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Sample records for invasive cervical cancer

  1. Cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia and invasive cervical cancer in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The relative incidences of cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia (CIN) and invasive cervical cancer were studied in black and white patients at the academic hospitals of the University of the Orange Free State. A statistically highly significant difference was found between black and white patients, with a higher incidence of ...

  2. HPV genotypes in invasive cervical cancer in Danish women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirschner, Benny; Junge, Jette; Holl, Katsiaryna

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) genotype distribution in invasive cervical cancers may differ by geographic region. The primary objective of this study was to estimate HPV-genotype distribution in Danish women with a diagnosis of invasive cervical cancer.......Human papillomavirus (HPV) genotype distribution in invasive cervical cancers may differ by geographic region. The primary objective of this study was to estimate HPV-genotype distribution in Danish women with a diagnosis of invasive cervical cancer....

  3. Cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia and invasive cervical cancer in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cancer in black and white patients. J. T. NEL, L. DE LANGE, P. J. MEIRING ... cervical cancer. This serious yet preventable disease is still very prevalent in South Africa, especially among black women. S AIr Med J 1994; 84: 18-19. Aanalysis of rime trends in .... therapy in users of oral contraceptives. Am J Clill Nucr 1982; 35:.

  4. Hypoxia stimulates invasion and migration of human cervical cancer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hao Xu

    2017-07-25

    Jul 25, 2017 ... cervical cancer cell lines invasion and migration are not yet clearly understood. Furthermore, and perhaps more importantly, tumour cells must survive in environmental conditions not present in normal tissue (Brown 1999). One of the most formidable barriers to their survival is hypoxia (Yoon et al. 2005).

  5. Association between cervical screening and prevention of invasive cervical cancer in Ontario: a population-based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicus, Danielle; Sutradhar, Rinku; Lu, Yan; Kupets, Rachel; Paszat, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the effect of cervical screening in the prevention of invasive cervical cancer among age groups, using a population-based case-control study in the province of Ontario, Canada. Exposure was defined as cervical cytology history greater than 3 months before the diagnosis date of cervical cancer (index date). Cases were women who were diagnosed with cervical cancer between January 1, 1998, and December 31, 2008. Controls were women without a diagnosis of cervical cancer on, or before, December 31, 2008. Two controls were matched to each case on year of birth and income quintile, as of the index date. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratio for having been screened among those with cervical cancer. Cervical cancer screening performed between 3 and 36 months before the index date was protective against invasive cervical cancer in women aged 40 through 69 years. In women younger than 40 years, cervical cancer screening performed 3 to 36 months before the index date was not protective. Cervical screening is associated with a reduced risk for invasive cervical cancer among women older than 40 years. Cervical cancer resources should be focused on maximizing the risk reduction.

  6. cd4 t-lymphocyte subsets in women with invasive cervical cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-10-01

    Oct 1, 2013 ... Invasive cervical cancer (ICC) is common in populations with high HIV prevalence in sub-Sahara. Africa (1,2). Depressed systemic as well as local immune responses have been observed in patients with advanced cervical cancer (3,4). Patients with iatrogenic CD4 cell depression following organ.

  7. Human papillomavirus infection, cervical dysplasia and invasive cervical cancer in Honduras: a case-control study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferrera, A.B.; Velema, J.P.; Figueroa, M.; Bulnes, R.; Toro, L.A.; Claros, J.M.; Barahona, O. de; Melchers, W.J.G.

    1999-01-01

    A substantial body of evidence has confirmed human papillomavirus (HPV) infection as the central etiological agents in human cervical carcinogenesis. In Honduras, cervical cancer is the most common cancer among women, with a high annual incidence. We conducted a population-based, case-control study

  8. Differences in human papillomavirus type distribution in high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive cervical cancer in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tjalma, Wiebren A; Fiander, Alison; Reich, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of differences in human papillomavirus (HPV)-type prevalence between high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (HG-CIN) and invasive cervical cancer (ICC) is crucial for understanding the natural history of HPV-infected cervical lesions and the potential impact of HPV vaccination...... on cervical cancer prevention. More than 6,000 women diagnosed with HG-CIN or ICC from 17 European countries were enrolled in two parallel cross-sectional studies (108288/108290). Centralised histopathology review and standardised HPV-DNA typing were applied to formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded cervical...... specimens dated 2001-2008. The pooled prevalence of individual HPV types was estimated using meta-analytic methods. A total of 3,103 women were diagnosed with HG-CIN and a total of 3,162 with ICC (median ages: 34 and 49 years, respectively), of which 98.5 and 91.8% were HPV-positive, respectively. The most...

  9. Risk of cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia and invasive cancer of the cervix in DES daughters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Verloop (Herman); F.E. van Leeuwen (F.); T.J.M. Helmerhorst (Theo); I.M.C.M. de Kok (Inge); van Erp, E.J.M.; H.H. van Boven (Hester); M.A. Rookus (Matti)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractObjective: Women exposed to diethylstilbestrol in utero (DES) have an increased risk of clear cell adenocarcinoma (CCA) of the vagina and cervix, while their risk of non-CCA invasive cervical cancer is still unclear. Methods: We studied the risk of pre-cancerous (CIN) lesions and non-CCA

  10. Human papillomavirus genotypes distribution in 175 invasive cervical cancer cases from Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Cristina Mendes de; Fregnani, José Humberto Tavares Guerreiro; Carvalho, Jesus Paula; Longatto-Filho, Adhemar; Levi, José Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Invasive cervical cancer is the second most common malignant tumor affecting Brazilian women. Knowledge on Human Papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes in invasive cervical cancer cases is crucial to guide the introduction and further evaluate the impact of new preventive strategies based on HPV. We aimed to provide updated comprehensive data about the HPV types’ distribution in patients with invasive cervical cancer. Fresh tumor tissue samples of histologically confirmed invasive cervical cancer were collected from 175 women attending two cancer reference hospitals from São Paulo State: ICESP and Hospital de Câncer de Barretos. HPV detection and genotyping were performed by the Linear Array HPV Genotyping Test (Roche Molecular Diagnostics, Pleasanton,USA). 170 out of 172 valid samples (99%) were HPV DNA positive. The most frequent types were HPV16 (77.6%), HPV18 (12.3%), HPV31 (8.8%), HPV33 (7.1%) and HPV35 (5.9%). Most infections (75%) were caused by individual HPV types. Women with adenocarcinoma were not younger than those with squamous cell carcinoma, as well, as women infected with HPV33 were older than those infected by other HPV types. Some differences between results obtained in the two hospitals were observed: higher overall prevalence of HPV16, absence of single infection by HPV31 and HPV45 was verified in HC-Barretos in comparison to ICESP patients. To our knowledge, this is one of the largest studies made with fresh tumor tissues of invasive cervical cancer cases in Brazil. This study depicted a distinct HPV genotype distribution between two centers that may reflect the local epidemiology of HPV transmission among these populations. Due to the impact of these findings on cervical cancer preventive strategies, extension of this investigation to routine screening populations is warranted

  11. Surgical staging identified false HPV-negative cases in a large series of invasive cervical cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, Karl Ulrich; Liebrich, Clemens; Luyten, Alexander; Zander, Martina; Iftner, Thomas

    2017-12-01

    We examined a large series of biopsy-proven invasive cervical cancers with surgical staging and HPV re-testing to estimate the relevance of HPV-negative cervical cancers in a Caucasian population. We prospectively collected smears from 371 patients with a biopsy-proven diagnosis of cervical cancer for HC2 testing of high-risk HPV (HR-HPV). In HC2-negative cases, smears and paraffin embedded tissue blocks underwent additional HPV genotyping. HC2 tests showed 31/371 cases (8.8%) had negative findings. Surgical staging showed that 21/31 HC2-negative cases (68%) were not cervical cancer. Overall, 340/350 cases of primary cervical cancer confirmed by surgical staging tested HC2 positive (97.2%). Non-high-risk HPV subtypes were detected in five cases (one HPV-53, one HPV-70, and three HPV-73) and high-risk subtypes in four patients with HC2-negative cervical cancer (two HPV 16 and two HPV-18). The remaining case, a primary undifferentiated carcinoma of the uterine cervix, tested negative for HPV-DNA with all tests. The main explanation for HPV-negative cervical cancer was a false diagnosis, followed by cancers associated with non-HR-HPV types, and false-negative HR-HPV results. Truly HPV negative seem to be very rare in Caucasian populations. Retrospective analyses without surgical staging may overestimate the proportion of HPV negative cervical cancers. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the place where a baby grows during pregnancy. Cervical cancer is caused by a virus called HPV. The ... for a long time, or have HIV infection. Cervical cancer may not cause any symptoms at first. Later, ...

  13. Twist and YB-1 gene expression in cervical cancer and precancerous tissue and their correlation with cell invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Tian

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the correlation of Twist and YB-1 gene expression in cervical cancer and precancerous tissue with cell invasion. Methods: Cervical cancer tissue, precancerous tissue and normal cervical tissue surgically removed in our hospital between May 2013 and April 2015 were collected; immunohistochemical staining kits were used to detect the positive protein expression rate of Twist and YB-1 gene; fluorescence quantitative PCR kits were used to detect Twist, YB-1 and invasion gene mRNA expression. Results: Twist and YB-1 mRNA expression and positive protein expression rate as well as USP22, Rab11, Rac1 and ANXA5 mRNA expression in cervical cancer tissue and precancerous tissue were significantly higher than those in normal cervical tissue, Twist and YB-1 mRNA expression and positive protein expression rate as well as USP22, Rab11, Rac1 and ANXA5 mRNA expression in cervical cancer tissue were significantly higher than those in precancerous tissue; USP22, Rab11, Rac1 and ANXA5 mRNA expression in cervical cancer tissue and precancerous tissue with positive Twist and YB-1 expression were significantly higher than those in cervical cancer tissue and precancerous tissue with negative Twist and YB-1 expression. Conclusion: Highly expressed Twist and YB-1 in cervical cancer and precancerous tissue can promote cell invasion.

  14. Associations between antioxidant vitamins and the risk of invasive cervical cancer in Chinese women: A case-control study

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Liyuan; Zhu, Hong; Lin, Chengjun; Che, Jianhua; Tian, Xiujuan; Han, Shiyu; Zhao, Honghui; Zhu, Yumei; Mao, Dongwei

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies on the associations between dietary antioxidant vitamins and the risk of cervical cancer remain inconsistent, and little evidence is available for serum antioxidant vitamins, which provide more accurate measurements of these nutrients. We conducted a case-control study of 458 incident cases with invasive cervical cancer and 742 controls to assess the effects of diet or serum antioxidant vitamins. Higher serum antioxidant vitamins were associated with a lower risk of cervical ...

  15. Intracervical US with a high-frequency miniature probe: a method for diagnosing early invasive cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, A; Okai, T; Kobayashi, K; Yoshikawa, H; Shiromizu, K; Matsuzawa, M; Taketani, Y

    1996-02-01

    To determine whether intracervical ultrasound (US) with a high-frequency miniature probe can depict cervical neoplasms, especially in early invasive stages. Forty-eight women with cervical cancer underwent preoperative transvaginal and intracervical US. US scans were compared with findings from histologic examination or surgery. Intracervical US was completed in 45 of the 48 patients. Both intracervical and transvaginal US were unable to depict preinvasive cancer. Intracervical US depicted the lesion in eight of 16 patients (50%) in whom the depth of cancer invasion was less than or equal to 5 mm, whereas transvaginal US failed to depict the lesion in all 16 patients. Intracervical US depicted the lesions in all 19 patients in whom the depth of cancer invasion was more than 5 mm, whereas transvaginal US was successful only in 14 (74%). Intracervical US is useful for evaluating invasive cervical cancer and is especially suitable for detecting early invasion in the endocervix.

  16. Effect of HIV Infection on Human Papillomavirus Types Causing Invasive Cervical Cancer in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Clifford, Gary M.; de Vuyst, Hugo; Tenet, Vanessa; Plummer, Martyn; Tully, Stephen; Franceschi, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: HIV infection is known to worsen the outcome of cervical human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and may do so differentially by HPV type. Design: Twenty-one studies were included in a meta-analysis of invasive cervical cancers (ICC) among women infected with HIV in Africa. Method: Type-specific HPV DNA prevalence was compared with data from a similar meta-analysis of HIV-negative ICC using prevalence ratios (PR). Results: HPV detection was similar in 770 HIV-positive (91.2%) and 384...

  17. Cervical Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-03-06

    Did you know that cervical cancer rates differ by race/ethnicity and region? Or that cervical cancer can usually be prevented if precancerous cervical lesions are found by a Pap test and treated? Find out how getting regular Pap tests can save a woman's life.  Created: 3/6/2007 by National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program.   Date Released: 4/25/2007.

  18. Gα12/13 signaling promotes cervical cancer invasion through the RhoA/ROCK-JNK signaling axis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Bo; Cui, Jinquan; Wang, Wuliang; Deng, Kehong

    2016-01-01

    Several reports have indicated a role for the members of the G12 family of heterotrimeric G proteins (Gα12 and Gα13) in oncogenesis and tumor cell growth. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the role of G12 signaling in cervical cancer. We demonstrated that expression of the G12 proteins was highly upregulated in cervical cancer cells. Additionally, expression of the activated forms of Gα12/Gα13 but not expression of activated Gαq induced cell invasion through the activation of the RhoA family of G proteins, but had no effect on cell proliferation in the cervical cancer cells. Inhibition of G12 signaling by expression of the RGS domain of the p115-Rho-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor (p115-RGS) blocked thrombin-stimulated cell invasion, but did not inhibit cell proliferation in cervical cells, whereas the inhibition of Gαq (RGS2) had no effect. Furthermore, G12 signaling was able to activate Rho proteins, and this stimulation was inhibited by p115-RGS, and Gα12-induced invasion was blocked by an inhibitor of RhoA/B/C (C3 toxin). Pharmacological inhibition of JNK remarkably decreased G12-induced JNK activation. Both a JNK inhibitor (SP600125) and a ROCK inhibitor (Y27632) reduced G12-induced JNK and c-Jun activation, and markedly inhibited G12-induced cellular invasion. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that stimulation of G12 proteins is capable of promoting invasion through RhoA/ROCK-JNK activation. -- Highlights: •Gα12/Gα13 is upregulated in cervical cancer cell lines. •Gα12/Gα13 is not involved in cervical cancer cell proliferation. •Gα12/Gα13 promotes cervical cancer cell invasion. •The role of Rho G proteins in G12-promoted cervical cancer cell invasion. •G12 promotes cell invasion through activation of the ROCK-JNK signaling axis.

  19. Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... I find more information about cervical and other gynecologic cancers? Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: 800-CDC-INFO or www. cdc. gov/ cancer/ gynecologic National Cancer Institute: 800-4-CANCER or www. ...

  20. miR-92a is upregulated in cervical cancer and promotes cell proliferation and invasion by targeting FBXW7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Chuanyi [Department of Oncology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008 (China); Shen, Liangfang, E-mail: lfshen2008@163.com [Department of Oncology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008 (China); Mao, Lei; Wang, Bing; Li, Yang; Yu, Huizhi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yueyang Second People' s Hospital, Yueyang 414000 (China)

    2015-02-27

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in the cervical carcinogenesis and progression. In this study, we investigated the role of miR-92a in progression and invasion of cervical cancer. MiR-92a was significantly upregulated in cervical cancer tissues and cell lines. Overexpression of miR-92a led to remarkably enhanced proliferation by promoting cell cycle transition from G1 to S phase and significantly enhanced invasion of cervical cancer cells, while its knockdown significantly reversed these cellular events. Bioinformatics analysis suggested F-box and WD repeat domain-containing 7 (FBXW7) as a novel target of miR-92a, and miR-92a suppressed the expression level of FBXW7 mRNA by direct binding to its 3′-untranslated region (3′UTR). Expression of miR-92a was negatively correlated with FBXW7 in cervical cancer tissues. Furthermore, Silencing of FBXW7 counteracted the effects of miR-92a suppression, while its overexpression reversed oncogenic effects of miR-92a. Together, these findings indicate that miR-92a acts as an onco-miRNA and may contribute to the progression and invasion of cervical cancer, suggesting miR-92a as a potential novel diagnostic and therapeutic target of cervical cancer. - Highlights: • miR-92a is elevated in cervical cancer tissues and cell lines. • miR-92a promotes cervical cancer cell proliferation, cell cycle transition from G1 to S phase and invasion. • FBXW7 is a direct target of miR-92a. • FBXW7 counteracts the oncogenic effects of miR-92a on cervical cancer cells.

  1. Cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bleeding between periods, after intercourse, or after menopause Vaginal discharge that does not stop, and may be pale, ... Instructions Hysterectomy - abdominal - discharge Hysterectomy - laparoscopic - ... Images Cervical cancer Cervical neoplasia ...

  2. Hypoxia stimulates invasion and migration of human cervical cancer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Here we show that hypoxiaincreases tumour cell invasion and migration by the modulation of Rab11, an important molecule for vesicular trafficking.In our study, we found that Rab11, together with the activation of Rac1, could stimulate invasion and migration of cervicalcancer cell lines HeLa/SiHa in hypoxia. Activation of ...

  3. Blood plasma surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for non-invasive optical detection of cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shangyuan; Lin, Duo; Lin, Juqiang; Li, Buhong; Huang, Zufang; Chen, Guannan; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Lan; Pan, Jianji; Chen, Rong; Zeng, Haishan

    2013-07-21

    Based on blood plasma surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) analysis, a simple and label-free blood test for non-invasive cervical cancer detection is presented in this paper. SERS measurements were performed on blood plasma samples from 60 cervical cancer patients and 50 healthy volunteers. Both the empirical approach and multivariate statistical techniques, including principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA), were employed to analyze and differentiate the obtained blood plasma SERS spectra. The empirical diagnostic algorithm based on the integration area of the SERS spectral bands (1310-1430 and 1560-1700 cm(-1)) achieved a diagnostic sensitivity of 70% and 83.3%, and a specificity of 76% and 78%, respectively, whereas the diagnostic algorithms based on PCA-LDA yielded a better diagnostic sensitivity of 96.7% and a specificity of 92% for separating cancerous samples from normal samples. This exploratory work demonstrates that a silver nanoparticle based SERS plasma analysis technique in conjunction with PCA-LDA has potential for improving cervical cancer detection and screening.

  4. Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 800-762-2264 Foundation for Women's Cancer Phone Number: 800-444-4441 Previous Page Next Page Cervical cancer fact sheet (PDF, 162 KB) Female reproductive system Related information Human papillomavirus (HPV) and genital ...

  5. Clinical significance of sentinel lymph node detection in patients with invasive cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinilkin, I. G.; Chernov, V. I.; Lyapunov, A. Yu.; Medvedeva, A. A.; Zelchan, R. V.; Chernyshova, A. L.; Kolomiets, L. A.; Bragina, O. D.

    2017-09-01

    The clinical significance of determining sentinel lymph nodes (SLN) in patients with invasive cervical cancer was studied. From 2013 to 2014, 30 cervical cancer patients (T1a1NxM0-T1b1NxM0) were treated at the Gynecological Oncology Department of the Cancer Research Institute. The day before surgery, four submucosal injections of 99mTc Al2O3 at a total dose of 80 MBq were made in each quadrant around the cervical tumor. Patients were submitted to preoperative lymphoscintigraphy and intraoperative SLN detection. The feasibility of preserving the reproductive potential in patients after radical abdominal trachelectomy was assessed. The 3-year, overall, disease-free and metastasis-free survival rates were analyzed. Thirty-four SLNs were detected by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and 42 SLNs were identified by intraoperative gamma probe. The sensitivity in detecting SLNs was 100% for intraoperative SLN identification and 80% for SPECT image. The reproductive potential was preserved in 86% of patients. The 3-year overall and metastases-free survival rates were 100%. Recurrence occurred in 8.6% of cases.

  6. Significance of CD133 positive cells in four novel HPV-16 positive cervical cancer-derived cell lines and biopsies of invasive cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Shifa; Sharma, Bal Krishan; Sood, Swati; Sharma, Sanjeev; Bagga, Rashmi; Bhattacharyya, Shalmoli; Rayat, Charan Singh; Dhaliwal, Lakhbir; Srinivasan, Radhika

    2018-04-02

    Cervical cancer is a major cause of cancer-related mortality in women in the developing world. Cancer Stem cells (CSC) have been implicated in treatment resistance and metastases development; hence understanding their significance is important. Primary culture from tissue biopsies of invasive cervical cancer and serial passaging was performed for establishing cell lines. Variable Number Tandem Repeat (VNTR) assay was performed for comparison of cell lines with their parental tissue. Tumorsphere and Aldefluor assays enabled isolation of cancer stem cells (CSC); immunofluorescence and flow cytometry were performed for their surface phenotypic expression in cell lines and in 28 tissue samples. Quantitative real-time PCR for stemness and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers, MTT cytotoxicity assay, cell cycle analysis and cell kinetic studies were performed. Four low-passage novel cell lines designated RSBS-9, - 14 and - 23 from squamous cell carcinoma and RSBS-43 from adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix were established. All were HPV16+. VNTR assay confirmed their uniqueness and derivation from respective parental tissue. CSC isolated from these cell lines showed CD133 + phenotype. In tissue samples of untreated invasive cervical cancer, CD133 + CSCs ranged from 1.3-23% of the total population which increased 2.8-fold in radiation-resistant cases. Comparison of CD133 + with CD133 - bulk population cells revealed increased tumorsphere formation and upregulation of stemness and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers with no significant difference in cisplatin sensitivity. Low-passage cell lines developed would serve as models for studying tumor biology. Cancer Stem Cells in cervical cancer display CD133 + phenotype and are increased in relapsed cases and hence should be targeted for achieving remission.

  7. Associations between antioxidant vitamins and the risk of invasive cervical cancer in Chinese women: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Liyuan; Zhu, Hong; Lin, Chengjun; Che, Jianhua; Tian, Xiujuan; Han, Shiyu; Zhao, Honghui; Zhu, Yumei; Mao, Dongwei

    2015-09-04

    Previous studies on the associations between dietary antioxidant vitamins and the risk of cervical cancer remain inconsistent, and little evidence is available for serum antioxidant vitamins, which provide more accurate measurements of these nutrients. We conducted a case-control study of 458 incident cases with invasive cervical cancer and 742 controls to assess the effects of diet or serum antioxidant vitamins. Higher serum antioxidant vitamins were associated with a lower risk of cervical cancer after adjusting for potential confounders. The odds ratios (ORs) for the highest (vs. lowest) quartile were 0.66 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.46-0.93; P = 0.024) for α-carotene, 0.63 (95% CI = 0.45-0.90; P = 0.006) for β-carotene, 0.53 (95% CI = 0.37-0.74; P vitamin E, and 0.48 (95% CI = 0.33-0.69; P vitamin C. Dietary intakes of vitamins E and C were inversely associated with the risk of cervical cancer. Risk of cervical cancer from serum antioxidant vitamins was more evident in passive smokers than non-passive smokers. These findings indicated that antioxidant vitamins (mainly α-carotene, β-carotene, and vitamins E and C) might be beneficial in reducing the risk of invasive cervical cancer in Chinese women, especially in passive smokers.

  8. Influence of picosecond pulse electric field to invasive ability of cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-mei WU

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the influence of picosecond pulse electric field (psPEF to the invasive ability of cervical cancer. Methods The model of cervical cancer was reproduced in BALB/c nude mice (n=24, and they were randomly divided into four groups (n=6 when the xenografts had grown reaching a diameter of 0.8-1.0cm: control group (psPEF was not given, low field intensity group (50kV/cm, moderate field intensity group (60kV/cm and high field intensity group (70kV/cm. Seven days after the psPEF treatment, the histomorphological changes were observed with HE staining and transmission electron microscopy (TEM, the expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and matrix metalloproteinases-9 (MMP-9 were determined with immunohistochemical (IHC staining, and the changes in protein level of VEGF and MMP-9 were assessed with Western blotting. Results After psPEF treatment, the area of necrosis was found to be increased with an increase in psPEF intensity. With TEM different degrees of apoptosis and necrosis in tumor cells with an increase of psPEF intensity were found. IHC showed that the number of VEGF and MMP-9 positive cells in cancer tissue was decreased with an increase in psPEF intensity. The average optical density (AOD of VEGF and MMP-9 proteins decreased significantly in psPEF treatment groups compared with that in control group, and the AOD values in psPEF treatment groups decreased with an increase in psPEF intensity, and the decrease was statistically significant (P<0.05. Western blotting showed the expressive levels of VEGF and MMP-9 proteins declined gradually with an increase in psPEF intensity, and the difference between groups was statistically significant (P<0.05. Conclusion psPEF may have anti-cervical cancer effects by inhibiting the secretion of VEGF and MMP-9 and reducing the invasive ability of cervical cancer cells. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.09.03

  9. Role of SDF-1 and CXCR4 in the proliferation, migration and invasion of cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chen; Cheng, Hailing; Li, Yanyun

    2016-11-01

    This study was to investigate the role of stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) and its corresponding receptor CXCR4 in the proliferation, migration and invasion of cervical cancer HeLa cells. CXCR4 expression in HeLa cells was measured by flow cytometry and Western Blot. Role of SDF-1 and CXCR4 in the HeLa cells proliferation was measured by MTT. Role of SDF-1 and CXCR4 in the migration and invasion of HeLa cell was measured by Boyden chamber. High expression of CXCR4 was observed on the surface of HeLa cells. Proliferation ability of HeLa cells was significantly increased after SDF-1 stimulation, which showed dose-dependent manner. After knock-down of CXCR4 expression by RNAi, SDF-1-stimulated HeLa cells proliferation was significantly blocked (PSDF-1 can induce migration and invasion of Hela cells, SDF-1-stimulated HeLa cells migration and invasion was significantly blocked (P<0.05) after knock-down of CXCR4 expression by RNAi. High expression of surface CXCR4 plays an important role in the proliferation, migration and invasion of HeLa cells.

  10. A non-invasive tool for detecting cervical cancer odor by trained scent dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Flores, Héctor; Apresa-García, Teresa; Garay-Villar, Ónix; Sánchez-Pérez, Alejandro; Flores-Villegas, David; Bandera-Calderón, Artfy; García-Palacios, Raúl; Rojas-Sánchez, Teresita; Romero-Morelos, Pablo; Sánchez-Albor, Verónica; Mata, Osvaldo; Arana-Conejo, Víctor; Badillo-Romero, Jesús; Taniguchi, Keiko; Marrero-Rodríguez, Daniel; Mendoza-Rodríguez, Mónica; Rodríguez-Esquivel, Miriam; Huerta-Padilla, Víctor; Martínez-Castillo, Andrea; Hernández-Gallardo, Irma; López-Romero, Ricardo; Bandala, Cindy; Rosales-Guevara, Juan; Salcedo, Mauricio

    2017-01-26

    Cervical Cancer (CC) has become a public health concern of alarming proportions in many developing countries such as Mexico, particularly in low income sectors and marginalized regions. As such, an early detection is a key medical factor in improving not only their population's quality of life but also its life expectancy. Interestingly, there has been an increase in the number of reports describing successful attempts at detecting cancer cells in human tissues or fluids using trained (sniffer) dogs. The great odor detection threshold exhibited by dogs is not unheard of. However, this represented a potential opportunity to develop an affordable, accessible, and non-invasive method for detection of CC. Using clicker training, a male beagle was trained to recognize CC odor. During training, fresh CC biopsies were used as a reference point. Other samples used included cervical smears on glass slides and medical surgical bandages used as intimate sanitary pads by CC patients. A double-blind procedure was exercised when testing the beagle's ability to discriminate CC from control samples. The beagle was proven able to detect CC-specific volatile organic compounds (VOC) contained in both fresh cervical smear samples and adsorbent material samples. Beagle's success rate at detecting and discriminating CC and non-CC odors, as indicated by specificity and sensitivity values recorded during the experiment, stood at an overall high (>90%). CC-related VOC in adsorbent materials were detectable after only eight hours of use by CC patients. Present data suggests different applications for VOC from the uterine cervix to be used in the detection and diagnosis of CC. Furthermore, data supports the use of trained dogs as a viable, affordable, non-invasive and, therefore, highly relevant alternative method for detection of CC lesions. Additional benefits of this method include its quick turnaround time and ease of use while remaining highly accurate and robust.

  11. Associations between methylation of paternally expressed gene 3 (PEG3, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive cervical cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica D Nye

    Full Text Available Cytology-based screening for invasive cervical cancer (ICC lacks sensitivity and specificity to discriminate between cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN likely to persist or progress from cases likely to resolve. Genome-wide approaches have been used to identify DNA methylation marks associated with CIN persistence or progression. However, associations between DNA methylation marks and CIN or ICC remain weak and inconsistent. Between 2008-2009, we conducted a hospital-based, case-control study among 213 Tanzania women with CIN 1/2/3 or ICC. We collected questionnaire data, biopsies, peripheral blood, cervical scrapes, Human papillomavirus (HPV and HIV-1 infection status. We assessed PEG3 methylation status by bisulfite pyrosequencing. Multinomial logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR and confidence intervals (CI 95% for associations between PEG3 methylation status and CIN or ICC. After adjusting for age, gravidity, hormonal contraceptive use and HPV infection, a 5% increase in PEG3 DNA methylation was associated with increased risk for ICC (OR = 1.6; 95% CI 1.2-2.1. HPV infection was associated with a higher risk of CIN1-3 (OR = 15.7; 95% CI 5.7-48.6 and ICC (OR = 29.5, 95% CI 6.3-38.4. Infection with high risk HPV was correlated with mean PEG3 differentially methylated regions (DMRs methylation (r = 0.34 p<0.0001, while the correlation with low risk HPV infection was weaker (r = 0.16 p = 0.047. Although small sample size limits inference, these data support that PEG3 methylation status has potential as a molecular target for inclusion in CIN screening to improve prediction of progression. Impact statement: We present the first evidence that aberrant methylation of the PEG3 DMR is an important co-factor in the development of Invasive cervical carcinoma (ICC, especially among women infected with high risk HPV. Our results show that a five percent increase in DNA methylation of PEG3 is associated with

  12. Radical trachelectomy in early-stage cervical cancer: A comparison of laparotomy and minimally invasive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Marcelo A; Rendón, Gabriel J; Munsell, Mark; Echeverri, Lina; Frumovitz, Michael; Schmeler, Kathleen M; Pareja, Rene; Escobar, Pedro F; Reis, Ricardo Dos; Ramirez, Pedro T

    2015-09-01

    Radical trachelectomy is considered standard of care in patients with early-stage cervical cancer interested in future fertility. The goal of this study was to compare operative, oncologic, and fertility outcomes in patients with early-stage cervical cancer undergoing open vs. minimally invasive radical trachelectomy. A retrospective review was performed of patients from four institutions who underwent radical trachelectomy for early-stage cervical cancer from June 2002 to July 2013. Perioperative, oncologic, and fertility outcomes were compared between patients undergoing open vs. minimally invasive surgery. A total of 100 patients were included in the analysis. Fifty-eight patients underwent open radical trachelectomy and 42 patients underwent minimally invasive surgery (MIS=laparoscopic or robotic). There were no differences in patient age, body mass index, race, histology, lymph vascular space invasion, or stage between the two groups. The median surgical time for MIS was 272min [range, 130-441min] compared with 270min [range, 150-373min] for open surgery (p=0.78). Blood loss was significantly lower for MIS vs. laparotomy (50mL [range, 10-225mL] vs. 300mL [50-1100mL]) (psurgery group (p=0.010). Length of hospitalization was shorter for MIS than for laparotomy (1day [1-3 days] vs. 4days [1-9 days]) (psurgery group. The median lymph node count was 17 (range, 5-47) for MIS vs. 22 (range, 7-48) for open surgery (p=0.03). There were no differences in the rate of postoperative complications (30% MIS vs. 31% open surgery). Among 83 patients who preserved their fertility (33 MIS vs. 50 open surgery), 34 (41%) patients attempted to get pregnant. Sixteen (47%) patients were able to do so (MIS: 2 vs. laparotomy: 14, p=0.01). The pregnancy rate was higher in the open surgery group when compared to the MIS group (51% vs. 28%, p=0.018). However, median follow-up was shorter is the MIS group compared with the open surgery group (25months [range, 10-69] vs. 66months [range, 11

  13. Occult invasive cervical cancer after simple hysterectomy: a multi-center retrospective study of 89 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Huimin; Cao, Dongyan; Yuan, Fang; Wang, Huilan; Chen, Jie; Wang, Yue; Shen, Keng; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2016-01-01

    Occult invasive cervical cancer (OICC) is sometimes incidentally found in surgical specimens after a simple hysterectomy (SH). This study was aimed at identifying a subset of patients with OICC who have a favorable prognosis. This patient group may not require adjuvant radiotherapy and other procedures. The medical records of women in whom OICC was detected after an inadvertent SH were retrospectively reviewed. The relevant data, including clinicopathological characteristics, treatment and clinical outcome were evaluated. The primary and secondary endpoints were overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival (RFS), respectively. Eighty-nine patients who met the inclusion criteria were included for analysis, and the risk of OICC was found to be 1.9 %. Finding an invasive cancer in a hysterectomy specimen after a conization procedure that shows positive margins was the most common reason (41.6 %) for the performance of inadvertent SH. In the univariate analysis, a tumor width > 20 mm, deep stromal invasion, and lymph node metastasis (LNM) were adversely associated with relapse (P < 0.001, < 0.001, and = 0.001, respectively) and survival (P = 0.003, 0.004, and 0.027, respectively), although these parameters were not independently associated with patient prognoses in the multivariate analysis. In patients with a tumor width ≤ 20 mm and superficial stromal invasion in the observation subgroup, the 5-year RFS and 5-year OS were both 100 %, whereas they were 57.1 % and 66.7 %, respectively, in patients with a tumor size > 20 mm and deep stromal invasion in the radiotherapy or chemotherapy subgroup (P < 0.001, and = 0.008, respectively). Simple observation after a lymphadenectomy procedure may be feasible in OICC patients with a tumor width ≤ 20 mm, superficial stromal invasion, a negative section margin in hysterectomy specimens, and no LNM

  14. Vascular endothelial growth factor C promotes cervical cancer cell invasiveness via regulation of microRNA-326/cortactin expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yang; Jiang, Shuyi; Yuan, Jin; Liu, Junxiu; Simoncini, Tommaso

    2018-04-16

    Vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGF-C) accelerates cervical cancer metastasis, while the detailed mechanism remains largely unknown. Recent evidence indicates that microRNA play a crucial role in controlling cancer cell invasiveness. In the present study, we investigated the role of miR-326 in VEGF-C-induced cervical cancer cell invasion. VEGF-C expression was higher and miR-326 was much lower in primary cervical cancer specimens than that in non-cancerous specimens, and a negative correlation between VEGF-C and miR-326 was found. On cervical carcinoma cell line SiHa cells, treatment with VEGF-C downregulated miR-326 level and increased cortactin protein expression. Transfection with miR-326 mimic reversed cortactin expression induced by VEGF-C, suggesting that VEGF-C increased cortactin via downregulation of miR-326. VEGF-C activated c-Src and c-Src inhibitor PP2 abolished VEGF-C effect on miR-326 and cortactin expression, implying that VEGF-C regulated miR-326/cortactin via c-Src signaling. VEGF-C promoted SiHa cell invasion index, which was largely inhibited by transfection with miR-326 antagonist or by siRNA against cortactin. In conclusion, our findings implied that VEGF-C reduced miR-326 expression and increased cortactin expression through c-Src signaling, leading to enhanced cervical cancer invasiveness. This may shed light on potential therapeutic strategies for cervical cancer therapy.

  15. ANALYSIS OF APOPTOSIS FACTORS IN PATIENTS WITH PREINVASIVE AND INVASIVE CERVICAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. I. Kovchur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article assesses the disturbance degree of apoptotic program in patients with preinvasive and invasive cervical cancer by investigating the expression level of genes of caspases-3, -6, -8 и -9 in mononuclear cells of periphery blood and in tumor tissue on the two regulating levels – on mRNA level (transcriptional and proteolytic activity (post transcriptional. 75 patients with stage III of cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CIN III  (middle age of 32,9 ± 7,4,45 patients with stage IA (31,3 ± 6,0, 21 – with stage II (43,6 ± 13,2, 15 – with stage III–IV (46,9 ± 11,1 have been examined. The control group has been formed from 30 almost healthy donors without any cervical pathology and papilloma human virus (control 1 and 30 patients with a preinvasive and microinvasive cervical cancer (control 2. It has been found that in proportion of progress of cervix cancer, the membranous expression of CD95 increases in MPB – fraction (peripheral blood monocytes when the a CIN and initial stages of cervix cancer, more than two times. Herewith number CD95+-lymphocytes is positively correlated with stage of cervical cancer (r = 0,91; R2  = 0,82; p << 0,01. It has been found out that the activity gain of caspase-8 (r = 0,92; R2  = 0,86; p << 0,01, caspase-6 (r = 0,77; R2 = 0,59; p << 0,01 and reduction activity of caspase-9 (r = –0,60;  R2 = 0,36; p < 0,01 in mononuclear cells of peripheral blood pointed out on the sensitivity increase to Fas-induced apoptosis. Opposite, in tumor tissue, beginning from CIN stage III, apoptosis-resistant phenotype is formed, it were defined by the expression of caspase-3 (r = –0,72; R2 = 0,52, p < 0,01, caspase-6 (r = –0,59; R2 = 0, 38; p < 0,01 и caspase-9 (r = –0,67; R2 = 0,45; p < 0,01 by mRNA level and proteolytic activity. It has been shown, that the cervical cancer development is accompanied by multilateral disturbances of apoptotic processes, which are realized in decreased function of

  16. Sexual behavior, venereal diseases, hygiene practices, and invasive cervical cancer in a high-risk population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, R; Brinton, L A; Reeves, W C; Brenes, M M; Tenorio, F; de Britton, R C; Gaitan, E; Garcia, M; Rawls, W E

    1990-01-15

    A case-control study of 759 women with invasive cervical cancer and 1430 controls in four Latin American countries evaluated risk in relation to sexual behavior, histories of specific venereal diseases, and hygiene practices. Early age at first sexual intercourse and increasing number of sexual partners were associated with significantly increased risks even after adjustment for their mutual effects. Risk increased to a twofold excess among women reporting first intercourse at 14 to 15 years of age compared with 20+ years. The number of steady sexual partners was a more important predictor of risk than the number of nonsteady partners, particularly before age 30, possibly reflecting the need for prolonged or repeated exposures to a transmissible agent, or different methods of protection against sexually transmitted diseases or pregnancy. Reported frequency of intercourse was not generally associated with risk, except among women reporting increased frequencies before 20 years of age. Histories of gonorrhea or crab lice were associated with increased risk, but histories of other venereal diseases were not significant predictors. No consistently increased risks were detected for women reporting specific hygiene or douching habits, except the practice of washing the genitalia infrequently during menstruation. These results provide support for a period of increased susceptibility to carcinogens during adolescence, and suggest that this may be an important determinant of the high incidence of cervical cancer in Latin America.

  17. HPV and cofactors for invasive cervical cancer in Morocco: a multicentre case-control study

    OpenAIRE

    Berraho, Mohamed; Amarti-Riffi, Afaf; El-Mzibri, Mohammed; Bezad, Rachid; Benjaafar, Noureddine; Benideer, Abdelatif; Matar, Noureddine; Qmichou, Zinab; Abda, Naima; Attaleb, Mohammed; Znati, Kaoutar; El Fatemi, Hind; Bendahhou, Karima; Obtel, Majdouline; Filali Adib, Abdelhai

    2017-01-01

    Background Limited national information is available in Morocco on the prevalence and distribution of HPV-sub-types of cervical cancer and the role of other risk factors. The aim was to determine the frequency of HPV-sub-types of cervical cancer in Morocco and investigate risk factors for this disease. Methods Between November 2009 and April 2012 a multicentre case-control study was carried out. A total of 144 cases of cervical cancer and 288 age-matched controls were included. Odds-ratios an...

  18. Human papillomavirus in invasive cervical cancer and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2 and 3 in Venezuela: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Lander, Jorge; Cortiñas, Paula; Loureiro, Carmen Luisa; Pujol, Flor Helene; Medina, Francisco; Capote-Negrín, Luis; Bianchi, Gino; García-Barriola, Victoria; Ruiz-Benni, Angela; Avilán-Rovira, José; Acosta, Humberto

    2012-10-01

    This study investigated the distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) types in invasive cervical cancer (ICC), cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2 (CIN2) and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 3 (CIN3) in Venezuela. Paraffin-embedded samples from 329 women from 29 medical centers of the 24 states of Venezuela were analyzed to determine the distribution of HPV types for ICC, CIN2, and CIN3, the prevalence of single and multiple infection, and the association of HPV types with severity of lesion, comparing CIN2 versus CIN3+ (CIN3 and ICC). The samples were analyzed with the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by reverse hybridization for the identification of HPV types. HPV was identified in 95/96 ICC specimens (98.9%), in 142/149 CIN3 (95.3%) and in 78/84 CIN2 samples (92.8%). The most common types for ICC and CIN3 were: HPV16, 18, 31, and 33, and for CIN2 were HPV16, 31, 51, 52, and 18. HPV single infection was found in 82.1% of ICC cases, in 79.4% of CIN2 cases, and in 77.4% of CIN3 cases. HPV16 was identified as a single infection more frequently in women with CIN3+ than in those with CIN2 (68.6% versus 46.7%, P=0.002), and HPV16 or HPV18 types were more prevalent in CIN3+ than in CIN2 (73.4% versus 50%, P=0.0006). this is the first study of the distribution of HPV types in ICC, CIN2, and CIN3 conducted throughout the territory of Venezuela. HPV16 and HPV18 were the most frequent HPV types identified in single and multiple infections in both ICC and CIN3 groups, and are associated with severity of lesion. The knowledge of the distribution of HPV types would allow organization of an HPV-DNA-based screening test, and consideration of the implementation of prophylactic vaccination in Venezuela. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Cervical Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Treatment Screening for cervical cancer using the Pap test has decreased the number of new cases of ... their chance of dying from cervical cancer . A Pap test is commonly used to screen for cervical cancer. ...

  20. HPV and cofactors for invasive cervical cancer in Morocco: a multicentre case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berraho, Mohamed; Amarti-Riffi, Afaf; El-Mzibri, Mohammed; Bezad, Rachid; Benjaafar, Noureddine; Benideer, Abdelatif; Matar, Noureddine; Qmichou, Zinab; Abda, Naima; Attaleb, Mohammed; Znati, Kaoutar; El Fatemi, Hind; Bendahhou, Karima; Obtel, Majdouline; Filali Adib, Abdelhai; Mathoulin-Pelissier, Simone; Nejjari, Chakib

    2017-06-20

    Limited national information is available in Morocco on the prevalence and distribution of HPV-sub-types of cervical cancer and the role of other risk factors. The aim was to determine the frequency of HPV-sub-types of cervical cancer in Morocco and investigate risk factors for this disease. Between November 2009 and April 2012 a multicentre case-control study was carried out. A total of 144 cases of cervical cancer and 288 age-matched controls were included. Odds-ratios and corresponding confidence-intervals were computed by conditional logistic regression models. Current HPV infection was detected in 92.5% of cases and 13.9% of controls. HPV16 was the most common type for both cases and controls. Very strong associations between HPV-sub-types and cervical cancer were observed: total-HPV (OR = 39), HPV16 (OR = 49), HPV18 (OR = 31), and multiple infections (OR = 13). Education, high parity, sexual intercourse during menstruation, history of sexually transmitted infections, and husband's multiple sexual partners were also significantly associated with cervical cancer in the multivariate analysis. Our results could be used to establish a primary prevention program and to prioritize limited screening to women who have specific characteristics that may put them at an increased risk of cervical cancer.

  1. Priority Setting for Improvement of Cervical Cancer Prevention in Iran

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majidi, A.; Ghiasvand, R.; Hadji, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer among women worldwide. Organized cervical screening and vaccination against human papilloma virus (HPV) have been successful interventions for prevention of invasive cervical cancer (ICC). Because of cultural and religious considerations...

  2. High HPV-51 prevalence in invasive cervical cancers: results of a pre-immunization survey in North Sardinia, Italy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Piana

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human Papilloma virus (HPV is recognized as the etiological agent of benign and malignant ano-genital lesions. The most prevalent genotypes associated with cervical carcinoma are HPV-16 and -18 worldwide. However, recent studies have emphasized the role of other genotypes, such as HPV-51, in the pathogenesis of cervical dysplasia. The aim of the study was to estimate the burden of HPV-51 infection in invasive cervical malignant lesions in Northern Sardinia, Italy. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An observational, retrospective, prevalence, mono-center study was carried out to evaluate the presence of HPV genotypes in tissues biopsies of cervical lesions (CIN-1, CIN-2, CIN-3 and invasive carcinoma gathered from 1996 to 2009. Biological samples were collected from women admitted consecutively to a tertiary university hospital situated in Sassari, Italy. Molecular methods were used to identify 28 oncogenic HPV types. A total of 155 formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded cervical tissue samples were analyzed. Approximately half of the cervical lesions were classified as invasive carcinoma. HPV-DNA was detected in 71% of the samples, with a higher frequency (100% in those categorized as invasive neoplasia. Mono- or co-infections were demonstrated in 45.8% and 25.8% of the cervical samples, respectively. Overall, the most prevalent HPV types were -16 (49% and -51 (19.4%, with an increased frequency of detection associated with the severity of the cervical lesions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This survey highlights for the first time the relevant role of HPV-51 infection in the pathogenesis of invasive cervical cancer prior to the introduction of a vaccination program. Although a selection bias could have influenced the results, other recent studies have described the impact of HPV-51. This remarkable epidemiological element should be carefully evaluated, particularly in the view of opting for preventive vaccines, whose cross-protection patterns

  3. Effect of HIV Infection on Human Papillomavirus Types Causing Invasive Cervical Cancer in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vuyst, Hugo; Tenet, Vanessa; Plummer, Martyn; Tully, Stephen; Franceschi, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: HIV infection is known to worsen the outcome of cervical human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and may do so differentially by HPV type. Design: Twenty-one studies were included in a meta-analysis of invasive cervical cancers (ICC) among women infected with HIV in Africa. Method: Type-specific HPV DNA prevalence was compared with data from a similar meta-analysis of HIV-negative ICC using prevalence ratios (PR). Results: HPV detection was similar in 770 HIV-positive (91.2%) and 3846 HIV-negative (89.6%) ICC, but HIV-positive ICC harbored significantly more multiple HPV infections (PR = 1.75, 95% confidence intervals: 1.18 to 2.58), which were significantly more prevalent in ICC tested from cells than from biopsies. HPV16 was the most frequently detected type in HIV-positive ICC (42.5%), followed by HPV18 (22.2%), HPV45 (14.4%), and HPV35 (7.1%). Nevertheless, HIV-positive ICC were significantly less frequently infected with HPV16 than HIV-negative ICC (PR = 0.88, 95% confidence intervals: 0.79 to 0.99). Other high-risk types were significantly more prevalent in HIV-positive ICC, but only for HPV18 was there a significantly higher prevalence of both single and multiple infections in HIV-positive ICC. Increases for other high-risk types were primarily accounted for by multiple infections. The proportion of HPV-positive ICC estimated attributable to HPV16/18 (71.8% in HIV positive, 73.4% in HIV negative) or HPV16/18/31/33/45/52/58 (88.8%, 89.5%) was not affected by HIV. Conclusions: HIV alters the relative carcinogenicity of HPV types, but prophylactic HPV16/18 vaccines may nevertheless prevent a similar proportion of ICC, irrespective of HIV infection. PMID:27331659

  4. Transvaginal ultrasound assessment of myometrial and cervical stroma invasion in women with endometrial cancer -interobserver reproducibility among ultrasound experts and gynaecologists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, LS; Lindqvist, PG; Flöter Rådestad, A

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess interobserver reproducibility among ultrasound experts and gynaecologists in the prediction of deep myometrial- and cervical stroma invasion by transvaginal ultrasound in women with endometrial cancer. METHODS: Video-clips of the corpus- and cervix uteri of 53 women...... with endometrial cancer, examined preoperatively by the same ultrasound expert, were integrated in a digitalized survey. Nine ultrasound experts and 9 gynaecologists evaluated presence or absence of deep myometrial- and cervical stroma invasion. Histopathology from hysterectomy specimen was used as gold standard.......001). CONCLUSION: Preoperative ultrasound assessment of deep myometrial- and cervical stroma invasion in endometrial cancer is best performed by ultrasound experts, as they show a higher degree of agreement to histopathology and higher interobserver reproducibility in the assessment of cervical stromal invasion....

  5. Invasive cervical carcinoma (Stages IB-IIB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sironi, S.; Zanello, A.; Rodighiero, M.G.; Vanzulli, A.; Del Maschio, A.; Taccagni, G.L.; Belloni, C.

    1991-01-01

    In the patients with invasive cervical carcinoma, the accurate assessment of parametrial invasion greatly affects the therapeutic choice between surgery and radiation therapy. As a matter of fact, surgery is usually performed only in the patients with carcinoma confined to the cervix, whereas those with parametrial involvement, or more advanced stages, are treated with radiation therapy. This prospective study was aimed at investigating the comparative adequecy of CT and MR imaging in assessing parametrial status in the patients with invasive cervical cancer. Twenty-one consecutive patients, with histologic diagnosis of cervical carcinoma, were investigated. All of them were clinically considered as having invasive cervical cancer (FIGO stage IB-IIB) and subsequently underwent surgery. In all cases, detailed histology of the parametrium was obtained. Pathological data were compared with CT and MR findings in all cases. As for assessing parametrial involvement by cancer, CT had 62% accuracy, 63% sensitivity, and 60% specificity, versus MR imaging 81% accuracy, 69% sensitivity, and 80% specificify. Therefore, MR imaging appears to be superior to CT in assessing the parametrial status of patients with invasive cervical carcinoma; the method yields valuable information for treatment planning

  6. High-Grade Cervical Dysplasia following Radiation Therapy for Invasive Cervical Cancer: A Report of Four Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salcedo, Mila Pontremoli; Milbourne, Andrea M.; Jhingran, Anuja; Eifel, Patricia J.; Ramirez, Pedro T.; Schmeler, Kathleen M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The standard treatment for locally advanced cervical cancer is chemoradiation, with the majority of patients having a complete response to the therapy. The current surveillance recommendations from the Society of Gynecologic Oncology include annual cytology, with a small proportion of patients subsequently diagnosed with high-grade cervical dysplasia (CIN 2/3). To date, there is limited information regarding the optimal treatment and outcome for patients diagnosed with CIN 2/3. The current report describes the diagnosis, management and outcome of 4 patients diagnosed with CIN 2/3 following chemoradiation. Case Description We describe 4 patients who developed CIN 2/3 seven months to 8 years following radiation therapy for locally advanced cervical cancer. All 4 patients were asymptomatic and the abnormalities were first detected by a Pap test. Three of the patients were managed conservatively with observation, and the CIN 2/3 resolved without intervention. One patient underwent 2 cervical conizations followed by a hysterectomy with no residual dysplasia noted on the hysterectomy specimen. Conclusion The majority of patients with recurrent cervical cancer after chemoradiation are symptomatic, and most cases are detected by a physical examination. The role of cytology, colposcopy and biopsies may be of limited value. Furthermore, the significance of the diagnosis of CIN 2/3 in patients previously treated with radiation therapy was not associated with recurrent disease in the 4 patients described. Our results suggest that cytology may be of limited value in detecting recurrence in patients following radiation therapy, even when CIN 2/3 is detected. PMID:26078740

  7. OPTIMIZATION OF THE EXTENT OF SURGERICAL TREATMENT FOR INVASIVE CERVICAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Chernyshova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study included 26 patients with stage Ia1 – Ib1 cervical cancer who underwent organ-preserving surgery (transabdominal trachelectomy. To visualize sentinel lymph nodes, lymphoscintigraphy with injection of radioactive lymphotropic isotope, 99mTc-labelled nanocolloid, was performed the day before surgery. Intraoperative identification of sentinel lymph nodes using gamma probe was carried out to assess which lymph nodes had taken up the radionuclide. Detection of sentinel lymph nodes in cervical cancer patients can accurately predict the pelvic lymph node status, assess the stage of the disease, individualize the extent of surgery and determine indications for organpreserving surgery.

  8. Introduction of p16INK4aas a surrogate biomarker for HPV in women with invasive cervical cancer in Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwath, Hina; Bansal, Devendra; Husain, Nazik Elmalaika; Mohamed, Mahmoud; Sultan, Ali A; Bedri, Shahinaz

    2017-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer in women worldwide with highest incidence reported in Eastern Africa in 2012. The primary goal of this study was to study the expression of p16 INK4a in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the cervix by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and determine relation with clinico-pathological parameters. This study further explored the correlation of p16 INK4a immunostaining with another proliferation marker, Ki-67 and to study if human papillomavirus (HPV) IHC can be used as a marker for detection of virus in high-grade dysplasia. A total of 90 samples, diagnosed for cervical cancer, were included in the study. Fixed Paraffin Embedded (FFPE) tissue sections were stained with anti-p16 INK4a , anti-Ki-67 and anti-HPV antibodies using automated immunohistochemistry platform (ASLink 48-DAKO). Immunohistochemical protein expression of p16 INK4a positivity was found to be highest in SCC (92.2%, n  = 71) than other HPV tumors (76.9%, n  = 10). The majority of cases (97.4%) were p16 INK4a positive in the age group 41-60 years. In addition, a statistically significant difference between p16 INK4a and HPV was observed among total cervical tumor cases and SCC cases. As expected staining of invasive cervical cancer with anti-HPV showed rare positivity because HPV heralds active infection in dysplastic lesions and not of frank cervical carcinoma. In contrast, anti-p16 INK4a IHC results showed positive correlation in SCC and other cervical tumors.

  9. Prior high-risk HPV testing and Pap test results for 427 invasive cervical cancers in China's largest CAP-certified laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Baowen; Li, Zaibo; Griffith, Christopher C; Yan, Shanshan; Chen, Congde; Ding, Xiangdong; Liang, Xiaoman; Yang, Huaitao; Zhao, Chengquan

    2015-07-01

    Cervical cancer and its precursor lesions are caused by a persistent high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) infection. hrHPV testing has been reported to have higher sensitivity than Papanicolaou (Pap) testing for the detection of cervical precursor lesions. However, limited data are available for prior human papillomavirus (HPV) testing results for patients later diagnosed with invasive cervical cancer, especially in countries lacking a national cervical cancer screening program such as China. This study investigated prior hrHPV testing results for patients with invasive cervical cancer in China. Cases with a histologic diagnosis of invasive cervical carcinoma were retrieved from Guangzhou KingMed Diagnostics (the largest independent pathology laboratory in China); prior hrHPV and Pap test results obtained within the year before the cancer diagnosis were recorded. HPV testing was negative in 7.5% of 427 cases of invasive cervical carcinoma, including squamous cell carcinoma (5%) and adenocarcinoma (25%). In 155 cervical cancer cases with prior hrHPV and Pap testing, the negative rate for Pap testing was 1.9%, and the negative rate for HPV was 9.7%. Furthermore, when only cases of adenocarcinoma (n = 18) were examined, both the hrHPV-negative rate and the Pap-negative rate were higher at 33% and 5.6%, respectively. These data demonstrate a considerable prior hrHPV-negative rate and a lower prior Pap-negative rate in patients with invasive cervical carcinoma (especially adenocarcinoma) from a population of women without access to an established screening program. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  10. Cervical Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cervical cytology (also called the Pap test or Pap smear) and, for some women, testing for human papillomavirus (HPV) . How does cervical cancer occur? Cancer occurs when cervical cells become abnormal ...

  11. The sentinel node in cervical cancer patients: role of tumor size and invasion of lymphatic vascular space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarganis, Petros; Kondi-Pafiti, Agatha; Arapantoni-Dadioti, Petroula; Trivizaki, Erasmia; Velentzas, Konstantinos; Vorgias, George; Fotiou, Stelios

    2009-01-01

    The sentinel lymph node (SLN) technique aims at predicting the absence of regional nodal metastasis and seems promising in the management of cervical cancer patients. Forty patients undergoing surgery for early cervical cancer were submitted to the SLN procedure, using Blue Patente alone in 3, radiocolloid injection alone in 4 and both methods in 33 (82.5%). All patients underwent radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy. The detection rate was as follows: overall 85%, blue dye alone 66%, radiocolloid alone 75%, dual method 87%. Detection was successful in 34 patients, with one false-negative result. No micrometastases were demonstrated during ultrastaging of the sentinels. The detection rate was higher in tumors 0.09). Significant negative correlation between lymphatic vascular space invasion (LVSI) and detection rate was found (p2 cm negatively affect the detection rate and may increase the incidence of false negatives.

  12. A Population-based Study of Invasive Cervical Cancer Patients in Beijing: 1993-2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In recent years, the incidence of cervical cancer has been rising, particularly in young adults, as the second most common gynecological cancer in China. The aim of this study was to explore the incidence change and the epidemiological characteristics of cervical cancer in Beijing over the past 16 years. Methods: All the cases of the study were limited to Beijing residents diagnosed with cervical cancer and registered in Beijing from January 1, 1993, to December 31, 2008. A total of 4100 patients with cervical cancer were obtained from the Statistics Database of Beijing Cancer Registry (BJCaR. According to the registered data, we retrospectively reviewed all original cases which we can acquired in reported hospital. Cervical situ cancer, cervical metastatic cancer, non-Beijing residents and repeatedly registered cases were excluded. Totally, 3641 registered cases were verified correctly. Meanwhile, we also collected the following data: Age, occupation, detected methods, histological type, and staging. The trends of incidence and mortality were analyzed by Joinpoint Regression Program 4.1.1.1 produced by National Cancer Institute (NCI, USA. The annual percent change (APC was calculated using the Joinpoint regression model. Results: The crude rates of incidence and mortality were 10.4 and 1.0 per 100,000 women, respectively during 1993 to 2008. The average WHO age-standardized incidence rates were 11.5 per 100,000 women. There was a decrease in incidence annually by 8.0% (P = 0.3 during 1993-1996 and a rapid increase annually by 18.9% after 1999 (P < 0.01. The median age was 67 years in 1993, but the median age decreased to 45 years in 2008. The peak of the age-specific incidence curve was at 40 years in the most recent period (2005-2008, which was 25-30 years earlier than that in previous periods (1993-1996. In the 2224 cases, the numbers of patients with stage I, II, III and IV were 910 (40.9%, 601 (27%, 542 (24.4%, 171 (7

  13. Targeting human papillomavirus to reduce the burden of cervical, vulvar and vaginal cancer and pre-invasive neoplasia: establishing the baseline for surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygård, Mari; Hansen, Bo Terning; Dillner, Joakim; Munk, Christian; Oddsson, Kristján; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Hortlund, Maria; Liaw, Kai-Li; Dasbach, Erik J; Kjær, Susanne Krüger

    2014-01-01

    Infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is causally related to cervical, vulvar and vaginal pre-invasive neoplasias and cancers. Highly effective vaccines against HPV types 16/18 have been available since 2006, and are currently used in many countries in combination with cervical cancer screening to control the burden of cervical cancer. We estimated the overall and age-specific incidence rate (IR) of cervical, vulvar and vaginal cancer and pre-invasive neoplasia in Denmark, Iceland, Norway and Sweden in 2004-2006, prior to the availability of HPV vaccines, in order to establish a baseline for surveillance. We also estimated the population attributable fraction to determine roughly the expected effect of HPV16/18 vaccination on the incidence of these diseases. Information on incident cervical, vulvar and vaginal cancers and high-grade pre-invasive neoplasias was obtained from high-quality national population-based registries. A literature review was conducted to define the fraction of these lesions attributable to HPV16/18, i.e., those that could be prevented by HPV vaccination. Among the four countries, the age-standardised IR/10⁵ of cervical, vaginal and vulvar cancer ranged from 8.4-13.8, 1.3-3.1 and 0.2-0.6, respectively. The risk for cervical cancer was highest in women aged 30-39, while vulvar and vaginal cancers were most common in women aged 70+. Age-standardised IR/10⁵ of cervical, vulvar and vaginal pre-invasive neoplasia ranged between 138.8-183.2, 2.5-8.8 and 0.5-1.3, respectively. Women aged 20-29 had the highest risk for cervical pre-invasive neoplasia, while vulvar and vaginal pre-invasive neoplasia peaked in women aged 40-49 and 60-69, respectively. Over 50% of the observed 47,820 incident invasive and pre-invasive cancer cases in 2004-2006 can be attributed to HPV16/18. In the four countries, vaccination against HPV 16/18 could prevent approximately 8500 cases of gynecological cancer and pre-cancer annually. Population-based cancer

  14. Dietary factors and in situ and invasive cervical cancer risk in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez, Carlos A.; Travier, Noemie; Lujan-Barroso, Leila; Castellsague, Xavier; Xavier Bosch, F.; Roura, Esther; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Palli, Domenico; Boeing, Heiner; Pala, Valeria; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Tumino, Rosario; Panico, Salvatore; Manjer, Jonas; Dillner, Joakim; Hallmans, Goran; Kjellberg, Lennart; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Altzibar, Jone M.; Barricarte, Aurelio; Navarro, Carmen; Rodriguez, Laudina; Allen, Naomi; Key, Timothy J.; Kaaks, Rudolf; Rohrmann, Sabine; Overvad, Kim; Olsen, Anja; Tjonneland, Anne; Munk, Christian; Kjaer, Susanne Kruger; Peeters, Petra H. M.; van Duijnhoven, Franzel J. B.; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Benetou, Vasiliki; Naska, Androniki; Lund, Eiliv; Engeset, Dagrun; Skeie, Guri; Franceschi, Silvia; Slimani, Nadia; Rinaldi, Sabina; Riboli, Elio

    2011-01-01

    Some dietary factors could be involved as cofactors in cervical carcinogenesis, but evidence is inconclusive. There are no data about the effect of fruits and vegetables intake (F&V) on cervical cancer from cohort studies. We examined the association between the intake of F&V and selected nutrients

  15. Effect of Twist, Snail and YB-1 gene expression in cervical cancer tissue on cell invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Qin Kang1

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of Twist, Snail and YB-1 gene expression in cervical cancer tissue on cell invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Methods: Cervical cancer tissue samples and tissue samples adjacent to carcinoma were collected from 138 patients with radical operation for cervical cancer, fluorescence quantitative PCR method was used to detect the mRNA expression of Twist, Snail and YB-1 genes, cell invasion-related genes and epithelial-mesenchymal transition marker genes, the Pearson test was used to analyze the correlation of Twist, Snail and YB-1 gene mRNA expression in cervical cancer tissue with cell invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Results: Twist, Snail and YB-1 gene mRNA expression in cervical cancer tissue were higher than those in tissue adjacent to carcinoma, the invasion genes STAT3, YAP1, TUG1, FoxM1 and Rab11 mRNA expression were higher than those in tissue adjacent to carcinoma, and the epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers E-cadherin and β-catenin gene mRNA expression were lower than those in tissue adjacent to carcinoma while vimentin gene mRNA expression was higher than that in tissue adjacent to carcinoma. Pearson test showed that Twist, Snail and YB-1 gene mRNA expression in cervical cancer tissue were directly correlated with cell invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Conclusion: Twist, Snail and YB-1 genes are highly expressed in cervical cancer tissue, and their abnormal expression directly leads to the increased tumor cell invasion activity and the aggravated epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

  16. Cervical cancer - screening and prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer cervix - screening; HPV - cervical cancer screening; Dysplasia - cervical cancer screening; Cervical cancer - HPV vaccine ... Almost all cervical cancers are caused by HPV (human papilloma virus). HPV is a common virus that spreads through sexual contact. Certain ...

  17. IL-17A promotes the migration and invasiveness of cervical cancer cells by coordinately activating MMPs expression via the p38/NF-κB signal pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minjuan Feng

    Full Text Available IL-17A plays an important role in many inflammatory diseases and cancers. We aimed to examine the effect of IL-17A on the invasion of cervical cancer cells and study its related mechanisms.Wound healing and matrigel transwell assays were used to examine the effect of IL-17A on cervical cancer cell migration and invasion by a panel of cervical cancer cell lines. The levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMPs were investigated using western blotting. The activity of p38 and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB signal pathway was detected too.Here, we showed that IL-17A could promote the migration and invasion of cervical cancer cells. Further molecular analysis showed that IL-17A could up-regulate the expressions and activities of MMP2 and MMP9, and down-regulate the expressions of TIMP-1 and TIMP-2. Furthermore, IL-17A also activates p38 signal pathway and increased p50 and p65 nuclear expression. In addition, treatment of cervical cancer cells with the pharmacological p38/NF-κB signal pathway inhibitors, SB203580 and PDTC, potently restored the roles of invasion and upregulation of MMPs induced by IL-17A.IL-17A could promote the migration and invasion of cervical cancer cell via up-regulating MMP2 and MMP9 expression, and down-regulating TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 expression via p38/NF-κB signal pathway. IL-17A may be a potential target to improve the prognosis for patients with cervical cancer.

  18. Cervical Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer found early may be easier to treat. Cervical cancer screening is usually part of a woman's health ... may do more tests, such as a biopsy. Cervical cancer screening has risks. The results can sometimes be ...

  19. Value of diffusion-weighted imaging in predicting parametrial invasion in stage IA2-IIA cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jung Jae; Kim, Chan Kyo; Park, Sung Yoon; Park, Byung Kwan; Kim, Bohyun

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the value of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in evaluating parametrial invasion (PMI) in stage IA2-IIA cervical cancer. A total of 117 patients with stage IA2-IIA cervical cancer who underwent preoperative MRI and radical hysterectomy were included in this study. Preoperative clinical variables and MRI variables were analysed and compared between the groups with and without pathologically proven PMI. All variables except age were significantly different between patients with and without pathologic PMI (P < 0.05). All variables except squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) antigen were also significantly correlated with pathologic PMI on univariate analysis (P < 0.05). Multivariate analysis indicated that PMI on MRI (P < 0.001) and tumour apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) (P = 0.029) were independent predictors of pathologic PMI. Area under the curve of PMI on MRI increased significantly from 0.793 to 0.872 when combined with tumour ADC (P = 0.002). When PMI on MRI was further stratified by tumour ADC, the false negative rate was 2.0 % (1/49). In stage IA2-IIA cervical cancer, tumour ADC and PMI on MRI seem to be independent predictors of pathologic PMI. Combining the two predictors improved the diagnostic performance of identifying patients at low risk of pathologic PMI. (orig.)

  20. Endometrial cancer with cervical stromal invasion: diagnostic accuracy of diffusion-weighted and dynamic contrast enhanced MR imaging at 3T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Gigin; Lu, Hsin-Ying [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou and Chang Gung University, Department of Medical Imaging and Intervention, Institute for Radiological Research, Guishan, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou, Clinical Phenome Center, Guishan, Taoyuan (China); Huang, Yu-Ting; Lin, Yu-Chun; Ng, Shu-Hang; Ng, Koon-Kwan [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou and Chang Gung University, Department of Medical Imaging and Intervention, Institute for Radiological Research, Guishan, Taoyuan (China); Chao, Angel; Lai, Chyong-Huey [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou and Chang Gung University, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Gynecologic Cancer Research Center, Guishan, Taoyuan (China); Yang, Lan-Yan [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou and Chang Gung University, Clinical Trial Center, Guishan, Taoyuan (China); Wu, Ren-Chin [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou and Chang Gung University, Department of Pathology, Guishan, Taoyuan (China)

    2017-05-15

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of diffusion-weighted (DW) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for detecting cervical stromal invasion in endometrial cancer. Eighty-three consecutive women with endometrial cancer underwent preoperative evaluation in a 3-T unit, including T2-weighted, DW (b = 0 and 1000 s/mm{sup 2}), and DCE MR imaging. Two radiologists independently assessed presence of cervical stromal invasion, with histopathological reference as gold standard. For assessing cervical stromal invasion, the diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity, respectively for Reader 1/Reader 2, were as follows: DW MR imaging - 95.2 %/91.6 %, 91.7 %/100 %, and 95.8 %/90.1 %; DCE MR imaging - 91.6 %/88 %, 58.3 %/50 %, and 97.2 %/94.4 %. The diagnostic performance of DW MR imaging (Reader 1: areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) = 0.98; Reader 2: AUC = 0.97) was significantly higher than that of DCE MR imaging (p = 0.009 for Reader 2) or T2-weighted MR imaging (Reader 1: p = 0.006; Reader 2: p = 0.013). Patients with cervical stromal invasion showed a significantly greater canal width (p < 0.0001) and myometrial invasion extent (p = 0.006). DW MR imaging has superior diagnostic performance compared with DCE MR imaging in the detection of cervical stromal invasion. (orig.)

  1. Overview and Prevention of Cervical Cancer | Ogu | Nigerian Health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cervical cancer though a preventable disease, still has an estimated mortality of 80% from invasive cervical cancer in developing countries. The aim of this paper is to present an overview of cervical cancer and the various modalities available for screening and prevention of cervical cancer. Methodology: ...

  2. Risk Factors Associated with Invasive Cervical Carcinoma among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Cervical cancer is a more serious public health problem than other cancers in women in Sub-Saharan Africa in general and in Ethiopia in particular. Thus, this study assessed risk factors related to invasive cervical carcinomas in southwestern Ethiopia. METHODS: Unmatched case control study was ...

  3. Secular trends of HPV genotypes in invasive cervical cancer in Cali, Colombia 1950-1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Gloria Ines; Bravo, Luis Eduardo; Hernandez-Suarez, Gustavo; Tous, Sara; Alemany, Laia; de Sanjose, Silvia; Bosch, F Xavier; Muñoz, Nubia

    2016-02-01

    Aim To estimate relative contribution and time trends of HPV types in cervical cancer in Cali, Colombia over a 50 years' period. Paraffin blocks of 736 cervical cancer histological confirmed cases were retrieved from the pathology laboratory at Hospital Universitario del Valle (Cali, Colombia) and HPV genotyped using SPF10-PCR/DEIA/LiPA25 (version 1) assay. Marginal effect of age and year of diagnosis in secular trends of HPV type prevalence among HPV+ cases were assessed by robust Poisson regression analysis. 64.7% (95%CI: 59.9-69.2) of squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) were attributed to HPV 16 and 18, 78.2% (95%CI: 74-82) to HPV 16, 18, 31, 33 and 45 and 84.8% (95%CI: 81-88.1) to HPV 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52 and 58 while ninety-three percent of adenocarcinomas (ADCs) were attributed to HPV 16, 18 and 45 only. The prevalence of specific HPV types did not change over the 50-year period. A significant downward trend of prevalence ratios of HPV16 (​P=0.017) and α7 but HPV 18 (i.e., HPV 39, 45, 68, 70, ​P=0.024) with increasing age at diagnosis was observed. In contrast, the prevalence ratio to other HPV genotypes of α9 but HPV 16 genotypes (i.e., HPV 31, 33, 35, 52, 58, 67, ​P=0.002) increased with increasing age at diagnosis. No changes were observed in the relative contribution of HPV types in cervical cancer in Cali, Colombia during the 50 years. In this population, an HPV vaccine including the HPV 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52 and 58 genotypes may have the potential to prevent ∼85% and 93% of SCC and ADC cases respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1275x1275 View Download Large: 2550x2550 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA Description: Stage IIIA cervical cancer; drawing ...

  5. Cervical Cancer Stage IVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IVA Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1575x1200 View Download Large: 3150x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IVA Description: Stage IVA cervical cancer; drawing ...

  6. Cervical Cancer Stage IVB

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IVB Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1200x1305 View Download Large: 2400x2610 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IVB Description: Stage IVB cervical cancer; drawing ...

  7. Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1425x1326 View Download Large: 2850x2651 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB Description: Stage IIIB cervical cancer; drawing ...

  8. Cervical Cancer Stage IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IA Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 720x576 ... Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IA Description: Stage IA1 and IA2 cervical cancer; drawing ...

  9. Comparing treatment outcomes of stage IIIB cervical cancer patients between those with and without lower third of vaginal invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katanyoo, Kanyarat

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate treatment outcomes between stage IIIB cervical cancer with and without lower third of vaginal invasion (LTI) in terms of response to treatment and overall survival (OS). Matching one patient with LTI for 2 patients without LTI who had completed treatment between 1995 and 2012 were conducted by using treatment modalities (radiation therapy [RT] alone vs. concurrent chemoradiation therapy [CCRT]) and tumor histology (squamous cell carcinoma [SCC] vs. adenocarcinoma [ADC]). Treatment outcomes including complete response (CR) rate of RT/CCRT, patterns of treatment failure and survival outcomes were analyzed. Of 216 stage IIIB cervical cancer patients, 114 of them had no LTI and 72 had LTI. Most of the patients (83.8%) had tumor histology as SCC. The CR rates between stage IIIB without LTI and with LTI were 93.8% and 81.9% (p=0.009), and corresponding with disease progression at pelvis accounted for 18.2% and 34.4% (p=0.017), respectively. Distant metastasis was comparable between 2 groups of patients, 28.9% in patients without LTI and 29.5% in patients with LTI (p=0.988). The 2-year and 5-year OS of stage IIIB without LTI were 66.5% and 46.8% compared to stage IIIB with LTI which were 43.1% and 28.9% (p=0.004), respectively. For multivariable analysis, stage IIIB with LTI was only the influential factor on OS with hazard ratio (HR) of 1.63 (p=0.012). Stage IIIB cervical cancer patients with LTI have poorer treatment outcomes including response to treatment and survival outcomes than patients in the same stage without LTI. Copyright © 2017. Asian Society of Gynecologic Oncology, Korean Society of Gynecologic Oncology

  10. Economic burden of cervical cancer in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharifa E.W. Puteh

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancers form the second highest number of female cancers in Malaysia, imposing a substantial amount of cost burden on its management. However, an estimation of cost burden of abnormal smears, cervical pre-invasive and invasive diseases needs to be done to show how much spending has been allocated to the problem. An expert panel committee came up with the clinical pathway and management algorithm of  cervical pre invasive and invasive diseases from July-December 2006 Malaysia. An activity based costing for each clinical pathway was done. Results were converted to USD. The cost of managing pre-invasive cervical cancers stage is USD 420,150 (Range: USD 197,158-879,679. Management of invasive cancer (new cases costs USD 51,533,233.44 (Range: USD 32,405,399.69 - USD 129,014,768.40. The cost of managing existing cases is USD 17,005,966.87 (Range: USD 10,693,781.90 - USD  28,901,587.12. The total cost of managing cervical cancers by health care providers in a public setting is around USD 75,888,329.45 (Range: USD 48,083,804.60 - USD 48,083,804.60. The outcome of this study has shown that preventive modalities such as screening have only contributed to 10.3 % of the total management cost of cervical cancer. The major cost contribution (67% came from treatment of invasive cancer especially at more advanced stages of cancer, followed by treatment of existing cases (22% and lastly on pre-invasive disease (0.6%. This study revealed that proportion of preventive modality in this country was still low, and the major cost came from actual treatment cost of cervical cancer. Therefore, heightened public cervical cancer screening in the country is needed. (Med J Indones 2008; 17: 272-80Keywords: cervical cancers, pre invasive disease, HPV vaccination

  11. Cervical Cancer Stage IB

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IB Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1613x1200 View Download Large: 3225x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IB Description: Stage IB1 and IB2 cervical ...

  12. Risks of Cervical Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Treatment Screening for cervical cancer using the Pap test has decreased the number of new cases of ... their chance of dying from cervical cancer . A Pap test is commonly used to screen for cervical cancer. ...

  13. HIV infection and invasive cervical cancers, treatment with radiation therapy: toxicity and outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrivastava, Shyam Kishore; Engineer, Reena; Rajadhyaksha, Sunil; Dinshaw, Ketayun A.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: To determine the effect of radiotherapy in HIV seropositive cervical cancer patients, tumour response and toxicity and compliance of patients to the treatment. Patients and methods: This study is a retrospective review of 42 HIV seropositive patients diagnosed with carcinoma cervix, between 1997 and 2003 at the Tata Memorial Hospital. The age and symptoms of presentation, clinical stage, response, compliance and tolerance to radiotherapy were studied. Results: Mean age at presentation was 41 years. All patients presented with the symptoms of cervical disease. Of these patients 31(74%) patients had 'Karnofsky Performance Scale' (KPS) more than 80%. Twenty-one (50%) of the patients were of Stage IIIb-IVa. Thirty-two (76%) were started on radiotherapy with radical intent. Compliance to radiotherapy was poor with 24% patients discontinuing after few fractions of radiotherapy. Seven (17%) patients were given palliative radiotherapy. Twenty-two patients completed prescribed radical radiotherapy and 50% of these achieved complete response. Grade III-IV acute gastrointestinal toxicity was seen in 14% of the patients, and grade III acute skin toxicity was seen in 27% of patients, leading to treatment delays. There was good relief of symptoms in patients treated with palliative intent. Conclusions: Radiotherapy is effective in this set of patients. Palliative fractionation schedules are effective for patients with poor performance status and locally advanced cancers in relieving the symptoms related to carcinoma cervix. An emphasis should be given to the increased acute mucosal and skin toxicity and to improving compliance and clinical outcome of these patients

  14. SCREENING FOR CERVICAL CANCER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    CANCER SCREENING. February 2004 Vol.22 No.2 CME 63. Cervical cancer remains a major health concern worldwide, especially in devel- oping countries. It is the commonest malignancy among black women in South. Africa. The quoted incidence of cervical cancer is approximately 30/100 000 women.1 Mortality is ...

  15. Satellite lymphovascular space invasion: An independent risk factor in early stage cervical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, F.J.M.; Zusterzeel, P.L.M.; Ham, M.A. van; Kuijpers, D.A.; Bulten, J.; Massuger, L.F.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study was performed to determine whether satellite LVSI in women with early stage cervical carcinoma is an independent prognostic factor for recurrence and survival. METHODS: A total of 210 eligible patients with FIGO stages IA2 and IB1 cervical carcinoma, who underwent radical

  16. Long noncoding RNA-EBIC promotes tumor cell invasion by binding to EZH2 and repressing E-cadherin in cervical cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning-xia Sun

    Full Text Available In recent years, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs have been demonstrated to play key roles in tumorgenesis. However, the contributions of lncRNAs to cervical cancer (CC remain largely unknown. In this study, differentially expressed lncRNAs and mRNAs in cervical cancer and paired peritumoral tissues were detected by transcriptome microarray analysis. We found 708 probe sets of lncRNAs increased and 836 probe sets decreased in CC tissues, while 1288 mRNA differential probe sets increased and 901 mRNA probe sets decreased. The results were validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR. Then, we found a specific differentially expressed lncRNA can physically bind to enhancer of zeste homolog2 (EZH2 by using RNA immunoprecipitation. We termed it as EZH2-binding lncRNA in cervical cancer [lncRNA-EBIC]. Wound healing assays and Matrigel invasion assays were used to determine the function of this lncRNA by silencing it. We observed that the migration and invasion of cervical cancer cells in vitro were inhibited upon suppression of lncRNA-EBIC by siRNA. We also found that the association between lncRNA-EBIC and EZH2 was required for the repression of E-cadherin, which was a key molecular in the metastasis of cervical cancer. Conclusion: These results demonstrated that lncRNA-EBIC was an oncogenic lncRNA, which could promote tumor cell invasion in CC by binding to EZH2 and inhibiting E-cadherin expression.

  17. Cervical Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... term pregnancies have an increased risk of cervical cancer. Using oral contraceptives for a long time Among women who are ... a 10 year period, the risk of cervical cancer returns to that of women who never used oral contraceptives. Smoking cigarettes Among women who are infected with ...

  18. Chlamydia trachomatis and invasive cervical cancer: a pooled analysis of the IARC multicentric case-control study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, J.S.; Bosetti, C; Munoz, N.; Herrero, R; Bosch, F.X.; Eluf-Neto, J; Meijer, C.J.L.M.; Brule, van den AJ; Franceschi, S; Peeling, RW

    2004-01-01

    To determine whether Chlamydia trachomatis infection is consistently associated with an increased risk of invasive cervical carcinoma (ICC) after accounting for the strong effect of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, a case-control study of 1,238 cases of ICC and 1,100 control women from 7

  19. Whole-genome analysis of human papillomavirus genotypes 52 and 58 isolated from Japanese women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenjimbayashi, Yuri; Onuki, Mamiko; Hirose, Yusuke; Mori, Seiichiro; Ishii, Yoshiyuki; Takeuchi, Takamasa; Tasaka, Nobutaka; Satoh, Toyomi; Morisada, Tohru; Iwata, Takashi; Miyamoto, Shingo; Matsumoto, Koji; Sekizawa, Akihiko; Kukimoto, Iwao

    2017-01-01

    Human papillomavirus genotypes 52 and 58 (HPV52/58) are frequently detected in patients with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and invasive cervical cancer (ICC) in East Asian countries including Japan. As with other HPV genotypes, HPV52/58 consist of multiple lineages of genetic variants harboring less than 10% differences between complete genome sequences of the same HPV genotype. However, site variations of nucleotide and amino acid sequences across the viral whole-genome have not been fully examined for HPV52/58. The aim of this study was to investigate genetic variations of HPV52/58 prevalent among Japanese women by analyzing the viral whole-genome sequences. The entire genomic region of HPV52/58 was amplified by long-range PCR with total cellular DNA extracted from cervical exfoliated cells isolated from Japanese patients with CIN or ICC. The amplified DNA was subjected to next generation sequencing to determine the complete viral genome sequences. Phylogenetic analyses were performed with the whole-genome sequences to assign variant lineages/sublineages to the HPV52/58 isolates. The variability in amino acid sequences of viral proteins was assessed by calculating the Shannon entropy scores at individual amino acid positions of HPV proteins. Among 52 isolates of HPV52 (CIN1, n  = 20; CIN2/3, n  = 21; ICC, n  = 11), 50 isolates belonged to lineage B (sublineage B2) and two isolates belonged to lineage A (sublineage A1). Among 48 isolates of HPV58 (CIN1, n  = 21; CIN2/3, n  = 19; ICC, n  = 8), 47 isolates belonged to lineage A (sublineages A1/A2/A3) and one isolate belonged to lineage C. Single nucleotide polymorphisms specific for individual variant lineages were determined throughout the viral genome based on multiple sequence alignments of the Japanese HPV52/58 isolates and reference HPV52/58 genomes. Entropy analyses revealed that the E1 protein was relatively variable among the HPV52 isolates, whereas the E7, E4, and L2 proteins showed

  20. Chlamydia trachomatis and invasive cervical cancer: a pooled analysis of the IARC multicentric case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jennifer S; Bosetti, Cristina; Muñoz, Nubia; Herrero, Rolando; Bosch, F Xavier; Eluf-Neto, José; Meijer, Chris J L M; Van Den Brule, Adriaan J C; Franceschi, Silvia; Peeling, Rosanna W

    2004-09-01

    To determine whether Chlamydia trachomatis infection is consistently associated with an increased risk of invasive cervical carcinoma (ICC) after accounting for the strong effect of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, a case-control study of 1,238 cases of ICC and 1,100 control women from 7 countries was carried out (hospital-based studies in Thailand, the Philippines, Morocco, Peru, Brazil and population-based studies in Colombia and Spain, all coordinated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France). C. trachomatis serum antibody detection was made by means of a microfluorescence assay. Among HPV DNA-positive cases and controls, the risk of squamous cell ICC was elevated in C. trachomatis seropositive women (OR = 1.8; 95% CI = 1.2-2.7) after adjustment for age, center, oral contraceptive use, history of Pap smears, number of full-term pregnancies and herpes simplex virus 2 seropositivity. The effect of C. trachomatis seropositivity on squamous cell ICC risk increased with increasing C. trachomatis antibody titers and was higher in women under 55 years of age. C. trachomatis antibodies were not associated with adeno- or adenosquamous cell carcinoma (OR = 1.0; 95% CI = 0.53-1.9) in HPV DNA-positive women. An association of C. trachomatis with squamous cell ICC was found among all cases and control women with or without adjustment for HPV. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. SCREENING FOR CERVICAL CANCER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    Cervical cancer remains a major health concern worldwide, especially in devel- oping countries. It is the commonest malignancy ... Based on data from Cali, Colombia, the impact of starting cervical screening at different ages shows that starting .... vated blue-white light is attached to the inner aspect of the upper speculum.

  2. Immunotherapy for Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    In an early phase NCI clinical trial, two patients with metastatic cervical cancer had a complete disappearance of their tumors after receiving treatment with a form of immunotherapy called adoptive cell transfer.

  3. Screening for Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cervical cancer: • Cytology: This test, also called a Pap test or Pap smear, looks for abnormal changes in ... women ages 21 to 65, screening with a Pap test every 3 years has the highest benefits with ...

  4. Predictors of cervical cancer being at an advanced stage at diagnosis in Sudan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibrahim, Ahmed; Rasch, Vibeke; Pukkala, Eero

    2011-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women in Sudan, with more than two-thirds of all women with invasive cervical cancer being diagnosed at an advanced stage (stages III and IV). The lack of a screening program for cervical cancer in Sudan may contribute to the late presentation...... diagnosis) of cervical cancer in Sudan....

  5. Low expression of human histocompatibility soluble leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G5) in invasive cervical cancer with and without metastasis, associated with papilloma virus (HPV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Marcia C M; Soares, Christiane P; Donadi, Eduardo A; Derchain, Sophie F M; Andrade, Liliana A L A; Silva, Tarsia G A; Hassumi, Marcela K; Simões, Renata T; Miranda, Fabiana A; Lira, Régia C P; Crispim, Janaina; Soares, Edson G

    2010-05-01

    Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is a non-classical major histocompatibility complex class Ib molecule that acts as a specific immunosuppressor. Some studies have demonstrated that human papillomavirus (HPV) seems to be involved in lower or absent HLA-G expression, particularly in cervical cancer. In this study, we performed a cross-sectional study, systematically comparing the qualitative expression of the HLA-G5 isoform in invasive cervical carcinoma (ICC), stratifying patients according to the presence [ICC with metastasis (ICC(W))] and absence [ICC without metastasis (ICC(WT))] of metastasis, correlating these findings with interference of HPV and demographic and clinical variables. Seventy-nine patients with a diagnosis of ICC were stratified into two groups: ICC(WT) (n=52 patients) and ICC(W) (n=27). Two biopsies were collected from each patient (one from the tumor lesion and one from a lymph node). Immunohistochemistry analyses were performed for the HLA-G5 isoform, for HPV detection, and virus typing. HLA-G5 isoform molecules were detected in 25 cases (31.6%), 17 (32.7%) without metastasis and 8 (29.6%) with metastasis. HPV was detected in the cervical lesions of 74 patients (93.7%), but low expression of the HLA-G5 isoform was observed in all HPV-related cases. These findings are important; however, additional studies are necessary to identify the influence of HPV with HLA-G5 isoform expression on invasive cervical malignancies.

  6. Preventing cervical cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cervical cancer remains the most common cancer diagnosed in women in southern Africa, with an estimated lifetime risk of 1 in. 26.1. Unfortunately most of these cancers are also diagnosed at a late stage, with subsequent poor prognosis for long-term survival. This very high incidence is particularly sad in an era where.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging for detection of parametrial invasion in cervical cancer. An updated systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature between 2012 and 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Sungmin; Kim, Sang Youn; Suh, Chong Hyun; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Kim, Seung Hyup

    2018-01-01

    To review the diagnostic performance of MRI for detection of parametrial invasion (PMI) in cervical cancer patients. MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched for studies providing diagnostic performance of MRI for detecting PMI in patients with cervical cancer. Studies published between 2012 and 2016 using surgico-pathological results as reference standard were included. Study quality was evaluated using QUADAS-2. Sensitivity and specificity of all studies were calculated. Results were pooled and plotted in a hierarchical summary receiver operating characteristic plot. Meta-regression and subgroup analyses were performed. Fourteen studies (1,028 patients) were included. Study quality was generally moderate. Pooled sensitivity was 0.76 (95% CI 0.67-0.84) and specificity was 0.94 (95% CI 0.91-0.95). The possibility of heterogeneity was considered low: Cochran's Q-test (p = 0.471), Tau 2 (0.240), Higgins I 2 (0%). With meta-regression analysis, magnet strength, use of DWI, and antispasmodic drugs were significant factors affecting heterogeneity (p < 0.01). Subgroup analysis for studies solely using radical hysterectomy as reference standard yielded pooled sensitivity and specificity of 0.73 (95% CI 0.60-0.83) and 0.93 (95% CI 0.90-0.95), respectively. MRI shows good performance for detection of PMI in cervical cancer. Using 3-T scanners and DWI may improve diagnostic performance. (orig.)

  8. [Minimally invasive approach for cervical spondylotic radiculopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Liang; Sun, Taicun; Huang, Yonghui

    2010-01-01

    To summarize the recent minimally invasive approach for cervical spondylotic radiculopathy (CSR). The recent literature at home and abroad concerning minimally invasive approach for CSR was reviewed and summarized. There were two techniques of minimally invasive approach for CSR at present: percutaneous puncture techniques and endoscopic techniques. The degenerate intervertebral disc was resected or nucleolysis by percutaneous puncture technique if CSR was caused by mild or moderate intervertebral disc herniations. The cervical microendoscopic discectomy and foraminotomy was an effective minimally invasive approach which could provide a clear view. The endoscopy techniques were suitable to treat CSR caused by foraminal osteophytes, lateral disc herniations, local ligamentum flavum thickening and spondylotic foraminal stenosis. The minimally invasive procedure has the advantages of simple handling, minimally invasive and low incidence of complications. But the scope of indications is relatively narrow at present.

  9. Cervical cancer: what's new?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Sadalla

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Cervical cancer is the most common gynecological cancer in Brazil. Among women, it is the second most frequent, second only to breast cancer. It is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the country, with estimated 15,590 new cases (2014 and 5,430 deaths (2013. In order to update information to improve outcomes, reduce morbidity and optimize the treatment of this cancer, this article will address the advancement of knowledge on cervical cancer. The topics covered include the role of surgery in different stages, treatment of locally advanced carcinomas, fertility preservation, the role of the sentinel lymph node technique, indications and techniques of radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and some special situations.

  10. Interaction between polymorphisms of the Human Leukocyte Antigen and HPV-16 Variants on the risk of invasive cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo Souza, Patricia S de; Maciag, Paulo C; Ribeiro, Karina B; Petzl-Erler, Maria Luiza; Franco, Eduardo L; Villa, Luisa L

    2008-01-01

    Persistent infection with oncogenic types of human papillomavirus (HPV) is the major risk factor for invasive cervical cancer (ICC), and non-European variants of HPV-16 are associated with an increased risk of persistence and ICC. HLA class II polymorphisms are also associated with genetic susceptibility to ICC. Our aim is to verify if these associations are influenced by HPV-16 variability. We characterized HPV-16 variants by PCR in 107 ICC cases, which were typed for HLA-DQA1, DRB1 and DQB1 genes and compared to 257 controls. We measured the magnitude of associations by logistic regression analysis. European (E), Asian-American (AA) and African (Af) variants were identified. Here we show that inverse association between DQB1*05 (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 0.66; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.39–1.12]) and HPV-16 positive ICC in our previous report was mostly attributable to AA variant carriers (OR = 0.27; 95%CI: 0.10–0.75). We observed similar proportions of HLA DRB1*1302 carriers in E-P positive cases and controls, but interestingly, this allele was not found in AA cases (p = 0.03, Fisher exact test). A positive association with DRB1*15 was observed in both groups of women harboring either E (OR = 2.99; 95% CI: 1.13–7.86) or AA variants (OR = 2.34; 95% CI: 1.00–5.46). There was an inverse association between DRB1*04 and ICC among women with HPV-16 carrying the 350T [83L] single nucleotide polymorphism in the E6 gene (OR = 0.27; 95% CI: 0.08–0.96). An inverse association between DQB1*05 and cases carrying 350G (83V) variants was also found (OR = 0.37; 95% CI: 0.15–0.89). Our results suggest that the association between HLA polymorphism and risk of ICC might be influenced by the distribution of HPV-16 variants

  11. Interaction between polymorphisms of the Human Leukocyte Antigen and HPV-16 Variants on the risk of invasive cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribeiro Karina B

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Persistent infection with oncogenic types of human papillomavirus (HPV is the major risk factor for invasive cervical cancer (ICC, and non-European variants of HPV-16 are associated with an increased risk of persistence and ICC. HLA class II polymorphisms are also associated with genetic susceptibility to ICC. Our aim is to verify if these associations are influenced by HPV-16 variability. Methods We characterized HPV-16 variants by PCR in 107 ICC cases, which were typed for HLA-DQA1, DRB1 and DQB1 genes and compared to 257 controls. We measured the magnitude of associations by logistic regression analysis. Results European (E, Asian-American (AA and African (Af variants were identified. Here we show that inverse association between DQB1*05 (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 0.66; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.39–1.12] and HPV-16 positive ICC in our previous report was mostly attributable to AA variant carriers (OR = 0.27; 95%CI: 0.10–0.75. We observed similar proportions of HLA DRB1*1302 carriers in E-P positive cases and controls, but interestingly, this allele was not found in AA cases (p = 0.03, Fisher exact test. A positive association with DRB1*15 was observed in both groups of women harboring either E (OR = 2.99; 95% CI: 1.13–7.86 or AA variants (OR = 2.34; 95% CI: 1.00–5.46. There was an inverse association between DRB1*04 and ICC among women with HPV-16 carrying the 350T [83L] single nucleotide polymorphism in the E6 gene (OR = 0.27; 95% CI: 0.08–0.96. An inverse association between DQB1*05 and cases carrying 350G (83V variants was also found (OR = 0.37; 95% CI: 0.15–0.89. Conclusion Our results suggest that the association between HLA polymorphism and risk of ICC might be influenced by the distribution of HPV-16 variants.

  12. Prevent Cervical Cancer!

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-01-08

    Cervical cancer can be prevented. Listen as two friends—one a doctor—talk about screening tests and early detection. Learn what test you might need.  Created: 1/8/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 1/8/2015.

  13. False positive CT findings of parametrial invasion of cervical carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Chi Soon; Moon, Ki Ho; Park, Jong Yeon; Lee, Suck Hong; Kim, Byung Soo

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the causative factors of the false positive CT findings of parametrial invasions of cervial cancer. We analyzed 17 parametria of 14 patients with the diseases staged over IIb on CT, but confirmed to be under stage IIa on pathology. The CT findings were retrospectively reviewed, and compared with pathologic findings. The causes of false positive diagnosis of parametrial invasions on CT were prominent cardinal ligaments (n = 12), vaginal fornix (n = 3), and prominent uterine vessels (n = 2). Familiarity with these CT finding may be helpful in avoiding false positive diagnosis of parametrial invasion in patients with uterine cervical carcinoma

  14. False positive CT findings of parametrial invasion of cervical carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Chi Soon; Moon, Ki Ho; Park, Jong Yeon; Lee, Suck Hong; Kim, Byung Soo [College of Medicine, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-02-15

    To evaluate the causative factors of the false positive CT findings of parametrial invasions of cervial cancer. We analyzed 17 parametria of 14 patients with the diseases staged over IIb on CT, but confirmed to be under stage IIa on pathology. The CT findings were retrospectively reviewed, and compared with pathologic findings. The causes of false positive diagnosis of parametrial invasions on CT were prominent cardinal ligaments (n = 12), vaginal fornix (n = 3), and prominent uterine vessels (n = 2). Familiarity with these CT finding may be helpful in avoiding false positive diagnosis of parametrial invasion in patients with uterine cervical carcinoma.

  15. Case Studies - Cervical Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-10-15

    Dr. Alan Waxman, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of New Mexico and chair of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) committee for the underserved, talks about several case studies for cervical cancer screening and management.  Created: 10/15/2010 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC).   Date Released: 6/9/2010.

  16. Future Directions - Cervical Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-10-15

    Dr. Alan Waxman, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of New Mexico and chair of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) committee for the underserved, talks about possible changes in cervical cancer screening and management.  Created: 10/15/2009 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC).   Date Released: 6/9/2010.

  17. Cervical Cancer: Reality and Paradigm Shift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Quiñones Ceballos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Invasive cervical carcinoma usually reaches its highest frequency between 35-50 years of age. The Cuban prevention program screens the female population aged 25 to 60 years using the Pap smear and reexamines them every three years. Despite this effort, advanced cancer is diagnosed in young women as well as in those 40 to 60 years of age.

  18. Apparent diffusion coefficient for prediction of parametrial invasion in cervical cancer: a critical evaluation based on stratification to a Likert scale using T2-weighted imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Sungmin; Kim, Sang Youn; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Kim, Seung Hyup

    2018-03-01

    To evaluate the value of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) for determining parametrial invasion (PMI) in cervical cancer, by stratifying them into subgroups based on a Likert scale using T2-weighted imaging (T2WI). This retrospective study included 87 patients with FIGO stage IA2-IIB cervical cancer who underwent preoperative MRI followed by radical hysterectomy. Radiological PMI was assessed on T2WI using a six-point Likert scale and ADC values of the tumors were measured. MRI findings were compared between patients with and without PMI. Differences in ADC according to the Likert scale were also assessed. 19 (21.8%) patients had pathological PMI. The prevalence of PMI was significantly associated with Likert scale (P PMI had significantly lower ADC values than those without PMI (P = 0.034). However, no significant difference was seen between patients with and without PMI within each Likert score group (P = 0.180-0.857). T2WI-based Likert score for radiological PMI and ADC values of the tumor were significantly associated with pathological PMI. However, the apparent association seen between ADC values and PMI may be due to contribution of high ADC values of MRI-invisible tumors rather than reflecting their relationship.

  19. Radiation Therapy Plus Cisplatin and Gemcitabine in Treating Patients With Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-23

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  20. Therapeutic vaccination for HPV induced cervical cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Joeli A; Hughes, Sarah H; Stone, Pamela; Caffrey, Angela S; Muderspach, Laila I; Roman, Lynda D; Weber, Jeffrey S; Kast, W Martin

    2007-01-01

    Cervical Cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women worldwide and is associated with Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection, creating a unique opportunity to treat cervical cancer through anti-viral vaccination. Although a prophylactic vaccine may be available within a year, millions of women, already infected, will continue to suffer from HPV-related disease, emphasizing the need to develop therapeutic vaccination strategies. A majority of clinical trials examining therapeutic vaccination have shown limited efficacy due to examining patients with more advanced-stage cancer who tend to have decreased immune function. Current trends in clinical trials with therapeutic agents examine patients with pre-invasive lesions in order to prevent invasive cervical cancer. However, longer follow-up is necessary to correlate immune responses to lesion regression. Meanwhile, preclinical studies in this field include further exploration of peptide or protein vaccination, and the delivery of HPV antigens in DNA-based vaccines or in viral vectors. As long as pre-clinical studies continue to advance, the prospect of therapeutic vaccination to treat existing lesions seem good in the near future. Positive consequences of therapeutic vaccination would include less disfiguring treatment options and fewer instances of recurrent or progressive lesions leading to a reduction in cervical cancer incidence.

  1. Practical aspects of cervical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tillaart, Sabrina Ada Hendrika Maria van den

    2013-01-01

    The thesis describes studies on practical aspects of cervical cancer, concering surgical considerations, and aspects of tumour behaviour and tumour spread. The thesis comprises studies on: the comparison of nerve-sparing and non-nerve-sparing radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer; a new surgical

  2. Therapeutic Vaccination for HPV Induced Cervical Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joeli A. Brinkman

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical Cancer is the second leading cause of cancer–related deaths in women worldwide and is associated with Human Papillomavirus (HPV infection, creating a unique opportunity to treat cervical cancer through anti-viral vaccination. Although a prophylactic vaccine may be available within a year, millions of women, already infected, will continue to suffer from HPV-related disease, emphasizing the need to develop therapeutic vaccination strategies. A majority of clinical trials examining therapeutic vaccination have shown limited efficacy due to examining patients with more advanced-stage cancer who tend to have decreased immune function. Current trends in clinical trials with therapeutic agents examine patients with pre-invasive lesions in order to prevent invasive cervical cancer. However, longer follow-up is necessary to correlate immune responses to lesion regression. Meanwhile, preclinical studies in this field include further exploration of peptide or protein vaccination, and the delivery of HPV antigens in DNA-based vaccines or in viral vectors. As long as pre-clinical studies continue to advance, the prospect of therapeutic vaccination to treat existing lesions seem good in the near future. Positive consequences of therapeutic vaccination would include less disfiguring treatment options and fewer instances of recurrent or progressive lesions leading to a reduction in cervical cancer incidence.

  3. [Primary cervical cancer screening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Hernández, Víctor Manuel; Vargas-Aguilar, Víctor Manuel; Tovar-Rodríguez, José María

    2015-01-01

    Cervico-uterine cancer screening with cytology decrease incidence by more than 50%. The cause of this cancer is the human papilloma virus high risk, and requires a sensitive test to provide sufficient sensitivity and specificity for early detection and greater interval period when the results are negative. The test of the human papilloma virus high risk, is effective and safe because of its excellent sensitivity, negative predictive value and optimal reproducibility, especially when combined with liquid-based cytology or biomarkers with viral load, with higher sensitivity and specificity, by reducing false positives for the detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or greater injury, with excellent clinical benefits to cervical cancer screening and related infection of human papilloma virus diseases, is currently the best test for early detection infection of human papillomavirus and the risk of carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  4. Screening for Cervical Cancer: Experience from a University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (12/121) of them were high grade squamous intra-epithelial lesions while invasive carcinoma was seen in 3.3% (4/121) of the smears. Conclusion: Presence of abnormal cervical smear in 20% of the study subjects underscores the need for routine screening for cervical cancer. While organized national screening policy is ...

  5. Invasive cervical carcinoma (stage IB-IIB): assessment with MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sironi, S.; Del Maschio, A.; Belloni, C.; Taccagni, L.

    1990-01-01

    In patients with cervical carcinoma the selection of the optimal therapy depends on the precise preoperative assessment of the extent of disease. Currently, decisions regarding the management of these patients are made on the basis of clinical (FIGO) staging that has 50% mean error rate. To investigate the value of MR imaging in staging patients with invasive cervical cancer, we performed 25 MR examinations on 23 patients with histologic diagnosis of cervical cancer. All patients were clinically considered as having stage IB or IIB disease and underwent radical hysterectomy, providing specimens for pathologic correlation. The overall accuracy of MR imaging in staging cervical carcinoma (stage IB-IIB) was 78.1%. MR imaging seems to be the most reliable preoperative modality for staging invasive cervical cancer

  6. THE EFFECT OF EARLY CERVICAL CANCER DIAGNOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman Haller

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Treatment effectiveness and clinical outcome of patients with cervical carcinoma FIGO stage IA1 and IA2 are analyzed in three different time period at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology Rijeka, Croatia. Method: Retrospective analysis of the hospital chart of all cervical cancer patients between 1991 and 2005 was conducted with five-year follow up. Results: Data on cervical cancer distribution by stage and five-year survival are presented. Separately analyzed age, histology type and treatment modalities in stage FIGO IA1 and IA2 during three consecutive five-year periods are presented. Conclusions: Conservative surgical approach – conization alone in stage IA1 of the squamous cell car- cinoma is reasonable and safe treatment option for reproductive active women. During observed periods conization became the most used surgical technique applied in almost two third of FIGO IA1 cervical cancer patients. Lymph vascular space invasion in stage IA1 lead to adjunct pelvic lymphadenectomy with unclear clinical benefit. In cervical cancer patients stage IA2 simple hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy could be accepted as a standard treatment. In these patients further studies are recommended to evaluate other less radical surgical techniques – simple and radical trachelectomy with or without pelvic lymphadenectomy. Radical hysterectomy in both stages IA1 and IA2, based on personal experience and literature data represents a surgical overtreatment and should be abandoned.

  7. Triapine, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Cervical Cancer or Vaginal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-16

    Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Vaginal Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Vaginal Cancer; Therapy-related Toxicity

  8. COEXISTANCE OF CERVICAL CANCER AND MISSED ABORTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. L. Chernyshova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is the most common malignancy associated with pregnancy. The clinical case presented in this paper is of interest for several reasons. First, human chorionic trophoblast was shown to be a target for HPV, resulting in termination of pregnancy, as evidenced by the analysis of HPV of the abortion material (high HPV 16 viral load. In addition, iliac lymph node metastasis occurred in minimal tumor invasion, significantly affecting the rate of survival.

  9. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy Followed by Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-03

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  10. January Monthly Spotlight: Cervical Health and Cervical Cancer Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    In January, CRCHD joins the nation in raising awareness for Cervical Health and Cervical Cancer Disparities. This month we share a special focus on NCI/CRCHD research programs that are trying to reduce cervical cancer disparities in underserved communities and the people who are spreading the word about the importance of early detection.

  11. Cervical cancer screening at crossroads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynge, Elsebeth; Rygaard, Carsten; Baillet, Miguel Vazquez-Prada

    2014-01-01

    Cervical screening has been one of the most successful public health prevention programmes. For 50 years, cytology formed the basis for screening, and detected cervical intraepithelial lesions (CIN) were treated surgically to prevent progression to cancer. In a high-risk country as Denmark......, screening decreased the incidence of cervical cancer from 34 to 11 per 100,000, age-standardized rate (World Standard Population). Screening is, however, also expensive; Denmark (population: 5.6 million) undertakes close to half a million tests per year, and has 6-8 CIN-treated women for each prevented...... cancer case. The discovery of human papillomavirus (HPV) as the cause of cervical cancer dramatically changed perspectives for disease control. Screening with HPV testing was launched around 1990, and preventive HPV vaccination was licensed in 2006. Long-term randomized controlled trials (RCT...

  12. Cervical Dysplasia: Is It Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervical dysplasia: Is it cancer? I had a Pap test recently, and my doctor said the results showed ... the appearance of the abnormal cells. On the Pap test report, this will be reported as a low- ...

  13. Treatment of cervical agenesis with minimally invasive therapy: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azami Denas Azinar

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Cervical agenesis is very rare congenital disorder case with cervical not formed. Because of cervical clogged so that menstruation can not be drained. We Report the case of a19 years old women still single with endometrioma, hematometra, cervical agenesis and perform surgery combination laparoscopy and transvaginally with laparoscopic cystectomy, neocervix, and use catheter no 24f in the new cervix. And now she can currently be normal menstruation. Minimally invasive theraphy of congenital anomalies case is recommended to save reproductive function. Keywords: Cervical agenesis, minimal invasive theraphy

  14. Cervical Cancer Screening - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Screening - English PDF It's a Simple Test - Cervical Cancer Screening - español (Spanish) PDF American Cancer Society Ukrainian (українська ) Expand Section Female Exam and Pap Smear - українська (Ukrainian) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Urdu ( ...

  15. Drugs Approved for Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for cervical cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  16. Targeting Human Papillomavirus to Reduce the Burden of Cervical, Vulvar and Vaginal Cancer and Pre-Invasive Neoplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygard, Mari; Hansen, Bo Terning; Dillner, Joakim

    2014-01-01

    was obtained from high-quality national population-based registries. A literature review was conducted to define the fraction of these lesions attributable to HPV16/18, i.e., those that could be prevented by HPV vaccination. RESULTS: Among the four countries, the age-standardised IR/10⁵ of cervical, vaginal...

  17. [Etiology and pathogenesis of precancerous lesions and invasive cervical carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panjković, Milana; Ivković-Kapicl, Tatjana

    2008-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common gynecological malignancy in the world. Human papilloma virus (HPV) infection is the leading ethiologic agent in the development of premalignant and malignant cervical diseases. HPV is a member of the Papovaviridae family and until now over 100 types have been recognized There are two types of viral infection: latent and productive. Virus induced oncogenesis is the result of interaction between virus oncoproteins E6 and E7 and tumor supresor host genes p53 and Rb. Many cofactors such as immunosuppression, early sexual relationship, multiple sexual partners, other sexualy transsmited infections and smoking are contributing factors of the precancerous and invasive cervical lesions. According to the oncogenic potential HPV are divided into three groups: low, intermediate and high oncogenic risk viruses. Molecular technics which are used for the virus detection are: In situ hibridisation, Hyybrid capture test and polymerasa chain reaction. Human papilloma virus testing has an important role in the follow up and treatment of women with "atypical squamous cells of unknown significant" changes in cervical smears and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions, changes in punch biopsy.

  18. Cetuximab, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IB, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-29

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  19. Type-specific HPV prevalence in invasive cervical cancer in the UK prior to national HPV immunisation programme: baseline for monitoring the effects of immunisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesher, David; Cuschieri, Kate; Hibbitts, Sam; Jamison, Jackie; Sargent, Alex; Pollock, Kevin G; Powell, Ned; Wilson, Robbie; McCall, Fiona; Fiander, Alison; Soldan, Kate

    2015-02-01

    To establish the human papillomavirus (HPV) type-specific prevalence in cervical cancer and high-grade cervical lesions in the UK prior to the introduction of national HPV vaccination. Specimens of cervical cancer (n=1235) and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN)3 (n=2268) were tested for HPV genotypes in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. Data were pooled and weighted estimates presented. Among cervical cancer cases, 95.8% were positive for at least one high-risk (HR) HPV type. Restricting to those with HR HPV, the proportion positive for HPV16 and/or HPV18 was similar across countries (weighted overall prevalence 83.0%). This proportion decreased with increasing age at diagnosis (p=0.0005). HPV31, HPV33, HPV45, HPV52 and/or HPV58 were detected in 16.1% of HR HPV-positive cervical cancers and there was no significant association with age for these types. For HR HPV-positive CIN3 cases, there was a similar age-specific pattern with the highest positivity of HPV16 and/or HPV18 in the youngest age group (77.2%). The proportion of HR HPV CIN3 cases positive for HPV31, HPV33, HPV45, HPV52 and/or HPV58 was 36.3% in those aged type-specific HPV prevalence in cervical disease. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. Cervical invasion of endometrial carcinoma - evaluation by parasagittal MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, T.; Kurachi, H.; Nakamura, H.; Tsuda, K.; Miyake, A.; Tomoda, K.; Hori, S.; Kozuka, T.

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-seven consecutive patients were examined by T2-(1800/70 ms) and postcontrast T1-weighted (600/15) spin echo (SE) or dynamic (200/15) SE MR imaging to determine the usefulness of parasagittal MR imaging in assessing cervical invasion of endometrial carcinoma. The images were obtained in a direction parallel to the longitudinal axis of the uterus (parasagittal). The cervical epithelium, being hyperintense on the late phase dynamic and postcontrast T1-weighted SE images, had disappeared partially or totally in all 4 patients with cervical invasion. The enhanced cervical epithelium was completely seen in one patient with the tumor protruding into the cervical canal in a polyp-like form without cervical epithelial invasion. The same was also seen in the 22 patients with the tumor remaining in the corpus cavity. The enhanced parasagittal MR images facilitated the evaluation of the extent of the endometrial carcinoma. (orig.)

  1. Cervical Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing cervical cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  2. Optical coherence tomography in diagnosing cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetzova, Irina A.; Shakhova, Natalia M.; Kachalina, Tatiana S.; Gladkova, Natalia D.; Myakov, Alexey V.; Iksanov, Rashid R.; Feldchtein, Felix I.

    2000-05-01

    Cervical cancer remains one of the most significant problem in oncogynecology. It tends towards treatment approaches that provide termination of pathological processes along with preservation of the patient's life quality. There is a need in earlier and more accurate diagnosis of pathological states, objective assessment of physiological processes, and adequate monitoring of the course of treatment. In our previous publications we have reported unique capabilities of the Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) to image in vivo the mucosa structure of the cervix and to monitor various physiological and pathological alterations. In this report, we present results of OCT application to diagnose different stages of cervical cancer and to control its treatment at early stages. We have performed OCT-colposcopy in 11 female patients with cervical cancer to derive OCT criteria of this disease, to provide exact demarcation of a pathological area, and to determine a real size of a tumor. We have found that, in general, borders of a tumor, defined visually and detected with OCT by violation of the basement membrane in exocervix, do not coincide. The mismatch depends on a stage of cancer and can be as much as several millimeters. This information is especially important for evaluation of linear dimension of tumors with 3 - 5 mm invasion and also for differential diagnosis between the T1 and T2 stages with cancer extension onto vagina.

  3. CDC Vital Signs: Cervical Cancer is Preventable

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Digital Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Cervical Cancer is Preventable Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend ... 000 More than 4,000 women die of cervical cancer each year. 93% As many as 93% of ...

  4. Preventing Cervical Cancer with HPV Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervical cancer can be prevented with HPV vaccines. NCI-supported researchers helped establish HPV as a cause of cervical cancer. They also helped create the first HPV vaccines, were involved in the vaccine trials, and contribute to ongoing studies.

  5. Cervical cancer: A global health crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, William; Bacon, Monica A; Bajaj, Amishi; Chuang, Linus T; Fisher, Brandon J; Harkenrider, Matthew M; Jhingran, Anuja; Kitchener, Henry C; Mileshkin, Linda R; Viswanathan, Akila N; Gaffney, David K

    2017-07-01

    Cervical cancer is the fourth most common malignancy diagnosed in women worldwide. Nearly all cases of cervical cancer result from infection with the human papillomavirus, and the prevention of cervical cancer includes screening and vaccination. Primary treatment options for patients with cervical cancer may include surgery or a concurrent chemoradiotherapy regimen consisting of cisplatin-based chemotherapy with external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy. Cervical cancer causes more than one quarter of a million deaths per year as a result of grossly deficient treatments in many developing countries. This warrants a concerted global effort to counter the shocking loss of life and suffering that largely goes unreported. This article provides a review of the biology, prevention, and treatment of cervical cancer, and discusses the global cervical cancer crisis and efforts to improve the prevention and treatment of the disease in underdeveloped countries. Cancer 2017;123:2404-12. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  6. Breast and cervical cancers diagnosed and stage at diagnosis among women served through the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jacqueline W; Royalty, Janet; Henley, Jane; White, Arica; Richardson, Lisa C

    2015-05-01

    To assess cancers diagnosed and the stage of cancer at the time of diagnosis among low-income, under-insured, or uninsured women who received services through the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP). Using the NBCCEDP database, we examined the number and percent of women diagnosed during 2009-2011 with in situ breast cancer, invasive breast cancer, and invasive cervical cancer by demographic and clinical characteristics, including age, race and ethnicity, test indication (screening or diagnostic), symptoms (for breast cancer), and screening history (for cervical cancer). We examined these characteristics by stage at diagnosis, a new variable included in the database obtained by linking with state-based central cancer registries. There were 11,569 women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer, 1,988 with in situ breast cancer, and 583 with invasive cervical cancer through the NBCCEDP. Women who reported breast symptoms or who had diagnostic mammography were more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer, and at a later stage, than those who did not have symptoms or who had screening mammography. Women who had been rarely or never screened for cervical cancer were more likely to be diagnosed with cervical cancer, and at a later stage, than women who received regular screenings. Women served through the NBCCEDP who have not had prior screening or who have symptoms were more often diagnosed with late-stage disease.

  7. Cervical Cancer Vaccination | Ajiboye | Tropical Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This article provides an overview of cervical cancer vaccine including safety, efficacy and cost in the primary prevention of cervical cancer. Discussion: The quadrivalent human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine protects against HPV types 6, 11, 16 and 18. These HPV types are responsible for 70% of cervical cancers ...

  8. Radiation Therapy and Cisplatin With or Without Epoetin Alfa in Treating Patients With Cervical Cancer and Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-08

    Anemia; Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Drug Toxicity; Radiation Toxicity; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  9. Cervical Cancer Screening with AMIGAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lairson, David R.; Chang, Yu-Chia; Byrd, Theresa L.; Smith, Judith Lee; Fernandez, Maria E.; Wilson, Katherine M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hispanic women have a higher incidence of cervical cancer than all other races and ethnicities. In Hispanic subgroups, Mexican American women were among the least likely to have received cervical cancer screening. In a recent RCT, Ayudando a las Mujeres con Información, Guia, y Amor para su Salud (AMIGAS) was shown to increase cervical cancer screening rates among women of Mexican descent at 6 months in all intervention arms compared to the control arm. Limited information exists about the economics of interventions to increase cervical cancer screening rates among women of Mexican descent. Purpose This study aims to estimate the cost-effectiveness of the alternative AMIGAS intervention methods for increasing cervical cancer screening among low-income women of Mexican descent in three U.S. communities. Methods Cost data were collected from 2008 to 2011 alongside the AMIGAS study of 613 women. Receipt of Pap test within 6 months of intervention was the primary outcome measure in the cost-effectiveness analysis, conducted during 2012–2013. Results The cost per additional woman screened comparing the video-only intervention to usual care was $980. The cost increased to $1,309 with participant time cost included. With an additional cost per participant of $3.90 compared to flipchart only, the full AMIGAS program (video plus flipchart) yielded 6.8% additional women screened. Conclusions Results on the average and incremental cost-effectiveness of the AMIGAS program elements may assist health policymakers and program managers to select and appropriately budget for interventions shown to increase cervical cancer screening among low-income women of Mexican descent. PMID:24842738

  10. Radiobiological characteristics of cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagabu, Teruo; Kobayashi, Takashi; Nanayama, Kunihiko

    1976-01-01

    In order to observe the radiobiological characteristics of cervical cancer, the author carried out irradiation of 60 Co in 16 cases of cervical cancer. The primary lesion of each case was exposed to radiation of 100 R once a day, 40 times in sequence, totaling 4,000 R. To evaluate this results, the vaginal smears were obtained everyday and examined for changes in cancerous cells caused by the irradiation. The results of our study showed that cervical cancer could be classified into three groups according to the radiosensitivity of its cancerous cells. In the group of low-radiosensitivity (11 cases of 16), the cancerous cells decreased gradually, and enlargement of the nuclei of the cancerous cells was observed from 2,000 R of irradiation, but the majority of the cancerous cells were those of nucleus after the irradiation of 4,000 R. In all of the 5 uterus removed, residual cancer lesion was noted. The radiocuability was unfavourable. In the group of high-radiosensitivity (4 cases of 16), the cancerous cells decreased remarkablly. Enlargement of nucleus was noted from 1,000 R of the irradiation, the cancerous cells of small-sized nucleus appeared with the irradiation of 3,000 R but the cancerous cells almost disappeared with the irradiation of 4,000 R. The radiocuability was favourable. In the group of combination of high-radiosensitivity and low-radiosensitivity portions (one case of 16), the cancerous cells decreased remarkablly until the exposure to the radiation of 2,000 R but thereafter did slowly. In a removed uterus, the cancer lesion was noted, but the prognosis was favourable. The foregoing results suggest that changes in the nuclear diameter of the cancerous cells in vaginal smears during irradiation can tell the radiosensitivity of the cancerous cells. (Kanao, N.)

  11. Lynch Syndrome and Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antill, Yoland C; Dowty, James G; Win, Aung Ko; Thompson, Tina; Walsh, Michael D; Cummings, Margaret C; Gallinger, Steven; Lindor, Noralane M; Le Marchand, Loïc; Hopper, John L; Newcomb, Polly A; Haile, Robert W; Church, James; Tucker, Katherine M; Buchanan, Daniel D; Young, Joanne P; Winship, Ingrid M; Jenkins, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Carriers of germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes are at increased risk of several cancers including colorectal and gynecologic cancers (Lynch syndrome). There is no substantial evidence that these mutations are associated with an increased risk of cervical cancer. A total of 369 families with at least one carrier of a mutation in a MMR gene (133 MLH1, 174 MSH2, 35 MSH6, and 27 PMS2) were ascertained via population cancer registries or via family cancer clinics in Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and USA. Personal and family histories of cancer were obtained from participant interviews. Modified segregation analysis was used to estimate the hazard ratio (incidence rates for carriers relative to those for the general population), and age-specific cumulative risks of cervical cancer for carriers. A total of 65 cases of cervical cancer were reported (including 10 verified by pathology reports). The estimated incidence was 5.6–fold (95% CI: 2.3–13.8; p=0.001) higher for carriers than for the general population with a corresponding cumulative risk to 80 years of 4.5% (95% CI: 1.9–10.7%) compared with 0.8% for the general population. The mean age at diagnosis was 43.1 years (95% CI: 40.0–46.2), 3.9 years younger than the reported USA population mean of 47.0 years (p=0.02). Women with MMR gene mutations were found to have an increased risk of cervical cancer. Due to limited pathology verification we cannot be certain that a proportion of these cases were not lower uterine segment endometrial cancers involving the endocervix, a recognized cancer of Lynch syndrome. PMID:26077226

  12. Thiazolidinediones abrogate cervical cancer growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuertz, Beverly R., E-mail: knier003@umn.edu; Darrah, Lindsay, E-mail: ldarrah@obgynmn.com; Wudel, Justin, E-mail: drwudel@drwudel.com; Ondrey, Frank G., E-mail: ondre002@umn.edu

    2017-04-15

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR γ) is activated by thiazolidinedione drugs (TZDs) and can promote anti-cancer properties. We used three TZDs (pioglitazone, rosiglitazone, and ciglitazone) to target cervical cancer cell lines and a nude mouse animal model. Each agent increased activation of PPAR γ, as judged by a luciferase reporter gene assay in three HPV-associated cell lines (CaSki, SiHa, and HeLa cells) while decreasing cellular proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. They also promoted Oil Red O accumulation in treated cell lines and upregulated the lipid differentiation marker adipsin. Interestingly, xenograft HeLa tumors in nude mice treated with 100 mg/kg/day pioglitazone exhibited decreased growth compared to control mice or mice treated with standard cervical chemotherapy. In conclusion, TZDs slow tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo with decreases in cell proliferation and increases in PPAR γ and adipsin. These agents may be interesting treatments or treatment adjuncts for HPV-associated cancers or perhaps even precancerous conditions. - Highlights: • Thiazolidinediones decreases cervical cancer proliferation. • Pioglitazone increases cervical cancer differentiation. • Pioglitazone decreases tumor growth in mice. • Pioglitazone may be a useful treatment adjunct.

  13. Adherence to the cervical cancer screening program in women living with HIV in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, Kristina; Ladelund, Steen; Jensen-Fangel, Søren

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Women living with HIV (WLWH) are at increased risk of invasive cervical cancer (ICC). International HIV guidelines suggest cervical screening twice the first year after HIV diagnosis and thereafter annually. Adherence to the HIV cervical screening program in Denmark is unknown. METHODS...

  14. Lymphedema After Surgery in Patients With Endometrial Cancer, Cervical Cancer, or Vulvar Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-03

    Lymphedema; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IB Vulvar Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVB Vulvar Cancer

  15. Targeting SPARC by lentivirus-mediated RNA interference inhibits cervical cancer cell growth and metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Jie

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC, a calcium-binding matricellular glycoprotein, is implicated in the progressions of some cancers. However, no information has been available to date regarding the function of SPARC in cervical cancer cell growth and metastasis. Methods In this study, we isolated and established high invasive subclones and low invasive subclones from human cervical cancer cell lines HeLa and SiHa by the limited dilution method. Real-time q-RT-PCR, Western Blot and ICC were performed to investigate SPARC mRNA and protein expressions in high invasive subclones and low invasive subclones. Then lentivirus vector with SPARC shRNA was constructed and infected the highly invasive subclones. Real-time q-RT-PCR, Western Blot and ICC were also performed to investigate the changes of SPARC expression after viral infection. In functional assays, effects of SPARC knockdown on the biological behaviors of cervical cancer cells were investigated. The mechanisms of SPARC in cervical cancer proliferation, apoptosis and invasion were also researched. Results SPARC was over-expressed in the highly invasive subclones compared with the low invasive subclones. Knockdown of SPARC significantly suppressed cervical cancer cell proliferation, and induced cell cycle arrest at the G1/G0 phase through the p53/p21 pathway, also caused cell apoptosis accompanied by the decreased ratio of Bcl-2/Bax, and inhibited cell invasion and metastasis accompanied by down-regulated MMP2 and MMP9 expressions and up-regulated E-cadherin expression. Conclusion SPARC is related to the invasive phenotype of cervical cancer cells. Knockdown of SPARC significantly suppresses cervical cancer cell proliferation, induces cell apoptosis and inhibits cell invasion and metastasis. SPARC as a promoter improves cervical cancer cell growth and metastasis.

  16. Methods for Cervical Cancer Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Vargas-Revilla

    2014-12-01

    This article is divided in three sections: the first one focuses on the general impact of cervical cancer has hadin CostaRica, these condsection gathers information about different methodologies used around the world to detect this cancer and the third one makes reference to the current development of the screening devise in Mexico that works as a monitoring system and can used by women without external assistance.

  17. Incidence of cervical dysplasia and cervical cancer in women living with HIV in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, Kristina; Ladelund, Steen; Jensen-Fangel, Søren

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Women living with HIV (WLWH) are reportedly at increased risk of invasive cervical cancer (ICC). WLWH in Denmark attend the National ICC screening program less often than women in the general population. We aimed to estimate the incidence of cervical dysplasia and ICC in WLWH...... and hazard ratios (HRs) for time from inclusion to first cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN)/ICC and time from first normal cervical cytology to first CIN/ICC were estimated. Sensitivity analyses were performed to include prior screening outcome, screening intensity and treatment of CIN...... with normal baseline cytology, incidences of CIN1+ and CIN2+ were higher in WLWH. However, incidences were comparable between WLWH and controls adherent to the National ICC screening program. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, WLWH develop more cervical disease than controls. However, incidences of CIN are comparable...

  18. Incidence of cervical dysplasia and cervical cancer in women living with HIV in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, K; Ladelund, Steen; Jensen-Fangel, S

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Women living with HIV (WLWH) are reportedly at increased risk of invasive cervical cancer (ICC). A recent publication found that WLWH in Denmark attend the national ICC screening programme less often than women in the general population. We aimed to estimate the incidence of cervical......, which contains nationwide records of all pathology specimens. The cumulative incidence and hazard ratios (HRs) for time from inclusion to first cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN)/ICC and time from first normal cervical cytology result to first CIN/ICC were estimated. Sensitivity analyses were...... in both groups were adherent to the national ICC screening programme and had a normal baseline cytology, incidences of CIN and ICC were comparable. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, WLWH developed more cervical disease than controls. Yet, in WLWH and controls adherent to the national ICC screening programme...

  19. [Dilemmas in the surgical treatment of cervical cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durdević, Srdan

    2004-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer of the female genital tract. There are 2200 newly registered cases of cervical cancer each year in Serbia, out of which 650 women die. The incidence of invasive, advanced cervical cancer has been on decrease, whereas the incidence of "in situ" stage carcinoma increases by 2% per year with tendency of increase in the younger age groups. The first radical abdominal hysterectomy was performed by Ernst Wertheim from Wienna in 1898, whereas Schauta performed the first vaginal hysterectomy in 1902. It was in 1995 when Daniel Dargent introduced radical vaginal trachelectomy combined with laparoscopic lymphadenectomy in order to preserve fertility in cases of initial-invasive stages of cervical cancer (FIGO I A2, I B1). Before choosing the surgical procedure, it is necessary to make a correct preoperative estimation of the stage of disease according to FIGO classification. Apart from gynecologic and rectovaginal examinations, in some cases it is necessary to perform additional examinations such as: cystoscopy, rectoscopy, CT or MRI examination of the pelvis, IVU, chest X-ray etc. The decision can be made only by an experienced gynecologist-surgeon who is able to solve all complications of treatment by himself. There are different surgical procedures for cervical cancer: abdominal, vaginal and combined. Introduction of laparoscopic lymphadenectomy combined with vaginal radical operations, to decrease surgical trauma and preserve fertility, has been of great significance.

  20. Raman spectroscopy in cervical cancers: An update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Rubina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer among women worldwide. Developing countries contribute more than 80% towards global burden. Over the last 2 decades, Raman spectroscopy (RS has been actively pursued for cervical cancer detection. In view of latest development in Raman spectroscopic applications in cervical cancers, especially in vivo studies, an update of the same is presented in this article. This articles opens with a brief note on Anatomy of cervix followed by Etiology, and conventional Screening and Diagnosis of Cervical cancers. In subsequent sections, brief description of Theory and Instrumentation of RS is followed by a review of recent developments in cervical cancer detection; with emphasis on cell lines, exfoliated cells, ex vivo and in vivo, and therapeutic response monitoring applications in cervical cancer.

  1. Somatic LKB1 mutations promote cervical cancer progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shana N Wingo

    Full Text Available Human Papilloma Virus (HPV is the etiologic agent for cervical cancer. Yet, infection with HPV is not sufficient to cause cervical cancer, because most infected women develop transient epithelial dysplasias that spontaneously regress. Progression to invasive cancer has been attributed to diverse host factors such as immune or hormonal status, as no recurrent genetic alterations have been identified in cervical cancers. Thus, the pressing question as to the biological basis of cervical cancer progression has remained unresolved, hampering the development of novel therapies and prognostic tests. Here we show that at least 20% of cervical cancers harbor somatically-acquired mutations in the LKB1 tumor suppressor. Approximately one-half of tumors with mutations harbored single nucleotide substitutions or microdeletions identifiable by exon sequencing, while the other half harbored larger monoallelic or biallelic deletions detectable by multiplex ligation probe amplification (MLPA. Biallelic mutations were identified in most cervical cancer cell lines; HeLa, the first human cell line, harbors a homozygous 25 kb deletion that occurred in vivo. LKB1 inactivation in primary tumors was associated with accelerated disease progression. Median survival was only 13 months for patients with LKB1-deficient tumors, but >100 months for patients with LKB1-wild type tumors (P = 0.015, log rank test; hazard ratio = 0.25, 95% CI = 0.083 to 0.77. LKB1 is thus a major cervical tumor suppressor, demonstrating that acquired genetic alterations drive progression of HPV-induced dysplasias to invasive, lethal cancers. Furthermore, LKB1 status can be exploited clinically to predict disease recurrence.

  2. Cervical Cancer Screening in Enugu, Nigeria. | Chukwuali | Tropical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: Though preventable by early detection and treatment of the pre-invasive stage, carcinoma of the cervix remains the commonest gynaecological malignancy in Nigeria and a leading cause of death among women. The preventive role of cervical cancer screening is directly related to the proportion of the population ...

  3. Overexpression of trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) contributes to the malignant progression in cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhaohu; Chen, Dandan; Chen, Xiaojie; Yang, Huikuan; Wei, Yaming

    2017-01-01

    There remains a great need for effective therapies for cervical cancers, the majority of which are aggressive leaving patients with poor prognosis. Here, we identify a novel candidate therapeutic target, trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) which overexpressed in cervical cancer cells and was associated with reduced postoperative survival. Functional studies demonstrated that TFF3 overexpression promoted the proliferation and invasion of cervical cancer cells, and inhibited the apoptosis by inducing the mRNA changes in SiHa and Hela cell lines. Conversely, TFF3 silencing disrupted the proliferation and invasion of cervical cancer cells, and induced the apoptosis via Click-iT EdU test, flow cytometry analysis and two-dimensional Matrigel Transwell analysis. Western blot analysis showed that overexpression of TFF3 repressed E-cadherin (CDH1) expression to promote the invasion of cervical cancer cells. Furthermore, down-regulated CDH1 via overexpression of TFF3 was significantly up-regulated by virtue of inhibitor of p-STAT3. These results suggested that TFF3 stimulated the invasion of cervical cancer cells probably by activating the STAT3/CDH1 signaling pathway. Furthermore, overexpression of TFF3 decreased the sensitivity of cervical cancer cells to etoposide by increasing P-glycoprotein (P-gp) functional activity. Overall, our work provides a preclinical proof that TFF3 not only contributes to the malignant progression of cervical cancers and but also is a potential therapeutic target.

  4. Analysis of clinical characteristics of 950 cases of cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-li ZHU

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To discuss the clinical features of the patients suffering from cervical cancer who visited Daping Hospital affiliated to Third Military Medical University in recent 10 years. Methods The clinical data of the patients who were pathologically diagnosed as invasive cervical cancer in Daping Hospital of TMMU from Jan. 2004 to Dec. 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. They were divided into different age groups and analyzed according to age, clinical features, pathological type, and surgical approach. Results Clinical data of 950 patients with invasive cervical cancer were reviewed in this study. The mean age of the patients was 46.9 years. The clinical features, pathological type, and surgical approaches were different in different age groups. Analysis of the age structure of the patients, the onset age of cervical cancer seemed to increase year by year. Conclusion The clinical features of cervical cancer are diversity in different age, and the strategy for controlling its development should be varied according to age. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.03.09

  5. Preventive vaccines for cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WHEELER COSETTE M

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential use of vaccines for the human papillomavirus (HPV in the prevention and treatment of cervical cancer is a possibility in the near future. Close to 20 genotypes of HPV, of the 75 that have been identified, infect the femine genital tract, but four subtypes (16, 18, 31 and 45 have been associated in close to 80% of cervical cancers. this article proposes that in order to design an effective prophylactic vaccine against HPV infection, an adequate immune response should be guaranteed through four goals; a activation of antigens present in the cell; b overcoming the host response and viral genetic variability in the T cell response; c generation of high levels of T and B memory cells; and d persistence of antigens.

  6. Factores de riesgo de cáncer cervicouterino invasor en mujeres mexicanas Risk factors in invasive cervical cancer among Mexican women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Leticia Tirado-Gómez

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Evaluar la asociación entre cáncer cervicouterino (CaCu invasor y el virus del papiloma humano de alto riesgo (VPH-AR (carga viral/tipo 16, así como con factores ginecológicos y socioeconómicos. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Estudio de casos y controles pareado individualmente (215 casos con CaCu invasor y 420 controles. La población de estudio se reclutó entre los años 2000 y 2001. Se evaluaron variables tradicionalmente asociadas con CaCu (ginecológicas y socioeconómicas y dos variables asociadas con la presencia de VPH (carga viral y el tipo 16. La presencia de VPH-AR se determinó mediante Captura de Híbridos II. La carga viral se midió a través de unidades relativas de luz y picogramos por ml (1 RLU=1 pg/ml, divididas en cuatro categorías: negativa (499 pg/ml. El análisis estimó razones de momios (RM ajustadas a través de modelos de regresión logística condicionada. RESULTADOS: La presencia de VPH-AR incrementa en 78 veces la probabilidad de presentar CaCu invasor; cuando el VPH es tipo 16, el incremento es mayor (RM= 429.7 comparado con otros tipos (RM=64.1. Se observó una tendencia importante en la RM al elevarse la carga viral (RM=46.6 carga baja; RM=250.7 intermedia y RM=612.9 alta. Finalmente, los factores demográficos y obstétricos conocidos, incrementaron la probabilidad de CaCu invasor. No se observó asociación entre CaCu invasor y tabaquismo en la población de estudio. CONCLUSIONES: Este estudio contribuye a la identificación de las mujeres con alto riesgo de desarrollar CaCu invasor, entre las pacientes infectadas con VPH-AR. Por otra parte, confirma la importancia de la infección de VPH-AR y refleja la carga viral del VPH-AR como cofactor y posible promotor en el desarrollo de la enfermedad. Por último, este biomarcador puede contribuir a mejorar la prevención y la detección temprana de esta enfermedad.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between invasive Cervical Cancer (CC and high risk Human

  7. Socioeconomic position and survival after cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibfelt, E H; Kjær, S K; Høgdall, C

    2013-01-01

    In an attempt to decrease social disparities in cancer survival, it is important to consider the mechanisms by which socioeconomic position influences cancer prognosis. We aimed to investigate whether any associations between socioeconomic factors and survival after cervical cancer could be expla......In an attempt to decrease social disparities in cancer survival, it is important to consider the mechanisms by which socioeconomic position influences cancer prognosis. We aimed to investigate whether any associations between socioeconomic factors and survival after cervical cancer could...

  8. Cervical cancer: current knowledge, perception and associated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and Objective: Cervical cancer is a major public health problem and one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality amongst the gynaecological cancers worldwide, especially in developing countries. Cervical cancer continues to persist in Nigeria like other developing countries despite the existence of ...

  9. THE CERVICAL CANCER SCREENING - UNSOLVED PROBLEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Kaprin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of cervical cancer (CC for many decades continues to be the center of attention leading foreign and domestic oncologists. Malignant cervical tumors occupy the leading position among malignant neoplasms of reproductive system in women, second only to breast cancer, despite having far more effective screening compared with this disease. On predictive expert estimates (taking into account population growth and the expected increase in life expectancy by 2020 in developing countries, the rising incidence and prevalence of cervical cancer is 40%, while in developed countries - 11%. If we do not perform timely interventions for prevention and treatment of cervical cancer, after 2050 cervical cancer every year in the world will become sick 1 million women. In the last decade inRussiathere has been a gradual increase in the incidence of cervical cancer: average annual growth rate of 2.21%, General 25,18%. Cervical cancer is one of nosological forms that meet all the requirements of population-based screening. The current Russian normative documents do not give clear answers to questions concerning the age of onset of cervical cancer screening and the time interval between tests, no clear program organized cytological screening of cervical cancer.

  10. Nanotechnology in the management of cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiezhong; Gu, Wenyi; Yang, Lei; Chen, Chen; Shao, Renfu; Xu, Kewei; Xu, Zhi Ping

    2015-03-01

    Cervical cancer is a major disease with high mortality. All cervical cancers are caused by infection with human papillomaviruses (HPV). Although preventive vaccines for cervical cancer are successful, treatment of cervical cancer is far less satisfactory because of multidrug resistance and side effects. In this review, we summarize the recent application of nanotechnology to the diagnosis and treatment of cervical cancer as well as the development of HPV vaccines. Early detection of cervical cancer enables tumours to be efficiently removed by surgical procedures, leading to increased survival rate. The current method of detecting cervical cancer by Pap smear can only achieve 50% sensitivity, whereas nanotechnology has been used to detect HPVs with greatly improved sensitivity. In cervical cancer treatment, nanotechnology has been used for the delivery of anticancer drugs to increase treatment efficacy and decrease side effects. Nanodelivery of HPV preventive and therapeutic vaccines has also been investigated to increase vaccine efficacy. Overall, these developments suggest that nanoparticle-based vaccine may become the most effective way to prevent and treat cervical cancer, assisted or combined with some other nanotechnology-based therapy. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Identifying Molecular Culprits of Cervical Cancer Progression | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA is found in 99.7% of invasive cervical carcinomas, providing strong evidence that the virus is a causative agent in the development of this disease. However, most women who become infected with HPV do not develop invasive cervical lesions, indicating that additional exogenous or genetic factors may determine whether HPV preclinical lesions will progress to cancer. Identification of these factors would be facilitated by a deeper understanding of the cellular and molecular changes that accompany progression to malignancy. In addition, knowledge of which women are at greatest risk for disease progression would be a significant clinical advancement in the management of patients with premalignant cervical lesions.

  12. Stages of Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nearby lymph nodes are also removed. Artificial openings ( stoma ) are made for urine and stool to flow ... information on cancer prevention, detection, genetics, treatment, supportive care, and complementary and alternative medicine. Most summaries come ...

  13. Prevent Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cause cancer. Most women don’t need a Pap test every year! Have your first Pap test when you’re 21. If your test results ... you can wait 3 years for your next Pap test. HPV tests aren’t recommended for screening women ...

  14. Cervical cancer control, priorities and new directions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monsonego, J; Bosch, F.X.; Coursaget, P.; Cox, JT; Franco, E; Frazer, I; Sankaranarayanan, R; Schiller, J; Singer, A; Wright, TCJr; Kinney, W; Meijer, C.J.L.M.; Linder, J

    2004-01-01

    99% of cervical cancer is initiated by HPV infection. The estimated lifetime risk of cervical cancer is nevertheless relatively low (less than 1 in 20 for most community based studies). Although sensitivity and specificity of the available diagnostic techniques are suboptimal, screening for

  15. Cervical cancer incidence in elderly women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynge, Elsebeth; Lönnberg, Stefan; Törnberg, Sven

    2017-01-01

    was to determine whether this bipolar pattern in age-specific incidence of cervical cancer reflects underlying biology or can be explained by the fact that the data come from birth cohorts with different screening histories. Methods: Combination of historical data on cervical screening and population-based cancer...

  16. Cervical cancer in India and HPV vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaarthigeyan, K

    2012-01-01

    Cervical cancer, mainly caused by Human Papillomavirus infection, is the leading cancer in Indian women and the second most common cancer in women worldwide. Though there are several methods of prevention of cervical cancer, prevention by vaccination is emerging as the most effective option, with the availability of two vaccines. Several studies have been published examining the vaccine's efficacy, immunogenicity and safety. Questions and controversy remain regarding mandatory vaccination, need for booster doses and cost-effectiveness, particularly in the Indian context.

  17. `WORSE THAN HIV' OR `NOT AS SERIOUS AS OTHER DISEASES'? CONCEPTUALIZATION OF CERVICAL CANCER AMONG NEWLY SCREENED WOMEN IN ZAMBIA

    OpenAIRE

    White, Heather L.; Mulambia, Chishimba; Sinkala, Moses; Mwanahamuntu, Mulindi H.; Parham, Groesbeck P.; Moneyham, Linda; Grimley, Diane M.; Chamot, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Invasive cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women worldwide, with approximately 85% of the disease burden occurring in developing countries. To date, there have been few systematic efforts to document African women's conceptualization of cervical cancer after participation in a visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA)-based “see and treat” cervical cancer prevention program. In this study, conducted between September, 2009-July, 2010, focus groups and in-depth interviews w...

  18. HPV in genital cancers (at the exception of cervical cancer) and anal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sanjosé, Silvia; Bruni, Laia; Alemany, Laia

    2014-12-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has been firmly established as a central and necessary cause of invasive cervical cancer and it has been etiologically linked to other anogenital (vulva, vagina, anus and penis) and head and neck cancers, particularly oropharyngeal. Although being rare, the incidence of some of these cancers in some countries has increased in the last decades. HPV-related anogenital tumors share many risk factors with cervical cancer. The HPV aetiological contribution differs in each anatomical location reflecting differences in the natural history and viral tissue tropism. The highest prevalence of HPV DNA in cancers other than cervix has been described for anal, followed by vagina, penile and vulvar cancers. HPV16 has been described as the most common type detected in all cancer sites with different contributions being the highest in anal carcinoma (around 80% of HPV DNA positive anal cancers) and the lowest in vaginal cancers with a contribution similar to that found in cervical cancers (around 60%). Current HPV vaccines have already demonstrated their efficacy in preventing anogenital pre-neoplastic lesions caused by vaccine HPV types. HPV-based prevention tools like HPV vaccination and to a lesser extend screening (e.g. for anal cancer) can be useful measures for reducing the burden of these anogenital cancers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Minimally invasive posterior cervical discectomy for cervical radiculopathy: technique and clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidar, Zvi; Salame, Khalil

    2011-12-01

    Retrospective analysis of data of all patients treated by minimally invasive posterior discectomy for cervical radiculopathy between January 2004 and February 2008. To describe our technique and report the outcome of minimally invasive posterior cervical discectomy using the MetRx tubular retractor system and surgical microscope. Although several studies have been published on posterior minimally invasive approaches to cervical radiculopathy, most have focused on decompression of the nerve root by laminoforaminotomy only without the removal of the offending disc. The hospital charts, magnetic resonance imaging studies, and follow-up records of all the patients were reviewed. Outcome was assessed by neurological status, visual analog scale (VAS) for neck and arm pain, and by the short form-36 health survey questionnaire. Thirty-two patients were included in this study. The follow-up time was 20 to 67 months (mean, 39 mo). Muscle weakness improved in all patients; sensory deficits resolved in 21 patients and improved in 7 patients. Analysis of the mean VAS for radicular pain, VAS for neck pain, and all 8 domains of the short form-36 health survey questionnaire showed significant improvement. Complications included 1 case of incidental dural tear without postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leakage and 1 case of longstanding neck pain. Minimally invasive posterior cervical discectomy is safe and effective in the management of lateral cervical disc herniation manifested by radiculopathy. In addition to eliminating some of the disadvantages of open surgical approaches, it may also have swifter symptoms resolution compared with laminoforaminotomy without discectomy.

  20. Trends of cervical cancer in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Bente B; Rebolj, Matejka; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2014-01-01

    . Nevertheless, little has been reported about long-term cancer trends in Greenland. Our aim was to describe and interpret the incidence of cervical cancer from 1950 to 2009. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We systematically searched PubMed for articles reporting the incidence of cervical cancer in Greenland. We...... with the introduction of screening. The data strongly suggested that the increased burden of cervical cancer in Greenlandic women was real and followed earlier changes in sexual behaviour; these changes were likely a consequence of the tremendous societal changes....

  1. Increasing Cervical Cancer Screening in Underserved Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsainvil, Merlyn A

    The incidence of cervical cancer has declined dramatically due to Papanicolaou smear testing. However, some minority populations continue to suffer with high incidences and/or death rates of cervical cancer, due to lack of screening. This article updates on cervical cancer screening and prevention and discusses cultural impacts on screening. Knowledge deficits disproportionately affect ethnic minority groups and contribute to cancer incidence, whereas lack of healthcare coverage and low socioeconomic status contribute to screening disparities. Although minority women have cultural beliefs and practices that influence screening, recommendation and/or education from a provider often lead to screening.

  2. Immunosuppression and risk of cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dugué, Pierre-Antoine; Rebolj, Matejka; Garred, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A markedly increased risk of cervical cancer is known in women immunosuppressed due to AIDS or therapy following organ transplantation. The aim of this review is to determine the association between other conditions affecting the immune system and the risk of cervical cancer. Patients with end......-stage renal disease seem to be at an increased risk of cervical cancer. A higher risk of cervical precancerous lesions was found in patients with some autoimmune diseases; particularly if treated with immunosuppressants. Among behavioral factors weakening the immune system, smoking appeared to strongly...... increase the risk of cervical cancer, while poor diet only moderately increased the risk. It is difficult to determine whether sexually transmitted infections other than human papillomavirus infection are independent risk factors. Identifying those groups of women likely to fail in clearing persistent...

  3. The Epidemiology of Human Papillomavirus Infection and Cervical Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Xavier Bosch

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer has been recognized as a rare outcome of a common Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI. The etiologic association is restricted to a limited number of viral types of the family of the Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs. The association is causal in nature and under optimal testing systems, HPV DNA can be identified in all specimens of invasive cervical cancer. As a consequence, it has been claimed that HPV infection is a necessary cause of cervical cancer. The evidence is consistent worldwide and implies both the Squamous Cell Carcinomas (SCC, the adenocarcinomas and the vast majority (i.e. > 95% of the immediate precursors, namely High Grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions (HSIL/Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia 3 (CIN3/Carcinoma in situ. Co-factors that modify the risk among HPV DNA positive women include the use of oral contraceptives (OC for five or more years, smoking, high parity (five or more full term pregnancies and previous exposure to other sexually transmitted diseases such as Chlamydia Trachomatis (CT and Herpes Simplex Virus type 2 (HSV-2. Women exposed to the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV are at high risk for HPV infection, HPV DNA persistency and progression of HPV lesions to cervical cancer.

  4. Cervical Cancer Screening with HPV Test

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-10-15

    Dr. Stewart Massad, a professor in the Division of Gynecologic Oncology at Washington University in Saint Louis and a board member of the American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Cancer Prevention (ASCCP), talks about cotesting with human papillomavirus (HPV) as part of a cervical cancer screening program.  Created: 10/15/2009 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC).   Date Released: 6/9/2010.

  5. Quantitative DNA methylation analysis of candidate genes in cervical cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin M Siegel

    Full Text Available Aberrant DNA methylation has been observed in cervical cancer; however, most studies have used non-quantitative approaches to measure DNA methylation. The objective of this study was to quantify methylation within a select panel of genes previously identified as targets for epigenetic silencing in cervical cancer and to identify genes with elevated methylation that can distinguish cancer from normal cervical tissues. We identified 49 women with invasive squamous cell cancer of the cervix and 22 women with normal cytology specimens. Bisulfite-modified genomic DNA was amplified and quantitative pyrosequencing completed for 10 genes (APC, CCNA, CDH1, CDH13, WIF1, TIMP3, DAPK1, RARB, FHIT, and SLIT2. A Methylation Index was calculated as the mean percent methylation across all CpG sites analyzed per gene (~4-9 CpG site per sequence. A binary cut-point was defined at >15% methylation. Sensitivity, specificity and area under ROC curve (AUC of methylation in individual genes or a panel was examined. The median methylation index was significantly higher in cases compared to controls in 8 genes, whereas there was no difference in median methylation for 2 genes. Compared to HPV and age, the combination of DNA methylation level of DAPK1, SLIT2, WIF1 and RARB with HPV and age significantly improved the AUC from 0.79 to 0.99 (95% CI: 0.97-1.00, p-value = 0.003. Pyrosequencing analysis confirmed that several genes are common targets for aberrant methylation in cervical cancer and DNA methylation level of four genes appears to increase specificity to identify cancer compared to HPV detection alone. Alterations in DNA methylation of specific genes in cervical cancers, such as DAPK1, RARB, WIF1, and SLIT2, may also occur early in cervical carcinogenesis and should be evaluated.

  6. Quantitative DNA methylation analysis of candidate genes in cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Erin M; Riggs, Bridget M; Delmas, Amber L; Koch, Abby; Hakam, Ardeshir; Brown, Kevin D

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation has been observed in cervical cancer; however, most studies have used non-quantitative approaches to measure DNA methylation. The objective of this study was to quantify methylation within a select panel of genes previously identified as targets for epigenetic silencing in cervical cancer and to identify genes with elevated methylation that can distinguish cancer from normal cervical tissues. We identified 49 women with invasive squamous cell cancer of the cervix and 22 women with normal cytology specimens. Bisulfite-modified genomic DNA was amplified and quantitative pyrosequencing completed for 10 genes (APC, CCNA, CDH1, CDH13, WIF1, TIMP3, DAPK1, RARB, FHIT, and SLIT2). A Methylation Index was calculated as the mean percent methylation across all CpG sites analyzed per gene (~4-9 CpG site) per sequence. A binary cut-point was defined at >15% methylation. Sensitivity, specificity and area under ROC curve (AUC) of methylation in individual genes or a panel was examined. The median methylation index was significantly higher in cases compared to controls in 8 genes, whereas there was no difference in median methylation for 2 genes. Compared to HPV and age, the combination of DNA methylation level of DAPK1, SLIT2, WIF1 and RARB with HPV and age significantly improved the AUC from 0.79 to 0.99 (95% CI: 0.97-1.00, p-value = 0.003). Pyrosequencing analysis confirmed that several genes are common targets for aberrant methylation in cervical cancer and DNA methylation level of four genes appears to increase specificity to identify cancer compared to HPV detection alone. Alterations in DNA methylation of specific genes in cervical cancers, such as DAPK1, RARB, WIF1, and SLIT2, may also occur early in cervical carcinogenesis and should be evaluated.

  7. Expression of Long Noncoding RNA Urothelial Cancer Associated 1 Promotes Cisplatin Resistance in Cervical Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bi; Huang, Zhi; Gao, Rui; Zeng, Zhu; Yang, Weiming; Sun, Yuan; Wei, Wei; Wu, Zhongqing; Yu, Lei; Li, Qinshan; Zhang, Shuai; Li, Fenghu; Liu, Guoli; Liu, Bingjie; Leng, Li; Zhan, Wei; Yu, Yanlong; Yang, Guozhen; Zhou, Shi

    2017-04-01

    Cisplatin resistance is still one of the main reasons for failure of clinical therapy for cervical cancer. But the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in cisplatin resistance of cervical cancer have still remained unclear. Recent studies reported that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are novel nonprotein-coding transcripts, which might play a key role in cancer biogenesis and prognosis. One of the lncRNAs, urothelial cancer associated 1 (UCA1), has been shown to promote different types of cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. This study showed that overexpression of UCA1 confers cisplatin resistance by promoting cancer cell proliferation and inhibiting apoptosis. In addition, knockdown of UCA1 remarkably decreased cisplatin resistance in cervical cancer cells. Moreover, results also indicated that UCA1 was involved in signaling pathways modulating cell apoptosis and proliferation. UCA1 suppressed apoptosis by downregulating caspase 3 and upregulating CDK2, whereas enhanced cell proliferation by increased level of survivin and decreased level of p21. This study reports for the first time that UCA1 might play an important role in the cisplatin resistance in cervical cancer, and also explain partially how UCA1 promotes cisplatin resistance in cancer cells. These results provide evidence to support that UCA1 can be used as a potential target for a novel therapeutic strategy for cervical cancer.

  8. Conservative Management of Invasive Cervical Resorption: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhan Raza Khan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasive cervical resorption is a condition that affects the root surface area below the epithelial attachment. Multiple treatment modalities are advocated, involving exposure of the invasive defect, removal of the granulation tissue and sealing with various restorative materials. This report demonstrates conservative treatment of a patient presenting with peri-apical periodontitis in upper right central and lateral incisors, along with Class II invasive resorption defect cervically on the mesial aspect of the central incisor, as a result of trauma. As the patient was not willing for any surgical intervention, only ortho-grade root canal treatment was carried out in both teeth, with Calcium hydroxide as intra-canal medicament. At three year follow-up, the patient remains asymptomatic demonstrating radiographic evidence of infilling of defect with bone-like tissue.Within the limitations of this report, it was seen that this conservative method for halting the progression of invasive cervical resorption could be under taken in patients who are un-willing for surgical intervention or in whom surgery is contra-indicated.

  9. Cervical Cancer is Preventable! PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-11-05

    This 60 second Public Service Announcement is based on the November 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Every visit to a doctor or nurse is an opportunity to prevent cervical cancer. Women can get a Pap test and HPV test to help prevent cervical cancer and adolescent boys and girls can get the HPV vaccination series to help prevent cervical and other cancers.  Created: 11/5/2014 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC).   Date Released: 11/5/2014.

  10. Vital Signs-Cervical Cancer is Preventable!

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-11-05

    This podcast is based on the November 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Every visit to a doctor or nurse is an opportunity to prevent cervical cancer. Women can get a Pap test and HPV test to help prevent cervical cancer and adolescent boys and girls can get the HPV vaccination series to help prevent cervical and other cancers.  Created: 11/5/2014 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 11/5/2014.

  11. Radiosensitizers in cervical cancer. Cisplatin and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cetina Lucely

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cervical cancer continues to be a significant health burden worldwide. Globally, the majority of cancers are locally advanced at diagnosis; hence, radiation remains the most frequently used therapeutical modality. Currently, the value of adding cisplatin or cisplatin-based chemotherapy to radiation for treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer is strongly supported by randomized studies and meta-analyses. Nevertheless, despite these significant achievements, therapeutic results are far from optimal; thus, novel therapies need to be assayed. A strategy currently being investigated is the use of newer radiosensitizers alone or in combination with platinum compounds. In the present work, we present preclinical information on known and newer cytotoxic agents as radiosensitizers on cervical cancer models, as well as the clinical information emanating from early phase trials that incorporate them to the cervical cancer management. In addition, we present the perspectives on the combined approach of radiation therapy and molecular target-based drugs with proven radiosensitizing capacity.

  12. Cervical Cancer Awareness and Screening in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingo, Alicea M.; Panozzo, Catherine A.; DiAngi, Yumi Taylor; Smith, Jennifer S.; Steenhoff, Andrew P.; Ramogola-Masire, Doreen; Brewer, Noel T.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Cervical cancer remains a leading cause of death in many developing countries due to limited screening by Papanicolaou (Pap) smear. We sought to better understand women’s beliefs about cervical cancer and screening in Botswana, a middle income African country with high rates of cervical cancer. Methods We interviewed 289 women attending general medicine or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) clinics, where Pap testing was available, in Gaborone, Botswana in January 2009. Results About three-quarters (72%) of respondents reported having ever had a Pap smear. HIV-positive women were more likely to have had a Pap smear than HIV-negative women (80% vs. 64%, OR=1.97, 95% CI: 1.10, 3.55). Screening was also more common among women who were older, had higher incomes, or had heard of cervical cancer. Almost all participants reported a desire to have a Pap smear. Reasons included to determine cervical health (56%), to improve overall health (33%), and to obtain early treatment (34%). About half (54%) of respondents said they did not know what causes cervical cancer, and almost none attributed the disease to HPV infection. Conclusion Study findings can inform interventions that seek to increase cervical cancer awareness and uptake of screening as it becomes more widely available. PMID:22367370

  13. The Korean guideline for cervical cancer screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Kyung-Jin; Lee, Yoon Jae; Suh, Mina; Yoo, Chong Woo; Lim, Myong Cheol; Choi, Jaekyung; Ki, Moran; Kim, Yong-Man; Kim, Jae-Weon; Kim, Jea-Hoon; Park, Eal Whan; Lee, Hoo-Yeon; Lim, Sung-Chul; Cho, Chi-Heum; Hong, Sung Ran; Dang, Ji Yeon; Kim, Soo Young; Kim, Yeol; Lee, Won-Chul

    2015-01-01

    The incidence rate of cervical cancer in Korea is still higher than in other developed countries, notwithstanding the national mass-screening program. Furthermore, a new method has been introduced in cervical cancer screening. Therefore, the committee for cervical cancer screening in Korea updated the recommendation statement established in 2002. The new version of the guideline was developed by the committee using evidence-based methods. The committee reviewed the evidence for the benefits and harms of the Papanicolaou test, liquid-based cytology, and human papillomavirus (HPV) testing, and reached conclusions after deliberation. The committee recommends screening for cervical cancer with cytology (Papanicolaou test or liquid-based cytology) every three years in women older than 20 years of age (recommendation A). The cervical cytology combined with HPV test is optionally recommended after taking into consideration individual risk or preference (recommendation C). The current evidence for primary HPV screening is insufficient to assess the benefits and harms of cervical cancer screening (recommendation I). Cervical cancer screening can be terminated at the age of 74 years if more than three consecutive negative cytology reports have been confirmed within 10 years (recommendation D). PMID:26197860

  14. Relationship between hTERC gene and precancerous lesion as well as occurrence and development of cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Hong Yi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the relationship between hTERC gene and precancerous lesion as well as occurrence and development of cervical cancer. Methods: A total of 120 cases receiving cervical biopsy in our hospital from May 2012 to December 2014 were selected for study, 45 cases of normal cervical tissue and inflammatory cervical tissue, 37 cases of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia tissue and 38 cases of cervical cancer tissue were included. hTERC gene expression, oncogene expression and invasive molecule contents in cervical tissue were detected. Results: Green signal copy number and red signal copy number of hTERC in cervical cancer tissue were significantly higher than those in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia tissue and normal cervical tissue, and the contents of hTERT and hTP were not different from those in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia tissue and normal cervical tissue; the contents of proteins encoded by p63, TNFAIP8, SRX, P459arom and Piwil2 as well as the contents of RbAp48, Furin, MT1-MMP, TGF-β1, FoxM1, uPA and tPA in cervical cancer tissue were significantly higher than those in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia tissue and normal cervical tissue; the contents of proteins encoded by p63, TNFAIP8, SRX, P459arom and Piwil2 as well as the contents of RbAp48, Furin, MT1-MMP, TGF-β1, FoxM1, uPA and tPA in cervical cancer tissue with high expression of hTERC were significantly higher than those in cervical cancer tissue with low expression of hTERC.Conclusions: Activation of telomerase and increase of hTERC expression are involved in the precancerous lesion as well as the occurrence and development of cervical cancer, and hTERC can activate the expression of oncogenes and increase the generation of invasive molecules.

  15. Cervical cancer and pregnancy: treatment management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazar, I.; Toth, R.

    2011-01-01

    Pregnancy and cervical carcinoma occurring concomitantly causes therapeutic and ethical dilemmas. The management for this situation will depend on the gestational age at the time of diagnosis, disease staging, size of the lesion and the patient’s wish to maintain pregnancy and fertility. Review of the literature suggest that pregnancy does not seem to influence the prognosis of cervical cancer. (author)

  16. The impact of anti HPV vaccination on cervical cancer incidence and HPV induced cervical lesions: consequences for clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, J A; Caffrey, A S; Muderspach, L I; Roman, L D; Kast, W M

    2005-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths in women worldwide. Screening for cervical cancer is accomplished utilizing a Pap smear and pelvic exam. While this technology is widely available and has reduced cervical cancer incidence in industrialized nations, it is not readily available in third world countries in which cervical cancer incidence and mortality is high. Development of cervical cancer is associated with infection with high risk types of human papillomavirus (HPV) creating a unique opportunity to prevent or treat cervical cancer through anti-viral vaccination strategies. Several strategies have been examined in clinical trials for both the prevention of HPV infection and the treatment of pre-existing HPV-related disease. Clinical trials utilizing prophylactic vaccines containing virus-like particles (VLPs) indicate good vaccine efficacy and it is predicted that a prophylactic vaccine may be available within the next five years. But, preclinical research in this area continues in order to deal with issues such as cost of vaccination in underserved third world populations. A majority of clinical trials using therapeutic agents which aim to prevent the progression of pre-existing HPV associated lesions or cancers have shown limited efficacy in eradicating established tumors in humans possibly due to examining patients with more advanced-stage cancer who tend to have decreased immune function. Future trends in clinical trials with therapeutic agents will examine patients with early stage cancers or pre-invasive lesions in order to prevent invasive cervical cancer. Meanwhile, preclinical studies in this field continue and include the further exploration of peptide or protein vaccination, and the delivery of HPV antigens in DNA-based vaccines or in viral vectors. Given that cervical cancers are caused by the human papillomavirus, the prospect of therapeutic vaccination to treat existing lesions and prophylactic vaccination to

  17. Colposcopy and High Resolution Anoscopy in Screening For Anal Dysplasia in Patients With Cervical, Vaginal, or Vulvar Dysplasia or Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Grade 1; Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Grade 2; Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Grade 3; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Vaginal Cancer; Recurrent Vulvar Cancer; Stage 0 Cervical Cancer; Stage 0 Vaginal Cancer; Stage 0 Vulvar Cancer; Stage I Vaginal Cancer; Stage I Vulvar Cancer; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage III Vulvar Cancer; Stage IV Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Vaginal Cancer

  18. Evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of extension in uterine cervical cancer cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Masaki; Okamura, Shinsuke; Ueki, Minoru; Sugimoto, Osamu

    1990-01-01

    To prove the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in determining the invasion of uterine cervical cancer with imaging planes, we evaluated 44 patients with histologically proved cervical cancer. MRI was performed with a Signa 1.5 T (General Electric), and a T 2 -weighted image was used. In coronal planes, the accuracy was 75.0% for parametrial invasion. It was impossible to diagnose in 77.8%, 92.1% and 63.2% the invasion of the uterine body, bladder, and rectum, respectively. In axial planes, the accuracy was 76.3%, 92.1% and 78.9% for the invasion of parametrium, bladder and rectum, respectively. It was impossible to diagnose in 72.2% the invasion of the uterine body. In sagittal planes, the accuracy was 80.6%, 97.4% and 89.7% for invasion of the uterine body, bladder and rectum, respectively. In all 39 cases it was impossible to diagnose parametrial invasion. In five cases, MRI failed to detect the tumor in any of the three planes, but in three cases it was able to detect the tumor in at least one of the three. We conclude as follows: MRI is a useful method in determining the invasion of cervical cancer. Coronal planes are recommended for the determination of parametrial invasion, axial planes for the parametrium, bladder and rectum, and sagittal planes for the uterine body, bladder and rectum. All three planes are needed to determine cervical cancer. (author)

  19. Stomach Cancer Following Hodgkin Lymphoma, Testicular Cancer and Cervical Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, Ethel S; Curtis, Rochelle E; Hauptmann, Michael

    2017-01-01

    To further understand the risk of stomach cancer after fractionated high-dose radiotherapy, we pooled individual-level data from three recent stomach cancer case-control studies. These studies were nested in cohorts of five-year survivors of first primary Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), testicular cancer...... (TC) or cervical cancer (CX) from seven countries. Detailed data were abstracted from patient records and radiation doses were reconstructed to the site of the stomach cancer for cases and to the corresponding sites for matched controls. Among 327 cases and 678 controls, mean doses to the stomach were...... 15.3 Gy, 24.7 Gy and 1.9 Gy, respectively, for Hodgkin lymphoma, testicular cancer and cervical cancer survivors, with an overall mean dose of 10.3 Gy. Risk increased with increasing radiation dose to the stomach cancer site (P

  20. Targeted treatments for cervical cancer: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peralta-Zaragoza O

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Oscar Peralta-Zaragoza,1 Víctor Hugo Bermúdez-Morales,1 Carlos Pérez-Plasencia,2,3 Jonathan Salazar-León,1 Claudia Gómez-Cerón,1 Vicente Madrid-Marina11Direction of Chronic Infections and Cancer, Research Center in Infection Diseases, National Institute of Public Health, Cuernavaca, Morelos, México; 2Oncogenomics Laboratory, National Cancer Institute of Mexico, Tlalpan, México; 3Biomedicine Unit, FES-Iztacala UNAM, México City, MéxicoAbstract: Cervical cancer is the second most common cause of cancer death in women worldwide and the development of new diagnosis, prognostic, and treatment strategies merits special attention. Although surgery and chemoradiotherapy can cure 80%–95% of women with early stage cancer, the recurrent and metastatic disease remains a major cause of cancer death. Many efforts have been made to design new drugs and develop gene therapies to treat cervical cancer. In recent decades, research on treatment strategies has proposed several options, including the role of HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes, which are retained and expressed in most cervical cancers and whose respective oncoproteins are critical to the induction and maintenance of the malignant phenotype. Other efforts have been focused on antitumor immunotherapy strategies. It is known that during the development of cervical cancer, a cascade of abnormal events is induced, including disruption of cellular cycle control, perturbation of antitumor immune response, alteration of gene expression, and deregulation of microRNA expression. Thus, in this review article we discuss potential targets for the treatment of cervical cancer associated with HPV infection, with special attention to immunotherapy approaches, clinical trials, siRNA molecules, and their implications as gene therapy strategies against cervical cancer development.Keywords: Cervical cancer, clinical trials, gene therapy, HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes, siRNAs

  1. Cervical cancer screening in the Faroe Islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Turið; Lynge, Elsebeth; Djurhuus, Gisela W

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Faroe Islands have had nationally organised cervical cancer screening since 1995. Women aged 25-60 years are invited every third year. Participation is free of charge. Although several European overviews on cervical screening are available, none have included the Faroe Islands. Ou...... the difficult geographical setting, the organised cervical cancer screening programme in the Faroe Islands has achieved a relatively high coverage rate. Nevertheless, challenges, e.g. consistent histology registration and sending reminders, still exist.......BACKGROUND: The Faroe Islands have had nationally organised cervical cancer screening since 1995. Women aged 25-60 years are invited every third year. Participation is free of charge. Although several European overviews on cervical screening are available, none have included the Faroe Islands. Our...... aim was to provide the first description of cervical cancer screening, and to determine the screening history of women diagnosed with cervical cancer in the Faroe Islands. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Screening data from 1996 to 2012 were obtained from the Diagnostic Centre at the National Hospital...

  2. Epidemiology of cervical cancer in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nubia Muñoz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To describe the incidence, mortality, time trends and prognostic factors for cervical cancer in Cali, Colombia, and to review the molecular epidemiological evidence showing that HPV is the major and necessary cause of cervical cancer and the implications of this discovery for primary and secondary prevention. Materials and methods. Incidence rates of cervical cancer during a 45-year period (1962-2007 were estimated based on the population-based cancer registry of Cali and the mortality statistics from the Municipal Health Secretariat of Cali. Prognostic factors were estimated based on relative survival. Review of the molecular epidemiological evidence linking HPV to cervical cancer was focused on the studies carried out in Cali and in other countries. Results. Incidence rates of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC declined from 120.4 per 100 000 in 1962-1966 to 25.7 in 2003-2007 while those of adenocarcinoma increased from 4.2 to 5.8. Mortality rates for cervical cancer declined from 18.5 in 1984-1988 to 7.0 per 100 000 in 2009-2011. Survival was lower in women over 65 years of age and in clinical stages 3-4. Review of the molecular epidemiological evidence showed that certain types of HPV are the central and necessary cause of cervical cancer. Conclusions. A decline in the incidence and mortality of SCC and an increase in the incidence of adenocarcinoma during a 45-year period was documented in Cali, Colombia

  3. Eradication of cervical cancer in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Xavier Bosch

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer remains within the three most common cancer in women worldwide and is still the commonest female cancer in 41 of 184 countries. Within Latin America, cervical ranks as the most common cancer among women in Bolivia and Peru and the second most frequent in Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, Paraguay, The Guyanas, Surinam and Venezuela. Due to its relatively early age at onset, it ranks among the three most frequent cancers in women aged below 45 years in 82% of all countries in the world irrespective of their screening practices.   DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.21149/spm.v58i2.7777

  4. NIH Research Leads to Cervical Cancer Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Transmitted Diseases NIH Research Leads to Cervical Cancer Vaccine Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For ... Douglas Lowy (left) and John Schiller developed the vaccine to prevent HPV infection in women, the cause ...

  5. Therapeutic Vaccination for HPV Induced Cervical Cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Brinkman, Joeli A.; Hughes, Sarah H.; Stone, Pamela; Caffrey, Angela S.; Muderspach, Laila I.; Roman, Lynda D.; Weber, Jeffrey S.; Kast, W. Martin

    2007-01-01

    Cervical Cancer is the second leading cause of cancer–related deaths in women worldwide and is associated with Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection, creating a unique opportunity to treat cervical cancer through anti-viral vaccination. Although a prophylactic vaccine may be available within a year, millions of women, already infected, will continue to suffer from HPV-related disease, emphasizing the need to develop therapeutic vaccination strategies. A majority of clinical trials examining th...

  6. Costs Associated with Cervical Cancer Screening

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-10-15

    Dr. Tom Cox, a practicing gynecologist and president of the American Society of Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, provides a brief introduction to cervical cancer screening guidelines and human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA testing.  Created: 10/15/2009 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC).   Date Released: 6/9/2010.

  7. Interstitial guidance of cancer invasion.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gritsenko, P.G.; Ilina, O.; Friedl, P.H.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer cell invasion into healthy tissues develops preferentially along pre-existing tracks of least resistance, followed by secondary tissue remodelling and destruction. The tissue scaffolds supporting or preventing guidance of invasion vary in structure and molecular composition between organs. In

  8. Endometrial cancer with cervical extension mimicking dual concordant endometrial and cervical malignancy by F18 FDG PET and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Seok Nam [Kwandong Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    A 35 year old woman with endometrial cancer and cervical extension underwent F18 FDG PET CT and MRI studies after resection of a cervical mass presumed to be cervical myoma. The patient underwent cervical myomectomy and the histopathologic report revealed poorly differentiated invasive carcinoma. Cervical cancer was ruled out because the patient had no history of sexual intercourse and was negative for human papilloma virus infection. The patient underwent radical hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo oophorectomy, pelvic and para aortic lymph node dissection, and multiple biopsies. F18 FDG PET CT showed intense FDG uptake along the cervix wall. T2 weighted MRI also revealed a mass lesion with high SI involving the anterior and posterior lips of the uterine cervix. Another area of focal increased uptake above the endometrial lesion in the left pelvic cavity was observed on PET CT and MRI, possibly due to a functioning ovary. PET CT and MRI were interpreted as showing a dual concordant malignant lesion due to separated FDG uptakes and high SI without any connection between the cervical and endometrial lesions. F18 FDG PET CT showed intense FDG uptake along the endometrium. Given the patient's history and the fact that she was not menstruating at the time of imaging, this intense uptake was interpreted as another pathologic lesion, suggesting dual primary lesions. A suspected heterogeneous mass lesion along the endometrium suggesting concordant endometrial cancer was found on MRI. Endometrial cancer with cervical extension is sometimes difficult to differentiate from primary cervical cancer. The final histopathologic report showed poorly differentiated endometrial adenocarcinoma with cervical extension, although the FDG PET CT and MRI findings were suggestive of concordant cervical and endometrial cancer. Although histopathologic confirmation is necessary for final diagnosis, MRI and FDG PET CT studies may aid in the differential diagnosis. A metastatic cervical mass

  9. Endometrial cancer with cervical extension mimicking dual concordant endometrial and cervical malignancy by F18 FDG PET and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Seok Nam

    2012-01-01

    A 35 year old woman with endometrial cancer and cervical extension underwent F18 FDG PET CT and MRI studies after resection of a cervical mass presumed to be cervical myoma. The patient underwent cervical myomectomy and the histopathologic report revealed poorly differentiated invasive carcinoma. Cervical cancer was ruled out because the patient had no history of sexual intercourse and was negative for human papilloma virus infection. The patient underwent radical hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo oophorectomy, pelvic and para aortic lymph node dissection, and multiple biopsies. F18 FDG PET CT showed intense FDG uptake along the cervix wall. T2 weighted MRI also revealed a mass lesion with high SI involving the anterior and posterior lips of the uterine cervix. Another area of focal increased uptake above the endometrial lesion in the left pelvic cavity was observed on PET CT and MRI, possibly due to a functioning ovary. PET CT and MRI were interpreted as showing a dual concordant malignant lesion due to separated FDG uptakes and high SI without any connection between the cervical and endometrial lesions. F18 FDG PET CT showed intense FDG uptake along the endometrium. Given the patient's history and the fact that she was not menstruating at the time of imaging, this intense uptake was interpreted as another pathologic lesion, suggesting dual primary lesions. A suspected heterogeneous mass lesion along the endometrium suggesting concordant endometrial cancer was found on MRI. Endometrial cancer with cervical extension is sometimes difficult to differentiate from primary cervical cancer. The final histopathologic report showed poorly differentiated endometrial adenocarcinoma with cervical extension, although the FDG PET CT and MRI findings were suggestive of concordant cervical and endometrial cancer. Although histopathologic confirmation is necessary for final diagnosis, MRI and FDG PET CT studies may aid in the differential diagnosis. A metastatic cervical mass from

  10. Overview of Microarray Analysis of Gene Expression and its Applications to Cervical Cancer Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Chao

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is one of the leading female cancers in Taiwan and ranks as the fifth cause of cancer death in the female population. Human papillomavirus has been established as the causative agent for cervical neoplasia and cervical cancer. However, the tumor biology involved in the prognoses of different cell types in early cancers and tumor responses to radiation in advanced cancers remain largely unknown. The introduction of microarray technologies in the 1990s has provided genome-wide strategies for searching tens of thousands of genes simultaneously. In this review, we first summarize the two types of microarrays: oligonucleotides microarray and cDNA microarray. Then, we review the studies of functional genomics in cervical cancer. Gene expression studies that involved cervical cancer cell lines, cervical cells of cancer versus normal ectocervix, cancer tissues of different histology, radioresistant versus radiosensitive patients, and the combinatorial gene expression associated with chromosomal amplifications are discussed. In particular, CEACAM5, TACSTD1, S100P, and MSLN have shown to be upregulated in adenocarcinoma, and increased expression levels of CEACAM5 and TACSTD1 were significantly correlated with poorer patient outcomes. On the other hand, 35 genes, including apoptotic genes (e.g. BIK, TEGT, SSI-3, hypoxia-inducible genes (e.g. HIF1A, CA12, and tumor cell invasion and metastasis genes (e.g. CTSL, CTSB, PLAU, CD44, have been noted to echo the hypothesis that increased tumor hypoxia leads to radiation resistance in cervical cancer during radiation.

  11. Second cancers following radiotherapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinerman, R.A.; Curtis, R.E.; Boice, J.D. Jr.; Flannery, J.T.; Fraumeni, J.F. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Incidence of second primary cancers was evaluated in 7,127 women with invasive cancer of the cervix uteri, diagnosed between 1935 and 1978, and followed up to 38 years (average, 8.9 yr) in Connecticut. Among 5,997 women treated with radiation, 449 developed second primary cancers compared with 313 expected (relative risk . 1.4) on the basis of rates from the Connecticut Tumor Registry. Excess incidence was noticeable 15 years or more after radiotherapy and attributed mostly to cancers of sites in or near the radiation field, especially the bladder, kidneys, rectum, corpus uteri, and ovaries. No excess was found for these sites among the 1,130 nonirradiated women. The ratio of observed to expected cancers for these sites did not vary appreciably by age at irradiation. The data suggested that high-dose pelvic irradiation was associated with increase in cancers of the bladder, kidneys, rectum, ovaries, corpus uteri, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma but, apparently, not leukemia, Hodgkin's disease, breast cancer, or colon cancer

  12. Vacunas terapéuticas recombinantes contra el cáncer del cuello uterino Recombinant therapeutic vaccines against invasive cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JAIME BERUMEN

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available Durante el desarrollo del cáncer cervicouterino se inducen mecanismos para evadir el sistema inmune, como son la disminución de la expresión de moléculas de antígeno mayor de histocompatibilidad I y la secreción de citocinas por las células tumorales. Como consecuencia de ello, la estimulación de linfocitos T citotóxicos (LTC y cooperadores (TC, de células asesinas naturales (AN y macrófagos es muy deficiente. Para inducir una respuesta inmune efectiva contra el tumor, se requiere la estimulación simultánea de múltiples componentes del sistema inmune: por vía sistémica la estimulación de LTC y TC contra epítopos del virus del papiloma humano, y en un nivel local, la inducción de la secreción de citocinas por el tumor, para aumentar el procesamiento y la presentación de blancos tumorales, así como la estimulación de los linfocitos, AN y macrófagos que infiltran el tumor.Several mechanisms to evade the immune system are induced during cervical cancer development, including the decrease of expression of class I HLA molecules and secretion of specific cytokines by tumoral cells. Consequently, the stimulation of cytotoxic (CTL and helper (TH T lymphocytes, as well as the natural killer (NK cells and macrophages is very poor. The induction of immune response against tumors needs the stimulation of multiple components of the immune system: systemic stimulation of CTL and TH against Human Papilloma Virus epitopes and directly in the tumor the secretion of specific cytokines to increase the antigen processing and presentation of tumoral targets, and the stimulation of lymphocyte, NK cells and macrophages that infiltrate tumors.

  13. Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Human Papilloma Virus-Related Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-23

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Human Papillomavirus Infection; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7

  14. Knowledge and attitude towards cervical cancer screening among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cervical cancer is a largely preventable disease. In western countries, the incidence of and mortality associated with cervical cancer has reduced substantially following the introduction of effective cervical screening programmes. This is in contrast to what is obtained in Africa including Nigeria where cervical ...

  15. Health seeking behavior of patients diagnosed with cervical cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cervical cancer is increasingly recognized as one of the public health problems among women in developing countries. Most women with cervical cancer are seen in the health care system late with advanced stage of cancer. This study aims to explore the care seeking behavior of women with cervical cancer.

  16. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy With or Without Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-23

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Chemotherapeutic Agent Toxicity; Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Psychological Impact of Cancer; Radiation Toxicity; Sexual Dysfunction and Infertility; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  17. Bevacizumab, Radiation Therapy, and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-21

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage III Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7

  18. Recurrent integration of human papillomaviruses 16, 45, and 67 near translocation breakpoints in new cervical cancer cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, L. A.; Szuhai, K.; van Eendenburg, J. D.; Bezrookove, V.; Kenter, G. G.; Schuuring, E.; Tanke, H.; Fleuren, G. J.

    1999-01-01

    Progressive chromosomal changes and integration of human papillomavirus (HPV) sequences mark the development of invasive cervical cancer. Chromosomal localization of HPV integration is essential to the study of genomic regions involved in HPV-induced pathogenesis. Yet, the available information

  19. Overexpression of ezrin and galectin-3 as predictors of poor prognosis of cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Li

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to explore the correlation of ezrin and galectin-3 expressions with prognosis in cervical cancer. The immunohistochemical method was applied to detect ezrin and galectin-3 expressions in normal cervix tissues (n=30, cervicitis tissues (n=28, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN tissues (classified as I-III, n=89, and cervical carcinoma tissues (n=84. Follow-up was conducted for 5 to 78 months to analyze the correlation of protein expressions with prognosis. Ezrin and galectin-3 expressions in cervical cancer were significantly higher than in normal cervix, cervicitis and CIN (all P<0.05, and expressions in CIN were significantly higher than in normal cervix and cervicitis (both P<0.05. The expressions of ezrin and galectin-3 were both related with histological grade, deep myometrial invasion and lymph node metastasis (all P<0.05. Spearman analysis showed that ezrin expression was positively correlated with galectin-3 expression in cervical cancer (r=0.355, P<0.05. The survival rate of patients with high expressions of ezrin and galectin-3 was significantly lower than those with low expressions of proteins (both P<0.05. The expressions of ezrin and galectin-3, histological grade, depth of stromal invasion, and lymph node metastasis are risk factors affecting the survival rate of patients with cervical cancer. The expressions of ezrin and galectin-3 were correlated with the development of cervical cancer, and overexpressions of those proteins were indicative of poor prognosis in patients with cervical cancer.

  20. January is Cervical Cancer Awareness Month

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Center for Global Health supports global activities to advance global cancer research, build expertise, and leverage resources across nations to address the challenges of cancer and reduce cancer deaths worldwide. Towards these aims, NCI has partnered with Pink Ribbon Red Ribbon, a global organization founded on public-private partnerships dedicated to saving women’s lives by advancing prevention, screening, and treatment for breast and cervical cancer in sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America.

  1. Screening history of cervical cancers in Emilia-Romagna, Italy: defining priorities to improve cervical cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Paolo Giorgi; Caroli, Stefania; Mancini, Silvia; de' Bianchi, Priscilla Sassoli; Finarelli, Alba C; Naldoni, Carlo; Bucchi, Lauro; Falcini, Fabio

    2015-03-01

    Most invasive cervical cancers in industrialized countries are due to the lack of Pap test coverage, very few are due to screening failures. This study aimed at quantifying the proportion of invasive cancers occurring in nonscreened or underscreened women and that in women with a previous negative screening, that is, screening failure, during the first two screening rounds (1996-2002) and in the following rounds (2003-2008) in the Emilia-Romagna region. All cases of invasive cancers registered in the regional cancer registry between 1996 and 2008 were classified according to screening history through a record linkage with the screening programme registry. The incidence significantly decreased from 11.6/100 000 to 8.7/100 000; this decrease is due to a reduction in squamous cell cancers (annual percentage change -6.2; confidence interval: -7.8, -4.6) and advanced cancers (annual percentage change -6.6; confidence interval: -8.8, -4.3), whereas adenocarcinomas and microinvasive cancers were essentially stable. The proportion of cancers among women not yet invited and among nonresponders decreased over the two periods, from 45.5 to 33.3%. In contrast, the proportion of women with a previous negative Pap test less than 5 years and 5 years or more before cancer incidence increased from 5.7 to 13.3% and from 0.3 to 5.5%, respectively. Although nonattendance of the screening programme remains the main barrier to cervical cancer control, the introduction of a more sensitive test, such as the human papillomavirus DNA test, could significantly reduce the burden of disease.

  2. The Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus in Cervical Cancer in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, SH; Zali, MR; Raoufi, M; Nadji, M; Kowsarian, P; Nowroozi, A

    2002-01-01

    Background: The human papiloma virus (HPV), which is sexually transmitted, and most commonly causes genital warts, has been linked to cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive carcinoma. Of ninety plus types of HPV, HPV-16 is the most prevalent in cervical cancer, followed by HPV-18, and HPV-33. As HPV's implication has not been assessed in the Middle East the main focus of this retrospective study was to determine the prevalence of HPV -16,18, and 33 in cases of cervical cancer from Iran. Material and Methods: This retrospective study covered 100 patients with uterine cervical carcinomas who were referred to two referral centers for cancer in Tehran-Iran. Pathological blocks were collected for these cases and initial review of the blocks showed poor specimens in 18 cases, which left 82 cases for the study. These samples were histologically examined to verify the presence and the type of carcinoma. The next step was in situ hybridzation for the detection of HPV common DNA. In Situ hybridization was preformed on all samples. Finally, Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) was preformed for the HPV types 16, 18, and 33. PCR amplification of exon 5 of the p53 gene was used as an internal control for the integrity of DNA. Takara PCR Human papilloma Detection method was used which includes primer for HPV 16, 18, and 33. Three primers were used alone, or in combination, in order to increase the sensitivity of the detection. Results: The majority of tumors were squamous cell carcinomas (87%). The rest were adenosquamous carcinoma and adenocarcinomas. None of the 82 different cervical carcinoma tissue samples were found to be positive by in situ hybridization. In the PCR samples, amplification of DNA was observed for 69 tumor specimens. In the remainning13 cases, the DNA in fixed tissue was degraded, as verified by the absence of an internal control band (p53). Out of the total 69 tumors (85.5%) with adequate DNA contained HPV band on PCR. The majority (73.9%) of HPV

  3. TRAILs towards improved cervical cancer treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maduro, John

    2009-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a life threatening disease occurring world-wide, but affecting especially women in developing countries. Standard treatment for cevical cancer varies per FIGO stage and patient related factors. In general patients with non bulky (<4 cm) FIGO stage IB and IIA are treated with a

  4. Cervical cancer management in Zaria, Nigeria SUMMARY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kemrilib

    24 patients who needed blood transfusion were adequately transfused and only 21.74% of all patients had complete treatment). ... cancer management in this centre with a view to finding ways to improve its management. Methods. All case notes for patients managed for cervical cancer in Ahmadu Bello University Teaching ...

  5. Urothelial cancers following radiation therapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, Seiji; Hasumi, Masaru; Sato, Jin; Mayuzumi, Takuji; Kumasaka, Fuminari; Shimizu, Toshihiro.

    1996-01-01

    Some reports have indicated that bladder cancer is induced by radiation therapy for cervical cancer. We encountered 6 cases of urothelial cancer (5 cases of bladder cancer and 1 case of ureter cancer) following radiation therapy for cervical cancer. Age at the time of diagnosis of cervical cancer ranged from 38 to 66 years, and the average was 51.2±11.0 (S.D.) years old. Age at the time of diagnosis of urothelial cancer ranged from 53 to 83 years, and the average was 67.5±10.3 years old. The interval between the diagnosis of cervical cancer and urothelial cancer ranged from 3 to 25 years, averaging 16.3 years. It is impossible to evaluate the risk of development of urothelial cancer after radiation therapy based on our data. However, it is important to make an effort to diagnose urothelial cancer at an early stage by educating patients (e.g., advising regular urine tests) after the follow-up period to cervical cancer. (author)

  6. Virus and Cervical Cancer: Role and implication: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Kalyani Raju

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the leading cancers in women worldwide especially in developing countries. Various etiological factors are described, of which Human papiloma virus (HPV) is proved by various molecular epidemiological studies to play a major role. However many co-factors are required and thought to facilitate the action of HPV in cervical carcinogenesis. Here the role of various viruses in cervical cancer and its implication in screening and diagnosis of cervical cancer is highlighte...

  7. Follow-up of abnormal or inadequate test results in the Danish Cervical Cancer Screening Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Bettina Kjær

    2014-01-01

    Denmark has a higher incidence of cervical cancer than other Nordic countries, although all Danish women (aged 23–65) are screened regularly to identify possible cervical dysplasia or asymptomatic invasive cancer. Annually 40 000 women receives an abnormal or inadequate test result and a follow......-up recommendation. However problems with delayed follow-up may threaten the effectiveness of the Danish Cervical Cancer Screening Program, as 20% of women are delayed and dysplasia potentially can progress into cancer. Delayed follow-up is found in situations where women either consciously or unconsciously postpone...... will be of great importance to the future organisation of cervical and colorectal cancer screening programmes in Denmark, but will also have international interest because of their similar challenges....

  8. the need to implement population based cervical cancer screening ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In developed countries, the incidence and prevalence of cervical cancer has been declining due to accessible organized cervical cancer screening using conventional cytology (Pap smear) and treatment of precancers. Available published data shows that cervical cancer mortality has decreased by 70 % over the past five.

  9. Cervical cancer screening among certified nurses in Enugu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cervical cancer is to a large extent preventable by effective screening. The effectiveness of such screening depends on the knowledge and attitude of the women. Objectives: To ascertain the knowledge of the certified nurses in a teaching hospital in Nigeria to cervical cancer, their attitude to cervical cancer screening and ...

  10. Cervical cancer control and prevention in Malawi: need for policy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Malawi has the highest incidents of cervical cancer followed by Mozambique and Comoros thus according to the 2014 Africa cervical cancer multi indicator incidence and mortality score card. Despite having an established cervical cancer prevention program, there is low screening coverage. Studies have been ...

  11. Breast and Cervical Cancers Awareness and Screening Practices ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Only 4/11(36.4%) of those who knew something about cervical cancer mentioned vaginal examination for cervical cancer screening and only one (0.1%) respondent mentioned Pap smear. The poor level of awareness and screening practices for breast and cervical cancers among women in these rural communities ...

  12. Natural History of HPV and Cervical Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-10-12

    Dr. Phil Castle, an intramural research scientist at the National Institutes of Health, talks about the natural history of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections, and cervical cancer and other anogenital cancers.  Created: 10/12/2009 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC).   Date Released: 6/9/2010.

  13. Why southeastern Nigerian women who are aware of cervical cancer screening do not go for cervical cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chigbu, Chibuike Ogwuegbu; Aniebue, Uzochukwu

    2011-10-01

    This study aimed to evaluate reasons behind nonuptake of cervical cancer screening by women who are aware of cervical cancer screening in southeast Nigeria. Women attending gynecologic clinics of 3 health institutions in Enugu, Nigeria, were interviewed by means of a questionnaire to determine those who were aware of cervical cancer screening. The biodemographic characteristics and level of knowledge of cervical cancer screening of women who underwent a previous screen were compared with those of women who did not undergo a previous screen. Reasons for nonuptake of cervical cancer screening as well as potential reasons for undertaking cervical cancer screening were also extracted. A total of 3712 women were interviewed. Of these respondents, 2048 (55.2%) were aware of cervical cancer screening.Only 19.0% of those who were aware of cervical cancer screening underwent a previous screen. Level of knowledge of cervical cancer prevention, university education, and age had a significant impact on the uptake of cervical cancer screening. Poor health-seeking behavior and fear of violation of privacy are the major reasons for nonuptake of cervical cancer screening. Potential reasons for uptake of cervical cancer screening include development of symptoms, adequate educative information, and physician's recommendation. Women in southern Nigeria do not go for cervical cancer screening because of poor understanding of cervical cancer prevention, feeling of violation of the privacy of their genitals, and poor health-seeking behavior. There is a need to modify current policy approaches to cervical cancer prevention in Nigeria. Policies that will address the privacy violation fears and poor health-seeking behavior of the Nigerian woman as well improve the level of educative information on cervical cancer prevention need to be evolved.

  14. Get Tested for Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Basics: Cervical Screening Tests What happens during a Pap test? A Pap test takes about 2 to 5 minutes. It may ... uterus, ovaries, and other organs. Learn more about Pap tests. What happens if I’m also having an ...

  15. Effects of irradiation for cervical cancer on subsequent breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harlan, L.C.M.

    1985-01-01

    Previous research suggests that cervical cancer patients have a lower risk of breast cancer than women in the general population. Possible explanations include opposing risk factors for cervical cancer and breast cancer, the effect of irradiation used to treat cervical cancer, or both. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between irradiation for cervical cancer and the subsequent development of breast cancer. There was no statistically significant relationship between radiation to the ovarian area and the risk of breast cancer in this study. However, the results were consistent with a 19% reduction in risk for women irradiated for cervical cancer when compared to nonirradiated women. In a dose-response analysis, there was a nonsignificant trend of decreased risk of breast cancer with increased radiation up to 1800 rad. There was no consistent pattern for higher doses. The trend, although nonsignificant, differed by age. Women <60 years of age at irradiation were generally at a lower risk of breast cancer than nonirradiated women. Women over 59 years were at an increased risk. There are some potentially important findings from this study which might influence medical care. These should be examined in the larger International Radiation Study

  16. Detecting cervical cancer by quantitative promoter hypermethylation assay on cervical scrapings : A feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reesink-Peters, N; Wisman, G.B.A.; Jeronimo, C; Tokumaru, CY; Cohen, Y; Dong, SM; Klip, HG; Buikema, HJ; Suurmeijer, AJH; Hollema, H; Boezen, HM; Sidransky, D; van der Zee, AGJ

    Current morphology-based cervical cancer screening is associated with significant false-positive and false-negative results. Tumor suppressor gene hypermethylation is frequently present in cervical cancer. It is unknown whether a cervical scraping reflects the methylation status of the underlying

  17. Exploring the barriers to health care and psychosocial challenges in cervical cancer management in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngutu M

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Mariah Ngutu, Isaac K Nyamongo Institute of Anthropology, Gender and African Studies (IAGAS, University of Nairobi, Nairobi, Kenya Abstract: Cervical cancer is the most frequent cancer among women aged between 15 years and 44 years in Kenya, resulting in an estimated 4,802 women being diagnosed with cervical cancer and 2,451 dying from the disease annually. It is often detected at its advanced invasive stages, resulting in a protracted illness upon diagnosis. This qualitative study looked at the illness trajectories of women living with cervical cancer enrolled for follow-up care at Kenyatta National Hospital cancer treatment center and the Nairobi Hospice, both in Nairobi county, Kenya. Using the qualitative phenomenological approach, data were collected through 18 in-depth interviews with women living with cervical cancer between April and July 2011. In-depth interviews with their caregivers, key informant interviews with health care workers, and participant observation field notes were used to provide additional qualitative data. These data were analyzed based on grounded theory’s inductive approach. Two key themes on which the data analysis was then anchored were identified, namely, psychosocial challenges of cervical cancer and structural barriers to quality health care. Findings indicated a prolonged illness trajectory with psychosocial challenges, fueled by structural barriers that women were faced with after a cervical cancer diagnosis. To address issues relevant to the increasing numbers of women with cervical cancer, research studies need to include larger samples of these women. Also important are studies that allow in-depth understanding of the experiences of women living with cervical cancer. Keywords: qualitative, illness trajectories, women, cervical cancer

  18. Radiation dose and subsequent risk for stomach cancer in long-term survivors of cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleinerman, Ruth A; Smith, Susan A; Holowaty, Eric

    2013-01-01

    To assess the dose-response relationship for stomach cancer after radiation therapy for cervical cancer.......To assess the dose-response relationship for stomach cancer after radiation therapy for cervical cancer....

  19. Sonographic assessment of vessel invasion by cervical masses in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.F. Carvalho

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Tumor invasion of the vessels displays both therapeutic and prognostic implications and represents a challenge for head and neck surgeons. Although previous research has shown that ultrasound can detect such invasions, accurate sonographic parameters to do so have not yet been established. We sought to determine sonographic criteria which are able to characterize these invasions. A high-resolution transducer was used to perform ultrasound examinations of 15 patients selected from a group with inconclusive radiography and computed tomography diagnosis. We found that encasement of the vessel, tumor immobility or fixation in the vessel wall, and narrowing and/or deformity of the lumen were the best criteria. Indeed, when loss of hyperechoic interface of the vessel wall was used as a single criterion it generated false positive results. This study shows that a combination of parameters can be used to provide the best sensitivity and specificity values to produce conclusive diagnosis of vessel invasion by tumors in the cervical region.

  20. Experiences and unmet needs of women undergoing Pap smear cervical cancer screening: impact on uptake of cervical cancer screening in south eastern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chigbu, Chibuike O; Onyebuchi, Azubuike K; Egbuji, Chuma C; Ezugwu, Eusebus C

    2015-03-01

    The burden of cervical cancer is on the increase in sub-Saharan Africa mainly due to inadequate provision and utilisation of cervical cancer prevention services. Several evidence-based strategies have been deployed to improve cervical cancer screening uptake without much success. However, patients' experiences and satisfaction with service provision has not been adequately studied. Inefficiencies in service delivery and less fulfilling experiences by women who attend cervical cancer screening could have considerable impact in future voluntary uptake of cervical cancer screening. Six hundred and eighty women who underwent Pap smear screening in three health care facilities in two states in south eastern Nigeria were interviewed to evaluate their satisfaction, willingness to undertake future voluntary screening, unmet needs and correlation between satisfaction level and willingness to undergo future screening. Satisfaction with Pap smear screening correlated positively with willingness to undertake future voluntary screening (Pearson's correlation coefficient = 0.78, P = 0.001). The mean satisfaction score was significantly higher among participants handled by nurses than those handled by the physicians (3.16 ± 0.94 vs 2.52 ± 0.77, P = 0.001). 'Scrapping discomfort' of the spatula was reported as the most dissatisfying aspect of Pap smear experience. The need for less invasive screening procedures was the most unmet need. It was concluded that improving the Pap smear screening experience of women and providing less invasive methods of cervical cancer screening with immediate results could improve uptake of cervical cancer screening in south eastern Nigeria.

  1. [Chromosomal instability in carcinogenesis of cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Los Santos-Munive, Victoria; Alonso-Avelino, Juan Angel

    2013-01-01

    In order to spot common chromosomal imbalances in early and late lesions of cervical cancer that might be used as progression biomarkers, we made a search of literature in PubMed from 1996 to 2011. The medical subject headings employed were chromosomal alterations, loss of heterozygosis, cervical cancer, cervical tumorigenesis, chromosomal aberrations, cervical intraepithelial neoplasm and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion. The common chromosomal imbalances were gains in 8q24 (77.7 %), 20q13 (66.9 %), 3q26 (47.1 %), Xp22 (43.8 %), and 5p15 (60 %), principally. On the other hand, integration of the high-risk human papillomavirus genome into the host chromosome has been associated with the development of neoplasia, but the chromosomal imbalances seem to precede and promote such integration. Chromosomal imbalances in 8q24, 20q13, 3q21-26 and 5p15-Xp22, determined by fluorescent in situ hybridization assay or comparative genomic hybridization assay for early detection of the presence of high-risk human papillomavirus, are promising markers of cervical cancer progression.

  2. Human papilloma virus identification in breast cancer patients with previous cervical neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Sutherland Lawson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Women with human papilloma virus (HPV associated cervical neoplasia have a higher risk of developing breast cancer than the general female population. The purpose of this study was to (i identify high risk for cancer HPVs in cervical neoplasia and subsequent HPV positive breast cancers which developed in the same patients and (ii determine if these HPVs were biologically active.Methods: A range of polymerase chain reaction (PCR and immunohistochemical techniques were used to conduct a retrospective cohort study of cervical precancers and subsequent breast cancers in the same patients. Results: The same high risk HPV types were identified in both the cervical and breast specimens in 13 (46% of 28 patients. HPV type 18 was the most prevalent. HPVs appeared to be biologically active as demonstrated by the expression of HPV E7 proteins and the presence of HPV associated koilocytes. The average age of these patients diagnosed with breast cancer following prior cervical precancer was 51 years, as compared to 60 years for all women with breast cancer (p for difference = 0.001. Conclusions: These findings indicate that high risk HPVs can be associated with cervical neoplasia and subsequent young age breast cancer. However these associations are unusual and are a very small proportion of breast cancers. These outcomes confirm and extend the observations of 2 similar previous studies and offer one explanation for the increased prevalence of serious invasive breast cancer among young women.

  3. 6 Common Cancers - Gynecologic Cancers Cervical, Endometrial, and Ovarian

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... American women this year, more than twice the number of women who will be diagnosed with cervical (lower part of the uterus) and ovarian (female reproductive glands) cancers combined. However, in terms of 2007 ...

  4. [Preoperative sonovue contrast color Doppler in patients with cervical cancer. Preliminary report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinova, M

    2013-01-01

    Angiogenesis has gained much attention in oncology in recent years. The purpose of this pilot study was to describe the preoperative sonographic patterns of SonoVue Contrast-Doppler ultrasound and the standard Color Dopper ultrasound of cervical cancer tumor angiogenesis. This is a prospective observational study. The study included fifteen patients with proven cervical cancer. Contrast Doppler US after the SonoVue injection gave a good picture of the intense intralesional tumor angiogenesis. Of the 15 patients with FIGO stage lb1 Contrast-sonography showed 12 patients stage Ib1, 1-stage Ib2, 1-stage IIb and 1-stage Iva at final diagnosis. SonoVue Contrast Doppler Ultrasound gave a better definition of the margins of the neoplastic lesions in the cervical cancer Because contrast agents increase the sensitivity of detection of parametrial invasion and lymph node metastases, they could pay an important role in the evaluation of uterine cervical cancer

  5. Cervical cancer educational pamphlets: Do they miss the mark for Mexican immigrant women's needs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Jennifer L

    2005-11-01

    The rate of invasive cervical cancer in US Hispanic women is nearly doubled that of non-Hispanics. Using in-depth interviews and content/grade level analysis of educational materials, this study explores the relevance of cervical cancer education materials to the needs of Mexican immigrant women. It also addresses health literacy issues that create barriers to learning. Findings show aspects of language, content, reading level, structure, and visual images in 22 cervical cancer pamphlets from 11 health care sites in a Midwest city were not relevant to the learning needs or health literacy levels of local Mexican immigrant women. Further research is recommended to establish an evidence base regarding optimal presentation of key elements of the cervical cancer educational message for Mexican immigrant women.

  6. Nanomechanical clues from morphologically normal cervical squamous cells could improve cervical cancer screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Li; Feng, Jiantao; Sun, Quanmei; Liu, Jing; Hua, Wenda; Li, Jing; Ao, Zhuo; You, Ke; Guo, Yanli; Liao, Fulong; Zhang, Youyi; Guo, Hongyan; Han, Jinsong; Xiong, Guangwu; Zhang, Lufang; Han, Dong

    2015-09-01

    Applying an atomic force microscope, we performed a nanomechanical analysis of morphologically normal cervical squamous cells (MNSCs) which are commonly used in cervical screening. Results showed that nanomechanical parameters of MNSCs correlate well with cervical malignancy, and may have potential in cancer screening to provide early diagnosis.Applying an atomic force microscope, we performed a nanomechanical analysis of morphologically normal cervical squamous cells (MNSCs) which are commonly used in cervical screening. Results showed that nanomechanical parameters of MNSCs correlate well with cervical malignancy, and may have potential in cancer screening to provide early diagnosis. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03662c

  7. Concomitant cervical and transperineal parametrial high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost for locally advanced cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Bailleux

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: There is no consensus for parametrial boost technic while both transvaginal and transperineal approaches are discussed. A prototype was developed consisting of a perineal template, allowing transperineal needle insertion. This study analyzed acute toxicity of concomitant cervical and transperineal parametrial high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB boost for locally advanced cervical cancer. Material and methods: From 01.2011 to 12.2014, 33 patients (pts presenting a locally advanced cervical cancer with parametrial invasion were treated. After the first course of external beam radiation therapy with cisplatinum, HDRB was performed combining endocavitary and interstitial technique for cervical and parametrial disease. Post-operative delineation (CTV, bladder, rectum, sigmoid and planification were based on CT-scan/MRI. HDRB was delivered in 3-5 fractions over 2-3 consecutive days. Acute toxicities occurring within 6 months after HDRB were retrospectively reviewed. Results: Median age was 56.4 years (27-79. Clinical stages were: T2b = 23 pts (69.7%, T3a = 1 pt (3%, T3b = 6 pts (18.2%, and T4a = 3 pts (9.1%. Median HDRB prescribed dose was 21 Gy (21-27. Median CTVCT (16 pts and HR-CTV MRI (17 pts were 52.6 cc (28.5-74.3, 31.9 cc (17.1-58, respectively. Median EQD2αβ10 for D90CTV and D90HR-CTV were 82.9 Gy (78.2-96.5, 84.8 Gy (80.6-91.4, respectively. Median EQD2αβ3 (CT/MRI for D2cc bladder, rectum and sigmoid were 75.5 Gy (66.6-90.9, 64.4 Gy (51.9-77.4, and 60.4 Gy (50.9-81.1, respectively. Median follow-up was 14 months (ranged 6-51. Among the 24 pts with MFU = 24 months, 2-year LRFS rate, RRFS, and OS were 86.8%, 88.8%, and 94.1%, respectively. The rates of acute genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were 36% (G1 dysuria = 8 pts, G2 infection = 2 pt, G3 infection = 2 pts, and 27% (G1 diarrhea = 9 pts, respectively. One patient presented vaginal bleeding at the time of applicator withdrawal (G3-blood transfusion; no bleeding was

  8. Cervical cancer and the human immunodeficiency virus: a review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Globally cervical cancer is one of the commonest cancers in women. It comprises approximately 12% of all cancers and is the commonest cancer in women in developing countries. The most recent compilation of global data indicates that an estimated 490 000 new cases of cervical cancer occur annually worldwide and ...

  9. Overexpression of cathepsin f, matrix metalloproteinases 11 and 12 in cervical cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Vazquez-Ortiz, Guelaguetza; Pina-Sanchez, Patricia; Vazquez, Karla; Duenas, Alfonso; Taja, Lucia; Mendoza, Patricia; Garcia, José A; Salcedo, Mauricio

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Cervical carcinoma (CC) is one of the most common cancers among women worldwide and the first cause of death among the Mexican female population. CC progression shows a continuum of neoplastic transitions until invasion. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cathepsins play a central role on the enhancement of tumor-induced angiogenesis, cell migration, proliferation, apoptosis and connective tissue degradation. MMPs -2 and -9 expression has been widely studied in cervical ...

  10. Cervical cancer stem cells and correlation with radiation response in locally advanced cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, Supriya; Goda, Jayant Sastri; Deodhar, Kedar

    2016-01-01

    While tumour-initiating cells (TIC) have been reported across solid tumours, there is dearth of data regarding TICs and radiation response in cervical cancer. From October, 2013- July, 2015 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer were included. Pretreatment biopsy was obtained. IHC was performed for SOX-2,OCT-4, Nanog (ESC), CD44 and Podoplanin (TIC). Semiquantitative scoring was used for IHC. All patients received uniform concurrent chemoradiation and brachytherapy. On follow up, local control and distant relapse was recorded

  11. Interstitial guidance of cancer invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsenko, Pavlo G; Ilina, Olga; Friedl, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Cancer cell invasion into healthy tissues develops preferentially along pre-existing tracks of least resistance, followed by secondary tissue remodelling and destruction. The tissue scaffolds supporting or preventing guidance of invasion vary in structure and molecular composition between organs. In the brain, the guidance is provided by myelinated axons, astrocyte processes, and blood vessels which are used as invasion routes by glioma cells. In the human breast, containing interstitial collagen-rich connective tissue, disseminating breast cancer cells preferentially invade along bundled collagen fibrils and the surface of adipocytes. In both invasion types, physical guidance prompted by interfaces and space is complemented by molecular guidance. Generic mechanisms shared by most, if not all, tissues include (i) guidance by integrins towards fibrillar interstitial collagen and/or laminins and type IV collagen in basement membranes decorating vessels and adipocytes, and, likely, CD44 engaging with hyaluronan; (ii) haptotactic guidance by chemokines and growth factors; and likely (iii) physical pushing mechanisms. Tissue-specific, resticted guidance cues include ECM proteins with restricted expression (tenascins, lecticans), cell-cell interfaces, and newly secreted matrix molecules decorating ECM fibres (laminin-332, thrombospondin-1, osteopontin, periostin). We here review physical and molecular guidance mechanisms in interstitial tissue and brain parenchyma and explore shared principles and organ-specific differences, and their implications for experimental model design and therapeutic targeting of tumour cell invasion. Copyright © 2011 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Gene expression in early stage cervical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biewenga, Petra; Buist, Marrije R.; Moerland, Perry D.; van Thernaat, Emiel Ver Loren; van Kampen, Antoine H. C.; ten Kate, Fiebo J. W.; Baas, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Objective. Pelvic lymph node metastases are the main prognostic factor for survival in early stage cervical cancer, yet accurate detection methods before surgery are lacking. In this study, we examined whether gene expression profiling can predict the presence of lymph node metastasis in early stage

  13. Cervical Cancer: paradigms at home and abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI funded a clinical trial that will have an impact on the treatment of late-stage cervical cancer, and also supported a screening trial in India using a network of community outreach workers offering low tech-screening by direct visualization of the cer

  14. New Guidelines for Cervical Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Human Papillomavirus (HPV): The name for a group of related viruses, some of which cause genital warts and some of which are linked to cervical changes and cancer of the cervix, vulva, vagina, penis, anus, and ...

  15. Awareness and risk factors for cervical cancer among Women in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: Cervical cancer is the commonest genital tract malignancy in Nigeria. Previous evidence reported a high awareness but a low practice in cervical screening amongst Nigerian woman. Respondents attributed this to poor physician referral. Objective: To determine the level of cervical cancer awareness amongst out ...

  16. Proteomic analysis of cervical cancer cells treated with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers and a leading cause of death among women worldwide. It is characterized by a well-defined premalignant phase that can be suspected on cytological examination of exfoliated cervical cells and confirmed on histological examination of cervical material. However, this is ...

  17. The therapy of the cervical cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bártová, Lenka

    2010-01-01

    Charles University in Prague Faculty of Pharmacy in Hradec Králové Department of farmakology and toxikology Author: Lenka Bártová Director of my diploma work: PharmDr. Ludmila Melicharová Title of diploma work: The therapy of the cervical cancer This diploma work describes the possibilities of prevention and medical treatment of the cancer of the uterine uvula. The theoretical part contains the fundamental information about this disease, prevention and medical procedures. The inseparable part...

  18. Cervical Cancer Screening in Underserved Populations

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-10-15

    Dr. Lisa Flowers, a specialist in human papillovarius (HPV)-related diseases and Director of Colposcopy at Emory University School of Medicine, talks about cervical cancer screening in underinsured or uninsured women.  Created: 10/15/2009 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC).   Date Released: 6/9/2010.

  19. Cervical cancer incidence and mortality in Fiji 2003-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, Rebecca; Fong, James; Taylor, Richard; Gyaneshwar, Rajanishwar; Carter, Karen

    2012-08-01

    Previous studies indicate that cervical cancer is the second most frequent cancer and most common cause of cancer mortality among women in Fiji. There is little published data on the epidemiology of cervical cancer in Pacific countries. To determine the incidence 2003-2009 of, and mortality 2003-2008 from, cervical cancer by ethnicity and period in Fiji, identify evidence of secular change and relate these data to other Pacific countries, Australia and New Zealand. Counts of incident cervical cancer cases (2003-2009) and unit record mortality data (2003-2008) from the Fiji Ministry of Health were used to calculate age-standardised (to the WHO World Population) cervical cancer incidence and mortality rates, and cervical or uterine cancer mortality rates, by ethnicity, with 95% confidence intervals. On the basis of comparison of cervical cancer mortality with cervical or uterine cancer mortality in Fiji with similar populations, misclassification of cervical cancer deaths is unlikely. There is no evidence of secular change in cervical cancer incidence and mortality rates for the study period. For women of all ages and ethnicities, the age-standardised incidence rate of cervical cancer (2003-2009) was 27.6 per 100,000 (95% CI 25.4-29.8) and the age-standardised mortality rate (2003-2008) was 23.9 per 100,000 (95% CI 21.5-26.4). The mortality/incidence ratio was 87%. Fijians had statistically significant higher age-standardised incidence and mortality rates than Indians. Fiji has one of the highest estimated rates of cervical cancer incidence and mortality in the Pacific region. Cervical cancer screening in Fiji needs to be expanded and strengthened. © 2012 The Authors ANZJOG © 2012 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  20. Study to Understand Cervical Cancer Early Endpoints and Determinants (SUCCEED)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study to comprehensively assess biomarkers of risk for progressive cervical neoplasia, and thus develop a new set of biomarkers that can distinguish those at highest risk of cervical cancer from those with benign infection

  1. Invasive cervical root resorption: Engineering the lost tissue by regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dexton Antony Johns

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasive cervical resorption (ICR is a localized resorptive process that commences on the surface of the root below the epithelial attachment and the coronal aspect of the supporting alveolar process, namely the zone of the connective tissue attachment′ early diagnosis, elimination of the resorption and restorative management are the keys to a successful outcome. Treatment done was a combined non-surgical root canal therapy, surgical treatment to expose the resorptive defect and the resorptive defect was filled up with reverse sandwich technique and finally the bony defect filled with platelet rich fibrin (PRF, hydroxylapatite and PRF membrane. Significant bone fill was obtained in our case after a 2 year follow-up period. This case report presents a treatment strategy that might improve the healing outcomes for patients with ICR.

  2. Knowledge, perceptions and practice of cervical cancer prevention ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Cervical cancer is the most common gynecological cancer and a leading cause of cancer death in women in Nigeria. This study was aimed to assess the knowledge, perception, and practice of cervical cancer prevention among female public secondary school teachers in Mushin, Lagos. Methods: This was a ...

  3. Cervical Cancer Screening by Female Workers in South East Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cervical cancer is the commonest genital tract cancer worldwide and one of the leading causes of death from cancer among women in developing countries . It is therefore a major female reproductive health problem. Roughly 80% of newly diagnosed cases of cervical cancer are in developing countries. Rates are highest ...

  4. Cervical cancer: a missed health priority in Tanzania | Saleh | East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cervical cancer is a malignant neoplasm of the cervix uteri. It is the second commonest cancer in women worldwide and is among the largest causes of global cancer mortality. Human papilloma virus (HPV) which is transmitted sexually, particularly subtypes 16 and 18 are responsible for causing majority of cervical cancer ...

  5. Adjustment of treatment parameters for photodynamic therapy of cervical pre-cancer and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. P. Aminodova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Comprehensive study for optimization of parameters of photodynamic action with fotoditazin in patients with tumor and pre-tumor cervical diseases was conducted. The study included 52 female patients: pre-invasive cervical diseases were diagnosed in 34 (CIN I – in 9, CIN II – in 13, CIN III – in 12, cervical cancer – in 11 (8 had squamous cell cancer, 3 – adenocarcinoma of cervical canal, chronic cervicitis – in 7. The study agent in the form of 0,5% gel was applied on cervix in dose of 1 ml. To detect optimal interval between gel application and conduction of photodynamic therapy dynamics of accumulation and elimination of photosensitizer by means of its fl uorescence was studied. Fotoditazin was shown to have good accumulation in pathological tissues. The maximal agent accumulation was noticed in 30 min, continued about 15 min, and then gradually decreased. Maximal fl uorescence of photosensitizer was observed in foci of malignant tumor and severe intraepithelial neoplasia. To detect optimal light dose for irradiation cytological study of cell smear from specimen after light exposure with different light doses was performed. The minimal light dose necessary for activation of photochemical reaction pathway was 100 J/cm2, and optimal – 250 J/cm2. This dose allowed to destroy all atypical cells in the area of light exposure after application of gel fotoditazin. According to obtain data we suppose that the most effi cient regimen of photodynamic therapy with local application of fotoditazin-gel for treating dysplasia and pre-invasive cervical cancer was a dose of laser irradiation of 250 J/cm2 with duration of application of 30–45 min. 

  6. Abnormal pap smear and cervical cancer in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kathleen Y

    2012-09-01

    Pregnancy represents a unique opportunity to screen reproductive age women for cervical cancer and abnormal cervical cytology is relatively common in this population. In the absence of large, prospective clinical trials investigating the optimal management strategies for cervical dysplasia in pregnant women, consensus guidelines established by the American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology is available with considerations to this special patient population. Modalities for evaluation and management algorithms are reviewed and summarized from largely case series of pregnant women with cervical dysplasia and cervical cancer.

  7. Radiation Therapy Results of Invasive Cervical Carcinoma Found After Inappropriate Hysterectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Doo Ho; Kim, Eun Seog; Nam, Kae Hyun; Huh, Seung Jae

    1996-01-01

    Purpose : Hysterectomy without lymph node dissection was considered an inadequate treatment method for invasive uterine cervix cancer. Usually the procedure was performed inadvertently on patients who were thought to have benign or premalignant conditions preoperatively. We analysed radiotherapy results of such patients to evaluate survival rates, failure patterns and prognostic factors according to various conditions. Methods and Materials : Sixty one patients undergoing hysterectomy in the presence of invasive cervical carcinoma were reviewed retrospectively. Preoperative diagnosis were carcioma in situ (38 cases), severe dysplasia(2), myoma(6), uterine bleeding (4), uterine prolapse (2), and early invasive cervix cancer (10) (One patient had myoma and carcinoma in situ coincidently). Patients received postoperative megavoltage radiotherapy form August 1985 to December 1993, and minimum follow-up period was 24 months. Eight patients reveived ICR only, 6 patients ICR and external radiation, and 47 patients received external radiation therapy only. Results : Overall 5-year survival rate and relapse-free survival rate were 83.8%, 86.9% respectively. For patients with retrospective stage IA, IB, IIB (gross residual after surgery), and vaginal cuff recurrence were 90.9%, 88.8%, 38.4%, and 100% respectively. There were 8 cases of treatment failure, most of them (5/8) were in patients with gross residual disease, other patients were full thickness involvement of cervix wall (2/8) except one. Patients with early vaginal cuff recurrence and microinvasive cervical cncer (stage IA) had no treatment related failure. Prognostic factors affecting survival by univariate analysis were status of residual disease, tumor histology and retrospective stage. Conclusion : Adjuvant radiotherapy appeared to be effective treatment method for patients with presumed stage IA, IB and early local recurrent disease after inadvertent hysterectomy. Survivals for patients with gross disease

  8. [Papillomavirus and cervical cancer in Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Ryan, Miguel; Valenzuela, María Teresa

    2008-11-01

    Molecular, clinical and epidemiological studies have established beyond doubt that human papiloma viruses (HPV) cause cervical cancer. The virus is also associated with genital warts and other less common cancers in oropharynx, vulva, vagina and penis. Worldwide, VPH genotypes 16 and 18 are the most common high risk genotypes, detected in near 70% of women with cervical cancer. The discovery of a cause-effect relationship between several carcinogenic microorganisms and cancer open avenues for new diagnostic, treatment and prevention strategies. In this issue of Revista Médica de Chile, two papers on HPV are presented. Guzman and colleagues demonstrate that HPV can be detected in 66% to 77% of healthy male adolescents bypolymerase chain reaction and that positivity depends on the site of the penis that is sampled. These results support the role of male to female transmission of high risk HPVs in Chile and should lead to even more active educational campaigns. The second paper provides recommendations for HPV vaccine use in Chile, generated by the Immunization Advisory Committee of the Chilean Infectious Disease Society. To issue these recommendations, the Committee analyzes the epidemiological information available on HPV infection and cervical cancer in Chile, vaccine safety and effectiveness data, and describes cost-effectiveness studies. Taking into account that universal vaccination is controversial, the Committee favors vaccine use in Chile and it's incorporation into a national program. However, there is an indication that the country requires the implementation of an integrated surveillance approach including cross matching of data obtained from HPV genotype surveillance, monitoring of vaccination coverage, and surveillance of cervical cancer. The final decision of universal vaccine use in Chile should be based on a through analysis of information.ev Mid Chile

  9. Biologia molecular do câncer cervical Molecular biology of cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Augusto Rivoire

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A carcinogênese é um processo de múltiplas etapas. Alterações no equilíbrio citogenético ocorrem na transformação do epitélio normal a câncer cervical. Numerosos estudos apoiam a hipótese de que a infecção por HPV está associada com o desenvolvimento de alterações malignas e pré-malignas do trato genital inferior. Neste trabalho são apresentadas as bases para a compreensão da oncogênese cervical. O ciclo celular é controlado por proto-oncogenes e genes supressores. Quando ocorrem mutações, proto-oncogenes tornam-se oncogenes, que são carcinogênicos e causam multiplicação celular excessiva. A perda da ação de genes supressores funcionais pode levar a célula ao crescimento inadequado. O ciclo celular também pode ser alterado pela ação de vírus, entre eles o HPV (Human Papiloma Virus, de especial interesse na oncogênese cervical. Os tipos de HPV 16 e 18 são os de maior interesse, freqüentemente associados a câncer cervical e anal. O conhecimento das bases moleculares que estão envolvidas na oncogênese cervical tem sido possível devido a utilização de técnicas avançadas de biologia molecular. A associação destas técnicas aos métodos diagnósticos clássicos, poderão levar a uma melhor avaliação das neoplasias cervicais e auxiliar no desenvolvimento de novas terapias, talvez menos invasivas e mais efetivas.Carcinogenesis involves several steps. Disorders of the cytogenetic balance occur during the evolution from normal epithelium to cervical cancer. Several studies support the hypothesis that the Human Papiloma Virus (HPV infection is associated to development of premalignant and malignant lesions of cervical cancer. In this review we show the basis to understand cervical oncogenesis. The cell cycle is controlled by protooncogenes and supressive genes. This orchestrated cell cycle can be affected by virus such as HPV. Of special interest in the cervical carcinogenesis are the HPV subtypes 16 and 18

  10. Pap screening as preventive tool against cervical cancer: a report of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The incidence of cervical cancer in the developed countries has significantly reduced as a result of well-organized and coordinated Pap screening program, which is aimed at detection of pre-invasive lesions that are then promptly treated. We report a 45-year old woman whose immediate elder sister had breast carcinoma, ...

  11. Acute phase reactants and complement components as indicators of recurrence in human cervical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velde, E.R. te; Berrens, L.; Zegers, B.J.M.; Ballieux, R.E.

    1965-01-01

    Twenty patients with invasive cervical cancer of the squamous cell type were treated by radiotherapy and/or radical hysterectomy. During a follow-up period of approximately 2 yr in 10 of these patients a recurrence was established. Serial determinations of three acute phase reactants (α1-acid

  12. Quality of life measurement in women with cervical cancer: implications for Chinese cervical cancer survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching Shirley SY

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Women with cervical cancer now have relatively good 5-year survival rates. Better survival rates have driven the paradigm in cancer care from a medical illness model to a wellness model, which is concerned with the quality of women's lives as well as the length of survival. Thus, the assessment of quality of life among cervical cancer survivors is increasingly paramount for healthcare professionals. The purposes of this review were to describe existing validated quality of life instruments used in cervical cancer survivors, and to reveal the implications of quality of life measurement for Chinese cervical cancer survivors. Methods A literature search of five electronic databases was conducted using the terms cervical/cervix cancer, quality of life, survivors, survivorship, measurement, and instruments. Articles published in either English or Chinese from January 2000 to June 2009 were searched. Only those adopting an established quality of life instrument for use in cervical cancer survivors were included. Results A total of 11 validated multidimensional quality of life instruments were identified from 41 articles. These instruments could be classified into four categories: generic, cancer-specific, cancer site-specific and cancer survivor-specific instruments. With internal consistency varying from 0.68-0.99, the test-retest reliability ranged from 0.60-0.95 based on the test of the Pearson coefficient. One or more types of validity supported the construct validity. Although all these instruments met the minimum requirements of reliability and validity, the original versions of these instruments were mainly in English. Conclusion Selection of an instrument should consider the purpose of investigation, take its psychometric properties into account, and consider the instrument's origin and comprehensiveness. As quality of life can be affected by culture, studies assessing the quality of life of cervical cancer survivors in

  13. The investment case for cervical cancer elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsu, Vivien Davis; Ginsburg, Ophira

    2017-07-01

    We already know what causes cervical cancer, how to prevent it, and how to treat it, even in resource-constrained settings. Inequitable access to human papillomavirus vaccine for girls and screening and precancer treatment for women in low- and middle-income countries is unacceptable on ethical, social, and financial grounds. The burden of cervical cancer falls on the poor and extends beyond the narrow bounds of the family, affecting national economic development and community life, as family resources are drained and poverty tightens its grip. Proven solutions are available and the priorities for the next few years are clear, as shown by the papers in this Supplement. Sustained political commitment and strategic investments in cervical cancer prevention can not only save millions of lives over the next 10 years, but can also pave the way for the broader fight against all cancers. © 2017 The Authors. International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  14. The male role in cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castellsagué Xavier

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental, clinical, and epidemiological evidence strongly suggests that genital Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs are predominantly sexually transmitted. Epidemiological studies in virginal and HPV-negative women clearly indicate that sexual intercourse is virtually a necessary step for acquiring HPV. As with any other sexually transmitted disease (STD men are implicated in the epidemiological chain of the infection. Penile HPVs are predominantly acquired through sexual contacts. Sexual contacts with women who are prostitutes play an important role in HPV transmission and in some populations sex workers may become an important reservoir of high-risk HPVs. Acting both as "carriers" and "vectors" of oncogenic HPVs male partners may markedly contribute to the risk of developing cervical cancer in their female partners. Thus, in the absence of screening programs, a woman's risk of cervical cancer may depend less on her own sexual behavior than on that of her husband or other male partners. Although more rarely than women, men may also become the "victims" of their own HPV infections as a fraction of infected men are at an increased risk of developing penile and anal cancers. Male circumcision status has been shown to reduce the risk not only of acquiring and transmitting genital HPVs but also of cervical cancer in their female partners. More research is needed to better understand the natural history and epidemiology of HPV infections in men.

  15. Cervical cancer: evaluation of our results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Cola, A.; Suárez, L.; Castillo, C.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Cervical cancer in women occupies 3rd place in incidence and 5th as a cause of cancer death in our country. The evolution is mainly determined by the stage, nodal status and histological type. The treatment of these tumors is surgical, radiant and / or systemic, depending on your choice mainly Stadium. Objective: To analyze the characteristics, evolution, treatment and survival of patients carriers of cervical cancer. Patients and Methods: The medical records were retrospectively analyzed for patients with cervical cancer treated at the Department of Oncology the Clinical Hospital in the period 1994-2004. Curves were constructed survival (sv) of total and free enfemedad sv sv by stage and after relapse by the method of Kaplan-Meier. Results: n = 75 patients, median age 45 years (24-90 years). Histological type: Epidermoid carcinomas 93% 5% 2% adenocarcinomas and adenosquamous. stadium (E) Initial: 31% IE, 38% EII, EIII 25%, 6% EIVA. Treatment was according to the stadium, considering that until 1999 was not standard concurrent chemoradiation. The median sv considering all stages was 124 months. The sv to 5 years for EI was 90% (median 188 sv months), for the ISI 65% (95 months) and the median sv CIRTs was 24 months. Followed for 13 months, 12 patients relapsed and the median after sv relapse was 8 months (95% CI 4-13 months) Conclusions: Although cervical cancer is a preventable disease, remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Our results are consistent with those reported in the literature, however far from the optimal, so it is necessary to continue clinical trials in this regard

  16. Cervical cancer screening among Southeast Asian American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ivy K; Dinh, Khanh T

    2011-02-01

    The incidence of cervical cancer is high among Southeast Asian American women, but their participation in preventive cervical cancer screening is alarmingly low. This paper reviews the literature on factors associated with participation in cervical cancer screening among women of Vietnamese, Cambodian and Hmong descent in the United States. These factors include acculturation, age, marital status, knowledge about cervical cancer, apprehension about cervical cancer screening, financial concerns, access to health care, and physician characteristics and recommendation. Suggestions for future research include the need to investigate the role of physicians treating Southeast Asian American women, the need for more extensive up-to-date studies on the current generation of young Southeast Asian American women, and the use of more advanced assessments of acculturation. Overall, much more work is needed in order to deepen our understanding of the various ways to improve the rate of cervical cancer screening among Southeast Asian American women.

  17. Low adherence to cervical cancer screening after subtotal hysterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lea Laird; Møller, Lars Mikael Alling; Gimbel, Helga Margrethe

    2015-01-01

    have unnecessary tests performed after total hysterectomy. Clarification of the use of cervical/vaginal smears after hysterectomy is needed to identify women at risk of cervical dysplasia or cancer. FUNDING: Research Foundation of Region Zealand, University of Southern Denmark, Nykøbing Falster......INTRODUCTION: A reason for not recommending subtotal hysterectomy is the risk of cervical pathology. We aimed to evaluate cervical cancer screening and to describe cervical pathology after subtotal and total hysterectomy for benign indications. METHODS: Data regarding adherence to screening.......7% were not screened. We found a minimum of one abnormal test in 28 (10.8%) after subtotal hysterectomy and one after total hysterectomy. No cervical cancers were found. CONCLUSIONS: Adherence to cervical cancer screening after subtotal hysterectomy in a Danish population is suboptimal and some patients...

  18. Intrauterine Device Use and Cervical Cancer Risk: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortessis, Victoria K; Barrett, Malcolm; Brown Wade, Niquelle; Enebish, Temuulen; Perrigo, Judith L; Tobin, Jessica; Zhong, Charlie; Zink, Jennifer; Isiaka, Vanessa; Muderspach, Laila I; Natavio, Melissa; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta

    2017-12-01

    To estimate the association between use of an intrauterine device (IUD) and risk of cervical cancer by subjecting existing data to critical review, quantitative synthesis, and interpretation. We searched PubMed, Web of Science, ClinicalTrials.gov, and catalogs of scientific meetings and abstracts, theses, and dissertations queried from inception through July 2016. Examination of abstracts from 225 reports identified 34 studies with individual-level measures of use of an IUD and incident cervical cancer. By critically assessing the full text of these reports, independent reviewers identified 17 studies conducted without recognized sources of systematic error, of which 16 could be harmonized for meta-analysis. Point and interval estimates of the association between use of an IUD and incident cervical cancer were extracted from original reports into a structured database along with key features of study design and implementation. A random-effects meta-analysis was implemented to quantitatively synthesize extracted estimates and assess likely influence of publication bias, residual confounding, heterogeneity of true effect size, and human papillomavirus prevalence and cervical cancer incidence in source populations. Women who used an IUD experienced less cervical cancer (summary odds ratio 0.64, 95% CI 0.53-0.77). Neither confounding by recognized risk factors nor publication bias seems a plausible explanation for the apparent protective effect, which may be stronger in populations with higher cervical cancer incidence. Invasive cervical cancer may be approximately one third less frequent in women who have used an IUD. This possible noncontraceptive benefit could be most beneficial in populations with severely limited access to screening and concomitantly high cervical cancer incidence.

  19. Second cancer after radiotherapy of the uterine cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Tadashi; Soejima, Toshinori; Hirota, Saeko; Obayashi, Kayoko; Ishida, Teruko; Takada, Yoshiki; Yoshida, Shoji; Kimura, Shuji

    1993-01-01

    To study the relative risk of second cancer after radiotherapy, we reviewed 2465 cases of uterine cervical cancer who were treated in our institute from 1962 to 1986 and were followed up for more than 5 years. Among them, 1502 cases were treated by radiotherapy with or without surgery (radiotherapy group), and the remainder were treated by surgery only (surgery only group). We defined second cancer as malignancy that occurred in another organ after an interval of 5 years or more from the end of treatment of the first cancer. The relative risk of second cancer was computed by the person-year method advocated by Schoenberg. Second cancer was observed among 8 cases of the surgery group, whereas 43 cases were observed among the radiotherapy group. The cases were: rectal cancer, 6 cases; bladder cancer, 4 cases. The observed and expected ratio (O/E ratio) was 4.02 in rectal cancer and 7.98 in bladder cancer. This incidence of the both cancers was significantly high in the radiotherapy group. Three of the 6 cases with rectal cancer underwent operation in our institute. The incubation periods between the first and second cancers were from 9 to 21 years. Each case exhibited symptoms of chronic radiation proctitis after radiotherapy for uterine cervical cancer. It is thought necessary to follow up such cases carefully to detect radiation induced cancer. (author)

  20. Cervical Cancer Awareness and Preventive Practices: A Challenge ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cervical cancer is the commonest gynaecological cancer in Nigeria and women of low socio-economic status are at high risk of this condition. A study was conducted on the awareness of cervical cancer, attitude towards the disease and screening practice of women residing in two urban slums of Lagos, Nigeria.

  1. Clinico-pathological characteristics of cervical cancer in Ghanaian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cervical cancer is a major cause of cancer related mortality in the developing countries, although preventable. The aim of this study was to use a retrospective descriptive study to determine the prevalence and the clinico-pathological characteristics of cervical cancer among genital tract ma-lignancies. This study reviewed ...

  2. Barriers to utilization of cervical cancer screening services among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cervical cancer (CC) is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer among women of reproductive age group; yet screening for early detection of the disease among them is not a common practice in Nigeria. This study therefore, investigated the barriers to utilization of cervical cancer screening service among women of ...

  3. The Need for Societal Investment to Improve Cervical Cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although cervical cancer is a preventable cancer with a well-known natural history, it remains a huge burden in developing countries of sub-Saharan Africa where organized cervical cancer screening services are lacking. Developed countries that have invested on providing organized screening programs have made ...

  4. Awareness and perception of risk for cervical cancer among women ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cervical cancer, though preventable, remains the leading cause of cancer death among women in developing countries after breast. Lack of awareness and access to preventive methods remains a key factor contributing to high levels of cervical cancer in these populations. Objectives: The study aimed to ...

  5. Drug Delivery Approaches for the Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Ordikhani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is a highly prevalent cancer that affects women around the world. With the availability of new technologies, researchers have increased their efforts to develop new drug delivery systems in cervical cancer chemotherapy. In this review, we summarized some of the recent research in systematic and localized drug delivery systems and compared the advantages and disadvantages of these methods.

  6. Distribution of HPV Genotype in Invasive Cervical Carcinoma and Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia in Zhejiang Province, Southeast China: Establishing the Baseline for Surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Xian Xu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV are firmly established as the principal causative agent for cervical carcinoma. Current vaccines may provide some protection for women from cervical carcinoma linked to HPV genotype 16 and 18. This may be the best vaccine for Western women, but the geographical variation in HPV distributions may not make it the most appropriate vaccine for China or Asia. This study provided an observational, retrospective, hospital-based cross-sectional study on the distribution of HPV genotypes among 5410 women with invasive cervical cancer (ICC or cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN. Overall, the positive rates of the four HPV types included in current prophylactic vaccines were counted, the two high-risk types (HPV-16 and -18 covered by current vaccines represented 66.9% of women with squamous cancer, 55.0% with adenocarcinoma, 64.9% with adenosquamous carcinoma and 77.4% of other type ICC, as well as 59.5% of CIN III, 45.0% of CIN II and 38.1% of CIN I cases. As expected, two low-risk types (HPV-6 and -11 included in the quadrivalent vaccine did not show good coverage data. Particularly worth mentioning is the fact that the addition of HPV-52 and -58 to the vaccine cocktail would increase cancer protection in our population, potentially preventing up to beyond 16% of squamous/adenosquamous carcinoma and other type of cervical cancers, and 7.75% of adenocarcinomas. It might also potentially reduce the rate of CIN III by a further 28.6% and CIN II and I by a third. This study established the baseline for surveillance in Zhejiang Province, and provides data for further vaccine designs: a quadrivalent HPV vaccine covering HPV-16/-58/-18/-52, would be more welcome in our region in the forthcoming year compared to the currently available vaccine.

  7. Distribution of HPV Genotype in Invasive Cervical Carcinoma and Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia in Zhejiang Province, Southeast China: Establishing the Baseline for Surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao-Xian; Zhou, Jian-Song; Yuan, Shu-Hui; Yu, Hua; Lou, Han-Mei

    2015-09-02

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) are firmly established as the principal causative agent for cervical carcinoma. Current vaccines may provide some protection for women from cervical carcinoma linked to HPV genotype 16 and 18. This may be the best vaccine for Western women, but the geographical variation in HPV distributions may not make it the most appropriate vaccine for China or Asia. This study provided an observational, retrospective, hospital-based cross-sectional study on the distribution of HPV genotypes among 5410 women with invasive cervical cancer (ICC) or cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). Overall, the positive rates of the four HPV types included in current prophylactic vaccines were counted, the two high-risk types (HPV-16 and -18) covered by current vaccines represented 66.9% of women with squamous cancer, 55.0% with adenocarcinoma, 64.9% with adenosquamous carcinoma and 77.4% of other type ICC, as well as 59.5% of CIN III, 45.0% of CIN II and 38.1% of CIN I cases. As expected, two low-risk types (HPV-6 and -11) included in the quadrivalent vaccine did not show good coverage data. Particularly worth mentioning is the fact that the addition of HPV-52 and -58 to the vaccine cocktail would increase cancer protection in our population, potentially preventing up to beyond 16% of squamous/adenosquamous carcinoma and other type of cervical cancers, and 7.75% of adenocarcinomas. It might also potentially reduce the rate of CIN III by a further 28.6% and CIN II and I by a third. This study established the baseline for surveillance in Zhejiang Province, and provides data for further vaccine designs: a quadrivalent HPV vaccine covering HPV-16/-58/-18/-52, would be more welcome in our region in the forthcoming year compared to the currently available vaccine.

  8. Chemoradiation Therapy and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Stages IB2-IIB or IIIB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-10

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Positive Para-Aortic Lymph Node; Positive Pelvic Lymph Node; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage II Cervical Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7

  9. Novel Somatic Copy Number Alteration Identified for Cervical Cancer in the Mexican American Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Torabi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer affects millions of Americans, but the rate for cervical cancer in the Mexican American is approximately twice that for non-Mexican Americans. The etiologies of cervical cancer are still not fully understood. A number of somatic mutations, including several copy number alterations (CNAs, have been identified in the pathogenesis of cervical carcinomas in non-Mexican Americans. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate CNAs in association with cervical cancer in the Mexican American population. We conducted a pilot study of genome-wide CNA analysis using 2.5 million markers in four diagnostic groups: reference (n = 125, low grade dysplasia (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN-I, n = 4, high grade dysplasia (CIN-II and -III, n = 5 and invasive carcinoma (squamous cell carcinoma (SCC, n = 5 followed by data analyses using Partek. We observed a statistically-significant difference of CNA burden between case and reference groups of different sizes (>100 kb, 10–100 kb and 1–10 kb of CNAs that included deletions and amplifications, e.g., a statistically-significant difference of >100 kb deletions was observed between the reference (6.6% and pre-cancer and cancer (91.3% groups. Recurrent aberrations of 98 CNA regions were also identified in cases only. However, none of the CNAs have an impact on cancer progression. A total of 32 CNA regions identified contained tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes. Moreover, the pathway analysis revealed endometrial cancer and estrogen signaling pathways associated with this cancer (p < 0.05 using Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG. This is the first report of CNAs identified for cervical cancer in the U.S. Latino population using high density markers. We are aware of the small sample size in the study. Thus, additional studies with a larger sample are needed to confirm the current findings.

  10. Cervical syphilitic lesions mimicking cervical cancer: a rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqing Zhu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A woman presented to the hospital due to postcoital vaginal bleeding. The patient was initially diagnosed with cervical carcinoma by clinicians at a local hospital. However, a biopsy of the cervical lesions revealed chronic inflammation and erosion of the cervical mucosa, and the rapid plasma reagin ratio titer was 1:256. The patient was eventually diagnosed with syphilitic cervicitis and treated with minocycline 0.1 g twice a day. The patient was cured with this treatment.

  11. CORRELATION OF CLINICAL AND PROGNOSTIC FACTORS, WHIT THE P53PROTEIN EXPRESSION IN INVASIVE CERVICAL CARCINOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcia Teresa Hinojosa Schäffer

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of p53 protein in cervical carcinoma correlated with clinical and prognostic factors was performed in a retrospective study with p53 expression detection by immunohistochemical technique. 120 slides of patients with squamous cell cancer at the Gynecologic Oncology Clinic and stored in the Department of Pathological Anatom at the School of Medicine of Botucatu were used. Age, ethnicity, parity, smoking habit, oral contraceptive use, age at first intercourse, histology, stage, treatment, and follow-up were the cofactors associated with p53 positivity. Fisher’s exact tests were carried out to analyze associations between p53 and variables, with p < 0.05 as the significant level. The study revealed a 43.3% frequency of patients with stage II disease and p53 positive rate with p = 0.001, and 64.2% frequency with p = 0.024 of Correlação de fatores clínicos e prognósticos proteína p53 no colo uterino. patients whose first intercourse occurred between the ages of 15 and 20. These findings show the correlation between stage II disease and age at fir st intercourse with p53 positive in invasive cervical cancer. Fisher's exact test revelead these cofactors to be statistically significant and there was no association between the protein p53 with others prognostic and analyzed cofactors. The prognostic value of p53 in cervical cancer had been examined, with the conclusion that p53 is correlated to unfavorable prognosis.

  12. Exploration of knowledge of cervical cancer and cervical cancer screening amongst HIV-positive women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna E. Maree

    2014-10-01

    Objective: The objective of the study was to determine what women being treated for HIV and AIDS at a specific healthcare centre in Johannesburg knew about cervical cancer and cervical screening. Method: A survey design was used, with data gathered by means of a self-administered questionnaire. Convenience sampling selected 315 women to participate (n = 315. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse the data and chi-square testing found associations between categorical variables. Results: The majority of respondents (78.7%; n = 248 indicated that they had heard of cervical cancer and 62.9% (n = 198 knew about the Pap smear, with nurses and doctors being the primary source of information. Of the women who knew about the Pap smear, less than one-third had had a smear done, the main reason being fear of the procedure. Conclusion: The study provided evidence that women attending the specific HIV clinic were more knowledgeable about cervical cancer and screening than those of unknown HIV status involved in previous studies. Knowledge was still at a low level, especially when their exceptionally high risk was taken into account. Once again it was found that having knowledge did not necessarily mean having had a Pap smear, which remains a huge challenge in the prevention of cervical cancer.

  13. Molecular mechanisms of cisplatin resistance in cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Haiyan; Luo, Hui; Zhang, Wenwen; Shen, Zhaojun; Hu, Xiaoli; Zhu, Xueqiong

    2016-01-01

    Patients with advanced or recurrent cervical cancer have poor prognosis, and their 1-year survival is only 10%–20%. Chemotherapy is considered as the standard treatment for patients with advanced or recurrent cervical cancer, and cisplatin appears to treat the disease effectively. However, resistance to cisplatin may develop, thus substantially compromising the efficacy of cisplatin to treat advanced or recurrent cervical cancer. In this article, we systematically review the recent literature and summarize the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying cisplatin resistance in cervical cancer. PMID:27354763

  14. Upregulation of long noncoding RNA TUG1 promotes cervical cancer cell proliferation and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yingying; Sun, Xiangwei; Mao, Chenchen; Guo, Gangqiang; Ye, Sisi; Xu, Jianfeng; Zou, Ruanmin; Chen, Jun; Wang, Ledan; Duan, Ping; Xue, Xiangyang

    2017-02-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), a novel class of transcripts that have critical roles in carcinogenesis and progression, have emerged as important gene expression modulators. Recent evidence indicates that lncRNA taurine-upregulated gene 1 (TUG1) functions as an oncogene in numerous types of human cancers. However, its function in the development of cervical cancer remains unknown. The aim of this research was to investigate the clinical significance and biological functions of TUG1 in cervical cancer. TUG1 was found to be significantly upregulated in cervical cancer tissues and four cervical cancer cell lines by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Elevated TUG1 expression was correlated with larger tumor size, advanced international federation of gynecology and obstetrics (FIGO) stage, poor differentiation, and lymph node metastasis. Furthermore, knockdown of TUG1 suppressed cell proliferation with activation of apoptosis, in part by regulating the expression of Bcl-2 and caspase-3. Silencing of TUG1 inhibited cell migration and invasion via the progression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Taken together, our findings indicate that TUG1 acts as an oncogene in cervical cancer and may represent a novel therapeutic target. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Bcl-2-like Protein 11 (BIM) Expression Is Associated with Favorable Prognosis for Patients with Cervical Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bo Wook; Cho, Hanbyoul; Ylaya, Kris; Kitano, Haruhisa; Chung, Joon-Yong; Hewitt, Stephen M; Kim, Jae-Hoon

    2017-09-01

    Bcl-2-like protein 11 (BIM) is a pro-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 protein family. BIM elicits cell death by binding to pro-survival Bcl-2 proteins. Even though the association of BIM expression with cell death has been investigated, its clinical survival significance in cervical cancer has not. In the current study, the prognostic significance of BIM in cervical cancer was investigated. The study included normal cervical tissues (n=254), cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) tissues (n=275), and invasive cervical cancer (n=164). In order to identify BIM expression, immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed, and IHC scoring by quantitative digital image analysis was determined. Then, the association of BIM with prognostic factors was investigated. BIM expression was higher in cervical cancer than normal cervical tissues (pBIM expression than did poor differentiation (p=0.001). Also, BIM expression was high in radiation-sensitive cervical cancer relative to radiation-resistant cancer (p=0.049). High BIM expression showed better 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) rates (p=0.049 and π=0.030, respectively) than did low expression. In a multivariate analysis, BIM was shown to be an independent risk factor for DFS and OS in cervical cancer, with hazard ratios of 0.22 (p=0.006) and 0.46 (p=0.046), respectively. BIM is associated with favorable prognostic markers for prediction of DFS and OS in cervical cancer. High BIM expression is a potential prognostic marker as well as a chemotherapeutic target for cervical cancer. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  16. Expected effect of vaccination using bivalent vaccine on incidence of cervical dysplasia and cervical cancer in terms of health care system in Slovak Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bielik, J.; Marusakova, E.; Masak, L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Human papillomavirus is a dominant cause of cervical dysplasia with possible transition to cervical cancer. The main purpose of the study was to make a qualified forecast of the potential of vaccination using a bivalent vaccine on the incidence of cervical dysplasia and cervical cancer as well as disease-related mortality in the Slovak Republic. Methods: The method of evaluation was the use of the Markov model that is strictly based on either epidemiological data from official institutions such as the National Oncology Register of the Slovak Republic, Statistic Office of the Slovak Republic, or the data from health insurance companies and the opinion of the experts´ panel of the Society of Gynaecology and Obstetrics. Results: Results obtained by modelling suggest that the introduction of HPV vaccination into the national immunization programme would result in a reduction of at least 84 deaths of women during the monitored period. Every cervical cancer death averted means 31 life years saved on average. Depending on the vaccination coverage in the cohort, HPV vaccination would cause a reduction of registered cervical dysplasia by 26,900 to 131,808 cases, a reduction of registered carcinoma in situ by 1,371 to 6,714 cases, and a decrease of registered invasive cervical carcinoma by 1,645 to 8,058 cases. Conclusion: The results of the analysis confirmed that HPV vaccination in 12-year old girls has the potential to significantly reduce both the incidence of cervical dysplasia and cervical cancer and mortality due to cervical cancer, whereby this form of primary intervention is also cost-effective. Vaccination also enhances the effect of standard secondary prevention realized by age dependant screening. (author)

  17. Nicotine promotes cervical carcinoma cell line HeLa migration and invasion by activating PI3k/Akt/NF-κB pathway in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengze; Gu, Weiting; Zhang, Yunpeng; Ji, Yawen; Wen, Yong; Xu, Xin

    2017-07-05

    Cigarette smoking is one of highly risk factors of cervical cancer. Recently nicotine has been reported to increase proliferation and invasion in some smoking related cancers, like non-small cell lung cancer and esophageal squamous cell cancer. However, the effects and mechanisms of nicotine stimulation on cervical cancer cells are not clear. Here, we investigated the effects and mechanisms of nicotine stimulation on HeLa cells in vitro. In our study, we found that nicotine could accelerate HeLa cells migration and invasion, activate PI3K/Akt and NF-κB pathways and increase the expression of Vimentin in vitro. Moreover, we demonstrated that the specific PI3K inhibitor LY294002 could reverse nicotine-induced cell migration and invasion, NF-κB activation and up-regulation of Vimentin. Inhibition of NF-κB by Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) also antagonized nicotine-induced cell migration, invasion and up-regulation of Vimentin. Simply put, these findings suggest that nicotine promotes cervical carcinoma cell line HeLa migration and invasion by activating PI3k/Akt/NF-κB pathway in vitro. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Human Papillomavirus Testing in the Prevention of Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wacholder, Sholom; Kinney, Walter; Gage, Julia C.; Castle, Philip E.

    2011-01-01

    Strong evidence now supports the adoption of cervical cancer prevention strategies that explicitly focus on persistent infection with the causal agent, human papillomavirus (HPV). To inform an evidence-based transition to a new public health approach for cervical cancer screening, we summarize the natural history and cervical carcinogenicity of HPV and discuss the promise and uncertainties of currently available screening methods. New HPV infections acquired at any age are virtually always benign, but persistent infections with one of approximately 12 carcinogenic HPV types explain virtually all cases of cervical cancer. In the absence of an overtly persistent HPV infection, the risk of cervical cancer is extremely low. Thus, HPV test results predict the risk of cervical cancer and its precursors (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3) better and longer than cytological or colposcopic abnormalities, which are signs of HPV infection. The logical and inevitable move to HPV-based cervical cancer prevention strategies will require longer screening intervals that will disrupt current gynecologic and cytology laboratory practices built on frequent screening. A major challenge will be implementing programs that do not overtreat HPV-positive women who do not have obvious long-term persistence of HPV or treatable lesions at the time of initial evaluation. The greatest potential for reduction in cervical cancer rates from HPV screening is in low-resource regions that can implement infrequent rounds of low-cost HPV testing and treatment. PMID:21282563

  19. Treatment Option Overview (Cervical Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... removed. These procedures are done using a low transverse incision or a vertical incision. Radical hysterectomy : Surgery ... tubes. Pelvic exenteration : Surgery to remove the lower colon , ... Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment that uses high-energy x-rays or ...

  20. General Information about Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... removed. These procedures are done using a low transverse incision or a vertical incision. Radical hysterectomy : Surgery ... tubes. Pelvic exenteration : Surgery to remove the lower colon , ... Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment that uses high-energy x-rays or ...

  1. Cervical cancer incidence after normal cytological sample in routine screening using SurePath, ThinPrep, and conventional cytology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rozemeijer, Kirsten; Naber, Steffie K; Penning, Corine

    2017-01-01

    of invasive cervical cancer after a normal screening sample for each screening test. Cox regression analyses assessed the hazard ratios, adjusted for calendar time, age, screening history, and socioeconomic status and including laboratories as random effects.Results The 72 month cumulative cancer incidence...

  2. Invasive cancer cells and metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2013-12-01

    The physics of cancer is a relatively new emerging field of cancer research. In the last decade it has become a focus of biophysical research as well as becoming a novel focus for classical cancer research. This special section of Physical Biology focusing on invasive cancer cells and metastasis (physical oncology) will give greater insight into the different subfields where physical approaches are being applied to cancer research. This focus on the physical aspects of cancer is necessary because novel approaches in the field of genomics and proteomics have not altered the field of cancer research dramatically, due to the fact that few breakthroughs have been made. It is still not understood why some primary tumors metastasize and thus have a worse outcome compared to others that do not metastasize. As biophysicists, we and others suggest that the mechanical properties of the cancer cells, which possess the ability to transmigrate, are quite different compared to non-metastatic and non-invasive cancer cells. Furthermore, we hypothesize that these cancer cells undergo a selection process within the primary tumor that enables them to weaken their cell-cell adhesions and to alter their cell-matrix adhesions in order to be able to cross the outermost boundary of the primary tumor, as well as the surrounding basement membrane, and to invade the connective tissue. This prerequisite may also help the cancer cells to enter blood or lymph vessels, get transported with the vessel flow and form secondary tumors either within the vessel, directly on the endothelium, or in a different organ after crossing the endothelial lining a second time. This special section begins with a paper by Mark F Coughlin and Jeffrey J Fredberg on the changes in cytoskeletal dynamics and nonlinear rheology due to the metastatic capability of cancer cells from different cancer tissue types such as skin, bladder, prostate and kidney [1]. The hypothesis was that the metastatic outcome is impacted by

  3. Cervical Cancer Screening | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  4. HPV infection in cervical and other cancers in Saudi Arabia: implication for prevention and vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazi eAlsbeih

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available HPV is closely associated with cervical cancer that the incidence of this tumor is regarded as a surrogate marker for HPV infection in countries lacking epidemiological studies. HPV is also implicated in subsets of anogenital and oro-pharyngeal cancers. Although cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women worldwide, its reported incidence is low in Saudi Arabia, ranking number 12 between all cancers in females and accounts only for 2.4% of all new cases, despite the lack of national screening programs. However, the limited available studies from Saudi Arabia indicate that HPV prevalence and genotypes’ distribution in invasive cervical cancer show similar pattern as in the world. Cytology screening (Pap Smear and HPV vaccinations are the two preventive measures against cervical cancer. The two available vaccines are effective against the two most common HPV genotypes (HPV-16 and 18. Since 92% of cervical tumors in the Kingdom are infected with HPV of which 78% are HPV-16 and 18 genotypes, vaccination is expected to protect against more than two-third of cervical cancers in Saudi Arabia. Nevertheless, due to its low incidence (2.1/100,000 women, a proper cost-effectiveness analysis is required to justify the implementation of a costly vaccine bearing in mind that HPV could potentially be associated with about 3% of all cancers. However, further studies are needed to ascertain the real prevalence of HPV at the population level at large, its association with various types of cancers and also the impact of local tradition and emerging behavioral trends that could affect HPV transmission and consequently the effectiveness of applying national vaccination program.

  5. Survival of a cohort of women with cervical cancer diagnosed in a Brazilian cancer center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Calazan do Carmo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess overall survival of women with cervical cancer and describe prognostic factors associated. METHODS: A total of 3,341 cases of invasive cervical cancer diagnosed at the Brazilian Cancer Institute, Rio de Janeiro, southeastern Brazil, between 1999 and 2004 were selected. Clinical and pathological characteristics and follow-up data were collected. There were performed a survival analysis using Kaplan-Meier curves and a multivariate analysis through Cox model. RESULTS: Of all cases analyzed, 68.3% had locally advanced disease at the time of diagnosis. The 5-year overall survival was 48%. After multivariate analysis, tumor staging at diagnosis was the single variable significantly associated with prognosis (p<0.001. There was seen a dose-response relationship between mortality and clinical staging, ranging from 27.8 to 749.6 per 1,000 cases-year in women stage I and IV, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The study showed that early detection through prevention programs is crucial to increase cervical cancer survival.

  6. [Isolated splenic metastases from cervical cancer: a rare entity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalón-López, José Sebastián; Souto-del Bosque, Rosalía; Montañez-Lugo, Juan Ignacio; Chávez-González, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Splenic metastases from solid tumors are a rare event with an incidence of only 2.9% to 9%. Splenic metastases from cervical cancer are a rare entity. Only a few cases have been reported of isolated spleen metastases from cervical cancer. We present the case of a 76-year-old woman with moderately differentiated endocervical adenocarcinoma stromal and endocervical invasion. Clinical stage was Ib1 and Ca-125 values of 150 U. She was managed with hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy. She received pelvic radiotherapy (45 Gy) followed 24 Gy of brachytherapy. Two years later she presented with abdominal pain. Abdominal computed tomography showed two splenic parenchymal lesions without disease in the remainder of the abdominal cavity and chest with a Ca-125 of 2,733 U. The patient is submitted to splenectomy. Histopathology demonstrates splenic metastases of well-differentiated adenocarcinoma from the endocervix. Immunohistochemical stain showed positivity from carcinoembryonic antigen; estrogen and progesterone receptors are negative. Ca-125 level 8 weeks after surgery was 16 U/ml. The patient received six cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy with paclitaxel and cisplatin. At 12 months follow-up the patient is alive and without evidence of tumor activity. The spleen is an uncommon site of metastasis. Splenectomy is considered the appropriate treatment in order to avoid complications such as splenic rupture and splenic vein thrombosis as well as to improve pain control from splenomegaly. Twelve months after surgery our patient is alive and without evidence of tumor activity.

  7. Alterations In Lipid Profile Of Patients With Advanced Cervical Cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background The changes in lipid profile have long been associated with cancer because lipids play key role in maintenance of cell integrity. Aims. The study evaluated alterations in plasma lipid profile in patients with advanced squamous cervical cancer. Materials And Method This hospital-based study included 30 cervical ...

  8. Towards improving cervical cancer screening in Nigeria: A review of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cervical cancer screening is the key to reducing the incidence and mortality of cervical cancer in developing countries. In the absence of a national screening program, healthcare givers in Nigeria are encouraged to routinely inform and screen eligible women. This review aims at equipping health workers for this task by ...

  9. Social Construction of Cervical Cancer Screening among Panamanian Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Arlene; Brown, Kelli McCormack; McDermott, Robert J.; Bryant, Carol A.; Coreil, Jeanine; Loseke, Donileen

    2012-01-01

    Background: Understanding how "health issues" are socially constructed may be useful for creating culturally relevant programs for Hispanic/Latino populations. Purpose: We explored the constructed meanings of cervical cancer and cervical cancer screening among Panamanian women, as well as socio-cultural factors that deter or encourage…

  10. The Perceptions Of Traditional Healers Of Cervical Cancer Care At ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this article is to explore and describe the perceptions of traditional healers of cervical cancer care. The incidence of cervical cancer, especially among black South African females, is among the highest in the world. Women report at clinics and hospitals on a daily basis with advanced stages (stages III and IV) ...

  11. Effect of training on knowledge about cervical cancer and Human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of training on knowledge about cervical cancer and Human Papiloma Virus vaccine among health care personnel in Benin City. ... This study assessed the effect of training on health care workers' knowledge of HPV, its relationship with cervical cancer and the role of HPV vaccine in prevention. Methods: This ...

  12. Perception and risk factors for cervical cancer among women in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This study assessed the perception of risk of cervical cancer and existence of risk factors for cervical cancer based on five known risk factors among women attending the Tamale Teaching Hospital in Tamale, Ghana. Methods: A consecutive sample of 300 women was interviewed using a semi structured ...

  13. Cervical cancer prevention practices amongst flower farm workers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The screening rate amongst the workers was very low. The findings of this survey warrant a very strong recommendation for the setting-up of workplace policies and mechanisms for cervical cancer education, screening and prevention interventions. Keywords: Cervical cancer, Awareness, Prevention, Workplace ...

  14. Targeting women with free cervical cancer screening: challenges ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: the study was conducted to determine the challenges and suggest solutions to conducting free cervical cancer screening among Nigerian women. Methods: awareness was created among women groups and mass media in Osun State for women to undergo free cervical cancer screening programme.

  15. An overview of innovative techniques to improve cervical cancer screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhuis, Esther R.; Reesink-Peters, Nathalie; Wisman, G. Bea A.; Nijman, Hans W.; van Zanden, Jelmer; Volders, Haukeline; Hollema, Harry; Suurmeijer, Albert J. H.; Schuuring, Ed; van der Zee, Ate G. J.

    2006-01-01

    Although current cytomorphology-based cervical cancer screening has reduced the incidence of cervical cancer, Pap-smears are associated with high false positive and false negative rates. This has spurred the search for new technologies to improve current screening. New methodologies are automation

  16. Knowledge of Cervical Cancer Risk Factors Among Refugee ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Less than 20% knew that cervical cancer could be detected early and 6.8% had had Pap smears done. Knowledge of risk factors, signs and symptoms was low, although there was a statistically significant relationship between the educational level of the women and risk factors for cervical cancer. The paper discusses the ...

  17. Women's perceived susceptibility to and utilisation of cervical cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-10-24

    Oct 24, 2014 ... and their intentions to be screened? Which modifying factors influence women's decisions to use cervical cancer screening services in Malawi? The objective of the study was to describe the association between perceived susceptibility to cervical cancer in women aged 42 and older and their intentions to ...

  18. The Vaccine and Cervical Cancer Screen project 2 (VACCS 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cervical cancer is a preventable disease with a high prevalence in South Africa (SA), where screening is opportunistic. Primary prevention is now possible through HPV vaccination. In VACCS 1 the feasibility of linking cervical cancer with HPV vaccination was demonstrated. Objectives: To investigate the ...

  19. Cervical Cancer Screening: A Survey of Current Practice Amongst ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To study the attitude toward and practice of cervical cancer screening amongst Nigerian gynaecologists, on whom the burden of treating cervical cancer rests. Study Design, Setting and Subjects: A self-administered, questionnaire survey of 113 Nigerian gynaecologists who attended the Annual General Meeting ...

  20. Cervical cancer management in Zaria, Nigeria | Sule | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper\\'s objective was to identify factors influencing cervical cancer management in Zaria with a view to improving the outcome of management. Case notes of patients managed for cervical cancer in Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital (ABUTH), Zaria between January 1 1999 and December 31 2003, were ...

  1. Cervical cancer knowledge and screening practices among women ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cervical cancer remains a major public health challenge in developing countries including Nigeria and contributes signi cantly as a major cause of death among women of reproductive age. This study was conducted to assess knowledge and cervical cancer screening practices among women of reproductive ...

  2. Immunology and Immunotherapy of high grade cervical lesions and cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos van Steenwijk, Peggy Jacqueline de

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). The immune system plays an important role in the protection against HPV and failure of the immune system can lead to the development of cervical cancer. Immunotherapy aims at the restoration of an effective anti-tumour immunity. This

  3. Apoptosis induction of epifriedelinol on human cervical cancer cell line

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Present investigation evaluates the antitumor activity of epifriedelinol for the management of cervical cancer by inducing process of apoptosis. Methods: Human Cervical Cancer Cell Line, C33A and HeLa were selected for study and treated with epifriedelinol at a concentration of (50-1000 μg/ml). Cytotoxicity of ...

  4. Knowledge, Attitude And Practice Of Screening For Cervical Cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This low participation in screening for cervical cancer was attributed to several reasons including ignorance of the existence of such a test, lack of awareness of centers where such services are obtainable, ignorance of the importance of screening and the risk factors to the development of cervical cancer. Conclusion: There ...

  5. Cervical Cancer and Human Papilloma Virus Knowledge and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Most respondents were aware of cervical cancer (95.4%), HPV (85.4%) and HPV vaccination (69.3%) and the most common source of information was school teaching. Good knowledge of cervical cancer, HPV and HPV vaccination was demonstrated by 51.8%, 67.1% and 21.1% respectively; only 39.6% fully accepted HPV ...

  6. Mini-invasive nonsurgical treatment of class 4 invasive cervical resorption: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Salzano

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Invasive Cervical Resorption (ICR is a pathological process that can lead to a progressive tooth destruction over time, as dentin is gradually replaced by granulomatous tissue. Unfortunately ICR is difficult to diagnose because it is often asymptomatic and can easily be mistaken for a carious lesion, especially in the early stages. According to the existing literature, class IV ICR treatment shows a success rate of 12.5% when the lesion affects more than one third of the root. In this paper we describe the conservative, nonsurgical approach we adopted in treating 5 cases of class IV ICR with the help of cone-beam computed tomography and operating microscope. Resorptions were filled with MTA in three cases and with Biodentine in two cases. The follow-up period ranged from 3 months to 2 years. All patients were found to be asymptomatic and check-up radiographic examinations did not show any signs of ICR relapse.

  7. Targeting women with free cervical cancer screening: challenges and lessons learnt from Osun state, southwest Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adepoju, Ebenezer Gbenga; Ilori, Temitope; Olowookere, Samuel Anu; Idowu, Ajibola

    2016-01-01

    The study was conducted to determine the challenges and suggest solutions to conducting free cervical cancer screening among Nigerian women. Awareness was created among women groups and mass media in Osun State for women to undergo free cervical cancer screening programme. Consenting women had their socio-demographic characteristics, awareness and uptake of HPV vaccine documented and papanicolaou smear procedure done with adequate referral for treatment given where necessary. A total of 287 women had cervical cancer screening. Mean (SD) age was 51.6 (14.3) years. Most participants were urban based (87.1%), married (63.1%), had secondary education (39%) and were traders (79.1%). None of the women were aware of the preventive HPV vaccine or had been vaccinated against HPV. About 6% were pre-invasive while 0.7% had invasive cervical cancer. The highest proportions of respondents affected were young, married and had lower education. Challenges identified included poor attendance, low risk perception and logistic issues. Most participants were urban based. There is need to decentralize cancer of cervix screening through mobile clinics and establishment of screening centres in the rural areas. Neighbour to neighbour sensitization is essential. Also, HPV vaccine should be available and affordable to all girls before sexual maturity.

  8. TCGA study identifies genomic features of cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Investigators with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network have identified novel genomic and molecular characteristics of cervical cancer that will aid in subclassification of the disease and may help target therapies that are most appropriate for each patient.

  9. Cervical cancer incidence in Denmark over six decades (1943-2002)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyndi, Marianne; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Kruger Kjaer, Susanne

    2006-01-01

    was largest in the period 1988-2002 as compared to 1968-1987, coinciding with an increase in the number of Danish women covered by the organized screening program. Women 20-29 years old showed a relatively stable squamous cell carcinoma incidence but an increasing adenocarcinoma incidence throughout the study......INTRODUCTION: The purpose of the study was to describe developments in the incidence of invasive cervical cancer in Denmark, focusing on histological types, over a period of 60 years. We also describe developments in the incidence of carcinoma in situ and mortality. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study...... is based on the Danish Cancer Registry database of 39,623 reported cases of invasive cervical cancer diagnosed among Danish women in the period 1943-2002. The most important variables and measures are age-specific and age-standardized incidence and estimated annual percent changes in incidence. RESULTS...

  10. Common filaggrin gene mutations and risk of cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Peter; Wohlfahrt, Jan; Sørensen, Erik

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As carriers of filaggrin gene (FLG) mutations may have a compromised cervical mucosal barrier against human papillomavirus infection, our primary objective was to study their risk of cervical cancer. METHODS: We genotyped 586 cervical cancer patients for the two most common FLG...... mutations, R501X and 2282del4, using blood from the Copenhagen Hospital Biobank, Denmark. Controls (n = 8050) were genotyped in previous population-based studies. Information on cervical cancer, mortality and emigration were obtained from national registers. Odds ratios (OR) were estimated by logistic...... and stratification by cancer stage. RESULTS: The primary results showed that FLG mutations were not associated with the risk of cervical cancer (6.3% of cases and 7.7% of controls were carriers; OR adjusted 0.81, 95% CI 0.57-1.14; OR adjusted+ weighted 0.96, 95% CI 0.58-1.57). Among cases, FLG mutations increased...

  11. Mapping HPV Vaccination and Cervical Cancer Screening Practice in the Pacific Region-Strengthening National and Regional Cervical Cancer Prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obel, J; McKenzie, J; Buenconsejo-Lum, L E

    2015-01-01

    guidelines and policies for HPV vaccination. CONCLUSION: Current practices to prevent cervical cancer in the Pacific Region do not match the high burden of disease from cervical cancer. A regional approach, including reducing vaccine prices by bulk purchase of vaccine, technical support for implementation...

  12. Changes in knowledge of cervical cancer following introduction of human papillomavirus vaccine among women at high risk for cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Stewart Massad

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: Substantial gaps in understanding of HPV and cervical cancer prevention exist despite years of health education. While more effective educational interventions may help, optimal cancer prevention may require opt-out vaccination programs that do not require nuanced understanding.

  13. O-linked N-acetylglucosamine transferase promotes cervical cancer tumorigenesis through human papillomaviruses E6 and E7 oncogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minjun; Kim, Yoon Sook; Kim, Hwajin; Kang, Min Young; Park, Jeongsook; Lee, Dong Hoon; Roh, Gu Seob; Kim, Hyun Joon; Kang, Sang Soo; Cho, Gyeong Jae; Park, Ji Kwon; Cho, Jin Won; Shin, Jeong Kyu; Choi, Wan Sung

    2016-07-12

    O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) transferase (OGT) increases O-GlcNAc modification (O-GlcNAcylation), and transcriptional co-regulator host cell factor 1 (HCF-1) is one of OGT targets. High-risk Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs) encode E6 and E7 oncoproteins, which promote cervical cancer. Here, we tested whether O-GlcNAc modification of HCF-1 affects HPV E6 and E7 expressions and tumorigenesis of cervical cancer. We found that depleting OGT with OGT-specific shRNA significantly decreased levels of E6 and E7 oncoproteins, and cervical cancer tumorigenesis, while OGT overexpression greatly increased levels of E6 and E7 oncoproteins. Notably, OGT overexpression caused dose-dependent increases in the transcriptional activity of E6 and E7, and this activity was decreased when HCF-1 was depleted with HCF-1-specific siRNA. Moreover, OGT depletion reduced proliferation, invasion, and metastasis in cervical cancer cells. Further, high glucose enhanced the interaction between OGT and HCF-1, paralleling increased levels of E6 and E7 in cervical cancer cells. Most importantly, we found that reducing OGT in HeLa cells caused decreased tumor growth in vivo. These findings identify OGT as a novel cellular factor involved in E6 and E7 expressions and cervical cancer tumorigenesis, suggesting that targeting OGT in cervical cancer may have potential therapeutic benefit.

  14. Mixed Lineage Kinase3 as a Novel Target for Invasive Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    myeloid M1 cell line. J Cell Biochem 86: 1–11. Hanahan D, Weinberg RA. (2000). The hallmarks of cancer. Cell 100: 57–70. Jacinto A, Woolner S, Martin P...papillomavirus E7 repression in cervical carcinoma cells initiates a transcriptional cascade driven by the retinoblastoma family, resulting in...axis induces expression of several breast cancer invasion genes (16). The mechanics of cancer cell migration involve cytoskeletal remodeling and focal

  15. Fludeoxyglucose F 18 PET Scan, CT Scan, and Ferumoxtran-10 MRI Scan Before Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Finding Lymph Node Metastasis in Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer or High-Risk Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-14

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Papillary Serous Carcinoma; Stage I Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  16. Risk of cervical cancer after completed post-treatment follow-up of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebolj, Matejka; Helmerhorst, Theo; Habbema, Dik

    2012-01-01

    To compare the risk of cervical cancer in women with histologically confirmed cervical intraepithelial neoplasia who returned to routine screening after having completed post-treatment follow-up with consecutive normal smear test results with women with a normal primary smear test result....

  17. Renal Metastasis from Primary Cervical Cancer: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Seong Woo; Kim, See Hyung; Kwon, Sun Young

    2013-01-01

    Metastasis of malignant tumors to the kidney is clinically rare and often discovered by autopsy. Primary lymphoma and lung cancer are known that can metastasize to the kidney. Other malignant tumor metastasis to the kidney is very unusual. Primary cervical cancer metastasis to adjacent pelvic organs and lymph nodes are well known followed by abdominal solid organs such as the liver and adrenal glands. However, reported primary cervical cancer metastasis to the kidney is extremely rare and mostly appeared as bilateral multiple renal masses. We report here on a rare case of unilateral single renal metastasis from primary cervical cancer after concur- rent chemoradiotherapy.

  18. Second primary cancer after treatment for cervical cancer. Late effects after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storm, H.H.

    1988-01-01

    Using data from the population-based Danish Cancer Registry, the relative risk (RR) of second primary cancer was assessed among 24,970 women with invasive cervical cancer (1943-1982) and 19,470 women with carcinoma in situ of the cervix. The analysis was stratified according to treatment with (+) and without (-) radiation. For all second primaries combined, a RR+ = 1.1 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.06-1.18) and a RR- = 1.3 (95% CI = 1.13-1.40) was observed after invasive cervical cancers and a RR+ = 3.5 (95% CI = 1.4-7.2) and RR- = 1.1 (95% CI = 0.7-1.6) following in situ cancer. The small overall excess of second primary cancer is accounted for by an increase of some cancers such as lung, bladder, and a concurrent decrease in others such as breast. Although not statistically different from nonirradiated, the RR increased with time since treatment among irradiated invasive cervical cancer patients in organs close to and at intermediate distance from the cervix, reaching a maximum after 30 or more years of follow-up (RR = 1.9; 95% CI = 1.4-2.5). Altogether, for these sites an excess of 64 cases per 10,000 women per year were attributable to radiation among survivors of 30+ years. The highest risks among long-term survivors were observed for the following: other genital organs (RR = 5.8; 95% CI = 1.8-13.0) bladder (RR = 5.5; 95% CI = 2.8-9.5), connective tissue (RR = 3.3; 95% CI = 0.4-12.0), stomach (RR = 2.5; 95% CI = 1.1-4.7) and rectum (RR = 2.4; 95% CI = 1.1-4.6). A significant deficit of risk for breast cancer (RR = 0.7, 95% CI = 0.6-0.8) was observed for 10+ years, may be attributable to the effect of ovarian ablation by radiotherapy

  19. Curcumin and emodin down-regulate TGF-β signaling pathway in human cervical cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Chandrakant Thacker

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is the major cause of cancer related deaths in women, especially in developing countries and Human Papilloma Virus infection in conjunction with multiple deregulated signaling pathways leads to cervical carcinogenesis. TGF-β signaling in later stages of cancer is known to induce epithelial to mesenchymal transition promoting tumor growth. Phytochemicals, curcumin and emodin, are effective as chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic compounds against several cancers including cervical cancer. The main objective of this work was to study the effect of curcumin and emodin on TGF-β signaling pathway and its functional relevance to growth, migration and invasion in two cervical cancer cell lines, SiHa and HeLa. Since TGF-β and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways are known to cross talk having common downstream targets, we analyzed the effect of TGF-β on β-catenin (an important player in Wnt/β-catenin signaling and also studied whether curcumin and emodin modulate them. We observed that curcumin and emodin effectively down regulate TGF-β signaling pathway by decreasing the expression of TGF-β Receptor II, P-Smad3 and Smad4, and also counterbalance the tumorigenic effects of TGF-β by inhibiting the TGF-β-induced migration and invasion. Expression of downstream effectors of TGF-β signaling pathway, cyclinD1, p21 and Pin1, was inhibited along with the down regulation of key mesenchymal markers (Snail and Slug upon curcumin and emodin treatment. Curcumin and emodin were also found to synergistically inhibit cell population and migration in SiHa and HeLa cells. Moreover, we found that TGF-β activates Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in HeLa cells, and curcumin and emodin down regulate the pathway by inhibiting β-catenin. Taken together our data provide a mechanistic basis for the use of curcumin and emodin in the treatment of cervical cancer.

  20. HPV types, HIV and invasive cervical carcinoma risk in Kampala, Uganda: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleter Bernhard

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While the association of human papillomavirus (HPV with cervical cancer is well established, the influence of HIV on the risk of this disease in sub-Saharan Africa remains unclear. To assess the risk of invasive cervical carcinoma (ICC associated with HIV and HPV types, a hospital-based case-control study was performed between September 2004 and December 2006 in Kampala, Uganda. Incident cases of histologically-confirmed ICC (N=316 and control women (N=314, who were visitors or care-takers of ICC cases in the hospital, were recruited. Blood samples were obtained for HIV serology and CD4 count, as well as cervical samples for HPV testing. HPV DNA detection and genotyping was performed using the SPF10/DEIA/LiPA25 technique which detects all mucosal HPV types by DEIA and identifies 25 HPV genotypes by LiPA version 1. Samples that tested positive but could not be genotyped were designated HPVX. Odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated by logistic regression, adjusting for possible confounding factors. Results For both squamous cell carcinoma (SCC and adenocarcinoma of the cervix, statistically significantly increased ORs were found among women infected with HPV, in particular single HPV infections, infections with HPV16-related types and high-risk HPV types, in particular HPV16, 18 and 45. For other HPV types the ORs for both SCC and adenocarcinoma were not statistically significantly elevated. HIV infection and CD4 count were not associated with SCC or adenocarcinoma risk in our study population. Among women infected with high-risk HPV types, no association between HIV and SCC emerged. However, an inverse association with adenocarcinoma was observed, while decrease in CD4 count was not associated with ICC risk. Conclusions The ORs for SCC and adenocarcinoma were increased in women infected with HPV, in particular single HPV infections, infections with HPV16- and 18-related types, and high-risk HPV types

  1. Improved abnormal Pap smear triage using cervical cancer biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killeen, Jeffrey L; Dye, Timothy; Grace, Chelestes; Hiraoka, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The current system of Pap smear screening and management of abnormal cytology has resulted in a marked reduction in invasive cervical cancer. Many women, however, are not found to have significant precursor lesions. This is due to the poor specificity of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) triage. More specific cervical cancer biomarkers may be more effective triage tools than hr-HPV. We evaluated whether a dual stain for p16 and Ki-67 might improve the triage of abnormal Pap smears. p16/Ki-67 immunostaining was performed on additional slides prepared from 515 women with abnormal Pap smears (301 atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance [ASCUS], 169 low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion [LSIL], 29 atypical squamous cells-cannot exclude high-grade lesion [ASC-H], 16 high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion [HSIL]). High-risk HPV typing was performed on all cases. Immunostaining and hr-HPV were compared in relation to their diagnostic accuracy for the detection of biopsy-proven cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 2/3. A cost analysis comparing hr-HPV versus immunostaining as the initial triage tool used for abnormal Pap smears was also performed. High-risk HPV was positive in 127 (42.2%) ASCUS, 129 (76.3%) LSIL, 20 (69.0%) ASC-H, and 15 (93.8%) HSIL. p16/Ki-67 was positive in 54 (17.9%) ASCUS, 73 (43.2%) LSIL, 19 (65.5%) ASC-H, and 15 (93.8%) HSIL. For detection of CIN 2/3, sensitivity/specificity of hr-HPV and p16/Ki-67 was 89.29%/14.94% and 96.43%/60.92%, respectively. Overall, diagnostic accuracy was statistically significantly higher for p16/Ki-67 compared with hr-HPV. Compared to HPV, immunostain triage could have generated approximately $46,000 savings in the study population. The triage of abnormal Pap smears by p16/Ki-67 immunostaining shows comparable sensitivity, improved specificity, and significantly improved diagnostic performance when compared to hr-HPV. Immunostaining is of value in triaging LSIL and ASC-H Pap smears in addition

  2. Uterine cervical cancer. Usefulness of MR imaging after the initial radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monzen, Yoshio [Hiroshima Prefectural Hiroshima Hospital (Japan); Mori, Hiromu; Matsumoto, Akira; Yoshida, Shintaro; Wakisaka, Masaki; Komatsu, Eiji; Tashiro, Makoto; Hori, Yuko

    1995-09-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diagnosing residual or recurrent tumors of cervical cancer after radiation therapy, we investigated the time difference between MRI and gynecologic findings in the diagnosis of residual or recurrent tumor in 12 patients with invasive cervical cancer. We defined a positive finding for residual or recurrent tumor as an uterine cervical mass isointense to muscle on T1-weighted images and hyperintense on T2-weighted images, and when a positive biopsy specimen was obtained. Two patients were diagnosed as having a residual or recurrent tumor by MRI. Positivity was demonstrated four and seven months later, respectively. MRI was more useful in the earlier diagnosis of residual or recurrent tumor of cervical cancer after radiation therapy than uterine biopsy. There was one patient whose differentiation from residual tumor or radiation-induced necrosis or inflammation on MRI was difficult. MRI and gynecologic check-up at a regular interval after radiation therapy was needed to distinguish them. One patient was diagnosed as having a recurrent tumor by gynecologic finding three months earlier than by MRI. Follow-up MRI examinations at a regular interval in addition to gynecologic examination is necessary for the early detection of recurrent cervical cancer after radiation therapy. (author).

  3. Preprocessing for Automating Early Detection of Cervical Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Abhishek; Kar, Avijit; Bhattacharyya, Debasis

    2011-01-01

    Uterine Cervical Cancer is one of the most common forms of cancer in women worldwide. Most cases of cervical cancer can be prevented through screening programs aimed at detecting precancerous lesions. During Digital Colposcopy, colposcopic images or cervigrams are acquired in raw form. They contain specular reflections which appear as bright spots heavily saturated with white light and occur due to the presence of moisture on the uneven cervix surface and. The cervix region occupies about hal...

  4. Patient, Physician, and Nurse Factors Associated With Entry Onto Clinical Trials and Finishing Treatment in Patients With Primary or Recurrent Uterine, Endometrial, or Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-26

    Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Sarcoma; Stage I Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage I Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IV Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IV Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  5. Small invasive colon cancer with systemic metastasis: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakamoto Taku

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background Recently, especially in Japan, several researchers have suggested that colorectal cancer can develop not only through an adenoma-carcinoma sequence but also from normal mucosa via a de novo pathway, and that these de novo cancers have more aggressive malignant potential. We report a case of aggressive colon cancer resulting in systemic metastasis despite small tumour size. Case Presentation A 35-year-old woman presented at the referring hospital with swelling of the left cervical lymph node. Biopsy of the lymph node revealed metastatic adenocarcinoma; however, CT scan and mammography were unable to identify the site of the primary lesion. She was diagnosed with unknown primary cancer and referred to our hospital for further examination. Immunohistochemical reevaluation showed the cervical lymph node biopsy specimen to be positive for CDX2 and CK20 and negative for CK7 expression, leading us to suspect the presence of a primary colorectal cancer. We performed a total colonoscopy, and detected a small protruding lesion in the transverse colon. The tumour was only 12 mm in diameter, with a central depressed component and a severely thickened stalk, which suggested direct cancer invasion of the deep submucosa. We concluded that this lesion was the site of origin of the metastasis despite the small tumour size, and performed diagnostic endoscopic mucosal resection. The lesion was found to have an intramucosal cancer component, demonstrating that this lesion represented primary colon cancer. The patient was referred to the gastrointestinal oncology division for systemic chemotherapy. Conclusions In this case, immunohistochemical findings strongly suggested the existence of a colorectal cancer. The non-polypoid gross appearance of the tumour suggested that it can originate de novo , thus providing a valuable case in support of the aggressive malignant potential of a de novo colorectal cancer pathway.

  6. Biomarkers and their use in cervical cancer chemoprevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlastos, Anne Thérèse; Schottenfeld, David; Follen, Michele

    2003-06-01

    Cervical cancer chemoprevention agents under study include diet and micronutrients (particularly beta-carotene, folate, and vitamins A, C, and E); medications such as retinoids (retinyl acetate gel, all-trans-retinoic acid, and 4-hydroxyphenylretinamide) that are chemically related to micronutrients; and other chemopreventives meant to affect the carcinogenic process at the cellular level, including such polyamine synthesis inhibitors as alpha-difluoromethylornithine. Agents become reasonable candidates for study when they have a biologic rationale, they are of low toxicity, and they can be taken for a long period of time. Since the human papillomavirus (HPV) is the major etiologic agent, the medication should show activity against HPV-positive preinvasive and invasive cell lines. The medication needs to be of low toxicity because it may be taken for long periods of time and less toxicity is tolerated in the precancerous setting. Until 1995, none of the studies used surrogate end point biomarkers (SEBs), relying instead on histologic and colposcopic regression as end points. All studies typically included subjects with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. Conclusions to be drawn from these studies include the following: Though micronutrients are logical candidates for chemoprevention, they haven't worked consistently, and the reasons remain unclear. Furthermore, SEBs need to be validated in phase I trials. Finally, a better understanding of the role of HPV needs elucidation, including an understanding of the relationship of the medication to HPV status and of the immunobiology of HPV throughout the trial.

  7. The analysis of the entire HLA, partial non-HLA and HPV for Chinese women with cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuping; Zhang, Qinming; Liu, Benrong; Yu, Guifang

    2008-10-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles have been associated with an increased or decreased risk of developing cervical cancer through infection with oncogenic forms of the human papillomavirus (HPV). The aim of this study was to analyze the interactions between HPV and HLA, particularly of the entire HLA and partial non-HLA regions, in invasive cervical cancers. The results showed the distribution of HPV genotypes among patients with cervical cancer in this group: the overall prevalence of HPV DNA was 91.3% (274/300). A total of 16 HPV genotypes, HPV16, 18, 58, 33, 81, 31, 68, 39, 67, 6, 11, 26, 52, 62, 66, and 70, were detected in patients with cervical cancer. Among the cervical cancer specimens, 68.7% were positive for HPV16. Genotyping was performed with 112 microsatellite markers spanning the entire HLA region and partial region of chromosome 6q15-16.3. D6S2766 and D6S2764, which are located near to the region containing the HLA-DPB genes, were negatively related with cervical cancer (OR for the D6S2766-195 allele carriers = 0.50), and positively related with cervical cancer (OR for the D6S2764-209 allele carriers = 2.44), respectively. Significant association was found for D6S1043 (allele 132) with HPV16-positive cervical cancer (OR = 4.52). There was an increased risk for carriers of alleles 112 and 132 at the D6S1043 locus, in particular for homozygotes. The present findings indicate that the antigenic presentation of HPV-derived peptides and non-HLA regions may be involved in the pathogenesis of HPV-associated cervical cancer.

  8. Brachytherapy Improves Survival in Stage III Endometrial Cancer With Cervical Involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingham, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Orton, Andrew; Boothe, Dustin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Stoddard, Greg [Division of Epidemiology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Huang, Y. Jessica; Gaffney, David K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Poppe, Matthew M., E-mail: Matthew.poppe@hci.utah.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the survival benefit of adding vaginal brachytherapy (BT) to pelvic external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in women with stage III endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Data Base was used to identify patients with stage III endometrial cancer from 2004 to 2013. Only women who received adjuvant EBRT were analyzed. Women were grouped according to receipt of BT. Logistic regression modeling was used to identify predictors of receiving BT. Log–rank statistics were used to compare survival outcomes. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to evaluate the effect of BT on survival. A propensity score–matched analysis was also conducted among women with cervical involvement. Results: We evaluated 12,988 patients with stage III endometrial carcinoma, 39% of whom received EBRT plus BT. Women who received BT were more likely to have endocervical or cervical stromal involvement (odds ratios 2.03 and 1.77; P<.01, respectively). For patients receiving EBRT alone, the 5-year survival was 66% versus 69% with the addition of BT at 5 years (P<.01). Brachytherapy remained significantly predictive of decreased risk of death (hazard ratio 0.86; P<.01) on multivariate Cox regression. The addition of BT to EBRT did not affect survival among women without cervical involvement (P=.84). For women with endocervical or cervical stromal invasion, the addition of BT significantly improved survival (log–rank P<.01). Receipt of EBRT plus BT was associated with improved survival in women with positive and negative surgical margins, and receiving chemotherapy did not alter the benefit of BT. Propensity score–matched analysis results confirmed the benefit of BT among women with cervical involvement (hazard ratio 0.80; P=.01). Conclusions: In this population of women with stage III endometrial cancer the addition of BT to EBRT was associated with an improvement in survival for women with endocervical or cervical stromal invasion.

  9. The correlation of the P53 protein expression in invasive cervical carcinoma with prognostic and clinical factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Aguiar Petri Nahas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of p53 protein in cervical carcinoma correlated with clinical and prognostic factors was performed in a retrospective study with p53 expression detection by immunohistochemical technique. 120 slides of patients with squamous cell cancer at the Gynecologic Oncology Clinic and stored in the Department of Pathological Anatom at the School of Medicine of Botucatu were used. Age, ethnicity, parity, smoking habit, oral contraceptive use, age at first intercourse, histology, stage, treatment, and follow-up were the cofactors associated with p53 positivity. Fisher’s exact tests were carried out to analyze associations between p53 and variables, with p < 0.05 as the significant level. The study revealed a 43.3% frequency of patients with stage II disease and p53 positive rate with p = 0.001, and 64.2% frequency with p = 0.024 of patients whose first intercourse occurred between the ages of 15 and 20. These findings show the correlation between stage II disease and age at first intercourse with p53 positive in invasive cervical cancer. Fisher's exact test revelead these cofactors to be statistically significant and there was no association between the protein p53 with others prognostic and analyzed cofactors. The prognostic value of p53 in cervical cancer had been examined, with the conclusion that p53 is correlated to unfavorable prognosis.

  10. The development of genes associated with radiosensitivity of cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hongyan; Chen Zhihua; He Guifang

    2007-01-01

    It has a good application prospect to predict effects of radiotherapy by examining radiosensitivity of patients with cervical cancers before their radiotherapy. Prediction of tumor cell radiosensitivity according to their level of gene expression and gene therapy to reverse radio-resistance prior to radiation on cervical cancers are heated researches on tumor therapy. The expression of some proliferation-related genes, apoptosis-related genes and hypoxia-related genes can inerease the radiosensitivity of cervical cancer. Microarray technology may have more direct applications to the study of biological pathway contributing to radiation resistance and may lead to development of alternative treatment modalities. (authors)

  11. Needs and priorities of women with endometrial and cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Mette Moustgaard; Mogensen, Ole; Dehn, Pernille

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Rehabilitation after cancer is important, and efficient rehabilitation requires knowledge of patient's needs. This study aimed to identify short-term rehabilitation needs of women with endometrial and cervical cancer. METHODS: Ninety-six women (82.6%) were included in an exploratory...... with endometrial cancer. Of these, 38 had FIGO-stage 1 disease (73.1%) and 25 were treated with laparoscopic surgery (48.1%). Emotional functioning was significantly worse prior to treatment in both the cancers (p endometrial) and worry constituted an unmet need in 70.7% of cervical...... and 34.7% of endometrial cancer patients. Both the patient groups experienced significant lymphedema post-treatment [endometrial cancer (p = 0.006) and cervical cancer (p = 0.002)]. Further, urological problems were more prevalent post-treatment in endometrial cancer patients (p = 0.018), while sexual...

  12. Diffusion-weighted MRI in cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McVeigh, Patrick Z.; Haider, Masoom A.; Syed, Aejaz M.; Milosevic, Michael; Fyles, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    The purpose was to investigate the potential value of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurement with MRI in the assessment of cervix cancer. Diffusion-weighted MRI was performed in 47 patients with cervical carcinoma undergoing chemoradiation therapy and 26 normal controls on a 1.5-T system with a b-value of 600 s/mm 2 . FIGO stage, tumor volume, nodal status, interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) and oxygen measurements were recorded. Response was defined as no visible tumor 3-6 months following completion of therapy. The average median ADC (mADC) of cervical carcinomas (1.09±0.20 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s) was significantly lower than normal cervix (2.09±0.46 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s) (P -3 mm 2 /s) compared to T2b (1.21 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s) and T3/T4 (1.10 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s) (P<0.001). In patients with squamous carcinomas the 90th percentile of ADC values was lower in responders than non-responders (P<0.05). Median ADC in cervix carcinoma is significantly lower compared to normal cervix. ADC may have predictive value in squamous tumors, but further long-term study will determine the ultimate clinical utility. (orig.)

  13. Cervical cancer screening and practice in low resource countries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While developed countries have recorded significant reduction in the incidence of cervical cancer owing to organized screening programs, treatment of premalignant cervical lesions, and follow-up of treated cases, developing countries including Nigeria are yet to optimally utilize screening services due to lack of organized ...

  14. Cervical cancer screening and practice in low resource countries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While developed countries have recorded significant reduction in the incidence of cervical cancer owing to organizedscreening programs, treatment of premalignant cervical lesions, and follow‑up of treated cases, developing countries including Nigeria are yet to optimally utilize screening services due to lack of organized ...

  15. CLINIC VISITS AND CERVICAL CANCER SCREENING IN ACCRA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-06-01

    Pap) smear and visual inspection of the cervix with acetic acid (VIA).3,4. Cervical cancer screening procedures are able to detect pre-malignant lesions of the cervix which can be treated and so pre- vent progress to cervical ...

  16. Cervical Cancer in Women with Unhealthy Cervix in a Rural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mubeen

    Journal of Basic and Clinical Reproductive Sciences ・ July - December 2013 ・ Vol 2 ・ Issue 2. 97. Cervical ... Background:Cervical cancer, the most common malignancy among Indian women, is the second most common and fifth most ... biomedical spectrum, but also has a wide cultural and socio-economic background.

  17. Epidemiological, clinical and therapeutic profile of cervical cancer in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: This study revealed a dramatic figure of cervical cancer in Butembo city. Effort should be made by the government and other health agencies to organize mass campaign to practice cervical screening as well as education on the various risk factors. Access to the vaccines (anti-HPV 16-18) and the precocious ...

  18. Cervical Cancer and Human Papilloma Virus Knowledge and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the commonest viral sexually transmitted infection in the world and the leading cause of cervical cancer. Medical students as future healthcare providers will play a role in influencing patients' decision to receive HPV vaccination. This study was aimed at determining the knowledge of cervical ...

  19. Knowledge and practice of cervical cancer screening at the Imo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Those who were aware of cervical cancer were 13.6% as against 6% who were aware of Pap smear. Only 2.4% of the 450 respondents had ever had a cervical cytology performed on them. The most frequent reason given for not using the service was lack of physician referral. Culture was found to negatively impact on the ...

  20. Reduced rate of human papillomavirus infection and genetic overtransmission of TP53 72C polymorphic variant lower cervical cancer incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsbeih, Ghazi A; Al-Harbi, Najla M; Bin Judia, Sara S; Khoja, Hatim A; Shoukri, Mohamed M; Tulbah, Asma M

    2017-07-01

    Cervical cancer is a predominantly human papillomavirus (HPV)-driven disease worldwide. However, its incidence is unexplainably low in western Asia, including Saudi Arabia. Using this paradigm, we investigated the role of HPV infection rate and host genetic predisposition in TP53 G72C single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) presumed to affect cancer incidence. Patients treated between 1990 and 2012 were reviewed, and a series of 232 invasive cervical cancer cases were studied and compared with 313 matched controls without cancer. SNP was genotyped by way of direct sequencing. HPV linear array analysis was used to detect and genotype HPV in tumor samples. The incidence of cervical cancer revealed bimodal peaks at 42.5 years, with a slighter rebound at 60.8 years. Among all cases, 77% were HPV-positive and 16 HPV genotypes were detected-mostly genotypes 16 (75%) and 18 (9%)-with no difference by age, histology, or geographical region. Although the TP53 G72C genotype was not associated with overall cervical cancer risk, it was significantly associated with HPV positivity (odds ratio, 0.57; 95% confidence interval, 0.36-0.90; P = .016). Furthermore, the variant C allele was significantly overtransmitted in the population (P Cervical cancer incidence displays bimodal curve peaking at a young age with secondary rebound at older age. The combination of relative low HPV infection and variant TP53 72C allele overtransmission provide a plausible explanation for the low incidence of cervical cancer in our population. Therefore, HPV screening and host SNP genotyping may provide more relevant biomarkers to gauge the risk of developing cervical cancer. Cancer 2017;123:2459-66. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Cancer Society.

  1. The prognostic values of the expression of Vimentin, TP53, and Podoplanin in patients with cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiaying; Lu, Jiaqi; Wang, Chao; Xue, Xiaohong

    2017-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), TP53, and Podoplanin have been implicated in the tumorigenesis and metastasis of human cancers. Nevertheless, the clinical significance of these markers in cancer patients is still not clear. In this study, we sought to determine the prognostic values of Vimentin, TP53, and Podoplanin in patients with cervical cancer. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western blot analysis were performed to determine the messenger RNA and protein expression levels of Vimentin, TP53, and Podoplanin, respectively, in cervical squamous cell carcinoma and adjacent normal cervical tissues. Additionally, the expression levels of Podoplanin were also measured in 130 cervical cancer patients (FIGO stages Ib1-IIa2) using immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining. The mRNA expression levels of Vimentin, TP53, and Podoplanin were considerably elevated in cervical cancer tissues, compared with those in the adjacent normal cervical tissues. Additionally, the protein expression levels of Vimentin were closely correlated with the age of onset (P = 0.007), lymph node metastasis (P = 0.007), lymphatic invasion (P = 0.024), disease recurrence (P < 0.001), and the clinical prognosis of patients with cervical cancer (P < 0.001). Our multivariate analysis also suggests that Vimentin is an independent marker for survival in cervical cancer patients. Furthermore, the expression levels of Vimentin are negatively correlated with the proliferation marker Ki67 expression. Our data show that Vimentin can serve as an independent prognostic marker for cervical cancer patients with primary surgery. Registration number ChiCTR-TRC-06000236 Registered 15 December 2006.

  2. The cervical cancer prevention programme in Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Ileana Quirós

    2015-01-01

    Cervical and uterine cancer continues to be an important issue for women around the world, although neoplasia has the greatest demonstrated potential for prevention. Costa Rica has achieved important advances in the reduction of the incidence and mortality of these cancers since the last century. This is the result of a series of policies, programmes, and plans, not only at the level of the health care system, but also in other areas. Increased access for women to care in health centres, fundamentally at the primary level, has been vital, as has ensuring the quality of cytology readings and access to diagnosis and treatment for precursor lesions for in situ and invasive cancers. Despite all of these achievements, there are still challenges to be overcome, which are widespread in many countries in Latin America and the Caribbean. It is important to learn from the experiences of other countries in order to improve women’s health not only as a health objective, but also as an ethical imperative to promote the exercise of women’s rights to life and health. PMID:26557876

  3. Cell membrane softening in human breast and cervical cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Händel, Chris; Schmidt, B. U. Sebastian; Schiller, Jürgen; Dietrich, Undine; Möhn, Till; Kießling, Tobias R.; Pawlizak, Steve; Fritsch, Anatol W.; Horn, Lars-Christian; Briest, Susanne; Höckel, Michael; Zink, Mareike; Käs, Josef A.

    2015-08-01

    Biomechanical properties are key to many cellular functions such as cell division and cell motility and thus are crucial in the development and understanding of several diseases, for instance cancer. The mechanics of the cellular cytoskeleton have been extensively characterized in cells and artificial systems. The rigidity of the plasma membrane, with the exception of red blood cells, is unknown and membrane rigidity measurements only exist for vesicles composed of a few synthetic lipids. In this study, thermal fluctuations of giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) directly derived from the plasma membranes of primary breast and cervical cells, as well as breast cell lines, are analyzed. Cell blebs or GPMVs were studied via thermal membrane fluctuations and mass spectrometry. It will be shown that cancer cell membranes are significantly softer than their non-malignant counterparts. This can be attributed to a loss of fluid raft forming lipids in malignant cells. These results indicate that the reduction of membrane rigidity promotes aggressive blebbing motion in invasive cancer cells.

  4. Dynamics of cancerous tissue correlates with invasiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Ann-Katrine Vransø; Wullkopf, Lena; Christensen, Amalie; Leijnse, Natascha; Tarp, Jens Magelund; Mathiesen, Joachim; Erler, Janine Terra; Oddershede, Lene Broeng

    2017-03-01

    Two of the classical hallmarks of cancer are uncontrolled cell division and tissue invasion, which turn the disease into a systemic, life-threatening condition. Although both processes are studied, a clear correlation between cell division and motility of cancer cells has not been described previously. Here, we experimentally characterize the dynamics of invasive and non-invasive breast cancer tissues using human and murine model systems. The intrinsic tissue velocities, as well as the divergence and vorticity around a dividing cell correlate strongly with the invasive potential of the tissue, thus showing a distinct correlation between tissue dynamics and aggressiveness. We formulate a model which treats the tissue as a visco-elastic continuum. This model provides a valid reproduction of the cancerous tissue dynamics, thus, biological signaling is not needed to explain the observed tissue dynamics. The model returns the characteristic force exerted by an invading cell and reveals a strong correlation between force and invasiveness of breast cancer cells, thus pinpointing the importance of mechanics for cancer invasion.

  5. Endometrial and cervical metastases leading to the diagnosis of a primary breast cancer: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Chupryna

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer can metastasize to a vast array of organs, but in rare cases cancer can form secondary lesions in the uterus and cervix. In our case report we have a 56 years old female with gynaecologic bleeding, bloating, and difficulty in breathing, fatigue, weakness and polyuria. After performing of dilatation and curettage the result was endometrial and cervical metastases which show histopathological and immunohistochemical results suggesting invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast that leads to primary breast cancer. The treatment was estimated on the basis of her status.

  6. Vaccines for Prevention of Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahomed, M.F.

    2017-01-01

    The characteristics of two prophylactic Human Papilloma Virus HPV vaccines and ethical issues related to HPV vaccination are reviewed in this paper. These vaccines have the potential of substantially reducing HPV-related morbidity and mortality, and in particular cervical cancer. The vaccines cannot treat women with current HPV infection or HPV related disease. They should be administered before the commencement of sexual activity. The ideal age group is adolescent girls between the ages 9-13. Both vaccines are highly efficacious and immunogenic and induce high levels of serum antibodies after three doses for all vaccine-related HPV types. School-based vaccination is considered as a costeffective method for its delivery. Adequate education of both clinicians and patients is an essential to ensure effective implementation when considering a national vaccination program. (author)

  7. CCR2-V64I polymorphism is associated with increased risk of cervical cancer but not with HPV infection or pre-cancerous lesions in African women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williamson Anna-Lise

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cervical cancer, caused by specific oncogenic types of human papillomavirus (HPV, is the second most common cancer in women worldwide. A large number of young sexually active women get infected by HPV but only a small fraction of them have persistent infection and develop cervical cancer pointing to co- factors including host genetics that might play a role in outcome of the HPV infection. This study investigated the role of CCR2-V64I polymorphism in cervical cancer, pre-cancers and HPV infection in South African women resident in Western Cape. CCR2-V64I polymorphism has been previously reported to influence the progression to cervical cancer in some populations and has also been associated with decreased progression from HIV infection to AIDS. Methods Genotyping for CCR2-V64I was done by PCR-SSP in a case-control study of 446 women (106 black African and 340 mixed-ancestry with histologically confirmed invasive cervical cancer and 1432 controls (322 black African and 1110 mixed-ancestry group-matched (1:3 by age, ethnicity and domicile status. In the control women HPV was detected using the Digene Hybrid Capture II test and cervical disease was detected by cervical cytology. Results The CCR2-64I variant was significantly associated with cervical cancer when cases were compared to the control group (P = 0.001. Further analysis comparing selected groups within the controls showed that individuals with abnormal cytology and high grade squamous intraepitleial neoplasia (HSIL did not have this association when compared to women with normal cytology. HPV infection also showed no association with CCR2-64I variant. Comparing SIL positive controls with the cases showed a significant association of CCR2-64I variant (P = 0.001 with cervical cancer. Conclusions This is the first study of the role of CCR2-V64I polymorphism in cervical cancer in an African population. Our results show that CCR2-64I variant is associated with the risk of

  8. CCR2-V64I polymorphism is associated with increased risk of cervical cancer but not with HPV infection or pre-cancerous lesions in African women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, Koushik; Dandara, Collet; Hoffman, Margaret; Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2010-01-01

    Cervical cancer, caused by specific oncogenic types of human papillomavirus (HPV), is the second most common cancer in women worldwide. A large number of young sexually active women get infected by HPV but only a small fraction of them have persistent infection and develop cervical cancer pointing to co- factors including host genetics that might play a role in outcome of the HPV infection. This study investigated the role of CCR2-V64I polymorphism in cervical cancer, pre-cancers and HPV infection in South African women resident in Western Cape. CCR2-V64I polymorphism has been previously reported to influence the progression to cervical cancer in some populations and has also been associated with decreased progression from HIV infection to AIDS. Genotyping for CCR2-V64I was done by PCR-SSP in a case-control study of 446 women (106 black African and 340 mixed-ancestry) with histologically confirmed invasive cervical cancer and 1432 controls (322 black African and 1110 mixed-ancestry) group-matched (1:3) by age, ethnicity and domicile status. In the control women HPV was detected using the Digene Hybrid Capture II test and cervical disease was detected by cervical cytology. The CCR2-64I variant was significantly associated with cervical cancer when cases were compared to the control group (P = 0.001). Further analysis comparing selected groups within the controls showed that individuals with abnormal cytology and high grade squamous intraepitleial neoplasia (HSIL) did not have this association when compared to women with normal cytology. HPV infection also showed no association with CCR2-64I variant. Comparing SIL positive controls with the cases showed a significant association of CCR2-64I variant (P = 0.001) with cervical cancer. This is the first study of the role of CCR2-V64I polymorphism in cervical cancer in an African population. Our results show that CCR2-64I variant is associated with the risk of cervical cancer but does not affect the susceptibility to HPV

  9. Studying the Physical Function and Quality of Life Before and After Surgery in Patients With Stage I Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-14

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Lymphedema; Sexual Dysfunction and Infertility; Stage IA1 Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IA2 Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IB1 Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7

  10. Pelvic inflammatory disease is a risk factor for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skapinyecz, J; Smid, I; Horváth, A; Jeney, Cs; Kardos, L; Kovács, P

    2003-01-01

    The acquisition of human papillomavirus (HPV), the most important etiological agent of cervical cancer, does not cause clinical complaints. Although HPV spreads together with agents causing pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) with complaints forcing the patient to seek medical advice, PID has not yet been evaluated as a predictor of cervical cancer. The present study aimed to determine the relationship between PID and HPV in order to evaluate the possible risk factor role of PID for cervical cancer. Two groups of patients were studied: (i) 2,215 women with PID; (ii) 4,217 women participating in a cervical cancer screening programme who were found to have cytological atypia, mucopurulent cervicitis or other colposcopically detected disorders but were free of symptoms of PID. The presence of HPV and other STD agents in cervical smears was detected with polymerase-chain reaction. HPV prevalence was 33.74% in patients with PID and 26.40% in the group of women without PID (p cervical cancer.

  11. Intraoperative irradiation in advanced cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado, G.; Goldson, A.L.; Ashayeri, E.; Petrilli, E.S.

    1987-01-01

    Conventional treatment of cervical cancer, such as radical hysterectomy with lymphadenectomy or pelvic exenteration, is limited to the pelvis. Standard radio-therapeutic treatment is a combination of external-beam radiotherapy to the pelvis and intracavitary applications. However, there is a group of patients for whom external radiotherapy alone has limitations. This group consists primarily of patients with large pelvic lymph nodes containing metastatic cancer, metastatically involved paraaortic lymph nodes outside the usual pelvic radiation field, or large central tumors with parametrial involvement. In patients with cancer of the cervix, the incidence of metastasis to paraaortic lymph nodes is high. Attempts to treat paraaortic nodes with external radiotherapy have resulted in high complication rates because the treatment field includes the highly sensitive gastrointestinal tract. External radiation therapy after retroperitoneal exploration of lymph nodes does not seem to improve survival. In an attempt to circumvent the morbidity and mortality associated with conventional external-beam irradiation, the authors initiated a pilot study of intraoperative electron-beam irradiation of the paraaortic nodes and of the large metastatic lymph nodes in the pelvis. The intraoperative boost was followed by conventional fractionated external-beam irradiation. The theoretical advantages of this procedure include a higher radiation tumor dose without a concomitant increase in treatment morbidity and mortality

  12. Provider Perspectives on Promoting Cervical Cancer Screening Among Refugee Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Ornelas, India J; Do, H Hoai; Magarati, Maya; Jackson, J Carey; Taylor, Victoria M

    2017-06-01

    Many refugees in the United States emigrated from countries where the incidence of cervical cancer is high. Refugee women are unlikely to have been screened for cervical cancer prior to resettlement in the U.S. National organizations recommend cervical cancer screening for refugee women soon after resettlement. We sought to identify health and social service providers' perspectives on promoting cervical cancer screening in order to inform the development of effective programs to increase screening among recently resettled refugees. This study consisted of 21 in-depth key informant interviews with staff from voluntary refugee resettlement agencies, community based organizations, and healthcare clinics serving refugees in King County, Washington. Interview transcripts were analyzed to identify themes. We identified the following themes: (1) refugee women are unfamiliar with preventive care and cancer screening; (2) providers have concerns about the timing of cervical cancer education and screening; (3) linguistic and cultural barriers impact screening uptake; (4) provider factors and clinic systems facilitate promotion of screening; and (5) strategies for educating refugee women about screening. Our findings suggest that refugee women are in need of health education on cervical cancer screening during early resettlement. Frequent messaging about screening could help ensure that women receive screening within the early resettlement period. Health education videos may be effective for providing simple, low literacy messages in women's native languages. Appointments with female clinicians and interpreters, as well as clinic systems that remind clinicians to offer screening at each appointment could increase screening among refugee women.

  13. Salvage Surgery for Cervical Cancer Recurrences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rema, P; Mathew, Arun Peter; Suchetha, S; Ahmed, Iqbal

    2017-06-01

    Cervical cancer usually presents in advanced stages and is treated with chemoradiation. About 15-20 % patients present with local recurrence after chemoradiation. Radical surgical resection is the only treatment modality offering long term survival benefit in recurrent cervical cancer. The most common surgical option for these patients is pelvic exenteration. Radical hysterectomy may be done for patients with a small centrally located recurrence in the cervix with no infiltration of adjacent structures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the morbidity and survival outcome following radical hysterectomy and pelvic exenteration for recurrent cancer cervix. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of our patients who underwent surgery for cancer cervix recurrence from January 2010 to December 2014. The postoperative morbidity was considered early if it happened in the initial 30 days of surgery and late if it occurred after 30 days. All patients were followed up till February 2015. Survival analysis was done using Kaplan- Meir method. Between January 2010 and December 2014, 20 patients with recurrent cervical cancer underwent radical surgical resection. The median age of the study group was 43 years (range 28-63 years). Seventeen patients had squamous cell carcinoma and 3 had adenocarcinoma. 13 underwent pelvic exenteration and 7 patients underwent radical type 2 hysterectomy with bilateral pelvic lymphnode dissection. In the exenteration group, 8 patients had anterior exenteration, 4 had total exenteration and one had posterior exenteration. Urinary diversion was done by ileal conduit in 8 patients, double barrel colostomy in two and wet colostomy in two patients. There were no immediate postoperative deaths. Operating time, blood transfusions needed and hospital stay was more in the exenteration group compared to radical hysterectomy patients. After pelvic exenteration post-operative complications were seen in 76.9 % of which the most common was of

  14. Obstetric outcomes after conservative treatment for cervical intraepithelial lesions and early invasive disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrgiou, Maria; Athanasiou, Antonios; Kalliala, Ilkka E J; Paraskevaidi, Maria; Mitra, Anita; Martin-Hirsch, Pierre Pl; Arbyn, Marc; Bennett, Phillip; Paraskevaidis, Evangelos

    2017-11-02

    The mean age of women undergoing local treatment for pre-invasive cervical disease (cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia; CIN) or early cervical cancer (stage IA1) is around their 30s and similar to the age of women having their first child. Local cervical treatment has been correlated to adverse reproductive morbidity in a subsequent pregnancy, however, published studies and meta-analyses have reached contradictory conclusions. To assess the effect of local cervical treatment for CIN and early cervical cancer on obstetric outcomes (after 24 weeks of gestation) and to correlate these to the cone depth and comparison group used. We searched the following databases: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; the Cochrane Library, 2017, Issue 5), MEDLINE (up to June week 4, 2017) and Embase (up to week 26, 2017). In an attempt to identify articles missed by the search or unpublished data, we contacted experts in the field and we handsearched the references of the retrieved articles and conference proceedings. We included all studies reporting on obstetric outcomes (more than 24 weeks of gestation) in women with or without a previous local cervical treatment for any grade of CIN or early cervical cancer (stage IA1). Treatment included both excisional and ablative methods. We excluded studies that had no untreated reference population, reported outcomes in women who had undergone treatment during pregnancy or had a high-risk treated or comparison group, or both DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We classified studies according to the type of treatment and the obstetric endpoint. Studies were classified according to method and obstetric endpoint. Pooled risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a random-effects model and inverse variance. Inter-study heterogeneity was assessed with I 2 statistics. We assessed maternal outcomes that included preterm birth (PTB) (spontaneous and threatened), preterm premature rupture of the membranes

  15. Effect of Training on Knowledge about Cervical Cancer and Human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    UNIBEN

    , Ezeanochie M2, Nwaneri ... to HPV, cervical cancer and HPV vaccines at a workshop organized to create awareness on the subject matter. Results: Of the 53 ..... reported resistance to giving the vaccines to adolescent girls and the reasons ...

  16. Grantee Spotlight: Dr. Kolawole Okuyemi - Improving Cervical Cancer Screening Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dr. Kolawole Okuyumi is studying cervical cancer screening attitudes and behaviors of African immigrants and refugees (Ethiopians, Nigerians, and Somalis) in Minnesota, and introducing “cancer” and “cervix” to their everyday vocabulary.

  17. Awareness, perceived risk and practices related to cervical cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Awareness, perceived risk and practices related to cervical cancer and Pap smear screening: A crosssectional study among HIV-positive women attending an urban HIV clinic in Johannesburg, South Africa.

  18. Cervical Cancer and Human Papilloma Virus Knowledge and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    =current) and cited as : Cervical Cancer and Human Papilloma Virus Knowledge and Acceptance of Vaccination among Medical Students in Southwest Nigeria. Funmilayo F. Adejuyigbe , Balogun R. Balogun , Adekemi. O. Sekoni and ...

  19. Fluorescence spectra of blood and urine for cervical cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masilamani, Vadivel; AlSalhi, Mohamad Saleh; Vijmasi, Trinka; Govindarajan, Kanaganaj; Rathan Rai, Ram; Atif, Muhammad; Prasad, Saradh; Aldwayyan, Abdullah S.

    2012-09-01

    In the current study, the fluorescence emission spectra (FES) and Stokes shift spectra (SSS) of blood and urine samples of cervical cancer patients were obtained and compared to those of normal controls. Both spectra showed that the relative intensity of biomolecules such as porphyrin, collagen, Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, and flavin were quite out of proportion in cervical cancer patients. The biochemical mechanism for the elevation of these fluorophores is not yet definitive; nevertheless, these biomolecules could serve as tumor markers for diagnosis, screening, and follow-up of cervical cancers. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on FES and SSS of blood and urine of cervical cancer patients to give a sensitivity of 80% and specificity of 78%.

  20. Bevacizumab improves survival for patients with advanced cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patients with advanced, recurrent, or persistent cervical cancer that was not curable with standard treatment who received the drug bevacizumab (Avastin) lived 3.7 months longer than patients who did not receive the drug, according to an interim analysis

  1. A Literature Review of Cervical Cancer Screening in Transgender Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatos, Kayla C

    2018-02-01

    Most female-to-male (FTM) transgender men retain their cervixes and need comprehensive sexual health care, including cervical cancer screening. According to the literature, FTM individuals obtain cervical cancer screening less frequently and are less likely to be up to date on their Pap tests compared with cisgender women. Misinformation related to human papillomavirus and cervical cancer risk was noted for health care providers and FTM individuals. Absence of transgender-specific guidelines or trained health care providers presents barriers to cervical cancer screening for FTM individuals, and further research is indicated to develop comprehensive guidelines unique to the needs and experiences of this population. © 2018 AWHONN, the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  2. The Vaccine and Cervical Cancer Screen (VACCS) project ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HPV) vaccination, as well as the information provided, methods of obtaining consent and assent, and completion rates achieved. Methods. Information on cervical cancer and HPV vaccination was provided to 19 primary schools in Western Cape ...

  3. Genotype distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) in histological sections of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive cervical carcinoma in Madrid, Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García-Espinosa, Benjamín; Moro-Rodríguez, Ernesto; Álvarez-Fernández, Emilio

    2012-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) genotype distribution and co-infection occurrence was studied in cervical specimens from the city of Madrid (Spain), as a contribution to the knowledge of Human Papillomavirus genotype distribution and prevalence of carcinogenic HPV types in cervical lesions in Spain. A total of 533 abnormal specimens, from the Hospital General Universitario “Gregorio Marañón” of Madrid, were studied. These included 19 benign lesions, 349 cervical intraepithelial neoplasias 1 (CIN1), 158 CIN2-3 and 7 invasive cervical carcinomas (ICC). HPV genotyping was performed using PCR and tube array hybridization. We detected 20 different HPV types: 13 carcinogenic high-risk HPV types (HR-HPVs), 2 probably carcinogenic high-risk HPV types (PHR-HPVs) and 5 carcinogenic low-risk HPV types (LR-HPVs). The most frequent HPV genotypes found in all specimens were HPV16 (26.0%), 31 (10.7%) and 58 (8.0%). HPV 18 was only detected in 5.0%. Co-infections were found in 30.7% of CIN 1 and 18.4% cases of CIN2-3. The highest percentage of HR HPVs was found in those specimens with a CIN2-3 lesion (93.7%). As our study shows the current tetravalent vaccine could be effective in our geographical area for preventing all the invasive cervical carcinomas. In addition, upon the estimates of the important presence of other HR-HPV types – such as 31, 58, 33 and 52 – in different preneoplasic lesions the effectiveness of HPV vaccination in our geographical area, and others with similar genotype distribution, should be limited

  4. Prevalence of Specific Types of Human Papiloma Virus in Cervical Intraepithelial Lesions and Cervical Cancer in Macedonian Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksioska-Papestiev, Irena; Chibisheva, Vesna; Micevska, Megi; Dimitrov, Goran

    2018-02-01

    with CIS. The lowest prevalence was detected in patients with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) (23,9%) and CIN 1-25 (6%). Results of HPV typing show that genotypes were found either single or multiple in both single and multiple infections. We have seen that HPV 16, 18 and 31 were the most common types detected among the patients from Macedonia. HPV 16 was present even in 52,1 % of women with CIS and in 41,2% in women with CIN 3. HPV type 31 ranked second in patients wit CIN1, CIN2, CIN3 but HPV 18 ranked second in patients with CIS with (12,8%). Surprisingly, patients with mixed infection had more low grade intraepithelial squamous lesions (LSIL) and high grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) then CIS. Among Macedonian women, HPV 16, 31 and 18 were HPV types strongly associated with intraepithelial cervical lesions and cervical cancers. The prevalence of high risk HPV was highest in youngest women, but the risk was highest among patients with invasive cervical cancer (ICC). Surprisingly, patients with mixed infection had more LSIL and HSIL then CIS.

  5. Quality of life characteristics inpatients with cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjelic-Radisic, Vesna; Jensen, Pernille T; Vlasic, Karin Kuljanic

    2012-01-01

    Annually about 500,000 women worldwide are diagnosed with cervical cancer. For many patients, young age at the time of diagnosis and a good prognosis regarding the disease imply a long life with the side-effects and sequels of various treatment options. The present study investigated the extent...... to which different quality of life (QoL) domains in patients during and after treatment for cervical cancer are affected according to menopausal status, treatment status and treatment modality....

  6. Epidemiology and costs of cervical cancer screening and cervical dysplasia in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valle Sabrina

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We estimated the number of women undergoing cervical cancer screening annually in Italy, the rates of cervical abnormalities detected, and the costs of screening and management of abnormalities. Methods The annual number of screened women was estimated from National Health Interview data. Data from the Italian Group for Cervical Cancer Screening were used to estimate the number of positive, negative and unsatisfactory Pap smears. The incidence of CIN (cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia was estimated from the Emilia Romagna Cancer Registry. Patterns of follow-up and treatment costs were estimated using a typical disease management approach based on national guidelines and data from the Italian Group for Cervical Cancer Screening. Treatment unit costs were obtained from Italian National Health Service and Hospital Information System of the Lazio Region. Results An estimated 6.4 million women aged 25–69 years undergo screening annually in Italy (1.2 million and 5.2 million through organized and opportunistic screening programs, respectively. Approximately 2.4% of tests have positive findings. There are approximately 21,000 cases of CIN1 and 7,000–17,000 cases of CIN2/3. Estimated costs to the healthcare service amount to €158.5 million for screening and €22.9 million for the management of cervical abnormalities. Conclusion Although some cervical abnormalities might have been underestimated, the total annual cost of cervical cancer prevention in Italy is approximately €181.5 million, of which 87% is attributable to screening.

  7. Barriers to utilization of cervical cancer screening services among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women and contributes significantly to cancer related deaths among women worldwide. Women knowledge and practice of screening for pre malignant lesions vary significantly. Studies on this subject had focused mostly on either medically informed ...

  8. Breast and cervical cancer screening programme implementation in 16 countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dowling, Emily C; Klabunde, Carrie; Patnick, Julietta

    2010-01-01

    There is a continuing need to monitor and evaluate the impact of organized screening programmes on cancer incidence and mortality. We report results from a programme assessment conducted within the International Cancer Screening Network (ICSN) to understand the characteristics of cervical screening...... programmes within countries that have established population-based breast cancer screening programmes....

  9. The challenges of human papillomavirus and cervical cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With the changing paradigm in disease trends, Nigeria may be faced with serious challenges in terms of healthcare and disease management. Cervical cancer, which is one of the cancers that is vaccine preventable, remain the most frequently reported and the leading cause of mortality from cancer in Nigeria. More than ...

  10. Knowledge and practice of cervical cancer screening among female ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer affecting women worldwide. It is a preventable disease but still remains a leading cause of cancer deaths in developing countries like Nigeria despite the availability of preventive and curative protocols. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the ...

  11. Cervical Cancer Awareness and Screening Uptake among Rural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cervical cancer is the most common cause of female genital cancer and female cancer deaths in developing countries such as Nigeria. The most recent government estimates put the number of new cases at 25,000 per year. According to the latest global estimates, 493, 000 new cases occur each year and ...

  12. Women's Attitude Towards Cervical Cancer Screening in North ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cancer of the cervix is the leading cancer in women in sub Saharan Africa. The aim of this study is to document the views of respondents on how to increase the uptake of cervical cancer screening. This was a cross sectional study of women attending the outpatient clinics of obstetrics and gynaecology in two tertiary ...

  13. Assessment of psychological barriers to cervical cancer screening ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    acetic acid wash are widely available throughout Ghana, yet less that 3% of Ghanaian women get a cervical cancer screening at regular ... Results: The results of the quantitative analysis indicated that cancer patients where not more likely to have greater knowledge of cancer ... School of Public Health, Ryals Public Health.

  14. Single-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion versus minimally invasive posterior cervical foraminotomy for patients with cervical radiculopathy: a cost analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Haley E; Canar, W Jeffrey; Gerard, Carter S; O'Toole, John E

    2014-11-01

    Patients suffering from cervical radiculopathy in whom a course of nonoperative treatment has failed are often candidates for a single-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) or posterior cervical foraminotomy (PCF). The objective of this analysis was to identify any significant cost differences between these surgical methods by comparing direct costs to the hospital. Furthermore, patient-specific characteristics were also considered for their effect on component costs. After obtaining approval from the medical center institutional review board, the authors conducted a retrospective cross-sectional comparative cohort study, with a sample of 101 patients diagnosed with cervical radiculopathy and who underwent an initial single-level ACDF or minimally invasive PCF during a 3-year period. Using these data, bivariate analyses were conducted to determine significant differences in direct total procedure and component costs between surgical techniques. Factorial ANOVAs were also conducted to determine any relationship between patient sex and smoking status to the component costs per surgery. The mean total direct cost for an ACDF was $8192, and the mean total direct cost for a PCF was $4320. There were significant differences in the cost components for direct costs and operating room supply costs. It was found that there was no statistically significant difference in component costs with regard to patient sex or smoking status. In the management of single-level cervical radiculopathy, the present analysis has revealed that the average cost of an ACDF is 89% more than a PCF. This increased cost is largely due to the cost of surgical implants. These results do not appear to be dependent on patient sex or smoking status. When combined with results from previous studies highlighting the comparable patient outcomes for either procedure, the authors' findings suggest that from a health care economics standpoint, physicians should consider a minimally invasive PCF

  15. Increasing incidence of invasive and in situ cervical adenocarcinoma in the Netherlands during 2004-2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Horst, J. (Judith); A.G. Siebers (Albertus); J. Bulten (Johannes); L.F. Massuger (Leon); de Kok, I.M. (Inge Mcm)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractIn the developed world, the incidence of cervical squamous cell carcinoma has decreased, however, the incidence of adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) and invasive adenocarcinoma increased, predominantly in young females. The goal of this study was to evaluate the most recent incidence rates of

  16. Pathways of cervical cancer screening among Chinese women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma GX

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Grace X Ma,1 Min Qi Wang,2 Xiang S Ma,3 Steven E Shive,4 Yin Tan,5 Jamil I Toubbeh51Department of Public Health, College of Health Professions, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, 2Department of Public and Community Health, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, 3College of Health Professions and School of Medicine, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, 4Center for Asian Health, Temple University, and Department of Health, East Stroudsburg University, East Stroudsburg, PA, 5Center for Asian Health, Department of Public Health, College of Health Professions, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USABackground: The purpose of this community-based study was to develop a structural equation model for factors contributing to cervical cancer screening among Chinese American women.Methods: A cross-sectional design included a sample of 573 Chinese American women aged 18 years and older. The initial step involved use of confirmatory factor analysis, that included the following variables: access to and satisfaction with health care, and enabling and predisposing cultural and health beliefs. Structural equation model analyses were conducted on factors related to cervical cancer screening.Results: Age, marital status, employment, household income, and having health insurance, but not educational level, were significantly related to cervical screening status. Predisposing and enabling factors were positively associated with cervical cancer screening. The cultural factor was significantly related to the enabling factor or the satisfaction with health care factor.Conclusion: This model highlights the significance of sociocultural factors in relation to cervical cancer screening. These factors were significant, with cultural, predisposing, enabling, and health belief factors and access to and satisfaction with health care reinforcing the need to assist Chinese American women with poor English fluency in translation and awareness of the importance of cervical

  17. Nuclear expression of Rac1 in cervical premalignant lesions and cervical cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza-Catalán, Miguel A; Castañeda-Saucedo, Eduardo; Cristóbal-Mondragón, Gema R; Adame-Gómez, Jesús; Valle-Flores, Heidi N del; Coppe, José Fco; Sierra-López, Laura; Romero-Hernández, Mirna A; Carmen Alarcón-Romero, Luz del; Illades-Aguiar, Berenice

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal expression of Rho-GTPases has been reported in several human cancers. However, the expression of these proteins in cervical cancer has been poorly investigated. In this study we analyzed the expression of the GTPases Rac1, RhoA, Cdc42, and the Rho-GEFs, Tiam1 and beta-Pix, in cervical pre-malignant lesions and cervical cancer cell lines. Protein expression was analyzed by immunochemistry on 102 cervical paraffin-embedded biopsies: 20 without Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions (SIL), 51 Low- grade SIL, and 31 High-grade SIL; and in cervical cancer cell lines C33A and SiHa, and non-tumorigenic HaCat cells. Nuclear localization of Rac1 in HaCat, C33A and SiHa cells was assessed by cellular fractionation and Western blotting, in the presence or not of a chemical Rac1 inhibitor (NSC23766). Immunoreacivity for Rac1, RhoA, Tiam1 and beta-Pix was stronger in L-SIL and H-SIL, compared to samples without SIL, and it was significantly associated with the histological diagnosis. Nuclear expression of Rac1 was observed in 52.9% L-SIL and 48.4% H-SIL, but not in samples without SIL. Rac1 was found in the nucleus of C33A and SiHa cells but not in HaCat cells. Chemical inhibition of Rac1 resulted in reduced cell proliferation in HaCat, C33A and SiHa cells. Rac1 is expressed in the nucleus of epithelial cells in SILs and cervical cancer cell lines, and chemical inhibition of Rac1 reduces cellular proliferation. Further studies are needed to better understand the role of Rho-GTPases in cervical cancer progression

  18. [The plasma levels and diagnostic utility of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and CA 125 in cervical cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubowicka, Emilia; Gacuta, Ewa; Zajkowska, Monika; Głażewska, Edyta Katarzyna; Przylipiak, Andrzej; Chrostek, Lech; Zbucka-Krętowska, Monika; Ławicki, Sławomir

    2017-07-21

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of proteolytic enzymes, involved in the degradation of extracellular matrix components. The physiological function of MMP-9 is associated with regulation of immune processes, embryogenesis, reproduction and wound healing. MMP-9 also plays a critical role in tumor invasion, degrading the basement membrane, what is observed in different types of cancers: breast, gastrointestinal, and gynecological. The aim of this study was to investigate the plasma levels and diagnostic utility of MMP-9 and CA 125 in cervical cancer patients. The study included 72 patients with cervical cancer and 24 healthy women. Plasma levels of the MMP- 9 was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and CA 15-3 - by chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay (CMIA). This studies have shown increase levels of MMP-9 and CA 125 in cervical cancer patients compared to health control group. In addition, the MMP-9 concentration increased with the clinical stage of tumor. The sensitivity and specificity of MMP-9, positive and negative predictive value, were higher or equal than CA 125, but this parameter can not be used as a single marker. Our studies of MMP-9 have shown a high utility to the exclusion of cancer, similarly to CA 125. The combined analysis of MMP-9 and CA 125 significantly increased the ability to diagnose a cervical cancer and the possibility exclusion of cancer. MMP-9 has shown the usefulness in the diagnosis of cervical cancer, but only in the combined analysis with CA 125, as a new diagnostic panel.

  19. Large Conization and Laparoendoscopic Single-Port Pelvic Lymphadenectomy in Early-Stage Cervical Cancer for Fertility Preservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polat Dursun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fertility preservation in early-stage cervical cancer is a hot topic in gynecologic oncology. Although radical vaginal trachelectomy (RVT is suggested as a fertility preserving approach, there are some serious concerns like cervical stenosis, second trimester loss, preterm delivery in survivors, and lack of residual tumor in the majority of the surgical specimens. Therefore, less radical surgical operations have been proposed in early-stage cervical carcinomas. On the other hand, single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS is an evolving endoscopic approach for minimal access surgery. In this report, we present a case with early-stage cervical cancer who wishes to preserve fertility. We successfully performed single-port pelvic lymphadenectomy and large conization to preserve fertility potential of the patient. We think that combination of less radical approach like conization and single-port pelvic lymphadenectomy might be less minimally invasive and is still an effective surgical approach in well-selected cases with cervical carcinomas. Incorporation of single-port laparoscopy into the minimally invasive fertility sparing management of the cervical cancer will improve patients outcome with less complications and better cosmesis. Further studies are needed to reach a clear conclusion.

  20. Validation of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer cervical cancer module for Chinese patients with cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua CH

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Cai-Hong Hua, Hui-Min Guo, Xin-Lei Guan, Fan-Jing Kong, Rui-Jie Hou, Xue-Ying Zhang, Shao-Ru Li Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, First Affiliated Hospital of Xinxiang Medical University, Weihui City, Henan Province, People’s Republic of China Purpose: The aim of our study was to assess, for the first time, the validity, reliability, and acceptability of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC Quality Of Life questionnaire (QLQ cervical cancer module (CX24 in Chinese cervical cancer patients. Patients and methods: One hundred fifteen outpatients with cervical cancer in the First Affiliated Hospital of Xinxiang Medical University from May 2013 to July 2013 were included in this study. All participants self-administered the EORTC QLQ-CX24 and the core questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30, and the Karnofsky Performance Scale was performed to evaluate scores. Data were analyzed with Cronbach’s α coefficient, Pearson correlation test, multitrait scaling analysis, and Mann–Whitney U test. Results: Scale reliability was confirmed by Cronbach’s α coefficients for internal consistency, which ranged from 0.71 to 0.82. Convergent and discriminant validity were confirmed by multitrait scaling analysis, which revealed three (3.4% scaling errors for symptom experience scales and zero (0% for body image as well as sexual/vaginal functioning scales. Higher missing value rate occurred in sexuality-related items. The clinical validity of the Chinese version of the EORTC QLQ-CX24 was demonstrated by the ability to discriminate among patients in different International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages. Conclusion: The EORTC QLQ-CX24 was proved to be a reliable and valid instrument with which to measure the quality of life in cervical cancer patients in the People’s Republic of China. Keywords: cervical cancer, quality of life, EORTC QLQ-CX24, People’s Republic of China

  1. Estimated effects of the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program on breast cancer mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoerger, Thomas J; Ekwueme, Donatus U; Miller, Jacqueline W; Uzunangelov, Vladislav; Hall, Ingrid J; Segel, Joel; Royalty, Janet; Gardner, James G; Smith, Judith Lee; Li, Chunyu

    2011-04-01

    The National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) provides breast cancer screening to medically underserved, low-income women aged 40-64 years. No study has evaluated NBCCEDP's effect on breast cancer mortality. This study estimates life-years saved by NBCCEDP breast cancer screening compared with screening in the absence of NBCCEDP and with no screening. A breast cancer simulation model based on existing Cancer Intervention and Surveillance Modeling Network models was constructed. The screening module from these models was modified to reflect screening frequency for NBCCEDP participants. Screening data for uninsured women represented what would have happened without the program. Separate simulations were performed for women who received NBCCEDP (Program) screening, women who potentially received screening without the program (No Program), and women who received no screening (No Screening). The impact of NBCCEDP was estimated as the difference in life-years between the Program and No Program, and the Program and No Screening scenarios. The analysis was performed in 2008-2009. Among 1.8 million women who were screened between 1991 and 2006, the Program saved 100,800 life-years compared with No Program and 369,000 life-years compared with No Screening. Per woman screened, the Program saved 0.056 life-years (95% CI=0.031, 0.081) compared with No Program and 0.206 life-years (95% CI=0.177, 0.234) compared with No Screening. Per woman with invasive breast cancer and screen-detected invasive cancer, the Program saved 0.41 and 0.71 life-years, respectively, compared with No Program. These estimates suggest that NBCCEDP breast cancer screening has reduced mortality among medically uninsured and underinsured low-income women. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Cervical cytology and the diagnosis of cervical cancer in older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landy, Rebecca; Castanon, Alejandra; Dudding, Nick; Lim, Anita Wey Wey; Hollingworth, Antony; Hamilton, Willie; Sasieni, Peter D

    2015-12-01

    Most non-screen-detected cervical cancers are advanced stage. We assess the potential for cytology to expedite diagnosis when used outside of routine call and recall screening for cervical cancer. Two cohorts of women with cytology that did not appear to have been taken as part of routine screening, nested within a census of cervical cytology, in England between April 2007 and March 2010 were studied: 93,322 women aged 40-69 at first cytology, and 14,668 women aged ≥70. The diagnostic performance of high grade cervical squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) or worse cytology was estimated. We also estimated case-fatality from stage distribution in women aged ≥66 with and without cytology in the year prior to diagnosis. There were 259 cancers diagnosed in women aged 40-69 at first cytology, and 78 in women aged ≥70. The sensitivity of cytology ≥ HSIL for cancer was 89% and 83% respectively, and the number of women needed to test to identify one cancer was 404 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 355-462) and 226 (95% CI: 177-292) respectively. Women aged ≥66 with cytology within a year of diagnosis had earlier stage cancers than those without, corresponding to a 17-22% reduction in case fatality. Cervical cytology is an excellent identifier of cancer among women tested outside routine screening call and recall. Its use as a triage tool, for instance in women with vague gynaecological symptoms, could facilitate earlier stage diagnosis and reduce cervical cancer mortality. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Surface activity, lipid profiles and their implications in cervical cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preetha A

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The profiles of lipids in normal and cancerous tissues may differ revealing information about cancer development and progression. Lipids being surface active, changes in lipid profiles can manifest as altered surface activity profiles. Langmuir monolayers offer a convenient model for evaluating surface activity of biological membranes. Aims: The aims of this study were to quantify phospholipids and their effects on surface activity of normal and cancerous human cervical tissues as well as to evaluate the role of phosphatidylcholine (PC and sphingomyelin (SM in cervical cancer using Langmuir monolayers. Methods and Materials: Lipid quantification was done using thin layer chromatography and phosphorus assay. Surface activity was evaluated using Langmuir monolayers. Monolayers were formed on the surface of deionized water by spreading tissue organic phase corresponding to 1 mg of tissue and studying their surface pressure-area isotherms at body temperature. The PC and SM contents of cancerous human cervical tissues were higher than those of the normal human cervical tissues. Role of PC and SM were evaluated by adding varying amounts of these lipids to normal cervical pooled organic phase. Statistical analysis: Student′s t-test (p < 0.05 and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA was used. Results: Our results reveals that the phosphatidylglycerol level in cancerous cervical tissue was nearly five folds higher than that in normal cervical tissue. Also PC and sphingomyelin SM were found to be the major phospholipid components in cancerous and normal cervical tissues respectively. The addition of either 1.5 µg DPPC or 0.5 µg SM /mg of tissue to the normal organic phase changed its surface activity profile to that of the cancerous tissues. Statistically significant surface activity parameters showed that PC and SM have remarkable roles in shifting the normal cervical lipophilic surface activity towards that of cancerous lipophilic

  4. Awareness, Knowledge and Attitudes Towards Cervical Cancer Amongst HIV-Positive Women Receiving Care in a Tertiary Hospital in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adibe, Maxwell O; Aluh, Deborah O

    2017-05-05

    The incidence of cervical cancer (CC) in the sub-Saharan Africa region, where Nigeria is located, is amongst the highest in the world; it is estimated that 70,722 new cases of invasive cervical cancer occur annually in sub-Saharan Africa. Immunosuppression, especially due to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, is a predisposing factor for persistent infection with high-risk human papilloma virus (HR-HPV) and the development of squamous intraepithelial lesions. Four hundred and fifty women who attended the HIV clinic at the Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, and who consented to participate in the study were randomly selected. They were given self-administered questionnaires which sought to determine their awareness and knowledge of cervical cancer and attitudes towards cervical cancer screening and prevention. The media 23% (n = 103) was the most common source of information amongst respondents who had heard about cervical cancer. For all the women surveyed, the average percentage knowledge was 9.95%. Having attitude scores greater than or equal to the mean attitude score of 55.16% was regarded as having a positive attitude while a score lower than that was regarded as negative attitude. About 43.5% (n = 195) respondents had a positive attitude towards cervical cancer screening and prevention. Cervical cancer awareness and knowledge amongst women attending the HIV clinic in the Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, were very poor. Their attitude towards cervical cancer screening practices and prevention was also very poor.

  5. Small cell cervical cancer: an unusual finding at cholecystectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boyle, Emily

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Small cell carcinoma of the cervix is a rare cancer, comprising less than 3% of all cervical neoplasms. It uniformly has a poor prognosis, and has a high mortality even with early stage disease. It can metastasise rapidly and metastatic sites include lung, liver, brain, bone, pancreas and lymph nodes. CASE: Here, we report the case of a 60-year-old woman with no symptoms of cervical pathology who developed post-renal failure following a laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The cause was bilateral ureteric obstruction from metastatic small cell cervical cancer and metastases were subsequently found on her gallbladder specimen. CONCLUSION: This is an unusual presentation of small cell cervical cancer and demonstrates the aggressive nature of this disease.

  6. History of high-risk HPV and Pap test results in a large cohort of patients with invasive cervical carcinoma: experience from the largest women's hospital in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xiang; Griffith, Christopher C; Zhou, Xiangrong; Wang, Zhiheng; Yan, Yabin; Li, Zaibo; Zhao, Chengquan

    2015-07-01

    Current cervical cancer screening guidelines recommend screening with a Papanicolaou (Pap) test or by cotesting (Pap and human papillomavirus [HPV]). Given the importance of high-risk HPV (hrHPV) infection in the development of cervical cancer, some studies are now suggesting the use of primary hrHPV testing as a possible screening modality. To gain further insight into the role of both Pap testing and hrHPV testing, the authors examined prior screening results in a population of Chinese patients with invasive cervical carcinoma. Cases with a histologic diagnosis of invasive cervical carcinoma were retrieved from the Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital of Fudan University from January 2011 to October 2014. Prior hrHPV testing and Pap test results within 3 years before the cancer diagnosis were recorded. Of 3714 patients with invasive cervical carcinoma, over a 46-month period, 525 had prior hrHPV testing using Hybrid Capture 2 within 3 years and 238 patients had Pap cytology testing within 1 year before the histological diagnosis. Within the 1-year period before diagnosis, the overall hrHPV-negative rate was 15.5% (74 of 477 patients) and the Pap-negative rate was also 15.5% (37 of 238 patients). Only 9 of 231 patients with both hrHPV testing and Pap testing (3.9%) had a double-negative result. Compared with squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma has significantly higher rates of prior negative results with both hrHPV and Pap cytology. The results of the current study demonstrated prior results of hrHPV testing and Pap cytology in a population of women in China who had not undergone intensive prior screening. Both hrHPV testing and Pap cytology were found to have similar negative rates in this population and, not surprisingly, there were fewer women who had negative testing results using both testing modalities. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  7. Uterine cervical cancer with brain metastasis as the initial site of presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yumi; Tanaka, Kei; Kobayashi, Yoichi; Shibuya, Hiromi; Nishigaya, Yoshiko; Momomura, Mai; Matsumoto, Hironori; Iwashita, Mitsutoshi

    2015-07-01

    Brain metastasis from uterine cervical cancer is rare, with an incidence of 0.5%, and usually occurs late in the course of the disease. We report a case of uterine cervical cancer with brain metastasis as the initial site of presentation. A 50-year-old woman with headache, vertigo, amnesia and loss of appetite was admitted for persistent vomiting. Contrast enhanced computed tomography showed a solitary right frontal cerebral lesion with ring enhancement and uterine cervical tumor. She was diagnosed with uterine cervical squamous cell carcinoma with parametrium invasion and no other distant affected organs were detected. The cerebral lesion was surgically removed and pathologically proved to be metastasis of uterine cervical squamous cell carcinoma. The patient underwent concurrent chemoradiotherapy, followed by cerebral radiation therapy, but multiple metastases to the liver and lung developed and the patient died 7 months after diagnosis of brain metastasis. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2015 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  8. Knowledge about cervical cancer and barriers of screening program among women in Wufeng County, a high-incidence region of cervical cancer in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yao; Li, Shuang; Yang, Ru; Zhou, Hang; Xiang, Qunying; Hu, Ting; Zhang, Qinghua; Chen, Zhilan; Ma, Ding; Feng, Ling

    2013-01-01

    Cervical cancer screening is an effective method for reducing the incidence and mortality of cervical cancer, but the screening attendance rate in developing countries is far from satisfactory, especially in rural areas. Wufeng is a region of high cervical cancer incidence in China. This study aimed to investigate the issues that concern cervical cancer and screening and the factors that affect women's willingness to undergo cervical cancer screening in the Wufeng area. A cross-sectional survey of women was conducted to determine their knowledge about cervical cancer and screening, demographic characteristics and the barriers to screening. Women who were willing to undergo screenings had higher knowledge levels. "Anxious feeling once the disease was diagnosed" (47.6%), "No symptoms/discomfort" (34.1%) and "Do not know the benefits of cervical cancer screening" (13.4%) were the top three reasons for refusing cervical cancer screening. Women who were younger than 45 years old or who had lower incomes, positive family histories of cancer, secondary or higher levels of education, higher levels of knowledge and fewer barriers to screening were more willing to participate in cervical cancer screenings than women without these characteristics. Efforts are needed to increase women's knowledge about cervical cancer, especially the screening methods, and to improve their perceptions of the screening process for early detection to reduce cervical cancer incidence and mortality rates.

  9. Knowledge about cervical cancer and barriers of screening program among women in Wufeng County, a high-incidence region of cervical cancer in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Jia

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer screening is an effective method for reducing the incidence and mortality of cervical cancer, but the screening attendance rate in developing countries is far from satisfactory, especially in rural areas. Wufeng is a region of high cervical cancer incidence in China. This study aimed to investigate the issues that concern cervical cancer and screening and the factors that affect women's willingness to undergo cervical cancer screening in the Wufeng area.A cross-sectional survey of women was conducted to determine their knowledge about cervical cancer and screening, demographic characteristics and the barriers to screening.Women who were willing to undergo screenings had higher knowledge levels. "Anxious feeling once the disease was diagnosed" (47.6%, "No symptoms/discomfort" (34.1% and "Do not know the benefits of cervical cancer screening" (13.4% were the top three reasons for refusing cervical cancer screening. Women who were younger than 45 years old or who had lower incomes, positive family histories of cancer, secondary or higher levels of education, higher levels of knowledge and fewer barriers to screening were more willing to participate in cervical cancer screenings than women without these characteristics.Efforts are needed to increase women's knowledge about cervical cancer, especially the screening methods, and to improve their perceptions of the screening process for early detection to reduce cervical cancer incidence and mortality rates.

  10. Second primary cancers in survivors of cervical cancer in the Netherlands: Implications for prevention and surveillance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, Melina; Liu, Lifang; Kenter, Gemma G.; Creutzberg, Carien L.; Coebergh, Jan Willem; Soerjomataram, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: We investigated the effects of socio-demographic, treatment- and tumor-specific determinants on the risk of developing a second malignancy among patients treated for cervical cancer. Material and methods: We included patients with a first cervical cancer (N = 12,048) from the Netherlands Cancer Registry (NCR), 1989–2008. Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) and absolute excess risks (AER) per 10,000 person-years were calculated to estimate the burden of second cancers in cervical cancer survivors. Incidence rate ratios (IRR) were computed to identify predictors for second cancers among cervical cancer survivors. Results: During the study period, 676 (5.6%) patients were diagnosed with a second cancer. Smoking-related cancers contributed the most to the overall burden of second cancers (AER = 21) and risks remained elevated after 10 years of follow-up (SIR = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.4–2.2), yet it decreased markedly in the younger birth cohorts. Cervical cancer survivors who underwent radiotherapy were at higher risk for a second tumor when compared to those without radiotherapy, especially at smoking-related sites (IRR = 1.6 (1.2–2.3)). Conclusion: Patients with cervical cancer had a significantly increased risk for a second cancer compared to the general population, especially for smoking- and irradiation-related tumors. Long-term follow-up suggested the importance of smoking cessation and the benefits of counseling cervical cancer patients accordingly, particularly those who received radiotherapy

  11. Awareness, perception and factors affecting utilization of cervical cancer screening services among women in Ibadan, Nigeria: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndikom, Chizoma Millicent; Ofi, Bola Abosede

    2012-08-06

    about cervical cancer especially by health workers. Also, cervical cancer services should be made available at very affordable cost so that women can easily access the services in order to reduce incidence of invasive cancer.

  12. Awareness, perception and factors affecting utilization of cervical cancer screening services among women in Ibadan, Nigeria: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ndikom Chizoma

    2012-08-01

    . Conclusion There is an urgent need for more enlightenment about cervical cancer especially by health workers. Also, cervical cancer services should be made available at very affordable cost so that women can easily access the services in order to reduce incidence of invasive cancer.

  13. Incidence of cervical dysplasia and cervical cancer in women living with HIV in Denmark: comparison with the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsteinsson, K; Ladelund, S; Jensen-Fangel, S; Katzenstein, T L; Johansen, I Somuncu; Pedersen, G; Junge, J; Helleberg, M; Storgaard, M; Obel, N; Lebech, A-M

    2016-01-01

    Women living with HIV (WLWH) are reportedly at increased risk of invasive cervical cancer (ICC). A recent publication found that WLWH in Denmark attend the national ICC screening programme less often than women in the general population. We aimed to estimate the incidence of cervical dysplasia and ICC in WLWH in Denmark compared with that in women in the general population. We studied a nationwide cohort of WLWH and a cohort of 15 age-matched women per WLWH from the general population for the period 1999-2010. Pathology samples were obtained from The Danish Pathology Data Bank, which contains nationwide records of all pathology specimens. The cumulative incidence and hazard ratios (HRs) for time from inclusion to first cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN)/ICC and time from first normal cervical cytology result to first CIN/ICC were estimated. Sensitivity analyses were performed to include prior screening outcome, screening intensity and treatment of CIN/ICC in the interpretation of results. We followed 1140 WLWH and 17 046 controls with no prior history of ICC or hysterectomy for 9491 and 156 865 person-years, respectively. Compared with controls, the overall incidences of CIN1 or worse (CIN1+), CIN2+ and CIN3+, but not ICC, were higher in WLWH and predicted by young age and a CD4 count < 200 cells/μL. In women with normal baseline cytology, incidences of CIN1+ and CIN2+ were higher in WLWH. However, when we compared subgroups of WLWH and controls where women in both groups were adherent to the national ICC screening programme and had a normal baseline cytology, incidences of CIN and ICC were comparable. Overall, WLWH developed more cervical disease than controls. Yet, in WLWH and controls adherent to the national ICC screening programme and with normal baseline cytology, incidences of CIN and ICC were comparable. © 2015 British HIV Association.

  14. Prospects for primary prevention of cervical cancer in developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franceschi Silvia

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The HPV types that cause cervical cancer are sexually transmitted, but there is little evidence that infection can be avoided by behavioural changes, such as condom use. In contrast, prophylactic vaccines against HPV infection are likely to have high efficacy. In principle, the effectiveness of HPV vaccination as a strategy for cervical cancer control can be measured either by monitoring secular trends in cervical cancer incidence or by conducting randomized trials. The former approach is unlikely to provide convincing evidence of effectiveness, since cervical cancer rates are subject to strong secular trends that are independent of intervention measures. A few phase III trials of HPV prophylactic vaccines are now being started. Such trials are very expensive studies involving frequent and complicated investigations. It is important, however, to start as soon as possible simpler trials designed to demonstrate the effectiveness of HPV vaccine in field conditions, i.e. in developing or intermediate countries which suffer the major burden of mortality from cervical cancer. Such trials may capture a difference in the most severe, and rarest, preinvasive cervical lesions (i.e., the real target of any HPV vaccine over a prolonged follow-up (20 years at least. The design of such studies is briefly considered for two areas: Southern India and South Korea.

  15. Multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dadkhah, Hossein [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Iowa, 1402 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Kim, Yusung; Flynn, Ryan T., E-mail: ryan-flynn@uiowa.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To present a novel brachytherapy technique, called multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy (H-RSBT), for the precise angular and linear positioning of a partial shield in a curved applicator. H-RSBT mechanically enables the dose delivery using only linear translational motion of the radiation source/shield combination. The previously proposed approach of serial rotating shield brachytherapy (S-RSBT), in which the partial shield is rotated to several angular positions at each source dwell position [W. Yang et al., “Rotating-shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer,” Phys. Med. Biol. 58, 3931–3941 (2013)], is mechanically challenging to implement in a curved applicator, and H-RSBT is proposed as a feasible solution. Methods: A Henschke-type applicator, designed for an electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™) and a 0.5 mm thick tungsten partial shield with 180° or 45° azimuthal emission angles and 116° asymmetric zenith angle, is proposed. The interior wall of the applicator contains six evenly spaced helical keyways that rigidly define the emission direction of the partial radiation shield as a function of depth in the applicator. The shield contains three uniformly distributed protruding keys on its exterior wall and is attached to the source such that it rotates freely, thus longitudinal translational motion of the source is transferred to rotational motion of the shield. S-RSBT and H-RSBT treatment plans with 180° and 45° azimuthal emission angles were generated for five cervical cancer patients with a diverse range of high-risk target volume (HR-CTV) shapes and applicator positions. For each patient, the total number of emission angles was held nearly constant for S-RSBT and H-RSBT by using dwell positions separated by 5 and 1.7 mm, respectively, and emission directions separated by 22.5° and 60°, respectively. Treatment delivery time and tumor coverage (D{sub 90} of HR-CTV) were the two metrics used as the basis for evaluation and

  16. Disparities in cervical and breast cancer mortality in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girianelli, Vania Reis; Gamarra, Carmen Justina; Azevedo e Silva, Gulnar

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze cervical and breast cancer mortality in Brazil according to socioeconomic and welfare indicators. METHODS Data on breast and cervical cancer mortality covering a 30-year period (1980-2010) were analyzed. The data were obtained from the National Mortality Database, population data from the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics database, and socioeconomic and welfare information from the Institute of Applied Economic Research. Moving averages were calculated, disaggregated by capital city and municipality. The annual percent change in mortality rates was estimated by segmented linear regression using the joinpoint method. Pearson’s correlation coefficients were conducted between average mortality rate at the end of the three-year period and selected indicators in the state capital and each Brazilian state. RESULTS There was a decline in cervical cancer mortality rates throughout the period studied, except in municipalities outside of the capitals in the North and Northeast. There was a decrease in breast cancer mortality in the capitals from the end of the 1990s onwards. Favorable socioeconomic indicators were inversely correlated with cervical cancer mortality. A strong direct correlation was found with favorable indicators and an inverse correlation with fertility rate and breast cancer mortality in inner cities. CONCLUSIONS There is an ongoing dynamic process of increased risk of cervical and breast cancer and attenuation of mortality because of increased, albeit unequal, access to and provision of screening, diagnosis and treatment.  PMID:25119941

  17. [The risk of breast cervical, endometrial and ovarian cancer in oral contraceptive users].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veljković, Milena; Veljković, Slavimir

    2010-01-01

    Oral contraceptives, mainly combined monophasic pills, are widely used by young women who expect their physicians to prescribe them safe drugs which will not harm their health and which will simplify their life. Numerous epidemiologic studies have been performed to determine the relation between oral contraceptive use and the development of neoplasms. An increased incidence of breast cancer has occurred simultaneously with the growing use of oral contraceptives. The possibility of a link between the oral contraceptive use and breast cancer has led to intensive research, but studies have provided inconsistent results causing confusion among clinicians. It was noticed that the risk of breast cancer was slightly elevated in current and recent young oral contraceptives users. That finding could be influenced by a detection bias or could be due to the biologic effect of the pills. The absolute number of additional breast cancer cases will be very small because of low baseline incidence of the disease in young women. Oral contraceptives probably promote growth of the already existing cancer, they are probably promoters not initiators of breast cancer. The available data do not provide a conclusive answer that is needed. Numerous factors may influence the development of cervical cancer. The evidence suggests that current and recent oral contraceptive users have an increased risk of cervical cancer which decline after discontinuation of the application of medication. Oral contraceptives might increase the biological vulnerability of the cervix. Cervical cancer develops slowly over a long time period and can be effectivelv prevented by periodic cervical screening. Fortunately, oral contraceptives do not mask abnormal cervical citology. Conclusions regarding invasive cervical cancer and oral contraceptive use are not definitive but if there is any increased risk, it is low. In oral contraceptive users the endometrium is almost under the influence of progestin component which

  18. dose in cervical cancer intracavitary brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Siavashpour

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To analyze the optimum organ filling point for organs at risk (OARs dose in cervical cancer high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy. Material and methods : In a retrospective study, 32 locally advanced cervical cancer patients (97 insertions who were treated with 3D conformal external beam radiation therapy (EBRT and concurrent chemotherapy during 2010-2013 were included. Rotterdam HDR tandem-ovoid applicators were used and computed tomography (CT scanning was performed after each insertion. The OARs delineation and GEC-ESTRO-based clinical target volumes (CTVs contouring was followed by 3D forward planning. Then, dose volume histogram (DVH parameters of organs were recorded and patients were classified based on their OARs volumes, as well as their inserted tandem length. Results : The absorbed dose to point A ranged between 6.5-7.5 Gy. D 0.1cm ³ and D 2cm ³ of the bladder significantly increased with the bladder volume enlargement (p value < 0.05. By increasing the bladder volume up to about 140 cm3, the rectum dose was also increased. For the cases with bladder volumes higher than 140 cm3, the rectum dose decreased. For bladder volumes lower than 75 cm3, the sigmoid dose decreased; however, for bladder volumes higher than 75 cm3, the sigmoid dose increased. The D 2cm ³ of the bladder and rectum were higher for longer tandems than for shorter ones, respectively. The divergence of the obtained results for different tandem lengths became wider by the extension of the bladder volume. The rectum and sigmoid volume had a direct impact on increasing their D 0.1cm ³ and D 2cm ³, as well as decreasing their D 10 , D 30 , and D 50 . Conclusions : There is a relationship between the volumes of OARs and their received doses. Selecting a bladder with a volume of about 70 cm3 or less proved to be better with regards to the dose to the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid.

  19. Robotic-assisted laparoscopic exenteration in recurrent cervical cancer Robotics improved the surgical experience for 2 women with recurrent cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Mitzie-Ann; Adams, Sarah; Eun, Daniel; Lee, David; Randall, Thomas C

    2010-06-01

    Pelvic exenteration can be used to cure women with a central pelvic recurrence or persistence of gynecologic malignancy after initial definitive therapy. Refinements in patient selection, operative techniques, and surgical instrumentation have significantly improved outcomes over the past 60 years, but the procedure is still associated with significant mortality, morbidity, and recovery time. New technologies have made it possible to approach radical gynecologic surgeries in a minimally invasive fashion. We present 2 patients successfully treated with robotic-assisted anterior pelvic exenteration for treatment of persistent or recurrent cervical cancer after definitive radiotherapy. Copyright 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. KIF18B promotes tumor progression through activating the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Y

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Yaqin Wu,1–3,* Anpeng Wang,1,3,4,* Biqing Zhu,1–3 Jian Huang,2,3 Emei Lu,2,3 Hanzi Xu,2,3 Wenjie Xia,1,3,4 Gaochao Dong,1 Feng Jiang,1,3,4 Lin Xu1,3,4 1Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular and Translational Cancer Research, Jiangsu Cancer Hospital, Jiangsu Institute of Cancer Research, The Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Jiangsu Cancer Hospital, Jiangsu Institute of Cancer Research, The Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China; 3The Fourth Clinical College of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China; 4Department of Thoracic Surgery, Jiangsu Cancer Hospital, Jiangsu Institute of Cancer Research, The Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this work Background: KIF18B was identified as a potential oncogene by analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas database.Materials and methods: We assessed KIF18B expression and explored its clinical significance in cervical cancer tissues. We have also evaluated the effects of KIF18B on cervical cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion both in vitro and in vivo.Results: Our results show that KIF18B is overexpressed in cervical cancer tissues and is associated with a large primary tumor size, an advanced FIGO stage, and an advanced tumor grade. Knockdown of KIF18B induces cell cycle G1-phase arrest and inhibits the proliferation, migration, and invasion of cervical cancer cells, whereas its overexpression promotes proliferation, migration, and invasion in these cells. Moreover, silencing of KIF18B reduces expression of CyclinD1, β-catenin, C-myc, and p-GSK3β expression.Conclusion: These data suggest that KIF18B can serve as a novel oncogene that promotes the tumorigenicity of cervical cancer cells by activating Wnt

  1. Lymphadenectomy in locally advanced cervical cancer study (LiLACS): Phase III clinical trial comparing surgical with radiologic staging in patients with stages IB2-IVA cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frumovitz, Michael; Querleu, Denis; Gil-Moreno, Antonio; Morice, Philippe; Jhingran, Anuja; Munsell, Mark F; Macapinlac, Homer A; Leblanc, Eric; Martinez, Alejandra; Ramirez, Pedro T

    2014-01-01

    Radiation treatment planning for women with locally advanced cervical cancer (stages IB2-IVA) is often based on positron emission tomography (PET). PET, however, has poor sensitivity in detecting metastases in aortocaval nodes. We have initiated a study with the objective of determining whether pre-therapeutic laparoscopic surgical staging followed by tailored chemoradiation improves survival as compared with PET/computed tomography (CT) radiologic staging alone followed by chemoradiation. This international, multicenter phase III trial will enroll 600 women with stages IB2-IVA cervical cancer and PET/CT findings showing fluorodeoxyglucose-avid pelvic nodes and fluorodeoxyglucose-negative para-aortic nodes. Eligible patients will be randomized to undergo either pelvic radiotherapy with chemotherapy (standard-of-care arm) or surgical staging via a minimally invasive extraperitoneal approach followed by tailored radiotherapy with chemotherapy (experimental arm). The primary end point is overall survival. Secondary end points are disease-free survival, short- and long-term morbidity with pre-therapeutic surgical staging, and determination of anatomic locations of metastatic para-aortic nodes in relationship to the inferior mesenteric artery. We believe this study will show that tailored chemoradiation after pre-therapeutic surgical staging improves survival as compared with chemoradiation based on PET/CT in women with stages IB2-IVA cervical cancer. Copyright © 2014 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Oxidative Stress Triggered by Apigenin Induces Apoptosis in a Comprehensive Panel of Human Cervical Cancer-Derived Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel P. Souza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the cytotoxic effects of apigenin (4′,5,7-trihydroxyflavone, particularly its marked inhibition of cancer cell viability both in vitro and in vivo, have attracted the attention of the anticancer drug discovery field. Despite this, there are few studies of apigenin in cervical cancer, and these studies have mostly been conducted using HeLa cells. To evaluate the possibility of apigenin as a new therapeutic candidate for cervical cancer, we evaluated its cytotoxic effects in a comprehensive panel of human cervical cancer-derived cell lines including HeLa (human papillomavirus/HPV 18-positive, SiHa (HPV 16-positive, CaSki (HPV 16 and HPV 18-positive, and C33A (HPV-negative cells in comparison to a nontumorigenic spontaneously immortalized human epithelial cell line (HaCaT. Our results demonstrated that apigenin had a selective cytotoxic effect and could induce apoptosis in all cervical cancer cell lines which were positively marked with Annexin V, but not in HaCaT (control cells. Additionally, apigenin was able to induce mitochondrial redox impairment, once it increased ROS levels and H2O2, decreased the Δψm, and increased LPO. Still, apigenin was able to inhibit migration and invasion of cancer cells. Thus, apigenin appears to be a promising new candidate as an anticancer drug for cervical cancer induced by different HPV genotypes.

  3. Large scale study of HPV genotypes in cervical cancer and different cytological cervical specimens in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chansaenroj, Jira; Junyangdikul, Pairoj; Chinchai, Teeraporn; Swangvaree, Sukumarn; Karalak, Anant; Gemma, Nobuhiro; Poovorawan, Yong

    2014-04-01

    Identification of high-risk HPV genotypes in patients is essential for vaccination and prevention programs while the geographic distribution of cervical cancer varies widely. HPV 16 is the major cause of cervical cancer followed by HPV 18, HPV 31, HPV 52, or HPV 58 depending on geographic area. In this study, the distribution of HPV genotypes in cervical specimens from women living in Thailand was analyzed by HPV testing with electrochemical DNA chip and PCR direct sequencing. The 716 specimens were grouped according to their cytological grades; 100 normal, 100 low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions, 100 high grade squamous intraepithelial lesions, and 416 specimens of cervical cancer. The results showed that HPV 16, HPV 18, HPV 52, and HPV 58 are the most common HPV genotypes in Thailand, respectively. With respect to age, women below the age of 26 years were almost negative for high-risk HPV DNA exclusively. Conversely, high prevalence of high-risk HPV DNA and abnormal cytology were usually found in women between 26 and 45 years while cervical cancer was detected mainly in women above the age of 45 years. To increase protection efficiency, a vaccine including HPV 52 and HPV 58 should be offered to Asian women, and primary HPV screening should start at 26-30 years of age. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. [Lobular neoplasms and invasive lobular breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinn, H-P; Helmchen, B; Heil, J; Aulmann, S

    2014-02-01

    The term lobular neoplasia (LN) comprises both atypical lobular hyperplasia (ALH), and lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) and thus a spectrum of morphologically heterogeneous but clinically and biologically related lesions. LN is regarded as a nonobligatory precursor lesion of invasive breast cancer and at the same time as an indicator lesion for ipsilateral and contralateral breast cancer risk of the patient. Rare pleomorphic or florid variants of LCIS must be differentiated from classical LCIS. The classical type of invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) can be distinguished from the non-special type of invasive breast cancer (NST) by E-cadherin inactivation, loss of E-cadherin related cell adhesion and the subsequent discohesive growth pattern. Variant forms of ILC may show different molecular features, and solid and pleomorphic differentiation patterns in cases of high grade variants. Important parameters for the prognostic assessment of ILC are tumor grading and the recognition of morphological variants.

  5. Aquatic invasive species: Lessons from cancer research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulveda, Adam; Ray, Andrew; Al-Chokhachy, Robert K.; Muhlfeld, Clint C.; Gresswell, Robert E.; Gross, Jackson A.; Kershner, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Aquatic invasive species are disrupting ecosystems with increasing frequency. Successful control of these invasions has been rare: Biologists and managers have few tools for fighting aquatic invaders. In contrast, the medical community has long worked to develop tools for preventing and fighting cancer. Its successes are marked by a coordinated research approach with multiple steps: prevention, early detection, diagnosis, treatment options and rehabilitation. The authors discuss how these steps can be applied to aquatic invasive species, such as the American bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus), in the Northern Rocky Mountain region of the United States, to expedite tool development and implementation along with achievement of biodiversity conservation goals.

  6. Human papillomavirus distribution in invasive cervical carcinoma in sub-Saharan Africa: could HIV explain the differences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndiaye, Cathy; Alemany, Laia; Ndiaye, Nafissatou; Kamaté, Bakarou; Diop, Yankhoba; Odida, Michael; Banjo, Kunbi; Tous, Sara; Klaustermeier, Jo Ellen; Clavero, Omar; Castellsagué, Xavier; Bosch, F Xavier; Trottier, Helen; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2012-12-01

    To describe human papillomavirus (HPV) distribution in invasive cervical carcinoma (ICC) from Mali and Senegal and to compare type-specific relative contribution among sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries. A multicentric study was conducted to collect paraffin-embedded blocks of ICC. Polymerase chain reaction, DNA enzyme immunoassay and line probe assay were performed for HPV detection and genotyping. Data from SSA (Mozambique, Nigeria and Uganda) and 35 other countries were compared. One hundred and sixty-four ICC cases from Mali and Senegal were tested from which 138 were positive (adjusted prevalence = 86.8%; 95% CI = 79.7-91.7%). HPV16 and HPV18 accounted for 57.2% of infections and HPV45 for 16.7%. In SSA countries, HPV16 was less frequent than in the rest of the world (49.4%vs. 62.6%; P < 0.0001) but HPV18 and HPV45 were two times more frequent (19.3%vs. 9.4%; P < 0.0001 and 10.3%vs. 5.6%; P < 0.0001, respectively). There was an ecological correlation between HIV prevalence and the increase of HPV18 and the decrease of HPV45 in ICC in SSA (P = 0.037 for both). HPV16/18/45 accounted for two-thirds of the HPV types found in invasive cervical cancer in Mali and Senegal. Our results suggest that HIV may play a role in the underlying HPV18 and HPV45 contribution to cervical cancer, but further studies are needed to confirm this correlation. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Physical state & copy number of high risk human papillomavirus type 16 DNA in progression of cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirish Shukla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: High-risk human papilloma virus (HR-HPV infection and its integration in host genome is a key event in malignant transformation of cervical cells. HPV16 being a dominant HR-HPV type, we undertook this study to analyze if viral load and physical state of the virus correlated with each other in the absence of other confounding variables and examined their potential as predictors of progressive cervical lesions. Methods: Both, viral load and integration status of HPV16 were determined by real time URR PCR and estimation of E2:E6 ratio in a total of 130 PGMY-RLB -confirmed, monotypic HPV16-infected cervical DNA samples from biopsies of cytology-confirmed low grade (LSIL, 30 and high grade (HSIL, 30, and invasive carcinoma, (squamous cell carcinoma SCC, 70 cases. Results: Investigation of DNA samples revealed a gradual increase in HPV16 viral load over several magnitudes and increased frequency of integration from LSIL to HSIL and HSIL to invasive cancer in relation to the severity of lesions in monotypic HPV16-infected cervical tissues. In a substantial number of precancer (11/60 and cancer cases (29/70, HPV16 was detected in concomitant mixed form. The concomitant form of HPV16 genome carried significantly higher viral load. Interpretation & conclusions: Overall, viral load and integration increased with disease severity and could be useful biomarkers in disease progression, at least, in HPV16-infected cervical pre-cancer and cancer lesions.

  8. Internet-Based Cervical Cancer Screening Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wilbur, David C; Crothers, Barbara A; Eichhorn, John H; Ro, Min S; Gelfand, Jeffrey A

    2008-01-01

    This project explores the combination of computerized automated primary screening of cervical cytology specimens in remote sites with interpretation of device-selected images transmitted via the Internet...

  9. A cohort analysis of cervical cancer in Israeli Jewish women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heering, S L; Beller, U; Baras, M; Ben-Shlomo, I; Steinitz, R; Harlap, S

    1990-12-01

    The incidence of squamous cell cervical cancer was studied in Jewish Israeli women between 1961 and 1981. The 1052 cases and the 27,832,272 women-years of observation were divided according to continent-of-origin, year-of-birth, and immigration-wave cohorts. Age-adjusted odds ratios were calculated for each cohort and compared. The incidence of cervical cancer was shown to have changed according to cohort year of birth, most significantly in women born in Europe and America. The highest risk in this group was seen in women born in 1891-1895 and 1941-1945 and the lowest in women born between 1926 and 1935. A high risk was also observed in all cohorts of North African women. There was a sharp rise in risk for women of all origins born after 1940. Immigration to Israel at a younger age was correlated with reduced risk for cervical cancer. It has been shown that epidemics of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are followed in time by epidemics of cervical cancer. Since there was an epidemic of STDs in Israel between 1967 and 1970, our results also suggest that there is a rise in the risk for cervical cancer in women who were sexually active during the epidemic of STDs. Because of the low rates for cervical cancer traditionally observed in Israeli women, routine screening was not done in Israel in the past. Should the relative risk for cervical cancer in women exposed during the 1967-1970 epidemic continue to be high, screening may prove worthwhile.

  10. Disulfiram-loaded immediate and extended release vaginal tablets for the localised treatment of cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baffoe, Clara S; Nguyen, Nhi; Boyd, Peter; Wang, Weiguang; Morris, Mark; McConville, Christopher

    2015-02-01

    To develop and manufacture both immediate and sustained release vaginal tablets containing the anticancer drug disulfiram, which has the potential to be used as a non-invasive treatment for cervical cancer. Disulfiram-loaded vaginal tablets were manufactured at pilot scale using the direct compression method. These tablets were tested in accordance with the European Pharmacopeia testing of solid dosage form guidelines. They were also tested using a biorelevant dissolution method as well as a dual-chambered release model designed to better mimic the dynamic nature of the vaginal vault. We have developed both immediate and sustained release vaginal tablets, which when manufactured at pilot scale are within the limits set by the European Pharmacopeia for the testing of solid dosage forms. Furthermore, these tablets are capable of releasing disulfiram in vitro using the dual-chambered release model at levels 25,000 times and 35,000 times greater than its IC50 concentration for the HeLa cervical cancer cell line. The successful pilot manufacture and testing of both the immediate and sustained release disulfiram-loaded vaginal tablets warrant further investigation, using an in-vivo model, to assess their potential for use as a non-invasive treatment option for cervical cancer. © 2014 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  11. Gene expression profiles of primary HPV16- and HPV18-infected early stage cervical cancers and normal cervical epithelium: identification of novel candidate molecular markers for cervical cancer diagnosis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santin, Alessandro D; Zhan, Fenghuang; Bignotti, Eliana; Siegel, Eric R; Cané, Stefania; Bellone, Stefania; Palmieri, Michela; Anfossi, Simone; Thomas, Maria; Burnett, Alexander; Kay, Helen H; Roman, Juan J; O'Brien, Timothy J; Tian, Erming; Cannon, Martin J; Shaughnessy, John; Pecorelli, Sergio

    2005-01-20

    With the goal of identifying genes with a differential pattern of expression between invasive cervical carcinomas (CVX) and normal cervical keratinocytes (NCK), we used oligonucleotide microarrays to interrogate the expression of 14,500 known genes in 11 primary HPV16 and HPV18-infected stage IB-IIA cervical cancers and four primary normal cervical keratinocyte cultures. Hierarchical cluster analysis of gene expression data identified 240 and 265 genes that exhibited greater than twofold up-regulation and down-regulation, respectively, in primary CVX when compared to NCK. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A/p16), mesoderm-specific transcript, forkhead box M1, v-myb myeloblastosis viral oncogene homolog (avian)-like2 (v-Myb), minichromosome maintenance proteins 2, 4, and 5, cyclin B1, prostaglandin E synthase (PTGES), topoisomerase II alpha (TOP2A), ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2C, CD97 antigen, E2F transcription factor 1, and dUTP pyrophosphatase were among the most highly overexpressed genes in CVX when compared to NCK. Down-regulated genes in CVX included transforming growth factor beta 1, transforming growth factor alpha, CFLAR, serine proteinase inhibitors (SERPING1 and SERPINF1), cadherin 13, protease inhibitor 3, keratin 16, and tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2 (TFPI-2). Differential expression of some of these genes including CDKN2A/p16, v-Myb, PTGES, and TOP2A was validated by quantitative real-time PCR. Flow cytometry on primary CVX and NCK and immunohistochemical staining of formalin fixed paraffin-embedded tumor specimens from which primary CVX cultures were derived as well as from a separate set of invasive cervical cancers confirmed differential expression of the CDKN2A/p16 and PTGES markers on CVX versus NCK. These results identify several genes that are coordinately disregulated in cervical cancer, likely representing common signaling pathways triggered by HPV transformation. Moreover, these data obtained with highly purified primary tumor

  12. Cervical spondylodiscitis following an invasive procedure on the neopharynx after circumferential pharyngolaryngectomy: a retrospective case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espitalier, Florent; de Keating-Hart, Anne; Morinière, Sylvain; Badet, Jean-Michel; Asseray, Nathalie; Ferron, Christophe; Malard, Olivier

    2016-12-01

    To highlight cervical spondylodiscitis as an infrequent complication following an invasive procedure on the neopharynx in patients previously treated with circumferential pharyngolaryngectomy with pectoralis major myocutaneous flap reconstruction. Patients diagnosed with cervical spondylodiscitis after circumferential pharyngolaryngectomy between 2001 and 2013 were retrospectively studied using a questionnaire sent to the French head and neck tumour study group. Medical history; tumour management; clinical symptoms; biological, microbiological and imaging results; and management of the infection were collected for each patient. Six men aged 51-66 years were diagnosed with spondylodiscitis on average 5.6 years after circumferential pharyngolaryngectomy, and a mean 2 months following an invasive procedure on the neopharynx (oesophageal dilatation, phonatory prosthesis insertion). The patients presented with cervical pain and increased CRP level. MRI showed epidural abscess and communication between the pharynx and vertebral bodies in most cases. Microbiological samples yielded bacteria from the pharynx flora. Infection was managed using antibiotics adjusted according to the culture results and spinal immobilisation for duration of 6-12 weeks. No surgical treatment was required. During follow-up, no patient experienced recurrence or residual disability. Cervical spondylodiscitis is a rare but potentially severe complication following an invasive procedure on the neopharynx after circumferential pharyngolaryngectomy. Therefore, the onset of nonspecific symptoms should not be overlooked, and MRI must be performed if infection is suspected. Microbiological confirmation is critical in optimising treatment, which should be aggressive, even if overall prognosis seems to be good.

  13. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of metastatic cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide. The outcome of patients with metastatic cervical cancer is poor. We reviewed the relevant literature concerning the treatment and diagnosis of metastatic cervical cancer. There are two types of metastasis related to different treatments and survival rates: hematogenous metastasis and lymphatic metastasis. Patients with hematogenous metastasis have a higher risk of death than those with lymphatic metastasis. In terms of diagnosis, fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and PET-computed tomography are effective tools for the evaluation of distant metastasis. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy and subsequent chemotherapy are well-tolerated and efficient for lymphatic metastasis. As for lung metastasis, chemotherapy and/or surgery are valuable treatments for resistant, recurrent metastatic cervical cancer and chemoradiotherapy may be the optimal choice for stage IVB cervical cancer. Chemotherapy and bone irradiation are promising for bone metastasis. A better survival is achieved with multimodal therapy. Craniotomy or stereotactic radiosurgery is an optimal choice combined with radiotherapy for solitary brain metastases. Chemotherapy and palliative brain radiation may be considered for multiple brain metastases and other organ metastases. PMID:27171673

  14. Minimally Invasive Anterior Cervical Discectomy Without Fusion to Treat Cervical Disc Herniations in Patients with Previous Cervical Fusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granville, Michelle; Berti, Aldo

    2017-01-01

    Adjacent level cervical disc disease and secondarily progressive disc space degeneration that develops years after previously successful anterior cervical fusion at one or more levels is a common, but potentially complex problem to manage. The patient is faced with the option of further open surgery which involves adding another level of disc removal with fusion, posterior decompression, and stabilization, or possibly replacing the degenerated disc with an artificial disc construct. These three cases demonstrate that some patients, especially after minor trauma, may have small herniated discs as the cause for their new symptoms rather than progressive segmental degeneration. Each patient became symptomatic after minor trauma three to six years after the original fusion and had no or minimal radiologic changes of narrowing of the disc or spur formation commonly seen in adjacent level disease, but rather had magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings typical of small herniated discs. After failing multiple months of conservative treatment they were offered surgery as an option. Subsequently, all three were successfully treated with minimal anterior discectomy without fusion. There are no reports in the literature of using minimal anterior cervical discectomy without fusion in previous fused patients. This report reviews the background of adjacent level cervical disease, the various biomechanical explanations for developing a new disc herniation rather than progressive segmental degeneration, and how anterior cervical discectomy without fusion can be an option in these patients. PMID:28473949

  15. Potential impact of nonavalent HPV vaccine in the prevention of high-grade cervical lesions and cervical cancer in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pista, Angela; de Oliveira, Carlos Freire; Lopes, Carlos; Cunha, Maria J

    2017-10-01

    To estimate the potential impact of the nonavalent HPV vaccine for high-grade cervical lesions and invasive cervical cancer (ICC) in Portugal. The present secondary analysis used data collected in the CLEOPATRE II study on the prevalence of HPV 6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58 among female patients aged 20-88 years. The prevalence of HPV types in patients with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grades 2/3 and ICC was examined. Data were included from 582 patients. There were 177, 341, and 64 patients with CIN2, CIN3, and ICC, respectively, and 169 (95.5%), 339 (99.4%), and 62 (96.9) of them had HPV infections. Of patients with HPV infections, HPV 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58 infections were identified in 150 (88.8%), 329 (97.1%), and 60 (96.8%) patients with CIN2, CIN3, and ICC, respectively. HPV genotypes 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58 were identified in 540 (94.7%) of the patients with HPV infections. The addition of the five HPV genotypes included in the nonavalent HPV vaccine (HPV 31/33/45/52/58) could result in the new HPV vaccine preventing 94.7% of CIN2/3 and ICC occurrences. © 2017 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  16. From Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Detection to Cervical Cancer Prevention in Clinical Practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sin Hang; Vigliotti, Jessica S.; Vigliotti, Veronica S.; Jones, William

    2014-01-01

    The newly gained knowledge of the viral etiology in cervical carcinogenesis has prompted industrial interests in developing virology-based tools for cervical cancer prevention. Due to the long incubation period from viral infection to developing an invasive cancer, a process whose outcome is influenced by numerous life-style and genetic factors, the true efficacy of the genotype-specific human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines in cervical cancer prevention cannot be determined for another 30 years. Most HPV DNA test kits designed to replace the traditional Papanicolaou (Pap) smears for precancer detection lack the analytical sensitivity and specificity to comprehensively detect all potentially carcinogenic HPVs and to perform reliable genotyping. The authors implemented the classic nested PCR and Sanger DNA-sequencing technology for routine HPV testing. The results showed a true negative HPV PCR invariably indicates the absence of precancerous cells in the cytology samples. However, 80.5% of single positive HPV-16 tests and 97.3% of single positive HPV-18 tests were associated with a negative or a largely self-reversible Pap cytology. Routine sensitive and reliable HPV type-specific or perhaps even variant-specific methods are needed to address the issues of persistence of HPV infection if a virology-based primary cervical screen is used to replace the Pap cytology screening paradigm

  17. From Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Detection to Cervical Cancer Prevention in Clinical Practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sin Hang, E-mail: shlee01@snet.net; Vigliotti, Jessica S.; Vigliotti, Veronica S.; Jones, William [Department of Pathology, Milford Hospital, 300 Seaside Ave., Milford, CT 06460 (United States)

    2014-10-02

    The newly gained knowledge of the viral etiology in cervical carcinogenesis has prompted industrial interests in developing virology-based tools for cervical cancer prevention. Due to the long incubation period from viral infection to developing an invasive cancer, a process whose outcome is influenced by numerous life-style and genetic factors, the true efficacy of the genotype-specific human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines in cervical cancer prevention cannot be determined for another 30 years. Most HPV DNA test kits designed to replace the traditional Papanicolaou (Pap) smears for precancer detection lack the analytical sensitivity and specificity to comprehensively detect all potentially carcinogenic HPVs and to perform reliable genotyping. The authors implemented the classic nested PCR and Sanger DNA-sequencing technology for routine HPV testing. The results showed a true negative HPV PCR invariably indicates the absence of precancerous cells in the cytology samples. However, 80.5% of single positive HPV-16 tests and 97.3% of single positive HPV-18 tests were associated with a negative or a largely self-reversible Pap cytology. Routine sensitive and reliable HPV type-specific or perhaps even variant-specific methods are needed to address the issues of persistence of HPV infection if a virology-based primary cervical screen is used to replace the Pap cytology screening paradigm.

  18. Accuracy of pelvic examination in the assessment of patients with operable cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Mitchel S; Cardosi, Richard J; Roberts, William S; Fiorica, James V; Grendys, Edward C; Griffin, David

    2004-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether pelvic examination identifies factors that suggest the need for radiotherapy after radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer. This was an observational study that was conducted from July 1, 2000 through December 31, 2002 that comprised 67 patients with stage 1B-2A cervical cancer who underwent primary surgical treatment. Assessments that were made on pelvic examination were compared with pathologic findings. Data were analyzed with the use of descriptive statistics, calculation of sensitivities, specificities, positive and negative predictive values, and determination of odds ratios. The overall spectrum of small to large tumors (examination (r=0.77-0.88). The accuracy of examination was approximately 50% for tumor diameter (+/-25%), 85% for cervical diameter (+/-25%), 80% for outer-third invasion, 80% for endophytic growth, and 90% for vaginal involvement. The likelihood for adjuvant radiotherapy had a significant association with the number of at-risk examination variables that were present. For women who undergo radical hysterectomy for stage 1B to 2A cervical cancer, the presence of multiple high-risk factors that are found on pelvic examination is associated significantly with indications for adjuvant postoperative radiotherapy.

  19. Nominated Texture Based Cervical Cancer Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Jayasingh Mariarputham

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate classification of Pap smear images becomes the challenging task in medical image processing. This can be improved in two ways. One way is by selecting suitable well defined specific features and the other is by selecting the best classifier. This paper presents a nominated texture based cervical cancer (NTCC classification system which classifies the Pap smear images into any one of the seven classes. This can be achieved by extracting well defined texture features and selecting best classifier. Seven sets of texture features (24 features are extracted which include relative size of nucleus and cytoplasm, dynamic range and first four moments of intensities of nucleus and cytoplasm, relative displacement of nucleus within the cytoplasm, gray level cooccurrence matrix, local binary pattern histogram, tamura features, and edge orientation histogram. Few types of support vector machine (SVM and neural network (NN classifiers are used for the classification. The performance of the NTCC algorithm is tested and compared to other algorithms on public image database of Herlev University Hospital, Denmark, with 917 Pap smear images. The output of SVM is found to be best for the most of the classes and better results for the remaining classes.

  20. Improving cervical cancer screening attendance in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Anni; Anttila, Ahti; Luostarinen, Tapio; Malila, Nea; Nieminen, Pekka

    2015-03-15

    High attendance is essential to cervical cancer screening results. Attendance in the Finnish program is currently at 70%, but extensive opportunistic screening occurs beside the organized. A shift from opportunistic to organized screening is imperative to optimize the costs and impact of screening and minimize potential harms. We evaluated the effect of reminder letters (1st reminder) and self-sampling test (2nd reminder) on program attendance. The study population consisted of 31,053 screening invitees in 31 Finnish municipalities. 8,284 non-attendees after one invitation received a reminder letter and 4,536 further non-attendees were offered a self-sampling option. Socioeconomic factors related to participation were clarified by combining screening data to data from Statistics Finland. Reminder letters increased participation from 72.6% (95% CI 72.1, 73.1) to 79.2% (95% CI 78.8, 79.7) and self-sampling further to 82.2% (95% CI 81.8, 82.7). Reminder letters with scheduled appointments resulted in higher increase than open invitations (10 vs. 6%). Screening of original non-attendees increased the yield of CIN3+ lesions by 24%. Non-attendance was associated with young age, immigrant background, lower education level and having never been married. We showed that a total attendance of well over 80% can be achieved within an organized program when the invitational protocol is carefully arranged. © 2014 UICC.

  1. Long Noncoding RNA GAS5, Which Acts as a Tumor Suppressor via microRNA 21, Regulates Cisplatin Resistance Expression in Cervical Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Qirong; Liu, Yan; Lyu, Huabing; Xu, Xiaying; Wu, Qingxia; Liu, Ni; Yin, Qi; Li, Juan; Sheng, Xiujie

    2017-07-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the functions of GAS5 as a tumor suppressor in cervical cancer and explore the mechanism. The expression of GAS5 and microRNA 21 (miR-21) was detected in primary cervical cancer tissue specimens, as well as in cervical cancer cell lines. We identified the interaction of GAS5 and miR-21 by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and dual-luciferase reporter assay. We also studied the functions of GAS5 in proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and invasion in cervical cancer cells in vitro and vivo. Finally, the impact of GAS5 on cisplatin resistance and its mechanism in cervical cancer cells was also identified. The expression of GAS5 and miR-21 was detected in primary cervical cancer tissue specimens, as well as in cervical cancer cell lines. GAS5, which is a tumor suppressor playing roles in inhibiting the malignancy of cervical cancer cells, including proliferation in vivo and vitro, migration, and invasion, has a low expression in cervical cancer tissue and cervical cancer cell lines, whereas miR-21 expression is high. GAS5 significantly decreased the expression of miR-21, and there is a reciprocal repression of gene expression between GAS5 and miR-21. Besides, most importantly, we found that high expression of GAS5 and low expression of miR-21 can enhance the sensitivity of SiHa/cDDP cancer cells to cisplatin. A further experiment for identifying the mechanism of cisplatin resistance by GAS5 showed that GAS5 can not only regulate phosphatase and tensin homolog through miR-21 but also influence the phosphorylation of Akt. Our results indicate that GAS5 is a direct target of miR-21 and can predict the clinical staging of cervical cancer. Most importantly, GAS5 can also influence cisplatin resistance in cervical cancer via regulating the phosphorylation of Akt. All of these suggest that GAS5 may be a novel therapeutic target for treating cervical cancer.

  2. Results of radiation therapy on cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsuhashi, Norio; Nagai, Teruo; Yamakawa, Michitaka; Tsuchiya, Miwako; Takahashi, Mitsuhiro; Niibe, Hideo

    1989-01-01

    Between 1969 and 1985, a total of 298 patients with cervical cancer were treated by radiation therapy at the Department of Radiology, Gunma University Hospital. Another 111 patients were treated with irradiation as a follow up to surgery; 69 for prophylactic reasons and 42 to treat residual tumors. Patients treated with irradiation alone were given a combination of external irradiation to the pelvis and low dose rate intracavitary irradiation. Patients treated post-operatively were given intracavitary electron beam irradiation of the resected end of the vagina, and external irradiation of the entire pelvis. The following results were obtained: In patients treated by radiation therapy alone, the relative 5-year survival rates according to clinical stage were: 108% for patients with stage I cancer, 90% for stage II, 62% for stage III, and 31% for stage IV. Stage IV patients with no evidence of hematogenous metastasis could be candidates for radical therapy. Local recurrence was observed in 13% of stage II and III patients, attributed to inadequate intracavitary treatment and the histological diagnosis of adenocarcinoma. Severe complications occurred in only 12 (4%) of the 298 patients treated with irradiation alone. The relative 5-year survival rates for patients treated with post-operative irradiation were 91% for patients treated prophylactically and 49% for patients treated for residual tumor. Patients treated with post-operative irradiation for residual tumor at the resected end of the vagina showed a high cumulative survival rate of 77%. Since urinary sequelae developed in only 4 patients, it would seem that electron beam irradiation of the resected end of the vagina is a safe and effective method of therapy. (author)

  3. [Secondary peritonitis due to rupture of pyometra in cervical cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeferino Toquero, Moisé; Bañuelos Flores, Joel

    2005-11-01

    Only 8 cases of spontaneous uterine rupture in untreated cervical cancer have been reported in the literature. We present the case of a 52-year-old female, who was admitted to the emergency room due to hypovolemic shock and signs of peritonitis. A 6x4x4 cm cervical tumor was detected at physical exam. At laparotomy 2000 mL of purulent material were found and a 1-cm perforation in the posterior portion of the uterine segment was identified. A subtotal hysterectomy was performed. The patient received antibiotic and support at Intensive Care Unit. Finally, the patient presented ascendant flaccid paralysis and died due to bronchoaspiration. Spontaneous pyometra rupture in untreated cervical cancer is a rare condition and must be considered in postmenopausal women with cervical tumors and peritonitis signs.

  4. Brachytherapy in the treatment of cervical cancer: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banerjee R

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Robyn Banerjee,1 Mitchell Kamrava21Department of Radiation Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; 2Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: Dramatic advances have been made in brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Radiation treatment planning has evolved from two-dimensional to three-dimensional, incorporating magnetic resonance imaging and/or computed tomography into the treatment paradigm. This allows for better delineation and coverage of the tumor, as well as improved avoidance of surrounding organs. Consequently, advanced brachytherapy can achieve very high rates of local control with a reduction in morbidity, compared with historic approaches. This review provides an overview of state-of-the-art gynecologic brachytherapy, with a focus on recent advances and their implications for women with cervical cancer.Keywords: cervical cancer, brachytherapy, image-guided brachytherapy

  5. On adequate treatment for stage 1 cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charkviani, L.I.; Kharaishvili, Ts.N.

    1985-01-01

    Expansive extirpation of the uterus was performed in 726 cases of stage TIbNXMO cervical cancer. 19.3% of 600 cases of pTIb cancer showed metastatic involvement of lymph nodes. Metastases into regional lymph nodes were found to be resistant to preoperative large-fraction irradiation. The long-term results of treatment of 484 patients with pTIbNOMO cervical cancer receiving 3 different treatment modalities (operation alone, surgery+preoperative irradiation and surgery+postoperative distant irradiation) did not show any significant difference. Complications and relapse were rarer in patients who received surgery only. Therefore, expansive extirpation of the uterus unaccompanied by distant radiotherapy should be a Method of choice in treatment of stage I cervical cancer (pTIbNOMO)

  6. Physical Activity and Cervical Cancer Testing among American Indian Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muus, Kyle J.; Baker-Demaray, Twyla B.; Bogart, T. Andy; Duncan, Glen E.; Jacobsen, Clemma; Buchwald, Dedra S.; Henderson, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Studies have shown that women who engage in high levels of physical activity have higher rates of cancer screening, including Papanicalaou (Pap) tests. Because American Indian (AI) women are at high risk for cervical cancer morbidity and mortality, we examined Pap screening prevalence and assessed whether physical activity was associated…

  7. Uptake of cervical cancer screening: awareness, willingness and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cervical cancer remains the commonest genital tract cancer and yet it is preventable through cytologic screening with Pap smear. Awareness and willingness among target population is an imperative for uptake of screening services. Aim: To contribute to the existing knowledge base, and in particular, bridge ...

  8. Knowledge of Cervical Cancer and its Screening Amongst Female ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cervical cancer is an important women's reproductive health problem, especially in developing countries. Efforts towards its prevention worldwide have focused on screening women at risk of disease using Pap smears and treating pre-cancerous lesions. A good knowledge and understanding of the level of ...

  9. Design The Cervical Cancer Detector Use The Artificial Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intan Af'idah, Dwi; Didik Widianto, Eko; Setyawan, Budi

    2013-06-01

    Cancer is one of the contagious diseases that become a public health issue, both in the world and in Indonesia. In the world, 12% of all deaths caused by cancer and is the second killer after cardiovascular disease. Early detection using the IVA is a practical and inexpensive (only requiring acetic acid). However, the accuracy of the method is quite low, as it can not detect the stage of the cancer. While other methods have a better sensitivity than the IVA method, is a method of PAP smear. However, this method is relatively expensive, and requires an experienced pathologist-cytologist. According to the case above, Considered important to make the cancer cervics detector that is used to detect the abnormality and cervical cancer stage and consists of a digital microscope, as well as a computer application based on artificial neural network. The use of cervical cancer detector software and hardware are integrated each other. After the specifications met, the steps to design the cervical cancer detection are: Modifying a conventional microscope by adding a lens, image recording, and the lights, Programming the tools, designing computer applications, Programming features abnormality detection and staging of cancer.

  10. Proteomic analysis of cervical cancer cells treated with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    medical care, especially in the field of clinical oncology. As SAHA has shown good results in human cancer therapy, we used HeLa cells as a model to identify whether SAHA would be effective in cervical cancer. We took the proteomics approach, particularly 2-DE and MS, to identify the altered proteins in HeLa cells before ...

  11. Assessment of psychological barriers to cervical cancer screening ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    among women in Kumasi, Ghana using a mixed methods approach. *Williams M1 .... market, pharmacies, trotro (public transportation) stops, and from the ..... Malaysia. Asian Pac. J. Cancer Prev. 2009;10(5):747–. 752. 27. Lin S-J. Factors influencing the uptake of screening services for breast and cervical cancer in Taiwan.

  12. Preferences for cervical cancer screening: The role of implicit associations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korfage, I.J.; Kwaadsteniet, E.W. de; Voorst, A. van; Stiggelbout, A.M.; Vries, M. de; Pieterse, A.H.

    2018-01-01

    Objectives: Implicit associations influence behaviour, but their impact on cancer screening intentions is unknown. Methods: We assessed implicit associations with cervical cancer screening using an evaluative priming task. Participants were shown primes ('Pap test', neutral or non-word) followed by

  13. Awareness of cervical cancer and its prevention among young ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cancer of the cervix is a major public health issue in the developing countries. The burden of the disease is considerable with associated morbidity and mortality among women in their productive years. The lack of awareness and adequate information about cervical cancer and its prevention may be ...

  14. Factors associated with management of cervical cancer patients at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract: Cervical cancer is an important public health problem among adult women worldwide. It is the second commonest malignancy in female worldwide and the leading malignancy among women in Tanzania. In most developing countries, cancer of the cervix tends to be diagnosed in its later stages when is less ...

  15. Knowledge, Practices and Education of Clients on Cervical Cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Most patients with cancer of the cervix present late with poor prognosis. Health workers' knowledge and utilization of the screening services might influence their clients. The aim of this study was to determine the knowledge, practice and education of clients on cervical cancer and its screening among female ...

  16. Awareness and perception of risk for cervical cancer among women ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    about their sociodemographic characteristics, marital and reproductive history, and awareness and perception of risk for cervical cancer. Data were .... Data were entered into a computer and analyzed using. Statistical Package for the Social ..... Information Centre). Human Papilloma Virus and Related Cancers in. Nigeria.

  17. Cervical cancer screening in Greenland, 1997-2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Signe; Wohlfahrt, Jan; Kjær, Susanne Krüger

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In spite of the high incidence of cervical cancer in Greenland, no assessment has been made of the impact of organized cervical screening, introduced in 1998, in relation to occurrence of high-grade cervical lesions. The objectives of the present study were to estimate coverage...... of the screening program was low during 1997-2011 with the highest level of 54% observed in 2011. Peaks in CIN3 incidence of around 300 per 100,000 person-years were observed in 1999 and between 2009 and 2011, while the incidence was lower of approximately 100 per 100,000 person-years between 2000 and 2008. During...

  18. Inadequate cervical cancer screening among mid-aged Australian women who have experienced partner violence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loxton, Deborah; Powers, Jennifer; Schofield, Margot; Hussain, Rafat; Hosking, Stacey

    Objectives. Partner violence is linked to cervical cancer and other gynaecological conditions. However, results of current research into associations between partner violence and cervical cancer screening have been inconclusive. Therefore, the current research investigates the association between

  19. Anterior cervical fusion versus minimally invasive posterior keyhole decompression for cervical radiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard M. Young

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: ACDF has been demonstrated to be an effective surgical procedure in treating degenerative spine disease in patients with radiculopathy and/or myelopathy. However, in a population with isolated radiculopathy and radiological imaging confirming an anterolateral disc or osteophyte complex, the MIPKF can provide similar results without the associated risks that accompany an anterior cervical spine fusion.

  20. Cervical spinal cord bullet fragment removal using a minimally invasive surgical approach: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawton Cort D

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We present a case of penetrating gunshot injury to the high-cervical spinal cord and describe a minimally invasive approach used for removal of the bullet fragment. We present this report to demonstrate technical feasibility of a minimally invasive approach to projectile removal. Case presentation An 18-year-old African-American man presented to our hospital with a penetrating gunshot injury to the high-cervical spine. The bullet lodged in the spinal cord at the C1 level and rendered our patient quadriplegic and dependent on a ventilator. For personal and forensic reasons, our patient and his family requested removal of the bullet fragment almost one year following the injury. Given the significant comorbidity associated with quadriplegia and ventilator dependency, a minimally invasive approach was used to limit the peri-operative complication risk and expedite recovery. Using a minimally invasive expandable retractor system and the aid of a microscope, the posterior arch of C1 was removed, the dura was opened, and the bullet fragment was successfully removed from the spinal cord. Conclusions Here we describe a minimally invasive procedure demonstrating the technical feasibility of removing an intramedullary foreign object from the high-cervical spine. We do not suggest that the availability of minimally invasive procedures should lower the threshold or expand the indications for the removal of bullet fragments in the spinal canal. Rather, our objective is to expand the indications for minimally invasive procedures in an effort to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with spinal procedures. In addition, this report may help to highlight the feasibility of this approach.

  1. Expression of IL-1α and IL-6 is Associated with Progression and Prognosis of Human Cervical Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhiwang; Lin, Yun; Ye, Xiaojuan; Feng, Chan; Lu, Yonglin; Yang, Guang; Dong, Chunyan

    2016-11-20

    BACKGROUND IL-1α and IL-6 are associated with the prognosis of a wide range of cancers, but their value in cervical cancer remains controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of IL-1α and IL-6 in cervical cancer and their significance in clinical prognosis. MATERIAL AND METHODS The expression of IL-1α and IL-6 in 105 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded cervical cancer tissues and adjacent non-tumor tissues was examined by immunohistochemistry. The results were semi-quantitatively scored and analyzed by chi-square test. Patient overall survival (OS) data was collected by follow-up and analyzed by Kaplan-Meier analysis. RESULTS The expression level of both IL-1α and IL-6 in cervical cancer tissue was higher than in adjacent non-tumor tissues (p<0.05). IL-1α expression was shown to be correlated with tumor size, FIGO histology grade, lymph node metastasis, stromal invasion, and tumor differentiation (p<0.05). IL-6 expression was shown to be correlated with tumor size, FIGO histology grade, and tumor differentiation (p<0.05). Patients with positive expression of IL-1α or IL-6 tended to have much shorter survival times than patients with negative expression. In addition, a multivariate Cox regression analysis demonstrated that IL-1α expression and lymph node metastasis were independent predictors of OS in cervical cancer patients. CONCLUSIONS The expression of IL-1α was significantly associated with tumor size, FIGO histology grade, lymph node metastasis, stromal invasion, and tumor differentiation. The expression of IL-6 was significantly associated with tumor size, FIGO histology grade, and tumor differentiation. Positive IL-1α and IL-6 expression was significantly correlated with poor prognosis. They may be considered valuable biomarkers for prognosis and potential therapeutic targets for cervical cancer.

  2. `WORSE THAN HIV' OR `NOT AS SERIOUS AS OTHER DISEASES'? CONCEPTUALIZATION OF CERVICAL CANCER AMONG NEWLY SCREENED WOMEN IN ZAMBIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Heather L.; Mulambia, Chishimba; Sinkala, Moses; Mwanahamuntu, Mulindi H.; Parham, Groesbeck P.; Moneyham, Linda; Grimley, Diane M.; Chamot, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Invasive cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women worldwide, with approximately 85% of the disease burden occurring in developing countries. To date, there have been few systematic efforts to document African women's conceptualization of cervical cancer after participation in a visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA)-based “see and treat” cervical cancer prevention program. In this study, conducted between September, 2009-July, 2010, focus groups and in-depth interviews were conducted with 60 women who had recently undergone cervical cancer screening at a government-operated primary health care clinic in Lusaka, Zambia. Interviewers elicited participants' causal representations of cervical cancer, associated physical signs and symptoms, perceived physical and psychological effects, and social norms regarding the disease. The lay model of illness causation portrayed by participants after recent exposure to program promotion messages departed in several ways from causal models described in other parts of the world. However, causal conceptualizations included both lay and biomedical elements, suggesting a possible shift from a purely traditional causal model to one that incorporates both traditional concepts and recently promoted biomedical concepts. Most, but not all, women still equated cervical cancer with death, and perceived it to be a highly stigmatized disease in Zambia because of its anatomic location, dire natural course, connections to socially-condemned behaviors, and association with HIV/AIDS. No substantive differences of disease conceptualization existed according to HIV serostatus, though HIV positive women acknowledged that their immune status makes them more aware of their health and more likely to seek medical attention. Further attention should be dedicated to the processes by which women incorporate new knowledge into their representations of cervical cancer. PMID:22459188

  3. 'Worse than HIV' or 'not as serious as other diseases'? Conceptualization of cervical cancer among newly screened women in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Heather L; Mulambia, Chishimba; Sinkala, Moses; Mwanahamuntu, Mulindi H; Parham, Groesbeck P; Moneyham, Linda; Grimley, Diane M; Chamot, Eric

    2012-05-01

    Invasive cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women worldwide, with approximately 85% of the disease burden occurring in developing countries. To date, there have been few systematic efforts to document African women's conceptualization of cervical cancer after participation in a visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA)-based "see and treat" cervical cancer prevention program. In this study, conducted between September, 2009-July, 2010, focus groups and in-depth interviews were conducted with 60 women who had recently undergone cervical cancer screening at a government-operated primary health care clinic in Lusaka, Zambia. Interviewers elicited participants' causal representations of cervical cancer, associated physical signs and symptoms, perceived physical and psychological effects, and social norms regarding the disease. The lay model of illness causation portrayed by participants after recent exposure to program promotion messages departed in several ways from causal models described in other parts of the world. However, causal conceptualizations included both lay and biomedical elements, suggesting a possible shift from a purely traditional causal model to one that incorporates both traditional concepts and recently promoted biomedical concepts. Most, but not all, women still equated cervical cancer with death, and perceived it to be a highly stigmatized disease in Zambia because of its anatomic location, dire natural course, connections to socially-condemned behaviors, and association with HIV/AIDS. No substantive differences of disease conceptualization existed according to HIV serostatus, though HIV positive women acknowledged that their immune status makes them more aware of their health and more likely to seek medical attention. Further attention should be dedicated to the processes by which women incorporate new knowledge into their representations of cervical cancer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A joint model of persistent human papillomavirus infection and cervical cancer risk: Implications for cervical cancer screening

    OpenAIRE

    Katki, Hormuzd A.; Cheung, Li C.; Fetterman, Barbara; Castle, Philip E.; Sundaram, Rajeshwari

    2015-01-01

    New cervical cancer screening guidelines in the US and many European countries recommend that women get tested for human papillomavirus (HPV). To inform decisions about screening intervals, we calculate the increase in precancer/cancer risk per year of continued HPV infection. However, both time to onset of precancer/cancer and time to HPV clearance are interval-censored, and onset of precancer/cancer strongly informatively censors HPV clearance. We analyze this bivariate informatively interv...

  5. Prevalence of micronuclei in exfoliated uterine cervical cells from patients with risk factors for cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lízia Maria Franco dos Reis Campos

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Pap smears are the most common and inexpensive screening method for cervical cancer. We analyzed micronucleus prevalence in exfoliated cervical mucosa cells, to investigate associations between increased numbers of micronuclei and risk factors for cervical cancer. DESIGN AND SETTING: Analytical cross-sectional study, at Instituto de Pesquisa em Oncologia (IPON. METHODS: Exfoliated cervical cells were obtained from 101 patients between September 2004 and November 2005. Patients' ages, habits (passive or active smoking, alcoholism and numbers of sexual partners, age at first sexual intercourse, contraceptive methods used, histories of sexually transmitted diseases, use of hormone replacement therapy, numbers of pregnancies and abortions, inflammatory cytology and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN were obtained. Cells were collected using Ayre spatulas, transferred to vials containing 0.9% saline solution for micronucleus tests and analyzed at 1000x magnification. The number of micronuclei in 1,000 epithelial cells per patient sample was counted. RESULTS: Comparisons between groups with active (7.9 ± 7.8 and passive (7.2 ± 10.6 smoking versus no smoking (3.7 ± 5.1; with/without alcoholism (7.8 ± 1.4 and 6.9 ± 10.1; with/without inflammatory cytology (10.7 ± 10.5 and 1.3 ± 1.7; and with CIN I, II and III and no CIN (respectively 4.3 ± 4.3, 10.6 ± 5.3, 22.7 ± 11.9 and 1.3 ± 1.4 found elevated micronucleus prevalence (P < 0.05. CONCLUSIONS: We concluded that the prevalence of micronuclei in exfoliated uterine cervical cells was greater in patients with one or more risk factors for uterine cervical cancer than in patients without risk factors.

  6. BANF1 is downregulated by IRF1-regulated microRNA-203 in cervical cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langyong Mao

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs play important roles in various biological processes and are closely associated with the development of cancer. In fact, aberrant expression of miRNAs has been implicated in numerous cancers. In cervical cancer, miR-203 levels are decreased, although the cause of this aberrant expression remains unclear. In this study, we investigate the molecular mechanisms regulating miR-203 gene transcription. We identify the miR-203 transcription start site by 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends and subsequently identify the miR-203 promoter region. Promoter analysis revealed that IRF1, a transcription factor, regulates miR-203 transcription by binding to the miR-203 promoter. We also demonstrate that miR-203 targets the 3' untranslated region of BANF1, thus downregulating its expression, whereas miR-203 expression is driven by IRF1. MiR-203 is involved in cell cycle regulation and overexpression of miR-203 suppresses cervical cancer cell proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion. The inhibitory effect of miR-203 on the cancer cells is partially mediated by downregulating its target, BANF1, since knockdown of BANF1 also suppresses colony formation, migration and invasion.

  7. Factors Associated with the Uptake of Cervical Cancer Screening Among Women in Portland, Jamaica

    OpenAIRE

    Ncube, Butho; Bey, Amita; Knight, Jeremy; Bessler, Patricia; Jolly, Pauline E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women worldwide and is the leading cause of deaths in developing countries. Despite the strong evidence that cervical cancer screening results in decreased mortality from this disease, the uptake for cervical screening among Jamaican women remains low. Aims : This study was carried out to identify factors associated with Jamaican women′s decisions to screen for cervical cancer. Materials and Methods: Cross-sectional descriptiv...

  8. Incidence, Trends and Ethnic Differences of Oropharyngeal, Anal and Cervical Cancers: Singapore, 1968-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Jennifer O.; Lim, Wei-Yen; Chow, Khuan-Yew; D’Souza, Gypsyamber

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, several Western countries have reported an increase in oropharyngeal and anal cancers caused by human papillomavirus (HPV). Trends in HPV-associated cancers in Asia have not been as well described. We describe the epidemiology of potentially HPV-related cancers reported to the Singapore Cancer Registry from 1968–2012. Analysis included 998 oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC), 183 anal squamous cell carcinoma (ASCC) and 8,019 invasive cervical cancer (ICC) cases. Additionally, 368 anal non-squamous cell carcinoma (ANSCC) and 2,018 non-oropharyngeal head and neck carcinoma (non-OP HNC) cases were included as comparators. Age-standardized incidence rates (ASR) were determined by gender and ethnicity (Chinese, Malay and Indian). Joinpoint regression was used to evaluate annual percentage change (APC) in incidence. OPSCC incidence increased in both genders (men 1993–2012, APC = 1.9%, pSingapore, but Pap screening programs have led to consistently decreasing incidence. PMID:26720001

  9. Non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmström, Per-Uno; Agrawal, Sachin; Bläckberg, Mats

    2017-01-01

    The management of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) has evolved from the first reports on bladder endoscopy and transurethral resection to the introduction of adjuvant intravesical treatment. However, disease recurrence and progression remain an ongoing risk, placing a heavy burden on he...

  10. Minimally invasive central corpectomy for ossified posterior longitudinal ligament in the cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Yoshitaka; Mizuno, Junichi; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Itoh, Yasunobu; Kubota, Keiichi; Watanabe, Sadayoshi; Matsuoka, Hidenori; Numazawa, Shinichi; Tomii, Masato; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2011-01-01

    Minimally invasive central corpectomy (MICC) for cervical segmental ossified posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) is described. The procedure of MICC includes upper- or lower-half central corpectomy of the involved cervical spine, transdiscal decompression of the adjacent disc level, dissection and partial removal of the OPLL, removal of the OPLL behind the vertebral body via these windows, and fusion with cylindrical titanium cages. Anterior plate fixation is not necessary. From January 2008 to December 2009 we surgically treated three patients with cervical OPLL by MICC. All three patients showed remarkable improvement of their symptoms within a few days after the operation. No neurological or radiological complication was observed during that period. MICC is beneficial in avoiding complete corpectomy and long fusion, usage of an anterior plate, and usage of a large external orthosis. MICC also reduces the risk of postoperative esophageal perforation due to a screw backing out of the plate. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Strategies for the prevention and control of cervical cancer in rural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Majority of “most-at-risk” women for cervical cancer disease who reside in rural communities of low and middle income countries (LMIC) do not have access to cervical cancer prevention programmes. This paper reviews epidemiology, recommendations, implementation strategies for prevention and control of cervical cancer ...

  12. Cervical Cancer Screening Interventions for U.S. Latinas: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Jacqueline; Dattalo, Patrick; Crowley, Meghan

    2012-01-01

    The high cervical cancer mortality rate among Latinas compared with other ethnic groups in the United States is of major concern. Latina women are almost twice as likely to die from cervical cancer as non-Hispanic white women. To improve Latina cervical cancer screening rates, interventions have been developed and tested. This systematic review…

  13. Does lowering the screening age for cervical cancer in The Netherlands make sense?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Aa, Maaike A.; de Kok, Inge M.C.M.; Siesling, Sabine; van Ballegooijen, Marjolein; Coebergh, Jan Willem W.

    2008-01-01

    Recommendations for the age to initiate cervical cancer screening should be directed towards maximum detection of early cervical cancer. However, the screening programme should do more good than harm. The aim of this analysis was to determine whether the target age for cervical cancer screening

  14. 75 FR 7282 - Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and... cervical cancer. The committee makes recommendations regarding national program goals and objectives... Force guidelines for breast and cervical cancer screening; Impact of the revised clinical screening...

  15. 77 FR 66469 - Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and... meeting of the aforementioned committee: Name: Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control..., regarding the early detection and control of breast and cervical cancer. The committee makes recommendations...

  16. Therapeutic immunization strategies against cervical cancer : induction of cell-mediated immunity in murine models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bungener, Laura Barbara

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the study described in this thesis is the development of a therapeutic immunization strategy against cervical cancer and pre-malignant precursor lesions of cervical cancer (CIN lesions). Cervical cancer is caused by high risk human papillomavirus (HPV). Two of the early proteins of high

  17. Epidemiological and clinical aspects of human papillomavirus detection in the prevention of cervical cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkers, R.L.M.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Bulten, J.; Melchers, W.J.G.

    2004-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a major cause of death, and the second most frequent cancer in women worldwide. Many studies have indicated a causal relation between genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infections and cervical cancer. High-risk HPV genotypes have been detected in almost 100% of all cervical

  18. Strategies for the Prevention and Control of Cervical Cancer in Rural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    adedamla

    Majority of “most-at-risk” women for cervical cancer disease who reside in rural communities of low and middle income countries (LMIC) do not have access to cervical cancer prevention programmes. This paper reviews epidemiology, recommendations, implementation strategies for prevention and control of cervical cancer ...

  19. HPV-related cervical disease and oropharyngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozza, Virginia; Pieralli, Annalisa; Corioni, Serena; Longinotti, Manuela; Bianchi, Claudia; Moncini, Daniela; Fallani, Maria Grazia

    2014-08-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV), especially HPV 16, is associated with the development of both cervical and oral cancer. We show the case of a woman affected by HPV-related cervical disease and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). A 41-year-old woman arrived at our Colposcopy Center following an abnormal Pap smear result (ASC-H) and a diagnosis of moderate cervical dysplasia obtained by a cervical biopsy. She underwent a colposcopy that showed a cervical abnormal transformation zone grade 2. A laser conization was performed in November 2010. Histology reported a moderate/severe dysplasia. The cone resection margins were free. Follow-up colposcopy and cytology were negative. The HPV testing showed an infection by HPV 16. In October 2012, the patient presented to the Head-Neck ER after episodes of hemoptysis; a lesion was found in the left tonsillar lodge. A biopsy was performed with a result of squamous cell carcinoma with low-grade differentiation. The HPV testing detected a high-risk HPV and the immunohistochemical analysis was positive for p16. She was treated by chemotherapy and brachytherapy. She was followed at the head-neck center with monthly visits with oral visual inspection that showed complete absence of mucosal abnormalities. HPV-related OPSCC and cervical precancerous/cancerous lesions have significant similarities in terms of pathogenesis. They are both caused largely by HPV 16, as in the present case. In conclusion, because of this association found in literature and in our case, we think that women with HPV cervical lesions should have regular surveillance for oropharyngeal cancer, whereas women with OPSCC should be encouraged to have diligent cervical screening.

  20. [Cigarette smoking among women attending cervical cancer screening program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walentowicz-Sadłecka, Małgorzata; Sadłecki, Paweł; Marszałek, Andrzej; Grabiec, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Cervical cancer is recognized as tobacco-related malignancy. HPV vaccination and introducing screening protocols were found as the best way to decrease cervical cancer related mortality. Besides the cytological screening programs of the uterine cervix smear, nowadays co-factors of carcinogenesis are taken into consideration, also. The aim of our study was to analyse data included in questionnaire of 310 women who underwent cytological examination wi thin cervical cancer screening program in our Department in 2011. There were no differences found between studied groups on rate of oral contraceptive or hormonal therapy use, as well as age and tobacco smoking. However, taking into account education and smoking, there was a significant correlation observed. Patients with higher education level smoked less often. The special attention should be paid to promote smoking cessation in the group of women who finished education on elementary level.

  1. Prediction of rehabilitation needs after treatment of cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Tina Broby; Sørensen, Bente; Dieperink, Karin B

    2017-01-01

    showed impaired quality of life, e.g., a lower body image and self-efficacy score, correlated with increasing BMI. Women who had surgery had greater risk of lymphedema, and women who received chemotherapy during treatment had a lower quality of life. All but one received radiotherapy. CONCLUSION......PURPOSE: Women treated for cervical cancer with radiotherapy and chemotherapy have reported serious bowel, vaginal, and sexual late effects. The purpose of this study was to describe late adverse effects, health-related quality of life, and self-efficacy in a representative Danish cervical cancer...... population in order to describe rehabilitation needs. METHODS: Women, mean age 55 years, treated for cervical cancer from January 2010 to July 2013, who were alive and without known relapse/metastases were included in this cross-sectional study. EORTC QLQ C30 and CX24 and self-efficacy questionnaires were...

  2. Cervical cancer screening continues to limit provision of contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Eleanor Bimla; Saint, Mona; Gildengorin, Ginny; Weitz, Tracy A; Stewart, Felicia H; Sawaya, George F

    2005-09-01

    Balancing needs for contraception and cervical cancer screening is challenging for clinicians. We assessed US obstetrician/gynecologists' practices regarding requirement of Pap testing before prescribing oral contraceptive or emergency contraceptive pills. Questionnaires structured as clinical vignettes describing women desiring contraception with different risks of cervical dysplasia were mailed to a national sample of 355 obstetrician/gynecologists. A minority (3%) of the 185 obstetrician/gynecologists who responded would refill 12 months of oral contraceptives without requiring Pap testing. However, most would provide a limited supply of oral contraceptives until Pap testing could be performed. A substantial proportion (11-16%) would refuse to prescribe emergency contraception to women who they felt required Pap testing. Younger physicians, those practicing in academic settings and those who follow American Cancer Society guidelines were more willing to prescribe contraceptives without Pap testing. Cervical cancer screening continues to limit prescription of routine and emergency contraception by many US obstetrician/gynecologists.

  3. Cervical cancer screening policies and coverage in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anttila, Ahti; von Karsa, Lawrence; Aasmaa, Auni

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare current policy, organisation and coverage of cervical cancer screening programmes in the European Union (EU) member states with European and other international recommendations. According to the questionnaire-based survey, there are large variations in cervical...... cancer screening policies and inadequacies in the key organisational elements of the programme such as registration and monitoring required for quality-assurance and fail-safe mechanisms. Based on data from available screening registers, coverage of the screening test taken within the population...... with education, training and communication among women, medical professionals and authorities are required, accordingly. The study indicates that, despite substantial efforts, the recommendations of the Council of the EU on organised population-based screening for cervical cancer are not yet fulfilled. Decision...

  4. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for advanced cervical cancer. A pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Junichi; Hashimoto, Ichiro; Seki, Noriko; Hongo, Atsushi; Mizutani, Yasushi; Miyagi, Yasunari; Yoshinouchi, Mitsuo; Kudo, Takafumi

    2001-01-01

    Recently, attempts have made to use radiotherapy in combination with chemotherapy in various solid tumors including cervical cancer. Twenty-four patients with locally advanced cervical cancer were treated with concurrent Carboplatin (16-24 mg/m 2 /day) or Nedaplatin (20 mg/m 2 /week) and conventional radiotherapy. Of 13 evaluable patients, there were nine complete responders and four partial responders. There was no renal damage or grade 4 hematological toxicity. Gastrointestinal adverse reactions were mild. One patient had grade 3 dermatologic toxicity after delayed radiation therapy. This pilot study suggests that daily Carboplatin or weekly Nedaplatin administered with standard radiation therapy is safe, well-tolerated, and thus may be useful as a radiation sensitizer in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer. (author)

  5. Management of External Invasive Cervical Resorption Tooth with Mineral Trioxide Aggregate: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuja Ikhar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasive cervical resorption is entirely uncommon entities and the etiology is poorly understood. A 19 year old patient presented with fractured upper left central incisor and sinus tract opening on the distobuccal aspect in cervical region. Radiographic examination shows irregular radiolucency over the coronal one-third and it extended externally towards the external invasive resorption. After sectional obturation, the defect was accessed surgically. The resorption area was chemomechanically debrided using irrigant solution. Fibre post placement using flowable composite resin and Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA was used to fill the resorptive defect, and the coronal access was temporarily sealed. Composite restoration was subsequently replaced with ceramic crown after 4 years. Radiographs at 1 and 4 years showed adequate repair of the resorption and endodontic success. Clinically and radiographically the tooth was asymptomatic, and no periodontal pocket was found after a 4-year followup.

  6. PDGF beta targeting in cervical cancer cells suggest a fine-tuning of compensatory signalling pathways to sustain tumourigenic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudoran, Oana Mihaela; Soritau, Olga; Balacescu, Loredana; Pop, Laura; Meurice, Guillaume; Visan, Simona; Lindberg, Staffan; Eniu, Alexandru; Langel, Ulo; Balacescu, Ovidiu; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana

    2015-02-01

    The platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) signalling pathway has been reported to play an important role in human cancers by modulating autocrine and paracrine processes such as tumour growth, metastasis and angiogenesis. Several clinical trials document the benefits of targeting this pathway; however, in cervical cancer the role of PDGF signalling in still unclear. In this study, we used siRNA against PDGF beta (PDGFBB) to investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms of PDGFBB signalling in Ca Ski and HeLa cervical cancer cells. Our results show that PDGFBB inhibition in Ca Ski cells led to rapid alterations of the transcriptional pattern of 579 genes, genes that are known to have antagonistic roles in regulating tumour progression. Concomitantly, with the lack of significant effects on cervical cancer cells proliferation, apoptosis, migration or invasion, these findings suggests that cervical cancer cells shift between compensatory signalling pathways to maintain their behaviour. The observed autocrine effects were limited to cervical cancer cells ability to adhere to an endothelial cell (EC) monolayer. However, by inhibiting PDGFBB on cervical cells, we achieved reduced proliferation of ECs in co-culture settings and cellular aggregation in conditioned media. Because of lack of PDGF receptor expression on ECs, we believe that these effects are a result of indirect PDGFBB paracrine signalling mechanisms. Our results shed some light into the understanding of PDGFBB signalling mechanism in cervical cancer cells, which could be further exploited for the development of synergistic anti-tumour and anti-angiogenic therapeutic strategies. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  7. Breaking the DNA damage response to improve cervical cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieringa, Hylke W; van der Zee, Ate G J; de Vries, Elisabeth G E; van Vugt, Marcel A T M

    2016-01-01

    Every year, cervical cancer affects ∼500,000 women worldwide, and ∼275,000 patients die of this disease. The addition of platin-based chemotherapy to primary radiotherapy has increased 5-year survival of advanced-stage cervical cancer patients, which is, however, still only 66%. One of the factors thought to contribute to treatment failure is the ability of tumor cells to repair chemoradiotherapy-induced DNA damage. Therefore, sensitization of tumor cells for chemoradiotherapy via inhibition of the DNA damage response (DDR) as a novel strategy to improve therapy effect, is currently studied pre-clinically as well as in the clinic. Almost invariably, cervical carcinogenesis involves infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV), which inactivates part of the DNA damage response. This HPV-mediated partial inactivation of the DDR presents therapeutic targeting of the residual DDR as an interesting approach to achieve chemoradio-sensitization for cervical cancer. How the DDR can be most efficiently targeted, however, remains unclear. The fact that cisplatin and radiotherapy activate multiple signaling axes within the DDR further complicates a rational choice of therapeutic targets within the DDR. In this review, we provide an overview of the current preclinical and clinical knowledge about targeting the DDR in cervical cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. WEE1 Inhibitor AZD1775, External Beam Radiation Therapy, and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Cervical, Vaginal, or Uterine Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-19

    Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage I Uterine Corpus Cancer AJCC v7; Stage I Vaginal Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IA Uterine Corpus Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IB Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IB Uterine Corpus Cancer AJCC v7; Stage II Cervical Cancer AJCC v7; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer AJCC v7; Stage II Vaginal Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage III Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage III Uterine Corpus Cancer AJCC v7; Stage III Vaginal Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer AJCC v7

  9. Awareness and practice of cervical cancer and Pap smear testing in a teaching hospital in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoureh Ghaoomi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cervical cancer is known to be preventable because of long period of pre-invasive stage, availability of screening tools, and effective treatments for early invasive cervical lesions. Screening is main measures to prevent the disease and Pap smear is a screening strategy for cervical cancer. Current paper aimed to evaluate levels of awareness and practice regarding Pap smear screening among women aged between 20 to 65 years in Tehran (Iran. Methods: This was a descriptive-analytical study conducted in Tehran City of Iran in 2015 at Firoozgar Hospital. The research population included all married, widowed and divorced women aged 20-65 years. Data analysis was performed using the Pearson correlation and Student’s t-tests in SPSS, ver. 23 (Chicago, IL, USA. Results: Among 90 individuals who have fill questionnaire completely, 66.6% subjects had Pap smear tests. 40% of the individuals aged between 30 to 39 and the education level is distributed equally between Intermediate, Diploma and graduate and only 3 percent of them, continue their education to higher level. There was a significant relationship between the awareness of Pap smear and educational level (of both wives and husbands. The people who have graduate degree, have the best awareness. Working women revealed higher level of awareness about Pap smear. Shame and fear of taking the cancer were the most common reasons which lead to avoidance in doing the test by the women, while the most encouraging factors for performing the test were the information mostly provided by physicians and after that, the information provided by friends. Conclusion: The awareness of Pap smear test which was measured by weighting different questions in the questionnaire by experts, prove that the women aged above 39, have an average level of awareness of Pap smear test. Due to high prevalence of cervical cancer and prolonged pre invasive course, role of Pap smear for early diagnosis necessitate the use

  10. Organization and evaluation of a pilot cervical cancer screening program in Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmouni, Farida; Sauvaget, Catherine; Belakhel, Latifa; Lucas, Eric; Khouchoua, Mohamed; Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate a pilot program for early detection of cervical cancer using visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) and the loop electrosurgical excision procedure (LEEP) in one region of Morocco. A descriptive analysis of the screening outcome measures of 43 participating primary care units and one reference center for LEEP was conducted in Meknès-Tafilalet between January 1, 2011, and December 31, 2013. Data on the number of participants, VIA results, colposcopy, and treatment were used in analyses. Of the 308 197 women in the target age group (30-49 years), 18 586 (6.0%) were screened by VIA. Positive screening test results were recorded for 1628 (8.8%) women, of whom 1144 (70.3%) received diagnostic confirmation by colposcopy. Of the 87 (7.6%) women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, only 16 (18.4%) underwent LEEP; three cases of invasive cervical cancer were diagnosed. Issues with implementation of the screening program were found, including low compliance and a low treatment rate of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia by LEEP. By contrast, high rates of colposcopy referral were observed. Screen-and-treat by ablative methods (e.g. thermocoagulation) should be considered to increase treatment rates at national scale-up. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Management of recurrent cervical cancer: a review of the literature.

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    Peiretti, M; Zapardiel, I; Zanagnolo, V; Landoni, F; Morrow, C P; Maggioni, A

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this narrative review is to update the current knowledge on the treatment of recurrent cervical cancer based on a literature review. A web based search in Medline and CancerLit databases has been carried out on recurrent cervical cancer management and treatment. All relevant information has been collected and analyzed, prioritizing randomized clinical trials. Cervical cancer still represents a significant problem for public health with an annual incidence of about half a million new cases worldwide. Percentages of pelvic recurrences fluctuate from 10% to 74% depending on different risk factors. Accordingly to the literature, it is suggested that chemoradiation treatment (containing cisplatin and/or taxanes) could represent the treatment of choice for locoregional recurrences of cervical cancer after radical surgery. Pelvic exenteration is usually indicated for selected cases of central recurrence of cervical cancer after primary or adjuvant radiation and chemotherapy with bladder and/or rectum infiltration neither extended to the pelvic side walls nor showing any signs of extrapelvic spread of disease. Laterally extended endopelvic resection (LEER) for the treatment of those patients with a locally advanced disease or with a recurrence affecting the pelvic wall has been described. The treatment of recurrences of cervical carcinoma consists of surgery, and of radiation and chemotherapy, or the combination of different modalities taking into consideration the type of primary therapy, the site of recurrence, the disease-free interval, the patient symptoms, performance status, and the degree to which any given treatment might be beneficial. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Screening for cervical cancer in imprisoned women in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Albert Schiaveto; de Souza, Taiana Gabriela Barbosa; Tsuha, Daniel Henrique; Barbieri, Ana Rita

    2017-01-01

    Context and objective Incarcerated women are more vulnerable to developing cervical cancer than women in general; therefore, screening and intervention programs must be included in their healthcare provision. We therefore aimed to investigate the state of cervical cancer screening for imprisoned women in Mato Grosso do Sul, and to analyze the interventions geared toward the control of cervical cancer. Materials and methods This was a cross-sectional study with analysis of primary and secondary data. Interviews were held with 510 women in seven prisons in the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso do Sul. The data for 352 medical records were analyzed statistically with the significance level set at 5%. Associations were assessed by the chi-squared test, adjusted by the Bonferroni correction. Results Most female prisoners had limited education, used tobacco, and had key risk factors for the development of cervical cancer. Half of the women interviewed (n = 255) stated that they had received a Papanicolaou (Pap) test in prison, but 134 (52.5%) of these did not know the result. Of those who had not received a Pap test, 149 (58.4%) stated that this was because of a lack of opportunity. There was no information regarding the provision of Pap tests or subsequent treatment in the medical records of 211 (59.9%) women. No protocols were in place for the provision of Pap tests in prison. There were statistical differences between prisons in terms of test frequency, the information provided to women, and how information was recorded in medical records. Conclusion The screening of cervical cancer in prisons is neither systematic nor regular, and the results are not communicated to women in a significant number of cases. It is necessary to organize health services within the prison environment, ensuring that tests are done and that there is investigation for human papillomavirus. This could increase the diagnosis of cervical cancer at less advanced stages of the disease. PMID:29252994

  13. Variable TERRA abundance and stability in cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Bong-Kyeong; Keo, Ponnarath; Bae, Jaeman; Ko, Jung Hwa; Choi, Joong Sub

    2017-06-01

    Telomeres are transcribed into long non-coding RNA, referred to as telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA), which plays important roles in maintaining telomere integrity and heterochromatin formation. TERRA has been well characterized in HeLa cells, a type of cervical cancer cell. However, TERRA abundance and stability have not been examined in other cervical cancer cells, at least to the best of our knowledge. Thus, in this study, we measured TERRA levels and stability, as well as telomere length in 6 cervical cancer cell lines, HeLa, SiHa, CaSki, HeLa S3, C-33A and SNU-17. We also examined the association between the TERRA level and its stability and telomere length. We found that the TERRA level was several fold greater in the SiHa, CaSki, HeLa S3, C-33A and SNU-17 cells, than in the HeLa cells. An RNA stability assay of actinomycin D-treated cells revealed that TERRA had a short half-life of ~4 h in HeLa cells, which was consistent with previous studies, but was more stable with a longer half-life (>8 h) in the other 5 cell lines. Telomere length varied from 4 to 9 kb in the cells and did not correlate significantly with the TERRA level. On the whole, our data indicate that TERRA abundance and stability vary between different types of cervical cancer cells. TERRA degrades rapidly in HeLa cells, but is maintained stably in other cervical cancer cells that accumulate higher levels of TERRA. TERRA abundance is associated with the stability of RNA in cervical cancer cells, but is unlikely associated with telomere length.

  14. Association between B7-H1 and cervical cancer: B7-H1 impairs the immune response in human cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jianying; Dai, Jianrong; Hou, Shunyu

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the preliminary mechanism of action of B7 homolog 1 (B7-H1) and investigate the association between B7-H1 and cervical cancer. The expression of B7 family proteins was measured in cervical cancer cells. Cervical cancer cells were co-cultured with T lymphocytes. An ELISA assay was subsequently conducted to analyze cytokine concentrations in the supernatants of the cultured T cells in cervical cancer cells and B7-H1 downregulated cells. Levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α mRNA in mice injected with cervical cancer cells or B7-H1 downregulated cells were measured by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. It was determined that cervical cancer cells express high levels of B7-H1, whereas the normal cervical epithelium does not express B7-H1. When co-cultured with T lymphocytes, cervical cancer cells were involved in the inhibition of lymphocyte activation. When B7-H1 was downregulated using a lentivirus, the proliferation ability did not change compared with cervical cancer cells, whereas the soluble factors secreted by T cells differed between cervical cancer cells and B7-H1 downregulated cells. In an animal model, injected B7-H1 downregulated cervical cancer cells elicited a more intense immune response, whereas cervical cancer cells had the wild immune response. Therefore, the results of the present study demonstrate that B7-H1 mediates the low immunogenicity of cervical cancer and is not attacked by the immune system.

  15. Brachytherapy in the treatment of cervical cancer: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Robyn; Kamrava, Mitchell

    2014-01-01

    Dramatic advances have been made in brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Radiation treatment planning has evolved from two-dimensional to three-dimensional, incorporating magnetic resonance imaging and/or computed tomography into the treatment paradigm. This allows for better delineation and coverage of the tumor, as well as improved avoidance of surrounding organs. Consequently, advanced brachytherapy can achieve very high rates of local control with a reduction in morbidity, compared with historic approaches. This review provides an overview of state-of-the-art gynecologic brachytherapy, with a focus on recent advances and their implications for women with cervical cancer.

  16. Nerve-sparing radical hysterectomy in cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phanida Jarruwale

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A new technique of extensive surgical intervention, namely nerve sparing radical hysterectomy (NSRH, was introduced as one of the treatment options for early stage cervical cancer patients because cervical cancer patients suffer from postoperative complications following radical hysterectomy procedure. The step of nerve preservation can reduce postoperative complications, such as bladder or sexual dysfunction problems that occur after a traditional radical hysterectomy procedure. The surgical outcomes seem to be favorable and no serious morbidity was noted. However, further study of the nerve sparing technique is necessary to improve this surgical advantage in the future.

  17. Gompertzian stochastic model with delay effect to cervical cancer growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazlan, Mazma Syahidatul Ayuni binti; Rosli, Norhayati binti; Bahar, Arifah

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a Gompertzian stochastic model with time delay is introduced to describe the cervical cancer growth. The parameters values of the mathematical model are estimated via Levenberg-Marquardt optimization method of non-linear least squares. We apply Milstein scheme for solving the stochastic model numerically. The efficiency of mathematical model is measured by comparing the simulated result and the clinical data of cervical cancer growth. Low values of Mean-Square Error (MSE) of Gompertzian stochastic model with delay effect indicate good fits

  18. Gompertzian stochastic model with delay effect to cervical cancer growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazlan, Mazma Syahidatul Ayuni binti; Rosli, Norhayati binti [Faculty of Industrial Sciences and Technology, Universiti Malaysia Pahang, Lebuhraya Tun Razak, 26300 Gambang, Pahang (Malaysia); Bahar, Arifah [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Johor Bahru, Johor and UTM Centre for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (UTM-CIAM), Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia)

    2015-02-03

    In this paper, a Gompertzian stochastic model with time delay is introduced to describe the cervical cancer growth. The parameters values of the mathematical model are estimated via Levenberg-Marquardt optimization method of non-linear least squares. We apply Milstein scheme for solving the stochastic model numerically. The efficiency of mathematical model is measured by comparing the simulated result and the clinical data of cervical cancer growth. Low values of Mean-Square Error (MSE) of Gompertzian stochastic model with delay effect indicate good fits.

  19. Sex, drugs, and politics: the HPV vaccine for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, Monica J; Carpenter, Laura M

    2008-09-01

    HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the world. While most strains are relatively harmless, some increase a woman's risk of developing cervical cancer. This article explores the intimate, contested relationships among etiologies of cervical cancer, development and use of the new HPV vaccine, and contested notions of sexuality. We particularly focus on shifts in US health care and sexual politics, where the vaccine has animated longstanding concerns about vaccination (e.g. parental rights, cost, specialisation) and young women's bodies and behaviour. We conclude that vaccines are a distinctive kind of pharmaceutical, invoking notions of contagion and containment, and that politics shape every aspect of the pharmaceutical life course.

  20. Disease-related needs of black patients with cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Treadwell

    1992-09-01

    Full Text Available The high incidence of cervical cancer amongst South African black women is complicated by late presentation for treatment as well as by misconceptions and ignorance which adversely affect the quality of their lives. The aim of the research was to determine the disease-related needs of patients suffering from cervical cancer which would serve as a basis for planning on providing for these needs. Needs for the following were identified: • Education on early detection in the community. • Education on nutrition and hygiene. • Information on and assistance in obtaining financial relief by means of subsidised transport and disability pensions.

  1. WHY SHOULD WE PERFORM EXTENDED SURGERIES FOR CERVICAL CANCER?

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    L. Ungar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A surgical technique for the complete removal of the connective tissue content of the pelvis was introduced in 1993 to improve oncological outcome of the surgical treatment of operable cervical cancer by reducing the risk of recurrence from the pelvis. Our results suggest that complete excision of the connective tissue content of the pelvis provides equal or better survival chances without any adjuvant treatment for almost 90 % of operable stage IB cervical cancer patients than less radical surgery with or without adjuvant treatment.

  2. Cancer stem cell contribution to glioblastoma invasiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortensi, Barbara; Setti, Matteo; Osti, Daniela; Pelicci, Giuliana

    2013-02-28

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive and lethal brain tumor in adults. Its invasive nature currently represents the most challenging hurdle to surgical resection. The mechanism adopted by GBM cells to carry out their invasive strategy is an intricate program that recalls what takes place in embryonic cells during development and in carcinoma cells during metastasis formation, the so-called epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. GBM cells undergo a series of molecular and conformational changes shifting the tumor toward mesenchymal traits, including extracellular matrix remodeling, cytoskeletal re-patterning, and stem-like trait acquisition. A deeper understanding of the mechanisms driving the whole infiltrative process represents the first step toward successful treatment of this pathology. Here, we review recent findings demonstrating the invasive nature of GBM cancer stem cells, together with novel candidate molecules associated with both cancer stem cell biology and GBM invasion, like doublecortin and microRNAs. These findings may affect the design of effective therapies currently not considered for GBM invasive progression.

  3. Variation in incidence of breast, lung and cervical cancer and malignant melanoma of skin by socioeconomic group in England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomson Catherine S

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer incidence varies by socioeconomic group and these variations have been linked with environmental and lifestyle factors, differences in access to health care and health seeking behaviour. Socioeconomic variations in cancer incidence by region and age are less clearly understood but they are crucial for targeting prevention measures and health care commissioning. Methods Data were obtained from all eight English cancer registries for patients diagnosed between 1998 and 2003, for all invasive cases of female breast cancer (ICD-10 code C50, lung cancer (ICD-10 codes C33-C34, cervical cancer (ICD-10 code C53, and malignant melanoma of the skin (ICD-10 code C43. Socioeconomic status was assigned to each patient based on their postcode of residence at diagnosis, using the income domain of the Index of Multiple Deprivation 2004. We analysed the socioeconomic variations in the incidence of breast, lung and cervical cancer and malignant melanoma of the skin for England, and regionally and by age. Results Incidence was highest for the most deprived patients for lung cancer and cervical cancer, whilst the opposite was observed for malignant melanoma and breast cancer. The difference in incidence between the most and the least deprived groups was higher for lung cancer patients aged under 65 at diagnosis than those over 65 at diagnosis, which may indicate a cohort effect. There were regional differences in the socioeconomic gradients with the gap being widest for lung and cervical cancer in the North (North East, North West and Yorkshire and Humberside and for malignant melanoma in the East and South West. There were only modest variations in breast cancer incidence by region. If the incidence of lung and cervical cancer were decreased to that of the least deprived group it would prevent 36% of lung cancer cases in men, 38% of lung cancer cases in women and 28% of cervical cancer cases. Incidence of breast cancer and melanoma was

  4. [La protein expression in cervical cancer tissues and its clinical significance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kunlun; Wu, Yi; Li, Mu; Li, Lan; Gao, Yane; Gao, Qing

    2013-07-01

    To investigate the expression of La protein in cervical cancer tissues and explore its role in the occurrence and progression of cervical cancer. The expression of La protein in cervical cancer and normal cervical tissues was detected by immunohistochemical staining. RNA interference technology was used to silence La protein expression in HeLa cells and the changes in cell proliferation, tumor sphere formation and cell cycles were investigated. The expression of La protein was significantly higher in cervical cancer tissues than in normal cervical tissues (61% vs 9%, PLa protein expression in HeLa cells caused significantly reduced the cell proliferation and lowered the tumor sphere formation rate from the control level of (17.1=1.92)% to (6.3=0.45)% (PLa can promote the development of cervical cancer and may play a critical role in the carcinogenesis and progression of cervical cancer.

  5. Illness Perception, Knowledge and Self-Care about Cervical Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Kern de Castro

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Prevention plays a central role in early detection of cervical cancer. Common Sense Model proposes that the nature and organization of illness representations can guide actions related to health and how self-care is exercised. The aim of this study was to describe and compare illness perception, knowledge and self-care in women with and without cancer precursor lesions. Participants were 92 women (aged 18-59 from primary care unity divided into two groups: women with and without premalignant lesion. Measures for illness perception, knowledge and self-care were used. There was no statistically significant difference (t test e chi-square test between groups in the variables analyzed. Despite the risk for cervical cancer, women with precursor lesions do not adjust their illness perceptions, knowledge and self-care to the situation. These data show the need to warn women against the cervical cancer risks, because their distorted perceptions and lack of knowledge about the disease may hamper the screening and control of cervical cancer.

  6. NHERF1 Enhances Cisplatin Sensitivity in Human Cervical Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Tao; Yang, Xiaomei; Qin, Qiong; Shi, Wen; Wang, Qiqi; Yang, Ying; He, Junqi

    2017-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common female malignancies, and cisplatin-based chemotherapy is routinely utilized in locally advanced cervical cancer patients. However, resistance has been the major limitation. In this study, we found that Na+/H+ Exchanger Regulatory Factor 1 (NHERF1) was downregulated in cisplatin-resistant cells. Analysis based on a cervical cancer dataset from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) showed association of NHERF1 expression with disease-free survival of patients received cisplatin treatment. NHERF1 overexpression inhibited proliferation and enhanced apoptosis in cisplatin-resistant HeLa cells, whereas NHERF1 knockdown had inverse effects. While parental HeLa cells were more resistant to cisplatin after NHERF1 knockdown, NHERF1 overexpression in CaSki cells promoted cisplatin sensitivity. Overexpression and knockdown studies also showed that NHERF1 significantly inhibited AKT and extracellular signal–regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways in cisplatin-resistant cells. Taken together, our results provide the first evidence that NHERF1 can sensitize cisplatin-refractory cervical cancer cells. This study may help to increase understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying cisplatin resistance in tumors. PMID:28085111

  7. Radiotherapy-induced vaginal fibrosis in cervical cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofsjö, Alexandra; Bohm-Starke, Nina; Blomgren, Bo; Jahren, Helen; Steineck, Gunnar; Bergmark, Karin

    2017-05-01

    Cervical cancer survivors treated with radiotherapy report vaginal inelasticity and decreased lubrication that may affect their sexual health, but it is unknown which normal tissue reactions mediate these symptoms. The aim of this study was to investigate the morphology of the connective tissue of the vaginal wall in cervical cancer survivors treated with radiotherapy. We recruited 34 cervical cancer survivors treated with radiotherapy and 37 age-matched controls. Via clinical examination the degree of vaginal atrophy and pelvic fibrosis were estimated. We collected vaginal biopsies, which underwent morphometric analysis focused on elastin and collagen. Additionally, radiation dose at biopsy site were calculated and correlated to the clinical and morphological findings. The survivors had marked morphological vaginal changes, most prominent in the survivors that had received the highest radiation dose at the biopsy site. Mucosal atrophy was observed in 91% and pelvic fibrosis in 97%. A shorter vagina was measured; 7.0 cm versus 10.3 cm in controls (p cancer survivors that had received external radiation. We found drastic differences in the vaginal wall between the irradiated cervical cancer survivors and the controls, indicating that radiotherapy-induced vaginal symptoms are mediated by connective tissue fibrosis and elastosis. Our results also support that patients treated with external radiation have the highest risk of developing vaginal fibrosis with impairment of their sexual health.

  8. NHERF1 Enhances Cisplatin Sensitivity in Human Cervical Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Tao; Yang, Xiaomei; Qin, Qiong; Shi, Wen; Wang, Qiqi; Yang, Ying; He, Junqi

    2017-01-12

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common female malignancies, and cisplatin-based chemotherapy is routinely utilized in locally advanced cervical cancer patients. However, resistance has been the major limitation. In this study, we found that Na⁺/H⁺ Exchanger Regulatory Factor 1 (NHERF1) was downregulated in cisplatin-resistant cells. Analysis based on a cervical cancer dataset from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) showed association of NHERF1 expression with disease-free survival of patients received cisplatin treatment. NHERF1 overexpression inhibited proliferation and enhanced apoptosis in cisplatin-resistant HeLa cells, whereas NHERF1 knockdown had inverse effects. While parental HeLa cells were more resistant to cisplatin after NHERF1 knockdown, NHERF1 overexpression in CaSki cells promoted cisplatin sensitivity. Overexpression and knockdown studies also showed that NHERF1 significantly inhibited AKT and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways in cisplatin-resistant cells. Taken together, our results provide the first evidence that NHERF1 can sensitize cisplatin-refractory cervical cancer cells. This study may help to increase understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying cisplatin resistance in tumors.

  9. [Modern tendencies in the treatment of cervical cancer stage IB-IIA, prognostic factors--our and foreign experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, S; Batashki, I

    2008-01-01

    We tried to summarize our and foreign experience in the treatment of cervical cancer stage IB-IIA, as well as to examine and evaluate the prognostic factors in this field. We tried to summarize our and foreign experience for 10 years period /from 1998 till 2008/ as we examined 1250 patients with cervical cancer stage IB-IIA. According to our results and most of the authors the preferred method for treatment of cervical cancer stage IB-IIA is the radical hysterectomy with or without chemo-radiation therapy. In patients with bulky lymph nodes we performed radical hysterectomy with dyssection only of these nudes, as in this way we converted the patient into patient with micrometastases. We introduced postoperative radiotherapy with "small field "of radiation. In our study we examined the most important prognostic factors as LVSI, the depth of invasion, the parametrial invasion and the hystological type of tumor. When we summarized our and foreign experience in the field of radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymph nude dyssection in the treatment of cervical cancer stage IB-IIA we have produced an algorithm, which can be practically useful.

  10. Treatment of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia in Denmark 1991 to 2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barken, Sidsel Svennekjær

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: Objectives: The number of invasive cervical cancers peaked in Denmark in 1966 with 963 cases. Cervical cancer is prevented by treatment of screen-detected cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). We assessed the trend in CIN treatments in Denmark. Material and Methods: From highly...

  11. Women’s perceived susceptibility to and utilisation of cervical cancer screening services in Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Y. Hami

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Malawi provides cervical cancer screening services free of charge at some public health facilities. Few women make use of these cancer screening services in Malawi and many women continue to be diagnosed with cervical cancer only during the late inoperable stages of the condition. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to discover whether the perceived susceptibility to cervical cancer, amongst Malawian women aged 42 and older, influenced their intentions to utilise the available free cervical cancer screening services. Method: A quantitative, cross-sectional descriptive study design was adopted. Structured interviews were conducted with 381 women who visited 3 health centres in the Blantyre District of Malawi. Results: A statistically-significant association existed between women’s intentions to be screened for cervical cancer and their knowledge about cervical cancer (X² = 8.9; df = 1; p = 0.003 and with having heard about HPV infection (X² = 4.2; df = 1; p = 0.041 at the 5% significance level. Cervical cancer screening services are provided free of charge in government health institutions in Malawi. Nevertheless, low perceived susceptibility to cervical cancer amongst women, aged 42 and older, might contribute to limited utilisation of cervical screening services, explaining why 80% of cervical cancer patients in Malawi were diagnosed during the late inoperable stages. Conclusion: Malawian women lacked awareness regarding their susceptibility to cervical cancer and required information about the available cervical cancer screening services. Malawi’s women, aged 42 and older, must be informed about the advantages of cervical cancer screening and about the importance of effective treatment if an early diagnosis has been made. Women aged 42 and older rarely attend antenatal, post-natal, well baby or family-planning clinics, where health education about cervical cancer screening is often provided. Consequently, these women

  12. Mulheres com câncer invasivo do colo uterino: suporte familiar como auxílio Mujeres con cancer invasivo del cuello uterino: suporte familiar como ayuda Women with invasive uterine cervical neoplasm: family support as a help

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejeane de Oliveira Barros

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Investigação de caráter qualitativo cujo referencial foi o da Psiconcologia, que teve como objetivo analisar a percepção da mulher que tem o diagnóstico de câncer invasivo do colo do útero; descrever o significado do suporte familiar para que essa enfrente a doença; identificar as modificações biopsicossociais decorrentes do câncer e descrever a sua experiência frente a esse diagnóstico. Os sujeitos da pesquisa foram doze mulheres com diagnóstico de câncer invasivo do colo do útero, com idade entre 28 e 61 anos e que estavam em tratamento. Por meio de entrevistas semi-estruturadas foi possível identificar a família como suporte básico no enfrentamento do câncer, tendo resultados positivos ou negativos na forma de lidar com a doença e o tratamento.Investigación de abordaje cualitativo cuyo referencial fue el de la Psico-oncologia, y que tuvo como objectivo analisar la actitud de la mujer que recibe un diagnóstico de cáncer invasivo en el cuello del útero; describir que tipo de suporte familiar recibe para que pueda enfrentar tal diagnóstico; identificar los cambios biopsicosociales decurrentes del cáncer y describir su experiencia frente a ese diagnóstico. Los sujetos a tal pesquisa fueron doce mujeres con diagnóstico de cáncer invasor en el cuello del útero, con edades que variaban entre 28 y 61 años y que estaban en tratamiento. Por medio de entrevistas medio estructuradas, fue posible identificar la familia como base de la estructura para enfrentar el cáncer, y también resultados positivos o negativos en la manera de llevar adelante tanto la enfermedad cuanto el tratamiento.An investigation of qualitative approach based on psycho-oncology principles, that had as objective to analyze the perception of women with a diagnosis of invasive cancer in the cervix; to describe family support that helped them to face the disease; to identify the bio-psycho-sociological modifications arising from the cancer and to

  13. Two cytological methods for screening for cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirschner, B.; Simonsen, K.; Junge, J.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Denmark has had an organized screening programme for cervical cancer since the 1960s. In spite of this, almost 150 Danish women die from the disease each year. There are currently two different methods for preparation of cervical samples: conventional Papanicolaou smear and liquid......-based cytology. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In 2002, the Department of Pathology, Hvidovre Hospital changed over from the conventional Papanicolaou smear screening method to SurePath liquid-based cytology. This article is based on a retrospective comparison on data from the population screening programme for cervical...... cancer in the Municipality of Copenhagen. RESULTS: The number of tests with the diagnosis of "normal cells" decreased 1% after the conversion to liquid-based cytology, whilst the number of tests with "atypical cells" and "cells suspicious for malignancy" increased by 64.3% and 41.2% respectively...

  14. Variable uterine uptake of FDG in adenomyosis during concurrent chemoradiation therapy for cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Jeong Il; Huh, Seung Jae; Kim, Young Il; Kim, Tae Joong; Park, Byung Kwan [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    To avoid improper tumor volume contouring in radiation therapy (RT) and other invasive procedures, we report a case of uterine adenomyosis showing increased 18F-fl uorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake on positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) mimicking malignant tumor in a 44-year-old woman during concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) for uterine cervical cancer. The adenomyosis was not associated with her menstrual cycle or with normal endometrium uptake, and it resolved one month after completion of RT. This case indicates that uterine adenomyosis in a premenopausal woman may show false positive uptake of 18FDG-PET/CT associated with CCRT.

  15. Human Papilloma Virus 16 and 18 Association in Cervical Intraepithelial Lesions and Cervical Cancers by In Situ Hybridization

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    Mohanty Manisa

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To correlate the association of high risk Human Papilloma Virus (HPV 16, 18 in cervical intraepithelial lesions and cervical cancers by in-situ hybridization (ISH technique. Study Group: Cervical biopsy and hysterectomy specimen of 78 young and adult women, attending Hi-Tech Medical College and Hospital, Bhubaneswar, who were clinically or cytologically suspected of cervical intraepithelial lesion or cervical cancer were taken as source of target viral DNA. Material: Formalin 10% as fixative H & E stain as routine staining agent In-situ hybridization kit for HPV 16 and 18 DNA. Method: After following standard protocol for surgical grossing, HPV 16, 18 In-situ hybridization kit was used on paraffin embedded tissue sections. Results: The percentage of positive cases was highest in cervical cancer patients followed by cervical intraepithelial lesions, high grade, and low grade. Conclusion: This study has been carried out for the first in our state and our results show high degree of positivity of HPV 16/18 in females with cervical intraepithelial lesions and cervical cancers attending our tertiary care hospital.

  16. Is Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy Overtreatment in Cervical Cancer Patients With Intermediate Risk Factors?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Sang-Young; Park, Sang-Il; Nam, Byung-Ho; Cho, Chul-Koo; Kim, Kidong; Kim, Beob-Jong; Kim, Moon-Hong; Choi, Seok-Cheol; Lee, Eui-Don; Lee, Kyoung-Hee

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) improves the outcome of cervical cancer patients with intermediate risk factors. Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and June 2006, the medical records of 735 patients who had undergone radical surgery for Stage IB-IIA cervical cancer were reviewed retrospectively. Of the 735 patients, 172 with two or more intermediate risk factors (i.e., lymphovascular space involvement, deep stromal invasion, and tumor size ≥2 cm) were grouped as follows according to the adjuvant treatment received: 34 patients, no further treatment; 49 patients, RT; and 89 patients, CRT. The significance of the clinical parameters and recurrence-free survival of each group were analyzed. Results: Of the 172 patients with any of the intermediate risk factors, 137 (79.6%) had two or more intermediate risk factors. Of the 172 patients, 12 developed recurrences (6.4%)->(7.0%), with 6 in the pelvis and 6 in distant sites. All 12 recurrences occurred in those who had two or more intermediate risk factors (sensitivity, 100%); however, only six recurrences were detected in patients who met the Gynecologic Oncology Group criteria for the intermediate-risk group (sensitivity, 50%; Z test, p .05). Conclusion: Postoperative adjuvant CRT can improve the outcome of cervical cancer patients with intermediate risk factors, with low increase in toxicity.

  17. An evaluation of sexual function after surgery and/or radiation for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruegar, Editha A.; Dolan, James R.; Potkul, R.K.; Fisher, Susan G.; McCall, Anne R.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence and severity of sexual dysfunction after the treatment of cervical cancer, identify specific factors related to sexual dysfunction, and determine whether or not patients sought treatments or counselling for these problems. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We designed a questionnaire that evaluated the quality of life status and sexual activity of women before and after treatment for invasive cervical cancer. Forty-five women were identified who had completed radiation and/or surgery, and had been free of disease for at least two years. Twenty-two women completed the questionnaire. RESULTS: Fourteen of the eighteen women who were sexually active resumed intercourse after treatment. Our questionnaire identified significant changes in sexual function after treatment. There was an increase in feelings of anxiety or tension before intercourse (p = .03) and in vaginal dryness (p = .04). The frequency of intercourse decreased (p = .07). Despite these problems, only six of the women were using estrogen or a vaginal dilator. Only one patient had sought information on sexual counselling services. CONCLUSIONS: Our questionnaire identified specific problems related to sexual function in women treated for cervical cancer. Using this questionnaire, we plan to conduct a prospective study which will identify women at greatest risk for sexual dysfunction, and who may benefit from counselling and education

  18. Human papillomavirus in cervical cancer and oropharyngeal cancer: One cause, two diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Tara A; Schiller, John T

    2017-06-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes greater than 5% of cancers worldwide, including all cervical cancers and an alarmingly increasing proportion of oropharyngeal cancers (OPCs). Despite markedly reduced cervical cancer incidence in industrialized nations with organized screening programs, cervical cancer remains the second most common cause of death from cancer in women worldwide, as developing countries lack resources for universal, high-quality screening. In the United States, HPV-related OPC is only 1 of 5 cancers with a rising incidence since 1975 and now has taken over the cervix as the most common site of HPV-related cancer. Similar trends follow throughout North America and Europe. The need for early detection and prevention is paramount. Despite the common etiologic role of HPV in the development of cervical cancer and HPV-associated OPC, great disparity exists between incidence, screening modalities (or lack thereof), treatment, and prevention in these 2 very distinct cohorts. These differences in cervical cancer and HPV-associated OPC and their impact are discussed here. Cancer 2017;123:2219-2229. © 2017 American Cancer Society. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  19. Cervical Cancer Screening Service Uptake and Associated Factors among Age Eligible Women in Mekelle Zone, Northern Ethiopia, 2015: A Community Based Study Using Health Belief Model.

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    Hinsermu Bayu

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer among women worldwide, with about 500,000 new patients diagnosed and over 250,000 deaths every year. Cervical cancer screening offers protective benefits and is associated with a reduction in the incidence of invasive cervical cancer and cervical cancer mortality. But there is very low participation rate in screening for cervical cancer among low and middle-income countries.This study aimed to determine cervical cancer screening service uptake and its associated factor among age eligible women in Mekelle zone, northern Ethiopia, 2015.A community based cross-sectional study was conducted in Mekelle zone among age eligible women from February to June 2015. Systematic sampling technique was used to select 1286 women in to the study. A pre-tested structured questionnaire was used to collect relevant data. Data was entered and cleaned using EPINFO and analyzed using SPSS version 20 software package. Bivariate and Multivariate logistic regression was performed to assess association between dependent and independent variables with 95% CI and p-value less than 0.05 was set for association.The study revealed that among 1186 age eligible women, only 235(19.8% have been screened for cervical cancer. Age (AOR = 1.799, 95%CI = 1.182-2.739, history of multiple sexual partners (AOR = 1.635, 95%CI = 1.094-2.443, history of sexually transmitted disease (AOR = 1.635,95%CI = 1.094-2.443, HIV sero status (AOR = 5.614, 95%CI = 2.595-12.144, perceived susceptibility to cervical cancer (AOR = 2.225, 95%CI = 1.308-3.783, perceived barriers to premalignant cervical lesions screening (AOR = 2.256, 95%CI = 1.447-3.517 and knowledge on cervical cancer and screening (AOR = 2.355, 95%CI = 1.155-4.802 were significant predictors of cervical cancer screening service uptake.Magnitude of cervical cancer screening service uptake among age eligible women is still unacceptably low. Age of the women, history of multiple sexual partners

  20. Autophagy regulates the stemness of cervical cancer stem cells

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    Yang Y

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Yi Yang,1,2 Li Yu,1 Jin Li,1 Ya Hong Yuan,1 Xiao Li Wang,1 Shi Rong Yan,1 Dong Sheng Li,1 Yan Ding1 1Hubei Key Laboratory of Embryonic Stem Cell Research, 2Reproductive Center, Taihe Hospital, Hubei University of Medicine, Shiyan, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Cancer stem cells (CSCs are a rare population of multipotent cells with the capacity to self-renew. It has been reported that there are CSCs in cervical cancer cells. Pluripotency-associated (PA transcription factors such as Oct4, Sox2, Nanog and CD44 have been used to isolate CSCs subpopulations. In this study, we showed that autophagy plays an important role in the biological behavior of cervical cancer cells. The expression of the autophagy protein Beclin 1 and LC3B was higher in tumorspheres established from human cervical cancers cell lines (and CaSki than in the parental adherent cells. It was also observed that the basal and starvation-induced autophagy flux was higher in tumorspheres than in the bulk population. Autophagy could regulate the expression level of PA proteins in cervical CSCs. In addition, CRISPR/Cas 9-mediated Beclin 1 knockout enhanced the malignancy of HeLa cells, leading to accumulation of PA proteins and promoted tumorsphere formation. Our findings suggest that autophagy modulates homeostasis of PA proteins, and Beclin 1 is critical for CSC maintenance and tumor development in nude mice. This demonstrates that a prosurvival autophagic pathway is critical for CSC maintenance. Keywords: cervical cancer, autophagy, cancer stem cell, LC3, Oct4