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Sample records for inveon pet scanner

  1. Performance evaluation of an Inveon PET preclinical scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinescu, Cristian C.; Mukherjee, Jogeshwar

    2009-05-01

    We evaluated the performance of an Inveon preclinical PET scanner (Siemens Medical Solutions), the latest MicroPET system. Spatial resolution was measured with a glass capillary tube (0.26 mm inside diameter, 0.29 mm wall thickness) filled with 18F solution. Transaxial and axial resolutions were measured with the source placed parallel and perpendicular to the axis of the scanner. The sensitivity of the scanner was measured with a 22Na point source, placed on the animal bed and positioned at different offsets from the center of the field of view (FOV), as well as at different energy and coincidence windows. The noise equivalent count rates (NECR) and the system scatter fraction were measured using rat-like (Φ = 60, L = 150 mm) and mouse-like (Φ = 25 mm, L = 70 mm) cylindrical phantoms. Line sources filled with high activity 18F (>250 MBq) were inserted parallel to the axes of the phantoms (13.5 and 10 mm offset). For each phantom, list-mode data were collected over 24 h at 350-650 keV and 250-750 keV energy windows and 3.4 ns coincidence window. System scatter fraction was measured when the random event rates were below 1%. Performance phantoms consisting of cylinders with hot rod inserts filled with 18F were imaged. In addition, we performed imaging studies that show the suitability of the Inveon scanner for imaging small structures such as those in mice with a variety of tracers. The radial, tangential and axial resolutions at the center of FOV were 1.46 mm, 1.49 and 1.15 mm, respectively. At a radial offset of 2 cm, the FWHM values were 1.73, 2.20 and 1.47 mm, respectively. At a coincidence window of 3.4 ns, the sensitivity was 5.75% for EW = 350-650 keV and 7.4% for EW = 250-750 keV. For an energy window of 350-650 keV, the peak NECR was 538 kcps at 131.4 MBq for the rat-like phantom, and 1734 kcps at 147.4 MBq for the mouse-like phantom. The system scatter fraction values were 0.22 for the rat phantom and 0.06 for the mouse phantom. The Inveon system

  2. Spatial resolution and sensitivity of the Inveon small-animal PET scanner.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, E.P.; Disselhorst, J.; Brom, M.; Laverman, P.; Gotthardt, M.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Boerman, O.C.

    2009-01-01

    The Inveon small-animal PET scanner is characterized by a large, 127-mm axial length and a 161-mm crystal ring diameter. The associated high sensitivity is obtained by using all lines of response (LORs) up to the maximum ring difference (MRD) of 79, for which the most oblique LORs form acceptance an

  3. Spatial resolution and sensitivity of the Inveon small-animal PET scanner.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, E.P.; Disselhorst, J.; Brom, M.; Laverman, P.; Gotthardt, M.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Boerman, O.C.

    2009-01-01

    The Inveon small-animal PET scanner is characterized by a large, 127-mm axial length and a 161-mm crystal ring diameter. The associated high sensitivity is obtained by using all lines of response (LORs) up to the maximum ring difference (MRD) of 79, for which the most oblique LORs form acceptance

  4. Validation of a Monte Carlo simulation of the Inveon PET scanner using GATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Lijun, E-mail: ljlubme@gmail.com; Zhang, Houjin; Bian, Zhaoying; Ma, Jianhua, E-mail: jianhuama@smu.edu.cn; Feng, Qiangjin; Chen, Wufan, E-mail: chenwf@fimmu.com

    2016-08-21

    The purpose of this study is to validate the application of GATE (Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission) Monte Carlo simulation toolkit in order to model the performance characteristics of Siemens Inveon small animal PET system. The simulation results were validated against experimental/published data in accordance with the NEMA NU-4 2008 protocol for standardized evaluation of spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction (SF) and noise equivalent counting rate (NECR) of a preclinical PET system. An agreement of less than 18% was obtained between the radial, tangential and axial spatial resolutions of the simulated and experimental results. The simulated peak NECR of mouse-size phantom agreed with the experimental result, while for the rat-size phantom simulated value was higher than experimental result. The simulated and experimental SFs of mouse- and rat- size phantom both reached an agreement of less than 2%. It has been shown the feasibility of our GATE model to accurately simulate, within certain limits, all major performance characteristics of Inveon PET system.

  5. Validation of a Monte Carlo simulation of the Inveon PET scanner using GATE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lijun; Zhang, Houjin; Bian, Zhaoying; Ma, Jianhua; Feng, Qiangjin; Chen, Wufan

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to validate the application of GATE (Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission) Monte Carlo simulation toolkit in order to model the performance characteristics of Siemens Inveon small animal PET system. The simulation results were validated against experimental/published data in accordance with the NEMA NU-4 2008 protocol for standardized evaluation of spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction (SF) and noise equivalent counting rate (NECR) of a preclinical PET system. An agreement of less than 18% was obtained between the radial, tangential and axial spatial resolutions of the simulated and experimental results. The simulated peak NECR of mouse-size phantom agreed with the experimental result, while for the rat-size phantom simulated value was higher than experimental result. The simulated and experimental SFs of mouse- and rat- size phantom both reached an agreement of less than 2%. It has been shown the feasibility of our GATE model to accurately simulate, within certain limits, all major performance characteristics of Inveon PET system.

  6. OSSI-PET: Open-Access Database of Simulated [(11)C]Raclopride Scans for the Inveon Preclinical PET Scanner: Application to the Optimization of Reconstruction Methods for Dynamic Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Marie-Paule; Charil, Arnaud; Callaghan, Paul; Wimberley, Catriona; Busso, Florian; Gregoire, Marie-Claude; Bardies, Manuel; Reilhac, Anthonin

    2016-07-01

    A wide range of medical imaging applications benefits from the availability of realistic ground truth data. In the case of positron emission tomography (PET), ground truth data is crucial to validate processing algorithms and assessing their performances. The design of such ground truth data often relies on Monte-Carlo simulation techniques. Since the creation of a large dataset is not trivial both in terms of computing time and realism, we propose the OSSI-PET database containing 350 simulated [(11)C]Raclopride dynamic scans for rats, created specifically for the Inveon pre-clinical PET scanner. The originality of this database lies on the availability of several groups of scans with controlled biological variations in the striata. Besides, each group consists of a large number of realizations (i.e., noise replicates). We present the construction methodology of this database using rat pharmacokinetic and anatomical models. A first application using the OSSI-PET database is presented. Several commonly used reconstruction techniques were compared in terms of image quality, accuracy and variability of the activity estimates and of the computed kinetic parameters. The results showed that OP-OSEM3D iterative reconstruction method outperformed the other tested methods. Analytical methods such as FBP2D and 3DRP also produced satisfactory results. However, FORE followed by OSEM2D reconstructions should be avoided. Beyond the illustration of the potential of the database, this application will help scientists to understand the different sources of noise and bias that can occur at the different steps in the processing and will be very useful for choosing appropriate reconstruction methods and parameters.

  7. NEMA NU 2-2007 performance measurements of the Siemens Inveon preclinical small animal PET system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Brad J; Hruska, Carrie B; McFarland, Aaron R; Lenox, Mark W; Lowe, Val J

    2009-04-21

    National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) NU 2-2007 performance measurements were conducted on the Inveon preclinical small animal PET system developed by Siemens Medical Solutions. The scanner uses 1.51 x 1.51 x 10 mm LSO crystals grouped in 20 x 20 blocks; a tapered light guide couples the LSO crystals of a block to a position-sensitive photomultiplier tube. There are 80 rings with 320 crystals per ring and the ring diameter is 161 mm. The transaxial and axial fields of view (FOVs) are 100 and 127 mm, respectively. The scanner can be docked to a CT scanner; the performance characteristics of the CT component are not included herein. Performance measurements of spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction and count rate performance were obtained for different energy windows and coincidence timing window widths. For brevity, the results described here are for an energy window of 350-650 keV and a coincidence timing window of 3.43 ns. The spatial resolution at the center of the transaxial and axial FOVs was 1.56, 1.62 and 2.12 mm in the tangential, radial and axial directions, respectively, and the system sensitivity was 36.2 cps kBq(-1) for a line source (7.2% for a point source). For mouse- and rat-sized phantoms, the scatter fraction was 5.7% and 14.6%, respectively. The peak noise equivalent count rate with a noisy randoms estimate was 1475 kcps at 130 MBq for the mouse-sized phantom and 583 kcps at 74 MBq for the rat-sized phantom. The performance measurements indicate that the Inveon PET scanner is a high-resolution tomograph with excellent sensitivity that is capable of imaging at a high count rate.

  8. Optimization of PET scanner geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, Lars-Eric; Karp, J.S. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2000-12-01

    Modern positron emission tomographs (PET), when used for 3D imaging, have a wide open gantry without intra plane septa and only little shielding. In order to reduce the scatter contamination from activity inside and outside the field-of-view (FOV), and to block radiation originating from activity outside-the-FOV, we have investigated the implementation of septa and additional patient shielding on our existing whole body PET scanner. A series of Monte Carlo simulations, based on EGS4, were performed to predict the potential benefits. Our simulations include point and line sources at various radial and axial positions in the FOV of the scanner, and different sized uniform cylinders (up to 100 cm long and 50 cm in diameter). The scanner itself is based on 6 continuous NaI(Tl) crystals, an axial FOV of 25.6 cm, a ring diameter of 90 cm, and a transaxial FOV of 56 cm. The results show that septa can reduce the relative scatter fraction and effectively block radiation from outside-the-FOV, but they also reduce the sensitivity for true events, leading to a decrease of the trues-to-singles ratio that is not desirable. The use of septa is only advantageous for large objects, if the loss of true events is compensated for by increasing the injected activity. Patient shields that are mounted outside-the-FOV reduce the contamination from scattered and single events without interfering with true events. They are more effective for objects with a small diameter and less effective for objects with a large diameter. (author)

  9. Combined PET/MRI scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlyer, David; Woody, Craig L.; Rooney, William; Vaska, Paul; Stoll, Sean; Pratte, Jean-Francois; O'Connor, Paul

    2007-10-23

    A combined PET/MRI scanner generally includes a magnet for producing a magnetic field suitable for magnetic resonance imaging, a radiofrequency (RF) coil disposed within the magnetic field produced by the magnet and a ring tomograph disposed within the magnetic field produced by the magnet. The ring tomograph includes a scintillator layer for outputting at least one photon in response to an annihilation event, a detection array coupled to the scintillator layer for detecting the at least one photon outputted by the scintillator layer and for outputting a detection signal in response to the detected photon and a front-end electronic array coupled to the detection array for receiving the detection signal, wherein the front-end array has a preamplifier and a shaper network for conditioning the detection signal.

  10. Comparison of Imaging Characteristics of 124I PET for Determination of Optimal Energy Window on the Siemens Inveon PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Ram Yu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose.124I has a half-life of 4.2 days, which makes it suitable for imaging over several days over its uptake and washout phases. However, it has a low positron branching ratio (23%, because of prompt gamma coincidence due to high-energy γ-photons (602 to 1,691 keV, which are emitted in cascade with positrons. Methods. In this study, we investigated the optimal PET energy window for 124I PET based on image characteristics of reconstructed PET. Image characteristics such as nonuniformities, recovery coefficients (RCs, and the spillover ratios (SORs of 124I were measured as described in NEMA NU 4-2008 standards. Results. The maximum and minimum prompt gamma coincidence fraction (PGF were 33% and 2% in 350~800 and 400~590 keV, respectively. The difference between best and worst uniformity in the various energy windows was less than 1%. The lowest SORs of 124I were obtained at 350~750 keV in nonradioactive water compartment. Conclusion. Optimal energy window should be determined based on image characteristics. Our developed correction method would be useful for the correction of high-energy prompt gamma photon in 124I PET. In terms of the image quality of 124I PET, our findings indicate that an energy window of 350~750 keV would be optimal.

  11. Compensation strategies for PET scanners with unconventional scanner geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Gundlich, B; Oehler, M

    2006-01-01

    The small animal PET scanner ClearPET®Neuro, developed at the Forschungszentrum Julich GmbH in cooperation with the Crystal Clear Collaboration (CERN), represents scanners with an unconventional geometry: due to axial and transaxial detector gaps ClearPet®Neuro delivers inhomogeneous sinograms with missing data. When filtered backprojection (FBP) or Fourier rebinning (FORE) are applied, strong geometrical artifacts appear in the images. In this contribution we present a method that takes the geometrical sensitivity into account and converts the measured sinograms into homogeneous and complete data. By this means artifactfree images are achieved using FBP or FORE. Besides an advantageous measurement setup that reduces inhomogeneities and data gaps in the sinograms, a modification of the measured sinograms is necessary. This modification includes two steps: a geometrical normalization and corrections for missing data. To normalize the measured sinograms, computed sinograms are used that describe the geometric...

  12. A PET scanner developed by CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1998-01-01

    This image shows a Position Emission Tomography (PET) scanner at the Hopital Cantonal Universitaire de Genève. Development of the multiwire proportional chamber at CERN in the mid-1970s was soon seen as a potential device for medical imaging. It is much more sensitive than previous devices and greatly reduced the dose of radiation received by the patient.

  13. Development of scintillation materials for PET scanners

    CERN Document Server

    Korzhik, Mikhail; Annenkov, Alexander N; Borissevitch, Andrei; Dossovitski, Alexei; Missevitch, Oleg; Lecoq, Paul

    2007-01-01

    The growing demand on PET methodology for a variety of applications ranging from clinical use to fundamental studies triggers research and development of PET scanners providing better spatial resolution and sensitivity. These efforts are primarily focused on the development of advanced PET detector solutions and on the developments of new scintillation materials as well. However Lu containing scintillation materials introduced in the last century such as LSO, LYSO, LuAP, LuYAP crystals still remain the best PET species in spite of the recent developments of bright, fast but relatively low density lanthanum bromide scintillators. At the same time Lu based materials have several drawbacks which are high temperature of crystallization and relatively high cost compared to alkali-halide scintillation materials. Here we describe recent results in the development of new scintillation materials for PET application.

  14. [Innovation and Future Technologies for PET Scanners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaya, Taiga

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) plays important roles in cancer diagnosis, neuroimaging and molecular imaging research; but potential points remain for which big improvements could be made, including spatial resolution, sensitivity and manufacturing costs. Higher spatial resolution is essential to enable earlier diagnosis, and improved sensitivity results in reduced radiation exposure and shortened measurement time. Therefore, research on next generation PET technologies remains a hot topic worldwide. In this paper, innovation and future technologies for the next generation PET scanners, such as time-of-flight measurement and simultaneous PET/MRI measurement, are described. Among them, depth-of-interaction (DOI) measurement in the radiation sensor will be a key technology to get any significant improvement in sensitivity while maintaining high spatial resolution. DOI measurement also has a potential to expand PET application fields because it allows for more flexible detector arrangement. As an example, the world's first, open-type PET geometry "OpenPET", which is expected to lead to PET imaging during treatment, is under development. The DOI detector itself continues to evolve with the help of recently developed semiconductor photodetectors, often referred to as silicon photomultipliers.

  15. Characterization of the Ferrara animal PET scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Di Domenico, G; Damiani, C; Del Guerra, A; Gilardi, M C; Motta, A; Zavattini, G

    2002-01-01

    A dedicated small animal PET scanner, YAPPET, was designed and built at Ferrara University. Each detector consists of a 20x20 matrix of 2x2x30 mm sup 3 YAP:Ce finger-like crystals glued together and directly coupled to a Hamamatsu position sensitive photomultiplier. The scanner is made from four detectors positioned on a rotating gantry at a distance of 7.5 cm from the center and the field of view (FOV) is 4 cm both in the transaxial direction and in the axial direction. The system operates in 3D acquisition mode. The performance parameters of YAPPET scanner such as spatial, energy and time resolution, as well as its sensitivity and counting rate have been determined. The average spatial resolution over the whole FOV is 1.8 mm at FWHM and 4.2 mm at FWTM. The sensitivity at the center is 640 cps/mu Ci.

  16. Dedicated PET scanners for breast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freifelder, Richard; Karp, Joel S. [University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, 110 Donner, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    1997-12-01

    We have used computer simulations to compare two designs for a PET scanner dedicated to breast imaging with a whole-body PET scanner. The new designs combine high spatial resolution, high sensitivity, and good energy resolution to detect small, low-contrast masses. The detectors are position sensitive NaI(Tl) scintillators. The first design is a ring scanner surrounding the breast and the second consists of two planar detectors placed on opposite sides of the breast. We have employed standard performance measures to compare the different designs: contrast, percentage standard deviation of the background, and signal-to-noise ratios of reconstructed images. The results of the simulations show that both of the proposed designs have better lesion detectability than a whole-body scanner. The results also show that contrast is higher in the ring breast system but that the noise is lower in the planar breast system. Overall, the ring system yields images with the best signal-to-noise ratios, although the planar system offers practical advantages for imaging the breast and axilla. (author)

  17. Dedicated PET scanners for breast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freifelder, R; Karp, J S

    1997-12-01

    We have used computer simulations to compare two designs for a PET scanner dedicated to breast imaging with a whole-body PET scanner. The new designs combine high spatial resolution, high sensitivity, and good energy resolution to detect small, low-contrast masses. The detectors are position sensitive NaI(Tl) scintillators. The first design is a ring scanner surrounding the breast and the second consists of two planar detectors placed on opposite sides of the breast. We have employed standard performance measures to compare the different designs: contrast, percentage standard deviation of the background, and signal-to-noise ratios of reconstructed images. The results of the simulations show that both of the proposed designs have better lesion detectability than a whole-body scanner. The results also show that contrast is higher in the ring breast system but that the noise is lower in the planar breast system. Overall, the ring system yields images with the best signal-to-noise ratios, although the planar system offers practical advantages for imaging the breast and axilla.

  18. Dedicated PET scanners for breast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freifelder, Richard; Karp, Joel S.

    1997-12-01

    We have used computer simulations to compare two designs for a PET scanner dedicated to breast imaging with a whole-body PET scanner. The new designs combine high spatial resolution, high sensitivity, and good energy resolution to detect small, low-contrast masses. The detectors are position sensitive NaI(Tl) scintillators. The first design is a ring scanner surrounding the breast and the second consists of two planar detectors placed on opposite sides of the breast. We have employed standard performance measures to compare the different designs: contrast, percentage standard deviation of the background, and signal-to-noise ratios of reconstructed images. The results of the simulations show that both of the proposed designs have better lesion detectability than a whole-body scanner. The results also show that contrast is higher in the ring breast system but that the noise is lower in the planar breast system. Overall, the ring system yields images with the best signal-to-noise ratios, although the planar system offers practical advantages for imaging the breast and axilla.

  19. Analysis framework for the J-PET scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Krzemień, W; Gruntowski, A; Stola, K; Trybek, D; Bednarski, T; Białas, P; Czerwiński, E; Kamińska, D; Kapłon, L; Kochanowski, A; Korcyl, G; Kowal, J; Kowalski, P; Kozik, T; Kubicz, E; Moskal, P; Niedźwiecki, Sz; Pałka, M; Raczyński, L; Rudy, Z; Salabura, P; Sharma, N G; Silarski, M; Słomski, A; Smyrski, J; Strzelecki, A; Wieczorek, A; Wiślicki, W; Zieliński, M; Zoń, N

    2015-01-01

    J-PET analysis framework is a flexible, lightweight, ROOT-based software package which provides the tools to develop reconstruction and calibration procedures for PET tomography. In this article we present the implementation of the full data-processing chain in the J-PET framework which is used for the data analysis of the J-PET tomography scanner. The Framework incorporates automated handling of PET setup parameters' database as well as high level tools for building data reconstruction procedures. Each of these components is briefly discussed.

  20. Quantification accuracy and partial volume effect in dependence of the attenuation correction of a state-of-the-art small animal PET scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannheim, Julia G; Judenhofer, Martin S; Schmid, Andreas; Tillmanns, Julia; Stiller, Detlef; Sossi, Vesna; Pichler, Bernd J

    2012-06-21

    Quantification accuracy and partial volume effect (PVE) of the Siemens Inveon PET scanner were evaluated. The influence of transmission source activities (40 and 160 MBq) on the quantification accuracy and the PVE were determined. Dynamic range, object size and PVE for different sphere sizes, contrast ratios and positions in the field of view (FOV) were evaluated. The acquired data were reconstructed using different algorithms and correction methods. The activity level of the transmission source and the total emission activity in the FOV strongly influenced the attenuation maps. Reconstruction algorithms, correction methods, object size and location within the FOV had a strong influence on the PVE in all configurations. All evaluated parameters potentially influence the quantification accuracy. Hence, all protocols should be kept constant during a study to allow a comparison between different scans.

  1. Geometric calibration between PET scanner and structured light scanner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjer, Hans Martin; Olesen, Oline Vinter; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold

    2011-01-01

    Head movements degrade the image quality of high resolution Positron Emission Tomography (PET) brain studies through blurring and artifacts. Manny image reconstruction methods allows for motion correction if the head position is tracked continuously during the study. Our method for motion tracking...

  2. Design and performance of HEAD PENN-PET scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freifelder, R.; Karp, J.S. (Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Radiology); Geagan, M.; Muehllehner, G. (UGM Medical Systems Inc., Philadelphia, PA (United States))

    1994-08-01

    A new PET scanner for brain imaging (and animals) has been designed with very high sensitivity and spatial resolution. The design is an evolution of the PENN-PET scanner, which uses large position-sensitive NaI(Tl) detectors, with Anger-type positioning logic, and which allows 3-D volume imaging, without septa. The new design is built with a single annular crystal coupled to 180 photomultiplier tubes, and uses local triggering electronics to subdivide the detector into small zones and to determine coincident events within the detector. The axial acceptance angle of [+-] 27 deg, with a field-of-view of 25.6 cm, is larger than any currently operating PET scanner. Performance measurements are presented.

  3. Development of a high resolution module for PET scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringhini, G.; Pizzichemi, M.; Ghezzi, A.; Stojkovic, A.; Tavernier, S.; Niknejad, T.; Varela, J.; Paganoni, M.; Auffray, E.

    2017-02-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanners require high performances in term of spatial resolution and sensitivity to allow early detection of cancer masses. In small animal and organ dedicated PET scanners the Depth of Interaction (DOI) information has to be obtained to avoid parallax errors and to reconstruct high resolution images. In the whole body PET, the DOI information can be useful to correct for the time jitter of the optical photons along the main axis of the scintillator, improving the time performances. In this work we present the development of PET module designed to reach high performance as compared to the current scanners while keeping the complexity of the system reasonably low. The module presented is based on a 64 LYSO (Lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate) crystals matrix and on a 4×4 MPPC (Multi Pixels Photon Counter) array as detector in a 4 to 1 coupling between the crystals and the detector and a single side readout. The lateral surfaces of the crystals are optically treated to be unpolished. The DOI and the energy resolution of the PET module are presented and a fast method to obtain the DOI calibration is discussed.

  4. Scatter fraction of the J-PET tomography scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Kowalski, P; Raczyński, L; Alfs, D; Bednarski, T; Białas, P; Czerwiński, E; Gajos, A; Głowacz, B; Jasińska, J; Kamińska, D; Korcyl, G; Kozik, T; Krzemień, W; Kubicz, E; Mohammad, M; Niedźwiecki, Sz; Pałka, M; Pawlik-Niedźwiecka, M; Rudy, Z; Silarski, M; Smyrski, J; Strzelecki, A; Wieczorek, A; Zgardzińska, B; Zieliński, M; Moskal, P

    2016-01-01

    A novel Positron Emission Tomography system, based on plastic scintillators, is being developed by the J-PET collaboration. In this article we present the simulation results of the scatter fraction, representing one of the parameters crucial for background studies defined in the NEMA-NU-2-2012 norm. We elaborate an event selection methods allowing to suppress events in which gamma quanta were scattered in the phantom or underwent the multiple scattering in the detector. The estimated scatter fraction for the single-layer J-PET scanner varies from 37% to 53% depending on the applied energy threshold.

  5. Performance evaluation of a high resolution dedicated breast PET scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García Hernández, Trinitat, E-mail: mtrinitat@eresa.com; Vicedo González, Aurora; Brualla González, Luis; Granero Cabañero, Domingo [Department of Medical Physics, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, Valencia 46014 (Spain); Ferrer Rebolleda, Jose; Sánchez Jurado, Raúl; Puig Cozar Santiago, Maria del [Department of Nuclear Medicine, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, Valencia 46014 (Spain); Roselló Ferrando, Joan [Department of Medical Physics, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, Valencia 46014 (Spain); Department of Physiology, University of Valencia, Valencia 46010 (Spain)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: Early stage breast cancers may not be visible on a whole-body PET scan. To overcome whole-body PET limitations, several dedicated breast positron emission tomography (DbPET) systems have emerged nowadays aiming to improve spatial resolution. In this work the authors evaluate the performance of a high resolution dedicated breast PET scanner (Mammi-PET, Oncovision). Methods: Global status, uniformity, sensitivity, energy, and spatial resolution were measured. Spheres of different sizes (2.5, 4, 5, and 6 mm diameter) and various 18 fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) activity concentrations were randomly inserted in a gelatine breast phantom developed at our institution. Several lesion-to-background ratios (LBR) were simulated, 5:1, 10:1, 20:1, 30:1, and 50:1. Images were reconstructed using different voxel sizes. The ability of experienced reporters to detect spheres was tested as a function of acquisition time, LBR, sphere size, and matrix reconstruction voxel size. For comparison, phantoms were scanned in the DbPET camera and in a whole body PET (WB-PET). Two patients who just underwent WB-PET/CT exams were imaged with the DbPET system and the images were compared. Results: The measured absolute peak sensitivity was 2.0%. The energy resolution was 24.0% ± 1%. The integral and differential uniformity were 10% and 6% in the total field of view (FOV) and 9% and 5% in the central FOV, respectively. The measured spatial resolution was 2.0, 1.9, and 1.7 mm in the radial, tangential, and axial directions. The system exhibited very good detectability for spheres ≥4 mm and LBR ≥10 with a sphere detection of 100% when acquisition time was set >3 min/bed. For LBR = 5 and acquisition time of 7 min the detectability was 100% for spheres of 6 mm and 75% for spheres of 5, 4, and 2.5 mm. Lesion WB-PET detectability was only comparable to the DbPET camera for lesion sizes ≥5 mm when acquisition time was >3 min and LBR > 10. Conclusions: The DbPET has a good

  6. Development of a PET Scanner for Simultaneously Imaging Small Animals with MRI and PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Thompson

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently, positron emission tomography (PET is playing an increasingly important role in the diagnosis and staging of cancer. Combined PET and X-ray computed tomography (PET-CT scanners are now the modality of choice in cancer treatment planning. More recently, the combination of PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is being explored in many sites. Combining PET and MRI has presented many challenges since the photo-multiplier tubes (PMT in PET do not function in high magnetic fields, and conventional PET detectors distort MRI images. Solid state light sensors like avalanche photo-diodes (APDs and more recently silicon photo-multipliers (SiPMs are much less sensitive to magnetic fields thus easing the compatibility issues. This paper presents the results of a group of Canadian scientists who are developing a PET detector ring which fits inside a high field small animal MRI scanner with the goal of providing simultaneous PET and MRI images of small rodents used in pre-clinical medical research. We discuss the evolution of both the crystal blocks (which detect annihilation photons from positron decay and the SiPM array performance in the last four years which together combine to deliver significant system performance in terms of speed, energy and timing resolution.

  7. Detector characterization for an inline PET scanner in hadrontherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taverne, Marina [IPNL, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69100 Villeurbanne (France); Boutemeur, Madjid [IPNL, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69100 Villeurbanne (France); Buthod, Anthony [IPNL, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69100 Villeurbanne (France); Guigues, Laurent [CREATIS, INSA Lyon, avenue Albert Einstein, 69100 Villeurbanne (France); Henriquet, Pierre [IPNL, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69100 Villeurbanne (France); Lollierou, Julien [IPNL, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69100 Villeurbanne (France); Ricol, Marie-Charlotte [IPNL, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69100 Villeurbanne (France); Rosset-Lanchet, Remi [IPNL, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69100 Villeurbanne (France); Roubin, Mathieu [IPNL, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69100 Villeurbanne (France); Saidi, Reda [IPNL, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69100 Villeurbanne (France); Sappey-Marinier, Dominique [CREATIS, INSA Lyon, avenue Albert Einstein, 69100 Villeurbanne (France); Testa, Etienne [IPNL, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69100 Villeurbanne (France)]. E-mail: taverne@ipnl.in2p3.fr

    2007-02-01

    Our group at the 'Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon' (IPNL) is working on physics and detectors for medical imaging. We are presently developing a small animal Positron Emission Tomograph (PET) scanner prototype with an innovative slow control and data acquisition features, for a demonstration purpose and within the crystal clear international collaboration. We also investigate a feasibility study of an online PET dedicated for inline and in situ dose deposition control in hadrontherapy. Here, we present the characterization setup and method we used to calibrate the detector heads of our PET prototype. Each of these heads consists of a single block continuous scintillating LySO crystal coupled to a multi-anode photomultiplier equipped with its proper acquisition readout chain.

  8. Improved spatial resolution in PET scanners using sampling techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surti, Suleman; Scheuermann, Ryan; Werner, Matthew E.; Karp, Joel S.

    2009-01-01

    Increased focus towards improved detector spatial resolution in PET has led to the use of smaller crystals in some form of light sharing detector design. In this work we evaluate two sampling techniques that can be applied during calibrations for pixelated detector designs in order to improve the reconstructed spatial resolution. The inter-crystal positioning technique utilizes sub-sampling in the crystal flood map to better sample the Compton scatter events in the detector. The Compton scatter rejection technique, on the other hand, rejects those events that are located further from individual crystal centers in the flood map. We performed Monte Carlo simulations followed by measurements on two whole-body scanners for point source data. The simulations and measurements were performed for scanners using scintillators with Zeff ranging from 46.9 to 63 for LaBr3 and LYSO, respectively. Our results show that near the center of the scanner, inter-crystal positioning technique leads to a gain of about 0.5-mm in reconstructed spatial resolution (FWHM) for both scanner designs. In a small animal LYSO scanner the resolution improves from 1.9-mm to 1.6-mm with the inter-crystal technique. The Compton scatter rejection technique shows higher gains in spatial resolution but at the cost of reduction in scanner sensitivity. The inter-crystal positioning technique represents a modest acquisition software modification for an improvement in spatial resolution, but at a cost of potentially longer data correction and reconstruction times. The Compton scatter rejection technique, while also requiring a modest acquisition software change with no increased data correction and reconstruction times, will be useful in applications where the scanner sensitivity is very high and larger improvements in spatial resolution are desirable. PMID:19779586

  9. Detective quantum efficiency (DQE) in PET scanners: A simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpetas, George E; Michail, Christos M; Fountos, George P; Kalyvas, Nektarios I; Valais, Ioannis G; Kandarakis, Ioannis S; Panayiotakis, George S

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the present study is to introduce the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) for the image quality assessment of positron emission tomography (PET) scanners. For this purpose, a thin layer chromatography (TLC) plane source was simulated using a previously validated, scanner and source geometry, Monte Carlo (MC) model. The model was developed with the Geant4 application for tomographic emission (GATE) MC package and reconstructed images obtained with the software for tomographic image reconstruction (STIR), with cluster computing. The GE Discovery ST PET scanner was simulated by using a previously validated code. A plane source consisting of a TLC plate, was simulated by a layer of silica gel on aluminum (Al) foil substrate, immersed in 18F-FDG bath solution (1MBq). Image quality was assessed in terms of the modulation transfer function (MTF) and the normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS) in order to obtain the detective quantum efficiency (DQE). MTF curves were estimated from transverse reconstructed images of the plane source, whereas the NNPS data were estimated from the corresponding coronal images. Images were reconstructed by the maximum likelihood estimation ordered subsets maximum a posteriori one step late (MLE)-OS-MAP-OSL algorithm, by using various subsets 1-21) and iterations 1-20). MTF values were found to increase up to the 12th iteration whereas remain almost constant thereafter. However, the range of the increase in the MTF is limited as the number of subsets increases. The noise levels were found to increase with the corresponding increase of both the number of iterations and subsets. The maximum NNPS value (0.517mm(2)) was observed for the 420 MLEM-equivalent iterations reconstructed image at 0cycles/mm. Finally DQE values were found to increase for spatial frequencies up to 0.038cycles/mm and to decrease thereafter with the corresponding increase in both number of iterations and subsets. The maximum DQE value (0.48 at 0.038cycles/mm) was

  10. Monte Carlo simulation of sensitivity and NECR of an entire-body PET scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isnaini, Ismet; Obi, Takashi; Yoshida, Eiji; Yamaya, Taiga

    2014-07-01

    The current positron emission tomography (PET) design is aimed toward establishing an entire-body PET scanner. An entire-body PET scanner is a scanner whose axial field of view (FOV) covers the whole body of a patient, whereas whole-body PET scanner can be of any axial FOV length, but was designed for a whole-body scan. Despite its high production cost, an entire-body depth-of-interaction PET scanner offers many benefits, such as shorter and dynamic PET time acquisition, as well as higher sensitivity and count rate performance. This PET scanner may be cost-effective for clinical PET scanners with high scan throughput. In this work, we evaluated the sensitivity and count rate performance of a 2-m-long PET scanner with conventional data acquisition (DAQ) architecture, using Monte Carlo simulation, and we evaluated two ring diameters (60 and 80 cm) to reduce the scanner cost. From simulation of scanning with a 2-m axial FOV, the sensitivity for a 2-m-long PET scanner of 60 and 80-cm diameter is around 80 and 68 times higher, respectively, than that of the conventional PET scanner. In addition, for the 2-m-long PET scanner with 60-cm diameter, the peak noise equivalent count rate (NECR) was 843 kcps at 125 MBq, whereas the peak for the 80-cm diameter was 989 kcps at 200 MBq. This shows gains of 15.3 and 17.95, respectively, in comparison with that of the conventional PET scanner. The 2-m-long PET scanner with 60-cm ring diameter could not only reduce the number of detectors by 21 %, but also had a 17 % higher sensitivity compared to that with an 80-cm ring diameter. On the other hand, despite the higher sensitivity, the NECR of the 60-cm ring diameter was smaller than that of the 80-cm ring diameter. This results from the single data loss due to dead time, whereas grouping of axially stacked detectors was used in the conventional DAQ architecture. Parallelization of the DAQ architecture is therefore important for the 2-m-long PET scanner to achieve its optimal

  11. Performance evaluation of the microPET R4 PET scanner for rodents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoess, Christof; Richerzhagen, Norbert; Graf, Rudolf; Wienhard, Klaus [Max-Planck-Institute for Neurological Research, Gleuelerstrasse 50, 50931 Cologne (Germany); Siegel, Stefan; Smith, Anne; Newport, Danny; Goble, Rhonda N. [Concorde Microsystems Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States); Winkeler, Alexandra [Max-Planck-Institute for Neurological Research, Gleuelerstrasse 50, 50931 Cologne (Germany); Center of Molecular Medicine, Cologne (Germany); Jacobs, Andreas; Heiss, Wolf-Dieter [Max-Planck-Institute for Neurological Research, Gleuelerstrasse 50, 50931 Cologne (Germany); Center of Molecular Medicine, Cologne (Germany); Department of Neurology at the University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany)

    2003-05-01

    The microPET R4 scanner is a dedicated positron emission tomograph (PET) for studies of rodents. A number of scanner parameters such as spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter, and count rate performance were determined in this work, which showed that the microPET R4 is a suitable PET scanner for small animals like mice and rats. In the center of the field of view (FOV) a maximal sensitivity of 43.66 cps/kBq for a centered point source was calculated from a measurement with a germanium-68 line source within an energy widow of 250-750 keV. A spatial resolution of 1.85 mm full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) in the axial direction and 1.66 mm FWHM in the transaxial direction was measured in the center with a 1-mm-diameter sodium-22 point source. Within the inner 20 mm of the FOV the volumetric resolution is better than 15.6 {mu}l, corresponding to a linear resolution of less than 2.5 mm in all three dimensions. Images of a high-resolution phantom and from mice and rat studies illustrate the good performance of the scanner. A maximal noise equivalent count rate (NECR) was reached at 174 kcps for a mouse phantom and at 93 kcps for a rat phantom (energy window 250-750 keV). Scatter fractions were measured between 0.30 and 0.42 for an energy window of 250-750 keV and phantom diameters similar to mice and rats. A comparison with the microPET P4 model for primates illustrates the gain in sensitivity due to a smaller detector ring diameter but also the changes in NECR. (orig.)

  12. Efficient system modeling for a small animal PET scanner with tapered DOI detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mengxi; Zhou, Jian; Yang, Yongfeng; Rodríguez-Villafuerte, Mercedes; Qi, Jinyi

    2016-01-21

    A prototype small animal positron emission tomography (PET) scanner for mouse brain imaging has been developed at UC Davis. The new scanner uses tapered detector arrays with depth of interaction (DOI) measurement. In this paper, we present an efficient system model for the tapered PET scanner using matrix factorization and a virtual scanner geometry. The factored system matrix mainly consists of two components: a sinogram blurring matrix and a geometrical matrix. The geometric matrix is based on a virtual scanner geometry. The sinogram blurring matrix is estimated by matrix factorization. We investigate the performance of different virtual scanner geometries. Both simulation study and real data experiments are performed in the fully 3D mode to study the image quality under different system models. The results indicate that the proposed matrix factorization can maintain image quality while substantially reduce the image reconstruction time and system matrix storage cost. The proposed method can be also applied to other PET scanners with DOI measurement.

  13. A study of artefacts in simultaneous PET and MR imaging using a prototype MR compatible PET scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slates, R B; Farahani, K; Shao, Y; Marsden, P K; Taylor, J; Summers, P E; Williams, S; Beech, J; Cherry, S R

    1999-08-01

    We have assessed the possibility of artefacts that can arise in attempting to perform simultaneous positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a small prototype MR compatible PET scanner (McPET). In these experiments, we examine MR images for any major artefacts or loss in image quality due to inhomogeneities in the magnetic field, radiofrequency interference or susceptibility effects caused by operation of the PET system inside the MR scanner. In addition, possible artefacts in the PET images caused by the static and time-varying magnetic fields or radiofrequency interference from the MR system were investigated. Biological tissue and a T2-weighted spin echo sequence were used to examine susceptibility artefacts due to components of the McPET scanner (scintillator, optical fibres) situated in the MR field of view. A range of commonly used MR pulse sequences was studied while acquiring PET data to look for possible artefacts in either the PET or MR images. Other than a small loss in signal-to-noise using gradient echo sequences, there was no significant interaction between the two imaging systems. Simultaneous PET and MR imaging of simple phantoms was also carried out in different MR systems with field strengths ranging from 0.2 to 4.7 T. The results of these studies demonstrate that it is possible to acquire PET and MR images simultaneously, without any significant artefacts or loss in image quality, using our prototype MR compatible PET scanner.

  14. STRIP-PET: a novel detector concept for the TOF-PET scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Moskal, P; Białas, P; Ciszewska, M; Czerwiński, E; Heczko, A; Kajetanowicz, M; Kapłon, Ł; Kochanowski, A; Konopka-Cupiał, G; Korcyl, G; Krzemień, W; Łojek, K; Majewski, J; Migdał, W; Molenda, M; Niedźwiecki, Sz; Pałka, M; Rudy, Z; Salabura, P; Silarski, M; Słomski, A; Smyrski, J; Zdebik, J; Zieliński, M

    2013-01-01

    We briefly present a design of a new PET scanner based on strips of polymer scintillators arranged in a barrel constituting a large acceptance detector. The solution proposed is based on the superior timing properties of the polymer scintillators. The position and time of the reaction of the gamma quanta in the detector material will be determined based on the time of arrival of light signals to the edges of the scintillator strips.

  15. Hybrid approach for attenuation correction in PET/MR scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos Ribeiro, A., E-mail: afribeiro@fc.ul.pt [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Sciences, University of Lisbon, Lisbon (Portugal); Rota Kops, E.; Herzog, H. [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany); Almeida, P. [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Sciences, University of Lisbon, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2014-01-11

    Aim: Attenuation correction (AC) of PET images is still one of the major limitations of hybrid PET/MR scanners. Different methods have been proposed to obtain the AC map from morphological MR images. Although, segmentation methods normally fail to differentiate air and bone regions, while template or atlas methods usually cannot accurately represent regions anatomically different from the template image. In this study a feed forward neural network (FFNN) algorithm is presented which directly outputs the attenuation coefficients by non-linear regression of the images acquired with an ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequence guided by the template-based AC map (TAC-map). Materials and methods: MR as well as CT data were acquired in four subjects. The UTE images and the TAC-map were the inputs of the presented FFNN algorithm for training as well as classification. The resulting attenuation maps were compared with CT-based, PNN-based and TAC maps. All the AC maps were used to reconstruct the PET emission data which were then compared for the different methods. Results: For each subject dice coefficients D were calculated between each method and the respective CT-based AC maps. The resulting Ds show higher values for all FFNN-based tissues comparatively to both TAC-based and PNN-based methods, particularly for bone tissue (D=0.77, D=0.51 and D=0.71, respectively). The AC-corrected PET images with the FFNN-based map show an overall lower relative difference (RD=3.90%) than those AC-corrected with the PNN-based (RD=4.44%) or template-based (RD=4.43%) methods. Conclusion: Our results show that an enhancement of current methods can be performed by combining both information of new MR image sequence techniques and general information provided from template techniques. Nevertheless, the number of tested subjects is statistically low and current analysis for a larger dataset is being carried out.

  16. Monte Carlo modeling of a clinical PET scanner by using the GATE dedicated computer code; Modelagem Monte Carlo de um PET Scanner clinico utilizando o codigo dedicado GATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Igor Fagner; Lima, Fernando Roberto de Andrade, E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.b [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear; Universidade de Pernambuco (UPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Escola Politecnica; Vieira, Jose Wilson [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear; Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2011-10-26

    This paper demonstrates more possible detailed the GATE simulated architecture involved in the 4D modeling of a General Electric PET scanner, the Advance. So, it were used data present in the literature on the configuration of GE modelled PET. The obtained results which were the 3D components of PET creation, and the simulation of 4D phenomena as the source decay and the gantry whirl, exhibit the potential of tool in emission tomograph modelling

  17. Data Acquisition and Image Reconstruction Systems from the miniPET Scanners to the CARDIOTOM Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valastván, I.; Imrek, J.; Hegyesi, G.; Molnár, J.; Novák, D.; Bone, D.; Kerek, A.

    2007-11-01

    Nuclear imaging devices play an important role in medical diagnosis as well as drug research. The first and second generation data acquisition systems and the image reconstruction library developed provide a unified hardware and software platform for the miniPET-I, miniPET-II small animal PET scanners and for the CARDIOTOM™.

  18. Study of PET scanner designs using clinical metrics to optimize the scanner axial FOV and crystal thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surti, S.; Werner, M. E.; Karp, J. S.

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study is to understand the trade-off between crystal thickness and scanner axial field-of-view FOV (AFOV) for clinical PET imaging. Clinical scanner design has evolved towards 20-25 mm thick crystals and 16-22 cm long scanner AFOV, as well as time-of-flight (TOF) imaging. While Monte Carlo studies demonstrate that longer AFOV and thicker crystals will lead to higher scanner sensitivity, cost has prohibited the building of commercial scanners with >22 cm AFOV. In this study, we performed a series of system simulations to optimize the use of a given amount of crystal material by evaluating the impact on system sensitivity and noise equivalent counts (NEC), as well as image quality in terms of lesion detectability. We evaluated two crystal types (LSO and LaBr3) and fixed the total crystal volume used for each type (8.2 L of LSO and 17.1 L of LaBr3) while varying the crystal thickness and scanner AFOV. In addition, all imaging times were normalized so that the total scan time needed to scan a 100 cm long object with multiple bed positions was kept constant. Our results show that the highest NEC cm-1 in a 35 cm diameter ×70 cm long line source cylinder is achieved for an LSO scanner with 10 mm long crystals and AFOV of 36 cm, while for LaBr3 scanners, the highest NEC cm-1 is obtained with 20 mm long crystals and an AFOV of 38 cm. Lesion phantom simulations show that the best lesion detection performance is achieved in scanners with long AFOV (≥36 cm) and using thin crystals (≤10 mm of LSO and ≤20 mm of LaBr3). This is due to a combination of improved NEC, as well as improved lesion contrast estimation due to better spatial resolution in thinner crystals. Alternatively, for lesion detection performance similar to that achieved in standard clinical scanner designs, the long AFOV scanners can be used to reduce the total scan time without increasing the amount of crystal used in the scanner. In addition, for LaBr3 based scanners, the reduced lesion

  19. A Movable Phantom Design for Quantitative Evaluation of Motion Correction Studies on High Resolution PET Scanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Svarer, C.; Sibomana, M.;

    2010-01-01

    Head movements during brain imaging using high resolution positron emission tomography (PET) impair the image quality which, along with the improvement of the spatial resolution of PET scanners, in general, raises the importance of motion correction. Here, we present a new design for an automatic...

  20. Initial results of simultaneous PET/MRI experiments with an MRI-compatible silicon photomultiplier PET scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyun Suk; Ko, Guen Bae; Kwon, Sun Il; Lee, Chan Mi; Ito, Mikiko; Chan Song, In; Lee, Dong Soo; Hong, Seong Jong; Lee, Jae Sung

    2012-04-01

    The most investigated semiconductor photosensor for MRI-compatible PET detectors is the avalanche photodiode (APD). However, the silicon photomultiplier (SiPM), also called the Geiger-mode APD, is gaining attention in the development of the next generation of PET/MRI systems because the SiPM has much better performance than the APD. We have developed an MRI-compatible PET system based on multichannel SiPM arrays to allow simultaneous PET/MRI. The SiPM PET scanner consists of 12 detector modules with a ring diameter of 13.6 cm and an axial extent of 3.2 cm. In each detector module, 4 multichannel SiPM arrays (with 4 × 4 channels arranged in a 2 × 2 array to yield 8 × 8 channels) were coupled with 20 × 18 Lu(1.9)Gd(0.1)SiO(5):Ce crystals (each crystal is 1.5 × 1.5 × 7 mm) and mounted on a charge division network for multiplexing 64 signals into 4 position signals. Each detector module was enclosed in a shielding box to reduce interference between the PET and MRI scanners, and the temperature inside the box was monitored for correction of the temperature-dependent gain variation of the SiPM. The PET detector signal was routed to the outside of the MRI room and processed with a field programmable gate array-based data acquisition system. MRI compatibility tests and simultaneous PET/MRI acquisitions were performed inside a 3-T clinical MRI system with 4-cm loop receiver coils that were built into the SiPM PET scanner. Interference between the imaging systems was investigated, and phantom and mouse experiments were performed. No radiofrequency interference on the PET signal or degradation in the energy spectrum and flood map was shown during simultaneous PET/MRI. The quality of the MRI scans acquired with and without the operating PET showed only slight degradation. The results of phantom and mouse experiments confirmed the feasibility of this system for simultaneous PET/MRI. Simultaneous PET/MRI was possible with a multichannel SiPM-based PET scanner, with no

  1. Performance analysis of a low-cost small animal PET/SPECT scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerra, Pedro [B104 ETS de Telecomuniacion, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: pguerra@die.upm.es; Rubio, Jose L. [B104 ETS de Telecomuniacion, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Ortuno, Juan E. [B104 ETS de Telecomuniacion, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Kontaxakis, Georgios [B104 ETS de Telecomuniacion, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Ledesma, Maria J. [B104 ETS de Telecomuniacion, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Santos, Andres [B104 ETS de Telecomuniacion, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2007-02-01

    In this work the performance of novel small animal positron/single-photon emission (PET/SPECT) scanner is estimated via Monte Carlo simulation, considering a YAP/LSO phoswich detector. To overcome the differences between PET and SPECT and in order to simplify the design, the system implements most signal processing digitally with programmable devices. The estimated performance of the described setup, expressed in terms of spatial image resolution and sensitivity, is 1.4 mm/0.6% for PET and 2.5 mm/0.025% for SPECT, figures that are comparable with state of the art dedicated scanners.

  2. An investigation of sensitivity limits in PET scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, L.; Townsend, D.; Conti, M.; Eriksson, M.; Rothfuss, H.; Schmand, M.; Casey, M. E.; Bendriem, B.

    2007-10-01

    Current systems for positron emission tomography (PET) generally cover a small solid angle which implies low sensitivity and therefore patient studies are relatively lengthy with acquisition comprising multiple bed positions. For cylindrical geometry, the axial field-of-view (FOV) may be increased by incorporating additional rings of block detectors in order to increase the solid angle coverage and hence the overall sensitivity. In this study we have taken that approach to the limit and studied an ultimate configuration with an axial extent up to 1 m or more. We have estimated the point source sensitivity and the absolute sensitivity (NEMA NU-2 2001). These sensitivity values can then be converted into count rates, for a particular phantom. A system comprising three rings of blocks based on the HIREZ block detector (Siemens Molecular Imaging) with 48 blocks/ring is taken as the starting point. Additional rings of blocks are then added. The diameter of the system for this study is 85.5 cm and the axial extent ranged from 16.4 cm, that of the current HIREZ system, up to over 3 m in order to obtain data points with a solid angle close to 4 π. In all calculations, the detectors were assumed to be lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) with a crystal thickness of 2 cm. The calculated count rate values are based on actual experimental data from the Siemens HIREZ scanner and then scaled based on the ratio of the calculated absolute sensitivity to the measured HIREZ absolute sensitivity. The point source sensitivity is given by the solid angle, the square of the crystal sensitivity and the square of the detector packing fraction. The point source sensitivity as a function of the axial extent shows an exponential increase reaching a limiting value as the solid angle approaches 4 π. A system with 100 cm axial extent has a solid angle of ˜75% of 4 π.

  3. Performance evaluation of a LYSO-based PET scanner for monitoring of dose delivery in hadrontherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbiani, E.; Belcari, N.; Camarlinghi, N.; Del Guerra, A.; Ferretti, S.; Kraan, A.; Panetta, D.; Sportelli, G.; Rosso, V.

    2015-12-01

    The DoPET scanner is a compact positron emission tomography (PET) device. It has been developed for monitoring the range of charged particles during therapy with hadron beams. Previous works have focused on the development and upgrade of the device and on data analysis. In this paper, a full performance characterization of the DoPET system in terms of the energy resolution, spatial resolution, sensitivity, uniformity, and noise equivalent count rate is reported. All measurements refer to an adapted version of the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) NU 4 - 2008 protocol, which was written originally for small animal PET systems. Since DoPET is a dual head planar system, it requires a modified characterisation procedure with respect to those described for ring geometries as in the NEMA NU 4 - 2008 protocol. The presented procedure may be of interest for any other PET system with a similar geometry as DoPET.

  4. Processing optimization with parallel computing for the J-PET tomography scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Krzemień, W; Bednarski, T; Białas, P; Czerwiński, E; Gajos, A; Gorgol, M; Jasińska, B; Kamińska, D; Kapłon, Ł; Korcyl, G; Kowalski, P; Kozik, T; Kubicz, E; Niedźwiecki, Sz; Pałka, M; Raczyński, L; Rudy, Z; Rundel, O; Sharma, N G; Silarski, M; Słomski, A; Stola, K; Strzelecki, A; Trybek, D; Wieczorek, Anna; Wiślicki, W; Zieliński, M; Zgardzińska, B K; Moskal, P

    2015-01-01

    The Jagiellonian-PET (J-PET) collaboration is developing a prototype TOF-PET detector based on long polymer scintillators. This novel approach exploits the excellent time properties of the plastic scintillators, which permit very precise time measurements. The very fast, FPGA-based front-end electronics and the data acquisition system, as well as, low- and high-level reconstruction algorithms were specially developed to be used with the J-PET scanner. The TOF-PET data processing and reconstruction are time and resource demanding operations, especially in case of a large acceptance detector, which works in triggerless data acquisition mode. In this article, we discuss the parallel computing methods applied to optimize the data processing for the J-PET detector. We begin with general concepts of parallel computing and then we discuss several applications of those techniques in the J-PET data processing.

  5. Effects of injected dose, BMI and scanner type on NECR and image noise in PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tingting; Chang, Guoping; Kohlmyer, Steve; Clark, John W; Rohren, Eric; Mawlawi, Osama R

    2011-08-21

    Noise equivalent count rate (NECR) and image noise are two different but related metrics that have been used to predict and assess image quality, respectively. The aim of this study is to investigate, using patient studies, the relationships between injected dose (ID), body mass index (BMI) and scanner type on NECR and image noise measurements in PET imaging. Two groups of 90 patients each were imaged on a GE DSTE and a DRX PET/CT scanner, respectively. The patients in each group were divided into nine subgroups according to three BMI (20-24.9, 25-29.9, 30-45 kg m(-2)) and three ID (296-444, 444-555, 555-740 MBq) ranges, resulting in ten patients/subgroup. All PET data were acquired in 3D mode and reconstructed using the VuePoint HD® fully 3D OSEM algorithm (2 iterations, 21(DRX) or 20 (DSTE) subsets). NECR and image noise measurements for bed positions covering the liver were calculated for each patient. NECR was calculated from the trues, randoms and scatter events recorded in the DICOM header of each patient study, while image noise was determined as the standard deviation of 50 non-neighboring voxels in the liver of each patient. A t-test compared the NECR and image noise for different scanners but with the same BMI and ID. An ANOVA test on the other hand was used to compare the results of patients with different BMI but the same ID and scanner type as well as different ID but the same BMI and scanner type. As expected the t-test showed a significant difference in NECR between the two scanners for all BMI and ID subgroups. However, contrary to what is expected no such findings were observed for image noise measurement. The ANOVA results showed a statistically significant difference in both NECR and image noise among the different BMI for each ID and scanner subgroup. However, there was no statistically significant difference in NECR and image noise across different ID for each BMI and scanner subgroup. Although the GE DRX PET/CT scanner has better count rate

  6. Effects of injected dose, BMI and scanner type on NECR and image noise in PET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tingting; Chang, Guoping; Kohlmyer, Steve; Clark, John W., Jr.; Rohren, Eric; Mawlawi, Osama R.

    2011-08-01

    Noise equivalent count rate (NECR) and image noise are two different but related metrics that have been used to predict and assess image quality, respectively. The aim of this study is to investigate, using patient studies, the relationships between injected dose (ID), body mass index (BMI) and scanner type on NECR and image noise measurements in PET imaging. Two groups of 90 patients each were imaged on a GE DSTE and a DRX PET/CT scanner, respectively. The patients in each group were divided into nine subgroups according to three BMI (20-24.9, 25-29.9, 30-45 kg m-2) and three ID (296-444, 444-555, 555-740 MBq) ranges, resulting in ten patients/subgroup. All PET data were acquired in 3D mode and reconstructed using the VuePoint HD® fully 3D OSEM algorithm (2 iterations, 21(DRX) or 20 (DSTE) subsets). NECR and image noise measurements for bed positions covering the liver were calculated for each patient. NECR was calculated from the trues, randoms and scatter events recorded in the DICOM header of each patient study, while image noise was determined as the standard deviation of 50 non-neighboring voxels in the liver of each patient. A t-test compared the NECR and image noise for different scanners but with the same BMI and ID. An ANOVA test on the other hand was used to compare the results of patients with different BMI but the same ID and scanner type as well as different ID but the same BMI and scanner type. As expected the t-test showed a significant difference in NECR between the two scanners for all BMI and ID subgroups. However, contrary to what is expected no such findings were observed for image noise measurement. The ANOVA results showed a statistically significant difference in both NECR and image noise among the different BMI for each ID and scanner subgroup. However, there was no statistically significant difference in NECR and image noise across different ID for each BMI and scanner subgroup. Although the GE DRX PET/CT scanner has better count rate

  7. A feasibility study of ortho-positronium decays measurement with the J-PET scanner based on plastic scintillators

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kamińska, D; Gajos, A; Czerwiński, E; Alfs, D; Bednarski, T; Białas, P; Curceanu, C; Dulski, K; Głowacz, B; Gupta-Sharma, N; Gorgol, M; Hiesmayr, B C; Jasińska, B; Korcyl, G; Kowalski, P; Krzemień, W; Krawczyk, N; Kubicz, E; Mohammed, M; Niedźwiecki, Sz; Pawlik-Niedźwiecka, M; Raczyński, L; Rudy, Z; Silarski, M; Wieczorek, A; Wiślicki, W; Zgardzińska, B; Zieliński, M; Moskal, P

    2016-01-01

    ...) for the registration of gamma quanta from decays of ortho-positronium (o-Ps). The J-PET is the first positron emission tomography scanner based on organic scintillators in contrast to all current PET scanners based on inorganic crystals...

  8. Design considerations for a limited angle, dedicated breast, TOF PET scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surti, S; Karp, J S [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)], E-mail: surti@mail.med.upenn.edu, E-mail: joelkarp@mail.med.upenn.edu

    2008-06-07

    Development of partial ring, dedicated breast positron emission tomography (PET) scanners is an active area of research. Due to the limited angular coverage, generation of distortion and artifact-free, fully 3D tomographic images is not possible without rotation of the detectors. With time-of-flight (TOF) information, it is possible to achieve the 3D tomographic images with limited angular coverage and without detector rotation. We performed simulations for a breast scanner design with a ring diameter and an axial length of 15 cm and comprising a full (180{sup 0} in-plane angular coverage), 2/3 (120{sup 0} in-plane angular coverage) or 1/2 (90{sup 0} in-plane angular coverage) ring detector. Our results show that as the angular coverage decreases, improved timing resolution is needed to achieve distortion-free and artifact-free images with TOF. The contrast recovery coefficient (CRC) value for small hot lesions in a partial ring scanner is similar to a full ring non-TOF scanner. Our results indicate that a timing resolution of 600 ps is needed for a 2/3 ring scanner, while a timing resolution of 300 ps is needed for a 1/2 ring scanner. We also analyzed the ratio of lesion CRC to the background pixel noise (SNR) and concluded that TOF improves the SNR values of the partial ring scanner, and helps to compensate for the loss in sensitivity due to reduced geometric sensitivity in a limited angle coverage PET scanner. In particular, it is possible to maintain similar SNR characteristic in a 2/3 ring scanner with a timing resolution of 300 ps as in a full ring non-TOF scanner.

  9. Design considerations for a limited angle, dedicated breast, TOF PET scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surti, S.; Karp, J. S.

    2008-06-01

    Development of partial ring, dedicated breast positron emission tomography (PET) scanners is an active area of research. Due to the limited angular coverage, generation of distortion and artifact-free, fully 3D tomographic images is not possible without rotation of the detectors. With time-of-flight (TOF) information, it is possible to achieve the 3D tomographic images with limited angular coverage and without detector rotation. We performed simulations for a breast scanner design with a ring diameter and an axial length of 15 cm and comprising a full (180° in-plane angular coverage), 2/3 (120° in-plane angular coverage) or 1/2 (90° in-plane angular coverage) ring detector. Our results show that as the angular coverage decreases, improved timing resolution is needed to achieve distortion-free and artifact-free images with TOF. The contrast recovery coefficient (CRC) value for small hot lesions in a partial ring scanner is similar to a full ring non-TOF scanner. Our results indicate that a timing resolution of 600 ps is needed for a 2/3 ring scanner, while a timing resolution of 300 ps is needed for a 1/2 ring scanner. We also analyzed the ratio of lesion CRC to the background pixel noise (SNR) and concluded that TOF improves the SNR values of the partial ring scanner, and helps to compensate for the loss in sensitivity due to reduced geometric sensitivity in a limited angle coverage PET scanner. In particular, it is possible to maintain similar SNR characteristic in a 2/3 ring scanner with a timing resolution of 300 ps as in a full ring non-TOF scanner.

  10. VrPET/CT: development of a rotating multimodality scanner for small-animal imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Lage, Eduardo; Vaquero, Juan José; Sisniega, Alejandro; España, Manuel; Tapias, Gustavo; Udías, Ángel; García,Verónica; Rodríguez-Ruano, Alexia; Desco, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    Proceeding of: 2008 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium Conference Record (NSS '08), Dresden, Germany, 19-25 Oct. 2008 This work reports on the development and evaluation of the PET component of a PETtCT system for small-animal in-vivo imaging. The PET and CT subsystems are assembled in a rotary gantry in such a way that the center of rotation for both imaging modalities is mechanically aligned. The PET scanner configuration is based on 2 detector modules, each of which consis...

  11. Spatial resolution of the HRRT PET scanner using 3D-OSEM PSF reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Sibomana, Merence; Keller, Sune Høgild;

    2009-01-01

    The spatial resolution of the Siemens High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT) dedicated brain PET scanner installed at Copenhagen University Hospital (Rigshospitalet) was measured using a point-source phantom with high statistics. Further, it was demonstrated how the newly developed 3D-OSEM PSF...

  12. Quantitative image reconstruction for total-body PET imaging using the 2-meter long EXPLORER scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuezhu; Zhou, Jian; Cherry, Simon R; Badawi, Ramsey D; Qi, Jinyi

    2017-03-21

    The EXPLORER project aims to build a 2 meter long total-body PET scanner, which will provide extremely high sensitivity for imaging the entire human body. It will possess a range of capabilities currently unavailable to state-of-the-art clinical PET scanners with a limited axial field-of-view. The huge number of lines-of-response (LORs) of the EXPLORER poses a challenge to the data handling and image reconstruction. The objective of this study is to develop a quantitative image reconstruction method for the EXPLORER and compare its performance with current whole-body scanners. Fully 3D image reconstruction was performed using time-of-flight list-mode data with parallel computation. To recover the resolution loss caused by the parallax error between crystal pairs at a large axial ring difference or transaxial radial offset, we applied an image domain resolution model estimated from point source data. To evaluate the image quality, we conducted computer simulations using the SimSET Monte-Carlo toolkit and XCAT 2.0 anthropomorphic phantom to mimic a 20 min whole-body PET scan with an injection of 25 MBq (18)F-FDG. We compare the performance of the EXPLORER with a current clinical scanner that has an axial FOV of 22 cm. The comparison results demonstrated superior image quality from the EXPLORER with a 6.9-fold reduction in noise standard deviation comparing with multi-bed imaging using the clinical scanner.

  13. PET performance evaluation of MADPET4: a small animal PET insert for a 7-Tesla MRI scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidvari, Negar; Cabello, Jorge; Topping, Geoffrey; Schneider, Florian Roland; Paul, Stephan; Schwaiger, Markus; Ziegler, Sibylle I

    2017-10-04

    MADPET4 is the first small animal PET insert with two layers of individually read out crystals in combination with silicon photomultiplier technology. It has a novel detector arrangement, in which all crystals face the center of field of view transaxially. In this work, the PET performance of MADPET4 was evaluated and compared to other preclinical PET scanners using the NEMA NU 4 measurements, followed by imaging a mouse-size hot-rod resolution phantom and two in vivo simultaneous PET/MRI scans in a 7-T MRI scanner. The insert had a peak sensitivity of 0.49%, using an energy threshold of 350 keV. A uniform transaxial resolution was obtained up to 15 mm radial offset from the axial center, using filtered back-projection with single-slice rebinning. The measured average radial and tangential resolutions (FWHM) were 1.38 mm and 1.39 mm, respectively. The 1.2 mm rods were separable in the hot-rod phantom using an iterative image reconstruction algorithm. The scatter fraction was 7.3% and peak noise equivalent count rate was 15.5 kcps at 65.1 MBq of activity. The FDG uptake in a mouse heart and brain were visible in the two in vivo simultaneous PET/MRI scans without applying image corrections. In conclusion, the insert demonstrated a good overall performance and can be used for small animal multi-modal research applications. © 2017 Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine.

  14. Validation of PET-SORTEO Monte Carlo simulations for the geometries of the MicroPET R4 and Focus 220 PET scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lartizien, C [CREATIS Laboratory, UMR CNRS 5220, Inserm U630, INSA-Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, F69621 Villeurbanne (France); Kuntner, C [Department of Radiopharmaceuticals, Austrian Research Center GmbH-ARC, Seibersdorf (Austria); Goertzen, A L [McConnell Brain Imaging Centre, Montreal (Canada); Evans, A C [McConnell Brain Imaging Centre, Montreal (Canada); Reilhac, A [CERMEP, Bron (France)

    2007-08-21

    PET-SORTEO is a Monte Carlo-based simulator that enables the fast generation of realistic PET data for the geometry of the ECAT EXACT HR+ scanner. In order to address the increasing need for simulation models of animal PET imaging systems, our aim is to adapt and configure this simulation tool for small animal PET scanners, especially for the widely distributed microPET R4 and Focus 220 systems manufactured by Siemens Preclinical Solutions. We propose a simulation model that can produce realistic rodent images in order to evaluate and optimize acquisition and reconstruction protocols. The first part of this study presents the validation of SORTEO against the geometries of the R4 and the Focus 220 systems. This validation is carried out against actual measurements performed on the R4 scanner at the Montreal Neurological Institute in Canada and on the Focus 220 system of Department of radiopharmaceuticals of the Austrian Research Center in Seibersdorf. The comparison of simulated and experimental performance measurements includes spatial resolution, energy spectra, scatter fraction and count rates. In the second part of the study, we demonstrate the ability to rapidly generate realistic whole-body radioactive distributions using the MOBY phantom and give comparative example case studies of the same rodent model simulated with PET-SORTEO for the R4 and Focus 220 systems.

  15. Small PET scanner based on MRI-compatible light sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, J.; Balkay, L.; Berenyi, E.

    2015-03-01

    Improving the quality of life of elderly people requires diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities for diseases of the central nervous system, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and epilepsy which have a rapidly growing impact on society. Minimallyinvasive imaging technologies such as PET and MRI allow for monitoring and tracking these illnesses, starting from their preliminary manifestations.

  16. First results of the INSIDE in-beam PET scanner for the on-line monitoring of particle therapy treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piliero, M. A.; Belcari, N.; Bisogni, M. G.; Camarlinghi, N.; Cerello, P.; Coli, S.; Del Guerra, A.; Ferrero, V.; Fiorina, E.; Giraudo, G.; Kostara, E.; Morrocchi, M.; Pennazio, F.; Peroni, C.; Pirrone, G.; Rivetti, A.; Rolo, M. D.; Rosso, V.; Sportelli, G.; Wheadon, R.

    2016-12-01

    Quality assessment of particle therapy treatments by means of PET systems has been carried out since late `90 and it is one of the most promising in-vivo non invasive monitoring techniques employed clinically. It can be performed with a diagnostic PET scanners installed outside the treatment room (off-line monitoring) or inside the treatment room (in-room monitoring). However the most efficient way is by integrating a PET scanner with the treatment delivery system (on-line monitoring) so that the biological wash out and the patient repositioning errors are minimized. In this work we present the performance of the in-beam PET scanner developed within the INSIDE project. The INSIDE PET scanner is made of two planar heads, 10 cm wide (transaxially) and 25 cm long (axially), composed of pixellated LFS crystals coupled to Hamamatsu MPPCs. Custom designed Front-End Electronics (FE) and Data AcQuisition (DAQ) systems allow an on-line reconstruction of PET images from separated in-spill and inter-spill data sets. The INSIDE PET scanner has been recently delivered at the CNAO (Pavia, Italy) hadrontherapy facility and the first experimental measurements have been carried out. Homogeneous PMMA phantoms and PMMA phantoms with small air and bone inserts were irradiated with monoenergetic clinical proton beams. The activity range was evaluated at various benchmark positions within the field of view to assess the homogeneity of response of the PET system. Repeated irradiations of PMMA phantoms with clinical spread out Bragg peak proton beams were performed to evaluate the reproducibility of the PET signal. The results found in this work show that the response of the INSIDE PET scanner is independent of the position within the radiation field. Results also show the capability of the INSIDE PET scanner to distinguish variations of the activity range due to small tissue inhomogeneities. Finally, the reproducibility of the activity range measurement was within 1 mm.

  17. Sensitivity booster for DOI-PET scanner by utilizing Compton scattering events between detector blocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Eiji, E-mail: rush@nirs.go.jp; Tashima, Hideaki; Yamaya, Taiga

    2014-11-01

    In a conventional PET scanner, coincidence events are measured with a limited energy window for detection of photoelectric events in order to reject Compton scatter events that occur in a patient, but Compton scatter events caused in detector crystals are also rejected. Scatter events within the patient causes scatter coincidences, but inter crystal scattering (ICS) events have useful information for determining an activity distribution. Some researchers have reported the feasibility of PET scanners based on a Compton camera for tracing ICS into the detector. However, these scanners require expensive semiconductor detectors for high-energy resolution. In the Anger-type block detector, single photons interacting with multiple detectors can be obtained for each interacting position and complete information can be gotten just as for photoelectric events in the single detector. ICS events in the single detector have been used to get coincidence, but single photons interacting with multiple detectors have not been used to get coincidence. In this work, we evaluated effect of sensitivity improvement using Compton kinetics in several types of DOI-PET scanners. The proposed method promises to improve the sensitivity using coincidence events of single photons interacting with multiple detectors, which are identified as the first interaction (FI). FI estimation accuracy can be improved to determine FI validity from the correlation between Compton scatter angles calculated on the coincidence line-of-response. We simulated an animal PET scanner consisting of 42 detectors. Each detector block consists of three types of scintillator crystals (LSO, GSO and GAGG). After the simulation, coincidence events are added as information for several depth-of-interaction (DOI) resolutions. From the simulation results, we concluded the proposed method promises to improve the sensitivity considerably when effective atomic number of a scintillator is low. Also, we showed that FI estimate

  18. Sensitivity booster for DOI-PET scanner by utilizing Compton scattering events between detector blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Eiji; Tashima, Hideaki; Yamaya, Taiga

    2014-11-01

    In a conventional PET scanner, coincidence events are measured with a limited energy window for detection of photoelectric events in order to reject Compton scatter events that occur in a patient, but Compton scatter events caused in detector crystals are also rejected. Scatter events within the patient causes scatter coincidences, but inter crystal scattering (ICS) events have useful information for determining an activity distribution. Some researchers have reported the feasibility of PET scanners based on a Compton camera for tracing ICS into the detector. However, these scanners require expensive semiconductor detectors for high-energy resolution. In the Anger-type block detector, single photons interacting with multiple detectors can be obtained for each interacting position and complete information can be gotten just as for photoelectric events in the single detector. ICS events in the single detector have been used to get coincidence, but single photons interacting with multiple detectors have not been used to get coincidence. In this work, we evaluated effect of sensitivity improvement using Compton kinetics in several types of DOI-PET scanners. The proposed method promises to improve the sensitivity using coincidence events of single photons interacting with multiple detectors, which are identified as the first interaction (FI). FI estimation accuracy can be improved to determine FI validity from the correlation between Compton scatter angles calculated on the coincidence line-of-response. We simulated an animal PET scanner consisting of 42 detectors. Each detector block consists of three types of scintillator crystals (LSO, GSO and GAGG). After the simulation, coincidence events are added as information for several depth-of-interaction (DOI) resolutions. From the simulation results, we concluded the proposed method promises to improve the sensitivity considerably when effective atomic number of a scintillator is low. Also, we showed that FI estimate

  19. Simulation study of a D-shape PET scanner for improved sensitivity and reduced cost in whole-body imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Abdella M.; Tashima, Hideaki; Yamaya, Taiga

    2017-05-01

    Much research effort is being made to increase the sensitivity and improve the imaging performance of positron emission tomography (PET) scanners. Conventionally, sensitivity can be increased by increasing the number of detector rings in the axial direction (but at high cost) or reducing the diameter of the scanner (with the disadvantages of reducing the space for patients and degrading the spatial resolution due to the parallax error). In this study, we proposed a PET scanner with a truncated ring and an array of detectors that can be arranged in a straight line below the bed. We called this system ‘D-PET’ as it resembles the letter ‘D’ when it is rotated by 90° in the counterclockwise direction. The basic design idea was to cut the unused space under the patient’s bed; this area is usually not in use in clinical diagnosis. We conducted Monte Carlo simulations of the D-PET scanner and compared its performance with a cylindrical PET scanner. The scanners were constructed from 4-layer depth-of-interaction detectors which consisted of a 16  ×  16  ×  4 LYSO crystal array with dimensions of 2.85  ×  2.85  ×  5 mm3. The results showed that the D-PET had an increase in sensitivity and peak-NECR of 30% and 18%, respectively. The D-PET had low noise in the reconstructed images throughout the field-of-view compared to the cylindrical PET. These were achieved while keeping sufficient space for the patient, and also without a severe effect on the spatial resolution. Furthermore, the number of detectors (and hence the cost) of the D-PET scanner was reduced by 12% compared to the cylindrical PET scanner.

  20. Development of a Single Detector Ring Micro Crystal Element Scanner: QuickPET II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert S. Miyaoka

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a single ring version of the micro crystal element scanner (MiCES and investigation of its spatial resolution imaging characteristics for mouse positron emission tomography (PET imaging. This single ring version of the MiCES system, referred to as QuickPET II, consists of 18 MiCE detector modules mounted as a single ring in a vertical gantry. The system has a 5.76-cm transverse field of view and a 1.98-cm axial field of view. In addition to the scanner and data acquisition system, we have developed an iterative reconstruction that includes a model of the system's detector response function. Evaluation images of line sources and mice have been acquired. Using filtered backprojection, the resolution for a reconstructed line source has been measured at 1.2 mm full width at half maximum. F-18-2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose mouse PET images are provided. The result shows that QuickPET II has the imaging characteristics to support high-resolution, static mouse PET studies using 18-F labeled compounds.

  1. Development of a single detector ring micro crystal element scanner: QuickPET II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaoka, Robert S; Janes, Marie L; Lee, Kisung; Park, Byungki; Kinahan, Paul E; Lewellen, Tom K

    2005-01-01

    This article describes a single ring version of the micro crystal element scanner (MiCES) and investigation of its spatial resolution imaging characteristics for mouse positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. This single ring version of the MiCES system, referred to as QuickPET II, consists of 18 MiCE detector modules mounted as a single ring in a vertical gantry. The system has a 5.76-cm transverse field of view and a 1.98-cm axial field of view. In addition to the scanner and data acquisition system, we have developed an iterative reconstruction that includes a model of the system's detector response function. Evaluation images of line sources and mice have been acquired. Using filtered backprojection, the resolution for a reconstructed line source has been measured at 1.2 mm full width at half maximum. F-18-2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose mouse PET images are provided. The result shows that QuickPET II has the imaging characteristics to support high-resolution, static mouse PET studies using 18-F labeled compounds.

  2. Performance Characteristics of BGO Detectors for a Low Cost Preclinical PET Scanner

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    PETbox is a low-cost benchtop PET scanner dedicated to high throughput preclinical imaging that is currently under development at our institute. This paper presents the design and characterization of the detectors that are used in the PETbox system. In this work, bismuth germanate scintillator was used for the detector, taking advantage of its high stopping power, high photoelectric event fraction, lack of intrinsic background radiation and low cost. The detector block was segmented into a pi...

  3. Investigation of spatial resolution improvement by use of a mouth-insert detector in the helmet PET scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Abdella M; Tashima, Hideaki; Yamaya, Taiga

    2017-10-06

    The dominant factor limiting the intrinsic spatial resolution of a positron emission tomography (PET) system is the size of the crystal elements in the detector. To increase sensitivity and achieve high spatial resolution, it is essential to use advanced depth-of-interaction (DOI) detectors and arrange them close to the subject. The DOI detectors help maintain high spatial resolution by mitigating the parallax error caused by the thickness of the scintillator near the peripheral regions of the field-of-view. As an optimal geometry for a brain PET scanner, with high sensitivity and spatial resolution, we proposed and developed the helmet-chin PET scanner using 54 four-layered DOI detectors consisting of a 16 × 16 × 4 array of GSOZ scintillator crystals with dimensions of 2.8 × 2.8 × 7.5 mm(3). All the detectors used in the helmet-chin PET scanner had the same spatial resolution. In this study, we conducted a feasibility study of a new add-on detector arrangement for the helmet PET scanner by replacing the chin detector with a segmented crystal cube, having high spatial resolution in all directions, which can be placed inside the mouth. The crystal cube (which we have named the mouth-insert detector) has an array of 20 × 20 × 20 LYSO crystal segments with dimensions of 1 × 1 × 1 mm(3). Thus, the scanner is formed by the combination of the helmet and mouth-insert detectors, and is referred to as the helmet-mouth-insert PET scanner. The results show that the helmet-mouth-insert PET scanner has comparable sensitivity and improved spatial resolution near the center of the hemisphere, compared to the helmet-chin PET scanner.

  4. Characterization of 176Lu background in LSO-based PET scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Maurizio; Eriksson, Lars; Rothfuss, Harold; Sjoeholm, Therese; Townsend, David; Rosenqvist, Göran; Carlier, Thomas

    2017-05-01

    LSO and LYSO are today the most common scintillators used in positron emission tomography. Lutetium contains traces of 176Lu, a radioactive isotope that decays β - with a cascade of γ photons in coincidence. Therefore, Lutetium-based scintillators are characterized by a small natural radiation background. In this paper, we investigate and characterize the 176Lu radiation background via experiments performed on LSO-based PET scanners. LSO background was measured at different energy windows and different time coincidence windows, and by using shields to alter the original spectrum. The effect of radiation background in particularly count-starved applications, such as 90Y imaging, is analysed and discussed. Depending on the size of the PET scanner, between 500 and 1000 total random counts per second and between 3 and 5 total true coincidences per second were measured in standard coincidence mode. The LSO background counts in a Siemens mCT in the standard PET energy and time windows are in general negligible in terms of trues, and are comparable to that measured in a BGO scanner of similar size.

  5. Multi-contrast attenuation map synthesis for PET/MR scanners: assessment on FDG and Florbetapir PET tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgos, Ninon [University College London, Translational Imaging Group, Centre for Medical Image Computing, London (United Kingdom); Cardoso, M.J.; Modat, Marc; Ourselin, Sebastien [University College London, Translational Imaging Group, Centre for Medical Image Computing, London (United Kingdom); University College London, Dementia Research Centre, Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom); Thielemans, Kris; Dickson, John [University College London, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Schott, Jonathan M. [University College London, Dementia Research Centre, Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom); Atkinson, David [University College London, Centre for Medical Imaging, London (United Kingdom); Arridge, Simon R. [University College London, Centre for Medical Image Computing, London (United Kingdom); Hutton, Brian F. [University College London, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); University of Wollongong, Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, Wollongong, NSW (Australia)

    2015-08-15

    Positron Emission Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PET/MR) scanners are expected to offer a new range of clinical applications. Attenuation correction is an essential requirement for quantification of PET data but MRI images do not directly provide a patient-specific attenuation map. Methods We further validate and extend a Computed Tomography (CT) and attenuation map (μ-map) synthesis method based on pre-acquired MRI-CT image pairs. The validation consists of comparing the CT images synthesised with the proposed method to the original CT images. PET images were acquired using two different tracers ({sup 18}F-FDG and {sup 18}F-florbetapir). They were then reconstructed and corrected for attenuation using the synthetic μ-maps and compared to the reference PET images corrected with the CT-based μ-maps. During the validation, we observed that the CT synthesis was inaccurate in areas such as the neck and the cerebellum, and propose a refinement to mitigate these problems, as well as an extension of the method to multi-contrast MRI data. Results With the improvements proposed, a significant enhancement in CT synthesis, which results in a reduced absolute error and a decrease in the bias when reconstructing PET images, was observed. For both tracers, on average, the absolute difference between the reference PET images and the PET images corrected with the proposed method was less than 2%, with a bias inferior to 1%. Conclusion With the proposed method, attenuation information can be accurately derived from MRI images by synthesising CT using routine anatomical sequences. MRI sequences, or combination of sequences, can be used to synthesise CT images, as long as they provide sufficient anatomical information. (orig.)

  6. Using triple gamma coincidences with a pixelated semiconductor Compton-PET scanner: a simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolstein, M.; Chmeissani, M.

    2016-01-01

    The Voxel Imaging PET (VIP) Pathfinder project presents a novel design using pixelated semiconductor detectors for nuclear medicine applications to achieve the intrinsic image quality limits set by physics. The conceptual design can be extended to a Compton gamma camera. The use of a pixelated CdTe detector with voxel sizes of 1 × 1 × 2 mm3 guarantees optimal energy and spatial resolution. However, the limited time resolution of semiconductor detectors makes it impossible to use Time Of Flight (TOF) with VIP PET. TOF is used in order to improve the signal to noise ratio (SNR) by using only the most probable portion of the Line-Of-Response (LOR) instead of its entire length. To overcome the limitation of CdTe time resolution, we present in this article a simulation study using β+-γ emitting isotopes with a Compton-PET scanner. When the β+ annihilates with an electron it produces two gammas which produce a LOR in the PET scanner, while the additional gamma, when scattered in the scatter detector, provides a Compton cone that intersects with the aforementioned LOR. The intersection indicates, within a few mm of uncertainty along the LOR, the origin of the beta-gamma decay. Hence, one can limit the part of the LOR used by the image reconstruction algorithm.

  7. Novel Geometrical Concept of a High Performance Brain PET Scanner Principle, Design and Performance Estimates

    CERN Document Server

    Séguinot, Jacques; Chesi, Enrico Guido; Joram, C; Mathot, S; Weilhammer, P; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Correia, J G; Ribeiro da Silva, M; Garibaldi, F; De Leo, R; Nappi, E; Corsi, F; Dragone, A; Schoenahl, F; Zaidi, H

    2006-01-01

    We present the principle, a possible implementation and performance estimates of a novel geometrical concept for a high resolution positron emission tomograph. The concept, which can for example be implemented in a brain PET device, promisses to lead to an essentially parallax free 3D image reconstruction with excellent spatial resolution and constrast, uniform over the complete field of view. The key components are matrices of long axially oriented scintillator crystals which are read out at both extremities by segmented Hybrid Photon Detectors. We discuss the relevant design considerations for a 3D axial PET camera module, motivate parameter and material choices, and estimate its performance in terms of spatial and energy resolution. We support these estimates by Monte Carlo simulations and in some cases by first experimental results. From the performance of a camera module, we extrapolate to the reconstruction resolution of a 3D axial PET scanner in a semi-analytical way and compare it to an existing state...

  8. A feasibility study of a prototype PET insert device to convert a general-purpose animal PET scanner to higher resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Heyu; Pal, Debashish; O'Sullivan, Joseph A; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2008-01-01

    We developed a prototype system to evaluate the feasibility of using a PET insert device to achieve higher resolution from a general-purpose animal PET scanner. The system consists of a high-resolution PET detector, a computer-controlled rotation stage, and a custom mounting plate. The detector consists of a cerium-doped lutetium oxyorthosilicate array (12 x 12 crystals, 0.8 x 1.66 x 3.75 mm(3) each) directly coupled to a position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PS-PMT). The detector signals were fed into the scanner electronics to establish coincidences between the 2 systems. The detector was mounted to a rotation stage that is attached to the scanner via the custom mounting plate after removing the transmission source holder. The rotation stage was concentric with the center of the scanner. The angular offset of the insert detector was calibrated via optimizing point-source images. In all imaging experiments, coincidence data were collected from 9 angles to provide 180 degrees sampling. A (22)Na point source was imaged at different offsets from the center to characterize the in-plane resolution of the insert system. A (68)Ge point source was stepped across the axial field of view to measure the sensitivity of the system. A 23.2-g mouse was injected with 38.5 MBq of (18)F-fluoride and imaged at 3 h after injection for 2 h. The transverse image resolution of the PET insert device ranges from 1.1- to 1.4-mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) without correction for the point-source dimension. This corresponds to approximately 33% improvement over the resolution of the original scanner (1.7- to 1.8-mm FWHM) in 2 of the 3 directions. The sensitivity of the device is 0.064% at the center of the field, 46-fold lower than the sensitivity of an existing animal PET scanner. The mouse bone scan had improved image resolution using the PET insert device over that of the existing animal PET scanner alone. We have demonstrated the feasibility of using a high-resolution insert

  9. Design study of an in situ PET scanner for use in proton beam therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surti, S; Daube-Witherspoon, M E; Karp, J S [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Zou, W; McDonough, J, E-mail: surti@mail.med.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2011-05-07

    Proton beam therapy can deliver a high radiation dose to a tumor without significant damage to surrounding healthy tissue or organs. One way of verifying the delivered dose distribution is to image the short-lived positron emitters produced by the proton beam as it travels through the patient. A potential solution to the limitations of PET imaging in proton beam therapy is the development of a high sensitivity, in situ PET scanner that starts PET imaging almost immediately after patient irradiation while the patient is still lying on the treatment bed. A partial ring PET design is needed for this application in order to avoid interference between the PET detectors and the proton beam, as well as restrictions on patient positioning on the couch. A partial ring also allows us to optimize the detector separation (and hence the sensitivity) for different patient sizes. Our goal in this investigation is to evaluate an in situ PET scanner design for use in proton therapy that provides tomographic imaging in a partial ring scanner design using time-of-flight (TOF) information and an iterative reconstruction algorithm. GEANT4 simulation of an incident proton beam was used to produce a positron emitter distribution, which was parameterized and then used as the source distribution inside a water-filled cylinder for EGS4 simulations of a PET system. Design optimization studies were performed as a function of crystal type and size, system timing resolution, scanner angular coverage and number of positron emitter decays. Data analysis was performed to measure the accuracy of the reconstructed positron emitter distribution as well as the range of the positron emitter distribution. We simulated scanners with varying crystal sizes (2-4 mm) and type (LYSO and LaBr{sub 3}) and our results indicate that 4 mm wide LYSO or LaBr{sub 3} crystals (resulting in 4-5 mm spatial resolution) are adequate; for a full-ring, non-TOF scanner we predict a low bias (<0.6 mm) and a good precision (<1

  10. Design study of an in situ PET scanner for use in proton beam therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surti, S.; Zou, W.; Daube-Witherspoon, M. E.; McDonough, J.; Karp, J. S.

    2011-05-01

    Proton beam therapy can deliver a high radiation dose to a tumor without significant damage to surrounding healthy tissue or organs. One way of verifying the delivered dose distribution is to image the short-lived positron emitters produced by the proton beam as it travels through the patient. A potential solution to the limitations of PET imaging in proton beam therapy is the development of a high sensitivity, in situ PET scanner that starts PET imaging almost immediately after patient irradiation while the patient is still lying on the treatment bed. A partial ring PET design is needed for this application in order to avoid interference between the PET detectors and the proton beam, as well as restrictions on patient positioning on the couch. A partial ring also allows us to optimize the detector separation (and hence the sensitivity) for different patient sizes. Our goal in this investigation is to evaluate an in situ PET scanner design for use in proton therapy that provides tomographic imaging in a partial ring scanner design using time-of-flight (TOF) information and an iterative reconstruction algorithm. GEANT4 simulation of an incident proton beam was used to produce a positron emitter distribution, which was parameterized and then used as the source distribution inside a water-filled cylinder for EGS4 simulations of a PET system. Design optimization studies were performed as a function of crystal type and size, system timing resolution, scanner angular coverage and number of positron emitter decays. Data analysis was performed to measure the accuracy of the reconstructed positron emitter distribution as well as the range of the positron emitter distribution. We simulated scanners with varying crystal sizes (2-4 mm) and type (LYSO and LaBr3) and our results indicate that 4 mm wide LYSO or LaBr3 crystals (resulting in 4-5 mm spatial resolution) are adequate; for a full-ring, non-TOF scanner we predict a low bias (<0.6 mm) and a good precision (<1 mm) in the

  11. A Novel Method for the Image Quality assessment of PET Scanners by Monte Carlo simulations: Effect of the scintillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpetas, G. E.; Michail, C. M.; Fountos, G. P.; Kalyvas, N. I.; Valais, I. G.; Kandarakis, I. S.; Panayiotakis, G. S.

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to propose a comprehensive method for PET scanners image quality assessment, by the simulation of a thin layer chromatography (TLC) flood source with a previous validated Monte-Carlo (MC) model. The model was developed by using the GATE MC package and reconstructed images were obtained using the STIR software, with cluster computing. The PET scanner simulated was the GE Discovery-ST. The TLC source was immersed in 18F-FDG bath solution (1MBq) in order to assess image quality. The influence of different scintillating crystals on PET scanner's image quality, in terms of the MTF, the NNPS and the DQE, was investigated. Images were reconstructed by the commonly used FBP2D, FPB3DRP and the OSMAPOSL (15 subsets, 3 iterations) reprojection algorithms. The PET scanner configuration, incorporating LuAP crystals, provided the optimum MTF values in both 2D and 3DFBP whereas the corresponding configuration with BGO crystals was found with the higher MTF values after OSMAPOSL. The scanner incorporating BGO crystals were also found with the lowest noise levels and the highest DQE values after all image reconstruction algorithms. The plane source can be also useful for the experimental image quality assessment of PET and SPECT scanners in clinical practice.

  12. A novel method for calibration and monitoring of time synchronization of TOF-PET scanners by means of cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Silarski, M; Bednarski, T; Moskal, P; Białas, P; Kapłon, Ł; Kochanowski, A; Korcyl, G; Kowal, J; Kowalski, P; Kozik, T; Krzemień, W; Molenda, M; Niedźwiecki, Sz; Pałka, M; Pawlik, M; Raczyński, L; Rudy, Z; Salabura, P; Sharma, N G; Słomski, A; Smyrski, J; Strzelecki, A; Wiślicki, W; Zieliński, M; Zoń, N

    2013-01-01

    All of the present methods for calibration and monitoring of TOF-PET scanner detectors utilize radioactive isotopes such as e.g. $^{22}$Na or $^{68}$Ge, which are placed or rotate inside the scanner. In this article we describe a novel method based on the cosmic rays application to the PET calibration and monitoring methods. The concept allows to overcome many of the drawbacks of the present methods and it is well suited for newly developed TOF-PET scanners with a large longitudinal field of view. The method enables also monitoring of the quality of the scintillator materials and in general allows for the continuous quality assurance of the PET detector performance.

  13. The imaging performance of a LaBr{sub 3}-based PET scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daube-Witherspoon, M E; Surti, S; Kyba, C C M; Wiener, R; Werner, M E; Kulp, R; Karp, J S [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, 423 Guardian Drive, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Perkins, A [Philips Healthcare (United States)], E-mail: daubewit@mail.med.upenn.edu

    2010-01-07

    A prototype time-of-flight (TOF) PET scanner based on cerium-doped lanthanum bromide [LaBr{sub 3} (5% Ce)] has been developed. LaBr{sub 3} has a high light output, excellent energy resolution and fast timing properties that have been predicted to lead to good image quality. Intrinsic performance measurements of spatial resolution, sensitivity and scatter fraction demonstrate good conventional PET performance; the results agree with previous simulation studies. Phantom measurements show the excellent image quality achievable with the prototype system. Phantom measurements and corresponding simulations show a faster and more uniform convergence rate, as well as more uniform quantification, for TOF reconstruction of the data, which have 375 ps intrinsic timing resolution, compared to non-TOF images. Measurements and simulations of a hot and cold sphere phantom show that the 7% energy resolution helps to mitigate residual errors in the scatter estimate because a high energy threshold (>480 keV) can be used to restrict the amount of scatter accepted without a loss of true events. Preliminary results with incorporation of a model of detector blurring in the iterative reconstruction algorithm not only show improved contrast recovery but also point out the importance of an accurate resolution model of the tails of LaBr{sub 3}'s point spread function. The LaBr{sub 3} TOF-PET scanner demonstrated the impact of superior timing and energy resolutions on image quality.

  14. Crystal timing offset calibration method for time of flight PET scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jinghan; Song, Xiyun

    2016-03-01

    In time-of-flight (TOF) positron emission tomography (PET), precise calibration of the timing offset of each crystal of a PET scanner is essential. Conventionally this calibration requires a specially designed tool just for this purpose. In this study a method that uses a planar source to measure the crystal timing offsets (CTO) is developed. The method uses list mode acquisitions of a planar source placed at multiple orientations inside the PET scanner field-of-view (FOV). The placement of the planar source in each acquisition is automatically figured out from the measured data, so that a fixture for exactly placing the source is not required. The expected coincidence time difference for each detected list mode event can be found from the planar source placement and the detector geometry. A deviation of the measured time difference from the expected one is due to CTO of the two crystals. The least squared solution of the CTO is found iteratively using the list mode events. The effectiveness of the crystal timing calibration method is evidenced using phantom images generated by placing back each list mode event into the image space with the timing offset applied to each event. The zigzagged outlines of the phantoms in the images become smooth after the crystal timing calibration is applied. In conclusion, a crystal timing calibration method is developed. The method uses multiple list mode acquisitions of a planar source to find the least squared solution of crystal timing offsets.

  15. An animal PET scanner using flat-panel position-sensitive PMTs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Takashi; Ote, Kibou; Sakai, Koichi; Noda, Akihiro; Shimizu, Keiji; Masuda, Keisuke; Ohmura, Tomohide; Watanabe, Mitsuo

    2014-01-01

    To design, build, and evaluate an animal PET scanner, which can be used with non-human primates under conscious condition, incorporating flat-panel position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PS-PMTs). The system contains 30 detector modules, each having two PS-PMTs and 16×18 lutetium–yttrium oxyortho-silicate scintillation crystal arrays. The system has 17,280 crystals (480 per ring) arranged in 36 rings, with a diameter of 508 mm and axial extent of 108 mm. The gantry tilt mechanism enables PET studies to be performed on a monkey in the sitting position. Data can be acquired in either the 2D or 3D mode, with the slice collimators being retracted in the 3D mode. At the center of the field-of-view, radial resolution is 2.7 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) and tangential resolution is 2.4 mm FWHM, while axial resolution is 2.5 mm FWHM for direct slices and 2.7 mm FWHM for cross slices. Scatter fraction, count rate capability, and sensitivity were evaluated using a cylindrical phantom 10 cm in diameter. The noise equivalent count rate in the 3D mode is equivalent to that in the 2D mode at a three times higher radioactivity level. Total system sensitivity is 1.3 kcps/(kBq/mL) in 2D mode and 7.4 kcps/(kBq/mL) in the 3D mode. Animal studies with a monkey were performed to evaluate the imaging capabilities of the scanner. The new PET scanner will be a useful research tool with non-human primates for pre-clinical drug development.

  16. Count rate performance study of the Lausanne ClearPET scanner demonstrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rey, M. [LPHE, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)]. E-mail: martin.rey@epfl.ch; Jan, S. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, CEA, F-91401 Orsay (France); Vieira, J.-M. [LPHE, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Mosset, J.-B. [LPHE, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Krieguer, M. [IIHE, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Comtat, C. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, CEA, F-91401 Orsay (France); Morel, C. [CPPM, CNRS-IN2P3, Universite de la Mediterranee Aix-Marseille II, F-13288 Marseille (France)

    2007-02-01

    This paper presents the count rate measurements obtained with the Lausanne partial ring ClearPET scanner demonstrator and compares them against GATE Monte Carlo simulations. For the present detector setup, a maximum single event count rate of 1.1 Mcps is measured or a 250-750 keV energy window. This corresponds to a coincidence count rate of approximately 22 kcps. Good agreements are observed between measured and simulated data. Count rate performance, including Noise Equivalent Count (NEC) curves, are determined and extrapolated for a full ring ClearPET design using GATE Monte Carlo simulations. For a full ring design with three rings of detector modules, NEC is peaking at about 70 kcps for 20 MBq.

  17. Optimal whole-body PET scanner configurations for different volumes of LSO scintillator: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Jonathan K; Dahlbom, Magnus L; Moses, William W; Balakrishnan, Karthik; Wang, Wenli; Cherry, Simon R; Badawi, Ramsey D

    2012-07-07

    The axial field of view (AFOV) of the current generation of clinical whole-body PET scanners range from 15-22 cm, which limits sensitivity and renders applications such as whole-body dynamic imaging or imaging of very low activities in whole-body cellular tracking studies, almost impossible. Generally, extending the AFOV significantly increases the sensitivity and count-rate performance. However, extending the AFOV while maintaining detector thickness has significant cost implications. In addition, random coincidences, detector dead time, and object attenuation may reduce scanner performance as the AFOV increases. In this paper, we use Monte Carlo simulations to find the optimal scanner geometry (i.e. AFOV, detector thickness and acceptance angle) based on count-rate performance for a range of scintillator volumes ranging from 10 to 93 l with detector thickness varying from 5 to 20 mm. We compare the results to the performance of a scanner based on the current Siemens Biograph mCT geometry and electronics. Our simulation models were developed based on individual components of the Siemens Biograph mCT and were validated against experimental data using the NEMA NU-2 2007 count-rate protocol. In the study, noise-equivalent count rate (NECR) was computed as a function of maximum ring difference (i.e. acceptance angle) and activity concentration using a 27 cm diameter, 200 cm uniformly filled cylindrical phantom for each scanner configuration. To reduce the effect of random coincidences, we implemented a variable coincidence time window based on the length of the lines of response, which increased NECR performance up to 10% compared to using a static coincidence time window for scanners with a large maximum ring difference values. For a given scintillator volume, the optimal configuration results in modest count-rate performance gains of up to 16% compared to the shortest AFOV scanner with the thickest detectors. However, the longest AFOV of approximately 2 m with

  18. Using compressive sensing to recover images from PET scanners with partial detector rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valiollahzadeh, SeyyedMajid, E-mail: sv4@rice.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, Houston, Texas 77005 and Department of Imaging Physics Unit 1352, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Clark, John W. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Mawlawi, Osama [Department of Imaging Physics Unit 1352, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Most positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scanners consist of tightly packed discrete detector rings to improve scanner efficiency. The authors’ aim was to use compressive sensing (CS) techniques in PET imaging to investigate the possibility of decreasing the number of detector elements per ring (introducing gaps) while maintaining image quality. Methods: A CS model based on a combination of gradient magnitude and wavelet domains (wavelet-TV) was developed to recover missing observations in PET data acquisition. The model was designed to minimize the total variation (TV) and L1-norm of wavelet coefficients while constrained by the partially observed data. The CS model also incorporated a Poisson noise term that modeled the observed noise while suppressing its contribution by penalizing the Poisson log likelihood function. Three experiments were performed to evaluate the proposed CS recovery algorithm: a simulation study, a phantom study, and six patient studies. The simulation dataset comprised six disks of various sizes in a uniform background with an activity concentration of 5:1. The simulated image was multiplied by the system matrix to obtain the corresponding sinogram and then Poisson noise was added. The resultant sinogram was masked to create the effect of partial detector removal and then the proposed CS algorithm was applied to recover the missing PET data. In addition, different levels of noise were simulated to assess the performance of the proposed algorithm. For the phantom study, an IEC phantom with six internal spheres each filled with F-18 at an activity-to-background ratio of 10:1 was used. The phantom was imaged twice on a RX PET/CT scanner: once with all detectors operational (baseline) and once with four detector blocks (11%) turned off at each of 0 °, 90 °, 180 °, and 270° (partially sampled). The partially acquired sinograms were then recovered using the proposed algorithm. For the third test, PET images

  19. Clinical evaluation of 2D versus 3D whole-body PET image quality using a dedicated BGO PET scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visvikis, D. [CHU Morvan, U650 INSERM, Laboratoire de Traitement de l' Information Medicale (LaTIM), Brest (France); Griffiths, D. [Lister Healthcare, London PET Centre, London (United Kingdom); Costa, D.C. [Middlesex Hospital, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Royal Free and University College Medical School, London (United Kingdom); HPP Medicina Molecular, SA Porto (Portugal); Bomanji, J.; Ell, P.J. [Middlesex Hospital, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Royal Free and University College Medical School, London (United Kingdom)

    2005-09-01

    Three-dimensional positron emission tomography (3D PET) results in higher system sensitivity, with an associated increase in the detection of scatter and random coincidences. The objective of this work was to compare, from a clinical perspective, 3D and two-dimensional (2D) acquisitions in terms of whole-body (WB) PET image quality with a dedicated BGO PET system. 2D and 3D WB emission acquisitions were carried out in 70 patients. Variable acquisition parameters in terms of time of emission acquisition per axial field of view (aFOV) and slice overlap between sequential aFOVs were used during the 3D acquisitions. 3D and 2D images were reconstructed using FORE+WLS and OSEM respectively. Scatter correction was performed by convolution subtraction and a model-based scatter correction in 2D and 3D respectively. All WB images were attenuation corrected using segmented transmission scans. Images were blindly assessed by three observers for the presence of artefacts, confidence in lesion detection and overall image quality using a scoring system. Statistically significant differences between 2D and 3D image quality were only obtained for 3D emission acquisitions of 3 min. No statistically significant differences were observed for image artefacts or lesion detectability scores. Image quality correlated significantly with patient weight for both modes of operation. Finally, no differences were seen in image artefact scores for the different axial slice overlaps considered, suggesting the use of five slice overlaps in 3D WB acquisitions. 3D WB imaging using a dedicated BGO-based PET scanner offers similar image quality to that obtained in 2D considering similar overall times of acquisitions. (orig.)

  20. COMPET: High resolution high sensitivity MRI compatible pre-clinical PET scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Hines, Kim-Eigard; Skretting, Arne; Rohne, Ole; Bjaalie, Jan G; Volgyes, David; Rissi, Michael; Dorholt, Ole; Stapnes, Steinar

    2013-01-01

    COMPET is a pre-clinical MRI compatible PET scanner which decouples sensitivity and resolution by the use of a novel detector design. The detector has been built using 8 x 8 cm(2) square layers consisting of 30 LYSO crystals (2 x 3 x 80 mm(2)) interleaved with 24 Wavelength Shifting Fibers (WLS) (3 x 1 x 80 mm(3)). By stacking several layers into a module, the point-of-interaction (POI) can be measured in 3D. Four layers form a PET ring where the sensitivity can be increased by stacking several layers. The layers can be stacked so that no inter-crystal or inter-module gap is formed. COMPET has used four assembled layers for module and scanner characterization. The modules are connected to the COMPET data-acquisition chain and the reconstructed images are produced with the novel geometry-independent COMPET image reconstruction algorithm. Time and energy resolution have been resolved and found to be around 4 as and 14% respectively. Tests for MRI interference and count rate performance have been carried out The...

  1. NEMA and clinical evaluation of a novel brain PET-CT scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogg, Kira S.; Toole, Terrence; Ouyang, Jinsong; Zhu, Xuping; Normandin, Marc; Johnson, Keith; Alpert, Nathaniel M.; Fakhri, Georges El

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the performance of a novel mobile human brain/small animal PET-CT system, developed by Photo Diagnostic Systems Inc. The scanner has a 35.7-cm diameter bore and a 22-cm axial extent. The detector ring has 7 modules each with 3×4 cerium-doped lutetium yttrium orthosilicate crystal blocks, each consisting of 22×22 outer layer and 21×21 inner layer crystals, each layer 1 cm thick. Light is collected by 12×12 SiPMs. The integrated CT can be used for attenuation correction and anatomical localization. The scanner was designed as a low-cost device that nevertheless produces high-quality PET images with the unique capability of battery-powered propulsion, enabling use in many settings. Methods Spatial resolution, sensitivity and noise-equivalent count rate (NECR) were measured based on the National Electrical Manufacturers Association NU2-2012 procedures. Reconstruction was done with tight energy and timing cuts: 400-650 keV and 7ns, and loose cuts: 350-700 keV and 10ns. Additional image quality measurements were made from phantoms, human, and animal studies. Performance was compared to a reference scanner (ECAT Exact HR+) with comparable imaging properties. Results The full-width half-max transverse resolution at 1 cm (10 cm) radius is 3.2 mm (5.2 mm radial, 3.1 mm tangential) and the axial resolution is 3.5 mm (4.0 mm). For tight (loose) cuts, a sensitivity of 7.5 (11.7) kcps/MBq at the center increases to 8.8 (13.9) kcps/MBq at a 10 cm radial offset. The maximum NECR of 19.5 (22.7) kcps was achieved for an activity concentration of 2.9 kBq/ml. Contrast recovery for 4:1 hot cylinder to warm background was 76% for the 25 mm diameter cylinder, but decreased with decreasing cylinder size. The quantitation agrees within 2% of the known activity distribution and concentration. Brain phantom and human scans have shown agreement in SUV values and image quality with the HR+. Conclusion We have characterized the performance of the NeuroPET

  2. Automatic extraction of forward stroke volume using dynamic PET/CT: a dual-tracer and dual-scanner validation in patients with heart valve disease

    OpenAIRE

    Harms, Hendrik Johannes; Tolbod, Lars Poulsen; Hansson, Nils Henrik Stubkjær; Kero, Tanja; Örndahl, Lovisa Holm; Kim, Won Yong; Bjerner, Tomas; Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Wiggers, Henrik; Frøkiær, Jørgen; Sörensen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to develop and validate an automated method for extracting forward stroke volume (FSV) using indicator dilution theory directly from dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) studies for two different tracers and scanners. METHODS: 35 subjects underwent a dynamic (11)C-acetate PET scan on a Siemens Biograph TruePoint-64 PET/CT (scanner I). In addition, 10 subjects underwent both dynamic (15)O-water PET and (11)C-acetate PET scans on a GE Discovery-ST PET...

  3. Three-dimensional imaging characteristics of the HEAD PENN-PET scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karp, J.S.; Freifelder, R.; Geagan, M.J. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    A volume-imaging PET scanner, without interplane septa, for brain imaging has been designed and built to achieve high performance, specifically in spatial resolution and sensitivity. The scanner is unique in its use of a single annular crystal of Na(Tl), which allows a field of view (FOV) of 25.6 cm in both the transverse and axial directions. Data are reconstructed into an image matrix of 128{sup 3} with (2mm){sup 3} voxels, using three-dimensional image reconstruction algorithms. Point-source measurements are performed to determine spatial resolution over the scanner FOV, and cylindrical phantom distributions are used to determine the sensitivity, scatter fraction and counting rate performance of the system a three-dimensional reconstruction algorithms. The system spatial resolution is measured to be 3.5mm in both the transverse and axial directions, in the center of the FOV. The true sensitivity, using the standard NEMA phantom (6 liter), is 660 kcps/{mu}Ci/ml, after subtracting a scatter fraction of 34%. Due to deadtime effects, we measure a peak true counting rate, after scatter and randoms subtraction, of 100 kcps at 0.7 mCi for a smaller brain-sized (1.1 liter) phantom, and 70 kcps for a head-sized (2.5 liter) phantom at the same activity. A typical {sup 18}F-FDG clinical brain study requires only 2 mCi to achieve high statistics (100 million true events) with a scan time of 30 min. The HEAD PENN-PET scanner is based on a cost-effective design using Nal(Tl) and has been shown to achieve high performance for brain studies and pediatric whole-body studies. As a full-time three-dimensional imaging scanner with a very large axial acceptance angle, high sensitivity is achieved. The system becomes counting-rate limited as the activity is increased, but we achieve high image quality with a small injected dose. This is a significant advantage for clinical imaging, particularly for pediatric patients. 38 refs., 8 figs.

  4. Designing a compact high performance brain PET scanner-simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Kuang; Majewski, Stan; Kinahan, Paul E; Harrison, Robert L; Elston, Brian F; Manjeshwar, Ravindra; Dolinsky, Sergei; Stolin, Alexander V; Brefczynski-Lewis, Julie A; Qi, Jinyi

    2016-05-21

    The desire to understand normal and disordered human brain function of upright, moving persons in natural environments motivates the development of the ambulatory micro-dose brain PET imager (AMPET). An ideal system would be light weight but with high sensitivity and spatial resolution, although these requirements are often in conflict with each other. One potential approach to meet the design goals is a compact brain-only imaging device with a head-sized aperture. However, a compact geometry increases parallax error in peripheral lines of response, which increases bias and variance in region of interest (ROI) quantification. Therefore, we performed simulation studies to search for the optimal system configuration and to evaluate the potential improvement in quantification performance over existing scanners. We used the Cramér-Rao variance bound to compare the performance for ROI quantification using different scanner geometries. The results show that while a smaller ring diameter can increase photon detection sensitivity and hence reduce the variance at the center of the field of view, it can also result in higher variance in peripheral regions when the length of detector crystal is 15 mm or more. This variance can be substantially reduced by adding depth-of-interaction (DOI) measurement capability to the detector modules. Our simulation study also shows that the relative performance depends on the size of the ROI, and a large ROI favors a compact geometry even without DOI information. Based on these results, we propose a compact 'helmet' design using detectors with DOI capability. Monte Carlo simulations show the helmet design can achieve four-fold higher sensitivity and resolve smaller features than existing cylindrical brain PET scanners. The simulations also suggest that improving TOF timing resolution from 400 ps to 200 ps also results in noticeable improvement in image quality, indicating better timing resolution is desirable for brain imaging.

  5. A feasibility study of ortho-positronium decays measurement with the J-PET scanner based on plastic scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminska, D.; Gajos, A.; Czerwinski, E.; Alfs, D.; Bednarski, T.; Bialas, P.; Dulski, K.; Glowacz, B.; Gupta-Sharma, N.; Korcyl, G.; Krawczyk, N.; Kubicz, E.; Mohammed, M.; Niedzwiecki, Sz.; Pawlik-Niedzwiecka, M.; Rudy, Z.; Wieczorek, A.; Zielinski, M.; Moskal, P. [Jagiellonian University, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Applied Computer Science, Krakow (Poland); Curceanu, C.; Silarski, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, CP 13, Frascati (Italy); Gorgol, M.; Jasinska, B.; Zgardzinska, B. [Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Department of Nuclear Methods, Institute of Physics, Lublin (Poland); Hiesmayr, B.C. [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, Vienna (Austria); Kowalski, P.; Raczynski, L.; Wislicki, W. [Swierk Computing Centre, National Centre for Nuclear Research, Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Krzemien, W. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, High Energy Department, Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    2016-08-15

    We present a study of the application of the Jagiellonian positron emission tomograph (J-PET) for the registration of gamma quanta from decays of ortho-positronium (o-Ps). The J-PET is the first positron emission tomography scanner based on organic scintillators in contrast to all current PET scanners based on inorganic crystals. Monte Carlo simulations show that the J-PET as an axially symmetric and high acceptance scanner can be used as a multi-purpose detector well suited to pursue research including e.g. tests of discrete symmetries in decays of ortho-positronium in addition to the medical imaging. The gamma quanta originating from o-Ps decay interact in the plastic scintillators predominantly via the Compton effect, making the direct measurement of their energy impossible. Nevertheless, it is shown in this paper that the J-PET scanner will enable studies of the o-Ps → 3γ decays with angular and energy resolution equal to σ(θ) ∼ 0.4 {sup circle} and σ(E) ∼ 4.1 keV, respectively. An order of magnitude shorter decay time of signals from plastic scintillators with respect to the inorganic crystals results not only in better timing properties crucial for the reduction of physical and instrumental background, but also suppresses significantly the pile-ups, thus enabling compensation of the lower efficiency of the plastic scintillators by performing measurements with higher positron source activities. (orig.)

  6. A feasibility study of ortho-positronium decays measurement with the J-PET scanner based on plastic scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamińska, D.; Gajos, A.; Czerwiński, E.; Alfs, D.; Bednarski, T.; Białas, P.; Curceanu, C.; Dulski, K.; Głowacz, B.; Gupta-Sharma, N.; Gorgol, M.; Hiesmayr, B. C.; Jasińska, B.; Korcyl, G.; Kowalski, P.; Krzemień, W.; Krawczyk, N.; Kubicz, E.; Mohammed, M.; Niedźwiecki, Sz.; Pawlik-Niedźwiecka, M.; Raczyński, L.; Rudy, Z.; Silarski, M.; Wieczorek, A.; Wiślicki, W.; Zgardzińska, B.; Zieliński, M.; Moskal, P.

    2016-08-01

    We present a study of the application of the Jagiellonian positron emission tomograph (J-PET) for the registration of gamma quanta from decays of ortho-positronium (o-Ps). The J-PET is the first positron emission tomography scanner based on organic scintillators in contrast to all current PET scanners based on inorganic crystals. Monte Carlo simulations show that the J-PET as an axially symmetric and high acceptance scanner can be used as a multi-purpose detector well suited to pursue research including e.g. tests of discrete symmetries in decays of ortho-positronium in addition to the medical imaging. The gamma quanta originating from o-Ps decay interact in the plastic scintillators predominantly via the Compton effect, making the direct measurement of their energy impossible. Nevertheless, it is shown in this paper that the J-PET scanner will enable studies of the { o-Ps }→ 3γ decays with angular and energy resolution equal to σ (θ ) ≈ {0.4°} and σ (E) ≈ 4.1 {keV}, respectively. An order of magnitude shorter decay time of signals from plastic scintillators with respect to the inorganic crystals results not only in better timing properties crucial for the reduction of physical and instrumental background, but also suppresses significantly the pile-ups, thus enabling compensation of the lower efficiency of the plastic scintillators by performing measurements with higher positron source activities.

  7. A feasibility study of ortho-positronium decays measurement with the J-PET scanner based on plastic scintillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamińska, D; Gajos, A; Czerwiński, E; Alfs, D; Bednarski, T; Białas, P; Curceanu, C; Dulski, K; Głowacz, B; Gupta-Sharma, N; Gorgol, M; Hiesmayr, B C; Jasińska, B; Korcyl, G; Kowalski, P; Krzemień, W; Krawczyk, N; Kubicz, E; Mohammed, M; Niedźwiecki, Sz; Pawlik-Niedźwiecka, M; Raczyński, L; Rudy, Z; Silarski, M; Wieczorek, A; Wiślicki, W; Zgardzińska, B; Zieliński, M; Moskal, P

    We present a study of the application of the Jagiellonian positron emission tomograph (J-PET) for the registration of gamma quanta from decays of ortho-positronium (o-Ps). The J-PET is the first positron emission tomography scanner based on organic scintillators in contrast to all current PET scanners based on inorganic crystals. Monte Carlo simulations show that the J-PET as an axially symmetric and high acceptance scanner can be used as a multi-purpose detector well suited to pursue research including e.g. tests of discrete symmetries in decays of ortho-positronium in addition to the medical imaging. The gamma quanta originating from o-Ps decay interact in the plastic scintillators predominantly via the Compton effect, making the direct measurement of their energy impossible. Nevertheless, it is shown in this paper that the J-PET scanner will enable studies of the [Formula: see text] decays with angular and energy resolution equal to [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], respectively. An order of magnitude shorter decay time of signals from plastic scintillators with respect to the inorganic crystals results not only in better timing properties crucial for the reduction of physical and instrumental background, but also suppresses significantly the pile-ups, thus enabling compensation of the lower efficiency of the plastic scintillators by performing measurements with higher positron source activities.

  8. A feasibility study of ortho-positronium decays measurement with the J-PET scanner based on plastic scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Kamińska, D; Czerwiński, E; Alfs, D; Bednarski, T; Białas, P; Curceanu, C; Dulski, K; Głowacz, B; Gupta-Sharma, N; Gorgol, M; Hiesmayr, B C; Jasińska, B; Korcyl, G; Kowalski, P; Krzemień, W; Krawczyk, N; Kubicz, E; Mohammed, M; Niedźwiecki, Sz; Pawlik-Niedźwiecka, M; Raczyński, L; Rudy, Z; Silarski, M; Wieczorek, A; Wiślicki, W; Zgardzińska, B; Zieliński, M; Moskal, P

    2016-01-01

    We present a study of the application of the Jagiellonian Positron Emission Tomograph (J-PET) for the registration of gamma quanta from decays of ortho-positronium (o-Ps). The J-PET is the first positron emission tomography scanner based on organic scintillators in contrast to all current PET scanners based on inorganic crystals. Monte Carlo simulations show that the J-PET as an axially symmetric and high acceptance scanner can be used as a multi-purpose detector well suited to pursue research including e.g. tests of discrete symmetries in decays of ortho-positronium in addition to the medical imaging. The gamma quanta originating from o-Ps decay interact in the plastic scintillators predominantly via the Compton effect, making the direct measurement of their energy impossible. Nevertheless, it is shown in this paper that the J-PET scanner will enable studies of the o-Ps$\\to3\\gamma$ decays with angular and energy resolution equal to $\\sigma(\\theta) \\approx 0.4^{\\circ}$ and $\\sigma(E) \\approx 4.1$ keV, respect...

  9. Coincidence measurements on detectors for microPET II: A 1 mm3 resolution PET scanner for small animal imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Chatziioannou, A; Shao, Y; Doshi, N K; Silverman, B; Meadors, K; Cherry, SR

    2000-01-01

    We are currently developing a small animal PET scanner with a design goal of 1 mm3 image resolution. We have built three pairs of detectors and tested performance in terms of crystal identification, spatial, energy and timing resolution. The detectors consisted of 12 multiplied by 12 arrays of 1 multiplied by 1 multiplied by 10mm LSO crystals (1.15 mm pitch) coupled to Hamamatsu H7546 64 channel PMTs via 5cm long coherent glass fiber bundles. Optical fiber connection is necessary to allow high packing fraction in a ring geometry scanner. Fiber bundles with and without extramural absorber (EMA) were tested. The results demonstrated an intrinsic spatial resolution of 1.12 mm (direct coupled LSO array), 1.23 mm (bundle without EMA) and 1.27 mm (bundle with EMA) using a similar to 500 micron diameter Na-22 source. Using a 330 micron line source filled with F-18, intrinsic resolution for the EMA bundle improved to 1.05 mm. The respective timing and energy resolution values were 1.96 ns, 21% (direct coupled), 2.20 ...

  10. Evaluation of New Inorganic Scintillators for Application in a Prototype Small Animal PET Scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Kuntner, C

    2003-01-01

    In the study of new pharmaceuticals as well as brain and genetic research, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a useful method. It has also recently entered the clinical domain in cardiology and particularly in oncology. Small animals such as mice, are often used to validate sophisticated models of human disease. High spatial resolution PET instrumentation is therefore necessary due to the reduced dimensions of the organs. Inorganic scintillators are employed in most of the diagnostic imaging devices. The ultimate performance of the PET scanner is tightly bound to the scintillation properties of the crystals. In the last years there has been an effort to develop new scintillating materials characterized by high light output, high detection efficiency and fast decay time. The most studied systems are mainly Ce3+-doped crystals such as LSO:Ce, YAP:Ce, LuAP:Ce, and recently also mixed Lux(RE3+)1-xAlO3:Ce crystals. These crystals are very attractive for medical application because of their high density (with th...

  11. Time-invariant component-based normalization for a simultaneous PET-MR scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belzunce, M A; Reader, A J

    2016-05-07

    Component-based normalization is a method used to compensate for the sensitivity of each of the lines of response acquired in positron emission tomography. This method consists of modelling the sensitivity of each line of response as a product of multiple factors, which can be classified as time-invariant, time-variant and acquisition-dependent components. Typical time-variant factors are the intrinsic crystal efficiencies, which are needed to be updated by a regular normalization scan. Failure to do so would in principle generate artifacts in the reconstructed images due to the use of out of date time-variant factors. For this reason, an assessment of the variability and the impact of the crystal efficiencies in the reconstructed images is important to determine the frequency needed for the normalization scans, as well as to estimate the error obtained when an inappropriate normalization is used. Furthermore, if the fluctuations of these components are low enough, they could be neglected and nearly artifact-free reconstructions become achievable without performing a regular normalization scan. In this work, we analyse the impact of the time-variant factors in the component-based normalization used in the Biograph mMR scanner, but the work is applicable to other PET scanners. These factors are the intrinsic crystal efficiencies and the axial factors. For the latter, we propose a new method to obtain fixed axial factors that was validated with simulated data. Regarding the crystal efficiencies, we assessed their fluctuations during a period of 230 d and we found that they had good stability and low dispersion. We studied the impact of not including the intrinsic crystal efficiencies in the normalization when reconstructing simulated and real data. Based on this assessment and using the fixed axial factors, we propose the use of a time-invariant normalization that is able to achieve comparable results to the standard, daily updated, normalization factors used in this

  12. Time-invariant component-based normalization for a simultaneous PET-MR scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belzunce, M. A.; Reader, A. J.

    2016-05-01

    Component-based normalization is a method used to compensate for the sensitivity of each of the lines of response acquired in positron emission tomography. This method consists of modelling the sensitivity of each line of response as a product of multiple factors, which can be classified as time-invariant, time-variant and acquisition-dependent components. Typical time-variant factors are the intrinsic crystal efficiencies, which are needed to be updated by a regular normalization scan. Failure to do so would in principle generate artifacts in the reconstructed images due to the use of out of date time-variant factors. For this reason, an assessment of the variability and the impact of the crystal efficiencies in the reconstructed images is important to determine the frequency needed for the normalization scans, as well as to estimate the error obtained when an inappropriate normalization is used. Furthermore, if the fluctuations of these components are low enough, they could be neglected and nearly artifact-free reconstructions become achievable without performing a regular normalization scan. In this work, we analyse the impact of the time-variant factors in the component-based normalization used in the Biograph mMR scanner, but the work is applicable to other PET scanners. These factors are the intrinsic crystal efficiencies and the axial factors. For the latter, we propose a new method to obtain fixed axial factors that was validated with simulated data. Regarding the crystal efficiencies, we assessed their fluctuations during a period of 230 d and we found that they had good stability and low dispersion. We studied the impact of not including the intrinsic crystal efficiencies in the normalization when reconstructing simulated and real data. Based on this assessment and using the fixed axial factors, we propose the use of a time-invariant normalization that is able to achieve comparable results to the standard, daily updated, normalization factors used in this

  13. Investigation of the CRT performance of a PET scanner based in liquid xenon: A Monte Carlo study

    CERN Document Server

    Gomez-Cadenas, J J; Ferrario, P; Monrabal, F; Rodríguez, J; Toledo, J F

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of the time of flight of the two 511 keV gammas recorded in coincidence in a PET scanner provides an effective way of reducing the random background and therefore increases the scanner sensitivity, provided that the coincidence resolving time (CRT) of the gammas is sufficiently good. Existing commercial systems based in LYSO crystals, such as the GEMINIS of Philips, reach CRT values of ~ 600 ps (FWHM). In this paper we present a Monte Carlo investigation of the CRT performance of a PET scanner exploiting the scintillating properties of liquid xenon. We find that an excellent CRT of 60-70 ps (depending on the PDE of the sensor) can be obtained if the scanner is instrumented with silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) sensitive to the ultraviolet light emitted by xenon. Alternatively, a CRT of 120 ps can be obtained instrumenting the scanner with (much cheaper) blue-sensitive SiPMs coated with a suitable wavelength shifter. These results show the excellent time of flight capabilities of a PET device b...

  14. Use of a clinical PET/MR scanner for preclinical research with first results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chary, Karthik; Teuho, Jarmo; Virta, Jenni; Sipilä, Hannu; Saunavaara, Virva; Roivainen, Anne; Teräs, Mika [Turku PET Centre, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland)

    2014-07-29

    This study was performed to evaluate the feasibility of preclinical imaging in a clinical PET/MR system. Preliminary sequences were evaluated for establishing preclinical protocols for rat brain and rabbit knee. Rats were placed in a stereotactic holder, allowing a 30 minute scan time before re-administration of anesthesia. In-house developed warm-water heating system was used to maintain the body temperature at 37.5°C, monitored using an MR-compatible rectal probe. Brain imaging was performed with a dedicated 4 channel phased array receive coil (RAPID Biomedical GmbH, Germany). High resolution coronal images were acquired using conventional T1-SE (0.30x0.30x1.2mm) and T2-TSE (0.23x0.23x0.7mm) with a total scan time of 30 min. PET/MR imaging was performed on two white rabbits. The rabbits were imaged in a custom wooden holder. PET/MR protocol had a total duration of 45 minutes. No external heating was used. MR protocol consisted of anatomical T1, T2 and PDW of the knees, using a SENSE Flex-S coil. MR attenuation correction (MRAC) was acquired with 3D T1-FFE using three-class segmentation. A dynamic 30 minute PET acquisition was started on injection of 33.8MBq of Ga-68. Animal coils enabled high resolution images to be acquired in reasonable acquisition time with regards to animal handling and anesthesia. T1 and T2 images provided good differentiation of anatomy in the rat brain with high contrast. T1, T2 and PDW images of the rabbit knee had high resolution and differentiation of anatomical structures. MRAC was able to distinguish the knees and the body contour. Image fusion of PET and MR was able to localize the infection, which was confirmed by a physician. Pre-clinical imaging with the Ingenuity TF was deemed feasible, although PET imaging is limited by the resolution of the scanner. The preliminary sequences were successfully implemented for future studies on the Ingenuity TF.

  15. Data processing and image reconstruction methods for the HEAD PENN-PET scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karp, J.S.; Becher, A.J.; Matej, S. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Kinahan, P.E. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1998-06-01

    Methods of reconstruction and quantitation are developed for a 3D system and are evaluated on the septa-less HEAD PENN-PET scanner, which has a very large axial acceptance angle ({theta}{sub max} = {+-}28{degree} in the center) and large axial field-of-view of 256 mm. To overcome the difficulties of data storage and reconstruction time with 3D reconstruction, the authors have reduced the size of the 4-D projection matrix required for 3D-RP reconstruction, and compared the results to the Fourier rebinning (FORE) algorithm. Both approaches achieve a favorable tradeoff in data storage requirements, reconstruction time, and accuracy that are suitable for clinical use. The authors have also studied the application of the FORE algorithm to transmission scans acquired with a singles point source ({sup 137}Cs) so that data quantitation can be performed.

  16. The INSIDE project: on-line monitoring and simulation validation with the in-beam PET scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, V.; INSIDE Collaboration

    2017-05-01

    The quality assurance of particle therapy treatment is a fundamental issue that can be addressed by developing reliable monitoring techniques and indicators of the treatment plan accuracy. Monitoring using Position Emission Tomography (PET) systems is the only in-vivo non invasive technique employed clinically and has been carried out in particle therapy since 1997. However, the PET monitoring of β + emitter isotopes is typically done after the treatment, resulting in a large fraction of lost data because of the isotopes rapid physical decay. The INSIDE collaboration has recently installed an in-beam PET scanner at the Italian National Center of Oncologic Hadrontherapy in Pavia, Italy. Here, there is an ongoing project in order to start testing the method on patients. This work focuses on the online performances of the scanner with clinical beams.

  17. Spatial distortion correction and crystal identification for MRI-compatible position-sensitive avalanche photodiode-based PET scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Abhijit J; Joshi, Anand A; Wu, Yibao; Leahy, Richard M; Cherry, Simon R; Badawi, Ramsey D

    2009-06-01

    Position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPDs) are gaining widespread acceptance in modern PET scanner designs, and owing to their relative insensitivity to magnetic fields, especially in those that are MRI-compatible. Flood histograms in PET scanners are used to determine the crystal of annihilation photon interaction and hence, for detector characterization and routine quality control. For PET detectors that use PSAPDs, flood histograms show a characteristic pincushion distortion when Anger logic is used for event positioning. A small rotation in the flood histogram is also observed when the detectors are placed in a magnetic field. We first present a general purpose automatic method for spatial distortion correction for flood histograms of PSAPD-based PET detectors when placed both inside and outside a MRI scanner. Analytical formulae derived for this scheme are based on a hybrid approach that combines desirable properties from two existing event positioning schemes. The rotation of the flood histogram due to the magnetic field is determined iteratively and is accounted for in the scheme. We then provide implementation details of a method for crystal identification we have previously proposed and evaluate it for cases when the PET detectors are both outside and in a magnetic field. In this scheme, Fourier analysis is used to generate a lower-order spatial approximation of the distortion-corrected PSAPD flood histogram, which we call the 'template'. The template is then registered to the flood histogram using a diffeomorphic iterative intensity-based warping scheme. The calculated deformation field is then applied to the segmentation of the template to obtain a segmentation of the flood histogram. A manual correction tool is also developed for exceptional cases. We present a quantitative assessment of the proposed distortion correction scheme and crystal identification method against conventional methods. Our results indicate that our proposed methods lead to

  18. Evaluation of transmission methodology and attenuation correction for the microPET Focus 220 animal scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehnert, Wencke [School of Medical Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, PO Box 170, Lidcombe NSW 1825 (Australia); Meikle, Steven R [School of Medical Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, PO Box 170, Lidcombe NSW 1825 (Australia); Siegel, Stefan [Siemens Preclinical Solutions, 810 Innovation Drive, Knoxville, TN 37932 (United States); Newport, Danny [Siemens Preclinical Solutions, 810 Innovation Drive, Knoxville, TN 37932 (United States); Banati, Richard B [School of Medical Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, PO Box 170, Lidcombe NSW 1825 (Australia); Rosenfeld, Anatoly B [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong NSW 2522 (Australia)

    2006-08-21

    An accurate, low noise estimate of photon attenuation in the subject is required for quantitative microPET studies of molecular tracer distributions in vivo. In this work, several transmission-based measurement techniques were compared, including coincidence mode with and without rod windowing, singles mode with two different energy sources ({sup 68}Ge and {sup 57}Co), and postinjection transmission scanning. In addition, the effectiveness of transmission segmentation and the propagation of transmission bias and noise into the emission images were examined. The {sup 57}Co singles measurements provided the most accurate attenuation coefficients and superior signal-to-noise ratio, while {sup 68}Ge singles measurements were degraded due to scattering from the object. Scatter correction of {sup 68}Ge transmission data improved the accuracy for a 10 cm phantom but over-corrected for a mouse phantom. {sup 57}Co scanning also resulted in low bias and noise in postinjection transmission scans for emission activities up to 20 MBq. Segmentation worked most reliably for transmission data acquired with {sup 57}Co but the minor improvement in accuracy of attenuation coefficients and signal-to-noise may not justify its use, particularly for small subjects. We conclude that {sup 57}Co singles transmission scanning is the most suitable method for measured attenuation correction on the microPET Focus 220 animal scanner.

  19. Design and performance evaluation of a high resolution IRI-microPET preclinical scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islami rad, S.Z., E-mail: szislami@yahoo.com [Department of Physic, Faculty of Science, University of Qom, Qom (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Peyvandi, R. Gholipour; Lehdarboni, M. Askari; Ghafari, A.A. [Instrumentation Research Group, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-05-01

    PET for small animal, IRI-microPET, was designed and built at the NSTRI. The scanner is made of four detectors positioned on a rotating gantry at a distance 50 mm from the center. Each detector consists of a 10×10 crystal matrix of 2×2×10 mm{sup 3} directly coupled to a PS-PMT. A position encoding circuit for specific PS-PMT has been designed, built and tested with a PD-MFS-2MS/s-8/14 data acquisition board. After implementing reconstruction algorithms (FBP, MLEM and SART) on sinograms, images quality and system performance were evaluated by energy resolution, timing resolution, spatial resolution, scatter fraction, sensitivity, RMS contrast and SNR parameters. The energy spectra were obtained for the crystals with an energy window of 300–700 keV. The energy resolution in 511 keV averaged over all modules, detectors, and crystals, was 23.5%. A timing resolution of 2.4 ns FWHM obtained by coincidence timing spectrum was measured with crystal LYSO. The radial and tangential resolutions for {sup 18}F (1.15-mm inner diameter) at the center of the field of view were 1.81 mm and 1.90 mm, respectively. At a radial offset of 5 mm, the FWHM values were 1.96 and 2.06 mm. The system scatter fraction was 7.1% for the mouse phantom. The sensitivity was measured for different energy windows, leading to a sensitivity of 1.74% at the center of FOV. Also, images quality was evaluated by RMS contrast and SNR factors, and the results show that the reconstructed images by MLEM algorithm have the best RMS contrast, and SNR. The IRI-microPET presents high image resolution, low scatter fraction values and improved SNR for animal studies.

  20. A count-rate model for PET scanners using pixelated Anger-logic detectors with different scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surti, S; Karp, J S [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, 110 Donner Building (HUP), 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2005-12-07

    A high count-rate simulation (HCRSim) model has been developed so that all results are derived from fundamental physics principles. Originally developed to study the behaviour of continuous sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) detectors, this model is now applied to PET scanners based on pixelated Anger-logic detectors using lanthanum bromide (LaBr{sub 3}), gadolinium orthosilicate (GSO) and lutetium orthosilicate (LSO) scintillators. This simulation has been used to study the effect on scanner deadtime and pulse pileup at high activity levels due to the scintillator stopping power ({mu}), decay time ({tau}) and energy resolution. Simulations were performed for a uniform 20 cm diameter x 70 cm long cylinder (NEMA NU2-2001 standard) in a whole-body scanner with an 85 cm ring diameter and a 25 cm axial field-of-view. Our results for these whole-body scanners demonstrate the potential of a pixelated Anger-logic detector and the relationship of its performance with the scanner NEC rate. Faster signal decay and short coincidence timing window lead to a reduction in deadtime and randoms fraction in the LaBr{sub 3} and LSO scanners compared to GSO. The excellent energy resolution of LaBr{sub 3} leads to the lowest scatter fraction for all scanners and helps compensate for reduced sensitivity compared to the GSO and LSO scanners, leading to the highest NEC values at high activity concentrations. The LSO scanner has the highest sensitivity of all the scanner designs investigated here, therefore leading to the highest peak NEC value but at a lower activity concentration than that of LaBr{sub 3}.

  1. A count-rate model for PET scanners using pixelated Anger-logic detectors with different scintillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surti, S; Karp, J S

    2005-12-07

    A high count-rate simulation (HCRSim) model has been developed so that all results are derived from fundamental physics principles. Originally developed to study the behaviour of continuous sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) detectors, this model is now applied to PET scanners based on pixelated Anger-logic detectors using lanthanum bromide (LaBr(3)), gadolinium orthosilicate (GSO) and lutetium orthosilicate (LSO) scintillators. This simulation has been used to study the effect on scanner deadtime and pulse pileup at high activity levels due to the scintillator stopping power (mu), decay time (tau) and energy resolution. Simulations were performed for a uniform 20 cm diameter x 70 cm long cylinder (NEMA NU2-2001 standard) in a whole-body scanner with an 85 cm ring diameter and a 25 cm axial field-of-view. Our results for these whole-body scanners demonstrate the potential of a pixelated Anger-logic detector and the relationship of its performance with the scanner NEC rate. Faster signal decay and short coincidence timing window lead to a reduction in deadtime and randoms fraction in the LaBr(3) and LSO scanners compared to GSO. The excellent energy resolution of LaBr(3) leads to the lowest scatter fraction for all scanners and helps compensate for reduced sensitivity compared to the GSO and LSO scanners, leading to the highest NEC values at high activity concentrations. The LSO scanner has the highest sensitivity of all the scanner designs investigated here, therefore leading to the highest peak NEC value but at a lower activity concentration than that of LaBr(3).

  2. Advantages and pitfalls of the silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) as photodetector for the next generation of PET scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Guerra, Alberto, E-mail: alberto.delguerra@df.unipi.i [Department of Physics, University of Pisa, Pisa I-56127 (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Pisa, Pisa I-56127 (Italy); Belcari, Nicola; Giuseppina Bisogni, Maria [Department of Physics, University of Pisa, Pisa I-56127 (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Pisa, Pisa I-56127 (Italy); LLosa, Gabriela [Department of Physics, University of Pisa, Pisa I-56127 (Italy); Marcatili, Sara [Department of Physics, University of Pisa, Pisa I-56127 (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Pisa, Pisa I-56127 (Italy); Ambrosi, Giovanni [INFN Sezione di Perugia, Perugia 10-06100 (Italy); Corsi, Franco; Marzocca, Cristoforo [DEE, Politecnico di Bari, I-70125 Bari (Italy); INFN Sezione di Bari, I-70125 Bari (Italy); Dalla Betta, Gianfranco [Department of Information and Communication Technology, University of Trento, I-38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); INFN Sezione di Trento, 38100 Povo di Trento (Italy); Piemonte, Claudio [FBK-irst, Center for Materials and Microsystems, I-38050 Povo di Trento (Italy)

    2010-05-21

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) are a novel type of photodetectors that show great promise for nuclear medicine applications and especially for the next generation of PET scanners. The INFN collaboration DASIPM2 is investigating in depth the properties of the SiPM developed at FBK-irst (Trento, Italy), whose performance compete successfully with those of similar devices produced by commercial companies, but have in addition novel and attractive properties, such as monolithic matrix arrangement. In this paper we illustrate the advantages and pitfalls of the SiPM for PET applications. In particular we report on the most recent experimental results for SiPM and SiPM matrices performances: (i) an intrinsic very good time resolution that coupled to a high PDE could favor time-of-flight PET exploitation; (ii) very high photodetector granularity that allows position determination with continuous crystal and possibly stacking of several layers, i.e., Depth Of Interaction information capability thus paving the way for the construction for the next generation of PET cameras; (iii) MRI compatibility in magnetic field and magnetic field gradient, thus giving the possibility of constructing a state-of-the-art PET insert within an MRI scanner.

  3. Voxelwise lp-ntPET for detecting localized, transient dopamine release of unknown timing: sensitivity analysis and application to cigarette smoking in the PET scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su Jin; Sullivan, Jenna M; Wang, Shuo; Cosgrove, Kelly P; Morris, Evan D

    2014-09-01

    The "linear parametric neurotransmitter PET" (lp-ntPET) model estimates time variation in endogenous neurotransmitter levels from dynamic PET data. The pattern of dopamine (DA) change over time may be an important element of the brain's response to addictive substances such as cigarettes or alcohol. We have extended the lp-ntPET model from the original region of interest (ROI) - based implementation to be able to apply the model at the voxel level. The resulting endpoint is a dynamic image, or movie, of transient neurotransmitter changes. Simulations were performed to select threshold values to reduce the false positive rate when applied to real (11)C-raclopride PET data. We tested the new voxelwise method on simulated data, and finally, we applied it to (11)C-raclopride PET data of subjects smoking cigarettes in the PET scanner. In simulation, the temporal precision of neurotransmitter response was shown to be similar to that of ROI-based lp-ntPET (standard deviation ∼ 3 min). False positive rates for the voxelwise method were well controlled by combining a statistical threshold (the F-test) with a new spatial (cluster-size) thresholding operation. Sensitivity of detection for the new algorithm was greater than 80% for the case of short-lived DA changes that occur in subregions of the striatum as might be the case with cigarette smoking. Finally, in (11)C-raclopride PET data, DA movies reveal for the first time that different temporal patterns of the DA response to smoking may exist in different subregions of the striatum. These spatiotemporal patterns of neurotransmitter change created by voxelwise lp-ntPET may serve as novel biomarkers for addiction and/or treatment efficacy.

  4. Influences of 3D PET scanner components on increased scatter evaluated by a Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Koshino, Kazuhiro; Iida, Hidehiro

    2017-05-01

    Monte Carlo simulation is widely applied to evaluate the performance of three-dimensional positron emission tomography (3D-PET). For accurate scatter simulations, all components that generate scatter need to be taken into account. The aim of this work was to identify the components that influence scatter. The simulated geometries of a PET scanner were: a precisely reproduced configuration including all of the components; a configuration with the bed, the tunnel and shields; a configuration with the bed and shields; and the simplest geometry with only the bed. We measured and simulated the scatter fraction using two different set-ups: (1) as prescribed by NEMA-NU 2007 and (2) a similar set-up but with a shorter line source, so that all activity was contained only inside the field-of-view (FOV), in order to reduce influences of components outside the FOV. The scatter fractions for the two experimental set-ups were, respectively, 45% and 38%. Regarding the geometrical configurations, the former two configurations gave simulation results in good agreement with the experimental results, but simulation results of the simplest geometry were significantly different at the edge of the FOV. From the simulation of the precise configuration, the object (scatter phantom) was the source of more than 90% of the scatter. This was also confirmed by visualization of photon trajectories. Then, the bed and the tunnel were mainly the sources of the rest of the scatter. From the simulation results, we concluded that the precise construction was not needed; the shields, the tunnel, the bed and the object were sufficient for accurate scatter simulations.

  5. Initial validation of 4D-model for a clinical PET scanner using the Monte Carlo code gate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Igor F.; Lima, Fernando R.A.; Gomes, Marcelo S., E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.b [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Vieira, Jose W.; Pacheco, Ludimila M. [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia (IFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Chaves, Rosa M. [Instituto de Radium e Supervoltagem Ivo Roesler, Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Building exposure computational models (ECM) of emission tomography (PET and SPECT) currently has several dedicated computing tools based on Monte Carlo techniques (SimSET, SORTEO, SIMIND, GATE). This paper is divided into two steps: (1) using the dedicated code GATE (Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission) to build a 4D model (where the fourth dimension is the time) of a clinical PET scanner from General Electric, GE ADVANCE, simulating the geometric and electronic structures suitable for this scanner, as well as some phenomena 4D, for example, rotating gantry; (2) the next step is to evaluate the performance of the model built here in the reproduction of test noise equivalent count rate (NEC) based on the NEMA Standards Publication NU protocols 2-2007 for this tomography. The results for steps (1) and (2) will be compared with experimental and theoretical values of the literature showing actual state of art of validation. (author)

  6. Energy-based scatter correction for 3-D PET scanners using NaI(T1) detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, L E; Karp, J S; Freifelder, R

    2000-05-01

    Earlier investigations with BGO positron emission tomography (PET) scanners showed that the scatter correction technique based on multiple acquisitions with different energy windows are problematic to implement because of the poor energy resolution of BGO (22%), particularly for whole-body studies. We believe that these methods are likely to work better with NaI(TI) because of the better energy resolution achievable with NaI(TI) detectors (10%). Therefore, we investigate two different choices for the energy window, a low-energy window (LEW) on the Compton spectrum at 400-450 keV, and a high-energy window (HEW) within the photopeak (lower threshold above 511 keV). The results obtained for our three-dimensional (3-D) (septa-less) whole-body scanners [axial field of view (FOV) of 12.8 cm and 25.6 cm] as well as for our 3-D brain scanner (axial FOV of 25.6 cm) show an accurate prediction of the scatter distribution for the estimation of trues method (ETM) using a HEW, leading to a significant reduction of the scatter contamination. The dual-energy window (DEW) technique using a LEW is shown to be intrinsically wrong; in particular, it fails for line source and bar phantom measurements. However, the method is able to produce good results for homogeneous activity distributions. Both methods are easy to implement, are fast, have a low noise propagation, and will be applicable to other PET scanners with good energy resolution and stability, such as hybrid NaI(TI) PET/SPECT dual-head cameras and future PET cameras with GSO or LSO scintillators.

  7. Quantitative measurements of cerebral blood flow in volume imaging PET scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.J.; Shao, L.; Freifelder, R.; Karp, J.S.; Ragland, J.D. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Quantitative measurements of Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF) are performed in a volume imaging PET Scanner by means of moderate activity infusions. In equilibrium infusions, activations are measured by scanning over 10 minutes with 16 minute activations. Typical measured whole brain CBF values are 37{+-}8 ml/min/100g, close to the value of 42 ml/min/100g reported by other groups using this method. For ramped infusions, scanning over 4 minutes with 5 minute activations results in whole brain CBFs of 49 {+-} 9 ml/min/100g, close to the Kety and Schmidt value of 50 ml/min/100g. Both equilibrium and ramped infusion methods have been used to study face and word memory in human subjects. Both methods were able to detect significant activations in regions implicated in human memory. The authors conclude that precise quantitation of regional CBF is achieved using both methods, and that ramped infusions also provide accurate measures of CBF. In addition a simplified protocol for ramped infusion studies has been developed. In this method the whole brain tissue time activity curve generated from dynamic scanning is replaced by an appropriately scaled camera coincidence countrate curve. The resulting whole brain CBF values are only 7% different from the dynamic scan and fit results. Regional CBFs (rCBF) may then be generated from the summed image (4.25 minutes) using a count density vs flow lookup table.

  8. Test of a single module of the J-PET scanner based on plastic scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Moskal, P; Bednarski, T; Czerwiński, E; Kapłon, Ł; Kubicz, E; Moskal, I; Pawlik-Niedźwiecka, M; Sharma, N G; Silarski, M; Zieliński, M; Zoń, N; Białas, P; Gajos, A; Kochanowski, A; Korcyl, G; Kowal, J; Kowalski, P; Kozik, T; Krzemień, W; Molenda, M; Pałka, M; Raczyński, L; Rudy, Z; Salabura, P; Słomski, A; Smyrski, J; Strzelecki, A; Wieczorek, A; Wiślicki, W

    2014-01-01

    Time of Flight Positron Emission Tomography scanner based on plastic scintillators is being developed at the Jagiellonian University by the J-PET collaboration. The main challenge of the conducted research lies in the elaboration of a method allowing application of plastic scintillators for the detection of low energy gamma quanta. In this article we report on tests of a single detection module built out from BC-420 plastic scintillator strip (with dimensions of 5x19x300mm^3) read out at two ends by Hamamatsu R5320 photomultipliers. The measurements were performed using collimated beam of annihilation quanta from the 68Ge isotope and applying the Serial Data Analyzer (Lecroy SDA6000A) which enabled sampling of signals with 50ps intervals. The time resolution of the prototype module was established to be better than 80ps (sigma) for a single level discrimination. The spatial resolution of the determination of the hit position along the strip was determined to be about 0.93cm (sigma) for the annihilation quanta...

  9. Design of a coincidence processing board for a dual-head PET scanner for breast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, J.D. [Departamento de Ingenieria Electronica, University Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n 46022, Valencia (Spain)]. E-mail: jormarp1@doctor.upv.es; Toledo, J. [Departamento de Ingenieria Electronica, University Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n 46022, Valencia (Spain); Esteve, R. [Departamento de Ingenieria Electronica, University Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n 46022, Valencia (Spain); Sebastia, A. [Departamento de Ingenieria Electronica, University Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n 46022, Valencia (Spain); Mora, F.J. [Departamento de Ingenieria Electronica, University Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n 46022, Valencia (Spain); Benlloch, J.M. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, CSIC-UV, Valencia (Spain); Fernandez, M.M. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, CSIC-UV, Valencia (Spain); Gimenez, M. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, CSIC-UV, Valencia (Spain); Gimenez, E.N. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, CSIC-UV, Valencia (Spain); Lerche, Ch.W. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, CSIC-UV, Valencia (Spain); Pavon, N. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, CSIC-UV, Valencia (Spain); Sanchez, F. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, CSIC-UV, Valencia (Spain)

    2005-07-01

    This paper describes the design of a coincidence processing board for a dual-head Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanner for breast imaging. The proposed block-oriented data acquisition system relies on a high-speed DSP processor for fully digital trigger and on-line event processing that surpasses the performance of traditional analog coincidence detection systems. A mixed-signal board has been designed and manufactured. The analog section comprises 12 coaxial inputs (six per head) which are digitized by means of two 8-channel 12-bit 40-MHz ADCs in order to acquire the scintillation pulse, the charge division signals and the depth of interaction within the scintillator. At the digital section, a state-of-the-art FPGA is used as deserializer and also implements the DMA interface to the DSP processor by storing each digitized channel into a fast embedded FIFO memory. The system incorporates a high-speed USB 2.0 interface to the host computer.

  10. Sampling FEE and Trigger-less DAQ for the J-PET Scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Korcyl, G; Bednarski, T; Białas, P; Czerwiński, E; Dulski, K; Gajos, A; Głowacz, B; Jasińska, B; Kamińska, D; Kapłon, Ł; Kowalski, P; Kozik, T; Krzemień, W; Kubicz, E; Mohammed, M; Niedźwiecki, Sz; Pałka, M; Pawlik-Niedźwiecka, M; Raczyński, L; Rudy, Z; Rundel, O; Sharma, N G; Silarski, M; Słomski, A; Stoła, K; Strzelecki, A; Wieczorek, A; Wiślicki, W; Zgardzińska, B K; Zieliński, M; Moskal, P

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a complete Data Acquisition System (DAQ) together with the readout mechanisms for the J-PET tomography scanner. In general detector readout chain is constructed out of Front-End Electronics (FEE), measurement devices like Time-to-Digital or Analog-to-Digital Converters (TDCs or ADCs), data collectors and storage. We have developed a system capable for maintaining continuous readout of digitized data without preliminary selection. Such operation mode results in up to 8 Gbps data stream, therefore it is required to introduce a dedicated module for online event building and feature extraction. The Central Controller Module, equipped with Xilinx Zynq SoC and 16 optical transceivers serves as such true real time computing facility. Our solution for the continuous data recording (trigger-less) is a novel approach in such detector systems and assures that most of the information is preserved on the storage for further, high-level processing. Signal discrimination applies an unique method of...

  11. Performance comparison of two commercial BGO-based PET/CT scanners using NEMA NU 2-2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolard, Grégory; Prior, John O; Modolo, Luca; Delaloye, Angelika Bischof; Kosinski, Marek; Wastiel, Claude; Malterre, Jérôme; Bulling, Shelley; Bochud, François; Verdun, Francis R

    2007-07-01

    Combined positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) scanners play a major role in medicine for in vivo imaging in an increasing number of diseases in oncology, cardiology, neurology, and psychiatry. With the advent of short-lived radioisotopes other than 18F and newer scanners, there is a need to optimize radioisotope activity and acquisition protocols, as well as to compare scanner performances on an objective basis. The Discovery-LS (D-LS) was among the first clinical PET/CT scanners to be developed and has been extensively characterized with older National Electrical Manufacturer Association (NEMA) NU 2-1994 standards. At the time of publication of the latest version of the standards (NU 2-2001) that have been adapted for whole-body imaging under clinical conditions, more recent models from the same manufacturer, i.e., Discovery-ST (D-ST) and Discovery-STE (D-STE), were commercially available. We report on the full characterization both in the two- and three-dimensional acquisition mode of the D-LS according to latest NEMA NU 2-2001 standards (spatial resolution, sensitivity, count rate performance, accuracy of count losses, and random coincidence correction and image quality), as well as a detailed comparison with the newer D-ST widely used and whose characteristics are already published.

  12. Fully-3D PET image reconstruction using scanner-independent, adaptive projection data and highly rotation-symmetric voxel assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheins, J J; Herzog, H; Shah, N J

    2011-03-01

    For iterative, fully 3D positron emission tomography (PET) image reconstruction intrinsic symmetries can be used to significantly reduce the size of the system matrix. The precalculation and beneficial memory-resident storage of all nonzero system matrix elements is possible where sufficient compression exists. Thus, reconstruction times can be minimized independently of the used projector and more elaborate weighting schemes, e.g., volume-of-intersection (VOI), are applicable. A novel organization of scanner-independent, adaptive 3D projection data is presented which can be advantageously combined with highly rotation-symmetric voxel assemblies. In this way, significant system matrix compression is achieved. Applications taking into account all physical lines-of-response (LORs) with individual VOI projectors are presented for the Siemens ECAT HR+ whole-body scanner and the Siemens BrainPET, the PET component of a novel hybrid-MR/PET imaging system. Measured and simulated data were reconstructed using the new method with ordered-subset-expectation-maximization (OSEM). Results are compared to those obtained by the sinogram-based OSEM reconstruction provided by the manufacturer. The higher computational effort due to the more accurate image space sampling provides significantly improved images in terms of resolution and noise.

  13. Performance Characteristics of BGO Detectors for a Low Cost Preclinical PET Scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H; Vu, N T; Bao, Q; Silverman, R W; Berry-Pusey, B N; Douraghy, A; Williams, D A; Rannou, F R; Stout, D B; Chatziioannou, A F

    2010-06-01

    PETbox is a low-cost benchtop PET scanner dedicated to high throughput preclinical imaging that is currently under development at our institute. This paper presents the design and characterization of the detectors that are used in the PETbox system. In this work, bismuth germanate scintillator was used for the detector, taking advantage of its high stopping power, high photoelectric event fraction, lack of intrinsic background radiation and low cost. The detector block was segmented into a pixelated array consisting of 20 × 44 elements, with a crystal pitch of 2.2 mm and a crystal cross section of 2 mm × 2 mm. The effective area of the array was 44 mm × 96.8 mm. The array was coupled to two Hamamatsu H8500 position sensitive photomultiplier tubes, forming a flat-panel type detector head with a sensitive area large enough to cover the whole body of a typical laboratory mouse. Two such detector heads were constructed and their performance was characterized. For one detector head, the energy resolution ranged from 16.1% to 38.5% full width at half maximum (FWHM), with a mean of 20.1%; for the other detector head, the energy resolution ranged from 15.5% to 42.7% FWHM, with a mean of 19.6%. The intrinsic spatial resolution was measured to range from 1.55 mm to 2.39 mm FWHM along the detector short axis and from 1.48 mm to 2.33 mm FWHM along the detector long axis, with an average of 1.78 mm. Coincidence timing resolution for the detector pair was measured to be 4.1 ns FWHM. These measurement results show that the detectors are suitable for our specific application.

  14. Simulation of the expected performance of a seamless scanner for brain PET based on highly pixelated CdTe detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhaylova, Ekaterina; De Lorenzo, Gianluca; Chmeissani, Mokhtar; Kolstein, Machiel; Cañadas, Mario; Arce, Pedro; Calderón, Yonatan; Uzun, Dilber; Ariño, Gerard; Macias-Montero, José Gabriel; Martinez, Ricardo; Puigdengoles, Carles; Cabruja, Enric

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this work is the evaluation of the design for a nonconventional PET scanner, the voxel imaging PET (VIP), based on pixelated room-temperature CdTe detectors yielding a true 3-D impact point with a density of 450 channels/cm(3), for a total 6 336 000 channels in a seamless ring shaped volume. The system is simulated and evaluated following the prescriptions of the NEMA NU 2-2001 and the NEMA NU 4-2008 standards. Results show that the excellent energy resolution of the CdTe detectors (1.6% for 511 keV photons), together with the small voxel pitch (1 × 1 × 2 mm(3)), and the crack-free ring geometry, give the design the potential to overcome the current limitations of PET scanners and to approach the intrinsic image resolution limits set by physics. The VIP is expected to reach a competitive sensitivity and a superior signal purity with respect to values commonly quoted for state-of-the-art scintillating crystal PETs. The system can provide 14 cps/kBq with a scatter fraction of 3.95% and 21 cps/kBq with a scatter fraction of 0.73% according to NEMA NU 2-2001 and NEMA NU 4-2008, respectively. The calculated NEC curve has a peak value of 122 kcps at 5.3 kBq/mL for NEMA NU 2-2001 and 908 kcps at 1.6 MBq/mL for NEMA NU 4-2008. The proposed scanner can achieve an image resolution of ~ 1 mm full-width at half-maximum in all directions. The virtually noise-free data sample leads to direct positive impact on the quality of the reconstructed images. As a consequence, high-quality high-resolution images can be obtained with significantly lower number of events compared to conventional scanners. Overall, simulation results suggest the VIP scanner can be operated either at normal dose for fast scanning and high patient throughput, or at low dose to decrease the patient radioactivity exposure. The design evaluation presented in this work is driving the development and the optimization of a fully operative prototype to prove the feasibility of the VIP concept.

  15. Synthesis and quality control of fluorodeoxyglucose and performance assessment of Siemens MicroFocus 220 small animal PET scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phaterpekar, Siddhesh Nitin

    The scope of this article is to cover the synthesis and quality control procedures involved in production of Fludeoxyglucose (18F--FDG). The article also describes the cyclotron production of 18F radioisotope and gives a brief overview on operations and working of a fixed energy medical cyclotron. The quality control procedures for FDG involve radiochemical and radionuclidic purity tests, pH tests, chemical purity tests, sterility tests, endotoxin tests. Each of these procedures were carried out for multiple batches of FDG with a passing rate of 95% among 20 batches. The article also covers the quality assurance steps for the Siemens MicroPET Focus 220 Scanner using a Jaszczak phantom. We have carried out spatial resolution tests on the scanner, with an average transaxial resolution of 1.775mm with 2-3mm offset. Tests involved detector efficiency, blank scan sinograms and transmission sinograms. A series of radioactivity distribution tests are also carried out on a uniform phantom, denoting the variations in radioactivity and uniformity by using cylindrical ROIs in the transverse region of the final image. The purpose of these quality control tests is to make sure the manufactured FDG is biocompatible with the human body. Quality assurance tests are carried on PET scanners for efficient performance, and to make sure the quality of images acquired is according to the radioactivity distribution in the subject of interest.

  16. Physical and clinical performance of the mCT time-of-flight PET/CT scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakoby, B. W.; Bercier, Y.; Conti, M.; Casey, M. E.; Bendriem, B.; Townsend, D. W.

    2011-04-01

    Time-of-flight (TOF) measurement capability promises to improve PET image quality. We characterized the physical and clinical PET performance of the first Biograph mCT TOF PET/CT scanner (Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc.) in comparison with its predecessor, the Biograph TruePoint TrueV. In particular, we defined the improvements with TOF. The physical performance was evaluated according to the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) NU 2-2007 standard with additional measurements to specifically address the TOF capability. Patient data were analyzed to obtain the clinical performance of the scanner. As expected for the same size crystal detectors, a similar spatial resolution was measured on the mCT as on the TruePoint TrueV. The mCT demonstrated modestly higher sensitivity (increase by 19.7 ± 2.8%) and peak noise equivalent count rate (NECR) (increase by 15.5 ± 5.7%) with similar scatter fractions. The energy, time and spatial resolutions for a varying single count rate of up to 55 Mcps resulted in 11.5 ± 0.2% (FWHM), 527.5 ± 4.9 ps (FWHM) and 4.1 ± 0.0 mm (FWHM), respectively. With the addition of TOF, the mCT also produced substantially higher image contrast recovery and signal-to-noise ratios in a clinically-relevant phantom geometry. The benefits of TOF were clearly demonstrated in representative patient images.

  17. Micro insert: a prototype full-ring PET device for improving the image resolution of a small-animal PET scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Heyu; Pal, Debashish; Song, Tae Yong; O'Sullivan, Joseph A; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2008-10-01

    A full-ring PET insert device should be able to enhance the image resolution of existing small-animal PET scanners. The device consists of 18 high-resolution PET detectors in a cylindric enclosure. Each detector contains a cerium-doped lutetium oxyorthosilicate array (12 x 12 crystals, 0.72 x 1.51 x 3.75 mm each) coupled to a position-sensitive photomultiplier tube via an optical fiber bundle made of 8 x 16 square multiclad fibers. Signals from the insert detectors are connected to the scanner through the electronics of the disabled first ring of detectors, which permits coincidence detection between the 2 systems. Energy resolution of a detector was measured using a (68)Ge point source, and a calibrated (68)Ge point source stepped across the axial field of view (FOV) provided the sensitivity profile of the system. A (22)Na point source imaged at different offsets from the center characterized the in-plane resolution of the insert system. Imaging was then performed with a Derenzo phantom filled with 19.5 MBq of (18)F-fluoride and imaged for 2 h; a 24.3-g mouse injected with 129.5 MBq of (18)F-fluoride and imaged in 5 bed positions at 3.5 h after injection; and a 22.8-g mouse injected with 14.3 MBq of (18)F-FDG and imaged for 2 h with electrocardiogram gating. The energy resolution of a typical detector module at 511 keV is 19.0% +/- 3.1%. The peak sensitivity of the system is approximately 2.67%. The image resolution of the system ranges from 1.0- to 1.8-mm full width at half maximum near the center of the FOV, depending on the type of coincidence events used for image reconstruction. Derenzo phantom and mouse bone images showed significant improvement in transaxial image resolution using the insert device. Mouse heart images demonstrated the gated imaging capability of the device. We have built a prototype full-ring insert device for a small-animal PET scanner to provide higher-resolution PET images within a reduced imaging FOV. Development of additional

  18. An effective scatter correction method based on single scatter simulation for a 3D whole-body PET scanner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Fei; Yamada Ryoko; Watanabe Mitsuo; Liu Hua-Feng

    2009-01-01

    Hamamatsu SHR74000 is a newly designed full three-dimensional(3D)whole body positron emission tomography (PET)scanner with small crystal size and large field of view(FOV).With the improvement of sensitivity,the scatter events increase significantly at the same time,especially for large objects.Monte Carlo simulations help US to understand the scatter phenomena and provide good references for scatter correction.In this paper,we introduce an effective scatter correction method based on single scatter simulation for the new PET scanner,which accounts for the full 3D scatter correction.With the results from Monte Carlo simulations,we implement a new scale method with special concentration on scatter events from outside the axial FOV and multiple scatter events.The effects of scatter correction are investigated and evaluated by phantom experiments;the results show good improvements in quantitative accuracy and contrast of the images,even for large objects.

  19. New shielding configurations for a simultaneous PET/MRI scanner at 7T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Bo J; Wu, Yibao; Cherry, Simon R; Walton, Jeffrey H

    2014-02-01

    Understanding sources of electromagnetic interference are important in designing any electronic system. This is especially true when combining positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a multimodality system as coupling between the subsystems can degrade the performance of either modality. For this reason, eliminating radio frequency (RF) interference and gradient-induced eddy currents have been major challenges in building simultaneous hybrid PET/MRI systems. MRI requires negligible RF interference at the Larmor resonance frequency, while RF interference at almost any frequency may corrupt PET data. Moreover, any scheme that minimizes these interactions would, ideally, not compromise the performance of either subsystem. This paper lays out a plan to resolve these problems. A carbon fiber composite material is found to be a good RF shield at the Larmor frequency (300MHz in this work) while introducing negligible gradient eddy currents. This carbon fiber composite also provides excellent structural support for the PET detector components. Low frequency electromagnetic radiation (81kHz here) from the switching power supplies of the gradient amplifiers was also found to interfere with the PET detector. Placing the PET detector module between two carbon fiber tubes and grounding the inner carbon fiber tube to the PET detector module ground reduced this interference. Further reductions were achieved by adding thin copper (Cu) foil on the outer carbon fiber case and electrically grounding the PET detector module so that all 3 components had a common ground, i.e. with the PET detector in an electrostatic cage. Finally, gradient switching typical in MRI sequences can result in count losses in the particular PET detector design studied. Moreover, the magnitude of this effect depends on the location of the detector within the magnet bore and which MRI gradient is being switched. These findings have a bearing on future designs of PET

  20. Development of a MPPC-based prototype gantry for future MRI-PET scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurei, Y.; Kataoka, J.; Kato, T.; Fujita, T.; Ohshima, T.; Taya, T.; Yamamoto, S.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed a high spatial resolution, compact Positron Emission Tomography (PET) module designed for small animals and intended for use in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems. This module consists of large-area, 4 × 4 ch MPPC arrays (S11830-3344MF; Hamamatsu Photonics K.K.) optically coupled with Ce-doped (Lu,Y)2(SiO4)O (Ce:LYSO) scintillators fabricated into 16 × 16 matrices of 0.5 × 0.5 mm2 pixels. We set the temperature sensor (LM73CIMK-0; National Semiconductor Corp.) at the rear of the MPPC acceptance surface, and apply optimum voltage to maintain the gain. The eight MPPC-based PET modules and coincidence circuits were assembled into a gantry arranged in a ring 90 mm in diameter to form the MPPC-based PET system. We have developed two types PET gantry: one made of non-magnetic metal and the other made of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) resins. The PET gantry was positioned around the RF coil of the 4.7 T MRI system. We took an image of a point }22Na source under fast spin echo (FSE) and gradient echo (GE), in order to measure the interference between the MPPC-based PET and MRI. The spatial resolution of PET imaging in a transaxial plane of about 1 mm (FWHM) was achieved in all cases. Operating with PET made of ABS has no effect on MR images, while operating with PET made of non-magnetic metal has a significant detrimental effect on MR images. This paper describes our quantitative evaluations of PET images and MR images, and presents a more advanced version of the gantry for future MRI/DOI-PET systems.

  1. Initial results of simultaneous PET/MRI experiments with an MRI-compatible silicon photomultiplier PET scanner

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yoon, Hyun Suk; Ko, Guen Bae; Kwon, Sun Il; Lee, Chan Mi; Ito, Mikiko; Chan Song, In; Lee, Dong Soo; Hong, Seong Jong; Lee, Jae Sung

    2012-01-01

    ...). However, the silicon photomultiplier (SiPM), also called the Geiger-mode APD, is gaining attention in the development of the next generation of PET/MRI systems because the SiPM has much better performance than the APD...

  2. A novel adaptive discrete cosine transform-domain filter for gap-inpainting of high resolution PET scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Cheng-Ting; Wu, Jay; Lin, Hsin-Hon; Chang, Shu-Jun; Chuang, Keh-Shih

    2014-08-01

    Several positron emission tomography (PET) scanners with special detector block arrangements have been developed in recent years to improve the resolution of PET images. However, the discontinuous detector blocks cause gaps in the sinogram. This study proposes an adaptive discrete cosine transform-based (aDCT) filter for gap-inpainting. The gap-corrupted sinogram was morphologically closed and subsequently converted to the DCT domain. A certain number of the largest coefficients in the DCT spectrum were identified to determine the low-frequency preservation region. The weighting factors for the remaining coefficients were determined by an exponential weighting function. The aDCT filter was constructed and applied to two digital phantoms and a simulated phantom introduced with various levels of noise. For the Shepp-Logan head phantom, the aDCT filter filled the gaps effectively. For the Jaszczak phantom, no secondary artifacts were induced after aDCT filtering. The percent mean square error and mean structure similarity of the aDCT filter were superior to those of the DCT2 filter at all noise levels. For the simulated striatal dopamine innervation study, the aDCT filter recovered the shape of the striatum and restored the striatum to reference activity ratios to the ideal value. The proposed aDCT filter can recover the missing gap data in the sinogram and improve the image quality and quantitative accuracy of PET images.

  3. Characterization of disease-related covariance topographies with SSMPCA toolbox: effects of spatial normalization and PET scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shichun; Ma, Yilong; Spetsieris, Phoebe G; Mattis, Paul; Feigin, Andrew; Dhawan, Vijay; Eidelberg, David

    2014-05-01

    To generate imaging biomarkers from disease-specific brain networks, we have implemented a general toolbox to rapidly perform scaled subprofile modeling (SSM) based on principal component analysis (PCA) on brain images of patients and normals. This SSMPCA toolbox can define spatial covariance patterns whose expression in individual subjects can discriminate patients from controls or predict behavioral measures. The technique may depend on differences in spatial normalization algorithms and brain imaging systems. We have evaluated the reproducibility of characteristic metabolic patterns generated by SSMPCA in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). We used [(18) F]fluorodeoxyglucose PET scans from patients with PD and normal controls. Motor-related (PDRP) and cognition-related (PDCP) metabolic patterns were derived from images spatially normalized using four versions of SPM software (spm99, spm2, spm5, and spm8). Differences between these patterns and subject scores were compared across multiple independent groups of patients and control subjects. These patterns and subject scores were highly reproducible with different normalization programs in terms of disease discrimination and cognitive correlation. Subject scores were also comparable in patients with PD imaged across multiple PET scanners. Our findings confirm a very high degree of consistency among brain networks and their clinical correlates in PD using images normalized in four different SPM platforms. SSMPCA toolbox can be used reliably for generating disease-specific imaging biomarkers despite the continued evolution of image preprocessing software in the neuroimaging community. Network expressions can be quantified in individual patients independent of different physical characteristics of PET cameras.

  4. A novel adaptive discrete cosine transform-domain filter for gap-inpainting of high resolution PET scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shih, Cheng-Ting; Lin, Hsin-Hon; Chuang, Keh-Shih [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Wu, Jay, E-mail: jwu@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Science, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Chang, Shu-Jun [Health Physics Division, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Atomic Energy Council, Taoyuan 32546, Taiwan (China)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: Several positron emission tomography (PET) scanners with special detector block arrangements have been developed in recent years to improve the resolution of PET images. However, the discontinuous detector blocks cause gaps in the sinogram. This study proposes an adaptive discrete cosine transform-based (aDCT) filter for gap-inpainting. Methods: The gap-corrupted sinogram was morphologically closed and subsequently converted to the DCT domain. A certain number of the largest coefficients in the DCT spectrum were identified to determine the low-frequency preservation region. The weighting factors for the remaining coefficients were determined by an exponential weighting function. The aDCT filter was constructed and applied to two digital phantoms and a simulated phantom introduced with various levels of noise. Results: For the Shepp-Logan head phantom, the aDCT filter filled the gaps effectively. For the Jaszczak phantom, no secondary artifacts were induced after aDCT filtering. The percent mean square error and mean structure similarity of the aDCT filter were superior to those of the DCT2 filter at all noise levels. For the simulated striatal dopamine innervation study, the aDCT filter recovered the shape of the striatum and restored the striatum to reference activity ratios to the ideal value. Conclusions: The proposed aDCT filter can recover the missing gap data in the sinogram and improve the image quality and quantitative accuracy of PET images.

  5. Impact of detector design on imaging performance of a long axial field-of-view, whole-body PET scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surti, S.; Karp, J. S.

    2015-07-01

    Current generation of commercial time-of-flight (TOF) PET scanners utilize 20-25 mm thick LSO or LYSO crystals and have an axial FOV (AFOV) in the range of 16-22 mm. Longer AFOV scanners would provide increased intrinsic sensitivity and require fewer bed positions for whole-body imaging. Recent simulation work has investigated the sensitivity gains that can be achieved with these long AFOV scanners, and has motivated new areas of investigation such as imaging with a very low dose of injected activity as well as providing whole-body dynamic imaging capability in one bed position. In this simulation work we model a 72 cm long scanner and prioritize the detector design choices in terms of timing resolution, crystal size (spatial resolution), crystal thickness (detector sensitivity), and depth-of-interaction (DOI) measurement capability. The generated list data are reconstructed with a list-mode OSEM algorithm using a Gaussian TOF kernel that depends on the timing resolution and blob basis functions for regularization. We use lesion phantoms and clinically relevant metrics for lesion detectability and contrast measurement. The scan time was fixed at 10 min for imaging a 100 cm long object assuming a 50% overlap between adjacent bed positions. Results show that a 72 cm long scanner can provide a factor of ten reduction in injected activity compared to an identical 18 cm long scanner to get equivalent lesion detectability. While improved timing resolution leads to further gains, using 3 mm (as opposed to 4 mm) wide crystals does not show any significant benefits for lesion detectability. A detector providing 2-level DOI information with equal crystal thickness also does not show significant gains. Finally, a 15 mm thick crystal leads to lower lesion detectability than a 20 mm thick crystal when keeping all other detector parameters (crystal width, timing resolution, and DOI capability) the same. However, improved timing performance with 15

  6. Impact of detector design on imaging performance of a long axial field-of-view, whole-body PET scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surti, S; Karp, J S

    2015-07-07

    Current generation of commercial time-of-flight (TOF) PET scanners utilize 20-25 mm thick LSO or LYSO crystals and have an axial FOV (AFOV) in the range of 16-22 mm. Longer AFOV scanners would provide increased intrinsic sensitivity and require fewer bed positions for whole-body imaging. Recent simulation work has investigated the sensitivity gains that can be achieved with these long AFOV scanners, and has motivated new areas of investigation such as imaging with a very low dose of injected activity as well as providing whole-body dynamic imaging capability in one bed position. In this simulation work we model a 72 cm long scanner and prioritize the detector design choices in terms of timing resolution, crystal size (spatial resolution), crystal thickness (detector sensitivity), and depth-of-interaction (DOI) measurement capability. The generated list data are reconstructed with a list-mode OSEM algorithm using a Gaussian TOF kernel that depends on the timing resolution and blob basis functions for regularization. We use lesion phantoms and clinically relevant metrics for lesion detectability and contrast measurement. The scan time was fixed at 10 min for imaging a 100 cm long object assuming a 50% overlap between adjacent bed positions. Results show that a 72 cm long scanner can provide a factor of ten reduction in injected activity compared to an identical 18 cm long scanner to get equivalent lesion detectability. While improved timing resolution leads to further gains, using 3 mm (as opposed to 4 mm) wide crystals does not show any significant benefits for lesion detectability. A detector providing 2-level DOI information with equal crystal thickness also does not show significant gains. Finally, a 15 mm thick crystal leads to lower lesion detectability than a 20 mm thick crystal when keeping all other detector parameters (crystal width, timing resolution, and DOI capability) the same. However, improved timing performance with 15

  7. Image quality assessment of LaBr{sub 3}-based whole-body 3D PET scanners: a Monte Carlo evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surti, S [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Karp, J S [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Muehllehner, G [Philips Medical Systems, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2004-10-07

    The main thrust for this work is the investigation and design of a whole-body PET scanner based on new lanthanum bromide scintillators. We use Monte Carlo simulations to generate data for a 3D PET scanner based on LaBr{sub 3} detectors, and to assess the count-rate capability and the reconstructed image quality of phantoms with hot and cold spheres using contrast and noise parameters. Previously we have shown that LaBr{sub 3} has very high light output, excellent energy resolution and fast timing properties which can lead to the design of a time-of-flight (TOF) whole-body PET camera. The data presented here illustrate the performance of LaBr{sub 3} without the additional benefit of TOF information, although our intention is to develop a scanner with TOF measurement capability. The only drawbacks of LaBr{sub 3} are the lower stopping power and photo-fraction which affect both sensitivity and spatial resolution. However, in 3D PET imaging where energy resolution is very important for reducing scattered coincidences in the reconstructed image, the image quality attained in a non-TOF LaBr{sub 3} scanner can potentially equal or surpass that achieved with other high sensitivity scanners. Our results show that there is a gain in NEC arising from the reduced scatter and random fractions in a LaBr{sub 3} scanner. The reconstructed image resolution is slightly worse than a high-Z scintillator, but at increased count-rates, reduced pulse pileup leads to an image resolution similar to that of LSO. Image quality simulations predict reduced contrast for small hot spheres compared to an LSO scanner, but improved noise characteristics at similar clinical activity levels.

  8. Development and evaluation of an ultra-fast ASIC for future PET scanners using TOF-capable MPPC array detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambe, T., E-mail: hiro-a-be.n@akane.waseda.jp [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1, Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Ikeda, H. [ISAS/JAXA, 3-1-1, Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara-shi, Kanagawa (Japan); Kataoka, J.; Matsuda, H.; Kato, T. [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1, Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-01-21

    We developed a front-end ASIC for future PET scanners with Time-Of-Flight (TOF) capability to be coupled with 4×4 Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC) arrays. The ASIC is designed based on the open-IP project proposed by JAXA and realized in TSMC 0.35 μm CMOS technology. The circuit comprises 16-channel, low impedance current conveyors for effectively acquiring fast MPPC signals. For precise measurement of the coincidence timing of 511-keV gamma rays, the leading-edge method was used to discriminate the signals. We first tested the time response of the ASIC by illuminating each channel of a MPPC array device 3×3 mm{sup 2} in size with a Pico-second Light Pulsar with a light emission peak of 655 nm and pulse duration of 54 ps (FWHM). We obtained 105 ps (FWHM) on average for each channel in time jitter measurements. Moreover, we compensated for the time lag of each channel with inner delay circuits and succeeded in suppressing about a 700-ps lag to only 15 ps. This paper reports TOF measurements using back-to-back 511-keV signals, and suggests that the ASIC can be a promising device for future TOF-PET scanners based on the MPPC array. - Highlights: • We developed a newly designed large-area monolithic MPPC array. • We obtained fine gain uniformity, and good energy and time resolutions when coupled to the LYSO scintillator. • We fabricated gamma-ray camera consisting of the MPPC array and the submillimeter pixelized LYSO and GGAG scintillators. • In the flood images, each crystal of scintillator matrices was clearly resolved. • Good energy resolutions for 662 keV gamma-rays for each LYSO and GGAG scintillator matrices were obtained.

  9. Characterization of a high-resolution hybrid DOI detector for a dedicated breast PET/CT scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinez, Felipe; Chaudhari, Abhijit J.; Yang, Yongfeng; Farrell, Richard; Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study is to design and test a new high-resolution hybrid depth of interaction (DOI) detector for a dedicated breast PET/CT scanner. Two detectors have been designed and built. The completed detectors are based on a 14 × 14 array of 1.5 × 1.5 × 20 mm3 unpolished lutetium orthosilicate scintillation crystals, with each element coated in a 50 μm layer of reflective material. The detector is read out from both ends using a position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT) and a large active area (20 × 20 mm2) avalanche photodiode (APD) to enable acquisition of DOI information. Nuclear instrumentation modules were used to characterize the detectors’ performances in terms of timing, intrinsic spatial resolution (ISR) and energy resolution, as well as DOI resolution with a dual-ended readout configuration. Measurements with the APD were performed at a temperature of 10 °C. All crystals were identified at all depths, even though the signal amplitude from the PSPMT decreases with depth away from it. We measured a timing resolution of 2.4 ns, and an average energy resolution of 19%. The mean ISR was measured to be 1.2 mm for crystals in the central row of the array for detectors in the face-to-face position. Two off-center positions were measured corresponding to 26° and 51° oblique photon incidence, and the mean ISR at these positions was 1.5 and 1.7 mm, respectively. The average DOI resolution across all crystals and depths was measured to be 2.9 mm (including the beam width of 0.6 mm). This detector design shows good promise as a high-resolution detector for a dedicated breast PET/CT scanner.

  10. PET/CT Scanner and Bone Marrow Biopsy in Detection of Bone Marrow Involvement in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Karak, Fadi; Bou-Orm, Ibrahim R.; Ghosn, Marwan; Kattan, Joseph; Farhat, Fadi; Ibrahim, Toni; Jreige, Mario; El Cheikh, Jean

    2017-01-01

    Evaluation of bone marrow involvement (BMI) is paramount in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) for prognostic and therapeutic reasons. PET/CT scanner (PET) is now a routine examination for the staging of DLBCL with prognostic and therapeutic implications. This study evaluates the role of PET for detecting marrow involvement compared to bone marrow biopsy (BMB). This monocentric study included 54 patients diagnosed with DLBCL between 2009 and 2013 and who had FDG PET/CT in a pre-treatment setting. A correlation analysis of the detection of BMI by PET and BMB was performed. A prognostic evaluation of BMI by BMB and/or PET/CT and correlation with an overall 2-year survival were analyzed. PET was more sensitive for the detection of BMI than BMB (92.3% vs. 38.5%). It can be considered a discriminatory Pre-BMB test with a negative predictive value of 97.6%. In addition, BMI by PET had a prognostic value with strong correlation with progression-free survival (PFS) (HR = 3.81; p = 0.013) and overall survival (OS) (HR = 4.12; p = 0.03) while the BMB had not. PET shows superior performance to the BMB for the detection of marrow involvement in DLBCL. It may be considered as the first line examination of bone marrow instead of the biopsy. PMID:28099514

  11. Development of an inexpensive, low attenuation styrofoam primate chair for use in a PET scanner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortekaas, R; van Waarde, A; Maguire, RP; Leenders, KL; Elsinga, PH

    2004-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic modelling of radiotracers for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of neuroreceptors can be performed with time-activity data for brain and blood. We aimed to develop an alternative to withdrawal of arterial blood samples for acquisition of a blood curve. A supportive primate c

  12. Five-year experience of quality control for a 3D LSO-based whole-body PET scanner: results and considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheoud, R; Goertzen, A L; Vigna, L; Ducharme, J; Sacchetti, G; Brambilla, M

    2012-07-01

    PET scanners require routine monitoring and quality control (QC) to ensure proper scanner performance. QC helps to ensure that PET equipment performs as specified by the manufacturer and that there have not been significant changes in the system response since acceptance. In this work we describe the maintenance history and we report on the results obtained from the PET system QC testing program over 5 years at two centers, both utilizing a Siemens Biograph 16 HiRez PET/CT system. QC testing programs were based on international standards and included the manufacturer's daily QC, monthly uniformity and sensitivity, quarterly cross-calibration and annual resolution and image quality. For the Winnipeg and Novara sites, two and one PET detector blocks have been replaced, respectively. Neither system has had other significant PET system related hardware replacements. The manufacturer's suggested daily QC was sensitive to detecting problems in the function of PET detector elements. The same test was not sensitive for detecting long term drifts in the systems: the Novara system observed a significant deterioration over five years of testing in the sensitivity which exhibited a decrease of 16% as compared to its initial value measured at system installation. The measure of the energy spectrum, showed that the 511 keV photopeak had shifted to a position of 468 keV. This shift was corrected by having service personnel perform a complete system calibration and detector block setup. We recommend including tests of system energy response and of sensitivity as part of a QC program since they can provide useful information on the actual performance of the scanner. A modification of the daily QC test by the manufacturer is suggested to monitor the long term stability of the system. Image quality and spatial resolution tests have proven to be of limited value for monitoring the system over time.

  13. A simple device to convert a small-animal PET scanner into a multi-sample tissue and injection syringe counter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Michael V; Seidel, Jurgen; Choyke, Peter L; Jagoda, Elaine M

    2017-10-01

    We describe a simple fixture that can be added to the imaging bed of a small-animal PET scanner that allows for automated counting of multiple organ or tissue samples from mouse-sized animals and counting of injection syringes prior to administration of the radiotracer. The combination of imaging and counting capabilities in the same machine offers advantages in certain experimental settings. A polyethylene block of plastic, sculpted to mate with the animal imaging bed of a small-animal PET scanner, is machined to receive twelve 5-ml containers, each capable of holding an entire organ from a mouse-sized animal. In addition, a triangular cross-section slot is machined down the centerline of the block to secure injection syringes from 1-ml to 3-ml in size. The sample holder is scanned in PET whole-body mode to image all samples or in one bed position to image a filled injection syringe. Total radioactivity in each sample or syringe is determined from the reconstructed images of these objects using volume re-projection of the coronal images and a single region-of-interest for each. We tested the accuracy of this method by comparing PET estimates of sample and syringe activity with well counter and dose calibrator estimates of these same activities. PET and well counting of the same samples gave near identical results (in MBq, R(2)=0.99, slope=0.99, intercept=0.00-MBq). PET syringe and dose calibrator measurements of syringe activity in MBq were also similar (R(2)=0.99, slope=0.99, intercept=- 0.22-MBq). A small-animal PET scanner can be easily converted into a multi-sample and syringe counting device by the addition of a sample block constructed for that purpose. This capability, combined with live animal imaging, can improve efficiency and flexibility in certain experimental settings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Monte Carlo simulation of PET/MR scanner and assessment of motion correction strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Işın, A.; Uzun Ozsahin, D.; Dutta, J.; Haddani, S.; El-Fakhri, G.

    2017-03-01

    Positron Emission Tomography is widely used in three dimensional imaging of metabolic body function and in tumor detection. Important research efforts are made to improve this imaging modality and powerful simulators such as GATE are used to test and develop methods for this purpose. PET requires acquisition time in the order of few minutes. Therefore, because of the natural patient movements such as respiration, the image quality can be adversely affected which drives scientists to develop motion compensation methods to improve the image quality. The goal of this study is to evaluate various image reconstructions methods with GATE simulation of a PET acquisition of the torso area. Obtained results show the need to compensate natural respiratory movements in order to obtain an image with similar quality as the reference image. Improvements are still possible in the applied motion field's extraction algorithms. Finally a statistical analysis should confirm the obtained results.

  15. Comparison of Monte Carlo simulated and measured performance parameters of miniPET scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis, S. A.; Emri, M.; Opposits, G.; Bükki, T.; Valastyán, I.; Hegyesi, Gy.; Imrek, J.; Kalinka, G.; Molnár, J.; Novák, D.; Végh, J.; Kerek, A.; Trón, L.; Balkay, L.

    2007-02-01

    In vivo imaging of small laboratory animals is a valuable tool in the development of new drugs. For this purpose, miniPET, an easy to scale modular small animal PET camera has been developed at our institutes. The system has four modules, which makes it possible to rotate the whole detector system around the axis of the field of view. Data collection and image reconstruction are performed using a data acquisition (DAQ) module with Ethernet communication facility and a computer cluster of commercial PCs. Performance tests were carried out to determine system parameters, such as energy resolution, sensitivity and noise equivalent count rate. A modified GEANT4-based GATE Monte Carlo software package was used to simulate PET data analogous to those of the performance measurements. GATE was run on a Linux cluster of 10 processors (64 bit, Xeon with 3.0 GHz) and controlled by a SUN grid engine. The application of this special computer cluster reduced the time necessary for the simulations by an order of magnitude. The simulated energy spectra, maximum rate of true coincidences and sensitivity of the camera were in good agreement with the measured parameters.

  16. Toward VIP-PIX: A Low Noise Readout ASIC for Pixelated CdTe Gamma-Ray Detectors for Use in the Next Generation of PET Scanners

    OpenAIRE

    Macias-Montero, Jose-Gabriel; Sarraj, Maher; Chmeissani, Mokhtar; Puigdengoles, Carles; Lorenzo, Gianluca De; Martínez, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    VIP-PIX will be a low noise and low power pixel readout electronics with digital output for pixelated Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) detectors. The proposed pixel will be part of a 2D pixel-array detector for various types of nuclear medicine imaging devices such as positron-emission tomography (PET) scanners, Compton gamma cameras, and positron-emission mammography (PEM) scanners. Each pixel will include a SAR ADC that provides the energy deposited with 10-bit resolution. Simultaneously, the self-...

  17. Validity of using a 3-dimensional PET scanner during inhalation of 15O-labeled oxygen for quantitative assessment of regional metabolic rate of oxygen in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Yuki; Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Koshino, Kazuhiro; Moriguchi, Tetsuaki; Iguchi, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Akihide; Enmi, Junichiro; Kawashima, Hidekazu; Zeniya, Tsutomu; Morita, Naomi; Nakagawara, Jyoji; Casey, Michael E; Iida, Hidehiro

    2014-09-21

    Use of 15O labeled oxygen (15O2) and positron emission tomography (PET) allows quantitative assessment of the regional metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) in vivo, which is essential to understanding the pathological status of patients with cerebral vascular and neurological disorders. The method has, however, been challenging, when a 3D PET scanner is employed, largely attributed to the presence of gaseous radioactivity in the trachea and the inhalation system, which results in a large amount of scatter and random events in the PET assessment. The present study was intended to evaluate the adequacy of using a recently available commercial 3D PET scanner in the assessment of regional cerebral radioactivity distribution during an inhalation of 15O2. Systematic experiments were carried out on a brain phantom. Experiments were also performed on a healthy volunteer following a recently developed protocol for simultaneous assessment of CMRO2 and cerebral blood flow, which involves sequential administration of 15O2 and C15O2. A particular intention was to evaluate the adequacy of the scatter-correction procedures. The phantom experiment demonstrated that errors were within 3% at the practically maximum radioactivity in the face mask, with the greatest radioactivity in the lung. The volunteer experiment demonstrated that the counting rate was at peak during the 15O gas inhalation period, within a verified range. Tomographic images represented good quality over the entire FOV, including the lower part of the cerebral structures and the carotid artery regions. The scatter-correction procedures appeared to be important, particularly in the process to compensate for the scatter originating outside the FOV. Reconstructed images dramatically changed if the correction was carried out using inappropriate procedures. This study demonstrated that accurate reconstruction could be obtained when the scatter compensation was appropriately carried out. This study also suggested the

  18. A prototype of very high-resolution small animal PET scanner using silicon pad detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Park, S J; Huh, S; Kagan, H; Honscheid, K; Burdette, D; Chesi, Enrico Guido; Lacasta, C; Llosa, G; Mikuz, M; Studen, A; Weilhammer, P; Clinthorne, N H

    2007-01-01

    Abstract A very high-resolution small animal positron emission tomograph (PET), which can achieve sub-millimeter spatial resolution, is being developed using silicon pad detectors. The prototype PET for a single slice instrument consists of two 1 mm thick silicon pad detectors, each containing a 32×16 array of 1.4×1.4 mm pads readout with four VATAGP3 chips which have 128 channels low-noise self-triggering ASIC in each chip, coincidence units, a source turntable and tungsten slice collimator. The silicon detectors were located edgewise on opposite sides of a 4 cm field-of-view to maximize efficiency. Energy resolution is dominated by electronic noise, which is 0.98% (1.38 keV) FWHM at 140.5 keV. Coincidence timing resolution is 82.1 ns FWHM and coincidence efficiency was measured to be 1.04×10−3% from two silicon detectors with annihilation photons of 18F source. Image data were acquired and reconstructed using conventional 2-D filtered-back projection (FBP) and a maximum likelihood expectation maximizat...

  19. Simultaneous hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate MRI and (18)F-FDG-PET in cancer (hyperPET): feasibility of a new imaging concept using a clinical PET/MRI scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutte, Henrik; Hansen, Adam E; Henriksen, Sarah T; Johannesen, Helle H; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan; Vignaud, Alexandre; Hansen, Anders E; Børresen, Betina; Klausen, Thomas L; Wittekind, Anne-Mette N; Gillings, Nic; Kristensen, Annemarie T; Clemmensen, Andreas; Højgaard, Liselotte; Kjær, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate, for the first time, the feasibility of a new imaging concept - combined hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) and (18)F-FDG-PET imaging. This procedure was performed in a clinical PET/MRI scanner with a canine cancer patient. We have named this concept hyper PET. Intravenous injection of the hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate results in an increase of (13)C-lactate, (13)C-alanine and (13)C-CO2 ((13)C-HCO3) resonance peaks relative to the tissue, disease and the metabolic state probed. Accordingly, with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and use of (13)C-pyruvate it is now possible to directly study the Warburg Effect through the rate of conversion of (13)C-pyruvate to (13)C-lactate. In this study, we combined it with (18)F-FDG-PET that studies uptake of glucose in the cells. A canine cancer patient with a histology verified local recurrence of a liposarcoma on the right forepaw was imaged using a combined PET/MR clinical scanner. PET was performed as a single-bed, 10 min acquisition, 107 min post injection of 310 MBq (18)F-FDG. (13)C-chemical shift imaging (CSI) was performed just after FDG-PET and 30 s post injection of 23 mL hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate. Peak heights of (13)C-pyruvate and (13)C-lactate were quantified using a general linear model. Anatomic (1)H-MRI included axial and coronal T1 vibe, coronal T2-tse and axial T1-tse with fat saturation following gadolinium injection. In the tumor we found clearly increased (13)C-lactate production, which also corresponded to high (18)F-FDG uptake on PET. This is in agreement with the fact that glycolysis and production of lactate are increased in tumor cells compared to normal cells. Yet, most interestingly, also in the muscle of the forepaw of the dog high (18)F-FDG uptake was observed. This was due to activity in these muscles prior to anesthesia, which was not accompanied by a similarly high (13)C-lactate production. Accordingly, this clearly

  20. A dedicated high-resolution PET imager for plant sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Mathews, Aswin J; Li, Ke; Wen, Jie; Komarov, Sergey; O'Sullivan, Joseph A; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2014-10-07

    PET provides an in vivo molecular and functional imaging capability that could be valuable for studying the interaction of plants in changing environments at the whole-plant level. We have developed a dedicated plant PET imager housed in a plant growth chamber (PGC), which provides a fully controlled environment. The system currently contains two types of scintillation detector modules from commercial small animal PET scanners: 84 microPET® detectors, which are made with scintillation crystal arrays of 2.2 mm(3) × 2.2 mm(3) × 10 mm(3) crystals to provide a large detection area; and 32 Inveon™ detectors, which are made with scintillation crystal arrays of 1.5 mm(3) × 1.5 mm(3) × 10 mm(3) crystals to provide higher spatial resolution. The detector modules are configured to form two half-rings, which provide a 15 cm-diameter trans-axial field of view (FOV) for dynamic tomographic imaging of small plants. Alternatively, the Inveon detectors can be reconfigured to form quarter-rings, which provide a 25 cm FOV using step-and-shoot motion. The imager contains two linear stages that move detectors vertically at different heights for multisection scanning, and two rotation stages to collect coincidence events from all angles when using the step-and-shoot acquisition. The detector modules and mechanical components of the imager are housed inside a PGC that regulates the environmental parameters. The system has a typical energy resolution of 15% for the Inveon detectors and 24% for the microPET detectors, timing resolution of 1.8 ns, and sensitivity of 1.3%, 1.4% and 3.0% measured at the center of the FOV, 5 cm off to the larger half-ring and 5 cm off to the smaller half-ring, respectively (with a 350-650 keV energy window and 3.1 ns timing window). The system's spatial resolution is capable of resolving rod sources of 1.25 mm diameter spaced 2.5 mm apart (center to center) using the ML-EM reconstruction algorithm. Preliminary imaging experiments

  1. Paul Lecoq assembles a read head made with special crystals for a PET (positron emission tomography) scanner. He is the initiator of the Crystal Clear collaboration, which aims to transfer crystals developed at CERN to applications in medical imaging.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    Paul Lecoq assembles a read head made with special crystals for a PET (positron emission tomography) scanner. He is the initiator of the Crystal Clear collaboration, which aims to transfer crystals developed at CERN to applications in medical imaging.

  2. Correction technique for cascade gammas in I-124 imaging on a fully-3D, Time-of-Flight PET Scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surti, Suleman; Scheuermann, Ryan; Karp, Joel S

    2009-06-01

    It has been shown that I-124 PET imaging can be used for accurate dose estimation in radio-immunotherapy techniques. However, I-124 is not a pure positron emitter, leading to two types of coincidence events not typically encountered: increased random coincidences due to non-annihilation cascade photons, and true coincidences between an annihilation photon and primarily a coincident 602 keV cascade gamma (true coincidence gamma-ray background). The increased random coincidences are accurately estimated by the delayed window technique. Here we evaluate the radial and time distributions of the true coincidence gamma-ray background in order to correct and accurately estimate lesion uptake for I-124 imaging in a time-of-flight (TOF) PET scanner. We performed measurements using a line source of activity placed in air and a water-filled cylinder, using F-18 and I-124 radio-isotopes. Our results show that the true coincidence gamma-ray backgrounds in I-124 have a uniform radial distribution, while the time distribution is similar to the scattered annihilation coincidences. As a result, we implemented a TOF-extended single scatter simulation algorithm with a uniform radial offset in the tail-fitting procedure for accurate correction of TOF data in I-124 imaging. Imaging results show that the contrast recovery for large spheres in a uniform activity background is similar in F-18 and I-124 imaging. There is some degradation in contrast recovery for small spheres in I-124, which is explained by the increased positron range, and reduced spatial resolution, of I-124 compared to F-18. Our results show that it is possible to perform accurate TOF based corrections for I-124 imaging.

  3. Semi-quantitative and simulation analyses of effects of {gamma} rays on determination of calibration factors of PET scanners with point-like {sup 22}Na sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Tomoyuki [School of Allied Health Sciences, Kitasato University, 1-15-1, Kitasato, Minamiku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, 252-0373 (Japan); Sato, Yasushi [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-1-1, Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8568 (Japan); Oda, Keiichi [Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, 1-1, Nakamachi, Itabashi, Tokyo, 173-0022 (Japan); Wada, Yasuhiro [RIKEN Center for Molecular Imaging Science, 6-7-3, Minamimachi, Minatoshima, Chuo, Kobe, Hyogo, 650-0047 (Japan); Murayama, Hideo [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1, Anagawa, Inage, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan); Yamada, Takahiro, E-mail: hasegawa@kitasato-u.ac.jp [Japan Radioisotope Association, 2-28-45, Komagome, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8941 (Japan)

    2011-09-21

    The uncertainty of radioactivity concentrations measured with positron emission tomography (PET) scanners ultimately depends on the uncertainty of the calibration factors. A new practical calibration scheme using point-like {sup 22}Na radioactive sources has been developed. The purpose of this study is to theoretically investigate the effects of the associated 1.275 MeV {gamma} rays on the calibration factors. The physical processes affecting the coincidence data were categorized in order to derive approximate semi-quantitative formulae. Assuming the design parameters of some typical commercial PET scanners, the effects of the {gamma} rays as relative deviations in the calibration factors were evaluated by semi-quantitative formulae and a Monte Carlo simulation. The relative deviations in the calibration factors were less than 4%, depending on the details of the PET scanners. The event losses due to rejecting multiple coincidence events of scattered {gamma} rays had the strongest effect. The results from the semi-quantitative formulae and the Monte Carlo simulation were consistent and were useful in understanding the underlying mechanisms. The deviations are considered small enough to correct on the basis of precise Monte Carlo simulation. This study thus offers an important theoretical basis for the validity of the calibration method using point-like {sup 22}Na radioactive sources.

  4. Characterization of a high resolution and high sensitivity pre-clinical PET scanner with 3D event reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Rissi, M; Bolle, E; Dorholt, O; Hines, K E; Rohne, O; Skretting, A; Stapnes, S; Volgyes, D

    2012-01-01

    COMPET is a preclinical PET scanner aiming towards a high sensitivity, a high resolution and MRI compatibility by implementing a novel detector geometry. In this approach, long scintillating LYSO crystals are used to absorb the gamma-rays. To determine the point of interaction (P01) between gamma-ray and crystal, the light exiting the crystals on one of the long sides is collected with wavelength shifters (WLS) perpendicularly arranged to the crystals. This concept has two main advantages: (1) The parallax error is reduced to a minimum and is equal for the whole field of view (FOV). (2) The P01 and its energy deposit is known in all three dimension with a high resolution, allowing for the reconstruction of Compton scattered gamma-rays. Point (1) leads to a uniform point source resolution (PSR) distribution over the whole FOV, and also allows to place the detector close to the object being imaged. Both points (1) and (2) lead to an increased sensitivity and allow for both high resolution and sensitivity at the...

  5. Performance evaluation of a high-resolution brain PET scanner using four-layer MPPC DOI detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Mitsuo; Saito, Akinori; Isobe, Takashi; Ote, Kibo; Yamada, Ryoko; Moriya, Takahiro; Omura, Tomohide

    2017-09-01

    A high-resolution positron emission tomography (PET) scanner, dedicated to brain studies, was developed and its performance was evaluated. A four-layer depth of interaction detector was designed containing five detector units axially lined up per layer board. Each of the detector units consists of a finely segmented (1.2 mm) LYSO scintillator array and an 8  ×  8 array of multi-pixel photon counters. Each detector layer has independent front-end and signal processing circuits, and the four detector layers are assembled as a detector module. The new scanner was designed to form a detector ring of 430 mm diameter with 32 detector modules and 168 detector rings with a 1.2 mm pitch. The total crystal number is 655 360. The transaxial and axial field of views (FOVs) are 330 mm in diameter and 201.6 mm, respectively, which are sufficient to measure a whole human brain. The single-event data generated at each detector module were transferred to the data acquisition servers through optical fiber cables. The single-event data from all detector modules were merged and processed to create coincidence event data in on-the-fly software in the data acquisition servers. For image reconstruction, the high-resolution mode (HR-mode) used a 1.2 mm2 crystal segment size and the high-speed mode (HS-mode) used a 4.8 mm2 size by collecting 16 crystal segments of 1.2 mm each to reduce the computational cost. The performance of the brain PET scanner was evaluated. For the intrinsic spatial resolution of the detector module, coincidence response functions of the detector module pair, which faced each other at various angles, were measured by scanning a 0.25 mm diameter 22Na point source. The intrinsic resolutions were obtained with 1.08 mm full width at half-maximum (FWHM) and 1.25 mm FWHM on average at 0 and 22.5 degrees in the first layer pair, respectively. The system spatial resolutions were less than 1.0 mm FWHM throughout the whole FOV, using a

  6. Performance evaluation of a high-resolution brain PET scanner using four-layer MPPC DOI detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Mitsuo; Saito, Akinori; Isobe, Takashi; Ote, Kibo; Yamada, Ryoko; Moriya, Takahiro; Omura, Tomohide

    2017-08-18

    A high-resolution positron emission tomography (PET) scanner, dedicated to brain studies, was developed and its performance was evaluated. A four-layer depth of interaction detector was designed containing five detector units axially lined up per layer board. Each of the detector units consists of a finely segmented (1.2 mm) LYSO scintillator array and an 8  ×  8 array of multi-pixel photon counters. Each detector layer has independent front-end and signal processing circuits, and the four detector layers are assembled as a detector module. The new scanner was designed to form a detector ring of 430 mm diameter with 32 detector modules and 168 detector rings with a 1.2 mm pitch. The total crystal number is 655 360. The transaxial and axial field of views (FOVs) are 330 mm in diameter and 201.6 mm, respectively, which are sufficient to measure a whole human brain. The single-event data generated at each detector module were transferred to the data acquisition servers through optical fiber cables. The single-event data from all detector modules were merged and processed to create coincidence event data in on-the-fly software in the data acquisition servers. For image reconstruction, the high-resolution mode (HR-mode) used a 1.2 mm(2) crystal segment size and the high-speed mode (HS-mode) used a 4.8 mm(2) size by collecting 16 crystal segments of 1.2 mm each to reduce the computational cost. The performance of the brain PET scanner was evaluated. For the intrinsic spatial resolution of the detector module, coincidence response functions of the detector module pair, which faced each other at various angles, were measured by scanning a 0.25 mm diameter (22)Na point source. The intrinsic resolutions were obtained with 1.08 mm full width at half-maximum (FWHM) and 1.25 mm FWHM on average at 0 and 22.5 degrees in the first layer pair, respectively. The system spatial resolutions were less than 1.0 mm FWHM throughout the whole FOV, using

  7. Deep Inspiration Breath Hold [(18)F]FDG PET-CT on 4-rings scanners in evaluating lung lesions: evidences from a phantom and a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caobelli, Federico; Puta, Erinda; Kaiser, Stefano Ren; Massetti, Valentina; Andreoli, Michela; Mostarda, Angelica; Soffientini, Alberto; Pizzocaro, Claudio; Guerra, Ugo Paolo

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the clinical feasibility of a Deep Inspiration Breath Hold (DIBH) (18)F-FDG PET-CT acquisition in apnea and compare the results obtained between these acts of acquisition in apnea and in Free Breathing in the evaluation of lung lesions. A pre-clinical phantom study was performed to evaluate the shortest simulated DIBH time according to the minimum detectable lesion that can be detected by our ultrasound scanner. This study was conducted by changing acquisition time and sphere-to-background activity ratio values and by using radioactivity densities similar to those generally found in clinical examinations. In the clinical study, 25 patients with pulmonary lesions underwent a standard whole body (18)F-FDG PET-CT scan in free breathing followed by a 20s single thorax acquisition PET/CT in DIBH acquisition. The phantom study indicated that a 20-s acquisition time provides an accurate evaluation of smallest sphere shaped lesions. In the clinical study, PET-CT scans obtained in DIBH studies showed a significant reduction of misalignment between the PET and CT scan images and an increase of SUVmax compared to free breathing acquisitions. A correlation between the %BH-index and lesion displacement between PET and CT images in FB acquisition was demonstrated, significantly higher for lesions with a displacement>8mm. The single 20s acquisition of DIBH PET-CT is a feasible technique for lung lesion detection in the clinical setting. It only requires a minor increase in examination time without special patient training. 20s DIBH scan provided a more precise measurement of SUVmax, especially for lesions in the lower lung lobes which usually show greater displacement between PET and CT scan images in FB acquisition. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  8. Impact of metallic dental implants on CT-based attenuation correction in a combined PET/CT scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamel, Ehab M.; Burger, Cyrill; Buck, Alfred; Schulthess, Gustav K. von; Goerres, Gerhard W. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2003-04-01

    Our objective was to study the effect of metal-induced artifacts on the accuracy of the CT-based anatomic map as a prerequisite for attenuation correction of the positron emission tomography (PET) emission data. Twenty-seven oncology patients with dental metalwork were enrolled in the present study. Data acquisition was performed on a PET/CT in-line system (Discovery LS, GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, Wis.). Attenuation correction of emission data was done twice, using an 80-mA CT scan (PET{sub CT80}) and a {sup 68}Ge transmission scan (PET{sub 68Ge}). Average count in kBq/cc was measured in regions with and without artifacts and compared for PET{sub CT80} and PET{sub 68Ge}. Data analysis of region of interests (ROIs) revealed that the ratio (ROIs PET{sub CT80}/ROIs PET{sub 68Ge}) and the difference (ROIs PET{sub CT80} minus ROIs PET{sub 68Ge}) had a higher mean of values in regions with artifacts than in regions without artifacts (1.2{+-}0.17 vs 1.06{+-}0.06 and 0.68{+-}0.67 vs 0.15{+-}0.17 kBq/cc, respectively). For most of the studied artifactual ROIs, the PET{sub CT80} values were higher than those of the PET{sub 68Ge}. Attenuation correction of PET emission data using an artifactual CT map yields false values in regions nearby artifacts caused by dental metalwork. This may falsely estimate PET quantitative studies and may disturb the visual interpretation of PET scan. (orig.)

  9. Studies of the high rate coincidence timing response of the STiC and TOFPET ASICs for the SAFIR PET scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, R.; Casella, C.; Corrodi, S.; Dissertori, G.; Fischer, J.; Howard, A.; Ito, M.; Lustermann, W.

    2016-12-01

    The proposed SAFIR PET detector will measure positron electron annihilations at injected activities up to 500 MBq in a mouse or rat. The system is required to have the best possible timing resolution in order to remove accidental coincidences (randoms) and maximise the image quality for short time frames allowing the possibility of 4-D kinetic modelling of simultaneous PET and MRI for the first time. Two different ASICs, TOFPET and STiC, have been investigated with LYSO crystal scintillators coupled to SiPM detectors and using 18F sources up to 480 MBq. Timing responses are very encouraging with a coincidence time resolution of ~100 ps measured at low activities, degrading to 130 ps at the foreseen scanner maximum event rate. Sensitivities for single event rates and coincidences are measured and compared with Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations.

  10. A new tool fixation for external 3D head tracking using the Polaris Vicra system with the HRRT PET scanner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Andersen, Flemming; Holm, Søren;

    Objectives: The Polaris Vicra system (Northern Digital Inc.) is used for external 3D head registration with the Siemens HRRT brain PET. Our new tool fixation using a standard bandaid with a velcro-strap implies an improved frame repositioning. Methods: Head movements during serial PET 15O-water s...

  11. On the accuracy and reproducibility of a novel probabilistic atlas-based generation for calculation of head attenuation maps on integrated PET/MR scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Kevin T. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Charlestown, MA (United States); Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Catana, Ciprian [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Charlestown, MA (United States); Poynton, Clare B. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Charlestown, MA (United States); Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, Boston, MA (United States); University of California, San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Chonde, Daniel B. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Charlestown, MA (United States); Harvard University, Program in Biophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2017-03-15

    To propose an MR-based method for generating continuous-valued head attenuation maps and to assess its accuracy and reproducibility. Demonstrating that novel MR-based photon attenuation correction methods are both accurate and reproducible is essential prior to using them routinely in research and clinical studies on integrated PET/MR scanners. Continuous-valued linear attenuation coefficient maps (''μ-maps'') were generated by combining atlases that provided the prior probability of voxel positions belonging to a certain tissue class (air, soft tissue, or bone) and an MR intensity-based likelihood classifier to produce posterior probability maps of tissue classes. These probabilities were used as weights to generate the μ-maps. The accuracy of this probabilistic atlas-based continuous-valued μ-map (''PAC-map'') generation method was assessed by calculating the voxel-wise absolute relative change (RC) between the MR-based and scaled CT-based attenuation-corrected PET images. To assess reproducibility, we performed pair-wise comparisons of the RC values obtained from the PET images reconstructed using the μ-maps generated from the data acquired at three time points. The proposed method produced continuous-valued μ-maps that qualitatively reflected the variable anatomy in patients with brain tumor and agreed well with the scaled CT-based μ-maps. The absolute RC comparing the resulting PET volumes was 1.76 ± 2.33 %, quantitatively demonstrating that the method is accurate. Additionally, we also showed that the method is highly reproducible, the mean RC value for the PET images reconstructed using the μ-maps obtained at the three visits being 0.65 ± 0.95 %. Accurate and highly reproducible continuous-valued head μ-maps can be generated from MR data using a probabilistic atlas-based approach. (orig.)

  12. Measured count-rate performance of the Discovery STE PET/CT scanner in 2D, 3D and partial collimation acquisition modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, L R; Schmitz, R E; Alessio, A M; Wollenweber, S D; Stearns, C W; Ganin, A; Harrison, R L; Lewellen, T K; Kinahan, P E

    2008-07-21

    We measured count rates and scatter fraction on the Discovery STE PET/CT scanner in conventional 2D and 3D acquisition modes, and in a partial collimation mode between 2D and 3D. As part of the evaluation of using partial collimation, we estimated global count rates using a scanner model that combined computer simulations with an empirical live-time function. Our measurements followed the NEMA NU2 count rate and scatter-fraction protocol to obtain true, scattered and random coincidence events, from which noise equivalent count (NEC) rates were calculated. The effect of patient size was considered by using 27 cm and 35 cm diameter phantoms, in addition to the standard 20 cm diameter cylindrical count-rate phantom. Using the scanner model, we evaluated two partial collimation cases: removing half of the septa (2.5D) and removing two-thirds of the septa (2.7D). Based on predictions of the model, a 2.7D collimator was constructed. Count rates and scatter fractions were then measured in 2D, 2.7D and 3D. The scanner model predicted relative NEC variation with activity, as confirmed by measurements. The measured 2.7D NEC was equal or greater than 3D NEC for all activity levels in the 27 cm and 35 cm phantoms. In the 20 cm phantom, 3D NEC was somewhat higher ( approximately 15%) than 2.7D NEC at 100 MBq. For all higher activity concentrations, 2.7D NEC was greater and peaked 26% above the 3D peak NEC. The peak NEC in 2.7D mode occurred at approximately 425 MBq, and was 26-50% greater than the peak 3D NEC, depending on object size. NEC in 2D was considerably lower, except at relatively high activity concentrations. Partial collimation shows promise for improved noise equivalent count rates in clinical imaging without altering other detector parameters.

  13. A Monte Carlo investigation of the spatial resolution performance of a small-animal PET scanner designed for mouse brain imaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Villafuerte, Mercedes; Yang, Yongfeng; Cherry, Simon R

    2014-02-01

    Our laboratory has developed PET detectors with depth-encoding accuracy of ∼2 mm based on finely pixelated crystals with a tapered geometry, readout at both ends with position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPDs). These detectors are currently being used in our laboratory to build a one-ring high resolution PET scanner for mouse brain imaging studies. Due to the inactive areas around the PSAPDs, large gaps exist between the detector modules which can degrade the image spatial resolution obtained using analytical reconstruction with filtered backprojection (FBP). In this work, the Geant4-based GATE Monte Carlo package was used to assist in determining whether gantry rotation was necessary and to assess the expected spatial resolution of the system. The following factors were investigated: rotating vs. static gantry modes with and without compensation of missing data using the discrete cosine transform (DCT) method, two levels of depth-encoding, and positron annihilation effects for (18)F. Our results indicate that while the static scanner produces poor quality FBP images with streak and ring artifacts, the image quality was greatly improved after compensation of missing data. The simulation indicates that the expected FWHM system spatial resolution is 0.70 ± 0.05 mm, which approaches the predicted limit of 0.5 mm FWHM due to positron range, photon non-colinearity and physical detector element size effects. We conclude that excellent reconstructed resolution without gantry rotation is possible even using FBP if the gaps are appropriately handled and that this design can approach the resolution limits set by positron annihilation physics.

  14. Toward VIP-PIX: A Low Noise Readout ASIC for Pixelated CdTe Gamma-Ray Detectors for Use in the Next Generation of PET Scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias-Montero, Jose-Gabriel; Sarraj, Maher; Chmeissani, Mokhtar; Puigdengoles, Carles; Lorenzo, Gianluca De; Martínez, Ricardo

    2013-08-01

    VIP-PIX will be a low noise and low power pixel readout electronics with digital output for pixelated Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) detectors. The proposed pixel will be part of a 2D pixel-array detector for various types of nuclear medicine imaging devices such as positron-emission tomography (PET) scanners, Compton gamma cameras, and positron-emission mammography (PEM) scanners. Each pixel will include a SAR ADC that provides the energy deposited with 10-bit resolution. Simultaneously, the self-triggered pixel which will be connected to a global time-to-digital converter (TDC) with 1 ns resolution will provide the event's time stamp. The analog part of the readout chain and the ADC have been fabricated with TSMC 0.25 μm mixed-signal CMOS technology and characterized with an external test pulse. The power consumption of these parts is 200 μW from a 2.5 V supply. It offers 4 switchable gains from ±10 mV/fC to ±40 mV/fC and an input charge dynamic range of up to ±70 fC for the minimum gain for both polarities. Based on noise measurements, the expected equivalent noise charge (ENC) is 65 e(-) RMS at room temperature.

  15. Comparison of target volumes in radiotherapy defined on scanner and on PET-T.D.M. with {sup 18}F-F.D.G. in the frame of head and neck cancers; Comparaison des volumes cibles en radiotherapie definis sur scanner et sur TEP-TDM au 18F FDG dans le cadre des cancers de la tete et du cou

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriques De Figueiredo, B.; Barret, O.; Allard, M.; Fernandez, P. [Service de medecine nucleaire, CHU de Pellegrin, Bordeaux, (France); Demeaux, H.; Maire, J.P.; Lagarde, P. [service de radiotherapie, hopital Saint-Andre, Bordeaux, (France); Kantor, G.; Richau, P. [departement de radiotherapie, institut Bergonie, Bordeaux, (France); De Mones Del Pujol, E. [service d' ORL, hopital Pellegrin, Bordeaux, (France)

    2009-05-15

    The objective is to study in a prospective way, in the frame of head and neck cancers, the impact of the positron computed tomography with {sup 18}F fluorodeoxyglucose (PET-F.D.G.) on the limitation of target volumes in radiotherapy. In conclusions, the gross tumor volume (G.T.V.) defined on PET is smaller than this one defined on scanner, that could be interesting in radiotherapy, in the perspective of a dose escalation. In addition, areas of discordance exist between the clinical target volumes (C.T.V.70 and C.T.V.50) defined on PET and on scanner. These discordances, synonyms of under or over estimation of target volumes, could have important clinical consequences in term of local control and toxicity. (N.C.)

  16. Imaging and PET-CT evaluation of Gi tract cancers; Imagerie et TEP scanner dans les cancers du tube digestif

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurent, V. [Hopital de Brabois-Vandoeuvre, Service de Radiologie Adultes, 54 - Nancy (France); Olivier, P. [Hopital de Brabois-Vandoeuvre, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, 54 - Nancy (France)

    2008-03-15

    Imaging plays a pivotal role in the management of G.I. tract cancers for diagnosis, characterization, locoregional staging, metastatic work-up and follow-up during and after curative or palliative treatment. The imaging protocols should be optimized and reproducible because of their impact on therapy. Thoracic, abdominal and pelvic CT is the cornerstone of the imaging work-up, optimized and reproducible because of their impact on therapy. Thoracic, abdominal and pelvic CT is the cornerstone of the imaging work-up, optimized and tailored to the specific G.I. segment involved, requiring good G.I. tract distension. Image interpretation of native axial and reformatted multiplanar images is routinely performed. In specific cases, additional targeted imaging with the US or MRI or whole body imaging with PET/CT or MRI may be valuable. PET/CT is a complement to morphological imaging. PET allows detection of lesions otherwise undetected on morphological imaging, usually due to poor contrast with surrounding tissues, and characterization of known lesions. PET/CT is best used as an integral part of a comprehensive imaging work-up. Radiologist and nuclear medicine specialists provide complementary information. each must be familiar with the clinical questions at hand and related stakes, and advantages and limitations of each modality to optimize treatment as part of a multidisciplinary management approach. (authors)

  17. A dedicated high resolution PET imager for plant sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Qiang; Li, Ke; Wen, Jie; Komarov, Sergey; O'Sullivan, Joseph A; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    PET provides in vivo molecular and functional imaging capability that is crucial to studying the interaction of plant with changing environment at the whole-plant level. We have developed a dedicated plant PET imager that features high spatial resolution, housed in a fully controlled environment provided by a plant growth chamber (PGC). The system currently contains two types of detector modules: 84 microPET R4 block detectors with 2.2 mm crystals to provide a large detecting area; and 32 Inveon block detectors with 1.5 mm crystals to provide higher spatial resolution. Outputs of the four microPET block detectors in a modular housing are concatenated by a custom printed circuit board to match the output characteristics of an Inveon detector. All the detectors are read out by QuickSilver electronics. The detector modules are configured to full rings with a 15 cm diameter trans-axial field of view (FOV) for dynamic tomographic imaging of small plants. Potentially, the Inveon detectors can be reconfigured to qua...

  18. Evaluation of strategies towards harmonization of FDG PET/CT studies in multicentre trials: comparison of scanner validation phantoms and data analysis procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makris, Nikolaos E.; Huisman, Marc C.; Lammertsma, Adriaan A.; Boellaard, Ronald [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kinahan, Paul E. [University of Washington, Imaging Research Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2013-10-15

    PET quantification based on standardized uptake values (SUV) is hampered by several factors, in particular by variability in PET acquisition settings and data analysis methods. Quantitative PET/CT studies acquired during a multicentre trial require harmonization of imaging procedures to maximize study power. The aims of this study were to determine which phantoms are most suitable for detecting differences in image quality and quantification, and which methods for defining volumes of interest (VOI) are least sensitive to these differences. The most common accreditation phantoms used in oncology FDG PET/CT trials were scanned on the same scanner. These phantoms were those used by the Society of Nuclear Medicine Clinical Trials Network (SNM-CTN), the European Association of Nuclear Medicine/National Electrical Manufacturers Association (EANM/NEMA) and the American College of Radiology (ACR). In addition, tumour SUVs were derived from ten oncology whole-body examinations performed on the same PET/CT system. Both phantom and clinical data were reconstructed using different numbers of iterations, subsets and time-of-flight kernel widths. Subsequently, different VOI methods (VOI{sub A50%,} VOI{sub max}, VOI{sub 3Dpeak,} VOI{sub 2Dpeak}) were applied to assess the impact of changes in image reconstruction settings on SUV and recovery coefficients (RC). All phantoms demonstrated sensitivity for detecting changes in SUV and RC measures in response to changes in image reconstruction settings and VOI analysis methods. The SNM-CTN and EANM/NEMA phantoms showed almost equal sensitivity in detecting RC differences with changes in image characteristics. Phantom and clinical data demonstrated that the VOI analysis methods VOI{sub A50%} and VOI{sub max} gave SUV and RC values with large variability in relation to image characteristics, whereas VOI{sub 3Dpeak} and VOI{sub 2Dpeak} were less sensitive to these differences. All three phantoms may be used to harmonize parameters for

  19. The effect of activity outside the field of view on image quality for a 3D LSO-based whole body PET/CT scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheoud, R; Secco, C; Della Monica, P; Leva, L; Sacchetti, G; Inglese, E; Brambilla, M

    2009-10-07

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the influence of outside field of view (FOV) activity concentration (A(c)(,out)) on the noise equivalent count rate (NECR), scatter fraction (SF) and image quality of a 3D LSO whole-body PET/CT scanner. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was the figure of merit used to characterize the image quality of PET scans. A modified International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) phantom was used to obtain SF and counting rates similar to those found in average patients. A scatter phantom was positioned at the end of the modified IEC phantom to simulate an activity that extends beyond the scanner. The modified IEC phantom was filled with (18)F (11 kBq mL(-1)) and the spherical targets, with internal diameter (ID) ranging from 10 to 37 mm, had a target-to-background ratio of 10. PET images were acquired with background activity concentrations into the FOV (A(c)(,bkg)) about 11, 9.2, 6.6, 5.2 and 3.5 kBq mL(-1). The emission scan duration (ESD) was set to 1, 2, 3 and 4 min. The tube inside the scatter phantom was filled with activities to provide A(c)(,out) in the whole scatter phantom of zero, half, unity, twofold and fourfold the one of the modified IEC phantom. Plots of CNR versus the various parameters are provided. Multiple linear regression was employed to study the effects of A(c)(,out) on CNR, adjusted for the presence of variables (sphere ID, A(c)(,bkg) and ESD) related to CNR. The presence of outside FOV activity at the same concentration as the one inside the FOV reduces peak NECR of 30%. The increase in SF is marginal (1.2%). CNR diminishes significantly with increasing outside FOV activity, in the range explored. ESD and A(c)(,out) have a similar weight in accounting for CNR variance. Thus, an experimental law that adjusts the scan duration to the outside FOV activity can be devised. Recovery of CNR loss due to an elevated A(c)(,out) activity seems feasible by modulating the ESD in individual bed positions according to A(c)(,out).

  20. Evaluation of a BGO-Based PET System for Single-Cell Tracking Performance by Simulation and Phantom Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Ouyang PhD

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A recent method based on positron emission was reported for tracking moving point sources using the Inveon PET system. However, the effect of scanner background noise was not further explored. Here, we evaluate tracking with the Genisys4, a bismuth germanate-based PET system, which has no significant intrinsic background and may be better suited to tracking lower and/or faster activity sources. Position-dependent sensitivity of the Genisys4 was simulated in Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE using a static 18F point source. Trajectories of helically moving point sources with varying activity and rotation speed were reconstructed from list-mode data as described previously. Simulations showed that the Inveon’s ability to track sources within 2 mm of localization error is limited to objects with a velocity-to-activity ratio < 0.13 mm/decay, compared to < 0.29 mm/decay for the Genisys4. Tracking with the Genisys4 was then validated using a physical phantom of helically moving [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose-in-oil droplets (< 0.24 mm diameter, 139-296 Bq, yielding < 1 mm localization error under the tested conditions, with good agreement between simulated sensitivity and measured activity (Pearson correlation R = .64, P << .05 in a representative example. We have investigated the tracking performance with the Genisys4, and results suggest the feasibility of tracking low activity, point source-like objects with this system.

  1. Recent Results with a segmented Hybrid Photon Detector for a novel parallax-free PET Scanner for Brain Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Braem, André; Joram, Christian; Mathot, Serge; Séguinot, Jacques; Weilhammer, Peter; Ciocia, F; De Leo, R; Nappi, E; Vilardi, I; Argentieri, A; Corsi, F; Dragone, A; Pasqua, D

    2007-01-01

    We describe the design, fabrication and test results of a segmented Hybrid Photon Detector with integrated auto-triggering front-end electronics. Both the photodetector and its VLSI readout electronics are custom designed and have been tailored to the requirements of a recently proposed novel geometrical concept of a Positron Emission Tomograph. Emphasis is laid on the PET specific features of the device. The detector has been fabricated in the photocathode facility at CERN.

  2. Recent results with a segmented Hybrid Photon Detector for a novel, parallax-free PET Scanner for Brain Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braem, A. [CERN, PH Department, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Chesi, E. [CERN, PH Department, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Joram, C. [CERN, PH Department, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Mathot, S. [CERN, PH Department, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Seguinot, J. [CERN, PH Department, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Weilhammer, P. [CERN, PH Department, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland)]. E-mail: Peter.Weilhammer@cern.ch; Ciocia, F. [INFN, Sezione di Bari and University of Bari, Bari (Italy); De Leo, R. [INFN, Sezione di Bari and University of Bari, Bari (Italy); Nappi, E. [INFN, Sezione di Bari and University of Bari, Bari (Italy); Vilardi, I. [INFN, Sezione di Bari and University of Bari, Bari (Italy); Argentieri, A. [INFN, Sezione di Bari and Politechnic of Bari, Bari (Italy); Corsi, F. [INFN, Sezione di Bari and Politechnic of Bari, Bari (Italy); Dragone, A. [INFN, Sezione di Bari and Politechnic of Bari, Bari (Italy); Pasqua, D. [INFN, Sezione di Bari and Politechnic of Bari, Bari (Italy)

    2007-02-01

    We describe the design, fabrication and test results of a segmented Hybrid Photon Detector with integrated auto-triggering front-end electronics. Both the photodetector and its VLSI readout electronics are custom designed and have been tailored to the requirements of a recently proposed novel geometrical concept of a Positron Emission Tomograph. Emphasis is laid on the PET specific features of the device. The detector has been fabricated in the photocathode facility at CERN.

  3. A segmented Hybrid Photon Detector with integrated auto-triggering front-end electronics for a PET scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Chesi, Enrico Guido; Joram, C; Mathot, S; Séguinot, Jacques; Weilhammer, P; Ciocia, F; De Leo, R; Nappi, E; Vilardi, I; Argentieri, A; Corsi, F; Dragone, A; Pasqua, D

    2006-01-01

    We describe the design, fabrication and test results of a segmented Hybrid Photon Detector with integrated auto-triggering front-end electronics. Both the photodetector and its VLSI readout electronics are custom designed and have been tailored to the requirements of a recently proposed novel geometrical concept of a Positron Emission Tomograph. Emphasis is put on the PET specific features of the device. The detector has been fabricated in the photocathode facility at CERN.

  4. Feasibility of a novel design of high resolution parallax-free Compton enhanced PET scanner dedicated to brain research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braem, A [CERN, PH Department, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Llatas, M Chamizo [Department of Corpuscular and Nuclear Physics, Geneva University, Geneva (Switzerland); Chesi, E [CERN, PH Department, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Correia, J G [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Sacavem (Portugal); Garibaldi, F [Instituto Superiore di Sanita, Roma (Italy); Joram, C [CERN, PH Department, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Mathot, S [CERN, PH Department, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Nappi, E [INFN, Sezione di Bari, Bari (Italy); Silva, M Ribeiro da [Centro de FIsica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon (Portugal); Schoenahl, F [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Geneva University Hospital, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Seguinot, J [CERN, PH Department, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Weilhammer, P [CERN, PH Department, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Zaidi, H [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Geneva University Hospital, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland)

    2004-06-21

    A novel concept for a positron emission tomography (PET) camera module is proposed, which provides full 3D reconstruction with high resolution over the total detector volume, free of parallax errors. The key components are a matrix of long scintillator crystals and hybrid photon detectors (HPDs) with matched segmentation and integrated readout electronics. The HPDs read out the two ends of the scintillator package. Both excellent spatial (x, y, z) and energy resolution are obtained. The concept allows enhancing the detection efficiency by reconstructing a significant fraction of events which underwent Compton scattering in the crystals. The proof of concept will first be demonstrated with yttrium orthoaluminate perovskite (YAP):Ce crystals, but the final design will rely on other scintillators more adequate for PET applications (e.g. LSO:Ce or LaBr{sub 3}:Ce). A promising application of the proposed camera module, which is currently under development, is a high resolution 3D brain PET camera with an axial field-of-view of {approx}15 cm dedicated to brain research. The design philosophy and performance predictions based on analytical calculations and Monte Carlo simulations are presented. Image correction and reconstruction tools required to operate this transmissionless device in a research environment are also discussed. Better or similar performance parameters were obtained compared to other known designs at lower fabrication cost. The axial geometrical concept also seems to be promising for applications such as positron emission mammography.

  5. Feasibility of a novel design of high resolution parallax-free Compton enhanced PET scanner dedicated to brain research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braem, A.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Chesi, E.; Correia, J. G.; Garibaldi, F.; Joram, C.; Mathot, S.; Nappi, E.; Ribeiro da Silva, M.; Schoenahl, F.; Séguinot, J.; Weilhammer, P.; Zaidi, H.

    2004-06-01

    A novel concept for a positron emission tomography (PET) camera module is proposed, which provides full 3D reconstruction with high resolution over the total detector volume, free of parallax errors. The key components are a matrix of long scintillator crystals and hybrid photon detectors (HPDs) with matched segmentation and integrated readout electronics. The HPDs read out the two ends of the scintillator package. Both excellent spatial (x, y, z) and energy resolution are obtained. The concept allows enhancing the detection efficiency by reconstructing a significant fraction of events which underwent Compton scattering in the crystals. The proof of concept will first be demonstrated with yttrium orthoaluminate perovskite (YAP):Ce crystals, but the final design will rely on other scintillators more adequate for PET applications (e.g. LSO:Ce or LaBr3:Ce). A promising application of the proposed camera module, which is currently under development, is a high resolution 3D brain PET camera with an axial field-of-view of ~15 cm dedicated to brain research. The design philosophy and performance predictions based on analytical calculations and Monte Carlo simulations are presented. Image correction and reconstruction tools required to operate this transmissionless device in a research environment are also discussed. Better or similar performance parameters were obtained compared to other known designs at lower fabrication cost. The axial geometrical concept also seems to be promising for applications such as positron emission mammography. All the authors are members of the CIMA Collaboration.

  6. Feasibility of a novel design of high resolution parallax-free Compton enhanced PET scanner dedicated to brain research

    CERN Document Server

    Braem, André; Chesi, Enrico Guido; Correia, J G; Garibaldi, F; Joram, C; Mathot, S; Nappi, E; Ribeiro da Silva, M; Schoenahl, F; Séguinot, Jacques; Weilhammer, P; Zaidi, H

    2004-01-01

    A novel concept for a positron emission tomography (PET) camera module is proposed, which provides full 3D reconstruction with high resolution over the total detector volume, free of parallax errors. The key components are a matrix of long scintillator crystals and hybrid photon detectors (HPDs) with matched segmentation and integrated readout electronics. The HPDs read out the two ends of the scintillator package. Both excellent spatial (x, y, z) and energy resolution are obtained. The concept allows enhancing the detection efficiency by reconstructing a significant fraction of events which underwent Compton scattering in the crystals. The proof of concept will first be demonstrated with yttrium orthoaluminate perovskite (YAP):Ce crystals, but the final design will rely on other scintillators more adequate for PET applications (e.g. LSO:Ce or LaBr /sub 3/:Ce). A promising application of the proposed camera module, which is currently under development, is a high resolution 3D brain PET camera with an axial fi...

  7. Performance study of a PET scanner based on monolithic scintillators for different DoI-dependent methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preziosi, E.; Sánchez, S.; González, A. J.; Pani, R.; Borrazzo, C.; Bettiol, M.; Rodriguez-Alvarez, M. J.; González-Montoro, A.; Moliner, L.; Benlloch, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    One of the technical objectives of the MindView project is developing a brain-dedicated PET insert based on monolithic scintillation crystals. It will be inserted in MRI systems with the purpose to obtain simultaneous PET and MRI brain images. High sensitivity, high image quality performance and accurate detection of the Depth-of-Interaction (DoI) of the 511keV photons are required. We have developed a DoI estimation method, dedicated to monolithic scintillators, allowing continuous DoI estimation and a DoI-dependent algorithm for the estimation of the photon planar impact position, able to improve the single module imaging capabilities. In this work, through experimental measurements, the proposed methods have been used for the estimation of the impact positions within the monolithic crystal block. We have evaluated the PET system performance following the NEMA NU 4-2008 protocol by reconstructing the images using the STIR 3D platform. The results obtained with two different methods, providing discrete and continuous DoI information, are compared with those obtained from an algorithm without DoI capabilities and with the ideal response of the detector. The proposed DoI-dependent imaging methods show clear improvements in the spatial resolution (FWHM) of reconstructed images, allowing to obtain values from 2mm (at the center FoV) to 3mm (at the FoV edges).

  8. Compressed sensing for reduction of noise and artefacts in direct PET image reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, Dominik; Israel, Ina; Schneider, Magdalena; Samnick, Samuel [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Basse-Luesebrink, Thomas C.; Kampf, Thomas; Jakob, Peter M. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Experimental Physics 5; Fischer, Andre [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Radiology

    2014-03-01

    Aim: Image reconstruction in positron emission tomography (PET) can be performed using either direct or iterative methods. Direct reconstruction methods need a short reconstruction time. However, for data containing few counts, they often result in poor visual images with high noise and reconstruction artefacts. Iterative reconstruction methods such as ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) can lead to overestimation of activity in cold regions distorting quantitative analysis. The present work investigates the possibilities to reduce noise and reconstruction artefacts of direct reconstruction methods using compressed sensing (CS). Materials and methods: Raw data are generated either using Monte Carlo simulations using GATE or are taken from PET measurements with a Siemens Inveon small-animal PET scanner. The fully sampled dataset was reconstructed using filtered backprojection (FBP) and reduced in Fourier space by multiplication with an incoherently undersampled sampling pattern, followed by an additional reconstruction with CS. Different sampling patterns are used and an average of the reconstructions is taken. The images are compared to the results of an OSEM reconstruction and quantified using signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Results: The application of the proposed CS post-processing technique clearly improves the image contrast. Dependent on the undersampling factor, noise and artefacts are reduced resulting in an SNR that is increased up to 3.4-fold. For short acquisition times with low count statistics the SNR of the CS reconstructed image exceeds the SNR of the OSEM reconstruction. Conclusion: Especially for low count data, the proposed CS-based post-processing method applied to FBP reconstructed PET images enhances the image quality significantly. (orig.)

  9. Assessment of a fully 3D Monte Carlo reconstruction method for preclinical PET with iodine-124

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, M.; Buvat, I.; Ammour, L.; Chouin, N.; Kraeber-Bodéré, F.; Chérel, M.; Carlier, T.

    2015-03-01

    Iodine-124 is a radionuclide well suited to the labeling of intact monoclonal antibodies. Yet, accurate quantification in preclinical imaging with I-124 is challenging due to the large positron range and a complex decay scheme including high-energy gammas. The aim of this work was to assess the quantitative performance of a fully 3D Monte Carlo (MC) reconstruction for preclinical I-124 PET. The high-resolution small animal PET Inveon (Siemens) was simulated using GATE 6.1. Three system matrices (SM) of different complexity were calculated in addition to a Siddon-based ray tracing approach for comparison purpose. Each system matrix accounted for a more or less complete description of the physics processes both in the scanned object and in the PET scanner. One homogeneous water phantom and three heterogeneous phantoms including water, lungs and bones were simulated, where hot and cold regions were used to assess activity recovery as well as the trade-off between contrast recovery and noise in different regions. The benefit of accounting for scatter, attenuation, positron range and spurious coincidences occurring in the object when calculating the system matrix used to reconstruct I-124 PET images was highlighted. We found that the use of an MC SM including a thorough modelling of the detector response and physical effects in a uniform water-equivalent phantom was efficient to get reasonable quantitative accuracy in homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms. Modelling the phantom heterogeneities in the SM did not necessarily yield the most accurate estimate of the activity distribution, due to the high variance affecting many SM elements in the most sophisticated SM.

  10. PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mariager, Rasmus Mølgaard; Schmidt, Regin; Heiberg, Morten Rievers

    PET handler om den hemmelige tjenestes arbejde under den kolde krig 1945-1989. Her fortæller Regin Schmidt, Rasmus Mariager og Morten Heiberg om de mest dramatiske og interessante sager fra PET's arkiv. PET er på flere måder en udemokratisk institution, der er sat til at vogte over demokratiet....... Dens virksomhed er skjult for offentligheden, den overvåger borgernes aktiviteter, og den registrerer følsomme personoplysninger. Historien om PET rejser spørgsmålet om, hvad man skal gøre, når befolkningen i et demokrati er kritisk indstillet over for overvågningen af lovlige politiske aktiviteter......, mens myndighederne mener, at det er nødvendigt for at beskytte demokratiet. PET er på en gang en fortælling om konkrete aktioner og begivenheder i PET's arbejde og et stykke Danmarkshistorie. Det handler om overvågning, spioner, politisk ekstremisme og international terrorisme.  ...

  11. Recovering the triple coincidence of non-pure positron emitters in preclinical PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsin-Hon; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Chen, Szu-Yu; Jan, Meei-Ling

    2016-03-01

    Non-pure positron emitters, with their long half-lives, allow for the tracing of slow biochemical processes which cannot be adequately examined by the commonly used short-lived positron emitters. Most of these isotopes emit high-energy cascade gamma rays in addition to positron decay that can be detected and create a triple coincidence with annihilation photons. Triple coincidence is discarded in most scanners, however, the majority of the triple coincidence contains true photon pairs that can be recovered. In this study, we propose a strategy for recovering triple coincidence events to raise the sensitivity of PET imaging for non-pure positron emitters. To identify the true line of response (LOR) from a triple coincidence, a framework utilizing geometrical, energy and temporal information is proposed. The geometrical criterion is based on the assumption that the LOR with the largest radial offset among the three sub pairs of triple coincidences is least likely to be a true LOR. Then, a confidence time window is used to test the valid LOR among those within triple coincidence. Finally, a likelihood ratio discriminant rule based on the energy probability density distribution of cascade and annihilation gammas is established to identify the true LOR. An Inveon preclinical PET scanner was modeled with GATE (GEANT4 application for tomographic emission) Monte Carlo software. We evaluated the performance of the proposed method in terms of identification fraction, noise equivalent count rates (NECR), and image quality on various phantoms. With the inclusion of triple coincidence events using the proposed method, the NECR was found to increase from 11% to 26% and 19% to 29% for I-124 and Br-76, respectively, when 7.4-185 MBq of activity was used. Compared to the reconstructed images using double coincidence, this technique increased the SNR by 5.1-7.3% for I-124 and 9.3-10.3% for Br-76 within the activity range of 9.25-74 MBq, without compromising the spatial resolution or

  12. Single scan parameterization of space-variant point spread functions in image space via a printed array: the impact for two PET/CT scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotasidis, F A; Matthews, J C; Angelis, G I; Noonan, P J; Jackson, A [Imaging, Genomics and Proteomics, Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, MAHSC, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Price, P [Academic Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Lionheart, W R [School of Mathematics, Alan Turing Building, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Reader, A J, E-mail: fotis.kotasidis@mmic.man.ac.uk [Brain Imaging Centre, Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2011-05-21

    Incorporation of a resolution model during statistical image reconstruction often produces images of improved resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. A novel and practical methodology to rapidly and accurately determine the overall emission and detection blurring component of the system matrix using a printed point source array within a custom-made Perspex phantom is presented. The array was scanned at different positions and orientations within the field of view (FOV) to examine the feasibility of extrapolating the measured point source blurring to other locations in the FOV and the robustness of measurements from a single point source array scan. We measured the spatially-variant image-based blurring on two PET/CT scanners, the B-Hi-Rez and the TruePoint TrueV. These measured spatially-variant kernels and the spatially-invariant kernel at the FOV centre were then incorporated within an ordinary Poisson ordered subset expectation maximization (OP-OSEM) algorithm and compared to the manufacturer's implementation using projection space resolution modelling (RM). Comparisons were based on a point source array, the NEMA IEC image quality phantom, the Cologne resolution phantom and two clinical studies (carbon-11 labelled anti-sense oligonucleotide [{sup 11}C]-ASO and fluorine-18 labelled fluoro-l-thymidine [{sup 18}F]-FLT). Robust and accurate measurements of spatially-variant image blurring were successfully obtained from a single scan. Spatially-variant resolution modelling resulted in notable resolution improvements away from the centre of the FOV. Comparison between spatially-variant image-space methods and the projection-space approach (the first such report, using a range of studies) demonstrated very similar performance with our image-based implementation producing slightly better contrast recovery (CR) for the same level of image roughness (IR). These results demonstrate that image-based resolution modelling within reconstruction is a valid alternative to

  13. PET imaging of neuroinflammation in a rat traumatic brain injury model with radiolabeled TSPO ligand DPA-714

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yu [Medical School of Southeast University, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Functional Imaging, Department of Radiology, Zhongda Hospital, Nanjing (China); National Institutes of Health - NIH, Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine - LOMIN, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering - NIBIB, Bethesda, MD (United States); Yue, Xuyi; Kiesewetter, Dale O.; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan [National Institutes of Health - NIH, Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine - LOMIN, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering - NIBIB, Bethesda, MD (United States); Teng, Gaojun [Medical School of Southeast University, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Functional Imaging, Department of Radiology, Zhongda Hospital, Nanjing (China)

    2014-07-15

    The inflammatory response in injured brain parenchyma after traumatic brain injury (TBI) is crucial in the pathological process. In order to follow microglia activation and neuroinflammation after TBI, we performed PET imaging in a rat model of TBI using {sup 18}F-labeled DPA-714, a ligand of the 18-kDa translocator protein (TSPO). TBI was induced in male SD rats by a controlled cortical impact. The success of the TBI model was confirmed by MRI. [{sup 18}F]DPA-714 was synthesized using a slightly modified TRACERLab FX-FN module and an automated procedure. In vivo PET imaging was performed at different time points after surgery using an Inveon small-animal PET scanner. The specificity of [{sup 18}F]DPA-714 was confirmed by a displacement study with an unlabeled competitive TSPO ligand, PK11195. Ex vivo autoradiography as well as immunofluorescence staining was carried out to confirm the in vivo PET results. Both in vivo T{sub 2}-weighted MR images and ex vivo TTC staining results revealed successful establishment of the TBI model. Compared with the sham-treated group, [{sup 18}F]DPA-714 uptake was significantly higher in the injured brain area on PET images. Increased lesion-to-normal ratios of [{sup 18}F]DPA-714 were observed in the brain of TBI rats on day 2 after surgery. Ratios peaked around day 6 (2.65 ± 0.36) and then decreased gradually to nearly normal levels on day 28. The displacement study using PK11195 confirmed the specific binding of [{sup 18}F]DPA-714 to TSPO. The results of ex vivo autoradiography were consistent with in vivo PET results. Immunofluorescence staining showed the time course of TSPO expression after TBI and the temporal and the spatial distribution of microglia in the damaged brain area. TSPO-targeted PET using [{sup 18}F]DPA-714 as the imaging probe can be used to dynamically monitor the inflammatory response after TBI in a noninvasive manner. This method will not only facilitate a better understanding of the inflammatory process

  14. {sup 13}N-ammonia myocardial perfusion imaging with a PET/CT scanner: impact on clinical decision making and cost-effectiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegrist, Patrick T.; Husmann, Lars; Knabenhans, Martina; Gaemperli, Oliver; Valenta, Ines; Hoefflinghaus, Tobias [University Hospital Zurich, Cardiovascular Center, Zurich (Switzerland); Scheffel, Hans; Stolzmann, Paul; Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Kaufmann, Philipp A. [University Hospital Zurich, Cardiovascular Center, Zurich (Switzerland); University Zurich, Center for Integrative Human Physiology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2008-05-15

    The purpose of the study is to determine the impact of {sup 13}N-ammonia positron emission tomography (PET) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) on clinical decision making and its cost-effectiveness. One hundred consecutive patients (28 women, 72 men; mean age 60.9 {+-} 12.0 years; range 24-85 years) underwent {sup 13}N-ammonia PET scanning (and computed tomography, used only for attenuation correction) to assess myocardial perfusion in patients with known (n = 79) or suspected (n = 8) coronary artery disease (CAD), or for suspected small-vessel disease (SVD; n = 13). Before PET, the referring physician was asked to determine patient treatment if PET would not be available. Four weeks later, PET patient management was reassessed for each patient individually. Before PET management strategies would have been: diagnostic angiography (62 of 100 patients), diagnostic angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI; 6 of 100), coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG; 3 of 100), transplantation (1 of 100), or conservative medical treatment (28 of 100). After PET scanning, treatment strategies were altered in 78 patients leading to: diagnostic angiography (0 of 100), PCI (20 of 100), CABG (3 of 100), transplantation (1 of 100), or conservative medical treatment (76 of 100). Patient management followed the recommendations of PET findings in 97% of the cases. Cost-effectiveness analysis revealed lower costs of EUR206/patient as a result of PET scanning. In a population with a high prevalence of known CAD, PET is cost-effective and has an important impact on patient management. (orig.)

  15. Scanner Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworski, Joy; Murphy, Kris

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe how they incorporated environmental awareness into their art curriculum. Here, they describe a digital photography project in which their students used flatbed scanners as cameras. Their students composed their objects directly on the scanner. The lesson enabled students to realize that artists have voices…

  16. Development and performance evaluation of Time-over-Threshold based digital PET (TODPET2) scanner using SiPM/Ce:GAGG-arrays for non-invasive measurement of blood RI concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, M.; Kamada, K.; Shoji, Y.; Yoshikawa, A.; Shimazoe, K.; Lipovec, A.; Takahashi, H.; Fujiwara, K.; Takahashi, M.; Momose, T.; Ito, S.; Tsutsumi, K.; Endo, T.; Sato, H.; Usuki, Y.

    2017-02-01

    We developed Time-over-Threshold based digital PET (TODPET2) tomograph using silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) arrays coupled with pixelized Ce:Gd3(Ga, Al)5O12 (Ce:GAGG) scintillators dedicated for non-invasive measurement of blood RI concentrations. The detector consists of 1.57 × 1.57 mm2 SiPM chips and 1.6 × 1.6 × 15 mm3 Ce:GAGG scintillators arranged on a 12 × 12 channel, both working as individual readout systems. After the development of the detector, we fabricated the PET gantry composed of 8 pieces of SiPM/Ce:GAGG detector array which signals were sent to the current-comparing type time-over-threshold (TOT) ASIC for individual readout of pixels. The PET scanner which we developed has 25 mm axial field-of-view (FOV) and 60 mm transaxial FOV. The spatial resolution reconstructed with maximum likelihood estimation method (MLEM) is 0.98 mm (FWHM) at the center of FOV. The sensitivity of the system is measured to be 1.31% using 22Na point source. Finally, timing response to changes in RI concentration was also measured using 5 mm diameter syringe injected with several concentrations of 18FDG.

  17. J-PET analysis framework for the prototype TOF-PET detector

    CERN Document Server

    Krzemień, W; Stola, K; Trybek, D; Bednarski, T; Białas, P; Czerwiński, E; Kapłon, Ł; Kochanowski, A; Korcyl, G; Kowal, J; Kowalski, P; Kozik, T; Molenda, M; Moskal, P; Niedźwiecki, Sz; Pałka, M; Pawlik, M; Raczyński, L; Rudy, Z; Salabura, P; Sharma, N G; Słomski, A; Smyrski, J; Strzelecki, A; Wiślicki, W; Zieliński, M; Zoń, N

    2013-01-01

    Novel TOF-PET scanner solutions demand, apart from the state of the art detectors, software for fast processing of the gathered data, monitoring of the whole scanner and reconstruction of the PET image. In this article we present an analysis framework for the novel STRIP-PET scanner developed by the J-PET collaboration in the Institute of Physics of the Jagiellonian University. This software is based on the ROOT package used in many particle physics experiments.

  18. Methods for Motion Correction Evaluation Using 18F-FDG Human Brain Scans on a High-Resolution PET Scanner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Sune H.; Sibomana, Merence; Olesen, Oline Vinter

    2012-01-01

    Many authors have reported the importance of motion correction (MC) for PET. Patient motion during scanning disturbs kinetic analysis and degrades resolution. In addition, using misaligned transmission for attenuation and scatter correction may produce regional quantification bias in the reconstr...

  19. Calibration test of PET scanners in a multi-centre clinical trial on breast cancer therapy monitoring using 18F-FLT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Bouchet

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: A multi-centre trial using PET requires the analysis of images acquired on different systems We designed a multi-centre trial to estimate the value of 18F-FLT-PET to predict response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer. A calibration check of each PET-CT and of its peripheral devices was performed to evaluate the reliability of the results. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 11 centres were investigated. Dose calibrators were assessed by repeated measurements of a 68Ge certified source. The differences between the clocks associated with the dose calibrators and inherent to the PET systems were registered. The calibration of PET-CT was assessed with an homogeneous cylindrical phantom by comparing the activities per unit of volume calculated from the dose calibrator measurements with that measured on 15 Regions of Interest (ROIs drawn on 15 consecutive slices of reconstructed filtered back-projection (FBP images. Both repeatability of activity concentration based upon the 15 ROIs (ANOVA-test and its accuracy were evaluated. RESULTS: There was no significant difference for dose calibrator measurements (median of difference -0.04%; min = -4.65%; max = +5.63%. Mismatches between the clocks were less than 2 min in all sites and thus did not require any correction, regarding the half life of 18F. For all the PET systems, ANOVA revealed no significant difference between the activity concentrations estimated from the 15 ROIs (median of difference -0.69%; min = -9.97%; max = +9.60%. CONCLUSION: No major difference between the 11 centres with respect to calibration and cross-calibration was observed. The reliability of our 18F-FLT multi-centre clinical trial was therefore confirmed from the physical point of view. This type of procedure may be useful for any clinical trial involving different PET systems.

  20. Use of Radioactive Ion Beams for Biomedical Research 2. in-vivo dosimetry using positron emitting rare earth isotopes with the rotating prototype PET scanner at the Geneva Cantonal Hospital

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % IS331 \\\\ \\\\ The use of radioactive metal ions (such as $^{90}$Y, $^{153}$Sm or $^{186}$Re) in cancer therapy has made some progress, but has been hampered by factors that could be addressed at CERN with a greater likelihood of success than at any other installation in the world. The present proposal seeks to use the unique advantage of CERN ISOLDE to get round these problems together with the PET scanners at the Cantonal Hospital Geneva (PET~=~positron emission tomography). Radioisotope production by spallation at ISOLDE makes available a complete range of isotopes having as complete a diversity of types and energy of radiation, of half-life, and of ionic properties as one would wish. Among these isotopes several positron-emitters having clinical relevance are available.\\\\ \\\\Some free rare earth chelatas are used presently in palliation of painful bone metastases. Curative effects are not able for the moment with this kind of radiopharmaceuticals. More and better data on the biokinetics and bio-distribution...

  1. Prototype pre-clinical PET scanner with depth-of-interaction measurements using single-layer crystal array and single-ended readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Sun; Kim, Kyeong Yun; Ko, Guen Bae; Lee, Jae Sung

    2017-05-01

    In this study, we developed a proof-of-concept prototype PET system using a pair of depth-of-interaction (DOI) PET detectors based on the proposed DOI-encoding method and digital silicon photomultiplier (dSiPM). Our novel cost-effective DOI measurement method is based on a triangular-shaped reflector that requires only a single-layer pixelated crystal and single-ended signal readout. The DOI detector consisted of an 18  ×  18 array of unpolished LYSO crystal (1.47  ×  1.47  ×  15 mm3) wrapped with triangular-shaped reflectors. The DOI information was encoded by depth-dependent light distribution tailored by the reflector geometry and DOI correction was performed using four-step depth calibration data and maximum-likelihood (ML) estimation. The detector pair and the object were placed on two motorized rotation stages to demonstrate 12-block ring PET geometry with 11.15 cm diameter. Spatial resolution was measured and phantom and animal imaging studies were performed to investigate imaging performance. All images were reconstructed with and without the DOI correction to examine the impact of our DOI measurement. The pair of dSiPM-based DOI PET detectors showed good physical performances respectively: 2.82 and 3.09 peak-to-valley ratios, 14.30% and 18.95% energy resolution, and 4.28 and 4.24 mm DOI resolution averaged over all crystals and all depths. A sub-millimeter spatial resolution was achieved at the center of the field of view (FOV). After applying ML-based DOI correction, maximum 36.92% improvement was achieved in the radial spatial resolution and a uniform resolution was observed within 5 cm of transverse PET FOV. We successfully acquired phantom and animal images with improved spatial resolution and contrast by using the DOI measurement. The proposed DOI-encoding method was successfully demonstrated in the system level and exhibited good performance, showing its feasibility for animal PET applications with high spatial

  2. Monte Carlo simulations in multi-detector CT (MDCT) for two PET/CT scanner models using MASH and FASH adult phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belinato, W., E-mail: wbfisica@gmail.com [Bahia Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology – IFBA, Vitória da Conquista, 45.100-000 (Brazil); Department of Physics, Federal University of Sergipe – UFS, São Cristóvão, 49.100-000 (Brazil); Santos, W.S. [Department of Physics, Federal University of Sergipe – UFS, São Cristóvão, 49.100-000 (Brazil); Paschoal, C.M.M., E-mail: cinthiam.paschoal@gmail.com [Department of Civil Engineering, Vale do Acarau State University – UVA, Sobral 62.040-730 (Brazil); Souza, D.N. [Department of Physics, Federal University of Sergipe – UFS, São Cristóvão, 49.100-000 (Brazil)

    2015-06-01

    The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) has been extensively used in oncology for diagnosis and staging of tumors, radiotherapy planning and follow-up of patients with cancer, as well as in cardiology and neurology. This study determines by the Monte Carlo method the internal organ dose deposition for computational phantoms created by multidetector CT (MDCT) beams of two PET/CT devices operating with different parameters. The different MDCT beam parameters were largely related to the total filtration that provides a beam energetic change inside the gantry. This parameter was determined experimentally with the Accu-Gold Radcal measurement system. The experimental values of the total filtration were included in the simulations of two MCNPX code scenarios. The absorbed organ doses obtained in MASH and FASH phantoms indicate that bowtie filter geometry and the energy of the X-ray beam have significant influence on the results, although this influence can be compensated by adjusting other variables such as the tube current–time product (mAs) and pitch during PET/CT procedures.

  3. Probabilistic atlas-based segmentation of combined T1-weighted and DUTE MRI for calculation of head attenuation maps in integrated PET/MRI scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poynton, Clare B; Chen, Kevin T; Chonde, Daniel B; Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Gollub, Randy L; Gerstner, Elizabeth R; Batchelor, Tracy T; Catana, Ciprian

    2014-01-01

    We present a new MRI-based attenuation correction (AC) approach for integrated PET/MRI systems that combines both segmentation- and atlas-based methods by incorporating dual-echo ultra-short echo-time (DUTE) and T1-weighted (T1w) MRI data and a probabilistic atlas. Segmented atlases were constructed from CT training data using a leave-one-out framework and combined with T1w, DUTE, and CT data to train a classifier that computes the probability of air/soft tissue/bone at each voxel. This classifier was applied to segment the MRI of the subject of interest and attenuation maps (μ-maps) were generated by assigning specific linear attenuation coefficients (LACs) to each tissue class. The μ-maps generated with this "Atlas-T1w-DUTE" approach were compared to those obtained from DUTE data using a previously proposed method. For validation of the segmentation results, segmented CT μ-maps were considered to the "silver standard"; the segmentation accuracy was assessed qualitatively and quantitatively through calculation of the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). Relative change (RC) maps between the CT and MRI-based attenuation corrected PET volumes were also calculated for a global voxel-wise assessment of the reconstruction results. The μ-maps obtained using the Atlas-T1w-DUTE classifier agreed well with those derived from CT; the mean DSCs for the Atlas-T1w-DUTE-based μ-maps across all subjects were higher than those for DUTE-based μ-maps; the atlas-based μ-maps also showed a lower percentage of misclassified voxels across all subjects. RC maps from the atlas-based technique also demonstrated improvement in the PET data compared to the DUTE method, both globally as well as regionally.

  4. NEMA NU 4-2008 Comparison of Preclinical PET Imaging Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goertzen, Andrew L.; Bao, Qinan; Bergeron, Mélanie; Blankemeyer, Eric; Blinder, Stephan; Cañadas, Mario; Chatziioannou, Arion F.; Dinelle, Katherine; Elhami, Esmat; Jans, Hans-Sonke; Lage, Eduardo; Lecomte, Roger; Sossi, Vesna; Surti, Suleman; Tai, Yuan-Chuan; Vaquero, Juan José; Vicente, Esther; Williams, Darin A.; Laforest, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) standard NU 4-2008 for performance measurements of small-animal tomographs was recently published. Before this standard, there were no standard testing procedures for preclinical PET systems, and manufacturers could not provide clear specifications similar to those available for clinical systems under NEMA NU 2-1994 and 2-2001. Consequently, performance evaluation papers used methods that were modified ad hoc from the clinical PET NEMA standard, thus making comparisons between systems difficult. Methods We acquired NEMA NU 4-2008 performance data for a collection of commercial animal PET systems manufactured since 2000: micro- PET P4, microPET R4, microPET Focus 120, microPET Focus 220, Inveon, ClearPET, Mosaic HP, Argus (formerly eXplore Vista), VrPET, LabPET 8, and LabPET 12. The data included spatial resolution, counting-rate performance, scatter fraction, sensitivity, and image quality and were acquired using settings for routine PET. Results The data showed a steady improvement in system performance for newer systems as compared with first-generation systems, with notable improvements in spatial resolution and sensitivity. Conclusion Variation in system design makes direct comparisons between systems from different vendors difficult. When considering the results from NEMA testing, one must also consider the suitability of the PET system for the specific imaging task at hand. PMID:22699999

  5. Quantitative PET imaging with the 3T MR-BrainPET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weirich, C., E-mail: c.weirich@fz-juelich.de [Forschungszentrum Jülich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine – 4, Juelich (Germany); Scheins, J.; Lohmann, P.; Tellmann, L. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine – 4, Juelich (Germany); Byars, L.; Michel, C. [Siemens Healthcare, Molecular Imaging, Knoxville, TN (United States); Rota Kops, E.; Brenner, D.; Herzog, H.; Shah, N.J. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine – 4, Juelich (Germany)

    2013-02-21

    The new hybrid imaging technology of MR-PET allows for simultaneous acquisition of versatile MRI contrasts and the quantitative metabolic imaging with PET. In order to achieve the quantification of PET images with minimal residual error the application of several corrections is crucial. In this work we present our results on quantification with the 3T MR BrainPET scanner.

  6. Lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) intrinsic activity correction and minimal detectable target activity study for SPECT imaging with a LSO-based animal PET scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Rutao; Ma, Tianyu; Shao, Yiping

    2008-08-01

    This work is part of a feasibility study to develop SPECT imaging capability on a lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) based animal PET system. The SPECT acquisition was enabled by inserting a collimator assembly inside the detector ring and acquiring data in singles mode. The same LSO detectors were used for both PET and SPECT imaging. The intrinsic radioactivity of 176Lu in the LSO crystals, however, contaminates the SPECT data, and can generate image artifacts and introduce quantification error. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effectiveness of a LSO background subtraction method, and to estimate the minimal detectable target activity (MDTA) of image object for SPECT imaging. For LSO background correction, the LSO contribution in an image study was estimated based on a pre-measured long LSO background scan and subtracted prior to the image reconstruction. The MDTA was estimated in two ways. The empirical MDTA (eMDTA) was estimated from screening the tomographic images at different activity levels. The calculated MDTA (cMDTA) was estimated from using a formula based on applying a modified Currie equation on an average projection dataset. Two simulated and two experimental phantoms with different object activity distributions and levels were used in this study. The results showed that LSO background adds concentric ring artifacts to the reconstructed image, and the simple subtraction method can effectively remove these artifacts—the effect of the correction was more visible when the object activity level was near or above the eMDTA. For the four phantoms studied, the cMDTA was consistently about five times of the corresponding eMDTA. In summary, we implemented a simple LSO background subtraction method and demonstrated its effectiveness. The projection-based calculation formula yielded MDTA results that closely correlate with that obtained empirically and may have predicative value for imaging applications.

  7. Impact of target-to-background ratio, target size, emission scan duration, and activity on physical figures of merit for a 3D LSO-based whole body PET/CT scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambilla, M; Matheoud, R; Secco, C; Sacchetti, G; Comi, S; Rudoni, M; Carriero, A; Inglese, E

    2007-10-01

    The aim of our work is to describe the way in which physical figures of merit such as contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) behave when varying acquisition parameters such as emission scan duration (ESD) or activity at the start of acquisition (A(acq)) that in clinical practice can be selected by the user, or object properties such as target dimensions or target-to-background (T/B) ratio, which depend uniquely on the intrinsic characteristics of the object being imaged. Figures of merit, used to characterize image quality and quantitative accuracy for a 3D-LSO based PET/CT scanner, were studied as a function of ESD and A(acq) for different target sizes and T/B ratios using a multivariate approach in a wide range of conditions approaching the ones that can be encountered in clinical practice. An annular ring of water bags of 3 cm thickness was fitted over an IEC phantom in order to obtain counting rates similar to those found in average patients. The average scatter fraction (SF) of the modified IEC phantom was similar to the mean SF measured on patients with a similar scanner. A supplemental set of micro-hollow spheres was positioned inside the phantom. The NEMA NU 2-2001 scatter phantom was positioned at the end of the IEC phantom to approximate the clinical situation of having activity that extends beyond the scanner. The phantoms were filled with a solution of water and 18F (12 kBq/mL) and the spheres with various T/B ratios of 22.5, 10.3, and 3.6. Sequential imaging was performed to acquire PET images with varying background activity concentrations of about 12, 9, 6.4, 5.3, and 3.1 kBq/mL, positioned on the linear portion of the phantom's NECR curve, well below peak NECR of 61.2 kcps that is reached at 31.8 kBq/mL. The ESD was set to 1, 2, 3, and 4 min/bed. With T/B ratios of 3.6, 10.3, and 22.5, the 13.0, 8.1, and 6.5 mm spheres were detectable for the whole ranges of background activity concentration and ESD, respectively. The ESD resulted as the most significant

  8. 应用NEMA 2001标准测试Biograph 64/True V PET/CT性能%Biograph 64/True V performance measurements for a combined PET/CT scanner using the National Electrical Manufacturers Association 2001 standard

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王国军; 张子纲; 贺海荣; 陈盛祖; 彭齐; 宣爱萍

    2009-01-01

    Objective Biograph 64/Troe V performance measumments were performed using National Electrical Manufacturers Association(NEMA)2001 standard.It could provide PET/CT NEMA 2001data.and analyze the advantage of Biograph 64/True V PET/CT by comparing testing results with other PET/CT data.Methotis Pefformance measuremen~included spatial resolution,sensitivitv,scatter fraction and count 1oss.~(18)F was used through out the testing.Spatial resolution based on its model.About 4.07 MBq ~(18)F was iniected into NEMA PET sensitivity model and the data was collected every 300 S.Scatter fraction and noise equivalent count were tested using scatter model with 1.037 MBq ~(18)F iniected in,and the data was collected every 15 min.every fragment for 10 min.totally 35 fragments.According to NEMA 2001 formula,image quality was evaluated based on body model.Results Average transverse and axial spatial resolution at l cm and at 10 em off center was 4.2(4.7)mm and 4.6(5.9)mm respectively.System sensitivity was 6.95×10~3·s~(-1)·MBq~(-1) for the two radial positions(0 and 10 cm).System scatter fraction was 32%. And noise equivalent count rate(NECR)was 1.46×10~5/s and 9.80×10~4/s.Conclusion The integrated PET/CT system Biograph 64/True V has overall excellent performance,in particularly,good resolution,high sensitivity.low scatter fraction and good NECR response.%目的 应用美国国家电器制造商协会(NEMA)2001标准对Biograph 64/True V(TV)PET/CT性能进行测试,以提供Biograph 64/TV测试数据并进行新老仪器测试结果 对照.方法 用NEMA 2001模型和测试方法 测试Biograph 64/TV PET/CT空间分辨率、灵敏度、散射分数和计数丢失参数,测试中使用~(18)F.用空间分辨率模型测试空间分辨率.将放射性活度4.07 MBq的~(18)F注射到NEMAPET灵敏度模型,测试灵敏度,每300 s采集1次数据.测散射分数和噪声等效计数:采用散射模型,且向模型内置人活度1.037 MBq ~(18)F,采集35帧,每帧采集10 min,间隔15

  9. PARAMETRIC IMAGING AND TEST-RETEST VARIABILITY OF 11C-(+)-PHNO BINDING TO D2/D3 DOPAMINE RECEPTORS IN HUMANS ON THE HRRT PET SCANNER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallezot, Jean-Dominique; Zheng, Ming-Qiang; Lim, Keunpoong; Lin, Shu-fei; Labaree, David; Matuskey, David; Huang, Yiyun; Ding, Yu-Shin; Carson, Richard E.; Malison, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    11C-(+)-PHNO is an agonist radioligand for imaging dopamine D2 and D3 receptors in the human brain with PET. In this study we evaluated the reproducibility of 11C-(+)-PHNO binding parameters using a within-day design and assessed parametric imaging methods. Methods Repeated studies were performed in eight subjects, with simultaneous measurement of the arterial input function and plasma free fraction. Two 11C-(+)-PHNO scans on the same subject were separated by 5.4±0.7 h. After evaluating compartment models, 11C-(+)-PHNO volumes of distribution VT and VT/fP and binding potentials BPND, BPP and BPF were quantified using the multilinear analysis MA1, with the cerebellum as reference region. Parametric images of BPND were also computed using SRTM and SRTM2. Results The test-retest variability of 11C-(+)-PHNO BPND was 9% in D2-rich regions (caudate and putamen). Among D3-rich regions, variability was low in pallidum (6%), but higher in substantia nigra (19%), thalamus (14%) and hypothalamus (21%). No significant mass carry-over effect was observed in D3-rich regions, although a trend in BPND was present in substantia nigra (−14±15%). Due to the relatively fast kinetics, low noise BPND parametric images were obtained with both SRTM and SRTM2 without spatial smoothing. Conclusion 11C-(+)-PHNO can be used to compute low noise parametric images in both D2 and D3 rich regions in humans. PMID:24732151

  10. Development of a large-area monolithic 4x4 MPPC array for a future PET scanner employing pixelized Ce:LYSO and Pr:LuAG crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, T., E-mail: katou.frme.8180@asagi.waseda.j [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1, Ohkubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Kataoka, J.; Nakamori, T.; Miura, T.; Matsuda, H. [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1, Ohkubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Sato, K.; Ishikawa, Y.; Yamamura, K.; Kawabata, N. [Solid State Division, Hamamatsu Photonics K. K., 1126-1, Ichino-cho, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka (Japan); Ikeda, H.; Sato, G. [ISAS/JAXA, 3-1-1, Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara-shi, Kanagawa (Japan); Kamada, K. [Materials Research Laboratory, Furukawa Co., Ltd., 1-25-13, Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0856 (Japan)

    2011-05-11

    We have developed a new type of large-area monolithic Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC) array consisting of a 4x4 matrix of 3x3 mm{sup 2} pixels. Each pixel comprises 3600 Geiger mode avalanche photodiodes (APDs) that achieve an average gain of 9.68x10{sup 5} at 71.9 V at 0 {sup o}C with variations of only {+-}7.2% over 4x4 pixels. Excellent uniformity was also obtained for photon detection efficiencies (PDE) of {+-}6.4%, whilst dark count rates at the single photoelectron (1 p.e.) level amounted to {approx_equal}2Mcps/pixel, measured at 0 {sup o}C. As the first step toward using the device in scintillation photon detectors, we fabricated a prototype gamma-ray camera consisting of an MPPC array optically coupled with a scintillator matrix, namely a 4x4 array of 3x3 x10 mm{sup 3} crystals. Specifically, we tested the performance with Ce-doped (Lu, Y){sub 2}(SiO{sub 4})O (Ce:LYSO), Pr-doped Lu{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} (Pr:LuAG) and 'surface coated' Pr:LuAG (Pr:LuAG (WLS)) matrices whereby the emission peak of Pr:LuAG was shifted from 310 to 420 nm via a wavelength shifter (WLS). Average energy resolutions of 13.83%, 14.70% and 13.96% (FWHM) were obtained for 662 keV gamma-rays, as measured at 0 {sup o}C with Ce:LYSO, Pr:LuAG and Pr:LuAG (WLS) scintillator matrices, respectively. We confirmed that the effective PDE for Pr:LuAG (WLS) had improved by more than 30% compared to original, non-coated Pr:LuAG matrix. These results suggest that a large-area monolithic MPPC array developed here could be promising for future medical imaging, particularly in positron emission tomography (PET).

  11. Advances in Clinical PET/MRI Instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Hans; Lerche, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    In 2010, the first whole-body PET/MRI scanners installed for clinical use were the sequential Philips PET/MRI with PMT-based, TOF-capable technology and the integrated simultaneous Siemens PET/MRI. Avalanche photodiodes as non-magneto-sensitive readout electronics allowed PET integrated within the MRI. The experiences with these scanners showed that improvements of software aspects, such as attenuation correction, were necessary and that efficient protocols combining optimally PET and MRI must be still developed. In 2014, General Electric issued an integrated PET/MRI with SiPM-based PET detectors, allowing TOF-PET. Looking at the MRI components of current PET/MR imaging systems, primary improvements come from sequences and new coils.

  12. THE CHARACTERISTICS OF EEC PET INSTRUMENTATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PAANS, AMJ

    1991-01-01

    As a result of a Guide-Questionnaire distributed among all European PET centers an inventory of the European PET instrumentation has become available in a data base. An overview and analysis of the European PET equipment, cyclotrons, scanners and software, together with some global information on th

  13. THE CHARACTERISTICS OF EEC PET INSTRUMENTATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PAANS, AMJ

    1991-01-01

    As a result of a Guide-Questionnaire distributed among all European PET centers an inventory of the European PET instrumentation has become available in a data base. An overview and analysis of the European PET equipment, cyclotrons, scanners and software, together with some global information on

  14. THE CHARACTERISTICS OF EEC PET INSTRUMENTATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PAANS, AMJ

    1991-01-01

    As a result of a Guide-Questionnaire distributed among all European PET centers an inventory of the European PET instrumentation has become available in a data base. An overview and analysis of the European PET equipment, cyclotrons, scanners and software, together with some global information on th

  15. MRI-Based Attenuation Correction for PET/MRI: A Novel Approach Combining Pattern Recognition and Atlas Registration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmann, M.; Steinke, F.; Scheel, V.; Charpiat, G.; Farquhar, J.D.R.; Aschoff, P.; Brady, M.; Schölkopf, B.; Pichler, B.J.

    2008-01-01

    For quantitative PET information, correction of tissue photon attenuation is mandatory. Generally in conventional PET, the attenuation map is obtained from a transmission scan, which uses a rotating radionuclide source, or from the CT scan in a combined PET/CT scanner. In the case of PET/MRI scanner

  16. Characterization by SPECT imaging, micro-PET with {sup 18}F-F.D.G. and micro scanner of an orthotopic osteosarcoma murine model; Caracterisation par imagerie TEMP, micro-TEP au {sup 18}F-FDG et microscanner d'un modele murin d'osteosarcome orthotopique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miot-Noirault, E.; Moins, N.; Chezal, J.M. [EA4231, UMR 990, Inserm, 63 - Clermont-Ferrand (France); Gouin, F.; Heymann, D.; Redini, F. [EA3822, UMR 957, 44 - Nantes (France)

    2010-07-01

    This study had for purpose the characterization of the murine model of POS-1 osteolytic osteosarcoma implanted in orthotopic situation, by SPECT imaging, micro-PET, micro scanner, clinical and histological study. Conclusions: these results show all the interest of multimodal small animal imaging as quantitative method of evaluation in vivo of the osteosarcoma tumor progression and bone rebuilding associated to the osteolytic evolution. The assessment in vivo of this pathology should allow to improve the knowledge of interactions between tumor cells and bone environment, preclinical evaluation in vivo of new therapy strategies targeting both tumor development and bone resorption. (N.C.)

  17. The AX-PET project Demonstration of a high resolution axial 3D PET

    CERN Document Server

    Bolle, E; Casella, C; Chesi, E; Clinthorne, N; Cochran, E; De Leo, R; Dissertori, G; Djambazov, G; Fanti, V; Honscheid, K; Huh, S; Johnson, I; Joram, C; Kagan, H; Lustermann, W; Meddi, F; Nappi, E; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Oliver, J F; Pauss, P; Rafecas, M; Renker, D; Rudge, A; Schinzel, D; Schneider, T; Seguinot, J; Smith, S; Solevi, P; Stapnes, S; Weilhammer, P

    2010-01-01

    The AX-PET is a new geometrical concept for a high resolution 3D PET scanner, based on matrices of axially oriented LYSO crystals interleaved by stacks of WLS, both individually read out by G-APDs. A PET demonstrator, based on two detector modules used in coincidence, is currently under construction.

  18. New scintillating crystals for PET scanners

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoq, P

    2002-01-01

    Systematic R&D on basic mechanism in inorganic scintillators, initiated by the Crystal Clear Collaboration at CERN 10 years ago, has contributed not to a small amount, to the development of new materials for a new generation of medical imaging devices with increased resolution and sensitivity. The first important requirement for a scintillator to be used in medical imaging devices is the stopping power for the given energy range of X and gamma rays to be considered, and more precisely the conversion efficiency. A high light yield is also mandatory to improve the energy resolution, which is essentially limited by the photostatistics and the electronic noise at these energies. A short scintillation decay time allows to reduce the dead time and therefore to increase the limiting counting rate. When all these requirements are fulfilled the sensitivity and image contrast are increased for a given patient dose, or the dose can be reduced. Examples of new materials under development by the Crystal Clear Collabor...

  19. Electronics design of a PET detector module with APD array

    CERN Document Server

    Wang Yong

    2002-01-01

    The author summarizes the advantages of APD-array for using in PET scanner. The front-end electronics for an experimental APD detector module was built and tested. According to the characteristics of APD-array and the demands of the signal readout in PET scanner, the full electronics system of an APD detector module was designed and presented in detail

  20. Network Security Scanner

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Network Security Scanner (NSS) is a tool that allows auditing and monitoring remote network computers for possible vulnerabilities, checks your network for all potential methods that a hacker might use to attack it. Network Security Scanner is a complete networking utilities package that includes a wide range of tools for network security auditing, vulnerability Auditing, scanning, monitoring and more. Network Security Scanner (NSS) is an easy to use, intuitive network security scanner that c...

  1. Clinical application of PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomena, Francisco [Hospital Clinico Villarroel, Barcelona (Spain). Nuclear Medicine]. E-mail: flomena@clinic.ub.es; Soler, Marina [CETIR Grup Medic. Esplkugues de Llobregat, Barcelona (Spain). PET Unit

    2005-10-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is an imaging modality that gives information on tissue metabolism and functionalism, different from other imaging techniques like computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which provide anatomical or structural information. PET has reached its development in biomedical research because of its capacity to use analogous compounds of many endogenous substance as tracers, and to measure, in vivo and in a non-invasive way, their consumption by the different organs and tissues of the mammalian body. Fluorodeoxyglucose-F 18 (FDG) PET has been proven to be a tracer adequate for clinical use in oncology and in many neurological diseases, with an excellent cost-efficiency ratio. The current PET-CT scanners can come to be the best tools for exploring patients who suffer from cancer.(author)

  2. 3D Surface Realignment Tracking for Medical Imaging: A Phantom Study with PET Motion Correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Jensen, Rasmus Ramsbøl

    2013-01-01

    We present a complete system for motion correction in high resolution brain positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The system is based on a compact structured light scanner mounted above the patient tunnel of the Siemens High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT) PET brain scanner. The struct......We present a complete system for motion correction in high resolution brain positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The system is based on a compact structured light scanner mounted above the patient tunnel of the Siemens High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT) PET brain scanner...

  3. Quantitative Techniques in PET-CT Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basu, Sandip; Zaidi, Habib; Holm, Soren; Alavi, Abass

    2011-01-01

    The appearance of hybrid PET/CT scanners has made quantitative whole body scanning of radioactive tracers feasible. This paper deals with the novel concepts for assessing global organ function and disease activity based on combined functional (PET) and structural (CT or MR) imaging techniques, their

  4. Optimization of PET system design for lesion detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Jinyi

    2000-10-13

    Traditionally, the figures of merit used in designing a PET scanner are spatial resolution, noise equivalent count rate, noise equivalent sensitivity, etc. These measures, however, do not directly reflect the lesion detectability using the PET scanner. Here we propose to optimize PET scanner design directly for lesion detection. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of lesion detection can be easily computed using the theoretical expressions that we have previously derived. Because no time consuming Monte Carlo simulation is needed, the theoretical expressions allow evaluation of a large range of parameters. The PET system parameters can then be chosen to achieve the maximum SNR for lesion detection. The simulation study shown in this paper was focused a single ring PET scanner without depth of interaction measurement. Randoms and scatters were also ignored.

  5. Do carotid MR surface coils affect PET quantification in PET/MR imaging?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willemink, Martin J; Eldib, Mootaz [Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States); Leiner, Tim [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Fayad, Zahi A; Mani, Venkatesh [Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-05-18

    To evaluate the effect of surface coils for carotid MR imaging on PET quantification in a clinical simultaneous whole-body PET/MR scanner. A cylindrical phantom was filled with a homogeneous 2L water-FDG mixture at a starting dose of 301.2MBq. Clinical PET/MR and PET/CT systems were used to acquire PET-data without a coil (reference standard) and with two carotid MRI coils (Siemens Special Purpose 8-Channel and Machnet 4-Channel Phased Array). PET-signal attenuation was evaluated with Osirix using 51 (PET/MR) and 37 (PET/CT) circular ROIs. Mean and maximum standardized uptake values (SUVs) were quantified for each ROI. Furthermore, SUVs of PET/MR and PET/CT were compared. For validation, a patient was scanned with an injected dose of 407.7MBq on both a PET/CT and a PET/MR system without a coil and with both coils. PET/MR underestimations were -2.2% (Siemens) and -7.8% (Machnet) for SUVmean, and -1.2% (Siemens) and -3.3% (Machnet) for SUVmax, respectively. For PET/CT, underestimations were -1.3% (Siemens) and -1.4% (Machnet) for SUVmean and -0.5% (both Siemens and Machnet) for SUVmax, respectively using no coil data as reference. Except for PET/CT SUVmax values all differences were significant. SUVs differed significantly between PET/MR and PET/CT with SUVmean values of 0.51-0.55 for PET/MR and 0.68-0.69 for PET/CT, respectively. The patient examination showed that median SUVmean values measured in the carotid arteries decreased from 0.97 without a coil to 0.96 (Siemens) and 0.88 (Machnet). Carotid surface coils do affect attenuation correction in both PET/MR and PET/CT imaging. Furthermore, SUVs differed significantly between PET/MR and PET/CT.

  6. Simulation of triple coincidences in PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cal-González, J; Lage, E; Herranz, E; Vicente, E; Udias, J M; Moore, S C; Park, M-A; Dave, S R; Parot, V; Herraiz, J L

    2015-01-07

    Although current PET scanners are designed and optimized to detect double coincidence events, there is a significant amount of triple coincidences in any PET acquisition. Triple coincidences may arise from causes such as: inter-detector scatter (IDS), random triple interactions (RT), or the detection of prompt gamma rays in coincidence with annihilation photons when non-pure positron-emitting radionuclides are used (β(+)γ events). Depending on the data acquisition settings of the PET scanner, these triple events are discarded or processed as a set of double coincidences if the energy of the three detected events is within the scanner's energy window. This latter option introduces noise in the data, as at most, only one of the possible lines-of-response defined by triple interactions corresponds to the line along which the decay occurred. Several novel works have pointed out the possibility of using triple events to increase the sensitivity of PET scanners or to expand PET imaging capabilities by allowing differentiation between radiotracers labeled with non-pure and pure positron-emitting radionuclides. In this work, we extended the Monte Carlo simulator PeneloPET to assess the proportion of triple coincidences in PET acquisitions and to evaluate their possible applications. We validated the results of the simulator against experimental data acquired with a modified version of a commercial preclinical PET/CT scanner, which was enabled to acquire and process triple-coincidence events. We used as figures of merit the energy spectra for double and triple coincidences and the triples-to-doubles ratio for different energy windows and radionuclides. After validation, the simulator was used to predict the relative quantity of triple-coincidence events in two clinical scanners assuming different acquisition settings. Good agreement between simulations and preclinical experiments was found, with differences below 10% for most of the observables considered. For clinical

  7. PET and PET/CT in clinical cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, Kyoung Sook [Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-02-15

    Cardiac PET emerged as a powerful tool that allowed in vivo quantification of physiologic processes including myocardial perfusion and metabolism, as well as neuronal and receptor function for more than 25 years. Now PET imaging has been playing an important role in the clinical evaluation of patients with known or suspected ischemic heart disease. This important clinical role is expected to grow with the availability of PET/CT scanner that allow a true integration of structure and function. The objective of this review is to provide and update on the current and future role of PET in clinical cardiology with a special eye on the great opportunities now offered by PET/CT.

  8. Fully 3D GPU PET reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herraiz, J.L., E-mail: joaquin@nuclear.fis.ucm.es [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Departmento Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Espana, S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Cal-Gonzalez, J. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Departmento Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Vaquero, J.J. [Departmento de Bioingenieria e Ingenieria Espacial, Universidad Carlos III, Madrid (Spain); Desco, M. [Departmento de Bioingenieria e Ingenieria Espacial, Universidad Carlos III, Madrid (Spain); Unidad de Medicina y Cirugia Experimental, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Madrid (Spain); Udias, J.M. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Departmento Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain)

    2011-08-21

    Fully 3D iterative tomographic image reconstruction is computationally very demanding. Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) has been proposed for many years as potential accelerators in complex scientific problems, but it has not been used until the recent advances in the programmability of GPUs that the best available reconstruction codes have started to be implemented to be run on GPUs. This work presents a GPU-based fully 3D PET iterative reconstruction software. This new code may reconstruct sinogram data from several commercially available PET scanners. The most important and time-consuming parts of the code, the forward and backward projection operations, are based on an accurate model of the scanner obtained with the Monte Carlo code PeneloPET and they have been massively parallelized on the GPU. For the PET scanners considered, the GPU-based code is more than 70 times faster than a similar code running on a single core of a fast CPU, obtaining in both cases the same images. The code has been designed to be easily adapted to reconstruct sinograms from any other PET scanner, including scanner prototypes.

  9. Colorimetric Scanner Characterisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon Y. Hardeberg

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, methods for the colorimetric characterisation of colour scanners are proposed and evaluated. These methods apply equally to other colour image input devices such as digital cameras. The goal of our characterisation is to establish the relationship between the device-dependent colour space of the scanner and the device-independent CIELAB colour space. The scanner characterisation is based on polynomial regression techniques. Several regression schemes have been tested. The retained method consists in applying a non-linear correction to the scanner RGB values followed by a 3rd order 3D polynomial regression function directly to CIELAB space. This method gives very good results in terms of residual colour differences. This is partly due to the fact that the RMS error that is minimised in the regression corresponds to ΔE*ab which is well correlated to visual colour differences.

  10. Twisting wire scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Gharibyan, V; Krouptchenkov, I; Nölle, D; Tiessen, H; Werner, M; Wittenburg, K

    2012-01-01

    A new type of 'two-in-one' wire scanner is proposed. Recent advances in linear motors' technology make it possible to combine translational and rotational movements. This will allow to scan the beam in two perpendicular directions using a single driving motor and a special fork attached to it. Vertical or horizontal mounting will help to escape problems associated with the 45 deg scanners. Test results of the translational part with linear motors is presented.

  11. PET/CT: underlying physics, instrumentation, and advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres Espallardo, I

    2017-01-12

    Since it was first introduced, the main goal of PET/CT has been to provide both PET and CT images with high clinical quality and to present them to radiologists and specialists in nuclear medicine as a fused, perfectly aligned image. The use of fused PET and CT images quickly became routine in clinical practice, showing the great potential of these hybrid scanners. Thanks to this success, manufacturers have gone beyond considering CT as a mere attenuation corrector for PET, concentrating instead on design high performance PET and CT scanners with more interesting features. Since the first commercial PET/CT scanner became available in 2001, both the PET component and the CT component have improved immensely. In the case of PET, faster scintillation crystals with high stopping power such as LYSO crystals have enabled more sensitive devices to be built, making it possible to reduce the number of undesired coincidence events and to use time of flight (TOF) techniques. All these advances have improved lesion detection, especially in situations with very noisy backgrounds. Iterative reconstruction methods, together with the corrections carried out during the reconstruction and the use of the point-spread function, have improved image quality. In parallel, CT instrumentation has also improved significantly, and 64- and 128-row detectors have been incorporated into the most modern PET/CT scanners. This makes it possible to obtain high quality diagnostic anatomic images in a few seconds that both enable the correction of PET attenuation and provide information for diagnosis. Furthermore, nowadays nearly all PET/CT scanners have a system that modulates the dose of radiation that the patient is exposed to in the CT study in function of the region scanned. This article reviews the underlying physics of PET and CT imaging separately, describes the changes in the instrumentation and standard protocols in a combined PET/CT system, and finally points out the most important

  12. PET/MR Imaging in Gynecologic Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohliger, Michael A; Hope, Thomas A; Chapman, Jocelyn S; Chen, Lee-May; Behr, Spencer C; Poder, Liina

    2017-08-01

    MR imaging and PET using 2-Deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoroglucose (FDG) are both useful in the evaluation of gynecologic malignancies. MR imaging is superior for local staging of disease whereas fludeoxyglucose FDG PET is superior for detecting distant metastases. Integrated PET/MR imaging scanners have great promise for gynecologic malignancies by combining the advantages of each modality into a single scan. This article reviews the technology behind PET/MR imaging acquisitions and technical challenges relevant to imaging the pelvis. A dedicated PET/MR imaging protocol; the roles of PET and MR imaging in cervical, endometrial, and ovarian cancers; and future directions for PET/MR imaging are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Preclinical positron emission tomography scanner based on a monolithic annulus of scintillator: initial design study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolin, Alexander V; Martone, Peter F; Jaliparthi, Gangadhar; Raylman, Raymond R

    2017-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) scanners designed for imaging of small animals have transformed translational research by reducing the necessity to invasively monitor physiology and disease progression. Virtually all of these scanners are based on the use of pixelated detector modules arranged in rings. This design, while generally successful, has some limitations. Specifically, use of discrete detector modules to construct PET scanners reduces detection sensitivity and can introduce artifacts in reconstructed images, requiring the use of correction methods. To address these challenges, and facilitate measurement of photon depth-of-interaction in the detector, we investigated a small animal PET scanner (called AnnPET) based on a monolithic annulus of scintillator. The scanner was created by placing 12 flat facets around the outer surface of the scintillator to accommodate placement of silicon photomultiplier arrays. Its performance characteristics were explored using Monte Carlo simulations and sections of the NEMA NU4-2008 protocol. Results from this study revealed that AnnPET's reconstructed spatial resolution is predicted to be [Formula: see text] full width at half maximum in the radial, tangential, and axial directions. Peak detection sensitivity is predicted to be 10.1%. Images of simulated phantoms (mini-hot rod and mouse whole body) yielded promising results, indicating the potential of this system for enhancing PET imaging of small animals.

  14. Development and Test of a High Performance Multi Channel Readout System on a Chip with Application in PET/MR

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The availability of new, compact, magnetic field tolerant sensors suitable for PET has opened the opportunity to build highly integrated PET scanners that can be included in commercial MR scanners. This combination has long been expected to have big advantages over existing systems combining PET and CT. This thesis describes my work towards building a highly integrated readout ASIC for application in PET/MR within the framework of the HYPERImage and SUBLIMA projects. It also gives a brief ...

  15. Cobalt-60 Container Scanner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a special container scanner in which the radiation source is a conventional radiography 60Co projector of (100-300)×3 .7×1010Bq. With a specia l sensitive array detector, invented by Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology ( INET) of Tsinghua University and other technical innovations, t he characteristics of the 60Co scanner qualify it for use in c ontainer insp ection. Its contrast indicator (CI) and image quality indicator (IQI) for 10 0 mm steel are equal to 0.7% and 2.5%, respectively, and the steel penetration ( SP) is about 240 mm. The 60Co container scanner is much more ec onomical and more reliable than those scanners using an accelerator source. Also, its penetr ation ability is much better than that of an X-ray machine scanner. This paper p resents the system design, the main difficulties and their technical solutions, the inspection characteristics and the special features of the 60Co sc anner.

  16. Performance comparison of two commercial whole-body PET/CT scanners using Nema NU 2-2001; Comparaison des performances de deux systemes TEP/TDM corps entier selon la norme NEMA NU 2-2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modolo, L.; Bolard, G.; Kosinski, M.; Bochud, F.; Verdun, F.R. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV), Universite de Lausanne, Institut Universitaire de Radiophysique Appliquee, Lausanne (Switzerland); Prior, J.O.; Bischof Delaloye, A. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV), Universite de Lausanne, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Lausanne (Switzerland); Seimbille, Y. [Hopitaux Universitaires de Geneve (HUG), Unite Cyclotron, Service de Medecine Nucleaire (Switzerland); Hejirad, N. [Clinique de Genolier, Service de Radiotherapie, Genolier (Switzerland)

    2007-08-15

    The goal of work is the characterization of two PET/CT units that are based on different technologies, using the methodology proposed in the N.E.M.A. NU 2-2001 standard. The two systems were qualified in the 3D acquisition mode by means of the National Electric Manufacturers Association (N.E.M.A.) phantoms. The results obtained showed that the N.E.M.A. standard allows to highlight differences in terms of spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction and counting rate performances between the two systems; differences that can be explained by the geometry of the units and the materials of the detectors used. Thus, the use of the standard makes it possible to benchmark PET units and establish reference values that can be used to follow the stability of the system over the time. The tests of image quality, obtained under conditions closer to the clinical applications, showed nevertheless that the two units give, in spite of different technologies, images with sufficient contrast, within short acquisition times, allowing the detection of small lesions. This test should be part of the constancy tests to enable the comparison of examinations performed on different units when the quantitative aspects are of importance. (authors)

  17. Standardised uptake values from PET/CT images: comparison with conventional attenuation-corrected PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souvatzoglou, M.; Ziegler, S.I.; Martinez, M.J.; Dzewas, G.; Schwaiger, M.; Bengel, F. [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Busch, R. [Institut fuer Epidemiologie und Statistik der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany)

    2007-03-15

    In PET/CT, CT-derived attenuation factors may influence standardised uptake values (SUVs) in tumour lesions and organs when compared with stand-alone PET. Therefore, we compared PET/CT-derived SUVs intra-individually in various organs and tumour lesions with stand-alone PET-derived SUVs. Thirty-five patients with known or suspected cancer were prospectively included. Sixteen patients underwent FDG PET using an ECAT HR+scanner, and subsequently a second scan using a Biograph Sensation 16PET/CT scanner. Nineteen patients were scanned in the reverse order. All images were reconstructed with an iterative algorithm (OSEM). Suspected lesions were grouped as paradiaphragmatic versus distant from the diaphragm. Mean and maximum SUVs were also calculated for brain, lung, liver, spleen and vertebral bone. The attenuation coefficients ({mu} values) used for correction of emission data (bone, soft tissue, lung) in the two data sets were determined. A body phantom containing six hot spheres and one cold cylinder was measured using the same protocol as in patients. Forty-six lesions were identified. There was a significant correlation of maximum and mean SUVs derived from PET and PET/CT for 14 paradiaphragmatic lesions (r=0.97 respectively; p<0.001 respectively) and for 32 lesions located distant from the diaphragm (r=0.87 and r=0.89 respectively; p<0.001 respectively). No significant differences were observed in the SUVs calculated with PET and PET/CT in the lesions or in the organs. In the phantom, radioactivity concentration in spheres calculated from PET and from PET/CT correlated significantly (r=0.99; p<0.001). SUVs of cancer lesions and normal organs were comparable between PET and PET/CT, supporting the usefulness of PET/CT-derived SUVs for quantification of tumour metabolism. (orig.)

  18. Portable biochip scanner device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perov, Alexander (Troitsk, RU); Sharonov, Alexei (Moscow, RU); Mirzabekov, Andrei D. (Darien, IL)

    2002-01-01

    A portable biochip scanner device used to detect and acquire fluorescence signal data from biological microchips (biochips) is provided. The portable biochip scanner device employs a laser for emitting an excitation beam. An optical fiber delivers the laser beam to a portable biochip scanner. A lens collimates the laser beam, the collimated laser beam is deflected by a dichroic mirror and focused by an objective lens onto a biochip. The fluorescence light from the biochip is collected and collimated by the objective lens. The fluorescence light is delivered to a photomultiplier tube (PMT) via an emission filter and a focusing lens. The focusing lens focuses the fluorescence light into a pinhole. A signal output of the PMT is processed and displayed.

  19. Biochip scanner device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perov, Alexander (Troitsk, RU); Belgovskiy, Alexander I. (Mayfield Heights, OH); Mirzabekov, Andrei D. (Darien, IL)

    2001-01-01

    A biochip scanner device used to detect and acquire fluorescence signal data from biological microchips or biochips and method of use are provided. The biochip scanner device includes a laser for emitting a laser beam. A modulator, such as an optical chopper modulates the laser beam. A scanning head receives the modulated laser beam and a scanning mechanics coupled to the scanning head moves the scanning head relative to the biochip. An optical fiber delivers the modulated laser beam to the scanning head. The scanning head collects the fluorescence light from the biochip, launches it into the same optical fiber, which delivers the fluorescence into a photodetector, such as a photodiode. The biochip scanner device is used in a row scanning method to scan selected rows of the biochip with the laser beam size matching the size of the immobilization site.

  20. Automatic extraction of forward stroke volume using dynamic PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harms, Hans; Tolbod, Lars Poulsen; Hansson, Nils Henrik;

    Background: Dynamic PET can be used to extract forward stroke volume (FSV) by the indicator dilution principle. The technique employed can be automated and is in theory independent on the tracer used and may therefore be added to any dynamic cardiac PET protocol. The aim of this study was to vali......Background: Dynamic PET can be used to extract forward stroke volume (FSV) by the indicator dilution principle. The technique employed can be automated and is in theory independent on the tracer used and may therefore be added to any dynamic cardiac PET protocol. The aim of this study...... was to validate automated methods for extracting FSV directly from dynamic PET studies for two different tracers and to examine potential scanner hardware bias. Methods: 21 subjects underwent a dynamic 27 min 11C-acetate PET scan on a Siemens Biograph TruePoint 64 PET/CT scanner (scanner I). In addition, 8...... subjects underwent a dynamic 6 min 15O-water PET scan followed by a 27 min 11C-acetate PET scan on a GE Discovery ST PET/CT scanner (scanner II). The LV-aortic time-activity curve (TAC) was extracted automatically from dynamic PET data using cluster analysis. The first-pass peak was isolated by automatic...

  1. Overview of the software architecture and data flow for the J-PET tomography device

    CERN Document Server

    Krzemien, W; Bialas, P; Czerwinski, E; Gajos, A; Gruntowski, A; Gruntowski, T; Kaplon, L; Kochanowski, A; Korcyl, G; Kowal, J; Kowalski, P; Kozik, T; Kubicz, E; Moskal, P; Niedzwiecki, Sz; Palka, M; Raczynski, L; Rudy, Z; Sharma, N G; Silarski, M; Slomski, A; Stola, K; Strzelecki, A; Trybek, D; Wieczorek, A; Zielinski, M; Wislicki, W; Zon, N

    2015-01-01

    Modern TOF-PET scanner systems require high-speed computing resources for efficient data processing, monitoring and image reconstruction. In this article we present the data flow and software architecture for the novel TOF-PET scanner developed by the J-PET collaboration. We discuss the data acquisition system, reconstruction framework and some image reconstruction issues. Also, the concept of computing outside hospitals in the remote centers such as \\'Swierk Computing Centre in Poland is presented.

  2. Overview of the software architecture and data flow for the J-PET tomography device

    CERN Document Server

    Krzemień, W; Białas, P; Czerwiński, E; Gajos, A; Głowacz, B; Jasińska, B; Kamińska, D; Korcyl, G; Kowalski, P; Kozik, T; Kubicz, E; Niedźwiecki, Sz; Pawlik-Niedźwiecka, M; Raczyński, L; Rudy, Z; Silarski, M; Strzelecki, A; Wieczorek, A; Wiślicki, W; Zieliński, M; Moskal, P

    2016-01-01

    Modern TOF-PET scanner systems require high-speed computing resources for efficient data processing, monitoring and image reconstruction. In this article we present the data flow and software architecture for the novel TOF-PET scanner developed by the J-PET collaboration. We discuss the data acquisition system, reconstruction framework and image reconstruction software. Also, the concept of computing outside hospitals in the remote centers such as \\'Swierk Computing Centre in Poland is presented.

  3. Ionization beam scanner

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1973-01-01

    Inner structure of an ionization beam scanner, a rather intricate piece of apparatus which permits one to measure the density distribution of the proton beam passing through it. On the outside of the tank wall there is the coil for the longitudinal magnetic field, on the inside, one can see the arrangement of electrodes creating a highly homogeneous transverse electric field.

  4. Evaluation of cat brain infarction model using microPET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Jin; Lee, Dong Soo; Kim, Yun Hui; Hwang, Do Won; Kim, Jin Su; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Sang Moo [Korea Institite of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-12-01

    PET has some disadvantage in the imaging of small animal due to poor resolution. With the advent of microPET scanner, it is possible to image small animals. However, the image quality was not good enough as human image. Due to larger brain, cat brain imaging was superior to mouse or rat. In this study, we established the cat brain infarction model and evaluate it and its temporal change using microPET scanner. Two adult male cats were used. Anesthesia was done with xylazine and ketamine HCI. A burr hole was made at 1 cm right lateral to the bregma. Collagenase type IV 10 {mu}l was injected using 30 G needle for 5 minutes to establish the infarction model. {sup 18}F-FDG microPET (Concorde Microsystems Inc., Knoxville, TN) scans were performed 1, 11 and 32 days after the infarction. In addition, {sup 18}F-FDG PET scans were performed using human PET scanner (Gemini, Philips medical systems, CA, USA) 13 and 47 days after the infarction. Two cat brain infarction models were established. The glucose metabolism of an infarction lesion improved with time. An infarction lesion was also distinguishable in the human PET scan. We successfully established the cat brain infarction model and evaluated the infarcted lesion and its temporal change using {sup 18}F-FDG microPET scanner.

  5. Evaluation of cat brain infarction model using microPET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. J.; Lee, D. S.; Kim, J. H.; Hwang, D. W.; Jung, J. G.; Lee, M. C [College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, S. M [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    PET has some disadvantage in the imaging of small animal due to poor resolution. With the advance of microPET scanner, it is possible to image small animals. However, the image quality was not so much satisfactory as human image. As cats have relatively large sized brain, cat brain imaging was superior to mice or rat. In this study, we established the cat brain infarction model and evaluate it and its temporal change using microPET scanner. Two adult male cats were used. Anesthesia was done with xylazine and ketamine HCl. A burr hole was made at 1cm right lateral to the bregma. Collagenase type IV 10 ul was injected using 30G needle for 5 minutes to establish the infarction model. F-18 FDG microPET (Concorde Microsystems Inc., Knoxville. TN) scans were performed 1. 11 and 32 days after the infarction. In addition. 18F-FDG PET scans were performed using Gemini PET scanner (Philips medical systems. CA, USA) 13 and 47 days after the infarction. Two cat brain infarction models were established. The glucose metabolism of an infraction lesion improved with time. An infarction lesion was also distinguishable in the Gemini PET scan. We successfully established the cat brain infarction model and evaluated the infarcted lesion and its temporal change using F-18 FDG microPET scanner.

  6. Importance of Attenuation Correction (AC) for Small Animal PET Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El Ali, Henrik H.; Bodholdt, Rasmus Poul; Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjær;

    2012-01-01

    was performed. Methods: Ten NMRI nude mice with subcutaneous implantation of human breast cancer cells (MCF-7) were scanned consecutively in small animal PET and CT scanners (MicroPETTM Focus 120 and ImTek’s MicroCATTM II). CT-based AC, PET-based AC and uniform AC methods were compared. Results: The activity...

  7. Scanner calibration revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozhitkov, Alexander E

    2010-07-01

    Calibration of a microarray scanner is critical for accurate interpretation of microarray results. Shi et al. (BMC Bioinformatics, 2005, 6, Art. No. S11 Suppl. 2.) reported usage of a Full Moon BioSystems slide for calibration. Inspired by the Shi et al. work, we have calibrated microarray scanners in our previous research. We were puzzled however, that most of the signal intensities from a biological sample fell below the sensitivity threshold level determined by the calibration slide. This conundrum led us to re-investigate the quality of calibration provided by the Full Moon BioSystems slide as well as the accuracy of the analysis performed by Shi et al. Signal intensities were recorded on three different microarray scanners at various photomultiplier gain levels using the same calibration slide from Full Moon BioSystems. Data analysis was conducted on raw signal intensities without normalization or transformation of any kind. Weighted least-squares method was used to fit the data. We found that initial analysis performed by Shi et al. did not take into account autofluorescence of the Full Moon BioSystems slide, which led to a grossly distorted microarray scanner response. Our analysis revealed that a power-law function, which is explicitly accounting for the slide autofluorescence, perfectly described a relationship between signal intensities and fluorophore quantities. Microarray scanners respond in a much less distorted fashion than was reported by Shi et al. Full Moon BioSystems calibration slides are inadequate for performing calibration. We recommend against using these slides.

  8. Scanner calibration revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pozhitkov Alexander E

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calibration of a microarray scanner is critical for accurate interpretation of microarray results. Shi et al. (BMC Bioinformatics, 2005, 6, Art. No. S11 Suppl. 2. reported usage of a Full Moon BioSystems slide for calibration. Inspired by the Shi et al. work, we have calibrated microarray scanners in our previous research. We were puzzled however, that most of the signal intensities from a biological sample fell below the sensitivity threshold level determined by the calibration slide. This conundrum led us to re-investigate the quality of calibration provided by the Full Moon BioSystems slide as well as the accuracy of the analysis performed by Shi et al. Methods Signal intensities were recorded on three different microarray scanners at various photomultiplier gain levels using the same calibration slide from Full Moon BioSystems. Data analysis was conducted on raw signal intensities without normalization or transformation of any kind. Weighted least-squares method was used to fit the data. Results We found that initial analysis performed by Shi et al. did not take into account autofluorescence of the Full Moon BioSystems slide, which led to a grossly distorted microarray scanner response. Our analysis revealed that a power-law function, which is explicitly accounting for the slide autofluorescence, perfectly described a relationship between signal intensities and fluorophore quantities. Conclusions Microarray scanners respond in a much less distorted fashion than was reported by Shi et al. Full Moon BioSystems calibration slides are inadequate for performing calibration. We recommend against using these slides.

  9. Microarray Scanner for Fluorescence Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Liqiang; Lu zukang; Li Yingsheng; Zheng Xufeng

    2003-01-01

    A novel pseudo confocal microarray scanner is introduced, in which one dimension scanning is performed by a galvanometer optical scanner and a telecentric objective, another dimension scanning is performed by a stepping motor.

  10. 4-D PET-MR with Volumetric Navigators and Compressed Sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedemonte, Stefano; Catana, Ciprian; Van Leemput, Koen

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid PET-MR scanners acquire multi-modal signals simultaneously, eliminating the requirement of software alignment between the MR and PET imaging data. However, the acquisition of high-resolution MR and PET images requires long scanning times, therefore movement of the subject during the acquis...

  11. Advances in SPECT and PET Hardware.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slomka, Piotr J; Pan, Tinsu; Berman, Daniel S; Germano, Guido

    2015-01-01

    There have been significant recent advances in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) hardware. Novel collimator designs, such as multi-pinhole and locally focusing collimators arranged in geometries that are optimized for cardiac imaging have been implemented to reduce imaging time and radiation dose. These new collimators have been coupled with solid state photon detectors to further improve image quality and reduce scanner size. The new SPECT scanners demonstrate up to a 7-fold increase in photon sensitivity and up to 2 times improvement in image resolution. Although PET scanners are used primarily for oncological imaging, cardiac imaging can benefit from the improved PET sensitivity of 3D systems without inter-plane septa and implementation of the time-of-flight reconstruction. Additionally, resolution recovery techniques are now implemented by all major PET vendors. These new methods improve image contrast, image resolution, and reduce image noise. Simultaneous PET/magnetic resonance (MR) hybrid systems have been developed. Solid state detectors with avalanche photodiodes or digital silicon photomultipliers have also been utilized in PET. These new detectors allow improved image resolution, higher count rate, as well as a reduced sensitivity to electromagnetic MR fields. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Competitive advantage of PET/MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadvar, Hossein; Colletti, Patrick M

    2014-01-01

    Multimodality imaging has made great strides in the imaging evaluation of patients with a variety of diseases. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is now established as the imaging modality of choice in many clinical conditions, particularly in oncology. While the initial development of combined PET/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) was in the preclinical arena, hybrid PET/MR scanners are now available for clinical use. PET/MRI combines the unique features of MRI including excellent soft tissue contrast, diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, fMRI and other specialized sequences as well as MR spectroscopy with the quantitative physiologic information that is provided by PET. Most evidence for the potential clinical utility of PET/MRI is based on studies performed with side-by-side comparison or software-fused MRI and PET images. Data on distinctive utility of hybrid PET/MRI are rapidly emerging. There are potential competitive advantages of PET/MRI over PET/CT. In general, PET/MRI may be preferred over PET/CT where the unique features of MRI provide more robust imaging evaluation in certain clinical settings. The exact role and potential utility of simultaneous data acquisition in specific research and clinical settings will need to be defined. It may be that simultaneous PET/MRI will be best suited for clinical situations that are disease-specific, organ-specific, related to diseases of the children or in those patients undergoing repeated imaging for whom cumulative radiation dose must be kept as low as reasonably achievable. PET/MRI also offers interesting opportunities for use of dual modality probes. Upon clear definition of clinical utility, other important and practical issues related to business operational model, clinical workflow and reimbursement will also be resolved. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. MR-Based Cardiac and Respiratory Motion-Compensation Techniques for PET-MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Camila; Kolbitsch, Christoph; Reader, Andrew J; Marsden, Paul; Schaeffter, Tobias; Prieto, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac and respiratory motion cause image quality degradation in PET imaging, affecting diagnostic accuracy of the images. Whole-body simultaneous PET-MR scanners allow for using motion information estimated from MR images to correct PET data and produce motion-compensated PET images. This article reviews methods that have been proposed to estimate motion from MR images and different techniques to include this information in PET reconstruction, in order to overcome the problem of cardiac and respiratory motion in PET-MR imaging. MR-based motion correction techniques significantly increase lesion detectability and contrast, and also improve accuracy of uptake values in PET images.

  14. PET/MRI in head and neck cancer: initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platzek, Ivan; Laniado, Michael [Dresden University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Dresden (Germany); Beuthien-Baumann, Bettina [Dresden University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Dresden (Germany); Schneider, Matthias [Dresden University Hospital, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dresden (Germany); Gudziol, Volker [Dresden University Hospital, Department of Otolaryngology, Dresden (Germany); Langner, Jens; Schramm, Georg; Hoff, Joerg van den [Institute of Bioinorganic and Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Kotzerke, Joerg [Dresden University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Dresden (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of PET/MRI (positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging) with FDG ({sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose) for initial staging of head and neck cancer. The study group comprised 20 patients (16 men, 4 women) aged between 52 and 81 years (median 64 years) with histologically proven squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck region. The patients underwent a PET scan on a conventional scanner and a subsequent PET/MRI examination on a whole-body hybrid system. FDG was administered intravenously prior to the conventional PET scan (267-395 MBq FDG, 348 MBq on average). The maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}) of the tumour and of both cerebellar hemispheres were determined for both PET datasets. The numbers of lymph nodes with increased FDG uptake were compared between the two PET datasets. No MRI-induced artefacts where observed in the PET images. The tumour was detected by PET/MRI in 17 of the 20 patients, by PET in 16 and by MRI in 14. The PET/MRI examination yielded significantly higher SUV{sub max} than the conventional PET scanner for both the tumour (p < 0.0001) and the cerebellum (p = 0.0009). The number of lymph nodes with increased FDG uptake detected using the PET dataset from the PET/MRI system was significantly higher the number detected by the stand-alone PET system (64 vs. 39, p = 0.001). The current study demonstrated that PET/MRI of the whole head and neck region is feasible with a whole-body PET/MRI system without impairment of PET or MR image quality. (orig.)

  15. Giardia & Pets

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body of water Young pets, like puppies and kittens, have a higher risk of illness than adult ... If your pet has persistent diarrhea, seek veterinary care. Diarrhea has different causes and could result in ...

  16. Pet Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pets can add fun, companionship and a feeling of safety to your life. Before getting a pet, think carefully about which animal is best for ... is each family member looking for in a pet? Who will take care of it? Does anyone ...

  17. PET and paediatrics; La tomographie par emission de positons (ou PET scan) en pediatrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boddaert, N. [Necker Enfants Malades, AP-HP, Serv Radiol Pediat, Paris (France); Ribeiro, M.J. [CEA, DSV, I2BM, Serv Hosp Frederic Joliot, F-91406 Orsay (France)

    2008-07-01

    Positon emission tomography (PET scan) is a functional imagery technique.As in scintigraphy, a radioactive tracer is administrated to the patient and its distribution into the organism is detected by a tomograph or a PET scanner. The nuclear medicine techniques which use radioactive tracers allow to obtain an imagery of the regional metabolism of glucose, blood flow or of different neurotransmitters. The PET-TDM (tomodensitometry) is an hybrid imagery system which associates a PET to a multi-bars scanner (4 to 64 bars). The use of hybrid imagery systems allows an anatomic register of the metabolic anomalies or others, as well as the adjustment of the attenuation of the emitted particles. (O.M.)

  18. Joint PET-MR respiratory motion models for clinical PET motion correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manber, Richard; Thielemans, Kris; Hutton, Brian F.; Wan, Simon; McClelland, Jamie; Barnes, Anna; Arridge, Simon; Ourselin, Sébastien; Atkinson, David

    2016-09-01

    Patient motion due to respiration can lead to artefacts and blurring in positron emission tomography (PET) images, in addition to quantification errors. The integration of PET with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in PET-MR scanners provides complementary clinical information, and allows the use of high spatial resolution and high contrast MR images to monitor and correct motion-corrupted PET data. In this paper we build on previous work to form a methodology for respiratory motion correction of PET data, and show it can improve PET image quality whilst having minimal impact on clinical PET-MR protocols. We introduce a joint PET-MR motion model, using only 1 min per PET bed position of simultaneously acquired PET and MR data to provide a respiratory motion correspondence model that captures inter-cycle and intra-cycle breathing variations. In the model setup, 2D multi-slice MR provides the dynamic imaging component, and PET data, via low spatial resolution framing and principal component analysis, provides the model surrogate. We evaluate different motion models (1D and 2D linear, and 1D and 2D polynomial) by computing model-fit and model-prediction errors on dynamic MR images on a data set of 45 patients. Finally we apply the motion model methodology to 5 clinical PET-MR oncology patient datasets. Qualitative PET reconstruction improvements and artefact reduction are assessed with visual analysis, and quantitative improvements are calculated using standardised uptake value (SUVpeak and SUVmax) changes in avid lesions. We demonstrate the capability of a joint PET-MR motion model to predict respiratory motion by showing significantly improved image quality of PET data acquired before the motion model data. The method can be used to incorporate motion into the reconstruction of any length of PET acquisition, with only 1 min of extra scan time, and with no external hardware required.

  19. Clinical application of pet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Lomeña

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET is an imaging modality that gives information on tissue metabolism and functionalism, different from other imaging techniques like computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, which provide anatomical or structural information. PET has reached its development in biomedical research because of its capacity to use analogous compounds of many endogenous substance as tracers, and to measure, in vivo and in a non-invasive way, their consumption by the different organs and tissues of the mammalian body. Fluordeoxyglucose-F18 (FDG PET has been proven to be a tracer adequate for clinical use in oncology and in many neurological diseases, with an excellent cost-efficiency ratio. The current PET-CT scanners can come to be the best tools for exploring patients who suffer from cancer.A tomografia por emissão de pósitrons (PET é uma técnica de diagnóstico por imagem que fornece informação sobre o metabolismo e funcionamento dos tecidos, diferente de outras técnicas de imagens como tomografia computadorizada (TC e ressonância magnética (RM, as quais fornecem informações estruturais ou anatômicas. O PET alcançou seu desenvolvimento em investigação biomédica devido à sua capacidade de usar traçadores análogos a muitas substâncias endógenas e de medir in vivo e de forma não invasiva seu consumo em diferentes órgãos e tecidos dos mamíferos 18Fluordesoxiglicose (FDG PET tem provado ser uma exploração de uso clínico com excelente relação custo benefício em oncologia e em muitas doenças neurológicas. Os atuais tomógrafos por PET-CT podem chegar a ser a melhor ferramenta de diagnóstico nos pacientes que sofrem de câncer.

  20. Molecular Imaging in Breast Cancer: From Whole-Body PET/CT to Dedicated Breast PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. B. Koolen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET, with or without integrated computed tomography (CT, using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG is based on the principle of elevated glucose metabolism in malignant tumors, and its use in breast cancer patients is frequently being investigated. It has been shown useful for classification, staging, and response monitoring, both in primary and recurrent disease. However, because of the partial volume effect and limited resolution of most whole-body PET scanners, sensitivity for the visualization of small tumors is generally low. To improve the detection and quantification of primary breast tumors with FDG PET, several dedicated breast PET devices have been developed. In this nonsystematic review, we shortly summarize the value of whole-body PET/CT in breast cancer and provide an overview of currently available dedicated breast PETs.

  1. Development of PET/MRI with insertable PET for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Jin Ho; Choi, Yong, E-mail: ychoi.image@gmail.com; Jung, Jiwoong; Kim, Sangsu; Lim, Hyun Keong; Im, Ki Chun [Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, 35 Baekbeom-ro, Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Chang Hyun; Park, Hyun-wook [Department of Electrical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyung Min; Kim, Jong Guk [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, 75 Nowon-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul 139-709 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a dual-modality positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with insertable PET for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of the human brain. Methods: The PET detector block was composed of a 4 × 4 matrix of detector modules, each consisting of a 4 × 4 array LYSO coupled to a 4 × 4 Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (GAPD) array. The PET insert consisted of 18 detector blocks, circularly mounted on a custom-made plastic base to form a ring with an inner diameter of 390 mm and axial length of 60 mm. The PET gantry was shielded with gold-plated conductive fabric tapes with a thickness of 0.1 mm. The charge signals of PET detector transferred via 4 m long flat cables were fed into the position decoder circuit. The flat cables were shielded with a mesh-type aluminum sheet with a thickness of 0.24 mm. The position decoder circuit and field programmable gate array-embedded DAQ modules were enclosed in an aluminum box with a thickness of 10 mm and located at the rear of the MR bore inside the MRI room. A 3-T human MRI system with a Larmor frequency of 123.7 MHz and inner bore diameter of 60 cm was used as the PET/MRI hybrid system. A custom-made radio frequency (RF) coil with an inner diameter of 25 cm was fabricated. The PET was positioned between gradient and the RF coils. PET performance was measured outside and inside the MRI scanner using echo planar imaging, spin echo, turbo spin echo, and gradient echo sequences. MRI performance was also evaluated with and without the PET insert. The stability of the newly developed PET insert was evaluated and simultaneous PET and MR images of a brain phantom were acquired. Results: No significant degradation of the PET performance caused by MR was observed when the PET was operated using various MR imaging sequences. The signal-to-noise ratio of MR images was slightly degraded due to the PET insert installed inside the MR bore while the homogeneity was

  2. Development of PET/MRI with insertable PET for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jin Ho; Choi, Yong; Jung, Jiwoong; Kim, Sangsu; Lim, Hyun Keong; Im, Ki Chun; Oh, Chang Hyun; Park, Hyun-wook; Kim, Kyung Min; Kim, Jong Guk

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a dual-modality positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with insertable PET for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of the human brain. The PET detector block was composed of a 4 × 4 matrix of detector modules, each consisting of a 4 × 4 array LYSO coupled to a 4 × 4 Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (GAPD) array. The PET insert consisted of 18 detector blocks, circularly mounted on a custom-made plastic base to form a ring with an inner diameter of 390 mm and axial length of 60 mm. The PET gantry was shielded with gold-plated conductive fabric tapes with a thickness of 0.1 mm. The charge signals of PET detector transferred via 4 m long flat cables were fed into the position decoder circuit. The flat cables were shielded with a mesh-type aluminum sheet with a thickness of 0.24 mm. The position decoder circuit and field programmable gate array-embedded DAQ modules were enclosed in an aluminum box with a thickness of 10 mm and located at the rear of the MR bore inside the MRI room. A 3-T human MRI system with a Larmor frequency of 123.7 MHz and inner bore diameter of 60 cm was used as the PET/MRI hybrid system. A custom-made radio frequency (RF) coil with an inner diameter of 25 cm was fabricated. The PET was positioned between gradient and the RF coils. PET performance was measured outside and inside the MRI scanner using echo planar imaging, spin echo, turbo spin echo, and gradient echo sequences. MRI performance was also evaluated with and without the PET insert. The stability of the newly developed PET insert was evaluated and simultaneous PET and MR images of a brain phantom were acquired. No significant degradation of the PET performance caused by MR was observed when the PET was operated using various MR imaging sequences. The signal-to-noise ratio of MR images was slightly degraded due to the PET insert installed inside the MR bore while the homogeneity was maintained. The change of gain of

  3. Combined PET/CT in oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Keon Wook [National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-02-01

    Presently, PET is widely used in oncology, but suffers from limitations of poor anatomical information. To compensate for this weakness, a combined PET/CT has been developed by Professor Townsend at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. The prototype was designed as PET and CT components combined serially in a gantry. The CT images provide not only accurate anatomical location of the lesions but also transmission map for attenuation correction. More than 300 cancer patients have been studied with the prototype of PET/CT since July, 1998. The PET/TC studies affected the managements in about 20{approx}30% of cancer patients. These changes are a consequence of the more accurate localization of functional abnormalities, and the distinction of pathological from normal physiological uptake. Now a variety of combined PET/CT scanners with high-end PET and high-end CT components are commercially available. With the high speed of multi-slice helical CT, throughput of patient's increases compared to conventional PET. Although some problems (such as a discrepancy in breathing state between the two modalities) still remain, the role of PET/CT in oncology is very promising.

  4. Simulation study comparing the helmet-chin PET with a cylindrical PET of the same number of detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Abdella M.; Tashima, Hideaki; Yoshida, Eiji; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Yamaya, Taiga

    2017-06-01

    There is a growing interest in developing brain PET scanners with high sensitivity and high spatial resolution for early diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases and studies of brain functions. Sensitivity of the PET scanner can be improved by increasing the solid angle. However, conventional PET scanners are designed based on a cylindrical geometry, which may not be the most efficient design for brain imaging in terms of the balance between sensitivity and cost. We proposed a dedicated brain PET scanner based on a hemispheric shape detector and a chin detector (referred to as the helmet-chin PET), which is designed to maximize the solid angle by increasing the number of lines-of-response in the hemisphere. The parallax error, which PET scanners with a large solid angle tend to have, can be suppressed by the use of depth-of-interaction detectors. In this study, we carry out a realistic evaluation of the helmet-chin PET using Monte Carlo simulation based on the 4-layer GSO detector which consists of a 16  ×  16  ×  4 array of crystals with dimensions of 2.8  ×  2.8  ×  7.5 mm3. The purpose of this simulation is to show the gain in imaging performance of the helmet-chin PET compared with the cylindrical PET using the same number of detectors in each configuration. The sensitivity of the helmet-chin PET evaluated with a cylindrical phantom has a significant increase, especially at the top of the (field-of-view) FOV. The peak-NECR of the helmet-chin PET is 1.4 times higher compared to the cylindrical PET. The helmet-chin PET provides relatively low noise images throughout the FOV compared to the cylindrical PET which exhibits enhanced noise at the peripheral regions. The results show the helmet-chin PET can significantly improve the sensitivity and reduce the noise in the reconstructed images.

  5. PET/CT alignment calibration with a non-radioactive phantom and the intrinsic 176Lu radiation of PET detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qingyang; Ma, Tianyu; Wang, Shi; Liu, Yaqiang; Gu, Yu; Dai, Tiantian

    2016-11-01

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is an important tool for clinical studies and pre-clinical researches which provides both functional and anatomical images. To achieve high quality co-registered PET/CT images, alignment calibration of PET and CT scanner is a critical procedure. The existing methods reported use positron source phantoms imaged both by PET and CT scanner and then derive the transformation matrix from the reconstructed images of the two modalities. In this paper, a novel PET/CT alignment calibration method with a non-radioactive phantom and the intrinsic 176Lu radiation of the PET detector was developed. Firstly, a multi-tungsten-alloy-sphere phantom without positron source was designed and imaged by CT and the PET scanner using intrinsic 176Lu radiation included in LYSO. Secondly, the centroids of the spheres were derived and matched by an automatic program. Lastly, the rotation matrix and the translation vector were calculated by least-square fitting of the centroid data. The proposed method was employed in an animal PET/CT system (InliView-3000) developed in our lab. Experimental results showed that the proposed method achieves high accuracy and is feasible to replace the conventional positron source based methods.

  6. PeneloPET, a Monte Carlo PET simulation tool based on PENELOPE: features and validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espana, S; Herraiz, J L; Vicente, E; Udias, J M [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Departmento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Vaquero, J J; Desco, M [Unidad de Medicina y CirugIa Experimental, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: jose@nuc2.fis.ucm.es

    2009-03-21

    Monte Carlo simulations play an important role in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, as an essential tool for the research and development of new scanners and for advanced image reconstruction. PeneloPET, a PET-dedicated Monte Carlo tool, is presented and validated in this work. PeneloPET is based on PENELOPE, a Monte Carlo code for the simulation of the transport in matter of electrons, positrons and photons, with energies from a few hundred eV to 1 GeV. PENELOPE is robust, fast and very accurate, but it may be unfriendly to people not acquainted with the FORTRAN programming language. PeneloPET is an easy-to-use application which allows comprehensive simulations of PET systems within PENELOPE. Complex and realistic simulations can be set by modifying a few simple input text files. Different levels of output data are available for analysis, from sinogram and lines-of-response (LORs) histogramming to fully detailed list mode. These data can be further exploited with the preferred programming language, including ROOT. PeneloPET simulates PET systems based on crystal array blocks coupled to photodetectors and allows the user to define radioactive sources, detectors, shielding and other parts of the scanner. The acquisition chain is simulated in high level detail; for instance, the electronic processing can include pile-up rejection mechanisms and time stamping of events, if desired. This paper describes PeneloPET and shows the results of extensive validations and comparisons of simulations against real measurements from commercial acquisition systems. PeneloPET is being extensively employed to improve the image quality of commercial PET systems and for the development of new ones.

  7. Laser Scanner Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuss, B.

    2005-09-06

    In the Summer of 2004 a request for proposals went out to potential vendors to offer a three-dimensional laser scanner for a number of unique metrology tasks at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Specifications were established including range, accuracy, scan density, resolution and field of view in consideration of anticipated department requirements. Four vendors visited the site to present their system and they were asked to perform three unique tests with their system on a two day visit to SLAC. Two of the three tests were created to emulate real-world applications at SLAC while the third was an accuracy and resolution series of experiments. The scope of these tests is presented and some of the vendor's results are included.

  8. Attenuation correction without transmission scan for the MAMMI breast PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soriano, A., E-mail: soriano@ific.uv.es [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (CSIC-Universitat de Valencia), Edificio Institutos de Paterna. Catedratico Jose Beltran, 2. E-46980 Paterna (Spain); Gonzalez, A. [ONCOVISION (GEM-Imaging group), Valencia (Spain); Orero, A.; Moliner, L.; Carles, M.; Sanchez, F.; Benlloch, J.M. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (CSIC-Universitat de Valencia), Edificio Institutos de Paterna. Catedratico Jose Beltran, 2. E-46980 Paterna (Spain); Correcher, C.; Carrilero, V.; Seimetz, M. [ONCOVISION (GEM-Imaging group), Valencia (Spain)

    2011-08-21

    Whole-body Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanners are required in order to span large Fields of View (FOV). Therefore, reaching the sensitivity and spatial resolution required for early stage breast tumor detection is not straightforward. MAMMI is a dedicated breast PET scanner with a ring geometry designed to provide PET images with a spatial resolution as high as 1.5 mm, being able to detect small breast tumors (<1cm). The patient lays down in prone position during the scan, thus making possible to image the whole breast, up to regions close to the base of the pectoral without the requirement of breast compression. Attenuation correction (AC) for PET data improves the image quality and the quantitative accuracy of radioactivity distribution determination. In dedicated, high resolution breast cancer scanners, this correction would enhance the proper diagnosis in early disease stages. In whole-body PET scanners, AC is usually taken into account with the use of transmission scans, either by external radioactive rod sources or by Computed Tomography (CT). This considerably increases the radiation dose administered to the patient and time needed for the exploration. In this work we propose a method for breast shape identification by means of PET image segmentation. The breast shape identification will be used for the determination of the AC. For the case of a specific breast PET scanner the procedure we propose should provide AC similar to that obtained by transmission scans as we take advantage of the breast anatomical simplicity. Experimental validation of the proposed approach with a dedicated breast PET prototype is also presented. The main advantage of this method is an important dose reduction since the transmission scan is not required.

  9. Simultaneous PET/MR imaging with a radio frequency-penetrable PET insert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Alexander M; Lee, Brian J; Chang, Chen-Ming; Levin, Craig S

    2017-01-01

    A brain sized radio frequency (RF)-penetrable PET insert has been designed for simultaneous operation with MRI systems. This system takes advantage of electro-optical coupling and battery power to electrically float the PET insert relative to the MRI ground, permitting RF signals to be transmitted through small gaps between the modules that form the PET ring. This design facilitates the use of the built-in body coil for RF transmission and thus could be inserted into any existing MR site wishing to achieve simultaneous PET/MR imaging. The PET detectors employ nonmagnetic silicon photomultipliers in conjunction with a compressed sensing signal multiplexing scheme, and optical fibers to transmit analog PET detector signals out of the MRI room for decoding, processing, and image reconstruction. The PET insert was first constructed and tested in a laboratory benchtop setting, where tomographic images of a custom resolution phantom were successfully acquired. The PET insert was then placed within a 3T body MRI system, and tomographic resolution/contrast phantom images were acquired both with only the B0 field present, and under continuous pulsing from different MR imaging sequences. The resulting PET images have comparable contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) under all MR pulsing conditions: The maximum percent CNR relative difference for each rod type among all four PET images acquired in the MRI system has a mean of 14.0 ± 7.7%. MR images were successfully acquired through the RF-penetrable PET shielding using only the built-in MR body coil, suggesting that simultaneous imaging is possible without significant mutual interference. These results show promise for this technology as an alternative to costly integrated PET/MR scanners; a PET insert that is compatible with any existing clinical MRI system could greatly increase the availability, accessibility, and dissemination of PET/MR. © 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  10. BEPC II wire scanner system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUI Yan-Feng; WANG Lin; ZHAO Ying; YUE Jun-Hui; LI Xiao-Ping; CAO Jian-She; MA Li

    2010-01-01

    To monitor the beam profile at the end of the linac non-destructively,a wire scanner as a new diagnostic instrument was designed,manufactured and installed in 2007.Since then,several measurements have been carried out using this device.This paper describes the whole system of the wire scanner and the testing results.

  11. Pure Nano-Rotation Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moo-Yeon Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We developed and tested a novel rotation scanner for nano resolution and accurate rotary motion about the rotation center. The scanner consists of circular hinges and leaf springs so that the parasitic error at the center of the scanner in the X and Y directions is minimized, and rotation performance is optimized. Each sector of the scanner's system was devised to have nano resolution by minimizing the parasitic errors of the rotation center that arise due to displacements other than rotation. The analytic optimal design results of the proposed scanner were verified using finite element analyses. The piezoelectric actuators were used to attain nano-resolution performances, and a capacitive sensor was used to measure displacement. A feedback controller was used to minimize the rotation errors in the rotation scanner system under practical conditions. Finally, the performance evaluation test results showed that the resonance frequency was 542 Hz, the resolution was 0.09 μrad, and the rotation displacement was 497.2 μrad. Our test results revealed that the rotation scanner exhibited accurate rotation about the center of the scanner and had good nano precision.

  12. Combined PET-MRI of the abdomen; Kombinierte PET-MRT des Abdomens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vag, Tibor; Eiber, M.; Schwaiger, M. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    The first fully integrated combined positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance imaging (PET-MRI) scanners have been clinically available since 2010. Large prospective studies regarding indications and diagnostic accuracy of this new modality are not yet available; however, preliminary studies have shown a higher diagnostic accuracy and confidence compared to PET-computed tomography (PET-CT) in regions where MRI is known to be superior to CT, such as the liver. The benefit of MRI in accurate lesion characterization and the additional value of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) as a complementary functional modality by means of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) is apparent in entities with low tracer uptake (e. g. due to small size) and a decreased or absent accumulation pattern on PET. (orig.) [German] Seit 2010 sind die ersten voll integrierten Positronenemissionstomographie(PET)-MR-Scanner im klinischen Gebrauch. Obwohl es derzeit noch an empirischen Daten im Sinne groesserer und prospektiver Studien fehlt, implizieren erste Studien einen diagnostischen Mehrwert gegenueber der PET-CT in Regionen, in denen die MRT bekanntermassen der CT ueberlegen ist. Diese ist in der besseren morphologischen Charakterisierung begruendet, die insbesondere bei Laesionen mit geringer Tracerspeicherung (z. B. aufgrund der geringen Groesse) oder unbekanntem Speicherverhalten in der PET ausschlaggebend ist. Zudem steht der MRT eine komplementaere funktionelle Modalitaet in Form der Diffusionsbildgebung zur Verfuegung, die ueber die Berechnung des Apparent-diffusion-coefficient(ADC)-Werts eine weitere Einschaetzung des Gewebes geben kann. (orig.)

  13. Exercises in PET Image Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nix, Oliver

    These exercises are complementary to the theoretical lectures about positron emission tomography (PET) image reconstruction. They aim at providing some hands on experience in PET image reconstruction and focus on demonstrating the different data preprocessing steps and reconstruction algorithms needed to obtain high quality PET images. Normalisation, geometric-, attenuation- and scatter correction are introduced. To explain the necessity of those some basics about PET scanner hardware, data acquisition and organisation are reviewed. During the course the students use a software application based on the STIR (software for tomographic image reconstruction) library 1,2 which allows them to dynamically select or deselect corrections and reconstruction methods as well as to modify their most important parameters. Following the guided tutorial, the students get an impression on the effect the individual data precorrections have on image quality and what happens if they are forgotten. Several data sets in sinogram format are provided, such as line source data, Jaszczak phantom data sets with high and low statistics and NEMA whole body phantom data. The two most frequently used reconstruction algorithms in PET image reconstruction, filtered back projection (FBP) and the iterative OSEM (ordered subset expectation maximation) approach are used to reconstruct images. The exercise should help the students gaining an understanding what the reasons for inferior image quality and artefacts are and how to improve quality by a clever choice of reconstruction parameters.

  14. Head and neck imaging with PET and PET/CT: artefacts from dental metallic implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goerres, Gerhard W.; Hany, Thomas F.; Kamel, Ehab; von Schulthess, Gustav K.; Buck, Alfred [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland)

    2002-03-01

    Germanium-68 based attenuation correction (PET{sub Ge68}) is performed in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging for quantitative measurements. With the recent introduction of combined in-line PET/CT scanners, CT data can be used for attenuation correction. Since dental implants can cause artefacts in CT images, CT-based attenuation correction (PET{sub CT}) may induce artefacts in PET images. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of dental metallic artwork on the quality of PET images by comparing non-corrected images and images attenuation corrected by PET{sub Ge68} and PET{sub CT}. Imaging was performed on a novel in-line PET/CT system using a 40-mAs scan for PET{sub CT} in 41 consecutive patients with high suspicion of malignant or inflammatory disease. In 17 patients, additional PET{sub Ge68} images were acquired in the same imaging session. Visual analysis of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) distribution in several regions of the head and neck was scored on a 4-point scale in comparison with normal grey matter of the brain in the corresponding PET images. In addition, artefacts adjacent to dental metallic artwork were evaluated. A significant difference in image quality scoring was found only for the lips and the tip of the nose, which appeared darker on non-corrected than on corrected PET images. In 33 patients, artefacts were seen on CT, and in 28 of these patients, artefacts were also seen on PET imaging. In eight patients without implants, artefacts were seen neither on CT nor on PET images. Direct comparison of PET{sub Ge68} and PET{sub CT} images showed a different appearance of artefacts in 3 of 17 patients. Malignant lesions were equally well visible using both transmission correction methods. Dental implants, non-removable bridgework etc. can cause artefacts in attenuation-corrected images using either a conventional {sup 68}Ge transmission source or the CT scan obtained with a combined PET/CT camera. We recommend that the

  15. PET/MR imaging of atherosclerosis: initial experience and outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rischpler, Christoph; Nekolla, Stephan G; Beer, Ambros J

    2013-01-01

    Hybrid scanners such as PET/CT have in the past emerged as a valuable modality in clinical routine as well as an important research tool. Recently, the newly developed fully integrated PET/MR scanners were introduced to the market, raising high expectations especially due to the excellent soft tissue contrast and functional imaging capabilities of MRI. In this issue of the American Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, initial experiences using a hybrid PET/MR scanner for carotid artery imaging in a group of patients with increased risk for atherosclerosis are described. This represents a proof-of-principle study, which could stimulate future applications of this powerful modality in atherosclerotic plaque imaging.

  16. Intraoral 3D scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühmstedt, Peter; Bräuer-Burchardt, Christian; Munkelt, Christoph; Heinze, Matthias; Palme, Martin; Schmidt, Ingo; Hintersehr, Josef; Notni, Gunther

    2007-09-01

    Here a new set-up of a 3D-scanning system for CAD/CAM in dental industry is proposed. The system is designed for direct scanning of the dental preparations within the mouth. The measuring process is based on phase correlation technique in combination with fast fringe projection in a stereo arrangement. The novelty in the approach is characterized by the following features: A phase correlation between the phase values of the images of two cameras is used for the co-ordinate calculation. This works contrary to the usage of only phase values (phasogrammetry) or classical triangulation (phase values and camera image co-ordinate values) for the determination of the co-ordinates. The main advantage of the method is that the absolute value of the phase at each point does not directly determine the coordinate. Thus errors in the determination of the co-ordinates are prevented. Furthermore, using the epipolar geometry of the stereo-like arrangement the phase unwrapping problem of fringe analysis can be solved. The endoscope like measurement system contains one projection and two camera channels for illumination and observation of the object, respectively. The new system has a measurement field of nearly 25mm × 15mm. The user can measure two or three teeth at one time. So the system can by used for scanning of single tooth up to bridges preparations. In the paper the first realization of the intraoral scanner is described.

  17. Image reconstruction techniques for high resolution human brain PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comtat, C.; Bataille, F.; Sureau, F. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot (CEA/DSV/DRM), 91 - Orsay (France)

    2006-07-01

    High resolution PET imaging is now a well established technique not only for small animal, but also for human brain studies. The ECAT HRRT brain PET scanner(Siemens Molecular Imaging) is characterized by an effective isotropic spatial resolution of 2.5 mm, about a factor of 2 better than for state-of-the-art whole-body clinical PET scanners. Although the absolute sensitivity of the HRRT (6.5 %) for point source in the center of the field-of-view is increased relative to whole-body scanner (typically 4.5 %) thanks to a larger co-polar aperture, the sensitivity in terms of volumetric resolution (75 (m{sup 3} at best for whole-body scanners and 16 (m{sup 3} for t he HRRT) is much lower. This constraint has an impact on the performance of image reconstruction techniques, in particular for dynamic studies. Standard reconstruction methods used with clinical whole-body PET scanners are not optimal for this application. Specific methods had to be developed, based on fully 3D iterative techniques. Different refinements can be added in the reconstruction process to improve image quality: more accurate modeling of the acquisition system, more accurate modeling of the statistical properties of the acquired data, anatomical side information to guide the reconstruction . We will present the performances these added developments for neuronal imaging in humans. (author)

  18. Dual-Modality Prostate Imaging with PET and Transrectal Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    the EXACT HR PET scanner. Hence, Task 1a was completed for both available PET scanners. Task 1b) Attach two 511 keV 68Ge point sources to TRUS stepper...1 and 2. The holder is an acrylic bar with two machined cylindrical cavities that hold the two 68Ge point sources (at the same height and 60.0 mm...apart). The bar mounts on top of the TRUS stepper with positioning pins and screws, accurately aligning two 68Ge point sources along the axial line of

  19. Nogle muligheder i scanner data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Hans Jørn

    2000-01-01

    I artiklen gives en diskussion af en række af de muligheder for effektivisering af marketingaktiviteter, der er til stede for såvel mærkevareudbyder som detaillist, ved udnyttelse af information fra scanner data......I artiklen gives en diskussion af en række af de muligheder for effektivisering af marketingaktiviteter, der er til stede for såvel mærkevareudbyder som detaillist, ved udnyttelse af information fra scanner data...

  20. An overview of the use of pigs in PET research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen

    . The dynamics of PET typically require a relatively large organ size and blood supply in order to properly evaluate radioligand binding kinetics. To fulfil these requirements, pigs have often been used in such studies. At least four factors have contributed to the ever-growing interest in using pigs for PET...... imaging. First, a wealth of information has become available concerning similarities of physiologic and pathologic processes in pigs and humans. Second, the size of most pig organs permits studies to be carried out in PET scanners otherwise designed for human use. Third, multiple blood samples can...... be drawn from pigs to carry out accurate metabolite analyses in studies of new PET radioligands. Fourth, pigs can easily be maintained in anaesthesia for long-term PET studies with multiple injections of radiotracers. Clearly, pigs have much to offer PET studies. In this presentation I will also give...

  1. A new electronic read-out for the YAPPET scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Damiani, C; Malaguti, R; Guerra, A D; Domenico, G D; Zavattini, G

    2002-01-01

    A small animal PET-SPECT scanner (YAPPET) prototype was built at the Physics Department of the Ferrara University and is presently being used at the Nuclear Medicine Department for radiopharmaceutical studies on rats. The first YAPPET prototype shows very good performances, but needs some improvements before it can be fully used for intensive radiopharmaceutical research. The main problem of the actual prototype is its heavy electronics, based on NIM and CAMAC standard modules. For this reason a new, compact read-out electronics was developed and tested. The results of a first series of tests made on the first prototype will be presented in the paper.

  2. Preliminary evaluation of a brain PET insertable to MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Gyuseng [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon, 305-701 South (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yong [Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, Seoul, 121-742 South (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Sung; An, Hyun Joon [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul, 110-744 South (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jin Ho [Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, Seoul, 121-742 South (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hyun Wook; Oh, Chang Hyun; Park, Kyeongjin; Lim, Kyung Taek; Cho, Minsik [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon, 305-701 South (Korea, Republic of); Sul, Woo Suk [National NanoFab Center, Deajeon, 305-806 South (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyoungtaek; Kim, Hyunduk [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon, 305-701 South (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-29

    There is a new trend of the medical image that diagnoses a brain disease as like Alzheimer dementia. The first qualified candidate is a PET-MRI fusion modality because MRI is a more powerful anatomic diagnosis tool than other modalities. In our study, in order to solve the high magnetic field from MRI, the development was consisted with four main items such as photo-sensor, PET scanner, MRI head-coil and attenuation correction algorithm development.

  3. Scatter Characterization and Correction for Simultaneous Multiple Small-Animal PET Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prasad, Rameshwar; Zaidi, Habib

    2014-01-01

    The rapid growth and usage of small-animal positron emission tomography (PET) in molecular imaging research has led to increased demand on PET scanner's time. One potential solution to increase throughput is to scan multiple rodents simultaneously. However, this is achieved at the expense of deterio

  4. OpenPET: a novel open-type PET system for 3D dose verification in particle therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaya, T.

    2017-01-01

    The OpenPET is the world’s first open-type 3D PET scanner for PET image-guided particle therapy such as in situ dose verification and direct tumour tracking. Even with a full-ring geometry, the OpenPET has an open gap between its two detector rings through which the treatment beam passes. Following the initial proposal of the dual-ring OpenPET (DROP), the single-ring OpenPET (SROP) was also proposed as a more efficient geometry than DROP in terms of manufacturing cost and sensitivity. A small SROP prototype was developed and feasibility of visualizing a 3D distribution of beam stopping positions inside a phantom was shown with the help of radioisotope particle beams, used as primary beams. Following these results, a full-size whole-body SROP prototype was developed.

  5. Pet Allergy Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatments ▸ Allergies ▸ Pet Allergy ▸ Pet Allergy Quiz Share | Pet Allergy Quiz More than half of U.S. households ... cat family. Yet, millions of people suffer from pet allergies. Take this quiz to test your knowledge ...

  6. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET. 22 figs.

  7. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

  8. PeneloPET:一种PET专用的蒙特卡罗仿真工具%PeneloPET: a PET-dedicated Monte Carlo simulation Toolkit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘豪佳; 赵书俊; 张斌; 周山虎

    2011-01-01

    It introduces PeneloPET, a PET - dedicated Monte Carlo simulation toolkit, which based on PENELOPE , including the features of PeneloPET and the general process of PeneloPET simulation, then we validate PeneloPET to model the GE Healthcare eXplore Vista microPET system. The PeneloPET simulation results a-gree well with the data from real scanners and GATE simulation data. Therefore, it can be concluded that PeneloPET is an accurate tool for PET simulations.%PeneloPET是一种基于PENELOPE的PET专用蒙特卡罗仿真工具.文章介绍了PeneloPET 的主要特点及使用PeneloPET进行PET仿真的一般过程,并以GE Healthcare的双环型eXplore Vista microPET为原型验证了PeneloPET仿真的有效性.仿真结果显示,PeneloPET仿真数据和实际实验结果及GATE仿真结果之间均具有良好的一致性,证明了PeneloPET是一种精确的PET仿真工具.

  9. EXPLORER: Changing the molecular imaging paradigm with total-body PET/CT (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Simon R.; Badawi, Ramsey D.; Jones, Terry

    2016-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is the highest sensitivity technique for human whole-body imaging studies. However, current clinical PET scanners do not make full use of the available signal, as they only permit imaging of a 15-25 cm segment of the body at one time. Given the limited sensitive region, whole-body imaging with clinical PET scanners requires relatively long scan times and subjects the patient to higher than necessary radiation doses. The EXPLORER initiative aims to build a 2-meter axial length PET scanner to allow imaging the entire subject at once, capturing nearly the entire available PET signal. EXPLORER will acquire data with ~40-fold greater sensitivity leading to a six-fold increase in reconstructed signal-to-noise ratio for imaging the total body. Alternatively, total-body images with the EXPLORER scanner will be able to be acquired in ~30 seconds or with ~0.15 mSv injected dose, while maintaining current PET image quality. The superior sensitivity will open many new avenues for biomedical research. Specifically for cancer applications, high sensitivity PET will enable detection of smaller lesions. Additionally, greater sensitivity will allow imaging out to 10 half-lives of positron emitting radiotracers. This will enable 1) metabolic ultra-staging with FDG by extending the uptake and clearance time to 3-5 hours to significantly improve contrast and 2) improved kinetic imaging with short-lived radioisotopes such as C-11, crucial for drug development studies. Frequent imaging studies of the same subject to study disease progression or to track response to therapy will be possible with the low dose capabilities of the EXPLORER scanner. The low dose capabilities will also open up new imaging possibilities in pediatrics and adolescents to better study developmental disorders. This talk will review the basis for developing total-body PET, potential applications, and review progress to date in developing EXPLORER, the first total-body PET scanner.

  10. MR-based PET motion correction procedure for simultaneous MR-PET neuroimaging of human brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Görge Ullisch

    Full Text Available Positron Emission Tomography (PET images are prone to motion artefacts due to the long acquisition time of PET measurements. Recently, simultaneous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and PET have become available in the first generation of Hybrid MR-PET scanners. In this work, the elimination of artefacts due to head motion in PET neuroimages is achieved by a new approach utilising MR-based motion tracking in combination with PET list mode data motion correction for simultaneous MR-PET acquisitions. The method comprises accurate MR-based motion measurements, an intra-frame motion minimising and reconstruction time reducing temporal framing algorithm, and a list mode based PET reconstruction which utilises the Ordinary Poisson Algorithm and avoids axial and transaxial compression. Compared to images uncorrected for motion, an increased image quality is shown in phantom as well as in vivo images. In vivo motion corrected images show an evident increase of contrast at the basal ganglia and a good visibility of uptake in tiny structures such as superior colliculi.

  11. Determination of the map of efficiency of the J-PET detector with the GATE package

    CERN Document Server

    Kowalski, P; Bednarski, T; Białas, P; Czerwiński, E; Giergiel, K; Kapłon, Ł; Kochanowski, A; Korcyl, G; Kowal, J; Kozik, T; Krzemień, W; Molenda, M; Moskal, I; Moskal, P; Niedźwiecki, Sz; Pałka, M; Pawlik-Niedźwiecka, M; Rudy, Z; Salabura, P; Sharma, N G; Silarski, M; Słomski, A; Smyrski, J; Strzelecki, A; Szymański, K; Wiślicki, W; Witkowski, P; Zieliński, M; Zoń, N

    2014-01-01

    A novel PET detector consisting of strips of polymer scintillators is being developed by the J-PET Collaboration. The map of efficiency and the map of geometrical acceptance of the 2-strip J-PET scanner are presented. Map of efficiency was determined using the Monte Carlo simulation software GATE based on GEANT4. Both maps were compared using method based on the chi2 test.

  12. Image reconstruction of mMR PET data using the open source software STIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markiewicz, Pawel [Centre for Medical Image Computing, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Thielemans, Kris [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Burgos, Ninon [Centre for Medical Image Computing, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Manber, Richard [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Jiao, Jieqing [Centre for Medical Image Computing, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Barnes, Anna [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Atkinson, David [Centre for Medical Imaging, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Arridge, Simon R [Centre for Medical Image Computing, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Hutton, Brian F [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Ourselin, Sébastien [Centre for Medical Image Computing, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Dementia Research Centre, University College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-29

    Simultaneous PET and MR acquisitions have now become possible with the new hybrid Biograph Molecular MR (mMR) scanner from Siemens. The purpose of this work is to create a platform for mMR 3D and 4D PET image reconstruction which would be freely accessible to the community as well as fully adjustable in order to obtain optimal images for a given research task in PET imaging. The proposed platform is envisaged to prove useful in developing novel and robust image bio-markers which could then be adapted for use on the mMR scanner.

  13. Calibration of photomultipliers gain used in the J-PET detector

    CERN Document Server

    Bednarski, T; Moskal, P; Białas, P; Giergiel, K; Kapłon, Ł; Kochanowski, A; Korcyl, G; Kowal, J; Kowalski, P; Kozik, T; Krzemień, W; Molenda, M; Moskal, I; Niedźwiecki, Sz; Pałka, M; Pawlik, M; Raczyński, L; Rudy, Z; Salabura, P; Sharma, N G; Silarski, M; Słomski, A; Smyrski, J; Strzelecki, A; Szymański, K; Wiślicki, W; Witkowski, P; Zieliński, M; Zoń, N

    2013-01-01

    Photomultipliers are commonly used in commercial PET scanner as devices which convert light produced in scintillator by gamma quanta from positron-electron annihilation into electrical signal. For proper analysis of obtained electrical signal, a photomultiplier gain curve must be known, since gain can be significantly different even between photomultipliers of the same model. In this article we describe single photoelectron method used for photomultipliers calibration applied for J-PET scanner, a novel PET detector being developed at the Jagiellonian University. Description of calibration method, an example of calibration curve and gain of few R4998 Hamamatsu photomultipliers are presented.

  14. Calibration and stability of a SiPM-based simultaneous PET/MR insert

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerche, Christoph W., E-mail: christoph.lerche@philips.com [Philips Research, Europe, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Mackewn, Jane [Kings College London (United Kingdom); Goldschmidt, Benjamin [Philips Research, Europe, Eindhoven (Netherlands); RWTH University Aachen (Germany); Salomon, Andre; Gebbhardt, Pierre; Weissler, Bjoern; Ayres, Richard [Philips Research, Europe Eindhoven (Netherlands); Kings College London (United Kingdom); Marsden, Paul [Kings College London (United Kingdom); Schulz, Volkmar [Philips Research, Europe, Eindhoven (Netherlands); RWTH University Aachen (Germany)

    2013-02-21

    On behalf of the HYPER Image project, a Silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) based preclinical PET insert for a commercial human 3 T MRI scanner was built. In this contribution we report on the stability of imaging performance of the PET scanner and MR hardness and compatibility. From data sets that were acquired during the last 7 months we extracted SiPM gain values and their annual drift, the mean energy resolution and the energy resolution drift, spatial resolution and spatial resolution drift, and photo peak position and their annual drift. Further, a point source and a hot rod phantom was imaged fully simultaneously with the MRI scanner and the PET scanner. No interference between either modality was observed.

  15. Wire Scanner Motion Control Card

    CERN Document Server

    Forde, S E

    2006-01-01

    Scientists require a certain beam quality produced by the accelerator rings at CERN. The discovery potential of LHC is given by the reachable luminosity at its interaction points. The luminosity is maximized by minimizing the beam size. Therefore an accurate beam size measurement is required for optimizing the luminosity. The wire scanner performs very accurate profile measurements, but as it can not be used at full intensity in the LHC ring, it is used for calibrating other profile monitors. As the current wire scanner system, which is used in the present CERN accelerators, has not been made for the required specification of the LHC, a new design of a wire scanner motion control card is part of the LHC wire scanner project. The main functions of this card are to control the wire scanner motion and to acquire the position of the wire. In case of further upgrades at a later stage, it is required to allow an easy update of the firmware, hence the programmable features of FPGAs will be used for this purpose. The...

  16. MRI data driven partial volume effects correction in PET imaging using 3D local multi-resolution analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Pogam, Adrien, E-mail: adrien.lepogam@univ-brest.fr [INSERM UMR 1101, LaTIM, Brest (France); Lamare, Frederic [Academic Nuclear Medicine Department, CHU Pellegrin, Bordeaux (France); Hatt, Mathieu [INSERM UMR 1101, LaTIM, Brest (France); Fernandez, Philippe [Academic Nuclear Medicine Department, CHU Pellegrin, Bordeaux (France); Le Rest, Catherine Cheze [INSERM UMR 1101, LaTIM, Brest (France); Academic Nuclear Medicine Department, CHU Poitiers, Poitiers (France); Visvikis, Dimitris [INSERM UMR 1101, LaTIM, Brest (France)

    2013-02-21

    PET partial volume effects (PVE) resulting from the limited resolution of PET scanners is still a quantitative issue that PET/MRI scanners do not solve by themselves. A recently proposed voxel-based locally adaptive 3D multi-resolution PVE correction based on the mutual analysis of wavelet decompositions was applied on 12 clinical {sup 18}F-FLT PET/T1 MRI images of glial tumors, and compared to a PET only voxel-wise iterative deconvolution approach. Quantitative and qualitative results demonstrated the interest of exploiting PET/MRI information with higher uptake increases (19±8% vs. 11±7%, p=0.02), as well as more convincing visual restoration of details within tumors with respect to deconvolution of the PET uptake only. Further studies are now required to demonstrate the accuracy of this restoration with histopathological validation of the uptake in tumors.

  17. Aircraft Scanners = NASA Digital Aerial Scanners (TMS, TIMS, NS001): Pre 1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Aircraft Scanners data set contains digital imagery acquired from several multispectral scanners including NS-001 Mutispectral scanner, Daedalus thematic mapper...

  18. Initial reconstruction results from a simulated adaptive small animal C shaped PET/MR insert

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efthimiou, Nikos [Technological Educational Institute of Athens (Greece); Kostou, Theodora; Papadimitroulas, Panagiotis [Technological Educational Institute of Athens (Greece); Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, University of Patras (Greece); Charalampos, Tsoumpas [Division of Biomedical Imaging, University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); Loudos, George [Technological Educational Institute of Athens (Greece)

    2015-05-18

    Traditionally, most clinical and preclinical PET scanners, rely on full cylindrical geometry for whole body as well as dedicated organ scans, which is not optimized with regards to sensitivity and resolution. Several groups proposed the construction of dedicated PET inserts for MR scanners, rather than the construction of new integrated PET/MR scanners. The space inside an MR scanner is a limiting factor which can be reduced further with the use of extra coils, and render the use of non-flexible cylindrical PET scanners difficult if not impossible. The incorporation of small SiPM arrays, can provide the means to design adaptive PET scanners to fit in tight locations, which, makes imaging possible and improve the sensitivity, due to the closer approximation to the organ of interest. In order to assess the performance of such a device we simulated the geometry of a C shaped PET, using GATE. The design of the C-PET was based on a realistic SiPM-BGO scenario. In order reconstruct the simulated data, with STIR, we had to calculate system probability matrix which corresponds to this non standard geometry. For this purpose we developed an efficient multi threaded ray tracing technique to calculate the line integral paths in voxel arrays. One of the major features is the ability to automatically adjust the size of FOV according to the geometry of the detectors. The initial results showed that the sensitivity improved as the angle between the detector arrays increases, thus better angular sampling the scanner's field of view (FOV). The more complete angular coverage helped in improving the shape of the source in the reconstructed images, as well. Furthermore, by adapting the FOV to the closer to the size of the source, the sensitivity per voxel is improved.

  19. Evaluation of resistive-plate-chamber-based TOF-PET applied to in-beam particle therapy monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Espallardo, I.; Diblen, F.; Rohling, H.; Solevi, P.; Gillam, J.; Watts, D.; España, S.; Vandenberghe, S.; Fiedler, F.; Rafecas, M.

    2015-05-01

    Particle therapy is a highly conformal radiotherapy technique which reduces the dose deposited to the surrounding normal tissues. In order to fully exploit its advantages, treatment monitoring is necessary to minimize uncertainties related to the dose delivery. Up to now, the only clinically feasible technique for the monitoring of therapeutic irradiation with particle beams is Positron Emission Tomography (PET). In this work we have compared a Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC)-based PET scanner with a scintillation-crystal-based PET scanner for this application. In general, the main advantages of the RPC-PET system are its excellent timing resolution, low cost, and the possibility of building large area systems. We simulated a partial-ring scanner based on an RPC prototype under construction within the Fondazione per Adroterapia Oncologica (TERA). For comparison with the crystal-based PET scanner we have chosen the geometry of a commercially available PET scanner, the Philips Gemini TF. The coincidence time resolution used in the simulations takes into account the current achievable values as well as expected improvements of both technologies. Several scenarios (including patient data) have been simulated to evaluate the performance of different scanners. Initial results have shown that the low sensitivity of the RPC hampers its application to hadron-beam monitoring, which has an intrinsically low positron yield compared to diagnostic PET. In addition, for in-beam PET there is a further data loss due to the partial ring configuration. In order to improve the performance of the RPC-based scanner, an improved version of the RPC detector (modifying the thickness of the gas and glass layers), providing a larger sensitivity, has been simulated and compared with an axially extended version of the crystal-based device. The improved version of the RPC shows better performance than the prototype, but the extended version of the crystal-based PET outperforms all other options.

  20. Database and data structure for the novel TOF-PET detector developed for J-PET project

    CERN Document Server

    Czerwiński, E; Bednarski, T; Białas, P; Kapłon, Ł; Kochanowski, A; Korcyl, G; Kowal, J; Kowalski, P; Kozik, T; Krzemień, W; Kubicz, E; Molenda, M; Moskal, P; Niedźwiecki, Sz; Pałka, M; Pawlik, M; Raczyński, L; Rudy, Z; Salabura, P; Sharma, N G; Silarski, M; Słomski, A; Smyrski, J; Strzelecki, A; Wieczorek, A; Wiślicki, W; Zoń, N

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of the hardware and the amount of data collected during the PET imaging process require application of modern methods of efficient data organization and processing. In this article we will discuss the data structures and the flow of collected data from the novel TOF-PET medical scanner which is being developed at the Jagiellonian University. The developed data format reflects: registration process of the gamma quanta emitted from positron-electron annihilation, Front-End Electronic (FEE) structure and required input information for the image reconstruction. In addition, the system database fulfills possible demands of the evolving J-PET project.

  1. Lanthanum halide scintillators for time-of-flight 3-D pet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Joel S.; Surti, Suleman

    2008-06-03

    A Lanthanum Halide scintillator (for example LaCl.sub.3 and LaBr.sub.3) with fast decay time and good timing resolution, as well as high light output and good energy resolution, is used in the design of a PET scanner. The PET scanner includes a cavity for accepting a patient and a plurality of PET detector modules arranged in an approximately cylindrical configuration about the cavity. Each PET detector includes a Lanthanum Halide scintillator having a plurality of Lanthanum Halide crystals, a light guide, and a plurality of photomultiplier tubes arranged respectively peripherally around the cavity. The good timing resolution enables a time-of-flight (TOF) PET scanner to be developed that exhibits a reduction in noise propagation during image reconstruction and a gain in the signal-to-noise ratio. Such a PET scanner includes a time stamp circuit that records the time of receipt of gamma rays by respective PET detectors and provides timing data outputs that are provided to a processor that, in turn, calculates time-of-flight (TOF) of gamma rays through a patient in the cavity and uses the TOF of gamma rays in the reconstruction of images of the patient.

  2. A Very High Spatial Resolution Detector for Small Animal PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanai Shah, M.S.

    2007-03-06

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is an in vivo analog of autoradiography and has the potential to become a powerful new tool in imaging biological processes in small laboratory animals. PET imaging of small animals can provide unique information that can help in advancement of human disease models as well as drug development. Clinical PET scanners used for human imaging are bulky, expensive and do not have adequate spatial resolution for small animal studies. Hence, dedicated, low cost instruments are required for conducting small animal studies with higher spatial resolution than what is currently achieved with clinical as well as dedicated small animal PET scanners. The goal of the proposed project is to investigate a new all solid-state detector design for small animal PET imaging. Exceptionally high spatial resolution, good timing resolution, and excellent energy resolution are expected from the proposed detector design. The Phase I project was aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of producing high performance solid-state detectors that provide high sensitivity, spatial resolution, and timing characteristics. Energy resolution characteristics of the new detector were also investigated. The goal of the Phase II project is to advance the promising solid-state detector technology for small animal PET and determine its full potential. Detectors modules will be built and characterized and finally, a bench-top small animal PET system will be assembled and evaluated.

  3. Senior Pets

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by Animal/Species Browse by Topic Browse by Discipline Resources Tools for K-12 Educators You are here: Home | Public Resources | Pet ... to 6 years of age. Contrary to popular belief, dogs do not age at a rate of 7 human years for each year in dog years. Age ...

  4. Pet Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, Kim

    1994-01-01

    This resource guide presents information on a variety of ways that animals can be used as a therapeutic modality with people having disabilities. Aspects addressed include: pet ownership and selection criteria; dogs (including service dogs, hearing/signal dogs, seeing leader dogs, and social/specialty dogs); horseriding for both therapy and fun;…

  5. Simultaneous PET/MRI with (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (hyperPET): phantom-based evaluation of PET quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Adam E; Andersen, Flemming L; Henriksen, Sarah T; Vignaud, Alexandre; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan H; Højgaard, Liselotte; Kjaer, Andreas; Klausen, Thomas L

    2016-12-01

    Integrated PET/MRI with hyperpolarized (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging ((13)C-MRSI) offers simultaneous, dual-modality metabolic imaging. A prerequisite for the use of simultaneous imaging is the absence of interference between the two modalities. This has been documented for a clinical whole-body system using simultaneous (1)H-MRI and PET but never for (13)C-MRSI and PET. Here, the feasibility of simultaneous PET and (13)C-MRSI as well as hyperpolarized (13)C-MRSI in an integrated whole-body PET/MRI hybrid scanner is evaluated using phantom experiments. Combined PET and (13)C-MRSI phantoms including a NEMA [(18)F]-FDG phantom, (13)C-acetate and (13)C-urea sources, and hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate were imaged repeatedly with PET and/or (13)C-MRSI. Measurements evaluated for interference effects included PET activity values in the largest sphere and a background region; total number of PET trues; and (13)C-MRSI signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for urea and acetate phantoms. Differences between measurement conditions were evaluated using t tests. PET and (13)C-MRSI data acquisition could be performed simultaneously without any discernible artifacts. The average difference in PET activity between acquisitions with and without simultaneous (13)C-MRSI was 0.83 (largest sphere) and -0.76 % (background). The average difference in net trues was -0.01 %. The average difference in (13)C-MRSI SNR between acquisitions with and without simultaneous PET ranged from -2.28 to 1.21 % for all phantoms and measurement conditions. No differences were significant. The system was capable of (13)C-MRSI of hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate. Simultaneous PET and (13)C-MRSI in an integrated whole-body PET/MRI hybrid scanner is feasible. Phantom experiments showed that possible interference effects introduced by acquiring data from the two modalities simultaneously are small and non-significant. Further experiments can now investigate the benefits of simultaneous PET and

  6. Quantitative myocardial blood flow imaging with integrated time-of-flight PET-MR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kero, Tanja; Nordström, Jonny; Harms, Hendrik J; Sörensen, Jens; Ahlström, Håkan; Lubberink, Mark

    2017-12-01

    The use of integrated PET-MR offers new opportunities for comprehensive assessment of cardiac morphology and function. However, little is known on the quantitative accuracy of cardiac PET imaging with integrated time-of-flight PET-MR. The aim of the present work was to validate the GE Signa PET-MR scanner for quantitative cardiac PET perfusion imaging. Eleven patients (nine male; mean age 59 years; range 46-74 years) with known or suspected coronary artery disease underwent (15)O-water PET scans at rest and during adenosine-induced hyperaemia on a GE Discovery ST PET-CT and a GE Signa PET-MR scanner. PET-MR images were reconstructed using settings recommended by the manufacturer, including time-of-flight (TOF). Data were analysed semi-automatically using Cardiac VUer software, resulting in both parametric myocardial blood flow (MBF) images and segment-based MBF values. Correlation and agreement between PET-CT-based and PET-MR-based MBF values for all three coronary artery territories were assessed using regression analysis and intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC). In addition to the cardiac PET-MR reconstruction protocol as recommended by the manufacturer, comparisons were made using a PET-CT resolution-matched reconstruction protocol both without and with TOF to assess the effect of time-of-flight and reconstruction parameters on quantitative MBF values. Stress MBF data from one patient was excluded due to movement during the PET-CT scanning. Mean MBF values at rest and stress were (0.92 ± 0.12) and (2.74 ± 1.37) mL/g/min for PET-CT and (0.90 ± 0.23) and (2.65 ± 1.15) mL/g/min for PET-MR (p = 0.33 and p = 0.74). ICC between PET-CT-based and PET-MR-based regional MBF was 0.98. Image quality was improved with PET-MR as compared to PET-CT. ICC between PET-MR-based regional MBF with and without TOF and using different filter and reconstruction settings was 1.00. PET-MR-based MBF values correlated well with PET-CT-based MBF values

  7. A case study in scanner optimisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, N J; Gibson, N M

    2014-02-01

    Ultrasound scanner preset programmes are factory set or tailored to user requirements. Scanners may, therefore, have different settings for the same application, even on similar equipment in a single department. The aims of this study were: (1) to attempt to match the performance of two scanners, where one was preferred and (2) to assess differences between six scanners used for breast ultrasound within our organisation. The Nottingham Ultrasound Quality Assurance software was used to compare imaging performance. Images of a Gammex RMI 404GS test object were collected from six scanners, using default presets, factory presets and settings matched to a preferred scanner. Resolution, low contrast performance and high contrast performance were measured. The performance of two scanners was successfully matched, where one had been preferred. Default presets varied across the six scanners, three different presets being used. The most used preset differed in settings across the scanners, most notably in the use of different frequency modes. The factory preset was more consistent across the scanners, the main variation being in dynamic range (55-70 dB). Image comparisons showed significant differences, which were reduced or eliminated by adjustment of settings to match a reference scanner. It is possible to match scanner performance using the Nottingham Ultrasound Quality Assurance software as a verification tool. Ultrasound users should be aware that scanners may not behave in a similar fashion, even with apparently equivalent presets. It should be possible to harmonise presets by consensus amongst users.

  8. Molecular cardiac PET besides FDG viability imaging; Molekulare Kardiale PET jenseits der FDG-Vitalitaetsdiagnostik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindner, O.; Burchert, W. [Universitaetsklinik der Ruhr-Univ. Bochum (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie, Nuklearmedizin und Molekulare Bildgebung, Herz- und Diabetszentrum NRW

    2009-06-15

    Molecular cardiac non F-18-FDG PET is currently based on perfusion imaging. It is of excellent diagnostic accuracy to detect coronary artery disease (CAD) and superior to perfusion SPECT. There is also evidence for its incremental prognostic value. The unique feature of PET to measure myocardial perfusion in absolute terms and in short time periods define its impact on cardiac imaging enabling both the evaluation of early changes in CAD and the accurate characterization of multivessel disease. Currently, all available PET perfusion tracers in Europe are cyclotron products. Rb-82, a generator product, is the most frequently employed perfusion tracer in the United States and cyclotron independent. This tracer has the potential to become an alternative in Europe soon. Nowadays, PET systems are manufactured as hybrid PET-CT scanners. In oncology, hybrid imaging revealed, that the combination of functional and morphological imaging is superior to the single components. In cardiology, the integration of perfusion PET imaging with CT calcium scoring and CT anatomy of the coronary arteries represents a similar constellation. Atherosclerotic plaque evaluation by combined PET-CT technique will be one of the most promising future applications with a potential immense impact on prophylaxis, diagnosis and therapy of CAD in the future. (orig.)

  9. Assessment of scatter for the micro-CT subsystem of the trimodality FLEX Triumph (TM) preclinical scanner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gutierrez, Daniel; Zaidi, Habib

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This work aims at assessing, through experimental measurements and Monte Carlo calculations, the scatter to primary ratio (SPR) for the micro-CT subsystem of the FLEX Triumph (TM) preclinical PET-CT scanner to improve its quantitative capabilities. Methods: Experimental measurements were ca

  10. SiPM-PET with a short optical fiber bundle for simultaneous PET-MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seong Jong; Kang, Han Gyoo; Ko, Guen Bae; Song, In Chan; Rhee, June-Tak; Lee, Jae Sung

    2012-06-21

    For positron emission tomography (PET) inserts to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications, optical fibers have been used for some time to transfer scintillation photons to photomultiplier tubes positioned outside the fringe magnetic field. We previously proposed a novel utilization of an optical fiber for good radio frequency (RF) transmission from body coils to an imaging object. Optical fiber bundles between silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) and scintillation crystals provide an increased spacing between RF-shielded electronics boxes, facilitating RF passage from the body RF coils to imaging objects. In this paper, we present test results of a SiPM-PET system with a short optical fiber bundle for simultaneous PET-MR imaging. We built the SiPM-PET system which consisted of 12 SiPM-PET modules; each module was assembled with a lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicatecrystal block, a 31 mm optical fiber bundle, a Hamamatsu multi-pixel photon counter S11064-050P and a signal processing box shielded with copper. The SiPM-PET system, with a face-to-face distance of 71 mm, was placed inside a 3 T MRI. A small surface coil placed inside the SiPM-PET system was used to receive the signal from phantoms while the body RF coil transmitted the RF pulses. The SiPM-PET system showed little performance degradation during the simultaneous PET-MR imaging and it caused no significant degradation of MR images with turbo spin echo (TSE), gradient echo or 3D spoiled gradient recalled sequences. Echo planar imaging MR images with and without the SiPM-PET inside the MR scanner were significantly worse than the images obtained with the TSE sequence.

  11. FIRST: Fast Iterative Reconstruction Software for (PET) tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Herraiz, J L; Vaquero, J J; Desco, M; Udias, J M

    2006-01-01

    Small animal PET scanners require high spatial resolution and good sensitivity. To reconstruct high-resolution images in 3D-PET, iterative methods, such as OSEM, are superior to analytical reconstruction algorithms, although their high computational cost is still a serious drawback. The higher performance of modern computers could make iterative image reconstruction fast enough to be viable, provided we are able to deal with the large number of probability coefficients for the system response matrix in high-resolution PET scanners, which is a difficult task that prevents the algorithms from reaching peak computing performance. Considering all possible axial and in-plane symmetries, as well as certain quasi-symmetries, we have been able to reduce the memory requirements to store the system response matrix (SRM) well below 1 GB, which allows us to keep the whole response matrix of the system inside RAM of ordinary industry-standard computers, so that the reconstruction algorithm can achieve near peak performanc...

  12. Preliminary results of a prototype C-shaped PET designed for an in-beam PET system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun-Il [Department of Radiation Convergence Engineering, Yonsei University, Wonju 220-710 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Yong Hyun, E-mail: ychung@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Radiation Convergence Engineering, Yonsei University, Wonju 220-710 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kisung [Department of Bio-convergence Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyeong Min [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yongkwon; Joung, Jinhun [Nucare Medical System, Inc., Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-21

    Positron emission tomography (PET) can be utilized in particle beam therapy to verify the dose distribution of the target volume as well as the accuracy of the treatment. We present an in-beam PET scanner that can be integrated into a particle beam therapy system. The proposed PET scanner consisted of 14 detector modules arranged in a C-shape to avoid blockage of the particle beam line by the detector modules. Each detector module was composed of a 9×9 array of 4.0 mm×4.0 mm×20.0 mm LYSO crystals optically coupled to four 29-mm-diameter PMTs using the photomultiplier-quadrant-sharing (PQS) technique. In this study, a Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) simulation study was conducted to design a C-shaped PET scanner and then experimental evaluation of the proposed design was performed. The spatial resolution and sensitivity were measured according to NEMA NU2-2007 standards and were 6.1 mm and 5.61 cps/kBq, respectively, which is in good agreement with our simulation, with an error rate of 12.0%. Taken together, our results demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed C-shaped in-beam PET system, which we expect will be useful for measuring dose distribution in particle therapy.

  13. Preliminary results of a prototype C-shaped PET designed for an in-beam PET system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Il; Chung, Yong Hyun; Lee, Kisung; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kim, Yongkwon; Joung, Jinhun

    2016-06-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) can be utilized in particle beam therapy to verify the dose distribution of the target volume as well as the accuracy of the treatment. We present an in-beam PET scanner that can be integrated into a particle beam therapy system. The proposed PET scanner consisted of 14 detector modules arranged in a C-shape to avoid blockage of the particle beam line by the detector modules. Each detector module was composed of a 9×9 array of 4.0 mm×4.0 mm×20.0 mm LYSO crystals optically coupled to four 29-mm-diameter PMTs using the photomultiplier-quadrant-sharing (PQS) technique. In this study, a Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) simulation study was conducted to design a C-shaped PET scanner and then experimental evaluation of the proposed design was performed. The spatial resolution and sensitivity were measured according to NEMA NU2-2007 standards and were 6.1 mm and 5.61 cps/kBq, respectively, which is in good agreement with our simulation, with an error rate of 12.0%. Taken together, our results demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed C-shaped in-beam PET system, which we expect will be useful for measuring dose distribution in particle therapy.

  14. Performance characterization of the PET-CT tomograph at the PET-cyclotron-radiochemistry site of Messina University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Amato

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A PET-cyclotron-radiochemistry plant was built at Messina University Hospital, whose diagnostics section was equipped with a PET-CT scanner composed by a time of flight PET and a 16-slice CT. The present note reports about the results of tomograph's acceptance tests, which had been planned and carried out in order to verify the correspondence of the specific scanner's performances declared by the firm and the fulfillment of Italian law's minimal criteria of acceptability. Acceptance tests gave positive results for all the physical parameters measured. The assessment of CT slice thickness, with regard to the thinner slices of 0.75 and 0.6 mm, required the employment of a manual procedure exploiting a phantom equipped with low inclination ramps. These results allowed us to assess a baseline of performance parameters to be taken as a reference for periodic constance tests.

  15. Experimental characterization of the Clear-PEM scanner spectrometric performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugalho, R.; Carriço, B.; Ferreira, C. S.; Frade, M.; Ferreira, M.; Moura, R.; Ortigão, C.; Pinheiro, J. F.; Rodrigues, P.; Rolo, I.; Silva, J. C.; Trindade, A.; Varela, J.

    2009-10-01

    In the framework of the Clear-PEM project for the construction of a high-resolution and high-specificity scanner for breast cancer imaging, a Positron Emission Mammography tomograph has been developed and installed at the Instituto Português de Oncologia do Porto hospital. The Clear-PEM scanner is mainly composed by two planar detector heads attached to a robotic arm, trigger/data acquisition electronics system and computing servers. The detector heads hold crystal matrices built from 2 × 2 × 20 mm3 LYSO:Ce crystals readout by Hamamatsu S8550 APD arrays. The APDs are optically coupled to both ends of the 6144 crystals in order to extract the DOI information for each detected event. Each one of 12288 APD's pixels is read and controlled by Application Specific Integrated Circuits water-cooled by an external cooling unit. The Clear-PEM frontend boards innovative design results in a unprecedented integration of the crystal matrices, APDs and ASICs, making Clear-PEM the PET scanner with the highest number of APD pixels ever integrated so far. In this paper, the scanner's main technical characteristics, calibration strategies and the first spectrometric performance evaluation in a clinical environment are presented. The first commissioning results show 99.7% active channels, which, after calibration, have inter-pixel and absolute gain distributions with dispersions of, respectively, 12.2% and 15.3%, demonstrating that despite the large number of channels, the system is uniform. The mean energy resolution at 511 keV is of 15.9%, with a 8.8% dispersion, and the mean CDOI-1 is 5.9%/mm, with a 7.8% dispersion. The coincidence time resolution, at 511 keV, for a energy window between 400 and 600 keV, is 5.2 ns FWHM.

  16. Experimental characterization of the Clear-PEM scanner spectrometric performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bugalho, R; Carrico, B; Ferreira, C S; Frade, M; Ferreira, M; Moura, R; Ortigao, C; Pinheiro, J F; Rodrigues, P; Rolo, I; Silva, J C; Trindade, A; Varela, J [Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas (LIP), Av. Elias Garcia 14-1, 1000-149 Lisboa (Portugal)], E-mail: frade@lip.pt

    2009-10-15

    In the framework of the Clear-PEM project for the construction of a high-resolution and high-specificity scanner for breast cancer imaging, a Positron Emission Mammography tomograph has been developed and installed at the Instituto Portugues de Oncologia do Porto hospital. The Clear-PEM scanner is mainly composed by two planar detector heads attached to a robotic arm, trigger/data acquisition electronics system and computing servers. The detector heads hold crystal matrices built from 2 x 2 x 20 mm{sup 3} LYSO:Ce crystals readout by Hamamatsu S8550 APD arrays. The APDs are optically coupled to both ends of the 6144 crystals in order to extract the DOI information for each detected event. Each one of 12288 APD's pixels is read and controlled by Application Specific Integrated Circuits water-cooled by an external cooling unit. The Clear-PEM frontend boards innovative design results in a unprecedented integration of the crystal matrices, APDs and ASICs, making Clear-PEM the PET scanner with the highest number of APD pixels ever integrated so far. In this paper, the scanner's main technical characteristics, calibration strategies and the first spectrometric performance evaluation in a clinical environment are presented. The first commissioning results show 99.7% active channels, which, after calibration, have inter-pixel and absolute gain distributions with dispersions of, respectively, 12.2% and 15.3%, demonstrating that despite the large number of channels, the system is uniform. The mean energy resolution at 511 keV is of 15.9%, with a 8.8% dispersion, and the mean C{sub DOI}{sup -1} is 5.9%/mm, with a 7.8% dispersion. The coincidence time resolution, at 511 keV, for a energy window between 400 and 600 keV, is 5.2 ns FWHM.

  17. [Research and development for next generation PET instrumentations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaya, Taiga

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) plays important roles in cancer diagnosis and molecular imaging research; but potential points remain for which big improvements could be made, including resolution, sensitivity and costs. For example, the sensitivity of present PET scanners does not exceed 10%. This means that more than 90% of the gamma-rays emitted from a subject are not utilized for imaging. Therefore, research on next generation PET technologies remains a hot topic worldwide. In this paper, we introduce some research trends by describing PET physics research in the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). A depth-of-interaction (DOI) detector, for which various methods have been studied, will be a key device to get any significant improvement in sensitivity while maintaining high spatial resolution. DOI measurement also has a potential to expand PET application fields because it allows for more flexible detector arrangement. As an example, we are developing the world's first, open-type PET geometry "OpenPET", which is expected to lead to PET imaging during treatment. The DOI detector itself continues to evolve with the help of recently developed semiconductor photodetectors, often referred to as silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs). We are developing a SiPM-based DOI detector to achieve sub-mm spatial resolution, which is reaching the theoretical limitation of PET imaging.

  18. Simultaneous acquisition of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) data and positron emission tomography (PET) images with a prototype MR-compatible, small animal PET imager

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raylman, Raymond R; Majewski, Stan; Velan, S Sendhil; Lemieux, Susan; Kross, Brian; Popov, Vladimir; Smith, Mark F; Weisenberger, Andrew G

    2007-06-01

    Multi-modality imaging (such as PET-CT) is rapidly becoming a valuable tool in the diagnosis of disease and in the development of new drugs. Functional images produced with PET, fused with anatomical images created by MRI, allow the correlation of form with function. Perhaps more exciting than the combination of anatomical MRI with PET, is the melding of PET with MR spectroscopy (MRS). Thus, two aspects of physiology could be combined in novel ways to produce new insights into the physiology of normal and pathological processes. Our team is developing a system to acquire MRI images and MRS spectra, and PET images contemporaneously. The prototype MR-compatible PET system consists of two opposed detector heads (appropriate in size for small animal imaging), operating in coincidence mode with an active field-of-view of ∼14 cm in diameter. Each detector consists of an array of LSO detector elements coupled through a 2-m long fiber optic light guide to a single position-sensitive photomultiplier tube. The use of light guides allows these magnetic field-sensitive elements of the PET imager to be positioned outside the strong magnetic field of our 3T MRI scanner. The PET scanner imager was integrated with a 12-cm diameter, 12-leg custom, birdcage coil. Simultaneous MRS spectra and PET images were successfully acquired from a multi-modality phantom consisting of a sphere filled with 17 brain relevant substances and a positron-emitting radionuclide. There were no significant changes in MRI or PET scanner performance when both were present in the MRI magnet bore. This successful initial test demonstrates the potential for using such a multi-modality to obtain complementary MRS and PET data.

  19. Simultaneous acquisition of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) data and positron emission tomography (PET) images with a prototype MR-compatible, small animal PET imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raylman, Raymond R.; Majewski, Stan; Velan, S. Sendhil; Lemieux, Susan; Kross, Brian; Popov, Vladimir; Smith, Mark F.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.

    2007-06-01

    Multi-modality imaging (such as PET-CT) is rapidly becoming a valuable tool in the diagnosis of disease and in the development of new drugs. Functional images produced with PET, fused with anatomical images created by MRI, allow the correlation of form with function. Perhaps more exciting than the combination of anatomical MRI with PET, is the melding of PET with MR spectroscopy (MRS). Thus, two aspects of physiology could be combined in novel ways to produce new insights into the physiology of normal and pathological processes. Our team is developing a system to acquire MRI images and MRS spectra, and PET images contemporaneously. The prototype MR-compatible PET system consists of two opposed detector heads (appropriate in size for small animal imaging), operating in coincidence mode with an active field-of-view of ˜14 cm in diameter. Each detector consists of an array of LSO detector elements coupled through a 2-m long fiber optic light guide to a single position-sensitive photomultiplier tube. The use of light guides allows these magnetic field-sensitive elements of the PET imager to be positioned outside the strong magnetic field of our 3T MRI scanner. The PET scanner imager was integrated with a 12-cm diameter, 12-leg custom, birdcage coil. Simultaneous MRS spectra and PET images were successfully acquired from a multi-modality phantom consisting of a sphere filled with 17 brain relevant substances and a positron-emitting radionuclide. There were no significant changes in MRI or PET scanner performance when both were present in the MRI magnet bore. This successful initial test demonstrates the potential for using such a multi-modality to obtain complementary MRS and PET data.

  20. Comparison of threshold-based and watershed-based segmentation for the truncation compensation of PET/MR images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaffert, T.; Renisch, S.; Tang, J.; Narayanan, M.; Hu, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Recently introduced combined PET/MR scanners need to handle the specific problem that a limited MR field of view sometimes truncates armor body contours, which prevents an accurate calculation of PET attenuation correction maps. Such maps of attenuation coefficients overbody structures are required

  1. Pet Disaster Preparedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safety Checklist – Arabic Pets and Disaster Safety Checklist – Chinese Pets and Disaster Safety Checklist – French Pets and ... Cross serves in the US, its territories and military installations around the world. Please try again. Your ...

  2. Your Pet's Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Animal Welfare Veterinary Careers Public Health Your Pet's Medications When your pet has a medical condition, ... authorized. What you can do to keep your pet safe When the medication is prescribed Let your ...

  3. Clinical evaluation of TOF versus non-TOF on PET artifacts in simultaneous PET/MR: a dual centre experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ter Voert, Edwin E G W; Veit-Haibach, Patrick; Ahn, Sangtae; Wiesinger, Florian; Khalighi, M Mehdi; Levin, Craig S; Iagaru, Andrei H; Zaharchuk, Greg; Huellner, Martin; Delso, Gaspar

    2017-07-01

    Our objective was to determine clinically the value of time-of-flight (TOF) information in reducing PET artifacts and improving PET image quality and accuracy in simultaneous TOF PET/MR scanning. A total 65 patients who underwent a comparative scan in a simultaneous TOF PET/MR scanner were included. TOF and non-TOF PET images were reconstructed, clinically examined, compared and scored. PET imaging artifacts were categorized as large or small implant-related artifacts, as dental implant-related artifacts, and as implant-unrelated artifacts. Differences in image quality, especially those related to (implant) artifacts, were assessed using a scale ranging from 0 (no artifact) to 4 (severe artifact). A total of 87 image artifacts were found and evaluated. Four patients had large and eight patients small implant-related artifacts, 27 patients had dental implants/fillings, and 48 patients had implant-unrelated artifacts. The average score was 1.14 ± 0.82 for non-TOF PET images and 0.53 ± 0.66 for TOF images (p < 0.01) indicating that artifacts were less noticeable when TOF information was included. Our study indicates that PET image artifacts are significantly mitigated with integration of TOF information in simultaneous PET/MR. The impact is predominantly seen in patients with significant artifacts due to metal implants.

  4. Clinical evaluation of TOF versus non-TOF on PET artifacts in simultaneous PET/MR: a dual centre experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voert, Edwin E.G.W. ter [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Veit-Haibach, Patrick [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); University Hospital Zurich, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Ahn, Sangtae [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Wiesinger, Florian [GE Global Research, Muenchen (Germany); Khalighi, M.M.; Delso, Gaspar [GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI (United States); Levin, Craig S. [Stanford University, Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford, CA (United States); Iagaru, Andrei H. [Stanford University, Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Stanford, CA (United States); Zaharchuk, Greg [Stanford University, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Huellner, Martin [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); University Hospital Zurich, Department of Neuroradiology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2017-07-15

    Our objective was to determine clinically the value of time-of-flight (TOF) information in reducing PET artifacts and improving PET image quality and accuracy in simultaneous TOF PET/MR scanning. A total 65 patients who underwent a comparative scan in a simultaneous TOF PET/MR scanner were included. TOF and non-TOF PET images were reconstructed, clinically examined, compared and scored. PET imaging artifacts were categorized as large or small implant-related artifacts, as dental implant-related artifacts, and as implant-unrelated artifacts. Differences in image quality, especially those related to (implant) artifacts, were assessed using a scale ranging from 0 (no artifact) to 4 (severe artifact). A total of 87 image artifacts were found and evaluated. Four patients had large and eight patients small implant-related artifacts, 27 patients had dental implants/fillings, and 48 patients had implant-unrelated artifacts. The average score was 1.14 ± 0.82 for non-TOF PET images and 0.53 ± 0.66 for TOF images (p < 0.01) indicating that artifacts were less noticeable when TOF information was included. Our study indicates that PET image artifacts are significantly mitigated with integration of TOF information in simultaneous PET/MR. The impact is predominantly seen in patients with significant artifacts due to metal implants. (orig.)

  5. Application of MR/PET in oncologic imaging; Einsatz von MR/PET in der onkologischen Bildgebung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwenzer, N.F.; Pfannenberg, C.; Werner, M.K. [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Tuebingen (Germany). Abt. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Reischl, G. [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Tuebingen (Germany). Abt. fuer Praeklinische Bildgebung und Radiopharmazie; Schmidt, H. [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Tuebingen (Germany). Abt. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Tuebingen (Germany). Abt. fuer Praeklinische Bildgebung und Radiopharmazie

    2012-09-15

    The present review aims to depict the possibilities offered by hybrid imaging with magnetic resonance positron emission tomography (MR/PET). Recently, new whole-body MR/PET scanners were introduced allowing for the combination of both modalities outside the brain. This is a challenge for both modalities: For MRI, it is essential to provide anatomical images with high resolution. Additionally, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), proton spectroscopy, but also dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging plays an important role. With regard to PET, the technical challenge mainly consists of obtaining an appropriate MR-based attenuation correction for the PET data. Using MR/PET, it is possible to acquire morphological and functional data in one examination. In particular, children and young adults will benefit from this new hybrid technique, especially in oncologic imaging with multiple follow-up examinations. However, it is expected that PET/CT will not be replaced completely by MR/PET because PET/CT is less cost-intensive and more widely available. Moreover, in lung imaging, MRI limitations still have to be accepted. Concerning research, simultaneous MR/PET offers a variety of new possibilities, for example cardiac imaging, functional brain studies or the evaluation of new tracers in correlation with specific MR techniques. (orig.)

  6. American Pet Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    海焰

    2007-01-01

    In America you can find dogs,cats, horses,monkeys, snakes and even pigs in almost every family.They are their pets.Americans love pets and look on them as a part of the family.Sometimes pet owners dress their pets in fashionable clothes.They even buy toys for their pets.Americans love their pets as their children, sometimes even better.

  7. A New Proton CT Scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Coutrakon, G; Boi, S; Dyshkant, A; Erdelyi, B; Hedin, D; Johnson, E; Krider, J; Rykalin, V; Uzunyan, S A; Zutshi, V; Fordt, R; Sellberg, G; Rauch, J E; Roman, M; Rubinov, P; Wilson, P; Naimuddin, M

    2014-01-01

    The design, construction, and preliminary testing of a second generation proton CT scanner is presented. All current treatment planning systems at proton therapy centers use X-ray CT as the primary imaging modality for treatment planning to calculate doses to tumor and healthy tissues. One of the limitations of X-ray CT is in the conversion of X-ray attenuation coefficients to relative (proton) stopping powers, or RSP. This results in more proton range uncertainty, larger target volumes and therefore, more dose to healthy tissues. To help improve this, we present a novel scanner capable of high dose rates, up to 2~MHz, and large area coverage, 20~x~24~cm$^2$, for imaging an adult head phantom and reconstructing more accurate RSP values.

  8. Effect of MR contrast agents on quantitative accuracy of PET in combined whole-body PET/MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lois, Cristina [University of Santiago de Compostela, Department of Particle Physics, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Health Research Institute of Santiago de Compostela (IDIS), Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Imaging Science Institute, Tuebingen (Germany); Bezrukov, Ilja [Eberhard Karls University, Laboratory for Preclinical Imaging and Imaging Technology of the Werner Siemens Foundation, Department of Preclinical Imaging and Radiopharmacy, Tuebingen (Germany); Max Plank Institute for Intelligent Systems, Department of Empirical Inference, Tuebingen (Germany); Schmidt, Holger [Eberhard Karls University, Laboratory for Preclinical Imaging and Imaging Technology of the Werner Siemens Foundation, Department of Preclinical Imaging and Radiopharmacy, Tuebingen (Germany); Eberhard Karls University, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Schwenzer, Nina; Werner, Matthias K. [Eberhard Karls University, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Kupferschlaeger, Juergen [Eberhard Karls University, Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Beyer, Thomas [Imaging Science Institute, Tuebingen (Germany); cmi-experts GmbH, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2012-11-15

    Clinical PET/MR acquisition protocols entail the use of MR contrast agents (MRCA) that could potentially affect PET quantification following MR-based attenuation correction (AC). We assessed the effect of oral and intravenous (IV) MRCA on PET quantification in PET/MR imaging. We employed two MRCA: Lumirem {sup registered} (oral) and Gadovist {sup registered} (IV). First, we determined their reference PET attenuation values using a PET transmission scan (ECAT-EXACT HR+, Siemens) and a CT scan (PET/CT Biograph 16 HI-REZ, Siemens). Second, we evaluated the attenuation of PET signals in the presence of MRCA. Phantoms were filled with clinically relevant concentrations of MRCA in a background of water and {sup 18}F-fluoride, and imaged using a PET/CT scanner (Biograph 16 HI-REZ, Siemens) and a PET/MR scanner (Biograph mMR, Siemens). Third, we investigated the effect of clinically relevant volumes of MRCA on MR-based AC using human pilot data: a patient study employing Gadovist {sup registered} (IV) and a volunteer study employing two different oral MRCA (Lumirem {sup registered} and pineapple juice). MR-based attenuation maps were calculated following Dixon-based fat-water segmentation and an external atlas-based and pattern recognition (AT and PR) algorithm. IV and oral MRCA in clinically relevant concentrations were found to have PET attenuation values similar to those of water. The phantom experiments showed that under clinical conditions IV and oral MRCA did not yield additional attenuation of PET emission signals. Patient scans showed that PET attenuation maps are not biased after the administration of IV MRCA but may be biased, however, after ingestion of iron oxide-based oral MRCA when segmentation-based AC algorithms are used. Alternative AC algorithms, such as AT and PR, or alternative oral contrast agents, such as pineapple juice, can yield unbiased attenuation maps. In clinical PET/MR scenarios MRCA are not expected to lead to markedly increased attenuation

  9. Microfabrication of fiber optic scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauver, Mark; Crossman-Bosworth, Janet L.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2002-06-01

    A cantilevered optical fiber is micromachined to function as a miniature resonant opto-mechanical scanner. By driving the base of the cantilevered fiber at a resonance frequency using a piezoelectric actuator, the free end of the cantilever beam becomes a scanned light source. The fiber scanners are designed to achieve wide field-of-view (FOV) and high scan frequency. We employ a non-linearly tapered profile fiber to achieve scan amplitudes of 1 mm at scan frequencies above 20 KHz. Scan angles of over 120 degree(s) (full angle) have been achieved. Higher order modes are also employed for scanning applications that require compactness while maintaining large angular FOV. Etching techniques are used to create the non-linearly tapered sections in single mode optical fiber. Additionally, micro-lenses are fabricated on the tips of the etched fibers, with lens diameters as small as 15 microns. Such lenses are capable of reducing the divergence angle of the emitted light to 5 degree(s) (full angle), with greater reduction expected by employing novel lens shaping techniques. Microfabricated optical fiber scanners have display applications ranging from micro-optical displays to larger panoramic displays. Applications for micro-image acquisition include small barcode readers to medical endoscopes.

  10. Novel Developments in Instrumentation for PET Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Joel

    2013-04-01

    Advances in medical imaging, in particular positron emission tomography (PET), have been based on technical developments in physics and instrumentation that have common foundations with detection systems used in other fields of physics. New detector materials are used in PET systems that maximize efficiency, timing characteristics and robustness, and which lead to improved image quality and quantitative accuracy for clinical imaging. Time of flight (TOF) techniques are now routinely used in commercial PET scanners that combine physiological imaging with anatomical imaging provided by x-ray computed tomography. Using new solid-state photo-sensors instead of traditional photo-multiplier tubes makes it possible to combine PET with magnetic resonance imaging which is a significant technical challenge, but one that is creating new opportunities for both research and clinical applications. An overview of recent advances in instrumentation, such as TOF and PET/MR will be presented, along with examples of imaging studies to demonstrate the impact on patient care and basic research of diseases.

  11. Pet Problems at Home: Pet Problems in the Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltow, Willow

    1984-01-01

    Discusses problems of pets in the community, examining the community's role related to disruptive pets and pet overpopulation. Also discusses pet problems at home, offering advice on selecting a pet, meeting a pet's needs, and disciplining pets. Includes a list of books, films/filmstrips, teaching materials, and various instructional strategies.…

  12. Pet Problems at Home: Pet Problems in the Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltow, Willow

    1984-01-01

    Discusses problems of pets in the community, examining the community's role related to disruptive pets and pet overpopulation. Also discusses pet problems at home, offering advice on selecting a pet, meeting a pet's needs, and disciplining pets. Includes a list of books, films/filmstrips, teaching materials, and various instructional strategies.…

  13. PET quantitation and imaging of the non-pure positron-emitting iodine isotope 124I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, H; Tellman, L; Qaim, S M; Spellerberg, S; Schmid, A; Coenen, H H

    2002-05-01

    A series of PET studies using phantoms is presented to characterize the imaging and quantitative performance of the positron-emitting iodine isotope 124I. Measurements were performed on the 2D-PET scanner GE 4096+ as well as on the Siemens PET scanner HRR+ operated in both 2D and 3D modes. No specific correction was applied for the gamma-rays emitted together with the positrons. As compared to 18F, in studies with 124I there is a small loss of image resolution and contrast, and an increase in background. The quantitative results varied between different scanners and various acquisition as well as reconstruction modes, with an average relative difference of -6 +/- 13% (mean+/-SD) in respect of the phantom radioactivity as measured with gamma-ray spectroscopy. We conclude that quantitation of a radiopharmaceutical labelled with 124I is feasible and may be improved by the development of specific corrections.

  14. A large area, silicon photomultiplier-based PET detector module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raylman, Rr; Stolin, A; Majewski, S; Proffitt, J

    2014-01-21

    The introduction of silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) has facilitated construction of compact, efficient and magnetic field-hardened positron emission tomography (PET) scanners. To take full advantage of these devices, methods for using them to produce large field-of-view PET scanners are needed. In this investigation, we explored techniques to combine two SiPM arrays to form the building block for a small animal PET scanner. The module consists of a 26 × 58 array of 1.5 × 1.5mm(2) LYSO elements (spanning 41 × 91mm(2)) coupled to two SensL SiPM arrays. The SiPMs were read out with new multiplexing electronics developed for this project. To facilitate calculation of event position with multiple SiPM arrays it was necessary to spread scintillation light amongst a number of elements with a small light guide. This method was successful in permitting identification of all detector elements, even at the seam between two SiPM arrays. Since the performance of SiPMs is enhanced by cooling, the detector module was fitted with a cooling jacket, which allowed the temperature of the device and electronics to be controlled. Testing demonstrated that the peak-to-valley contrast ratio of the light detected from the scintillation array was increased by ∼45% when the temperature was reduced from 28 °C to 16 °C. Energy resolution for 511 keV photons improved slightly from 18.8% at 28 °C to 17.8% at 16 °C. Finally, the coincidence timing resolution of the module was found to be insufficient for time-of-flight applications (∼2100 ps at 14 °C). The first use of these new modules will be in the construction of a small animal PET scanner to be integrated with a 3T clinical magnetic resonance imaging scanner.

  15. Molecular Imaging Challenges With PET

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoq, P

    2010-01-01

    The future trends in molecular imaging and associated challenges for in-vivo functional imaging are illustrated on the basis of a few examples, such as atherosclerosis vulnerable plaques imaging or stem cells tracking. A set of parameters are derived to define the specifications of a new generation of in-vivo imaging devices in terms of sensitivity, spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. The limitations of strategies used in present PET scanners are discussed and new approaches are proposed taking advantage of recent progress on materials, photodetectors and readout electronics. A special focus is put on metamaterials, as a new approach to bring more functionality to detection devices. It is shown that the route is now open towards a fully digital detector head with very high photon counting capability over a large energy range, excellent timing precision and possibility of imaging the energy deposition process.

  16. PET/MR Imaging in Cancers of the Gastrointestinal Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paspulati, Raj Mohan; Gupta, Amit

    2016-10-01

    PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) is an established hybrid imaging technique for staging and follow-up of gastrointestinal (GI) tract malignancies, especially for colorectal carcinoma. Dedicated hybrid PET/MR imaging scanners are currently available for clinical use. Although they will not replace regular use of PET/CT, they may have utility in selected cases of GI tract malignancies. The superior soft tissue contrast resolution and depiction of anatomy and the functional information obtained from diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) provided by MR imaging in PET/MR imaging are advantages over CT of PET/CT for T staging and follow-up of rectal carcinoma and for better characterization of liver lesions. Functional information from DWI and use of liver-specific MR imaging contrast agents are an added advantage in follow-up of liver metastases after systemic and locoregional treatment. New radiotracers will improve the utility of PET/MR imaging in staging and follow-up of tumors, which may not be [18F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose avid, such as hepatocellular carcinoma and neuroendocrine tumors. PET/MR imaging also has application in selected cases of cholangiocarcinoma, gallbladder cancer, and pancreatic carcinoma for initial staging and follow-up assessment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of effects of magnetic field by TMS on PET data acquisition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Sung; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Narayana, Shalini; Fox, Peter [Health Science Center, Texas Univ., San Antonio (United States)

    2001-07-01

    There is a controversy regarding the necessity of mu-metal shielding of PET scanner during transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). The aim of this study was to test the effects of magnetic field by TMS on PET data acquisition. With TMS on and off in PET field of view, transmission images were acquired for 9 minutes. The frequency and intensity of stimulation were set at 3 {approx} 5 Hz and 70% of the maximum output of the stimulator, respectively. Distance between TMS coil and patient port edge of the PET gantry was varied from 2 cm to 21 cm, and arrangement of TMS coil was varied between parallel or perpendicular orientation of the maximum field with the scanner's axis. On inspection of the sinograms of transmission PET scans and their subtraction images, there was no measurable difference between TMS on and off conditions for any distance and any orientation. The lack of effect may be due to the long distance between TMS coil and detector block in PET scanner with respect to quick fading of magnetic field with distance (3% of maximum field at 10 cm, in air) and the brief duration ({approx}250 {mu} sec) of TMS pulse relative to total PET acquisition time.

  18. Multimodal neuroimaging in humans at 9.4 T: a technological breakthrough towards an advanced metabolic imaging scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, N Jon

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this paper is twofold: firstly, to explore the potential of simultaneously acquiring multimodal MR-PET-EEG data in a human 9.4 T scanner to provide a platform for metabolic brain imaging. Secondly, to demonstrate that the three modalities are complementary, with MRI providing excellent structural and functional imaging, PET providing quantitative molecular imaging, and EEG providing superior temporal resolution. A 9.4 T MRI scanner equipped with a PET insert and a commercially available EEG device was used to acquire in vivo proton-based images, spectra, and sodium- and oxygen-based images with MRI, EEG signals from a human subject in a static 9.4 T magnetic field, and demonstrate hybrid MR-PET capability in a rat model. High-resolution images of the in vivo human brain with an isotropic resolution of 0.5 mm and post-mortem brain images of the cerebellum with an isotropic resolution of 320 µm are presented. A (1)H spectrum was also acquired from 2 × 2 × 2 mm voxel in the brain allowing 12 metabolites to be identified. Imaging based on sodium and oxygen is demonstrated with isotropic resolutions of 2 and 5 mm, respectively. Auditory evoked potentials measured in a static field of 9.4 T are shown. Finally, hybrid MR-PET capability at 9.4 T in the human scanner is demonstrated in a rat model. Initial progress on the road to 9.4 T multimodal MR-PET-EEG is illustrated. Ultra-high resolution structural imaging, high-resolution images of the sodium distribution and proof-of-principle (17)O data are clearly demonstrated. Further, simultaneous MR-PET data are presented without artefacts and EEG data successfully corrected for the cardioballistic artefact at 9.4 T are presented.

  19. New cardiac cameras: single-photon emission CT and PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slomka, Piotr J; Berman, Daniel S; Germano, Guido

    2014-07-01

    Nuclear cardiology instrumentation has evolved significantly in the recent years. Concerns about radiation dose and long acquisition times have propelled developments of dedicated high-efficiency cardiac SPECT scanners. Novel collimator designs, such as multipinhole or locally focusing collimators arranged in geometries that are optimized for cardiac imaging, have been implemented to enhance photon-detection sensitivity. Some of these new SPECT scanners use solid-state photon detectors instead of photomultipliers to improve image quality and to reduce the scanner footprint. These new SPECT devices allow dramatic up to 7-fold reduction in acquisition times or similar reduction in radiation dose. In addition, new hardware for photon attenuation correction allowing ultralow radiation doses has been offered by some vendors. To mitigate photon attenuation artifacts for the new SPECT scanners not equipped with attenuation correction hardware, 2-position (upright-supine or prone-supine) imaging has been proposed. PET hardware developments have been primarily driven by the requirements of oncologic imaging, but cardiac imaging can benefit from improved PET image quality and improved sensitivity of 3D systems. The time-of-flight reconstruction combined with resolution recovery techniques is now implemented by all major PET vendors. These new methods improve image contrast and image resolution and reduce image noise. High-sensitivity 3D PET without interplane septa allows reduced radiation dose for cardiac perfusion imaging. Simultaneous PET/MR hybrid system has been developed. Solid-state PET detectors with avalanche photodiodes or digital silicon photomultipliers have been introduced, and they offer improved imaging characteristics and reduced sensitivity to electromagnetic MR fields. Higher maximum count rate of the new PET detectors allows routine first-pass Rb-82 imaging, with 3D PET acquisition enabling clinical utilization of dynamic imaging with myocardial flow

  20. MRI for attenuation correction in PET: methods and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenknecht, Gudrun; Kaiser, Hans-Jürgen; Mottaghy, Felix M; Herzog, Hans

    2013-02-01

    In current combined PET/MR systems, PET attenuation correction is based on MRI, since the small bore inside MRI systems and the strong magnetic field do not permit a rotating PET transmission source or a CT device to be integrated. Unlike CT measurements in PET/CT scanners, the MR signal is not directly correlated to tissue density and thus cannot be converted by a simple transformation of intensity values. Various approaches have been developed based on templates, atlas information, direct segmentation of T1-weighted MR images, or segmentation of images from special MR sequences. The advantages and disadvantages of these approaches as well as additional challenges will be discussed in this review.

  1. Open magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailey, D

    2006-11-01

    (1) In most MRI scanners, the patient examination table fits inside a long cylindrical tube. Large patients cannot be accommodated, and some persons experience claustrophobic reactions. Open MRI systems, in which the patient is placed between two plates, overcome these disadvantages. (2) Open MRI scanners are widely used in health care. High-field closed MRI systems are preferred for many examinations. (3) Early versions of open MRI scanners had low magnetic field strength, gave poorer image quality than most closed systems, and required longer examination times. Newer open scanners include machines with higher magnetic field strengths and improved image quality. (4) Closed high magnetic field scanners with short magnets and wide bore tubes offer improved comfort to patients, and may be an alternative to open scanners. (5) There is interest in using open systems for intra-operative and image-guided interventions.

  2. Simultaneous functional imaging using fPET and fMRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villien, Marjorie [CERMEP (France)

    2015-05-18

    Brain mapping of task-associated changes in metabolism with PET has been accomplished by subtracting scans acquired during two distinct static states. We have demonstrated that PET can provide truly dynamic information on cerebral energy metabolism using constant infusion of FDG and multiple stimuli in a single experiment. We demonstrate here that the functional PET (fPET-FDG) method accomplished simultaneously with fMRI, can enable the first direct comparisons in time, space and magnitude of hemodynamics and oxygen and glucose consumption. The imaging studies were performed on a 3T Tim-Trio MR scanner modified to support an MR-compatible BrainPET insert. Ten healthy subjects were included. The total PET acquisition and infusion time was 90 minutes. We did 3 blocks of right hand fingers tapping for 10 minutes at 30, 50 and 70 minutes after the beginning of the PET acquisition. ASL and BOLD imaging were acquired simultaneously during the motor paradigm. Changes in glucose utilization are easily observed as changes in the TAC slope of the PET data (FDG utilization rate) and in the derivative signal during motor stimuli in the activated voxels. PET and MRI (ASL, and BOLD) activations are largely colocalized but with very different statistical significance and temporal dynamic, especially in the ipsilateral side of the stimuli. This study demonstrated that motor activation can be measured dynamically during a single FDG PET scan. The complementary nature of fPET-FDG to fMRI capitalizes on the emerging technology of hybrid MR-PET scanners. fPET-FDG, combined with quantitative fMRI methods, allow us to simultaneously measure dynamic changes in glucose utilization and hemodynamic, addressing vital questions about neurovascular coupling.

  3. Recovery and normalization of triple coincidences in PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lage, Eduardo, E-mail: elage@mit.edu; Parot, Vicente; Dave, Shivang R.; Herraiz, Joaquin L. [Madrid-MIT M+Visión Consortium, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Moore, Stephen C.; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Park, Mi-Ae [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Udías, Jose M. [Grupo de Física Nuclear, Departamento de Física Atómica Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, CEI Moncloa, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Vaquero, Juan J. [Departamento de Ingeniería Biomédica e Ingeniería Aeroespacial, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Leganés 28911 (Spain)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Triple coincidences in positron emission tomography (PET) are events in which three γ-rays are detected simultaneously. These events, though potentially useful for enhancing the sensitivity of PET scanners, are discarded or processed without special consideration in current systems, because there is not a clear criterion for assigning them to a unique line-of-response (LOR). Methods proposed for recovering such events usually rely on the use of highly specialized detection systems, hampering general adoption, and/or are based on Compton-scatter kinematics and, consequently, are limited in accuracy by the energy resolution of standard PET detectors. In this work, the authors propose a simple and general solution for recovering triple coincidences, which does not require specialized detectors or additional energy resolution requirements. Methods: To recover triple coincidences, the authors’ method distributes such events among their possible LORs using the relative proportions of double coincidences in these LORs. The authors show analytically that this assignment scheme represents the maximum-likelihood solution for the triple-coincidence distribution problem. The PET component of a preclinical PET/CT scanner was adapted to enable the acquisition and processing of triple coincidences. Since the efficiencies for detecting double and triple events were found to be different throughout the scanner field-of-view, a normalization procedure specific for triple coincidences was also developed. The effect of including triple coincidences using their method was compared against the cases of equally weighting the triples among their possible LORs and discarding all the triple events. The authors used as figures of merit for this comparison sensitivity, noise-equivalent count (NEC) rates and image quality calculated as described in the NEMA NU-4 protocol for the assessment of preclinical PET scanners. Results: The addition of triple-coincidence events with the

  4. 18F-FDG PET of the hands with a dedicated high-resolution PEM system (arthro-PET): correlation with PET/CT, radiography and clinical parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhlanga, Joyce C; Carrino, John A; Lodge, Martin; Wang, Hao; Wahl, Richard L

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to prospectively determine the feasibility and compare the novel use of a positron emission mammography (PEM) scanner with standard PET/CT for evaluating hand osteoarthritis (OA) with (18)F-FDG. Institutional review board approval and written informed consent were obtained for this HIPAA-compliant prospective study in which 14 adults referred for oncological (18)F-FDG PET/CT underwent dedicated hand PET/CT followed by arthro-PET using the PEM device. Hand radiographs were obtained and scored for the presence and severity of OA. Summed qualitative and quantitative joint glycolytic scores for each modality were compared with the findings on plain radiography and clinical features. Eight patients with clinical and/or radiographic evidence of OA comprised the OA group (mean age 73 ± 7.7 years). Six patients served as the control group (53.7 ± 9.3 years). Arthro-PET quantitative and qualitative joint glycolytic scores were highly correlated with PET/CT findings in the OA patients (r = 0.86. p = 0.007; r = 0.94, p = 0.001). Qualitative arthro-PET and PET/CT joint scores were significantly higher in the OA patients than in controls (38.7 ± 6.6 vs. 32.2 ± 0.4, p = 0.02; 37.5 ± 5.4 vs. 32.2 ± 0.4, p = 0.03, respectively). Quantitative arthro-PET and PET/CT maximum SUV-lean joint scores were higher in the OA patients, although they did not reach statistical significance (20.8 ± 4.2 vs. 18 ± 1.8, p = 0.13; 22.8 ± 5.38 vs. 20.1 ± 1.54, p = 0.21). By definition, OA patients had higher radiographic joint scores than controls (30.9 ± 31.3 vs. 0, p = 0.03). Hand imaging using a small field of view PEM system (arthro-PET) with FDG is feasible, performing comparably to PET/CT in assessing metabolic joint activity. Arthro-PET and PET/CT showed higher joint FDG uptake in OA. Further exploration of arthro-PET in arthritis management is warranted.

  5. Modeling of a piezoelectric micro-scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Chaehoi, A; Cornez, D; Kirk, K

    2008-01-01

    Micro-scanners have been widely used in many optical applications. The micro-scanner presented in this paper uses multimorph-type bending actuators to tilt a square plate mirror. This paper presents a complete analytical model of the piezoelectric micro-scanner. This theoretical model based on strength of material equations calculates the force generated by the multimorphs on the mirror, the profile of the structure and the angular deflection of the mirror. The proposed model, used to optimize the design of the piezoelectric silicon micro-scanner, is intended for further HDL integration, allowing in this way system level simulation and optimization.

  6. 3D Surface Realignment Tracking for Medical Imaging: A Phantom Study with PET Motion Correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Jensen, Rasmus Ramsbøl

    2011-01-01

    We present a complete system for motion correction in high resolution brain positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. It is based on a compact structured light scanner mounted above the patient tunnel of the Siemens High Resolution Research Tomograph PET brain scanner. The structured light system...... is equipped with a near infrared diode and uses phase-shift interferometry to compute 3D representations of the forehead of the patient. These 3D point clouds are progressively aligned to a reference surface and thereby giving the head pose changes. The estimated pose changes are used to reposition a sequence...

  7. 3D Surface Realignment Tracking for Medical Imaging: A Phantom Study with PET Motion Correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Jensen, Rasmus Ramsbøl

    2011-01-01

    We present a complete system for motion correction in high resolution brain positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. It is based on a compact structured light scanner mounted above the patient tunnel of the Siemens High Resolution Research Tomograph PET brain scanner. The structured light system...... is equipped with a near infrared diode and uses phase-shift interferometry to compute 3D representations of the forehead of the patient. These 3D point clouds are progressively aligned to a reference surface and thereby giving the head pose changes. The estimated pose changes are used to reposition a sequence...

  8. Combined SPECT/CT and PET/CT for breast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, Paolo [Università di Napoli Federico II, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy); Larobina, Michele [Istituto di Biostrutture e Bioimmagini, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via Tommaso De Amicis, 95, Naples I-80145 (Italy); Di Lillo, Francesca [Università di Napoli Federico II, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy); Del Vecchio, Silvana [Università di Napoli Federico II, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche Avanzate, Via Pansini, 5, Naples I-80131 (Italy); Mettivier, Giovanni, E-mail: mettivier@na.infn.it [Università di Napoli Federico II, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy)

    2016-02-11

    In the field of nuclear medicine imaging, breast imaging for cancer diagnosis is still mainly based on 2D imaging techniques. Three-dimensional tomographic imaging with whole-body PET or SPECT scanners, when used for imaging the breast, has performance limits in terms of spatial resolution and sensitivity, which can be overcome only with a dedicated instrumentation. However, only few hybrid imaging systems for PET/CT or SPECT/CT dedicated to the breast have been developed in the last decade, providing complementary functional and anatomical information on normal breast tissue and lesions. These systems are still under development and clinical trials on just few patients have been reported; no commercial dedicated breast PET/CT or SPECT/CT is available. This paper reviews combined dedicated breast PET/CT and SPECT/CT scanners described in the recent literature, with focus on their technological aspects.

  9. Experimental evaluation of a simple lesion detection task with time-of-flight PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surti, S; Karp, J S [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)], E-mail: surti@mail.med.upenn.edu, E-mail: joelkarp@mail.med.upenn.edu

    2009-01-21

    A new generation of high-performance, time-of-flight (TOF) PET scanners have recently been developed. In earlier works, the gain with TOF information was derived as a reduction of noise in the reconstructed image, or essentially a gain in scanner sensitivity. These derivations were applicable to analytical reconstruction techniques and 2D PET imaging. In this work, we evaluate the gain measured in the clinically relevant task of lesion detection with TOF information in fully 3D PET scanners using iterative reconstruction algorithms. We performed measurements in a fully 3D TOF PET scanner using spherical lesions in uniform, cylindrical phantom. Lesion detectability was estimated for 10 mm diameter lesions using a non-prewhitening matched filter signal-to-noise-ratio (NPW SNR) as the metric. Our results show that the use of TOF information leads to increased lesion detectability, which is achieved with less number of iterations of the reconstruction algorithm. These phantom results indicate that clinically, TOF PET will allow reduced scan times and improved lesion detectability, especially in large patients.

  10. Assessment of PET & ASL metabolism in the hippocampal subfields of MCI and AD using simultaneous PET-MR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goubran, Maged; Douglas, David; Chao, Steven; Quon, Andrew; Tripathi, Pragya; Holley, Dawn; Vasanawala, Minal; Zaharchuk, Greg; Zeineh, Michael [Stanford University (United States)

    2015-05-18

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has been reported to show decreased metabolic activity in the hippocampus using FDG PET-MR. Histological data suggests that the hippocampal subfields are selectively affected in AD. Given the simultaneous imaging nature of integrated PET-MR scanners and the multimodal capabilities of PET-MR, our purpose here is to assess FDG activity, as well as ASL perfusion in the subfields of MCI and AD patients. 10 consecutive subjects were recruited for this study 3 MCI, 3 AD patients and 4 age-matched controls. The scanning was performed on a simultaneous 3T PET/MR scanner. To delineate the hippocampal subfields, automatic segmentation of hippocampal subfields (ASHS) was employed. Static FDG-PET series were reconstructed for analysis at 45-75 min for all subjects. All imaging sequences were automatically registered to the oblique coronal T2-weighted images (segmentation space). PET standardized uptake values (SUV) in the hippocampal subfields were normalized by the pons. FDG PET metabolism was reduced significantly in AD, as well as MCI patients as compared to controls, with the highest effect demonstrated in the CA3/DG and CA1/2 (p = 0.047, subfields. Patients (MCI and AD combined) had decreased metabolism as compared to controls in CA1/2 and significantly smaller volumes the Subiculum. When assessing CBF across groups, a significant decrease in CBF was found in the Subiculum. Our preliminary results demonstrate that PET-MRI may potentially be a sensitive biomarker and tool for early diagnosis of AD. They also confirm the importance of assessing metabolic and structural changes of neurodegenerative diseases at the subfield level.

  11. Simultaneous MRI and PET imaging of a rat brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raylman, Raymond R.; Majewski, Stan; Lemieux, Susan K.; Sendhil Velan, S.; Kross, Brian; Popov, Vladimir; Smith, Mark F.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Zorn, Carl; Marano, Gary D.

    2006-12-01

    Multi-modality imaging is rapidly becoming a valuable tool in the diagnosis of disease and in the development of new drugs. Functional images produced with PET fused with anatomical structure images created by MRI will allow the correlation of form with function. Our group is developing a system to acquire MRI and PET images contemporaneously. The prototype device consists of two opposed detector heads, operating in coincidence mode. Each MRI-PET detector module consists of an array of LSO detector elements coupled through a long fibre optic light guide to a single Hamamatsu flat panel position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The use of light guides allows the PSPMTs to be positioned outside the bore of a 3T MRI scanner where the magnetic field is relatively small. To test the device, simultaneous MRI and PET images of the brain of a male Sprague Dawley rat injected with FDG were successfully obtained. The images revealed no noticeable artefacts in either image set. Future work includes the construction of a full ring PET scanner, improved light guides and construction of a specialized MRI coil to permit higher quality MRI imaging.

  12. Simultaneous MRI and PET imaging of a rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raylman, Raymond R [Center for Advanced Imaging, Department of Radiology, Box 9236, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States); Majewski, Stan [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA (United States); Lemieux, Susan K [Center for Advanced Imaging, Department of Radiology, Box 9236, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States); Velan, S Sendhil [Center for Advanced Imaging, Department of Radiology, Box 9236, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States); Kross, Brian [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA (United States); Popov, Vladimir [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA (United States); Smith, Mark F [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA (United States); Weisenberger, Andrew G [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA (United States); Zorn, Carl [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA (United States); Marano, Gary D [Center for Advanced Imaging, Department of Radiology, Box 9236, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2006-12-21

    Multi-modality imaging is rapidly becoming a valuable tool in the diagnosis of disease and in the development of new drugs. Functional images produced with PET fused with anatomical structure images created by MRI will allow the correlation of form with function. Our group is developing a system to acquire MRI and PET images contemporaneously. The prototype device consists of two opposed detector heads, operating in coincidence mode. Each MRI-PET detector module consists of an array of LSO detector elements coupled through a long fibre optic light guide to a single Hamamatsu flat panel position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The use of light guides allows the PSPMTs to be positioned outside the bore of a 3T MRI scanner where the magnetic field is relatively small. To test the device, simultaneous MRI and PET images of the brain of a male Sprague Dawley rat injected with FDG were successfully obtained. The images revealed no noticeable artefacts in either image set. Future work includes the construction of a full ring PET scanner, improved light guides and construction of a specialized MRI coil to permit higher quality MRI imaging.

  13. Experimental characterization and system simulations of depth of interaction PET detectors using 0.5 mm and 0.7 mm LSO arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Sara St; Yang, Yongfeng; Wu, Yibao; Farrell, Richard; Dokhale, Purushottam; Shah, Kanai S.; Cherry, Simon R.

    2009-07-01

    Small animal PET scanners may be improved by increasing the sensitivity, improving the spatial resolution and improving the uniformity of the spatial resolution across the field of view. This may be achieved by using PET detectors based on crystal elements that are thin in the axial and transaxial directions and long in the radial direction, and by employing depth of interaction (DOI) encoding to minimize the parallax error. With DOI detectors, the diameter of the ring of the PET scanner may also be decreased. This minimizes the number of detectors required to achieve the same solid angle coverage as a scanner with a larger ring diameter and minimizes errors due to non-collinearity of the annihilation photons. In this study, we characterize prototype PET detectors that are finely pixelated with individual LSO crystal element sizes of 0.5 mm × 0.5 mm × 20 mm and 0.7 mm × 0.7 mm × 20 mm, read out at both ends by position sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPDs). Both a specular reflector and a diffuse reflector were evaluated. The detectors were characterized based on the ability to clearly resolve the individual crystal elements, the DOI resolution and the energy resolution. Our results indicate that a scanner based on any of the four detector designs would offer improved spatial resolution and more uniform spatial resolution compared to present day small animal PET scanners. The greatest improvements to spatial resolution will be achieved when the detectors employing the 0.5 mm × 0.5 mm × 20 mm crystals are used. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to demonstrate that 2 mm DOI resolution is adequate to ensure uniform spatial resolution for a small animal PET scanner geometry using these detectors. The sensitivity of such a scanner was also simulated using Monte Carlo simulations and was shown to be greater than 10% for a four ring scanner with an inner diameter of 6 cm, employing 20 detectors per scanner ring.

  14. Design and evaluation of the MAMMI dedicated breast PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moliner, L.; Gonzalez, A. J.; Soriano, A.; Sanchez, F.; Correcher, C.; Orero, A.; Carles, M.; Vidal, L. F.; Barbera, J.; Caballero, L.; Seimetz, M.; Vazquez, C.; Benlloch, J. M. [Instituto de Instrumentacion para Imagen Molecular (I3M), Centro Mixto CSIC, Universitat Politecnica de Valencia, CIEMAT, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Instituto de Instrumentacion para Imagen Molecular (I3M), Centro Mixto CSIC, Universitat Politecnica de Valencia, CIEMAT, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain) and Oncovision, GEM-Imaging SA. 46012 Valencia (Spain); Instituto de Instrumentacion para Imagen Molecular (I3M), Centro Mixto CSIC, Universitat Politecnica de Valencia, CIEMAT, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Oncovision, GEM-Imaging SA. 46012 Valencia (Spain); Instituto de Instrumentacion para Imagen Molecular (I3M), Centro Mixto CSIC, Universitat Politecnica de Valencia, CIEMAT, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Oncovision, GEM-Imaging SA. 46012 Valencia (Spain); Instituto de Instrumentacion para Imagen Molecular (I3M), Centro Mixto CSIC, Universitat Politecnica de Valencia, CIEMAT, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: A breast dedicated positron emission tomography (PET) scanner has been developed based on monolithic LYSO crystals coupled to position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMTs). In this study, we describe the design of the PET system and report on its performance evaluation. Methods: MAMMI is a breast PET scanner based on monolithic LYSO crystals. It consists of 12 compact modules with a transaxial field of view (FOV) of 170 mm in diameter and 40 mm axial FOV that translates to cover up to 170 mm. The patient lies down in a prone position that facilitates maximum breast elongation. Quantitative performance analysis of the calculated method for the attenuation correction specifically developed for MAMMI, and based on PET image segmentation, has also been conducted in this evaluation. In order to fully determine the MAMMI prototype's performance, we have adapted the measurements suggested for National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) NU 2-2007 and NU 4-2008 protocol tests, as they are defined for whole-body and small animal PET scanners, respectively. Results: Spatial resolutions of 1.6, 1.8, and 1.9 mm were measured in the axial, radial, and tangential directions, respectively. A scatter fraction of 20.8% was obtained and the maximum NEC was determined to be 25 kcps at 44 MBq. The average sensitivity of the system was observed to be 1% for an energy window of (250 keV-750 keV) and a maximum absolute sensitivity of 1.8% was measured at the FOV center. Conclusions: The overall performance of the MAMMI reported on this evaluation quantifies its ability to produce high quality PET images. Spatial resolution values below 3 mm were measured in most of the FOV. Only the radial component of spatial resolution exceeds the 3 mm at radial positions larger than 60 mm. This study emphasizes the need for standardized testing methodologies for dedicated breast PET systems similar to NEMA standards for whole-body and small animal PET scanners.

  15. Software-based PET-MR image coregistration: combined PET-MRI for the rest of us

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, Matthew S.; Liu, Xinyang; Vyas, Pranav K.; Safdar, Nabile M. [Children' s National Health System, Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation, Washington, DC (United States); Plishker, William; Zaki, George F. [IGI Technologies, Inc., College Park, MD (United States); Shekhar, Raj [Children' s National Health System, Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation, Washington, DC (United States); IGI Technologies, Inc., College Park, MD (United States)

    2016-10-15

    -based solution that achieves the many benefits of hybrid PET/MRI scanners without actually needing one. The method proved to be accurate and potentially clinically useful. (orig.)

  16. NEMA NU 2-2012 performance studies for the SiPM-based ToF-PET component of the GE SIGNA PET/MR system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, Alexander M. [Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-5128 and Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-5128 (United States); Deller, Timothy W.; Maramraju, Sri Harsha [GE Healthcare, Waukesha, Wisconsin 53188-1678 (United States); Khalighi, Mohammad Mehdi [GE Healthcare, Applied Science Lab, Menlo Park, California 94025-3493 (United States); Delso, Gaspar [GE Healthcare and University Hospital of Zurich, Zurich 8006 (Switzerland); Levin, Craig S., E-mail: cslevin@stanford.edu [Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-5128 (United States); Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-5128 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-5128 (United States); Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-5128 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: The GE SIGNA PET/MR is a new whole body integrated time-of-flight (ToF)-PET/MR scanner from GE Healthcare. The system is capable of simultaneous PET and MR image acquisition with sub-400 ps coincidence time resolution. Simultaneous PET/MR holds great potential as a method of interrogating molecular, functional, and anatomical parameters in clinical disease in one study. Despite the complementary imaging capabilities of PET and MRI, their respective hardware tends to be incompatible due to mutual interference. In this work, the GE SIGNA PET/MR is evaluated in terms of PET performance and the potential effects of interference from MRI operation. Methods: The NEMA NU 2-2012 protocol was followed to measure PET performance parameters including spatial resolution, noise equivalent count rate, sensitivity, accuracy, and image quality. Each of these tests was performed both with the MR subsystem idle and with continuous MR pulsing for the duration of the PET data acquisition. Most measurements were repeated at three separate test sites where the system is installed. Results: The scanner has achieved an average of 4.4, 4.1, and 5.3 mm full width at half maximum radial, tangential, and axial spatial resolutions, respectively, at 1 cm from the transaxial FOV center. The peak noise equivalent count rate (NECR) of 218 kcps and a scatter fraction of 43.6% are reached at an activity concentration of 17.8 kBq/ml. Sensitivity at the center position is 23.3 cps/kBq. The maximum relative slice count rate error below peak NECR was 3.3%, and the residual error from attenuation and scatter corrections was 3.6%. Continuous MR pulsing had either no effect or a minor effect on each measurement. Conclusions: Performance measurements of the ToF-PET whole body GE SIGNA PET/MR system indicate that it is a promising new simultaneous imaging platform.

  17. Optimization, evaluation, and comparison of standard algorithms for image reconstruction with the VIP-PET

    OpenAIRE

    Mikhaylova, E.; Kolstein, M.; De Lorenzo, G.; Chmeissani, M.

    2014-01-01

    A novel positron emission tomography (PET) scanner design based on a room-temperature pixelated CdTe solid-state detector is being developed within the framework of the Voxel Imaging PET (VIP) Pathfinder project [1]. The simulation results show a great potential of the VIP to produce high-resolution images even in extremely challenging conditions such as the screening of a human head [2]. With unprecedented high channel density (450 channels/cm3) image reconstruction is a challenge. Therefore...

  18. FDG PET/MR for lymph node staging in head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platzek, Ivan, E-mail: ivan.platzek@uniklinikum-dresden.de [Dresden University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Fetscherstr. 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Beuthien-Baumann, Bettina, E-mail: bettina.beuthien-baumann3@uniklinikum-dresden.de [Dresden University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Fetscherstr. 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Schneider, Matthias, E-mail: m.schneider@mkgdresden.de [Dresden University Hospital, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Fetscherstr. 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Gudziol, Volker, E-mail: volker.gudziol@uniklinikum-dresden.de [Dresden University Hospital, Department of Otolaryngology, Fetscherstr. 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Kitzler, Hagen H., E-mail: hagen.kitzler@uniklinikum-dresden.de [Dresden University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Fetscherstr. 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Maus, Jens, E-mail: j.maus@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiopharmaceutical Cancer Research, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Schramm, Georg, E-mail: g.schramm@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiopharmaceutical Cancer Research, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Popp, Manuel, E-mail: manuel.popp@praxisklinik-dresden.de [Dresden University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Fetscherstr. 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Laniado, Michael, E-mail: michael.laniado@uniklinikum-dresden.de [Dresden University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Fetscherstr. 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Kotzerke, Jörg, E-mail: Joerg.Kotzerke@uniklinikum-dresden.de [Dresden University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Fetscherstr. 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Hoff, Jörg van den, E-mail: j.van_den_hoff@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiopharmaceutical Cancer Research, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-07-15

    Objective: To assess the diagnostic value of PET/MR (positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging) with FDG (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose) for lymph node staging in head and neck cancer. Materials and methods: This prospective study was approved by the local ethics committee; all patients signed informed consent. Thirty-eight patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck region underwent a PET scan on a conventional scanner and a subsequent PET/MR on a whole-body hybrid system after a single intravenous injection of FDG. The accuracy of PET, MR and PET/MR for lymph node metastases were compared using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Histology served as the reference standard. Results: Metastatic disease was confirmed in 16 (42.1%) of 38 patients and 38 (9.7%) of 391 dissected lymph node levels. There were no significant differences between PET/MR, MR and PET and MR (p > 0.05) regarding accuracy for cervical metastatic disease. Based on lymph node levels, sensitivity and specificity for metastatic involvement were 65.8% and 97.2% for MR, 86.8% and 97.0% for PET and 89.5% and 95.2% for PET/MR. Conclusions: In head and neck cancer, FDG PET/MR does not significantly improve accuracy for cervical lymph node metastases in comparison to MR or PET.

  19. Clinical Evaluation of Zero-Echo-Time Attenuation Correction for Brain 18F-FDG PET/MRI: Comparison with Atlas Attenuation Correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, Tetsuro; Ter Voert, Edwin E G W; Warnock, Geoffrey; Buck, Alfred; Huellner, Martin; Veit-Haibach, Patrick; Delso, Gaspar

    2016-12-01

    Accurate attenuation correction (AC) on PET/MR is still challenging. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical feasibility of AC based on fast zero-echo-time (ZTE) MRI by comparing it with the default atlas-based AC on a clinical PET/MR scanner.

  20. Extension and validation of an analytical model for in vivo PET verification of proton therapy--a phantom and clinical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Attanasi, F; Knopf, A; Parodi, K.; Paganetti, Harald; Bortfeld, Thomas; Rosso, V; Del Guerra, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    The interest in positron emission tomography (PET) as a tool for treatment verification in proton therapy has become widespread in recent years, and several research groups worldwide are currently investigating the clinical implementation. After the first off-line investigation with a PET/CT scanner

  1. Pets and the immunocompromised person

    Science.gov (United States)

    AIDS patients and pets; Bone marrow transplant patients and pets; Chemotherapy patients and pets ... systems may be advised to give up their pets to avoid getting diseases from the animals. People ...

  2. Laser Scanner For Automatic Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Fernando D.; Correia, Bento A.; Rebordao, Jose M.; Rodrigues, F. Carvalho

    1989-01-01

    The automated magazines are beeing used at industry more and more. One of the problems related with the automation of a Store House is the identification of the products envolved. Already used for stock management, the Bar Codes allows an easy way to identify one product. Applied to automated magazines, the bar codes allows a great variety of items in a small code. In order to be used by the national producers of automated magazines, a devoted laser scanner has been develloped. The Prototype uses an He-Ne laser whose beam scans a field angle of 75 degrees at 16 Hz. The scene reflectivity is transduced by a photodiode into an electrical signal, which is then binarized. This digital signal is the input of the decodifying program. The machine is able to see barcodes and to decode the information. A parallel interface allows the comunication with the central unit, which is responsible for the management of automated magazine.

  3. Non-Destructive Testing Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Bio-Imaging Research's technology that originated in an aerospace program has come full circle with a new aerospace adaptation called the Advanced Computed Tomography Inspection System, or ACTIS. The medical version of CT scans the human body for tumors or other abnormalities, the ACTIS system finds imperfections in aerospace structures and components, such as castings, assemblies, rocket motors and nozzles. ACTIS is described by its developer as the most versatile CT scanner available for non-destructive testing applications. ACTIS is a variable geometry system. ACTIS source and detectors can be moved closer together or farther apart to optimize the geometry for different sizes of test objects. The combination of variable geometry, three sources, and focusing detectors makes ACTIS cost effective for a broad range of applications. System can scan anything from very small turbine blades to large rocket assemblies.

  4. Optimization of Protocol CT, PET-CT, whole body; Optimizacion de protocolo CT, en PET-CT, de cuerpo entero

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, Fredys Santos, E-mail: fsantos@ccss.sa.cr [Caja Costarricense de Seguro Social (ACCPR/CCSS), San Jose (Costa Rica). Area Control de Calidade Y Proteccion Radiologica; Namias, Mauro, E-mail: mnamias@gmail.com [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (FCDN/CNEA), Buenos Aires (Argentina). Fundacion Centro Diagnostico Nuclear

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study was to optimize the acquisition protocols and processing existing of the CT PET/CT scanner for clinical use of Nuclear Diagnostic Center Foundation, a way to minimize the radiation dose while maintaining diagnostic image quality properly. Dosimetric data of PET / CT service were surveyed and obtained the baseline against which we compare and define strategies and modifications to develop online. We selected transaxial up to the pulmonary hilum and liver slices as the anatomical regions of interest that led to the standardization of the study.

  5. Establishment study of the in vivo imaging analysis with small animal imaging modalities (micro-PET and micro-SPECT/CT) for bio-drug development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Beomsu; Park, Sanghyeon; Park, Jeonghoon; Jo, Sungkee; Jung, Uhee; Kim, Seolwha; Lee, Yunjong; Choi, Daeseong

    2011-01-15

    In this study, we established the image acquisition and analysis procedures of micro-PET, SPECT/CT using the experimental animal (mouse) for the development of imaging assessment method for the bio-drug. We examined the micro-SPECT/CT, PET imaging study using the Siemens Inveon micro-multimodality system (SPECT/CT) and micro-PET with {sup 99m}Tc-MDP, DMSA, and {sup 18}F-FDG. SPECT imaging studies using 3 types of pinhole collimators. 5-MWB collimator was used for SPECT image study. To study whole-body distribution, {sup 99m}Tc-MDP SPECT image study was performed. We obtained the fine distribution image. And the CT images was obtained to provide the anatomical information. And then these two types images are fused. To study specific organ uptake, we examined {sup 99}mTc-DMSA SPECT/CT imaging study. We also performed the PET image study using U87MG tumor bearing mice and {sup 18}F-FDG. The overnight fasting, warming and anesthesia with 2% isoflurane pretreatment enhance the tumor image through reducing the background uptake including brown fat, harderian gland and skeletal muscles. Also we got the governmental approval for use of x-ray generator for CT and radioisotopes as sealed and open source. We prepared the draft of process procedure for the experimental animal imaging facility. These research results can be utilized as a basic image study protocols and data for the image assessment of drugs including biological drug.

  6. Optimization of the protocols for the use of contrast agents in PET/CT studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelegrí Martínez, L; Kohan, A A; Vercher Conejero, J L

    The introduction of PET/CT scanners in clinical practice in 1998 has improved care for oncologic patients throughout the clinical pathway, from the initial diagnosis of disease through the evaluation of the response to treatment to screening for possible recurrence. The CT component of a PET/CT study is used to correct the attenuation of PET studies; CT also provides anatomic information about the distribution of the radiotracer. CT is especially useful in situations where PET alone can lead to false positives and false negatives, and CT thereby improves the diagnostic performance of PET. The use of intravenous or oral contrast agents and optimal CT protocols have improved the detection and characterization of lesions. However, there are circumstances in which the systematic use of contrast agents is not justified. The standard acquisition in PET/CT scanners is the whole body protocol, but this can lead to artifacts due to the position of patients and respiratory movements between the CT and PET acquisitions. This article discusses these aspects from a constructive perspective with the aim of maximizing the diagnostic potential of PET/CT and providing better care for patients.

  7. 3D whole body scanners revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Haar, F.B. ter

    2013-01-01

    An overview of whole body scanners in 1998 (H.A.M. Daanen, G.J. Van De Water. Whole body scanners, Displays 19 (1998) 111-120) shortly after they emerged to the market revealed that the systems were bulky, slow, expensive and low in resolution. This update shows that new developments in sensing and

  8. Long-Range WindScanner System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vasiljevic, Nikola; Lea, Guillaume; Courtney, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The technical aspects of a multi-Doppler LiDAR instrument, the long-range WindScanner system, are presented accompanied by an overview of the results from several field campaigns. The long-range WindScanner system consists of three spatially-separated, scanning coherent Doppler LiDARs and a remot...

  9. Trends in PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, William W.

    2000-11-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging is a well established method for obtaining information on the status of certain organs within the human body or in animals. This paper presents an overview of recent trends PET instrumentation. Significant effort is being expended to develop new PET detector modules, especially those capable of measuring depth of interaction. This is aided by recent advances in scintillator and pixellated photodetector technology. The other significant area of effort is development of special purpose PET cameras (such as for imaging breast cancer or small animals) or cameras that have the ability to image in more than one modality (such as PET / SPECT or PET / X-Ray CT).

  10. Monitoring proton radiation therapy with in-room PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xuping; España, Samuel; Daartz, Juliane; Liebsch, Norbert; Ouyang, Jinsong; Paganetti, Harald; Bortfeld, Thomas R; El Fakhri, Georges

    2011-07-07

    We used a mobile positron emission tomography (PET) scanner positioned within the proton therapy treatment room to study the feasibility of proton range verification with an in-room, stand-alone PET system, and compared with off-line equivalent studies. Two subjects with adenoid cystic carcinoma were enrolled into a pilot study in which in-room PET scans were acquired in list-mode after a routine fractionated treatment session. The list-mode PET data were reconstructed with different time schemes to generate in-room short, in-room long and off-line equivalent (by skipping coincidences from the first 15 min during the list-mode reconstruction) PET images for comparison in activity distribution patterns. A phantom study was followed to evaluate the accuracy of range verification for different reconstruction time schemes quantitatively. The in-room PET has a higher sensitivity compared to the off-line modality so that the PET acquisition time can be greatly reduced from 30 to proton therapy. Better accuracy in Monte Carlo predictions, especially for biological decay modeling, is necessary.

  11. A simulation study of a C-shaped in-beam PET system for dose verification in carbon ion therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung An, Su; Beak, Cheol-Ha; Lee, Kisung; Hyun Chung, Yong

    2013-01-01

    The application of hadrons such as carbon ions is being developed for the treatment of cancer. The effectiveness of such a technique is due to the eligibility of charged particles in delivering most of their energy near the end of the range, called the Bragg peak. However, accurate verification of dose delivery is required since misalignment of the hadron beam can cause serious damage to normal tissue. PET scanners can be utilized to track the carbon beam to the tumor by imaging the trail of the hadron-induced positron emitters in the irradiated volume. In this study, we designed and evaluated (through Monte Carlo simulations) an in-beam PET scanner for monitoring patient dose in carbon beam therapy. A C-shaped PET and a partial-ring PET were designed to avoid interference between the PET detectors and the therapeutic carbon beam delivery. Their performance was compared with that of a full-ring PET scanner. The C-shaped, partial-ring, and full-ring scanners consisted of 14, 12, and 16 detector modules, respectively, with a 30.2 cm inner diameter for brain imaging. Each detector module was composed of a 13×13 array of 4.0 mm×4.0 mm×20.0 mm LYSO crystals and four round 25.4 mm diameter PMTs. To estimate the production yield of positron emitters such as 10C, 11C, and 15O, a cylindrical PMMA phantom (diameter, 20 cm; thickness, 20 cm) was irradiated with 170, 290, and 350 AMeV 12C beams using the GATE code. Phantom images of the three types of scanner were evaluated by comparing the longitudinal profile of the positron emitters, measured along the carbon beam as it passed a simulated positron emitter distribution. The results demonstrated that the development of a C-shaped PET scanner to characterize carbon dose distribution for therapy planning is feasible.

  12. Evaluating Commercial Scanners for Astronomical Image Digitization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simcoe, R. J.

    2009-08-01

    Many organizations have been interested in understanding if commercially available scanners are adequate for scientifically useful digitization. These scanners range in price from a few hundred to a few tens of thousands of dollars (USD), often with little apparent difference in performance specifications. This paper describes why the underlying technology used in flatbed scanners tends to effectively limit resolutions to the 600-1200 dots per inch (dpi) range and how the overall system Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) can be used to evaluate the quality of the digitized data for the small feature sizes found in astronomical images. Two scanners, the Epson V750 flatbed scanner and the Nikon Cool Scan 9000ED film strip scanner, are evaluated through their Modulation Transfer Functions (MTF). The MTF of the Harvard DASCH scanner is also shown for comparison. The particular goal of this evaluation was to understand if the scanners could be used for digitizing spectral plates at the University of Toronto. The plates of primary interest were about 15 mm (5/8 inch) wide by 180 mm (7~inches) long and ˜50 mm x 80 mm (2 x 3 inches). The results of the MTF work show that the Epson scanner, despite claims of high resolution, is of limited value for scientific imaging of feature sizes below about 50 μm and therefore not a good candidate for digitizing the spectral plates and problematic for scanning direct plates. The Nikon scanner is better and, except for some frustrating limitations in its software, its performance seems to hold promise as a digitizer for spectral plates in the University of Toronto collection.

  13. Uniformity studies inter cut with continuous movement PET stretcher; Homogeneidad intercorte de estudios PET con movimiento continuo de camila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cons Perez, N.; Gomez Gonzalez, N.; Garcia Repiso, S.; Hernandez Rodriguez, J.; Montes Fuentes, C.; Garcia Ledesma, J.; Diez Gallego, M. A.

    2015-07-01

    One of the latest advances in PET scanners is the introduction of acquisitions with continuous movement of stretcher (CBM) Among the benefits that this technology brings they are: lower axial variation of noise, greater flexibility in planning studies with different levels of statistics for different anatomical and greater patient comfort regions. Behavior unexpected because the concentration obtained in all CBMs studies with PET-CT scanner Biograph mCTFlow (Slemens Medica Solutions) we propose a quantitative analysis with a series of parameters chosen to assess the inhomogeneity between cuts in the concentration obtained by homogeneous mannequins. A comparison with studies of static bed (S and S) indicates a problem only mode dynamic bed. (Author)

  14. Strategy study of quantification harmonization of SUV in PET/CT images; Estudo da estrategia de harmonizacao da quantificacao do SUV em imagens de PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Andreia Caroline Fischer da Silveira

    2014-07-01

    In clinical practice, PET/CT images are often analyzed qualitatively by visual comparison of tumor lesions and normal tissues uptake; and semi-quantitatively by means of a parameter called SUV (Standardized Uptake Value). To ensure that longitudinal studies acquired on different scanners are interchangeable, and information of quantification is comparable, it is necessary to establish a strategy to harmonize the quantification of SUV. The aim of this study is to evaluate the strategy to harmonize the quantification of PET/CT images, performed with different scanner models and manufacturers. For this purpose, a survey of the technical characteristics of equipment and acquisition protocols of clinical images of different services of PET/CT in the state of Rio Grande do Sul was conducted. For each scanner, the accuracy of SUV quantification, and the Recovery Coefficient (RC) curves were determined, using the reconstruction parameters clinically relevant and available. From these data, harmonized performance specifications among the evaluated scanners were identified, as well as the algorithm that produces, for each one, the most accurate quantification. Finally, the most appropriate reconstruction parameters to harmonize the SUV quantification in each scanner, either regionally or internationally were identified. It was found that the RC values of the analyzed scanners proved to be overestimated by up to 38%, particularly for objects larger than 17mm. These results demonstrate the need for further optimization, through the reconstruction parameters modification, and even the change of the reconstruction algorithm used in each scanner. It was observed that there is a decoupling between the best image for PET/CT qualitative analysis and the best image for quantification studies. Thus, the choice of reconstruction method should be tied to the purpose of the PET/CT study in question, since the same reconstruction algorithm is not adequate, in one scanner, for qualitative

  15. PET functional volume delineation: a robustness and repeatability study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatt, Mathieu [CHU Morvan, INSERM, U650, LaTIM, Brest (France); CHU MORVAN, LaTIM, INSERM U650, Brest (France); Cheze-le Rest, Catherine [CHU Morvan, INSERM, U650, LaTIM, Brest (France); CHU, Academic Department of Nuclear Medicine, Brest (France); Albarghach, Nidal; Pradier, Olivier [CHU Morvan, INSERM, U650, LaTIM, Brest (France); CHU, Institute of Oncology, Brest (France); Visvikis, Dimitris [CHU Morvan, INSERM, U650, LaTIM, Brest (France)

    2011-04-15

    Current state-of-the-art algorithms for functional uptake volume segmentation in PET imaging consist of threshold-based approaches, whose parameters often require specific optimization for a given scanner and associated reconstruction algorithms. Different advanced image segmentation approaches previously proposed and extensively validated, such as among others fuzzy C-means (FCM) clustering, or fuzzy locally adaptive bayesian (FLAB) algorithm have the potential to improve the robustness of functional uptake volume measurements. The objective of this study was to investigate robustness and repeatability with respect to various scanner models, reconstruction algorithms and acquisition conditions. Robustness was evaluated using a series of IEC phantom acquisitions carried out on different PET/CT scanners (Philips Gemini and Gemini Time-of-Flight, Siemens Biograph and GE Discovery LS) with their associated reconstruction algorithms (RAMLA, TF MLEM, OSEM). A range of acquisition parameters (contrast, duration) and reconstruction parameters (voxel size) were considered for each scanner model, and the repeatability of each method was evaluated on simulated and clinical tumours and compared to manual delineation. For all the scanner models, acquisition parameters and reconstruction algorithms considered, the FLAB algorithm demonstrated higher robustness in delineation of the spheres with low mean errors (10%) and variability (5%), with respect to threshold-based methodologies and FCM. The repeatability provided by all segmentation algorithms considered was very high with a negligible variability of <5% in comparison to that associated with manual delineation (5-35%). The use of advanced image segmentation algorithms may not only allow high accuracy as previously demonstrated, but also provide a robust and repeatable tool to aid physicians as an initial guess in determining functional volumes in PET. (orig.)

  16. Leptospirosis and Pets

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bacterial Special Pathogens Branch (BSPB) BSPB Laboratory Submissions Pets Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Leptospirosis is ... that can affect human and animals, including your pets. All animals can potentially become infected with Leptospirosis. ...

  17. Heart PET scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nuclear medicine scan; Heart positron emission tomography; Myocardial PET scan ... A PET scan requires a small amount of radioactive material (tracer). This tracer is given through a vein (IV), ...

  18. Positron Emission Tomography (PET): Towards Time of Flight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karp, Joel (University of Pennsylvania)

    2004-09-29

    PET is a powerful imaging tool that is being used to study cancer, using a variety of tracers to measure physiological processes including glucose metabolism, cell proliferation, and hypoxia in tumor cells. As the utilization of PET has grown in the last several years, it has become clear that improved lesion detection and quantification are critical goals for cancer studies. Although physical performance of the current generation of PET scanners has improved recently, there are limitations especially for heavy patients where attenuation and scatter effects are increased. We are investigating new scintillation detectors, scanner designs, and image processing algorithms in order to overcome these limitations and improve performance. In particular, we are studying scanner designs that would incorporate scintillators with improved energy and timing resolution. Improved energy resolution helps to reduce scattered radiation, and improved timing resolution makes it feasible to incorporate the time-of-flight information between the two coincident gamma rays into the image reconstruction algorithm, a technique that improves signal-to-noise. Results of recent experiments and computer simulations will be shown to demonstrate these potential improvements.

  19. PET-CT for nuclear medicine diagnostics of multiple myeloma; PET-CT in der nuklearmedizinischen Diagnostik des multiplen Myeloms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, A. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Klinische Kooperationseinheit Nuklearmedizin, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-06-15

    Functional or morphofunctional imaging modalities are used in myeloma patients for the diagnosis and therapy management within research protocols. Despite new staging criteria, which take into account the viability of a myeloma lesion, positron emission tomography (PET) is not used routinely. The impact of PET is therefore open. The role of PET and PET computed tomography (PET-CT) for the diagnosis and therapy management is discussed. The use of PET with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) allows the measurement of viable myeloma lesions and correlates with the stage of disease. A negative FDG examination correlates with a better prognosis. Furthermore, the number of focal lesions as well as the whole functional volume of myeloma lesions in FDG have a prognostic impact. Several studies have demonstrated the impact of FDG for the assessment of therapy monitoring and show that FDG is an earlier indicator for therapy response as compared to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The CT component of the new hybrid systems allows the assessment of osteolytic lesions in CT and their viability in FDG. The combination of PET with an MRT scanner allows the simultaneous measurement of bone marrow infiltration, focal lesions and their viability. The use of modern hybrid scanners, such as PET-CT and PET-MRT facilitates the simultaneous measurement of viable myeloma lesions, osteolytic lesions and bone marrow infiltration in the whole body; therefore, it is expected that these imaging modalities will play a greater role both in diagnosis and therapy management. (orig.) [German] Funktionelle oder morphologisch-funktionelle bildgebende Verfahren werden in der Diagnostik und im Therapiemanagement des multiplen Myeloms (MM) primaer fuer wissenschaftliche Zwecke eingesetzt. Ein routinemaessiger klinischer Einsatz ist trotz neuer Stadieneinteilung nicht erfolgt. Die Wertigkeit der Positronenemissionstomographie (PET) ist noch offen. Die Rolle von PET und PET-CT fuer die Diagnostik und das

  20. Noise and physical limits to maximum resolution of PET images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herraiz, J.L.; Espana, S. [Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Vicente, E.; Vaquero, J.J.; Desco, M. [Unidad de Medicina y Cirugia Experimental, Hospital GU ' Gregorio Maranon' , E-28007 Madrid (Spain); Udias, J.M. [Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: jose@nuc2.fis.ucm.es

    2007-10-01

    In this work we show that there is a limit for the maximum resolution achievable with a high resolution PET scanner, as well as for the best signal-to-noise ratio, which are ultimately related to the physical effects involved in the emission and detection of the radiation and thus they cannot be overcome with any particular reconstruction method. These effects prevent the spatial high frequency components of the imaged structures to be recorded by the scanner. Therefore, the information encoded in these high frequencies cannot be recovered by any reconstruction technique. Within this framework, we have determined the maximum resolution achievable for a given acquisition as a function of data statistics and scanner parameters, like the size of the crystals or the inter-crystal scatter. In particular, the noise level in the data as a limitation factor to yield high-resolution images in tomographs with small crystal sizes is outlined. These results have implications regarding how to decide the optimal number of voxels of the reconstructed image or how to design better PET scanners.

  1. PET/MRI for Preoperative Planning in Patients with Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft Jakobsen, Annika; Jensen, Karl Erik; L�fgren, Johan;

    2013-01-01

    Clinical positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisition protocols may improve the evaluation of soft tissue sarcomas (STS) prior to surgical planning. We examined two patients with lower extremity STS using a Siemens Biograph mMR PET/MRI scanner and the glucose...... analogue 18F-fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG). We investigated clinically relevant tumor volumes and evaluated the relations to skeletal periosteum and nerve bundles. The patient scans suggest that FDG PET/MRI improved the edge detection, and invasion of tumor tissue into important adjacent anatomical structures...... planning, including radiation therapy planning in patients with STS....

  2. The pivotal role of FDG-PET/CT in modern medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hess, Søren; Blomberg, Björn Alexander; Zhu, Hongyun June;

    2014-01-01

    The technology behind positron emission tomography (PET) and the most widely used tracer, 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (FDG), were both conceived in the 1970s, but the latest decade has witnessed a rapid emergence of FDG-PET as an effective imaging technique. This is not least due to the emerg......The technology behind positron emission tomography (PET) and the most widely used tracer, 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (FDG), were both conceived in the 1970s, but the latest decade has witnessed a rapid emergence of FDG-PET as an effective imaging technique. This is not least due...... to the emergence of hybrid scanners combining PET with computed tomography (PET/CT). Molecular imaging has enormous potential for advancing biological research and patient care, and FDG-PET/CT is currently the most widely used technology in this domain. In this review, we discuss contemporary applications of FDG......-PET and FDG-PET/CT as well as novel developments in quantification and potential future indications including the emerging new modality PET/magnetic resonance imaging....

  3. PET Scanning Protocols for In-Situ Dose Delivery Verification of Proton Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buitenhuis, H.J.T.; Dendooven, P.; Biegun, A.K.; van der Borden, A.J.; Diblen, F.; van Goethem, M.-J.; van der Schaaf, A.A.; van t Veld, Aart; Brandenburg, S.

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography is so far the only method for in-vivo dose delivery verification in hadron therapy that is in clinical use. A PET scanner placed in the treatment position (in-situ) will be able to obtain the highest number of counts, as it minimizes the decay of the positron emitting

  4. Statistical image reconstruction methods in PET with compensation for missing data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinahan, P.E. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Fessler, J.A.; Karp, J.S.

    1996-12-31

    We present the results of combining volume imaging with the PENN-PET scanner with statistical image reconstruction methods such as the penalized weighted least squares (PWLS) method. The goal of this particular combination is to improve both classification and estimation tasks in PET imaging protocols where image quality is dominated by spatially-variant system responses and/or measurement statistics. The PENN-PET scanner has strongly spatially-varying system behavior due to its volume imaging design and the presence of detector gaps. Statistical methods are easily adapted to this scanner geometry, including the detector gaps, and have also been shown to have improved bias/variance trade-offs compared to the standard filtered-backprojection (FBP) reconstruction method. The PWLS method requires fewer iterations and may be more tolerant of errors in the system model than other statistical methods. We present results demonstrating the improvement in image quality for PWLS image reconstructions of data from the PENN-PET scanner.

  5. PET Scanning Protocols for In-Situ Dose Delivery Verification of Proton Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buitenhuis, H.J.T.; Dendooven, P.; Biegun, A.K.; van der Borden, A.J.; Diblen, F.; van Goethem, M.-J.; van der Schaaf, A.A.; van t Veld, Aart; Brandenburg, S.

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography is so far the only method for in-vivo dose delivery verification in hadron therapy that is in clinical use. A PET scanner placed in the treatment position (in-situ) will be able to obtain the highest number of counts, as it minimizes the decay of the positron emitting nu

  6. Isotope specific resolution recovery image reconstruction in high resolution PET imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kotasidis, Fotis A.; Angelis, Georgios I.; Anton-Rodriguez, Jose; Matthews, Julian C.; Reader, Andrew J.; Zaidi, Habib

    Purpose: Measuring and incorporating a scanner-specific point spread function (PSF) within image reconstruction has been shown to improve spatial resolution in PET. However, due to the short half-life of clinically used isotopes, other long-lived isotopes not used in clinical practice are used to

  7. Automatic Thresholding for Frame-Repositioning Using External Tracking in PET Brain Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Keller, Sune; Sibomana, Merence

    2010-01-01

    Motion correction (MC) in positron emission tomography (PET) brain imaging become of higher importance with increasing scanner resolution. Several motion correction methods have been suggested and so far the Polaris Vicra tracking system has been the preferred one for motion registration. We pres...

  8. A simulation study of a dual-plate in-room PET system for dose verification in carbon ion therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ze; Hu, Zheng-Guo; Chen, Jin-Da; Zhang, Xiu-Ling; Guo, Zhong-Yan; Xiao, Guo-Qing; Sun, Zhi-Yu; Huang, Wen-Xue; Wang, Jian-Song

    2014-08-01

    During carbon ion therapy, lots of positron emitters such as 11C, 15O, 10C are generated in irradiated tissues by nuclear reactions, and can be used to track the carbon beam in the tissue by a positron emission tomography (PET) scanner. In this study, an dual-plate in-room PET scanner has been designed and evaluated based on the GATE simulation platform to monitor patient dose in carbon ion therapy. The dual-plate PET is designed to avoid interference with the carbon beamline and with patient positioning. Its performance was compared with that of four-head and full-ring PET scanners. The dual-plate, four-head and full-ring PET scanners consisted of 30, 60, 60 detector modules, respectively, with a 36 cm distance between directly opposite detector modules for dose deposition measurements. Each detector module consisted of a 24×24 array of 2 mm×2 mm×18 mm LYSO pixels coupled to a Hamamatsu H8500 PMT. To estimate the production yield of positron emitters, a 10 cm×15 cm×15 cm cuboid PMMA phantom was irradiated with 172, 200, 250 MeV/u 12C beams. 3D images of the activity distribution measured by the three types of scanner are produced by an iterative reconstruction algorithm. By comparing the longitudinal profile of positron emitters along the carbon beam path, it is indicated that use of the dual-plate PET scanner is feasible for monitoring the dose distribution in carbon ion therapy.

  9. Automatic extraction of forward stroke volume using dynamic PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harms, Hans; Tolbod, Lars Poulsen; Hansson, Nils Henrik Stubkjær

    2015-01-01

    from PET data using cluster analysis. The first-pass peak was isolated by automatic extrapolation of the downslope of the TAC. FSV was calculated as the injected dose divided by the product of heart rate and the area under the curve of the first-pass peak. Gold standard FSV was measured using phase-contrast...... a dynamic 11 C-acetate PET scan on a Siemens Biograph TruePoint-64 PET/CT (scanner I). In addition, 10 subjects underwent both dynamic 15 O-water PET and 11 C-acetate PET scans on a GE Discovery-ST PET/CT (scanner II). The left ventricular (LV)-aortic time-activity curve (TAC) was extracted automatically.......001 for all). FSV based on 11 C-acetate and 15 O-water correlated highly (r = 0.99, slope = 1.03) with no significant difference between FSV estimates (p = 0.14). Conclusions FSV can be obtained automatically using dynamic PET/CT and cluster analysis. Results are almost identical for 11 C-acetate and 15 O...

  10. Radiation assessment to paediatric with F-18-FDG undergo whole-body PET/CT examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhalisa, H., E-mail: dhalisa82@gmail.com; Rafidah, Z. [Kluster Oncology Science and Radiology, Advanced Medical Dental Institute, Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM), Bertam, Penang (Malaysia); Mohamad, A. S. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, National Cancer Institute, No 4 Jalan P7, Presint 7, Putrajaya (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    This study was carried out on wholebody radiation dose assessment to paediatrics patient who undergo PET/CT scanner at Institut Kanser Negara. Consist of 68 patients with varies of malignancies and epilepsy disease case covering age between 2 years to 12 years old. This is a retrospective study from 2010-2014. The use of PET/CT scanner as an advanced tool has been proven to give an extra radiation dose to the patient. It is because of the radiation exposure from the combination of both CT and PET scans rather than a single CT or PET scan. Furthermore, a study on radiation dose to paediatric patient undergoing PET/CT is rare in Malaysia. So, the aim of this study is to estimate the wholebody effective dose to paediatric patient in Malaysia. Effective dose from PET scan was calculated based on the activity of F18 FDG and dose coefficient reported in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 106. Effective dose from CT was determined using k coefficient as reported in ICRP publication 102 and Dose Length Product (DLP) value. The average effective dose from PET and CT were found to be 7.05mSv and 5.77mSv respectively. The mean wholebody effective dose received by a patient with combined PETCT examination was 12.78mSv. These results could be used as reference for dosimetry of a patient undergoing PETCT examination in Malaysia.

  11. A Cross-Platform Smartphone Brain Scanner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jakob Eg; Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Stahlhut, Carsten

    We describe a smartphone brain scanner with a low-costwireless 14-channel Emotiv EEG neuroheadset interfacingwith multiple mobile devices. This personal informaticssystem enables minimally invasive and continuouscapturing of brain imaging data in natural settings. Thesystem applies an inverse...

  12. Simulation of a MR–PET protocol for staging of head-and-neck cancer including Dixon MR for attenuation correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eiber, Matthias, E-mail: matthias.eiber@tum.de [Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Souvatzoglou, Michael, E-mail: msouvatz@yahoo.de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Pickhard, Anja, E-mail: a.pickhard@lrz.tum.de [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Loeffelbein, Denys J., E-mail: denys.loeffelbein@gmx.de [Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Knopf, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.knopf@tum.de [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Holzapfel, Konstantin, E-mail: holzapfel@roe.med.tum.de [Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Martinez-Möller, Axel, E-mail: a.martinez-moller@lrz.tu-muenchen.de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); and others

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To simulate and optimize a MR protocol for squamous cell cancer of the head and neck (HNSCC) patients for potential future use in an integrated whole-body MR–PET scanner. Materials and methods: On a clinical 3T scanner, which is the basis for a recently introduced fully integrated whole-body MR–PET, 20 patients with untreated HNSCC routinely staged with 18F-FDG PET/CT underwent a dedicated MR protocol for the neck. Moreover, a whole-body Dixon MR-sequence was applied, which is used for attenuation correction on a recently introduced hybrid MR–PET scanner. In a subset of patients volume-interpolated-breathhold (VIBE) T1w-sequences for lungs and liver were added. Total imaging time was analyzed for both groups. The quality of the delineation of the primary tumor (scale 0–3) and the presence or absence of lymph node metastases (scale 1–5) was evaluated for CT, MR, PET/CT and a combination of MR and PET to ensure that the MR–PET fusion does not cause a loss of diagnostic capability. PET was used to identify distant metastases. The PET dataset for simulated MR/PET was based on a segmentation of the CT data into 4 classes according to the approach of the Dixon MR-sequence for MR–PET. Standard of reference was histopathology in 19 cases. In one case no histopathological confirmation of a primary tumor could be achieved. Results: Mean imaging time was 35:17 min (range: 31:08–42:42 min) for the protocol including sequences for local staging and attenuation correction and 44:17 min (range: 35:44–54:58) for the extended protocol. Although not statistically significant a combination of MR and PET performed better in the delineation of the primary tumor (mean 2.20) compared to CT (mean 1.40), MR (1.95) and PET/CT (2.15) especially in patients with dental implants. PET/CT and combining MR and PET performed slightly better than CT and MR for the assessment of lymph node metastases. Two patients with distant metastases were only identified by PET

  13. How flatbed scanners upset accurate film dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Battum, L J; Huizenga, H; Verdaasdonk, R M; Heukelom, S

    2016-01-21

    Film is an excellent dosimeter for verification of dose distributions due to its high spatial resolution. Irradiated film can be digitized with low-cost, transmission, flatbed scanners. However, a disadvantage is their lateral scan effect (LSE): a scanner readout change over its lateral scan axis. Although anisotropic light scattering was presented as the origin of the LSE, this paper presents an alternative cause. Hereto, LSE for two flatbed scanners (Epson 1680 Expression Pro and Epson 10000XL), and Gafchromic film (EBT, EBT2, EBT3) was investigated, focused on three effects: cross talk, optical path length and polarization. Cross talk was examined using triangular sheets of various optical densities. The optical path length effect was studied using absorptive and reflective neutral density filters with well-defined optical characteristics (OD range 0.2-2.0). Linear polarizer sheets were used to investigate light polarization on the CCD signal in absence and presence of (un)irradiated Gafchromic film. Film dose values ranged between 0.2 to 9 Gy, i.e. an optical density range between 0.25 to 1.1. Measurements were performed in the scanner's transmission mode, with red-green-blue channels. LSE was found to depend on scanner construction and film type. Its magnitude depends on dose: for 9 Gy increasing up to 14% at maximum lateral position. Cross talk was only significant in high contrast regions, up to 2% for very small fields. The optical path length effect introduced by film on the scanner causes 3% for pixels in the extreme lateral position. Light polarization due to film and the scanner's optical mirror system is the main contributor, different in magnitude for the red, green and blue channel. We concluded that any Gafchromic EBT type film scanned with a flatbed scanner will face these optical effects. Accurate dosimetry requires correction of LSE, therefore, determination of the LSE per color channel and dose delivered to the film.

  14. PET/CT Imaging in Mouse Models of Myocardial Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Gargiulo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Different species have been used to reproduce myocardial infarction models but in the last years mice became the animals of choice for the analysis of several diseases, due to their short life cycle and the possibility of genetic manipulation. Many techniques are currently used for cardiovascular imaging in mice, including X-ray computed tomography (CT, high-resolution ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, and nuclear medicine procedures. Cardiac positron emission tomography (PET allows to examine noninvasively, on a molecular level and with high sensitivity, regional changes in myocardial perfusion, metabolism, apoptosis, inflammation, and gene expression or to measure changes in anatomical and functional parameters in heart diseases. Currently hybrid PET/CT scanners for small laboratory animals are available, where CT adds high-resolution anatomical information. This paper reviews mouse models of myocardial infarction and discusses the applications of dedicated PET/CT systems technology, including animal preparation, anesthesia, radiotracers, and images postprocessing.

  15. Programmable electronics for low-cost small animal PET/SPECT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerra, Pedro [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, ETSI de Telecomunicacion, Madrid 28040 (Spain)]. E-mail: pguerra@die.upm.es; Rubio, Jose L. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, ETSI de Telecomunicacion, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Kontaxakis, Georgios [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, ETSI de Telecomunicacion, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Ortuno, Juan E. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, ETSI de Telecomunicacion, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Ledesma, Maria J. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, ETSI de Telecomunicacion, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Santos, Andres [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, ETSI de Telecomunicacion, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2006-12-20

    This work describes and characterizes the detector module of a novel positron/single photon emission (PET/SPECT) scanner for small animals. This detector consists of a YAP/LSO phoswich, a photomultiplier and acquisition front-end, and will be used as building block of a low-cost hybrid tomograph. The front-end processes data sampled at a fixed frequency, where a state-of-the-art programmable device estimates scintillation pulse parameters by means of digital algorithms. Finally, the estimated properties of the proposed detector module are used to model a rotating four-head scanner. The performance of the proposed PET/SPECT scanner is estimated and first results are promising in both modalities, deserving further research and optimization.

  16. Uncertainty Propagation for Terrestrial Mobile Laser Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezian, c.; Vallet, Bruno; Soheilian, Bahman; Paparoditis, Nicolas

    2016-06-01

    Laser scanners are used more and more in mobile mapping systems. They provide 3D point clouds that are used for object reconstruction and registration of the system. For both of those applications, uncertainty analysis of 3D points is of great interest but rarely investigated in the literature. In this paper we present a complete pipeline that takes into account all the sources of uncertainties and allows to compute a covariance matrix per 3D point. The sources of uncertainties are laser scanner, calibration of the scanner in relation to the vehicle and direct georeferencing system. We suppose that all the uncertainties follow the Gaussian law. The variances of the laser scanner measurements (two angles and one distance) are usually evaluated by the constructors. This is also the case for integrated direct georeferencing devices. Residuals of the calibration process were used to estimate the covariance matrix of the 6D transformation between scanner laser and the vehicle system. Knowing the variances of all sources of uncertainties, we applied uncertainty propagation technique to compute the variance-covariance matrix of every obtained 3D point. Such an uncertainty analysis enables to estimate the impact of different laser scanners and georeferencing devices on the quality of obtained 3D points. The obtained uncertainty values were illustrated using error ellipsoids on different datasets.

  17. Automatic extraction of forward stroke volume using dynamic 11C-acetate PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harms, Hans; Tolbod, Lars Poulsen; Hansson, Nils Henrik;

    , potentially introducing bias if measured with a separate modality. The aim of this study was to develop and validate methods for automatically extracting FSV directly from the dynamic PET used for measuring oxidative metabolism. Methods: 16 subjects underwent a dynamic 27 min PET scan on a Siemens Biograph...... TruePoint 64 PET/CT scanner after bolus injection of 399±27 MBq of 11C-acetate. The LV-aortic time-activity curve (TAC) was extracted automatically from dynamic PET data using cluster analysis. The first-pass peak was derived by automatic extrapolation of the down-slope of the TAC. FSV...... was then calculated as the injected dose divided by the product of heart rate and the area under the curve of the first-pass peak. Gold standard FSV was measured in the left ventricular outflow tract by cardiovascular magnetic resonance using phase-contrast velocity mapping within two weeks of PET imaging. Results...

  18. easyPET: a novel concept for an affordable tomographic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arosio, V.; Caccia, M.; Castro, I. F.; Correia, P. M. M.; Mattone, C.; Moutinho, L. M.; Santoro, R.; Silva, A. L. M.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.

    2017-02-01

    The easyPET concept described here aims to reduce complexity and cost of preclinical Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanners. The system, original in its principle and realisation, is based on a single pair of detectors and a rotating mechanism with two degrees of freedom reproducing the functionalities of an entire PET ring. The characterisation of a 2D imaging prototype, realised to assess the easyPET concept, is presented in this paper. In particular, a spatial resolution of 1±0.1 mm and a sensitivity of 0.1% with an energy threshold of 80 keV have been measured. These encouraging results, compared to the performances of commercial preclinical PET, motivate the feasibility study of a 3D system.

  19. Cyclotron-produced radioisotopes and their clinical use at the Austin PET Centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tochon-Danguy, H.J. [Centre for PET, Melbourne, VIC (Australia). Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre

    1997-12-31

    A Centre for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) has been established within the Department of Nuclear Medicine at the Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre in Melbourne. PET is a non-invasive technique based on the use of biologically relevant compounds labelled with short-lived positron-emitting radionuclides such as carbon-11, nitrogen-13, oxygen-15 and fluorine-18. The basic equipment consists of a medical cyclotron (10 MeV proton and 5 MeV deuteron), six lead-shielded hot cells with associated radiochemistry facilities and a whole body PET scanner. During its first five years of operation, the Melbourne PET Centre, has pursued a strong radiolabelling development program, leading to an ambitious clinical program in neurology, oncology and cardiology. This presentation will describe the basic principles of the PET technique and review the cyclotron-produced radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals. Radiolabelling development programs and clinical applications are also addressed. 30 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig.

  20. Design and performance evaluation of a coplanar multimodality scanner for rodent imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lage, E; Vaquero, J J; Sisniega, A; Tapias, G; Abella, M; Rodriguez-Ruano, A; Desco, M [Unidad de Medicina y Cirugia Experimental, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Madrid (Spain); Espana, S [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Complutense, Madrid (Spain); Ortuno, J E [Networking Research Center on Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine (CIBER-BBN), Zaragoza (Spain); Udias, A [Departamento de Estadistica e Investigacion Operativa, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Fuenlabrada (Spain)], E-mail: elage@mce.hggm.es

    2009-09-21

    This work reports on the development and performance evaluation of the VrPET/CT, a new multimodality scanner with coplanar geometry for in vivo rodent imaging. The scanner design is based on a partial-ring PET system and a small-animal CT assembled on a rotatory gantry without axial displacement between the geometric centers of both fields of view (FOV). We report on the PET system performance based on the NEMA NU-4 protocol; the performance characteristics of the CT component are not included herein. The accuracy of inter-modality alignment and the imaging capability of the whole system are also evaluated on phantom and animal studies. Tangential spatial resolution of PET images ranged between 1.56 mm at the center of the FOV and 2.46 at a radial offset of 3.5 cm. The radial resolution varies from 1.48 mm to 1.88 mm, and the axial resolution from 2.34 mm to 3.38 mm for the same positions. The energy resolution was 16.5% on average for the entire system. The absolute coincidence sensitivity is 2.2% for a 100-700 keV energy window with a 3.8 ns coincident window. The scatter fraction values for the same settings were 11.45% for a mouse-sized phantom and 23.26% for a rat-sized phantom. The peak noise equivalent count rates were also evaluated for those phantoms obtaining 70.8 kcps at 0.66 MBq/cc and 31.5 kcps at 0.11 MBq/cc, respectively. The accuracy of inter-modality alignment is below half the PET resolution, and the image quality of biological specimens agrees with measured performance parameters. The assessment presented in this study shows that the VrPET/CT system is a good performance small-animal imager, while the cost derived from a partial ring detection system is substantially reduced as compared with a full-ring PET tomograph.

  1. PET and PET-CT. State of the art and future prospects; PET e PET- TC. Stato dell'arte e prospettive future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanti, Stefano; Franchi, Roberto [Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna (Italy). U.O. di medicina legale; Battista, Giuseppe; Monetti, Nino; Canini, Romeo [Bologna Univ., Bologna (Italy). Dipartimento clinico di scienze radiologiche e istocitopatologiche

    2005-07-15

    Fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) enables the in vivo study of tissue metabolism, and thus is able to identify malignant tumours as hypermetabolic lesions by an increase in tracer uptake. Many papers have demonstrated both the relevant impact of FDG PET on staging of many cancers and the superior accuracy of the technique compared with conventional diagnostic methods for pre-treatment evaluation, therapy response evaluation and relapse identification. In particular PET was found useful in identifying lymph nodal and metastatic spread. thus altering patient management in more than 30% of cases. PET images, however, provide limited anatomical data, which in regions such as the head and neck, mediastinum and pelvic cavity is a significant drawback. The exact localization of lesions may also be difficult in some cases, on the basis of PET images alone. The introduction of combined PET-computed tomography (PET-CT) scanners enables the almost simultaneous acquisition of transmission and emission images, thus obtaining optimal fusion images in a very short time. PET-CT fusion images enable lesions to be located, reducing false positive studies and increasing accuracy; the overall duration of examination may also be reduced. On the basis of both literature data and our experience we established the clinical indications when PET-CT may be particularly useful, in comparison with PET alone. It should also be underlined that the use of PET-CT is almost mandatory for new traces such as C-choline and C-methionine; these new tracers may be applied for studying tumours not assessable with FDG, such as prostate cancer. In conclusion PET-CT is at present the most advanced method for metabolic imaging, and is capable of precisely localizing and assessing tumours; fusion images reduce false positive and inconclusive studies, thus increasing diagnostic accuracy. [Italian] La PET con FDG F-18 ha consentito di studiare il metabolismo dei tessuti in vivo e di

  2. Spatial resolution limits for the isotropic-3D PET detector X’tal cube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Eiji, E-mail: rush@nirs.go.jp; Tashima, Hideaki; Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Inadama, Naoko; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Murayama, Hideo; Yamaya, Taiga

    2013-11-11

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become a popular imaging method in metabolism, neuroscience, and molecular imaging. For dedicated human brain and small animal PET scanners, high spatial resolution is needed to visualize small objects. To improve the spatial resolution, we are developing the X’tal cube, which is our new PET detector to achieve isotropic 3D positioning detectability. We have shown that the X’tal cube can achieve 1 mm{sup 3} uniform crystal identification performance with the Anger-type calculation even at the block edges. We plan to develop the X’tal cube with even smaller 3D grids for sub-millimeter crystal identification. In this work, we investigate spatial resolution of a PET scanner based on the X’tal cube using Monte Carlo simulations for predicting resolution performance in smaller 3D grids. For spatial resolution evaluation, a point source emitting 511 keV photons was simulated by GATE for all physical processes involved in emission and interaction of positrons. We simulated two types of animal PET scanners. The first PET scanner had a detector ring 14.6 cm in diameter composed of 18 detectors. The second PET scanner had a detector ring 7.8 cm in diameter composed of 12 detectors. After the GATE simulations, we converted the interacting 3D position information to digitalized positions for realistic segmented crystals. We simulated several X’tal cubes with cubic crystals from (0.5 mm){sup 3} to (2 mm){sup 3} in size. Also, for evaluating the effect of DOI resolution, we simulated several X’tal cubes with crystal thickness from (0.5 mm){sup 3} to (9 mm){sup 3}. We showed that sub-millimeter spatial resolution was possible using cubic crystals smaller than (1.0 mm){sup 3} even with the assumed physical processes. Also, the weighted average spatial resolutions of both PET scanners with (0.5 mm){sup 3} cubic crystals were 0.53 mm (14.6 cm ring diameter) and 0.48 mm (7.8 cm ring diameter). For the 7.8 cm ring diameter, spatial

  3. Performance evaluation of Biograph PET/CT system based on Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Gao, Fei; Liu, Hua-Feng

    2010-10-01

    Combined lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) Biograph PET/CT is developed by Siemens Company and has been introduced into medical practice. There is no septa between the scintillator rings, the acquisition mode is full 3D mode. The PET components incorporate three rings of 48 detector blocks which comprises a 13×13 matrix of 4×4×20mm3 elements. The patient aperture is 70cm, the transversal field of view (FOV) is 58.5cm, and the axial field of view is 16.2cm. The CT components adopt 16 slices spiral CT scanner. The physical performance of this PET/CT scanner has been evaluated using Monte Carlo simulation method according to latest NEMA NU 2-2007 standard and the results have been compared with real experiment results. For PET part, in the center FOV the average transversal resolution is 3.67mm, the average axial resolution is 3.94mm, and the 3D-reconstructed scatter fraction is 31.7%. The sensitivities of the PET scanner are 4.21kcps/MBq and 4.26kcps/MBq at 0cm and 10cm off the center of the transversal FOV. The peak NEC is 95.6kcps at a concentration of 39.2kBq/ml. The spatial resolution of CT part is up to 1.12mm at 10mm off the center. The errors between simulated and real results are permitted.

  4. LOR-interleaving image reconstruction for PET imaging with fractional-crystal collimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yusheng; Matej, Samuel; Karp, Joel S.; Metzler, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become an important modality in medical and molecular imaging. However, in most PET applications, the resolution is still mainly limited by the physical crystal sizes or the detector’s intrinsic spatial resolution. To achieve images with better spatial resolution in a central region of interest (ROI), we have previously proposed using collimation in PET scanners. The collimator is designed to partially mask detector crystals to detect lines of response (LORs) within fractional crystals. A sequence of collimator-encoded LORs is measured with different collimation configurations. This novel collimated scanner geometry makes the reconstruction problem challenging, as both detector and collimator effects need to be modeled to reconstruct high-resolution images from collimated LORs. In this paper, we present a LOR-interleaving (LORI) algorithm, which incorporates these effects and has the advantage of reusing existing reconstruction software, to reconstruct high-resolution images for PET with fractional-crystal collimation. We also develop a 3D ray-tracing model incorporating both the collimator and crystal penetration for simulations and reconstructions of the collimated PET. By registering the collimator-encoded LORs with the collimator configurations, high-resolution LORs are restored based on the modeled transfer matrices using the non-negative least-squares method and EM algorithm. The resolution-enhanced images are then reconstructed from the high-resolution LORs using the MLEM or OSEM algorithm. For validation, we applied the LORI method to a small-animal PET scanner, A-PET, with a specially designed collimator. We demonstrate through simulated reconstructions with a hot-rod phantom and MOBY phantom that the LORI reconstructions can substantially improve spatial resolution and quantification compared to the uncollimated reconstructions. The LORI algorithm is crucial to improve overall image quality of collimated PET, which

  5. Monte Carlo based performance assessment of different animal PET architectures using pixellated CZT detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visvikis, D. [INSERM U650, LaTIM, University Hospital Medical School, F-29609 Brest (France)]. E-mail: Visvikis.Dimitris@univ-brest.fr; Lefevre, T. [INSERM U650, LaTIM, University Hospital Medical School, F-29609 Brest (France); Lamare, F. [INSERM U650, LaTIM, University Hospital Medical School, F-29609 Brest (France); Kontaxakis, G. [ETSI Telecomunicacion Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria, s/n 28040, Madrid (Spain); Santos, A. [ETSI Telecomunicacion Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria, s/n 28040, Madrid (Spain); Darambara, D. [Department of Physics, School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom)

    2006-12-20

    The majority of present position emission tomography (PET) animal systems are based on the coupling of high-density scintillators and light detectors. A disadvantage of these detector configurations is the compromise between image resolution, sensitivity and energy resolution. In addition, current combined imaging devices are based on simply placing back-to-back and in axial alignment different apparatus without any significant level of software or hardware integration. The use of semiconductor CdZnTe (CZT) detectors is a promising alternative to scintillators for gamma-ray imaging systems. At the same time CZT detectors have the potential properties necessary for the construction of a truly integrated imaging device (PET/SPECT/CT). The aims of this study was to assess the performance of different small animal PET scanner architectures based on CZT pixellated detectors and compare their performance with that of state of the art existing PET animal scanners. Different scanner architectures were modelled using GATE (Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission). Particular scanner design characteristics included an overall cylindrical scanner format of 8 and 24 cm in axial and transaxial field of view, respectively, and a temporal coincidence window of 8 ns. Different individual detector modules were investigated, considering pixel pitch down to 0.625 mm and detector thickness from 1 to 5 mm. Modified NEMA NU2-2001 protocols were used in order to simulate performance based on mouse, rat and monkey imaging conditions. These protocols allowed us to directly compare the performance of the proposed geometries with the latest generation of current small animal systems. Results attained demonstrate the potential for higher NECR with CZT based scanners in comparison to scintillator based animal systems.

  6. A simulation study of a dual-plate in-room PET system for dose verification in carbon ion therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Ze; Xiao, Guo-Qing; Chen, Jin-Da; Zhang, Xiu-Ling; Guo, Zhong-Yan; Sun, Zhi-Yu; Huang, Wen-Xue; Wang, Jian-Song

    2013-01-01

    Carbon ion therapy have the ability to overcome the limitation of convertional radiotherapy due to its most energy deposition in selective depth, usually called Bragg peak, which results in increased biological effectiness. During carbon ion therapy, lots positron emitters such as $^{11}$C, $^{15}$O, $^{10}$C are generated in irradiated tissues by nuclear reactions. Immediately after patient irradiation, PET scanners can be used to measure the spatial distribution of positron emitters, which can track the carbon beam to the tissue. In this study, we designed and evaluated an dual-plate in-room PET scanner to monitor patient dose in carbon ion therapy, which is based on GATE simulation platform. A dual-plate PET is designed to avoid interference with the carbon beam line and with patient positioning. Its performance was compared with that of four-head and full-ring PET scanners. The dual-plate, four-head and full-ring PET scanners consisted of 30, 60, 60 detector modules, respectively, with a 36 cm distance be...

  7. A model of the high count rate performance of NaI(Tl)-based PET detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wear, J.A.; Karp, J.S.; Freifelder, R. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Mankoff, D.A. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Muehllehner, G. [UGM Medical Systems, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1998-06-01

    A detailed model of the response of large-area NaI(Tl) detectors used in PET and their triggering and data acquisition electronics has been developed. This allows one to examine the limitations of the imaging system`s performance due to degradation in the detector performance from light pile-up and deadtime from triggering and event processing. Comparisons of simulation results to measurements from the HEAD PENN-PET scanner have been performed to validate the Monte Carlo model. The model was then used to predict improvements in the high count rate performance of the HEAD PENN-PET scanner using different signal integration times, light response functions, and detectors.

  8. Is there any maximum standardized uptake value variation among positron emission tomography scanners for mediastinal staging in non-small cell lung cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskender, Ilker; Kadioglu, Salih Zeki; Kosar, Altug; Atasalihi, Ali; Kir, Altan

    2011-06-01

    The maximum standardized uptake value (SUV(max)) varies among positron emission tomography-integrated computed tomography (PET/CT) centers in the staging of non-small cell lung cancer. We evaluated the ratio of the optimum SUV(max) cut-off for the lymph nodes to the median SUV(max) of the primary tumor (ratioSUV(max)) to determine SUV(max) variations between PET/CT scanners. The previously described PET predictive ratio (PPR) was also evaluated. PET/CT and mediastinoscopy and/or thoracotomy were performed on 337 consecutive patients between September 2005 and March 2009. Thirty-six patients were excluded from the study. The pathological results were correlated with the PET/CT findings. Histopathological examination was performed on 1136 N2 lymph nodes using 10 different PET/CT centers. The majority of patients (group A: 240) used the same PET/CT scanner at four different centers. Others patients were categorized as group B. The ratioSUV(max) for groups A and B was 0.18 and 0.22, respectively. The same ratio for centers 1, 2, 3 and 4 was 0.2, 0.21, 0.21, and 0.23, respectively. The optimal cut-off value of the PPR to predict mediastinal lymph node pathology for malignancy was 0.49 (likelihood ratio +2.02; sensitivity 70%, specificity 65%). We conclude that the ratioSUV(max) was similar for different scanners. Thus, SUV(max) is a valuable cut-off for comparing-centers.

  9. Geo-PET: A novel generic organ-pet for small animal organs and tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sensoy, Levent

    Reconstructed tomographic image resolution of small animal PET imaging systems is improving with advances in radiation detector development. However the trend towards higher resolution systems has come with an increase in price and system complexity. Recent developments in the area of solid-state photomultiplication devices like silicon photomultiplier arrays (SPMA) are creating opportunities for new high performance tools for PET scanner design. Imaging of excised small animal organs and tissues has been used as part of post-mortem studies in order to gain detailed, high-resolution anatomical information on sacrificed animals. However, this kind of ex-vivo specimen imaging has largely been limited to ultra-high resolution muCT. The inherent limitations to PET resolution have, to date, excluded PET imaging from these ex-vivo imaging studies. In this work, we leverage the diminishing physical size of current generation SPMA designs to create a very small, simple, and high-resolution prototype detector system targeting ex-vivo tomographic imaging of small animal organs and tissues. We investigate sensitivity, spatial resolution, and the reconstructed image quality of a prototype small animal PET scanner designed specifically for imaging of excised murine tissue and organs. We aim to demonstrate that a cost-effective silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) array based design with thin crystals (2 mm) to minimize depth of interaction errors might be able to achieve sub-millimeter resolution. We hypothesize that the substantial decrease in sensitivity associated with the thin crystals can be compensated for with increased solid angle detection, longer acquisitions, higher activity and wider acceptance energy windows (due to minimal scatter from excised organs). The constructed system has a functional field of view (FoV) of 40 mm diameter, which is adequate for most small animal specimen studies. We perform both analytical (3D-FBP) and iterative (ML-EM) methods in order to

  10. MEMS temperature scanner: principles, advances, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Thomas; Saupe, Ray; Stock, Volker; Gessner, Thomas

    2010-02-01

    Contactless measurement of temperatures has gained enormous significance in many application fields, ranging from climate protection over quality control to object recognition in public places or military objects. Thereby measurement of linear or spatially temperature distribution is often necessary. For this purposes mostly thermographic cameras or motor driven temperature scanners are used today. Both are relatively expensive and the motor drive devices are limited regarding to the scanning rate additionally. An economic alternative are temperature scanner devices based on micro mirrors. The micro mirror, attached in a simple optical setup, reflects the emitted radiation from the observed heat onto an adapted detector. A line scan of the target object is obtained by periodic deflection of the micro scanner. Planar temperature distribution will be achieved by perpendicularly moving the target object or the scanner device. Using Planck radiation law the temperature of the object is calculated. The device can be adapted to different temperature ranges and resolution by using different detectors - cooled or uncooled - and parameterized scanner parameters. With the basic configuration 40 spatially distributed measuring points can be determined with temperatures in a range from 350°C - 1000°C. The achieved miniaturization of such scanners permits the employment in complex plants with high building density or in direct proximity to the measuring point. The price advantage enables a lot of applications, especially new application in the low-price market segment This paper shows principle, setup and application of a temperature measurement system based on micro scanners working in the near infrared range. Packaging issues and measurement results will be discussed as well.

  11. FIRST: Fast Iterative Reconstruction Software for (PET) tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herraiz, J L [Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Espana, S [Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Vaquero, J J [Unidad de Medicina y CirugIa Experimental, Hospital GU Gregorio Maranon, Madrid (Spain); Desco, M [Unidad de Medicina y CirugIa Experimental, Hospital GU Gregorio Maranon, Madrid (Spain); UdIas, J M [Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain)

    2006-09-21

    Small animal PET scanners require high spatial resolution and good sensitivity. To reconstruct high-resolution images in 3D-PET, iterative methods, such as OSEM, are superior to analytical reconstruction algorithms, although their high computational cost is still a serious drawback. The higher performance of modern computers could make iterative image reconstruction fast enough to be viable, provided we are able to deal with the large number of probability coefficients for the system response matrix in high-resolution PET scanners, which is a difficult task that prevents the algorithms from reaching peak computing performance. Considering all possible axial and in-plane symmetries, as well as certain quasi-symmetries, we have been able to reduce the memory requirements to store the system response matrix (SRM) well below 1 GB, which allows us to keep the whole response matrix of the system inside RAM of ordinary industry-standard computers, so that the reconstruction algorithm can achieve near peak performance. The elements of the SRM are stored as cubic spline profiles and matched to voxel size during reconstruction. In this way, the advantages of 'on-the-fly' calculation and of fully stored SRM are combined. The on-the-fly part of the calculation (matching the profile functions to voxel size) of the SRM accounts for 10-30% of the reconstruction time, depending on the number of voxels chosen. We tested our approach with real data from a commercial small animal PET scanner. The results (image quality and reconstruction time) show that the proposed technique is a feasible solution.

  12. {sup 18}F-FDG PET in children with lymphomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depas, Gisele; Barsy, Caroline De; Foidart, Jacqueline; Rigo, Pierre; Hustinx, Roland [University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Liege (Belgium); Jerusalem, Guy [University Hospital, Division of Medical Oncology, Liege (Belgium); Hoyoux, Claire; Dresse, Marie-Francoise [CHR Citadelle, Division of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Liege (Belgium); Fassotte, Marie-France [University Hospital, Division of Hematology, Liege (Belgium); Paquet, Nancy [Hotel de Dieu, Levis, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Quebec (Canada)

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the performance of positron emission tomography (PET) with {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) in children with lymphomas, at various stages of their disease. Twenty-eight children (mean age 12.5 years, 14 girls, 14 boys) with Hodgkin's disease (HD, n=17) or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL, n=11) were evaluated. Patients were investigated at initial staging (n=19), early in the course of treatment (n=19), at the end of treatment (n=16) and during long-term follow-up (n=19). A total of 113 whole-body PET studies were performed on dedicated scanners. PET results were compared with the results of conventional methods (CMs) such as physical examination, laboratory studies, chest X-rays, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasonography and bone scan when available. At initial evaluation (group 1), PET changed the disease stage and treatment in 10.5% of the cases. In early evaluation of the response to treatment (group 2), PET failed to predict two relapses and one incomplete response to treatment. In this group, however, PET did not show any false positive results. There were only 4/75 false positive results for PET among patients studied at the end of treatment (group 3, specificity 94%) or during the systematic follow-up (group 4, specificity 95%), as compared with 27/75 for CMs (specificity 54% and 66%, respectively). {sup 18}F-FDG-PET is a useful tool for evaluating children with lymphomas. Large prospective studies are needed to appreciate its real impact on patient management. (orig.)

  13. Disaster Preparedness for Your Pet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and prepare a disaster kit for your pet. Leaving pets out of evacuation plans can put pets, ... during an evacuation Contact your local emergency management office and ask if they offer accommodations for owners ...

  14. Sensory analysis of pet foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppel, Kadri

    2014-08-01

    Pet food palatability depends first and foremost on the pet and is related to the pet food sensory properties such as aroma, texture and flavor. Sensory analysis of pet foods may be conducted by humans via descriptive or hedonic analysis, pets via acceptance or preference tests, and through a number of instrumental analysis methods. Sensory analysis of pet foods provides additional information on reasons behind palatable and unpalatable foods as pets lack linguistic capabilities. Furthermore, sensory analysis may be combined with other types of information such as personality and environment factors to increase understanding of acceptable pet foods. Most pet food flavor research is proprietary and, thus, there are a limited number of publications available. Funding opportunities for pet food studies would increase research and publications and this would help raise public awareness of pet food related issues. This mini-review addresses current pet food sensory analysis literature and discusses future challenges and possibilities.

  15. PET studies in epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Sarikaya, Ismet

    2015-01-01

    Various PET studies, such as measurements of glucose, serotonin and oxygen metabolism, cerebral blood flow and receptor bindings are availabe for epilepsy. 18Fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET imaging of brain glucose metabolism is a well established and widely available technique. Studies have demonstrated that the sensitivity of interictal FDG-PET is higher than interictal SPECT and similar to ictal SPECT for the lateralization and localization of epileptogenic foci in presurgical patients...

  16. Specific recommendations for accurate and direct use of PET-CT in PET guided radiotherapy for head and neck sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, C. M., E-mail: christopher.thomas@gstt.nhs.uk; Convery, D. J.; Greener, A. G. [Guy' s and St. Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, Medical Physics Department, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom); Pike, L. C.; Baker, S.; Woods, E. [Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King' s College London, King' s Health Partners, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom); Hartill, C. E. [Guy' s and St. Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, Radiotherapy, Clinical Outpatients Clinic, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-15

    techniques, laser positioning may affect setup accuracy and couch deflection may be greater than scanners dedicated to radiotherapy. The full set of departmental commissioning and routine quality assurance tests applied to radiotherapy CT simulators must be carried out on the PET-CT scanner. CT image quality must be optimized for radiotherapy planning whilst understanding that the appearance will differ between scanners and may affect delineation. PET-CT quality assurance schedules will need to be added to and modified to incorporate radiotherapy quality assurance. Methods of working for radiotherapy and PET staff will change to take into account considerations of both parties. PET to CT alignment must be subject to quality control on a loaded and unloaded couch preferably using a suitable emission phantom, and tested throughout the whole data pathway. Data integrity must be tested throughout the whole pathway and a system included to verify that delineated structures are transferred correctly. Excellent multidisciplinary team communication and working is vital, and key staff members on both sides should be specifically dedicated to the project. Patient pathway should be clearly devised to optimize patient care and the resources of all departments. Recruitment of a cohort of patients into a methodology study is valuable to test the quality assurance methods and pathway.

  17. Clinical PET application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sang Moo; Hong, Song W.; Choi, Chang W.; Yang, Seong Dae [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea)

    1997-12-01

    PET gives various methabolic images, and is very important, new diagnostic modality in clinical oncology. In Korea Cancer Center Hospital, PET is installed as a research tool of long-mid-term atomic research project. For the efficient use of PET for clinical and research projects, income from the patients should be managed to get the raw material, equipment, manpower, and also for the clinical PET research. 1. Support the clinical application of PET in oncology. 2. Budgetary management of income, costs for raw material, equipment, manpower, and the clinical PET research project. In this year, 250 cases of PET images were obtained, which resulted total income of 180,000,000 won. 50,000,000 won was deposited for the 1998 PET clinical research. Second year PET clinical research should be managed under unified project. Increased demand for {sup 18}FDG in and outside KCCH need more than 2 times production of {sup 18}FDG in a day purchase of HPLC pump and {sup 68}Ga pin source which was delayed due to economic crisis, should be done early in 1998. (author). 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Comparison of (18)F-FET PET and perfusion-weighted MRI for glioma grading: a hybrid PET/MR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verger, Antoine; Filss, Christian P; Lohmann, Philipp; Stoffels, Gabriele; Sabel, Michael; Wittsack, Hans J; Kops, Elena Rota; Galldiks, Norbert; Fink, Gereon R; Shah, Nadim J; Langen, Karl-Josef

    2017-08-22

    Both perfusion-weighted MR imaging (PWI) and O-(2-(18)F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine PET ((18)F-FET) provide grading information in cerebral gliomas. The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic value of (18)F-FET PET and PWI for tumor grading in a series of patients with newly diagnosed, untreated gliomas using an integrated PET/MR scanner. Seventy-two patients with untreated gliomas [22 low-grade gliomas (LGG), and 50 high-grade gliomas (HGG)] were investigated with (18)F-FET PET and PWI using a hybrid PET/MR scanner. After visual inspection of PET and PWI maps (rCBV, rCBF, MTT), volumes of interest (VOIs) with a diameter of 16 mm were centered upon the maximum of abnormality in the tumor area in each modality and the contralateral unaffected hemisphere. Mean and maximum tumor-to-brain ratios (TBRmean, TBRmax) were calculated. In addition, Time-to-Peak (TTP) and slopes of time-activity curves were calculated for (18)F-FET PET. Diagnostic accuracies of (18)F-FET PET and PWI for differentiating low-grade glioma (LGG) from high-grade glioma (HGG) were evaluated by receiver operating characteristic analyses (area under the curve; AUC). The diagnostic accuracy of (18)F-FET PET and PWI to discriminate LGG from HGG was similar with highest AUC values for TBRmean and TBRmax of (18)F-FET PET uptake (0.80, 0.83) and for TBRmean and TBRmax of rCBV (0.80, 0.81). In case of increased signal in the tumor area with both methods (n = 32), local hot-spots were incongruent in 25 patients (78%) with a mean distance of 10.6 ± 9.5 mm. Dynamic FET PET and combination of different parameters did not further improve diagnostic accuracy. Both (18)F-FET PET and PWI discriminate LGG from HGG with similar diagnostic performance. Regional abnormalities in the tumor area are usually not congruent indicating that tumor grading by (18)F-FET PET and PWI is based on different pathophysiological phenomena.

  19. Performance comparison of two resolution modeling PET reconstruction algorithms in terms of physical figures of merit used in quantitative imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheoud, R; Ferrando, O; Valzano, S; Lizio, D; Sacchetti, G; Ciarmiello, A; Foppiano, F; Brambilla, M

    2015-07-01

    Resolution modeling (RM) of PET systems has been introduced in iterative reconstruction algorithms for oncologic PET. The RM recovers the loss of resolution and reduces the associated partial volume effect. While these methods improved the observer performance, particularly in the detection of small and faint lesions, their impact on quantification accuracy still requires thorough investigation. The aim of this study was to characterize the performances of the RM algorithms under controlled conditions simulating a typical (18)F-FDG oncologic study, using an anthropomorphic phantom and selected physical figures of merit, used for image quantification. Measurements were performed on Biograph HiREZ (B_HiREZ) and Discovery 710 (D_710) PET/CT scanners and reconstructions were performed using the standard iterative reconstructions and the RM algorithms associated to each scanner: TrueX and SharpIR, respectively. RM determined a significant improvement in contrast recovery for small targets (≤17 mm diameter) only for the D_710 scanner. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) increased when RM was applied using both scanners. The SUVmax of small targets was on average lower with the B_HiREZ than with the D_710. Sharp IR improved the accuracy of SUVmax determination, whilst TrueX showed an overestimation of SUVmax for sphere dimensions greater than 22 mm. The goodness of fit of adaptive threshold algorithms worsened significantly when RM algorithms were employed for both scanners. Differences in general quantitative performance were observed for the PET scanners analyzed. Segmentation of PET images using adaptive threshold algorithms should not be undertaken in conjunction with RM reconstructions. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Manually operated small envelope scanner system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sword, Charles Keith

    2017-04-18

    A scanner system and method for acquisition of position-based ultrasonic inspection data are described. The scanner system includes an inspection probe and a first non-contact linear encoder having a first sensor and a first scale to track inspection probe position. The first sensor is positioned to maintain a continuous non-contact interface between the first sensor and the first scale and to maintain a continuous alignment of the first sensor with the inspection probe. The scanner system may be used to acquire two-dimensional inspection probe position data by including a second non-contact linear encoder having a second sensor and a second scale, the second sensor positioned to maintain a continuous non-contact interface between the second sensor and the second scale and to maintain a continuous alignment of the second sensor with the first sensor.

  1. A flexible and wearable terahertz scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, D.; Oda, S.; Kawano, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Imaging technologies based on terahertz (THz) waves have great potential for use in powerful non-invasive inspection methods. However, most real objects have various three-dimensional curvatures and existing THz technologies often encounter difficulties in imaging such configurations, which limits the useful range of THz imaging applications. Here, we report the development of a flexible and wearable THz scanner based on carbon nanotubes. We achieved room-temperature THz detection over a broad frequency band ranging from 0.14 to 39 THz and developed a portable THz scanner. Using this scanner, we performed THz imaging of samples concealed behind opaque objects, breakages and metal impurities of a bent film and multi-view scans of a syringe. We demonstrated a passive biometric THz scan of a human hand. Our results are expected to have considerable implications for non-destructive and non-contact inspections, such as medical examinations for the continuous monitoring of health conditions.

  2. Metal Optics For Laser Profile Scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klauke, T.; Hock, F.

    1987-01-01

    Laser scanners are a valuable tool for qualitiy control in hostile hot and vibrating environments. Their high measuring speed allows time minimisation of disturbing influences. The loss of accuracy of systems due to thermal distortion could be minimised by designing mechanical-optical systems with low temperature gradients and small differences between thermal expansions of the components. For application in the forging production a laser scanner measuring in situ a series of profile lines describing the hot forging tools has been designed using aluminium for all distortion sensitive mechanical and optical components.

  3. Triple-head gamma camera PET: system overview and performance characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosev, D; Loncarić, S; Vandenberghe, S; Dodig, D

    2002-08-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is currently performed using either a dedicated PET scanner or scintillation gamma camera equipped with electronic circuitry for coincidence detection of 511 keV annihilation quanta (gamma camera PET system). Although the resolution limits of these two instruments are comparable, the sensitivity and count rate performance of the gamma camera PET system are several times lower than that of the PET scanner. Most gamma camera PET systems are manufactured as dual-detector systems capable of performing dual-head coincidence imaging. One possible step towards the improvement of the sensitivity of the gamma camera PET system is to add another detector head. This work investigates the characteristics of one such triple-head gamma camera PET system capable of performing triple-head coincidence imaging. The following performance characteristics of the system were assessed: spatial resolution, sensitivity, count rate performance. The spatial resolution, expressed as the full width at half-maximum (FWHM), at 1 cm radius is 5.9 mm; at 10 cm radius, the transverse radial resolution is 5.3 mm, whilst the transverse tangential and axial resolutions are 8.9 mm and 13.3 mm, respectively. The sensitivity for a standard cylindrical phantom is 255 counts.s(-1).MBq*(-1)), using a 30% width photopeak energy window. An increase of 35% in the PET sensitivity is achievable by opening an additional 30% width energy window in the Compton region. The count rate in coincidence mode, at the upper limit of the systems optimal performance, is 45 kc.s(-1) (kc=kilocounts) using the photopeak energy window only, and increases to 60 kc.s(-1) using the photopeak + Compton windows. Sensitivity results are compared with published data for a similar dual-head detector system.

  4. TOTAL-BODY PET: MAXIMIZING SENSITIVITY TO CREATE NEW OPPORTUNITIES FOR CLINICAL RESEARCH AND PATIENT CARE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Simon R; Jones, Terry; Karp, Joel S; Qi, Jinyi; Moses, William; Badawi, Ramsey

    2017-09-21

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is widely considered as the most sensitive technique available for non-invasively studying physiology, metabolism and molecular pathways in the living human being. However, the utility of PET, being a photon deficient modality, remains constrained by factors including low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), long imaging times and concerns regarding radiation dose. Two developments offer the potential to dramatically increase the effective sensitivity of PET. First by increasing the geometric coverage to encompass the entire body, sensitivity can be increased by a factor of ~40 for total-body imaging or a factor of ~4-5 for imaging a single organ such as the brain or heart. The world's first total-body PET/computerized tomography (CT) scanner is currently under construction to demonstrate how this step change in sensitivity impacts the way PET is utilized both in clinical research and patient care. Second, there is the future prospect of significant improvements in timing resolution that could lead to further effective sensitivity gains. When combined with total-body PET, this could produce overall sensitivity gains of more than two orders of magnitude compared to existing state-of-the-art systems. In this article we discuss the benefits of increasing body coverage, describe our efforts to develop a first-generation total-body PET/CT scanner, discuss selected application areas for total-body PET and project the impact of further improvements in time-of-flight (TOF) PET. Copyright © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  5. Exact rebinning methods for three-dimensional PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X; Defrise, M; Michel, C; Sibomana, M; Comtat, C; Kinahan, P; Townsend, D

    1999-08-01

    The high computational cost of data processing in volume PET imaging is still hindering the routine application of this successful technique, especially in the case of dynamic studies. This paper describes two new algorithms based on an exact rebinning equation, which can be applied to accelerate the processing of three-dimensional (3-D) PET data. The first algorithm, FOREPROJ, is a fast-forward projection algorithm that allows calculation of the 3-D attenuation correction factors (ACF's) directly from a two-dimensional (2-D) transmission scan, without first reconstructing the attenuation map and then performing a 3-D forward projection. The use of FOREPROJ speeds up the estimation of the 3-D ACF's by more than a factor five. The second algorithm, FOREX, is a rebinning algorithm that is also more than five times faster, compared to the standard reprojection algorithm (3DRP) and does not suffer from the image distortions generated by the even faster approximate Fourier rebinning (FORE) method at large axial apertures. However, FOREX is probably not required by most existing scanners, as the axial apertures are not large enough to show improvements over FORE with clinical data. Both algorithms have been implemented and applied to data simulated for a scanner with a large axial aperture (30 degrees), and also to data acquired with the ECAT HR and the ECAT HR+ scanners. Results demonstrate the excellent accuracy achieved by these algorithms and the important speedup when the sinogram sizes are powers of two.

  6. PET: the importance of physicists for the clinical arena

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    David Townsend giving a seminar at CERN on 9 February. The past few years have seen significant advances in the development of instrumentation for Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The recent appearance of combined PET and Computed Tomography (CT) scanners that can simultaneously image both anatomy and function is of particular importance. This was the main subject of "Advances in PET imaging: from physics to physician", a seminar presented at CERN by David Townsend on Wednesday 9 February  and organized by the TT and PH groups. David Townsend, who started his career at CERN in the 1970s, is now Professor at the Department of Medicine, University of Tennessee Medical Center (Knoxville, TN). Recipient of the 2004 Clinical Scientist of the Year Award, he is an internationally renowned researcher and PET physicist, with over 25 years of experience in the field. His 1999 image of the year, an award from the Society of Nuclear Medicine in the US, was produced using a combined state-of-the art PET and a true d...

  7. A unified Fourier theory for time-of-flight PET data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yusheng; Matej, Samuel; Metzler, Scott D.

    2016-01-01

    Fully 3D time-of-flight (TOF) PET scanners offer the potential of previously unachievable image quality in clinical PET imaging. TOF measurements add another degree of redundancy for cylindrical PET scanners and make photon-limited TOF-PET imaging more robust than non-TOF PET imaging. The data space for 3D TOF-PET data is five-dimensional with two degrees of redundancy. Previously, consistency equations were used to characterize the redundancy of TOF-PET data. In this paper, we first derive two Fourier consistency equations and Fourier-John equation for 3D TOF PET based on the generalized projection-slice theorem; the three partial differential equations (PDEs) are the dual of the sinogram consistency equations and John’s equation. We then solve the three PDEs using the method of characteristics. The two degrees of entangled redundancy of the TOF-PET data can be explicitly elicited and exploited by the solutions of the PDEs along the characteristic curves, which gives a complete understanding of the rich structure of the 3D x-ray transform with TOF measurement. Fourier rebinning equations and other mapping equations among different types of PET data are special cases of the general solutions. We also obtain new Fourier rebinning and consistency equations (FORCEs) from other special cases of the general solutions, and thus we obtain a complete scheme to convert among different types of PET data: 3D TOF, 3D non-TOF, 2D TOF and 2D non-TOF data. The new FORCEs can be used as new Fourier-based rebinning algorithms for TOF-PET data reduction, inverse rebinnings for designing fast projectors, or consistency conditions for estimating missing data. Further, we give a geometric interpretation of the general solutions—the two families of characteristic curves can be obtained by respectively changing the azimuthal and co-polar angles of the biorthogonal coordinates in Fourier space. We conclude the unified Fourier theory by showing that the Fourier consistency equations

  8. A unified Fourier theory for time-of-flight PET data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yusheng; Matej, Samuel; Metzler, Scott D

    2016-01-21

    Fully 3D time-of-flight (TOF) PET scanners offer the potential of previously unachievable image quality in clinical PET imaging. TOF measurements add another degree of redundancy for cylindrical PET scanners and make photon-limited TOF-PET imaging more robust than non-TOF PET imaging. The data space for 3D TOF-PET data is five-dimensional with two degrees of redundancy. Previously, consistency equations were used to characterize the redundancy of TOF-PET data. In this paper, we first derive two Fourier consistency equations and Fourier-John equation for 3D TOF PET based on the generalized projection-slice theorem; the three partial differential equations (PDEs) are the dual of the sinogram consistency equations and John's equation. We then solve the three PDEs using the method of characteristics. The two degrees of entangled redundancy of the TOF-PET data can be explicitly elicited and exploited by the solutions of the PDEs along the characteristic curves, which gives a complete understanding of the rich structure of the 3D x-ray transform with TOF measurement. Fourier rebinning equations and other mapping equations among different types of PET data are special cases of the general solutions. We also obtain new Fourier rebinning and consistency equations (FORCEs) from other special cases of the general solutions, and thus we obtain a complete scheme to convert among different types of PET data: 3D TOF, 3D non-TOF, 2D TOF and 2D non-TOF data. The new FORCEs can be used as new Fourier-based rebinning algorithms for TOF-PET data reduction, inverse rebinnings for designing fast projectors, or consistency conditions for estimating missing data. Further, we give a geometric interpretation of the general solutions--the two families of characteristic curves can be obtained by respectively changing the azimuthal and co-polar angles of the biorthogonal coordinates in Fourier space. We conclude the unified Fourier theory by showing that the Fourier consistency equations are

  9. My Pet Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lark, Adam; Kramp, Robyne; Nurnberger-Haag, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Many teachers and students have experienced the classic pet rock experiment in conjunction with a geology unit. A teacher has students bring in a "pet" rock found outside of school, and the students run geologic tests on the rock. The tests include determining relative hardness using Mohs scale, checking for magnetization, and assessing luster.…

  10. My Pet Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lark, Adam; Kramp, Robyne; Nurnberger-Haag, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Many teachers and students have experienced the classic pet rock experiment in conjunction with a geology unit. A teacher has students bring in a "pet" rock found outside of school, and the students run geologic tests on the rock. The tests include determining relative hardness using Mohs scale, checking for magnetization, and assessing luster.…

  11. Mobile PET Center Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhikova, O.; Naumov, N.; Sergienko, V.; Kostylev, V.

    2017-01-01

    Positron emission tomography is the most promising technology to monitor cancer and heart disease treatment. Stationary PET center requires substantial financial resources and time for construction and equipping. The developed mobile solution will allow introducing PET technology quickly without major investments.

  12. Usage of Recycled Pet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ebru Tayyar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing industrialization, urbanization and the technological development have caused to increase depletion of the natural resources and environmental pollution's problem. Especially, for the countries which have not enough space recycling of the waste eliminating waste on regular basis or decreasing the amount and volume of waste have provided the important advantages. There are lots of studies and projects to develop both protect resources and prevent environmental pollution. PET bottles are commonly used in beverage industry and can be reused after physical and chemical recycling processes. Usage areas of recycled PET have been developed rapidly. Although recycled PET is used in plastic industry, composite industry also provides usage alternatives of recycled PET. Textile is a suitable sector for recycling of some plastics made of polymers too. In this study, the recycling technologies and applications of waste PET bottles have been investigated and scientific works in this area have been summarized.

  13. Development and evaluation of a practical method to measure the Depth of Interaction function for a single side readout PET detector

    CERN Document Server

    Stringhini, G.; Ghezzi, A.; Stojkovic, A.; Paganoni, M.; Auffray, E.

    2016-01-01

    In small animal and organ dedicated PET scanners, the knowledge of depth of interaction (DOI) of the gamma ray along the main axis of the scintillator is a fundamental information in order to avoid parallax error and to achieve high performances in terms of spatial resolution. Recently we developed a new method to obtain the DOI function for a single side readout PET module, recirculating the scintillation light in the matrix by means of a mirror placed on top of the module. In a complete PET scanner, periodical DOI calibrations have to be performed to prevent time dependent miscalibrations and performance degradations. The current DOI calibration relies on a coincidence system between the module and an external scintillator to provide a priori the DOI information and it is clearly not feasible in a real system without unpractical disassemblies of the scanner. In this paper we develop instead a fast and precise calibration method based on uniform irradiation of the scintillators. Three irradiation modalities ...

  14. {sup 18}F-FDG PET of the hands with a dedicated high-resolution PEM system (arthro-PET): correlation with PET/CT, radiography and clinical parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mhlanga, Joyce C.; Lodge, Martin [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of Nuclear Medicine, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Baltimore, MD (United States); Carrino, John A. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of Musculoskeletal Radiology, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Baltimore, MD (United States); Wang, Hao [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Oncology Biostatistics Division, Baltimore, MD (United States); Wahl, Richard L. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of Nuclear Medicine, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Baltimore, MD (United States); Johns Hopkins University Hospitals, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-12-15

    The aim of this study was to prospectively determine the feasibility and compare the novel use of a positron emission mammography (PEM) scanner with standard PET/CT for evaluating hand osteoarthritis (OA) with {sup 18}F-FDG. Institutional review board approval and written informed consent were obtained for this HIPAA-compliant prospective study in which 14 adults referred for oncological {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT underwent dedicated hand PET/CT followed by arthro-PET using the PEM device. Hand radiographs were obtained and scored for the presence and severity of OA. Summed qualitative and quantitative joint glycolytic scores for each modality were compared with the findings on plain radiography and clinical features. Eight patients with clinical and/or radiographic evidence of OA comprised the OA group (mean age 73 ± 7.7 years). Six patients served as the control group (53.7 ± 9.3 years). Arthro-PET quantitative and qualitative joint glycolytic scores were highly correlated with PET/CT findings in the OA patients (r = 0.86. p = 0.007; r = 0.94, p = 0.001). Qualitative arthro-PET and PET/CT joint scores were significantly higher in the OA patients than in controls (38.7 ± 6.6 vs. 32.2 ± 0.4, p = 0.02; 37.5 ± 5.4 vs. 32.2 ± 0.4, p = 0.03, respectively). Quantitative arthro-PET and PET/CT maximum SUV-lean joint scores were higher in the OA patients, although they did not reach statistical significance (20.8 ± 4.2 vs. 18 ± 1.8, p = 0.13; 22.8 ± 5.38 vs. 20.1 ± 1.54, p= 0.21). By definition, OA patients had higher radiographic joint scores than controls (30.9 ± 31.3 vs. 0, p = 0.03). Hand imaging using a small field of view PEM system (arthro-PET) with FDG is feasible, performing comparably to PET/CT in assessing metabolic joint activity. Arthro-PET and PET/CT showed higher joint FDG uptake in OA. Further exploration of arthro-PET in arthritis management is warranted. (orig.)

  15. A self-normalization reconstruction technique for PET scans using the positron emission data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, André; Goldschmidt, Benjamin; Botnar, René; Kiessling, Fabian; Schulz, Volkmar

    2012-12-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) image quality in both clinical and preclinical environments highly depends on an accurate knowledge of the detector hardware to correct for image quality degrading effects like gain, temperature, and photon detection efficiency variations of the individual crystals. In conventional PET systems some of these variations are typically corrected using a dedicated calibration scan in which the scanner performance for a well-known activity source is measured. We propose an alternative method for estimating the relative sensitivity of each detector pixel using the coincidences as well as the singles emission data of each PET scan. The overall idea is to compare the total sum of all measured single photons before coincidence processing in each crystal with a steadily low-frequent distribution that can normally be expected. Both the estimated activity and the estimated detector sensitivity are simultaneously improved by using an extended iterative reconstruction scheme. This way we ensure the use of an optimal calibration correction (with the exception of a global factor) for each data set, even if the scanner performance has changed between two scans. Data measured with a preclinical PET scanner (HYPERIon-I) which uses analog silicon photomultipliers in combination with a custom-made ASIC shows a significant increase of image quality and homogeneity using the proposed method.

  16. In-beam PET at high-energy photon beams: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, H.; Enghardt, W.

    2006-04-01

    For radiation therapy with carbon ion beams, either for the stable isotope 12C or for the radioactive one 11C, it has been demonstrated that the β+-activity distribution created or deposited, respectively, within the irradiated volume can be visualized by means of positron emission tomography (PET). The PET images provide valuable information for quality assurance and precision improvement of ion therapy. Dedicated PET scanners have been integrated into treatment sites at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator at Chiba (HIMAC), Japan, and the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany, to make PET imaging feasible during therapeutic irradiation (in-beam PET). A similar technique may be worthwhile for radiotherapy with high-energy bremsstrahlung. In addition to monitoring the dose delivery process which in-beam PET has been primarily developed for, it may be expected that radiation response of tissue can be detected by means of in-beam PET. We investigate the applicability of PET for treatment control in the case of using bremsstrahlung spectra produced by 15-50 MeV electrons. Target volume activation due to (γ, n) reactions at energies above 20 MeV yields moderate β+-activity levels, which can be employed for imaging. The radiation from positrons produced by pair production is not presently usable because the detectors are overloaded due to the low duty factor of medical electron linear accelerators. However, the degradation of images caused by positron motion between creation and annihilation seems to be tolerable.

  17. Use of visual and permanent identification for pets by veterinary clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingman, P A; Levy, J K; Rockey, L E; Crandall, M M

    2014-07-01

    It is estimated that more than 5 million stray dogs and cats enter animal shelters in the USA each year, but less than half are ever reunited with their owners. Lost pets with identification microchips are up to 21 times more likely to be reunited than those without. Finders of lost pets are more likely to consult veterinarians than shelters for assistance, and pet owners look first to veterinarians for advice regarding pet health, protection, and welfare. An online survey of 1086 veterinary clinics in the South-Eastern USA was conducted to evaluate how veterinary clinics functioned as a part of the pet identification network. Scanning and microchip implants were offered by 91% of surveyed clinics and 41% used 'global' scanners capable of detecting all currently used microchip brands. Clinics more frequently relied on pet owners to register contact information rather than providing this service for clients (52% vs. 43%, respectively). Even though lost dogs are more likely to be reunited with owners than lost cats, microchips and collars were more likely to be recommended for all dogs (85% and 93%, respectively) than for all cats (67% and 61%, respectively). Only half of clinics that recommended identification collars made them available to their clients. Veterinarians can protect animals, pet owners and the human-animal bond by integrating pet identification into preventive health care.

  18. The PS Booster Fast Wire Scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Burger, S; Priestnall, K; Raich, U

    2003-01-01

    The very tight emittance budget for LHC type beams makes precise emittance measurements in the injector complex a necessity. The PS machine uses 2 fast wire scanners per transverse plane for emittance measurement of the circulating beams. In order to ease comparison the same type of wire scanners have been newly installed in the upstream machine, the PS Booster, where each of the 4 rings is equipped with 2 wire scanners measuring the horizontal and vertical profiles. Those wire scanners use new and more modern control and readout electronics featuring dedicated intelligent motor movement controllers, which relieves the very stringent real time constraints due to the very high speed of 20m/s. In order to be able to measure primary beams at the very low injection energy of the Booster (50MeV) secondary emission currents from the wire can be measured as well as secondary particle flows at higher primary particle energies during and after acceleration. The solution adopted for the control of the devices is descri...

  19. submitter Dynamical Models of a Wire Scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Barjau, Ana; Dehning, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    The accuracy of the beam profile measurements achievable by the current wire scanners at CERN is limited by the vibrations of their mechanical parts. In particular, the vibrations of the carbon wire represent the major source of wire position uncertainty which limits the beam profile measurement accuracy. In the coming years, due to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade, a wire traveling speed up to 20 $m s^{−1}$ and a position measurement accuracy of the order of 1 μm will be required. A new wire scanner design based on the understanding of the wire vibration origin is therefore needed. We present the models developed to understand the main causes of the wire vibrations observed in an existing wire scanner. The development and tuning of those models are based on measurements and tests performed on that CERN proton synchrotron (PS) scanner. The final model for the (wire + fork) system has six degrees-of-freedom (DOF). The wire equations contain three different excitation terms: inertia...

  20. Learning and Teaching with a Computer Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planinsic, G.; Gregorcic, B.; Etkina, E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces the readers to simple inquiry-based activities (experiments with supporting questions) that one can do with a computer scanner to help students learn and apply the concepts of relative motion in 1 and 2D, vibrational motion and the Doppler effect. We also show how to use these activities to help students think like…

  1. Inter laboratory comparison of industrial CT scanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angel, Jais Andreas Breusch; Cantatore, Angela; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    In this report results from an intercomparison of industrial CT scanners are presented. Three audit items, similar to common industrial parts, were selected for circulation: a single polymer part with complex geometry (Item 1), a simple geometry part made of two polymers (Item 2) and a miniature...

  2. Rail profile control using laser triangulation scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boronahin, Ð. ńlexandr M.; Larionov, Daniil Yu.; Podgornaya, Liudmila N.; Shalymov, Roman V.; Filatov, Yuri V.; Bokhman, Evgueny D.

    2016-11-01

    Rail track geometric parameters measurement requires knowledge of left and right rail head location in each section. First of all displacement in transverse plane of rail head point located at a distance of 14 mm below the running surface, must be controlled [1]. It is carried out by detecting of each rail profile using triangulation laser scanners. Optical image recognition is carried out successfully in the laboratory, approaches used for this purpose are widely known. However, laser scanners operation has several features on railways leading to necessity of traditional approaches adaptation for solving these particular problems. The most significant problem is images noisiness due to the solar flashes and the effect of "Moon path" on the smooth rail surface. Using of optical filters gives inadequate result, because scanner laser diodes radiation frequency varies with temperature changes that forbid the use of narrow-band filters. Consideration of these features requires additional constructive and algorithmic solutions, including involvement of information from other sensors of the system. The specific usage of optical scanners for rail profiles control is the subject of the paper.

  3. Recent developments in time-of-flight PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandenberghe, S.; Mikhaylova, E.; D’Hoe, E.; Mollet, P. [ELIS-IMINDS-Medical IT-IBITECH Ghent University, De Pintelaan 185, Blok B, Gent, 9000 (Belgium); Karp, J. S. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2016-02-16

    While the first time-of-flight (TOF)-positron emission tomography (PET) systems were already built in the early 1980s, limited clinical studies were acquired on these scanners. PET was still a research tool, and the available TOF-PET systems were experimental. Due to a combination of low stopping power and limited spatial resolution (caused by limited light output of the scintillators), these systems could not compete with bismuth germanate (BGO)-based PET scanners. Developments on TOF system were limited for about a decade but started again around 2000. The combination of fast photomultipliers, scintillators with high density, modern electronics, and faster computing power for image reconstruction have made it possible to introduce this principle in clinical TOF-PET systems. This paper reviews recent developments in system design, image reconstruction, corrections, and the potential in new applications for TOF-PET. After explaining the basic principles of time-of-flight, the difficulties in detector technology and electronics to obtain a good and stable timing resolution are shortly explained. The available clinical systems and prototypes under development are described in detail. The development of this type of PET scanner also requires modified image reconstruction with accurate modeling and correction methods. The additional dimension introduced by the time difference motivates a shift from sinogram- to listmode-based reconstruction. This reconstruction is however rather slow and therefore rebinning techniques specific for TOF data have been proposed. The main motivation for TOF-PET remains the large potential for image quality improvement and more accurate quantification for a given number of counts. The gain is related to the ratio of object size and spatial extent of the TOF kernel and is therefore particularly relevant for heavy patients, where image quality degrades significantly due to increased attenuation (low counts) and high scatter fractions. The

  4. Recent developments in time-of-flight PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberghe, S; Mikhaylova, E; D'Hoe, E; Mollet, P; Karp, J S

    2016-12-01

    While the first time-of-flight (TOF)-positron emission tomography (PET) systems were already built in the early 1980s, limited clinical studies were acquired on these scanners. PET was still a research tool, and the available TOF-PET systems were experimental. Due to a combination of low stopping power and limited spatial resolution (caused by limited light output of the scintillators), these systems could not compete with bismuth germanate (BGO)-based PET scanners. Developments on TOF system were limited for about a decade but started again around 2000. The combination of fast photomultipliers, scintillators with high density, modern electronics, and faster computing power for image reconstruction have made it possible to introduce this principle in clinical TOF-PET systems. This paper reviews recent developments in system design, image reconstruction, corrections, and the potential in new applications for TOF-PET. After explaining the basic principles of time-of-flight, the difficulties in detector technology and electronics to obtain a good and stable timing resolution are shortly explained. The available clinical systems and prototypes under development are described in detail. The development of this type of PET scanner also requires modified image reconstruction with accurate modeling and correction methods. The additional dimension introduced by the time difference motivates a shift from sinogram- to listmode-based reconstruction. This reconstruction is however rather slow and therefore rebinning techniques specific for TOF data have been proposed. The main motivation for TOF-PET remains the large potential for image quality improvement and more accurate quantification for a given number of counts. The gain is related to the ratio of object size and spatial extent of the TOF kernel and is therefore particularly relevant for heavy patients, where image quality degrades significantly due to increased attenuation (low counts) and high scatter fractions. The

  5. Occurrence and characteristics of mutual interference between LIDAR scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gunzung; Eom, Jeongsook; Park, Seonghyeon; Park, Yongwan

    2015-05-01

    The LIDAR scanner is at the heart of object detection of the self-driving car. Mutual interference between LIDAR scanners has not been regarded as a problem because the percentage of vehicles equipped with LIDAR scanners was very rare. With the growing number of autonomous vehicle equipped with LIDAR scanner operated close to each other at the same time, the LIDAR scanner may receive laser pulses from other LIDAR scanners. In this paper, three types of experiments and their results are shown, according to the arrangement of two LIDAR scanners. We will show the probability that any LIDAR scanner will interfere mutually by considering spatial and temporal overlaps. It will present some typical mutual interference scenario and report an analysis of the interference mechanism.

  6. Markerless 3D Head Tracking for Motion Correction in High Resolution PET Brain Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter

    images. Incorrect motion correction can in the worst cases result in wrong diagnosis or treatment. The evolution of a markerless custom-made structured light 3D surface tracking system is presented. The system is targeted at state-of-the-art high resolution dedicated brain PET scanners with a resolution......This thesis concerns application specific 3D head tracking. The purpose is to improve motion correction in position emission tomography (PET) brain imaging through development of markerless tracking. Currently, motion correction strategies are based on either the PET data itself or tracking devices...... of a few millimeters. Stateof- the-art hardware and software solutions are integrated into an operational device. This novel system is tested against a commercial tracking system popular in PET brain imaging. Testing and demonstrations are carried out in clinical settings. A compact markerless tracking...

  7. Automatic extraction of forward stroke volume using dynamic 11C-acetate PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harms, Hans; Tolbod, Lars Poulsen; Hansson, Nils Henrik

    was then calculated as the injected dose divided by the product of heart rate and the area under the curve of the first-pass peak. Gold standard FSV was measured in the left ventricular outflow tract by cardiovascular magnetic resonance using phase-contrast velocity mapping within two weeks of PET imaging. Results...... TruePoint 64 PET/CT scanner after bolus injection of 399±27 MBq of 11C-acetate. The LV-aortic time-activity curve (TAC) was extracted automatically from dynamic PET data using cluster analysis. The first-pass peak was derived by automatic extrapolation of the down-slope of the TAC. FSV...... = 0.001). Conclusions: FSV can be obtained automatically and reliably using dynamic 11C-acetate PET/CT and cluster analysis, although a small overestimation is observed when compared to FSV determined from MRI. This method could potentially be generalized to other tracers, although this requires...

  8. Development and experimental medicine applications of PET in oncology: a historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Terry; Price, Pat

    2012-03-01

    Nearly 90 years of scientific research have led to the use of PET and the ability to forge advances in the field of oncology. In this Historial Review we outline the key developments made with this imaging technique, including the evolution of cyclotrons and scanners, together with the associated advances made in image reconstruction, presentation, analysis of data, and radiochemistry. The applications of PET to experimental medicine are summarised, and we cover how these are related to the use and development of PET, especially in the assessment of tumour biology and pharmacology. The use of PET in clinical oncology and for tissue pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies as a means of supporting drug development is detailed. The current limitations of the technology are also discussed.

  9. Calibration and equivalency analysis of image plate scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, G. Jackson, E-mail: williams270@llnl.gov; Maddox, Brian R.; Chen, Hui [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Kojima, Sadaoki [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada-oka, 2-6, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Millecchia, Matthew [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    A universal procedure was developed to calibrate image plate scanners using radioisotope sources. Techniques to calibrate scanners and sources, as well as cross-calibrate scanner models, are described to convert image plate dosage into physical units. This allows for the direct comparison of quantitative data between any facility and scanner. An empirical relation was also derived to establish sensitivity response settings for arbitrary gain settings. In practice, these methods may be extended to any image plate scanning system.

  10. Parallax error in long-axial field-of-view PET scanners—a simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmall, Jeffrey P.; Karp, Joel S.; Werner, Matt; Surti, Suleman

    2016-07-01

    There is a growing interest in the design and construction of a PET scanner with a very long axial extent. One critical design challenge is the impact of the long axial extent on the scanner spatial resolution properties. In this work, we characterize the effect of parallax error in PET system designs having an axial field-of-view (FOV) of 198 cm (total-body PET scanner) using fully-3D Monte Carlo simulations. Two different scintillation materials were studied: LSO and LaBr3. The crystal size in both cases was 4  ×  4  ×  20 mm3. Several different depth-of-interaction (DOI) encoding techniques were investigated to characterize the improvement in spatial resolution when using a DOI capable detector. To measure spatial resolution we simulated point sources in a warm background in the center of the imaging FOV, where the effects of axial parallax are largest, and at several positions radially offset from the center. Using a line-of-response based ordered-subset expectation maximization reconstruction algorithm we found that the axial resolution in an LSO scanner degrades from 4.8 mm to 5.7 mm (full width at half max) at the center of the imaging FOV when extending the axial acceptance angle (α) from  ±12° (corresponding to an axial FOV of 18 cm) to the maximum of  ±67°—a similar result was obtained with LaBr3, in which the axial resolution degraded from 5.3 mm to 6.1 mm. For comparison we also measured the degradation due to radial parallax error in the transverse imaging FOV; the transverse resolution, averaging radial and tangential directions, of an LSO scanner was degraded from 4.9 mm to 7.7 mm, for a measurement at the center of the scanner compared to a measurement with a radial offset of 23 cm. Simulations of a DOI detector design improved the spatial resolution in all dimensions. The axial resolution in the LSO-based scanner, with α  =  ± 67°, was improved from 5.7 mm to 5.0 mm by

  11. MR-guided PET motion correction in LOR space using generic projection data for image reconstruction with PRESTO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheins, J., E-mail: j.scheins@fz-juelich.de [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-4), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Leo-Brandt-Str., 52425 Jülich (Germany); Ullisch, M.; Tellmann, L.; Weirich, C.; Rota Kops, E.; Herzog, H.; Shah, N.J. [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-4), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Leo-Brandt-Str., 52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2013-02-21

    The BrainPET scanner from Siemens, designed as hybrid MR/PET system for simultaneous acquisition of both modalities, provides high-resolution PET images with an optimum resolution of 3 mm. However, significant head motion often compromises the achievable image quality, e.g. in neuroreceptor studies of human brain. This limitation can be omitted when tracking the head motion and accurately correcting measured Lines-of-Response (LORs). For this purpose, we present a novel method, which advantageously combines MR-guided motion tracking with the capabilities of the reconstruction software PRESTO (PET Reconstruction Software Toolkit) to convert motion-corrected LORs into highly accurate generic projection data. In this way, the high-resolution PET images achievable with PRESTO can also be obtained in presence of severe head motion.

  12. 21 CFR 892.1330 - Nuclear whole body scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1330 Nuclear whole body scanner. (a) Identification. A nuclear whole body scanner is a device intended to measure and image the distribution of... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nuclear whole body scanner. 892.1330 Section...

  13. The use of mobile 3D scanners in maxillofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Florian; Möhlhenrich, Stephan Christian; Ayoub, Nassim; Goloborodko, Evgeny; Ghassemi, Alireza; Lethaus, Bernd; Hölzle, Frank; Modabber, Ali

    There are many possibilities for the use of three-dimensional (3D) scanners in maxillofacial surgery. This study aimed to investigate whether the bundling and syncing of two 3D scanners has advantages over single-scanner acquisition in terms of scan quality and the time required to scan an object. Therefore, the speed and precision of 3D data acquisition with one scanner versus two synced scanners was measured in 30 subjects. This was done by analyzing the results obtained by scanning test objects attached to the forehead and cheeks of the subjects. Statistical methods included the Student t test for paired samples. Single-scanner recording resulted in significantly lower mean error of measurement than synced recording with two scanners for length (P scanner method resulted in a significantly lowermean error of measurement than the two-scanner method for frontal/lower plane angles (P scanners resulted in a significant reduction of scanning time (P 3D scanner, the bundling of two 3D scanners resulted in faster scanning times but lower scan quality.

  14. A new methodological approach for PET implementation in radiotherapy treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellan, Elena; Ferretti, Alice; Capirci, Carlo; Grassetto, Gaia; Gava, Marcello; Chondrogiannis, Sotirios; Virdis, Graziella; Marzola, Maria Cristina; Massaro, Arianna; Rubello, Domenico; Nibale, Otello

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, a new methodological approach to using PET information in radiotherapy treatment planning has been discussed. Computed tomography (CT) represents the primary modality to plan personalized radiation treatment, because it provides the basic electron density map for correct dose calculation. If PET scanning is also performed it is typically coregistered with the CT study. This operation can be executed automatically by a hybrid PET/CT scanner or, if the PET and CT imaging sets have been acquired through different equipment, by a dedicated module of the radiotherapy treatment planning system. Both approaches have some disadvantages: in the first case, the bore of a PET/CT system generally used in clinical practice often does not allow the use of certain bulky devices for patient immobilization in radiotherapy, whereas in the second case the result could be affected by limitations in window/level visualization of two different image modalities, and the displayed PET volumes can appear not to be related to the actual uptake into the patient. To overcome these problems, at our centre a specific procedure has been studied and tested in 30 patients, allowing good results of precision in the target contouring to be obtained. The process consists of segmentation of the biological target volume by a dedicated PET/CT console and its export to a dedicated radiotherapy system, where an image registration between the CT images acquired by the PET/CT scanner and a large-bore CT is performed. The planning target volume is contoured only on the large-bore CT and is used for virtual simulation, to individuate permanent skin markers on the patient.

  15. Studies oriented to optimize the image quality of the small animal PET: Clear PET, modifying some of the parameters of the reconstruction algorithm IMF-OSEM 3D on the data acquisition simulated with GAMOS; Estudios para la optimizaciOn de la calidad de imagen en el escaner ClearPET, modifi cando parametros del algoritmo IMF-OSEM 3D sobre adquisiciones simuladas con GAMOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canadas, M.; Mendoza, J.; Embid, M.

    2007-09-27

    This report presents studies oriented to optimize the image quality of the small animal PET: Clear- PET. Certain figures of merit (FOM) were used to assess a quantitative value of the contrast and delectability of lesions. The optimization was carried out modifying some of the parameters in the reconstruction software of the scanner, imaging a mini-Derenzo phantom and a cylinder phantom with background activity and two hot spheres. Specifically, it was evaluated the incidence of the inter-update Metz filter (IMF) inside the iterative reconstruction algorithm 3D OSEM. The data acquisition was simulated using the GAMOS framework (Monte Carlo simulation). Integrating GAMOS output with the reconstruction software of the scanner was an additional novelty of this work, to achieve this, data sets were written with the list-mode format (LMF) of ClearPET. In order to verify the optimum values obtained, we foresee to make real acquisitions in the ClearPET of CIEMAT. (Author) 17 refs.

  16. Qualification of National Cancer Institute-Designated Cancer Centers for Quantitative PET/CT Imaging in Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuermann, Joshua S; Reddin, Janet S; Opanowski, Adam; Kinahan, Paul E; Siegel, Barry A; Shankar, Lalitha K; Karp, Joel S

    2017-07-01

    The National Cancer Institute developed the Centers for Quantitative Imaging Excellence (CQIE) initiative in 2010 to prequalify imaging facilities at all of the National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive and clinical cancer centers for oncology trials using advanced imaging techniques, including PET. Here we review the CQIE PET/CT scanner qualification process and results in detail. Methods: Over a period of approximately 5 y, sites were requested to submit a variety of phantoms, including uniform and American College of Radiology-approved phantoms, PET/CT images, and examples of clinical images. Submissions were divided into 3 distinct time periods: initial submission (T0) and 2 requalification submissions (T1 and T2). Images were analyzed using standardized procedures, and scanners received a pass or fail designation. Sites had the opportunity to submit new data for scanners that failed. Quantitative results were compared across scanners within a given time period and across time periods for a given scanner. Results: Data from 65 unique PET/CT scanners across 56 sites were submitted for CQIE T0 qualification; 64 scanners passed the qualification. Data from 44 (68%) of those 65 scanners were submitted for T2. From T0 to T2, the percentage of scanners passing the CQIE qualification on the first attempt rose from 38% for T1 to 67% for T2. The most common reasons for failure were SUV outside specifications, incomplete submission, and uniformity issues. Uniform phantom and American College of Radiology-approved phantom results between scanner manufacturers were similar. Conclusion: The results of the CQIE process showed that periodic requalification may decrease the frequency of deficient data submissions. The CQIE project also highlighted the concern within imaging facilities about the burden of maintaining different qualifications and accreditations. Finally, for quantitative imaging-based trials, further evaluation of the relationships between the level of

  17. Evaluation of GMI and PMI diffeomorphic-based demons algorithms for aligning PET and CT Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Juan; Wang, Hongjun; Zhang, You; Yin, Yong

    2015-07-08

    Fusion of anatomic information in computed tomography (CT) and functional information in 18F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET) is crucial for accurate differentiation of tumor from benign masses, designing radiotherapy treatment plan and staging of cancer. Although current PET and CT images can be acquired from combined 18F-FDG PET/CT scanner, the two acquisitions are scanned separately and take a long time, which may induce potential positional errors in global and local caused by respiratory motion or organ peristalsis. So registration (alignment) of whole-body PET and CT images is a prerequisite for their meaningful fusion. The purpose of this study was to assess the performance of two multimodal registration algorithms for aligning PET and CT images. The proposed gradient of mutual information (GMI)-based demons algorithm, which incorporated the GMI between two images as an external force to facilitate the alignment, was compared with the point-wise mutual information (PMI) diffeomorphic-based demons algorithm whose external force was modified by replacing the image intensity difference in diffeomorphic demons algorithm with the PMI to make it appropriate for multimodal image registration. Eight patients with esophageal cancer(s) were enrolled in this IRB-approved study. Whole-body PET and CT images were acquired from a combined 18F-FDG PET/CT scanner for each patient. The modified Hausdorff distance (d(MH)) was used to evaluate the registration accuracy of the two algorithms. Of all patients, the mean values and standard deviations (SDs) of d(MH) were 6.65 (± 1.90) voxels and 6.01 (± 1.90) after the GMI-based demons and the PMI diffeomorphic-based demons registration algorithms respectively. Preliminary results on oncological patients showed that the respiratory motion and organ peristalsis in PET/CT esophageal images could not be neglected, although a combined 18F-FDG PET/CT scanner was used for image acquisition. The PMI diffeomorphic-based demons

  18. High-Resolution PET Detector. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karp, Joel

    2014-03-26

    The objective of this project was to develop an understanding of the limits of performance for a high resolution PET detector using an approach based on continuous scintillation crystals rather than pixelated crystals. The overall goal was to design a high-resolution detector, which requires both high spatial resolution and high sensitivity for 511 keV gammas. Continuous scintillation detectors (Anger cameras) have been used extensively for both single-photon and PET scanners, however, these instruments were based on NaI(Tl) scintillators using relatively large, individual photo-multipliers. In this project we investigated the potential of this type of detector technology to achieve higher spatial resolution through the use of improved scintillator materials and photo-sensors, and modification of the detector surface to optimize the light response function.We achieved an average spatial resolution of 3-mm for a 25-mm thick, LYSO continuous detector using a maximum likelihood position algorithm and shallow slots cut into the entrance surface.

  19. Combined PET/MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, D. L.; Pichler, B. J.; Gückel, B.

    2015-01-01

    This paper summarises key themes and discussions from the 4th international workshop dedicated to the advancement of the technical, scientific and clinical applications of combined positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems that was held in Tübingen, Germany, from...... February 23 to 27, 2015. Specifically, we summarise the three days of invited presentations from active researchers in this and associated fields augmented by round table discussions and dialogue boards with specific topics. These include the use of PET/MRI in cardiovascular disease, paediatrics, oncology......, neurology and multi-parametric imaging, the latter of which was suggested as a key promoting factor for the wider adoption of integrated PET/MRI. Discussions throughout the workshop and a poll taken on the final day demonstrated that attendees felt more strongly that PET/MRI has further advanced in both...

  20. A single-mode data acquisition architecture for PET/MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sportelli, Giancarlo; Belcari, Nicola; Bisogni, Maria Giuseppina; Camarlinghi, Niccolo; Zaccaro, Emanuele; Del Guerra, Alberto [Department of Physics, University of Pisa and INFN, Pisa (Italy)

    2015-05-18

    The development of MRI compatible detectors based on compact solid state photomultipliers has recently led to simultaneous fully integrated PET/MRI systems for human imaging. The PET acquisition design for MRI integration is known to have several additional constraints, including smaller space, electromagnetic compatibility issues and thermal management. The current work presents the PET acquisition architecture that has been developed for the TRIMAGE project, whose aim is to provide a cost effective, commercial grade trimodality PET/MRI/EEG scanner. The TRIMAGE PET component consists of 216 modules of 2.5 cm x 2.5 cm, arranged in 18 rectangular detectors of 5 cm x 15 cm, the latter in the axial direction, to form a full ring of 31 cm diameter. Each module consists of a staggered dual layer LYSO matrix read out by two arrays of 4 x 8 SiPMs and an ASIC. The detector board hosts a low-power low-end FPGA that performs pixel identification, energy calibration and handles the communication between the ASICs and the motherboard, which is located in proximity of the scanner. Data is streamed using high-density shielded cables and high-speed LVDS transmission to 9 low-end SoC FPGAs and from there to a central mainboard where coincidences and events statistics are processed. Coincidence data is finally transmitted to a host PC for image reconstruction. The proposed architecture and technological solutions will be presented and discussed.

  1. Validation of a highly integrated SiPM readout system with a TOF-PET demonstrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niknejad, T.; Setayeshi, S.; Tavernier, S.; Bugalho, R.; Ferramacho, L.; Di Francesco, A.; Leong, C.; Rolo, M. D.; Shamshirsaz, M.; Silva, J. C.; Silva, R.; Silveira, M.; Zorraquino, C.; Varela, J.

    2016-12-01

    We have developed a highly integrated, fast and compact readout electronics for Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) based Time of Flight Positron Emission Tomography (TOF-PET) scanners. The readout is based on the use of TOP-PET Application Specific Integrated Circuit (PETsys TOFPET1 ASIC) with 64 channels, each with its amplifier, discriminator, Time to Digital Converter (TDC) and amplitude determination using Time Over Threshold (TOT). The ASIC has 25 ps r.m.s. intrinsic time resolution and fully digital output. The system is optimised for high rates, good timing, low power consumption and low cost. For validating the readout electronics, we have built a technical PET scanner, hereafter called ``demonstrator'', with 2'048 SiPM channels. The PET demonstrator has 16 compact Detector Modules (DM). Each DM has two ASICs reading 128 SiPM pixels in one-to-one coupling to 128 Lutetium Yttrium Orthosilicate (LYSO) crystals measuring 3.1 × 3.1 × 15 mm3 each. The data acquisition system for the demonstrator has two Front End Boards type D (FEB/D), each collecting the data of 1'024 channels (8 DMs), and transmitting assembled data frames through a serial link (4.8 Gbps), to a single Data Acquisition (DAQ) board plugged into the Peripheral Component Interconnect Express (PCIe) bus of the data acquisition PC. Results obtained with this PET demonstrator are presented.

  2. Multi-atlas attenuation correction supports full quantification of static and dynamic brain PET data in PET-MR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mérida, Inés; Reilhac, Anthonin; Redouté, Jérôme; Heckemann, Rolf A.; Costes, Nicolas; Hammers, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    work demonstrates that inaccuracies in attenuation maps can induce bias in dynamic brain PET studies. Multi-atlas attenuation correction with MaxProb enables quantification on hybrid PET-MR scanners, eschewing the need for CT.

  3. PET studies in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarikaya, Ismet

    2015-01-01

    Various PET studies, such as measurements of glucose, serotonin and oxygen metabolism, cerebral blood flow and receptor bindings are availabe for epilepsy. (18)Fluoro-2-deoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) PET imaging of brain glucose metabolism is a well established and widely available technique. Studies have demonstrated that the sensitivity of interictal FDG-PET is higher than interictal SPECT and similar to ictal SPECT for the lateralization and localization of epileptogenic foci in presurgical patients refractory to medical treatments who have noncontributory EEG and MRI. In addition to localizing epileptogenic focus, FDG-PET provide additional important information on the functional status of the rest of the brain. The main limitation of interictal FDG-PET is that it cannot precisely define the surgical margin as the area of hypometabolism usually extends beyond the epileptogenic zone. Various neurotransmitters (GABA, glutamate, opiates, serotonin, dopamine, acethylcholine, and adenosine) and receptor subtypes are involved in epilepsy. PET receptor imaging studies performed in limited centers help to understand the role of neurotransmitters in epileptogenesis, identify epileptic foci and investigate new treatment approaches. PET receptor imaging studies have demonstrated reduced (11)C-flumazenil (GABAA-cBDZ) and (18)F-MPPF (5-HT1A serotonin) and increased (11)C-cerfentanil (mu opiate) and (11)C-MeNTI (delta opiate) bindings in the area of seizure. (11)C-flumazenil has been reported to be more sensitive than FDG-PET for identifying epileptic foci. The area of abnormality on GABAAcBDZ and opiate receptor images is usually smaller and more circumscribed than the area of hypometabolism on FDG images. Studies have demonstrated that (11)C-alpha-methyl-L-tryptophan PET (to study synthesis of serotonin) can detect the epileptic focus within malformations of cortical development and helps in differentiating epileptogenic from non-epileptogenic tubers in patients with tuberous

  4. Compact and mobile high resolution PET brain imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Proffitt, James

    2011-02-08

    A brain imager includes a compact ring-like static PET imager mounted in a helmet-like structure. When attached to a patient's head, the helmet-like brain imager maintains the relative head-to-imager geometry fixed through the whole imaging procedure. The brain imaging helmet contains radiation sensors and minimal front-end electronics. A flexible mechanical suspension/harness system supports the weight of the helmet thereby allowing for patient to have limited movements of the head during imaging scans. The compact ring-like PET imager enables very high resolution imaging of neurological brain functions, cancer, and effects of trauma using a rather simple mobile scanner with limited space needs for use and storage.

  5. Ghost signals in Allison emittance scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stockli, Martin P.; /SNS Project, Oak Ridge /Tennessee U.; Leitner, M.; /LBL, Berkeley; Moehs, D.P.; /Fermilab; Keller, R.; /LBL, Berkeley; Welton, R.F.; /SNS Project, Oak

    2004-12-01

    For over 20 years, Allison scanners have been used to measure emittances of low-energy ion beams. We show that scanning large trajectory angles produces ghost signals caused by the sampled beamlet impacting on an electric deflection plate. The ghost signal strength is proportional to the amount of beam entering the scanner. Depending on the ions, and their velocity, the ghost signals can have the opposite or the same polarity as the main beam signals. The ghost signals cause significant errors in the emittance estimates because they appear at large trajectory angles. These ghost signals often go undetected because they partly overlap with the real signals, are mostly below the 1% level, and often hide in the noise. A simple deflection plate modification is shown to reduce the ghost signal strength by over 99%.

  6. Laser scanner 3D terrestri e mobile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Ciamba

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Recentemente si è svolto a Roma un evento dimostrativo per informare, professionisti e ricercatori del settore inerente il rilievo strumentale, sulle recenti innovazioni che riguardano i laser scanner 3d. Il mercato della strumentazione dedicata al rilevamento architettonico e dell'ambiente, offre molte possibilità di scelta. Oggi i principali marchi producono strumenti sempre più efficienti ed ideati per ambiti di applicazione specifici, permettendo ai professionisti, la giusta scelta in termini di prestazioni ed economia.A demonstration event was recently held in Rome with the aim to inform professionals and researchers on recent innovations on instrumental survey related to the 3d laser scanner. The market of instrumentation for architectural survey offers many possibilitiesof choice. Today the major brands produce instruments that are more efficient and designed for specific areas of application, allowing the right choice in terms of performance and economy.

  7. Compact beamforming in medical ultrasound scanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomov, Borislav Gueorguiev

    2003-01-01

    This Ph.D. project was carried out at the Center for Fast Ultrasound Imaging, Technical University of Denmark, under the supervision of Prof. Jørgen Arendt Jensen, Assoc. Prof. Jens Sparsø and Prof. Erik Bruun. The goal was to investigate methods for efficient beamforming, which make it possible...... compact implementation of the beamformer compared to the case where conventional A/D conversion is used. The compact and economic beamforming is a key aspect in the progress of medical ultrasound imaging. Currently, 64 or 128 channels are widely used in scanners, top-of-the-range scanners have 256...... with an introduction into medical ultrasound, its basic principles, system evolution and its place among medical imaging techniques. Then, ultrasound acoustics is introduced, as a necessary base for understanding the concepts of acoustic focusing and beamforming, which follow. The necessary focusing information...

  8. PET/CT Artifacts

    OpenAIRE

    Blodgett, Todd M.; Mehta, Ajeet S.; Mehta, Amar S.; Laymon, Charles M; Carney, Jonathan; Townsend, David W.

    2011-01-01

    There are several artifacts encountered in PET/CT imaging, including attenuation correction (AC) artifacts associated with using CT for attenuation correction. Several artifacts can mimic a 2-deoxy-2-[18F] fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) avid malignant lesions and therefore recognition of these artifacts is clinically relevant. Our goal was to identify and characterize these artifacts and also discuss some protocol variables that may affect image quality in PET/CT.

  9. PET and PET/CT in endocrine tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudczak, Robert [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical University of Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: robert.dudczak@meduniwien.ac.at; Traub-Weidinger, Tatjana [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical University of Vienna (Austria)

    2010-03-15

    Functional information provided by PET tracers together with the superior image quality and the better data quantification by PET technology had a changing effect on the significance of nuclear medicine in medical issues. Recently introduced hybrid PET/CT systems together with the introduction of novel PET radiopharmaceuticals have contributed to the fact that nuclear medicine has become a growing diagnostic impact on endocrinology. In this review imaging strategies, different radiopharmaceuticals including the basic mechanism of their cell uptake, and the diagnostic value of PET and PET/CT in endocrine tumours except differentiated thyroid carcinomas will be discussed.

  10. Characterization and simulation of a CdTe detector for use in PET

    OpenAIRE

    Ariño Estrada, Gerard; Chmeissani, Mokhtar; Lorenzo, Gianluca De

    2012-01-01

    The Voxel Imaging PET (VIP) Path nder project got the 4 year European Research Council FP7 grant in 2010 to prove the feasibility of using CdTe detectors in a novel conceptual design of PET scanner. The work presented in this thesis is a part of the VIP project and consists of, on the one hand, the characterization of a CdTe detector in terms of energy resolution and coincidence time resolution and, on the other hand, the simulation of the setup with the single detector in order to extend the...

  11. J-PET detector system for studies of the electron-positron annihilations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawlik-Niedźwiecka M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Jagiellonian Positron Emission Tomograph (J-PET has been recently constructed at the Jagiellonian University as a prototype of a cost-effective scanner for the metabolic imaging of the whole human body. J-PET detector is optimized for the measurement of momentum and polarization of photons from the electron-positron annihilations. It is built out of strips of plastic scintillators, forming three cylindrical layers. As detector of gamma quanta it will be used for studies of discrete symmetries and multiparticle entanglement of photons originating from the decays of ortho-positronium atoms.

  12. Structured light 3D tracking system for measuring motions in PET brain imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Jørgensen, Morten Rudkjær; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold

    2010-01-01

    with a DLP projector and a CCD camera is set up on a model of the High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT). Methods to reconstruct 3D point clouds of simple surfaces based on phase-shifting interferometry (PSI) are demonstrated. The projector and camera are calibrated using a simple stereo vision procedure......Patient motion during scanning deteriorates image quality, especially for high resolution PET scanners. A new proposal for a 3D head tracking system for motion correction in high resolution PET brain imaging is set up and demonstrated. A prototype tracking system based on structured light...

  13. J-PET detector system for studies of the electron-positron annihilations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlik-Niedźwiecka, M.; Khreptak, O.; Gajos, A.; Wieczorek, A.; Alfs, D.; Bednarski, T.; Białas, P.; Curceanu, C.; Czerwiński, E.; Dulski, K.; Głowacz, B.; Gupta-Sharma, N.; Gorgol, M.; Hiesmayr, B. C.; Jasińska, B.; Kamińska, D.; Korcyl, G.; Kowalski, P.; Krzmień, W.; Krawczyk, N.; Kubicz, E.; Mohammed, M.; Niedźwiecki, Sz.; Raczyński, L.; Rudy, Z.; Silarski, M.; Wiślicki, W.; Zgardzińska, B.; Zieliński, M.; Moskal, P.

    2016-11-01

    Jagiellonian Positron Emission Tomograph (J-PET) has been recently constructed at the Jagiellonian University as a prototype of a cost-effective scanner for the metabolic imaging of the whole human body. J-PET detector is optimized for the measurement of momentum and polarization of photons from the electron-positron annihilations. It is built out of strips of plastic scintillators, forming three cylindrical layers. As detector of gamma quanta it will be used for studies of discrete symmetries and multiparticle entanglement of photons originating from the decays of ortho-positronium atoms.

  14. Get Mobile – The Smartphone Brain Scanner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahlhut, Carsten; Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Petersen, Michael Kai

    This demonstration will provide live-interaction with a smartphone brain scanner consisting of a low-cost wireless 14-channel EEG headset (Emotiv Epoc) and a mobile device. With our system it is possible to perform real-time functional brain imaging on a smartphone device, including stimulus deli......) that are based on Linux operating systems. Thus our system runs on multiple platforms, including Maemo/MeeGo based smartphones, Android-based smartphones and tablet devices....

  15. Usefulness of {sup 11}C-methionine PET in evaluation of brain lesions with hypo- or isometabolism on {sup 18}F-FDG PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Y. K.; Chung, J. K.; Yeo, J. S.; Lee, D. S.; Jeong, H. W.; Lee, M. C. [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-07-01

    Because some brain tumors show iso-or hypometabolism on {sup 18}F-FDG PET, there have been problems in detection of primary or recurrent tumor and in differentiation from benign lesion with {sup 18}F-FDG PET. We investigated the usefulness of {sup 11}C-methionine PET in characterizing brain lesions in these conditions. In 34 patients with brain lesions (27 for initial diagnosis, 7 for detecting recurrence ) who showed hypo- or isometabolism compared to normal brain tissue on {sup 18}F-FDG PET, we performed {sup 11}C-methionine PET. Five minutes after injection of 550 MBq {sup 11}C-methionine, attenuation corrected brain images were obtained with a dedicated PET scanner. Brain lesions were 18 gliomas, 4 metastatic brain tumors, 2 meningiomas, 1 mixed germ cell tumor and 3 benign tumors and 6 non-tumorous lesions (3 neurocysticercosis, 2 meningiomas, 1 mixed germ cell tumor and 3 benign tumors and 6 non-tumorous lesions (3 neurocysticercosis, 2 tumor necrosis, 1 granuloma). To find the correlation between methione uptake and proliferation activity, Ki 67 proliferation Index in 8 patients or Proliferation index (P1=G2+M+S/total cycle) using DNA flow cytometry in 10 patients were obtained. Of 25 tumorous lesions without definitive hypermetabolism on {sup 18}F-FDG PET, all except two glioma (92%) showed moderate to high uptake in entire or thick peripheral tumor uptake in {sup 11}C-methionine PET. The uptake ratio of tumor to normal brain in {sup 18}F-FDG and {sup 11}C-methionine PET were 0.96 {+-}0.32 and 2.43 {+-} 1.26, respectively. Nine benign lesions with hypo- or isometabolism on {sup 18}F-FDG PET were also no significantly increased {sup 11}C-methionine uptake. {sup 11}C-methionine uptake and proliferation activity were correlated with Ki 67 index or PI (r=0.6). Two glioma shown no increased {sup 11}C-methionine uptake had low proliferative activity (Ki 67 < 1%). {sup 11}C-methionin PET could detect brain tumors and differentiate brain lesions with high

  16. PET/MR in oncology: an introduction with focus on MR and future perspectives for hybrid imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balyasnikova, Svetlana; Löfgren, Johan; de Nijs, Robin; Zamogilnaya, Yanna; Højgaard, Liselotte; Fischer, Barbara M

    2012-01-01

    After more than 20 years of research, a fully integrated PET/MR scanner was launched in 2010 enabling simultaneous acquisition of PET and MR imaging. Currently, no clinical indication for combined PET/MR has been established, however the expectations are high. In this paper we will discuss some of the challenges inherent in this new technology, but focus on potential applications for simultaneous PET/MR in the field of oncology. Methods and tracers for use with the PET technology will be familiar to most readers of this journal; thus this paper aims to provide a short and basic introduction to a number of different MRI techniques, such as DWI-MR (diffusion weighted imaging MR), DCE-MR (dynamic contrast enhanced MR), MRS (MR spectroscopy) and MR for attenuation correction of PET. All MR techniques presented in this paper have shown promising results in the treatment of patients with solid tumors and could be applied together with PET increasing the amount of information about the tissues of interest. The potential clinical benefit of applying PET/MR in staging, radiotherapy planning and treatment evaluation in oncology, as well as the research perspectives for the use of PET/MR in the development of new tracers and drugs will be discussed. PMID:23145362

  17. A near-infrared confocal scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungwoo; Yoo, Hongki

    2014-06-01

    In the semiconductor industry, manufacturing of three-dimensional (3D) packages or 3D integrated circuits is a high-performance technique that requires combining several functions in a small volume. Through-silicon vias, which are vertical electrical connections extending through a wafer, can be used to direct signals between stacked chips, thus increasing areal density by stacking and connecting multiple patterned chips. While defect detection is essential in the semiconductor manufacturing process, it is difficult to identify defects within a wafer or to monitor the bonding results between bonded surfaces because silicon and many other semiconductor materials are opaque to visible wavelengths. In this context, near-infrared (NIR) imaging is a promising non-destructive method to detect defects within silicon chips, to inspect bonding between chips and to monitor the chip alignment since NIR transmits through silicon. In addition, a confocal scanner provides high-contrast, optically-sectioned images of the specimen due to its ability to reject out-of-focus noise. In this study, we report an NIR confocal scanner that rapidly acquires high-resolution images with a large field of view through silicon. Two orthogonal line-scanning images can be acquired without rotating the system or the specimen by utilizing two orthogonally configured resonant scanning mirrors. This NIR confocal scanner can be efficiently used as an in-line inspection system when manufacturing semiconductor devices by rapidly detecting defects on and beneath the surface.

  18. Strategies to reduce radiation dose in cardiac PET/CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tung Hsin; Wu, Nien-Yun; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Wu, Jay; S. P. Mok, Greta; Yang, Ching-Ching; Huang, Tzung-Chi

    2011-08-01

    Our aim was to investigate CT dose reduction strategies on a hybrid PET/CT scanner for cardiac applications.MaterialsImage quality and dose estimation of different CT scanning protocols for CT coronary angiography (CTCA), and CT-based attenuation correction for PET imaging were investigated. Fifteen patients underwent CTCA, perfusion PET imaging at rest and under stress, and FDG PET for myocardial viability. These patients were divided into three groups based on the CTCA technique performed: retrospectively gated helical (RGH), ECG tube current modulation (ETCM), and prospective gated axial (PGA) acquisitions. All emission images were corrected for photon attenuation using CT images obtained by default setting and an ultra-low dose CT (ULDCT) scan.ResultsRadiation dose in RGH technique was 22.2±4.0 mSv. It was reduced to 10.95±0.82 and 4.13±0.31 mSv using ETCM and PGA techniques, respectively. Radiation dose in CT transmission scan was reduced by 96.5% (from 4.53±0.5 to 0.16±0.01 mSv) when applying ULDCT as compared to the default CT. No significant difference in terms of image quality was found among various protocols.ConclusionThe proposed CT scanning strategies, i.e. ETCM or PGA for CTCA and ULDCT for PET attenuation correction, could reduce radiation dose up to 47% without degrading imaging quality in an integrated cardiac PET/CT coronary artery examination.

  19. Clinical PET/MRI in neurooncology: opportunities and challenges from a single-institution perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marner, Lisbeth; Henriksen, Otto M; Lundemann, Micha