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Sample records for invasive streptococcus pneumoniae

  1. The post-vaccine microevolution of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, A.J.H.; Mobegi, F.M.; Jonge, M.I. de; Hijum, S.A.F.T. van; Meis, J.F.; Hermans, P.W.M.; Ferwerda, G.; Bentley, S.D.; Zomer, A.L.

    2015-01-01

    The 7-valent pneumococcal conjugated vaccine (PCV7) has affected the genetic population of Streptococcus pneumoniae in pediatric carriage. Little is known however about pneumococcal population genomics in adult invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) under vaccine pressure. We sequenced and serotyped

  2. Serotype-specific mortality from invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae disease revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martens, Pernille; Worm, Signe Westring; Lundgren, Bettina

    2004-01-01

    Serotype-specific mortality from invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae disease revisited.Martens P, Worm SW, Lundgren B, Konradsen HB, Benfield T. Department of Infectious Diseases 144, Hvidovre University Hospital, DK-2650 Hvidovre, Denmark. pernillemartens@yahoo.com BACKGROUND: Invasive infection w...... pneumococcal disease. The limitations of the current polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccine warrant the development of alternative vaccines. We suggest that the virulence of pneumococcal serotypes should be considered in the design of novel vaccines....

  3. Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae in Children, Malawi, 2004–2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Dean B.; Broughton, Caroline; Denis, Brigitte B.; Banda, Daniel L.; Carrol, Enitan D.; Parry, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    Of 176 invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from children in Malawi, common serotypes were 1 (23%), 6A/B (18%), 14 (6%), and 23F (6%). Coverage with the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) was 39%; PCV10 and PCV13 increased coverage to 66% and 88%, respectively. We found chloramphenicol resistance in 27% of isolates and penicillin nonsusceptibility in 10% (by using meningitis breakpoints); all were ceftriaxone susceptible. PMID:21749782

  4. Streptococcus pneumoniae

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clinical significance of antimicrobial resistance in. Streptococcus pneumoniae. Michael R Jacobs. Despite increasing resistance in the pneumococcus over the past 30 years, there are few cases of treatment failure of non-meningeal infections with high-dosage parenteral penicillin G, which still remains highly effective for.

  5. Streptococcus pneumoniae aislados de infecciones invasivas: serotipos y resistencia antimicrobiana Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from invasive infections: serotypes and antimicrobial resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladys Antonia Cueto Montoya

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Las meningoencefalitis bacterianas constituyen una enfermedad invasiva importante, quizás no tanto por su frecuencia, como por la gravedad de su cuadro. Los cambios en la epidemiología de los síndromes neurológicos infecciosos en Cuba a partir de la vacunación contra meningococo BC y Haemophilus influenzae b han hecho que el Streptococcus pneumoniae constituya el agente causal más frecuente. Debido al incremento de la resistencia de este microorganismo a los antibióticos habituales, se realizaron modificaciones al régimen terapéutico convencional, fundamentalmente en las meningitis pediátricas. Es necesario lograr el aislamiento en cultivo de este agente para conocer los serotipos más frecuentes en el país, y lograr una vacuna neumocócica conjugada, así como para la vigilancia de las cepas frente a los antimicrobianos.The bacterial meningoencephalitis is an important invasive disease, not only because of its frequency, but also because of the severity of its picture. The changes in the epidemiology of the neurological infectious syndromes in Cuba starting from the vaccination against meningococcus BC and Haemophilus infuenzae b have made that Streptococcus pneumoniae be the most frequent causal agent. Due to the increase of the resistance of this microorganism to habitual antibiotics, modifications were made in the conventional therapeutic regimen, mainly in the pediatric meningitis. It is necessary to achieve the isolation in culture of this agent to know the most common serotypes in the country, to attain a conjugated pneumococcal vaccine, and to keep the surveillance of the strains against the antimicrobials.

  6. Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergenfelz, Caroline; Hakansson, Anders P

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to review the literature regarding the mechanisms of transition from asymptomatic colonization to induction of otitis media and how the insight into the pathogenesis of otitis media has the potential to help design future otitis media-directed vaccines. Respiratory viruses have long been shown to predispose individuals to bacterial respiratory infections, such as otitis media. Recent information suggests that Streptococcus pneumoniae , which colonize the nasopharynx asymptomatically, can sense potentially "threatening" changes in the nasopharyngeal environment caused by virus infection by upregulating specific sets of genes involved in biofilm release, dissemination from the nasopharynx to other sites, and protection against the host immune system. Furthermore, an understanding of the transcriptional and proteomic changes occurring in bacteria during transition to infection has led to identification of novel vaccine targets that are disease-specific and will not affect asymptomatic colonization. This approach will avoid major changes in the delicate balance of microorganisms in the respiratory tract microbiome due to elimination of S. pneumoniae . Our recent findings are reviewed in the context of the current literature on the epidemiology and pathogenesis of otitis media. We also discuss how other otopathogens, such as Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis , as well as the normal respiratory microbiome, can modulate the ability of pneumococci to cause infection. Furthermore, the unsatisfactory protection offered by the pneumococcal conjugate vaccines is highlighted and we review potential future strategies emerging to confer a more specific protection against otitis media.

  7. PavA of Streptococcus pneumoniae Modulates Adherence, Invasion, and Meningeal Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Pracht, Daniela; Elm, Christine; Gerber, Joachim; Bergmann, Simone; Rohde, Manfred; Seiler, Marleen; Kim, Kwang S.; Jenkinson, Howard F.; Nau, Roland; Hammerschmidt, Sven

    2005-01-01

    Pneumococcal adherence and virulence factor A (PavA) is displayed to the cell outer surface of Streptococcus pneumoniae and mediates pneumococcal binding to immobilized fibronectin. PavA, which lacks a typical gram-positive signal sequence and cell surface anchorage motif, is essential for pneumococcal virulence in a mouse infection model of septicemia. In this report the impact of PavA on pneumococcal adhesion to and invasion of eukaryotic cells and on experimental pneumococcal meningitis wa...

  8. Serotype and Genotype Distribution among Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates in Colombia, 2005–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Eliana L.; Ramos, Viviana; Sanabria, Olga; Moreno, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    In Colombia, a laboratory-based surveillance of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates as part of SIREVA II PAHO has been conducted since 1994. This study describes the serotype distribution, antimicrobial resistance, and genetic relationships of pneumococcal isolates recovered in Colombia from 2005 to 2010. In this study, demographic data of invasive S. pneumoniae isolates were analyzed, and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns were determined. Pulse field gel electrophoresis (n = 629) and multilocus sequence typing (n = 10) were used to determine genetic relationship of isolates with minimal inhibitory concentration to penicillin ≥0.125 µg/mL. A total of 1775 isolates of S. pneumoniae were obtained. Fifteen serotypes accounted for 80.7% of isolates. Serotype 14 (23.1%) was the most frequent in the general population. Penicillin resistance was 30.7% in meningitis and 9.0% in non-meningitis. Clones Spain6BST90, Spain9VST156, Spain23FST81, and Colombia23FST338 were associated to isolates. Additionally, serotype 6A isolates were associated with ST460 and ST473, and 19A isolates with ST276, ST320, and ST1118. In conclusion, the surveillance program provided updated information of trends in serotype distribution, antimicrobial resistance and the circulation of clones in invasive pneumococcal diseases. These results could be helpful to understand the epidemiology of S. pneumoniae in Colombia, and provide a baseline to measure the impact of vaccine introduction. PMID:24416330

  9. Serotypes and antibiotic susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates causative of invasive diseases in Mexican children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arredondo-García, José Luis; Calderón, Ernesto; Echániz-Aviles, Gabriela; Soto-Noguerón, Araceli; Arzate, Patricia; Amabile-Cuevas, Carlos F

    2011-03-02

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a worldwide leading cause of morbidity and mortality, while susceptibility towards penicillin and macrolides can be less than 50% in many regions. A total of 150 isolates of S. pneumoniae causative of invasive diseases in children were characterized, of which 24.6% had a fatal outcome. The most prevalent serotypes were 19F, 6B, 23F and 14. Resistance to penicillin, erythromycin (mostly of macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin resistance phenotype) or trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was found in more than 40% of the isolates, but no resistance phenotype appeared linked to lethality. Serotype 3 isolates, which were seldom resistant, had a twofold lethality rate compared to the total sample. Serotyping could provide a better outcome-predicting tool than susceptibility testing. The seven-valent vaccine does not include the most prevalent serotypes found in Mexico.

  10. Characterisation of Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolated from Cambodian Children between 2007 - 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Catrin E; Giess, Adam; Soeng, Sona; Sar, Poda; Kumar, Varun; Nhoung, Pheakdey; Bousfield, Rachel; Turner, Paul; Stoesser, Nicole; Day, Nicholas P J; Parry, Christopher M

    2016-01-01

    The 13-valent pneumococcal vaccine (PCV13) was introduced in Cambodia in January 2015. There are limited data concerning the common serotypes causing invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). Knowledge of the circulating pneumococcal serotypes is important to monitor epidemiological changes before and after vaccine implementation. All episodes of IPD defined by the isolation of Streptococcus pneumoniae from blood, cerebrospinal fluid or other sterile site in Cambodian children admitted to the Angkor Hospital for Children in Siem Reap, Northwestern Cambodia, between 1st January 2007 and 1st July 2012 were retrospectively studied. Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates that could be retrieved underwent phenotypic typing and whole genome sequencing. There were 90 Cambodian children hospitalized with IPD with a median (IQR) age of 2.3 years (0.9-6.2). The case fatality was 15.6% (95% CI 8-23). Of 50 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates available for further testing, 46% were penicillin non-susceptible and 8% were ceftriaxone non-susceptible, 78% were cotrimoxazole resistant, 30% were erythromycin resistant and 30% chloramphenicol resistant. There were no significant changes in resistance levels over the five-year period. The most common serotypes were 1 (11/50; 22%), 23F (8/50; 16%), 14 (6/50; 12%), 5 (5/50; 10%) and 19A (3/50; 6%). Coverage by PCV7, PCV10 and PCV13 was 44%, 76% and 92% respectively. We identified novel multilocus sequence types and resistotypes using whole genome sequencing. This study suggests IPD is an important disease in Cambodian children and can have a significant mortality. PCV13 coverage of the serotypes determined in studied strains was high and consistent with another recent study. The phenotypic resistance patterns observed were similar to other regional studies. The use of whole genome sequencing in the present study provides additional typing and resistance information together with the description of novel sequence types and resistotypes.

  11. Characterisation of Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolated from Cambodian Children between 2007 - 2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catrin E Moore

    Full Text Available The 13-valent pneumococcal vaccine (PCV13 was introduced in Cambodia in January 2015. There are limited data concerning the common serotypes causing invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD. Knowledge of the circulating pneumococcal serotypes is important to monitor epidemiological changes before and after vaccine implementation.All episodes of IPD defined by the isolation of Streptococcus pneumoniae from blood, cerebrospinal fluid or other sterile site in Cambodian children admitted to the Angkor Hospital for Children in Siem Reap, Northwestern Cambodia, between 1st January 2007 and 1st July 2012 were retrospectively studied. Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates that could be retrieved underwent phenotypic typing and whole genome sequencing.There were 90 Cambodian children hospitalized with IPD with a median (IQR age of 2.3 years (0.9-6.2. The case fatality was 15.6% (95% CI 8-23. Of 50 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates available for further testing, 46% were penicillin non-susceptible and 8% were ceftriaxone non-susceptible, 78% were cotrimoxazole resistant, 30% were erythromycin resistant and 30% chloramphenicol resistant. There were no significant changes in resistance levels over the five-year period. The most common serotypes were 1 (11/50; 22%, 23F (8/50; 16%, 14 (6/50; 12%, 5 (5/50; 10% and 19A (3/50; 6%. Coverage by PCV7, PCV10 and PCV13 was 44%, 76% and 92% respectively. We identified novel multilocus sequence types and resistotypes using whole genome sequencing.This study suggests IPD is an important disease in Cambodian children and can have a significant mortality. PCV13 coverage of the serotypes determined in studied strains was high and consistent with another recent study. The phenotypic resistance patterns observed were similar to other regional studies. The use of whole genome sequencing in the present study provides additional typing and resistance information together with the description of novel sequence types and resistotypes.

  12. Characterisation of Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolated from Cambodian Children between 2007 – 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giess, Adam; Soeng, Sona; Sar, Poda; Kumar, Varun; Nhoung, Pheakdey; Bousfield, Rachel; Turner, Paul; Stoesser, Nicole; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Parry, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The 13-valent pneumococcal vaccine (PCV13) was introduced in Cambodia in January 2015. There are limited data concerning the common serotypes causing invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). Knowledge of the circulating pneumococcal serotypes is important to monitor epidemiological changes before and after vaccine implementation. Methods All episodes of IPD defined by the isolation of Streptococcus pneumoniae from blood, cerebrospinal fluid or other sterile site in Cambodian children admitted to the Angkor Hospital for Children in Siem Reap, Northwestern Cambodia, between 1st January 2007 and 1st July 2012 were retrospectively studied. Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates that could be retrieved underwent phenotypic typing and whole genome sequencing. Results There were 90 Cambodian children hospitalized with IPD with a median (IQR) age of 2.3 years (0.9–6.2). The case fatality was 15.6% (95% CI 8–23). Of 50 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates available for further testing, 46% were penicillin non-susceptible and 8% were ceftriaxone non-susceptible, 78% were cotrimoxazole resistant, 30% were erythromycin resistant and 30% chloramphenicol resistant. There were no significant changes in resistance levels over the five-year period. The most common serotypes were 1 (11/50; 22%), 23F (8/50; 16%), 14 (6/50; 12%), 5 (5/50; 10%) and 19A (3/50; 6%). Coverage by PCV7, PCV10 and PCV13 was 44%, 76% and 92% respectively. We identified novel multilocus sequence types and resistotypes using whole genome sequencing. Conclusions This study suggests IPD is an important disease in Cambodian children and can have a significant mortality. PCV13 coverage of the serotypes determined in studied strains was high and consistent with another recent study. The phenotypic resistance patterns observed were similar to other regional studies. The use of whole genome sequencing in the present study provides additional typing and resistance information together with the description of novel

  13. Bacteremia with Streptococcus pneumoniae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, J S; Jensen, T G; Kolmos, H J

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a hospital-based cohort study among adult patients with first-time Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteremia (SPB) from 2000 through 2008. Patients were identified in a population-based bacteremia database and followed up for mortality through the Danish Civil Registration System (CRS...

  14. Susceptibilidad a antimicrobianos en aislamientos de Streptococcus pneumoniae invasor en Colombia Susceptibility to antimicrobial agents in isolates of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aura Lucía Leal

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio para determinar los patrones de susceptibilidad a los antimicrobianos de los aislamientos de Streptococcus pneumoniae causante de enfermedad invasora diagnosticada en Colombia en niños menores de 5 años entre 1994 y 1996 y para establecer la distribución de los tipos capsulares de los aislamientos resistentes. Se analizaron 324 aislamientos recuperados durante la ejecución del Protocolo Nacional de Serotipificación de S. pneumoniae realizado en Santa Fe de Bogotá, Medellín y Cali, Colombia, entre julio de 1994 y marzo de 1996. Se observó que 119 de todos los aislamientos (36,7% presentaban susceptibilidad disminuida por lo menos a un antimicrobiano, que 39 (12% presentaban susceptibilidad disminuida a la penicilina y que de estos últimos aislamientos, 29 presentaban resistencia intermedia y 10 resistencia alta. Nueve aislamientos (2,8% presentaban resistencia a la ceftriaxona, 80 (24,7% a la combinación de trimetoprima y sulfametoxazol (TMS, 49 (15,1% al cloranfenicol y 31 (9,6% a la eritromicina. Se observó resistencia a dos antimicrobianos en 31 aislamientos (9,6% y multirresistencia en 22 (6,7%. Estos 22 aislamientos mostraron resistencia al TMS. Las asociaciones más frecuentes fueron penicilina, TMS y eritromicina en 5 casos; penicilina, cloranfenicol, TMS y eritromicina en 4; penicilina, ceftriaxona, cloranfenicol y TMS en 3; y penicilina, ceftriaxona, cloranfenicol, TMS y eritromicina en 3 casos. Los serotipos más frecuentes en los aislamientos resistentes a la penicilina fueron: 23F (53,8%, 14 (25,6%, 6B (7,7%, 9V (5,1%, 19F (5,1% y 34 (2,6%. Los serotipos más frecuentes en los aislamientos resistentes a antimicrobianos distintos de la penicilina fueron: 5 (37,5%, 23F (7,5%, 14 (18,8% y 6B (13,8%. Esta diferencia en la distribución de los serotipos fue estadísticamente significativa (P A study was done to determine the patterns of susceptibility to antimicrobial agents in isolates of Streptococcus

  15. Interspecies Recombination in Type II Topoisomerase Genes Is Not a Major Cause of Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Pletz, Mathias W. R.; McGee, Lesley; Beall, Bernard; Whitney, Cynthia G.; Klugman, Keith P.

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the topoisomerase type II enzymes account for fluoroquinolone resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae. These mutations can arise spontaneously or be transferred by intraspecies or interspecies recombination, primarily with viridans streptococci. We analyzed the nucleotide sequences of the quinolone resistance-determining regions of 49 invasive levofloxacin-resistant pneumococcal isolates and did not find any evidence for interspecies recombination.

  16. streptococcus pneumoniae , klebsiella pneumoniae proteus vulgaris

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    ABSTRACT. This investigation was conducted to determine the in-vitro effect of aqueous, ethanol and methanol crude extracts of Euphorbia hirta at concentrations ranging from 10mg/ml – 100mg/ml against three pathogenic bacteria (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Proteus vulgaris) using cup plate ...

  17. Molecular Analysis of Rising Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Belgian Non-Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates (1995-2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyssens, Pieter-Jan; Van Bambeke, Françoise; Mattheus, Wesley; Bertrand, Sophie; Fux, Frédéric; Van Bossuyt, Eddie; Damée, Sabrina; Nyssen, Henry-Jean; De Craeye, Stéphane; Verhaegen, Jan; Tulkens, Paul M.; Vanhoof, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of a longitudinal surveillance study (1995–2014) on fluoroquinolone resistance (FQ-R) among Belgian non-invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates (n = 5,602). For many years, the switch to respiratory fluoroquinolones for the treatment of (a)typical pneumonia had no impact on FQ-R levels. However, since 2011 we observed a significant decrease in susceptibility towards ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin and levofloxacin with peaks of 9.0%, 6.6% and 3.1% resistant isolates, respectively. Resistance to moxifloxacin arised sporadically, and remained <1% throughout the entire study period. We observed classical topoisomerase mutations in gyrA (n = 25), parC (n = 46) and parE (n = 3) in varying combinations, arguing against clonal expansion of FQ-R. The impact of recombination with co-habiting commensal streptococci on FQ-R remains marginal (10.4%). Notably, we observed that a rare combination of DNA Gyrase mutations (GyrA_S81L/GyrB_P454S) suffices for high-level moxifloxacin resistance, contrasting current model. Interestingly, 85/422 pneumococcal strains display MICCIP values which were lowered by at least four dilutions by reserpine, pointing at involvement of efflux pumps in FQ-R. In contrast to susceptible strains, isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin significantly overexpressed the ABC pump PatAB in comparison to reference strain S. pneumoniae ATCC 49619, but this could only be linked to disruptive terminator mutations in a fraction of these. Conversely, no difference in expression of the Major Facilitator PmrA, unaffected by reserpine, was noted between susceptible and resistant S. pneumoniae strains. Finally, we observed that four isolates displayed intermediate to high-level ciprofloxacin resistance without any known molecular resistance mechanism. Focusing future molecular studies on these isolates, which are also commonly found in other studies, might greatly assist in the battle against rising pneumococcal drug resistance. PMID:27227336

  18. Molecular Analysis of Rising Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Belgian Non-Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates (1995-2014.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter-Jan Ceyssens

    Full Text Available We present the results of a longitudinal surveillance study (1995-2014 on fluoroquinolone resistance (FQ-R among Belgian non-invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates (n = 5,602. For many years, the switch to respiratory fluoroquinolones for the treatment of (atypical pneumonia had no impact on FQ-R levels. However, since 2011 we observed a significant decrease in susceptibility towards ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin and levofloxacin with peaks of 9.0%, 6.6% and 3.1% resistant isolates, respectively. Resistance to moxifloxacin arised sporadically, and remained <1% throughout the entire study period. We observed classical topoisomerase mutations in gyrA (n = 25, parC (n = 46 and parE (n = 3 in varying combinations, arguing against clonal expansion of FQ-R. The impact of recombination with co-habiting commensal streptococci on FQ-R remains marginal (10.4%. Notably, we observed that a rare combination of DNA Gyrase mutations (GyrA_S81L/GyrB_P454S suffices for high-level moxifloxacin resistance, contrasting current model. Interestingly, 85/422 pneumococcal strains display MICCIP values which were lowered by at least four dilutions by reserpine, pointing at involvement of efflux pumps in FQ-R. In contrast to susceptible strains, isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin significantly overexpressed the ABC pump PatAB in comparison to reference strain S. pneumoniae ATCC 49619, but this could only be linked to disruptive terminator mutations in a fraction of these. Conversely, no difference in expression of the Major Facilitator PmrA, unaffected by reserpine, was noted between susceptible and resistant S. pneumoniae strains. Finally, we observed that four isolates displayed intermediate to high-level ciprofloxacin resistance without any known molecular resistance mechanism. Focusing future molecular studies on these isolates, which are also commonly found in other studies, might greatly assist in the battle against rising pneumococcal drug resistance.

  19. Molecular Analysis of Rising Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Belgian Non-Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates (1995-2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyssens, Pieter-Jan; Van Bambeke, Françoise; Mattheus, Wesley; Bertrand, Sophie; Fux, Frédéric; Van Bossuyt, Eddie; Damée, Sabrina; Nyssen, Henry-Jean; De Craeye, Stéphane; Verhaegen, Jan; Tulkens, Paul M; Vanhoof, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of a longitudinal surveillance study (1995-2014) on fluoroquinolone resistance (FQ-R) among Belgian non-invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates (n = 5,602). For many years, the switch to respiratory fluoroquinolones for the treatment of (a)typical pneumonia had no impact on FQ-R levels. However, since 2011 we observed a significant decrease in susceptibility towards ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin and levofloxacin with peaks of 9.0%, 6.6% and 3.1% resistant isolates, respectively. Resistance to moxifloxacin arised sporadically, and remained topoisomerase mutations in gyrA (n = 25), parC (n = 46) and parE (n = 3) in varying combinations, arguing against clonal expansion of FQ-R. The impact of recombination with co-habiting commensal streptococci on FQ-R remains marginal (10.4%). Notably, we observed that a rare combination of DNA Gyrase mutations (GyrA_S81L/GyrB_P454S) suffices for high-level moxifloxacin resistance, contrasting current model. Interestingly, 85/422 pneumococcal strains display MICCIP values which were lowered by at least four dilutions by reserpine, pointing at involvement of efflux pumps in FQ-R. In contrast to susceptible strains, isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin significantly overexpressed the ABC pump PatAB in comparison to reference strain S. pneumoniae ATCC 49619, but this could only be linked to disruptive terminator mutations in a fraction of these. Conversely, no difference in expression of the Major Facilitator PmrA, unaffected by reserpine, was noted between susceptible and resistant S. pneumoniae strains. Finally, we observed that four isolates displayed intermediate to high-level ciprofloxacin resistance without any known molecular resistance mechanism. Focusing future molecular studies on these isolates, which are also commonly found in other studies, might greatly assist in the battle against rising pneumococcal drug resistance.

  20. Serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing invasive disease in the Republic of Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Vickers, I

    2011-05-01

    The 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was included in the routine infant immunization schedule in Ireland in September 2008. We determined the serotype of 977 S. pneumoniae isolates causing invasive disease between 2000-2002 and 2007-2008, assessed for the presence of the recently described serotype 6C and determined the susceptibility of isolates during 2007-2008 to penicillin and cefotaxime. Serotype 14 was the most common serotype during both periods and 7·7% of isolates previously typed as serotype 6A were serotype 6C. During 2000-2002 and 2007-2008, PCV7 could potentially have prevented 85% and 74% of invasive pneumococcal disease in the target population (i.e. children aged <2 years), respectively. The level of penicillin non-susceptibility was 17% in 2007-2008. Ongoing surveillance of serotypes is required to determine the impact of PCV7 in the Irish population and to assess the potential of new vaccines with expanded valency.

  1. Streptococcus pneumoniae PspC Subgroup Prevalence in Invasive Disease and Differences in Contribution to Complement Evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Maten, Erika; van den Broek, Bryan; de Jonge, Marien I; Rensen, Kim J W; Eleveld, Marc J; Zomer, Aldert L; Cremers, Amelieke J H; Ferwerda, Gerben; de Groot, Ronald; Langereis, Jeroen D; van der Flier, Michiel

    2018-04-01

    The pneumococcal capsular serotype is an important determinant of complement resistance and invasive disease potential, but other virulence factors have also been found to contribute. Pneumococcal surface protein C (PspC), a highly variable virulence protein that binds complement factor H to evade C3 opsonization, is divided into two subgroups: choline-bound subgroup I and LPxTG-anchored subgroup II. The prevalence of different PspC subgroups in invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) and functional differences in complement evasion are unknown. The prevalence of PspC subgroups in IPD isolates was determined in a collection of 349 sequenced strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from adult patients. pspC deletion mutants and isogenic pspC switch mutants were constructed to study differences in factor H binding and complement evasion in relation to capsule thickness. Subgroup I pspC was far more prevalent in IPD isolates than subgroup II pspC The presence of capsule was associated with a greater ability of bound factor H to reduce complement opsonization. Pneumococcal subgroup I PspC bound significantly more factor H and showed more effective complement evasion than subgroup II PspC in isogenic encapsulated pneumococci. We conclude that variation in the PspC subgroups, independent of capsule serotypes, affects pneumococcal factor H binding and its ability to evade complement deposition. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  2. Streptococcus pneumoniae Drugs Resistance in Acute Rhinosinusitis

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    Chong Jie Hao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute rhinosinusitis that usually caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae becomes the reason why patients seek for medical care. Drugs resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae is increasing worldwide. This study was conducted to determine drugs resistance of Streptococcus pneumonia from acute rhinosinusitis in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital. Methods: A descriptive laboratory study was conducted in June–October 2014 at the Laboratory of Microbiology Faculty of Medicine Universitas Padjadjaran. The sample was taken using nasopharyngeal swabbing from 100 acute rhinosinusitis patients in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital and planted on tryptic soy agar containing 5% sheep blood and 5 μg/ml of gentamicin sulphate and then incubated in 5% CO2 incubator at 37°C for 24 hours. The identification of Streptococcus pneumonia was performed by optochin test. The susceptibility test against Streptococcus pneumoniae was done using disk diffusion method.The antibiotic disks were trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, oxacillin, levofloxacin, azithromycin, and doxycycline. Results: Out of 100 samples, 8 of them were tested positive for Streptococcus pneumoniae. Three of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates died with unknown reason after it were stored at -80 .The drugs resistance test showed the resistance of Streptococcus pneumonia to oxacillin, azithromycin and trimethoprim were 6, whereas levofloxacin and doxycycline are 4. Conclusions: Streptococcus pneumonia drugs resistance in acute rhinosinusitis shows the resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae to oxacillin, azithromycin and trimethoprim are 6, whereas the resistance to levofloxacin and doxycycline are 4.

  3. Gene Regulation in Streptococcus pneumoniae: interplay between nutrition and virulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.T. Hendriksen (Wouter)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractStreptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) is a Gram-positive bacterium, which belongs to the species of streptococci. Other pathogenic bacteria belonging to this class include Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus suis, Streptococcus uberis, Streptococcus

  4. Molecular characteristics of penicillin-binding protein 2b, 2x and 1a sequences in Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates causing invasive diseases among children in Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X; Liu, J; Zhang, Z; Liu, Y; Wang, Y; Liu, Y

    2016-04-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is one of the common pathogens causing severe invasive infections in children. This study aimed to investigate the serotype distribution and variations of penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) 2b, 2x and 1a in S. pneumoniae isolates causing invasive diseases in Northeast China. A total of 256 strains were isolated from children with invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) from January 2000 to October 2014. All strains were serotyped and determined for antibiotic resistance. The amplicons of penicillin-binding domains in pbp1a, pbp2b and pbp2x genes were sequenced for variation identification. The most prevalent serotypes of isolates in IPD children were 19A, 14, 19F, 23F and 6B. 19A and 19F were the most frequent serotypes of penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae (PRSP), which present with high resistance to amoxicillin, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone and meropenem. The numbers of amino acid substitutions of penicillin-non-susceptible S. pneumoniae (PNSP) isolates were higher than those of penicillin-sensitive S. pneumoniae isolates in all the PBP genes (p isolates carried 25 amino acid mutations, including Ala618 → Gly between positions 560 and 675 in PBP2b and Thr338 → Ala substitutions in PBP2x. The amino acid alterations in PBP2b, PBP2x and PBP1a from S. pneumoniae were closely associated with resistance to β-lactam antibiotics. This study provides new data for further monitoring of genetic changes related to the emergence and spread of resistance to β-lactam antibiotics in China.

  5. [Streptococcus pneumoniae Vaccination in Children and Adolescents at High Risk of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tendais-Almeida, Marta; Ferreira-Magalhães, Manuel; Alves, Inês; Tavares, Margarida; Azevedo, Inês

    2015-01-01

    In Portugal, pneumococcal vaccination is free of charge and recommended by the Directorate-General of Health for the pediatric population at high risk of invasive pneumococcal disease. Our main aim was to describe the vaccination uptake in a pediatric population attending a hospital outpatient clinic. Cross-sectional observational survey of a pediatric population attending a referral hospital outpatient clinic, from July to December 2014. Data was collected from clinical records, Individual Health Bulletin or the registry from Plataforma de Dados da Saúde®. Of the 122 participants, 95.9% had, at least, one shot of pneumococcal vaccine, but only 64.8% of these completed the age recommended vaccination scheme. Uptake was higher in children 5 years old had a higher uptake of 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine than the 2 to 5-years old ones (74.5% vs 40.5%; p < 0.001). Most of our pediatric population at high risk of IPD was vaccinated; nevertheless, only two-thirds had completed the scheme for their age. The main failure was on the 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine administration. Although these results are better than those reported in other European countries with similar recommendations, it is essential to explore the causes for the observed flaws in order to optimize vaccination rates.

  6. Extracellular matrix formation enhances the ability of Streptococcus pneumoniae to cause invasive disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Trappetti

    Full Text Available During infection, pneumococci exist mainly in sessile biofilms rather than in planktonic form, except during sepsis. However, relatively little is known about how biofilms contribute to pneumococcal pathogenesis. Here, we carried out a biofilm assay on opaque and transparent variants of a clinical serotype 19F strain WCH159. After 4 days incubation, scanning electron microscopy revealed that opaque biofilm bacteria produced an extracellular matrix, whereas the transparent variant did not. The opaque biofilm-derived bacteria translocated from the nasopharynx to the lungs and brain of mice, and showed 100-fold greater in vitro adherence to A549 cells than transparent bacteria. Microarray analysis of planktonic and sessile bacteria from transparent and opaque variants showed differential gene expression in two operons: the lic operon, which is involved in choline uptake, and in the two-component system, ciaRH. Mutants of these genes did not form an extracellular matrix, could not translocate from the nasopharynx to the lungs or the brain, and adhered poorly to A549 cells. We conclude that only the opaque phenotype is able to form extracellular matrix, and that the lic operon and ciaRH contribute to this process. We propose that during infection, extracellular matrix formation enhances the ability of pneumococci to cause invasive disease.

  7. Nasopharyngeal colonization and invasive disease are enhanced by the cell wall hydrolases LytB and LytC of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Ramos-Sevillano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common colonizer of the human nasopharynx and one of the major pathogens causing invasive disease worldwide. Dissection of the molecular pathways responsible for colonization, invasion, and evasion of the immune system will provide new targets for antimicrobial or vaccine therapies for this common pathogen. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have constructed mutants lacking the pneumococcal cell wall hydrolases (CWHs LytB and LytC to investigate the role of these proteins in different phases of the pneumococcal pathogenesis. Our results show that LytB and LytC are involved in the attachment of S. pneumoniae to human nasopharyngeal cells both in vitro and in vivo. The interaction of both proteins with phagocytic cells demonstrated that LytB and LytC act in concert avoiding pneumococcal phagocytosis mediated by neutrophils and alveolar macrophages. Furthermore, C3b deposition was increased on the lytC mutant confirming that LytC is involved in complement evasion. As a result, the lytC mutant showed a reduced ability to successfully cause pneumococcal pneumonia and sepsis. Bacterial mutants lacking both LytB and LytC showed a dramatically impaired attachment to nasopharyngeal cells as well as a marked degree of attenuation in a mouse model of colonization. In addition, C3b deposition and phagocytosis was more efficient for the double lytB lytC mutant and its virulence was greatly impaired in both systemic and pulmonary models of infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study confirms that the CWHs LytB and LytC of S. pneumoniae are essential virulence factors involved in the colonization of the nasopharynx and in the progress of invasive disease by avoiding host immunity.

  8. Seeing Streptococcus pneumoniae, a Common Killer Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Rikke Schmidt; Andersen, Ebbe Sloth

    2014-01-01

    of the bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae by use of ink, watercolours and computer graphics. We propose a novel artistic visual rendering of Streptococcus pneumoniae and ask what the value of these kind of representations are compared to traditional scientific data. We ask if drawings and computer...

  9. Regulation of neuraminidase expression in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gualdi Luciana

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sialic acid (N-acetylneuraminic acid; NeuNAc is one of the most important carbohydrates for Streptococcus pneumoniae due of its role as a carbon and energy source, receptor for adhesion and invasion and molecular signal for promotion of biofilm formation, nasopharyngeal carriage and invasion of the lung. Results In this work, NeuNAc and its metabolic derivative N-acetyl mannosamine (ManNAc were used to analyze regulatory mechanisms of the neuraminidase locus expression. Genomic and metabolic comparison to Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus gordonii and Streptococcus sanguinis elucidates the metabolic association of the two amino sugars to different parts of the locus coding for the two main pneumococcal neuraminidases and confirms the substrate specificity of the respective ABC transporters. Quantitative gene expression analysis shows repression of the locus by glucose and induction of all predicted transcriptional units by ManNAc and NeuNAc, each inducing with higher efficiency the operon encoding for the transporter with higher specificity for the respective amino sugar. Cytofluorimetric analysis demonstrated enhanced surface exposure of NanA on pneumococci grown in NeuNAc and ManNAc and an activity assay allowed to quantify approximately twelve times as much neuraminidase activity on induced cells as opposed to glucose grown cells. Conclusions The present data increase the understanding of metabolic regulation of the nanAB locus and indicate that experiments aimed at the elucidation of the relevance of neuraminidases in pneumococcal virulence should possibly not be carried out on bacteria grown in glucose containing media.

  10. Population biology of Streptococcus pneumoniae in West Africa: multilocus sequence typing of serotypes that exhibit different predisposition to invasive disease and carriage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric S Donkor

    Full Text Available Little is known about the population biology of Streptococcus pneumoniae in developing countries, although the majority of pneumococcal infections occur in this setting. The aim of the study was to apply MLST to investigate the population biology of S. pneumoniae in West Africa.Seventy three invasive and carriage S. pneumoniae isolates from three West African countries including The Gambia, Nigeria and Ghana were investigated. The isolates covered seven serotypes (1, 3, 5, 6A, 11, 14, 23F and were subjected to multilocus sequence typing and antibiotic susceptibility testing.Overall, 50 different sequence types (STs were identified, of which 38% (29 were novel. The most common ST was a novel clone-ST 4012 (6.5%, and some clones including STs 913, 925, 1737, 2160 and 3310 appeared to be specific to the study region. Two STs including ST 63 and ST 4012 were associated with multiple serotypes indicating a history of serotype switching. ST 63 was associated with serotypes 3 and 23F, while ST 4012 was associated with serotypes 6A and 23. eBURST analyses using the stringent 6/7 identical loci definition grouped the 50 STs into 5 clonal complexes and 65 singletons, expressing a high level of genetic diversity among the isolates. Compared to the other serotypes, serotypes 1 and 5 isolates appeared to be more clonal. Internationally recognized antibiotic resistant clones of S. pneumoniae were generally absent in the population investigated and the only multidrug resistant isolate identified (1/66 belong to the Pneumocococcal Epidemiology Network clone ST 63.The pneumococcal population in West Africa is quite divergent, and serotypes that are common in invasive disease (such as serotypes 1 and 5 are more likely to be clonal than serotypes that are common in carriage.

  11. Population biology of Streptococcus pneumoniae in West Africa: multilocus sequence typing of serotypes that exhibit different predisposition to invasive disease and carriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donkor, Eric S; Adegbola, Richard A; Wren, Brendan W; Antonio, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the population biology of Streptococcus pneumoniae in developing countries, although the majority of pneumococcal infections occur in this setting. The aim of the study was to apply MLST to investigate the population biology of S. pneumoniae in West Africa. Seventy three invasive and carriage S. pneumoniae isolates from three West African countries including The Gambia, Nigeria and Ghana were investigated. The isolates covered seven serotypes (1, 3, 5, 6A, 11, 14, 23F) and were subjected to multilocus sequence typing and antibiotic susceptibility testing. Overall, 50 different sequence types (STs) were identified, of which 38% (29) were novel. The most common ST was a novel clone-ST 4012 (6.5%), and some clones including STs 913, 925, 1737, 2160 and 3310 appeared to be specific to the study region. Two STs including ST 63 and ST 4012 were associated with multiple serotypes indicating a history of serotype switching. ST 63 was associated with serotypes 3 and 23F, while ST 4012 was associated with serotypes 6A and 23. eBURST analyses using the stringent 6/7 identical loci definition grouped the 50 STs into 5 clonal complexes and 65 singletons, expressing a high level of genetic diversity among the isolates. Compared to the other serotypes, serotypes 1 and 5 isolates appeared to be more clonal. Internationally recognized antibiotic resistant clones of S. pneumoniae were generally absent in the population investigated and the only multidrug resistant isolate identified (1/66) belong to the Pneumocococcal Epidemiology Network clone ST 63. The pneumococcal population in West Africa is quite divergent, and serotypes that are common in invasive disease (such as serotypes 1 and 5) are more likely to be clonal than serotypes that are common in carriage.

  12. Prevalence of penicillin and erythromycin resistance among invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates reported by laboratories in the southern and eastern Mediterranean region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, M A; Tiemersma, E; Scicluna, E; van de Sande-Bruinsma, N; de Kraker, M; Monen, J; Grundmann, H

    2009-03-01

    Information about the epidemiology of resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae within southern and eastern countries of the Mediterranean region is incomplete, as reports have been sporadic and difficult to compare. Over a 36-month period, from 2003 to 2005, the ARMed project collected 1298 susceptibility test results of invasive isolates of S. pneumoniae from blood and spinal fluid cultures routinely processed within 59 participating laboratories situated in Algeria, Cyprus, Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Malta, Morocco, Tunisia and Turkey. Overall, 26% (335) of isolates were reported as non-susceptible to penicillin, with the highest proportions being reported from Algeria (44%) and Lebanon (40%). During the same time period, the highest proportions of pneumococci that were not susceptible to erythromycin were reported from Malta (46%) and Tunisia (39%). Proportions of dual non-susceptibility in excess of 5% were found in laboratories in Algeria, Tunisia, Lebanon, Jordan and Turkey. ARMed data on the antimicrobial resistance epidemiology of S. pneumoniae in the southern and eastern Mediterranean region provided evidence of high rates of resistance, especially to penicillin. This evidence calls for a greater focus on the identification of relevant drivers of resistance and on the implemention of effective practices in order to address the problem of resistence.

  13. Trends in Antimicrobial Resistance in 1,968 Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae Strains Isolated in Spanish Hospitals (2001 to 2003): Decreasing Penicillin Resistance in Children's Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oteo, Jesús; Lázaro, Edurne; de Abajo, Francisco J.; Baquero, Fernando; Campos, José

    2004-01-01

    To address the public health problem of antibiotic resistance, the European Union (EU) founded the European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance System. A network of 40 hospitals that serve approximately 30% of the Spanish population (about 12 million) participated. Each laboratory reported data on antimicrobial susceptibility testing using standard laboratory procedures that were evaluated by an external quality control program. The antibiotic consumption data were obtained from the National Health System. We compared the antibiotic susceptibility of Spanish isolates of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae (2001 to 2003) with antibiotic consumption. Invasive S. pneumoniae was isolated from 1,968 patients, 20% of whom were children at or below the age of 14 years. Of non-penicillin-susceptible strains (35.6%; 95% confidence interval, 34 to 37.2), 26.4% were considered intermediate and 9.2% were considered resistant. Between 2001 and 2003, penicillin resistance decreased from 39.5 to 33% overall and from 60.4 to 41.2% in children at or below the age of 14 years (P = 0.002). Resistance to erythromycin was at 26.6%, and coresistance with penicillin was at 19.1%. Of total isolates, the ciprofloxacin MIC was >2 μg/ml for 2.1%, with numbers increasing from 0.4% (2001) to 3.9% (2003). Total antibiotic use decreased from 21.66 to 19.71 defined daily doses/1,000 inhabitants/day between 1998 and 2002. While consumption of broad-spectrum penicillins, cephalosporins, and erythromycin declined, use of amoxicillin-clavulanate and quinolones increased by 17.5 and 27%, respectively. The frequency of antibiotic resistance in invasive S. pneumoniae in Spain was among the highest in the EU. However, a significant decrease in penicillin resistance was observed in children. This decrease coincided with the introduction of a heptavalent conjugate pneumoccocal vaccine (June 2001) and with a global reduction in antibiotic consumption levels. PMID:15583283

  14. Streptococcus pneumoniae urinary tract infection in pedeatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pougnet, Richard; Sapin, Jeanne; De Parscau, Loïc; Pougnet, Laurence

    2017-06-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae infections in children are most often lung infections or meningitis. Urinary tract infections are much rarer. We present the case of a urinary tract infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae. The clinical picture was classical. The urine culture showed the presence of Streptococcus pneumoniae in urine (10 4 UFC/mL; with 2 × 10 4 leucocytes/mL). The literature mentions a few cases of such infections. In some studies, the prevalence of Streptococcus pneumoniae in urine of children is less than 1%. Those children mostly present abnormalities of urinary tract. In our case, urinary ultrasound scan have shown the presence of an ectopic kidney in this child. The discussion between the clinician and the biologist has contributed to the discovery of this renal anomaly.

  15. Parallel Evolution in Streptococcus pneumoniae Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churton, Nicholas W V; Misra, Raju V; Howlin, Robert P; Allan, Raymond N; Jefferies, Johanna; Faust, Saul N; Gharbia, Saheer E; Edwards, Richard J; Clarke, Stuart C; Webb, Jeremy S

    2016-05-09

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a commensal human pathogen and the causative agent of various invasive and noninvasive diseases. Carriage of the pneumococcus in the nasopharynx is thought to be mediated by biofilm formation, an environment where isogenic populations frequently give rise to morphological colony variants, including small colony variant (SCV) phenotypes. We employed metabolic characterization and whole-genome sequencing of biofilm-derived S. pneumoniae serotype 22F pneumococcal SCVs to investigate diversification during biofilm formation. Phenotypic profiling revealed that SCVs exhibit reduced growth rates, reduced capsule expression, altered metabolic profiles, and increased biofilm formation compared to the ancestral strain. Whole-genome sequencing of 12 SCVs from independent biofilm experiments revealed that all SCVs studied had mutations within the DNA-directed RNA polymerase delta subunit (RpoE). Mutations included four large-scale deletions ranging from 51 to 264 bp, one insertion resulting in a coding frameshift, and seven nonsense single-nucleotide substitutions that result in a truncated gene product. This work links mutations in the rpoE gene to SCV formation and enhanced biofilm development in S. pneumoniae and therefore may have important implications for colonization, carriage, and persistence of the organism. Furthermore, recurrent mutation of the pneumococcal rpoE gene presents an unprecedented level of parallel evolution in pneumococcal biofilm development. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  16. PENICILLIN–RESISTANT STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE – A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Since the first report in 1967, the incidence of Penicillin Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (Pneumococcus) has risen steadily worldwide, and now complicates diagnostic and treatment strategies for infections due to this organism. More worrisome is the fact that in areas where Penicillin Resistant Streptococcus ...

  17. Detection and quantification of Streptococcus pneumoniae from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to develop a real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for quantitative detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae from clinical respiratory specimens. Initially, 184 respiratory specimens from patients with community acquired pneumonia (CAP) (n = 129) and 55 cases with hospital associated ...

  18. Klebsiella pneumoniae Invasive Syndrome

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    Vasco Evangelista

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Klebsiella pneumoniae invasive syndrome (KPIS is a rare clinical condition characterized by primary liver abscess associated with metastatic infection. Most case reports are from Southeast Asia, with only one case described in Portugal. The Authors present the case of a 44-year-old man with a history of fever, dry cough and cervicalgia. A thoracic computed tomography (CT scan showed multiple pulmonary and hepatic nodules, suggestive of metastatic malignancy. Both blood cultures and bronchoalveolar lavage were positive for Klebsiella pneumoniae. Imaging studies were repeated during his hospital stay, showing a reduction in both number and volume of identified lesions, thus revealing their infectious nature. This case illustrates how much this entity can mimic other illnesses.

  19. Mucosal Infections and Invasive Potential of Nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae Are Enhanced by Oligopeptide Binding Proteins AliC and AliD

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    Jessica L. Bradshaw

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae (NESp is an emerging human pathogen that colonizes the nasopharynx and is associated with noninvasive diseases such as otitis media (OM, conjunctivitis, and nonbacteremic pneumonia. Since capsule expression was previously thought to be necessary for establishment of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD, serotype-specific polysaccharide capsules are targeted by currently licensed pneumococcal vaccines. Yet, NESp expressing oligopeptide binding proteins AliC and AliD have been isolated during IPD. Thus, we hypothesize AliC and AliD are major NESp virulence determinants that facilitate persistence and development of IPD. Our study reveals that NESp expressing AliC and AliD have intensified virulence compared to isogenic mutants. Specifically, we demonstrate AliC and AliD enhance murine nasopharyngeal colonization and pulmonary infection and are required for OM in a chinchilla model. Furthermore, AliC and AliD increase pneumococcal survival in chinchilla whole blood and aid in resistance to killing by human leukocytes. Comparative proteome analysis revealed significant alterations in protein levels when AliC and AliD were absent. Virulence-associated proteins, including a pneumococcal surface protein C variant (CbpAC, were significantly downregulated, while starvation response indicators were upregulated in the double mutant relative to wild-type levels. We also reveal that differentially expressed CbpAC was essential for NESp adherence to epithelial cells, virulence during OM, reduction of C3b deposition on the NESp surface, and binding to nonspecific IgA. Altogether, the rise in NESp prevalence urges the need to understand how NESp establishes disease and persists in a host. This study highlights the roles of AliC, AliD, and CbpAC in the pathogenesis of NESp.

  20. Impacto da vacina conjugada contra Streptococcus pneumoniae em doenças invasivas Impact of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine on the prevention of invasive pneumococcal diseases

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    Lucia Ferro Bricks

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Rever os estudos que avaliam o impacto da vacina conjugada 7-valente na incidência de doenças invasivas por pneumococo e analisar o possível impacto dessa vacina no Brasil. FONTE DE DADOS:Foram pesquisadas as bases de dados MEDLINE, LILACS, Cochrane Database Reviews (janeiro de 2000 a janeiro de 2006, selecionando-se para análise os artigos contendo as seguintes palavras-chave: Streptococcus pneumoniae, pneumococo, vacina conjugada, resistência, antibióticos e meningite. Também foi realizada busca de informações sobre o tema nos sites do Centers for Disease Control, Ministério da Saúde e Centro de Vigilância Epidemiológica do Estado de São Paulo. SÍNTESE DOS DADOS: A vacina conjugada 7-valente reduziu a incidência de doenças invasivas por pneumococo, número de consultas por doenças respiratórias de vias aéreas superiores e inferiores, consumo de antibióticos e incidência de doenças invasivas por pneumococo por cepas resistentes a antibióticos não apenas nas crianças vacinadas, como em adultos e idosos. No Brasil, os coeficientes de incidência de doenças invasivas por pneumococo em crianças menores de 5 anos são elevados, a taxa de letalidade de meningites pneumocócicas é alta e as taxas de resistência parcial e plena à penicilina aumentaram substancialmente nos últimos 5 anos. CONCLUSÕES:Devido aos benefícios diretos e indiretos do uso em larga escala da vacina conjugada 7-valente, essa vacina deve ser incluída no calendário básico de imunização do Brasil.OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the impact of heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in invasive pneumococcal diseases in the United States, and to analyze the potential impact of this vaccine in Brazil. SOURCES OF DATA: MEDLINE, LILACS, Cochrane Database Reviews, as well as the websites of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, Brazilian Ministry of Health and Centro de Vigilância Epidemiológica do Estado de São Paulo from

  1. Enhanced Determination of Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotypes Associated with Invasive Disease in Laos by Using a Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction Serotyping Assay with Cerebrospinal Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Catrin E.; Sengduangphachanh, Amphone; Thaojaikong, Thaksinaporn; Sirisouk, Joy; Foster, Dona; Phetsouvanh, Rattanaphone; McGee, Lesley; Crook, Derrick W.; Newton, Paul N.; Peacock, Sharon J.

    2010-01-01

    A prospective hospital-based study was undertaken to define the incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) and circulating serotypes in Laos. Of 10,799 patients with hemocultures and 353 patients with cerebrospinal fluid samples, 0.21% and 5.4%, respectively, were positive for Streptococcus pneumoniae, giving a total of 35 IPD patients. We developed a real-time polymerase chain reaction to detect serotypes represented in the 13-valent pneumococcal vaccine. A blinded evaluation comparing serotype as defined by the Quellung reaction versus the polymerase chain reaction demonstrated 100% concordance. The most frequent serotype (n = 33 patients) was 1 (n = 6), followed by serotypes 5, 6A/B/C, 14, and 23F. Serotypes represented in the 7-valent polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccine (PCV-7) infected 39% of patients, with 73% coverage for the PCV-10 and PCV-13 vaccines. Although the sample size is small, these data suggest that the PCV-7 vaccine may have relatively low efficacy in Laos. Further studies are urgently needed to guide pneumococcal vaccine policy in Laos. PMID:20810803

  2. Monoclonal Idiotope Vaccine against Streptococcus pneumoniae Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Mary K.; Ward, Ronald E.; Kohler, Heinz

    1984-12-01

    A monoclonal anti-idiotope antibody coupled to a carrier protein was used to immunize BALB/c mice against a lethal Streptococcus pneumoniae infection. Vaccinated mice developed a high titer of antibody to phosphorylcholine, which is known to protect against infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae. Measurement of the median lethal dose of the bacteria indicated that anti-idiotope immunization significantly increased the resistance of BALB/c mice to the bacterial challenge. Antibody to an idiotope can thus be used as an antigen substitute for the induction of protective immunity.

  3. Influenza A virus facilitates Streptococcus pneumoniae transmission and disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diavatopoulos, D.A.; Short, K.R.; Price, J.T.; Wilksch, J.J.; Brown, L.E.; Briles, D.E.; Strugnell, R.A.; Wijburg, O.L.

    2010-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) kills approximately 1.6 million people annually. Pneumococcal infections predominantly manifest as pneumonia, sepsis, meningitis, and otitis media. S. pneumoniae is also a member of the normal nasopharyngeal flora, colonizing up to 80% of children.

  4. Serotype changes and antimicrobial nonsusceptibility rates of invasive and non-invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates after implementation of 10-valent pneumococcal nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine (PHiD-CV) in Bulgaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setchanova, Lena; Murdjeva, Marianna; Stancheva, Iglika; Alexandrova, Alexandra; Sredkova, Maria; Stoeva, Temenuga; Yoneva, Magda; Kurchatova, Anna; Mitov, Ivan

    The 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV10) has been included in Bulgarian Childhood Immunization Program since 2010. This study aimed to assess serotype distribution and antimicrobial resistance of 198 invasive and non-invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae strains that had been isolated in Bulgaria during 2011-2016 from patients with invasive (IPD) and non-invasive (NIPD) pneumococcal diseases. The most common invasive serotypes were 3 (10.1%), 19F (4.0%), and 7F (3.0%). A significant decrease in the proportion of invasive vaccine types (VTs) from 64.2% to 35.2% was found in comparison with pre-vaccine era. The most common serotypes among middle ear fluids were 3, 19A and 19F (5.6% each), and VTs fell down from 66.4% to 40.0% in post-PCV10 period. Among respiratory isolates, the most prevalent serotypes were some emergent serotypes such as 15A/B/C (5.0%), 19A, and 6C (4.0% each). VTs decreased significantly (16.3%) among vaccinated children compared to unvaccinated children and adults (44.0%). Two non-VTs (19A and 6C) have increased significantly more (pantibiotic nonsusceptible S. pneumoniae in Bulgaria remained high in post-PCV10 era. Among all source of isolates, antimicrobial nonsusceptibility rates were: oral penicillin - 46.5%, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole - 45.4%, erythromycin - 43.9%, tetracycline - 37.4%, and multidrug-resistance (MDR) was 44%. The most common MDR serotypes were 19F, 19A, 6A/C, 15A/B/C and 23A. Our results proved that PCV10 vaccination substantially reduced VTs pneumococcal IPD and NIPD. There has been a shift in the distribution of S. pneumoniae serotypes mostly in vaccinated children but also in the whole population and strong serotype-specific antibiotic resistance was observed after vaccine implementation. Therefore, it is important to continue monitoring serotype changes and pneumococcal resistance among all patient ages in addition to aid in determining the long-term effectiveness of PCV10 interventions. Copyright © 2017

  5. Serotype changes and antimicrobial nonsusceptibility rates of invasive and non-invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates after implementation of 10-valent pneumococcal nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine (PHiD-CV in Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Setchanova

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV10 has been included in Bulgarian Childhood Immunization Program since 2010. This study aimed to assess serotype distribution and antimicrobial resistance of 198 invasive and non-invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae strains that had been isolated in Bulgaria during 2011–2016 from patients with invasive (IPD and non-invasive (NIPD pneumococcal diseases. The most common invasive serotypes were 3 (10.1%, 19F (4.0%, and 7F (3.0%. A significant decrease in the proportion of invasive vaccine types (VTs from 64.2% to 35.2% was found in comparison with pre-vaccine era. The most common serotypes among middle ear fluids were 3, 19A and 19F (5.6% each, and VTs fell down from 66.4% to 40.0% in post-PCV10 period. Among respiratory isolates, the most prevalent serotypes were some emergent serotypes such as 15A/B/C (5.0%, 19A, and 6C (4.0% each. VTs decreased significantly (16.3% among vaccinated children compared to unvaccinated children and adults (44.0%. Two non-VTs (19A and 6C have increased significantly more (p < 0.05 in vaccinated children than in unvaccinated patients. The rates of antibiotic nonsusceptible S. pneumoniae in Bulgaria remained high in post-PCV10 era. Among all source of isolates, antimicrobial nonsusceptibility rates were: oral penicillin – 46.5%, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole – 45.4%, erythromycin – 43.9%, tetracycline – 37.4%, and multidrug-resistance (MDR was 44%. The most common MDR serotypes were 19F, 19A, 6A/C, 15A/B/C and 23A. Our results proved that PCV10 vaccination substantially reduced VTs pneumococcal IPD and NIPD. There has been a shift in the distribution of S. pneumoniae serotypes mostly in vaccinated children but also in the whole population and strong serotype-specific antibiotic resistance was observed after vaccine implementation. Therefore, it is important to continue monitoring serotype changes and pneumococcal resistance among all patient ages in addition to

  6. Factors associated with colonization of Streptococcus pneumoniae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Espinosa-De Los Monteros, L.E., Aguilar-Ituarte, F., Jimenez-Juarez, R.N., Rodriguez-Suarez, R.S.. & Gomez-Barreto, D. (2010) Streptococcus pneumonia serotype replacement in nasopharyngeal colonization in children vaccinated with PCV7 in Mexico. Salud Publica de. Mexico 52, 4-13. Faden, H., Duffy, L., Wasielewski, ...

  7. Dyrkningsnegativ Streptococcus pneumoniae endokarditis diagnosticeret med polymerasekaedereaktion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rasmus Vedby; Kemp, Michael; Bangsborg, Jette Marie

    2008-01-01

    A 60-year old man was admitted with sepsis and meningitis of unknown aetiology. Underlying aortic valve endocarditis was diagnosed by echocardiography and severe insufficiency led to aortic valve replacement. Application of broad-range PCR to cusp tissue revealed a DNA product, and a diagnosis...... of Streptococcus pneumoniae endocarditis was obtained by DNA sequencing....

  8. NEW VIRULENCE FACTORS OF STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermans, Peter Wilhelmus Maria; Bootsma, Jeanette Hester; Burghout, Pieter Jan; Kuipers, Oscar; Bijlsma, Johanna Jacoba Elisabeth; Kloosterman, Tomas Gerrit; Andersen, Christian O.

    2011-01-01

    The present invention provides proteins/genes, which are essential for survival, and consequently, for virulence of Streptococcus pneumoniae in vivo, and thus are ideal vaccine candidates for a vaccine preparation against pneumococcal infection. Further, also antibodies against said protein(s) are

  9. Acanthamoeba castellanii interactions with Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Yee Ong, Timothy Yu; Jung, Suk Yul; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2017-12-01

    Among the genus Streptococcus, S. pyogenes and S. pneumoniae are the major causes of pharyngitis, impetigo, pneumonia and meningitis in humans. Streptococcus spp. are facultative anaerobes that are nutritionally fastidious, yet survive in the environment and target the predisposed population. Antibacterial disinfectants have been partially effective only, indicating the need for novel preventative measures and to understand mechanisms of bacterial resistance. Acanthamoeba is a free-living protist that is known to harbour microbial pathogens, provide shelter, and assist in their transmission to susceptible population. The overall aim of this study was to determine whether S. pyogenes and S. pneumoniae can interact with A. castellanii by associating, invading, and surviving inside trophozoites and cysts. It was observed that both S. pyogenes and S. pneumoniae were able to associate as well as invade and/or taken up by the phagocytic A. castellanii trophozoite. Notably, S. pyogenes and S. pneumoniae survived the encystation process, avoided phagocytosis, multiplied, and exhibited higher recovery from the mature cysts, compared with the trophozoite stage (approximately 2 bacteria per amoebae ratio for cyst stage versus 0.02 bacteria per amoeba ration for trophozoite stage). As Acanthamoeba cysts are resilient and can disperse through the air, A. castellanii can act as a vector in providing shelter, facilitating growth and possibly genetic exchanges. In addition, these interactions may contribute to S. pyogenes and S. pneumoniae survival in harsh environments, and transmission to susceptible population and possibly affecting their virulence. Future studies will determine the molecular mechanisms associated with Acanthamoeba interactions with Streptococcus and the evolution of pathogenic bacteria and in turn expedite the discovery of novel therapeutic and/or preventative measures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Serotype distribution and antimicrobial resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated in Algiers, Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramdani-Bouguessa, Nadjia; Rahal, Kheira

    2003-02-01

    There are few data on antibiotic resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae in Algeria. Among 309 strains, 34.6% were penicillin G-nonsusceptible S. pneumoniae strains (25.2% were intermediate and 9.4% were resistant). Serotypes 1, 5, 14, and 6 were the most frequent in invasive child infections. A multicenter study to standardize the national guidelines is needed.

  11. Síndrome hemolítico-urêmica relacionada à infecção invasiva pelo Streptococcus pneumoniae Hemolytic-uremic syndrome complicating invasive pneumococcal disease

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    Anna Leticia de O. Cestari

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: A doença pneumocócica é importante problema de saúde pública e raramente há associação desta infecção com a síndrome hemolítico-urêmica (SHU grave. O objetivo deste artigo é relatar o caso de um paciente com esta associação. DESCRIÇÃO DO CASO: Criança do sexo masculino, com 17 meses de idade, admitida no hospital com insuficiência respiratória aguda e necessitando de suporte ventilatório. O exame radiológico mostrava extensa opacidade homogênea em hemitórax direito. A hemocultura foi positiva para Streptococcus pneumoniae. Nos exames de admissão, notaram-se: hemoglobina de 6,5g/dL, 38.000 plaquetas/mm³, uréia de 79mg/dL e creatinina de 1,64mg/dL. No primeiro dia, apresentou oligoanúria e hipervolemia, necessitando de hemodiafiltração. Evoluiu com disfunção de múltiplos órgãos e óbito no sétimo dia. A necrópsia mostrou áreas extensas de necrose cortical e tubular renal, com depósito de fibrina nas arteríolas. COMENTÁRIOS: A SHU associada ao pneumococo apresenta morbidade e mortalidade elevadas. Em crianças com doença pneumocócica invasiva e acometimento hematológico ou renal grave, deve-se estar atento a esta rara complicação. Merecem investigação os seguintes aspectos relacionados à doença: a função da detecção precoce de antígenos T ativados no diagnóstico e terapêutica, o papel do fator H na patogênese, o método ideal de substituição renal e a definição do prognóstico em longo prazo.OBJECTIVE: Pneumococcal diseases are a major public health problem. Severe hemolytic-uremic syndrome is an uncommon complication. The aim of this study is to report a child with this complication. CASE DESCRIPTION: A male child with 17 months old was admitted to the hospital, due to acute respiratory failure, needing ventilatory support. Roentgenogram demonstrated massive condensation of right lung and Streptococcus pneumonia was isolated from blood cultures. Laboratory tests showed

  12. Serotypes and Clonal Diversity of Streptococcus pneumoniae Causing Invasive Disease in the Era of PCV13 in Catalonia, Spain.

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    Eva Del Amo

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to study the serotypes and clonal diversity of pneumococci causing invasive pneumococcal disease in Catalonia, Spain, in the era of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13. In our region, this vaccine is only available in the private market and it is estimated a PCV13 vaccine coverage around 55% in children. A total of 1551 pneumococcal invasive isolates received between 2010 and 2013 in the Molecular Microbiology Department at Hospital Sant Joan de Déu, Barcelona, were included. Fifty-two serotypes and 249 clonal types-defined by MLST-were identified. The most common serotypes were serotype 1 (n = 182; 11.7%, 3 (n = 145; 9.3%, 19A (n = 137; 8.8% and 7F (n = 122; 7.9%. Serotype 14 was the third most frequent serotype in children < 2 years (15 of 159 isolates. PCV7 serotypes maintained their proportion along the period of study, 16.6% in 2010 to 13.4% in 2013, whereas there was a significant proportional decrease in PCV13 serotypes, 65.3% in 2010 to 48.9% in 2013 (p<0.01. This decrease was mainly attributable to serotypes 19A and 7F. Serotype 12F achieved the third position in 2013 (n = 22, 6.4%. The most frequent clonal types found were ST306 (n = 154, 9.9%, ST191 (n = 111, 7.2%, ST989 (n = 85, 5.5% and ST180 (n = 80, 5.2%. Despite their decrease, PCV13 serotypes continue to be a major cause of disease in Spain. These results emphasize the need for complete PCV13 vaccination.

  13. Oropharyngeal Colonization by Streptococcus pneumoniae among Medical Students in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Stella Valencia; Yanti Mulyana; Diah Dhianawaty

    2016-01-01

    Background: Streptococcus pneumoniae may colonize the upper respiratory tract without causing any symptoms. Medical students may be inhabited by these bacteria and transmit them to patients who were prone to infections. Streptococcus pneumoniae resistance to antibiotics was recently reported. This study was conducted to determine whether there was Streptococcus pneumoniae colonization among Medical Students of the Faculty of Medicine Universitas Padjadjaran Batch 2011 and analyze its suscepti...

  14. Population snapshot of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing invasive disease in South Africa prior to introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines.

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    Kedibone M Ndlangisa

    Full Text Available We determined the sequence types of isolates that caused invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD prior to routine use of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV in South Africa. PCV-13 serotypes and 6C isolates collected in 2007 (1 461/2 437, 60% from patients of all ages as part of on-going, national, laboratory-based surveillance for IPD, were selected for genetic characterization. In addition, all 134 non-PCV isolates from children <2 years were selected for characterization. Sequence type diversity by serotype and age category (children <5 years vs. individuals ≥5 years was assessed for PCV serotypes using Simpson's index of diversity. Similar genotypes circulated among isolates from children and adults and the majority of serotypes were heterogeneous. While globally disseminated clones were common among some serotypes (e.g., serotype 1 [clonal complex (CC 217, 98% of all serotype 1] and 14 [CC230, 43%], some were represented mainly by clonal complexes rarely reported elsewhere (e.g., serotype 3 [CC458, 60%] and 19A [CC2062, 83%]. In children <2 years, serotype 15B and 8 were the most common serotypes among non-PCV isolates (16% [22/134] and 15% [20/134] isolates, respectively. Sequence type 7052 and 53 were most common among serotypes 15B and 8 isolates and accounted for 58% (7/12 and 64% (9/14 of the isolates, respectively. Serotype 19F, 14, 19A and 15B had the highest proportions of penicillin non-susceptible isolates. Genotypes rarely reported in other parts of the world but common among some of our serotypes highlight the importance of our data as these genotypes may emerge post PCV introduction.

  15. Streptococcus pneumoniae, mecanismos de resistencia antimicrobiana

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    Amauri Noda Albelo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available El Streptococcus pneumoniae, principal agente causal de la neumonía comunitaria, líder en la etiología de la otitis media y la meningitis, en las últimas 3 décadas ha incrementado, de manera importante, su resistencia a los agentes terapéuticos más utilizados, como los betalactámicos, macrólidos, azálidos y fluroquinolonas. La versatilidad adaptativa del microorganismo le ha permitido crear mecanismos capaces de sobreponerse a cualquiera de estas agresiones terapéuticas con un grado variable de eficacia. Se realiza una revisión de los mecanismos más importantes implicados en la adquisición de resistencia antimicrobiana por S. pneumoniae, y se precisan algunos de los factores de riesgo implicados en infección por S. pneumoniae resistente.

  16. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia induce distinct host responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Kevin W; McDunn, Jonathan E; Clark, Andrew T; Dunne, W Michael; Dixon, David J; Turnbull, Isaiah R; Dipasco, Peter J; Osberghaus, William F; Sherman, Benjamin; Martin, James R; Walter, Michael J; Cobb, J Perren; Buchman, Timothy G; Hotchkiss, Richard S; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2010-01-01

    Pathogens that cause pneumonia may be treated in a targeted fashion by antibiotics, but if this therapy fails, then treatment involves only nonspecific supportive measures, independent of the inciting infection. The purpose of this study was to determine whether host response is similar after disparate infections with similar mortalities. Prospective, randomized controlled study. Animal laboratory in a university medical center. Pneumonia was induced in FVB/N mice by either Streptococcus pneumoniae or two different concentrations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from septic animals was assayed by a microarray immunoassay measuring 18 inflammatory mediators at multiple time points. The host response was dependent on the causative organism as well as kinetics of mortality, but the pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses were independent of inoculum concentration or degree of bacteremia. Pneumonia caused by different concentrations of the same bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, also yielded distinct inflammatory responses; however, inflammatory mediator expression did not directly track the severity of infection. For all infections, the host response was compartmentalized, with markedly different concentrations of inflammatory mediators in the systemic circulation and the lungs. Hierarchical clustering analysis resulted in the identification of five distinct clusters of the host response to bacterial infection. Principal components analysis correlated pulmonary macrophage inflammatory peptide-2 and interleukin-10 with progression of infection, whereas elevated plasma tumor necrosis factor sr2 and macrophage chemotactic peptide-1 were indicative of fulminant disease with >90% mortality within 48 hrs. Septic mice have distinct local and systemic responses to Streptococcus pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. Targeting specific host inflammatory responses induced by distinct bacterial infections could represent a

  17. Distribución de serotipos de Streptococcus pneumoniae aislados de infecciones invasoras en el Hospital de Niños de Santa Fe Serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from invasive infections at the Hospital de Niños of Santa Fe.

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    C. Mayoral

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Con la introducción de vacunas conjugadas antineumocócicas se observó, en muchos países, disminución de aislamientos de Streptococcus pneumoniae del serotipo 14 y aumento de aislamientos correspondientes a serotipos no incluidos en esas vacunas. En 1993, el Hospital de Niños de Santa Fe comenzó la vigilancia de la distribución de serotipos de Streptococcus pneumoniae invasores. En este trabajo se estudió la correlación entre serotipo y a patología (neumonía/meningitis, b edad (menor o mayor de dos años, y c CIM de penicilina, para los serotipos aislados en el período 2003-2005. El serotipo predominante fue el 14, seguido del 1, 6B, 18C, 7F, 19F y 5. El serotipo 14 mostró asociación estadísticamente significativa con valores de CIM de penicilina entre 0,5 y 2 mg/l, no así con alguna patología, aunque se lo halló con mayor frecuencia en neumonías que en meningitis. Los serotipos 14 y 1 prevalecieron en niños menores y mayores de 2 años, respectivamente. La CIM de penicilina = 2 mg/l se observó más en neumonías que en meningitis. La frecuencia relativa de los diferentes serotipos hallados fue semejante a la observada en el período 1993-99; no obstante, los serotipos 18C, 4, 12F y 22F no se habían encontrado antes. La aparición de nuevos serotipos convierte en importante la vigilancia, dada la necesidad de formular vacunas que los incluyan y que efectivamente prevengan las infecciones neumocócicas más comunes.The serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae varies through time. The introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines showed a decreased prevalence of pneumococcal invasive isolates belonging to serotype 14 and an increase of serotypes not therein included. In 1993, the Hospital de Niños of Santa Fe began surveillance of the serotype distribution of invasive S. pneumoniae disease. In the period 2003 - 2005, 76 isolates were analysed by studying the correlation between serotype and pathology, age and MIC

  18. Streptococcus pneumoniae sepsis in the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Atul; Hunt, Rod W; Doherty, Richard R

    2012-02-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP) is an uncommon cause of neonatal sepsis. To report on the spectrum of morbidity associated with SP infections in the neonatal period. A case series of SP infection in the neonatal period was studied. Maternal and neonatal outcomes were noted. Four cases of neonatal SP infection are reported, one of which was due to a strain with reduced susceptibility to penicillin. All four cases had very early onset of severe clinical disease with bacteremia and pneumonia. In one case a retrospective diagnosis of meningitis was made as well. Maternal illness was a feature in one of these infants. Although less common now than in the pre-antibiotic era, Streptococcus pneumoniae remains a rare but important cause of neonatal sepsis and can mimic early onset Group B streptococcal sepsis. It is unclear whether current infant or adult pneumococcal immunisation programs might influence its incidence in the neonatal period. The potential for strains with reduced susceptibility to β-lactam antibiotics to cause neonatal infection needs to be considered in relevant settings. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2010 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  19. Meningitis and pneumonia in Guatemalan children: the importance of Haemophilus influenzae type b and Streptococcus pneumoniae Meningitis y neumonía en niños guatemaltecos: importancia de Haemophilus influenzae tipo b y de Streptococcus pneumoniae

    OpenAIRE

    Edwin J. Asturias; Monica Soto; Ricardo Menendez; Patricia L. Ramirez; Fabio Recinos; Remei Gordillo; Elizabeth Holt; Neal A. Halsey

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the epidemiology of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and Streptococcus pneumoniae invasive infections in hospitalized Guatemalan children. This is an important issue since Hib vaccine has not been incorporated into the routine immunization program in Guatemala and information from hospital records in 1995 indicated a low incidence of Hib and S. pneumoniae as causes of meningitis and invasive infections. METHODS: Children who were hospitalized in Guatemala City with ...

  20. Oropharyngeal Colonization by Streptococcus pneumoniae among Medical Students in Indonesia

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    Stella Valencia

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Streptococcus pneumoniae may colonize the upper respiratory tract without causing any symptoms. Medical students may be inhabited by these bacteria and transmit them to patients who were prone to infections. Streptococcus pneumoniae resistance to antibiotics was recently reported. This study was conducted to determine whether there was Streptococcus pneumoniae colonization among Medical Students of the Faculty of Medicine Universitas Padjadjaran Batch 2011 and analyze its susceptibility patterns towards several antibiotics. Methods: A descriptive study was conducted involving 75 Medical Students of the Faculty of Medicine Universitas Padjadjaran Batch 2011 that met the selection criteria. After informed consent, oropharyngeal throat swab was taken and further identification was carried out. Once Streptococcus pneumoniae colony was identified, susceptibility testing would be performed. Results: The identification results indicate that 7 students (9% were colonized by Streptococcus pneumoniae. The susceptibility test showed that out of 7 isolates, 2 were resistant to 1 antibiotic, 1 was resistant to 2 antibiotics, and 4 were resistant to 3 antibiotics. Meanwhile, Streptococcus pneumoniae was resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (71%, oxacillin (71%, erythromycin (57%, and levofloxacin (14%. Conclusions: Streptococcus pneumoniae colonization is found among medical students. All Streptococcus pneumoniae are resistant to one or more antibiotics, mostly to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and oxacillin.

  1. Prevalence of mef and ermB genes in invasive pediatric erythromycin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from Argentina Prevalencia de los genes mef y ermB en aislamientos invasivos de Streptococcus pneumoniae resistentes a eritromicina recuperados de pacientes pediátricos en Argentina

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    A. Corso

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available During the period 1993-2001, a total of 1,499 pneumococci isolates were recovered through the Argentinean surveillance of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing invasive disease in children under 6 years of age, 3.5% of which were erythromycin resistant. Among the 50 erythromycin-resistant strains available, 58% (n=29 harbored mefA/E genes (15 mefA, 30%; and 14 mefE, 28%, 34% (n=17 ermB, and 6% (n=3 both mefA/E plus ermB genes, while one isolate was negative for all the acquired genes studied. The England14-9 (42%, Poland6B-20 (20% and Spain9v-3 (16% clones were responsible for the emergence of pneumococcal macrolide resistance in pediatric population from Argentina.En el marco del programa de vigilancia regional SIREVA, se analizaron 1499 aislamientos de Streptococcus pneumoniae causantes de enfermedad invasiva en menores de 6 años, recuperados entre 1993 y 2001. Se detectó un 3,5% de resistencia a eritromicina. De los 50 aislamientos resistentes a eritromicina que pudieron ser estudiados, el 58% (n=29 tenían los genes mefA/E (15 mefA, 30% y 14 mefE, 28%, el 34% (n=17 el gen ermB y el 6% (n=3 la combinación de genes mefA/E y ermB. Sólo un aislamiento fue negativo para todos los genes analizados. Los clones internacionales England14-9, Poland6B-20 y Spain9v-3 representaron el 78% del total de aislamientos resistentes (42, 20 y 16%, respectivamente y se consideraron los responsables de la emergencia de la resistencia a macrólidos entre los neumococos que afectan a la población pediátrica de Argentina.

  2. Purpura Fulminans Secondary to Streptococcus pneumoniae Meningitis

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    Erick F. Alvarez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpura fulminans (PF is a rare skin disorder with extensive areas of blueblack hemorrhagic necrosis. Patients manifest typical laboratory signs of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC. Our case describes a 37-year-old previously healthy man who presented with 3 days of generalized malaise, headache, vomiting, photophobia, and an ecchymotic skin rash. Initial laboratory workup revealed DIC without obvious infectious trigger including unremarkable cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biochemical analysis. There was further progression of the skin ecchymosis and multiorgan damage consistent with PF. Final CSF cultures revealed Streptococcus pneumoniae. Despite normal initial CSF biochemical analysis, bacterial meningitis should always be considered in patients with otherwise unexplained DIC as this may be an early manifestation of infection. PF is a clinical diagnosis that requires early recognition and prompt empirical treatment, especially, in patients with progressive altered mental status, ecchymotic skin rash, and DIC.

  3. Lung abscess due to Streptococcus pneumoniae simulating pulmonary tuberculosis: presentation of two cases

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    Alessandro Perazzo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In the past, anaerobes were the most common cause of community-acquired lung abscess; Streptococcus species were the second most common cause. In recent years, this has changed. Klebsiella pneumoniae is now most common cause of community- acquired lung abscess, although Streptococcus species remain pathogen of major importance. We present two cases of pulmonary cavitation due to Streptococcus pneumoniae which resembled pulmonary tuberculosis with regards to their history and radiological findings. These are examples of a common diagnosis presenting in an uncommon way. Our cases had some peculiarities: they had a clinical picture strongly suggestive of pulmonary tuberculosis or lung cancer rather than necrotizing infectious pneumonia in patients with no comorbidities or underlying diseases (including oral or dental pathologies. Radiological findings did not help the clinicians: pulmonary tuberculosis was the first diagnostic hypothesis in both cases. An underlying lung cancer was excluded in the first case only after invasive pulmonary procedures.

  4. Case Report of Necrotizing Fasciitis Associated with Streptococcus pneumoniae

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    Lei Jiao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis, caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, is an extremely rare and life-threatening bacterial soft tissue infection. We report a case of early necrotizing fasciitis associated with Streptococcus pneumoniae infection in a 26-year-old man who was immunocompromised with mixed connective tissue disease. The patient presented with acute, painful, erythematous, and edematous skin lesions of his right lower back, which rapidly progressed to the right knee. The patient underwent surgical exploration, and a diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis was confirmed by pathological evidence of necrosis of the fascia and neutrophil infiltration in tissue biopsies. Cultures of fascial tissue biopsies and blood samples were positive for Streptococcus pneumoniae. To our knowledge, this is the first report of necrotizing fasciitis resulting from Streptococcus pneumoniae diagnosed at early phase; the patient recovered well without surgical debridement.

  5. Polymeric immunoglobulin receptor-mediated invasion of Streptococcus pneumoniae into host cells requires a coordinate signaling of SRC family of protein-tyrosine kinases, ERK, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Vaibhav; Asmat, Tauseef M; Dierdorf, Nina I; Hauck, Christof R; Hammerschmidt, Sven

    2010-11-12

    Streptococcus pneumoniae are commensals of the human nasopharynx with the capacity to invade mucosal respiratory cells. PspC, a pneumococcal surface protein, interacts with the human polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) to promote bacterial adherence to and invasion into epithelial cells. Internalization of pneumococci requires the coordinated action of actin cytoskeleton rearrangements and the retrograde machinery of pIgR. Here, we demonstrate the involvement of Src protein-tyrosine kinases (PTKs), focal adhesion kinase (FAK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) but not p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) in pneumococcal invasion via pIgR. Pharmacological inhibitors of PTKs and MAPKs and genetic interference with Src PTK and FAK functions caused a significant reduction of pIgR-mediated pneumococcal invasion but did not influence bacterial adhesion to host cells. Furthermore, pneumococcal ingestion by host cells induces activation of ERK1/2 and JNK. In agreement with activated JNK, its target molecule and DNA-binding protein c-Jun was phosphorylated. We also show that functionally active Src PTK is essential for activation of ERK1/2 upon pneumococcal infections. In conclusion, these data illustrate the importance of a coordinated signaling between Src PTKs, ERK1/2, and JNK during PspC-pIgR-mediated uptake of pneumococci by host epithelial cells.

  6. Impacto de la resistencia a antimicrobianos y de serotipos de Streptococcus pneumoniae en la mortalidad de niños menores de 5 años con enfermedad invasora The impact of antimicrobial resistance and capsular type distribution on the mortality of children under 5 years of age with invasive disease caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae

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    Ana María Ríos

    1999-02-01

    antimicrobianos. En el desarrollo de una vacuna deberían tenerse en cuenta las diferencias de mortalidad según los serotipos, a fin de lograr un mayor impacto en la morbilidad y mortalidad infantiles por enfermedad de origen neumocócico.Severe pneumonia and meningitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae have been persistently associated with high mortality rates, despite advances in antimicrobial therapy and the development of vaccines. Resistance to penicillin and other antimicrobial agents is increasing and spreading worldwide. Even though risk factors for development of antimicrobial resistance have been identified, their influence on mortality has not been clarified. With regard to virulence, differences among serotypes have been determined, but their impact on mortality is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the risk factors associated with mortality in children with invasive pneumococcal disease. Clinical records for 245 children under 5 years of age with invasive disease due to S. pneumoniae were reviewed. Children were diagnosed between 1994 and 1996 in Colombia, during the study of S. pneumoniae capsular types conducted by the Pan American Health Organization's Regional System for Vaccines. Of the 245 patients whose charts were examined, 29 (11% died. No significant differences in age, gender, underlying disease, nor antimicrobial treatment concordance were found. Variables associated with mortality in the univariate analysis were a diagnosis of meningitis; antimicrobial resistance to penicillin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMS, or erythromycin; multiresistance, and serotypes 6, 23F, 7F, 8, and 35B. In the logistic regression, serotypes 7F (OR = 7,13; P = 0,04 and 8 (OR = 13,8; P = 0,07, polipnea (OR = 2,74; P = 0,03, meningitis (OR = 5,02; P = 0,0001 and TMS resistance (OR = 2,62; P = 0,02 continued to be associated with mortality. In patients with pneumonia, serotype was the factor most consistently associated with mortality; in meningitis patients, it

  7. Meningitis and pneumonia in Guatemalan children: the importance of Haemophilus influenzae type b and Streptococcus pneumoniae

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    Edwin J. Asturias

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the epidemiology of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib and Streptococcus pneumoniae invasive infections in hospitalized Guatemalan children. This is an important issue since Hib vaccine has not been incorporated into the routine immunization program in Guatemala and information from hospital records in 1995 indicated a low incidence of Hib and S. pneumoniae as causes of meningitis and invasive infections. METHODS: Children who were hospitalized in Guatemala City with clinical signs compatible with bacterial infections were evaluated for evidence of Hib or S. pneumoniae infection. Normally sterile body fluids were cultured, and antigen detection was performed on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and pleural fluid. RESULTS: Of 1 203 children 1-59 months of age hospitalized over a 28-month period, 725 of them (60.3% had a primary diagnosis of pneumonia, 357 (29.7% of meningitis, 60 (5.0% of cellulitis, and 61 (5.1% of sepsis and other conditions. Hib was identified in 20.0% of children with meningitis and S. pneumoniae in 12.9%. The average annual incidence of Hib meningitis was 13.8 cases per 100 000 children under 5 years of age, and 32.4% of meningitides caused by Hib and 58.7% of S. pneumoniae meningitides occurred prior to 6 months of age. Case fatality rates were 14.1%, 37.0%, and 18.0%, respectively, for children with Hib, S. pneumoniae, and culture-negative and antigen-negative meningitis. Prior antibiotic therapy was common and was associated with significant reductions in CSF-culture-positive results for children with other evidence of Hib or S. pneumoniae meningitis. CONCLUSIONS: Improvements in case detection, culture methods, and latex agglutination for antigen detection in CSF resulted in identification of Hib and S. pneumoniae as important causes of severe disease in Guatemalan children. Using a cutoff of > 10 white blood cells per cubic millimeter in CSF would improve the sensitivity for detection of bacterial

  8. Evolution of Streptococcus pneumoniae and its close commensal relatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilian, Mogens; Poulsen, Knud; Blomqvist, Trinelise

    2008-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a member of the Mitis group of streptococci which, according to 16S rRNA-sequence based phylogenetic reconstruction, includes 12 species. While other species of this group are considered prototypes of commensal bacteria, S. pneumoniae is among the most frequent microbial...

  9. Genome-wide identification of Streptococcus pneumoniae genes essential for bacterial replication during experimental meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molzen, T E; Burghout, P; Bootsma, H J

    2010-01-01

    Meningitis is the most serious of invasive infections caused by the Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae. Vaccines protect only against a limited number of serotypes, and evolving bacterial resistance to antimicrobials impedes treatment. Further insight into the molecular pathogenesis...... of invasive pneumococcal disease is required in order to enable the development of new or adjunctive treatments and/or pneumococcal vaccines that are efficient across serotypes. We applied genomic array footprinting (GAF) in the search for S. pneumoniae genes that are essential during experimental meningitis...

  10. Characterization and transfer studies of macrolide resistance genes in Streptococcus pneumoniae from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karen L; Hammerum, Anette M; Lambertsen, Lotte M

    2010-01-01

    Over the last decade, erythromycin resistance has been increasing in frequency in Streptococcus pneumoniae in Denmark. In the present study, 49 non-related erythromycin-resistant S. pneumoniae isolates from invasive sites and 20 isolates from non-invasive sites were collected; antimicrobial...... influence on the protein. Transformation was detectable in 5 out of 13 isolates and transfer of erm(B), mef(I) and mef(E) was detected. To our knowledge, this is the first time mef(I) has been proved transformable. Gene transfer by conjugation was not detectable. Erythromycin resistance in pneumococcal...

  11. Community-based outbreaks in vulnerable populations of invasive infections caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes 5 and 8 in Calgary, Canada.

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    Otto G Vanderkooi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Outbreaks of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD typically occur within institutions. Beginning in 2005, we detected an increase in serotype (ST 5 and ST8 IPD cases, predominantly in homeless persons living in an open community. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: CASPER (Calgary Area S. pneumoniae Epidemiology Research surveillance study of all IPD (sterile site isolates in our region (pop ~1,100,000. Interviews and chart reviews of all cases and all isolates phenotypically analyzed and selected isolated tested by multi-locus sequence typing (MLST. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: During 2005-2007, 162 cases of ST5 IPD and 45 cases of ST8 IPD were identified. The isolates demonstrated phenotypic and genotypic clonality. The ST5 isolates were sequence type (ST 289 and demonstrated intermediate susceptibility to TMP-SMX. The ST8 isolates were predominantly ST1268, with a susceptible antimicrobial susceptibility profile. Individuals with ST5 IPD were more likely to be middle aged (OR 2.6, homeless (OR 4.4, using illicit drugs(OR 4.8, and asthmatic(OR 2.6. Those with ST8 were more likely to be male (OR 4.4, homeless (OR 2.6, aboriginal (OR7.3, and a current smoker (OR 2.5. Overlapping outbreaks of ST5 and ST8 IPD occurred in an open community in Calgary, Canada and homelessness was a predominant risk factor. Homelessness represents a unique community in which pneumococcal outbreaks can occur.

  12. Biofilm Formation Enhances Fomite Survival of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes

    OpenAIRE

    Marks, Laura R.; Reddinger, Ryan M.; Hakansson, Anders P.

    2014-01-01

    Both Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus pneumoniae are widely thought to rapidly die outside the human host, losing infectivity following desiccation in the environment. However, to date, all literature investigating the infectivity of desiccated streptococci has used broth-grown, planktonic populations. In this study, we examined the impact of biofilm formation on environmental survival of clinical and laboratory isolates of S. pyogenes and S. pneumoniae as both organisms are thought t...

  13. Mixed Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes meningitis in an immunocompromised adult patient: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demerle, Clémence; Ivanov, Vadim; Mercier, Cédric; Costello, Régis; Drancourt, Michel

    2015-11-29

    Community-acquired meningitis is a monomicrobial infection caused by either viruses or bacteria in the vast majority of patients. We report here one exceptional case of a patient with mixed bacterial meningitis due to Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes. We report the case of a 68-year-old immunocompromised Caucasian man suffering from otitis and then meningitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes. Bacteria were undistinguishable by direct microscopic examination of the cerebrospinal fluid. He responded well to treatment with cefotaxime and dexamethasone, with no sequelae observed at the 4-month follow-up. This first reported case of mixed S. pneumoniae and S. pyogenes meningitis illustrates the life-threatening consequences of barotrauma in immunocompromised patients suffering from otorhinolaryngeal infections.

  14. Demographic profile of healthy children with nasopharyngeal colonisation ofStreptococcus pneumoniae: A research paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Radhika; Sankar, Janani; Putlibai, Sulochana; Raghavan, Vaidehi

    2017-01-01

    Pneumonia is a preventable cause of mortality in children. Streptococcus pneumoniae colonising the nasopharynx of healthy children can cause invasive diseases and the serotype distribution of colonisation isolates should be an indicator of invasive disease, antibiotic resistance profiles, and potential vaccine coverage. Identifying factors influencing nasopharyngeal colonisation, the serotypes and antimicrobial resistance pattern can improve rational preventive strategies. Identify risk factors associated with nasopharyngeal colonisation of S.pneumoniae in healthy children between 6 months to 5 years of age. Determine the serotype and antibiotic sensitivity of S. pneumoniae isolated from nasopharynx of healthy children. This prospective observational included 500 healthy children, 6months to 5 years of age. Demographic features of the study population, the serotypes and antimicrobial sensitivity pattern of S.Pneumoniae isolated from cultures of nasopharyngeal swabs were subjected to statistical analysis. S. pneumoniae was isolated in 9% of 450 children. Increased nasopharyngeal carriage rate was associated with overcrowding 48.8% and poor ventilation 35.5%. 6B (n=16) was the most common serotype isolated. 69% were serogroups known to cause invasive disease All S. pneumoniae isolates were susceptible to vancomycin and linezolid. Antimicrobial susceptibility of PCV 7 serotypes were greater than non PCV 7 serotypes for almost all antimicrobials tested. Penicillin resistance was 11 % and MDR 51.

  15. Demographic profile of healthy children with nasopharyngeal colonisation of Streptococcus pneumoniae: A research paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika Raman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pneumonia is a preventable cause of mortality in children. Streptococcus pneumoniae colonising the nasopharynx of healthy children can cause invasive diseases and the serotype distribution of colonisation isolates should be an indicator of invasive disease, antibiotic resistance profiles, and potential vaccine coverage. Identifying factors influencing nasopharyngeal colonisation, the serotypes and antimicrobial resistance pattern can improve rational preventive strategies. Objectives: Identify risk factors associated with nasopharyngeal colonisation of S.pneumoniae in healthy children between 6 months to 5 years of age. Determine the serotype and antibiotic sensitivity of S. pneumoniae isolated from nasopharynx of healthy children. Methods: This prospective observational included 500 healthy children, 6months to 5 years of age. Demographic features of the study population, the serotypes and antimicrobial sensitivity pattern of S.Pneumoniae isolated from cultures of nasopharyngeal swabs were subjected to statistical analysis. Results: S. pneumoniae was isolated in 9% of 450 children. Increased nasopharyngeal carriage rate was associated with overcrowding 48.8% and poor ventilation 35.5%. 6B (n=16 was the most common serotype isolated. 69% were serogroups known to cause invasive disease All S. pneumoniae isolates were susceptible to vancomycin and linezolid. Antimicrobial susceptibility of PCV 7 serotypes were greater than non PCV 7 serotypes for almost all antimicrobials tested. Penicillin resistance was 11 % and MDR 51%

  16. Outbreak of Streptococcus pneumoniae in a Psychiatric Unit

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-11-02

    Dr. Katherine Fleming-Dutra, an epidemiologist at CDC, discusses her investigation of a Streptococcus pneumoniae outbreak in a pediatric psychiatric unit.  Created: 11/2/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID); National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 11/5/2012.

  17. Community-acquired Streptococcus viridans pneumonia in a healthy child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Fang-Yih; Wang, Chih-Chien; Chang, Yaw-Wen; Chen, Shyi-Jou

    2012-04-01

    Streptococcus viridans is usually considered to be nonpathogenic in healthy patients. Some strains become penicillin-resistant and cause life-threatening infections in immuno-compromised patients. We report an immunocompetent boy who had community-acquired S. viridans pneumonia that was resistant to penicillin. Clinicians should note local patterns of virulence and antibiotic resistance in S. viridans and adjust treatment strategies accordingly.

  18. Parallel Evolution of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus mitis to Pathogenic and Mutualistic Lifestyles

    OpenAIRE

    Kilian, Mogens; Riley, David R.; Jensen, Anders; Brüggemann, Holger; Tettelin, Hervé

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae is one of the leading causes of fatal infections affecting humans. Intriguingly, phylogenetic analysis shows that the species constitutes one evolutionary lineage in a cluster of the otherwise commensal Streptococcus mitis strains, with which humans live in harmony. In a comparative analysis of 35 genomes, including phylogenetic analyses of all predicted genes, we have shown that the pathogenic pneumococcus has evolved into a master of genomic f...

  19. Clinical behavior of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningoencephalitis Comportamiento clinico y terapéutico de la meningoencefalitis por Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raisa Bu-Coifiu Fanego

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: There was an increased number of cases of meningoencephalitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, after the successful vaccination campaigns against Neisseria meningitidis and Haemophilus influenzae. This paper aims at describing the clinical characteristics, the laboratory findings, the complications, and the therapeutic management of these patients, who have been suffering from this disease since 1993 to 2006. METHOD: Twelve children with Streptococcus pneumoniae meningoencephalitis admitted to the pediatric hospital of San Miguel del Padron, City of Havana in this period were assessed. RESULTS: Children under one year are the most frequently affected. Septic shock and brain edema were the most severe complications. Three patients died, implying that this disease has a serious course. Early treatment of brain edema is very important to reduce mortality. The elective drugs for treatment of these cases of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningoencephalitis were vancomycin combined with cephalosporin, cefotaxime or ceftriaxone type. CONCLUSION: Patients with Streptococcus pneumoniae meningoencephalitis show clinical characteristics, complications, and sequels that are different to other bacterial meningoencephalitis, meaning that they could be helpful for physicians considering the differential diagnosis of meningoencephalitis.OBJETIVO: Existe un incremento de la meningoencefalitis producida por Streptococcus pneumoniae, después de las campañas exitosas de vacunación contra Neisseria meningitidis y Haemophilus influenzae. El objetivo de este trabajo es describir las caracteristicas clinicas, los hallazgos de laboratorio, las complicaciones y el manejo terapéutico de los pacientes que sufrieron esta enfermedad desde 1993 a 2006. MÉTODO: Se estudiaron doce niños con meningoencefalitis por Streptococcus pneumoniae ingresados en el Hospital Pediátrico de San Miguel del Padrón, Ciudad de La Habana en este periodo. RESULTADOS: Los ni

  20. Factors associated with colonization of Streptococcus pneumoniae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    -fives attending clinic in Mwanza City, Tanzania. ... Number of children at home, positive HIV status and someone smoking showed association with S. pneumoniae carriage but the differences were not statistically significant. The resistance ...

  1. Nasopharyngeal carriage of Streptococcus pneumonia in pneumonia-prone age groups in Semarang, Java Island, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farida, Helmia; Severin, Juliëtte A; Gasem, M Hussein; Keuter, Monique; Wahyono, Hendro; van den Broek, Peterhans; Hermans, Peter W M; Verbrugh, Henri A

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a worldwide occurring pathogen Nasopharyngeal carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae precedes pneumonia and other pneumococcal diseases in the community. Little is known about S. pneumoniae carriage in Indonesia, complicating strategies to control pneumococcal diseases. We investigated nasopharyngeal carriage of S. pneumoniae in Semarang, Indonesia. A population-based survey was performed in Semarang, Indonesia. Nasopharyngeal swabs and questionnaires were taken from 496 healthy young (6-60 month-old) children and 45-70 year-old adults. Forty-three percent of children aged 6-60 months and 11% of adults aged 45-75 years carried S. pneumoniae. Determinants of carriage were being a child (OR 7.7; 95% CI = 4.5-13.0), passive smoking (OR 2.1; 95% CI = 1.3-3.4), and contact with toddler(s) at home (OR 3.0; 95% CI = 1.9-4.7). The most frequent serotypes found were 6A/B and 15B/C. The current commercially available vaccines cover <50% serotypes found in children. Twenty-four percent of S. pneumoniae strains were penicillin non-susceptible, and 45% were resistant to cotrimoxazol. The limited coverage of commercially available vaccines against the serotypes found in this population, and the high proportion of non-susceptibility to penicillin and cotrimoxazol suggest the need for region-specific information and strategies to control S. pneumoniae.

  2. Cross-protective mucosal immunity mediated by memory Th17 cells against Streptococcus pneumoniae lung infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Jiang, B; Guo, Y; Li, W; Tian, Y; Sonnenberg, G F; Weiser, J N; Ni, X; Shen, H

    2017-01-01

    Pneumonia caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae (Sp) remains a leading cause of serious illness and death worldwide. Immunization with conjugated pneumococcal vaccine has lowered the colonization rate and consequently invasive diseases by inducing serotype-specific antibodies. However, many of the current pneumonia cases result from infection by serotype strains not included in the vaccine. In this study, we asked if cross-protection against lung infection by heterologous strains can be induced, and investigated the underlying immune mechanism. We found that immune mice recovered from a prior infection were protected against heterologous Sp strains in the pneumonia challenge model, as evident by accelerated bacterial clearance, reduced pathology, and apoptosis of lung epithelial cells. Sp infection in the lung induced strong T-helper type 17 (Th17) responses at the lung mucosal site. Transfer of CD4 + T cells from immune mice provided heterologous protection against pneumonia, and this protection was abrogated by interleukin-17A (IL-17A) blockade. Transfer of memory CD4 + T cells from IL-17A-knockout mice failed to provide protection. These results indicate that memory Th17 cells had a key role in providing protection against pneumonia in a serotype-independent manner and suggest the feasibility of developing a broadly protective vaccine against bacterial pneumonia by targeting mucosal Th17 T cells.

  3. Impacto de Streptococcus pneumoniae en las neumonías del niño latinoamericano Impact of Streptococcus pneumoniae in pneumonias of Latin American children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Hortal

    2000-09-01

    xico (47,0% y los menores a Colombia (12,1%. La resistencia a la penicilina se asoció con un reducido número de serotipos capsulares, fundamentalmente el 14 y el 23F, el primero resistente a la penicilina y a la trimetoprima-sulfametoxazol, y el segundo multirresistente. La frecuencia de la resistencia a la trimetoprima-sulfametoxazol fue elevada en todos los países y el valor máximo correspondió a Argentina (58,0%. La disminución de la susceptibilidad al cloranfenicol tuvo baja frecuencia, salvo en Colombia (23,4%. La resistencia a la eritromicina fue baja en todos los países y todos los aislados fueron sensibles a la vancomicina.Community-acquired pneumonia is one of the leading causes of infant morbidity and mortality. Studies conducted in developing countries indicate that the most serious symptoms of pneumonia are associated with bacterial causes, mainly Streptococcus pneumoniae, followed by Haemophilus influenzae type b. Managing those infections in children under two years of age is hindered by the lack of appropriate vaccines and by the decreased susceptibility of S. pneumoniae to penicillin and other antibiotics. In 1993, at the initiative of the Regional System for Vaccines of the Pan American Health Organization, and with funding from the Canadian International Development Agency, a study was designed to identify the S. pneumoniae capsular types that cause invasive disease in Latin American children under 5 years of age. The objective of the study was to determine the ideal composition of a conjugate vaccine that could be used in Latin America, and the penicillin susceptibility of the S. pneumoniae isolates. The initiative was undertaken in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, and Uruguay. This report analyzes the information that the participating countries generated on pneumococcal pneumonia. A total of 3 393 children were found with systemic S. pneumoniae infections, of which 1 578 corresponded to pneumonias. The analysis focused on 1 409 cases

  4. Significant variation in transformation frequency in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Benjamin A; Rozen, Daniel E

    2013-01-01

    The naturally transformable bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae is able to take up extracellular DNA and incorporate it into its genome. Maintaining natural transformation within a species requires that the benefits of transformation outweigh its costs. Although much is known about the distribution of natural transformation among bacterial species, little is known about the degree to which transformation frequencies vary within species. Here we find that there is significant variation in transformation frequency between strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from asymptomatic carriage, and that this variation is not concordant with isolate genetic relatedness. Polymorphism in the signalling system regulating competence is also not causally related to differences in transformation frequency, although this polymorphism does influence the degree of genetic admixture experienced by bacterial strains. These data suggest that bacteria can evolve new transformation frequencies over short evolutionary timescales. This facility may permit cells to balance the potential costs and benefits of transformation by regulating transformation frequency in response to environmental conditions. PMID:23303370

  5. Neutrophil evasion strategies by Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Megan L; Surewaard, Bas G J

    2018-03-01

    Humans are well equipped to defend themselves against bacteria. The innate immune system employs diverse mechanisms to recognize, control and initiate a response that can destroy millions of different microbes. Microbes that evade the sophisticated innate immune system are able to escape detection and could become pathogens. The pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus are particularly successful due to the development of a wide variety of virulence strategies for bacterial pathogenesis and they invest significant efforts towards mechanisms that allow for neutrophil evasion. Neutrophils are a primary cellular defense and can rapidly kill invading microbes, which is an indispensable function for maintaining host health. This review compares the key features of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus in epidemiology, with a specific focus on virulence mechanisms utilized to evade neutrophils in bacterial pathogenesis. It is important to understand the complex interactions between pathogenic bacteria and neutrophils so that we can disrupt the ability of pathogens to cause disease.

  6. Detection and quantification of Streptococcus pneumoniae from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-05

    Oct 5, 2011 ... pneumonia and bronco alveolar lavage (BAL) from HAP patients were cultured. The swabbed specimens were held on tubes containing 2 ml of 0.85% NaCl and vortex for 30 s. They were subsequently cultured on sheep blood agar, gentamicin blood agar and thioglycholate broth using calibrated loop ...

  7. Significant variation in transformation frequency in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Benjamin A; Rozen, Daniel E

    2013-01-01

    The naturally transformable bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae is able to take up extracellular DNA and incorporate it into its genome. Maintaining natural transformation within a species requires that the benefits of transformation outweigh its costs. Although much is known about the distribution of natural transformation among bacterial species, little is known about the degree to which transformation frequencies vary within species. Here we find that there is significant variation in trans...

  8. Streptococcus group B positive mothers and neonatal pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Zisovska, Elizabeta; Pehcevska, Nevena

    2013-01-01

    Background: Maternal vaginal swabs positive for Streptococcus group B (GBS) can cause severe infections in newborns. The aims of this study were: to identufy the rate of neonatal pneumonia in GBS positive mothers, GBS negative mothers, and mothers with unknown bacterial status. The positive predictive value of GBS positive status for neonatal plenumonia is only 23,5%, but the negative predictive value is 91%, which means that the GBS negative mothers have really low risk for having baby w...

  9. Correlations between computed tomography findings and clinical manifestations of Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagihashi, Kunihiro; Kurihara, Yasuyuki; Fujikawa, Atsuko; Matsuoka, Shin; Nakajima, Yasuo

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the imaging features and compare computed tomography (CT) findings with clinical features of patients with Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia. We retrospectively reviewed 75 patients (44 men, 31 women; mean age 67 years) diagnosed with S. pneumoniae pneumonia who underwent chest CT scanning at our institution between January 2007 and August 2008. Diagnoses were based on detection of the S. pneumoniae antigen in urine. Chest CT scans revealed abnormalities in all patients. The predominant opacity patterns were an airspace pneumonia pattern (48%) and a bronchopneumonia pattern (48%), followed by an interstitial pneumonia pattern (4%). Consolidation was observed most frequently (84%) followed by ground glass opacity (82.7%), bronchial wall thickening (61.3%), and centrilobular nodules (49.3%). Airway dilatation (21.6%), pleural effusion (33.3%), lymphadenopathy (34.8%), and pulmonary emphysema (21.3%) were also observed. Pulmonary emphysema was significantly less frequent in patients with the bronchopneumonia pattern than in those without (p=0.007). The clinical features and CT findings did not differ significantly. CT image analysis showed that patients with S. pneumoniae pneumonia exhibited the bronchopneumonia and airspace pneumonia patterns with equal frequency. Bronchopneumonia pattern was less common in patients with preexisting emphysema. (author)

  10. Ten years of surveillance for invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae during the era of antiretroviral scale-up and cotrimoxazole prophylaxis in Malawi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean B Everett

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available To document trends in invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD in a central hospital in Malawi during the period of national scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART and cotrimoxazole prophylaxis.Between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2009 almost 100,000 blood cultures and 40,000 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF cultures were obtained from adults and children admitted to the Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Blantyre, Malawi with suspected severe bacterial infection.4,445 pneumococcal isolates were obtained over the 10 year period. 1,837 were from children: 885 (19.9% from blood and 952 (21.4% from CSF. 2,608 were from adults: 1,813 (40.8% from blood and 795 (17.9% from CSF. At the start of the surveillance period cotrimoxazole resistance was 73.8% and at the end was 92.6%. Multidrug resistance (MDR was present in almost one third of isolates and was constant over time. Free ART was introduced in Malawi in 2004. From 2005 onwards there was a decline in invasive pneumococcal infections with a negative correlation between ART scale-up and the decline in IPD (Pearson's correlation r = -0.91; p<0.001.During 2004-2009, national ART scale-up in Malawi was associated with a downward trend in IPD at QECH. The introduction of cotrimoxazole prophylaxis in HIV-infected groups has not coincided with a further increase in pneumococcal cotrimoxazole or multidrug resistance. These data highlight the importance of surveillance for high disease burden infections such as IPD in the region, which will be vital for monitoring pneumococcal conjugate vaccine introduction into national immunisation programmes.

  11. Structure of a conjugative element in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vijayakumar, M.N.; Priebe, S.D.; Guild, W.R.

    1986-06-01

    The authors have cloned and mapped a 69-kilobase (kb) region of the chromosome of Streptococcus pneumoniae DP1322, which carries the conjugative Omega(cat-tet) insertion from S. pneumoniae BM6001. This element proved to be 65.5 kb in size. Location of the junctions was facilitated by cloning a preferred target region from the wild-type strain Rx1 recipient genome. This target site was preferred by both the BM6001 element and the cat-erm-tet element from Streptococcus agalactiae B109. Within the BM6001 element cat and tet were separated by 30 kb, and cat was flanked by two copies of a sequence that was also present in the recipient strain Rx1 DNA. Another sequence at least 2.4 kb in size was found inside the BM6001 element and at two places in the Rx1 genome. Its role is unknown. The ends of the BM6001 element appear to be the same as those of the B109 element, both as seen after transfer to S. pneumoniae and as mapped by others in pDP5 after transposition in Streptococcus faecalis. No homology is seen between the ends of the BM6001 element and no evidence found suggesting that it ever circularizes.

  12. [Streptococcus pneumoniae of lesser sensitivity to penicillin in the Sfax region, Tunisia (1994-1995)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feki-Berrajah, L; Mahjoubi-Rhimi, F; Karray-Hakim, H; Ben Salah-Maaloul, F; Kallel, C; Hammami, A

    1998-05-01

    In the last fifteen years, the frequency of Streptococcus pneumoniae resistance to penicillin has been regularly increasing with various degrees in different geographical zones. In order to determine the epidemiological situation in our region, we studied penicillin G susceptibility of S. pneumoniae strains isolated in our laboratory for 2 years 1994 and 1995. The S. pneumoniae strains with reduced susceptibility to penicillin G (PSDP) were detected by oxacillin screen test (using 1 microgram oxacillin disk) and completed with the determination of penicillin G MIC. We isolated 107 S. pneumoniae strains (41 in 1994 and 66 in 1995); 12 of them had reduced susceptibility to penicillin (11.2%). The study showed a difference in the percentage of penicillin susceptibility between invasive (5.1%) and non invasive strains (28.6%). The rate of strains with reduced susceptibility to penicillin increased from 7.3% in 1994 to 13.6% in 1995 with a higher degree of resistance in 1995. We concluded that our region is not spared from the problem of the decreased susceptibility to penicillin G of S. pneumoniae. These results should prompt us to survey the evolution of such resistance.

  13. Streptococcus pneumoniae Is Desiccation Tolerant and Infectious upon Rehydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Rebecca L.; Camilli, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is a frequent colonizer of the nasopharynx and one of the leading causative agents of otitis media, pneumonia, and meningitis. The current literature asserts that S. pneumoniae is transmitted person to person via respiratory droplets; however, environmental surfaces (fomites) have been linked to the spread of other respiratory pathogens. Desiccation tolerance has been to shown to be essential for long-term survival on dry surfaces. This study investigated the survival and infectivity of S. pneumoniae following desiccation under ambient conditions. We recovered viable bacteria after all desiccation periods tested, ranging from 1 h to 4 weeks. Experiments conducted under nutrient limitation indicate that desiccation is a condition separate from starvation. Desiccation of an acapsular mutant and 15 different clinical isolates shows that S. pneumoniae desiccation tolerance is independent of the polysaccharide capsule and is a species-wide phenomenon, respectively. Experiments demonstrating that nondesiccated and desiccated S. pneumoniae strains colonize the nasopharynx at comparable levels, combined with their ability to survive long-term desiccation, suggest that fomites may serve as alternate sources of pneumococcal infection. PMID:21610120

  14. Serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing invasive disease in children in the post-PCV era: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn Balsells

    Full Text Available Routine immunisation with pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV7/10/13 has reduced invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD due to vaccine serotypes significantly. However, an increase in disease due to non-vaccine types, or serotype replacement, has been observed. Serotypes' individual contributions to IPD play a critical role in determining the overall effects of PCVs. This study examines the distribution of pneumococcal serotypes in children to identify leading serotypes associated with IPD post-PCV introduction.A systematic search was performed to identify studies and surveillance reports (published between 2000 and December 2015 of pneumococcal serotypes causing childhood IPD post-PCV introduction. Serotype data were differentiated based on the PCV administered during the study period: PCV7 or higher valent PCVs (PCV10 or PCV13. Meta-analysis was conducted to estimate the proportional contributions of the most frequent serotypes in childhood IPD in each period.We identified 68 studies reporting serotype data among IPD cases in children. We analysed data from 38 studies (14 countries where PCV7 was administered and 20 (24 countries where PCV10 or PCV13 have been introduced. Studies reported early and late periods of PCV7 administration (range: 2001∓13. In these settings, serotype 19A was the most predominant cause of childhood IPD, accounting for 21.8% (95%CI 18.6∓25.6 of cases. In countries that have introduced higher valent PCVs, study periods were largely representative of the transition and early years of PCV10 or PCV13. In these studies, the overall serotype-specific contribution of 19A was lower (14.2% 95%CI 11.1∓18.3. Overall, non-PCV13 serotypes contributed to 42.2% (95%CI 36.1∓49.5% of childhood IPD cases. However, regional differences were noted (57.8% in North America, 71.9% in Europe, 45.9% in Western Pacific, 28.5% in Latin America, 42.7% in one African country, and 9.2% in one Eastern Mediterranean country. Predominant non

  15. Antimicrobial Susceptibility/Resistance of Streptococcus Pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karcic, Emina; Aljicevic, Mufida; Bektas, Sabaheta; Karcic, Bekir

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Pneumococcal infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, whose treatment is threatened with an increase in the number of strains resistant to antibiotic therapy. Goal: The main goal of this research was to investigate the presence of antimicrobial susceptibility/resistance of S. pneumoniae. Material and methods: Taken are swabs of the nose and nasopharynx, eye and ear. In vitro tests that were made in order to study the antimicrobial resistance of pneumococci are: disk diffusion method and E-test. Results: The resistance to inhibitors of cell wall synthesis was recorded at 39.17%, protein synthesis inhibitors 19.67%, folate antagonists 47.78% and quinolone in 1.11%. S. pneumoniae has shown drug resistance to erythromycin in 45%, clindamycin in 45%, chloramphenicol–0.56%, rifampicin–6.11%, tetracycline–4.67%, penicillin-G in 4.44%, oxacillin in 73.89%, ciprofloxacin in 1.11% and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole in 5.34% of cases. Conclusion: The highest resistance pneumococcus showed to erythromycin, clindamycin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and these should be avoided in the treatment. The least resistance pneumococcus showed to tetracycline, rifampicin, chloramphenicol, penicillin-G and ciprofloxacin. PMID:26236165

  16. [Streptococcus pyogenes infection in paediatrics: from pharyngotonsillitis to invasive infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espadas Maciá, David; Flor Macián, Eva María; Borrás, Rafael; Poujois Gisbert, Sandrine; Muñoz Bonet, Juan Ignacio

    2018-02-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes or Group A Streptococci (GAS) cause many infections in infancy. Changes in its epidemiology have been described in recent years, including an increase in invasive infections (iGAS). A retrospective-descriptive study was conducted on children less than 15 years old, with GAS infections, in particular iGAS, and their complications from February 2004-April 2014. A total of 2,192 positive cultures were obtained of which 92.7% were pharyngeal cultures. Twenty-nine patients were admitted to hospital: 4 with suppurative complications, 7 post-infective, 14 iGAS, and 4 probable iGAS cases. There were no differences in the frequency of GAS isolations/year. Non-invasive isolates were more frequent in winter and spring (P<.001), and 68.3% were in patients younger than 5 years. The incidence of iGAS was 2.1/100,000 children/year. There was no seasonality, and it was more frequent in younger children (P=.039). The most common diagnosis was pneumonia (6/14). Eight patients required intensive care. They were treated empirically with second or third-generation cephalosporin or with intravenous penicillin, and pneumonia required longer treatment times (P=.016). All GAS isolates were sensitive to penicillin, and 10.6% were resistant to erythromycin. The time spent in hospital was longer for iGAS than other cases (P=.028). No patients died. Pharyngotonsillitis caused by GAS is common in childhood, and its incidence is increasing in children younger than 5 years. At the moment, post-infectious complications are rare. Invasive infections are the most severe forms of presentation, and are more common in younger children. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Streptococcus pneumoniae-associated pneumonia complicated by purulent pericarditis: case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cillóniz, Catia; Rangel, Ernesto; Barlascini, Cornelius; Piroddi, Ines Maria Grazia; Torres, Antoni; Nicolini, Antonello

    2015-01-01

    In the antibiotic era, purulent pericarditis is a rare entity. However, there are still reports of cases of the disease, which is associated with high mortality, and most such cases are attributed to delayed diagnosis. Approximately 40-50% of all cases of purulent pericarditis are caused by Gram-positive bacteria, Streptococcus pneumoniae in particular. We report four cases of pneumococcal pneumonia complicated by pericarditis, with different clinical features and levels of severity. In three of the four cases, the main complication was cardiac tamponade. Microbiological screening (urinary antigen testing and pleural fluid culture) confirmed the diagnosis of severe pneumococcal pneumonia complicated by purulent pericarditis. In cases of pneumococcal pneumonia complicated by pericarditis, early diagnosis is of paramount importance to avoid severe hemodynamic compromise. The complications of acute pericarditis appear early in the clinical course of the infection. The most serious complications are cardiac tamponade and its consequences. Antibiotic therapy combined with pericardiocentesis drastically reduces the mortality associated with purulent pericarditis.

  18. Genomic Analysis of a Serotype 5 Streptococcus pneumoniae Outbreak in British Columbia, Canada, 2005–2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth R. Miller

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Streptococcus pneumoniae can cause a wide spectrum of disease, including invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD. From 2005 to 2009 an outbreak of IPD occurred in Western Canada, caused by a S. pneumoniae strain with multilocus sequence type (MLST 289 and serotype 5. We sought to investigate the incidence of IPD due to this S. pneumoniae strain and to characterize the outbreak in British Columbia using whole-genome sequencing. Methods. IPD was defined according to Public Health Agency of Canada guidelines. Two isolates representing the beginning and end of the outbreak were whole-genome sequenced. The sequences were analyzed for single nucleotide variants (SNVs and putative genomic islands. Results. The peak of the outbreak in British Columbia was in 2006, when 57% of invasive S. pneumoniae isolates were serotype 5. Comparison of two whole-genome sequenced strains showed only 10 SNVs between them. A 15.5 kb genomic island was identified in outbreak strains, allowing the design of a PCR assay to track the spread of the outbreak strain. Discussion. We show that the serotype 5 MLST 289 strain contains a distinguishing genomic island, which remained genetically consistent over time. Whole-genome sequencing holds great promise for real-time characterization of outbreaks in the future and may allow responses tailored to characteristics identified in the genome.

  19. Streptococcus pneumoniae sepsis as the initial presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdem I

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ilknur Erdem,1 Senay Elbasan Omar,1 Ridvan Kara Ali,1 Hayati Gunes,2 Aynur Eren Topkaya2 1Department of Infectious Diseases, 2Department of Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Namik Kemal University, Tekirdag, Turkey Objective: Infections are among the most important causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE but are rare initial presentation of the disease. Therefore, in this study, we describe a case of Streptococcus pneumoniae sepsis in a young woman with previously undiagnosed SLE. Case report: A 23-year-old female patient was admitted to our outpatient clinic complaining of high fever (40°C, chills, fatigue, generalized myalgia, and cough with brown sputum for 5 days. Blood cultures grew gram-positive coccus defined as S. pneumoniae using standard procedures. Antinuclear antibody was positive at a titer of 1/1,000, and anti-double-stranded DNA was positive at 984 IU/mL. She was diagnosed with SLE. Her respiratory symptoms and pleural effusion were considered to be due to pulmonary manifestation of SLE. Conclusion: The underlying immunosuppression caused by SLE could have predisposed the patient to invasive pneumococcal disease. It may also occur as a primary presenting feature, although a rare condition. Keywords: Streptococcus pneumoniae, sepsis, systemic lupus erythematosus

  20. Development of Streptococcus pneumoniae Vaccines Using Live Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shifeng Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae still causes severe morbidity and mortality worldwide, especially in young children and the elderly. Much effort has been dedicated to developing protein-based universal vaccines to conquer the current shortcomings of capsular vaccines and capsular conjugate vaccines, such as serotype replacement, limited coverage and high costs. A recombinant live vector vaccine delivering protective antigens is a promising way to achieve this goal. In this review, we discuss the researches using live recombinant vaccines, mainly live attenuated Salmonella and lactic acid bacteria, to deliver pneumococcal antigens. We also discuss both the limitations and the future of these vaccines.

  1. Epidemiological studies of potent environment pathogen streptococcus pneumoniae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brohi, N.A.; Tunio, S.A.

    2016-01-01

    A general survey for six months was undertaken for the prevalence of environmental bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae among the different age groups (3-65 years) including both sexes from various hospitals of Hyderabad city. Laboratory examinations revealed S. pneumoniae as most potent environmental pathogen from the sputum and throat swabs of old aged patients and children respectively. During observations, 39 specimens were growth positive; the biochemistry of isolates revealed that they were coagulase, catalase and oxidase negative, TSI, gel hydrolysis positive and were able to ferment glucose, lactose, maltose, galactose, fructose, sucrose, starch and raffinose. The results of antimicrobial activity showed that pneumococci were resistant to the cefspan, septran, cravit, pipemetic acid, azomax, bacitracin, and penicillin and a clear zone of inhibition was observed on clithromycin, optochin, cefizox, genatamycin, minocyclin, levoflaxacin, and vancomycin. There were intermediate zone of inhibition found on claforan, nalidixic acid, amoxycillin, fosfomycin, fortum, and erythromycin on Mueller Hinton's agar after 24 hours incubation. (author)

  2. Isolation and characterization of unsaturated fatty acid auxotrophs of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altabe, Silvia; Lopez, Paloma; de Mendoza, Diego

    2007-11-01

    Unsaturated fatty acid (UFA) biosynthesis is essential for the maintenance of membrane structure and function in many groups of anaerobic bacteria. Like Escherichia coli, the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae produces straight-chain saturated fatty acids (SFA) and monounsaturated fatty acids. In E. coli UFA synthesis requires the action of two gene products, the essential isomerase/dehydratase encoded by fabA and an elongation condensing enzyme encoded by fabB. S. pneumoniae lacks both genes and instead employs a single enzyme with only an isomerase function encoded by the fabM gene. In this paper we report the construction and characterization of an S. pneumoniae 708 fabM mutant. This mutant failed to grow in complex medium, and the defect was overcome by addition of UFAs to the growth medium. S. pneumoniae fabM mutants did not produce detectable levels of monounsaturated fatty acids as determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and thin-layer chromatography analysis of the radiolabeled phospholipids. We also demonstrate that a fabM null mutant of the cariogenic organism Streptococcus mutants is a UFA auxotroph, indicating that FabM is the only enzyme involved in the control of membrane fluidity in streptococci. Finally we report that the fabN gene of Enterococcus faecalis, coding for a dehydratase/isomerase, complements the growth of S. pneumoniae fabM mutants. Taken together, these results suggest that FabM is a potential target for chemotherapeutic agents against streptococci and that S. pneumoniae UFA auxotrophs could help identify novel genes encoding enzymes involved in UFA biosynthesis.

  3. Parallel evolution of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus mitis to pathogenic and mutualistic lifestyles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilian, Mogens; Riley, David R; Jensen, Anders; Brüggemann, Holger; Tettelin, Hervé

    2014-07-22

    The bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae is one of the leading causes of fatal infections affecting humans. Intriguingly, phylogenetic analysis shows that the species constitutes one evolutionary lineage in a cluster of the otherwise commensal Streptococcus mitis strains, with which humans live in harmony. In a comparative analysis of 35 genomes, including phylogenetic analyses of all predicted genes, we have shown that the pathogenic pneumococcus has evolved into a master of genomic flexibility while lineages that evolved into the nonpathogenic S. mitis secured harmonious coexistence with their host by stabilizing an approximately 15%-reduced genome devoid of many virulence genes. Our data further provide evidence that interspecies gene transfer between S. pneumoniae and S. mitis occurs in a unidirectional manner, i.e., from S. mitis to S. pneumoniae. Import of genes from S. mitis and other mitis, anginosus, and salivarius group streptococci ensured allelic replacements and antigenic diversification and has been driving the evolution of the remarkable structural diversity of capsular polysaccharides of S. pneumoniae. Our study explains how the unique structural diversity of the pneumococcal capsule emerged and conceivably will continue to increase and reveals a striking example of the fragile border between the commensal and pathogenic lifestyles. While genomic plasticity enabling quick adaptation to environmental stress is a necessity for the pathogenic streptococci, the commensal lifestyle benefits from stability. Importance: One of the leading causes of fatal infections affecting humans, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and the commensal Streptococcus mitis are closely related obligate symbionts associated with hominids. Faced with a shortage of accessible hosts, the two opposing lifestyles evolved in parallel. We have shown that the nonpathogenic S. mitis secured harmonious coexistence with its host by stabilizing a reduced genome devoid of many virulence genes

  4. Zinc oxide nanoparticle inhibits the biofilm formation of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Purnita; Agarwal, Bikash; Goswami, Madhurankhi; Maiti, Debasish; Baruah, Sunandan; Tribedi, Prosun

    2018-01-01

    Biofilms are structured consortia of microbial cells that grow on living and non living surfaces and surround themselves with secreted polymers. Infections with bacterial biofilms have emerged as a foremost public health concern because biofilm growing cells can be highly resistant to both antibiotics and host immune defenses. Zinc oxide nanoparticles have been reported as a potential antimicrobial agent, thus, in the current study, we have evaluated the antimicrobial as well as antibiofilm activity of zinc oxide nanoparticles against the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae which is a significant cause of disease. Zinc oxide nanoparticles showed strong antimicrobial activity against S. pneumoniae, with an MIC value of 40 μg/ml. Biofilm inhibition of S. pneumoniae was also evaluated by performing a series of experiments such as crystal violet assay, microscopic observation, protein count, EPS secretion etc. using sub-MIC concentrations (3, 6 and 12 µg/ml) of zinc oxide nanoparticles. The results showed that the sub-MIC doses of zinc oxide nanoparticles exhibited significant anti-biofilm activity against S. pneumoniae, with maximum biofilm attenuation found at 12 μg/ml. Taken together, the results indicate that zinc oxide nanoparticles can be considered as a potential agent for the inhibition of microbial biofilms.

  5. Purification and preliminary crystallization of alanine racemase from Streptococcus pneumoniae

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    Im Hookang

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the past fifteen years, antibiotic resistance in the Gram-positive opportunistic human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae has significantly increased. Clinical isolates from patients with community-acquired pneumonia or otitis media often display resistance to two or more antibiotics. Given the need for new therapeutics, we intend to investigate enzymes of cell wall biosynthesis as novel drug targets. Alanine racemase, a ubiquitous enzyme among bacteria and absent in humans, provides the essential cell wall precursor, D-alanine, which forms part of the tetrapeptide crosslinking the peptidoglycan layer. Results The alanine racemases gene from S. pneumoniae (alrSP was amplified by PCR and cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The 367 amino acid, 39854 Da dimeric enzyme was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity and preliminary crystals were obtained. Racemic activity was demonstrated through complementation of an alr auxotroph of E. coli growing on L-alanine. In an alanine racemases photometric assay, specific activities of 87.0 and 84.8 U mg-1 were determined for the conversion of D- to L-alanine and L- to D-alanine, respectively. Conclusion We have isolated and characterized the alanine racemase gene from the opportunistic human pathogen S. pneumoniae. The enzyme shows sufficient homology with other alanine racemases to allow its integration into our ongoing structure-based drug design project.

  6. Detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae in whole blood by PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Isaacman, D J; Wadowsky, R M; Rydquist-White, J; Post, J C; Ehrlich, G D

    1995-03-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of bacteremia in both children and adults. Currently, the diagnosis of pneumococcal bacteremia relies on the isolation and identification of the bacteria from blood cultures. We have developed a sensitive assay for the detection of S. pneumoniae in whole blood by the PCR. A specific primer-probe set (JM201 and JM202 primers with JM204 probe) designed from the penicillin-binding protein 2B gene was demonstrated to reproducibly detect between 10 and 100 fg of input purified S. pneumoniae DNA. This assay system was shown to be inclusive for all strains of S. pneumoniae evaluated, including 15 different serotypes and a battery of penicillin-resistant and -sensitive strains. The specificity of this PCR-based assay was demonstrated by its inability to support amplification from a series of human, bacterial, and yeast genomic DNAs. A general specimen preparation method which should be suitable for the purification of DNA from any pathogens in whole blood was developed. With this protocol it was possible to detect S. pneumoniae-specific DNA from whole blood specimens inoculated with as little as 4 CFU/ml. Copurified human blood DNA, ranging from 0 to 4.5 micrograms per PCR, did not affect the sensitivity of S. pneumoniae detection by PCR. A blinded clinical trial was used to compare the PCR-based assay with standard microbiological blood culture for the detection of S. pneumoniae bacteremia in 36 specimens obtained from pediatric patients seen in the emergency room of Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh. With culture as the "gold standard," the PCR-based assay had a sensitivity of 80% (4 of 5 culture-positive specimens were PCR positive) and a specificity of 84% (26 of 31 culture-negative specimens were PCR negative). However, three patients whose specimens were PCR positive and culture negative had histories suggestive of bacteremia, including recent positive blood cultures, treatment with antibiotics, cellulitis, and multiple

  7. Human pleural fluid is a potent growth medium for Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popowicz, Natalia D; Lansley, Sally M; Cheah, Hui M; Kay, Ian D; Carson, Christine F; Waterer, Grant W; Paton, James C; Brown, Jeremy S; Lee, Y C Gary

    2017-01-01

    Empyema is defined by the presence of bacteria and/or pus in pleural effusions. However, the biology of bacteria within human pleural fluid has not been studied. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most common cause of pediatric and frequent cause of adult empyema. We investigated whether S. pneumoniae can proliferate within human pleural fluid and if growth is affected by the cellular content of the fluid and/or characteristics of pneumococcal surface proteins. Invasive S. pneumoniae isolates (n = 24) and reference strain recovered from human blood or empyema were inoculated (1.5×106CFU/mL) into sterile human malignant pleural fluid samples (n = 11). All S. pneumoniae (n = 25) strains proliferated rapidly, increasing by a median of 3009 (IQR 1063-9846) from baseline at 24hrs in all pleural effusions tested. Proliferation was greater than in commercial pneumococcal culture media and concentrations were maintained for 48hrs without autolysis. A similar magnitude of proliferation was observed in pleural fluid before and after removal of its cellular content, p = 0.728. S. pneumoniae (D39 strain) wild-type, and derivatives (n = 12), each with mutation(s) in a different gene required for full virulence were inoculated into human pleural fluid (n = 8). S. pneumoniae with pneumococcal surface antigen A (ΔpsaA) mutation failed to grow (2207-fold lower than wild-type), pgrowth was restored with manganese supplementation. Growth of other common respiratory pathogens (n = 14) across pleural fluid samples (n = 7) was variable and inconsistent, with some strains failing to grow. We establish for the first time that pleural fluid is a potent growth medium for S. pneumoniae and proliferation is dependent on the PsaA surface protein and manganese.

  8. The enhanced pneumococcal LAMP assay: a clinical tool for the diagnosis of meningitis due to Streptococcus pneumoniae.

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    Dong Wook Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of invasive bacterial disease in developed and developing countries. We studied the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP technique to assess its suitability for detecting S. pneumoniae nucleic acid in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We established an improved LAMP assay targeting the lytA gene (Streptococcus pneumoniae [Sp] LAMP. The analytical specificity of the primers was validated by using 32 reference strains (10 Streptococcus and seven non-Streptococcus species plus 25 clinical alpha-hemolytic streptococcal strains, including four S. pneumoniae strains and 21 other strains (3 S. oralis, 17 S. mitis, and one Streptococcus species harboring virulence factor-encoding genes (lytA or ply. Within 30 minutes, the assay could detect as few as 10 copies of both purified DNA and spiked CSF specimens with greater sensitivity than conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR. The linear determination range for this assay is 10 to 1,000,000 microorganisms per reaction mixture using real-time turbidimetry. We evaluated the clinical sensitivity and specificity of the Sp LAMP assay using 106 randomly selected CSF specimens from children with suspected meningitis in Korea, China and Vietnam. For comparison, CSF specimens were also tested against conventional PCR and culture tests. The detection rate of the LAMP method was substantially higher than the rates of PCR and culture tests. In this small sample, relative to the LAMP assay, the clinical sensitivity of PCR and culture tests was 54.5% and 33.3%, respectively, while clinical specificity of the two tests was 100%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Compared to PCR, Sp LAMP detected S. pneumoniae with higher analytical and clinical sensitivity. This specific and sensitive LAMP method offers significant advantages for screening patients on a population basis and for diagnosis in clinical settings.

  9. Translation quality control is maintained by the penicillin resistance factor MurM in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shepherd, Jennifer; Ibba, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a causative agent of nosocomial infections such as pneumonia, meningitis and septicaemia. Penicillin resistance in S. pneumoniae depends in part upon MurM, an aminoacyl-tRNA-ligase that attaches L-serine or L-alanine to the stem peptide lysine of Lipid II in cell wall...

  10. Selective IgM deficiency in an adult presenting with Streptococcus pneumoniae septic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuphuakrat, Angsana; Ngamjanyaporn, Pintip; Nantiruj, Kanokrat; Luangwedchakarn, Voravich; Malathum, Kumthorn

    2016-02-01

    Septic arthritis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae is uncommon. Most of the patients who have invasive pneumococcal infection have underlying diseases associated with impaired immune function. We report a case of polyarticular pneumococcal septic arthritis in a previously healthy adult as the first manifestation of selective immunoglobulin (Ig)M deficiency. The patient had no evidence of autoimmune disease or malignancy. Serum IgG, IgA, and complement levels were normal. Numbers of lymphocyte subsets were in normal range except that of CD4+ cells, which was slightly low. Invasive pneumococcal disease in a healthy adult should lead to further investigation for underlying diseases including primary immunodeficiencies. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Interspecific plasmid transfer between Streptococcus pneumoniae and Bacillus subtilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa, M. (Inst. de Immunologia y Biologia Microbiana, Velazquez, Madrid, Spain); Lopez, P.; Perez-Urena, M.T.; Lacks, S.A.

    1982-01-01

    The streptococcal plasmids pMV158 and pLS1, grown in Streptococcus pneumoniae, were transformed to Bacillus subtilis by DNA-mediated transformation.The plasmids were unchanged in the new host; no deletions were observed in 80 instances of transfer. Hybrid plasmids were produced by recombining the EcoRI fragment of pBD6 that confers Km/sup r/ with EcoRI-cut pLS1, which confers Tc/sup r/. The simple hybrid, pMP2, was transferable to both species and expressed Tc/sup r/ and Km/sup r/ in both. A derivative, pMP5, which contained an insertion in the pBD6 component, expressed a higher level of kanomycin resistance and was more easily selected in S. pneumoniae. Another derivative, pMP3, which contained an additional EcoRI fragment, presumably of pneumococcal chromosomal DNA, could not be transferred to B. subtilis. Previous findings that monomeric plasmid forms could transform S. pneumoniae but not B. subtilis were confirmed using single plasmid preparations. Although plasmids extracted from either species were readily transferred to S. pneumoniae, successive passage in B. subtilis increased the ability of plasmid extracts to transfer the plasmid to a B. subtilis recipient. This adaptation was tentatively ascribed to an enrichment of multimeric forms in extracts of B. subtilis as compared to S. pneumoniae. A review of host ranges exhibited by plasmids of Gram-positive bacteria suggested differences in their ability to use particular host replication functions. (JMT)

  12. Gene expression platform for synthetic biology in the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorg, Robin A; Kuipers, Oscar P; Veening, Jan-Willem

    2015-03-20

    The human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is a bacterium that owes its success to complex gene expression regulation patterns on both the cellular and the population level. Expression of virulence factors enables a mostly hazard-free presence of the commensal, in balance with the host and niche competitors. Under specific circumstances, changes in this expression can result in a more aggressive behavior and the reversion to the invasive form as pathogen. These triggering conditions are very difficult to study due to the fact that environmental cues are often unknown or barely possible to simulate outside the host (in vitro). An alternative way of investigating expression patterns is found in synthetic biology approaches of reconstructing regulatory networks that mimic an observed behavior with orthogonal components. Here, we created a genetic platform suitable for synthetic biology approaches in S. pneumoniae and characterized a set of standardized promoters and reporters. We show that our system allows for fast and easy cloning with the BglBrick system and that reliable and robust gene expression after integration into the S. pneumoniae genome is achieved. In addition, the cloning system was extended to allow for direct linker-based assembly of ribosome binding sites, peptide tags, and fusion proteins, and we called this new generally applicable standard "BglFusion". The gene expression platform and the methods described in this study pave the way for employing synthetic biology approaches in S. pneumoniae.

  13. Characterization of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from Austrian companion animals and horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginders, Maximilian; Leschnik, Michael; Künzel, Frank; Kampner, Doris; Mikula, Claudia; Steindl, Georg; Eichhorn, Inga; Feßler, Andrea T; Schwarz, Stefan; Spergser, Joachim; Loncaric, Igor

    2017-11-14

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the genetic relatedness and the antimicrobial resistance profiles of a collection of Austrian Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from companion animals and horses. A total of 12 non-repetitive isolates presumptively identified as S. pneumoniae were obtained during routinely diagnostic activities between March 2009 and January 2017. Isolates were confirmed as S. pneumoniae by bile solubility and optochin susceptibility testing, matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry and sequence analysis of a part recA and the 16S rRNA genes. Isolates were further characterized by pneumolysin polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and genotyped by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed and resistance genes were detected by specific PCR assays. All isolates were serotyped. Four sequence types (ST) (ST36, ST3546, ST6934 and ST6937) and four serotypes (3, 19A, 19F and 23F) were detected. Two isolates from twelve displayed a multidrug-resistance pheno- and genotype. This study represents the first comprehensive investigation on characteristics of S. pneumoniae isolates recovered from Austrian companion animals and horses. The obtained results indicate that common human sero- (23F) and sequence type (ST36) implicated in causing invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) may circulate in dogs. Isolates obtained from other examined animals seem to be host-adapted.

  14. ASC and NLRP3 impair host defense during lethal pneumonia caused by serotype 3 Streptococcus pneumoniae in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lieshout, Miriam H. P.; de Vos, Alex F.; Dessing, Mark C.; de Porto, Alexander P. N. A.; de Boer, Onno J.; de Beer, Regina; Terpstra, Sanne; Florquin, Sandrine; van't Veer, Cornelis; van der Poll, Tom

    2018-01-01

    Streptococcus (S.) pneumoniae is the most common cause of community-acquired pneumonia. The Nod-like receptor family pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome, consisting of NLRP3, ASC (the adaptor apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD) and caspase-1, has been implicated in

  15. Fluoroquinolone-nonsusceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from a medical center in the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine era

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    Hsin-Hang Chen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Purpose: Streptococcus pneumoniae is one of the most common pathogens to cause mucosal and invasive infection in humans. Resistance to fluoroquinolones (FQ is associated with clinical failure when treating pneumococcal diseases and increase of mortality. Methods: We collected clinical isolates of S. pneumoniae from January 2011 to July 2015 at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan. Susceptibility to FQ was examined by disk diffusion method. Levofloxacin or moxifloxacin-nonsusceptible S. pneumoniae isolates were analyzed by serotyping, multilocus sequence typing, and sequencing of the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs of gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE. Results: During the study period, 42 FQ-nonsusceptible pneumococcal isolates were identified. The rate increased from 1.6% of total pneumococcal isolates (2 of 127 in 2011 to 4.6% (13 of 283 in 2014, then decreased to 1.5% (3 of 202 in the first half of 2015. These isolates belonged to 13 serotypes, and serotype 14 (12 of 42, 33.3% was the most prevalent. Most of the isolates belonged to international clones or their variants. After QRDR analysis, there were 19 isolates in five clusters that shared both the same sequence type and QRDR mutation. Conclusions: FQ resistance initially emerged in either vaccine or nonvaccine serotypes. The majority of isolates were international clones or related variants, suggesting that resistance was disseminated through clonal spread. The wide use of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine since 2013 appears to have reduced the spread of FQ-nonsusceptible pneumococci. Keywords: Fluoroquinolone, resistance, Streptococcus pneumoniae, pneumococcal conjugate vaccine

  16. Comparison of extraction procedures for proteome analysis of Streptococcus pneumoniae and a basic reference map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encheva, Vesela; Gharbia, Saheer E; Wait, Robin; Begum, Shajna; Shah, Haroun N

    2006-06-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is an important human pathogen causing life-threatening invasive diseases such as pneumonia, meningitis and bacteraemia. Despite major advances in our understanding of pneumococcal mechanisms of pathogenicity obtained through genomic studies very little has been achieved on the characterisation of the proteome of this pathogen. The highly complex structure of its cell envelope particularly amongst the various capsular forms enables the cell to resist lysis by conventional mechanical methods. It is therefore highly desirable to develop a cellular lysis and protein solubilisation procedure that minimises protein losses and allows for maximum possible coverage of the proteome of S. pneumoniae. Here we have utilised various combinations of mechanical or enzymatic cell lysis with two protein solubilisation mixtures urea/CHAPS-based mixture or SDS/DTT-based mixture in order to achieve best quality protein profiles using two proteomic technologies surface-enhanced laser desorption ionisation (SELDI) TOF MS and 2-DE. While urea/CHAPS-based mixture combined with freeze/thawing provided enough material for good-quality SELDI TOF MS fingerprints, a combination of mechanical, enzymatic and chemical lysis was needed to be used to successfully extract the desired protein content for 2-DE analysis. The methods chosen were also assessed for reproducibility and tested on various capsular types of S. pneumoniae. As a result, good-quality and reproducible profiles were created using various ProteinChip arrays and more than 800 protein spots were separated on a single 2-D gel of S. pneumoniae. Twenty-five of the most abundant protein spots were identified using LC/MS/MS to create a reference map of S. pneumoniae. The proteins identified included glycolytic enzymes such as glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, phosphoglycerate kinase, enolase etc. Several fermentation enzymes were also present including two of the components of the arginine deiminase system

  17. Epidemiology of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus colonization in healthy Venezuelan children

    OpenAIRE

    Quintero, B.; Araque, M.; van der Gaast-de Jongh, C.; Escalona, F.; Correa, M.; Morillo-Puente, S.; Vielma, S.; Hermans, P. W. M.

    2010-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. We investigated both the colonization and co-colonization characteristics for these pathogens among 250 healthy children from 2 to 5?years of age in Merida, Venezuela, in 2007. The prevalence of S. pneumoniae colonization, S. aureus colonization, and S. pneumoniae?S. aureus co-colonization was 28%, 56%, and 16%, respectively. Pneumococcal serotypes 6B (14%), 19F (12%), 23F (12%), 15 (9%), 6...

  18. Moxifloxacin in experimental Streptococcus pneumoniae cerebritis and meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djukic, Marija; Böttcher, Tobias; Wellmer, Andreas; Gerber, Joachim; Brocke, Viola V; Eiffert, Helmut; Nau, Roland

    2005-01-01

    Rifampin, a protein synthesis inhibitor, reduced mortality in a mouse model of meningitis compared to bacteriolytic cephalosporin standard therapy. To assess whether moxifloxacin (known to cause a less rapid bacteriolysis than cephalosporins) can similarly reduce mortality, mice infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae by deep intracerebral injection were treated subcutaneously with either 200 mg/kg of moxifloxacin or ceftriaxone every 8 hours for 5 days (n = 49 each). They were then observed for an additional 8 days. Overall mortalities were 35 and 29 in moxifloxacin- and ceftriaxone-treated mice, respectively (p = 0.29). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis also revealed no statistically significant differences (p = 0.32). Moxifloxacin failed to reduce mortality compared to cephalosporin standard therapy.

  19. Purulent pericarditis and pneumonia caused by Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Jürgen; Schmitz, Roland; van der Linden, Mark; Nührenberg, Thomas; Häcker, Georg; Neumann, Franz-Josef

    2014-02-01

    Purulent pericarditis is a life-threatening disease that usually manifests following bacteraemia or through spreading from an intrathoracic focus. Only a few cases of this disease have been reported with Lancefield group C streptococci as aetiological agents, and the primary focus in these infections remains unknown. We report a case of purulent pericarditis with septic and cardiogenic shock, caused by Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus (group C) in a 51-year-old patient. The pathogen was possibly contracted through contact with horses. Most probably, it caused initially pneumonia before spreading to the pericardium, either directly or via the bloodstream. A combined therapeutic approach, consisting of antibiotic therapy and repeated pericardial drainage, was necessary to ensure a clinical cure. After discharge, long-term follow-up for development of constrictive pericarditis is considered mandatory.

  20. Biofilm formation enhances fomite survival of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Laura R; Reddinger, Ryan M; Hakansson, Anders P

    2014-03-01

    Both Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus pneumoniae are widely thought to rapidly die outside the human host, losing infectivity following desiccation in the environment. However, to date, all literature investigating the infectivity of desiccated streptococci has used broth-grown, planktonic populations. In this study, we examined the impact of biofilm formation on environmental survival of clinical and laboratory isolates of S. pyogenes and S. pneumoniae as both organisms are thought to colonize the human host as biofilms. Results clearly demonstrate that while planktonic cells that are desiccated rapidly lose viability both on hands and abiotic surfaces, such as plastic, biofilm bacteria remain viable over extended periods of time outside the host and remain infectious in a murine colonization model. To explore the level and extent of streptococcal fomite contamination that children might be exposed to naturally, direct bacteriologic cultures of items in a day care center were conducted, which demonstrated high levels of viable streptococci of both species. These findings raise the possibility that streptococci may survive in the environment and be transferred from person to person via fomites contaminated with oropharyngeal secretions containing biofilm streptococci.

  1. Streptococcus pneumoniae coinfection is correlated with the severity of H1N1 pandemic influenza.

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    Gustavo Palacios

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Initial reports in May 2009 of the novel influenza strain H1N1pdm estimated a case fatality rate (CFR of 0.6%, similar to that of seasonal influenza. In July 2009, however, Argentina reported 3056 cases with 137 deaths, representing a CFR of 4.5%. Potential explanations for increased CFR included virus reassortment or genetic drift, or infection of a more vulnerable population. Virus genomic sequencing of 26 Argentinian samples representing both severe and mild disease indicated no evidence of reassortment, mutations associated with resistance to antiviral drugs, or genetic drift that might contribute to virulence. Furthermore, no evidence was found for increased frequency of risk factors for H1N1pdm disease.We examined nasopharyngeal swab samples (NPS from 199 cases of H1N1pdm infection from Argentina with MassTag PCR, testing for 33 additional microbial agents. The study population consisted of 199 H1N1pdm-infected subjects sampled between 23 June and 4 July 2009. Thirty-nine had severe disease defined as death (n = 20 or hospitalization (n = 19; 160 had mild disease. At least one additional agent of potential pathogenic importance was identified in 152 samples (76%, including Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 62; Haemophilus influenzae (n = 104; human respiratory syncytial virus A (n = 11 and B (n = 1; human rhinovirus A (n = 1 and B (n = 4; human coronaviruses 229E (n = 1 and OC43 (n = 2; Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 2; Acinetobacter baumannii (n = 2; Serratia marcescens (n = 1; and Staphylococcus aureus (n = 35 and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA, n = 6. The presence of S. pneumoniae was strongly correlated with severe disease. S. pneumoniae was present in 56.4% of severe cases versus 25% of mild cases; more than one-third of H1N1pdm NPS with S. pneumoniae were from subjects with severe disease (22 of 62 S. pneumoniae-positive NPS, p = 0.0004. In subjects 6 to 55 years of age, the adjusted odds ratio (OR of severe disease in the presence of

  2. Nasopharyngeal co-colonization with Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae in children is bacterial genotype independent.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melles, D.C.; Bogaert, D.; Gorkink, R.F.; Peeters, J.K.; Moorhouse, M.J.; Ott, A.; Leeuwen, W.B. van; Simons, G.; Verbrugh, H.A.; Hermans, P.W.M.; Belkum, A. van

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial interference between Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae in the nasopharynx has been observed during colonization, which might have important clinical implications for the widespread use of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in young children. This study aimed to determine

  3. Molecular epidemiology of penicillin-nonsusceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae among children in Greece

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Bogaert (Debby); G.A. Syrogiannopoulos; I.N. Grivea; R. de Groot (Ronald); N.G. Beratis; P.W.M. Hermans (Peter)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractA total of 145 penicillin-nonsusceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae strains were isolated from young carriers in Greece and analyzed by antibiotic susceptibility testing, serotyping, restriction fragment end labeling (RFEL), and penicillin-binding protein

  4. Meropenem susceptibility of Neisseria meningitidis and Streptococcus pneumoniae from meningitis patients in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Beek, D.; Hensen, E. F.; Spanjaard, L.; de Gans, J.; Enting, R. H.; Dankert, J.

    1997-01-01

    In-vitro susceptibility of 299 Neisseria meningitidis and 157 Streptococcus pneumoniae strains from meningitis patients in The Netherlands in 1993 and 1994 to meropenem was determined using the Etest. Susceptibility to penicillin, ceftriaxone, and chloramphenicol was also determined. Rifampicin

  5. Streptococcus pneumoniae-associated pneumonia complicated by purulent pericarditis: case series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cilloniz, Catia; Torres, Antoni [Servicio de Neumologia, Hospital Clinic de Barcelona, Ciber de Enfermedades Respiratorias (CIBERES), Instituto de Investigacion Biomedica Agusti Pi i Sunyer, Universidad de Barcelona (Spain); Rangel, Ernesto [Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autonoma de Nayarit, Tepic (Mexico); Barlascini, Cornelius [Servizio di Igiene e Sanita Pubblica, Ospedale Generale di Sestri Levante, Sestri Levante (Italy); Piroddi, Ines Maria Grazia; Nicolini, Antonello, E-mail: antonellonicolini@gmail.com [Servizio di Pneumologia, Ospedale Generale di Sestri Levante, Sestri Levante (Italy)

    2015-07-15

    Objective: In the antibiotic era, purulent pericarditis is a rare entity. However, there are still reports of cases of the disease, which is associated with high mortality, and most such cases are attributed to delayed diagnosis. Approximately 40-50% of all cases of purulent pericarditis are caused by Gram-positive bacteria, Streptococcus pneumoniae in particular. Methods: We report four cases of pneumococcal pneumonia complicated by pericarditis, with different clinical features and levels of severity. Results: In three of the four cases, the main complication was cardiac tamponade. Microbiological screening (urinary antigen testing and pleural fluid culture) confirmed the diagnosis of severe pneumococcal pneumonia complicated by purulent pericarditis. Conclusions: In cases of pneumococcal pneumonia complicated by pericarditis, early diagnosis is of paramount importance to avoid severe hemodynamic compromise. The complications of acute pericarditis appear early in the clinical course of the infection. The most serious complications are cardiac tamponade and its consequences. Antibiotic therapy combined with pericardiocentesis drastically reduces the mortality associated with purulent pericarditis. (author)

  6. Streptococcus pneumoniae-associated pneumonia complicated by purulent pericarditis: case series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cilloniz, Catia; Torres, Antoni; Rangel, Ernesto; Barlascini, Cornelius; Piroddi, Ines Maria Grazia; Nicolini, Antonello

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In the antibiotic era, purulent pericarditis is a rare entity. However, there are still reports of cases of the disease, which is associated with high mortality, and most such cases are attributed to delayed diagnosis. Approximately 40-50% of all cases of purulent pericarditis are caused by Gram-positive bacteria, Streptococcus pneumoniae in particular. Methods: We report four cases of pneumococcal pneumonia complicated by pericarditis, with different clinical features and levels of severity. Results: In three of the four cases, the main complication was cardiac tamponade. Microbiological screening (urinary antigen testing and pleural fluid culture) confirmed the diagnosis of severe pneumococcal pneumonia complicated by purulent pericarditis. Conclusions: In cases of pneumococcal pneumonia complicated by pericarditis, early diagnosis is of paramount importance to avoid severe hemodynamic compromise. The complications of acute pericarditis appear early in the clinical course of the infection. The most serious complications are cardiac tamponade and its consequences. Antibiotic therapy combined with pericardiocentesis drastically reduces the mortality associated with purulent pericarditis. (author)

  7. Streptococcus pneumoniae-associated pneumonia complicated by purulent pericarditis: case series *

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cillóniz, Catia; Rangel, Ernesto; Barlascini, Cornelius; Piroddi, Ines Maria Grazia; Torres, Antoni; Nicolini, Antonello

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: In the antibiotic era, purulent pericarditis is a rare entity. However, there are still reports of cases of the disease, which is associated with high mortality, and most such cases are attributed to delayed diagnosis. Approximately 40-50% of all cases of purulent pericarditis are caused by Gram-positive bacteria, Streptococcus pneumoniae in particular. Methods: We report four cases of pneumococcal pneumonia complicated by pericarditis, with different clinical features and levels of severity. Results: In three of the four cases, the main complication was cardiac tamponade. Microbiological screening (urinary antigen testing and pleural fluid culture) confirmed the diagnosis of severe pneumococcal pneumonia complicated by purulent pericarditis. Conclusions: In cases of pneumococcal pneumonia complicated by pericarditis, early diagnosis is of paramount importance to avoid severe hemodynamic compromise. The complications of acute pericarditis appear early in the clinical course of the infection. The most serious complications are cardiac tamponade and its consequences. Antibiotic therapy combined with pericardiocentesis drastically reduces the mortality associated with purulent pericarditis. PMID:26398760

  8. Discrimination between Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus mitis based on sorting of their MALDI mass spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikryannikova, L N; Filimonova, A V; Malakhova, M V; Savinova, T; Filimonova, O; Ilina, E N; Dubovickaya, V A; Sidorenko, S V; Govorun, V M

    2013-11-01

    Accurate species-level identification of alpha-hemolytic (viridans) streptococci (VGS) is very important for understanding their pathogenicity and virulence. However, an extremely high level of similarity between VGS within the mitis group (S. pneumoniae, S. mitis, S. oralis and S. pseudopneumoniae) often results in misidentification of these organisms. Earlier, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has been suggested as a tool for the rapid identification of S. pneumoniae. However, by using Biotyper 3.0 (Bruker) or Vitek MS (bioMérieux) databases, Streptococcus mitis/oralis species can be erroneously identified as S. pneumoniae. ClinProTools 2.1 software was used for the discrimination of MALDI-TOF mass spectra of 25 S. pneumoniae isolates, 34 S. mitis and three S. oralis. Phenotypical tests and multilocus gene typing schemes for the S. pneumoniae (http://spneumoniae.mlst.net/) and viridans streptococci (http://viridans.emlsa.net/) were used for the identification of isolates included in the study. The classifying model was generated based on different algorithms (Genetic Algorithm, Supervised Neural Network and QuickClassifier). In all cases, values of sensitivity and specificity were found to be equal or close to 100%, allowing discrimination of mass spectra of different species. Three peaks (6949, 9876 and 9975 m/z) were determined conferring the maximal statistical weight onto each model built. We find this approach to be promising for viridans streptococci discrimination. © 2012 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2012 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  9. Pherotypes are driving genetic differentiation within Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramirez Mario

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The boundaries of bacterial species and the mechanisms underlying bacterial speciation are matters of intense debate. Theoretical studies have shown that recombination acts as a strong cohesive force preventing divergence in bacterial populations. Streptococcus pneumoniae populations have the telltale signs of high recombination with competence implicated as the major driving force behind gene exchange. Competence in S. pneumoniae is triggered by a quorum-sensing mechanism controlled by the competence-stimulating peptide pheromone. Results We studied the distribution of the two major pherotypes in the pneumococcal population and their association with serotype, antimicrobial resistance and genetic lineage. Using multilocus sequence data we evaluated pherotype influence on the dynamics of horizontal gene transfer. We show that pherotype is a clonal property of pneumococci. Standard population genetic analysis and multilocus infinite allele model simulations support the hypothesis that two genetically differentiated populations are defined by the major pherotypes. Conclusion Severe limitations to gene flow can therefore occur in bacterial species in the absence of geographical barriers and within highly recombinogenic populations. This departure from panmixia can have important consequences for our understanding of the response of pneumococci to human imposed selective pressures such as vaccination and antibiotic use.

  10. A visual review of the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engholm, Ditte Høyer; Kilian, Mogens; Goodsell, David S; Andersen, Ebbe Sloth; Kjærgaard, Rikke Schmidt

    2017-11-01

    Being the principal causative agent of bacterial pneumonia, otitis media, meningitis and septicemia, the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major global health problem. To highlight the molecular basis of this problem, we have portrayed essential biological processes of the pneumococcal life cycle in eight watercolor paintings. The paintings are done to a consistent nanometer scale based on currently available data from structural biology and proteomics. In this review article, the paintings are used to provide a visual review of protein synthesis, carbohydrate metabolism, cell wall synthesis, cell division, teichoic acid synthesis, virulence, transformation and pilus synthesis based on the available scientific literature within the field of pneumococcal biology. Visualization of the molecular details of these processes reveals several scientific questions about how molecular components of the pneumococcal cell are organized to allow biological function to take place. By the presentation of this visual review, we intend to stimulate scientific discussion, aid in the generation of scientific hypotheses and increase public awareness. A narrated video describing the biological processes in the context of a whole-cell illustration accompany this article. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Activities of Fluoroquinolones against Streptococcus pneumoniae Type II Topoisomerases Purified as Recombinant Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Morrissey, Ian; George, John

    1999-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae topoisomerase IV and DNA gyrase have been purified from a fluoroquinolone-susceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae strain, from first-step mutants showing low-level resistance to ciprofloxacin, sparfloxacin, levofloxacin, and ofloxacin, and from two clinical isolates showing intermediate- and high-level fluoroquinolone resistance by a gene cloning method that produces recombinant proteins from Escherichia coli. The concentrations of ciprofloxacin, sparfloxacin, levofloxac...

  12. Rapid bactericidal activity of sitafloxacin against Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Hiroko; Inoue, Kazue; Okumura, Ryo; Hoshino, Kazuki

    2013-02-01

    The initial bactericidal activity of quinolones against Streptococcus pneumoniae at the concentration equivalent to their respective peak serum concentration (C(max)) and free drug fraction of C(max) (fC(max)) were investigated. The bactericidal activity of sitafloxacin (STFX), levofloxacin (LVFX), moxifloxacin (MFLX), and garenoxacin (GRNX) were compared by determining the actual killing of bacteria at C(max) and fC(max) for 1 and 2 hours based on the Japanese maximum dose per administration (100, 500, 400, and 400 mg, respectively). Against 4 quinolone-susceptible clinical isolates (wild-type), STFX with C(max) and fC(max) exhibited the most rapid bactericidal activity resulting in an average reduction of > or = 3.0 log10 colony forming units (CFU)/ mL in 1 hour. STFX with C(max) and fC(max) also showed the most rapid and potent bactericidal activity against 9 clinical isolates with single par (C/E) mutation, resulting in > or = 3.0 log10 CFU/mL average reduction in viable cells in 1 hour. STFX showed a statistically significant advantage in initial bactericidal activity over other quinolones for single mutants (P bactericidal activity between STFX and other quinolones was higher in single mutants than wild-type strains, was confirmed using S. pneumoniae ATCC49619 (wild-type) and its laboratory single parC mutant. As a result, STFX showed a similar rapid and potent initial bactericidal activity against both strains, while initial bactericidal activity for other quinolones was significantly reduced in the single mutant (P bactericidal activity against wild-type and single mutants of S. pneumoniae and its bactericidal activity is not affected by the presence of a single par mutation compared to LVFX, MFLX, and GRNX.

  13. Differential recognition and hydrolysis of host carbohydrate antigens by Streptococcus pneumoniae family 98 glycoside hydrolases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Melanie A; Whitworth, Garrett E; El Warry, Nahida; Randriantsoa, Mialy; Samain, Eric; Burke, Robert D; Vocadlo, David J; Boraston, Alisdair B

    2009-09-18

    The presence of a fucose utilization operon in the Streptococcus pneumoniae genome and its established importance in virulence indicates a reliance of this bacterium on the harvesting of host fucose-containing glycans. The identities of these glycans, however, and how they are harvested is presently unknown. The biochemical and high resolution x-ray crystallographic analysis of two family 98 glycoside hydrolases (GH98s) from distinctive forms of the fucose utilization operon that originate from different S. pneumoniae strains reveal that one enzyme, the predominant type among pneumococcal isolates, has a unique endo-beta-galactosidase activity on the LewisY antigen. Altered active site topography in the other species of GH98 enzyme tune its endo-beta-galactosidase activity to the blood group A and B antigens. Despite their different specificities, these enzymes, and by extension all family 98 glycoside hydrolases, use an inverting catalytic mechanism. Many bacterial and viral pathogens exploit host carbohydrate antigens for adherence as a precursor to colonization or infection. However, this is the first evidence of bacterial endoglycosidase enzymes that are known to play a role in virulence and are specific for distinct host carbohydrate antigens. The strain-specific distribution of two distinct types of GH98 enzymes further suggests that S. pneumoniae strains may specialize to exploit host-specific antigens that vary from host to host, a factor that may feature in whether a strain is capable of colonizing a host or establishing an invasive infection.

  14. Characterization of Spbhp-37, a haemoglobin-binding protein of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Elena eRomero-Espejel

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is a Gram-positive microorganism that is the cause of bacterial pneumonia, sinusitis and otitis media. This human pathogen also can cause invasive diseases such as meningitis, bacteremia and septicemia. Haemoglobin (Hb and haem can support the growth and viability of S. pneumoniae as sole iron sources. Unfortunately, the acquisition mechanism of Hb and haem in this bacterium has been poorly studied. Previously we identified two proteins of 37 and 22 kDa as putative Hb- and haem-binding proteins (Spbhp-37 and Spbhp-22, respectively. The sequence of Spbhp-37 protein was database annotated as lipoprotein without any function or localization. Here it was immunolocalized in the surface cell by transmission electron microscopy using specific antibodies produced against the recombinant protein. The expression of Spbhp-37 was increased when bacteria were grown in media culture supplied with Hb. In addition, the affinity of Sphbp-37 for Hb was determined. Thus, in this work we are presenting new findings that attempt to explain the mechanism involved in iron acquisition of this pathogen. In the future these results could help to develop new therapy targets in order to avoid the secondary effects caused by the traditional therapies.

  15. Differential Recognition and Hydrolysis of Host Carbohydrate Antigens by Streptococcus pneumoniae Family 98 Glycoside Hydrolases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, M.; Whitworth, G; El Warry, N; Randriantsoa, M; Samain, E; Burke, R; Vocadlo, D; Boraston, A

    2009-01-01

    The presence of a fucose utilization operon in the Streptococcus pneumoniae genome and its established importance in virulence indicates a reliance of this bacterium on the harvesting of host fucose-containing glycans. The identities of these glycans, however, and how they are harvested is presently unknown. The biochemical and high resolution x-ray crystallographic analysis of two family 98 glycoside hydrolases (GH98s) from distinctive forms of the fucose utilization operon that originate from different S. pneumoniae strains reveal that one enzyme, the predominant type among pneumococcal isolates, has a unique endo-{beta}-galactosidase activity on the LewisY antigen. Altered active site topography in the other species of GH98 enzyme tune its endo-{beta}-galactosidase activity to the blood group A and B antigens. Despite their different specificities, these enzymes, and by extension all family 98 glycoside hydrolases, use an inverting catalytic mechanism. Many bacterial and viral pathogens exploit host carbohydrate antigens for adherence as a precursor to colonization or infection. However, this is the first evidence of bacterial endoglycosidase enzymes that are known to play a role in virulence and are specific for distinct host carbohydrate antigens. The strain-specific distribution of two distinct types of GH98 enzymes further suggests that S. pneumoniae strains may specialize to exploit host-specific antigens that vary from host to host, a factor that may feature in whether a strain is capable of colonizing a host or establishing an invasive infection.

  16. Polyamine transporter potABCD is required for virulence of encapsulated but not nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haley R Pipkins

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is commonly found in the human nasopharynx and is the causative agent of multiple diseases. Since invasive pneumococcal infections are associated with encapsulated pneumococci, the capsular polysaccharide is the target of licensed pneumococcal vaccines. However, there is an increasing distribution of non-vaccine serotypes, as well as nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae (NESp. Both encapsulated and nonencapsulated pneumococci possess the polyamine oligo-transport operon (potABCD. Previous research has shown inactivation of the pot operon in encapsulated pneumococci alters protein expression and leads to a significant reduction in pneumococcal murine colonization, but the role of the pot operon in NESp is unknown. Here, we demonstrate deletion of potD from the NESp NCC1 strain MNZ67 does impact expression of the key proteins pneumolysin and PspK, but it does not inhibit murine colonization. Additionally, we show the absence of potD significantly increases biofilm production, both in vitro and in vivo. In a chinchilla model of otitis media (OM, the absence of potD does not significantly affect MNZ67 virulence, but it does significantly reduce the pathogenesis of the virulent encapsulated strain TIGR4 (serotype 4. Deletion of potD also significantly reduced persistence of TIGR4 in the lungs but increased persistence of PIP01 in the lungs. We conclude the pot operon is important for the regulation of protein expression and biofilm formation in both encapsulated and NCC1 nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae. However, in contrast to encapsulated pneumococcal strains, polyamine acquisition via the pot operon is not required for MNZ67 murine colonization, persistence in the lungs, or full virulence in a model of OM. Therefore, NESp virulence regulation needs to be further established to identify potential NESp therapeutic targets.

  17. Burden of disease caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae in children younger than 5 years: global estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Katherine L; Wolfson, Lara J; Watt, James P; Henkle, Emily; Deloria-Knoll, Maria; McCall, Natalie; Lee, Ellen; Mulholland, Kim; Levine, Orin S; Cherian, Thomas

    2009-09-12

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of bacterial pneumonia, meningitis, and sepsis in children worldwide. However, many countries lack national estimates of disease burden. Effective interventions are available, including pneumococcal conjugate vaccine and case management. To support local and global policy decisions on pneumococcal disease prevention and treatment, we estimated country-specific incidence of serious cases and deaths in children younger than 5 years. We measured the burden of pneumococcal pneumonia by applying the proportion of pneumonia cases caused by S pneumoniae derived from efficacy estimates from vaccine trials to WHO country-specific estimates of all-cause pneumonia cases and deaths. We also estimated burden of meningitis and non-pneumonia, non-meningitis invasive disease using disease incidence and case-fatality data from a systematic literature review. When high-quality data were available from a country, these were used for national estimates. Otherwise, estimates were based on data from neighbouring countries with similar child mortality. Estimates were adjusted for HIV prevalence and access to care and, when applicable, use of vaccine against Haemophilus influenzae type b. In 2000, about 14.5 million episodes of serious pneumococcal disease (uncertainty range 11.1-18.0 million) were estimated to occur. Pneumococcal disease caused about 826,000 deaths (582,000-926,000) in children aged 1-59 months, of which 91,000 (63,000-102,000) were in HIV-positive and 735,000 (519,000-825,000) in HIV-negative children. Of the deaths in HIV-negative children, over 61% (449,000 [316,000-501,000]) occurred in ten African and Asian countries. S pneumoniae causes around 11% (8-12%) of all deaths in children aged 1-59 months (excluding pneumococcal deaths in HIV-positive children). Achievement of the UN Millennium Development Goal 4 for child mortality reduction can be accelerated by prevention and treatment of pneumococcal disease, especially in

  18. Streptococcus pneumoniae and reactive oxygen species : an unusual approach to living with radicals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yesilkaya, Hasan; Andisi, Vahid Farshchi; Andrew, Peter W.; Bijlsma, Jetta J. E.

    Streptococcus pneumoniae, an aerotolerant anaerobe, is an important human pathogen that regularly encounters toxic oxygen radicals from the atmosphere and from the host metabolism and immune system. Additionally, S. pneumoniae produces large amounts of H2O2 as a byproduct of its metabolism, which

  19. Cellular localization of choline-utilization proteins in Streptococcus pneumoniae using novel fluorescent reporter systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eberhardt, Alice; Wu, Ling J.; Errington, Jeff; Vollmer, Waldemar; Veening, Jan-Willem

    2009-01-01

    P>The molecular mechanisms underlying cell growth, cell division and pathogenesis in Streptococcus pneumoniae are still not fully understood. Single-cell methodologies are potentially of great value to investigate S. pneumoniae cell biology. Here, we report the construction of novel plasmids for

  20. Bright fluorescent Streptococcus pneumoniae for live cell imaging of host-pathogen interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kjos, Morten; Aprianto, Rieza; Fernandes, Vitor E; Andrew, Peter W; van Strijp, Jos A G; Nijland, Reindert; Veening, Jan-Willem

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common nasopharyngeal resident in healthy people, but at the same time one of the major causes of infectious diseases such as pneumonia, meningitis and sepsis. The shift from commensal to pathogen and its interaction with host cells is poorly understood. One of the

  1. Bright Fluorescent Streptococcus pneumoniae for Live-Cell Imaging of Host-Pathogen Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kjos, Morten; Aprianto, Rieza; Fernandes, Vitor E.; Andrew, Peter W.; van Strijp, Jos A. G.; Nijland, Reindert; Veening, Jan-Willem

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common nasopharyngeal resident in healthy people but, at the same time, one of the major causes of infectious diseases such as pneumonia, meningitis, and sepsis. The shift from commensal to pathogen and its interaction with host cells are poorly understood. One of the

  2. N-acetylgalatosamine-Mediated Regulation of the aga Operon by AgaR in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Afzal, Muhammad; Shafeeq, Sulman; Ahmed, Hifza; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2016-01-01

    Here, we analyze the transcriptomic response of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 to N-acetylgalactosamine (NAGa). Transcriptome comparison of S. pneumoniae D39 grown in NAGaM17 (0.5% NAGa + M17) to that grown in GM17 (0.5% Glucose + M17) revealed the elevated expression of various carbon metabolic

  3. Characterization of a Multipeptide Lantibiotic Locus in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Maricic

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial communities are established through a combination of cooperative and antagonistic interactions between the inhabitants. Competitive interactions often involve the production of antimicrobial substances, including bacteriocins, which are small antimicrobial peptides that target other community members. Despite the nearly ubiquitous presence of bacteriocin-encoding loci, inhibitory activity has been attributed to only a small fraction of gene clusters. In this study, we characterized a novel locus (the pld locus in the pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae that drives the production of a bacteriocin called pneumolancidin, which has broad antimicrobial activity. The locus encodes an unusual tandem array of four inhibitory peptides, three of which are absolutely required for antibacterial activity. The three peptide sequences are similar but appear to play distinct roles in regulation and inhibition. A modification enzyme typically found in loci encoding a class of highly modified bacteriocins called lantibiotics was required for inhibitory activity. The production of pneumolancidin is controlled by a two-component regulatory system that is activated by the accumulation of modified peptides. The locus is located on a mobile element that has been found in many pneumococcal lineages, although not all elements carry the pld genes. Intriguingly, a minimal region containing only the genes required for pneumolancidin immunity was found in several Streptococcus mitis strains. The pneumolancidin-producing strain can inhibit nearly all pneumococci tested to date and provided a competitive advantage in vivo. These peptides not only represent a unique strategy for bacterial competition but also are an important resource to guide the development of new antimicrobials.

  4. recA-based PCR assay for accurate differentiation of Streptococcus pneumoniae from other viridans streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbinden, A; Köhler, N; Bloemberg, G V

    2011-02-01

    Proper identification of Streptococcus pneumoniae by conventional methods remains problematic. The discriminatory power of the 16S rRNA gene, which can be considered the "gold standard" for molecular identification, is too low to differentiate S. pneumoniae from closely related species such as Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae, Streptococcus mitis, and Streptococcus oralis in the routine clinical laboratory. A 313-bp part of recA was selected on the basis of variability within the S. mitis group, showing <95.8% interspecies homology. In addition, 6 signature nucleotides specific for S. pneumoniae were identified within the 313-bp recA fragment. We show that recA analysis is a useful tool for proper identification to species level within the S. mitis group, in particular, for pneumococci.

  5. recA-Based PCR Assay for Accurate Differentiation of Streptococcus pneumoniae from Other Viridans Streptococci▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbinden, A.; Köhler, N.; Bloemberg, G. V.

    2011-01-01

    Proper identification of Streptococcus pneumoniae by conventional methods remains problematic. The discriminatory power of the 16S rRNA gene, which can be considered the “gold standard” for molecular identification, is too low to differentiate S. pneumoniae from closely related species such as Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae, Streptococcus mitis, and Streptococcus oralis in the routine clinical laboratory. A 313-bp part of recA was selected on the basis of variability within the S. mitis group, showing <95.8% interspecies homology. In addition, 6 signature nucleotides specific for S. pneumoniae were identified within the 313-bp recA fragment. We show that recA analysis is a useful tool for proper identification to species level within the S. mitis group, in particular, for pneumococci. PMID:21147955

  6. Invasive disease by Streptococcus pyogenes: patients hospitalized for 6 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-Constantí, Vanessa; Trenchs-Sainz de la Maza, Victoria; Sanz-Marcos, Nuria Elvira; Guitart-Pardellans, Carmina; Gené-Giralt, Amadeu; Luaces-Cubells, Carles

    2017-07-10

    The last years an increase of severe cases of invasive disease (ID) due to Streptococcus pyogenes or streptococcus b-hemolytic group A (SGA) had been detected. The aim of this study was to analyze the epidemiology and the clinical features of ID due to SGA in a tertiary Pediatric Hospital. Retrospective study in a Pediatric hospital, of all in-patients with final diagnosis of ID due to SGA during 6 years (2009-2014). To consider ID, SGA had to be isolated in sterile samples; in patients with fascitis necroticans in skin samples or in any sample in patients with the diagnostic of Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome (STSS). The SSTS was defined as hypotension and at least 2 of these criteria: renal failure, hepatic failure, acute respiratory distress, tissue necrosis or desquamative erythematous rash. Demographic data, type of infection, risk factors, clinical presentation, analytical data at admission, treatment, need for admission to a pediatric intensive care unit, microbiological data, hospital stay and evolution were collected. Fifty-two (52) cases were included (12/10,000 of all inpatients); 3 years-old was the medium age (p25-75: 1.4-6.9 years); 28 (53.8%) were boys. Fourteen patients (26.9%) had risk factors. Fever was the major symptom (51 patients, 98.1%). The skin lesions were the most frequent clinical manifestations found (21; 40.4%). In 50 (96%) cases, SGA was isolated in at least one sterile sample. Skin and soft tissue infections were diagnosed in 14 patients (26.9%), 14 (26.9%) pneumonias, 12 (23.1%) bones and joints infections, 10 (19.2%) SSTS, 6 (11.5%) occult bacteremia, 4 (7.7%) meningitis and 2 (3.8%) sepsis. Surgery was required in 18 cases (34.6%) and 17 patients (32.7%) needed intensive care. The medium hospital stay was 9.5 days (p25-75: 8-15 days). Three patients presented sequels and one patient died. The ID due to SGA was a rare but serious reason for hospital admission. Skin and soft tissue infections, and pleuroneumonia were the most

  7. Understanding the bacterial polysaccharide antigenicity of Streptococcus agalactiae versus Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadirvelraj, Renuka; Gonzalez-Outeiriño, Jorge; Foley, B Lachele; Beckham, Meredith L; Jennings, Harold J; Foote, Simon; Ford, Michael G; Woods, Robert J

    2006-05-23

    Bacterial surface capsular polysaccharides (CPS) that are similar in carbohydrate sequence may differ markedly in immunogenicity and antigenicity. The structural origin of these phenomena is poorly understood. Such a case is presented by the Gram-positive bacteria Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus; GBS) type III (GBSIII) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (Pn) type 14 (Pn14), which share closely related CPS sequences. Nevertheless, antibodies (Abs) against GBSIII rarely cross-react with the CPS from Pn14. To establish the origin for the variation in CPS antigenicity, models for the immune complexes of CPS fragments from GBSIII and Pn14, with the variable fragment (Fv) of a GBS-specific mAb (mAb 1B1), are presented. The complexes are generated through a combination of comparative Ab modeling and automated ligand docking, followed by explicitly solvated 10-ns molecular dynamics simulations. The relationship between carbohydrate sequence and antigenicity is further quantified through the computation of interaction energies using the Molecular Mechanics-Generalized Born Surface Area (MM-GBSA) method, augmented by conformational entropy estimates. Despite the electrostatic differences between Pn14 and GBSIII CPS, analysis indicates that entropic penalties are primarily responsible for the loss of affinity of the highly flexible Pn14 CPS for mAb 1B1. The similarity of the solution conformation of the relatively rigid GBSIII CPS with that in the immune complex characterizes the previously undescribed 3D structure of the conformational epitope. The analysis provides a comprehensive interpretation for a large body of biochemical and immunological data related to Ab recognition of bacterial polysaccharides and should be applicable to other Ab-carbohydrate interactions.

  8. Carriage rate and serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae amongst children in Thika Hospital, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Githii

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Rates of carriage are highest in infants and the elderly. The objectives of this study were to determine the rate of nasopharyngeal colonization by S. pneumoniae, and to describe the antibiotic resistant patterns and the serotypes of the carried isolates. A cross-sectional study design was used. Nasopharyngeal swabs were collected from 315 children in the months of Octoberand November 2010 and processed to isolate S. pneumoniae. The isolates were serotyped by the Quellung reaction and their antibiotic susceptibilities assessed by the disc diffusion method. The overall nasopharyngeal carriage rate for S. pneumoniae was 17%. Seventeen serotypes were detected amongst 55 strains analysed: 6A, 23F, 19F, 13, 6B, 14A, 20, 7C, 1,15B, 35B, 19A, 11A, 34, 5, 3 and 23A. Susceptibility testing revealed that nearly all (98% were resistant to cotrimoxazole, 9% were resistant to penicillin and 7% to cefotaxime. Resistance to chloramphenicol and erythromycin was 2% and 4%, respectively. All isolates were fully sensitive to tetracycline. High levels of cotrimoxazole resistance and some resistance to other antimicrobial agents commonly used in Thika District Hospital shows that there is need to revise antimicrobial policy in this region in the treatment of invasive pneumococcal infections. The frequent serotypes found in this study have previously been associated with pneumococcal infectionsin children. Several of these serotypes are included in the ten-valent vaccine and therefore useof this vaccine will help reduce pneumococcal infections in Thika.

  9. Circulation of Streptococcus pneumoniae clone Colombia5 ST289 in nine Latin American countries Circulación de Streptococcus pneumoniae clon Colombia5 ST289 en nueve países de América Latina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Firacative

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine genetic relatedness of clone Colombia5 ST289 with invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 5 isolates recovered in nine Latin American countries. METHODS: Forty-four invasive S. pneumoniae serotype 5 isolates recovered from children under 5 years of age in Bolivia, Chile, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, and Venezuela were studied. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns of DNA treated with SmaI restriction enzyme were classified using Tenover's criteria and analyzed with the Fingerprinting II program to determine their genetic relatedness with the Colombian clone. RESULTS: All isolates had a genetic similarity of 78.5% or more with the Colombian clone. Thirteen electrophoretic subtypes derived of pattern A were identified, and five of them (A5, A6, A8, A13, A27 comprised 61.4% of the isolates. CONCLUSIONS: Clone Colombia5 ST289 is disseminated in Latin America. This is important because S. pneumoniae serotype 5 frequently causes invasive disease in the region and is associated with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistance.OBJETIVO: Determinar la relación genética del clon Colombia5 ST289 con los aislamientos invasores de Streptococcus pneumoniae serotipo 5 provenientes de nueve países latinoamericanos. MÉTODOS: Se estudiaron 45 aislamientos invasores de Streptococcus pneumoniae serotipo 5 procedentes de niños menores de 5 años de Bolivia, Chile, Ecuador, Nicaragua, Panamá, Paraguay, Perú, República Dominicana y Venezuela. Los patrones en electroforesis en gel de campo pulsante del ADN tratado con la enzima de restricción SmaI se clasificaron mediante el criterio de Tenover y se analizaron con el programa Fingerprinting II para determinar su relación genética con el clon colombiano. RESULTADOS: Todos los aislamientos tuvieron una similitud genética de 78,5% o mayor con el clon colombiano. Se identificaron 13 subtipos electroforéticos derivados del patrón A y cinco de ellos

  10. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of Streptococcus pneumoniae in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiñones-Falconi, Francisco; Calva, Juan José; López-Vidal, Yolanda; Galicia-Velazco, Miriam; Jiménez-Martinez, María Elena; Larios-Mondragón, Lina

    2004-05-01

    The susceptibility to 14 beta-lactam and non-beta-lactam antimicrobial agents was evaluated for Streptococcus pneumoniae from patients with community-acquired respiratory infections in a Mexican medical center. Three hundred fifteen pneumococcal isolates obtained from patients between 1995 and 2001 were tested by the broth microdilution test. Fifty-two percent of the isolates were nonsusceptible to penicillin (minimal inhibitory concentration, >0.06 microg/mL). Penicillin-nonsusceptible isolates were more likely to exhibit resistance to cephalosporins, macrolides, ciprofloxacin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline when compared to penicillin-susceptible isolates. Ninety-three percent of the penicillin-nonsusceptible isolates were resistant to at least one other class of antimicrobials, in contrast to only 47% of the penicillin-susceptible strains (p amoxicillin/clavulanate, ceftriaxone, levofloxacin, and gatifloxacin. Reduced susceptibility to penicillin was considered to be a reliable marker for the higher probability of multidrug resistance, thus requiring in vitro tests to guide chemotherapy or the choices of parenteral extended spectrum cephalosporins or newer respiratory quinolones.

  11. Conservative sex and the benefits of transformation in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J P Engelmoer

    Full Text Available Natural transformation has significant effects on bacterial genome evolution, but the evolutionary factors maintaining this mode of bacterial sex remain uncertain. Transformation is hypothesized to have both positive and negative evolutionary effects on bacteria. It can facilitate adaptation by combining beneficial mutations into a single individual, or reduce the mutational load by exposing deleterious alleles to natural selection. Alternatively, it may expose transformed cells to damaged or otherwise mutated environmental DNA and is energetically expensive. Here, we examine the long-term effects of transformation in the naturally competent species Streptococcus pneumoniae by evolving populations of wild-type and competence-deficient strains in chemostats for 1000 generations. Half of these populations were exposed to periodic mild stress to examine context-dependent benefits of transformation. We find that competence reduces fitness gain under benign conditions; however, these costs are reduced in the presence of periodic stress. Using whole genome re-sequencing, we show that competent populations fix fewer new mutations and that competence prevents the emergence of mutators. Our results show that during evolution in benign conditions competence helps maintain genome stability but is evolutionary costly; however, during periods of stress this same conservativism enables cells to retain fitness in the face of new mutations, showing for the first time that the benefits of transformation are context dependent.

  12. pneumoniae

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Since the first report in 1967, the incidence of Penicillin Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (Pneu- mococcus) has risen steadily worldwide, and now complicates diagnostic and treatment strategies for infections due to this organism. More worrisome is the fact that in areas where Penicillin Resistant. Streptococcus ...

  13. Meningitis and pneumonia in Guatemalan children: the importance of Haemophilus influenzae type b and Streptococcus pneumoniae Meningitis y neumonía en niños guatemaltecos: importancia de Haemophilus influenzae tipo b y de Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin J. Asturias

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the epidemiology of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib and Streptococcus pneumoniae invasive infections in hospitalized Guatemalan children. This is an important issue since Hib vaccine has not been incorporated into the routine immunization program in Guatemala and information from hospital records in 1995 indicated a low incidence of Hib and S. pneumoniae as causes of meningitis and invasive infections. METHODS: Children who were hospitalized in Guatemala City with clinical signs compatible with bacterial infections were evaluated for evidence of Hib or S. pneumoniae infection. Normally sterile body fluids were cultured, and antigen detection was performed on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and pleural fluid. RESULTS: Of 1 203 children 1-59 months of age hospitalized over a 28-month period, 725 of them (60.3% had a primary diagnosis of pneumonia, 357 (29.7% of meningitis, 60 (5.0% of cellulitis, and 61 (5.1% of sepsis and other conditions. Hib was identified in 20.0% of children with meningitis and S. pneumoniae in 12.9%. The average annual incidence of Hib meningitis was 13.8 cases per 100 000 children under 5 years of age, and 32.4% of meningitides caused by Hib and 58.7% of S. pneumoniae meningitides occurred prior to 6 months of age. Case fatality rates were 14.1%, 37.0%, and 18.0%, respectively, for children with Hib, S. pneumoniae, and culture-negative and antigen-negative meningitis. Prior antibiotic therapy was common and was associated with significant reductions in CSF-culture-positive results for children with other evidence of Hib or S. pneumoniae meningitis. CONCLUSIONS: Improvements in case detection, culture methods, and latex agglutination for antigen detection in CSF resulted in identification of Hib and S. pneumoniae as important causes of severe disease in Guatemalan children. Using a cutoff of > 10 white blood cells per cubic millimeter in CSF would improve the sensitivity for detection of bacterial

  14. Discrimination of Streptococcus pneumoniae from viridans group streptococci by genomic subtractive hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Nao; Seki, Mitsuko; Nakano, Yoshio; Kiyoura, Yusuke; Maeno, Masao; Yamashita, Yoshihisa

    2005-09-01

    Two oligonucleotide primer sets for the discrimination of Streptococcus pneumoniae from "pneumococcus-like" oral streptococcal isolates by PCR were developed. Genomic subtractive hybridization was performed to search for differences between Streptococcus pneumoniae strain WU2 and the most closely related oral streptococcus, Streptococcus mitis strain 903. We identified 19 clones that contained S. pneumoniae-specific nucleotide fragments that were absent from the chromosomal DNA of typical laboratory strains of S. mitis and other oral bacteria. Subsequently, oligonucleotide PCR primers for the detection of S. pneumoniae were designed from the sequences of the subtracted DNA fragments, and the specificities of the 19 primer sets were evaluated by PCR using chromosomal DNAs extracted from four S. pneumoniae clinical isolates and from 20 atypical organisms classified as S. mitis or S. oralis, which harbored genes encoding the pneumococcal virulence factors autolysin (lytA) or pneumolysin (ply), as templates. Of the 19 primer sets, two (Spn9802 and Spn9828) did not amplify PCR products from any of the pneumococcus-like streptococcal strains that we examined. The genes containing the Spn9802 and Spn9828 sequences encoded proteins of unknown function that did not correspond to any previously described proteins in other bacteria. These new oligonucleotide primers may be very useful for early and correct diagnosis of S. pneumoniae infections.

  15. Novel molecular method for identification of Streptococcus pneumoniae applicable to clinical microbiology and 16S rRNA sequence-based microbiome studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholz, Christian F. P.; Poulsen, Knud; Kilian, Mogens

    2012-01-01

    The close phylogenetic relationship of the important pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae and several species of commensal streptococci, particularly Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae, and the recently demonstrated sharing of genes and phenotypic traits previously considered spe...

  16. Septic arthritis of shoeulder caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 23F in a female infant. Report of a case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flores Nava Gerardo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a female infant previously vaccinated against Streptococcus pneumoniae who developed a septic arthritis in the right shoulder. An artrothomy was performed. The culture of the sy- novial fluid was positive for serotype 23F Streptococcus pneumonia.

  17. The Streptococcus pneumoniae pilus-1 displays a biphasic expression pattern.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella De Angelis

    Full Text Available The Streptococcus pneumoniae pilus-1 is encoded by pilus islet 1 (PI-1, which has three clonal variants (clade I, II and III and is present in about 30% of clinical pneumococcal isolates. In vitro and in vivo assays have demonstrated that pilus-1 is involved in attachment to epithelial cells and virulence, as well as protection in mouse models of infection. Several reports suggest that pilus-1 expression is tightly regulated and involves the interplay of numerous genetic regulators, including the PI-1 positive regulator RlrA. In this report we provide evidence that pilus expression, when analyzed at the single-cell level in PI-1 positive strains, is biphasic. In fact, the strains present two phenotypically different sub-populations of bacteria, one that expresses the pilus, while the other does not. The proportions of these two phenotypes are variable among the strains tested and are not influenced by genotype, serotype, growth conditions, colony morphology or by the presence of antibodies directed toward the pilus components. Two sub-populations, enriched in pilus expressing or not expressing bacteria were obtained by means of colony selection and immuno-detection methods for five strains. PI-1 sequencing in the two sub-populations revealed the absence of mutations, thus indicating that the biphasic expression observed is not due to a genetic modification within PI-1. Microarray expression profile and western blot analyses on whole bacterial lysates performed comparing the two enriched sub-populations, revealed that pilus expression is regulated at the transcriptional level (on/off regulation, and that there are no other genes, in addition to those encoded by PI-1, concurrently regulated across the strains tested. Finally, we provide evidence that the over-expression of the RrlA positive regulator is sufficient to induce pilus expression in pilus-1 negative bacteria. Overall, the data presented here suggest that the observed biphasic pilus

  18. Streptococcus pneumoniae Serine Protease HtrA, but Not SFP or PrtA, Is a Major Virulence Factor in Pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoppelaar, S.F. de; Bootsma, H.J.; Zomer, A.L.; Roelofs, J.J.; Hermans, P.W.M.; Veer, C. van't; Poll, T. van der

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus (S.) pneumoniae is a common causative pathogen in pneumonia. Serine protease orthologs expressed by a variety of bacteria have been found of importance for virulence. Previous studies have identified two serine proteases in S. pneumoniae, HtrA (high-temperature requirement A) and PrtA

  19. Streptococcus pneumoniae serine protease HtrA, but not SFP or PrtA, is a major virulence factor in pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Stoppelaar, Sacha F.; Bootsma, Hester J.; Zomer, Aldert; Roelofs, Joris J. T. H.; Hermans, Peter W. M.; van 't Veer, Cornelis; van der Poll, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus (S.) pneumoniae is a common causative pathogen in pneumonia. Serine protease orthologs expressed by a variety of bacteria have been found of importance for virulence. Previous studies have identified two serine proteases in S. pneumoniae, HtrA (high-temperature requirement A) and PrtA

  20. Reduction of Streptococcus pneumoniae Colonization and Dissemination by a Nonopsonic Capsular Polysaccharide Antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R. Doyle

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae colonization of the nasopharynx (NP is a prerequisite for invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD. The marked reduction in IPD that followed the routine use of pneumococcal polysaccharide conjugate vaccines (PCVs has been linked to reduced NP colonization with vaccine-included serotypes (STs, with the caveat that PCVs are less effective against pneumonia than against IPD. Although PCV-elicited opsonic antibodies that enhance phagocytic killing of the homologous ST are considered a key correlate of PCV-mediated protection, recent studies question this relationship for some STs, including ST3. Studies with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs to the pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide (PPS of ST3 (PPS3 have shown that nonopsonic, as well as opsonic, antibodies can each protect mice against pneumonia and sepsis, but the effect of these types of MAbs on NP colonization is unknown. In this study, we determined the effects of protective opsonic and nonopsonic PPS3 MAbs on ST3 NP colonization in mice. Our results show that a nonopsonic MAb reduced early NP colonization and prevented ST3 dissemination to the lungs and blood, but an opsonic MAb did not. Moreover, the opsonic MAb induced a proinflammatory NP cytokine response, but the nonopsonic MAb had an antiinflammatory effect. The effect of the nonopsonic MAb on colonization did not require its Fc region, but its antiinflammatory effect did. Our findings challenge the paradigm that opsonic MAbs are required to prevent NP colonization and suggest that further studies of the activity of nonopsonic antibodies could advance our understanding of mechanisms of PCV efficacy and provide novel correlates of protection.

  1. Community-acquired pneumonia caused by carbapenem-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae: re-examining its prevention and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doi A

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Asako Doi,1,2 Kentaro Iwata,3 Hiroshi Takegawa,4 Kanji Miki,5 Yumi Sono,1,2 Hiroaki Nishioka,2 Jumpei Takeshita,6 Keisuke Tomii,7 Tsunekazu Haruta11Department of Infectious Diseases, 2Department of General Internal Medicine, Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital, 3Division of Infectious Diseases, Kobe University Hospital, Japan; 4Department of Laboratory Medicine, Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital, Japan; 5Hyogo Health Service Association, Hyogo, 6Foundation of Biochemical Research and Innovation, Osaka, 7Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital, Hyogo, JapanAbstract: A 73-year-old man with no significant past medical history or any history of health care visits was hospitalized for pneumonia. Sputum culture revealed multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, even to carbapenems. The patient was later treated successfully with levofloxacin. Throat cultures from his two grandchildren revealed S. pneumoniae with the same susceptibility pattern. Analysis for resistant genes revealed gPRSP (pbp1a + pbp2x + pbp2b gene variants in both the patient and his grandchildren, none of whom had received pneumococcal vaccines of any kind. This case illustrates the importance of the emergence of carbapenem-resistant S. pneumoniae. Non-rational use of carbapenems for community-acquired infections may be counterproductive. This case also highlights the importance of pneumococcal vaccinations in children and the elderly.Keywords: carbapenem resistance, Streptococcus pneumoniae, pneumonia

  2. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome caused by the dissemination of an invasive emm3/ST15 strain of Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Nai, Emina; Yoshida, Tomohiro; Endo, Shota; Hamajima, Emi; Akiyama, Satoka; Ikuta, Yoji; Obana, Natsuko; Kawaguchi, Takahiro; Hayashi, Kenta; Noda, Masahiro; Sumita, Tomoko; Kokaji, Masayuki; Katori, Tatsuo; Hashino, Masanori; Oba, Kunihiro; Kuroda, Makoto

    2017-12-18

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus [GAS]) is a major human pathogen that causes a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. Although invasive GAS (iGAS) infections are relatively uncommon, emm3/ST15 GAS is a highly virulent, invasive, and pathogenic strain. Global molecular epidemiology analysis has suggested that the frequency of emm3 GAS has been recently increasing. A 14-year-old patient was diagnosed with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome and severe pneumonia, impaired renal function, and rhabdomyolysis. GAS was isolated from a culture of endotracheal aspirates and designated as KS030. Comparative genome analysis suggested that KS030 is classified as emm3 (emm-type) and ST15 (multilocus sequencing typing [MLST]), which is similar to iGAS isolates identified in the UK (2013) and Switzerland (2015). We conclude that the global dissemination of emm3/ST15 GAS strain has the potential to cause invasive disease.

  3. A functional genomics approach to establish the complement of carbohydrate transporters in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Bidossi

    Full Text Available The aerotolerant anaerobe Streptococcus pneumoniae is part of the normal nasopharyngeal microbiota of humans and one of the most important invasive pathogens. A genomic survey allowed establishing the occurrence of twenty-one phosphotransferase systems, seven carbohydrate uptake ABC transporters, one sodium:solute symporter and a permease, underlining an exceptionally high capacity for uptake of carbohydrate substrates. Despite high genomic variability, combined phenotypic and genomic analysis of twenty sequenced strains did assign the substrate specificity only to two uptake systems. Systematic analysis of mutants for most carbohydrate transporters enabled us to assign a phenotype and substrate specificity to twenty-three transport systems. For five putative transporters for galactose, pentoses, ribonucleosides and sulphated glycans activity was inferred, but not experimentally confirmed and only one transport system remains with an unknown substrate and lack of any functional annotation. Using a metabolic approach, 80% of the thirty-two fermentable carbon substrates were assigned to the corresponding transporter. The complexity and robustness of sugar uptake is underlined by the finding that many transporters have multiple substrates, and many sugars are transported by more than one system. The present work permits to draw a functional map of the complete arsenal of carbohydrate utilisation proteins of pneumococci, allows re-annotation of genomic data and might serve as a reference for related species. These data provide tools for specific investigation of the roles of the different carbon substrates on pneumococcal physiology in the host during carriage and invasive infection.

  4. Genetic transformation of Streptococcus pneumoniae by DNA cloned into the single-stranded bacteriophage f1.

    OpenAIRE

    Barany, F; Boeke, J D

    1983-01-01

    A Staphylococcus aureus plasmid derivative, pFB9, coding for erythromycin and chloramphenicol resistance was cloned into the filamentous Escherichia coli phage f1. Recombinant phage-plasmid hybrids, designated plasmids, were isolated from E. coli and purified by transformation into Streptococcus pneumoniae. Single-stranded DNA was prepared from E. coli cells infected with two different plasmids, fBB101 and fBB103. Introduction of fully or partially single-stranded DNA into Streptococcus pneum...

  5. Dendritic Cell-Derived Exosomes Express a Streptococcus pneumoniae Capsular Polysaccharide Type 14 Cross-Reactive Antigen That Induces Protective Immunoglobulin Responses against Pneumococcal Infection in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    II, is unknown. Invasive infections with Streptococcus pneumoniae are a leading cause of meningitis and a major cause of otitis media and bacteremia...Use of Laboratory Animals (27a). MAbs specific for bacterial polysaccharides. A mouse IgG1() monoclonal antibody (MAb) (clone 44.1) and two IgM...were obtained from bone marrow (BM) cells cultured in media supplemented with 10 ng/ml of murine recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating

  6. Polymicrobial subdural empyema: involvement of Streptococcus pneumoniae revealed by lytA PCR and antigen detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Thomas; Clemmensen, Dorte; Ridderberg, Winnie

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a case of a subdural empyema (SDE) caused by a coinfection with Streptococcus intermedius and Streptococcus pneumoniae, initially considered a S. intermedius infection only. An otherwise healthy 11-year-old female was admitted to the hospital after 5 days of illness. Symptoms....... The empyema was evacuated twice, day 8 and 18, with good results. Primary samples showed growth of S. intermedius only. The severity of the clinical picture elicited supplementary samples, which were additionally positive for S. pneumoniae by an in-house specific lytA PCR and/or a commercial antigen test....

  7. Streptococcus pneumoniae: estudo das cepas isoladas de liquor Streptococcus pneumoniae: a study of strains isolated from cerebrospinal fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ataiza C. Vieira

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar a freqüência dos sorotipos capsulares e a susceptibilidade antimicrobiana de cepas de Streptococcus pneumoniae, assim como dar suporte à indicação de vacinas disponíveis e ao uso de antimicrobianos. MÉTODOS: Neste estudo retrospectivo, foram adotadas metodologias padronizadas para identificar, sorotipar e determinar a susceptibilidade à penicilina, cefotaxima e vancomicina. O estudo foi realizado com cepas de pneumococo isoladas de liquor em pacientes atendidos nos hospitais públicos e em três hospitais particulares do Distrito Federal no período de janeiro de 1995 a dezembro de 2004. A identificação e a determinação de susceptibilidade a antimicrobianos foi realizada no Laboratório Central de Saúde Pública no Distrito Federal. A sorotipagem foi realizada no Instituto Adolfo Lutz. RESULTADOS: Foram isoladas 232 cepas de pneumococo, compreendendo 126 cepas (54,31% de pacientes do sexo masculino. A idade dos pacientes variou de 0 a 62 anos, sendo agrupados em faixas etárias de 0 a 5, 6 a 17, 18 a 50 e acima de 50 anos. Identificaram-se 36 sorotipos distintos. Desses destacaram-se oito: 14, 6B, 18C, 5, 19F, 23F, 9V e 6A. O teste de oxacilina caracterizou 67 cepas resistentes à penicilina; dessas, 47 foram confirmadas pelo E teste com resistência de nível intermediário. Nenhuma cepa apresentou resistência de alto nível. CONCLUSÃO: A resistência do pneumococo à penicilina apresentou um aumento gradativo nos últimos 10 anos no Distrito Federal. Os sorotipos mais isolados na faixa etária de 0 a 5 anos foram também os mais envolvidos na resistência à penicilina, e estão incluídos na vacina 7-valente.OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency of capsular serotypes and the antimicrobial susceptibility of strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae, as well as to provide recommendations on the use of available vaccines and antimicrobial drugs. METHODS: In this retrospective study, standard procedures were followed

  8. Streptococcus pneumoniae Coinfection Is Correlated with the Severity of H1N1 Pandemic Influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisterna, Daniel; Savji, Nazir; Bussetti, Ana Valeria; Kapoor, Vishal; Hui, Jeffrey; Tokarz, Rafal; Briese, Thomas; Baumeister, Elsa; Lipkin, W. Ian

    2009-01-01

    Background Initial reports in May 2009 of the novel influenza strain H1N1pdm estimated a case fatality rate (CFR) of 0.6%, similar to that of seasonal influenza. In July 2009, however, Argentina reported 3056 cases with 137 deaths, representing a CFR of 4.5%. Potential explanations for increased CFR included virus reassortment or genetic drift, or infection of a more vulnerable population. Virus genomic sequencing of 26 Argentinian samples representing both severe and mild disease indicated no evidence of reassortment, mutations associated with resistance to antiviral drugs, or genetic drift that might contribute to virulence. Furthermore, no evidence was found for increased frequency of risk factors for H1N1pdm disease. Methods/Principal Findings We examined nasopharyngeal swab samples (NPS) from 199 cases of H1N1pdm infection from Argentina with MassTag PCR, testing for 33 additional microbial agents. The study population consisted of 199 H1N1pdm-infected subjects sampled between 23 June and 4 July 2009. Thirty-nine had severe disease defined as death (n = 20) or hospitalization (n = 19); 160 had mild disease. At least one additional agent of potential pathogenic importance was identified in 152 samples (76%), including Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 62); Haemophilus influenzae (n = 104); human respiratory syncytial virus A (n = 11) and B (n = 1); human rhinovirus A (n = 1) and B (n = 4); human coronaviruses 229E (n = 1) and OC43 (n = 2); Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 2); Acinetobacter baumannii (n = 2); Serratia marcescens (n = 1); and Staphylococcus aureus (n = 35) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA, n = 6). The presence of S. pneumoniae was strongly correlated with severe disease. S. pneumoniae was present in 56.4% of severe cases versus 25% of mild cases; more than one-third of H1N1pdm NPS with S. pneumoniae were from subjects with severe disease (22 of 62 S. pneumoniae-positive NPS, p = 0

  9. Streptococcus pneumoniae cocultured with fibroblasts enhances both interferon production and cytotoxic activity by lymphocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Weigent, D A; Baron, S; Stanton, G J

    1985-01-01

    Cell-mediated cytotoxicity against normal human fibroblasts was dependent on treatment of the fibroblasts with Streptococcus pneumoniae. Both spontaneous and interferon (IFN)-enhanced lymphocytes killed human foreskin (HFS) or skin muscle cells cocultured with S. pneumoniae five- to eightfold more than control nontreated cells. Based on Percoll gradient centrifugation, the cytotoxic effector cell migrated like a large granular lymphocyte. The human IFN produced from mixtures of HFS cells, lym...

  10. Radiolabeling of gemifloxacin with technetium-99m and biological evaluation in artificially Streptococcus pneumoniae infected rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syed Qaiser Shah; Muhammad Rafiullah Khan

    2011-01-01

    In the current investigation complexation of the gemifloxacin (GIN) with technetium-99 m ( 99m Tc) and its biological evaluation in artificially Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae) infected rats was assessed as potential S. pneumoniae infection radiotracer. Radiochemically the 99m Tc-GIN complex was further analyzed in terms of stability in saline, in vitro stability in serum at 37 deg C, in vitro binding with S. pneumoniae and biodistribution in artificially S. pneumoniae (living and heat killed) infected rats. The complex was found 97.25 ± 0.25% radiochemically stable in saline at 30 min after reconstitution. The stability of the 99m Tc-GIN complex was decreased to 90.50 ± 0.20% within 240 min after reconstitution. In serum the 99m Tc-GIN complex showed stable profile with the appearance of 18.85% free tracer within 16 h of incubation. The 99m Tc-GIN complex showed saturated in vitro binding with S. pneumoniae after different intervals. Almost five fold uptake was observed in living S. pneumoniae infected muscle of the rats as compared to the inflamed and normal muscle. No significant difference in the uptake of heat killed S. pneumoniae infected, inflamed and normal muscles of the rats. The high RCP yield in saline, in vitro permanence in serum, in vitro binding with living S. pneumoniae and biodistribution in artificially S. pneumoniae infected rats we recommend the 99m Tc-GIN as potential S. pneumoniae infection radiotracer. (author)

  11. Drug-resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates among Spanish middle aged and older adults with community-acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raga-Luria Xavier

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pneumococcal diseases remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Updated data on drug-resistance from different populations may be important to recognize changes in disease patterns. This study assessed current levels of penicilin resistance among Streptococcus Pneumoniae causing pneumonia in Spanish middle age and older adults. Methods Antimicrobial susceptibility was tested for 104 consecutive isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae recovered from patients 50 years or older with radiographically confirmed pneumonia in the region of Tarragona (Spain between 2002 and 2007. According to the minimum inhibitory concentration of tested antimicrobials (penicillin, erythromycin, cefotaxime and levofloxacin strains were classified as susceptible or resistant. Antimicrobial resistance was determined for early cases (2002–2004 and contemporary cases (2005–2007. Results Twenty-seven (25.9% were penicillin-resistant strains (19 strains with intermediate resistance and 8 strains with high resistance. Penicillin-resistance was higher in 2002–2004 than in 2005–2007 (39.5% vs 18.2%, p = 0.017. Of 27 penicillin-resistant strains, 10 (37% were resistant to erythromycin, 8 (29.6% to cefotaxime, 2 (7.4% to levofloxacin, and 4 (14.8% were identified as multidrug resistant. Case-fatality rate was higher among those patients who had an infection caused by any penicillin susceptible strain (16.9% than in those with infections due to penicillin-resistant strains. Conclusion Resistance to penicillin among Streptococcus pneumoniae remains high, but such resistance does not result in increased mortality in patients with pneumococcal pneumonia.

  12. Efficacy of some synthetic antibiotics on Streptococcus pneumoniae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of some synthetic antibiotics on Streptococcus pnemoniae and Proteus mirabilis isolated from cultured Clarias gariepinus, an important food fish raised in a concrete tank was carried out to ascertain their remedies on mortalities of the Clarias gariepinus adult fish. Streptococcus pnemoniae and Proteus mirabilis were ...

  13. Infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae in children with or without radiologically confirmed pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dafne C. Andrade

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: Among children with clinical diagnosis of community‐acquired pneumonia submitted to chest radiograph, those with radiologically confirmed pneumonia present a higher rate of infection by S. pneumoniae when compared with those with a normal chest radiograph.

  14. In vitro Reconstitution of Peptidoglycan Assembly from the Gram-Positive Pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zapun, A.; Philippe, J.; Abrahams, K.A.; Signor, L.; Roper, D.I.; Breukink, E.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/120305100; Vernet, T.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the molecular basis of bacterial cell wall assembly is of paramount importance in addressing the threat of increasing antibiotic resistance worldwide. Streptococcus pneumoniae presents a particularly acute problem in this respect, as it is capable of rapid evolution by homologous

  15. Multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from healthy Ghanaian preschool children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dayie, Nicholas Tete Kwaku Dzifa; Arhin, Reuben E.; Newman, Mercy J.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the cause of high mortality among children worldwide. Antimicrobial treatment and vaccination are used to control pneumococcal infections. In Ghana, data on antimicrobial resistance and the prevalence of multidrug-resistant pneumococcal clones are scarce; hence, the ai...

  16. Pyruvate Oxidase Influences the Sugar Utilization Pattern and Capsule Production in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvalho, Sandra M.; Farshchi Andisi, Vahid; Gradstedt, Henrik; Neef, Jolanda; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Neves, Ana R.; Bijlsma, Jetta J. E.

    2013-01-01

    Pyruvate oxidase is a key function in the metabolism and lifestyle of many lactic acid bacteria and its activity depends on the presence of environmental oxygen. In Streptococcus pneumoniae the protein has been suggested to play a major role in metabolism and has been implicated in virulence,

  17. Plasimids containing the gene for DNA polymerase I from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacks, Sanford A.; Martinez, Susana; Lopez, Paloma; Espinosa, Manuel

    1991-01-01

    A method is disclosed for cloning the gene which encodes a DNA polymerase-exonuclease of Streptococcus pneumoniae. Plasmid pSM22, the vector containing the pneumocccal polA gene, facilitates the expression of 50-fold greater amounts of the PolI enzyme.

  18. Characterization of the ROK-family transcriptional regulator RokA of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shafeeq, Sulman; Kloosterman, Tomas G.; Rajendran, Vijayanand; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Kilian, M.

    2012-01-01

    The Gram-positive human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae possesses an unusually high number of gene clusters specific for carbohydrate utilization. This provides it with the ability to use a wide array of sugars, which may aid during infection and survival in different environmental conditions

  19. The ParB-parS Chromosome Segregation System Modulates Competence Development in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Attaiech, Laetitia; Minnen, Anita; Kjos, Morten; Gruber, Stephan; Veening, Jan-Willem

    UNLABELLED: ParB proteins bind centromere-like DNA sequences called parS sites and are involved in plasmid and chromosome segregation in bacteria. We previously showed that the opportunistic human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae contains four parS sequences located close to the origin of

  20. 77 FR 26014 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: P4 Peptide From Streptococcus Pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-02

    ... Licensing and Marketing Specialist, Technology Transfer Office, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention... Grant of Exclusive License: P4 Peptide From Streptococcus Pneumoniae AGENCY: Technology Transfer Office... for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Technology Transfer Office, Department of Health and Human...

  1. Gene Expression Platform for Synthetic Biology in the Human Pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorg, Robin A; Kuipers, Oscar P; Veening, Jan-Willem

    2015-01-01

    The human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is a bacterium that owes its success to complex gene expression regulation patterns on both the cellular and the population level. Expression of virulence factors enables a mostly hazard-free presence of the commensal, in balance with the

  2. Epidemiology of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus colonization in healthy Venezuelan children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quintero, B.; Araque, M.; Gaast-de Jongh, C.E. van der; Escalona, F.; Correa, M.; Morillo-Puente, S.; Vielma, S.; Hermans, P.W.M.

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. We investigated both the colonization and co-colonization characteristics for these pathogens among 250 healthy children from 2 to 5 years of age in Merida, Venezuela, in 2007. The prevalence of

  3. Comparative study of five different DNA fingerprint techniques for molecular typing of Streptococcus pneumoniae strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.W.M. Hermans (Peter); M. Sluijter (Marcel); T. Hoogenboezem (Theo); H. Heersma; A.F. van Belkum (Alex); R. de Groot (Ronald)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of this study was to identify the strengths and weaknesses of five DNA fingerprint methods for epidemiological typing of Streptococcus pneumoniae. We investigated the usefulness of (i) ribotyping, (ii) BOX fingerprinting with the BOX repetitive sequence of S.

  4. Novel BOX repeat PCR assay for high-resolution typing of Streptococcus pneumoniae strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.F. van Belkum (Alex); R. de Groot (Ronald); P.W.M. Hermans (Peter); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); M. Sluijter (Marcel)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractTyping data obtained by specifically targeting a single, high-stringency PCR at the pneumococcal BOX repeat element for 28 strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae completely corroborated the resolutions attained by five genotypic procedures as described by Hermans et al.

  5. Multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae in Poland: identification of emerging clones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Overweg (Karin); P.W.M. Hermans (Peter); K. Trzcinski; M. Sluijter (Marcel); W. Hryniewicz

    1999-01-01

    textabstractPenicillin resistance among Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates has rapidly emerged in Poland during the last decade and has reached prevalence levels of up to 14.4% in 1997. In order to investigate the nature of this increase, a molecular epidemiological

  6. Transcriptional and metabolic effects of glucose on Streptococcus pneumoniae sugar metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paixão, Laura; Caldas, José; Kloosterman, Tomas G; Kuipers, Oscar P; Vinga, Susana; Neves, Ana R

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a strictly fermentative human pathogen that relies on carbohydrate metabolism to generate energy for growth. The nasopharynx colonized by the bacterium is poor in free sugars, but mucosa lining glycans can provide a source of sugar. In blood and inflamed tissues glucose

  7. Plasmids containing the gene for DNA polymerase I from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacks, S.A.; Martinez, S.; Lopez, P.; Espinosa, M.

    1987-08-28

    A method is disclosed for cloning the gene which encodes a DNA polymerase-exonuclease of /und Streptococcus/ /und pneumoniae/. Plasmid pSM22, the vector containing the pneumococcal polA gene, facilitates the expression of 50-fold greater amounts of the PolI enzyme. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  8. Carrier state of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Neisseria meningitidis and Corynebacterium diphtheriae among school children in Pokhara, Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharm Raj Bhatta

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the incidence of carrier state of Haemophilus influenzae type b, Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Neisseria meningitidis and Corynebacterium diphtheriae among school children. Methods: Specimen from posterior pharyngeal wall and tonsils were collected on calcium alginate coated swabs from 1 02 participants. Processing of specimen and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was done by standard procedures. Results: Potential pathogens isolated in our study were S. pneumoniae (14.7%, Staphylococcus aureus (12.7%, Corynebacterium diphtheriae (3.9%, Streptococcus pyogenes (3.9% and Haemophilus influenzae (1.9%. Important findings in antibiogram include high resistance of S. pneumoniae to penicillin (73% and resistance of Staphylococcus aureus to oxacillin (23%. Conclusions: Pharyngeal colonization by S. pneumoniae among school children was found high and there is need of introduction of pneumococcal vaccines among children. Despite expected universal vaccination, pharyngeal colonization by Corynebacterium diphtheriae is possible and there is possibility of transmission.

  9. Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype-2 childhood meningitis in Bangladesh: a newly recognized pneumococcal infection threat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir K Saha

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of meningitis in countries where pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV targeting commonly occurring serotypes are not routinely used. However, effectiveness of PCV would be jeopardized by emergence of invasive pneumococcal diseases (IPD caused by serotypes which are not included in PCV. Systematic hospital based surveillance in Bangladesh was established and progressively improved to determine the pathogens causing childhood sepsis and meningitis. This also provided the foundation for determining the spectrum of serotypes causing IPD. This article reports an unprecedented upsurge of serotype 2, an uncommon pneumococcal serotype, without any known intervention. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Cases with suspected IPD had blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF collected from the beginning of 2001 till 2009. Pneumococcal serotypes were determined by capsular swelling of isolates or PCR of culture-negative CSF specimens. Multicenter national surveillance, expanded from 2004, identified 45,437 patients with suspected bacteremia who were blood cultured and 10,618 suspected meningitis cases who had a lumber puncture. Pneumococcus accounted for 230 culture positive cases of meningitis in children <5 years. Serotype-2 was the leading cause of pneumococcal meningitis, accounting for 20.4% (45/221; 95% CI 15%-26% of cases. Ninety eight percent (45/46 of these serotype-2 strains were isolated from meningitis cases, yielding the highest serotype-specific odds ratio for meningitis (29.6; 95% CI 3.4-256.3. The serotype-2 strains had three closely related pulsed field gel electrophoresis types. CONCLUSIONS: S. pneumoniae serotype-2 was found to possess an unusually high potential for causing meningitis and was the leading serotype-specific cause of childhood meningitis in Bangladesh over the past decade. Persisting disease occurrence or progressive spread would represent a major potential infection threat since serotype-2

  10. Epigenetic Switch Driven by DNA Inversions Dictates Phase Variation in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is an important epigenetic mechanism for phenotypic diversification in all forms of life. We previously described remarkable cell-to-cell heterogeneity in epigenetic pattern within a clonal population of Streptococcus pneumoniae, a leading human pathogen. We here report that the epigenetic diversity is caused by extensive DNA inversions among hsdSA, hsdSB, and hsdSC, three methyltransferase hsdS genes in the Spn556II type-I restriction modification (R-M locus. Because hsdSA encodes the sequence recognition subunit of this type-I R-M DNA methyltransferase, these site-specific recombinations generate pneumococcal cells with variable HsdSA alleles and thereby diverse genome methylation patterns. Most importantly, the DNA methylation pattern specified by the HsdSA1 allele leads to the formation of opaque colonies, whereas the pneumococci lacking HsdSA1 produce transparent colonies. Furthermore, this HsdSA1-dependent phase variation requires intact DNA methylase activity encoded by hsdM in the Spn556II (renamed colony opacity determinant or cod locus. Thus, the DNA inversion-driven ON/OFF switch of the hsdSA1 allele in the cod locus and resulting epigenetic switch dictate the phase variation between the opaque and transparent phenotypes. Phase variation has been well documented for its importance in pneumococcal carriage and invasive infection, but its molecular basis remains unclear. Our work has discovered a novel epigenetic cause for this significant pathobiology phenomenon in S. pneumoniae. Lastly, our findings broadly represents a significant advancement in our understanding of bacterial R-M systems and their potential in shaping epigenetic and phenotypic diversity of the prokaryotic organisms because similar site-specific recombination systems widely exist in many archaeal and bacterial species.

  11. Coordinated Bacteriocin Expression and Competence in Streptococcus pneumoniae Contributes to Genetic Adaptation through Neighbor Predation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Yun Wholey

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus has remained a persistent cause of invasive and mucosal disease in humans despite the widespread use of antibiotics and vaccines. The resilience of this organism is due to its capacity for adaptation through the uptake and incorporation of new genetic material from the surrounding microbial community. DNA uptake and recombination is controlled by a tightly regulated quorum sensing system that is triggered by the extracellular accumulation of competence stimulating peptide (CSP. In this study, we demonstrate that CSP can stimulate the production of a diverse array of blp bacteriocins. This cross stimulation occurs through increased production and secretion of the bacteriocin pheromone, BlpC, and requires a functional competence regulatory system. We show that a highly conserved motif in the promoter of the operon encoding BlpC and its transporter mediates the upregulation by CSP. The accumulation of BlpC following CSP stimulation results in augmented activation of the entire blp locus. Using biofilm-grown organisms as a model for competition and genetic exchange on the mucosal surface, we demonstrate that DNA exchange is enhanced by bacteriocin secretion suggesting that co-stimulation of bacteriocins with competence provides an adaptive advantage. The blp and com regulatory pathways are believed to have diverged and specialized in a remote ancestor of pneumococcus. Despite this, the two systems have maintained a regulatory connection that promotes competition and adaptation by targeting for lysis a wide array of potential competitors while simultaneously providing the means for incorporation of their DNA.

  12. Inspecting the potential physiological and biomedical value of 44 conserved uncharacterised proteins of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Galiano, Antonio J; Yuste, José; Cercenado, María I; de la Campa, Adela G

    2014-08-05

    The major Gram-positive coccoid pathogens cause similar invasive diseases and show high rates of antimicrobial resistance. Uncharacterised proteins shared by these organisms may be involved in virulence or be targets for antimicrobial therapy. Forty four uncharacterised proteins from Streptococcus pneumoniae with homologues in Enterococcus faecalis and/or Staphylococcus aureus were selected for analysis. These proteins showed differences in terms of sequence conservation and number of interacting partners. Twenty eight of these proteins were monodomain proteins and 16 were modular, involving domain combinations and, in many cases, predicted unstructured regions. The genes coding for four of these 44 proteins were essential. Genomic and structural studies showed one of the four essential genes to code for a promising antibacterial target. The strongest impact of gene removal was on monodomain proteins showing high sequence conservation and/or interactions with many other proteins. Eleven out of 40 knockouts (one for each gene) showed growth delay and 10 knockouts presented a chaining phenotype. Five of these chaining mutants showed a lack of putative DNA-binding proteins. This suggest this phenotype results from a loss of overall transcription regulation. Five knockouts showed defective autolysis in response to penicillin and vancomycin, and attenuated virulence in an animal model of sepsis. Uncharacterised proteins make up a reservoir of polypeptides of different physiological importance and biomedical potential. A promising antibacterial target was identified. Five of the 44 examined proteins seemed to be virulence factors.

  13. Recombination in Streptococcus pneumoniae Lineages Increase with Carriage Duration and Size of the Polysaccharide Capsule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrispin Chaguza

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae causes a high burden of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD globally, especially in children from resource-poor settings. Like many bacteria, the pneumococcus can import DNA from other strains or even species by transformation and homologous recombination, which has allowed the pneumococcus to evade clinical interventions such as antibiotics and pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs. Pneumococci are enclosed in a complex polysaccharide capsule that determines the serotype; the capsule varies in size and is associated with properties including carriage prevalence and virulence. We determined and quantified the association between capsule and recombination events using genomic data from a diverse collection of serotypes sampled in Malawi. We determined both the amount of variation introduced by recombination relative to mutation (the relative rate and how many individual recombination events occur per isolate (the frequency. Using univariate analyses, we found an association between both recombination measures and multiple factors associated with the capsule, including duration and prevalence of carriage. Because many capsular factors are correlated, we used multivariate analysis to correct for collinearity. Capsule size and carriage duration remained positively associated with recombination, although with a reduced P value, and this effect may be mediated through some unassayed additional property associated with larger capsules. This work describes an important impact of serotype on recombination that has been previously overlooked. While the details of how this effect is achieved remain to be determined, it may have important consequences for the serotype-specific response to vaccines and other interventions.

  14. Serotypes and antimicrobial resistance of meningeal isolates of Streptococcus pneumonia. Cuba, 2007-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilda Toraño-Peraza

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available An observational study was conducted to know the serotypes and antimicrobial susceptibility of isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae responsible for meningitis in Cuba, where there is no vaccine yet to prevent invasive pneumococcal disease. The study included the total number of isolates submitted to the "Pedro Kourí" Institute between 2007 and 2012 (N=237. Serotypes identification was performed using capsular swelling test and antimicrobial susceptibility was studied by determining the minimum inhibitory concentration using the broth microdilution method. Predominant serotypes were 6A, 6B, 14, 19F and 23F and other non-vaccinal 18 serogroups/serotypes were identified in 29.1% of the isolates. A tendency to an increased resistance to penicillin (44.3 % was observed; the most common resistance patterns were: penicillin-trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and penicillin-erythromycin (21.1% and 10.5%, respectively. The largest number of isolates resistant to penicillin was in serotypes 6B, 14, 19F and 23F and the possibility of resistant non-vaccine serotypes emergence should be considered. The results show that 70.4 % of the isolates studied corresponds to the serotypes included in 13-valent conjugated pneumococcal vaccine, but with 10-valent it would achieve a lower vaccination potential coverage (56.1%. This information must be considered when evaluating the decision to use in Cuba any commercially available vaccine or the proposal of another strategy of vaccination from autochthonous vaccine candidates.

  15. Uji Daya Hambat Ekstrak Buah Belimbing Manis (Averrhoa carambola terhadap Pertumbuhan Bakteri Streptococcus pneumoniae secara In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Risandi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakBuah belimbing manis (Averrhoa carambola merupakan salah satu tanaman Indonesia yang diyakini memiliki khasiat obat. Salah satu manfaat yang dapat diambil dari sari buah belimbing manis (Averrhoa carambola adalah dapat mengobati radang tenggorokan. Radang tenggorokan merupakan salah satu infeksi yang disebabkan oleh bakteri Streptococcus pneumoniae. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah menentukan daya hambat ekstrak buah belimbing manis (Averrhoa carambola terhadap pertumbuhan bakteri Streptococcus pneumoniae  secara in vitro. Metode studi ini ialah eksperimental dengan desain postest only control group design yang dilakukan di Laboratorium Biota Sumatera Universitas Andalas dan Laboratorium Mikrobiologi Fakultas Kedokteran Universitas Andalas dari Agustus sampai Oktober 2014. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa ekstrak buah belimbing manis (Averrhoa carambola dengan konsentrasi yaitu 5%, 10%, 15% dan 20% tidak memiliki daya hambat terhadap pertumbuhan bakteri Streptococcus pneumoniae.  Hal ini terbukti karena tidak terbentuk zona hambat pada agar darah dan tidak terdapat pengaruh lama kontak ekstrak buah belimbing manis (Averrhoa carambola  terhadap pertumbuhan bakteri Streptococcus pneumoniae secara in vitro. Ekstrak buah belimbing manis tidak memiliki efek antibakteri terhadap pertumbuhan bakteri Streptococcus pneumoniae.Kata kunci: ekstrak buah belimbing manis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, daya hambat Abstract             Star fruit (Averrhoa carambola is a Indonesian plant that is believed to have medicinal properties. One of the benefits that can be drawn from the juice of star fruit (Averrhoa carambola is the ability to treat strep throat. Strep throat is a bacterial infection caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae. The objective of this study was to determine the inhibitory extract of star fruit (Averrhoa carambola on the growth of the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae in vitro. This was an experimental  research  with design

  16. Case-control study of pneumonia patients with Streptococcus anginosus group bacteria in their sputum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Jun; Sakanashi, Daisuke; Haranaga, Shusaku; Kinjo, Takeshi; Hagihara, Mao; Kato, Hideo; Suematsu, Hiroyuki; Yamagishi, Yuka; Fujita, Jiro; Mikamo, Hiroshige

    2016-12-01

    In recent years, Streptococcus anginosus group (SAG) bacteria are becoming increasingly recognized as important pneumonia-causing pathogens. Although several small studies have been reported, the features of SAG pneumonia remain unclear, because the identification of SAG from sputum cultures is not routinely performed in most microbiology laboratories. The aim of this study was to elucidate the clinical characteristics of SAG pneumonia. This was a retrospective case-control study utilizing data obtained in our hospital between September 2009 and June 2016. We investigated 31 patients with SAG pneumonia (PWP), and also assessed the difference between the 31 PWP and 37 patients without pneumonia (PWOP) in whose sputum SAG was detected. Seventy-one percent of the patients were men and the median age was 78 years in the PWP. Univariate analysis indicated that the PWP were significantly more often a bed-ridden (p pneumonia (NHCAP) was the more common type of pneumonia (54.8%). S. anginosus was detected significantly more frequently in sputum cultures of PWP than PWOP (p bacteria. SAG should be recognized as important causative pathogens of pneumonia, particularly among elderly patients with underlying disease associated with aspiration. NHCAP was the more common type of SAG pneumonia in this study. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Internamento devido a PAC por Streptococcus pneumoniae - Avaliação de factores de mortalidade Streptococcus pneumoniae - caused CAP in hospitalised patients: mortality predictors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Figueiredo

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available A avaliação da gravidade perante qualquer caso de pneumonia adquirida na comunidade (PAC é de suma importância, pois dela decorrem decisões como a necessidade de internamento e o tratamento empírico inicial. Os autores apresentam um estudo retrospectivo, que incluiu doentes internados devido a pneumonia por Streptococcus pneumoniae durante o ano de 2006, no Hospital de São João. A confirmação etiológica de infecção foi feita por isolamentos no sangue, líquido pleural, secreções traqueobrônquicas, lavado brônquico, lavado broncoalveolar e pesquisa de antigenúria. Foram analisados os factores de risco e avaliados, com base nas normas PSI (Pneumonia Severity Index e da British Thoracic Society (BTS - CURB-65. A análise estatística foi efectuada utilizando teste T para amostras independentes e ANOVA, usando o programa de análise estatística SPSS 14.0. Foram incluídos 104 doentes com idade mediana de 63 anos, sendo 67,3% do sexo masculino. O estudo revelou existir uma associação com significado estatístico entre os resultados de PSI e CURB-65 e a evolução para a mortalidade. Apesar da melhoria dos meios diagnósticos e profilácticos, e da terapêutica antibiótica, a pneumonia pneumocócica permanece uma entidade de grande morbilidade e mortalidade. O valor preditivo das normas PSI e CURB-65 foi confirmado nesta população de doentes, documentando uma correlação entre o número de factores de risco e a evolução da doença.Probably the most important decision in the management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia (CAP is patient site of care. Patients with Streptococcus pneumoniae-caused CAP admitted to our hospital between 1st January and 31st December 2006 were retrospectively analysed. Samples of blood, sputum, bronchial and bronchoalveolar lavage and urine were collected for microbiological testing using standard culture techniques and urine antigen detection. Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI and British Thoracic Society

  18. Viridans group streptococci are donors in horizontal transfer of topoisomerase IV genes to Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsalobre, Luz; Ferrándiz, María José; Liñares, Josefina; Tubau, Fe; de la Campa, Adela G

    2003-07-01

    A total of 46 ciprofloxacin-resistant (Cip(r)) Streptococcus pneumoniae strains were isolated from 1991 to 2001 at the Hospital of Bellvitge. Five of these strains showed unexpectedly high rates of nucleotide variations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of their parC, parE, and gyrA genes. The nucleotide sequence of the full-length parC, parE, and gyrA genes of one of these isolates revealed a mosaic structure compatible with an interspecific recombination origin. Southern blot analysis and nucleotide sequence determinations showed the presence of an ant-like gene in the intergenic parE-parC regions of the S. pneumoniae Cip(r) isolates with high rates of variations in their parE and parC QRDRs. The ant-like gene was absent from typical S. pneumoniae strains, whereas it was present in the intergenic parE-parC regions of the viridans group streptococci (Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus oralis). These results suggest that the viridans group streptococci are acting as donors in the horizontal transfer of fluoroquinolone resistance genes to S. pneumoniae.

  19. Collectin Kidney 1 Plays an Important Role in Innate Immunity against Streptococcus pneumoniae Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Insu; Mori, Kenichiro; Ohtani, Katsuki; Matsuda, Yasuyuki; Roy, Nitai; Kim, YounUck; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Wakamiya, Nobutaka

    2017-01-01

    Collectins are C-type lectins that are involved in innate immunity as pattern recognition molecules. Recently, collectin kidney 1 (CL-K1) has been discovered, and in vitro studies have shown that CL-K1 binds to microbes and activates the lectin complement pathway. However, in vivo functions of CL-K1 against microbes have not been elucidated. To investigate the biological functions of CL-K1, we generated CL-K1 knockout (CL-K1-/-) mice and then performed a Streptococcus pneumoniae infection analysis. First, we found that recombinant human CL-K1 bound to S. pneumoniae in a calcium-dependent manner, and induced complement activation. CL-K1-/- mice sera formed less C3 deposition on S. pneumoniae. Furthermore, immunofluorescence analysis in the wild-type (WT) mice demonstrated that CL-K1 and C3 were localized on S. pneumoniae in infected lungs. CL-K1-/- mice revealed decreased phagocytosis of S. pneumoniae. Consequently, less S. pneumoniae clearance was observed in their lungs. CL-K1-/- mice showed severe pulmonary inflammation and weight loss in comparison with WT mice. Finally, the decreased clearance and severe pulmonary inflammation caused by S. pneumoniae infection might cause higher CL-K1-/- mice lethality. Our results suggest that CL-K1 might play an important role in host protection against S. pneumoniae infection through the activation of the lectin complement pathway. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Necrotizing pneumonia and acute purulent pericarditis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 19A in a healthy 4-year-old girl after one catch-up dose of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shay; Tsai, Jeng-Dau; Tsao, Ten-Fu; Liao, Pei-Fen; Sheu, Ji-Nan

    2016-08-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common cause of infectious diseases in children that may lead to life-threatening complications. Acute purulent pericarditis is an uncommon complication of S. pneumoniae in the antibiotic era. A healthy 4-year-old girl was admitted with pneumonia and pleural effusion. She had received one catch-up dose of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine at 2 years of age. She rapidly developed necrotizing pneumonia, complicated by bronchopleural fistula presenting as subcutaneous emphysema and pneumothorax and acute purulent pericarditis. S. pneumoniae serotype 19A was subsequently identified from blood, empyema and pericardial fluid cultures. After appropriate antibiotic therapy and a right lower lobectomy, her condition stabilized and she promptly recovered. This case highlights two rare potential clinical complications of pneumococcal disease in a child: necrotizing pneumonia and acute purulent pericarditis. This is the first report of a child who received just one catch-up dose of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine at 2 years of age, as per the United States' Advisory Committee on Immunization Practice's recommendations, but who still developed severe invasive pneumococcal disease with life-threatening complications caused by S. pneumoniae serotype 19A.

  1. Acute bacterial meningitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae resistant to the antimicrobian agents and their serotypes Meningite bacteriana aguda por Streptococcus pneumoniae resistente aos antimicrobianos e seus sorotipos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Maciel de Oliveira Rossoni

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The main objectives of this study are to evaluate the resistance rates of Streptococcus pneumonia to penicillin G, ceftriaxone and vancomycin in patients with meningitis; to analyze possible risk factors to the antimicrobian resistance; to describe the serotypes detected and to suggest an initial empirical treatment for meningitis. The sensitiveness and serotypes of all isolated S. pneumoniae of patients with acute bacterial meningitis received by the Paraná State Central Laboratory from April 2001 to august 2002 have been evaluated. One hundred S. pneumoniae have been isolated, of which 15% were resistant to penicillin, 1% to cephalosporin and 0% to vancomycin. The serotypes most found were 14 (19%, 3 and 23F (10% each. When only the resistant serotypes were analyzed, the most prevalent was the 14 with 44%. The risk factors found in relation to the S. pneumoniae resistance were: age under one year old (p=0.01 and previous use of antibiotic (p=0.046. The resistance rates found, which were moderate to penicillin, low to cephalosporin and neutral to vancomycin, suggest the isolated use of a 3rd generation cephalosporin as an initial empirical therapy for the treatment of acute bacterial meningitis with a communitarian background.Este estudo teve como objetivo avaliar as taxas de resistência de Streptococcus pneumoniae, isolados de pacientes com meningite, à penicilina G, ceftriaxona e vancomicina; avaliar possíveis fatores de risco para resistência antimicrobiana; descrever os sorotipos encontrados e sugerir a terapêutica empírica inicial para meningite. Foram isoladas 100 amostras de S. pneumoniae, encontrando-se 15% de resistência à penicilina, 1% à cefalosporina e 0% à vancomicina. Os sorotipos mais encontrados foram 14 (19%, 3 e 23F (10% cada. Analisando-se os resistentes, o sorotipo 14 (44% também foi o mais freqüente. Os fatores de risco para resistência de S. pneumoniae encontrados foram: idade menor que um ano (p=0,01 e o uso

  2. [Real-time PCR detection of Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae DNA in clinical specimens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacková, Z; Lžičařová, D; Stock, N K; Kozáková, J

    2015-10-01

    The study aim was to implement a molecular real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay recommended by the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) for the detection of Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae in clinical (culture negative) specimens from patients with suspected invasive bacterial disease. Clinical specimens are referred to the National Reference Laboratory (NRL) for Meningococcal Infections, Unit for Airborne Bacterial Infections, Centre for Epidemiology and Microbiology, National Institute of Public Health from various regions of the Czech Republic. Clinical specimens are, in particular, cerebrospinal fluid, anti-coagulated blood or serum and, exceptionally, post-mortem specimens. The NRL has implemented molecular diagnosis of these bacterial pathogens involved in meningitis and sepsis from clinical specimens since 1999. The first diagnostic method was semi-nested PCR followed by electrophoretic analysis. In 2014, a molecular qualitative real-time PCR assay was implemented.

  3. Antagonism between penicillin and erythromycin against Streptococcus pneumoniae in vitro and in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, H K; Jensen, T G; Dessau, R B

    2000-01-01

    The combination of beta-lactam antibiotics and macrolides is often recommended for the initial empirical treatment of acute pneumonia in order to obtain activity against the most important pathogens. Theoretically, this combination may be inexpedient, as the bacteriostatic agent may antagonize...... the effect of the bactericidal agent. In this study, the possible interaction between penicillin and erythromycin was investigated in vitro and in vivo against four clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae with MICs of penicillin ranging from 0.016 to 0.5 mg/L and of erythromycin from 0. 25 to >128 mg...

  4. Decreased virulence of a pneumolysin-deficient strain of Streptococcus pneumoniae in murine meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellmer, Andreas; Zysk, Gregor; Gerber, Joachim; Kunst, Tammo; Von Mering, Matthias; Bunkowski, Stefanie; Eiffert, Helmut; Nau, Roland

    2002-11-01

    Pneumolysin, neuraminidases A and B, and hyaluronidase are virulence factors of Streptococcus pneumoniae that appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of meningitis. In a murine model of meningitis after intracerebral infection using mutants of S. pneumoniae D39, only mice infected with a pneumolysin-deficient strain were healthier at 32 and 36 h, had lower bacterial titers in blood at 36 h, and survived longer than the D39 parent strain. Cerebellar and spleen bacterial titers, meningeal inflammation, and neuronal damage scores remained uninfluenced by the lack of any of the virulence factors.

  5. Choline Binding Proteins from Streptococcus pneumoniae: A Dual Role as Enzybiotics and Targets for the Design of New Antimicrobials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Maestro

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus is an important pathogen responsible for acute invasive and non-invasive infections such as meningitis, sepsis and otitis media, being the major cause of community-acquired pneumonia. The fight against pneumococcus is currently hampered both by insufficient vaccine coverage and by rising antimicrobial resistances to traditional antibiotics, making necessary the research on novel targets. Choline binding proteins (CBPs are a family of polypeptides found in pneumococcus and related species, as well as in some of their associated bacteriophages. They are characterized by a structural organization in two modules: a functional module (FM, and a choline-binding module (CBM that anchors the protein to the choline residues present in the cell wall through non-covalent interactions. Pneumococcal CBPs include cell wall hydrolases, adhesins and other virulence factors, all playing relevant physiological roles for bacterial viability and virulence. Moreover, many pneumococcal phages also make use of hydrolytic CBPs to fulfill their infectivity cycle. Consequently, CBPs may play a dual role for the development of novel antipneumococcal drugs, both as targets for inhibitors of their binding to the cell wall and as active cell lytic agents (enzybiotics. In this article, we review the current state of knowledge about host- and phage-encoded pneumococcal CBPs, with a special focus on structural issues, together with their perspectives for effective anti-infectious treatments.

  6. In vitro activity of bioactive extracts from rare actinomycetes against multi-drug resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, K; Raj, V S; Upadhyay, D J; Gupta, R K

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we investigated the in vitro potential of the bioactive extracts from five putatively novel species of actinomycetes isolated from the Indian hot desert against multi-drug resistant (MDR) Streptococcus pneumoniae. The antimicrobial activity of 10 different extracts was evaluated against S. pneumoniae strains with, erm(B) and mef(E) genes as well as fluoroquinolone-resistant (FQ(R) ) strains using the micro-broth dilution method. Of these 10 extracts, four exhibited good to excellent anti-S. pneumoniae activity with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) ranging from 0·125 to 8 μg ml(-1) . The time-kill kinetics study showed that these extracts killed the pathogens in 2-8 h. In vitro cell-free transcription/translation of luciferase gene using S30 bacterial extract and TNT mammalian ribosome indicated that they inhibited bacterial ribosomes at much lower concentrations than those required to inhibit the mammalian ribosomes. This study demonstrates that these are potent concentration-dependent bactericidal metabolites with 16-fold higher in vitro activity than levofloxacin against MDR S. pneumoniae. Metabolites from actinomycetes can be excellent inhibitors of MDR S. pneumoniae. Considering the in vitro efficacy of these crude extracts against S. pneumoniae MDR spp., once purified these can be used against streptococcal pathogens causing community-acquired pneumonia. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. An Increase in Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotype 12F

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2018-02-08

    Dr. Cynthia Whitney, a CDC medical doctor and Epidemiologist, discusses serotype 12F pneumoniae.  Created: 2/8/2018 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 2/8/2018.

  8. Antibiotic resistant profile of Streptococcus pneumoniae from the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The isolates were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing using the disc diffusion method. Results: S. pneumoniae was isolated from 37(42.04%) of the 88 samples. Isolates showed the highest resistance of 12 (32.43%) to erythromycin and lowest resistance of 4(10.81%) to ciprofloxacin. The resistance profiles for ...

  9. Escherichia coli, Streptococcus pneumoniae, 4(1.2%) Haemophilus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pneumoniae, P.aeruginosa, and. S.aureus may also cause acute conjunctivitis in neonates or children3 In sexually active teenagers and adults,. C.trachomatis and N.gonorrhoea have been implicated. In young children, H.influenzae can cause ...

  10. A Multi-Scale Computational Study on the Mechanism of Streptococcus pneumoniae Nicotinamidase (SpNic)

    OpenAIRE

    Ion, Bogdan; Kazim, Erum; Gauld, James

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinamidase (Nic) is a key zinc-dependent enzyme in NAD metabolism that catalyzes the hydrolysis of nicotinamide to give nicotinic acid. A multi-scale computational approach has been used to investigate the catalytic mechanism, substrate binding and roles of active site residues of Nic from Streptococcus pneumoniae (SpNic). In particular, density functional theory (DFT), molecular dynamics (MD) and ONIOM quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods have been employed. The o...

  11. Synthesis of Streptococcus pneumoniae type 3 neoglycoproteins varying in oligosaccharide chain length, loading and carrier protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Lefeber, D.J.; Kamerling, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    The preparation is described of a range of neoglycoproteins containing synthesised fragments of the capsular polysaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae type 3, that is beta-D-GlcpA-(1->4)-beta-D-Glcp-(1->O)-(CH2)3NH2 (1), beta-D-Glcp-(1->3)-beta-D-GlcpA-(1->4)-beta-D-Glcp-(1->O)-(CH2)3NH2 (2), and

  12. Roles of the Essential Protein FtsA in Cell Growth and Division in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mura, Andrea; Fadda, D.; Perez, A.J.; Danforth, M.L.; Musu, D.; Rico, A.I.; Krupka, M.; Denapaite, D.; Tsui, H-Ch.T.; Winkler, M.E.; Branny, Pavel; Vicente, M.; Margolin, W.; Massidda, O.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 199, č. 3 (2017), č. článku UNSP e00608. ISSN 0021-9193 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP302/12/0256; GA MŠk LH12055 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : FtsA * Gram-positive cocci * Streptococcus pneumoniae Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 3.143, year: 2016

  13. Dysregulation of transition metal ion homeostasis is the molecular basis for cadmium toxicity in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    OpenAIRE

    Begg, Stephanie L.; Eijkelkamp, Bart A.; Luo, Zhenyao; Cou?ago, Rafael M.; Morey, Jacqueline R.; Maher, Megan J.; Ong, Cheryl-lynn Y.; McEwan, Alastair G.; Kobe, Bostjan; O?Mara, Megan L.; Paton, James C.; McDevitt, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium is a transition metal ion that is highly toxic in biological systems. Although relatively rare in the Earth?s crust, anthropogenic release of cadmium since industrialization has increased biogeochemical cycling and the abundance of the ion in the biosphere. Despite this, the molecular basis of its toxicity remains unclear. Here we combine metal-accumulation assays, high-resolution structural data and biochemical analyses to show that cadmium toxicity, in Streptococcus pneumoniae, occu...

  14. The pavA gene of Streptococcus pneumoniae encodes a fibronectin-binding protein that is essential for virulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holmes, AR; McNab, R; Millsap, KW; Rohde, M; Hammerschmidt, S; Mawdsley, JL; Jenkinson, HF

    Streptococcus pneumoniae colonizes the nasopharynx in up to 40% of healthy subjects, and is a leading cause of middle ear infections (otitis media), meningitis and pneumonia. Pneumococci adhere to glycosidic receptors on epithelial cells and to immobilized fibronectin, but the bacterial adhesins

  15. Quorum Sensing Regulation of Competence and Bacteriocins in Streptococcus pneumoniae and mutans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanker, Erin; Federle, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    The human pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus mutans have both evolved complex quorum sensing (QS) systems that regulate the production of bacteriocins and the entry into the competent state, a requirement for natural transformation. Natural transformation provides bacteria with a mechanism to repair damaged genes or as a source of new advantageous traits. In S. pneumoniae, the competence pathway is controlled by the two-component signal transduction pathway ComCDE, which directly regulates SigX, the alternative sigma factor required for the initiation into competence. Over the past two decades, effectors of cellular killing (i.e., fratricides) have been recognized as important targets of the pneumococcal competence QS pathway. Recently, direct interactions between the ComCDE and the paralogous BlpRH pathway, regulating bacteriocin production, were identified, further strengthening the interconnections between these two QS systems. Interestingly, a similar theme is being revealed in S. mutans, the primary etiological agent of dental caries. This review compares the relationship between the bacteriocin and the competence QS pathways in both S. pneumoniae and S. mutans, and hopes to provide clues to regulatory pathways across the genus Streptococcus as a potential tool to efficiently investigate putative competence pathways in nontransformable streptococci. PMID:28067778

  16. Antibiotic resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae in children with acute otitis media treatment failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielnik-Jurkiewicz, Beata; Bielicka, Anna

    2015-12-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria is a major cause of treatment failure in children with acute otitis media (AOM). This study aimed to analyze the types of bacterial strains in fluid isolated from the middle ear of children with AOM who did not respond to oral antibiotic treatment. We also determined the antibiotic resistance of the most frequently isolated bacterial strain (Streptococcus pneumoniae) found in these children. This was a prospective study of 157 children with AOM aged from 6 months to 7 years admitted due to unsuccessful oral antibiotic treatment. All children underwent a myringotomy, and samples of the middle ear fluid were collected for bacteriological examination. Positive bacterial cultures were obtained in 104 patients (66.2%), with Streptococcus pneumoniae (39.69%), Haemophilus influenzae (16.03%) Staphylococcus aureus (16.03%), Staphylococcus haemolyticus (6.9%) and Streptococcus pyogenes (5.34%) found most frequently. The majority (65.4%) of S. pneumoniae strains were penicillin-intermediate-resistant or penicillin-resistant, and 67.2% strains of S. pneumoniae were multidrug-resistant. We identified S. pneumoniae as the most frequently isolated pathogen from the middle ear in children with AOM treatment failure and determined that the majority of strains were antibiotic-resistant. We propose that the microbiological identification of bacterial strains and their degree of antibiotic resistance should be performed prior to therapy in order to choose the most appropriate antibiotic therapy for children with AOM treatment failure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Antimicrobial resistance and serotyping of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from pediatric patients in Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil Resistência antimicrobiana e sorotipagem de Streptococcus pneumoniae isolado de pacientes pediátricos em Belo Horizonte, MG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Gomes de Oliveira Magalhães

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Thirty one Streptococcus pneumoniae invasive strains were isolated from a pediatric population in Belo Horizonte from June, 1999 to May, 2001. Penicillin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline and chloramphenicol resistance rates for the isolates were 41.9, 58.1, 25.8 and 3.2%, respectively. Intermediate penicillin resistant (MICs between 0.1 and 1.0 µg/ml and resistant (MICs > 2.0 µg/ml isolates occured at rates of 38.7 and 3.2%, respectively. Resistance to erythromycin, ofloxacin, rifampin or vancomicyn was not detected. Ten S. pneumoniae serotypes (14, 5, 10 A, 6B, 15B, 18C, 6 A, 18 A, 19 A and 19 F were identified. Serotype 14 (12 out of 31 was predominant among the isolates. Penicillin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistance was more common in 14 and 6B serotypes.Trinta e três linhagens invasivas do S. pneumoniae foram isoladas a partir de pacientes pediátricos em Belo Horizonte, MG, Brasil, de junho de 1999 a maio de 2001. As taxas de resistência à penicilina, ao trimetoprim-sultametoxazol, tetraciclina e cloranfenicol foram respectivamente, 41, 9; 58,1 e 3,2%. A resistência intermediária à penicilina (MICs entre 0,1 e 1,0 µg/ml e resistência total (MICs>2.0 µg/ml ocorreram, respectivamente, nas porcentagens de 38,7 e 3,2%. Não foi detectada resistência à eritromicina, ofloxacin, rifampina e vancomicina. Foram identificados 9 sorotipos do S. pneumoniae (14, 5, 10 , 6B, 15B, 18C, 6 A, 18 19 A e 19F entre os isolados. O sorotipo 14 (12 de 31 foi predominate entre os isolados. A resistência à penicilina e ao trimetoprim-sulfametoxazol estava sempre associada aos sorotipos 14 e 6B.

  18. Streptococcus pneumoniae – caused CAP in hospitalised patients: mortality predictors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Figueiredo

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Probably the most important decision in the management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia (CAP is patient site of care. Patients with Streptococcus pneumoniae-caused CAP admitted to our hospital between 1st January and 31st December 2006 were retrospectively analysed. Samples of blood, sputum, bronchial and bronchoalveolar lavage and urine were collected for microbiological testing using standard culture techniques and urine antigen detection. Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI and British Thoracic Society (BTS CURB-65 scoring tools were evaluated. The statistical treatment was performed using the SPSS 14.0 program. We included 104 patients, 67.3% male, median age 63 years old, mortality 13.4%. There was a significant association between the PSI and CURB-65 score and mortality. Despite advances, CAP is still an important health problem with a high atten - dant morbi-mortality. This study confirms the value of PSI and CURB-65 in the prediction of severe pneumonia. Resumo: A avaliação da gravidade perante qualquer caso de pneumonia adquirida na comunidade (PAC é de suma importância, pois dela decorrem decisões como a necessidade de internamento e o tratamento empírico inicial. Os autores apresentam um estudo retrospectivo, que incluiu doentes internados devido a pneumonia por Streptococcus pneumoniae durante o ano de 2006, no Hospital de São João. A confirmação etiológica de infecção foi feita por isolamentos no sangue, líquido pleural, secreções traqueobrônquicas, lavado brônquico, lavado broncoalveolar e pesquisa de antigenúria. Foram analisados os factores de risco e avaliados, com base nas normas PSI (Pneumonia Severity Index e da British Thoracic Society (BTS - CURB-65. A análise estatística foi efectuada utilizando teste T para amostras independentes e ANOVA, usando o programa de análise estatística SPSS 14.0.Foram incluídos 104 doentes com idade mediana de 63 anos, sendo 67

  19. Influenza A Virus Infection Predisposes Hosts to Secondary Infection with Different Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotypes with Similar Outcome but Serotype-Specific Manifestation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma-Chawla, Niharika; Sender, Vicky; Kershaw, Olivia; Gruber, Achim D.; Volckmar, Julia; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) and Streptococcus pneumoniae are major causes of respiratory tract infections, particularly during coinfection. The synergism between these two pathogens is characterized by a complex network of dysregulated immune responses, some of which last until recovery following IAV infection. Despite the high serotype diversity of S. pneumoniae and the serotype replacement observed since the introduction of conjugate vaccines, little is known about pneumococcal strain dependency in the enhanced susceptibility to severe secondary S. pneumoniae infection following IAV infection. Thus, we studied how preinfection with IAV alters host susceptibility to different S. pneumoniae strains with various degrees of invasiveness using a highly invasive serotype 4 strain, an invasive serotype 7F strain, and a carrier serotype 19F strain. A murine model of pneumococcal coinfection during the acute phase of IAV infection showed a significantly increased degree of pneumonia and mortality for all tested pneumococcal strains at otherwise sublethal doses. The incidence and kinetics of systemic dissemination, however, remained bacterial strain dependent. Furthermore, we observed strain-specific alterations in the pulmonary levels of alveolar macrophages, neutrophils, and inflammatory mediators ultimately affecting immunopathology. During the recovery phase following IAV infection, bacterial growth in the lungs and systemic dissemination were enhanced in a strain-dependent manner. Altogether, this study shows that acute IAV infection predisposes the host to lethal S. pneumoniae infection irrespective of the pneumococcal serotype, while the long-lasting synergism between IAV and S. pneumoniae is bacterial strain dependent. These results hold implications for developing tailored therapeutic treatment regimens for dual infections during future IAV outbreaks. PMID:27647871

  20. Early Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype changes in Utah adults after the introduction of PCV13 in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Brian A; Dascomb, Kristin K; Mehta, Rajesh R; Stockmann, Chris; Mason, Edward O; Ampofo, Krow; Pavia, Andrew T; Byington, Carrie L

    2016-01-20

    Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV) have indirect effects due to decreased Streptococcus pneumoniae colonization in vaccine recipients. We sought to determine whether the introduction of PCV13 in children led to changes in the epidemiology and clinical manifestations of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in adults. We described demographics, comorbidities, clinical manifestations, and serotypes of IPD in Utah adults before (November 2009-February 2010) and after (March 2010-March 2012) the introduction of PCV13 in children. We also compare serotypes causing IPD in Utah adults and children. After the introduction of PCV13 in the childhood vaccine program, the proportion of IPD due to PCV13 exclusive serotypes decreased significantly in Utah adults (64-40%, p=0.009), primarily due to a decline in serotype 7F (36-15%, p=0.008). There were non-significant increases in IPD due to Pneumococcal polysaccharide 23 (PPV23) unique serotypes and non-vaccine serotypes, most notably serotype 22F. Changes in the proportions of vaccine and non-vaccine serotypes were similar in adults and children. Meningitis was more commonly due to non-vaccine serotypes relative to non-meningitis cases (47% vs. 18%, p=0.007). When stratified by sex, decreases in PCV13 serotype IPD were only noted in men (76-33%, p=0.001). Serotype epidemiology of IPD in adults closely follows that of children in the PCV13 era. Continued surveillance is needed to confirm whether replacement serotypes will lead to increases in pneumococcal meningitis and whether there are sex differences in the indirect effects of PCV vaccination in children. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A reação em cadeia da polimerase na detecção da resistência à penicilina em Streptococcus pneumoniae Polymerase chain reaction used to detect Streptococcus pneumoniae resistance to penicillin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Walker Zettler

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: O Streptococcus pneumoniae é o mais freqüente agente etiológico de infecções respiratórias adquiridas na comunidade e sua resistência aos antimicrobianos tem aumentado nos últimos anos. A determinação da resistência é feita rotineiramente por método lento que depende do crescimento em cultura e determinação da concentração inibitória mínima (CIM. A reação em cadeia da polimerase (PCR detecta os genes responsáveis pela resistência do Streptococcus pneumoniae a penicilina em cerca de 8 horas. OBJETIVO: Comparar a PCR com o método da CIM no diagnóstico da resistência da Streptococcus pneumoniae a penicilina. MÉTODO: Foram estudadas 153 amostras de Streptococcus pneumoniae, isoladas de diferentes sítios anatômicos, usando-se para detecção de mutações nos genes que codificam as proteínas ligadoras de penicilina 1a, 2b e 2x, responsáveis pela resistência à penicilina. A ocorrência das mutações foi correlacionada com a CIM de penicilina, determinada pelo teste de difusão em ágar. RESULTADOS: A resistência global à penicilina do Streptococcus pneumoniae foi de 22,8% (16,3% de resistência intermediária e 6,5% de resistência alta. Em proporções estatisticamente significativas, as amostras sensíveis à penicilina não tinham mutações, as intermediárias apenas uma, geralmente na proteína ligadora de penicilina 2x, e as altamente resistentes tinham mutações nas três proteínas investigadas. CONCLUSÃO: A PCR é um método rápido para a detecção da resistência à penicilina do Streptococcus pneumoniae, que poderá vir a ser utilizado na prática clínica.BACKGROUND: Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most common etiologic agent of community-acquired respiratory infections. In recent years, S. pneumoniae resistance to antimicrobial agents has increased. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC is routinely used to determine resistance. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR detects the genes

  2. Prevalence and serotype distribution of nasopharyngeal carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae in China: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Fu, Jinjian; Liang, Zhuoxin; Chen, Jichang

    2017-12-13

    To explore the overall prevalence and serotype distribution of nasopharyngeal carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae(S. pneumoniae) among healthy children. A search for pneumococcal nasopharyngeal carriage studies including children published up to July 31th, 2016 was conducted to describe carriage in China. The review also describes antibiotic resistance in and serotypes of S. pneumoniae and assesses the impact of vaccination on carriage in this region. Summary measures for overall prevalence, antibiotic resistance, and serotype distributions extracted from the analyzed data were determined with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using random-effects models. Heterogeneity was assessed using I 2 test statistics. Thirty-seven studies were included in this review, and the majority of studies (64.9%) were located in the pre-introduction period of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) in China. The pooled prevalence of S. pneumoniae nasopharyngeal carriage was 21.4% (95% CI: 18.3-24.4%). Carriage was highest in children attending kindergartens [24.5%, (19.7-29.3%)] and decreased with increasing age. Before the introduction of PCV7 into China, the prevalence of S. pneumoniae nasopharyngeal carriage was 25.8% (20.7-30.9%), the pooled carriage of S. pneumoniae sharply dropped into the 14.1% (11.3-16.9%) by PCV7 vaccination period (P China, the penicillin resistance rate in S. pneumoniae isolated from healthy children was 31.9% (21.2-42.6%); however, this rate sharply decreased after the introduction of PCV7 in China [21.6%, (7.4-35.9%)], and the difference between the rates during these two time periods was statistically significant (P value China. PCV7 immunization was found to be associated with reduction of nasopharyngeal colonization of S. pneumoniae. Conjugate vaccination coverage was slightly affected by the introduction of PCV7 into China because of low vaccination rate. The government should implement timely adjusted conjugate vaccination strategies based on

  3. Bactericidal effect of bovine lactoferrin and synthetic peptide lactoferrin chimera in Streptococcus pneumoniae and the decrease in luxS gene expression by lactoferrin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    León-Sicairos, N.; Angulo-Zamudio, U.A.; Vidal, J.E.; López-Torres, C.A.; Bolscher, J.G.M.; Nazmi, K.; Reyes-Cortes, R.; Reyes-López, M.; de la Garza, M.; Canizalez-Román, A.

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is responsible for nearly one million child deaths annually. Pneumococcus causes infections such as pneumonia, otitis media, meningitis, and sepsis. The human immune system includes antibacterial peptides and proteins such as lactoferrin (LF), but its activity

  4. Activities of Fluoroquinolones against Streptococcus pneumoniae Type II Topoisomerases Purified as Recombinant Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Ian; George, John

    1999-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae topoisomerase IV and DNA gyrase have been purified from a fluoroquinolone-susceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae strain, from first-step mutants showing low-level resistance to ciprofloxacin, sparfloxacin, levofloxacin, and ofloxacin, and from two clinical isolates showing intermediate- and high-level fluoroquinolone resistance by a gene cloning method that produces recombinant proteins from Escherichia coli. The concentrations of ciprofloxacin, sparfloxacin, levofloxacin, or ofloxacin required to inhibit wild-type topoisomerase IV were 8 to 16 times lower than those required to inhibit wild-type DNA gyrase. Furthermore, low-level resistance to these fluoroquinolones was entirely due to the reduced inhibitory activity of fluoroquinolones against topoisomerase IV. For all the laboratory strains, the 50% inhibitory concentration for topoisomerase IV directly correlated with the MIC. We therefore propose that with S. pneumoniae, ciprofloxacin, sparfloxacin, levofloxacin, and ofloxacin target topoisomerase IV in preference to DNA gyrase. Sitafloxacin, on the other hand, was found to be equipotent against either enzyme. This characteristic is unique for a fluoroquinolone. A reduction in the sensitivities of both topoisomerase IV and DNA gyrase are required, however, to achieve intermediate- or high-level fluoroquinolone resistance in S. pneumoniae. PMID:10543732

  5. Influence of the blood bacterial load on the meningeal inflammatory response in Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, C; O´Reilly, T; Brandt, C

    2006-01-01

    was induced by intracisternal injection of approximately 1 x 10(6) CFU Streptococcus pneumoniae, type 3, and the 26 rabbits were either provided with approximately 1 x 10(6) CFU S. pneumoniae intravenously at 0 hour ("bacteraemic" rabbits, n = 9), immunized with paraformaldehyde-killed S. pneumoniae for 5...... weeks prior to the experiment ("immunized" rabbits", n = 8), or not treated further ("control" rabbits, n = 9). WBC and bacterial concentrations were determined in CSF and blood every second hour during a 16 hours study period together with CSF IL-8 and protein levels. We also studied CSF and blood WBC...... bacterial levels were observed (P > 0.05). Blood WBC decreased in bacteraemic rabbits between approximately 10-16 hours after the bacterial inoculation in contrast to an increase for both the immunized rabbits and controls (P rabbits as compared...

  6. A type IV pilus mediates DNA binding during natural transformation in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurenceau, Raphaël; Péhau-Arnaudet, Gérard; Baconnais, Sonia; Gault, Joseph; Malosse, Christian; Dujeancourt, Annick; Campo, Nathalie; Chamot-Rooke, Julia; Le Cam, Eric; Claverys, Jean-Pierre; Fronzes, Rémi

    2013-01-01

    Natural genetic transformation is widely distributed in bacteria and generally occurs during a genetically programmed differentiated state called competence. This process promotes genome plasticity and adaptability in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Transformation requires the binding and internalization of exogenous DNA, the mechanisms of which are unclear. Here, we report the discovery of a transformation pilus at the surface of competent Streptococcus pneumoniae cells. This Type IV-like pilus, which is primarily composed of the ComGC pilin, is required for transformation. We provide evidence that it directly binds DNA and propose that the transformation pilus is the primary DNA receptor on the bacterial cell during transformation in S. pneumoniae. Being a central component of the transformation apparatus, the transformation pilus enables S. pneumoniae, a major Gram-positive human pathogen, to acquire resistance to antibiotics and to escape vaccines through the binding and incorporation of new genetic material.

  7. A type IV pilus mediates DNA binding during natural transformation in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaël Laurenceau

    Full Text Available Natural genetic transformation is widely distributed in bacteria and generally occurs during a genetically programmed differentiated state called competence. This process promotes genome plasticity and adaptability in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Transformation requires the binding and internalization of exogenous DNA, the mechanisms of which are unclear. Here, we report the discovery of a transformation pilus at the surface of competent Streptococcus pneumoniae cells. This Type IV-like pilus, which is primarily composed of the ComGC pilin, is required for transformation. We provide evidence that it directly binds DNA and propose that the transformation pilus is the primary DNA receptor on the bacterial cell during transformation in S. pneumoniae. Being a central component of the transformation apparatus, the transformation pilus enables S. pneumoniae, a major Gram-positive human pathogen, to acquire resistance to antibiotics and to escape vaccines through the binding and incorporation of new genetic material.

  8. A variable region within the genome of Streptococcus pneumoniae contributes to strain-strain variation in virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard M Harvey

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial factors responsible for the variation in invasive potential between different clones and serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae are largely unknown. Therefore, the isolation of rare serotype 1 carriage strains in Indigenous Australian communities provided a unique opportunity to compare the genomes of non-invasive and invasive isolates of the same serotype in order to identify such factors. The human virulence status of non-invasive, intermediately virulent and highly virulent serotype 1 isolates was reflected in mice and showed that whilst both human non-invasive and highly virulent isolates were able to colonize the murine nasopharynx equally, only the human highly virulent isolates were able to invade and survive in the murine lungs and blood. Genomic sequencing comparisons between these isolates identified 8 regions >1 kb in size that were specific to only the highly virulent isolates, and included a version of the pneumococcal pathogenicity island 1 variable region (PPI-1v, phage-associated adherence factors, transporters and metabolic enzymes. In particular, a phage-associated endolysin, a putative iron/lead permease and an operon within PPI-1v exhibited niche-specific changes in expression that suggest important roles for these genes in the lungs and blood. Moreover, in vivo competition between pneumococci carrying PPI-1v derivatives representing the two identified versions of the region showed that the version of PPI-1v in the highly virulent isolates was more competitive than the version from the less virulent isolates in the nasopharyngeal tissue, blood and lungs. This study is the first to perform genomic comparisons between serotype 1 isolates with distinct virulence profiles that correlate between mice and humans, and has highlighted the important role that hypervariable genomic loci, such as PPI-1v, play in pneumococcal disease. The findings of this study have important implications for understanding the processes that

  9. Genome-wide identification of genes essential for the survival of Streptococcus pneumoniae in human saliva.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilly M Verhagen

    Full Text Available Since Streptococcus pneumoniae transmits through droplet spread, this respiratory tract pathogen may be able to survive in saliva. Here, we show that saliva supports survival of clinically relevant S. pneumoniae strains for more than 24 h in a capsule-independent manner. Moreover, saliva induced growth of S. pneumoniae in growth-permissive conditions, suggesting that S. pneumoniae is well adapted for uptake of nutrients from this bodily fluid. By using Tn-seq, a method for genome-wide negative selection screening, we identified 147 genes potentially required for growth and survival of S. pneumoniae in saliva, among which genes predicted to be involved in cell envelope biosynthesis, cell transport, amino acid metabolism, and stress response predominated. The Tn-seq findings were validated by testing a panel of directed gene deletion mutants for their ability to survive in saliva under two testing conditions: at room temperature without CO2, representing transmission, and at 37 °C with CO2, representing in-host carriage. These validation experiments confirmed that the plsX gene and the amiACDEF and aroDEBC operons, involved in respectively fatty acid metabolism, oligopeptide transport, and biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids play an important role in the growth and survival of S. pneumoniae in saliva at 37 °C. In conclusion, this study shows that S. pneumoniae is well-adapted for growth and survival in human saliva and provides a genome-wide list of genes potentially involved in adaptation. This notion supports earlier evidence that S. pneumoniae can use human saliva as a vector for transmission.

  10. Novel role for the Streptococcus pneumoniae toxin pneumolysin in the assembly of biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shak, Joshua R; Ludewick, Herbert P; Howery, Kristen E; Sakai, Fuminori; Yi, Hong; Harvey, Richard M; Paton, James C; Klugman, Keith P; Vidal, Jorge E

    2013-09-10

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is an important commensal and pathogen responsible for almost a million deaths annually in children under five. The formation of biofilms by S. pneumoniae is important in nasopharyngeal colonization, pneumonia, and otitis media. Pneumolysin (Ply) is a toxin that contributes significantly to the virulence of S. pneumoniae and is an important candidate as a serotype-independent vaccine target. Having previously demonstrated that a luxS knockout mutant was unable to form early biofilms and expressed less ply mRNA than the wild type, we conducted a study to investigate the role of Ply in biofilm formation. We found that Ply was expressed in early phases of biofilm development and localized to cellular aggregates as early as 4 h postinoculation. S. pneumoniae ply knockout mutants in D39 and TIGR4 backgrounds produced significantly less biofilm biomass than wild-type strains at early time points, both on polystyrene and on human respiratory epithelial cells, cultured under static or continuous-flow conditions. Ply's role in biofilm formation appears to be independent of its hemolytic activity, as S. pneumoniae serotype 1 strains, which produce a nonhemolytic variant of Ply, were still able to form biofilms. Transmission electron microscopy of biofilms grown on A549 lung cells using immunogold demonstrated that Ply was located both on the surfaces of pneumococcal cells and in the extracellular biofilm matrix. Altogether, our studies demonstrate a novel role for pneumolysin in the assembly of S. pneumoniae biofilms that is likely important during both carriage and disease and therefore significant for pneumolysin-targeting vaccines under development. The bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae (commonly known as the pneumococcus) is commonly carried in the human nasopharynx and can spread to other body sites to cause disease. In the nasopharynx, middle ear, and lungs, the pneumococcus forms multicellular surface-associated structures called biofilms

  11. Acción in vitro de diez plantas medicinales sobre diez cepas diferentes de Streptococcus pneumoniae

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    JM Guevara Duncan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: El portador sano es el principal diseminador de las infecciones neumocócicas por la nasofaringe. Una alternativa para combatirlo son las plantas medicinales. Objetivos: Determinar la efectividad de diez plantas medicinales frente a Streptococcus pneumoniae. Diseño: Estudio experimental in vitro. Material biológico: Plantas medicinales y cepas de Streptococcus pneumoniae. Intervenciones: Los extractos de 10 plantas medicinales fueron puestos en contacto in vitro con 10 cepas de Streptococcus pneumoniae. Principales medidas de resultados: Actividad de las plantas medicinales sobre las cepas de Streptococcus pneumoniae. Resultados: almendro y Bellaco caspi fueron las únicas plantas que dieron pequeño halo de inhibición con algunas cepas; con almendro se inhibió dos cepas y con Bellaco caspi, se inhibió siete cepas y tres resultaron resistentes. Estos resultados no tuvieron relación con el serotipo de neumococo ni con los antibióticos utilizados en los antibiogramas realizados previamente. Conclusiones: El Bellaco caspi podría ser una alternativa para atacar al neumococo en la nasofaringe. Pero, por haber presentado resistencia a tres cepas de Streptococcus pneumoniae, antes de usarlo sería conveniente desarrollar un antibiograma de los neumococos contra las plantas medicinales.

  12. Variation in Streptococcus pneumoniae susceptibility to human antimicrobial peptides may mediate intraspecific competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habets, Michelle G J L; Rozen, Daniel E; Brockhurst, Michael A

    2012-09-22

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a facultative pathogen inhabiting the nasopharynx of humans where it is exposed to a range of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) of the innate immune response. It is possible therefore that the susceptibility of strains to AMPs plays a role in determining their ability to colonize, and furthermore, that AMPs could mediate competitive interactions between co-colonizing genotypes. However, little is known about patterns of natural variation in AMP susceptibility of S. pneumoniae, and it is unclear whether the susceptibilities of an isolate to multiple human AMPs are correlated. We tested this by characterizing the susceptibility of 31 S. pneumoniae natural isolates to human neutrophil peptide (HNP-1) (α-defensin) and LL-37 (cathelicidin). We observed significant variation in susceptibility between isolates to both AMPs, and in the majority of isolates, susceptibilities to HNP-1 and LL-37 were uncorrelated. Clinical isolates were more susceptible to AMPs than were carriage isolates. The polysaccharide capsule of S. pneumoniae is thought to protect cells against AMPs. However, serotype alone could not explain the observed variation in susceptibility suggesting that genetic background plays an equally important role. We tested directly whether AMPs could mediate competition between isolates using competition experiments in the presence and absence of AMPs. These experiments demonstrated that AMPs could indeed reverse the outcome of competition between selected isolates. AMP-mediated competition could therefore contribute to the maintenance of intraspecific genetic diversity in S. pneumoniae.

  13. Silica desiccant packets for storage and transport of Streptococcus pneumoniae and other clinically relevant species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey L Pell

    Full Text Available Bacterial isolates are often transported between laboratories for research and diagnostic purposes. Silica desiccant packets (SDPs, which are inexpensive and do not require freezing, were evaluated for storage and recovery of bacterial isolates. Conditions such as inoculum size, swab type and temperature of storage were investigated using ten Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates. The optimized protocol was then tested using 49 additional S. pneumoniae isolates representing 40 serogroups. Overall, S. pneumoniae growth was considered satisfactory (>100 colony forming units for 98/109 (89.9% and 20/20 (100% swabs after 14 days at room temperature or 28 days at 4° C, respectively. Storage in SDPs did not impact on the ability of S. pneumoniae isolates to be subsequently serotyped. When the survival of nine other clinically relevant bacterial species was tested, seven were viable after 28 days at room temperature, the exceptions being Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Haemophilus influenzae. SDPs are suitable for transport and short-term storage of bacterial species including S. pneumoniae.

  14. Integrated Translatomics with Proteomics to Identify Novel Iron–Transporting Proteins in Streptococcus pneumoniae

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    Xiao-Yan eYang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae is a major human pathogen causing morbidity and mortality worldwide. Efficiently acquiring iron from the environment is critical for S. pneumoniae to sustain growth and cause infection. There are only three known iron-uptake systems in Streptococcal species responsible for iron acquisition from the host, including ABC transporters PiaABC, PiuABC and PitABC. Besides, no other iron-transporting system has been suggested. In this work, we employed our newly established translating mRNA analysis integrated with proteomics to evaluate the possible existence of novel iron transporters in the bacterium. We simultaneously deleted the iron-binding protein genes of the three iron-uptake systems to construct a piaA/piuA/pitA triple mutant (Tri-Mut of S. pneumoniae D39, in which genes and proteins related to iron transport should be regulated in response to the deletion. With ribosome associated mRNA sequencing-based translatomics focusing on translating mRNA and iTRAQ quantitative proteomics based on the covalent labeling of peptides with tags of varying mass, we indeed observed a large number of genes and proteins representing various coordinated biological pathways with significantly altered expression levels in the Tri-Mut mutant. Highlighted in this observation is the identification of several new potential iron-uptake ABC transporters participating in iron metabolism of Streptococcus. In particular, putative protein SPD_1609 in operon 804 was verified to be a novel iron-binding protein with similar function to PitA in S. pneumoniae. These data derived from the integrative translatomics and proteomics analyses provided rich information and insightful clues for further investigations on iron-transporting mechanism in bacteria and the interplay between Streptococcal iron availability and the biological metabolic pathways.

  15. Streptococcus pneumoniae Supragenome Hybridization Arrays for Profiling of Genetic Content and Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadam, Anagha; Janto, Benjamin; Eutsey, Rory; Earl, Joshua P; Powell, Evan; Dahlgren, Margaret E; Hu, Fen Z; Ehrlich, Garth D; Hiller, N Luisa

    2015-02-02

    There is extensive genomic diversity among Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates. Approximately half of the comprehensive set of genes in the species (the supragenome or pangenome) is present in all the isolates (core set), and the remaining is unevenly distributed among strains (distributed set). The Streptococcus pneumoniae Supragenome Hybridization (SpSGH) array provides coverage for an extensive set of genes and polymorphisms encountered within this species, capturing this genomic diversity. Further, the capture is quantitative. In this manner, the SpSGH array allows for both genomic and transcriptomic analyses of diverse S. pneumoniae isolates on a single platform. In this unit, we present the SpSGH array, and describe in detail its design and implementation for both genomic and transcriptomic analyses. The methodology can be applied to construction and modification of SpSGH array platforms, as well to other bacterial species as long as multiple whole-genome sequences are available that collectively capture the vast majority of the species supragenome. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. Fallos vacunales a vacunas conjugadas de Streptococcus pneumoniae y Haemophilus influenzae tipo b

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    Gonzalo Angulo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Haemophilus influenzae type b and Streptococcus pneumoniae are the main cause agents of otitis, pneumonia, sepsis and meningitis, affecting mainly children under 5 years. Conjugate vaccines for encapsulated germs have dramatically decreased, the various diseases caused by these germs. Despite the decrease in morbidity and mortality, vaccine failures were observed. Children who experienced vaccine failures to Haemophilus influenzae type b had associated comorbidities more frequently than the general population (prematurity, HIV, Down syndrome, tumors, etc.. Nevertheless, most of these children have no medical history or immunological disorders. There is no consensus on whether all patients with vaccine failures should be assessed immunologically and how. There are recommendations to indicate a booster dose to patients with certain comorbidities and patients experiencing vaccine failure even in the absence of theses. Of the vaccine preparations available for Haemophilus influenzae type b association with acellular Bordetella pertussis proved to be less immunogenic and is currently being discouraged. Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes 6B and 19F are less immunogenics and explain most of the vaccine failures in some series.

  17. Extracellular zinc competitively inhibits manganese uptake and compromises oxidative stress management in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

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    Bart A Eijkelkamp

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae requires manganese for colonization of the human host, but the underlying molecular basis for this requirement has not been elucidated. Recently, it was shown that zinc could compromise manganese uptake and that zinc levels increased during infection by S. pneumoniae in all the niches that it colonized. Here we show, by quantitative means, that extracellular zinc acts in a dose dependent manner to competitively inhibit manganese uptake by S. pneumoniae, with an EC50 of 30.2 µM for zinc in cation-defined media. By exploiting the ability to directly manipulate S. pneumoniae accumulation of manganese, we analyzed the connection between manganese and superoxide dismutase (SodA, a primary source of protection for S. pneumoniae against oxidative stress. We show that manganese starvation led to a decrease in sodA transcription indicating that expression of sodA was regulated through an unknown manganese responsive pathway. Intriguingly, examination of recombinant SodA revealed that the enzyme was potentially a cambialistic superoxide dismutase with an iron/manganese cofactor. SodA was also shown to provide the majority of protection against oxidative stress as a S. pneumoniae ΔsodA mutant strain was found to be hypersensitive to oxidative stress, despite having wild-type manganese levels, indicating that the metal ion alone was not sufficiently protective. Collectively, these results provide a quantitative assessment of the competitive effect of zinc upon manganese uptake and provide a molecular basis for how extracellular zinc exerts a 'toxic' effect on bacterial pathogens, such as S. pneumoniae.

  18. Recent epidemiology of Streptococcus pneumoniae in nasopharynxes of Korean children with acute otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seung Beom; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Kang, Jin Han; Ma, Sang Hyuk; Kim, Chun Soo; Kim, Kyung-Hyo; Kim, Hwang Min; Choi, Young Youn

    2017-03-01

    This prospective study was performed to evaluate serotype distribution, multilocus sequence typing, and antibiotic susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae identified in Korean children with acute otitis media (AOM) after the introduction of a 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7). Nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from children diagnosed with AOM in seven hospitals in Korea. The bacteria identified in these samples and the serotypes, sequence types (STs), and antibiotic susceptibilities of S. pneumoniae isolates were evaluated. A total of 390 children were enrolled, and bacteria were identified in 376 (96.4%) children. S. pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis were identified in 155 (39.7%), 127 (32.6%) and 86 (22.1%) children, respectively. Serotype 19A (22.4%) was the most common S. pneumoniae serotype, with serogroups 11 (14.7%) and 15 (13.5%) following. ST320 (23.5%) was the most common ST; ST166 (17.0%) and ST83 (8.5%) followed. The overall susceptibility rates of S. pneumoniae to oral penicillin V and amoxicillin/clavulanate were 2.6% and 53.2%, respectively. The susceptibility rate to cefditoren was 91.0%; however, the rates for other cephalosporins were less than 10.0%. Compared with other serogroups, S. pneumoniae serogroups 19, 11, and 15 showed significantly lower susceptibility rates to all the antibiotics tested. S. pneumoniae serotype 19A, serogroups 11 and 15 were the major nasopharyngeal-colonizing bacteria in Korean children with AOM after the introduction of PCV7. These relatively prevalent serotype/serogroups showed lower antibiotic susceptibility rates. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Análise das cepas de Streptococcus pneumoniae causadores de pneumonia invasiva: sorotipos e sensibilidade aos antimicrobianos

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    Cristina R. M. Yoshioka

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Identificar os sorotipos de pneumococo mais frequentemente isolados de crianças internadas com pneumonia invasiva, comparar os sorotipos com os incluídos em vacinas conjugadas e analisar sua sensibilidade aos antimicrobianos mais utilizados na faixa etária pediátrica. MÉTODOS: Estudo descritivo, retrospectivo das pneumonias pneumocócicas identificadas em crianças internadas no hospital universitário da Universidade de São Paulo, no período de janeiro de 2003 a outubro de 2008. Os critérios de inclusão foram: faixa etária de 29 dias até 15 anos incompletos com diagnóstico clínico e radiológico de pneumonia e com cultura de sangue e/ou líquido pleural com crescimento de Streptococcus pneumoniae. RESULTADOS: Foram incluídas no estudo 107 crianças. Os sorotipos mais frequentes foram: 14 (36,5%, 1 (16,7%, 5 (14,6%, 6B (6,3% e 3 (4,2%. A proporção de sorotipos contidos na vacina conjugada heptavalente seria de 53,1%, na vacina 10-valente de 86,5% e na 13-valente seria de 96,9%. De acordo com os padrões do Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute 2008, 100 cepas (93,5% de pneumococos foram sensíveis à penicilina (concentração inibitória mínima, CIM 8 µg/mL. Verificamos alta taxa de sensibilidade para as cepas testadas para vancomicina, rifampicina, ceftriaxone, clindamicina, cloranfenicol e eritromicina. CONCLUSÕES: Nossos resultados confirmam um expressivo impacto potencial das vacinas conjugadas, principalmente pela 10-valente e 13-valente, sobre os casos de pneumonias invasivas. Os resultados de sensibilidade à penicilina evidenciam que a opção terapêutica de escolha para o tratamento das pneumonias invasivas continua sendo a penicilina.

  20. Septicemia with Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuursted, Kurt; Littauer, Pia Jeanette; Greve, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae was described in 2004 as a new human pathogen, acknowledged in a range of clinical infections typically associated to the respiratory tract. This report demonstrates that S. pseudopneumoniae has the potential to cause invasive infection. In blood cultures from three...... patients, growth of an atypical Streptococcus pneumoniae (non-capsular, non-serotypeable, optochin susceptible under ambient atmosphere and bile-intermediately soluble) was recovered. All three patients had a history of a haematological disease (myelodysplastic syndrome and multiple myeloma...

  1. Structure of the Streptococcus pneumoniae Surface Protein and Adhesin PfbA

    OpenAIRE

    Suits, Michael D.; Boraston, Alisdair B.

    2013-01-01

    PfbA (plasmin- and fibronectin-binding protein A) is an extracellular Streptococcus pneumoniae cell-wall attached surface protein that binds to fibronectin, plasmin, and plasminogen. Here we present a structural analysis of the surface exposed domains of PfbA using a combined approach of X-ray crystallography and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The crystal structure of the PfbA core domain, here called PfbAβ, determined to 2.28 Å resolution revealed an elongated 12-stranded parallel β-he...

  2. Identification of a patient with Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteremia and meningitis by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacman, D J; Zhang, Y; Rydquist-White, J; Wadowsky, R M; Post, J C; Ehrlich, G D

    1995-06-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay based on the penicillin-binding protein gene PBP2B identified the presence of DNA specific for Streptococcus pneumoniae in the serum and CSF of a patient with culture-proven bacteremia and meningitis. Positive signals were seen to dilutions of 1:125 and 1:390,625 for the blood and CSF specimens, respectively. Potential advantages of PCR over conventional culture include exquisite sensitivity, faster results and the ability to identify the organisms by the presence of species-specific DNA even in patients pretreated with antibiotics.

  3. Serine protease PrtA from Streptococcus pneumoniae plays a role in the killing of S. pneumoniae by apolactoferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Shaper; Wilson, Landon; Benjamin, William H; Novak, Jan; Barnes, Stephen; Hollingshead, Susan K; Briles, David E

    2011-06-01

    It is known that apolactoferrin, the iron-free form of human lactoferrin, can kill many species of bacteria, including Streptococcus pneumoniae. Lactoferricin, an N-terminal peptide of apolactoferrin, and fragments of it are even more bactericidal than apolactoferrin. In this study we found that apolactoferrin must be cleaved by a serine protease in order for it to kill pneumococci. The serine protease inhibitors were able to block killing by apolactoferrin but did not block killing by a lactoferrin-derived peptide. Thus, the killing of pneumococci by apolactoferrin appears to require a protease to release a lactoferricin-like peptide(s). Incubation of apolactoferrin with growing pneumococci resulted in a 12-kDa reduction in its molecular mass, of which about 7 to 8 kDa of the reduction was protease dependent. Capsular type 2 and 19F strains with mutations in the gene encoding the major cell wall-associated serine protease, prtA, lost much of their ability to degrade apolactoferrin and were relatively resistant to killing by apolactoferrin (P mass by about 8 kDa, and greatly enhance the killing activity of the solution containing the apolactoferrin and its cleavage products. Mass spectroscopy revealed that PrtA makes a major cut between amino acids 78 and 79 of human lactoferrin, removing the N-terminal end of the molecule (about 8.6 kDa). The simplest interpretation of these data is that the mechanism by which apolactoferrin kills Streptococcus pneumoniae requires the release of a lactoferricin-like peptide(s) and that it is this peptide(s), and not the intact apolactoferrin, which kills pneumococci.

  4. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae at the initial stage of influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Misao; Ozaki, Kyoko; Nitahara, Yoshiyuki; Higuchi, Wataru; Takano, Tomomi; Nishiyama, Akihito; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2009-10-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae infections in children with influenza have been noted because of the severity of co-infection. In Japan, vaccination against S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae infections has been listed in the vaccine program in 2008, but the characteristics of the two organisms, colonizing at the initial stage of influenza infection, have not been investigated in detail. Nasopharyngeal swabs from children with influenza (flu(+)) (n= 236; mean age, 6.2 years) were examined for bacterial pathogens, including S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae. They were then examined for serotypes, drug susceptibilities, and resistance genes (or gene mutations). As a reference, children with upper respiratory tract infection (URTI(+), flu(-); n = 189; mean age, 6.2 years) were also examined. S. pneumoniae, beta-streptococci (groups A, B, and G), methicillin-susceptible and -resistant S. aureus, Moraxella catarrhalis, and H. influenzae were isolated. For S. pneumoniae, nine serotypes were detected with prevalent types of 3, 6, 19 and 23. Penicillin resistance was detected in types 19 and 23, while resistance to macrolide and clindamycin was found in various types. For H. influenzae, only b serotype was detected, with marked ampicillin resistance. The majority was non-typeable. Very similar results were obtained even in URTI(+) (flu(-)) cases. Multiple drug-resistant S. pneumoniae with major serotypes, for example, 19 and 23 and H. influenzae with serotype b were already present at the initial stage of influenza infection, similar to URTI(+) flu(-) cases. They could be prevented by current vaccines, but drug-resistant non-typeable H. influenzae is troubling.

  5. Interferon-γ from Brain Leukocytes Enhances Meningitis by Type 4 Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettini, Elena; Fiorino, Fabio; Cuppone, Anna Maria; Iannelli, Francesco; Medaglini, Donata; Pozzi, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of bacterial meningitis. Pneumococcal meningitis is a life-threatening disease with high rates of mortality and neurological sequelae. Immune targeting of S. pneumoniae is essential for clearance of infection; however, within the brain, the induced inflammatory response contributes to pathogenesis. In this study we investigate the local inflammatory response and the role of IFN-γ in a murine model of pneumococcal meningitis induced by intracranial injection of type 4 S. pneumoniae. Lymphoid and myeloid cell populations involved in meningitis, as well as cytokine gene expression, were investigated after infection. Animals were treated with a monoclonal antibody specific for murine IFN-γ to evaluate its role in animal survival. Intracranial inoculation of 3 × 104 colony-forming units of type 4 strain TIGR4 caused 75% of mice to develop meningitis within 4 days. The amount of lymphocytes, NK cells, neutrophils, monocytes and macrophages in the brain increased 48 h post infection. IFN-γ mRNA levels were about 240-fold higher in brains of infected mice compared to controls. Pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β and TNF-α, and TLR2 were also upregulated. In vivo treatment with anti-IFN-γ antibody increased survival of infected mice. This study shows that IFN-γ produced during meningitis by type 4 S. pneumoniae enhances bacterial pathogenesis exerting a negative effect on the disease outcome. PMID:26648922

  6. Streptococcus intermedius Causing Necrotizing Pneumonia in an Immune Competent Female: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faris Hannoodi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 52-year-old immunocompetent Caucasian female treated for necrotizing Streptococcus intermedius pneumonia and review available literature of similar cases. Our patient presented with respiratory failure and required hospitalization and treatment in the intensive care unit. Moreover, she required surgical drainage of right lung empyema as well as decortication and resection. The review of literature revealed three cases of S. intermedius pneumonia, one of which was a mortality. Comparison of the published cases showed a highly varied prehospital course and radiological presentations, with a symptomatic phase ranging from 10 days to five months. Radiological findings varied from an isolated pleural effusion to systemic disease with the presence of brain abscesses. Immunocompetence appears to correlate well with the overall prognosis. In addition, smoking appears to be an important risk factor for S. intermedius pneumonia. In 2 (50% of cases, pleural fluid analysis identified S. intermedius. In contrast, no organism was found in our patient, necessitating the acquisition of lung tissue sample for the diagnosis. In conclusion, both medical and surgical management are necessary for effective treatment of S. intermedius pneumonia. The outcome of treatment is good in immunocompetent individuals.

  7. Efficacy of Ceftaroline Fosamil against Penicillin-Sensitive and -Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae in an Experimental Rabbit Meningitis Model

    OpenAIRE

    Cottagnoud, P.; Cottagnoud, M.; Acosta, F.; Stucki, A.

    2013-01-01

    Ceftaroline is a new cephalosporin with bactericidal activity against resistant Gram-positive organisms, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, as well as common Gram-negative organisms. This study tested the prodrug, ceftaroline fosamil, against a penicillin-sensitive and a penicillin-resistant strain of S. pneumoniae in an experimental rabbit meningitis model. The penetration of ceftaroline into inflamed meninges was a...

  8. Mechanisms of dexamethasone-mediated inhibition of Toll-like receptor signaling induced by Neisseria meningitidis and Streptococcus pneumoniae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Trine; Berg, Randi S; Paludan, Søren R

    2008-01-01

    significantly reduces mortality and morbidity from bacterial meningitis. Here we investigate the molecular mechanisms behind the inhibitory effect of dexamethasone upon the inflammatory responses evoked by Neisseria meningitidis and Streptococcus pneumoniae, two of the major causes of bacterial meningitis......B alpha synthesis. Our data also revealed that the timing of steroid treatment relative to infection was important for achieving strong inhibition, particularly in response to S. pneumoniae. Altogether, we describe important targets of dexamethasone in the inflammatory responses evoked by N. meningitidis...

  9. SURFACE PROTEINS AND PNEUMOLYSIN OF ENCAPSULATED AND NONENCAPSULATED STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE MEDIATE VIRULENCE IN A CHINCHILLA MODEL OF OTITIS MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lance E. Keller

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae infections result in a range of human diseases and are responsible for almost one million deaths annually. Pneumococcal disease is mediated in part through surface structures and an anti-phagocytic capsule. Recent studies have shown that nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae (NESp make up a significant portion of the pneumococcal population and are able to cause disease. NESp lack some common surface proteins expressed by encapsulated pneumococci, but express surface proteins unique to NESp. A chinchilla model of otitis media (OM was used to determine the effect various pneumococcal mutations have on pathogenesis in both NESp and encapsulated pneumococci. Epithelial cell adhesion and invasion assays were used to examine the effects in relation to deletion of intrinsic genes or expression of novel genes. A mouse model of colonization was also utilized for comparison of various pneumococcal mutants. It was determined that pneumococcal surface protein K (PspK and pneumolysin (Ply affect NESp middle ear pathogenesis, but only PspK affected epithelial cell adhesion. Experiments in an OM model were done with encapsulated strains testing the importance of native virulence factors and treatment of OM. First, a triple deletion of the common virulence factors PspA, PspC, and Ply, (ΔPAC, from an encapsulated background abolished virulence in an OM model while a PspC mutant had detectable, but reduced amounts of recoverable bacteria compared to wildtype. Next, treatment of OM was effective when starting antibiotic treatment within 24 hrs with resolution by 48 hrs post treatment. Expression of NESp-specific virulence factor PspK in an encapsulated strain has not been previously studied, and we showed significantly increased adhesion and invasion of human epithelial cells by pneumococci. Murine colonization was not significantly increased when an encapsulated strain expressed PspK, but colonization was increased when a capsule

  10. Solithromycin inhibition of protein synthesis and ribosome biogenesis in Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Haemophilus influenzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Ward; Frazier, Ashley D; Champney, W Scott

    2013-04-01

    The continuing increase in antibiotic-resistant microorganisms is driving the search for new antibiotic targets and improved antimicrobial agents. Ketolides are semisynthetic derivatives of macrolide antibiotics, which are effective against certain resistant organisms. Solithromycin (CEM-101) is a novel fluoroketolide with improved antimicrobial effectiveness. This compound binds to the large 50S subunit of the ribosome and inhibits protein biosynthesis. Like other ketolides, it should impair bacterial ribosomal subunit formation. This mechanism of action was examined in strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, and Haemophilus influenzae. The mean 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) for solithromycin inhibition of cell viability, protein synthesis, and growth rate were 7.5, 40, and 125 ng/ml for Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, and Haemophilus influenzae, respectively. The net formation of the 50S subunit was reduced in all three organisms, with IC50s similar to those given above. The rates of 50S subunit formation measured by a pulse-chase labeling procedure were reduced by 75% in cells growing at the IC50 of solithromycin. Turnover of 23S rRNA was stimulated by solithromycin as well. Solithromycin was found to be a particularly effective antimicrobial agent, with IC50s comparable to those of telithromycin and significantly better than those of azithromycin and clarithromycin in these three microorganisms.

  11. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of DnaJ from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Shasha; Jin, Li; Niu, Siqiang; Yang, Wei; Zhang, Shaocheng; Guo, Zhen; Zhang, Hongpeng; Huang, Ailong; Yin, Yibing; Wang, Deqiang

    2013-01-01

    DnaJ from Streptococcus pneumoniae (SpDnaJ) is involved in the infectious disease process and is being developed as a potential vaccine to prevent bacterial infection. Here the expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of SpDnaJ are reported. DnaJ, cooperating with DnaK and GrpE, promotes the folding of unfolded hydrophobic polypeptides, dissociates protein complexes and translocates protein across membranes. Additionally, DnaJ from Streptococcus pneumoniae (SpDnaJ) is involved in the infectious disease process and is being developed as a potential vaccine to prevent bacterial infection. Here the expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of SpDnaJ are reported. The crystals belong to space groups I222 or I2 1 2 1 2 1 and the diffraction resolution is 3.0 Å with unit-cell parameters a = 47.68, b = 104.45, c = 234.57 Å. The crystal most likely contains one molecule in the asymmetric unit, with a V M value of 3.24 Å 3 Da −1 and a solvent content of 62.1%

  12. X-linked agammaglobulinemia combined with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and invasive Klebsiella pneumoniae polyarticular septic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zaihua; Kang, Yuli; Lin, Zhenlang; Huang, Yanjing; Lv, Huoyang; Li, Yasong

    2015-02-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency disease caused by mutations in the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) gene. XLA can also present in combination with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), the major chronic rheumatologic disease in children. We report herein the first known case of a juvenile patient diagnosed with XLA combined with JIA that later developed into invasive Klebsiella pneumoniae polyarticular septic polyarthritis. An additional comprehensive review of XLA combined with JIA and invasive K. pneumoniae septic arthritis is also presented. XLA was identified by the detection of BTK mutations while the diagnosis of JIA was established by clinical and laboratory assessments. Septic arthritis caused by invasive K. pneumoniae was confirmed by culturing of the synovia and gene detection of the isolates. Invasive K. pneumoniae infections can not only result in liver abscesses but also septic arthritis, although this is rare. XLA combined with JIA may contribute to invasive K. pneumoniae infection.

  13. Feasibility and Safety of Local Treatment with Recombinant Human Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor in a Rat Model of Streptococcus pneumoniae Pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florry E van den Boogaard

    Full Text Available Pulmonary coagulopathy is intrinsic to pulmonary injury including pneumonia. Anticoagulant strategies could benefit patients with pneumonia, but systemic administration of anticoagulant agents may lead to suboptimal local levels and may cause systemic hemorrhage. We hypothesized nebulization to provide a safer and more effective route for local administration of anticoagulants. Therefore, we aimed to examine feasibility and safety of nebulization of recombinant human tissue factor pathway inhibitor (rh-TFPI in a well-established rat model of Streptococcus (S. pneumoniae pneumonia. Thirty minutes before and every 6 hours after intratracheal instillation of S. pneumonia causing pneumonia, rats were subjected to local treatment with rh-TFPI or placebo, and sacrificed after 42 hours. Pneumonia was associated with local as well as systemic activation of coagulation. Nebulization of rh-TFPI resulted in high levels of rh-TFPI in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, which was accompanied by an attenuation of pulmonary coagulation. Systemic rh-TFPI levels remained undetectable, and systemic TFPI activity and systemic coagulation were not affected. Histopathology revealed no bleeding in the lungs. We conclude that nebulization of rh-TFPI seems feasible and safe; local anticoagulant treatment with rh-TFPI attenuates pulmonary coagulation, while not affecting systemic coagulation in a rat model of S. pneumoniae pneumonia.

  14. Detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae from Different Types of Nasopharyngeal Swabs in Children.

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    Felix S Dube

    Full Text Available A better understanding of the epidemiology of nasopharyngeal carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae is important to assess the impact of vaccination and the pathogenesis of pneumococcal disease. We compared the recovery of S. pneumoniae from nylon flocked, Dacron and rayon swabs.The recovery of S. pneumoniae from mocked specimens using flocked, Dacron and rayon swabs were compared by culture. The yield from paired nasopharyngeal (NP samples obtained from healthy children sampled with flocked and Dacron swabs was also determined using culture and lytA-targeted real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR.Using mock specimen, the percentage recovery of S. pneumoniae ATCC 49619 (serotype 19F strain from the flocked swabs was 100%, while it was 41% from Dacron swabs and 7% from rayon swabs. Similar results were observed for S. pneumoniae serotypes 1 and 5. S. pneumoniae was cultured from 18 of 42 (43% paired NP samples from the healthy children (median age 8 [interquartile range (IQR 5-16] months. The median number of colony-forming units (CFU recovered from flocked swabs was two-fold higher (8.8×10(4 CFU/mL [IQR, 2.0×10(2 - 4.0×10(5 CFU/mL] than Dacron swabs (3.7×10(4 CFU/mL [IQR, 4.0×10(2-3.2×10(5 CFU/mL], p = 0.17. Using lytA-targeted qPCR from paired NP samples, the median copy number of S. pneumoniae detected from flocked swabs was significantly higher than from Dacron swabs (3.0×10(5 genome copies/mL [IQR, 1.3×10(2-1.8×10(6] vs. 9.3×10(4 genome copies/mL [IQR, 7.0×10(1-1.1×10(6]; p = 0.005.Flocked swabs released more S. pneumoniae compared to both Dacron and rayon swabs from mock specimens. Similarly, higher bacterial loads were detected by qPCR from flocked swabs compared with Dacron swabs from healthy children.

  15. Regions of Diversity 8, 9 and 13 contribute to Streptococcus pneumoniae virulence

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    Orihuela Carlos J

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of community-acquired pneumonia. Previously, using comparative genomic analyses, 13 regions of genomic plasticity have been identified in the S. pneumoniae genome. These "Regions of Diversity" (RDs accounted for half the genomic variation observed amongst all pneumococci tested, moreover, were determined to encode a variety of putative virulence factors. To date, genes within 5 RDs have been unequivocally demonstrated to contribute to S. pneumoniae virulence. It is unknown if the remaining RDs also contribute to virulence. Results Using allelic exchange, we created S. pneumoniae mutants that were deficient in RD2, 5, 7, 8, 9, 12 and 13. Mutants deficient in RD8, 9 and 13 were attenuated in a mouse model of disease. RD8 is 40,358 nucleotides in length and encodes 37 genes. Using a panel of isogenic mutants, we determined that RD8b3 is the operon within RD8 that is responsible for virulence. Mice infected with mutants deficient in RD8, RD8b3, RD9 and RD13 had significantly less bacteria in the blood two days after intranasal challenge and improved survival over time versus mice infected with wild type. In all instances mutants colonized the nasopharynx at levels equivalent to wild type. Conclusion Genes within RD1, 3, 4, 6, and 10 have previously been shown to contribute to virulence. This study demonstrates that genes within RD8, 9 and 13 also contribute to virulence. The ability of mutants deficient in RD2, 5, 7, 8, 9, 12, and 13 to colonize the nasopharynx indicates that genes within these RDs are not required for asymptomatic carriage. Nonetheless, the observation that mutants deficient in RD8b3, 9 and 13 are attenuated indicates that genes within these loci are necessary for spread of the bacteria beyond the nasopharynx to normally sterile sites.

  16. Comparative In Vivo Efficacies of Tedizolid in Neutropenic versus Immunocompetent Murine Streptococcus pneumoniae Lung Infection Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelraouf, Kamilia; Nicolau, David P

    2017-01-01

    Given that tedizolid exhibits substantial lung penetration, we hypothesize that it could achieve good efficacy against Streptococcus pneumoniae lung infections. We evaluated the pharmacodynamics of tedizolid for treatment of S. pneumoniae lung infections and compared the efficacies of tedizolid human-simulated epithelial lining fluid (ELF) exposures in immunocompetent and neutropenic murine lung infection models. ICR mice were rendered neutropenic via intraperitoneal cyclophosphamide injections and then inoculated intranasally with S. pneumoniae suspensions. Immunocompetent CBA/J mice were inoculated similarly. Single daily tedizolid doses were administered 4 h postinoculation (termed 0 h). Changes in log 10 CFU at 24 h compared with 0-h controls were estimated. Ratios of area under the free-drug concentration-time curve to MIC (fAUC 0-24 /MIC) required to achieve various efficacy endpoints against each isolate were estimated using the Hill equation. Tedizolid doses in neutropenic and immunocompetent mice that mimic the human-simulated ELF exposure were examined. Stasis, 1-log reduction, and 2-log reduction were achieved at fAUC 0-24 /MIC of 8.96, 24.62, and 48.34, respectively, in immunocompetent mice and 19.21, 48.29, and 103.95, respectively, in neutropenic mice. Tedizolid at 40 mg/kg of body weight/day and 55 mg/kg/day in immunocompetent and neutropenic mice, respectively, resulted in ELF AUC 0-24 comparable to that achieved in humans following a 200-mg once-daily clinical dose. These human-simulated ELF exposures were adequate to attain >2-log reduction in bacterial burden at 24 h in 3 out of 4 isolates in both models and 1.58- and 0.74-log reductions with the fourth isolate in immunocompetent and neutropenic mice, respectively. Tedizolid showed potent in vivo efficacy against S. pneumoniae in both immunocompetent and neutropenic lung infection models, which support its consideration for S. pneumoniae lung infections. Copyright © 2016 American Society for

  17. 220D-F2 from Rubus ulmifolius kills Streptococcus pneumoniae planktonic cells and pneumococcal biofilms.

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    Sharmila J Talekar

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus forms organized biofilms to persist in the human nasopharynx. This persistence allows the pneumococcus to produce severe diseases such as pneumonia, otitis media, bacteremia and meningitis that kill nearly a million children every year. While bacteremia and meningitis are mediated by planktonic pneumococci, biofilm structures are present during pneumonia and otitis media. The global emergence of S. pneumoniae strains resistant to most commonly prescribed antibiotics warrants further discovery of alternative therapeutics. The present study assessed the antimicrobial potential of a plant extract, 220D-F2, rich in ellagic acid, and ellagic acid derivatives, against S. pneumoniae planktonic cells and biofilm structures. Our studies first demonstrate that, when inoculated together with planktonic cultures, 220D-F2 inhibited the formation of pneumococcal biofilms in a dose-dependent manner. As measured by bacterial counts and a LIVE/DEAD bacterial viability assay, 100 and 200 µg/ml of 220D-F2 had significant bactericidal activity against pneumococcal planktonic cultures as early as 3 h post-inoculation. Quantitative MIC's, whether quantified by qPCR or dilution and plating, showed that 80 µg/ml of 220D-F2 completely eradicated overnight cultures of planktonic pneumococci, including antibiotic resistant strains. When preformed pneumococcal biofilms were challenged with 220D-F2, it significantly reduced the population of biofilms 3 h post-inoculation. Minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC50 was obtained incubating biofilms with 100 µg/ml of 220D-F2 for 3 h and 6 h of incubation. 220D-F2 also significantly reduced the population of pneumococcal biofilms formed on human pharyngeal cells. Our results demonstrate potential therapeutic applications of 220D-F2 to both kill planktonic pneumococcal cells and disrupt pneumococcal biofilms.

  18. Genotyping and serotyping of macrolide and multidrug resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from carrier children

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    S F Swedan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Streptococcus pneumoniae, an opportunistic pathogen commonly carried asymptomatically in the nasopharynx of children, is associated with increasing rates of treatment failures due to a worldwide increase in drug resistance. We investigated the carriage of S. pneumoniae in children 5 years or younger, the identity of prevalent serotypes, the rates of resistance to macrolides and other antimicrobial agents and the genotypes responsible for macrolide resistance. Materials and Methods: Nasopharyngeal swabs were collected from 157 children under 5 years for cultural isolation of S. pneumoniae. Antibiogram of isolates  was determined using the disk diffusion test, and the minimal inhibitory concentration to macrolides was determined using the E-test. Isolate serotypes and macrolide resistance genes, erm(B and mef(E, were identified using multiplex polymerase chain reactions. Results: S. pneumoniae was recovered from 33.8% of children; 41.9% among males and 21.9% among females (P = 0.009. The highest carriage rate occurred among age groups 7-12 months and 49-60 months. Most frequent serotypes were 19F, 6A/B, 11A, 19A, 14 and 15B/C.  Resistance to macrolides was 60.4%. Resistance to oxacillin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and clindamycin was present among 90.6%, 54.7% and 32.1% of isolates, respectively. All isolates were susceptible to chloramphenicol, levofloxacin and vancomycin. Isolates resistant to one or more macrolide drugs were more likely to be multidrug resistant. Resistance to clindamycin or oxacillin coexisted with macrolide resistance. Among the erythromycin-resistant isolates, erm(B, mef(E and erm(B and mef(E genes were present at rates of 43.8%, 37.5% and 6.3%, respectively. Erm(B and mef(E were associated with very high level and moderate-to-high level resistance to macrolides, respectively. Conclusion: A significant proportion of children harboured macrolide and multidrug-resistant S. pneumoniae.

  19. Proteomic evaluation and validation of cathepsin D regulated proteins in macrophages exposed to Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bewley, Martin A; Pham, Trong K; Marriott, Helen M; Noirel, Josselin; Chu, Hseuh-Ping; Ow, Saw Y; Ryazanov, Alexey G; Read, Robert C; Whyte, Moira K B; Chain, Benny; Wright, Phillip C; Dockrell, David H

    2011-06-01

    Macrophages are central effectors of innate immune responses to bacteria. We have investigated how activation of the abundant macrophage lysosomal protease, cathepsin D, regulates the macrophage proteome during killing of Streptococcus pneumoniae. Using the cathepsin D inhibitor pepstatin A, we demonstrate that cathepsin D differentially regulates multiple targets out of 679 proteins identified and quantified by eight-plex isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation. Our statistical analysis identified 18 differentially expressed proteins that passed all paired t-tests (α = 0.05). This dataset was enriched for proteins regulating the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis or inhibiting competing death programs. Five proteins were selected for further analysis. Western blotting, followed by pharmacological inhibition or genetic manipulation of cathepsin D, verified cathepsin D-dependent regulation of these proteins, after exposure to S. pneumoniae. Superoxide dismutase-2 up-regulation was temporally related to increased reactive oxygen species generation. Gelsolin, a known regulator of mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, was down-regulated in association with cytochrome c release from mitochondria. Eukaryotic elongation factor (eEF2), a regulator of protein translation, was also down-regulated by cathepsin D. Using absence of the negative regulator of eEF2, eEF2 kinase, we confirm that eEF2 function is required to maintain expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1, delaying macrophage apoptosis and confirm using a murine model that maintaining eEF2 function is associated with impaired macrophage apoptosis-associated killing of Streptococcus pneumoniae. These findings demonstrate that cathepsin D regulates multiple proteins controlling the mitochondrial pathway of macrophage apoptosis or competing death processes, facilitating intracellular bacterial killing.

  20. Streptococcus pneumoniae from Palestinian nasopharyngeal carriers: serotype distribution and antimicrobial resistance.

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    Abedelmajeed Nasereddin

    Full Text Available Infections of Streptococcus pneumoniae in children can be prevented by vaccination; left untreated, they cause high morbidity and fatalities. This study aimed at determining the nasopharyngeal carrier rates, serotype distribution and antimicrobial resistance patterns of S. pneumoniae in healthy Palestinian children under age two prior to the full introduction of the pneumococcal 7-valent conjugate vaccine (PCV7, which was originally introduced into Palestine in a pilot trial in September, 2010. In a cross sectional study, nasopharyngeal specimens were collected from 397 healthy children from different Palestinian districts between the beginning of November 2012 to the end of January 2013. Samples were inoculated into blood agar and suspected colonies were examined by amplifying the pneumococcal-specific autolysin gene using a real-time PCR. Serotypes were identified by a PCR that incorporated different sets of specific primers. Antimicrobial susceptibility was measured by disk diffusion and MIC methods. The resulting carrier rate of Streptococcus pneumoniae was 55.7% (221/397. The main serotypes were PCV7 serotypes 19F (12.2%, 23F (9.0%, 6B (8.6% and 14 (4% and PCV13 serotypes 6A (13.6% and 19A (4.1%. Notably, serotype 6A, not included in the pilot trial (PCV7 vaccine, was the most prevalent. Resistance to more than two drugs was observed for bacteria from 34.1% of the children (72/211 while 22.3% (47/211 carried bacteria were susceptible to all tested antibiotics. All the isolates were sensitive to cefotaxime and vancomycin. Any or all of these might impinge on the type and efficacy of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccines and antibiotics to be used for prevention and treatment of pneumococcal disease in the country.

  1. β-1,4-Galactosyltransferase-catalyzed synthesis of the branched tetrasaccharide repeating unit of Streptococcus pneumoniae type 14

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Niggemann, J.; Kamerling, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    A chemoenzymatic approach is described towards the branched tetrasaccharide repeating unit, beta-d-Galp- (1->4)-beta-d-Glcp-(1->6)-[beta-d-Galp-(1->4)]-beta-d-GlcpNAc, of Streptococcus pneumoniae type 14 in a form suitable for conjugation. The linear trisaccharide acceptor,

  2. GalR Acts as a Transcriptional Activator of galKT in the Presence of Galactose in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Afzal, Muhammad; Shafeeq, Sulman; Manzoor, Irfan; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2015-01-01

    We explored the regulatory mechanism of Leloir pathway genes in Streptococcus pneumoniae D39. Here, we demonstrate that the expression of galKT is galactose dependent. By microarray analysis and quantitative RT-PCR, we further show the role of the transcriptional regulator GalR, present upstream of

  3. UlaR activates expression of the ula operon in Streptococcus pneumoniae in the presence of ascorbic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Afzal, Muhammad; Shafeeq, Sulman; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta; Kuipers, Oscar P

    In this study, the regulatory mechanism of the ula (utilization of l-ascorbic acid) operon, putatively responsible for transport and utilization of ascorbic acid in Streptococcus pneumoniae strain D39, is studied. β-Galactosidase assay data demonstrate that expression of the ula operon is increased

  4. Emergence in France of Multiple Clones of Clinical Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates with High-Level Resistance to Amoxicillin

    OpenAIRE

    Doit, Catherine; Loukil, Chawki; Fitoussi, Frederic; Geslin, Pierre; Bingen, Edouard

    1999-01-01

    The genetic relatedness of French isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae highly resistant to amoxicillin (MIC, ≥4 μg/ml, equal to or exceeding those of penicillin) was investigated by molecular fingerprinting. The results suggest that high-level resistance to amoxicillin has emerged within preexisting penicillin-resistant clones.

  5. The effect of immunization with pneumococcal conjugated vaccines on Streptococcus pneumoniae resistance patterns in acute otitis media

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    Tal Marom

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Following the introduction of 7- and 13-pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs in Israel, we demonstrated that within Streptococcus pneumoniae (Sp positive middle ear cultures, obtained from young children with severe acute otitis media (AOM episodes, there were more penicillin-susceptible and less multi-drug resistant Sp isolates in PCV immunized children.

  6. LocZ is a new cell division protein involved in proper septum placement in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holečková, Nela; Doubravová, Linda; Massidda, Orietta; Molle, Virginie; Buriánková, Karolína; Benada, Oldřich; Kofroňová, Olga; Ulrych, Aleš; Branny, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 1 (2015), s. 1-13 ISSN 2150-7511 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP207/12/1568; GA ČR GAP302/12/0256 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : cell division * septum placement * Streptococcus pneumoniae Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 6.975, year: 2015

  7. Use of MALDI Biotyper plus ClinProTools mass spectra analysis for correct identification of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus mitis/oralis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jonathan H K; She, Kevin K K; Wong, Oi-Ying; Teng, Jade L L; Yam, Wing-Cheong; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y; Cheng, Vincent C C; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2015-08-01

    Differentiation of Streptococcus pneumoniae from other viridans group streptococci is well known to be challenging in clinical laboratories. Matrix assisted laser desorption ionisation-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) had been reported to be a good alternative for Streptococcus species level identification. However, differentiation of S. pneumoniae from other Streptococcus mitis group organisms was found to be problematic using the Bruker MALDI Biotyper system. This study used the Bruker MALDI Biotyper system in addition to a mass spectra model analysis generated by 10 reference strains of S. pneumoniae, 8 strains of S. mitis and 2 strains of S. oralis in the ClinProTools to identify 28 clinical isolates of S. pneumoniae and 47 isolates of S. mitis/oralis. The results were compared with those generated by the MALDI Biotyper system alone. The percentages of correct species level identification using the MALDI Biotyper system alone and the direct transfer and extraction method were 66.7% (50/75) and 70.7% (53/75), respectively. With the additional ClinProTools mass spectra analysis, the percentages of correct identification by the direct transfer and extraction method increased to 85.3% (64/75) and 100% (75/75), respectively. This new workflow significantly improved the accuracy of S. pneumoniae and S. mitis/oralis identification. The additional ClinProTools mass spectra analysis with extraction method after MALDI Biotyper identification significantly improved the accuracy of identification among S. pneumoniae, S. oralis and S. mitis. The extra 15 min processing time of spectra analysis should be affordable in most clinical laboratories. We suggest that the same approach could be further explored in handling other bacterial species with high similarities. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. Characteristics and Outcome of Streptococcus pneumoniae Endocarditis in the XXI Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Egea, Viviana; Muñoz, Patricia; Valerio, Maricela; de Alarcón, Arístides; Lepe, José Antonio; Miró, José M.; Gálvez-Acebal, Juan; García-Pavía, Pablo; Navas, Enrique; Goenaga, Miguel Angel; Fariñas, María Carmen; Vázquez, Elisa García; Marín, Mercedes; Bouza, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Streptococcus pneumoniae is an infrequent cause of severe infectious endocarditis (IE). The aim of our study was to describe the epidemiology, clinical and microbiological characteristics, and outcome of a series of cases of S. pneumoniae IE diagnosed in Spain and in a series of cases published since 2000 in the medical literature. We prospectively collected all cases of IE diagnosed in a multicenter cohort of patients from 27 Spanish hospitals (n = 2539). We also performed a systematic review of the literature since 2000 and retrieved all cases with complete clinical data using a pre-established protocol. Predictors of mortality were identified using a logistic regression model. We collected 111 cases of pneumococcal IE: 24 patients from the Spanish cohort and 87 cases from the literature review. Median age was 51 years, and 23 patients (20.7%) were under 15 years. Men accounted for 64% of patients, and infection was community-acquired in 96.4% of cases. The most important underlying conditions were liver disease (27.9%) and immunosuppression (10.8%). A predisposing heart condition was present in only 18 patients (16.2%). Pneumococcal IE affected a native valve in 93.7% of patients. Left-sided endocarditis predominated (aortic valve 53.2% and mitral valve 40.5%). The microbiological diagnosis was obtained from blood cultures in 84.7% of cases. In the Spanish cohort, nonsusceptibility to penicillin was detected in 4.2%. The most common clinical manifestations included fever (71.2%), a new heart murmur (55%), pneumonia (45.9%), meningitis (40.5%), and Austrian syndrome (26.1%). Cardiac surgery was performed in 47.7% of patients. The in-hospital mortality rate was 20.7%. The multivariate analysis revealed the independent risk factors for mortality to be meningitis (OR, 4.3; 95% CI, 1.4–12.9; P < 0.01). Valve surgery was protective (OR, 0.1; 95% CI, 0.04–0.4; P < 0.01). Streptococcus pneumoniae IE is a community-acquired disease that mainly

  9. Pyruvate oxidase influences the sugar utilization pattern and capsule production in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

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    Sandra M Carvalho

    Full Text Available Pyruvate oxidase is a key function in the metabolism and lifestyle of many lactic acid bacteria and its activity depends on the presence of environmental oxygen. In Streptococcus pneumoniae the protein has been suggested to play a major role in metabolism and has been implicated in virulence, oxidative stress survival and death in stationary phase. Under semi-aerobic conditions, transcriptomic and metabolite profiling analysis of a spxB mutant grown on glucose showed minor changes compared to the wild type, apart from the significant induction of two operons involved in carbohydrate uptake and processing. This induction leads to a change in the sugar utilization capabilities of the bacterium, as indicated by the analysis of the growth profiles of the D39 parent and spxB mutant on alternative carbohydrates. Metabolic analysis and growth experiments showed that inactivation of SpxB has no effect on the glucose fermentation pattern, except under aerobic conditions. More importantly, we show that mutation of spxB results in the production of increased amounts of capsule, the major virulence factor of S. pneumoniae. Part of this increase can be attributed to induction of capsule operon (cps transcription. Therefore, we propose that S. pneumoniae utilizes pyruvate oxidase as an indirect sensor of the oxygenation of the environment, resulting in the adaption of its nutritional capability and the amount of capsule to survive in the host.

  10. Pyruvate oxidase influences the sugar utilization pattern and capsule production in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Sandra M; Farshchi Andisi, Vahid; Gradstedt, Henrik; Neef, Jolanda; Kuipers, Oscar P; Neves, Ana R; Bijlsma, Jetta J E

    2013-01-01

    Pyruvate oxidase is a key function in the metabolism and lifestyle of many lactic acid bacteria and its activity depends on the presence of environmental oxygen. In Streptococcus pneumoniae the protein has been suggested to play a major role in metabolism and has been implicated in virulence, oxidative stress survival and death in stationary phase. Under semi-aerobic conditions, transcriptomic and metabolite profiling analysis of a spxB mutant grown on glucose showed minor changes compared to the wild type, apart from the significant induction of two operons involved in carbohydrate uptake and processing. This induction leads to a change in the sugar utilization capabilities of the bacterium, as indicated by the analysis of the growth profiles of the D39 parent and spxB mutant on alternative carbohydrates. Metabolic analysis and growth experiments showed that inactivation of SpxB has no effect on the glucose fermentation pattern, except under aerobic conditions. More importantly, we show that mutation of spxB results in the production of increased amounts of capsule, the major virulence factor of S. pneumoniae. Part of this increase can be attributed to induction of capsule operon (cps) transcription. Therefore, we propose that S. pneumoniae utilizes pyruvate oxidase as an indirect sensor of the oxygenation of the environment, resulting in the adaption of its nutritional capability and the amount of capsule to survive in the host.

  11. Streptococcus pneumoniae Causes Experimental Meningitis following Intranasal and Otitis Media Infections via a Nonhematogenous Route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Andrea; Brigham, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    Using two different animal models of Streptococcus pneumoniae infection, we have demonstrated that this organism is able to spread to the central nervous system and cause meningitis by bypassing the bloodstream. Following respiratory tract infection induced via intranasal inoculation, bacteria were rapidly found in the bloodstream and brains in the majority of infected mice. A similar pattern of dissemination occurred following otitis media infection via transbullar injection of gerbils. However, a small percentage of animals infected by either route showed no bacteria in the blood and yet did have significant numbers of bacteria in brain tissue. Subsequent experiments using a galU mutant of S. pneumoniae, which is impaired in its ability to disseminate to the bloodstream following infection, showed that this organism is able to spread to the brain and cerebrospinal fluid. These results demonstrate that, unlike many bacterial pathogens that cause meningitis, S. pneumoniae is able to do so independent of bloodstream involvement upon different routes of infection. This may address the difficulty in treating human infections caused by this organism. PMID:11705903

  12. Streptococcus pneumoniae TIGR4 Flavodoxin: Structural and Biophysical Characterization of a Novel Drug Target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Cárdenas, Ángela; Rojas, Adriana L; Conde-Giménez, María; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramón; Sancho, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (Sp) strain TIGR4 is a virulent, encapsulated serotype that causes bacteremia, otitis media, meningitis and pneumonia. Increased bacterial resistance and limited efficacy of the available vaccine to some serotypes complicate the treatment of diseases associated to this microorganism. Flavodoxins are bacterial proteins involved in several important metabolic pathways. The Sp flavodoxin (Spfld) gene was recently reported to be essential for the establishment of meningitis in a rat model, which makes SpFld a potential drug target. To facilitate future pharmacological studies, we have cloned and expressed SpFld in E. coli and we have performed an extensive structural and biochemical characterization of both the apo form and its active complex with the FMN cofactor. SpFld is a short-chain flavodoxin containing 146 residues. Unlike the well-characterized long-chain apoflavodoxins, the Sp apoprotein displays a simple two-state thermal unfolding equilibrium and binds FMN with moderate affinity. The X-ray structures of the apo and holo forms of SpFld differ at the FMN binding site, where substantial rearrangement of residues at the 91-100 loop occurs to permit cofactor binding. This work will set up the basis for future studies aiming at discovering new potential drugs to treat S. pneumoniae diseases through the inhibition of SpFld.

  13. Dominance of multidrug resistant CC271 clones in macrolide-resistant streptococcus pneumoniae in Arizona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowers Jolene R

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rates of resistance to macrolide antibiotics in Streptococcus pneumoniae are rising around the world due to the spread of mobile genetic elements harboring mef(E and erm(B genes and post-vaccine clonal expansion of strains that carry them. Results Characterization of 592 clinical isolates collected in Arizona over a 10 year period shows 23.6% are macrolide resistant. The largest portion of the macrolide-resistant population, 52%, is dual mef(E/erm(B-positive. All dual-positive isolates are multidrug-resistant clonal lineages of Taiwan19F-14, mostly multilocus sequence type 320, carrying the recently described transposon Tn2010. The remainder of the macrolide resistant S. pneumoniae collection includes 31% mef(E-positive, and 9% erm(B-positive strains. Conclusions The dual-positive, multidrug-resistant S. pneumoniae clones have likely expanded by switching to non-vaccine serotypes after the heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine release, and their success limits therapy options. This upsurge could have a considerable clinical impact in Arizona.

  14. Molecular basis for different levels of tet(M) expression in Streptococcus pneumoniae clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grohs, Patrick; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Podglajen, Isabelle; Grondin, Sophie; Firon, Arnaud; Poyart, Claire; Varon, Emmanuelle; Gutmann, Laurent

    2012-10-01

    Seventy-four unrelated clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae harboring the tet(M) gene were studied. Seven strains with low tetracycline (Tc) MICs (0.25 to 0.5 μg/ml) were found to harbor truncated tet(M) alleles that were inactivated by different frameshift mutations. In contrast, five strains bore deletions in the tet(M) promoter region, among which four displayed increased Tc MICs (16 to 64 μg/ml). The same promoter mutations were detected in Tc-resistant mutants selected in vitro from various susceptible strains. Sequence analysis revealed that these deletions might impede the formation of the transcriptional attenuator located immediately upstream of tet(M). Expression in Enterococcus faecalis of a tet(M) reporter gene transcribed from these promoter mutants conferred a level of Tc resistance similar to that observed in the parental S. pneumoniae strains. These results show that different levels of Tc susceptibility found in clinical isolates of S. pneumoniae can be explained by frameshift mutations within tet(M) and by alterations of the upstream transcriptional attenuator.

  15. LuxS impacts on LytA-dependent autolysis and on competence in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romao, Susana; Memmi, Guido; Oggioni, Marco R; Trombe, Marie-Claude

    2006-02-01

    The ubiquitous protein LuxS with S-ribosylhomocysteinase activity is involved in S-adenosyl methionine detoxification, C-1 unit recycling and the production of autoinducers that allow the cell to sense and respond to cell density. Independent reports describe the impact of LuxS deficiency on Streptococcus pneumoniae virulence in the mouse. In vitro, LuxS deficiency confers discrete phenotypes. A combined approach using genetic dissection and mixed-culture experiments allowed the involvement of LuxS in the developmental physiology of S. pneumoniae to be investigated. Functional LuxS was found to be related on the one hand to down-regulation of competence, and on the other hand to attenuation of autolysis in cultures entering stationary phase. The competence phenotype of luxS mutant bacteria was complemented by media conditioned by competence-defective ComAB0 bacteria, but not by BSA. The autolytic phenotype was complemented by BSA, but not by conditioned supernatants. It is suggested that the impact of LuxS on competence, but not on autolysis, involves cell-cell communication. The phenotype of luxS mutant strains reveals a hierarchy in the competence regulatory networks of S. pneumoniae.

  16. IL-22 Defect During Streptococcus pneumoniae Infection Triggers Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichavant, Muriel; Sharan, Riti; Le Rouzic, Olivier; Olivier, Cécile; Hennegrave, Florence; Rémy, Gaëlle; Pérez-Cruz, Magdiel; Koné, Bachirou; Gosset, Pierre; Just, Nicolas; Gosset, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    Progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is linked to episodes of exacerbations caused by bacterial infections due to Streptococcus pneumoniae. Our objective was to identify during COPD, factors of susceptibility to bacterial infections among cytokine network and their role in COPD exacerbations. S. pneumoniae was used to sub-lethally challenge mice chronically exposed to air or cigarette smoke (CS) and to stimulate peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from non-smokers, smokers and COPD patients. The immune response and the cytokine production were evaluated. Delayed clearance of the bacteria and stronger lung inflammation observed in infected CS-exposed mice were associated with an altered production of IL-17 and IL-22 by innate immune cells. This defect was related to a reduced production of IL-1β and IL-23 by antigen presenting cells. Importantly, supplementation with recombinant IL-22 restored bacterial clearance in CS-exposed mice and limited lung alteration. In contrast with non-smokers, blood NK and NKT cells from COPD patients failed to increase IL-17 and IL-22 levels in response to S. pneumoniae, in association with a defect in IL-1β and IL-23 secretion. This study identified IL-17 and IL-22 as susceptibility factors in COPD exacerbation. Therefore targeting such cytokines could represent a potent strategy to control COPD exacerbation.

  17. IL-22 Defect During Streptococcus pneumoniae Infection Triggers Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel Pichavant

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is linked to episodes of exacerbations caused by bacterial infections due to Streptococcus pneumoniae. Our objective was to identify during COPD, factors of susceptibility to bacterial infections among cytokine network and their role in COPD exacerbations. S. pneumoniae was used to sub-lethally challenge mice chronically exposed to air or cigarette smoke (CS and to stimulate peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from non-smokers, smokers and COPD patients. The immune response and the cytokine production were evaluated. Delayed clearance of the bacteria and stronger lung inflammation observed in infected CS-exposed mice were associated with an altered production of IL-17 and IL-22 by innate immune cells. This defect was related to a reduced production of IL-1β and IL-23 by antigen presenting cells. Importantly, supplementation with recombinant IL-22 restored bacterial clearance in CS-exposed mice and limited lung alteration. In contrast with non-smokers, blood NK and NKT cells from COPD patients failed to increase IL-17 and IL-22 levels in response to S. pneumoniae, in association with a defect in IL-1β and IL-23 secretion. This study identified IL-17 and IL-22 as susceptibility factors in COPD exacerbation. Therefore targeting such cytokines could represent a potent strategy to control COPD exacerbation.

  18. The Relevance of a Novel Quantitative Assay to Detect up to 40 Major Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotypes Directly in Clinical Nasopharyngeal and Blood Specimens.

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    Melina Messaoudi

    Full Text Available For epidemiological and surveillance purposes, it is relevant to monitor the distribution and dynamics of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes. Conventional serotyping methods do not provide rapid or quantitative information on serotype loads. Quantitative serotyping may enable prediction of the invasiveness of a specific serotype compared to other serotypes carried. Here, we describe a novel, rapid multiplex real-time PCR assay for identification and quantification of the 40 most prevalent pneumococcal serotypes and the assay impacts in pneumonia specimens from emerging and developing countries. Eleven multiplex PCR to detect 40 serotypes or serogroups were optimized. Quantification was enabled by reference to standard dilutions of known bacterial load. Performance of the assay was evaluated to specifically type and quantify S. pneumoniae in nasopharyngeal and blood samples from adult and pediatric patients hospitalized with pneumonia (n = 664 from five different countries. Serogroup 6 was widely represented in nasopharyngeal specimens from all five cohorts. The most frequent serotypes in the French, South African, and Brazilian cohorts were 1 and 7A/F, 3 and 19F, and 14, respectively. When both samples were available, the serotype in blood was always present as carriage with other serotypes in the nasopharynx. Moreover, the ability of a serotype to invade the bloodstream may be linked to its nasopharyngeal load. The mean nasopharyngeal concentration of the serotypes that moved to the blood was 3 log-fold higher than the ones only found in the nasopharynx. This novel, rapid, quantitative assay may potentially predict some of the S. pneumoniae serotypes invasiveness and assessment of pneumococcal serotype distribution.

  19. Role of Streptococcus pneumoniae OM001 operon in capsular polysaccharide production, virulence and survival in human saliva.

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    Zuleeza Ahmad

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of community-acquired pneumonia in all ages worldwide, and with ever-increasing antibiotic resistance, the understanding of its pathogenesis and spread is as important as ever. Recently, we reported the presence of a Low Molecular Weight Tyrosine Phosphatase (LMWPTP Spd1837 in the pneumococcus. This protein is encoded in an operon, OM001 with two other genes, with previous work implicating this operon as important for pneumococcal virulence. Thus, we set out to investigate the role of the individual genes in the operon during pneumococcal pathogenesis. As LMWPTPs play a major role in capsular polysaccharide (CPS biosynthesis in many bacteria, we tested the effect of mutating spd1837 and its adjacent genes, spd1836 and spd1838 on CPS levels. Our results suggest that individual deletion of the genes, including the LMWPTP, did not modulate CPS levels, in multiple conditions, and in different strain backgrounds. Following in vivo studies, Spd1836 was identified as a novel virulence factor during pneumococcal invasive disease, in both the lungs and blood, with this protein alone responsible for the effects of operon's role in virulence. We also showed that a deletion in spd1836, spd1838 or the overall OM001 operon reduced survival in human saliva during the conditions that mimic transmission compared to the wildtype strain. With studies suggesting that survival in human saliva may be important for transmission, this study identifies Spd1836 and Spd1838 as transmission factors, potentially facilitating the spread of the pneumococcus from person to person. Overall, this study hopes to further our understanding of the bacterial transmission that precedes disease and outbreaks.

  20. Role of Streptococcus pneumoniae OM001 operon in capsular polysaccharide production, virulence and survival in human saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Zuleeza; Harvey, Richard M; Paton, James C; Standish, Alistair J; Morona, Renato

    2018-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of community-acquired pneumonia in all ages worldwide, and with ever-increasing antibiotic resistance, the understanding of its pathogenesis and spread is as important as ever. Recently, we reported the presence of a Low Molecular Weight Tyrosine Phosphatase (LMWPTP) Spd1837 in the pneumococcus. This protein is encoded in an operon, OM001 with two other genes, with previous work implicating this operon as important for pneumococcal virulence. Thus, we set out to investigate the role of the individual genes in the operon during pneumococcal pathogenesis. As LMWPTPs play a major role in capsular polysaccharide (CPS) biosynthesis in many bacteria, we tested the effect of mutating spd1837 and its adjacent genes, spd1836 and spd1838 on CPS levels. Our results suggest that individual deletion of the genes, including the LMWPTP, did not modulate CPS levels, in multiple conditions, and in different strain backgrounds. Following in vivo studies, Spd1836 was identified as a novel virulence factor during pneumococcal invasive disease, in both the lungs and blood, with this protein alone responsible for the effects of operon's role in virulence. We also showed that a deletion in spd1836, spd1838 or the overall OM001 operon reduced survival in human saliva during the conditions that mimic transmission compared to the wildtype strain. With studies suggesting that survival in human saliva may be important for transmission, this study identifies Spd1836 and Spd1838 as transmission factors, potentially facilitating the spread of the pneumococcus from person to person. Overall, this study hopes to further our understanding of the bacterial transmission that precedes disease and outbreaks.

  1. The oral commensal Streptococcus mitis shows a mixed memory Th cell signature that is similar to and cross-reactive with Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engen, Stian André; Valen Rukke, Håkon; Becattini, Simone; Jarrossay, David; Blix, Inger Johanne; Petersen, Fernanda Cristina; Sallusto, Federica; Schenck, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Carriage of and infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae is known to predominantly induce T helper 17 (Th17) responses in humans, but the types of Th cells showing reactivity towards commensal streptococci with low pathogenic potential, such as the oral commensals S. mitis and S. salivarius, remain uncharacterized. Memory CD4(+) T helper (Th) cell subsets were isolated from healthy human blood donors according to differential expression of chemokine receptors, expanded in vitro using polyclonal stimuli and characterized for reactivity against different streptococcal strains. Th cells responding to S. mitis, S. salivarius and S. pneumoniae were predominantly in a CCR6(+)CXCR3(+) subset and produced IFN-γ, and in a CCR6(+)CCR4(+) subset and produced IL-17 and IL-22. Frequencies of S. pneumoniae-reactive Th cells were higher than frequencies of S. mitis- and S. salivarius-specific Th cells. S. mitis and S. pneumoniae isogenic capsule knock-out mutants and a S. mitis mutant expressing the serotype 4 capsule of S. pneumoniae showed no different Th cell responses as compared to wild type strains. S. mitis-specific Th17 cells showed cross-reactivity with S. pneumoniae. As Th17 cells partly control clearance of S. pneumoniae, cross-reactive Th17 cells that may be induced by commensal bacterial species may influence the immune response, independent of capsule expression.

  2. The oral commensal Streptococcus mitis shows a mixed memory Th cell signature that is similar to and cross-reactive with Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stian André Engen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Carriage of and infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae is known to predominantly induce T helper 17 (Th17 responses in humans, but the types of Th cells showing reactivity towards commensal streptococci with low pathogenic potential, such as the oral commensals S. mitis and S. salivarius, remain uncharacterized. METHODS: Memory CD4(+ T helper (Th cell subsets were isolated from healthy human blood donors according to differential expression of chemokine receptors, expanded in vitro using polyclonal stimuli and characterized for reactivity against different streptococcal strains. RESULTS: Th cells responding to S. mitis, S. salivarius and S. pneumoniae were predominantly in a CCR6(+CXCR3(+ subset and produced IFN-γ, and in a CCR6(+CCR4(+ subset and produced IL-17 and IL-22. Frequencies of S. pneumoniae-reactive Th cells were higher than frequencies of S. mitis- and S. salivarius-specific Th cells. S. mitis and S. pneumoniae isogenic capsule knock-out mutants and a S. mitis mutant expressing the serotype 4 capsule of S. pneumoniae showed no different Th cell responses as compared to wild type strains. S. mitis-specific Th17 cells showed cross-reactivity with S. pneumoniae. CONCLUSIONS: As Th17 cells partly control clearance of S. pneumoniae, cross-reactive Th17 cells that may be induced by commensal bacterial species may influence the immune response, independent of capsule expression.

  3. Emergence of Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotype 12F after Sequential Introduction of 7- and 13-Valent Vaccines, Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokney, Assaf; Ben-Shimol, Shalom; Korenman, Zinaida; Porat, Nurith; Gorodnitzky, Zeev; Givon-Lavi, Noga; Ron, Merav; Agmon, Vered; Dagan, Ron; Valinsky, Lea

    2018-03-01

    Israel implemented use of 7- and 13-valent pneumococcal vaccine in 2009 and 2010, respectively. We describe results of prospective, population-based, nationwide active surveillance of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 12F (Sp12F) invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) dynamics in the 7 years after vaccine introduction. Of 4,573 IPD episodes during July 2009-June 2016, a total of 434 (9.5%) were caused by Sp12F. Sp12F IPD rates (cases/100,000 population) increased in children 3.9 since 2011-2012, followed by an increase in all ages. During 2011-2016, Sp12F was the most prevalent IPD serotype. Sp12F isolates were mostly penicillin nonsusceptible (MIC >0.06 µg/mL; MIC 50  = 0.12) and predominantly of sequence type 3774), a clone exclusively found in Israel (constituting ≈90% of isolates in 2000-2009). The sharp increase, long duration, and predominance of Sp12F IPD after vaccine implementation reflect a single clone expansion and may represent more than a transient outbreak.

  4. Streptococcus pneumoniae serine protease HtrA, but not SFP or PrtA, is a major virulence factor in pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Stoppelaar, Sacha F; Bootsma, Hester J; Zomer, Aldert; Roelofs, Joris J T H; Hermans, Peter W M; van 't Veer, Cornelis; van der Poll, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus (S.) pneumoniae is a common causative pathogen in pneumonia. Serine protease orthologs expressed by a variety of bacteria have been found of importance for virulence. Previous studies have identified two serine proteases in S. pneumoniae, HtrA (high-temperature requirement A) and PrtA (cell wall-associated serine protease A), that contributed to virulence in models of pneumonia and intraperitoneal infection respectively. We here sought to identify additional S. pneumoniae serine proteases and determine their role in virulence. The S. pneumoniae D39 genome contains five putative serine proteases, of which HtrA, Subtilase Family Protein (SFP) and PrtA were selected for insertional mutagenesis because they are predicted to be secreted and surface exposed. Mutant D39 strains lacking serine proteases were constructed by in-frame insertion deletion mutagenesis. Pneumonia was induced by intranasal infection of mice with wild-type or mutant D39. After high dose infection, only D39ΔhtrA showed reduced virulence, as reflected by strongly reduced bacterial loads, diminished dissemination and decreased lung inflammation. D39ΔprtA induced significantly less lung inflammation together with smaller infiltrated lung surface, but without influencing bacterial loads. After low dose infection, D39ΔhtrA again showed strongly reduced bacterial loads; notably, pneumococcal burdens were also modestly lower in lungs after infection with D39Δsfp. These data confirm the important role for HtrA in S. pneumoniae virulence. PrtA contributes to lung damage in high dose pneumonia; it does not however contribute to bacterial outgrowth in pneumococcal pneumonia. SFP may facilitate S. pneumoniae growth after low dose infection.

  5. Aspectos Clínicos y neuroinmunológicos de la meningoencefalitis por Streptococcus pneumoniae

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    Raisa Bu-Coifiu

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Después de exitosas campañas de vacunación contra Neisseria meningitidis y Haemophilus influenzae hubo un aumento de casos de meningoencefalitis por Streptococcus pneumoniae. Con el objetivo de describir las características clínicas, los hallazgos de laboratorio y las complicaciones encontradas a un grupo de pacientes que sufrieron de esta enfermedad entre 1993 y 2006, evaluar el estado de la barrera sangre-líquido cefalorraquídeo (LCR y el patrón de respuesta de síntesis intratecal de inmunoglobulinas a través del reibergrama, se estudiaron 12 niños con meningoencefalitis por Streptococcus pneumoniae que ingresaron en el Hospital Pediátrico de San Miguel del Padrón, Ciudad de La Habana, en ese periodo. Se dosificaron albúmina IgA, IgM e IgG y sus subclases por inmunodifusión radial en suero y líquido cefalorraquídeo. La edad más frecuente resultó la menor de un año. Las mayores complicaciones fueron: shock séptico y edema cerebral. Hubo tres pacientes fallecidos. Los patrones de las tres clases mayores de inmunoglobulinas aparecieron en el 33% del total. Los dos patrones de subclases de IgG más IgM tuvieron en común la disfunción de la barrera sangre-líquido cefalorraquídeo. La respuesta inmune intratecal en los pacientes con meningoencefalitis por Streptococcus pneumoniae tiene características distintivas que lo diferencian de otras meningoencefalitis de origen bacteriano por lo que en su conjunto podrían ser elementos a ser tomados en cuenta para auxiliar al médico en su diagnóstico diferencial y en la táctica para una vacuna cubana.

  6. The Oral Commensal Streptococcus mitis Shows a Mixed Memory Th Cell Signature That Is Similar to and Cross-Reactive with Streptococcus pneumoniae

    OpenAIRE

    Engen, Stian André; Valen Rukke, Håkon; Becattini, Simone; Jarrossay, David; Blix, Inger Johanne; Petersen, Fernanda Cristina; Sallusto, Federica; Schenck, Karl

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Carriage of and infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae is known to predominantly induce T helper 17 (Th17) responses in humans, but the types of Th cells showing reactivity towards commensal streptococci with low pathogenic potential, such as the oral commensals S. mitis and S. salivarius, remain uncharacterized. METHODS: Memory CD4(+) T helper (Th) cell subsets were isolated from healthy human blood donors according to differential expression of chemokine receptors, expanded in ...

  7. [Bactericidal activity of sitafloxacin and other new quinolones against antimicrobial resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Intetsu; Kanayama, Akiko; Hasegawa, Miyuki; Kaneko, Akihiro

    2013-02-01

    We conducted a study assess the bactericidal activity of sitafloxacin (STFX) against Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates recovered from respiratory infections including penicillin-resistant (PRSP) isolates, macrolide resistant isolates possessing mefA and ermB resistance genes and quinolone resistance isolates with mutations in gyrA or gyrA and parC. Each isolate tested was grown in hemosupplemented Mueller-Hinton broth and adjusted to approximately 10(5) CFU/ mL. Isolates were than exposed to a Cmax antimicrobial blood level that would be attained with routine antimicrobial administration and an antimicrobial level that would be expected 4 hours post-Cmax (Cmax 4hr). Bactericidal activity was measured for up to 8 hours. Excluding a subset of S. pneumoniae isolates with mutations in the quinolone resistance determining region (QRDR), all quinolones showed bactericidal activity at Cmax and Cmax 4 hr antimicrobial concentrations for up to 8 hours. Against S. pneumoniae isolates with either gyrA or gyrA and parC mutations, bactericidal activity of STFX was shown for up to 4 to 8 hours following Cmax based on a limit of detection of bactericidal activity below the limit of detection for up to 8 hours with exposure to Cmax and no bactericidal activity was seen with levofloxacin. When all quinolones tested where adjusted to concentrations corresponding to their MICs, STFX showed the most rapid bactericidal activity against PRSP. This rapid bactericidal activity in PRSP is a key to the effectiveness of STFX. Our findings show that beyond inhibition of bacterial replication by blocking their DNA replication pathway and synthesis of proteins, STFX demonstrated characteristics contributing to greater bactericidal activity compared to GRNX. In conclusion, of the newer quinolones, STFX showed the strongest bactericidal activity against S. pneumoniae isolates with mutations in the QRDR which indicates that it may show the most effective clinical utility among the quinolones in

  8. Streptococcus pneumoniae DNA Gyrase and Topoisomerase IV: Overexpression, Purification, and Differential Inhibition by Fluoroquinolones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiao-Su; Fisher, L. Mark

    1999-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae gyrA and gyrB genes specifying the DNA gyrase subunits have been cloned into pET plasmid vectors under the control of an inducible T7 promoter and have been separately expressed in Escherichia coli. Soluble 97-kDa GyrA and 72-kDa GyrB proteins bearing polyhistidine tags at their respective C-terminal and N-terminal ends were purified to apparent homogeneity by one-step nickel chelate column chromatography and were free of host E. coli topoisomerase activity. Equimolar amounts of the gyrase subunits reconstituted ATP-dependent DNA supercoiling with comparable activity to gyrase of E. coli and Staphylococcus aureus. In parallel, S. pneumoniae topoisomerase IV ParC and ParE subunits were similarly expressed in E. coli, purified to near homogeneity as 93- and 73-kDa proteins, and shown to generate efficient ATP-dependent DNA relaxation and DNA decatenation activities. Using the purified enzymes, we examined the inhibitory effects of three paradigm fluoroquinolones—ciprofloxacin, sparfloxacin, and clinafloxacin—which previous genetic studies with S. pneumoniae suggested act preferentially through topoisomerase IV, through gyrase, and through both enzymes, respectively. Surprisingly, all three quinolones were more active in inhibiting purified topoisomerase IV than gyrase, with clinafloxacin showing the greatest inhibitory potency. Moreover, the tested agents were at least 25-fold more effective in stabilizing a cleavable complex (the relevant cytotoxic lesion) with topoisomerase IV than with gyrase, with clinafloxacin some 10- to 32-fold more potent against either enzyme, in line with its superior activity against S. pneumoniae. The uniform target preference of the three fluoroquinolones for topoisomerase IV in vitro is in apparent contrast to the genetic data. We interpret these results in terms of a model for bacterial killing by quinolones in which cellular factors can modulate the effects of target affinity to determine the cytotoxic

  9. Components of Streptococcus pneumoniae suppress allergic airways disease and NKT cells by inducing regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorburn, Alison N; Foster, Paul S; Gibson, Peter G; Hansbro, Philip M

    2012-05-01

    Asthma is an allergic airways disease (AAD) caused by dysregulated immune responses and characterized by eosinophilic inflammation, mucus hypersecretion, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). NKT cells have been shown to contribute to AHR in some mouse models. Conversely, regulatory T cells (Tregs) control aberrant immune responses and maintain homeostasis. Recent evidence suggests that Streptococcus pneumoniae induces Tregs that have potential to be harnessed therapeutically for asthma. In this study, mouse models of AAD were used to identify the S. pneumoniae components that have suppressive properties, and the mechanisms underlying suppression were investigated. We tested the suppressive capacity of type-3-polysaccharide (T3P), isolated cell walls, pneumolysoid (Ply) and CpG. When coadministered, T3P + Ply suppressed the development of: eosinophilic inflammation, Th2 cytokine release, mucus hypersecretion, and AHR. Importantly, T3P + Ply also attenuated features of AAD when administered during established disease. We show that NKT cells contributed to the development of AAD and also were suppressed by T3P + Ply treatment. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of NKT cells induced AHR, which also could be reversed by T3P + Ply. T3P + Ply-induced Tregs were essential for the suppression of NKT cells and AAD, which was demonstrated by Treg depletion. Collectively, our results show that the S. pneumoniae components T3P + Ply suppress AAD through the induction of Tregs that blocked the activity of NKT cells. These data suggest that S. pneumoniae components may have potential as a therapeutic strategy for the suppression of allergic asthma through the induction of Tregs and suppression of NKT cells.

  10. Antibiotic treatment and the diagnosis of Streptococcus pneumoniae in lower respiratory tract infections in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsgaard, Jens; Møller, Jens Kjølseth; Kilian, Mogens

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the possible influence of antibiotic treatment on the results of different diagnostic tests for the diagnosis of lower respiratory tract infections with Streptococcus pneumoniae. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A prospective cohort of 159 unselected adult immunocompetent patients...... admitted to Silkeborg County Hospital in Denmark with community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections underwent microbiological investigations with fiber-optic bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage, blood and sputum culture and urine antigen test for type-specific polysaccharide capsular antigens...... was positive in both systems, making a total of 22 patients with documented pneumococcal infection. As a positive culture test was dependent on the absence of antibiotic treatment, whereas a positive urine antigen test depended on antibiotic treatment within 48 hours, the two tests were complementary...

  11. Meningitis caused by streptococci other than Streptococcus pneumoniae: a retrospective clinical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Kirsten; Harder, Eva; Wandall, Johan

    1999-01-01

    We reviewed the medical records of 26 patients (median age 62 years, range 5-76 years) admitted to our institution during 1978-98 with acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) caused by streptococci other than Streptococcus pneumoniae (comprising 1.9% of all patients with ABM). 19 cases were community......-acquired and 7 were nosocomial. 73% had comorbid or predisposing conditions and 73% had an identifiable extracerebral focus; only in 2 patients no comorbid disease, primary focus or predisposing condition was present. Five patients had cerebral abscesses, and 5 had endocarditis. Beta-haemolytic streptococci were...... grown in 14 cases (serotype A: 4, B: 5, C: 1, G: 4) and were predominant among patients with endocarditis, whereas alpha- or non-haemolytic strains grew in 12 cases (S. mitis: 4, S. constellatus: 2, E. faecalis: 2, S. bovis: 1, unspecified: 3) and were predominant in patients with a brain abscess...

  12. Dysregulation of transition metal ion homeostasis is the molecular basis for cadmium toxicity in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begg, Stephanie L; Eijkelkamp, Bart A; Luo, Zhenyao; Couñago, Rafael M; Morey, Jacqueline R; Maher, Megan J; Ong, Cheryl-Lynn Y; McEwan, Alastair G; Kobe, Bostjan; O'Mara, Megan L; Paton, James C; McDevitt, Christopher A

    2015-03-03

    Cadmium is a transition metal ion that is highly toxic in biological systems. Although relatively rare in the Earth's crust, anthropogenic release of cadmium since industrialization has increased biogeochemical cycling and the abundance of the ion in the biosphere. Despite this, the molecular basis of its toxicity remains unclear. Here we combine metal-accumulation assays, high-resolution structural data and biochemical analyses to show that cadmium toxicity, in Streptococcus pneumoniae, occurs via perturbation of first row transition metal ion homeostasis. We show that cadmium uptake reduces the millimolar cellular accumulation of manganese and zinc, and thereby increases sensitivity to oxidative stress. Despite this, high cellular concentrations of cadmium (~17 mM) are tolerated, with negligible impact on growth or sensitivity to oxidative stress, when manganese and glutathione are abundant. Collectively, this work provides insight into the molecular basis of cadmium toxicity in prokaryotes, and the connection between cadmium accumulation and oxidative stress.

  13. SUSCEPTIBILITY OF RESPIRATORY ISOLATES OF STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE ISOLATED FROM CHILDREN HOSPITALIZED IN THE CLINICAL CENTER NIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinić, Marina M; Mladenović Antić, Snezana; Kocić, Branislava; Stanković Dordević, Dobrila; Vrbić, Miodrag; Bogdanović, Milena

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is one of the most common causes of respiratory infections. The aim was to study the susceptibility to antimicrobial agents of respiratory isolates ofStreptococcus pneumoniae obtained from hospitalized children. A total of 190 respiratory pneumococcal isolates obtained from children aged from 0 to 14 years were isolated and identified by using standard microbiological methods. Susceptibility to oxacillin, erythromycin, clindamycin, tetracycline, cotrimoxazole, ofloxacin and rifampicin was tested by disc diffusion method. Minimal inhibitory concentrations for amoxicillin and ceftriaxone were determined by means of E test. The macrolide-resistant phenotype was detected by double disc diffusion test. All tested isolates were susceptible to amoxicillin and ceftriaxone. The minimal amoxicillin concentration inhibiting the growth of 50% of isolates and of 90% of isolates was 0.50 microg/ml and 1.0 microg/ml, respectively and the minimal ceftriaxone concentration inhibiting the growth of 50% of isolates and of 90% of isolates was 0.25 microg/ml and 0.50 microg/ml, respectively. Susceptibility to erythromycin and clindamycin was observed in 21.6% and 29.47% of isolates, respectively. The resistence to macrolides-M phenotype was detected in 10.07% of isolates and constitutive macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin phenotype (constitutive MLS phenotype) was found in 89.93% of isolates. All tested isolates were susceptible to ofloxacin and rifampicin. Amoxicillin could be the therapy of choice in pediatric practice. The macrolides should not be recommended for the empirical therapy of pneumococcal respiratory tract infection in our local area.

  14. The Small Molecule DAM Inhibitor, Pyrimidinedione, Disrupts Streptococcus pneumoniae Biofilm Growth In Vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Kumar Yadav

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae persist in the human nasopharynx within organized biofilms. However, expansion to other tissues may cause severe infections such as pneumonia, otitis media, bacteremia, and meningitis, especially in children and the elderly. Bacteria within biofilms possess increased tolerance to antibiotics and are able to resist host defense systems. Bacteria within biofilms exhibit different physiology, metabolism, and gene expression profiles than planktonic cells. These differences underscore the need to identify alternative therapeutic targets and novel antimicrobial compounds that are effective against pneumococcal biofilms. In bacteria, DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam alters pathogenic gene expression and catalyzes the methylation of adenine in the DNA duplex and of macromolecules during the activated methyl cycle (AMC. In pneumococci, AMC is involved in the biosynthesis of quorum sensing molecules that regulate competence and biofilm formation. In this study, we examine the effect of a small molecule Dam inhibitor, pyrimidinedione, on Streptococcus pneumoniae biofilm formation and evaluate the changes in global gene expression within biofilms via microarray analysis. The effects of pyrimidinedione on in vitro biofilms were studied using a static microtiter plate assay, and the architecture of the biofilms was viewed using confocal and scanning electron microscopy. The cytotoxicity of pyrimidinedione was tested on a human middle ear epithelium cell line by CCK-8. In situ oligonucleotide microarray was used to compare the global gene expression of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 within biofilms grown in the presence and absence of pyrimidinedione. Real-time RT-PCR was used to study gene expression. Pyrimidinedione inhibits pneumococcal biofilm growth in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner, but it does not inhibit planktonic cell growth. Confocal microscopy analysis revealed the absence of organized biofilms, where cell

  15. Nucleotide sequence and functional analysis of the tet (M)-carrying conjugative transposon Tn5251 of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Francesco; Oggioni, Marco R; Pozzi, Gianni; Iannelli, Francesco

    2010-07-01

    The Tn916-like genetic element Tn5251 is part of the composite conjugative transposon (CTn) Tn5253 of Streptococcus pneumoniae, a 64.5-kb chromosomal element originally called Omega(cat-tet) BM6001. DNA sequence analysis showed that Tn5251 is 18 033-bp long and contains 22 ORFs, 20 of which have the same direction of transcription. Annotation was possible for 11 out of 22 ORFs, including the tet(M) tetracycline resistance gene and int and xis involved in the integration/excision process. Autonomous copies of Tn5251 were generated during matings of Tn5253-containing donors with S. pneumoniae and Enterococcus faecalis. Tn5251 was shown to integrate at different sites in the bacterial chromosome. It behaves as a fully functional CTn capable of independent conjugal transfer to a variety of bacterial species including S. pneumoniae, Streptococcus gordonii, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus agalactiae, E. faecalis and Bacillus subtilis. The excision of Tn5251 produces a circular intermediate and a deletion in Tn5253 at a level of 1.2 copies per 10(5) chromosomes.

  16. Identification of proteins in Streptococcus pneumoniae by reverse vaccinology and genetic diversity of these proteins in clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argondizzo, Ana Paula Corrêa; da Mota, Fabio Faria; Pestana, Cristiane Pinheiro; Reis, Joice Neves; de Miranda, Antonio Basílio; Galler, Ricardo; Medeiros, Marco Alberto

    2015-02-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Virulence-associated proteins common and conserved among all capsular types now represent the best strategy to combat pneumococcal infections. Our aim was to identify conserved targets in pneumococci that showed positive prediction for lipoprotein and extracellular subcellular location using bioinformatics programs and verify the distribution and the degree of conservation of these targets in pneumococci. These targets can be considered potential vaccine candidate to be evaluated in the future. A set of 13 targets were analyzed and confirmed the presence in all pneumococci tested. These 13 genes were highly conserved showing around >96 % of amino acid and nucleotide identity, but they were also present and show high identity in the closely related species Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus oralis, and Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae. S. oralis clusters away from S. pneumoniae, while S. pseudopneumoniae and S. mitis cluster closer. The divergence between the selected targets was too small to be observed consistently in phylogenetic groups between the analyzed genomes of S. pneumoniae. The proteins analyzed fulfill two of the initial criteria of a vaccine candidate: targets are present in a variety of different pneumococci strains including different serotypes and are conserved among the samples evaluated.

  17. Effect of Xylitol on Growth of Streptococcus pneumoniae in the Presence of Fructose and Sorbitol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapiainen, Terhi; Kontiokari, Tero; Sammalkivi, Laura; Ikäheimo, Irma; Koskela, Markku; Uhari, Matti

    2001-01-01

    Xylitol is effective in preventing acute otitis media by inhibiting the growth of Streptococcus pneumoniae. To clarify this inhibition we used fructose, which is known to block similar growth inhibition observed in Streptococcus mutans. In addition, we evaluated the efficacy of sorbitol in inhibiting the growth of pneumococci, as sorbitol is widely used for indications similar to those for which xylitol is used. The addition of 5% xylitol to the growth medium resulted in marked growth inhibition, an effect which was totally eliminated in the presence of 1, 2.5, or 5% fructose but not in the presence of 1 or 5% glucose, 1% galactose, or 1% sucrose. This finding implies that xylitol-induced inhibition of pneumococcal growth is mediated via the fructose phosphotransferase system in a way similar to that in which mutans group streptococcal growth is inhibited. The addition of sorbitol at concentrations of 1, 2.5, or 5% to the growth medium did not affect the growth of pneumococci and neither inhibited nor enhanced the xylitol-induced growth impairment. Thus, it seems that xylitol is the only commercially used sugar substitute proven to have an antimicrobial effect on pneumococci. PMID:11120960

  18. Multicentre in-vitro evaluation of the susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis to ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, co-amoxiclav and sparfloxacin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HoogkampKorstanje, JAA; DirksGo, SIS; Kabel, P; Manson, WL; Stobberingh, EE; Vreede, RW; Davies, BI

    Seven laboratories, including a reference laboratory, tested the susceptibility of Moraxella catarrhalis, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae strains to ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, co-amoxiclav and sparfloxacin with the Etest. A total of 976 strains were collected. The results

  19. Characterization of NAD salvage pathways and their role in virulence in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Michael D. L.; Echlin, Haley; Dao, Tina H.

    2015-01-01

    NAD is a necessary cofactor present in all living cells. Some bacteria cannot de novo synthesize NAD and must use the salvage pathway to import niacin or nicotinamide riboside via substrate importers NiaX and PnuC, respectively. Although homologues of these two importers and their substrates have been identified in other organisms, limited data exist in Streptococcus pneumoniae, specifically, on its effect on overall virulence. Here, we sought to characterize the substrate specificity of NiaX and PnuC in Str. pneumoniae TIGR4 and the contribution of these proteins to virulence of the pathogen. Although binding affinity of each importer for nicotinamide mononucleotide may overlap, we found NiaX to specifically import nicotinamide and nicotinic acid, and PnuC to be primarily responsible for nicotinamide riboside import. Furthermore, a pnuC mutant is completely attenuated during both intranasal and intratracheal infections in mice. Taken together, these findings underscore the importance of substrate salvage in pneumococcal pathogenesis and indicate that PnuC could potentially be a viable small-molecule therapeutic target to alleviate disease progression in the host. PMID:26311256

  20. Discovery of prenylated flavonoids with dual activity against influenza virus and Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grienke, Ulrike; Richter, Martina; Walther, Elisabeth; Hoffmann, Anja; Kirchmair, Johannes; Makarov, Vadim; Nietzsche, Sandor; Schmidtke, Michaela; Rollinger, Judith M

    2016-06-03

    Influenza virus neuraminidase (NA) is the primary target for influenza therapeutics. Severe complications are often related to secondary pneumonia caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococci), which also express NAs. Recently, a NA-mediated lethal synergism between influenza A viruses and pneumococci was described. Therefore, dual inhibitors of both viral and bacterial NAs are expected to be advantageous for the treatment of influenza. We investigated the traditional Chinese herbal drug sāng bái pí (mulberry root bark) as source for anti-infectives. Two prenylated flavonoid derivatives, sanggenon G (4) and sanggenol A (5) inhibited influenza A viral and pneumococcal NAs and, in contrast to the approved NA inhibitor oseltamivir, also planktonic growth and biofilm formation of pneumococci. Evaluation of 27 congeners of 5 revealed a correlation between the degree of prenylation and bioactivity. Abyssinone-V 4'-methyl ether (27) inhibited pneumococcal NA with IC50 = 2.18 μM, pneumococcal growth with MIC = 5.63 μM, and biofilm formation with MBIC = 4.21 μM, without harming lung epithelial cells. Compounds 5 and 27 also disrupt the synergism between influenza A virus and pneumococcal NA in vitro, hence functioning as dual-acting anti-infectives. The results warrant further studies on whether the observed disruption of this synergism is transferable to in vivo systems.

  1. Transcriptional profiling of UlaR-regulated genes in Streptococcus pneumoniae

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    Sulman Shafeeq

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The transcriptional regulator UlaR belongs to the family of PRD-containing transcriptional regulators, which are mostly involved in the regulation of carbohydrate metabolism. The role of the transcriptional regulator UlaR in Streptococcus pneumoniae has recently been described [1]. Here, we report detailed genome-wide transcriptional profiling of UlaR-regulated genes in S. pneumoniae D39 and its ∆ulaR derivative, either in the presence of 10 mM ascorbic acid in M17 medium using microarray analysis. 10 mM concentration of ascorbic acid was supplemented to the M17 medium because our lacZ-fusion studies indicated that UlaR acts as a transcriptional activator of its targets in the presence of ascorbic acid and the expression of the ula operon was maximal at a 10 mM ascorbic acid concentration [1]. All transcriptional profiling data of UlaR-regulated genes was deposited to Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO database under accession number GSE61649.

  2. Prophage spontaneous activation promotes DNA release enhancing biofilm formation in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

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    Margarida Carrolo

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus is able to form biofilms in vivo and previous studies propose that pneumococcal biofilms play a relevant role both in colonization and infection. Additionally, pneumococci recovered from human infections are characterized by a high prevalence of lysogenic bacteriophages (phages residing quiescently in their host chromosome. We investigated a possible link between lysogeny and biofilm formation. Considering that extracellular DNA (eDNA is a key factor in the biofilm matrix, we reasoned that prophage spontaneous activation with the consequent bacterial host lysis could provide a source of eDNA, enhancing pneumococcal biofilm development. Monitoring biofilm growth of lysogenic and non-lysogenic pneumococcal strains indicated that phage-infected bacteria are more proficient at forming biofilms, that is their biofilms are characterized by a higher biomass and cell viability. The presence of phage particles throughout the lysogenic strains biofilm development implicated prophage spontaneous induction in this effect. Analysis of lysogens deficient for phage lysin and the bacterial major autolysin revealed that the absence of either lytic activity impaired biofilm development and the addition of DNA restored the ability of mutant strains to form robust biofilms. These findings establish that limited phage-mediated host lysis of a fraction of the bacterial population, due to spontaneous phage induction, constitutes an important source of eDNA for the S. pneumoniae biofilm matrix and that this localized release of eDNA favors biofilm formation by the remaining bacterial population.

  3. Frequent beneficial mutations during single-colony serial transfer of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

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    Kathleen E Stevens

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The appearance of new mutations within a population provides the raw material for evolution. The consistent decline in fitness observed in classical mutation accumulation studies has provided support for the long-held view that deleterious mutations are more common than beneficial mutations. Here we present results of a study using a mutation accumulation design with the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae in which the fitness of the derived populations increased. This rise in fitness was associated specifically with adaptation to survival during brief stationary phase periods between single-colony population bottlenecks. To understand better the population dynamics behind this unanticipated adaptation, we developed a maximum likelihood model describing the processes of mutation and stationary-phase selection in the context of frequent population bottlenecks. Using this model, we estimate that the rate of beneficial mutations may be as high as 4.8×10(-4 events per genome for each time interval corresponding to the pneumococcal generation time. This rate is several orders of magnitude higher than earlier estimates of beneficial mutation rates in bacteria but supports recent results obtained through the propagation of small populations of Escherichia coli. Our findings indicate that beneficial mutations may be relatively frequent in bacteria and suggest that in S. pneumoniae, which develops natural competence for transformation, a steady supply of such mutations may be available for sampling by recombination.

  4. Streptococcus pneumoniae Can Utilize Multiple Sources of Hyaluronic Acid for Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Carolyn; Stewart, Jason M.; Tazi, Mia F.; Burnaugh, Amanda M.; Linke, Caroline M.; Woodiga, Shireen A.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms by which Streptococcus pneumoniae obtains carbohydrates for growth during airway colonization remain to be elucidated. The low concentration of free carbohydrates in the normal human airway suggests that pneumococci must utilize complex glycan structures for growth. The glycosaminoglycan hyaluronic acid is present on the apical surface of airway epithelial cells. As pneumococci express a hyaluronate lyase (Hyl) that cleaves hyaluronic acid into disaccharides, we hypothesized that during colonization pneumococci utilize the released carbohydrates for growth. Hyaluronic acid supported significant pneumococcal growth in an hyl-dependent manner. A phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system (PTS) and an unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolase (Ugl) encoded downstream of hyl are also essential for growth on hyaluronic acid. This genomic arrangement is present in several other organisms, suggesting conservation of the utilization mechanism between species. In vivo experiments support the hypothesis that S. pneumoniae utilizes hyaluronic acid as a carbon source during colonization. We also demonstrate that pneumococci can utilize the hyaluronic acid capsule of other bacterial species for growth, suggesting an alternative carbohydrate source for pneumococcal growth. Together, these data support a novel function for pneumococcal degradation of hyaluronic acid in vivo and provide mechanistic details of growth on this glycosaminoglycan. PMID:22311922

  5. Characterization of pneumonia due to Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priestnall, Simon L; Erles, Kerstin; Brooks, Harriet W; Cardwell, Jacqueline M; Waller, Andrew S; Paillot, Romain; Robinson, Carl; Darby, Alistair C; Holden, Matthew T G; Schöniger, Sandra

    2010-11-01

    Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus has been linked to cases of acute fatal pneumonia in dogs in several countries. Outbreaks can occur in kenneled dog populations and result in significant levels of morbidity and mortality. This highly contagious disease is characterized by the sudden onset of clinical signs, including pyrexia, dyspnea, and hemorrhagic nasal discharge. The pathogenesis of S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus infection in dogs is poorly understood. This study systematically characterized the histopathological changes in the lungs of 39 dogs from a large rehoming shelter in London, United Kingdom; the dogs were infected with S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus. An objective scoring system demonstrated that S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus caused pneumonia in 26/39 (66.7%) dogs, and most of these dogs (17/26 [65.4%]) were classified as severe fibrino-suppurative, necrotizing, and hemorrhagic. Three recently described superantigen genes (szeF, szeN, and szeP) were detected by PCR in 17/47 (36.2%) of the S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus isolates; however, there was no association between the presence of these genes and the histopathological score. The lungs of S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus-infected dogs with severe respiratory signs and lung pathology did however have significantly higher mRNA levels of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and interleukin 8 (IL-8) than in uninfected controls, suggesting a role for an exuberant host immune response in the pathogenesis of this disease.

  6. Contribution of Topoisomerase IV and DNA Gyrase Mutations in Streptococcus pneumoniae to Resistance to Novel Fluoroquinolones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestova, Ekaterina; Beyer, Rebecca; Cianciotto, Nicholas P.; Noskin, Gary A.; Peterson, Lance R.

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we assessed the activity of ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, sparfloxacin, and trovafloxacin against clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae that were resistant to the less-recently developed fluoroquinolones by using defined amino acid substitutions in DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV. The molecular basis for resistance was assessed by using mutants selected with trovafloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and levofloxacin in vitro. This demonstrated that the primary target of trovafloxacin in S. pneumoniae is the ParC subunit of DNA topoisomerase IV, similar to most other fluoroquinolones. However, first-step mutants bearing the Ser79→Phe/Tyr substitution in topoisomerase IV subunit ParC were susceptible to trovafloxacin with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 0.25 μg/ml, and mutations in the structural genes for both topoisomerase IV subunit ParC (parC) and the DNA gyrase subunit (gyrA) were required to achieve levels of resistance above the breakpoint. The data also suggest that enhanced activity of trovafloxacin against pneumococci is due to a combination of factors that may include reduced efflux of this agent and an enhanced activity against both DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV. PMID:10428926

  7. Antimicrobial Activity of Novel Synthetic Peptides Derived from Indolicidin and Ranalexin against Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindal, Hassan Mahmood; Le, Cheng Foh; Mohd Yusof, Mohd Yasim; Velayuthan, Rukumani Devi; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran; Zain, Sharifuddin Md; Isa, Diyana Mohd; Sekaran, Shamala Devi

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) represent promising alternatives to conventional antibiotics in order to defeat multidrug-resistant bacteria such as Streptococcus pneumoniae. In this study, thirteen antimicrobial peptides were designed based on two natural peptides indolicidin and ranalexin. Our results revealed that four hybrid peptides RN7-IN10, RN7-IN9, RN7-IN8, and RN7-IN6 possess potent antibacterial activity against 30 pneumococcal clinical isolates (MIC 7.81-15.62µg/ml). These four hybrid peptides also showed broad spectrum antibacterial activity (7.81µg/ml) against S. aureus, methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA), and E. coli. Furthermore, the time killing assay results showed that the hybrid peptides were able to eliminate S. pneumoniae within less than one hour which is faster than the standard drugs erythromycin and ceftriaxone. The cytotoxic effects of peptides were tested against human erythrocytes, WRL-68 normal liver cell line, and NL-20 normal lung cell line. The results revealed that none of the thirteen peptides have cytotoxic or hemolytic effects at their MIC values. The in silico molecular docking study was carried out to investigate the binding properties of peptides with three pneumococcal virulent targets by Autodock Vina. RN7IN6 showed a strong affinity to target proteins; autolysin, pneumolysin, and pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) based on rigid docking studies. Our results suggest that the hybrid peptides could be suitable candidates for antibacterial drug development.

  8. Exposure to welding fumes and lower airway infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suri, Reetika; Periselneris, Jimstan; Lanone, Sophie; Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C; Melton, Geoffrey; Palmer, Keith T; Andujar, Pascal; Antonini, James M; Cohignac, Vanessa; Erdely, Aaron; Jose, Ricardo J; Mudway, Ian; Brown, Jeremy; Grigg, Jonathan

    2016-02-01

    Welders are at increased risk of pneumococcal pneumonia. The mechanism for this association is not known. The capacity of pneumococci to adhere to and infect lower airway cells is mediated by host-expressed platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR). We sought to assess the effect of mild steel welding fumes (MS-WF) on PAFR-dependent pneumococcal adhesion and infection to human airway cells in vitro and on pneumococcal airway infection in a mouse model. The oxidative potential of MS-WF was assessed by their capacity to reduce antioxidants in vitro. Pneumococcal adhesion and infection of A549, BEAS-2B, and primary human bronchial airway cells were assessed by means of quantitative bacterial culture and expressed as colony-forming units (CFU). After intranasal instillation of MS-WF, mice were infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung CFU values were determined. PAFR protein levels were assessed by using immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry, and PAFR mRNA expression was assessed by using quantitative PCR. PAFR was blocked by CV-3988, and oxidative stress was attenuated by N-acetylcysteine. MS-WF exhibited high oxidative potential. In A549 and BEAS-2B cells MS-WF increased pneumococcal adhesion and infection and PAFR protein expression. Both CV-3988 and N-acetylcysteine reduced MS-WF-stimulated pneumococcal adhesion and infection of airway cells. MS-WF increased mouse lung PAFR mRNA expression and increased BALF and lung pneumococcal CFU values. In MS-WF-exposed mice CV-3988 reduced BALF CFU values. Hypersusceptibility of welders to pneumococcal pneumonia is in part mediated by the capacity of welding fumes to increase PAFR-dependent pneumococcal adhesion and infection of lower airway cells. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. All rights reserved.

  9. Chemical interference with iron transport systems to suppress bacterial growth of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

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    Xiao-Yan Yang

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential nutrient for the growth of most bacteria. To obtain iron, bacteria have developed specific iron-transport systems located on the membrane surface to uptake iron and iron complexes such as ferrichrome. Interference with the iron-acquisition systems should be therefore an efficient strategy to suppress bacterial growth and infection. Based on the chemical similarity of iron and ruthenium, we used a Ru(II complex R-825 to compete with ferrichrome for the ferrichrome-transport pathway in Streptococcus pneumoniae. R-825 inhibited the bacterial growth of S. pneumoniae and stimulated the expression of PiuA, the iron-binding protein in the ferrichrome-uptake system on the cell surface. R-825 treatment decreased the cellular content of iron, accompanying with the increase of Ru(II level in the bacterium. When the piuA gene (SPD_0915 was deleted in the bacterium, the mutant strain became resistant to R-825 treatment, with decreased content of Ru(II. Addition of ferrichrome can rescue the bacterial growth that was suppressed by R-825. Fluorescence spectral quenching showed that R-825 can bind with PiuA in a similar pattern to the ferrichrome-PiuA interaction in vitro. These observations demonstrated that Ru(II complex R-825 can compete with ferrichrome for the ferrichrome-transport system to enter S. pneumoniae, reduce the cellular iron supply, and thus suppress the bacterial growth. This finding suggests a novel antimicrobial approach by interfering with iron-uptake pathways, which is different from the mechanisms used by current antibiotics.

  10. Enhanced detection and serotyping of Streptococcus pneumoniae using multiplex polymerase chain reaction

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    Jong Gyun Ahn

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available &lt;B&gt;Purpose:&lt;/B&gt; Methods for quick and reliable detection of &lt;I&gt;Streptococcus pneumoniae&lt;/I&gt; are needed for the diagnosis of pneumococcal disease and vaccine studies. This study aimed to show that sequential multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR is more efficient than conventional culture in achieving &lt;I&gt;S. pneumoniae -positive&lt;/i&gt; results. &lt;B&gt;Methods:&lt;/B&gt; Nasopharyngeal (NP secretions were obtained from 842 pediatric patients admitted with lower respiratory infections at Severance Children’s Hospital in Korea between March 2009 and June 2010. For identification and serotype determination of pneumococci from the NP secretions, the secretions were evaluated via multiplex PCR technique with 35 serotype-specific primers arranged in 8 multiplex PCR sets and conventional bacteriological culture technique. &lt;B&gt;Results:&lt;/B&gt; Among the results for 793 samples that underwent both bacterial culture and PCR analysis for pneumococcal detection, 153 (19.3% results obtained by PCR and 81 (10.2% results obtained by conventional culture technique were positive for S. pneumoniae. The predominant serotypes observed, in order of decreasing frequency, were 19A (23%, 6A/B (16%, 19F (11%, 15B/C (5%, 15A (5%, and 11A (4%; further, 26% of the isolates were non-typeable. &lt;B&gt;Conclusion:&lt;/B&gt; As opposed to conventional bacteriological tests, PCR analysis can accurately and rapidly identify pneumococcal serotypes.

  11. Influence of the blood bacterial load on the meningeal inflammatory response in Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis

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    Frimodt-Møller Niels

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite bacteraemia is present in the majority of patients with pneumococcal, little is known about the influence of the systemic infection on the meningeal inflammatory response. Methods To explore the role of systemic infection on the meningeal inflammation, experimental meningitis was induced by intracisternal injection of ~1 × 106 CFU Streptococcus pneumoniae, type 3, and the 26 rabbits were either provided with ~1 × 106 CFU S. pneumoniae intravenously at 0 hour ("bacteraemic" rabbits, n = 9, immunized with paraformaldehyde-killed S. pneumoniae for 5 weeks prior to the experiment ("immunized" rabbits", n = 8, or not treated further ("control" rabbits, n = 9. WBC and bacterial concentrations were determined in CSF and blood every second hour during a 16 hours study period together with CSF IL-8 and protein levels. We also studied CSF and blood WBC levels in 153 pneumococcal meningitis patients with and without presence of bacteraemia. Results As designed, blood bacterial concentrations were significantly different among three experimental groups during the 16 hours study period (Kruskal Wallis test, P P > 0.05. Blood WBC decreased in bacteraemic rabbits between ~10–16 hours after the bacterial inoculation in contrast to an increase for both the immunized rabbits and controls (P P In patients with pneumococcal meningitis, no significant difference in CSF WBC was observed between patients with or without bacteraemia at admission (n = 103, 1740 cells/μL (123–4032 vs. n = 50, 1961 cells/μL (673–5182, respectively, P = 0.18, but there was a significant correlation between CSF and blood WBC (n = 127, Spearman rho = 0.234, P = 0.008. Conclusion Our results suggest that a decrease in peripheral WBC induced by enhanced bacteraemia in pneumococcal meningitis results in an attenuated CSF pleocytosis.

  12. Fitness of Streptococcus pneumoniae fluoroquinolone-resistant strains with topoisomerase IV recombinant genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsalobre, Luz; de la Campa, Adela G

    2008-03-01

    The low prevalence of ciprofloxacin-resistant (Cp r) Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates carrying recombinant topoisomerase IV genes could be attributed to a fitness cost imposed by the horizontal transfer, which often implies the acquisition of larger-than-normal parE-parC intergenic regions. A study of the transcription of these genes and of the fitness cost for 24 isogenic Cp r strains was performed. Six first-level transformants were obtained either with PCR products containing the parC quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of S. pneumoniae Cp r mutants with point mutations or with a PCR product that includes parE-QRDR-ant-parC-QRDR from a Cp r Streptococcus mitis isolate. The latter yielded two strains, T6 and T11, carrying parC-QRDR and parE-QRDR-ant-parC-QRDR, respectively. These first-level transformants were used as recipients in further transformations with the gyrA-QRDR PCR products to obtain 18 second-level transformants. In addition, strain Tr7 (which contains the GyrA E85K change) was used. Reverse transcription-PCR experiments showed that parE and parC were cotranscribed in R6, T6, and T11; and a single promoter located upstream of parE was identified in R6 by primer extension. The fitness of the transformants was estimated by pairwise competition with R6 in both one-cycle and two-cycle experiments. In the one-cycle experiments, most strains carrying the GyrA E85K change showed a fitness cost; the exception was recombinant T14. In the two-cycle experiments, a fitness cost was observed in most first-level transformants carrying the ParC changes S79F, S79Y, and D83Y and the GyrA E85K change; the exceptions were recombinants T6 and T11. The results suggest that there is no impediment due to a fitness cost for the spread of recombinant Cp r S. pneumoniae isolates, since some recombinants (T6, T11, and T14) exhibited an ability to compensate for the cost.

  13. Activity of tedizolid phosphate (TR-701) in murine models of infection with penicillin-resistant and penicillin-sensitive Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sunghak; Im, Weonbin; Bartizal, Ken

    2012-09-01

    The in vitro activity of tedizolid (previously known as torezolid, TR-700) against penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (PRSP) clinical isolates and the in vivo efficacy of tedizolid phosphate (torezolid phosphate, TR-701) in murine models of PRSP systemic infection and penicillin-susceptible S. pneumoniae (PSSP) pneumonia were examined using linezolid as a comparator. The MIC(90) against 28 PRSP isolates was 0.25 μg/ml for tedizolid, whereas it was 1 μg/ml for linezolid. In mice infected systemically with a lethal inoculum of PRSP 1 h prior to a single administration of either antimicrobial, oral tedizolid phosphate was equipotent to linezolid (1 isolate) to 2-fold more potent than linezolid (3 isolates) for survival at day 7, with tedizolid phosphate 50% effective dose (ED(50)) values ranging from 3.19 to 11.53 mg/kg of body weight/day. In the PSSP pneumonia model, the ED(50) for survival at day 15 was 2.80 mg/kg/day for oral tedizolid phosphate, whereas it was 8.09 mg/kg/day for oral linezolid following 48 h of treatment with either agent. At equivalent doses (10 mg/kg once daily tedizolid phosphate or 5 mg/kg twice daily linezolid), pneumococcal titers in the lungs at 52 h postinfection were approximately 3 orders of magnitude lower with tedizolid phosphate treatment than with linezolid treatment or no treatment. Lung histopathology showed less inflammatory cell invasion into alveolar spaces in mice treated with tedizolid phosphate than in untreated or linezolid-treated mice. These results demonstrate that tedizolid phosphate is effective in murine models of PRSP systemic infection and PSSP pneumonia.

  14. Streptococcus pneumoniae Attenuated Strain SPY1 with an Artificial Mineral Shell Induces Humoral and Th17 Cellular Immunity and Protects Mice against Pneumococcal Infection

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    Xinyuan Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major pathogen leading to substantial morbidity and mortality in children under 5 years of age. Vaccination is an effective strategy to prevent S. pneumoniae infection. SPY1 is a pneumococcal vaccine candidate strain obtained in our previous study. To improve its stability and immunogencity, in this study, we constructed the SPY1ΔlytA strain that lacks autolysin activity and was coated with an artificial exterior surface calcium phosphate shell by in situ mineralization. The resulting strain SPY1ΔlytACaPi displayed enhanced thermal stability enabling storage at 37°C for 1 week. Furthermore, mucosal and subcutaneous immunization with the SPY1ΔlytACaPi strain induced better protective effects than SPY1ΔlytA in anti-colonization after challenging with 19F and anti-invasion by D39 in mice. Subcutaneous immunization with SPY1ΔlytACaPi elicited higher IgG level while mucosal immunization primarily elicited an immune response which is supposed to be related to Th17 cells. Taken together, the mineralized strain may be a promising candidate for an attenuated S. pneumoniae vaccine.

  15. Efficacy of ceftaroline fosamil against penicillin-sensitive and -resistant streptococcus pneumoniae in an experimental rabbit meningitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottagnoud, P; Cottagnoud, M; Acosta, F; Stucki, A

    2013-10-01

    Ceftaroline is a new cephalosporin with bactericidal activity against resistant Gram-positive organisms, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, as well as common Gram-negative organisms. This study tested the prodrug, ceftaroline fosamil, against a penicillin-sensitive and a penicillin-resistant strain of S. pneumoniae in an experimental rabbit meningitis model. The penetration of ceftaroline into inflamed meninges was approximately 14%. Ceftaroline fosamil was slightly superior to ceftriaxone against the penicillin-sensitive strain and significantly superior to the combination of ceftriaxone and vancomycin against the penicillin-resistant strain.

  16. Antimicrobial activity of innate immune molecules against Streptococcus pneumoniae, Moraxella catarrhalis and nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

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    Teufert Karen

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite its direct connection to the nasopharynx which harbors otitis media pathogens as part of its normal flora, the middle ear cavity is kept free of these bacteria by as yet unknown mechanisms. Respiratory mucosal epithelia, including those of the middle ear and eustachian tube, secrete antimicrobial effectors including lysozyme, lactoferrin and β defensins-1 and -2. To elucidate the role of these innate immune molecules in the normal defense and maintenance of sterility of respiratory mucosa such as that of the middle ear, we assessed their effect on the respiratory pathogens nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi 12, Moraxella catarrhalis 035E, and Streptococcus pneumoniae 3, and 6B. Methods Two assay methods, the radial assay and the liquid broth assay, were employed for testing the antimicrobial activity of the molecules. This was done in order to minimize the possibility that the observed effects were artifacts of any single assay system employed. Also, transmission electron microscopy (TEM was employed to evaluate the effect of antimicrobial innate immune molecules on OM pathogens. For the statistical analysis of the data, Student's t-test was performed. Results Results of the radial diffusion assay showed that β defensin-2 was active against all four OM pathogens tested, while treatment with β defensin-1 appeared to only affect M. catarrhalis. The radial assay results also showed that lysozyme was quite effective against S. pneumoniae 3 and 6B and was partially bacteriostatic/bactericidal against M. catarrhalis. Lysozyme however, appeared not to affect the growth of NTHi. Thus, lysozyme seems to have a more pronounced impact on the growth of the Gram-positive S. pneumoniae as compared to that of Gram-negative pathogens. Lactoferrin on the other hand, enhanced the growth of the bacteria tested. The results of the radial assays were confirmed using liquid broth assays for antimicrobial activity, and showed that

  17. Differentiation of Streptococcus pneumoniae conjunctivitis outbreak isolates by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Yulanda M; Moura, Hercules; Woolfitt, Adrian R; Pirkle, James L; Barr, John R; Carvalho, Maria Da Gloria; Ades, Edwin P; Carlone, George M; Sampson, Jacquelyn S

    2008-10-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus [Pnc]) is a causative agent of many infectious diseases, including pneumonia, septicemia, otitis media, and conjunctivitis. There have been documented conjunctivitis outbreaks in which nontypeable (NT), nonencapsulated Pnc has been identified as the etiological agent. The use of mass spectrometry to comparatively and differentially analyze protein and peptide profiles of whole-cell microorganisms remains somewhat uncharted. In this report, we discuss a comparative proteomic analysis between NT S. pneumoniae conjunctivitis outbreak strains (cPnc) and other known typeable or NT pneumococcal and streptococcal isolates (including Pnc TIGR4 and R6, Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae, and Streptococcus pyogenes) and nonstreptococcal isolates (including Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, and Staphylococcus aureus) as controls. cPnc cells and controls were grown to mid-log phase, harvested, and subsequently treated with a 10% trifluoroacetic acid-sinapinic acid matrix mixture. Protein and peptide fragments of the whole-cell bacterial isolate-matrix combinations ranging in size from 2 to 14 kDa were evaluated by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry. Additionally Random Forest analytical tools and dendrogramic representations (Genesis) suggested similarities and clustered the isolates into distinct clonal groups, respectively. Also, a peak list of protein and peptide masses was obtained and compared to a known Pnc protein mass library, in which a peptide common and unique to cPnc isolates was tentatively identified. Information gained from this study will lead to the identification and validation of proteins that are commonly and exclusively expressed in cPnc strains which could potentially be used as a biomarker in the rapid diagnosis of pneumococcal conjunctivitis.

  18. Strain-specific virulence phenotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae assessed using the Chinchilla laniger model of otitis media.

    OpenAIRE

    Michael L Forbes; Edward Horsey; N Luisa Hiller; Farrel J Buchinsky; Jay D Hayes; James M Compliment; Todd Hillman; Suzanne Ezzo; Kai Shen; Randy Keefe; Karen Barbadora; J Christopher Post; Fen Ze Hu; Garth D Ehrlich

    2008-01-01

    Background Streptococcus pneumoniae [Sp] infection is associated with local and systemic disease. Our current understanding of the differential contributions of genetic strain variation, serotype, and host response to disease phenotype is incomplete. Using the chinchilla model of otitis media [OM] we investigated the disease phenotype generated by the laboratory strain TIGR4 and each of thirteen clinical strains (BS68-75, BS290, BS291, BS293, BS436 and BS437); eleven of the thirteen strains h...

  19. The impact of specific and non-specific immunity on the ecology of Streptococcus pneumoniae and the implications for vaccination

    OpenAIRE

    Flasche, Stefan; Edmunds, W. John; Miller, Elizabeth; Goldblatt, David; Robertson, Chris; Choi, Yoon Hong

    2013-01-01

    More than 90 capsular serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae coexist despite competing for nasopharyngeal carriage and a gradient in fitness. The underlying mechanisms for this are poorly understood and make assessment of the likely population impact of vaccination challenging. We use an individual-based simulation model to generalize widely used deterministic models for pneumococcal competition and show that in these models short-term serotype-specific and serotype non-specific immunity could...

  20. Colonização e resistência antimicrobiana de Streptococcus pneumoniae isolado em nasofaringe de crianças com rinofaringite aguda Nasopharyngeal colonization and antimicrobial resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated in children with acute rinofaringitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lêda Lúcia M. Ferreira

    2001-06-01

    of studies regarding invasive infections, thus indicating that nasopharyngeal isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae can be used in the surveillance of antimicrobial resistance in a defined geographical area.

  1. The dynamics of nasopharyngeal streptococcus pneumoniae carriage among rural Gambian mother-infant pairs

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    Secka Ousman

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus pneumoniae is an important cause of community acquired pneumonia, sepsis, meningitis and otitis media globally and has been incriminated as a major cause of serious childhood bacterial infections in The Gambia. Better understanding of the dynamics of transmission and carriage will inform control strategies. Methods This study was conducted among 196 mother-infant pairs recruited at birth from six villages in the West Kiang region of The Gambia. Nasopharyngeal swabs were collected from mother-infant pairs at birth (within 12 hours of delivery, 2, 5 and 12 months. Standard techniques of culture were used to identify carriage and serotype S. pneumoniae. Results Of 46 serotypes identified, the 6 most common, 6A, 6B, 14, 15, 19F and 23F, accounted for 67.3% of the isolates from infants. Carriage of any serotype among infants rose from 1.5% at birth to plateau at approximately 80% by 2 m (prevalence at 2 m = 77%; 5 m = 86%; 12 m = 78%. Likewise, maternal carriage almost doubled in the first 2 months post-partum and remained elevated for the next 10 m (prevalence at birth = 13%; 2 m = 24%; 5 m = 22%; 12 m = 21%. Carriage was significantly seasonal in both infants and mothers with a peak in December and lowest transmission in August. The total number of different serotypes we isolated from each infant varied and less than would be expected had the serotypes assorted independently. In contrast, this variability was much as expected among mothers. The half-life of a serotype colony was estimated to be 1.90 m (CI95%: 1.66-2.21 in infants and 0.75 m (CI95%: 0.55-1.19 in mothers. While the odds for a serotype to be isolated from an infant increased by 9-fold if it had also been isolated from the mother, the population attributable fraction (PAF of pneumococcal carriage in infants due to maternal carriage was only 9.5%. Some marked differences in dynamics were observed between vaccine and non-vaccine serotypes. Conclusions

  2. Nasopharyngeal carriage, antibiogram & serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae among healthy under five children

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    K.L. Ravi Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Information related to nasopharyngeal carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae among healthy children is scanty in India. This prospective study was undertaken to determine the presence of asymptomatic nasopharyngeal colonization, assess serogroups/types (SGT and drug resistance of S. pneumoniae in children below five years of age. Methods: A total of 109 male and 81 female children in the age group of three months to five years belonging to different socio-economic classes were enrolled. They were recruited across all age groups from those attending paediatric OPD of a tertiary care and research centre for immunization program. Fifty three isolates identified as pneumococci were tested for their antimicrobial susceptibility pattern by Kirby-Bauer′s disc diffusion and E-Test methods. Serotyping was performed by detection of the quelling reaction with specific antiserum. Result: The pneumococcal carriage rate in the study population was 27.9 per cent. The isolation rate was associated with age being higher (49.2% in smaller children (3-12 months and among male (62.2%. The most prevalent SGTs were 19 followed by 10, 14 and 7; 21 per cent of isolates belonging to serotype 10 (n=7 were 11 (n=4 were not covered in any of the conjugate vaccines currently available in Indian market. Resistance to co-trimoxazole, tetracycline, penicillin and erythromycin was observed in 91 per cent (n=48, 36 per cent (n=19, 17 per cent (n=9 and 9 per cent (n=5 isolates, respectively. All the penicillin resistant isolates were found to be intermediately resistant by E-Test. Multidrug resistance was observed in 19 per cent (n=10 isolates. Interpretation & conclusions: High level of antibiotic resistance was present in S. pneumoniae isolated from healthy children below age five. A pneumococcal conjugate vaccine with the prevailing SGTs would help to reduce the pool of antibiotic resistant pneumococci. Continued surveillance of serotypes and tracking

  3. Synthesis of four spacer-containing 'tetrasaccharides' that represent four possible repeating units of the capsular polysaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae type 6B

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Thijssen, M.J.L.; Bijkerk, M.H.G.; Kamerling, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    In the framework of studies towards oligosaccharide-conjugate based vaccines against Streptococcus pneumoniae, the synthesis is reported of four spacer-containing 'tetrasaccharides' that each can be conceived as representing a repeating unit of the capsular polysaccharide of S. pneumoniae serotype

  4. The alpha-tocopherol form of vitamin E boosts elastase activity of human PMNs and their ability to kill Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite the availability of vaccines, Streptococcus pneumoniae remains a leading cause of life-threatening infections such as pneumonia, bacteremia and meningitis. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) are a key determinant of disease course, because optimal host defense requires an initial robust pul...

  5. Post-infective transverse myelitis following Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis with radiological features of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis: a case report

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    Williams Thomas

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Post-infectious autoimmune demyelination of the central nervous system is a rare neurological disorder typically associated with exanthematous viral infections. We report an unusual presentation of the condition and a previously undocumented association with Streptococcus pneumonia meningitis. Case presentation A 50-year-old Caucasian woman presented to our facility with an acute myelopathy three days after discharge following acute Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis. Imaging studies of the spine ruled out an infective focus and no other lesions were seen within the cord. Diffuse, bilateral white matter lesions were seen within the cerebral hemispheres, and our patient was diagnosed as having a post-infective demyelination syndrome that met the diagnostic criteria for an acute transverse myelitis. Our patient clinically and radiologically improved following treatment with steroids. Conclusions The novel association of a Streptococcus pneumoniae infection with post-infectious autoimmune central nervous system demyelination should alert the reader to the potentially causative role of this common organism, and gives insights into the pathogenesis. The unusual dissociation between the clinical presentation and the location of the radiological lesions should also highlight the potential for the condition to mimic the presentation of others, and stimulates debate on the definitions of acute transverse myelitis and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, and their potential overlap.

  6. Assessment of ceftaroline fosamil in the treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia due to Streptococcus pneumoniae: insights from two randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorr, Andrew F; Kollef, Marin; Eckburg, Paul B; Llorens, Lily; Friedland, H David

    2013-03-01

    Ceftaroline fosamil resulted in higher cure rates than ceftriaxone in patients with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia in 2 randomized trials (FOCUS 1 and FOCUS 2). The present analysis examines the subgroup of patients with Streptococcus pneumoniae infection to determine whether the apparent difference in cure rates persists after adjusting for potential covariates. We retrospectively pooled subjects with S. pneumoniae isolated at baseline in the original studies and employed logistic regression to evaluate the independent relationship between clinical cure and treatment with ceftaroline. Covariates evaluated included demographics, severity of illness, bacteremia, and pathogen characteristics. The final cohort included 139 subjects (69 ceftaroline, 70 ceftriaxone). Unadjusted cure rates were 85.5% and 68.6% (P = 0.009) in the ceftaroline and ceftriaxone groups, respectively. After logistic regression, ceftaroline remained associated with higher cure rates. Our findings indicate that ceftaroline may result in improved outcomes of S. pneumoniae pneumonia. Formal clinical trials are warranted to confirm this hypothesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Neuraminidase A-Exposed Galactose Promotes Streptococcus pneumoniae Biofilm Formation during Colonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchette, Krystle A.; Shenoy, Anukul T.; Milner, Jeffrey; Gilley, Ryan P.; McClure, Erin; Hinojosa, Cecilia A.; Kumar, Nikhil; Daugherty, Sean C.; Tallon, Luke J.; Ott, Sandra; King, Samantha J.; Ferreira, Daniela M.; Gordon, Stephen B.; Tettelin, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is an opportunistic pathogen that colonizes the nasopharynx. Herein we show that carbon availability is distinct between the nasopharynx and bloodstream of adult humans: glucose is absent from the nasopharynx, whereas galactose is abundant. We demonstrate that pneumococcal neuraminidase A (NanA), which cleaves terminal sialic acid residues from host glycoproteins, exposed galactose on the surface of septal epithelial cells, thereby increasing its availability during colonization. We observed that S. pneumoniae mutants deficient in NanA and β-galactosidase A (BgaA) failed to form biofilms in vivo despite normal biofilm-forming abilities in vitro. Subsequently, we observed that glucose, sucrose, and fructose were inhibitory for biofilm formation, whereas galactose, lactose, and low concentrations of sialic acid were permissive. Together these findings suggested that the genes involved in biofilm formation were under some form of carbon catabolite repression (CCR), a regulatory network in which genes involved in the uptake and metabolism of less-preferred sugars are silenced during growth with preferred sugars. Supporting this notion, we observed that a mutant deficient in pyruvate oxidase, which converts pyruvate to acetyl-phosphate under non-CCR-inducing growth conditions, was unable to form biofilms. Subsequent comparative transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analyses of planktonic and biofilm-grown pneumococci showed that metabolic pathways involving the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-phosphate and subsequently leading to fatty acid biosynthesis were consistently upregulated during diverse biofilm growth conditions. We conclude that carbon availability in the nasopharynx impacts pneumococcal biofilm formation in vivo. Additionally, biofilm formation involves metabolic pathways not previously appreciated to play an important role. PMID:27481242

  8. Clinical presentation and prognostic factors of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis according to the focus of infection

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    Samuelsson Susanne

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We conducted a nationwide study in Denmark to identify clinical features and prognostic factors in patients with Streptococcus pneumoniae according to the focus of infection. Methods Based on a nationwide registration, clinical information's was prospectively collected from all reported cases of pneumococcal meningitis during a 2-year period (1999–2000. Clinical and laboratory findings at admission, clinical course and outcome of the disease including follow-up audiological examinations were collected retrospectively. The focus of infection was determined according to the clinical diagnosis made by the physicians and after review of the medical records. Results 187 consecutive cases with S. pneumoniae meningitis were included in the study. The most common focus was ear (30%, followed by lung (18%, sinus (8%, and other (2%. In 42% of cases a primary infection focus could not be determined. On admission, fever and an altered mental status were the most frequent findings (in 93% and 94% of cases, respectively, whereas back rigidity, headache and convulsion were found in 57%, 41% and 11% of cases, respectively. 21% of patients died during hospitalisation (adults: 27% vs. children: 2%, Fisher Exact Test, P P = 0.0005. Prognostic factors associated with fatal outcome in univariate logistic regression analysis were advanced age, presence of an underlying disease, history of headache, presence of a lung focus, absence of an otogenic focus, having a CT-scan prior to lumbar puncture, convulsions, requirement of assisted ventilation, and alterations in various CSF parameters (WBC P P = 0.005. Conclusion These results emphasize the prognostic importance of an early recognition of a predisposing focus to pneumococcal meningitis.

  9. Neuraminidase A-Exposed Galactose Promotes Streptococcus pneumoniae Biofilm Formation during Colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchette, Krystle A; Shenoy, Anukul T; Milner, Jeffrey; Gilley, Ryan P; McClure, Erin; Hinojosa, Cecilia A; Kumar, Nikhil; Daugherty, Sean C; Tallon, Luke J; Ott, Sandra; King, Samantha J; Ferreira, Daniela M; Gordon, Stephen B; Tettelin, Hervé; Orihuela, Carlos J

    2016-10-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is an opportunistic pathogen that colonizes the nasopharynx. Herein we show that carbon availability is distinct between the nasopharynx and bloodstream of adult humans: glucose is absent from the nasopharynx, whereas galactose is abundant. We demonstrate that pneumococcal neuraminidase A (NanA), which cleaves terminal sialic acid residues from host glycoproteins, exposed galactose on the surface of septal epithelial cells, thereby increasing its availability during colonization. We observed that S. pneumoniae mutants deficient in NanA and β-galactosidase A (BgaA) failed to form biofilms in vivo despite normal biofilm-forming abilities in vitro Subsequently, we observed that glucose, sucrose, and fructose were inhibitory for biofilm formation, whereas galactose, lactose, and low concentrations of sialic acid were permissive. Together these findings suggested that the genes involved in biofilm formation were under some form of carbon catabolite repression (CCR), a regulatory network in which genes involved in the uptake and metabolism of less-preferred sugars are silenced during growth with preferred sugars. Supporting this notion, we observed that a mutant deficient in pyruvate oxidase, which converts pyruvate to acetyl-phosphate under non-CCR-inducing growth conditions, was unable to form biofilms. Subsequent comparative transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analyses of planktonic and biofilm-grown pneumococci showed that metabolic pathways involving the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-phosphate and subsequently leading to fatty acid biosynthesis were consistently upregulated during diverse biofilm growth conditions. We conclude that carbon availability in the nasopharynx impacts pneumococcal biofilm formation in vivo Additionally, biofilm formation involves metabolic pathways not previously appreciated to play an important role. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Natural genetic transformation generates a population of merodiploids in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Calum; Caymaris, Stéphanie; Zomer, Aldert; Bootsma, Hester J; Prudhomme, Marc; Granadel, Chantal; Hermans, Peter W M; Polard, Patrice; Martin, Bernard; Claverys, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Partial duplication of genetic material is prevalent in eukaryotes and provides potential for evolution of new traits. Prokaryotes, which are generally haploid in nature, can evolve new genes by partial chromosome duplication, known as merodiploidy. Little is known about merodiploid formation during genetic exchange processes, although merodiploids have been serendipitously observed in early studies of bacterial transformation. Natural bacterial transformation involves internalization of exogenous donor DNA and its subsequent integration into the recipient genome by homology. It contributes to the remarkable plasticity of the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae through intra and interspecies genetic exchange. We report that lethal cassette transformation produced merodiploids possessing both intact and cassette-inactivated copies of the essential target gene, bordered by repeats (R) corresponding to incomplete copies of IS861. We show that merodiploidy is transiently stimulated by transformation, and only requires uptake of a ~3-kb DNA fragment partly repeated in the chromosome. We propose and validate a model for merodiploid formation, providing evidence that tandem-duplication (TD) formation involves unequal crossing-over resulting from alternative pairing and interchromatid integration of R. This unequal crossing-over produces a chromosome dimer, resolution of which generates a chromosome with the TD and an abortive chromosome lacking the duplicated region. We document occurrence of TDs ranging from ~100 to ~900 kb in size at various chromosomal locations, including by self-transformation (transformation with recipient chromosomal DNA). We show that self-transformation produces a population containing many different merodiploid cells. Merodiploidy provides opportunities for evolution of new genetic traits via alteration of duplicated genes, unrestricted by functional selective pressure. Transient stimulation of a varied population of merodiploids by

  11. Natural genetic transformation generates a population of merodiploids in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calum Johnston

    Full Text Available Partial duplication of genetic material is prevalent in eukaryotes and provides potential for evolution of new traits. Prokaryotes, which are generally haploid in nature, can evolve new genes by partial chromosome duplication, known as merodiploidy. Little is known about merodiploid formation during genetic exchange processes, although merodiploids have been serendipitously observed in early studies of bacterial transformation. Natural bacterial transformation involves internalization of exogenous donor DNA and its subsequent integration into the recipient genome by homology. It contributes to the remarkable plasticity of the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae through intra and interspecies genetic exchange. We report that lethal cassette transformation produced merodiploids possessing both intact and cassette-inactivated copies of the essential target gene, bordered by repeats (R corresponding to incomplete copies of IS861. We show that merodiploidy is transiently stimulated by transformation, and only requires uptake of a ~3-kb DNA fragment partly repeated in the chromosome. We propose and validate a model for merodiploid formation, providing evidence that tandem-duplication (TD formation involves unequal crossing-over resulting from alternative pairing and interchromatid integration of R. This unequal crossing-over produces a chromosome dimer, resolution of which generates a chromosome with the TD and an abortive chromosome lacking the duplicated region. We document occurrence of TDs ranging from ~100 to ~900 kb in size at various chromosomal locations, including by self-transformation (transformation with recipient chromosomal DNA. We show that self-transformation produces a population containing many different merodiploid cells. Merodiploidy provides opportunities for evolution of new genetic traits via alteration of duplicated genes, unrestricted by functional selective pressure. Transient stimulation of a varied population of

  12. Clones of Streptococcus zooepidemicus from outbreaks of hemorrhagic canine pneumonia and associated immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velineni, Sridhar; Timoney, John F; Russell, Kim; Hamlen, Heidi J; Pesavento, Patricia; Fortney, William D; Crawford, P Cynda

    2014-09-01

    Acute hemorrhagic pneumonia caused by Streptococcus zooepidemicus has emerged as a major disease of shelter dogs and greyhounds. S. zooepidemicus strains differing in multilocus sequence typing (MLST), protective protein (SzP), and M-like protein (SzM) sequences were identified from 9 outbreaks in Texas, Kansas, Florida, Nevada, New Mexico, and Pennsylvania. Clonality based on 2 or more isolates was evident for 7 of these outbreaks. The Pennsylvania and Nevada outbreaks also involved cats. Goat antisera against acutely infected lung tissue as well as convalescent-phase sera reacted with a mucinase (Sz115), hyaluronidase (HylC), InlA domain-containing cell surface-anchored protein (INLA), membrane-anchored protein (MAP), SzP, SzM, and extracellular oligopeptide-binding protein (OppA). The amino acid sequences of SzP and SzM of the isolates varied greatly. The szp and szm alleles of the closely related Kansas clone (sequence type 129 [ST-129]) and United Kingdom isolate BHS5 (ST-123) were different, indicating that MLST was unreliable as a predictor of virulence phenotype. Combinations of conserved HylC and serine protease (ScpC) and variable SzM and SzP proteins of S. zooepidemicus strain NC78 were protectively immunogenic for mice challenged with a virulent canine strain. Thus, although canine pneumonia outbreaks are caused by different strains of S. zooepidemicus, protective immune responses were elicited in mice by combinations of conserved or variable S. zooepidemicus proteins from a single strain. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Reactive Oxygen Species Contribute to the Bactericidal Effects of the Fluoroquinolone Moxifloxacin in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrándiz, M J; Martín-Galiano, A J; Arnanz, C; Zimmerman, T; de la Campa, A G

    2016-01-01

    We studied the transcriptomic response of Streptococcus pneumoniae to the fluoroquinolone moxifloxacin at a concentration that inhibits DNA gyrase. Treatment of the wild-type strain R6, at a concentration of 10× the MIC, triggered a response involving 132 genes after 30 min of treatment. Genes from several metabolic pathways involved in the production of pyruvate were upregulated. These included 3 glycolytic enzymes, which ultimately convert fructose 6-phosphate to pyruvate, and 2 enzymes that funnel phosphate sugars into the glycolytic pathway. In addition, acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) carboxylase was downregulated, likely leading to an increase in acetyl-CoA. When coupled with an upregulation in formate acetyltransferase, an increase in acetyl-CoA would raise the production of pyruvate. Since pyruvate is converted by pyruvate oxidase (SpxB) into hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), an increase in pyruvate would augment intracellular H2O2. Here, we confirm a 21-fold increase in the production of H2O2 and a 55-fold increase in the amount of hydroxyl radical in cultures treated during 4 h with moxifloxacin. This increase in hydroxyl radical through the Fenton reaction would damage DNA, lipids, and proteins. These reactive oxygen species contributed to the lethality of the drug, a conclusion supported by the observed protective effects of an SpxB deletion. These results support the model whereby fluoroquinolones cause redox alterations. The transcriptional response of S. pneumoniae to moxifloxacin is compared with the response to levofloxacin, an inhibitor of topoisomerase IV. Levofloxacin triggers the transcriptional activation of iron transport genes and also enhances the Fenton reaction. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. The impact of pneumolysin on the macrophage response to Streptococcus pneumoniae is strain-dependent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard M Harvey

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is the world's leading cause of pneumonia, bacteremia, meningitis and otitis media. A major pneumococcal virulence factor is the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin, which has the defining property of forming pores in cholesterol-containing membranes. In recent times a clinically significant and internationally successful serotype 1 ST306 clone has been found to express a non-cytolytic variant of Ply (Ply306. However, while the pneumococcus is a naturally transformable organism, strains of the ST306 clonal group have to date been virtually impossible to transform, severely restricting efforts to understand the role of non-cytolytic Ply in the success of this clone. In this study isogenic Ply mutants were constructed in the D39 background and for the first time in the ST306 background (A0229467 to enable direct comparisons between Ply variants for their impact on the immune response in a macrophage-like cell line. Strains that expressed cytolytic Ply were found to induce a significant increase in IL-1β release from macrophage-like cells compared to the non-cytolytic and Ply-deficient strains in a background-independent manner, confirming the requirement for pore formation in the Ply-dependent activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. However, cytolytic activity in the D39 background was found to induce increased expression of the genes encoding GM-CSF (CSF2, p19 subunit of IL-23 (IL23A and IFNβ (IFNB1 compared to non-cytolytic and Ply-deficient D39 mutants, but had no effect in the A0229467 background. The impact of Ply on the immune response to the pneumococcus is highly dependent on the strain background, thus emphasising the importance of the interaction between specific virulence factors and other components of the genetic background of this organism.

  15. Validation of an immunodiagnostic assay for detection of 13 Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype-specific polysaccharides in human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pride, Michael W; Huijts, Susanne M; Wu, Kangjian; Souza, Victor; Passador, Sherry; Tinder, Chunyan; Song, Esther; Elfassy, Arik; McNeil, Lisa; Menton, Ronald; French, Roger; Callahan, Janice; Webber, Chris; Gruber, William C; Bonten, Marc J M; Jansen, Kathrin U

    2012-08-01

    To improve the clinical diagnosis of pneumococcal infection in bacteremic and nonbacteremic community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), a Luminex technology-based multiplex urinary antigen detection (UAD) diagnostic assay was developed and validated. The UAD assay can simultaneously detect 13 different serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae by capturing serotype-specific S. pneumoniae polysaccharides (PnPSs) secreted in human urine. Assay specificity is achieved by capturing the polysaccharides with serotype-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) on spectrally unique microspheres. Positivity for each serotype was based on positivity cutoff values calculated from a standard curve run on each assay plate together with positive- and negative-control urine samples. The assay is highly specific, since significant signals are detected only when each PnPS was paired with its homologous MAb-coated microspheres. Validation experiments demonstrated excellent accuracy and precision. The UAD assay and corresponding positivity cutoff values were clinically validated by assessing 776 urine specimens obtained from patients with X-ray-confirmed CAP. The UAD assay demonstrated 97% sensitivity and 100% specificity using samples obtained from patients with bacteremic, blood culture-positive CAP. Importantly, the UAD assay identified Streptococcus pneumoniae (13 serotypes) in a proportion of individuals with nonbacteremic CAP, a patient population for which the pneumococcal etiology of CAP was previously difficult to assess. Therefore, the UAD assay provides a specific, noninvasive, sensitive, and reproducible tool to support vaccine efficacy as well as epidemiological evaluation of pneumococcal disease, including CAP, in adults.

  16. Antibiotic sensitivities of Streptococcus pneumoniae, viridans streptococci, and group A hemolytic streptococci isolated from the maxillary and ethmoid sinuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keleş, Erol; Aral, Murat; Alpay, H Cengiz

    2006-01-01

    To investigate antibiotic sensitivities of Streptococcus pneumoniae, viridans streptococci, and group A hemolytic streptococci isolated from the culture materials obtained from the sinuses of patients undergoing functional endoscopic sinus surgery due to chronic sinusitis. We recruited 93 patients (63 males, 30 females; mean age 36+/-17.5; range 19 to 68 years) who underwent functional endoscopic sinus surgery due to chronic sinusitis. Before surgical intervention, in order to eliminate a possible contamination from the skin and neighboring structures, nasal mucosa was cleansed with povidone-iodine solution. Nasal smear samples were obtained from all the patients before and after applying povidone-iodine solution. Streptococcus pneumoniae, viridans streptococci and group A hemolytic streptococci that were isolated from the cultures were tested for antibiotic sensitivity. The number of anaerobic bacteria isolated from 58 patients (62.3%) before applying povidone-iodine was 72, following the application of povidone-iodine a total of 16 microorganisms were identified from 12 patients (12.9%). Microorganisms were isolated from 95.6% (89/93) of the samples obtained from the maxillary sinuses and 91.3% (85/93) of the samples obtained from the ethmoid sinuses. The most commonly identified microorganisms from both sinuses were coagulase negative staphylococcus followed by viridans streptococci, coagulase positive staphylococcus, Streptococcus pneumoniae and group A hemolytic streptococci. For viridans streptococcal strains that were isolated, 33.3% were resistant to tetracycline, 23.8% to chloramphenicol, and 19.04% to penicillin. Hemolytic streptococci strains were sensitive to penicillin, ofloxacin, ceftriaxone, and cefepime in all the groups; however, they had 50% resistance to erythromycin and chloramphenicol and 100% resistance to tetracycline. The resistance pattern of the isolated Streptococcus pneumoniae strains were as follows: 25% to penicillin, 66.6% to

  17. Identification of the cpsA gene as a specific marker for the discrimination of Streptococcus pneumoniae from viridans group streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hee Kuk; Lee, Sang-Jae; Yoon, Jang Won; Shin, Jong Wook; Shin, Hyoung-Shik; Kook, Joong-Ki; Myung, Soon Chul; Kim, Wonyong

    2010-10-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae, the aetiological agent of pneumonia and non-gonococcal urethritis, shares a high degree of DNA sequence identity with the viridans group of streptococci, particularly Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus oralis. Although their clinical and pathological manifestations are different, discrimination between S. pneumoniae and its close viridans cocci relatives is still quite difficult. Suppression subtractive hybridization was performed to identify the genomic differences between S. pneumoniae and S. mitis. Thirty-four resulting S. pneumoniae-specific clones were examined by sequence determination and comparative DNA sequence analysis using blast. S. pneumoniae-specific primers were subsequently designed from one of the clonal DNA sequences containing the cps gene (coding for capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis). The primer specificities were evaluated using 49 viridans streptococci including 26 S. pneumoniae, 54 other streptococci, 14 Lactococcus species, 14 Enterococcus species and three Vagococcus species, and compared with the specificities of previously described autolysin (lytA), pneumolysin (ply), Spn9802 and Spn9828 primers. The newly designed cpsA-specific primer set was highly specific to S. pneumoniae and was even better than the existing primers. These findings may help improve the rapid identification and differentiation of S. pneumoniae from closely related members of the viridans group streptococci.

  18. Self-assembled particulate PsaA as vaccine against Streptococcus pneumoniae infection

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    Majela González-Miro

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is a human pathogen responsible for the majority of childhood pneumonia and media otitis cases worldwide. The diversity of its capsular polysaccharides (CPS results in more than 91 serotypes of which at least 23 are virulent. Various CPS conjugated to immunogenic carrier proteins are currently licensed and provide protection against the infection caused by the respective serotypes but not against new and emerging virulent serotypes. In this study, we considered the conserved protein antigen PsaA, the pneumococcal surface adhesin A, in order to overcome the limitations of CPS antigens. The PsaA was translationally fused to a polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB synthase which mediated production of PsaA displayed on PHB inclusions in recombinant Escherichia coli. This suggested that the PsaA fusion to the PHB synthase did not interfere with PHB synthase activity and its ability to mediate formation of nano-sized inclusions composed of a PHB core surrounded by the PHB synthase fused to PsaA. Isolated PHB beads showed a negative surface charge. Transmission electron microscopy analysis suggested that the PsaA fusion to the PHB synthase reduced the size of PHB beads from about 500 nm to 100 nm. The integrity and antigenicity of the fusion protein attached to isolated PHB beads was confirmed by SDS-PAGE, tryptic peptide fingerprinting analysis using MALDI-TOF-MS/MS and immunoblotting using a monoclonal anti-PsaA antibody. Mice immunized with PsaA displaying PHB beads produced high and specific IgG levels dominated by IgG1 isotype. While IgG1 titer were similar between soluble and insoluble PsaA, the IgG2 titers were strongly increased upon vaccination with insoluble PsaA i.e. PsaA displayed on PHB beads. Particulate PsaA-PHB beads elicited IgG antibodies recognizing PsaA in whole cell lysates of seven different serotypes of S. pneumoniae. This study suggested that PHB beads are suitable carriers for PsaA in order to induce a significant

  19. Determination of Characteristics of Erythromycin Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae with Preferred PCV Usage in Iran.

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    Malihe Talebi

    Full Text Available Amongst 100 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from clinical cases and nasopharynx of healthy individuals, 60 erythromycin resistant strains were isolated and characterized using MLST, PFGE, transposon analysis and Quellung reaction. Most of the S. pneumoniae erythromycin resistant (80% were found to be attributable to the ermB-edncoded ribosome methylase activity which differs from the dominant mechanism of macrolide resistance seen in North America. The most predominant transposons were; Tn1545/6003 (27%, Tn6002 (22%, Tn2009 (20%, Tn2010 (17%. Number of the clinical isolates carrying Tn2010 was more significant than the normal flora. The serotypes found were; 14 (33%, 3 (22%, 23F (15%, 19F (15%, 19A (7%, 6A (3%, 9V (3% and 6B (2%. The most prevalent serotypes among the clinical (n = 28 and normal flora (n = 32 isolates were serotypes 14 (46% and 3 (31%, respectively. The most prevalent vaccine serotypes amongst the clinical isolates and the healthy individuals were pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV 13 and PCV10, respectively. PFGE revealed 34 pulsotypes with 9 common and 25 single types. Significant number of the normal isolates belonged to CT5 and CT6. On the other hand, significant number of clinical isolates belonged to CT8 as compared to the normal flora isolates. MLST showed 2 dominant sequence types. ST3130 (23% and ST180 (22% were the most predominant sequence types in the clinical and normal isolates, respectively. There was no significant difference in other sequence types between clinical and normal flora isolates. Three polyclonal complexes including Sweden15A -25, Spain23F-1 and Spain9V-3 constituted 58% of the isolates. Our results suggest that the genetic diversity and transposon distribution were high among S. pneumoniae, particularly in the isolates containing erm(B and double antibiotic resistant genes (erm/mef. The results presented here could influence the change in the current vaccination practices in Iran which currently

  20. Whole genome analysis of linezolid resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae reveals resistance and compensatory mutations

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    Légaré Danielle

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several mutations were present in the genome of Streptococcus pneumoniae linezolid-resistant strains but the role of several of these mutations had not been experimentally tested. To analyze the role of these mutations, we reconstituted resistance by serial whole genome transformation of a novel resistant isolate into two strains with sensitive background. We sequenced the parent mutant and two independent transformants exhibiting similar minimum inhibitory concentration to linezolid. Results Comparative genomic analyses revealed that transformants acquired G2576T transversions in every gene copy of 23S rRNA and that the number of altered copies correlated with the level of linezolid resistance and cross-resistance to florfenicol and chloramphenicol. One of the transformants also acquired a mutation present in the parent mutant leading to the overexpression of an ABC transporter (spr1021. The acquisition of these mutations conferred a fitness cost however, which was further enhanced by the acquisition of a mutation in a RNA methyltransferase implicated in resistance. Interestingly, the fitness of the transformants could be restored in part by the acquisition of altered copies of the L3 and L16 ribosomal proteins and by mutations leading to the overexpression of the spr1887 ABC transporter that were present in the original linezolid-resistant mutant. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the usefulness of whole genome approaches at detecting major determinants of resistance as well as compensatory mutations that alleviate the fitness cost associated with resistance.

  1. A Multi-Scale Computational Study on the Mechanism of Streptococcus pneumoniae Nicotinamidase (SpNic

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    Bogdan F. Ion

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinamidase (Nic is a key zinc-dependent enzyme in NAD metabolism that catalyzes the hydrolysis of nicotinamide to give nicotinic acid. A multi-scale computational approach has been used to investigate the catalytic mechanism, substrate binding and roles of active site residues of Nic from Streptococcus pneumoniae (SpNic. In particular, density functional theory (DFT, molecular dynamics (MD and ONIOM quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM methods have been employed. The overall mechanism occurs in two stages: (i formation of a thioester enzyme-intermediate (IC2 and (ii hydrolysis of the thioester bond to give the products. The polar protein environment has a significant effect in stabilizing reaction intermediates and in particular transition states. As a result, both stages effectively occur in one step with Stage 1, formation of IC2, being rate limiting barrier with a cost of 53.5 kJ•mol−1 with respect to the reactant complex, RC. The effects of dispersion interactions on the overall mechanism were also considered but were generally calculated to have less significant effects with the overall mechanism being unchanged. In addition, the active site lysyl (Lys103 is concluded to likely play a role in stabilizing the thiolate of Cys136 during the reaction.

  2. A multi-scale computational study on the mechanism of Streptococcus pneumoniae Nicotinamidase (SpNic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ion, Bogdan F; Kazim, Erum; Gauld, James W

    2014-09-29

    Nicotinamidase (Nic) is a key zinc-dependent enzyme in NAD metabolism that catalyzes the hydrolysis of nicotinamide to give nicotinic acid. A multi-scale computational approach has been used to investigate the catalytic mechanism, substrate binding and roles of active site residues of Nic from Streptococcus pneumoniae (SpNic). In particular, density functional theory (DFT), molecular dynamics (MD) and ONIOM quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods have been employed. The overall mechanism occurs in two stages: (i) formation of a thioester enzyme-intermediate (IC2) and (ii) hydrolysis of the thioester bond to give the products. The polar protein environment has a significant effect in stabilizing reaction intermediates and in particular transition states. As a result, both stages effectively occur in one step with Stage 1, formation of IC2, being rate limiting barrier with a cost of 53.5 kJ·mol-1 with respect to the reactant complex, RC. The effects of dispersion interactions on the overall mechanism were also considered but were generally calculated to have less significant effects with the overall mechanism being unchanged. In addition, the active site lysyl (Lys103) is concluded to likely play a role in stabilizing the thiolate of Cys136 during the reaction.

  3. A programmed cell division delay preserves genome integrity during natural genetic transformation in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergé, Matthieu J; Mercy, Chryslène; Mortier-Barrière, Isabelle; VanNieuwenhze, Michael S; Brun, Yves V; Grangeasse, Christophe; Polard, Patrice; Campo, Nathalie

    2017-11-20

    Competence for genetic transformation is a differentiation program during which exogenous DNA is imported into the cell and integrated into the chromosome. In Streptococcus pneumoniae, competence develops transiently and synchronously in all cells during exponential phase, and is accompanied by a pause in growth. Here, we reveal that this pause is linked to the cell cycle. At least two parallel pathways impair peptidoglycan synthesis in competent cells. Single-cell analyses demonstrate that ComM, a membrane protein induced during competence, inhibits both initiation of cell division and final constriction of the cytokinetic ring. Competence also interferes with the activity of the serine/threonine kinase StkP, the central regulator of pneumococcal cell division. We further present evidence that the ComM-mediated delay in division preserves genomic integrity during transformation. We propose that cell division arrest is programmed in competent pneumococcal cells to ensure that transformation is complete before resumption of cell division, to provide this pathogen with the maximum potential for genetic diversity and adaptation.

  4. Activity of LY333328 in Experimental Meningitis Caused by a Streptococcus pneumoniae Strain Susceptible to Penicillin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Joachim; Smirnov, Alexander; Wellmer, Andreas; Ragheb, Jasmin; Prange, Juliane; Schütz, Eckhardt; Wettich, Klaus; Kalich, Siegfried; Nau, Roland

    2001-01-01

    In a rabbit model of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis single doses of 10 and 2.5 mg of the glycopeptide LY333328 per kg of body weight reduced bacterial titers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) almost as rapidly as ceftriaxone at 10 mg/kg/h (changes in log CFU, −0.29 ± 0.21 and −0.26 ± 0.22 versus −0.34 ± 0.15/ml/h). A dose of 1 mg/kg was bacteriostatic (change in log CFU, 0.01 ± 0.11/ml/h). In two animals receiving LY333328 at a dose of 40 mg/kg the bacterial titers were reduced by 0.54 and 0.51 log CFU/ml/h. The penetration of CSF by LY333328 was 1 to 5%. The concentrations of lipoteichoic and teichoic acids in CSF and neuronal damage were similar in ceftriaxone- and LY333328-treated animals. PMID:11408247

  5. Clinical implication of extended-spectrum cephalosporin nonsusceptibility in Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, S-H; Chung, J-W; Kim, B-N; Kwak, Y G; Kim, T H; Lee, E J; Choo, E J; Jeon, M-H; Lee, M S; Bae, I-G; Lee, S-R; Song, E H; Jun, J-B; Kim, M-N; Kim, S-H; Lee, S-O; Kim, Y S; Woo, J H; Choi, S-H

    2012-11-01

    The clinical implication of extended-spectrum cephalosporin (ESC) resistance has been unclear in patients with Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis (SPM). We collected the clinical data of 120 patients with SPM in 12 hospitals of the Republic of Korea. The clinical characteristics and outcomes of 23 ESC-nonsusceptible SPM episodes were compared to those of 97 ESC-susceptible episodes. Hospital acquisition, presence of other foci of pneumococcal infection, septic shock at initial presentation, or concomitant bacteremia were more commonly observed in ESC-nonsusceptible than ESC-susceptible SPM. Empiric antimicrobial therapy with vancomycin and ESC combination was very common in both groups. Although there was a tendency towards higher early fatality in ESC-nonsusceptible SPM (3-day mortality; 17.4 % vs. 4.4 %, p = 0.05), in-hospital mortality (26.1 % vs. 20.9 %, p = 0.59) and median length of hospital stay (20 days vs. 24 days, p = 0.34) did not differ between ESC-nonsusceptible and ESC-susceptible SPM.

  6. Effect of transforming DNA on growth and frequency of mutation of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grist, R W; Butler, L O

    1983-01-01

    We studied the effect of the presence of homologous transforming DNA on the growth of several transformable strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae and on the frequency of mutation of these strains to various antibiotic resistances. We observed no effect on growth until the strains became competent, when growth was depressed. At the end of the competence period, some strains showed recovery to varying degrees, whereas others showed evidence of cell death. Growth was also depressed by the presence of DNA from Escherichia coli, indicating that recombination was not likely to be the cause of the observed effect. Furthermore, cell death was not caused by the induction of a prophage. Several of the strains showed increased mutation frequencies during the competence period, although treatment with E. coli DNA gave no such effect, indicating that the mutagenesis was due to recombination. We observed no mutagenesis due to UV irradiation of the strains. The possibility that integration of the transforming DNA may produce lesions which induce error-prone repair is discussed. Furthermore, a strain that showed no mutability by transforming DNA, indicating the presence of a more efficient repair system, gave evidence of producing higher amounts of the hex system when competent, and the possible relationship between these properties is discussed.

  7. Identifying transmission routes of Streptococcus pneumoniae and sources of acquisitions in high transmission communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althouse, B M; Hammitt, L L; Grant, L; Wagner, B G; Reid, R; Larzelere-Hinton, F; Weatherholtz, R; Klugman, K P; Rodgers, G L; O'Brien, K L; Hu, H

    2017-10-01

    Identifying the transmission sources and reservoirs of Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP) is a long-standing question for pneumococcal epidemiology, transmission dynamics, and vaccine policy. Here we use serotype to identify SP transmission and examine acquisitions (in the same household, local community, and county, or of unidentified origin) in a longitudinal cohort of children and adults from the Navajo Nation and the White Mountain Apache American Indian Tribes. We found that adults acquire SP relatively more in the household than other age groups, and children 2-8 years old typically acquire in their own or surrounding communities. Age-specific transmission probability matrices show that transmissions within household were mostly seen from older to younger siblings. Outside the household, children most often transmit to other children in the same age group, showing age-assortative mixing behavior. We find toddlers and older children to be most involved in SP transmission and acquisition, indicating their role as key drivers of SP epidemiology. Although infants have high carriage prevalence, they do not play a central role in transmission of SP compared with toddlers and older children. Our results are relevant to inform alternative pneumococcal conjugate vaccine dosing strategies and analytic efforts to inform optimization of vaccine programs, as well as assessing the transmission dynamics of pathogens transmitted by close contact in general.

  8. Hyaluronic Acid Derived from Other Streptococci Supports Streptococcus pneumoniae In Vitro Biofilm Formation

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    Mukesh Kumar Yadav

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the role of hyaluronic acid (HA on S. pneumoniae in vitro biofilm formation and evaluate gene expressions of virulence and/or biofilm related genes. Biofilms were grown in medium supplied with HA derived from capsule of Streptococcus equi. The biomasses of biofilms were detected by crystal-violet (CV microtiter plate assay, and the morphology was viewed under scanning electron microscope (SEM. The gene expressions were assessed by relative quantitative RT-PCR. The results showed that the HA support pneumococcal growth in planktonic form and within biofilms. The CV-microtiter plate assay detected significantly increased biofilm growth in medium containing HA. The SEM analysis revealed thick and organized biofilms in positive control and HA supplemented medium. The nanA, nanB, bgaA, strH, luxS, hysA, ugl, and PST-EIIA encoding genes were significantly upregulated in the planktonic cells grown in presence of HA, while the lytA and comA genes were downregulated. Similarly the luxS, hysA, ugl, and PST-EIIA encoding genes were significantly upregulated by more than 2-folds in HA biofilms. The results of this study indicate that the HA derived from capsule of S. equi supports pneumococcal growth in planktonic state and within biofilms and upregulated virulence and biofilm related genes.

  9. Transport of Streptococcus pneumoniae capsular polysaccharide in MHC Class II tubules.

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    Tom Li Stephen

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial capsular polysaccharides are virulence factors and are considered T cell-independent antigens. However, the capsular polysaccharide Sp1 from Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 1 has been shown to activate CD4(+ T cells in a major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II-dependent manner. The mechanism of carbohydrate presentation to CD4(+ T cells is unknown. We show in live murine dendritic cells (DCs that Sp1 translocates from lysosomal compartments to the plasma membrane in MHCII-positive tubules. Sp1 cell surface presentation results in reduction of self-peptide presentation without alteration of the MHCII self peptide repertoire. In DM-deficient mice, retrograde transport of Sp1/MHCII complexes resulting in T cell-dependent immune responses to the polysaccharide in vitro and in vivo is significantly reduced. The results demonstrate the capacity of a bacterial capsular polysaccharide antigen to use DC tubules as a vehicle for its transport as an MHCII/saccharide complex to the cell surface for the induction of T cell activation. Furthermore, retrograde transport requires the functional role of DM in self peptide-carbohydrate exchange. These observations open new opportunities for the design of vaccines against microbial encapsulated pathogens.

  10. Identification of PblB mediating galactose-specific adhesion in a successful Streptococcus pneumoniae clone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yu-Chia; Lin, Tzu-Lung; Lin, Che-Ming; Wang, Jin-Town

    2015-07-21

    The pneumococcal genome is variable and there are minimal data on the influence of the accessory genome on phenotype. Pneumococcal serotype 14 sequence type (ST) 46 had been the most prevalent clone causing pneumonia in children in Taiwan. A microarray was constructed using the genomic DNA of a clinical strain (NTUH-P15) of serotype 14 ST46. Using DNA hybridization, genomic variations in NTUH-P15 were compared to those of 3 control strains. Microarray analysis identified 7 genomic regions that had significant increases in hybridization signals in the NTUH-P15 strain compared to control strains. One of these regions encoded PblB, a phage-encoded virulence factor implicated (in Streptococcus mitis) in infective endocarditis. The isogenic pblB mutant decreased adherence to A549 human lung epithelial cell compared to wild-type NTUH-P15 strain (P = 0.01). Complementation with pblB restored the adherence. PblB is predicted to contain a galactose-binding domain-like region. Preincubation of NTUH-P15 with D-galactose resulted in decreases of adherence to A549 cell in a dose-dependent manner. Challenge of mice with NTUH-P15, isogenic pblB mutant and pblB complementation strains determined that PblB was required for bacterial persistence in the nasopharynx and lung. PblB, as an adhesin mediating the galactose-specific adhesion activity of pneumococci, promote pneumococcal clonal success.

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF A NEW PROCESS FOR PURIFICATION OF CAPSULAR POLYSACCHARIDE FROM Streptococcus pneumoniae SEROTYPE 14

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    R. T. Zanardo

    Full Text Available Abstract The main virulence factor of Streptococcus pneumoniae is the capsular polysaccharide (PS, which is the antigen of all current vaccines that are prepared with PS purified from serotypes prevalent in the population. In this work, three purification strategies were evaluated and a new process was developed for purification of serotype 14 PS (PS14, responsible for 39.8% of diseases in children of 0-6 years old in Brazil. The developed method consists of cell separation by tangential microfiltration, concentration of the microfiltrate by tangential ultrafiltration (50 kDa, diafiltration in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate using a 30 kDa ultrafiltration membrane, precipitation with 5% trichloroacetic acid, precipitation with 20% and 60% ethanol, and anion exchange chromatography. The required purity regarding nucleic acids (≤ 2% and proteins (≤ 3% was achieved, resulting in a relative purity of 439 mg PS14/mg nucleic acids and 146 mg PS14/mg proteins. The final polysaccharide recovery was 65%, which is higher than the recovery of the majority of processes described in the literature.

  12. Autolytic Activity and Plasma Binding Study of Aap, a Novel Minor Autolysin of Streptococcus pneumoniae

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    Ramina Mahboobi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Pneumococcal autolysins are enzymes involved in cell wall turnover and cellular division physiologically. They have been found to be involved in the pneumococcus pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to identify the autolytic activity of Spr1754 as a novel protein of Streptococcus pneumoniae. Moreover, the binding of the recombinant protein to plasma proteins was also determined. The spr1754 gene was amplified by PCR and cloned into the pET21a(+ prokaryotic expression vector. The constructed pET21a(+/spr1754 recombinant plasmid was transformed into E. coli Origami (DE3 and induced using IPTG. The recombinant protein of Spr1754 was purified by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography and confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis using anti-His tag monoclonal antibody. Autolytic activity and the ability of the recombinant protein in binding to plasma proteins were performed using zymogram analysis and western blot, respectively. The spr1754 with expected size was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli Origami (DE3, successfully. After purification of the Spr1754 recombinant protein, the autolytic activity was observed by zymography. Of the four plasma proteins used in this study, binding of lactoferrin to Spr1754 recombinant protein was shown. The Spr1754 recombinant protein has a bifunctional activity, i.e., as being autolysin and lactoferrin binding and designated as Aap (autolytic/ adhesion/ pneumococcus. Nevertheless, characterization of the Aap needs to be followed using gene inactivation and cell wall localization.

  13. Prevalência de sorotipos e resistência antimicrobiana de cepas invasivas do Streptococcus pneumoniae

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    Mantese Orlando C.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar o perfil de sorotipos e a susceptibilidade aos antimicrobianos de cepas de Streptococcus pneumoniae obtidas em espécimes clínicos de pacientes com doença invasiva, bem como suas implicações na formulação de vacinas pneumocócicas. MÉTODOS: Cepas de pneumococo isoladas no Laboratório de Análises Clínicas do Hospital de Clínicas da Universidade Federal de Uberlândia a partir de amostras clínicas de pacientes com doença invasiva foram identificadas e enviadas ao Instituto Adolfo Lutz em São Paulo para confirmação da identificação, sorotipagem e determinação da susceptibilidade aos antimicrobianos. RESULTADOS: De abril de 1999 a março de 2003, foram isoladas 148 cepas invasivas de pneumococo, sendo 84 (56,7% provenientes de pacientes do sexo masculino. A idade variou de um dia a 88,83 anos, com média de 21,33+25,82 anos e mediana de 4,42 anos. Os diagnósticos clínicos mais comuns foram pneumonia (91 casos; 61,4%, meningite (32 casos; 21,6% e bacteremia sem foco evidente (15 casos; 10,1%. As principais fontes de recuperação foram sangue (76 amostras; 51,3%, líquido pleural (39; 26,3% e liquor (30; 20,2%. No total, foram identificados 23 diferentes sorotipos entre 143 amostras testadas, sendo os mais comuns os seguintes: 14, 3, 1, 5, 6A, 6B e 18C. Dentre 30 (20,2% cepas oxacilina-resistentes, 23 (15,5% confirmaram a resistência à penicilina (12,8% com nível intermediário e 2,7%, com nível pleno, que esteve restrita aos sorotipos 14, 23F, 19A e 6B, predominando em indivíduos com até dois anos de idade (p = 0,0008. Foi detectada susceptibilidade diminuída ao cotrimoxazol (63,4%, à eritromicina (8,3%, à clindamicina (8,7% e à ofloxacina (0,8%. A resistência à cefotaxima foi detectada em três das 30 cepas testadas (2% das 148, todas elas com resistência confirmada à penicilina. Não foi observada resistência a cloranfenicol, rifampicina ou vancomicina. CONCLUSÕES: A resistência

  14. Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... know you have it. Walking pneumonia (also called atypical pneumonia because it's different from the typical bacterial pneumonia) ... ray and blood tests. People with bacterial or atypical pneumonia will probably be given antibiotics to take at ...

  15. Antibiotic susceptibility in Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pyogenes in Pakistan: a review of results from the Survey of Antibiotic Resistance (SOAR) 2002-15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, A; Hasan, R; Nizamuddin, S; Mahmood, N; Mukhtar, S; Ali, F; Morrissey, I; Barker, K; Torumkuney, D

    2016-05-01

    To investigate changes in the antibiotic susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pyogenes from the Survey of Antibiotic Resistance (SOAR) in community-acquired respiratory tract infections (CA-RTIs) between 2002 and 2015 in Pakistan. This is a review based on previously published studies from 2002-03, 2004-06 and 2007-09 and also new data from 2014-15. Susceptibility was determined by Etest(®) or disc diffusion according to CLSI and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) breakpoints. A total of 706 isolates from CA-RTIs comprising 381 S. pneumoniae, 230 H. influenzae and 95 S. pyogenes were collected between 2002 and 2015 and tested against a range of antibiotics. Antibiotic resistance in S. pneumoniae rose steeply from 2002 to 2009, with isolates non-susceptible to penicillin and macrolides increasing from 10% to 34.1% and from 13%-14% to 29.7%, respectively. Susceptibility to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (and by inference amoxicillin) remained between 99.4% and 100% from 2002 to 2015. Over the years, the prevalence of susceptibility to cefuroxime was 98%-100% among S. pneumoniae. Resistance in S. pneumoniae to some older antibiotics between 2007 and 2009 was high (86.8% for trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and 57.2% for tetracycline). Between 2002 and 2015, ampicillin resistance (β-lactamase-positive strains) among H. influenzae has remained low (between 2.6% and 3.2%) and almost unchanged over the years (H. influenzae was not tested during 2004-06). For S. pyogenes isolates, macrolide resistance reached 22%; however, susceptibility to penicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and cefuroxime remained stable at 100%. In S. pneumoniae from Pakistan, there has been a clear reduction in susceptibility to key antibiotics since 2002, but not to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (amoxicillin) or cefuroxime. However, susceptibility in H. influenzae has remained stable. Local antibiotic susceptibility/resistance data are essential to

  16. Biological and Epidemiological Features of Antibiotic-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae in Pre- and Post-Conjugate Vaccine Eras: a United States Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Lindsay; McGee, Lesley; Tomczyk, Sara

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Streptococcus pneumoniae inflicts a huge disease burden as the leading cause of community-acquired pneumonia and meningitis. Soon after mainstream antibiotic usage, multiresistant pneumococcal clones emerged and disseminated worldwide. Resistant clones are generated through adaptation to antibiotic pressures imposed while naturally residing within the human upper respiratory tract. Here, a huge array of related commensal streptococcal strains transfers core genomic and accessory resistance determinants to the highly transformable pneumococcus. β-Lactam resistance is the hallmark of pneumococcal adaptability, requiring multiple independent recombination events that are traceable to nonpneumococcal origins and stably perpetuated in multiresistant clonal complexes. Pneumococcal strains with elevated MICs of β-lactams are most often resistant to additional antibiotics. Basic underlying mechanisms of most pneumococcal resistances have been identified, although new insights that increase our understanding are continually provided. Although all pneumococcal infections can be successfully treated with antibiotics, the available choices are limited for some strains. Invasive pneumococcal disease data compiled during 1998 to 2013 through the population-based Active Bacterial Core surveillance program (U.S. population base of 30,600,000) demonstrate that targeting prevalent capsular serotypes with conjugate vaccines (7-valent and 13-valent vaccines implemented in 2000 and 2010, respectively) is extremely effective in reducing resistant infections. Nonetheless, resistant non-vaccine-serotype clones continue to emerge and expand. PMID:27076637

  17. Streptococcus pneumoniae aislados durante 2002-2006: serotipos y resistencia antibiótica. Correlación con las vacunas existentes

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    José María Guevara-Duncan

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Identificar los serotipos de S. pneumoniae aislados, correlacionándolos con los incluidos en las vacunas existentes y su resistencia antimicrobiana. Diseño: Estudio descriptivo, observacional y longitudinal. Lugar: Instituto de Medicina Tropical Daniel A. Carrión, Facultad de Medicina, UNMSM. Material biológico: Cepas de Streptococcus pneumoniae. Intervenciones: Cuarenta Streptococcus pneumoniae de nuestro cepario, aislados entre el 2002 y 2006, fueron serotipificados en el Instituto de Salud Carlos III en Madrid -España; 15 fueron invasivos, 11 aislados de infecciones localizadas, 6 de portadores y 8 eran multiresistentes. Principales medidas de resultados: Protección de las vacunas existentes en nuestro medio a las infecciones causadas por Streptococcus pneumoniae. Resultados: Hubo 14 serotipos diferentes y los serogrupos más identificados fueron 23, 19 y 6. El 28,6% estaba contenido en la vacuna 7-valente, 42,9% en la 9-valente, 50% en la 11-valente y el 71,4% en la 23-valente; 57,5% fue resistente a la penicilina y 30% a eritromicina. El grupo de Streptococcus invasivo resultó más sensible a los antibióticos que los otros grupos. Los serotipos asociados a multirresistencia fueron 19F y 23F. Conclusiones: Ninguna de las vacunas protege a todas las infecciones causadas por Streptococcus pneumoniae, en nuestro medio.

  18. ROLE OF STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE IN THE STRUCTURE OF BACTERIAL INFECTIONS IN THE CHILDREN HOSPITALIZED TO INPATIENT HOSPITALS IN MOSCOW IN 2011–2012

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    A. A. Baranov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Data on the spread of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes in the RF are extremely limited. 3 pneumococcal conjugated vaccines are approved inRussia; however, neither has yet been employed in the framework of the national population immunization program. At the same time, it is the dataon the serotype range of pneumococcal infections that may be considered the prognostic efficacy criterion for the national vaccination programs.The objective of this research is identification of the circulating S. pneumoniae serotypes and spread of pneumococcal etiology infections in the structure of bacterial infections in the infants hospitalized to 5 inpatient hospital of Moscow in 2011–2012. The trial involved 864 patients in tote. Vast majority of patients (86% had acute purulent otitis media and sinusitis. Community-acquired pneumonia was diagnosed in 9% of patients, sepsis and bacteremia — in 3.6%; purulent meningitis — 1.2% of patients. It has been revealed that S. pneumoniae is the primary pathogen in the structure of nasopharyngeal carriage in the children under 5 years of age hospitalized with acute bacterial infections, and the primary bacterial causative agent of acute otitis media at this age. Nasopharyngeal pneumococcal carriage analysis revealed the prevalent serotypes — 19F, 14, 23F, 3, 6A and B; they were present in 3/4 of all cases; 19F was the most frequent (> 20%. Diversity of the S. pneumoniae serotypes detected in middle ear liquid was less significant — 17 serotypes (in comparison with 24 serotypes in nasopharynx. The 5 prevalent serotypes were 19F, 3, 14, 23F, 6B and 19A (> 75% in tote. Detection rate of serotypes 3 and 19A in middle ear liquid significantly exceeded the detection rate of these serotypes in case of nasopharyngeal carriage. The study of invasive infections revealed serotypes 14, 23F, 3 and 15C. These data may be used as a benchmark for future monitoring and evaluation of effect of PCV vaccines on epidemiology of

  19. Standardisation and evaluation of a quantitative multiplex real-time PCR assay for the rapid identification of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feroze Ahmed Ganaie

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid diagnosis of Streptococcus pneumoniae can play a significant role in decreasing morbidity and mortality of infection. The accurate diagnosis of pneumococcal disease is hampered by the difficulties in growing the isolates from clinical specimens and also by misidentification. Molecular methods have gained popularity as they offer improvement in the detection of causative pathogens with speed and ease. The present study aims at validating and standardising the use of 4 oligonucleotide primer-probe sets (pneumolysin [ply], autolysin [lytA], pneumococcal surface adhesion A [psaA] and Spn9802 [DNA fragment] in a single-reaction mixture for the detection and discrimination of S. pneumoniae. Here, we validate a quantitative multiplex real-time PCR (qmPCR assay with a panel consisting of 43 S. pneumoniae and 29 non-pneumococcal isolates, 20 culture positive, 26 culture negative and 30 spiked serum samples. A standard curve was obtained using S. pneumoniae ATCC 49619 strain and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH gene was used as an endogenous internal control. The experiment showed high sensitivity with lower limit of detection equivalent to 4 genome copies/µl. The efficiency of the reaction was 100% for ply, lytA, Spn9802 and 97% for psaA. The test showed sensitivity and specificity of 100% with culture isolates and serum specimens. This study demonstrates that qmPCR analysis of sera using 4 oligonucleotide primers appears to be an appropriate method for the genotypic identification of S. pneumoniae infection.

  20. Frequency of Streptococcus pneumonia and Haemophilus influenza in acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive airway disease and their sensitivity to levofloxacin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furqan, S.; Paracha, S.A.U.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae in acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and their sensitivity to levofloxacin. Methods: The cross-sectional study was conducted at the Department of Medicine, AbbasiShaheed Hospital, Karachi, between July 2009 and January 2010. Patients already diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and admitted with symptoms of acute exacerbation were included in the study and their sputum samples were sent for microbiological evaluation. SPSS 16 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Of the total 105 patients in the study, 90 (85.17%) were males. Overall mean age at presentation was 62+-10.2 years. S. pneumoniae was isolated from sputum culture of 33 (31.4%) patients, while 13 (12.4%) patients showed growth of H. influenzae. Out of the 33 sputum specimens of S. pneumoniae, 32 (97.0%) were sensitive to levofloxacin, while 1 (3.0%) was resistant. All the 13 isolates of H. influenzae were sensitive to levofloxacin. Conclusion: S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae are still the most prevalent organisms isolated in acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in our population. Levofloxacin is still considered a highly sensitive antibiotic against these common micro-organisms in our population, but S. pneumoniae has started developing resistance against levofloxacin. Therefore, intermittent surveillance regarding development of resistance pattern of common micro-organisms against commonly prescribed antibiotics is required. (author)

  1. Unusual Manifestation of Severe Conjugated Hyperbilirubinemia in an Infant with Streptococcus pneumoniae-associated Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Pin Chen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is an uncommon etiologic organism in children with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS. Historically, severe S. pneumoniae-associated HUS usually has a poor clinical outcome. The clinical manifestations of marked jaundice and hepatic dysfunction in this form of HUS are extremely rare. We report a 10-month-old female infant with S. pneumoniae-associated HUS who had the unusual manifestation of severely elevated conjugated bilirubin and hepatic transaminases. Screening for viral hepatitis was negative, and evidence of biliary obstruction and hepatotoxic drug exposure was also absent. The patient was treated with antihypertensive agents for 2.5 months and required peritoneal dialysis for a period of 26 days. Hepatic function returned to normal on the 8th day of hospitalization. Renal function was mildly impaired at 1-year follow-up. Our report suggests that severe conjugated hyperbilirubinemia is a rare manifestation of S. pneumoniae-associated HUS in children. It is important for pediatricians that pneumococcal infection with severe hematologic and renal disorders should be investigated for evidence of S. pneumoniae-associated HUS. [J Formos Med Assoc 2007;106(2 Suppl:S17-S22

  2. Host Glycan Sugar-Specific Pathways in Streptococcus pneumonia: Galactose as a Key Sugar in Colonisation and Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paixão, Laura; Oliveira, Joana; Veríssimo, André; Vinga, Susana; Lourenço, Eva C.; Ventura, M. Rita; Kjos, Morten; Veening, Jan-Willem; Fernandes, Vitor E.; Andrew, Peter W.; Yesilkaya, Hasan; Neves, Ana Rute

    2015-01-01

    The human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae is a strictly fermentative organism that relies on glycolytic metabolism to obtain energy. In the human nasopharynx S. pneumoniae encounters glycoconjugates composed of a variety of monosaccharides, which can potentially be used as nutrients once depolymerized by glycosidases. Therefore, it is reasonable to hypothesise that the pneumococcus would rely on these glycan-derived sugars to grow. Here, we identified the sugar-specific catabolic pathways used by S. pneumoniae during growth on mucin. Transcriptome analysis of cells grown on mucin showed specific upregulation of genes likely to be involved in deglycosylation, transport and catabolism of galactose, mannose and N acetylglucosamine. In contrast to growth on mannose and N-acetylglucosamine, S. pneumoniae grown on galactose re-route their metabolic pathway from homolactic fermentation to a truly mixed acid fermentation regime. By measuring intracellular metabolites, enzymatic activities and mutant analysis, we provide an accurate map of the biochemical pathways for galactose, mannose and N-acetylglucosamine catabolism in S. pneumoniae. Intranasal mouse infection models of pneumococcal colonisation and disease showed that only mutants in galactose catabolic genes were attenuated. Our data pinpoint galactose as a key nutrient for growth in the respiratory tract and highlights the importance of central carbon metabolism for pneumococcal pathogenesis. PMID:25826206

  3. Nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae causes otitis media during single-species infection and during polymicrobial infection with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrah, Kyle A; Pang, Bing; Richardson, Stephen; Perez, Antonia; Reimche, Jennifer; King, Lauren; Wren, John; Swords, W Edward

    2015-07-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae strains lacking capsular polysaccharide have been increasingly reported in carriage and disease contexts. Since most cases of otitis media involve more than one bacterial species, we aimed to determine the capacity of a nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae clinical isolate to induce disease in the context of a single-species infection and as a polymicrobial infection with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae. Using the chinchilla model of otitis media, we found that nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae colonizes the nasopharynx following intranasal inoculation, but does not readily ascend into the middle ear. However, when we inoculated nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae directly into the middle ear, the bacteria persisted for two weeks post-inoculation and induced symptoms consistent with chronic otitis media. During coinfection with nontypeable H. influenzae, both species persisted for one week and induced polymicrobial otitis media. We also observed that nontypeable H. influenzae conferred passive protection from killing by amoxicillin upon S. pneumoniae from within polymicrobial biofilms in vitro. Therefore, based on these results, we conclude that nonencapsulated pneumococci are a potential causative agent of chronic/recurrent otitis media, and can also cause mutualistic infection with other opportunists, which could complicate treatment outcomes. © FEMS 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Two-component system response regulators involved in virulence of Streptococcus pneumoniae TIGR4 in infective endocarditis.

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    My Trihn

    Full Text Available Streptococci resident in the oral cavity have been linked to infective endocarditis (IE. While other viridans streptococci are commonly studied in relation to IE, less research has been focused on Streptococcus pneumoniae. We established for the first time an animal model of S. pneumoniae IE, and examined the virulence of the TIGR4 strain in this model. We hypothesized that two-component systems (TCS may mediate S. pneumoniae TIGR4 strain virulence in IE and examined TCS response regulator (RR mutants of TIGR4 in vivo with the IE model. Thirteen of the 14 RR protein genes were mutagenized, excluding only the essential gene SP_1227. The requirement of the 13 RRs for S. pneumoniae competitiveness in the IE model was assessed in vivo through use of quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR and competitive index assays. Using real-time PCR, several RR mutants were detected at significantly lower levels in infected heart valves compared with a control strain suggesting the respective RRs are candidate virulence factors for IE. The virulence reduction of the ΔciaR mutant was further confirmed by competitive index assay. Our data suggest that CiaR is a virulence factor of S. pneumoniae strain TIGR4 for IE.

  5. Description of the Pathogenic Features of Streptococcus pyogenes Isolates from Invasive and Non-Invasive Diseases in Aichi, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Masakado; Yamada, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Masahiro; Adachi, Hirokazu; Kobayashi, Shinichi; Yamashita, Teruo; Minagawa, Hiroko; Tatsuno, Ichiro; Hasegawa, Tadao

    2016-07-22

    We identified hypervirulent Streptococcus pyogenes in 27 and 420 isolates from patients with invasive and non-invasive diseases, respectively, in Aichi Prefecture, Japan, between 2003 and 2012, in an attempt to understand why the prevalence of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) suddenly increased in this location during 2011. Hypervirulent strains belong to the emm1 genotype, with a mutation in the covR/S genes that regulate many other genes, encoding virulence determinants and resulting in the absence of the proteinase streptococcal exotoxin B and the production of virulence factors such as the superantigen streptococcal exotoxin A, the nuclease streptococcal DNase, the cytotoxin NAD-glycohydrolase, and the hemolysin streptolysin O. We found 1 strain from invasive disease and 1 from non-invasive disease with traits similar to those of hypervirulent strains, except that the sda1 gene was absent. We also found 1 non-emm1 strain with phenotypic and genetic traits identical to those of the emm1 hypervirulent strains except that it did not belong to emm1 genotype, from non-invasive diseases cases in 2011. These findings suggested that hypervirulent and hypervirulent-like strains from invasive and non-invasive disease cases could have at least partially contributed to the sudden increase in the number of patients with STSS in Aichi during 2011.

  6. Preventing invasive Group B Streptococcus (GBS) disease in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    9 No. 3 has been successfully used for the prevention of tetanus, influenza and pertussis in infants.[11] A trivalent GBS polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccine (against serotypes Ia, Ib and III) has completed phase-II evaluation among pregnant women and has the potential to prevent 70 - 80% of all invasive GBS disease.

  7. Tn5253 family integrative and conjugative elements carrying mef(I) and catQ determinants in Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingoia, Marina; Morici, Eleonora; Morroni, Gianluca; Giovanetti, Eleonora; Del Grosso, Maria; Pantosti, Annalisa; Varaldo, Pietro E

    2014-10-01

    The linkage between the macrolide efflux gene mef(I) and the chloramphenicol inactivation gene catQ was first described in Streptococcus pneumoniae (strain Spn529), where the two genes are located in a module designated IQ element. Subsequently, two different defective IQ elements were detected in Streptococcus pyogenes (strains Spy029 and Spy005). The genetic elements carrying the three IQ elements were characterized, and all were found to be Tn5253 family integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs). The ICE from S. pneumoniae (ICESpn529IQ) was sequenced, whereas the ICEs from S. pyogenes (ICESpy029IQ and ICESpy005IQ, the first Tn5253-like ICEs reported in this species) were characterized by PCR mapping, partial sequencing, and restriction analysis. ICESpn529IQ and ICESpy029IQ were found to share the intSp 23FST81 integrase gene and an identical Tn916 fragment, whereas ICESpy005IQ has int5252 and lacks Tn916. All three ICEs were found to lack the linearized pC194 plasmid that is usually associated with Tn5253-like ICEs, and all displayed a single copy of a toxin-antitoxin operon that is typically contained in the direct repeats flanking the excisable pC194 region when this region is present. Two different insertion sites of the IQ elements were detected, one in ICESpn529IQ and ICESpy029IQ, and another in ICESpy005IQ. The chromosomal integration of the three ICEs was site specific, depending on the integrase (intSp 23FST81 or int5252). Only ICESpy005IQ was excised in circular form and transferred by conjugation. By transformation, mef(I) and catQ were cotransferred at a high frequency from S. pyogenes Spy005 and at very low frequencies from S. pneumoniae Spn529 and S. pyogenes Spy029. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Pretreatment of epithelial cells with live Streptococcus pneumoniae has no detectable effect on influenza A virus replication in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Ouyang

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAV and Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus are two major upper respiratory tract pathogens responsible for exacerbated disease in coinfected individuals. Despite several studies showing increased susceptibility to secondary bacterial infections following IAV infection, information on the direct effect of S. pneumoniae on IAV in vitro is unknown. This is an important area of investigation as S. pneumoniae is a common commensal of the human upper respiratory tract, present as an important coinfecting pathogen with IAV infection. A recent study showed that S. pneumoniae enhances human metapneumovirus infection in polarized bronchial epithelial cells in vitro. The aim of the current study was to determine whether treatment of epithelial cells with S. pneumoniae affects IAV replication using a standard immunofluorescence assay (IFA. For this study we used four IAV permissive epithelial cell lines including two human-derived cell lines, 12 pneumococcal strains including recent human clinical isolates which represent different genetic backgrounds and serotypes, and six IAV strains of varying genetic nature and pathogenic potential including the pandemic 2009 H1N1 virus. Our results suggested that pretreatment of MDCK cells with 7.5×10(6 colony-forming units (CFUs of live S. pneumoniae resulted in gradual cell-death in a time-dependent manner (0.5 to 4 hr. But, pretreatment of cell lines with 7.5×10(5 and lower CFUs of S. pneumoniae had no detectable effect on either the morphology of cells or on the IAV replication. However, unlike in epithelial cell lines, due to influence of secreted host factors the effect of pneumococci on IAV replication may be different during coinfections in vivo in the human upper respiratory tract, and in vitro with primary human polarized bronchial epithelial cells.

  9. Serotipos prevalentes de Streptococcus pneumoniae colonizadores de nasofaringe, en niños del Distrito Federal Prevalence of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes on nasopharyngeal colonization in children of Mexico City

    OpenAIRE

    Fortino Solórzano-Santos; Laura Alicia Ortiz-Ocampo; Ma Guadalupe Miranda-Novales; Gabriela Echániz-Avilés; Araceli Soto-Noguerón; Héctor Guiscafré-Gallardo

    2005-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Determinar frecuencia, serotipos y susceptibilidad a ocho antimicrobianos en Streptococcus pneumoniae aislados de la nasofaringe de una muestra representativa de niños menores de cinco años de edad residentes en el Distrito Federal. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Estudio transversal, hecho de febrero de 2002 a enero de 2003. Se incluyeron niños de 2 meses a 5 años. A los seleccionados se les tomó una muestra de exudado faríngeo con hisopo de alginato de calcio. Bajo técnicas ya establecidas se...

  10. Características clínico-microbiológicas de la meningitis por Streptococcus pneumoniae resistente a la penicilina Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis resistant to penicillin clinical and microbiological characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Demóstenes Gómez-Barreto; Ernesto Calderón-Jaimes; Romeo S. Rodríguez; Luz Elena Espinosa de los Monteros; Maricruz Juárez

    1999-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Evaluar la susceptibilidad antimicrobiana de Streptococcus pneumoniae aislado del líquido cefalorraquídeo de niños con meningitis, así como describir y comparar las características clínicas y microbiológicas, el tratamiento y la evolución del padecimiento entre niños infectados con cepas sensibles y resistentes a la penicilina y la cefalosporina. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Treinta y ocho niños con meningitis neumocócica fueron incluidos prospectivamente en el Programa Institucional de Vigi...

  11. C4 deficiency is a predisposing factor for Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced autoantibody production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yammani, Rama D.; Leyva, Marcela A.; Jennings, Ryan N.; Haas, Karen M.

    2015-01-01

    Reductions in C4 levels may predispose individuals to infection with encapsulated bacteria as well as autoimmunity. In this study, we examined the role C4 has in protection against Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced autoimmunity. Mild respiratory infection with serotype 19F pneumococci selectively induced systemic anti-dsDNA IgA production in naïve C4-/- mice, but not C3-/- or wild type mice. Systemic challenge with virulent serotype 3 pneumococci also induced anti-dsDNA IgA production in immune C4-/- mice. Remarkably, pneumococcal polysaccharide (PPS) vaccination alone induced C4-/- mice to produce increased anti-dsDNA IgA levels that were maintained in some mice for months. These effects were most pronounced in female C4-/- mice. Importantly, immunization-induced increases in anti-dsDNA IgA levels were strongly associated with increased IgA deposition in kidneys. Cross-reactivity between pneumococcal antigens and dsDNA played a partial role in the induction of anti-dsDNA IgA, but a major role for PPS-associated TLR2 agonists was also revealed. Administration of the TLR2/4 antagonist, OxPAPC, at the time of PPS immunization completely blocked the production of anti-dsDNA IgA in C4-/- mice without suppressing PPS-specific Ab production. The TLR2 agonist, Pam3Csk4, similarly induced anti-dsDNA IgA production in C4-/- mice, which OxPAPC also prevented. LPS, a TLR4 agonist, had no effect. Pam3Csk4, but not LPS, also induced dsDNA-specific IgA production by C4-/- splenic IgA+ B cells in vitro, indicating TLR2 agonists can stimulate autoAb production via B cell-intrinsic mechanisms. Collectively, our results show an important role for C4 in suppressing autoAb production elicited by cross-reactive antigens and TLR2 agonists associated with S. pneumoniae. PMID:25339671

  12. Characterization of protective extracellular membrane-derived vesicles produced by Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaya-Abril, Alfonso; Prados-Rosales, Rafael; McConnell, Michael J; Martín-Peña, Reyes; González-Reyes, José Antonio; Jiménez-Munguía, Irene; Gómez-Gascón, Lidia; Fernández, Javier; Luque-García, José L; García-Lidón, Carlos; Estévez, Héctor; Pachón, Jerónimo; Obando, Ignacio; Casadevall, Arturo; Pirofski, Liise-Anne; Rodríguez-Ortega, Manuel J

    2014-06-25

    Extracellular vesicles are produced by many pathogenic microorganisms and have varied functions that include secretion and release of microbial factors, which contribute to virulence. Very little is known about vesicle production by Gram-positive bacteria, as well as their biogenesis and release mechanisms. In this work, we demonstrate the active production of vesicles by Streptococcus pneumoniae from the plasma membrane, rather than being a product from cell lysis. We biochemically characterized them by proteomics and fatty acid analysis, showing that these vesicles and the plasma membrane resemble in essential aspects, but have some differences: vesicles are more enriched in lipoproteins and short-chain fatty acids. We also demonstrate that these vesicles act as carriers of surface proteins and virulence factors. They are also highly immunoreactive against human sera and induce immune responses that protect against infection. Overall, this work provides insights into the biology of this important Gram-positive human pathogen and the role of extracellular vesicles in clinical applications. Pneumococcus is one of the leading causes of bacterial pneumonia worldwide in children and the elderly, being responsible for high morbidity and mortality rates in developing countries. The augment of pneumococcal disease in developed countries has raised major public health concern, since the difficulties to treat these infections due to increasing antibiotic resistance. Vaccination is still the best way to combat pneumococcal infections. One of the mechanisms that bacterial pathogens use to combat the defense responses of invaded hosts is the production and release of extracellular vesicles derived from the outer surface. Little is known about this phenomenon in Gram-positives. We show that pneumococcus produces membrane-derived vesicles particularly enriched in lipoproteins. We also show the utility of pneumococcal vesicles as a new type of vaccine, as they induce protection

  13. The Transcriptome of Streptococcus pneumoniae Induced by Local and Global Changes in Supercoiling

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    Adela G. de la Campa

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial chromosome is compacted in a manner optimal for DNA transactions to occur. The degree of compaction results from the level of DNA-supercoiling and the presence of nucleoid-binding proteins. DNA-supercoiling is homeostatically maintained by the opposing activities of relaxing DNA topoisomerases and negative supercoil-inducing DNA gyrase. DNA-supercoiling acts as a general cis regulator of transcription, which can be superimposed upon other types of more specific trans regulatory mechanism. Transcriptomic studies on the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae, which has a relatively small genome (∼2 Mb and few nucleoid-binding proteins, have been performed under conditions of local and global changes in supercoiling. The response to local changes induced by fluoroquinolone antibiotics, which target DNA gyrase subunit A and/or topoisomerase IV, involves an increase in oxygen radicals which reduces cell viability, while the induction of global supercoiling changes by novobiocin (a DNA gyrase subunit B inhibitor, or by seconeolitsine (a topoisomerase I inhibitor, has revealed the existence of topological domains that specifically respond to such changes. The control of DNA-supercoiling in S. pneumoniae occurs mainly via the regulation of topoisomerase gene transcription: relaxation triggers the up-regulation of gyrase and the down-regulation of topoisomerases I and IV, while hypernegative supercoiling down-regulates the expression of topoisomerase I. Relaxation affects 13% of the genome, with the majority of the genes affected located in 15 domains. Hypernegative supercoiling affects 10% of the genome, with one quarter of the genes affected located in 12 domains. However, all the above domains overlap, suggesting that the chromosome is organized into topological domains with fixed locations. Based on its response to relaxation, the pneumococcal chromosome can be said to be organized into five types of domain: up-regulated, down

  14. Identification and characterization of noncoding small RNAs in Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 2 strain D39.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Ho-Ching Tiffany; Mukherjee, Dhriti; Ray, Valerie A; Sham, Lok-To; Feig, Andrew L; Winkler, Malcolm E

    2010-01-01

    We report a search for small RNAs (sRNAs) in the low-GC, gram-positive human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae. Based on bioinformatic analyses by Livny et al. (J. Livny, A. Brencic, S. Lory, and M. K. Waldor, Nucleic Acids Res. 34:3484-3493, 2006), we tested 40 candidates by Northern blotting and confirmed the expression of nine new and one previously reported (CcnA) sRNAs in strain D39. CcnA is one of five redundant sRNAs reported by Halfmann et al. (A. Halfmann, M. Kovacs, R. Hakenbeck, and R. Bruckner, Mol. Microbiol. 66:110-126, 2007) that are positively controlled by the CiaR response regulator. We characterized 3 of these 14 sRNAs: Spd-sr17 (144 nucleotides [nt]; decreased in stationary phase), Spd-sr37 (80 nt; strongly expressed in all growth phases), and CcnA (93 nt; induced by competence stimulatory peptide). Spd-sr17 and CcnA likely fold into structures containing single-stranded regions between hairpin structures, whereas Spd-sr37 forms a base-paired structure. Primer extension mapping and ectopic expression in deletion/insertion mutants confirmed the independent expression of the three sRNAs. Microarray analyses indicated that insertion/deletion mutants in spd-sr37 and ccnA exerted strong cis-acting effects on the transcription of adjacent genes, indicating that these sRNA regions are also cotranscribed in operons. Deletion or overexpression of the three sRNAs did not cause changes in growth, certain stress responses, global transcription, or virulence. Constitutive ectopic expression of CcnA reversed some phenotypes of D39 Delta ciaR mutants, but attempts to link CcnA to -E to comC as a target were inconclusive in ciaR(+) strains. These results show that S. pneumoniae, which lacks known RNA chaperones, expresses numerous sRNAs, but three of these sRNAs do not strongly affect common phenotypes or transcription patterns.

  15. Invasive Streptococcus viridans sphenoethmoiditis leading to an orbital apex syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodily, Lance; Yu, Jenny; Sorrentino, Dante; Branstetter, Barton

    2017-12-01

    Orbital apex syndrome due to spread of infectious sinusitis is a serious disease, often with an insidious presentation with few ophthalmic signs and symptoms. Failure to recognize and treat infectious orbital apex syndrome early portends a grave prognosis, including profound, permanent visual loss and potentially death. Herein we describe a representative case and discuss the relevant aspects of prompt diagnosis and treatment. An unusual case of infectious orbital apex syndrome due to contiguous spread of Streptococcus viridans sphenoethmoiditis in a hospitalized, immunosuppressed patient with acute myelogenous leukemia is presented. Given the few clinic signs and subtle imaging findings, a delay in diagnosis occurred resulting in vision loss to light perception and internal carotid artery occlusion within the cavernous sinus. A brief literature review of orbital apex syndromes is presented. A high clinical suspicion for orbital apex syndrome must be maintained in the appropriate circumstance given the subtle clinical signs and imaging, as well as the potential devastating morbidity of the disease process. Prompt diagnosis and treatment is crucial to patient survival and preservation of vision.

  16. Streptococcus pneumoniae Eradicates Preformed Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms through a Mechanism Requiring Physical Contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Faidad; Wu, Xueqing; Matzkin, Gideon L.; Khan, Mohsin A.; Sakai, Fuminori; Vidal, Jorge E.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (Sau) strains are a main cause of disease, including nosocomial infections which have been linked to the production of biofilms and the propagation of antibiotic resistance strains such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). A previous study found that Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn) strains kill planktonic cultures of Sau strains. In this work, we have further evaluated in detail the eradication of Sau biofilms and investigated ultrastructural interactions of the biofilmicidal effect. Spn strain D39, which produces the competence stimulating peptide 1 (CSP1), reduced Sau biofilms within 8 h of inoculation, while TIGR4, producing CSP2, eradicated Sau biofilms and planktonic cells within 4 h. Differences were not attributed to pherotypes as other Spn strains producing different pheromones eradicated Sau within 4 h. Experiments using Transwell devices, which physically separated both species growing in the same well, demonstrated that direct contact between Spn and Sau was required to efficiently eradicate Sau biofilms and biofilm-released planktonic cells. Physical contact-mediated killing of Sau was not related to production of hydrogen peroxide as an isogenic TIGR4ΔspxB mutant eradicated Sau bacteria within 4 h. Confocal micrographs confirmed eradication of Sau biofilms by TIGR4 and allowed us to visualize ultrastructural point of contacts between Sau and Spn. A time-course study further demonstrated spatial colocalization of Spn chains and Sau tetrads as early as 30 min post-inoculation (Pearson's coefficient >0.72). Finally, precolonized biofilms produced by Sau strain Newman, or MRSA strain USA300, were eradicated by mid-log phase cultures of washed TIGR4 bacteria within 2 h post-inoculation. In conclusion, Spn strains rapidly eradicate pre-colonized Sau aureus biofilms, including those formed by MRSA strains, by a mechanism(s) requiring bacterium-bacterium contact, but independent from the production of hydrogen peroxide

  17. Distinct effects on diversifying selection by two mechanisms of immunity against Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Li

    Full Text Available Antigenic variation to evade host immunity has long been assumed to be a driving force of diversifying selection in pathogens. Colonization by Streptococcus pneumoniae, which is central to the organism's transmission and therefore evolution, is limited by two arms of the immune system: antibody- and T cell- mediated immunity. In particular, the effector activity of CD4(+ T(H17 cell mediated immunity has been shown to act in trans, clearing co-colonizing pneumococci that do not bear the relevant antigen. It is thus unclear whether T(H17 cell immunity allows benefit of antigenic variation and contributes to diversifying selection. Here we show that antigen-specific CD4(+ T(H17 cell immunity almost equally reduces colonization by both an antigen-positive strain and a co-colonized, antigen-negative strain in a mouse model of pneumococcal carriage, thus potentially minimizing the advantage of escape from this type of immunity. Using a proteomic screening approach, we identified a list of candidate human CD4(+ T(H17 cell antigens. Using this list and a previously published list of pneumococcal Antibody antigens, we bioinformatically assessed the signals of diversifying selection among the identified antigens compared to non-antigens. We found that Antibody antigen genes were significantly more likely to be under diversifying selection than the T(H17 cell antigen genes, which were indistinguishable from non-antigens. Within the Antibody antigens, epitopes recognized by human antibodies showed stronger evidence of diversifying selection. Taken together, the data suggest that T(H17 cell-mediated immunity, one form of T cell immunity that is important to limit carriage of antigen-positive pneumococcus, favors little diversifying selection in the targeted antigen. The results could provide new insight into pneumococcal vaccine design.

  18. Streptococcus pneumoniae eradicates preformed Staphylococcus aureus biofilms through a mechanism requiring physical contact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faidad Khan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus (Sau strains are a main cause of disease, including nosocomial infections which have been linked to the production of biofilms and the propagation of antibiotic resistance strains such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. A previous study found that Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn strains kill planktonic cultures of Sau strains. In this work, we have further evaluated in detail the eradication of Sau biofilms and investigated ultrastructural interactions of the biofilmicidal effect. Spn strain D39, which produces the competence stimulating peptide 1 (CSP1, reduced Sau biofilms within 8 h of inoculation, while TIGR4, producing CSP2, eradicated Sau biofilms and planktonic cells within 4 h. Differences were not attributed to pherotypes as other Spn strains producing different pheromones eradicated Sau within 4 h. Experiments using Transwell devices, which physically separated both species growing in the same well, demonstrated that direct contact between Spn and Sau was required to efficiently eradicate Sau biofilms and biofilm-released planktonic cells. Physical contact-mediated killing of Sau was not related to production of hydrogen peroxide as an isogenic TIGR4spxB mutant eradicated Sau bacteria within 4 h. Confocal micrographs confirmed eradication of Sau biofilms by TIGR4 and allowed us to visualize ultrastructural point of contacts between Sau and Spn. A time-course study further demonstrated spatial colocalization of Spn chains and Sau tetrads as early as 30 min post-inoculation (Pearson’s coefficient >0.72. Finally, precolonized biofilms produced by Sau strain Newman, or MRSA strain USA300, were eradicated by mid-log phase cultures of washed TIGR4 bacteria within 2 h post-inoculation. In conclusion, Spn strains rapidly eradicate pre-colonized Sau aureus biofilms, including those formed by MRSA strains, by a mechanism(s requiring bacterium-bacterium contact, but independent from the production of

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of phosphoglycerate kinase from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardo-García, Noelia; Bartual, Sergio G.; Fulde, Marcus; Bergmann, Simone; Hermoso, Juan A.

    2011-01-01

    Phosphoglycerate kinase, a two-domain enzyme involved in the glycolytic pathway, has been crystallized. Both the N-terminal domain and a ternary complex of the full-length enzyme with substrates were crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. Inclusion of the substrates was critical in order to obtain crystals of the full-length protein. Phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) is a widespread two-domain enzyme that plays a critical role in the glycolytic pathway. Several glycolytic enzymes from streptococci have been identified as surface-exposed proteins that are involved in streptococcal virulence by their ability to bind host proteins. This binding allows pneumococcal cells to disseminate through the epithelial and endothelial layers. Crystallization of PGK from Streptococcus pneumoniae yielded orthorhombic crystals (space group I222, unit-cell parameters a = 62.73, b = 75.38, c = 83.63 Å). However, the unit cell of these crystals was not compatible with the presence of full-length PGK. Various analytical methods showed that only the N-terminal domain of PGK was present in the I222 crystals. The ternary complex of PGK with adenylyl imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP) and 3-phospho-d-glycerate (3PGA) produced monoclinic crystals (space group P2 1 , unit-cell parameters a = 40.35, b = 78.23, c = 59.03 Å, β = 96.34°). Molecular replacement showed that this new crystal form contained full-length PGK, thereby indicating the relevance of including substrates in order to avoid proteolysis during the crystallization process

  20. Pronounced metabolic changes in adaptation to biofilm growth by Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Raymond N; Skipp, Paul; Jefferies, Johanna; Clarke, Stuart C; Faust, Saul N; Hall-Stoodley, Luanne; Webb, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae accounts for a significant global burden of morbidity and mortality and biofilm development is increasingly recognised as important for colonization and infection. Analysis of protein expression patterns during biofilm development may therefore provide valuable insights to the understanding of pneumococcal persistence strategies and to improve vaccines. iTRAQ (isobaric tagging for relative and absolute quantification), a high-throughput gel-free proteomic approach which allows high resolution quantitative comparisons of protein profiles between multiple phenotypes, was used to interrogate planktonic and biofilm growth in a clinical serotype 14 strain. Comparative analyses of protein expression between log-phase planktonic and 1-day and 7-day biofilm cultures representing nascent and late phase biofilm growth were carried out. Overall, 244 proteins were identified, of which >80% were differentially expressed during biofilm development. Quantitatively and qualitatively, metabolic regulation appeared to play a central role in the adaptation from the planktonic to biofilm phenotype. Pneumococci adapted to biofilm growth by decreasing enzymes involved in the glycolytic pathway, as well as proteins involved in translation, transcription, and virulence. In contrast, proteins with a role in pyruvate, carbohydrate, and arginine metabolism were significantly increased during biofilm development. Downregulation of glycolytic and translational proteins suggests that pneumococcus adopts a covert phenotype whilst adapting to an adherent lifestyle, while utilization of alternative metabolic pathways highlights the resourcefulness of pneumococcus to facilitate survival in diverse environmental conditions. These metabolic proteins, conserved across both the planktonic and biofilm phenotypes, may also represent target candidates for future vaccine development and treatment strategies. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001182.

  1. Sequence diversity within the capsular genes of Streptococcus pneumoniae serogroup 6 and 19.

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    Karin Elberse

    Full Text Available The main virulence factor of Streptococcus pneumoniae is the capsule. The polysaccharides comprising this capsule are encoded by approximately 15 genes and differences in these genes result in different serotypes. The aim of this study was to investigate the sequence diversity of the capsular genes of serotypes 6A, 6B, 6C, 19A and 19F and to explore a possible effect of vaccination on variation and distribution of these serotypes in the Netherlands. The complete capsular gene locus was sequenced for 25 serogroup 6 and for 20 serogroup 19 isolates. If one or more genes varied in 10 or more base pairs from the reference sequence, it was designated as a capsular subtype. Allele-specific PCRs and specific gene sequencing of highly variable capsular genes were performed on 184 serogroup 6 and 195 serogroup 19 isolates to identify capsular subtypes. This revealed the presence of 6, 3 and a single capsular subtype within serotypes 6A, 6B and 6C, respectively. The serotype 19A and 19F isolates comprised 3 and 4 capsular subtypes, respectively. For serogroup 6, the genetic background, as determined by multi locus sequence typing (MLST and multiple-locus variable number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA, seemed to be closely related to the capsular subtypes, but this was less pronounced for serogroup 19 isolates. The data also suggest shifts in the occurrence of capsular subtypes within serotype 6A and 19A after introduction of the 7-valent pneumococcal vaccine. The shifts within these non-vaccine serotypes might indicate that these capsular subtypes are filling the niche of the vaccine serotypes. In conclusion, there is considerable DNA sequence variation of the capsular genes within pneumococcal serogroup 6 and 19. Such changes may result in altered polysaccharides or in strains that produce more capsular polysaccharides. Consequently, these altered capsules may be less sensitive for vaccine induced immunity.

  2. Digital gene expression analysis in mice lung with coinfection of influenza and streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jun; Zhou, Linlin; Wang, Hongren; Qin, Zhen; Xiang, Li; Zhu, Jie; Huang, Xiaojun; Yang, Yuan; Li, Wanyi; Wang, Baoning; Li, Mingyuan

    2017-12-22

    Influenza A virus (IAV) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP) are two major upper respiratory tract pathogens that can also cause infection in polarized bronchial epithelial cells to exacerbate disease in coinfected individuals which may result in significant morbidity. However, the underlying molecular mechanism is poorly understood. Here, we employed BALB/c ByJ mice inflected with SP, IAV, IAV followed by SP (IAV+SP) and PBS (Control) as models to survey the global gene expression using digital gene expression (DGE) profiling. We attempt to gain insights into the underlying genetic basis of this synergy at the expression level. Gene expression profiles were obtain using the Illimina/Hisseq sequencing technique, and further analyzed by enrichment analysis of Gene Ontology (GO) and Pathway function. The hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining revealed different tissue changes in groups during which IAV+SP group showed the most severe cell apoptosis. Compared with Control, a total of 2731, 3221 and 3946 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were detected in SP, IAV and IAV+SP respectively. Besides, sixty-two GO terms were identified by Gene Ontology functional enrichment analysis, such as cell killing, biological regulation, response to stimulus, signaling, biological adhesion, enzyme regulator activity, receptor regulator activity and translation regulator activity. Pathway significant enrichment analysis indicated the dysregulation of multiple pathways, including apoptosis pathway. Among these, five selected genes were further verified by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). This study shows that infection with SP, IAV or IAV+SP induces apoptosis with different degrees which might provide insights into the molecular mechanisms to facilitate further research.

  3. Co-Transcriptomes of Initial Interactions In Vitro between Streptococcus Pneumoniae and Human Pleural Mesothelial Cells.

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    Claire J Heath

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn is a major causative organism of empyema, an inflammatory condition occurring in the pleural sac. In this study, we used human and Spn cDNA microarrays to characterize the transcriptional responses occurring during initial contact between Spn and a human pleural mesothelial cell line (PMC in vitro. Using stringent filtering criteria, 42 and 23 Spn genes were up-and down-regulated respectively. In particular, genes encoding factors potentially involved in metabolic processes and Spn adherence to eukaryotic cells were up-regulated e.g. glnQ, glnA, aliA, psaB, lytB and nox. After Spn initial contact, 870 human genes were differentially regulated and the largest numbers of significant gene expression changes were found in canonical pathways for eukaryotic initiation factor 2 signaling (60 genes out of 171, oxidative phosphorylation (32/103, mitochondrial dysfunction (37/164, eIF4 and p70S6K signaling (28/142, mTOR signaling (27/182, NRF2-mediated oxidative stress response (20/177, epithelial adherens junction remodeling (11/66 and ubiquitination (22/254. The cellular response appeared to be directed towards host cell survival and defense. Spn did not activate NF-kB or phosphorylate p38 MAPK or induce cytokine production from PMC. Moreover, Spn infection of TNF-α pre-stimulated PMC inhibited production of IL-6 and IL-8 secretion by >50% (p<0.01. In summary, this descriptive study provides datasets and a platform for examining further the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of empyema.

  4. Alterations of Bacteroides sp., Neisseria sp., Actinomyces sp., and Streptococcus sp. populations in the oropharyngeal microbiome are associated with liver cirrhosis and pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Haifeng; Qian, Guirong; Ren, Zhigang; Zhang, Chunxia; Zhang, Hua; Xu, Wei; Ye, Ping; Yang, Yunmei; Li, Lanjuan

    2015-06-23

    The microbiomes of humans are associated with liver and lung inflammation. We identified and verified alterations of the oropharyngeal microbiome and assessed their association with cirrhosis and pneumonia. Study components were as follows: (1) determination of the temporal stability of the oropharyngeal microbiome; (2) identification of oropharyngeal microbial variation in 90 subjects; (3) quantitative identification of disease-associated bacteria. DNAs enriched in bacterial sequences were produced from low-biomass oropharyngeal swabs using whole genome amplification and were analyzed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis. Whole genome amplification combined with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis monitored successfully oropharyngeal microbial variations and showed that the composition of each subject's oropharyngeal microbiome remained relatively stable during the follow-up. The microbial composition of cirrhotic patients with pneumonia differed from those of others and clustered together in subgroup analysis. Further, species richness and the value of Shannon's diversity and evenness index increased significantly in patients with cirrhosis and pneumonia versus others (p pneumonia). Moreover, we identified variants of Bacteroides, Eubacterium, Lachnospiraceae, Neisseria, Actinomyces, and Streptococcus through phylogenetic analysis. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays revealed that the populations of Bacteroides, Neisseria, and Actinomycetes increased, while that of Streptococcus decreased in cirrhotic patients with pneumonia versus others (p pneumonia). Alterations of Bacteroides, Neisseria, Actinomyces, and Streptococcus populations in the oropharyngeal microbiome were associated with liver cirrhosis and pneumonia.

  5. Effects of deletion of the Streptococcus pneumoniae lipoprotein diacylglyceryl transferase gene lgt on ABC transporter function and on growth in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suneeta Chimalapati

    Full Text Available Lipoproteins are an important class of surface associated proteins that have diverse roles and frequently are involved in the virulence of bacterial pathogens. As prolipoproteins are attached to the cell membrane by a single enzyme, prolipoprotein diacylglyceryl transferase (Lgt, deletion of the corresponding gene potentially allows the characterisation of the overall importance of lipoproteins for specific bacterial functions. We have used a Δlgt mutant strain of Streptococcus pneumoniae to investigate the effects of loss of lipoprotein attachment on cation acquisition, growth in media containing specific carbon sources, and virulence in different infection models. Immunoblots of triton X-114 extracts, flow cytometry and immuno-fluorescence microscopy confirmed the Δlgt mutant had markedly reduced lipoprotein expression on the cell surface. The Δlgt mutant had reduced growth in cation depleted medium, increased sensitivity to oxidative stress, reduced zinc uptake, and reduced intracellular levels of several cations. Doubling time of the Δlgt mutant was also increased slightly when grown in medium with glucose, raffinose and maltotriose as sole carbon sources. These multiple defects in cation and sugar ABC transporter function for the Δlgt mutant were associated with only slightly delayed growth in complete medium. However the Δlgt mutant had significantly reduced growth in blood or bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and a marked impairment in virulence in mouse models of nasopharyngeal colonisation, sepsis and pneumonia. These data suggest that for S. pneumoniae loss of surface localisation of lipoproteins has widespread effects on ABC transporter functions that collectively prevent the Δlgt mutant from establishing invasive infection.

  6. Evaluation of serotype-specific immunity to Streptococcus pneumoniae in pregnant women and cord blood of infants: impact of race and ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Shahana A; Ladson, Gwinnett; Kabir, Madina S

    2012-01-01

    Although invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) has significantly decreased in children since the introduction of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, instances of IPD from non-PCV7 serotypes have increased. Concerns remain regarding the risk for IPD during the neonatal period. Our objective was to measure quantitative antibody levels to 16 serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae in pregnant non-Hispanic black, non-Hispanic white, and Hispanic mothers, and in cord blood samples. Antibody levels were evaluated by Luminex assay. Forty-two percent of all mothers had protective (-0.35 microg/mL) antibody levels to 16 serotypes. Hispanic mothers were most likely to possess protective antibody levels for 12 serotypes but were less likely to possess protective antibody levels for serotypes 9V, 12F, and 18C, compared to non-Hispanic white or black mothers. Thirty-three percent of cord blood samples demonstrated protective antibody levels. Hispanic infants had a higher prevalence of protective antibodies to all serotypes except 11A, 14, 18C, and 23F. Non-Hispanic black infants had a higher prevalence of protective immunity to serotypes 11A, 14, and 18C, and non-Hispanic white infants to only serotype 23F. Hispanic mothers and their infants have a higher prevalence of protective immunity to most serotypes of S pneumoniae, compared to white or black mothers/infants. We found no evidence of a lower prevalence of protective immunity to specific serotypes in non-Hispanic black vs. non-Hispanic white infants that might account for the reported higher incidence of IPDs in blacks. Environmental factors in Hispanic mothers may be responsible for their enhanced level of immunity. A significant number of cord blood samples had inadequate levels of protective immunity to a variety of S pneumoniae serotypes.

  7. Mecanismo de patogenicidad de "Streptococcus pneumoniae" asociados a enfermedad invasiva y enfermedad pulmonar obstructiva crónica

    OpenAIRE

    Aguinagalde Salazar, Leire

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae, también conocido como neumococo, es uno de los patógenos humanos más importantes responsable de infecciones severas tales como neumonía bacteriémica y meningitis, así como de enfermedades no tan graves como neumonía adquirida en la comunidad, otitis media aguda, sinusitis y conjuntivitis (Bogaert et al., 2004), que afectan principalmente a niños, personas mayores de 65 años y pacientes inmunocomprometidos (Koedel et al., 2002; van der Poll y Opal, 2009). La enfermeda...

  8. Cryptococcus neoformans and Streptococcus pneumoniae co-infection in post-traumatic meningitis in a patient with unknown HIV status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Faryal; Fasih, Naima; Zafar, Afia

    2015-10-01

    Meningitis is a serious disease associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Mixed meningeal infections due to bacteria and fungi are exceptionally rare. Here we report a case of meningeal co-infection with cryptococcus neoformans and streptococcus pneumoniae in a patient with unknown human immunodeficiency virus status. Because of the rarity of such cases, stringent screening of every cerebrospinal fluid specimen to exclude the presence of multiple pathogens is imperative. Assessment of patients for immunodeficiencies in case of isolation of an opportunistic organism like cryptococcus is also needed.

  9. Clonal relationships among penicillin-susceptible, multiresistant serotype 6B Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates recovered in Greece and France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrogiannopoulos, G A; Doit, C; Grivea, I N; Geslin, P; Bingen, E

    2001-01-01

    In January 1996 the emergence of penicillin-susceptible, multiresistant serotype 6B Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates resistant to chloramphenicol, tetracycline, erythromycin, clindamycin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was observed in young carriers in the city of Patras, located in the southwestern region of Greece. Later, a significant spread of pneumococci with this unusual phenotype was noted in carriers living in various other areas of the country. Using restriction fragment length polymorphism of the ribosomal RNA genes, clonal relationships were found between these Greek strains and serotype 6B penicillin-susceptible, multiresistant pneumococci isolated in France between January 1992 and September 1996. The French and Greek isolates appear to have a common ancestry.

  10. Identification and Characterization of Noncoding Small RNAs in Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotype 2 Strain D39 ▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Tsui, Ho-Ching Tiffany; Mukherjee, Dhriti; Ray, Valerie A.; Sham, Lok-To; Feig, Andrew L.; Winkler, Malcolm E.

    2009-01-01

    We report a search for small RNAs (sRNAs) in the low-GC, Gram-positive human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae. Based on bioinformatic analyses by Livny et al. (J. Livny, A. Brencic, S. Lory, and M. K. Waldor, Nucleic Acids Res. 34:3484-3493, 2006), we tested 40 candidates by Northern blotting and confirmed the expression of nine new and one previously reported (CcnA) sRNAs in strain D39. CcnA is one of five redundant sRNAs reported by Halfmann et al. (A. Halfmann, M. Kovacs, R. Hakenbeck, an...

  11. Synthesis and conformational analysis of a simplified inositol-model of the Streptococcus pneumoniae 19F capsular polysaccharide repeating unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catelani, Giorgio; D'Andrea, Felicia; Guazzelli, Lorenzo; Griselli, Alessio; Testi, Nicola; Chiacchio, Maria Assunta; Legnani, Laura; Toma, Lucio

    2017-04-18

    Carbohydrate mimics have been studied for a long time as useful sugar substitutes, both in the investigation of biological events and in the treatment of sugar-related diseases. Here we report further evaluation of the capabilities of inositols as carbohydrate substitutes. The conformational features of an inositol-model of a simplified repeating unit corresponding to the capsular polysaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae 19F has been evaluated by computational analysis, and compared to the native repeating unit. The inositol mimic was synthesized, and its experimental spectroscopic data allowed for verification of the theoretical results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Binding of Streptococcus pneumoniae Endopeptidase O (PepO) to Complement Component C1q Modulates the Complement Attack and Promotes Host Cell Adherence*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Vaibhav; Sroka, Magdalena; Fulde, Marcus; Bergmann, Simone; Riesbeck, Kristian; Blom, Anna M.

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-positive species Streptococcus pneumoniae is a human pathogen causing severe local and life-threatening invasive diseases associated with high mortality rates and death. We demonstrated recently that pneumococcal endopeptidase O (PepO) is a ubiquitously expressed, multifunctional plasminogen and fibronectin-binding protein facilitating host cell invasion and evasion of innate immunity. In this study, we found that PepO interacts directly with the complement C1q protein, thereby attenuating the classical complement pathway and facilitating pneumococcal complement escape. PepO binds both free C1q and C1 complex in a dose-dependent manner based on ionic interactions. Our results indicate that recombinant PepO specifically inhibits the classical pathway of complement activation in both hemolytic and complement deposition assays. This inhibition is due to direct interaction of PepO with C1q, leading to a strong activation of the classical complement pathway, and results in consumption of complement components. In addition, PepO binds the classical complement pathway inhibitor C4BP, thereby regulating downstream complement activation. Importantly, pneumococcal surface-exposed PepO-C1q interaction mediates bacterial adherence to host epithelial cells. Taken together, PepO facilitates C1q-mediated bacterial adherence, whereas its localized release consumes complement as a result of its activation following binding of C1q, thus representing an additional mechanism of human complement escape by this versatile pathogen. PMID:24739385

  13. Dominance of multidrug-resistant Denmark(14)-32 (ST230) clone among Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 19A isolates causing pneumococcal disease in Bulgaria from 1992 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setchanova, Lena Petrova; Alexandrova, Alexandra; Dacheva, Daniela; Mitov, Ivan; Kaneva, Radka; Mitev, Vanio

    2015-02-01

    A pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV10) was introduced in Bulgarian national immunization program since April 2010. Clonal composition based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing genotyping of 52 serotype 19A Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates was analyzed. These were invasive and respiratory isolates collected between 1992 and 2013 from both children (78.8% clone. The most frequent sequence type (ST) was ST230 (48.1%) and together with four other closely related STs (15.4%), belonging to ST1611, ST276, ST7466, and ST2013, which were single- and double-locus variants; they were included in the main CC230. The disappearance of highly drug-resistant ST663 clone and emergence of new clones as CC320 and CC199 was also observed among the rest 19A isolates. A comparison of clonal composition between invasive and noninvasive isolates did not show a great genetic diversity among both kinds of isolates. Continuous surveillance of serotype 19A population following the introduction of PCV10 is essential to evaluate the impact of the vaccine on the epidemiology of this serotype.

  14. Heteroduplex DNA mismatch repair system of Streptococcus pneumoniae: cloning and expression of the hexA gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balganesh, T.S.; Lacks, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    Mutations affecting heteroduplex DNA mismatch repair in Streptococcus pneumoniae were localized in two genes, hexA and hexB, by fractionation of restriction fragments carrying mutant alleles. A fragment containing the hexA4 allele was cloned in the S. pneumoniae cloning system, and the hexA + allele was introduced into the recombinant plasmid by chromosomal facilitation of plasmid transfer. Subcloning localized the functional hexA gene to a 3.5-kilobase segment of the cloned pneumococcal DNA. The product of this gene was shown in Bacillus subtilis minicells to be a polypeptide with an M/sub r/ of 86,000. Two mutant alleles of hexA showed partial expression of the repair system when present in multicopy plasmids. A model for mismatch repair, which depends on the interaction of two protein components to recognize the mismatched base pair and excise a segment of DNA between strand breaks surrounding the mismatch, is proposed

  15. Comparison of PCR-based methods for the simultaneous detection of Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae in clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Filippis, Ivano; de Andrade, Claudia Ferreira; Caldeira, Nathalia; de Azevedo, Aline Carvalho; de Almeida, Antonio Eugenio

    2016-01-01

    Several in-house PCR-based assays have been described for the detection of bacterial meningitis caused by Neisseria meningitidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Haemophilus influenzae from clinical samples. PCR-based methods targeting different bacterial genes are frequently used by different laboratories worldwide, but no standard method has ever been established. The aim of our study was to compare different in-house and a commercial PCR-based tests for the detection of bacterial pathogens causing meningitis and invasive disease in humans. A total of 110 isolates and 134 clinical samples (99 cerebrospinal fluid and 35 blood samples) collected from suspected cases of invasive disease were analyzed. Specific sets of primers frequently used for PCR-diagnosis of the three pathogens were used and compared with the results achieved using the multiplex approach described here. Several different gene targets were used for each microorganism, namely ctrA, crgA and nspA for N. meningitidis, ply for S. pneumoniae, P6 and bexA for H. influenzae. All used methods were fast, specific and sensitive, while some of the targets used for the in-house PCR assay detected lower concentrations of genomic DNA than the commercial method. An additional PCR reaction is described for the differentiation of capsulated and non-capsulated H. influenzae strains, the while commercial method only detects capsulated strains. The in-house PCR methods here compared showed to be rapid, sensitive, highly specific, and cheaper than commercial methods. The in-house PCR methods could be easily adopted by public laboratories of developing countries for diagnostic purposes. The best results were achieved using primers targeting the genes nspA, ply, and P6 which were able to detect the lowest DNA concentrations for each specific target. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. A cluster of ecthyma outbreaks caused by a single clone of invasive and highly infective Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserzug, Oshri; Valinsky, Lea; Klement, Eyal; Bar-Zeev, Yael; Davidovitch, Nadav; Orr, Nadav; Korenman, Zina; Kayouf, Raid; Sela, Tamar; Ambar, Ruhama; Derazne, Estela; Dagan, Ron; Zarka, Salman

    2009-05-01

    Ecthyma is an invasive, ulcerated skin infection. Four ecthyma outbreaks occurred in different infantry units in the Israeli Defense Force from October 2004 through February 2005. Morbidity attack rates in the first 3 outbreaks were 89% (49 of 55 soldiers), 73% (32 of 44), and 82% (37 of 45). In the fourth outbreak, in which early intervention (antimicrobial treatment and improvement of hygiene) was applied, the attack rate was 25% (10 of 40 soldiers). In the first outbreak cluster, 4 soldiers experienced poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis, and 5 cases of systemic sequelae were recorded (1 case of severe septic shock, 3 cases of pneumonia, and 1 case of septic olecranon bursitis). Streptococcus pyogenes and Staphylococcus aureus were isolated from ecthyma sores, oropharynx, and anterior nares of affected and unaffected soldiers involved in all 4 outbreaks. Although the S. aureus isolates had different genomic profiles, >90% of S. pyogenes isolates were identified as belonging to a single clone, emm type 81, T type 8. Epidemiological investigation revealed that the hygiene levels of the soldiers and their living conditions were probably the most important cause for the difference in attack rates, wound severity, and systemic sequelae found between and within the units. Our study demonstrates the possible ramifications of the combination of a virulent and highly infective S. pyogenes strain and poor living conditions, and it emphasizes the importance of early intervention in such conditions.

  17. Streptococcus sanguinis as an opportunistic bacteria in human oral cavity: Adherence, colonization, and invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hening Tjaturina Pramesti

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus sanguinis (formerly S. sanguis is a Gram-positive, facultative anaerobe,  nonmotile , normal  inhabitant of the human oral cavity, and  a member of  the viridans group of streptococci. Among the streptococcus, S. sanguinis is a  primary colonizer in the human tooth surface or it is recognize as a ‘pioneer’ by forming dental plaque. The aim of this paper is to review the role of Streptococcus sanguinis  in the adherence to and  invasion of  human tissues.  S. sanguinis  has been reported  that it is associated  with healthy  tooth  surfaces  but not with caries. S. sanguinis  tend to involved in an interspecies interactions with Streptococcus mutans, which is known as  competition/coexistence within dental biofilm.  In their colonization, this bacteria used enzyme sortase A (SrtA to cleave  LPXTG-containing proteins sequence and  anchored  the  cell wall, while virulence factors  in infective endocarditis  involved housekeeping functions such as cell wall synthesis, amino acid and nucleic acid synthesis, and the ability to survive under anaerobic conditions.

  18. Resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae to antimicrobials in São Paulo, Brazil: clinical features and serotypes Resistência antimicrobiana de Streptococcus pneumoniae em São Paulo, Brasil: quadro clínico e sorotipos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Sara S. Levin

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available To study resistance to antimicrobials, serotypes and clinical features of S. pneumoniae in S. Paulo, Brazil, 50 patients with a positive culture were evaluated: 7 were considered carriers and 43 had pneumococcal infections. Pneumonia and meningitis were the most commom infections. Mortality was 34% and underlying diseases were present in 70%. Relative resistance to penicillin occurred in 24% and complete resistance was not detected. Resistance to tetracycline was 32% and to sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim 32%; one strain had intermediate susceptibility to erythromycin; no resistance was present for chloramphenicol, rifampin or vancomycin. Resistance to at least one of the drugs tested occurred in 62%. Results by the E-test for penicillin were similar to those by the agar dilution method. There were 24 different serotypes and 74% of the strains belonged to the 23-valent vaccine including all the penicillin-resistant strains. In this study S. pneumoniae caused severe infections and presented a high resistance rate to commonly used antimicrobials. Routine surveillance of resistance and the use of vaccination, as well as the restriction of inappropriate use of antimicrobials, are recommended in São Paulo, Brazil.Com a finalidade de estudar resistência a antimicrobianos, sorotipos e quadro clínico de Streptococcus pneumoniae em São Paulo, Brasil, foram avaliados 50 pacientes com culturas positivas: 7 foram considerados portadores e 43 infectados. Pneumonia e meningite foram as infecções mais freqüentes. A letalidade foi de 34% e doenças de base estiveram presentes em 70%. Resistência relativa a penicilina ocorreu em 24% e a resistência completa não foi detectada. Resistência a tetraciclina ocorreu em 32% e a sulfametoxazol/trimetoprim em 32% e houve uma cepa com sensibilidade intermediária a eritromicina. Não houve resistência a cloranfenicol, rifampicina ou vancomicina. Em 62% dos casos houve resistência a pelo menos uma das drogas

  19. Importance of Bacterial Replication and Alveolar Macrophage-Independent Clearance Mechanisms during Early Lung Infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camberlein, Emilie; Cohen, Jonathan M.; José, Ricardo; Hyams, Catherine J.; Callard, Robin; Chimalapati, Suneeta; Yuste, Jose; Edwards, Lindsey A.; Marshall, Helina; van Rooijen, Nico; Noursadeghi, Mahdad

    2015-01-01

    Although the importance of alveolar macrophages for host immunity during early Streptococcus pneumoniae lung infection is well established, the contribution and relative importance of other innate immunity mechanisms and of bacterial factors are less clear. We have used a murine model of S. pneumoniae early lung infection with wild-type, unencapsulated, and para-amino benzoic acid auxotroph mutant TIGR4 strains to assess the effects of inoculum size, bacterial replication, capsule, and alveolar macrophage-dependent and -independent clearance mechanisms on bacterial persistence within the lungs. Alveolar macrophage-dependent and -independent (calculated indirectly) clearance half-lives and bacterial replication doubling times were estimated using a mathematical model. In this model, after infection with a high-dose inoculum of encapsulated S. pneumoniae, alveolar macrophage-independent clearance mechanisms were dominant, with a clearance half-life of 24 min compared to 135 min for alveolar macrophage-dependent clearance. In addition, after a high-dose inoculum, successful lung infection required rapid bacterial replication, with an estimated S. pneumoniae doubling time of 16 min. The capsule had wide effects on early lung clearance mechanisms, with reduced half-lives of 14 min for alveolar macrophage-independent and 31 min for alveolar macrophage-dependent clearance of unencapsulated bacteria. In contrast, with a lower-dose inoculum, the bacterial doubling time increased to 56 min and the S. pneumoniae alveolar macrophage-dependent clearance half-life improved to 42 min and was largely unaffected by the capsule. These data demonstrate the large effects of bacterial factors (inoculum size, the capsule, and rapid replication) and alveolar macrophage-independent clearance mechanisms during early lung infection with S. pneumoniae. PMID:25583525

  20. rpoA is a useful gene for identification and classification of Streptococcus pneumoniae from the closely related viridans group streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hee Kuk; Yoon, Jang Won; Shin, Jong Wook; Kim, Jae Yeol; Kim, Wonyong

    2010-04-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae, the leading etiological agent of pneumonia, shares a high degree of DNA sequence homology with the viridans group of streptococci. The clinical and pathological manifestations may present with different features, and discrimination between S. pneumoniae and its close viridans cocci relatives, such as Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus oralis, is still quite difficult. The 445-bp sequences of the N-terminal region of rpoA from nine S. pneumoniae, seven S. mitis, ten S. oralis, and two related strains were determined and compared with their respective 16S rRNA gene sequences to establish their usefulness in phylogenetic analysis. Pairwise comparisons of rpoA sequences among the species showed higher rates of evolution with lower similarities (92.3-100%) than those of 16S rRNA genes (96.8-100%). The rpoA-based phylogeny generated deeper branches and presented improved discriminatory resolution than the 16S rRNA gene-based phylogeny. These results show that rpoA sequences represent a consistent, but more discriminating, genomic marker than 16S rRNA gene sequences for investigating the evolutionary relationships of Streptococcus at the species level. rpoA could be a useful marker for identifying and classifying S. pneumoniae, S. mitis, and S. oralis from closely related taxa.

  1. Two unusual cases of successful treatment of hypermucoviscous Klebsiella pneumoniae invasive syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namikawa, Hiroki; Yamada, Koichi; Fujimoto, Hiroki; Oinuma, Ken-Ichi; Tochino, Yoshihiro; Takemoto, Yasuhiko; Kaneko, Yukihiro; Shuto, Taichi; Kakeya, Hiroshi

    2016-11-16

    A few Japanese cases of hypermucoviscous Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) invasive syndrome have recently been reported. Although extrahepatic complications from bacteremic dissemination have been observed, infected aneurysms are rare. Furthermore, the primary source of infection is generally a liver abscess, and is rarely the prostate. Therefore, we report two atypical cases of hypermucoviscous K. pneumoniae invasive syndrome. The first case was an 81-year-old Japanese man with no significant medical history, who was referred to our hospital for vision loss in his right eye. Contrast-enhanced whole-body computed tomography revealed abscesses in the liver and the prostate, and an infected left internal iliac artery aneurysm. Contrast-enhanced head magnetic resonance imaging revealed brain abscesses. Cultures of the liver abscess specimen and aqueous humor revealed K. pneumoniae with the hypermucoviscosity phenotype, which carried the magA gene (mucoviscosity-associated gene A) and the rmpA gene (regulator of mucoid phenotype A). We performed enucleation of the right eyeball, percutaneous transhepatic drainage, coil embolization of the aneurysm, and administered a 6-week course of antibiotic treatment. The second case was a 69-year-old Japanese man with diabetes mellitus, who was referred to our hospital with fever, pollakiuria, and pain on urination. Contrast-enhanced whole-body computed tomography revealed lung and prostate abscesses, but no liver abscesses. Contrast-enhanced head magnetic resonance imaging revealed brain abscesses. The sputum, urine, prostate abscess specimen, and aqueous humor cultures revealed K. pneumoniae with the hypermucoviscosity phenotype, which carried magA and rmpA. We performed enucleation of the left eyeball, percutaneous drainage of the prostate abscess, and administered a 5-week course of antibiotic treatment. Hypermucoviscous K. pneumoniae can cause infected aneurysms, and the prostate can be the primary site of infection. We

  2. Streptococcus pneumoniae-Induced Oxidative Stress in Lung Epithelial Cells Depends on Pneumococcal Autolysis and Is Reversible by Resveratrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahlten, Janine; Kim, Ye-Ji; Doehn, Jan-Moritz; Pribyl, Thomas; Hocke, Andreas C; García, Pedro; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Suttorp, Norbert; Hippenstiel, Stefan; Hübner, Ralf-Harto

    2015-06-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most common cause of community-acquired pneumonia worldwide. During pneumococcal pneumonia, the human airway epithelium is exposed to large amounts of H2O2 as a product of host and pathogen oxidative metabolism. Airway cells are known to be highly vulnerable to oxidant damage, but the pathophysiology of oxidative stress induced by S. pneumoniae and the role of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-mediated antioxidant systems of the host are not well characterized. For gluthation/gluthathion disulfide analysis BEAS-2B cells, primary broncho-epithelial cells (pBEC), explanted human lung tissue and mouse lungs were infected with different S. pneumoniae strains (D39, A66, R6x, H2O2/pneumolysin/LytA- deficient mutants of R6x). Cell death was proven by LDH assay and cell viability by IL-8 ELISA. The translocation of Nrf2 and the expression of catalase were shown via Western blot. The binding of Nrf2 at the catalase promoter was analyzed by ChIP. We observed a significant induction of oxidative stress induced by S. pneumoniae in vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro. Upon stimulation, the oxidant-responsive transcription factor Nrf2 was activated, and catalase was upregulated via Nrf2. The pneumococci-induced oxidative stress was independent of S. pneumoniae-derived H2O2 and pneumolysin but depended on the pneumococcal autolysin LytA. The Nrf2 inducer resveratrol, as opposed to catalase, reversed oxidative stress in lung epithelial cells. These observations indicate a H2O2-independent induction of oxidative stress in lung epithelial cells via the release of bacterial factors of S. pneumoniae. Resveratrol might be an option for prevention of acute lung injury and inflammatory responses observed in pneumococcal pneumonia. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Characterization of Th17 responses to Streptococcus pneumoniae in humans: comparisons between adults and children in a developed and a developing country

    OpenAIRE

    Lundgren, A.; Bhuiyan, T.; Novak, D.; Kaim, J.; Reske, A.; Lu, Y. J.; Qadri, F.; Malley, R.

    2012-01-01

    Intranasal exposure to Streptococcus pneumoniae as well as mucosal or parenteral immunization with a recently developed killed pneumococcal whole cell vaccine, confer Th17-mediated protection against subsequent S. pneumoniae colonization in mice. Given our interest in the function of Th17 cells and the ongoing efforts to develop this vaccine for use in infants and children in developing countries, we analyzed Th17 responses to the whole cell antigen (WCA) and individual pneumococcal antigens ...

  4. Novel plasmid-based genetic tools for the study of promoters and terminators in Streptococcus pneumoniae and Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Cruz, Sofía; Solano-Collado, Virtu; Espinosa, Manuel; Bravo, Alicia

    2010-11-01

    Promoter-probe and terminator-probe plasmid vectors make possible to rapidly examine whether particular sequences function as promoter or terminator signals in various genetic backgrounds and under diverse environmental stimuli. At present, such plasmid-based genetic tools are very scarce in the Gram-positive pathogenic bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae and Enterococcus faecalis. Hence, we developed novel promoter-probe and terminator-probe vectors based on the Streptococcus agalactiae pMV158 plasmid, which replicates autonomously in numerous Gram-positive bacteria. As reporter gene, a gfp allele encoding a variant of the green fluorescent protein was used. These genetic tools were shown to be suitable to assess the activity of promoters and terminators (both homologous and heterologous) in S. pneumoniae and E. faecalis. In addition, the promoter-probe vector was shown to be a valuable tool for the analysis of regulated promoters in vivo, such as the promoter of the pneumococcal fuculose kinase gene. These new plasmid vectors will be very useful for the experimental verification of predicted promoter and terminator sequences, as well as for the construction of new inducible-expression vectors. Given the promiscuity exhibited by the pMV158 replicon, these vectors could be used in a variety of Gram-positive bacteria. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A novel computational method identifies intra- and inter-species recombination events in Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Sanguinetti

    Full Text Available Advances in high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies have determined an explosion in the number of sequenced bacterial genomes. Comparative sequence analysis frequently reveals evidences of homologous recombination occurring with different mechanisms and rates in different species, but the large-scale use of computational methods to identify recombination events is hampered by their high computational costs. Here, we propose a new method to identify recombination events in large datasets of whole genome sequences. Using a filtering procedure of the gene conservation profiles of a test genome against a panel of strains, this algorithm identifies sets of contiguous genes acquired by homologous recombination. The locations of the recombination breakpoints are determined using a statistical test that is able to account for the differences in the natural rate of evolution between different genes. The algorithm was tested on a dataset of 75 genomes of Staphylococcus aureus and 50 genomes comprising different streptococcal species, and was able to detect intra-species recombination events in S. aureus and in Streptococcus pneumoniae. Furthermore, we found evidences of an inter-species exchange of genetic material between S. pneumoniae and Streptococcus mitis, a closely related commensal species that colonizes the same ecological niche. The method has been implemented in an R package, Reco, which is freely available from supplementary material, and provides a rapid screening tool to investigate recombination on a genome-wide scale from sequence data.

  6. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Liping; Feng, Lingling; Zhou, Li; Gui, Jie; Wan, Jian; Hu, Xiaopeng

    2010-01-01

    3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase of Streptococcus pneumoniae has been cloned, overexpressed and purified to homogeneity using Ni–NTA affinity chromatography. Crystals were obtained using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Class II 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductases are potential targets for novel antibiotic development. In order to obtain a precise structural model for use in virtual screening and inhibitor design, HMG-CoA reductase of Streptococcus pneumoniae was cloned, overexpressed and purified to homogeneity using Ni–NTA affinity chromatography. Crystals were obtained using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. A complete data set was collected from a single frozen crystal on a home X-ray source. The crystal diffracted to 2.3 Å resolution and belonged to the orthorhombic space group C222 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 773.4836, b = 90.3055, c = 160.5592 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. Assuming the presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit, the solvent content was estimated to be 54.1% (V M = 2.68 Å 3 Da −1 )

  7. Activity of ceftobiprole against Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates exhibiting high-level resistance to ceftriaxone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Todd A; Flamm, Robert K; Lynch, A Simon

    2012-06-01

    Tracking Resistance in the US Today (TRUST) 2008 surveillance data showed that 6% of Streptococcus pneumoniae were non-susceptible to ceftriaxone [minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ≥ 2 μg/mL] and that 8% of the ceftriaxone-non-susceptible isolates exhibited high-level resistance (MIC ≥ 8 μg/mL). Here we describe the activity of ceftobiprole against ceftriaxone-resistant isolates and characterise the genotypic traits associated with resistance. Thirty isolates with ceftriaxone MICs ≥ 8 μg/mL were analysed by sequencing of penicillin-binding protein (PBP) and murM genes. Sequencing of pbp1a, pbp2b and pbp2x showed nine PBP patterns, with the most common (n=17) being: PBP1a T371S (STMK motif), P432T (SRNVP motif); PBP2b T446A (SSNT motif), A619G (KTGTA motif); and PBP2x T338A and M339F (STMK motif), L364F, I371T, R384G, M400T, L546V (LKSGT motif); six isolates had the same pattern without the PBP2b A619G change. For these 23 isolates, MICs were 8 μg/mL for ceftriaxone, 4-8 μg/mL for penicillin and 0.5-2 μg/mL for ceftobiprole. The remaining seven isolates with higher MICs (ceftriaxone 8-32 μg/mL, penicillin 4-32 μg/mL and ceftobiprole 2-4 μg/mL) had fewer PBP active-site motif substitutions. The majority of isolates (17/30) had murM alleles similar to the wild-type, whilst the rest had alleles reflecting a mosaic structure. No murM alleles were associated with higher MICs. Against these 30 isolates, ceftobiprole was 4-16-fold more active than ceftriaxone. Widely described PBP and MurM substitutions probably account for the high ceftriaxone MICs (8 μg/mL) in the majority of isolates. However, seven isolates with ceftriaxone MICs of 8-32 μg/mL had fewer PBP substitutions in active-site motifs, suggesting either that there is another resistance mechanism or that unique PBP mutations may contribute to high-level β-lactam resistance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  8. Susceptibilidad antimicrobiana de Streptococcus pneumoniae colonizante de nasofaringe en niños colombianos con neumonía

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aura Lucía Leal

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae es uno de los principales agentes causales de infección respiratoria aguda (IRA en niños y su resistencia a antibióticos se ha incrementado en todo el mundo. En este estudio se determinaron los patrones de susceptibilidad a antimicrobianos de S. pneumoniae colonizante de las vías respiratorias altas en 272 niños hospitalizados por neumonía en dos hospitales de Santafé de Bogotá. Se aisló S. pneumoniae en 114 pacientes (42%. Se observó susceptibilidad disminuida a la penicilina en 19 aislamientos (17%, con sensibilidad intermedia en 12 (11% y franca resistencia en 7 (6%. Solo 1 de los 19 aislamientos resistentes a penicilina mostró también resistencia a la ceftriaxona. Se observó sensibilidad disminuida a la eritromicina en 3 aislamientos (3%, al cloranfenicol en 6 (5% y al cotrimoxazol (trimetoprima + sulfametoxazol en 46 (40%. Se encontró multirresistencia en 7 aislamientos (6%. El serotipo con sensibilidad disminuida a la penicilina que se halló con mayor frecuencia fue el 23F (68,4%. Se observó una asociación entre la edad, el uso previo de antibióticos y la colonización con S. pneumoniae con susceptibilidad disminuida a la penicilina o multirresistencia. Este estudio confirma la presencia de resistencia antimicrobiana de S. pneumoniae en Colombia y resalta la importancia del uso racional de los antibióticos y de la implementación de la vigilancia epidemiológica sobre este agente.

  9. Mechanism for transfer of transposon Tn2010 carrying macrolide resistance genes in Streptococcus pneumoniae and its effects on genome evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenqing; Yao, Kaihu; Zhang, Gang; Yang, Yonghong; Li, Yun; Lv, Yuan; Feng, Jie

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the mechanism responsible for the horizontal transfer of transposon Tn2010 in Streptococcus pneumoniae, and the genomic alterations introduced by the transfer process. Tn2010 was identified using PCR in 15 clinical isolates of S. pneumoniae with erythromycin resistance. S. pneumoniae and Enterococcus faecalis isolates were used as recipient cells in mating and transformation experiments to test the conjugative transferability and transformability of Tn2010. Whole-genome sequencing was used to assess the effects of the Tn2010 transfer on recipient genomes. The biological cost of the horizontal acquisition of Tn2010 and additional genomic changes was investigated by growth competition experiments. Tn2010 was transformed at a frequency of 3 × 10(-7) transformants per cfu, whereas no transconjugants were detected using S. pneumoniae or E. faecalis as recipient cells. Genome analysis showed that many other recombinations were scattered throughout the genome of the transformants in addition to transposon Tn2010. The transformants demonstrated a negligible fitness cost compared with the wild-type strain. Tn2010 tended to be transferred by transformation rather than conjugation in S. pneumoniae, and the spread of Tn2010 could have a profound effect on the evolution of the genome. The acquisition of Tn2010 with negligible fitness cost may facilitate spread of the transposon. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Nebulized C1-Esterase Inhibitor does not Reduce Pulmonary Complement Activation in Rats with Severe Streptococcus Pneumoniae Pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Beer, Friso; Lagrand, Wim; Glas, Gerie J.; Beurskens, Charlotte J. P.; van Mierlo, Gerard; Wouters, Diana; Zeerleder, Sacha; Roelofs, Joris J. T. H.; Juffermans, Nicole P.; Horn, Janneke; Schultz, Marcus J.

    2016-01-01

    Complement activation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of pneumonia. We hypothesized that inhibition of the complement system in the lungs by repeated treatment with nebulized plasma-derived human C1-esterase inhibitor reduces pulmonary complement activation and subsequently attenuates

  11. Activity of Tedizolid Phosphate (TR-701) in Murine Models of Infection with Penicillin-Resistant and Penicillin-Sensitive Streptococcus pneumoniae

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Sunghak; Im, Weonbin; Bartizal, Ken

    2012-01-01

    The in vitro activity of tedizolid (previously known as torezolid, TR-700) against penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (PRSP) clinical isolates and the in vivo efficacy of tedizolid phosphate (torezolid phosphate, TR-701) in murine models of PRSP systemic infection and penicillin-susceptible S. pneumoniae (PSSP) pneumonia were examined using linezolid as a comparator. The MIC90 against 28 PRSP isolates was 0.25 μg/ml for tedizolid, whereas it was 1 μg/ml for linezolid. In mice infec...

  12. Nasopharyngeal carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae and other bacteria in the 7th year after implementation of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, Astrid A T M; van Houten, Marlies A.; Bruin, Jacob P.; Wijmenga-Monsuur, Alienke J.; Trzciński, Krzysztof; Bogaert, Debby; Rots, Nynke Y.; Sanders, Elisabeth A M

    2016-01-01

    After introduction of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) in the infant national immunization program (NIP) in the Netherlands in 2006, Streptococcus pneumoniae strains of the non-vaccine serotype 19A emerged and became the dominant serotype in carriage in children and their parents.

  13. PENICILLIN-BINDING PROTEIN 2X OF STREPTOCOCCUS-PNEUMONIAE - EXPRESSION IN ESCHERICHIA-COLI AND PURIFICATION OF A SOLUBLE ENZYMATICALLY ACTIVE DERIVATIVE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LAIBLE, G; KECK, W; LURZ, R; MOTTL, H; FRERE, JM; JAMIN, M; HAKENBECK, R

    1992-01-01

    A 2.5-kb DNA fragment including the structural gene coding for the penicillin-binding protein 2x (PBP 2x) of Streptococcus pneumoniae has been cloned into the vector pJDC9 and expressed in Escherichia coli. Mapping of RNA polymerase binding sites by electron microscopy indicated that the pbpX

  14. Ascorbic acid-dependent gene expression in Streptococcus pneumoniae and the activator function of the transcriptional regulator UlaR2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Afzal, Muhammad; Shafeeq, Sulman; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we have explored the impact of ascorbic acid on the transcriptome of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39. The expression of several genes and operons, including the ula operon (which has been previously shown to be involved in ascorbic acid utilization), the AdcR regulon (which has been

  15. Rapid Screening of Topoisomerase Gene Mutations by a Novel Melting Curve Analysis Method for Early Warning of Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae Emergence▿

    OpenAIRE

    Fukushima, Kazuko Y.; Hirakata, Yoichi; Sugahara, Kazuyuki; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Kondo, Akira; Kohno, Shigeru; Kamihira, Shimeru

    2006-01-01

    We developed a real-time PCR assay combined with melting curve analysis for rapidly genotyping quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDR) of topoisomerase genes in Streptococcus pneumoniae. This assay was not only accurate for the screening of fluoroquinolone (FQ) resistance but also relevant as an early warning system for detecting preexisting single QRDR mutations.

  16. The alpha-tocopherol form of vitamin E reverses age-associated susceptibility to Streptococcus pneumoniae lung infection by modulating pulmonary neutrophil recruitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streptococcus pneumonia infections are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in older patients. Uncontrolled neutrophil-driven pulmonary inflammation exacerbates this disease. To test whether the alpha-tocopherol (alpha-Toc) form of vitamin E, a regulator of immunity, can modulate neutrophil...

  17. Isolation and structural studies of phosphate-containing oligosaccharides from alkaline and acid hydrolysates of Streptococcus pneumoniae type 6B capsular polysaccharide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Dam, J.E.G. van; Breg, J.N.; Komen, R.; Kamerling, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    The capsular polysaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 6B [->2)-α-D-Galp-(1->3)-α-D-Glcp-(1->3)-α-L-Rhap-(1->4)-D-RibOH-(5-P->n was depolymerised under alkaline (NaOH) and acidic (HF) conditions. The former treatment yielded, as the major component,

  18. Antimicrobial Activities and Postantibiotic Effects of Clarithromycin, 14-Hydroxy-Clarithromycin, and Azithromycin in Epithelial Cell Lining Fluid against Clinical Isolates of Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae

    OpenAIRE

    Bergman, Kimberly L.; Olsen, Keith M.; Peddicord, Tom E.; Fey, Paul D.; Rupp, Mark E.

    1999-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of concentrations of selected macrolides found in epithelial cell lining fluid was investigated. Clarithromycin demonstrated greater potency and a significantly longer postantibiotic effect (PAE) than azithromycin against Streptococcus pneumoniae. Azithromycin displayed greater potency, faster killing, and a longer PAE than clarithromycin against Haemophilus influenzae. Drug concentrations in epithelial cell lining fluid similar to those found in tissue did not impr...

  19. Evolution of an international external quality assurance model to support laboratory investigation of Streptococcus pneumoniae, developed for the SIREVA project in Latin America, from 1993 to 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovgren, Marguerite; Talbot, James A; Brandileone, Maria Cristina; Casagrande, Silvana T; Agudelo, Clara Inés; Castañeda, Elizabeth; Regueira, Mabel; Corso, Alejandra; Heitmann, Ingrid; Maldonado, Aurora; Echániz-Avilés, Gabriela; Soto-Noguerón, Araceli; Hortal, María; Camou, Teresa; Gabastou, Jean-Marc; Di Fabio, José Luis

    2007-10-01

    In 1993 the Pan American Health Organization initiated a laboratory-based surveillance system, called the SIREVA project, to learn about Streptococcus pneumoniae invasive disease in Latin American children. In 1994, National Laboratories in six countries were trained to perform serotyping and antibiotic susceptibility testing using broth microdilution to determine the MIC for specified antibiotics. An international External Quality Assurance (EQA) program was developed to monitor and support ongoing laboratory performance. The EQA program was coordinated by the National Centre for Streptococcus (NCS), Edmonton, Canada, and included external proficiency testing (EPT) and a validation process requiring regular submission of a sample of isolates from each laboratory to the NCS for verification of the serotype and MIC. In 1999, the EQA program was decentralized to use three of the original laboratories as regional quality control centers to address operational concerns and to accommodate the growth of the laboratory network to more than 20 countries including the Caribbean region. The overall EPT serotyping accuracies for phase I (1993 to 1998) and phase II (1999 to 2005) were 88.0 and 93.8%, respectively; the MIC correlations within +/-1 log(2) dilution of the expected result were 83.0 and 91.0% and the interpretive category agreements were 89.1 and 95.3%. Overall, the validation process serotyping accuracies for phases I and II were 81.9 and 88.1%, respectively, 80.4 and 90.5% for MIC agreement, and 85.8 and 94.3% for category agreement. These results indicate a high level of testing accuracy in participating National Laboratories and a sustained increase in EQA participation in Latin America and the Caribbean.

  20. Characteristics and Outcome of Streptococcus pneumoniae Endocarditis in the XXI Century: A Systematic Review of 111 Cases (2000-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Egea, Viviana; Muñoz, Patricia; Valerio, Maricela; de Alarcón, Arístides; Lepe, José Antonio; Miró, José M; Gálvez-Acebal, Juan; García-Pavía, Pablo; Navas, Enrique; Goenaga, Miguel Angel; Fariñas, María Carmen; Vázquez, Elisa García; Marín, Mercedes; Bouza, Emilio

    2015-09-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is an infrequent cause of severe infectious endocarditis (IE). The aim of our study was to describe the epidemiology, clinical and microbiological characteristics, and outcome of a series of cases of S. pneumoniae IE diagnosed in Spain and in a series of cases published since 2000 in the medical literature. We prospectively collected all cases of IE diagnosed in a multicenter cohort of patients from 27 Spanish hospitals (n = 2539). We also performed a systematic review of the literature since 2000 and retrieved all cases with complete clinical data using a pre-established protocol. Predictors of mortality were identified using a logistic regression model. We collected 111 cases of pneumococcal IE: 24 patients from the Spanish cohort and 87 cases from the literature review. Median age was 51 years, and 23 patients (20.7%) were under 15 years. Men accounted for 64% of patients, and infection was community-acquired in 96.4% of cases. The most important underlying conditions were liver disease (27.9%) and immunosuppression (10.8%). A predisposing heart condition was present in only 18 patients (16.2%). Pneumococcal IE affected a native valve in 93.7% of patients. Left-sided endocarditis predominated (aortic valve 53.2% and mitral valve 40.5%). The microbiological diagnosis was obtained from blood cultures in 84.7% of cases. In the Spanish cohort, nonsusceptibility to penicillin was detected in 4.2%. The most common clinical manifestations included fever (71.2%), a new heart murmur (55%), pneumonia (45.9%), meningitis (40.5%), and Austrian syndrome (26.1%). Cardiac surgery was performed in 47.7% of patients. The in-hospital mortality rate was 20.7%. The multivariate analysis revealed the independent risk factors for mortality to be meningitis (OR, 4.3; 95% CI, 1.4-12.9; P < 0.01). Valve surgery was protective (OR, 0.1; 95% CI, 0.04-0.4; P < 0.01). Streptococcus pneumoniae IE is a community-acquired disease that mainly affects native aortic

  1. Serotipos prevalentes de Streptococcus pneumoniae colonizadores de nasofaringe, en niños del Distrito Federal Prevalence of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes on nasopharyngeal colonization in children of Mexico City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fortino Solórzano-Santos

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar frecuencia, serotipos y susceptibilidad a ocho antimicrobianos en Streptococcus pneumoniae aislados de la nasofaringe de una muestra representativa de niños menores de cinco años de edad residentes en el Distrito Federal. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Estudio transversal, hecho de febrero de 2002 a enero de 2003. Se incluyeron niños de 2 meses a 5 años. A los seleccionados se les tomó una muestra de exudado faríngeo con hisopo de alginato de calcio. Bajo técnicas ya establecidas se realizó identificación, tipificación y susceptibilidad a ocho antimicrobianos de los aislamientos de S. pneumoniae. Se utilizó estadística descriptiva, prueba de Ji cuadrada y razón de momios (IC 95% para los factores de riesgo. RESULTADOS: Se estudiaron 573 niños. En 122/573 (21.4% niños se aisló S. pneumoniae. Los serotipos más frecuentes fueron el 23F, 35, 19F, 11A y 15A; 46% de los serotipos encontrados no son cubiertos con la vacuna heptavalente. Se encontró 12% de susceptibilidad reducida a la penicilina, con 3% de cepas con alta resistencia; la resistencia a eritromicina fue >30% y para trimetoprim-sulfametoxazol (TMP/SMX >40%. No hubo cepas resistentes a vancomicina, cefotaxima, amoxicilina-clavulanato, cloranfenicol o ampicilina. CONCLUSIONES: El porcentaje de serotipos de S. pneumoniae en portadores nasofaríngeos no cubiertos por la vacuna heptavalente es alto, y la resistencia a macrólidos y TMP/SMX es elevada, lo que debe alertar al grupo médico.OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency, serotypes and susceptibility profiles to eight antimicrobials in Streptococcus pneumoniae nasopharyngeal isolates from a representative sample of children under 5 years of age, residents of Mexico City. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 573 children aged 2 months to 5 years. A nasopharyngeal sample was taken. S. pneumoniae identification, capsular serotyping and antimicrobial susceptibility to eight antimicrobials

  2. Meningitis caused by Neisseria Meningitidis, Hemophilus Influenzae Type B and Streptococcus Pneumoniae during 2005–2012 in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyhan, Mehmet; Gürler, Nezahat; Ozsurekci, Yasemin; Keser, Melike; Aycan, Ahmet Emre; Gurbuz, Venhar; Salman, Nuran; Camcioglu, Yildiz; Dinleyici, Ener Cagri; Ozkan, Sengul; Sensoy, Gulnar; Belet, Nursen; Alhan, Emre; Hacimustafaoglu, Mustafa; Celebi, Solmaz; Uzun, Hakan; Faik Oner, Ahmet; Kurugol, Zafer; Ali Tas, Mehmet; Aygun, Denizmen; Oncel, Eda Karadag; Celik, Melda; Yasa, Olcay; Akin, Fatih; Coşkun, Yavuz

    2014-01-01

    Successful vaccination policies for protection from bacterial meningitis are dependent on determination of the etiology of bacterial meningitis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were obtained prospectively from children from 1 month to ≤ 18 years of age hospitalized with suspected meningitis, in order to determine the etiology of meningitis in Turkey. DNA evidence of Neisseria meningitidis (N. meningitidis), Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae), and Hemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) was detected using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In total, 1452 CSF samples were evaluated and bacterial etiology was determined in 645 (44.4%) cases between 2005 and 2012; N. meningitidis was detected in 333 (51.6%), S. pneumoniae in 195 (30.2%), and Hib in 117 (18.1%) of the PCR positive samples. Of the 333 N. meningitidis positive samples 127 (38.1%) were identified as serogroup W-135, 87 (26.1%) serogroup B, 28 (8.4%) serogroup A and 3 (0.9%) serogroup Y; 88 (26.4%) were non-groupable. As vaccines against the most frequent bacterial isolates in this study are available and licensed, these results highlight the need for broad based protection against meningococcal disease in Turkey. PMID:25483487

  3. Serotype distribution and antibiotic susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae strains in the south of Tunisia: A five-year study (2012–2016 of pediatric and adult populations

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    Sonia Ktari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To analyze the serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae clinical isolates collected in the south of Tunisia over a 5-year period in different age groups and to assess their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. Methods: A total of 305 non-duplicate S. pneumoniae isolates were collected between January 2012 and December 2016 at the university hospital in Sfax, Tunisia. All isolates were serotyped by multiplex PCR. The antibiotic susceptibility of all isolates was determined using the disk diffusion test or Etest assay. Results: Among the 305 pneumococcal isolates, 76 (24.9% were invasive and 229 (75.1% were non-invasive. The most common serotypes were 19F (20%, 14 (16.7%, 3 (9.2%, 23F (7.5%, 19A (5.9%, and 6B (5.9%. Potential immunization coverage rates for pneumococcal conjugate vaccines PCV7, PCV10, and PCV13 were 58%, 59.3%, and 78.7%, respectively. Three-quarters (75.3% of pneumococcal isolates were non-susceptible to penicillin. The resistance rate to erythromycin was 71.4%. Only two isolates were resistant to levofloxacin. Conclusions: 19F and 14 were the most prevalent serotypes in the south of Tunisia. The inclusion of a PCV in the immunization program could be useful for reducing the burden of pneumococcal diseases. The high resistance rate to penicillin and macrolides is alarming. Prudent use of antibiotics is crucial to prevent the selection of multidrug-resistant pneumococci. Keywords: Streptococcus pneumoniae, Antibiotic, Serotype, PCV, Tunisia

  4. Características clínico-microbiológicas de la meningitis por Streptococcus pneumoniae resistente a la penicilina Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis resistant to penicillin clinical and microbiological characteristics

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    Demóstenes Gómez-Barreto

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Evaluar la susceptibilidad antimicrobiana de Streptococcus pneumoniae aislado del líquido cefalorraquídeo de niños con meningitis, así como describir y comparar las características clínicas y microbiológicas, el tratamiento y la evolución del padecimiento entre niños infectados con cepas sensibles y resistentes a la penicilina y la cefalosporina. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Treinta y ocho niños con meningitis neumocócica fueron incluidos prospectivamente en el Programa Institucional de Vigilancia de las Infecciones Neumocócicas, durante el lapso 1994-1998. Los datos clínicos y de laboratorio se colectaron de cada expediente. RESULTADOS: Del total de niños, 63% era menor de dos años de edad, 28.9% mostró cepas insensibles a la penicilina, 18.4% tenía resistencia intermedia, y 10.5% tenía resistencia elevada. El 2.6% mostró también resistencia a la cefotaxima. La única característica (por la prueba exacta de Fisher asociada con la resistencia fue: enfermedad de base previa al proceso (pOBJECTIVE: To evaluate the susceptibility to antibiotics of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from cerebrospinal fluid of children with meningitis. To describe and compare the clinical and microbiological characteristics, treatment and outcome among children infected with strains either susceptible or resistant to penicillin and cephalosporin. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 38 children with pneumococcal meningitis were prospectively enrolled in the Institutional Surveillance Program for Pneumococcal Infections during 1994-1998. Clinical and laboratory data were collected by chart review. RESULTS: Of the 38 children, 24 (63% were less than 2 years of age, 11 (28.9% had drug-resistant S. pneumoniae, 18.4% had intermediate resistance, 10.5% high level resistance and 2.6% also showed high level resistance to cefotaxime. The only associated factors (by Fisher’s exact test associated to resistance were: previous use of antibiotics (p=0

  5. Transcriptional response of Streptococcus pneumoniae to varying concentrations of carbohydrates and metal ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manzoor, Irfan

    2015-01-01

    S. pneumoniae is one of the most common human pathogen that resides in nasopharynx. It is responsible for millions of death every year all over the world, especially in young children. S. pneumoniae can spread from nasopharynx to different parts of the human body where it may encounter different

  6. Capsular Polysaccharide Expression in Commensal Streptococcus Species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov Sørensen, Uffe B; Yao, Kaihu; Yang, Yonghong

    2016-01-01

    Expression of a capsular polysaccharide is considered a hallmark of most invasive species of bacteria, including Streptococcus pneumoniae, in which the capsule is among the principal virulence factors and is the basis for successful vaccines. Consequently, it was previously assumed that capsule....... pneumoniae evolved by import of cps fragments from commensal Streptococcus species, resulting in a mosaic of genes of different origins. The demonstrated antigenic identity of at least eight of the numerous capsular polysaccharide structures expressed by commensal streptococci with recognized serotypes of S...... of Streptococcus pneumoniae and is the basis for successful vaccines against infections caused by this important pathogen. Contrasting with previous assumptions, this study showed that expression of capsular polysaccharides by the same genetic mechanisms is a general property of closely related species...

  7. Group A Streptococcus tissue invasion by CD44-mediated cell signalling

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    Cywes, Colette; Wessels, Michael R.

    2001-12-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (also known as group A Streptococcus, GAS), the agent of streptococcal sore throat and invasive soft-tissue infections, attaches to human pharyngeal or skin epithelial cells through specific recognition of its hyaluronic acid capsular polysaccharide by the hyaluronic-acid-binding protein CD44 (refs 1, 2). Because ligation of CD44 by hyaluronic acid can induce epithelial cell movement on extracellular matrix, we investigated whether molecular mimicry by the GAS hyaluronic acid capsule might induce similar cellular responses. Here we show that CD44-dependent GAS binding to polarized monolayers of human keratinocytes induced marked cytoskeletal rearrangements manifested by membrane ruffling and disruption of intercellular junctions. Transduction of the signal induced by GAS binding to CD44 on the keratinocyte surface involved Rac1 and the cytoskeleton linker protein ezrin, as well as tyrosine phosphorylation of cellular proteins. Studies of bacterial translocation in two models of human skin indicated that cell signalling triggered by interaction of the GAS capsule with CD44 opened intercellular junctions and promoted tissue penetration by GAS through a paracellular route. These results support a model of host cytoskeleton manipulation and tissue invasion by an extracellular bacterial pathogen.

  8. Respiratory Commensal Bacteria Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum Improves Resistance of Infant Mice to Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Streptococcus pneumoniae Superinfection

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    Paulraj Kanmani

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum is a Gram-positive bacterium found as a member of the normal microbiota of the upper respiratory tract. It was suggested that C. pseudodiphtheriticum may be potentially used as a next-generation probiotic for nasal application, although no deep studies were performed in this regard. We hypothesized that human isolate C. pseudodiphtheriticum strain 090104 is able to modulate the respiratory innate immune response and beneficially influence the resistance to viral and bacterial infections. Therefore, in the present study we investigated how the exposure of infant mice to nasal priming with viable or non-viable C. pseudodiphtheriticum 090104 influences the respiratory innate immune response triggered by Toll-like receptor (TLR-3 activation, the susceptibility to primary Respiratory Synsytial Virus (RSV infection, and the resistance to secondary Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia. We demonstrated that the nasal priming with viable C. pseudodiphtheriticum 090104 differentially modulated TLR3-mediated innate antiviral immune response in the respiratory tract of infant mice, improving their resistance to primary RSV infection, and secondary pneumococcal pneumonia. In association with the protection against RSV-pneumococcal superinfection, we found that viable C. pseudodiphtheriticum improved lung CD3+CD4+IFN-γ+, and CD3+CD4+IL-10+ T cells as well as CD11c+SiglecF+IFN-β+ alveolar macrophages. Of interest, non-viable bacteria did not have the same protective effect, suggesting that C. pseudodiphtheriticum colonization is needed for achieving its protective effect. In conclusion, we present evidence that nasal application of viable C. pseudodiphtheriticum could be thought as an alternative to boost defenses against RSV and secondary pneumococcal pneumonia, which should be further studied and validated in clinical trials. Due to the absence of a long-lasting immunity, re-infection with RSV throughout life is common

  9. Characterization of biofilm matrix, degradation by DNase treatment and evidence of capsule downregulation in Streptococcus pneumoniae clinical isolates

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    Johnson Candice

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common respiratory pathogen and a major causative agent of respiratory infections, including otitis media (OM. Pneumococcal biofilms have been demonstrated on biopsies of the middle ear mucosa in children receiving tympanostomy tubes, supporting the hypothesis that chronic OM may involve biofilm development by pathogenic bacteria as part of the infectious process. To better understand pneumococcal biofilm formation six low-passage encapsulated nasopharyngeal isolates of S. pneumoniae were assessed over a six-eight day period in vitro. Results Multiparametric analysis divided the strains into two groups. Those with a high biofilm forming index (BFI were structurally complex, exhibited greater lectin colocalization and were more resistant to azithromycin. Those with a low BFI developed less extensive biofilms and were more susceptible to azithromycin. dsDNA was present in the S. pneumoniae biofilm matrix in all strains and treatment with DNase I significantly reduced biofilm biomass. Since capsule expression has been hypothesized to be associated with decreased biofilm development, we also examined expression of cpsA, the first gene in the pneumococcal capsule operon. Interestingly, cpsA was downregulated in biofilms in both high and low BFI strains. Conclusion All pneumococcal strains developed biofilms that exhibited extracellular dsDNA in the biofilm matrix, however strains with a high BFI correlated with greater carbohydrate-associated structural complexity and antibiotic resistance. Furthermore, all strains of S. pneumoniae showed downregulation of the cpsA gene during biofilm growth compared to planktonic culture, regardless of BFI ranking, suggesting downregulation of capsule expression occurs generally during adherent growth.

  10. Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a physical exam, and lab tests to diagnose pneumonia. Treatment depends on what kind you have. If bacteria are the cause, antibiotics should help. If you have viral pneumonia, your doctor may prescribe an antiviral medicine to ...

  11. Temporal Changes in Invasive Group B Streptococcus Serotypes: Implications for Vaccine Development.

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    Ziyaad Dangor

    Full Text Available There is a paucity of longitudinal data on the serotype-specific burden of invasive group B Streptococcus (GBS disease from low-middle income countries, which could inform selection of vaccine epitopes.From 2005 to 2014, infants less than 90 days of age with invasive GBS disease were identified through sentinel laboratory and hospital admission surveillance at Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital in Soweto, South Africa.We identified 820 cases of invasive GBS disease, including 55% among newborns <7 days age (i.e. early-onset disease; EOD. The overall incidence (per 1,000 live births of invasive GBS disease was 2.59 (95% CI: 2.42-2.77, including 1.41 (95% CI: 1.28-1.55 for EOD and 1.18 (95% CI: 1.06-1.30 in infants 7-89 days age (late-onset disease. Year-on-year, from 2005 to 2014, we observed a 9.4% increase in incidence of serotype Ia invasive disease (RR: 1.09; 95% CI: 1.04-1.15; p<0.001, and a 7.4% decline in serotype III invasive disease (RR: 0.93; 95% CI: 0.90-0.96; p<0.001. Overall, serotypes Ia (28.2%, III (55.4% and V (7.9% were the commonest disease causing serotypes.The incidence of invasive GBS disease has remained persistently high in our setting, with some changes in serotype distribution, albeit mainly involving the same group of dominant serotypes.

  12. Identification of the psaA Gene, Coding for Pneumococcal Surface Adhesin A, in Viridans Group Streptococci other than Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jado, Isabel; Fenoll, Asunción; Casal, Julio; Pérez, Amalia

    2001-01-01

    The gene encoding the pneumococcal surface adhesin A (PsaA) protein has been identified in three different viridans group streptococcal species. Comparative studies of the psaA gene identified in different pneumococcal isolates by sequencing PCR products showed a high degree of conservation among these strains. PsaA is encoded by an open reading frame of 930 bp. The analysis of this fragment in Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus oralis, and Streptococcus anginosus strains revealed a sequence identity of 95, 94, and 90%, respectively, to the corresponding open reading frame of the previously reported Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 6B strain. Our results confirm that psaA is present and detectable in heterologous bacterial species. The possible implications of these results for the suitability and potential use of PsaA in the identification and diagnosis of pneumococcal diseases are discussed. PMID:11527799

  13. Penicillin resistance is not extrapolable to amoxicillin resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from middle ear fluid in children with acute otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblüt, Andrés; Santolaya, María Elena; Gonzalez, Patricia; Borel, Cecilia; Cofré, José

    2006-03-01

    We evaluated the in vitro antibacterial activity of amoxicillin against penicillin-susceptible and -nonsusceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae strains isolated from children with acute otitis media (AOM). Children more than 3 months of age with AOM who were seen in the Dr Sótero del Rio and Luis Calvo Mackenna Hospitals in Santiago, Chile, between July 1998 and December 2002 were subjected to tympanic puncture for middle ear fluid culture. The penicillin and amoxicillin susceptibilities of the S pneumoniae isolates were determined by epsilometer test (E test). A bacterial pathogen was isolated in 432 of 543 children (80%) as follows: S pneumoniae, 40%; Haemophilus influenzae, 29%; Moraxella catarrhalis, 7%; and Streptococcus pyogenes, 4%. Penicillin-susceptible S pneumoniae strains were less common than amoxicillin-susceptible strains (60% versus 95%; odds ratio [OR], 0.08; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.04 to 0.18). Both intermediate- and high-resistance strains were more common for penicillin (22% versus 4.5%; OR, 5.6; 95% CI, 2.5 to 12.7) than for amoxicillin (18% versus 0.5%; OR, 41.3; 95% CI, 6.0 to 821). Penicillin resistance is not extrapolable to amoxicillin among S pneumoniae strains isolated from middle ear fluid of children with AOM. Our results support the recommendation to evaluate the minimal inhibitory concentrations of penicillin-nonsusceptible S pneumoniae for amoxicillin and to continue use of this antimicrobial as a first-line antimicrobial choice for children with AOM.

  14. Penicillin resistance and serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae in Ghanaian children less than six years of age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dayie, Nicholas T. K. D.; Arhin, Reuben E.; Newman, Mercy J.

    2013-01-01

    resistance. Conclusions: These findings indicate that the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-13) recently introduced in Ghana will cover 48% and 51% of the serotypes identified in Accra and Tamale, respectively. The 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV-23) will cover 54% of all......Background: The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of nasopharyngeal carriage, serotype distribution, and penicillin resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae in children 2 mu g/ml and were classified as fully penicillin resistant with 45% of the isolates having intermediate...... serotypes detected. The two penicillin resistant isolates (MIC 32 mu g/ml) were serotypes included in both PCV-13 and PPV-23. A nationwide monitoring system of penicillin susceptibility patterns and pneumococcal serotypes is recommended....

  15. Meningitis neonatal e infección puerperal por Streptococcus pneumoniae: Presentación de un caso

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    Cecilia Ortiz Rodríguez

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Las infecciones neonatales causadas por Streptococcus pneumoniae constituyen un fenómeno raro, poco reportado en la literatura médica; en el presente trabajo se describe el caso de una meningoencefalitis purulenta de aparición precoz, en un neonato nacido por parto eutócico, a termino y de buen peso. Se aisló el microorganismo en la sangre y en el líquido cefalorraquídeo del recién nacido, así como en los loquios de la madre. Las 3 antibiotipias fueron idénticas. La evolución del niño fue desfavorable, el cual falleció a las 81 horas de vida, en un cuadro de fallo multiorgánico. La necropsia corroboró el diagnóstico. La madre desarrolló una endometritis puerperal a los 4 días, con buena evolución.Neonatal infections caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae are a rare phenomenon that is barely reported in the medical literature. The present paper describes a case of early purulent meningoencephalitis occurred in an adequate birthweight neonate born to term eutocic delivery. The microorganism was isolated in the newborn's blood and cerebrospinal fluid as well as in his mother's lochia. The three antibiotypes were identical. The newborn did not recover and died after 81 hours due to a multiple organ failure. Necropsy confirmed the diagnosis. The mother developed puerperal endometritis after 4 days but did recover.

  16. In Vivo Pharmacodynamic Target Assessment of Delafloxacin against Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Klebsiella pneumoniae in a Murine Lung Infection Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepak, Alexander J; Andes, David R

    2016-08-01

    Delafloxacin is a broad-spectrum anionic fluoroquinolone under development for the treatment of bacterial pneumonia. The goal of the study was to determine the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) targets in the murine lung infection model for Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Klebsiella pneumoniae Four isolates of each species were utilized for in vivo studies: for S. aureus, one methicillin-susceptible and three methicillin-resistant isolates; S. pneumoniae, two penicillin-susceptible and two penicillin-resistant isolates; K. pneumoniae, one wild-type and three extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing isolates. MICs were determined using CLSI methods. A neutropenic murine lung infection model was utilized for all treatment studies, and drug dosing was by the subcutaneous route. Single-dose plasma pharmacokinetics was determined in the mouse model after administration of 2.5, 10, 40, and 160 mg/kg. For in vivo studies, 4-fold-increasing doses of delafloxacin (range, 0.03 to 160 mg/kg) were administered every 6 h (q6h) to infected mice. Treatment outcome was measured by determining organism burden in the lung (CFU counts) at the end of each experiment (24 h). The Hill equation for maximum effect (Emax) was used to model the dose-response data. The magnitude of the PK/PD index, the area under the concentration-time curve over 24 h in the steady state divided by the MIC (AUC/MIC), associated with net stasis and 1-log kill endpoints was determined in the lung model for all isolates. MICs ranged from 0.004 to 1 mg/liter. Single-dose PK parameter ranges include the following: for maximum concentration of drug in serum (Cmax), 2 to 70.7 mg/liter; AUC from 0 h to infinity (AUC0-∞), 2.8 to 152 mg · h/liter; half-life (t1/2), 0.7 to 1 h. At the start of therapy mice had 6.3 ± 0.09 log10 CFU/lung. In control mice the organism burden increased 2.1 ± 0.44 log10 CFU/lung over the study period. There was a relatively steep dose-response relationship

  17. Two unusual cases of successful treatment of hypermucoviscous Klebsiella pneumoniae invasive syndrome

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    Hiroki Namikawa

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A few Japanese cases of hypermucoviscous Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae invasive syndrome have recently been reported. Although extrahepatic complications from bacteremic dissemination have been observed, infected aneurysms are rare. Furthermore, the primary source of infection is generally a liver abscess, and is rarely the prostate. Therefore, we report two atypical cases of hypermucoviscous K. pneumoniae invasive syndrome. Case presentation The first case was an 81-year-old Japanese man with no significant medical history, who was referred to our hospital for vision loss in his right eye. Contrast-enhanced whole-body computed tomography revealed abscesses in the liver and the prostate, and an infected left internal iliac artery aneurysm. Contrast-enhanced head magnetic resonance imaging revealed brain abscesses. Cultures of the liver abscess specimen and aqueous humor revealed K. pneumoniae with the hypermucoviscosity phenotype, which carried the magA gene (mucoviscosity-associated gene A and the rmpA gene (regulator of mucoid phenotype A. We performed enucleation of the right eyeball, percutaneous transhepatic drainage, coil embolization of the aneurysm, and administered a 6-week course of antibiotic treatment. The second case was a 69-year-old Japanese man with diabetes mellitus, who was referred to our hospital with fever, pollakiuria, and pain on urination. Contrast-enhanced whole-body computed tomography revealed lung and prostate abscesses, but no liver abscesses. Contrast-enhanced head magnetic resonance imaging revealed brain abscesses. The sputum, urine, prostate abscess specimen, and aqueous humor cultures revealed K. pneumoniae with the hypermucoviscosity phenotype, which carried magA and rmpA. We performed enucleation of the left eyeball, percutaneous drainage of the prostate abscess, and administered a 5-week course of antibiotic treatment. Conclusions Hypermucoviscous K. pneumoniae can cause infected

  18. Preformulation characterization of an aluminum salt-adjuvanted trivalent recombinant protein-based vaccine candidate against Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Vidyashankara; Hu, Lei; Liyanage, Mangala Roshan; Esfandiary, Reza; Reinisch, Christoph; Meinke, Andreas; Maisonneuve, Jeff; Volkin, David B; Joshi, Sangeeta B; Middaugh, C Russell

    2012-09-01

    The preformulation of a trivalent recombinant protein-based vaccine candidate for protection against Streptococcus pneumoniae is described both in the presence and in the absence of aluminum salt adjuvants. The biophysical properties of the three protein-based antigens, fragments of pneumococcal surface adhesion A (PsaA), serine-threonine protein kinase (StkP), and protein required for cell wall separation of group B streptococcus (PcsB), were studied using several spectroscopic and light scattering techniques. An empirical phase diagram was constructed to assess the overall conformational stability of the three antigens as a function of pH and temperatures. A variety of excipients were screened on the basis of their ability to stabilize each antigen using intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Sorbitol, sucrose, and trehalose stabilized the three proteins in solution. The addition of manganese also showed a drastic increase in the thermal stability of SP1650 in solution. The adsorption and desorption processes of each of the antigens to aluminum salt adjuvants were evaluated, and the stability of the adsorbed proteins was then assessed using intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. All the three proteins showed good adsorption to Alhydrogel. PsaA was destabilized when adsorbed onto Alhydrogel® and adding sodium phosphate showed a stabilizing effect. PcsB was found to be stabilized when adsorbed to Alhydrogel®, and no destabilizing or stabilizing effects were seen in the case of StkP. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Resistencia a antibióticos no betalactámicos de aislamientos invasores de Streptococcus pneumoniae en niños latinoamericanos: SIREVA II, 2000-2005 Resistance to non-beta-lactam antibiotics in the clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae of children in Latin America: SIREVA II, 2000-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Inés Agudelo

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO:Determinar la evolución de la resistencia a la eritromicina, el cloranfenicol, el trimetoprim-sulfametozaxol (SXT y la vancomicina de aislamientos invasores de Streptococcus pneumoniae obtenidos de niños de 10 países de América Latina y del Caribe en seis años de vigilancia. MÉTODOS: Se analizaron 8 993 aislamientos de S. pneumoniae recuperados entre 2000 y 2005 de niños menores de 6 años con infecciones invasoras, procedentes de Argentina, Brasil, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, México, Paraguay, República Dominicana, Uruguay y Venezuela. La sensibilidad a los antibióticos se determinó mediante los métodos establecidos y estandarizados en el proyecto SIREVA. La resistencia a múltiples antibióticos se definió como la resistencia a tres o más familias de antibióticos, de los no betalactámicos analizados en este estudio o de los betalactámicos evaluados en un estudio previo en el que 37,8% de estos aislamientos presentaron sensibilidad disminuida a la penicilina. RESULTADOS: Se encontró algún grado de resistencia al SXT y la eritromicina (56,4% y 15,4% de los aislamientos estudiados, respectivamente y 4,6% presentó alta resistencia al cloranfenicol. Todos los aislamientos fueron sensibles a la vancomicina. Se observó la mayor frecuencia de resistencia al SXT en los aislamientos de neumonía y a la eritromicina en los casos de sepsis (61,6% y 25,5%, respectivamente; P OBJECTIVE: To examine the development of resistance to erythromycin, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMZ, and vancomycin of the invasive isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae obtained from children in 10 Latin American/Caribbean countries during six years of surveillance. METHODS: Analysis of 8 993 isolates of S. pneumoniae recovered in 2000-2005 from children with invasive infections, who were less than 6 years of age, and from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Mexico, Paraguay, Uruguay, or Venezuela. Antibiotic

  20. Combination vaccine against invasive meningococcal B and pneumococcal infections: Potential epidemiological and economic impact in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Bos; H.C. Rüumke (Hans); K. Welte (Karl); L. Spanjaard (Lodewijk); L. van Alphen (Loek); M.J. Postma (Maarten)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis group B are among the main causes of invasive bacterial meningitis infections in infants. Worldwide, these diseases lead to significant mortality, morbidity and costs. The societal impact is especially severe since the

  1. CRH Affects the Phenotypic Expression of Sepsis-Associated Virulence Factors by Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotype 1 In vitro

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    Colette G. Ngo Ndjom

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is a life-threatening health condition caused by infectious pathogens of the respiratory tract, and accounts for 28–50% of annual deaths in the US alone. Current treatment regimen advocates the use of corticosteroids as adjunct treatment with antibiotics, for their broad inhibitory effect on the activity and production of pro-inflammatory mediators. However, despite their use, corticosteroids have not proven to be able to reverse the death incidence among septic patients. We have previously demonstrated the potential for neuroendocrine factors to directly influence Streptococcus pneumoniae virulence, which may in turn mediate disease outcome leading to sepsis and septic shock. The current study investigated the role of Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH in mediating key markers of pneumococcal virulence as important phenotypic determinants of sepsis and septic shock risks. In vitro cultures of serotype 1 pneumococcal strain with CRH promoted growth rate, increased capsule thickness and penicillin resistance, as well as induced pneumolysin gene expression. These results thus provide significant insights of CRH–pathogen interactions useful in understanding the underlying mechanisms of neuroendocrine factor's role in the onset of community acquired pneumonias (CAP, sepsis and septic shock.

  2. Replication of type 5 adenovirus promotes middle ear infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae in the chinchilla model of otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrah, Kyle A; Turner, Roberta L; Pang, Bing; Perez, Antonia C; Reimche, Jennifer L; King, Lauren B; Wren, John; Gandhi, Uma; Swords, W Edward; Ornelles, David A

    2015-03-01

    Adenoviral infection is a major risk factor for otitis media. We hypothesized that adenovirus promotes bacterial ascension into the middle ear through the disruption of normal function in the Eustachian tubes due to inflammation-induced changes. An intranasal infection model of the chinchilla was used to test the ability of type 5 adenovirus to promote middle ear infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae. The hyperinflammatory adenovirus mutant dl327 and the nonreplicating adenovirus mutant H5wt300ΔpTP were used to test the role of inflammation and viral replication, respectively, in promotion of pneumococcal middle ear infection. Precedent infection with adenovirus resulted in a significantly greater incidence of middle ear disease by S. pneumoniae as compared to nonadenovirus infected animals. Infection with the adenovirus mutant dl327 induced a comparable degree of bacterial ascension into the middle ear as did infection with the wild-type virus. By contrast, infection with the nonreplicating adenovirus mutant H5wt300ΔpTP resulted in less extensive middle ear infection compared to the wild-type adenovirus. We conclude that viral replication is necessary for adenoviral-induced pneumococcal middle ear disease. © FEMS 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Replication of type 5 adenovirus promotes middle ear infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae in the chinchilla model of otitis media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrah, Kyle A.; Turner, Roberta L.; Pang, Bing; Perez, Antonia C.; Reimche, Jennifer L.; King, Lauren B.; Wren, John; Gandhi, Uma; Swords, W. Edward; Ornelles, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviral infection is a major risk factor for otitis media. We hypothesized that adenovirus promotes bacterial ascension into the middle ear through the disruption of normal function in the Eustachian tubes due to inflammation-induced changes. An intranasal infection model of the chinchilla was used to test the ability of type 5 adenovirus to promote middle ear infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae. The hyperinflammatory adenovirus mutant dl327 and the nonreplicating adenovirus mutant H5wt300ΔpTP were used to test the role of inflammation and viral replication, respectively, in promotion of pneumococcal middle ear infection. Precedent infection with adenovirus resulted in a significantly greater incidence of middle ear disease by S. pneumoniae as compared to nonadenovirus infected animals. Infection with the adenovirus mutant dl327 induced a comparable degree of bacterial ascension into the middle ear as did infection with the wild-type virus. By contrast, infection with the nonreplicating adenovirus mutant H5wt300ΔpTP resulted in less extensive middle ear infection compared to the wild-type adenovirus. We conclude that viral replication is necessary for adenoviral-induced pneumococcal middle ear disease. PMID:25251686

  4. A Novel Function for the Streptococcus pneumoniae Aminopeptidase N: Inhibition of T Cell Effector Function through Regulation of TCR Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lance K. Blevins

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn causes a variety of disease states including fatal bacterial pneumonia. Our previous finding that introduction of Spn into an animal with ongoing influenza virus infection resulted in a CD8+ T cell population with reduced effector function gave rise to the possibility of direct regulation by pneumococcal components. Here, we show that treatment of effector T cells with lysate derived from Spn resulted in inhibition of IFNγ and tumor necrosis factor α production as well as of cytolytic granule release. Spn aminopeptidase N (PepN was identified as the inhibitory bacterial component and surprisingly, this property was independent of the peptidase activity found in this family of proteins. Inhibitory activity was associated with reduced activation of ZAP-70, ERK1/2, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and p38, demonstrating the ability of PepN to negatively regulate TCR signaling at multiple points in the cascade. These results reveal a novel immune regulatory function for a bacterial aminopeptidase.

  5. Outcome of meningitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae type b in children in The Gambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetghebuer, T; West, T E; Wermenbol, V; Cadbury, A L; Milligan, P; Lloyd-Evans, N; Adegbola, R A; Mulholland, E K; Greenwood, B M; Weber, M W

    2000-03-01

    In developing countries, endemic childhood meningitis is a severe disease caused most commonly by Streptococcus pneumoniae or Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib). Although many studies have shown that fatality rates associated with meningitis caused by these organisms are high in developing countries, little is known about the long-term outcome of survivors. The purpose of this study was to assess the importance of disabilities following pneumococcal and Hib meningitis in The Gambia. 257 children aged 0-12 years hospitalized between 1990 and 1995 with culture-proven S. pneumoniae (n = 134) or Hib (n = 123) meningitis were included retrospectively in the study. 48% of children with pneumococcal meningitis and 27% of children with Hib meningitis died whilst in hospital. Of the 160 survivors, 89 (55%) were followed up between September 1996 and October 1997. Of the children with pneumococcal meningitis that were traced, 58% had clinical sequelae; half of them had major disabilities preventing normal adaptation to social life. 38% of survivors of Hib meningitis had clinical sequelae, a quarter of whom had major disabilities. Major handicaps found were hearing loss, mental retardation, motor abnormalities and seizures. These data show that despite treatment with effective antibiotics, pneumococcal and Hib meningitis kill many Gambian children and leave many survivors with severe sequelae. Hib vaccination is now given routinely in The Gambia; an effective pneumococcal vaccine is needed.

  6. Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates in healthy children attending day-care centers in 12 states in Mexico Aislamientos de S. pneumoniae en niños sanos de estancias infantiles en 12 estados de México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz Elena Espinosa-de los Monteros

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic nasopharyngeal carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae, which is a major factor in the transmission of this bacterium. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Nasopharyngeal cultures were performed on children attending 32 day-care centers in 12 states in Mexico. RESULTS: Streptococcus pneumoniae was isolated from the nasopharynx of 829 out of 2 777(29.9% subjects aged two months to six years. All children lived in urban areas and 80% spent more than six hours daily in a day-care center. Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes most frequently identified were: 19F (23%, 6B (15.6%, 23F (11.2% and 6A (14.9%. Thirty-six percent of the isolates were susceptible to penicillin. CONCLUSIONS: Serotype distribution suggests the possible benefits that could be obtained from the heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine.OBJETIVO: La intención de este estudio fue determinar la prevalencia de portadores nasofaríngeos asintomáticos de Streptococcus pneumoniae, el cual es el principal factor en la transmisión de esta bacteria. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Los cultivos nasofaríngeos fueron realizados en niños que asisten a 32 estancias infantiles en 12 estados de México. RESULTADOS: Streptococcus pneumoniae fue aislado de la nasofaringe de 829 (29.9% niños de los 2 777 incluidos en el estudio con un rango de edad de 2 meses a 6 años. Todos los niños vivían en áreas urbanas y 80% permanecían más de seis horas diarias en la estancia infantil. Los serotipos de Streptococcus pneumoniae más frecuentemente identificados fueron: 19F (23%, 6B (15.6%, 23F (11.2% y 6 A (14.9%. Treinta y seis por ciento de los aislamientos fueron susceptibles a penicilina. CONCLUSIONES: La distribución de serotipos nos da una idea de los posibles beneficios que podrían obtenerse de la vacuna neumocóccica conjugada heptavalente.

  7. Trends in antibacterial resistance among Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated in the USA: update from PROTEKT US Years 1–4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Steven D

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing prevalence of resistance to established antibiotics among key bacterial respiratory tract pathogens, such as Streptococcus pneumoniae, is a major healthcare problem in the USA. The PROTEKT US study is a longitudinal surveillance study designed to monitor the susceptibility of key respiratory tract pathogens in the USA to a range of commonly used antimicrobials. Here, we assess the geographic and temporal trends in antibacterial resistance of S. pneumoniae isolates from patients with community-acquired respiratory tract infections collected between Year 1 (2000–2001 and Year 4 (2003–2004 of PROTEKT US. Methods Antibacterial minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined centrally using the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI broth microdilution method; susceptibility was defined according to CLSI interpretive criteria. Macrolide resistance genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction. Results A total of 39,495 S. pneumoniae isolates were collected during 2000–2004. The percentage of isolates resistant to erythromycin, penicillin, levofloxacin, and telithromycin were 29.3%, 21.2%, 0.9%, and 0.02%, respectively, over the 4 years, with marked regional variability. The proportion of isolates exhibiting multidrug resistance (includes isolates known as penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae and isolates resistant to ≥ 2 of the following antibiotics: penicillin; second-generation cephalosporins, e.g. cefuroxime; macrolides; tetracyclines; and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole remained stable at ~30% over the study period. Overall mef(A was the most common macrolide resistance mechanism. The proportion of mef(A isolates decreased from 68.8% to 62.3% between Year 1 and Year 4, while the percentage of isolates carrying both erm(B and mef(A increased from 9.7% to 18.4%. Over 99% of the erm(B+mef(A-positive isolates collected over Years 1–4 exhibited multidrug resistance. Higher than previously

  8. A Quorum-Sensing System That RegulatesStreptococcus pneumoniaeBiofilm Formation and Surface Polysaccharide Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junges, Roger; Salvadori, Gabriela; Shekhar, Sudhanshu; Åmdal, Heidi A; Periselneris, Jimstan N; Chen, Tsute; Brown, Jeremy S; Petersen, Fernanda C

    2017-01-01

    Despite vaccines, Streptococcus pneumoniae kills more than a million people yearly. Thus, understanding how pneumococci transition from commensals to pathogens is particularly relevant. Quorum sensing regulates collective behaviors and thus represents a potential driver of commensal-to-pathogen transitions. Rgg/small hydrophobic peptide (SHP) quorum-sensing systems are widespread in streptococci, yet they remain largely uncharacterized in S. pneumoniae . Using directional transcriptome sequencing, we show that the S. pneumoniae D39 Rgg0939/SHP system induces the transcription of a single gene cluster including shp and capsule gene homologs. Capsule size measurements determined by fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran exclusion allowed assignment of the system to the regulation of surface polysaccharide expression. We found that the SHP pheromone induced exopolysaccharide expression in R36A, an unencapsulated derivative of D39. In the encapsulated parent strain, overexpression of the Rgg system resulted in a mutant with increased capsule size. In line with previous studies showing that capsule expression is inversely associated with biofilm formation, we found that biofilm formed on lung epithelial cells was decreased in the overexpression strain and increased in an rgg deletion mutant. Although no significant differences were observed between D39 and the rgg deletion mutant in a mouse model of lung infection, in competitive assays, overexpression reduced fitness. This is the first study to reveal a quorum-sensing system in streptococci that regulates exopolysaccharide synthesis from a site distinct from the original capsule locus. IMPORTANCE Quorum sensing regulates bacterial social behaviors by production, secretion, and sensing of pheromones. In this study, we characterized a new quorum-sensing system of the Rgg/SHP class in S. pneumoniae D39. The system was found to directly induce the expression of a single gene cluster comprising the gene for the SHP pheromone

  9. Caracterización molecular de aislamientos invasores colombianos de Streptococcus pneumoniae serotipo 5 recuperados entre 1994 y 2004.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Firacative

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Introducción. Streptococcus pneumoniae serotipo 5 es causa importante de enfermedad invasora en Colombia, donde se ha demostrado la circulación del clon 19-Colombia(5 susceptible a penicilina pero resistente a tetraciclina y a cloranfenicol. Objetivo. Establecer las relaciones genéticas de aislamientos invasores colombianos de S. pneumoniae serotipo 5 recuperados entre 1994 y 2004 con el clon 19-Colombia(5. Materiales y métodos. Se estudiaron 83 aislamientos que tenían datos de susceptibilidad a penicilina, vancomicina, ceftriaxona, eritromicina, trimetoprim sulfametoxazol, cloranfenicol y tetraciclina, de los cuales 29 fueron obtenidos de niños menores de cinco años. El patrón de restricción del ADN se determinó por electroforesis en gel de campo pulsado, usando la enzima Sma I. La similitud genética entre los aislamientos y el clon se estableció según los criterios de Tenover y utilizando el programa Fingerprinting II. Resultados. Todos los aislamientos se relacionaron con el clon 19-Colombia5 y se agruparon en el patrón electroforético A con 17 subtipos. El patrón A se estableció en 32 aislamientos (38,6%, el A8 en 18 (21,7% y el A5 en 10 (12%, los 15 patrones restantes agruparon los otros 23 aislamientos. Los 34 aislamientos resistentes a tetraciclina y cloranfenicol mostraron relación con los patrones electroforéticos A (n = 32, A16 (n = 1 y A28 (n = 1, caracterizados, al igual que el clon, por presentar una banda de 340 Kb. Conclusión. Estos resultados muestran la circulación continua en el país de aislamientos de S. pneumoniae serotipo 5 genéticamente relacionados con el clon 19-Colombia(5.

  10. Non-invasive monitoring of Streptococcus pyogenes vaccine efficacy using biophotonic imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faraz M Alam

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes infection of the nasopharynx represents a key step in the pathogenic cycle of this organism and a major focus for vaccine development, requiring robust models to facilitate the screening of potentially protective antigens. One antigen that may be an important target for vaccination is the chemokine protease, SpyCEP, which is cell surface-associated and plays a role in pathogenesis. Biophotonic imaging (BPI can non-invasively characterize the spatial location and abundance of bioluminescent bacteria in vivo. We have developed a bioluminescent derivative of a pharyngeal S. pyogenes strain by transformation of an emm75 clinical isolate with the luxABCDE operon. Evaluation of isogenic recombinant strains in vitro and in vivo confirmed that bioluminescence conferred a growth deficit that manifests as a fitness cost during infection. Notwithstanding this, bioluminescence expression permitted non-invasive longitudinal quantitation of S. pyogenes within the murine nasopharynx albeit with a detection limit corresponding to approximately 10(5 bacterial colony forming units (CFU in this region. Vaccination of mice with heat killed streptococci, or with SpyCEP led to a specific IgG response in the serum. BPI demonstrated that both vaccine candidates reduced S. pyogenes bioluminescence emission over the course of nasopharyngeal infection. The work suggests the potential for BPI to be used in the non-invasive longitudinal evaluation of potential S. pyogenes vaccines.

  11. Non-Invasive Monitoring of Streptococcus pyogenes Vaccine Efficacy Using Biophotonic Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Faraz M.; Bateman, Colin; Turner, Claire E.; Wiles, Siouxsie; Sriskandan, Shiranee

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes infection of the nasopharynx represents a key step in the pathogenic cycle of this organism and a major focus for vaccine development, requiring robust models to facilitate the screening of potentially protective antigens. One antigen that may be an important target for vaccination is the chemokine protease, SpyCEP, which is cell surface-associated and plays a role in pathogenesis. Biophotonic imaging (BPI) can non-invasively characterize the spatial location and abundance of bioluminescent bacteria in vivo. We have developed a bioluminescent derivative of a pharyngeal S. pyogenes strain by transformation of an emm75 clinical isolate with the luxABCDE operon. Evaluation of isogenic recombinant strains in vitro and in vivo confirmed that bioluminescence conferred a growth deficit that manifests as a fitness cost during infection. Notwithstanding this, bioluminescence expression permitted non-invasive longitudinal quantitation of S. pyogenes within the murine nasopharynx albeit with a detection limit corresponding to approximately 105 bacterial colony forming units (CFU) in this region. Vaccination of mice with heat killed streptococci, or with SpyCEP led to a specific IgG response in the serum. BPI demonstrated that both vaccine candidates reduced S. pyogenes bioluminescence emission over the course of nasopharyngeal infection. The work suggests the potential for BPI to be used in the non-invasive longitudinal evaluation of potential S. pyogenes vaccines. PMID:24278474

  12. Efficacy of Solithromycin (CEM-101) for Experimental Otitis Media Caused by Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueira, M; Fernandes, P; Pelton, S I

    2016-09-01

    Solithromycin (CEM-101) is a "fourth-generation" macrolide, as it has three binding site and is acid stable. The three binding sites confer activity against bacteria resistant to the older macrolides and ketolides, including multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). The objective of this study was to evaluate solithromycin pharmacokinetics (PK), middle ear fluid (MEF) concentrations, and microbiologic efficacy in a chinchilla model of experimental otitis media (EOM) due to strains of S. pneumoniae or NTHi. Plasma PK (maximum concentration of drug in serum [Cmax] and area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h [AUC0-24]) and middle ear fluid (MEF) concentrations were determined. Isolates with specified antimicrobial susceptibility patterns were inoculated directly into the middle ear (ME). Plasma and MEF were collected for PK and MEF cultures performed to determine efficacy. Solithromycin administered at 150 mg/kg of body weight/day resulted in Cmax and AUC0-24 values of 2.2 μg/ml and 27.4 μg · h/ml in plasma and 1.7 μg/ml and 28.2 μg · h/ml in extracellular MEF on day 1. By day 3, Cmax and AUC0-24 values had increased to 4.5 μg/ml and 54 μg · h/ml in plasma and 4.8 μg/ml and 98.6 μg · h/ml in extracellular MEF. For NTHi EOM, three isolates with MIC/minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) ratios of 0.5/1 μg/ml (isolate BCH1), 2/2 μg/ml (isolate BMC1247C), and 4/4 μg/ml (isolate BMC1213C) were selected. The MEF of >85% of animals infected with BCH1 and BMC1247C was sterilized. For NTHi BMC1213, >85% of MEF cultures remained positive. For S. pneumoniae EOM, 3 isolates with MIC/MBC ratios of 0.06/0.125 μg/ml (S. pneumoniae 331), 0.125/1 μg/ml (S. pneumoniae CP-645 [MLSB phenotype]), and 0.5/2 μg/ml (CP-712 [mefA subclass mefA resistance]) were selected. Solithromycin sterilized MEF in 100% of animals infected with S. pneumoniae 331 and S. pneumoniae CP-645. ME infection persisted in 60% of

  13. Infección invasiva por Streptococcus pneumoniae: reporte de caso de un paciente con síndrome de Austrian

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Echeverri; María de los Ángeles Vargas; Lorena Matta; Fernando Rosso; Janier Daniel Segura

    2015-01-01

    Descrito inicialmente en 1957 por Robert Austrian, el síndrome que lleva su nombre se define como la tríada de neumonía, endocarditis y meningitis secundarias a una infección invasiva por Streptococcus pneumoniae. Desde entonces, y debido a su infrecuencia, se han reportado muy pocos casos en la literatura científica. A continuación se presenta el caso de un paciente de 61 años de edad con un cuadro inicial de meningitis bacteriana por S. pneumoniae, acompañado de neumonía bacteriana e in...

  14. Antimicrobial activity of solithromycin against serotyped macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates collected from U.S. medical centers in 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, D J; Mendes, R E; Jones, R N

    2015-04-01

    Solithromycin, a next-generation macrolide and novel fluoroketolide, was tested against a 2012 collection of serotyped U.S. macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates associated with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP). Against all 272 isolates, solithromycin demonstrated high potency (MIC50/90, 0.06/0.25 μg/ml), and it inhibited all strains at MICs of ≤0.5 μg/ml, including the two most prevalent macrolide-resistant serotypes (19A and 35B). These data support the continued clinical development of solithromycin for the treatment of multidrug-resistant CABP. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Antimicrobial Activity of Solithromycin against Serotyped Macrolide-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates Collected from U.S. Medical Centers in 2012

    OpenAIRE

    Farrell, D. J.; Mendes, R. E.; Jones, R. N.

    2015-01-01

    Solithromycin, a next-generation macrolide and novel fluoroketolide, was tested against a 2012 collection of serotyped U.S. macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates associated with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP). Against all 272 isolates, solithromycin demonstrated high potency (MIC50/90, 0.06/0.25 μg/ml), and it inhibited all strains at MICs of ≤0.5 μg/ml, including the two most prevalent macrolide-resistant serotypes (19A and 35B). These data support the continue...

  16. Estructura poblacional de "Streptococcus pneumoniae" con resistencia a los macrólidos asociada a bombas de eflujo (genes mef) y mecanismos duales [genes mef y erm (B)

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez García de la Pedrosa, María Elia

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae constituye un patógeno relevante en la patología infecciosa. Asimismo, es paradigma en el estudio de la evolución de la resistencia a los antimicrobianos y en el estudio de la estructura poblacional en los que la utilización de los antimicrobianos y la implantación de políticas de vacunación han determinado modificaciones relevantes en los últimos años. El presente trabajo está encaminado a analizar la relación entre resistencia y clonalidad en S. pneumoniae, utilizan...

  17. Molecular characterization of invasive Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis. Multicenter study: Argentina 2011-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, Fernando; Blanco, Alejandra; Villalón, Pilar; Beratz, Noelia; Sáez Nieto, Juan Antonio; Lopardo, Horacio

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (SDSE) has virulence factors similar to those of Streptococcus pyogenes. Therefore, it causes pharyngitis and severe infections indistinguishable from those caused by the classic pathogen. The objectives of this study were: to know the prevalence of SDSE invasive infections in Argentina, to study the genetic diversity, to determine the presence of virulence genes, to study antibiotic susceptibility and to detect antibiotic resistance genes. Conventional methods of identification were used. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion and the agar dilution methods and the E-test. Twenty eight centers from 16 Argentinean cities participated in the study. Twenty three isolates (16 group G and 7 group C) were obtained between July 1 2011 and June 30 2012. Two adult patients died (8.7%). Most of the isolates were recovered from blood (60.9%). All isolates carried speJ and ssa genes. stG62647, stG653 and stG840 were the most frequent emm types. Nineteen different PFGE patterns were detected. All isolates were susceptible to penicillin and levofloxacin, 6 (26.1%) showed resistance or reduced susceptibility to erythromycin [1 mef(A), 3 erm(TR), 1 mef(A)+erm(TR) and 1 erm(TR)+erm(B)] and 7 (30.4%) were resistant or exhibited reduced susceptibility to tetracycline [2 tet(M), 5 tet(M)+tet(O)]. The prevalence in Argentina was of at least 23 invasive infections by SDSE. A wide genetic diversity was observed. All isolates carried speJ and ssa genes. Similarly to other studies, macrolide resistance (26.1%) was mainly associated to the MLS B phenotype. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. M-ficolin binds selectively to the capsular polysaccharides of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes 19B and 19C and of a S. mitis strain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Troels R; Hansen, Annette; Sørensen, Uffe

    2013-01-01

    of infections. We investigated the binding selectivity by examining the binding of M-ficolin to a panel of more than 100 different streptococcal strains (Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus mitis) each expressing distinct polysaccharide structures. M-ficolin binding was observed for three strains only......, the pneumococcal serotypes 19B and 19C and a single mitis strain expressing a similar polysaccharide structure. The bound M-ficolin, in association with MASP-2, mediated complement factor C4 cleavage. Binding to the bacteria was inhibitable by N-acetyl glucosamine indicating that the interaction with the bacterial...... able to demonstrate specific binding of M-ficolin to some capsular polysaccharides of the opportunistic pathogen S. pneumoniae and of the commensal bacterium S. mitis....

  19. Evaluation of 17 medicinal plants from Northern Côte d'Ivoire for their in vitro activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koné, W Mamidou; Atindehou, K Kamanzi; Kacou-N'douba, A; Dosso, M

    2006-08-28

    Twenty crude extracts from 17 species out of 11 families were assessed for their antibacterial activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae (Pneumococcus). The selected plants are used in Northern Côte d'Ivoire to treat various infections including respiratory track diseases. From all the tested extracts, only 7 from 6 plants showed a promising in vitro bactericidal activity against Pneumococcus, including strains resistant to penicillin. The most active extracts were from Erythrina senegalensis (Fabaceae), Piliostigma thonningii (Caesalpiniaceae), Waltheria indica (Sterculiaceae), Andira inermis (Fabaceae), Uapaca togoensis (Euphorbiaceae), Keetia hispida (Rubiaceae) and Combretum molle (Combretaceae). This is the first time that the antipneumococcal activity of the tested plants is reported. The results of this preliminary investigation support the traditional use of these plants in the treatment of pneumococcal infections. The most active of them could be candidates for isolation of compounds which could serve as lead structures for the development of new drugs against Streptococcus pneumoniae.

  20. A reação em cadeia da polimerase na detecção da resistência à penicilina em Streptococcus pneumoniae

    OpenAIRE

    Zettler,Eduardo Walker; Scheibe,Rosane M.; Dias,Cícero A. G.; Santafé,Patrícia; Moreira,José da Silva; Santos,Diógenes S.; Fritscher,Carlos Cezar

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUÇÃO: O Streptococcus pneumoniae é o mais freqüente agente etiológico de infecções respiratórias adquiridas na comunidade e sua resistência aos antimicrobianos tem aumentado nos últimos anos. A determinação da resistência é feita rotineiramente por método lento que depende do crescimento em cultura e determinação da concentração inibitória mínima (CIM). A reação em cadeia da polimerase (PCR) detecta os genes responsáveis pela resistência do Streptococcus pneumoniae a penicilina em cerca...

  1. A Cross-sectional Survey Assessing Carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae in a Healthy Population in Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Na; Chen, Zhao Yun; Chen, Tao; Zhu, Bing Qing; Xu, Li; Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Ai Yu; Zhao, Pan; Liu, Ji Wen; Shao, Zhu Jun

    2018-03-01

    The carriage rate and serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae) in a healthy population in China remains unclear. In this study, we collected the oropharyngeal swabs from 513 individuals in Xinjiang, China. Real-time PCR targeting the lytA gene and 12 serotypes were assessed to identify S. pneumoniae carriage. The total carriage rate of S. pneumoniae was 70.4% (361/513). The most prevalent serotypes were 19B/F, 18B/C, 5, and 6A/B. The highest carriage rate of S. pneumoniae was noted in children aged 6-10 years (88.6%), which merits further attention. The co-colonization rate of two or more S. pneumoniae serotypes was 79.8% (264/331). This study aimed to investigate the baseline pneumococcal carriage rate among healthy individuals in China to improve our understanding of the epidemiology of S. pneumoniae. Copyright © 2018 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  2. Fucose-Mediated Transcriptional Activation of the fcs Operon by FcsR in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manzoor, Irfan; Shafeeq, Sulman; Afzal, Muhammad; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we explore the impact of fucose on the transcriptome of S. pneumoniae D39. The expression of various genes and operons, including the fucose uptake PTS and utilization operon (fcs operon) was altered in the presence of fucose. By means of quantitative RT-PCR and β-galactosidase

  3. Improved Differentiation of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Other S. mitis Group Streptococci by MALDI Biotyper Using an Improved MALDI Biotyper Database Content and a Novel Result Interpretation Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harju, Inka; Lange, Christoph; Kostrzewa, Markus; Maier, Thomas; Rantakokko-Jalava, Kaisu; Haanperä, Marjo

    2017-03-01

    Reliable distinction of Streptococcus pneumoniae and viridans group streptococci is important because of the different pathogenic properties of these organisms. Differentiation between S. pneumoniae and closely related Sreptococcus mitis species group streptococci has always been challenging, even when using such modern methods as 16S rRNA gene sequencing or matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. In this study, a novel algorithm combined with an enhanced database was evaluated for differentiation between S. pneumoniae and S. mitis species group streptococci. One hundred one clinical S. mitis species group streptococcal strains and 188 clinical S. pneumoniae strains were identified by both the standard MALDI Biotyper database alone and that combined with a novel algorithm. The database update from 4,613 strains to 5,627 strains drastically improved the differentiation of S. pneumoniae and S. mitis species group streptococci: when the new database version containing 5,627 strains was used, only one of the 101 S. mitis species group isolates was misidentified as S. pneumoniae , whereas 66 of them were misidentified as S. pneumoniae when the earlier 4,613-strain MALDI Biotyper database version was used. The updated MALDI Biotyper database combined with the novel algorithm showed even better performance, producing no misidentifications of the S. mitis species group strains as S. pneumoniae All S. pneumoniae strains were correctly identified as S. pneumoniae with both the standard MALDI Biotyper database and the standard MALDI Biotyper database combined with the novel algorithm. This new algorithm thus enables reliable differentiation between pneumococci and other S. mitis species group streptococci with the MALDI Biotyper. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  4. Synthesis of a selectively protected trisaccharide building block of the capsular polysaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae types 6A and 6B

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Slaghek, T.M.; Vliet, M.J. van; Maas, A.A.M.; Kamerling, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    4-Methoxybenzyl 2,4-di-O-benzyl-3-O-[2,4,6-tri-O-benzyl-3-O-(3,4,6-tri-O-benzyl-α-D-galactopyranosyl)-α-D- glucopyranosyl]-α-L-rhamnopyranoside (22), a building block for the α-D-Galp-(1->3)-α-D-Glcp-(1->3)-α-L-Rhap fragment of the capsular polysaccharides of Streptococcus pneumoniae types 6A and 6B

  5. Etiology of acute otitis media and serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae in Chilean children <5 years of age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblut, Andres; Napolitano, Carla; Pereira, Angelica; Moreno, Camilo; Kolhe, Devayani; Lepetic, Alejandro; Ortega-Barria, Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The impact of bacterial conjugate vaccines on acute otitis media (AOM) is affected by several factors including population characteristics, bacterial etiology and vaccine conjugation method, carrier, and coverage. This study estimated the baseline etiology, distribution, and antibiotic susceptibility of bacterial serotypes that causes AOM in children aged <5 years in a public setting in Santiago, Chile. Children aged ≥3 months and <5 years referred to the physician for treatment of AOM episodes (with an onset of symptoms <72 h) were enrolled between September 2009 and September 2010. Middle ear fluid (MEF) was collected by tympanocentesis or by otorrhea for identification and serotyping of bacteria. Antibacterial susceptibility was tested using E-test (etrack: 112671). Of 160 children (mean age 27.10 ± 15.83 months) with AOM episodes, 164 MEF samples (1 episode each from 156 children; 2 episodes each from 4 children) were collected. Nearly 30% of AOM episodes occurred in children aged 12 to 23 months. Streptococcus pneumoniae (41.7% [58/139]) and Haemophilus influenzae (40.3% [56/139]) were predominant among the cultures that showed bacterial growth (85% [139/164]). All Streptococcus pneumoniae positive episodes were serotyped, 19F (21%) and 14 (17%) were the predominant serotypes; all Haemophilus influenzae strains were nontypeable. Streptococcus pneumoniae were resistant to penicillin (5%) and erythromycin (33%); Haemophilus influenzae were resistant to ampicillin (14%) and cefuroxime and cefotaxime (2% each). AOM in Chilean children is predominantly caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae and nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae. Use of a broad spectrum vaccine against these pathogens might aid the reduction of AOM in Chile. PMID:28178138

  6. Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae induce different intracerebral mRNA cytokine patterns during the course of experimental bacterial meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    DIAB, A; ZHU, J; LINDQUIST, L; WRETLIND, B; BAKHIET, M; LINK, H

    1997-01-01

    Using in situ hybridization with radiolabelled oligonucleotide probes, we studied the mRNA expression of IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), TNF-β, interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) in the brain during the lethal course of experimental meningitis in a rat model inoculated intracisternally with Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) or Streptococcus pneumoniae and in uninfected control rats inoculated with the same volume of PBS. The production of IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6 and IFN-γ was also evaluated by immunohistochemistry. In the brain of Hib-inoculated rats, there was marked mRNA expression of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, IL-12 and IFN-γ. IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α were up-regulated throughout the observation period at 2, 8 and 18 h post-inoculation (p.i.), with similar patterns of induction. The Th1 cytokines IFN-γ and TNF-β were up-regulated within 8 h p.i. IL-10 and TGF-β were down-regulated at 18 h p.i., while IL-4 was not detected. In contrast, the brain of S. pneumoniae-inoculated rats showed lower levels of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α, but higher levels of TNF-β and detectable mRNA expression of IL-4 when compared with Hib-inoculated rats. IL-12, IFN-γ, IL-10 and TGF-β exhibited similar patterns of induction in the brains of Hib- and S. pneumoniae-inoculated rats. At 18 h p.i., immunohistochemistry showed similar patterns of IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6 and IFN-γ as mRNA expression in the brains of Hib- and S. pneumoniae-inoculated rats. The differences of cytokine profiles induced by the two bacterial strains may imply that different immunomodulating approaches should be considered, depending on etiology. PMID:9276517

  7. Caracterización de conjugados inmunogénicos de polisacárido capsular Streptococcus pneumoniae serotipo 14

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janoi Chang

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Las vacunas conjugadas que consisten en polisacáridos bacterianos unidos a través de un enlace covalente a una proteína portadora, han tenido un gran impacto en los esquemas de vacunación infantil, disminuyendo de forma dramática la incidencia de infecciones bacterianas. En el caso de Streptococcus pneumoniae, a pesar de que se han descrito más de 90 serotipos basados en la estructura de las cápsulas polisacarídicas y que al menos 23 tienen una importancia clínica demostrada, solo un número limitado de siete, o más recientemente 10 y 13, están incluidos en las vacunas conjugadas licenciadas. Por otra parte, la necesidad creciente de estas vacunas en el mundo requiere la incorporación de nuevos productores que se enfrentan a una elevada complejidad tecnológica, pues en todo el procedimiento de conjugación no se pueden afectar las características estructurales por las que el polisacárido es reconocido inmunológicamente. Este trabajo implementó un procedimiento de conjugación para el polisacárido de la cápsula de Streptococcus pneumoniae serotipo 14. El procedimiento comprendió la fragmentación, oxidación peryódica y posterior conjugación del polisacárido a anatoxina tetánica o diftérica. Cada intermedio fue caracterizado por métodos físico-químicos. En todas las reacciones se obtuvieron rendimientos superiores al 50%. Los conjugados generaron altos títulos de anticuerpos específicos de tipo IgG y memoria inmunológica. Se concluyó que el procedimiento permitió la obtención de conjugados inmunogénicos de serotipo 14.

  8. Klebsiella pneumoniae invasive liver abscess syndrome with purulent meningitis and septic shock: A case from mainland China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yun; Wong, Chi-Chun; Lai, San-Chuan; Lin, Zheng-Hua; Zheng, Wei-Liang; Zhao, Hui; Pan, Kong-Han; Chen, Shu-Jie; Si, Jian-Min

    2016-03-07

    We present a rare case of invasive liver abscess syndrome due to Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) with metastatic meningitis and septic shock. A previously healthy, 55-year-old female patient developed fever, liver abscess, septic shock, purulent meningitis and metastatic hydrocephalus. Upon admission, the clinical manifestations, laboratory and imaging examinations were compatible with a diagnosis of K. pneumoniae primary liver abscess. Her distal metastasis infection involved meningitis and hydrocephalus, which could flare abruptly and be life threatening. Even with early adequate drainage and antibiotic therapy, the patient's condition deteriorated and she ultimately died. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of K. pneumoniae invasive liver abscess syndrome with septic meningitis reported in mainland China. Our findings reflect the need for a better understanding of the epidemiology, risk factors, complications, comorbid medical conditions and treatment of this disease.

  9. Antagonism between penicillin and erythromycin against Streptococcus pneumoniae in vitro and in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, H K; Jensen, T G; Dessau, R B

    2000-01-01

    The combi