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Sample records for invasive streptococcus pyogenes

  1. [Streptococcus pyogenes infection in paediatrics: from pharyngotonsillitis to invasive infections].

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    Espadas Maciá, David; Flor Macián, Eva María; Borrás, Rafael; Poujois Gisbert, Sandrine; Muñoz Bonet, Juan Ignacio

    2018-02-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes or Group A Streptococci (GAS) cause many infections in infancy. Changes in its epidemiology have been described in recent years, including an increase in invasive infections (iGAS). A retrospective-descriptive study was conducted on children less than 15 years old, with GAS infections, in particular iGAS, and their complications from February 2004-April 2014. A total of 2,192 positive cultures were obtained of which 92.7% were pharyngeal cultures. Twenty-nine patients were admitted to hospital: 4 with suppurative complications, 7 post-infective, 14 iGAS, and 4 probable iGAS cases. There were no differences in the frequency of GAS isolations/year. Non-invasive isolates were more frequent in winter and spring (P<.001), and 68.3% were in patients younger than 5 years. The incidence of iGAS was 2.1/100,000 children/year. There was no seasonality, and it was more frequent in younger children (P=.039). The most common diagnosis was pneumonia (6/14). Eight patients required intensive care. They were treated empirically with second or third-generation cephalosporin or with intravenous penicillin, and pneumonia required longer treatment times (P=.016). All GAS isolates were sensitive to penicillin, and 10.6% were resistant to erythromycin. The time spent in hospital was longer for iGAS than other cases (P=.028). No patients died. Pharyngotonsillitis caused by GAS is common in childhood, and its incidence is increasing in children younger than 5 years. At the moment, post-infectious complications are rare. Invasive infections are the most severe forms of presentation, and are more common in younger children. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Invasive disease by Streptococcus pyogenes: patients hospitalized for 6 years.

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    Arias-Constantí, Vanessa; Trenchs-Sainz de la Maza, Victoria; Sanz-Marcos, Nuria Elvira; Guitart-Pardellans, Carmina; Gené-Giralt, Amadeu; Luaces-Cubells, Carles

    2017-07-10

    The last years an increase of severe cases of invasive disease (ID) due to Streptococcus pyogenes or streptococcus b-hemolytic group A (SGA) had been detected. The aim of this study was to analyze the epidemiology and the clinical features of ID due to SGA in a tertiary Pediatric Hospital. Retrospective study in a Pediatric hospital, of all in-patients with final diagnosis of ID due to SGA during 6 years (2009-2014). To consider ID, SGA had to be isolated in sterile samples; in patients with fascitis necroticans in skin samples or in any sample in patients with the diagnostic of Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome (STSS). The SSTS was defined as hypotension and at least 2 of these criteria: renal failure, hepatic failure, acute respiratory distress, tissue necrosis or desquamative erythematous rash. Demographic data, type of infection, risk factors, clinical presentation, analytical data at admission, treatment, need for admission to a pediatric intensive care unit, microbiological data, hospital stay and evolution were collected. Fifty-two (52) cases were included (12/10,000 of all inpatients); 3 years-old was the medium age (p25-75: 1.4-6.9 years); 28 (53.8%) were boys. Fourteen patients (26.9%) had risk factors. Fever was the major symptom (51 patients, 98.1%). The skin lesions were the most frequent clinical manifestations found (21; 40.4%). In 50 (96%) cases, SGA was isolated in at least one sterile sample. Skin and soft tissue infections were diagnosed in 14 patients (26.9%), 14 (26.9%) pneumonias, 12 (23.1%) bones and joints infections, 10 (19.2%) SSTS, 6 (11.5%) occult bacteremia, 4 (7.7%) meningitis and 2 (3.8%) sepsis. Surgery was required in 18 cases (34.6%) and 17 patients (32.7%) needed intensive care. The medium hospital stay was 9.5 days (p25-75: 8-15 days). Three patients presented sequels and one patient died. The ID due to SGA was a rare but serious reason for hospital admission. Skin and soft tissue infections, and pleuroneumonia were the most

  3. Non-invasive monitoring of Streptococcus pyogenes vaccine efficacy using biophotonic imaging.

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    Faraz M Alam

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes infection of the nasopharynx represents a key step in the pathogenic cycle of this organism and a major focus for vaccine development, requiring robust models to facilitate the screening of potentially protective antigens. One antigen that may be an important target for vaccination is the chemokine protease, SpyCEP, which is cell surface-associated and plays a role in pathogenesis. Biophotonic imaging (BPI can non-invasively characterize the spatial location and abundance of bioluminescent bacteria in vivo. We have developed a bioluminescent derivative of a pharyngeal S. pyogenes strain by transformation of an emm75 clinical isolate with the luxABCDE operon. Evaluation of isogenic recombinant strains in vitro and in vivo confirmed that bioluminescence conferred a growth deficit that manifests as a fitness cost during infection. Notwithstanding this, bioluminescence expression permitted non-invasive longitudinal quantitation of S. pyogenes within the murine nasopharynx albeit with a detection limit corresponding to approximately 10(5 bacterial colony forming units (CFU in this region. Vaccination of mice with heat killed streptococci, or with SpyCEP led to a specific IgG response in the serum. BPI demonstrated that both vaccine candidates reduced S. pyogenes bioluminescence emission over the course of nasopharyngeal infection. The work suggests the potential for BPI to be used in the non-invasive longitudinal evaluation of potential S. pyogenes vaccines.

  4. Non-Invasive Monitoring of Streptococcus pyogenes Vaccine Efficacy Using Biophotonic Imaging

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    Alam, Faraz M.; Bateman, Colin; Turner, Claire E.; Wiles, Siouxsie; Sriskandan, Shiranee

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes infection of the nasopharynx represents a key step in the pathogenic cycle of this organism and a major focus for vaccine development, requiring robust models to facilitate the screening of potentially protective antigens. One antigen that may be an important target for vaccination is the chemokine protease, SpyCEP, which is cell surface-associated and plays a role in pathogenesis. Biophotonic imaging (BPI) can non-invasively characterize the spatial location and abundance of bioluminescent bacteria in vivo. We have developed a bioluminescent derivative of a pharyngeal S. pyogenes strain by transformation of an emm75 clinical isolate with the luxABCDE operon. Evaluation of isogenic recombinant strains in vitro and in vivo confirmed that bioluminescence conferred a growth deficit that manifests as a fitness cost during infection. Notwithstanding this, bioluminescence expression permitted non-invasive longitudinal quantitation of S. pyogenes within the murine nasopharynx albeit with a detection limit corresponding to approximately 105 bacterial colony forming units (CFU) in this region. Vaccination of mice with heat killed streptococci, or with SpyCEP led to a specific IgG response in the serum. BPI demonstrated that both vaccine candidates reduced S. pyogenes bioluminescence emission over the course of nasopharyngeal infection. The work suggests the potential for BPI to be used in the non-invasive longitudinal evaluation of potential S. pyogenes vaccines. PMID:24278474

  5. Detection of invasive protein profile of Streptococcus pyogenes M1 isolates from pharyngitis patients.

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    Hasegawa, Tadao; Okamoto, Akira; Kamimura, Takuya; Tatsuno, Ichiro; Hashikawa, Shin-Nosuke; Yabutani, Mitsutaka; Matsumoto, Masakado; Yamada, Keiko; Isaka, Masanori; Minami, Masaaki; Ohta, Michio

    2010-03-01

    Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) is a re-emerging infectious disease in Japan and many other developed countries. Epidemiological studies have revealed that the M1 serotype of Streptococcus pyogenes is the most dominant causative isolate of STSS. Recent characterization of M1 isolates revealed that the mutation of covS, one of the two-component regulatory systems, plays an important role in STSS by altering protein expression. We analyzed the M1 S. pyogenes clinical isolates before or after 1990 in Japan, using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). PFGE profiles were different between the isolates before and after 1990. Markedly different profiles among isolates after 1990 from STSS and pharyngitis patients were detected. Sequence analysis of two-component regulatory systems showed that covS mutations were detected not only in STSS but also in three pharyngitis isolates, in which proteins from the culture supernatant displayed the invasive type. The mutated CovS detected in the pharyngitis isolates had impaired function on the production of streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B (SpeB) analyzed by 2-DE. These results suggest that several covS mutations that lead to the malfunction of the CovS protein occurred even in pharyngeal infection.

  6. Streptococcus pyogenes toxic-shock syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Antunes, R; Diogo, M; Carvalho, A; Pimentel, T; Oliveira, J

    2011-01-01

    Recently there has been an exponential increase in invasive infections caused by Streptococcus ß hemolyticcus group A. In about one third of cases they are complicated by toxic shock syndrome, characterized by septic shock and multiorgan failure. The authors, by their rarity, report a case of bacteraemia caused by Streptococcus pyogenes complicated by toxic shock syndrome.

  7. Description of the Pathogenic Features of Streptococcus pyogenes Isolates from Invasive and Non-Invasive Diseases in Aichi, Japan.

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    Matsumoto, Masakado; Yamada, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Masahiro; Adachi, Hirokazu; Kobayashi, Shinichi; Yamashita, Teruo; Minagawa, Hiroko; Tatsuno, Ichiro; Hasegawa, Tadao

    2016-07-22

    We identified hypervirulent Streptococcus pyogenes in 27 and 420 isolates from patients with invasive and non-invasive diseases, respectively, in Aichi Prefecture, Japan, between 2003 and 2012, in an attempt to understand why the prevalence of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) suddenly increased in this location during 2011. Hypervirulent strains belong to the emm1 genotype, with a mutation in the covR/S genes that regulate many other genes, encoding virulence determinants and resulting in the absence of the proteinase streptococcal exotoxin B and the production of virulence factors such as the superantigen streptococcal exotoxin A, the nuclease streptococcal DNase, the cytotoxin NAD-glycohydrolase, and the hemolysin streptolysin O. We found 1 strain from invasive disease and 1 from non-invasive disease with traits similar to those of hypervirulent strains, except that the sda1 gene was absent. We also found 1 non-emm1 strain with phenotypic and genetic traits identical to those of the emm1 hypervirulent strains except that it did not belong to emm1 genotype, from non-invasive diseases cases in 2011. These findings suggested that hypervirulent and hypervirulent-like strains from invasive and non-invasive disease cases could have at least partially contributed to the sudden increase in the number of patients with STSS in Aichi during 2011.

  8. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome caused by the dissemination of an invasive emm3/ST15 strain of Streptococcus pyogenes.

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    Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Nai, Emina; Yoshida, Tomohiro; Endo, Shota; Hamajima, Emi; Akiyama, Satoka; Ikuta, Yoji; Obana, Natsuko; Kawaguchi, Takahiro; Hayashi, Kenta; Noda, Masahiro; Sumita, Tomoko; Kokaji, Masayuki; Katori, Tatsuo; Hashino, Masanori; Oba, Kunihiro; Kuroda, Makoto

    2017-12-18

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus [GAS]) is a major human pathogen that causes a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. Although invasive GAS (iGAS) infections are relatively uncommon, emm3/ST15 GAS is a highly virulent, invasive, and pathogenic strain. Global molecular epidemiology analysis has suggested that the frequency of emm3 GAS has been recently increasing. A 14-year-old patient was diagnosed with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome and severe pneumonia, impaired renal function, and rhabdomyolysis. GAS was isolated from a culture of endotracheal aspirates and designated as KS030. Comparative genome analysis suggested that KS030 is classified as emm3 (emm-type) and ST15 (multilocus sequencing typing [MLST]), which is similar to iGAS isolates identified in the UK (2013) and Switzerland (2015). We conclude that the global dissemination of emm3/ST15 GAS strain has the potential to cause invasive disease.

  9. Streptococcus pyogenes translocates across an epithelial barrier.

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    Sumitomo, Tomoko

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a β-hemolytic organism responsible for a wide variety of human diseases that commonly occur as self-limiting purulent diseases of the pharynx and skin. Although the occurrence of invasive infections by S. pyogenes is rare, mortality rates remain high even with progressive medical therapy. As a prerequisite for causing the severe invasive disease, S. pyogenes must invade underlying sterile tissues by translocating across the epithelial barrier. In this study, streptolysin S and SpeB were identified as the novel factors that facilitate bacterial translocation via degradation of intercellular junctions. Furthermore, we found that S. pyogenes exploits host plasminogen for acceleration of bacterial invasion into deeper tissues via tricellular tight junctions. Here, I would like to show our study on bacterial translocation across the epithelial barrier through paracellular route.

  10. Controlled Human Infection for Vaccination Against Streptococcus Pyogenes

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    2018-03-07

    Streptococcus Pyogenes Pharyngitis; Streptococcus Pharyngitis; Strep Throat; Streptococcus Pyogenes Infection; Group A Streptococcus: B Hemolytic Pharyngitis; Group A Streptococcal Infection; Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections; Bacterial Infections

  11. Virulence factors of Streptococcus pyogenes strains from women in peri-labor with invasive infections.

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    Golińska, E; van der Linden, M; Więcek, G; Mikołajczyk, D; Machul, A; Samet, A; Piórkowska, A; Dorycka, M; Heczko, P B; Strus, M

    2016-05-01

    Invasive group A streptococcal (GAS) infections constitute an important epidemiological problem. Many cases occur in women during the postnatal period. The objective of this study was to evaluate the presence of the genes responsible for production of iron-chelating protein (perR) and superantigens (speA, speB, speC, speF, speG, speH, speI, speJ, speK, speL, speM, smeZ, and ssa) in S. pyogenes strains isolated from invasive infections in women after delivery. Furthermore, this study sought to verify whether S. pyogenes strains show special phenotypic and genotypic (sla, spy1325) characteristics that may play a decisive role in adherence to the genital tract epithelium. Moreover, the emm-types and antibiotic susceptibility were determined. We tested 30 invasive S. pyogenes strains isolated from postpartum invasive infection and 37 GAS control strains isolated from the genital tracts of asymptomatic multiparous women. The majority of the tested strains were shown to express two types of emm genes (1 and 28), though emm -12, -28, -75 and -89 were uniquely expressed in the group of strains isolated from invasive infections. A significantly higher prevalence of perR in the strains from puerperal fever was shown. Significant differences were also found between the two groups with respect to the incidence of the genes related to adherence; GAS strains originating from women with sepsis/puerperal fever showed presence of these genes less frequently than those of the control group. Although differences in frequencies of the gene coding for various superantigens were noted between the compared groups of GAS strains, they were not significant.

  12. Streptococcus pyogenes CAMP factor promotes bacterial adhesion and invasion in pharyngeal epithelial cells without serum via PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

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    Kurosawa, Mie; Oda, Masataka; Domon, Hisanori; Isono, Toshihito; Nakamura, Yuki; Saitoh, Issei; Hayasaki, Haruaki; Yamaguchi, Masaya; Kawabata, Shigetada; Terao, Yutaka

    2018-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a bacterium that causes systemic diseases, such as pharyngitis and toxic shock syndrome, via oral- or nasal-cavity infection. S. pyogenes produces various molecules known to function with serum components that lead to bacterial adhesion and invasion in human tissues. In this study, we identified a novel S. pyogenes adhesin/invasin. Our results revealed that CAMP factor promoted streptococcal adhesion and invasion in pharyngeal epithelial Detroit562 cells without serum. Recombinant CAMP factor initially localized on the membranes of cells and then became internalized in the cytosol following S. pyogenes infection. Additionally, CAMP factor phosphorylated phosphoinositide 3-kinase and serine-threonine kinase in the cells. ELISA results demonstrate that CAMP factor affected the amount of phosphorylated phosphoinositide 3-kinase and serine-threonine kinase in Detroit562 cells. Furthermore, CAMP factor did not reverse the effect of phosphoinositide 3-kinase knockdown by small interfering RNA in reducing the level of adhesion and invasion of S. pyogenes isogenic cfa-deficient mutant. These results suggested that S. pyogenes CAMP factor activated the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/serine-threonine kinase signaling pathway, promoting S. pyogenes invasion of Detroit562 cells without serum. Our findings suggested that CAMP factor played an important role on adhesion and invasion in pharyngeal epithelial cells. Copyright © 2017 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. A cluster of ecthyma outbreaks caused by a single clone of invasive and highly infective Streptococcus pyogenes.

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    Wasserzug, Oshri; Valinsky, Lea; Klement, Eyal; Bar-Zeev, Yael; Davidovitch, Nadav; Orr, Nadav; Korenman, Zina; Kayouf, Raid; Sela, Tamar; Ambar, Ruhama; Derazne, Estela; Dagan, Ron; Zarka, Salman

    2009-05-01

    Ecthyma is an invasive, ulcerated skin infection. Four ecthyma outbreaks occurred in different infantry units in the Israeli Defense Force from October 2004 through February 2005. Morbidity attack rates in the first 3 outbreaks were 89% (49 of 55 soldiers), 73% (32 of 44), and 82% (37 of 45). In the fourth outbreak, in which early intervention (antimicrobial treatment and improvement of hygiene) was applied, the attack rate was 25% (10 of 40 soldiers). In the first outbreak cluster, 4 soldiers experienced poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis, and 5 cases of systemic sequelae were recorded (1 case of severe septic shock, 3 cases of pneumonia, and 1 case of septic olecranon bursitis). Streptococcus pyogenes and Staphylococcus aureus were isolated from ecthyma sores, oropharynx, and anterior nares of affected and unaffected soldiers involved in all 4 outbreaks. Although the S. aureus isolates had different genomic profiles, >90% of S. pyogenes isolates were identified as belonging to a single clone, emm type 81, T type 8. Epidemiological investigation revealed that the hygiene levels of the soldiers and their living conditions were probably the most important cause for the difference in attack rates, wound severity, and systemic sequelae found between and within the units. Our study demonstrates the possible ramifications of the combination of a virulent and highly infective S. pyogenes strain and poor living conditions, and it emphasizes the importance of early intervention in such conditions.

  14. Changing epidemiology of Streptococcus pyogenes emm types and associated invasive and noninvasive infections in Southern Taiwan.

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    Su, Yu-Fang; Wang, Shih-Min; Lin, Ya-Lan; Chuang, Woei-Jer; Lin, Yee-Shin; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Lin, Ming T; Liu, Ching-Chuan

    2009-08-01

    A total of 242 isolates were recovered from 76 patients with invasive diseases, 89 with scarlet fever, and 77 with pharyngitis. The most frequent emm types were types 12 (43.4%), 4 (18.2%), and 1 (16.9%). emm12 reemerged in 2005 and peaked in 2007. emm11 was recovered only from patients with invasive disease.

  15. Thermoregulation of Capsule Production by Streptococcus pyogenes

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    Kang, Song Ok; Wright, Jordan O.; Tesorero, Rafael A.; Lee, Hyunwoo; Beall, Bernard; Cho, Kyu Hong

    2012-01-01

    The capsule of Streptococcus pyogenes serves as an adhesin as well as an anti-phagocytic factor by binding to CD44 on keratinocytes of the pharyngeal mucosa and the skin, the main entry sites of the pathogen. We discovered that S. pyogenes HSC5 and MGAS315 strains are further thermoregulated for capsule production at a post-transcriptional level in addition to the transcriptional regulation by the CovRS two-component regulatory system. When the transcription of the hasABC capsular biosynthetic locus was de-repressed through mutation of the covRS system, the two strains, which have been used for pathogenesis studies in the laboratory, exhibited markedly increased capsule production at sub-body temperature. Employing transposon mutagenesis, we found that CvfA, a previously identified membrane-associated endoribonuclease, is required for the thermoregulation of capsule synthesis. The mutation of the cvfA gene conferred increased capsule production regardless of temperature. However, the amount of the capsule transcript was not changed by the mutation, indicating that a post-transcriptional regulator mediates between CvfA and thermoregulated capsule production. When we tested naturally occurring invasive mucoid strains, a high percentage (11/53, 21%) of the strains exhibited thermoregulated capsule production. As expected, the mucoid phenotype of these strains at sub-body temperature was due to mutations within the chromosomal covRS genes. Capsule thermoregulation that exhibits high capsule production at lower temperatures that occur on the skin or mucosal surface potentially confers better capability of adhesion and invasion when S. pyogenes penetrates the epithelial surface. PMID:22615992

  16. Importance of whole genome sequencing for the assessment of outbreaks in diagnostic laboratories: analysis of a case series of invasive Streptococcus pyogenes infections.

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    Tagini, F; Aubert, B; Troillet, N; Pillonel, T; Praz, G; Crisinel, P A; Prod'hom, G; Asner, S; Greub, G

    2017-07-01

    Outbreaks of Streptococcus pyogenes hypervirulent clones are constant public health threats. In western Switzerland, an increase of severe cases of S. pyogenes invasive infections was observed between December 2015 and March 2016. Our aim was (i) to investigate these cases by the use of Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS) and (ii) to determine the specific virulome and resistome of each isolate in order to undertake adequate public health measures. Eleven Streptococcus pyogenes strains isolated from 11 patients with severe invasive infections between December 13, 2015 and March 12, 2016 were included in our study. Practically, emm-typing, MLST and WGS were used to investigate the relatedness between the isolates. The presence of virulence and antibiotic resistance genes as well as mutations in transcriptional regulators of virulence and in genes encoding for antibiotic targets were assessed. Three and two groups of isolates shared the same emm-type and ST type, respectively. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) analysis revealed 14 to 32 SNPs between the strains of the same emm-type group, ruling out the possibility of a clonal outbreak. Mutations found in covS and rocA could partially explain an increased virulence. As these reassuring results were obtained in less than 10 days, no specific hospital hygiene and no dedicated public health measures had to be undertaken. WGS is a powerful technique to discriminate between closely related strains, excluding an outbreak in less than 10 days. Moreover, WGS provided extensive data on the virulome and resistome of all these strains.

  17. (Roxb) Schltr Extract against Streptococcus pyogenes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the anti-Streptococcus pyogenes activity of the chloroform extract of Boesenbergia pandurata (Roxb.) Schltr. (Zingiberaceae) and investigate its possible antibacterial mechanisms of action. Methods: Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) values were ...

  18. Status of research and development of vaccines for Streptococcus pyogenes.

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    Steer, Andrew C; Carapetis, Jonathan R; Dale, James B; Fraser, John D; Good, Michael F; Guilherme, Luiza; Moreland, Nicole J; Mulholland, E Kim; Schodel, Florian; Smeesters, Pierre R

    2016-06-03

    Streptococcus pyogenes is an important global pathogen, causing considerable morbidity and mortality, especially in low and middle income countries where rheumatic heart disease and invasive infections are common. There is a number of promising vaccine candidates, most notably those based on the M protein, the key virulence factor for the bacterium. Vaccines against Streptococcus pyogenes are considered as impeded vaccines because of a number of crucial barriers to development. Considerable effort is needed by key players to bring current vaccine candidates through phase III clinical trials and there is a clear need to develop a roadmap for future development of current and new candidates. Copyright © 2016 World Health Organization. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Novel Regulatory Small RNAs in Streptococcus pyogenes

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    Tesorero, Rafael A.; Yu, Ning; Wright, Jordan O.; Svencionis, Juan P.; Cheng, Qiang; Kim, Jeong-Ho; Cho, Kyu Hong

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A Streptococcus or GAS) is a Gram-positive bacterial pathogen that has shown complex modes of regulation of its virulence factors to cause diverse diseases. Bacterial small RNAs are regarded as novel widespread regulators of gene expression in response to environmental signals. Recent studies have revealed that several small RNAs (sRNAs) have an important role in S. pyogenes physiology and pathogenesis by regulating gene expression at the translational level. To search for new sRNAs in S. pyogenes, we performed a genomewide analysis through computational prediction followed by experimental verification. To overcome the limitation of low accuracy in computational prediction, we employed a combination of three different computational algorithms (sRNAPredict, eQRNA and RNAz). A total of 45 candidates were chosen based on the computational analysis, and their transcription was analyzed by reverse-transcriptase PCR and Northern blot. Through this process, we discovered 7 putative novel trans-acting sRNAs. Their abundance varied between different growth phases, suggesting that their expression is influenced by environmental or internal signals. Further, to screen target mRNAs of an sRNA, we employed differential RNA sequencing analysis. This study provides a significant resource for future study of small RNAs and their roles in physiology and pathogenesis of S. pyogenes. PMID:23762235

  20. Molecular typing of Chinese Streptococcus pyogenes isolates.

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    You, Yuanhai; Wang, Haibin; Bi, Zhenwang; Walker, Mark; Peng, Xianhui; Hu, Bin; Zhou, Haijian; Song, Yanyan; Tao, Xiaoxia; Kou, Zengqiang; Meng, Fanliang; Zhang, Menghan; Bi, Zhenqiang; Luo, Fengji; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2015-06-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes causes human infections ranging from mild pharyngitis and impetigo to serious diseases including necrotizing fasciitis and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. The objective of this study was to compare molecular emm typing and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) with multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) for genotyping of Chinese S. pyogenes isolates. Molecular emm typing and PFGE were performed using standard protocols. Seven variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) loci reported in a previous study were used to genotype 169 S. pyogenes geographically-diverse isolates from China isolated from a variety of disease syndromes. Multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis provided greater discrimination between isolates when compared to emm typing and PFGE. Removal of a single VNTR locus (Spy2) reduced the sensitivity by only 0.7%, which suggests that Spy2 was not informative for the isolates screened. The results presented support the use of MLVA as a powerful epidemiological tool for genotyping S. pyogenes clinical isolates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Acanthamoeba castellanii interactions with Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes.

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    Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Yee Ong, Timothy Yu; Jung, Suk Yul; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2017-12-01

    Among the genus Streptococcus, S. pyogenes and S. pneumoniae are the major causes of pharyngitis, impetigo, pneumonia and meningitis in humans. Streptococcus spp. are facultative anaerobes that are nutritionally fastidious, yet survive in the environment and target the predisposed population. Antibacterial disinfectants have been partially effective only, indicating the need for novel preventative measures and to understand mechanisms of bacterial resistance. Acanthamoeba is a free-living protist that is known to harbour microbial pathogens, provide shelter, and assist in their transmission to susceptible population. The overall aim of this study was to determine whether S. pyogenes and S. pneumoniae can interact with A. castellanii by associating, invading, and surviving inside trophozoites and cysts. It was observed that both S. pyogenes and S. pneumoniae were able to associate as well as invade and/or taken up by the phagocytic A. castellanii trophozoite. Notably, S. pyogenes and S. pneumoniae survived the encystation process, avoided phagocytosis, multiplied, and exhibited higher recovery from the mature cysts, compared with the trophozoite stage (approximately 2 bacteria per amoebae ratio for cyst stage versus 0.02 bacteria per amoeba ration for trophozoite stage). As Acanthamoeba cysts are resilient and can disperse through the air, A. castellanii can act as a vector in providing shelter, facilitating growth and possibly genetic exchanges. In addition, these interactions may contribute to S. pyogenes and S. pneumoniae survival in harsh environments, and transmission to susceptible population and possibly affecting their virulence. Future studies will determine the molecular mechanisms associated with Acanthamoeba interactions with Streptococcus and the evolution of pathogenic bacteria and in turn expedite the discovery of novel therapeutic and/or preventative measures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Gene Repertoire Evolution of Streptococcus pyogenes Inferred from Phylogenomic Analysis with Streptococcus canis and Streptococcus dysgalactiae

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    Lefébure, Tristan; Richards, Vince P.; Lang, Ping; Pavinski-Bitar, Paulina; Stanhope, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, is an important human pathogen classified within the pyogenic group of streptococci, exclusively adapted to the human host. Our goal was to employ a comparative evolutionary approach to better understand the genomic events concomitant with S. pyogenes human adaptation. As part of ascertaining these events, we sequenced the genome of one of the potential sister species, the agricultural pathogen S. canis, and combined it in a comparative genomics reconciliation analysis with two other closely related species, Streptococcus dysgalactiae and Streptococcus equi, to determine the genes that were gained and lost during S. pyogenes evolution. Genome wide phylogenetic analyses involving 15 Streptococcus species provided convincing support for a clade of S. equi, S. pyogenes, S. dysgalactiae, and S. canis and suggested that the most likely S. pyogenes sister species was S. dysgalactiae. The reconciliation analysis identified 113 genes that were gained on the lineage leading to S. pyogenes. Almost half (46%) of these gained genes were phage associated and 14 showed significant matches to experimentally verified bacteria virulence factors. Subsequent to the origin of S. pyogenes, over half of the phage associated genes were involved in 90 different LGT events, mostly involving different strains of S. pyogenes, but with a high proportion involving the horse specific pathogen S. equi subsp. equi, with the directionality almost exclusively (86%) in the S. pyogenes to S. equi direction. Streptococcus agalactiae appears to have played an important role in the evolution of S. pyogenes with a high proportion of LGTs originating from this species. Overall the analysis suggests that S. pyogenes adaptation to the human host was achieved in part by (i) the integration of new virulence factors (e.g. speB, and the sal locus) and (ii) the construction of new regulation networks (e.g. rgg, and to some extent speB). PMID:22666370

  3. Gene repertoire evolution of Streptococcus pyogenes inferred from phylogenomic analysis with Streptococcus canis and Streptococcus dysgalactiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tristan Lefébure

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes, is an important human pathogen classified within the pyogenic group of streptococci, exclusively adapted to the human host. Our goal was to employ a comparative evolutionary approach to better understand the genomic events concomitant with S. pyogenes human adaptation. As part of ascertaining these events, we sequenced the genome of one of the potential sister species, the agricultural pathogen S. canis, and combined it in a comparative genomics reconciliation analysis with two other closely related species, Streptococcus dysgalactiae and Streptococcus equi, to determine the genes that were gained and lost during S. pyogenes evolution. Genome wide phylogenetic analyses involving 15 Streptococcus species provided convincing support for a clade of S. equi, S. pyogenes, S. dysgalactiae, and S. canis and suggested that the most likely S. pyogenes sister species was S. dysgalactiae. The reconciliation analysis identified 113 genes that were gained on the lineage leading to S. pyogenes. Almost half (46% of these gained genes were phage associated and 14 showed significant matches to experimentally verified bacteria virulence factors. Subsequent to the origin of S. pyogenes, over half of the phage associated genes were involved in 90 different LGT events, mostly involving different strains of S. pyogenes, but with a high proportion involving the horse specific pathogen S. equi subsp. equi, with the directionality almost exclusively (86% in the S. pyogenes to S. equi direction. Streptococcus agalactiae appears to have played an important role in the evolution of S. pyogenes with a high proportion of LGTs originating from this species. Overall the analysis suggests that S. pyogenes adaptation to the human host was achieved in part by (i the integration of new virulence factors (e.g. speB, and the sal locus and (ii the construction of new regulation networks (e.g. rgg, and to some extent speB.

  4. Gene repertoire evolution of Streptococcus pyogenes inferred from phylogenomic analysis with Streptococcus canis and Streptococcus dysgalactiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefébure, Tristan; Richards, Vince P; Lang, Ping; Pavinski-Bitar, Paulina; Stanhope, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, is an important human pathogen classified within the pyogenic group of streptococci, exclusively adapted to the human host. Our goal was to employ a comparative evolutionary approach to better understand the genomic events concomitant with S. pyogenes human adaptation. As part of ascertaining these events, we sequenced the genome of one of the potential sister species, the agricultural pathogen S. canis, and combined it in a comparative genomics reconciliation analysis with two other closely related species, Streptococcus dysgalactiae and Streptococcus equi, to determine the genes that were gained and lost during S. pyogenes evolution. Genome wide phylogenetic analyses involving 15 Streptococcus species provided convincing support for a clade of S. equi, S. pyogenes, S. dysgalactiae, and S. canis and suggested that the most likely S. pyogenes sister species was S. dysgalactiae. The reconciliation analysis identified 113 genes that were gained on the lineage leading to S. pyogenes. Almost half (46%) of these gained genes were phage associated and 14 showed significant matches to experimentally verified bacteria virulence factors. Subsequent to the origin of S. pyogenes, over half of the phage associated genes were involved in 90 different LGT events, mostly involving different strains of S. pyogenes, but with a high proportion involving the horse specific pathogen S. equi subsp. equi, with the directionality almost exclusively (86%) in the S. pyogenes to S. equi direction. Streptococcus agalactiae appears to have played an important role in the evolution of S. pyogenes with a high proportion of LGTs originating from this species. Overall the analysis suggests that S. pyogenes adaptation to the human host was achieved in part by (i) the integration of new virulence factors (e.g. speB, and the sal locus) and (ii) the construction of new regulation networks (e.g. rgg, and to some extent speB).

  5. Evolutionary Constraints Shaping Streptococcus pyogenes-Host Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkening, Reid V; Federle, Michael J

    2017-07-01

    Research on the Gram-positive human-restricted pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A Streptococcus, GAS) has long focused on invasive illness, the most severe manifestations of GAS infection. Recent advances in descriptions of molecular mechanisms of GAS virulence, coupled with massive sequencing efforts to isolate genomes, have allowed the field to better understand the molecular and evolutionary changes leading to pandemic strains. These findings suggest that it is necessary to rethink the dogma involving GAS pathogenesis, and that the most productive avenues for research going forward may be investigations into GAS in its 'normal' habitat, the nasopharynx, and its ability to either live with its host in an asymptomatic lifestyle or as an agent of superficial infections. This review will consider these advances, focusing on the natural history of GAS, the evolution of pandemic strains, and novel roles for several key virulence factors that may allow the field to better understand their physiological role. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the variable domain of Scl2.3, a streptococcal collagen-like protein from invasive M3-type Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squeglia, Flavia; Bachert, Beth; Romano, Maria; Lukomski, Slawomir; Berisio, Rita

    2013-09-01

    Streptococcal collagen-like proteins (Scls) are widely expressed by the well recognized human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes. These surface proteins contain a signature central collagen-like region and an amino-terminal globular domain, termed the variable domain, which is protruded away from the cell surface by the collagen-like domain. Despite their recognized importance in bacterial pathogenicity, no structural information is presently available on proteins of the Scl class. The variable domain of Scl2 from invasive M3-type S. pyogenes has successfully been crystallized using vapour-diffusion methods. The crystals diffracted to 1.5 Å resolution and belonged to space group H32, with unit-cell parameters a = 44.23, b = 44.23, c = 227.83 Å. The crystal structure was solved by single-wavelength anomalous dispersion using anomalous signal from a europium chloride derivative.|

  7. Highly virulent M1 Streptococcus pyogenes isolates resistant to clindamycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plainvert, C; Martin, C; Loubinoux, J; Touak, G; Dmytruk, N; Collobert, G; Fouet, A; Ploy, M-C; Poyart, C

    2015-01-01

    Emm1-type group A Streptococcus (GAS), or Streptococcus pyogenes, is mostly responsible for invasive infections such as necrotizing fasciitis (NF) and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS). The recommended treatment of severe invasive GAS infections is a combination of clindamycin and penicillin. Until 2012, almost all emm1 isolates were susceptible to clindamycin. We aimed to identify the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of emm1 GAS clone resistant to clindamycin. GAS strains were characterized by emm sequence typing, detection of genes encoding pyrogenic exotoxins or superantigens. Cluster analysis was performed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Antibiotic susceptibility was assessed using disk diffusion and resistance genes were detected by PCR. A total of 1321 GAS invasive isolates were analyzed between January 2011 and December 2012. The overall number of invasive isolates resistant to clindamycin was 52 (3.9%); seven of them were emm1 isolates. All isolates had the same genomic markers: macrolide resistance due to the presence of the erm(B) gene, emm subtype 1.0, the same toxin or superantigen profile, PFGE pattern and sequence type. This is the first description of highly virulent GAS emm1 isolates resistant to clindamycin in France. This article strengthens the need for monitoring the epidemiology of invasive GAS strains as they could lead to changes in treatment guidelines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Nasopharyngeal Infection of Mice with Streptococcus pyogenes and In Vivo Detection of Superantigen Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeppa, Joseph J; Wakabayashi, Adrienne T; Kasper, Katherine J; Xu, Stacey X; Haeryfar, S M Mansour; McCormick, John K

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a globally prominent human-specific pathogen that is responsible for an enormous burden of infectious disease. Despite intensive experimental efforts to understand the molecular correlates that contribute to invasive infections, there has been less focus on S. pyogenes carriage and local infection of the nasopharynx. This chapter describes an acute nasopharyngeal infection model in mice that is utilized in our laboratory to study the role of superantigen toxins in the biology of S. pyogenes. We also describe a method to detect superantigen-specific T cell activation in vivo.

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the variable domain of Scl2.3, a streptococcal collagen-like protein from invasive M3-type Streptococcus pyogenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Squeglia, Flavia; Bachert, Beth; Romano, Maria; Lukomski, Slawomir; Berisio, Rita

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the variable domain of the collagen-like protein Scl2 from invasive M3-type S. pyogenes has successfully been crystallized. Single-wavelength anomalous dispersion experiments have been carried out to obtain experimental phases by preparing crystal derivatives with lanthanides. Model building and refinement, which are in progress, will provide the first structural clues for Scls. Streptococcal collagen-like proteins (Scls) are widely expressed by the well recognized human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes. These surface proteins contain a signature central collagen-like region and an amino-terminal globular domain, termed the variable domain, which is protruded away from the cell surface by the collagen-like domain. Despite their recognized importance in bacterial pathogenicity, no structural information is presently available on proteins of the Scl class. The variable domain of Scl2 from invasive M3-type S. pyogenes has successfully been crystallized using vapour-diffusion methods. The crystals diffracted to 1.5 Å resolution and belonged to space group H32, with unit-cell parameters a = 44.23, b = 44.23, c = 227.83 Å. The crystal structure was solved by single-wavelength anomalous dispersion using anomalous signal from a europium chloride derivative.|

  10. Streptococcus pyogenes meningitis in children: report of two cases and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana V. Arnoni

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes meningitis (SPM occurs sporadically, even with the increase of invasive streptococcal disease observed in the past years. We reported two cases of SPM in infants to alert pediatricians for the possibility of this agent as a cause of meningitis in previously healthy children.

  11. Identification of the Streptococcus pyogenes surface antigens recognised by pooled human immunoglobulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reglinski, Mark; Gierula, Magdalena; Lynskey, Nicola N.; Edwards, Robert J.; Sriskandan, Shiranee

    2015-01-01

    Immunity to common bacteria requires the generation of antibodies that promote opsonophagocytosis and neutralise toxins. Pooled human immunoglobulin is widely advocated as an adjunctive treatment for clinical Streptococcus pyogenes infection however, the protein targets of the reagent remain ill defined. Affinity purification of the anti-streptococcal antibodies present within pooled immunoglobulin resulted in the generation of an IgG preparation that promoted opsonophagocytic killing of S. pyogenes in vitro and provided passive immunity in vivo. Isolation of the streptococcal surface proteins recognised by pooled human immunoglobulin permitted identification and ranking of 94 protein antigens, ten of which were reproducibly identified across four contemporary invasive S. pyogenes serotypes (M1, M3, M12 and M89). The data provide novel insight into the action of pooled human immunoglobulin during invasive S. pyogenes infection, and demonstrate a potential route to enhance the efficacy of antibody based therapies. PMID:26508447

  12. Caracterización molecular de Streptococcus pyogenes causantes de enfermedad invasora y síndrome de shock tóxico estreptocócico Molecular characterization of Streptococcus pyogenes from invasive disease and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome episodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Traverso

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes es el agente causal de varias enfermedades comunes entre las que se incluyen la faringoamigdalitis, la escarlatina y el impétigo. Sin embargo, en las últimas décadas se ha registrado mundialmente un resurgimiento de casos de enfermedad invasora y síndrome de shock tóxico estreptocócico (SSTE. El propósito del presente trabajo fue estudiar la diversidad genética, los factores de virulencia (genes spe, sme, ssa y la sensibilidad a los antibióticos de 10 cepas de S. pyogenes causantes de enfermedad invasora y SSTE. Los aislamientos fueron recuperados de hemocultivos de pacientes internados en el Hospital Santamarina y en la Nueva Clínica Chacabuco (Tandil, Argentina entre diciembre de 2000 y abril de 2005. Predominaron 2 patrones de electroforesis en campo pulsante. El más frecuente comprendió 5 aislamientos del tipo emm1-T1, con perfil de toxinas speA, speB, speF, speG y smeZ. El segundo patrón más frecuente incluyó 2 aislamientos tipo emm3-TNT (speB, speF, speG. Estos dos tipos (emm1 y emm3 fueron los prevalentes en las infecciones invasoras. Las otras tres cepas correspondieron a los tipos emm49-TNT (speB, speC, speF, speG, emm75-T25 (speB, speF, speG y emm83-TNT (speB, speF, speG, ssa, smeZ. Se encontró diversidad genética entre las cepas aisladas, pero todos los aislamientos fueron sensibles a penicilina, cefotaxima, eritromicina, clindamicina, cloranfenicol, tetraciclina y rifampicina. Por tal motivo, aún es válido el tratamiento empírico con penicilina asociada a clindamicina.Streptococcus pyogenes causes a variety of common human diseases, including pharyngitis, scarlet fever and impetigo. Nevertheless, the past decades have witnessed a worldwide resurgence in invasive disease and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the genetic diversity, virulence gene distribution (spe, sme and ssa genes and susceptibility pattern of 10 S. pyogenes isolates

  13. High prevalence of fluoroquinolone-nonsusceptible Streptococcus pyogenes emm12 in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiun-Nong; Chang, Lin-Li; Lai, Chung-Hsu; Huang, Yi-Han; Chen, Wei-Fang; Yang, Chih-Hui; Hsu, Janine; Lin, Hsi-Hsun; Chen, Yen-Hsu

    2015-10-01

    Fluoroquinolone-nonsusceptible Streptococcus pyogenes has rapidly emerged in several countries. The aim of this study was to survey the epidemiology and molecular characteristics of fluoroquinolone-nonsusceptible S. pyogenes in Taiwan. A total of 350 consecutive S. pyogenes isolates were collected between January 2005 and December 2012, including 152 (43.4%) invasive and 198 (56.6%) noninvasive isolates. Thirty-nine isolates (11.1%) of S. pyogenes were nonsusceptible to fluoroquinolones, including one emm1/ST28, 4 emm4/ST39, 33 emm12/ST36, and 1 emm87/ST62. Of all the isolates, emm12 (50%) demonstrated the highest prevalence of fluoroquinolone nonsusceptibility. Alterations of Ser79Phe and Ala12Val in ParC were the most frequently mutations in fluoroquinolone-nonsusceptible S. pyogenes isolates. There were no amino acid substitutions in GyrB, and 1 emm87 isolate exhibited 3 nonsynonymous mutations in ParE. Our study reveals the emergence of fluoroquinolone-nonsusceptible S. pyogenes emm12/ST36 in Taiwan. Regular surveillance of fluoroquinolone susceptibility in S. pyogenes is suggested. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Biofilm Formation Enhances Fomite Survival of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes

    OpenAIRE

    Marks, Laura R.; Reddinger, Ryan M.; Hakansson, Anders P.

    2014-01-01

    Both Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus pneumoniae are widely thought to rapidly die outside the human host, losing infectivity following desiccation in the environment. However, to date, all literature investigating the infectivity of desiccated streptococci has used broth-grown, planktonic populations. In this study, we examined the impact of biofilm formation on environmental survival of clinical and laboratory isolates of S. pyogenes and S. pneumoniae as both organisms are thought t...

  15. Anti-Streptococcus pyogenes Activity of Selected Medicinal Plant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Original Research Article. Anti-Streptococcus pyogenes Activity of Selected. Medicinal Plant Extracts Used in Thai Traditional Medicine. Surasak Limsuwan1 and Supayang P Voravuthikunchai2*. 1Faculty of Traditional Thai Medicine and Natural Products Research Center of Excellence, 2Department of Microbiology and.

  16. Streptococcus pyogenes: an unusual cause of salpingitis. Case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blot, Mathieu; de Curraize, Claire; Salmon-Rousseau, Arnaud; Gehin, Sophie; Bador, Julien; Chavanet, Pascal; Neuwirth, Catherine; Piroth, Lionel; Amoureux, Lucie

    2017-10-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes can colonize genitourinary tract, but it is a rare cause of salpingitis. We report a case of bilateral salpingitis due to Streptococcus pyogenes in a 34-year-old woman using an intra-uterine device and which occurred following a family history of recurrent S. pyogenes infections. We review 12 other cases reported in the literature, and discuss the pathophysiological mechanisms of this potentially life-threatening disease. It is important to take into account consider Streptococcus pyogenes as a cause of acute salpingitis in the context of recent intra-familial Streptococcus pyogenes infections.

  17. Detection of Streptococcus pyogenes using rapid visual molecular assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiangna; He, Xiaoming; Li, Huan; Zhao, Jiangtao; Huang, Simo; Liu, Wei; Wei, Xiao; Ding, Yiwei; Wang, Zhaoyan; Zou, Dayang; Wang, Xuesong; Dong, Derong; Yang, Zhan; Yan, Xiabei; Huang, Liuyu; Du, Shuangkui; Yuan, Jing

    2015-09-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is an increasingly important pathogen in many parts of the world. Rapid and accurate detection of S. pyogenes aids in the control of the infection. In this study, a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay was developed and validated for the specific detection of S. pyogenes. The assay incorporates two methods: a chromogenic analysis using a calcein/Mn(2+) complex and real-time turbidity monitoring to assess the reaction. Both methods detected the target DNA within 60 min under 64°C isothermal conditions. The assay used specifically designed primers to target spy1258, and correctly identified 111 strains of S. pyogenes and 32 non-S. pyogenes strains, including other species of the genus Streptococcus. Tests using reference strains showed that the LAMP assay was highly specific. The sensitivity of the assay, with a detection limit of 1.49 pg DNA, was 10-fold greater than that of PCR. The LAMP assay established in this study is simple, fast and sensitive, and does not rely upon any special equipment; thus, it could be employed in clinical diagnosis. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. The role of coagulation/fibrinolysis during Streptococcus pyogenes infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loof, Torsten G; Deicke, Christin; Medina, Eva

    2014-01-01

    The hemostatic system comprises platelet aggregation, coagulation and fibrinolysis and is a host defense mechanism that protects the integrity of the vascular system after tissue injury. During bacterial infections, the coagulation system cooperates with the inflammatory system to eliminate the invading pathogens. However, pathogenic bacteria have frequently evolved mechanisms to exploit the hemostatic system components for their own benefit. Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as Group A Streptococcus, provides a remarkable example of the extraordinary capacity of pathogens to exploit the host hemostatic system to support microbial survival and dissemination. The coagulation cascade comprises the contact system (also known as the intrinsic pathway) and the tissue factor pathway (also known as the extrinsic pathway), both leading to fibrin formation. During the early phase of S. pyogenes infection, the activation of the contact system eventually leads to bacterial entrapment within a fibrin clot, where S. pyogenes is immobilized and killed. However, entrapped S. pyogenes can circumvent the antimicrobial effect of the clot by sequestering host plasminogen on the bacterial cell surface that, after conversion into its active proteolytic form, plasmin, degrades the fibrin network and facilitates the liberation of S. pyogenes from the clot. Furthermore, the surface-localized fibrinolytic activity also cleaves a variety of extracellular matrix proteins, thereby enabling S. pyogenes to migrate across barriers and disseminate within the host. This review summarizes the knowledge gained during the last two decades on the role of coagulation/fibrinolysis in host defense against S. pyogenes as well as the strategies developed by this pathogen to evade and exploit these host mechanisms for its own benefit.

  19. Development of a multicomponent vaccine for Streptococcus pyogenes based on the antigenic targets of IVIG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reglinski, Mark; Lynskey, Nicola N; Choi, Yoon Jung; Edwards, Robert J; Sriskandan, Shiranee

    2016-04-01

    Despite over a century of research and the careful scrutiny of many promising targets, there is currently no vaccine available for the prevention of Streptococcus pyogenes infection. Through analysis of the protective, anti-streptococcal components of pooled human immunoglobulin, we previously identified ten highly conserved and invariant S. pyogenes antigens that contribute to anti-streptococcal immunity in the adult population. We sought to emulate population immunity to S. pyogenes through a process of active vaccination, using the antigens targeted by pooled human immunoglobulin. Seven targets were produced recombinantly and mixed to form a multicomponent vaccine (Spy7). Vaccinated mice were challenged with S. pyogenes isolates representing four globally relevant serotypes (M1, M3, M12 and M89) using an established model of invasive disease. Vaccination with Spy7 stimulated the production of anti-streptococcal antibodies, and limited systemic dissemination of M1 and M3 S. pyogenes from an intramuscular infection focus. Vaccination additionally attenuated disease severity due to M1 S. pyogenes as evidenced by reduction in weight loss, and modulated cytokine release. Spy7 vaccination successfully stimulated the generation of protective anti-streptococcal immunity in vivo. Identification of reactive antigens using pooled human immunoglobulin may represent a novel route to vaccine discovery for extracellular bacteria. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Mixed Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes meningitis in an immunocompromised adult patient: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demerle, Clémence; Ivanov, Vadim; Mercier, Cédric; Costello, Régis; Drancourt, Michel

    2015-11-29

    Community-acquired meningitis is a monomicrobial infection caused by either viruses or bacteria in the vast majority of patients. We report here one exceptional case of a patient with mixed bacterial meningitis due to Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes. We report the case of a 68-year-old immunocompromised Caucasian man suffering from otitis and then meningitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes. Bacteria were undistinguishable by direct microscopic examination of the cerebrospinal fluid. He responded well to treatment with cefotaxime and dexamethasone, with no sequelae observed at the 4-month follow-up. This first reported case of mixed S. pneumoniae and S. pyogenes meningitis illustrates the life-threatening consequences of barotrauma in immunocompromised patients suffering from otorhinolaryngeal infections.

  1. Streptococcus pyogenes biofilms – formation, biology,and clinical relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas eFiedler

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococci, GAS is an exclusive human bacterial pathogen. The virulence potential of this species is tremendous. Interactions with humans range from asymptomatic carriage over mild and superficial infections of skin and mucosal membranes up to systemic purulent toxic-invasive disease manifestations. Particularly the latter are a severe threat for predisposed patients and lead to significant death tolls worldwide. This places GAS among the most important Gram-positive bacterial pathogens. Many recent reviews have highlighted the GAS repertoire of virulence factors, regulators and regulatory circuits/networks that enable GAS to colonize the host and to deal with all levels of the host immune defense. This covers in vitro and in vivo studies, including animal infection studies based on mice and more relevant, macaque monkeys. It is now appreciated that GAS, like many other bacterial species, do not necessarily exclusively live in a planktonic lifestyle. GAS is capable of microcolony and biofilm formation on host cells and tissues. We are now beginning to understand that this feature significantly contributes to GAS pathogenesis. In this review we will discuss the current knowledge on GAS biofilm formation, the biofilm-phenotype associated virulence factors, regulatory aspects of biofilm formation, the clinical relevance, and finally contemporary treatment regimens and future treatment options.

  2. Local Th17/IgA immunity correlate with protection against intranasal infection with Streptococcus pyogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Rasmus; Christensen, Dennis; Hansen, Lasse Bøllehuus

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus, GAS) is responsible for a wide array of infections. Respiratory transmission via droplets is the most common mode of transmission but it may also infect the host via other routes such as lesions in the skin. To advance the development of a future...... that locally primed immunity is important for the defense against intranasal infection with Streptococcus pyogenes....

  3. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of Streptococcus pyogenes laminin-binding protein Lbp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linke, Christian, E-mail: clin180@ec.auckland.ac.nz [School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Caradoc-Davies, Tom T. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Australian Synchrotron, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Proft, Thomas [School of Medical Sciences, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Baker, Edward N. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand)

    2008-02-01

    The S. pyogenes laminin-binding protein Lbp, which is essential for adhesion to human laminin, has been expressed, purified and crystallized. The laminin-binding protein Lbp (Spy2007) from Streptococcus pyogenes (a group A streptococcus) mediates adhesion to the human basal lamina glycoprotein laminin. Accordingly, Lbp is essential in in vitro models of cell adhesion and invasion. However, the molecular and structural basis of laminin binding by bacteria remains unknown. Therefore, the lbp gene has been cloned for recombinant expression in Escherichia coli. Lbp has been purified and crystallized from 30%(w/v) PEG 1500 by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 42.62, b = 92.16, c = 70.61 Å, β = 106.27°, and diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution.

  4. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of Streptococcus pyogenes laminin-binding protein Lbp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linke, Christian; Caradoc-Davies, Tom T.; Proft, Thomas; Baker, Edward N.

    2008-01-01

    The S. pyogenes laminin-binding protein Lbp, which is essential for adhesion to human laminin, has been expressed, purified and crystallized. The laminin-binding protein Lbp (Spy2007) from Streptococcus pyogenes (a group A streptococcus) mediates adhesion to the human basal lamina glycoprotein laminin. Accordingly, Lbp is essential in in vitro models of cell adhesion and invasion. However, the molecular and structural basis of laminin binding by bacteria remains unknown. Therefore, the lbp gene has been cloned for recombinant expression in Escherichia coli. Lbp has been purified and crystallized from 30%(w/v) PEG 1500 by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group P2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 42.62, b = 92.16, c = 70.61 Å, β = 106.27°, and diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution

  5. Anti-Bacterial Activity of Phenolic Compounds against Streptococcus pyogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macé, Sabrina; Hansen, Lisbeth Truelstrup; P. Vasantha Rupasinghe, H.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Worldwide, Streptococcus pyogenes is the leading cause of bacterial pharyngitis. To reduce the use of antibiotics, antimicrobial phytochemical-containing remedies, which have long been in use in traditional medicine, may provide new approaches for management of streptococcal pharyngitis....... The objective of this study was to assess the inhibitory activities of 25 natural phenolic compounds against three strains of S. pyogenes. Methods: After an initial screening, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of the nine most effective phenolic compounds...... were determined. The effect of four compounds with the lowest MIC and MBC on streptococcal growth and biofilm formation was also studied. Results: 1,2-Naphthoquinone and 5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone elicited the greatest anti-S. pyogenes activities with MICs ranging from 0.39 to 6.25 µg mL−1 and MBCs...

  6. In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of Essential Oils against Streptococcus pyogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Sfeir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes plays an important role in the pathogenesis of tonsillitis. The present study was conducted to evaluate the in vitro antibacterial activities of 18 essential oils chemotypes from aromatic medicinal plants against S. pyogenes. Antibacterial activity of essential oils was investigated using disc diffusion method. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration of essential oils showing an important antibacterial activity was measured using broth dilution method. Out of 18 essential oils tested, 14 showed antibacterial activity against S. pyogenes. Among them Cinnamomum verum, Cymbopogon citratus, Thymus vulgaris CT thymol, Origanum compactum, and Satureja montana essential oils exhibited significant antibacterial activity. The in vitro results reported here suggest that, for patients suffering from bacterial throat infections, if aromatherapy is used, these essential oils, considered as potential antimicrobial agents, should be preferred.

  7. Functional and Structural Properties of a Novel Protein and Virulence Factor (sHIP) in Streptococcus pyogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewska, Magdalena; Happonen, Lotta; Kahn, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a significant bacterial pathogen in the human population. The importance of virulence factors for the survival and colonization of S. pyogenes is well established, and many of these factors are exposed to the extracellular environment enabling bacterial interactions...... with the host. In the present study we quantitatively analyzed and compared S. pyogenes proteins in the growth medium of a strain that is virulent to mice, with a non-virulent strain. Particularly one of these proteins was present at significantly higher levels in stationary growth medium from the virulent......), and the name sHIP (streptococcal Histidine-rich glycoprotein Interacting Protein) is therefore proposed. HRG has antibacterial activity, and when challenged by HRG, sHIP was found to rescue S. pyogenes bacteria. This and the finding that patients with invasive S. pyogenes infection respond with antibody...

  8. Structure and Interactions of a Dimeric Variant of sHIP, a Novel Virulence Determinant of Streptococcus pyogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diehl, Carl; Wisniewska, Magdalena; Frick, Inga-Maria

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is one of the most significant bacterial pathogens in the human population mostly causing superficial and uncomplicated infections (pharyngitis and impetigo) but also invasive and life-threatening disease. We have previously identified a virulence determinant, protein s......HIP, which is secreted at higher levels by an invasive compared to a non-invasive strain of S. pyogenes. The present work presents a further characterization of the structural and functional properties of this bacterial protein. Biophysical and structural studies have shown that protein sHIP forms stable...

  9. Increase in fluoroquinolone non-susceptibility among clinical Streptococcus pyogenes in Belgium during 2007-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Heirstraeten, Liesbet; Leten, Gert; Lammens, Christine; Goossens, Herman; Malhotra-Kumar, Surbhi

    2012-11-01

    To study the temporal evolution of fluoroquinolone non-susceptibility among Streptococcus pyogenes during 2007-10 in Belgium. S. pyogenes (n = 4690) recovered from patients with tonsillopharyngitis or skin, wound or invasive infections were screened for fluoroquinolone non-susceptibility. A selection of fluoroquinolone-non-susceptible strains was investigated for resistance mechanisms: reserpine-sensitive efflux and mutations in topoisomerase genes parC and gyrA. Clonality was determined by emm typing. Fluoroquinolone non-susceptibility (ciprofloxacin MIC ≥2 mg/L) was identified in 535 (11.4%) of 4690 S. pyogenes recovered during 2007-10 in Belgium. The proportion of fluoroquinolone-non-susceptible S. pyogenes increased significantly from 4.3% (2008) to 10.9% (2009) to 21.6% (2010) and coincided with a significant increase in emm6 strains among fluoroquinolone-non-susceptible S. pyogenes. Ciprofloxacin MICs of 2-8 mg/L correlated with first-step ParC substitutions. Two high-level fluoroquinolone-resistant S. pyogenes strains (ciprofloxacin MICs 32 mg/L) showed second-step substitutions in GyrA (Ser-81→Phe or Tyr) in addition to first-step mutations in parC. Reserpine-sensitive efflux was not observed. We report an unprecedented increase in fluoroquinolone-non-susceptible S. pyogenes in Belgium, a country with high quinolone use, as well as emergence of two high-level fluoroquinolone-resistant S. pyogenes strains with second-step mutations in gyrA, warning us of the need for more prudent use of fluoroquinolones and for continued resistance surveillance.

  10. Invasieve infecties door beta-haemolytische Streptokokken Lancefield Groep A (Streptococcus pyogenes, GAS) in Nederland, 1992-1993

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens JFP; Schouls LM; van Silfhout A; Elzenaar CP; Brunings HA; Blokpoel MCJ; Top J; van Leeuwen WJ; LBA; MMB

    1994-01-01

    In recent years an increase of severe invasive infections and toxic shock syndrome (TSS) with beta-haemolytic Group A streptococci (Streptococcus pyogenes, GAS) has been reported from North-America and North-Western Europe. In the spring of 1992 several reports of cases suggested that this epidemic

  11. Factors that cause trimethoprim resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, René; van der Linden, Mark; Chhatwal, Gursharan S; Nitsche-Schmitz, D Patric

    2014-01-01

    The use of trimethoprim in treatment of Streptococcus pyogenes infections has long been discouraged because it has been widely believed that this pathogen is resistant to this antibiotic. To gain more insight into the extent and molecular basis of trimethoprim resistance in S. pyogenes, we tested isolates from India and Germany and sought the factors that conferred the resistance. Resistant isolates were identified in tests for trimethoprim or trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (SXT) susceptibility. Resistant isolates were screened for the known horizontally transferable trimethoprim-insensitive dihydrofolate reductase (dfr) genes dfrG, dfrF, dfrA, dfrD, and dfrK. The nucleotide sequence of the intrinsic dfr gene was determined for resistant isolates lacking the horizontally transferable genes. Based on tentative criteria, 69 out of 268 isolates (25.7%) from India were resistant to trimethoprim. Occurring in 42 of the 69 resistant isolates (60.9%), dfrF appeared more frequently than dfrG (23 isolates; 33.3%) in India. The dfrF gene was also present in a collection of SXT-resistant isolates from Germany, in which it was the only detected trimethoprim resistance factor. The dfrF gene caused resistance in 4 out of 5 trimethoprim-resistant isolates from the German collection. An amino acid substitution in the intrinsic dihydrofolate reductase known from trimethoprim-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae conferred resistance to S. pyogenes isolates of emm type 102.2, which lacked other aforementioned dfr genes. Trimethoprim may be more useful in treatment of S. pyogenes infections than previously thought. However, the factors described herein may lead to the rapid development and spread of resistance of S. pyogenes to this antibiotic agent.

  12. Delineation of Streptococcus dysgalactiae, its subspecies, and its clinical and phylogenetic relationship to Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Anders; Kilian, Mogens

    2012-01-01

    The taxonomic status and structure of Streptococcus dysgalactiae have been the object of much confusion. Bacteria belonging to this species are usually referred to as Lancefield group C or group G streptococci in clinical settings in spite of the fact that these terms lack precision and prevent recognition of the exact clinical relevance of these bacteria. The purpose of this study was to develop an improved basis for delineation and identification of the individual species of the pyogenic group of streptococci in the clinical microbiology laboratory, with a special focus on S. dysgalactiae. We critically reexamined the genetic relationships of the species S. dysgalactiae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus canis, and Streptococcus equi, which may share Lancefield group antigens, by phylogenetic reconstruction based on multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) and 16S rRNA gene sequences and by emm typing combined with phenotypic characterization. Analysis of concatenated sequences of seven genes previously used for examination of viridans streptococci distinguished robust and coherent clusters. S. dysgalactiae consists of two separate clusters consistent with the two recognized subspecies dysgalactiae and equisimilis. Both taxa share alleles with S. pyogenes in several housekeeping genes, which invalidates identification based on single-locus sequencing. S. dysgalactiae, S. canis, and S. pyogenes constitute a closely related branch within the genus Streptococcus indicative of recent descent from a common ancestor, while S. equi is highly divergent from other species of the pyogenic group streptococci. The results provide an improved basis for identification of clinically important pyogenic group streptococci and explain the overlapping spectrum of infections caused by the species associated with humans.

  13. Delineation of Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Its Subspecies, and Its Clinical and Phylogenetic Relationship to Streptococcus pyogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Anders

    2012-01-01

    The taxonomic status and structure of Streptococcus dysgalactiae have been the object of much confusion. Bacteria belonging to this species are usually referred to as Lancefield group C or group G streptococci in clinical settings in spite of the fact that these terms lack precision and prevent recognition of the exact clinical relevance of these bacteria. The purpose of this study was to develop an improved basis for delineation and identification of the individual species of the pyogenic group of streptococci in the clinical microbiology laboratory, with a special focus on S. dysgalactiae. We critically reexamined the genetic relationships of the species S. dysgalactiae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus canis, and Streptococcus equi, which may share Lancefield group antigens, by phylogenetic reconstruction based on multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) and 16S rRNA gene sequences and by emm typing combined with phenotypic characterization. Analysis of concatenated sequences of seven genes previously used for examination of viridans streptococci distinguished robust and coherent clusters. S. dysgalactiae consists of two separate clusters consistent with the two recognized subspecies dysgalactiae and equisimilis. Both taxa share alleles with S. pyogenes in several housekeeping genes, which invalidates identification based on single-locus sequencing. S. dysgalactiae, S. canis, and S. pyogenes constitute a closely related branch within the genus Streptococcus indicative of recent descent from a common ancestor, while S. equi is highly divergent from other species of the pyogenic group streptococci. The results provide an improved basis for identification of clinically important pyogenic group streptococci and explain the overlapping spectrum of infections caused by the species associated with humans. PMID:22075580

  14. Comparative pathogenomic characterization of a non-invasive serotype M71 strain Streptococcus pyogenes NS53 reveals incongruent phenotypic implications from distinct genotypic markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yun-Juan; Li, Yang; Liang, Zhong; Agrahari, Garima; Lee, Shaun W; Ploplis, Victoria A; Castellino, Francis J

    2017-07-31

    The strains serotyped as M71 from group A Streptococcus are common causes of pharyngeal and skin diseases worldwide. Here we characterize the genome of a unique non-invasive M71 human isolate, NS53. The genome does not contain structural rearrangements or large-scale gene gains/losses, but encodes a full set of non-truncated known virulence factors, thus providing an ideal reference for comparative studies. However, the NS53 genome showed incongruent phenotypic implications from distinct genotypic markers. NS53 is characterized as an emm pattern D and FCT (fibronectin-collagen-T antigen) type-3 strain, typical of skin tropic strains, but is phylogenetically close to emm pattern E strains with preference for both skin and pharyngeal infections. We propose that this incongruence could result from recombination within the emm gene locus, or, alternatively, selection has been against those genetic alterations. Combined with the inability to select for CovS switching, a process is indicated whereby NS53 has been pre-adapted to specific host niches selecting against variations in CovS and many other genes. This may allow the strain to attain successful colonization and long-term survival. A balance between genetic variations and fitness may exist for this bacterium to form a stabilized genome optimized for survival in specific host environments. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Characterization of Streptococcus pyogenes from Animal Clinical Specimens, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela, Ana Isabel; Villalón, Pilar; Sáez-Nieto, Juan Antonio; Chacón, Gema; Domínguez, Lucas; Fernández-Garayzábal, José Francisco

    2017-12-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes appears to be almost exclusively restricted to humans, with few reports on isolation from animals. We provide a detailed characterization (emm typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis [PFGE], and multilocus sequence typing [MLST]) of 15 S. pyogenes isolates from animals associated with different clinical backgrounds. We also investigated erythromycin resistance mechanisms and phenotypes and virulence genes. We observed 2 emm types: emm12 (11 isolates) and emm77 (4 isolates). Similarly, we observed 2 genetic linages, sequence type (ST) 26 and ST63. Most isolates exhibited the M macrolide resistance phenotype and the mefA/ermB genotype. Isolates were grouped into 2 clones on the basis of emm-MLST-PFGE-virulence gene profile combinations: clone 1, characterized by the combined genotype emm12-ST36-pulsotype A-speG; and clone 2, characterized by the genotype emm77-ST63-pulsotype B-speC. Our results do not show conclusively that animals may represent a new reservoir of S. pyogenes but indicate the ability of human-derived S. pyogenes isolates to colonize and infect animals.

  16. Characterization of levofloxacin non-susceptible clinical Streptococcus pyogenes isolated in the central part of Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrelli, D; Di Luca, M C; Prenna, M; Bernaschi, P; Repetto, A; Vitali, L A

    2014-02-01

    We investigated the prevalence, genetics, and clonality of fluoroquinolone non-susceptible isolates of Streptococcus pyogenes in the central part of Italy. S. pyogenes strains (n = 197) were isolated during 2012 from patients with tonsillopharyngitis, skin, wound or invasive infections and screened for fluoroquinolone non-susceptibility (resistance to norfloxacin and levofloxacin minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) = 2 mg/L) following EUCAST guidelines. First-step topoisomerase parC and gyrA substitutions were investigated using sequencing analysis. Clonality was determined by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE; SmaI digestion) and by emm typing. The fluoroquinolone non-susceptible phenotype was identified in 18 isolates (9.1 %) and correlated with mutations in parC, but not in gyrA, the most frequent leading to substitution of the serine at position 79 with an alanine. Most of the fluoroquinolone non-susceptible isolates belonged to the emm-type 6, even if other emm-types were also represented (emm75, emm89, and emm2). A significant level of association was measured between PFGE and both emm type and substitutions in parC. The prevalence of fluoroquinolone non-susceptible Streptococcus pyogenes isolates in Italy is of concern and, although the well-known emm type 6 is dominant, other types are appearing and spreading.

  17. One More Disguise in the Stealth Behavior of Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischetti, Vincent A; Dale, James B

    2016-05-17

    The ability to hide in the animal kingdom is essential for survival; the same is true for bacteria. Streptococcus pyogenes is considered one of the more successful stealth bacteria in its production of a hyaluronic acid capsule that is chemically identical to the hyaluronic acid lining human joints. It has also acquired the capacity to enter eukaryotic cells to avoid the onslaught of the host's immune defenses, as well as drugs. From this intracellular vantage point, it may remain dormant from days to weeks, only to cause disease again at a later time, perhaps causing a relapse in a drug-treated patient. We now learn that it is able to enter macrophages as well, enabling the Streptococcus to use this "Trojan horse" approach to be transported to distant sites in the body. Copyright © 2016 Fischetti and Dale.

  18. One More Disguise in the Stealth Behavior of Streptococcus pyogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent A. Fischetti

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The ability to hide in the animal kingdom is essential for survival; the same is true for bacteria. Streptococcus pyogenes is considered one of the more successful stealth bacteria in its production of a hyaluronic acid capsule that is chemically identical to the hyaluronic acid lining human joints. It has also acquired the capacity to enter eukaryotic cells to avoid the onslaught of the host’s immune defenses, as well as drugs. From this intracellular vantage point, it may remain dormant from days to weeks, only to cause disease again at a later time, perhaps causing a relapse in a drug-treated patient. We now learn that it is able to enter macrophages as well, enabling the Streptococcus to use this “Trojan horse” approach to be transported to distant sites in the body.

  19. Incidencia de faringitis por Streptococcus pyogenes en Bariloche: Argentina Incidence of Streptococcus pyogenes pharyngitis in Bariloche: Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Rubinstein

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Fueron evaluadas la incidencia y estacionalidad de faringitis por Streptococcus pyogenes en Bariloche, una ciudad donde las bajas temperaturas favorecen las condiciones de hacinamiento durante gran parte del año. Se analizaron 5.276 hisopados de fauces durante el período 2000-2003. Las muestras fueron sembradas en agar sangre ovina (5% e incubadas 24-48 h a 35 °C. Las colonias beta-hemolíticas fueron identificadas utilizando los métodos convencionales. Se calcularon las medias mensuales de hisopados de fauces totales, de aislamientos de S. pyogenes y de los porcentajes de faringitis por S. pyogenes. La incidencia de faringitis por este microorganismo fue superior al 24% en todos los meses del período abril-diciembre, con un máximo en noviembre (33%. El mes de menor incidencia fue febrero (13%. Se observó una tendencia creciente desde marzo a noviembre, con un leve valle en julio y un marcado descenso que se inició en diciembre y mostró valores mínimos en enero y febrero, los meses más cálidos. Este patrón estacional difiere del observado en climas templados. La incidencia fue alta durante gran parte del año, abarcando desde mediados del otoño hasta principios del verano.The incidence and seasonality of pharyngitis by S. pyogenes in Bariloche, a city were long periods of low temperatures result in extended indoor activities were studied. A total of 5276 throat swab specimens collected during 2000-2003 in the clinical microbiology laboratories of the three main medical institutions of the city, were analyzed. Samples were cultured on blood-agar media containing 5% defibrinated sheep blood, and incubated for 24-48 h at 35 °C. Strains were identified using standard procedures. Monthly means for throat swabs, S. pyogenes isolates, and percent of S. pyogenes pharyngitis, were estimated. The incidence of pharyngitis by this microorganism was greater than 24% for every month within the April-December period, reaching a maximum in

  20. The hypervariable region of Streptococcus pyogenes M protein escapes antibody attack by antigenic variation and weak immunogenicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lannergård, Jonas; Gustafsson, Caj Ulrik Mattias; Waldemarsson, Johan

    2011-01-01

    , we analyzed the clinically important HVR-containing M proteins of the human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes. Antibodies elicited by M proteins were directed almost exclusively against the C-terminal part and not against the N-terminal HVR. Similar results were obtained for mice and humans...... with invasive S. pyogenes infection. Nevertheless, only anti-HVR antibodies protected efficiently against infection, as shown by passive immunizations. The HVR fused to an unrelated protein elicited no antibodies, implying that it is inherently weakly immunogenic. These data indicate that the M protein HVR...

  1. Distribution of small native plasmids in Streptococcus pyogenes in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, René; Nerlich, Andreas; Chhatwal, Gursharan S; Nitsche-Schmitz, D Patric

    2014-05-01

    Complete characterization of a Streptococcus pyogenes population from a defined geographic region comprises information on the plasmids that circulate in these bacteria. Therefore, we determined the distribution of small plasmids (pyogenes isolates from India, where diversity of strains and incidence rates of S. pyogenes infections are high. The collection comprised 77 emm-types. For plasmid detection and discrimination, we developed PCRs for different plasmid replication initiation protein genes, the putative repressor gene copG and bacteriocin genes dysA and scnM57. Plasmid distribution was limited to 13 emm-types. Co-detection analysis using aforementioned PCRs revealed four distinct plasmid sub-types, two of which were previously unknown. Representative plasmids pA852 and pA996 of the two uncharacterized plasmid sub-types were sequenced. These two plasmids could be assigned to the pMV158 and the pC194/pUB110 family of rolling-circle plasmids, respectively. The majority of small plasmids found in India belonged to the two newly characterized sub-types, with pA852- and pA996-like plasmids amounting to 42% and 22% of all detected plasmids, respectively. None of the detected plasmids coded for a known antibiotic resistance gene. Instead, all of the four plasmid sub-types carried known or potential bacteriocin genes. These genes may have influence on the evolutionary success of certain S. pyogenes genotypes. Notably, pA852-like plasmids were found in all isolates of the most prevalent emm-type 11.0. Together, a priori fitness of this genotype and increased fitness due to the acquired plasmids may have rendered type emm11.0 successful and caused the prevalence of pA852-like plasmids in India. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Streptococcus pyogenes and re-emergence of scarlet fever as a public health problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Samson SY; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2012-01-01

    Explosive outbreaks of infectious diseases occasionally occur without immediately obvious epidemiological or microbiological explanations. Plague, cholera and Streptococcus pyogenes infection are some of the epidemic-prone bacterial infections. Besides epidemiological and conventional microbiological methods, the next-generation gene sequencing technology permits prompt detection of genomic and transcriptomic profiles associated with invasive phenotypes. Horizontal gene transfer due to mobile genetic elements carrying virulence factors and antimicrobial resistance, or mutations associated with the two component CovRS operon are important bacterial factors conferring survival advantage or invasiveness. The high incidence of scarlet fever in children less than 10 years old suggests that the lack of protective immunity is an important host factor. A high population density, overcrowded living environment and a low yearly rainfall are environmental factors contributing to outbreak development. Inappropriate antibiotic use is not only ineffective for treatment, but may actually drive an epidemic caused by drug-resistant strains and worsen patient outcomes by increasing the bacterial density at the site of infection and inducing toxin production. Surveillance of severe S. pyogenes infection is important because it can complicate concurrent chickenpox and influenza. Concomitant outbreaks of these two latter infections with a highly virulent and drug-resistant S. pyogenes strain can be disastrous. PMID:26038416

  3. Murine Vaginal Colonization Model for Investigating Asymptomatic Mucosal Carriage of Streptococcus pyogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Michael E.; Nielsen, Hailyn V.; Hultgren, Scott J.

    2013-01-01

    While many virulence factors promoting Streptococcus pyogenes invasive disease have been described, specific streptococcal factors and host properties influencing asymptomatic mucosal carriage remain uncertain. To address the need for a refined model of prolonged S. pyogenes asymptomatic mucosal colonization, we have adapted a preestrogenized murine vaginal colonization model for S. pyogenes. In this model, derivatives of strains HSC5, SF370, JRS4, NZ131, and MEW123 established a reproducible, asymptomatic colonization of the vaginal mucosa over a period of typically 3 to 4 weeks' duration at a relatively high colonization efficiency. Prior treatment with estradiol prolonged streptococcal colonization and was associated with reduced inflammation in the colonized vaginal epithelium as well as a decreased leukocyte presence in vaginal fluid compared to the levels of inflammation and leukocyte presence in non-estradiol-treated control mice. The utility of our model for investigating S. pyogenes factors contributing to mucosal carriage was verified, as a mutant with a mutation in the transcriptional regulator catabolite control protein A (CcpA) demonstrated significant impairment in vaginal colonization. An assessment of in vivo transcriptional activity in the CcpA− strain for several known CcpA-regulated genes identified significantly elevated transcription of lactate oxidase (lctO) correlating with excessive generation of hydrogen peroxide to self-lethal levels. Deletion of lctO did not impair colonization, but deletion of lctO in a CcpA− strain prolonged carriage, exceeding even that of the wild-type strain. Thus, while LctO is not essential for vaginal colonization, its dysregulation is deleterious, highlighting the critical role of CcpA in promoting mucosal colonization. The vaginal colonization model should prove effective for future analyses of S. pyogenes mucosal colonization. PMID:23460515

  4. Functional and structural properties of a novel protein and virulence factor (Protein sHIP) in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewska, Magdalena; Happonen, Lotta; Kahn, Fredrik; Varjosalo, Markku; Malmström, Lars; Rosenberger, George; Karlsson, Christofer; Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Pozdnyakova, Irina; Frick, Inga-Maria; Björck, Lars; Streicher, Werner; Malmström, Johan; Wikström, Mats

    2014-06-27

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a significant bacterial pathogen in the human population. The importance of virulence factors for the survival and colonization of S. pyogenes is well established, and many of these factors are exposed to the extracellular environment, enabling bacterial interactions with the host. In the present study, we quantitatively analyzed and compared S. pyogenes proteins in the growth medium of a strain that is virulent to mice with a non-virulent strain. Particularly, one of these proteins was present at significantly higher levels in stationary growth medium from the virulent strain. We determined the three-dimensional structure of the protein that showed a unique tetrameric organization composed of four helix-loop-helix motifs. Affinity pull-down mass spectrometry analysis in human plasma demonstrated that the protein interacts with histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG), and the name sHIP (streptococcal histidine-rich glycoprotein-interacting protein) is therefore proposed. HRG has antibacterial activity, and when challenged by HRG, sHIP was found to rescue S. pyogenes bacteria. This and the finding that patients with invasive S. pyogenes infection respond with antibody production against sHIP suggest a role for the protein in S. pyogenes pathogenesis. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Functional and Structural Properties of a Novel Protein and Virulence Factor (Protein sHIP) in Streptococcus pyogenes *

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewska, Magdalena; Happonen, Lotta; Kahn, Fredrik; Varjosalo, Markku; Malmström, Lars; Rosenberger, George; Karlsson, Christofer; Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Pozdnyakova, Irina; Frick, Inga-Maria; Björck, Lars; Streicher, Werner; Malmström, Johan; Wikström, Mats

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a significant bacterial pathogen in the human population. The importance of virulence factors for the survival and colonization of S. pyogenes is well established, and many of these factors are exposed to the extracellular environment, enabling bacterial interactions with the host. In the present study, we quantitatively analyzed and compared S. pyogenes proteins in the growth medium of a strain that is virulent to mice with a non-virulent strain. Particularly, one of these proteins was present at significantly higher levels in stationary growth medium from the virulent strain. We determined the three-dimensional structure of the protein that showed a unique tetrameric organization composed of four helix-loop-helix motifs. Affinity pull-down mass spectrometry analysis in human plasma demonstrated that the protein interacts with histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG), and the name sHIP (streptococcal histidine-rich glycoprotein-interacting protein) is therefore proposed. HRG has antibacterial activity, and when challenged by HRG, sHIP was found to rescue S. pyogenes bacteria. This and the finding that patients with invasive S. pyogenes infection respond with antibody production against sHIP suggest a role for the protein in S. pyogenes pathogenesis. PMID:24825900

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptococcus pyogenes Strain JMUB1235 Isolated from an Acute Phlegmonous Gastritis Patient

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, Shinya; Sasahara, Teppei; Arai, Naoshi; Sasaki, Kazumasa; Aiba, Yoshifumi; Sato?o, Yusuke; Cui, Longzhu

    2016-01-01

    Acute phlegmonous gastritis is an uncommon endogenous bacterial gastritis presenting with a high mortality rate. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of an emm89 Streptococcus pyogenes strain, JMUB1235, which is the causative agent of acute phlegmonous gastritis.

  7. Carrying pharyngeal of Streptococcus pyogenes and sensitivity profiles in schoolchild from Cartagena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy Margarita Villafañe-Ferrer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available To determine the frequency of carrying pharyngeal of Streptococcus pyogenes and their sensitivity profiles in schoolchildren from Cartagena. Analytical cross-sectional study, the sample was composed by 131 children. Strains of Streptococcus pyogenes were identified using conventional methods. Antibiotic sensitivity was determined the Kirby-Bauer methods. A questionnaire was applied in order to identify risk factors associated.19,8% of children were carriers of bacterium. 26 isolates of Streptococcus pyogenes were obtained. To evaluate the sensitivity were found strains sensible to ceftriaxone and erytrhomycin (84,6% each one. 23,1% (6/26 0f isolates were resistant to ampicillin. It not was found association between carrying pharyngeal of Streptococcus pyogenes and risk factors (p>0,05. It were found resistant strains to antibiotics considered of first election for therapy of infectious diseases produced by this bacterium.

  8. Detection of Streptococcus pyogenes virulence genes in Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis from Vellore, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbar, Anshu; Itzek, Andreas; Pieper, Dietmar H; Nitsche-Schmitz, D Patric

    2018-03-12

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (SDSE), belonging to the group C and G streptococci, are human pathogens reported to cause clinical manifestations similar to infections caused by Streptococcus pyogenes. To scrutinize the distribution of gene coding for S. pyogenes virulence factors in SDSE, 255 isolates were collected from humans infected with SDSE in Vellore, a region in southern India, with high incidence of SDSE infections. Initial evaluation indicated SDSE isolates comprising of 82.35% group G and 17.64% group C. A multiplex PCR system was used to detect 21 gene encoding virulence-associated factors of S. pyogenes, like superantigens, DNases, proteinases, and other immune modulatory toxins. As validated by DNA sequencing of the PCR products, sequences homologous to speC, speG, speH, speI, speL, ssa and smeZ of the family of superantigen coding genes and for DNases like sdaD and sdc were detected in the SDSE collection. Furthermore, there was high abundance (48.12% in group G and 86.6% in group C SDSE) of scpA, the gene coding for C5a peptidase in these isolates. Higher abundance of S. pyogenes virulence factor genes was observed in SDSE of Lancefield group C as compared to group G, even though the incidence rates in former were lower. This study not only substantiates detection of S. pyogenes virulence factor genes in whole genome sequenced SDSE but also makes significant contribution towards the understanding of SDSE and its increasing virulence potential.

  9. Conjugative transfer of the erm(A) gene from erythromycin-resistant Streptococcus pyogenes to macrolide-susceptible S. pyogenes, Enterococcus faecalis and Listeria innocua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovanetti, E; Magi, G; Brenciani, A; Spinaci, C; Lupidi, R; Facinelli, B; Varaldo, P E

    2002-08-01

    In mating experiments, the erythromycin resistance methylase gene erm(A) was successfully transferred from erm(A)-positive clinical isolates of Streptococcus pyogenes to macrolide-susceptible recipients of S. pyogenes, Enterococcus faecalis and Listeria innocua. Compared with the SmaI macrorestriction pattern of the S. pyogenes recipient, the patterns of S. pyogenes transconjugants shared the lack of a fragment and the appearance of a new, larger fragment. This is the first experimental evidence that the erm(A) gene can be transferred from erythromycin-resistant S. pyogenes to macrolide-susceptible S. pyogenes as well as to other Gram-positive recipients.

  10. Comparative epidemiology of Streptococcus pyogenes emm-types causing invasive and noninvasive infections in French children by use of high-resolution melting-polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Humières, Camille; Bidet, Philippe; Levy, Corinne; Béchet, Stéphane; Bonacorsi, Stéphane; Bingen, Edouard; Cohen, Robert

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to analyze the epidemiology of Group A streptococci (GAS) emm-types causing invasive and noninvasive infections in French children. From September 2009 to May 2011, we analyzed GAS isolates from 585 pharyngitis, 125 invasive infections and, for the first time in France, 32 healthy carriers. M protein gene (emm) typing of the isolates was carried out by a new rapid technique, combining 3 multiplex-polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) coupled to high-resolution melting (HRM) curves, able to detect 13 major emm-types (emm 1, 3, 4, 6, 11, 12, 22, 28, 75, 77, 87, 89 and 102). GAS belonging to emm-type 1 were more frequently found among invasive infections than among pharyngitis (24.0% vs. 11.5%, P type 4, 17.4% vs. 6.4%, P = 0.002 and emm-type 89, 9.9% vs. 2.4%, P = 0.006, respectively) and emm 3 and 4 were more common in cases of pharyngitis associated with scarlet fever (21.6% vs. 6.0%, P epidemiological studies. Comparison of GAS causing invasive and noninvasive infections in the same population of children displays an unbalanced repartition of emm-types.

  11. Dynamics in prophage content of invasive and noninvasive M1 and M28 Streptococcus pyogenes isolates in the Netherlands from 1959 to 1996

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlaminckx, B.J.M.; Schuren, F.H.J.; Montijn, R.C.; Caspers, M.P.M.; Beitsma, M.M.; Wannet, W.J.B.; Schouls, L.M.; Verhoef, J.; Jansen, W.T.M.

    2007-01-01

    Invasive group A streptococcal (GAS) disease reemerged in The Netherlands in the late 1980s. To seek an explanation for this resurgence, the genetic compositions of 22 M1 and 19 M28 GAS strains isolated in The Netherlands between 1960s and the mid-1990s were analyzed by using a mixed-genome DNA

  12. An improved SELEX technique for selection of DNA aptamers binding to M-type 11 of Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamula, Camille L A; Peng, Hanyong; Wang, Zhixin; Tyrrell, Gregory J; Li, Xing-Fang; Le, X Chris

    2016-03-15

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a clinically important pathogen consisting of various serotypes determined by different M proteins expressed on the cell surface. The M type is therefore a useful marker to monitor the spread of invasive S. pyogenes in a population. Serotyping and nucleic acid amplification/sequencing methods for the identification of M types are laborious, inconsistent, and usually confined to reference laboratories. The primary objective of this work is to develop a technique that enables generation of aptamers binding to specific M-types of S. pyogenes. We describe here an in vitro technique that directly used live bacterial cells and the Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX) strategy. Live S. pyogenes cells were incubated with DNA libraries consisting of 40-nucleotides randomized sequences. Those sequences that bound to the cells were separated, amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), purified using gel electrophoresis, and served as the input DNA pool for the next round of SELEX selection. A specially designed forward primer containing extended polyA20/5Sp9 facilitated gel electrophoresis purification of ssDNA after PCR amplification. A counter-selection step using non-target cells was introduced to improve selectivity. DNA libraries of different starting sequence diversity (10(16) and 10(14)) were compared. Aptamer pools from each round of selection were tested for their binding to the target and non-target cells using flow cytometry. Selected aptamer pools were then cloned and sequenced. Individual aptamer sequences were screened on the basis of their binding to the 10 M-types that were used as targets. Aptamer pools obtained from SELEX rounds 5-8 showed high affinity to the target S. pyogenes cells. Tests against non-target Streptococcus bovis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Enterococcus species demonstrated selectivity of these aptamers for binding to S. pyogenes. Several aptamer sequences were found to bind

  13. Cysteine proteinase from Streptococcus pyogenes enables evasion of innate immunity via degradation of complement factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda-Ogawa, Mariko; Ogawa, Taiji; Terao, Yutaka; Sumitomo, Tomoko; Nakata, Masanobu; Ikebe, Kazunori; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2013-05-31

    Streptococcus pyogenes is an important human pathogen that causes invasive diseases such as necrotizing fasciitis, sepsis, and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. We investigated the function of a major cysteine protease from S. pyogenes that affects the amount of C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) and other complement factors and aimed to elucidate the mechanism involved in occurrence of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome from the aspect of the complement system. First, we revealed that culture supernatant of a given S. pyogenes strain and recombinant SpeB degraded the C1-INH. Then, we determined the N-terminal sequence of the C1-INH fragment degraded by recombinant SpeB. Interestingly, the region containing one of the identified cleavage sites is not present in patients with C1-INH deficiency. Scanning electron microscopy of the speB mutant incubated in human serum showed the abnormal superficial architecture and irregular oval structure. Furthermore, unlike the wild-type strain, that mutant strain showed lower survival capacity than normal as compared with heat-inactivated serum, whereas it had a significantly higher survival rate in serum without the C1-INH than in normal serum. Also, SpeB degraded multiple complement factors and the membrane attack complex. Flow cytometric analyses revealed deposition of C9, one of the components of membrane the attack complex, in greater amounts on the surface of the speB mutant, whereas lower amounts of C9 were bound to the wild-type strain surface. These results suggest that SpeB can interrupt the human complement system via degrading the C1-INH, thus enabling S. pyogenes to evade eradication in a hostile environment.

  14. CodY-mediated regulation of Streptococcus pyogenes exoproteins

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    McDowell Emily J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The production of Streptococcus pyogenes exoproteins, many of which contribute to virulence, is regulated in response to nutrient availability. CodY is a transcriptional regulator that controls gene expression in response to amino acid availability. The purpose of this study was to identify differences in the expression of streptococcal exoproteins associated with deletion of the codY gene. Results We compared the secreted proteins produced by wild-type S. pyogenes to a codY mutant in the post-exponential phase of growth. We used both one and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to separate exoproteins. Proteins that were significantly different in abundance upon repeated analysis were identified with tandem mass spectrometry. The production of the secreted cysteine protease SpeB, a secreted chromosomally encoded nuclease (SdaB, and a putative adhesion factor (Spy49_0549 were more abundant in supernatant fluids obtained from the codY mutant. In addition, hyaluronidase (HylA, CAMP factor (Cfa, a prophage encoded nuclease (Spd-3, and an uncharacterized extracellular protein (Spy49_0015 were less abundant in supernatant fluids obtained from the codY mutant strain. Enzymatic assays showed greater DNase activity in culture supernatants isolated in the post-exponential phase of growth from the codY mutant strain compared to the wild-type strain. Because extracellular nucleases and proteases can influence biofilm formation, we also measured the ability of the strains to form biofilms during growth with both rich medium (Todd Hewitt yeast extract; THY and chemically defined media (CDM. No difference was observed with rich media but with CDM the biofilms formed by the codY mutant strain had less biomass compared to the wild-type strain. Conclusions Overall, the results indicate that CodY alters the abundance of a select group of S. pyogenes exoproteins, including DNases, a protease, and hylauronidase, which together may alleviate

  15. Meningite neonatal por Streptococcus pyogenes e trombose de seio sagital: relato de caso Neonatal Streptococcus pyogenes meningitis and sagittal sinus thrombosis: case report

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    VERA LÚCIA JORNADA KREBS

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Relatamos um caso de meningite por Streptococcus pyogenes em menina de 18 dias de vida, com evolução complicada por trombose de seio sagital. São discutidos alguns aspectos da patogênese, tratamento e seguimento da doença. Frente ao aumento mundial das infecções estreptocócicas graves nos últimos 10 anos, é provável que a meningite neonatal por Streptococcus pyogenes se torne mais frequente no futuro, sendo importante estar alerta para o diagnóstico precoce e as possíveis complicações dessa infecção potencialmente letal.We report a case of Streptococcus pyogenes meningitis in a 18 days year-old-girl with clinical course complicated by sagittal sinus thrombosis. Some aspects of the pathogenesis, treatment and follow-up of the disease are discussed. The world increase of serious streptococcal infections in the last 10 years, probably will become neonatal Streptococcus pyogenes meningitis more frequent in the future and it is important to be alert for the precocious diagnosis and the possible complications of that potentially lethal infection.

  16. Biofilm formation enhances fomite survival of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Laura R; Reddinger, Ryan M; Hakansson, Anders P

    2014-03-01

    Both Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus pneumoniae are widely thought to rapidly die outside the human host, losing infectivity following desiccation in the environment. However, to date, all literature investigating the infectivity of desiccated streptococci has used broth-grown, planktonic populations. In this study, we examined the impact of biofilm formation on environmental survival of clinical and laboratory isolates of S. pyogenes and S. pneumoniae as both organisms are thought to colonize the human host as biofilms. Results clearly demonstrate that while planktonic cells that are desiccated rapidly lose viability both on hands and abiotic surfaces, such as plastic, biofilm bacteria remain viable over extended periods of time outside the host and remain infectious in a murine colonization model. To explore the level and extent of streptococcal fomite contamination that children might be exposed to naturally, direct bacteriologic cultures of items in a day care center were conducted, which demonstrated high levels of viable streptococci of both species. These findings raise the possibility that streptococci may survive in the environment and be transferred from person to person via fomites contaminated with oropharyngeal secretions containing biofilm streptococci.

  17. Recurrent bacteremia with different strains of Streptococcus pyogenes in an immunocompromised child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Takuya; Minami, Masaaki; Narita, Kotaro; Nakata, Tomohiko; Itomi, Seiko; Kubota, Kinya; Oya, Teruaki; Nishiyama, Hideki; Kato, Hideki; Yuasa, Norihiro

    2016-06-01

    We report an immunocompromised child who experienced two episodes of bacteremia due to Streptococcus pyogenes. Random amplification of polymorphic DNA profiles, emm genotypes, superantigen profiles, antimicrobial susceptibility, and resistance-related genes were investigated, and the results showed different profiles between the two isolates. This is the first report describing recurrent bacteremia caused by different strains of S. pyogenes. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Genomic analysis of a Streptococcus pyogenes strain causing endocarditis in a child

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    M. Beye

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We sequenced the genome of Streptococcus pyogenes strain G773 that caused an infective endocarditis in a 4-year-old boy suffering from acute endocarditis. The 1.9-Mb genome exhibited a specific combination of virulence factors including a complete integrative and conjugative element, sp2905, previously described as incomplete in S. pyogenes, and five bacteriocin-coding genes. However, strain G773 lacked a CRISPR-Cas system.

  19. Variation in Streptococcus pyogenes NAD+ glycohydrolase is associated with tissue tropism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddle, David J; Bessen, Debra E; Caparon, Michael G

    2010-07-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is an important pathogen that causes a variety of diseases. The most common infections involve the throat (pharyngitis) or skin (impetigo); however, the factors that determine tissue tropism and severity are incompletely understood. The S. pyogenes NAD(+) glycohydrolase (SPN) is a virulence factor that has been implicated in contributing to the pathogenesis of severe infections. However, the role of SPN in determining the bacterium's tissue tropism has not been evaluated. In this report, we examine the sequences of spn and its endogenous inhibitor ifs from a worldwide collection of S. pyogenes strains. Analysis of average pairwise nucleotide diversity, average number of nucleotide differences, and ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitutions revealed significant diversity in spn and ifs. Application of established models of molecular evolution shows that SPN is evolving under positive selection and diverging into NAD(+) glycohydrolase (NADase)-active and -inactive subtypes. Additionally, the NADase-inactive SPN subtypes maintain the characteristics of a functional gene while ifs becomes a pseudogene. Thus, NADase-inactive SPN continues to evolve under functional constraint. Furthermore, NADase activity did not correlate with invasive disease in our collection but was associated with tissue tropism. The ability to cause infection at both the pharynx and the skin ("generalist" strains) is correlated with NADase-active SPN, while the preference for causing infection at either the throat or the skin ("specialist" strains) is associated with NADase-inactive SPN. These findings suggest that SPN has a NADase-independent function and prompt a reevaluation of the role of SPN in streptococcal pathogenesis.

  20. Regulation of sagA, siaA and scpC by SilCR, a putative signaling peptide of Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Kowthar Y; de Azavedo, Joyce C; Bast, Darrin J; Cvitkovitch, Dennis G

    2008-12-01

    SilCR, a 17 amino acid putative signaling peptide, was proposed to modulate gene expression in Streptococcus pyogenes. We showed that SilCR added exogenously to an M1 serotype strain lacking the sil locus upregulates the in vitro expression of sagA, siaA, and scpC, genes associated with S. pyogenes pathogenesis. Interestingly, only sagA and siaA were upregulated by SilCR in vivo, whereas the expression of scpC remained unaltered. A previous report indicated that exogenously added SilCR protects mice to some degree from developing necrotic lesions caused by an invasive strain of S. pyogenes. In contrast to this report, we found that SilCR did not reduce lesion formation in a subcutaneous murine model of S. pyogenes infection but rather appeared to delay wound healing.

  1. Pleural empyema and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome due to Streptococcus pyogenes in a healthy Spanish traveler in Japan

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    Tetsuya Sakai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Group A Streptococcus (GAS, Streptococcus pyogenes causes invasive infections including streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS and local infections. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a case of an invasive GAS infection with pneumonia and pleural empyema (PE followed by STSS (disseminated intravascular coagulation [DIC] and acute renal insufficiency in a healthy male adult. He received combined supportive therapies of PE drainage, anti-DIC agent, hemodialysis, and antimicrobials and eventually made a clinical recovery. GAS isolated from PE was found to have emm1/speA genes, suggestive of a pathogenic strain. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of this disease entity (pneumonia, PE, and STSS in healthy male adults as well as children and adult women.

  2. Mechanism and regulation of phosphate transport in Streptococcus pyogenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reizer, J.; Saier, M.H. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    In contrast to results reported with other bacteria, uptake of 32 Pi in Streptococcus pyogenes was found to occur rapidly in starved cultures and to be strongly and immediately inhibited by addition of exogenous glycolytic energy sources (such as glucose) and nonglycolytic sources of ATP (such as arginine). Preincubation of starved cells with NaF, iodoacetate, or arsenate eliminated the inhibiting effect of glucose but not that of arginine. In accordance with the hypothesis that transport was attributable to P/sub i/-P/sub i/ exchange, uptake and efflux of 32 P/sub i/ in the presence of trans unlabeled P/sub i/ exhibited similar characteristics and were largely eliminated by reduction of the trans P/sub i/ concentration. Neither process was inhibited appreciably by pretreatment of cells with ionophores or metabolic inhibitors, but both processes were abolished by exposure to p-chloromercuribenzoate. Inhibition by both exogenous energy sources resulted in a reduction in the maximal velocity of transport (V/sub max/). Whereas arginine also caused a shift in the apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (K/sub m/) to larger values, glucose did not alter the K/sub m/. On the basis of the results reported, it is proposed that the rate of P/sub i/ exchange is determined positively by the intracellular and extracellular concentrations of P/sub i/ and negatively by ATP or metabolites thereof. The mechanism of ATP action is unknown but could involve either covalent or noncovalent modification of the carrier protein

  3. Superantigenic activity of emm3 Streptococcus pyogenes is abrogated by a conserved, naturally occurring smeZ mutation.

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    Claire E Turner

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes M/emm3 strains have been epidemiologically linked with enhanced infection severity and risk of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS, a syndrome triggered by superantigenic stimulation of T cells. Comparison of S. pyogenes strains causing STSS demonstrated that emm3 strains were surprisingly less mitogenic than other emm-types (emm1, emm12, emm18, emm28, emm87, emm89 both in vitro and in vivo, indicating poor superantigenic activity. We identified a 13 bp deletion in the superantigen smeZ gene of all emm3 strains tested. The deletion led to a premature stop codon in smeZ, and was not present in other major emm-types tested. Expression of a functional non-M3-smeZ gene successfully enhanced mitogenic activity in emm3 S. pyogenes and also restored mitogenic activity to emm1 and emm89 S. pyogenes strains where the smeZ gene had been disrupted. In contrast, the M3-smeZ gene with the 13 bp deletion could not enhance or restore mitogenicity in any of these S. pyogenes strains, confirming that M3-smeZ is non-functional regardless of strain background. The mutation in M3-smeZ reduced the potential for M3 S. pyogenes to induce cytokines in human tonsil, but not during invasive infection of superantigen-sensitive mice. Notwithstanding epidemiological associations with STSS and disease severity, emm3 strains have inherently poor superantigenicity that is explained by a conserved mutation in smeZ.

  4. Trading Capsule for Increased Cytotoxin Production: Contribution to Virulence of a Newly Emerged Clade of emm89 Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Luchang; Olsen, Randall J; Nasser, Waleed; de la Riva Morales, Ivan; Musser, James M

    2015-10-06

    Strains of emm89 Streptococcus pyogenes have become one of the major causes of invasive infections worldwide in the last 10 years. We recently sequenced the genome of 1,125 emm89 strains and identified three major phylogenetic groups, designated clade 1, clade 2, and the epidemic clade 3. Epidemic clade 3 strains, which now cause the great majority of infections, have two distinct genetic features compared to clade 1 and clade 2 strains. First, all clade 3 organisms have a variant 3 nga promoter region pattern, which is associated with increased production of secreted cytolytic toxins SPN (S. pyogenes NADase) and SLO (streptolysin O). Second, all clade 3 strains lack the hasABC locus mediating hyaluronic acid capsule synthesis, whereas this locus is intact in clade 1 and clade 2 strains. We constructed isogenic mutant strains that produce different levels of SPN and SLO toxins and capsule (none, low, or high). Here we report that emm89 strains with elevated toxin production are significantly more virulent than low-toxin producers. Importantly, we also show that capsule production is dispensable for virulence in strains that already produce high levels of SPN and SLO. Our results provide new understanding about the molecular mechanisms contributing to the rapid emergence and molecular pathogenesis of epidemic clade 3 emm89 S. pyogenes. S. pyogenes (group A streptococcus [GAS]) causes pharyngitis ("strep throat"), necrotizing fasciitis, and other human infections. Serious infections caused by emm89 S. pyogenes strains have recently increased in frequency in many countries. Based on whole-genome sequence analysis of 1,125 strains recovered from patients on two continents, we discovered that a new emm89 clone, termed clade 3, has two distinct genetic features compared to its predecessors: (i) absence of the genes encoding antiphagocytic hyaluronic acid capsule virulence factor and (ii) increased production of the secreted cytolytic toxins SPN and SLO. emm89 S. pyogenes

  5. A Case of Systemic Infection Caused by Streptococcus pyogenes Oral Infection in an Edentulous Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Yumi; Abe, Masanobu; Inaki, Ryoko; Zong, Liang; Suenaga, Hideyuki; Abe, Takahiro; Hoshi, Kazuto

    2017-08-18

    Infections in the oral and maxillofacial region can sometimes extend beyond the oral cavity, with serious consequences. Most oral infections are odontogenic, occurring through the root apex of the tooth or the periodontal pocket. It thus makes sense that edentulous patients have a much lower risk of oral bacterial infection. For this reason, while there are many reports on systemic infections caused by oral infections, few of these describe such infections in edentulous patients. We present a case of oral and maxillofacial cellulitis followed by sepsis due to Streptococcus pyogenes infection in an 89-year-old Japanese edentulous woman. S. pyogenes was detected in the wound of left maxilla and the blood sample. S. pyogenes has been reported to be one of the most common and influential aerobic bacteria associated with deep neck infection and subsequent systemic infection. Left maxillary sinusitis was observed, and this could be the origin of the S. pyogenes infection. S. pyogenes derived from the sinusitis and leaked to the oral cavity might have caused systemic infection through wounding of the oral mucosa. Fortunately, intensive antibiotic therapy was effective, and the patient recovered without any surgical procedures. We experienced a rare case of oral and maxillofacial cellulitis followed by sepsis due to a Streptococcus pyogenes infection in an old edentulous woman. This result indicated that, while edentulous patients are considered to have no risk of odontogenic infection, they still carry a risk of bacterial infection.

  6. Pyogenic liver abscess secondary to disseminated Streptococcus Anginosus from Sigmoid Diverticulitis

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    Shishir Murarka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyogenic liver abscess secondary to dissemination from Sigmoid diverticulitis is rare. Streptococcus anginosus has been linked to abscesses but has been rarely reported from a Sigmoid diverticulitis source. We report a case of liver abscess in which the source was confounding but eventually was traced to Sigmoid diverticulitis on laparotomy.

  7. Production of recombinant streptokinase from Streptococcus pyogenes isolate and its potential for thrombolytic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assiri, Abdullah S; El-Gamal, Basiouny A; Hafez, Elsayed E; Haidara, Mohamed A

    2014-12-01

    To produce an effective recombinant streptokinase (rSK) from pathogenic Streptococcus pyogenes isolate in yeast, and evaluate its potential for thrombolytic therapy. This study was conducted from November 2012 to December 2013 at King Khalid University, Abha, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). Throat swabs collected from 45 pharyngitis patients in Asser Central Hospital, Abha, KSA were used to isolate Streptococcus pyogenes. The bacterial DNA was used for amplification of the streptokinase gene (1200 bp). The gene was cloned and in vitro transcribed in an eukaryotic expression vector that was transformed into yeast Pichia pastoris SMD1168, and the rSK protein was purified and tested for its thrombolytic activity. The Streptococcus pyogenes strain was isolated and its DNA nucleotide sequence revealed similarity to other Streptococcus pyogenes in the Gene bank. Sequencing of the amplified gene based on DNA nucleotide sequence revealed a SK gene closely related to other SK genes in the Gene bank. However, based on deduced amino acids sequence, the gene formed a separate cluster different from clusters formed by other examined genes, suggesting a new bacterial isolate and accordingly a new gene. The purified protein showed 82% clot lysis compared to a commercial SK (81%) at an enzyme concentration of 2000 U/ml. The present yeast rSK showed similar thrombolytic activity in vitro as that of a commercial SK, suggesting its potential for thrombolytic therapy and large scale production. 

  8. Characterization of Streptococcus pyogenes isolates responsible for adult meningitis in France from 2003 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plainvert, Céline; Doloy, Alexandra; Joubrel, Caroline; Maataoui, Naouale; Dmytruk, Nicolas; Touak, Gérald; Collobert, Gislène; Fouet, Agnès; Poyart, Claire; Loubinoux, Julien

    2016-04-01

    Sixty-three cases of Streptococcus pyogenes meningitis in adults were studied. Three predominant emm types were associated with meningitis: emm1 (44%), emm3 (11%), and emm6 (11%). Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome and mortality rates were 40% and 38%, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Streptococcus pyogenes udgående fra tonsilfokus som mulig årsag til alvorlig sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alimoradi, Jalal; Lisby, Gorm; Jeppesen, Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (SP) is a common bacterial pathogen. For the past two decades, several studies have reported an increase in the severity and the incidence of SP infections. Case: a 60-year-old female admitted to the hospital with tonsillitis acuta verified by strep-A test was initially...

  10. Production of recombinant streptokinase from Streptococcus pyogenes isolate and its potential for thrombolytic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assiri, Abdullah S.; El-Gamal, Basiouny A.; Hafez, Elsayed E.; Haidara, Mohamed A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To produce an effective recombinant streptokinase (rSK) from pathogenic Streptococcus pyogenes isolate in yeast, and evaluate its potential for thrombolytic therapy. Methods: This study was conducted from November 2012 to December 2013 at King Khalid University, Abha, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). Throat swabs collected from 45 pharyngitis patients in Asser Central Hospital, Abha, KSA were used to isolate Streptococcus pyogenes. The bacterial DNA was used for amplification of the streptokinase gene (1200 bp). The gene was cloned and in vitro transcribed in an eukaryotic expression vector that was transformed into yeast Pichia pastoris SMD1168, and the rSK protein was purified and tested for its thrombolytic activity. Results: The Streptococcus pyogenes strain was isolated and its DNA nucleotide sequence revealed similarity to other Streptococcus pyogenes in the Gene bank. Sequencing of the amplified gene based on DNA nucleotide sequence revealed a SK gene closely related to other SK genes in the Gene bank. However, based on deduced amino acids sequence, the gene formed a separate cluster different from clusters formed by other examined genes, suggesting a new bacterial isolate and accordingly a new gene. The purified protein showed 82% clot lysis compared to a commercial SK (81%) at an enzyme concentration of 2000 U/ml. Conclusion: The present yeast rSK showed similar thrombolytic activity in vitro as that of a commercial SK, suggesting its potential for thrombolytic therapy and large scale production. PMID:25491213

  11. Streptococcus pyogenes udgående fra tonsilfokus som mulig årsag til alvorlig sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alimoradi, Jalal; Lisby, Gorm; Jeppesen, Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (SP) is a common bacterial pathogen. For the past two decades, several studies have reported an increase in the severity and the incidence of SP infections. Case: a 60-year-old female admitted to the hospital with tonsillitis acuta verified by strep-A test was initially tre...

  12. The CXC Chemokine-degrading Protease SpyCep of Streptococcus pyogenes Promotes Its Uptake into Endothelial Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Simran Jeet; Nerlich, Andreas; Bergmann, Simone; Rohde, Manfred; Fulde, Marcus; Zähner, Dorothea; Hanski, Emanuel; Zinkernagel, Annelies; Nizet, Victor; Chhatwal, Gursharan S.; Talay, Susanne R.

    2010-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes expresses the LPXTG motif-containing cell envelope serine protease SpyCep (also called ScpC, PrtS) that degrades and inactivates the major chemoattractant interleukin 8 (IL-8), thereby impairing host neutrophil recruitment. In this study, we identified a novel function of SpyCep: the ability to mediate uptake into primary human endothelial cells. SpyCep triggered its uptake into endothelial cells but not into human epithelial cells originating from pharynx or lung, indicating an endothelial cell-specific uptake mechanism. SpyCep mediated cellular invasion by an endosomal/lysosomal pathway distinct from the caveolae-mediated invasion pathway of S. pyogenes. Recombinant expression and purification of proteolytically active SpyCep and a series of subfragments allowed functional dissection of the domains responsible for endothelial cell invasion and IL-8 degradation. The N-terminal PR domain was sufficient to mediate endothelial cell invasion, whereas for IL-8-degrading activity, the protease domain and the flanking A domain were required. A polyclonal rabbit serum raised against the recombinant protease efficiently blocked the invasion-mediating activity of SpyCep but not its proteolytic function, further indicating that SpyCep-mediated internalization is independent from its enzymatic activity. SpyCep may thus specifically mediate its own uptake as secreted protein into human endothelial cells. PMID:20562101

  13. The CXC chemokine-degrading protease SpyCep of Streptococcus pyogenes promotes its uptake into endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Simran Jeet; Nerlich, Andreas; Bergmann, Simone; Rohde, Manfred; Fulde, Marcus; Zähner, Dorothea; Hanski, Emanuel; Zinkernagel, Annelies; Nizet, Victor; Chhatwal, Gursharan S; Talay, Susanne R

    2010-09-03

    Streptococcus pyogenes expresses the LPXTG motif-containing cell envelope serine protease SpyCep (also called ScpC, PrtS) that degrades and inactivates the major chemoattractant interleukin 8 (IL-8), thereby impairing host neutrophil recruitment. In this study, we identified a novel function of SpyCep: the ability to mediate uptake into primary human endothelial cells. SpyCep triggered its uptake into endothelial cells but not into human epithelial cells originating from pharynx or lung, indicating an endothelial cell-specific uptake mechanism. SpyCep mediated cellular invasion by an endosomal/lysosomal pathway distinct from the caveolae-mediated invasion pathway of S. pyogenes. Recombinant expression and purification of proteolytically active SpyCep and a series of subfragments allowed functional dissection of the domains responsible for endothelial cell invasion and IL-8 degradation. The N-terminal PR domain was sufficient to mediate endothelial cell invasion, whereas for IL-8-degrading activity, the protease domain and the flanking A domain were required. A polyclonal rabbit serum raised against the recombinant protease efficiently blocked the invasion-mediating activity of SpyCep but not its proteolytic function, further indicating that SpyCep-mediated internalization is independent from its enzymatic activity. SpyCep may thus specifically mediate its own uptake as secreted protein into human endothelial cells.

  14. Genome sequence analysis of emm89 Streptococcus pyogenes strains causing infections in Scotland, 2010-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beres, Stephen B; Olsen, Randall J; Ojeda Saavedra, Matthew; Ure, Roisin; Reynolds, Arlene; Lindsay, Diane S J; Smith, Andrew J; Musser, James M

    2017-12-01

    Strains of type emm89 Streptococcus pyogenes have recently increased in frequency as a cause of human infections in several countries in Europe and North America. This increase has been molecular epidemiologically linked with the emergence of a new genetically distinct clone, designated clade 3. We sought to extend our understanding of this epidemic behavior by the genetic characterization of type emm89 strains responsible in recent years for an increased frequency of infections in Scotland. We sequenced the genomes of a retrospective cohort of 122 emm89 strains recovered from patients with invasive and noninvasive infections throughout Scotland during 2010 to 2016. All but one of the 122 emm89 infection isolates are of the recently emerged epidemic clade 3 clonal lineage. The Scotland isolates are closely related to and not genetically distinct from recent emm89 strains from England, they constitute a single genetic population. The clade 3 clone causes virtually all-contemporary emm89 infections in Scotland. These findings add Scotland to a growing list of countries of Europe and North America where, by whole genome sequencing, emm89 clade 3 strains have been demonstrated to be the cause of an ongoing epidemic of invasive infections and to be genetically related due to descent from a recent common progenitor.

  15. Complement-mediated opsonization of invasive group A Streptococcus pyogenes strain AP53 is regulated by the bacterial two-component cluster of virulence responder/sensor (CovRS) system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrahari, Garima; Liang, Zhong; Mayfield, Jeffrey A; Balsara, Rashna D; Ploplis, Victoria A; Castellino, Francis J

    2013-09-20

    Group A Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS) strain AP53 is a primary isolate from a patient with necrotizing fasciitis. These AP53 cells contain an inactivating mutation in the sensor component of the cluster of virulence (cov) responder (R)/sensor (S) two-component gene regulatory system (covRS), which enhances the virulence of the primary strain, AP53/covR(+)S(-). However, specific mechanisms by which the covRS system regulates the survival of GAS in humans are incomplete. Here, we show a key role for covRS in the regulation of opsonophagocytosis of AP53 by human neutrophils. AP53/covR(+)S(-) cells displayed potent binding of host complement inhibitors of C3 convertase, viz. Factor H (FH) and C4-binding protein (C4BP), which concomitantly led to minimal C3b deposition on AP53 cells, further showing that these plasma protein inhibitors are active on GAS cells. This resulted in weak killing of the bacteria by human neutrophils and a corresponding high death rate of mice after injection of these cells. After targeted allelic alteration of covS(-) to wild-type covS (covS(+)), a dramatic loss of FH and C4BP binding to the AP53/covR(+)S(+) cells was observed. This resulted in elevated C3b deposition on AP53/covR(+)S(+) cells, a high level of opsonophagocytosis by human neutrophils, and a very low death rate of mice infected with AP53/covR(+)S(+). We show that covRS is a critical transcriptional regulator of genes directing AP53 killing by neutrophils and regulates the levels of the receptors for FH and C4BP, which we identify as the products of the fba and enn genes, respectively.

  16. Chromosomal Islands of Streptococcus pyogenes and related streptococci: Molecular Switches for Survival and Virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Van Nguyen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes is a significant pathogen of humans, annually causing over 700,000,000 infections and 500,000 deaths. Virulence in S. pyogenes is closely linked to mobile genetic elements like phages and chromosomal islands (CI. S. pyogenes phage-like chromosomal islands (SpyCI confer a complex mutator phenotype on their host. SpyCI integrate into the 5’ end of DNA mismatch repair (MMR gene mutL, which also disrupts downstream operon genes lmrP, ruvA, and tag. During early logarithmic growth, SpyCI excise from the bacterial chromosome and replicate as episomes, relieving the mutator phenotype. As growth slows and the cells enter stationary phase, SpyCI reintegrate into the chromosome, again silencing the MMR operon. This system creates a unique growth-dependent and reversible mutator phenotype. Additional CI using the identical attachment site in mutL have been identified in related species, including Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis, Streptococcus anginosus, Streptococcus intermedius, Streptococcus parauberis, and Streptococcus canis. These CI have small genomes, which range from 13-20 kB, conserved integrase and DNA replication genes, and no identifiable genes encoding capsid proteins. SpyCI may employ a helper phage for packaging and dissemination in a fashion similar to the Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity islands (SaPI. Outside of the core replication and integration genes, SpyCI and related CI show considerable diversity with the presence of many indels that may contribute to the host cell phenotype or fitness. SpyCI are a subset of a larger family of streptococcal CI who potentially regulate the expression of other host genes. The biological and phylogenetic analysis of streptococcal chromosomal islands provides important clues as to how these chromosomal islands help S. pyogenes and other streptococcal species persist in human populations in spite of antibiotic therapy and immune challenges.

  17. Chromosomal islands of Streptococcus pyogenes and related streptococci: molecular switches for survival and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Scott V; McShan, William M

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a significant pathogen of humans, annually causing over 700,000,000 infections and 500,000 deaths. Virulence in S. pyogenes is closely linked to mobile genetic elements like phages and chromosomal islands (CI). S. pyogenes phage-like chromosomal islands (SpyCI) confer a complex mutator phenotype on their host. SpyCI integrate into the 5' end of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutL, which also disrupts downstream operon genes lmrP, ruvA, and tag. During early logarithmic growth, SpyCI excise from the bacterial chromosome and replicate as episomes, relieving the mutator phenotype. As growth slows and the cells enter stationary phase, SpyCI reintegrate into the chromosome, again silencing the MMR operon. This system creates a unique growth-dependent and reversible mutator phenotype. Additional CI using the identical attachment site in mutL have been identified in related species, including Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis, Streptococcus anginosus, Streptococcus intermedius, Streptococcus parauberis, and Streptococcus canis. These CI have small genomes, which range from 13 to 20 kB, conserved integrase and DNA replication genes, and no identifiable genes encoding capsid proteins. SpyCI may employ a helper phage for packaging and dissemination in a fashion similar to the Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity islands (SaPI). Outside of the core replication and integration genes, SpyCI and related CI show considerable diversity with the presence of many indels that may contribute to the host cell phenotype or fitness. SpyCI are a subset of a larger family of streptococcal CI who potentially regulate the expression of other host genes. The biological and phylogenetic analysis of streptococcal chromosomal islands provides important clues as to how these chromosomal islands help S. pyogenes and other streptococcal species persist in human populations in spite of antibiotic therapy and immune challenges.

  18. High Prevalence of Macrolide-resistance and Molecular Characterization of Streptococcus pyogenes Isolates Circulating in China from 2009 to 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Binghuai; Fang, Yujie; Fan, Yanyan; Chen, Xingchun; Wang, Junrui; Zeng, Ji; Li, Yi; Zhang, Zhijun; Huang, Lei; Li, Hongxia; Li, Dong; Zhu, Fengxia; Cui, Yanchao; Wang, Duochun

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, or group A Streptococcus, is a pathogen responsible for a wide range of clinical manifestations, from mild skin and soft tissue infections and pharyngitis to severe diseases. Its epidemiological characteristics should be comprehensively under surveillance for regulating the national prevention and treatment practice. Herein, a total of 140 S. pyogenes, including 38 invasive and 102 noninvasive isolates, were collected from infected patients in 10 tertiary general hospitals from 7 cities/provinces in China during the years 2009–2016. All strains were characterized by classical and molecular techniques for its emm types/subtypes, virulent factors and antibiotic resistance profiling. Of 140 isolates, 15 distinct emm types and 31 subtypes were detected, dominated by emm12 (60 isolates, 42.9%), emm1(43, 30.7%), and emm89 (10, 7.1%), and 8 new emm variant subtypes were identified. All strains, invasive or not, harbored the superantigenic genes, speB and slo. The other virulence genes, smeZ, speF, and speC accounted for 96.4, 91.4, and 87.1% of collected isolates, respectively. Further multilocus sequence typing (MLST) placed all strains into 22 individual sequence types (STs), including 4 newly-identified STs (11, 7.9%). All isolates were phenotypically susceptible to penicillin, ampicillin, cefotaxime, and vancomycin, whereas 131(93.5%), 132(94.2%), and 121(86.4%) were resistant to erythromycin, clindamycin, and tetracycline, respectively. Our study highlights high genotypic diversity and high prevalence of macrolide resistance of S. pyogenes among clinical isolates circulating in China. PMID:28642756

  19. Sequence variability is correlated with weak immunogenicity in Streptococcus pyogenes M protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lannergård, Jonas; Kristensen, Bodil M.; Gustafsson, Mattias C. U.

    2015-01-01

    The M protein of Streptococcus pyogenes, a major bacterial virulence factor, has an amino-terminal hypervariable region (HVR) that is a target for type-specific protective antibodies. Intriguingly, the HVR elicits a weak antibody response, indicating that it escapes host immunity by two mechanisms...... fibrinogen-binding B repeat region exhibits extensive sequence divergence. Analysis of antisera from S. pyogenes-infected patients, infected mice, and immunized mice showed that both the HVR and the B repeat region elicited weak antibody responses, while the conserved carboxy-terminal part was immunodominant...

  20. Genome-scale reconstruction of the Streptococcus pyogenes M49 metabolic network reveals growth requirements and indicates potential drug targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levering, J.; Fiedler, T.; Sieg, A.; van Grinsven, K.W.A.; Hering, S.; Veith, N.; Olivier, B.G.; Klett, L.; Hugenholtz, J.; Teusink, B.; Kreikemeyer, B.; Kummer, U.

    2016-01-01

    Genome-scale metabolic models comprise stoichiometric relations between metabolites, as well as associations between genes and metabolic reactions and facilitate the analysis of metabolism. We computationally reconstructed the metabolic network of the lactic acid bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes

  1. Activation of TAFI on the surface of Streptococcus pyogenes evokes inflammatory reactions by modulating the kallikrein/kinin system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bengtson, Sara H.; Sandén, Caroline; Mörgelin, Matthias; Marx, Pauline F.; Olin, Anders I.; Leeb-Lundberg, L. M. Fredrik; Meijers, Joost C. M.; Herwald, Heiko

    2008-01-01

    Bacteria-controlled regulation of host responses to infection is an important virulence mechanism that has been demonstrated to contribute to disease progression. Here we report that the human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes employs the procarboxypeptidase TAFI (thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis

  2. Integration of Genomic and Other Epidemiologic Data to Investigate and Control a Cross-Institutional Outbreak of Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalker, Victoria J; Smith, Alyson; Al-Shahib, Ali; Botchway, Stella; Macdonald, Emily; Daniel, Roger; Phillips, Sarah; Platt, Steven; Doumith, Michel; Tewolde, Rediat; Coelho, Juliana; Jolley, Keith A; Underwood, Anthony; McCarthy, Noel D

    2016-06-01

    Single-strain outbreaks of Streptococcus pyogenes infections are common and often go undetected. In 2013, two clusters of invasive group A Streptococcus (iGAS) infection were identified in independent but closely located care homes in Oxfordshire, United Kingdom. Investigation included visits to each home, chart review, staff survey, microbiologic sampling, and genome sequencing. S. pyogenes emm type 1.0, the most common circulating type nationally, was identified from all cases yielding GAS isolates. A tailored whole-genome reference population comprising epidemiologically relevant contemporaneous isolates and published isolates was assembled. Data were analyzed independently using whole-genome multilocus sequencing and single-nucleotide polymorphism analyses. Six isolates from staff and residents of the homes formed a single cluster that was separated from the reference population by both analytical approaches. No further cases occurred after mass chemoprophylaxis and enhanced infection control. Our findings demonstrate the ability of 2 independent analytical approaches to enable robust conclusions from nonstandardized whole-genome analysis to support public health practice.

  3. Genome Analysis of Streptococcus pyogenes Associated with Pharyngitis and Skin Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Joe; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Jospin, Guillaume; Coil, David A.; Khazen, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a very important human pathogen, commonly associated with skin or throat infections but can also cause life-threatening situations including sepsis, streptococcal toxic shock syndrome, and necrotizing fasciitis. Various studies involving typing and molecular characterization of S. pyogenes have been published to date; however next-generation sequencing (NGS) studies provide a comprehensive collection of an organism’s genetic variation. In this study, the genomes of nine S. pyogenes isolates associated with pharyngitis and skin infection were sequenced and studied for the presence of virulence genes, resistance elements, prophages, genomic recombination, and other genomic features. Additionally, a comparative phylogenetic analysis of the isolates with global clones highlighted their possible evolutionary lineage and their site of infection. The genomes were found to also house a multitude of features including gene regulation systems, virulence factors and antimicrobial resistance mechanisms. PMID:27977735

  4. Erythromycine resistance in streptococcus pyogenes group a throat isolates in sukkur city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Memon, B.

    2007-01-01

    To examine and evaluate the predominant and common etiologic agent(s) of pharyngitis in Sukkur city and to determine their current antibiotic susceptibility/resistance trends. Out of 257 throat samples, 149 positive for Streptococcus pyogenes Group A between November 2001 and May 2003 from adult population of Sukkur city were tested for their susceptibility to erythromycin, clindamycin, azithromycin and clairithromycin. The throat samples (swabs) were examined by Gram-stain, API system, and for presence of a hemolysis. Samples were further cultured on Muller Hinton agar for determination of antibiotic sensitivity patterns. The sensitivity was performed on only those samples which were positive for S. pyogenes. Of all throat isolates, 95% were predominantly resistant to erythromycin. Their sensitivity towards clindamycin was 30%, azithromycin 44% and clairithromycin 76% respectively. The current pharyngeal isolates of S. pyogenes exhibited frequent and alarmingly high erythromycin resistance which may be due to both intrinsic and acquired mechanisms. (author)

  5. [Epidemiology and clinical features of Streptococcus pyogenes bacteremia in Cartagena (Murcia, Spain)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimeno-Almazán, Amaya; Viqueira-Gonzalez, Montserrat; Alcalde, María Del Mar; Alcaraz-Vidal, Begoña; Vera-Méndez, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    A gradual increase in severe cases due to Streptococcus pyogenes or Streptococcus beta-hemolytic group A (SGA), has been detected in the last few decades. Retrospective study of bacteremia due to S.pyogenes detected between January 2009 and January 2013 in Cartagena. The annual incidence for severe bacteremia has been estimated. Thirteen cases of SGA bacteremia were recorded. The incidence increased from 0.37 in 2009 to 2.5 cases/100,000 inhabitants in 2012. The predominant focus was skin and soft tissue infections (53%). Early mortality was 20%. Severe streptococcal disease is rare, but affects individuals with good functional status, and is associated with a high mortality. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  6. Nasopharyngeal infection by Streptococcus pyogenes requires superantigen-responsive Vβ-specific T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeppa, Joseph J.; Kasper, Katherine J.; Mohorovic, Ivor; Mazzuca, Delfina M.

    2017-01-01

    The globally prominent pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes secretes potent immunomodulatory proteins known as superantigens (SAgs), which engage lateral surfaces of major histocompatibility class II molecules and T-cell receptor (TCR) β-chain variable domains (Vβs). These interactions result in the activation of numerous Vβ-specific T cells, which is the defining activity of a SAg. Although streptococcal SAgs are known virulence factors in scarlet fever and toxic shock syndrome, mechanisms by how SAgs contribute to the life cycle of S. pyogenes remain poorly understood. Herein, we demonstrate that passive immunization against the Vβ8-targeting SAg streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin A (SpeA), or active immunization with either wild-type or a nonfunctional SpeA mutant, protects mice from nasopharyngeal infection; however, only passive immunization, or vaccination with inactive SpeA, resulted in high-titer SpeA-specific antibodies in vivo. Mice vaccinated with wild-type SpeA rendered Vβ8+ T cells poorly responsive, which prevented infection. This phenotype was reproduced with staphylococcal enterotoxin B, a heterologous SAg that also targets Vβ8+ T cells, and rendered mice resistant to infection. Furthermore, antibody-mediated depletion of T cells prevented nasopharyngeal infection by S. pyogenes, but not by Streptococcus pneumoniae, a bacterium that does not produce SAgs. Remarkably, these observations suggest that S. pyogenes uses SAgs to manipulate Vβ-specific T cells to establish nasopharyngeal infection. PMID:28794279

  7. Recurrent Streptococcus pyogenes genital infection in a woman: test and treat the partner!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilienne Verkaeren

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Group A Streptococcus (GAS is a well-known cause of vulvovaginitis in prepubescent girls, but it is rarely described in adult women. We describe the case of a 64-year-old woman who presented with endometritis revealed by GAS bacteraemia, followed by recurrent vulvovaginitis due to a wild-type strain of GAS. She relapsed twice despite amoxicillin treatment. Her husband was found to be an asymptomatic carrier after GAS was identified in nasal and rectal swabs. She was cured after eradication of carriage in both herself and her husband with amoxicillin and rifampin. When recurrent Streptococcus pyogenes genital infections occur, test and treat the partner.

  8. Streptococcus pyogenes CAMP factor attenuates phagocytic activity of RAW 264.7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosawa, Mie; Oda, Masataka; Domon, Hisanori; Saitoh, Issei; Hayasaki, Haruaki; Terao, Yutaka

    2016-02-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes produces molecules that inhibit the function of human immune system, thus allowing the pathogen to grow and spread in tissues. It is known that S. pyogenes CAMP factor increases erythrocytosis induced by Staphylococcus aureus β-hemolysin. However, the effects of CAMP factor for immune cells are unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of CAMP factor to macrophages. Western blotting analysis demonstrated that all examined strains expressed CAMP factor protein. In the presence of calcium or magnesium ion, CAMP factor was significantly released in the supernatant. In addition, both culture supernatant from S. pyogenes strain SSI-9 and recombinant CAMP factor dose-dependently induced vacuolation in RAW 264.7 cells, but the culture supernatant from Δcfa isogenic mutant strain did not. CAMP factor formed oligomers in RAW 264.7 cells in a time-dependent manner. CAMP factor suppressed cell proliferation via G2 phase cell cycle arrest without inducing cell death. Furthermore, CAMP factor reduced the uptake of S. pyogenes and phagocytic activity indicator by RAW 264.7 cells. These results suggest that CAMP factor works as a macrophage dysfunction factor. Therefore, we conclude that CAMP factor allows S. pyogenes to escape the host immune system, and contribute to the spread of streptococcal infection. Copyright © 2015 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Inactivation of the CovR/S Virulence Regulator Impairs Infection in an Improved Murine Model of Streptococcus pyogenes Naso-Pharyngeal Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Faraz M.; Turner, Claire E.; Smith, Ken; Wiles, Siouxsie; Sriskandan, Shiranee

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a leading cause of pharyngeal infection, with an estimated 616 million cases per year. The human nasopharynx represents the major reservoir for all S. pyogenes infection, including severe invasive disease. To investigate bacterial and host factors that influence S. pyogenes infection, we have devised an improved murine model of nasopharyngeal colonization, with an optimized dosing volume to avoid fulminant infections and a sensitive host strain. In addition we have utilized a refined technique for longitudinal monitoring of bacterial burden that is non-invasive thereby reducing the numbers of animals required. The model was used to demonstrate that the two component regulatory system, CovR/S, is required for optimum infection and transmission from the nasopharynx. There is a fitness cost conferred by covR/S mutation that is specific to the nasopharynx. This may explain why S. pyogenes with altered covR/S have not become prevalent in community infections despite possessing a selective advantage in invasive infection. PMID:23637876

  10. Epidemiology Analysis of Streptococcus pyogenes in a Hospital in Southern Taiwan by Use of the Updated emm Cluster Typing System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang-Ni, Chuan; Zheng, Po-Xing; Wang, Shu-Ying; Tsai, Pei-Jane; Chuang, Woei-Jer; Lin, Yee-Shin; Liu, Ching-Chuan; Wu, Jiunn-Jong

    2016-01-01

    emm typing is the most widely used molecular typing method for the human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus [GAS]). emm typing is based on a small variable region of the emm gene; however, the emm cluster typing system defines GAS types according to the nearly complete sequence of the emm gene. Therefore, emm cluster typing is considered to provide more information regarding the functional and structural properties of M proteins in different emm types of GAS. In the present study, 677 isolates collected between 1994 and 2008 in a hospital in southern Taiwan were analyzed by the emm cluster typing system. emm clusters A-C4, E1, E6, and A-C3 were the most prevalent emm cluster types and accounted for 67.4% of total isolates. emm clusters A-C4 and E1 were associated with noninvasive diseases, whereas E6 was significantly associated with both invasive and noninvasive manifestations. In addition, emm clusters D4, E2, and E3 were significantly associated with invasive manifestations. Furthermore, we found that the functional properties of M protein, including low fibrinogen-binding and high IgG-binding activities, were correlated significantly with invasive manifestations. In summary, the present study provides updated epidemiological information on GAS emm cluster types in southern Taiwan. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. [Orbital cellulitis complicated by subperiosteal abscess due to Streptococcus pyogenes infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruíz Carrillo, José Daniel; Vázquez Guerrero, Edwin; Mercado Uribe, Mónica Cecilia

    Orbital cellulitis is an infectious disease that is very common in pediatric patients, in which severe complications may develop. Etiological agents related to this disease are Haemophilus influenzae B, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Moraxella catarrhalis, which correspond to 95% of cases. Moreover, Streptococcus beta hemolytic and anaerobic microorganisms may also be present corresponding to < 5% of the cases. We present an uncommon case of cellulitis complicated by sub-periosteal abscess caused by Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A beta hemolytic streptococcus). A 9-year-old male patient with a history of deficit disorder and hyperactivity since 5 years of age. His current condition started with erythema in the external edge of the right eye, increase in peri-orbicular volume with limitation of eyelid opening, progression to proptosis, pain with eye movements and conjunctival purulent discharge. Image studies reported subperiosteal abscess and preseptal right with extraocular cellulitis. The patient started with empirical antibiotic treatment, surgical drainage and culture of purulent material from which Streptococcus pyogenes was isolated. Due to the implementation of vaccination schemes against H. influenza and S. pneumoniae since the 90s, the cases by these pathogens have decreased, causing new bacteria to take place as the cause of the infection. The importance of considering S. pyogenes as an etiology of orbital cellulitis is the rapid progression to abscess formation, and the few cases described in the literature. Copyright © 2017 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  12. Delineation of Streptococcus dysgalactiae, its subspecies, and its clinical and phylogenetic relationship to Streptococcus pyogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders; Kilian, Mogens

    2011-01-01

    The close phylogenetic relationship of the important pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae and several species of commensal streptococci, particularly Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae, and the recently demonstrated sharing of genes and phenotypic traits previously considered...

  13. Cell Death Induction By Streptococcus Pyogenes in Four Types of Malignant Cell Llines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Mollaii

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Background:The interest in using bacteria as anti- cancer therapeutic agents dates back to the end of the19th century. Some bacteria like Salmonella and Listeria replicate effectively inside malignant cell lines and suppress their growth. The bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes has become medically famous as a flesh-eating pathogen since mid-1980s. It is the causative agent of a life threatening clinical condition called necrotizing fasciitis. S. pyogenes usually produces a range of lytic enzymes that promote bacterial pathogenesis. With these characters, could this bacteria. be employed as a curing agent for certain cancers? The aim of this study was to determine the influence of S. pyogenes on malignant cellular death (apoptosis or necrosis- in an ex-vivo "experimental- interventional" study.Methods: The cytotoxicity of fifteen internalized streptococcal strains( including 12 clinical isolates, 2 known M types [M1, M3] and standard strain, on four types of malignant cell lines- A549, BT-20, PC-3, L-929- were tested by Trypan blue exclusion, DNAfragmentation and WST-1 methods. The streptococcal protease, lipase, DNase and serum opacity factor (SOF were tested concurrently. The standard strain of Streptococcus (Enterococcus faecalis was employed as negative control. The results were analyzed by statistical Minitab software.   Results: The overall cytotoxicity rate of -internalized- S. pyogenes was 57% by trypan blue method and 50 % by DNA electrophoresis. False positive results occurred for the negative control in WST-1; therefore this test did not present reasonable results. The correlation between production of SOF, lipase, DNase and cytotoxicity of S. pyogenes was not significant (p > 0.05. However, 67% of the protease positive strains induced cellular death in at least one type of - malignant cell line (p

  14. Kinetic characterization of arginine deiminase and carbamate kinase from Streptococcus pyogenes M49.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hering, Silvio; Sieg, Antje; Kreikemeyer, Bernd; Fiedler, Tomas

    2013-09-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus, GAS) is an important human pathogen causing mild superficial infections of skin and mucous membranes, but also life-threatening systemic diseases. S. pyogenes and other prokaryotic organisms use the arginine deiminase system (ADS) for survival in acidic environments. In this study, the arginine deiminase (AD), and carbamate kinase (CK) from S. pyogenes M49 strain 591 were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli DH5α, purified, and kinetically characterized. AD and CK from S. pyogenes M49 share high amino acid sequence similarity with the respective enzymes from Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis IL1403 (45.6% and 53.5% identical amino acids) and Enterococcus faecalis V583 (66.8% and 66.8% identical amino acids). We found that the arginine deiminase of S. pyogenes is not allosterically regulated by the intermediates and products of the arginine degradation (e.g., ATP, citrulline, carbamoyl phosphate). The Km and Vmax values for arginine were 1.13±0.12mM (mean±SD) and 1.51±0.07μmol/min/mg protein. The carbamate kinase is inhibited by ATP but unaffected by arginine and citrulline. The Km and Vmax values for ADP were 0.72±0.08mM and 1.10±0.10μmol/min/mg protein and the Km for carbamoyl phosphate was 0.65±0.07mM. The optimum pH and temperature for both enzymes were 6.5 and 37°C, respectively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. ICESpy009, a Conjugative Genetic Element Carrying mef(E) in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Grosso, Maria; Camilli, Romina; Rizzi, Ermanno; Pietrelli, Alessandro; De Bellis, Gianluca; Pantosti, Annalisa

    2016-07-01

    Efflux-mediated macrolide resistance due to mef(E) and mel, carried by the mega element, is common in Streptococcus pneumoniae, for which it was originally characterized, but it is rare in Streptococcus pyogenes In S. pyogenes, mega was previously found to be enclosed in Tn2009, a composite genetic element of the Tn916 family containing tet(M) and conferring erythromycin and tetracycline resistance. In this study, S. pyogenes isolates containing mef(E), apparently not associated with other resistance determinants, were examined to characterize the genetic context of mega. By whole-genome sequencing of one isolate, MB56Spyo009, we identified a novel composite integrative and conjugative element (ICE) carrying mega, designated ICESpy009, belonging to the ICESa2603 family. ICESpy009 was 55 kb long, contained 61 putative open reading frames (ORFs), and was found to be integrated into hylA, a novel integration site for the ICESa2603 family. The modular organization of the ICE was similar to that of members of the ICESa2603 family carried by different streptococcal species. In addition, a novel cluster of accessory resistance genes was found inside a region that encloses mega. PCR mapping targeting ICESpy009 revealed the presence of a similar ICE in five other isolates under study. While in three isolates the integration site was the same as that of ICESpy009, in two isolates the ICE was integrated into rplL, the typical integration site of the ICESa2603 family. ICESpy009 was able to transfer macrolide resistance by conjugation to both S. pyogenes and S. pneumoniae, showing the first evidence of the transferability of mega from S. pyogenes. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Streptococcus pyogenes as the cause of vulvovaginitis and balanitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randjelovic, Gordana; Otasevic, Suzana; Mladenovic-Antic, Snezana; Mladenovic, Vesna; Radovanovic-Velickovic, Radmila; Randjelovic, Marina; Bogdanovic, Dragan

    2017-04-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus) is the etiological agent of perineal infection in children, consisting of perianal infection, vulvovaginitis and balanitis. If it is not properly diagnosed and treated, it can persist for many months and can cause severe complications. Furthermore, treatment with penicillin can be followed by failures and recurrences. We report here the prevalence of S. pyogenes isolates in genital tract specimens from girls (n = 1692) with symptoms of vulvovaginitis and from boys (n = 52) with balanitis in the municipality of Nis, Southeast-Serbia (the Western Balkans) in a 10 year period, and the seasonal distribution, patient age and sensitivity to bacitracin and antimicrobial drugs used in the treatment of streptococcal infection. Streptococcal vulvovaginitis was diagnosed in 2.30% of examinees. Of those cases, 64.10% were detected from April to September, and it was most common (71.79%) in girls aged 3-7 years. Streptococcal balanitis was diagnosed in two instances: in a 4-year-old boy and in a 7-year-old boy. S. pyogenes strains resistant to bacitracin were identified in five girls. Two isolates with M phenotype and five isolates with cMLS B phenotype were identified. Streptococcal vulvovaginitis was diagnosed less often in the present study, but it was still far more common than streptococcal balanitis in childhood. Bacitracin resistance of S. pyogenes strains should be taken into account in routine microbiological identification, and the detection of S. pyogenes isolates resistant to erythromycin requires surveillance in the present geographical territory. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  17. Functional dissection of Streptococcus pyogenes M5 protein: the hypervariable region is essential for virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Waldemarsson

    Full Text Available The surface-localized M protein of Streptococcus pyogenes is a major virulence factor that inhibits phagocytosis, as determined ex vivo. Because little is known about the role of M protein in vivo we analyzed the contribution of different M protein regions to virulence, using the fibrinogen (Fg-binding M5 protein and a mouse model of acute invasive infection. This model was suitable, because M5 is required for mouse virulence and binds mouse and human Fg equally well, as shown here. Mixed infection experiments with wild type bacteria demonstrated that mutants lacking the N-terminal hypervariable region (HVR or the Fg-binding B-repeat region were strongly attenuated, while a mutant lacking the conserved C-repeats was only slightly attenuated. Because the HVR of M5 is not required for phagocytosis resistance, our data imply that this HVR plays a major but unknown role during acute infection. The B-repeat region is required for phagocytosis resistance and specifically binds Fg, suggesting that it promotes virulence by binding Fg. However, B-repeat mutants were attenuated even in Fg-deficient mice, implying that the B-repeats may have a second function, in addition to Fg-binding. These data demonstrate that two distinct M5 regions, including the HVR, are essential to virulence during the early stages of an infection. In particular, our data provide the first in vivo evidence that the HVR of an M protein plays a major role in virulence, focusing interest on the molecular role of this region.

  18. Inhibition of Growth and Gene Expression by PNA-peptide Conjugates in Streptococcus pyogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadja Patenge

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available While Streptococcus pyogenes is consistently susceptible toward penicillin, therapeutic failure of penicillin treatment has been reported repeatedly and a considerable number of patients exhibit allergic reactions to this substance. At the same time, streptococcal resistance to alternative antibiotics, e.g., macrolides, has increased. Taken together, these facts demand the development of novel therapeutic strategies. In this study, S. pyogenes growth was inhibited by application of peptide-conjugated antisense-peptide nucleic acids (PNAs specific for the essential gyrase A gene (gyrA. Thereby, HIV-1 Tat peptide-coupled PNAs were more efficient inhibitors of streptococcal growth as compared with (KFF3K-coupled PNAs. Peptide-anti-gyrA PNAs decreased the abundance of gyrA transcripts in S. pyogenes. Growth inhibition by antisense interference was enhanced by combination of peptide-coupled PNAs with protein-level inhibitors. Antimicrobial synergy could be detected with levofloxacin and novobiocin, targeting the gyrase enzyme, and with spectinomycin, impeding ribosomal function. The prospective application of carrier peptide-coupled antisense PNAs in S. pyogenes covers the use as an antimicrobial agent and the employment as a knock-down strategy for the investigation of virulence factor function.

  19. Streptococcus pyogenes cluster in a care home in England April to June 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, L M; Lamagni, T; Efstratiou, A; Foley, C; Gilman, J; Lilley, M; Guha, S; Head, F; Han, T

    2011-11-24

    Two fatal cases of Streptococcus pyogenes emm st22.6 bacteraemia occurred in a care home in England during April and June 2010, initiating a cluster investigation. The first case had left the home 13 days before the second case took up residence. We sought further cases and carriers. We swabbed throat and chronic skin lesions from residents and staff and examined these specimens for the presence of S. pyogenes. 61 specimens were taken from 18 of 19 residents and 39 of 39 staff. All results from swabbing were culture negative. We observed infection control practices and the environment at the care home for deficiencies. Issues were identified relating to the correct use of personal protective equipment, hand hygiene, clinical waste and laundry. Infection control practices were improved and training given. Infection control practices and the environment at a care home should be examined as part of the investigation of a S. pyogenes cluster. Screening for carriage of S. pyogenes should be done before antibiotic chemoprophylaxis is issued to care home residents and staff.

  20. RNA sequencing uncovers antisense RNAs and novel small RNAs in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Rhun, Anaïs; Beer, Yan Yan; Reimegård, Johan; Chylinski, Krzysztof; Charpentier, Emmanuelle

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a human pathogen responsible for a wide spectrum of diseases ranging from mild to life-threatening infections. During the infectious process, the temporal and spatial expression of pathogenicity factors is tightly controlled by a complex network of protein and RNA regulators acting in response to various environmental signals. Here, we focus on the class of small RNA regulators (sRNAs) and present the first complete analysis of sRNA sequencing data in S. pyogenes. In the SF370 clinical isolate (M1 serotype), we identified 197 and 428 putative regulatory RNAs by visual inspection and bioinformatics screening of the sequencing data, respectively. Only 35 from the 197 candidates identified by visual screening were assigned a predicted function (T-boxes, ribosomal protein leaders, characterized riboswitches or sRNAs), indicating how little is known about sRNA regulation in S. pyogenes. By comparing our list of predicted sRNAs with previous S. pyogenes sRNA screens using bioinformatics or microarrays, 92 novel sRNAs were revealed, including antisense RNAs that are for the first time shown to be expressed in this pathogen. We experimentally validated the expression of 30 novel sRNAs and antisense RNAs. We show that the expression profile of 9 sRNAs including 2 predicted regulatory elements is affected by the endoribonucleases RNase III and/or RNase Y, highlighting the critical role of these enzymes in sRNA regulation.

  1. Antibacterial Activity of Rhodomyrtus tomentosa (Aiton Hassk. Leaf Extract against Clinical Isolates of Streptococcus pyogenes

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    Surasak Limsuwan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol extract of Rhodomyrtus tomentosa (Aiton Hassk. leaf was evaluated for antibacterial activity against 47 clinical isolates of Streptococcus pyogenes. The extract exhibited good anti-S. pyogenes activity against all the tested isolates with similar minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC, 3.91–62.5 μg mL−1 and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC, 3.91–62.5 μg mL−1 ranges. No surviving cells were detected at 16 h after treatment with 8 × MIC of the extract. The extract-treated cells demonstrated no lysis and cytoplasmic leakage through the bacterial membrane. Electron micrographs further revealed that the extract did not cause any dramatic changes on the treated cells. Rhodomyrtone, an isolated compound, exhibited good anti-S. pyogenes activity (14 isolates, expressed very low MIC (0.39–1.56 μg mL−1 and MBC (0.39-1.56 μg mL−1 values. Rhodomyrtus tomentosa leaf extract and rhodomyrtone displayed promising antibacterial activity against clinical isolates of S. pyogenes.

  2. Innate Immune Response to Streptococcus pyogenes Depends on the Combined Activation of TLR13 and TLR2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieber, Christina; Janos, Marton; Koestler, Tina; Gratz, Nina; Li, Xiao-Dong; Castiglia, Virginia; Aberle, Marion; Sauert, Martina; Wegner, Mareike; Alexopoulou, Lena; Kirschning, Carsten J.; Chen, Zhijian J.; von Haeseler, Arndt; Kovarik, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Innate immune recognition of the major human-specific Gram-positive pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes is not understood. Here we show that mice employ Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2- and TLR13-mediated recognition of S. pyogenes. These TLR pathways are non-redundant in the in vivo context of animal infection, but are largely redundant in vitro, as only inactivation of both of them abolishes inflammatory cytokine production by macrophages and dendritic cells infected with S. pyogenes. Mechanistically, S. pyogenes is initially recognized in a phagocytosis-independent manner by TLR2 and subsequently by TLR13 upon internalization. We show that the TLR13 response is specifically triggered by S. pyogenes rRNA and that Tlr13−/− cells respond to S. pyogenes infection solely by engagement of TLR2. TLR13 is absent from humans and, remarkably, we find no equivalent route for S. pyogenes RNA recognition in human macrophages. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that TLR13 occurs in all kingdoms but only in few mammals, including mice and rats, which are naturally resistant against S. pyogenes. Our study establishes that the dissimilar expression of TLR13 in mice and humans has functional consequences for recognition of S. pyogenes in these organisms. PMID:25756897

  3. Platelet Activation by Streptococcus pyogenes Leads to Entrapment in Platelet Aggregates, from Which Bacteria Subsequently Escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Lisbeth; Baumgarten, Maria; Mörgelin, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Platelet activation and aggregation have been reported to occur in response to a number of Gram-positive pathogens. Here, we show that platelet aggregates induced by Streptococcus pyogenes were unstable and that viable bacteria escaped from the aggregates over time. This was not due to differential activation in response to the bacteria compared with physiological activators. All the bacterial isolates induced significant platelet activation, including integrin activation and alpha and dense-granule release, at levels equivalent to those induced by potent physiological platelet activators that induced stable aggregates. The ability to escape the aggregates and to resist the antibacterial effects of platelets was dependent on active protein synthesis by the bacteria within the aggregate. We conclude that S. pyogenes bacteria can temporarily cover themselves with activated platelets, and we propose that this may facilitate survival of the bacteria in the presence of platelets. PMID:25069984

  4. Predominant role of msr(D) over mef(A) in macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Tatsuno, Ichiro; Okada, Ryo; Hata, Nanako; Matsumoto, Masakado; Isaka, Masanori; Isobe, Ken-ichi; Hasegawa, Tadao

    2016-01-01

    In Japan, the number of patients with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome is reported to be increasing. mef(A) gene-positive macrolide-resistant emm1 strains are thought to possibly contribute to the rise in the frequency of STSS. Although analyses of macrolide-resistant mechanisms, including mef(A) resistance, have been performed mainly in Streptococcus pneumoniae, the role of this gene in Streptococcus pyogenes has not been completely investigated. Therefore, to the best of our knowledge, we established the first mef(A)-knockout strain using an emm1-type S. pyogenes strain, and tested its susceptibility to erythromycin, clarithromycin and azithromycin. We found that the antimicrobial susceptibilities were almost identical to those of the parental strain. Hence, we established a knockout strain for another gene, msr(D), that is located immediately downstream of mef(A). The macrolide resistances of the resulting strain significantly decreased, and were further altered when both mef(A) and msr(D) were knocked out. The introduction of the msr(D) gene into a macrolide-sensitive strain conferred more resistance than the introduction of the mef(A) gene. The erythromycin susceptibilities of knockout strains were further dissected using two additional emm4- and emm75-type S. pyogenes strains. We found almost identical results for both strains except for the mef(A) knockout emm4 type, whose susceptibility was altered, although the change was less than that for the msr(D) knockout. These results suggest that both mef(A) and msr(D) are involved in macrolide resistance in S. pyogenes, and that the msr(D) gene plays a more predominant role in macrolide resistance than mef(A).

  5. Local Th17/IgA immunity correlate with protection against intranasal infection with Streptococcus pyogenes.

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    Rasmus Mortensen

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus, GAS is responsible for a wide array of infections. Respiratory transmission via droplets is the most common mode of transmission but it may also infect the host via other routes such as lesions in the skin. To advance the development of a future vaccine against GAS, it is therefore important to investigate how protective immunity is related to the route of vaccine administration. To explore this, we examined whether a parenterally administered anti-GAS vaccine could protect against an intranasal GAS infection or if this would require locally primed immunity. We foundd that a parenteral CAF01 adjuvanted GAS vaccine offered no protection against intranasal infection despite inducing strong systemic Th1/Th17/IgG immunity that efficiently protected against an intraperitoneal GAS infection. However, the same vaccine administered via the intranasal route was able to induce protection against repeated intranasal GAS infections in a murine challenge model. The lack of intranasal protection induced by the parenteral vaccine correlated with a reduced mucosal recall response at the site of infection. Taken together, our results demonstrate that locally primed immunity is important for the defense against intranasal infection with Streptococcus pyogenes.

  6. Local Th17/IgA immunity correlate with protection against intranasal infection with Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Rasmus; Christensen, Dennis; Hansen, Lasse Bøllehuus; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Andersen, Peter; Dietrich, Jes

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus, GAS) is responsible for a wide array of infections. Respiratory transmission via droplets is the most common mode of transmission but it may also infect the host via other routes such as lesions in the skin. To advance the development of a future vaccine against GAS, it is therefore important to investigate how protective immunity is related to the route of vaccine administration. To explore this, we examined whether a parenterally administered anti-GAS vaccine could protect against an intranasal GAS infection or if this would require locally primed immunity. We foundd that a parenteral CAF01 adjuvanted GAS vaccine offered no protection against intranasal infection despite inducing strong systemic Th1/Th17/IgG immunity that efficiently protected against an intraperitoneal GAS infection. However, the same vaccine administered via the intranasal route was able to induce protection against repeated intranasal GAS infections in a murine challenge model. The lack of intranasal protection induced by the parenteral vaccine correlated with a reduced mucosal recall response at the site of infection. Taken together, our results demonstrate that locally primed immunity is important for the defense against intranasal infection with Streptococcus pyogenes.

  7. The structure of pyogenecin immunity protein, a novel bacteriocin-like immunity protein from Streptococcus pyogenes

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    Volkart Lour

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many Gram-positive lactic acid bacteria (LAB produce anti-bacterial peptides and small proteins called bacteriocins, which enable them to compete against other bacteria in the environment. These peptides fall structurally into three different classes, I, II, III, with class IIa being pediocin-like single entities and class IIb being two-peptide bacteriocins. Self-protective cognate immunity proteins are usually co-transcribed with these toxins. Several examples of cognates for IIa have already been solved structurally. Streptococcus pyogenes, closely related to LAB, is one of the most common human pathogens, so knowledge of how it competes against other LAB species is likely to prove invaluable. Results We have solved the crystal structure of the gene-product of locus Spy_2152 from S. pyogenes, (PDB:2fu2, and found it to comprise an anti-parallel four-helix bundle that is structurally similar to other bacteriocin immunity proteins. Sequence analyses indicate this protein to be a possible immunity protein protective against class IIa or IIb bacteriocins. However, given that S. pyogenes appears to lack any IIa pediocin-like proteins but does possess class IIb bacteriocins, we suggest this protein confers immunity to IIb-like peptides. Conclusions Combined structural, genomic and proteomic analyses have allowed the identification and in silico characterization of a new putative immunity protein from S. pyogenes, possibly the first structure of an immunity protein protective against potential class IIb two-peptide bacteriocins. We have named the two pairs of putative bacteriocins found in S. pyogenes pyogenecin 1, 2, 3 and 4.

  8. An Approach for Identification of Novel Drug Targets in Streptococcus pyogenes SF370 Through Pathway Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Satendra; Singh, Dev Bukhsh; Singh, Anamika; Gautam, Budhayash; Ram, Gurudayal; Dwivedi, Seema; Ramteke, Pramod W

    2016-12-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is one of the most important pathogens as it is involved in various infections affecting upper respiratory tract and skin. Due to the emergence of multidrug resistance and cross-resistance, S. Pyogenes is becoming more pathogenic and dangerous. In the present study, an in silico comparative analysis of total 65 metabolic pathways of the host (Homo sapiens) and the pathogen was performed. Initially, 486 paralogous enzymes were identified so that they can be removed from possible drug target list. The 105 enzymes of the biochemical pathways of S. pyogenes from the KEGG metabolic pathway database were compared with the proteins from the Homo sapiens by performing a BLASTP search against the non-redundant database restricted to the Homo sapiens subset. Out of these, 83 enzymes were identified as non-human homologous while 30 enzymes of inadequate amino acid length were removed for further processing. Essential enzymes were finally mined from remaining 53 enzymes. Finally, 28 essential enzymes were identified in S. pyogenes SF370 (serotype M1). In subcellular localization study, 18 enzymes were predicted with cytoplasmic localization and ten enzymes with the membrane localization. These ten enzymes with putative membrane localization should be of particular interest. Acyl-carrier-protein S-malonyltransferase, DNA polymerase III subunit beta and dihydropteroate synthase are novel drug targets and thus can be used to design potential inhibitors against S. pyogenes infection. 3D structure of dihydropteroate synthase was modeled and validated that can be used for virtual screening and interaction study of potential inhibitors with the target enzyme.

  9. The structure of pyogenecin immunity protein, a novel bacteriocin-like immunity protein from streptococcus pyogenes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, C.; Coggill, P.; Bateman, A.; Finn, R.; Cymborowski, M.; Otwinowski, Z.; Minor, W.; Volkart, L.; Joachimiak, A.; Wellcome Trust Sanger Inst.; Univ. of Virginia; UT Southwestern Medical Center

    2009-12-17

    Many Gram-positive lactic acid bacteria (LAB) produce anti-bacterial peptides and small proteins called bacteriocins, which enable them to compete against other bacteria in the environment. These peptides fall structurally into three different classes, I, II, III, with class IIa being pediocin-like single entities and class IIb being two-peptide bacteriocins. Self-protective cognate immunity proteins are usually co-transcribed with these toxins. Several examples of cognates for IIa have already been solved structurally. Streptococcus pyogenes, closely related to LAB, is one of the most common human pathogens, so knowledge of how it competes against other LAB species is likely to prove invaluable. We have solved the crystal structure of the gene-product of locus Spy-2152 from S. pyogenes, (PDB: 2fu2), and found it to comprise an anti-parallel four-helix bundle that is structurally similar to other bacteriocin immunity proteins. Sequence analyses indicate this protein to be a possible immunity protein protective against class IIa or IIb bacteriocins. However, given that S. pyogenes appears to lack any IIa pediocin-like proteins but does possess class IIb bacteriocins, we suggest this protein confers immunity to IIb-like peptides. Combined structural, genomic and proteomic analyses have allowed the identification and in silico characterization of a new putative immunity protein from S. pyogenes, possibly the first structure of an immunity protein protective against potential class IIb two-peptide bacteriocins. We have named the two pairs of putative bacteriocins found in S. pyogenes pyogenecin 1, 2, 3 and 4.

  10. Expression of Recombinant Streptokinase from Streptococcus Pyogenes and its Reaction with Infected Human and Murine Sera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molaee, Neda; Abtahi, Hamid; Mosayebi, Ghasem

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): Streptokinase (SKa) is an antigenic protein which is secreted by Streptococcus pyogenes. Streptokinase induces inflammation by complement activation, which may play a role in post infectious diseases. In the present study, recombinant streptokinase from S. pyogenes was produced and showed that recombinant SKa protein was recognized by infected human sera using Western blot analysis. Materials and Methods: In this study, the ska gene from S. pyogenes was amplified and cloned into pET32a which is a prokaryotic expression vector. pET32a-ska was transformed to Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) pLysS and gene expression was induced by IPTG. Protein production was improved by modification of composition of the bacterial culture media and altering the induction time by IPTG. The expressed protein was purified by affinity chromatography using the Ni-NTA resin. The integrity of the product was confirmed by Westernblot analysis using infected mice. Serum reactivity of five infected individuals was further analyzed against the recombinant SKa protein. Results: Data indicated that recombinant SKa protein from S. pyogenes can be recognized by patient and mice sera. The concentration of the purified recombinant protein was 3.2 mg/L of initial culture. The highest amount of the expressed protein after addition of IPTG was obtained in a bacterial culture without glucose with the culture optical density of 0.8 (OD600 = 0.8). Conclusion : Present data shows, recombinant SKa protein has same epitopes with natural form of this antigen. Recombinant SKa also seemed to be a promising antigen for the serologic diagnosis of S. pyogenes infections. PMID:24171077

  11. Expression of Recombinant Streptokinase from Streptococcus Pyogenes and Its Reaction with Infected Human and Murine Sera

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    Neda Molaee

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available   Objective(s: Streptokinase (SKa is an antigenic protein which is secreted by Streptococcus pyogenes. Streptokinase induces inflammation by complement activation, which may play a role in post infectious diseases. In the present study, recombinant streptokinase from S. pyogenes was produced and showed that recombinant SKa protein was recognized by infected human sera using Western blot analysis.   Materials and Methods: In this study, the ska gene from S. pyogenes was amplified and cloned into pET32a which is a prokaryotic expression vector. pET32a-ska was transformed to Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3 pLysS and gene expression was induced by IPTG. Protein production was improved by modification of composition of the bacterial culture media and altering the induction time by IPTG. The expressed protein was purified by affinity chromatography using the Ni-NTA resin. The integrity of the product was confirmed by Westernblot analysis using infected mice. Serum reactivity of five infected individuals was further analyzed against the recombinant SKa protein. Results: Data indicated that recombinant SKa protein from S. pyogenes can be recognized by patient and mice sera. The concentration of the purified recombinant protein was 3.2 mg/L of initial culture. The highest amount of the expressed protein after addition of IPTG was obtained in a bacterial culture without glucose with the culture optical density of 0.8 (OD600 = 0.8. Conclusion : Present data shows, recombinant SKa protein has same epitopes with natural form of this antigen. Recombinant SKa also seemed to be a promising antigen for the serologic diagnosis of S. pyogenes infections.

  12. Identification and cluster analysis of Streptococcus pyogenes by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

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    Jie Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Whole-cell matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MS has been successfully applied for bacterial identification and typing of many pathogens. The fast and reliable qualities of MALDI-TOF MS make it suitable for clinical diagnostics. MALDI-TOF MS for the identification and cluster analysis of Streptococcus pyogenes, however, has not been reported. The goal of our study was to evaluate this approach for the rapid identification and typing of S. pyogenes. METHODS: 65 S. pyogenes isolates were obtained from the hospital. The samples were prepared and MALDI-TOF MS measurements were conducted as previously reported. Identification of unknown spectra was performed via a pattern recognition algorithm with a reference spectra and a dendrogram was constructed using the statistical toolbox in Matlab 7.1 integrated in the MALDI Biotyper 2.0 software. RESULTS: For identification, 61 of 65 S. pyogenes isolates could be identified correctly by MALDI-TOF MS with BioType 2.0 when compared to biochemical identification (API Strep, with an accuracy of 93.85%. In clustering analysis, 44 of 65 isolates were in accordance with those established by M typing, with a matching rate of 67.69%. When only the M type prevalence in China was considered, 41 of 45 isolates were in agreement with M typing, with a matching rate of 91.1%. CONCLUSIONS: It was here shown that MALDI-TOF MS with Soft Biotype 2.0 and its database could facilitate rapid identification of S. pyogenes. It may present an attractive alternative to traditional biochemical methods of identification. However, for classification, more isolates and advances in the MALDI-TOF MS technology are needed to improve accuracy.

  13. Streptococcus pyogenes degrades extracellular matrix in chondrocytes via MMP-13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Atsuo; Okahashi, Nobuo; Maruyama, Fumito; Ooshima, Takashi; Hamada, Shigeyuki; Nakagawa, Ichiro

    2008-01-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) causes a wide range of human diseases, including bacterial arthritis. The pathogenesis of arthritis is characterized by synovial proliferation and the destruction of cartilage and subchondral bone in joints. We report here that GAS strain JRS4 invaded a chondrogenic cell line ATDC5 and induced the degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM), whereas an isogenic mutant of JRS4 lacking a fibronectin-binding protein, SAM1, failed to invade the chondrocytes or degrade the ECM. Reverse transcription-PCR and Western blot analysis revealed that the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 was strongly elevated during the infection with GAS. A reporter assay revealed that the activation of the AP-1 transcription factor and the phosphorylation of c-Jun terminal kinase participated in MMP-13 expression. These results suggest that MMP-13 plays an important role in the destruction of infected joints during the development of septic arthritis

  14. Protein F, a fibronectin-binding protein, is an adhesin of the group A streptococcus Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanski, E; Caparon, M

    1992-07-01

    Binding to fibronectin has been suggested to play an important role in adherence of the group A streptococcus Streptococcus pyrogenes to host epithelial cells; however, the identity of the streptococcal fibronectin receptor has been elusive. Here we demonstrate that the fibronectin-binding property of S. pyogenes is mediated by protein F, a bacterial surface protein that binds fibronectin at high affinity. The gene encoding protein F (prtF) produced a functional fibronectin-binding protein in Escherichia coli. Insertional mutagenesis of the cloned gene generated a mutation that resulted in the loss of fibronectin-binding activity. When this mutation was introduced into the S. pyrogenes chromosome by homologous recombination with the wild-type allele, the resulting strains no longer produced protein F and lost their ability to bind fibronectin. The mutation could be complemented by prtF introduced on a plasmid. Mutants lacking protein F had a much lower capacity to adhere to respiratory epithelial cells. These results demonstrate that protein F is an important adhesin of S. pyogenes.

  15. Streptococcus pyogenes emm types and subtypes of isolates from paediatric asymptomatic carriers and children with pharyngitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blandino, Giovanna; Puglisi, Salvatore; Speciale, Annamaria; Musumeci, Rosario

    2011-01-01

    This study determined emm subtypes of Streptococcus pyogenes strains isolated from asymptomatic carriers and children with pharyngitis. All strains were previously investigated for fibronectin-binding genes (prtF1 and prtF2) and antimicrobial susceptibility. The most significant differences between the two groups, which share only 5 of the 14 detected emmsubtypes, concern the presence of the two more common emmsubtypes, 12.0 (50.0% vs. 3.1%, for asymptomatic carriers and children with pharyngitis, respectively) and 1.0 (28.1% vs. 0%, for children with pharyngitis and asymptomatic carriers, respectively).

  16. The surgical team as a source of postoperative wound infections caused by Streptococcus pyogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, H J; Svendsen, R N; Nielsen, S V

    1997-01-01

    Postoperative wound infection, caused by Streptococcus pyogenes transmitted during the operation from members of the surgical team, is a rare but serious complication of surgery. This study describes three cases, which could be traced to an orthopaedic surgeon, who carried the epidemic strain...... surgeons and obstetricians. In outbreaks where an attack rate could be calculated, it was at least 7%. T-28 was the most commonly involved T-type, accounting for seven outbreaks. The anus and vagina were the most common carrier sites in staff members. A combination of penicillin and oral vancomycin seemed...

  17. SENSIBILIDAD ANTIMICROBIANA CAUSADA POR EL Streptococcus Pyogenes EN MUESTRAS DE CULTIVO DE EXUDADO FARÍNGEO

    OpenAIRE

    Solórzano Solórzano, Stalin Lorenzo; Universidad Técnica de Machala, El Oro – Ecuador

    2016-01-01

    El Streptococcus pyogenes es uno de los de los gérmenes patógenos más frecuentes, causante de enfermedades supurativas y no supurativas; son la causa más habitual de faringitis bacteriana y constituye una de las mayores causas de enfermedad infecciosa relacionada con morbi-mortalidad en todo el mundo. Después de un período de incubación de 2 a 4 días; el aislamiento del microorganismo causal en el exudado faríngeo no implica necesariamente su patogenicidad; y  es necesaria la demostración de ...

  18. Isolation of Streptococcus pyogenes in individuals with pharyngotonsillitis and antimicrobial susceptibility testing

    OpenAIRE

    Scalabrin, Rozana; Buss, Gisele D.; Iamaguchi, Kelly Cristina S.; Cardoso, Celso Luiz; Garcia, Lourdes B.

    2003-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Investigamos a ocorrência de Streptococcus pyogenes em indivíduos com faringoamigdalite que espontaneamente procuraram atendimento em farmácias e unidades de saúde. FORMA DE ESTUDO: Coorte longitudinal. MATERIAL E MÉTODOS: Com auxílio de "swab" e abaixador de língua foram coletadas amostras da orofaringe de 58 indivíduos, as quais foram semeadas por técnica de esgotamento em placas contendo ágar sangue. No momento da coleta, nenhum dos indivíduos estava sob tratamento com antibiótic...

  19. Targeted Curing of All Lysogenic Bacteriophage from Streptococcus pyogenes Using a Novel Counter-selection Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euler, Chad W.; Juncosa, Barbara; Ryan, Patricia A.; Deutsch, Douglas R.; McShan, W. Michael; Fischetti, Vincent A.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a human commensal and a bacterial pathogen responsible for a wide variety of human diseases differing in symptoms, severity, and tissue tropism. The completed genome sequences of >37 strains of S. pyogenes, representing diverse disease-causing serotypes, have been published. The greatest genetic variation among these strains is attributed to numerous integrated prophage and prophage-like elements, encoding several virulence factors. A comparison of isogenic strains, differing in prophage content, would reveal the effects of these elements on streptococcal pathogenesis. However, curing strains of prophage is often difficult and sometimes unattainable. We have applied a novel counter-selection approach to identify rare S. pyogenes mutants spontaneously cured of select prophage. To accomplish this, we first inserted a two-gene cassette containing a gene for kanamycin resistance (KanR) and the rpsL wild-type gene, responsible for dominant streptomycin sensitivity (SmS), into a targeted prophage on the chromosome of a streptomycin resistant (SmR) mutant of S. pyogenes strain SF370. We then applied antibiotic counter-selection for the re-establishment of the KanS/SmR phenotype to select for isolates cured of targeted prophage. This methodology allowed for the precise selection of spontaneous phage loss and restoration of the natural phage attB attachment sites for all four prophage-like elements in this S. pyogenes chromosome. Overall, 15 mutants were constructed that encompassed every permutation of phage knockout as well as a mutant strain, named CEM1ΔΦ, completely cured of all bacteriophage elements (a ~10% loss of the genome); the only reported S. pyogenes strain free of prophage-like elements. We compared CEM1ΔΦ to the WT strain by analyzing differences in secreted DNase activity, as well as lytic and lysogenic potential. These mutant strains should allow for the direct examination of bacteriophage relationships within S. pyogenes and

  20. Parotiditis por Streptococcus Pyogenes: Presentacion de un caso

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    Zoila del S. López-Díaz

    1995-08-01

    Full Text Available La glándula parótida es generalmente afectada por procesos inflamatorios. Su etiología se debe a infecciones primarias de la glándula o como complicación de infecciones sistémicas. Se reporta el Stafilococcus aureus como el agente causal más frecuente de parotiditis aguda supurada, y se señalan además otras bacterias y virus. Se presenta un niño de 9 años de edad con un proceso supurativo agudo de la parótida izquierda de un mes de evolución, con salida de abundante pus por el conducto de Stenon. Se realizó cultivo de la secreción e identificación de Streptococcus B hemolítico grupo A, a pesar de haber recibido antibioticoterapia previa. Se utilizó ampicillina y se tuvo en cuenta la sensibilidad in vitro; no presentó mejoría clínica, por lo que se decidió el empleo de la sialografía como alternativa terapéutica en este caso. Se obtuvo la resolución del proceso supurativo infeccioso y además se evidenció en este estudio la pérdida del estroma parotídeo.

  1. Recurrent Streptococcus pyogenes genital infection in a woman: test and treat the partner!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkaeren, Emilienne; Epelboin, Loïc; Epelboin, Sylvie; Boddaert, Nathalie; Brossier, Florence; Caumes, Eric

    2014-12-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) is a well-known cause of vulvovaginitis in prepubescent girls, but it is rarely described in adult women. We describe the case of a 64-year-old woman who presented with endometritis revealed by GAS bacteraemia, followed by recurrent vulvovaginitis due to a wild-type strain of GAS. She relapsed twice despite amoxicillin treatment. Her husband was found to be an asymptomatic carrier after GAS was identified in nasal and rectal swabs. She was cured after eradication of carriage in both herself and her husband with amoxicillin and rifampin. When recurrent Streptococcus pyogenes genital infections occur, test and treat the partner. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. A case of descending mediastinitis caused by Streptococcus pyogenes harboring genotype emm25 and sequence type 660.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohya, Hiroaki; Mori, Nobuaki; Hayashi, Tetsuro; Minami, Shujiro; Higuchi, Akiko; Takahashi, Takashi

    2017-06-01

    Descending mediastinitis caused by Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus, GAS) is rare among cases of invasive GAS infection. In this report, we describe a case of a cervical abscess and secondary descending mediastinitis in a previously healthy 39-year-old Japanese man. The patient presented with a 2-week history of a sore throat, and subsequently developed an abscess and descending mediastinitis. We treated the cervical abscess using ampicillin/sulbactam and drainage, and GAS was subsequently isolated in two blood cultures from the patient's admission. Microbiological analyses revealed that the isolate harbored genotype emm25 and sequence type (ST) 660. This strain was susceptible to erythromycin (minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC]: ≤0.12 μg/mL), resistant to minocycline (MIC: >4 μg/mL), and possessed the tet(M) determinant. Although we have reviewed the literature regarding the clinical and microbiological characteristics of descending mediastinitis cause by GAS, little is known regarding epidemiological and clinical characteristics of emm25/ST660 GAS. Furthermore, to best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of descending mediastinitis caused by emm25/ST660 GAS. Therefore, physicians should be aware of case with a cervical abscess and secondary descending mediastinitis caused by GAS infection, even if the patient is immunocompetent. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. SpyB, a Small Heme-Binding Protein, Affects the Composition of the Cell Wall in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, Rebecca J; Chen, Jing; Kant, Sashi; Rechkina, Elena; Rush, Jeffrey S; Forsberg, Lennart S; Jaehrig, Bernhard; Azadi, Parastoo; Tchesnokova, Veronika; Sokurenko, Evgeni V; Zhu, Haining; Korotkov, Konstantin V; Pancholi, Vijay; Korotkova, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A Streptococcus or GAS) is a hemolytic human pathogen associated with a wide variety of infections ranging from minor skin and throat infections to life-threatening invasive diseases. The cell wall of GAS consists of peptidoglycan sacculus decorated with a carbohydrate comprising a polyrhamnose backbone with immunodominant N-acetylglucosamine side-chains. All GAS genomes contain the spyBA operon, which encodes a 35-amino-acid membrane protein SpyB, and a membrane-bound C3-like ADP-ribosyltransferase SpyA. In this study, we addressed the function of SpyB in GAS. Phenotypic analysis of a spyB deletion mutant revealed increased bacterial aggregation, and reduced sensitivity to β-lactams of the cephalosporin class and peptidoglycan hydrolase PlyC. Glycosyl composition analysis of cell wall isolated from the spyB mutant suggested an altered carbohydrate structure compared with the wild-type strain. Furthermore, we found that SpyB associates with heme and protoporphyrin IX. Heme binding induces SpyB dimerization, which involves disulfide bond formation between the subunits. Thus, our data suggest the possibility that SpyB activity is regulated by heme.

  4. Streptococcus pyogenes Arginine and Citrulline Catabolism Promotes Infection and Modulates Innate Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusumano, Zachary T.; Watson, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    A bacterium's ability to acquire nutrients from its host during infection is an essential component of pathogenesis. For the Gram-positive pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes, catabolism of the amino acid arginine via the arginine deiminase (ADI) pathway supplements energy production and provides protection against acid stress in vitro. Its expression is enhanced in murine models of infection, suggesting an important role in vivo. To gain insight into the function of the ADI pathway in pathogenesis, the virulence of mutants defective in each of its enzymes was examined. Mutants unable to use arginine (ΔArcA) or citrulline (ΔArcB) were attenuated for carriage in a murine model of asymptomatic mucosal colonization. However, in a murine model of inflammatory infection of cutaneous tissue, the ΔArcA mutant was attenuated but the ΔArcB mutant was hyperattenuated, revealing an unexpected tissue-specific role for citrulline metabolism in pathogenesis. When mice defective for the arginine-dependent production of nitric oxide (iNOS−/−) were infected with the ΔArcA mutant, cutaneous virulence was rescued, demonstrating that the ability of S. pyogenes to utilize arginine was dispensable in the absence of nitric oxide-mediated innate immunity. This work demonstrates the importance of arginine and citrulline catabolism and suggests a novel mechanism of virulence by which S. pyogenes uses its metabolism to modulate innate immunity through depletion of an essential host nutrient. PMID:24144727

  5. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the minor pilin FctB from Streptococcus pyogenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linke, Christian; Young, Paul G.; Kang, Hae Joo; Proft, Thomas; Baker, Edward N.

    2010-01-01

    The minor pilin FctB from S. pyogenes strain 90/306S was expressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. The hexagonal FctB crystals diffracted to 2.9 Å resolution. The minor pilin FctB is an integral part of the pilus assembly expressed by Streptococcus pyogenes. Since it is located at the cell wall, it can be hypothesized that it functions as a cell-wall anchor for the streptococcal pilus. In order to elucidate its structure, the genes for FctB from the S. pyogenes strains 90/306S and SF370 were cloned for overexpression in Escherichia coli. FctB from strain 90/306S was crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using sodium citrate as a precipitant. The hexagonal FctB crystals belonged to space group P6 1 or P6 5 , with unit-cell parameters a = b = 95.15, c = 100.25 Å, and diffracted to 2.9 Å resolution

  6. Two-Component Systems Involved in Susceptibility to Nisin A in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawada-Matsuo, Miki; Tatsuno, Ichiro; Arii, Kaoru; Zendo, Takeshi; Oogai, Yuichi; Noguchi, Kazuyuki; Hasegawa, Tadao; Sonomoto, Kenji; Komatsuzawa, Hitoshi

    2016-10-01

    Two-component systems (TCSs) are regulatory systems in bacteria that play important roles in sensing and adapting to the environment. In this study, we systematically evaluated the roles of TCSs in the susceptibility of the group A Streptococcus (GAS; Streptococcus pyogenes) SF370 strain to several types of lantibiotics. Using individual TCS deletion mutants, we found that the deletion of srtRK (spy_1081-spy_1082) in SF370 increased the susceptibility to nisin A, which is produced by Lactococcus lactis ATCC 11454, but susceptibility to other types of lantibiotics (nukacin ISK-1, produced by Staphylococcus warneri, and staphylococcin C55, produced by Staphylococcus aureus) was not altered in the TCS mutants tested. The expression of srtFEG (spy_1085 to spy_1087), which is located downstream of srtRK and is homologous to ABC transporters, was increased in response to nisin A. However, srtEFG expression was not induced by nisin A in the srtRK mutant. The inactivation of srtFEG increased the susceptibility to nisin A. These results suggest that SrtRK controls SrtFEG expression to alter the susceptibility to nisin A. Further experiments showed that SrtRK is required for coexistence with L. lactis ATCC 11454, which produces nisin A. Our results elucidate the important roles of S. pyogenes TCSs in the interactions between different bacterial species, including bacteriocin-producing bacteria. In this study, we focused on the association of TCSs with susceptibility to bacteriocins in S. pyogenes SF370, which has no ability to produce bacteriocins, and reported two major new findings. We demonstrated that the SrtRK TCS is related to susceptibility to nisin A by controlling the ABC transporter SrtFEG. We also showed that S. pyogenes SrtRK is important for survival when the bacteria are cocultured with nisin A-producing Lactococcus lactis This report highlights the roles of TCSs in the colocalization of bacteriocin-producing bacteria and non-bacteriocin-producing bacteria. Our

  7. Identification of Streptococcus pyogenes - Phenotypic Tests vs Molecular Assay (spy1258PCR): A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Tintu; Sistla, Sujatha

    2016-07-01

    Traditionally Group A Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS) is differentiated from other beta haemolytic streptococci (BHS) by certain presumptive tests such as bacitracin sensitivity and production of Pyrollidonyl Aryl Sulfatase (PYR). The phenotypic and genotypic confirmatory tests are Lancefield grouping for cell wall carbohydrate antigen and PCR for spy1258 gene respectively. Reliance on presumptive tests alone may lead to misidentification of isolates. To compare the predictive values of routine phenotypic tests with spy1258 PCR for the identification of Streptococcus pyogenes. This comparative analytical study was carried out in the Department of Microbiology, JIPMER, Puducherry, over a period of 18 months (1(st) November 2013 to 30(th) April 2015). Two hundred and six consecutive BHS isolates from various clinical samples were subjected to phenotypic tests such as bacitracin sensitivity, PYR test and Lancefield grouping. The results were compared with spy1258 PCR which was considered 95 the confirmatory test for identification. The sensitivity and specificity of phenotypic tests were as follows; Susceptibility to bacitracin - 95.42%, 70.96%, PYR test - 95.42%, 77.41%, Lancefield grouping- 97.71%, 80.64%. Clinical laboratories should not depend on bacitracin sensitivity as a single presumptive test for the routine identification of GAS but should use supplemental tests such as PYR test or latex agglutination test and for best results use spy1258 PCR.

  8. Characterisation of clinically isolated Streptococcus pyogenes from balanoposthitis patients, with special emphasis on emm89 isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Tadao; Hata, Nanako; Matsui, Hideyuki; Isaka, Masanori; Tatsuno, Ichiro

    2017-04-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes causes a variety of diseases, such as pharyngitis and toxic shock syndrome. In addition, this bacterium is a causative agent of balanoposthitis. To reveal the bacteriological characteristics of the isolates from balanoposthitis patients, we analysed 47 isolates. In addition, novel clade genotype emm89 S. pyogenes isolates have been reported to be spreading worldwide recently. Hence, we further analysed eight emm89 isolates. A drug susceptibility experiment was performed and emm types were determined. More detailed experiments, such as PCR analysis for the presence of virulence-associated genes and MLST analysis, were performed especially using emm89 isolates. All isolates were sensitive to ampicillin, but 34 % of the isolates were resistant to at least one antibiotic. The emm types of the isolates varied, with emm89 and emm11 being the most prevalent, but the emm1 type was not detected. The analysis of emm89 isolates revealed that drug susceptibilities varied. All isolates were negative for the hasABC gene and produced active NADase that are characteristics of novel clade genotype emm89 S. pyogenes. MLST analysis demonstrated that six isolates were of the ST101 type, the most predominant type reported thus far, but two isolates were of the ST646 type. According to the PCR analysis used to determine the presence of streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin-related genes, the six ST101 isolates were further classified into four groups. These results suggest that balanoposthitis is caused by a variety of types of S. pyogenes, with novel clade genotype emm89 isolates playing a role in balanoposthitis infections in Japan.

  9. Importance of adhesins in the recurrence of pharyngeal infections caused by Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, Aniela; Scioscia, Natalia; Geoffroy, Enrique; Ponce, Iván; García, Patricia

    2017-04-01

    Pharyngo-amygdalitis is the most common infection caused by Streptococcus pyogenes (S. pyogenes). Reinfection with strains of different M types commonly occurs. However, a second infection with a strain of the same M type can still occur and is referred to as recurrence. We aimed to assess whether recurrence of S. pyogenes could be associated to erythromycin resistance, biofilm formation or surface adhesins like fibronectin-binding proteins and pilus proteins, both located in the fibronectin-binding, collagen-binding, T-antigen (FCT) region. We analyed clinical isolates of S. pyogenes obtained from children with multiple positive cultures of throat swabs. We analysed potential associations between M types, clonal patterns, biofilm production and FCT types with their capacity of producing a recurrent infection. We genetically defined recurrence as an infection with the same M type (same strain) and reinfection as an infection with a different M type. No differences were observed between recurrent and reinfection isolates in relation to erythromycin resistance, presence and number of domains of prtF1 gene, and biofilm formation capacity; the only significant difference was the higher frequency of FCT-4 type among recurrent isolates. However, when all the factors that could contribute to recurrence (erythromycin resistance, biofilm production, presence of prtF1 gene and FCT-4 type) were analysed together, we observed that recurrent isolates have a higher number of factors than reinfection isolates. Recurrence seems not to be associated with biofilm formation. However, pili and fibronectin-binding proteins could be associated with recurrence because FCT-4 isolates which harbour two fibronectin-binding proteins are more frequent among recurrent isolates.

  10. Comparative genomics of Streptococcus pyogenes M1 isolates differing in virulence and propensity to cause systemic infection in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiebig, A.; Loof, T.G.; Babbar, A.; Itzeg, A.; Koehorst, J.J.; Schaap, P.J.; Nitsche-Schmitz, D.P.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes serotype M1 is a frequent cause of severe infections in humans. Some M1 isolates are pathogenic in mice and used in studies on infection pathogenesis. We observed marked differences in murine infections caused by M1 strain SF370, 5448, 5448AP or AP1 which prompted us to

  11. Identifying protective Streptococcus pyogenes vaccine antigens recognized by both B and T cells in human adults and children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Rasmus; Nissen, Thomas Nørrelykke; Fredslund, Sine

    2016-01-01

    No commercial vaccine exists against Group A streptococci (GAS; Streptococcus pyogenes) and only little is known about anti-GAS protective immunity. In our effort to discover new protective vaccine candidates, we selected 21 antigens based on an in silico evaluation. These were all well...

  12. Chronic plaque psoriasis: streptococcus pyogenes throat carriage rate and therapeutic response to oral antibiotics in comparison with oral methotrexate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raza, N.; Usman, M.; Hameed, A.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the throat carriage rate of Streptococcus pyogenes in patients having chronic plaque psoriasis and the effect of antibiotics as compared with that of oral methotrexate. Forty patients and 40 age and gender-matched controls were selected. Throat swab for culture of Streptococcus pyogenes was taken from each patient and control. All patients were treated with oral Penicillin V 250 mg, 6 hourly, and oral Rifampicin, 600 mg daily, for 10 days. Pre- and post therapy 'Psoriasis Area and Severity Index' (PASI) were compared. Thirty of these 40 patients were later given oral methotrexate, 5-10 mg weekly, for 04 weeks and pre- and post-therapy PASI were compared. Chi-square and paired-samples t-test were used for data analysis. Throat swab cultures were positive for Streptococcus pyogenes in 05 (12.5%) patients and none (0%) of the controls (p=0.02). Mean pre- and postantibiotic therapy PASI were 15.92 + 05.94 and 15.19 + 06.17 respectively (p=0.078). Mean pre- and postmethotrexate PASI were 15.81+ 5.55 and 8.79 + 4.19 respectively (p <0.01). Throat carriage of Streptococcus pyogenes is common in patients with chronic plaque psoriasis. Short-term antibiotic treatment has no role in routine treatment of chronic plaque psoriasis. However, it would be worthwhile to consider the effects of long term antibiotics on chronic plaque psoriasis. (author)

  13. Members of a new subgroup of Streptococcus anginosus harbor virulence related genes previously observed in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbar, Anshu; Kumar, Venkatesan Naveen; Bergmann, René; Barrantes, Israel; Pieper, Dietmar H; Itzek, Andreas; Nitsche-Schmitz, D Patric

    2017-04-01

    Conventionally categorized as commensals, the Streptococci of the species S. anginosus are facultative human pathogens that are difficult to diagnose and often overlooked. Furthermore, detailed investigation and diagnosis of S. anginosus infections is hampered by unexplored taxonomy and widely elusive molecular pathogenesis. To explore their pathogenic potential, S. anginosus isolates collected from patients of two geographical locations (Vellore, India and Leipzig, Germany) were subjected to multi-locus sequence analysis (MLSA). This analysis revealed the potential presence of a new distinct clade of the species S. anginosus, tentatively termed here as genomosubspecies vellorensis. A complementary PCR-based screening for S. pyogenes virulence factor as well as antibiotic resistance genes revealed not only the presence of superantigen- and extracellular DNase coding genes identical to corresponding genes of S. pyogenes, but also of erythromycin and tetracycline resistance genes in the genomes of the analyzed S. anginosus isolates, thus posing a matter of significant health concern. Identification of new pathogenic S. anginosus strains capable of causing difficult to treat infections may pose additional challenges to the diagnosis and treatment of Streptococcus based infections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Carrier state of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Neisseria meningitidis and Corynebacterium diphtheriae among school children in Pokhara, Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharm Raj Bhatta

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the incidence of carrier state of Haemophilus influenzae type b, Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Neisseria meningitidis and Corynebacterium diphtheriae among school children. Methods: Specimen from posterior pharyngeal wall and tonsils were collected on calcium alginate coated swabs from 1 02 participants. Processing of specimen and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was done by standard procedures. Results: Potential pathogens isolated in our study were S. pneumoniae (14.7%, Staphylococcus aureus (12.7%, Corynebacterium diphtheriae (3.9%, Streptococcus pyogenes (3.9% and Haemophilus influenzae (1.9%. Important findings in antibiogram include high resistance of S. pneumoniae to penicillin (73% and resistance of Staphylococcus aureus to oxacillin (23%. Conclusions: Pharyngeal colonization by S. pneumoniae among school children was found high and there is need of introduction of pneumococcal vaccines among children. Despite expected universal vaccination, pharyngeal colonization by Corynebacterium diphtheriae is possible and there is possibility of transmission.

  15. [Past and present of streptococcus pyogenes: some pathogenic factors and their genetic determination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totolian, A A

    2015-01-01

    In this review two aspects dealt with Streptococcus pyogenes--one of the leading agent responsible for infectious diseases and another related to their complications in humans worldwide--are given. In the first part of the review the comparative evaluation of laboratory diagnostic approaches and methods used in the second half of the twentieth century and molecular technologies developed during last twenty years are described. In the second part the role of the main microbial pathogenic factors as well as the data on intra- and interspecies genetic exchange with extrachromosomal genetic elements and their influence on biological properties of the pathogen are discussed. Essential for today possibilities for molecular epidemiology of streptococcal pathology approaches must be introduces in diagnostic laboratories within the country.

  16. Scrum kidney: epidemic pyoderma caused by a nephritogenic Streptococcus pyogenes in a rugby team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludlam, H; Cookson, B

    1986-08-09

    In December, 1984, an outbreak of pyoderma affected five scrum players in the St Thomas' Hospital rugby team. The causative organism, Streptococcus pyogenes, was acquired during a match against a team experiencing an outbreak of impetigo, and was transmitted to two front row players of another team a week later, and to two girlfriends of affected St Thomas' players a month later. The strain was M-type 49, tetracycline-resistant, and virulent. It caused salpingitis in a girlfriend and acute glomerulonephritis in one rugby player. No case of subclinical glomerulonephritis was detected in eight patients with pyoderma. Screening of the St Thomas' Hospital team revealed four further cases of non-streptococcal skin infection, with evidence for contemporaneous spread of Staphylococcus aureus. Teams should not field players with sepsis, and it may be advisable to apply a skin antiseptic to traumatised skin after the match.

  17. Macrolide resistance can be transferred by conjugation from viridans streptococci to Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jönsson, Maria; Swedberg, Göte

    2006-08-01

    Efflux pumps encoded by mef genes are among the most common mechanisms of resistance to macrolides. These genes are often located on horizontally transferable elements such as transposons. We present data indicating conjugative transfer of the mef(E) gene from viridans streptococci to the pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes. The mef(E) gene is located on the previously described MEGA (macrolide efflux genetic assembly) element. Of 110 isolates tested, 85% of those that carried the mef(A/E) gene carried it on MEGA, and in all cases of conjugal transfer of the mef(E) gene it was carried on MEGA. It therefore appears reasonable to draw the conclusion that this element is important in the lateral transfer of macrolide resistance between streptococci.

  18. Isolation and immunochemical characterization of carbohydrate antigens prepared from group A Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, S; Okahashi, N; Yamamoto, T; Morisaki, I; Michalek, S M; McGhee, J R

    1983-11-01

    Group A carbohydrate antigens were prepared from isolated cell walls or whole cells of Streptococcus pyogenes strain Sv (group A, M type 3). Cell walls were lysate by the enzymatic action of M1 endo-N-acetylmuramidase. The cell wall lysate was concentrated and chromatographed on a Sephadex G-100 column. Two fractions reactive with group A antisera were obtained. These were composed of N-acetylglucosamine, rhamnose, and peptidoglycan components such as glutamic acid, lysine, alanine, N-acetylmuramic acid and N-acetylglucosamine. For comparison, hot TCA extract of the cell walls (TCAgA) or Rantz and Randall extract of the whole cells (RRgA) was purified chromatographically. The latter two also contained rhamnose and glucosamine, and were reactive with group A antisera. The molecular weights of M1gA antigens were larger than those of TCAgA and RRgA. Hapten inhibition study indicated that N-acetylglucosamine was the most potent inhibitor.

  19. Sequence variability is correlated with weak immunogenicity in Streptococcus pyogenes M protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lannergård, Jonas; Kristensen, Bodil M; Gustafsson, Mattias C U; Persson, Jenny J; Norrby-Teglund, Anna; Stålhammar-Carlemalm, Margaretha; Lindahl, Gunnar

    2015-10-01

    The M protein of Streptococcus pyogenes, a major bacterial virulence factor, has an amino-terminal hypervariable region (HVR) that is a target for type-specific protective antibodies. Intriguingly, the HVR elicits a weak antibody response, indicating that it escapes host immunity by two mechanisms, sequence variability and weak immunogenicity. However, the properties influencing the immunogenicity of regions in an M protein remain poorly understood. Here, we studied the antibody response to different regions of the classical M1 and M5 proteins, in which not only the HVR but also the adjacent fibrinogen-binding B repeat region exhibits extensive sequence divergence. Analysis of antisera from S. pyogenes-infected patients, infected mice, and immunized mice showed that both the HVR and the B repeat region elicited weak antibody responses, while the conserved carboxy-terminal part was immunodominant. Thus, we identified a correlation between sequence variability and weak immunogenicity for M protein regions. A potential explanation for the weak immunogenicity was provided by the demonstration that protease digestion selectively eliminated the HVR-B part from whole M protein-expressing bacteria. These data support a coherent model, in which the entire variable HVR-B part evades antibody attack, not only by sequence variability but also by weak immunogenicity resulting from protease attack. © 2015 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Sequence variability is correlated with weak immunogenicity in Streptococcus pyogenes M protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lannergård, Jonas; Kristensen, Bodil M; Gustafsson, Mattias C U; Persson, Jenny J; Norrby-Teglund, Anna; Stålhammar-Carlemalm, Margaretha; Lindahl, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    The M protein of Streptococcus pyogenes, a major bacterial virulence factor, has an amino-terminal hypervariable region (HVR) that is a target for type-specific protective antibodies. Intriguingly, the HVR elicits a weak antibody response, indicating that it escapes host immunity by two mechanisms, sequence variability and weak immunogenicity. However, the properties influencing the immunogenicity of regions in an M protein remain poorly understood. Here, we studied the antibody response to different regions of the classical M1 and M5 proteins, in which not only the HVR but also the adjacent fibrinogen-binding B repeat region exhibits extensive sequence divergence. Analysis of antisera from S. pyogenes-infected patients, infected mice, and immunized mice showed that both the HVR and the B repeat region elicited weak antibody responses, while the conserved carboxy-terminal part was immunodominant. Thus, we identified a correlation between sequence variability and weak immunogenicity for M protein regions. A potential explanation for the weak immunogenicity was provided by the demonstration that protease digestion selectively eliminated the HVR-B part from whole M protein-expressing bacteria. These data support a coherent model, in which the entire variable HVR-B part evades antibody attack, not only by sequence variability but also by weak immunogenicity resulting from protease attack. PMID:26175306

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase from Streptococcus pyogenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Eun Hyuk; Lim, Jong Eun; Chi, Young Min; Lee, Ki Seog

    2012-01-01

    Succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) from S. pyogenes was purified and crystallized. Crystals of native and NAD + -complexed SSADH diffracted to resolutions of 1.6 and 1.7 Å, respectively. Succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) plays a critical role in the metabolism of the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and catalyzes the NAD(P) + -coupled oxidation of succinic semialdehyde (SSA) to succinic acid (SA). SSADH from Streptococcus pyogenes has been purified and crystallized as the apoenzyme and in a complex with NAD + . The crystals of native and NAD + -complexed SSADH diffracted to resolutions of 1.6 and 1.7 Å, respectively, using a synchrotron-radiation source. Both crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 93.3, b = 100.3, c = 105.1 Å for the native crystal and a = 93.3, b = 100.3, c = 105.0 Å for the complex crystal. Preliminary molecular replacement confirmed the presence of one dimer in both crystals, corresponding to a Matthews coefficient (V M ) of 2.37 Å 3 Da −1 and a solvent content of 48.0%

  2. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the adhesion domain of Epf from Streptococcus pyogenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linke, Christian; Siemens, Nikolai; Middleditch, Martin J.; Kreikemeyer, Bernd; Baker, Edward N.

    2012-01-01

    The putative adhesion domain of the multidomain protein Epf from S. pyogenes has been crystallized in space groups P2 1 and P2 1 2 1 2 1 . The crystals diffracted to 2.0 and 1.6 Å resolution, respectively, at the Australian Synchrotron. The extracellular protein Epf from Streptococcus pyogenes is important for streptococcal adhesion to human epithelial cells. However, Epf has no sequence identity to any protein of known structure or function. Thus, several predicted domains of the 205 kDa protein Epf were cloned separately and expressed in Escherichia coli. The N-terminal domain of Epf was crystallized in space groups P2 1 and P2 1 2 1 2 1 in the presence of the protease chymotrypsin. Mass spectrometry showed that the species crystallized corresponded to a fragment comprising residues 52–357 of Epf. Complete data sets were collected to 2.0 and 1.6 Å resolution, respectively, at the Australian Synchrotron

  3. Expression, purification and crystallization of the C-terminal LRR domain of Streptococcus pyogenes protein 0843

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haikarainen, Teemu; Loimaranta, Vuokko; Prieto-Lopez, Carlos; Battula, Pradeep; Finne, Jukka; Papageorgiou, Anastassios C.

    2013-01-01

    The C-terminal LRR domain of S. pyogenes protein 0843 was overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. A complete data set to 1.59 Å resolution was collected using synchrotron radiation. Streptococcus pyogenes protein 0843 (Spy0843) is a recently identified protein with a potential adhesin function. Sequence analysis has shown that Spy0843 contains two leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domains that mediate interactions with the gp340 receptor. Here, the C-terminal LRR domain was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized in the presence of 1.7–1.8 M ammonium sulfate pH 7.4 as precipitant. Data were collected from a single crystal to 1.59 Å resolution at 100 K at a synchrotron-radiation source. The crystal was found to belong to space group I4 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = b = 121.4, c = 51.5 Å and one molecule in the asymmetric unit. Elucidation of the crystal structure will provide insights into the interactions of Spy0843 with the gp340 receptor and a better understanding of the role of Spy0843 in streptococcal infections

  4. Active but inoperable thrombin is accumulated in a plasma protein layer surrounding Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naudin, Clément; Hurley, Sinead M; Malmström, Erik; Plug, Tom; Shannon, Oonagh; Meijers, Joost C M; Mörgelin, Matthias; Björck, Lars; Herwald, Heiko

    2015-10-01

    Activation of thrombin is a critical determinant in many physiological and pathological processes including haemostasis and inflammation. Under physiological conditions many of these functions are involved in wound healing or eradication of an invading pathogen. However, when activated systemically, thrombin can contribute to severe and life-threatening conditions by causing complications such as multiple multi-organ failure and disseminated intravascular coagulation. In the present study we investigated how the activity of thrombin is modulated when it is bound to the surface of Streptococcus pyogenes. Our data show that S. pyogenes bacteria become covered with a proteinaceous layer when incubated with human plasma, and that thrombin is a constituent of this layer. Though the coagulation factor is found attached to the bacteria with a functional active site, thrombin has lost its capacity to interact with its natural substrates and inhibitors. Thus, the interaction of bacteria with human plasma renders thrombin completely inoperable at the streptococcal surface. This could represent a host defense mechanism to avoid systemic activation of coagulation which could be otherwise induced when bacteria enter the circulation and cause systemic infection.

  5. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns, emm type distribution and genetic diversity of Streptococcus pyogenes recovered in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glauber P Arêas

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes is responsible for a variety of infectious diseases and immunological complications. In this study, 91 isolates of S. pyogenes recovered from oropharynx secretions were submitted to antimicrobial susceptibility testing, emm typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE analysis. All isolates were susceptible to ceftriaxone, levofloxacin, penicillin G and vancomycin. Resistance to erythromycin and clindamycin was 15.4%, which is higher than previous reports from this area, while 20.9% of the isolates were not susceptible to tetracycline. The macrolide resistance phenotypes were cMLSB (10 and iMLSB (4. The ermB gene was predominant, followed by the ermA gene. Thirty-two emm types and subtypes were found, but five (emm1, emm4, emm12, emm22, emm81 were detected in 48% of the isolates. Three new emm subtypes were identified (emm1.74, emm58.14, emm76.7. There was a strong association between emm type and PFGE clustering. A variety of PFGE profiles as well as emm types were found among tetracycline and erythromycin-resistant isolates, demonstrating that antimicrobial resistant strains do not result from the expansion of one or a few clones. This study provides epidemiological data that contribute to the development of suitable strategies for the prevention and treatment of such infections in a poorly studied area.

  6. The ScpC Protease of Streptococcus pyogenes Affects the Outcome of Sepsis in a Murine Model ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Sjölinder, Hong; Lövkvist, Lena; Plant, Laura; Eriksson, Jens; Aro, Helena; Jones, Allison; Jonsson, Ann-Beth

    2008-01-01

    The ScpC protease of Streptococcus pyogenes degrades interleukin-8 (IL-8), a chemokine that mediates neutrophil transmigration and activation. The ability to degrade IL-8 differs dramatically among clinical isolates of S. pyogenes. Bacteria expressing ScpC overcome immune clearance by preventing the recruitment of neutrophils in soft tissue infection of mice. To study the role of ScpC in streptococcal sepsis, we generated an ScpC mutant that did not degrade IL-8 and thus failed to prevent the...

  7. Transcriptome Remodeling Contributes to Epidemic Disease Caused by the Human Pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beres, Stephen B; Kachroo, Priyanka; Nasser, Waleed; Olsen, Randall J; Zhu, Luchang; Flores, Anthony R; de la Riva, Ivan; Paez-Mayorga, Jesus; Jimenez, Francisco E; Cantu, Concepcion; Vuopio, Jaana; Jalava, Jari; Kristinsson, Karl G; Gottfredsson, Magnus; Corander, Jukka; Fittipaldi, Nahuel; Di Luca, Maria Chiara; Petrelli, Dezemona; Vitali, Luca A; Raiford, Annessa; Jenkins, Leslie; Musser, James M

    2016-05-31

    For over a century, a fundamental objective in infection biology research has been to understand the molecular processes contributing to the origin and perpetuation of epidemics. Divergent hypotheses have emerged concerning the extent to which environmental events or pathogen evolution dominates in these processes. Remarkably few studies bear on this important issue. Based on population pathogenomic analysis of 1,200 Streptococcus pyogenes type emm89 infection isolates, we report that a series of horizontal gene transfer events produced a new pathogenic genotype with increased ability to cause infection, leading to an epidemic wave of disease on at least two continents. In the aggregate, these and other genetic changes substantially remodeled the transcriptomes of the evolved progeny, causing extensive differential expression of virulence genes and altered pathogen-host interaction, including enhanced immune evasion. Our findings delineate the precise molecular genetic changes that occurred and enhance our understanding of the evolutionary processes that contribute to the emergence and persistence of epidemically successful pathogen clones. The data have significant implications for understanding bacterial epidemics and for translational research efforts to blunt their detrimental effects. The confluence of studies of molecular events underlying pathogen strain emergence, evolutionary genetic processes mediating altered virulence, and epidemics is in its infancy. Although understanding these events is necessary to develop new or improved strategies to protect health, surprisingly few studies have addressed this issue, in particular, at the comprehensive population genomic level. Herein we establish that substantial remodeling of the transcriptome of the human-specific pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes by horizontal gene flow and other evolutionary genetic changes is a central factor in precipitating and perpetuating epidemic disease. The data unambiguously show that

  8. Potential antibiotic and anti-infective effects of rhodomyrtone from Rhodomyrtus tomentosa (Aiton) Hassk. on Streptococcus pyogenes as revealed by proteomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limsuwan, Surasak; Voravuthikunchai, Supayang Piyawan; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Kayser, Oliver; Meinders, Hesseling A.

    2011-01-01

    Rhodomyrtone from Rhodomyrtus tomentosa (Aiton) Hassk. leaf extract has a strong antibacterial activity against the bacterial pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes. Our previous studies indicated that the bactericidal activity of rhodomyrtone might involve intracellular targets. In the present studies we

  9. Structure and interactions of a dimeric variant of sHIP, a novel virulence determinant of Streptococcus pyogenes

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    Carl eDiehl

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes is one of the most significant bacterial pathogens in the human population mostly causing superficial and uncomplicated infections (pharyngitis and impetigo but also invasive and life-threatening disease. We have previously identified a virulence determinant, protein sHIP, which is secreted at higher levels by an invasive compared to a non-invasive strain of S. pyogenes. The present work presents a further characterization of the structural and functional properties of this bacterial protein. Biophysical and structural studies have shown that protein sHIP forms stable tetramers both in the crystal and in solution. The tetramers are composed of four helix-loop-helix motifs with the loop regions connecting the helices displaying a high degree of flexibility. Owing to interactions at the tetramer interface, the observed tetramer can be described as a dimer of dimers. We identified three residues at the tetramer interface (Leu84, Leu88, Tyr95, which due to largely non-polar side-chains, could be important determinants for protein oligomerization. Based on these observations, we produced a sHIP variant in which these residues were mutated to alanines. Biophysical experiments clearly indicated that the sHIP mutant appear only as dimers in solution confirming the importance of the interfacial residues for protein oligomerisation. Furthermore, we could show that the sHIP mutant interacts with intact histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG and the histidine-rich repeats in HRG, and inhibits their antibacterial activity to the same or even higher extent as compared to the wild type protein sHIP. We determined the crystal structure of the sHIP mutant, which, as a result of the high quality of the data, allowed us to improve the existing structural model of the protein. Finally, by employing NMR spectroscopy in solution, we generated a model for the complex between the sHIP mutant and an HRG-derived heparin-binding peptide, providing further

  10. The AgI/II family adhesin AspA is required for respiratory infection by Streptococcus pyogenes.

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    Linda Franklin

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS is a human pathogen that causes pharyngitis and invasive diseases such as toxic shock syndrome and sepsis. The upper respiratory tract is the primary reservoir from which GAS can infect new hosts and cause disease. The factors involved in colonisation are incompletely known however. Previous evidence in oral streptococci has shown that the AgI/II family proteins are involved. We hypothesized that the AspA member of this family might be involved in GAS colonization. We describe a novel mouse model of GAS colonization of the nasopharynx and lower respiratory tract to elucidate these interactions. We used two clinical M serotypes expressing AspA, and their aspA gene deletant isogenic mutants in experiments using adherence assays to respiratory epithelium, macrophage phagocytosis and neutrophil killing assays and in vivo models of respiratory tract colonisation and infection. We demonstrated the requirement for AspA in colonization of the respiratory tract. AspA mutants were cleared from the respiratory tract and were deficient in adherence to epithelial cells, and susceptible to phagocytosis. Expression of AspA in the surrogate host Lactococcus lactis protected bacteria from phagocytosis. Our results suggest that AspA has an essential role in respiratory infection, and may function as a novel anti-phagocytic factor.

  11. Lactobacilli interfere with Streptococcus pyogenes hemolytic activity and adherence to host epithelial cells

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    Sunil D Saroj

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A streptococcus (GAS, a frequent colonizer of the respiratory tract mucosal surface, causes a variety of human diseases, ranging from pharyngitis to the life-threatening streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome. Lactobacilli have been demonstrated to colonize the respiratory tract. In this study, we investigated the interference of lactobacilli with the virulence phenotypes of GAS. The Lactobacillus strains L. rhamnosus Kx151A1 and L. reuteri PTA-5289, but not L. salivarius LMG9477, inhibited the hemolytic activity of GAS. The inhibition of hemolytic activity was attributed to a decrease in the production of streptolysin S (SLS. Conditioned medium (CM from the growth of L. rhamnosus Kx151A1 and L. reuteri PTA-5289 was sufficient to down-regulate the expression of the sag operon, encoding SLS. The Lactobacillus strains L. rhamnosus Kx151A1, L. reuteri PTA-5289 and L. salivarius LMG9477 inhibited the initial adherence of GAS to host epithelial cells. Intriguingly, competition with a combination of Lactobacillus species reduced GAS adherence to host cells most efficiently. The data suggest that an effector molecule released from certain Lactobacillus strains attenuates the production of SLS at the transcriptional level and that combinations of Lactobacillus strains may protect the pharyngeal mucosa more efficiently from the initial colonization of GAS. The effector molecules released from Lactobacillus strains affecting the virulence phenotypes of pathogens hold potential in the development of a new generation of therapeutics.

  12. PepO, a CovRS-controlled endopeptidase, disrupts Streptococcus pyogenes quorum sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkening, Reid V; Chang, Jennifer C; Federle, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS, Streptococcus pyogenes) is a human-restricted pathogen with a capacity to both colonize asymptomatically and cause illnesses ranging from pharyngitis to necrotizing fasciitis. An understanding of how and when GAS switches between genetic programs governing these different lifestyles has remained an enduring mystery and likely requires carefully tuned environmental sensors to activate and silence genetic schemes when appropriate. Herein, we describe the relationship between the Control of Virulence (CovRS, CsrRS) two-component system and the Rgg2/3 quorum-sensing pathway. We demonstrate that responses of CovRS to the stress signals Mg(2+) and a fragment of the antimicrobial peptide LL-37 result in modulated activity of pheromone signaling of the Rgg2/3 pathway through a means of proteolysis of SHP peptide pheromones. This degradation is mediated by the cytoplasmic endopeptidase PepO, which is the first identified enzymatic silencer of an RRNPP-type quorum-sensing pathway. These results suggest that under conditions in which the virulence potential of GAS is elevated (i.e. enhanced virulence gene expression), cellular responses mediated by the Rgg2/3 pathway are abrogated and allow individuals to escape from group behavior. These results also indicate that Rgg2/3 signaling is instead functional during non-virulent GAS lifestyles. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Zn2+ Uptake in Streptococcus pyogenes: Characterization of adcA and lmb Null Mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedde, Vittorio; Rosini, Roberto; Galeotti, Cesira L

    2016-01-01

    An effective regulation of metal ion homeostasis is essential for the growth of microorganisms in any environment and in pathogenic bacteria is strongly associated with their ability to invade and colonise their hosts. To gain a better insight into zinc acquisition in Group A Streptococcus (GAS) we characterized null deletion mutants of the adcA and lmb genes of Streptococcus pyogenes strain MGAS5005 encoding the orthologues of AdcA and AdcAII, the two surface lipoproteins with partly redundant roles in zinc homeostasis in Streptococcus pneumoniae. Null adcA and lmb mutants were analysed for their capability to grow in zinc-depleted conditions and were found to be more susceptible to zinc starvation, a phenotype that could be rescued by the addition of Zn2+ ions to the growth medium. Expression of AdcA, Lmb and HtpA, the polyhistidine triad protein encoded by the gene adjacent to lmb, during growth under conditions of limited zinc availability was examined by Western blot analysis in wild type and null mutant strains. In the wild type strain, AdcA was always present with little variation in expression levels between conditions of excess or limited zinc availability. In contrast, Lmb and HtpA were expressed at detectable levels only during growth in the presence of low zinc concentrations or in the null adcA mutant, when expression of lmb is required to compensate for the lack of adcA expression. In the latter case, Lmb and HtpA were overexpressed by several fold, thus indicating that also in GAS AdcA is a zinc-specific importer and, although it shares this function with Lmb, the two substrate-binding proteins do not show fully overlapping roles in zinc homeostasis.

  14. Identification of a two-component Class IIb bacteriocin in Streptococcus pyogenes by recombinase-based in vivo expression technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Brent D.; Herfst, Christine A.; Tonial, Nicholas C.; Wakabayashi, Adrienne T.; Zeppa, Joseph J.; McCormick, John K.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a globally prominent bacterial pathogen that exhibits strict tropism for the human host, yet bacterial factors responsible for the ability of S. pyogenes to compete within this limited biological niche are not well understood. Using an engineered recombinase-based in vivo expression technology (RIVET) system, we identified an in vivo-induced promoter region upstream of a predicted Class IIb bacteriocin system in the M18 serotype S. pyogenes strain MGAS8232. This promoter element was not active under in vitro laboratory conditions, but was highly induced within the mouse nasopharynx. Recombinant expression of the predicted mature S. pyogenes bacteriocin peptides (designated SpbM and SpbN) revealed that both peptides were required for antimicrobial activity. Using a gain of function experiment in Lactococcus lactis, we further demonstrated S. pyogenes immunity function is encoded downstream of spbN. These data highlight the importance of bacterial gene regulation within appropriate environments to help understand mechanisms of niche adaptation by bacterial pathogens. PMID:27808235

  15. Molecular characterization of macrolide resistant Streptococcus pyogenes isolates from pharyngitis patients in Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opavski, Natasa; Gajic, Ina; Borek, Anna L; Obszańska, Katarzyna; Stanojevic, Maja; Lazarevic, Ivana; Ranin, Lazar; Sitkiewicz, Izabela; Mijac, Vera

    2015-07-01

    A steady increase in macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes, group A streptococci (GAS) was reported in Serbia during 2004-2009 (9.9%). However, there are no data on the molecular epidemiology of pharyngeal macrolide resistance GAS (MRGAS) isolates. Therefore, the aims of this first nationwide study were to examine the prevalence of macrolide resistance in Serbian GAS and to determine their resistance phenotypes, genotypes and clonal relationships. Overall 3893 non-duplicate pharyngeal S. pyogenes isolates from outpatients with GAS infection were collected throughout country during 2008 and 2009. Among 486 macrolide resistant pharyngeal isolates collected, 103 were further characterized. Macrolide resistance phenotypes and genotypes were determined by double-disk diffusion test and PCR, respectively. Strain relatedness was determined by emm typing, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), multilocus variable tandem repeat analysis (MLVA), phage profiling (PP) and virulence factor profiling (VFP). Overall, macrolide resistance among GAS isolates in Serbia was 12.5%. M phenotype was the most common (71.8%), followed by iMLS (18.4%) and cMLS (9.7%). Three clonal complexes--emm75/mefA/ST49, emm12/mefA/ST36 and emm77/ermA/tetO/ST63 comprised over 90% of the tested strains. Although MLVA, PP and VFP distinguished 10, 20 and 12 different patterns, respectively, cluster analysis disclosed only small differences between strains which belonged to the same emm/ST type. Our data indicate dominance of three major internationally widely disseminated macrolide resistant clones and a high genetic homogeneity among the Serbian MRGAS population. Continued surveillance of macrolide resistance and clonal composition in MRGAS in Serbia in future is necessary to determine stability of MRGAS clones and to guide therapy strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Infección y colonización faríngea asintomática de niños por Streptococcus pyogenes = Streptococcus pyogenes infection and asymptomatic throat carriage in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acuña Ramos, Clara Patricia

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: establecer la frecuencia de estreptococo beta hemolítico del grupo A (Streptococcus pyogenes en niños, mediante una prueba rápida de inmunoensayo cromatográfico.Métodos: estudio piloto de tipo transversal en una muestra no probabilística de 144 niños entre 3 y 13 años, asistentes a centros infantiles de Medellín y su área metropolitana y a una institución educativa de Bogotá. Se tomaron muestras de garganta por frotis para la prueba rápida de S. pyogenes y se recolectó información demográfica y de antecedentes personales mediante una encuesta. Se calcularon los promedios con sus desviaciones estándar y los porcentajes de acuerdo con la naturaleza de las variables de interés.Resultados: la edad promedio del grupo fue 5,5 ± 2,8 años con distribución similar por sexo. Veintiún niños (14,6% fueron positivos para S. pyogenes, diez de ellos fueron posibles infecciones y 11, portadores asintomáticos. De los 144 niños, 45 (31,3% tenían síntomas faríngeos, de los cuales 10 (22,2% tenían S. pyogenes. Un total de 99 (68,8% niños fueron asintomáticos y 11 de estos (11,1% presentaron prueba positiva para S. pyogenes.Discusión: la alta frecuencia de S. pyogenes en este grupo es un llamado de atención sobre la necesidad de implementar protocolos de manejo con pruebas rápidas para la detección del microorganismo.

  17. The microbiology of impetigo in indigenous children: associations between Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, scabies, and nasal carriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Asha C; Tong, Steven Y C; Chatfield, Mark D; Carapetis, Jonathan R

    2014-12-31

    Impetigo is caused by both Streptococcus pyogenes and Staphylococcus aureus; the relative contributions of each have been reported to fluctuate with time and region. While S. aureus is reportedly on the increase in most industrialised settings, S. pyogenes is still thought to drive impetigo in endemic, tropical regions. However, few studies have utilised high quality microbiological culture methods to confirm this assumption. We report the prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of impetigo pathogens recovered in a randomised, controlled trial of impetigo treatment conducted in remote Indigenous communities of northern Australia. Each child had one or two sores, and the anterior nares, swabbed. All swabs were transported in skim milk tryptone glucose glycogen broth and frozen at -70°C, until plated on horse blood agar. S. aureus and S. pyogenes were confirmed with latex agglutination. From 508 children, we collected 872 swabs of sores and 504 swabs from the anterior nares prior to commencement of antibiotic therapy. S. pyogenes and S. aureus were identified together in 503/872 (58%) of sores; with an additional 207/872 (24%) sores having S. pyogenes and 81/872 (9%) S. aureus, in isolation. Skin sore swabs taken during episodes with a concurrent diagnosis of scabies were more likely to culture S. pyogenes (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.1 - 4.4, p = 0.03). Eighteen percent of children had nasal carriage of skin pathogens. There was no association between the presence of S. aureus in the nose and skin. Methicillin-resistance was detected in 15% of children who cultured S. aureus from either a sore or their nose. There was no association found between the severity of impetigo and the detection of a skin pathogen. S. pyogenes remains the principal pathogen in tropical impetigo; the relatively high contribution of S. aureus as a co-pathogen has also been confirmed. Children with scabies were more likely to have S. pyogenes detected. While clearance of S. pyogenes is the key

  18. SENSITIZATION TO STREPTOCOCCUS PYOGENES AT CHILDREN OF EARLY AND PRESCHOOL AGE WITH RECURRENT RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS — PREDICTORS OF RHEUMATIC PATHOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Shabaldina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes is the reason of rheumatism and a post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis. Primary colonization of mucosal with this microorganism develops in the period of early ontogenesis. It was confirmed that at a carriage of this microorganism children at them activate immunopathological reactions. Clinic and immune features of the children with recurrent respiratory infections of early and preschool age having the immune response to S. pyogenes were studied. Position of risk of formation of rheumatic diseases at these children was studied. 771 children, in an age interval of 2–6 years are examined. Immune and clinical indicators in two groups of the children having the immune response to S. pyogenes (n = 306 and not having it (n = 465 were analyzed. It was shown that in group of the children with immune response to S. pyogenes were authentically higher: point of an hereditary predisposition, expressiveness of placental insufficiency and a fetal hypoxia during the real pregnancy, and in the post-natal period degree of a thymomegaly, a pharyngeal lymphoid ring hypertrophy, skin manifestations of food allergy on the first year of life, the frequency of sharp respiratory infections within one year — in comparison with control. The group of the children having the immune response to S. pyogenes had a high level in a nasal secret of TNFα, IL-4, IFNα, and in blood — ASL-O, ASG, RF, CRP and immunoglobulin E. It was shown that at the children with a sensitization to S. pyogenes were lowered in peripheral blood: the general leukocytes, lymphocytes, T-lymphocytes (CD3 positive, T-helpery (CD3 and CD4 positive, an immunoregulatory index (the relation of CD4 of positive lymphocytes to CD8 to positive lymphocytes, phagocytosis (in test with nitro blue tetrazolium chloride — NBT and immunoglobulin A — in comparison with control. The atopic immune response to S. pyogenes, S. pneumoniae, S. aureus, P. vulgaris, K. pneumoniae, H

  19. Características de la resistencia antimicrobiana de una colección clínica de Strptococcus pyogenes Antimicrobial resistance of Streptococcus pyogenes clinical strains

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    Romeo S. Rodríguez

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar la susceptibilidad antimicrobiana de Streptococcus pyogenes con el fin de estimar la prevalencia de los fenotipos de resistencia a los macrólidos. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se realizó un estudio de tipo transversal, en 1999, en el que se evaluaron 100 cepas de S. pyogenes, aislados en el Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez, en el lapso comprendido entre 1992 y 1998, procedentes de niños con faringoamigdalitis, conservadas en congelación en el laboratorio de bacteriología hasta su procesamiento. Se determinó la susceptibilidad antimicrobiana a algunos beta-lactámicos, macrólidos y clindamicina. La resistencia a eritromicina se probó por medio de la prueba de difusión de doble disco. Se calcularon medidas de tendencia central. RESULTADOS: Todas las cepas fueron sensibles a los beta-lactámicos y clindamicina; 16% fueron resistentes a los macrólidos, y todas correspondieron al fenotipo M. CONCLUSIONES: Es conveniente realizar periódicamente pruebas de escrutinio para conocer los posibles cambios en los patrones de sensibilidad estreptocócica.OBJECTIVE: To determine the antibiotic susceptibility of recent isolates of Streptococcus pyogenes and to evaluate the prevalence of macrolide-resistant phenotypes. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In 1999, we conducted a cross-sectional study at Mexico Children's Hospital "Federico Gomez", to analyze one hundred strains of S. pyogenes isolated from 1992 to 1998, in children with uncomplicated pharyngotonsillitis. Strains were frozen at the bacteriology lab until they were analyzed. Strains were tested for susceptibility against some beta-lactams, macrolides and clindamycin. Double-disk testing was carried out to evaluate erythromycin-resistant phenotypes. Data are presented using central tendency measures. RESULTS: All tested strains were not resistant to beta-lactams and clindamycin; 16% of the strains were resistant to macrolides and all of them belonged to phenotype M. CONCLUSIONS

  20. Streptococcal 5'-Nucleotidase A (S5nA), a Novel Streptococcus pyogenes Virulence Factor That Facilitates Immune Evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lisa; Khemlani, Adrina; Lorenz, Natalie; Loh, Jacelyn M S; Langley, Ries J; Proft, Thomas

    2015-12-25

    Streptococcus pyogenes is an important human pathogen that causes a wide range of diseases. Using bioinformatics analysis of the complete S. pyogenes strain SF370 genome, we have identified a novel S. pyogenes virulence factor, which we termed streptococcal 5'-nucleotidase A (S5nA). A recombinant form of S5nA hydrolyzed AMP and ADP, but not ATP, to generate the immunomodulatory molecule adenosine. Michaelis-Menten kinetics revealed a Km of 169 μm and a Vmax of 7550 nmol/mg/min for the substrate AMP. Furthermore, recombinant S5nA acted synergistically with S. pyogenes nuclease A to generate macrophage-toxic deoxyadenosine from DNA. The enzyme showed optimal activity between pH 5 and pH 6.5 and between 37 and 47 °C. Like other 5'-nucleotidases, S5nA requires divalent cations and was active in the presence of Mg(2+), Ca(2+), or Mn(2+). However, Zn(2+) inhibited the enzymatic activity. Structural modeling combined with mutational analysis revealed a highly conserved catalytic dyad as well as conserved substrate and cation-binding sites. Recombinant S5nA significantly increased the survival of the non-pathogenic bacterium Lactococcus lactis during a human whole blood killing assay in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting a role as an S. pyogenes virulence factor. In conclusion, we have identified a novel S. pyogenes enzyme with 5'-nucleotidase activity and immune evasion properties. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Extreme sequence divergence but conserved ligand-binding specificity in Streptococcus pyogenes M protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Many pathogenic microorganisms evade host immunity through extensive sequence variability in a protein region targeted by protective antibodies. In spite of the sequence variability, a variable region commonly retains an important ligand-binding function, reflected in the presence of a highly conserved sequence motif. Here, we analyze the limits of sequence divergence in a ligand-binding region by characterizing the hypervariable region (HVR of Streptococcus pyogenes M protein. Our studies were focused on HVRs that bind the human complement regulator C4b-binding protein (C4BP, a ligand that confers phagocytosis resistance. A previous comparison of C4BP-binding HVRs identified residue identities that could be part of a binding motif, but the extended analysis reported here shows that no residue identities remain when additional C4BP-binding HVRs are included. Characterization of the HVR in the M22 protein indicated that two relatively conserved Leu residues are essential for C4BP binding, but these residues are probably core residues in a coiled-coil, implying that they do not directly contribute to binding. In contrast, substitution of either of two relatively conserved Glu residues, predicted to be solvent-exposed, had no effect on C4BP binding, although each of these changes had a major effect on the antigenic properties of the HVR. Together, these findings show that HVRs of M proteins have an extraordinary capacity for sequence divergence and antigenic variability while retaining a specific ligand-binding function.

  2. Preclinical safety study of a recombinant Streptococcus pyogenes vaccine formulated with aluminum adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    HogenEsch, Harm; Dunham, Anisa; Burlet, Elodie; Lu, Fangjia; Mosley, Yung-Yi C; Morefield, Garry

    2017-02-01

    A recombinant vaccine composed of a fusion protein formulated with aluminum hydroxide adjuvant is under development for protection against diseases caused by Streptococcus pyogenes. The safety and local reactogenicity of the vaccine was assessed by a comprehensive series of clinical, pathologic and immunologic tests in preclinical experiments. Outbred mice received three intramuscular injections of 1/5th of the human dose (0.1 ml) and rabbits received two injections of the full human dose. Control groups received adjuvant or protein antigen. The vaccine did not cause clinical evidence of systemic toxicity in mice or rabbits. There was a transient increase of peripheral blood neutrophils after the third vaccination of mice. In addition, the concentration of acute phase proteins serum amyloid A and haptoglobin was significantly increased 1 day after injection of the vaccine in mice. There was mild transient swelling and erythema of the injection site in both mice and rabbits. Treatment-related pathology was limited to inflammation at the injection site and accumulation of adjuvant-containing macrophages in the draining lymph nodes. In conclusion, the absence of clinical toxicity in two animal species suggest that the vaccine is safe for use in a phase I human clinical trial. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Molecular epidemiology, antimicrobial susceptibility, and characterization of macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pyogenes in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yuhei; Gotoh, Kenji; Teramachi, Mariko; Ishimoto, Kazuhisa; Tsumura, Naoki; Shindou, Shizuo; Yamashita, Yushiro

    2016-11-01

    Here we report the molecular epidemiology of macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococci, GAS) isolated from children with pharyngotonsillitis between 2011 and 2013 in Japan. In 299 isolates, 124 (41.5%) isolates were macrolide-resistant. We characterized the isolates by emm typing, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Of 299 isolates, 124 (41.5%) were macrolide-resistant isolates, 76 (61.3%) possessed mefA and 46 (37.1%) possessed ermB. All 76 isolates with mefA possessed msrD. There were no isolates possessed ermTR in this study. Eight emm/MLST types were observed. The predominant type was emm1/ST28 (57 isolates, 46.0%), which possessed the mefA/msrD complex, presenting as the M phenotype. The second most predominant type was emm12/ST467, which possessed ermB, presenting as the cMLS B phenotype. Of the cMLS B phenotype isolates, types emm28/ST52 and emm12/ST36 had multiple genetic backgrounds. We found high proportions of macrolide-resistant GAS in the southwestern areas of Japan. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Inducer expulsion in Streptococcus pyogenes: properties and mechanism of the efflux reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutrina, S.L.; Reizer, J.; Saier, M.H Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Expulsion of preaccumulated methyl-β-D-thiogalactoside-phosphate (TMG-P) from Streptococcus pyogenes is a two-step process comprising intracellular dephosphorylation of TMG-P followed by rapid efflux of the intracellularly formed free galactoside. The present study identifies the mechanism and the order and characterizes the temperature dependency of the efflux step. Unidirectional efflux of the intracellularly formed [ 14 C]TMG was only slightly affected when measured in the presence of unlabeled TMG (25 to 400 mM) in the extracellular medium. In contrast, pronounced inhibition of net efflux was observed in the presence of relatively low concentrations (1 to 16 mM) of extracellular [ 14 C]TMG. Since net efflux was nearly arrested when the external concentration of [ 14 C]TMG approached the intracellular concentration of this sugar, we propose that a facilitated diffusion mechanism is responsible for efflux and equilibration of TMG between the intracellular and extracellular milieus. The exit reaction was markedly dependent upon temperature, exhibited a high energy of activation (23 kcal [ca. 96 kJ] per mol), and followed first-order kinetics, indicating that the permease mediating this efflux was not saturated under the conditions of expulsion employed

  5. Mercury(II) and methyl mercury speciation on Streptococcus pyogenes loaded Dowex Optipore SD-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuzen, Mustafa, E-mail: m.tuzen@gmail.com [Gaziosmanpasa University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Chemistry Department, 60250 Tokat (Turkey); Uluozlu, Ozgur Dogan [Gaziosmanpasa University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Chemistry Department, 60250 Tokat (Turkey); Karaman, Isa [Gaziosmanpasa University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Biology Department, 60250 Tokat (Turkey); Soylak, Mustafa [Erciyes University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Chemistry Department, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)

    2009-09-30

    A solid phase extraction procedure based on speciation of mercury(II) and methyl mercury on Streptococcus pyogenes immobilized on Dowex Optipore SD-2 has been established. Selective and sequential elution with 0.1 mol L{sup -1} HCl for methyl mercury and 2 mol L{sup -1} HCl for mercury(II) were performed at pH 8. The determination of mercury levels was performed by cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry (CVAAS). Optimal analytical conditions including pH, amounts of biosorbent, sample volumes, etc., were investigated. The influences of the some alkaline and earth alkaline ions and some transition metals on the recoveries were also investigated. The capacity of biosorbent for mercury(II) and methyl mercury was 4.8 and 3.4 mg g{sup -1}. The detection limit (3 sigma) of the reagent blank for mercury(II) and methyl mercury was 2.1 and 1.5 ng L{sup -1}. Preconcentration factor was calculated as 25. The relative standard deviations of the procedure were below 7%. The validation of the presented procedure is performed by the analysis of standard reference material (NRCC-DORM 2 Dogfish Muscle). The procedure was successfully applied to the speciation of mercury(II) and methyl mercury in natural water and environmental samples.

  6. Mercury(II) and methyl mercury speciation on Streptococcus pyogenes loaded Dowex Optipore SD-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuzen, Mustafa; Uluozlu, Ozgur Dogan; Karaman, Isa; Soylak, Mustafa

    2009-01-01

    A solid phase extraction procedure based on speciation of mercury(II) and methyl mercury on Streptococcus pyogenes immobilized on Dowex Optipore SD-2 has been established. Selective and sequential elution with 0.1 mol L -1 HCl for methyl mercury and 2 mol L -1 HCl for mercury(II) were performed at pH 8. The determination of mercury levels was performed by cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry (CVAAS). Optimal analytical conditions including pH, amounts of biosorbent, sample volumes, etc., were investigated. The influences of the some alkaline and earth alkaline ions and some transition metals on the recoveries were also investigated. The capacity of biosorbent for mercury(II) and methyl mercury was 4.8 and 3.4 mg g -1 . The detection limit (3 sigma) of the reagent blank for mercury(II) and methyl mercury was 2.1 and 1.5 ng L -1 . Preconcentration factor was calculated as 25. The relative standard deviations of the procedure were below 7%. The validation of the presented procedure is performed by the analysis of standard reference material (NRCC-DORM 2 Dogfish Muscle). The procedure was successfully applied to the speciation of mercury(II) and methyl mercury in natural water and environmental samples.

  7. Isolamento de Streptococcus pyogenes em indivíduos com faringoamigdalite e teste de susceptibilidade a antimicrobianos Isolation of Streptococcus pyogenes in individuals with pharyngotonsillitis and antimicrobial susceptibility testing

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    Rozana Scalabrin

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Investigamos a ocorrência de Streptococcus pyogenes em indivíduos com faringoamigdalite que espontaneamente procuraram atendimento em farmácias e unidades de saúde. FORMA DE ESTUDO: Coorte longitudinal. MATERIAL E MÉTODOS: Com auxílio de "swab" e abaixador de língua foram coletadas amostras da orofaringe de 58 indivíduos, as quais foram semeadas por técnica de esgotamento em placas contendo ágar sangue. No momento da coleta, nenhum dos indivíduos estava sob tratamento com antibióticos. A identificação do S. pyogenes foi feita presuntivamente pelo teste de sensibilidade a bacitracina e confirmada pela grupagem sorológica através da extração do antígeno grupo-específico. RESULTADOS: Das 58 amostras de orofaringe analisadas, 32 (55,2% foram provenientes de indivíduos atendidos em farmácias e 26 (44,8% foram obtidas daqueles que procuraram as unidades de saúde. Um total de 15 (25,9% amostras apresentou cultura positiva para S. pyogenes, sendo a maioria dos isolamentos (9/15, 60% proveniente de indivíduos atendidos em farmácia. Streptococcus pyogenes foi isolado em 33,3% (11/33 dos indivíduos com idade entre zero e 15 anos e em 16% (4/25 daqueles com idade acima de 15 anos. As 15 cepas isoladas foram sensíveis a todos os antimicrobianos testados. CONCLUSÃO: Os resultados do presente estudo enfatizam a importância do diagnóstico bacteriológico no tratamento adequado da faringoamigdalite estreptocócica que permite a prevenção das complicações supurativas ou não supurativas e a erradicação do microrganismo da orofaringe.AIM: We investigate the occurrence of Streptococcus pyogenes in individuals with pharyngotonsillitis that spontaneously sought attendance in drugstores or in health units. STUDY DESIGN: Longitudinal cohorte. MATERIAL AND METHOD: Samples from oropharynx of 58 individuals were collected with swab and tongue depressor and inoculated on sheep blood agar plates. At the moment the samples were

  8. Type I Interferon Production Induced by Streptococcus pyogenes-Derived Nucleic Acids Is Required for Host Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratz, Nina; Hartweger, Harald; Matt, Ulrich; Kratochvill, Franz; Janos, Marton; Sigel, Stefanie; Drobits, Barbara; Li, Xiao-Dong; Knapp, Sylvia; Kovarik, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a Gram-positive human pathogen that is recognized by yet unknown pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). Engagement of these receptor molecules during infection with S. pyogenes, a largely extracellular bacterium with limited capacity for intracellular survival, causes innate immune cells to produce inflammatory mediators such as TNF, but also type I interferon (IFN). Here we show that signaling elicited by type I IFNs is required for successful defense of mice against lethal subcutaneous cellulitis caused by S. pyogenes. Type I IFN signaling was accompanied with reduced neutrophil recruitment to the site of infection. Mechanistic analysis revealed that macrophages and conventional dendritic cells (cDCs) employ different signaling pathways leading to IFN-beta production. Macrophages required IRF3, STING, TBK1 and partially MyD88, whereas in cDCs the IFN-beta production was fully dependent on IRF5 and MyD88. Furthermore, IFN-beta production by macrophages was dependent on the endosomal delivery of streptococcal DNA, while in cDCs streptococcal RNA was identified as the IFN-beta inducer. Despite a role of MyD88 in both cell types, the known IFN-inducing TLRs were individually not required for generation of the IFN-beta response. These results demonstrate that the innate immune system employs several strategies to efficiently recognize S. pyogenes, a pathogenic bacterium that succeeded in avoiding recognition by the standard arsenal of TLRs. PMID:21625574

  9. Relevance of the two-component sensor protein CiaH to acid and oxidative stress responses in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsuno, Ichiro; Isaka, Masanori; Okada, Ryo; Zhang, Yan; Hasegawa, Tadao

    2014-03-28

    The production of virulence proteins depends on environmental factors, and two-component regulatory systems are involved in sensing these factors. We previously established knockout strains in all suspected two-component regulatory sensor proteins of the emm1 clinical strain of S. pyogenes and examined their relevance to acid stimuli in a natural atmosphere. In the present study, their relevance to acid stimuli was re-examined in an atmosphere containing 5% CO2. The spy1236 (which is identical to ciaHpy) sensor knockout strain showed significant growth reduction compared with the parental strain in broth at pH 6.0, suggesting that the Spy1236 (CiaHpy) two-component sensor protein is involved in acid response of S. pyogenes. CiaH is also conserved in Streptococcus pneumoniae, and it has been reported that deletion of the gene for its cognate response regulator (ciaRpn) made the pneumococcal strains more sensitive to oxidative stress. In this report, we show that the spy1236 knockout mutant of S. pyogenes is more sensitive to oxidative stress than the parental strain. These results suggest that the two-component sensor protein CiaH is involved in stress responses in S. pyogenes.

  10. Genome-scale reconstruction of the Streptococcus pyogenes M49 metabolic network reveals growth requirements and indicates potential drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levering, Jennifer; Fiedler, Tomas; Sieg, Antje; van Grinsven, Koen W A; Hering, Silvio; Veith, Nadine; Olivier, Brett G; Klett, Lara; Hugenholtz, Jeroen; Teusink, Bas; Kreikemeyer, Bernd; Kummer, Ursula

    2016-08-20

    Genome-scale metabolic models comprise stoichiometric relations between metabolites, as well as associations between genes and metabolic reactions and facilitate the analysis of metabolism. We computationally reconstructed the metabolic network of the lactic acid bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes M49. Initially, we based the reconstruction on genome annotations and already existing and curated metabolic networks of Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactococcus lactis. This initial draft was manually curated with the final reconstruction accounting for 480 genes associated with 576 reactions and 558 metabolites. In order to constrain the model further, we performed growth experiments of wild type and arcA deletion strains of S. pyogenes M49 in a chemically defined medium and calculated nutrient uptake and production fluxes. We additionally performed amino acid auxotrophy experiments to test the consistency of the model. The established genome-scale model can be used to understand the growth requirements of the human pathogen S. pyogenes and define optimal and suboptimal conditions, but also to describe differences and similarities between S. pyogenes and related lactic acid bacteria such as L. lactis in order to find strategies to reduce the growth of the pathogen and propose drug targets. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Type I interferon production induced by Streptococcus pyogenes-derived nucleic acids is required for host protection.

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    Nina Gratz

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes is a Gram-positive human pathogen that is recognized by yet unknown pattern recognition receptors (PRRs. Engagement of these receptor molecules during infection with S. pyogenes, a largely extracellular bacterium with limited capacity for intracellular survival, causes innate immune cells to produce inflammatory mediators such as TNF, but also type I interferon (IFN. Here we show that signaling elicited by type I IFNs is required for successful defense of mice against lethal subcutaneous cellulitis caused by S. pyogenes. Type I IFN signaling was accompanied with reduced neutrophil recruitment to the site of infection. Mechanistic analysis revealed that macrophages and conventional dendritic cells (cDCs employ different signaling pathways leading to IFN-beta production. Macrophages required IRF3, STING, TBK1 and partially MyD88, whereas in cDCs the IFN-beta production was fully dependent on IRF5 and MyD88. Furthermore, IFN-beta production by macrophages was dependent on the endosomal delivery of streptococcal DNA, while in cDCs streptococcal RNA was identified as the IFN-beta inducer. Despite a role of MyD88 in both cell types, the known IFN-inducing TLRs were individually not required for generation of the IFN-beta response. These results demonstrate that the innate immune system employs several strategies to efficiently recognize S. pyogenes, a pathogenic bacterium that succeeded in avoiding recognition by the standard arsenal of TLRs.

  12. Emergence of high-level fluoroquinolone resistance in emm6 Streptococcus pyogenes and in vitro resistance selection with ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin and moxifloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra-Kumar, Surbhi; Van Heirstraeten, Liesbet; Lammens, Christine; Chapelle, Sabine; Goossens, Herman

    2009-05-01

    To investigate the prevalence of fluoroquinolone resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes and its in vitro selection by ciprofloxacin and the respiratory fluoroquinolones, levofloxacin and moxifloxacin. S. pyogenes (n = 5851) recovered from pharyngitis and invasive infections during 2003-06 in Belgium were screened for fluoroquinolone non-susceptibility (ciprofloxacin MIC > or =2 mg/L) and further studied for mutations in the topoisomerase genes, reserpine-sensitive efflux, clonality by PFGE and emm typing. Fourteen well-characterized fluoroquinolone-non-susceptible or -susceptible isolates were exposed stepwise to increasing levels of ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin and moxifloxacin. Selected mutants with increased MICs were analysed for resistance mechanisms. Mutation frequencies at 2x and 4x MIC of moxifloxacin and levofloxacin were estimated for a clinical emm6 parent strain carrying mutations in both parC and gyrA. Prevalence of fluoroquinolone-non-susceptible S. pyogenes (n = 437; 7.47%) increased significantly from 2.08% and 5.08% to 13.11% during 2003-05 and decreased to 8.93% in 2006 (chi(2) test; P fluoroquinolone-non-susceptible isolates. Of the 71 S. pyogenes sequenced, 70 harboured first-step parC or gyrA mutations correlating with ciprofloxacin MICs 2-8 mg/L. Reserpine-sensitive efflux was not observed. One emm6parC mutant (Ser79Ala) also showed a second-step mutation in gyrA (Ser81Tyr), with MICs of ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin and moxifloxacin of 32, 8 and 1 mg/L, respectively. Mean mutation frequencies under moxifloxacin selection were 500- to 30 000-fold higher for this strain than those for an emm6 control strain. Selection of the emm6 double mutant with moxifloxacin generated a mutant with a moxifloxacin MIC of 64 mg/L and a levofloxacin MIC of 128 mg/L, and an additional Asp83Tyr substitution in ParC. We report an emergence of levofloxacin and high-level ciprofloxacin resistance associated with a second-step gyrA mutation in a clinical emm6 S. pyogenes

  13. Scarlet Fever Epidemic in China Caused by Streptococcus pyogenes Serotype M12: Epidemiologic and Molecular Analysis

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    Yuanhai You

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available From 2011, Hong Kong and mainland China have witnessed a sharp increase in reported cases, with subsequent reports of epidemic scarlet fever in North Asia and the United Kingdom. Here we examine epidemiological data and investigate the genomic context of the predominantly serotype M12 Streptococcus pyogenes scarlet fever isolates from mainland China. Incident case data was obtained from the Chinese Nationwide Notifiable Infectious Diseases Reporting Information System. The relative risk of scarlet fever in recent outbreak years 2011–2016 was calculated using the median age-standardised incidence rate, compared to years 2003–2010 prior this outbreak. Whole genome sequencing was performed on 32 emm12 scarlet fever isolates and 13 emm12 non-scarlet fever isolates collected from different geographic regions of China, and compared with 203 published emm12 S. pyogenes genomes predominantly from scarlet fever outbreaks in Hong Kong (n = 134 and the United Kingdom (n = 63. We found during the outbreak period (2011–2016, the median age-standardised incidence in China was 4.14/100,000 (95% confidence interval (CI 4.11-4.18, 2.62-fold higher (95% CI 2.57-2.66 than that of 1.58/100,000 (95% CI 1.56-1.61 during the baseline period prior to the outbreak (2003−2010. Highest incidence was reported for children 5 years of age (80.5/100,000. Streptococcal toxin encoding prophage φHKU.vir and φHKU.ssa in addition to the macrolide and tetracycline resistant ICE-emm12 and ICE-HKU397 elements were found amongst mainland China multi-clonal emm12 isolates suggesting a role in selection and expansion of scarlet fever lineages in China. Global dissemination of toxin encoded prophage has played a role in the expansion of scarlet fever emm12 clones. These findings emphasize the role of comprehensive surveillance approaches for monitoring of epidemic human disease.

  14. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the tRNA-specific adenosine deaminase from Streptococcus pyogenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ku, Min-Je; Lee, Won-Ho; Nam, Ki-hyun; Rhee, Kyeong-hee; Lee, Ki-Seog; Kim, Eunice EunKyung; Yu, Myung-Hee; Hwang, Kwang Yeon

    2005-01-01

    The tRNA-specific adenosine deaminase from the pathogenic bacteria S. pyogenes has been overexpressed and crystallized. The tRNA-specific adenosine deaminase from the pathogenic bacteria Streptococcus pyogenes (spTAD) has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli and crystallized in the presence of Zn 2+ ion at 295 K using ammonium sulfate as a precipitant. Flash-cooled crystals of spTAD diffracted to 2.0 Å using 30%(v/v) glycerol as a cryoprotectant. X-ray diffraction data have been collected to 2.0 Å using synchrotron radiation. The crystal belongs to the tetragonal space group P4 2 2 1 2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 81.042, c = 81.270 Å. The asymmetric unit contains one subunit of spTAD, with a corresponding crystal volume per protein weight (V M ) of 3.3 Å 3 Da −1 and a solvent content of 62.7%

  15. Single- and multistep resistance selection studies on the activity of retapamulin compared to other agents against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosowska-Shick, Klaudia; Clark, Catherine; Credito, Kim; McGhee, Pamela; Dewasse, Bonifacio; Bogdanovich, Tatiana; Appelbaum, Peter C

    2006-02-01

    Retapamulin had the lowest rate of spontaneous mutations by single-step passaging and the lowest parent and selected mutant MICs by multistep passaging among all drugs tested for all Staphylococcus aureus strains and three Streptococcus pyogenes strains which yielded resistant clones. Retapamulin has a low potential for resistance selection in S. pyogenes, with a slow and gradual propensity for resistance development in S. aureus.

  16. Label-free proteomic analysis of environmental acidification-influenced Streptococcus pyogenes secretome reveals a novel acid-induced protein histidine triad protein A (HtpA) involved in necrotizing fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yao-Tseng; Wang, Jie-Siou; Tsai, Shu-Han; Chuan, Chiang-Ni; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Liao, Pao-Chi

    2014-09-23

    Streptococcus pyogenes is responsible for various diseases. During infection, bacteria must adapt to adverse environments, such as the acidic environment. Acidic stimuli may stimulate S. pyogenes to invade into deeper tissue. However, how this acidic stimulus causes S. pyogenes to manipulate its secretome for facilitating invasion remains unclear. The dynamic label-free LC-MS/MS profiling identified 97 proteins, which are influenced by environmental acidification. Among these, 33 (34%) of the identified proteins were predicted to be extracellular proteins. Interestingly, classical secretory proteins comprise approximately 90% of protein abundance of the secretome in acidic condition at the stationary phase. One acid-induced secreted protein, HtpA, was selected to investigate its role in invasive infection. The mouse infected by the htpA deficient mutant showed lower virulence and smaller lesion area than the wild-type strain. The mutant strain was more efficiently cleared at infected skin than the wild-type strain. Besides, the relative phagocytosis resistance is lower in the mutant strain than in the wild-type strain. These data indicate that a novel acid-induced virulence factor, HtpA, which improves anti-phagocytosis ability for causing necrotizing fasciitis. Our investigation provides vital information for documenting the broad influences and mechanisms underlying the invasive behavior of S. pyogenes in an acidified environment. The acidified infected environment may facilitate S. pyogenes invasion from the mucosa to the deeper subepithelial tissue. The acid stimuli have been considered to affect the complex regulatory network of S. pyogenes for causing severe infections. Many of secreted virulence factors influenced by acidified environment may also play a crucial role in pathogenesis of invasive disease. To investigate temporal secretome changes under acidic environment, a comparative secretomics approach using label-free LC-MS/MS was undertaken to analyze

  17. Tn5253 family integrative and conjugative elements carrying mef(I) and catQ determinants in Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingoia, Marina; Morici, Eleonora; Morroni, Gianluca; Giovanetti, Eleonora; Del Grosso, Maria; Pantosti, Annalisa; Varaldo, Pietro E

    2014-10-01

    The linkage between the macrolide efflux gene mef(I) and the chloramphenicol inactivation gene catQ was first described in Streptococcus pneumoniae (strain Spn529), where the two genes are located in a module designated IQ element. Subsequently, two different defective IQ elements were detected in Streptococcus pyogenes (strains Spy029 and Spy005). The genetic elements carrying the three IQ elements were characterized, and all were found to be Tn5253 family integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs). The ICE from S. pneumoniae (ICESpn529IQ) was sequenced, whereas the ICEs from S. pyogenes (ICESpy029IQ and ICESpy005IQ, the first Tn5253-like ICEs reported in this species) were characterized by PCR mapping, partial sequencing, and restriction analysis. ICESpn529IQ and ICESpy029IQ were found to share the intSp 23FST81 integrase gene and an identical Tn916 fragment, whereas ICESpy005IQ has int5252 and lacks Tn916. All three ICEs were found to lack the linearized pC194 plasmid that is usually associated with Tn5253-like ICEs, and all displayed a single copy of a toxin-antitoxin operon that is typically contained in the direct repeats flanking the excisable pC194 region when this region is present. Two different insertion sites of the IQ elements were detected, one in ICESpn529IQ and ICESpy029IQ, and another in ICESpy005IQ. The chromosomal integration of the three ICEs was site specific, depending on the integrase (intSp 23FST81 or int5252). Only ICESpy005IQ was excised in circular form and transferred by conjugation. By transformation, mef(I) and catQ were cotransferred at a high frequency from S. pyogenes Spy005 and at very low frequencies from S. pneumoniae Spn529 and S. pyogenes Spy029. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Differential compartmentalization of Streptococcus pyogenes virulence factors and host protein binding properties as a mechanism for host adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilsgård, Ola; Karlsson, Christofer; Malmström, Erik; Malmström, Johan

    2016-11-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is an important human pathogen responsible for substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although S. pyogenes is a strictly human pathogen with no other known animal reservoir, several murine infection models exist to explore different aspects of the bacterial pathogenesis. Inoculating mice with wild-type S. pyogenes strains can result in the generation of new bacterial phenotypes that are hypervirulent compared to the original inoculum. In this study, we used a serial mass spectrometry based proteomics strategy to investigate if these hypervirulent strains have an altered distribution of virulence proteins across the intracellular, surface associated and secreted bacterial compartments and if any change in compartmentalization can alter the protein-protein interaction network between bacteria and host proteins. Quantitative analysis of the S. pyogenes surface and secreted proteomes revealed that animal passaged strains are associated with significantly higher amount of virulence factors on the bacterial surface and in the media. This altered virulence factor compartmentalization results in increased binding of several mouse plasma proteins to the bacterial surface, a trend that was consistent for mouse plasma from several different mouse strains. In general, both the wild-type strain and animal passaged strain were capable of binding high amounts of human plasma proteins. However, compared to the non-passaged strains, the animal passaged strains displayed an increased ability to bind mouse plasma proteins, in particular for M protein binders, indicating that the increased affinity for mouse blood plasma proteins is a consequence of host adaptation of this pathogen to a new host. In conclusion, plotting the total amount of virulence factors against the total amount of plasma proteins associated to the bacterial surface could clearly separate out animal passaged strains from wild type strains indicating a virulence model that could

  19. Factor H-IgG Chimeric Proteins as a Therapeutic Approach against the Gram-Positive Bacterial Pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Anna M; Magda, Michal; Kohl, Lisa; Shaughnessy, Jutamas; Lambris, John D; Ram, Sanjay; Ermert, David

    2017-12-01

    Bacteria can cause life-threatening infections, such as pneumonia, meningitis, or sepsis. Antibiotic therapy is a mainstay of treatment, although antimicrobial resistance has drastically increased over the years. Unfortunately, safe and effective vaccines against most pathogens have not yet been approved, and thus developing alternative treatments is important. We analyzed the efficiency of factor H (FH)6-7/Fc, a novel antibacterial immunotherapeutic protein against the Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes This protein is composed of two domains of complement inhibitor human FH (FH complement control protein modules 6 and 7) that bind to S. pyogenes , linked to the Fc region of IgG (FH6-7/Fc). FH6-7/Fc has previously been shown to enhance complement-dependent killing of, and facilitate bacterial clearance in, animal models of the Gram-negative pathogens Haemophilus influenzae and Neisseria meningitidis We hypothesized that activation of complement by FH6-7/Fc on the surface of Gram-positive bacteria such as S. pyogenes will enable professional phagocytes to eliminate the pathogen. We found that FH6-7/Fc alleviated S. pyogenes- induced sepsis in a transgenic mouse model expressing human FH ( S. pyogenes binds FH in a human-specific manner). Furthermore, FH6-7/Fc, which binds to protein H and selected M proteins, displaced FH from the bacterial surface, enhanced alternative pathway activation, and reduced bacterial blood burden by opsonophagocytosis in a C3-dependent manner in an ex vivo human whole-blood model. In conclusion, FH-Fc chimeric proteins could serve as adjunctive treatments against multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  20. Bacterial Superantigens Promote Acute Nasopharyngeal Infection by Streptococcus pyogenes in a Human MHC Class II-Dependent Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Katherine J.; Zeppa, Joseph J.; Wakabayashi, Adrienne T.; Xu, Stacey X.; Mazzuca, Delfina M.; Welch, Ian; Baroja, Miren L.; Kotb, Malak; Cairns, Ewa; Cleary, P. Patrick; Haeryfar, S. M. Mansour; McCormick, John K.

    2014-01-01

    Establishing the genetic determinants of niche adaptation by microbial pathogens to specific hosts is important for the management and control of infectious disease. Streptococcus pyogenes is a globally prominent human-specific bacterial pathogen that secretes superantigens (SAgs) as ‘trademark’ virulence factors. SAgs function to force the activation of T lymphocytes through direct binding to lateral surfaces of T cell receptors and class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC-II) molecules. S. pyogenes invariably encodes multiple SAgs, often within putative mobile genetic elements, and although SAgs are documented virulence factors for diseases such as scarlet fever and the streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS), how these exotoxins contribute to the fitness and evolution of S. pyogenes is unknown. Here we show that acute infection in the nasopharynx is dependent upon both bacterial SAgs and host MHC-II molecules. S. pyogenes was rapidly cleared from the nasal cavity of wild-type C57BL/6 (B6) mice, whereas infection was enhanced up to ∼10,000-fold in B6 mice that express human MHC-II. This phenotype required the SpeA superantigen, and vaccination with an MHC –II binding mutant toxoid of SpeA dramatically inhibited infection. Our findings indicate that streptococcal SAgs are critical for the establishment of nasopharyngeal infection, thus providing an explanation as to why S. pyogenes produces these potent toxins. This work also highlights that SAg redundancy exists to avoid host anti-SAg humoral immune responses and to potentially overcome host MHC-II polymorphisms. PMID:24875883

  1. Protective Mechanisms of Respiratory Tract Streptococci against Streptococcus pyogenes Biofilm Formation and Epithelial Cell Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Tomas; Riani, Catur; Koczan, Dirk; Standar, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococci [GAS]) encounter many streptococcal species of the physiological microbial biome when entering the upper respiratory tract of humans, leading to the question how GAS interact with these bacteria in order to establish themselves at this anatomic site and initiate infection. Here we show that S. oralis and S. salivarius in direct contact assays inhibit growth of GAS in a strain-specific manner and that S. salivarius, most likely via bacteriocin secretion, also exerts this effect in transwell experiments. Utilizing scanning electron microscopy documentation, we identified the tested strains as potent biofilm producers except for GAS M49. In mixed-species biofilms, S. salivarius dominated the GAS strains, while S. oralis acted as initial colonizer, building the bottom layer in mixed biofilms and thereby allowing even GAS M49 to form substantial biofilms on top. With the exception of S. oralis, artificial saliva reduced single-species biofilms and allowed GAS to dominate in mixed biofilms, although the overall two-layer structure was unchanged. When covered by S. oralis and S. salivarius biofilms, epithelial cells were protected from GAS adherence, internalization, and cytotoxic effects. Apparently, these species can have probiotic effects. The use of Affymetrix array technology to assess HEp-2 cell transcription levels revealed modest changes after exposure to S. oralis and S. salivarius biofilms which could explain some of the protective effects against GAS attack. In summary, our study revealed a protection effect of respiratory tract bacteria against an important airway pathogen and allowed a first in vitro insight into local environmental processes after GAS enter the respiratory tract. PMID:23241973

  2. Throat Carriage Rate and Antimicrobial Resistance of Streptococcus pyogenes In Rural Children in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpech, Gastón; Sparo, Mónica; Baldaccini, Beatriz; Pourcel, Gisela; Lissarrague, Sabina; García Allende, Leonardo

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic carriers of group A β-hemolytic streptococci (GAS) in children living in a rural community and to investigate the association between episodes of acute pharyngitis and carrier status. Throat swabs were collected from September to November 2013 among children 5-13 years of age from a rural community (Maria Ignacia-Vela, Argentina). The phenotypic characterization of isolates was performed by conventional tests. Antimicrobial susceptibility was assayed for penicillin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, erythromycin, and clindamycin (disk diffusion). The minimum inhibitory concentration was determined for penicillin, cefotaxime, tetracycline, and erythromycin. The carriage of β-hemolytic streptococci was detected in 18.1% of participants, with Streptococcus pyogenes in 18 participants followed by S. dysgalactiae ssp. equisimilis in 5. The highest proportion of GAS was found in 8 to 10-year-old children. No significant association between the number of episodes of acute pharyngitis suffered in the last year and the carrier state was detected ( p >0.05). Tetracycline resistance (55.5%) and macrolide-resistant phenotypes (11.1%) were observed. Resistance to penicillin, cefotaxime, or chloramphenicol was not expressed in any streptococcal isolate. The present study demonstrated significant throat carriage of GAS and the presence of group C streptococci ( S. dysgalactiae ssp. equisimilis ) in an Argentinian rural population. These results point out the need for continuous surveillance of GAS and non-GAS carriage as well as of antimicrobial resistance in highly susceptible populations, such as school-aged rural children. An extended surveillance program including school-aged children from different cities should be considered to estimate the prevalence of GAS carriage in Argentina.

  3. The Crystal Structure of Streptococcus pyogenes Uridine Phosphorylase Reveals a Distinct Subfamily of Nucleoside Phosphorylases

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    Tran, Timothy H.; Christoffersen, S.; Allan, Paula W.; Parker, William B.; Piskur, Jure; Serra, I.; Terreni, M.; Ealick, Steven E. (Cornell); (Pavia); (Lund); (Southern Research)

    2011-09-20

    Uridine phosphorylase (UP), a key enzyme in the pyrimidine salvage pathway, catalyzes the reversible phosphorolysis of uridine or 2'-deoxyuridine to uracil and ribose 1-phosphate or 2'-deoxyribose 1-phosphate. This enzyme belongs to the nucleoside phosphorylase I superfamily whose members show diverse specificity for nucleoside substrates. Phylogenetic analysis shows Streptococcus pyogenes uridine phosphorylase (SpUP) is found in a distinct branch of the pyrimidine subfamily of nucleoside phosphorylases. To further characterize SpUP, we determined the crystal structure in complex with the products, ribose 1-phosphate and uracil, at 1.8 {angstrom} resolution. Like Escherichia coli UP (EcUP), the biological unit of SpUP is a hexamer with an ?/? monomeric fold. A novel feature of the active site is the presence of His169, which structurally aligns with Arg168 of the EcUP structure. A second active site residue, Lys162, is not present in previously determined UP structures and interacts with O2 of uracil. Biochemical studies of wild-type SpUP showed that its substrate specificity is similar to that of EcUP, while EcUP is {approx}7-fold more efficient than SpUP. Biochemical studies of SpUP mutants showed that mutations of His169 reduced activity, while mutation of Lys162 abolished all activity, suggesting that the negative charge in the transition state resides mostly on uracil O2. This is in contrast to EcUP for which transition state stabilization occurs mostly at O4.

  4. The PerR-Regulated P1B-4-Type ATPase (PmtA) Acts as a Ferrous Iron Efflux Pump in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Andrew G; Ong, Cheryl-Lynn Y; Djoko, Karrera Y; West, Nicholas P; Davies, Mark R; McEwan, Alastair G; Walker, Mark J

    2017-06-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus [GAS]) is an obligate human pathogen responsible for a broad spectrum of human disease. GAS has a requirement for metal homeostasis within the human host and, as such, tightly modulates metal uptake and efflux during infection. Metal acquisition systems are required to combat metal sequestration by the host, while metal efflux systems are essential to protect against metal overload poisoning. Here, we investigated the function of PmtA ( P erR-regulated m etal t ransporter A ), a P 1B-4 -type ATPase efflux pump, in invasive GAS M1T1 strain 5448. We reveal that PmtA functions as a ferrous iron [Fe(II)] efflux system. In the presence of high Fe(II) concentrations, the 5448Δ pmtA deletion mutant exhibited diminished growth and accumulated 5-fold-higher levels of intracellular Fe(II) than did the wild type and the complemented mutant. The 5448Δ pmtA deletion mutant also showed enhanced susceptibility to killing by the Fe-dependent antibiotic streptonigrin as well as increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and superoxide. We suggest that the PerR-mediated control of Fe(II) efflux by PmtA is important for bacterial defense against oxidative stress. PmtA represents an exemplar for an Fe(II) efflux system in a host-adapted Gram-positive bacterial pathogen. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  5. Ongoing outbreak of invasive and non-invasive disease due to group A Streptococcus (GAS) type emm66 among homeless and people who inject drugs in England and Wales, January to December 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundle, Nick; Bubba, Laura; Coelho, Juliana; Kwiatkowska, Rachel; Cloke, Rachel; King, Sarah; Rajan-Iyer, Jill; Courtney-Pillinger, Max; Beck, Charles R; Hope, Vivian; Lamagni, Theresa; Brown, Colin S; Jermacane, Daiga; Glass, Rachel; Desai, Monica; Gobin, Maya; Balasegaram, Sooria; Anderson, Charlotte

    2017-01-19

    We report an outbreak of invasive and non-invasive disease due to an unusual type of Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus, emm66) among a vulnerable, largely homeless population in southern England and Wales, detected in September 2016. Twenty-seven confirmed cases were subsequently identified between 5 January and 29 December 2016; 20 injected drugs and six reported problematic alcohol use. To date, we have ruled out drug-related vehicles of infection and identified few common risk factors. This article is copyright of The Authors, 2017 .

  6. The post-vaccine microevolution of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, A.J.H.; Mobegi, F.M.; Jonge, M.I. de; Hijum, S.A.F.T. van; Meis, J.F.; Hermans, P.W.M.; Ferwerda, G.; Bentley, S.D.; Zomer, A.L.

    2015-01-01

    The 7-valent pneumococcal conjugated vaccine (PCV7) has affected the genetic population of Streptococcus pneumoniae in pediatric carriage. Little is known however about pneumococcal population genomics in adult invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) under vaccine pressure. We sequenced and serotyped

  7. In vitro activity of josamycin against Streptococcus pyogenes isolated from patients with upper respiratory tract infections in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auzou, M; Caillon, J; Poyart, C; Weber, P; Ploy, M-C; Leclercq, R; Cattoir, V

    2015-07-01

    The primary objective of our study was to obtain susceptibility data for josamycin against Streptococcus pyogenes isolated from patients presenting with upper respiratory tract infections in France. The secondary objective was to characterize the molecular mechanism of resistance in macrolide-resistant isolates. MICs of erythromycin, clarithromycin, azithromycin, josamycin, and clindamycin were determined by the broth microdilution method. Resistance genes erm(B), erm(TR), and mef(A) were screened by PCR. The MIC50 and MIC90 of josamycin against 193 isolates of S. pyogenes were 0.12 and 0.25mg/L, respectively, with a resistance rate estimated at 4.7%. Resistance was due to the erm(B) gene whereas strains harboring erm(TR) or mef(A) remained susceptible. Josamycin was active against >95% of S. pyogenes isolated from patients with upper respiratory tract infections, and can be used as an alternative for the treatment of pharyngitis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Inhibitory role of acyl homoserine lactones in hemolytic activity and viability of Streptococcus pyogenes M6 S165

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saroj, Sunil D.; Holmer, Linda; Berengueras, Júlia M.; Jonsson, Ann-Beth

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes an adapted human pathogen asymptomatically colonizes the nasopharynx, among other polymicrobial communities. However, information on the events leading to the colonization and expression of virulence markers subject to interspecies and host-bacteria interactions are limited. The interference of acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) with the hemolytic activity and viability of S. pyogenes M6 S165 was examined. AHLs, with fatty acid side chains ≥12 carbon atoms, inhibited hemolytic activity by downregulating the expression of the sag operon involved in the production of streptolysin S. Inhibitory AHLs upregulated the expression of transcriptional regulator LuxR. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed the interaction of LuxR with the region upstream of sagA. AHL-mediated bactericidal activity observed at higher concentrations (mM range) was an energy-dependent process, constrained by the requirement of glucose and iron. Ferrichrome transporter FtsABCD facilitated transport of AHLs across the streptococcal membrane. The study demonstrates a previously unreported role for AHLs in S. pyogenes virulence. PMID:28303956

  9. Evaluation of the Potency, Neutralizing Antibody Response, and Stability of a Recombinant Fusion Protein Vaccine for Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlet, E; HogenEsch, H; Dunham, A; Morefield, G

    2017-05-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes or group A streptococcus (GAS) is a Gram-positive bacterium that can cause a wide range of diseases, including pharyngitis, impetigo, scarlet fever, necrotizing fasciitis, rheumatic fever, and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. Despite the increasing burden on global health caused by GAS, there is currently no licensed vaccine available. In this study, we evaluated immunogenicity, induction of neutralizing antibodies, and stability of a new recombinant fusion protein vaccine that targets infections from GAS. The recombinant fusion protein (SpeAB) combines inactive mutant forms of streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin A (SpeA) and streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B (SpeB). The SpeAB vaccine evaluated in this study was adsorbed to an aluminum adjuvant and demonstrated robust immunogenicity, eliciting production of specific neutralizing antibodies against SpeA and SpeB, two major virulence factors of S. pyogenes. Stability studies suggest that the vaccine will retain immunogenicity for at least 2 years when stored at refrigerated temperatures. This novel vaccine shows great potential to provide protection against GAS infections and to reduce the burden of GAS disease globally.

  10. Molecular modeling and simulation of FabG, an enzyme involved in the fatty acid pathway of Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafreen, Rajamohmed Beema; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha

    2013-09-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (SP) is the major cause of pharyngitis accompanied by strep throat infections in humans. 3-keto acyl reductase (FabG), an important enzyme involved in the elongation cycle of the fatty acid pathway of S. pyogenes, is essential for synthesis of the cell-membrane, virulence factors and quorum sensing-related mechanisms. Targeting SPFabG may provide an important aid for the development of drugs against S. pyogenes. However, the absence of a crystal structure for FabG of S. pyogenes limits the development of structure-based drug designs. Hence, in the present study, a homology model of FabG was generated using the X-ray crystallographic structure of Aquifex aeolicus (PDB ID: 2PNF). The modeled structure was refined using energy minimization. Furthermore, active sites were predicted, and a large dataset of compounds was screened against SPFabG. The ligands were docked using the LigandFit module that is available from Discovery Studio version 2.5. From this list, 13 best hit ligands were chosen based on the docking score and binding energy. All of the 13 ligands were screened for Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, Excretion and Toxicity (ADMET) properties. From this, the two best descriptors, along with one descriptor that lay outside the ADMET plot, were selected for molecular dynamic (MD) simulation. In vitro testing of the ligands using biological assays further substantiated the efficacy of the ligands that were screened based on the in silico methods. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. PORTADORES ASSINTOMÁTICOS DE STREPTOCOCCUS PYOGENES E STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS ENTRE CRIANÇAS ATENDIDAS EM UMA CRECHE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Braoios

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes and Staphylococcus aureus are recognized as important infantile pathogens. Infections of pharynx caused by these microorganisms are common in individuals of 0 to 12 years. In children taken care in day-care center a serious problem of health can become, a time that the transmission in gives airmail and living together with assymptomathics carrier can unchain outbreak infections pharynx. Beyond of infection, S. pyogenes can unchain serious imunologycal sequels. The rheumatic fever and the glomerunephits are imunologycal riots that can cause cardiac and renals injuries. These pathologys demand continuous treatment to prevent re-infection. The precocious detection of assymptomathics carriers can help in the prevention of the sequels, through treatment prophylactic with antibiotics adequate. After the development of the sequel does not have available treatment for the cure of the patient. This work had for objective to detect assymptomathics carriers of S. pyogenes and S. aureus between childrens taken care of in the day-care center “Municipal Association of Minor’s Protection” in the city Presidente Bernardes, SP. For this way, oropharynx samples had been collected with aid of swab absorbed in barren physiological solution. After the culture of the samples, bacterial identification had been performed by conventional biochemistry techniques. Samples had been of 122 children of 0 to 6 years. In 10 children (8.2% were isolated S. aureus, and 2 children (1.6% were isolated S. pyogenes. Despite the low index of carriers, these few children who carry these microorganisms can become souces of contagion for the individuals that coexist together.

  12. In Vitro Activity of Antimicrobial Agents Against Streptococcus Pyogenes Isolates from patients with Acute Tonsillopharyngitis in Dakar, Senegal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gueye Ndiaye

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes (S. pyogenes is the most important causative agent of tonsillopharyngitis. Beta-lactam antibiotics, particularly penicillin, are the drug of first choice and macrolides are recommended for patients who are allergic to penicillin. However, other antibiotics are also used for the treatment of streptococcal tonsillopharyngitis. In recent years, the increase in the incidence of respiratory tract pathogens that are resistant to current antibacterial agents highlights the need to monitor the evolution of the resistance of these pathogens to antibiotics. In this study, we assess the susceptibility of 98 isolates of S. pyogenes to 16 antibiotics. The pathogens were recovered from patients with acute tonsillopharyngitis in Dakar, the Senegalese capital city, who were recruited from May 2005 to August 2006. All strains were susceptible to penicillin with low Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC = 0,016 mg/L. Amoxicillin had high activity (100% showing its importance in treatment of streptococcal infections. Cephalosporins had MIC90 values ranging from 0.016 to 0.094 mg/L. Macrolides have shown high activity. All strains were resistant to tetracyclin. Other molecules such as teicoplanin, levofloxacin and chloramphenicol were also active and would represent alternatives to treatment of tonsillopharyngitis due to this pathogen. These results indicate that no significant resistance to antibiotics was found among patients with tonsillopharyngitis studied in Dakar. Limitations of this study were that the number of isolates tested was small and all isolates were collected from one hospital in Dakar. Hence, results may not be representative of the isolates found, in the wider community or other regions of Senegal. Further studies are needed in other parts of Dakar and other geographic regions of Senegal, in order to better clarify the antibiotic susceptibility profile of S. pyogenes isolates recovered from patients with tonsillopharyngitis.

  13. Cloning of the gene encoding Streptococcin A-FF22, a novel lantibiotic produced by Streptococcus pyogenes, and determination of its nucleotide sequence.

    OpenAIRE

    Hynes, W L; Ferretti, J J; Tagg, J R

    1993-01-01

    Streptococcin A-FF22 (SA-FF22) is a lantibiotic produced by Streptococcus pyogenes FF22. The nucleotide sequence of the SA-FF22 structural gene (scnA) was determined and shown to encode a 51-amino-acid prepeptide. The proteolytic processing site of the SA-FF22 prepeptide differs from that which characterizes other type A lantibiotics.

  14. Complete Genome Sequences of emm111 Type Streptococcus pyogenes Strain GUR, with Antitumor Activity, and Its Derivative Strain GURSA1 with an Inactivated emm Gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suvorova, Maria A; Tsapieva, Anna N; Bak, Emilie Glad

    2017-01-01

    We present here the complete genome sequence of Streptococcus pyogenes type emm111 strain GUR, a throat isolate from a scarlet fever patient, which has been used to treat cancer patients in the former Soviet Union. We also present the complete genome sequence of its derivative strain GURSA1...

  15. Antibacterial resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS) from healthy carriers and tonsillitis patients and association with antibacterial sale in the Faroe Islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Marita D; Gaini, Shahin; Gislason, Hannes

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antibacterial resistance of Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS), and correlate the findings with the sales of erythromycin and tetracycline. General practitioners in the Faroe Islands were recruited to send oropharyngeal swabs. From an ongoing pneumococcal...

  16. CovRS-Regulated Transcriptome Analysis of a Hypervirulent M23 Strain of Group A Streptococcus pyogenes Provides New Insights into Virulence Determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yun-Juan; Liang, Zhong; Mayfield, Jeffrey A; Lee, Shaun W; Ploplis, Victoria A; Castellino, Francis J

    2015-10-01

    The two-component control of virulence (Cov) regulator (R)-sensor (S) (CovRS) regulates the virulence of Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus [GAS]). Inactivation of CovS during infection switches the pathogenicity of GAS to a more invasive form by regulating transcription of diverse virulence genes via CovR. However, the manner in which CovRS controls virulence through expression of extended gene families has not been fully determined. In the current study, the CovS-regulated gene expression profiles of a hypervirulent emm23 GAS strain (M23ND/CovS negative [M23ND/CovS(-)]) and a noninvasive isogenic strain (M23ND/CovS(+)), under different growth conditions, were investigated. RNA sequencing identified altered expression of ∼ 349 genes (18% of the chromosome). The data demonstrated that M23ND/CovS(-) achieved hypervirulence by allowing enhanced expression of genes responsible for antiphagocytosis (e.g., hasABC), by abrogating expression of toxin genes (e.g., speB), and by compromising gene products with dispensable functions (e.g., sfb1). Among these genes, several (e.g., parE and parC) were not previously reported to be regulated by CovRS. Furthermore, the study revealed that CovS also modulated the expression of a broad spectrum of metabolic genes that maximized nutrient utilization and energy metabolism during growth and dissemination, where the bacteria encounter large variations in available nutrients, thus restructuring metabolism of GAS for adaption to diverse growth environments. From constructing a genome-scale metabolic model, we identified 16 nonredundant metabolic gene modules that constitute unique nutrient sources. These genes were proposed to be essential for pathogen growth and are likely associated with GAS virulence. The genome-wide prediction of genes associated with virulence identifies new candidate genes that potentially contribute to GAS virulence. The CovRS system modulates transcription of ∼ 18% of the genes in the

  17. Molecular Characteristics of Erythromycin-Resistant Streptococcus pyogenes Strains Isolated from Children Patients in Tunis, Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksia, Sonia; Smaoui, Hanen; Hraoui, Manel; Bouafsoun, Aida; Boutiba-Ben Boubaker, Ihem; Kechrid, Amel

    2017-07-01

    The aims of our study were to characterize phenotypically and genotypically erythromycin-resistant Streptococcus pyogenes or group A streptococci (ERGAS) isolates, to evaluate macrolide resistance and to analyze the association between emm types and virulence factors. Included in this study were all ERGAS strains isolated from 2000 to 2013 at the Children's hospital of Tunis. Antimicrobial susceptibility was performed according to the CA-SFM guidelines. Macrolide resistance genes were revealed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Virulence factor genes (pyrogenic exotoxin genes and superantigen gene) were detected by PCR, and the emm types were defined by the sequencing of the variable 5' end of the emm gene. Among the 289 GAS isolates collected, 15 (5.2%) were resistant to erythromycin; 7 of the strains were assigned to the cMLS B phenotype (46.6%); 5 harbored ermB gene alone (33.3%); and 2 strains coharbored ermB and mefA (13.3%). The remaining (53.4%) were assigned to the M phenotype and harbored the mefA gene. The frequency of detection of each toxin gene among ERGAS was 13.4% for speA (2 strains), 53.4% for speC (8 strains), and 13.4% for ssa (2 strains). Emm types 1, 58, 11, and 78 were the most frequent among ERGAS strains. The distribution of the cMLS B and M phenotypes changed over the period of investigation with a decrement of cMLS B phenotype and ermB gene that predominated between 2000 and 2006 and an increase of M phenotype and mefA gene between 2007 and 2013, but this difference was nonstatistically significant because of the low number of resistant strains. Emm types 1, 58, and 4 were only present among strains assigned to the M phenotype. However strains assigned to the cMLS B phenotype were associated to emm11, emm22, emm28, emm78, or emm76. There was diversity in emm distribution in ERGAS between the two study periods. There was diversity in emm distribution among ERGAS particularly in 2000-2006. Indeed, from 2000 to 2006, the 6 ERGAS

  18. The ScpC Protease of Streptococcus pyogenes Affects the Outcome of Sepsis in a Murine Model ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjölinder, Hong; Lövkvist, Lena; Plant, Laura; Eriksson, Jens; Aro, Helena; Jones, Allison; Jonsson, Ann-Beth

    2008-01-01

    The ScpC protease of Streptococcus pyogenes degrades interleukin-8 (IL-8), a chemokine that mediates neutrophil transmigration and activation. The ability to degrade IL-8 differs dramatically among clinical isolates of S. pyogenes. Bacteria expressing ScpC overcome immune clearance by preventing the recruitment of neutrophils in soft tissue infection of mice. To study the role of ScpC in streptococcal sepsis, we generated an ScpC mutant that did not degrade IL-8 and thus failed to prevent the recruitment of immune cells as well as to cause disease after soft tissue infection. In a murine model of sepsis, challenge with the ScpC mutant resulted in more severe systemic disease with higher bacteremia levels and mortality than did challenge with the wild-type strain. As expected, the blood level of KC, the murine IL-8 homologue, increased in mice infected with the ScpC mutant. However, the elevated KC levels did not influence neutrophil numbers in blood, as it did in soft tissue, indicating that additional factors contributed to neutrophil transmigration in blood. In addition, the absence of ScpC increased tumor necrosis factor, IL-6, and C5a levels in blood, which contributed to disease severity. Thus, the ScpC mutant triggers high neutrophil infiltration but not lethal outcome after soft tissue infection, whereas intravenous infection leads to highly aggressive systemic disease. PMID:18573900

  19. The ScpC protease of Streptococcus pyogenes affects the outcome of sepsis in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjölinder, Hong; Lövkvist, Lena; Plant, Laura; Eriksson, Jens; Aro, Helena; Jones, Allison; Jonsson, Ann-Beth

    2008-09-01

    The ScpC protease of Streptococcus pyogenes degrades interleukin-8 (IL-8), a chemokine that mediates neutrophil transmigration and activation. The ability to degrade IL-8 differs dramatically among clinical isolates of S. pyogenes. Bacteria expressing ScpC overcome immune clearance by preventing the recruitment of neutrophils in soft tissue infection of mice. To study the role of ScpC in streptococcal sepsis, we generated an ScpC mutant that did not degrade IL-8 and thus failed to prevent the recruitment of immune cells as well as to cause disease after soft tissue infection. In a murine model of sepsis, challenge with the ScpC mutant resulted in more severe systemic disease with higher bacteremia levels and mortality than did challenge with the wild-type strain. As expected, the blood level of KC, the murine IL-8 homologue, increased in mice infected with the ScpC mutant. However, the elevated KC levels did not influence neutrophil numbers in blood, as it did in soft tissue, indicating that additional factors contributed to neutrophil transmigration in blood. In addition, the absence of ScpC increased tumor necrosis factor, IL-6, and C5a levels in blood, which contributed to disease severity. Thus, the ScpC mutant triggers high neutrophil infiltration but not lethal outcome after soft tissue infection, whereas intravenous infection leads to highly aggressive systemic disease.

  20. Bivalent mucosal peptide vaccines administered using the LCP carrier system stimulate protective immune responses against Streptococcus pyogenes infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Kai; Ebensen, Thomas; Chandrudu, Saranya; Skwarczynski, Mariusz; Toth, Istvan; Olive, Colleen; Guzman, Carlos A

    2017-11-01

    Despite the broad knowledge about the pathogenicity of Streptococcus pyogenes there is still a controversy about the correlate of protection in GAS infections. We aimed in further improving the immune responses stimulated against GAS comparing different vaccine formulations including bis-(3',5')-cyclic dimeric adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) and BPPCysMPEG, a derivative of the macrophage-activating lipopeptide (MALP-2), as adjuvants, respectively, to be administered with and without the universal T helper cell epitope P25 along with the optimized B cell epitope J14 of the M protein and B and T cell epitopes of SfbI. Lipopeptide based nano carrier systems (LCP) were used for efficient antigen delivery across the mucosal barrier. The stimulated immune responses were efficient in protecting mice against a respiratory challenge with a lethal dose of a heterologous S. pyogenes strain. Moreover, combination of the LCP based peptide vaccine with c-di-AMP allowed reduction of antigen dose at the same time maintaining vaccine efficacy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular epidemiological characteristics of Streptococcus pyogenes strains involved in an outbreak of scarlet fever in China, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yuan Hai; Song, Yan Yan; Yan, Xiao Mei; Wang, Hai Bin; Zhang, Meng Han; Tao, Xiao Xia; Li, Lei Lei; Zhang, Yu Xin; Jiang, Xi Hong; Zhang, Bing Hua; Zhou, Hao; Xiao, Di; Jin, Lian Mei; Feng, Zi Jian; Luo, Feng Ji; Zhang, Jian Zhong

    2013-11-01

    To investigate molecular characterization of streptococcus pyogenes isolates involved in an outbreak of scarlet fever in China in 2011. Seventy-four Streptococcal pyogenes involved in an outbreak of scarlet fever were isolated from pediatric patients in the areas with high incidence in China from May to August of 2011. Emm genotyping, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), superantigen (SAg) genes and antimicrobial susceptibility profiling were analyzed for these isolates. A total of 4 different emm types were identified. Emm12 was the most prevalent type which contained four predominating PFGE patterns corresponding to four different virulence and superantigen profiles. Emm12 (79.7%) and emm1 (14.9%) accounted for approximately 94% of all the isolates. The speA gene was all negative in emm12 isolates and positive in emm1 isolates. All strains were resistant to erythromycin, and 89.4% of them were resistant to erythromycin, tracycline, and clindamycin simultaneously. Several highly diversified clones with a high macrolide resistance rate comprise a predominant proportion of circulating strains, though no new emm type was found in this outbreak. The data provide a baseline for further surveillance of scarlet fever, which may contribute to the explanation of the outbreak and development of a GAS vaccine in China. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  2. The YvqE two-component system controls biofilm formation and acid production in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaka, Masanori; Tatsuno, Ichiro; Maeyama, Jun-Ichi; Matsui, Hideyuki; Zhang, Yan; Hasegawa, Tadao

    2016-07-01

    In Streptococcus pyogenes, proteins involved in determining virulence are controlled by stand-alone response regulators and by two-component regulatory systems. Previous studies reported that, compared to the parental strain, the yvqE sensor knockout strain showed significantly reduced growth and lower virulence. To determine the function of YvqE, we performed biofilm analysis and pH assays on yvqE mutants, and site-directed mutagenesis of YvqE. The yvqE deletion mutant showed a slower acid production rate, indicating that YvqE regulates acid production from sugar fermentation. The mutant strain, in which the Asp(26) residue in YvqE was replaced with Asn, affected biofilm formation, suggesting that this amino acid senses hydrogen ions produced by fermentative sugar metabolism. Signals received by YvqE were directly or indirectly responsible for inducing pilus expression. This study shows that at low environmental pH, biofilm formation in S. pyogenes is mediated by YvqE and suggests that regulation of pilus expression by environmental acidification could be directly under the control of YvqE. © 2016 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Correlation between genetic features of the mef(A)-msr(D) locus and erythromycin resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitali, Luca Agostino; Di Luca, Maria Chiara; Prenna, Manuela; Petrelli, Dezemona

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the correlation between the genetic variation within mef(A)-msr(D) determinants of efflux-mediated erythromycin resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes and the level of erythromycin resistance. Twenty-eight mef(A)-positive strains were selected according to erythromycin MIC (4-32 μg/mL), and their mef(A)-msr(D) regions were sequenced. Strains were classified according to the bacteriophage carrying mef(A)-msr(D). A new Φm46.1 genetic variant was found in 8 strains out of 28 and named VP_00501.1. Degree of allelic variation was higher in mef(A) than in msr(D). Hotspots for recombination were mapped within the locus that could have shaped the apparent mosaic structure of the region. There was a general correlation between mef(A)-msr(D) sequence and erythromycin resistance level. However, lysogenic conversion of susceptible strains by mef(A)-msr(D)-carrying Φm46.1 indicated that key determinants may not all reside within the mef(A)-msr(D) locus and that horizontal gene transfer could contribute to changes in the level of antibiotic resistance in S. pyogenes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the tRNA-specific adenosine deaminase from Streptococcus pyogenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ku, Min-Je [Functional Proteomics Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, 39-1 Hawolgok-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Won-Ho [Functional Proteomics Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, 39-1 Hawolgok-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Ki-hyun; Rhee, Kyeong-hee [Biomedical Research Center, Life Science Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, 39-1 Hawolgok-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ki-Seog [Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eunice EunKyung [Biomedical Research Center, Life Science Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, 39-1 Hawolgok-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Myung-Hee [Functional Proteomics Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, 39-1 Hawolgok-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Kwang Yeon, E-mail: hwangky@kist.re.kr [Biomedical Research Center, Life Science Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, 39-1 Hawolgok-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Functional Proteomics Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, 39-1 Hawolgok-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-04-01

    The tRNA-specific adenosine deaminase from the pathogenic bacteria S. pyogenes has been overexpressed and crystallized. The tRNA-specific adenosine deaminase from the pathogenic bacteria Streptococcus pyogenes (spTAD) has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli and crystallized in the presence of Zn{sup 2+} ion at 295 K using ammonium sulfate as a precipitant. Flash-cooled crystals of spTAD diffracted to 2.0 Å using 30%(v/v) glycerol as a cryoprotectant. X-ray diffraction data have been collected to 2.0 Å using synchrotron radiation. The crystal belongs to the tetragonal space group P4{sub 2}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 81.042, c = 81.270 Å. The asymmetric unit contains one subunit of spTAD, with a corresponding crystal volume per protein weight (V{sub M}) of 3.3 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and a solvent content of 62.7%.

  5. Group A Streptococcus tissue invasion by CD44-mediated cell signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cywes, Colette; Wessels, Michael R.

    2001-12-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (also known as group A Streptococcus, GAS), the agent of streptococcal sore throat and invasive soft-tissue infections, attaches to human pharyngeal or skin epithelial cells through specific recognition of its hyaluronic acid capsular polysaccharide by the hyaluronic-acid-binding protein CD44 (refs 1, 2). Because ligation of CD44 by hyaluronic acid can induce epithelial cell movement on extracellular matrix, we investigated whether molecular mimicry by the GAS hyaluronic acid capsule might induce similar cellular responses. Here we show that CD44-dependent GAS binding to polarized monolayers of human keratinocytes induced marked cytoskeletal rearrangements manifested by membrane ruffling and disruption of intercellular junctions. Transduction of the signal induced by GAS binding to CD44 on the keratinocyte surface involved Rac1 and the cytoskeleton linker protein ezrin, as well as tyrosine phosphorylation of cellular proteins. Studies of bacterial translocation in two models of human skin indicated that cell signalling triggered by interaction of the GAS capsule with CD44 opened intercellular junctions and promoted tissue penetration by GAS through a paracellular route. These results support a model of host cytoskeleton manipulation and tissue invasion by an extracellular bacterial pathogen.

  6. Streptococcus pyogenes Phospholipase A2 Induces the Expression of Adhesion Molecules on Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells and Aorta of Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Masataka; Domon, Hisanori; Kurosawa, Mie; Isono, Toshihito; Maekawa, Tomoki; Yamaguchi, Masaya; Kawabata, Shigetada; Terao, Yutaka

    2017-01-01

    The Streptococcus pyogenes phospholipase A 2 (SlaA) gene is highly conserved in the M3 serotype of group A S. pyogenes , which often involves hypervirulent clones. However, the role of SlaA in S. pyogenes pathogenesis is unclear. Herein, we report that SlaA induces the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM1) via the arachidonic acid signaling cascade. Notably, recombinant SlaA induced ICAM1 and VCAM1 expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), resulting in enhanced adhesion of human monocytic leukemia (THP-1) cells. However, C134A, a variant enzyme with no enzymatic activity, did not induce such events. In addition, culture supernatants from S. pyogenes SSI-1 enhanced the adhesion of THP-1 cells to HUVECs, but culture supernatants from the Δ slaA isogenic mutant strain had limited effects. Aspirin, a cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitor, prevented the adhesion of THP-1 cells to HUVECs and did not induce ICAM1 and VCAM1 expression in HUVECs treated with SlaA. However, zileuton, a 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor, did not exhibit such effects. Furthermore, pre-administration of aspirin in mice intravenously injected with SlaA attenuated the transcriptional abundance of ICAM1 and VCAM1 in the aorta. These results suggested that SlaA from S. pyogenes stimulates the expression of adhesion molecules in vascular endothelial cells. Thus, SlaA contributes to the inflammation of vascular endothelial cells upon S. pyogenes infection.

  7. The molecular mechanism of N-acetylglucosamine side-chain attachment to the Lancefield group A carbohydrate in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, Jeffrey S; Edgar, Rebecca J; Deng, Pan; Chen, Jing; Zhu, Haining; van Sorge, Nina M; Morris, Andrew J; Korotkov, Konstantin V; Korotkova, Natalia

    2017-11-24

    In many Lactobacillales species ( i.e. lactic acid bacteria), peptidoglycan is decorated by polyrhamnose polysaccharides that are critical for cell envelope integrity and cell shape and also represent key antigenic determinants. Despite the biological importance of these polysaccharides, their biosynthetic pathways have received limited attention. The important human pathogen, Streptococcus pyogenes , synthesizes a key antigenic surface polymer, the Lancefield group A carbohydrate (GAC). GAC is covalently attached to peptidoglycan and consists of a polyrhamnose polymer, with N -acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) side chains, which is an essential virulence determinant. The molecular details of the mechanism of polyrhamnose modification with GlcNAc are currently unknown. In this report, using molecular genetics, analytical chemistry, and mass spectrometry analysis, we demonstrated that GAC biosynthesis requires two distinct undecaprenol-linked GlcNAc-lipid intermediates: GlcNAc-pyrophosphoryl-undecaprenol (GlcNAc-P-P-Und) produced by the GlcNAc-phosphate transferase GacO and GlcNAc-phosphate-undecaprenol (GlcNAc-P-Und) produced by the glycosyltransferase GacI. Further investigations revealed that the GAC polyrhamnose backbone is assembled on GlcNAc-P-P-Und. Our results also suggested that a GT-C glycosyltransferase, GacL, transfers GlcNAc from GlcNAc-P-Und to polyrhamnose. Moreover, GacJ, a small membrane-associated protein, formed a complex with GacI and significantly stimulated its catalytic activity. Of note, we observed that GacI homologs perform a similar function in Streptococcus agalactiae and Enterococcus faecalis In conclusion, the elucidation of GAC biosynthesis in S. pyogenes reported here enhances our understanding of how other Gram-positive bacteria produce essential components of their cell wall. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Oral immunization of mice with engineered Lactobacillus gasseri NM713 strain expressing Streptococcus pyogenes M6 antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Nahla M; Abdelaziz, Sahar A

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this in vivo study was to evaluate the effects of a recombinant probiotic strain, Lactobacillus gasseri NM713, which expresses the conserved region of streptococcal M6 protein (CRR6), as an oral vaccine against Streptococcus pyogenes. A dose of 10(9) cells of the recombinant strain in 150 μL PBS buffer was administered orally to a group of mice. One control group received an equivalent dose of Lb. gasseri NM613 (containing the empty plasmid without insert) or and another control group received PBS buffer. Each group contained 30 mice. The immunization protocol was followed on three consecutive days, after which two booster doses were administered at two week intervals. Fecal and serum samples were collected from the mice on Days 18, 32, 46, 58 after the first immunization and Day 0 prior to immunization. Anti-CRR6 IgA and IgG concentrations were measured by ELISA in fecal and sera samples, respectively, to assess immune responses. Vaccination with the recombinant Lb. gasseri NM713 strain induced significant protection after nasal challenge with S. pyogenes, only a small percentage of this group developing streptococcal infection (10%) or dying of it (3.3%) compared with the NM613 and PBS control groups, high percentages of which developed streptococcal infection (43.3% and 46.7%, respectively) and died of it (46.7% and 53%, respectively). These results indicate that recombinant Lb. gasseri NM713 has potential as an oral delivery vaccine against streptococcus group A. © 2016 The Societies and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  9. Case report of the family transmission of Streptococcus pyogenes orbital cellulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christelle Doyon, MD

    2017-06-01

    Conclusions and importance: To our knowledge, this is the first case ever reported of family transmission of orbital cellulitis. This highlights the importance of early diagnosis and treatment of S pyogenes, and the role of throat cultures as means of diagnosis even in the absence of symptoms or signs of pharyngitis.

  10. Use of a Phosphorylation Site Mutant To Identify Distinct Modes of Gene Repression by the Control of Virulence Regulator (CovR) in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstmann, Nicola; Sahasrabhojane, Pranoti; Yao, Hui; Su, Xiaoping; Shelburne, Samuel A

    2017-09-15

    Control of the virulence regulator/sensor kinase (CovRS) two-component system (TCS) serves as a model for investigating the impact of signaling pathways on the pathogenesis of Gram-positive bacteria. However, the molecular mechanisms by which CovR, an OmpR/PhoB family response regulator, controls virulence gene expression are poorly defined, partly due to the labile nature of its aspartate phosphorylation site. To better understand the regulatory effect of phosphorylated CovR, we generated the phosphorylation site mutant strain 10870-CovR-D53E, which we predicted to have a constitutive CovR phosphorylation phenotype. Interestingly, this strain showed CovR activity only for a subset of the CovR regulon, which allowed for classification of CovR-influenced genes into D53E-regulated and D53E-nonregulated groups. Inspection of the promoter sequences of genes belonging to each group revealed distinct promoter architectures with respect to the location and number of putative CovR-binding sites. Electrophoretic mobility shift analysis demonstrated that recombinant CovR-D53E protein retains its ability to bind promoter DNA from both CovR-D53E-regulated and -nonregulated groups, implying that factors other than mere DNA binding are crucial for gene regulation. In fact, we found that CovR-D53E is incapable of dimerization, a process thought to be critical to OmpR/PhoB family regulator function. Thus, our global analysis of CovR-D53E indicates dimerization-dependent and dimerization-independent modes of CovR-mediated repression, thereby establishing distinct mechanisms by which this critical regulator coordinates virulence gene expression. IMPORTANCE Streptococcus pyogenes causes a wide variety of diseases, ranging from superficial skin and throat infections to life-threatening invasive infections. To establish these various disease manifestations, Streptococcus pyogenes requires tightly coordinated production of its virulence factor repertoire. Here, the response regulator

  11. Citrulline protects Streptococcus pyogenes from acid stress using the arginine deiminase pathway and the F1Fo-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusumano, Zachary T; Caparon, Michael G

    2015-04-01

    A common stress encountered by both pathogenic and environmental bacteria is exposure to a low-pH environment, which can inhibit cell growth and lead to cell death. One major defense mechanism against this stress is the arginine deiminase (ADI) pathway, which catabolizes arginine to generate two ammonia molecules and one molecule of ATP. While this pathway typically relies on the utilization of arginine, citrulline has also been shown to enter into the pathway and contribute to protection against acid stress. In the pathogenic bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes, the utilization of citrulline has been demonstrated to contribute to pathogenesis in a murine model of soft tissue infection, although the mechanism underlying its role in infection is unknown. To gain insight into this question, we analyzed a panel of mutants defective in different steps in the ADI pathway to dissect how arginine and citrulline protect S. pyogenes in a low-pH environment. While protection provided by arginine utilization occurred through the buffering of the extracellular environment, citrulline catabolism protection was pH independent, requiring the generation of ATP via the ADI pathway and a functional F1Fo-ATP synthase. This work demonstrates that arginine and citrulline catabolism protect against acid stress through distinct mechanisms and have unique contributions to virulence during an infection. An important aspect of bacterial pathogenesis is the utilization of host-derived nutrients during an infection for growth and virulence. Previously published work from our lab identified a unique role for citrulline catabolism in Streptococcus pyogenes during a soft tissue infection. The present article probes the role of citrulline utilization during this infection and its contribution to protection against acid stress. This work reveals a unique and concerted action between the catabolism of citrulline and the F1Fo-ATPase that function together to provide protection for bacteria in a low

  12. Streptococcus pyogenes strains in Sao Paulo, Brazil: molecular characterization as a basis for StreptInCor coverage capacity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freschi de Barros, Samar; De Amicis, Karine Marafigo; Alencar, Raquel; Smeesters, Pierre Robert; Trunkel, Ariel; Postól, Edilberto; Almeida Junior, João Nóbrega; Rossi, Flavia; Pignatari, Antonio Carlos Campos; Kalil, Jorge; Guilherme, Luiza

    2015-08-05

    Several human diseases are caused by Streptococcus pyogenes, ranging from common infections to autoimmunity. Characterization of the most prevalent strains worldwide is a useful tool for evaluating the coverage capacity of vaccines under development. In this study, a collection of S. pyogenes strains from Sao Paulo, Brazil, was analyzed to describe the diversity of strains and assess the vaccine coverage capacity of StreptInCor. Molecular epidemiology of S. pyogenes strains was performed by emm-genotyping the 229 isolates from different clinical sites, and PCR was used for superantigen profile analysis. The emm-pattern and tissue tropism for these M types were also predicted and compared based on the emm-cluster classification. The strains were fit into 12 different emm-clusters, revealing a diverse phylogenetic origin and, consequently, different mechanisms of infection and escape of the host immune system. Forty-eight emm-types were distinguished in 229 samples, and the 10 most frequently observed types accounted for 69 % of all isolates, indicating a diverse profile of circulating strains comparable to other countries under development. A similar proportion of E and A-C emm-patterns were observed, whereas pattern D was less frequent, indicating that the strains of this collection primarily had a tissue tropism for the throat. In silico analysis of the coverage capacity of StreptInCor, an M protein-conserved regionally based vaccine candidate developed by our group, had a range of 94.5 % to 59.7 %, with a mean of 71.0 % identity between the vaccine antigen and the predicted amino acid sequence of the emm-types included here. This is the first report of S. pyogenes strain characterization in Sao Paulo, one of the largest cities in the world; thus, the strain panel described here is a representative sample for vaccine coverage capacity analysis. Our results enabled evaluation of StreptInCor candidate vaccine coverage capacity against diverse M-types, indicating

  13. Antibiotic susceptibility in Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pyogenes in Pakistan: a review of results from the Survey of Antibiotic Resistance (SOAR) 2002-15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, A; Hasan, R; Nizamuddin, S; Mahmood, N; Mukhtar, S; Ali, F; Morrissey, I; Barker, K; Torumkuney, D

    2016-05-01

    To investigate changes in the antibiotic susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pyogenes from the Survey of Antibiotic Resistance (SOAR) in community-acquired respiratory tract infections (CA-RTIs) between 2002 and 2015 in Pakistan. This is a review based on previously published studies from 2002-03, 2004-06 and 2007-09 and also new data from 2014-15. Susceptibility was determined by Etest(®) or disc diffusion according to CLSI and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) breakpoints. A total of 706 isolates from CA-RTIs comprising 381 S. pneumoniae, 230 H. influenzae and 95 S. pyogenes were collected between 2002 and 2015 and tested against a range of antibiotics. Antibiotic resistance in S. pneumoniae rose steeply from 2002 to 2009, with isolates non-susceptible to penicillin and macrolides increasing from 10% to 34.1% and from 13%-14% to 29.7%, respectively. Susceptibility to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (and by inference amoxicillin) remained between 99.4% and 100% from 2002 to 2015. Over the years, the prevalence of susceptibility to cefuroxime was 98%-100% among S. pneumoniae. Resistance in S. pneumoniae to some older antibiotics between 2007 and 2009 was high (86.8% for trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and 57.2% for tetracycline). Between 2002 and 2015, ampicillin resistance (β-lactamase-positive strains) among H. influenzae has remained low (between 2.6% and 3.2%) and almost unchanged over the years (H. influenzae was not tested during 2004-06). For S. pyogenes isolates, macrolide resistance reached 22%; however, susceptibility to penicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and cefuroxime remained stable at 100%. In S. pneumoniae from Pakistan, there has been a clear reduction in susceptibility to key antibiotics since 2002, but not to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (amoxicillin) or cefuroxime. However, susceptibility in H. influenzae has remained stable. Local antibiotic susceptibility/resistance data are essential to

  14. [S. Pyogenes invasive disease in a paediatric hospital: 1996-2009].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, Joana Serra; Neto, Paula; Alves, Manuela Costa; Rodrigues, Fernanda

    2010-01-01

    S. pyogenes is among the most common bacteria in Pediatrics, and is associated with a wide variety of infections and large range of severity. The aim was to evaluate trends of Group A Streptococcal invasive disease in a paediatric tertiary hospital. Retrospective analyses of the medical records of all children with group A streptococcal invasive disease (positive culture obtained from sterile sites), from January 1996 to December 2009 (14 years). There were 24 cases, with a maximum of four cases/year. Eighteen cases (75%) ocurred in the second half of the study. Sixty-seven percent were boys and the median age was three years. The most frequent clinical manifestations were fever (79%), rash (54%) and arthalgia/limbs' pain (46%). The diagnoses were bacteriemia (six), osteoarticular infection (five), celulitis (three), pyomyositis, mastoiditis, surgical wound infection, toxic shock syndrome (two each), necrotizing fasciitis and pneumonia (one each). Four cases occurred during the course of varicella. Other risk factors were present in six cases. Median neutrophyl count was 10.690 x 105/L (2.013-19.180 x 105/L) and median C reactive protein was 146 mg/L (3-425 mg/L). Bacteria were isolated mainly from blood (71%). The outcome was good for most cases but there were two deaths due to toxic shock syndrome. M typing and the presence of virulence factors genes were not assessed. Although the number is small, there was an increase of S. pyogenes invasive disease in the second half of the study. Several cases occurred in the course of varicela or in the presence of other risk factors. Fatal outcome was associated with two toxic shock syndrome cases. Microbiological investigation is essential to understand which M types or virulence factors genes are involved.

  15. Factor H binds to the hypervariable region of many Streptococcus pyogenes M proteins but does not promote phagocytosis resistance or acute virulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Caj Ulrik Mattias; Lannergård, Jonas; Nilsson, Olof Rickard

    2013-01-01

    Many pathogens express a surface protein that binds the human complement regulator factor H (FH), as first described for Streptococcus pyogenes and the antiphagocytic M6 protein. It is commonly assumed that FH recruited to an M protein enhances virulence by protecting the bacteria against...... complement deposition and phagocytosis, but the role of FH-binding in S. pyogenes pathogenesis has remained unclear and controversial. Here, we studied seven purified M proteins for ability to bind FH and found that FH binds to the M5, M6 and M18 proteins but not the M1, M3, M4 and M22 proteins. Extensive...... to an M protein promotes virulence, studies in transgenic mice did not demonstrate a role for bound FH during acute infection. Moreover, phagocytosis tests indicated that ability to bind FH is neither sufficient nor necessary for S. pyogenes to resist killing in whole human blood. While these data shed...

  16. Adaptive Immunity against Streptococcus pyogenes in Adults Involves Increased IFN-gamma and IgG3 Responses Compared with Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Rasmus; Nissen, Thomas Norrelykke; Blauenfeldt, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Each year, millions of people are infected with Streptococcus pyogenes, leading to an estimated 500,000 annual deaths worldwide. For unknown reasons, school-aged children have substantially higher infection rates than adults. The goal for this study was to provide, to our knowledge, the first...... detailed characterization of the human adaptive immune response against S. pyogenes in both children and adults. We report that all adults in our study, as well as most children, showed immunity against the two conserved group A streptococci (GAS) Ags, streptococcal C5a peptidase and immunogenic secreted...... significantly with IFN-γ, but not with IL-5, IL-13, IL-17, or TNF-α. Interestingly, children showed a similar pattern of Ag-specific cytokine release, but displayed significantly lower levels of IgG3 and IFN-γ compared with adults. Thus, human immune responses against S. pyogenes consist of a robust Th1...

  17. Superoxide anions produced by Streptococcus pyogenes group A-stimulated keratinocytes are responsible for cellular necrosis and bacterial growth inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnier, Elodie; Grange, Philippe A; Ollagnier, Guillaume; Crickx, Etienne; Elie, Laetitia; Chouzenoux, Sandrine; Weill, Bernard; Plainvert, Céline; Poyart, Claire; Batteux, Frédéric; Dupin, Nicolas

    2016-02-01

    Gram-positive Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus or GAS) is a major skin pathogen and interacts with keratinocytes in cutaneous tissues. GAS can cause diverse suppurative and inflammatory infections, such as cellulitis, a common acute bacterial dermo-hypodermitis with a high morbidity. Bacterial isolation yields from the lesions are low despite the strong local inflammation observed, raising numerous questions about the pathogenesis of the infection. Using an in vitro model of GAS-infected keratinocytes, we show that the major ROS produced is the superoxide anion ([Formula: see text]), and that its production is time- and dose-dependent. Using specific modulators of ROS production, we show that [Formula: see text] is mainly synthesized by the cytoplasmic NADPH oxidase. Superoxide anion production leads to keratinocyte necrosis but incomplete inhibition of GAS growth, suggesting that GAS may be partially resistant to the oxidative burst. In conclusion, GAS-stimulated keratinocytes are able to develop an innate immune response based on the production of ROS. This local immune response limits GAS development and induces keratinocyte cell death, resulting in the skin lesions observed in patients with cellulitis. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Serotype-specific mortality from invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae disease revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martens, Pernille; Worm, Signe Westring; Lundgren, Bettina

    2004-01-01

    Serotype-specific mortality from invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae disease revisited.Martens P, Worm SW, Lundgren B, Konradsen HB, Benfield T. Department of Infectious Diseases 144, Hvidovre University Hospital, DK-2650 Hvidovre, Denmark. pernillemartens@yahoo.com BACKGROUND: Invasive infection w...... pneumococcal disease. The limitations of the current polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccine warrant the development of alternative vaccines. We suggest that the virulence of pneumococcal serotypes should be considered in the design of novel vaccines....

  19. Necrotizing soft tissue infections caused by Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis of groups C and G in western Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruun, T; Kittang, B R; de Hoog, B J; Aardal, S; Flaatten, H K; Langeland, N; Mylvaganam, H; Vindenes, H A; Skrede, S

    2013-12-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus, GAS) is a major cause of necrotizing soft tissue infection (NSTI). On rare occasions, other β-haemolytic streptococci may also cause NSTI, but the significance and nature of these infections has not been thoroughly investigated. In this study, clinical and molecular characteristics of NSTI caused by GAS and β-haemolytic Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis of groups C and G (GCS/GGS) in western Norway during 2000-09 are presented. Clinical data were included retrospectively. The bacterial isolates were subsequently emm typed and screened for the presence of genes encoding streptococcal superantigens. Seventy cases were identified, corresponding to a mean annual incidence rate of 1.4 per 100 000. Sixty-one of the cases were associated with GAS, whereas GCS/GGS accounted for the remaining nine cases. The in-hospital case fatality rates of GAS and GCS/GGS disease were 11% and 33%, respectively. The GCS/GGS patients were older, had comorbidities more often and had anatomically more superficial disease than the GAS patients. High age and toxic shock syndrome were associated with mortality. The Laboratory Risk Indicator for Necrotizing Fasciitis laboratory score showed high values (≥6) in only 31 of 67 cases. Among the available 42 GAS isolates, the most predominant emm types were emm1, emm3 and emm4. The virulence gene profiles were strongly correlated to emm type. The number of superantigen genes was low in the four available GCS/GGS isolates. Our findings indicate a high frequency of streptococcal necrotizing fasciitis in our community. GCS/GGS infections contribute to the disease burden, but differ from GAS cases in frequency and predisposing factors. © 2013 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2013 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  20. Intergenic Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Polymorphism Upstream of rocA Alters Toxin Production and Enhances Virulence in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Luchang; Olsen, Randall J; Horstmann, Nicola; Shelburne, Samuel A; Fan, Jia; Hu, Ye; Musser, James M

    2016-07-01

    Variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) polymorphisms are ubiquitous in bacteria. However, only a small fraction of them has been functionally studied. Here, we report an intergenic VNTR polymorphism that confers an altered level of toxin production and increased virulence in Streptococcus pyogenes The nature of the polymorphism is a one-unit deletion in a three-tandem-repeat locus upstream of the rocA gene encoding a sensor kinase. S. pyogenes strains with this type of polymorphism cause human infection and produce significantly larger amounts of the secreted cytotoxins S. pyogenes NADase (SPN) and streptolysin O (SLO). Using isogenic mutant strains, we demonstrate that deleting one or more units of the tandem repeats abolished RocA production, reduced CovR phosphorylation, derepressed multiple CovR-regulated virulence factors (such as SPN and SLO), and increased virulence in a mouse model of necrotizing fasciitis. The phenotypic effect of the VNTR polymorphism was nearly the same as that of inactivating the rocA gene. In summary, we identified and characterized an intergenic VNTR polymorphism in S. pyogenes that affects toxin production and virulence. These new findings enhance understanding of rocA biology and the function of VNTR polymorphisms in S. pyogenes. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Lactobacillus plantarum reduces Streptococcus pyogenes virulence by modulating the IL-17, IL-23 and Toll-like receptor 2/4 expressions in human epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Antonietta; Losacco, Antonio; Carratelli, Caterina Romano; Domenico, Marina Di; Bevilacqua, Nazario

    2013-10-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a common colonizer of the mucosal layers in the mouth, nose, and pharynx but it is also a major Gram-positive human pathogen that causes infections ranging from pharyngitis to severe systemic diseases. The lactobacilli colonize the oral tracts and are known to protect against colonization by many pathogens. Epithelial cells participate in the innate host defense by expressing a variety of proinflammatory cytokines and TLRs in the interaction with microorganisms. The potentially probiotic strain Lactobacillus plantarum was investigated for its capacity to influence the innate immune response of HEp-2 and A549 epithelial cells to S. pyogenes infection. In both epithelial cell types, pre-treatment with L. plantarum showed inhibition of S. pyogenes growth and a greater decrease in IL-17 and IL-23 levels compared to the control. Pre-treatment with the anti-TLR2/4 antibody abolished the inhibitory effects of L. plantarum on IL-17 and IL-23 production following S. pyogenes infection, indicating that L. plantarum downregulates TLR2/4-dependent IL-17 and IL-23 production. Overall, our findings suggest that in epithelial cell cultures with S. pyogenes, cytokine responses are modulated by the presence of L. plantarum through the induction of TLR2/TLR4. © 2013.

  2. Local activation of coagulation factor XIII reduces systemic complications and improves the survival of mice after Streptococcus pyogenes M1 skin infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deicke, Christin; Chakrakodi, Bhavya; Pils, Marina C; Dickneite, Gerhard; Johansson, Linda; Medina, Eva; Loof, Torsten G

    2016-11-01

    Coagulation is a mechanism for wound healing after injury. Several recent studies delineate an additional role of the intrinsic pathway of coagulation, also known as the contact system, in the early innate immune response against bacterial infections. In this study, we investigated the role of factor XIII (FXIII), which is activated upon coagulation induction, during Streptococcus pyogenes-mediated skin and soft tissue infections. FXIII has previously been shown to be responsible for the immobilization of bacteria within a fibrin network which may prevent systemic bacterial dissemination. In order to investigate if the FXIII-mediated entrapment of S. pyogenes also influences the disease outcome we used a murine S. pyogenes M1 skin and soft tissue infection model. Here, we demonstrate that a lack of FXIII leads to prolonged clotting times, increased signs of inflammation, and elevated bacterial dissemination. Moreover, FXIII-deficient mice show an impaired survival when compared with wildtype animals. Additionally, local reconstitution of FXIII-deficient mice with a human FXIII-concentrate (Fibrogammin ® P) could reduce the systemic complications, suggesting a protective role for FXIII during early S. pyogenes skin infection. FXIII therefore might be a possible therapeutically application to support the early innate immune response during skin infections caused by S. pyogenes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Sensibilidad antimicrobiana y caracterización de cepas de Streptococcus pyogenes aisladas de un brote de escarlatina Antimicrobial sensitivity and typing of Streptococcus pyogenes strains isolated during a scarlet fever outbreak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto González Pedraza-Avilés

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Evaluar la actividad in vitro de 13 antibióticos contra 47 Streptococcus pyogenes grupo A (SGA. Determinar la presencia de genes que codifican para exotoxina pirogénica estreptocóccica A (SpeA y serotipos con base en proteína M. Material y métodos. Estudio transversal hecho en el Centro de Salud Dr. José Castro Villagrana sobre un brote de escarlatina en el Colegio Espíritu de América, entre diciembre de 1999 y enero de 2000. El número de niños estudiados fue 137. Se extrajeron porcentajes de sensibilidad. La concentración inhibitoria mínima (CIM se obtuvo por microdilución semiautomatizada. Se utilizó un secuenciador automatizado de DNA para el análisis de variación de secuencias en los genes que codifican para proteína M y SpeA. Resultados. Todas las cepas fueron sensibles a beta-lactámicos y clindamicina; 12.7% fueron resistentes a eritromicina. El serotipo M2 fue el más frecuente, 27 del total. Prácticamente todas las bacterias (96% con el gen SpeA tienen el gen que codifica para el serotipo M2. Conclusiones. Debido a la reciente reaparición de infecciones por SGA se sugiere realizar estudios tanto de sensibilidad a macrólidos y beta-lactámicos, como de epidemiología molecular.Objective. To evaluate the in vitro activities of 13 antimicrobial agents against 47 group A Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS strains, and to determine the presence of genes encoding streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin A (SpeA and the M--protein serotypes. Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted at Centro de Salud Dr. José Castro Villagrana, during a scarlet fever outbreak occurring between December 1999 and January 2000, among 137 children at Colegio Espíritu de América. Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs were obtained by the semiautomated microdilution method. Automated DNA sequencing was used for analysis of sequence variation in genes encoding the M protein, and SpeA. Results. All strains were sensitive to

  4. Multiple length peptide-pheromone variants produced by Streptococcus pyogenes directly bind Rgg proteins to confer transcriptional regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Chaitanya; Jimenez, Juan Cristobal; Nanavati, Dhaval; Federle, Michael J

    2014-08-08

    Streptococcus pyogenes, a human-restricted pathogen, accounts for substantial mortality related to infections worldwide. Recent studies indicate that streptococci produce and respond to several secreted peptide signaling molecules (pheromones), including those known as short hydrophobic peptides (SHPs), to regulate gene expression by a quorum-sensing mechanism. Upon transport into the bacterial cell, pheromones bind to and modulate activity of receptor proteins belonging to the Rgg family of transcription factors. Previously, we reported biofilm regulation by the Rgg2/3 quorum-sensing circuit in S. pyogenes. The aim of this study was to identify the composition of mature pheromones from cell-free culture supernatants that facilitate biofilm formation. Bioluminescent reporters were employed to detect active pheromones in culture supernatants fractionated by reverse-phase chromatography, and mass spectrometry was used to characterize their properties. Surprisingly, multiple SHPs that varied by length were detected. Synthetic peptides of each variant were tested individually using bioluminescence reporters and biofilm growth assays, and although activities differed widely among the group, peptides comprising the C-terminal eight amino acids of the full-length native peptide were most active. Direct Rgg/SHP interactions were determined using a fluorescence polarization assay that utilized FITC-labeled peptide ligands. Peptide receptor affinities were seen to be as low as 500 nm and their binding affinities directly correlated with observed bioactivity. Revelation of naturally produced pheromones along with determination of their affinity for cognate receptors are important steps forward in designing compounds whose purpose is positioned for future therapeutics aimed at treating infections through the interference of bacterial communication. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Emergence of Streptococcus pyogenes emm102 causing toxic shock syndrome in Southern Taiwan during 2005-2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiun-Nong Lin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS is an uncommon but life-threatening disease caused by Streptococcus pyogenes. METHODS: To understand the clinical and molecular characteristics of STSS, we analyzed clinical data and explored the emm types, superantigen genes, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of causative S. pyogenes isolates obtained between 2005 and 2012. RESULTS: In total, 53 patients with STSS were included in this study. The median age of the patients was 57 years (range: 9-83 years, and 81.1% were male. The most prevalent underlying disease was diabetes mellitus (45.3%. Skin and soft-tissue infection accounted for 86.8% of STSS. The overall mortality rate was 32.1%. Underlying diseases had no statistical impact on mortality. A total of 19 different emm types were identified. The most prevalent emm type was emm102 (18.9%, followed by emm11 (17%, emm1 (11.3%, emm87 (9.4%, and emm89 (7.5%. There was no statistically significant association between emm type and a fatal outcome. Among the superantigen genes, speB was the most frequently detected one (92.5%, followed by smeZ (90.6%, speG (81.1%, speC (39.6%, and speF (39.6%. The majority of emm102 strains were found to have speB, speC, speG, and smeZ. The presence of speG was negatively associated with a fatal outcome (P = 0.045. CONCLUSIONS: Our surveillance revealed the emergence of uncommon emm types, particularly emm102, causing STSS in southern Taiwan. Characterization of clinical, epidemiological, and molecular characteristics of STSS will improve our understanding of this life-threatening disease.

  6. Investigation of antibacterial activities of Albizia gummifera and Ferula communis on Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptoccus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unasho, Abayneh; Geyid, Aberra; Melaku, Abebe; Debela, Asfaw; Mekasha, Amha; Girma, Samson; Kebede, Tesfaye; Fantaw, Surafael; Asaminew, Nega; Mamo, Kidanemariam

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory Tract infections continue to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality world wide. There is a failure to treat respiratory infections due to the emergence of antibiotic resistant strains among the most common respiratory pathogens. To evaluate the in vitro antibacterial activities of two traditionally used plants: Albizia gummifera (Ambabesa-Muka, Oromifa, Sessa-Amharic.) and Ferula communis (Doge-Oromifa, Dog-Amharic) against clinical isolates of S. pyogenes and S. pneumoniae. The study involving the antibacterial susceptibility test of traditionally used plant species against Gram-positive bacterial pathogens was conducted over a period of 5 months (January - August, 2004) at the Ethiopian Health, and Nutrition Research Institute. The in vitro antibacterial activities of 80% methanol crude extracts prepared from the seeds of Ablizia gummifera and, roots of Ferula communis as well as their respective hydro alcoholic solvent fractionates of both plant species were tested for inhibitory activity against the clinical isolates of six S. pneumonae and twenty two S. pyogenes using agar dilution method. Eighty percent ethanol solubilized fractions of both plants were found to have antibacterial effects to all assayed bacteria while aqueous solubilized fractions did not exhibit any effect. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the 80% ethanol solubilized fractions was determined and the MIC of the fractions ranged from 500 mg/ ml to 1000 mg/ml for both plants showing the extracts may contain bioactive compounds of therapeutic interest. All extracts showed antibacterial activities against clinical isolates of S. pyogenes and S. pneumoniae. The extracts may contain compounds with potential therapeutic activity. Further purification and identification are needed to be tested using animal models.

  7. A Highly Active and Negatively Charged Streptococcus pyogenes Lysin with a Rare d-Alanyl-l-Alanine Endopeptidase Activity Protects Mice against Streptococcal Bacteremia

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    Lood, Rolf; Raz, Assaf; Molina, Henrik; Euler, Chad W.

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophage endolysins have shown great efficacy in killing Gram-positive bacteria. PlyC, a group C streptococcal phage lysin, represents the most efficient lysin characterized to date, with a remarkably high specificity against different streptococcal species, including the important pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes. However, PlyC is a unique lysin, in terms of both its high activity and structure (two distinct subunits). We sought to discover and characterize a phage lysin active against S. pyogenes with an endolysin architecture distinct from that of PlyC to determine if it relies on the same mechanism of action as PlyC. In this study, we identified and characterized an endolysin, termed PlyPy (phage lysin from S. pyogenes), from a prophage infecting S. pyogenes. By in silico analysis, PlyPy was found to have a molecular mass of 27.8 kDa and a pI of 4.16. It was active against a majority of group A streptococci and displayed high levels of activity as well as binding specificity against group B and C streptococci, while it was less efficient against other streptococcal species. PlyPy showed the highest activity at neutral pH in the presence of calcium and NaCl. Surprisingly, its activity was not affected by the presence of the group A-specific carbohydrate, while the activity of PlyC was partly inhibited. Additionally, PlyPy was active in vivo and could rescue mice from systemic bacteremia. Finally, we developed a novel method to determine the peptidoglycan bond cleaved by lysins and concluded that PlyPy exhibits a rare d-alanyl-l-alanine endopeptidase activity. PlyPy thus represents the first lysin characterized from Streptococcus pyogenes and has a mechanism of action distinct from that of PlyC. PMID:24637688

  8. Streptococcus pyogenes Endopeptidase O Contributes to Evasion from Complement-mediated Bacteriolysis via Binding to Human Complement Factor C1q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda-Ogawa, Mariko; Sumitomo, Tomoko; Mori, Yasushi; Hamd, Dalia Talat; Ogawa, Taiji; Yamaguchi, Masaya; Nakata, Masanobu; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2017-03-10

    Streptococcus pyogenes secretes various virulence factors for evasion from complement-mediated bacteriolysis. However, full understanding of the molecules possessed by this organism that interact with complement C1q, an initiator of the classical complement pathway, remains elusive. In this study, we identified an endopeptidase of S. pyogenes , PepO, as an interacting molecule, and investigated its effects on complement immunity and pathogenesis. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and surface plasmon resonance analysis findings revealed that S. pyogenes recombinant PepO bound to human C1q in a concentration-dependent manner under physiological conditions. Sites of inflammation are known to have decreased pH levels, thus the effects of PepO on bacterial evasion from complement immunity was analyzed in a low pH condition. Notably, under low pH conditions, PepO exhibited a higher affinity for C1q as compared with IgG, and PepO inhibited the binding of IgG to C1q. In addition, pepO deletion rendered S. pyogenes more susceptible to the bacteriocidal activity of human serum. Also, observations of the morphological features of the pepO mutant strain (Δ pepO ) showed damaged irregular surfaces as compared with the wild-type strain (WT). WT-infected tissues exhibited greater severity and lower complement activity as compared with those infected by Δ pepO in a mouse skin infection model. Furthermore, WT infection resulted in a larger accumulation of C1q than that with Δ pepO. Our results suggest that interaction of S. pyogenes PepO with C1q interferes with the complement pathway, which enables S. pyogenes to evade complement-mediated bacteriolysis under acidic conditions, such as seen in inflammatory sites. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Streptococcus pyogenes Endopeptidase O Contributes to Evasion from Complement-mediated Bacteriolysis via Binding to Human Complement Factor C1q*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda-Ogawa, Mariko; Sumitomo, Tomoko; Mori, Yasushi; Hamd, Dalia Talat; Ogawa, Taiji; Yamaguchi, Masaya; Nakata, Masanobu; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes secretes various virulence factors for evasion from complement-mediated bacteriolysis. However, full understanding of the molecules possessed by this organism that interact with complement C1q, an initiator of the classical complement pathway, remains elusive. In this study, we identified an endopeptidase of S. pyogenes, PepO, as an interacting molecule, and investigated its effects on complement immunity and pathogenesis. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and surface plasmon resonance analysis findings revealed that S. pyogenes recombinant PepO bound to human C1q in a concentration-dependent manner under physiological conditions. Sites of inflammation are known to have decreased pH levels, thus the effects of PepO on bacterial evasion from complement immunity was analyzed in a low pH condition. Notably, under low pH conditions, PepO exhibited a higher affinity for C1q as compared with IgG, and PepO inhibited the binding of IgG to C1q. In addition, pepO deletion rendered S. pyogenes more susceptible to the bacteriocidal activity of human serum. Also, observations of the morphological features of the pepO mutant strain (ΔpepO) showed damaged irregular surfaces as compared with the wild-type strain (WT). WT-infected tissues exhibited greater severity and lower complement activity as compared with those infected by ΔpepO in a mouse skin infection model. Furthermore, WT infection resulted in a larger accumulation of C1q than that with ΔpepO. Our results suggest that interaction of S. pyogenes PepO with C1q interferes with the complement pathway, which enables S. pyogenes to evade complement-mediated bacteriolysis under acidic conditions, such as seen in inflammatory sites. PMID:28154192

  10. Distribution of subclasses mefA and mefE of the mefA gene among clinical isolates of macrolide-resistant (M-phenotype) Streptococcus pneumoniae, viridans group streptococci, and Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardanuy, Carmen; Tubau, Fe; Liñares, Josefina; Domínguez, María Angeles; Pallarés, Román; Martín, Rogelio

    2005-02-01

    The distribution of subclasses mefA and mefE of the mefA gene among 116 M-phenotype streptococci was as follows: pneumococci (38 strains had mefE and 4 mefA), viridans streptococci (49 mefE and 1 mefA), and Streptococcus pyogenes (24 mefA). Spain(9V)-3-14 and England(14)-9 clones of serotype 14 were dominant among pneumococci.

  11. Emergence of scarlet fever Streptococcus pyogenes emm12 clones in Hong Kong is associated with toxin acquisition and multidrug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Mark R; Holden, Matthew T; Coupland, Paul; Chen, Jonathan H K; Venturini, Carola; Barnett, Timothy C; Zakour, Nouri L Ben; Tse, Herman; Dougan, Gordon; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Walker, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    A scarlet fever outbreak began in mainland China and Hong Kong in 2011 (refs. 1-6). Macrolide- and tetracycline-resistant Streptococcus pyogenes emm12 isolates represent the majority of clinical cases. Recently, we identified two mobile genetic elements that were closely associated with emm12 outbreak isolates: the integrative and conjugative element ICE-emm12, encoding genes for tetracycline and macrolide resistance, and prophage ΦHKU.vir, encoding the superantigens SSA and SpeC, as well as the DNase Spd1 (ref. 4). Here we sequenced the genomes of 141 emm12 isolates, including 132 isolated in Hong Kong between 2005 and 2011. We found that the introduction of several ICE-emm12 variants, ΦHKU.vir and a new prophage, ΦHKU.ssa, occurred in three distinct emm12 lineages late in the twentieth century. Acquisition of ssa and transposable elements encoding multidrug resistance genes triggered the expansion of scarlet fever-associated emm12 lineages in Hong Kong. The occurrence of multidrug-resistant ssa-harboring scarlet fever strains should prompt heightened surveillance within China and abroad for the dissemination of these mobile genetic elements.

  12. Streptococcus pyogenes Sortase Mutants Are Highly Susceptible to Killing by Host Factors Due to Aberrant Envelope Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raz, Assaf; Tanasescu, Ana-Maria; Zhao, Anna M.; Serrano, Anna; Alston, Tricia; Sol, Asaf; Bachrach, Gilad; Fischetti, Vincent A.

    2015-01-01

    Cell wall anchored virulence factors are critical for infection and colonization of the host by Gram-positive bacteria. Such proteins have an N-terminal leader sequence and a C-terminal sorting signal, composed of an LPXTG motif, a hydrophobic stretch, and a few positively charged amino acids. The sorting signal halts translocation across the membrane, allowing sortase to cleave the LPXTG motif, leading to surface anchoring. Deletion of sortase prevents the anchoring of virulence factors to the wall; the effects on bacterial physiology however, have not been thoroughly characterized. Here we show that deletion of Streptococcus pyogenes sortase A leads to accumulation of sorting intermediates, particularly at the septum, altering cellular morphology and physiology, and compromising membrane integrity. Such cells are highly sensitive to cathelicidin, and are rapidly killed in blood and plasma. These phenomena are not a loss-of-function effect caused by the absence of anchored surface proteins, but specifically result from the accumulation of sorting intermediates. Reduction in the level of sorting intermediates leads to a return of the sortase mutant to normal morphology, while expression of M protein with an altered LPXTG motif in wild type cells leads to toxicity in the host environment, similar to that observed in the sortase mutant. These unanticipated effects suggest that inhibition of sortase by small-molecule inhibitors could similarly lead to the rapid elimination of pathogens from an infected host, making such inhibitors much better anti-bacterial agents than previously believed. PMID:26484774

  13. Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae in Children, Malawi, 2004–2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Dean B.; Broughton, Caroline; Denis, Brigitte B.; Banda, Daniel L.; Carrol, Enitan D.; Parry, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    Of 176 invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from children in Malawi, common serotypes were 1 (23%), 6A/B (18%), 14 (6%), and 23F (6%). Coverage with the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) was 39%; PCV10 and PCV13 increased coverage to 66% and 88%, respectively. We found chloramphenicol resistance in 27% of isolates and penicillin nonsusceptibility in 10% (by using meningitis breakpoints); all were ceftriaxone susceptible. PMID:21749782

  14. Molecular characterization of invasive Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis. Multicenter study: Argentina 2011-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, Fernando; Blanco, Alejandra; Villalón, Pilar; Beratz, Noelia; Sáez Nieto, Juan Antonio; Lopardo, Horacio

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (SDSE) has virulence factors similar to those of Streptococcus pyogenes. Therefore, it causes pharyngitis and severe infections indistinguishable from those caused by the classic pathogen. The objectives of this study were: to know the prevalence of SDSE invasive infections in Argentina, to study the genetic diversity, to determine the presence of virulence genes, to study antibiotic susceptibility and to detect antibiotic resistance genes. Conventional methods of identification were used. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion and the agar dilution methods and the E-test. Twenty eight centers from 16 Argentinean cities participated in the study. Twenty three isolates (16 group G and 7 group C) were obtained between July 1 2011 and June 30 2012. Two adult patients died (8.7%). Most of the isolates were recovered from blood (60.9%). All isolates carried speJ and ssa genes. stG62647, stG653 and stG840 were the most frequent emm types. Nineteen different PFGE patterns were detected. All isolates were susceptible to penicillin and levofloxacin, 6 (26.1%) showed resistance or reduced susceptibility to erythromycin [1 mef(A), 3 erm(TR), 1 mef(A)+erm(TR) and 1 erm(TR)+erm(B)] and 7 (30.4%) were resistant or exhibited reduced susceptibility to tetracycline [2 tet(M), 5 tet(M)+tet(O)]. The prevalence in Argentina was of at least 23 invasive infections by SDSE. A wide genetic diversity was observed. All isolates carried speJ and ssa genes. Similarly to other studies, macrolide resistance (26.1%) was mainly associated to the MLS B phenotype. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Identification of novel growth phase- and media-dependent small non-coding RNAs in Streptococcus pyogenes M49 using intergenic tiling arrays

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    Patenge Nadja

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs have attracted attention as a new class of gene regulators in both eukaryotes and bacteria. Genome-wide screening methods have been successfully applied in Gram-negative bacteria to identify sRNA regulators. Many sRNAs are well characterized, including their target mRNAs and mode of action. In comparison, little is known about sRNAs in Gram-positive pathogens. In this study, we identified novel sRNAs in the exclusively human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes M49 (Group A Streptococcus, GAS M49, employing a whole genome intergenic tiling array approach. GAS is an important pathogen that causes diseases ranging from mild superficial infections of the skin and mucous membranes of the naso-pharynx, to severe toxic and invasive diseases. Results We identified 55 putative sRNAs in GAS M49 that were expressed during growth. Of these, 42 were novel. Some of the newly-identified sRNAs belonged to one of the common non-coding RNA families described in the Rfam database. Comparison of the results of our screen with the outcome of two recently published bioinformatics tools showed a low level of overlap between putative sRNA genes. Previously, 40 potential sRNAs have been reported to be expressed in a GAS M1T1 serotype, as detected by a whole genome intergenic tiling array approach. Our screen detected 12 putative sRNA genes that were expressed in both strains. Twenty sRNA candidates appeared to be regulated in a medium-dependent fashion, while eight sRNA genes were regulated throughout growth in chemically defined medium. Expression of candidate genes was verified by reverse transcriptase-qPCR. For a subset of sRNAs, the transcriptional start was determined by 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends-PCR (RACE-PCR analysis. Conclusions In accord with the results of previous studies, we found little overlap between different screening methods, which underlines the fact that a comprehensive analysis of s

  16. Expression profile of BAFF in peripheral blood from patients of IgA nephropathy: Correlation with clinical features and Streptococcus pyogenes infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Nuoyan; Fan, Jinjin; Wang, Bing; Wang, Dongxian; Feng, Pinning; Yang, Qiongqiong; Yu, Xueqing

    2017-04-01

    B cells are critically important for the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy (IgAN). The present study aimed to investigate the abundance of B cell activating factor (BAFF), which belongs to the tumor necrosis factor superfamily, in the peripheral blood of patients with IgAN. The different forms of BAFF in peripheral blood and its association with clinical features and immunological factors were analyzed. mRNA levels of BAFF and other associated genes in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients with IgAN and controls were analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Cellular BAFF proteins in PBMCs and plasma soluble BAFF proteins were measured by western blot analysis and ELISA, respectively. PBMCs from patients were stimulated with Streptococcus pyogenes (S. pyogenes) ex vivo for the BAFF secretion assay. The data demonstrated that, although mRNA levels of BAFF in PBMC were not significantly increased in patients with IgAN, they were positively associated with those of a proliferation inducing ligand (APRIL), Toll‑like receptor (TLR)2, TLR4 and TLR7. The cellular BAFF protein in PBMCs was not upregulated. Plasma BAFF protein levels in patients with IgAN (n=76) were significantly decreased compared with controls. However, plasma BAFF levels were positively associated with serum creatinine, proteinuria, uric acid and group A Streptococcus infection index in patients with IgAN. In patients with IgAN, plasma BAFF concentrations were markedly higher in those with more severe renal tubular atrophy/interstitial fibrosis and global glomerulosclerosis. Furthermore, BAFF production in PBMCs of patients with IgAN was increased following S. pyogenes stimulation ex vivo. In conclusion, plasma BAFF levels in patients with IgAN were associated with renal function and disease activity. S. pyogenes infection was closely associated with BAFF production in patients with IgAN.

  17. High-resolution crystal structure of Streptococcus pyogenes β-NAD{sup +} glycohydrolase in complex with its endogenous inhibitor IFS reveals a highly water-rich interface

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    Yoon, Ji Young; An, Doo Ri; Yoon, Hye-Jin [Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyoun Sook [Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Jae [Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Im, Ha Na; Jang, Jun Young [Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Se Won, E-mail: sewonsuh@snu.ac.kr [Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-01

    The crystal structure of the complex between the C-terminal domain of Streptococcus pyogenes β-NAD{sup +} glycohydrolase and an endogenous inhibitor for SPN was determined at 1.70 Å. It reveals that the interface between the two proteins is highly rich in water molecules. One of the virulence factors produced by Streptococcus pyogenes is β-NAD{sup +} glycohydrolase (SPN). S. pyogenes injects SPN into the cytosol of an infected host cell using the cytolysin-mediated translocation pathway. As SPN is toxic to bacterial cells themselves, S. pyogenes possesses the ifs gene that encodes an endogenous inhibitor for SPN (IFS). IFS is localized intracellularly and forms a complex with SPN. This intracellular complex must be dissociated during export through the cell envelope. To provide a structural basis for understanding the interactions between SPN and IFS, the complex was overexpressed between the mature SPN (residues 38–451) and the full-length IFS (residues 1–161), but it could not be crystallized. Therefore, limited proteolysis was used to isolate a crystallizable SPN{sub ct}–IFS complex, which consists of the SPN C-terminal domain (SPN{sub ct}; residues 193–451) and the full-length IFS. Its crystal structure has been determined by single anomalous diffraction and the model refined at 1.70 Å resolution. Interestingly, our high-resolution structure of the complex reveals that the interface between SPN{sub ct} and IFS is highly rich in water molecules and many of the interactions are water-mediated. The wet interface may facilitate the dissociation of the complex for translocation across the cell envelope.

  18. High-resolution crystal structure of Streptococcus pyogenes β-NAD+ glycohydrolase in complex with its endogenous inhibitor IFS reveals a highly water-rich interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Ji Young; An, Doo Ri; Yoon, Hye-Jin; Kim, Hyoun Sook; Lee, Sang Jae; Im, Ha Na; Jang, Jun Young; Suh, Se Won

    2013-01-01

    The crystal structure of the complex between the C-terminal domain of Streptococcus pyogenes β-NAD + glycohydrolase and an endogenous inhibitor for SPN was determined at 1.70 Å. It reveals that the interface between the two proteins is highly rich in water molecules. One of the virulence factors produced by Streptococcus pyogenes is β-NAD + glycohydrolase (SPN). S. pyogenes injects SPN into the cytosol of an infected host cell using the cytolysin-mediated translocation pathway. As SPN is toxic to bacterial cells themselves, S. pyogenes possesses the ifs gene that encodes an endogenous inhibitor for SPN (IFS). IFS is localized intracellularly and forms a complex with SPN. This intracellular complex must be dissociated during export through the cell envelope. To provide a structural basis for understanding the interactions between SPN and IFS, the complex was overexpressed between the mature SPN (residues 38–451) and the full-length IFS (residues 1–161), but it could not be crystallized. Therefore, limited proteolysis was used to isolate a crystallizable SPN ct –IFS complex, which consists of the SPN C-terminal domain (SPN ct ; residues 193–451) and the full-length IFS. Its crystal structure has been determined by single anomalous diffraction and the model refined at 1.70 Å resolution. Interestingly, our high-resolution structure of the complex reveals that the interface between SPN ct and IFS is highly rich in water molecules and many of the interactions are water-mediated. The wet interface may facilitate the dissociation of the complex for translocation across the cell envelope

  19. Incidence and characterization of beta-hemolytic Streptococcus milleri and differentiation from S. pyogenes (group A), S. equisimilis (group C), and large-colony group G streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, J; Yajko, D M; Hadley, W K

    1985-01-01

    The biochemical characteristics of 172 clinical isolates of group A, C, F, or G or "nongroupable" beta-hemolytic streptococci were examined. Among these isolates, 91 were identified as beta-hemolytic strains of Streptococcus milleri. The remaining isolates included 20 Streptococcus pyogenes, 21 Streptococcus equisimilis, 37 large-colony group G streptococci, and 3 unidentified nongroupable isolates. A majority (84%) of the S. milleri strains possessed Lancefield group antigen (3 A, 27 C, 41 F, and 5 G), whereas 15 S. milleri strains (16%) were nongroupable. Serological tests did not differentiate S. milleri isolates with group A, C, or G antigen from S. pyogenes (group A), S. equisimilis (group C), or large-colony group G streptococci. Biochemical tests which were found useful for differentiation included the Voges-Proskauer test, hydrolysis of pyroglutamic acid and beta-D-glucuronide, bacitracin susceptibility, and acid production from ribose. S. milleri represented 56% of the group C, 100% of the group F, and 83% of the nongroupable beta-hemolytic streptococci isolated in our clinical laboratory, whereas the incidence of S. milleri among group A and group G streptococci was estimated to be low. The role of beta-hemolytic S. milleri as a cause of human infection remains obscured by the failure to routinely differentiate S. milleri from other beta-hemolytic streptococci. PMID:3902878

  20. Heterologous expression of Ralp3 in Streptococcus pyogenes M2 and M6 strains affects the virulence characteristics.

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    Nikolai Siemens

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ralp3 is a transcriptional regulator present in a serotype specific fashion on the chromosome of the human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococci, GAS. In serotypes harbouring the ralp3 gene either positive or negative effects on important metabolic and virulence genes involved in colonization and immune evasion in the human host were observed. A previous study revealed that deletion of ralp3 in a GAS M49 serotype significantly attenuated many virulence traits and caused metabolic disadvantages. This leads to two questions: (i which kind of consequences could Ralp3 expression have in GAS serotypes naturally lacking this gene, and (ii is Ralp3 actively lost during evolution in these serotypes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated the role of Ralp3 in GAS M2 and M6 pathogenesis. Both serotypes lack ralp3 on their chromosome. The heterologous expression of ralp3 in both serotypes resulted in reduced attachment to and internalization into the majority of tested epithelial cells. Both ralp3 expression strains showed a decreased ability to survive in human blood and exclusively M2::ralp3 showed decreased survival in human serum. Both mutants secreted more active SpeB in the supernatant, resulting in a higher activity compared to wild type strains. The respective M2 and M6 wild type strains outcompeted the ralp3 expression strains in direct metabolic competition assays. The phenotypic changes observed in the M2:ralp3 and M6:ralp3 were verified on the transcriptional level. Consistent with the virulence data, tested genes showed transcript level changes in the same direction. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Together these data suggest that Ralp3 can take over transcriptional control of virulence genes in serotypes lacking the ralp3 gene. Those serotypes most likely lost Ralp3 during evolution since obviously expression of this gene is disadvantageous for metabolism and pathogenesis.

  1. The Influence of Programmed Cell Death in Myeloid Cells on Host Resilience to Infection with Legionella pneumophila or Streptococcus pyogenes.

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    Pia Gamradt

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Pathogen clearance and host resilience/tolerance to infection are both important factors in surviving an infection. Cells of the myeloid lineage play important roles in both of these processes. Neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells all have important roles in initiation of the immune response and clearance of bacterial pathogens. If these cells are not properly regulated they can result in excessive inflammation and immunopathology leading to decreased host resilience. Programmed cell death (PCD is one possible mechanism that myeloid cells may use to prevent excessive inflammation. Myeloid cell subsets play roles in tissue repair, immune response resolution, and maintenance of homeostasis, so excessive PCD may also influence host resilience in this way. In addition, myeloid cell death is one mechanism used to control pathogen replication and dissemination. Many of these functions for PCD have been well defined in vitro, but the role in vivo is less well understood. We created a mouse that constitutively expresses the pro-survival B-cell lymphoma (bcl-2 protein in myeloid cells (CD68(bcl2tg, thus decreasing PCD specifically in myeloid cells. Using this mouse model we explored the impact that decreased cell death of these cells has on infection with two different bacterial pathogens, Legionella pneumophila and Streptococcus pyogenes. Both of these pathogens target multiple cell death pathways in myeloid cells, and the expression of bcl2 resulted in decreased PCD after infection. We examined both pathogen clearance and host resilience and found that myeloid cell death was crucial for host resilience. Surprisingly, the decreased myeloid PCD had minimal impact on pathogen clearance. These data indicate that the most important role of PCD during infection with these bacteria is to minimize inflammation and increase host resilience, not to aid in the clearance or prevent the spread of the pathogen.

  2. Sensibilidad antimicrobiana y caracterización de cepas de Streptococcus pyogenes aisladas de un brote de escarlatina

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    Pedraza-Avilés Alberto González

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Evaluar la actividad in vitro de 13 antibióticos contra 47 Streptococcus pyogenes grupo A (SGA. Determinar la presencia de genes que codifican para exotoxina pirogénica estreptocóccica A (SpeA y serotipos con base en proteína M. Material y métodos. Estudio transversal hecho en el Centro de Salud Dr. José Castro Villagrana sobre un brote de escarlatina en el Colegio Espíritu de América, entre diciembre de 1999 y enero de 2000. El número de niños estudiados fue 137. Se extrajeron porcentajes de sensibilidad. La concentración inhibitoria mínima (CIM se obtuvo por microdilución semiautomatizada. Se utilizó un secuenciador automatizado de DNA para el análisis de variación de secuencias en los genes que codifican para proteína M y SpeA. Resultados. Todas las cepas fueron sensibles a beta-lactámicos y clindamicina; 12.7% fueron resistentes a eritromicina. El serotipo M2 fue el más frecuente, 27 del total. Prácticamente todas las bacterias (96% con el gen SpeA tienen el gen que codifica para el serotipo M2. Conclusiones. Debido a la reciente reaparición de infecciones por SGA se sugiere realizar estudios tanto de sensibilidad a macrólidos y beta-lactámicos, como de epidemiología molecular.

  3. Structural Analysis of Streptococcus pyogenes NADH Oxidase: Conformational Dynamics Involved in Formation of the C(4a)-Peroxyflavin Intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallen, Jamie R; Mallett, T Conn; Okuno, Takashi; Parsonage, Derek; Sakai, Hiroaki; Tsukihara, Tomitake; Claiborne, Al

    2015-11-17

    In probing the oxygen reactivity of an Enterococcus faecalis NADH oxidase (Nox; O2 → 2H2O) C42S mutant lacking the Cys42-sulfenic acid (Cys42-SOH) redox center, we provided direct evidence of a C(4a)-peroxyflavin intermediate in the oxidative half-reaction and also described a conformational or chemical change that is rate-limiting for full reoxidation of the homodimer. In this work, the Nox from Streptococcus pyogenes (SpyNox) has been expressed and crystallized, and the overoxidized wild-type [Cys44-SOH → Cys44-sulfinic acid (Cys44-SO2H)] and C44S mutant enzyme structures have been refined at 2.0 and 2.15 Å, respectively. We show that azide binds to the two-electron reduced wild-type (EH2) enzyme and to the mutant enzyme in solution, but with a significantly higher affinity for the mutant protein. The spectral course of the titration with the SpyNox EH2 form clearly indicates progressive displacement of the Cys44-S(-) → FAD charge-transfer interaction. An azide soak with C44S Nox crystals led to the structure of the complex, as refined at 2.10 Å. The active-site N3(-) ligand is proximal to the Ser44 and His11 side chains, and a significant shift in the Ser44 side chain also appears. This provides an attractive explanation for the azide-induced loss of charge-transfer absorbance seen with the wild-type EH2 form and also permits accommodation of a C(4a)-peroxyflavin structural model. The conformation of Ser44 and the associated helical element, and the resulting steric accommodation, appear to be linked to the conformational change described in the E. faecalis C42S Nox oxidative half-reaction.

  4. Epidemiological study of erythromycin-resistant Streptococcus pyogenes from Korea and Japan by emm genotyping and multilocus sequence typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Takashi; Arai, Kazuaki; Lee, Dong Hyun; Koh, Eun Ha; Yoshida, Haruno; Yano, Hisakazu; Kaku, Mitsuo; Kim, Sunjoo

    2016-01-01

    We determined the epidemiological characteristics of erythromycin (EM)-resistant Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococci, GAS) strains isolated from Korea and Japan, using emm genotyping and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Clinical isolates of GAS had been collected from 1992 to 2012 in Korea and from 2004 to 2009 in Japan. EM resistance was determined by the microdilution method, and resistance genotypes were assessed by PCR. The emm genotyping and MLST were performed by DNA sequencing. The emm genotypes and sequence types (STs) were concordant in 143 (85.1%) of 168 EM-resistant GAS strains from Korea. ST36/emm12 (35.1%), ST52/emm28 (22.6%), and ST49/emm75 (16.1%) were the most common types. Most of the ST36 (93.9%) and ST52 (95.8%) strains harbored erm(B), whereas strains ST49, ST42, and ST15 contained mef(A). The concordance between emm genotypes and STs was 41 (93.2%) among 44 EM-resistant GAS strains from Japan. ST36/emm12 (34.1%), ST49/emm75 (18.2%), and ST28/emm1 (15.9%) were the major types. ST36 isolates harbored either erm(B) (56.3%) or mef(A) (37.5%), whereas isolates ST28, ST49, and ST38 carried only mef(A). The proportion of erm(B) and mef(A) was 66.1% and 33.3% in Korea and 22.7% and 68.2% in Japan, respectively. The common STs in Korea and Japan were ST36 and ST49, whereas ST52 was present only in Korea and ST28 only in Japan. Genotype erm(B) was predominant in Korea, whereas mef(A) was frequent in Japan. There were differences between Korea and Japan regarding the frequencies of emm genotypes, STs, and EM resistance genes among the EM-resistant GAS.

  5. The Influence of Programmed Cell Death in Myeloid Cells on Host Resilience to Infection with Legionella pneumophila or Streptococcus pyogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamradt, Pia; Xu, Yun; Gratz, Nina; Duncan, Kellyanne; Kobzik, Lester; Högler, Sandra; Decker, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Pathogen clearance and host resilience/tolerance to infection are both important factors in surviving an infection. Cells of the myeloid lineage play important roles in both of these processes. Neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells all have important roles in initiation of the immune response and clearance of bacterial pathogens. If these cells are not properly regulated they can result in excessive inflammation and immunopathology leading to decreased host resilience. Programmed cell death (PCD) is one possible mechanism that myeloid cells may use to prevent excessive inflammation. Myeloid cell subsets play roles in tissue repair, immune response resolution, and maintenance of homeostasis, so excessive PCD may also influence host resilience in this way. In addition, myeloid cell death is one mechanism used to control pathogen replication and dissemination. Many of these functions for PCD have been well defined in vitro, but the role in vivo is less well understood. We created a mouse that constitutively expresses the pro-survival B-cell lymphoma (bcl)-2 protein in myeloid cells (CD68(bcl2tg), thus decreasing PCD specifically in myeloid cells. Using this mouse model we explored the impact that decreased cell death of these cells has on infection with two different bacterial pathogens, Legionella pneumophila and Streptococcus pyogenes. Both of these pathogens target multiple cell death pathways in myeloid cells, and the expression of bcl2 resulted in decreased PCD after infection. We examined both pathogen clearance and host resilience and found that myeloid cell death was crucial for host resilience. Surprisingly, the decreased myeloid PCD had minimal impact on pathogen clearance. These data indicate that the most important role of PCD during infection with these bacteria is to minimize inflammation and increase host resilience, not to aid in the clearance or prevent the spread of the pathogen. PMID:27973535

  6. Extended binding site on fibronectin for the functional upstream domain of protein F1 of Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Lisa M; Tomasini-Johansson, Bianca R; Ma, Wenjiang; Annis, Douglas S; Eickstaedt, Nathan L; Ensenberger, Martin G; Satyshur, Kenneth A; Mosher, Deane F

    2010-12-24

    The 49-residue functional upstream domain (FUD) of Streptococcus pyogenes F1 adhesin interacts with fibronectin (FN) in a heretofore unknown manner that prevents assembly of a FN matrix. Biotinylated FUD (b-FUD) bound to adsorbed FN or its recombinant N-terminal 70-kDa fibrin- and gelatin-binding fragment (70K). Binding was blocked by FN or 70K, but not by fibrin- or gelatin-binding subfragments of 70K. Isothermal titration calorimetry showed that FUD binds with K(d) values of 5.2 and 59 nM to soluble 70K and FN, respectively. We tested sets of FUD mutants and epitope-mapped monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for ability to compete with b-FUD for binding to FN or to block FN assembly by cultured fibroblasts. Deletions or alanine substitutions throughout FUD caused loss of both activities. mAb 4D1 to the (2)FNI module had little effect, whereas mAb 7D5 to the (4)FNI module in the fibrin-binding region, 5C3 to the (9)FNI module in the gelatin-binding region, or L8 to the G-strand of (1)FNIII module adjacent to (9)FNI caused loss of binding of b-FUD to FN and decreased FN assembly. Conversely, FUD blocked binding of 7D5, 5C3, or L8, but not of 4D1, to FN. Circular dichroism indicated that FUD binds to 70K by β-strand addition, a possibility supported by modeling based on crystal structures of peptides bound to (2)FNI-(5)FNI of the fibrin-binding domain and (8)FNI-(9)FNI of the gelatin-binding domain. Thus, the interaction likely involves an extensive anti-parallel β-zipper in which FUD interacts with the E-strands of (2)FNI-(5)FNI and (8)FNI-(9)FNI.

  7. Identification and Characterization of Fluoroquinolone Non-susceptible Streptococcus pyogenes Clones Harboring Tetracycline and Macrolide Resistance in Shanghai, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yinfang; Cai, Jiehao; Davies, Mark R.; Zhang, Chi; Gao, Kun; Qiao, Dan; Jiang, Haoqin; Yao, Weilei; Li, Yuefang; Zeng, Mei; Chen, Mingliang

    2018-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as group A Streptococcus (GAS), is one of the top 10 infectious causes of death worldwide. Macrolide and tetracycline resistant GAS has emerged as a major health concern in China coinciding with an ongoing scarlet fever epidemic. Furthermore, increasing rates of fluoroquinolone (FQ) non-susceptibility within GAS from geographical regions outside of China has also been reported. Fluoroquinolones are the third most commonly prescribed antibiotic in China and is an therapeutic alternative for multi-drug resistant GAS. The purpose of this study was to investigate the epidemiological and molecular features of GAS fluoroquinolone (FQ) non-susceptibility in Shanghai, China. GAS (n = 2,258) recovered between 2011 and 2016 from children and adults were tested for FQ-non-susceptibility. Efflux phenotype and mutations in parC, parE, gyrA, and gyrB were investigated and genetic relationships were determined by emm typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and phylogenetic analysis. The frequency of GAS FQ-non-susceptibility was 1.3% (30/2,258), with the phenotype more prevalent in GAS isolated from adults (14.3%) than from children (1.2%). Eighty percent (24/30) of FQ-non-susceptible isolates were also resistant to both macrolides (ermB) and tetracycline (tetM) including the GAS sequence types emm12, emm6, emm11, and emm1. Genomic fingerprinting analysis of the 30 isolates revealed that non-susceptibility may arise in various genetic backgrounds even within a single emm type. No efflux phenotype was observed in FQ non-susceptible isolates, and molecular analysis of the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) identified several sequence polymorphisms in ParC and ParE, and none in GyrA and GyrB. Expansion of this analysis to 152 publically available GAS whole genome sequences from Hong Kong predicted 7.9% (12/152) of Hong Kong isolates harbored a S79F ParC mutation, of which 66.7% (8/12) were macrolide and tetracycline resistant

  8. Identification and Characterization of Fluoroquinolone Non-susceptible Streptococcus pyogenes Clones Harboring Tetracycline and Macrolide Resistance in Shanghai, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinfang Shen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as group A Streptococcus (GAS, is one of the top 10 infectious causes of death worldwide. Macrolide and tetracycline resistant GAS has emerged as a major health concern in China coinciding with an ongoing scarlet fever epidemic. Furthermore, increasing rates of fluoroquinolone (FQ non-susceptibility within GAS from geographical regions outside of China has also been reported. Fluoroquinolones are the third most commonly prescribed antibiotic in China and is an therapeutic alternative for multi-drug resistant GAS. The purpose of this study was to investigate the epidemiological and molecular features of GAS fluoroquinolone (FQ non-susceptibility in Shanghai, China. GAS (n = 2,258 recovered between 2011 and 2016 from children and adults were tested for FQ-non-susceptibility. Efflux phenotype and mutations in parC, parE, gyrA, and gyrB were investigated and genetic relationships were determined by emm typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and phylogenetic analysis. The frequency of GAS FQ-non-susceptibility was 1.3% (30/2,258, with the phenotype more prevalent in GAS isolated from adults (14.3% than from children (1.2%. Eighty percent (24/30 of FQ-non-susceptible isolates were also resistant to both macrolides (ermB and tetracycline (tetM including the GAS sequence types emm12, emm6, emm11, and emm1. Genomic fingerprinting analysis of the 30 isolates revealed that non-susceptibility may arise in various genetic backgrounds even within a single emm type. No efflux phenotype was observed in FQ non-susceptible isolates, and molecular analysis of the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs identified several sequence polymorphisms in ParC and ParE, and none in GyrA and GyrB. Expansion of this analysis to 152 publically available GAS whole genome sequences from Hong Kong predicted 7.9% (12/152 of Hong Kong isolates harbored a S79F ParC mutation, of which 66.7% (8/12 were macrolide and tetracycline resistant

  9. Copper Tolerance and Characterization of a Copper-Responsive Operon, copYAZ, in an M1T1 Clinical Strain of Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Christie A; Gordon, Lily D; Fang, Zhong; Holder, Robert C; Reid, Sean D

    2015-08-01

    Infection with Streptococcus pyogenes is associated with a breadth of clinical manifestations ranging from mild pharyngitis to severe necrotizing fasciitis. Elevated levels of intracellular copper are highly toxic to this bacterium, and thus, the microbe must tightly regulate the level of this metal ion by one or more mechanisms, which have, to date, not been clearly defined. In this study, we have identified two virulence mechanisms by which S. pyogenes protects itself against copper toxicity. We defined a set of putative genes, copY (for a regulator), copA (for a P1-type ATPase), and copZ (for a copper chaperone), whose expression is regulated by copper. Our results indicate that these genes are highly conserved among a range of clinical S. pyogenes isolates. The copY, copA, and copZ genes are induced by copper and are transcribed as a single unit. Heterologous expression assays revealed that S. pyogenes CopA can confer copper tolerance in a copper-sensitive Escherichia coli mutant by preventing the accumulation of toxic levels of copper, a finding that is consistent with a role for CopA in copper export. Evaluation of the effect of copper stress on S. pyogenes in a planktonic or biofilm state revealed that biofilms may aid in protection during initial exposure to copper. However, copper stress appears to prevent the shift from the planktonic to the biofilm state. Therefore, our results indicate that S. pyogenes may use several virulence mechanisms, including altered gene expression and a transition to and from planktonic and biofilm states, to promote survival during copper stress. Bacterial pathogens encounter multiple stressors at the host-pathogen interface. This study evaluates a virulence mechanism(s) utilized by S. pyogenes to combat copper at sites of infection. A better understanding of pathogen tolerance to stressors such as copper is necessary to determine how host-pathogen interactions impact bacterial survival during infections. These insights may

  10. Molecular characterization and evaluation of the emerging antibiotic-resistant Streptococcus pyogenes from eastern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Dipanwita; Saha, Somnath; Sinha, Sukanta; Pal, Nishith Kumar; Bhattacharya, Basudev

    2016-12-12

    Group A Streptococcus strains causing wide variety of diseases, recently became noticeable in eastern India, are not amenable to standard treatment protocol thus enhancing the possibility of disease morbidity by becoming antibiotic resistance. The association of Lancefield group A Streptococcal variation with degree of vir architectural diversity was evaluated using emm typing and restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses. The antibiotic sensitivity patterns were examined by modified Kirby-Bauer method of disk diffusion. Percentage calculations, 95% confidence interval and one-way ANOVA were used to assess differences in proportions. Our observations revealed 20 different emm types and 13 different HaeIII vir typing patterns. A 1.2 kb fragment was found in all HaeIII typing pattern. Fragments of 1.2 kb and 550 bp were conserved in majority of the isolates. HinfI digestion was found proficient in differentiating the strains of same vir typing patterns. Strong predominance of speC (85%) and speF (80%) genes have been observed encoding exotoxins production. 4 isolates were found to be erythromycin resistant and were of genotype emm49. High degree of tetracycline resistance was shown by 53.57% isolates which belonged to 12 different emm genotypes. These findings suggested that in addition to emm typing, sequential application of HaeIII and HinfI restriction enzymes in vir typing analysis is an effective tool for group A streptococcal molecular characterization associated with antibiotic resistance.

  11. Isolation of Streptococcus pyogenes from children with pharyngitis and emm type analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravi, Azar D; Ebrahimifard, Nasim; Shamsizadeh, Ahmad; Shoja, Saeed

    2016-05-01

    The group A streptococcus (GAS) M protein, encoded by the emm gene, acts as a major virulence factor. Emm-typing is the GAS gold standard molecular typing and is based on the DNA sequence of the nucleotides of the emm gene. The aim of the present study was to isolate GAS from patients and to detect the emm types of the isolates using emm typing. A total of 1000 throat samples were collected from patients with pharyngitis referred to Aboozar Children's Hospital in Ahvaz, Iran. We performed antimicrobial susceptibility testing on all isolates using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. Additionally, amplification of the emm gene was performed using polymerase chain reaction using the standard primers and described protocol. From all throat samples screened, 25 isolates (2.5%) were identified as GAS. Antibiotic susceptibility testing revealed that all the GAS isolates were susceptible to penicillin and erythromycin, but 44% showed resistance to vancomycin. Based on polymerase chain reaction for the emm gene, the obtained emm types were: emm-3, observed in 20 isolates (80%); emm-1 observed in four isolates (16%); and emm-75 observed in one isolate (4%). The result of the present study showed that penicillin and erythromycin are still the most effective antibiotics against the organism. The emm typing revealed that emm type-3 was detected in most of the isolates from patients with purulent pharyngitis. On the basis of the findings of this study, we may conclude that emm typing provides new insights on the genetic diversity of the M proteins, and is of demonstrable value for molecular studies of GAS. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Taiwan LLC.

  12. Revelation of susceptibility differences due to Hg(II) accumulation in Streptococcus pyogenes against CX-AgNPs and Cefixime by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasheed, Wasia; Shah, Muhammad Raza; Perveen, Samina; Ahmed, Shakil; Uzzaman, Sami

    2018-01-01

    Solution based method for the formation of chemically modified silver nanoparticles (CX-AgNPs) using Cefixime as stabilizing and reducing agent was developed. The CX-AgNPs were characterized by AFM, UV-visible, FT-IR and MALDI-TOF MS. Bactericidal efficiency of CX-AgNPs and Cefixime against Streptococcus pyogenes was evaluated. Afterwards, susceptibility differences of Streptococcus pyogenes due to accumulation of Hg(II) against CX-AgNPs and Cefixime were estimated and validated through Atomic force microscopy. Selectivity and sensitivity of CX-AgNPs against Hg(II) was evaluated in a systematic manner. The CX-AgNPs was titrated against optically silent Hg(II) which induced enhancement in the SPR band of CX-AgNPs. The increase in intensity of SPR band of CX-AgNPs was determined to be proportionate to the concentration of Hg(II) in the range of 33.3-700µM obeying linear regression equation of y = 0.125x + 8.962 with the detection limit of 0.10µM and the coefficient of determination equals to 0.985 (n = 3). The association constant Ka of CX-AgNPs-Hg(II) was found to be 386.0095mol -1 dm 3 by using the Benesi Hildebrand plot. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Factor H Binds to the Hypervariable Region of Many Streptococcus pyogenes M Proteins but Does Not Promote Phagocytosis Resistance or Acute Virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Bodil M.; Olsen, John E.; Harris, Claire L.; Ufret-Vincenty, Rafael L.; Stålhammar-Carlemalm, Margaretha; Lindahl, Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    Many pathogens express a surface protein that binds the human complement regulator factor H (FH), as first described for Streptococcus pyogenes and the antiphagocytic M6 protein. It is commonly assumed that FH recruited to an M protein enhances virulence by protecting the bacteria against complement deposition and phagocytosis, but the role of FH-binding in S. pyogenes pathogenesis has remained unclear and controversial. Here, we studied seven purified M proteins for ability to bind FH and found that FH binds to the M5, M6 and M18 proteins but not the M1, M3, M4 and M22 proteins. Extensive immunochemical analysis indicated that FH binds solely to the hypervariable region (HVR) of an M protein, suggesting that selection has favored the ability of certain HVRs to bind FH. These FH-binding HVRs could be studied as isolated polypeptides that retain ability to bind FH, implying that an FH-binding HVR represents a distinct ligand-binding domain. The isolated HVRs specifically interacted with FH among all human serum proteins, interacted with the same region in FH and showed species specificity, but exhibited little or no antigenic cross-reactivity. Although these findings suggested that FH recruited to an M protein promotes virulence, studies in transgenic mice did not demonstrate a role for bound FH during acute infection. Moreover, phagocytosis tests indicated that ability to bind FH is neither sufficient nor necessary for S. pyogenes to resist killing in whole human blood. While these data shed new light on the HVR of M proteins, they suggest that FH-binding may affect S. pyogenes virulence by mechanisms not assessed in currently used model systems. PMID:23637608

  14. Factor H binds to the hypervariable region of many Streptococcus pyogenes M proteins but does not promote phagocytosis resistance or acute virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattias C U Gustafsson

    Full Text Available Many pathogens express a surface protein that binds the human complement regulator factor H (FH, as first described for Streptococcus pyogenes and the antiphagocytic M6 protein. It is commonly assumed that FH recruited to an M protein enhances virulence by protecting the bacteria against complement deposition and phagocytosis, but the role of FH-binding in S. pyogenes pathogenesis has remained unclear and controversial. Here, we studied seven purified M proteins for ability to bind FH and found that FH binds to the M5, M6 and M18 proteins but not the M1, M3, M4 and M22 proteins. Extensive immunochemical analysis indicated that FH binds solely to the hypervariable region (HVR of an M protein, suggesting that selection has favored the ability of certain HVRs to bind FH. These FH-binding HVRs could be studied as isolated polypeptides that retain ability to bind FH, implying that an FH-binding HVR represents a distinct ligand-binding domain. The isolated HVRs specifically interacted with FH among all human serum proteins, interacted with the same region in FH and showed species specificity, but exhibited little or no antigenic cross-reactivity. Although these findings suggested that FH recruited to an M protein promotes virulence, studies in transgenic mice did not demonstrate a role for bound FH during acute infection. Moreover, phagocytosis tests indicated that ability to bind FH is neither sufficient nor necessary for S. pyogenes to resist killing in whole human blood. While these data shed new light on the HVR of M proteins, they suggest that FH-binding may affect S. pyogenes virulence by mechanisms not assessed in currently used model systems.

  15. Gene Regulation in Streptococcus pneumoniae: interplay between nutrition and virulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.T. Hendriksen (Wouter)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractStreptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) is a Gram-positive bacterium, which belongs to the species of streptococci. Other pathogenic bacteria belonging to this class include Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus suis, Streptococcus uberis, Streptococcus

  16. NEPHRITOGENIC ACTIVITY OF STREPTOCOCCUS PYOGENES emm1 AND emm12 GENOTYPES ISOLATED FROM PATIENTS AND ASYMPTOMATIC CARRIERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Burova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the nephritogenic activity of Streptococcus pyogenes genotype emm1 and emm12 clinical isolates from scarlet fever patients and healthy children was considered. As earlier established, strains of these types differ in Fc-binding profile, interacting with native IgG and immune complexes (IC, respectively. As expected, all the type emm1 strains bound native IgG; besides, ICs interacted only with strains from patients but not with those from carriers. In contrast, all type emm12 strains appeared to be negative for native IgG, whereas ICs were bound by strains from patients exclusively. None of the tested strains bound IgG3. By immunization of rabbits, binding of native IgG as well as ICs was associated with increasing of anti-IgG antibodies titer, formation of ICs, «crescent» deposition of IgG and C3-complement, local production of the proinflammatory cytokine TNFα, аnd also with accumulation of lymphocytes in kidney tissue. These signs indicated immune inflammation, leading to experimental membrane-proliferative glomerulonephritis (PSGN. It is known that PSGN development depends on IC-binding by tissue FcγR, on complement activation as well as on tissue infiltration by macrophages/monocytes. According to the data of morphometric evaluation the nephritogenic activity of the type emm12 strains exceeded those of type emm1. On testing of three IC-binding emm12 strains in six rabbits, typical PSGN developed in 5 of them and an abortive process in 1 animal. In case of five IgG-binding type emm1 strains, out of ten rabbits full-blown PSGN was observed only in 3 of them, but abortive changes in 5 and negative result in 2 animals. No pathologic changes were elicited by the «carrier» strains of either genotype; the inability of these to bind ICs, according to literature data, could be explained by mutation in the Mga-regulator gene thereby impeding M-proteins synthesis. We conclude that isolation of type emm12 IC-binding strains at acute

  17. Virulence gene pool detected in bovine group C Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae isolates by use of a group A S. pyogenes virulence microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rato, Márcia G; Nerlich, Andreas; Bergmann, René; Bexiga, Ricardo; Nunes, Sandro F; Vilela, Cristina L; Santos-Sanches, Ilda; Chhatwal, Gursharan S

    2011-07-01

    A custom-designed microarray containing 220 virulence genes of Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus [GAS]) was used to test group C Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae (GCS) field strains causing bovine mastitis and group C or group G Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (GCS/GGS) isolates from human infections, with the latter being used for comparative purposes, for the presence of virulence genes. All bovine and all human isolates carried a fraction of the 220 genes (23% and 39%, respectively). The virulence genes encoding streptolysin S, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, the plasminogen-binding M-like protein PAM, and the collagen-like protein SclB were detected in the majority of both bovine and human isolates (94 to 100%). Virulence factors, usually carried by human beta-hemolytic streptococcal pathogens, such as streptokinase, laminin-binding protein, and the C5a peptidase precursor, were detected in all human isolates but not in bovine isolates. Additionally, GAS bacteriophage-associated virulence genes encoding superantigens, DNase, and/or streptodornase were detected in bovine isolates (72%) but not in the human isolates. Determinants located in non-bacteriophage-related mobile elements, such as the gene encoding R28, were detected in all bovine and human isolates. Several virulence genes, including genes of bacteriophage origin, were shown to be expressed by reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR). Phylogenetic analysis of superantigen gene sequences revealed a high level (>98%) of identity among genes of bovine GCS, of the horse pathogen Streptococcus equi subsp. equi, and of the human pathogen GAS. Our findings indicate that alpha-hemolytic bovine GCS, an important mastitis pathogen and considered to be a nonhuman pathogen, carries important virulence factors responsible for virulence and pathogenesis in humans.

  18. Virulence Gene Pool Detected in Bovine Group C Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae Isolates by Use of a Group A S. pyogenes Virulence Microarray ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rato, Márcia G.; Nerlich, Andreas; Bergmann, René; Bexiga, Ricardo; Nunes, Sandro F.; Vilela, Cristina L.; Santos-Sanches, Ilda; Chhatwal, Gursharan S.

    2011-01-01

    A custom-designed microarray containing 220 virulence genes of Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus [GAS]) was used to test group C Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae (GCS) field strains causing bovine mastitis and group C or group G Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (GCS/GGS) isolates from human infections, with the latter being used for comparative purposes, for the presence of virulence genes. All bovine and all human isolates carried a fraction of the 220 genes (23% and 39%, respectively). The virulence genes encoding streptolysin S, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, the plasminogen-binding M-like protein PAM, and the collagen-like protein SclB were detected in the majority of both bovine and human isolates (94 to 100%). Virulence factors, usually carried by human beta-hemolytic streptococcal pathogens, such as streptokinase, laminin-binding protein, and the C5a peptidase precursor, were detected in all human isolates but not in bovine isolates. Additionally, GAS bacteriophage-associated virulence genes encoding superantigens, DNase, and/or streptodornase were detected in bovine isolates (72%) but not in the human isolates. Determinants located in non-bacteriophage-related mobile elements, such as the gene encoding R28, were detected in all bovine and human isolates. Several virulence genes, including genes of bacteriophage origin, were shown to be expressed by reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR). Phylogenetic analysis of superantigen gene sequences revealed a high level (>98%) of identity among genes of bovine GCS, of the horse pathogen Streptococcus equi subsp. equi, and of the human pathogen GAS. Our findings indicate that alpha-hemolytic bovine GCS, an important mastitis pathogen and considered to be a nonhuman pathogen, carries important virulence factors responsible for virulence and pathogenesis in humans. PMID:21525223

  19. Simultaneous isolation of emm89-type Streptococcus pyogenes strains with a wild-type or mutated covS gene from a single streptococcal toxic shock syndrome patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuno, Katsuaki; Okada, Ryo; Zhang, Yan; Isaka, Masanori; Tatsuno, Ichiro; Shibata, Shinichiro; Hasegawa, Tadao

    2014-04-01

    Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) is a re-emerging infectious disease in many developed countries. Recent studies have suggested that mutations in CovRS, a two-component regulatory system in Streptococcus pyogenes, play important roles in the pathogenesis of STSS. However, in vivo evidence of the significance of CovRS in human infections has not been fully demonstrated. We investigated five S. pyogenes strains isolated simultaneously from the pharynx, sputum, knee joint, cerebrospinal fluid and blood of a single STSS patient. All were emm89-type strains, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis revealed that the strains of pharynx and blood were isogenic. The growth rates of the strains from pharynx and sputum were faster than those of the other strains. Protein profiles of the culture supernatants of strains from the pharynx and sputum were also different from those of the other strains. Sequence analyses revealed that strains from the knee joint, cerebrospinal fluid and blood contained a single nucleotide difference in the covS coding region, resulting in one amino acid change, compared with the other strains. Introduction of a plasmid containing the covS gene from the pharynx strain to the blood strain increased the production of SpeB protein. This suggests that the one amino acid alteration in CovS was relevant to pathogenesis. This report supports the idea that mutated CovS plays important roles in vivo in the dissemination of S. pyogenes from the upper respiratory tract of human to aseptic tissues such as blood and cerebrospinal fluid.

  20. Is there any difference in pyogenic liver abscess caused by Streptococcus milleri and Klebsiella spp?: retrospective analysis over a 10-year period in a regional hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Siu-Tong; Kong Li, Michael Kin

    2013-02-01

    To compare the clinical characteristics of patients with Streptococcus milleri (SM) and Klebsiella spp. associated pyogenic liver abscess (PLA). A retrospective study of patients with PLA due to SM and Klebsiella spp. was conducted. Clinical characteristics, laboratory and radiological features, management and outcomes were analyzed. From 2000 to 2009 inclusive, 21 and 140 patients had SM and Klebsiella spp. associated monomicrobial infected PLA, respectively. A higher incidence of active malignancy occurred in the SM group (14.3% vs. 3.6%, p Klebsiella spp. associated PLA tended to have more complications: bacteremia (61.6% vs. 31.6%, p Klebsiella spp. with regard to risk factors, clinical manifestations and complications. However, both can be effectively treated with a combination of antibiotics and image-guided aspiration with/without drainage. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Scarlet fever is caused by a limited number of Streptococcus pyogenes lineages and is associated with the exotoxin genes ssa, speA and speC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Costa, Catarina; Carriço, Joao A; Ramirez, Mario; Melo-Cristino, Jose

    2014-03-01

    Several outbreaks of scarlet fever caused by Streptococcus pyogenes were recently reported. Scarlet fever is historically considered a toxin-mediated disease, dependent on the production of the exotoxins SpeA and SpeC, but a strict association between scarlet fever and these exotoxins is not always detected. The aims of this study were to characterize the scarlet fever bacterial isolates recovered from patients in a Lisbon hospital and to identify any distinctive characteristics of such isolates. We characterized a collection of 303 pharyngeal S. pyogenes collected between 2002 and 2008. One-hundred and one were isolated from scarlet fever patients and 202 were associated to a diagnosis of tonsillo-pharyngitis. Isolates were characterized by T and emm typing, pulsed field gel electrophoresis profiling and superantigen gene profiling. The diversity of the scarlet fever isolates was lower than that of the pharyngitis isolates. Specific lineages of emm87, emm4 and emm3 were overrepresented in scarlet fever isolates but only 1 pulsed field gel electrophoresis major lineage was significantly associated with scarlet fever. Multivariate analysis indicated associations of ssa, speA and speC with scarlet fever. In nonoutbreak conditions, scarlet fever is caused by a number of distinct genetic lineages. The lower diversity of these isolates and the association with specific exotoxin genes indicates that some lineages are more prone to cause this presentation than others even in nonoutbreak conditions.

  2. Streptococcal pyogenic exotoxin B (SpeB) boosts the contact system via binding of a-1 antitrypsin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meinert Niclasen, Louise; Olsen, Johan G; Dagil, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The Streptococcus pyogenes cysteine protease SpeB (streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B) is important for the invasive potential of the bacteria, but its production is down-regulated following systemic infection. This prompted us to investigate if SpeB potentiated the host immune response after...

  3. SpxA1 and SpxA2 Act Coordinately To Fine-Tune Stress Responses and Virulence in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Port, Gary C; Cusumano, Zachary T; Tumminello, Paul R; Caparon, Michael G

    2017-03-28

    SpxA is a unique transcriptional regulator highly conserved among members of the phylum Firmicutes that binds RNA polymerase and can act as an antiactivator. Why some Firmicutes members have two highly similar SpxA paralogs is not understood. Here, we show that the SpxA paralogs of the pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes , SpxA1 and SpxA2, act coordinately to regulate virulence by fine-tuning toxin expression and stress resistance. Construction and analysis of mutants revealed that SpxA1 - mutants were defective for growth under aerobic conditions, while SpxA2 - mutants had severely attenuated responses to multiple stresses, including thermal and oxidative stresses. SpxA1 - mutants had enhanced resistance to the cationic antimicrobial molecule polymyxin B, while SpxA2 - mutants were more sensitive. In a murine model of soft tissue infection, a SpxA1 - mutant was highly attenuated. In contrast, the highly stress-sensitive SpxA2 - mutant was hypervirulent, exhibiting more extensive tissue damage and a greater bacterial burden than the wild-type strain. SpxA1 - attenuation was associated with reduced expression of several toxins, including the SpeB cysteine protease. In contrast, SpxA2 - hypervirulence correlated with toxin overexpression and could be suppressed to wild-type levels by deletion of speB These data show that SpxA1 and SpxA2 have opposing roles in virulence and stress resistance, suggesting that they act coordinately to fine-tune toxin expression in response to stress. SpxA2 - hypervirulence also shows that stress resistance is not always essential for S. pyogenes pathogenesis in soft tissue. IMPORTANCE For many pathogens, it is generally assumed that stress resistance is essential for pathogenesis. For Streptococcus pyogenes , environmental stress is also used as a signal to alter toxin expression. The amount of stress likely informs the bacterium of the strength of the host's defense response, allowing it to adjust its toxin expression to produce the ideal

  4. Long-term antibody memory induced by synthetic peptide vaccination is protective against Streptococcus pyogenes infection and is independent of memory T cell help.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Manisha; Wykes, Michelle N; Hartas, Jon; Good, Michael F; Batzloff, Michael R

    2013-03-15

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus [GAS]) is a leading human pathogen associated with a diverse array of mucosal and systemic infections. Vaccination with J8, a conserved region synthetic peptide derived from the M-protein of GAS and containing only 12 aa from GAS, when conjugated to diphtheria toxoid, has been shown to protect mice against a lethal GAS challenge. Protection has been previously shown to be Ab-mediated. J8 does not contain a dominant GAS-specific T cell epitope. The current study examined long-term Ab memory and dissected the role of B and T cells. Our results demonstrated that vaccination generates specific memory B cells (MBC) and long-lasting Ab responses. The MBC response can be activated following boost with Ag or limiting numbers of whole bacteria. We further show that these memory responses protect against systemic infection with GAS. T cell help is required for activation of MBC but can be provided by naive T cells responding directly to GAS at the time of infection. Thus, individuals whose T cells do not recognize the short synthetic peptide in the vaccine will be able to generate a protective and rapid memory Ab response at the time of infection. These studies significantly strengthen previous findings, which showed that protection by the J8-diphtheria toxoid vaccine is Ab-mediated and suggest that in vaccine design for other organisms the source of T cell help for Ab responses need not be limited to sequences from the organism itself.

  5. Celulitis orbitaria complicada por absceso subperióstico debido a infección por Streptococcus pyogenes

    OpenAIRE

    José Daniel Ruíz Carrillo; Edwin Vázquez Guerrero; Mónica Cecilia Mercado Uribe

    2017-01-01

    Introducción: La celulitis orbitaria es una enfermedad infecciosa muy frecuente en la edad pediátrica que puede provocar el desarrollo de severas complicaciones. Los principales microorganismos involucrados son Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae y Moraxella catarrhalis, que juntos corresponden al 95% de los casos. También se pueden presentar Streptococcus beta hemolíticos y microorganismos anaerobios, que corresponden a menos del 5% de los casos. Se presen...

  6. Clinical and epidemiological aspects of invasive Streptococcus pyogenes infections in Denmark during 2003 and 2004

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luca-Harari, B.; Linden, M. van der; Staum-Kattoft, M.

    2008-01-01

    being higher in patients more than 70 years of age (36.5%). For streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) and necrotizing fasciitis the CFRs were 53% and 25%, respectively. Out of 16 T types recorded, three predominated: T28 (23%), T1 (22%), and the cluster T3/13/B3264 (14%). Among 21) different emm...

  7. Celulitis orbitaria complicada por absceso subperióstico debido a infección por Streptococcus pyogenes

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    José Daniel Ruíz Carrillo

    2017-03-01

    Conclusiones: Debido a la implementación de los esquemas de vacunación desde la década de los 90 contra H. influenza y S. pneumoniae, los casos por estos patógenos han disminuido, provocando que nuevas bacterias tomen su lugar como causantes de la infección. La importancia de considerar a S. pyogenes como etiología de celulitis orbitaria radica en la rápida progresión para la formación de abscesos, así como los pocos casos descritos en la literatura.

  8. Association of the shuffling of Streptococcus pyogenes clones and the fluctuation of scarlet fever cases between 2000 and 2006 in central Taiwan

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    Wang Wan-Ling

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number of scarlet fever occurrences reported between 2000 and 2006 fluctuated considerably in central Taiwan and throughout the nation. Isolates of Streptococcus pyogenes were collected from scarlet fever patients in central Taiwan and were characterized by emm sequencing and a standardized pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE method. National weekly report data were collected for investigating epidemiological trends. Results A total of 23 emm types were identified in 1,218 S. pyogenes isolates. The five most prevalent emm types were emm12 (50.4%, emm4 (23.2%, emm1 (16.4%, emm6 (3.8% and emm22 (3.0%. PFGE analysis with SmaI suggested that, with a few exceptions, strains with a common emm type belonged to the same clone. There were two large emm12 clones, one with DNA resistant to cleavage by SmaI. Each prevalent emm clone had major PFGE strain(s and many minor strains. Most of the minor strains emerged in the population and disappeared soon after. Even some major strains remained prevalent for only 2–3 years before declining. The large fluctuation of scarlet fever cases between 2000 and 2006 was associated with the shuffling of six prevalent emm clones. In 2003, the dramatic drop in scarlet fever cases in central Taiwan and throughout the whole country was associated with the occurrence of a severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS outbreak that occurred between late-February and mid-June in Taiwan. Conclusion The occurrences of scarlet fever in central Taiwan in 2000–2006 were primarily caused by five emm types, which accounted for 96.8% of the isolates collected. Most of the S. pyogenes strains (as defined by PFGE genotypes emerged and lasted for only a few years. The fluctuation in the number of scarlet fever cases during the seven years can be primarily attributed to the shuffling of six prevalent emm clones and to the SARS outbreak in 2003.

  9. Meningitis neonatal por Streptococcus pyogenes y revisión de la literatura de los últimos 50 años Neonatal meningitis caused by Streptococcus pyogenes and literature review of the last 50 years

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    Manuel Díaz Alvarez

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Se describe el caso de un recién nacido fallecido a causa de meningitis bacteriana por estreptococo del grupo A. Se revisó la literatura mediante la búsqueda en distintas bases de datos y otras fuentes de los últimos 50 años. Antes de la publicación de este caso, se han documentado casos de otros 20 neonatos con meningitis bacteriana por estreptococo del grupo A y se halla la descripción clínica de ellos desde el año 1957. En otros artículos al mostrar la casuística de sepsis o meningitis neonatal, en general, reportan casos de recién nacidos con esta infección ocasionada por estreptococos del grupo A, pero no se ofrece información detallada de los casos. Según las publicaciones citadas, se demuestra que, aunque en la actualidad el estreptococo del grupo A no es ya un azote en el período neonatal, puede considerarse entre los microorganismos causales de meningitis bacteriana neonatal.The case of a newborn infant who died of bacterial meningitis caused by streptococcus of the group A was described. The literature was reviewed by searching different databases and other sources of the last 50 years. Before publishing this case, cases of other 20 neonates with bacterial meningitis due to streptococcus of the group A have been documented and their clinical description has been made since 1957. Other articles show the casuistics of sepsis or neonatal meningitis in general by reporting cases of newborns with this infection produced by streptococcus of group A, but no detailed information of the cases is provided. According to the publications cited, it was proved that in spite of the fact that at present streptococcus is not a hazard in the neonatal period, it may be considered among the microorganisms causing neonatal bacterial meningitis.

  10. Identification and characterization of two temperature-induced surface-associated proteins of Streptococcus suis with high homologies to members of the arginine deiminase system of Streptococcus pyogenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winterhoff, N.; Goethe, R.; Gruening, P.; Rohde, M.; Kalisz, H.; Smith, H.E.; Valentin-Weigand, P.

    2002-01-01

    The present study was performed to identify stress-induced putative virulence proteins of Streptococcus suis. For this, protein expression patterns of streptococci grown at 32, 37, and 42°C were compared by one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Temperature shifts from 32 and 37 to 42°C

  11. [Carriage of Streptococcus pyogenes in primary school children: M-protein types, pyrogenic toxin genes, and investigation of the clonal relationships between the isolates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otlu, Barış; Karakurt, Cemşit; Bayındır, Yaşar; Kayabaş, Üner; Yakupoğulları, Yusuf; Gözükara Bağ, Harika

    2015-07-01

    M-protein and pyrogenic toxins are the most important virulence factors of Streptococcus pyogenes, and they play significant role in the pathophysiology of acute rheumatoid fever and scarlet fever, respectively. In this study, the pharyngeal carriage of S.pyogenes of the primary school children, clonal relationship of the strains, M-protein types, and the presence of pyrogenic toxin genes were aimed to be investigated. A total of 668 throat cultures obtained from children (age range: 6-16 years) in two primary schools in our region, were included in the study. The clonal relationships of the isolated group A streptococci (GAS) strains were investigated by DiversiLab assay (BioMérieux, France), and the clonal relatedness was confirmed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) method. M-protein (emm) typing was performed by DNA sequencing as suggested by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The genes encoding pyrogenic toxins, speA and speC, were investigated by an in-house multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. S.pyogenes was isolated from 134 (20.05%) of the throat samples. The GAS carriage rate of the students aged ≥10 was statistically higher than those 7-9 years age group (%22 vs %16.4, pprotein gene could be characterized only among 123 isolates by DNA sequencing, and 20 different emm types were detected. The most frequent emm type was emm1 (n=38, 30.9%) followed by emm12 (n=18, 14.6%), emm89 (n=10, 8.1%), emm118 (n=9, 7.3%), and emm4 (n=7, 5.7%). Pyrogenic toxin genes were found in 25 (18.6%) of the isolates, including speA in 11 isolates (8.2%) and speC in 12 isolates (8.9%) and both genes were detected in 2 isolates (1.5%). Sixty-two different Rep (Repetitive extragenic palindromic)-PCR profiles were detected in 134 S.pyogenes isolates by DiversiLab method. Thirteen different clusters were formed by a total of clonally related 36 isolates revealing a strain clustering ratio of 26.9%. Clonal relationship of all isolates in the same

  12. Antibacterial resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS) from healthy carriers and tonsillitis patients and association with antibacterial sale in the Faroe Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnussen, Marita D; Gaini, Shahin; Gislason, Hannes; Kristinsson, Karl G

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antibacterial resistance of Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS), and correlate the findings with the sales of erythromycin and tetracycline. General practitioners in the Faroe Islands were recruited to send oropharyngeal swabs. From an ongoing pneumococcal study, nasopharyngeal swabs were sampled from healthy children 0-7 years of age. Erythromycin susceptibility data from Iceland were obtained from the reference laboratory at the Landspitali University Hospital. Susceptibility testing in the Faroe Islands and Iceland was performed according to CLSI methods and criteria. The resistance rate to erythromycin and tetracycline found in patients in the Faroe Islands in 2009/2010 was 6% and 30% respectively. Tetracycline resistance in patients declined significantly from 2009 to 2010 (37-10%, p-value = 0.006 < 0.05) and differed significantly between age groups (p-value = 0.03 < 0.05). In Iceland, there was a peak in erythromycin resistance in 2008 (44%) and a substantial decrease in 2009 (5%). Although the prevalence of erythromycin and tetracycline resistance in the Faroe Islands and Iceland may be associated with antimicrobial use, sudden changes can occur with the introduction of new resistant clones. © 2016 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Ultrahigh and High Resolution Structures and Mutational Analysis of Monomeric Streptococcus pyogenes SpeB Reveal a Functional Role for the Glycine-rich C-terminal Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González-Páez, Gonzalo E.; Wolan, Dennis W. (Scripps)

    2012-09-05

    Cysteine protease SpeB is secreted from Streptococcus pyogenes and has been studied as a potential virulence factor since its identification almost 70 years ago. Here, we report the crystal structures of apo mature SpeB to 1.06 {angstrom} resolution as well as complexes with the general cysteine protease inhibitor trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido(4-guanidino)butane and a novel substrate mimetic peptide inhibitor. These structures uncover conformational changes associated with maturation of SpeB from the inactive zymogen to its active form and identify the residues required for substrate binding. With the use of a newly developed fluorogenic tripeptide substrate to measure SpeB activity, we determined IC{sub 50} values for trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido(4-guanidino)butane and our new peptide inhibitor and the effects of mutations within the C-terminal active site loop. The structures and mutational analysis suggest that the conformational movements of the glycine-rich C-terminal loop are important for the recognition and recruitment of biological substrates and release of hydrolyzed products.

  14. Purification and characterization of erythrogenic toxins of Streptococcus pyogenes. VI. Mitogenic activity of isoelectrically focused erythrogenic toxin preparations and culture supernatants of group A streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knöll, H; Gerlach, D; Ozegowski, J H; Hribalová, V; Köhler, W

    1983-11-01

    Isoelectric focusing (IF) was used to separate erythrogenic toxins (ET) type A, B and C from concentrated culture filtrates of Streptococcus pyogenes strains. The ET's were identified by their mitogenic activity on human lymphocytes in the lymphocyte transformation test: purified ET type A appeared at pH 5.3, ET type C at pH 6.8 and ET type B at pH 7.5 to 8.5; the ET type B was only biologically active when PAGE IF was used. IF on Sephadex G 100 failed to yield active B toxin. The application of as little as 0.1 micrograms ET type A to an isoelectric focusing gel was still sufficient to detect a mitogenic peak in the eluates. ET type A was identified in nine out of 10 culture filtrates, ET type C in 4 out of 10. Detection of ET type B (identical with streptococcal proteinase proenzyme) in culture filtrates after IF proved to be difficult. Here the pH of cultivation media and the autocatalytic conversion of streptococcal proteinase proenzyme to activated proteinase have to be considered.

  15. EFFECT OF THE ESSENTIAL OIL, INFUSION AND ETHANOL EXTRACT OF Thymus vulgaris L., ON THE GROWTH IN VITRO OF GROUP A ß-HEMOLYTIC Streptococcus pyogenes

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    Eloy Solano

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Se estimó un tratamiento alternativo de bajo costo para conocer la efectividad del tomillo Thymus vulgaris L., sobre la faringoamigdalitis bacteriana. Al aceite esencial obtenido por destilación, extracto etanólico e infusión de tomillo; se les evaluó su actividad biológica sobre el crecimiento de Streptococcus pyogenes ß-hemolítico del grupo A de Lancefield, principal causante de la faringoamigdalitis. Se realizaron pruebas de sensibilidad y se midieron las zonas de inhibición in vitro. El aceite esencial destilado, registró el mayor halo de inhibición (3.2 cm, incluso superó a la penicilina (2.4 cm. Con el extracto etanólico la inhibición fue menor y con la infusión no hubo inhibición. El aceite esencial y el extracto etanólico fueron analizados por medio de cromatografía en capa fina y cromatografía de gases para determinar su concentración y pureza en comparación con el aceite escencial puro de tomillo, obteniéndose la presencia de timol y en menor grado carvacrol, agentes activos que producen inhibición en el crecimiento bacteriano.

  16. Relevance of spontaneous fabT mutations to a streptococcal toxic shock syndrome to non-streptococcal toxic shock syndrome transition in the novel-type Streptococcus pyogenes isolates that lost a salRK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsuno, Ichiro; Okada, Ryo; Matsumoto, Masakado; Hata, Nanako; Matsui, Hideyuki; Zhang, Yan; Isaka, Masanori; Hasegawa, Tadao

    2016-05-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a causative agent of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS). Mutations in covR/S or rgg, negative regulators, can reportedly modulate the severity of infection in this pathogen. Recently, we showed that the regions encoding the SalR-SalK, a two-component regulatory system, were deleted in some emm 1-type isolates (named as 'novel-type'). In this study, the two novel 'STSS' isolates 10-85stss and 11-171stss were more virulent than the two novel 'non-STSS' isolates 11O-2non and 11T-3non when examined using a mouse model of invasive infection. Genome-sequencing experiments using the three strains 10-85stss , 11-171stss , and 11O-2non detected only one single nucleotide polymorphism that causes a non-synonymous mutation in fabT encoding a transcriptional regulator in strain 11O-2non . Loss of fabT reduced the high level of virulence observed in the STSS isolates to that in the non-STSS isolates, and introduction of an intact fabT compensated the lower virulence of 11O-2non , suggesting that the mutation in fabT, but not in covR/S or rgg, is involved in the differential virulence among the novel-type clinical isolates. This type of non-synonymous fabT mutation was also identified in 12 non-STSS isolates (including 11O-2non and 11T-3non ), and most of those 12 isolates showed impaired FabT function. © 2016 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Aspectos clínico-epidemiológicos de las infecciones por Streptococcus pyogenes en el período neonatal Clinical and epidemiological aspects of the infections caused by Streptococcus pyogenes in the neonatal period

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    Manuel Díaz Alvarez

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCCIÓN. El objetivo de la presente investigación fue describir las características clínicas y epidemiológicas de la infección por Estreptococo del grupo A en los recién nacidos egresados de hospitales maternos. MÉTODOS. Se realizó un estudio descriptivo, que incluyó a recién nacidos consecutivos, quienes tuvieron infecciones por estreptococos del grupo A y que estuvieron ingresados en el servicio de neonatología del Hospital Pediátrico Universitario «Juan M. Márquez» entre 1992 y el 2005. Se procesaron y analizaron distintas variables clínicas y epidemiológicas con cálculo de tasas de incidencia y letalidad. RESULTADOS. Se registraron 20 recién nacidos con infección por estreptococos del grupo A, lo cual representó una tasa promedio anual de 0,2 cada 100 ingresos. Esta infección muestra una incidencia con tendencia significativa a disminuir en los últimos años. Según la clasificación utilizada, todas las infecciones fueron de inicio tardío y, de acuerdo al origen, predominaron las adquiridas en la comunidad (95,0 %. La infección de tejidos blandos fue la forma clínica más frecuente (10 de 20; 50 % y cursó con bacteriemia. Los aislamientos de estreptococos del grupo A tuvieron un 100 % de sensibilidad ante los betalactámicos. Hubo un solo paciente fallecido, afecto de meningitis, lo cual significó una tasa de letalidad del 5,0 %. CONCLUSIONES. El estreptococo del grupo A es un agente causal de infecciones que afectan al recién nacido, fundamentalmente en el ambiente comunitario. Estas infecciones pueden ser letales en algunos pacientes con infección del sistema nervioso central, a pesar del patrón de elevada susceptibilidad a los betalactámicos.INTRODUCTION. The objective of the present investigation was to describe the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of the infection caused by group A Streptococcus in the newborn infants discharged from maternal hospitals. METHODS. A descriptive study that

  18. In vitro antimicrobial activity of ozenoxacin against methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant S. aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes isolated from clinical cutaneous specimens in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanayama, Shoji; Ikeda, Fumiaki; Okamoto, Kazuaki; Nakajima, Akiko; Matsumoto, Tatsumi; Ishii, Ritsuko; Amano, Ayako; Matsuzaki, Kaoru; Matsumoto, Satoru

    2016-10-01

    Ozenoxacin, a novel non-fluorinated topical quinolone, was assessed for in vitro antimicrobial activity against each 50 isolates of methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), and Streptococcus pyogenes according to the broth microdilution method recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. The isolates used in this study were recovered from cutaneous specimens of Japanese adult and pediatric patients who visited hospitals in 2014. The MIC90s of ozenoxacin against MSSA, MRSA and S. pyogenes isolates from adult patients were ≤0.06, 4 and ≤0.06 μg/mL, respectively. The MIC90s of ozenoxacin against MSSA and S. pyogenes isolates from pediatric patients were equal to those against the adult isolates. On the other hand, the MIC90s of ozenoxacin against the pediatric MRSA isolates was 0.12 μg/mL, and was 32 times lower than that against the adult isolates. The antimicrobial activity of ozenoxacin against MSSA, MRSA and S. pyogenes was equal to or greater than those of 7 reference antimicrobial agents had been used for the treatment of skin infections. The MICs of ozenoxacin was highly correlated with those of nadifloxacin and levofloxacin in the 50 MRSA isolates (r(2) = 0.906 and 0.833, respectively). However, ozenoxacin kept the potent antimicrobial activity with the MIC ranging from 1 to 4 μg/mL even against MRSA low susceptible (MIC: >64 μg/mL) to nadifloxacin or levofloxacin. Ozenoxacin could represent the first-in-class non-fluorinated quinolone for the topical treatment of various superficial skin infections caused by MSSA, MRSA and S. pyogenes. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Preliminary pediatric clinical evaluation of the oral probiotic Streptococcus salivarius K12 in preventing recurrent pharyngitis and/or tonsillitis caused by Streptococcus pyogenes and recurrent acute otitis media

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    Di Pierro F

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Francesco Di Pierro,1 Guido Donato,2 Federico Fomia,3 Teresa Adami,4 Domenico Careddu,5 Claudia Cassandro,6 Roberto Albera61Scientific Department, Velleja Research, Milano, 2ASL 1, Cuneo, 3ASL 3, Brescia, 4Infective Diseases, Verona, 5ASL 13, Novara, 6Surgical Science Department, Università degli Studi, Torino, ItalyBackground: The oral probiotic Streptococcus salivarius K12 has been shown clearly to antagonize the growth of Streptococcus pyogenes, the most important bacterial cause of pharyngeal infections in humans, by releasing two bacteriocins named salivaricin A2 and salivaricin B. Unpublished observations indicate that it can also antagonize the growth of other bacteria involved in acute otitis media. Because of its ability to colonize the oral cavity and its safety profile, we have tested its efficacy in reducing the incidence of streptococcal pharyngitis and/or tonsillitis and episodes of acute otitis media.Methods: We enrolled 82 children, including 65 with and 17 without a recent diagnosis of recurrent oral streptococcal pathology. Of those with recurrent pathology, 45 were treated daily for 90 days with an oral slow-release tablet containing five billion colony-forming units of S. salivarius K12 (Bactoblis®, and the remaining 20 served as an untreated control group. The 17 children without a recent diagnosis of recurrent oral pathology were used as an additional control group. After 90 days of treatment, a 6-month follow-up period without treatment was included to evaluate a possible persistent protective role for the previously administered product.Results: The 41 children who completed the 90-day course of Bactoblis showed a reduction in their episodes of streptococcal pharyngeal infection (about 90% and/or acute otitis media (about 40%, calculated by comparing infection rates in the previous year. The 90-day treatment also reduced the reported incidence of pharyngeal and ear infections by about 65% in the 6-month follow-up period

  20. The role of minimally invasive spine surgery in the management of pyogenic spinal discitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turel, Mazda K; Kerolus, Mena; Deutsch, Harel

    2017-01-01

    Background: Diagnostic yields for spondylodiscitis from CT guided biopsy is low. In the recent years, minimally invasive surgery (MIS) has shown to have a low morbidity and faster recovery. For spinal infections, MIS surgery may offer an opportunity for early pain control while obtaining a higher diagnostic yield than CT-guided biopsies. The aim of this study was to review our patients who underwent MIS surgery for spinal infection and report outcomes. Methods: A retrospective review of seven patients who underwent MIS decompression and/or discectomy in the setting of discitis, osteomyelitis, spondylodiscitis, and/or an epidural abscess was identified. Patient data including symptoms, visual analog score (VAS), surgical approach, antibiotic regimen, and postoperative outcomes were obtained. Results: Of the 7 patients, 5 patients had lumbar infections and two had thoracic infections. All seven patients improved in VAS immediately after surgery and at discharge. The average VAS improved by 4.4 ± 1.9 points. An organism was obtained in 6 of the 7 (85%) patients by the operative cultures. All patients made an excellent clinical recovery without the need for further spine surgery. All patients who received postoperative imaging on follow-up showed complete resolution or dramatically improved magnetic resonance imaging changes. The follow-up ranged from 2 to 9 months. Conclusions: MIS surgery provides an opportunity for early pain relief in patients with discitis, osteomyelitis, spondylodiscitis, and/or epidural abscess by directly addressing the primary cause of pain. MIS surgery for discitis provides a higher diagnostic yield to direct antibiotic treatment. MIS surgery results in good long-term recovery. PMID:28250635

  1. Use of flow cytometry for the adhesion analysis of Streptococcus pyogenes mutant strains to epithelial cells: investigation of the possible role of surface pullulanase and cysteine protease, and the transcriptional regulator Rgg

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    Finne Jukka

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flow cytometry based adherence assay is a potentially powerful but little used method in the study of bacterial binding to host structures. We have previously characterized a glycoprotein-binding activity in Streptococcus pyogenes called 'strepadhesin' binding to thyroglobulin, submaxillar mucin, fetuin and asialofetuin. We have identified surface-associated pullulanase (PulA and cysteine protease (SpeB as carriers of strepadhesin activity. In the present paper, we investigated the use of flow cytometry as a method to study the binding of Rgg, SpeB and PulA knock-out strains to cultured human epithelial cells. Results Streptococcal mutants were readily labelled with CFDA-SE and their binding to epithelial cells could be effectively studied by flow cytometry. A strain deficient in Rgg expression showed increased binding to the analyzed epithelial cell lines of various origin. Inactivation of SpeB had no effect on the adhesion, while PulA knock-out strains displayed decreased binding to the cell lines. Conclusion These results suggest that the flow cytometric assay is a valuable tool in the analysis of S. pyogenes adherence to host cells. It appears to be an efficient and sensitive tool for the characterization of interactions between the bacteria and the host at the molecular level. The results also suggest a role for Rgg regulated surface molecules, like PulA, in the adhesion of S. pyogenes to host cells.

  2. Mutations in the control of virulence sensor gene from Streptococcus pyogenes after infection in mice lead to clonal bacterial variants with altered gene regulatory activity and virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A Mayfield

    Full Text Available The cluster of virulence sensor (CovS/responder (CovR two-component operon (CovRS regulates ∼15% of the genes of the Group A Streptococcal pyogenes (GAS genome. Bacterial clones containing inactivating mutations in the covS gene have been isolated from patients with virulent invasive diseases. We report herein an assessment of the nature and types of covS mutations that can occur in both virulent and nonvirulent GAS strains, and assess whether a nonvirulent GAS can attain enhanced virulence through this mechanism. A group of mice were infected with a globally-disseminated clonal M1T1 GAS (isolate 5448, containing wild-type (WT CovRS (5448/CovR+S+, or less virulent engineered GAS strains, AP53/CovR+S+ and Manfredo M5/CovR+S+. SpeB negative GAS clones from wound sites and/or from bacteria disseminated to the spleen were isolated and the covS gene was subjected to DNA sequence analysis. Numerous examples of inactivating mutations were found in CovS in all regions of the gene. The mutations found included frame-shift insertions and deletions, and in-frame small and large deletions in the gene. Many of the mutations found resulted in early translation termination of CovS. Thus, the covS gene is a genomic mutagenic target that gives GAS enhanced virulence. In cases wherein CovS- was discovered, these clonal variants exhibited high lethality, further suggesting that randomly mutated covS genes occur during the course of infection, and lead to the development of a more invasive infection.

  3. Robot guidance for percutaneous minimally invasive placement of pedicle screws for pyogenic spondylodiscitis is associated with lower rates of wound breakdown compared to conventional fluoroscopy-guided instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaid, Awad; von Eckardstein, Kajetan; Smoll, Nicolas Roydon; Solomiichuk, Volodymyr; Rohde, Veit; Martinez, Ramon; Schatlo, Bawarjan

    2018-04-01

    Postoperative wound healing can pose a problem in patients undergoing instrumented surgery for pyogenic spondylodiscitis. Robotic guidance allows the minimally invasive placement of pedicle screws in the thoracolumbar spine. We assessed whether using this technique to perform minimally invasive surgery had an impact on wound healing in patients with pyogenic spondylodiscitis when compared to conventional open fluoroscopy-guided surgery. We reviewed charts of 206 consecutive patients who underwent instrumentation for pyogenic spondylodiscitis. The need for wound revision was the primary outcome measure. Patient variables and comorbidities as well as surgical technique (robotic versus fluoroscopy-guided) were analyzed. We also compared fluoroscopy times between the two groups. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to identify predictors of wound breakdown. A total of 206 patients underwent surgery for spondylodiscitis. Robotic surgical assistance was used for percutaneous instrumentation in 47.6% of cases (n = 98). Wound healing problems requiring revision occurred in 30 out of 206 patients (14.6%). Univariate analysis revealed a potential association of wound breakdown with (1) robotic technique, (2) age > 70 years, and (3) the presence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. After multivariate correction however, only robotic technique retained significance with an odds ratio of 0.39 (CI 95% 0.16-0.94; p = 0.035). Wound revision was required in eight out of 98 patients (8.1%) in the robot group and 22/108 (20%) in the conventional surgery group. Fluoroscopy times were significantly lower in the robot group with a mean of 123 ± 86 s in comparison with a mean of 157 ± 99 s in the conventional group (p = 0.014). While initially designed to improve the accuracy of pedicle screw placement, robot-assisted minimally invasive technique had a tangible effect on both radiation exposure and the rate of wound breakdown in patients with pyogenic

  4. PavA of Streptococcus pneumoniae Modulates Adherence, Invasion, and Meningeal Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Pracht, Daniela; Elm, Christine; Gerber, Joachim; Bergmann, Simone; Rohde, Manfred; Seiler, Marleen; Kim, Kwang S.; Jenkinson, Howard F.; Nau, Roland; Hammerschmidt, Sven

    2005-01-01

    Pneumococcal adherence and virulence factor A (PavA) is displayed to the cell outer surface of Streptococcus pneumoniae and mediates pneumococcal binding to immobilized fibronectin. PavA, which lacks a typical gram-positive signal sequence and cell surface anchorage motif, is essential for pneumococcal virulence in a mouse infection model of septicemia. In this report the impact of PavA on pneumococcal adhesion to and invasion of eukaryotic cells and on experimental pneumococcal meningitis wa...

  5. Preventing invasive Group B Streptococcus (GBS) disease in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    9 No. 3 has been successfully used for the prevention of tetanus, influenza and pertussis in infants.[11] A trivalent GBS polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccine (against serotypes Ia, Ib and III) has completed phase-II evaluation among pregnant women and has the potential to prevent 70 - 80% of all invasive GBS disease.

  6. Invasive Streptococcus viridans sphenoethmoiditis leading to an orbital apex syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodily, Lance; Yu, Jenny; Sorrentino, Dante; Branstetter, Barton

    2017-12-01

    Orbital apex syndrome due to spread of infectious sinusitis is a serious disease, often with an insidious presentation with few ophthalmic signs and symptoms. Failure to recognize and treat infectious orbital apex syndrome early portends a grave prognosis, including profound, permanent visual loss and potentially death. Herein we describe a representative case and discuss the relevant aspects of prompt diagnosis and treatment. An unusual case of infectious orbital apex syndrome due to contiguous spread of Streptococcus viridans sphenoethmoiditis in a hospitalized, immunosuppressed patient with acute myelogenous leukemia is presented. Given the few clinic signs and subtle imaging findings, a delay in diagnosis occurred resulting in vision loss to light perception and internal carotid artery occlusion within the cavernous sinus. A brief literature review of orbital apex syndromes is presented. A high clinical suspicion for orbital apex syndrome must be maintained in the appropriate circumstance given the subtle clinical signs and imaging, as well as the potential devastating morbidity of the disease process. Prompt diagnosis and treatment is crucial to patient survival and preservation of vision.

  7. Complement inhibition by Sarcoptes scabiei protects Streptococcus pyogenes - An in vitro study to unravel the molecular mechanisms behind the poorly understood predilection of S. pyogenes to infect mite-induced skin lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swe, Pearl M; Christian, Lindsay D; Lu, Hieng C; Sriprakash, Kadaba S; Fischer, Katja

    2017-03-01

    On a global scale scabies is one of the most common dermatological conditions, imposing a considerable economic burden on individuals, communities and health systems. There is substantial epidemiological evidence that in tropical regions scabies is often causing pyoderma and subsequently serious illness due to invasion by opportunistic bacteria. The health burden due to complicated scabies causing cellulitis, bacteraemia and sepsis, heart and kidney diseases in resource-poor communities is extreme. Co-infections of group A streptococcus (GAS) and scabies mites is a common phenomenon in the tropics. Both pathogens produce multiple complement inhibitors to overcome the host innate defence. We investigated the relative role of classical (CP), lectin (LP) and alternative pathways (AP) towards a pyodermic GAS isolate 88/30 in the presence of a scabies mite complement inhibitor, SMSB4. Opsonophagocytosis assays in fresh blood showed baseline immunity towards GAS. The role of innate immunity was investigated by deposition of the first complement components of each pathway, specifically C1q, FB and MBL from normal human serum on GAS. C1q deposition was the highest followed by FB deposition while MBL deposition was undetectable, suggesting that CP and AP may be mainly activated by GAS. We confirmed this result using sera depleted of either C1q or FB, and serum deficient in MBL. Recombinant SMSB4 was produced and purified from Pichia pastoris. SMSB4 reduced the baseline immunity against GAS by decreasing the formation of CP- and AP-C3 convertases, subsequently affecting opsonisation and the release of anaphylatoxin. Our results indicate that the complement-inhibitory function of SMSB4 promotes the survival of GAS in vitro and inferably in the microenvironment of the mite-infested skin. Understanding the tripartite interactions between host, parasite and microbial pathogens at a molecular level may serve as a basis to develop improved intervention strategies targeting scabies

  8. Spontaneous Pyogenic Spondylodiscitis in the Thoracic or Lumbar Spine: A Retrospective Cohort Study Comparing the Safety and Efficacy of Minimally Invasive and Open Surgery Over a Nine-Year Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viezens, Lennart; Schaefer, Christian; Helmers, Rachel; Vettorazzi, Eik; Schroeder, Malte; Hansen-Algenstaedt, Nils

    2017-06-01

    Pyogenic spondylodiscitis is a rare disease, but its incidence is increasing. Over the last decade, spinal surgery has been modified to become minimally invasive. In degenerative spinal disorders, such minimally invasive surgery (MIS) reduces blood loss, muscular trauma, and the hospital stay. However, it is not known whether MIS also confers these benefits to patients with pyogenic spondylodiscitis. This retrospective cohort study compared the safety and efficacy of MIS and the conventional open surgical procedure in patients with pyogenic spondylodiscitis. The study cohort consisted of all consecutive patients who underwent surgery for thoracic or lumbar pyogenic spondylodiscitis that was not caused by previous surgery or tuberculosis in our tertiary-care institution between January 2003 and December 2011. Of the 148 eligible patients, 75 and 73 underwent MIS and open surgery, respectively. The 2 groups did not differ in terms of age, body mass index, American Society of Anaesthesiologists score, comorbidities, septic disease, or preoperative neurologic deficit. The 2 methods were associated with similar postoperative stays in the intensive care unit, overall hospital stays, complication rates, and postoperative survival. However, MIS was associated with a significantly shorter operating time, a lower perioperative need for blood products, and, as expected, an increased intraoperative fluoroscopy duration. Our 9-year experience suggests that MIS is safe and effective for spontaneous pyogenic thoracic and lumbar spondylodiscitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Streptococcus sanguinis as an opportunistic bacteria in human oral cavity: Adherence, colonization, and invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hening Tjaturina Pramesti

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus sanguinis (formerly S. sanguis is a Gram-positive, facultative anaerobe,  nonmotile , normal  inhabitant of the human oral cavity, and  a member of  the viridans group of streptococci. Among the streptococcus, S. sanguinis is a  primary colonizer in the human tooth surface or it is recognize as a ‘pioneer’ by forming dental plaque. The aim of this paper is to review the role of Streptococcus sanguinis  in the adherence to and  invasion of  human tissues.  S. sanguinis  has been reported  that it is associated  with healthy  tooth  surfaces  but not with caries. S. sanguinis  tend to involved in an interspecies interactions with Streptococcus mutans, which is known as  competition/coexistence within dental biofilm.  In their colonization, this bacteria used enzyme sortase A (SrtA to cleave  LPXTG-containing proteins sequence and  anchored  the  cell wall, while virulence factors  in infective endocarditis  involved housekeeping functions such as cell wall synthesis, amino acid and nucleic acid synthesis, and the ability to survive under anaerobic conditions.

  10. Point-Counterpoint: A Nucleic Acid Amplification Test for Streptococcus pyogenes Should Replace Antigen Detection and Culture for Detection of Bacterial Pharyngitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritt, Bobbi S; Patel, Robin; Kirn, Thomas J; Thomson, Richard B

    2016-10-01

    Nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) have frequently been the standard diagnostic approach when specific infectious agents are sought in a clinic specimen. They can be applied for specific agents such as S. pyogenes, or commercial multiplex NAATs for detection of a variety of pathogens in gastrointestinal, bloodstream, and respiratory infections may be used. NAATs are both rapid and sensitive. For many years, S. pyogenes testing algorithms used a rapid and specific group A streptococcal antigen test to screen throat specimens, followed, in some clinical settings, by a throat culture for S. pyogenes to increase the sensitivity of its detection. Now S. pyogenes NAATs are being used with increasing frequency. Given their accuracy, rapidity, and ease of use, should they replace antigen detection and culture for the detection of bacterial pharyngitis? Bobbi Pritt and Robin Patel of the Mayo Clinic, where S. pyogenes NAATs have been used for well over a decade with great success, will explain the advantages of this approach, while Richard (Tom) Thomson and Tom Kirn of the NorthShore University HealthSystem will discuss their concerns about this approach to diagnosing bacterial pharyngitis. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Chemoprophylaxis against Group A Streptococcus during Military Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-12-14

    chemoprophylaxis policy, the highlights of which are presented in this paper. 28 29 Group A Streptococcus 30 Streptococcus pyogenes (or GAS) is a Gram-positive...236 6, 2017. 237 20. Gray GC, Escamilla J, Hyams KC, Struewing JP, Kaplan EL, Tupponce AK. Hyperendemic 238 Streptococcus pyogenes infection...Pharyngeal colonization prevalence rates 261 for Streptococcus pyogenes and Steptococcus pneumoniae in a respiratory chemoprophylaxis 262 intervention

  12. Streptococcus pneumoniae aislados de infecciones invasivas: serotipos y resistencia antimicrobiana Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from invasive infections: serotypes and antimicrobial resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladys Antonia Cueto Montoya

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Las meningoencefalitis bacterianas constituyen una enfermedad invasiva importante, quizás no tanto por su frecuencia, como por la gravedad de su cuadro. Los cambios en la epidemiología de los síndromes neurológicos infecciosos en Cuba a partir de la vacunación contra meningococo BC y Haemophilus influenzae b han hecho que el Streptococcus pneumoniae constituya el agente causal más frecuente. Debido al incremento de la resistencia de este microorganismo a los antibióticos habituales, se realizaron modificaciones al régimen terapéutico convencional, fundamentalmente en las meningitis pediátricas. Es necesario lograr el aislamiento en cultivo de este agente para conocer los serotipos más frecuentes en el país, y lograr una vacuna neumocócica conjugada, así como para la vigilancia de las cepas frente a los antimicrobianos.The bacterial meningoencephalitis is an important invasive disease, not only because of its frequency, but also because of the severity of its picture. The changes in the epidemiology of the neurological infectious syndromes in Cuba starting from the vaccination against meningococcus BC and Haemophilus infuenzae b have made that Streptococcus pneumoniae be the most frequent causal agent. Due to the increase of the resistance of this microorganism to habitual antibiotics, modifications were made in the conventional therapeutic regimen, mainly in the pediatric meningitis. It is necessary to achieve the isolation in culture of this agent to know the most common serotypes in the country, to attain a conjugated pneumococcal vaccine, and to keep the surveillance of the strains against the antimicrobials.

  13. Peritonitis primaria por Streptococcus pyogenes

    OpenAIRE

    Munrós, Jordina; Alonso Vargas, María Inmaculada; Pino Saladrigues, Marta del; Pahisa Fábregas, Jaume; Almela, M. (Manel); Mensa Pueyo, Josep; Carmona Herrera, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Sr. Editor: la peritonitis de origen infeccioso habitualmente es secundaria a procesos patológicos del tracto gastrointestinal o genitourinario y suele ser polimicrobiana. Se denomina peritonitis primaria o espontánea aquélla en la que no se objetiva ninguna causa evidente. Generalmente es de etiología monomicrobiana y se observa en pacientes afectos de cirrosis hepática, síndrome nefrótico o inmunosupresión. Su hallazgo en personas sin ninguna comorbilidad es muy poco frecuente. Los microorg...

  14. Temporal Changes in Invasive Group B Streptococcus Serotypes: Implications for Vaccine Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziyaad Dangor

    Full Text Available There is a paucity of longitudinal data on the serotype-specific burden of invasive group B Streptococcus (GBS disease from low-middle income countries, which could inform selection of vaccine epitopes.From 2005 to 2014, infants less than 90 days of age with invasive GBS disease were identified through sentinel laboratory and hospital admission surveillance at Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital in Soweto, South Africa.We identified 820 cases of invasive GBS disease, including 55% among newborns <7 days age (i.e. early-onset disease; EOD. The overall incidence (per 1,000 live births of invasive GBS disease was 2.59 (95% CI: 2.42-2.77, including 1.41 (95% CI: 1.28-1.55 for EOD and 1.18 (95% CI: 1.06-1.30 in infants 7-89 days age (late-onset disease. Year-on-year, from 2005 to 2014, we observed a 9.4% increase in incidence of serotype Ia invasive disease (RR: 1.09; 95% CI: 1.04-1.15; p<0.001, and a 7.4% decline in serotype III invasive disease (RR: 0.93; 95% CI: 0.90-0.96; p<0.001. Overall, serotypes Ia (28.2%, III (55.4% and V (7.9% were the commonest disease causing serotypes.The incidence of invasive GBS disease has remained persistently high in our setting, with some changes in serotype distribution, albeit mainly involving the same group of dominant serotypes.

  15. Pyogenic sacroiliitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, G.; Kabins, S.A.

    1980-01-01

    Seven definite and three probable cases of pyogenic sacroiliitis are presented and compared to 72 cases found in the English literature. Patients may present with a subacute localized or an acute systemic illness. Six of our patients were parenteral drug abusers. Sacroiliac uptake of gallium 67 citrate and/or technetium 99m pyrophosphate suggested the diagnosis which was confirmed by fluoroscopically controlled joint aspiration when blood cultures were sterile. Gram-negative organisms, group B streptococci and a Staphylococcus were isolated. Antibiotic treatment for four to six weeks was uniformly successful. Surgery should be reserved for abscess or sequestrum formation, neither of which were encountered in this series

  16. Liquid–liquid diffusion crystallization improves the X-ray diffraction of EndoS, an endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase from Streptococcus pyogenes with activity on human IgG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trastoy, Beatriz; Lomino, Joseph V.; Wang, Lai-Xi; Sundberg, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    A comparative study of vapor diffusion versus liquid–liquid diffusion methods used for the crystallization of EndoS is reported. X-ray diffraction data to 2.6 and 1.9 Å resolution were collected for wild-type endoglycosidase and glycosynthase constructs of EndoS, respectively. Endoglycosidase S (EndoS) is an enzyme secreted by Streptococcus pyogenes that specifically hydrolyzes the β-1,4-di-N-acetylchitobiose core glycan on immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies. One of the most common human pathogens and the cause of group A streptococcal infections, S. pyogenes secretes EndoS in order to evade the host immune system by rendering IgG effector mechanisms dysfunctional. On account of its specificity for IgG, EndoS has also been used extensively for chemoenzymatic synthesis of homogeneous IgG glycoprotein preparations and is being developed as a novel therapeutic for a wide range of autoimmune diseases. The structural basis of its enzymatic activity and substrate specificity, however, remains unknown. Here, the purification and crystallization of EndoS are reported. Using traditional hanging-drop and sitting-drop vapor-diffusion crystallization, crystals of EndoS were grown that diffracted to a maximum of 3.5 Å resolution but suffered from severe anisotropy, the data from which could only be reasonably processed to 7.5 Å resolution. When EndoS was crystallized by liquid–liquid diffusion, it was possible to grow crystals with a different space group to those obtained by vapor diffusion. Crystals of wild-type endoglycosidase and glycosynthase constructs of EndoS grown by liquid–liquid diffusion diffracted to 2.6 and 1.9 Å resolution, respectively, with a greatly diminished anisotropy. Despite extensive efforts, the failure to reproduce these liquid–liquid diffusion-grown crystals by vapor diffusion suggests that these crystallization methods each sample a distinct crystallization space

  17. Functional Predominance of msr(D), Which Is More Effective as mef(A)-Associated Than mef(E)-Associated, Over mef(A)/mef(E) in Macrolide Resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsuno, Ichiro; Isaka, Masanori; Masuno, Katsuaki; Hata, Nanako; Matsumoto, Masakado; Hasegawa, Tadao

    2018-02-06

    Although mef(A) and its subclass mef(E) genes have long been considered to play a central role in macrolide efflux-based resistance, we have previously demonstrated that the msr(D) gene located immediately downstream of the mef(A) gene plays a predominant role in Streptococcus pyogenes macrolide resistance. The mef(A) and mef(E) genes are carried by different genetic elements and the resistance associated with mef(A) was reported to be higher than that associated with mef(E); therefore, we further investigated the functional relevance of mef(A)/mef(E) and its associated msr(D). We established additional mef(A)-, mef(E)-, and their associated msr(D)-knockout strains and confirmed the predominance of msr(D) over mef(A)/mef(E). In addition, we performed experiments introducing mef(A), mef(E), and their associated msr(D) genes into mef(A)/mef(E)-msr(D) double-knockout and mef(A)/mef(E) negative strains. Neither mef(A) nor mef(E) genes had effects on erythromycin resistance. However, both associated msr(D) showed significant effects, and the mef(A)-associated msr(D) exhibited more effect than the mef(E)-associated one. These results suggest that an overall functional predominance of msr(D) over mef(A)/mef(E) is conceivable in efflux-based macrolide resistance in at least some S. pyogenes strains. Furthermore, the higher resistance of mef(A) system over mef(E) system could be derived at least in part from functional differences of mef(A)- and mef(E)-associated msr(D).

  18. Characterisation of Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolated from Cambodian Children between 2007 - 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Catrin E; Giess, Adam; Soeng, Sona; Sar, Poda; Kumar, Varun; Nhoung, Pheakdey; Bousfield, Rachel; Turner, Paul; Stoesser, Nicole; Day, Nicholas P J; Parry, Christopher M

    2016-01-01

    The 13-valent pneumococcal vaccine (PCV13) was introduced in Cambodia in January 2015. There are limited data concerning the common serotypes causing invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). Knowledge of the circulating pneumococcal serotypes is important to monitor epidemiological changes before and after vaccine implementation. All episodes of IPD defined by the isolation of Streptococcus pneumoniae from blood, cerebrospinal fluid or other sterile site in Cambodian children admitted to the Angkor Hospital for Children in Siem Reap, Northwestern Cambodia, between 1st January 2007 and 1st July 2012 were retrospectively studied. Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates that could be retrieved underwent phenotypic typing and whole genome sequencing. There were 90 Cambodian children hospitalized with IPD with a median (IQR) age of 2.3 years (0.9-6.2). The case fatality was 15.6% (95% CI 8-23). Of 50 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates available for further testing, 46% were penicillin non-susceptible and 8% were ceftriaxone non-susceptible, 78% were cotrimoxazole resistant, 30% were erythromycin resistant and 30% chloramphenicol resistant. There were no significant changes in resistance levels over the five-year period. The most common serotypes were 1 (11/50; 22%), 23F (8/50; 16%), 14 (6/50; 12%), 5 (5/50; 10%) and 19A (3/50; 6%). Coverage by PCV7, PCV10 and PCV13 was 44%, 76% and 92% respectively. We identified novel multilocus sequence types and resistotypes using whole genome sequencing. This study suggests IPD is an important disease in Cambodian children and can have a significant mortality. PCV13 coverage of the serotypes determined in studied strains was high and consistent with another recent study. The phenotypic resistance patterns observed were similar to other regional studies. The use of whole genome sequencing in the present study provides additional typing and resistance information together with the description of novel sequence types and resistotypes.

  19. Characterisation of Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolated from Cambodian Children between 2007 - 2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catrin E Moore

    Full Text Available The 13-valent pneumococcal vaccine (PCV13 was introduced in Cambodia in January 2015. There are limited data concerning the common serotypes causing invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD. Knowledge of the circulating pneumococcal serotypes is important to monitor epidemiological changes before and after vaccine implementation.All episodes of IPD defined by the isolation of Streptococcus pneumoniae from blood, cerebrospinal fluid or other sterile site in Cambodian children admitted to the Angkor Hospital for Children in Siem Reap, Northwestern Cambodia, between 1st January 2007 and 1st July 2012 were retrospectively studied. Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates that could be retrieved underwent phenotypic typing and whole genome sequencing.There were 90 Cambodian children hospitalized with IPD with a median (IQR age of 2.3 years (0.9-6.2. The case fatality was 15.6% (95% CI 8-23. Of 50 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates available for further testing, 46% were penicillin non-susceptible and 8% were ceftriaxone non-susceptible, 78% were cotrimoxazole resistant, 30% were erythromycin resistant and 30% chloramphenicol resistant. There were no significant changes in resistance levels over the five-year period. The most common serotypes were 1 (11/50; 22%, 23F (8/50; 16%, 14 (6/50; 12%, 5 (5/50; 10% and 19A (3/50; 6%. Coverage by PCV7, PCV10 and PCV13 was 44%, 76% and 92% respectively. We identified novel multilocus sequence types and resistotypes using whole genome sequencing.This study suggests IPD is an important disease in Cambodian children and can have a significant mortality. PCV13 coverage of the serotypes determined in studied strains was high and consistent with another recent study. The phenotypic resistance patterns observed were similar to other regional studies. The use of whole genome sequencing in the present study provides additional typing and resistance information together with the description of novel sequence types and resistotypes.

  20. Characterisation of Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolated from Cambodian Children between 2007 – 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giess, Adam; Soeng, Sona; Sar, Poda; Kumar, Varun; Nhoung, Pheakdey; Bousfield, Rachel; Turner, Paul; Stoesser, Nicole; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Parry, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The 13-valent pneumococcal vaccine (PCV13) was introduced in Cambodia in January 2015. There are limited data concerning the common serotypes causing invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). Knowledge of the circulating pneumococcal serotypes is important to monitor epidemiological changes before and after vaccine implementation. Methods All episodes of IPD defined by the isolation of Streptococcus pneumoniae from blood, cerebrospinal fluid or other sterile site in Cambodian children admitted to the Angkor Hospital for Children in Siem Reap, Northwestern Cambodia, between 1st January 2007 and 1st July 2012 were retrospectively studied. Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates that could be retrieved underwent phenotypic typing and whole genome sequencing. Results There were 90 Cambodian children hospitalized with IPD with a median (IQR) age of 2.3 years (0.9–6.2). The case fatality was 15.6% (95% CI 8–23). Of 50 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates available for further testing, 46% were penicillin non-susceptible and 8% were ceftriaxone non-susceptible, 78% were cotrimoxazole resistant, 30% were erythromycin resistant and 30% chloramphenicol resistant. There were no significant changes in resistance levels over the five-year period. The most common serotypes were 1 (11/50; 22%), 23F (8/50; 16%), 14 (6/50; 12%), 5 (5/50; 10%) and 19A (3/50; 6%). Coverage by PCV7, PCV10 and PCV13 was 44%, 76% and 92% respectively. We identified novel multilocus sequence types and resistotypes using whole genome sequencing. Conclusions This study suggests IPD is an important disease in Cambodian children and can have a significant mortality. PCV13 coverage of the serotypes determined in studied strains was high and consistent with another recent study. The phenotypic resistance patterns observed were similar to other regional studies. The use of whole genome sequencing in the present study provides additional typing and resistance information together with the description of novel

  1. Expression of the major heat shock proteins DnaK and GroEL in Streptococcus pyogenes: a comparison to Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laport, M S; de Castro, A C; Villardo, A; Lemos, J A; Bastos, M C; Giambiagi-deMarval, M

    2001-04-01

    One of the outstanding problems in the field of heat shock response has been to elucidate the mechanism underlying the induction of heat shock proteins (HSPs). In this work, we initiate an analysis of the expression of heat shock groEL and dnaK genes and their promoters in S. pyogenes. The synthesis of total cellular proteins was studied upon transfer of a log-phase culture from 37 degrees C to 42 degrees C by performing 5-min pulse-labeling experiments with (35)S-Met. The heat shock responses in the pathogenic Gram-positive cocci, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus, were also analyzed.

  2. Serotype and Genotype Distribution among Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates in Colombia, 2005–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Eliana L.; Ramos, Viviana; Sanabria, Olga; Moreno, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    In Colombia, a laboratory-based surveillance of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates as part of SIREVA II PAHO has been conducted since 1994. This study describes the serotype distribution, antimicrobial resistance, and genetic relationships of pneumococcal isolates recovered in Colombia from 2005 to 2010. In this study, demographic data of invasive S. pneumoniae isolates were analyzed, and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns were determined. Pulse field gel electrophoresis (n = 629) and multilocus sequence typing (n = 10) were used to determine genetic relationship of isolates with minimal inhibitory concentration to penicillin ≥0.125 µg/mL. A total of 1775 isolates of S. pneumoniae were obtained. Fifteen serotypes accounted for 80.7% of isolates. Serotype 14 (23.1%) was the most frequent in the general population. Penicillin resistance was 30.7% in meningitis and 9.0% in non-meningitis. Clones Spain6BST90, Spain9VST156, Spain23FST81, and Colombia23FST338 were associated to isolates. Additionally, serotype 6A isolates were associated with ST460 and ST473, and 19A isolates with ST276, ST320, and ST1118. In conclusion, the surveillance program provided updated information of trends in serotype distribution, antimicrobial resistance and the circulation of clones in invasive pneumococcal diseases. These results could be helpful to understand the epidemiology of S. pneumoniae in Colombia, and provide a baseline to measure the impact of vaccine introduction. PMID:24416330

  3. Serotypes and antibiotic susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates causative of invasive diseases in Mexican children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arredondo-García, José Luis; Calderón, Ernesto; Echániz-Aviles, Gabriela; Soto-Noguerón, Araceli; Arzate, Patricia; Amabile-Cuevas, Carlos F

    2011-03-02

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a worldwide leading cause of morbidity and mortality, while susceptibility towards penicillin and macrolides can be less than 50% in many regions. A total of 150 isolates of S. pneumoniae causative of invasive diseases in children were characterized, of which 24.6% had a fatal outcome. The most prevalent serotypes were 19F, 6B, 23F and 14. Resistance to penicillin, erythromycin (mostly of macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin resistance phenotype) or trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was found in more than 40% of the isolates, but no resistance phenotype appeared linked to lethality. Serotype 3 isolates, which were seldom resistant, had a twofold lethality rate compared to the total sample. Serotyping could provide a better outcome-predicting tool than susceptibility testing. The seven-valent vaccine does not include the most prevalent serotypes found in Mexico.

  4. Pharmacodynamic analysis and clinical trial of amoxicillin sprinkle administered once daily for 7 days compared to penicillin V potassium administered four times daily for 10 days in the treatment of tonsillopharyngitis due to Streptococcus pyogenes in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichichero, M E; Casey, J R; Block, S L; Guttendorf, R; Flanner, H; Markowitz, D; Clausen, S

    2008-07-01

    An a priori pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) target of 40% daily time above the MIC (T >MIC; based on the MIC(90) of 0.06 microg/ml for Streptococcus pyogenes reported in the literature) was shown to be achievable in a phase 1 study of 23 children with a once-daily (QD) modified-release, multiparticulate formulation of amoxicillin (amoxicillin sprinkle). The daily T >MIC achieved with the QD amoxicillin sprinkle formulation was comparable to that achieved with a four-times-daily (QID) penicillin VK suspension. An investigator-blinded, randomized, parallel-group, multicenter study involving 579 children 6 months to 12 years old with acute streptococcal tonsillopharyngitis was then undertaken. Children were randomly assigned 1:1 to receive either the amoxicillin sprinkle (475 mg for ages 6 months to 4 years, 775 mg for ages 5 to 12 years) QD for 7 days or 10 mg/kg of body weight of penicillin VK QID for 10 days (up to the maximum dose of 250 mg QID). Unexpectedly, the rates of bacteriological eradication at the test of cure were 65.3% (132/202) for the amoxicillin sprinkle and 68.0% (132/194) for penicillin VK (95% confidence interval, -12.0% to 6.6%). Thus, neither antibiotic regimen met the minimum criterion of > or =85% eradication ordinarily required by the U.S. FDA for first-line treatment of tonsillopharyngitis due to S. pyogenes. The results of subgroup analyses across demographic characteristics and current infection characteristics and by age/weight categories were consistent with the primary-efficacy result. The clinical cure rates for amoxicillin sprinkle and penicillin VK were 86.1% (216/251) and 91.9% (204/222), respectively (95% confidence interval, -11.6% to -0.4%). The results of a post hoc PD analysis suggested that a requirement for 60% daily T >MIC(90) more accurately predicted the observed high failure rates for bacteriologic eradication with the amoxicillin sprinkle and penicillin VK suspension studied. Based on the association between

  5. Pharmacodynamic Analysis and Clinical Trial of Amoxicillin Sprinkle Administered Once Daily for 7 Days Compared to Penicillin V Potassium Administered Four Times Daily for 10 Days in the Treatment of Tonsillopharyngitis Due to Streptococcus pyogenes in Children▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichichero, M. E.; Casey, J. R.; Block, S. L.; Guttendorf, R.; Flanner, H.; Markowitz, D.; Clausen, S.

    2008-01-01

    An a priori pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) target of 40% daily time above the MIC (T >MIC; based on the MIC90 of 0.06 μg/ml for Streptococcus pyogenes reported in the literature) was shown to be achievable in a phase 1 study of 23 children with a once-daily (QD) modified-release, multiparticulate formulation of amoxicillin (amoxicillin sprinkle). The daily T >MIC achieved with the QD amoxicillin sprinkle formulation was comparable to that achieved with a four-times-daily (QID) penicillin VK suspension. An investigator-blinded, randomized, parallel-group, multicenter study involving 579 children 6 months to 12 years old with acute streptococcal tonsillopharyngitis was then undertaken. Children were randomly assigned 1:1 to receive either the amoxicillin sprinkle (475 mg for ages 6 months to 4 years, 775 mg for ages 5 to 12 years) QD for 7 days or 10 mg/kg of body weight of penicillin VK QID for 10 days (up to the maximum dose of 250 mg QID). Unexpectedly, the rates of bacteriological eradication at the test of cure were 65.3% (132/202) for the amoxicillin sprinkle and 68.0% (132/194) for penicillin VK (95% confidence interval, −12.0% to 6.6%). Thus, neither antibiotic regimen met the minimum criterion of ≥85% eradication ordinarily required by the U.S. FDA for first-line treatment of tonsillopharyngitis due to S. pyogenes. The results of subgroup analyses across demographic characteristics and current infection characteristics and by age/weight categories were consistent with the primary-efficacy result. The clinical cure rates for amoxicillin sprinkle and penicillin VK were 86.1% (216/251) and 91.9% (204/222), respectively (95% confidence interval, −11.6% to −0.4%). The results of a post hoc PD analysis suggested that a requirement for 60% daily T >MIC90 more accurately predicted the observed high failure rates for bacteriologic eradication with the amoxicillin sprinkle and penicillin VK suspension studied. Based on the association between longer

  6. Portadores assintomáticos de infecções por Streptococcus pyogenes em duas escolas públicas na cidade do Recife, Pernambuco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciel Amelia

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: investigar a prevalência Streptococus pyogenes em secreção de orofaringe de escolares procedentes de duas escolas públicas da cidade Recife. MÉTODOS: estudo epidemiológico e clínico-microbiológico descritivo no qual foram examinados 753 escolares. A cultura bacteriana da secreção orofaringeana foi realizada em ágar-sangue de carneiro 5% e as cepas SBGA identificadas através dos testes de bacitracina, Pyr e aglutinação em látex. RESULTADOS: a faixa etária dos 753 escolares analisados variou de cinco a 19 anos, sendo 54,3% do sexo masculino e 45,7% do sexo feminino. Seis eram portadores assintomáticos de SBGA e foram submetidos ao tratamento com penicilina. Após o tratamento, realizou-se a dosagem da antiestreptolisina o (ASLO, cujos títulos séricos foram inferiores a 200UT. CONCLUSÕES: uma prevalência de SBGA de 0,8% foi estimada em portadores assintomáticos, considerada baixa, quando comparado a outros resultados em estudos semelhantes. Os autores sugerem a realização de outros estudos para estimar a prevalência de SBGA em crianças com faringite e sua relação com a febre reumática aguda.

  7. Detection of staphylococcus aureus and streptococcus pyogenes in the personnel of the department of surgery and surgical rooms at the San Jose Universitary Hospital Popayan, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Caldas

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To detect Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes in health personnel of the surgical and surgery services at Hospital San José. Methodology. Descriptive, Prospective cross-sectional study. The techniques used were surveys and sampling nasal and pharyngeal microbiological cultures. Results. It was found that from 29 persons under study, 10 (34.40yo were S. aureus carriers, and it was not found S. pyogenes carriers. From the positives, 8 (80% were S. aureus nasal carriers, and 2 (20% pharyngeal carriers. From 8 people (80%, 4 (40% belonged to the department ofsurgery and another 4 (40% to the surgical services; 2 (20% from the pharyngeal positives worked at the surgery services. From the carriers, 5 people (50% were nursing assistants, followed by 4 (40%, who belong to doctors and 1 person (10% belonged to nursing.

  8. Purulent Pericarditis Caused by Group A Streptococcus

    OpenAIRE

    Bhaduri-McIntosh, Sumita; Prasad, Meeta; Moltedo, José; Vázquez, Marietta

    2006-01-01

    Purulent pericarditis is a rare disease that is most often caused by organisms such as Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, viridans streptococci, Haemophilus influenzae, and anaerobic bacteria. We present an unusual case of purulent pericarditis caused by Streptococcus pyogenes, Lancefield group A streptococcus (GAS), and we provide a review of the literature.

  9. [Structural homology between streptolysin O (SLO) produced by streptococcus pyogenes and SLO-like protein produced by non-pathogenic streptococci and cross-reactivity of antibody against SLO-like protein to SLO].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Kenji; Koike, Hisashi; Ota, Hiromi; Nakagawa, Mayumi; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Kotani, Kazuhiko

    2008-08-01

    Nine clones of non-pathogenic streptococci were isolated from the pharynges of seven healthy subjects, and grown on sheep blood agar plates with a hemolysis or gamma hemolysis, then cultured in LB broth for 16 hrs. Purified streptolysin O (SLO) purchased from Sigma Chemical Co. (Sigma-SLO), SLO antigen as a latex agglutination reagent from A company (A-SLO) and supernatants from four culture media were electrophoresed on 12% SDS-polyacrylamide gel and transferred to PVDF membranes. Immunological analyses of antibodies against SLO in healthy sera and proteins in culture medium demonstrated that healthy sera contained an antibody recognizing Sigma-SLO, A-SLO and a protein of the same size as SLO (SLO-like protein) in culture medium. These findings suggest that healthy subjects develop an antibody directed against SLO-like protein produced by non-pathogenic streptococci, and that this antibody cross-reacts with Sigma-SLO and A-SLO. Using DNA from Streptococcus pyogenes and non-pathogenic streptococci, the SLO gene and SLO-like protein gene were analyzed by direct sequencing with oligonucleotide primers designed to cover no. 74 to approximately 1900 of the SLO gene. There were three different bases resulting in amino acid substitution between the SLO gene and SLO-like protein gene, namely 101Lys (AAA) of SLO to Asn (AAT), 175Met (ATG) to Arg (AGG) and 185Asp (GAT) to Asn (AAT). Remaining 560 residues of 563 amino acids constituting SLO-like protein were homologous to SLO. Non-pathogenic streptococci on the pharynges of healthy subjects produce an SLO-like protein composed of amino acids similar to those of SLO, which induces an antibody against this SLO-like protein in serum. It is likely that an antibody against SLO-like protein in healthy sera cross-reacts with SLO and causes a pseudo-positive reaction on ASO measurement by the latex agglutination method using SLO antigen.

  10. Identification of a high-virulence clone of type III Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus) causing invasive neonatal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musser, J M; Mattingly, S J; Quentin, R; Goudeau, A; Selander, R K

    1989-06-01

    Chromosomal genotypes of 128 isolates of six serotypes (Ia, Ib, Ic, II, Ic/II, and III) of Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus) recovered predominantly from human infants in the United States were characterized by an analysis of electrophoretically demonstrable allelic profiles at 11 metabolic enzyme loci. Nineteen distinctive electrophoretic types (ETs), representing multilocus clonal genotypes, were identified. Mean genetic diversity per locus among ETs of isolates of the same serotype was, on average, nearly equal to that in all 19 ETs. Cluster analysis of the ETs revealed two primary phylogenetic divisions at a genetic distance of 0.65. A single clone (ET 1) represented by 40 isolates expressing type III antigen formed division I. Division II was composed of 18 ETs in three major lineages diverging from one another at distances greater than 0.35 and included strains of all six antigenic classes. The type III organisms in division I produce more extracellular neuraminidase and apparently are more virulent than the type III strains in division II, which are related to strains of other serotypes that cause disease much less frequently. The existence of this unusually virulent clone accounts, in major part, for the high morbidity and mortality associated with infection by type III organisms.

  11. Signal transduction through CsrRS confers an invasive phenotype in group A Streptococcus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hien J Tran-Winkler

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The CsrRS (or CovRS two component system controls expression of up to 15% of the genome of group A Streptococcus (GAS. While some studies have suggested that the sensor histidine kinase CsrS responds to membrane perturbations as a result of various environmental stresses, other data have implicated the human antimicrobial peptide LL-37 and extracellular Mg(2+ as specific signals. We now report that Mg(2+ and LL-37 have opposite effects on expression of multiple genes that are activated or repressed by the transcriptional regulator CsrR. Using a GAS isolate representative of the recently emerged and widely disseminated M1T1 clone implicated in severe invasive disease, we found marked up-regulation by CsrRS of multiple virulence factors including pyrogenic exotoxin A, DNase Sda1, streptolysin O, and the hyaluronic acid capsular polysaccharide, among others. Topology and surface protein labeling studies indicated that CsrS is associated with the bacterial cell membrane and has a surface-exposed extracellular domain accessible to environmental ligands. Replacement of a cluster of three acidic amino acids with uncharged residues in the extracellular domain of CsrS abrogated LL-37 signaling and conferred a hyporesponsive phenotype consistent with tonic activation of CsrS autokinase activity, an effect that could be overridden by mutation of the CsrS active site histidine. Both loss- and gain-of-function mutations of a conserved site in the receiver domain of CsrR established an essential role for lysine 102 in CsrS-to-CsrR signal transduction. These results provide strong evidence that Mg(2+ and LL-37 are specific signals that function by altering CsrS autokinase activity and downstream phosphotransfer to CsrR to modulate its activity as a transcriptional regulator. The representation of multiple antiphagocytic and cytotoxic factors in the CsrRS regulon together with results of in vitro phagocytic killing assays support the hypothesis that Csr

  12. Molecular epidemiology, antimicrobial susceptibilities and resistance mechanisms of Streptococcus pyogenes isolates resistant to erythromycin and tetracycline in Spain (1994–2006

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    Rubio-López Virginia

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Group A Streptococcus (GAS causes human diseases ranging in severity from uncomplicated pharyngitis to life-threatening necrotizing fasciitis and shows high rates of macrolide resistance in several countries. Our goal is to identify antimicrobial resistance in Spanish GAS isolates collected between 1994 and 2006 and to determine the molecular epidemiology (emm/T typing and PFGE and resistance mechanisms of those resistant to erythromycin and tetracycline. Results Two hundred ninety-five out of 898 isolates (32.8% were erythromycin resistant, with the predominance of emm4T4, emm75T25, and emm28T28, accounting the 67.1% of the 21 emm/T types. Spread of emm4T4, emm75T25 and emm28T28 resistant clones caused high rates of macrolide resistance. The distribution of the phenotypes was M (76.9%, cMLSB (20.3%, iMLSB (2.7% with the involvement of the erythromycin resistance genes mef(A (89.5%, msr(D (81.7%, erm(B (37.3% and erm(A (35.9%. Sixty-one isolates were tetracycline resistant, with the main representation of the emm77T28 among 20 emm/T types. To note, the combination of tet(M and tet(O tetracycline resistance genes were similar to tet(M alone reaching values close to 40%. Resistance to both antibiotics was detected in 19 isolates of 7 emm/T types, being emm11T11 and the cMLSB phenotype the most frequent ones. erm(B and tet(M were present in almost all the strains, while erm(A, mef(A, msr(D and tet(O appeared in less than half of them. Conclusions Spanish GAS were highly resistant to macrolides meanwhile showed minor resistance rate to tetracycline. A remarkable correlation between antimicrobial resistance and emm/T type was noticed. Clonal spread of emm4T4, emm75T25 and emm28T28 was the main responsable for macrolide resistance where as that emm77T28 clones were it to tetraclycline resistance. A wide variety of macrolide resistance genes were responsible for three macrolide resistance phenotypes.

  13. Effect of poly-hexamethylene biguanide hydrochloride (PHMB) treated non-sterile medical gloves upon the transmission of Streptococcus pyogenes, carbapenem-resistant E. coli, MRSA and Klebsiella pneumoniae from contact surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, S; Wilson, A P R

    2017-08-17

    Reduction of accidental contamination of the near-patient environment has potential to reduce acquisition of healthcare-associated infection(s). Although medical gloves should be removed when soiled or touching the environment, compliance is variable. The use of antimicrobial-impregnated medical gloves could reduce the horizontal-transfer of bacterial contamination between surfaces. Determine the activity of antimicrobial-impregnated gloves against common hospital pathogens: Streptococcus pyogenes, carbapenem-resistant E.coli (CREC), MRSA and ESBL-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae. Fingerpads (~1cm 2 ) of PHMB-treated and untreated gloves were inoculated with 10 μL (~10 4 colony-forming-units [cfu]) of test-bacteria prepared in heavy-soiling (0.5%BSA), blood or distilled-water (no-soiling) and sampled after 0.25, 1, 10 or 15 min contact-time. Donor surfaces (~1cm 2 computer-keys) contaminated with wet/dry inoculum were touched with the fingerpad of treated/untreated gloves and subsequently pressed onto recipient (uncontaminated) computer-keys. Approximately 4.50log 10 cfu of all bacteria persisted after 15 min on untreated gloves regardless of soil-type. In the absence of soiling, PHMB-treated gloves reduced surface-contamination by ~4.5log 10 cfu (>99.99%) within 10 min of contact-time but only ~2.5log 10 (>99.9%) and ~1.0log 10 reduction respectively when heavy-soiling or blood was present. Gloves became highly-contaminated (~4.52log 10 -4.91log 10 cfu) when handling recently-contaminated computer-keys. Untreated gloves contaminated "recipient" surfaces (~4.5log 10 cfu) while PHMB-treated gloves transferred fewer bacteria (2.4-3.6log 10 cfu). When surface contamination was dry, PHMB gloves transferred fewer bacteria (0.3-0.6log 10 cfu) to "recipient" surfaces than untreated gloves (1.0-1.9log 10 ; P gloves may be useful in preventing dissemination of organisms in the near-patient environment during routine care. However they are not a substitute for

  14. Inference of Antibiotic Resistance and Virulence Among Diverse Group A Streptococcus Strains Using emm Sequencing and Multilocus Genotyping Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-04

    Surveillance Center, Silver Spring, Maryland, United States of America Abstract Background: Group A Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS) exhibits a high...david.metzgar@med.navy.mil Introduction Group A Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS) is a common agent of pharyngitis, febrile respiratory infection, and...Spratt BG, Kalia A, Cross JH, Bessen DE (2001) Multilocus sequence typing of Streptococcus pyogenes and the relationship between emm type and clone. Infect

  15. Interspecies Recombination in Type II Topoisomerase Genes Is Not a Major Cause of Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Pletz, Mathias W. R.; McGee, Lesley; Beall, Bernard; Whitney, Cynthia G.; Klugman, Keith P.

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the topoisomerase type II enzymes account for fluoroquinolone resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae. These mutations can arise spontaneously or be transferred by intraspecies or interspecies recombination, primarily with viridans streptococci. We analyzed the nucleotide sequences of the quinolone resistance-determining regions of 49 invasive levofloxacin-resistant pneumococcal isolates and did not find any evidence for interspecies recombination.

  16. (garlic) and erythromycin on streptococcus pyogenes abstract

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    LIVINGSTON

    thrombosis and hypertension , diabetic mellitus ; artherosclerosis inhibition and exhibits broad antibiotic spectrum . It has been suggested that garlic decreases fatigue and improvesmemory . Erythromycin is a macrolide antibiotic, which has antimicrobial spectrum similar to or slightly wider than that of penicillin and is often.

  17. Use of a dynamic in vitro attachment and invasion system (DIVAS) to determine influence of growth rate on invasion of respiratory epithelial cells by group B Streptococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, G; Paoletti, L C

    2001-11-06

    Expression of capsular polysaccharide (CPS) and some surface proteins by group B Streptococcus (GBS) is regulated by growth rate. We hypothesized that precise control of GBS growth, and thus surface-expressed components, could modulate the ability of GBS to invade eukaryotic cells. To test this hypothesis, a dynamic in vitro attachment and invasion system (DIVAS) was developed that combines the advantages of bacterial growth in continuous culture with tissue culture. Tissue culture flasks were modified with inlet and outlet ports to permit perfusion of GBS. Encapsulated type III GBS strains M781 and COH1 and strains COH1-11 and COH1-13 (transposon mutants of COH1 that express an asialo CPS or are acapsular, respectively) were grown in continuous culture in a chemically defined medium at fast mass doubling time (t(d) = 1.8 h) and slow (t(d) = 11 h) growth rates, conditions previously shown to induce and repress, respectively, type III CPS expression. Encapsulated GBS strains invaded A549 respiratory epithelial cells 20- to 700-fold better at the fast than at the slow growth rate, suggesting a role for CPS. However, unencapsulated GBS were also invasive but only when cultured at the fast growth rate, which indicates that GBS invasion is independent of CPS expression and can be regulated by growth rate. Growth rate-dependent invasion occurred when GBS was grown in continuous culture under glucose-defined, thiamine-defined, and undefined nutrient limitations. These results suggest a growth rate-dependent regulation of GBS pathogenesis and demonstrate the usefulness of DIVAS as a tool in studies of host-microbe interactions.

  18. Streptococcus pneumoniae PspC Subgroup Prevalence in Invasive Disease and Differences in Contribution to Complement Evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Maten, Erika; van den Broek, Bryan; de Jonge, Marien I; Rensen, Kim J W; Eleveld, Marc J; Zomer, Aldert L; Cremers, Amelieke J H; Ferwerda, Gerben; de Groot, Ronald; Langereis, Jeroen D; van der Flier, Michiel

    2018-04-01

    The pneumococcal capsular serotype is an important determinant of complement resistance and invasive disease potential, but other virulence factors have also been found to contribute. Pneumococcal surface protein C (PspC), a highly variable virulence protein that binds complement factor H to evade C3 opsonization, is divided into two subgroups: choline-bound subgroup I and LPxTG-anchored subgroup II. The prevalence of different PspC subgroups in invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) and functional differences in complement evasion are unknown. The prevalence of PspC subgroups in IPD isolates was determined in a collection of 349 sequenced strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from adult patients. pspC deletion mutants and isogenic pspC switch mutants were constructed to study differences in factor H binding and complement evasion in relation to capsule thickness. Subgroup I pspC was far more prevalent in IPD isolates than subgroup II pspC The presence of capsule was associated with a greater ability of bound factor H to reduce complement opsonization. Pneumococcal subgroup I PspC bound significantly more factor H and showed more effective complement evasion than subgroup II PspC in isogenic encapsulated pneumococci. We conclude that variation in the PspC subgroups, independent of capsule serotypes, affects pneumococcal factor H binding and its ability to evade complement deposition. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  19. Genome-wide molecular dissection of serotype M3 group A Streptococcus strains causing two epidemics of invasive infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beres, Stephen B; Sylva, Gail L; Sturdevant, Daniel E; Granville, Chanel N; Liu, Mengyao; Ricklefs, Stacy M; Whitney, Adeline R; Parkins, Larye D; Hoe, Nancy P; Adams, Gerald J; Low, Donald E; DeLeo, Frank R; McGeer, Allison; Musser, James M

    2004-08-10

    Molecular factors that contribute to the emergence of new virulent bacterial subclones and epidemics are poorly understood. We hypothesized that analysis of a population-based strain sample of serotype M3 group A Streptococcus (GAS) recovered from patients with invasive infection by using genome-wide investigative methods would provide new insight into this fundamental infectious disease problem. Serotype M3 GAS strains (n = 255) cultured from patients in Ontario, Canada, over 11 years and representing two distinct infection peaks were studied. Genetic diversity was indexed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, DNA-DNA microarray, whole-genome PCR scanning, prophage genotyping, targeted gene sequencing, and single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping. All variation in gene content was attributable to acquisition or loss of prophages, a molecular process that generated unique combinations of proven or putative virulence genes. Distinct serotype M3 genotypes experienced rapid population expansion and caused infections that differed significantly in character and severity. Molecular genetic analysis, combined with immunologic studies, implicated a 4-aa duplication in the extreme N terminus of M protein as a factor contributing to an epidemic wave of serotype M3 invasive infections. This finding has implications for GAS vaccine research. Genome-wide analysis of population-based strain samples cultured from clinically well defined patients is crucial for understanding the molecular events underlying bacterial epidemics.

  20. Milleri group streptococcus--a stepchild in the viridans family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegman-Igra, Y; Azmon, Y; Schwartz, D

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to provide a comprehensive review of the pathogenic role and spectrum of disease of milleri group streptococci, with special attention to bloodstream invasion and to possible differential roles among the three species. All consecutive isolates of milleri group streptococci from any anatomic source, during a 37-month period, in a tertiary care teaching hospital in Tel-Aviv, Israel, were thoroughly investigated. Identification to the species level was performed by an automated system.Streptococcus anginosus constituted 82% of the 245 patient-unique isolates from hospitalized patients. All nonurinary isolates were involved in pyogenic infections mostly originating from the gastrointestinal tract, with bacteremia in 28 cases. The 71 urinary isolates represented either urinary tract infection or nonsignificant bacteriuria. No specific association could be detected between species and the infection site, except for a higher relative representation of Streptococcus constellatus in bacteremia. Milleri group streptococci are common in clinical practice and play a different pathogenic role to other viridans streptococci. Due to their invariable association with pyogenic processes, their presence in blood warrants immediate focus identification. In addition, they have a previously unappreciated clinical niche concerning urinary tract infection. The identification of viridans streptococci to the species level is of paramount clinical significance.

  1. Characteristics of Streptococcus Strains Isolated From Clinical Specimens Other Than Throat Culture and Characteristics of Streptococcal Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Ünlü

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was to investigate the laboratory and clinical features of patients in whom Streptococcus spp. were isolated from cultures other than throat cultures. Methods: A total of 161 Streptococcus strains isolated from clinical specimens from 101 (64% hospitalized patients and 65 (36% outpatients and clinical and laboratory features of patients were investigated retrospectively. Isolated Streptococcus strains were further identified for type and antibiotic susceptibility according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. Results: Streptococcus strains types were determined as follows; group A (9-5.6%, group B (64-39.7%, group C (2-1.2%, group D (2-1.2%, group G (2-1.2%, viridans (57-32.2%, and Streptococcus pneumonia (24-14,9%. Most frequently observed infections were urinary system infections (52-32.2%, skin and soft tissue infections (48-29.8% and pulmonary infections (25-15.5%. In 87 (54% of patients, there was more than one comorbid condition. While all group A Streptococcus pyogenes strains were susceptible to penicillin, 13% of Streptococcus pneumonia were resistant to penicillin and 36.3% were resistant to macrolides. Mortality was observed in eight patients. Conclusion: Invasive streptococcal infections may cause serious mortality and morbidity especially in patients with comorbid conditions. Early detection and appropriate antimicrobial therapy are most important parameters for the management of streptococcal infections.

  2. Primary pyogenic spondylitis following kyphoplasty: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heyse Thomas J

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Only ten cases of primary pyogenic spondylitis following vertebroplasty have been reported in the literature. To the best of our knowledge, we present the first reported case of primary pyogenic spondylitis and spondylodiscitis caused by kyphoplasty. Case presentation A 72-year old Caucasian man with an osteoporotic compression fracture of the first lumbar vertebra after kyphoplasty developed sensory incomplete paraplegia below the first lumbar vertebra. This was caused by myelon compression following pyogenic spondylitis with a psoas abscess. Computed tomography guided aspiration of the abscess cavity yielded group C Streptococcus. The psoas abscess was percutaneously drained and laminectomy and posterior instrumentation with an internal fixator from the eleventh thoracic vertebra to the fourth lumbar vertebra was performed. In a second operation, corpectomy of the first lumbar vertebra with cement removal and fusion from the twelfth thoracic vertebra to the second lumbar vertebra with a titanium cage was performed. Six weeks postoperatively, the patient was pain free with no neurologic deficits or signs of infection. Conclusion Pyogenic spondylitis is an extremely rare complication after kyphoplasty. When these patients develop recurrent back pain postoperatively, the diagnosis of pyogenic spondylitis must be considered.

  3. Pyogenic abscess (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... become infected. The most common infecting bacteria include E coli , enterococcus, staphylococcus, and streptococcus. Treatment is usually a combination of drainage and prolonged antibiotic therapy.

  4. Sequence type 1 group B Streptococcus, an emerging cause of invasive disease in adults, evolves by small genetic changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Anthony R; Galloway-Peña, Jessica; Sahasrabhojane, Pranoti; Saldaña, Miguel; Yao, Hui; Su, Xiaoping; Ajami, Nadim J; Holder, Michael E; Petrosino, Joseph F; Thompson, Erika; Margarit Y Ros, Immaculada; Rosini, Roberto; Grandi, Guido; Horstmann, Nicola; Teatero, Sarah; McGeer, Allison; Fittipaldi, Nahuel; Rappuoli, Rino; Baker, Carol J; Shelburne, Samuel A

    2015-05-19

    The molecular mechanisms underlying pathogen emergence in humans is a critical but poorly understood area of microbiologic investigation. Serotype V group B Streptococcus (GBS) was first isolated from humans in 1975, and rates of invasive serotype V GBS disease significantly increased starting in the early 1990s. We found that 210 of 229 serotype V GBS strains (92%) isolated from the bloodstream of nonpregnant adults in the United States and Canada between 1992 and 2013 were multilocus sequence type (ST) 1. Elucidation of the complete genome of a 1992 ST-1 strain revealed that this strain had the highest homology with a GBS strain causing cow mastitis and that the 1992 ST-1 strain differed from serotype V strains isolated in the late 1970s by acquisition of cell surface proteins and antimicrobial resistance determinants. Whole-genome comparison of 202 invasive ST-1 strains detected significant recombination in only eight strains. The remaining 194 strains differed by an average of 97 SNPs. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a temporally dependent mode of genetic diversification consistent with the emergence in the 1990s of ST-1 GBS as major agents of human disease. Thirty-one loci were identified as being under positive selective pressure, and mutations at loci encoding polysaccharide capsule production proteins, regulators of pilus expression, and two-component gene regulatory systems were shown to affect the bacterial phenotype. These data reveal that phenotypic diversity among ST-1 GBS is mainly driven by small genetic changes rather than extensive recombination, thereby extending knowledge into how pathogens adapt to humans.

  5. Serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing invasive disease in the Republic of Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Vickers, I

    2011-05-01

    The 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was included in the routine infant immunization schedule in Ireland in September 2008. We determined the serotype of 977 S. pneumoniae isolates causing invasive disease between 2000-2002 and 2007-2008, assessed for the presence of the recently described serotype 6C and determined the susceptibility of isolates during 2007-2008 to penicillin and cefotaxime. Serotype 14 was the most common serotype during both periods and 7·7% of isolates previously typed as serotype 6A were serotype 6C. During 2000-2002 and 2007-2008, PCV7 could potentially have prevented 85% and 74% of invasive pneumococcal disease in the target population (i.e. children aged <2 years), respectively. The level of penicillin non-susceptibility was 17% in 2007-2008. Ongoing surveillance of serotypes is required to determine the impact of PCV7 in the Irish population and to assess the potential of new vaccines with expanded valency.

  6. Susceptibilidad a antimicrobianos en aislamientos de Streptococcus pneumoniae invasor en Colombia Susceptibility to antimicrobial agents in isolates of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aura Lucía Leal

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio para determinar los patrones de susceptibilidad a los antimicrobianos de los aislamientos de Streptococcus pneumoniae causante de enfermedad invasora diagnosticada en Colombia en niños menores de 5 años entre 1994 y 1996 y para establecer la distribución de los tipos capsulares de los aislamientos resistentes. Se analizaron 324 aislamientos recuperados durante la ejecución del Protocolo Nacional de Serotipificación de S. pneumoniae realizado en Santa Fe de Bogotá, Medellín y Cali, Colombia, entre julio de 1994 y marzo de 1996. Se observó que 119 de todos los aislamientos (36,7% presentaban susceptibilidad disminuida por lo menos a un antimicrobiano, que 39 (12% presentaban susceptibilidad disminuida a la penicilina y que de estos últimos aislamientos, 29 presentaban resistencia intermedia y 10 resistencia alta. Nueve aislamientos (2,8% presentaban resistencia a la ceftriaxona, 80 (24,7% a la combinación de trimetoprima y sulfametoxazol (TMS, 49 (15,1% al cloranfenicol y 31 (9,6% a la eritromicina. Se observó resistencia a dos antimicrobianos en 31 aislamientos (9,6% y multirresistencia en 22 (6,7%. Estos 22 aislamientos mostraron resistencia al TMS. Las asociaciones más frecuentes fueron penicilina, TMS y eritromicina en 5 casos; penicilina, cloranfenicol, TMS y eritromicina en 4; penicilina, ceftriaxona, cloranfenicol y TMS en 3; y penicilina, ceftriaxona, cloranfenicol, TMS y eritromicina en 3 casos. Los serotipos más frecuentes en los aislamientos resistentes a la penicilina fueron: 23F (53,8%, 14 (25,6%, 6B (7,7%, 9V (5,1%, 19F (5,1% y 34 (2,6%. Los serotipos más frecuentes en los aislamientos resistentes a antimicrobianos distintos de la penicilina fueron: 5 (37,5%, 23F (7,5%, 14 (18,8% y 6B (13,8%. Esta diferencia en la distribución de los serotipos fue estadísticamente significativa (P A study was done to determine the patterns of susceptibility to antimicrobial agents in isolates of Streptococcus

  7. Incompetence of neutrophils to invasive group A streptococcus is attributed to induction of plural virulence factors by dysfunction of a regulator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manabu Ato

    Full Text Available Group A streptococcus (GAS causes variety of diseases ranging from common pharyngitis to life-threatening severe invasive diseases, including necrotizing fasciitis and streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome. The characteristic of invasive GAS infections has been thought to attribute to genetic changes in bacteria, however, no clear evidence has shown due to lack of an intriguingly study using serotype-matched isolates from clinical severe invasive GAS infections. In addition, rare outbreaks of invasive infections and their distinctive pathology in which infectious foci without neutrophil infiltration hypothesized us invasive GAS could evade host defense, especially neutrophil functions. Herein we report that a panel of serotype-matched GAS, which were clinically isolated from severe invasive but not from non-invaive infections, could abrogate functions of human polymorphnuclear neutrophils (PMN in at least two independent ways; due to inducing necrosis to PMN by enhanced production of a pore-forming toxin streptolysin O (SLO and due to impairment of PMN migration via digesting interleukin-8, a PMN attracting chemokine, by increased production of a serine protease ScpC. Expression of genes was upregulated by a loss of repressive function with the mutation of csrS gene in the all emm49 severe invasive GAS isolates. The csrS mutants from clinical severe invasive GAS isolates exhibited high mortality and disseminated infection with paucity of neutrophils, a characteristic pathology seen in human invasive GAS infection, in a mouse model. However, GAS which lack either SLO or ScpC exhibit much less mortality than the csrS-mutated parent invasive GAS isolate to the infected mice. These results suggest that the abilities of GAS to abrogate PMN functions can determine the onset and severity of invasive GAS infection.

  8. Pyogenic sacroiliitis: diagnosis, management and clinical outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucera, Tomas; Sponer, Pavel [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital in Hradec Kralove, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Brtkova, Jindra [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital in Hradec Kralove, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Ryskova, Lenka [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital in Hradec Kralove, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Popper, Eduard [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital in Hradec Kralove, Department of Rehabilitation, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Frank, Martin [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital in Hradec Kralove, Department of Surgery, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Kucerova, Marie [Regional Hospital in Pardubice, Department of Neurosurgery, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)

    2015-01-15

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the role of diagnostic tools and management options for patients with pyogenic sacroiliitis, including potential complications. This retrospective study included 16 patients with pyogenic sacroiliitis who were admitted to a single orthopaedic centre between 2007 and 2012. The following data were collected: demographics, history, radiography, magnetic resonance images (MRI), biological data, type of pathogenic agent, abscess formation, type of management, and clinical outcome. Our study demonstrated that only one-fifth of the patients with lumbogluteal or hip pain had established diagnoses of suspected pyogenic sacroiliitis upon admission. MRIs confirmed this diagnosis in all cases. MRI examinations revealed joint fluid in the sacroiliac joint and significant oedema of the adjacent bone and soft tissues. In 12 of the 16 cases, erosions of the subchondral bone were encountered. Contrast-enhanced MRI revealed that 9 patients had abscesses. All patients received antibiotic therapy. Antibiotic treatment was only successful in 9 cases. The other 7 patients underwent computed tomography (CT)-guided abscess drainage. Drainage was sufficient for 4 patients, but 3 patients required open surgery. One patient required sacroiliac arthrodesis. The clinical outcomes included minimal disability (n = 10), moderate disability (n = 5), and full disability (n = 1) of the spine. Contrast-enhanced MRI is mandatory for a reliable diagnosis. Abscess formation was observed in approximately half of the MRI-diagnosed sacroiliitis cases and required minimally invasive drainage under CT guidance or frequently open surgery. (orig.)

  9. Pyogenic sacroiliitis: diagnosis, management and clinical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucera, Tomas; Sponer, Pavel; Brtkova, Jindra; Ryskova, Lenka; Popper, Eduard; Frank, Martin; Kucerova, Marie

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the role of diagnostic tools and management options for patients with pyogenic sacroiliitis, including potential complications. This retrospective study included 16 patients with pyogenic sacroiliitis who were admitted to a single orthopaedic centre between 2007 and 2012. The following data were collected: demographics, history, radiography, magnetic resonance images (MRI), biological data, type of pathogenic agent, abscess formation, type of management, and clinical outcome. Our study demonstrated that only one-fifth of the patients with lumbogluteal or hip pain had established diagnoses of suspected pyogenic sacroiliitis upon admission. MRIs confirmed this diagnosis in all cases. MRI examinations revealed joint fluid in the sacroiliac joint and significant oedema of the adjacent bone and soft tissues. In 12 of the 16 cases, erosions of the subchondral bone were encountered. Contrast-enhanced MRI revealed that 9 patients had abscesses. All patients received antibiotic therapy. Antibiotic treatment was only successful in 9 cases. The other 7 patients underwent computed tomography (CT)-guided abscess drainage. Drainage was sufficient for 4 patients, but 3 patients required open surgery. One patient required sacroiliac arthrodesis. The clinical outcomes included minimal disability (n = 10), moderate disability (n = 5), and full disability (n = 1) of the spine. Contrast-enhanced MRI is mandatory for a reliable diagnosis. Abscess formation was observed in approximately half of the MRI-diagnosed sacroiliitis cases and required minimally invasive drainage under CT guidance or frequently open surgery. (orig.)

  10. A Red Blood Cell Membrane-Camouflaged Nanoparticle Counteracts Streptolysin O-Mediated Virulence Phenotypes of Invasive Group A Streptococcus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Escajadillo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Group A Streptococcus (GAS, an important human-specific Gram-positive bacterial pathogen, is associated with a broad spectrum of disease, ranging from mild superficial infections such as pharyngitis and impetigo, to serious invasive infections including necrotizing fasciitis and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. The GAS pore-forming streptolysin O (SLO is a well characterized virulence factor produced by nearly all GAS clinical isolates. High level expression of SLO is epidemiologically linked to intercontinental dissemination of hypervirulent clonotypes and poor clinical outcomes. SLO can trigger macrophage and neutrophil cell death and/or the inactivation of immune cell functions, and promotes tissue injury and bacterial survival in animal models of infection. In the present work, we describe how the pharmacological presentation of red blood cell (RBC derived biomimetic nanoparticles (“nanosponges” can sequester SLO and block the ability of GAS to damage host cells, thereby preserving innate immune function and increasing bacterial clearance in vitro and in vivo. Nanosponge administration protected human neutrophils, macrophages, and keratinocytes against SLO-mediated cytotoxicity. This therapeutic intervention prevented SLO-induced macrophage apoptosis and increased neutrophil extracellular trap formation, allowing increased GAS killing by the respective phagocytic cell types. In a murine model of GAS necrotizing skin infection, local administration of the biomimetic nanosponges was associated with decreased lesion size and reduced bacterial colony-forming unit recovery. Utilization of a toxin decoy and capture platform that inactivates the secreted SLO before it contacts the host cell membrane, presents a novel virulence factor targeted strategy that could be a powerful adjunctive therapy in severe GAS infections where morbidity and mortality are high despite antibiotic treatment.

  11. Molecular Analysis of Rising Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Belgian Non-Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates (1995-2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyssens, Pieter-Jan; Van Bambeke, Françoise; Mattheus, Wesley; Bertrand, Sophie; Fux, Frédéric; Van Bossuyt, Eddie; Damée, Sabrina; Nyssen, Henry-Jean; De Craeye, Stéphane; Verhaegen, Jan; Tulkens, Paul M.; Vanhoof, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of a longitudinal surveillance study (1995–2014) on fluoroquinolone resistance (FQ-R) among Belgian non-invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates (n = 5,602). For many years, the switch to respiratory fluoroquinolones for the treatment of (a)typical pneumonia had no impact on FQ-R levels. However, since 2011 we observed a significant decrease in susceptibility towards ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin and levofloxacin with peaks of 9.0%, 6.6% and 3.1% resistant isolates, respectively. Resistance to moxifloxacin arised sporadically, and remained <1% throughout the entire study period. We observed classical topoisomerase mutations in gyrA (n = 25), parC (n = 46) and parE (n = 3) in varying combinations, arguing against clonal expansion of FQ-R. The impact of recombination with co-habiting commensal streptococci on FQ-R remains marginal (10.4%). Notably, we observed that a rare combination of DNA Gyrase mutations (GyrA_S81L/GyrB_P454S) suffices for high-level moxifloxacin resistance, contrasting current model. Interestingly, 85/422 pneumococcal strains display MICCIP values which were lowered by at least four dilutions by reserpine, pointing at involvement of efflux pumps in FQ-R. In contrast to susceptible strains, isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin significantly overexpressed the ABC pump PatAB in comparison to reference strain S. pneumoniae ATCC 49619, but this could only be linked to disruptive terminator mutations in a fraction of these. Conversely, no difference in expression of the Major Facilitator PmrA, unaffected by reserpine, was noted between susceptible and resistant S. pneumoniae strains. Finally, we observed that four isolates displayed intermediate to high-level ciprofloxacin resistance without any known molecular resistance mechanism. Focusing future molecular studies on these isolates, which are also commonly found in other studies, might greatly assist in the battle against rising pneumococcal drug resistance. PMID:27227336

  12. Molecular Analysis of Rising Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Belgian Non-Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates (1995-2014.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter-Jan Ceyssens

    Full Text Available We present the results of a longitudinal surveillance study (1995-2014 on fluoroquinolone resistance (FQ-R among Belgian non-invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates (n = 5,602. For many years, the switch to respiratory fluoroquinolones for the treatment of (atypical pneumonia had no impact on FQ-R levels. However, since 2011 we observed a significant decrease in susceptibility towards ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin and levofloxacin with peaks of 9.0%, 6.6% and 3.1% resistant isolates, respectively. Resistance to moxifloxacin arised sporadically, and remained <1% throughout the entire study period. We observed classical topoisomerase mutations in gyrA (n = 25, parC (n = 46 and parE (n = 3 in varying combinations, arguing against clonal expansion of FQ-R. The impact of recombination with co-habiting commensal streptococci on FQ-R remains marginal (10.4%. Notably, we observed that a rare combination of DNA Gyrase mutations (GyrA_S81L/GyrB_P454S suffices for high-level moxifloxacin resistance, contrasting current model. Interestingly, 85/422 pneumococcal strains display MICCIP values which were lowered by at least four dilutions by reserpine, pointing at involvement of efflux pumps in FQ-R. In contrast to susceptible strains, isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin significantly overexpressed the ABC pump PatAB in comparison to reference strain S. pneumoniae ATCC 49619, but this could only be linked to disruptive terminator mutations in a fraction of these. Conversely, no difference in expression of the Major Facilitator PmrA, unaffected by reserpine, was noted between susceptible and resistant S. pneumoniae strains. Finally, we observed that four isolates displayed intermediate to high-level ciprofloxacin resistance without any known molecular resistance mechanism. Focusing future molecular studies on these isolates, which are also commonly found in other studies, might greatly assist in the battle against rising pneumococcal drug resistance.

  13. Molecular Analysis of Rising Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Belgian Non-Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates (1995-2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyssens, Pieter-Jan; Van Bambeke, Françoise; Mattheus, Wesley; Bertrand, Sophie; Fux, Frédéric; Van Bossuyt, Eddie; Damée, Sabrina; Nyssen, Henry-Jean; De Craeye, Stéphane; Verhaegen, Jan; Tulkens, Paul M; Vanhoof, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of a longitudinal surveillance study (1995-2014) on fluoroquinolone resistance (FQ-R) among Belgian non-invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates (n = 5,602). For many years, the switch to respiratory fluoroquinolones for the treatment of (a)typical pneumonia had no impact on FQ-R levels. However, since 2011 we observed a significant decrease in susceptibility towards ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin and levofloxacin with peaks of 9.0%, 6.6% and 3.1% resistant isolates, respectively. Resistance to moxifloxacin arised sporadically, and remained topoisomerase mutations in gyrA (n = 25), parC (n = 46) and parE (n = 3) in varying combinations, arguing against clonal expansion of FQ-R. The impact of recombination with co-habiting commensal streptococci on FQ-R remains marginal (10.4%). Notably, we observed that a rare combination of DNA Gyrase mutations (GyrA_S81L/GyrB_P454S) suffices for high-level moxifloxacin resistance, contrasting current model. Interestingly, 85/422 pneumococcal strains display MICCIP values which were lowered by at least four dilutions by reserpine, pointing at involvement of efflux pumps in FQ-R. In contrast to susceptible strains, isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin significantly overexpressed the ABC pump PatAB in comparison to reference strain S. pneumoniae ATCC 49619, but this could only be linked to disruptive terminator mutations in a fraction of these. Conversely, no difference in expression of the Major Facilitator PmrA, unaffected by reserpine, was noted between susceptible and resistant S. pneumoniae strains. Finally, we observed that four isolates displayed intermediate to high-level ciprofloxacin resistance without any known molecular resistance mechanism. Focusing future molecular studies on these isolates, which are also commonly found in other studies, might greatly assist in the battle against rising pneumococcal drug resistance.

  14. GROUP B STREPTOCOCCUS CIRCUMVENTS NEUTROPHILS AND NEUTROPHIL EXTRACELLULAR TRAPS DURING AMNIOTIC CAVITY INVASION AND PRETERM LABOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldenow, Erica; Gendrin, Claire; Ngo, Lisa; Bierle, Craig; Vornhagen, Jay; Coleman, Michelle; Merillat, Sean; Armistead, Blair; Whidbey, Christopher; Alishetti, Varchita; Santana-Ufret, Veronica; Ogle, Jason; Gough, Michael; Srinouanprachanh, Sengkeo; MacDonald, James W; Bammler, Theo K; Bansal, Aasthaa; Liggitt, H. Denny; Rajagopal, Lakshmi; Waldorf, Kristina M Adams

    2016-01-01

    Preterm birth is a leading cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality. Although microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity (MIAC) is associated with the majority of early preterm births, the temporal events that occur during MIAC and preterm labor are not known. Group B Streptococci (GBS) are β-hemolytic, gram-positive bacteria, which commonly colonize the vagina but have been recovered from the amniotic fluid in preterm birth cases. To understand temporal events that occur during MIAC, we utilized a unique chronically catheterized nonhuman primate model that closely emulates human pregnancy. This model allows monitoring of uterine contractions, timing of MIAC and immune responses during pregnancy-associated infections. Here, we show that adverse outcomes such as preterm labor, MIAC, and fetal sepsis were observed more frequently during infection with hemolytic GBS when compared to nonhemolytic GBS. Although MIAC was associated with systematic progression in chorioamnionitis beginning with chorionic vasculitis and progressing to neutrophilic infiltration, the ability of the GBS hemolytic pigment toxin to induce neutrophil cell death and subvert killing by neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) in placental membranes in vivo facilitated MIAC and fetal injury. Furthermore, compared to maternal neutrophils, fetal neutrophils exhibit decreased neutrophil elastase activity and impaired phagocytic functions to GBS. Collectively, our studies demonstrate how a unique bacterial hemolytic lipid toxin enables GBS to circumvent neutrophils and NETs in placental membranes to induce fetal injury and preterm labor. PMID:27819066

  15. [Streptococcus pneumoniae Vaccination in Children and Adolescents at High Risk of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tendais-Almeida, Marta; Ferreira-Magalhães, Manuel; Alves, Inês; Tavares, Margarida; Azevedo, Inês

    2015-01-01

    In Portugal, pneumococcal vaccination is free of charge and recommended by the Directorate-General of Health for the pediatric population at high risk of invasive pneumococcal disease. Our main aim was to describe the vaccination uptake in a pediatric population attending a hospital outpatient clinic. Cross-sectional observational survey of a pediatric population attending a referral hospital outpatient clinic, from July to December 2014. Data was collected from clinical records, Individual Health Bulletin or the registry from Plataforma de Dados da Saúde®. Of the 122 participants, 95.9% had, at least, one shot of pneumococcal vaccine, but only 64.8% of these completed the age recommended vaccination scheme. Uptake was higher in children 5 years old had a higher uptake of 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine than the 2 to 5-years old ones (74.5% vs 40.5%; p < 0.001). Most of our pediatric population at high risk of IPD was vaccinated; nevertheless, only two-thirds had completed the scheme for their age. The main failure was on the 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine administration. Although these results are better than those reported in other European countries with similar recommendations, it is essential to explore the causes for the observed flaws in order to optimize vaccination rates.

  16. Extracellular matrix formation enhances the ability of Streptococcus pneumoniae to cause invasive disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Trappetti

    Full Text Available During infection, pneumococci exist mainly in sessile biofilms rather than in planktonic form, except during sepsis. However, relatively little is known about how biofilms contribute to pneumococcal pathogenesis. Here, we carried out a biofilm assay on opaque and transparent variants of a clinical serotype 19F strain WCH159. After 4 days incubation, scanning electron microscopy revealed that opaque biofilm bacteria produced an extracellular matrix, whereas the transparent variant did not. The opaque biofilm-derived bacteria translocated from the nasopharynx to the lungs and brain of mice, and showed 100-fold greater in vitro adherence to A549 cells than transparent bacteria. Microarray analysis of planktonic and sessile bacteria from transparent and opaque variants showed differential gene expression in two operons: the lic operon, which is involved in choline uptake, and in the two-component system, ciaRH. Mutants of these genes did not form an extracellular matrix, could not translocate from the nasopharynx to the lungs or the brain, and adhered poorly to A549 cells. We conclude that only the opaque phenotype is able to form extracellular matrix, and that the lic operon and ciaRH contribute to this process. We propose that during infection, extracellular matrix formation enhances the ability of pneumococci to cause invasive disease.

  17. Mechanisms of group A Streptococcus resistance to reactive oxygen species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henningham, Anna; Döhrmann, Simon; Nizet, Victor; Cole, Jason N.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as group A Streptococcus (GAS), is an exclusively human Gram-positive bacterial pathogen ranked among the ‘top 10’ causes of infection-related deaths worldwide. GAS commonly causes benign and self-limiting epithelial infections (pharyngitis and impetigo), and less frequent severe invasive diseases (bacteremia, toxic shock syndrome and necrotizing fasciitis). Annually, GAS causes 700 million infections, including 1.8 million invasive infections with a mortality rate of 25%. In order to establish an infection, GAS must counteract the oxidative stress conditions generated by the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the infection site by host immune cells such as neutrophils and monocytes. ROS are the highly reactive and toxic byproducts of oxygen metabolism, including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), superoxide anion (O2•−), hydroxyl radicals (OH•) and singlet oxygen (O2*), which can damage bacterial nucleic acids, proteins and cell membranes. This review summarizes the enzymatic and regulatory mechanisms utilized by GAS to thwart ROS and survive under conditions of oxidative stress. PMID:25670736

  18. Mechanisms of group A Streptococcus resistance to reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henningham, Anna; Döhrmann, Simon; Nizet, Victor; Cole, Jason N

    2015-07-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as group A Streptococcus (GAS), is an exclusively human Gram-positive bacterial pathogen ranked among the 'top 10' causes of infection-related deaths worldwide. GAS commonly causes benign and self-limiting epithelial infections (pharyngitis and impetigo), and less frequent severe invasive diseases (bacteremia, toxic shock syndrome and necrotizing fasciitis). Annually, GAS causes 700 million infections, including 1.8 million invasive infections with a mortality rate of 25%. In order to establish an infection, GAS must counteract the oxidative stress conditions generated by the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the infection site by host immune cells such as neutrophils and monocytes. ROS are the highly reactive and toxic byproducts of oxygen metabolism, including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), superoxide anion (O2•(-)), hydroxyl radicals (OH•) and singlet oxygen (O2*), which can damage bacterial nucleic acids, proteins and cell membranes. This review summarizes the enzymatic and regulatory mechanisms utilized by GAS to thwart ROS and survive under conditions of oxidative stress. © FEMS 2015.

  19. Characterization of Enterococcus faecalis Alkaline Phosphatase and Use in Identifying Streptococcus agalactiae Secreted Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Martin H.; Nittayajarn, Aphakorn; Ross, R. Paul; Rothschild, Cynthia B.; Parsonage, Derek; Claiborne, Al; Rubens, Craig E.

    1999-01-01

    We have identified and characterized an Enterococcus faecalis alkaline phosphatase (AP, encoded by phoZ). The predicted gene product shows homology with alkaline phosphatases from a variety of species; it has especially high similarity with two alkaline phosphatases from Bacillus subtilis. Expression of phoZ in Escherichia coli, E. faecalis, Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]), or Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus [GAS]) produces a blue-colony phenotype on plate...

  20. Increasing incidence of pyogenic spondylodiscitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehrer, Michala; Pedersen, Court; Jensen, Thøger G

    2014-01-01

    Smaller studies indicate that the incidence of pyogenic spondylodiscitis is increasing, possible related to a growing elderly population. Data supporting this is sparse, and we therefore studied patient characteristics and changes in spondylodiscitis incidence 1995-2008.......Smaller studies indicate that the incidence of pyogenic spondylodiscitis is increasing, possible related to a growing elderly population. Data supporting this is sparse, and we therefore studied patient characteristics and changes in spondylodiscitis incidence 1995-2008....

  1. Outbreak of Invasive Infections From Subtype emm26.3 Group A Streptococcus Among Homeless Adults-Anchorage, Alaska, 2016-2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosites, Emily; Frick, Anna; Gounder, Prabhu; Castrodale, Louisa; Li, Yuan; Rudolph, Karen; Hurlburt, Debby; Lecy, Kristen D; Zulz, Tammy; Adebanjo, Tolu; Onukwube, Jennifer; Beall, Bernard; Van Beneden, Chris A; Hennessy, Thomas; McLaughlin, Joseph; Bruce, Michael G

    2018-03-19

    In 2016, we detected an outbreak of group A Streptococcus (GAS) invasive infections among the estimated 1000 persons experiencing homelessness (PEH) in Anchorage, Alaska. We characterized the outbreak and implemented a mass antibiotic intervention at homeless service facilities. We identified cases through the Alaska GAS laboratory-based surveillance system. We conducted emm typing, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, and whole-genome sequencing on all invasive isolates and compared medical record data of patients infected with emm26.3 and other emm types. In February 2017, we offered PEH at 6 facilities in Anchorage a single dose of 1 g of azithromycin. We collected oropharyngeal and nonintact skin swabs on a subset of participants concurrent with the intervention and 4 weeks afterward. From July 2016 through April 2017, we detected 42 invasive emm26.3 cases in Anchorage, 35 of which were in PEH. The emm26.3 isolates differed on average by only 2 single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Compared to other emm types, infection with emm26.3 was associated with cellulitis (odds ratio [OR], 2.5; P = .04) and necrotizing fasciitis (OR, 4.4; P = .02). We dispensed antibiotics to 391 PEH. Colonization with emm26.3 decreased from 4% of 277 at baseline to 1% of 287 at follow-up (P = .05). Invasive GAS incidence decreased from 1.5 cases per 1000 PEH/week in the 6 weeks prior to the intervention to 0.2 cases per 1000 PEH/week in the 6 weeks after (P = .01). In an invasive GAS outbreak in PEH in Anchorage, mass antibiotic administration was temporally associated with reduced invasive disease cases and colonization prevalence.

  2. Septicemia with Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuursted, Kurt; Littauer, Pia Jeanette; Greve, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae was described in 2004 as a new human pathogen, acknowledged in a range of clinical infections typically associated to the respiratory tract. This report demonstrates that S. pseudopneumoniae has the potential to cause invasive infection. In blood cultures from three...... patients, growth of an atypical Streptococcus pneumoniae (non-capsular, non-serotypeable, optochin susceptible under ambient atmosphere and bile-intermediately soluble) was recovered. All three patients had a history of a haematological disease (myelodysplastic syndrome and multiple myeloma...

  3. Invasive group A Streptococcus disease in French-Canadian children is not associated with a defect in MyD88/IRAK4-pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Isabel; Brito, Rose-Marie; Bidet, Philippe; Rallu, Fabien; Laferrière, Celine; Ovetchkine, Philippe; Le Deist, Francoise

    2014-02-05

    Beta-hemolytic Group A Streptococcus invasive disease (iGASd) has been subject to intense research since its re-emergence in the late 1980s. In Quebec, an increase in the number of severe iGASd cases has recently been observed. Because of the inter-individual variability in the severity of iGASd, a hereditary predisposition to invasive disease can be suspected. Given that iGASd occurs in MyD88- and IRAK4-deficient patients, although rarely, the increasing frequency of iGASd in the population of French-Canadian children may be associated with a deficiency in the host's innate immune response. In this report, we assessed the influence of: (i) bacterial genotype and virulence factors, (ii) immune-cellular features, and (iii) Myd88/IRAK4-dependent response to GAS in vitro on the susceptibility to iGASd in a paediatric cohort of 16 children: 11 French-Canadian and 5 from diverse origin. GAS virulence factors and genotype are not implicated in the susceptibility toward iGASd, and cellular and MyD88/IRAK4 deficiencies are excluded in our patients. Although it has been shown that the MyD88/IRAK4-dependent signal is involved in the response to invasive GAS, our data indicates that a MyD88/IRAK4-mediated signalling defect is not the main factor responsible for the susceptibility to severe iGASd in a paediatric population from the province of Quebec.

  4. Capsule of Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus hampers the adherence and invasion of epithelial and endothelial cells and is attenuated during internalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bin; Pei, Xiaomeng; Su, Yiqi; Ma, Zhe; Fan, Hongjie

    2016-08-01

    Direct interaction between pathogens and host cells often is a prerequisite for colonization, infection and dissemination. Regulated production of capsular polysaccharide (CPS), which is made of hyaluronic acid, is essential for the pathogenicity of Streptococcus equi subsp. Zooepidemicus (SEZ). Here, we constructed a CPS-deleted mutant and analyzed it along with the parental wild-type strain in attachment and invasion of mammalian epithelial and endothelial cell lines. The CPS-deleted mutant exhibited significant increase in adherence and invasion by several orders of magnitude compared with the wild-type strain through quantitative analysis and electron microscopy observation. After the wild-type strain was recovered from invaded cells, its morphology was analyzed by visual methods and scanning electron microscopy, which revealed that its capsule was almost completely absent. Capsule measurements showed a similar result in which CPS production was nearly attenuated to the same extent as in the CPS-deleted mutant. qPCR assays revealed a marked reduction in the transcriptional levels of the CPS biosynthesis genes, has operon. Moreover, the repression in capsular production was stable inheritance. Our findings indicate that SEZ is a facultative intracellular bacterium, capsule attenuation in SEZ contributes to attachment and invasion in interactions with host cells, and the active regulation of capsule breakdown is controlled by SEZ during internalization. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Epidemiology and emm types of invasive group A streptococcal infections in Finland, 2008-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, P W; Lindholm, L; Lyytikäinen, O; Jalava, J; Pätäri-Sampo, A; Vuopio, J

    2015-10-01

    Invasive Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus, GAS) infections are a major global cause of morbidity and mortality. We analysed the surveillance data on invasive GAS and the microbiological characteristics of corresponding isolates to assess the incidence and emm type distribution of invasive GAS infections in Finland. Cases defined as patients with isolations of blood and cerebrospinal fluid S. pyogenes are mandatorily notified to the National Infectious Disease Registry and sent to the national reference laboratory for emm typing. Antimicrobial data were collected through the network including all clinical microbiology laboratories. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis was performed to assess clonality. In total, 1165 cases of invasive GAS were reported in Finland during 2008-2013; the median age was 52 years (range, 0-100) and 54% were male. The overall day 7 case fatality rate was 5.1% (59 cases). The average annual incidence was 3.6 cases per 100,000 population. A total of 1122 invasive GAS isolates (96%) were analysed by emm typing; 72 different emm types were identified, of which emm28 (297 isolates, 26%), emm89 (193 isolates, 12%) and emm1 (132 isolates, 12%) were the most common types. During 2008-2013, an increase of erythromycin resistance (1.9% to 8.7%) and clindamycin (0.9% to 9.2%) was observed. This resistance increase was in parallel with the introduction of a novel clone emm33 into Finland. The overall incidence of invasive GAS infections remained stable over the study period in Finland. We identified clonal spread of macrolide-resistant invasive emm33 GAS type, highlighting the importance of molecular surveillance.

  6. Invasive Streptococcus mutans induces inflammatory cytokine production in human aortic endothelial cells via regulation of intracellular toll-like receptor 2 and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, E; Oho, T

    2017-04-01

    Streptococcus mutans, the primary etiologic agent of dental caries, can gain access to the bloodstream and has been associated with cardiovascular disease. However, the roles of S. mutans in inflammation in cardiovascular disease remain unclear. The aim of this study was to examine cytokine production induced by S. mutans in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) and to evaluate the participation of toll-like receptors (TLRs) and cytoplasmic nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD) -like receptors in HAECs. Cytokine production by HAECs was determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, and the expression of TLRs and NOD-like receptors was evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction, flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry. The involvement of TLR2 and NOD2 in cytokine production by invaded HAECs was examined using RNA interference. The invasion efficiencies of S. mutans strains were evaluated by means of antibiotic protection assays. Five of six strains of S. mutans of various serotypes induced interleukin-6, interleukin-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 production by HAECs. All S. mutans strains upregulated TLR2 and NOD2 mRNA levels in HAECs. Streptococcus mutans Xc upregulated the intracellular TLR2 and NOD2 protein levels in HAECs. Silencing of the TLR2 and NOD2 genes in HAECs invaded by S. mutans Xc led to a reduction in interleukin-6, interleukin-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 production. Cytokine production induced by invasive S. mutans via intracellular TLR2 and NOD2 in HAECs may be associated with inflammation in cardiovascular disease. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Streptococcus viridans osteomyelitis and endocarditis following dental treatment: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Maitrayee; Patel, Brijesh R; Patel, Minal; Bashir, Tariq

    2009-09-14

    Vertebral osteomyelitis is an uncommon complication of infective endocarditis with the organism Streptococcus viridans being a rare cause of the condition. This case highlights an unusual presentation of Streptococcus viridans associated with infective endocarditis and pyogenic osteomyelitis in a patient following a dental procedure.

  8. Streptococcus viridans osteomyelitis and endocarditis following dental treatment: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Choudhury, Maitrayee; Patel, Brijesh R; Patel, Minal; Bashir, Tariq

    2009-01-01

    Vertebral osteomyelitis is an uncommon complication of infective endocarditis with the organism Streptococcus viridans being a rare cause of the condition. This case highlights an unusual presentation of Streptococcus viridans associated with infective endocarditis and pyogenic osteomyelitis in a patient following a dental procedure.

  9. Prevalence of emm types and antimicrobial susceptibility of Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Eva; Zollner-Schwetz, Ines; Zarfel, Gernot; Masoud-Landgraf, Lilian; Gehrer, Michael; Wagner-Eibel, Ute; Grisold, Andrea J; Feierl, Gebhard

    2015-12-01

    An increase of severe infections caused by Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (SDSE) similar to infections caused by Streptococcus pyogenes has been reported over the last years. Little is known about infections with SDSE in Austria. Therefore, we investigated a collection of 113 SDSE invasive and non-invasive isolates from different infection sites and type of infections as well as patients' characteristics. The isolates were phenotypically identified and emm typed using the enlarged emm database from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Additionally, 13 antimicrobial agents were tested using EUCAST guidelines and virulence genes were investigated. Severe SDSE infections were most common in elderly men with underlying diseases especially diabetes mellitus. With VitekMS identification of SDSE isolates was successful to the species level only. Emm typing revealed 24 different emm types, one new type and one new subtype. StG485, stG6, stC74a, stG643, and stG480 were the predominant types in this study, stC74a and stG652 in invasive infections and stG643, stC74a and stG485 in non-invasive infections. Resistance was observed to tetracycline (62%), macrolides (13%) with one M phenotype, and clindamycin (12%) presenting 6 constitutive MLS(B) phenotypes and 8 inducible MLS(B) phenotypes. Levofloxacin resistance was detected only in one isolate. All isolates tested for virulence genes were positive for scpA, ska, saga and slo. Superantigenic genes were negative except speG(dys) (positive 17/34; 50%). This paper presents the first report of SDSE infections in Austria. Severe SDSE infections were found mainly in elderly men with underlying diseases. SDSE isolates demonstrated substantial emm type diversity without association with infections site or invasiveness. Analysis of virulence genes showed no significant difference between invasive and non-invasive infections. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Polar invasion and translocation of Neisseria meningitidis and Streptococcus suis in a novel human model of the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier.

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    Christian Schwerk

    Full Text Available Acute bacterial meningitis is a life-threatening disease in humans. Discussed as entry sites for pathogens into the brain are the blood-brain and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB. Although human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC constitute a well established human in vitro model for the blood-brain barrier, until now no reliable human system presenting the BCSFB has been developed. Here, we describe for the first time a functional human BCSFB model based on human choroid plexus papilloma cells (HIBCPP, which display typical hallmarks of a BCSFB as the expression of junctional proteins and formation of tight junctions, a high electrical resistance and minimal levels of macromolecular flux when grown on transwell filters. Importantly, when challenged with the zoonotic pathogen Streptococcus suis or the human pathogenic bacterium Neisseria meningitidis the HIBCPP show polar bacterial invasion only from the physiologically relevant basolateral side. Meningococcal invasion is attenuated by the presence of a capsule and translocated N. meningitidis form microcolonies on the apical side of HIBCPP opposite of sites of entry. As a functionally relevant human model of the BCSFB the HIBCPP offer a wide range of options for analysis of disease-related mechanisms at the choroid plexus epithelium, especially involving human pathogens.

  11. Nasopharyngeal colonization and invasive disease are enhanced by the cell wall hydrolases LytB and LytC of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

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    Elisa Ramos-Sevillano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common colonizer of the human nasopharynx and one of the major pathogens causing invasive disease worldwide. Dissection of the molecular pathways responsible for colonization, invasion, and evasion of the immune system will provide new targets for antimicrobial or vaccine therapies for this common pathogen. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have constructed mutants lacking the pneumococcal cell wall hydrolases (CWHs LytB and LytC to investigate the role of these proteins in different phases of the pneumococcal pathogenesis. Our results show that LytB and LytC are involved in the attachment of S. pneumoniae to human nasopharyngeal cells both in vitro and in vivo. The interaction of both proteins with phagocytic cells demonstrated that LytB and LytC act in concert avoiding pneumococcal phagocytosis mediated by neutrophils and alveolar macrophages. Furthermore, C3b deposition was increased on the lytC mutant confirming that LytC is involved in complement evasion. As a result, the lytC mutant showed a reduced ability to successfully cause pneumococcal pneumonia and sepsis. Bacterial mutants lacking both LytB and LytC showed a dramatically impaired attachment to nasopharyngeal cells as well as a marked degree of attenuation in a mouse model of colonization. In addition, C3b deposition and phagocytosis was more efficient for the double lytB lytC mutant and its virulence was greatly impaired in both systemic and pulmonary models of infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study confirms that the CWHs LytB and LytC of S. pneumoniae are essential virulence factors involved in the colonization of the nasopharynx and in the progress of invasive disease by avoiding host immunity.

  12. Trends in Antimicrobial Resistance in 1,968 Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae Strains Isolated in Spanish Hospitals (2001 to 2003): Decreasing Penicillin Resistance in Children's Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oteo, Jesús; Lázaro, Edurne; de Abajo, Francisco J.; Baquero, Fernando; Campos, José

    2004-01-01

    To address the public health problem of antibiotic resistance, the European Union (EU) founded the European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance System. A network of 40 hospitals that serve approximately 30% of the Spanish population (about 12 million) participated. Each laboratory reported data on antimicrobial susceptibility testing using standard laboratory procedures that were evaluated by an external quality control program. The antibiotic consumption data were obtained from the National Health System. We compared the antibiotic susceptibility of Spanish isolates of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae (2001 to 2003) with antibiotic consumption. Invasive S. pneumoniae was isolated from 1,968 patients, 20% of whom were children at or below the age of 14 years. Of non-penicillin-susceptible strains (35.6%; 95% confidence interval, 34 to 37.2), 26.4% were considered intermediate and 9.2% were considered resistant. Between 2001 and 2003, penicillin resistance decreased from 39.5 to 33% overall and from 60.4 to 41.2% in children at or below the age of 14 years (P = 0.002). Resistance to erythromycin was at 26.6%, and coresistance with penicillin was at 19.1%. Of total isolates, the ciprofloxacin MIC was >2 μg/ml for 2.1%, with numbers increasing from 0.4% (2001) to 3.9% (2003). Total antibiotic use decreased from 21.66 to 19.71 defined daily doses/1,000 inhabitants/day between 1998 and 2002. While consumption of broad-spectrum penicillins, cephalosporins, and erythromycin declined, use of amoxicillin-clavulanate and quinolones increased by 17.5 and 27%, respectively. The frequency of antibiotic resistance in invasive S. pneumoniae in Spain was among the highest in the EU. However, a significant decrease in penicillin resistance was observed in children. This decrease coincided with the introduction of a heptavalent conjugate pneumoccocal vaccine (June 2001) and with a global reduction in antibiotic consumption levels. PMID:15583283

  13. Molecular characteristics of penicillin-binding protein 2b, 2x and 1a sequences in Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates causing invasive diseases among children in Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X; Liu, J; Zhang, Z; Liu, Y; Wang, Y; Liu, Y

    2016-04-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is one of the common pathogens causing severe invasive infections in children. This study aimed to investigate the serotype distribution and variations of penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) 2b, 2x and 1a in S. pneumoniae isolates causing invasive diseases in Northeast China. A total of 256 strains were isolated from children with invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) from January 2000 to October 2014. All strains were serotyped and determined for antibiotic resistance. The amplicons of penicillin-binding domains in pbp1a, pbp2b and pbp2x genes were sequenced for variation identification. The most prevalent serotypes of isolates in IPD children were 19A, 14, 19F, 23F and 6B. 19A and 19F were the most frequent serotypes of penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae (PRSP), which present with high resistance to amoxicillin, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone and meropenem. The numbers of amino acid substitutions of penicillin-non-susceptible S. pneumoniae (PNSP) isolates were higher than those of penicillin-sensitive S. pneumoniae isolates in all the PBP genes (p isolates carried 25 amino acid mutations, including Ala618 → Gly between positions 560 and 675 in PBP2b and Thr338 → Ala substitutions in PBP2x. The amino acid alterations in PBP2b, PBP2x and PBP1a from S. pneumoniae were closely associated with resistance to β-lactam antibiotics. This study provides new data for further monitoring of genetic changes related to the emergence and spread of resistance to β-lactam antibiotics in China.

  14. Streptococcus zooepidemicus and Streptococcus equi evolution: the role of CRISPRs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Andrew S; Robinson, Carl

    2013-12-01

    The host-restricted bacterium Streptococcus equi is the causative agent of equine strangles, the most frequently diagnosed infectious disease of horses worldwide. The disease is characterized by abscessation of the lymph nodes of the head and neck, leading to significant welfare and economic cost. S. equi is believed to have evolved from an ancestral strain of Streptococcus zooepidemicus, an opportunistic pathogen of horses and other animals. Comparison of the genome of S. equi strain 4047 with those of S. zooepidemicus identified examples of gene loss due to mutation and deletion, and gene gain through the acquisition of mobile genetic elements that have probably shaped the pathogenic specialization of S. equi. In particular, deletion of the CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) locus in the ancestor of S. equi may have predisposed the bacterium to acquire and incorporate new genetic material into its genome. These include four prophages and a novel integrative conjugative element. The virulence cargo carried by these mobile genetic elements is believed to have shaped the ability of S. equi to cause strangles. Further sequencing of S. zooepidemicus has highlighted the diversity of this opportunistic pathogen. Again, CRISPRs are postulated to influence evolution, balancing the need for gene gain over genome stability. Analysis of spacer sequences suggest that these pathogens may be susceptible to a limited range of phages and provide further evidence of cross-species exchange of genetic material among Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus agalactiae and Streptococcus dysgalactiae.

  15. Serotype changes and antimicrobial nonsusceptibility rates of invasive and non-invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates after implementation of 10-valent pneumococcal nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine (PHiD-CV) in Bulgaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setchanova, Lena; Murdjeva, Marianna; Stancheva, Iglika; Alexandrova, Alexandra; Sredkova, Maria; Stoeva, Temenuga; Yoneva, Magda; Kurchatova, Anna; Mitov, Ivan

    The 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV10) has been included in Bulgarian Childhood Immunization Program since 2010. This study aimed to assess serotype distribution and antimicrobial resistance of 198 invasive and non-invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae strains that had been isolated in Bulgaria during 2011-2016 from patients with invasive (IPD) and non-invasive (NIPD) pneumococcal diseases. The most common invasive serotypes were 3 (10.1%), 19F (4.0%), and 7F (3.0%). A significant decrease in the proportion of invasive vaccine types (VTs) from 64.2% to 35.2% was found in comparison with pre-vaccine era. The most common serotypes among middle ear fluids were 3, 19A and 19F (5.6% each), and VTs fell down from 66.4% to 40.0% in post-PCV10 period. Among respiratory isolates, the most prevalent serotypes were some emergent serotypes such as 15A/B/C (5.0%), 19A, and 6C (4.0% each). VTs decreased significantly (16.3%) among vaccinated children compared to unvaccinated children and adults (44.0%). Two non-VTs (19A and 6C) have increased significantly more (pantibiotic nonsusceptible S. pneumoniae in Bulgaria remained high in post-PCV10 era. Among all source of isolates, antimicrobial nonsusceptibility rates were: oral penicillin - 46.5%, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole - 45.4%, erythromycin - 43.9%, tetracycline - 37.4%, and multidrug-resistance (MDR) was 44%. The most common MDR serotypes were 19F, 19A, 6A/C, 15A/B/C and 23A. Our results proved that PCV10 vaccination substantially reduced VTs pneumococcal IPD and NIPD. There has been a shift in the distribution of S. pneumoniae serotypes mostly in vaccinated children but also in the whole population and strong serotype-specific antibiotic resistance was observed after vaccine implementation. Therefore, it is important to continue monitoring serotype changes and pneumococcal resistance among all patient ages in addition to aid in determining the long-term effectiveness of PCV10 interventions. Copyright © 2017

  16. Serotype changes and antimicrobial nonsusceptibility rates of invasive and non-invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates after implementation of 10-valent pneumococcal nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine (PHiD-CV in Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Setchanova

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV10 has been included in Bulgarian Childhood Immunization Program since 2010. This study aimed to assess serotype distribution and antimicrobial resistance of 198 invasive and non-invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae strains that had been isolated in Bulgaria during 2011–2016 from patients with invasive (IPD and non-invasive (NIPD pneumococcal diseases. The most common invasive serotypes were 3 (10.1%, 19F (4.0%, and 7F (3.0%. A significant decrease in the proportion of invasive vaccine types (VTs from 64.2% to 35.2% was found in comparison with pre-vaccine era. The most common serotypes among middle ear fluids were 3, 19A and 19F (5.6% each, and VTs fell down from 66.4% to 40.0% in post-PCV10 period. Among respiratory isolates, the most prevalent serotypes were some emergent serotypes such as 15A/B/C (5.0%, 19A, and 6C (4.0% each. VTs decreased significantly (16.3% among vaccinated children compared to unvaccinated children and adults (44.0%. Two non-VTs (19A and 6C have increased significantly more (p < 0.05 in vaccinated children than in unvaccinated patients. The rates of antibiotic nonsusceptible S. pneumoniae in Bulgaria remained high in post-PCV10 era. Among all source of isolates, antimicrobial nonsusceptibility rates were: oral penicillin – 46.5%, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole – 45.4%, erythromycin – 43.9%, tetracycline – 37.4%, and multidrug-resistance (MDR was 44%. The most common MDR serotypes were 19F, 19A, 6A/C, 15A/B/C and 23A. Our results proved that PCV10 vaccination substantially reduced VTs pneumococcal IPD and NIPD. There has been a shift in the distribution of S. pneumoniae serotypes mostly in vaccinated children but also in the whole population and strong serotype-specific antibiotic resistance was observed after vaccine implementation. Therefore, it is important to continue monitoring serotype changes and pneumococcal resistance among all patient ages in addition to

  17. DNase Sda1 allows invasive M1T1 Group A Streptococcus to prevent TLR9-dependent recognition.

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    Satoshi Uchiyama

    Full Text Available Group A Streptococcus (GAS has developed a broad arsenal of virulence factors that serve to circumvent host defense mechanisms. The virulence factor DNase Sda1 of the hyperinvasive M1T1 GAS clone degrades DNA-based neutrophil extracellular traps allowing GAS to escape extracellular killing. TLR9 is activated by unmethylated CpG-rich bacterial DNA and enhances innate immune resistance. We hypothesized that Sda1 degradation of bacterial DNA could alter TLR9-mediated recognition of GAS by host innate immune cells. We tested this hypothesis using a dual approach: loss and gain of function of DNase in isogenic GAS strains and presence and absence of TLR9 in the host. Either DNA degradation by Sda1 or host deficiency of TLR9 prevented GAS induced IFN-α and TNF-α secretion from murine macrophages and contributed to bacterial survival. Similarly, in a murine necrotizing fasciitis model, IFN-α and TNF-α levels were significantly decreased in wild type mice infected with GAS expressing Sda1, whereas no such Sda1-dependent effect was seen in a TLR9-deficient background. Thus GAS Sda1 suppressed both the TLR9-mediated innate immune response and macrophage bactericidal activity. Our results demonstrate a novel mechanism of bacterial innate immune evasion based on autodegradation of CpG-rich DNA by a bacterial DNase.

  18. Human milk oligosaccharides inhibit growth of group B Streptococcus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, Ann E; Autran, Chloe A; Szyszka, Alexandra; Escajadillo, Tamara; Huang, Mia; Godula, Kamil; Prudden, Anthony R; Boons, Geert-Jan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/088245489; Lewis, Amanda L; Doran, Kelly S; Nizet, Victor; Bode, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus, GBS) is a leading cause of invasive bacterial infections in newborns, typically acquired vertically during childbirth secondary to maternal vaginal colonization. Human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) have important nutritional and biological activities

  19. Population biology of Streptococcus pneumoniae in West Africa: multilocus sequence typing of serotypes that exhibit different predisposition to invasive disease and carriage.

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    Eric S Donkor

    Full Text Available Little is known about the population biology of Streptococcus pneumoniae in developing countries, although the majority of pneumococcal infections occur in this setting. The aim of the study was to apply MLST to investigate the population biology of S. pneumoniae in West Africa.Seventy three invasive and carriage S. pneumoniae isolates from three West African countries including The Gambia, Nigeria and Ghana were investigated. The isolates covered seven serotypes (1, 3, 5, 6A, 11, 14, 23F and were subjected to multilocus sequence typing and antibiotic susceptibility testing.Overall, 50 different sequence types (STs were identified, of which 38% (29 were novel. The most common ST was a novel clone-ST 4012 (6.5%, and some clones including STs 913, 925, 1737, 2160 and 3310 appeared to be specific to the study region. Two STs including ST 63 and ST 4012 were associated with multiple serotypes indicating a history of serotype switching. ST 63 was associated with serotypes 3 and 23F, while ST 4012 was associated with serotypes 6A and 23. eBURST analyses using the stringent 6/7 identical loci definition grouped the 50 STs into 5 clonal complexes and 65 singletons, expressing a high level of genetic diversity among the isolates. Compared to the other serotypes, serotypes 1 and 5 isolates appeared to be more clonal. Internationally recognized antibiotic resistant clones of S. pneumoniae were generally absent in the population investigated and the only multidrug resistant isolate identified (1/66 belong to the Pneumocococcal Epidemiology Network clone ST 63.The pneumococcal population in West Africa is quite divergent, and serotypes that are common in invasive disease (such as serotypes 1 and 5 are more likely to be clonal than serotypes that are common in carriage.

  20. Population biology of Streptococcus pneumoniae in West Africa: multilocus sequence typing of serotypes that exhibit different predisposition to invasive disease and carriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donkor, Eric S; Adegbola, Richard A; Wren, Brendan W; Antonio, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the population biology of Streptococcus pneumoniae in developing countries, although the majority of pneumococcal infections occur in this setting. The aim of the study was to apply MLST to investigate the population biology of S. pneumoniae in West Africa. Seventy three invasive and carriage S. pneumoniae isolates from three West African countries including The Gambia, Nigeria and Ghana were investigated. The isolates covered seven serotypes (1, 3, 5, 6A, 11, 14, 23F) and were subjected to multilocus sequence typing and antibiotic susceptibility testing. Overall, 50 different sequence types (STs) were identified, of which 38% (29) were novel. The most common ST was a novel clone-ST 4012 (6.5%), and some clones including STs 913, 925, 1737, 2160 and 3310 appeared to be specific to the study region. Two STs including ST 63 and ST 4012 were associated with multiple serotypes indicating a history of serotype switching. ST 63 was associated with serotypes 3 and 23F, while ST 4012 was associated with serotypes 6A and 23. eBURST analyses using the stringent 6/7 identical loci definition grouped the 50 STs into 5 clonal complexes and 65 singletons, expressing a high level of genetic diversity among the isolates. Compared to the other serotypes, serotypes 1 and 5 isolates appeared to be more clonal. Internationally recognized antibiotic resistant clones of S. pneumoniae were generally absent in the population investigated and the only multidrug resistant isolate identified (1/66) belong to the Pneumocococcal Epidemiology Network clone ST 63. The pneumococcal population in West Africa is quite divergent, and serotypes that are common in invasive disease (such as serotypes 1 and 5) are more likely to be clonal than serotypes that are common in carriage.

  1. Enhanced Determination of Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotypes Associated with Invasive Disease in Laos by Using a Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction Serotyping Assay with Cerebrospinal Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Catrin E.; Sengduangphachanh, Amphone; Thaojaikong, Thaksinaporn; Sirisouk, Joy; Foster, Dona; Phetsouvanh, Rattanaphone; McGee, Lesley; Crook, Derrick W.; Newton, Paul N.; Peacock, Sharon J.

    2010-01-01

    A prospective hospital-based study was undertaken to define the incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) and circulating serotypes in Laos. Of 10,799 patients with hemocultures and 353 patients with cerebrospinal fluid samples, 0.21% and 5.4%, respectively, were positive for Streptococcus pneumoniae, giving a total of 35 IPD patients. We developed a real-time polymerase chain reaction to detect serotypes represented in the 13-valent pneumococcal vaccine. A blinded evaluation comparing serotype as defined by the Quellung reaction versus the polymerase chain reaction demonstrated 100% concordance. The most frequent serotype (n = 33 patients) was 1 (n = 6), followed by serotypes 5, 6A/B/C, 14, and 23F. Serotypes represented in the 7-valent polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccine (PCV-7) infected 39% of patients, with 73% coverage for the PCV-10 and PCV-13 vaccines. Although the sample size is small, these data suggest that the PCV-7 vaccine may have relatively low efficacy in Laos. Further studies are urgently needed to guide pneumococcal vaccine policy in Laos. PMID:20810803

  2. Prevalence of penicillin and erythromycin resistance among invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates reported by laboratories in the southern and eastern Mediterranean region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, M A; Tiemersma, E; Scicluna, E; van de Sande-Bruinsma, N; de Kraker, M; Monen, J; Grundmann, H

    2009-03-01

    Information about the epidemiology of resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae within southern and eastern countries of the Mediterranean region is incomplete, as reports have been sporadic and difficult to compare. Over a 36-month period, from 2003 to 2005, the ARMed project collected 1298 susceptibility test results of invasive isolates of S. pneumoniae from blood and spinal fluid cultures routinely processed within 59 participating laboratories situated in Algeria, Cyprus, Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Malta, Morocco, Tunisia and Turkey. Overall, 26% (335) of isolates were reported as non-susceptible to penicillin, with the highest proportions being reported from Algeria (44%) and Lebanon (40%). During the same time period, the highest proportions of pneumococci that were not susceptible to erythromycin were reported from Malta (46%) and Tunisia (39%). Proportions of dual non-susceptibility in excess of 5% were found in laboratories in Algeria, Tunisia, Lebanon, Jordan and Turkey. ARMed data on the antimicrobial resistance epidemiology of S. pneumoniae in the southern and eastern Mediterranean region provided evidence of high rates of resistance, especially to penicillin. This evidence calls for a greater focus on the identification of relevant drivers of resistance and on the implemention of effective practices in order to address the problem of resistence.

  3. Production of bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances (BLIS by Streptococcus salivarius strains isolated from the tongue and throat of children with and without sore throat Produção de substâncias inibidoras semelhantes à bacteriocina por cepas de Streptococcus salivarius, isoladas da língua e garganta de crianças com e sem dor de garganta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Fantinato

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus salivarius strains, isolated from children with and without sore throat, were tested for bacteriocin production against Streptococcus pyogenes. S. salivarius strains producing bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances (BLIS against S. pyogenes were more frequently found in children without sore throat. These results suggest that these children may be protected against sore throat by the presence of BLIS-positive S. salivarius strains.Cepas de Streptococcus salivarius, isoladas de crianças com e sem dor de garganta, foram testadas quanto à produção de bacteriocina contra Streptococcus pyogenes. Os resultados mostraram que as crianças que não tinham dor de garganta possuiam, na boca, cepas de bactérias produtoras de substâncias inibidoras semelhantes à bacteriocina contra S. pyogenes.

  4. Impacto da vacina conjugada contra Streptococcus pneumoniae em doenças invasivas Impact of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine on the prevention of invasive pneumococcal diseases

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    Lucia Ferro Bricks

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Rever os estudos que avaliam o impacto da vacina conjugada 7-valente na incidência de doenças invasivas por pneumococo e analisar o possível impacto dessa vacina no Brasil. FONTE DE DADOS:Foram pesquisadas as bases de dados MEDLINE, LILACS, Cochrane Database Reviews (janeiro de 2000 a janeiro de 2006, selecionando-se para análise os artigos contendo as seguintes palavras-chave: Streptococcus pneumoniae, pneumococo, vacina conjugada, resistência, antibióticos e meningite. Também foi realizada busca de informações sobre o tema nos sites do Centers for Disease Control, Ministério da Saúde e Centro de Vigilância Epidemiológica do Estado de São Paulo. SÍNTESE DOS DADOS: A vacina conjugada 7-valente reduziu a incidência de doenças invasivas por pneumococo, número de consultas por doenças respiratórias de vias aéreas superiores e inferiores, consumo de antibióticos e incidência de doenças invasivas por pneumococo por cepas resistentes a antibióticos não apenas nas crianças vacinadas, como em adultos e idosos. No Brasil, os coeficientes de incidência de doenças invasivas por pneumococo em crianças menores de 5 anos são elevados, a taxa de letalidade de meningites pneumocócicas é alta e as taxas de resistência parcial e plena à penicilina aumentaram substancialmente nos últimos 5 anos. CONCLUSÕES:Devido aos benefícios diretos e indiretos do uso em larga escala da vacina conjugada 7-valente, essa vacina deve ser incluída no calendário básico de imunização do Brasil.OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the impact of heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in invasive pneumococcal diseases in the United States, and to analyze the potential impact of this vaccine in Brazil. SOURCES OF DATA: MEDLINE, LILACS, Cochrane Database Reviews, as well as the websites of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, Brazilian Ministry of Health and Centro de Vigilância Epidemiológica do Estado de São Paulo from

  5. Heterologous expression of Streptococcus mutans Cnm in Lactococcus lactis promotes intracellular invasion, adhesion to human cardiac tissues and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freires, Irlan A; Avilés-Reyes, Alejandro; Kitten, Todd; Simpson-Haidaris, P J; Swartz, Michael; Knight, Peter A; Rosalen, Pedro L; Lemos, José A; Abranches, Jacqueline

    2017-01-02

    In S. mutans, the expression of the surface glycoprotein Cnm mediates binding to extracellular matrix proteins, endothelial cell invasion and virulence in the Galleria mellonella invertebrate model. To further characterize Cnm as a virulence factor, the cnm gene from S. mutans strain OMZ175 was expressed in the non-pathogenic Lactococcus lactis NZ9800 using a nisin-inducible system. Despite the absence of the machinery necessary for Cnm glycosylation, Western blot and immunofluorescence microscopy analyses demonstrated that Cnm was effectively expressed and translocated to the cell wall of L. lactis. Similar to S. mutans, expression of Cnm in L. lactis enabled robust binding to collagen and laminin, invasion of human coronary artery endothelial cells and increased virulence in G. mellonella. Using an ex vivo human heart tissue colonization model, we showed that Cnm-positive strains of either S. mutans or L. lactis outcompete their Cnm-negative counterparts for tissue colonization. Finally, Cnm expression facilitated L. lactis adhesion and colonization in a rabbit model of infective endocarditis. Collectively, our results provide unequivocal evidence that binding to extracellular matrices mediated by Cnm is an important virulence attribute of S. mutans and confirm the usefulness of the L. lactis heterologous system for further characterization of bacterial virulence factors.

  6. Genomic analysis reveals multi-drug resistance clusters in Group B Streptococcus CC17 hypervirulent isolates causing neonatal invasive disease in southern mainland China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmondo Campisi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal invasive disease caused by group B Streptococcus (GBS represents a significant public health care concern globally. However, data related to disease burden, serotype distribution and molecular epidemiology in China and other Asian countries are very few and specifically relative to confined regions. The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic characteristics of GBS isolates recovered from neonates with invasive disease during 2013-2014 at Guangzhou and Changsha hospitals in southern mainland China. We assessed the capsular polysaccharide (CPS type, pilus islands (PIs distribution and hvgA gene presence in a panel of 26 neonatal clinical isolates, of which 8 were recovered from Early Onset Disease (EOD and 18 from Late Onset Disease (LOD. Among 26 isolates examined, five serotypes were identified. Type III was the most represented (15 cases, particularly among LOD strains (n=11, followed by types Ib (n=5, V (n=3, Ia (n=2 and II (n=1. We performed whole-genome sequencing (WGS analysis and antimicrobial susceptibility testing on the 14 serotype III isolates belonging to the hypervirulent Clonal Complex 17 (serotype III-CC17.The presence of PI-2b alone was associated with 13 out of 14 serotype III-CC17 strains. Genome analysis led us to identify two multi-drug resistance gene clusters harbored in two new versions of integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs, carrying five or eight antibiotic resistance genes, respectively. These ICEs replaced the 16 kb-locus that normally contains the PI-1 operon. All isolates harboring the identified ICEs showed multiple resistances to aminoglycoside, macrolide and tetracycline antibiotic classes. In conclusion, we report the first whole-genome sequence analysis of 14 GBS serotype III-CC17 strains isolated in China, representing the most prevalent lineage causing neonatal invasive disease. The acquisition of newly identified ICEs conferring multiple antibiotic resistances could in part explain

  7. Streptococcus iniae and Streptococcus agalactiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streptococcus iniae and S. agalactiae are economically important Gram positive bacterial pathogens of cultured and wild fish with a worldwide distribution. Both bacteria are potential zoonotic pathogens and have been associated most often with infections in immunocompromised people. Streptococcus in...

  8. [THE DIAGNOSTIC APPROACHES TO VERIFICATION OF STREPTOCOCCUS INFECTION IN PATIENTS WITH INFECTIOUS MONONUCLEOSIS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M A; Labushkina, A V; Simovanian, E N; Kharseeva, G G

    2015-11-01

    The Rostovskii state medical university of Minzdrav of Russia, 344022 Rostov-on-Don, Russia The analysis is applied concerning significance of laboratory techniques of verification of streptococcus infection (bacteriological analysis, detection of anti-streptolysin O in pair serums) in 148 patients with infectious mononucleosis aged from 3 to 15 years. The content of anti-streptolysin O exceeded standard in 41 ± 4.8% of patients with concomitant in acute period and in 49.5 ± 4.9% during period of re-convalescence. This data differed from analogous indicator in patients with negative result of examination on streptococcus infection independently of period of disease (9.3 ± 2.8%). The exceeding of standard of anti-streptolysin O was detected more frequently (t ≥ 2, P ≥ 95%) in patients with isolation of Streptococcus pyogenes (56.9 ± 5.8%) than in patients with Streptococcus viridans (31.2 ± 6.5%). The concentration of anti-streptolysin 0 in patients with concomitant streptococcus infection varied within limits 200-1800 IE/ml. The minimal level of anti-streptolysin O (C = 200 IE/mI) was detected independently of type of isolated Streptococcus and period of disease. The high levels of anti-streptolysin O were observed exclusively in patients with isolation of Streptococcus pyogenes. In blood serum ofpatient with concomitant streptococcus infection (Streptococcus pyogenes + Streptococcus viridans) increasing of level of anti-streptolysin O was detected in dynamics of diseases from minimal (C = 200 IE/ ml) to moderately high (200 streptococcus infection in patients with infectious mononucleosis the anamnesis data is to be considered. The complex bacteriological and serological examination ofpatients is to be implemented This is necessary for early detection ofpatients with streptococcus infection and decreasing risk of formation of streptococcus carrier state.

  9. Antibiotic Therapy in Pyogenic Meningitis in Paediatric Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajdin, F.; Rasheed, M.A.; Ashraf, M.; Khan, G.J.; Rasheed, H.; Ejaz, H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To isolate and identify the causative pathogen, antibiotic sensitivity testing and success rate of empirical antibiotic therapy in pyogenic meningitis. Study Design: Analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: The Children's Hospital and Institute of Child Health, Lahore, Pakistan, from March to July 2012. Methodology: The study was performed on 72 culture positive meningitis cases in children less than 15 years of age. This therapy was evaluated by monitoring the patient's clinical picture for 14 - 21 days. The collected data was analyzed by Chi-square test. Results: Seventeen different bacteria were isolated. The most commonly occurring bacteria were coagulase negative Staphylococci (25%), E. coli (12.5%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (8.3%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (8.3%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (8.3%). All the bacteria were sensitive to vancomycin (96.7%), meropenem (76.7%), amikacin (75%), ciprofloxacin (65.3%), chloramphenicol (46.5%), ceftazidime (44.2%), cefepime (41.9%), co-amoxiclav (38.0%), oxacillin (34.8%), cefotaxime (21.4%), penicillin (20.7%), ceftriaxone (18.6%), cefuroxime (14%) and ampicillin (6.9%). The combination of sulbactam and cefoperazone showed antimicrobial sensitivity of 81.4%. The success rate of empirical antibiotic therapy was 91.7%. Conclusion: It was found that Gram negative bacteria were the major cause of pyogenic meningitis. Mostly there were resistant strains against all commonly used antibiotics except vancomycin. All empirical antibiotic therapies were found to be most successful. (author)

  10. Evaluation of a commercial Streptococcus pyogenes in a kit for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-07-03

    Jul 3, 1990 ... processed in a bacteriology laboratory take 24 - 48 hours before results are available, a delay that may ... rapid detection ofthis organism at the patient's bedsideY We. Departments of Plastic Surgery and Medical ... In the clinical study swabs were taken by the nursing staff in the Bums Unit. All wounds were ...

  11. Evaluation of a commercial Streptococcus pyogenes in a kit for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-07-03

    Jul 3, 1990 ... 4. Cruickshank R, Duguid JP, Marmion BP, Swain RHA, Medical Microbiology. 12th ed. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingsrone, 1975: 367-372. 5. Ginsburg PJ. A ceview of bum-wound infections in 1986 with a critical . analysis of diagnostic methods, rreatment and prophylaxis at Hillbrow. Hospital. M. Med. (path.

  12. IMMUNOSUPPRESSIVE EFFECTS OF ARGININE DEIMINASE FROM STREPTOCOCCUS PYOGENES

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    E. A. Starikova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Many pathogens use metabolic pathway of arginine for successful dissemination. Bacterial arginine deiminase hydrolyzes arginine to form one molecule of ammonia and two molecules of ATP. The activity of the enzyme contributes to the improvement of survival of pathogenic bacteria in conditions of low pH at the site of infection or in phagolysosome, as well as in anaerobic conditions, and also leads to deficiency of arginine. Metabolism of arginine plays an important role in regulating the functions of immune system cells in mammals. Arginine is a substrate of enzymes NOS and arginase. Arginine depletion, potentially contributs to immunosuppression. The review analyzed the literature data on the effect of streptococcal arginine deiminase on the metabolism of arginine eukaryotic cells, and discusses immunosuppressive action of the enzyme.

  13. Serotypes and Clonal Diversity of Streptococcus pneumoniae Causing Invasive Disease in the Era of PCV13 in Catalonia, Spain.

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    Eva Del Amo

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to study the serotypes and clonal diversity of pneumococci causing invasive pneumococcal disease in Catalonia, Spain, in the era of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13. In our region, this vaccine is only available in the private market and it is estimated a PCV13 vaccine coverage around 55% in children. A total of 1551 pneumococcal invasive isolates received between 2010 and 2013 in the Molecular Microbiology Department at Hospital Sant Joan de Déu, Barcelona, were included. Fifty-two serotypes and 249 clonal types-defined by MLST-were identified. The most common serotypes were serotype 1 (n = 182; 11.7%, 3 (n = 145; 9.3%, 19A (n = 137; 8.8% and 7F (n = 122; 7.9%. Serotype 14 was the third most frequent serotype in children < 2 years (15 of 159 isolates. PCV7 serotypes maintained their proportion along the period of study, 16.6% in 2010 to 13.4% in 2013, whereas there was a significant proportional decrease in PCV13 serotypes, 65.3% in 2010 to 48.9% in 2013 (p<0.01. This decrease was mainly attributable to serotypes 19A and 7F. Serotype 12F achieved the third position in 2013 (n = 22, 6.4%. The most frequent clonal types found were ST306 (n = 154, 9.9%, ST191 (n = 111, 7.2%, ST989 (n = 85, 5.5% and ST180 (n = 80, 5.2%. Despite their decrease, PCV13 serotypes continue to be a major cause of disease in Spain. These results emphasize the need for complete PCV13 vaccination.

  14. The association between varicella (chickenpox and group A streptococcus infections in historical perspective

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    Stephen Coleman

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the research is to investigate the historical relationship between varicella and Streptococcus pyogenes infections. In the past few decades, varicella has been identified as a risk factor for invasive group A streptococcus infections. The question is whether this relationship also existed between varicella and scarlet fever in the historical era. Methods: The analysis begins with a search of historical medical reports on the relationship between varicella and scarlet fever epidemics in the late 19th and early 20th century, as well as in more recent empirical studies. Correlations and cross-correlations between varicella and scarlet fever are analyzed using weekly public health case reports from 1924 to 1932 for Boston, Chicago, New York City, and Philadelphia. Regression models are used to estimate the relationship between varicella and scarlet fever after controlling for seasonal forcing. Results: Historical records give limited support for a causal relationship between varicella and scarlet fever but indicate that these diseases often occurred close in time to each other. Likewise, statistical analysis shows that varicella and scarlet fever epidemics are closely aligned with each other, and varicella has a strong relationship with scarlet fever. The relationship is stronger than reported in any previous research on the two diseases. Conclusion: The close correspondence of the two diseases likely depends on multiple factors, including seasonal forcing, a causal relationship, and co-infections. The results raise questions about whether this close relationship might have had a synergistic effect or a role in the evolution of S. pyogenes from the virulent, high incidence epidemics of the 19th century to the relatively benign scarlet fever of the 1950s.

  15. The association between varicella (chickenpox) and group A streptococcus infections in historical perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the research is to investigate the historical relationship between varicella and Streptococcus pyogenes infections. In the past few decades, varicella has been identified as a risk factor for invasive group A streptococcus infections. The question is whether this relationship also existed between varicella and scarlet fever in the historical era. Methods: The analysis begins with a search of historical medical reports on the relationship between varicella and scarlet fever epidemics in the late 19th and early 20th century, as well as in more recent empirical studies. Correlations and cross-correlations between varicella and scarlet fever are analyzed using weekly public health case reports from 1924 to 1932 for Boston, Chicago, New York City, and Philadelphia. Regression models are used to estimate the relationship between varicella and scarlet fever after controlling for seasonal forcing. Results: Historical records give limited support for a causal relationship between varicella and scarlet fever but indicate that these diseases often occurred close in time to each other. Likewise, statistical analysis shows that varicella and scarlet fever epidemics are closely aligned with each other, and varicella has a strong relationship with scarlet fever. The relationship is stronger than reported in any previous research on the two diseases. Conclusion: The close correspondence of the two diseases likely depends on multiple factors, including seasonal forcing, a causal relationship, and co-infections. The results raise questions about whether this close relationship might have had a synergistic effect or a role in the evolution of S. pyogenes from the virulent, high incidence epidemics of the 19th century to the relatively benign scarlet fever of the 1950s. PMID:27504182

  16. Local Changes in Rates of Group A Streptococcus Disease and Antibiotic Resistance are Associated with Geographically Widespread Strain Turnover Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    253 14. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) Group A Streptococcus pyogenes is a primary agent of respiratory disease in military environments...COVERED (from - to) January 2007–December 2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Local Changes in Rates of Group A Streptococcus Disease and Antibiotic Resistance...antibiotic resistance of 802 Streptococcus isolates from 10 US military facilities collected from 2002 through 2007. Most of these sites provided

  17. Full-genome dissection of an epidemic of severe invasive disease caused by a hypervirulent, recently emerged clone of group A Streptococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fittipaldi, Nahuel; Beres, Stephen B; Olsen, Randall J; Kapur, Vivek; Shea, Patrick R; Watkins, M Ebru; Cantu, Concepcion C; Laucirica, Daniel R; Jenkins, Leslie; Flores, Anthony R; Lovgren, Marguerite; Ardanuy, Carmen; Liñares, Josefina; Low, Donald E; Tyrrell, Gregory J; Musser, James M

    2012-04-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) causes an exceptionally broad range of infections in humans, from relatively mild pharyngitis and skin infections to life-threatening necrotizing fasciitis and toxic shock syndrome. An epidemic of severe invasive human infections caused by type emm59 GAS, heretofore an exceedingly rare cause of disease, spread west to east across Canada over a 3-year period (2006 to 2008). By sequencing the genomes of 601 epidemic, historic, and other emm59 organisms, we discovered that a recently emerged, genetically distinct emm59 clone is responsible for the Canadian epidemic. Using near-real-time genome sequencing, we were able to show spread of the Canadian epidemic clone into the United States. The extensive genome data permitted us to identify patterns of geographic dissemination as well as links between emm59 subclonal lineages that cause infections. Mouse and nonhuman primate models of infection demonstrated that the emerged clone is unusually virulent. Transmission of epidemic emm59 strains may have occurred primarily by skin contact, as suggested by an experimental model of skin transmission. In addition, the emm59 strains had a significantly impaired ability to persist in human saliva and to colonize the oropharynx of mice, and seldom caused human pharyngitis. Our study contributes new information to the rapidly emerging field of molecular pathogenomics of bacterial epidemics and illustrates how full-genome data can be used to precisely illuminate the landscape of strain dissemination during a bacterial epidemic. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Mucosal Infections and Invasive Potential of Nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae Are Enhanced by Oligopeptide Binding Proteins AliC and AliD

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    Jessica L. Bradshaw

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae (NESp is an emerging human pathogen that colonizes the nasopharynx and is associated with noninvasive diseases such as otitis media (OM, conjunctivitis, and nonbacteremic pneumonia. Since capsule expression was previously thought to be necessary for establishment of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD, serotype-specific polysaccharide capsules are targeted by currently licensed pneumococcal vaccines. Yet, NESp expressing oligopeptide binding proteins AliC and AliD have been isolated during IPD. Thus, we hypothesize AliC and AliD are major NESp virulence determinants that facilitate persistence and development of IPD. Our study reveals that NESp expressing AliC and AliD have intensified virulence compared to isogenic mutants. Specifically, we demonstrate AliC and AliD enhance murine nasopharyngeal colonization and pulmonary infection and are required for OM in a chinchilla model. Furthermore, AliC and AliD increase pneumococcal survival in chinchilla whole blood and aid in resistance to killing by human leukocytes. Comparative proteome analysis revealed significant alterations in protein levels when AliC and AliD were absent. Virulence-associated proteins, including a pneumococcal surface protein C variant (CbpAC, were significantly downregulated, while starvation response indicators were upregulated in the double mutant relative to wild-type levels. We also reveal that differentially expressed CbpAC was essential for NESp adherence to epithelial cells, virulence during OM, reduction of C3b deposition on the NESp surface, and binding to nonspecific IgA. Altogether, the rise in NESp prevalence urges the need to understand how NESp establishes disease and persists in a host. This study highlights the roles of AliC, AliD, and CbpAC in the pathogenesis of NESp.

  19. Streptococcus suis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fang; Yi, Li; Yu, Ningwei; Wang, Guangyu; Ma, Zhe; Lin, Huixing; Fan, Hongjie

    2017-01-01

    Invasive infections caused by Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (SS2) has emerged as a clinical problem in recent years. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are an important mechanism for the trapping and killing of pathogens that are resistant to phagocytosis. Biofilm formation can protect bacteria from being killed by phagocytes. Until now, there have only been a few studies that focused on the interactions between bacterial biofilms and NETs. SS2 in both a biofilm state and a planktonic cell state were incubated with phagocytes and NETs, and bacterial survival was assessed. DNase I and cytochalasin B were used to degrade NET DNA or suppress phagocytosis, respectively. Extracellular DNA was stained with impermeable fluorescent dye to quantify NET formation. Biofilm formation increased up to 6-fold in the presence of neutrophils, and biofilms were identified in murine tissue. Both planktonic and biofilm cells induced neutrophils chemotaxis to the infection site, with neutrophils increasing by 85.1 and 73.8%, respectively. The bacteria in biofilms were not phagocytized. The bactericidal efficacy of NETs on the biofilms and planktonic cells were equal; however, the biofilm extracellular matrix can inhibit NET release. Although biofilms inhibit NETs release, NETs appear to be an important mechanism to eliminate SS2 biofilms. This knowledge advances the understanding of biofilms and may aid in the development of treatments for persistent infections with a biofilm component.

  20. Whole genome sequencing of group A Streptococcus: development and evaluation of an automated pipeline for emmgene typing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Kapatai

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes group A Streptococcus (GAS is the most common cause of bacterial throat infections, and can cause mild to severe skin and soft tissue infections, including impetigo, erysipelas, necrotizing fasciitis, as well as systemic and fatal infections including septicaemia and meningitis. Estimated annual incidence for invasive group A streptococcal infection (iGAS in industrialised countries is approximately three per 100,000 per year. Typing is currently used in England and Wales to monitor bacterial strains of S. pyogenes causing invasive infections and those isolated from patients and healthcare/care workers in cluster and outbreak situations. Sequence analysis of the emm gene is the currently accepted gold standard methodology for GAS typing. A comprehensive database of emm types observed from superficial and invasive GAS strains from England and Wales informs outbreak control teams during investigations. Each year the Bacterial Reference Department, Public Health England (PHE receives approximately 3,000 GAS isolates from England and Wales. In April 2014 the Bacterial Reference Department, PHE began genomic sequencing of referred S. pyogenes isolates and those pertaining to selected elderly/nursing care or maternity clusters from 2010 to inform future reference services and outbreak analysis (n = 3, 047. In line with the modernizing strategy of PHE, we developed a novel bioinformatics pipeline that can predict emmtypes using whole genome sequence (WGS data. The efficiency of this method was measured by comparing the emmtype assigned by this method against the result from the current gold standard methodology; concordance to emmsubtype level was observed in 93.8% (2,852/3,040 of our cases, whereas in 2.4% (n = 72 of our cases concordance was observed to emm type level. The remaining 3.8% (n = 117 of our cases corresponded to novel types/subtypes, contamination, laboratory sample transcription errors or problems arising

  1. Population snapshot of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing invasive disease in South Africa prior to introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kedibone M Ndlangisa

    Full Text Available We determined the sequence types of isolates that caused invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD prior to routine use of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV in South Africa. PCV-13 serotypes and 6C isolates collected in 2007 (1 461/2 437, 60% from patients of all ages as part of on-going, national, laboratory-based surveillance for IPD, were selected for genetic characterization. In addition, all 134 non-PCV isolates from children <2 years were selected for characterization. Sequence type diversity by serotype and age category (children <5 years vs. individuals ≥5 years was assessed for PCV serotypes using Simpson's index of diversity. Similar genotypes circulated among isolates from children and adults and the majority of serotypes were heterogeneous. While globally disseminated clones were common among some serotypes (e.g., serotype 1 [clonal complex (CC 217, 98% of all serotype 1] and 14 [CC230, 43%], some were represented mainly by clonal complexes rarely reported elsewhere (e.g., serotype 3 [CC458, 60%] and 19A [CC2062, 83%]. In children <2 years, serotype 15B and 8 were the most common serotypes among non-PCV isolates (16% [22/134] and 15% [20/134] isolates, respectively. Sequence type 7052 and 53 were most common among serotypes 15B and 8 isolates and accounted for 58% (7/12 and 64% (9/14 of the isolates, respectively. Serotype 19F, 14, 19A and 15B had the highest proportions of penicillin non-susceptible isolates. Genotypes rarely reported in other parts of the world but common among some of our serotypes highlight the importance of our data as these genotypes may emerge post PCV introduction.

  2. PYOGENIC LIVER ABSCESS: DIAGNOSTIC AND THERAPEUTIC MANAGEMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Rosa, Otto Mauro Dos; Lunardelli, Henrique Simonsen; Ribeiro-Junior, Marcelo Augusto Fontenelle

    2016-01-01

    The pyogenic liver abscess has an incidence of 1.1/1,000 habitants. Mortality can reach 100%. The use of less invasive procedures diminish morbidity and hospital stay. Identify risk factors in patients who underwent percutaneous drainage guided by ultrasound as treatment. Were analyzed 10 patients submitted to the method. Epidemiological characteristics, laboratory markers and imaging exams (ultrasound and CT) were evaluated. The majority of the patients were men with mean age of 50 years old. Liver disease, alcoholism and biliary tract disease were the most common prodromes. Abdominal pain (90%), fever (70%) and jaundice (40%) were the most common clinical manifestations. Mortality of 20% was observed in this series. Hypoalbuminemia and days of hospitalization had a statistically significant positive association with death. The pyogenic liver abscess has subacute evolution which makes the diagnosis difficult. Image exams have high sensitivity in diagnosis, particularly computed tomography. Percutaneous drainage associated with antibiotic therapy is safe and effective therapeutic resource. O abscesso hepático piogênico tem incidência de 1,1 por 1.000 habitantes com mortalidade podendo chegar a 100%. O uso de recursos menos invasivos diminuem morbimortalidade e tempo de internação hospitalar. Identificar fatores de risco no abscesso hepático piogênico tratado por drenagem percutânea guiada por ultrassom. Total de 10 pacientes foram submetidos ao procedimento. Foram avaliadas características epidemiológicas, marcadores laboratoriais exames de imagem (ultrassom e tomografia). Na amostra houve predominância do sexo masculino, com média de idade de 50 anos. Hepatopatia, etilismo e doença da via biliar foram os pródromos mais frequentes. Dor abdominal (90%), febre (70%) e icterícia (40%) foram manifestações clínicas mais comuns. Houve mortalidade de 20% nesta série. Hipoalbuminemia e dias de internação hospitalar tiveram associação positiva com

  3. Crystal structure of the zymogen form of the group A Streptococcus virulence factor SpeB: an integrin-binding cysteine protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, T F; Cooney, J C; Baker, H M; McSweeney, S; Liu, M; Gubba, S; Musser, J M; Baker, E N

    2000-02-29

    Pathogenic bacteria secrete protein toxins that weaken or disable their host, and thereby act as virulence factors. We have determined the crystal structure of streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B (SpeB), a cysteine protease that is a major virulence factor of the human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes and participates in invasive disease episodes, including necrotizing fasciitis. The structure, determined for the 40-kDa precursor form of SpeB at 1.6-A resolution, reveals that the protein is a distant homologue of the papain superfamily that includes the mammalian cathepsins B, K, L, and S. Despite negligible sequence identity, the protease portion has the canonical papain fold, albeit with major loop insertions and deletions. The catalytic site differs from most other cysteine proteases in that it lacks the Asn residue of the Cys-His-Asn triad. The prosegment has a unique fold and inactivation mechanism that involves displacement of the catalytically essential His residue by a loop inserted into the active site. The structure also reveals the surface location of an integrin-binding Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif that is a feature unique to SpeB among cysteine proteases and is linked to the pathogenesis of the most invasive strains of S. pyogenes.

  4. StreptInCor: a candidate vaccine epitope against S. pyogenes infections induces protection in outbred mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edilberto Postol

    Full Text Available Infection with Streptococcus pyogenes (S. pyogenes can result in several diseases, particularly in children. S. pyogenes M protein is the major virulence factor, and certain regions of its N-terminus can trigger autoimmune sequelae such as rheumatic fever in susceptible individuals with untreated group A streptococcal pharyngitis. In a previous study, we utilized a large panel of human peripheral blood cells to define the C-terminal protective epitope StreptInCor (medical identity, which does not induce autoimmune reactions. We recently confirmed the results in HLA-transgenic mice. In the present study, we extended the experimental assays to outbred animals (Swiss mice. Herein, we demonstrate high titers of StreptInCor-specific antibodies, as well as appropriate T-cell immune responses. No cross-reaction to cardiac myosin was detected. Additionally, immunized Swiss mice exhibited 87% survival one month after challenge with S. pyogenes. In conclusion, the data presented herein reinforce previous results in humans and animals and further emphasize that StreptInCor could be an effective and safe vaccine for the prevention of S. pyogenes infections.

  5. Síndrome hemolítico-urêmica relacionada à infecção invasiva pelo Streptococcus pneumoniae Hemolytic-uremic syndrome complicating invasive pneumococcal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Leticia de O. Cestari

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: A doença pneumocócica é importante problema de saúde pública e raramente há associação desta infecção com a síndrome hemolítico-urêmica (SHU grave. O objetivo deste artigo é relatar o caso de um paciente com esta associação. DESCRIÇÃO DO CASO: Criança do sexo masculino, com 17 meses de idade, admitida no hospital com insuficiência respiratória aguda e necessitando de suporte ventilatório. O exame radiológico mostrava extensa opacidade homogênea em hemitórax direito. A hemocultura foi positiva para Streptococcus pneumoniae. Nos exames de admissão, notaram-se: hemoglobina de 6,5g/dL, 38.000 plaquetas/mm³, uréia de 79mg/dL e creatinina de 1,64mg/dL. No primeiro dia, apresentou oligoanúria e hipervolemia, necessitando de hemodiafiltração. Evoluiu com disfunção de múltiplos órgãos e óbito no sétimo dia. A necrópsia mostrou áreas extensas de necrose cortical e tubular renal, com depósito de fibrina nas arteríolas. COMENTÁRIOS: A SHU associada ao pneumococo apresenta morbidade e mortalidade elevadas. Em crianças com doença pneumocócica invasiva e acometimento hematológico ou renal grave, deve-se estar atento a esta rara complicação. Merecem investigação os seguintes aspectos relacionados à doença: a função da detecção precoce de antígenos T ativados no diagnóstico e terapêutica, o papel do fator H na patogênese, o método ideal de substituição renal e a definição do prognóstico em longo prazo.OBJECTIVE: Pneumococcal diseases are a major public health problem. Severe hemolytic-uremic syndrome is an uncommon complication. The aim of this study is to report a child with this complication. CASE DESCRIPTION: A male child with 17 months old was admitted to the hospital, due to acute respiratory failure, needing ventilatory support. Roentgenogram demonstrated massive condensation of right lung and Streptococcus pneumonia was isolated from blood cultures. Laboratory tests showed

  6. The Impact of Obesity and Diabetes on the Risk of Disease and Death due to Invasive Group A Streptococcus Infections in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, Gayle; Hao, Yongping; Pondo, Tracy; Miller, Lisa; Petit, Susan; Thomas, Ann; Lindegren, Mary Louise; Farley, Monica M; Dumyati, Ghinwa; Como-Sabetti, Kathryn; Harrison, Lee H; Baumbach, Joan; Watt, James; Van Beneden, Chris

    2016-04-01

    Invasive group A Streptococcus (iGAS) infections cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. We analyzed whether obesity and diabetes were associated with iGAS infections and worse outcomes among an adult US population. We determined the incidence of iGAS infections using 2010-2012 cases in adults aged ≥ 18 years from Active Bacterial Core surveillance (ABCs), a population-based surveillance system, as the numerator. For the denominator, we used ABCs catchment area population estimates from the 2011 to 2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey. The relative risk (RR) of iGAS was determined by obesity and diabetes status after adjusting for age group, gender, race, and other underlying conditions through binomial logistic regression. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine whether obesity or diabetes was associated with increased odds of death due to iGAS compared to normal weight and nondiabetic patients, respectively. Between 2010 and 2012, 2927 iGAS cases were identified. Diabetes was associated with an increased risk of iGAS in all racial groups (adjusted risk ratio [aRR] ranged from 2.71 to 5.08). Grade 3 obesity (body mass index [BMI] ≥ 40) was associated with an increased risk of iGAS for whites (aRR = 3.47; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.00-4.01). Grades 1-2 (BMI = 30.0-obesity were associated with an increased odds of death (odds ratio [OR] = 1.55, [95% CI, 1.05, 2.29] and OR = 1.62 [95% CI, 1.01, 2.61], respectively) when compared to normal weight patients. These results may help target vaccines against GAS that are currently under development. Efforts to develop enhanced treatment regimens for iGAS may improve prognoses for obese patients. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  7. Pyogenic Flexor Tenosynovitis in an Infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James I. Gragg

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Pyogenic flexor tenosynovitis is a rare, though well known infectious process of the flexor tendon sheath of the hand. This condition is generally diagnosed in adults by the observance of the four Kanavel signs. Application of the Kanavel signs to diagnosis in the pediatric population, however, is of unknown utility. We present the case of a 13-month-old male with pyogenic flexor tenosynovitis who presented with all four of the Kanavel signs.

  8. Vulvar Lobular Capillary Hemangioma (Pyogenic Granuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kian-Mei Chong

    2005-03-01

    Conclusion: Pyogenic granuloma is considered a reactive hyperproliferative vascular response to trauma or other stimuli. The name “pyogenic granuloma” is a misnomer since the condition is not associated with pus and does not represent a granuloma histologically. There are a few cases of lobular capillary hemangioma of the glans penis but it is rare on the female genitalia. We present this case to help physicians become aware that lobular capillary hemangiomas may occur at this site.

  9. Cryptogenic pyogenic liver abscess as the herald of colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Soung Won; Jang, Jae Young; Lee, Tae Hee; Kim, Hyun Gun; Hong, Sung Wook; Park, Seung Hoon; Kim, Sang Gyune; Cheon, Young Koog; Kim, Young Seok; Cho, Young Deok; Kim, Jin-Oh; Kim, Boo Sung; Lee, Eun Jung; Kim, Tae Hyong

    2012-02-01

    Colonic mucosal defects might be a route for bacterial invasion into the portal system, with subsequent hematogenous spread to the liver. We retrospectively investigated the results of colonoscopy and the clinical characteristics of patients with pyogenic liver abscess of colonic origin. A total of 230 consecutive patients with pyogenic liver abscess were reviewed between 2003 and 2010. The 230 patients were categorized into three groups (pancreatobiliary [n = 135], cryptogenic [n = 81], and others [n = 14]). Of the 81 cryptogenic patients, 37 (45.7%) underwent colonoscopy. Colonic lesions with mucosal defects were considered colonic causes of abscess. In the 37 colonoscopic investigations, colon cancer was found in six patients (16.2%), laterally-spreading tumor (LST) in two patients (5.4%), multiple colon ulcers in one patient (2.7%), colon polyps in 17 patients (45.9%), and diverticula in four patients (10.8%). Nine (11%) of 81 cryptogenic abscesses were therefore reclassified as being of colonic origin (colon cancer = 6, LST = 2, ulcer = 1). Three cases were stage III colon cancer, and the others were stage I. Two LST were high-grade dysplasia. The percentage of patients with Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) and diabetes mellitus (DM) of colonic origin was 66.7%, which was significantly higher than the 8.6% for other causes (P colonic cause. Colonoscopy should be considered for the detection of hidden colonic malignant lesions in patients with cryptogenic pyogenic liver abscess, especially for patients with K. pneumoniae and DM. © 2011 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  10. Case report of the family transmission ofStreptococcus pyogenesorbital cellulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyon, Christelle; Goodyear, Émilie

    2017-06-01

    This is a case report of an unusual case of the family transmission of Streptococcus pyogenes infection in three siblings. One brother contracted the infection which resulted in orbital cellulitis of two of his siblings, in the absence of anatomical or immunological predisposing factors. A young boy contracted an uncomplicated S pyogenes upper respiratory tract infection. The twin brother closely followed by the older sister both developed a S pyogenes orbital cellulitis a couple of days later. To our knowledge, this is the first case ever reported of family transmission of orbital cellulitis. This highlights the importance of early diagnosis and treatment of S pyogenes , and the role of throat cultures as means of diagnosis even in the absence of symptoms or signs of pharyngitis.

  11. [Antibiotics susceptibility of Streptococcus and Enterococcus: data of Onerba network].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachée, A; Varon, E; Jouy, E; Meunier, D

    2009-05-01

    This work was aimed to analyze trends in susceptibility to antibiotics among the main species of beta-hemolytic streptococci involved in community-acquired infections in human (Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus agalactiae), or in animals (Streptococcus suis and Streptococcus uberis) and also among the main enterocci species, Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium. Data were recorded since 1996 through the Onerba networks. S. pyogenes, as the other beta-hemolytic streptococci studied remained fully susceptible to beta-lactam antibiotics. However, susceptibility to macrolides is clearly decreasing in S. pyogenes. In 2002, only 62 to 65% of the strains according to the network considered, were susceptible to erythromycin. A similar trend was observed for S. agalactiae with only 75% of erythromycin susceptibility in 2002, and for both species isolated from animals S. suis and S. uberis, with respectively 35 and 76% of strains susceptible to erythromycin. In enterococci, susceptibility to beta-lactams remained stable between 2000 and 2004. Indeed, the susceptibility to aminopenicillins remained high in E. faecalis (about 98%), whereas the proportion of E. faecium isolates susceptible to these antibiotics were lower than 60%. From 1999 to 2004, various studies conducted in French hospitals showed that the vancomycin resistance among enterococci accounted for less than 2%. However, the recent emergence of glycopeptide resistant enterococci clusters in French hospitals is a matter of concern and emphasizes the need for an ongoing surveillance. Such trend in macrolide resistance among S. pyogenes or S. agalactiae should consequently lead to propose other alternatives in case of beta-lactam allergy, and for pharyngitis, to rethink the place of the culture for susceptibility testing.

  12. Molecular Epidemiology and Genomics of Group A Streptococcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessen, Debra E.; McShan, W. Michael; Nguyen, Scott V.; Shetty, Amol; Agrawal, Sonia; Tettelin, Hervé

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus; GAS) is a strict human pathogen with a very high prevalence worldwide. This review highlights the genetic organization of the species and the important ecological considerations that impact its evolution. Recent advances are presented on the topics of molecular epidemiology, population biology, molecular basis for genetic change, genome structure and genetic flux, phylogenomics and closely related streptococcal species, and the long- and short-term evolution of GAS. The application of whole genome sequence data to addressing key biological questions is discussed. PMID:25460818

  13. M-protein gene-type distribution and hyaluronic acid capsule in group A Streptococcus clinical isolates in Chile: association of emm gene markers with csrR alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, A; Rojas, P; Rodríguez, C; Undabarrena, A; Garate, C; Riedel, I; Román, J C; Kalergis, A M; García, P

    2012-07-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes causes a variety of infections because of virulence factors such as capsular hyaluronic acid and M protein. The aim of this study was to determine emm types and capsule phenotype in 110 isolates of S. pyogenes from patients with invasive (sterile sites) and non-invasive (mainly pharyngitis) infections in Chile, and the relationship between both virulence factors. The most abundant types found were emm12, emm1, emm4 and emm28 and their distribution was similar to that seen in Latin America and developed countries, but very different from that in Asia and Pacific Island countries. Ten of 16 emm types identified in pharyngeal isolates were found in sterile-site isolates, and three of nine emm types of sterile-site isolates occurred in pharyngeal isolates; three emm subtypes were novel. The amount of hyaluronic acid was significantly higher in sterile-site isolates but did not differ substantially among emm types. Only three isolates were markedly capsulate and two of them had mutations in the csrR gene that codes for a repressor of capsule synthesis genes. We found a non-random association between emm types and csrR gene alleles suggesting that horizontal gene transfer is not freely occurring in the population.

  14. Pyogenic Brain Abscess Caused by Peptostreptococcus in a Patient with HIV-1 Infection

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    Jose Armando Gonzales Zamora

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In the setting of HIV, cerebral lesions are usually secondary to lymphoma and opportunistic infections; however, in patients with CD4 counts above 200 cells/uL, other pathologies such as pyogenic brain abscess could gain importance. The microbiology of pyogenic brain abscess has Staphylococcus and Streptococcus as the leading etiologic pathogens in immunocompetent individuals. Peptostreptococcus is also recognized as a common cause of brain abscess in this patient population. In HIV-infected individuals, there have been sporadic reports of Peptostreptococcus infections but none of brain abscess. We describe the case of a 43-years-old HIV-infected patient with a CD4 count of 350 cells/uL that developed a Peptostreptococcus brain abscess presumably from hematogenous spread of an odontogenic source. Treatment with stereotactic needle aspiration in two opportunities and four weeks of intravenous antibiotics led to a complete resolution of this infection. This case highlights the importance of a multidisciplinary approach for an effective treatment of pyogenic brain abscess in HIV-1 patients.

  15. Surgical Management of Pyogenic Discitis of Lumbar Region

    OpenAIRE

    Devkota, Pramod; Krishnakumar, R; Renjith Kumar, J

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective review of patients who had pyogenic discitis and were managed surgically. Purpose To analyze the bacteriology, pathology, management and outcome of pyogenic discitis of the lumbar region treated surgically. Overview of Literature Surgical management of pyogenic discitis is still an infrequently used modality of treatment. Methods A total of 42 patients comprised of 33 males and 9 females who had pyogenic discitis with a mean age of 51.61 years (range, 16-75 years) w...

  16. covR Mediated Antibiofilm Activity of 3-Furancarboxaldehyde Increases the Virulence of Group A Streptococcus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganapathy Ashwinkumar Subramenium

    Full Text Available Group A streptococcus (GAS, Streptococcus pyogenes, a multi-virulent, exclusive human pathogen responsible for various invasive and non-invasive diseases possesses biofilm forming phenomenon as one of its pathogenic armaments. Recently, antibiofilm agents have gained prime importance, since inhibiting the biofilm formation is expected to reduce development of antibiotic resistance and increase their susceptibility to the host immune cells.The current study demonstrates the antibiofilm activity of 3Furancarboxaldehyde (3FCA, a floral honey derived compound, against GAS biofilm, which was divulged using crystal violet assay, light microscopy, and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The report is extended to study its effect on various aspects of GAS (morphology, virulence, aggregation at its minimal biofilm inhibitory concentration (132μg/ml. 3FCA was found to alter the growth pattern of GAS in solid and liquid medium and increased the rate of auto-aggregation. Electron microscopy unveiled the increase in extra polymeric substances around cell. Gene expression studies showed down-regulation of covR gene, which is speculated to be the prime target for the antibiofilm activity. Increased hyaluronic acid production and down regulation of srtB gene is attributed to the enhanced rate of auto-aggregation. The virulence genes (srv, mga, luxS and hasA were also found to be over expressed, which was manifested with the increased susceptibility of the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans to 3FCA treated GAS. The toxicity of 3FCA was ruled out with no adverse effect on C. elegans.Though 3FCA possess antibiofilm activity against GAS, it was also found to increase the virulence of GAS. This study demonstrates that, covR mediated antibiofilm activity may increase the virulence of GAS. This also emphasizes the importance to analyse the acclimatization response and virulence of the pathogen in the presence of antibiofilm compounds prior to their clinical trials.

  17. Polymeric immunoglobulin receptor-mediated invasion of Streptococcus pneumoniae into host cells requires a coordinate signaling of SRC family of protein-tyrosine kinases, ERK, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Vaibhav; Asmat, Tauseef M; Dierdorf, Nina I; Hauck, Christof R; Hammerschmidt, Sven

    2010-11-12

    Streptococcus pneumoniae are commensals of the human nasopharynx with the capacity to invade mucosal respiratory cells. PspC, a pneumococcal surface protein, interacts with the human polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) to promote bacterial adherence to and invasion into epithelial cells. Internalization of pneumococci requires the coordinated action of actin cytoskeleton rearrangements and the retrograde machinery of pIgR. Here, we demonstrate the involvement of Src protein-tyrosine kinases (PTKs), focal adhesion kinase (FAK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) but not p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) in pneumococcal invasion via pIgR. Pharmacological inhibitors of PTKs and MAPKs and genetic interference with Src PTK and FAK functions caused a significant reduction of pIgR-mediated pneumococcal invasion but did not influence bacterial adhesion to host cells. Furthermore, pneumococcal ingestion by host cells induces activation of ERK1/2 and JNK. In agreement with activated JNK, its target molecule and DNA-binding protein c-Jun was phosphorylated. We also show that functionally active Src PTK is essential for activation of ERK1/2 upon pneumococcal infections. In conclusion, these data illustrate the importance of a coordinated signaling between Src PTKs, ERK1/2, and JNK during PspC-pIgR-mediated uptake of pneumococci by host epithelial cells.

  18. Conjugative transfer of R-plasmids from Streptococcus faecalis to Staphylococcus aureus.

    OpenAIRE

    Schaberg, D R; Clewell, D B; Glatzer, L

    1982-01-01

    R-plasmids originally isolated from Streptococcus pyogenes(pAC1,pAM15346), Streptococcus agalactiae(pIP501), and Streptococcus faecalis(pAM beta 1) were shown to be self-transferable on filter membranes from S. faecalis JH2-2 to Staphylococcus aureus recipients. The nonconjugative plasmid pAM alpha 1 was mobilized into S. aureus by pAM beta 1. Once in S. aureus, conjugative R-plasmids could be transferred to a second S. aureus recipient or back into S. faecalis. Determinants for chloramphenic...

  19. Application of a new method for detecting streptococcal nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide glycohydrolase to various M types of Streptoccus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lütticken, R; Lütticken, D; Johnson, D R; Wannamaker, L W

    1976-05-01

    The production of extracellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide glycohydrolase (NADase) by Streptococcus pyogenes can easily be demonstrated using the fluorescence of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide in ultraviolet light occurring on addition of strong alkali. The new method described here uses microtiter plates and can be read with the naked eye. It permits the screening of large numbers of strains in a short time and with minimal amounts of reagents. The sensitivity of the new method proved to be good in comparison with the bisulfite spectrophotometric method. Culture supernatants of 177 group A streptococci were tested for NADase production by the microtiter fluorescence method. We could confirm former findings that strains within a certain M type of S. pyogenes are usually either producers or nonproducers of the enzyme. The usefulness of the test for screening of streptococcal NADase production is discussed.

  20. Pyogenic Tenosynovitis in Infants: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lironi, Céline; Steiger, Christina; Juchler, Céline; Spyropoulou, Vasiliki; Samara, Eleftheria; Ceroni, Dimitri

    2017-11-01

    Pyogenic tenosynovitis is an uncommon condition in children, and there are few published case reports. We present a series of 11 cases who were treated in the Geneva Children Hospital in the last 10 years. Kingella kingae was the main pathogen, and the characteristics of infection (inflammatory indices, clinical findings and severity) are similar to other osteoarticular K. kingae infections in infants.

  1. Pyogenic granuloma associated with mandibular odontoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Ocampo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: pyogenic granuloma is a kind of inflammatory hyperplasia of multifactorial origin, which is usually related to trauma or constant irritation, drug use, hormonal factors, among others. Meanwhile the odontoma is a benign tumor odontogenic composed of epithelial and mesenchymal cells, their development is usually associated with trauma, infections, inherited disorders or hyperactivity odontoblast. Objectives: The objective is to present the clinical case of a patient that presented a case of pyogenic granuloma related to the presence of a mandibular odontoma, and therapeutic management and postoperative results. Case report: The case shows a female patient of 32 years old with a history of multinodular goiter and hypothyroidism, developing a mandibular odontoma of the left side associated with pyogenic granuloma in the same area, which was treated with surgical excision and reconstructed affected tissues with lyophilized bone and collagen membrane. Favorable outcome after surgery without evidence of recurrence, with proper osseointegration of alloplastic materials and soft tissues. Conclusions: The irritant effect of the presence of a tumor (odontoma in developing confirmed pyogenic granuloma.

  2. Pyogenic Granuloma with Severe Mandibular Bone Destruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Jeong Won; Heo, Min Suk; Lee, Sam Sun; Choi, Soon Chul; Park, Tae Won [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology and Dental Research Institute College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-06-15

    Pyogenic granuloma is a overzealous proliferation of a vascular type connective tissue as a result of some minor trauma and is a well circumscribed elevated, pedunculated or sessile benign inflammatory lesion of skin and mucous membrane. The clinical features of pyogenic granuloma are indicative but not specific and nearly all cases of pyogenic granulomas are superficial in nature, and there is little if any mention in the literature of these lesions producing alveolar bone even jaw bone loss. This case is somewhat unique in that the lesion was an obvious histologic pyogenic granuloma; however, it appeared to invade the mandibular bone which resulted in the loss of the adjacent teeth. A 12-year-old boy came to Seoul National University Dental Hospital with chief complaints of left facial swelling. The features obtained were as follows ; Plain radiograms showed a large well-circumscribed radiolucent lesion on left mandibular ramus area, which made severe expansion of lingual cortex and displacement of lower left 3rd molar tooth germ. Computed tomograms showed large soft tissue mass involving left masticator space with destruction of left mandibular ramus. Histologically, sections revealed loose edematous stroma with intense infiltration of inflammatory cells and proliferation of vascular channels. Also, there were focal areas of extensive capillary proliferation, bone destruction and peripheral new bone formation.

  3. Streptococcus pneumoniae

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clinical significance of antimicrobial resistance in. Streptococcus pneumoniae. Michael R Jacobs. Despite increasing resistance in the pneumococcus over the past 30 years, there are few cases of treatment failure of non-meningeal infections with high-dosage parenteral penicillin G, which still remains highly effective for.

  4. Streptococcus suis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggenborg, René; Gaïni, Shahin; Kjaeldgaard, Poul

    2008-01-01

    Meningitis and spondylodiscitis caused by Streptococcus suis is a rare disease which is contracted by occupational exposure to pigs. We report a 54-y-old pig-farm worker with S. suis meningitis and septicaemia complicated with thoracal and lumbar spine spondylodiscitis. The S. suis strain involved...

  5. Postpartum pyogenic sacroiliitis with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a healthy adult: A case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imagama, Takashi; Tokushige, Atsunori; Sakka, Akihito; Seki, Kazushige; Taguchi, Toshihiko

    2015-06-01

    Back and buttock pain during pregnancy and the postpartum period generally improves spontaneously and rarely causes problems. However, such pain is infrequently induced by pyogenic sacroiliitis. We herein present a 37-year-old female patient with no previous medical history who developed pyogenic sacroiliitis with severe right buttock pain 7 days after cesarean delivery. Arthrocentesis was performed, and a culture revealed the presence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). After 6 weeks of treatment with intravenous antibiotics, her infection became quiescent. Eight cases of pyogenic sacroiliitis during the postpartum period and seven cases during pregnancy have been reported, but most of the causative pathogens were methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus or Streptococcus species. This report describes the first case of postpartum pyogenic sacroiliitis caused by MRSA. The frequency of infection with MRSA has recently increased, and community-acquired MRSA, which affects even healthy young people, has also become a problem. Antibiotics for empirical therapy after a diagnosis of pyogenic sacroiliitis, including anti-MRSA antibiotics, should be carefully selected. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. NAD+-Glycohydrolase Promotes Intracellular Survival of Group A Streptococcus.

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    Onkar Sharma

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A global increase in invasive infections due to group A Streptococcus (S. pyogenes or GAS has been observed since the 1980s, associated with emergence of a clonal group of strains of the M1T1 serotype. Among other virulence attributes, the M1T1 clone secretes NAD+-glycohydrolase (NADase. When GAS binds to epithelial cells in vitro, NADase is translocated into the cytosol in a process mediated by streptolysin O (SLO, and expression of these two toxins is associated with enhanced GAS intracellular survival. Because SLO is required for NADase translocation, it has been difficult to distinguish pathogenic effects of NADase from those of SLO. To resolve the effects of the two proteins, we made use of anthrax toxin as an alternative means to deliver NADase to host cells, independently of SLO. We developed a novel method for purification of enzymatically active NADase fused to an amino-terminal fragment of anthrax toxin lethal factor (LFn-NADase that exploits the avid, reversible binding of NADase to its endogenous inhibitor. LFn-NADase was translocated across a synthetic lipid bilayer in vitro in the presence of anthrax toxin protective antigen in a pH-dependent manner. Exposure of human oropharyngeal keratinocytes to LFn-NADase in the presence of protective antigen resulted in cytosolic delivery of NADase activity, inhibition of protein synthesis, and cell death, whereas a similar construct of an enzymatically inactive point mutant had no effect. Anthrax toxin-mediated delivery of NADase in an amount comparable to that observed during in vitro infection with live GAS rescued the defective intracellular survival of NADase-deficient GAS and increased the survival of SLO-deficient GAS. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that delivery of LFn-NADase prevented intracellular trafficking of NADase-deficient GAS to lysosomes. We conclude that NADase mediates cytotoxicity and promotes intracellular survival of GAS in host cells.

  7. Prevalence of mef and ermB genes in invasive pediatric erythromycin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from Argentina Prevalencia de los genes mef y ermB en aislamientos invasivos de Streptococcus pneumoniae resistentes a eritromicina recuperados de pacientes pediátricos en Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Corso

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available During the period 1993-2001, a total of 1,499 pneumococci isolates were recovered through the Argentinean surveillance of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing invasive disease in children under 6 years of age, 3.5% of which were erythromycin resistant. Among the 50 erythromycin-resistant strains available, 58% (n=29 harbored mefA/E genes (15 mefA, 30%; and 14 mefE, 28%, 34% (n=17 ermB, and 6% (n=3 both mefA/E plus ermB genes, while one isolate was negative for all the acquired genes studied. The England14-9 (42%, Poland6B-20 (20% and Spain9v-3 (16% clones were responsible for the emergence of pneumococcal macrolide resistance in pediatric population from Argentina.En el marco del programa de vigilancia regional SIREVA, se analizaron 1499 aislamientos de Streptococcus pneumoniae causantes de enfermedad invasiva en menores de 6 años, recuperados entre 1993 y 2001. Se detectó un 3,5% de resistencia a eritromicina. De los 50 aislamientos resistentes a eritromicina que pudieron ser estudiados, el 58% (n=29 tenían los genes mefA/E (15 mefA, 30% y 14 mefE, 28%, el 34% (n=17 el gen ermB y el 6% (n=3 la combinación de genes mefA/E y ermB. Sólo un aislamiento fue negativo para todos los genes analizados. Los clones internacionales England14-9, Poland6B-20 y Spain9v-3 representaron el 78% del total de aislamientos resistentes (42, 20 y 16%, respectivamente y se consideraron los responsables de la emergencia de la resistencia a macrólidos entre los neumococos que afectan a la población pediátrica de Argentina.

  8. Endocarditis caused by Streptococcus canis: an emerging zoonosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacave, Guillaume; Coutard, Aymeric; Troché, Gilles; Augusto, Sandrine; Pons, Stéphanie; Zuber, Benjamin; Laurent, Virginie; Amara, Marlène; Couzon, Brigitte; Bédos, Jean-Pierre; Pangon, Béatrice; Grimaldi, David

    2016-02-01

    We report a human case of infective endocarditis caused by Streptococcus canis. Identification was carried out from positive blood culture using mass spectrometry and SodA gene sequencing. S. canis related zoonotic invasive infections may have been previously underdiagnosed due to inadequate identification of group G Streptococcus species.

  9. Gingival pyogenic granuloma developing during isotretinoin treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engin Şenel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pyogenic granuloma (PG is a rare side effect of isotretinoin therapy. Oral pyogenic granuloma developing during isotretinoin treatment has not been reported so far. A 22-old-male patient, who had been given oral isotretinoin treatment for severe nodular acne, was admitted with the complaint of a painless and red nodule in his lower gum at the end of the second month of the treatment. The patient did not report any history of trauma or dental treatment. Dermatologic examination revealed a hemorrhagic nodule measuring 1.5x1 cm in size in the lower gums of the cutting and canine teeth. The lesion was excised completely. Histopathological examination disclosed acanthosis and hyperkeratosis in epidermis, subepidermal vascular proliferation, edema, and sparsely scattered inflammatory cell groups. The mechanism by which isotretinoin causes pyogenic granulomas is not exactly known. It should be considered that this rare side effect can be gingival in patients taking isotretinoin and the regular oral examination should not be neglected.

  10. Distribución de serotipos de Streptococcus pneumoniae aislados de infecciones invasoras en el Hospital de Niños de Santa Fe Serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from invasive infections at the Hospital de Niños of Santa Fe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Mayoral

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Con la introducción de vacunas conjugadas antineumocócicas se observó, en muchos países, disminución de aislamientos de Streptococcus pneumoniae del serotipo 14 y aumento de aislamientos correspondientes a serotipos no incluidos en esas vacunas. En 1993, el Hospital de Niños de Santa Fe comenzó la vigilancia de la distribución de serotipos de Streptococcus pneumoniae invasores. En este trabajo se estudió la correlación entre serotipo y a patología (neumonía/meningitis, b edad (menor o mayor de dos años, y c CIM de penicilina, para los serotipos aislados en el período 2003-2005. El serotipo predominante fue el 14, seguido del 1, 6B, 18C, 7F, 19F y 5. El serotipo 14 mostró asociación estadísticamente significativa con valores de CIM de penicilina entre 0,5 y 2 mg/l, no así con alguna patología, aunque se lo halló con mayor frecuencia en neumonías que en meningitis. Los serotipos 14 y 1 prevalecieron en niños menores y mayores de 2 años, respectivamente. La CIM de penicilina = 2 mg/l se observó más en neumonías que en meningitis. La frecuencia relativa de los diferentes serotipos hallados fue semejante a la observada en el período 1993-99; no obstante, los serotipos 18C, 4, 12F y 22F no se habían encontrado antes. La aparición de nuevos serotipos convierte en importante la vigilancia, dada la necesidad de formular vacunas que los incluyan y que efectivamente prevengan las infecciones neumocócicas más comunes.The serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae varies through time. The introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines showed a decreased prevalence of pneumococcal invasive isolates belonging to serotype 14 and an increase of serotypes not therein included. In 1993, the Hospital de Niños of Santa Fe began surveillance of the serotype distribution of invasive S. pneumoniae disease. In the period 2003 - 2005, 76 isolates were analysed by studying the correlation between serotype and pathology, age and MIC

  11. The changing epidemiology of group B streptococcus bloodstream infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballard, Mark S; Schønheyder, Henrik C; Knudsen, Jenny Dahl

    2016-01-01

    Background Population-based studies conducted in single regions or countries have identified significant changes in the epidemiology of invasive group B streptococcus (GBS) infection. However, no studies have concurrently compared the epidemiology of GBS infections among multiple different regions...

  12. Salivaricin 9, a new lantibiotic produced by Streptococcus salivarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wescombe, P A; Upton, M; Renault, P; Wirawan, R E; Power, D; Burton, J P; Chilcott, C N; Tagg, J R

    2011-05-01

    Salivaricin 9 (Sal9) is a 2560 Da lantibiotic having just 46 % amino acid identity with its closest known homologue, the Streptococcus pyogenes lantibiotic SA-FF22. The Sal9 locus (designated siv) in Streptococcus salivarius strain 9 was partially sequenced and localized to an approximately 170 kb megaplasmid, which also harbours the locus for the lantibiotic salivaricin A4. The entire locus was fully characterized in the draft genome sequence of S. salivarius strain JIM8780 and shown to consist of eight genes, having the following putative functions: sivK, sensor kinase; sivR, response regulator; sivA, Sal9 precursor peptide; sivM, lantibiotic modification enzyme; sivT, ABC transporter involved in the export of Sal9 and concomitant cleavage of its leader peptide; and sivFEG, encoding lantibiotic self-immunity. Intriguingly, in contrast to strain 9, the siv locus was chromosomally located in strain JIM8780--the first lantibiotic locus shown not to be exclusively plasmid-associated in S. salivarius. Sal9-containing extracts specifically induced lantibiotic production in both strain 9 and strain JIM8780, indicating that Sal9 functions as a signal peptide for upregulation of its own biosynthesis. Screening representative strains of three streptococcal species (S. salivarius, S. pyogenes and S. mitis) for sivA indicated that it was present only in S. salivarius, with 12 of 28 tested S. salivarius positive. Since Sal9 was inhibitory to all tested S. pyogenes strains it appears to have potential as an important component of the bacteriocin armoury of S. salivarius probiotics intended to control S. pyogenes infections of the human oral cavity.

  13. Tigecycline (GAR-936) activity against Streptococcus gallolyticus (bovis) and viridans group streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moet, Gary J; Dowzicky, Michael J; Jones, Ronald N

    2007-03-01

    Viridans group streptococci including Streptococcus gallolyticus (formerly S. bovis) represent serious invasive pathogens often associated with endocarditis or sepsis among immunocompromised or cancer patients. Tigecycline (GAR-936), the first clinically studied glycylcycline, has a potent gram-positive activity with a potential treatment option for these streptococcal infections. The studied collection (848 strains) included 100 isolates each of Streptococcus anginosus, Streptococcus constellatus, Streptococcus intermedius, Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus sanguis, and fewer strains of S. gallolyticus (98 strains) and Streptococcus mutans (50 strains). These strains were isolated from patients on 3 continents in the SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program and tested for susceptibility and interpreted by Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute broth microdilution methods and criteria (viridans group streptococci species and S. gallolyticus with an overall MIC90 at < or = 0.06 microg/mL; the highest MIC was only 0.25 microg/mL.

  14. Differing Efficacies of Lead Group A Streptococcal Vaccine Candidates and Full-Length M Protein in Cutaneous and Invasive Disease Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Rivera-Hernandez

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Group A Streptococcus (GAS is an important human pathogen responsible for both superficial infections and invasive diseases. Autoimmune sequelae may occur upon repeated infection. For this reason, development of a vaccine against GAS represents a major challenge, since certain GAS components may trigger autoimmunity. We formulated three combination vaccines containing the following: (i streptolysin O (SLO, interleukin 8 (IL-8 protease (Streptococcus pyogenes cell envelope proteinase [SpyCEP], group A streptococcal C5a peptidase (SCPA, arginine deiminase (ADI, and trigger factor (TF; (ii the conserved M-protein-derived J8 peptide conjugated to ADI; and (iii group A carbohydrate lacking the N-acetylglucosamine side chain conjugated to ADI. We compared these combination vaccines to a “gold standard” for immunogenicity, full-length M1 protein. Vaccines were adjuvanted with alum, and mice were immunized on days 0, 21, and 28. On day 42, mice were challenged via cutaneous or subcutaneous routes. High-titer antigen-specific antibody responses with bactericidal activity were detected in mouse serum samples for all vaccine candidates. In comparison with sham-immunized mice, all vaccines afforded protection against cutaneous challenge. However, only full-length M1 protein provided protection in the subcutaneous invasive disease model.

  15. Oral pyogenic granuloma in Ghanaians: a review of cases

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    McRoy

    Background: Pyogenic granulomas, when presented late, can sometimes pose diagnostic challenge due to their remarkably large sizes. There has been no known published data among Ghanaians on this subject. Aim: To determine the clinical, demographic, pathological features and management of oral pyogenic.

  16. Community-acquired soft-tissue pyogenic abscesses in Mulago ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Clinical practice, for a long time, has dwelt on study and management of pyogenic abscesses without distinction between nosocomial and community-acquired types. This study aimed at identifying the bacteria isolated from community-acquired acute subcutaneous and soft tissue pyogenic abscesses.

  17. Actinomyces pyogenes septic arthritis in a diabetic farmer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lynch, M

    2012-02-03

    We report a case of septic arthritis and osteomyelitis of the left ankle due to Actinomyces pyogenes in a diabetic farmer. Few confirmed human cases of A. pyogenes infection have been reported, partly because of inadequate identification of this bacterium. Bacteriological characteristics of the organism, which resembles Arcanobacterium haemolyticum, are described with a review of previous case reports.

  18. Case Report: Corneal Pyogenic Granuloma: Rare Complication of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Slit lamp examination showed vascularized central corneal mass with surrounding stromal infiltrates. The mass was excised, and histopathological examination confirmed pyogenic granuloma of the cornea. Conclusion: Corneal pyogenic granuloma could be a rare complication of infectious keratitis. Therefore, it should be ...

  19. mef(A), mef(E) and a new mef allele in macrolide-resistant Streptococcus spp. isolates from Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangvik, Maria; Littauer, Pia; Simonsen, Gunnar Skov; Sundsfjord, Arnfinn; Dahl, Kristin Hegstad

    2005-11-01

    To type mef genes in a nationwide collection of clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes as well as pharyngeal carrier strains of viridans streptococci in Norway. Erythromycin-resistant mef-positive multilocus sequence-typed (MLST) clinical isolates of S. pneumoniae (n = 36) and S. pyogenes (n = 12) from the National Surveillance Program for Antimicrobial Resistance (NORM) as well as viridans streptococci (n = 20) from healthy adults were included. PCR-amplified mef genes were initially discriminated by BamHI digestion. Selected mef genes from representatives of different sequence types (STs) of S. pneumoniae (n = 11) and S. pyogenes (n = 4), and viridans group streptococcal species (n = 8) were typed by sequencing and their strains examined for co-resistances. Hydropathy plots of different mef-encoded proteins were performed. A predominance of mef(A) was detected in S. pneumoniae (23/36) and S. pyogenes (9/12) due to the clonal spread of ST9 and ST39, respectively. mef(E) was the most widely distributed mef determinant occurring in nine different STs of S. pneumoniae and in four different viridans species. A new mef allele was identified in two STs of S. pyogenes. mef(E) is the most widely distributed mef determinant in Norwegian clinical strains of S. pneumoniae and pharyngeal carrier strains of various viridans streptococci. However, mef(A) is more prevalent in S. pneumoniae and S. pyogenes due to clonal spread. A new mef allele was found in two different STs of S. pyogenes.

  20. Invasive Group A Streptococcal Disease. National Epidemiology and Genetic Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlaminckx, B.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Infections with group A streptococci (GAS), or S. pyogenes, range from mild and superficial to very severe and lethal invasive disease. In severe invasive GAS infections, hypotension and multiorgan failure may develop rapidly resulting in the development of toxic shock-like syndrome (TSS). In the

  1. CT in pyogenic osteomyelitis of the spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kattapuram, S.V.; Phillips, W.C.; Boyd, R.

    1983-01-01

    Six patients with bacteriologically proven pyogenic osteomyelitis of the spine were followed serially with computed tomography (CT). Initial evaluation of the involved vertebral bodies and adjacent soft tissues showed a drop in CT numbers when compared to normal cancellous bone and soft tissues. A soft-tissue mass was seen in all cases. After appropriate antibiotic therapy, all six patients showed an increase in bone density and a diminution of the soft-tissue mass (p < 0.05). Five of the six patients showed a further decrease in soft-tissue CT numbers

  2. Streptococcus agalactiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Otaibi, Humoud M; Talea, Mohammed; Kirat, Omar; Stone, Donald U; May, William N; Kozak, Igor

    2016-01-01

    A 25-year-old Syrian male with a previous episode of Stevens-Johnson syndrome with bilateral corneal cicatrization previously underwent surgery for Type 1 Boston Keratoprosthesis (K-Pro). Sixteen months after the K-Pro surgery, the patient presented with decreased vision to hand motion and microbial keratitis of the graft around the K-Pro with purulent discharge. Corneal scrapings were nonrevealing. B-scan in 3 days showed increased debris in the vitreous cavity and thickened retinochoroidal layer. Intravitreal tap and injections of vancomycin and ceftazidime were performed. The vitreous culture revealed β-hemolytic Streptococcus agalactiae ; fungal cultures were negative. Repeat B-scan 3 days later demonstrated decreased vitreous opacity, and the patient felt more comfortable and was without pain. His visual acuity improved to 20/70, ocular findings have been stable for 9 months, and the patient continues to be monitored.

  3. Ten years of surveillance for invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae during the era of antiretroviral scale-up and cotrimoxazole prophylaxis in Malawi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean B Everett

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available To document trends in invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD in a central hospital in Malawi during the period of national scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART and cotrimoxazole prophylaxis.Between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2009 almost 100,000 blood cultures and 40,000 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF cultures were obtained from adults and children admitted to the Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Blantyre, Malawi with suspected severe bacterial infection.4,445 pneumococcal isolates were obtained over the 10 year period. 1,837 were from children: 885 (19.9% from blood and 952 (21.4% from CSF. 2,608 were from adults: 1,813 (40.8% from blood and 795 (17.9% from CSF. At the start of the surveillance period cotrimoxazole resistance was 73.8% and at the end was 92.6%. Multidrug resistance (MDR was present in almost one third of isolates and was constant over time. Free ART was introduced in Malawi in 2004. From 2005 onwards there was a decline in invasive pneumococcal infections with a negative correlation between ART scale-up and the decline in IPD (Pearson's correlation r = -0.91; p<0.001.During 2004-2009, national ART scale-up in Malawi was associated with a downward trend in IPD at QECH. The introduction of cotrimoxazole prophylaxis in HIV-infected groups has not coincided with a further increase in pneumococcal cotrimoxazole or multidrug resistance. These data highlight the importance of surveillance for high disease burden infections such as IPD in the region, which will be vital for monitoring pneumococcal conjugate vaccine introduction into national immunisation programmes.

  4. Radiological evaluation of recurrent pyogenic cholangitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byon, Joo Nam; Chung, Doo Young; Suh, Chee Jang; Won, Jong Jin

    1984-01-01

    Recurrent pyogenic cholangitis (RPC) is defined as a condition in which there is a primary bacterial cholangitis, characterized clinically by recurrent attacks of fever, chills, abdominal pain, and jaundice. 17 cases of recurrent pyogenic cholangitis at Won Kwang University Hospital during the past three years were analyzed by clinical, radiological and surgical findings. The results were as follows: 1. Peak incidence was noted at fifth decade (35%) and the ratio of male to female was almost equal (1 : 1.1). 2. Most of patients were undernourished and rural population in low socio-economic state. 3. The characteristic and most frequent symptom were fever, chills, abdominal , pain, and jaundice. 4. Serum alkaline phosphatase level was elevated almost 4 times to the upper limit of normal. 5. There was a history of cholecystectomy with or without T-tube drainage in 65% of 17 cases. 6. The cholangiographic findings in the biliary trees were stricture, stones and dilated ducts, and occurred more commonly in the left hepatic duct than right. 7. Most stones of biliary trees were pigment stones, and occasionally muddy stones were sen. 8. Most of the organism obtained from bile culture were E. coli, supported an infective etiology.

  5. Diagnosis and treatment of pyogenic bone infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikpeme, I A; Ngim, N E; Ikpeme, A A

    2010-03-01

    Pyogenic osteomyelitis is still frequently seen in the developing world and the treatment of chronic osteomyelitis presents a considerable challenge despite advances in microbiological techniques, antibiotics and surgical techniques. Acute haematogenous osteomyelitis is commoner in children. In the pre-antibiotic era, mortality rate was high and progression to chronic osteomyelitis was common. A near similar scenario still exists in many developing countries due to the combination of inappropriate and/or inadequate antibiotic therapy, delayed presentation and unorthodox interventions by traditional healers. Chronic osteomyelitis may result from poorly treated or untreated acute osteomyelitis, open fractures, surgery for an array of orthopaedic conditions and from contiguous spread from infected soft tissue as may occur in diabetic foot infections. A large array of treatment techniques hinged on sequestrectomy/ debridement, management of dead space, improvement of oxygenation and perfusion to ischaemic tissue exist. Despite these, total eradication of disease is difficult. This article summarizes the pathology and methods of management available for pyogenic osteomyelitis. In its acute and chronic forms, the disease is likely to remain prevalent in the developing world until issues of ignorance, poverty and prompt access to appropriate and efficacious medical care are addressed.

  6. Streptococcus Constellatus Spondylodiscitis in a Teenager: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim SW

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus constellatus is an extremely rare cause of pyogenic spondylodiscitis. Literature search yielded only one case report in an elderly 72 years old man with spontaneous T10-T11 S. constellatus spondylodiscitis. It is virtually unheard of in young teenage. We report the case of a 14 years old male teenager who presented with worsening low back pain for one year with no neurological deficit. Imaging studies were consistent with features of L4-L5 spondylodiscitis. CT guided biopsy grew a pure culture of streptococcus constellatus sensitive to penicillin and erythromycin. He showed full recovery with six weeks of intravenous antibiotics. Due to the insidious onset, this case highlight the importance of high clinical suspicion and early diagnosis, with image guided biopsy followed by treatment with appropriate intravenous antibiotics to enable full recovery without further neurological deterioration.

  7. Streptococcus Constellatus Spondylodiscitis in a Teenager: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, S W; Lim, H Y; Kannaiah, T; Zuki, Z

    2017-11-01

    Streptococcus constellatus is an extremely rare cause of pyogenic spondylodiscitis. Literature search yielded only one case report in an elderly 72 years old man with spontaneous T10-T11 S. constellatus spondylodiscitis. It is virtually unheard of in young teenage. We report the case of a 14 years old male teenager who presented with worsening low back pain for one year with no neurological deficit. Imaging studies were consistent with features of L4-L5 spondylodiscitis. CT guided biopsy grew a pure culture of streptococcus constellatus sensitive to penicillin and erythromycin. He showed full recovery with six weeks of intravenous antibiotics. Due to the insidious onset, this case highlight the importance of high clinical suspicion and early diagnosis, with image guided biopsy followed by treatment with appropriate intravenous antibiotics to enable full recovery without further neurological deterioration.

  8. Group B streptococcus - pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000511.htm Group B streptococcus - pregnancy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Group B streptococcus (GBS) is a type of bacteria that ...

  9. Community-based outbreaks in vulnerable populations of invasive infections caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes 5 and 8 in Calgary, Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto G Vanderkooi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Outbreaks of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD typically occur within institutions. Beginning in 2005, we detected an increase in serotype (ST 5 and ST8 IPD cases, predominantly in homeless persons living in an open community. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: CASPER (Calgary Area S. pneumoniae Epidemiology Research surveillance study of all IPD (sterile site isolates in our region (pop ~1,100,000. Interviews and chart reviews of all cases and all isolates phenotypically analyzed and selected isolated tested by multi-locus sequence typing (MLST. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: During 2005-2007, 162 cases of ST5 IPD and 45 cases of ST8 IPD were identified. The isolates demonstrated phenotypic and genotypic clonality. The ST5 isolates were sequence type (ST 289 and demonstrated intermediate susceptibility to TMP-SMX. The ST8 isolates were predominantly ST1268, with a susceptible antimicrobial susceptibility profile. Individuals with ST5 IPD were more likely to be middle aged (OR 2.6, homeless (OR 4.4, using illicit drugs(OR 4.8, and asthmatic(OR 2.6. Those with ST8 were more likely to be male (OR 4.4, homeless (OR 2.6, aboriginal (OR7.3, and a current smoker (OR 2.5. Overlapping outbreaks of ST5 and ST8 IPD occurred in an open community in Calgary, Canada and homelessness was a predominant risk factor. Homelessness represents a unique community in which pneumococcal outbreaks can occur.

  10. Protein array profiling of tic patient sera reveals a broad range and enhanced immune response against Group A Streptococcus antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Bombaci

    Full Text Available The human pathogen Group A Streptococcus (Streptococcus pyogenes, GAS is widely recognized as a major cause of common pharyngitis as well as of severe invasive diseases and non-suppurative sequelae associated with the existence of GAS antigens eliciting host autoantibodies. It has been proposed that a subset of paediatric disorders characterized by tics and obsessive-compulsive symptoms would exacerbate in association with relapses of GAS-associated pharyngitis. This hypothesis is however still controversial. In the attempt to shed light on the contribution of GAS infections to the onset of neuropsychiatric or behavioral disorders affecting as many as 3% of children and adolescents, we tested the antibody response of tic patient sera to a representative panel of GAS antigens. In particular, 102 recombinant proteins were spotted on nitrocellulose-coated glass slides and probed against 61 sera collected from young patients with typical tic neuropsychiatric symptoms but with no overt GAS infection. Sera from 35 children with neither tic disorder nor overt GAS infection were also analyzed. The protein recognition patterns of these two sera groups were compared with those obtained using 239 sera from children with GAS-associated pharyngitis. This comparative analysis identified 25 antigens recognized by sera of the three patient groups and 21 antigens recognized by tic and pharyngitis sera, but poorly or not recognized by sera from children without tic. Interestingly, these antigens appeared to be, in quantitative terms, more immunogenic in tic than in pharyngitis patients. Additionally, a third group of antigens appeared to be preferentially and specifically recognized by tic sera. These findings provide the first evidence that tic patient sera exhibit immunological profiles typical of individuals who elicited a broad, specific and strong immune response against GAS. This may be relevant in the context of one of the hypothesis proposing that GAS

  11. Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergenfelz, Caroline; Hakansson, Anders P

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to review the literature regarding the mechanisms of transition from asymptomatic colonization to induction of otitis media and how the insight into the pathogenesis of otitis media has the potential to help design future otitis media-directed vaccines. Respiratory viruses have long been shown to predispose individuals to bacterial respiratory infections, such as otitis media. Recent information suggests that Streptococcus pneumoniae , which colonize the nasopharynx asymptomatically, can sense potentially "threatening" changes in the nasopharyngeal environment caused by virus infection by upregulating specific sets of genes involved in biofilm release, dissemination from the nasopharynx to other sites, and protection against the host immune system. Furthermore, an understanding of the transcriptional and proteomic changes occurring in bacteria during transition to infection has led to identification of novel vaccine targets that are disease-specific and will not affect asymptomatic colonization. This approach will avoid major changes in the delicate balance of microorganisms in the respiratory tract microbiome due to elimination of S. pneumoniae . Our recent findings are reviewed in the context of the current literature on the epidemiology and pathogenesis of otitis media. We also discuss how other otopathogens, such as Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis , as well as the normal respiratory microbiome, can modulate the ability of pneumococci to cause infection. Furthermore, the unsatisfactory protection offered by the pneumococcal conjugate vaccines is highlighted and we review potential future strategies emerging to confer a more specific protection against otitis media.

  12. Intravenous pyogenic granuloma or intravenous lobular capillary hemangioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghekiere, Olivier; Galant, Christine; Berg, Bruno Vande [Cliniques Universitaires St. Luc, Department of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium)

    2005-06-01

    Lobular capillary hemangioma is a vascular neoplasm that commonly occurs as a cutaneous tumor. When it involves the skin and mucosal surfaces, ulceration and suppuration may occur, hence the classic term of pyogenic granuloma. Intravenous pyogenic granuloma is a rare solitary form of lobular capillary hemangioma that usually occurs in the veins of the neck and upper extremities. We report the ultrasonographic and magnetic resonance imaging findings of a pyogenic intravenous granuloma localized in the right cephalic vein. The imaging and pathological findings and the differential diagnoses are discussed. (orig.)

  13. Decompression alone versus fusion for pyogenic spondylodiscitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Sung Hyun; Zhang, Ho Yeol; Lim, Hyun Sun; Song, Hyeon Jin; Yang, Kyung Hwa

    2017-08-01

    A spinal infection is a serious problem for a spine surgeon, and there is currently much debate regarding how best to treat pyogenic spondylodiscitis using antibiotics and the instrumentations that have been developed to date. The purpose of this study was to determine which method is better for treating pyogenic spondylodiscitis. A retrospective chart review was performed. Thirty-one patients with pyogenic spondylodiscitis underwent surgical treatment between 2000 and 2016 at the authors' institution. Clinical outcomes were assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). We measured translation and rotation on flexion and extension X-rays to identify instability. Patients were divided into two groups: Group I, decompression group; Group II, decompression plus fusion group. Group I exhibited no instability according to a preoperative radiographic study, whereas Group II exhibited instability. Both groups were compared with respect to demographics and laboratory findings, including tests to determine C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and erythrocyte sedimentation rates (ESR), organisms, and the total duration of antibiotic treatment after the operation. We compared the results of the preoperative, postoperative, and last follow-up radiographic examinations of the sagittal alignment of the infected segment. This study was supported by a clinical research fund (4,500 dollars) from the National Health Insurance Service, Ilsan Hospital. A total of 31 patients were included; 22 (71%) were in Group I and 9 (29%) were in Group II. On radiological examination, the mean preoperative translation and rotation values in Group I were 2.45±1.22 mm and 5.64±1.98°, and in Group II were 5.35±1.65 mm and 12.01±4.22°. At the last follow-up, the mean translation and rotation values in Group I were 1.95±1.75 mm and 2.69±1.61°, and in Group II were 1.77±1.02 mm and 3.44±2.07°. Both Groups I and II exhibited stability after the operation. No differences were detected in

  14. Bacteremia with Bacteroides pyogenes after a cat bite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ida Ringsborg; Justesen, Ulrik Stenz

    2011-01-01

    Animal bite wounds are often infected with bacteria from the animal's oral flora. We report what we believe to be the first case of bacteremia with Bacteroides pyogenes resulting from an infected cat bite.......Animal bite wounds are often infected with bacteria from the animal's oral flora. We report what we believe to be the first case of bacteremia with Bacteroides pyogenes resulting from an infected cat bite....

  15. A case of Bacteroides pyogenes bacteremia secondary to liver abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong Eun; Park, So-Young; Song, Dong Joon; Huh, Hee Jae; Ki, Chang-Seok; Peck, Kyong Ran; Lee, Nam Yong

    2016-12-01

    Bacteroides pyogenes, a non-spore-forming, anaerobic, gram-negative rod, is a component of the oral flora of animals and has, on occasion, been reported to cause human infection through dog or cat bites. We report the first case of B. pyogenes bacteremia secondary to liver abscess with no history of an animal bite. The microorganism was identified by 16S rRNA sequencing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing invasive disease in children in the post-PCV era: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn Balsells

    Full Text Available Routine immunisation with pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV7/10/13 has reduced invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD due to vaccine serotypes significantly. However, an increase in disease due to non-vaccine types, or serotype replacement, has been observed. Serotypes' individual contributions to IPD play a critical role in determining the overall effects of PCVs. This study examines the distribution of pneumococcal serotypes in children to identify leading serotypes associated with IPD post-PCV introduction.A systematic search was performed to identify studies and surveillance reports (published between 2000 and December 2015 of pneumococcal serotypes causing childhood IPD post-PCV introduction. Serotype data were differentiated based on the PCV administered during the study period: PCV7 or higher valent PCVs (PCV10 or PCV13. Meta-analysis was conducted to estimate the proportional contributions of the most frequent serotypes in childhood IPD in each period.We identified 68 studies reporting serotype data among IPD cases in children. We analysed data from 38 studies (14 countries where PCV7 was administered and 20 (24 countries where PCV10 or PCV13 have been introduced. Studies reported early and late periods of PCV7 administration (range: 2001∓13. In these settings, serotype 19A was the most predominant cause of childhood IPD, accounting for 21.8% (95%CI 18.6∓25.6 of cases. In countries that have introduced higher valent PCVs, study periods were largely representative of the transition and early years of PCV10 or PCV13. In these studies, the overall serotype-specific contribution of 19A was lower (14.2% 95%CI 11.1∓18.3. Overall, non-PCV13 serotypes contributed to 42.2% (95%CI 36.1∓49.5% of childhood IPD cases. However, regional differences were noted (57.8% in North America, 71.9% in Europe, 45.9% in Western Pacific, 28.5% in Latin America, 42.7% in one African country, and 9.2% in one Eastern Mediterranean country. Predominant non

  17. An Unusual Case of Streptococcus anginosus Group Pyomyositis Diagnosed Using Direct 16S Ribosomal DNA Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Walkty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria belonging to the Streptococcus anginosus group (Streptococcus intermedius, Streptococcus constellatus and Streptococcus anginosus are capable of causing serious pyogenic infections, with a tendency for abscess formation. The present article reports a case of S anginosus group pyomyositis in a 47-year-old man. The pathogen was recovered from one of two blood cultures obtained from the patient, but speciation was initially not performed because the organism was considered to be a contaminant (viridans streptococci group. The diagnosis was ultimately confirmed using 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing of purulent fluid obtained from a muscle abscess aspirate. The present case serves to emphasize that finding even a single positive blood culture of an organism belonging to the S anginosus group should prompt careful evaluation of the patient for a pyogenic focus of infection. It also highlights the potential utility of 16S ribosomal DNA amplification and sequencing in direct pathogen detection from aspirated fluid in cases of pyomyositis in which antimicrobial therapy was initiated before specimen collection.

  18. Capsular Polysaccharide Expression in Commensal Streptococcus Species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov Sørensen, Uffe B; Yao, Kaihu; Yang, Yonghong

    2016-01-01

    Expression of a capsular polysaccharide is considered a hallmark of most invasive species of bacteria, including Streptococcus pneumoniae, in which the capsule is among the principal virulence factors and is the basis for successful vaccines. Consequently, it was previously assumed that capsule....... pneumoniae evolved by import of cps fragments from commensal Streptococcus species, resulting in a mosaic of genes of different origins. The demonstrated antigenic identity of at least eight of the numerous capsular polysaccharide structures expressed by commensal streptococci with recognized serotypes of S...... of Streptococcus pneumoniae and is the basis for successful vaccines against infections caused by this important pathogen. Contrasting with previous assumptions, this study showed that expression of capsular polysaccharides by the same genetic mechanisms is a general property of closely related species...

  19. An Affymetrix Microarray Design for Microbial Genotyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes APRT M1 GAS 5 Streptococcus pyogenes Manfredo st M5 50 Streptococcus pyogenes MGAS 10270 st M2 95 Streptococcus pyogenes MGAS 10394 st...M6 95 Streptococcus pyogenes MGAS 10750 st M4 83 Streptococcus pyogenes MGAS 2096 st M12 57 Streptococcus pyogenes MGAS 315 st M3 85 Streptococcus ... pyogenes MGAS 5005 st M1 35 Streptococcus pyogenes MGAS 6180 st M28

  20. Contribution of Each of Four Superantigens to Streptococcus equi-Induced Mitogenicity, Gamma Interferon Synthesis, and Immunity ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Paillot, Romain; Robinson, Carl; Steward, Karen; Wright, Nicola; Jourdan, Thibaud; Butcher, Nicola; Heather, Zoe; Waller, Andrew S.

    2010-01-01

    Streptococcus equi is the causative agent of strangles, the most frequently diagnosed infectious disease of horses worldwide. The disease is characterized by abscessation and swelling of the lymph nodes of the head and neck, which can literally strangle the horse to death. S. equi produces four recently acquired phage-associated bacterial superantigens (sAgs; SeeH, SeeI, SeeL, and SeeM) that share homology with the mitogenic toxins of Streptococcus pyogenes. The aim of this study was to chara...

  1. Analysis of CRISPR-Cas System in Streptococcus thermophilus and Its Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengyuan Hao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available CRISPR-Cas (Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR associated proteins loci, which provide a specific immunity against exogenous elements, are hypervariable among distinct prokaryotes. Based on previous researches, this review focuses on concluding systematical genome editing protocols in Streptococcus thermophilus. Firstly, its protocols and optimized conditions in gene editing are introduced. What’s more, classification and diversity analyses of S. thermophilus CRISPR-Cas benefit the further understanding of evolution relationship among Streptococcus. Ability of its foreign segment integration and spacer source analyses also indicate a new direction of phage resistance. Above all, all of these point out its potential to be regarded as another model system other than type II CRISPR-Cas in Streptococcus pyogenes.

  2. A Second Tylosin Resistance Determinant, Erm B, in Arcanobacterium pyogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, B. Helen; Trinh, Hien T.; Songer, J. Glenn; Billington, Stephen J.

    2004-01-01

    Arcanobacterium pyogenes, a common inhabitant of the mucosal surfaces of livestock, is also a pathogen associated with a variety of infections. In livestock, A. pyogenes is exposed to antimicrobial agents used for prophylaxis and therapy, notably tylosin, a macrolide used extensively for the prevention of liver abscessation in feedlot cattle in the United States. Many, but not all, tylosin-resistant A. pyogenes isolates carry erm(X), suggesting the presence of other determinants of tylosin resistance. Oligonucleotide primers designed for conserved regions of erm(B), erm(C), and erm(T) were used to amplify a 404-bp fragment from a tylosin-resistant A. pyogenes isolate, OX-7. DNA sequencing revealed that the PCR product was 100% identical to erm(B) genes, and the erm(B) gene region was cloned in Escherichia coli. The A. pyogenes Erm B determinant had the most DNA identity with an Erm B determinant carried by the Clostridium perfringens plasmid pIP402. However, the A. pyogenes determinant lacked direct repeat DR1 and contained a deletion in DR2. Flanking the A. pyogenes erm(B) gene were partial and entire genes similar to those found on the Enterococcus faecalis multiresistance plasmid pRE25. This novel architecture suggests that the erm(B) element may have arisen by recombination of two distinct genetic elements. Ten of 32 tylosin-resistant isolates carried erm(B), as determined by DNA hybridization, and all 10 isolates carried a similar element. Insertion of the element was site specific, as PCR and Southern blotting analysis revealed that the erm(B) element was inserted into orfY, a gene of unknown function. However, in three strains, this insertion resulted in a partial duplication of orfY. PMID:14982756

  3. Surgical management of pyogenic discitis of lumbar region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devkota, Pramod; Krishnakumar, R; Renjith Kumar, J

    2014-04-01

    Retrospective review of patients who had pyogenic discitis and were managed surgically. To analyze the bacteriology, pathology, management and outcome of pyogenic discitis of the lumbar region treated surgically. Surgical management of pyogenic discitis is still an infrequently used modality of treatment. A total of 42 patients comprised of 33 males and 9 females who had pyogenic discitis with a mean age of 51.61 years (range, 16-75 years) were included in this study. All the cases were confirmed as having pyogenic discitis by pus culture report and histopathological examination. The mean follow-up period was 41.9 months. Debridement and posterior lumbar interbody fusion with autologous iliac bone graft was done in all cases. Thirteen (30.95%) patients had other medical co-morbidities. Five cases had a previous operation of the spine, and three cases had a history of vertebral fracture. Three patients were operated for gynaecological problems, and four cases had a history of urological surgery. L4-5 level was the most frequent site of pyogenic discitis. The most common bacterium isolated was Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). Radiologically good fusion was seen in the majority of patients. Pyogenic discitis should be suspected in people having pain and local tenderness in the spinal region with a rise in inflammatory parameters in blood. The most common bacterium was S. aureus, but there were still a greater number of patients infected with other types of bacteria. Therefore, antibiotics therapy should be started only after isolating the bacteria and making the culture sensitivity report.

  4. Induction of group A Streptococcus virulence by a human antimicrobial peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryllos, Ioannis; Tran-Winkler, Hien J; Cheng, Ming-Fang; Chung, Hachung; Bolcome, Ro