these sources. We compare our findings with X-ray background synthesis models as well as with Compton-thick surveys in the COSMOS and XMM/CDFS areas.

  12. On the Compton scattering redistribution function in plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madej, J.; Różańska, A.; Majczyna, A.; Należyty, M.

    2017-08-01

    Compton scattering is the dominant opacity source in hot neutron stars, accretion discs around black holes and hot coronae. We collected here a set of numerical expressions of the Compton scattering redistribution functions (RFs) for unpolarized radiation, which are more exact than the widely used Kompaneets equation. The principal aim of this paper is the presentation of the RF by Guilbert, which is corrected for the computational errors in the original paper. This corrected RF was used in the series of papers on model atmosphere computations of hot neutron stars. We have also organized four existing algorithms for the RF computations into a unified form ready to use in radiative transfer and model atmosphere codes. The exact method by Nagirner & Poutanen was numerically compared to all other algorithms in a very wide spectral range from hard X-rays to radio waves. Sample computations of the Compton scattering RFs in thermal plasma were done for temperatures corresponding to the atmospheres of bursting neutron stars and hot intergalactic medium. Our formulae are also useful to study the Compton scattering of unpolarized microwave background radiation in hot intracluster gas and the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. We conclude that the formulae by Guilbert and the exact quantum mechanical formulae yield practically the same RFs for gas temperatures relevant to the atmospheres of X-ray bursting neutron stars, T ≤ 108 K.

  13. Attenuation studies near K-absorption edges using Compton ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The results are consistent with theoretical values derived from the XCOM package. Keywords. Photon interaction; 241Am; gamma ray attenuation; Compton scattering; absorption edge; rare earth elements. PACS Nos 32.80.-t; 32.90.+a. 1. Introduction. Photon interaction studies at energies around the absorption edge have ...

  14. Momentum densities and Compton profiles of alkali-metal atoms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 60; Issue 3 ... Quantum defect theory; wave functions of alkali-metal atoms; momentum properties. ... to study the momentum properties of atoms from 3Li to 37Rb. The numerical results obtained for the momentum density, moments of momentum density and Compton ...

  15. Infrared phenomena in quantum electrodynamics : II. Bremsstrahlung and compton scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haeringen, W. van

    The infrared aspects of quantum electrodynamics are discussed by treating two examples of scattering processes, bremsstrahlung and Compton scattering. As in the previous paper one uses a non-covariant diagram technique which gives very clear insight in the cancelling of infrared divergences between

  16. On a low intensity 241Am Compton spectrometer for measurement ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, a new design and construction of a low intensity (100 mCi) 241Am -ray Compton spectrometer is presented. The planar spectrometer is based on a small disc source with the shortest geometry. Measurement of the momentum density of polycrystalline Al is used to evaluate the performance of the new design.

  17. Strong anisotropy in the low temperature Compton profiles of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Compton profiles of momentum distribution of conduction electrons in the orthorhom- bic phase of α-Ga metal at low temperature are calculated in the band model for the three crys- tallographic directions (100), (010), and (001). Unlike the results at room temperature, previously reported by Lengeler, Lasser and ...

  18. On a low intensity 241 Am Compton spectrometer for measurement ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, a new design and construction of a low intensity (100 mCi) 241Am -ray Compton spectrometer is presented. The planar spectrometer is based on a small disc source with the shortest geometry. Measurement of the momentum density of polycrystalline Al is used to evaluate the performance of the new design.

  19. Gamma-spectrometry with Compton suppressed detectors arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schueck, C.; Hannachi, F.; Chapman, R.

    1985-01-01

    Recent results of experiments performed with two different Compton-suppressed detectors arrays in Daresbury and Berkeley (/sup 163,164/Yb and 154 Er, respectively), are presented together with a brief description of the national French array presently under construction in Strasbourg. 25 refs., 15 figs

  20. Strong anisotropy in the low temperature Compton profiles of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B P PANDA and N C MOHAPATRA£. Department of Physics, Chikiti Mahavidyalaya, Chikiti 761 010, India. £Department of Physics, Berhampur University, Berhampur 760 007, India. MS received 12 April 2001; revised 1 September 2001. Abstract. Compton profiles of momentum distribution of conduction electrons in the ...

  1. GPU-accelerated iterative reconstruction from Compton scattered data using a matched pair of conic projector and backprojector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Van-Giang; Lee, Soo-Jin

    2016-07-01

    Iterative reconstruction from Compton scattered data is known to be computationally more challenging than that from conventional line-projection based emission data in that the gamma rays that undergo Compton scattering are modeled as conic projections rather than line projections. In conventional tomographic reconstruction, to parallelize the projection and backprojection operations using the graphics processing unit (GPU), approximated methods that use an unmatched pair of ray-tracing forward projector and voxel-driven backprojector have been widely used. In this work, we propose a new GPU-accelerated method for Compton camera reconstruction which is more accurate by using exactly matched pair of projector and backprojector. To calculate conic forward projection, we first sample the cone surface into conic rays and accumulate the intersecting chord lengths of the conic rays passing through voxels using a fast ray-tracing method (RTM). For conic backprojection, to obtain the true adjoint of the conic forward projection, while retaining the computational efficiency of the GPU, we use a voxel-driven RTM which is essentially the same as the standard RTM used for the conic forward projector. Our simulation results show that, while the new method is about 3 times slower than the approximated method, it is still about 16 times faster than the CPU-based method without any loss of accuracy. The net conclusion is that our proposed method is guaranteed to retain the reconstruction accuracy regardless of the number of iterations by providing a perfectly matched projector-backprojector pair, which makes iterative reconstruction methods for Compton imaging faster and more accurate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Design of a Paraxial Inverse Compton Scattering Diagnostic for an Intense Relativistic Electron Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    same energy range [26-29]. After the scattered photons are produced at z = 34.5 m they begin to propagate forward in a cone with a half angle of θs...34 Xray "Energy"(keV)" LIF" HOPG" PET" ADP" TAP" RAP" KAP" ODPB" Figure 7. Bragg angle plotted as a function crystal materials and X-ray energy. The

  3. Compton DIV: Using a Compton-Based Gamma-Ray Imager for Design Information Verification of Uranium Enrichment Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burks, M.; Verbeke, J.; Dougan, A.; Wang, T.; Decman, D.

    2009-01-01

    A feasibility study has been performed to determine the potential usefulness of Compton imaging as a tool for design information verification (DIV) of uranium enrichment plants. Compton imaging is a method of gamma-ray imaging capable of imaging with a 360-degree field of view over a broad range of energies. These systems can image a room (with a time span on the order of one hour) and return a picture of the distribution and composition of radioactive material in that room. The effectiveness of Compton imaging depends on the sensitivity and resolution of the instrument as well the strength and energy of the radioactive material to be imaged. This study combined measurements and simulations to examine the specific issue of UF 6 gas flow in pipes, at various enrichment levels, as well as hold-up resulting from the accumulation of enriched material in those pipes. It was found that current generation imagers could image pipes carrying UF 6 in less than one hour at moderate to high enrichment. Pipes with low enriched gas would require more time. It was also found that hold-up was more amenable to this technique and could be imaged in gram quantities in a fraction of an hour. another questions arises regarding the ability to separately image two pipes spaced closely together. This depends on the capabilities of the instrument in question. These results are described in detail. In addition, suggestions are given as to how to develop Compton imaging as a tool for DIV

  4. Relativistic Turbulence with Strong Synchrotron and Synchrotron-Self-Compton Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzdensky, D. A.

    2018-03-01

    Many relativistic plasma environments in high-energy astrophysics, including pulsar wind nebulae, hot accretion flows onto black holes, relativistic jets in active galactic nuclei and gamma-ray bursts, and giant radio lobes, are naturally turbulent. The plasma in these environments is often so hot that synchrotron and inverse-Compton (IC) radiative cooling becomes important. In this paper we investigate the general thermodynamic and radiative properties (and hence the observational appearance) of an optically thin relativistically hot plasma stirred by driven magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence and cooled by radiation. We find that if the system reaches a statistical equilibrium where turbulent heating is balanced by radiative cooling, the effective electron temperature tends to attain a universal value θ = kT_e/m_e c^2 ˜ 1/√{τ_T}, where τT = neσTL ≪ 1 is the system's Thomson optical depth, essentially independent of the strength of turbulent driving and hence of the magnetic field. This is because both MHD turbulent dissipation and synchrotron cooling are proportional to the magnetic energy density. We also find that synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) cooling and perhaps a few higher-order IC components are automatically comparable to synchrotron in this regime. The overall broadband radiation spectrum then consists of several distinct components (synchrotron, SSC, etc.), well separated in photon energy (by a factor ˜ τ_T^{-1}) and roughly equal in power. The number of IC peaks is checked by Klein-Nishina effects and depends logarithmically on τT and the magnetic field. We also examine the limitations due to synchrotron self-absorption, explore applications to Crab PWN and blazar jets, and discuss links to radiative magnetic reconnection.

  5. A simple framework for modelling the dependence of bulk Comptonization by turbulence on accretion disc parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, J.; Blaes, O. M.; Hirose, S.

    2018-03-01

    Warm Comptonization models for the soft X-ray excess in AGN do not self-consistently explain the relationship between the Comptonizing medium and the underlying accretion disc. Because of this, they cannot directly connect the fitted Comptonization temperatures and optical depths to accretion disc parameters. Since bulk velocities exceed thermal velocities in highly radiation pressure dominated discs, in these systems bulk Comptonization by turbulence may provide a physical basis in the disc itself for warm Comptonization models. We model the dependence of bulk Comptonization on fundamental accretion disc parameters, such as mass, luminosity, radius, spin, inner boundary condition, and α. In addition to constraining warm Comptonization models, our model can help distinguish contributions from bulk Comptonization to the soft X-ray excess from those due to other physical mechanisms, such as absorption and reflection. By linking the time variability of bulk Comptonization to fluctuations in the disc vertical structure due to MRI turbulence, our results show that observations of the soft X-ray excess can be used to study disc turbulence in the radiation pressure dominated regime. Because our model connects bulk Comptonization to one dimensional vertical structure temperature profiles in a physically intuitive way, it will be useful for understanding this effect in future simulations run in new regimes.

  6. FORWARD AND INVERSE MODELING OF THE EMISSION AND TRANSMISSION SPECTRUM OF GJ 436B: INVESTIGATING METAL ENRICHMENT, TIDAL HEATING, AND CLOUDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morley, Caroline V. [Department of Astronomy, Harvard University, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Knutson, Heather [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Line, Michael [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, 781 South Terrace Road, Tempe, AZ 85281 (United States); Fortney, Jonathan J.; Teal, Dillon [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Thorngren, Daniel [Department of Physics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Marley, Mark S.; Lupu, Roxana, E-mail: caroline.morley@cfa.harvard.edu [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2017-02-01

    The Neptune-mass GJ 436b is one of the most studied transiting exoplanets with repeated measurements of its thermal emission and transmission spectra. We build on previous studies to answer outstanding questions about this planet, including its potentially high metallicity and tidal heating of its interior. We present new observations of GJ 436b’s thermal emission at 3.6 and 4.5 μ m, which reduce uncertainties in estimates of GJ 436b’s flux at those wavelengths and demonstrate consistency between Spitzer observations spanning more than 7 yr. We analyze the Spitzer thermal emission photometry and Hubble WFC3 transmission spectrum. We use a dual-pronged modeling approach of both self-consistent and retrieval models. We vary the metallicity, intrinsic luminosity from tidal heating, disequilibrium chemistry, and heat redistribution. We also study clouds and photochemical hazes, but do not find strong evidence for either. The self-consistent and retrieval models combine to suggest that GJ 436b has a high atmospheric metallicity, with best fits at or above several hundred times solar metallicity, tidal heating warming its interior with best-fit intrinsic effective temperatures around 300–350 K, and disequilibrium chemistry. High metal enrichments (>600× solar) occur from the accretion of rocky, rather than icy, material. Assuming the interior temperature T {sub int} ∼ 300–350 K, we find a dissipation factor Q ′ ∼ 2 × 10{sup 5}–10{sup 6}, larger than Neptune’s Q ′, implying a long tidal circularization timescale for the orbit. We suggest that Neptune-mass planets may be more diverse than imagined, with metal enhancements spanning several orders of magnitude, to perhaps over 1000× solar metallicity. High-fidelity observations with instruments like the James Webb Space Telescope will be critical for characterizing this diversity.

  7. Electronic properties of Be and Al by Compton scattering technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguiar, J.C.; Di Rocco, H.O.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, electronic properties of beryllium and aluminum are examined by using Compton scattering technique. The method is based on the irradiation of samples using a beam narrow of mono- energetic photons of 59.54 keV product of radioactive decay of Am -241 . Scattered radiation is collected by a high resolution semiconductor detector positioned at an angle of 90°. The measured spectrum is commonly called Compton profile and contains useful information about the electronic structure of the material. The experimental results are compared with theoretical calculations such as density functional theory showing a good agreement. However, these results show some discrepancies with many libraries used in codes such as Monte Carlo simulation. Since these libraries are based on the values tabulated by Biggs, Mendelsohn and Mann 1975 thus overestimating the scattered radiation on the material. (authors) [es

  8. Laser Compton Scattering Gamma Ray Induced Photo-Trasmutation

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Dazhi

    2004-01-01

    High brightness beams of gamma rays produced with laser Compton scattering have the potential to realize photo-transmutation through (γ,n) reaction, implying an efficient method to dispose long-lived fission products. Preliminary investigations have been carried out in understanding the feasibility of development of a transmutation facility to repose nuclear waste. A laser Compton scattering experimental setup based on a storage ring started to generate gamma-ray beams for studying the coupling of gamma photons and nuclear giant resonance. This paper demonstrates the dependency of nuclear transmutation efficiency on target dimensions and gamma ray features. 197Au sample was adopted in our experiment, and experimental results correspond to the theoretical estimations.

  9. Deeply virtual compton scattering on a virtual pion target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amrath, D.; Diehl, M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Lansberg, J.P. [Ecole Polytechnique, 91 - Palaiseau (France). Centre de Physique Theorique]|[Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2008-07-15

    We study deeply virtual Compton scattering on a virtual pion that is emitted by a proton. Using a range of models for the generalized parton distributions of the pion, we evaluate the cross section, as well as the beam spin and beam charge asymmetries in the leading-twist approximation. Studying Compton scattering on the pion in suitable kinematics puts high demands on both beam energy and luminosity, and we find that the corresponding requirements will first be met after the energy upgrade at Jefferson Laboratory. As a by-product of our study, we construct a parameterization of pion generalized parton distributions that has a non-trivial interplay between the x and t dependence and is in good agreement with form factor data and lattice calculations. (orig.)

  10. Simplified slow anti-coincidence circuit for Compton suppression systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Azmi, Darwish [Department of Applied Sciences, College of Technological Studies, Public Authority for Applied Education and Training, P.O. Box 42325, Shuwaikh 70654 (Kuwait)], E-mail: ds.alazmi@paaet.edu.kw

    2008-08-15

    Slow coincidence circuits for the anti-coincidence measurements have been considered for use in Compton suppression technique. The simplified version of the slow circuit has been found to be fast enough, satisfactory and allows an easy system setup, particularly with the advantage of the automatic threshold setting of the low-level discrimination. A well-type NaI detector as the main detector surrounded by plastic guard detector has been arranged to investigate the performance of the Compton suppression spectrometer using the simplified slow circuit. The system has been tested to observe the improvement in the energy spectra for medium to high-energy gamma-ray photons from terrestrial and environmental samples.

  11. Comparison between electron and neutron Compton scattering studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreh Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We compare two techniques: Electron Compton Scattering (ECS and neutron Compton scattering (NCS and show that using certain incident energies, both can measure the atomic kinetic energy of atoms in molecules and solids. The information obtained is related to the Doppler broadening of nuclear levels and is very useful for deducing the widths of excited levels in many nuclei in self absorption measurements. A comparison between the atomic kinetic energies measured by the two methods on the same samples is made. Some results are also compared with calculated atomic kinetic energies obtained using the harmonic approximation where the vibrational frequencies were taken from IR/Raman optical measurements. The advantages of the ECS method are emphasized.

  12. Electronic properties and Compton scattering studies of monoclinic tungsten dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heda, N. L.; Ahuja, Ushma

    2015-01-01

    We present the first ever Compton profile measurement of WO2 using a 20 Ci 137Cs γ-ray source. The experimental data have been used to test different approximations of density functional theory in linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) scheme. It is found that theoretical Compton profile deduced using generalized gradient approximation (GGA) gives a better agreement than local density approximation and second order GGA. The computed energy bands, density of states and Mulliken's populations (MP) data confirm a metal-like behavior of WO2. The electronic properties calculated using LCAO approach are also compared with those obtained using full potential linearized augmented plane wave method. The nature of bonding in WO2 is also compared with isoelectronic WX2 (X=S, Se) compounds in terms of equal-valence-electron-density profiles and MP data, which suggest an increase in ionic character in the order WSe2→WS2→WO2.

  13. Performance evaluation of MACACO: a multilayer Compton camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Enrique; Barrio, John; Etxebeste, Ane; Ortega, Pablo G.; Lacasta, Carlos; Oliver, Josep F.; Solaz, Carles; Llosá, Gabriela

    2017-09-01

    Compton imaging devices have been proposed and studied for a wide range of applications. We have developed a Compton camera prototype which can be operated with two or three detector layers based on monolithic lanthanum bromide (LaBr3 ) crystals coupled to silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs), to be used for proton range verification in hadron therapy. In this work, we present the results obtained with our prototype in laboratory tests with radioactive sources and in simulation studies. Images of a 22 Na and an 88 Y radioactive sources have been successfully reconstructed. The full width half maximum of the reconstructed images is below 4 mm for a 22 Na source at a distance of 5 cm.

  14. Simplified slow anti-coincidence circuit for Compton suppression systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Azmi, Darwish

    2008-01-01

    Slow coincidence circuits for the anti-coincidence measurements have been considered for use in Compton suppression technique. The simplified version of the slow circuit has been found to be fast enough, satisfactory and allows an easy system setup, particularly with the advantage of the automatic threshold setting of the low-level discrimination. A well-type NaI detector as the main detector surrounded by plastic guard detector has been arranged to investigate the performance of the Compton suppression spectrometer using the simplified slow circuit. The system has been tested to observe the improvement in the energy spectra for medium to high-energy gamma-ray photons from terrestrial and environmental samples

  15. The Compton-Schwarzschild correspondence from extended de Broglie relations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lake, Matthew J. [The Institute for Fundamental Study, “The Tah Poe Academia Institute' ,Naresuan University, Phitsanulok 65000 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Ministry of Education,Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Carr, Bernard [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London,Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-17

    The Compton wavelength gives the minimum radius within which the mass of a particle may be localized due to quantum effects, while the Schwarzschild radius gives the maximum radius within which the mass of a black hole may be localized due to classial gravity. In a mass-radius diagram, the two lines intersect near the Planck point (l{sub P},m{sub P}), where quantum gravity effects become significant. Since canonical (non-gravitational) quantum mechanics is based on the concept of wave-particle duality, encapsulated in the de Broglie relations, these relations should break down near (l{sub P},m{sub P}). It is unclear what physical interpretation can be given to quantum particles with energy E≫m{sub P}c{sup 2}, since they correspond to wavelengths λ≪l{sub P} or time periods τ≪t{sub P} in the standard theory. We therefore propose a correction to the standard de Broglie relations, which gives rise to a modified Schrödinger equation and a modified expression for the Compton wavelength, which may be extended into the region E≫m{sub P}c{sup 2}. For the proposed modification, we recover the expression for the Schwarzschild radius for E≫m{sub P}c{sup 2} and the usual Compton formula for E≪m{sub P}c{sup 2}. The sign of the inequality obtained from the uncertainty principle reverses at m≈m{sub P}, so that the Compton wavelength and event horizon size may be interpreted as minimum and maximum radii, respectively. We interpret the additional terms in the modified de Broglie relations as representing the self-gravitation of the wave packet.

  16. Directional Unfolded Source Term (DUST) for Compton Cameras.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Dean J.; Mitchell, Dean J.; Horne, Steven M.; O' Brien, Sean; Thoreson, Gregory G

    2018-03-01

    A Directional Unfolded Source Term (DUST) algorithm was developed to enable improved spectral analysis capabilities using data collected by Compton cameras. Achieving this objective required modification of the detector response function in the Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS). Experimental data that were collected in support of this work include measurements of calibration sources at a range of separation distances and cylindrical depleted uranium castings.

  17. Renormalized Compton scattering and nonlinear damping of collisionless drift waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krommes, J.A.

    1979-05-01

    A kinetic theory for the nonlinear damping of collisionless drift waves in a shear-free magnetic field is presented. The general formalism is a renormalized version of induced scattering on the ions and reduces correctly to weak turbulence theory. The approximation studied explicitly reduces to Compton scattering, systematizes thee earlier calculations of Dupree and Tetreault (DT) [Phys. Fluids 21, 425 (1978)], and extends that theory to finite ion gyroradius. Certain conclusions differ significantly from those of DT

  18. Compton scattering at finite temperature: thermal field dynamics approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juraev, F.I.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Compton scattering is a classical problem of quantum electrodynamics and has been studied in its early beginnings. Perturbation theory and Feynman diagram technique enables comprehensive analysis of this problem on the basis of which famous Klein-Nishina formula is obtained [1, 2]. In this work this problem is extended to the case of finite temperature. Finite-temperature effects in Compton scattering is of practical importance for various processes in relativistic thermal plasmas in astrophysics. Recently Compton effect have been explored using closed-time path formalism with temperature corrections estimated [3]. It was found that the thermal cross section can be larger than that for zero-temperature by several orders of magnitude for the high temperature realistic in astrophysics [3]. In our work we use a main tool to account finite-temperature effects, a real-time finite-temperature quantum field theory, so-called thermofield dynamics [4, 5]. Thermofield dynamics is a canonical formalism to explore field-theoretical processes at finite temperature. It consists of two steps, doubling of Fock space and Bogolyubov transformations. Doubling leads to appearing additional degrees of freedom, called tilded operators which together with usual field operators create so-called thermal doublet. Bogolyubov transformations make field operators temperature-dependent. Using this formalism we treat Compton scattering at finite temperature via replacing in transition amplitude zero-temperature propagators by finite-temperature ones. As a result finite-temperature extension of the Klein-Nishina formula is obtained in which differential cross section is represented as a sum of zero-temperature cross section and finite-temperature correction. The obtained result could be useful in quantum electrodynamics of lasers and for relativistic thermal plasma processes in astrophysics where correct account of finite-temperature effects is important. (author)

  19. Detection of detachments and inhomogeneities in frescos by Compton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellano, A.; Cesareo, R.; Buccolieri, G.; Donativi, M.; Palama, F.; Quarta, S.; De Nunzio, G.; Brunetti, A.; Marabelli, M.; Santamaria, U.

    2005-01-01

    A mobile instrument has been developed for the detection and mapping of detachments in frescos by using Compton back scattered photons. The instrument is mainly composed of a high energy X-ray tube, an X-ray detection system and a translation table. The instrument was first applied to samples simulating various detachment situations, and then transferred to the Vatican Museum to detect detachments and inhomogeneities in the stanza di Eliodoro, one of the 'Raphael's stanze'

  20. Detection of detachments and inhomogeneities in frescos by Compton scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellano, A. [Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Universita di Lecce, 73100 Lecce (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Lecce, via per Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Cesareo, R. [Istituto di Matematica e Fisica, Universita di Sassari, 07100 Sassari (Italy) and INFN, Sezione di Cagliari, Cittadella Universitaria di Monserrato, 09042 Cagliari (Italy)]. E-mail: cesareo@uniss.it; Buccolieri, G. [Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Universita di Lecce, 73100 Lecce (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Lecce, via per Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Donativi, M. [Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Universita di Lecce, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Palama, F. [Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Universita di Lecce, 73100 Lecce (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Lecce, via per Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Quarta, S. [Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Universita di Lecce, 73100 Lecce (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Lecce, via per Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); De Nunzio, G. [Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Universita di Lecce, 73100 Lecce (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Lecce, via per Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Brunetti, A. [Istituto di Matematica e Fisica, Universita di Sassari, 07100 Sassari (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Cagliari, Cittadella Universitaria di Monserrato, 09042 Cagliari (Italy); Marabelli, M. [Istituto Centrale del Restauro, P.zza S. Francesco di Paola, 00184 Rome (Italy); Santamaria, U. [Laboratori dei Musei Vaticani, Citta del Vaticano, Rome (Italy)

    2005-07-01

    A mobile instrument has been developed for the detection and mapping of detachments in frescos by using Compton back scattered photons. The instrument is mainly composed of a high energy X-ray tube, an X-ray detection system and a translation table. The instrument was first applied to samples simulating various detachment situations, and then transferred to the Vatican Museum to detect detachments and inhomogeneities in the stanza di Eliodoro, one of the 'Raphael's stanze'.

  1. The Compton-Schwarzschild correspondence from extended de Broglie relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lake, Matthew J.; Carr, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    The Compton wavelength gives the minimum radius within which the mass of a particle may be localized due to quantum effects, while the Schwarzschild radius gives the maximum radius within which the mass of a black hole may be localized due to classial gravity. In a mass-radius diagram, the two lines intersect near the Planck point (l P ,m P ), where quantum gravity effects become significant. Since canonical (non-gravitational) quantum mechanics is based on the concept of wave-particle duality, encapsulated in the de Broglie relations, these relations should break down near (l P ,m P ). It is unclear what physical interpretation can be given to quantum particles with energy E≫m P c 2 , since they correspond to wavelengths λ≪l P or time periods τ≪t P in the standard theory. We therefore propose a correction to the standard de Broglie relations, which gives rise to a modified Schrödinger equation and a modified expression for the Compton wavelength, which may be extended into the region E≫m P c 2 . For the proposed modification, we recover the expression for the Schwarzschild radius for E≫m P c 2 and the usual Compton formula for E≪m P c 2 . The sign of the inequality obtained from the uncertainty principle reverses at m≈m P , so that the Compton wavelength and event horizon size may be interpreted as minimum and maximum radii, respectively. We interpret the additional terms in the modified de Broglie relations as representing the self-gravitation of the wave packet.

  2. Quantitative Compton suppression spectrometry at elevated counting rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westphal, G.P.; Joestl, K.; Schroeder, P.; Lauster, R.; Hausch, E.

    1999-01-01

    For quantitative Compton suppression spectrometry the decrease of coincidence efficiency with counting rate should be made negligible to avoid a virtual increase of relative peak areas of coincident isomeric transitions with counting rate. To that aim, a separate amplifier and discriminator has been used for each of the eight segments of the active shield of a new well-type Compton suppression spectrometer, together with an optimized, minimum dead-time design of the anticoincidence logic circuitry. Chance coincidence losses in the Compton suppression spectrometer are corrected instrumentally by comparing the chance coincidence rate to the counting rate of the germanium detector in a pulse-counting Busy circuit (G.P. Westphal, J. Rad. Chem. 179 (1994) 55) which is combined with the spectrometer's LFC counting loss correction system. The normally not observable chance coincidence rate is reconstructed from the rates of germanium detector and scintillation detector in an auxiliary coincidence unit, after the destruction of true coincidence by delaying one of the coincidence partners. Quantitative system response has been tested in two-source measurements with a fixed reference source of 60 Co of 14 kc/s, and various samples of 137 Cs, up to aggregate counting rates of 180 kc/s for the well-type detector, and more than 1400 kc/s for the BGO shield. In these measurements, the net peak areas of the 1173.3 keV line of 60 Co remained constant at typical values of 37 000 with and 95 000 without Compton suppression, with maximum deviations from the average of less than 1.5%

  3. Real and virtual Compton scattering: The nucleon polarizabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downie, E.J.; Fonvieille, H.

    2011-01-01

    We give an overview of low-energy Compton scattering γ (*) p → γp with a real or virtual incoming photon. These processes allow the investigation of one of the fundamental properties of the nucleon, i.e. how its internal structure deforms under an applied static electromagnetic field. Our knowledge of nucleon polarizabilities and their generalization to non-zero four-momentum transfer will be reviewed, including the presently ongoing experiments and future perspectives. (authors)

  4. Deeply virtual Compton scattering: How to test handbag dominance?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gousset, T.; Gousset, T.; Diehl, M.; Pire, B.; Diehl, M.; Ralston, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    We propose detailed tests of the handbag approximation in exclusive deeply virtual Compton scattering. Those tests make no use of any prejudice about parton correlations in the proton which are basically unknown objects and beyond the scope of perturbative QCD. Since important information on the proton substructure can be gained in the regime of light cone dominance we consider that such a class of tests is of special relevance. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  5. Formal analogy between Compton scattering and Doppler effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, A.; Olsen, Jørgen Seir

    1966-01-01

    Viewed from the scatterer, the energy of the incoming photon or particle is equal to that of the outgoing, and the angle of incidence is equal to the angle of reflection, when the direction of the velocity of the scatterer after the collision is taken as reference. This paper sets out to prove...... this statement in a more simple and direct way. The authors only consider the Compton scatting process as it is quite analogous to the particle case....

  6. The electromagnetic calorimeter in JLab Real Compton Scattering Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert Shahinyan; Eugene Chudakov; A. Danagoulian; P. Degtyarenko; K. Egiyan; V. Gorbenko; J. Hines; E. Hovhannisyan; Ch. Hyde; C.W. de Jager; A. Ketikyan; V. Mamyan; R. Michaels; A.M. Nathan; V. Nelyubin; I. Rachek; M. Roedelbrom; A. Petrosyan; R. Pomatsalyuk; V. Popov; J. Segal; Yu. Shestakov; J. Templon; H. Voskanyan; B. Wojtsekhowski

    2007-04-16

    A hodoscope calorimeter comprising of 704 lead-glass blocks is described. The calorimeter was constructed for use in the JLab Real Compton Scattering experiment. The detector provides a measurement of the coordinates and the energy of scattered photons in the GeV energy range with resolutions of 5 mm and 6\\%/$\\sqrt{E_\\gamma \\, [GeV]}$, respectively. Design features and performance parameters during the experiment are presented.

  7. Rosseland and Flux Mean Opacities for Compton Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poutanen, Juri, E-mail: juri.poutanen@utu.fi [Tuorla Observatory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, Väisäläntie 20, FI-21500 Piikkiö (Finland)

    2017-02-01

    Rosseland mean opacity plays an important role in theories of stellar evolution and X-ray burst models. In the high-temperature regime, when most of the gas is completely ionized, the opacity is dominated by Compton scattering. Our aim here is to critically evaluate previous works on this subject and to compute the exact Rosseland mean opacity for Compton scattering over a broad range of temperature and electron degeneracy parameter. We use relativistic kinetic equations for Compton scattering and compute the photon mean free path as a function of photon energy by solving the corresponding integral equation in the diffusion limit. As a byproduct we also demonstrate the way to compute photon redistribution functions in the case of degenerate electrons. We then compute the Rosseland mean opacity as a function of temperature and electron degeneracy and present useful approximate expressions. We compare our results to previous calculations and find a significant difference in the low-temperature regime and strong degeneracy. We then proceed to compute the flux mean opacity in both free-streaming and diffusion approximations, and show that the latter is nearly identical to the Rosseland mean opacity. We also provide a simple way to account for the true absorption in evaluating the Rosseland and flux mean opacities.

  8. ILC beam energy measurement by means of laser Compton backscattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muchnoi, N. [Budker Inst. for Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Schreiber, H.J.; Viti, M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    A novel, non-invasive method of measuring the beam energy at the International Linear Collider is proposed. Laser light collides head-on with beam particles and either the energy of the Compton scattered electrons near the kinematic end-point is measured or the positions of the Compton backscattered {gamma}-rays, the edge electrons and the unscattered beam particles are recorded. A compact layout for the Compton spectrometer is suggested. It consists of a bending magnet and position sensitive detectors operating in a large radiation environment. Several options for high spatial resolution detectors are discussed. Simulation studies support the use of an infrared or green laser and quartz fiber detectors to monitor the backscattered photons and edge electrons. Employing a cavity monitor, the beam particle position downstream of the magnet can be recorded with submicrometer precision. Such a scheme provides a feasible and promising method to access the incident beam energy with precisions of 10{sup -4} or better on a bunch-to-bunch basis while the electron and positron beams are in collision. (orig.)

  9. Electronic structure of the palladium hydride studied by compton scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Mizusaki, S; Yamaguchi, M; Hiraoka, N; Itou, M; Sakurai, Y

    2003-01-01

    The hydrogen-induced changes in the electronic structure of Pd have been investigated by Compton scattering experiments associated with theoretical calculations. Compton profiles (CPs) of single crystal of Pd and beta phase hydride PdH sub x (x=0.62-0.74) have been measured along the [100], [110] and [111] directions with a momentum resolution of 0.14-0.17 atomic units using 115 keV x-rays. The theoretical Compton profiles have been calculated from the wavefunctions obtained utilizing the full potential linearized augmented plane wave method within the local density approximation for Pd and stoichiometric PdH. The experimental and the theoretical results agreed well with respect to the difference in the CPs between PdH sub x and Pd, and the anisotropy in the CPs of Pd or PdH sub x. This study provides lines of evidence that upon hydride formation the lowest valance band of Pd is largely modified due to hybridization with H 1s-orbitals and the Fermi energy is raised into the sp-band. (author)

  10. Measurements of Compton Scattered Transition Radiation at High Lorentz Factors

    CERN Document Server

    Case, Gary L.; Cherry, Michael L.; Isbert, Joachim; Mitchell, John W.; Patterson, Donald; Case, Gary L.; Cherry, Michael L.; Isbert, Joachim; Mitchell, John W.; Patterson, Donald

    2004-01-01

    X-ray transition radiation can be used to measure the Lorentz factor of relativistic particles. Standard transition radiation detectors (TRDs) typically incorporate thin plastic foil radiators and gas-filled x-ray detectors, and are sensitive up to \\gamma ~ 10^4. To reach higher Lorentz factors (up to \\gamma ~ 10^5), thicker, denser radiators can be used, which consequently produce x-rays of harder energies (>100 keV). At these energies, scintillator detectors are more efficient in detecting the hard x-rays, and Compton scattering of the x-rays out of the path of the particle becomes an important effect. The Compton scattering can be utilized to separate the transition radiation from the ionization background spatially. The use of conducting metal foils is predicted to yield enhanced signals compared to standard nonconducting plastic foils of the same dimensions. We have designed and built a Compton Scatter TRD optimized for high Lorentz factors and exposed it to high energy electrons at the CERN SPS. We pres...

  11. Electronic structure of AlAs: A Compton profile study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, G.; Joshi, K.B.; Mishra, M.C.; Kothari, R.K.; Sharma, Y.C.; Vyas, V.; Sharma, B.K.

    2009-01-01

    The electronic structure of AlAs through a Compton profile study is presented in this paper. Theoretical calculations are performed following the linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) method and the empirical pseudopotential method (EPM). In LCAO method, to treat exchange and correlation two cases are considered. In the first case, the exchange function of Becke and the correlation function of Perdew and Wang on the basis of generalized gradient approximation (PW-GGA) is adopted. In the second case, the hybrid function B3PW is adopted. Measurement of Compton profile on the polycrystalline AlAs is performed using 59.54 keV gamma-rays. The spherically averaged theoretical Compton profiles are in good agreement with the measurement. The best agreement is, however, shown by the EPM. The anisotropies predicted by B3PW and the EPM are smaller than those from the PW-GGA calculation. On the basis of equal-valence-electron-density profiles, it is found that AlAs is more covalent compared to AlN. The charge transfer model suggests transfer of 0.6e - from Al to As on compound formation.

  12. Electronic properties and Compton scattering studies of monoclinic tungsten dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heda, N.L.; Ahuja, Ushma

    2015-01-01

    We present the first ever Compton profile measurement of WO 2 using a 20 Ci 137 Cs γ-ray source. The experimental data have been used to test different approximations of density functional theory in linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) scheme. It is found that theoretical Compton profile deduced using generalized gradient approximation (GGA) gives a better agreement than local density approximation and second order GGA. The computed energy bands, density of states and Mulliken's populations (MP) data confirm a metal-like behavior of WO 2 . The electronic properties calculated using LCAO approach are also compared with those obtained using full potential linearized augmented plane wave method. The nature of bonding in WO 2 is also compared with isoelectronic WX 2 (X=S, Se) compounds in terms of equal-valence-electron-density profiles and MP data, which suggest an increase in ionic character in the order WSe 2 →WS 2 →WO 2 . - Highlights: • Presented first-ever Compton profile (CP) measurements on WO 2 . • Analyzed CP data in terms of LCAO–DFT calculations. • Discussed energy band, DOS and Mulliken's population. • Discussed equally scaled CPs and bonding of isoelectronic WO 2 , WS 2 and WSe 2 . • Reported metallic character and Fermi surface topology of WO 2

  13. Compton profile study and electronic properties of tantalum diboride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raykar, Veera; Bhamu, K.C.; Ahuja, B.L.

    2013-01-01

    We have reported the first-ever experimental Compton profile (CP) of TaB 2 using 20 Ci 137 Cs Compton spectrometer. To compare the experimental data, we have also computed the theoretical CPs using density functional theory (DFT) and hybridization of DFT and Hartree–Fock (HF) within linear combination of the atomic orbitals (LCAO) method. In addition, we have reported energy bands and density of states of TaB 2 using LCAO and full potential-linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) methods. A real space analysis of CP of TaB 2 confirms its metallic character which is in tune with the cross-overs of Fermi level by energy bands and Fermi surface topology. A comparison of equal-valence-electron-density (EVED) experimental profiles of isoelectronic TaB 2 and NbB 2 show more covalent (or less ionic) character of TaB 2 than that of NbB 2 which is in agreement with available ionicity data. - Highlights: ► Reported first-ever experimental Compton profile (CP) of TaB 2 . ► Interpreted experimental CP using theoretical CP within density functional theory. ► Analyzed equal-valence-electron-density experimental CPs of TaB 2 and NbB 2 . ► Established metallic character by taking Fourier transform of experimental CP. ► Reported energy bands, DOS and Fermi surface of TaB 2 using LCAO and FP-LAPW

  14. Compton-thick AGNs in the NuSTAR Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesi, S.; Ajello, M.; Marcotulli, L.; Comastri, A.; Lanzuisi, G.; Vignali, C.

    2018-02-01

    We present the 2–100 keV spectral analysis of 30 candidate Compton-thick-(CT-)active galactic nuclei (AGNs) selected in the Swift-Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) 100 month survey. The average redshift of these objects is ∼ 0.03, and they all lie within ∼500 Mpc. We used the MyTorus model to perform X-ray spectral fittings both without and with the contribution of the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) data in the 3–50 keV energy range. When the NuSTAR data are added to the fit, 13 out of 30 of these objects (43% of the whole sample) have intrinsic absorption N H 3σ confidence level, i.e., they are reclassified from Compton thick to Compton thin. Consequently, we infer an overall observed fraction of the CT-AGN, with respect to the whole AGN population, lower than the one reported in previous works, as low as ∼4%. We find evidence that this overestimation of N H is likely due to the low quality of a subsample of spectra, either in the 2–10 keV band or in the Swift-BAT one.

  15. Guiding the Design of Radiation Imagers with Experimentally Benchmarked Geant4 Simulations for Electron-Tracking Compton Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffer, Amy Beth

    Radiation imagers are import tools in the modern world for a wide range of applications. They span the use-cases of fundamental sciences, astrophysics, medical imaging, all the way to national security, nuclear safeguards, and non-proliferation verification. The type of radiation imagers studied in this thesis were gamma-ray imagers that detect emissions from radioactive materials. Gamma-ray imagers goal is to localize and map the distribution of radiation within their specific field-of-view despite the fact of complicating background radiation that can be terrestrial, astronomical, and temporal. Compton imaging systems are one type of gamma-ray imager that can map the radiation around the system without the use of collimation. Lack of collimation enables the imaging system to be able to detect radiation from all-directions, while at the same time, enables increased detection efficiency by not absorbing incident radiation in non-sensing materials. Each Compton-scatter events within an imaging system generated a possible cone-surface in space that the radiation could have originated from. Compton imaging is limited in its reconstructed image signal-to-background due to these source Compton-cones overlapping with background radiation Compton-cones. These overlapping cones limit Compton imaging's detection-sensitivity in image space. Electron-tracking Compton imaging (ETCI) can improve the detection-sensitivity by measuring the Compton-scattered electron's initial trajectory. With an estimate of the scattered electron's trajectory, one can reduce the Compton-back-projected cone to a cone-arc, thus enabling faster radiation source detection and localization. However, the ability to measure the Compton-scattered electron-trajectories adds another layer of complexity to an already complex methodology. For a real-world imaging applications, improvements are needed in electron-track detection efficiency and in electron-track reconstruction. One way of measuring Compton

  16. Gate simulation of Compton Ar-Xe gamma-camera for radionuclide imaging in nuclear medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubov, L. Yu; Belyaev, V. N.; Berdnikova, A. K.; Bolozdynia, A. I.; Akmalova, Yu A.; Shtotsky, Yu V.

    2017-01-01

    Computer simulations of cylindrical Compton Ar-Xe gamma camera are described in the current report. Detection efficiency of cylindrical Ar-Xe Compton camera with internal diameter of 40 cm is estimated as1-3%that is 10-100 times higher than collimated Anger’s camera. It is shown that cylindrical Compton camera can image Tc-99m radiotracer distribution with uniform spatial resolution of 20 mm through the whole field of view.

  17. Virtual Compton Scattering at MAMI and measurement of the proton generalized polarizabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, Julie

    1998-01-01

    We have measured the absolute unpolarized cross sections for photon electro-production of the proton with the Three-Spectrometer-Setup at MAMI at a momentum transfer q=600 MeV (or squared quadra-momentum of the virtual photon 0.33 GeV square) and a virtual photon polarization 0.62. The momentum for the outgoing real photon q' ranged from 33 to 111 MeV. We extracted two combinations of the generalized polarizabilities (GPs) of the proton. The reaction of interest is Virtual Compton Scattering off the proton. We can access to a measurement of the rigidity of the internal structure of the nucleon. Below pion production threshold but arbitrary squared quadra-momentum of the virtual photon, measured observables are the GPs. They generalize the concept of electric and magnetic polarizabilities already defined in Real Compton Scattering. Experimentally, the scattered electron was detected in coincidence with the recoiling proton in two high-resolution spectrometers. The photon emission process was selected by a cut on the missing mass squared distribution around zero. This PhD work describes the analysis work from raw data to absolute and precise cross sections (within a 3 pc statistical and 4 pc systematic accuracies). Our experiment at Mainz demonstrates that it is possible to measure two structure functions related to the GPs; extracted values are presented. These observables are compared with theoretical predictions and are very efficient to disentangle models of the non-perturbative structure of the nucleon. (author) [fr

  18. NuSTAR Unveils a Compton-thick Type 2 Quasar in Mrk 34

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, P.; Lansbury, G. B.; Alexander, D. M.; Stern, D.; Arévalo, P.; Ballantyne, D. R.; Baloković, M.; Bauer, F. E.; Boggs, S. E.; Brandt, W. N.; Brightman, M.; Christensen, F. E.; Comastri, A.; Craig, W. W.; Del Moro, A.; Elvis, M.; Fabian, A. C.; Hailey, C. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Hickox, R. C.; Koss, M.; LaMassa, S. M.; Luo, B.; Madejski, G. M.; Ptak, A. F.; Puccetti, S.; Teng, S. H.; Urry, C. M.; Walton, D. J.; Zhang, W. W.

    2014-09-01

    We present Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) 3-40 keV observations of the optically selected Type 2 quasar (QSO2) SDSS J1034+6001 or Mrk 34. The high-quality hard X-ray spectrum and archival XMM-Newton data can be fitted self-consistently with a reflection-dominated continuum and a strong Fe Kα fluorescence line with equivalent width >1 keV. Prior X-ray spectral fitting below 10 keV showed the source to be consistent with being obscured by Compton-thin column densities of gas along the line of sight, despite evidence for much higher columns from multiwavelength data. NuSTAR now enables a direct measurement of this column and shows that N H lies in the Compton-thick (CT) regime. The new data also show a high intrinsic 2-10 keV luminosity of L 2-10 ~ 1044 erg s-1, in contrast to previous low-energy X-ray measurements where L 2-10 X-ray selection below 10 keV does not pick up this source as an intrinsically luminous obscured quasar). Both the obscuring column and the intrinsic power are about an order of magnitude (or more) larger than inferred from pre-NuSTAR X-ray spectral fitting. Mrk 34 is thus a "gold standard" CT QSO2 and is the nearest non-merging system in this class, in contrast to the other local CT quasar NGC 6240, which is currently undergoing a major merger coupled with strong star formation. For typical X-ray bolometric correction factors, the accretion luminosity of Mrk 34 is high enough to potentially power the total infrared luminosity. X-ray spectral fitting also shows that thermal emission related to star formation is unlikely to drive the observed bright soft component below ~3 keV, favoring photoionization instead.

  19. CsI Calorimeter for a Compton-Pair Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, Eric J.

    We propose to build and test a hodoscopic CsI(Tl) scintillating-crystal calorimeter for a medium-energy γ-ray Compton and pair telescope. The design and technical approach for this calorimeter relies deeply on heritage from the Fermi LAT CsI Calorimeter, but it dramatically improves the low-energy performance of that design by reading out the scintillation light with silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs), making the technology developed for Fermi applicable in the Compton regime. While such a hodoscopic calorimeter is useful for an entire class of medium-energy γ-ray telescope designs, we propose to build it explicitly to support beam tests and balloon flight of the Proto-ComPair telescope, the development and construction of which was funded in a four-year APRA program beginning in 2015 ("ComPair: Steps to a Medium Energy γ-ray Mission" with PI J. McEnery of GSFC). That award did not include funding for its CsI calorimeter subsystem, and this proposal is intended to cover that gap. ComPair is a MIDEX-class instrument concept to perform a high-sensitivity survey of the γ-ray sky from 0.5 MeV to 500 MeV. ComPair is designed to provide a dramatic increase in sensitivity relative to previous instruments in this energy range (predominantly INTEGRAL/SPI and Compton COMPTEL), with the same transformative sensitivity increase - and corresponding scientific return- that the Fermi Large Area Telescope provided relative to Compton EGRET. To enable transformative science over a broad range of MeV energies and with a wide field of view, ComPair is a combined Compton telescope and pair telescope employing a silicon-strip tracker (for Compton scattering and pair conversion and tracking) and a solid-state CdZnTe calorimeter (for Compton absorption) and CsI calorimeter (for pair calorimetry), surrounded by a plastic scintillator anti-coincidence detector. Under the current proposal, we will complete the detailed design, assembly, and test of the CsI calorimeter for the risk

  20. Electron momentum distribution of BaZrO3 using Compton scattering technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Sonu; Mund, H.S.; Sahariya, Jagrati; Ahuja, B.L.; Tiwari, Shailja

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the first ever experimental Compton profile of BaZrO 3 has been measured using 20 Ci 137 Cs Compton spectrometer. To compare our experimental data, we have also computed theoretical Compton profiles using linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) within the frame work of density functional theory. It is seen that the experimental Compton profile shows a better agreement with LCAO within generalised gradient approximation (GCA) than the second order correction to GCA and also hybridization of HF and density functional theory. (author)

  1. Electronic structure of CdMoO{sub 4} using Compton scattering technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Khushboo, E-mail: khushboo.phy@gmail.com; Ahuja, B. L. [Department of Physics, University College of Science, M.L. Sukhadia University, Udaipur-313001 (India); Sahariya, Jagrati [Department of Physics, Manipal University, Jaipur-303007 (India)

    2014-04-24

    The first ever Compton profile of polycrystalline CdMoO{sub 4} has been measured using {sup 137}Cs spectrometer. The results are compared with theoretical Compton profiles deduced from free atom and linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) methods. We have also computed the energy bands using density functional theory (DFT) within LCAO. The computed bands confirm the semiconducting behaviour of this compound. It is seen that the DFT theoretical profile (with local density approximation) gives a better agreement with the experimental Compton data than free atom Compton profile.

  2. From neutron Compton profiles to momentum distribution: Assessment of direct numerical determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senesi, R.; Flammini, D.; Romanelli, G.; Andreani, C.

    2013-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering at high momentum transfers, in the neutron Compton scattering regime, provides an access to the neutron Compton profiles, the analogous of Compton profiles in X-ray scattering. The line shape analysis of the neutron Compton profiles is usually carried out making use of multiparametric nonlinear fitting, garnering detailed information about the momentum distribution of the target atoms. This paper presents the proposal to directly determine numerically the momentum distribution from the profiles, thus eliminating the possible instabilities present in multiparametric fitting. A comparison with Monte Carlo simulations and with previous measurements on polycrystalline ice provides quantitative assessments of the proposed method

  3. From neutron Compton profiles to momentum distribution: Assessment of direct numerical determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senesi, R., E-mail: roberto.senesi@uniroma2.it [Università degli Studi di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Centro NAST, Nanoscienze and Nanotecnologie and Strumentazione, Università degli Studi di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); CNR-IPCF (Italy); Flammini, D.; Romanelli, G. [Università degli Studi di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Centro NAST, Nanoscienze and Nanotecnologie and Strumentazione, Università degli Studi di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Andreani, C. [Università degli Studi di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Centro NAST, Nanoscienze and Nanotecnologie and Strumentazione, Università degli Studi di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); CNR-IPCF (Italy)

    2013-03-11

    Inelastic neutron scattering at high momentum transfers, in the neutron Compton scattering regime, provides an access to the neutron Compton profiles, the analogous of Compton profiles in X-ray scattering. The line shape analysis of the neutron Compton profiles is usually carried out making use of multiparametric nonlinear fitting, garnering detailed information about the momentum distribution of the target atoms. This paper presents the proposal to directly determine numerically the momentum distribution from the profiles, thus eliminating the possible instabilities present in multiparametric fitting. A comparison with Monte Carlo simulations and with previous measurements on polycrystalline ice provides quantitative assessments of the proposed method.

  4. Simulating Gamma-Ray Emission in Star-forming Galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfrommer, Christoph [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Pakmor, Rüdiger; Simpson, Christine M.; Springel, Volker, E-mail: cpfrommer@aip.de [Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies, Schloss-Wolfsbrunnenweg 35, D-69118 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-10-01

    Star-forming galaxies emit GeV and TeV gamma-rays that are thought to originate from hadronic interactions of cosmic-ray (CR) nuclei with the interstellar medium. To understand the emission, we have used the moving-mesh code Arepo to perform magnetohydrodynamical galaxy formation simulations with self-consistent CR physics. Our galaxy models exhibit a first burst of star formation that injects CRs at supernovae. Once CRs have sufficiently accumulated in our Milky Way–like galaxy, their buoyancy force overcomes the magnetic tension of the toroidal disk field. As field lines open up, they enable anisotropically diffusing CRs to escape into the halo and to accelerate a bubble-like, CR-dominated outflow. However, these bubbles are invisible in our simulated gamma-ray maps of hadronic pion-decay and secondary inverse-Compton emission because of low gas density in the outflows. By adopting a phenomenological relation between star formation rate (SFR) and far-infrared emission and assuming that gamma-rays mainly originate from decaying pions, our simulated galaxies can reproduce the observed tight relation between far-infrared and gamma-ray emission, independent of whether we account for anisotropic CR diffusion. This demonstrates that uncertainties in modeling active CR transport processes only play a minor role in predicting gamma-ray emission from galaxies. We find that in starbursts, most of the CR energy is “calorimetrically” lost to hadronic interactions. In contrast, the gamma-ray emission deviates from this calorimetric property at low SFRs due to adiabatic losses, which cannot be identified in traditional one-zone models.

  5. Electronic structure in the bulk and at the surface of lanthanide materials. A detailed study with X-ray emission and inverse photoemission

    CERN Document Server

    Huebinger, F

    2000-01-01

    LaTe. With measurements of the O3-XE in the Lanthanum-Chalcogenides we could demonstrate the transfer of s-like valence electrons from the Lanthanum atom to the Chalcogen atom. Furthermore, the binding energy of the state at the Lanthanum atom was determined. The surface core-level shift is smaller by 25 % in the Chalcogenides than in La-metal. We also describe a theoretical model, which qualitatively explains the observed larger shifts of the core-level binding energy in PE than in IPE from Lanthan-Chalcogenides. This dissertation is concerned with the occupied and unoccupied electronic structure of lanthanide materials. With surface sensitive electron-excited x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) we could experimentally determine a surface and bulk partial density of states (p-DOS) for the metals Lanthanum, Lutetium and Samarium. From calculations of the O3-XE transition probability we anticipate a three times higher probability for s-like than for d-like electrons to fill the 5p3/2-hole; this was confirmed exp...

  6. Iron K and Compton hump reverberation in SWIFT J2127.4+5654 and NGC 1365 revealed by NuSTAR and XMM–Newton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kara, E.; Zoghbi, A.; Marinucci, A.

    2015-01-01

    In the past five years, a flurry of X-ray reverberation lag measurements of accreting supermassive black holes have been made using the XMM–Newton telescope in the 0.3–10 keV energy range. In this work, we use the NuSTAR (Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array) telescope to extend the lag analysis...... up to higher energies for two Seyfert galaxies, SWIFT J2127.4+5654 and NGC 1365. X-ray reverberation lags are due to the light travel time delays between the direct continuum emission and the reprocessed emission from the inner radii of an ionized accretion disc. XMM–Newton has been particularly...... evidence for Compton reflection, known as the Compton ‘hump’. The XMM–Newton data show Fe K lags in both SWIFT J2127.4+5654 and NGC 1365. The NuSTAR data provide independent confirmation of these Fe K lags, and also show evidence for the corresponding Compton hump lags, especially in SWIFT J2127...

  7. Ks-BAND DETECTION OF THERMAL EMISSION AND COLOR CONSTRAINTS TO CoRoT-1b: A LOW-ALBEDO PLANET WITH INEFFICIENT ATMOSPHERIC ENERGY REDISTRIBUTION AND A TEMPERATURE INVERSION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, Justin C.; Apai, Daniel; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; Sing, David K.; Burrows, Adam

    2009-01-01

    We report the detection in Ks-band of the secondary eclipse of the hot Jupiter CoRoT-1b from time series photometry with the ARC 3.5 m telescope at Apache Point Observatory. The eclipse shows a depth of 0.336 ± 0.042% and is centered at phase 0.5022 +0.0023 -0.0027 , consistent with a zero eccentricity orbit (e cos ω = 0.0035 +0.0036 -0.0042 ). We perform the first optical to near-infrared multi-band photometric analysis of an exoplanet's atmosphere and constrain the reflected and thermal emissions by combining our result with the recent 0.6, 0.71, and 2.09 μm secondary eclipse detections by Snellen et al., Gillon et al., and Alonso et al. Comparing the multi-wavelength detections to state-of-the-art radiative-convective chemical-equilibrium atmosphere models, we find the near-infrared fluxes difficult to reproduce. The closest blackbody-based and physical models provide the following atmosphere parameters: a temperature T = 2460 +80 -160 K; a very low Bond albedo A B = 0.000 +0.081 -0.000 ; and an energy redistribution parameter P n = 0.1, indicating a small but nonzero amount of heat transfer from the day to nightside. The best physical model suggests a thermal inversion layer with an extra optical absorber of opacity κ e = 0.05 cm 2 g -1 , placed near the 0.1 bar atmospheric pressure level. This inversion layer is located 10 times deeper in the atmosphere than the absorbers used in models to fit mid-infrared Spitzer detections of other irradiated hot Jupiters.

  8. Inverse relationship between brain glucose and ketone metabolism in adults during short-term moderate dietary ketosis: A dual tracer quantitative positron emission tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courchesne-Loyer, Alexandre; Croteau, Etienne; Castellano, Christian-Alexandre; St-Pierre, Valérie; Hennebelle, Marie; Cunnane, Stephen C

    2017-07-01

    Ketones (principally β-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate (AcAc)) are an important alternative fuel to glucose for the human brain, but their utilisation by the brain remains poorly understood. Our objective was to use positron emission tomography (PET) to assess the impact of diet-induced moderate ketosis on cerebral metabolic rate of acetoacetate (CMRa) and glucose (CMRglc) in healthy adults. Ten participants (35 ± 15 y) received a very high fat ketogenic diet (KD) (4.5:1; lipid:protein plus carbohydrates) for four days. CMRa and CMRglc were quantified by PET before and after the KD with the tracers, 11 C-AcAc and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG), respectively. During the KD, plasma ketones increased 8-fold ( p = 0.005) while plasma glucose decreased by 24% ( p = 0.005). CMRa increased 6-fold ( p = 0.005), whereas CMRglc decreased by 20% ( p = 0.014) on the KD. Plasma ketones were positively correlated with CMRa (r = 0.93; p < 0.0001). After four days on the KD, CMRa represented 17% of whole brain energy requirements in healthy adults with a 2-fold difference across brain regions (12-24%). The CMR of ketones (AcAc and β-hydroxybutyrate combined) while on the KD was estimated to represent about 33% of brain energy requirements or approximately double the CMRa. Whether increased ketone availability raises CMR of ketones to the same extent in older people as observed here or in conditions in which chronic brain glucose hypometabolism is present remains to be determined.

  9. Polarimetric Analysis of the Long Duration Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 160530A With the Balloon Borne Compton Spectrometer and Imager

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowell, A. W.; Boggs, S. E; Chiu, C. L.; Kierans, C. A.; Sleator, C.; Tomsick, J. A.; Zoglauer, A. C. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley (United States); Chang, H.-K.; Tseng, C.-H.; Yang, C.-Y. [Institute of Astronomy, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan (China); Jean, P.; Ballmoos, P. von [IRAP Toulouse (France); Lin, C.-H. [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taiwan (China); Amman, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (United States)

    2017-10-20

    A long duration gamma-ray burst, GRB 160530A, was detected by the Compton Spectrometer and Imager (COSI) during the 2016 COSI Super Pressure Balloon campaign. As a Compton telescope, COSI is inherently sensitive to the polarization of gamma-ray sources in the energy range 0.2–5.0 MeV. We measured the polarization of GRB 160530A using (1) a standard method (SM) based on fitting the distribution of azimuthal scattering angles with a modulation curve and (2) an unbinned, maximum likelihood method (MLM). In both cases, the measured polarization level was below the 99% confidence minimum detectable polarization levels of 72.3% ± 0.8% (SM) and 57.5% ± 0.8% (MLM). Therefore, COSI did not detect polarized gamma-ray emission from this burst. Our most constraining 90% confidence upper limit on the polarization level was 46% (MLM).

  10. A spectral geometric model for Compton single scatter in PET based on the single scatter simulation approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazantsev, I. G.; Olsen, U. L.; Poulsen, H. F.; Hansen, P. C.

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the idealized mathematical model of single scatter in PET for a detector system possessing excellent energy resolution. The model has the form of integral transforms estimating the distribution of photons undergoing a single Compton scattering with a certain angle. The total single scatter is interpreted as the volume integral over scatter points that constitute a rotation body with a football shape, while single scattering with a certain angle is evaluated as the surface integral over the boundary of the rotation body. The equations for total and sample single scatter calculations are derived using a single scatter simulation approximation. We show that the three-dimensional slice-by-slice filtered backprojection algorithm is applicable for scatter data inversion provided that the attenuation map is assumed to be constant. The results of the numerical experiments are presented.

  11. Inverse problems of geophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanovskaya, T.B.

    2003-07-01

    This report gives an overview and the mathematical formulation of geophysical inverse problems. General principles of statistical estimation are explained. The maximum likelihood and least square fit methods, the Backus-Gilbert method and general approaches for solving inverse problems are discussed. General formulations of linearized inverse problems, singular value decomposition and properties of pseudo-inverse solutions are given

  12. Fuzzy Inverse Compactness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halis Aygün

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce definitions of fuzzy inverse compactness, fuzzy inverse countable compactness, and fuzzy inverse Lindelöfness on arbitrary -fuzzy sets in -fuzzy topological spaces. We prove that the proposed definitions are good extensions of the corresponding concepts in ordinary topology and obtain different characterizations of fuzzy inverse compactness.

  13. Compton scattering and the gamma-ray power-law spectrum in Markarian 421

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Krolik, Julian H.

    1993-01-01

    The nearest BL Lac object, Mrk 421, has a gamma-ray spectrum which is approximately flat in EF-sub E from E less than about 50 MeV to E greater than about 1 TeV. Inverse Compton scattering can explain this smooth spectrum, despite the structure in the Klein-Nishina cross section, if the injected electron distribution function is proportional to gamma exp -2, where gamma is the electron Lorentz factor. When this is the case, the structure imprinted on the steady state electron distribution function by the structure in the Klein-Nishina cross section is almost exactly compensated in the radiated spectrum. Because particle acceleration in strong shocks injects particles with this distribution function, this shape injection function is in fact quite plausible. Other blazars may be explained by the same model if the cutoff below TeV energies observed in other objects is due to pair production on the cosmological IR background, as suggested by Stecker et al. (1992).

  14. Observations and numerical studies of gamma-ray emission in colliding-wind binaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reitberger, K.

    2014-01-01

    Massive stars in binary systems have long been regarded as potential sources of high-energy gamma rays. The emission is thought to arise in the region where the stellar winds collide, thereby producing accelerated particles which subsequently emit gamma rays.This scenario is supported by observations with the Fermi Large Area Telescope presented in this thesis. To address the underlying emission mechanisms in a quantitative way, numerical simulations that incorporate hydrodynamics, the acceleration of charged particles as well as the subsequent gamma-ray emission were found to be needed.This thesis presents the analysis of a high-energy gamma-ray source and its identification with the particle-accelerating colliding-wind binary system Eta Carinae. In order to go beyond the present understanding of such objects, this work provides detailed description of a new 3D-hydrodynamical model, which incorporates the line-driven acceleration of the winds, gravity, orbital motion and the radiative cooling of the shocked plasma, as well as the diffusive shock acceleration of charged particles in the wind collision region. In a subsequent step we simulate and study the resulting gamma-ray emission via relativistic bremsstrahlung, anisotropic inverse Compton radiation and neutral pion decay. (author) [de

  15. Compton profiles by inelastic ion-electron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeckl, H.; Bell, F.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown that Compton profiles (CP) can be measured by inelastic ion-electron scattering. Within the impulse approximation the binary-encounter peak (BEP) reflects the CP of the target atom whereas the electron-loss peak (ELP) is given by projectile CP's. Evaluation of experimental data reveals that inelastic ion-electron scattering might be a promising method to supply inelastic electron or photon scattering for the determination of target CP's. The measurement of projectile CP's is unique to ion scattering since one gains knowledge about wave-function effects because of the high excitation degree of fast heavy-ion projectiles

  16. Beam-charge azimuthal asymmetry and deeply virtual Compton scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airapetian, A.; Akopov, N.; Akopov, Z.; Amarian, M.; Andrus, A.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Augustyniak, W.; Avakian, R.; Avetissian, A.; Avetissian, E.; Bailey, P.; Balin, D.; Beckmann, M.; Belostotski, S.; Bianchi, N.; Blok, H. P.; Böttcher, H.; Borissov, A.; Borysenko, A.; Bouwhuis, M.; Brüll, A.; Bryzgalov, V.; Capiluppi, M.; Capitani, G. P.; Chen, T.; Ciullo, G.; Contalbrigo, M.; Dalpiaz, P. F.; Deconinck, W.; de Leo, R.; Demey, M.; de Nardo, L.; de Sanctis, E.; Devitsin, E.; di Nezza, P.; Dreschler, J.; Düren, M.; Ehrenfried, M.; Elalaoui-Moulay, A.; Elbakian, G.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elschenbroich, U.; Fabbri, R.; Fantoni, A.; Felawka, L.; Frullani, S.; Funel, A.; Gapienko, G.; Gapienko, V.; Garibaldi, F.; Garrow, K.; Gaskell, D.; Gavrilov, G.; Gharibyan, V.; Grebeniouk, O.; Gregor, I. M.; Hadjidakis, C.; Hafidi, K.; Hartig, M.; Hasch, D.; Hesselink, W. H. A.; Hillenbrand, A.; Hoek, M.; Holler, Y.; Hommez, B.; Hristova, I.; Iarygin, G.; Ivanilov, A.; Izotov, A.; Jackson, H. E.; Jgoun, A.; Kaiser, R.; Kinney, E.; Kisselev, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Kopytin, M.; Korotkov, V.; Kozlov, V.; Krauss, B.; Krivokhijine, V. G.; Lagamba, L.; Lapikás, L.; Laziev, A.; Lenisa, P.; Liebing, P.; Linden-Levy, L. A.; Lorenzon, W.; Lu, H.; Lu, J.; Lu, S.; Ma, B.-Q.; Maiheu, B.; Makins, N. C. R.; Mao, Y.; Marianski, B.; Marukyan, H.; Masoli, F.; Mexner, V.; Meyners, N.; Michler, T.; Mikloukho, O.; Miller, C. A.; Miyachi, Y.; Muccifora, V.; Murray, M.; Nagaitsev, A.; Nappi, E.; Naryshkin, Y.; Negodaev, M.; Nowak, W.-D.; Oganessyan, K.; Ohsuga, H.; Osborne, A.; Pickert, N.; Potterveld, D. H.; Raithel, M.; Reggiani, D.; Reimer, P. E.; Reischl, A.; Reolon, A. R.; Riedl, C.; Rith, K.; Rosner, G.; Rostomyan, A.; Rubacek, L.; Rubin, J.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salomatin, Y.; Sanjiev, I.; Savin, I.; Schäfer, A.; Schnell, G.; Schüler, K. P.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Seitz, B.; Shanidze, R.; Shearer, C.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shutov, V.; Sinram, K.; Sommer, W.; Stancari, M.; Statera, M.; Steffens, E.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, J.; Stinzing, F.; Tait, P.; Tanaka, H.; Taroian, S.; Tchuiko, B.; Terkulov, A.; Trzcinski, A.; Tytgat, M.; Vandenbroucke, A.; van der Nat, P. B.; van der Steenhoven, G.; van Haarlem, Y.; Vikhrov, V.; Vincter, M. G.; Vogel, C.; Volmer, J.; Wang, S.; Wendland, J.; Ye, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yen, S.; Zihlmann, B.; Zupranski, P.

    2007-01-01

    The first observation of an azimuthal cross section asymmetry with respect to the charge of the incoming lepton beam is reported from a study of hard exclusive electroproduction of real photons. The data have been accumulated by the HERMES experiment at DESY, in which the HERA 27.6 GeV electron or positron beam scattered off an unpolarized hydrogen gas target. The observed asymmetry is attributed to the interference between the Bethe-Heitler process and the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) process. The interference term is sensitive to DVCS amplitudes, which provide the most direct access to generalized parton distributions.

  17. Kharkov X-ray Generator Based On Compton Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shcherbakov, A.; Zelinsky, A.; Mytsykov, A.; Gladkikh, P.; Karnaukhov, I.; Lapshin, V.; Telegin, Y.; Androsov, V.; Bulyak, E.; Botman, J.I.M.; Tatchyn, R.; Lebedev, A.

    2004-01-01

    Nowadays X-ray sources based on storage rings with low beam energy and Compton scattering of intense laser beams are under development in several laboratories. An international cooperative project of an advanced X-ray source of this type at the Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) is described. The status of the project is reviewed. The design lattice of the storage ring and calculated X-ray beam parameters are presented. The results of numerical simulation carried out for proposed facility show a peak spectral X-ray intensity of about 1014 can be produced

  18. Sources of the X-rays Based on Compton Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Androsov, V.; Bulyak, E.; Gladkikh, P.; Karnaukhov, I.; Mytsykov, A.; Telegin, Yu.; Shcherbakov, A.; Zelinsky, A.

    2007-01-01

    The principles of the intense X-rays generation by laser beam scattering on a relativistic electron beam are described and description of facilities assigned to produce the X-rays based on Compton scattering is presented. The possibilities of various types of such facilities are estimated and discussed. The source of the X-rays based on a storage ring with low beam energy is described in details and advantages of the sources of such type are discussed.The results of calculation and numerical simulation carried out for laser electron storage ring NESTOR that is under development in NSC KIPT show wide prospects of the accelerator facility of such type

  19. Time Projection Compton Spectrometer (TPCS). User`s guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landron, C.O. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Baldwin, G.T. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    1994-04-01

    The Time Projection Compton Spectrometer (TPCS) is a radiation diagnostic designed to determine the time-integrated energy spectrum between 100 keV -- 2 MeV of flash x-ray sources. This guide is intended as a reference for the routine operator of the TPCS. Contents include a brief overview of the principle of operation, detailed component descriptions, detailed assembly and disassembly procedures, guide to routine operations, and troubleshooting flowcharts. Detailed principle of operation, signal analysis and spectrum unfold algorithms are beyond the scope of this guide; however, the guide makes reference to sources containing this information.

  20. The electron beam dynamics simulation in the laser-electron storage ring involving compton and intrabeam scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladkikh, P.I.; Telegin, Yu.N.; Karnaukhov, I.M.

    2002-01-01

    The feasibility of the development of intense X-ray sources based on Compton scattering in laser-electron storage rings is discussed. The results of the electron beam dynamics simulation involving Compton and intrabeam scattering are presented

  1. The electron beam dynamics simulation in the laser-electron storage ring involving compton and intrabeam scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Gladkikh, P I; Karnaukhov, I M

    2002-01-01

    The feasibility of the development of intense X-ray sources based on Compton scattering in laser-electron storage rings is discussed. The results of the electron beam dynamics simulation involving Compton and intrabeam scattering are presented.

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF THE MODEL OF GALACTIC INTERSTELLAR EMISSION FOR STANDARD POINT-SOURCE ANALYSIS OF FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acero, F.; Ballet, J. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Université Paris Diderot, Service d’Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Ackermann, M.; Buehler, R. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Ajello, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Kinard Lab of Physics, Clemson, SC 29634-0978 (United States); Albert, A.; Baldini, L.; Bloom, E. D.; Bottacini, E.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Barbiellini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bastieri, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Bellazzini, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bissaldi, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Bonino, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Torino, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Brandt, T. J.; Buson, S. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Bregeon, J. [Laboratoire Univers et Particules de Montpellier, Université Montpellier, CNRS/IN2P3, Montpellier (France); Bruel, P., E-mail: isabelle.grenier@cea.fr, E-mail: casandjian@cea.fr [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, École polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, Palaiseau (France); and others

    2016-04-01

    Most of the celestial γ rays detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope originate from the interstellar medium when energetic cosmic rays interact with interstellar nucleons and photons. Conventional point-source and extended-source studies rely on the modeling of this diffuse emission for accurate characterization. Here, we describe the development of the Galactic Interstellar Emission Model (GIEM), which is the standard adopted by the LAT Collaboration and is publicly available. This model is based on a linear combination of maps for interstellar gas column density in Galactocentric annuli and for the inverse-Compton emission produced in the Galaxy. In the GIEM, we also include large-scale structures like Loop I and the Fermi bubbles. The measured gas emissivity spectra confirm that the cosmic-ray proton density decreases with Galactocentric distance beyond 5 kpc from the Galactic Center. The measurements also suggest a softening of the proton spectrum with Galactocentric distance. We observe that the Fermi bubbles have boundaries with a shape similar to a catenary at latitudes below 20° and we observe an enhanced emission toward their base extending in the north and south Galactic directions and located within ∼4° of the Galactic Center.

  3. Development of the Model of Galactic Interstellar Emission for Standard Point-Source Analysis of Fermi Large Area Telescope Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acero, F.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Brandt, T. J.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Most of the celestial gamma rays detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope originate from the interstellar medium when energetic cosmic rays interact with interstellar nucleons and photons. Conventional point-source and extended-source studies rely on the modeling of this diffuse emission for accurate characterization. Here, we describe the development of the Galactic Interstellar Emission Model (GIEM),which is the standard adopted by the LAT Collaboration and is publicly available. This model is based on a linear combination of maps for interstellar gas column density in Galactocentric annuli and for the inverse-Compton emission produced in the Galaxy. In the GIEM, we also include large-scale structures like Loop I and the Fermi bubbles. The measured gas emissivity spectra confirm that the cosmic-ray proton density decreases with Galactocentric distance beyond 5 kpc from the Galactic Center. The measurements also suggest a softening of the proton spectrum with Galactocentric distance. We observe that the Fermi bubbles have boundaries with a shape similar to a catenary at latitudes below 20deg and we observe an enhanced emission toward their base extending in the north and south Galactic directions and located within approximately 4deg of the Galactic Center.

  4. Implicit numerical method for Compton scattering energy exchange between electrons and non-Planckian radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winslow, A.M.

    1975-01-01

    The multi-frequency grey method is extended to include Compton scattering. In this way one arrives at an expression for the total Compton scattering energy exchange rate, which, for a Planckian radiation field, reduces to a well known formula. 15 references, 5 graphs

  5. Compton profile study of V3Ge and Cr3Ge

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper the results of a Compton profile study of two polycrystalline. A15 compounds, namely, V3Ge and Cr3Ge, have been reported. The measurements have been performed using 59.54 keV γ-rays from an 241Am source. The theoretical Compton profiles have been computed for both the compounds using ...

  6. The Compton Camera - medical imaging with higher sensitivity Exhibition LEPFest 2000

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    The Compton Camera reconstructs the origin of Compton-scattered X-rays using electronic collimation with Silicon pad detectors instead of the heavy conventional lead collimators in Anger cameras - reaching up to 200 times better sensitivity and a factor two improvement in resolution. Possible applications are in cancer diagnosis, neurology neurobiology, and cardiology.

  7. Compton energy-absorption scattering cross-sections for H, C, N, O, P, Ca and assessment of doppler broadening

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, D V; Brunetti, A; Gigante, G E

    2003-01-01

    Total Compton, individual shell and Compton energy-absorption scattering cross-sections are evaluated in the energy region 0.005 to 10 MeV for H, C. N, O. P and Ca. Compton energy absorption cross-sections deviate numerically with available values. The cause of the numerical discrepancies are not fully understood but can be attributed to Doppler broadening of the Compton scattered photons through a given angle. (authors)

  8. Analysis of the factors that affect photon counts in Compton scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Guang; Xiao, Guangyu

    2014-10-30

    Compton scattering has been applied in a variety of fields. The factors that affect Compton scattering have been studied extensively in the literature. However, the factors that affect the measured photon counts in Compton scattering are rarely considered. In this paper, we make a detailed discussion on those factors. First, Compton scattering experiments of some alloy series and powder mixture series are explored. Second, the electron density is researched in terms of atom and lattice constants. Third, the factor of attenuation coefficient is discussed. And then, the active degree of electrons is discussed based on the DFT theory. Lastly, the conclusions are made, that the factors affecting Compton scattering photon counts include mainly electron number density, attenuation coefficient and active degree of electrons. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Few arc-minute and keV resolutions with the TIGRE Compton telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zych, A.; Bhattacharya, D.; Dixon, D.; ONeill, T.; Tuemer, T.; White, R. S.; Ryan, J.; McConnell, M.; Macri, J.; Oegelman, H.; hide

    1997-01-01

    The tracking and imaging gamma ray experiment (TIGRE) Compton telescope concept can provide an angular resolution of a few arcmin, an energy resolution of a few keV and high sensitivity, while providing the wide field of view necessary for surveying and monitoring observations. Silicon and CdZnTe strip detectors are used to detect Compton pair events and determine their incident directions and energies. Above 400 keV, Compton recoil electrons are tracked through successive layers of thin silicon strip detectors. Compton scattered photons are detected with CdZnTe strip detectors. Pair electrons and positrons are tracked to provide high sensitivity observations in the 10 to 100 MeV range. Polarization studies are performed with large angle Compton scatter events. The TIGRE concept and development status are described.

  10. Effect of detector parameters on the image quality of Compton camera for 99mTc

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, S. H.; Seo, H.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, C. S.; Lee, J. S.; Kim, C. H.

    2007-02-01

    The Compton camera has a bright future as a medical imaging device considering its compactness, low patient dose, multiple-radioisotope tracing capability, inherent three dimensional (3D) imaging capability at a fixed position, etc. Currently, however, the image resolution of the Compton camera is not sufficient for medical imaging. In this study, we investigated the influence of various detector parameters on the image quality of the Compton camera for 99mTc with GEANT4. Our result shows that the segmentation of the detectors significantly affects the image resolution of the Compton camera. The energy discrimination of the detectors was found to significantly affect both the sensitivity and spatial resolution. The use of a higher energy gamma source (e.g., 18F emitting 511 keV photons), however, will significantly improve the spatial resolution of the Compton camera. It will also minimize the effect of the detector energy resolution.

  11. Design Study for Direction Variable Compton Scattering Gamma Ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kii, T.; Omer, M.; Negm, H.; Choi, Y. W.; Kinjo, R.; Yoshida, K.; Konstantin, T.; Kimura, N.; Ishida, K.; Imon, H.; Shibata, M.; Shimahashi, K.; Komai, T.; Okumura, K.; Zen, H.; Masuda, K.; Hori, T.; Ohgaki, H.

    2013-03-01

    A monochromatic gamma ray beam is attractive for isotope-specific material/medical imaging or non-destructive inspection. A laser Compton scattering (LCS) gamma ray source which is based on the backward Compton scattering of laser light on high-energy electrons can generate energy variable quasi-monochromatic gamma ray. Due to the principle of the LCS gamma ray, the direction of the gamma beam is limited to the direction of the high-energy electrons. Then the target object is placed on the beam axis, and is usually moved if spatial scanning is required. In this work, we proposed an electron beam transport system consisting of four bending magnets which can stick the collision point and control the electron beam direction, and a laser system consisting of a spheroidal mirror and a parabolic mirror which can also stick the collision point. Then the collision point can be placed on one focus of the spheroid. Thus gamma ray direction and collision angle between the electron beam and the laser beam can be easily controlled. As the results, travelling direction of the LCS gamma ray can be controlled under the limitation of the beam transport system, energy of the gamma ray can be controlled by controlling incident angle of the colliding beams, and energy spread can be controlled by changing the divergence of the laser beam.

  12. Compton Scattering of Quasi-Real Virtual Photons at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, Valery P.; Anselmo, F.; Arefiev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Bajo, A.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldew, S.V.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Barczyk, A.; Barillere, R.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Batalova, N.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bellucci, L.; Berbeco, R.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B.L.; Biasini, M.; Biglietti, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J.J.; Blyth, S.C.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bohm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bottai, S.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J.G.; Brochu, F.; Burger, J.D.; Burger, W.J.; Cai, X.D.; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A.; Casaus, J.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y.H.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; de la Cruz, B.; Cucciarelli, S.; de Asmundis, R.; Deglon, P.; Debreczeni, J.; Degre, A.; Dehmelt, K.; Deiters, K.; della Volpe, D.; Delmeire, E.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; De Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; Dierckxsens, M.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Doria, A.; Dova, M.T.; Duchesneau, D.; Duda, M.; Echenard, B.; Eline, A.; El Hage, A.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F.J.; Extermann, P.; Falagan, M.A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J.H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P.H.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, I.; Forconi, G.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Iouri; Ganguli, S.N.; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gataullin, M.; Gentile, S.; Giagu, S.; Gong, Z.F.; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Grimm, O.; Gruenewald, M.W.; Guida, M.; Gupta, V.K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L.J.; Haas, D.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Herve, Alain; Hirschfelder, J.; Hofer, H.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzner, G.; Hou, S.R.; Jin, B.N.; Jindal, P.; Jones, Lawrence W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M.N.; Kim, J.K.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; Konig, A.C.; Kopal, M.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraber, M.; Kraemer, R.W.; Kruger, A.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leiste, R.; Levtchenko, M.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Likhoded, S.; Lin, C.H.; Lin, W.T.; Linde, F.L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z.A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y.S.; Luci, C.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W.G.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Mana, C.; Mans, J.; Martin, J.P.; Marzano, F.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R.R.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W.J.; Mihul, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Mohanty, G.B.; Muanza, G.S.; Muijs, A.J.M.; Musicar, B.; Musy, M.; Nagy, S.; Natale, S.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Nisati, A.; Novak, T.; Kluge, Hannelies; Ofierzynski, R.; Organtini, G.; Pal, I.; Palomares, C.; Paolucci, P.; Paramatti, R.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, Thomas Cantzon; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pedace, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Piccolo, D.; Pierella, F.; Pioppi, M.; Piroue, P.A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Pothier, J.; Prokofiev, D.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rahaman, Mohammad Azizur; Raics, P.; Raja, N.; Ramelli, R.; Rancoita, P.G.; Ranieri, R.; Raspereza, A.; Razis, P.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Riemann, S.; Riles, Keith; Roe, B.P.; Romero, L.; Rosca, A.; Rosemann, C.; Rosenbleck, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Roth, Stefan; Rubio, J.A.; Ruggiero, G.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sakharov, A.; Saremi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Schafer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schmidt-Kaerst, S.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D.J.; Sciacca, C.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Son, D.; Souga, C.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D.P.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L.Z.; Sushkov, S.; Suter, H.; Swain, J.D.; Szillasi, Z.; Tang, X.W.; Tarjan, P.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Tellili, B.; Teyssier, D.; Timmermans, Charles; Ting, Samuel C.C.; Ting, S.M.; Tonwar, S.C.; Toth, J.; Tully, C.; Tung, K.L.; Ulbricht, J.; Valente, E.; Van de Walle, R.T.; Vasquez, R.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Viertel, G.; Villa, S.; Vivargent, M.; Vlachos, S.; Vodopianov, I.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Vorobyov, A.A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Z.M.; Weber, M.; Wynhoff, S.; Xia, L.; Xu, Z.Z.; Yamamoto, J.; Yang, B.Z.; Yang, H.J.; Yeh, S.C.; Zalite, An.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhao, J.; Zhu, G.Y.; Zhu, R.Y.; Zhuang, H.L.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Zoller, M.

    2005-01-01

    Compton scattering of quasi-real virtual photons, gamma e+- -> gamma e+-, is studied with 0.6fb-1 of data collected by the L3 detector at the LEP e+e- collider at centre-of-mass energies root(s')=189-209GeV. About 4500 events produced by the interaction of virtual photons emitted by e+- of one beam with e-+ of the opposite beam are collected for effective centre-of-mass energies of the photon-electron and photon-positron systems in the range from root(s')= 35GeV up to root(s')=175GeV, the highest energy at which Compton scattering was ever probed. The cross sections of the gamma e+- -> gamma e+- process as a function of root(s') and of the rest-frame scattering angle are measured, combined with previous L3 measurements down to root(s')~20GeV, and found to agree with the QED expectations.

  13. Laser Pulse Shaping for Ultrahigh Intensity Compton Scattering*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troha, A. L.; Le Sage, G. P.; Bennett, C.; Kolner, B. H.; Heritage, J. P.; Hartemann, F. V.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.

    1996-11-01

    At ultrahigh intensities, where the normalized vector potential associated with the laser wave exceeds unity, the electron axial velocity modulation due to radiation pressure yields nonlinear Compton backscattered spectra. For applications requiring a narrow Doppler upshifted linewidth, such as the future g-g collider or focused X-ray generation, this poses a serious problem. It is shown that temporal laser pulse shaping using holographic (spectral) filtering at the Fourier plane of a chirped pulse laser amplifier, or similar approaches, can alleviate this problem, and that this technique can be scaled to the required multi-TW range. In particular, Compton backscattered spectra are calculated in the case of the optical square pulses similar to those experimentally observed by Weiner et al. Issues such as nonlinear effects, higher-order dispersion, 3D effects and optical noise are also discussed. *Work supported in part by DoD/AFOSR (MURI) F49620-95-1-0253, AFOSR (ATRI) F30602-94-2-001, ARO DAAHO4-95-1-0336 and LLNL/LDRD DoE W-7405-ENG-48

  14. Compton profile study and electronic properties of tantalum diboride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raykar, Veera; Bhamu, K C; Ahuja, B L

    2013-07-01

    We have reported the first-ever experimental Compton profile (CP) of TaB2 using 20 Ci(137)Cs Compton spectrometer. To compare the experimental data, we have also computed the theoretical CPs using density functional theory (DFT) and hybridization of DFT and Hartree-Fock (HF) within linear combination of the atomic orbitals (LCAO) method. In addition, we have reported energy bands and density of states of TaB2 using LCAO and full potential-linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) methods. A real space analysis of CP of TaB2 confirms its metallic character which is in tune with the cross-overs of Fermi level by energy bands and Fermi surface topology. A comparison of equal-valence-electron-density (EVED) experimental profiles of isoelectronic TaB2 and NbB2 show more covalent (or less ionic) character of TaB2 than that of NbB2 which is in agreement with available ionicity data. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Imaging of Gamma-ray Scatter from a Polymethyl-methacrylate Phantom Using a Compton Imaging Spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Samuel J; Kearfott, Kimberlee J

    2017-08-01

    Commercially available gamma-ray imaging spectrometers have been introduced recently and are currently undergoing investigations for various applications in nuclear power plants, environmental management, and medical environments. A Compton imaging gamma-ray spectrometer uses an array of detectors or a single position-sensitive crystal to create planar images of radionuclide distributions. The typical software included with these devices creates images of specific radionuclides using only the counts under their known gamma emission photopeaks. This approach prevents the direct imaging of scattered radiation, which is of interest for many radiation protection applications. In this paper, a technique for imaging radiation scatter or portions of the scatter spectrum is implemented. This involves the creation of a virtual radionuclide in software with peaks placed throughout the backscatter continuum of interest and then imaging that virtual radionuclide in the post-processing software. This technique is used to image the Compton scatter successfully from a polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) phantom placed in a Cs irradiator beam. Measured scatter energies were found to be within 15% of the expected values, sufficient to predict scatter behavior and individually measure separate sources of scatter at different angles.

  16. Inverse free electron laser accelerator for advanced light sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Duris

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the inverse free electron laser (IFEL scheme as a compact high gradient accelerator solution for driving advanced light sources such as a soft x-ray free electron laser amplifier or an inverse Compton scattering based gamma-ray source. In particular, we present a series of new developments aimed at improving the design of future IFEL accelerators. These include a new procedure to optimize the choice of the undulator tapering, a new concept for prebunching which greatly improves the fraction of trapped particles and the final energy spread, and a self-consistent study of beam loading effects which leads to an energy-efficient high laser-to-beam power conversion.

  17. Development of a multi-keV Compton source on ELSA linac and optimization with a photons piling-up system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaleil, Annaig

    2016-01-01

    X-ray sources based on inverse Compton scattering process produce tunable near-monochromatic and highly directive X-rays. Recent advances in laser and accelerator technologies make the development of such very compact hard X-ray sources possible. These sources are particularly attractive in several applications such as medical imaging, cancer therapy or culture-heritage study, currently performed in size-limited infrastructures. The main objective of this thesis is the development of an inverse Compton scattering source on the ELSA linac of CEA at Bruyeres-le-Chatel as a calibration tool for ultra-fast detectors. A non-resonant cavity was designed to multiply the number of emitted X-ray photons. The laser optical path is folded to pile-up laser pulses at the interaction point, thus increasing the interaction probability. Another way of optimizing the X-ray yield consists in increasing the electron bunch density at the interaction point, which is strongly dependent on the electron energy. A facility up-grade was performed to increase the electron energy up to 30 MeV. The X-ray output gain obtained thanks to this system was measured and compared with calculated expectations and 3D PIC simulations. (author) [fr

  18. Beam Size Measurement by Optical Diffraction Radiation and Laser System for Compton Polarimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chuyu [Peking Univ., Beijing (China)

    2012-12-31

    difficulty of diagnostics. For most cases, intercepting measurements are no longer acceptable, and nonintercepting method like synchrotron radiation monitor can not be applied to linear accelerators. The development of accelerator technology asks for simutanous diagnostics innovations, to expand the performance of diagnostic tools to meet the requirements of the next generation accelerators. Diffraction radiation and inverse Compton scattering are two of the most promising techniques, their nonintercepting nature avoids perturbance to the beam and damage to the instrumentation. This thesis is divided into two parts, beam size measurement by optical diffraction radiation and Laser system for Compton polarimeter. Diffraction radiation, produced by the interaction between the electric field of charged particles and the target, is related to transition radiation. Even though the theory of diffraction radiation has been discussed since 1960s, there are only a few experimental studies in recent years. The successful beam size measurement by optical diffraction radiation at CEBAF machine is a milestone: First of all, we have successfully demonstrated diffraction radiation as an effective nonintercepting diagnostics; Secondly, the simple linear relationship between the diffraction radiation image size and the actual beam size improves the reliability of ODR measurements; And, we measured the polarized components of diffraction radiation for the first time and I analyzed the contribution from edge radiation to diffraction radiation.

  19. Final state interaction and temperature effects in Compton scattering from lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sternemann, Christian

    2000-01-01

    This thesis presents measurements of lithium Compton profiles with an incident energy around 9 keV and a momentum space resolution of 0.02 a.u. to investigate the effect of final state interaction and thus to test the validity of the impulse approximation in interpreting the valence electron Compton profile. Furthermore, the temperature dependence of the lithium Compton profile is studied at 30 keV incident energy and 0.10 a.u. momentum space resolution. Both experiments are discussed with respect to the well known discrepancy between experimentally found lithium Compton profiles and results from bandstructure calculations in local density approximation. The valence Compton profiles measured at 9 keV show an asymmetric shape and the predicted sharp features at the Fermi break which should be resolved with the highly improved momentum space resolution are drastically smeared out. The asymmetry agrees well with calculations using a many-particle scheme including self-energy and vertex corrections of the proper polarization function. The additional broadening of the Compton profile is mainly attributed to the finite width of the spectral density function of the excited particle resulting in an intrinsic resolution limit for Compton profile measurements at low incident energies. Under these experimental conditions the application of the impulse approximation is not justified. The temperature dependent measurements of the lithium valence Compton profiles exhibit a narrowing of the valence electron Compton profile with increasing temperature. The Compton profile measured at 95 K is above the room temperature profile around the Fermi momentum and below at the Compton peak. No temperature dependence of the core electron contribution to the Compton profile is detected. The temperature effect is confronted with a temperature dependent jellium calculation and with computations utilizing an empirical local pseudopotential, where in the pseudopotential calculation the influence

  20. High energy power-law tail in X-ray binaries and bulk Comptonization due to an outflow from a disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Nagendra

    2018-02-01

    We study the high energy power-law tail emission of X-ray binaries (XRBs) by a bulk Comptonization process which is usually observed in the very high soft (VHS) state of black hole (BH) XRBs and the high soft (HS) state of the neutron star (NS) and BH XRBs. Earlier, to generate the power-law tail in bulk Comptonization framework, a free-fall converging flow into BH or NS had been considered as a bulk region. In this work, for a bulk region we consider mainly an outflow geometry from the accretion disk which is bounded by a torus surrounding the compact object. We have two choices for an outflow geometry: (i) collimated flow and (ii) conical flow of opening angle θ _b and the axis is perpendicular to the disk. We also consider an azimuthal velocity of the torus fluids as a bulk motion where the fluids are rotating around the compact object (a torus flow). We find that the power-law tail can be generated in a torus flow having large optical depth and bulk speed (>0.75 c), and in conical flow with θ _b > ˜ 30° for a low value of Comptonizing medium temperature. Particularly, in conical flow the low opening angle is more favourable to generate the power-law tail in both the HS state and the VHS state. We notice that when the outflow is collimated, then the emergent spectrum does not have power-law component for a low Comptonizing medium temperature.

  1. Evaluation of double photon coincidence Compton imaging method with GEANT4 simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, Yuri; Shimazoe, Kenji; Mizumachi, Yuki; Takahashi, Hiroyuki

    2017-11-01

    Compton imaging has been used for various applications including astronomical observations, radioactive waste management, and biomedical imaging. The positions of radioisotopes are determined in the intersections of multiple cone traces through a large number of events, which reduces signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the images. We have developed an advanced Compton imaging method to localize radioisotopes with high SNR by using information of the interactions of Compton scattering caused by two gamma rays at the same time, as the double photon coincidence Compton imaging method. The targeted radioisotopes of this imaging method are specific nuclides that emit several gamma rays at the same time such as 60Co, 134Cs, and 111In, etc. Since their locations are determined in the intersections of two Compton cones, the most of cone traces would disappear in the three-dimensional space, which enhances the SNR and angular resolution. In this paper, the comparison of the double photon coincidence Compton imaging method and the single photon Compton imaging method was conducted by using GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation.

  2. Compton profiles of some composite materials normalized by a new method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankarshan, B. M.; Umesh, T. K.

    2018-03-01

    Recently, we have shown that as a novel approach, in the case of samples which can be treated as pure incoherent scatterers, the effective atomic number Zeff itself could be conveniently used to normalize their un-normalized Compton profiles. In the present investigation, we have attempted to examine the efficacy of this approach. For this purpose, we have first determined the single differential Compton scattering cross sections (SDCS) of the elements C and Al as well as of some H, C, N and O based polymer samples such as bakelite, epoxy, nylon and teflon which are pure incoherent scatterers. The measurements were made at 120° in a goniometer assembly that employs a high resolution high purity germanium detector. The SDCS values were used to obtain the Zeff and the un-normalized Compton profiles. These Compton profiles were separately normalized with their Zeff values (for Compton scattering) as well as with the normalization constant obtained by integrating their Hartree-Fock Biggs et al Compton profiles based on the mixture rule. These two sets of values agreed well within the range of experimental errors, implying that Zeff can be conveniently used to normalize the experimental Compton profiles of pure incoherent scatterers.

  3. The Swift BAT Perspective on Non-Thermal Emission in HIFLUGCS Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wik, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    The search for diffuse non-thermal, inverse Compton (IC) emission from galaxy clusters at hard X-ray energies has been underway for many years, with most detections being either of low significance or controversial. Until recently, comprehensive surveys of hard X-ray emission from clusters were not possible; instead, individually proposed-for. long observations would be collated from the archive. With the advent of the Swift BAT all sky survey, any c1u,;ter's emission above 14 keV can be probed with nearly uniform sensitivity. which is comparable to that of RXTE, Beppo-SAX, and Suzaku with the 58-month version of the survey. In this work. we search for non-thermal excess emission above the exponentially decreasing, high energy thermal emission in the flux-limited HIFLUGCS sample. The BAT emission from many of the detected clusters is marginally extended; we are able to extract the total flux for these clusters using fiducial models for their spatial extent. To account for thermal emission at BAT energies, XMM-Newton EPIC spectra are extracted from coincident spatial regions so that both the thermal and non-thermal spectral components can be determined simultaneou,;ly in joint fits. We find marginally significant IC components in 6 clusters, though after closer inspection and consideration of systematic errors we are unable to claim a clear detection in any of them. The spectra of all clusters are also summed to enhance a cumulative non-thermal signal not quite detectable in individual clusters. After constructing a model based on single temperature

  4. Laser propagation and compton scattering in parabolic plasma channel

    CERN Document Server

    Dongguo, L; Yokoya, K; Hirose, T

    2003-01-01

    A Gaussian laser beam propagating in a parabolic plasma channel is discussed in this paper. For a weak laser, plasma density perturbation induced by interaction between the laser field and plasma is very small, the refractive index can be assumed to be constant with respect to time variable. For a parabolic plasma channel, through the static propagation equation, we obtain an analytical solution of the profile function of the Gaussian laser beam for an unmatched case and give the general condition for the matched case. As the laser intensity increases, an effect due to strong laser fields is included. We discuss how to design and select the distribution of plasma density for a certain experiment in which a plasma channel is utilized to guide a laser beam. The number of scattered photons (X-rays) generated through Compton backscattering in a plasma channel is discussed. (author)

  5. Second LaBr3 Compton Telescope Prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llosa, Gabriela; Cabello, Jorge; Gillam, John-E.; Lacasta, Carlos; Oliver, Josep F.; Rafecas, Magdalena; Solaz, Carles; Solevi, Paola; Stankova, Vera; Torres-Espallardo, Irene; Trovato, Marco

    2013-06-01

    A Compton telescope for dose delivery monitoring in hadron therapy is under development at IFIC Valencia within the European project ENVISION. The telescope will consist of three detector planes, each one composed of a LaBr 3 continuous scintillator crystal coupled to four silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) arrays. After the development of a first prototype which served to assess the principle, a second prototype with larger crystals has been assembled and is being tested. The current version of the prototype consists of two detector layers, each one composed of a 32.5 x 35 mm 2 crystal coupled to four SiPM arrays. The VATA64HDR16 ASIC has been employed as front-end electronics. The readout system consists of a custom made data acquisition board. Tests with point-like sources have been carried out in the laboratory, assessing the correct functioning of the device. The system optimization is ongoing. (authors)

  6. Deeply virtual compton scattering in color dipole formalism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, Magno V.T. [Universidade Federal do Pampa (UNIPAMPA), Bage, RS (Brazil)

    2007-06-15

    In this contribution we summarize recent investigations on the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) within the color dipole approach. The color dipole cross section is implemented through the phenomenological saturation model. The role played by its QCD evolution and skewedness effects in the DVCS cross section are discussed. The results are compared with the recent H1 and ZEUS Collaborations data. The skewing factor, defined as the ratio of the imaginary parts of the amplitudes Im A({gamma}* p {yields} {gamma}* p)/ Im A({gamma}* p {yields} {gamma} p) can be extracted from the data using recent DVCS and the inclusive inelastic cross section measurements at DESY-HERA. We report on this experimental extraction and compare the results to the theoretical predictions for NLO QCD and the color dipole approach. (author)

  7. A Compton camera prototype for prompt gamma medical imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thirolf P.G.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Compton camera prototype for a position-sensitive detection of prompt γ rays from proton-induced nuclear reactions is being developed in Garching. The detector system allows to track the Comptonscattered electrons. The camera consists of a monolithic LaBr3:Ce scintillation absorber crystal, read out by a multi-anode PMT, preceded by a stacked array of 6 double-sided silicon strip detectors acting as scatterers. The LaBr3:Ce crystal has been characterized with radioactive sources. Online commissioning measurements were performed with a pulsed deuteron beam at the Garching Tandem accelerator and with a clinical proton beam at the OncoRay facility in Dresden. The determination of the interaction point of the photons in the monolithic crystal was investigated.

  8. Generation of laser Compton gamma-rays using Compact ERL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shizuma, Toshiyuki; Hajima, Ryoichi; Nagai, Ryoji; Hayakawa, Takehito; Mori, Michiaki; Seya, Michio

    2015-01-01

    Nondestructive isotope-specific assay system using nuclear resonance fluorescence has been developed at JAEA. In this system, intense, mono-energetic laser Compton scattering (LCS) gamma-rays are generated by combining an energy recovery linac (ERL) and laser enhancement cavity. As technical development for such an intense gamma-ray source, we demonstrated generation of LCS gamma-rays using Compact ERL (supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology) developed in collaboration with KEK. We also measured X-ray fluorescence for elements near iron region by using mono-energetic LCS gamma-rays. In this presentation, we will show results of the experiment and future plan. (author)

  9. Fast cooling of bunches in compton storage rings*

    CERN Document Server

    Bulyak, E; Zimmermann, F

    2011-01-01

    We propose an enhancement of laser radiative cooling by utilizing laser pulses of small spatial and temporal dimensions, which interact only with a fraction of an electron bunch circulating in a storage ring. We studied the dynamics of such electron bunch when laser photons scatter off the electrons at a collision point placed in a section with nonzero dispersion. In this case of ‘asymmetric cooling’, the stationary energy spread is much smaller than under conditions of regular scattering where the laser spot size is larger than the electron beam; and the synchrotron oscillations are damped faster. Coherent oscillations of large amplitude may be damped within one synchrotron period, so that this method can support the rapid successive injection of many bunches in longitudinal phase space for stacking purposes. Results of extensive simulations are presented for the performance optimization of Compton gamma-ray sources and damping rings.

  10. Effect of Transverse Coupling on Asymmetric Cooling in Compton Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Bulyak, E; Zimmermann, F

    2013-01-01

    Fast cooling of bunches circulating in a Compton ring is achieved by placing the collision point between electron bunches and laser pulses in a dispersive section and by, in addition, introducing a transverse offset between the laser pulse and the electron-beam closed orbit. Growth of the emittance in the dispersive transversal direction due to the additional excitation of betatron oscillations limits this type of cooling. Here we present the results of further studies on the fast cooling process, looking at the effect of the coupling of the transverse (betatron) oscillations. We first show theoretically that the transverse betatron coupling shortens the cooling time and hence reduces the steady-state energy spread of the electron beam, as well as the quantum losses. The theoretical estimates are then validated by simulations. Finally, a proof-of-principle experiment at the KEK ATF Damping Ring is proposed.

  11. Compton scattering from nuclei and photo-absorption sum rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorchtein, Mikhail; Hobbs, Timothy; Londergan, J. Timothy; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2011-01-01

    We revisit the photo-absorption sum rule for real Compton scattering from the proton and from nuclear targets. In analogy with the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule appropriate at low energies, we propose a new 'constituent quark model' sum rule that relates the integrated strength of hadronic resonances to the scattering amplitude on constituent quarks. We study the constituent quark model sum rule for several nuclear targets. In addition, we extract the α=0 pole contribution for both proton and nuclei. Using the modern high-energy proton data, we find that the α=0 pole contribution differs significantly from the Thomson term, in contrast with the original findings by Damashek and Gilman.

  12. Hybrid coded aperture and Compton imaging using an active mask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, L.J.; Wallace, M.S.; Galassi, M.C.; Hoover, A.S.; Mocko, M.; Palmer, D.M.; Tornga, S.R.; Kippen, R.M.; Hynes, M.V.; Toolin, M.J.; Harris, B.; McElroy, J.E.; Wakeford, D.; Lanza, R.C.; Horn, B.K.P.; Wehe, D.K.

    2009-01-01

    The trimodal imager (TMI) images gamma-ray sources from a mobile platform using both coded aperture (CA) and Compton imaging (CI) modalities. In this paper we will discuss development and performance of image reconstruction algorithms for the TMI. In order to develop algorithms in parallel with detector hardware we are using a GEANT4 [J. Allison, K. Amako, J. Apostolakis, H. Araujo, P.A. Dubois, M. Asai, G. Barrand, R. Capra, S. Chauvie, R. Chytracek, G. Cirrone, G. Cooperman, G. Cosmo, G. Cuttone, G. Daquino, et al., IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. NS-53 (1) (2006) 270] based simulation package to produce realistic data sets for code development. The simulation code incorporates detailed detector modeling, contributions from natural background radiation, and validation of simulation results against measured data. Maximum likelihood algorithms for both imaging methods are discussed, as well as a hybrid imaging algorithm wherein CA and CI information is fused to generate a higher fidelity reconstruction.

  13. Electromagnetic energies of nuclei and the nuclear Compton amplitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friar, J.L.

    1976-01-01

    The electromagnetic energy of a nucleus is derived in perturbation theory, which relates this quantity to the amplitude for the forward scattering of virtual photons on a nucleus (nuclear Compton amplitude). Through the use of the gauge invariance of this amplitude, the energy is separated into Coulomb and transverse components. Our formalism, although basically nonrelativistic, admits corrections of order (v/c) 2 to the nuclear charge operator. The energy is further separated into one-body terms, related to the n--p mass difference, and two-body terms which lead to the Breit interaction and the nuclear Lamb shift. These results are then related to electron scattering sum rules in the manner of Cottingham. Mesonic contributions to the electromagnetic energy are also discussed

  14. Deeply virtual compton scattering at 6 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthot, J.; Chen, J.P.; Chudakov, E.

    2000-01-01

    We propose a measurement of the Deep Virtual Compton Scattering process (DVCS) ep → epγ in Hall A at Jefferson Lab with a 6 GeV beam. We are able to explore the onset of Q 2 scaling, by measuring a beam helicity asymmetry for Q 2 ranging from 1.5 to 2.5 GeV 2 at x B ∼0.35. At this kinematics, the asymmetry is dominated by the DVCS - Bethe-Heitler (BH) interference, which is proportional to the imaginary part of the DVCS amplitude amplified by the full magnitude of the BH amplitude. The imaginary part of the DVCS amplitude is expected to scale early. Indeed, the imaginary part of the forward Compton amplitude measured in deep inelastic scattering (via the optical theorem) scales at Q 2 as low as 1 GeV 2 . If the scaling regime is reached, we will make an 8% measurement of the skewed parton distributions (SPD) contributing to the DVCS amplitude. Also, this experiment allows us to separately estimate the size of the higher-twist effects, since they are only suppressed by an additional factor 1/Q compared to the leading-twist term, and have a different angular dependence. We use a polarized electron beam and detect the scattered electron in the HRSe, the real photon in an electromagnetic calorimeter (under construction) and the recoil proton in a shielded scintillator array (to be constructed). This allows as to determine the difference in cross-sections for electrons of opposite helicities. This observable is directly linked to the SPD's. We estimate that 25 days of beam (600 hours) are needed to achieve this goal. (authors)

  15. Use of implicit Monte Carlo radiation transport with hydrodynamics and compton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleck, J.A. Jr.

    1971-03-01

    It is shown that the combination of implicit radiation transport and hydrodynamics, Compton scattering, and any other energy transport can be simply carried out by a ''splitting'' procedure. Contributions to material energy exchange can be reckoned separately for hydrodynamics, radiation transport without scattering, Compton scattering, plus any other possible energy exchange mechanism. The radiation transport phase of the calculation would be implicit, but the hydrodynamics and Compton portions would not, leading to possible time step controls. The time step restrictions which occur on radiation transfer due to large Planck mean absorption cross-sections would not occur

  16. Virtual Compton Scattering off a Spinless Target in the AdS/QCD correspondence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallon, Samuel [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique d' Orsay - LPT, Bat. 210, Univ. Paris-Sud 11, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Marquet, Cyrille [IPhT - Institut de Physique Theorique, Orme des Merisiers bat. 774, PC 136, CEA/DSM/IPhT, CEA/Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Roiesnel, Claude [Centre de Physique Theorique - CPHT, UMR 7644, Ecole Polytechnique, Bat. 6, RDC, F91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

    2010-07-01

    We study the doubly virtual Compton scattering off a spinless target {gamma}* P {yields} {gamma}* P' within the Anti-de Sitter(AdS)/QCD formalism. We find that the general structure allowed by the Lorentz invariance and gauge invariance of the Compton amplitude is not easily reproduced with the standard recipes of the AdS/QCD correspondence. In the soft-photon regime, where the semi-classical approximation is supposed to apply best, we show that the measurements of the electric and magnetic polarizabilities of a target like the charged pion in real Compton scattering, can already serve as stringent tests. (author)

  17. Test of Compton camera components for prompt gamma imaging at the ELBE bremsstrahlung beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueso-González, F.; Golnik, C.; Berthel, M.; Dreyer, A.; Enghardt, W.; Fiedler, F.; Heidel, K.; Kormoll, T.; Rohling, H.; Schöne, S.; Schwengner, R.; Wagner, A.; Pausch, G.

    2014-05-01

    In the context of ion beam therapy, particle range verification is a major challenge for the quality assurance of the treatment. One approach is the measurement of the prompt gamma rays resulting from the tissue irradiation. A Compton camera based on several position sensitive gamma ray detectors, together with an imaging algorithm, is expected to reconstruct the prompt gamma ray emission density map, which is correlated with the dose distribution. At OncoRay and Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), a Compton camera setup is being developed consisting of two scatter planes: two CdZnTe (CZT) cross strip detectors, and an absorber consisting of one Lu2SiO5 (LSO) block detector. The data acquisition is based on VME electronics and handled by software developed on the ROOT framework. The setup has been tested at the linear electron accelerator ELBE at HZDR, which is used in this experiment to produce bunched bremsstrahlung photons with up to 12.5 MeV energy and a repetition rate of 13 MHz. Their spectrum has similarities with the shape expected from prompt gamma rays in the clinical environment, and the flux is also bunched with the accelerator frequency. The charge sharing effect of the CZT detector is studied qualitatively for different energy ranges. The LSO detector pixel discrimination resolution is analyzed and it shows a trend to improve for high energy depositions. The time correlation between the pulsed prompt photons and the measured detector signals, to be used for background suppression, exhibits a time resolution of 3 ns FWHM for the CZT detector and of 2 ns for the LSO detector. A time walk correction and pixel-wise calibration is applied for the LSO detector, whose resolution improves up to 630 ps. In conclusion, the detector setup is suitable for time-resolved background suppression in pulsed clinical particle accelerators. Ongoing tasks are the quantitative comparison with simulations and the test of imaging algorithms. Experiments at proton

  18. The Contribution of Compton-Thick AGN/ULIRGs to the X-Ray Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardini, Emanuele

    Accretion onto the supermassive black holes located at the centre of Active Galactic Nuclei(AGN) is one of the most efficient power sources in the Universe, and provides a significant contribution to the energy radiated over cosmic times. The spectral shape of the X-ray background and its progressive resolution strongly suggests that most AGN are heavily obscured by large amounts of dust and gas. Their primary radiation field is reprocessed and re-emitted at longer wavelengths, driving a huge IR luminosity. Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs) are the local counterparts of the high-redshift (z sport the typical features of buried AGN in the mid-IR. IRAS 12127 1412 was observed for the first time in the X-rays by our group. Its Chandra spectrum clearly shows the signatures of AGN reflection at 2 10 keV. Similar properties were previously found in IRAS 00182 7112. Our Suzaku observations will allow to pinpont the AGN emission above 10 keV, and will provide fundamental information on the physical and geometrical structure of Compton-thick AGN embedded in a nuclear starburst. These sources are believed to experience the very initial phase of the AGN feedback on the surrounding environment, eventually leading to the formation of powerful optically- bright quasars. Besides this, we stress another remarkable opportunity related to the study of these two ULIRGs. Due to their really unique mid-IR and hard X-ray spectral properties, IRAS 00182 7112 and IRAS 12127 1412 can be considered as representative templates for a significant fraction of the obscured AGN population. Their broadband spectral energy distribution can then be used to calibrate new photometric diagnostics based on mid-IR colors and bolometric corrections, capable of selecting their faint counterparts within the IR deep fields. The wealth of data in the WISE and Spitzer archives will allow a complete census of this AGN subclass. The reflection efficiency inferred from our new Suzaku observations will make

  19. Strong-field QED processes in short laser pulses. One- and two-photon Compton scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seipt, Daniel

    2012-12-20

    The purpose of this thesis is to advance the understanding of strong-field QED processes in short laser pulses. The processes of non-linear one-photon and two-photon Compton scattering are studied, that is the scattering of photons in the interaction of relativistic electrons with ultra-short high-intensity laser pulses. These investigations are done in view of the present and next generation of ultra-high intensity optical lasers which are supposed to achieve unprecedented intensities of the order of 10{sup 24} W/cm{sup 2} and beyond, with pulse lengths in the order of some femtoseconds. The ultra-high laser intensity requires a non-perturbative description of the interaction of charged particles with the laser field to allow for multi-photon interactions, which is beyond the usual perturbative expansion of QED organized in powers of the fine structure constant. This is achieved in strong-field QED by employing the Furry picture and non-perturbative solutions of the Dirac equation in the presence of a background laser field as initial and final state wave functions, as well as the laser dressed Dirac-Volkov propagator. The primary objective is a realistic description of scattering processes with regard to the finite laser pulse duration beyond the common approximation of infinite plane waves, which is made necessary by the ultra-short pulse length of modern high-intensity lasers. Non-linear finite size effects are identified, which are a result of the interplay between the ultra-high intensity and the ultra-short pulse length. In particular, the frequency spectra and azimuthal photon emission spectra are studied emphasizing the differences between pulsed and infinite laser fields. The proper description of the finite temporal duration of the laser pulse leads to a regularization of unphysical infinities (due to the infinite plane-wave description) of the laser-dressed Dirac-Volkov propagator and in the second-order strong-field process of two-photon Compton

  20. Strong-field QED processes in short laser pulses. One- and two-photon Compton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seipt, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to advance the understanding of strong-field QED processes in short laser pulses. The processes of non-linear one-photon and two-photon Compton scattering are studied, that is the scattering of photons in the interaction of relativistic electrons with ultra-short high-intensity laser pulses. These investigations are done in view of the present and next generation of ultra-high intensity optical lasers which are supposed to achieve unprecedented intensities of the order of 10 24 W/cm 2 and beyond, with pulse lengths in the order of some femtoseconds. The ultra-high laser intensity requires a non-perturbative description of the interaction of charged particles with the laser field to allow for multi-photon interactions, which is beyond the usual perturbative expansion of QED organized in powers of the fine structure constant. This is achieved in strong-field QED by employing the Furry picture and non-perturbative solutions of the Dirac equation in the presence of a background laser field as initial and final state wave functions, as well as the laser dressed Dirac-Volkov propagator. The primary objective is a realistic description of scattering processes with regard to the finite laser pulse duration beyond the common approximation of infinite plane waves, which is made necessary by the ultra-short pulse length of modern high-intensity lasers. Non-linear finite size effects are identified, which are a result of the interplay between the ultra-high intensity and the ultra-short pulse length. In particular, the frequency spectra and azimuthal photon emission spectra are studied emphasizing the differences between pulsed and infinite laser fields. The proper description of the finite temporal duration of the laser pulse leads to a regularization of unphysical infinities (due to the infinite plane-wave description) of the laser-dressed Dirac-Volkov propagator and in the second-order strong-field process of two-photon Compton scattering. An

  1. Atmospheric inverse modeling via sparse reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Hase

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Many applications in atmospheric science involve ill-posed inverse problems. A crucial component of many inverse problems is the proper formulation of a priori knowledge about the unknown parameters. In most cases, this knowledge is expressed as a Gaussian prior. This formulation often performs well at capturing smoothed, large-scale processes but is often ill equipped to capture localized structures like large point sources or localized hot spots. Over the last decade, scientists from a diverse array of applied mathematics and engineering fields have developed sparse reconstruction techniques to identify localized structures. In this study, we present a new regularization approach for ill-posed inverse problems in atmospheric science. It is based on Tikhonov regularization with sparsity constraint and allows bounds on the parameters. We enforce sparsity using a dictionary representation system. We analyze its performance in an atmospheric inverse modeling scenario by estimating anthropogenic US methane (CH4 emissions from simulated atmospheric measurements. Different measures indicate that our sparse reconstruction approach is better able to capture large point sources or localized hot spots than other methods commonly used in atmospheric inversions. It captures the overall signal equally well but adds details on the grid scale. This feature can be of value for any inverse problem with point or spatially discrete sources. We show an example for source estimation of synthetic methane emissions from the Barnett shale formation.

  2. Atmospheric inverse modeling via sparse reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hase, Nils; Miller, Scot M.; Maaß, Peter; Notholt, Justus; Palm, Mathias; Warneke, Thorsten

    2017-10-01

    Many applications in atmospheric science involve ill-posed inverse problems. A crucial component of many inverse problems is the proper formulation of a priori knowledge about the unknown parameters. In most cases, this knowledge is expressed as a Gaussian prior. This formulation often performs well at capturing smoothed, large-scale processes but is often ill equipped to capture localized structures like large point sources or localized hot spots. Over the last decade, scientists from a diverse array of applied mathematics and engineering fields have developed sparse reconstruction techniques to identify localized structures. In this study, we present a new regularization approach for ill-posed inverse problems in atmospheric science. It is based on Tikhonov regularization with sparsity constraint and allows bounds on the parameters. We enforce sparsity using a dictionary representation system. We analyze its performance in an atmospheric inverse modeling scenario by estimating anthropogenic US methane (CH4) emissions from simulated atmospheric measurements. Different measures indicate that our sparse reconstruction approach is better able to capture large point sources or localized hot spots than other methods commonly used in atmospheric inversions. It captures the overall signal equally well but adds details on the grid scale. This feature can be of value for any inverse problem with point or spatially discrete sources. We show an example for source estimation of synthetic methane emissions from the Barnett shale formation.

  3. A possible role for silicon microstrip detectors in nuclear medicine: Compton imaging of positron emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scannavini, M. G.; Speller, R. D.; Royle, G. J.; Cullum, I.; Raymond, M.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.

    2002-01-01

    Collimation of gamma-rays based on Compton scatter could provide in principle high resolution and high sensitivity, thus becoming an advantageous method for the imaging of radioisotopes of clinical interest. A small laboratory prototype of a Compton camera is being constructed in order to initiate studies aimed at assessing the feasibility of Compton imaging of positron emitters. The design of the camera is based on the use of a silicon collimator consisting of a stack of double-sided, AC-coupled microstrip detectors (area 6×6 cm 2, 500 μm thickness, 128 channels/side). Two APV6 chips are employed for signal readout on opposite planes of each detector. This work presents the first results on the noise performance of the silicon strip detectors. Measurements of the electrical characteristics of the detector are also reported. On the basis of the measured noise, an angular resolution of approximately 5° is predicted for the Compton collimator.

  4. A possible role for silicon microstrip detectors in nuclear medicine Compton imaging of positron emitters

    CERN Document Server

    Scannavini, M G; Royle, G J; Cullum, I; Raymond, M; Hall, G; Iles, G

    2002-01-01

    Collimation of gamma-rays based on Compton scatter could provide in principle high resolution and high sensitivity, thus becoming an advantageous method for the imaging of radioisotopes of clinical interest. A small laboratory prototype of a Compton camera is being constructed in order to initiate studies aimed at assessing the feasibility of Compton imaging of positron emitters. The design of the camera is based on the use of a silicon collimator consisting of a stack of double-sided, AC-coupled microstrip detectors (area 6x6 cm sup 2 , 500 mu m thickness, 128 channels/side). Two APV6 chips are employed for signal readout on opposite planes of each detector. This work presents the first results on the noise performance of the silicon strip detectors. Measurements of the electrical characteristics of the detector are also reported. On the basis of the measured noise, an angular resolution of approximately 5 deg. is predicted for the Compton collimator.

  5. Comparative Compton scattering studies in Cu2O and Ag2O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandyopadhyay, S.; Chatterjee, A.K.; Saha, S.K.; Chatterjee, A.

    1994-01-01

    Compton scattering studies in polycrystalline Cu 2 O and Ag 2 O with 59.54 keV γ radiation are reported. A comparison has been made between the valance Compton profiles of these two components scaled to lattice momentum by normalizing them to equal electron density for outer valence electrons, and this comparison shows some differences between the bonding characters of Cu 2 O and Ag 2 O. (author)

  6. Simulation of laser-Compton cooling of electron beams for future linear colliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ohgaki

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available We study a method of laser-Compton cooling of electron beams for future linear colliders. Using a Monte Carlo code, we evaluate the effects of the laser-electron interaction for transverse cooling. The optics with and without chromatic correction for the cooling are examined. The laser-Compton cooling for Japan Linear Collider/Next Linear Collider at E_{0}=2 GeV is considered.

  7. An undergraduate laboratory study of the polarisation of annihilation photons using Compton scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Knights, Patrick; Ryburn, Finlay; Tungate, Garry; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos

    2018-01-01

    An experiment for the advanced undergraduate laboratory which allows students to study the effect of photon polarisation in Compton scattering and to explore q\\ uantum entanglement is described. The quantum entangled photons are produced through electron-positron annihilation in the $S$-state, and their polarisations a\\ re analysed using the Compton scattering cross-section dependence on the photon polarisation. The equipment necessary for this experiment is available at a typ\\ ical undergrad...

  8. On the timing properties of germanium detectors: The centroid diagrams of prompt photopeaks and Compton events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penev, I.; Andrejtscheff, W.; Protochristov, Ch.; Zhelev, Zh.

    1987-01-01

    In the applications of the generalized centroid shift method with germanium detectors, the energy dependence of the time centroids of prompt photopeaks (zero-time line) and of Compton background events reveal a peculiar behavior crossing each other at about 100 keV. The effect is plausibly explained as associated with the ratio of γ-quanta causing the photoeffect and Compton scattering, respectively, at the boundaries of the detector. (orig.)

  9. Inverse Analysis of Cavitation Impact Phenomena on Structures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lambrakos, S. G; Tran, N. E

    2007-01-01

    A general methodology is presented for in situ detection of cavitation impact phenomena on structures based on inverse analysis of luminescent emissions resulting from the collapsing of bubbles onto surfaces...

  10. Development of electron-tracking Compton imaging system with 30-μm SOI pixel sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, Y.; Shimazoe, K.; Mizumachi, Y.; Takahashi, H.; Kamada, K.; Takeda, A.; Tsuru, T.; Arai, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Compton imaging is a useful method to localize gamma sources without using mechanical collimators. In conventional Compton imaging, the incident directions of gamma rays are estimated in a cone for each event by analyzing the sequence of interactions of each gamma ray followed by Compton kinematics. Since the information of the ejection directions of the recoil electrons is lost, many artifacts in the shape of cone traces are generated, which reduces signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and angular resolution. We have developed an advanced Compton imaging system with the capability of tracking recoil electrons by using a combination of a trigger-mode silicon-on-insulator (SOI) pixel detector and a GAGG detector. This system covers the 660-1330 keV energy range for localization of contamination nuclides such as 137Cs and 134Cs inside the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in Japan. The ejection directions of recoil electrons caused by Compton scattering are detected on the micro-pixelated SOI detector, which can theoretically be used to determine the incident directions of the gamma rays in a line for each event and can reduce the appearance of artifacts. We obtained 2-D reconstructed images from the first iteration of the proposed system for 137Cs, and the SNR and angular resolution were enhanced compared with those of conventional Compton imaging systems.

  11. Inverse Kinematics using Quaternions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Knud; Erleben, Kenny; Engell-Nørregård, Morten

    In this project I describe the status of inverse kinematics research, with the focus firmly on the methods that solve the core problem. An overview of the different methods are presented Three common methods used in inverse kinematics computation have been chosen as subject for closer inspection....

  12. Inverse logarithmic potential problem

    CERN Document Server

    Cherednichenko, V G

    1996-01-01

    The Inverse and Ill-Posed Problems Series is a series of monographs publishing postgraduate level information on inverse and ill-posed problems for an international readership of professional scientists and researchers. The series aims to publish works which involve both theory and applications in, e.g., physics, medicine, geophysics, acoustics, electrodynamics, tomography, and ecology.

  13. Compton scattering study of electron momentum distribution in lithium fluoride using 662 keV gamma radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayakumar, R.; Shivaramu; Ramamurthy, N.; Ford, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    Here we report the first ever 137 Cs Compton spectroscopy study of lithium fluoride. The spherical average Compton profiles of lithium fluoride are deduced from Compton scattering measurements on poly crystalline sample at gamma ray energy of 662 keV. To compare the experimental data, we have computed the spherical average Compton profiles using self-consistent Hartree-Fock wave functions employed on linear combination of atomic orbital (HF-LCAO) approximation. The directional Compton profiles and their anisotropic effects are also calculated using the same HF-LCAO approximation. The experimental spherical average profiles are found to be in good agreement with the corresponding HF-LCAO calculations and in qualitative agreement with Hartree-Fock free atom values. The present experimental isotropic and calculated directional profiles are also compared with the available experimental isotropic and directional Compton profiles using 59.54 and 159 keV γ-rays

  14. FRONT-END ASIC FOR A SILICON COMPTON TELESCOPE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DE GERONIMO,G.; FRIED, J.; FROST, E.; PHLIPS, B.; VERNON, E.; WULF, E.A.

    2007-10-27

    We describe a front-end application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) developed for a silicon Compton telescope. Composed of 32 channels, it reads out signals in both polarities from each side of a Silicon strip sensor, 2 mm thick 27 cm long, characterized by a strip capacitance of 30 pF. Each front-end channel provides low-noise charge amplification, shaping with a stabilized baseline, discrimination, and peak detection with an analog memory. The channels can process events simultaneously, and the read out is sparsified. The charge amplifier makes uses a dual-cascode configuration and dual-polarity adaptive reset, The low-hysteresis discriminator and the multi-phase peak detector process signals with a dynamic range in excess of four hundred. An equivalent noise charge (ENC) below 200 electrons was measured at 30 pF, with a slope of about 4.5 electrons/pF at a peaking time of 4 {micro}s. With a total dissipated power of 5 mW the channel covers an energy range up to 3.2 MeV.

  15. Deeply virtual Compton scattering off unpolarised deuterium at HERMES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, Gordon D.

    2008-08-01

    The HERMES experiment was a forward angle spectrometer on the HERA storage ring at DESY, Hamburg, Germany. HERMES successfully increased understanding of the ''spin puzzle'', the spin structure of the nucleon, by providing high precision measurements of ΔΣ in the Quark Parton Model, the fraction of the spin carried by the current quarks. Following the link of another piece of the puzzle, the orbital angular momentum of quarks and gluons, to the Generalised Parton Distribution (GPD) theoretical framework, HERMES focused on measurements of the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) process. These measurements are sensitive to GPDs, allowing further experimental constraints to be made on the components of nucleon spin. In the Winter shutdown period 2005-2006 HERMES was upgraded with a Recoil Detector in the target region. This allowed the experiment to make exclusive measurements of the DVCS process for the rst time, reducing background and increasing the resolution of various kinematic variables. The method for reconstructing particle tracks in the inhomogeneous magnetic eld is investigated here. DVCS o a deuterium target is measured with all available data prior to the installation of the Recoil Detector. A comparison is made to currently available models of spin-(1)/(2) GPDs. This analysis has been approved for publication by the HERMES collaboration. The data is further employed in an investigation of a model dependent constraint of the total angular momentum of up and down quarks in the nucleon. (orig.)

  16. Deeply virtual Compton scattering off unpolarised deuterium at HERMES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Gordon D.

    2008-10-15

    The HERMES experiment was a forward angle spectrometer on the HERA storage ring at DESY, Hamburg, Germany. HERMES successfully increased understanding of the ''spin puzzle'', the spin structure of the nucleon, by providing high precision measurements of {delta}{sigma} in the Quark Parton Model, the fraction of the spin carried by the current quarks. Following the link of another piece of the puzzle, the orbital angular momentum of quarks and gluons, to the Generalised Parton Distribution (GPD) theoretical framework, HERMES focused on measurements of the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) process. These measurements are sensitive to GPDs, allowing further experimental constraints to be made on the components of nucleon spin. In the Winter shutdown period 2005-2006 HERMES was upgraded with a Recoil Detector in the target region. This allowed the experiment to make exclusive measurements of the DVCS process for the rst time, reducing background and increasing the resolution of various kinematic variables. The method for reconstructing particle tracks in the inhomogeneous magnetic eld is investigated here. DVCS o a deuterium target is measured with all available data prior to the installation of the Recoil Detector. A comparison is made to currently available models of spin-(1)/(2) GPDs. This analysis has been approved for publication by the HERMES collaboration. The data is further employed in an investigation of a model dependent constraint of the total angular momentum of up and down quarks in the nucleon. (orig.)

  17. Wide Angle Compton Scattering within the SCET factorization Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kivel Nikolay

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Existing data for the electromagnetic proton form factors and for the cross section of the wide angle Compton scattering (WACS show that the hard two-gluon exchange mechanism (collinear factorization is still not applicable in the kinematical region where Mandelstam variables s ~ −t ~ −u are about few GeV2. On the other hand these observables can be described in phenomenological models where spectator quarks are soft which assumes a large contribution due to the soft-overlap mechanism. It turns out that the simple QCD factorization picture is not complete and must also include the soft-overlap contribution which can be described as a certain matrix element in the soft collinear effective theory (SCET. Then the leading power contribution to WACS amplitude is described as a sum of the hard- and soft-spectator contributions. The existing experimental data allows one to check certain conclusions based on the assumption about dominant role of the soft-spectator mechanism.

  18. Deeply virtual Compton scattering off longitudinally polarised protons at HERMES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahon, David Francis

    2010-03-01

    This thesis details the simultaneous extraction of three polarisation-dependent asymmetries in the distribution of real photons from the ep→epγ interaction and its indistinguishable deeply virtual Compton scattering and Bethe-Heitler processes at the HERMES fixed-target experiment at Desy. The data analysed were taken using a longitudinally polarised 27.57 GeV positron beam incident on a longitudinally polarised hydrogen gas target. The extracted asymmetries include two single-spin asymmetries A UL and A LU which depend on the polarisation of the target and beam respectively, averaged over all other polarisation states. The double-spin asymmetry A LL dependent on the product of the beam and target polarisations is extracted for the first time. The asymmetry amplitudes extracted relate to combinations of Generalised Parton Distributions (GPDs), predominantly H and H. The extracted amplitudes are presented across the HERMES kinematic range alongside theoretical predictions from a GPD model based on double distributions. Large sin φ and cos(0φ) amplitudes are observed for A UL and A LL respectively, with an unexpectedly large sin(2φ) amplitude for A UL . The results for the A UL and A LL asymmetries are broadly compatible with theory predictions, and the extracted A LU amplitudes are compatible with HERMES results extracted from a significantly larger data set. It is foreseen that these results will form input to future global data-based GPD models which aim to provide a better understanding of GPDs. (orig.)

  19. Beam Diagnostics for Laser Undulator Based on Compton Backward Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Kuroda, R

    2005-01-01

    A compact soft X-ray source is required in various research fields such as material and biological science. The laser undulator based on Compton backward scattering has been developed as a compact soft X-ray source for the biological observation at Waseda University. It is performed in a water window region (250eV - 500 eV) using the interaction between 1047 nm Nd:YLF laser (10ps FWHM) and about 5 MeV high quality electron beam (10ps FWHM) generated from rf gun system. The range of X-ray energy in the water window region has K-shell absorption edges of Oxygen, Carbon and Nitrogen, which mainly constitute of living body. Since the absorption coefficient of water is much smaller than the protein's coefficient in this range, a dehydration of the specimens is not necessary. To generate the soft X-ray pulse stably, the electron beam diagnostics have been developed such as the emittance measurement using double slit scan technique, the bunch length measurement using two frequency analysis technique. In this confere...

  20. POST-PERIASTRON GAMMA-RAY FLARE FROM PSR B1259-63/LS 2883 AS A RESULT OF COMPTONIZATION OF THE COLD PULSAR WIND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khangulyan, Dmitry [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science/JAXA, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Aharonian, Felix A. [Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 31 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Bogovalov, Sergey V. [Department of Molecular Physics, National Research Nuclear University (MEPHI), Kashirskoe shosse 31, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Ribo, Marc, E-mail: khangul@astro.isas.jaxa.jp, E-mail: felix.aharonian@dias.ie, E-mail: svbogovalov@mephi.ru, E-mail: mribo@am.ub.es [Departament d' Astronomia i Meteorologia, Institut de Ciences del Cosmos (ICC), Universitat de Barcelona (IEEC-UB), Marti i Franques 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-06-10

    We argue that the bright flare of the binary pulsar PSR B1259-63/LS2883 detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope is due to the inverse Compton scattering of the unshocked electron-positron pulsar wind with a Lorentz factor {Gamma}{sub 0} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 4}. The combination of two effects both linked to the circumstellar disk (CD) is a key element in the proposed model. The first effect is related to the impact of the surrounding medium on the termination of the pulsar wind. Inside the disk, the 'early' termination of the wind results in suppression of its gamma-ray luminosity. When the pulsar escapes the disk, the conditions for termination of the wind undergo significant changes. This would lead to a dramatic increase of the pulsar wind zone, and thus to the proportional increase of the gamma-ray flux. On the other hand, if the parts of the CD disturbed by the pulsar can supply infrared photons of density high enough for efficient Comptonization of the wind, almost the entire kinetic energy of the pulsar wind would be converted to radiation, thus the gamma-ray luminosity of the wind could approach the level of the pulsar's spin-down luminosity as reported by the Fermi Collaboration.

  1. Determination of the Compton suppression efficiency of Ge-BGO detectors in low γ-ray energy region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rak, J.; Brudanin, V.B.; Egorov, V.G.; Kovalenko, V.E.; Briancon, Ch.; Dionisio, J.S.; Vieu, Ch.

    1993-01-01

    The response function and the rejection factor of Compton suppression gamma spectrometers have been calculated using the Monte Carlo method starting from low energy region (20 keV). Special emphasis has been given to the influence of inactive layers surrounding the Ge detector on the Compton suppression factor. The calculated properties of two types of Compton suppression detectors have been compared with experimental data. Some possible modifications of Compton suppression spectrometer intended for the study of low gamma energy region are suggested. 12 refs.; 6 figs.; 2 tabs

  2. CGRO/BATSE Data Support the New Paradigm For GRB Prompt Emission and the New L-i(nTh)-E-peak,i(nTh,rest) Relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiriec, S.; Gonzalez, M.M.; Sacahui, J.R.; Kouveliotou, C.; Gehrels, N.; McEnery, J.

    2016-01-01

    The paradigm for gamma-ray burst (GRB) prompt emission is changing. Since early in the Compton Gamma RayObservatory (CGRO) era, the empirical Band function has been considered a good description of the keV-MeV-gamma-ray prompt emission spectra despite the fact that its shape was very often inconsistent with the theoretical predictions, especially those expected in pure synchrotron emission scenarios. We have recently established a new observational model analyzing data of the NASA Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. In this model, GRB prompt emission would be a combination of three main emission components: (i) a thermal-like component that we have interpreted so far as emission from the jet photosphere, (ii) a non-thermal component that we have interpreted so far as either synchrotron radiation from the propagating and accelerated charged particles within the jet or reprocessed jet photospheric emission, and (iii) an additional non-thermal (cutoff) power law (PL) extending from low to high energies in gamma-rays and most likely of inverse Compton origin. In this article we reanalyze some of the bright GRBs, namely GRBs 941017, 970111, and 990123, observed with the Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on board CGRO with the new model. We conclude that BATSE data for these three GRBs are fully consistent with the recent results obtained with Fermi: some bright BATSE GRBs exhibit three separate components during the prompt phase with similar spectral parameters as those reported from Fermi data. In addition, the analysis of the BATSE GRBs with the new prompt emission model results in a relation between the time-resolved energy flux of the non-thermal component, F(in)(Th), and its corresponding nuFnu spectral peak energy,Epeak,inTh (i.e., FinThEpeak,inTh ), which has a similar index when fitted to a PL as the one initially derived from Fermi data. For GRBs with known redshifts (z) this results in a possible universal relation between the luminosity of the non

  3. Gravity inversion code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhard, N.R.

    1979-01-01

    The gravity inversion code applies stabilized linear inverse theory to determine the topography of a subsurface density anomaly from Bouguer gravity data. The gravity inversion program consists of four source codes: SEARCH, TREND, INVERT, and AVERAGE. TREND and INVERT are used iteratively to converge on a solution. SEARCH forms the input gravity data files for Nevada Test Site data. AVERAGE performs a covariance analysis on the solution. This document describes the necessary input files and the proper operation of the code. 2 figures, 2 tables

  4. Characterization of CT beams using Compton spectrometry; Caracterização de feixes de TC utilizando Espectrometria Compton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terini, Ricardo A.; Nerssissian, Denise Y.; Campelo, Maria Carolina S.; Yoshimura, Elisabeth M., E-mail: rterini@if.usp.br [Universidade de São Paulo (LDRFM/USP), SP (Brazil). Lab. de Dosimetria das Radiações e Física Médica

    2017-07-01

    Obtaining the energy spectra of computed tomography (CT) X-ray beams is essential, helping to obtain parameters that characterize beam quality and equipment performance. However, CT photon fluxes are too high to have the spectra measured directly with common photon counting detectors. In this work, a Compton spectrometer was designed, with Al-Pb-Al collimators and shields, as well as a cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector to get the spectrum of CT beams, from the measurement of the spectrum of a beam scattered at 90 deg by a polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) rod. A MatLab® computer code was developed, using the Waller-Hartree formalism, to reconstruct the spectrum of the incident beam, from the measured scattered beam spectrum. Tests at IF-USP Laboratory of Radiation Dosimetry and Medical Physics with standard CT beams showed that the reconstructed spectrum is alike the directly measured beam. Shielding influence and scatterer thickness were investigated. The system was tested in measurements on a GE 690 CT scanner, showing practical positioning on the exam table, and alignment with CT lasers refined by scan projection radiography. Spectra obtained with the properly shielded system presented values of half-value layer (HVL) compatible with those measured in QC tests and kVp values with accuracy to evaluate the scanner voltage calibration. (author)

  5. Sharp spatially constrained inversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vignoli, Giulio G.; Fiandaca, Gianluca G.; Christiansen, Anders Vest C A.V.C.

    2013-01-01

    We present sharp reconstruction of multi-layer models using a spatially constrained inversion with minimum gradient support regularization. In particular, its application to airborne electromagnetic data is discussed. Airborne surveys produce extremely large datasets, traditionally inverted...... by using smoothly varying 1D models. Smoothness is a result of the regularization constraints applied to address the inversion ill-posedness. The standard Occam-type regularized multi-layer inversion produces results where boundaries between layers are smeared. The sharp regularization overcomes...... inversions are compared against classical smooth results and available boreholes. With the focusing approach, the obtained blocky results agree with the underlying geology and allow for easier interpretation by the end-user....

  6. Inverse planning IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenwald, J.-C.

    2008-01-01

    The lecture addressed the following topics: Optimizing radiotherapy dose distribution; IMRT contributes to optimization of energy deposition; Inverse vs direct planning; Main steps of IMRT; Background of inverse planning; General principle of inverse planning; The 3 main components of IMRT inverse planning; The simplest cost function (deviation from prescribed dose); The driving variable : the beamlet intensity; Minimizing a 'cost function' (or 'objective function') - the walker (or skier) analogy; Application to IMRT optimization (the gradient method); The gradient method - discussion; The simulated annealing method; The optimization criteria - discussion; Hard and soft constraints; Dose volume constraints; Typical user interface for definition of optimization criteria; Biological constraints (Equivalent Uniform Dose); The result of the optimization process; Semi-automatic solutions for IMRT; Generalisation of the optimization problem; Driving and driven variables used in RT optimization; Towards multi-criteria optimization; and Conclusions for the optimization phase. (P.A.)

  7. Submucous Myoma Induces Uterine Inversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Li Chen

    2006-06-01

    Conclusion: Nonpuerperal inversion of the uterus is rarely encountered by gynecologists. Diagnosis of uterine inversion is often not easy and imaging studies might be helpful. Surgical treatment is the method of choice in nonpuerperal uterine inversion.

  8. Deeply virtual Compton scattering off longitudinally polarised protons at HERMES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahon, David Francis

    2010-06-15

    This thesis details the simultaneous extraction of three polarisation-dependent asymmetries in the distribution of real photons from the ep{yields}ep{gamma} interaction and its indistinguishable deeply virtual Compton scattering and Bethe-Heitler processes at the HERMES fixed-target experiment at Desy. The data analysed were taken using a longitudinally polarised 27.57 GeV positron beam incident on a longitudinally polarised hydrogen gas target. The extracted asymmetries include two single-spin asymmetries A{sub UL} and A{sub LU} which depend on the polarisation of the target and beam respectively, averaged over all other polarisation states. The double-spin asymmetry A{sub LL} dependent on the product of the beam and target polarisations is extracted for the first time. The asymmetry amplitudes extracted relate to combinations of Generalised Parton Distributions (GPDs), predominantly H and H. The extracted amplitudes are presented across the HERMES kinematic range alongside theoretical predictions from a GPD model based on double distributions. Large sin {phi} and cos(0{phi}) amplitudes are observed for A{sub UL} and A{sub LL} respectively, with an unexpectedly large sin(2{phi}) amplitude for A{sub UL}. The results for the A{sub UL} and A{sub LL} asymmetries are broadly compatible with theory predictions, and the extracted A{sub LU} amplitudes are compatible with HERMES results extracted from a significantly larger data set. It is foreseen that these results will form input to future global data-based GPD models which aim to provide a better understanding of GPDs. (orig.)

  9. Observations of MCG-5-23-16 with Suzaku, XMM-Newton and NuSTAR: Disk Tomography and Compton Hump Reverberation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoghbi, A.; Cackett, E. M.; Reynolds, C.; Kara, E.; Harrison, F. A.; Fabian, A. C.; Lohfink, A.; Matt, G.; Stern, D.; Zhang, W. W.

    2014-01-01

    MCG-5-23-16 is one of the first active galactic nuclei (AGNs) where relativistic reverberation in the iron K line originating in the vicinity of the supermassive black hole was found, based on a short XMM-Newton observation. In this work, we present the results from long X-ray observations using Suzaku, XMM-Newton, and NuSTAR designed to map the emission region using X-ray reverberation. A relativistic iron line is detected in the lag spectra on three different timescales, allowing the emission from different regions around the black hole to be separated. Using NuSTAR coverage of energies above 10 keV reveals a lag between these energies and the primary continuum, which is detected for the first time in an AGN. This lag is a result of the Compton reflection hump responding to changes in the primary source in a manner similar to the response of the relativistic iron K line.

  10. Development of compact Compton camera for 3D image reconstruction of radioactive contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Y.; Terasaka, Y.; Ozawa, S.; Nakamura Miyamura, H.; Kaburagi, M.; Tanifuji, Y.; Kawabata, K.; Torii, T.

    2017-11-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FDNPS), operated by Tokyo Electric Power Company Holdings, Inc., went into meltdown after the large tsunami caused by the Great East Japan Earthquake of March 11, 2011. Very large amounts of radionuclides were released from the damaged plant. Radiation distribution measurements inside FDNPS buildings are indispensable to execute decommissioning tasks in the reactor buildings. We have developed a compact Compton camera to measure the distribution of radioactive contamination inside the FDNPS buildings three-dimensionally (3D). The total weight of the Compton camera is lower than 1.0 kg. The gamma-ray sensor of the Compton camera employs Ce-doped GAGG (Gd3Al2Ga3O12) scintillators coupled with a multi-pixel photon counter. Angular correction of the detection efficiency of the Compton camera was conducted. Moreover, we developed a 3D back-projection method using the multi-angle data measured with the Compton camera. We successfully observed 3D radiation images resulting from the two 137Cs radioactive sources, and the image of the 9.2 MBq source appeared stronger than that of the 2.7 MBq source.

  11. On the line-shape analysis of Compton profiles and its application to neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanelli, G.; Krzystyniak, M.

    2016-01-01

    Analytical properties of Compton profiles are used in order to simplify the analysis of neutron Compton scattering experiments. In particular, the possibility to fit the difference of Compton profiles is discussed as a way to greatly decrease the level of complexity of the data treatment, making the analysis easier, faster and more robust. In the context of the novel method proposed, two mathematical models describing the shapes of differenced Compton profiles are discussed: the simple Gaussian approximation for harmonic and isotropic local potential, and an analytical Gauss–Hermite expansion for an anharmonic or anisotropic potential. The method is applied to data collected by VESUVIO spectrometer at ISIS neutron and muon pulsed source (UK) on Copper and Aluminium samples at ambient and low temperatures. - Highlights: • A new method to analyse neutron Compton scattering data is presented. • The method allows many corrections on the experimental data to be avoided. • The number of needed fitting parameters is drastically reduced using the new method. • Mass-selective analysis is facilitated with parametric studies benefiting the most. • Observables linked to anisotropic momentum distribution are obtained analytically.

  12. On the possibility of using X-ray Compton scattering to study magnetoelectrical properties of crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, S. P., E-mail: steve.collins@diamond.ac.uk; Laundy, D.; Connolley, T.; Laan, G. van der; Fabrizi, F. [Diamond Light Source Ltd, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Janssen, O. [Department of Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Cooper, M. J. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Ebert, H.; Mankovsky, S. [Universität München, Department Chemie, Haus E2.033, Butenandtstrasse 5-13, D-81377 München (Germany)

    2016-02-16

    The possibility of using X-ray Compton scattering to reveal antisymmetric components of the electron momentum density, as a fingerprint of magnetoelectric sample properties, is investigated experimentally and theoretically by studying the polar ferromagnet GaFeO{sub 3}. This paper discusses the possibility of using Compton scattering – an inelastic X-ray scattering process that yields a projection of the electron momentum density – to probe magnetoelectrical properties. It is shown that an antisymmetric component of the momentum density is a unique fingerprint of such time- and parity-odd physics. It is argued that polar ferromagnets are ideal candidates to demonstrate this phenomenon and the first experimental results are shown, on a single-domain crystal of GaFeO{sub 3}. The measured antisymmetric Compton profile is very small (≃ 10{sup −5} of the symmetric part) and of the same order of magnitude as the statistical errors. Relativistic first-principles simulations of the antisymmetric Compton profile are presented and it is shown that, while the effect is indeed predicted by theory, and scales with the size of the valence spin–orbit interaction, its magnitude is significantly overestimated. The paper outlines some important constraints on the properties of the antisymmetric Compton profile arising from the underlying crystallographic symmetry of the sample.

  13. Development of a compact scintillator-based high-resolution Compton camera for molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishimoto, A., E-mail: daphne3h-aya@ruri.waseda.jp [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Ohkubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Kataoka, J.; Koide, A.; Sueoka, K.; Iwamoto, Y.; Taya, T. [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Ohkubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Ohsuka, S. [Central Research Laboratory, Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., 5000 Hirakuchi, Hamakita-ku, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka (Japan)

    2017-02-11

    The Compton camera, which shows gamma-ray distribution utilizing the kinematics of Compton scattering, is a promising detector capable of imaging across a wide range of energy. In this study, we aim to construct a small-animal molecular imaging system in a wide energy range by using the Compton camera. We developed a compact medical Compton camera based on a Ce-doped Gd{sub 3}Al{sub 2}Ga{sub 3}O{sub 12} (Ce:GAGG) scintillator and multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC). A basic performance confirmed that for 662 keV, the typical energy resolution was 7.4 % (FWHM) and the angular resolution was 4.5° (FWHM). We then used the medical Compton camera to conduct imaging experiments based on a 3-D imaging reconstruction algorithm using the multi-angle data acquisition method. The result confirmed that for a {sup 137}Cs point source at a distance of 4 cm, the image had a spatial resolution of 3.1 mm (FWHM). Furthermore, we succeeded in producing 3-D multi-color image of different simultaneous energy sources ({sup 22}Na [511 keV], {sup 137}Cs [662 keV], and {sup 54}Mn [834 keV]).

  14. An energy-subtraction Compton scatter camera design for in vivo medical imaging of radiopharmaceuticals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohe, R. C.; Valentine, J. D.

    1996-12-01

    A Compton scatter camera (CSC) design is proposed for imaging radioisotopes used as biotracers. A clinical version may increase sensitivity by a factor of over 100, while maintaining or improving spatial resolution, as compared with existing Anger cameras that use lead collimators. This novel approach is based on using energy subtraction (/spl Delta/E=E/sub 0/-E/sub SC/, where E/sub 0/, /spl Delta/E, and E/sub SC/ are the energy at the emitted gamma ray, the energy deposited by the initial Compton scatter, and the energy of the Compton scattered photon) to determine the amount of energy deposited in the primary system. The energy subtraction approach allows the requirement of high energy resolution to be placed on a secondary detector system instead of the primary detector system. Requiring primary system high energy resolution has significantly limited previous CSC designs for medical imaging applications. Furthermore, this approach is dependent on optimizing the camera design for data acquisition of gamma rays that undergo only one Compton scatter in a low-Z primary detector system followed by total absorption of the Compton scattered photon in a high-Z secondary detector system. The proposed approach allows for a more compact primary detector system, a more simplified pulse processing interface, and a much less complicated detector cooling scheme as compared with previous CSC designs. Analytical calculations and Monte Carlo simulation results for some specific detector materials and geometries are presented.

  15. Characterization of a module with pixelated CdTe detectors for possible PET, PEM and compton camera applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariño-Estrada, G.; Chmeissani, M.; de Lorenzo, G.; Puigdengoles, C.; Martínez, R.; Cabruja, E.

    2014-05-01

    We present the measurement of the energy resolution and the impact of charge sharing for a pixel CdTe detector. This detector will be used in a novel conceptual design for diagnostic systems in the field of nuclear medicine such as positron emission tomography (PET), positron emission mammography (PEM) and Compton camera. The detector dimensions are 10 mm × 10 mm × 2 mm and with a pixel pitch of 1 mm × 1 mm. The pixel CdTe detector is a Schottky diode and it was tested at a bias of -1000 V. The VATAGP7.1 frontend ASIC was used for the readout of the pixel detector and the corresponding single channel electronic noise was found to be σ < 2 keV for all the pixels. We have achieved an energy resolution, FWHM/Epeak, of 7.1%, 4.5% and 0.98% for 59.5, 122 and 511 keV respectively. The study of the charge sharing shows that 16% of the events deposit part of their energy in the adjacent pixel.

  16. High-Energy Emission From Millisecond Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Alice K.; Usov, Vladimir V.; Muslimov, Alex G.

    2004-01-01

    The X-ray and gamma-ray spectrum of rotation-powered millisecond pulsars is investigated in a model for acceleration and pair cascades on open field lines above the polar caps. Although these pulsars have low surface magnetic fields, their short periods allow them to have large magnetospheric potential drops, but the majority do not produce sufficient pairs to completely screen the accelerating electric field. In these sources, the primary and secondary electrons continue to accelerate to high altitude and their Lorentz factors are limited by curvature and synchrotron radiation reaction. The accelerating particles maintain high Lorentz factors and undergo cyclotron resonant absorption of radio emission, that produces and maintains a large pitch angle, resulting in a strong synchrotron component. The resulting spectra consist of several distinct components: curvature radiation from primary electrons dominating from 1 - 100 GeV, synchrotron radiation from primary and secondary electrons dominating up to about 100 MeV, and much weaker inverse-Compton radiation from primary electrons a t 0.1 - 1 TeV. We find that the relative size of these components depends on pulsar period, period derivative, and neutron star mass and radius with the level of the synchrotron component also depending sensitively on the radio emission properties. This model is successful in describing the observed X-ray and gamma-ray spectrum of PSR J0218+4232 as synchrotron radiation, peaking around 100 MeV and extending up to a turnover around several GeV. The predicted curvature radiation components from a number of millisecond pulsars, as well as the collective emission from the millisecond pulsars in globular clusters, should be detectable with AGILE and GLAST. We also discuss a hidden population of X-ray-quiet and radio-quiet millisecond pulsars which have evolved below the pair death line, some of which may be detectable by telescopes sensitive above 1 GeV. Subject headings: pulsars: general

  17. The experimental challenge of virtual compton scattering above 8 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierre Bertin; Yves Roblin; Charles Hyde-Wright

    1999-01-01

    We discuss the experimental issues confronting measurements of the Virtual Compton Scattering (VCS) reaction ep->ep gamma with electron beam energies 6-30 GeV. We specifically address the kinematics of Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (Deep Inelastic Scattering, with coincident detection of the exclusive real photon nearly parallel to the virtual photon direction) and large transverse momentum VCS (High energy VCS of arbitrary Q 2 , and the recoil proton emitted with high momentum transverse to the virtual photon direction). We discuss the experimental equipment necessary for these measurements. For the DVCS, we emphasize the importance of the Bethe-Heitler-Compton interference terms that can be measured with the electron-positron (beam charge) asymmetry, and the electron beam helicity asymmetry

  18. Virtual Compton Scattering off a Spinless Target in the AdS/QCD correspondence

    CERN Document Server

    Marquet, C.; Wallon, S.

    2010-01-01

    We perform a study of the doubly virtual Compton scattering off a spinless target gamma* P -> gamma* P' within the Anti-de Sitter(AdS)/QCD formalism. We find that the general structure allowed by the Lorentz invariance and gauge invariance of the Compton amplitude is not easily reproduced with the standard recipes of the AdS/QCD correspondence. In the soft-photon regime, where the semi-classical approximation is supposed to apply best, we show that the measurements of the electric and magnetic polarizabilities of a target like the charged pion in real Compton scattering, can already serve as stringent tests, and presumably exclude results based on the AdS/QCD correspondence in its minimal version.

  19. Application of Compton-suppressed self-induced XRF to spent nuclear fuel measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Se-Hwan; Jo, Kwang Ho; Lee, Seung Kyu; Seo, Hee; Lee, Chaehun; Won, Byung-Hee; Ahn, Seong-Kyu; Ku, Jeong-Hoe

    2017-11-01

    Self-induced X-ray fluorescence (XRF) is a technique by which plutonium (Pu) content in spent nuclear fuel can be directly quantified. In the present work, this method successfully measured the plutonium/uranium (Pu/U) peak ratio of a pressurized water reactor (PWR)'s spent nuclear fuel at the Korea atomic energy research institute (KAERI)'s post irradiation examination facility (PIEF). In order to reduce the Compton background in the low-energy X-ray region, the Compton suppression system additionally was implemented. By use of this system, the spectrum's background level was reduced by a factor of approximately 2. This work shows that Compton-suppressed selfinduced XRF can be effectively applied to Pu accounting in spent nuclear fuel.

  20. Analysis of the electronic structure of ZrO{sub 2} by Compton spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahammad, F. M.; Mahammed, S. F. [University of Tikrit 42, Department of Physics (Iraq); Kumar, R.; Vijay, Y. K.; Sharma, B. K. [University of Rajasthan, Department of Physics (India); Sharma, G., E-mail: gsphysics@gmail.com [University of Kota, Department of Pure and Applied Physics (India)

    2013-07-15

    The electronic structure of ZrO{sub 2} is studied using the Compton scattering technique. The first-ever Compton profile measurement on polycrystalline ZrO{sub 2} was obtained using 59.54 keV gamma-rays emanating from the {sup 241}Am radioisotope. To explain the experimental data, we compute theoretical Compton profile values using the method of linear combination of atomic orbitals in the framework of density functional theory. The correlation scheme proposed by Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof and the exchange scheme of Becke are considered. The ionic-model-based calculations for a number of configurations, i.e., Zr{sup +x}(O{sup -x/2}){sub 2} (0 {<=} x {<=} 2), are also performed to estimate the charge transfer on compound formation, and the study supports transfer of 1.5 electrons from Zr to O atoms.

  1. Electronic properties of Laves phase ZrFe2 using Compton spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Samir; Kumar, Kishor; Dashora, Alpa; Ahuja, B. L.

    2016-05-01

    First-ever experimental Compton profile of Laves phase ZrFe2, using indigenous 20 Ci 137Cs Compton spectrometer, is presented. To analyze the experimental electron momentum density, we have deduced the theoretical Compton profiles using density functional theory (DFT) and hybridization of DFT and Hartree-Fock scheme within linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) method. The energy bands and density of states are also calculated using LCAO prescription. The theoretical profile based on local density approximation gives a better agreement with the experimental profile than other reported schemes. The present investigations validate the inclusion of correlation potential of Perdew-Zunger in predicting the electronic properties of ZrFe2.

  2. Real space analysis of Compton profile of Heusler alloy Ni2TiAl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahariya, Jagrati; Mund, H. S.; Ahuja, B. L.

    2012-06-01

    Electron momentum density of Ni2TiAl alloy has been studied using Compton scattering technique. The experiment has been performed using 20 Ci 137Cs (661.65 keV) Compton spectrometer at an intermediate resolution of 0.34 a.u. To interpret the experimental data, we have calculated the Compton profiles using Hartree Fock and density functional theories within the frame work of linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) method. The experimental data have been interpreted in term of autocorrelation function B(z) of the one electron wave function. The experimental B(z) function has been compared with the LCAO based theoretical B(z), to analyze the electronic and structural properties of Ni2TiAl.

  3. Electronic properties of Laves phase ZrFe{sub 2} using Compton spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatt, Samir, E-mail: sameerbhatto11@gmail.com; Kumar, Kishor; Ahuja, B. L. [Department of Physics, University College of Science, ML Sukhadia University, Udaipur-313001 (India); Dashora, Alpa [UM-DAE Centre for Excellence in Basic Sciences, Vidyanagari, Santacruz(E), Mumbai-400098 (India)

    2016-05-06

    First-ever experimental Compton profile of Laves phase ZrFe{sub 2}, using indigenous 20 Ci {sup 137}Cs Compton spectrometer, is presented. To analyze the experimental electron momentum density, we have deduced the theoretical Compton profiles using density functional theory (DFT) and hybridization of DFT and Hartree-Fock scheme within linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) method. The energy bands and density of states are also calculated using LCAO prescription. The theoretical profile based on local density approximation gives a better agreement with the experimental profile than other reported schemes. The present investigations validate the inclusion of correlation potential of Perdew-Zunger in predicting the electronic properties of ZrFe{sub 2}.

  4. High energy Compton spectroscopy and electronic structure of Laves phase ZrFe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Samir; Kumar, Kishor; Arora, Gunjan; Bapna, Komal; Ahuja, B. L.

    2016-08-01

    We present the first-ever experimental Compton profile of Laves phase ZrFe2 using indigenous 20 Ci 137Cs Compton spectrometer. To annotate the experimental electron momentum density, we have calculated the theoretical Compton profiles using density functional theory (DFT) and hybridization of Hartree-Fock and DFT within linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) method. The spin-polarized energy bands and density of states are computed using LCAO and full potential-linearized augmented plane wave methods. The revised Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof functional (for solids) based theoretical profile gives a marginally better agreement with the experimental profile as compared to other approximations considered in the present work. The Fermi surface topology of ZrFe2 is explained in terms of majority- and minority-spin energy bands.

  5. The experimental challenge of virtual compton scattering above 8 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Bertin, P

    1999-01-01

    We discuss the experimental issues confronting measurements of the Virtual Compton Scattering (VCS) reaction ep->ep gamma with electron beam energies 6-30 GeV. We specifically address the kinematics of Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (Deep Inelastic Scattering, with coincident detection of the exclusive real photon nearly parallel to the virtual photon direction) and large transverse momentum VCS (High energy VCS of arbitrary Q sup 2 , and the recoil proton emitted with high momentum transverse to the virtual photon direction). We discuss the experimental equipment necessary for these measurements. For the DVCS, we emphasize the importance of the Bethe-Heitler-Compton interference terms that can be measured with the electron-positron (beam charge) asymmetry, and the electron beam helicity asymmetry.

  6. Where are Compton-thick radio galaxies? A hard X-ray view of three candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursini, F.; Bassani, L.; Panessa, F.; Bazzano, A.; Bird, A. J.; Malizia, A.; Ubertini, P.

    2018-03-01

    We present a broad-band X-ray spectral analysis of the radio-loud active galactic nuclei NGC 612, 4C 73.08 and 3C 452, exploiting archival data from NuSTAR, XMM-Newton, Swift and INTEGRAL. These Compton-thick candidates are the most absorbed sources among the hard X-ray selected radio galaxies studied in Panessa et al. We find an X-ray absorbing column density in every case below 1.5 × 1024 cm-2, and no evidence for a strong reflection continuum or iron K α line. Therefore, none of these sources is properly Compton-thick. We review other Compton-thick radio galaxies reported in the literature, arguing that we currently lack strong evidences for heavily absorbed radio-loud AGNs.

  7. Modulated method for efficient, narrow-bandwidth, laser Compton X-ray and gamma-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barty, Christopher P. J.

    2017-07-11

    A method of x-ray and gamma-ray generation via laser Compton scattering uses the interaction of a specially-formatted, highly modulated, long duration, laser pulse with a high-frequency train of high-brightness electron bunches to both create narrow bandwidth x-ray and gamma-ray sources and significantly increase the laser to Compton photon conversion efficiency.

  8. Luminosity optimization schemes in Compton experiments based on Fabry-Perot optical resonators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Variola

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The luminosity of Compton x-ray and γ sources depends on the average current in electron bunches, the energy of the laser pulses, and the geometry of the particle bunch to laser pulse collisions. To obtain high power photon pulses, these can be stacked in a passive optical resonator (Fabry-Perot cavity especially when a high average flux is required. But, in this case, owing to the presence of the optical cavity mirrors, the electron bunches have to collide at an angle with the laser pulses with a consequent luminosity decrease. In this article a crab-crossing scheme is proposed for Compton sources, based on a laser amplified in a Fabry-Perot resonator, to eliminate the luminosity losses given by the crossing angle, taking into account that in laser-electron collisions only the electron bunches can be tilted at the collision point. We report the analytical study on the crab-crossing scheme for Compton gamma sources. The analytical expression for the total yield of photons generated in Compton sources with the crab-crossing scheme of collision is derived. The optimal collision angle of the bunch was found to be equal to half of the collision angle. At this crabbing angle, the maximal yield of scattered off laser photons is attained thanks to the maximization, in the collision process, of the time spent by the laser pulse in the electron bunch. Estimations for some Compton source projects are presented. Furthermore, some schemes of the optical cavities configuration are analyzed and the luminosity calculated. As illustrated, the four-mirror two- or three-dimensional scheme is the most appropriate for Compton sources.

  9. Compton cooling of jets as the origin of radio-quiet quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemiginowska, Aneta; Elvis, Martin

    1994-01-01

    We consider the Compton drag as a possible mechanism for jet deceleration in radio-quiet quasars, using an isotropic radiation field in a central region as a source of soft photons, provides an efficient means of decelerating electrons in a jet. Depending on the energy density of the radiation field, the jet may be stopped before reaching the radius at which the dynamical timescale is shorter than the Compton cooling timescale. We present preliminary results of our calculations and conclude that radio-quiet quasars may differ from radio-loud in their central radiation density.

  10. Gravitation and Special Relativity from Compton Wave Interactions at the Planck Scale: An Algorithmic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, William C., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper space is modeled as a lattice of Compton wave oscillators (CWOs) of near- Planck size. It is shown that gravitation and special relativity emerge from the interaction between particles Compton waves. To develop this CWO model an algorithmic approach was taken, incorporating simple rules of interaction at the Planck-scale developed using well known physical laws. This technique naturally leads to Newton s law of gravitation and a new form of doubly special relativity. The model is in apparent agreement with the holographic principle, and it predicts a cutoff energy for ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays that is consistent with observational data.

  11. Study and development of a spectrometer with Compton suppression and gamma coincidence counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masse, D.

    1990-10-01

    This paper presents the characteristics of a spectrometer consisting of a Ge detector surrounded by a NaI(T1) detector that can operate in Compton-suppression and gamma-gamma coincidence modes. The criteria that led to this measurement configuration are discussed and the spectrometer performances are shown for 60 Co and 137 Cs gamma-ray sources. The results for the measurement of 189 Ir (Compton suppression) and for the measurement of 101 Rh (gamma-gamma coincidence) in the presence of other radioisotopes are given. 83 Rb and 105 Ag isotopes are also measured with this spectrometer [fr

  12. Electronic structure of Ni2TiAl: Theoretical aspects and Compton scattering measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahariya, Jagrati; Ahuja, B. L.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we report electron momentum density of Ni2TiAl alloy using an in-house 20 Ci 137Cs (661.65 keV) Compton spectrometer. The experimental data have been analyzed in terms of energy bands and density of states computed using linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) method. In the LCAO computations, we have considered local density approximation, generalized gradient approximation and recently developed second order generalized gradient approximation within the frame work of density functional theory. Anisotropies in theoretical Compton profiles along [1 0 0], [1 1 0] and [1 1 1] directions are also explained in terms of energy bands.

  13. Electronic structure of Ni{sub 2}TiAl: Theoretical aspects and Compton scattering measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahariya, Jagrati [Department of Physics, University College of Science, M.L. Sukhadia University, Durga Nursery Road, Udaipur 313001, Rajasthan (India); Ahuja, B.L., E-mail: blahuja@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, University College of Science, M.L. Sukhadia University, Durga Nursery Road, Udaipur 313001, Rajasthan (India)

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we report electron momentum density of Ni{sub 2}TiAl alloy using an in-house 20 Ci {sup 137}Cs (661.65 keV) Compton spectrometer. The experimental data have been analyzed in terms of energy bands and density of states computed using linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) method. In the LCAO computations, we have considered local density approximation, generalized gradient approximation and recently developed second order generalized gradient approximation within the frame work of density functional theory. Anisotropies in theoretical Compton profiles along [1 0 0], [1 1 0] and [1 1 1] directions are also explained in terms of energy bands.

  14. Experimental study on the CsI (Tl) crystal anti-compton detector in CDEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shukui; Yue Qian; Tang Changjian

    2012-01-01

    CDEX (China Dark matter Experiment) Collaboration will carry out direct search for dark matter with Ultra-Low Energy Threshold High Purity germanium (ULE-HPGe) detector at CJPL (China Jinping deep underground Laboratory). Before underground research, some experiments of the CsI (Tl) crystal Anti-Compton detector have been done on the ground, including light guide choice, wrapping material choice, height uniformity of CsI (Tl) crystal, side uniformity of CsI (Tl) crystal and the test results of all the crystals. Through the preliminary work on the ground, we have got some knowledge of the anti-compton detector and prepared for the underground experiment. (authors)

  15. Accurate measurement of the electron beam polarization in JLab Hall A using Compton polarimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escoffier, S.; Bertin, P.Y.; Brossard, M.; Burtin, E.; Cavata, C.; Colombel, N.; Jager, C.W. de; Delbart, A.; Lhuillier, D.; Marie, F.; Mitchell, J.; Neyret, D.; Pussieux, T.

    2005-01-01

    A major advance in accurate electron beam polarization measurement has been achieved at Jlab Hall A with a Compton polarimeter based on a Fabry-Perot cavity photon beam amplifier. At an electron energy of 4.6GeV and a beam current of 40μA, a total relative uncertainty of 1.5% is typically achieved within 40min of data taking. Under the same conditions monitoring of the polarization is accurate at a level of 1%. These unprecedented results make Compton polarimetry an essential tool for modern parity-violation experiments, which require very accurate electron beam polarization measurements

  16. A Programmable Liquid Collimator for Both Coded Aperture Adaptive Imaging and Multiplexed Compton Scatter Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    aperture system was first suggested by Dicke [21] and Ables [2] in 1968. X-ray astronomers had been seeking a system in which heavenly X-ray sources...uses Compton scatter X-rays [66]. including a fresco, and Egyptian mummy, and a medieval clasp [30]. It was found that Compton scatter imaging was useful...astron- omy”. Proceedings of the Astronomical Society of Australia, 1:172, December 1968. URL http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1968PASAu...1..172A. [3

  17. High intensity compact Compton X-ray sources: Challenges and potential of applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquet, M., E-mail: mjacquet@lal.in2p3.fr

    2014-07-15

    Thanks to the exceptional development of high power femtosecond lasers in the last 15 years, Compton based X-ray sources are in full development over the world in the recent years. Compact Compton sources are able to combine the compactness of the instrument with a beam of high intensity, high quality, tunable in energy. In various fields of applications such as biomedical science, cultural heritage preservation and material science researches, these sources should provide an easy working environment and the methods currently used at synchrotrons could be largely developed in a lab-size environment as hospitals, labs, or museums.

  18. Parity assignments in 140Ce up to 7 MeV using Compton polarimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buessing, M. A.; Elvers, M.; Endres, J.; Hasper, J.; Zilges, A.; Fritzsche, M.; Lindenberg, K.; Mueller, S.; Savran, D.; Sonnabend, K.

    2008-01-01

    Parity quantum numbers of J=1 states up to 7 MeV in the region of the Pygmy Dipole Resonance in 140 Ce were determined model independently by combining the methods of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence and Compton polarimetry. For the first time the well-established method of Compton polarimetry was applied at such high energies. The experiment was performed using a fourfold segmented HPGe clover detector for the detection of the scattered photons. For all investigated dipole transitions asymmetries are found which correspond to negative parity of the excited states

  19. Double electron ionization in Compton scattering of high energy photons by helium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M.Y.; Mikhailov, A.I.

    1995-01-01

    The cross section for double-electron ionization of two-electron atoms and ions in Compton scattering of high energy photons is calculated. It is demonstrated that its dependence on the incoming photon frequency is the same as that for single-electron ionization. The ratio of open-quotes double-to-singleclose quotes ionization in Compton scattering was found to be energy independent and almost identical with the corresponding value for photoionization. For the He atom it is 1.68%. This surprising result deserves experimental verification

  20. Research building gamma Compton scattering measurement system and related exercises for training nuclear human resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mai Xuan Phong; Nguyen Van Hung; Pham Xuan Hai; Le Van Ngoc; Nguyen Xuan Hai; Dang Lanh; Tran Quoc Duong

    2013-01-01

    In this subject we have designed and manufactured Compton scattering gamma measurement system based on the calculated optimal configuration as well as the conditions of protect radiation by using Monte-Carlo simulation program and fabrication with the optimal conditions were selected. Monte-Carlo simulation calculation of Compton scattering gamma follow different angles on copper, surveying gamma radiation attenuation characteristics of materials: lead, iron, aluminum, and compared with the experimental results performed on the same measurement system has been built and given for evaluation, comments. (author)

  1. Double electron ionization in Compton scattering of high energy photons by helium atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amusia, M.Y.; Mikhailov, A.I. [St. Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation)

    1995-08-01

    The cross section for double-electron ionization of two-electron atoms and ions in Compton scattering of high energy photons is calculated. It is demonstrated that its dependence on the incoming photon frequency is the same as that for single-electron ionization. The ratio of {open_quotes}double-to-single{close_quotes} ionization in Compton scattering was found to be energy independent and almost identical with the corresponding value for photoionization. For the He atom it is 1.68%. This surprising result deserves experimental verification.

  2. Polarized gamma-rays with laser-Compton backscattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohgaki, H.; Noguchi, T.; Sugiyama, S. [Electrotechnical Lab., Ibaraki (Japan)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Polarized gamma-rays were generated through laser-Compton backscattering (LCS) of a conventional Nd:YAG laser with electrons circulating in the electron storage ring TERAS at Electrotechnical Laboratory. We measured the energy, the energy spread, and the yield of the gamma-rays to characterize our gamma-ray source. The gamma-ray energy can be varied by changing the energy of the electrons circulating the storage ring. In our case, the energy of electrons in the storage ring were varied its energy from 200 to 750 MeV. Consequently, we observed gamma-ray energies of 1 to 10 MeV with 1064 run laser photons. Furthermore, the gamma-ray energy was extended to 20 MeV by using the 2nd harmonic of the Nd:YAG laser. This shows a good agreement with theoretical calculation. The gamma-ray energy spread was also measured to be 1% FWHM for -1 MeV gamma-rays and to be 4% FWHM for 10 MeV gamma-rays with a narrow collimator that defined the scattering cone. The gamma-ray yield was 47.2 photons/mA/W/s. This value is consistent with a rough estimation of 59.5 photons/mA/W/s derived from theory. Furthermore, we tried to use these gamma-rays for a nuclear fluorescence experiment. If we use a polarized laser beam, we can easily obtain polarized gamma-rays. Elastically scattered photons from {sup 208} Pb were clearly measured with the linearly polarized gamma-rays, and we could assign the parity of J=1 states in the nucleus. We should emphasize that the polarized gamma-ray from LCS is quit useful in this field, because we can use highly, almost completely, polarized gamma-rays. We also use the LCS gamma-rays to measure the photon absorption coefficients. In near future, we will try to generate a circular polarized gamma-ray. We also have a plan to use an FEL, because it can produce intense laser photons in the same geometric configuration as the LCS facility.

  3. Hadronic weak charges and parity-violating forward Compton scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorchtein, Mikhail; Spiesberger, Hubert

    2016-11-01

    Background: Parity-violating elastic electron-nucleon scattering at low momentum transfer allows one to access the nucleon's weak charge, the vector coupling of the Z -boson to the nucleon. In the Standard Model and at tree level, the weak charge of the proton is related to the weak mixing angle and accidentally suppressed, QWp ,tree=1 -4 sin2θW≈0.07 . Modern experiments aim at extracting QWp at ˜1 % accuracy. Similarly, parity nonconservation in atoms allows to access the weak charge of atomic nuclei. Purpose: We consider a novel class of radiative corrections due to the exchange of two photons, with parity violation in the hadronic/nuclear system. These corrections are prone to long-range interactions and may affect the extraction of sin2θW from the experimental data at the relevant level of precision. Methods: The two-photon exchange contribution to the parity-violating electron-proton scattering amplitude is studied in the framework of forward dispersion relations. We address the general properties of the parity-violating forward Compton scattering amplitude and use relativistic chiral perturbation theory to provide the first field-theoretical proof that it obeys a superconvergence relation. Results: We show that the significance of this new correction increases with the beam energy in parity-violating electron scattering, but the superconvergence relation protects the formal definition of the weak charge as a limit at zero-momentum transfer and zero energy. We evaluate the new correction in a hadronic model with pion loops and the Δ (1232 ) resonance, supplemented with a high-energy contribution. For the kinematic conditions of existing and upcoming experiments we show that two-photon exchange corrections with hadronic or nuclear parity violation do not pose a problem for the interpretation of the data in terms of the weak mixing angle at the present level of accuracy. Conclusions: Two-photon exchange in presence of hadronic or nuclear parity violation

  4. Study of electron densities of normal and neoplastic human breast tissues by Compton scattering using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoniassi, M.; Conceição, A.L.C.; Poletti, M.E.

    2012-01-01

    Electron densities of 33 samples of normal (adipose and fibroglangular) and neoplastic (benign and malignant) human breast tissues were determined through Compton scattering data using a monochromatic synchrotron radiation source and an energy dispersive detector. The area of Compton peaks was used to determine the electron densities of the samples. Adipose tissue exhibits the lowest values of electron density whereas malignant tissue the highest. The relationship with their histology was discussed. Comparison with previous results showed differences smaller than 4%. - Highlights: ► Electron density of normal and neoplastic breast tissues was measured using Compton scattering. ► Monochromatic synchrotron radiation was used to obtain the Compton scattering data. ► The area of Compton peaks was used to determine the electron densities of samples. ► Adipose tissue shows the lowest electron density values whereas the malignant tissue the highest. ► Comparison with previous results showed differences smaller than 4%.

  5. Inverse scale space decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Marie Foged; Benning, Martin; Schönlieb, Carola-Bibiane

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the inverse scale space flow as a decomposition method for decomposing data into generalised singular vectors. We show that the inverse scale space flow, based on convex and even and positively one-homogeneous regularisation functionals, can decompose data represented...... by the application of a forward operator to a linear combination of generalised singular vectors into its individual singular vectors. We verify that for this decomposition to hold true, two additional conditions on the singular vectors are sufficient: orthogonality in the data space and inclusion of partial sums...... of the subgradients of the singular vectors in the subdifferential of the regularisation functional at zero. We also address the converse question of when the inverse scale space flow returns a generalised singular vector given that the initial data is arbitrary (and therefore not necessarily in the range...

  6. Modeling the Broad-Band Emission from the Gamma-Ray Emitting Narrow-Line Seyfert-1 Galaxies 1H 0323+342 and B2 0954+25A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arrieta-Lobo, Maialen; Boisson, Catherine; Zech, Andreas, E-mail: maialen.arrieta@obspm.fr [Laboratoire Univers et Theories, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, Université Paris-Diderot, PSL Research University, Meudon (France)

    2017-12-08

    Prior to the Fermi-LAT era, only two classes of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) were thought to harbor relativistic jets that radiate up to gamma-ray energies: blazars and radio galaxies. The detection of variable gamma-ray emission from Narrow Line Seyfert 1 (NLSy1) galaxies has put them on the spotlight as a new class of gamma-ray emitting AGN. In this respect, gamma-ray emitting NLSy1s seem to be situated between blazars (dominated by non-thermal emission) and Seyferts (accretion disc dominated). In this work, we model the Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) of two gamma-loud NLSy1s, 1H 0323+342 and B2 0954+25A, during quiescent and flaring episodes via a multi-component radiative model that features a relativistic jet and external photon fields from the torus, disc, corona and Broad Line Region (BLR). We find that the interpretation of the high-energy emission of jetted NLSy1s requires taking into account Inverse Compton emission from particles in the relativistic jet that interact with external photon fields. Minimal changes are applied to the model parameters to transition from average to flaring states. In this scenario, the observed variability is explained mainly by means of changes in the jet density and Doppler factor.

  7. Inversion assuming weak scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xenaki, Angeliki; Gerstoft, Peter; Mosegaard, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    due to the complex nature of the field. A method based on linear inversion is employed to infer information about the statistical properties of the scattering field from the obtained cross-spectral matrix. A synthetic example based on an active high-frequency sonar demonstrates that the proposed...

  8. Locative Inversion in English

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekhuis, H.

    2005-01-01

    This article aims at reformulating in more current terms Hoekstra and Mulder’s (1990) analysis of the Locative Inversion (LI) construction. The new proposal is crucially based on the assumption that Small Clause (SC) predicates agree with their external argument in phi-features, which may be

  9. Discovery of a Kiloparsec Extended Hard X-Ray Continuum and Fe-Kα from the Compton Thick AGN ESO 428-G014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbiano, G.; Elvis, M.; Paggi, A.; Karovska, M.; Maksym, W. P.; Raymond, J.; Risaliti, G.; Wang, Junfeng

    2017-06-01

    We report the discovery of kiloparsec-scale diffuse emission in both the hard continuum (3-6 keV) and in the Fe-Kα line in the Compton thick (CT) Seyfert galaxy ESO 428-G014. This extended hard component contains at least ˜24% of the observed 3-8 keV emission, and follows the direction of the extended optical line emission (ionization cone) and radio jet. The extended hard component has ˜0.5% of the intrinsic 2-10 keV luminosity within the bi-cones. A uniform scattering medium of density 1 {{cm}}-3 would produce this luminosity in a 1 kpc path length in the bi-cones. Alternatively, higher column density molecular clouds in the disk of ESO 428-G014 may be responsible for these components. The continuum may also be enhanced by the acceleration of charged particles in the radio jet. The steeper spectrum (Γ ˜ 1.7 ± 0.4) of the hard continuum outside of the central 1.″5 radius nuclear region suggests a contribution of scattered/fluorescent intrinsic Seyfert emission. Ultrafast nuclear outflows cannot explain the extended Fe-Kα emission. This discovery suggests that we may need to revise the picture at the base of our interpretation of CT AGN spectra.

  10. Bayesian seismic AVO inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buland, Arild

    2002-07-01

    A new linearized AVO inversion technique is developed in a Bayesian framework. The objective is to obtain posterior distributions for P-wave velocity, S-wave velocity and density. Distributions for other elastic parameters can also be assessed, for example acoustic impedance, shear impedance and P-wave to S-wave velocity ratio. The inversion algorithm is based on the convolutional model and a linearized weak contrast approximation of the Zoeppritz equation. The solution is represented by a Gaussian posterior distribution with explicit expressions for the posterior expectation and covariance, hence exact prediction intervals for the inverted parameters can be computed under the specified model. The explicit analytical form of the posterior distribution provides a computationally fast inversion method. Tests on synthetic data show that all inverted parameters were almost perfectly retrieved when the noise approached zero. With realistic noise levels, acoustic impedance was the best determined parameter, while the inversion provided practically no information about the density. The inversion algorithm has also been tested on a real 3-D dataset from the Sleipner Field. The results show good agreement with well logs but the uncertainty is high. The stochastic model includes uncertainties of both the elastic parameters, the wavelet and the seismic and well log data. The posterior distribution is explored by Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation using the Gibbs sampler algorithm. The inversion algorithm has been tested on a seismic line from the Heidrun Field with two wells located on the line. The uncertainty of the estimated wavelet is low. In the Heidrun examples the effect of including uncertainty of the wavelet and the noise level was marginal with respect to the AVO inversion results. We have developed a 3-D linearized AVO inversion method with spatially coupled model parameters where the objective is to obtain posterior distributions for P-wave velocity, S

  11. Pseudo waveform inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Chang Soo; Park, Keun Pil [Korea Inst. of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Jung Hee; Hyun, Byung Koo; Shin, Sung Ryul [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    The seismic reflection exploration technique which is one of the geophysical methods for oil exploration became effectively to image the subsurface structure with rapid development of computer. However, the imagining of subsurface based on the conventional data processing is almost impossible to obtain the information on physical properties of the subsurface such as velocity and density. Since seismic data are implicitly function of velocities of subsurface, it is necessary to develop the inversion method that can delineate the velocity structure using seismic topography and waveform inversion. As a tool to perform seismic inversion, seismic forward modeling program using ray tracing should be developed. In this study, we have developed the algorithm that calculate the travel time of the complex geologic structure using shooting ray tracing by subdividing the geologic model into blocky structure having the constant velocity. With the travel time calculation, the partial derivatives of travel time can be calculated efficiently without difficulties. Since the current ray tracing technique has a limitation to calculate the travel times for extremely complex geologic model, our aim in the future is to develop the powerful ray tracer using the finite element technique. After applying the pseudo waveform inversion to the seismic data of Korea offshore, we can obtain the subsurface velocity model and use the result in bring up the quality of the seismic data processing. If conventional seismic data processing and seismic interpretation are linked with this inversion technique, the high quality of seismic data processing can be expected to image the structure of the subsurface. Future research area is to develop the powerful ray tracer of ray tracing which can calculate the travel times for the extremely complex geologic model. (author). 39 refs., 32 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Calculation of the inverse data space via sparse inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Saragiotis, Christos

    2011-01-01

    The inverse data space provides a natural separation of primaries and surface-related multiples, as the surface multiples map onto the area around the origin while the primaries map elsewhere. However, the calculation of the inverse data is far from trivial as theory requires infinite time and offset recording. Furthermore regularization issues arise during inversion. We perform the inversion by minimizing the least-squares norm of the misfit function by constraining the $ell_1$ norm of the solution, being the inverse data space. In this way a sparse inversion approach is obtained. We show results on field data with an application to surface multiple removal.

  13. A study on CZT and scintillator based micro-PETs with compton tracing technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Chang Yeon; Lee, Won Ho [Dept. of Bio-convergence Engineering, Korea University Graduate School, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this research, the performance of micro-PET with CZT semiconductor was compared with those with LYSO and LGSO scintillators based on detection efficiency and the quality of reconstructed images. Compton and conventional PET system with three detector materials were evaluated and compared with each other. The conventional PETs widely used in clinics generally consisted of lutetium series scintillators such as LSO, LYSO or LGSO. These scintillators have high atomic number and density, and hence, their detection efficiencies are very high. Even though the atomic number and density of CZT were relatively lower than those of scintillators resulting in less detection efficiency, the pixellized CZTs showed much higher position resolution than conventional detectors. Moreover, pixellized CZT can precisely track the interaction position inside detectors, in which Compton scattering as well as photoelectric events can be effective interaction, and hence, the detection efficiency improves significantly. For all material, the efficiency of Compton PETs was always higher than that of conventional PETs, and hence the image quality was also improved by using Compton PET technology.

  14. Variation of Compton Profiles of the CO2 at different pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürol, Ali; Şakar, Erdem

    2017-04-01

    In this study, it has been measured the Compton Profile of the CO2 gas at different pressures by using a Compton Profile Spectrometer with an annular Am-241 radioactive source and a HPGe detector. CO2 gas molecules sealed in a gas chamber at different pressures. The gas pressure had been set by using an analog manometer before the measurements. The γ-rays emitted from source was incident into the gas from a hostaphan window. The detector recorded the scattered photons from molecules. To obtain correct Compton Profile values, the raw data were corrected for some effects; i.e. scattering from the gas chamber's walls, absorption effects of windows on gas chamber and detector, and multiple scattering corrections. A Matlab Code has been used for all calculations. The results clearly demonstrate the valance electronic structure of the materials is highly depending on the pressure. According to our experimental results, when the pressure in the gas chamber increase the Compton Profiles of valance electrons changes ˜ 8,0%.

  15. Estimation of Compton Imager Using Single 3D Position-Sensitive LYSO Scintillator: Monte Carlo Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Taewoong; Lee, Hyounggun; Kim, Younghak; Lee, Wonho [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    The performance of a Compton imager using a single three-dimensional position-sensitive LYSO scintillator detector was estimated using a Monte Carlo simulation. The Compton imager consisted of a single LYSO scintillator with a pixelized structure. The size of the scintillator and each pixel were 1.3 × 1.3 × 1.3 cm{sup 3} and 0.3 × 0.3 × 0.3 cm{sup 3}, respectively. The order of γ-ray interactions was determined based on the deposited energies in each detector. After the determination of the interaction sequence, various types of reconstruction algorithms such as simple back-projection, filtered back-projection, and list-mode maximum-likelihood expectation maximization (LM-MLEM) were applied and compared with each other in terms of their angular resolution and signal-tonoise ratio (SNR) for several γ-ray energies. The LM-MLEM reconstruction algorithm exhibited the best performance for Compton imaging in maintaining high angular resolution and SNR. The two sources of {sup 137}Cs (662 keV) could be distinguishable if they were more than 17 ◦ apart. The reconstructed Compton images showed the precise position and distribution of various radiation isotopes, which demonstrated the feasibility of the monitoring of nuclear materials in homeland security and radioactive waste management applications.

  16. VIG Seminar March 1, 2018 Alex Compton NCI-Frederick | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Please join us for the Virology Interest Group Seminar on Thursday, March 1st, from 2:30 until 3:30 in Bethesda, Building 50, Room 2328. The seminar will also be broadcasted to Frederick, Building 549, Conference Room A. This seminar will be presented by Alex Compton, NCI-Frederick.

  17. Establishing Site X: Letter, Arthur H. Compton to Enrico Fermi, September 14, 1942

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, A. H.

    1942-09-01

    This letter from Compton to Fermi describes developments bearing on the establishment of site X (which, as of the letter date, is definitely determined as at the Tennessee Valley) for the construction of a pile and associated pilot plant buildings, describes the situation as of the letter date, and offers counsel as to how to proceed.

  18. Room temperature Compton profiles of conduction electrons in α-Ga ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Room temperature Compton profiles of momentum distribution of conduction electrons in -Ga metal are calculated in band model. For this purpose, the conduction electron wave functions are determined in a temperature-dependent non-local model potential. The profiles calculated along the crystallographic directions, ...

  19. Compton scattering study and electronic properties of vanadium carbide: A validation of hybrid functional

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Ritu; Sahariya, Jagrati; Ahuja, B.L.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we have reported the isotropic Compton profile of VC measured using high energy (661.65 keV) γ-radiations from a 137 Cs isotope. To compare the experimental momentum densities, we have also employed the linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO). In addition, energy bands, density of states and Fermi surface topology of VC have been computed using FP-LAPW and LCAO methods. It is seen that the LCAO with hybridization of density functional theory and Hartree-Fock (so called B3LYP) gives a better agreement with the present Compton profile experiment. This shows validation of an exact exchange part in hybrid density functional. On the basis of energy bands, we have discussed the microscopic origin for the anomalous behavior of hardness of VC. The relative nature of bonding in VC and NbC is also discussed in terms of valence charge densities and Mulliken's population analysis. To establish the role of Compton profiles in computation of cohesive properties of refractory materials, we have also calculated for the first time the cohesive energy using the present experimental Compton profile and compared it with the existing data.

  20. Compton scattering study and electronic properties of vanadium carbide: A validation of hybrid functional

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Ritu; Sahariya, Jagrati [Department of Physics, University College of Science, M.L. Sukhadia University, Udaipur 313001, Rajasthan (India); Ahuja, B.L., E-mail: blahuja@yahoo.co [Department of Physics, University College of Science, M.L. Sukhadia University, Udaipur 313001, Rajasthan (India)

    2011-05-01

    In this paper, we have reported the isotropic Compton profile of VC measured using high energy (661.65 keV) {gamma}-radiations from a {sup 137}Cs isotope. To compare the experimental momentum densities, we have also employed the linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO). In addition, energy bands, density of states and Fermi surface topology of VC have been computed using FP-LAPW and LCAO methods. It is seen that the LCAO with hybridization of density functional theory and Hartree-Fock (so called B3LYP) gives a better agreement with the present Compton profile experiment. This shows validation of an exact exchange part in hybrid density functional. On the basis of energy bands, we have discussed the microscopic origin for the anomalous behavior of hardness of VC. The relative nature of bonding in VC and NbC is also discussed in terms of valence charge densities and Mulliken's population analysis. To establish the role of Compton profiles in computation of cohesive properties of refractory materials, we have also calculated for the first time the cohesive energy using the present experimental Compton profile and compared it with the existing data.