WorldWideScience

Sample records for invasive pneumococcal disease

  1. Treatment and prevention of invasive pneumococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Alegría, A R; Pintado, V; Barbolla, I

    2018-02-12

    Invasive pneumococcal disease is a severe infection that mainly affects patients with associated comorbidity. The paediatric conjugate vaccination has resulted in a change in the adult vaccination strategy. The antibiotic resistance of pneumococcus is not currently a severe problem. Nevertheless, the World Health Organisation has included pneumococcus among the bacteria whose treatment requires the introduction of new drugs, such as ceftaroline and ceftobiprole. Although the scientific evidence is still limited, the combination of beta-lactams and macrolides is recommended as empiric therapy for bacteraemic pneumococcal pneumonia. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  2. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal Diseases, All Ages

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal Diseases, All Ages - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  3. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive pneumococcal disease, age <5

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive pneumococcal disease, age <5 - 2018. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  4. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive pneumococcal disease, all ages

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive pneumococcal disease, all ages - 2018. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  5. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal Diseases, All Ages

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal Diseases, All Ages - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during...

  6. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal Diseases, Age <5

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal Diseases, Age <5 - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during...

  7. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal Diseases, Age <5

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal Diseases, Age <5 - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during...

  8. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive pneumococcal disease, age <5

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive pneumococcal disease, age <5 - 2018. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during...

  9. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive pneumococcal disease, all ages

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive pneumococcal disease, all ages - 2018. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during...

  10. Serotype-Specific Changes in Invasive Pneumococcal Disease after Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine Introduction: A Pooled Analysis of Multiple Surveillance Sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feikin, Daniel R.; Kagucia, Eunice W.; Loo, Jennifer D.; Link-Gelles, Ruth; Puhan, Milo A.; Cherian, Thomas; Levine, Orin S.; Whitney, Cynthia G.; O'Brien, Katherine L.; Moore, Matthew R.; Adegbola, Claire A.; Agocs, Mary; Ampofo, Krow; Andrews, Nick; Barton, Theresa; Benito, Javier; Broome, Claire V.; Bruce, Michael G.; Bulkow, Lisa R.; Byington, Carrie L.; Camou, Teresa; Cook, Heather; Cotter, Suzanne; Dagan, Ron; de Wals, Philippe; Deceuninck, Geneviève; Denham, Barbara; Edwards, Giles; Eskola, Juhani; Fitzgerald, Margaret; Galanakis, Emmanouil; Garcia-Gabarrot, Gabriela; Garcia-Garcia, Juan J.; Gene, Amadeu; Gomez, Borja; Heffernan, Helen; Hennessy, Thomas W.; Heuberger, Sigrid; Hilty, Markus; Ingels, Helene; Jayasinghe, Sanjay; Kellner, James D.; Klein, Nicola P.; Kormann-Klement, Andrea; Kozakova, Jana; Krause, Vicki; Kriz, Paula; Lambertsen, Lotte; Lepoutre, Agnès; Lipsitch, Marc; Lopez-Vega, Mariana; Lovgren, Marguerite; Maraki, Sofia; Mason, Edward O.; McIntyre, Peter B.; Menzies, Robert; Messina, Allison; Miller, Elizabeth; Mintegi, Santiago; Motlova, Jitka; Moulton, Lawrence H.; Mühlemann, Kathrin; Muñoz-Almagro, Carmen; Murdoch, David R.; Park, Daniel E.; Reingold, Arthur L.; Sa-Leao, Raquel; Sanyal, Abanti; Smith, Peter G.; Spanjaard, Lodewijk; Techasaensiri, Chonnamet; Thompson, Richard E.; Thoon, Koh C.; Tyrrell, Gregory J.; Valentiner-Branth, Palle; van der Ende, Arie; Vanderkooi, Otto G.; van der Linden, Mark P. G.; Varon, Emmanuelle; Verhaegen, Jan; Vestrheim, Didrik F.; Vickers, Imelda; von Gottberg, Anne; von Kries, Rüdiger; Waight, Pauline; Weatherholtz, Robert; Weiss, Susanne; Yee, Arnold; Zaidi, Anita K. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Vaccine-serotype (VT) invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) rates declined substantially following introduction of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) into national immunization programs. Increases in non-vaccineserotype (NVT) IPD rates occurred in some sites, presumably

  11. Recurrent invasive pneumococcal disease in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingels, Helene; Lambertsen, Lotte; Harboe, Zitta B

    2014-01-01

    %, and 78% of the cases would have been covered by the 7-, 10-, and 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines, respectively. Conclusions: Of children with an IPD episode, 2.4% experienced rIPD, and an underlying disease was documented in 66% of these children. Investigation of underlying conditions...... laboratory-confirmed cases of IPD in children aged 0-15 y were identified from the Neisseria and Streptococcus Reference Laboratory, Statens Serum Institut, Denmark for the period 1980-2013. rIPD was defined as isolation of Streptococcus pneumoniae from any normally sterile site ≥ 30 days after an initial...... positive culture. Clinical data were obtained for all children with rIPD. Results: Of all children with IPD, 2.4% (59/2418) experienced at least 1 episode of rIPD, and an underlying condition was documented in 39 (66%). Immune deficiency due to transplantation (n = 9) was the most common disease; however...

  12. Pediatric invasive pneumococcal disease in Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba, I D; Ba, A; Faye, P M; Thiongane, A; Attiyé Kane, M; Sonko, A; Diop, A; Deme Ly, I; Diouf, F N; Ndiaye, O; Leye, M M M; Cissé, M F; Ba, M

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to describe the clinical, epidemiological, and outcome characteristics of IPD case patients hospitalized at the Albert-Royer National Children's Hospital (French acronym CHNEAR) to evaluate the disease burden of IPDs in a pediatric hospital of Dakar (Senegal). All children aged 0-15 years hospitalized at the CHNEAR between January 1st, 2008 and December 31st, 2013 for a documented IPD were included in the study. Medical history, risk factors, clinical, bacteriological, and outcome data was collected. Data was then analyzed using the SPSS software, version 16 (Pearson's Chi(2) test: a P-valueSenegal. Infants<2 years of age are particularly affected. The very high case fatality (17%) was significantly associated with meningeal infection sites hence the need for better access to pneumococcal vaccines. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  13. Invasive pneumococcal and meningococcal disease : association with influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus activity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, A G S C; Sanders, E A M; VAN DER Ende, A; VAN Loon, A M; Hoes, A W; Hak, E

    2008-01-01

    Few studies have examined the relationship between viral activity and bacterial invasive disease, considering both influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). This study aimed to assess the potential relationship between invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), meningococcal disease (MD), and

  14. Recurrent Invasive Pneumococcal Disease Serotype 12F in a Vaccinated Splenectomized Patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Anne Katrine; Schumacher, Anna Holst; Kantsø, Bjørn

    2016-01-01

    This is the first case report of recurrent invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), specifically, due to serotype 12F. The patient described here was vaccinated with the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) due to previous splenectomy, and an anti-pneumococcal IgG test concluded...

  15. Seasonal invasive pneumococcal disease in children: role of preceding respiratory viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampofo, Krow; Bender, Jeffrey; Sheng, Xiaoming; Korgenski, Kent; Daly, Judy; Pavia, Andrew T; Byington, Carrie L

    2008-08-01

    Our objective was to demonstrate correlations between invasive pneumococcal disease in children and circulating respiratory viruses. This retrospective study included 6 winter respiratory viral seasons (2001-2007) in Intermountain Healthcare, an integrated health system in the Intermountain West, including Primary Children's Medical Center in Salt Lake City, Utah. Children <18 years of age who were hospitalized with either invasive pneumococcal disease in any Intermountain Healthcare facility or culture-confirmed invasive pneumococcal disease at Primary Children's Medical Center were included. We analyzed the correlation between invasive pneumococcal disease and circulating respiratory viruses. A total of 435 children with invasive pneumococcal disease and 203 with culture-confirmed invasive pneumococcal disease were hospitalized in an Intermountain Healthcare facility or Primary Children's Medical Center during the study period. During the same period, 6963 children with respiratory syncytial virus, 1860 with influenza virus, 1459 with parainfluenza virus, and 818 with adenoviruses were evaluated at Primary Children's Medical Center. A total of 253 children with human metapneumovirus were identified during the last 5 months of the study. There were correlations between invasive pneumococcal disease and seasonal respiratory syncytial virus, influenza virus, and human metapneumovirus activity. The correlation with invasive pneumococcal disease was strong up to 4 weeks after respiratory syncytial virus activity. For influenza virus and human metapneumovirus, the correlations were strong at 2 weeks after activity of these viruses. Pneumonia was the most common clinical disease associated with culture-confirmed invasive pneumococcal disease, mostly attributable to serotypes 1, 19A, 3, and 7F. In the post-pneumococcal conjugate vaccine era, seasonal increases in respiratory syncytial virus, influenza virus, and human metapneumovirus infections in children were

  16. Recurrent invasive pneumococcal disease in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingels, Helene; Lambertsen, Lotte; Harboe, Zitta B

    2014-01-01

    , anatomic abnormalities (n = 8), complement C2 deficiency (n = 4), and congenital asplenia (n = 3) were all registered more than once. No underlying disease was detected in 18 children (31%). Based on the serotype distribution of S. pneumoniae isolates in rIPD among children aged 0-5 y (n = 41), 51%, 66...... laboratory-confirmed cases of IPD in children aged 0-15 y were identified from the Neisseria and Streptococcus Reference Laboratory, Statens Serum Institut, Denmark for the period 1980-2013. rIPD was defined as isolation of Streptococcus pneumoniae from any normally sterile site ≥ 30 days after an initial...... positive culture. Clinical data were obtained for all children with rIPD. Results: Of all children with IPD, 2.4% (59/2418) experienced at least 1 episode of rIPD, and an underlying condition was documented in 39 (66%). Immune deficiency due to transplantation (n = 9) was the most common disease; however...

  17. Immunodeficiency among children with recurrent invasive pneumococcal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingels, Helene; Schejbel, Lone; Lundstedt, A C

    2015-01-01

    examined. RESULTS: In total, rIPD were observed in 54 children (68 cases of rIPD of 2192 IPD cases). Children with classical risk factors for IPD were excluded, and among the remaining 22 children, 15 were eligible for analysis. Of these 6 (40%) were complement C2-deficient. Impaired vaccination response......BACKGROUND: Recurrent invasive pneumococcal disease (rIPD) occurs mostly in children with an underlying disease, but some cases remain unexplained. Immunodeficiency has been described in children with rIPD, but the prevalence is unknown. We used a nationwide registry of all laboratory......-confirmed cases of rIPD to identify cases of unexplained rIPD and examine them for immunodeficiency. METHODS: Cases of rIPD in children 0-15 years of age from 1980 to 2008 were identified. Children without an obvious underlying disease were screened for complement function, T-cell, B-cell, natural killer...

  18. Estimated effect of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination on invasive pneumococcal disease and associated mortality, Denmark 2000-2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harboe, Zitta B; Valentiner-Branth, Palle; Benfield, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    In order to provide an estimation of the direct and indirect benefits of pneumococcal vaccination with three protein-conjugate pneumococcal vaccines (PCV) we described the epidemiology and mortality from invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in Denmark between 2000 and 2005. Approximately 1080 cases......% to 91% depending on the PCV used. The mean mortality proportion after IPD was 18%, with approximately 190 deaths annually. One to two deaths among children younger than 5 years and approximately 50 deaths related to IPD caused by vaccine serotypes among older age groups could be prevented annually...

  19. Clinical and bacteriological characteristics of invasive pneumococcal disease after pneumococcal 10-valent conjugate vaccine implementation in Salvador, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Regis Leite

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasive pneumococcal disease is a relevant public health problem in Brazil, especially among children and the elderly. In July/2010 a 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine was introduced to the immunization schedule of Brazilian children under two years of age. Between July/2010 and December/2013 we conducted a case-series study on invasive pneumococcal disease in Salvador, Brazil to describe the clinical and bacteriological profile of invasive pneumococcal disease cases during the post-implementation period. Eighty-two cases were eligible. Mean age was 31 years (interquartile range, 3–42; 17.1% and 30.5% were under 2 years and 5 years, respectively. Pneumococcal meningitis (n = 64, 78.1%, bacteraemic pneumococcal pneumonia (n = 12, 14.6% and bacteraemia (n = 6, 7.3% were the clinical syndromes identified. Thirty-three different serotypes were found. Of these, serotype 14 (n = 12, 14.6% was the most common, followed by 23F (n = 10, 12.2%, 12F (n = 8, 9.8%, 18 C (n = 5, 6.1% and 6B (n = 5, 6.1%. Investigations conducted in Salvador in the pre-vaccine period did not identify serotype 12F as one of the most prevalent serotypes. Increase of serotype 12F was observed in different regions of Brazil, in the post-vaccine period. Among children under two years of age, the target group for 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, 11 (78.6% of the 14 isolated strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae belonged to vaccine serotypes; at least 50% of these children were not vaccinated. The relatively recent implementation of 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in Brazil reinforces the need to maintain an active surveillance of invasive pneumococcal disease cases, considering the possible increase of invasive pneumococcal disease cases related to non-vaccine serotypes and the changes on the clinical presentation of the disease.

  20. Invasive pneumococcal disease in the Netherlands : Syndromes, outcome and potential vaccine benefits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Angelique G. S. C.; Rodenburg, Gerwin D.; de Greeff, Sabine C.; Hak, Eelko; Veenhoven, Reinier H.; Spanjaard, Lodewijk; Schouls, Leo M.; Sanders, Elisabeth A. M.; van der Ende, Arie

    2009-01-01

    With a retrospective study of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) surveillance data representative for similar to 25% of the Dutch population (1275 hospitalized cases) over the period June 2004-June 2006 prior to the implementation of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7), the aim was

  1. Invasive pneumococcal disease in the Netherlands: Syndromes, outcome and potential vaccine benefits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Angelique G. S. C.; Rodenburg, Gerwin D.; de Greeff, Sabine C.; Hak, Eelko; Veenhoven, Reinier H.; Spanjaard, Lodewijk; Schouls, Leo M.; Sanders, Elisabeth A. M.; van der Ende, Arie

    2009-01-01

    With a retrospective study of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) surveillance data representative for approximately 25% of the Dutch population (1275 hospitalized cases) over the period June 2004-June 2006 prior to the implementation of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7), the aim

  2. Immunogenicity of a 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) and impact on carriage in Venezuelan children at risk of invasive pneumococcal diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rivera-Olivero, I.A.; Nogal, B. del; Fuentes, M.; Cortez, R.; Bogaert, D.; Hermans, P.W.M.; Waard, J.H. de

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: We evaluated the immunogenicity of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7), and its impact on pneumococcal carriage in Venezuelan children at high risk for invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). METHODS: 82 children (age 2-59 months) with sickle cell anemia (n=22),

  3. Invasive pneumococcal disease in Danish children, 1996-2007, prior to the introduction of heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Thilde N; Kristensen, Tim D; Kaltoft, Margit S

    2008-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to document the epidemiology, microbiology and outcome of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) among children vaccine (PCV7) into the Danish routine...... children vaccination....... immunization programme October 2007. Methods: Clinical and microbiological records on cases of IPD in children children

  4. Dynamic models of pneumococcal carriage and the impact of the Heptavalent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine on invasive pneumococcal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmunds W John

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine has been introduced in national immunisation programmes of most industrialised countries and recently in two African GAVI eligible countries (Rwanda and The Gambia. However the long term effects of PCV are still unclear, as beneficial direct and herd immunity effects might be countered by serotype replacement. Method A dynamic, age-structured, compartmental model of Streptococcus pneumoniae transmission was developed to predict the potential impact of PCV7 on the incidence of invasive disease accounting for both herd immunity and serotype replacement effects. The model was parameterised using epidemiological data from England and Wales and pre and post-vaccination surveillance data from the US. Results Model projections showed that serotype replacement plays a crucial role in determining the overall effect of a PCV7 vaccination programme and could reduce, negate or outweigh its beneficial impact. However, using the estimate of the competition parameter derived from the US post-vaccination experience, an infant vaccination programme would prevent 39,000 IPD cases in the 20 years after PCV7 introduction in the UK. Adding a catch-up campaign for under 2 or under 5 year olds would provide a further reduction of 1,200 or 3,300 IPD cases respectively, mostly in the first few years of the programme. Conclusions This analysis suggests that a PCV vaccination programme would eradicate vaccine serotypes from circulation. However, the increase in carriage of non-vaccine serotypes, and the consequent increase in invasive disease, could reduce, negate or outweigh the benefit. These results are sensitive to changes in the protective effect of the vaccine, and, most importantly, to the level of competition between vaccine and non-vaccine types. The techniques developed here can be used to assess the introduction of vaccination programmes in developing countries and provide the basis for cost

  5. Estimated effect of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination on invasive pneumococcal disease and associated mortality, Denmark 2000-2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harboe, Z.B.; Valentiner-Branth, P.; Benfield, T.L.

    2008-01-01

    In order to provide an estimation of the direct and indirect benefits of pneumococcal vaccination with three protein-conjugate pneumococcal vaccines (PCV) we described the epidemiology and mortality from invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in Denmark between 2000 and 2005. Approximately 1080 cases......% to 91% depending on the PCV used. The mean mortality proportion after IPD was 18%, with approximately 190 deaths annually. One to two deaths among children younger than 5 years and approximately 50 deaths related to IPD caused by vaccine serotypes among older age groups could be prevented annually...... were registered annually during the period. The overall incidence of IPD increased significantly, from 15.4 cases per 100,000 population in 2000 to 20.7 cases per 100,000 in 2005 (pcases. The serotype coverage in children under 5 years varied from 64...

  6. Estimated effect of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination on invasive pneumococcal disease and associated mortality, Denmark 2000-2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harboe, Z.B.; Valentiner-Branth, P.; Benfield, T.L.

    2008-01-01

    % to 91% depending on the PCV used. The mean mortality proportion after IPD was 18%, with approximately 190 deaths annually. One to two deaths among children younger than 5 years and approximately 50 deaths related to IPD caused by vaccine serotypes among older age groups could be prevented annually......In order to provide an estimation of the direct and indirect benefits of pneumococcal vaccination with three protein-conjugate pneumococcal vaccines (PCV) we described the epidemiology and mortality from invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in Denmark between 2000 and 2005. Approximately 1080 cases...... were registered annually during the period. The overall incidence of IPD increased significantly, from 15.4 cases per 100,000 population in 2000 to 20.7 cases per 100,000 in 2005 (pchildren under 5 years varied from 64...

  7. Invasive pneumococcal disease in patients with haematological malignancies before routine use of conjugate vaccines in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, Vesa; Aittoniemi, Janne; Lyytikäinen, Outi; Klemets, Peter; Ollgren, Jukka; Silvennoinen, Raija; Nuorti, J Pekka; Sinisalo, Marjatta

    2016-01-01

    The baseline national invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) incidence rate, serotype distribution and serotype coverage of pneumococcal vaccines were evaluated in patients with Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, myeloma and leukaemia within 1 year after haematological diagnosis during 1995-2002, before introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines. Pneumococcal serotype distribution among these patients was different from serotypes causing IPD in the general population. The serotype coverages of PCV13 and PPSV23 were 57% and 64%, respectively, lower than in the general population. This reflects a higher predisposition to IPD in vaccinated patients with haematological malignancies and possibly less benefit of herd immunity gained with the wide use of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines in the general population. This data will be useful as a baseline for determining the future role of adult PCV vaccination in these patient groups.

  8. Population-based surveillance for invasive pneumococcal disease in homeless adults in Toronto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plevneshi, Agron; Svoboda, Tomislav; Armstrong, Irene; Tyrrell, Gregory J; Miranda, Anna; Green, Karen; Low, Donald; McGeer, Allison

    2009-09-29

    Identification of high-risk populations for serious infection due to S. pneumoniae will permit appropriately targeted prevention programs. We conducted prospective, population-based surveillance for invasive pneumococcal disease and laboratory confirmed pneumococcal pneumonia in homeless adults in Toronto, a Canadian city with a total population of 2.5 M, from January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2006. We identified 69 cases of invasive pneumococcal disease and 27 cases of laboratory confirmed pneumococcal pneumonia in an estimated population of 5050 homeless adults. The incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease in homeless adults was 273 infections per 100,000 persons per year, compared to 9 per 100,000 persons per year in the general adult population. Homeless persons with invasive pneumococcal disease were younger than other adults (median age 46 years vs 67 years, Pdrugs (42% vs 4%, Phomeless than other adults (7/58, 12% vs. 24/943, 2.5%, Phomeless adults, 28 (32%) of pneumococcal isolates were of serotypes included in the 7-valent conjugate vaccine, 42 (48%) of serotypes included in the 13-valent conjugate vaccine, and 72 (83%) of serotypes included in the 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine. Although no outbreaks of disease were identified in shelters, there was evidence of clustering of serotypes suggestive of transmission of pathogenic strains within the homeless population. Homeless persons are at high risk of serious pneumococcal infection. Vaccination, physical structure changes or other program to reduce transmission in shelters, harm reduction programs to reduce rates of smoking, alcohol abuse and infection with bloodborne pathogens, and improved treatment programs for HIV infection may all be effective in reducing the risk.

  9. Invasive pneumococcal disease and the potential for prevention by vaccination in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, H K; Metcalf, S C; Tomlin, K; Read, R C; Dockrell, D H

    2007-05-01

    Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) is associated with a high mortality despite antimicrobial therapy, but may be preventable by pneumococcal vaccination. The extent of previous exposure to pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide vaccination prior to an episode of IPD in hospitalised adults in the United Kingdom is unclear. We conducted a retrospective cohort study in adults with IPD admitted to either of two teaching hospitals in Sheffield, United Kingdom during 1992-2000. Receipt of pneumococcal vaccination, risk factors for IPD, death and disability were determined. The number of cases of IPD was 552 and 187/230 patient records from one site were reviewed. According to UK pneumococcal vaccination guidelines 59% of patients should have received the vaccine and 76% of patients if updated guidelines, which include age>65 years as an indication, are applied. In patients with known risk factors, excluding age, only 8% had been vaccinated. The mortality from IPD was 21% and an additional 6% suffered major complications. In patients hospitalised with IPD there is a high rate of pre-existing risk factors and a low rate of administration of pneumococcal vaccination. IPD incurs significant mortality, morbidity and economic cost and there is potential for reducing this by improved uptake of pneumococcal vaccination.

  10. Population-based surveillance for invasive pneumococcal disease in homeless adults in Toronto.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agron Plevneshi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Identification of high-risk populations for serious infection due to S. pneumoniae will permit appropriately targeted prevention programs. METHODS: We conducted prospective, population-based surveillance for invasive pneumococcal disease and laboratory confirmed pneumococcal pneumonia in homeless adults in Toronto, a Canadian city with a total population of 2.5 M, from January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2006. RESULTS: We identified 69 cases of invasive pneumococcal disease and 27 cases of laboratory confirmed pneumococcal pneumonia in an estimated population of 5050 homeless adults. The incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease in homeless adults was 273 infections per 100,000 persons per year, compared to 9 per 100,000 persons per year in the general adult population. Homeless persons with invasive pneumococcal disease were younger than other adults (median age 46 years vs 67 years, P<.001, and more likely than other adults to be smokers (95% vs. 31%, P<.001, to abuse alcohol (62% vs 15%, P<.001, and to use intravenous drugs (42% vs 4%, P<.001. Relative to age matched controls, they were more likely to have underlying lung disease (12/69, 17% vs 17/272, 6%, P = .006, but not more likely to be HIV infected (17/69, 25% vs 58/282, 21%, P = .73. The proportion of patients with recurrent disease was five fold higher for homeless than other adults (7/58, 12% vs. 24/943, 2.5%, P<.001. In homeless adults, 28 (32% of pneumococcal isolates were of serotypes included in the 7-valent conjugate vaccine, 42 (48% of serotypes included in the 13-valent conjugate vaccine, and 72 (83% of serotypes included in the 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine. Although no outbreaks of disease were identified in shelters, there was evidence of clustering of serotypes suggestive of transmission of pathogenic strains within the homeless population. CONCLUSIONS: Homeless persons are at high risk of serious pneumococcal infection. Vaccination, physical structure changes

  11. An eHealth Project on Invasive Pneumococcal Disease: Comprehensive Evaluation of a Promotional Campaign

    OpenAIRE

    Panatto, Donatella; Domnich, Alexander; Gasparini, Roberto; Bonanni, Paolo; Icardi, Giancarlo; Amicizia, Daniela; Arata, Lucia; Carozzo, Stefano; Signori, Alessio; Bechini, Angela; Boccalini, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Background The recently launched Pneumo Rischio eHealth project, which consists of an app, a website, and social networking activity, is aimed at increasing public awareness of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). The launch of this project was prompted by the inadequate awareness of IPD among both laypeople and health care workers, the heavy socioeconomic burden of IPD, and the far from optimal vaccination coverage in Italy, despite the availability of safe and effective vaccines. Objective ...

  12. Invasive Pneumococcal Disease: Still Lots to Learn and a Need for Standardized Data Collection Instruments

    OpenAIRE

    Marrie, T. J.; Tyrrell, G. J.; Majumdar, Sumit R.; Eurich, Dean T.

    2017-01-01

    Background. Large studies of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) are frequently lacking detailed clinical information. Methods. A population-based 15-year study of IPD in Northern Alberta. Results. 2435 patients with a mean age of 54.2 years formed the study group. Males outnumbered females and Aboriginal and homeless persons were overrepresented. High rates of smoking, excessive alcohol use, and illicit drug use were seen. Almost all (87%) had a major comorbidity and 15% had functional limit...

  13. Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients Are at Increased Risk of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantsø, Bjørn; Simonsen, Jacob; Hoffmann, Steen

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), Crohn's disease (CD), and ulcerative colitis (UC) are chronic diseases characterized by an inappropriate immune response, which may also increase the risk of infections. We investigated the risk of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) before and after...... to a constant level, which for CD was significantly increased (approximately twofold, HR, 1.99; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.59-2.49) and for UC non-significantly just above 1. IBD medication use including tumor necrosis factor alpha antagonists had limited impact on the risk of IPD, although having ever...... the risk according to ever use of specific IBD medications. Next, using conditional logistic regression, we evaluated the odds of IPD prior to IBD diagnosis. RESULTS: The HRs for IPD within the first 6 months after IBD diagnosis were significantly and more than threefold increased and then decreased...

  14. Type I interferon protects against pneumococcal invasive disease by inhibiting bacterial transmigration across the lung.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim S LeMessurier

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae infection is a leading cause of bacterial pneumonia, sepsis and meningitis and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Type I interferon (IFN-I, whose contribution to antiviral and intracellular bacterial immunity is well established, is also elicited during pneumococcal infection, yet its functional significance is not well defined. Here, we show that IFN-I plays an important role in the host defense against pneumococci by counteracting the transmigration of bacteria from the lung to the blood. Mice that lack the type I interferon receptor (Ifnar1 (-/- or mice that were treated with a neutralizing antibody against the type I interferon receptor, exhibited enhanced development of bacteremia following intranasal pneumococcal infection, while maintaining comparable bacterial numbers in the lung. In turn, treatment of mice with IFNβ or IFN-I-inducing synthetic double stranded RNA (poly(I:C, dramatically reduced the development of bacteremia following intranasal infection with S. pneumoniae. IFNβ treatment led to upregulation of tight junction proteins and downregulation of the pneumococcal uptake receptor, platelet activating factor receptor (PAF receptor. In accordance with these findings, IFN-I reduced pneumococcal cell invasion and transmigration across epithelial and endothelial layers, and Ifnar1 (-/- mice showed overall enhanced lung permeability. As such, our data identify IFN-I as an important component of the host immune defense that regulates two possible mechanisms involved in pneumococcal invasion, i.e. PAF receptor-mediated transcytosis and tight junction-dependent pericellular migration, ultimately limiting progression from a site-restricted lung infection to invasive, lethal disease.

  15. [Recurrent invasive pneumococcal disease in a patient with IgG-κ smoldering multiple myeloma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Masahiro; Oshimi, Kazuo; Matsukawa, Toshihiro; Okada, Kouhei; Miyagishima, Takuto

    A 68-year-old female with smoldering multiple myeloma (IgG-κ type) was admitted to the hospital owing to general fatigue, fever, and pain in the right leg. On the day following admission, she developed shock, and a blood culture revealed Streptococcus pneumoniae. She was diagnosed with septic shock and invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). She received antibiotics and intravenous immunoglobulin and improved after several days. She had a history of recurrent IPD and had received the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine 23 (PPSV23) 2 years earlier. Therefore, we inquired with the National Institute of Infectious Diseases if the pneumococcal serotype isolated from her present IPD contained PPSV23. The results showed that her serotype was 19F, a serotype present in PPSV23. We administered pneumococcal conjugate vaccine 13 (PCV13) ; however, she was unable to mount high enough opsonophagocytic assay titers against some serotypes, including 19F. We think she was unable to mount effective humoral immune responses to PPSV23 or PCV13 owing to her underlying disease, smoldering myeloma. It should be considered how IPD can be effectively prevented in patients with multiple myeloma.

  16. Diagnostic value of serum pneumococcal DNA load during invasive pneumococcal infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, A.J.H.; Hagen, F.; Hermans, P.W.M.; Meis, J.F.G.M.; Ferwerda, G.

    2014-01-01

    Detection of pneumococcal DNA in blood could be a fast alternative for blood culture in invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). In this study we compared the diagnostic value of the serum pneumococcal DNA load between different clinical syndromes in adults with bacteremic pneumococcal infections, also

  17. A reflection on invasive pneumococcal disease and pneumococcal conjugate vaccination coverage in children in Southern Europe (2009-2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Marta; Castro, Olga; Palmieri, Melissa; Efklidou, Sofia; Castagna, Stefano; Hoet, Bernard

    2017-06-03

    Higher-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) were licensed from 2009 in Europe; similar worldwide clinical effectiveness was observed for PCVs in routine use. Despite a proven medical need, PCV vaccination in Southern Europe remained suboptimal until 2015/16. We searched PubMed for manuscripts published between 2009 and mid-2016. Included manuscripts had to contain data about invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) incidence, or vaccination coverage with higher-valent PCVs. This review represents the first analysis of vaccination coverage and impact of higher-valent PCVs on overall IPD in Southern European countries (Portugal, Spain, Italy, Greece, Cyprus). Vaccination coverage in the Portuguese private market peaked around 2008 at 75% (children ≤ 2 years) but declined to 63% in 2012. In Madrid, coverage was 95% (2007-2012) but dropped to 67% (2013/14; children ≤ 2 years) after funding termination in May 2012. PCVs were recently introduced in the national immunisation program (NIP) of Portugal (2015) and Spain (2015/16). In Italy, coverage for the complete PCV schedule (children ≤ 2 years) was 88% in 2013, although highly variable between regions (45-99%). In Greece, in 2013, 82.3% had received 3 PCV doses by 12 months, while 62.3% received the fourth dose by 24 months. Overall IPD (net benefit: effect on vaccine types, vaccine-related types, and non-vaccine types) has decreased; in Greece, pneumococcal meningitis incidence remained stable. Continued IPD surveillance or national registers using ICD-10 codes of clinically suspected IPD are necessary, with timely publicly available reports and adequate national vaccination registers to assess trends in vaccination coverage, allowing evaluation of PCVs in NIPs.

  18. Early effectiveness of heptavalent conjugate pneumococcal vaccination on invasive pneumococcal disease after the introduction in the Danish Childhood Immunization Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harboe, Zitta B.; Valentiner-Branth, Palle; Benfield, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of the heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) on invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) 1 year after PCV7's introduction in the childhood immunization programme through a nationwide cohort study based on laboratory surveillance data. There was a decline...... in the overall incidence of IPD from 19.4 to 17.1 cases per 100,000 population (incidence rate ratios (IRR) 0.87; 95% confidence interval (CI) [0.81-0.96]), and of meningitis from 1.56 to 1.16 (IRR 0.74; 95% CI [0.57-0.97]) comparing pre-PCV7 (years 2000-2007) and PCV7 (year 2008) periods. In children ..., the incidence decreased from 54 to 23 cases per 100,000 (IRR 0.43; 95% CI [0.29-0.62]) and for vaccine-serotypes from 36.7 to 7.7 (IRR 0.20; 95% CI [0.09-0.38]). The incidence of IPD declined approximately 10% (IRR 0.90; 95% CI [0.84-0.97]) in patients aged >or=2 years. The case fatality was 17% in both periods...

  19. Serotype 5 pneumococci causing invasive pneumococcal disease outbreaks in Barcelona, Spain (1997 to 2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolo, Dora; Fenoll, Asunción; Fontanals, Dionísia; Larrosa, Nieves; Giménez, Montserrat; Grau, Immaculada; Pallarés, Román; Liñares, Josefina; Ardanuy, Carmen

    2013-11-01

    In this study, we analyzed the clinical and molecular epidemiology of invasive serotype 5 (Ser5) pneumococcal isolates in four teaching hospitals in the Barcelona, Spain, area (from 1997 to 2011). Among 5,093 invasive pneumococcal isolates collected, 134 (2.6%) Ser5 isolates were detected. Although the overall incidence of Ser5-related invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) was low (0.25 cases/100,000 inhabitants), three incidence peaks were detected: 0.63/100,000 in 1999, 1.15/100,000 in 2005, and 0.37/100,000 in 2009. The rates of Ser5 IPD were higher among young adults (18 to 64 years old) and older adults (>64 years old) in the first two peaks, whereas they were higher among children in 2009. The majority (88.8%) of the patients presented with pneumonia. Comorbid conditions were present in young adults (47.6%) and older adults (78.7%), the most common comorbid conditions being chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (20.6% and 38.3%, respectively) and cardiovascular diseases (11.1% and 38.3%, respectively). The mortality rates were higher among older adults (8.5%). All Ser5 pneumococci tested were fully susceptible to penicillin, cefotaxime, erythromycin, and ciprofloxacin. The resistance rates were 48.5% for co-trimoxazole, 6.7% for chloramphenicol, and 6% for tetracycline. Two major related sequence types (STs), ST1223 (n = 65) and ST289 (n = 61), were detected. The Colombia(5)-ST289 clone was responsible for all the cases in the Ser5 outbreak in 1999, whereas the ST1223 clone accounted for 73.8% and 61.5% of the isolates in 2005 and 2009, respectively. Ser5 pneumococci are a frequent cause of IPD outbreaks in the community and involve children and adults with or without comorbidities. The implementation of the new pneumococcal conjugated vaccines (PCV10 and PCV13) might prevent such outbreaks.

  20. Minimum incidence of adult invasive pneumococcal disease in Blantyre, Malawi an urban african setting: a hospital based prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Zeev, Naor; Mtunthama, Neema; Gordon, Stephen B; Mwafulirwa, Gershom; French, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Invasive pneumococcal disease causes substantial morbidity and mortality in Africa. Evaluating population level indirect impact on adult disease of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) programmes in infants requires baseline population incidence rates but these are often lacking in areas with limited disease surveillance. We used hospital based blood culture and cerebrospinal fluid surveillance to calculate minimal incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease in the adult (≥15 years old) population of Blantyre, a rapidly growing urban centre in southern Malawi, in the period preceding vaccine introduction. Invasive pneumococcal disease incidence in Blantyre district was high, mean 58.1 (95% confidence interval (CI): 53.7, 62.7) per 100,000 person years and peaking among 35 to 40 year olds at 108.8 (95%CI: 89.0, 131.7) mirroring the population age prevalence of HIV infection. For pneumococcal bacteraemia in urban Blantyre, mean incidence was 60.6 (95% CI: 55.2, 66.5) per 100,000 person years, peaking among 35 to 40 year olds at 114.8 (95%CI: 90.3, 143.9). We suspected that our surveillance may under-ascertain the true burden of disease, so we used location data from bacteraemic subjects and projected population estimates to calculate local sub-district incidence, then examined the impact of community level socio-demographic covariates as possible predictors of local sub-district incidence of pneumococcal and non-pneumococcal pathogenic bacteraemia. Geographic heterogeneity in incidence was marked with localised hotspots but ward level covariates apart from prison were not associated with pneumococcal bacteraemia incidence. Modelling suggests that the current sentinel surveillance system under-ascertains the true burden of disease. We outline a number of challenges to surveillance for pneumococcal disease in our low-resource setting. Subsequent surveillance in the vaccine era will have to account for geographic heterogeneity when evaluating population level indirect

  1. Minimum incidence of adult invasive pneumococcal disease in Blantyre, Malawi an urban african setting: a hospital based prospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naor Bar-Zeev

    Full Text Available Invasive pneumococcal disease causes substantial morbidity and mortality in Africa. Evaluating population level indirect impact on adult disease of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV programmes in infants requires baseline population incidence rates but these are often lacking in areas with limited disease surveillance. We used hospital based blood culture and cerebrospinal fluid surveillance to calculate minimal incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease in the adult (≥15 years old population of Blantyre, a rapidly growing urban centre in southern Malawi, in the period preceding vaccine introduction. Invasive pneumococcal disease incidence in Blantyre district was high, mean 58.1 (95% confidence interval (CI: 53.7, 62.7 per 100,000 person years and peaking among 35 to 40 year olds at 108.8 (95%CI: 89.0, 131.7 mirroring the population age prevalence of HIV infection. For pneumococcal bacteraemia in urban Blantyre, mean incidence was 60.6 (95% CI: 55.2, 66.5 per 100,000 person years, peaking among 35 to 40 year olds at 114.8 (95%CI: 90.3, 143.9. We suspected that our surveillance may under-ascertain the true burden of disease, so we used location data from bacteraemic subjects and projected population estimates to calculate local sub-district incidence, then examined the impact of community level socio-demographic covariates as possible predictors of local sub-district incidence of pneumococcal and non-pneumococcal pathogenic bacteraemia. Geographic heterogeneity in incidence was marked with localised hotspots but ward level covariates apart from prison were not associated with pneumococcal bacteraemia incidence. Modelling suggests that the current sentinel surveillance system under-ascertains the true burden of disease. We outline a number of challenges to surveillance for pneumococcal disease in our low-resource setting. Subsequent surveillance in the vaccine era will have to account for geographic heterogeneity when evaluating population

  2. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal to Legionellosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal to Legionellosis - 2016. In this Table, provisional* cases of selected†notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during...

  3. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal to Legionellosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal to Legionellosis - 2015.In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  4. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal to Legionellosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal to Legionellosis - 2015.In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  5. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal to Legionellosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal to Legionellosis - 2016. In this Table, provisional* cases of selected† notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  6. Effects of Infant Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccination on Serotype Distribution in Invasive Pneumococcal Disease among Children and Adults in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linden, Mark; Falkenhorst, Gerhard; Perniciaro, Stephanie; Imöhl, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the effects of the introduction of universal infant pneumococcal conjugate vaccination in 2006 on invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) among children and adults in Germany with a focus on the dynamics of serotype distribution in vaccinated and non-vaccinated age groups. Over a period of 22 years (1992-2014), microbiological diagnostic laboratories from all over Germany have been sending isolates of IPD cases to the German National Reference Center for Streptococci on a voluntary basis. Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates were serotyped using Neufeld's Quellung method. Among children vaccination (1997-2006) to 23.5% in the early vaccination period (2007-2010; p = 1.30E-72) and sank further to 5.2% in the late vaccination period (2010-2014; p = 4.59E-25). Similar reductions were seen for the separate age groups vaccination period (1992-2006) to 24.7% (p = 3.78E-88) in the early vaccination period and 8.2% (p = 5.97E-161) in the late vaccination period. Both among children and among adults, the non-PCV7 serotypes 1, 3, 7F and 19A significantly increased in the early vaccination period. After the switch from PCV7 to PVC10/PCV13 for infant vaccination in 2010, serotypes 1, 6A and 7F significantly decreased. A decrease in serotype 19A was only observed in 2013-2014, as compared to 2010-2011 (children p = 4.16E-04, adults p = 6.98E-06). Among adults, serotype 3, which strongly increased in the early vaccination period (p = 4.44E-15), remained at a constant proportion in the late vaccination period. The proportion of non-PCV13 vaccine serotypes increased over the whole vaccination period, with serotypes 10A, 12F, 23B, 24F and 38 most significantly increasing among children and serotypes 6C, 12F, 15A, 22F and 23B increasing among adults. Eight years of childhood pneumococcal conjugate vaccination have had a strong effect on the pneumococcal population in Germany, both among the target group for vaccination as well as among older children and adults.

  7. Antimicrobial resistance among isolates causing invasive pneumococcal disease before and after licensure of heptavalent conjugate pneumococcal vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Theodore Karnezis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The impact of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-7 on antibiotic resistance among pneumococcal strains causing invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD has varied in different locales in the United States. We assessed trends in IPD including trends for IPD caused by penicillin non-susceptible strains before and after licensure of PCV-7 and the impact of the 2008 susceptibility breakpoints for penicillin on the epidemiology of resistance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed a retrospective review of IPD cases at Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital of New York-Presbyterian, Columbia University Medical Center. Subjects were < or = 18 years of age with Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from sterile body sites from January 1995-December 2006. The rate of IPD from 1995-1999 versus 2002-2006 significantly decreased from 4.1 (CI(95 3.4, 4.8 to 1.7 (CI(95 1.3, 2.2 per 1,000 admissions. Using the breakpoints in place during the study period, the proportion of penicillin non-susceptible strains increased from 27% to 49% in the pre- vs. post-PCV-7 era, respectively (p = 0.001, although the rate of IPD caused by non-susceptible strains did not change from 1995-1999 (1.1 per 1,000 admissions, CI(95 0.8, 1.5 when compared with 2002-2006 (0.8 per 1,000 admissions, CI(95 0.6, 1.2. In the multivariate logistic regression model controlling for the effects of age, strains causing IPD in the post-PCV-7 era were significantly more likely to be penicillin non-susceptible compared with strains in the pre-PCV-7 era (OR 2.46, CI(95 1.37, 4.40. However, using the 2008 breakpoints for penicillin, only 8% of strains were non-susceptible in the post-PCV-7 era. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: To date, there are few reports that document an increase in the relative proportion of penicillin non-susceptible strains of pneumococci causing IPD following the introduction of PCV-7. Active surveillance of pneumococcal serotypes and antibiotic resistance using the new

  8. Impact of 13-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccination in Invasive Pneumococcal Disease Incidence and Mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harboe, Zitta Barrella; Dalby, Tine; Weinberger, Daniel M

    2014-01-01

    or expected as a part of natural, cyclical variations. METHODS: This was a Danish nationwide population-based cohort study based on the linkage of laboratory surveillance data and the Danish Civil Registration System. Changes in IPD incidence and mortality during baseline (2000-2007), 7-valent pneumococcal...... from natural cyclical patterns. Serotype 19A significantly increased following PCV7's introduction, but the incidence declined toward baseline in 2012. CONCLUSIONS: PCV13 has brought greater benefits than we had expected in our setting. We observed a further decline on IPD incidence shortly after...... the shift from PCV7 to PCV13 in the national immunization program. This decline was accompanied by a substantial population-level decline in pneumococcal-related mortality of nearly 30% among nonvaccinated persons....

  9. Which individuals are at increased risk of pneumococcal disease and why? Impact of COPD, asthma, smoking, diabetes, and/or chronic heart disease on community-acquired pneumonia and invasive pneumococcal disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Antoni; Blasi, Francesco; Dartois, Nathalie; Akova, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Pneumococcal disease (including community-acquired pneumonia and invasive pneumococcal disease) poses a burden to the community all year round, especially in those with chronic underlying conditions. Individuals with COPD, asthma or who smoke, and those with chronic heart disease or diabetes mellitus have been shown to be at increased risk of pneumococcal disease compared with those without these risk factors. These conditions, and smoking, can also adversely affect patient outcomes, including short-term and long-term mortality rates, following pneumonia. Community-acquired pneumonia, and in particular pneumococcal pneumonia, is associated with a significant economic burden, especially in those who are hospitalised, and also has an impact on a patient's quality of life. Therefore, physicians should target individuals with COPD, asthma, heart disease or diabetes mellitus, and those who smoke, for pneumococcal vaccination at the earliest opportunity at any time of the year. PMID:26219979

  10. Pneumococcal colonization and invasive disease studied in a porcine model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greeff, de Astrid; Selm, van Saskia; Buys, Herma; Harders-Westerveen, José F.; Tunjungputri, Rahajeng N.; Mast, de Quirijn; Ven, van der Andre J.; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, Norbert; Jonge, de Marien I.; Smith, Hilde E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Streptococcus pneumoniae, a Gram-positive bacterium carried in the human nasopharynx, is an important human pathogen causing mild diseases such as otitis media and sinusitis as well as severe diseases including pneumonia, meningitis and sepsis. There is a strong resemblance between

  11. Pneumococcal colonization and invasive disease studied in a porcine model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greeff, A. De; Selm, S. van; Buys, H.; Harders-Westerveen, J.F.; Tunjungputri, R.N.; Mast, Q. de; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, N.; Jonge, M.I. de; Smith, H.E.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Streptococcus pneumoniae, a Gram-positive bacterium carried in the human nasopharynx, is an important human pathogen causing mild diseases such as otitis media and sinusitis as well as severe diseases including pneumonia, meningitis and sepsis. There is a strong resemblance between the

  12. [Streptococcus pneumoniae Vaccination in Children and Adolescents at High Risk of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tendais-Almeida, Marta; Ferreira-Magalhães, Manuel; Alves, Inês; Tavares, Margarida; Azevedo, Inês

    2015-01-01

    In Portugal, pneumococcal vaccination is free of charge and recommended by the Directorate-General of Health for the pediatric population at high risk of invasive pneumococcal disease. Our main aim was to describe the vaccination uptake in a pediatric population attending a hospital outpatient clinic. Cross-sectional observational survey of a pediatric population attending a referral hospital outpatient clinic, from July to December 2014. Data was collected from clinical records, Individual Health Bulletin or the registry from Plataforma de Dados da Saúde®. Of the 122 participants, 95.9% had, at least, one shot of pneumococcal vaccine, but only 64.8% of these completed the age recommended vaccination scheme. Uptake was higher in children 5 years old had a higher uptake of 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine than the 2 to 5-years old ones (74.5% vs 40.5%; p < 0.001). Most of our pediatric population at high risk of IPD was vaccinated; nevertheless, only two-thirds had completed the scheme for their age. The main failure was on the 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine administration. Although these results are better than those reported in other European countries with similar recommendations, it is essential to explore the causes for the observed flaws in order to optimize vaccination rates.

  13. Effect of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine on invasive pneumococcal disease in England and Wales 4 years after its introduction: an observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waight, Pauline A; Andrews, Nicholas J; Ladhani, Shamez N; Sheppard, Carmen L; Slack, Mary P E; Miller, Elizabeth

    2015-05-01

    The 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) protects against key serotypes that increased after routine immunisation with the seven-valent vaccine (PCV7), but its potential for herd protection and serotype replacement is uncertain. The aim of this study was to analyse the effect of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine on invasive pneumococcal disease in England and Wales 4 years after its introduction. We used a national dataset of electronically reported and serotyped invasive pneumococcal disease cases in England and Wales to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRRs) for vaccine and non-vaccine type invasive pneumococcal disease between July, 2013, and June, 2014, versus the pre-PCV13 and pre-PCV7 baseline. Incidence rates were corrected for missing serotype data and changes in surveillance sensitivity over time. An over-dispersed Poisson model was used to estimate IRRs and confidence intervals. Incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease in the epidemiological year 2013/14 decreased by 32% compared with the pre-PCV13 baseline (incidence 10·14 per 100,000 in 2008-10 vs 6·85 per 100,000 in 2013/14; IRR 0·68, 95% CI 0·64-0·72). This was due to an 86% reduction of the serotypes covered by PCV7 (1·46 vs 0·20 per 100,000; IRR 0·14, 0·10-0·18) and a 69% reduction of the additional six serotypes covered by PCV13 (4·48 vs 1·40 per 100,000; IRR 0·31, 0·28-0·35). When compared with the pre-PCV7 baseline, there was a 56% overall reduction in invasive pneumococcal disease (15·63 vs 6·85 per 100,000; IRR 0·44, 95% CI 0·43-0·47). Compared with the pre-PCV13 baseline, the incidence of non-PCV13 serotypes increased (incidence all ages 4·19 vs 5·25 per 100,000; IRR 1·25, 95% CI 1·17-1·35) due to increases across a broad range of serotypes in children younger than 5 years and in people aged 45 years or more. In children younger than 5 years, incidence of non-PCV13 serotypes in 2013/14 was higher than in 2012/13 (age Wales has reduced the

  14. Recurrent invasive pneumococcal disease in children: underlying clinical conditions, and immunological and microbiological characteristics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laia Alsina

    Full Text Available Clinical, immunological and microbiological characteristics of recurrent invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD in children were evaluated, differentiating relapse from reinfection, in order to identify specific risk factors for both conditions.All patients <18 years-old with recurrent IPD admitted to a tertiary-care pediatric center from January 2004 to December 2011 were evaluated. An episode of IPD was defined as the presence of clinical findings of infection together with isolation and/or pneumococcal DNA detection by Real-Time PCR in any sterile body fluid. Recurrent IPD was defined as 2 or more episodes in the same individual at least 1 month apart. Among recurrent IPD, we differentiated relapse (same pneumococcal isolate from reinfection.593 patients were diagnosed with IPD and 10 patients died. Among survivors, 23 episodes of recurrent IPD were identified in 10 patients (1.7%. Meningitis was the most frequent form of recurrent IPD (10 episodes/4 children followed by recurrent empyema (8 episodes/4 children. Three patients with recurrent empyema caused by the same pneumococcal clone ST306 were considered relapses and showed high bacterial load in their first episode. In contrast, all other episodes of recurrent IPD were considered reinfections. Overall, the rate of relapse of IPD was 0.5% and the rate of reinfection 1.2%. Five out of 7 patients with reinfection had an underlying risk factor: cerebrospinal fluid leak (n = 3, chemotherapy treatment (n = 1 and a homozygous mutation in MyD88 gene (n = 1. No predisposing risk factors were found in the remainder.recurrent IPD in children is a rare condition associated with an identifiable risk factor in case of reinfection in almost 80% of cases. In contrast, recurrent IPD with pleuropneumonia is usually a relapse of infection.

  15. Mannose-binding lectin gene, MBL2, polymorphisms are not associated with susceptibility to invasive pneumococcal disease in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbo, Lene Fogt; Harboe, Zitta Barrella; Clausen, Louise Nygaard

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Most children are transiently colonized with Streptococcus pneumoniae, but very few develop invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). Host genetic variation of innate immunity may predispose to IPD. We investigated the effect of genetic variation in the mannose-binding lectin gene, MBL2......, on susceptibility and disease severity of IPD in previously healthy children aged

  16. Clinical and microbiological characteristics of unusual manifestations of invasive pneumococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Adrian; Pérez-Rodríguez, Maria Teresa; Nodar, Andrés; Martínez-Lamas, Lucía; Vasallo, Francisco Jose; Álvarez-Fernández, Maximiliano; Crespo, Manuel

    2017-06-22

    Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) typically presents as bacterial pneumonia, meningitis or primary bacteraemia. However, Streptococcus pneumoniae can produce infection at any level of the body (endocarditis, arthritis, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, etc.), which is also known as unusual IPD (uIPD). There are very limited data available about the clinical and microbiological profile of these uncommon manifestations of pneumococcal disease. Our aim was to analyse clinical forms, microbiological profile, epidemiology and prognosis of a cohort of patients with unusual invasive pneumococcal disease (uIPD). We present a retrospective study of 389 patients (all adult and paediatric patients diagnosed during the period) diagnosed with IPD at our hospital (Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Vigo) between 1992 and 2014. We performed an analysis of clinical, microbiological and demographical characteristics of patients comparing the pre-pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) period with the post-vaccination phase. IPD and uIPD were defined as follows; IPD: infection confirmed by the isolation of S. pneumoniae from a normally sterile site, which classically presented as bacterial pneumonia, meningitis or primary bacteraemia; uIPD: any case of IPD excluding pneumonia, meningitis, otitis media, rhinosinusitis or primary bacteraemia. A total of 22 patients (6%) met the criteria of uIPD. A Charlson index >2 was more prevalent in uIPD patients than IPD patients (45% vs 24%; p=0.08). The most common clinical presentation of uIPD was osteoarticular infection (8 patients, 36%), followed by gastrointestinal disease (4 patients, 18%). Infection with serotypes included in PCV-13 was significantly higher in IPD patients (65%) than in patients with uIPD, 35% (p=0.018). Conversely, infection with multidrug-resistant strains was higher among patient with uIPD (27% vs 9%; p=0.014). The all-cause mortality rate was 15%, 13% in the IPD group and 32% among patients with uIPD (p=0

  17. Long-term impact of 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccination on invasive pneumococcal disease among children in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinta-Kokko, Hanna; Palmu, Arto A; Auranen, Kari; Nuorti, J Pekka; Toropainen, Maija; Siira, Lotta; Virtanen, Mikko J; Nohynek, Hanna; Jokinen, Jukka

    2018-04-05

    The ten-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV10) was introduced into the Finnish National Vaccination Programme (NVP) in September 2010. The impact of PCV10 vaccination against invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in vaccine-eligible children has been high. We evaluated the long-term impact of PCV10 vaccination against IPD in vaccine-eligible and older, unvaccinated children six years after PCV10 introduction with a special focus on cross-protection against PCV10-related serotypes (serotypes in the same serogroups as the PCV10 types). We used data on IPD from the national, population-based surveillance. A target cohort of vaccine-eligible children (born June 2010 or later) was followed from 3 months of age until the end of 2016. For the indirect effect, another cohort of older PCV10-ineligible children was followed from 2012 through 2016. IPD rates were compared with those of season- and age-matched reference cohorts before NVP introduction. Among vaccine-eligible children, the incidence of all IPD decreased by 79% (95% CI 74-83%). There was a statistically significant reduction in the incidence of 6A IPD, but for 19A, the reduction was non-significant and the incidence of 19A increased towards the end of the study period in the older vaccine-eligible children. The increase in non-PCV10 related serotypes was non-significant. In the unvaccinated older children, the incidence of all IPD decreased by 33% (95% CI 8-52%) compared to the reference cohort, and there was no impact on serotype 6A or 19A IPD. Overall, the impact of PCV10 vaccination on IPD was high in vaccine-eligible children, with a major reduction in vaccine-type disease, and without notable replacement by other serotype groups. Our data suggest that PCV10 results in long-lasting direct cross-protection against 6A IPD. For 19A, no net reduction was observed six years after NVP introduction in the vaccine-eligible cohort. The indirect impact on IPD in unvaccinated children sustained. Copyright

  18. Serotype-specific changes in invasive pneumococcal disease after pneumococcal conjugate vaccine introduction: a pooled analysis of multiple surveillance sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R Feikin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vaccine-serotype (VT invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD rates declined substantially following introduction of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7 into national immunization programs. Increases in non-vaccine-serotype (NVT IPD rates occurred in some sites, presumably representing serotype replacement. We used a standardized approach to describe serotype-specific IPD changes among multiple sites after PCV7 introduction. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Of 32 IPD surveillance datasets received, we identified 21 eligible databases with rate data ≥ 2 years before and ≥ 1 year after PCV7 introduction. Expected annual rates of IPD absent PCV7 introduction were estimated by extrapolation using either Poisson regression modeling of pre-PCV7 rates or averaging pre-PCV7 rates. To estimate whether changes in rates had occurred following PCV7 introduction, we calculated site specific rate ratios by dividing observed by expected IPD rates for each post-PCV7 year. We calculated summary rate ratios (RRs using random effects meta-analysis. For children <5 years old, overall IPD decreased by year 1 post-PCV7 (RR 0.55, 95% CI 0.46-0.65 and remained relatively stable through year 7 (RR 0.49, 95% CI 0.35-0.68. Point estimates for VT IPD decreased annually through year 7 (RR 0.03, 95% CI 0.01-0.10, while NVT IPD increased (year 7 RR 2.81, 95% CI 2.12-3.71. Among adults, decreases in overall IPD also occurred but were smaller and more variable by site than among children. At year 7 after introduction, significant reductions were observed (18-49 year-olds [RR 0.52, 95% CI 0.29-0.91], 50-64 year-olds [RR 0.84, 95% CI 0.77-0.93], and ≥ 65 year-olds [RR 0.74, 95% CI 0.58-0.95]. CONCLUSIONS: Consistent and significant decreases in both overall and VT IPD in children occurred quickly and were sustained for 7 years after PCV7 introduction, supporting use of PCVs. Increases in NVT IPD occurred in most sites, with variable magnitude. These findings may not

  19. The epidemiology of invasive pneumococcal disease in the Canadian North from 1999 to 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Helferty

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction . The International Circumpolar Surveillance network is a population-based surveillance system that collects data on invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD in Northern Canada. A 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine was first introduced in some regions of Northern Canada in 2002, followed by 10-valent (2009 and 13-valent (PCV-13 vaccines (2010. A 23-valent polysaccharide (PPV-23 vaccine was first introduced in 1988 for special populations and adults aged 65 years and older. To describe the epidemiology in the context of pneumococcal vaccination programs, we analysed surveillance data from Northern Canada from 1999 to 2010. Methods . A standardized case report form capturing demographic and clinical information was completed for all IPD cases in Northern Canada meeting the national case definition. Isolates were sent to a reference laboratory for confirmation, serotyping and antimicrobial resistance testing. Both laboratory and epidemiological data were sent to the Public Health Agency of Canada for analysis. Population denominators were obtained from Statistics Canada. Results . From 1999 to 2010, 433 IPD cases were reported (average 36 cases per year. Incidence was greatest among infants aged <2 years and among those aged 65 years and older, with an average annual incidence of 133 and 67 cases per 100,000 population, respectively. After a peak in incidence in 2008, rates among infants have declined. Incidence rates varied from 2 to 16 times greater, depending on the year, among Aboriginals compared to non-Aboriginals. Hospitalization was reported in 89% of all cases and the case fatality ratio was 6.0%. Clinical manifestations varied, with some patients reporting >1 manifestation. Pneumonia was the most common (70%, followed by bacteremia/septicaemia (30% and meningitis (8%. Approximately, 42% of cases aged <2 years in 2009 and 2010 had serotypes covered by the PCV-13. In addition, the majority (89% of serotypes isolated in cases

  20. Invasive pneumococcal disease : Clinical outcomes and patient characteristics 2-6 years after introduction of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine compared to the pre-vaccine period, the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenvoort, Gertjan H J; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Vlaminckx, Bart J.; Elberse, Karin E.; de Melker, Hester E.; van der Ende, Arie; Knol, Mirjam J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Implementation of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) in the Dutch national immunization program for infants led to a shift from vaccine to non-vaccine serotypes in invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in all age groups. We studied the impact of the serotype shift on clinical

  1. Host Factors and Biomarkers Associated with Poor Outcomes in Adults with Invasive Pneumococcal Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeo Hanada

    Full Text Available Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD causes considerable morbidity and mortality. We aimed to identify host factors and biomarkers associated with poor outcomes in adult patients with IPD in Japan, which has a rapidly-aging population.In a large-scale surveillance study of 506 Japanese adults with IPD, we investigated the role of host factors, disease severity, biomarkers based on clinical laboratory data, treatment regimens, and bacterial factors on 28-day mortality.Overall mortality was 24.1%, and the mortality rate increased from 10.0% in patients aged ˂50 years to 33.1% in patients aged ≥80 years. Disease severity also increased 28-day mortality, from 12.5% among patients with bacteraemia without sepsis to 35.0% in patients with severe sepsis and 56.9% with septic shock. The death rate within 48 hours after admission was high at 54.9%. Risk factors for mortality identified by multivariate analysis were as follows: white blood cell (WBC count <4000 cells/μL (odds ratio [OR], 6.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.7-12.8, p < .001; age ≥80 years (OR, 6.5; 95% CI, 2.0-21.6, p = .002; serum creatinine ≥2.0 mg/dL (OR, 4.5; 95% CI, 2.5-8.1, p < .001; underlying liver disease (OR, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.6-7.8, p = .002; mechanical ventilation (OR, 3.0; 95% CI, 1.7-5.6, p < .001; and lactate dehydrogenase ≥300 IU/L (OR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.4-4.0, p = .001. Pneumococcal serotype and drug resistance were not associated with poor outcomes.Host factors, disease severity, and biomarkers, especially WBC counts and serum creatinine, were more important determinants of mortality than bacterial factors.

  2. Invasive pneumococcal diseases in children in Hokkaido, Japan from April 2000, to March 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    In Japan, the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-7) became commercially available as a voluntary vaccine in March 2010. It was included in the routine immunization schedule in April 2013 and was replaced by PCV-13 in November 2013. We evaluated 146 cases of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in 142 children (2 developed the disease twice, and 1 developed it three times) treated in the northern district of Hokkaido, Japan from April 2000 to March 2015, before and after the introduction of PCV-7. The incidence rate per 100,000 people aged March 2010, and reached 87.5 per 100,000 people per year between April 2009 and March 2010, which was immediately before the introduction of PCV-7. Subsequently, the incidence rate started to show a decreasing trend and reached as low as 9.5 per 100,000 people per year between April 2013 and March 2014. However, the incidence rate showed an increasing trend again between April 2014 and March 2015, reaching 33.4 per 100,000 people per year. Serotyping was performed for the 77 strains collected between April 2000 and March 2010. The most frequently isolated serotype was 6B (31.2%), followed by 23F (14.3%) and 19F (13.0%). Among them, 55 strains were covered by PCV-7 (71.4%), and 64 strains were covered by PCV-13 (83.1%). Of the 33 strains collected between April 2010 and March 2015, 14 were covered by PCV-7 (42.4%) and 16 were covered by PCV-13 (48.4%), showing a significant decrease (p < 0.01). Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Recurrent invasive pneumococcal disease in children--host factors and vaccination response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingels, Helene Andrea Sinclair

    2015-07-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is still a leading cause of septicaemia, pneumonia and meningitis in young children world-wide with over half a million children dying annually from pneumococcal disease.  Some children are prone to repeated episodes of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) because of an underlying predisposing disease. Recurrent IPD (rIPD) is a rarity and published reports on rIPD are limited by having few children included, selected groups of patients or short follow-up periods. Deficiencies in the innate or adaptive immune system have been described in children with rIPD, but the frequency of immunodeficiency among such patients is unknown. The aim of this PhD thesis was to examine paediatric cases of laboratory-confirmed rIPD, over a 33-year period in Denmark, to determine risk factors and study aspects of the immunological background for this problem in children. In October 2007, a seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was implemented in the Danish infant immunization programme. An additional aim of the thesis was to examine the impact of vaccination on a population level, following the first three years of general PCV7 vaccination in Denmark. The thesis consists of three papers, which are all directly or indirectly based on data retrieved from the National Streptococcus Pneumoniae Registry. This registry is nationwide and dates back to 1938. The registry contains data from all laboratory-confirmed cases of IPD in Denmark and is continually updated for national surveillance. In Paper 1, we conducted a 33-year retrospective nationwide study of paediatric rIPD. By using data from the National Streptococcus Pneumoniae Registry combined with clinical data from hospital records, we could describe one of the largest known cohorts of children (n:59) with rIPD . We covered epidemiological, microbiological, and clinical features of this clinical entity. Of all children experiencing rIPD, 47% had a known predisposing underlying disease at the time of

  4. Impacto da vacina conjugada contra Streptococcus pneumoniae em doenças invasivas Impact of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine on the prevention of invasive pneumococcal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Ferro Bricks

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Rever os estudos que avaliam o impacto da vacina conjugada 7-valente na incidência de doenças invasivas por pneumococo e analisar o possível impacto dessa vacina no Brasil. FONTE DE DADOS:Foram pesquisadas as bases de dados MEDLINE, LILACS, Cochrane Database Reviews (janeiro de 2000 a janeiro de 2006, selecionando-se para análise os artigos contendo as seguintes palavras-chave: Streptococcus pneumoniae, pneumococo, vacina conjugada, resistência, antibióticos e meningite. Também foi realizada busca de informações sobre o tema nos sites do Centers for Disease Control, Ministério da Saúde e Centro de Vigilância Epidemiológica do Estado de São Paulo. SÍNTESE DOS DADOS: A vacina conjugada 7-valente reduziu a incidência de doenças invasivas por pneumococo, número de consultas por doenças respiratórias de vias aéreas superiores e inferiores, consumo de antibióticos e incidência de doenças invasivas por pneumococo por cepas resistentes a antibióticos não apenas nas crianças vacinadas, como em adultos e idosos. No Brasil, os coeficientes de incidência de doenças invasivas por pneumococo em crianças menores de 5 anos são elevados, a taxa de letalidade de meningites pneumocócicas é alta e as taxas de resistência parcial e plena à penicilina aumentaram substancialmente nos últimos 5 anos. CONCLUSÕES:Devido aos benefícios diretos e indiretos do uso em larga escala da vacina conjugada 7-valente, essa vacina deve ser incluída no calendário básico de imunização do Brasil.OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the impact of heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in invasive pneumococcal diseases in the United States, and to analyze the potential impact of this vaccine in Brazil. SOURCES OF DATA: MEDLINE, LILACS, Cochrane Database Reviews, as well as the websites of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, Brazilian Ministry of Health and Centro de Vigilância Epidemiológica do Estado de São Paulo from

  5. [Pneumococcal invasive disease in newborns before and after 7-valent and 13-valent universal pneumococcal vaccination in Uruguay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assandri, Elizabeth; Amorín, Belén; Gesuele, Juan P; Algorta, Gabriela; Pírez, María Catalina

    2015-04-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae infections are not frequent in neonates, but presents high morbidity and mortality. In 2008, the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) was introduced in the childhood vaccination schedule and then replaced by 13-valent PCV in 2010. First dose is given at 2 months of age. Protection of neonates is expected with universal vaccination. To describe the clinical presentation, microbiology and outcome of neonates with pneumococcal invasive infections (PII) detected in two hospitals in Uruguay in 2001-2007 (pre-vaccination), 2008 (intervention) and 2009-2013 (post-vaccination). A descriptive, retrospective study was done at Pereira Rossell Hospital and Paysandú Hospital. All isolates of S. pneumoniae obtained from normally sterile fluids were included. Data were obtained from the clinical records and the microbiology laboratory. A statistical analysis with absolute frequencies, relative, rates and relative risk was performed. 25 neonates were enrolled with diagnosis of: sepsis (n = 13), meningitis (n = 9), bacteremia (n = 1), pneumonia with empyema (n = 1) and pneumonia (n = 1). The incidence of PII in the prevaccination period was 19/25, with a rate of 0.30/1,000 births, compared to post-vaccination rate of 0.04/1,000. The relative risk was 5.9. 6/20 (30%) cases of death were reported (meningitis n = 3; sepsis n = 2; empyema n = 1). Most common serotypes were 5 and 1 (14/25) and 24/25 strains were susceptible to penicillin. The symptoms were indistinguishable to infections caused by other pathogens. PII cases decreased and no deaths occurred in the post-vaccination period. No increase in non-vaccine serotypes was observed.

  6. A functional variant in TIRAP, also known as MAL, and protection against invasive pneumococcal disease, bacteraemia, malaria and tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Khor, Chiea C.; Chapman, Stephen J.; Vannberg, Fredrik O; Dunne, Aisling; Murphy, Caroline; Ling, Edmund Y; Frodsham, Angela J.; Walley, Andrew J; Kyrieleis, Otto; Khan, Amir; Aucan, Christophe; Segal, Shelley; Moore, Catrin E.; Knox, Kyle; Campbell, Sarah J.

    2007-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and members of their signalling pathway play an important role in the initiation of the innate immune response to a wide variety of pathogens1,2,3. The adaptor protein TIRAP mediates downstream signalling of TLR-2 and -44,5,6. We report a case-control genetic association study of 6106 individuals from Gambia, Kenya, United Kingdom, and Vietnam, with invasive pneumococcal disease, bacteraemia, malaria and tuberculosis. Thirty-three SNPs were genotyped, including TIRA...

  7. Invasive Pneumococcal Disease: Still Lots to Learn and a Need for Standardized Data Collection Instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Marrie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Large studies of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD are frequently lacking detailed clinical information. Methods. A population-based 15-year study of IPD in Northern Alberta. Results. 2435 patients with a mean age of 54.2 years formed the study group. Males outnumbered females and Aboriginal and homeless persons were overrepresented. High rates of smoking, excessive alcohol use, and illicit drug use were seen. Almost all (87% had a major comorbidity and 15% had functional limitations prior to admission. Bacteremia, pneumonia, and meningitis were the most common major manifestations of IPD. Almost half of the patients had alteration of mental status at the time of admission and 22% required mechanical ventilation. Myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism, and new onset stroke occurred in 1.7, 1.3, and 1.1% of the patients, respectively; of those who had echocardiograms, 35% had impaired ventricular function. The overall in-hospital mortality was 15.6%. Conclusions. IPD remains a serious infection in adults. In addition to immunization, preventative measures need to consider the sociodemographic features more carefully. A standard set of data need to be collected so that comparisons can be made from study to study. Future investigations should target cardiac function and pulmonary embolism prevention in this population.

  8. Invasive Pneumococcal Disease: Still Lots to Learn and a Need for Standardized Data Collection Instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrie, T J; Tyrrell, G J; Majumdar, Sumit R; Eurich, Dean T

    2017-01-01

    Background. Large studies of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) are frequently lacking detailed clinical information. Methods. A population-based 15-year study of IPD in Northern Alberta. Results. 2435 patients with a mean age of 54.2 years formed the study group. Males outnumbered females and Aboriginal and homeless persons were overrepresented. High rates of smoking, excessive alcohol use, and illicit drug use were seen. Almost all (87%) had a major comorbidity and 15% had functional limitations prior to admission. Bacteremia, pneumonia, and meningitis were the most common major manifestations of IPD. Almost half of the patients had alteration of mental status at the time of admission and 22% required mechanical ventilation. Myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism, and new onset stroke occurred in 1.7, 1.3, and 1.1% of the patients, respectively; of those who had echocardiograms, 35% had impaired ventricular function. The overall in-hospital mortality was 15.6%. Conclusions. IPD remains a serious infection in adults. In addition to immunization, preventative measures need to consider the sociodemographic features more carefully. A standard set of data need to be collected so that comparisons can be made from study to study. Future investigations should target cardiac function and pulmonary embolism prevention in this population.

  9. Trends in mortality and antibiotic resistance among HIV-infected patients with invasive pneumococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau, I; Ardanuy, C; Liñares, J; Podzamczer, D; Schulze, M H; Pallares, Roman

    2009-09-01

    The aim of the study was to describe trends and risk factors for mortality and changes in antibiotic resistance, serotypes and clones among HIV-infected patients with invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). A prospective study of 199 episodes of IPD occurring in a cohort of 4011 HIV-infected patients was carried out. Predictors of mortality included clinical and microbiological data. The 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) for children was introduced in late 2001. Time periods were classified for mortality studies as pre- (1986-1996), early (1997-2001) and late (2002-2007) highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) era, and for serotype studies as pre-PCV7 (1986-2001) and PCV7 (2002-2007) era. Of 199 IPD episodes, 71 (36%) occurred in HIV-infected patients with associated comorbidities (mainly liver cirrhosis; 52 of 71), which increased in recent years. The incidence of IPD decreased from the pre-HAART era to the early HAART era and then remained stable in the late HAART era (24.1, 8.4 and 7.4 episodes per 1000 patient-years, respectively). Rates of 30-day mortality have risen over the three periods (8, 19 and 25%, respectively; P = 0.017). In multiple logistic regression analysis, predictors of mortality were shock at presentation [odds ratio (OR) 7.01; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.05-23.87] and associated comorbidities (OR 4.27; 95% CI 1.53-11.92). In the PCV7 era, IPD caused by non-PCV7 serotypes increased, and resistance to betalactams decreased. The most frequent genotypes were Spain(9V)-ST156, Spain(23F)-ST81, ST88(19F), Sweden(1)-ST304 and Spain(6B)-ST90. In the late HAART era, the incidence of IPD has not significantly decreased. Mortality from IPD has risen in association with an increase in comorbidities such as liver cirrhosis. New vaccination strategies are needed to diminish the burden of IPD in the HIV-infected population.

  10. [Characterization of patients who died of invasive pneumococcal disease in the child population of Bogota, Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Juan Pablo; Leal, Aura Lucia; Patiño, Jaime; Montañez, Anita; Camacho, Germán; Beltrán, Sandra; Bonilla, Carolina; Barrero, Rocio; Mariño, Cristina; Ramos, Nicolás

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae), also known as pneumococcus, is one of the main bacteria associated with mortality in children under 2 years of age, with a morbidity and mortality incidence that varies according to demographics and exposure to risk, or protective factors. To describe the child mortality due to invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) between 2008 -2014 (6 years), in 8 Medical Centres in Bogotá, Colombia. Descriptive observational case series of patients who died of IPD, aged 28 days to 18 years, in 8 tertiary care institutions in Bogota, Colombia. The study period was from 1 January 2008 to 15 January 2014. 239 patients. A total of 239 registered cases of IPD were reviewed, showing a mortality of 8% (n 18). The mean age of patients that died was 43.7 months, with an age range from 2 to 176 months (14 years), with 66% of the cases being male. Serotypes were identified in 8 patients, finding: 6A, 6B, 10A, 14, 18C, 23B, 23F, and 35B. The most common clinical presentation of the cases was meningitis with mortality of 33% (6 cases), followed by bacteraemia without focus in 28% (5 cases), and pneumonia with 27% (5 cases). Combined clinical situations were presented, such as pneumonia and meningitis in 11% (2 cases). Two of the patients had clearly documented risk factors for IPD (asplenia and chronic respiratory disease). IPD mortality is particularly high in children under 2 years in male patients, especially when presented with a meningeal focus (44%). Serotyping was not possible in all patients who died, since no strain isolated was sent to the National Institute of Health. Continuous and systematic vigilance is required to evaluate the impact of vaccination and possible changes in the pattern of presentation of disease. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Previous antibiotic exposure and antimicrobial resistance in invasive pneumococcal disease: results from prospective surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuster, Stefan P; Rudnick, Wallis; Shigayeva, Altynay; Green, Karen; Baqi, Mahin; Gold, Wayne L; Lovinsky, Reena; Muller, Matthew P; Powis, Jeff E; Rau, Neil; Simor, Andrew E; Walmsley, Sharon L; Low, Donald E; McGeer, Allison

    2014-10-01

    Estimating the risk of antibiotic resistance is important in selecting empiric antibiotics. We asked how the timing, number of courses, and duration of antibiotic therapy in the previous 3 months affected antibiotic resistance in isolates causing invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). We conducted prospective surveillance for IPD in Toronto, Canada, from 2002 to 2011. Antimicrobial susceptibility was measured by broth microdilution. Clinical information, including prior antibiotic use, was collected by chart review and interview with patients and prescribers. Clinical information and antimicrobial susceptibility were available for 4062 (90%) episodes; 1193 (29%) of episodes were associated with receipt of 1782 antibiotic courses in the prior 3 months. Selection for antibiotic resistance was class specific. Time elapsed since most recent antibiotic was inversely associated with resistance (cephalosporins: adjusted odds ratio [OR] per day, 0.98; 95% confidence interval [CI], .96-1.00; P = .02; macrolides: OR, 0.98; 95% CI, .96-.99; P = .005; penicillins: OR [log(days)], 0.62; 95% CI, .44-.89; P = .009; fluoroquinolones: profile penalized-likelihood OR [log(days)], 0.62; 95% CI, .39-1.04; P = .07). Risk of resistance after exposure declined most rapidly for fluoroquinolones and penicillins and reached baseline in 2-3 months. The decline in resistance was slowest for macrolides, and in particular for azithromycin. There was no significant association between duration of therapy and resistance for any antibiotic class. Too few patients received multiple courses of the same antibiotic class to assess the significance of repeat courses. Time elapsed since last exposure to a class of antibiotics is the most important factor predicting antimicrobial resistance in pneumococci. The duration of effect is longer for macrolides than other classes. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved

  12. Recurrent severe invasive pneumococcal disease in an adult with previously unknown hyposplenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballegaard, Vibe C; Schejbel, Lone; Hoffmann, Steen

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The risk of life-threatening and invasive infections with encapsulated bacteria is increased in patients with hyposplenia or asplenia. We report a case of recurrent invasive pneumococcal meningitis in a woman with previous unknown hyposplenia. She was vaccinated after the first episode...... was found. Despite immunization against S. pneumoniae and measurement of what was interpreted as protective levels of serotype-specific IgG antibodies after vaccination, the patient suffered from a third episode of IPD. CONCLUSIONS: Individuals with predisposing medical conditions or a history of severe...... infections with encapsulated bacteria should be screened for spleen dysfunction. If splenic function is impaired, prevention against severe invasive infection with encapsulated bacteria are a major priority....

  13. Mathematical modelling long-term effects of replacing Prevnar7 with Prevnar13 on invasive pneumococcal diseases in England and Wales.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Hong Choi

    Full Text Available England and Wales recently replaced the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7 with its 13-valent equivalent (PCV13, partly based on projections from mathematical models of the long-term impact of such a switch compared to ceasing pneumococcal conjugate vaccination altogether.A compartmental deterministic model was used to estimate parameters governing transmission of infection and competition between different groups of pneumococcal serotypes prior to the introduction of PCV13. The best-fitting parameters were used in an individual based model to describe pneumococcal transmission dynamics and effects of various options for the vaccination programme change in England and Wales. A number of scenarios were conducted using (i different assumptions about the number of invasive pneumococcal disease cases adjusted for the increasing trend in disease incidence prior to PCV7 introduction in England and Wales, and (ii a range of values representing serotype replacement induced by vaccination of the additional six serotypes in PCV13.Most of the scenarios considered suggest that ceasing pneumococcal conjugate vaccine use would cause an increase in invasive pneumococcal disease incidence, while replacing PCV7 with PCV13 would cause an overall decrease. However, the size of this reduction largely depends on the level of competition induced by the additional serotypes in PCV13. The model estimates that over 20 years of PCV13 vaccination, around 5000-62000 IPD cases could be prevented compared to stopping pneumococcal conjugate vaccination altogether.Despite inevitable uncertainty around serotype replacement effects following introduction of PCV13, the model suggests a reduction in overall invasive pneumococcal disease incidence in all cases. Our results provide useful evidence on the benefits of PCV13 to countries replacing or considering replacing PCV7 with PCV13, as well as data that can be used to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of such a switch.

  14. Invasive pneumococcal disease in Catalonian elderly people, 2002-2009: serotype coverage for different anti-pneumococcal vaccine formulations at the beginning of the new conjugate vaccines era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila-Corcoles, Angel; Ochoa-Gondar, Olga; Gomez-Bertomeu, Frederic; Raga-Luria, Xavier

    2011-10-06

    Population-based surveillance study conducted among persons 65 years or older from the region of Tarragona (Southern Catalonia, Spain) during 2002-2009. All cases with isolation of pneumococcus from normally sterile bodily fluids were included. Incidence rates of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) and prevalence of infections caused by serotypes included in different pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) and the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV-23) were calculated. Overall, 176 IPD cases were observed, which means an incidence of 48 episodes per 100,000 person-year throughout the study period. The most dominant serotypes were 7F (10.1%), 14 (9.4%), 19A (9.4%), 3 (8.6%), 6A (7.9%) and 1 (7.2%). IPD cases due to PCV-7 types (from 37.2% to 14.6%; p=0.003) and PCV-10 types (from 60.5% to 32.3%; p=0.002) considerably decreased between 2002-2005 and 2006-2009 periods. Percentage of cases due to PCV-13 types (76.7% vs 62.5%; p=0.099) and PPV-23 types (81.4% vs 68.8%; p=0.122) did not significantly change between both periods. As main conclusion, in our setting, the PCV-13 has almost similar serotype coverage to the PPV-23 in preventing IPD among the elderly population, which suggests a possible future use of the conjugate vaccine in all age groups. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Invasive pneumococcal disease in the Community of Valencia. Six years of surveillance (2007-2012)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciancotti Oliver, Lucía Rosa; Huertas Zarco, Isabel; Pérez Pérez, Elvira; Carmona Martí, Esther; Carbó Malonda, Rosa; Gil Bru, Ana; González Moran, Francisco

    2015-03-01

    The introduction of conjugated anti-pneumonia vaccines has led to a change in the epidemiology of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease (IPD). The aim of this study is to describe the trends in IPD in the Community of Valencia during the period 2007-2012. A retrospective, descriptive and longitudinal study was conducted on IPD in the Community of Valencia during the period 2007-2012, The information sources used were the Epidemiological Surveillance Analysis (Análisis de la Vigilancia Epidemiológica (AVE)) and the Valencian Microbiology Network (Red Microbiológica Valenciana (RedMIVA)) of the Valencia Health Department. The incidence of IPD decreased between 2007 and 2012 in all age groups, mainly in the under 5 year-olds, dropping from 30.5 cases to 12.3 cases per 10(5) inhabitants (p< .001). Pneumonia was the principal presentation of the disease, with a decrease in its rates from 6.9 to 4.1 cases per 10(5) inhabitants (p< .001). A gradual, non-significant, reduction from 26% to 12% (p=.23) was observed in the proportion of cases due to the serotypes contained in the heptavalent vaccine (PCV7), mainly in the under 5 year-olds. The cases due to additional serotypes in 13-valent conjugated vaccine (1, 3, 5, 6A, 7F and 19A) also showed a decreasing trend, mainly in vaccinated under 5 year-olds (52.6% vs 14.3%; p=.03), while the cases due to non-vaccine serotypes significantly increased from 42.3% to 56.7% in the general population (p=.002), and from 47.4% to 78.6% in vaccinated under 5 year-olds (p=.08). The results of this study show a reduction in the incidence of IPD, with a decrease in the proportion of cases produced by vaccine serotypes, and an increase in the proportion of those not vaccinated. Epidemiological Surveillance is necessary to monitor the trends in the disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  16. Rates of, and risk factors for, septic arthritis in patients with invasive pneumococcal disease: prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrie, Thomas J; Tyrrell, Gregory J; Majumdar, Sumit R; Eurich, Dean T

    2017-10-12

    There are many case reports of septic arthritis complicating invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD); however, no study has compared patients with IPD with septic arthritis to those who didn't develop septic arthritis Thus, we aimed to determine the rates of, and risk factors for, septic arthritis in patients with invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). Socio-demographic, clinical, and serological data were captured on all patients with IPD in Northern Alberta, Canada from 2000 to 2014. Septic arthritis was identified by attending physicians. Descriptive statistics and multivariate analyses were used to compare characteristics of those with septic arthritis and IPD to those who did not. Septic arthritis developed in 51 of 3251 (1.6%) of patients with IPD. Inability to walk independently, male sex, and underlying joint disease were risk factors for developing septic arthritis in patients with IPD. Capsular serotypes 22 and 12F were more common in patients with septic arthritis than those without. In patients with IPD, septic arthritis is uncommon. Certain risk factors such as walking with or without assistance and underlying joint disease make biological sense as damaged joints are more likely to be infected in the presence of bacteremia. Not applicable.

  17. Invasive pneumococcal disease among children younger than 5 years of age before and after introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in Casablanca, Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diawara, Idrissa; Zerouali, Khalid; Katfy, Khalid; Zaki, Bahija; Belabbes, Houria; Najib, Jillali; Elmdaghri, Naima

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the incidence rate of invasive pneumococcal disease, the rates of antibiotic resistance and serotype distribution among children ≤5 years old before and after PCVs introduction in Casablanca, Morocco. This study was conducted at the Ibn Rochd University Hospital Centre of Casablanca during two periods encompassing pre-and post-implementation of PCVs, respectively from January 2007 to October 2010 and from January 2011 to December 2014. All the non-duplicate invasive S. pneumoniae isolates recovered during the study periods were included. There were 136 cases of IPD, 91 before and 45 after PCVs introduction. The greatest decrease in incidence rate of IPD occurred in children ≤ 2 years of age declining from 34.6 to 13.5 per 100,000 populations (p<0.0001) before and after vaccination, respectively. The incidence rate of PCV-7, PCV-10 non-PCV-7 and PCV-13 non-PCV-10 serotypes decrease significantly from 18.0 to 4.6, from 5.7 to 1.3 and from 5.7 to 0.8/100,000 population (p<0.001) in the same age, respectively. Shifts in the distribution of IPD serotypes and reductions in the incidence rate of disease suggest an effective reduction of the burden of IPD in children, but continued high quality surveillance is critical to assess the changes in serotype distributions. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Antibody Response is More Likely to Pneumococcal Proteins Than to Polysaccharide After HIV-associated Invasive Pneumococcal Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantsø, Bjørn; Green, Nicola; Goldblatt, David

    2015-01-01

    to at least 1 protein compared to 51% of non-IPD controls. HIV IPD cases responded to more proteins than non-IPD controls (8.6 ± 8.4 vs 4.2 ± 7.6 proteins; P = .01), and had a significantly higher probability of yielding an antibody response to the proteins PiaA, PsaA, and PcpA. Twenty-two percent of HIV......-infected individuals with IPD had a serotype-specific antibody response. Younger age at the time of IPD was the only predictor of a serotype-specific pneumococcal antibody response, whereas we did not identify predictors of a protein-specific antibody response. CONCLUSIONS: Antibody responses occurred more frequently...

  19. The changing epidemiology of invasive pneumococcal disease at a tertiary children's hospital through the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine era: a case for continuous surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampofo, Krow; Pavia, Andrew T; Chris, Stockmann; Hersh, Adam L; Bender, Jeffrey M; Blaschke, Anne J; Weng, Hsin Yi Cindy; Korgenski, Kent E; Daly, Judy; Mason, Edward O; Byington, Carrie L

    2012-03-01

    In 2000, a 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was licensed for use among US children. Many sites have since reported changes in invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). We recognized an opportunity to describe the changes in epidemiology, clinical syndromes, and serotype distribution during a 14-year period including 4 years before vaccine introduction and spanning the entire PCV7 era. Cases were defined as children <18 years of age who were cared for at Primary Children's Medical Center for culture-confirmed IPD. We defined the prevaccine period as the time frame spanning from 1997 to 2000 and the postvaccine period from 2001 to 2010. Demographics, clinical data, and outcomes were collected through electronic query and chart review. Streptococcus pneumoniae serotyping was performed using the capsular swelling method. The median age of children with IPD increased from 19 months during the prevaccine period to 27 months during postvaccine period (P = 0.02), with a larger proportion of IPD among children older than 5 years. The proportion of IPD associated with pneumonia increased substantially from 29% to 50% (P < 0.001). This increase was primarily attributable to an increase in complicated pneumonia (17% to 33%, P < 0.001). Nonvaccine serotypes 7F, 19A, 22F, and 3 emerged as the dominant serotypes in the postvaccine period. In children with IPD who were younger than 5 years, for whom vaccine is recommended, 67% of the cases were caused by serotypes in 13-valent PCV during 2005 to 2010. After PCV7 was introduced, significant changes in IPD were noted. One-third of IPD occurred in children older than 5 years, who were outside the age-group for which PCV is recommended. Continued surveillance is warranted to identify further evolution of the epidemiology, clinical syndromes, and serotype distribution of S. pneumoniae after 13-valent PCV licensure.

  20. Impact of ten-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccination on invasive pneumococcal disease in Finnish children--a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokinen, Jukka; Rinta-Kokko, Hanna; Siira, Lotta; Palmu, Arto A; Virtanen, Mikko J; Nohynek, Hanna; Virolainen-Julkunen, Anni; Toropainen, Maija; Nuorti, J Pekka

    2015-01-01

    The ten-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV10) was introduced into the Finnish National Vaccination Program (NVP) in September 2010 with a 2+1 schedule (3, 5, 12 months) without catch-up vaccinations. We evaluated the direct and indirect effects of PCV10 on invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) among children ≤5 years of age during the first three years after NVP introduction. We conducted a population-based, observational follow-up study. The cohort of vaccine-eligible children (all children born June 1, 2010 or later) was followed from 3 months of age until the end of 2013. For the indirect effect, another cohort of older children ineligible for PCV10 vaccination was followed from 2011 through 2013. Both cohorts were compared with season- and age-matched reference cohorts before NVP introduction. National, population-based laboratory surveillance data were used to compare culture-confirmed serotype-specific IPD rates in the vaccine target and reference cohorts by using Poisson regression models. The overall IPD rate among vaccine-eligible children was reduced by 80% (95%CI 72 to 85); the reduction in vaccine-type IPD was 92% (95%CI 86 to 95). However, a non-significant increase in non-vaccine type IPD was observed. During 2012-2013, we also observed a 48% (95%CI 18 to 69) reduction in IPD among unvaccinated children 2 to 5 years of age, which was mostly attributable to the ten vaccine serotypes. This is the first population-based study investigating the impact of PCV10 introduction without prior PCV7 use. A substantial decrease in IPD rates among vaccine-eligible children was observed. A smaller and temporally delayed reduction among older, unvaccinated children suggests that PCV10 also provides indirect protection against vaccine-type IPD. Changes in serotype distribution warrant continuous monitoring of potential increases in non-vaccine serotypes.

  1. Impact of ten-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccination on invasive pneumococcal disease in Finnish children--a population-based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jukka Jokinen

    Full Text Available The ten-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV10 was introduced into the Finnish National Vaccination Program (NVP in September 2010 with a 2+1 schedule (3, 5, 12 months without catch-up vaccinations. We evaluated the direct and indirect effects of PCV10 on invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD among children ≤5 years of age during the first three years after NVP introduction.We conducted a population-based, observational follow-up study. The cohort of vaccine-eligible children (all children born June 1, 2010 or later was followed from 3 months of age until the end of 2013. For the indirect effect, another cohort of older children ineligible for PCV10 vaccination was followed from 2011 through 2013. Both cohorts were compared with season- and age-matched reference cohorts before NVP introduction. National, population-based laboratory surveillance data were used to compare culture-confirmed serotype-specific IPD rates in the vaccine target and reference cohorts by using Poisson regression models.The overall IPD rate among vaccine-eligible children was reduced by 80% (95%CI 72 to 85; the reduction in vaccine-type IPD was 92% (95%CI 86 to 95. However, a non-significant increase in non-vaccine type IPD was observed. During 2012-2013, we also observed a 48% (95%CI 18 to 69 reduction in IPD among unvaccinated children 2 to 5 years of age, which was mostly attributable to the ten vaccine serotypes.This is the first population-based study investigating the impact of PCV10 introduction without prior PCV7 use. A substantial decrease in IPD rates among vaccine-eligible children was observed. A smaller and temporally delayed reduction among older, unvaccinated children suggests that PCV10 also provides indirect protection against vaccine-type IPD. Changes in serotype distribution warrant continuous monitoring of potential increases in non-vaccine serotypes.

  2. HIV Infection and the Epidemiology of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease (IPD in South African Adults and Older Children Prior to the Introduction of a Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine (PCV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Meiring

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is the commonest cause of bacteremic pneumonia among HIV-infected persons. As more countries with high HIV prevalence are implementing infant pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV programs, we aimed to describe the baseline clinical characteristics of adult invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD in the pre-PCV era in South Africa in order to interpret potential indirect effects following vaccine use.National, active, laboratory-based surveillance for IPD was conducted in South Africa from 1 January 2003 through 31 December 2008. At 25 enhanced surveillance (ES hospital sites, clinical data, including HIV serostatus, were collected from IPD patients ≥ 5 years of age. We compared the clinical characteristics of individuals with IPD in those HIV-infected and -uninfected using multivariable analysis. PCV was introduced into the routine South African Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI in 2009.In South Africa, from 2003-2008, 17 604 cases of IPD occurred amongst persons ≥ 5 years of age, with an average incidence of 7 cases per 100 000 person-years. Against a national HIV-prevalence of 18%, 89% (4190/4734 of IPD patients from ES sites were HIV-infected. IPD incidence in HIV-infected individuals is 43 times higher than in HIV-uninfected persons (52 per 100 000 vs. 1.2 per 100 000, with a peak in the HIV-infected elderly population of 237 per 100 000 persons. Most HIV-infected individuals presented with bacteremia (74%, 3 091/4 190. HIV-uninfected individuals were older; and had more chronic conditions (excluding HIV than HIV-infected persons (39% (210/544 vs. 19% (790/4190, p<0.001. During the pre-PCV immunization era in South Africa, 71% of serotypes amongst HIV-infected persons were covered by PCV13 vs. 73% amongst HIV-uninfected persons, p = 0.4, OR 0.9 (CI 0.7-1.1.Seventy to eighty-five percent of adult IPD in the pre-PCV era were vaccine serotypes and 93% of cases had recognized risk factors (including HIV-infection for

  3. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal to Legionellosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal to Legionellosis - 2014.In this Table, all conditions with a 5-year average annual national total of more than or equals...

  4. An eHealth Project on Invasive Pneumococcal Disease: Comprehensive Evaluation of a Promotional Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panatto, Donatella; Domnich, Alexander; Gasparini, Roberto; Bonanni, Paolo; Icardi, Giancarlo; Amicizia, Daniela; Arata, Lucia; Carozzo, Stefano; Signori, Alessio; Bechini, Angela; Boccalini, Sara

    2016-12-02

    The recently launched Pneumo Rischio eHealth project, which consists of an app, a website, and social networking activity, is aimed at increasing public awareness of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). The launch of this project was prompted by the inadequate awareness of IPD among both laypeople and health care workers, the heavy socioeconomic burden of IPD, and the far from optimal vaccination coverage in Italy, despite the availability of safe and effective vaccines. The objectives of our study were to analyze trends in Pneumo Rischio usage before and after a promotional campaign, to characterize its end users, and to assess its user-rated quality. At 7 months after launching Pneumo Rischio, we established a 4-month marketing campaign to promote the project. This intervention used various approaches and channels, including both traditional and digital marketing strategies. To highlight usage trends, we used different techniques of time series analysis and modeling, including a modified Mann-Kendall test, change-point detection, and segmented negative binomial regression of interrupted time series. Users were characterized in terms of demographics and IPD risk categories. Customer-rated quality was evaluated by means of a standardized tool in a sample of app users. Over 1 year, the app was accessed by 9295 users and the website was accessed by 143,993 users, while the project's Facebook page had 1216 fans. The promotional intervention was highly effective in increasing the daily number of users. In particular, the Mann-Kendall trend test revealed a significant (P ≤.01) increasing trend in both app and website users, while change-point detection analysis showed that the first significant change corresponded to the start of the promotional campaign. Regression analysis showed a significant immediate effect of the intervention, with a mean increase in daily numbers of users of 1562% (95% CI 456%-4870%) for the app and 620% (95% CI 176%-1777%) for the website

  5. Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients Are at Increased Risk of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease: A Nationwide Danish Cohort Study 1977-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantsø, Bjørn; Simonsen, Jacob; Hoffmann, Steen; Valentiner-Branth, Palle; Petersen, Andreas Munk; Jess, Tine

    2015-11-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), Crohn's disease (CD), and ulcerative colitis (UC) are chronic diseases characterized by an inappropriate immune response, which may also increase the risk of infections. We investigated the risk of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) before and after diagnosis of IBD in a population-based cohort study. In a cohort of 74,156 IBD patients and 1,482,363 non-IBD controls included and followed during 1977-2013, hazard rate ratios (HRs) for IPD in IBD patients vs. controls were calculated by Cox regression. Within the IBD group, we also calculated the risk according to ever use of specific IBD medications. Next, using conditional logistic regression, we evaluated the odds of IPD prior to IBD diagnosis. The HRs for IPD within the first 6 months after IBD diagnosis were significantly and more than threefold increased and then decreased to a constant level, which for CD was significantly increased (approximately twofold, HR, 1.99; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.59-2.49) and for UC non-significantly just above 1. IBD medication use including tumor necrosis factor alpha antagonists had limited impact on the risk of IPD, although having ever used azathioprine increased the risk of IPD in patients with UC (HR, 2.38; 95% CI, 1.00-5.67). Up to 4 years prior to IBD diagnosis, the odds ratio for IPD was significantly increased (UC HR, 1.51, 95% CI, 1.05-2.17; CD HR, 1.79, 95% CI, 1.05-3.03). The risk of IPD is significantly increased both before and after diagnosis of IBD, with limited impact of IBD medications. This suggests that the risk of IPD in patients with IBD is related to the underlying altered immune response in these patients.

  6. [Increase in the incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease caused by serotype 19A prior to the implementation of the expanded pneumococcal vaccines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Martínez, F; Saavedra Lozano, J; Navarro Gómez, M L; Santos Sebastián, M M; Rodríguez Fernández, R; González Sánchez, M; Hernández-Sampelayo Matos, T

    2013-11-01

    To describe the epidemiology, clinical syndromes and microbiological characteristics of serotype 19A as the main cause of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in children admitted to a tertiary hospital in Spain. A retrospective (1998-2004) and prospective (2005-2009) study was conducted on children with IPD produced by serotype 19A. The study was divided into three periods (P): P1 (1998-2001) when PCV7 had not been commercialized; P2 (2002-2005) with 40% vaccine coverage among children; and P3 (2006-2009) when the vaccine was added to the Childhood Immunization Schedule in Madrid. A total of 155 isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP) producing IPD were analysed, with 21 of them being serotype 19A (14%). An increased prevalence of serotype 19A was found: 2/45 cases (4.4%) in P1, 3/41 cases (7.3%) in P2 and 16/69 cases (23.2%) in P3. It occurred mostly in children younger than 2 years (16/21; 76%). This serotype was the main cause of meningitis (5/20; 25%), pleural empyema (3/22; 14%) and bacteraemic mastoiditis (2/4; 50%). Thirteen isolates (61.5%) had an MIC ≥ 0.12μ/ml for penicillin in extra-meningeal infections, and 3 of the 5 isolates causing meningitis (60%) had an MIC ≥ 1μ/ml for cefotaxime. Serotype 19A was the main causal agent of IPD in the PCV7 era (P3), with high antibiotic resistance rates. This serotype was responsible for all types of IPD, being the main cause of meningitis. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Changes in the Nature and Severity of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease in Children Before and After the Seven-valent and Thirteen-valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine Programs in Calgary, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketson, Leah J; Conradi, Nicholas G; Vanderkooi, Otto G; Kellner, James D

    2018-01-01

    Since the introduction of childhood pneumococcal conjugate vaccines, invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) incidence has decreased in children and the predominant serotypes causing disease have changed. This study describes changes in the clinical features of IPD in children (vaccine introduction. The Calgary Area Streptococcus pneumoniae Epidemiology Research study collects information on all IPD cases in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Descriptive and regression analyses were used to compare IPD in the pre-vaccine (January 2000 to August 2002), post-7-valent protein-polysaccharide conjugate vaccine (September 2002 to June 2010) and post-13-valent protein-polysaccharide conjugate vaccine (PCV13) (July 2010 to December 2015) periods; intensive care unit and inpatient admissions were outcome measures. The incidence of IPD in children (children presenting with IPD shifted from 2.0 years (interquartile range: 2.5) in the pre-vaccine period to 3.9 years (interquartile range: 6.2) in the post-PCV13 period. The proportion of children with a comorbidity that is an indication for pneumococcal vaccination did not change. Invasive disease with focus (meningitis, pneumonia, empyema, peritonitis) compared with invasive disease with bacteremia only increased from 44.6% in pre-vaccine to 64.0% and 61.4% in the post-7-valent protein-polysaccharide conjugate vaccine and post-PCV13 periods, respectively (P = 0.017). Having IPD in the post-PCV13 period compared with the pre-vaccine period was associated with an increased odds of hospitalization [Odds ratio (OR): 2.9; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.4-6.2]. Clinical features of IPD have changed since pneumococcal conjugate vaccines were introduced, with a shift toward more focal infections requiring hospitalization. Although overall IPD cases have declined, disease that does occur appears to be more severe.

  8. The Changing Epidemiology of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease at a Tertiary Children’s Hospital through the PCV7 Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    AMPOFO, KROW; PAVIA, ANDREW T.; STOCKMANN, CHRIS; HERSH, ADAM L.; BENDER, JEFFERY M.; BLASCHKE, ANNE J.; WENG, HSIN YI CINDY; KORGENSKI, KENT E.; DALY, JUDY; MASON, EDWARD O.; BYINGTON, CARRIE L.

    2011-01-01

    Background In 2000, a 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was licensed for use among U.S. children. Many sites have since reported changes in invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). We recognized an opportunity to describe the changes in epidemiology, clinical syndromes and serotype distribution over a 14 year period including 4 years before vaccine introduction and spanning the entire PCV7 era. Methods Cases were defined as children <18 years of age who were cared for at Primary Children’s Medical Center for culture-confirmed IPD. We defined the pre-vaccine period as the timeframe spanning 1997–2000 and the post-vaccine period from 2001–2010. Demographics, clinical data, and outcomes were collected through electronic query and chart review. S. pneumoniae serotyping was performed using the capsular swelling method. Results The median age of children with IPD increased from 19 months during the pre-vaccine period to 27 months during post-vaccine period (P = 0.02) with a larger proportion of IPD among children older than 5 years. The proportion of IPD associated with pneumonia increased substantially from 29% to 50% (P < 0.001). This increase was primarily attributable to an increase in complicated pneumonia (17% to 33%; P < 0.001). Non-vaccine serotypes 7F, 19A, 22F and 3 emerged as the dominant serotypes in the post-vaccine period. Of S. pneumoniae isolates collected from children <5 years of age, for which vaccine is recommended, 67% of IPD was due to serotypes in PCV13 during 2005–2010. Conclusions After PCV7 was introduced, significant changes in IPD were noted. One third of IPD occurred in children older than 5 years, who were outside the age group for which PCV is recommended. Continued surveillance is warranted to identify further evolution of the epidemiology, clinical syndromes, and serotype distribution of S. pneumoniae following PCV13 licensure. PMID:22330164

  9. Population snapshot of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing invasive disease in South Africa prior to introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kedibone M Ndlangisa

    Full Text Available We determined the sequence types of isolates that caused invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD prior to routine use of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV in South Africa. PCV-13 serotypes and 6C isolates collected in 2007 (1 461/2 437, 60% from patients of all ages as part of on-going, national, laboratory-based surveillance for IPD, were selected for genetic characterization. In addition, all 134 non-PCV isolates from children <2 years were selected for characterization. Sequence type diversity by serotype and age category (children <5 years vs. individuals ≥5 years was assessed for PCV serotypes using Simpson's index of diversity. Similar genotypes circulated among isolates from children and adults and the majority of serotypes were heterogeneous. While globally disseminated clones were common among some serotypes (e.g., serotype 1 [clonal complex (CC 217, 98% of all serotype 1] and 14 [CC230, 43%], some were represented mainly by clonal complexes rarely reported elsewhere (e.g., serotype 3 [CC458, 60%] and 19A [CC2062, 83%]. In children <2 years, serotype 15B and 8 were the most common serotypes among non-PCV isolates (16% [22/134] and 15% [20/134] isolates, respectively. Sequence type 7052 and 53 were most common among serotypes 15B and 8 isolates and accounted for 58% (7/12 and 64% (9/14 of the isolates, respectively. Serotype 19F, 14, 19A and 15B had the highest proportions of penicillin non-susceptible isolates. Genotypes rarely reported in other parts of the world but common among some of our serotypes highlight the importance of our data as these genotypes may emerge post PCV introduction.

  10. [Emergence of invasive pneumococcal disease caused by non-vaccine serotypes in the era of the 7-valent conjugate vaccine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Martínez, F; Navarro Gómez, M L; Saavedra Lozano, J; Santos Sebastián, M M; Rodríguez Fernández, R; González Sanchéz, M; Cercenado Mansilla, E; Hernández-Sampelayo Matos, T

    2014-03-01

    There has been an increased incidence in invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) produced by non-vaccine serotype (NVS) of Streptococcus pneumoniae after the introduction of PCV7. Our objective was to describe the epidemiological, clinical and microbiological characteristics of IPD caused by NVS in a tertiary hospital in Madrid. Retrospective (1998-2004) and prospective (2005-2009) study evaluating IPD caused by NVS in children. The study was divided into three periods: P1 (1998-2001) when PCV7 was not commercialized; P2 (2002-2005) with 40% vaccine coverage among children; and P3 (2006-2009) when the vaccine was added to the Childhood Immunization Schedule in Madrid. We analyzed 155 cases of IPD. One hundred and fifty of these isolates were serotyped (100 were NVS). There was an increase in the prevalence of IPD from P1 (31%) to P2 (54%) and P3 (91%). The most relevant emerging serotypes were 19A, 7F, 1, 5, 3 and 15C. The most significant clinical syndromes produced by some specific serotypes were as follows: lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) by serotypes 1, 3, 5 and 15C; LRTI, primary bacteremia and meningitis by serotype 19A; and primary bacteremia by serotype 7F (66%). The large majority (83.8%) of NVS were sensitive to penicillin. There has been an increased prevalence of IPD caused by NVS since the introduction of PCV7. These changes should prompt the introduction of new pneumococcal vaccines, which include most of the NVS, in the childhood immunization calendar to prevent IPD in children. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. The Czech Surveillance System for Invasive Pneumococcal Disease, 2008-2013: A Follow-Up Assessment and Sensitivity Estimation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Katharina Stock

    Full Text Available Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD is caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae and mostly presents as pneumonia, sepsis or meningitis. A notable portion of IPD cases is vaccine preventable and the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV was introduced into the routine childhood immunization programs in many countries during the last decades.Before PCV introduction in the Czech Republic in 2010, a national surveillance system for IPD was implemented in 2008 and further improved in 2011. In this study, we describe the new surveillance system for the first time and measure its sensitivity between 2010 and 2013 using the capture-recapture method. Furthermore, we describe the recent epidemiological trend of IPD, taking sensitivity estimates into account.Between 2010 and 2013 the estimated sensitivity of the overall IPD surveillance increased from 81% to 99%. The sensitivity of individual reporting sources increased from 72% to 87% for the laboratory system and from 31% to 89% for the epidemiological notification system. Crucial for this improvement was the introduction of quarterly report reminders in 2011. Due to positive source dependency, the presented sensitivity estimates are most probably overestimated and reflect the upper limit of reporting completeness. Stratification showed variation in sensitivity of reporting particularly according to region. An effect of the PVC vaccination in the Czech Republic is visible in the incidence of IPD in target age groups (<5 y. This influence was not evident in the total IPD incidence and may interfere with increasing sensitivity of reporting. In 2013, an increase in the IPD incidence was observed. This finding requires further observation and a detailed vaccine impact analysis is needed to assess the current immunization strategy.

  12. Pediatric invasive pneumococcal disease caused by vaccine serotypes following the introduction of conjugate vaccination in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harboe, Zitta B; Valentiner-Branth, Palle; Ingels, Helene

    2013-01-01

    A seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was introduced in the Danish childhood immunization program (2+1 schedule) in October 2007, followed by PCV13 starting from April 2010. The nationwide incidence of IPD among children younger than 5 years nearly halved after the introduction...... of children suspected to present with a vaccine failure. The period between April 19 and December 31, 2010 was considered a PCV7/PCV13 transitional period, where both vaccines were offered. We identified 45 episodes of IPD caused by a PCV7 serotype (23% of the total number) and 105 (55%) caused by one...... of the 6 additional serotypes in PCV13. Ten children had received at least one PCV7 dose before the onset of IPD caused by a PCV7 serotype. Seven children were considered to be incompletely vaccinated before IPD, but only three cases fulfilled the criteria of vaccine failure (caused by serotypes 14, 19F...

  13. The epidemiology of invasive pneumococcal disease in British Columbia following implementation of an infant immunization program: increases in herd immunity and replacement disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahni, Vanita; Naus, Monika; Hoang, Linda; Tyrrell, Gregory J; Martin, Irene; Patrick, David M

    2012-01-01

    In 2003, British Columbia (BC) introduced a universal heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-7) program for infants, and in 2007 revised the recommended schedule from four doses to three doses. We describe trends in the incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in association with these program changes. All confirmed cases are reported to the BC Centre for Disease Control (BCCDC) using a standardized data collection process; isolates are forwarded to the BCCDC Public Health and Reference Microbiology Laboratory for serotyping and to the National Reference Laboratory for confirmation. Upon implementation of the reduced dose program in 2007, additional epidemiological data, including immunization history, were collected for children 16 years of age, herd immunity is evident and decreasing trends of PCV-7 serotypes continued even after the dose reduction program was introduced. However, gains in disease reduction were offset by increases in replacement serotypes, particularly among the over-65 age group. This has resulted in no net change in adult IPD rates. The implementation of the PCV-7 program has changed the epidemiology of IPD in BC through direct effects of the vaccine, herd immunity and serotype replacement. The introduction of a three-dose schedule was not associated with an excess of vaccine failures.

  14. Risk factors and comorbidities for invasive pneumococcal disease in Western Australian Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faye Janice Lim

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Australian Aboriginal people have among the highest rates of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD worldwide. We investigated clinical diagnosis, risk factors, comorbidities and vaccine coverage in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal IPD cases. Using enhanced surveillance, we identified IPD cases in Western Australia, Australia, between 1997 and 2007. We calculated the proportion with risk factors and comorbidities in children (<5 years and adults (≥15 years, as well as adults living in metropolitan and non-metropolitan regions. We then calculated the proportion of cases eligible for vaccination who were vaccinated before contracting IPD. Of the 1,792 IPD cases that were reported, 355 (20% were Aboriginal and 1,155 (65% were adults. Pneumonia was the most common diagnosis (61% of non-Aboriginal and 49% of Aboriginal adult IPD cases in 2001-2007. Congenital abnormality was the most frequent comorbidity in non-Aboriginal children (11%. In Aboriginal children, preterm delivery was most common (14%. Ninety-one percent of non-Aboriginal and 96% of Aboriginal adults had one or more risk factors or comorbidities. In non-Aboriginal adults, cardiovascular disease (34% was the predominant comorbidity whilst excessive alcohol use (66% was the most commonly reported risk factor in Aboriginal adults. In adults, comorbidities were more frequently reported among those in metropolitan regions than those in non-metropolitan regions. Vaccination status was unknown for 637 of 1,082 cases post-July 2001. Forty-one percent of non-Aboriginal and 60% of Aboriginal children were eligible for vaccination but were not vaccinated. Among adults with risk factors who were eligible for vaccination and with known vaccination status, 75% Aboriginal and 94% non-Aboriginal were not vaccinated. An all-of-life immunisation register is needed to evaluate vaccine coverage and effectiveness in preventing IPD in adults.

  15. Pediatric invasive pneumococcal disease caused by vaccine serotypes following the introduction of conjugate vaccination in Denmark.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zitta B Harboe

    Full Text Available A seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7 was introduced in the Danish childhood immunization program (2+1 schedule in October 2007, followed by PCV13 starting from April 2010. The nationwide incidence of IPD among children younger than 5 years nearly halved after the introduction of PCV7 in the program, mainly due to a decline in IPD caused by PCV7-serotypes. We report the results from a nationwide population-based cohort study of laboratory confirmed IPD cases in children younger than 5 years during October 1, 2007 to December 31, 2010 and describe the characteristics of children suspected to present with a vaccine failure. The period between April 19 and December 31, 2010 was considered a PCV7/PCV13 transitional period, where both vaccines were offered. We identified 45 episodes of IPD caused by a PCV7 serotype (23% of the total number and 105 (55% caused by one of the 6 additional serotypes in PCV13. Ten children had received at least one PCV7 dose before the onset of IPD caused by a PCV7 serotype. Seven children were considered to be incompletely vaccinated before IPD, but only three cases fulfilled the criteria of vaccine failure (caused by serotypes 14, 19F and 23F. One case of vaccine failure was observed in a severely immunosuppressed child following three PCV7 doses, and two cases were observed in immunocompetent children following two infant doses before they were eligible for their booster. None of the IPD cases caused by the additional PCV13 serotypes had been vaccinated by PCV13 and there were therefore no PCV13-vaccine failures in the first 8-months after PCV13 introduction in Denmark.

  16. Let the sun shine in: effects of ultraviolet radiation on invasive pneumococcal disease risk in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Caroline C

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common cause of community acquired pneumonia and bacteremia. Excess wintertime mortality related to pneumonia has been noted for over a century, but the seasonality of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD has been described relatively recently and is poorly understood. Improved understanding of environmental influence on disease seasonality has taken on new urgency due to global climate change. Methods We evaluated 602 cases of IPD reported in Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, from 2002 to 2007. Poisson regression models incorporating seasonal smoothers were used to identify associations between weekly weather patterns and case counts. Associations between acute (day-to-day environmental fluctuations and IPD occurrence were evaluated using a case-crossover approach. Effect modification across age and sex strata was explored, and meta-regression models were created using stratum-specific estimates for effect. Results IPD incidence was greatest in the wintertime, and spectral decomposition revealed a peak at 51.0 weeks, consistent with annual periodicity. After adjustment for seasonality, yearly increases in reporting, and temperature, weekly incidence was found to be associated with clear-sky UV index (IRR per unit increase in index: 0.70 [95% CI 0.54-0.91]. The effect of UV index was highest among young strata and decreased with age. At shorter time scales, only an association with increases in ambient sulphur oxides was linked to disease risk (OR for highest tertile of exposure 0.75, 95% CI 0.60 to 0.93. Conclusion We confirmed the wintertime predominance of IPD in a major urban center. The major predictor of IPD in Philadelphia is extended periods of low UV radiation, which may explain observed wintertime seasonality. The mechanism of action of diminished light exposure on disease occurrence may be due to direct effects on pathogen survival or host immune function via altered 1,25-(OH2-vitamin

  17. [Pneumococcal vaccine recommendations in chronic respiratory diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas Maldonado, F; Alfageme Michavila, I; Barchilón Cohen, V S; Peis Redondo, J I; Vargas Ortega, D A

    2014-09-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia is an acute respiratory infectious disease which has an incidence of 3-8 cases/1,000 inhabitants, and increases with age and comorbidities. The pneumococcus is the organism most frequently involved in community-acquired pneumonia in the adult (30-35%). Around 40% of patients with community-acquired pneumonia require hospital admission, and around 10% need to be admitted to an intensive care unit. The most serious forms of pneumococcal infection include invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), which covers cases of bacteremia (associated or not to pneumonia), meningitis, pleuritis, arthritis, primary peritonitis and pericarditis. Currently, the biggest problem with the pneumococcus is the emergence of resistance to antimicrobial agents, and its high morbimortality, despite the use of appropriate antibiotics and proper medical treatment. Certain underlying medical conditions increase the risk of IPD and its complications, especially, from the respiratory diseases point of view, smoking and chronic respiratory diseases. Pneumococcal disease, according to the WHO, is the first preventable cause of death worldwide in children and adults. Among the strategies to prevent IPD is vaccination. WHO considers that its universal introduction and implementation against pneumococcus is essential and a priority in all countries. There are currently 2 pneumococcal vaccines for adults: the 23 serotypes polysaccharide and conjugate 13 serotypes. The scientific societies represented here have worked to develop some recommendations, based on the current scientific evidence, regarding the pneumococcal vaccination in the immunocompetent adult with chronic respiratory disease and smokers at risk of suffering from IPD. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  18. Impact of 13-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine Used in Children on Invasive Pneumococcal Disease in Children and Adults in the United States: Analysis of Multisite, Population-based Surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Matthew R.; Link-Gelles, Ruth; Schaffner, William; Lynfield, Ruth; Lexau, Catherine; Bennett, Nancy M.; Petit, Susan; Zansky, Shelley M.; Harrison, Lee H.; Reingold, Arthur; Miller, Lisa; Scherzinger, Karen; Thomas, Ann; Farley, Monica M.; Zell, Elizabeth R.; Taylor, Thomas H.; Pondo, Tracy; Rodgers, Loren; McGee, Lesley; Beall, Bernard; Jorgensen, James H.; Whitney, Cynthia G.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Background In 2000, 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was introduced in the U.S. and resulted in dramatic reductions in invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) and modest increases in non-PCV7-type IPD. In 2010, a 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) replaced PCV7 in the U.S. immunization schedule. We evaluated the effect of PCV13 use in children on IPD in children and adults in the U.S. Methods We used laboratory- and population-based data on incidence of IPD from CDC’s Emerging Infections Program / Active Bacterial Core surveillance in a time-series model to estimate the impact of vaccination. Cases of IPD during July 2004–June 2013 were classified as being caused by the PCV13 serotypes against which PCV7 has no effect (PCV13/nonPCV7). Findings Compared with incidence expected among children <5 years old if PCV7 alone had been continued, incidence of IPD overall and IPD caused by PCV13/nonPCV7 serotypes declined by 64% (95% interval estimate [IE] 59–68 %) and 93% (95%IE 91–94), respectively, by July 2012–June 2013. Among adults, incidence of IPD overall and PCV13/nonPCV7-type IPD also declined by 12–32% and 58–72%, respectively, depending on age. In all age groups, reductions were driven principally by changes in incidence of serotypes 19A and 7F. We estimate that over 30,000 cases of IPD and 3,000 deaths were averted in the first 3 years following PCV13 introduction. Interpretation PCV13 has reduced IPD among all ages when used routinely in children in the U.S. Serotypes 19A and 7F, which emerged after PCV7 introduction, have been effectively controlled. PMID:25656600

  19. Changes in invasive pneumococcal disease serotypes in a regional area of Australia following three years of 7vPCV introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakhrul Islam

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD is a serious bacterial disease. Vaccination can prevent disease for many of the current serotypes. The aim of this investigation was to describe the notification rates of IPD in a regional area of Australia, explore changes in rates since the introduction of the population vaccine programmes in 2005 and to describe changes in the distribution of serotypes in relation to the available vaccines after three years.Methods: Annualized IPD notification rates were calculated for residents of a regional area in northern New South Wales. Rates were analysed according to serotypes covered by available vaccines. Changes in serotypes were compared for the periods 2002–2004 and 2008–2010.Results: The annualized notification rate of IPD in all ages for the period 2002–2004 was 13.7 per 100 000 population and 8.3 per 100 000 population for the period 2008–2010 (rate ratio [RR], 0.61, confidence interval [CI]: 0.51–0.72. The largest decline was observed in 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (7vPCV types across all age groups (RR, 0.17, CI: 0.12–0.24 and in the zero to four year age group (RR, 0.03, CI: 0.01–0.11. The six serotypes included in the new 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, but not in the 7vPCV, accounted for 40.6% of IPD cases in the zero to four year age group during the period of 2008–2010.Discussion: The introduction of 7vPCV significantly reduced the overall notification rate of IPD caused by the serotypes contained in this vaccine. This decline in IPD rates in children can be directly attributed to the use of 7vPCV, and in adults it is most likely an indirect effect of the 7vPCV programme in children.

  20. Pneumococcal vaccination rates in children with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nero, Alecia C; Akuete, Kwei; Leasure Reeves, Sarah; Dombkowski, Kevin J

    2014-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) confers an increased risk of invasive pneumococcal disease, especially among young children. Pneumococcal vaccination decreases this risk, but the completion rate of age-appropriate vaccinations is not well defined in SCD. The goal of this study was to assess whether pneumococcal vaccines are administered to high-risk children with SCD according to recommended vaccine schedules. A case-control design was used to conduct this study. Administrative data were obtained on Michigan Medicaid or Children's Special Health Care Services programs enrollees. In addition, Michigan Newborn Screening and Michigan Care Improvement Registry records were used to confirm diagnosis and vaccine administration. This study compared pneumococcal vaccination rates in a cohort of 179 children with SCD with 537 age-matched non-SCD controls (1:3) enrolled in the Michigan Medicaid Program between 2001 and 2008. Study subjects were born in the state of Michigan between 2001 and 2005. The main outcome measure was the proportion of children defined as up to date for pneumococcal vaccines at defined milestone ages. Children with SCD had significantly higher vaccination rates than controls, yet these values were much lower than state and national immunization survey rates. Barriers to completing age-appropriate recommended pneumococcal immunizations should be identified and addressed to further reduce invasive pneumococcal disease in this high-risk patient population.

  1. Impact of Pneumococcal Conjugate Universal Routine Vaccination on Pneumococcal Disease in Italian Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Fortunato

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In Italy, the effectiveness of pneumococcal universal vaccination in preventing vaccine-type invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD in the PCV7/PCV13 shifting period was estimated to be 84.3% (95% CI: 84.0–84.6% in children <5 years. This study aims at corroborating the estimation of both the effectiveness (VE of PCVs and its impact in reducing pneumococcal diseases. A 1 : 3 matched-case-control study was conducted among children <5 years old hospitalized for IPD or pneumococcal pneumonia (PP between 2006 and 2012 in the Puglia region. Moreover, hospitalizations for pneumococcal outcomes in the pre- and postvaccination period and the hospitalization risk ratios (HRRs with 95% CIs were computed in Italy and in the first eight regions that introduced PCVs in 2006. The overall effectiveness of PCVs was 75% (95% CI: 61%–84%; it was 69% (95% CI: 30%–88% against IPD and 77% (95% CI: 61%–87% against PP. PCVs showed a significant impact on IPD and acute otitis media either at a national level or in those regions with a longer vaccination history, with a nearly 40% reduction of hospitalizations for both outcomes. Our findings provide further evidence of the effectiveness of PCVs against pneumococcal diseases and its impact on nasopharyngeal carriage in children <5 years, indicating the importance of maintaining high immunization coverage.

  2. Serious pneumococcal disease outbreak in men exposed to metal fume - detection, response and future prevention through pneumococcal vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Judith; Patterson, Lynsey; Irvine, Neil; Doherty, Lorraine; Loughrey, Anne; Kidney, Joe; Sheppard, Carmen; Kapatai, Georgia; Fry, Norman K; Ramsay, Mary; Jessop, Lucy

    2017-07-13

    Welders and those exposed to metal fume are known to be at increased risk of pneumococcal pneumonia and invasive pneumococcal disease. Current UK guidance recommends that vaccination against pneumococcus be considered in those at risk of frequent or continuous occupational exposure to metal fume, taking into account the exposure control measures in place. We report an outbreak of serious pneumococcal disease that occurred between April and June 2015 among a multinational workforce exposed to metal fumes while working on the refurbishment of an oil rig in a Belfast shipyard. Four confirmed and five probable cases were identified, which occurred despite the use of environmental control measures and the availability of respiratory protective equipment. To provide direct protection to those at risk of pneumococcal disease and to eradicate carriage of pneumococcus and interrupt transmission, pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) and antibiotic prophylaxis were offered to 680 individuals identified as potentially exposed to metal fume. Low levels of prior pneumococcal vaccination were reported among this target group (vaccine-preventable strains covered by the conjugate and polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccines currently available. We propose that consideration should be given to strengthening implementation around pneumococcal vaccination for those exposed to metal fume through their work, even when other control measures are in place, to reduce the risk of future cases and outbreaks of serious pneumococcal disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Invasive pneumococcal infection despite 7-valent conjugated vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien Joye

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite good cover with 7-valent vaccination, invasive pneumococcal infections may still be misdiagnosed and may lead to lifethreatening situations or death in young children. New serotypes are emerging and, therefore, clinicians must keep a high level of suspicion in young children regardless of their vaccination status. We report three cases of invasive pneumococcal infection due to new serotypes not covered by the 7-valent conjugated vaccine, two of which led children to death.

  4. The herd effects of infant PCV7/PCV13 sequential implementation on adult invasive pneumococcal disease, six years post implementation; a nationwide study in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev-Yochay, Gili; Katzir, Michal; Strahilevitz, Jacob; Rahav, Galia; Finn, Talya; Miron, Dan; Maor, Yasmin; Chazan, Bibiana; Schindler, Yehudith; Dagan, Ron

    2017-04-25

    Introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) has nearly eliminated vaccine-type (VT) invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in children, yet the reported resulting reduction of adult IPD is variable. We present the indirect impact of sequential PCV7/PCV13 implementation in Israel on adult IPD. An ongoing nationwide active surveillance was initiated on July 2009 when PCV7 was implemented (with Catch-up). PCV7 was gradually replaced by PCV13 since November 2010. Comorbidity and outcome data were collected from medical files. Incidence rates were calculated for overall and vaccine-type IPD. A total of 2579 IPD cases were diagnosed among a population of 5.0-5.5 million adults >18y (2009-2015). Incidence rates were 9.15/100,000 and 10.16/100,000 in the first and second study years, respectively. However, after PCV13 implementation, the rates decreased to 7.19 within four years, and remained stable in the two following years. Within 6years, PCV7-VT-IPD incidence decreased from 2.52 to 0.52 (79%) and PCV13-VT-IPD from 6.15 to 1.81 (71%). Concurrently, non-VT13 incidence increased from 2.99 to 5.25. Approximately 50% of all patients were adults ≥65y, in whom the decrease in PCV13-VT-IPD incidence was smaller and slower (65% vs. >80% decrease in adults adult IPD, six years post-PCV7/13 implementation emphasizes the importance of indirect protection in achieving overall population impact and should be considered when discussing the potential additional benefits of direct adult PCV vaccination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Pneumococcal disease: Closing the gap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashfaq Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available oday, India is home to 99 million elderly people. By 2050, the number of elderly in this country will have gone up to 300 million1. With an increase in life expectancy from 32 years at the time of independence to 67.14 years in 20121, 10% of the population finds itself labeled as ‘senior citizen’. Inevitably, age brings with it comorbidities, immune senescence and pneumococcal disease. Pneumonia, in deference to its considerable morbidity and mortality, was exalted by Sir William Osler to its dubious pedestal of “Captain of all these Men of Death”. Unsurprisingly, immune debility and in several regions of the planet increasing antibiotic resistance, have ensured that pneumococcal pneumonia continues to take a large toll of senior citizens. Death rates have hardly budged over the last three decades. In India, pneumonia accounts for 25-30% deaths in the elderly3, a fatality rate almost unrivalled by most other terminal diseases. Among 15 high-burden countries, India has the dubious distinction of ranking third from last in the Global Action Plan for Pneumonia and Diarrhea (GAPPD4. During the World Immunization Week 2015 (April 24th to 30th, the ‘Close the Immunization Gap’ campaign gains crucial importance. Immunization, long vaunted as one of the most successful and cost-effective health interventions there is, prevent 2 to 3 million deaths every year, and saves enor-mous hospitalization costs and prevents loss of productivity. The recently published CAPiTA study (Community Acquired Pneumonia Immunization Trial in Adults, evaluated the efficacy of a novel 13-valent conju-gate vaccine for Pneumococcal pneumonia a vac-cine proven for its efficacy in children for the first time in older adults over 85,000 of them. Childhood vaccination with ‘PCV-13’, of course, was instrumental in reducing nasopharyngeal carriage of Strep pneumonia and decreasing the prevalence of Pneumococcal disease in the community at large. Altogether, the idea

  6. Incidence and risk factors for invasive pneumococcal disease in HIV-infected and non-HIV-infected individuals before and after the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harboe, Zitta Barrella; Larsen, Mette; Ladelund, Steen

    2014-01-01

    with an increased risk of IPD. Detectable viral loads (RR, 1.88 [95% CI, 1.79-1.98]) and a relative fall in CD4 T-cell counts were also associated with an increased risk (≥500 to 350-500 CD4 T cells/µL: RR, 1.29 [95% CI, 1.21-1.37] and risk of IPD declined over time......BACKGROUND: Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) is an important cause of morbidity among individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We described incidence and risk factors for IPD in HIV-infected and uninfected individuals. METHODS: Nationwide population-based cohort study of HIV......-infected adults treated at all Danish HIV treatment centers during 1995-2012. Nineteen population-matched controls per HIV-infected individual were retrieved. The risk of IPD was assessed using Poisson regression. RESULTS: The incidence of IPD was 304.7 cases per 100 000 person-years of follow-up (PYFU) in HIV...

  7. Rare variants in MYD88, IRAK4 and IKBKG and susceptibility to invasive pneumococcal disease: a population-based case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda K Ellis

    Full Text Available Although rare variants within the Toll-like receptor signalling pathway genes have been found to underlie human primary immunodeficiencies associated with selective predisposition to invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD, the contribution of variants in these genes to IPD susceptibility at the population level remains unknown. Complete re-sequencing of IRAK4, MYD88 and IKBKG genes was undertaken in 164 IPD cases from the UK and 164 geographically-matched population-based controls. 233 single-nucleotide variants (SNVs were identified, of which ten were in coding regions. Four rare coding variants were predicted to be deleterious, two variants in MYD88 and two in IRAK4. The predicted deleterious variants in MYD88 were observed as two heterozygote cases but not seen in controls. Frequencies of predicted deleterious IRAK4 SNVs were the same in cases and controls. Our findings suggest that rare, functional variants in MYD88, IRAK4 or IKBKG do not significantly contribute to IPD susceptibility in adults at the population level.

  8. Pneumococcal vaccination and chronic respiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Froes F

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Filipe Froes,1 Nicolas Roche,2 Francesco Blasi3,4 1Chest Department, Hospital Pulido Valente, North Lisbon Hospital Center, Lisbon, Portugal; 2Department of Respiratory and Intensive Care Medicine, Cochin Hospital, Paris Descartes University, Paris, France; 3Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, University of Milan, 4Internal Medicine Department, Respiratory Unit and Adult Cystic Fibrosis Center, Fondazione IRCCS ca Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy Abstract: Patients with COPD and other chronic respiratory diseases are especially vulnerable to viral and bacterial pulmonary infections, which are major causes of exacerbations, hospitalization, disease progression, and mortality in COPD patients. Effective vaccines could reduce the burden of respiratory infections and acute exacerbations in COPD patients, but what is the evidence for this? This article reviews and discusses the existing evidence for pneumococcal vaccination efficacy and its changing role in patients with chronic respiratory diseases, especially COPD. Specifically, the recent Community-Acquired Pneumonia Immunization Trial in Adults (CAPITA showed the efficacy of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in older adults, many of whom had additional risk factors for pneumococcal disease, including chronic lung diseases. Taken together, the evidence suggests that pneumococcal and influenza vaccinations can prevent community-acquired pneumonia and acute exacerbations in COPD patients, while pneumococcal vaccination early in the course of COPD could help maintain stable health status. Despite the need to prevent pulmonary infections in patients with chronic respiratory diseases and evidence for the efficacy of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, pneumococcal vaccine coverage and awareness are low and need to be improved. Respiratory physicians need to communicate the benefits of vaccination more effectively to their patients who suffer from chronic respiratory diseases

  9. Síndrome hemolítico-urêmica relacionada à infecção invasiva pelo Streptococcus pneumoniae Hemolytic-uremic syndrome complicating invasive pneumococcal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Leticia de O. Cestari

    2008-03-01

    hemoglobin level of 6.5g/dL, 38,000 platelets/mm³, blood urea nitrogen of 79mg/dL and creatinine of 1.64mg/dL. On the first day, patient developed oliguria and hypervolemia and needed hemodiafiltration. Multiple organs dysfunction syndrome was followed by death on the seventh day. Necropsy showed extensive renal cortical and tubular necrosis with fibrin deposits on arterioles. COMMENTS: Hemolytic-uremic syndrome complicating invasive pneumococcal disease has high morbidity and mortality rates. Children with pneumococcal infection and severe hematologic or renal abnormalities should be investigated. The usefulness of early recognition of T-antigen activation on diagnosis and therapeutics, the role of complement factor H in the pathology, the ideal renal replacement method and the definition of long term outcome are issues to be investigated.

  10. Pneumococcal Disease: Symptoms and Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sensitive to light) Confusion In babies, meningitis may cause poor eating and drinking, low alertness, and vomiting. Pneumococcal bacteremia is a blood infection. Symptoms include: Fever Chills Low alertness Sepsis is a complication caused by the body’s overwhelming ...

  11. Incidencia de enfermedad neumocócica invasiva en Cantabria (1995-2001 e implicaciones para el calendario vacunal Incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease in Cantabria, Spain, (1995-2001 and implications for the childhood inmunization schedule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. González

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Describir la incidencia de enfermedad neumocócica invasiva en Cantabria en los años 1995-2001. Método: Consulta de los registros del conjunto mínimo básico de datos (CMBD de los hospitales públicos de Cantabria, así como altas de los hospitales privados, registro de enfermedades de declaración obligatoria (EDO, y diagnósticos microbiológicos e historias clínicas de los niños ingresados en el Servicio de Pediatría del Hospital Cantabria (el hospital de referencia de tercer nivel. Resultados: Se obtuvo una incidencia de meningitis de 5,55, 5,03 y 0,76/100.000 en los niños Objective: To describe the incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease in Cantabria (Spain between 1995 and 2001. Method: We reviewed the records of the Minimum Data Set (MDS of public hospitals in Cantabria, discharges from private hospitals and the registry of diseases of mandatory reporting, as well as the microbiologic diagnoses and medical records of children discharged from the Pediatric Service of the Cantabria Hospital (the tertiary care hospital in our autonomous community. Results: We obtained a meningitis incidence of 5.55, 5.03 and 0.76/100,000 in children < 2 years, ≥ 2 and < 5 years, and ≥ 5 years respectively, and an incidence of invasive disease of 11.11, 11.32 and 1.49/100,000 in the same age groups. Conclusions: The incidence of meningitis and invasive pneumococcal disease in Cantabria is low. We discuss factors that should be taken into account when introducing the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in the childhood immunization schedule of Cantabria.

  12. Serotype-specific mortality from invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae disease revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martens, Pernille; Worm, Signe Westring; Lundgren, Bettina

    2004-01-01

    Serotype-specific mortality from invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae disease revisited.Martens P, Worm SW, Lundgren B, Konradsen HB, Benfield T. Department of Infectious Diseases 144, Hvidovre University Hospital, DK-2650 Hvidovre, Denmark. pernillemartens@yahoo.com BACKGROUND: Invasive infection w...... pneumococcal disease. The limitations of the current polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccine warrant the development of alternative vaccines. We suggest that the virulence of pneumococcal serotypes should be considered in the design of novel vaccines....

  13. Hospitalizations for pneumonia, invasive diseases and otitis in Tuscany (Italy), 2002-2014: Which was the impact of universal pneumococcal pediatric vaccination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccalini, Sara; Varone, Ornella; Chellini, Martina; Pieri, Luca; Sala, Antonino; Berardi, Cesare; Bonanni, Paolo; Bechini, Angela

    2017-02-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the main causative organism of acute media otitis in children and meningitis and bacterial pneumonia in the community. Since 2008 in Tuscany, central Italy, the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (7-valent vaccine, switched to 13-valent vaccine in 2010) was actively offered free of charge to all newborns. Aim of the study is to evaluate the impact of pneumococcal pediatric vaccination in the Tuscan population on hospitalizations potentially caused by S. pneumoniae, during pre-vaccination (PVP, 2002-2007) and vaccination period (VP, 2009-2014). We analyzed hospital discharge records (HDRs) of all hospitals in Tuscany from 2002 to 2014. Hospitalizations potentially due to pneumococcal diseases were 347, 221. The general hospitalization rate was 716/100,000 inhabitants during PVP and 753/100,000 in VP, with a decrease of 29.1% in the age-group 0-9 y ("target" of the vaccination program) and an increase of 75.7% in subjects >64 y of age. During VP, admission days and hospitalization costs increased (6.2% and 24.2%, respectively), especially in patients >64 y (12.9% and 33.8%, respectively); in children vaccination resulted in the decrease of hospitalizations in younger but the expected indirect effect in the elderly was not reported, justifying the Tuscan recommendation to extend the vaccination to subjects > 64 y.

  14. Economic studies applied to vaccines against invasive diseases: An updated budget impact analysis of age-based pneumococcal vaccination strategies in the elderly in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccalini, Sara; Bechini, Angela; Gasparini, Roberto; Panatto, Donatella; Amicizia, Daniela; Bonanni, Paolo

    2017-02-01

    Many evaluations have been performed on the economic impact of pneumococcal vaccination in older adults (>64 y of age) in several countries, including Italy. However, these studies did not include the new data on the effectiveness of 13-valent conjugate pneumococcal vaccine (PCV13) in the elderly reported by the CAPiTA Study. The aim of the present study was to update our previous budget impact analysis of multi-cohort PCV13 vaccination in adults in Italy by including new scientific evidence. We also compared single-cohort vaccination strategies per year, in order to identify the cohort with the most favorable economic profile, in the event of the multi-cohort approach not being economically sustainable for the National Health System (NHS). The new impact analysis highlights that the vaccination of one, two or three adult cohorts per year in Italy would lead to a considerable reduction in pneumococcal disease and its related costs over 5 y. The strategies proved cost-effective (ICERs ranging from €14,605 to €15,412/QALY), i.e. well below the threshold of €50,000/QALY. The ICERs were slightly lower than those calculated in the first published analysis and vaccination continued to be economically favorable. In the case of a mono-cohort strategy, the vaccination of 65-year-old subjects, albeit more expensive, proved to be more favorable than the vaccination of 70- or 75-year-old cohorts. Finally, after the inclusion of the recent clinical evidence, the age-based PCV13 vaccination of the elderly in Italy continued to be economically justified from the NHS perspective in the short period. Vaccination of the elderly should therefore be strongly recommended nationwide in Italy.

  15. Sustained reduction in vaccine-type invasive pneumococcal disease despite waning effects of a catch-up campaign in Kilifi, Kenya: A mathematical model based on pre-vaccination data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojal, John; Flasche, Stefan; Hammitt, Laura L; Akech, Donald; Kiti, Moses C; Kamau, Tatu; Adetifa, Ifedayo; Nurhonen, Markku; Scott, J Anthony G; Auranen, Kari

    2017-08-16

    In 2011, Kenya introduced the 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine together with a catch-up campaign for children aged vaccination surveillance study based in Kilifi, there was a substantial decline in invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). However, given the continued circulation of the vaccine serotypes it is possible that vaccine-serotype disease may re-emerge once the effects of the catch-up campaign wear off. We developed a compartmental, age-structured dynamic model of pneumococcal carriage and invasive disease for three serotype groups: the 10-valent vaccine serotypes and two groups of non-vaccine serotypes based on their susceptibility to mutual competition. The model was calibrated to age- and serotype-specific data on carriage and IPD in the pre-vaccination era and used to predict carriage prevalence and IPD up to ten years post-vaccination in Kilifi. The model was validated against the observed carriage prevalence after vaccine introduction. The model predicts a sustained reduction in vaccine-type pneumococcal carriage prevalence from 33% to 8% in infants and from 30% to 8% in 1-5year olds over the 10-year period following vaccine introduction. The incidence of IPD is predicted to decline across all age groups resulting in an overall reduction of 56% in the population, corresponding to 10.4 cases per 100,000 per year. The vaccine-type IPD incidence is estimated to decline by 83% while non-vaccine-type IPD incidence is predicted to increase by 52%. The model's predictions of carriage prevalence agrees well with the observed data in the first five years post-vaccination. We predict a sustained and substantial decline in IPD through PCV vaccination and that the current regimen is insufficient to fully eliminate vaccine-serotype circulation in the model. We show that the observed impact is likely to be sustained despite waning effects of the catch-up campaign. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Invasive pneumococcal diseases among hospitalized children in Lima, Peru Enfermedades neumocócicas invasoras en niños hospitalizados en Lima, Perú

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa J. Ochoa

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the epidemiology of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD and the antibiotic susceptibility and serotype distribution of S. pneumoniae in pediatric patients in Lima, Peru. METHODS: A 2-year, multicenter, passive surveillance study conducted from May 2006- April 2008 in 11 public hospitals and five private laboratories in Lima, Peru, in patients less than 16 years of age with sterile site cultures yielding S. pneumoniae. Antibiotic susceptibility was performed by Etest® (AB Biodisk, Solna, Switzerland. Strains were serotyped by the Quellung reaction. RESULTS: In all, 101 IPD episodes were studied, 68.3% of which were among children less than 24 months of age. Diagnoses were: pneumonia (47.5%, meningitis (38.6%, and sepsis (7.9%. The overall case fatality rate was 22.0%; case fatality rate in meningitis was 32.4%. While 80.0% of fatal cases were in those less than 24 months of age, only 50.7% of non-fatal cases (P OBJETIVO: Determinar la epidemiología de la enfermedad neumocócica invasora y la sensibilidad a los antibióticos y la distribución de los serotipos de S. pneumoniae en pacientes pediátricos en Lima, Perú. MÉTODOS: Estudio multicéntrico de vigilancia pasiva durante dos años, entre mayo del 2006 y abril del 2008, en 11 hospitales públicos y 5 consultorios privados de Lima, en pacientes menores de 16 años con cultivos de sitios estériles positivos para S. pneumoniae. Se determinó la sensibilidad a los antibióticos mediante Etest® (AB Biodisk, Solna, Suiza. Se serotipificaron las cepas mediante la reacción de Quellung. RESULTADOS: En total, se estudiaron 101 episodios de enfermedad neumocócica invasora, 68,3% de ellos en niños menores de 24 meses, con los siguientes diagnósticos: neumonía (47,5%, meningitis (38,6% y septicemia (7,9%. La tasa de letalidad general fue de 22,0% y la tasa de letalidad por meningitis de 32,4%. Si bien 80,0% de los casos mortales ocurrió en menores de 24 meses, solo 50

  17. Variant mannose-binding lectin alleles are not associated with susceptibility to or outcome of invasive pneumococcal infection in randomly included patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg, Gitte; Weis, Nina; Madsen, Hans O

    2002-01-01

    for pneumococcal infections. To assess the influence of MBL genotypes on the course and outcome of invasive pneumococcal disease, clinical data for 141 adult patients were collected prospectively and their genotypes were determined. All patients included had positive blood cultures for Streptococcus pneumoniae....... The distribution of variant MBL alleles related to low MBL serum concentrations was similar among the patients and healthy individuals, and MBL genotype was not associated with infection outcome. Thus, in a random adult population with invasive pneumococcal infection, MBL does not seem to play a role......Invasive pneumococcal disease is a serious infection that primarily affects very young children and elderly or immunocompromised individuals but also affects previously healthy people. Variant mannose-binding lectin (MBL) alleles are associated with recurrent infections and may be a risk factor...

  18. Childhood pneumococcal disease burden in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustovski, Federico Ariel; García Martí, Sebastián; Pichon-Riviere, Andrés; Debbag, Roberto

    2009-05-01

    To understand the disease burden of pneumococcal disease (PD), a major cause of childhood morbidity and mortality in Argentina, and to draw a baseline against which the need for and effectiveness of vaccination with pneumococcal conjugate vaccines might be measured. A Markov model was constructed to estimate incidence and mortality rates of PD-meningitis (MEN), bacteremia/septicemia (BACT), pneumonia (PNEU), acute otitis media (AOM)-among a hypothetical, birth cohort of 750,000 Argentine infants born in 2006-2015. A systematic review of the literature was performed to select and incorporate input parameters. Life years and costs in 2006 US$ were expressed as both undiscounted and discounted. The number of PD episodes estimated to occur over a 10-year period in the hypothetical birth cohort were: MEN, 225; BACT, 2841; PNEU, 2628; and AOM, 2,066,719. Chronic sequelae of MEN could be expected to cause neurological damage in 43 children and severe hearing issues in 28. Results indicate that there would be 78 PD-related deaths in the cohort (29% due to MEN; 54%, BACT; and 17%, PNEU). The undiscounted life-expectancy for individuals in the birth cohort was estimated to be 72.4 years (29.0 years discounted). Mean, undiscounted, lifetime costs attributed to PD for each child of the cohort totaled US$167 (US$151 discounted), imposing a total, cohort cost-burden of more than US$126 million (US$113 million discounted). The study shows that PD imposes a significant health and economic burden on the Argentine population. This information is essential for assessing the potential health and economic impact of introducing pneumococcal conjugate vaccine into the national immunization schedule.

  19. Pneumococcal Disease: Types of Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... World Health Organization National Foundation for Infectious Diseases Sepsis Types of Infection Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria, or pneumococcus, can cause many types of illnesses. Some of these illnesses ...

  20. Prevention of pneumococcal diseases in the post-seven valent vaccine era: A European perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weil-Olivier Catherine

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The burden of invasive pneumococcal disease in young children decreased dramatically following introduction of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7. The epidemiology of S. pneumoniae now reflects infections caused by serotypes not included in PCV7. Recently introduced higher valency pneumococcal vaccines target the residual burden of invasive and non-invasive infections, including those caused by serotypes not included in PCV7. This review is based on presentations made at the European Society of Pediatric Infectious Diseases in June 2011. Discussion Surveillance data show increased circulation of the non-PCV7 vaccine serotypes 1, 3, 6A, 6C, 7 F and 19A in countries with routine vaccination. Preliminary evidence suggests that broadened serotype coverage offered by higher valency vaccines may be having an effect on invasive disease caused by some of those serotypes, including 19A, 7 F and 6C. Aetiology of community acquired pneumonia remains a difficult clinical diagnosis. However, recent reports indicate that pneumococcal vaccination has reduced hospitalisations of children for vaccine serotype pneumonia. Variations in serotype circulation and occurrence of complicated and non-complicated pneumonia caused by non-PCV7 serotypes highlight the potential of higher valency vaccines to decrease the remaining burden. PCVs reduce nasopharyngeal carriage and acute otitis media (AOM caused by vaccine serotypes. Recent investigations of the interaction between S. pneumoniae and non-typeable H. influenzae suggest that considerable reduction in severe, complicated AOM infections may be achieved by prevention of early pneumococcal carriage and AOM infections. Extension of the vaccine serotype spectrum beyond PCV7 may provide additional benefit in preventing the evolution of AOM. The direct and indirect costs associated with pneumococcal disease are high, thus herd protection and infections caused by non-vaccine serotypes

  1. The burden of pneumococcal disease in children less than 5 years of age in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howidi, Mohammad; Muhsin, Haider; Rajah, Jaishen

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in both developing and industrialized countries, especially among young children and in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent individuals. It is implicated in both invasive (e.g. meningitis and septicemia) as well as noninvasive disease (community-acquired pneumonia and otitis media). The objective of the current study was to describe the overall epidemiology of both invasive and noninvasive pneumococcal disease in Abu Dhabi over a 5-year period. Retrospective review of all pediatric (≤ 5 year old) pneumococcal disease admissions to Shaikh Khalifa Medical City (SKMC) and Mafraq Hospital in Abu Dhabi from 1 January 2001 till 31 December 2005.th We retrieved computerized data from the health information management systems (International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision (ICD9) diagnosis codes) as well as manual surveillance in the laboratory record of pneumococcal isolates. The incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease was 13.6/100, 000 per year (95% CI, 6.5-24.9) and the incidence of noninvasive pneumococcal disease was 172.5/100,000 per year (95% CI, 143.8-205.2). The total incidence rate was 186.0/100, 000 per year (95% CI, 156.2-219.9). This epidemiological survey indicates that the incidence rates in the United Arab Emirate are higher than in Western countries where conjugate pneumococcal vaccine has been introduced. This study is important as it documents the incidence of pneumococcal disease in the era before introduction of the conjugate pneumococcal vaccine and allows for future research to document the impact of a new vaccine considering the geographic variation of pneumococcal serotypes.

  2. Enfermedad neumocócica invasiva en la población infantil de la Comunidad Valenciana Invasive pneumococcal disease in children in the community of Valencia, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Goicoechea-Sáez

    2003-12-01

    .Objective: Pneumococcal disease is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in children. The recent authorization of the heptavalent conjugate vaccine has increased interest in this disease. The objective of this study was to identify the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of this disease, as well as its outcome in the pediatric population of the Autonomous Community of Valencia. Method: Data were obtained from the medical records of children aged less than 15 years who were positive for pneumococcus isolation on admission to hospital between 1996 and 2000. All the public hospitals of the Autonomous Community of Valencia were included. Changes in incidence were evaluated by comparing rates and outcomes (sequelae and lethality through frequency and age distribution. Results: One hundred twenty-seven cases were registered, giving a mean annual rate of 3.89/105 inhabitants aged less than 15 years. The rate was 20.14 in children aged less than 2 years. A total of 29.1% of the children had previous health problems. The main clinical manifestations included sepsis/bacteremia (38%, pneumonia (31% and meningitis (24%. At discharge sequelae were present in 10 children, 75% of whom were aged less than 2 years. Eight children died (6.3% lethality. Conclusions: In the period and region studied, pneumococcal infection was present mainly in children aged less than 2 years and in those with previous health problems. In the last few years, mortality has increased. Thus, inclusion of pneumococcal disease in the epidemiological surveillance system would be appropriate to achieve more precise estimations of its epidemiological patterns and to determine whether the conjugate vaccine represents a solution to the problems currently associated with this bacteria.

  3. Surveillance of pneumococcal-associated disease among hospitalized children in Khanh Hoa Province, Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anh, Dang Duc; Kilgore, Paul E; Slack, Mary P E; Nyambat, Batmunkh; Tho, Le Huu; Yoshida, Lay Myint; Nguyen, Hien Anh; Nguyen, Cat Dinh; Chong, Chia Yin; Nguyen, Dong; Ariyoshi, Koya; Clemens, John D; Jodar, Luis

    2009-03-01

    To understand the epidemiology of childhood bacterial diseases, including invasive pneumococcal disease, prospective surveillance was conducted among hospitalized children in Nha Trang, Vietnam. From April 2005 through August 2006, pediatricians at the Khanh Hoa General Hospital used standardized screening criteria to identify children aged <5 years who had signs and symptoms of invasive bacterial disease. All cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood specimens collected were tested by bacterial culture. Selected culture-negative specimens were tested for Streptococcus pneumoniae by antigen detection or for Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, Neisseria meningitidis, and S. pneumoniae by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A total of 987 children were enrolled (794 with pneumonia, 76 with meningitis, and 117 with other syndromes consistent with invasive bacterial disease); 84% of children were aged 0-23 months, and 57% were male. Seven (0.71%) of 987 blood cultures and 4 (15%) of 26 CSF cultures were positive for any bacterial pathogen (including 6 for H. influenzae type b and 1 for S. pneumoniae). Pneumococcal antigen testing and PCR identified an additional 16 children with invasive pneumococcal disease (12 by antigen testing and 4 by PCR). Among children aged <5 years who lived in Nha Trang, the incidence rate of invasive pneumococcal disease was at least 48.7 cases per 100,000 children (95% confidence interval, 27.9-85.1 cases per 100,000 children). S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae type b were the most common causes of laboratory-confirmed invasive bacterial disease in children. PCR and antigen testing increased the sensitivity of detection and provided a more accurate estimate of the burden of invasive bacterial disease in Vietnam.

  4. Enfermedad neumocócica invasiva en niños de la Región de Murcia Invasive pneumococcal disease in children in the region of Murcia, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I. Espín

    2002-10-01

    vaccine, the incidence and characteristics of invasive pneumococcal disease in children in the region of Murcia should be determined. This would provide information that could be useful for properly establishing the indications for vaccination. Methods: A retrospective search was conducted for cases of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae in children aged less 15 years old treated in hospitals in Murcia from 1991-2000. The data sources were the databases of the microbiology services, the Minimum Data Set, the Pediatric Admissions Register and the EDO Register. Results: The incidence rate for the period 1996-2000 was 18.25 per 10(5 children per year for children aged under 1 year in the case of invasive disease (10.6 for meningitis, 13.6 for those under 2 years for invasive disease (6 for meningitis, 8.9 for those under 5 years (1.35 for meningitis and 3.7 for those under 15 years (1.3 for meningitis. Twenty-eight percent of the patients presented risk factors. Complications occurred in 35.2% and sequelae occurred in 5%. The mortality rate was 11.8%. The prevalent serogroups were 19, 6, 18, 5, 14 and 23. Conclusions: The high percentage of patients with risk factors for invasive pneumococcal disease suggests the need to implement vaccination programs aimed at risk groups. Although the incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease in the region of Murcia differs from that in other areas, the incidence of meningitis is similar to that reported by other studies. Because of the severity of the disease, cost-effectiveness studies to evaluate the possible incorporation of the vaccine in the vaccination calendar are justified.

  5. NFKBIZ polymorphisms and susceptibility to pneumococcal disease in European and African populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Stephen J; Khor, Chiea C; Vannberg, Fredrik O; Rautanen, Anna; Segal, Shelley; Moore, Catrin E; Davies, Robert J O; Day, Nicholas P; Peshu, Norbert; Crook, Derrick W; Berkley, James A; Williams, Thomas N; Scott, J Anthony; Hill, Adrian V S

    2011-01-01

    The proinflammatory transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) plays a central role in host defence against pneumococcal disease. Both rare mutations and common polymorphisms in the NFKBIA gene encoding the NF-κB inhibitor IκB-α associate with susceptibility to bacterial disease, but the possible role of polymorphisms within the related IκB-ζ gene NFKBIZ in the development of invasive pneumococcal disease has not previously been reported. To investigate this further, we examined the frequencies of 22 single-nucleotide polymorphisms spanning NFKBIZ in two case-control studies, comprising UK Caucasian (n=1008) and Kenyan (n=723) individuals. Nine polymorphisms within a single UK linkage disequilibrium block and all four polymorphisms within the equivalent, shorter Kenyan linkage disequilibrium block displayed either significant association with invasive pneumococcal disease or a trend towards association. For each polymorphism, heterozygosity was associated with protection from invasive pneumococcal disease when compared to the combined homozygous states (e.g. for rs600718, Mantel-Haenszel 2×2 χ2=7.576, P=0.006, OR=0.67, 95% CI for OR: 0.51-0.88; for rs616597, Mantel-Haenszel 2×2 χ2=8.715, P=0.003, OR=0.65, 95% CI: 0.49-0.86). We conclude that multiple NFKBIZ polymorphisms associate with susceptibility to invasive pneumococcal disease in humans. The study of multiple populations may aid fine-mapping of associations within extensive regions of strong linkage disequilibrium (‘transethnic mapping’). PMID:19798075

  6. Genetic diversity of pneumococcal surface protein A in invasive pneumococcal isolates from Korean children, 1991-2016.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki Wook Yun

    Full Text Available Pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA is an important virulence factor of pneumococci and has been investigated as a primary component of a capsular serotype-independent pneumococcal vaccine. Thus, we sought to determine the genetic diversity of PspA to explore its potential as a vaccine candidate. Among the 190 invasive pneumococcal isolates collected from Korean children between 1991 and 2016, two (1.1% isolates were found to have no pspA by multiple polymerase chain reactions. The full length pspA genes from 185 pneumococcal isolates were sequenced. The length of pspA varied, ranging from 1,719 to 2,301 base pairs with 55.7-100% nucleotide identity. Based on the sequences of the clade-defining regions, 68.7% and 49.7% were in PspA family 2 and clade 3/family 2, respectively. PspA clade types were correlated with genotypes using multilocus sequence typing and divided into several subclades based on diversity analysis of the N-terminal α-helical regions, which showed nucleotide sequence identities of 45.7-100% and amino acid sequence identities of 23.1-100%. Putative antigenicity plots were also diverse among individual clades and subclades. The differences in antigenicity patterns were concentrated within the N-terminal 120 amino acids. In conclusion, the N-terminal α-helical domain, which is known to be the major immunogenic portion of PspA, is genetically variable and should be further evaluated for antigenic differences and cross-reactivity between various PspA types from pneumococcal isolates.

  7. Genetic diversity of pneumococcal surface protein A in invasive pneumococcal isolates from Korean children, 1991-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Ki Wook; Choi, Eun Hwa; Lee, Hoan Jong

    2017-01-01

    Pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) is an important virulence factor of pneumococci and has been investigated as a primary component of a capsular serotype-independent pneumococcal vaccine. Thus, we sought to determine the genetic diversity of PspA to explore its potential as a vaccine candidate. Among the 190 invasive pneumococcal isolates collected from Korean children between 1991 and 2016, two (1.1%) isolates were found to have no pspA by multiple polymerase chain reactions. The full length pspA genes from 185 pneumococcal isolates were sequenced. The length of pspA varied, ranging from 1,719 to 2,301 base pairs with 55.7-100% nucleotide identity. Based on the sequences of the clade-defining regions, 68.7% and 49.7% were in PspA family 2 and clade 3/family 2, respectively. PspA clade types were correlated with genotypes using multilocus sequence typing and divided into several subclades based on diversity analysis of the N-terminal α-helical regions, which showed nucleotide sequence identities of 45.7-100% and amino acid sequence identities of 23.1-100%. Putative antigenicity plots were also diverse among individual clades and subclades. The differences in antigenicity patterns were concentrated within the N-terminal 120 amino acids. In conclusion, the N-terminal α-helical domain, which is known to be the major immunogenic portion of PspA, is genetically variable and should be further evaluated for antigenic differences and cross-reactivity between various PspA types from pneumococcal isolates.

  8. The post-vaccine microevolution of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, A.J.H.; Mobegi, F.M.; Jonge, M.I. de; Hijum, S.A.F.T. van; Meis, J.F.; Hermans, P.W.M.; Ferwerda, G.; Bentley, S.D.; Zomer, A.L.

    2015-01-01

    The 7-valent pneumococcal conjugated vaccine (PCV7) has affected the genetic population of Streptococcus pneumoniae in pediatric carriage. Little is known however about pneumococcal population genomics in adult invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) under vaccine pressure. We sequenced and serotyped

  9. Characterization of Pneumococcal Genes Involved in Bloodstream Invasion in a Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Layla K Mahdi

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus continues to account for significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, causing life-threatening diseases such as pneumonia, bacteremia and meningitis, as well as less serious infections such as sinusitis, conjunctivitis and otitis media. Current polysaccharide vaccines are strictly serotype-specific and also drive the emergence of non-vaccine serotype strains. In this study, we used microarray analysis to compare gene expression patterns of either serotype 4 or serotype 6A pneumococci in the nasopharynx and blood of mice, as a model to identify genes involved in invasion of blood in the context of occult bacteremia in humans. In this manner, we identified 26 genes that were significantly up-regulated in the nasopharynx and 36 genes that were significantly up-regulated in the blood that were common to both strains. Gene Ontology classification revealed that transporter and DNA binding (transcription factor activities constitute the significantly different molecular functional categories for genes up-regulated in the nasopharynx and blood. Targeted mutagenesis of selected genes from both niches and subsequent virulence and pathogenesis studies identified the manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase (SodA as most likely to be essential for colonization, and the cell wall-associated serine protease (PrtA as important for invasion of blood. This work extends our previous analyses and suggests that both PrtA and SodA warrant examination in future studies aimed at prevention and/or control of pneumococcal disease.

  10. Cost effectiveness of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination against acute otitis media in children: a review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonacker, C.W.; Broos, P.H.; Sanders, E.A.; Schilder, A.G.M.; Rovers, M.M.

    2011-01-01

    While pneumococcal conjugate vaccines have shown to be highly effective against invasive pneumococcal disease, their potential effectiveness against acute otitis media (AOM) might become a major economic driver for implementing these vaccines in national immunization programmes. However, the

  11. Vaccination of risk groups in England using the 13 valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine : economic analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozenbaum, Mark H.; van Hoek, Albert Jan; Fleming, Douglas; Trotter, Caroline L.; Miller, Elizabeth; Edmunds, W. John

    2012-01-01

    Objective To estimate the cost effectiveness of vaccinating people with high risk conditions against invasive pneumococcal disease using the 13 valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. Design Economic evaluation using a cohort model from the perspective of healthcare providers. Setting England.

  12. Effectiveness of the 23-Valent Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine (PPV23 against Pneumococcal Disease in the Elderly: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Falkenhorst

    Full Text Available Routine vaccination of elderly people against pneumococcal diseases is recommended in many countries. National guidelines differ, recommending either the 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23, the 13-valent conjugate vaccine (PCV13 or both. Considering the ongoing debate on the effectiveness of PPV23, we performed a systematic literature review and meta-analysis of the vaccine efficacy/effectiveness (VE of PPV23 against invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD and pneumococcal pneumonia in adults aged ≥60 years living in industrialized countries.We searched for pertinent clinical trials and observational studies in databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. We assessed the risk of bias of individual studies using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool for randomized controlled trials and the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale for observational studies. We rated the overall quality of the evidence by GRADE criteria. We performed meta-analyses of studies grouped by outcome and study design using random-effects models. We applied a sensitivity analysis excluding studies with high risk of bias.We identified 17 eligible studies. Pooled VE against IPD (by any serotype was 73% (95%CI: 10-92% in four clinical trials, 45% (95%CI: 15-65% in three cohort studies, and 59% (95%CI: 35-74% in three case-control studies. After excluding studies with high risk of bias, pooled VE against pneumococcal pneumonia (by any serotype was 64% (95%CI: 35-80% in two clinical trials and 48% (95%CI: 25-63% in two cohort studies. Higher VE estimates in trials (follow-up ~2.5 years than in observational studies (follow-up ~5 years may indicate waning protection. Unlike previous meta-analyses, we excluded two trials with high risk of bias regarding the outcome pneumococcal pneumonia, because diagnosis was based on serologic methods with insufficient specificity.Our meta-analysis revealed significant VE of PPV23 against both

  13. Pneumococcal Vaccination Rates in VHA Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Case, David J.; Copeland, Laurel A.; Stock, Eileen M.; Herrera, Henry R.; Pfanner, Timothy P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an inflammatory condition of the digestive tract not caused by infectious agents. Symptoms of IBD, such as diarrhea and pain, diminish one's quality of life. Underlying immune dysregulation may put IBD patients at risk for severe infectious disease making preventative vaccination highly recommended. Therefore, this study sought to assess rates of pneumococcal vaccination in patients with IBD. A cross-sectional observational study was employed utili...

  14. Long-term mortality after IPD and bacteremic versus non-bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenvoort, Gertjan H J; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; de Melker, Hester E.; van der Ende, Arie; Vlaminckx, Bart J.; Knol, Mirjam J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Short-term mortality after invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) and pneumococcal pneumonia is high but data on long-term mortality (including the comparison between bacteremic and non-invasive/non-bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia) within the first years after diagnosis are scarce. Methods

  15. Long-term mortality after IPD and bacteremic versus non-bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenvoort, Gertjan H. J.; Sanders, Elisabeth A. M.; de Melker, Hester E.; van der Ende, Arie; Vlaminckx, Bart J.; Knol, Mirjam J.

    2017-01-01

    Short-term mortality after invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) and pneumococcal pneumonia is high but data on long-term mortality (including the comparison between bacteremic and non-invasive/non-bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia) within the first years after diagnosis are scarce. Adult patients

  16. Optimising assessments of the epidemiological impact in the Netherlands of paediatric immunisation with 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine using dynamic transmission modelling

    OpenAIRE

    De Cao, Elisabetta; Melegaro, Alessia; Klok, Rogier; Postma, Maarten

    2014-01-01

    This work is the first attempt to quantify the overall effects of a 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) vaccination programme in the Dutch population taking into account all the direct and indirect effects of the vaccine on invasive pneumococcal disease. Using available Dutch data, a dynamic transmission model for the spread of pneumococci and potential subsequent invasive pneumococcal disease has been adapted to the Dutch setting. Overall, invasive pneumococcal disease cases in ...

  17. Bacterial Invasion of the Inner Ear in Association With Pneumococcal Meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Nue; Brandt, Christian; Østergaard, Christian

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the pathways of bacterial invasion and subsequent spreading in the inner ear during pneumococcal meningitis. STUDY DESIGN: A well-established adult rat model of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis was used. METHODS: Thirty rats were inoculated intrathecally with S. pneumoniae...... spreading were found within the inner ear. Bacterial elimination was evidenced by engulfment by macrophages within the inner ear. CONCLUSION: From the meninges, pneumococci invade the inner ear through the cochlear aqueduct during the first days of infection, whereas hematogenous invasion via the spiral...

  18. Pneumococcal vaccination rates in VHA patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, David J; Copeland, Laurel A; Stock, Eileen M; Herrera, Henry R; Pfanner, Timothy P

    2015-02-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an inflammatory condition of the digestive tract not caused by infectious agents. Symptoms of IBD, such as diarrhea and pain, diminish one's quality of life. Underlying immune dysregulation may put IBD patients at risk for severe infectious disease making preventative vaccination highly recommended. Therefore, this study sought to assess rates of pneumococcal vaccination in patients with IBD.A cross-sectional observational study was employed utilizing administrative data extracts from the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) to identify patients diagnosed with IBD per International Classification of Diseases, Version 9, Clinical Modification codes. Their pneumococcal vaccine histories were determined from Common Procedural Terminology codes. Data were aggregated to the patient level and subjected to multivariable logistic regression to assess factors associated with receipt of the vaccination and 1-year mortality; survival analyses extended follow-up to as much as 4 years following IBD diagnosis.From October 2004 to September 2009, 49,350 patients were diagnosed with IBD in the VHA. Incidence was approximately 6000 cases/y. Patients averaged 62 years (±15, range 19-98) with 45% aged 65 or older. Approximately 6% were women, 21% were highly disabled from a military service-connected condition, 46% had hypertension, 38% dyslipidemia, and 18% diabetes. Only 20% of the cohort received pneumococcal vaccination including 5% vaccinated prior to IBD diagnosis, 2% on the date of diagnosis, and 13% subsequently. Being married, living outside the Northeast, and having more comorbidities were associated with vaccination before IBD diagnosis; models of vaccination at or after diagnosis demonstrated poor fit: little better than chance. Vaccinations before, after, and at diagnosis were protective against 1-year mortality adjusting for clinical and demographic covariates. Living in the South was an independent risk factor for death among IBD

  19. A Case of Invasive Pneumococcal Infection with Septic Shock and Rare Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R. Woytanowski

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasive pneumococcus is a serious illness with potentially devastating outcomes. A 64-year-old female with a medical history of psoriatic arthritis and diabetes was transferred from an outside hospital for ventilator dependent respiratory failure and altered mental status. She initially presented with worsening back pain and was found to have leukocytosis with bandemia and acute renal failure but she was in septic shock upon arrival to our tertiary care center. Her blood cultures grew Streptococcus pneumoniae and MRI of the brain revealed pus within the posterior lateral ventricles and multiple infarcts. MRI of the spine revealed a psoas abscess. Transesophageal echocardiogram revealed mitral valve vegetation and her right eye developed endogenous endophthalmitis. She was treated with intravenous and intravitreal antibiotics and underwent drainage of the abscess with no improvement in mental status. Repeat imaging revealed multiple new thalamic, basal ganglia, and parietal lobe infarcts likely from septic emboli. After a protracted ICU stay, the patient’s family opted for comfort care. The incidence of invasive pneumococcal infections has declined rapidly since the advent of antibiotics and vaccines. With the growing incidence of antibiotic resistance as well as the emergence of new immunomodulating drugs for various pathologies, there is a concern that invasive infections will reemerge. Ventriculitis and endogenous endophthalmitis are very rare complications of pneumococcal bacteremia.

  20. Evaluating the costs of pneumococcal disease in selected Latin American countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constenla, Dagna

    2007-10-01

    To estimate the costs of pneumococcal disease in Brazil, Chile and Uruguay, to describe how these costs vary between different patient groups, and to discuss factors that affect these cost variations. The cost of pneumococcal disease was estimated from the health care perspective. For each country, baseline cost estimates were primarily developed using health resources information from patient-level data and facility-specific cost data. A regression model was constructed separately for four types of pneumococcal diseases. The skewness-kurtosis test and the Cook-Weisberg test were performed to test the normality of the residuals and the heteroscedasticity, respectively. The treatment of pneumococcal meningitis generated up to US$ 5 435 per child. The treatment costs of pneumococcal pneumonia were lower, ranging from US$ 372 per child to US$ 3 483 per child. Treatment of acute otitis media cost between US$ 20 per child and US$ 217 per child. The main source of treatment costs variations was level of service provided and country in which costs were incurred. However, the tendency of costs to change with these variables was not statistically significant at the 5% level for most pneumococcal disease models. Pneumococcal disease resulted in significant economic burden to selected health care systems in Latin America. The patterns of treatment cost of pneumococcal disease showed a great deal of variation.

  1. treatment and prevention of pneumococcal disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    other pro-inflammatory activities of this toxin contribute to disease pathogenesis and pathology, as well as various ... Medical Research Council Unit for Inflammation and Immunity, Department of. Immunology, Faculty of Health Sciences, ... primarily as the sentinels of the innate immune system. Exposure to small numbers of ...

  2. PCR deduction of invasive and colonizing pneumococcal serotypes from Venezuela: a critical appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello Gonzalez, Teresita; Rivera-Olivero, Ismar Alejandra; Sisco, María Carolina; Spadola, Enza; Hermans, Peter W; de Waard, Jacobus H

    2014-04-15

    Serotype surveillance of Streptococcus pneumoniae is indispensable for evaluating the potential impact of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines. Serotyping by the standard Quellung reaction is technically demanding, time consuming, and expensive. A simple and economical strategy is multiplex PCR-based serotyping. We evaluated the cost effectiveness of a modified serial multiplex PCR (mPCR), resolving 24 serotypes in four PCR reactions and optimally targeting the most prevalent invasive and colonizing pneumococcal serotypes found in Venezuela. A total of 223 pneumococcal isolates, 140 invasive and 83 carriage isolates, previously serotyped by the Quellung reaction and representing the 18 most common serotypes/groups identified in Venezuela, were serotyped with the adapted mPCR. The mPCR serotyped 76% of all the strains in the first two PCR reactions and 91% after four reactions, correctly identifying 17 serotypes/groups. An isolate could be serotyped with mPCR in less than 2 minutes versus 15 minutes for the Quellung reaction, considerably lowering labor costs. A restrictive weakness of mPCR was found for the detection of 19F strains. Most Venezuelan 19F strains were not typeable using the mPCR, and two 19F cps serotype variants were identified. The mPCR assay is an accurate, rapid, and economical method for the identification of the vast majority of the serotypes from Venezuela and can be used in place of the standard Quellung reaction. An exception is the identification of serotype 19F. In this setting, most 19F strains were not detectable with mPCR, demonstrating a need of serology-based quality control for PCR-based serotyping.

  3. Risk factors for pneumococcal nasopharyngeal colonization before and after pneumococcal conjugate vaccination in persons with HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öbrink-Hansen, Kristina; Søgaard, Ole S; Harboe, Zitta B

    HIV-infected individuals have excess rates of invasive pneumococcal disease. We investigated risk factors for nasopharyngeal pneumococcal colonization at baseline and after 9 months in 96 HIV patients immunized twice with 7- valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine ±1mg CPG 7909. In total, 22 patients...... (23%) were colonized, 11 at baseline only, four at both baseline and 9 months, and seven at 9 months only. Compared to non-colonized patients, more colonized patients were smokers, had lower CD4+ nadir and had an AIDS-diagnosis. Immunization, antiretroviral treatment and the CPG adjuvant had no impact...... on colonization. These results suggest preventive strategies in addition to pneumococcal immunization....

  4. Celiac Disease and Increased Risk of Pneumococcal Infection: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Malorie; Scott-Sheldon, Lori A J; Risech-Neyman, Yesenia; Moss, Steven F; Ludvigsson, Jonas F; Green, Peter H R

    2018-01-01

    Celiac disease has been associated with hyposplenism, and multiple case reports link celiac disease and pneumococcal infections; however, increased risk of pneumococcal infection in celiac disease has not been confirmed. The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review to determine the risk of pneumococcal infections in celiac disease. Relevant studies were identified using electronic bibliographic searches of PubMed, OVID, Medline, and EMBASE (1980 to February 2017) and reviewing abstracts from major conferences in gastroenterology. Using number of events in celiac patients and referent patients, we calculated a summary relative risk of pneumococcal infections. All analyses were conducted in Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software using random-effects assumptions. Of a total of 156 articles, 3, representing 3 large databases (the Swedish National Inpatient Register; the Oxford Record Linkage Study; and the English National Hospital Episode Statistics) were included. Each compared patients with celiac disease and confirmed pneumococcal infection to a specific reference group: inpatients and/or the general population. Overall, the odds of pneumococcal infection were higher among hospitalized celiac patients compared with controls (odds ratio 1.66; 95% confidence interval 1.43-1.92). There was no evidence of heterogeneity (Q[1] = 1.17, P = .56, I 2  = 0%). Celiac disease is associated with an increased risk of pneumococcal infection. Preventive pneumococcal vaccination should be considered for those with celiac disease, with special attention to those aged 15-64 years who have not received the scheduled pneumococcal vaccination series as a child. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Can the success of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines for the prevention of pneumococcal diseases in children be extrapolated to adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil-Olivier, Catherine; Gaillat, Jacques

    2014-04-11

    Before conjugate pneumococcal vaccines (PCVs) were introduced it was estimated that Streptococcus pneumoniae caused 500,000 cases of pneumonia, 50,000 cases of bacteremia and 3000 cases of meningitis annually in the United States in both children and adults. After 10 years of routine use of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) the incidence of vaccine-type pneumococcal diseases (PDs) had significantly decreased in vaccinated children (direct effect) and unvaccinated subjects of all ages (indirect effect). Second generation, higher-valent PCVs, especially 13-valent (PCV13), routinely implemented since 2010, have reduced the incidence of PDs caused by the six additional non-PCV7 serotypes, in both vaccinated and unvaccinated subjects. The licence for this vaccine has recently been extended to include adults aged 18 to 49 in Europe. Although PCV13 has an indirect effect on IPD in adults, this will probably not achieve the same level of disease control in adults and the elderly (especially those at high risk) as that obtained in vaccinated children. As highlighted in this paper, differences exist between children and adults for PD manifestations (incidence, morbidity and mortality) and serotypes isolated in nasopharyngeal carriage and diseases, so benefits from adult vaccination must be considered in this light. PCV13 induces an immune response in adults that is non-inferior for all serotypes common with the 23-valent plain polysaccharide vaccine that is currently recommended for adults and even superior for many serotypes. Although there is no evidence that this immune response translates to clinical efficacy in adults as seen in children, the results from a randomised trial in The Netherlands, expected in 2014, should provide the missing evidence. This evidence and efficient surveillance systems should provide the necessary data, essential for policy makers in their decisions on adult pneumococcal vaccination policies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd

  6. Complement component 5 contributes to poor disease outcome in humans and mice with pneumococcal meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woehrl, Bianca; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Murr, Carmen; Heckenberg, Sebastiaan G.B.; Baas, Frank; Pfister, Hans W.; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Morgan, B. Paul; Barnum, Scott R.; van der Ende, Arie; Koedel, Uwe; van de Beek, Diederik

    2011-01-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis is the most common and severe form of bacterial meningitis. Fatality rates are substantial, and long-term sequelae develop in about half of survivors. Disease outcome has been related to the severity of the proinflammatory response in the subarachnoid space. The complement system, which mediates key inflammatory processes, has been implicated as a modulator of pneumococcal meningitis disease severity in animal studies. Additionally, SNPs in genes encoding complement pathway proteins have been linked to susceptibility to pneumococcal infection, although no associations with disease severity or outcome have been established. Here, we have performed a robust prospective nationwide genetic association study in patients with bacterial meningitis and found that a common nonsynonymous complement component 5 (C5) SNP (rs17611) is associated with unfavorable disease outcome. C5 fragment levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with bacterial meningitis correlated with several clinical indicators of poor prognosis. Consistent with these human data, C5a receptor–deficient mice with pneumococcal meningitis had lower CSF wbc counts and decreased brain damage compared with WT mice. Adjuvant treatment with C5-specific monoclonal antibodies prevented death in all mice with pneumococcal meningitis. Thus, our results suggest C5-specific monoclonal antibodies could be a promising new antiinflammatory adjuvant therapy for pneumococcal meningitis. PMID:21926466

  7. Systematic review of pneumococcal disease costs and productivity loss studies in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahia, Luciana; Toscano, Cristiana M; Takemoto, Maíra Libertad Soligo; Araujo, Denizar Vianna

    2013-07-02

    Pneumococcal disease is an important cause of morbidity and mortality associated with significant economic burden for healthcare systems and society. To systematically review pneumococcal disease cost of illness and productivity loss studies in the Latin America and Caribbean (LAC) region. A search of relevant databases was performed till November 2011. A broad and sensitive search strategy was used consisting of medical subject headings (MeSH) terms for pneumococcal disease, healthcare costs and productivity loss studies. No language restriction was applied. Only papers from LAC region and child population were analyzed. Additional exclusion criteria included duplicate studies, and insufficient information about methods. A total of 1241 citations were retrieved. After applying the exclusion criteria, only 16 studies remained for analysis. There were 4 papers from Brazil, 3 from Argentina, 2 from Colombia, 2 from Mexico, 1 from Uruguay, 1 from Chile, and 3 analyzing a group of LAC countries. Only 4 were cost-of-illness studies, 11 were cost-effectiveness studies of pneumococcal vaccine and 1 study of the pneumococcal burden of disease. Methods used for quantifying health resource utilization and costing methods varied significantly among studies, as well as data sources considered. Productivity losses were considered in 8 studies, all of which used the human capital approach method. Pneumococcal disease cost estimates varied significantly depending on the pneumococcal syndromes considered, methods used, study perspective and type of costs included. This systematic review reinforced the importance of standardization of methods for cost studies that can allow comparison and reproducibility in other settings. These estimates can be useful for future economic analysis conducted to support the decision making process on the introduction of new vaccines in LAC. However, caution must be taken, as methodological aspects of studies will result in estimates with varying

  8. Serotype changes and antimicrobial nonsusceptibility rates of invasive and non-invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates after implementation of 10-valent pneumococcal nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine (PHiD-CV) in Bulgaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setchanova, Lena; Murdjeva, Marianna; Stancheva, Iglika; Alexandrova, Alexandra; Sredkova, Maria; Stoeva, Temenuga; Yoneva, Magda; Kurchatova, Anna; Mitov, Ivan

    The 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV10) has been included in Bulgarian Childhood Immunization Program since 2010. This study aimed to assess serotype distribution and antimicrobial resistance of 198 invasive and non-invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae strains that had been isolated in Bulgaria during 2011-2016 from patients with invasive (IPD) and non-invasive (NIPD) pneumococcal diseases. The most common invasive serotypes were 3 (10.1%), 19F (4.0%), and 7F (3.0%). A significant decrease in the proportion of invasive vaccine types (VTs) from 64.2% to 35.2% was found in comparison with pre-vaccine era. The most common serotypes among middle ear fluids were 3, 19A and 19F (5.6% each), and VTs fell down from 66.4% to 40.0% in post-PCV10 period. Among respiratory isolates, the most prevalent serotypes were some emergent serotypes such as 15A/B/C (5.0%), 19A, and 6C (4.0% each). VTs decreased significantly (16.3%) among vaccinated children compared to unvaccinated children and adults (44.0%). Two non-VTs (19A and 6C) have increased significantly more (pantibiotic nonsusceptible S. pneumoniae in Bulgaria remained high in post-PCV10 era. Among all source of isolates, antimicrobial nonsusceptibility rates were: oral penicillin - 46.5%, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole - 45.4%, erythromycin - 43.9%, tetracycline - 37.4%, and multidrug-resistance (MDR) was 44%. The most common MDR serotypes were 19F, 19A, 6A/C, 15A/B/C and 23A. Our results proved that PCV10 vaccination substantially reduced VTs pneumococcal IPD and NIPD. There has been a shift in the distribution of S. pneumoniae serotypes mostly in vaccinated children but also in the whole population and strong serotype-specific antibiotic resistance was observed after vaccine implementation. Therefore, it is important to continue monitoring serotype changes and pneumococcal resistance among all patient ages in addition to aid in determining the long-term effectiveness of PCV10 interventions. Copyright © 2017

  9. Serotype changes and antimicrobial nonsusceptibility rates of invasive and non-invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates after implementation of 10-valent pneumococcal nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine (PHiD-CV in Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Setchanova

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV10 has been included in Bulgarian Childhood Immunization Program since 2010. This study aimed to assess serotype distribution and antimicrobial resistance of 198 invasive and non-invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae strains that had been isolated in Bulgaria during 2011–2016 from patients with invasive (IPD and non-invasive (NIPD pneumococcal diseases. The most common invasive serotypes were 3 (10.1%, 19F (4.0%, and 7F (3.0%. A significant decrease in the proportion of invasive vaccine types (VTs from 64.2% to 35.2% was found in comparison with pre-vaccine era. The most common serotypes among middle ear fluids were 3, 19A and 19F (5.6% each, and VTs fell down from 66.4% to 40.0% in post-PCV10 period. Among respiratory isolates, the most prevalent serotypes were some emergent serotypes such as 15A/B/C (5.0%, 19A, and 6C (4.0% each. VTs decreased significantly (16.3% among vaccinated children compared to unvaccinated children and adults (44.0%. Two non-VTs (19A and 6C have increased significantly more (p < 0.05 in vaccinated children than in unvaccinated patients. The rates of antibiotic nonsusceptible S. pneumoniae in Bulgaria remained high in post-PCV10 era. Among all source of isolates, antimicrobial nonsusceptibility rates were: oral penicillin – 46.5%, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole – 45.4%, erythromycin – 43.9%, tetracycline – 37.4%, and multidrug-resistance (MDR was 44%. The most common MDR serotypes were 19F, 19A, 6A/C, 15A/B/C and 23A. Our results proved that PCV10 vaccination substantially reduced VTs pneumococcal IPD and NIPD. There has been a shift in the distribution of S. pneumoniae serotypes mostly in vaccinated children but also in the whole population and strong serotype-specific antibiotic resistance was observed after vaccine implementation. Therefore, it is important to continue monitoring serotype changes and pneumococcal resistance among all patient ages in addition to

  10. Invasive pneumococcal infections among persons with and without underlying medical conditions: Implications for prevention strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ollgren Jukka

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23 is recommended for persons aged Methods Population-based data on all episodes of IPD (positive blood or cerebrospinal fluid culture reported by Finnish clinical microbiology laboratories during 1995–2002 were linked to data in national health care registries and vital statistics to obtain information on the patient's preceding hospitalisations, co-morbidities, and outcome of illness. Results Overall, 4357 first episodes of IPD were identified in all age groups (average annual incidence, 10.6/100,000. Patients aged 18–49 and 50–64 years accounted for 1282 (29% and 934 (21% of IPD cases, of which 372 (29% and 427 (46% had a current PPV23 indication, respectively. Overall, 536 (12% IPD patients died within one month of first positive culture. Persons aged 18–64 years accounted for 254 (47% of all deaths (case-fatality proportion, 12%. Of those who died 117 (46% did not have a vaccine indication. In a survival model, patients with alcohol-related diseases, non-haematological malignancies, and those aged 50–64 years were most likely to die. Conclusion In the general population of non-elderly adults, almost two-thirds of IPD and half of fatal cases occurred in persons without a recognised PPV23 indication. Policymakers should consider additional prevention strategies such as lowering the age of universal PPV23 vaccination and introducing routine childhood pneumococcal conjugate immunisation which could provide substantial health benefits to this population through indirect vaccine effects.

  11. Antibody response to pneumococcal vaccine in patients with early stage Hodgkin's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, B.; Specht, L.; Henrichsen, J.

    1989-01-01

    Antibody response to pneumococcal vaccination was studied in 76 patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) before, during and at different time intervals after cessation of therapy. All patients were in pathological stage I and II following explorative laparatomy with splenectomy. The increase in antib......Antibody response to pneumococcal vaccination was studied in 76 patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) before, during and at different time intervals after cessation of therapy. All patients were in pathological stage I and II following explorative laparatomy with splenectomy. The increase...

  12. Zinc metalloproteinase ZmpC suppresses experimental pneumococcal meningitis by inhibiting bacterial invasion of central nervous systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Masaya; Nakata, Masanobu; Sumioka, Ryuichi; Hirose, Yujiro; Wada, Satoshi; Akeda, Yukihiro; Sumitomo, Tomoko; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2017-11-17

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of bacterial meningitis. Here, we investigated whether pneumococcal paralogous zinc metalloproteases contribute to meningitis onset. Findings of codon-based phylogenetic analyses indicated 3 major clusters in the Zmp family; ZmpA, ZmpC, and ZmpB, with ZmpD as a subgroup. In vitro invasion assays of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMECs) showed that deletion of the zmpC gene in S. pneumoniae strain TIGR4 significantly increased bacterial invasion into hBMECs, whereas deletion of either zmpA or zmpB had no effect. In a mouse meningitis model, the zmpC deletion mutant exhibited increased invasion of the brain and was associated with increased matrix metalloproteinase-9 in plasma and mortality as compared with the wild type. We concluded that ZmpC suppresses pneumococcal virulence by inhibiting bacterial invasion of the central nervous system. Furthermore, ZmpC illustrates the evolutional theory stating that gene duplication leads to acquisition of novel function to suppress excessive mortality.

  13. Evolution of the epidemiology of pneumococcal disease among Utah children through the vaccine era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampofo, Krow; Pavia, Andrew T; Stockmann, Chris R; Blaschke, Anne J; Weng, Hsin Yi Cindy; Korgenski, Kent E; Daly, Judy; Byington, Carrie L

    2011-12-01

    From 1996 to 2009, we analyzed changes in pneumococcal disease (PD) in Utah children aged <18 years using International Classification of Diseases, ninth revision coded hospital discharges. We observed a sustained decrease in the incidence of PD among children <5 years in 2001-2004 (-36%) and 2005-2009 (-34%) compared with 1996-2000 (pre-7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine). Decreases were primarily in bacteremia, uncomplicated pneumonia, and meningitis. In contrast, significant increases in complicated pneumonia/empyema were noted in children <5 years (+95% and +85%) and 5 to 17 years (+2% and +70%). Despite decreases in PD among Utah children, complicated pneumonia/empyema has increased during the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine era.

  14. Antibody response to pneumococcal vaccine in patients with early stage Hodgkin's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, B.; Specht, L.; Henrichsen, J.

    1989-01-01

    Antibody response to pneumococcal vaccination was studied in 76 patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) before, during and at different time intervals after cessation of therapy. All patients were in pathological stage I and II following explorative laparatomy with splenectomy. The increase in antib......Antibody response to pneumococcal vaccination was studied in 76 patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) before, during and at different time intervals after cessation of therapy. All patients were in pathological stage I and II following explorative laparatomy with splenectomy. The increase...... in antibody response was compared to the findings in 12 healthy volunteers with the aim of establishing the optimal time for vaccination. Serum antibodies against 6 of the pneumococcal polysaccharide antigens (types 1, 4, 7F, 14, 18C and 23F) contained in the vaccine were determined by an ELISA. Antibody...

  15. Pneumococcal colonisation density: a new marker for disease severity in HIV-infected adults with pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrich, Werner C; Madhi, Shabir A; Adrian, Peter V; van Niekerk, Nadia; Telles, Jean-Noel; Ebrahim, N; Messaoudi, Melina; Paranhos-Baccalà, Glaucia; Giersdorf, Sven; Vernet, Guy; Mueller, Beat; Klugman, Keith P

    2014-08-11

    A high genomic load of Pneumococcus from blood or cerebrospinal fluid has been associated with increased mortality. We aimed to analyse whether nasopharyngeal colonisation density in HIV-infected patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is associated with markers of disease severity or poor outcome. Quantitative lytA real-time PCR was performed on nasopharyngeal swabs in HIV-infected South African adults hospitalised for acute CAP at Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital, Soweto, South Africa. Pneumonia aetiology was considered pneumococcal if any sputum culture or Gram stain, urinary pneumococcal C-polysaccharide-based antigen, blood culture or whole blood lytA real-time PCR revealed pneumococci. There was a moderate correlation between the mean nasopharyngeal colonisation densities and increasing CURB65 scores among all-cause patients with pneumonia (Spearman correlation coefficient r=0.15, p=0.06) or with the Pitt bacteraemia score among patients with pneumococcal bacteraemia (p=0.63). In patients with pneumococcal pneumonia, nasopharyngeal pneumococcal colonisation density was higher among non-survivors than survivors (7.7 vs 6.1 log10 copies/mL, respectively, p=0.02) and among those who had pneumococci identified from blood cultures and/or by whole blood lytA real-time PCR than those with non-bacteraemic pneumococcal pneumonia (6.6 vs 5.6 log10 copies/mL, p=0.03). Nasopharyngeal colonisation density correlated positively with the biomarkers procalcitonin (Spearman correlation coefficient r=0.37, pmarker for pneumococcal pneumonia in HIV-infected adults. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. Pneumococcal Transmission and Disease In Silico: A Microsimulation Model of the Indirect Effects of Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurhonen, Markku; Cheng, Allen C.; Auranen, Kari

    2013-01-01

    Background The degree and time frame of indirect effects of vaccination (serotype replacement and herd immunity) are key determinants in assessing the net effectiveness of vaccination with pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV) in control of pneumococcal disease. Using modelling, we aimed to quantify these effects and their dependence on coverage of vaccination and the vaccine's efficacy against susceptibility to pneumococcal carriage. Methods and Findings We constructed an individual-based simulation model that explores the effects of large-scale PCV programmes and applied it in a developed country setting (Finland). A population structure with transmission of carriage taking place within relevant mixing groups (families, day care groups, schools and neighbourhoods) was considered in order to properly assess the dependency of herd immunity on coverage of vaccination and vaccine efficacy against carriage. Issues regarding potential serotype replacement were addressed by employing a novel competition structure between multiple pneumococcal serotypes. Model parameters were calibrated from pre-vaccination data about the age-specific carriage prevalence and serotype distribution. The model predicts that elimination of vaccine-type carriage and disease among those vaccinated and, due to a substantial herd effect, also among the general population takes place within 5–10 years since the onset of a PCV programme with high (90%) coverage of vaccination and moderate (50%) vaccine efficacy against acquisition of carriage. A near-complete replacement of vaccine-type carriage by non-vaccine-type carriage occurs within the same time frame. Conclusions The changed patterns in pneumococcal carriage after PCV vaccination predicted by the model are unequivocal. The overall effect on disease incidence depends crucially on the magnitude of age- and serotype-specific case-to-carrier ratios of the remaining serotypes relative to those of the vaccine types. Thus the availability of

  17. Pneumococcal transmission and disease in silico: a microsimulation model of the indirect effects of vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markku Nurhonen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The degree and time frame of indirect effects of vaccination (serotype replacement and herd immunity are key determinants in assessing the net effectiveness of vaccination with pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV in control of pneumococcal disease. Using modelling, we aimed to quantify these effects and their dependence on coverage of vaccination and the vaccine's efficacy against susceptibility to pneumococcal carriage. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We constructed an individual-based simulation model that explores the effects of large-scale PCV programmes and applied it in a developed country setting (Finland. A population structure with transmission of carriage taking place within relevant mixing groups (families, day care groups, schools and neighbourhoods was considered in order to properly assess the dependency of herd immunity on coverage of vaccination and vaccine efficacy against carriage. Issues regarding potential serotype replacement were addressed by employing a novel competition structure between multiple pneumococcal serotypes. Model parameters were calibrated from pre-vaccination data about the age-specific carriage prevalence and serotype distribution. The model predicts that elimination of vaccine-type carriage and disease among those vaccinated and, due to a substantial herd effect, also among the general population takes place within 5-10 years since the onset of a PCV programme with high (90% coverage of vaccination and moderate (50% vaccine efficacy against acquisition of carriage. A near-complete replacement of vaccine-type carriage by non-vaccine-type carriage occurs within the same time frame. CONCLUSIONS: The changed patterns in pneumococcal carriage after PCV vaccination predicted by the model are unequivocal. The overall effect on disease incidence depends crucially on the magnitude of age- and serotype-specific case-to-carrier ratios of the remaining serotypes relative to those of the vaccine types. Thus the

  18. Cost-effectiveness analysis of a universal vaccination programme with the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-7) in Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergman, Annika; Hjelmgren, Jonas; Ortqvist, Ake

    2008-01-01

    that vaccination of 1 cohort could potentially prevent 9 cases of pneumococcal meningitis, 22 cases of pneumococcal septicaemia, 509 cases of hospitalized pneumonia, 7812 cases of acute otitis media, and 2.7 fatalities, among children 0-4 y of age and 6 episodes of pneumococcal meningitis and 167 cases......The 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-7) has proved to be highly effective against invasive pneumococcal disease and has also provided some protection against all-cause pneumonia and acute otitis media. The objective of this study was to evaluate the projected health benefits, costs...

  19. Invasive Meningococcal Men Y Disease

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-04-18

    Dr. Leonard Mayer, a public health microbiologist at CDC, discusses invasive meningococcal disease.  Created: 4/18/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/23/2012.

  20. Invasive meningococcal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa L. Strelow

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Invasive meningococcal disease (IMD is a major public health and continues to cause substantial mortality and morbidity. Serotype C is the most frequent in Brazil. The clinical spectrum of IMD is broad (meningitis, meningococcemia or both and the clinical evolution may be unpredictable. Main features associated with mortality are: age higher than 50 years old, seizures, shock, and meningococcemia without meningitis. Blood cultures should be obtained immediately. Lumbar puncture can be performed without previous computed tomography scan (CT in most cases. Clinical features can be useful to predic patients where an abnormal CT scan is likely. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF culture and Gram stain should always be required. Latex agglutination sensitivity is highly variable. Polymerase chain reaction is specially useful when other methods are negative or delayed. Usually ceftriaxone should not be delayed while awaiting CSF study or CT. Dexamethasone can be used in meningococcal meningitis. Early suspicion of IMD and antibiotic in primary care before hospitalization, rapid transportation to a hospital, and stabilization in an intensive-care unit has substantially reduced the case-fatality rate. Vaccines against serotypes A, C, W-135, and Y are available while vaccines against serotype B are expected.

  1. Experimental studies of pneumococcal meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Christian T

    2010-01-01

    This thesis summarizes experimental meningitis research conducted at Statens Serum Institut in collaboration with the Copenhagen HIV programme and the Danish Research Centre for Magnetic Resonance between 2001 and 2007. Previous experimental studies had shown that the host inflammatory response in invasive infections contributed significantly to an extremely poor outcome despite initiation of efficient antimicrobial chemotherapy. Consequently, we aimed to investigate and clarify how the course of disease in pneumococcal meningitis was modulated by local meningeal inflammation and concomitant systemic infection and inflammation. Experimental studies were based on the development of a rat model of pneumococcal meningitis, refined and optimized to closely resemble the human disease, mimicking disease severity, outcome, focal- and global brain injury and brain pathophysiology. These endpoints were evaluated by the development of a clinical score system, definition of outcomes and measurement of hearing loss by otoacoustic emission. The investigation of in-vitro and in-vivo brain pathology with histology and MRI revealed an injury pattern similar to that found clinically. Additionally, MRI enabled the study of parameters closely related to the cerebral pathophysiology of meningitis (brain oedema, blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability, focal brain injury and hydrocephalus). Modulation of the inflammatory host response was achieved by initiation of treatment prior to infection: 1) G-CSF treatment increased the peripheral availability of leukocytes, 2) Selectin blocker fucoidin attenuated meningeal leukocyte accumulation and 3) A serotype specific Ab augmented systemic pneumococcal phagocytosis. The studies revealed a dual role of the inflammatory response in pneumococcal meningitis. Whilst focal brain injury appeared to result from local meningeal infectious processes, clinical disease severity and outcome appeared determined by systemic infection. Furthermore systemic

  2. [Pneumococcal carriage in mothers and children of the Panare Amerindians from the State of Bolivar, Venezuela].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bello Gonzalez, T.; Rivera-Olivero, I.A.; Pocaterra, L.; Spadola, E.; Araque, M.; Hermans, P.W.M.; Waard, J.H. de

    2010-01-01

    In North America, the indigenous groups have been identified as a population with increased risk of pneumococcal colonization and pneumococcal invasive disease. However, little information is available from South American natives. In the present study we evaluated the nasopharyngeal carriage and

  3. Parental knowledge, attitudes and perception of pneumococcal disease and pneumococcal conjugate vaccines in Singapore: a questionnaire-based assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choon How How

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Under the National Childhood Immunisation Schedule (NCIS in Singapore most vaccines are provided free while some, including pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV, added to the NCIS in October 2009, are not free. In contrast to ≥95 % coverage achieved for recommended childhood vaccines that are free, 2013 coverage of the PCV booster dose was 58.9 % (for unclear reasons. To date, no population impact on pneumococcal disease (PD has been observed. We conducted a questionnaire-based study of parents of young children to assess the value of PCV to parents, and to quantify the extent to which vaccine cost is a barrier to PCV uptake in Singapore. Methods A single, trained interviewer administered a questionnaire to 200 parents ≥21 years of age with young children attending the Singapore Sengkang Polyclinic. The questionnaire asked closed-ended questions on parents’ knowledge about PD and PCV. A 5-point Likert scale measured perceived benefits and barriers to PCV vaccination. Results There were 162 parents whose children were either PCV-vaccinated or who intended to vaccinate their child with PCV (Vaccinated group, and 38 whose children were non-PCV vaccinated or who did not intend to vaccinate (Unvaccinated group. The odds ratio for PCV vaccination among parents who perceived cost as a barrier was 0.16 (95%CI 0.02–1.23. Compared to the Vaccinated group, parents in the Unvaccinated group were less willing to pay for PCV (50.0 %/94.4 %. Compared to the Vaccinated group, fewer parents in the Unvaccinated group had heard about PD (34.2 %/82.1 % or PCV (36.8 %/69.1 %, or perceived that PD was a threat to their child. Fewer parents in the Unvaccinated group knew that vaccination could prevent PD (28.9 %/77.8 %, or reported that PCV vaccination was recommended to them by any source (63.2 % had no PCV recommendation, versus 20.4 %. When informed that PCV is included in the NCIS only 65.8 % of parents in the Unvaccinated

  4. Humoral response to conjugate pneumococcal vaccine in paediatric oncology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Frankie Wai Tsoi; Ip, Margaret; Chu, Yvonne Yuen Ling; Lin, Zheng; Lee, Vincent; Shing, Ming Kong; Leung, Wing Kwan; Yuen, Patrick Man Pan; Li, Chi Kong

    2012-04-01

    Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) is an effective way to prevent invasive pneumococcal diseases in high risk populations. The efficacy of this vaccine in paediatric oncology patients remains unknown. The authors evaluated the antibody response to seven pneumococcal serotypes in paediatric oncology patients given two doses of heptavalent PCV (PCV-7). Forty-four patients (20 males; 24 females) with median age 9.5 years were studied. After two doses of PCV-7, 86-100% of patients had protective antibody titres against the seven vaccine serotypes. Increases in geometric mean antibody concentrations ranged from 3.8-fold for serotype 19F to 85.8-fold for serotype 14. There was no documented invasive pneumococcal disease in our cohort during the study period. PCV can elicit protective antipneumococcal antibody responses in paediatric oncology patients.

  5. Hyposplenism as a cause of pneumococcal meningoencephalitis in an adult patient with coeliac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Caraceni

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Coeliac disease can be associated with hyposplenism and splenic atrophy, which may increase the patient’s risk for fatal infections caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae or Pneumococcus. It is general opinion that many more patients with coeliac disease have died from hyposplenism-related infections than those reported in literature. Case report: A 62-year-old woman with recently diagnosed coeliac disease was hospitalized with high fever, disorientation, and nuchal rigidity. Cerebral computed tomography was negative. Laboratory tests showed an elevated leukocyte count and very high levels of C reactive protein. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF contained an increased number of mononuclear cells associated with a low glucose level and high protein concentrations. The CSF culture was positive for Streptococcus pneumoniae. Neurological conditions rapidly deteriorated with the onset of coma, and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed initial signs of encephalitis extending above and below the tentorium. Abdominal ultrasonography disclosed splenic hypotrophy that raised the suspicion of hyposplenism. The diagnosis of hyposplenism was confirmed by demonstration of Howell-Jolly bodies in a peripheral blood smear. Discussion: This is the first reported case of pneumococcal meningoencephalitis caused by splenic hypofunction in a patient with coeliac disease. When coeliac disease is diagnosed with a marked delay in an elderly patient, spleen function should always be assessed. If impaired, the patient should undergo vaccination with pneumococcal conjugate vaccine to prevent pneumococcal infections.

  6. A Case of Waterhouse-Friderichsen Syndrome Resulting from an Invasive Pneumococcal Infection in a Patient with a Hypoplastic Spleen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazumasa Emori

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 50-year-old male was brought to our emergency department by ambulance with complaints of pain and numbness in both legs. At arrival, purple spots were evident on his neck and face. Examination of the vital sign indicated septic shock. Laboratory data and blood gas analysis revealed disseminated intravascular coagulation, multiple organ failure, and metabolic acidosis. Peripheral blood smears revealed Howell-Jolly bodies, indicating decreased splenic function. A rapid urinary pneumococcal antigen test was also found to be positive. After admission to the intensive care unit, extensive treatment, including polymyxin-B direct hemoperfusion and administration of methylprednisolone and broad spectrum antibiotics was immediately initiated. Despite of our efforts to save his life, the patient died six hours after the arrival. The following day, blood cultures revealed the presence of Streptococcus pneumoniae. An autopsy revealed a hypoplastic spleen and a bilateral adrenal hemorrhage, indicating acute adrenal insufficiency caused by sepsis. Finally, the patient was diagnosed with Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome. Although severe infection may be seen in the splenectomized patients, it should be noted that patients with a hypoplastic spleen may have acute severe infections. We, therefore, report a case of Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome resulting from an invasive pneumococcal infection in a patient with a hypoplastic spleen.

  7. A Case of Waterhouse-Friderichsen Syndrome Resulting from an Invasive Pneumococcal Infection in a Patient with a Hypoplastic Spleen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emori, Kazumasa; Takeuchi, Nobuhiro; Soneda, Junichi

    2016-01-01

    A 50-year-old male was brought to our emergency department by ambulance with complaints of pain and numbness in both legs. At arrival, purple spots were evident on his neck and face. Examination of the vital sign indicated septic shock. Laboratory data and blood gas analysis revealed disseminated intravascular coagulation, multiple organ failure, and metabolic acidosis. Peripheral blood smears revealed Howell-Jolly bodies, indicating decreased splenic function. A rapid urinary pneumococcal antigen test was also found to be positive. After admission to the intensive care unit, extensive treatment, including polymyxin-B direct hemoperfusion and administration of methylprednisolone and broad spectrum antibiotics was immediately initiated. Despite of our efforts to save his life, the patient died six hours after the arrival. The following day, blood cultures revealed the presence of Streptococcus pneumoniae. An autopsy revealed a hypoplastic spleen and a bilateral adrenal hemorrhage, indicating acute adrenal insufficiency caused by sepsis. Finally, the patient was diagnosed with Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome. Although severe infection may be seen in the splenectomized patients, it should be noted that patients with a hypoplastic spleen may have acute severe infections. We, therefore, report a case of Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome resulting from an invasive pneumococcal infection in a patient with a hypoplastic spleen.

  8. Redefining risk categories for pneumococcal disease in adults: critical analysis of the evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Curcio

    2015-08-01

    Conclusions: The ORs for CAP and IPD of patients with two or more comorbidities, with or without smoking, were found to be similar to the ORs for CAP and IPD described in the literature for patients currently classified as high risk. The potential impact of multiple, stacking comorbidities is underestimated and there is a need for the risk categories for pneumococcal disease to be redefined.

  9. VACCINATION OF PREMATURE INFANTS AND CHILDREN WITH CONGENITAL HEART DISEASE IN IRKUTSK USING CONJUGATED PNEUMOCOCCAL VACCINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Il'ina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Study aim: analyzing the results of pneumococcal infection vaccination conducted to reduce infantile morbidity and mortality in 2011-2012 at the expenses of the Irkutsk municipal budget. Patients and methods. Vaccination using the 7- and 13-valent pneumococcal conjugated vaccine was conducted for more than 700 risk group children: premature infants, children with congenital heart diseases or bronchopulmonary dysplasia from 2 months to 2 years of age. 193 vaccinated children had been observed for 1.5 years. 30% of premature infants and 46% of children with congenital heart diseases were vaccinated using the PCV7/PCV13 vaccine at the age of 2-6 months, 52 and 40% - at the age of 7-11 months, accordingly. The PCV7/PCV13 vaccine was administered together with other vaccines of the national preventive vaccination calendar in 65% of cases. Results. Rate of general post-vaccinal reactions (body temperature increase from 37.6 to 38.0oC – 4%; no local reactions were registered. No other unfavorable phenomena were noted in the post-vaccinal period. No cases of pneumonia, meningitis, acute otitis media and bronchoobstructive syndrome were registered within the observation period. Conclusions: pneumococcal infection vaccination of premature infants with congenital heart diseases and bronchopulmonary dysplasia conducted in Irkutsk proved high efficacy and safety of the used vaccine – PCV7/PCV13. 

  10. Thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor influences disease severity in humans and mice with pneumococcal meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mook-Kanamori, B B; Valls Serón, M; Geldhoff, M; Havik, S R; van der Ende, A; Baas, F; van der Poll, T; Meijers, J C M; P Morgan, B; Brouwer, M C; van de Beek, D

    2015-11-01

    Mortality and morbidity in patients with bacterial meningitis result from the proinflammatory response and dysregulation of coagulation and fibrinolysis. Thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) is activated by free thrombin or thrombin in complex with thrombomodulin, and plays an antifibrinolytic role during fibrin clot degradation, but also has an anti-inflammatory role by inactivating proinflammatory mediators, such as complement activation products. To assess the role of TAFI in pneumococcal meningitis. We performed a prospective nationwide genetic association study in patients with bacterial meningitis, determined TAFI and complement levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and assessed the function of TAFI in a pneumococcal meningitis mouse model by using Cpb2 (TAFI) knockout mice. Polymorphisms (reference sequences: rs1926447 and rs3742264) in the CPB2 gene, coding for TAFI, were related to the development of systemic complications in patients with pneumococcal meningitis. Higher protein levels of TAFI in CSF were significantly associated with CSF complement levels (C3a, iC3b, and C5b-9) and with more systemic complications in patients with bacterial meningitis. The risk allele of rs1926447 (TT) was associated with higher levels of TAFI in CSF. In the murine model, consistent with the human data, Cpb2-deficient mice had decreased disease severity, as reflected by lower mortality, and attenuated cytokine levels and bacterial outgrowth in the systemic compartment during disease, without differences in the brain compartment, as compared with wild-type mice. These findings suggest that TAFI plays an important role during pneumococcal meningitis, which is likely to be mediated through inhibition of the complement system, and influences the occurrence of systemic complications and inflammation. © 2015 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  11. Meningitis - pneumococcal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pneumococcal meningitis; Pneumococcus - meningitis ... Pneumococcal meningitis is caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria (also called pneumococcus, or S pneumoniae ). This type of bacteria is the ...

  12. Impact and cost-effectiveness of different vaccination strategies to reduce the burden of pneumococcal disease among elderly in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorrington, Dominic; van Rossum, Leo; Knol, Mirjam; de Melker, Hester; Rümke, Hans; Hak, Eelko; van Hoek, Albert Jan

    2018-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae causes morbidity and mortality among all ages in The Netherlands. To reduce this burden, infants in The Netherlands receive the 10-valent pneumococcal conjugated vaccine (PCV10), but older persons are not targeted. We assessed the impact and cost-effectiveness of vaccination with 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) or 13-valent PCV (PCV13) among all those aged 60, 65 or 70 and/or in combination with replacing PCV10 with PCV13 in the infant vaccination programme. A static cost-effectiveness model was parameterized including projected trends for invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) and hospitalised community acquired pneumonia (CAP). The different strategies were evaluated using vaccine list prices and a 10-year time horizon. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER) were calculated with the current strategy (infant vaccination program with PCV10) as reference. Compared to the reference, the largest impact on pneumococcal disease burden was projected with a combined use of PCV13 among infants and PPV23 at 60, 65 and 70 years, preventing 1,635 cases of IPD and 914 cases of CAP. The most cost-effective strategy was vaccinating with PPV23 at 70 years only with similar low ICERs at age 60 and 65. The impact of the use of PCV13 among infants depends strongly on the projected herd-immunity effect on serotype 19A. Vaccinating elderly with either PCV13 or PPV23 was dominated by PPV23 in all investigated scenarios, mainly due to the lower price of PPV23. Under the current assumptions, the best value for money is the use of PPV23 for elderly, with a single dose or at five year increment between age 60 to age 70.

  13. Dynamics and Determinants of Pneumococcal Antibodies Specific against 13 Vaccine Serotypes in the Pre-Vaccination Era

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins-van Ginkel, Annemarijn C|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413970434; Berbers, Guy A M; Grundeken, Lucienne H; Tcherniaeva, Irina; Wittenberns, Jelle I; Elberse, Karin; Mollema, Liesbeth; de Melker, Hester E; Knol, Mirjam J

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) for infants decreased overall invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), while non-vaccine serotype IPD increased. To fully understand this serotype replacement, knowledge about serotype dynamics in the pre-vaccine era is needed. In

  14. Pathogenesis and Pathophysiology of Pneumococcal Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mook-Kanamori, Barry B.; Geldhoff, Madelijn; van der Poll, Tom; van de Beek, Diederik

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Pneumococcal meningitis continues to be associated with high rates of mortality and long-term neurological sequelae. The most common route of infection starts by nasopharyngeal colonization by Streptococcus pneumoniae, which must avoid mucosal entrapment and evade the host immune system after local activation. During invasive disease, pneumococcal epithelial adhesion is followed by bloodstream invasion and activation of the complement and coagulation systems. The release of inflammatory mediators facilitates pneumococcal crossing of the blood-brain barrier into the brain, where the bacteria multiply freely and trigger activation of circulating antigen-presenting cells and resident microglial cells. The resulting massive inflammation leads to further neutrophil recruitment and inflammation, resulting in the well-known features of bacterial meningitis, including cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis, cochlear damage, cerebral edema, hydrocephalus, and cerebrovascular complications. Experimental animal models continue to further our understanding of the pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis and provide the platform for the development of new adjuvant treatments and antimicrobial therapy. This review discusses the most recent views on the pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis, as well as potential targets for (adjunctive) therapy. PMID:21734248

  15. Streptococcus pneumoniae PspC Subgroup Prevalence in Invasive Disease and Differences in Contribution to Complement Evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Maten, Erika; van den Broek, Bryan; de Jonge, Marien I; Rensen, Kim J W; Eleveld, Marc J; Zomer, Aldert L; Cremers, Amelieke J H; Ferwerda, Gerben; de Groot, Ronald; Langereis, Jeroen D; van der Flier, Michiel

    2018-04-01

    The pneumococcal capsular serotype is an important determinant of complement resistance and invasive disease potential, but other virulence factors have also been found to contribute. Pneumococcal surface protein C (PspC), a highly variable virulence protein that binds complement factor H to evade C3 opsonization, is divided into two subgroups: choline-bound subgroup I and LPxTG-anchored subgroup II. The prevalence of different PspC subgroups in invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) and functional differences in complement evasion are unknown. The prevalence of PspC subgroups in IPD isolates was determined in a collection of 349 sequenced strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from adult patients. pspC deletion mutants and isogenic pspC switch mutants were constructed to study differences in factor H binding and complement evasion in relation to capsule thickness. Subgroup I pspC was far more prevalent in IPD isolates than subgroup II pspC The presence of capsule was associated with a greater ability of bound factor H to reduce complement opsonization. Pneumococcal subgroup I PspC bound significantly more factor H and showed more effective complement evasion than subgroup II PspC in isogenic encapsulated pneumococci. We conclude that variation in the PspC subgroups, independent of capsule serotypes, affects pneumococcal factor H binding and its ability to evade complement deposition. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  16. IMMUNIZATION OF CHILDREN AGAINST PNEUMOCOCCAL DISEASE: PRACTICAL ASPECTS FROM THE STANDPOINT OF AN OTOLARYNGOLOGIST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Gubanova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the results of studying the effectiveness of vaccination of children with allergic disorders and frequently ill children against pneumococcal diseases. The effectiveness and good tolerability of the vaccine was detected. A follow-up study of the vaccinated children was performed. The positive effect of vaccination on the incidence of acute respiratory diseases, acute adenoiditis and acute otitis media in all groups of children was shown. The positive effect of vaccination on the degree of hyperplasia of adenoid tissue in the nasopharynx of frequently ill children was proved.

  17. Pneumococcal serotypes and mortality following invasive pneumococcal disease: a population-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harboe, Zitta B; Thomsen, Reimar W; Riis, Anders

    2009-01-01

    younger than age 5 y. Age, male sex, meningitis, high comorbidity level, alcoholism, and early decade of diagnosis were significantly associated with mortality. Among individuals aged 5 y and older, serotypes 31, 11A, 35F, 17F, 3, 16F, 19F, 15B, and 10A were associated with highly increased mortality...... as compared with serotype 1 (all: adjusted odds ratio >or=3, p

  18. Vaccines against invasive Salmonella disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLennan, Calman A; Martin, Laura B; Micoli, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Though primarily enteric pathogens, Salmonellae are responsible for a considerable yet under-appreciated global burden of invasive disease. In South and South-East Asia, this manifests as enteric fever caused by serovars Typhi and Paratyphi A. In sub-Saharan Africa, a similar disease burden results from invasive nontyphoidal Salmonellae, principally serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis. The existing Ty21a live-attenuated and Vi capsular polysaccharide vaccines target S. Typhi and are not effective in young children where the burden of invasive Salmonella disease is highest. After years of lack of investment in new Salmonella vaccines, recent times have seen increased interest in the area led by emerging-market manufacturers, global health vaccine institutes and academic partners. New glycoconjugate vaccines against S. Typhi are becoming available with similar vaccines against other invasive serovars in development. With other new vaccines under investigation, including live-attenuated, protein-based and GMMA vaccines, now is an exciting time for the Salmonella vaccine field. PMID:24804797

  19. Impact of routine PCV7 (Prevenar) vaccination of infants on the clinical and economic burden of pneumococcal disease in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljunid, Syed; Abuduxike, Gulifeiya; Ahmed, Zafar; Sulong, Saperi; Nur, Amrizal Muhd; Goh, Adrian

    2011-09-21

    Pneumococcal disease is the leading cause of vaccine-preventable death in children younger than 5 years of age worldwide. The World Health Organization recommends pneumococcal conjugate vaccine as a priority for inclusion into national childhood immunization programmes. Pneumococcal vaccine has yet to be included as part of the national vaccination programme in Malaysia although it has been available in the country since 2005. This study sought to estimate the disease burden of pneumococcal disease in Malaysia and to assess the cost effectiveness of routine infant vaccination with PCV7. A decision model was adapted taking into consideration prevalence, disease burden, treatment costs and outcomes for pneumococcal disease severe enough to result in a hospital admission. Disease burden were estimated from the medical records of 6 hospitals. Where local data was unavailable, model inputs were obtained from international and regional studies and from focus group discussions. The model incorporated the effects of herd protection on the unvaccinated adult population. At current vaccine prices, PCV7 vaccination of 90% of a hypothetical 550,000 birth cohort would incur costs of RM 439.6 million (US$128 million). Over a 10 year time horizon, vaccination would reduce episodes of pneumococcal hospitalisation by 9,585 cases to 73,845 hospitalisations with cost savings of RM 37.5 million (US$10.9 million) to the health system with 11,422.5 life years saved at a cost effectiveness ratio of RM 35,196 (US$10,261) per life year gained. PCV7 vaccination of infants is expected to be cost-effective for Malaysia with an incremental cost per life year gained of RM 35,196 (US$10,261). This is well below the WHO's threshold for cost effectiveness of public health interventions in Malaysia of RM 71,761 (US$20,922).

  20. Prophylactic antibiotics for preventing pneumococcal infection in children with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankine-Mullings, Angela E; Owusu-Ofori, Shirley

    2017-10-10

    Persons with sickle cell disease (SCD) are particularly susceptible to infection. Infants and very young children are especially vulnerable. The 'Co-operative Study of Sickle Cell Disease' observed an incidence rate for pneumococcal septicaemia of 10 per 100 person years in children under the age of three years. Vaccines, including customary pneumococcal vaccines, may be of limited use in this age group. Therefore, prophylactic penicillin regimens may be advisable for this population. This is an update of a Cochrane Review first published in 2002, and previously updated, most recently in 2014. To assess the effects of antibiotic prophylaxis against pneumococcus in children with SCD in relation to:1. incidence of infection;2. mortality;3. drug-related adverse events (as reported in the included studies) to the individual and the community;4. the impact of discontinuing at various ages on incidence of infection and mortality. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register, which is comprised of references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and also two clinical trials registries: ClinicalTrials.gov and the WHO International Registry Platform. Additionally, we carried out handsearching of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings.Date of the most recent search: 19 December 2016. All randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing prophylactic antibiotics to prevent pneumococcal infection in children with SCD with placebo, no treatment or a comparator drug. Both authors independently extracted data and assessed trial quality. The authors used the GRADE criteria to assess the quality of the evidence. Five trials were identified by the searches, of which three trials (880 children randomised) met the inclusion criteria. All of the included trials showed a reduced incidence of infection in children with SCD (SS or Sβ0Thal) receiving prophylactic penicillin

  1. Combination vaccine against invasive meningococcal B and pneumococcal infections: Potential epidemiological and economic impact in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Bos; H.C. Rüumke (Hans); K. Welte (Karl); L. Spanjaard (Lodewijk); L. van Alphen (Loek); M.J. Postma (Maarten)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis group B are among the main causes of invasive bacterial meningitis infections in infants. Worldwide, these diseases lead to significant mortality, morbidity and costs. The societal impact is especially severe since the

  2. Hydroxyurea therapy of a murine model of sickle cell anemia inhibits the progression of pneumococcal disease by down-modulating E-selectin

    OpenAIRE

    Lebensburger, Jeffrey D.; Howard, Thad; Hu, Yunming; Pestina, Tamara I.; Gao, Geli; Johnson, Melissa; Zakharenko, Stanislav S.; Ware, Russell E.; Tuomanen, Elaine I.; Persons, Derek A.; Rosch, Jason W.

    2012-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is characterized by chronic hemolysis coupled with extensive vascular inflammation. This inflammatory state also mechanistically promotes a high risk of lethal, invasive pneumococcal infection. Current treatments to reduce vaso-occlusive complications include chronic hydroxyurea therapy to induce fetal hemoglobin. Because hydroxyurea also reduces leukocytosis, an understanding of the impact of this treatment on pneumococcal pathogenesis is needed. Using a sickle cell mouse ...

  3. Optimising assessments of the epidemiological impact in the Netherlands of paediatric immunisation with 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine using dynamic transmission modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Cao, Elisabetta; Melegaro, Alessia; Klok, Rogier; Postma, Maarten

    2014-01-01

    This work is the first attempt to quantify the overall effects of a 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) vaccination programme in the Dutch population taking into account all the direct and indirect effects of the vaccine on invasive pneumococcal disease. Using available Dutch data, a

  4. Pneumococcal Meningitis in an Adolescent with Fever and Foot Ache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Dias

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasive pneumococcal disease predominantly affects younger children, elderly, and immunocompromised patients. Pneumococcal meningitis is a particularly important form of presentation, considering its high rate of morbimortality. We present the case of a previously healthy 12-year-old adolescent male who was hospitalized due to suspicion of osteoarticular infection in his left foot. A few hours later, he developed meningeal signs, exhibiting slight pleocytosis and Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates in both cerebrospinal fluid and blood. Imaging studies were inconclusive regarding the nature of the foot disorder. We considered the hypothesis of osteomyelitis of the navicular bone as the most likely, for which he completed six weeks of antibiotic therapy. There was a favorable clinical evolution, along with complete absence of osteoarticular or neurological sequelae. The relevance of this clinical case resides in the unusual presentation of invasive pneumococcal disease in this age group, as well as in the rare form of orthopedic involvement.

  5. Clinical burden of pneumonia, meningitis and septicemia in Norway 2 years after 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munson, Samantha; Raluy-Callado, Mireia; Lambrelli, Dimitra; Wasiak, Radek; Eriksson, Daniel; Gray, Sharon

    2015-08-01

    This population-based, retrospective study quantified the rates of all-cause and pneumococcal pneumonia, meningitis and septicemia in Norway from 2008 to 2009 and determined the proportions of cases caused by pneumococcal vaccine serotypes. Data on patients with all-cause and pneumococcal pneumonia, meningitis and septicemia were obtained from the Norwegian Patient Registry, which collects hospitalization data from all Norwegian public hospitals based on International Classification of Diseases codes. Norwegian Patient Registry case records linked to the Norwegian Surveillance System for Communicable Diseases provided serotype data for invasive pneumococcal disease in patients with microbiological cultures. In 2008 and 2009, hospitalization rates were relatively stable for all-cause pneumonia (5.28 and 5.35, respectively, per 1000), meningitis (10.70 and 9.67, respectively, per 100,000), and septicemia (from 171.81 to 161.46 per 100,000). In contrast, rates decreased for International Classification of Diseases-10 diagnosed pneumococcal pneumonia (from 13.66 to 10.52 per 100,000), although these cases may be under-reported because of inclusion in all-cause pneumonia. Rates also decreased in diagnosed pneumococcal meningitis (from 1.60 to 1.19 per 100,000) and diagnosed pneumococcal septicemia (from 9.08 to 7.94 per 100,000). Diagnosed pneumococcal disease rates were highest in younger children and older adults, peaking at ⩾ 60 years old. Pneumococcal pneumonia, meningitis and septicemia caused by serotypes included in the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine decreased substantially during the study period, with corresponding serotype replacement by non-7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine serotypes. From 2008 to 2009, International Classification of Diseases-10 diagnosed pneumococcal pneumonia, meningitis and septicemia decreased in most age groups but remained greatest among subjects aged 0-1 and ⩾ 60 years. © 2015 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  6. Changing trends in serotypes of S. pneumoniae isolates causing invasive and non-invasive diseases in unvaccinated population in Mexico (2000-2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnalla-Barajas, María Noemí; Soto-Noguerón, Araceli; Sánchez-Alemán, Miguel Angel; Solórzano-Santos, Fortino; Velazquez-Meza, María Elena; Echániz-Aviles, Gabriela

    2017-05-01

    Introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV) targeted against a limited number of serotypes substantially decreased invasive (IPD) and non-invasive pneumococcal diseases (NIPD) but it was accompanied by non-vaccine type replacement disease. After 9 years of introduction of PCV in Mexico, we analyze the evidence of the indirect effects on IPD and NIPD serotype distribution among groups not targeted to receive the vaccine. From January 2000 to December 2014, pneumococcal strains isolated from IPD and NIPD cases from patients ≥5 years of age from participant hospitals of the SIREVA II (Sistema Regional de Vacunas) network were serotyped. A regression analysis was performed considering year and proportion of serotypes included in the different vaccine formulations (PCV7, PCV10 and PCV13). The slope was obtained for each regression line and their correspondent p-value. The proportion of each serotype in the pre-PCV7 and post-PCV7 periods was evaluated by χ2 test. From a total of 1147 pneumococcal strains recovered, 570 corresponded to the pre-PCV7 and 577 to the post-PCV7 periods. The proportion of vaccine serotypes included in the three PCV formulations decreased by 2.4, 2.6 and 1.3%, respectively per year during the study period. A significant increase of serotype 19A was observed in the post-vaccine period in all age groups. A percentage of annual decline of serotypes causing IPD and NIPD included in PCV was detected among groups not targeted to receive the vaccine, probably due to herd effect. Considering pneumococcal serotype distribution is a dynamic process, we highlight the importance of surveillance programs. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geldhoff, M.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a serious infectious disease, involving the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord, and the subarachnoid space. In the Netherlands most common causative agents are Streptococcus pneumoniae (72%) and Neisseria meningitidis (11%). The incidence of pneumococcal

  8. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine – a health priority | Zar | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies evaluating a 9-valent PCV in South Africa and The Gambia reported a 72 - 77% reduction in vaccineserotype- specific invasive disease in vaccinated children. As many of the pneumococcal serotypes associated with antibiotic resistance are included in PCV, vaccination has also been associated with a reduction in ...

  9. Indirect (herd) protection, following pneumococcal conjugated vaccines introduction: A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaban, Gal; Ben-Shimol, Shalom

    2017-05-19

    Pneumococcal diseases are major causes of morbidity among adults, especially those over 50years of age. While pneumococcal conjugated vaccines (PCV's) impact on pneumococcal disease rates among children is well established, the extent of its impact on adult pneumococcal related illness remains unclear. The aim of this systematic literature review was to describe the impact of PCV introduction to childhood national immunization programs worldwide on PCV-naive adult population. A systematic literature search was performed using the PubMed database. The search was limited to articles written in English and published between January 2000 and February 2016. Studies evaluating pneumococcal disease rates in individuals over 5years of age were included. Independent extraction of articles was performed by the two authors. Search terms included: Pneumococcal conjugated vaccine, herd, indirect, adults, and pneumonia. Forty-nine articles meeting the selection criteria were identified, 39 regarding invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD, one on meningitis only), 8 regarding pneumonia, and 2 on both IPD and pneumonia. The majority of reports were from the US, UK and Canada. Considerable variability in the data sources, quality and completeness was observed. While most studies reported either statistically significant reduction or insignificant changes in IPD and pneumonia disease rates in adults following PCV nationwide implementation, few studies reported statistically significant increase in pneumococcal disease rates, these were mainly from countries with low PCV coverage rates and/or inadequate surveillance. Invasive pneumococcal diseases and pneumonia rates among the adult population decreased in most countries following PCV introduction into the NIP. This indirect effect on older population seems to be dependent on PCV coverage rates and time from PCV nationwide implementation. Adults >65years old seem to benefit the most from PCV introduction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd

  10. Effectiveness of different vaccine schedules for heptavalent and 13-valent conjugate vaccines against pneumococcal disease in the Community of Madrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latasa, P; Ordobás, M; Garrido-Estepa, M; Gil de Miguel, A; Sanz, J C; Barranco, M D; Insúa, E; García-Comas, L

    2017-09-25

    The heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-7) was added to the childhood routine vaccination program in the Community of Madrid in November of 2006 with 3+1 recommended doses and a catch-up for those under 2years old. In June 2010, PCV-7 was replaced by 13-valent vaccine (PCV-13) with 2+1 recommended doses. In July of 2012, the PCV-13 was removed from the funded program and reintroduced again (2+1 recommended doses) in December 2014. In between, children were vaccinated privately with 3+1 recommended doses of PCV-13. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of each vaccination schedule used in the Community of Madrid. We included all cases of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) reported between 2007 and 2015 to the Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System. Vaccination information was obtained from the Immunization Registry. Vaccine effectiveness (VE) was estimated using the indirect cohort design for cases with serotype information. A total 779 cases were included in the study. Among them 47.6% of the cases were primo-vaccinated with booster, 20% primo-vaccinated, 15.9% incompletely primo-vaccinated and 16.5% not vaccinated. The VE for ≥1 doses of any PCV was 82% (CI 95%: 67.8-89.9%): 91.9% (CI 95%: 76.5-97.2%) for PCV-7 and 77.2% (48.6-89.9%) for PCV-13. VE in those receiving the full 2+1 or 3+1 schedules was 100% for both vaccines. A high number of vaccine failures were reported in children before they had the opportunity to receive the booster dose, especially due to PCV-13-non-PCV-7 serotypes. VE was higher for PCV-7 compared to PCV-13, except for those that received the complete schedule with booster that achieved 100% of VE, which shows the relevance of the vaccines and complying with all doses scheduled. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Meeting the challenge: prevention of pneumococcal disease with conjugate vaccines Al encuentro del reto: prevención de la enfermedad neumocócica con vacunas conjugadas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma Gabriela Echániz-Avilés

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is one of the leading causes of both invasive and noninvasive diseases in the pediatric population and continues to represent a significant public health burden worldwide. The increasing incidence of antibioticresistant strains of the pathogen has complicated treatment and management of the various pneumococcal disease manifestations. Thus, the best management strategy may be the prevention of pneumococcal diseases through vaccination. Although several pneumococcal conjugate vaccines have been clinically studied in infants and children, only a 7-valent conjugate vaccine (PNCRM7; Prevnar®/Prevenar® is currently approved for the prevention of invasive disease. Vaccination with PNCRM7 is safe and effective in infants and young children. Routine vaccination with the conjugate vaccine could improve outcomes by safeguarding against the development of antibiotic-resistant strains of S. pneumoniae, thus simplifying the management of pneumococcal disease. Additionally, the overall costs associated with the treatment of pneumococcal diseases could be substantially reduced, particularly in developing countries. The time has come for fully applying this new advancement against S. pneumoniae, to benefit the children of the world. The Spanish version of this paper is available at: http://www.insp.mx/salud/index.htmlStreptococcus pneumoniae es uno de los principales agentes causantes de enfermedades invasoras y no invasoras en la población pediátrica y sigue representando uno de los principales problemas de salud pública a nivel mundial. La incidencia creciente de cepas resistentes a diversos antimicrobianos ha complicado el tratamiento y manejo de varias de las manifestaciones de la enfermedad neumocócica. Con éstas consideraciones, la mejor estrategia de manejo es la prevención de éstas enfermedades a través de la vacunación. A pesar de que se han estudiado diversas vacunas neumocócicas conjugadas en niños, solo una

  12. Seasonal changes in climatic parameters and their relationship with the incidence of pneumococcal bacteraemia in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Torben; Lundbye-Christensen, Søren; Thomsen, R.W.

    2008-01-01

    The seasonal variation in the incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease is well recognized, but little is known about its relationship with actual changes in climatic parameters. In this 8-year longitudinal population-based study in Denmark, a harmonic sinusoidal regression model was used...... to examine whether preceding changes in climatic parameters corresponded with subsequent variations in the incidence of pneumococcal bacteraemia, independently of seasonal variation. The study shows that changes in temperature can be used to closely predict peaks in the incidence of pneumococcal bacteraemia...

  13. Combination vaccine against invasive meningococcal B and pneumococcal infections: potential epidemiological and economic impact in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Jasper M.; Rümke, Hans C.; Welte, Robert; Spanjaard, Lodewijk; van Alphen, Loek; Postma, Maarten J.

    2006-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis group B are among the main causes of invasive bacterial meningitis infections in infants. Worldwide, these diseases lead to significant mortality, morbidity and costs. The societal impact is especially severe since the majority of cases occur in

  14. Combination vaccine against invasive meningococcal B and pneumococcal infections - Potential epidemiological and economic impact in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, J.M.; Rumke, H.C.; Welte, R.; Spanjaard, L.; van Alphen, L.; Postma, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis group B are among the main causes of invasive bacterial meningitis infections in infants. Worldwide, these diseases lead to significant mortality, morbidity and costs. The societal impact is especially severe since the majority of cases

  15. Poor Long-Term Efficacy of Prevnar-13 in Sickle Cell Disease Mice Is Associated with an Inability to Sustain Pneumococcal-Specific Antibody Titers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M Szczepanek

    Full Text Available One of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in children with sickle cell disease (SCD is infection with the pneumococcal bacterium (Streptococcus pneumoniae. Unfortunately, the polysaccharide-conjugate vaccine appears to be less effective in individuals with SCD when compared to the general population. We sought to better understand the relative efficacy of pneumococcal vaccination in a SCD mouse challenge model.Transgenic control and SCD mice were monitored for mortality after intranasal pneumococcal infection or pneumococcal vaccination with Prevnar-13 and type-matched challenge. Anti-pneumococcal antibody titers were measured by ELISA and opsonophagocytosis was measured in vitro.Mortality after pneumococcal infection was similar between control and SCD mice. However, after three intramuscular polysaccharide-conjugate vaccinations, all control mice were protected following high-dose intranasal infection, whereas 60% of SCD mice died. Anti-pneumococcal antibody titers showed initial IgG and IgM responses in both groups, but waning titers were observed in the SCD group, even after boosting. When functionally assayed in vitro, serum from SCD mice 13 weeks after a second booster shot maintained little to no ability to opsonize pneumococci, while serum from control mice sustained a significantly higher capacity opsonization. Thus, it appears that SCD mice do not maintain antibody responses to pneumococcal polysaccharides after Prevnar-13 vaccination, thereby leaving them susceptible to mortality after type-matched infection.Our results emphasize the need to better understand the correlates of immune protection in SCD so that pneumococcal vaccines can be improved and mortality reduced in this susceptible population.

  16. PNEUMOCOCCAL INFECTION AND ASSOCIATED DISEASES — A SERIOUS PROBLEM OF MODERN HEALTH CARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Baranov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumococcal infection is one of the most widespread reasons for the development of infections of the respiratory passages (otitis, sinusitis in children. At the same time, it may act as an etiological factor of severe urgent conditions, such as pneumococcal meningitis and pneumococcal pneumonia, especially in children under 2 years old. A reliable method for preventing this infection is specific immunological prophylaxis. The article covers in detail the issue of vaccination in Russia and in other countries. The necessity of vaccination of all infants is demonstrated, as well as the necessity of participation in resolving this issue not only of pediatricians but governmental institutions as well in order to enhance safety and efficiency of vaccination and include this vaccine into the national calendar.Key words: pneumococcal infection, forms, complications, vaccination, national vaccination calendar, risk groups, children.

  17. Pneumococcal Sepsis Complicated by Splenic Abscesses and Purpura Fulminans in a 15-Month-Old Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Pangonis MD

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is an invasive organism that causes a wide range of common diseases, including sinusitis, acute otitis media, and pneumonia. Splenic abscesses and purpura fulminans (PF are rare complications of pneumococcal disease. Splenic abscesses caused by S pneumoniae have only been reported in the adult literature. PF has been described in the pediatric population as a rare complication in patients with invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD with and without underlying immunological disorders such as asplenia. Here, we report a patient with IPD complicated by splenic abscesses and PF. Our patient initially presented with bacteremia, septic shock, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. She subsequently developed PF and splenic abscesses. She survived her illness after receiving a total of 8 weeks of antibiotic therapy. This case highlights 2 rare complications of IPD and demonstrates the need to keep pneumococcal disease in the differential diagnosis even in children whose vaccination status is up to date.

  18. Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Associated with Pneumococcal Pneumonia. A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Ariel Efrén Uriarte Méndez; Andrés Prieto Apesteguía; Jesús Vila Díaz; Jorge Luis Capote Padrón; Kendrie Villavicencio Cardoso; Alnilam Fernández González

    2013-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome is a condition characterized by hemolytic microangiopathic anemia, thrombocytopenia and acute renal failure. In its classic form it is associated with diarrhea and it has a good prognosis. When there is an invasive pneumococcal disease as underlying condition, it has a mortality rate of 25%, and half of the surviving cases develop end-stage renal disease (ESRD). We present the case of a 17-month-old child with hemolytic uremic syndrome secondary to pneumonia with emp...

  19. Cepas invasivas de pneumococo isoladas de crianças e adolescentes em Salvador Invasive pneumococcal strains isolated from children and adolescents in Salvador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana M. Nascimento-Carvalho

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: descrever resistência antimicrobiana e sorotipos de cepas de pneumococo. MÉTODOS: durante 57 meses, foi conduzida uma vigilância de cepas invasivas de pneumococo de pacientes com idade OBJECTIVE: describe the antimicrobial resistance and serotype distribution of pneumococcal strains. METHODS: in a 57-month period, a laboratory-based surveillance of invasive pneumococcal strains from patients aged < 20 years was conducted. Pneumococcus was identified by means of tests for solubility in bile and optochin. Pneumococcal resistance to penicillin was screened by 1µg oxacillin disc and minimal inhibitory concentration was determined for the strains not susceptible to penicillin. Disc diffusion and broth microdilution methods were used for surveillance of resistance to other antimicrobials. Pneumococci were serotyped by means of the Neufeld-Quellung reactions. RESULTS: of 70 patients, 57.1% were males. The mean age was 1.92 yrs (mean 3.19 + 3.66 yrs, range 1 month to 19.5 yrs; 52.9% and 81.4% were < 2 yrs and < 5 yrs, respectively. The strains were isolated from blood (91.4%, CSF (2.9%, pleural (2.9%, peritoneal (1.4% and abscess (1.4% fluids from patients with pneumonia (77.1%, fever without localizing signs (10.0%, meningitis (4.3%, others (8.6%. Resistance was detected to penicillin (20.0%, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (65.7%, tetracycline (21.4%, ofloxacin (6.3%, erythromycin (5.7%, clindamycin (2.9%. All tested strains were susceptible to chloramphenicol and vancomycin. Among penicillin-resistant strains, high resistance was detected in one, the same that showed intermediate resistance to cefotaxime. The most frequent serotypes were: 14 (22.9%, 5 and 6A (10.0% each, 6B and 19F (8.6% each, 9V, 18C and 23F (5.7% each. Resistance to penicillin was detected in serotypes 14 (71.4%, 6B and 19F (14.3% each. CONCLUSIONS: of 70 strains, 67.2% were classified as serotypes included in the heptavalent conjugate pneumococcal vaccine as well as

  20. Serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing invasive disease in the Republic of Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Vickers, I

    2011-05-01

    The 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was included in the routine infant immunization schedule in Ireland in September 2008. We determined the serotype of 977 S. pneumoniae isolates causing invasive disease between 2000-2002 and 2007-2008, assessed for the presence of the recently described serotype 6C and determined the susceptibility of isolates during 2007-2008 to penicillin and cefotaxime. Serotype 14 was the most common serotype during both periods and 7·7% of isolates previously typed as serotype 6A were serotype 6C. During 2000-2002 and 2007-2008, PCV7 could potentially have prevented 85% and 74% of invasive pneumococcal disease in the target population (i.e. children aged <2 years), respectively. The level of penicillin non-susceptibility was 17% in 2007-2008. Ongoing surveillance of serotypes is required to determine the impact of PCV7 in the Irish population and to assess the potential of new vaccines with expanded valency.

  1. Adverse Reactions to Pneumococcal Vaccine in Pediatric and Adolescent Patients with Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jin; Kemiki, Opeyemi; Hsu, Lewis L; Rivers, Angela E

    2015-07-01

    To review five cases of severe adverse reactions after vaccination with the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23) in pediatric and adolescent patients with sickle cell disease (SCD), and to evaluate the prevalence of adverse reactions to PPSV23 in patients with SCD by analyzing data from the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). Case series and retrospective analysis of data from the VAERS. Medical records from a tertiary care hospital and the VAERS database. Five cases of severe adverse reactions after vaccination with PPSV23 in pediatric and adolescent patients with SCD (aged 2-22 years) were reviewed. The adverse reactions occurred within 24 hours after immunization, and all five patients required medical attention. Analysis of data from the VAERS found that PPSV23 was the most commonly reported vaccine causing adverse events in patients with SCD, accounting for 62% of all vaccine-induced adverse events. This rate is significantly higher than the rate of adverse events related to PPSV23 in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or asthma (62% vs 16%, padverse reactions in pediatric patients (adverse reactions to PPSV23 is greater in patients with SCD than in patients with HIV or asthma, and especially in pediatric and adolescent patients with SCD compared with their adult counterparts. Health care professionals should closely monitor for potential adverse events after PPSV23 vaccination or revaccination in patients with SCD, adhere to the recommended time interval between PCV13 and PPSV23 administration, and possibly consider avoiding simultaneous administration of other vaccines with PPSV23. © 2015 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  2. Pneumococcal vaccines: the impact of conjugate vaccine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mäkelä, P. Helena; Siber, George R; Klugman, Keith P

    2008-01-01

    ... of Streptococcus pneumoniae with Complement Proteins 83 Margaret K. Hostetter III. Clinical Disease and Epidemiology 8 Epidemiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Serious Pneumococcal Infections in Chi...

  3. Cost-effectiveness analysis of pneumococcal vaccination of adults and elderly persons in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Graeve, D; Lombaert, G; Goossens, H

    2000-06-01

    To analyse the direct medical costs and effectiveness of vaccinating adults aged between 18 and 64 years and elderly persons > or = 65 years of age with the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine. This was a decision-analytic modelling study from the societal perspective in Belgium. The analysis compared 'vaccination' with 'no vaccination and treatment'. Calculations were based on the assumption that vaccination is as effective against all pneumococcal infections as it is against invasive pneumococcal disease. Data on the incidence of pneumococcal pneumonia and meningitis, frequency of hospitalisation, mortality rates and vaccine effectiveness were derived from the international literature. Costs were derived from analysis of historical data for cases of pneumococcal infection in Belgium. Vaccinating 1000 adults between the ages of 18 and 64 years gains approximately 2 life-years in comparison with the no vaccination option. However, to realise these additional health benefits requires additional costs of 11,800 European Currency Units (ECU; 1995 values) per life-year saved. Vaccinating 1000 elderly people (> or = 65 years) leads to > 9 life-years gained as well as a small monetary benefit of ECU1250. An extensive sensitivity analysis did not greatly affect the results for the elderly population: vaccination in this age group always remained favourable, and thus it is clearly indicated from an economic point of view. A crucial assumption for both age groups is that the effectiveness of the vaccine holds for all pneumococcal pneumonia. It is clear that the results will become less favourable if this assumption is dropped. Preventing pneumococcal infections by vaccination clearly benefits people's health. Reimbursement can be recommended for the elderly group; however, more accurate epidemiological data are still needed to make decisions concerning routine pneumococcal vaccination in adults issue of whether the effectiveness of the vaccine holds for all

  4. Optimal serotype compositions for Pneumococcal conjugate vaccination under serotype replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurhonen, Markku; Auranen, Kari

    2014-02-01

    Pneumococcal conjugate vaccination has proved highly effective in eliminating vaccine-type pneumococcal carriage and disease. However, the potential adverse effects of serotype replacement remain a major concern when implementing routine childhood pneumococcal conjugate vaccination programmes. Applying a concise predictive model, we present a ready-to-use quantitative tool to investigate the implications of serotype replacement on the net effectiveness of vaccination against invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) and to guide in the selection of optimal vaccine serotype compositions. We utilise pre-vaccination data on pneumococcal carriage and IPD and assume partial or complete elimination of vaccine-type carriage, its replacement by non-vaccine-type carriage, and stable case-to-carrier ratios (probability of IPD per carriage episode). The model predicts that the post-vaccination IPD incidences in Finland for currently available vaccine serotype compositions can eventually decrease among the target age group of children replacement through herd effects, the decrease among the older population is predicted to be much less (20-40%). We introduce a sequential algorithm for the search of optimal serotype compositions and assess the robustness of inferences to uncertainties in data and assumptions about carriage and IPD. The optimal serotype composition depends on the age group of interest and some serotypes may be highly beneficial vaccine types in one age category (e.g. 6B in children), while being disadvantageous in another. The net effectiveness will be improved only if the added serotype has a higher case-to-carrier ratio than the average case-to-carrier ratio of the current non-vaccine types and the degree of improvement in effectiveness depends on the carriage incidence of the serotype. The serotype compositions of currently available pneumococcal vaccines are not optimal and the effectiveness of vaccination in the population at large could be improved by including

  5. Optimal Serotype Compositions for Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccination under Serotype Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurhonen, Markku; Auranen, Kari

    2014-01-01

    Pneumococcal conjugate vaccination has proved highly effective in eliminating vaccine-type pneumococcal carriage and disease. However, the potential adverse effects of serotype replacement remain a major concern when implementing routine childhood pneumococcal conjugate vaccination programmes. Applying a concise predictive model, we present a ready-to-use quantitative tool to investigate the implications of serotype replacement on the net effectiveness of vaccination against invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) and to guide in the selection of optimal vaccine serotype compositions. We utilise pre-vaccination data on pneumococcal carriage and IPD and assume partial or complete elimination of vaccine-type carriage, its replacement by non-vaccine-type carriage, and stable case-to-carrier ratios (probability of IPD per carriage episode). The model predicts that the post-vaccination IPD incidences in Finland for currently available vaccine serotype compositions can eventually decrease among the target age group of children vaccine types in one age category (e.g. 6B in children), while being disadvantageous in another. The net effectiveness will be improved only if the added serotype has a higher case-to-carrier ratio than the average case-to-carrier ratio of the current non-vaccine types and the degree of improvement in effectiveness depends on the carriage incidence of the serotype. The serotype compositions of currently available pneumococcal vaccines are not optimal and the effectiveness of vaccination in the population at large could be improved by including new serotypes in the vaccine (e.g. 22 and 9N). PMID:24550722

  6. Cost-effectiveness and Health Benefits of Pediatric 23-valent Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine, 7-valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine and Forecasting 13-valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Xiuting; Gai Tobe, Ruoyan; Liu, Xiaoyan; Mori, Rintaro

    2016-11-01

    Each year in China, approximately 700,000 children under 5 years old are diagnosed with pneumonia, and 30,000 die of the disease. Although 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-7) and 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV-23) are available in China, the costs are borne by the consumer, resulting in low coverage for PCV-7. We aimed to conduct a simulation study to assess the cost-effectiveness and health benefits of PCV-7, 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-13) and PPV-23 to prevent childhood pneumonia and other vaccine-preventive diseases in China. An economic evaluation was performed using a Markov simulation model. Parameters including demographic, epidemiological data, costs and efficacy of vaccines were obtained from previous studies. A hypothetical cohort of 100,000 newborns (focusing on pneumococcal diseases ≤7 years old) was followed up until death or 100 years of age. The model incorporated the impact of vaccination on reduction of incidence of pneumococcal diseases and mortality of children ≤7 years. Outcomes are presented in terms of disease cases averted, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and incremental cost-effectiveness ratio. Under baseline assumptions, PPV-23 is currently the only cost-effective option, whereas PCV-13 showed the greatest impact on pneumococcal disease burden, reducing invasive pneumococcal diseases by 31.3%, pneumonia by 15.3% and gaining 73.8 QALYs (10,000 individuals at discount rate of 3%). Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of PCV-13 and PCV-7 are US$29,460/QALY and US$104,094/QALY, respectively, showing no cost-effectiveness based on the World Health Organization recommended willingness-to-pay threshold. On the other hand, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of PCVs were most sensitive to vaccination costs; if it reduces 4.7% and 32.2% for PCV-7 and PCV-13, respectively, the vaccination will be cost-effective. To scale up current vaccination strategies and achieve potential health

  7. Hydroxyurea therapy of a murine model of sickle cell anemia inhibits the progression of pneumococcal disease by down-modulating E-selectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebensburger, Jeffrey D; Howard, Thad; Hu, Yunming; Pestina, Tamara I; Gao, Geli; Johnson, Melissa; Zakharenko, Stanislav S; Ware, Russell E; Tuomanen, Elaine I; Persons, Derek A; Rosch, Jason W

    2012-02-23

    Sickle cell anemia is characterized by chronic hemolysis coupled with extensive vascular inflammation. This inflammatory state also mechanistically promotes a high risk of lethal, invasive pneumococcal infection. Current treatments to reduce vaso-occlusive complications include chronic hydroxyurea therapy to induce fetal hemoglobin. Because hydroxyurea also reduces leukocytosis, an understanding of the impact of this treatment on pneumococcal pathogenesis is needed. Using a sickle cell mouse model of pneumococcal pneumonia and sepsis, administration of hydroxyurea was found to significantly improve survival. Hydroxyurea treatment decreased neutrophil extravasation into the infected lung coincident with significantly reduced levels of E-selectin in serum and on pulmonary epithelia. The protective effect of hydroxyurea was abrogated in mice deficient in E-selectin. The decrease in E-selectin levels was also evident in human sickle cell patients receiving hydroxyurea therapy. These data indicate that in addition to induction of fetal hemoglobin, hydroxyurea attenuates leukocyte-endothelial interactions in sickle cell anemia, resulting in protection against lethal pneumococcal sepsis.

  8. Invasive pests—insects and diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald A. Duerr; Paul A. Mistretta

    2013-01-01

    Key FindingsNonnative pest species have increasing impacts in the South regardless of climate change, patterns of land ownership, or changes in the composition of vegetation.“New” nonnative invasive insects and diseases will have serious impacts on southern forests over the next 50 years. Some species such as emerald ash borer...

  9. A pharmacist-driven academic detailing program to increase adult pneumococcal vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffrey, Aisling R; DeAngelis, Jennifer M; Ward, Kristina E; Orr, K Kelly; Morrill, Haley J; Gosciminski, Michael; LaPlante, Kerry L

    2017-09-23

    To describe our statewide, pharmacist-led education campaign to increase knowledge and awareness of pneumococcal immunization recommendations. Immunization providers and residents in the state of Rhode Island. A clinical pathway (i.e., decision-support tool) was developed to educate health professionals about appropriate indications, administration schedules, and frequently asked questions for the 2 different adult pneumococcal vaccines. Academic detailing and distribution of the clinical pathway to health professionals was conducted across Rhode Island. Community outreach activities included radio ads as well as distribution of patient handouts and wallet cards at community events. To our knowledge, this was the first statewide, pharmacist-driven academic detailing and community outreach campaign to promote adult pneumococcal vaccination. Academically detailed immunization providers received a 6-question survey. Pneumococcal disease rate differences between the study periods were evaluated with the use of Fisher exact tests, whereas changes in vaccination were assessed with the use of chi-square tests. From November 2013 through July 2015, our academic detailers visited and distributed our vaccination pathway materials to more than 400 practice sites across Rhode Island, including 68% of community pharmacies and all adult acute care hospitals. Of the 413 surveys completed, 92% of respondents agreed that their knowledge of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, 13-valent and pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine, 23-valent had improved. Pneumococcal vaccination increased significantly (absolute difference 3.9%, percentage change in proportion 5.4%; P = 0.01), and pneumococcal disease decreased significantly between the preintervention and intervention periods (-2.74/10,000 discharges [95% CI -5.15 to -0.32], P = 0.02). Invasive pneumococcal disease decreased by 21 cases per 1,000,000 population per year between the preintervention and postintervention periods (-42

  10. Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine (PCV13): What You Need to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... drugs. This makes prevention of the disease, through vaccination, even more important. 2 PCV13 vaccine Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (called PCV13) protects against 13 types of pneumococcal bacteria. PCV13 is routinely given to ...

  11. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) - What you need to know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... drugs. This makes prevention of the disease, through vaccination, even more important. 2. PCV13 vaccine Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (called PCV13) protects against 13 types of pneumococcal bacteria. PCV13 is routinely given to ...

  12. The cost-effectiveness of a 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccination for infants in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoek, Albert Jan; Choi, Yoon Hong; Trotter, Caroline; Miller, Elizabeth; Jit, Mark

    2012-11-26

    In the immunisation schedule in England and Wales, the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-7) was replaced by the 13-valent vaccine (PCV-13) in April 2010 after having been used since September 2006. The introduction of PCV-7 was informed by a cost effectiveness analysis using an infectious disease model which projected herd immunity and serotype replacement effects based on the post-vaccine experience in the United States at that time. To investigate the cost effectiveness of the introduction of PCV-13. Invasive disease incidence following vaccination was projected from a dynamic infectious disease model, and combined with serotype specific disease outcomes obtained from a large hospital dataset linked to laboratory confirmation of invasive pneumococcal disease. The economic impact of replacing PCV-7 with PCV-13 was compared to stopping the use of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination altogether. Discontinuing PCV-7 would lead to a projected increase in invasive pneumococcal disease, costs and loss of quality of life compared to the introduction of PCV-13. However under base case assumptions (assuming no impact on non-invasive disease, maximal competition between vaccine and non-vaccine types, time horizon of 30 years, vaccine price of £49.60 a dose+£7.50 administration costs and discounting of costs and benefits at 3.5%) the introduction of PCV-13 is only borderline cost effective compared to a scenario of discontinuing of PCV-7. The intervention becomes more cost-effective when projected impact of non-invasive disease is included or the discount factor for benefits is reduced to 1.5%. To our knowledge this is the first evaluation of a transition from PCV-7 to PCV-13 based on a dynamic model. The cost-effectiveness of such a policy change depends on a number of crucial assumptions for which evidence is limited, particularly the impact of PCV-13 on non-invasive disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Invasive pneumococcal disease in Danish children, 1996-2007, prior to the introduction of heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Thilde N; Kristensen, Tim D; Kaltoft, Margit S

    2008-01-01

    , but considerably higher, 62 per 100 000, in children risk factors....... The Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype was available for 81 cases. Seventy-five percent of the IPD cases in children aged /=2 years. Conclusion: Our data indicate that an estimated 75% of all IPD cases among...

  14. [Pneumococcal vaccination: conjugated vaccine induces herd immunity and reduces antibiotic resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletz, M W; Maus, U; Hohlfeld, J M; Lode, H; Welte, T

    2008-02-01

    Pneumococcal infections (pneumonia, otitis media, sinusitis, meningitis) are common and usually involve toddlers and the elderly. Currently, two pneumococcal vaccines are in clinical use. The older vaccine consists of pure capsular polysaccharides from 23 pneumococcal serotypes and induces only a limited B-cell response because polysaccharides are poor antigens that stimulate mainly B-cells. In 2000, a vaccination program with a novel 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine was launched in the U.S. The conjugation of capsular polysaccharides with a highly immunogenic diphtheria toxoid protein induces both a T cell and B cell response that results in specific humoral and mucosal immunity. Since children are the main reservoir of pneumococci, the 7-valent conjugate vaccine seems to eradicate the respective pneumococcal serotypes within the population, as demonstrated by recent US data. Pronounced herd immunity resulted in a decrease in invasive pneumococcal diseases in vaccinees and non-vaccinees as well as in a reduction of antibiotic resistance rates. However, recent data suggest a replacement of vaccine-serotypes by non-vaccine serotypes, which conquer the ecological niche created by the vaccine. In order to encounter this problem a 13-valent conjugated vaccine is currently under development.

  15. Serotype Distribution in Non-Bacteremic Pneumococcal Pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benfield, Thomas; Skovgaard, Marlene; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl

    2013-01-01

    There is limited knowledge of serotypes that cause non-bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia (NBP). Here we report serotypes, their associated disease potential and coverage of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV) in adults with NBP and compare these to bacteremic pneumonia (BP).......There is limited knowledge of serotypes that cause non-bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia (NBP). Here we report serotypes, their associated disease potential and coverage of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV) in adults with NBP and compare these to bacteremic pneumonia (BP)....

  16. Genetic Variation in NFKBIE Is Associated With Increased Risk of Pneumococcal Meningitis in Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbo, Lene F; Harboe, Zitta Barrella; Clausen, Louise N

    2016-01-01

    NFKBIA, NFKBIE and NFKBIZ. We aimed to replicate previous findings of genetic variation associated with invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), and to assess whether similar associations could be found in invasive meningococcal disease (IMD). METHODS: Cases with IPD and IMD and controls were identified......BACKGROUND: Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis are frequent pathogens in life-threatening infections. Genetic variation in the immune system may predispose to these infections. Nuclear factor-κB is a key component of the TLR-pathway, controlled by inhibitors, encoded by the genes.......86-1.35). The remaining SNPs were not associated with susceptibility to invasive disease. None of the SNPs were associated with risk of IMD or mortality. CONCLUSIONS: A NFKBIE polymorphism was associated with increased risk of pneumococcal meningitis....

  17. Optimising assessments of the epidemiological impact in The Netherlands of paediatric immunisation with 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine using dynamic transmission modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cao, Elisabetta; Melegaro, Alessia; Klok, Rogier; Postma, Maarten

    2014-01-01

    This work is the first attempt to quantify the overall effects of a 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) vaccination programme in the Dutch population taking into account all the direct and indirect effects of the vaccine on invasive pneumococcal disease. Using available Dutch data, a dynamic transmission model for the spread of pneumococci and potential subsequent invasive pneumococcal disease has been adapted to the Dutch setting. Overall, invasive pneumococcal disease cases in the Netherlands are predicted to decrease from a pre-vaccination level of 2623 cases annually to 2475, 2289, 2185, 2179, and 2178 cases annually 5-, 10-, 20-, 30-, and 40-years, respectively, post-vaccination. Therefore, vaccination with PCV13 in the Netherlands is predicted to lower invasive pneumococcal disease cases per year by up to 445 cases in the medium- to long-term. The results are quite robust for the sensitivity analyses performed on the parameters that regulate herd immunity and competition between vaccine and non-vaccine types.

  18. Optimising assessments of the epidemiological impact in The Netherlands of paediatric immunisation with 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine using dynamic transmission modelling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta De Cao

    Full Text Available This work is the first attempt to quantify the overall effects of a 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13 vaccination programme in the Dutch population taking into account all the direct and indirect effects of the vaccine on invasive pneumococcal disease. Using available Dutch data, a dynamic transmission model for the spread of pneumococci and potential subsequent invasive pneumococcal disease has been adapted to the Dutch setting. Overall, invasive pneumococcal disease cases in the Netherlands are predicted to decrease from a pre-vaccination level of 2623 cases annually to 2475, 2289, 2185, 2179, and 2178 cases annually 5-, 10-, 20-, 30-, and 40-years, respectively, post-vaccination. Therefore, vaccination with PCV13 in the Netherlands is predicted to lower invasive pneumococcal disease cases per year by up to 445 cases in the medium- to long-term. The results are quite robust for the sensitivity analyses performed on the parameters that regulate herd immunity and competition between vaccine and non-vaccine types.

  19. Pneumococcal pneumonia prevention among adults: is the herd effect of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination in children as good a way as the active immunization of the elderly?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prato, Rosa; Fortunato, Francesca; Martinelli, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    The indirect protection of adults as a result of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination of infants has been discussed from different epidemiological points of view. In some countries, including Italy, even after pediatric vaccination, vaccine serotypes are still responsible for most pneumonia and invasive diseases in the elderly. Although the Community-Acquired Pneumonia Immunization Trial in Adults (CAPITA) produced encouraging results, it has not showed the efficacy of the 13-valent conjugate vaccine in preventing pneumococcal community-acquired pneumonia regardless of the number of episodes and serotype. Addressing these points by monitoring the direct impact of adult vaccination in real life distinguished from the effects of herd immunity will assist public health decision-making on the most effective adult pneumococcal vaccination strategies.

  20. Molecular epidemiology of pneumococcal isolates from children in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Hua Kang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To investigate the molecular epidemiology of pneumococcal isolates in Chongqing, China. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 51 invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae strains were from children with invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD and 32 carriage strains from healthy children from January 2010 to December 2013 at the Children’s Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China. Multilocus sequence typing was used to identify the sequence types (STs. Capsular serotypes were determined by multiplex polymerase chain reaction. Drug susceptibility and resistance was determined by minimum inhibitory concentrations. Results: In this study, 11 serotypes were identified among the 83 S. pneumoniae clinical isolates tested. Prevalent serotypes were 19A (20.4%, 6A/B (20.4%, 19F (15.7%, 14 (14.5%, and 23F (10.8%. Serotype 19F was the most frequent carriage strain, and serotype 19A was the most frequent invasive strain. The ST983 was the most prevalent ST for carriage strains, and ST320 was the most prevalent ST for invasive strains. For gene analysis, psaA (99.5% and piaA (98.6% were present and much conserved in all pneumococci tested. The cps2A and pcsB genes were more frequent in invasive isolates than carriage strains. Antimicrobial resistance rates of invasive pneumococcal isolates to erythromycin, penicillin, meropenem, cefotaxime, and clindamycin were higher than the carriage isolates from children. Conclusion: Our epidemiological evidence shows that 19A, 6A/B, 19F, 14, and 23F remain the most prevalent serotypes, which can be targeted by PCV13. Genotypes and drug resistance varied between carriage and invasive strains. The PsaA and PiaA may be good protein vaccine candidates.

  1. Association of secondhand smoke exposure with pediatric invasive bacterial disease and bacterial carriage: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Chang Lee

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A number of epidemiologic studies have observed an association between secondhand smoke (SHS exposure and pediatric invasive bacterial disease (IBD but the evidence has not been systematically reviewed. We carried out a systematic review and meta-analysis of SHS exposure and two outcomes, IBD and pharyngeal carriage of bacteria, for Neisseria meningitidis (N. meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib, and Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae.Two independent reviewers searched Medline, EMBASE, and selected other databases, and screened articles for inclusion and exclusion criteria. We identified 30 case-control studies on SHS and IBD, and 12 cross-sectional studies on SHS and bacterial carriage. Weighted summary odd ratios (ORs were calculated for each outcome and for studies with specific design and quality characteristics. Tests for heterogeneity and publication bias were performed. Compared with those unexposed to SHS, summary OR for SHS exposure was 2.02 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.52-2.69 for invasive meningococcal disease, 1.21 (95% CI 0.69-2.14 for invasive pneumococcal disease, and 1.22 (95% CI 0.93-1.62 for invasive Hib disease. For pharyngeal carriage, summary OR was 1.68 (95% CI, 1.19-2.36 for N. meningitidis, 1.66 (95% CI 1.33-2.07 for S. pneumoniae, and 0.96 (95% CI 0.48-1.95 for Hib. The association between SHS exposure and invasive meningococcal and Hib diseases was consistent regardless of outcome definitions, age groups, study designs, and publication year. The effect estimates were larger in studies among children younger than 6 years of age for all three IBDs, and in studies with the more rigorous laboratory-confirmed diagnosis for invasive meningococcal disease (summary OR 3.24; 95% CI 1.72-6.13.When considered together with evidence from direct smoking and biological mechanisms, our systematic review and meta-analysis indicates that SHS exposure may be associated with invasive meningococcal disease. The

  2. Association of secondhand smoke exposure with pediatric invasive bacterial disease and bacterial carriage: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chien-Chang; Middaugh, Nicole A; Howie, Stephen R C; Ezzati, Majid

    2010-12-07

    A number of epidemiologic studies have observed an association between secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure and pediatric invasive bacterial disease (IBD) but the evidence has not been systematically reviewed. We carried out a systematic review and meta-analysis of SHS exposure and two outcomes, IBD and pharyngeal carriage of bacteria, for Neisseria meningitidis (N. meningitidis), Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib), and Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae). Two independent reviewers searched Medline, EMBASE, and selected other databases, and screened articles for inclusion and exclusion criteria. We identified 30 case-control studies on SHS and IBD, and 12 cross-sectional studies on SHS and bacterial carriage. Weighted summary odd ratios (ORs) were calculated for each outcome and for studies with specific design and quality characteristics. Tests for heterogeneity and publication bias were performed. Compared with those unexposed to SHS, summary OR for SHS exposure was 2.02 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.52-2.69) for invasive meningococcal disease, 1.21 (95% CI 0.69-2.14) for invasive pneumococcal disease, and 1.22 (95% CI 0.93-1.62) for invasive Hib disease. For pharyngeal carriage, summary OR was 1.68 (95% CI, 1.19-2.36) for N. meningitidis, 1.66 (95% CI 1.33-2.07) for S. pneumoniae, and 0.96 (95% CI 0.48-1.95) for Hib. The association between SHS exposure and invasive meningococcal and Hib diseases was consistent regardless of outcome definitions, age groups, study designs, and publication year. The effect estimates were larger in studies among children younger than 6 years of age for all three IBDs, and in studies with the more rigorous laboratory-confirmed diagnosis for invasive meningococcal disease (summary OR 3.24; 95% CI 1.72-6.13). When considered together with evidence from direct smoking and biological mechanisms, our systematic review and meta-analysis indicates that SHS exposure may be associated with invasive meningococcal disease. The epidemiologic

  3. 42 CFR 410.57 - Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. 410.57... § 410.57 Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. (a) Medicare Part B pays for pneumococcal vaccine and its administration when reasonable and necessary for the prevention of disease, if the vaccine is ordered by a doctor...

  4. Nasopharyngeal colonization and invasive disease are enhanced by the cell wall hydrolases LytB and LytC of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Ramos-Sevillano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common colonizer of the human nasopharynx and one of the major pathogens causing invasive disease worldwide. Dissection of the molecular pathways responsible for colonization, invasion, and evasion of the immune system will provide new targets for antimicrobial or vaccine therapies for this common pathogen. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have constructed mutants lacking the pneumococcal cell wall hydrolases (CWHs LytB and LytC to investigate the role of these proteins in different phases of the pneumococcal pathogenesis. Our results show that LytB and LytC are involved in the attachment of S. pneumoniae to human nasopharyngeal cells both in vitro and in vivo. The interaction of both proteins with phagocytic cells demonstrated that LytB and LytC act in concert avoiding pneumococcal phagocytosis mediated by neutrophils and alveolar macrophages. Furthermore, C3b deposition was increased on the lytC mutant confirming that LytC is involved in complement evasion. As a result, the lytC mutant showed a reduced ability to successfully cause pneumococcal pneumonia and sepsis. Bacterial mutants lacking both LytB and LytC showed a dramatically impaired attachment to nasopharyngeal cells as well as a marked degree of attenuation in a mouse model of colonization. In addition, C3b deposition and phagocytosis was more efficient for the double lytB lytC mutant and its virulence was greatly impaired in both systemic and pulmonary models of infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study confirms that the CWHs LytB and LytC of S. pneumoniae are essential virulence factors involved in the colonization of the nasopharynx and in the progress of invasive disease by avoiding host immunity.

  5. Immunosuppressive drugs impairs antibody response of the polysaccharide and conjugated pneumococcal vaccines in patients with Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantsø, Bjørn; Halkjær, Sofie Ingdam; Thomsen, Ole Østergaard

    2015-01-01

    with and without immunosuppressive treatment four weeks post vaccination. METHODS: In a randomized trial of the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) and the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugated vaccine (PCV13), a group of CD patients treated with immunosuppressive drugs (IS) alone or in combination...

  6. Prevalence of nasopharyngeal antibiotic-Resistant pneumococcal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Pneumococcal resistance was significant in this group of children with easy access to paediatric services and antibiotic use. The implication of such high resistance for the treatment of pneumococcal diseases is that high-dose amoxicillin is the preferred empirical oral therapy for treatment of otitis media.

  7. Serotypes and Clonal Diversity of Streptococcus pneumoniae Causing Invasive Disease in the Era of PCV13 in Catalonia, Spain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Del Amo

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to study the serotypes and clonal diversity of pneumococci causing invasive pneumococcal disease in Catalonia, Spain, in the era of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13. In our region, this vaccine is only available in the private market and it is estimated a PCV13 vaccine coverage around 55% in children. A total of 1551 pneumococcal invasive isolates received between 2010 and 2013 in the Molecular Microbiology Department at Hospital Sant Joan de Déu, Barcelona, were included. Fifty-two serotypes and 249 clonal types-defined by MLST-were identified. The most common serotypes were serotype 1 (n = 182; 11.7%, 3 (n = 145; 9.3%, 19A (n = 137; 8.8% and 7F (n = 122; 7.9%. Serotype 14 was the third most frequent serotype in children < 2 years (15 of 159 isolates. PCV7 serotypes maintained their proportion along the period of study, 16.6% in 2010 to 13.4% in 2013, whereas there was a significant proportional decrease in PCV13 serotypes, 65.3% in 2010 to 48.9% in 2013 (p<0.01. This decrease was mainly attributable to serotypes 19A and 7F. Serotype 12F achieved the third position in 2013 (n = 22, 6.4%. The most frequent clonal types found were ST306 (n = 154, 9.9%, ST191 (n = 111, 7.2%, ST989 (n = 85, 5.5% and ST180 (n = 80, 5.2%. Despite their decrease, PCV13 serotypes continue to be a major cause of disease in Spain. These results emphasize the need for complete PCV13 vaccination.

  8. Clinical and Epidemiological Evidence of the Red Queen Hypothesis in Pneumococcal Serotype Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockmann, Chris; Ampofo, Krow; Pavia, Andrew T; Blaschke, Anne J; Mason, Edward O; Presson, Angela P; Forney, Larry J; Byington, Carrie L

    2016-09-01

    The Red Queen hypothesis is an evolutionary theory that describes the reciprocal coevolution of competing species. We sought to study whether introduction of the 7- and 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV7 and PCV13, respectively) altered pneumococcal serotype dynamics among children with invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) as predicted by the Red Queen hypothesis. This study examined pneumococcal isolates (n = 641) obtained from children <18 years of age hospitalized with IPD from 1997 to 2014 in Utah. A review of the literature also identified several additional studies conducted in the United States and Europe that were used to test the external generalizability of our Utah findings. Simpson's index was used to quantify pneumococcal serotype diversity. In Utah, the introduction of PCV7 and PCV13 was associated with rapid increases in serotype diversity (P < .001). Serotypes rarely present before vaccine introduction emerged as common causes of IPD. Diversity then decreased (P < .001) as competition selected for the fittest serotypes and new evolutionary equilibriums were established. This pattern was also observed more broadly in the United States, the United Kingdom, Norway, and Spain. This vaccine-driven example of human/bacterial coevolution appears to confirm the Red Queen hypothesis, which reveals a limitation of serotype-specific vaccines and offers insights that may facilitate alternative strategies for the elimination of IPD. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Pneumococcal vaccination in adults: rationale, state of the art and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Icardi, G; Sticchi, L; Bagnasco, A; Iudici, R; Durando, P

    2012-06-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite the availability, since the early 1980s, of a 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PP V23), its recommendation and increased use in the last decades, and the indirect benefits against invasive pneumococcal diseases following the pediatric immunization strategies with the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7), pneumoccal diseases, particularly Community Acquired Pneumonia (CAP), still remain a substantial burden among older adults in Western countries. The recent availability on the market of a second generation of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines, with an enlarged spectrum of protection against some serotypes not included in the PCV7 (i.e., the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine--PCV13), opens new interesting perspectives for improving the control of this significant health-care issue among the entire population. The most interesting and up-dated epidemiological data regarding the impact of SP in adults and the elderly in Western countries, together with the available evidence concerning the efficacy and effectiveness of the PPV23 in the same population, are reported and discussed below.

  10. Identifying barriers to adult pneumococcal vaccination: an NFID task force meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehm, Susan J; File, Thomas M; Metersky, Mark; Nichol, Kristin L; Schaffner, William

    2012-05-01

    Pneumococcal infection is common in adults, and invasive disease is associated with a high mortality rate. Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine can prevent invasive pneumococcal disease and is recommended for people aged ≥ 65 years and for younger adults with high-risk chronic conditions; however, vaccination rates are suboptimal in all of these groups. A multidisciplinary task force meeting examined ways to increase vaccination rates in the target populations. Barriers to vaccination include lack of awareness of the disease or vaccine among vaccination candidates and health care providers, failure to assume responsibility for vaccination, competing priorities, incomplete or inaccessible documentation of previous vaccines, and health care system delivery challenges. Efforts to address these barriers should use appropriate methods. For example, potential vaccine recipients might be motivated by a message from a community leader, whereas health care providers are more apt to offer a vaccine when reminded that it is a recommended best practice. All health care providers need to accept responsibility for vaccination so that this preventive measure becomes a high priority in the care of patients at risk for serious pneumococcal infection.

  11. INVASIVE AMOEBIASIS COMPLICATING IFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziglam H

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTIONAmoebiasis, which is caused by the intestinal protozoan Entamoeba histolytica, is a ubiquitous parasitic infection affecting approximately 10% of the world’s population and causing more deaths every year (100,000 deaths than any other parasitic infection, with the exception of malaria and schistosomiasis [1–3]. Most individuals with an E. histolytica infection are asymptomatic, but some develop severe invasive disease, such as amoebic colitis. Other manifestations, such as pulmonary, cardiac or brain involvement, are rare. Intestinal amoebiasis can probably also present as a chronic, non-dysenteric syndrome of diarrhoea, weight loss, and abdominal pain that can last for years and mimic inflammatory bowel disease. Fulminant colitis with bowel necrosis leading to perforation and peritonitis occurs in only about 0.5% of cases, but it is associated with a mortality rate of more than 40%. Patients with invasive amoebiasis living in the United Kingdom and other developed countries generally acquire the infection in another country in which the pathogenic species is endemic. Areas that have high rates of amoebic infection include India, Africa, Mexico and parts of Central and South America. Infection with pathogenic E. histolytica is not a common cause of travelers’ diarrhoea, and gastrointestinal infection is uncommon in travelers who have spent less than one month in endemic areas.

  12. Immunogenicity of a 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine in elderly residents of a long-term care facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Teresa Valenzuela B.

    Full Text Available S. pneumoniae is a significant cause of community-acquired pneumonia in the elderly, and accounts for the majority of the pneumonia deaths among the elderly. We conducted this randomized double-blind study to evaluate the immune response to a 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine and the persistence of antibodies two years after the vaccination in an elderly population in Santiago, Chile. A total of 118 elderly nursing home residents received either the pneumococcal or a tetanus control vaccine. Serum samples were taken at enrolment, at two months, and at two years post-vaccination. Pre-vaccination anti-pneumococcal antibody geometric mean concentrations (GMC were similar in both study groups, with increased levels of antibodies found only against serotype 14. The pneumococcal vaccine was highly immunogenic at 2 months, and titers remained high two years after the vaccination for the 10 serotypes studied in this elderly population. The results thus support the benefits of this pneumococcal vaccine in this elderly population who are at increased risk of invasive pneumococcal disease.

  13. Patients with Crohn's disease on anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy are at significant risk of inadequate response to the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang Kyun; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Ye, Byong Duk; Lee, Kang-Moon; Kim, You Sun; Rhee, Sang Youl; Kim, Hyo-Jong; Yang, Suk-Kyun; Moon, Won; Koo, Ja-Seol; Lee, Suck-Ho; Seo, Geom Seog; Park, Soo Jung; Choi, Chang Hwan; Jung, Sung-Ae; Hong, Sung Noh; Im, Jong Pil; Kim, Eun Soo

    2014-05-01

    The effect of immunosuppressants on the efficacy of a variety of vaccines is a controversial issue in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In this study we determined whether specific immunosuppressants impair the serological response to the standard 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23) in a large cohort of patients with Crohn's disease (CD). This was a multi-center, prospective observational study of adult patients with CD at 15 academic teaching hospitals in Korea. The study population received one intramuscular injection of PPSV23. Anti-pneumococcal IgG antibody titers were measured by immunoassay prior to and 4weeks after vaccination. All vaccination-related adverse events and the effect of the vaccine on disease activity were also evaluated. The overall serological response rate was 67.5% (133/197). The serological response rate was significantly lower in patients on anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) therapy (50.0% on anti-TNF alone; 58.0% on anti-TNF combined with an immunomodulator, IM) than patients on 5-aminosalicylate (78.4%; all P-values vs. 5-aminosalicylaterisk of an inadequate response to PPSV23. The pneumococcal vaccination strategy should be optimized for patients with CD on anti-TNF therapy. © 2013 European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of influenza and pneumococcal vaccines in elderly persons in years of low influenza activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, Brith; Pauksen, Karlis; Sylvan, Staffan P E

    2008-04-28

    The present prospective study was conducted from 2003-2005, among all individuals 65 years and older in Uppsala County, a region with 300 000 inhabitants situated close to the Stockholm urban area.The objective of this study was to assess the preventive effect of influenza and pneumococcal vaccination in reducing hospitalisation and length of hospital stay (LOHS) even during periods of low influenza activity. The specificity of the apparent vaccine associations were evaluated in relation to the influenza seasons. In 2003, the total study population was 41,059, of which 12,907 (31%) received influenza vaccine of these, 4,447 (11%) were administered the pneumococcal vaccine. In 2004, 14,799 (34%) individuals received the influenza vaccine and 8,843 (21%) the pneumococcal vaccine and in 2005 16,926 (39%) individuals were given the influenza vaccine and 12,340 (28%) the pneumococcal vaccine.Our findings indicated that 35% of the vaccinated cohort belonged to a medical risk category (mainly those persons that received the pneumococcal vaccine). Data on hospitalisation and mortality during the 3-year period were obtained from the administrative database of the Uppsala county council. During the influenza seasons, reduction of hospital admissions and significantly shorter in-hospital stay for influenza was observed in the vaccinated cohort (below 80 years of age). For individuals who also had received the pneumococcal vaccine, a significant reduction of hospital admissions and of in-hospital stay was observed for invasive pneumococcal disease and for pneumococcal pneumonia. Effectiveness was observed for cardiac failure even in persons that also had received the pneumococcal vaccine, despite that the pneumococcal vaccinated mainly belonged to a medical risk category. Reduction of death from all causes was observed during the influenza season of 2004, in the 75-84-year old age group and in all age-groups during the influenza season 2005. The present study confirmed the

  15. Effect of influenza and pneumococcal vaccines in elderly persons in years of low influenza activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvan Staffan PE

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present prospective study was conducted from 2003–2005, among all individuals 65 years and older in Uppsala County, a region with 300 000 inhabitants situated close to the Stockholm urban area. The objective of this study was to assess the preventive effect of influenza and pneumococcal vaccination in reducing hospitalisation and length of hospital stay (LOHS even during periods of low influenza activity. The specificity of the apparent vaccine associations were evaluated in relation to the influenza seasons. Results In 2003, the total study population was 41,059, of which 12,907 (31% received influenza vaccine of these, 4,447 (11% were administered the pneumococcal vaccine. In 2004, 14,799 (34% individuals received the influenza vaccine and 8,843 (21% the pneumococcal vaccine and in 2005 16,926 (39% individuals were given the influenza vaccine and 12,340 (28% the pneumococcal vaccine. Our findings indicated that 35% of the vaccinated cohort belonged to a medical risk category (mainly those persons that received the pneumococcal vaccine. Data on hospitalisation and mortality during the 3-year period were obtained from the administrative database of the Uppsala county council. During the influenza seasons, reduction of hospital admissions and significantly shorter in-hospital stay for influenza was observed in the vaccinated cohort (below 80 years of age. For individuals who also had received the pneumococcal vaccine, a significant reduction of hospital admissions and of in-hospital stay was observed for invasive pneumococcal disease and for pneumococcal pneumonia. Effectiveness was observed for cardiac failure even in persons that also had received the pneumococcal vaccine, despite that the pneumococcal vaccinated mainly belonged to a medical risk category. Reduction of death from all causes was observed during the influenza season of 2004, in the 75–84-year old age group and in all age-groups during the influenza

  16. [New ideas on the therapeutic effect of a combination of vaccines against pneumococcal, Haemophilus influenzae type b infection, and influenza in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostinov, M P; Zhestkov, A V; Protasov, A D; Magarshak, O O; Kostinova, T A

    2015-01-01

    To estimate the indicators of the therapeutic effect of combination vaccination against pneumococcal, Haemophilus influenzae type b infection, and influenza in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Clinical, bacteriological, and immunological studies, by determining the quality of life (QL), were conducted in COPD patients during a year after combination vaccination against pneumococcal, Haemophilus influenza type b infection, and influenza. One year after the vaccination, there were reductions in the number of COPD exacerbations by 3.7 times, in that of antibiotic therapy cycles by 3.4 times, in the levels of inflammatory mediators of interleukins 2 and 8 and interferon-γ, and in the synthesis of IgG antibodies to Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae type b, and influenza virus strains as compared to the baseline values. Combination vaccination against bacterial and viral infections substantially improves the major clinical parameters of COPD, positively affecting LQ indicators that generally characterize the therapeutic effect of immunization.

  17. A public health and budget impact analysis of vaccinating the elderly and at-risk adults with the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine or 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yiling; Gauthier, Aline; Keeping, Sam; Carroll, Stuart

    2014-12-01

    Since the introduction of the routine childhood immunization, a change in epidemiology of pneumococcal disease has been seen in both children and adults. This study aimed to quantify the public health and budget impact of pneumococcal vaccination of the elderly and those in at risk groups in the UK. The model was adapted from a previous population-based Markov model. At-risk adults and the elderly were assumed to receive PPV23 or PCV13 vaccination or no vaccination. Over the study period (2012-2016), PPV23 vaccination led to a reduction in the number of invasive pneumococcal disease cases in most scenarios. The net budget impact ranged between £15 and £39 million (vs no vaccination) or between -£116 and -£93 million (vs PCV13). PPV23 vaccination program remains the optimal strategy from public health and budgetary perspectives despite epidemiological changes. PCV13 is likely to impose a significant budget with limited health benefits.

  18. Herd immunity and pneumococcal conjugate vaccine: a quantitative model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, Michael; Barskey, Albert; Baughman, Wendy; Barker, Lawrence; Whitney, Cynthia G; Shaw, Kate M; Orenstein, Walter; Stephens, David S

    2007-07-20

    Invasive pneumococcal disease in older children and adults declined markedly after introduction in 2000 of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine for young children. An empirical quantitative model was developed to estimate the herd (indirect) effects on the incidence of invasive disease among persons >or=5 years of age induced by vaccination of young children with 1, 2, or >or=3 doses of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, Prevnar (PCV7), containing serotypes 4, 6B, 9V, 14, 18C, 19F and 23F. From 1994 to 2003, cases of invasive pneumococcal disease were prospectively identified in Georgia Health District-3 (eight metropolitan Atlanta counties) by Active Bacterial Core surveillance (ABCs). From 2000 to 2003, vaccine coverage levels of PCV7 for children aged 19-35 months in Fulton and DeKalb counties (of Atlanta) were estimated from the National Immunization Survey (NIS). Based on incidence data and the estimated average number of doses received by 15 months of age, a Poisson regression model was fit, describing the trend in invasive pneumococcal disease in groups not targeted for vaccination (i.e., adults and older children) before and after the introduction of PCV7. Highly significant declines in all the serotypes contained in PCV7 in all unvaccinated populations (5-19, 20-39, 40-64, and >64 years) from 2000 to 2003 were found under the model. No significant change in incidence was seen from 1994 to 1999, indicating rates were stable prior to vaccine introduction. Among unvaccinated persons 5+ years of age, the modeled incidence of disease caused by PCV7 serotypes as a group dropped 38.4%, 62.0%, and 76.6% for 1, 2, and 3 doses, respectively, received on average by the population of children by the time they are 15 months of age. Incidence of serotypes 14 and 23F had consistent significant declines in all unvaccinated age groups. In contrast, the herd immunity effects on vaccine-related serotype 6A incidence were inconsistent. Increasing trends of non

  19. Clinical and microbiological implications of invasive pneumococcal disease in hospitalized patients (1998–2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Inês Cazentini Medeiros

    2016-05-01

    Conclusion: The present findings highlight the importance of IPD among young adults and older adults. In the era of conjugate vaccines, monitoring serotypes in different age groups is essential to assess the impact and adequacy of immunization.

  20. Delayed cerebral thrombosis complicating pneumococcal meningitis: an autopsy study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelen-Lee, Joo-Yeon; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Aronica, Eleonora; van de Beek, Diederik

    2018-01-01

    Background: Delayed cerebral thrombosis (DCT) is a devastating cerebrovascular complication in patients with excellent initial recovery of pneumococcal meningitis. The aetiology is unknown, but direct bacterial invasion, activation of coagulation or post-infectious immunoglobulin deposition has been

  1. Pneumococcal meningitis and endocarditis in an infant: possible improved survival with factor V Leiden mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Sitikant; Doulah, Assaf; Brown, Elspeth

    2017-10-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae infections continue to remain associated with high morbidity and mortality. Although the incidence of invasive meningeal and/or lung disease are not uncommon, Streptococcus pneumoniae endocarditis is rare especially in healthy pediatric population. New studies have suggested a strong association between factor V leiden (FVL) mutation and favorable outcomes in critically ill children. A healthy 10 month old presented with sepsis and meningeal signs, was later confirmed to have Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis and endocarditis. She was found to have factor V leiden mutation and made a complete recovery despite initial complications. Presence of factor V leiden mutation in critically ill children with severe septicaemia possibly contributes to better outcomes. What is known: • Mortality and morbidity remain high with invasive pneumococcal disease. • Pneumococcal endocarditis is rare in healthy pediatric population and results in significant morbidity and mortality What is new: • New studies have suggested a strong association between factor V leiden (FVL) mutation and favorable outcomes in critically ill children. • The presence of factor V mutation in children with extensive invasive pneumococcal disease possibly contributes to a better outcome.

  2. Pneumococcal Vaccination in High-Risk Individuals: Are We Doing It Right?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadatou, Ioanna; Spoulou, Vana

    2016-05-01

    Controversy exists regarding the optimal use of the 23-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine for the protection of high-risk individuals, such as children and adults with immunocompromising conditions and the elderly. The effectiveness and immunogenicity of 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) are limited in such high-risk populations compared to the healthy, with meta-analyses failing to provide robust evidence on vaccine efficacy against invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) or pneumonia. Moreover, several studies have demonstrated a PPV23-induced state of immune tolerance or hyporesponsiveness to subsequent vaccination, where the response to revaccination does not reach the levels achieved with primary vaccination. The clinical significance of hyporesponsiveness is not yet clarified, but attenuated humoral and cellular response could lead to reduced levels of protection and increased susceptibility to pneumococcal disease. As disease epidemiology among high-risk groups shows that we are still in need of maximum serotype coverage, the optimal use of PPV23 in the context of combined conjugate/polysaccharide vaccine schedules is an important priority. In this minireview, we discuss PPV23-induced hyporesponsiveness and its implications in designing highly effective vaccination schedules for the optimal protection for high-risk individuals. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. The role of television advertising in increasing pneumococcal vaccination coverage among the elderly, North Coast, New South Wales, 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Cate; Corben, Paul; Turahui, John; Gilmour, Robin

    2008-10-01

    North Coast Area Health Service (NCAHS) conducted a seven week television advertising campaign to raise community awareness of the availability of free adult pneumococcal vaccination and to increase coverage among North Coast residents in high risk groups. Effectiveness of the campaign was evaluated by examining vaccine ordering patterns of North Coast vaccination providers from 2005/2006 as a proxy for vaccination coverage. In the months during and immediately following (June-September 2006) the advertising campaign, a significantly higher proportion of vaccines were despatched to North Coast immunisation service providers. The advertising campaign was an effective strategy to promote vaccination among NCAHS residents not immunised in the first year of the National Pneumococcal Program for Older Australians. This higher immunisation coverage is expected to contribute to the statewide trend of significant reductions in invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) notifications.

  4. Herd immunity and serotype replacement 4 years after seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccination in England and Wales: an observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Elizabeth; Andrews, Nicholas J; Waight, Pauline A; Slack, Mary Pe; George, Robert C

    2011-10-01

    The seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) has reduced vaccine-type (VT) invasive pneumococcal disease but increases in non-vaccine-type (NVT) disease have varied between countries. We assess the effect of the PCV7 vaccination on VT and NVT disease in England and Wales. The study cohort was the population of England and Wales from July, 2000, to June, 2010. We calculated incidence rate ratios (IRRs) to compare incidences of VT and NVT disease before (2000-06) and after (2009-10) the introduction of PCV7. We used data from the national surveillance database. Cases included in our analysis were restricted to those confirmed by culture linked with isolates referred for serotyping at the national reference centre by laboratories in England and Wales. We adjusted for potential bias from missing data (serotype and age of patient) and changes in case ascertainment rates during the study period. 5809 cases of invasive pneumococcal disease were reported in 2009-10, giving an incidence of 10·6 per 100,000 population in 2009-10, which, when compared with the adjusted average annual incidence of 16·1 in 2000-06, gives an overall reduction of 34% (95% CI 28-39). VT disease decreased in all age groups, with reductions of 98% in individuals younger than 2 years and 81% in those aged 65 years or older. NVT disease increased by 68% in individuals younger than 2 years and 48% in those aged 65 years or older, giving an overall reduction in invasive pneumococcal disease of 56% in those younger than 2 years and 19% in those aged 65 years or older. After vaccine introduction, more NVT serotypes increased in frequency than decreased, which is consistent with vaccine-induced replacement. Key serotypes showing replacement were 7F, 19A, and 22F. Increases in NVT invasive pneumococcal disease were not associated with antimicrobial resistance. Despite much serotype replacement, a substantial reduction in invasive pneumococcal disease in young children can be achieved with PCV7

  5. Invasive Meningococcal Disease. Cuba, 1983- 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio E. Pérez

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Invasive Meningococcal Disease (IMD is a worldwide health problem. In Cuba, vaccination against meningococcal B-C has been carried out since 1989. The study aimed at describing the epidemiology of IMD in Cuba from 1983 to 2006 and at contributing to the immunization strategy. A descriptive and analytical study was carried out. Epidemiological data was obtained from the National Surveillance System at the Institute "Pedro Kourí". More than 1 000 cases were reported in 1986 and the overall incidence was above 10/100 000 inhabitants. Since 1989 a remarkable and continuous decline in the incidence was observed. In the last nine years a strong association of IMD to boarding school students (OR=9.4; confidence interval 95%: 5.1-17.4, recluses (OR=5.9; CI 95%: 1.5 -24.3 and day students (OR=3.9; CI 95%: 2.8-5.6 was observed. Housewife (OR=4.9; CI 95%: 1.9-12.4 and pensioned (OR=4.5; CI 95%: 1.2-16.8 showed association with mortality. Previous vaccination was a protective factor against morbidity (OR=0.6; CI 95%: 0.4-1.0 and mortality (OR=0.4; CI 95%: 0.2-0.9 by IMD. Neisseria meningitidis B4:P1.15 was the main circulating strain. Incidence of IMD declined markedly in Cuba by using group BC strain-specific meningococcal vaccine.

  6. Invasive meningococcal disease in children in Ireland, 2001-2011.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ó Maoldomhnaigh, Cilian

    2016-12-01

    In 1999, invasive meningococcal disease was hyperendemic in Ireland at 14.75\\/100 000 population, with 60% group B and 30% group C diseases. National sepsis guidelines and meningococcal C vaccines were introduced in 2000. Despite a spontaneous decline in group B infection, invasive meningococcal disease remains a leading cause of sepsis. This study characterises the epidemiology of invasive meningococcal disease in children in Ireland since the introduction of meningococcal C vaccine and reviews its clinical presentation, hospital course and outcome in anticipation of meningococcal B vaccine introduction.

  7. Enhanced Determination of Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotypes Associated with Invasive Disease in Laos by Using a Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction Serotyping Assay with Cerebrospinal Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Catrin E.; Sengduangphachanh, Amphone; Thaojaikong, Thaksinaporn; Sirisouk, Joy; Foster, Dona; Phetsouvanh, Rattanaphone; McGee, Lesley; Crook, Derrick W.; Newton, Paul N.; Peacock, Sharon J.

    2010-01-01

    A prospective hospital-based study was undertaken to define the incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) and circulating serotypes in Laos. Of 10,799 patients with hemocultures and 353 patients with cerebrospinal fluid samples, 0.21% and 5.4%, respectively, were positive for Streptococcus pneumoniae, giving a total of 35 IPD patients. We developed a real-time polymerase chain reaction to detect serotypes represented in the 13-valent pneumococcal vaccine. A blinded evaluation comparing serotype as defined by the Quellung reaction versus the polymerase chain reaction demonstrated 100% concordance. The most frequent serotype (n = 33 patients) was 1 (n = 6), followed by serotypes 5, 6A/B/C, 14, and 23F. Serotypes represented in the 7-valent polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccine (PCV-7) infected 39% of patients, with 73% coverage for the PCV-10 and PCV-13 vaccines. Although the sample size is small, these data suggest that the PCV-7 vaccine may have relatively low efficacy in Laos. Further studies are urgently needed to guide pneumococcal vaccine policy in Laos. PMID:20810803

  8. Emergence of Invasive Haemophilus influenzae Type A Disease in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giufrè, Maria; Cardines, Rita; Brigante, Gioconda; Orecchioni, Francesca; Cerquetti, Marina

    2017-06-01

    We report on the first detection of 2 cases of invasive Haemophilus influenzae type a (Hia) disease in Italy. The cases were sustained by the same Hia "strain" belonging to the ST23 clone that has previously been reported only outside Europe. The emergence of invasive Hia disease is of concern. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Childhood pneumococcal disease burden in Argentina Carga por enfermedad neumocócica en niños de Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Ariel Augustovski

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To understand the disease burden of pneumococcal disease (PD, a major cause of childhood morbidity and mortality in Argentina, and to draw a baseline against which the need for and effectiveness of vaccination with pneumococcal conjugate vaccines might be measured. METHODS: A Markov model was constructed to estimate incidence and mortality rates of PD-meningitis (MEN, bacteremia/septicemia (BACT, pneumonia (PNEU, acute otitis media (AOM-among a hypothetical, birth cohort of 750 000 Argentine infants born in 2006-2015. A systematic review of the literature was performed to select and incorporate input parameters. Life years and costs in 2006 US$ were expressed as both undiscounted and discounted. RESULTS: The number of PD episodes estimated to occur over a 10-year period in the hypothetical birth cohort were: MEN, 225; BACT, 2 841; PNEU, 2 628; and AOM, 2 066 719. Chronic sequelae of MEN could be expected to cause neurological damage in 43 children and severe hearing issues in 28. Results indicate that there would be 78 PD-related deaths in the cohort (29% due to MEN; 54%, BACT; and 17%, PNEU. The undiscounted life-expectancy for individuals in the birth cohort was estimated to be 72.4 years (29.0 years discounted. Mean, undiscounted, lifetime costs attributed to PD for each child of the cohort totaled US$ 167 (US$ 151 discounted, imposing a total, cohort cost-burden of more than US$ 126 million (US$ 113 million discounted. CONCLUSIONS: The study shows that PD imposes a significant health and economic burden on the Argentine population. This information is essential for assessing the potential health and economic impact of introducing pneumococcal conjugate vaccine into the national immunization schedule.OBJETIVOS: Analizar la carga que provoca la enfermedad neumocócica (EN, una importante causa de morbimortalidad infantil en Argentina y establecer una línea de base a partir de la cual se pueda medir la necesidad y la eficacia del

  10. Invasive Group A Streptococcal Disease. National Epidemiology and Genetic Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlaminckx, B.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Infections with group A streptococci (GAS), or S. pyogenes, range from mild and superficial to very severe and lethal invasive disease. In severe invasive GAS infections, hypotension and multiorgan failure may develop rapidly resulting in the development of toxic shock-like syndrome (TSS). In the

  11. Trivalent pneumococcal protein vaccine protects against experimental acute otitis media caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae in an infant murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qingfu; Pryharski, Karin; Pichichero, Michael E

    2017-01-05

    Currently licensed serotype-based pneumococcal vaccines are effective in preventing invasive pneumococcal diseases, but less effective in preventing non-bacteremic pneumonia and acute otitis media (AOM). We previously reported that a trivalent pneumococcal protein recombinant vaccine (PPrV) protected against pneumonia in a murine model. Here we evaluated PPrV protection against AOM in an infant murine model. C57BL/6J mice were intramuscularly vaccinated at 1-3weeks of age with monovalent pneumococcal histidine triad protein D (PhtD), or pneumococcal choline binding protein A (PcpA), or detoxified pneumolysin (PlyD1), or trivalent vaccine, and transtympanically challenged at 7-8weeks of age with 1×10 2 CFU of pneumococcal strain BG7322 (6A) or 1×10 4 CFU of pneumococcal nontypeable strain 0702064MEF. Serum IgG titers were determined by ELISA. At 24 and 48h post infection (hpi), animals were sacrificed and middle ear fluid (MEF) samples were collected to determine pneumococcal CFUs. We found that vaccination of infant mice with monovalent and trivalent pneumococcal proteins elicited significant serum IgG antibody responses to corresponding component proteins. Vaccination with PhtD reduced BG7322 bacterial burdens in MEF at both 24 (p=0.05) and 48hpi (p=0.16). Vaccination with PcpA significantly reduced the bacterial burdens in MEF at both 24 (p=0.02) and 48hpi (p=0.004), and PlyD1 significantly reduced bacterial burden in MEF at 48hpi (p=0.02). Vaccination with trivalent PPrV (PhtD, PcpA and PlyD1) significantly reduced Spn burdens in MEF at both 24 (p=0.001) and 48hpi (panimals were challenged with a non-typeable Spn strain. Vaccinated mice had significantly milder inflammatory cytokine levels (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, MIP-2 and KC) in middle ears at 24hpi (all p values<0.05). Trivalent PPrV confers protection against pneumococcal AOM in an infant murine model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Pneumococcal Vaccination Among Medicare Beneficiaries Occurring After the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices Recommendation for Routine Use Of 13-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine and 23-Valent Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine for Adults Aged ≥65 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Carla L; Williams, Walter W; Warnock, Rob; Pilishvili, Tamara; Kim, David; Kelman, Jeffrey A

    2017-07-14

    On September 19, 2014, CDC published the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommendation for the routine use of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) among adults aged ≥65 years, to be used in series with 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23) (1). This replaced the previous recommendation that adults aged ≥65 years should be vaccinated with a single dose of PPSV23. As a proxy for estimating PCV13 and PPSV23 vaccination coverage among adults aged ≥65 years before and after implementation of these revised recommendations, CDC analyzed claims for vaccination submitted for reimbursement to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS). Claims from any time during a beneficiary's enrollment in Medicare Parts A (hospital insurance) and B (medical insurance) since reaching age 65 years were assessed among beneficiaries continuously enrolled in Medicare Parts A and B during annual periods from September 19, 2009, through September 18, 2016. By September 18, 2016, 43.2% of Medicare beneficiaries aged ≥65 years had claims for at least 1 dose of PPSV23 (regardless of PCV13 status), 31.5% had claims for at least 1 dose of PCV13 (regardless of PPSV23 status), and 18.3% had claims for at least 1 dose each of PCV13 and PPSV23. Claims for either type of pneumococcal vaccine were highest among beneficiaries who were older, white, or with chronic and immunocompromising medical conditions than among healthy adults. Implementation of the National Vaccine Advisory Committee's standards for adult immunization practice to assess vaccination status at every patient encounter, recommend needed vaccines, and administer vaccination or refer to a vaccinating provider might help increase pneumococcal vaccination coverage and reduce the risk for pneumonia and invasive pneumococcal disease among older adults (2).

  13. Extracellular matrix formation enhances the ability of Streptococcus pneumoniae to cause invasive disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Trappetti

    Full Text Available During infection, pneumococci exist mainly in sessile biofilms rather than in planktonic form, except during sepsis. However, relatively little is known about how biofilms contribute to pneumococcal pathogenesis. Here, we carried out a biofilm assay on opaque and transparent variants of a clinical serotype 19F strain WCH159. After 4 days incubation, scanning electron microscopy revealed that opaque biofilm bacteria produced an extracellular matrix, whereas the transparent variant did not. The opaque biofilm-derived bacteria translocated from the nasopharynx to the lungs and brain of mice, and showed 100-fold greater in vitro adherence to A549 cells than transparent bacteria. Microarray analysis of planktonic and sessile bacteria from transparent and opaque variants showed differential gene expression in two operons: the lic operon, which is involved in choline uptake, and in the two-component system, ciaRH. Mutants of these genes did not form an extracellular matrix, could not translocate from the nasopharynx to the lungs or the brain, and adhered poorly to A549 cells. We conclude that only the opaque phenotype is able to form extracellular matrix, and that the lic operon and ciaRH contribute to this process. We propose that during infection, extracellular matrix formation enhances the ability of pneumococci to cause invasive disease.

  14. [Anti-pneumococcal vaccine coverage for hospitalized risk patients: Assessment and suggestions for improvements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, C; Le Garlantezec, P; Lamand, V; Rasamijao, V; Rapp, C

    2016-05-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae can cause invasive infections. Incidence and severity are linked to patients' risk factors. Due to the resistance to leading antibiotics, the anti-pneumococcal vaccination has become a major public health issue. The purpose of this survey was to evaluate the anti-pneumococcal vaccine coverage in a population of adults with risk factors. This was a prospective study that included patients with at least one recommendation for pneumococcal vaccination as indicated by the Weekly Epidemiological Bulletin (BEH), to which three further US recommendations were added (diabetes, obesity and age>65years). One hundred and thirty-four patients with an average age of 70 years were included. The physician could only confirm 68 % of the patients' vaccination status. Vaccination coverage as recommended by the BEH board was 30 % (n=54). All HIV patients were vaccinated (n=2) and the vaccination coverage was 75 % (n=8) for patients treated for autoimmune diseases and only 10 % (n=20) for patients treated with chemotherapy. Patients with no vaccination didn't know the existence of the vaccine or didn't know that vaccination was recommended to them. This study has highlighted a deficit in pneumococcal vaccination coverage and a high level of ignorance of the existence of recommended vaccination. In addition to awareness campaign for patients and caregiver training, the expansion of the vaccine e-book utilization could improve the vaccination status. Copyright © 2015 Académie Nationale de Pharmacie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Vaccination for the control of childhood bacterial pneumonia - Haemophilus influenzae type b and pneumococcal vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana C Otczyk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumonia in childhood is endemic in large parts of the world and in particular, in developing countries, as well as in many indigenous communities within developed nations. Haemophilus influenzae type b and Streptococcus pneumoniae conjugate vaccines are currently available against the leading bacterial causes of pneumonia.  The use of the vaccines in both industrialised and developing countries have shown a dramatic reduction in the burden of pneumonia and invasive disease in children.  However, the greatest threat facing pneumococcal conjugate vaccine effectiveness is serotype replacement.  The current vaccines provide serotype-specific, antibody–mediated protection against only a few of the 90+ capsule serotypes.  Therefore, there has been a focus in recent years to rapidly advance technologies that will result in broader disease coverage and more affordable vaccines that can be used in developing countries.  The next generation of pneumococcal vaccines have advanced to clinical trials.

  16. Early impact of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine on pneumococcal meningitis-Burkina Faso, 2014-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambiré, Dinanibè; Soeters, Heidi M; Ouédraogo-Traoré, Rasmata; Medah, Isaïe; Sangaré, Lassana; Yaméogo, Issaka; Sawadogo, Guetawendé; Ouédraogo, Abdoul-Salam; Ouangraoua, Soumeya; McGee, Lesley; Srinivasan, Velusamy; Aké, Flavien; Congo-Ouédraogo, Malika; Ky Ba, Absatou; Whitney, Cynthia G; Novak, Ryan T; Van Beneden, Chris

    2018-03-01

    We evaluate early impact of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) on pneumococcal meningitis in Burkina Faso. Nationwide surveillance gathered demographic/clinical information and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) results for meningitis cases. Pneumococcal cases were confirmed by culture, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), or latex agglutination, and strains serotyped using PCR. We compared incidence (cases per 100,000) in the early post-PCV13 period (2014 and 2015) to average pre-PCV13 incidence (2011-2013). In 2015, age-specific pneumococcal meningitis incidences were 8.7 (disease in older children and adults requires continued monitoring. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Nasopharyngeal Pneumococcal Colonization and Impact of a Single Dose of 13-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine in Indian Children With HIV and Their Unvaccinated Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Bikas K; Bhattacharya, Sangeeta Das; Sutcliffe, Catherine G; Ganaie, Feroze; Bhaskar, Arun; Bhattacharyya, Subhasish; Niyogi, Swapan Kumar; Moss, William J; Panda, Samiran; Ravikumar, Kadahalli Lingegowda; Das, Ranjan Saurav; Mandal, Sutapa

    2018-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection increases risk of invasive disease from Streptococcus pneumoniae. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV) prevent invasive disease and acquisition of vaccine type (VT) pneumococcus in the nasopharynx. To look at the safety and impact of one dose of PCV13 on acquisition of VT pneumococcal carriage in Indian children with HIV. We conducted a cohort study in families of HIV-infected children (CLH) and families of HIV-uninfected children (HUC) in West Bengal. All children received one dose of PCV13. Nasopharyngeal swabs were collected from children and parents at baseline and 2 months after vaccination. One hundred and fifteen CLH and 47 HUC received one dose of PCV13. Fifty-eight percent of CLH were on antiretroviral therapy (ART), and the median nadir CD4 count was 287. There were no significant adverse events in either group. HUC had more VT colonization than CLH-55% versus 23% of all pneumococcal isolates. HIV infection doubled the risk of nonvaccine serotype colonization (P = 0.03). There was no difference in acquisition of VT isolates in CLH (4.4%) and HUC (4.5%) post-PCV13; however, older CLH (>5 years) had decreased clearance of VT strains. ART made no difference in pneumococcal colonization at baseline or after PCV13; however, CLH with higher nadir CD4 counts before starting ART were less likely to have VT colonization post-PCV13 (prevalence ratio, 0.2; 95% confidence interval: 0.1-0.5). While there was no difference in acquisition of VT nasopharyngeal carriage of pneumococcus in CLH and HUC after one dose of PCV13, earlier access to ART may impact response to PCV13 in CLH.

  18. [Health economic evaluation of a 23 value pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccination pilot programme among elderly chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Y P; Zhao, K; Li, X; Shi, L W; Guo, W D; Qi, X R; Sui, B Y; Zhou, R M

    2016-12-06

    Objective: From the perspective of health economics, to evaluate 23 pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccination programme among chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patient. Methods: In the pilot counties of the project of integrated care pathway for COPD patient (Hanbin district of Hanzhong city in Shanxi Province, Qianjian district of Qingqing city, Huandao district of Qindao city in Shangdong Province, Wen county of Jiaozuo city in Henan Province), information of insurance participants of New Rural Cooperative Medical System (NRCS) was collected by local NRCM information system, which included general information as well as records of medical care and medical fee. Nonprobability sampling method was applied to select a total of 860 objects, who were over 60 years old with local household registration, hospitalized within one recent year due to COPD acute exacerbation, and without vaccination of 23 voluntary pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine within 3 years. A quasi-experimental design without control group was adopted. Objects were vaccinated with 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine from January to December in 2013, then were followed up from January in 2014 for one year. Data of effectiveness and medical cost was collected by self-designed questionnaire and (Chinese version). Paired rank sum test applied to test the difference of quality of life, number and direct medical cost of treatment (including outpatient treatment and hospitalization) due to COPD acute exacerbation, one year before and after intervention. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) and cost-benefit ratio (CBR) of the programme were calculated. Results: By January 2014, eight hundred sixty objects were vaccinated. By January 2015, seven hundred eighty eight objects were followed up, with 72 cases withdrawed (8.4%). On average, COPD patients reduced 1.12±2.51 treatments due to acute exacerbation, including 0.28±2.09 outpatient treatments and 0.85±1.15 hospitalizations

  19. Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype-2 childhood meningitis in Bangladesh: a newly recognized pneumococcal infection threat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir K Saha

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of meningitis in countries where pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV targeting commonly occurring serotypes are not routinely used. However, effectiveness of PCV would be jeopardized by emergence of invasive pneumococcal diseases (IPD caused by serotypes which are not included in PCV. Systematic hospital based surveillance in Bangladesh was established and progressively improved to determine the pathogens causing childhood sepsis and meningitis. This also provided the foundation for determining the spectrum of serotypes causing IPD. This article reports an unprecedented upsurge of serotype 2, an uncommon pneumococcal serotype, without any known intervention. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Cases with suspected IPD had blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF collected from the beginning of 2001 till 2009. Pneumococcal serotypes were determined by capsular swelling of isolates or PCR of culture-negative CSF specimens. Multicenter national surveillance, expanded from 2004, identified 45,437 patients with suspected bacteremia who were blood cultured and 10,618 suspected meningitis cases who had a lumber puncture. Pneumococcus accounted for 230 culture positive cases of meningitis in children <5 years. Serotype-2 was the leading cause of pneumococcal meningitis, accounting for 20.4% (45/221; 95% CI 15%-26% of cases. Ninety eight percent (45/46 of these serotype-2 strains were isolated from meningitis cases, yielding the highest serotype-specific odds ratio for meningitis (29.6; 95% CI 3.4-256.3. The serotype-2 strains had three closely related pulsed field gel electrophoresis types. CONCLUSIONS: S. pneumoniae serotype-2 was found to possess an unusually high potential for causing meningitis and was the leading serotype-specific cause of childhood meningitis in Bangladesh over the past decade. Persisting disease occurrence or progressive spread would represent a major potential infection threat since serotype-2

  20. Minimally Invasive Management of Acute Biliary Tract Disease during Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Tomás Chiappetta Porras

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Acute biliary diseases during pregnancy have been classically managed conservatively. Advances in minimally invasive surgery and the high recurrence rate of symptoms observed changed this management. Methods. This is a prospective observational study. Initial management was medical. Unresponsive patients were treated with minimally invasive techniques including gallbladder percutaneous aspiration or cholecystostomy, endoscopic retrograde cholangiography, and laparoscopic cholecystectomy, depending on the pregnancy trimester and underlying diagnosis. Results. 122 patients were admitted. 69 (56.5% were unresponsive to medical treatment. Recurrent gallbladder colic was the most frequent indication for minimally invasive intervention, followed by acute cholecystitis, choledocholithiasis, and acute biliary pancreatitis. 8 patients were treated during the first trimester, 54 during the second, and 7 during the last trimester. There was no fetal morbidity or mortality. Maternal morbidity was minor with no mortality. Conclusion. Acute biliary tract diseases during pregnancy may be safely treated with minimally invasive procedures according to the underlying diagnosis and to the trimester of pregnancy.

  1. Dominance of multidrug-resistant Denmark(14)-32 (ST230) clone among Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 19A isolates causing pneumococcal disease in Bulgaria from 1992 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setchanova, Lena Petrova; Alexandrova, Alexandra; Dacheva, Daniela; Mitov, Ivan; Kaneva, Radka; Mitev, Vanio

    2015-02-01

    A pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV10) was introduced in Bulgarian national immunization program since April 2010. Clonal composition based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing genotyping of 52 serotype 19A Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates was analyzed. These were invasive and respiratory isolates collected between 1992 and 2013 from both children (78.8% clone. The most frequent sequence type (ST) was ST230 (48.1%) and together with four other closely related STs (15.4%), belonging to ST1611, ST276, ST7466, and ST2013, which were single- and double-locus variants; they were included in the main CC230. The disappearance of highly drug-resistant ST663 clone and emergence of new clones as CC320 and CC199 was also observed among the rest 19A isolates. A comparison of clonal composition between invasive and noninvasive isolates did not show a great genetic diversity among both kinds of isolates. Continuous surveillance of serotype 19A population following the introduction of PCV10 is essential to evaluate the impact of the vaccine on the epidemiology of this serotype.

  2. [Invasive mould disease in haematological patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Camps, Isabel; Jarque, Isidro

    2014-01-01

    Invasive mould infections (IMI) are a persistent problem with high morbidity and mortality rates among patients receiving chemotherapy for hematological malignancies and hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. Management of IMI in this setting has become increasingly complex with the advent of new antifungal agents and diagnostic tests, which have resulted in different therapeutic strategies (prophylactic, empirical, pre-emptive, and directed). A proper assessment of the individual risk for IMI appears to be critical in order to use the best prophylactic and therapeutic approach and increase the survival rates. Among the available antifungal drugs, the most frequently used in the hematologic patient are fluconazole, mould-active azoles (itraconazole, posaconazole and voriconazole), candins (anidulafungin, caspofungin and micafungin), and lipid formulations of amphotericin B. Specific recommendations for their use, and criteria for selecting the antifungal agents are discussed in this paper. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Espana.

  3. Retrospective economic evaluation of childhood 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccination in Australia: Uncertain herd impact on pneumonia critical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newall, A T; Reyes, J F; McIntyre, P; Menzies, R; Beutels, P; Wood, J G

    2016-01-12

    Retrospective cost-effectiveness analyses of vaccination programs using routinely collected post-implementation data are sparse by comparison with pre-program analyses. We performed a retrospective economic evaluation of the childhood 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) program in Australia. We developed a deterministic multi-compartment model that describes health states related to invasive and non-invasive pneumococcal disease. Costs (Australian dollars, A$) and health effects (quality-adjusted life years, QALYs) were attached to model states. The perspective for costs was that of the healthcare system and government. Where possible, we used observed changes in the disease rates from national surveillance and healthcare databases to estimate the impact of the PCV7 program (2005-2010). We stratified our cost-effectiveness results into alternative scenarios which differed by the outcome states included. Parameter uncertainty was explored using probabilistic sensitivity analysis. The PCV7 program was estimated to have prevented ∼5900 hospitalisations and ∼160 deaths from invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). Approximately half of these were prevented in adults via herd protection. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was ∼A$161,000 per QALY gained when including only IPD-related outcomes. The cost-effectiveness of PCV7 remained in the range A$88,000-$122,000 when changes in various non-invasive disease states were included. The inclusion of observed changes in adult non-invasive pneumonia deaths substantially improved cost-effectiveness (∼A$9000 per QALY gained). Using the initial vaccine price negotiated for Australia, the PCV7 program was unlikely to have been cost-effective (at conventional thresholds) unless observed reductions in non-invasive pneumonia deaths in the elderly are attributed to it. Further analyses are required to explore this finding, which has significant implications for the incremental benefit achievable by adult PCV

  4. Fluoroquinolone-nonsusceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from a medical center in the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Hang Chen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Purpose: Streptococcus pneumoniae is one of the most common pathogens to cause mucosal and invasive infection in humans. Resistance to fluoroquinolones (FQ is associated with clinical failure when treating pneumococcal diseases and increase of mortality. Methods: We collected clinical isolates of S. pneumoniae from January 2011 to July 2015 at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan. Susceptibility to FQ was examined by disk diffusion method. Levofloxacin or moxifloxacin-nonsusceptible S. pneumoniae isolates were analyzed by serotyping, multilocus sequence typing, and sequencing of the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs of gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE. Results: During the study period, 42 FQ-nonsusceptible pneumococcal isolates were identified. The rate increased from 1.6% of total pneumococcal isolates (2 of 127 in 2011 to 4.6% (13 of 283 in 2014, then decreased to 1.5% (3 of 202 in the first half of 2015. These isolates belonged to 13 serotypes, and serotype 14 (12 of 42, 33.3% was the most prevalent. Most of the isolates belonged to international clones or their variants. After QRDR analysis, there were 19 isolates in five clusters that shared both the same sequence type and QRDR mutation. Conclusions: FQ resistance initially emerged in either vaccine or nonvaccine serotypes. The majority of isolates were international clones or related variants, suggesting that resistance was disseminated through clonal spread. The wide use of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine since 2013 appears to have reduced the spread of FQ-nonsusceptible pneumococci. Keywords: Fluoroquinolone, resistance, Streptococcus pneumoniae, pneumococcal conjugate vaccine

  5. Vaccine escape recombinants emerge after pneumococcal vaccination in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brueggemann, Angela B; Pai, Rekha; Crook, Derrick W; Beall, Bernard

    2007-11-01

    The heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was introduced in the United States (US) in 2000 and has significantly reduced invasive pneumococcal disease; however, the incidence of nonvaccine serotype invasive disease, particularly due to serotype 19A, has increased. The serotype 19A increase can be explained in part by expansion of a genotype that has been circulating in the US prior to vaccine implementation (and other countries since at least 1990), but also by the emergence of a novel "vaccine escape recombinant" pneumococcal strain. This strain has a genotype that previously was only associated with vaccine serotype 4, but now expresses a nonvaccine serotype 19A capsule. Based on prior evidence for capsular switching by recombination at the capsular locus, the genetic event that resulted in this novel serotype/genotype combination might be identifiable from the DNA sequence of individual pneumococcal strains. Therefore, the aim of this study was to characterise the putative recombinational event(s) at the capsular locus that resulted in the change from a vaccine to a nonvaccine capsular type. Sequencing the capsular locus flanking regions of 51 vaccine escape (progeny), recipient, and putative donor pneumococci revealed a 39 kb recombinational fragment, which included the capsular locus, flanking regions, and two adjacent penicillin-binding proteins, and thus resulted in a capsular switch and penicillin nonsusceptibility in a single genetic event. Since 2003, 37 such vaccine escape strains have been detected, some of which had evolved further. Furthermore, two new types of serotype 19A vaccine escape strains emerged in 2005. To our knowledge, this is the first time a single recombinational event has been documented in vivo that resulted in both a change of serotype and penicillin nonsusceptibility. Vaccine escape by genetic recombination at the capsular locus has the potential to reduce PCV7 effectiveness in the longer term.

  6. The effect of age on the response to the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahm Moon H

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the elderly. To prevent invasive pneumococcal diseases, the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV is recommended in subjects over 65 years of age. Although it has been reported to provide approximately 50-80% protection against invasive disease in the general elderly population, there is still controversy as to the effectiveness of the PPV in the elderly. Methods To evaluate the immune response to the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine in the elderly, samples from young adults and elderly were obtained before and one month after vaccination. The quantitative and qualitative response to the vaccine were measured by the ELISA and opsonophagocytic killing assay for eight vaccine type serotypes (4, 6B, 9V, 14, 18C, 19A, 19F, 23F and one vaccine-related serotype (6A. Results The response to the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine showed a similar response between adults and elderly when evaluated by the ELISA, however the functional activity of the antibodies elicited after vaccination were lower in the elderly group for more than half of the serotypes evaluated. In comparison of the antibody needed for 1:8 opsonic titer, more antibodies were needed in the elderly for serotypes Pn 4, 19F, 23F and 6A, suggesting the functional activity of antibody detected by the ELISA was lower in the elderly compared with the adult group for these serotypes. As for subjects with an opsonic titer Conclusions Although the amount of antibodies elicited were similar between the two age groups, distinct differences in function were noted. This report highlights the importance of a quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the immunogenic response to the PPV in the elderly age group. Trial registration This trial is registered with Clinical trials.gov. Registration number NCT00964769

  7. Vaccine escape recombinants emerge after pneumococcal vaccination in the United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela B Brueggemann

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7 was introduced in the United States (US in 2000 and has significantly reduced invasive pneumococcal disease; however, the incidence of nonvaccine serotype invasive disease, particularly due to serotype 19A, has increased. The serotype 19A increase can be explained in part by expansion of a genotype that has been circulating in the US prior to vaccine implementation (and other countries since at least 1990, but also by the emergence of a novel "vaccine escape recombinant" pneumococcal strain. This strain has a genotype that previously was only associated with vaccine serotype 4, but now expresses a nonvaccine serotype 19A capsule. Based on prior evidence for capsular switching by recombination at the capsular locus, the genetic event that resulted in this novel serotype/genotype combination might be identifiable from the DNA sequence of individual pneumococcal strains. Therefore, the aim of this study was to characterise the putative recombinational event(s at the capsular locus that resulted in the change from a vaccine to a nonvaccine capsular type. Sequencing the capsular locus flanking regions of 51 vaccine escape (progeny, recipient, and putative donor pneumococci revealed a 39 kb recombinational fragment, which included the capsular locus, flanking regions, and two adjacent penicillin-binding proteins, and thus resulted in a capsular switch and penicillin nonsusceptibility in a single genetic event. Since 2003, 37 such vaccine escape strains have been detected, some of which had evolved further. Furthermore, two new types of serotype 19A vaccine escape strains emerged in 2005. To our knowledge, this is the first time a single recombinational event has been documented in vivo that resulted in both a change of serotype and penicillin nonsusceptibility. Vaccine escape by genetic recombination at the capsular locus has the potential to reduce PCV7 effectiveness in the longer term.

  8. [Prophylaxis of Community-Acquired Pneumonia Outbreaks with Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine. Prospects Analysis for Russian Military Community].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guchev, I A; Klochkov, O I; Sinopalnikov, A I

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococcal pneumonia and other diseases caused by pneumococci still remain the main factors of high morbidity and mortality rates throughout the world. Pneumococci as the leading pathogens of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), acute otitis media and sinusitis also cause a number of other serious systemic disorders including invasive infections with high mortality in spite of the antimicrobial resistance status and adequate antimicrobials choice. Pneumococcal infections are responsible for 5-35% or more of community-acquired pneumonias. The burden of pneumonia (up to 100-200 per thousand) is recorded among military recruits in training centers. Since the specific environment of the soldiers could be carrected, their health protection requires medical surveillance. For these reasons, polysaccharide and more immunogenic conjugated pneumococcal vaccines were developed. There is now an urgent need to understand whether such vaccines are effective in military conscripts. Controversy about the effectiveness and value of the polysaccharide (PPV-23) vaccine as a CAP morbidity restriction measure still persists. There were implemented plenty of metaanalyses of pneumococcal vaccines in adults. Some of them showed that the vaccine was effective against bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia in 'low risk' healthy adults and elders. There have been a number of poor quality observational studies in Russia where 'all pneumonia cases' were considered as an endpoint. It remains controversial whether these observational studies provide adequate evidence to justify the use of the polysaccharide vaccine in the groups of healthy young men for whom it is being advocated. In our analysis we found weak evidence supporting pneumococcal vaccination with PPV-23 for this group. Nevertheless, favorable tendency was found to immunize. It is the reason for a trail to find pharmacoepidemiological support for vaccination by novel conjugated vaccines with better immunogenicity.

  9. Invasive Disease Caused by Nontypeable Haemophilus Influenzae

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-11-12

    Dr. Elizabeth Briere discusses Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae which causes a variety of infections in children and adults.  Created: 11/12/2015 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 11/17/2015.

  10. Pneumococcal Vaccines (PCV, PPSV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Educators Search English Español Your Child's Immunizations: Pneumococcal Vaccines (PCV, PPSV) KidsHealth / For Parents / Your Child's Immunizations: ... cochlear implants. Why Are the PCV and PPSV Vaccines Recommended? Children younger than 2 years old, adults ...

  11. Preventing invasive Group B Streptococcus (GBS) disease in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    9 No. 3 has been successfully used for the prevention of tetanus, influenza and pertussis in infants.[11] A trivalent GBS polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccine (against serotypes Ia, Ib and III) has completed phase-II evaluation among pregnant women and has the potential to prevent 70 - 80% of all invasive GBS disease.

  12. Predictors of pneumococcal vaccination uptake in hospitalized patients aged 65 years and over shortly following the commencement of a publicly funded national pneumococcal vaccination program in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridda, Iman; MacIntyre, Raina C; Lindley, Richard I; McIntyre, Peter B; Sullivan, John; Gilbert, Gwendolyn; Kovoor, Pramesh; Manolios, Nicholas; Fox, John

    2007-01-01

    In January 2005, Australia became the first country to introduce a publicly funded pneumococcal vaccination program for persons 65 years and older which is free at point of service, although the vaccine cost had previously been partially subsidized. Hospitalization in this age group is an important indicator of risk of invasive pneumococcal disease but vaccine uptake has been suboptimal. To determine vaccination rates and predictors of vaccination in the elderly hospitalised patients before and after January 2005. We validated vaccination status against general practitioner (GP) records for patients aged > or = 65 years admitted to a large teaching hospital in Sydney between 16th of May 2005 and the 20th of February 2006 and examined predictors of vaccination. Commencement of the new program resulted in a significant increase in vaccination uptake from 39% of inpatients prior to the free program to 73% in the same cohort of inpatients post January 2005. We found that patient recall of vaccination status was not reliable. Self-report of pneumococcal vaccination had a sensitivity of 0.53 and a specificity of 0.55, highlighting that validation of vaccination status is required. Age over 80 years and dementia significantly predicted under-vaccination. This highlights the importance of integrating free vaccine supply and delivery in primary care to achieve high vaccination coverage. However, demented patients and the very elderly remain under-vaccinated, despite being admitted to hospital for active management of acute conditions.

  13. Monitoring the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines into West Africa: design and implementation of a population-based surveillance system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant A Mackenzie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Routine use of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs in developing countries is expected to lead to a significant reduction in childhood deaths. However, PCVs have been associated with replacement disease with non-vaccine serotypes. We established a population-based surveillance system to document the direct and indirect impact of PCVs on the incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD and radiological pneumonia in those aged 2 months and older in The Gambia, and to monitor changes in serotype-specific IPD. Here we describe how this surveillance system was set up and is being operated as a partnership between the Medical Research Council Unit and the Gambian Government. This surveillance system is expected to provide crucial information for immunisation policy and serves as a potential model for those introducing routine PCV vaccination in diverse settings.

  14. Epidemiology of Invasive Haemophilus influenzae Disease, Europe, 2007-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Robert; Economopoulou, Assimoula; Dias, Joana Gomes; Bancroft, Elizabeth; Ramliden, Miriam; Celentano, Lucia Pastore

    2017-03-01

    We describe the epidemiology of invasive Haemophilus influenzae disease during 2007-2014 in 12 European countries and assess overall H. influenzae disease trends by serotype and patient age. Mean annual notification rate was 0.6 cases/100,000 population, with an increasing annual trend of 3.3% (95% CI 2.3% to 4.3%). The notification rate was highest for patients influenzae (NTHi) caused 78% of all cases and showed increasing trends among persons 20 years of age. Serotype f cases showed an increasing trend among persons >60 years of age. Serotype b cases showed decreasing trends among persons 1-5 months, 1-4 years, and >40 years of age. Sustained success of routine H. influenzae serotype b vaccination is evident. Surveillance systems must adopt a broad focus for invasive H. influenzae disease. Increasing reports of NTHi, particularly among neonates, highlight the potential benefit of a vaccine against NTHi.

  15. Epidemiology of Invasive Haemophilus influenzae Disease, Europe, 2007–2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economopoulou, Assimoula; Dias, Joana Gomes; Bancroft, Elizabeth; Ramliden, Miriam; Celentano, Lucia Pastore

    2017-01-01

    We describe the epidemiology of invasive Haemophilus influenzae disease during 2007–2014 in 12 European countries and assess overall H. influenzae disease trends by serotype and patient age. Mean annual notification rate was 0.6 cases/100,000 population, with an increasing annual trend of 3.3% (95% CI 2.3% to 4.3%). The notification rate was highest for patients influenzae (NTHi) caused 78% of all cases and showed increasing trends among persons 20 years of age. Serotype f cases showed an increasing trend among persons >60 years of age. Serotype b cases showed decreasing trends among persons 1–5 months, 1–4 years, and >40 years of age. Sustained success of routine H. influenzae serotype b vaccination is evident. Surveillance systems must adopt a broad focus for invasive H. influenzae disease. Increasing reports of NTHi, particularly among neonates, highlight the potential benefit of a vaccine against NTHi. PMID:28220749

  16. Pneumococcal disease and vaccination in the Americas: an agenda for accelerated vaccine introduction Enfermedad neumocócica y vacunación antineumocócica en las Américas: programa de acción para la introducción acelerada de una vacuna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Garcia

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available This piece summarizes the presentations and discussions at a meeting on pneumococcal disease surveillance in the Americas that was held in Mexico City, Mexico, on 2 November 2004. This meeting was organized by the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO and the Pneumococcal Vaccines Accelerated Development and Introduction Plan (PneumoADIP of the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization (GAVI. The meeting participants reviewed the status of pneumococcal disease surveillance in the Region of the Americas, estimates of the burden of pneumococcal disease, the distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes that cause invasive disease, the status of pneumococcal vaccine introduction, health economic analyses, and financial issues related to vaccine introduction. The meeting participants also worked to identify the next steps for generating the critical information needed to help make decisions on pneumococcal vaccine introduction. Coordinated pneumococcal disease surveillance for the Region of the Americas dates back to the 1993 establishment by PAHO of the Regional System for Vaccines (RSV project for surveillance of bacterial meningitis and pneumonia, including pneumococcal disease. Surveillance data from the RSV indicate that the distribution of major serotypes in the Americas has been stable over time (but that antibiotic resistance is increasing, with serotype 14 being the leading serotype isolated in most countries participating in RSV. Based on local serotype data from six of the RSV countries (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, and Uruguay, the 7-valent vaccine would cover 65% of serotypes, the 9-valent vaccine would cover 77%, and the 11-valent vaccine would cover 83%.Este trabajo resume las presentaciones y los debates que hubo en una reunión sobre la vigilancia de las enfermedades neumocócicas en las Américas, celebrada en la ciudad de México, México, el 2 de noviembre de 2004. La reunión la habían organizado la

  17. PavA of Streptococcus pneumoniae Modulates Adherence, Invasion, and Meningeal Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Pracht, Daniela; Elm, Christine; Gerber, Joachim; Bergmann, Simone; Rohde, Manfred; Seiler, Marleen; Kim, Kwang S.; Jenkinson, Howard F.; Nau, Roland; Hammerschmidt, Sven

    2005-01-01

    Pneumococcal adherence and virulence factor A (PavA) is displayed to the cell outer surface of Streptococcus pneumoniae and mediates pneumococcal binding to immobilized fibronectin. PavA, which lacks a typical gram-positive signal sequence and cell surface anchorage motif, is essential for pneumococcal virulence in a mouse infection model of septicemia. In this report the impact of PavA on pneumococcal adhesion to and invasion of eukaryotic cells and on experimental pneumococcal meningitis wa...

  18. A Perspective on Invasive Salmonella Disease in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crump, John A; Heyderman, Robert S

    2015-11-01

    Salmonella enterica is a leading cause of community-acquired bloodstream infection in Africa. The contribution of typhoidal and nontyphoidal Salmonella serovars to invasive disease varies considerably in place and time, even within the same country. Nonetheless, many African countries are now thought to experience typhoid fever incidence >100 per 100,000 per year with approximately 1% of patients dying. Invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (iNTS) disease was estimated to cause 3.4 million illnesses and 681 316 deaths in 2010, with the most disease in Africa. Antimicrobial drug resistance is a growing problem in S. enterica that threatens to further compromise patient outcomes. Reservoirs for nontyphoidal Salmonella and the predominant routes of transmission for typhoidal and nontyphoidal Salmonella are not well understood in Africa, hampering the design of evidence-based, non-vaccine- and vaccine-based prevention measures. It is difficult to distinguish clinically invasive Salmonella disease from febrile illnesses caused by other pathogens. Blood cultures are the mainstay of laboratory diagnosis, but lack sensitivity due to the low magnitude of bacteremia, do not produce results at point of care, and are not widely available in Africa. Serologic approaches to diagnosis remain inaccurate, and nucleic acid amplification tests are also compromised by low concentrations of bacteria. High-throughput whole-genome sequencing, together with a range of novel analytic pipelines, has provided new insights into the complex pattern of epidemiology, pathogenesis, and host adaptation. Concerted efforts are therefore needed to apply these new tools in the context of high-quality field surveillance to improve diagnosis, patient management, control, and prevention of invasive Salmonella infections in Africa. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Evaluating the costs of pneumococcal disease in selected Latin American countries Evaluación de los costos de la enfermedad neumocócica en países seleccionados de América Latina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagna Constenla

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To estimate the costs of pneumococcal disease in Brazil, Chile and Uruguay, to describe how these costs vary between different patient groups, and to discuss factors that affect these cost variations. METHODS: The cost of pneumococcal disease was estimated from the health care perspective. For each country, baseline cost estimates were primarily developed using health resources information from patient-level data and facility-specific cost data. A regression model was constructed separately for four types of pneumococcal diseases. The skewness-kurtosis test and the Cook-Weisberg test were performed to test the normality of the residuals and the heteroscedasticity, respectively. RESULTS: The treatment of pneumococcal meningitis generated up to US$ 5 435 per child. The treatment costs of pneumococcal pneumonia were lower, ranging from US$ 372 per child to US$ 3 483 per child. Treatment of acute otitis media cost between US$ 20 per child and US$ 217 per child. The main source of treatment costs variations was level of service provided and country in which costs were incurred. However, the tendency of costs to change with these variables was not statistically significant at the 5% level for most pneumococcal disease models. CONCLUSIONS: Pneumococcal disease resulted in significant economic burden to selected health care systems in Latin America. The patterns of treatment cost of pneumococcal disease showed a great deal of variation.OBJETIVOS: Estimar los costos de la enfermedad neumocócica en Brasil, Chile y Uruguay, describir cómo varían estos costos entre diferentes grupos de pacientes y discutir los factores que influyen en las variaciones de estos costos. MÉTODOS: El costo de la enfermedad neumocócica se estimó desde la perspectiva de la atención sanitaria. Inicialmente se establecieron estimados de referencia de los costos para cada país a partir de la información de los recursos sanitarios empleados, según los datos de

  20. Immunogenicity and safety of single-dose, 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in pediatric and adolescent oncology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Te-Yu; Kotecha, Rishi S; Blyth, Christopher C; Steed, Sarah K; Thornton, Ruth B; Ryan, Anne L; Cole, Catherine H; Richmond, Peter C

    2017-11-01

    Children receiving immunosuppressive treatment for cancer are at high risk for invasive pneumococcal disease. The 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) can prevent pneumococcal disease in healthy children; however, there is an absence of literature regarding the benefit of PCV13 in immunocompromised children with cancer. A prospective, open-label cohort study recruited children between ages 1 and 18 years who were receiving active immunosuppressive therapy (AIT) or were within 12 months after completing immunosuppressive therapy (CIT). Blood samples were taken before and 4 weeks after the administration of single-dose PCV13. Serotype-specific immunoglobulin G antibody titers were measured, and titers ≥0.35 μg/mL were considered protective. Solicited side effects were recorded in a 7-day diary after vaccination. Eighty-five children were recruited. At baseline, ≤50% had protective antibody titers against Streptococcus pneumoniae for 10 serotypes in the AIT group and for 8 serotypes in the CIT group. Postvaccination, ≥70% had protective antibody titers for 9 and 11 serotypes in the AIT and CIT groups, respectively. Both groups had comparable responses to PCV7 serotypes, whereas a significantly higher proportion in the CIT group achieved protective antibody titers to PCV13 serotypes. There was a low rate of serious adverse events (3.5%). A single-dose of PCV13 is safe and immunogenic in children diagnosed with cancer. All children who are receiving therapy for cancer should receive a single dose of PCV13 as soon as possible after diagnosis, regardless of prior PCV exposure. The current data support the recommendation for an additional dose of PCV13 after the completion of immunosuppressive therapy to provide additional protection against invasive pneumococcal disease. Cancer 2017;123:4215-4223. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  1. Evaluation of impact of 23 valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine following 7 valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in Australian Indigenous children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasinghe, Sanjay; Chiu, Clayton; Menzies, Rob; Lehmann, Deborah; Cook, Heather; Giele, Carolien; Krause, Vicki; McIntyre, Peter

    2015-11-27

    High incidence and serotype diversity of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in Indigenous children in remote Australia led to rapid introduction of 7-valent conjugate pneumococcal vaccine (7vPCV) at 2, 4 and 6 months in 2001, followed by 23-valent polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccine (23vPPV) in the second year of life. All other Australian children were offered 3 doses of 7vPCV without a booster from 2005. This study evaluated the impact of the unique pneumococcal vaccine schedule of 7vPCV followed by the 23vPPV booster among Indigenous Australian children. Changes in IPD incidence derived from population-based passive laboratory surveillance in Indigenous children vaccine introduction period (Indigenous 1994-2000; non-Indigenous 2002-2004) to the post-vaccine period (2008-2010 in both groups) using incidence rate ratios (IRRs) stratified by age into serotype groupings of vaccine (7v and 13vPCV and 23vPPV) and non-vaccine types. Vaccine coverage was assessed from the Australian Childhood Immunisation Register. At baseline, total IPD incidence per 100,000 was 216 (n=230) in Indigenous versus 55 (n=1993) in non-Indigenous children. In 2008-2010, IRRs for 7vPCV type IPD were 0.03 in both groups, but for 23v-non7v type IPD 1.2 (95% CI 0.8-1.8) in Indigenous versus 3.1 (95% CI 2.5-3.7) in non-Indigenous, difference driven primarily by serotype 19A IPD (IRR 0.6 in Indigenous versus 4.3 in non-Indigenous). For non-7vPCV type IPD overall, IRR was significantly higher in those age-eligible for 23vPPV booster compared to those younger, but in both age groups was lower than for non-Indigenous children. These ecologic data suggest a possible "serotype replacement sparing" effect of 23vPPV following 7vPCV priming, especially for serotype 19A with supportive evidence from other immunogenicity and carriage studies. Applicability post 10vPCV or 13v PCV priming in similar settings would depend on local serotype distribution of IPD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  2. Incidence and impact of false-positive urine pneumococcal antigen testing in hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryscavage, Patrick A; Noskin, Gary A; Bobb, Anne; Bardowski, Laura; Zembower, Teresa R

    2011-08-01

    Immunochromatographic urine pneumococcal antigen testing (ICT) has become a common diagnostic tool for those presenting with possible invasive pneumococcal disease. The incidence and clinical impact of ICT false-positivity on hospitalized patients has not been assessed outside of specific patient subpopulations. ICT performance needs to be assessed in a real-world clinical setting. This study aims to describe the incidence and clinical impact of ICT false-positivity in a hospital setting over a 19-month period. A retrospective cohort study was performed to assess the incidence of false-positive (FP) ICT among hospitalized patients from November 21, 2007 to June 30, 2009. The primary objective was to describe the incidence of FP ICT results. The secondary objective was to describe what clinical impact, if any, could be attributed to FP ICT results. During the study period, 52 positive ICT results were obtained, of which 5 (9.6%) were deemed falsely positive. Interestingly, two of the 5 FP results were from patients who had received 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine (PPV) in the 2 days prior to ICT. The management of all 5 patients was impacted by the FP results through unnecessary antimicrobial treatment and/or deferral of further clinical evaluation. Health care providers should be aware of the potential for ICT FP and should order and interpret these tests within an informed clinical framework.

  3. Sporadic isolated congenital asplenia with fulminant pneumococcal meningitis: a case report and updated literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Shigeo

    2017-12-18

    Isolated congenital asplenia (ICA) is a rare and life-threatening condition that predisposes patients to severe bacterial infections. Most of the reported cases are familial and the mode of inheritance is usually autosomal dominant. Here, we report a case of sporadic isolated asplenia and review the literature while focusing on sporadic cases. We report the case of an 11-month-old female infant who developed fulminant pneumococcal meningitis. The pneumococcal vaccine-unimmunized patient was hospitalized with fever, irritability, and purpura, and was diagnosed as having meningitis, septic shock, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Streptococcus pneumoniae was isolated from both cerebrospinal fluid and blood. She was successfully treated with prompt antibiotic therapy. During hospitalization, abdominal ultrasonography and computed tomography findings, scintigraphy results, and Howell-Jolly body-containing red blood cells indicated the presence of asplenia without any visceroarterial anomalies. Moreover, the findings of peripheral blood smears and spleen ultrasonographic examinations of her parents were normal. Majority of sporadic ICA cases were detected only after the onset of overwhelming infection and had a high mortality. In cases of severe invasive pneumococcal disease, a systematic search for Howell-Jolly bodies on blood smears and the presence of asplenia on abdominal imaging are essential for detecting ICA even in the absence of any family history. After the diagnosis of ICA, patient and parent education, vaccinations, antibiotic prophylaxis, and prompt empiric treatment of febrile episode should be provided.

  4. Invasive Group A Streptococcal Disease: Risk Factors for Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Orin S.; Schwartz, Benjamin; Harrison, Lee H.; Farley, Monica M.; McGeer, Allison; Schuchat, Anne

    2003-01-01

    We conducted a case-control study to identify risk factors for invasive group A streptococcal (GAS) infections, which can be fatal. Case-patients were identified when Streptoccus pyogenes was isolated from a normally sterile site and control subjects (two or more) were identified and matched to case-patients by using sequential-digit telephone dialing. All participants were noninstitutionalized surveillance area residents, >18 years of age. Conditional logistic regression identified the risk factors for invasive GAS infection: in adults 18 to 44 years of age, exposure to one or more children with sore throats (relative risk [RR]=4.93, p=0.02), HIV infection (RR =15.01, p=0.04), and history of injecting drug use (RR=14.71, p=0.003); in adults >45 years of age, number of persons in the home (RR=2.68, p=0.004), diabetes (RR= 2.27, p=0.03), cardiac disease (RR=3.24, p=0.006), cancer (RR= 3.54, p=0.006), and corticosteroid use (RR=5.18, p=0.03). Thus, host and environmental factors increased the risk for invasive GAS disease. PMID:12967496

  5. The full benefits of adult pneumococcal vaccination: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawasz, Andrew; Johnson, Sydney T.; Sato, Reiko; Bloom, David E.

    2017-01-01

    Background Pneumococcal disease causes substantial morbidity and mortality, including among adults. Adult pneumococcal vaccines help to prevent these burdens, but they are underused. Accounting for the full benefits of adult pneumococcal vaccination may promote more rational resource allocation decisions with respect to adult pneumococcal vaccines. Objectives Using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, we conducted a systematic review to assess the extent to which the literature has empirically captured (e.g., through measurement or modeling) the full benefits of adult pneumococcal vaccination. Methods We systematically searched PubMed and Embase to identify studies published between January 1, 2010 and April 10, 2016 that examine adult pneumococcal vaccination. We included articles if they captured any health or economic benefit of an adult pneumococcal vaccine administered to adults age ≥ 50 or ≥ 18 in risk groups. Finally, we summarized the literature by categorizing the types of benefits captured, the perspective taken, and the strength of the evidence presented. Our protocol is number 42016038335 in the PROSPERO International prospective register of systematic reviews. Results We identified 5,857 papers and included 150 studies for analysis. While most capture health gains and healthcare cost savings, far fewer studies consider additional benefit categories, such as productivity gains. However, the studies with a broader approach still exhibit significant limitations; for example, many present only abstracts, while others offer no new measurements. Studies that examine the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine focus more on broad economic benefits, but still have limitations. Conclusions This review highlights the need for more robust empirical accounting of the full benefits of adult pneumococcal vaccination. Literature outside this realm indicates that these broad benefits may be substantial

  6. ADULT PNEUMOCOCCAL VACCINATION GUIDELINE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    fully sensitive to penicillin, in 1967 the first clinical isolate demonstrating penicillin resistance was documented. Initial reports of penicillin resistance were from Australia, New. Guinea and South Africa. More recent reports have shown a dramatic increase in pneumococcal resistance to penicillin even in countries such as the ...

  7. Description of the Pathogenic Features of Streptococcus pyogenes Isolates from Invasive and Non-Invasive Diseases in Aichi, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Masakado; Yamada, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Masahiro; Adachi, Hirokazu; Kobayashi, Shinichi; Yamashita, Teruo; Minagawa, Hiroko; Tatsuno, Ichiro; Hasegawa, Tadao

    2016-07-22

    We identified hypervirulent Streptococcus pyogenes in 27 and 420 isolates from patients with invasive and non-invasive diseases, respectively, in Aichi Prefecture, Japan, between 2003 and 2012, in an attempt to understand why the prevalence of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) suddenly increased in this location during 2011. Hypervirulent strains belong to the emm1 genotype, with a mutation in the covR/S genes that regulate many other genes, encoding virulence determinants and resulting in the absence of the proteinase streptococcal exotoxin B and the production of virulence factors such as the superantigen streptococcal exotoxin A, the nuclease streptococcal DNase, the cytotoxin NAD-glycohydrolase, and the hemolysin streptolysin O. We found 1 strain from invasive disease and 1 from non-invasive disease with traits similar to those of hypervirulent strains, except that the sda1 gene was absent. We also found 1 non-emm1 strain with phenotypic and genetic traits identical to those of the emm1 hypervirulent strains except that it did not belong to emm1 genotype, from non-invasive diseases cases in 2011. These findings suggested that hypervirulent and hypervirulent-like strains from invasive and non-invasive disease cases could have at least partially contributed to the sudden increase in the number of patients with STSS in Aichi during 2011.

  8. Population biology of Streptococcus pneumoniae in West Africa: multilocus sequence typing of serotypes that exhibit different predisposition to invasive disease and carriage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric S Donkor

    Full Text Available Little is known about the population biology of Streptococcus pneumoniae in developing countries, although the majority of pneumococcal infections occur in this setting. The aim of the study was to apply MLST to investigate the population biology of S. pneumoniae in West Africa.Seventy three invasive and carriage S. pneumoniae isolates from three West African countries including The Gambia, Nigeria and Ghana were investigated. The isolates covered seven serotypes (1, 3, 5, 6A, 11, 14, 23F and were subjected to multilocus sequence typing and antibiotic susceptibility testing.Overall, 50 different sequence types (STs were identified, of which 38% (29 were novel. The most common ST was a novel clone-ST 4012 (6.5%, and some clones including STs 913, 925, 1737, 2160 and 3310 appeared to be specific to the study region. Two STs including ST 63 and ST 4012 were associated with multiple serotypes indicating a history of serotype switching. ST 63 was associated with serotypes 3 and 23F, while ST 4012 was associated with serotypes 6A and 23. eBURST analyses using the stringent 6/7 identical loci definition grouped the 50 STs into 5 clonal complexes and 65 singletons, expressing a high level of genetic diversity among the isolates. Compared to the other serotypes, serotypes 1 and 5 isolates appeared to be more clonal. Internationally recognized antibiotic resistant clones of S. pneumoniae were generally absent in the population investigated and the only multidrug resistant isolate identified (1/66 belong to the Pneumocococcal Epidemiology Network clone ST 63.The pneumococcal population in West Africa is quite divergent, and serotypes that are common in invasive disease (such as serotypes 1 and 5 are more likely to be clonal than serotypes that are common in carriage.

  9. Population biology of Streptococcus pneumoniae in West Africa: multilocus sequence typing of serotypes that exhibit different predisposition to invasive disease and carriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donkor, Eric S; Adegbola, Richard A; Wren, Brendan W; Antonio, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the population biology of Streptococcus pneumoniae in developing countries, although the majority of pneumococcal infections occur in this setting. The aim of the study was to apply MLST to investigate the population biology of S. pneumoniae in West Africa. Seventy three invasive and carriage S. pneumoniae isolates from three West African countries including The Gambia, Nigeria and Ghana were investigated. The isolates covered seven serotypes (1, 3, 5, 6A, 11, 14, 23F) and were subjected to multilocus sequence typing and antibiotic susceptibility testing. Overall, 50 different sequence types (STs) were identified, of which 38% (29) were novel. The most common ST was a novel clone-ST 4012 (6.5%), and some clones including STs 913, 925, 1737, 2160 and 3310 appeared to be specific to the study region. Two STs including ST 63 and ST 4012 were associated with multiple serotypes indicating a history of serotype switching. ST 63 was associated with serotypes 3 and 23F, while ST 4012 was associated with serotypes 6A and 23. eBURST analyses using the stringent 6/7 identical loci definition grouped the 50 STs into 5 clonal complexes and 65 singletons, expressing a high level of genetic diversity among the isolates. Compared to the other serotypes, serotypes 1 and 5 isolates appeared to be more clonal. Internationally recognized antibiotic resistant clones of S. pneumoniae were generally absent in the population investigated and the only multidrug resistant isolate identified (1/66) belong to the Pneumocococcal Epidemiology Network clone ST 63. The pneumococcal population in West Africa is quite divergent, and serotypes that are common in invasive disease (such as serotypes 1 and 5) are more likely to be clonal than serotypes that are common in carriage.

  10. Influence of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccines on the temporal variation of pneumococcal carriage and the nasal microbiota in healthy infants: a longitudinal analysis of a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mika, Moana; Maurer, Josua; Korten, Insa; Allemann, Aurélie; Aebi, Suzanne; Brugger, Silvio D; Qi, Weihong; Frey, Urs; Latzin, Philipp; Hilty, Markus

    2017-07-24

    Bacterial colonization of the upper airways is a prerequisite for subsequent invasive disease. With the introduction of the 7- and 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV7 and PCV13), changes in pneumococcal upper airway colonization have been described. It is, however, less evident whether the vaccines lead to compositional changes of the upper airway microbiota. Here, we performed a case-control study using samples from a longitudinal infant cohort from Switzerland. We compared pneumococcal carriage and the nasal microbiota within the first year of life of healthy infants vaccinated with either PCV7 (n = 20, born in 2010) or PCV13 (n = 21, born between 2011 and 2013). Nasal swabs were collected every second week (n = 763 in total). Pneumococcal carriage was analyzed by quantitative PCR of the pneumococcal-specific lytA gene. Analysis of the bacterial core microbiota was performed based on 16S rRNA sequencing and subsequent oligotyping. We exclusively performed oligotyping of the core microbiota members, which were defined as the five most abundant bacterial families (Moraxellaceae, Streptococcaceae, Staphylococcaceae, Corynebacteriaceae, and Pasteurellaceae). Linear mixed effect (LME) and negative binomial regression models were used for statistical analyses. We found a higher number of samples positive for pneumococcal carriage in PCV7- compared to PCV13-vaccinated infants (LME model; P = 0.01). In contrast, infants vaccinated in the PCV13 era had an increased alpha diversity as measured by the richness and the Shannon Diversity Index (LME model; P = 0.003 and P = 0.01, respectively). Accordingly, the PCV13 era was associated with clusters of a higher diversity than PCV7-associated clusters. Furthermore, infants vaccinated with PCV13 had a higher binary-based within-subject microbiota similarity, as well as a decreased Jensen-Shannon distance over time as compared to PCV7-vaccinated infants, indicating a higher microbiota stability in the PCV

  11. A Decade of Invasive Meningococcal Disease Surveillance in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoczyńska, Anna; Waśko, Izabela; Kuch, Alicja; Kadłubowski, Marcin; Gołębiewska, Agnieszka; Foryś, Małgorzata; Markowska, Marlena; Ronkiewicz, Patrycja; Wasiak, Katarzyna; Kozińska, Aleksandra; Matynia, Bożena; Hryniewicz, Waleria

    2013-01-01

    Background Neisseria meningitidis is a leading etiologic agent of severe invasive disease. The objective of the study was to characterise invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) epidemiology in Poland during the last decade, based on laboratory confirmed cases. Methods The study encompassed all invasive meningococci collected between 2002 and 2011 in the National Reference Centre for Bacterial Meningitis. The isolates were re-identified and characterised by susceptibility testing, MLST analysis, porA and fetA sequencing. A PCR technique was used for meningococcal identification directly from clinical materials. Results In the period studied, 1936 cases of IMD were confirmed, including 75.6% identified by culture. Seven IMD outbreaks, affecting mostly adolescents, were reported; all were caused by serogroup C meningococci of ST-11. The highest incidence was observed among children under one year of age (15.71/100,000 in 2011). The general case fatality rate in the years 2010–2011 was 10.0%. Meningococci of serogroup B, C, Y and W-135 were responsible for 48.8%, 36.6%, 1.2% and 1.2% of cases, respectively. All isolates were susceptible to third generation cephalosporins, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, and 84.2% were susceptible to penicillin. MLST analysis (2009–2011) revealed that among serogroup B isolates the most represented were clonal complexes (CC) ST-32CC, ST-18CC, ST-41/44CC, ST-213CC and ST-269CC, and among serogroup C: ST-103CC, ST-41/44CC and ST-11CC. Conclusions The detection of IMD in Poland has changed over time, but observed increase in the incidence of the disease was mostly attributed to changes in the surveillance system including an expanded case definition and inclusion of data from non-culture diagnostics. PMID:23977184

  12. A decade of invasive meningococcal disease surveillance in Poland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Skoczyńska

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitidis is a leading etiologic agent of severe invasive disease. The objective of the study was to characterise invasive meningococcal disease (IMD epidemiology in Poland during the last decade, based on laboratory confirmed cases.The study encompassed all invasive meningococci collected between 2002 and 2011 in the National Reference Centre for Bacterial Meningitis. The isolates were re-identified and characterised by susceptibility testing, MLST analysis, porA and fetA sequencing. A PCR technique was used for meningococcal identification directly from clinical materials.In the period studied, 1936 cases of IMD were confirmed, including 75.6% identified by culture. Seven IMD outbreaks, affecting mostly adolescents, were reported; all were caused by serogroup C meningococci of ST-11. The highest incidence was observed among children under one year of age (15.71/100,000 in 2011. The general case fatality rate in the years 2010-2011 was 10.0%. Meningococci of serogroup B, C, Y and W-135 were responsible for 48.8%, 36.6%, 1.2% and 1.2% of cases, respectively. All isolates were susceptible to third generation cephalosporins, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, and 84.2% were susceptible to penicillin. MLST analysis (2009-2011 revealed that among serogroup B isolates the most represented were clonal complexes (CC ST-32CC, ST-18CC, ST-41/44CC, ST-213CC and ST-269CC, and among serogroup C: ST-103CC, ST-41/44CC and ST-11CC.The detection of IMD in Poland has changed over time, but observed increase in the incidence of the disease was mostly attributed to changes in the surveillance system including an expanded case definition and inclusion of data from non-culture diagnostics.

  13. [State of the art in invasive diseases by filamentous fungi].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pemán, Javier; Quindós, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections have become a major cause of morbimortality in intensive care patients, persons suffering from cancer or immune deficiencies, and other diseases with impaired immunity. Candida albicans remains the most frequent fungal pathogen, but advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of invasive candidiasis are leading to important etiological changes. Among the emerging invasive mycoses, are those caused by filamentous fungi, such as Aspergillus, Lomentospora/Scedosporium, Fusarium or the Mucorales. Invasive aspergillosis is difficult to diagnose, and although there are diagnostic tools available, their use is not widespread, and their effectiveness vary depending on the group of patients. Clinical suspicion in high-risk patients, radiological diagnosis and the use of biomarkers, such as 1,3-β-D-glucan and galactomannan, can be of great help. However, diagnostic resources are limited in other mycoses, but radiology, pathological studies and the microbiological diagnosis can be useful. The high mortality of these mycoses requires early empirical antifungal treatment in many cases. Voriconazole is the first choice for treatment of the majority of aspergillosis, scedosporiasis, fusariosis and other hyalohyphomycoses. The treatment of mucormycoses, Lomentospora prolificans infections or mycoses by dematiaceous fungi are more complicated. Amphotericin B is active against many mucoralean fungi, but the combination of two or more antifungal agents could be a therapeutic alternative in many amphotericin B-refractory mycoses. Current clinical challenges include improving the diagnosis and the treatment of these mycoses, along with improving the adequate prevention in patients at high risk of suffering from them. Copyright © 2014 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. PROPHYLAXIS OF PNEUMOCOCCAL INFECTION IN CHILDREN HAS POSITIVE EFFECT ON ALL POPULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.V. Fedoseenko

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern data of effectiveness prophylaxis of pneumococcal infection in children younger 1 year old with vaccine is presented in this article. Including of 7 - valency pneumococcal conjugated vaccine (PCV-7 in immunization program of some countries resulted in decrease of morbidity as in vaccinated group, as in all population. It was marked that vaccination with PCV-7 plays important pathogenetic role in termination of hidden forms of disease and prevention of spreading of pneumococcal infection, including the most severe types, hardly treated with antibiotics.Key words: children, pneumococcal infection, vaccination.

  15. Density and Duration of Pneumococcal Carriage Is Maintained by Transforming Growth Factor β1 and T Regulatory Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coward, William R.; Gritzfeld, Jenna F.; Richards, Luke; Garcia-Garcia, Francesc J.; Dotor, Javier; Gordon, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Nasopharyngeal carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae is a prerequisite for invasive disease, but the majority of carriage episodes are asymptomatic and self-resolving. Interactions determining the development of carriage versus invasive disease are poorly understood but will influence the effectiveness of vaccines or therapeutics that disrupt nasal colonization. Objectives: We sought to elucidate immunological mechanisms underlying noninvasive pneumococcal nasopharyngeal carriage. Methods: Pneumococcal interactions with human nasopharyngeal and bronchial fibroblasts and epithelial cells were investigated in vitro. A murine model of nasopharyngeal carriage and an experimental human pneumococcal challenge model were used to characterize immune responses in the airways during carriage. Measurements and Main Results: We describe the previously unknown immunological basis of noninvasive carriage and highlight mechanisms whose perturbation may lead to invasive disease. We identify the induction of active transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 by S. pneumoniae in human host cells and highlight the key role for TGF-β1 and T regulatory cells in the establishment and maintenance of nasopharyngeal carriage in mice and humans. We identify the ability of pneumococci to drive TGF-β1 production from nasopharyngeal cells in vivo and show that an immune tolerance profile, characterized by elevated TGF-β1 and high nasopharyngeal T regulatory cell numbers, is crucial for prolonged carriage of pneumococci. Blockade of TGF-β1 signaling prevents prolonged carriage and leads to clearance of pneumococci from the nasopharynx. Conclusions: These data explain the mechanisms by which S. pneumoniae colonize the human nasopharynx without inducing damaging host inflammation and provide insight into the role of bacterial and host constituents that allow and maintain carriage. PMID:24749506

  16. Targets for adjunctive therapy in pneumococcal meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barichello, Tatiana; Collodel, Allan; Generoso, Jaqueline S; Simões, Lutiana R; Moreira, Ana Paula; Ceretta, Renan A; Petronilho, Fabrícia; Quevedo, João

    2015-01-15

    Pneumococcal meningitis is a severe infectious disease of the central nervous system (CNS) and a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The inflammatory reaction to the disease contributes to neuronal injury and involves the meninges, the subarachnoid space and the brain parenchymal vessels. Bacterial pathogens may reach the blood-brain barrier and be recognized by antigen-presenting cells through the binding of Toll-like receptors, triggering an inflammatory cascade. This in turn produces cytokines and chemokines, increases adhesion molecule expression and attracts leukocytes from the blood. This cascade leads to lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial damage and blood-brain barrier permeability. In spite of effective antibacterial treatments, approximately one third of survivors suffer from long-term sequelae, such as hearing loss, cerebral palsy, seizures, hydrocephaly or cognitive impairment. This review summarizes the information on targets of adjuvant treatments of acute pneumococcal meningitis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing invasive disease in children in the post-PCV era: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn Balsells

    Full Text Available Routine immunisation with pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV7/10/13 has reduced invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD due to vaccine serotypes significantly. However, an increase in disease due to non-vaccine types, or serotype replacement, has been observed. Serotypes' individual contributions to IPD play a critical role in determining the overall effects of PCVs. This study examines the distribution of pneumococcal serotypes in children to identify leading serotypes associated with IPD post-PCV introduction.A systematic search was performed to identify studies and surveillance reports (published between 2000 and December 2015 of pneumococcal serotypes causing childhood IPD post-PCV introduction. Serotype data were differentiated based on the PCV administered during the study period: PCV7 or higher valent PCVs (PCV10 or PCV13. Meta-analysis was conducted to estimate the proportional contributions of the most frequent serotypes in childhood IPD in each period.We identified 68 studies reporting serotype data among IPD cases in children. We analysed data from 38 studies (14 countries where PCV7 was administered and 20 (24 countries where PCV10 or PCV13 have been introduced. Studies reported early and late periods of PCV7 administration (range: 2001∓13. In these settings, serotype 19A was the most predominant cause of childhood IPD, accounting for 21.8% (95%CI 18.6∓25.6 of cases. In countries that have introduced higher valent PCVs, study periods were largely representative of the transition and early years of PCV10 or PCV13. In these studies, the overall serotype-specific contribution of 19A was lower (14.2% 95%CI 11.1∓18.3. Overall, non-PCV13 serotypes contributed to 42.2% (95%CI 36.1∓49.5% of childhood IPD cases. However, regional differences were noted (57.8% in North America, 71.9% in Europe, 45.9% in Western Pacific, 28.5% in Latin America, 42.7% in one African country, and 9.2% in one Eastern Mediterranean country. Predominant non

  18. Promoting pneumococcal immunizations among rural Medicare beneficiaries using multiple strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Elizabeth A; Harwell, Todd S; Donahue, Peg M; Weisner, M'liss A; McInerney, Michael J; Holzman, Greg S; Helgerson, Steven D

    2003-01-01

    Vaccine-preventable diseases among adults are major contributing causes of morbidity and mortality in the United States. However, adult immunizations continue to be underutilized in both urban and rural areas. To evaluate the effectiveness of a community-wide education campaign and mailed reminders promoting pneumococcal immunizations to rural Medicare beneficiaries. We implemented a community-wide education campaign, and mailed reminders were sent to Medicare beneficiaries in 1 media market in Montana to increase pneumococcal immunizations. In a second distinct media market, mailed reminders only were sent to beneficiaries. The proportion of respondents aged 65 years and older aware of pneumococcal immunizations increased significantly from baseline to follow-up among respondents both in the education-plus-reminder (63% to 78%, P = 0.04) and the reminder-only (64% to 74%, P = 0.05) markets. Overall from 1998 to 1999, there was a 3.7-percentage-point increase in pneumococcal immunization claims for Medicare beneficiaries in the education-plus-reminder market and a 1.5-percentage-point increase in the reminder-only market. Medicare beneficiaries sent reminders in the education-plus-reminder market compared to those in the reminder-only market were more likely to have a claim for pneumococcal immunization in 1999 (odds ratio 1.18, 95% confidence interval 1.08 to 1.28). The results suggest that these quality improvement strategies (community education plus reminders and reminders alone) modestly increased pneumococcal immunization awareness and pneumococcal immunization among rural adults. Mailed reminder exposure was associated with an increased prevalence of pneumococcal immunizations between 1998 and 1999 and was augmented somewhat by the education campaign.

  19. Invasive plants, insects, and diseases in the forests of the Anthropocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander M. Evans

    2014-01-01

    Invasive species, non-native plants, insects, and diseases can devastate forests. They outcompete native species, replace them in the ecosystem, and even drive keystone forest species to functional extinction. Invasives have negative effects on forest hydrology, carbon storage, and nutrient cycling. The damage caused by invasive species exacerbates the other forest...

  20. The intention of Dutch general practitioners to offer vaccination against pneumococcal disease, herpes zoster and pertussis to people aged 60 years and older.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Birthe A; Eilers, Renske; Mollema, Liesbeth; Ferreira, José; de Melker, Hester E

    2017-06-07

    Increasing life expectancy results in a larger proportion of older people susceptible to vaccine preventable diseases (VPDs). In the Netherlands, influenza vaccination is routinely offered to people aged 60 years and older. Vaccination against pneumococcal disease, herpes zoster and pertussis is rarely used. These vaccines will be evaluated by the Dutch Health Council and might be routinely offered to older people in the near future. Possible expansion of the program depends partly on the willingness of general practitioners (GPs) to endorse additional vaccinations. In this study, we assessed predictors of GPs' attitude and intention to vaccinate people aged 60 years and older. GPs (N = 12.194) were invited to fill in an online questionnaire consisting of questions about social cognitive factors that can influence the willingness of GPs to vaccinate people aged 60 years and older, including underlying beliefs, practical considerations of adding more vaccines to the national program, demographics, and GPs' patient population characteristics. The questionnaire was filled in by 732 GPs. GPs were positive both about vaccination as a preventive tool and the influenza vaccination program, but somewhat less positive about expanding the current program. Prediction analysis showed that the intention of GPs to offer additional vaccination was predicted by their attitude towards offering additional vaccination, towards vaccination as a preventive tool, towards offering vaccination during an outbreak and on GPs opinion regarding suitability to offer additional vaccination (R 2  = 0.60). The attitude of GPs towards offering additional vaccination was predicted by the perceived severity of herpes zoster and pneumonia, as well as the perceived incidence of herpes zoster. Severity of diseases was ranked as important argument to recommend vaccination, followed by effectiveness and health benefits of vaccines. Providing GPs with evidence-based information about the severity

  1. Impact and cost-effectiveness of different vaccination strategies to reduce the burden of pneumococcal disease among elderly in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thorrington, Dominic; van Rossum, Leo; Knol, Mirjam; de Melker, Hester; Rümke, Hans; Hak, Eelko; van Hoek, Albert Jan

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Streptococcus pneumoniae causes morbidity and mortality among all ages in The Netherlands. To reduce this burden, infants in The Netherlands receive the 10-valent pneumococcal conjugated vaccine (PCV10), but older persons are not targeted. We assessed the impact and cost-effectiveness of

  2. Impact and cost-effectiveness of different vaccination strategies to reduce the burden of pneumococcal disease among elderly in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thorrington, Dominic; van Rossum, Leo; Knol, Mirjam; de Melker, Hester; Rümke, Hans; Hak, Eelko; van Hoek, Albert Jan

    2018-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae causes morbidity and mortality among all ages in The Netherlands. To reduce this burden, infants in The Netherlands receive the 10-valent pneumococcal conjugated vaccine (PCV10), but older persons are not targeted. We assessed the impact and cost-effectiveness of vaccination

  3. V-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 3 (AKT3) contributes to poor disease outcome in humans and mice with pneumococcal meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valls Serón, Mercedes; Ferwerda, Bart; Engelen-Lee, Jooyeon; Geldhoff, Madelijn; Jaspers, Valery; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Tanck, Michael W.; Baas, Frank; van der Ende, Arie; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis is the most common and severe form of bacterial meningitis. Fatality rates are substantial, and long-term sequelae develop in about half of survivors. Here, we have performed a prospective nationwide genetic association study using the Human Exome BeadChip and identified gene

  4. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine administration during therapy for pediatric leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Nigel W; Balloch, Anne; Tikkanen, Leena; Merchinaud, Francoise; Downie, Peter; Buttery, Jim P

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric leukemia patients are at high risk of invasive pneumococcal disease. The study aim was to determine the antibody response to a 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV10) administered during chemotherapy. An open-label study in pediatric leukemia patients: Group 1 had completed a primary 7-valent (PCV7) course and received a single PCV10 dose. Group 2 were PCV immunization naïve and received 3 doses of PCV10, administered 2 months apart. Serum samples were taken at baseline and 1 month post each PCV10 dose. Antipneumococcal serotype-specific IgG to 10 serotypes were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and the functional response to 4 serotypes (1, 6B, 19F and 23F) was measured using opsonophagocytic assays. Thirty-nine participants were recruited between May 2010 and January 2011; group 1 (n = 27) and group 2 (n = 12). The diagnosis was acute lymphoblastic leukemia (38) and acute myeloid leukemia (1). Median age was 6.2 years (1.7-17.2 years) with 62% male. The median time from diagnosis to baseline serology was 7.4 months (1.6-36.8 months). At baseline, protective geometric mean concentration above the threshold (>0.35 μg/mL) ranged from 5.3% (serotype 4) to 71% (serotype 19F). More than 60% of participants in both groups were above threshold postimmunization for 7 of the 10 PCV serotypes. Opsonophagocytic assay correlated with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for 3 of the 4 serotypes and r ranged from 0.51 to 0.84. An injection-site reaction was reported in 73% (27/37). It is safe to administer PCV10 vaccine during therapy for pediatric leukemia. It provided a satisfactory serum immune response for the majority of vaccine serotypes.

  5. Reduced-dose schedules with pneumococcal conjugate vaccine: impact on nasopharyngeal carriage and herd immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gils, E.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    The success of the 4-dose schedule with 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) is based on direct protection against vaccine serotype pneumococcal disease in vaccinees but also on the observed large herd effect in unvaccinated age groups. However, the nasopharyngeal vacant niche is filled by

  6. Invasive Meningococcal Disease on the Workplaces: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccò, Matteo; Vezzosi, Luigi; Odone, Anna; Signorelli, Carlo

    2017-10-23

    Background and aims of the work: Invasive Meningococcal Disease (IMD) represents a global health threat, and occupational settings have the potential to contribute to its spreading. Therefore, here we present the available evidences on the epidemiology of IMD on the workplaces. The following key words were used to explore PubMed: Neisseria meningitidis, meningococcus, meningococcal, invasive meningococcal disease, epidemiology, outbreaks, profession(al), occupation(al). We identified a total of 12 IMD cases among healthcare workers (HCW), 44 involving biological laboratory workers (BLW), 8 among school personnel, and eventually 27 from other settings, including 3 large industrial working populations. Eventual prognosis of BLW, particularly the case/fatality ratio, was dismal. As clustered in time and space, data about school cases as well as industrial cases seem to reflect community rather than occupational outbreaks. In general, we identified a common pattern for HCW and BLW, i.e. the exposure to droplets or aerosol containing N meningitidis in absence of appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) and/or microbiological safety devices (MSD) (e.g. cabinets). Post-exposure chemoprophylaxis (PEC) was rarely reported by HCW (16.7%) workers, and never by BLW. Data regarding vaccination status were available only for a case, who had failed requested boosters. The risk for occupational transmission of IMD appears relatively low, possibly as a consequence of significant reporting bias, with the exception of HCW and BLW. Improved preventive measures should be implemented in these occupational groups, in order to improve the strict use of PPE and MSD, and the appropriate implementation of PEC.

  7. The immunological mechanisms that control pneumococcal carriage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon P Jochems

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Colonization of the human nasopharynx by pneumococcus is extremely common and is both the primary reservoir for transmission and a prerequisite for disease. Current vaccines targeting the polysaccharide capsule effectively prevent colonization, conferring herd protection within vaccinated communities. However, these vaccines cover only a subset of all circulating pneumococcal strains, and serotype replacement has been observed. Given the success of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV in preventing colonization in unvaccinated adults within vaccinated communities, reducing nasopharyngeal colonization has become an outcome of interest for novel vaccines. Here, we discuss the immunological mechanisms that control nasopharyngeal colonization, with an emphasis on findings from human studies. Increased understanding of these immunological mechanisms is required to identify correlates of protection against colonization that will facilitate the early testing and design of novel vaccines.

  8. Prospects for preventing infant invasive GBS disease through maternal vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhi, Shabir A; Dangor, Ziyaad

    2017-08-16

    Group B streptococcus (GBS) is a leading cause of neonatal sepsis, with the highest incidence (1.3 per 1000 live births) reported from Africa. Although the incidence of invasive GBS disease is reportedly low in South Asia, there is disconnect between prevalence of maternal recto-vaginal colonization and the incidence of early-onset disease (EOD). This is possibly due to case-ascertainment biases that omit investigation of newborns dying on day-0 of life, which accounts for >90% of EOD. Furthermore, GBS is associated with approximately 15% of all infection related stillbirths. Vaccination of pregnant women with a serotype-specific polysaccharide epitope vaccine could possibly protect against EOD and late-onset disease (LOD) in their infants through transplacental transfer of serotype-specific capsular antibody. Furthermore, vaccination of pregnant women might also protect against impaired neurodevelopment following GBS associated neonatal sepsis, and fetal loss/stillbirths. Licensure of a GBS vaccine might be feasible based on safety evaluation and a sero-correlate of protection, with vaccine effectiveness subsequently being demonstrated in phase IV studies. A randomized-controlled trial would, however, be best suited as a vaccine-probe to fully characterize the contribution of GBS to neonatal sepsis associated morbidity and mortality and adverse fetal outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Direct-Conversion Molecular Breast Imaging of Invasive Breast Cancer: Imaging Features, Extent of Invasive Disease, and Comparison Between Invasive Ductal and Lobular Histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conners, Amy Lynn; Jones, Katie N; Hruska, Carrie B; Geske, Jennifer R; Boughey, Judy C; Rhodes, Deborah J

    2015-09-01

    The purposes of this study were to compare the tumor appearance of invasive breast cancer on direct-conversion molecular breast imaging using a standardized lexicon and to determine how often direct-conversion molecular breast imaging identifies all known invasive tumor foci in the breast, and whether this differs for invasive ductal versus lobular histologic profiles. Patients with prior invasive breast cancer and concurrent direct-conversion molecular breast imaging examinations were retrospectively reviewed. Blinded review of direct-conversion molecular breast imaging examinations was performed by one of two radiologists, according to a validated lexicon. Direct-conversion molecular breast imaging findings were matched with lesions described on the pathology report to exclude benign reasons for direct-conversion molecular breast imaging findings and to document direct-conversion molecular breast imaging-occult tumor foci. Associations between direct-conversion molecular breast imaging findings and tumor histologic profiles were examined using chi-square tests. In 286 patients, 390 invasive tumor foci were present in 294 breasts. A corresponding direct-conversion molecular breast imaging finding was present for 341 of 390 (87%) tumor foci described on the pathology report. Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) tumor foci were more likely to be a mass (40% IDC vs 15% invasive lobular carcinoma [ILC]; p invasive disease in 79.8% of cases and was more likely to do so for IDC than for ILC (86.1% vs 56.7%; p invasive foci in 249 of 286 (87%) patients. Direct-conversion molecular breast imaging features of invasive cancer, including lesion type and intensity, differ by histologic subtype. Direct-conversion molecular breast imaging is less likely to show all foci of ILC compared with IDC.

  10. Invasive versus non-invasive ventilation for acute respiratory failure in neuromuscular disease and chest wall disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Fang; Annane, Djillali; Orlikowski, David; He, Li; Yang, Mi; Zhou, Muke; Liu, Guan J

    2017-12-04

    Acute respiratory failure is a common life-threatening complication of acute onset neuromuscular diseases, and may exacerbate chronic hypoventilation in patients with neuromuscular disease or chest wall disorders. Standard management includes oxygen supplementation, physiotherapy, cough assistance, and, whenever needed, antibiotics and intermittent positive pressure ventilation. Non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NIV) via nasal, buccal or full-face devices has become routine practice in many centres. The primary objective of this review was to compare the efficacy of non-invasive ventilation with invasive ventilation in improving short-term survival in acute respiratory failure in people with neuromuscular disease and chest wall disorders. The secondary objectives were to compare the effects of NIV with those of invasive mechanical ventilation on improvement in arterial blood gas after 24 hours and lung function measurements after one month, incidence of barotrauma and ventilator-associated pneumonia, duration of mechanical ventilation, length of stay in the intensive care unit and length of hospital stay. We searched the following databases on 11 September 2017: the Cochrane Neuromuscular Specialised Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE and Embase. We also searched conference proceedings and clinical trials registries. We planned to include randomised or quasi-randomised trials with or without blinding. We planned to include trials performed in children or adults with acute onset neuromuscular diseases or chronic neuromuscular disease or chest wall disorders presenting with acute respiratory failure that compared the benefits and risks of invasive ventilation versus NIV. Two review authors reviewed searches and independently selected studies for assessment. We planned to follow standard Cochrane methodology for data collection and analysis. We did not identify any trials eligible for inclusion in the review. Acute respiratory failure is a life-threatening complication of

  11. Necrotizing pneumonia and acute purulent pericarditis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 19A in a healthy 4-year-old girl after one catch-up dose of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shay; Tsai, Jeng-Dau; Tsao, Ten-Fu; Liao, Pei-Fen; Sheu, Ji-Nan

    2016-08-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common cause of infectious diseases in children that may lead to life-threatening complications. Acute purulent pericarditis is an uncommon complication of S. pneumoniae in the antibiotic era. A healthy 4-year-old girl was admitted with pneumonia and pleural effusion. She had received one catch-up dose of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine at 2 years of age. She rapidly developed necrotizing pneumonia, complicated by bronchopleural fistula presenting as subcutaneous emphysema and pneumothorax and acute purulent pericarditis. S. pneumoniae serotype 19A was subsequently identified from blood, empyema and pericardial fluid cultures. After appropriate antibiotic therapy and a right lower lobectomy, her condition stabilized and she promptly recovered. This case highlights two rare potential clinical complications of pneumococcal disease in a child: necrotizing pneumonia and acute purulent pericarditis. This is the first report of a child who received just one catch-up dose of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine at 2 years of age, as per the United States' Advisory Committee on Immunization Practice's recommendations, but who still developed severe invasive pneumococcal disease with life-threatening complications caused by S. pneumoniae serotype 19A.

  12. Following in real time the impact of pneumococcal virulence factors in an acute mouse pneumonia model using bioluminescent bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Malek; Abdullah, Mohammed R; Schulz, Christian; Kohler, Thomas; Pribyl, Thomas; Jensch, Inga; Hammerschmidt, Sven

    2014-02-23

    Pneumonia is one of the major health care problems in developing and industrialized countries and is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Despite advances in knowledge of this illness, the availability of intensive care units (ICU), and the use of potent antimicrobial agents and effective vaccines, the mortality rates remain high(1). Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading pathogen of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and one of the most common causes of bacteremia in humans. This pathogen is equipped with an armamentarium of surface-exposed adhesins and virulence factors contributing to pneumonia and invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). The assessment of the in vivo role of bacterial fitness or virulence factors is of utmost importance to unravel S. pneumoniae pathogenicity mechanisms. Murine models of pneumonia, bacteremia, and meningitis are being used to determine the impact of pneumococcal factors at different stages of the infection. Here we describe a protocol to monitor in real-time pneumococcal dissemination in mice after intranasal or intraperitoneal infections with bioluminescent bacteria. The results show the multiplication and dissemination of pneumococci in the lower respiratory tract and blood, which can be visualized and evaluated using an imaging system and the accompanying analysis software.

  13. Bias with respect to socioeconomic status: A closer look at zip code matching in a pneumococcal vaccine effectiveness study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Link-Gelles

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2010, 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13 was introduced in the US for prevention of invasive pneumococcal disease in children. Individual-level socioeconomic status (SES is a potential confounder of the estimated effectiveness of PCV13 and is often controlled for in observational studies using zip code as a proxy. We assessed the utility of zip code matching for control of SES in a post-licensure evaluation of the effectiveness of PCV13 (calculated as [1-matched odds ratio]*100. We used a directed acyclic graph to identify subsets of confounders and collected SES variables from birth certificates, geocoding, a parent interview, and follow-up with medical providers. Cases tended to be more affluent than eligible controls (for example, 48.3% of cases had private insurance vs. 44.6% of eligible controls, but less affluent than enrolled controls (52.9% of whom had private insurance. Control of confounding subsets, however, did not result in a meaningful change in estimated vaccine effectiveness (original estimate: 85.1%, 95% CI 74.8–91.9%; adjusted estimate: 82.5%, 95% CI 65.6–91.1%. In the context of a post-licensure vaccine effectiveness study, zip code appears to be an adequate, though not perfect, proxy for individual SES. Keywords: Socioeconomic status, PCV13, Pneumococcus, Pneumococcal vaccine, Vaccine effectiveness, Matched case-control

  14. Hearing loss in adults surviving pneumococcal meningitis is associated with otitis and pneumococcal serotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heckenberg, S. G. B.; Brouwer, M. C.; van der Ende, A.; Hensen, E. F.; van de Beek, D.

    2012-01-01

    Clin Microbiol Infect 2012; 18: 849855 Abstract We assessed the incidence of hearing loss and its relationship with clinical characteristics and pneumococcal serotypes in adults surviving pneumococcal meningitis. We analysed hearing loss in 531 adults surviving pneumococcal meningitis included in

  15. Hospitalization rates for pneumococcal disease in Brazil, 2004 - 2006 Hospitalizaciones por enfermedad neumocócica en Brasil, 2004-2006 Hospitalizações por doença pneumocócica no Brasil, 2004 - 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hillegonda Maria Dutilh Novaes

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To estimate hospitalization rates for pneumococcal disease based on the Brazilian Hospital Information System (SIH. METHODS: Descriptive study based on the Hospital Information System of Brazilian National Health System data from January 2004 to December 2006: number of hospitalizations and deaths for pneumococcal meningitis, pneumococcal sepsis, pneumococcal pneumonia and Streptococcus pneumoniae as the cause of diseases reported in Brazil. Data from the 2003 Brazilian National Household Survey were used to estimate events in the private sector. Pneumococcal meningitis cases and deaths reported to the Notifiable Diseases Information System during the study period were also analyzed. RESULTS: Pneumococcal disease accounted for 34,217 hospitalizations in the Brazilian National Health System (0.1% of all hospitalizations in the public sector. Pneumococcal pneumonia accounted for 64.8% of these hospitalizations. The age distribution of the estimated hospitalization rates for pneumococcal disease showed a "U"-shape curve with the highest rates seen in children under one (110 to 136.9 per 100,000 children annually. The highest hospital case-fatality rates were seen among the elderly, and for sepsis and meningitis. CONCLUSIONS: PD is a major public health problem in Brazil. The analysis based on the SIH can provide an important input to pneumococcal disease surveillance and the impact assessment of immunization programs.OBJETIVO: Estimar las hospitalizaciones por enfermedad neumocócica con base en datos del Sistema de Informaciones Hospitalarias (SIH. MÉTODOS: Estudio descriptivo con base en datos del SIH de enero de 2004 a diciembre de 2006: números de hospitalizaciones y muertes por meningitis neumocócica, sepsis neumocócica, neumonía neumocócica y Streptococcus pneumoniae como causa de enfermedades ocurridas en Brasil. Datos de la Investigación Nacional por Muestras de Domicilios 2003 fueron utilizados para el sector privado

  16. Cost-effectiveness of heptavalent conjugate pneumococcal vaccine (Prevenar) in Germany: considering a high-risk population and herd immunity effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Adam; Patel, Nishma; Scott, David A; Runge, Claus; Claes, Christa; Rose, Markus

    2008-02-01

    In Germany, the seven-valent conjugate vaccine Prevenar is recommended for use in children at high risk of pneumococcal disease. Recent data suggest that giving conjugate vaccine to all children may lead to a decline in pneumococcal disease in unvaccinated adults, a phenomenon known as herd immunity. This analysis evaluated the cost and economic consequences in Germany of vaccinating (1) children at high risk, (2) all children when considering only benefits for vaccinated individuals and (3) all children when also considering herd immunity benefits. Costs in the model included vaccination, management of meningitis, bacteraemia, pneumonia and acute otitis media, insurance payments to parents and the costs of care for long-term disabilities. The model estimated that the cost-effectiveness of vaccination would be 38,222 euros per life year gained in children at high risk and 100,636 euros per life year gained in all children when not considering herd immunity. When considering herd immunity effects, the model estimated that offering vaccination for all children would reduce adult deaths by 3,027 per year, and vaccination would be broadly cost neutral. The findings are sensitive to the effect of conjugate vaccine on the rates of pneumonia and invasive disease in the elderly. If the herd immunity effect of conjugate vaccination in Germany is similar to that observed elsewhere, offering vaccine to all children will be more attractive than the current policy of restricting vaccination to children at high risk of pneumococcal disease.

  17. Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmela, Carolina; Chevarin, Caroline; Xu, Zhilu; Torres, Joana; Sevrin, Gwladys; Hirten, Robert; Barnich, Nicolas; Ng, Siew C; Colombel, Jean-Frederic

    2018-03-01

    Intestinal microbiome dysbiosis has been consistently described in patients with IBD. In the last decades, Escherichia coli , and the adherent-invasive E coli (AIEC) pathotype in particular, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of IBD. Since the discovery of AIEC, two decades ago, progress has been made in unravelling these bacteria characteristics and its interaction with the gut immune system. The mechanisms of adhesion of AIEC to intestinal epithelial cells (via FimH and cell adhesion molecule 6) and its ability to escape autophagy when inside macrophages are reviewed here. We also explore the existing data on the prevalence of AIEC in patients with Crohn's disease and UC, and the association between the presence of AIEC and disease location, activity and postoperative recurrence. Finally, we highlight potential therapeutic strategies targeting AIEC colonisation of gut mucosa, including the use of phage therapy, bacteriocins and antiadhesive molecules. These strategies may open new avenues for the prevention and treatment of IBD in the future. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  18. Pneumococcal meningitis: epidemiological profile pre- and post-introduction of the pneumococcal 10-valent conjugate vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Tatiane E; Maluf, Eliane M C P; Rodrigues, Cristina O

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the possible effects of the introduction of the pneumococcal conjugate 10-valent vaccine schedule in the state of Parana on pneumococcal meningitis cases and to assess the distribution of serotypes among cases. Cross-sectional study with retrospective data collection of cases of pneumococcal meningitis in the state of Paraná reported to Sistema de Informação de Agravos de Notificação (SINAN), from 1998 to 2011. A total of 1,339 cases of pneumococcal meningitis were analyzed; 1,205 cases from the pre-vaccine period (1998-2009) were compared to 134 cases from the post-vaccine period (2010-2011). Descriptive and comparative statistical analyses (chi-squared test and prevalence ratio) were performed using JMP 5.1.2 statistical software (JMP Statistical Discovery, North Carolina, USA) and EPI INFO 6 (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Georgia, EUA). There was a significant reduction in the mean rates of incidence and mortality in the general population. The analysis of cases in the pre- and post-vaccination periods in the age groups covered by vaccination (younger than 2 years) showed significant reductions in incidence rates (6.01 cases/100,000 to 2.49 cases/100,000 individuals) and mortality (1.85 cases/100,000 population to 0.47 cases/100,000 population), while the mean lethality rate did not change significantly. There was a significant reduction in cases whose serotypes are included in the vaccine (80.7% to 53.3%). Even after a short time of use, the 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine has already had a significant impact in reducing the incidence and mortality of meningitis cases among infants, as well as the reduction of cases whose serotypes are included in the vaccine. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Molecular characteristics of penicillin-binding protein 2b, 2x and 1a sequences in Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates causing invasive diseases among children in Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X; Liu, J; Zhang, Z; Liu, Y; Wang, Y; Liu, Y

    2016-04-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is one of the common pathogens causing severe invasive infections in children. This study aimed to investigate the serotype distribution and variations of penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) 2b, 2x and 1a in S. pneumoniae isolates causing invasive diseases in Northeast China. A total of 256 strains were isolated from children with invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) from January 2000 to October 2014. All strains were serotyped and determined for antibiotic resistance. The amplicons of penicillin-binding domains in pbp1a, pbp2b and pbp2x genes were sequenced for variation identification. The most prevalent serotypes of isolates in IPD children were 19A, 14, 19F, 23F and 6B. 19A and 19F were the most frequent serotypes of penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae (PRSP), which present with high resistance to amoxicillin, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone and meropenem. The numbers of amino acid substitutions of penicillin-non-susceptible S. pneumoniae (PNSP) isolates were higher than those of penicillin-sensitive S. pneumoniae isolates in all the PBP genes (p isolates carried 25 amino acid mutations, including Ala618 → Gly between positions 560 and 675 in PBP2b and Thr338 → Ala substitutions in PBP2x. The amino acid alterations in PBP2b, PBP2x and PBP1a from S. pneumoniae were closely associated with resistance to β-lactam antibiotics. This study provides new data for further monitoring of genetic changes related to the emergence and spread of resistance to β-lactam antibiotics in China.

  20. Recurrent pneumococcal meningitis in a splenectomised HIV-infected patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quesne Gilles

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of human disease, especially in pre-school children and elderly people, as well as in special risk groups such as asplenic, antibody deficient patients, or presenting disruption of natural barriers. The occurrence of pneumococcal disease has increased with the onset of the HIV epidemic and the emergence of drug-resistance. Case presentation We report the case of an HIV-1-infected patient who experienced three episodes of recurrent pneumococcal meningitis over a 4-year period, despite chemoprophylaxis and capsular vaccination. Conclusions Efficacy of anti-pneumococcal chemoprophylaxis and vaccination in HIV-infected patients are discussed in the light of this particular case.

  1. Impact of bacteremia on the pathogenesis of experimental pneumococcal meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, C.T.; Holm, D.; Liptrot, Matthew George

    2008-01-01

    Background. Bacteremia plays a major role in the outcome of pneumococcal meningitis. This experimental study investigated how bacteremia influences the pathophysiologic profile of the brain. Methods. Rats with Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis were randomized to 1 of 3 groups of infected study...... rats: (1) rats with attenuated bacteremia resulting from intravenous injection of serotype-specific pneumococcal antibody, (2) rats with early-onset bacteremia resulting from concomitant intravenous infection, or (3) a meningitis control group. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, ventricle size......, brain water distribution, and brain pathologic findings were analyzed using magnetic resonance morphological and functional imaging. Laboratory data and clinical disease scores were obtained. Results. Attenuation of the bacteremic component of pneumococcal meningitis improved clinical disease symptoms...

  2. [Pneumococcal vaccination coverage in at-risk children in Catalonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Roser; Armadans, Lluís; Martínez, Xavier; Moraga, Fernando; Campins, Magda

    2015-11-01

    The public health system in Catalonia only funds pneumococcal vaccination in paediatrics for children at-risk. The aim of this study was to determine pneumococcal vaccination coverage and its association with age, sociodemographic factors and other variables. Descriptive cross-sectional study of children aged between 2 months and 15 years old assigned to primary care centres in Catalonia and with diseases that are included for pneumococcal vaccine in the official vaccination program. The information on vaccination status and study variables were obtained from data registered in the electronic medical records in the primary care centres. An analysis was made of the association between pneumococcal vaccination and demographic and medical variables using bivariate analysis and a multiple logistic regression model. The adjusted odds ratio (aOR), with a confidence interval of 95%, was used to measure the relationships. Pneumococcal vaccination coverage was 47.7%. Variables which predicted pneumococcal vaccination were: age (aOR: 9.2 [7.9-10.7] in children 2 months-2 years old; aOR 8.1 [7.0-9.3] in children 3-5 years; aOR: 4.6 [4.0-5.2] in children 6-10 years), Spanish nationality (aOR: 3.9 [3.5-4.3]), correct immunisation according to systematic immunisation schedule (aOR: 2.5 [2.1-3.0]), and number of risk conditions (aOR: 3.2 [2.5-4.1] in children with 2 or more conditions). Pneumococcal vaccination coverage in children with risk conditions is low in Catalonia. Strategies need to be implemented to increase coverage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  3. Invasive Group A streptococcal disease in Ireland, 2004 to 2010.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Martin, J

    2011-01-01

    Invasive group A streptococcal infections (iGAS) are a major clinical and public health challenge. iGAS is a notifiable disease in Ireland since 2004. The aim of this paper is to describe the epidemiology of iGAS in Ireland for the first time over the seven-year period from 2004 to 2010. The Irish national electronic infectious disease reporting system was used by laboratories to enter the source of iGAS isolates, and by departments of public health to enter clinical and epidemiological details. We extracted and analysed data from 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2010. Over the study period, 400 iGAS cases were notified. The annual incidence of iGAS doubled, from 0.8 per 100,000 population in 2004 to 1.6 in 2008, and then remained the same in 2009 and 2010. The reported average annual incidence rates were highest among children up to five years of age (2.3\\/100,000) and adults aged over 60 years (3.2\\/100,000). The most common risk factors associated with iGAS were skin lesions or wounds. Of the 174 people for whom clinical syndrome information was available, 28 (16%) cases presented with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome and 19 (11%) with necrotising fasciitis. Of the 141 cases for whom seven-day outcomes were recorded, 11 people died with iGAS identified as the main cause of death (seven-day case fatality rate 8%). The notification rate of iGAS in Ireland was lower than that reported in the United Kingdom, Nordic countries and North America but higher than southern and eastern European countries. The reasons for lower notification rates in Ireland compared with other countries may be due to a real difference in incidence, possibly due to prescribing practices, or due to artefacts resulting from the specific Irish case definition and\\/or low reporting in the early stages of a new surveillance system. iGAS disease remains an uncommon but potentially severe disease in Ireland. Ongoing surveillance is required in order to undertake appropriate control measures and

  4. A live-attenuated pneumococcal vaccine elicits CD4+ T-cell dependent class switching and provides serotype independent protection against acute otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosch, Jason W; Iverson, Amy R; Humann, Jessica; Mann, Beth; Gao, Geli; Vogel, Peter; Mina, Michael; Murrah, Kyle A; Perez, Antonia C; Edward Swords, W; Tuomanen, Elaine I; McCullers, Jonathan A

    2014-01-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae remains one of the most common infectious diseases worldwide despite widespread vaccination. A major limitation of the currently licensed pneumococcal vaccines is the lack of efficacy against mucosal disease manifestations such as AOM, acute bacterial sinusitis and pneumonia. We sought to generate a novel class of live vaccines that (1) retain all major antigenic virulence proteins yet are fully attenuated and (2) protect against otitis media. A live vaccine candidate based on deletion of the signal recognition pathway component ftsY induced potent, serotype-independent protection against otitis media, sinusitis, pneumonia and invasive pneumococcal disease. Protection was maintained in animals coinfected with influenza virus, but was lost if mice were depleted of CD4(+) T cells at the time of vaccination. The live vaccine induced a strong serum IgG2a and IgG2b response that correlated with CD4(+) T-cell mediated class switching. Deletion of genes required for microbial adaptation to the host environment is a novel live attenuated vaccine strategy yielding the first experimental vaccine effective against pneumococcal otitis media.

  5. [Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberán, José; Mensa, José

    2014-01-01

    Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) is a common infection in immunocompromised patients with hematological malignancies or allogenic stem cell transplantation, and is less frequent in the context of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Mucociliary activity impairment, immunosuppression due to the inhibition of alveolar macrophages and neutrophils by steroids, and receiving broad-spectrum antibiotics, play a role in the development of IPA in COPD patients. Colonized patients or those with IPA are older, with severe CODP stage (GOLD≥III), and have a higher number of comorbidities. The mortality rate is high due to the fact that having a definitive diagnosis of IPA in COPD patients is often difficult. The main clinical and radiological signs of IPA in these types of patients are non-specific, and tissue samples for definitive diagnosis are often difficult to obtain. The poor prognosis of IPA in COPD patients could perhaps be improved by faster diagnosis and prompt initiation of antifungal treatment. Some tools, such as scales and algorithms based on risk factors of IPA, may be useful for its early diagnosis in these patients. Copyright © 2014 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Intestinal invasion and disseminated disease associated with Penicillium chrysogenum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herchline Thomas E

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Penicillium sp., other than P. marneffei, is an unusual cause of invasive disease. These organisms are often identified in immunosuppressed patients, either due to human immunodeficiency virus or from immunosuppressant medications post-transplantation. They are a rarely identified cause of infection in immunocompetent hosts. Case presentation A 51 year old African-American female presented with an acute abdomen and underwent an exploratory laparotomy which revealed an incarcerated peristomal hernia. Her postoperative course was complicated by severe sepsis syndrome with respiratory failure, hypotension, leukocytosis, and DIC. On postoperative day 9 she was found to have an anastamotic breakdown. Pathology from the second surgery showed transmural ischemic necrosis with angioinvasion of a fungal organism. Fungal blood cultures were positive for Penicillium chrysogenum and the patient completed a 6 week course of amphotericin B lipid complex, followed by an extended course oral intraconazole. She was discharged to a nursing home without evidence of recurrent infection. Discussion Penicillium chrysogenum is a rare cause of infection in immunocompetent patients. Diagnosis can be difficult, but Penicillium sp. grows rapidly on routine fungal cultures. Prognosis remains very poor, but aggressive treatment is essential, including surgical debridement and the removal of foci of infection along with the use of amphotericin B. The clinical utility of newer antifungal agents remains to be determined.

  7. Targeting pneumococcal vaccination to high-risk groups: a feasibility study in one general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriwardena, A N

    1999-04-01

    The Department of Health recommends pneumococcal vaccination opportunistically or when immunising against influenza. This was a study in one general practice to assess the feasibility of targeting patients for pneumococcal vaccination in primary care. We also examined the rate of uptake of pneumococcal vaccine in identified risk groups after one year of a pneumococcal vaccination programme. A self-administered questionnaire was given to patients attending for influenza vaccine between September and December 1996. A total of 551/747 (73.8%) patients returned completed questionnaires. Few patients receiving influenza vaccination (133/509, 26%) were aware of pneumococcal vaccine. Only 55/108 (51%) of those given influenza vaccination were in a clinical risk group for pneumococcal vaccine. Attitudes towards vaccination were more positive and intention to take up pneumococcal vaccination significantly greater in high-risk patients compared to those who were not in a risk group. A targeted vaccination campaign directed at high-risk patients, both opportunistically and those attending for influenza vaccination over one year, resulted in the following proportions of patients in at-risk groups being vaccinated: coronary disease 144/312 (46%), diabetes 79/132 (60%), splenectomy 2/2 (100%), chronic obstructive airways disease and asthma 135/700 (19%), and chronic renal failure 5/9 (56%). Most doses of pneumococcal vaccine (336/463; 73%) were delivered to patients in high-risk groups. We conclude that a well-organised pneumococcal vaccination campaign can improve coverage of at-risk patients in general practice. Programmes to increase patient awareness of the vaccine, improved availability of vaccine, and practice guidelines, would help to target the vaccine to at-risk patients. Patients with chronic lung disease and asthma were particularly difficult to define and target in this study. A review of the UK guidelines, aligning those for pneumococcal and influenza vaccination

  8. Factors associated with the occurrence of hearing loss after pneumococcal meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worsøe, Lise Lotte; Caye-Thomasen, P.; Brandt, C.T.

    2010-01-01

    Background. On the basis of a nationwide registration during a 5-year period (1999-2003), the frequency and severity of hearing loss was investigated retrospectively in 343 consecutive Danish patients who survived pneumococcal meningitis, to identify important risk factors (including the pneumoco...... is common after pneumococcal meningitis, and audiometry should be performed on all those who survive pneumococcal meningitis. Important risk factors for hearing loss are advanced age, female sex, severity of meningitis, and bacterial serotype......Background. On the basis of a nationwide registration during a 5-year period (1999-2003), the frequency and severity of hearing loss was investigated retrospectively in 343 consecutive Danish patients who survived pneumococcal meningitis, to identify important risk factors (including...... the pneumococcal serotype) for development of hearing loss. Methods. Results of blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biochemistry, bacterial serotyping, follow-up audiological examinations, and medical records were collected, and disease-related risk factors for hearing loss were identified. The mean pure...

  9. Impact of Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine Administration in Pediatric Older Age Groups in Low and Middle Income Countries: A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Bonner

    Full Text Available Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV is included in the World Health Organization's routine immunization schedule and is recommended by WHO for vaccination in high-risk children up to 60 months. However, many countries do not recommend vaccination in older age groups, nor have donors committed to supporting extended age group vaccination. To better inform decision-making, this systematic review examines the direct impact of extended age group vaccination in children over 12 months in low and middle income countries.An a priori protocol was used. Using pre-specified terms, a search was conducted using PubMed, LILACS, Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CAB Abstracts, clinicaltrials.gov and the International Symposium on Pneumococci and Pneumococcal Diseases abstracts. The primary outcome was disease incidence, with antibody titers and nasopharyngeal carriage included as secondary outcomes.Eighteen studies reported on disease incidence, immune response, and nasopharyngeal carriage. PCV administered after 12 months of age led to significant declines in invasive pneumococcal disease. Immune response to vaccine type serotypes was significantly higher for those vaccinated at older ages than the unimmunized at the established 0.2 ug/ml and 0.35 ug/ml thresholds. Vaccination administered after one year of age significantly reduced VT carriage with odds ratios ranging from 0.213 to 0.69 over four years. A GRADE analysis indicated that the studies were of high quality.PCV administration in children over 12 months leads to significant protection. The direct impact of PCV administration, coupled with the large cohort of children missed in first year vaccination, indicates that countries should initiate or expand PCV immunization for extended age group vaccinations. Donors should support implementation of PCV as part of delayed or interrupted immunization for older children. For countries to

  10. Pneumococcal pulmonary valve endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apostolos Vrettos

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary valve endocarditis is a rare type of infective endocarditis (IE. Streptococcus pneumoniae is a pathogen that is uncommonly associated with IE. A 50 year-old male was referred to us after an incidental echocardiographic finding of a pulmonary valve vegetation. The patient had a recent admission for drainage of a scrotal abscess from which S. pneumoniae was isolated, complicated by hospital acquired pneumonia and pulmonary embolism. Analysis using polymerase chain reaction of the surgically resected mass revealed signs of 16S ribosomal DNA consistent with S. pneumoniae infection. This was an extremely rare case of pneumococcal pulmonary valve IE presenting entirely asymptomatically in the absence of any known risk factors.

  11. Unusual initial abdominal presentations of invasive meningococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiddir, Tamazoust; Gros, Marion; Hong, Eva; Terrade, Aude; Denizon, Mélanie; Deghmane, Ala-Eddine; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir

    2018-03-28

    Invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) is recognized as septicemia and/or meningitis. However, early symptoms may vary and are frequently nonspecific. Early abdominal presentations have been increasingly described. We aimed to explore a large cohort of patients with initial abdominal presentations for association with particular meningococcal strains. Confirmed IMD cases in France between 1991-2016 were screened for the presence within the 24 hours before diagnosis of at least one of the following criteria (1) abdominal pain, (2) gastro-enteritis with diarrhea and vomiting, (3) diarrhea only. Whole genome sequencing was performed on all cultured isolates. We identified 105 cases (median age 19 years) of early abdominal presentations with a sharp increase since 2014. Early abdominal pain alone was the most frequent symptom (n=67, 64%), followed by gastro-enteritis (n=26, 25%) and diarrhea alone (n=12, 11%). Twenty patients (20%) had abdominal surgery. A higher case fatality rate (24%) was observed in these cases compared to 10.4% in all IMD in France (p=0.007) with high levels of inflammation markers in the blood. Isolates of group W were significantly more predominant in these cases compared to all IMD. Most of these isolates belonged to clonal complex ST-11 (cc11) of the sublineages of the South American-UK strain. Abdominal presentations are frequently provoked by hyperinvasive isolates of meningococci. Delay in the management of these cases and the virulence of the isolates may explain the high fatality rate. Rapid recognition is a key element to improve their management.

  12. Familial isolated congenital asplenia: a rare, frequently hereditary dominant condition, often detected too late as a cause of overwhelming pneumococcal sepsis. Report of a new case and review of 31 others.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Brigitte; Menetrey, Céline; Belin, Valérie; Brosset, Philippe; de Lumley, Lionel; Fisher, Alain

    2002-07-01

    Congenital isolated asplenia may arise as a minor form of situs abnormalities or result from an unrelated specific defect of spleen development. It is a rare life-threatening condition and pneumococcal sepsis is often the first sign of the disease. We report on the case of a deceased 11-month-old girl and her father who developed recurrent pneumococcal meningitis. The fatal evolution in the girl was due to Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 23 with intermediate penicillin sensitivity 4 h after amoxicillin (100 mg/kg i.v.) administration. Establishing the diagnosis of congenital isolated asplenia in the case of pneumococcal sepsis can be achieved by performing two easy and non-invasive investigations: searching for Howell-Jolly bodies on blood smears and performing ultrasound examination of the abdomen to look for the spleen. In the case of congenital isolated asplenia, use of appropriate prophylaxis could save the lives of affected children. Our review of the literature yielded 31 cases of congenital isolated asplenia. Thirteen were sporadic and 18 were familial cases involving eight families. in the case of Streptococcus pneumoniae sepsis, a systematic search for Howell-Jolly bodies on blood smears and ultrasound examination of the abdomen for the presence of asplenia should be mandatory to detect isolated congenital asplenia. If asplenia is found, potentially life-saving antibiotic prophylaxis and pneumococcal vaccination should be initiated.

  13. Clinical outcome of pneumococcal meningitis during the emergence of pencillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gouveia Edilane L

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prior to the availability of generic third-generation cephalosporins, penicillins were widely used for treatment of pneumococcal meningitis in developing countries despite concerns about rising levels of penicillin resistance among pneumococcal isolates. We examined the impact of penicillin resistance on outcomes of pneumococcal meningitis over a ten year period in an infectious diseases hospital in Brazil. Methods Clinical presentation, antimicrobial therapy and outcomes were reviewed for 548 patients with culture-confirmed pneumococcal meningitis from December, 1995, to November, 2005. Pneumococcal isolates from meningitis patients were defined as penicillin-resistant if Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations for penicillin were greater than 0.06 μg/ml. Proportional hazards regression was used to identify risk factors for fatal outcomes. Results During the ten-year period, ceftriaxone replaced ampicillin as first-line therapy for suspected bacterial meningitis. In hospital case-fatality for pneumococcal meningitis was 37%. Of 548 pneumococcal isolates from meningitis cases, 92 (17% were resistant to penicillin. After controlling for age and severity of disease at admission, penicillin resistance was associated with higher case-fatality (Hazard Ratio [HR], 1.62; 95% Confidence Interval [CI], 1.08-2.43. Penicillin-resistance remained associated with higher case-fatality when initial therapy included ceftriaxone (HR, 1.68; 95% CI 1.02-2.76. Conclusions Findings support the use of third generation cephalosporin antibiotics for treatment of suspected pneumococcal meningitis even at low prevalence of pneumococcal resistance to penicillins.

  14. Pneumococcal Disease: Diagnosis and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... antibiotics in 3 out of every 10 cases. Antibiotic sensitivity testing shows which antibiotics will be most successful ... typically includes ‘broad-spectrum’ antibiotics until results of antibiotic sensitivity testing are available. Broad-spectrum antibiotics work against ...

  15. New pneumococcal conjugate vaccine introductions in four sub ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Pneumonia is a main cause of under-five mortality in low-income settings. The pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) has been introduced in many countries as a tool in the disease's prevention. Although PCV's effectiveness has been established, less is known about the effects of introducing additional ...

  16. Pneumococcal Pneumonia and Pandemic H1N1

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-06-06

    Dr. George Nelson, a CDC medical officer, discusses the relationship between pneumococcal pneumonia and Pandemic H1N1.  Created: 6/6/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 6/6/2012.

  17. Cushing's triad in pneumococcal meningitis due to brainstem ischemia: early detection by diffusion-weighted MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haarman, E.G.; Vermeulen, R.J.; van Furth, A.M.; Verbeke, J.I.M.L.; Plotz, F.B.

    2008-01-01

    An infant with pneumococcal meningitis developed signs of raised intracranial pressure during the progression of the disease, including loss of consciousness, hypertension, bradycardia, and respiratory depression. However, both the emergency computed tomography scan findings and intracranial

  18. Incidence of invasive Haemophilus influenzae type b disease in Italian children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tozzi, Alberto E.; Salmaso, Stefania; Atti, Marta L. Ciofi degli; Panei, Pietro; Anemona, Alessandra; Scuderi, Gabriella; Wassilak, Steven G.F.

    1997-01-01

    To estimate the incidence of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) invasive disease in Italian infants we performed a prospective study in a cohort of newborns enrolled for a randomized trial on safety and efficacy of three pertussis vaccines and followed for onset of serious disease or pertussis. The overall cumulative incidence observed in 15,601 children was 51.3/100,000 for all invasive Hib infections and 38.4/100,000 for Hib meningitis, over 27 months of observation. The incidence density of all invasive Hib diseases was 28.7/100,000 person-years, while meningitis occurred with an incidence of 21.5/100,000 person-years. Among the eight cases detected, six were meningitis, one sepsis, and one cellulitis. The child with sepsis died. The incidence and epidemiology of invasive Hib disease in Italy are comparable to those reported from other European countries. Cost-benefit analyses are needed for planning Italian vaccination policy

  19. A Review of Diagnostic Methods for Invasive Fungal Diseases: Challenges and Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Falci, Diego R.; Stadnik, Claudio M. B.; Pasqualotto, Alessandro C.

    2017-01-01

    Invasive fungal diseases are associated with a high morbidity and mortality, particularly in the context of immunosuppression. Diagnosis of invasive fungal diseases is usually complicated by factors such as poor clinical suspicion and unspecific clinical findings. Access to modern diagnostic tools is frequently limited in developing countries. Here, we describe five real-life clinical cases from a Brazilian tertiary hospital, in order to illustrate how to best select diagnostic tests in patie...

  20. Invasive disease by Streptococcus pyogenes: patients hospitalized for 6 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-Constantí, Vanessa; Trenchs-Sainz de la Maza, Victoria; Sanz-Marcos, Nuria Elvira; Guitart-Pardellans, Carmina; Gené-Giralt, Amadeu; Luaces-Cubells, Carles

    2017-07-10

    The last years an increase of severe cases of invasive disease (ID) due to Streptococcus pyogenes or streptococcus b-hemolytic group A (SGA) had been detected. The aim of this study was to analyze the epidemiology and the clinical features of ID due to SGA in a tertiary Pediatric Hospital. Retrospective study in a Pediatric hospital, of all in-patients with final diagnosis of ID due to SGA during 6 years (2009-2014). To consider ID, SGA had to be isolated in sterile samples; in patients with fascitis necroticans in skin samples or in any sample in patients with the diagnostic of Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome (STSS). The SSTS was defined as hypotension and at least 2 of these criteria: renal failure, hepatic failure, acute respiratory distress, tissue necrosis or desquamative erythematous rash. Demographic data, type of infection, risk factors, clinical presentation, analytical data at admission, treatment, need for admission to a pediatric intensive care unit, microbiological data, hospital stay and evolution were collected. Fifty-two (52) cases were included (12/10,000 of all inpatients); 3 years-old was the medium age (p25-75: 1.4-6.9 years); 28 (53.8%) were boys. Fourteen patients (26.9%) had risk factors. Fever was the major symptom (51 patients, 98.1%). The skin lesions were the most frequent clinical manifestations found (21; 40.4%). In 50 (96%) cases, SGA was isolated in at least one sterile sample. Skin and soft tissue infections were diagnosed in 14 patients (26.9%), 14 (26.9%) pneumonias, 12 (23.1%) bones and joints infections, 10 (19.2%) SSTS, 6 (11.5%) occult bacteremia, 4 (7.7%) meningitis and 2 (3.8%) sepsis. Surgery was required in 18 cases (34.6%) and 17 patients (32.7%) needed intensive care. The medium hospital stay was 9.5 days (p25-75: 8-15 days). Three patients presented sequels and one patient died. The ID due to SGA was a rare but serious reason for hospital admission. Skin and soft tissue infections, and pleuroneumonia were the most

  1. Pneumococcal pneumonia: clinical features, diagnosis and management in HIV-infected and HIV noninfected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeddu, Giordano; Fois, Alessandro Giuseppe; Pirina, Pietro; Mura, Maria Stella

    2009-05-01

    In this review, we focus on the clinical features, diagnosis and management of pneumococcal pneumonia in HIV-infected and noninfected patients, with particular attention to the most recent advances in this area. Classical clinical features are found in young adults, whereas atypical forms occur in immunocompromised patients including HIV-infected individuals. Bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia is more frequently observed in HIV-infected and also in low-risk patients, according to the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI). Pneumococcal pneumonia diagnostic process includes physical examination, radiologic findings and microbiologic diagnosis. However, etiologic diagnosis using traditional culture methods is difficult to obtain. In this setting, urinary antigen test, which recognizes Streptococcus pneumoniae cell wall C-polysaccharide, increases the probability of etiologic diagnosis. A correct management approach is crucial in reducing pneumococcal pneumonia mortality. The use of the PSI helps clinicians in deciding between inpatient and outpatient management in immunocompetent individuals, according to Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA)-American Thoracic Society (ATS) guidelines. Recent findings support PSI utility also in HIV-infected patients. Recently, efficacy of pneumococcal vaccine in reducing pneumococcal disease incidence has been evidenced in both HIV-infected and noninfected individuals. Rapid diagnosis and correct management together with implementation of preventive measures are crucial in order to reduce pneumococcal pneumonia related incidence and mortality in HIV-infected and noninfected patients.

  2. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine failure in children: A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oligbu, Godwin; Hsia, Yingfen; Folgori, Laura; Collins, Sarah; Ladhani, Shamez

    2016-12-07

    Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) are highly effective in preventing pneumococcal invasive disease (IPD) due to serotypes included in the vaccines. The risk of vaccine-type IPD in immunised children (i.e. vaccine failure) has not been systematically assessed in countries with established PCV programmes. We undertook a systematic review of the English literature published from January 2000 to April 2016 to evaluate the vaccine schedule, risk factors, serotype distribution, clinical presentation and outcomes of vaccine failure in children vaccinated with the 7-valent (PCV7), 10-valent (PCV10), and 13-valent (PCV13) vaccines. Data sources included MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane library, and references within identified articles. We identified 1742 potential studies and included 20 publications involving 7584 participants in children aged ⩽5year-olds: 5202 received 2 doses followed by a booster in 10 studies, (68.6%), 64 (0.8%) received 3 doses without a booster in 2 studies, and 2318 received a 3+1 schedule (30.6%) in 8 studies. A total of 159 vaccine failure cases were identified, representing 2.1% [95% CI: 1.8-2.4%] of the reported IPD cases. Most studies did not report clinical characteristics or outcomes. Among eight studies reporting comorbidities, 33/77 patients (42.9%) had an underlying condition. The main serotypes associated with vaccine failure were 19F (51/128 cases with known serotype; 39.8%), 6B (33/128; 25.8%), and 4 (10/128; 7.8%). Only five studies reported patient outcomes, with a crude case fatality rate of 2.4% (2/85; 95%CI: 0.3-8.5%). Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines have been implemented in national immunisation programmes for more than a decade, yet there are only a few studies reporting vaccine failure. PCV failure is rare, irrespective of vaccine or schedule. Co-morbidity prevalence was high amongst vaccine failure cases but case fatality rate was relatively low. There is a need for more systematic reporting vaccine failure cases in countries

  3. Serotype distribution of pneumococci isolated from pediatric patients with acute otitis media and invasive infections, and potential coverage of pneumococcal conjugated vaccines Distribución de serotipos de neumococos aislados de pacientes pediátricos con otitis media aguda e infecciones invasivas y su cobertura potencial a través de vacunas conjugadas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanesa Reijtman

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A 16-month prospective, descriptive study was conducted on pneumococcal serotype distribution isolated from children with acute otitis media (AÜM and invasive infections (INV. Eighty-nine children with pneumococcal INV and 324 with a first episode of AOM were included. Bacterial pathogens (N = 326 were isolated from the middle-ear fluid of 250 patients. A total of 30 pneumococcal serotypes were identified. Prevalent serotypes were 14, 19A, 9V, 3, 19F, 6A, 23F, and 18C in AOM and 14, 1, 19A, 5, 12F, 6B, and 18C in INV. Potential coverage with PCV10 vaccine would be 46.5 % and 60.7 % for pneumococci involved in AOM and INV, respectively; it would be 71.7 % and 73 % with PCV13. PCV10, conjugated with a Haemophilus protein, would have an immunologic coverage of 39.9 % for AOM vs. 18.5 % with PCV13. However, differences in the prevention of INV were crucial for the decision to include the 13-valent vaccine in the national calendar for children less than two years old in Argentina.Se realizó un estudio prospectivo descriptivo sobre la distribución de serotipos de neumococos aislados de niños con otitis media aguda (OMA y con infecciones invasivas (INV en un período de 16 meses. Se incluyeron 89 niños con INV neumocócicas y 324 con un primer episodio de OMA. Trescientos cuarenta y seis patógenos se aislaron de las secreciones de oído medio obtenidas de 250 pacientes. Se identificaron 30 serotipos y los más prevalentes fueron el 14, 19A, 9V, 3, 19F, 6A, 23F y 18C en OMA y el 14, 1, 19A, 5, 12F, 6B y 18C en INV. La cobertura potencial con la vacuna PCV10 sería de 46,5 % y 60,7 % para neumococos involucrados en OMA y en INV, respectivamente; con la PCV13, esta sería de 71,7 % y 73 %. La PCV10 conjugada con una proteína de Haemophilus tendría una cobertura inmunológica del 39,9 % para OMA, contra una cobertura del 18,5 % de la PCV13. Sin embargo, las diferencias en la prevención de INV fueron determinantes a la hora de considerar

  4. Minimally Invasive Procedures - Direct and Video-Assisted Forms in the Treatment of Heart Diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Josué Viana Neto, E-mail: jvcn@uol.com.br [Instituto do Coração do Nordeste (INCONE), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Universidade de Fortaleza (UNIFOR), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Melo, Emanuel Carvalho; Silva, Juliana Fernandes [Instituto do Coração do Nordeste (INCONE), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Rebouças, Leonardo Lemos; Corrêa, Larissa Chagas; Germano, Amanda de Queiroz [Universidade de Fortaleza (UNIFOR), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Machado, João José Aquino [Instituto do Coração do Nordeste (INCONE), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil)

    2014-03-15

    Minimally invasive cardiovascular procedures have been progressively used in heart surgery. To describe the techniques and immediate results of minimally invasive procedures in 5 years. Prospective and descriptive study in which 102 patients were submitted to minimally invasive procedures in direct and video-assisted forms. Clinical and surgical variables were evaluated as well as the in hospital follow-up of the patients. Fourteen patients were operated through the direct form and 88 through the video-assisted form. Between minimally invasive procedures in direct form, 13 had aortic valve disease. Between minimally invasive procedures in video-assisted forms, 43 had mitral valve disease, 41 atrial septal defect and four tumors. In relation to mitral valve disease, we replaced 26 and reconstructed 17 valves. Aortic clamp, extracorporeal and procedure times were, respectively, 91,6 ± 21,8, 112,7 ± 27,9 e 247,1 ± 20,3 minutes in minimally invasive procedures in direct form. Between minimally invasive procedures in video-assisted forms, 71,6 ± 29, 99,7 ± 32,6 e 226,1 ± 42,7 minutes. Considering intensive care and hospitalization times, these were 41,1 ± 14,7 hours and 4,6 ± 2 days in minimally invasive procedures in direct and 36,8 ± 16,3 hours and 4,3 ± 1,9 days in minimally invasive procedures in video-assisted forms procedures. Minimally invasive procedures were used in two forms - direct and video-assisted - with safety in the surgical treatment of video-assisted, atrial septal defect and tumors of the heart. These procedures seem to result in longer surgical variables. However, hospital recuperation was faster, independent of the access or pathology.

  5. PNEUMOCOCCAL INFECTION: MODERN VIEW ON THE ISSUE AND PREVENTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.К. Tatochenko

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumococci are spread everywhere and they are very often a component of the microflora of the upper respiratory tracts. The level of the pneumococcus carriage is correlated with age. Among children the highest frequency is observed at the age of 4,5 years (up to 90% of cases, among adults it is 5–10%. According to international and Russian data, pneumococcal infection causes up to 76% of all the aetiologically deciphered cases of community cacquired pneumonia among adults and up to 94% (aggravated cases among children. The most frequent clinical forms of pneumococcal infection among children are acute otitis media (over 30%, pneumonia and meningitis (about 5–20% of all purulent bacterial meningitis, among adults — meningitis and sepsis. In 1998, in Russia was registered the first and still the only vaccine for the prevention of pneumococcal infection — Pneumo 23 (Sanofi Pasteur. The vaccine consists of 23 antic gens of the most dangerous pneumococcus serotypes and is used for the prevention of all the forms of pneumococcal infection. The composition of Pneumo 23 corresponds to 85% of pneumococcus serotypes circulating across Europe and to 90% serotypes resistant to penicillin. According to Russian data Pneumo 23 consists of about 80% of pneumococcus serotypes isolated in healthy carriers and ill with acute respiratory diseases and of 92% of serotypes in those suffering from acute bronchitis and pneumonia. The results of the clinical studies allow us to recommend the use of the given vaccine in a complex therapy of children, suffering from latent TB infection, often recurrent episodes of bronchopulmonary pathologies, ENT diseases, bronchial asthma and other chronic diseases.Key words: therapy, pediatrics, pneumonia, bronchial asthma, chronic obstructive lungs disease, prevention, treatment, pneumococcal infection.

  6. Cerebral Vasculitis Complicating Pneumococcal Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Khedher

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cerebral vasculitis is an uncommon life-threatening complication of community-acquired bacterial meningitis. Patient and methods: We report the case of a 64-year-old woman with pneumococcal meningitis who developed parainfectious vasculitis causing ischaemic brain damage. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI confirmed the diagnosis. Clinical and radiological recovery after delayed addition of corticosteroid was achieved. Discussion: This report shows that the onset of neurological deficits following pneumococcal meningitis can be caused by cerebral vasculitis. Underdosing with antibiotics and delayed adjunctive dexamethasone seem to favour this complication. There are no guidelines for treatment but high doses of steroids led to resolution in this case.

  7. Do pneumococcal conjugate vaccines provide any cross-protection against serotype 19A?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoet Bernard

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Introduction of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (7vCRM in several countries has led to a rapid, significant drop in vaccine-type invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD in immunized children. In the United States and some other countries with high antibiotic use, a subsequent rise in serotype 19A IPD has been taken to indicate that the 19F conjugate in the vaccine provides no cross-protection against the immunologically related 19A. Discussion We systematically assessed the clinical efficacy and effectiveness of 19F-containing vaccines against 19A disease or nasopharyngeal carriage by searching English-language articles in the electronic databases PubMed, Current contents, Scopus, and Embase from 1985 to 2008. The vaccine efficacy and effectiveness point estimates were consistently positive for modest protection against 19A IPD and acute otitis media (AOM. However, statistical significance was not reached in any individual study. No consistent impact of 7vCRM on 19A nasopharyngeal colonization could be detected. These findings are discussed in context of immunogenicity analyses indicating that 7vCRM induces functionally active anti-19A antibodies after the booster dose, and that other 19F-containing vaccine formulations may elicit higher levels of such antibodies after both primary and booster doses. Summary Taken together, these results suggest that 19F-conjugates can provide some protection against 19A disease. The magnitude of this protection in a given setting will likely depend on several factors. These include the anti-19A immunogenicity of the specific vaccine formulation, the number of doses of that formulation needed to elicit the response, and the burden of 19A disease that occurs after those doses. It is possible that a modest protective effect may be obscured by the presence of countervailing selection pressures (such as high antibiotic use that favor an increase in colonization with antibiotic

  8. Invasive Group A Streptococcal Disease: Risk Factors for Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Factor, Stephanie H.; Levine, Orin S.; Schwartz, Benjamin; Harrison, Lee H.; Farley, Monica M.; McGeer, Allison; Schuchat, Anne

    2003-01-01

    We conducted a case-control study to identify risk factors for invasive group A streptococcal (GAS) infections, which can be fatal. Case-patients were identified when Streptoccus pyogenes was isolated from a normally sterile site and control subjects (two or more) were identified and matched to case-patients by using sequential-digit telephone dialing. All participants were noninstitutionalized surveillance area residents, >18 years of age. Conditional logistic regression identified the risk ...

  9. Clonal Expansion of the Macrolide Resistant ST386 within Pneumococcal Serotype 6C in France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janoir, Claire; Cohen, Robert; Levy, Corinne; Bingen, Edouard; Lepoutre, Agnès; Gutmann, Laurent; Varon, Emmanuelle

    2014-01-01

    In France, the use of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) lead to an overall significant decrease in PCV7 invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) incidence. However, the decrease in vaccine serotype prevalence was partially counterbalanced by the serotype replacement phenomenon. In this study, we analyzed the role of the newly described serotype 6C as one of the replacement serotypes. This work was conducted on a large time scale from the early PCV7 era (2002–2003) to the PCV13 era (2010–2011), both on IPD strains recovered from the whole population and nasopharyngeal colonizing strains isolated in infant less than two years, who are known to be the main reservoir for pneumococci. Serotype 6C took advantage over 6A and 6B serotypes, which both decreased over time. A continuous and significant increase in 6C IPD was observed in adults along the study period; in contrast, in children less than two years, only an increase in 6C nasopharyngeal carriage was found, the prevalence of serotype 6C in IPD remaining very low over time. Among 101 6C invasive and colonizing strains studied by MLST, 24 STs were found to be related to three major clonal complexes, CC395, CC176, and CC315. STs related to CC176 tend to disappear after 2009 and were essentially replaced by ST386 (CC315), which dramatically increased over time. This clonal expansion may be explained by the erythromycin and tetracycline resistances associated with this clone. Finally, the decrease observed in nasopharyngeal 6C carriage since 2010, likely related to the PCV13 introduction in the French immunization schedule, is expected to lead to a decrease in 6C IPD in adults thereafter. PMID:24603763

  10. Analysis of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae in invasive disease reveals lack of the capsule locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lâm, T-T; Claus, H; Frosch, M; Vogel, U

    2016-01-01

    Among invasive Haemophilus influenzae, unencapsulated strains have largely surpassed the previously predominant serotype b (Hib) because of Hib vaccination. Isolates without the genomic capsule (cap) locus are designated non-typeable H. influenzae (NTHi). They are different from capsule-deficient variants that show deletion of the capsule transport gene bexA within the cap locus. The frequency of capsule-deficient variants in invasive disease is unknown. We analysed 783 unencapsulated invasive isolates collected over 5 years in Germany and found no single capsule-deficient isolate. Invasive unencapsulated strains in Germany were exclusively NTHi. A negative serotyping result by slide agglutination was therefore highly predictive for NTHi. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The diagnosis and management of pre-invasive breast disease: Problems associated with management of pre-invasive lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purushotham, Anand D

    2003-01-01

    The treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) involves adequate surgical excision with adjuvant radiotherapy where appropriate. An inadequate excision margin and young age are independent risk factors for local recurrence. Routine surgery to axillary lymph nodes is not recommended in pure DCIS. In localised DCIS, adjuvant radiotherapy is recommended on the basis of tumour size, margin width and pathological subtypes. The role of adjuvant tamoxifen as systemic therapy is controversial. The treatment of atypical ductal/lobular hyperplasia and lobular carcinoma in situ involves surgical excision to exclude coexisting DCIS or invasive disease

  12. Application of minimally invasive technique in surgical treatment of pancreatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Yixi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, with the rapid development of minimally invasive concept, from laparoscopic operation to three-dimension laparoscopic technique and to robotic surgical system, treatment modalities have changed a lot. Pancreatic diseases, including multiple lesions, have different prognoses. An appropriate surgical procedure should be selected while ensuring the radical treatment of disease, so as to minimize the injury to patients and the impairment of organ function. Minimally invasive technique is of great significance in the surgical treatment of pancreatic diseases.

  13. Cost-effectiveness analysis of infant universal routine pneumococcal vaccination in Malaysia and Hong Kong

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, David Bin-Chia; Roberts, Craig; Lee, Vivian Wing Yan; Hong, Li-Wen; Tan, Kah Kee; Mak, Vivienne; Lee, Kenneth Kwing Chin

    2015-01-01

    Pneumococcal disease causes large morbidity, mortality and health care utilization and medical and non-medical costs, which can all be reduced by effective infant universal routine immunization programs with pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV). We evaluated the clinical and economic benefits of such programs with either 10- or 13-valent PCVs in Malaysia and Hong Kong by using an age-stratified Markov cohort model with many country-specific inputs. The incremental cost per quality-adjusted l...

  14. A nationwide study on the impact of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination on antibiotic use and ventilation tube insertion in Denmark 2000-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howitz, Michael Frantz; Harboe, Zitta Barrella; Ingels, Helene; Valentiner-Branth, Palle; Mølbak, Kåre; Djurhuus, Bjarki Ditlev

    2017-10-13

    Introduction of Pneumococcal Conjugated Vaccines (PCV) in national immunization programs have been successful in reducing the number of invasive and lower respiratory pneumococcal infections. The impact of the vaccines on upper respiratory infections caused by pneumococci is less clear although these account for most pneumococcal infections. In this study, we used likely proxies for respiratory infections in children, such as antibiotic use and ventilation tube insertions (VTI), to estimate the impact of the vaccine on a national level. The study was designed as a population-based retrospective observational study, comparing trends in the incidence rate of antibiotic prescriptions and VTIs in the period 2000-2014, where PCV7 was introduced in 2007 and PCV13 in 2010. The introduction of PCV7 and PCV13 correlated with changes in the incidence rate from an almost steady increase in prescription of antibiotics in the pre-PCV period to a decreasing incidence for all children age 0-15years. The 2.4 DDD per person year in 2014 was at almost the same level of antibiotic use as in 2000 at 2.3 DDD per person year. Similar patterns were observed in the mostly vaccinated age groups below 5years of age. For VTI we observed a decreasing incidence rate in the years following introduction of PCV13 ending with a slightly higher incidence at 35 per 1000 person years in 2014 compared to 31 in year 2000. We conclude that the steady increase in antibiotic use and VTI in the pre-PCV period have been partially reversed to near year 2000 levels after the introduction of PCV. This indicates that implementation of pneumococcal vaccines in the Childhood Vaccination Programme has likely reduced the incidence of upper respiratory diseases due to pneumococci in Denmark. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Development of non-invasive ventilation treatment practice for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Helle M; Titlestad, Ingrid L; Huniche, Lotte

    2017-01-01

    and identifying end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease posed difficulties and caused doubts concerning initiation and continuation of non-invasive ventilation as life-sustaining treatment. Health professionals expressed a need for knowledge of patients' perspectives and attitude towards non...... experienced fear and 14 discomfort during treatment. The co-researcher group described health professionals' perspectives and analysed treatment practice based on data from patients' perspectives developing new management strategies in clinical practice with non-invasive ventilation. Conclusion...

  16. Cost-effectiveness of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccination in Mongolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, Neisha; Chen, Cynthia; Yoong, Joanne; Luvsan, Munkh-Erdene; Fox, Kimberley; Sarankhuu, Amarzaya; La Vincente, Sophie; Jit, Mark

    2017-02-15

    The Ministry of Health (MOH), Mongolia, is considering introducing 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) in its national immunization programme to prevent the burden of disease caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae. This study evaluates the cost-effectiveness and budget impact of introducing PCV13 compared to no PCV vaccination in Mongolia. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of introducing PCV13 compared to no PCV vaccination was assessed using an age-stratified static multiple cohort model. The risk of various clinical presentations of pneumococcal disease (meningitis, pneumonia, non-meningitis non-pneumonia invasive pneumococcal disease and acute otitis media) at all ages for thirty birth cohorts was assessed. The analysis considered both health system and societal perspectives. A 3+0 vaccine schedule and price of US$3.30 per dose was assumed for the baseline scenario based on Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance's advance market commitment tail price. The ICER of PCV13 introduction is estimated at US$52 per disability-adjusted life year (DALY) averted (health system perspective), and cost-saving (societal perspective). Although indirect effects of PCV have been well-documented, a conservative scenario that does not consider indirect effects estimated PCV13 introduction to cost US$79 per DALY averted (health system perspective), and US$19 per DALY averted (societal perspective). Vaccination with PCV13 is expected to cost around US$920,000 in 2016, and thereafter US$820,000 every year. The programme is likely to reduce direct disease-related costs to MOH by US$440,000 in the first year, increasing to US$510,000 by 2025. Introducing PCV13 as part of Mongolia's national programme appears to be highly cost-effective when compared to no vaccination and cost-saving from a societal perspective at vaccine purchase prices offered through Gavi. Notwithstanding uncertainties around some parameters, cost-effectiveness of PCV introduction for Mongolia remains

  17. Triggers for driving treatment of at-risk patients with invasive fungal disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drgona, L.; Colita, A.; Klimko, N.; Rahav, G.; Ozcan, M.A.; Donnelly, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    Timing of treatment for invasive fungal disease (IFD) is critical for making appropriate clinical decisions. Historically, many centres have treated at-risk patients prior to disease detection to try to prevent fungal colonization or in response to antibiotic-resistant fever. Many studies have

  18. PNEUMOCOCCAL CAPSULAR ANTIGEN-DETECTION AND PNEUMOCOCCAL SEROLOGY IN PATIENTS WITH COMMUNITY ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOERSMA, WG; LOWENBERG, A; HOLLOWAY, Y; KUTTSCHRUTTER, H; SNIJDER, JAM; KOETER, GH

    1991-01-01

    Background Methods to determine the microbial cause of community acquired pneumonia include detection of pneumococcal antigen and measurement of pneumococcal capsular antibody response. Their usefulness compared with conventional microbiological techniques was investigated in patients with

  19. Clinical and Molecular Epidemiology of Childhood Invasive Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Disease in England and Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sarah; Vickers, Anna; Ladhani, Shamez N; Flynn, Sally; Platt, Steven; Ramsay, Mary E; Litt, David J; Slack, Mary P E

    2016-03-01

    In countries with established Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) immunization programs, nontypeable H. influenzae (NTHi) is now responsible for nearly all invasive H. influenzae cases across all age groups. Public Health England (PHE) conducts enhanced national surveillance of invasive H. influenzae disease in England and Wales. Invasive NTHi isolates submitted to Public Health England from children of ages 1 month to 10 years during 2003-2010 were characterized by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Detailed clinical information was obtained for all laboratory-confirmed cases of invasive NTHi disease in children during 2009-2013. In England and Wales, there were 7797 cases of invasive H. influenzae disease diagnosed during 2000-2013 and 1585 (20%) occurred in children aged 1 month to 10 years, where NTHi was responsible for 31-51 cases (incidence, 0.53-0.92/100,000) annually. Detailed clinical follow-up of 214 confirmed NTHi cases diagnosed in this age-group during 2009-2013 revealed that 52% (n = 111) occurred in <2-year-old and 52% (n=110) had comorbidity. Bacteremic pneumonia was the most common clinical presentation (n = 99, 46%), 16% (n = 34) required intensive care and 11% (n = 23) died. Characterization by biotyping and MLST of 316 NTHi strains from children with invasive disease during 2003-2010 revealed a genetically heterogeneous population (155 MLSTs) with diverse biotypes and no association with comorbidity status, clinical disease or outcome. The high level of genetic diversity in invasive NTHi strains highlights the difficulties in developing an effective vaccine against this pathogen.

  20. Invasive fungal disease in specific at-risk patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosario Urbino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematological patients, such as patients with lymphoproliferative syndromes, pediatric patients and patients in ICU, are not conventionally classified as high risk patients for the development of IFI, however invasive fungal infections should not be underestimated. In this subset of patients, particularly patients with lymphoproliferative syndromes are classified at intermediate risk for IFI especially if treated with monoclonal antibodies, purine analogs or steroids. With regard to pediatric patients the incidence of IFD is lower than in adults and is greater in patients with acute myeloid leukemia and in allotransplant patients. Finally, in patients in ICU there is high incidence of mold and Candida. Factors associated with increased mortality is the delay in admission in intensive care units, high-dose corticosteroid therapy, and GvHD.  

  1. Exploring the role of competition induced by non-vaccine serotypes for herd protection following pneumococcal vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masala, G L; Lipsitch, M; Bottomley, C; Flasche, S

    2017-11-01

    The competitive pressure from non-vaccine serotypes may have helped pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) to limit vaccine-type (VT) serotype prevalence. We aimed to investigate if, consequently, the indirect protection of vaccines targeting most pneumococcal serotypes could fall short of the profound effects of current formulations. We compared three previously described pneumococcal models harmonized to simulate 20 serotypes with a combined pre-vaccination prevalence in children younger than 5-years-old of 40%. We simulated vaccines of increasing valency by adding serotypes in order of their competitiveness and explored their ability to reduce VT carriage by 95% within 10 years after introduction. All models predicted that additional valency will reduce indirect vaccine effects and hence the overall vaccine impact on carriage both in children and adults. Consequently, the minimal effective coverage (efficacy against carriage×vaccine coverage) needed to eliminate VT carriage increased with increasing valency. One model predicted this effect to be modest, while the other two predicted that high-valency vaccines may struggle to eliminate VT pneumococci unless vaccine efficacy against carriage can be substantially improved. Similar results were obtained when settings of higher transmission intensity and different PCV formulations were explored. Failure to eliminate carriage as a result of increased valency could lead to overall decreased impact of vaccination if the disease burden caused by the added serotypes is low. Hence, a comparison of vaccine formulations of varying valency, and pan-valent formulations in particular, should consider the invasiveness of targeted serotypes, as well as efficacy against carriage. © 2017 The Authors.

  2. Initial Serological Response after Prime-boost Pneumococcal Vaccination in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Mai T T; Lindegaard, Hanne; Hendricks, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the initial serological responses to pneumococcal vaccination with the 13-valent protein-conjugated pneumococcal vaccine (PCV13) followed by the 23-valent polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccine (PPV23) among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with biological disease......-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARD) according to dosing and intervals between immunizations. METHODS: Investigator-initiated clinical trial. Patients with RA receiving bDMARD were randomized (1:1:1) to immunization with single dose PCV13 followed by PPV23 after 16 or 24 weeks, or double dose PCV13 followed by PPV23...... after 16 weeks. A comparison group of patients with RA treated with conventional synthetic (cs)DMARD received single dose PCV13 followed by PPV23 16 weeks later. Pneumococcal antibodies were collected before and 4 weeks after each vaccination. The primary endpoint was the proportion of participants...

  3. TGF-b2 induction regulates invasiveness of Theileria-transformed leukocytes and disease susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Chaussepied

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Theileria parasites invade and transform bovine leukocytes causing either East Coast fever (T. parva, or tropical theileriosis (T. annulata. Susceptible animals usually die within weeks of infection, but indigenous infected cattle show markedly reduced pathology, suggesting that host genetic factors may cause disease susceptibility. Attenuated live vaccines are widely used to control tropical theileriosis and attenuation is associated with reduced invasiveness of infected macrophages in vitro. Disease pathogenesis is therefore linked to aggressive invasiveness, rather than uncontrolled proliferation of Theileria-infected leukocytes. We show that the invasive potential of Theileria-transformed leukocytes involves TGF-b signalling. Attenuated live vaccine lines express reduced TGF-b2 and their invasiveness can be rescued with exogenous TGF-b. Importantly, infected macrophages from disease susceptible Holstein-Friesian (HF cows express more TGF-b2 and traverse Matrigel with great efficiency compared to those from disease-resistant Sahiwal cattle. Thus, TGF-b2 levels correlate with disease susceptibility. Using fluorescence and time-lapse video microscopy we show that Theileria-infected, disease-susceptible HF macrophages exhibit increased actin dynamics in their lamellipodia and podosomal adhesion structures and develop more membrane blebs. TGF-b2-associated invasiveness in HF macrophages has a transcription-independent element that relies on cytoskeleton remodelling via activation of Rho kinase (ROCK. We propose that a TGF-b autocrine loop confers an amoeboid-like motility on Theileria-infected leukocytes, which combines with MMP-dependent motility to drive invasiveness and virulence.

  4. Hearing loss in adults surviving pneumococcal meningitis is associated with otitis and pneumococcal serotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heckenberg, S.; Brouwer, M.; van den Ende, A.; Hensen, E.F.; van de Beek, D.

    2012-01-01

    Clin Microbiol Infect 2012; 18: 849-855 We assessed the incidence of hearing loss and its relationship with clinical characteristics and pneumococcal serotypes in adults surviving pneumococcal meningitis. We analysed hearing loss in 531 adults surviving pneumococcal meningitis included in two

  5. Escherichia coli in chronic inflammatory bowel diseases: An update on adherent invasive Escherichia coli pathogenicity

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez-Medina, Margarita; Garcia-Gil, Librado Jesus

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli), and particularly the adherent invasive E. coli (AIEC) pathotype, has been increasingly implicated in the ethiopathogenesis of Crohn’s disease (CD). E. coli strains with similar pathogenic features to AIEC have been associated with other intestinal disorders such as ulcerative colitis, colorectal cancer, and coeliac disease, but AIEC prevalence in these diseases remains largely unexplored. Since AIEC was described one decade ago, substantial progress has been made i...

  6. Pneumococcal responses are similar in Papua New Guinean children aged 3-5 years vaccinated in infancy with pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine with or without prior pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, or without pneumococcal vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita H J van den Biggelaar

    Full Text Available In an earlier trial, Papua New Guinean (PNG children at high risk of pneumococcal disease were randomized to receive 0 or 3 doses of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7, followed by a single dose of 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23 at 9 months of age. We here studied in a non-randomized follow-up trial the persistence of pneumococcal immunity in these children at 3-5 years of age (n = 132, and in 121 community controls of a similar age with no prior pneumococcal vaccination.Circulating IgG antibody titers to all PCV7 and PPV23-only serotypes 2, 5 and 7F were measured before and after challenge with 1/5th of a normal PPV23 dose. Serotype-specific memory B-cells were enumerated at 10 months and 3-5 years of age for a subgroup of study children.Serotype-specific IgG antibody titers before and after challenge were similar for children who received PCV7/PPV23, PPV23 only, or no pneumococcal vaccines. Before challenge, at least 89% and 59% of children in all groups had serotype-specific titers ≥ 0.35μg/ml and ≥ 1.0 μg/ml, respectively. Post-challenge antibody titers were higher or similar to pre-challenge titers for most children independent of pneumococcal vaccination history. The rise in antibody titers was significantly lower when pre-challenge titers were higher. Overall the relative number of serotype-specific memory B-cells remained the same or increased between 10 months and 3-5 years of age, and there were no differences in serotype-specific memory B-cell numbers at 3-5 years of age between the three groups.Immunity induced by PCV7 and/or PPV23 immunization in infancy does not exceed that of naturally acquired immunity in 3-5-year-old children living in a highly endemic area. Also, there was no evidence that PPV23 immunization in the first year of life following PCV7 priming induces longer-term hypo-responsiveness.Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01414504 and NCT00219401.

  7. Pneumococcal responses are similar in Papua New Guinean children aged 3-5 years vaccinated in infancy with pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine with or without prior pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, or without pneumococcal vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Peter C.; Fuery, Angela; Anderson, Denise; Opa, Christine; Saleu, Gerard; Lai, Mildred; Francis, Jacinta P.; Alpers, Michael P.; Pomat, William S.; Lehmann, Deborah

    2017-01-01

    Trial design In an earlier trial, Papua New Guinean (PNG) children at high risk of pneumococcal disease were randomized to receive 0 or 3 doses of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7), followed by a single dose of 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) at 9 months of age. We here studied in a non-randomized follow-up trial the persistence of pneumococcal immunity in these children at 3–5 years of age (n = 132), and in 121 community controls of a similar age with no prior pneumococcal vaccination. Methods Circulating IgG antibody titers to all PCV7 and PPV23-only serotypes 2, 5 and 7F were measured before and after challenge with 1/5th of a normal PPV23 dose. Serotype-specific memory B-cells were enumerated at 10 months and 3–5 years of age for a subgroup of study children. Results Serotype-specific IgG antibody titers before and after challenge were similar for children who received PCV7/PPV23, PPV23 only, or no pneumococcal vaccines. Before challenge, at least 89% and 59% of children in all groups had serotype-specific titers ≥ 0.35μg/ml and ≥ 1.0 μg/ml, respectively. Post-challenge antibody titers were higher or similar to pre-challenge titers for most children independent of pneumococcal vaccination history. The rise in antibody titers was significantly lower when pre-challenge titers were higher. Overall the relative number of serotype-specific memory B-cells remained the same or increased between 10 months and 3–5 years of age, and there were no differences in serotype-specific memory B-cell numbers at 3–5 years of age between the three groups. Conclusions Immunity induced by PCV7 and/or PPV23 immunization in infancy does not exceed that of naturally acquired immunity in 3-5-year-old children living in a highly endemic area. Also, there was no evidence that PPV23 immunization in the first year of life following PCV7 priming induces longer-term hypo-responsiveness. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01414504 and NCT

  8. Invasive Meningococcal Capsular Group Y Disease, England and Wales, 2007–2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucidarme, Jay; Newbold, Lynne S.; Gray, Stephen J.; Carr, Anthony D.; Findlow, Jamie; Ramsay, Mary E.; Kaczmarski, Edward B.; Borrow, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Enhanced national surveillance for invasive meningococcal disease in England and Wales identified an increase in laboratory-confirmed capsular group Y (MenY) disease from 34 cases in 2007 to 44 in 2008 and 65 in 2009. For cases diagnosed in 2009, patient median age at disease onset was 60 years; 39% of patients had underlying medical conditions, and 19% died. MenY isolates causing invasive disease during 2007–2009 belonged mainly to 1 of 4 clonal complexes (cc), cc23 (56% of isolates), cc174 (21%), cc167 (11%), and cc22 (8%). The 2009 increase resulted primarily from sequence type 1655 (cc23) (22 cases in 2009, compared with 4 cases each in 2007 and 2008). cc23 was associated with lpxL1 mutations and meningitis in younger age groups (65 years). The increase in MenY disease requires careful epidemiologic and molecular monitoring. PMID:22261040

  9. Invasive and non-invasive evaluation of spontaneous arteriogenesis in a novel porcine model for peripheral arterial obstructive disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschmann, Ivo R; Voskuil, Michiel; van Royen, Niels; Hoefer, Imo E; Scheffler, Klaus; Grundmann, Sebastian; Hennig, Jürgen; Schaper, Wolfgang; Bode, Christoph; Piek, Jan J

    2003-03-01

    Our current knowledge regarding the efficacy of factors stimulating collateral artery growth in the peripheral circulation primarily stems from models in small animals. However, experimental models in large sized animals are a prerequisite for extrapolation of growth factor therapy to patients with peripheral atherosclerotic obstructive disease. Therefore, we have developed a novel porcine femoral artery ligation model using non-invasive and invasive evaluation techniques. In 12 young farm pigs and nine older minipigs, a ligation of the superficial femoral artery was performed. Using an intra-arterial catheter, phosphate buffered saline (PBS) was administered with a first-pass over the collateral vascular bed. Directly after ligation as well as after 2 weeks of continuous infusion of PBS, perfusion of the leg was measured using various flow and pressure parameters. Using a pump driven extracorporal system, collateral conductance was determined under maximal vasodilatation. Conductance decreased after acute ligation to similar levels in both young farm pigs as well as the older minipigs (both 9.3% of normal perfusion) and recovered after 2 weeks to a higher value in farm pigs compared with minipigs (22.4 vs. 12.7% of normal; Parteries. To the best of our knowledge this is the first in vivo pig model for hemodynamic assessment of growth of collateral arteries in the peripheral circulation, that is suitable for evaluation of arteriogenic effects of growth factors or genes.

  10. Invasive meningococcal disease without meningitis: a forgotten diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walayat S

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Saqib Walayat,1 Nooreen Hussain,1 Abdullah H Malik,1 Elsa Vazquez-Melendez,1 Bhagat S Aulakh,2 Teresa Lynch1 1Department of Internal Medicine, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, Peoria, IL, USA; 2Department of Pulmonary/Critical Care Medicine, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, Peoria, IL, USA Abstract: Neisseria meningitidis, a Gram-negative diplococcus, is an uncommon cause of pneumonia. There have been only about 344 cases reported worldwide from 1906 to 2015. To our knowledge, there have been only 3 cases reported in the USA in the past 2 decades. We present a case of a 72-year-old male with a past medical history of severe COPD, obstructive sleep apnea, and stage I lung cancer status post-stereotactic body radiation therapy 1 year ago, who was admitted with a 6-day history of productive cough with yellowish sputum, shortness of breath, extreme myalgias, and fatigue. Chest X-ray revealed an infiltrative process in the left lower lung field and left-sided pleural effusion. Blood cultures grew beta-lactamase-negative N. meningitidis after 24 hours. Our patient was initially treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics, which were later switched to amoxicillin to complete a total of 14 days of antibiotics. Diagnosing meningococcal pneumonia requires a high level of suspicion, as sputum cultures may be falsely positive due to asymptomatic carriage of the organism in the upper respiratory tract in up to 10% of outpatient population. We highlight this case as early recognition and treatment is critical. The case fatality rate for N. meningitidis pneumonia has been reported to be higher compared with meningococcal meningitis. Keywords: Neisseria meningitidis, pneumonia, invasive meningococcal pneumonia, sepsis

  11. Spermidine Biosynthesis and Transport Modulate Pneumococcal Autolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    Polyamines are small cationic molecules that have far-reaching roles in biology. In the case of pathogenic bacteria, these functions include those central to their pathogenesis. Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major bacterial pathogen, causing a diverse range of diseases that account for significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. In this work, we characterize the polyamine biosynthetic pathway of S. pneumoniae, demonstrating that this organism produces spermidine from arginine. The synthesis of spermidine was found to be nonessential for growth in a polyamine-free chemically defined medium. However, mutant strains lacking the ability to synthesize or transport spermidine displayed a significant delay in the onset of autolysis. We provide evidence for a model in which spermidine modulates the activity of the major autolysin LytA in the pneumococcal cell wall compartment via interactions with negatively charged molecules, such as teichoic acids. PMID:25092031

  12. Presentation of life-threatening invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella disease in Malawian children: A prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLennan, Calman A; Msefula, Chisomo L; Gondwe, Esther N; Gilchrist, James J; Pensulo, Paul; Mandala, Wilson L; Mwimaniwa, Grace; Banda, Meraby; Kenny, Julia; Wilson, Lorna K; Phiri, Amos; MacLennan, Jenny M; Molyneux, Elizabeth M; Molyneux, Malcolm E; Graham, Stephen M

    2017-12-01

    Nontyphoidal Salmonellae commonly cause invasive disease in African children that is often fatal. The clinical diagnosis of these infections is hampered by the absence of a clear clinical syndrome. Drug resistance means that empirical antibiotic therapy is often ineffective and currently no vaccine is available. The study objective was to identify risk factors for mortality among children presenting to hospital with invasive Salmonella disease in Africa. We conducted a prospective study enrolling consecutive children with microbiologically-confirmed invasive Salmonella disease admitted to Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Blantyre, in 2006. Data on clinical presentation, co-morbidities and outcome were used to identify children at risk of inpatient mortality through logistic-regression modeling. Over one calendar year, 263 consecutive children presented with invasive Salmonella disease. Median age was 16 months (range 0-15 years) and 52/256 children (20%; 95%CI 15-25%) died. Nontyphoidal serovars caused 248/263 (94%) of cases. 211/259 (81%) of isolates were multi-drug resistant. 251/263 children presented with bacteremia, 6 with meningitis and 6 with both. Respiratory symptoms were present in 184/240 (77%; 95%CI 71-82%), 123/240 (51%; 95%CI 45-58%) had gastrointestinal symptoms and 101/240 (42%; 95%CI 36-49%) had an overlapping clinical syndrome. Presentation at Salmonella disease in Malawi is characterized by high mortality and prevalence of multi-drug resistant isolates, along with non-specific presentation. Young infants, children with dyspnea and HIV-infected children bear a disproportionate burden of the Salmonella-associated mortality in Malawi. Strategies to improve prevention, diagnosis and management of invasive Salmonella disease should be targeted at these children.

  13. Improvement of antibiotic therapy and ICU survival in severe non-pneumococcal community-acquired pneumonia: a matched case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattarello, Simone; Lagunes, Leonel; Vidaur, Loreto; Solé-Violán, Jordi; Zaragoza, Rafael; Vallés, Jordi; Torres, Antoni; Sierra, Rafael; Sebastian, Rosa; Rello, Jordi

    2015-09-10

    We aimed to compare intensive care unit mortality due to non-pneumococcal severe community-acquired pneumonia between the periods 2000-2002 and 2008-2014, and the impact of the improvement in antibiotic strategies on outcomes. This was a matched case-control study enrolling 144 patients with non-pneumococcal severe pneumonia: 72 patients from the 2000-2002 database (CAPUCI I group) were paired with 72 from the 2008-2014 period (CAPUCI II group), matched by the following variables: microorganism, shock at admission, invasive mechanical ventilation, immunocompromise, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and age over 65 years. The most frequent microorganism was methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (22.1%) followed by Legionella pneumophila and Haemophilus influenzae (each 20.7%); prevalence of shock was 59.7%, while 73.6% of patients needed invasive mechanical ventilation. Intensive care unit mortality was significantly lower in the CAPUCI II group (34.7% versus 16.7%; odds ratio (OR) 0.78, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.64-0.95; p = 0.02). Appropriate therapy according to microorganism was 91.5% in CAPUCI I and 92.7% in CAPUCI II, while combined therapy and early antibiotic treatment were significantly higher in CAPUCI II (76.4 versus 90.3% and 37.5 versus 63.9%; p antibiotic therapy (OR 0.23, 95% CI 0.07-0.74) and early antibiotic treatment (OR 0.07, 95% CI 0.02-0.22) were independently associated with decreased intensive care unit mortality. In non-pneumococcal severe community-acquired pneumonia , early antibiotic administration and use of combined antibiotic therapy were both associated with increased intensive care unit survival during the study period.

  14. Invasion speeds of Triatoma dimidiata, vector of Chagas disease: An application of orthogonal polynomials method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesk, Mohammed; Mahdjoub, Tewfik; Gourbière, Sébastien; Rabinovich, Jorge E; Menu, Frédéric

    2016-04-21

    Demographic processes and spatial dispersal of Triatoma dimidiata, a triatomine species vector of Chagas disease, are modeled by integrodifference equations to estimate invasion capacity of this species under different ecological conditions. The application of the theory of orthogonal polynomials and the steepest descent method applied to these equations, allow a good approximation of the abundance of the adult female population and the invasion speed. We show that: (1) under the same mean conditions of demography and dispersal, periodic spatial dispersal results in an invasion speed 2.5 times larger than the invasion speed when spatial dispersal is continuous; (2) when the invasion speed of periodic spatial dispersal is correlated to adverse demographic conditions, it is 34.7% higher as compared to a periodic dispersal that is correlated to good demographic conditions. From our results we conclude, in terms of triatomine population control, that the invasive success of T. dimidiata may be most sensitive to the probability of transition from juvenile to adult stage. We discuss our main theoretical predictions in the light of observed data in different triatomines species found in the literature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Characterization of some pneumococcal bacteriophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, R.D.; Guild, W.R.

    1976-01-01

    The growth of pneumococcal phages at high cell and phage densities is enhanced strongly by the substitution of potassium for sodium in the medium. Initial titers of 2 x 10 10 to 4 x 10 10 PFU/ml are readily obtained, and concentrated stocks are stable in a storage buffer described here. The mechanism of the cation effect is obscure. Phages ω3 and ω8 each have linear double-stranded DNA of 33 x 10 6 daltons per particle, with an apparent guanine plus cytosine content of 47 to 49 mol percent, as determined by buoyancy and melting temperature, but with an unusual absorbance spectrum. Efficiency of plating is high if sufficient time is allowed for a relatively slow adsorption, which differs several-fold in rate between the two phages. Morphologically, these and other pneumococcal phages are similar to coliphage lambda but with a longer tail and tail fiber. Upon UV inactivation, ω3 and ω8 have D 37 values of 33 and 55 J/m 2 , respectively, and each shows multiplicity reactivation. A total of 13 ts mutants have been isolated from the two phages, representing only two complementation groups; complementation and recombination occur between ω3 and ω8 mutants. Both phages provoke high-titer antisera with extensive cross-reactivity against a number of newly isolated pneumococcal phages

  16. Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) in stable patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijkstra, PJ

    2003-01-01

    While non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) has become an accepted management approach for patients with acute hypercapnia, it remains unclear whether it can also be beneficial in stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients with chronic respiratory failure. Randomised

  17. Advances in invasive evaluation and treatment of patients with ischemic heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeven, Barend Leendert van der

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to evaluate new developments in the treatment of patients with ischemic heart disease, with special focus to the invasive evaluation of plaque characteristics in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and treatment of STEMI patients with

  18. Inflammasome activation mediates inflammation and outcome in humans and mice with pneumococcal meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Inflammasomes are multi-protein intracellular signaling complexes that have recently been hypothesized to play a role in the regulation of the inflammation response. We studied associations between inflammasome-associated cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with bacterial meningitis and clinical outcome, and pneumococcal serotype. In a murine model of pneumococcal meningitis we examined the pathophysiological roles of two inflammasome proteins, NLRP3 (Nod-like receptor protein-3) and adaptor protein ASC (apoptosis-associated speck-like protein). Methods In a nationwide prospective cohort study, CSF cytokine levels were measured and related to clinical outcome and pneumococcal serotype. In a murine model of pneumococcal meningitis using Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 3, we examined bacterial titers, cytokine profiles and brain histology at 6 and 30 hours after inoculation in wild-type (WT), Asc and Nlrp3 deficient mice. Results In patients with bacterial meningitis, CSF levels of inflammasome associated cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 were related to complications, and unfavorable disease outcome. CSF levels of IL-1β were associated with pneumococcal serotype (pmeningitis, which may dependent on the pneumococcal serotype. PMID:23902681

  19. An audit of influenza and pneumococcal vaccination in rheumatology outpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell William S

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza and pneumococcal vaccination are recommended for a number of clinical risk groups including patients treated with major immunosuppressant disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. Such immunisation is not only safe but immunogenic in patients with rheumatic diseases. We sought to establish dual vaccination rates and significant influencing factors amongst our hospital rheumatology outpatients. Method We audited a sample of 101 patients attending hospital rheumatology outpatient clinics on any form of disease modifying treatment by clinical questionnaire and medical record perusal. Further data were collected from the local immunisation coordinating agency and analysed by logistic regression modelling. Results Although there was a high rate of awareness with regard to immunisation, fewer patients on major immunosuppressants were vaccinated than patients with additional clinical risk factors against influenza (53% vs 93%, p Conclusion Influenza and pneumococcal immunisation is suboptimal amongst patients on current immunosuppressant treatments attending rheumatology outpatient clinics. Raising awareness amongst patients may not be sufficient to improve vaccination rates and alternative strategies such as obligatory pneumococcal vaccination prior to treatment initiation and primary care provider education need to be explored.

  20. Host genetics and invasive fungal diseases : towards improved diagnosis and therapy?

    OpenAIRE

    Cunha, Cristina; Carvalho, Agostinho

    2012-01-01

    Invasive fungal diseases are life-threatening conditions affecting severely immunocompromised patients such as stem-cell transplant recipients. Recent concerns over antifungal prescription and the exceptionally high healthcare costs owing to the chronic course and high mortality rates of fungal diseases have been shifting the attention from universal antifungal prophylaxis to risk stratification and preemptive approaches [1]. This has motivated the search for ‘individual’ risk factors with pr...

  1. Role of minimally invasive surgery in the treatment of diverticular disease: an evidence-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissolati, Massimiliano; Orsenigo, Elena; Staudacher, Carlo

    2015-12-01

    The clinical spectrum of diverticular disease varies from asymptomatic diverticulosis to symptomatic disease with potentially fatal complications, such as perforation or bleeding. While the presence of diverticula is common, symptomatic diverticulitis is relatively uncommon, occurring in an estimated 10-30 % of patients. There is continued debate as to whether patients should undergo elective resection for diverticular disease and regarding the role of minimally invasive surgery. Since the first publication on laparoscopic colorectal procedures, the interest in minimally invasive surgery has kept growing. Laparoscopic sigmoid resection with restoration of continuity is currently the prevailing modality for treating acute and recurrent sigmoid diverticulitis. However, it still remains unclear whether laparoscopy should be recommended also for complicated sigmoid diverticulitis. The potential benefits of reduced pain and analgesic requirements, smaller scars, and shorter hospital stay but longer operative times are appealing to both patients and surgeons. Nevertheless, there many concerns regarding the time and the type of surgery. Although the role of minimally invasive surgery in the treatment of colonic diseases is progressively increased, current randomized controlled trials should demonstrate whether laparoscopic lavage, Hartmann's procedure or resection and anastomosis achieve the best results for patients. This review aimed to analyze the results of laparoscopic colonic resection for patients with uncomplicated and complicated forms of sigmoid diverticular disease and to determine what stages profit from a laparoscopic procedure and whether the approach can be performed with a low complication rate even for patients with complicated forms of the disease.

  2. Peritoneal B-1b and B-2 B-cells confer long-term protection from pneumococcal serotype 3 infection after vaccination with Prevnar-13 and are defective in sickle cell disease mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotte, Christina; Szczepanek, Steven M

    2017-06-16

    Long-term immunity after inoculation with the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (Prevnar-13) is impaired in sickle cell disease (SCD) mice. We sought to determine which B-cell subsets are defective in SCD mice after vaccination with Prevnar-13, yet confer long-term immunity in wild-type (WT) mice. We vaccinated WT and SCD mice three times at three week intervals with Prevnar-13. Fourteen weeks later, 5∗10 4 cells of isolated peritoneal B-1a, B-1b, and B-2 cells were harvested and intraperitoneally transferred to Rag -/- recipients. A week later recipients were intraperitoneally challenged with 10 3 CFU of Streptococcus pneumoniae (serotype 3). Recipient mice that received either B-1b or B-2 B-cells from WT mice survived challenge, whereas mice that received B-1a cells died. Recipient mice that received B-1a, B-1b, or B-2 cells from SCD mice died after challenge. Both B-1b and B-2 cells appear to confer long-term immunity after Prevnar-13 vaccination, yet neither subset functions properly in SCD mice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Non-Invasive Therapy of Peripheral Arterial Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcial, José M; Pérez, Reynerio; Vargas, Pedro; Franqui-Rivera, Hilton

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Lifestyle changes, like the cessation of the use of tobacco as well as a modification of dietary and exercise habits, can be the most cost-effective interventions in patients with PAD. Smocking cessation is the most important intervention, since it increases survival in these patients. Antiplatelet therapy is an essential component in the treatment of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) of the lower extremities. In addition to delaying arterial obstructive progression, these agents are most usefull in reducing adverse cardiovascular events such as non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI), stroke and vascular death. Mainstay of treatment continues to be aspirin monotherapy (75-325mg daily). Current treatment for lower extremity PAD is directed towards the relief of symptoms and improvement in QoL. The two agents which have consistently been found to be most efficient in achieving these goals are cilostazol and naftidrofuryl oxalate. Naftidrofuryl oxalate may emerge as the most efficient and cost-effective treatment for symptom relief.

  4. Capsular switching as a strategy to increase pneumococcal virulence in experimental otitis media model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabharwal, Vishakha; Stevenson, Abbie; Figueira, Marisol; Orthopoulos, George; Trzciński, Krzysztof; Pelton, Stephen I

    2014-04-01

    We hypothesized that capsular switch event, in which pneumococcus acquires a new capsule operon by horizontal gene transfer, may result in emergence of strains with increased virulence in acute otitis media. Using serotype 6A strain from a patient with invasive pneumococcal disease and clonally distant serotype 6C strain isolated from asymptomatic carrier we created 6A:6C (6A background with 6C capsule) capsular transformants and applied whole genome macro-restriction analysis to assess conservation of the 6A chassis. Next, we assessed complement (C3) and antibodies deposition on surface of pneumococcal cells and tested capsule recipient, capsule donor and two 6A:6C transformants for virulence in chinchilla experimental otitis media model. Both 6A:6C(1 or 2) transformants bound less C3 compared to 6C capsule-donor strain but more compared to serotype 6A capsule-recipient strain. Pneumococci were present in significantly higher proportion of ears among animals challenged with either of two 6A:6C(1 or 2) transformants compared to chinchillas infected with 6C capsule-donor strain [p < 0.001] whereas a significantly decreased proportion of ears were infected with 6A:6C(1 or 2) transformants as compared to 6A capsule-recipient strain. Our observations though limited to two serotypes demonstrate that capsular switch events can result in Streptococcus pneumoniae strains of enhanced virulence for respiratory tract infection. Copyright © 2014 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Pneumococcal vaccination reduces the risk of community-acquired pneumonia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Junko; Mori, Mitsuru; Ohnishi, Hirofumi; Tsugawa, Takeshi; Hori, Tsukasa; Yoto, Yuko; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki

    2017-03-01

    The seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was introduced to Japan in 2009, after which there was a rapid decline in invasive pneumococcal disease. There are few data, however, on the effectiveness of PCV7 against community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). We conducted an ambispective cohort study among children aged 0-6 years old who attended day-care centers. A total of 624 children at 10 day-care centers in Sapporo, Japan participated in the study. The parents reported whether their child had received PCV7 one or more times, as well as the exact dates of vaccination from records in maternal and child health handbooks marked by pediatricians. Each CAP event was reported by parents according to doctor diagnosis. A Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to calculate the hazard ratio (HR) and 95%CI of CAP incidence reduced by PCV7 inoculation. During the observational period, 94 subjects contracted CAP. After adjusting for potentially confounding variables, inoculation with PCV7 was significantly associated with a reduced risk of CAP (HR, 0.22; 95%CI: 0.13-0.34). On stratified analysis by age, PCV7 was significantly associated with a reduced risk of CAP in both children aged <3 years (HR, 0.31; 95%CI: 0.14-0.71), and those ≥3 years (HR, 0.20; 95%CI: 0.09-0.43). PCV7 is highly effective in reducing the risk of CAP in children attending day-care centers. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  6. Safety and immunogenicity of neonatal pneumococcal conjugate vaccination in Papua New Guinean children: a randomised controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William S Pomat

    Full Text Available Approximately 826,000 children, mostly young infants, die annually from invasive pneumococcal disease. A 6-10-14-week schedule of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV is efficacious but neonatal PCV may provide earlier protection and better coverage. We conducted an open randomized controlled trial in Papua New Guinea to compare safety, immunogenicity and priming for memory of 7-valent PCV (PCV7 given in a 0-1-2-month (neonatal schedule with that of the routine 1-2-3-month (infant schedule.We randomized 318 infants at birth to receive PCV7 in the neonatal or infant schedule or no PCV7. All infants received 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV at age 9 months. Serotype-specific serum IgG for PCV7 (VT serotypes and non-VT serotypes 2, 5 and 7F were measured at birth and 2, 3, 4, 9, 10 and 18 months of age. Primary outcomes were geometric mean concentrations (GMCs and proportions with concentration ≥ 0.35 µg/ml of VT serotype-specific pneumococcal IgG at age 2 months and one month post-PPV.We enrolled 101, 105 and 106 infants, respectively, into neonatal, infant and control groups. Despite high background levels of maternally derived antibody, both PCV7 groups had higher GMCs than controls at age 2 months for serotypes 4 (p<0.001 and 9V (p<0.05 and at age 3 months for all VTs except 6B. GMCs for serotypes 4, 9V, 18C and 19F were significantly higher (p<0.001 at age 2 months in the neonatal (one month post-dose2 PCV7 than in the infant group (one month post-dose1 PCV7. PPV induced significantly higher VT antibody responses in PCV7-primed than unprimed infants, with neonatal and infant groups equivalent. High VT and non-VT antibody concentrations generally persisted to age 18 months.PCV7 is well-tolerated and immunogenic in PNG neonates and young infants and induces immunologic memory to PPV booster at age 9 months with antibody levels maintained to age 18 months.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00219401.

  7. Pneumococcal vaccination in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: A multicenter placebo-controlled randomized double-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabar, Sophie; Groh, Matthieu; Bahuaud, Mathilde; Le Guern, Véronique; Costedoat-Chalumeau, Nathalie; Mathian, Alexis; Hanslik, Thomas; Guillevin, Loïc; Batteux, Frédéric; Launay, Odile

    2017-09-05

    Invasive pneumococcal disease and respiratory tract infections are both frequent and severe in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This study aimed to compare the immunological efficacy and safety of pneumococcal vaccination with the 23-valent polysaccharide (PPS) vaccine alone to a sequential immunization with the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate (PnCj) vaccine followed by PPS in patients with SLE and stable diseaase. Multicenter randomized placebo-controlled double-blind trial: PPS vaccine alone (placebo-PPS group) or PnCj vaccine followed by PPS vaccine (PnCj-PPS group) 24weeks later. The primary endpoint was the rate of responders at week 28 to at least 5 of the 7 serotypes (4, 6B, 9V, 14, 18C, 19F and 23F) shared by both PPS and PnCj. Pneumococcal IgG antibodies' opsonophagocytic activity (OPA) were also assessed. Twenty-five patients in the placebo-PPS group and 17 in the PnCj-PPS group were included in a modified intention-to-treat analysis. The primary endpoint was reached in 72% (18/25) in the placebo-PPS and 76% (13/17) in the PnCj-PPS group (p=0.75). There was no difference in the rates of responders with OPA. At week 52, 13/18 (72%) patients in the placebo-PPS group and 10/13 (77%) patients in the PnCj-PPS group (p=0.77) that met the primary endpoint at week 28 were still responders to ≥5/7 serotypes shared by both PPS and PnCj vaccines. Nine SLE flares were reported in 6 patients (4 in the placebo-PPS and 2 in the PnCj-PPS groups respectively, p=0.70). Sequential administration of PnCj vaccine followed by PPS vaccine is safe and shows short-term immunological efficacy in patients with SLE but was not superior to the PPS vaccine alone. www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT NCT00611663. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Percolation-based risk index for pathogen invasion: application to soilborne disease in propagation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggi, S; Neri, F M; Deytieux, V; Bates, A; Otten, W; Gilligan, C A; Bailey, D J

    2013-10-01

    Propagation systems for seedling growth play a major role in agriculture, and in notable cases (such as organic systems), are under constant threat from soil and seedborne fungal plant pathogens such as Rhizoctonia solani or Pythium spp. Yet, to date little is known that links the risk of disease invasion to the host density, which is an agronomic characteristic that can be readily controlled. We introduce here, for the first time in an agronomic system, a percolation framework to analyze the link. We set up an experiment to study the spread of the ubiquitous fungus R. solani in replicated propagation systems with different planting densities, and fit a percolation-based epidemiological model to the data using Bayesian inference methods. The estimated probability of pathogen transmission between infected and susceptible plants is used to calculate the risk of invasion. By comparing the transmission probability and the risk values obtained for different planting densities, we are able to give evidence of a nonlinear relationship between disease invasion and the inter-plant spacing, hence to demonstrate the existence of a spatial threshold for epidemic invasion. The implications and potential use of our methods for the evaluation of disease control strategies are discussed.

  9. Repeat pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine in Indigenous Australian adults is associated with decreased immune responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moberley, Sarah; Licciardi, Paul V; Balloch, Anne; Andrews, Ross; Leach, Amanda J; Kirkwood, Marie; Binks, Paula; Mulholland, Kim; Carapetis, Jonathan; Tang, Mimi L K; Skull, Sue

    2017-05-19

    Indigenous adults residing in the Northern Territory of Australia experience elevated rates of invasive pneumococcal disease despite the routine use of 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (23vPPV). We hypothesised that the limited protection from 23vPPV may be due to hyporesponsiveness as a result of vaccine failure from repeated vaccination. To explore this possibility, we evaluated the immune response to a first and second dose of 23vPPV in Indigenous adults and a first dose of 23vPPV in non-Indigenous adults. Serotype-specific IgG was measured by ELISA for all 23 vaccine serotypes at baseline and at one month post-vaccination. Individuals were considered to have an adequate immune response if paired sera demonstrated either: a four-fold rise in antibody concentration; a two-fold rise if the post vaccination antibody was >1.3μg/ml but 4.0μg/ml for at least half of the serotypes tested (12/23). Our per-protocol analysis included the comparison of outcomes for three groups: Indigenous adults receiving a second 23vPPV dose (N=20) and Indigenous (N=60) and non-Indigenous adults (N=25) receiving their first 23vPPV dose. All non-Indigenous adults receiving a first dose of 23vPPV mounted an adequate immune response (25/25). There was no significant difference in the proportion of individuals with an adequate response using our definition (primary endpoint), with 88% of Indigenous adults mounted an adequate response following first dose 23vPPV (53/60) compared to 70% having an adequate response following a second dose of 23vPPV (14/20; p=0.05). The risk difference between Indigenous participants receiving first dose compared to non-Indigenous participants receiving first dose was significant when comparing a response threshold of at least 70% (-27%, 95% CI: -43% to -11%; p=0.01) and 90% (-38%, 95% CI: -60% to -16%; p=0.006) of serotypes with a positive response. Indigenous participants demonstrated a poorer response to a first dose 23vPPV compared to their

  10. SHOULD WE PROTECT THE CHILDREN AGAINST PNEUMOCOCCAL INFECTION?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Baranov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Diseases caused by streptococcus are a serious issue for the health care worldwide mostly due to wide spread, high lethal risk in the event of the severe run, increasing resistance of pneumococcus to antibacterial therapy, troubles with high efficiency of vaccines as pertaining to the special structure of the pathogen. Every year 1,6 mln people die of the diseases caused by pneumococcus worldwide, 50-70% of whom are children under 5 years. The highest morbidity falls onto the infants under 2 and younger and the elderly people. HIV infection and other immunodeficiency states increase the chance to get infected with pneumococcus caused diseases. There is a wide variety of pneumococci (about 90 serotypes which have different degrees of virulence and pathogenesis. It is evident that on the one hand vaccines offered for the struggle against this dangerous infection should protect against the most widely spread and harmful serotypes and on the other hand should have a high degree of efficiency and safety for the one to be vaccinated. Today healthcare services make use of 7-valent conjugate polysaccharide-baleuronic vaccine (PCVB7 and nonconjugate polysaccharide vaccine against 23 serotypes. 23-valent vaccines are designed for the adolescent and elderly people, yet it is not licensed for the application among patients aged under2 who are the primary target group for the vaccination. PCVB7 incorporated serotypes causing invasive pneumococcal diseases among children in 60-85% of cases. The vaccine is well tolerated and deemed to be safe. It forms an express immune response (cellular, humoral, mucosal and also reduces the nasopharyngeal bacteria carrying. This vaccine is highly immunogenic across all the age groups yet it is not licensed for the application among children under 5, including infants (under 12 months. Acknowledging high importance of diseases caused by pneumococci among infants, high efficiency and safety of PCVB7 in the given age group who

  11. The role of pneumococcal infection in development of exacerbations in children with bronchial asthma and obstructive bronchitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Kukhtinova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumococcal infection remains the key cause of severe diseases of lower airways and deaths in children. The objective: to study the role of pneumococcal infection in pathogenesis of exacerbations of recurrent obstructive pulmonary diseases. Methods: etiological structure of lower airways infections was evaluated in 125 patients 1–15 years old with bronchial asthma or recurrent bronchitis. Results: etiologic role of Streptococcus pneumoniae in development of low airways infections was detected in 48% of patients with atopic asthma, 85% — with asthma without atopy, 97% — with recurrent bronchitis. Repeated microbiological examination confirmed chronic carriage of S. рneumoniae in nasopharinx in 31% of patients. Conclusion: early active prophylaxis with vaccine against pneumococcal infection including conjugated vaccines is able to prevent further progression of a disease.Key words: children, bronchial asthma, obstructive bronchitis, exacerbation, pneumococcal infection.

  12. Ten years of surveillance for invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae during the era of antiretroviral scale-up and cotrimoxazole prophylaxis in Malawi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean B Everett

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available To document trends in invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD in a central hospital in Malawi during the period of national scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART and cotrimoxazole prophylaxis.Between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2009 almost 100,000 blood cultures and 40,000 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF cultures were obtained from adults and children admitted to the Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Blantyre, Malawi with suspected severe bacterial infection.4,445 pneumococcal isolates were obtained over the 10 year period. 1,837 were from children: 885 (19.9% from blood and 952 (21.4% from CSF. 2,608 were from adults: 1,813 (40.8% from blood and 795 (17.9% from CSF. At the start of the surveillance period cotrimoxazole resistance was 73.8% and at the end was 92.6%. Multidrug resistance (MDR was present in almost one third of isolates and was constant over time. Free ART was introduced in Malawi in 2004. From 2005 onwards there was a decline in invasive pneumococcal infections with a negative correlation between ART scale-up and the decline in IPD (Pearson's correlation r = -0.91; p<0.001.During 2004-2009, national ART scale-up in Malawi was associated with a downward trend in IPD at QECH. The introduction of cotrimoxazole prophylaxis in HIV-infected groups has not coincided with a further increase in pneumococcal cotrimoxazole or multidrug resistance. These data highlight the importance of surveillance for high disease burden infections such as IPD in the region, which will be vital for monitoring pneumococcal conjugate vaccine introduction into national immunisation programmes.

  13. Prospective Surveillance of Invasive Group A Streptococcal Disease, Fiji, 2005–2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenney, Adam; Kado, Joseph; Good, Michael F.; Batzloff, Michael; Waqatakirewa, Lepani; Mullholland, E. Kim; Carapetis, Jonathan R.

    2009-01-01

    We undertook a prospective active surveillance study of invasive group A streptococcal (GAS) disease in Fiji over a 23-month period, 2005–2007. We identified 64 cases of invasive GAS disease, which represents an average annualized all-ages incidence of 9.9 cases/100,000 population per year (95% confidence interval [CI] 7.6–12.6). Rates were highest in those >65 years of age and in those <5 years, particularly in infants, for whom the incidence was 44.9/100,000 (95% CI 18.1–92.5). The case-fatality rate was 32% and was associated with increasing age and underlying coexisting disease, including diabetes and renal disease. Fifty-five of the GAS isolates underwent emm sequence typing; the types were highly diverse, with 38 different emm subtypes and no particular dominant type. Our data support the view that invasive GAS disease is common in developing countries and deserves increased public health attention. PMID:19193265

  14. Characterization of a pneumococcal meningitis mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mook-Kanamori Barry

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background S. pneumoniae is the most common causative agent of meningitis, and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. We aimed to develop an integrated and representative pneumococcal meningitis mouse model resembling the human situation. Methods Adult mice (C57BL/6 were inoculated in the cisterna magna with increasing doses of S. pneumoniae serotype 3 colony forming units (CFU; n = 24, 104, 105, 106 and 107 CFU and survival studies were performed. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, brain, blood, spleen, and lungs were collected. Subsequently, mice were inoculated with 104 CFU S. pneumoniae serotype 3 and sacrificed at 6 (n = 6 and 30 hours (n = 6. Outcome parameters were bacterial outgrowth, clinical score, and cytokine and chemokine levels (using Luminex® in CSF, blood and brain. Meningeal inflammation, neutrophil infiltration, parenchymal and subarachnoidal hemorrhages, microglial activation and hippocampal apoptosis were assessed in histopathological studies. Results Lower doses of bacteria delayed onset of illness and time of death (median survival CFU 104, 56 hrs; 105, 38 hrs, 106, 28 hrs. 107, 24 hrs. Bacterial titers in brain and CSF were similar in all mice at the end-stage of disease independent of inoculation dose, though bacterial outgrowth in the systemic compartment was less at lower inoculation doses. At 30 hours after inoculation with 104 CFU of S. pneumoniae, blood levels of KC, IL6, MIP-2 and IFN- γ were elevated, as were brain homogenate levels of KC, MIP-2, IL-6, IL-1β and RANTES. Brain histology uniformly showed meningeal inflammation at 6 hours, and, neutrophil infiltration, microglial activation, and hippocampal apoptosis at 30 hours. Parenchymal and subarachnoidal and cortical hemorrhages were seen in 5 of 6 and 3 of 6 mice at 6 and 30 hours, respectively. Conclusion We have developed and validated a murine model of pneumococcal meningitis.

  15. Effects of climate change, invasive species, and disease on the distribution of native European crayfishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capinha, César; Larson, Eric R; Tricarico, Elena; Olden, Julian D; Gherardi, Francesca

    2013-08-01

    Climate change will require species to adapt to new conditions or follow preferred climates to higher latitudes or elevations, but many dispersal-limited freshwater species may be unable to move due to barriers imposed by watershed boundaries. In addition, invasive nonnative species may expand into new regions under future climate conditions and contribute to the decline of native species. We evaluated future distributions for the threatened European crayfish fauna in response to climate change, watershed boundaries, and the spread of invasive crayfishes, which transmit the crayfish plague, a lethal disease for native European crayfishes. We used climate projections from general circulation models and statistical models based on Mahalanobis distance to predict climate-suitable regions for native and invasive crayfishes in the middle and at the end of the 21st century. We identified these suitable regions as accessible or inaccessible on the basis of major watershed boundaries and present occurrences and evaluated potential future overlap with 3 invasive North American crayfishes. Climate-suitable areas decreased for native crayfishes by 19% to 72%, and the majority of future suitable areas for most of these species were inaccessible relative to native and current distributions. Overlap with invasive crayfish plague-transmitting species was predicted to increase. Some native crayfish species (e.g., noble crayfish [Astacus astacus]) had no future refugia that were unsuitable for the modeled nonnative species. Our results emphasize the importance of preventing additional introductions and spread of invasive crayfishes in Europe to minimize interactions between the multiple stressors of climate change and invasive species, while suggesting candidate regions for the debatable management option of assisted colonization. © 2013 Society for Conservation Biology.

  16. The Speed of Invasion: Rates of Spread for Thirteen Exotic Forest Insects and Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander M. Evans

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Invasive, exotic insects and diseases have a devastating effect on North American forests. The rate of spread, or range expansion, is one of the main determinants of an invasive organism’s impact, and can play a major role in structuring management response options. To better understand how exotic organisms have spread through our forests, this study employs a consistent, rigorous analytical framework to analyze a comprehensive geospatial database for the spread of seven exotic insects and six diseases. This study includes new data for six insects and two diseases in combination with five invasive species previously analyzed using the same technique. The quantile regression analysis of over 3000 records of infestation over the preceding century show that the rate of spread of invasive forest insects and diseases ranges from 4.2 km·year−1 to 57.0 km·year−1. The slowest disease spread was white pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola at 7.4 km·year−1 while the most rapid disease spread was chestnut blight (Cryphonectria parasitica at 31.3 km·year−1. The slowest insect spread was balsam woolly adelgid (Adelges piceae (4.2 km·year−1 while the fastest was emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis at 57.0 km·year−1. Species that can fly long distances or are vectored by flying insects have spread faster than those that are passively dispersed. This analysis highlights the difficulty of estimating spread rates from studies of individual dispersal or flight distances, but the estimated spread rates in this study are generally in line with previous estimates.

  17. Patient with vascular disease: diagnosis and minimally invasive therapy. Which techniques for which disease?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauffmann, G.W.; Grenacher, L.; Bahner, M.L.; Hess, T.; Richter, G.M.

    2001-01-01

    The non-invasive imaging modalities, color coded duplex sonography (CCDS), magnetic resonance tomography (MRT), and computed tomography (CT), have pushed conventional angiography out of most diagnostic fields. The experienced user will achieve fast, reliable answers with CCDS in dedicated clinical settings. MRT as well as CT are concurring imaging modalities for the most appropriate diagnostic answer. Not only pure image quality, but also patient management, and availability play a major role. Catheter based angiography will in the future still play a role in mesenteric ischemia (nonocclusive disease) and for imaging of very small vessel pathology, e.g. on panarteriitis nodosa. At the moment, peripheral leg run-offs are still best performed with conventional angiography, nevertheless, MR as well as CT seem to have the ability to perform diagnostic procedures. Ongoing studies will allow a solid judgement in the near future. The true value of catheter angiography is in the direct assessment, planning, and performance of interventional procedures, e.g. catheter based obliteration or revascularization. Implantation of stent devices and a whole range of different mechanical and pharmacological revascularization procedures have improved the interventional management of vascular stenoses and occlusions. The interventional radiologist is treating physician in the classical sense in this setting. Acute bleeding episodes, e.g. in the brain, thorax, abdomen, or pelvis, are best imaged with computed tomography. Conventional angiography still plays a major diagnostic and therapeutic role in bleeding into preformed cavities, such as the bile ducts or the intestine. In this setting, all available information including CT scans should be valued. For complex therapeutic regimens in oncology or in pure palliative situations, angiographic diagnosis followed by embolization and/or ablation therapy is established. (orig.) [de

  18. Presentation of life-threatening invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella disease in Malawian children: A prospective observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Msefula, Chisomo L.; Gondwe, Esther N.; Gilchrist, James J.; Pensulo, Paul; Mandala, Wilson L.; Mwimaniwa, Grace; Banda, Meraby; Kenny, Julia; Wilson, Lorna K.; Phiri, Amos; MacLennan, Jenny M.; Molyneux, Elizabeth M.; Molyneux, Malcolm E.; Graham, Stephen M.

    2017-01-01

    Nontyphoidal Salmonellae commonly cause invasive disease in African children that is often fatal. The clinical diagnosis of these infections is hampered by the absence of a clear clinical syndrome. Drug resistance means that empirical antibiotic therapy is often ineffective and currently no vaccine is available. The study objective was to identify risk factors for mortality among children presenting to hospital with invasive Salmonella disease in Africa. We conducted a prospective study enrolling consecutive children with microbiologically-confirmed invasive Salmonella disease admitted to Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Blantyre, in 2006. Data on clinical presentation, co-morbidities and outcome were used to identify children at risk of inpatient mortality through logistic-regression modeling. Over one calendar year, 263 consecutive children presented with invasive Salmonella disease. Median age was 16 months (range 0–15 years) and 52/256 children (20%; 95%CI 15–25%) died. Nontyphoidal serovars caused 248/263 (94%) of cases. 211/259 (81%) of isolates were multi-drug resistant. 251/263 children presented with bacteremia, 6 with meningitis and 6 with both. Respiratory symptoms were present in 184/240 (77%; 95%CI 71–82%), 123/240 (51%; 95%CI 45–58%) had gastrointestinal symptoms and 101/240 (42%; 95%CI 36–49%) had an overlapping clinical syndrome. Presentation at <7 months (OR 10.0; 95%CI 2.8–35.1), dyspnea (OR 4.2; 95%CI 1.5–12.0) and HIV infection (OR 3.3; 95%CI 1.1–10.2) were independent risk factors for inpatient mortality. Invasive Salmonella disease in Malawi is characterized by high mortality and prevalence of multi-drug resistant isolates, along with non-specific presentation. Young infants, children with dyspnea and HIV-infected children bear a disproportionate burden of the Salmonella-associated mortality in Malawi. Strategies to improve prevention, diagnosis and management of invasive Salmonella disease should be targeted at these children

  19. Presentation of life-threatening invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella disease in Malawian children: A prospective observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calman A MacLennan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Nontyphoidal Salmonellae commonly cause invasive disease in African children that is often fatal. The clinical diagnosis of these infections is hampered by the absence of a clear clinical syndrome. Drug resistance means that empirical antibiotic therapy is often ineffective and currently no vaccine is available. The study objective was to identify risk factors for mortality among children presenting to hospital with invasive Salmonella disease in Africa. We conducted a prospective study enrolling consecutive children with microbiologically-confirmed invasive Salmonella disease admitted to Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Blantyre, in 2006. Data on clinical presentation, co-morbidities and outcome were used to identify children at risk of inpatient mortality through logistic-regression modeling. Over one calendar year, 263 consecutive children presented with invasive Salmonella disease. Median age was 16 months (range 0-15 years and 52/256 children (20%; 95%CI 15-25% died. Nontyphoidal serovars caused 248/263 (94% of cases. 211/259 (81% of isolates were multi-drug resistant. 251/263 children presented with bacteremia, 6 with meningitis and 6 with both. Respiratory symptoms were present in 184/240 (77%; 95%CI 71-82%, 123/240 (51%; 95%CI 45-58% had gastrointestinal symptoms and 101/240 (42%; 95%CI 36-49% had an overlapping clinical syndrome. Presentation at <7 months (OR 10.0; 95%CI 2.8-35.1, dyspnea (OR 4.2; 95%CI 1.5-12.0 and HIV infection (OR 3.3; 95%CI 1.1-10.2 were independent risk factors for inpatient mortality. Invasive Salmonella disease in Malawi is characterized by high mortality and prevalence of multi-drug resistant isolates, along with non-specific presentation. Young infants, children with dyspnea and HIV-infected children bear a disproportionate burden of the Salmonella-associated mortality in Malawi. Strategies to improve prevention, diagnosis and management of invasive Salmonella disease should be targeted at these children.

  20. Epidemiology of invasive Haemophilus influenzae type b disease and the susceptibility of aggregate hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danuz, Wanda Alexandra

    2015-02-01

    Haemophilus influenzae type b bacteria has been responsible for recent increase in invasive disease in the adult population of the United States. This increase in H. influenzae infections is greatest in individuals above 65 years of age. A plausible explanation for this increase may be the changes observed in the epidemiology of invasive H. influenzae type b (Hib) disease and the susceptibility of aggregate hosts. A comprehensive literature review was conducted from multiple data sources, such as PubMed, MEDLINE, CDC, journal articles, reference texts, and Internet websites. The increase in infectious disease caused by H. influenzae type b bacteria is affecting individuals 65 years and older and is preventable. However, Hib vaccines are currently approved for the pediatric population and susceptible adults with certain immune deficiencies. New trends in this invasive disease require reevaluation of current guidelines to include individuals 65 years and older as target population for the polysaccharide Hib vaccine. The changing epidemiology of H. influenzae type b bacteria requires reevaluation of current immunization guidelines regarding Hib vaccination so that it is included in the immunization schedule for adults aged 65 and above. ©2014 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  1. Cost-Effectiveness of Vaccinating Immunocompetent ≥65 Year Olds with the 13-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoek, Albert Jan; Miller, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Recently a large clinical trial showed that the use of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) among immunocompetent individuals aged 65 years and over was safe and efficacious. The aim of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of vaccinating immunocompetent 65 year olds with PCV13 vaccine in England. England is a country with universal childhood pneumococcal conjugate vaccination programme in place (7-valent (PCV7) since 2006 and PCV13 since 2010), as well as a 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide (PPV23) vaccination programme targeting clinical risk-groups and those ≥65 years. A static cohort cost-effectiveness model was developed to follow a cohort of 65 year olds until death, which will be vaccinated in the autumn of 2016 with PCV13. Sensitivity analysis was performed to test the robustness of the results. The childhood vaccination programme with PCV7 has induced herd protection among older unvaccinated age groups, with a resultant low residual disease burden caused by PCV7 vaccine types. We show similar herd protection effects for the 6 additional serotypes included in PCV13, and project a new low post-introduction equilibrium of vaccine-type disease in 2018/19. Applying these incidence projections for both invasive disease and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), and using recent measures of vaccine efficacy against these endpoints for ≥65 year olds, we estimate that vaccination of a cohort of immunocompetent 65 year olds with PCV13 would directly prevent 26 cases of IPD, 69 cases of CAP and 15 deaths. The associated cost-effectiveness ratio is £257,771 per QALY gained (using list price of £49.10 per dose and £7.51 administration costs) and is therefore considered not cost-effective. To obtain a cost-effective programme the price per dose would need to be negative. The results were sensitive to disease incidence, waning vaccine protection and case fatality rate; despite this, the overall conclusion was robust. Vaccinating

  2. Factors associated with influenza and pneumococcal vaccine uptake among rheumatoid arthritis patients in Denmark invited to participate in a pneumococcal vaccine trial (Immunovax_RA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, MTT; Lindegaard, H.; Hendricks, O.

    2017-01-01

    -rheumatic drugs (bDMARDs). Self-reported uptake of vaccination against seasonal influenza ever was 59% overall; 57% among patients receiving cDMARDs and 61% in patients receiving bDMARDs. Self-reported vaccine uptake against pneumococcal diseases was only 6% overall. Older age, educational level, and information......Objective: This study investigates predictors of influenza and pneumococcal vaccine coverage among rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, and explores possible differences according to type of RA therapy. Method: RA patients from two clinics in the region of Southern Denmark were informed about...... the survey during scheduled follow-up visits. The questionnaire included questions concerning previous influenza and pneumococcal vaccine uptake, attitudes about vaccination, and socio-demographic factors. Factors associated with recalled vaccine uptake were assessed by multivariate logistic regression...

  3. Novos pontos de corte de sensibilidade nas taxas de resistência antimicrobiana de cepas invasivas de pneumococo New susceptibility breakpoints in antimicrobial resistance rates of invasive pneumococcal strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Carolina Bejo Wolkers

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar impacto dos novos pontos de corte de sensibilidade à penicilina nas taxas de resistência de cepas de pneumococo obtidas de crianças com pneumonia. MÉTODOS: Cepas de pneumococo isoladas no laboratório de análises clínicas do Hospital de Clínicas de Uberlândia, Uberlândia (MG, a partir de amostras de pacientes internados foram enviadas ao Instituto Adolfo Lutz, Sao Paulo (SP, para confirmação da identificação, sorotipagem e determinação da sensibilidade aos antimicrobianos. RESULTADOS: De abril de 1999 a dezembro de 2008 foram enviadas ao Instituto Adolfo Lutz 330 cepas de pneumococo, sendo 195 (59% provenientes de pacientes com diagnóstico de pneumonia. Destas, foram analisadas 100 cepas de pacientes com idade ≤ 12 anos; a idade dos pacientes variou de 1 a 12,6 anos, com média de 2,4 e mediana de 1,7 anos; 47 pacientes eram do sexo masculino; as fontes de recuperação foram sangue (42% e líquido pleural (58%. Foram detectadas 35 cepas oxacilina-resistentes: segundo os critérios do Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI de 2007 [concentração inibitória mínima (CIM ≤ 0,06 µg/mL para sensibilidade (S, 0,12 a 1 µg/mL para resistência intermediária (RI e ≥ 2 µg/mL para resistência plena (RP], 22 cepas apresentaram RI e 11, RP para penicilina. De acordo com os critérios atuais do CLSI de 2008 (≤ 2 µg/mL para S, 4 µg/mL para RI e ≥ 8 µg/mL para RP apenas uma cepa confirmou RI à penicilina. Detectou-se resistência a cotrimoxazol (80%, tetraciclina (21%, eritromicina (13%, clindamicina (13% e ceftriaxona (uma cepa, simultaneamente resistente a penicilina. CONCLUSÕES: Com a aplicação dos novos pontos de corte para sensibilidade in vitro, as taxas de resistência a penicilina caíram 97%, de 33 para 1%.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of new penicillin susceptibility breakpoints on resistance rates of pneumococcal strains collected from children with pneumonia. METHODS

  4. Invasive candidosis: contrasting the perceptions of infectious disease physicians and intensive care physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Schultz

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction We analyze how infectious disease physicians perceive and manage invasive candidosis in Brazil, in comparison to intensive care unit specialists. Methods A 38-question survey was administered to 56 participants. Questions involved clinicians' perceptions of the epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment and prophylaxis of invasive candidosis. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results The perception that candidemia not caused by Candida albicans occurs in less than 10% of patients is more commonly held by intensive care unit specialists (p=0.018. Infectious disease physicians almost always use antifungal drugs in the treatment of patients with candidemia, and antifungal drugs are not as frequently prescribed by intensive care unit specialists (p=0.006. Infectious disease physicians often do not use voriconazole when a patient's antifungal treatment has failed with fluconazole, which also differs from the behavior of intensive care unit specialists (p=0.019. Many intensive care unit specialists use fluconazole to treat candidemia in neutropenic patients previously exposed to fluconazole, in contrast to infectious disease physicians (p=0.024. Infectious disease physicians prefer echinocandins as a first choice in the treatment of unstable neutropenic patients more frequently than intensive care unit specialists (p=0.013. When candidemia is diagnosed, most infectious disease physicians perform fundoscopy (p=0.015, whereas intensive care unit specialists usually perform echocardiograms on all patients (p=0.054. Conclusions This study reveals a need to better educate physicians in Brazil regarding invasive candidosis. The appropriate management of this disease depends on more drug options being available in our country in addition to global coverage in private and public hospitals, thereby improving health care.

  5. Pneumococcal vaccination by general practitioners: an evaluation of current practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peetermans, W E; Lacante, P

    1999-11-12

    During the first two years following registration of the 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine in Belgium, the numbers of doses administered were 166 and 211 per 10,000 inhabitants, representing a vaccination coverage of nearly 20% of the recommended target population as defined by the High Council for Public Health. The time course of vaccine use showed a seasonal variation with up to 74 and 85% of the doses administered from September through November in 1996 and 1997, respectively. Vaccination practices by general practitioners and the profile of the patients who received the pneumococcal vaccine were studied during the September through December period each year. Among the 18,236 patients included, 82% were above 60 years of age (mean age 69.5 years). The main indications for vaccination were chronic bronchopulmonary disease (41%) and cardiovascular disorders (26%). Age as the sole criterion was mentioned for only 17% of vaccine recipients. Sixty percent of the patients received influenza vaccine concomitantly. The intensity of the mass media campaign correlated with the public awareness of the national recommendations. These observations provide insight into current practices for pneumococcal vaccination in Belgium and suggest opportunities for future vaccination campaigns.

  6. Optimizing Outcomes in Immunocompromised Hosts: Understanding the Role of Immunotherapy in Invasive Fungal Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Ravikumar, Sharada; Win, Mar Soe; Chai, Louis Yi Ann

    2015-01-01

    A major global concern is the emergence and spread of systemic life –threatening fungal infections in critically ill patients. The increase in invasive fungal infections, caused most commonly by Candida and Aspergillus species, occurs in patients with impaired defenses due to a number of reasons such as underlying disease, the use of chemotherapeutic and immunosuppressive agents, broad-spectrum antibiotics, prosthetic devices and grafts, burns, neutropenia and HIV infection. The high morbidit...

  7. Advances in invasive evaluation and treatment of patients with ischemic heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hoeven, Barend Leendert van der

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to evaluate new developments in the treatment of patients with ischemic heart disease, with special focus to the invasive evaluation of plaque characteristics in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and treatment of STEMI patients with drug-eluting stents. Additionally, the results of two preclinical studies were described investigating a new mouse model of focal drug-delivery to inhibit restenosis and an evidence based treatment protocol...

  8. Effects of Host Variability on the Spread of Invasive Forest Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Simone Prospero; Michelle Cleary

    2017-01-01

    Biological invasions, resulting from deliberate and unintentional species transfers of insects, fungal and oomycete organisms, are a major consequence of globalization and pose a significant threat to biodiversity. Limiting damage by non-indigenous forest pathogens requires an understanding of their current and potential distributions, factors affecting disease spread, and development of appropriate management measures. In this review, we synthesize innate characteristics of invading organism...

  9. The impact of meningococcal polymerase chain reaction testing on laboratory confirmation of invasive meningococcal disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Drew, Richard J

    2012-03-01

    Laboratory methods of diagnosis were examined for 266 children with invasive meningococcal disease. Seventy-five (36%) of 207 cases with bloodstream infection had both positive blood culture and blood meningococcal polymerase chain reaction (PCR), 130 (63%) negative blood culture and positive blood PCR, and 2 (1%) had positive blood culture and negative blood PCR. Sixty-three percent of cases were diagnosed by PCR alone.

  10. A Non-Human Primate Model of Severe Pneumococcal Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Luis F.; Restrepo, Marcos I.; Hinojosa, Cecilia A.; Soni, Nilam J.; Shenoy, Anukul T.; Gilley, Ryan P.; Gonzalez-Juarbe, Norberto; Noda, Julio R.; Winter, Vicki T.; de la Garza, Melissa A.; Shade, Robert E.; Coalson, Jacqueline J.; Giavedoni, Luis D.; Anzueto, Antonio; Orihuela, Carlos J.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of community-acquired pneumonia and infectious death in adults worldwide. A non-human primate model is needed to study the molecular mechanisms that underlie the development of severe pneumonia, identify diagnostic tools, explore potential therapeutic targets, and test clinical interventions during pneumococcal pneumonia. Objective To develop a non-human primate model of pneumococcal pneumonia. Methods Seven adult baboons (Papio cynocephalus) were surgically tethered to a continuous monitoring system that recorded heart rate, temperature, and electrocardiography. Animals were inoculated with 109 colony-forming units of S. pneumoniae using bronchoscopy. Three baboons were rescued with intravenous ampicillin therapy. Pneumonia was diagnosed using lung ultrasonography and ex vivo confirmation by histopathology and immunodetection of pneumococcal capsule. Organ failure, using serum biomarkers and quantification of bacteremia, was assessed daily. Results Challenged animals developed signs and symptoms of pneumonia 4 days after infection. Infection was characterized by the presence of cough, tachypnea, dyspnea, tachycardia and fever. All animals developed leukocytosis and bacteremia 24 hours after infection. A severe inflammatory reaction was detected by elevation of serum cytokines, including Interleukin (IL)1Ra, IL-6, and IL-8, after infection. Lung ultrasonography precisely detected the lobes with pneumonia that were later confirmed by pathological analysis. Lung pathology positively correlated with disease severity. Antimicrobial therapy rapidly reversed symptomology and reduced serum cytokines. Conclusions We have developed a novel animal model for severe pneumococcal pneumonia that mimics the clinical presentation, inflammatory response, and infection kinetics seen in humans. This is a novel model to test vaccines and treatments, measure biomarkers to diagnose pneumonia, and predict outcomes. PMID:27855182

  11. Exome Array Analysis of Susceptibility to Pneumococcal Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloek, Anne T.; van Setten, Jessica; van der Ende, Arie; Bots, Michiel L.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Serón, Mercedes Valls; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van de Beek, Diederik; Ferwerda, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Host genetic variability may contribute to susceptibility of bacterial meningitis, but which genes contribute to the susceptibility to this complex disease remains undefined. We performed a genetic association study in 469 community-acquired pneumococcal meningitis cases and 2072 population-based controls from the Utrecht Health Project in order to find genetic variants associated with pneumococcal meningitis susceptibility. A HumanExome BeadChip was used to genotype 102,097 SNPs in the collected DNA samples. Associations were tested with the Fisher exact test. None of the genetic variants tested reached Bonferroni corrected significance (p-value meningitis were rs139064549 on chromosome 1 in the COL11A1 gene (p = 1.51 × 10−6; G allele OR 3.21 [95% CI 2.05–5.02]) and rs9309464 in the EXOC6B gene on chromosome 2 (p = 6.01 × 10−5; G allele OR 0.66 [95% CI 0.54–0.81]). The sequence kernel association test (SKAT) tests for associations between multiple variants in a gene region and pneumococcal meningitis susceptibility yielded one significant associated gene namely COL11A1 (p = 1.03 × 10−7). Replication studies are needed to validate these results. If replicated, the functionality of these genetic variations should be further studied to identify by which means they influence the pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis. PMID:27389768

  12. Estimating the Clinical and Economic Impact of Maintaining use of 13-valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine (PCV13) in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Wasserman, Matt; Wilson, Michele; McDade, Cheryl; Grajales, Ana Gabriela; Palacios, Maria Gabriela; Baez- Revueltas, Fabiola Berenice; Farkouh, Raymond

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background PCV13 replaced 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in the routine infant immunization schedule in Mexico since 2011. The use of PCV13 has reduced pneumococcal disease incidence for vaccine serotypes, particularly 19A, which emerged following PCV7 use. The 10-valent vaccine (PCV10) contains the same serotypes as PCV13 with the exception of serotypes 3, 19A and 6A but also has different conjugated proteins for the common serotypes. This study evaluated the potential heal...

  13. Insights into Parkinson's disease models and neurotoxicity using non-invasive imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez-Pernaute, Rosario; Brownell, Anna-Liisa; Jenkins, Bruce G.; Isacson, Ole

    2005-01-01

    Loss of dopamine in the nigrostriatal system causes a severe impairment in motor function in patients with Parkinson's disease and in experimental neurotoxic models of the disease. We have used non-invasive imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to investigate in vivo the changes in the dopamine system in neurotoxic models of Parkinson's disease. In addition to classic neurotransmitter studies, in these models, it is also possible to characterize associated and perhaps pathogenic factors, such as the contribution of microglia activation and inflammatory responses to neuronal damage. Functional imaging techniques are instrumental to our understanding and modeling of disease mechanisms, which should in turn lead to development of new therapies for Parkinson's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders

  14. Clinical applications of non-invasive imaging techniques in suspected coronary artery disease and in acute myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nucifora, Gaetano

    2015-01-01

    Non-invasive cardiac imaging modalities play a crucial role in the diagnostic process and clinical management of patients without known coronary artery disease and patients with acute myocardial infarction. The first part of the thesis discusses the use of non-invasive imaging modalities (including

  15. Impact of 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine on pneumococcal meningitis in children up to two years of age in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indianara Maria Grando

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to analyze the impact of vaccination against Streptococcus pneumoniae on the morbidity and mortality from pneumococcal meningitis in children ≤ 2 years in Brazil, from 2007 to 2012. This is a descriptive study and ecological analysis using data from the Information System on Notifiable Diseases. Pre-vaccination (2007-2009 and post-vaccination (2011-2012 periods were defined to compare incidence rates and mortality. A total of 1,311 cases and 430 deaths were reported during the study period. Incidence decreased from 3.70/100,000 in 2007 to 1.84/100,000 in 2012, and mortality decreased from 1.30/100,000 to 0.40/100,000, or 50% and 69% respectively, with the greatest impact in the 6-11 month age group. This decrease in Pneumococcal meningitis morbidity and mortality rates two years after introduction of the 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine suggests its effectiveness.

  16. Effects of Host Variability on the Spread of Invasive Forest Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Prospero

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Biological invasions, resulting from deliberate and unintentional species transfers of insects, fungal and oomycete organisms, are a major consequence of globalization and pose a significant threat to biodiversity. Limiting damage by non-indigenous forest pathogens requires an understanding of their current and potential distributions, factors affecting disease spread, and development of appropriate management measures. In this review, we synthesize innate characteristics of invading organisms (notably mating system, reproduction type, and dispersal mechanisms and key factors of the host population (namely host diversity, host connectivity, and host susceptibility that govern spread and impact of invasive forest pathogens at various scales post-introduction and establishment. We examine spread dynamics for well-known invasive forest pathogens, Hymenoscyphus fraxineus (T. Kowalski Baral, Queloz, Hosoya, comb. nov., causing ash dieback in Europe, and Cryphonectria parasitica, (Murr. Barr, causing chestnut blight in both North America and Europe, illustrating the importance of host variability (diversity, connectivity, susceptibility in their invasion success. While alien pathogen entry has proven difficult to control, and new biological introductions are indeed inevitable, elucidating the key processes underlying host variability is crucial for scientists and managers aimed at developing effective strategies to prevent future movement of organisms and preserve intact ecosystems.

  17. Schilder's disease: non-invasive diagnosis and successful treatment with human immunoglobulins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Dror; Konen, Osnat; Straussberg, Rachel

    2012-03-01

    Schilder's disease (SD) is a rare variant of multiple sclerosis with a predilection to children. It is characterized by focal neurological abnormalities, which are atypical for MS, in conjunction with tumor-like white matter lesions on MRI. We report the case of an 11-year-old girl that demonstrates two important features of the disease: a) the clinical presentation and subsequent course in conjunction with the serial neuroradiological findings stress the feasibility of a non-invasive diagnosis of SD; and b) we report a significant clinical response to treatment with intravenous human Immunoglobulins. Copyright © 2011 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Invasive meningococcal disease epidemiology and control measures: a framework for evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro, J Jaime; Möller, Jörgen; Getsios, Denis; Coudeville, L; El-Hadi, Wissam; Chevat, Catherine; Nguyen, Van Hung; Caro, Ingrid

    2007-01-01

    Background Meningococcal disease can have devastating consequences. As new vaccines emerge, it is necessary to assess their impact on public health. In the absence of long-term real world data, modeling the effects of different vaccination strategies is required. Discrete event simulation provides a flexible platform with which to conduct such evaluations. Methods A discrete event simulation of the epidemiology of invasive meningococcal disease was developed to quantify the potential impact of implementing routine vaccination of adolescents in the United States with a quadrivalent conjugate vaccine protecting against serogroups A, C, Y, and W-135. The impact of vaccination is assessed including both the direct effects on individuals vaccinated and the indirect effects resulting from herd immunity. The simulation integrates a variety of epidemiologic and demographic data, with core information on the incidence of invasive meningococcal disease and outbreak frequency derived from data available through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Simulation of the potential indirect benefits of vaccination resulting from herd immunity draw on data from the United Kingdom, where routine vaccination with a conjugate vaccine has been in place for a number of years. Cases of disease are modeled along with their health consequences, as are the occurrence of disease outbreaks. Results When run without a strategy of routine immunization, the simulation accurately predicts the age-specific incidence of invasive meningococcal disease and the site-specific frequency of outbreaks in the Unite States. 2,807 cases are predicted annually, resulting in over 14,000 potential life years lost due to invasive disease. In base case analyses of routine vaccination, life years lost due to infection are reduced by over 45% (to 7,600) when routinely vaccinating adolescents 12 years of age at 70% coverage. Sensitivity analyses indicate that herd immunity plays an important role when this

  19. Invasive meningococcal disease epidemiology and control measures: a framework for evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coudeville L

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Meningococcal disease can have devastating consequences. As new vaccines emerge, it is necessary to assess their impact on public health. In the absence of long-term real world data, modeling the effects of different vaccination strategies is required. Discrete event simulation provides a flexible platform with which to conduct such evaluations. Methods A discrete event simulation of the epidemiology of invasive meningococcal disease was developed to quantify the potential impact of implementing routine vaccination of adolescents in the United States with a quadrivalent conjugate vaccine protecting against serogroups A, C, Y, and W-135. The impact of vaccination is assessed including both the direct effects on individuals vaccinated and the indirect effects resulting from herd immunity. The simulation integrates a variety of epidemiologic and demographic data, with core information on the incidence of invasive meningococcal disease and outbreak frequency derived from data available through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Simulation of the potential indirect benefits of vaccination resulting from herd immunity draw on data from the United Kingdom, where routine vaccination with a conjugate vaccine has been in place for a number of years. Cases of disease are modeled along with their health consequences, as are the occurrence of disease outbreaks. Results When run without a strategy of routine immunization, the simulation accurately predicts the age-specific incidence of invasive meningococcal disease and the site-specific frequency of outbreaks in the Unite States. 2,807 cases are predicted annually, resulting in over 14,000 potential life years lost due to invasive disease. In base case analyses of routine vaccination, life years lost due to infection are reduced by over 45% (to 7,600 when routinely vaccinating adolescents 12 years of age at 70% coverage. Sensitivity analyses indicate that herd immunity plays

  20. Breath Analysis as a Potential and Non-Invasive Frontier in Disease Diagnosis: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, a small number of diseases, particularly cardiovascular (CVDs, oncologic (ODs, neurodegenerative (NDDs, chronic respiratory diseases, as well as diabetes, form a severe burden to most of the countries worldwide. Hence, there is an urgent need for development of efficient diagnostic tools, particularly those enabling reliable detection of diseases, at their early stages, preferably using non-invasive approaches. Breath analysis is a non-invasive approach relying only on the characterisation of volatile composition of the exhaled breath (EB that in turn reflects the volatile composition of the bloodstream and airways and therefore the status and condition of the whole organism metabolism. Advanced sampling procedures (solid-phase and needle traps microextraction coupled with modern analytical technologies (proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry, selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry, ion mobility spectrometry, e-noses, etc. allow the characterisation of EB composition to an unprecedented level. However, a key challenge in EB analysis is the proper statistical analysis and interpretation of the large and heterogeneous datasets obtained from EB research. There is no standard statistical framework/protocol yet available in literature that can be used for EB data analysis towards discovery of biomarkers for use in a typical clinical setup. Nevertheless, EB analysis has immense potential towards development of biomarkers for the early disease diagnosis of diseases.

  1. Integration of non-invasive functional assessments with anatomical risk stratification in complex coronary artery disease: the non-invasive functional SYNTAX score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, Carlos; Onuma, Yoshinobu; Miyazaki, Yosuke; Morel, Marie-Angèle; Serruys, Patrick W

    2017-04-01

    Since the early days of coronary angiography, the extension and severity of coronary artery disease (CAD) have been used for risk stratification. The SYNTAX score objectively characterizes CAD in patients with multivessel disease. Furthermore, recalculating the SYNTAX score by the incorporation of the functional component coronary stenosis (i.e., FFR) increases the discrimination for the risk of adverse events. The calculation of the SYNTAX score derived from non-invasive modalities such as coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) has emerged as a mean to obtain the SYNTAX score before invasive cardiac catheterization. Likewise, the computation of the non-invasive fractional flow reserve CT (FFR CT ) allows for the calculation of the non-invasive functional SYNTAX score. Ultimately, the combination of anatomical and functional evaluations with clinical factors further refines the identification of patients at risk and provides a recommendation for the Heart Team regarding the treatment strategy (i.e., PCI or CABG) based on the predicted 4-year mortality. The purpose of this review is to describe the integration of a novel non-invasive functional coronary assessment with the angiographic risk score in patients with multivessel CAD.

  2. PNEUMOCOCCAL INFECTION — IN THE CENTRE OF ATTENTION AGAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Sidorenko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This article present a general review on pneumococcal infection, its prevalence, clinic types in children in Russia and worldwide. Description of S. pneumoniae serotypes' distribution and its influence at clinical manifestation of pneumococcal infection and vaccination effectiveness is provided. Author evaluates perspectives of pneumococcal infection prevention by vaccination with pneumococcal conjugated 7-valent vaccine in Russia.Key words: children, pneumococcal infection, vaccination, pneumococcal conjugated 7 valent vaccine.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2009;8(3:82-87

  3. Methods and challenges in measuring the impact of national pneumococcal and rotavirus vaccine introduction on morbidity and mortality in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Zeev, Naor; Kapanda, Lester; King, Carina; Beard, James; Phiri, Tambosi; Mvula, Hazzie; Crampin, Amelia C; Mwansambo, Charles; Costello, Anthony; Parashar, Umesh; Tate, Jacqueline E; Verani, Jennifer R; Whitney, Cynthia G; Heyderman, Robert S; Cunliffe, Nigel A; French, Neil

    2015-05-28

    Pneumonia and gastroenteritis are leading causes of vaccine-preventable childhood morbidity and mortality. Malawi introduced pneumococcal conjugate and rotavirus vaccines to the immunisation programme in 2011 and 2012, respectively. Evaluating their effectiveness is vital to ensure optimal implementation and justify sustained investment. A national evaluation platform was established to determine vaccine effectiveness and impact in Malawi. Impact and effectiveness against vaccine-type invasive pneumococcal disease, radiological pneumonia and rotavirus gastroenteritis are investigated using before-after incidence comparisons and case-control designs, respectively. Mortality is assessed using a prospective population cohort. Cost-effectiveness evaluation is nested within the case-control studies. We describe platform characteristics including strengths and weaknesses for conducting vaccine evaluations. Integrating data from individual level and ecological methods across multiple sites provides comprehensive information for policymakers on programme impact and vaccine effectiveness including changes in serotype/genotype distribution over time. Challenges to robust vaccine evaluation in real-world conditions include: vaccination ascertainment; pre-existing rapid decline in mortality and pneumococcal disease in the context of non-vaccine interventions; and the maintenance of completeness and quality of reporting at scale and over time. In observational non-randomised designs ascertainment of vaccine status may be biased particularly in infants with fatal outcomes. In the context of multiple population level interventions targeting study endpoints attribution of reduced incidence to vaccine impact may be flawed. Providing evidence from several independent but complementary studies will provide the greatest confidence in assigning impact. Welcome declines in disease incidence and in child mortality make accrual of required sample sizes difficult, necessitating large

  4. Pediatric invasive disease due to Haemophilus influenzae serogroup A in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia: case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roaa, Zailaie; Abdulsalam, Alawfi; Shahid, Ghazi; Kamaldeen, Baba; Tariq, Al Fawaz

    2016-05-31

    We describe the first two cases of invasive disease caused by Haemophilus influenzae serotype A in Saudi Arabia. This is the first known reported invasive Haemophilus influenzae serotype A from Saudi Arabia. A ten-month-old and three-month-old male not known to have any past history of any medical illness and who had received H. influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine presented to our hospital mainly with fever of few days' duration. A provisional diagnosis of meningitis with sepsis was made and laboratory tests were requested. The chest radiograph was normal. The laboratory results revealed leukocytosis, but leukopenia was noticed in the younger infant. Blood culture and cerebrospinal fluid specimens yielded a pure culture of Haemophilus influenzae and serotyping showed the isolates to be serogroup A. Both patients were started on vancomycin and third-generation cephalosporin. On receiving the blood culture result, vancomycin was stopped. Fever subsided after 48 hours, while in the second case, it continued for 12 days from the admission date. The repeat blood cultures were negative. Antibiotic therapy was given for 10 days for the first case with an unremarkable hospital course, while the second case was complicated by seizure and received a longer duration of antibiotics. Both infants were discharged home in good condition. Invasive non-typeable H. influenzae strains are emerging and there is a need for surveillance of this disease. This has implications in future vaccine development.

  5. [Fungal invasion of connective tissue in patients with gingival-periodontal disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Nicolás Agustín; Puia, Sebastian; Toranzo, Silvia; Brusca, María Isabel

    2015-01-01

    In the last few years unusual microorganisms have been isolated from subgingival biofilm, as possible initiators or contributors to periodontal disease, especially in patients who show no improvement during treatment. To study the Candida invasion of the connective tissue in relation to subgingival biofilm presence. A total of 55 immunocompetent patients of both sexes, between 21 and 55 years of age, non-smokers, without previous antimicrobial treatment, suffering periodontal diseases, were studied. Soft tissues, supragingival and subgingival plaque samples, and periodontal pocket biopsies were taken. Microscopic studies, cultures, assimilation profiles, and DNA amplifications were performed. In 35% of the samples, different species of Candida were isolated in cultures, especially Candida albicans. Hyphae invasions in the connective tissue were observed, in association with anaerobic microorganisms (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans) in patients with periodontitis. Different species of Candida could be part of the periodontal plaque and could play an important role in the adherence to soft tissues, allowing deep invasion. They also could infect gingival pockets in patients with gingivitis, even in healthy locations, playing a commensal or opportunist role. Copyright © 2011 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Recommendations for Risk Categorization and Prophylaxis of Invasive Fungal Diseases in Hematological Malignancies: A Critical Review of Evidence and Expert Opinion (TEO-4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Boğa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This is the last of a series of articles on invasive fungal infections prepared by opinion leaders in Turkey. The aim of these articles is to guide clinicians in managing invasive fungal diseases in hematological malignancies and stem cell transplantation based on the available best evidence in this field. The previous articles summarized the diagnosis and treatment of invasive fungal disease and this article aims to explain the risk categorization and guide the antifungal prophylaxis in invasive fungal disease.

  7. Infection and invasion mechanisms of Trypanosoma cruzi in the congenital transmission of Chagas' disease: a proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemmerling, Ulrike; Bosco, Cleo; Galanti, Norbel

    2010-01-01

    Chagas' disease is produced by the haemophlagelated protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi and transmitted by haematophages insects such as Triatoma infestans (vinchuca). Due to vector control, congenital transmission gains importance and is responsible for the presence and expansion of this disease in non-endemic areas. The mechanisms of congenital infection are uncertain. It has been suggested that the parasite reaches the fetus through the bloodstream by crossing the placental barrier, and that congenital Chagas' disease is the result of complex interactions between the immune response, placental factors, and the parasite's characteristics. We review the cellular and molecular mechanisms of infection and invasion of the parasite and how immune and placental factors may modulate this process. Finally, we propose a possible model for the vertical transmission of Chagas' disease.

  8. Pneumococcal resistance in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, C E; Moore, J E; Murphy, P G

    1997-12-01

    The first case reports of infection with penicillin-resistant pneumococci (PRP, MIC > 0.1 mg/L) and multidrug-resistant pneumococci were made in Australia in 1967 and South Africa in 1977, respectively. Since this time these organisms have spread to become a worldwide problem. In Europe PRP prevalence rates of up to 40% have been reported from Spain and 58% from Hungary, although there has been considerable national, regional and local variation in these figures. Until recently the UK was considered to have low prevalence of PRP. As recently as 1990, 100% of 7255 strains of pneumococci from 61 centres across the UK were found to be penicillin sensitive. However, there have now been several reports of significant and rising levels of resistance nationwide. Erythromycin resistance has also risen from 2.8% to 8.6% between 1990 and 1995 in England and Wales. At the Northern Ireland Public Health Laboratory (NIPHL) 3171 strains of pneumococci were examined using the oxacillin screening test between 1988 and 1995, during which time the annual rate of penicillin resistance was found to increase from 1 mg/L) increased from 0% to 36% and levels of PRP cross-resistance to cephalosporins and ciprofloxacin were 89% and 78%, respectively, which are amongst the highest in the UK. Similar rates of penicillin resistance have now been reported from several geographically disparate regions in the UK including Liverpool, Manchester and London. The number of laboratories in England and Wales reporting the isolation of PRPs to the Central Public Health Laboratory increased from 23 (3%) in 1987 to 72 (21%) in 1991 and a recent study from this reference laboratory showed that the prevalence of pneumococcal resistance to penicillin had increased 2.5-fold between 1990 and 1995. Clearly both PRP and multidrug-resistant pneumococci are increasing in prevalence in the UK, and this increase is likely to continue. A recent model of the evolution of national PRP prevalence rates describes a slow

  9. MICROBIOLOGICAL CHARACTERISATION OF Haemophilus influenzae STRAINS ISOLATED FROM PATIENTS WITH INVASIVE AND RESPIRATORY DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Kostyanev

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 175 H. influenzae strains were collected between 1994 and 2009 from all aged patient groups. The strains were isolated from patients with invasive and community-acquired respiratory tract infections. All strains were identified according to standard microbiological methods. Serotyping was done by a coagglutination test and by molecular PCR capsular genotyping. Beta-lactamase production was determined by the chromogenic cephalosporin test with nitrocephin as substrate. Most of the isolated H. influenzae strains were from children under 5 years of age (57.7%. Overall, 61 strains belonged to serotype b (34.9% by the means of PCR capsular typing, 1 strain was type f, and 113 isolates (64.6% were non-typeable (non-encapsulated H. influenzae. Among the infants and children with meningitis or other invasive infections, aged 2 month to 5 years, all strains, except one, were serotype b. In respiratory tract infections (pneumonia, otitis media, sinusitis and people with chronic pulmonary diseases - exacerbations of COPD, bronchiectasis, cystic fibrosis the most common - 96.5% were non-typeable strains in both groups children and adults. Overall, the prevalence of beta-lactamase production was 19.4%. But, it was much higher for invasive strains from CSF isolates - 37.7%, 25% in blood samples, and 37.5% in otitis media causative strains. Beta-lactamase production was less frequent in respiratory tract isolates - in sputum 13.3% and in URT samples - 2.3%. The rate of beta-lactamase production in CSF isolates has not changed for the last 10 years.PCR capsular genotyping method has to be performed for all non-b-type strains. The implementation of Hib vaccine in our country will be accompanied by a reduction in invasive diseases caused by H. influenzae type b in children, but it is not useful in preventing infections caused by non-typeable H. influenzae strains.

  10. Prediction of Occult Invasive Disease in Ductal Carcinoma in Situ Using Deep Learning Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Bibo; Grimm, Lars J; Mazurowski, Maciej A; Baker, Jay A; Marks, Jeffrey R; King, Lorraine M; Maley, Carlo C; Hwang, E Shelley; Lo, Joseph Y

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether deep features extracted from digital mammograms using a pretrained deep convolutional neural network are prognostic of occult invasive disease for patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) on core needle biopsy. In this retrospective study, digital mammographic magnification views were collected for 99 subjects with DCIS at biopsy, 25 of which were subsequently upstaged to invasive cancer. A deep convolutional neural network model that was pretrained on nonmedical images (eg, animals, plants, instruments) was used as the feature extractor. Through a statistical pooling strategy, deep features were extracted at different levels of convolutional layers from the lesion areas, without sacrificing the original resolution or distorting the underlying topology. A multivariate classifier was then trained to predict which tumors contain occult invasive disease. This was compared with the performance of traditional "handcrafted" computer vision (CV) features previously developed specifically to assess mammographic calcifications. The generalization performance was assessed using Monte Carlo cross-validation and receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Deep features were able to distinguish DCIS with occult invasion from pure DCIS, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.70 (95% confidence interval, 0.68-0.73). This performance was comparable with the handcrafted CV features (area under the curve = 0.68; 95% confidence interval, 0.66-0.71) that were designed with prior domain knowledge. Despite being pretrained on only nonmedical images, the deep features extracted from digital mammograms demonstrated comparable performance with handcrafted CV features for the challenging task of predicting DCIS upstaging. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Relationship between invasion of the periodontium by periodontal pathogens and periodontal disease: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Luzia; Azevedo, Nuno Filipe; Felino, António; Pinto, Miguel Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial invasion of the periodontal tissues has been suggested as a relevant step in the etiopathogenesis of periodontal disease. However, its exact importance remains to be defined. The present systematic review assessed the scientific evidence concerning the relationship between the quality or quantity of periodontal microbiota in periodontal tissues and development of periodontal disease. The databases Medline-PubMed, Cochrane-CENTRAL, ISI Web of Knowledge and SCOPUS were searched, up to January 2014. Studies that reported evaluation of periodontal pathogens invasion on human tissues were selected. The screening of 440 title/abstracts elected 26 papers for full-text reading. Twenty three papers were subsequently excluded because of insufficient data or a study protocol not related to the objectives of this systematic review. All included studies were case-control studies that evaluated intracellular or adherent bacteria to epithelial cells from periodontal pockets versus healthy sulci. Study protocols presented heterogeneity regarding case and control definitions and methodological approaches for microbial identification. No consistent significant differences were found related to the presence/absence or proportion of specific periopathogens across the studies, as only one study found statistically significant differences regarding the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans (p = 0.043), T. forsythia (P < 0.001), P. intermedia (P < 0.001), C. ochracea (P < 0.001) and C. rectus (P = 0.003) in epithelial cells from periodontal pockets vs. healthy sulci. All studies reported a larger unspecific bacterial load in or on the epithelial cells taken from a diseased site compared to a healthy sulcus. The current available data is of low to moderate quality and inconsistent mainly due to study design, poor reporting and methodological diversity. As so, there is insufficient evidence to support or exclude the invasion by periodontal pathogens as a key step in the

  12. Estimating the Clinical and Economic Impact of Maintaining use of 13-valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine (PCV13) in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Matt; Wilson, Michele; McDade, Cheryl; Grajales, Ana Gabriela; Palacios, Maria Gabriela; Baez- Revueltas, Fabiola Berenice; Farkouh, Raymond

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background PCV13 replaced 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in the routine infant immunization schedule in Mexico since 2011. The use of PCV13 has reduced pneumococcal disease incidence for vaccine serotypes, particularly 19A, which emerged following PCV7 use. The 10-valent vaccine (PCV10) contains the same serotypes as PCV13 with the exception of serotypes 3, 19A and 6A but also has different conjugated proteins for the common serotypes. This study evaluated the potential health and economic implications of switching from PCV13 to PCV10 in Mexico. Methods A decision-analytic model was developed to estimate public health and economic impact of maintaining PCV13 compared with switching to PCV10 in Mexico. Disease incidence at time of potential switch for invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), pneumonia (PNE) and acute otitis media (AOM) was obtained from Dirección General de Epidemiología and the published literature. Historical data was used to estimate IPD trends under different infant vaccine pressures and the model forecasted disease across the population. For each vaccination program, health outcomes and associated health-care costs were estimated. Costs, utility weights, and risk of disease-specific complications were derived from published sources. Results In the base case, continued use of PCV13 would result in significantly fewer cases of pneumococcal disease than switching to PCV10 in Mexico (See Table 1). Despite a higher vaccine cost, PCV13 was cost-saving compared with PCV10 in the base case and across a number of scenarios evaluated. Table 1: Total cases and costs associated with maintaining use of PCV13 vs. switching to PCV10 in Mexico over a 10 year period PCV13 PCV10 Difference IPD 16,808 17,248 −440 AOM 7,023,448 7,245,446 −221,998 PNE 1,743,115 1,831,936 −88,821 Deaths 19,457 19,867 −410 Total QALYs 864,069,669 864,068,101 1,568 Total Cost $258,353,508,707 $264,927,566,637 −$6,574,057,930 ICER PCV13 Dominant Costs are

  13. Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine - what you need to know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... taken in its entirety from the CDC Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine Information Statement (VIS): www.cdc.gov/vaccines/ ... statements/ppv.html CDC review information for Pneumococcal Polysaccharide VIS: Page last reviewed: April 24, 2015 Page ...

  14. The adult nasopharyngeal microbiome as a determinant of pneumococcal acquisition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, Amelieke Jh; Zomer, Aldert L; Gritzfeld, Jenna F; Ferwerda, Gerben; van Hijum, Sacha Aft; Ferreira, Daniela M; Shak, Joshua R; Klugman, Keith P; Boekhorst, Jos; Timmerman, Harro M; de Jonge, Marien I; Gordon, Stephen B; Hermans, Peter Wm

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several cohort studies have indicated associations between S. pneumoniae and other microbes in the nasopharynx. To study causal relationships between the nasopharyngeal microbiome and pneumococcal carriage, we employed an experimental human pneumococcal carriage model. Healthy adult

  15. [S. Pyogenes invasive disease in a paediatric hospital: 1996-2009].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, Joana Serra; Neto, Paula; Alves, Manuela Costa; Rodrigues, Fernanda

    2010-01-01

    S. pyogenes is among the most common bacteria in Pediatrics, and is associated with a wide variety of infections and large range of severity. The aim was to evaluate trends of Group A Streptococcal invasive disease in a paediatric tertiary hospital. Retrospective analyses of the medical records of all children with group A streptococcal invasive disease (positive culture obtained from sterile sites), from January 1996 to December 2009 (14 years). There were 24 cases, with a maximum of four cases/year. Eighteen cases (75%) ocurred in the second half of the study. Sixty-seven percent were boys and the median age was three years. The most frequent clinical manifestations were fever (79%), rash (54%) and arthalgia/limbs' pain (46%). The diagnoses were bacteriemia (six), osteoarticular infection (five), celulitis (three), pyomyositis, mastoiditis, surgical wound infection, toxic shock syndrome (two each), necrotizing fasciitis and pneumonia (one each). Four cases occurred during the course of varicella. Other risk factors were present in six cases. Median neutrophyl count was 10.690 x 105/L (2.013-19.180 x 105/L) and median C reactive protein was 146 mg/L (3-425 mg/L). Bacteria were isolated mainly from blood (71%). The outcome was good for most cases but there were two deaths due to toxic shock syndrome. M typing and the presence of virulence factors genes were not assessed. Although the number is small, there was an increase of S. pyogenes invasive disease in the second half of the study. Several cases occurred in the course of varicela or in the presence of other risk factors. Fatal outcome was associated with two toxic shock syndrome cases. Microbiological investigation is essential to understand which M types or virulence factors genes are involved.

  16. Increase of Neisseria meningitidis W:cc11 invasive disease in Chile has no correlation with carriage in adolescents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina S Rubilar

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitidis is a human exclusive pathogen that can lead to invasive meningococcal disease or may be carried in the upper respiratory tract without symptoms. The relationship between carriage and disease remains poorly understood but it is widely accepted that decreasing carriage by immunization should lead to a reduction of invasive cases. Latin America has experienced an increased incidence of serogroup W invasive cases of Neisseria meningitidis in the last decade. Specifically in Chile, despite low total incidence of invasive cases, serogroup W has become predominant since 2011 and has been associated with elevated mortality. Expecting to gain insight into the epidemiology of this disease, this study has used molecular typing schemes to compare Neisseria meningitidis isolates causing invasive disease with those isolates collected from adolescent carriers during the same period in Chile. A lower carriage of the serogroup W clonal complex ST-11/ET37 than expected was found; whereas, the same clonal complex accounted for 66% of total invasive meningococcal disease cases in the country that year. A high diversity of PorA variable regions and fHbp peptides was also ascertained in the carrier isolates compared to the invasive ones. According to the results shown here, the elevated number of serogroup W invasive cases in our country cannot be explained by a rise of carriage of pathogenic isolates. Overall, this study supports the idea that some strains, as W:cc11 found in Chile, possess an enhanced virulence to invade the host. Notwithstanding hypervirulence, this strain has not caused an epidemic in Chile. Finally, as genetic transfer occurs often, close surveillance of Neisseria meningitidis strains causing disease, and particularly hypervirulent W:cc11, should be kept as a priority in our country, in order to prepare the best response to face genetic changes that could lead to enhanced fitness of this pathogen.

  17. Treatment of intervertebral disc degenerative disease using percutaneous nucleotomy–an overview of less invasive procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miran Jeromel

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Less invasive treatment methods for intervertebral disc disease and decompression of neural structures as a consequence of contained disc herniation represent an alternative to surgical procedure. Percutaneus nucleotomy uses a percutaneous approach to the intervertebral disc. The article presents the evolution of numerous procedureds in clinical practice.Methods: Percutaneous nucleoplasty is a fluoroscopy-guided procedure which enables controlled and safe entrance into the intervertebral disc. The procedure is performed under strict aseptic conditions, using a local anaesthesia with the patient under analgosedation. Based on the principle of therapeutic intradiscal action, the procedures can be divided into three groups: chemical (chemonucleolysis with chimopapain, alcohol, ozone, mechanical (automated percutaneous lumbar discectomy – APLD, arthroscopic discectomy and thermical methods (laser, radiofrequency ablation, intradiscal electrothermal annuloplasty – IDET, Coblation®.Results: Percutaneous nucleotomy by the majority of the mentioned procedures results in a therapeutic effect (reduction of pain and decompression of neural structures. Fast recovery represents a major advantage of less invasive treatment.Conclusions: Less invasive method (nucleotomy using different procedures represents a successful alternative approach to surgical discectomy. Proper patient selection and safe technique are mandatory in order to achieve a good clinical outcome.

  18. A meta-analysis of antimicrobial susceptibility profiles for pneumococcal pneumonia in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iroh Tam, Pui-Ying; Sadoh, Ayebo E; Obaro, Stephen K

    2018-02-01

    Pneumonia causes an enormous burden of childhood disease globally, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. Pneumococcus is the most common bacterial aetiology of pneumonia; however, antimicrobials are limited and may not adequately address the local epidemiology of the region. To undertake a review and meta-analysis of pneumonia studies in sub-Saharan Africa to evaluate antimicrobial susceptibility patterns in childhood pneumonia. Articles published in PubMed and Google between 2006 and 2016 which evaluated antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of pneumococcal pneumonia in children in sub-Saharan Africa were identified. The source of specimens, pathogens and antimicrobial susceptibility data were extracted. Pooled analysis of susceptible isolates was conducted using random effects models. Children from 15 studies and 1634 isolates were included in the meta-analysis. In cases of childhood pneumonia, the mean overall proportion of penicillin susceptibility from invasive specimens of Streptococcus pneumoniae was 85.7% (95% CI 80.1-91.3), and of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was 21.0% (95% CI 5.1-36.9). Compared with all S. pneumoniae specimens, penicillin susceptibility was 68.6% (95% CI 59.6-77.5) and that of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was 26.3% (95% CI 14.1-38.6). A high level of heterogeneity was detected, reflecting the paucity of data available. The establishment of national and regional diagnostic platforms to monitor antimicrobial susceptibility profiles for pneumonia as well as other invasive diseases will provide data with which to assess the relevance and adaptation of antimicrobial prescribing recommendations.

  19. Pneumococcal carriage among indigenous Warao children in Venezuela: serotypes, susceptibility patterns, and molecular epidemiology.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rivera-Olivero, I.A.; Bogaert, D.; Bello, T.; Nogal, B. del; Sluijter, M.; Hermans, P.W.M.; Waard, J.H. de

    2007-01-01

    Little attention has been paid to pneumococcal carriage and disease in Amerindians from Latin America. The Warao people, an indigenous population from Venezuela, live in the delta of the Orinoco River in geographically isolated communities with difficult access to medical care. To obtain insight

  20. Effects of Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine 2 Years after Its Introduction, the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenburg, Gerwin D.; de Greeff, Sabine C.; Jansen, Angelique G. C. S.; de Melker, Hester E.; Schouls, Leo M.; Hak, Eelko; Spanjaard, Lodewijk; Sanders, Elisabeth A. M.; van der Ende, Arie

    In the Netherlands, the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-7) was implemented in a 3+1-dose schedule in the national immunization program for infants born after April 1, 2006. To assess the vaccine's effectiveness, we compared disease incidence before and after vaccine implementation (June

  1. Effects of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine 2 years after its introduction, the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenburg, Gerwin D.; de Greeff, Sabine C.; Jansen, Angelique G. C. S.; de Melker, Hester E.; Schouls, Leo M.; Hak, Eelko; Spanjaard, Lodewijk; Sanders, Elisabeth A. M.; van der Ende, Arie

    2010-01-01

    In the Netherlands, the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-7) was implemented in a 3+1-dose schedule in the national immunization program for infants born after April 1, 2006. To assess the vaccine's effectiveness, we compared disease incidence before and after vaccine implementation (June

  2. Risk factors for the severity and mortality of pneumococcal pneumonia: Importance of premorbid patients' performance status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiguro, Takashi; Kagiyama, Naho; Uozumi, Ryuji; Odashima, Kyuto; Kurashima, Kazuyoshi; Morita, Satoshi; Takayanagi, Noboru

    2016-10-01

    Comorbidity is known to be associated with the severity and mortality of pneumonia. The severity of each underlying disease varies, and performance status, which is known to be a prognostic factor of malignant diseases, reflects the overall patient condition as affected by his/her comorbidity and underlying diseases of various severity. We investigated whether premorbid patients' performance status is associated with the severity and mortality of pneumococcal pneumonia. This retrospective study assessed these factors in hospitalized patients suffering from pneumococcal pneumonia from 2002 to 2015. We included 424 patients aged 68.9 ± 14.1 years in the study, of which 68.9% were men. A multivariate analysis found that advanced age (≥65 years), diabetes mellitus, and poor performance status were independent factors associated with severity, whereas old pulmonary tuberculosis, poor performance status, pneumococcal bacteremia, and severe pneumonia were independent factors that were associated with non-survival. Poor performance status was associated with the severity and mortality of pneumococcal pneumonia. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. ADULT RESPIRATORY-DISTRESS SYNDROME (ARDS) DUE TO BACTEREMIC PNEUMOCOCCAL PNEUMONIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MANNES, GPM; BOERSMA, WG; BAUR, CHJM; POSTMUS, PE

    We describe a patient, who had no pre-existing disease, with bacteraemic pneumococcal pneumonia and adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), a rare complication. In spite of the use of antibiotics and intensive treatment the mortality rate of this kind of infection remains high. Streptococcus

  4. Minimally invasive surgical treatment for temporomandibular joint in patients with various rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yu. Drobyshev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint (TMJ involvement occurs in patients with different rheumatic diseases (RDs. Pain, limitation of mouth opening can lead to significant problems in both oral hygiene and when eating. Conservative treatments for TMJ lesions are not always effective. Objective: to evaluate the efficiency of minimally invasive surgical interventions (TMJ arthrocentesis and arthroscopy in patients with RDs. Patients and methods. The investigation enrolled 64 patients with different RDs (43 with rheumatoid arthritis, 11 with psoriatic arthritis, 8 with systemic lupus erythematosus, and 2 with ankylosing spondylitis who were divided into three groups in relation to the severity of TMJ involvement in accordance with the Wilkes classification. All the patients underwent TMJ magnetic resonance imaging at baseline and 6 months after treatment. Also at baseline, 14 days, and 1, 6, and 12 months after surgery, the investigators assessed TMJ pain intensity by visual analogue scale and the parameters of mandibular movements. Patients with Wilkes stages IV and V TMJ involvement underwent arthroscopic intervention into the TMJ and those with III stage received TMJ arthrocentesis with arthrolavage. Results and discussion. After surgical treatment, all the groups were noted to have a significant decrease in TMJ pain intensity compared with the baseline level; moreover, the severity of TMJ pain most significantly decreased on day 7 after surgery. Later on, positive changes remained within subsequent follow-up months. There were data similar in the higher degree of mouth opening. The results of surgical treatment in patients with Wilkes stage V TMJ involvement were worse than in those with stages III and IV. Conclusion. Minimally invasive TMJ surgery in patients with RDs is effective and associated with the low frequency of postoperative complications and exacerbations of RDs. The efficiency of minimally invasive TMJ surgery is higher in patients with the

  5. Mortality reductions for older adults differ by race/ethnicity and gender since the introduction of adult and pediatric pneumococcal vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soneji, Samir; Metlay, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    We determined the effectiveness of a 23-valent-polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccine (PPV-23) and pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-7) in reducing adult pneumococcal mortality by comparing historically predicted declines in pneumococcal disease mortality with observed patterns since the introduction of PPV-23 and PCV-7, including analyses of age, gender, and racial/ethnic subgroups. We analyzed all deaths registered on U.S. death certificates reporting any site of pneumococcal infection (e.g., meningitis, sepsis, pneumonia, bacteremia, and peritonitis) from 1968 to 2006. We used time-series dynamic linear regression on annual pneumococcal mortality rates to determine the percentage reduction in post-1983 mortality rates for a given increase in PPV-23 vaccination rates and post-2000 mortality rates for a given increase in PCV-7 vaccination rates. Pneumococcal mortality decreased well before the introduction of PPV-23 in 1983 and again before the introduction of PCV-7 in 2000. The level of PPV-23 vaccination was associated with a direct and significant reduction in adult mortality, especially white female adults > or = 65 years of age. In contrast, the level of PCV-7 vaccination in the population was not associated with an indirect and significant reduction in pneumococcal mortality beyond the historical pace of decline. PPV-23 introduction was associated with a reduction in pneumococcal mortality among older adults > or = 65 years of age beyond levels predicted by secular trends, whereas PCV-7 introduction was not. Mortality reduction was not uniformly experienced across the population, revealing the need for additional strategies to reduce pneumococcal mortality in older adults.

  6. Changing trends in serotypes of S. pneumoniae isolates causing invasive and non-invasive diseases in unvaccinated population in Mexico (2000-2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Noemí Carnalla-Barajas

    2017-05-01

    Conclusions: A percentage of annual decline of serotypes causing IPD and NIPD included in PCV was detected among groups not targeted to receive the vaccine, probably due to herd effect. Considering pneumococcal serotype distribution is a dynamic process, we highlight the importance of surveillance programs.

  7. A Retrospective Study of the Clinical Burden of Hospitalized All-Cause and Pneumococcal Pneumonia in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelly A. McNeil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Routine vaccination against Streptococcus pneumoniae is recommended in Canada for infants, the elderly, and individuals with chronic comorbidity. National incidence and burden of all-cause and pneumococcal pneumonia in Canada (excluding Quebec were assessed. Methods. Incidence, length of stay, and case-fatality rates of hospitalized all-cause and pneumococcal pneumonia were determined for 2004–2010 using ICD-10 discharge data from the Canadian Institutes for Health Information Discharge Abstract Database. Population-at-risk data were obtained from the Statistics Canada census. Temporal changes in pneumococcal and all-cause pneumonia rates in adults ≥65 years were analyzed by logistic regression. Results. Hospitalization for all-cause pneumonia was highest in children 70 years and declined significantly from 1766/100,000 to 1537/100,000 per year in individuals aged ≥65 years (P<0.001. Overall hospitalization for pneumococcal pneumonia also declined from 6.40/100,000 to 5.08/100,000 per year. Case-fatality rates were stable (11.6% to 12.3%. Elderly individuals had longer length of stay and higher case-fatality rates than younger groups. Conclusions. All-cause and pneumococcal pneumonia hospitalization rates declined between 2004 and 2010 in Canada (excluding Quebec. Direct and indirect effects from pediatric pneumococcal immunization may partly explain some of this decline. Nevertheless, the burden of disease from pneumonia remains high.

  8. 2016 guidelines for the use of antifungal agents in patients with invasive fungal diseases in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiang-Chi Kung

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The Infectious Diseases Society of Taiwan, Medical Foundation in Memory of Dr. Deh-Lin Cheng, Foundation of Professor Wei-Chuan Hsieh for Infectious Diseases Research and Education, and CY Lee's Research Foundation for Pediatric Infectious Diseases and Vaccines have updated the guidelines for the use of antifungal agents in adult patients with invasive fungal diseases in Taiwan. This guideline replaces the 2009 version. Recommendations are provided for Candida, Cryptococcus, Aspergillus and Mucormycetes. The focus is based on up-to-date evidence on indications for treatment or prophylaxis of the most common clinical problems. To support the recommendations in this guideline, the committee considered the rationale, purpose, local epidemiology, and key clinical features of invasive fungal diseases to select the primary and alternative antifungal agents. This is the first guideline that explicitly describes the quality and strength of the evidence to support these recommendations. The strengths of the recommendations are the quality of the evidence, the balance between benefits and harms, resource and cost. The guidelines are not intended nor recommended as a substitute for bedside judgment in the management of individual patients, the advice of qualified health care professionals, and more recent evidence concerning therapeutic efficacy and emergence of resistance. Practical considerations for individualized selection of antifungal agents include patient factors, pathogen, site of infection and drug-related factors, such as drug–drug interaction, drug-food intervention, cost and convenience. The guidelines are published in the Journal of Microbiology, Immunology and Infection and are also available on the Society website.

  9. Impact of 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine on pneumococcal meningitis in children up to two years of age in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Grando, Indianara Maria; Moraes, Camile de; Flannery, Brendan; Ramalho, Walter Massa; Horta, Marco Aurélio P.; Pinho, Diana Lucia Moura; Nascimento, Gilmara Lima

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the impact of vaccination against Streptococcus pneumoniae on the morbidity and mortality from pneumococcal meningitis in children ≤ 2 years in Brazil, from 2007 to 2012. This is a descriptive study and ecological analysis using data from the Information System on Notifiable Diseases. Pre-vaccination (2007-2009) and post-vaccination (2011-2012) periods were defined to compare incidence rates and mortality. A total of 1,311 cases and 430 deaths were r...

  10. Escherichia coli in chronic inflammatory bowel diseases: An update on adherent invasive Escherichia coli pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Medina, Margarita; Garcia-Gil, Librado Jesus

    2014-08-15

    Escherichia coli (E. coli), and particularly the adherent invasive E. coli (AIEC) pathotype, has been increasingly implicated in the ethiopathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD). E. coli strains with similar pathogenic features to AIEC have been associated with other intestinal disorders such as ulcerative colitis, colorectal cancer, and coeliac disease, but AIEC prevalence in these diseases remains largely unexplored. Since AIEC was described one decade ago, substantial progress has been made in deciphering its mechanisms of pathogenicity. However, the molecular bases that characterize the phenotypic properties of this pathotype are still not well resolved. A review of studies focused on E. coli populations in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is presented here and we discuss about the putative role of this species on each IBD subtype. Given the relevance of AIEC in CD pathogenesis, we present the latest research findings concerning AIEC host-microbe interactions and pathogenicity. We also review the existing data regarding the prevalence and abundance of AIEC in CD and its association with other intestinal diseases from humans and animals, in order to discuss the AIEC disease- and host-specificity. Finally, we highlight the fact that dietary components frequently found in industrialized countries may enhance AIEC colonization in the gut, which merits further investigation and the implementation of preventative measures.

  11. Strains Responsible for Invasive Meningococcal Disease in Patients With Terminal Complement Pathway Deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosain, Jérémie; Hong, Eva; Fieschi, Claire; Martins, Paula Vieira; El Sissy, Carine; Deghmane, Ala-Eddine; Ouachée, Marie; Thomas, Caroline; Launay, David; de Pontual, Loïc; Suarez, Felipe; Moshous, Despina; Picard, Capucine; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique

    2017-04-15

    Patients with terminal complement pathway deficiency (TPD) are susceptible to recurrent invasive meningococcal disease (IMD). Neisseria meningitidis (Nm) strains infecting these patients are poorly documented in the literature. We identified patients with TPD and available Nm strains isolated during IMD. We investigated the genetic basis of the different TPDs and the characteristics of the Nm strains. We included 56 patients with C5 (n = 8), C6 (n = 20), C7 (n = 18), C8 (n = 9), or C9 (n = 1) deficiency. Genetic study was performed in 47 patients and 30 pathogenic variants were identified in the genes coding for C5 (n = 4), C6 (n = 5), C7 (n = 12), C8 (n = 7), and C9 (n = 2). We characterized 61 Nm strains responsible for IMD in the 56 patients with TPD. The most frequent strains belonged to groups Y (n = 27 [44%]), B (n = 18 [30%]), and W (n = 8 [13%]). Hyperinvasive clonal complexes (CC11, CC32, CC41/44, and CC269) were responsible for 21% of IMD cases. The CC23 predominates and represented 26% of all invasive isolates. Eleven of the 15 clonal complexes identified fit to 12 different clonal complexes belonging to carriage strains. Unusual meningococcal strains with low level of virulence similar to carriage strains are most frequently responsible for IMD in patients with TPD. © The Author 217. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Serotype and Genotype Distribution among Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates in Colombia, 2005–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Eliana L.; Ramos, Viviana; Sanabria, Olga; Moreno, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    In Colombia, a laboratory-based surveillance of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates as part of SIREVA II PAHO has been conducted since 1994. This study describes the serotype distribution, antimicrobial resistance, and genetic relationships of pneumococcal isolates recovered in Colombia from 2005 to 2010. In this study, demographic data of invasive S. pneumoniae isolates were analyzed, and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns were determined. Pulse field gel electrophoresis (n = 629) and multilocus sequence typing (n = 10) were used to determine genetic relationship of isolates with minimal inhibitory concentration to penicillin ≥0.125 µg/mL. A total of 1775 isolates of S. pneumoniae were obtained. Fifteen serotypes accounted for 80.7% of isolates. Serotype 14 (23.1%) was the most frequent in the general population. Penicillin resistance was 30.7% in meningitis and 9.0% in non-meningitis. Clones Spain6BST90, Spain9VST156, Spain23FST81, and Colombia23FST338 were associated to isolates. Additionally, serotype 6A isolates were associated with ST460 and ST473, and 19A isolates with ST276, ST320, and ST1118. In conclusion, the surveillance program provided updated information of trends in serotype distribution, antimicrobial resistance and the circulation of clones in invasive pneumococcal diseases. These results could be helpful to understand the epidemiology of S. pneumoniae in Colombia, and provide a baseline to measure the impact of vaccine introduction. PMID:24416330

  13. 220D-F2 from Rubus ulmifolius kills Streptococcus pneumoniae planktonic cells and pneumococcal biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharmila J Talekar

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus forms organized biofilms to persist in the human nasopharynx. This persistence allows the pneumococcus to produce severe diseases such as pneumonia, otitis media, bacteremia and meningitis that kill nearly a million children every year. While bacteremia and meningitis are mediated by planktonic pneumococci, biofilm structures are present during pneumonia and otitis media. The global emergence of S. pneumoniae strains resistant to most commonly prescribed antibiotics warrants further discovery of alternative therapeutics. The present study assessed the antimicrobial potential of a plant extract, 220D-F2, rich in ellagic acid, and ellagic acid derivatives, against S. pneumoniae planktonic cells and biofilm structures. Our studies first demonstrate that, when inoculated together with planktonic cultures, 220D-F2 inhibited the formation of pneumococcal biofilms in a dose-dependent manner. As measured by bacterial counts and a LIVE/DEAD bacterial viability assay, 100 and 200 µg/ml of 220D-F2 had significant bactericidal activity against pneumococcal planktonic cultures as early as 3 h post-inoculation. Quantitative MIC's, whether quantified by qPCR or dilution and plating, showed that 80 µg/ml of 220D-F2 completely eradicated overnight cultures of planktonic pneumococci, including antibiotic resistant strains. When preformed pneumococcal biofilms were challenged with 220D-F2, it significantly reduced the population of biofilms 3 h post-inoculation. Minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC50 was obtained incubating biofilms with 100 µg/ml of 220D-F2 for 3 h and 6 h of incubation. 220D-F2 also significantly reduced the population of pneumococcal biofilms formed on human pharyngeal cells. Our results demonstrate potential therapeutic applications of 220D-F2 to both kill planktonic pneumococcal cells and disrupt pneumococcal biofilms.

  14. Clinical applications of non-invasive imaging techniques in suspected coronary artery disease and in acute myocardial infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Nucifora, Gaetano

    2015-01-01

    Non-invasive cardiac imaging modalities play a crucial role in the diagnostic process and clinical management of patients without known coronary artery disease and patients with acute myocardial infarction. The first part of the thesis discusses the use of non-invasive imaging modalities (including coronary artery calcium scoring, multi-slice computed tomography coronary angiography, conventional two-dimensional echocardiography and speckle-tracking echocardiography) for the diagnosis and ris...

  15. Prevention of Pneumococcal Infection in Children with Chronic Diseases of the Nasopharynx Reduces the Incidence of Other Respiratory Tract Infections: Results of a Comparative Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Vavilova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A promising approach to solving the problem of widespread infections of the respiratory tract in children is the use ofspecific prophylaxis against the pneumococcus.Objective: Our aim was to examine the clinical efficacy of PCV13 of children with chronic foci of infection in the nasopharynx and the changes of local factors of protection of the upper respiratory tract.Methods: We have evaluated the incidence of respiratory tract and ENT infections in children with chronic diseases of the nasopharynx. Research period: January 2011 — January 2015. Upper airway function examination included cytologic analysis — counting the main cell populations ratio in the common cytoplasm, lysozym activity and secretory immunoglobulin of class A (sIgA in nasal secretions.Results: The study involved 876 children 2–5 years old. Main group (PCV13 amounted to 448 patients, and the control group (unvaccinated 428. Annual dynamic observation showed a significant reduction of acute morbidity by 2 times (p < 0.001, pneumonia by 2.4 times (p = 0.042, acute bronchitis by 2.5 times (p = 0.008, concomitant ENT pathology (acute otitis media and acute exacerbations of chronic sinusitis by 2.2 times (p = 0.001 and 2.3 times (p = 0.004, respectively. There was a positive effect of vaccination on the level of local factors of protection of the upper respiratory tract (lysozyme, sIgA, the somatic cell count in nasal secretions.Conclusion: PCV13 vaccination reduces the risk of developing acute respiratory infections and ENT infections in children with chronic diseases of the nasopharynx. This is against the background of recovery in the levels of factors of local immunity.

  16. Epidemiology of serogroup B invasive meningococcal disease in Ontario, Canada, 2000 to 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dang Vica

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Invasive meningococcal disease (IMD caused by serogroup B is the last major serogroup in Canada to become vaccine-preventable. The anticipated availability of vaccines targeting this serogroup prompted an assessment of the epidemiology of serogroup B disease in Ontario, Canada. Methods We retrieved information on confirmed IMD cases reported to Ontario’s reportable disease database between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2010 and probabilistically-linked these cases to Public Health Ontario Laboratory records. Rates were calculated with denominator data obtained from Statistics Canada. We calculated a crude number needed to vaccinate using the inverse of the infant ( Results A total of 259 serogroup B IMD cases were identified in Ontario over the 11-year period. Serogroup B was the most common cause of IMD. Incidence ranged from 0.11 to 0.27/100,000/year, and fluctuated over time. Cases ranged in age from 13 days to 101 years; 21.4% occurred in infants, of which 72.7% were Conclusions Although rare, the proportion of IMD caused by serogroup B has increased and currently causes most IMD in Ontario, with infants having the highest risk of disease. Although serogroup B meningococcal vaccines are highly anticipated, our findings suggest that decisions regarding publicly funding serogroup B meningococcal vaccines will be difficult and may not be based on disease burden alone.

  17. FACTS AND OPINIONS ON USEFULNESS OF PNEUMOCOCCAL VACCINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.P. Kostinov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the problem of pneumococcal infections (pneumonias, meningitis, otitis in children and adults. The modern opportunities of vaccinoprophylaxis and its usefulness in public health service are shown. The perspectives and questions on safety and effectiveness of pneumococcal conjugated 7-valent vaccine as the basic method of pneumococcal infections prophylaxis in infants and children from risk groups (with bronchial asthma, sickle-cell anemia, etc. are presented in details.Key words: children, pneumococcal infection, vaccination, pneumococcal conjugated 7-valent vaccine.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2009;8(4:79-83

  18. Combination of pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA with whole cell pertussis vaccine increases protection against pneumococcal challenge in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Leonor S Oliveira

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of respiratory acute infections around the world. In Latin America, approximately 20,000 children under 5 years of age die of pneumococcal diseases annually. Pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA is among the best-characterized pneumococcal antigens that confer protection in animal models of pneumococcal infections and, as such, is a good alternative for the currently available conjugated vaccines. Efficient immune responses directed to PspA in animal models have already been described. Nevertheless, few low cost adjuvants for a subunit pneumococcal vaccine have been proposed to date. Here, we have tested the adjuvant properties of the whole cell Bordetella pertussis vaccine (wP that is currently part of the DTP (diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine administrated to children in several countries, as an adjuvant to PspA. Nasal immunization of BALB/c mice with a combination of PspA5 and wP or wP(low--a new generation vaccine that contains low levels of B. pertussis LPS--conferred protection against a respiratory lethal challenge with S. pneumoniae. Both PspA5-wP and PspA5-wP(low vaccines induced high levels of systemic and mucosal antibodies against PspA5, with similar profile, indicating no essential requirement for B. pertussis LPS in the adjuvant properties of wP. Accordingly, nasal immunization of C3H/HeJ mice with PspA5-wP conferred protection against the pneumococcal challenge, thus ruling out a role for TLR4 responses in the adjuvant activity and the protection mechanisms triggered by the vaccines. The high levels of anti-PspA5 antibodies correlated with increased cross-reactivity against PspAs from different clades and also reflected in cross-protection. In addition, passive immunization experiments indicated that antibodies played an important role in protection in this model. Finally, subcutaneous immunization with a combination of PspA5 with DTP(low protected mice against challenge with two

  19. Second hand smoke exposure and the risk of invasive meningococcal disease in children: systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray Rachael L

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Invasive meningococcal disease remains an important cause of serious morbidity and mortality in children and young people. There is a growing body of literature to suggest that exposure to passive smoke may play a role in the development of the disease, therefore we have performed a systematic review to provide a comprehensive estimate of the magnitude of this effect for smoking by any household member, by individual family members, and of maternal smoking before and after birth. Methods Four databases (Medline, Embase, PsychINFO and CAB Abstracts database were searched to identify studies (to June 2012 and reference lists scanned for further studies. Titles, abstracts and full texts were checked for eligibility independently by two authors. Quality of included studies was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Pooled odds ratios (OR with 95% confidence intervals (CI were estimated using random effect models, with heterogeneity quantified using I2. Results We identified 18 studies which assessed the effects of SHS on the risk of invasive meningococcal disease in children. SHS in the home doubled the risk of invasive meningococcal disease (OR 2.18, 95% CI 1.63 to 2.92, I2 = 72%, with some evidence of an exposure-response gradient. The strongest effect was seen in children under 5 years (OR 2.48, 95% CI 1.51 to 4.09, I2 = 47%. Maternal smoking significantly increased the risk of invasive meningococcal disease by 3 times during pregnancy (OR 2.93, 95% CI 1.52-5.66 and by 2 times after birth (OR 2.26, 95% CI 1.54-3.31. Conclusions SHS exposure, and particularly passive foetal exposure to maternal smoking during pregnancy, significantly increases the risk of childhood invasive meningococcal disease. It is likely that an extra 630 cases of invasive meningococcal disease annually in children under 16 are directly attributable to SHS exposure in UK homes.

  20. Gene expression in cortex and hippocampus during acute pneumococcal meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wittwer Matthias

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pneumococcal meningitis is associated with high mortality (~30% and morbidity. Up to 50% of survivors are affected by neurological sequelae due to a wide spectrum of brain injury mainly affecting the cortex and hippocampus. Despite this significant disease burden, the genetic program that regulates the host response leading to brain damage as a consequence of bacterial meningitis is largely unknown. We used an infant rat model of pneumococcal meningitis to assess gene expression profiles in cortex and hippocampus at 22 and 44 hours after infection and in controls at 22 h after mock-infection with saline. To analyze the biological significance of the data generated by Affymetrix DNA microarrays, a bioinformatics pipeline was used combining (i a literature-profiling algorithm to cluster genes based on the vocabulary of abstracts indexed in MEDLINE (NCBI and (ii the self-organizing map (SOM, a clustering technique based on covariance in gene expression kinetics. Results Among 598 genes differentially regulated (change factor ≥ 1.5; p ≤ 0.05, 77% were automatically assigned to one of 11 functional groups with 94% accuracy. SOM disclosed six patterns of expression kinetics. Genes associated with growth control/neuroplasticity, signal transduction, cell death/survival, cytoskeleton, and immunity were generally upregulated. In contrast, genes related to neurotransmission and lipid metabolism were transiently downregulated on the whole. The majority of the genes associated with ionic homeostasis, neurotransmission, signal transduction and lipid metabolism were differentially regulated specifically in the hippocampus. Of the cell death/survival genes found to be continuously upregulated only in hippocampus, the majority are pro-apoptotic, while those continuously upregulated only in cortex are anti-apoptotic. Conclusion Temporal and spatial analysis of gene expression in experimental pneumococcal meningitis identified potential

  1. Clinical presentation of invasive disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis serogroup Y in Sweden, 1995 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Säll, O; Stenmark, B; Glimåker, M; Jacobsson, S; Mölling, P; Olcén, P; Fredlund, H

    2017-07-01

    Over the period 1995-2012, the incidence of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) caused by Neisseria meningitidis serogroup Y (NmY) increased significantly in Sweden. This is mainly due to the emergence of a predominant cluster named strain type YI subtype 1, belonging to the ST-23 clonal complex (cc). The aim of this study was to examine the clinical picture of patients with invasive disease caused by NmY and to analyse whether the predominant cluster exhibits certain clinical characteristics that might explain the increased incidence. In this retrospective observational study, the medical records available from patients with IMD caused by Nm serogroup Y in Sweden between 1995 and 2012 were systematically reviewed. Patient characteristics, in-hospital findings and outcome were studied and differences between the dominating cluster and other isolates were analysed. Medical records from 175 of 191 patients were retrieved. The median age was 62 years. The all-cause mortality within 30 days of admission was 9% (15/175) in the whole material; 4% (2/54) in the cohort with strain type YI subtype 1 and 11% (12/121) among patients with other isolates. Thirty-three per cent of the patients were diagnosed with meningitis, 19% with pneumonia, 10% with arthritis and 35% were found to have bacteraemia but no apparent organ manifestation. This survey included cases with an aggressive clinical course as well as cases with a relatively mild clinical presentation. There was a trend towards lower mortality and less-severe disease in the cohort with strain type YI subtype 1 compared with the group with other isolates.

  2. Cost-effectiveness of new pneumococcal conjugate vaccines in Turkey: a decision analytical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakır Mustafa

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus pneumoniae infections, which place a considerable burden on healthcare resources, can be reduced in a cost-effective manner using a 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-7. We compare the cost effectiveness of a 13-valent PCV (PCV-13 and a 10-valent pneumococcal non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae protei