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Sample records for invasion molecular analysis

  1. Non-Invasive Early Detection and Molecular Analysis of Low X-ray Dose Effects in the Lens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, Lee [Boston University

    2014-07-02

    This is the Final Progress Report for DOE-funded research project DE-PS02-08ER08-01 titled “Non-Invasive Early Detection and Molecular Analysis of Low X-ray Dose Effects in the Lens”. The project focuses on the effects of low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation on the ocular lens. The lens is an exquisitely radiosensitive tissue with a highly-ordered molecular structure that is amenable to non-invasive optical study from the periphery. These merits point to the lens as an ideal target for laser-based molecular biodosimetry (MBD). Following exposure to different types of ionizing radiations, the lens demonstrates molecular changes (e.g., oxidation, racemization, crosslinkage, truncation, aggregation, etc.) that impact the structure and function of the long-lived proteins in the cytosol of lens fiber cells. The vast majority of proteins in the lens comprise the highly-ordered crystallins. These highly conserved lens proteins are amongst the most concentrated and stable in the body. Once synthesized, the crystallins are retained in the fiber cell cytoplasm for life. Taken together, these properties point to the lens as an ideal system for quantitative in vivo MBD assessment using quasi-elastic light scattering (QLS) analysis. In this project, we deploy a purpose-designed non-invasive infrared laser QLS instrument as a quantitative tool for longitudinal assessment of pre-cataractous molecular changes in the lenses of living mice exposed to low-dose low-LET radiation compared to non-irradiated sham controls. We hypothesize that radiation exposure will induce dose-dependent changes in the molecular structure of matrix proteins in the lens. Mechanistic assays to ascertain radiation-induced molecular changes in the lens focus on protein aggregation and gene/protein expression patterns. We anticipate that this study will contribute to our understanding of early molecular changes associated with radiation-induced tissue pathology. This study also affords potential for

  2. Geographic distribution of Staphylococcus aureus causing invasive infections in Europe: a molecular-epidemiological analysis.

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    Hajo Grundmann

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most important human pathogens and methicillin-resistant variants (MRSAs are a major cause of hospital and community-acquired infection. We aimed to map the geographic distribution of the dominant clones that cause invasive infections in Europe.In each country, staphylococcal reference laboratories secured the participation of a sufficient number of hospital laboratories to achieve national geo-demographic representation. Participating laboratories collected successive methicillin-susceptible (MSSA and MRSA isolates from patients with invasive S. aureus infection using an agreed protocol. All isolates were sent to the respective national reference laboratories and characterised by quality-controlled sequence typing of the variable region of the staphylococcal spa gene (spa typing, and data were uploaded to a central database. Relevant genetic and phenotypic information was assembled for interactive interrogation by a purpose-built Web-based mapping application. Between September 2006 and February 2007, 357 laboratories serving 450 hospitals in 26 countries collected 2,890 MSSA and MRSA isolates from patients with invasive S. aureus infection. A wide geographical distribution of spa types was found with some prevalent in all European countries. MSSA were more diverse than MRSA. Genetic diversity of MRSA differed considerably between countries with dominant MRSA spa types forming distinctive geographical clusters. We provide evidence that a network approach consisting of decentralised typing and visualisation of aggregated data using an interactive mapping tool can provide important information on the dynamics of MRSA populations such as early signalling of emerging strains, cross border spread, and importation by travel.In contrast to MSSA, MRSA spa types have a predominantly regional distribution in Europe. This finding is indicative of the selection and spread of a limited number of clones within health care

  3. Molecular analysis of predation by carabid beetles (Carabidae) on the invasive Iberian slug Arion lusitanicus.

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    Hatteland, B A; Symondson, W O C; King, R A; Skage, M; Schander, C; Solhøy, T

    2011-12-01

    The invasive Iberian slug, Arion lusitanicus, is spreading through Europe and poses a major threat to horticulture and agriculture. Natural enemies, capable of killing A. lusitanicus, may be important to our understanding of its population dynamics in recently invaded regions. We used polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to study predation on A. lusitanicus by carabid beetles in the field. A first multiplex PCR was developed, incorporating species-specific primers, and optimised in order to amplify parts of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene of large Arion slugs, including A. lusitanicus from the gut contents of the predators. A second multiplex PCR, targeting 12S rRNA mtDNA, detected predation on smaller Arion species and the field slug Deroceras reticulatum. Feeding trials were conducted to measure the effects of digestion time on amplicon detectability. The median detection times (the time at which 50% of samples tested positive) for A. lusitanicus and D. reticulatum DNA in the foreguts of Carabus nemoralis were 22 h and 20 h, respectively. Beetle activity-densities were monitored using pitfall traps, and slug densities were estimated using quadrats. Predation rates on slugs in the field by C. nemoralis in spring ranged from 16-39% (beetles positive for slug DNA) and were density dependent, with numbers of beetles testing positive being positively correlated with densities of the respective slug species. Carabus nemoralis was shown to be a potentially important predator of the alien A. lusitanicus in spring and may contribute to conservation biological control.

  4. E-cadherin expression phenotypes associated with molecular subtypes in invasive non-lobular breast cancer: evidence from a retrospective study and meta-analysis.

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    Liu, Jiang-Bo; Feng, Chen-Yi; Deng, Miao; Ge, Dong-Feng; Liu, De-Chun; Mi, Jian-Qiang; Feng, Xiao-Shan

    2017-08-01

    This retrospective study and meta-analysis was designed to explore the relationship between E-cadherin (E-cad) expression and the molecular subtypes of invasive non-lobular breast cancer, especially in early-stage invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). A total of 156 post-operative cases of early-stage IDCs were retrospectively collected for the immunohistochemistry (IHC) detection of E-cad expression. The association of E-cad expression with molecular subtypes of early-stage IDCs was analyzed. A literature search was conducted in March 2016 to retrieve publications on E-cad expression in association with molecular subtypes of invasive non-lobular breast cancer, and a meta-analysis was performed to estimate the relational statistics. E-cad was expressed in 82.7% (129/156) of early-stage IDCs. E-cad expression was closely associated with the molecular types of early-stage IDCs (P cancer (TNBC) than in other molecular subtypes (TNBC vs. luminal A: RR = 3.45, 95% CI = 2.79-4.26; TNBC vs. luminal B: RR = 2.41, 95% CI = 1.49-3.90; TNBC vs. HER2-enriched: RR = 1.95, 95% CI = 1.24-3.07). Early-stage IDCs or invasive non-lobular breast cancers with the TNBC molecular phenotype have a higher risk for the loss of E-cad expression than do tumors with non-TNBC molecular phenotypes, suggesting that E-cad expression phenotypes were closely related to molecular subtypes and further studies are needed to clarify the underlying mechanism.

  5. Antibiotic susceptibility and molecular analysis of invasive Haemophilus influenzae in Canada, 2007 to 2014.

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    Tsang, Raymond S W; Shuel, Michelle; Whyte, Kathleen; Hoang, Linda; Tyrrell, Gregory; Horsman, Greg; Wylie, John; Jamieson, Frances; Lefebvre, Brigitte; Haldane, David; Gad, Rita R; German, Gregory J; Needle, Robert

    2017-05-01

    Previously we studied the antibiotic susceptibility of invasive Haemophilus influenzae collected in Canada from 1990 to 2006 and characterized isolates by serotype, MLST and ftsI gene sequencing for significant PBP3 mutations. To provide an update based on isolates collected from 2007 to 2014. A total of 882 case isolates were characterized by serotype using slide agglutination and PCR. MLST was carried out to determine ST. Isolates were tested for β-lactamase production, presence of significant PBP3 mutations and antibiotic susceptibility by disc diffusion against 14 antibiotics. MIC values of three antibiotics were determined for 316 isolates using microbroth dilution. Non-typeable H. influenzae accounted for 54.6% of the isolates and 45.4% were serotypeable, predominantly type a (23.1%), type b (8.3%) and type f (10.8%). The overall rate of ampicillin resistance due to β-lactamase production was 16.4% and increased from 13.5% in 2007-10 to 19% in 2011-14. Significant PBP3 mutations were identified in 129 isolates (14.6%) with 23 (2.6%) also producing β-lactamase. MLST identified related STs (ST-136, ST-14 and ST-367) associated exclusively with genetically β-lactamase-negative, ampicillin-resistant isolates and confirmed previously reported associations between significant PBP3 mutations and ST. A significant increase in β-lactamase-producing isolates was observed from 2007 to 2014; the rate of significant PBP3 mutations has increased since previously reported and 52.5% of non-typeable H. influenzae now show resistance markers. Resistance to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole was common and no resistance to fluoroquinolones or third-generation cephalosporins was found. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Determining the geographic origin of invasive populations of the mealybug Planococcus ficus based on molecular genetic analysis.

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    Daane, Kent M; Middleton, Mathew C; Sforza, René F H; Kamps-Hughes, Nicholas; Watson, Gillian W; Almeida, Rodrigo P P; Correa, Margarita C G; Downie, Doug A; Walton, Vaughn M

    2018-01-01

    Determining the most likely source of an invasive pest species might help to improve their management by establishing efficient quarantine measures and heading the search of efficient biological control agents. Planococcus ficus is an invasive mealybug pest of vineyards in Argentina, California, Mexico, Peru and South Africa. This mealybug pest had a previously known geographic distribution spanning southern Europe, the Middle East, and parts of northern Africa. In North America, Pl. ficus was first discovered in the early 1990s and soon thereafter in Mexico. To determine the origin of invasive populations in North America, Pl. ficus from California and Mexico were compared with material throughout its presumptive native range in the Mediterranean region, as well as material collected from an older invasion in South Africa and recently invaded Argentina. From each sample location, genomic DNA was sequenced for the nuclear internal transcribed spacer one (ITS1) and the mitochondrial cytochrome c. oxidase one (CO1). Phylogenetic analyses of CO1, ITS1 and concatenated CO1 and ITS1 data-sets using Bayesian and neighbor-joining analysis support two major divisions: a European grouping (Europe, Tunisia, Turkey) and a Middle Eastern grouping (Israel and Egypt). The invasive populations in Argentina and South Africa align with the European group and the invasive populations in North America align with the Middle Eastern group, with one Israel sample aligning closely with the North American clade, suggesting that Israel was the origin of those populations.

  7. Molecular Analysis of Rising Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Belgian Non-Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates (1995-2014)

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    Ceyssens, Pieter-Jan; Van Bambeke, Françoise; Mattheus, Wesley; Bertrand, Sophie; Fux, Frédéric; Van Bossuyt, Eddie; Damée, Sabrina; Nyssen, Henry-Jean; De Craeye, Stéphane; Verhaegen, Jan; Tulkens, Paul M.; Vanhoof, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of a longitudinal surveillance study (1995–2014) on fluoroquinolone resistance (FQ-R) among Belgian non-invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates (n = 5,602). For many years, the switch to respiratory fluoroquinolones for the treatment of (a)typical pneumonia had no impact on FQ-R levels. However, since 2011 we observed a significant decrease in susceptibility towards ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin and levofloxacin with peaks of 9.0%, 6.6% and 3.1% resistant isolates, respectively. Resistance to moxifloxacin arised sporadically, and remained <1% throughout the entire study period. We observed classical topoisomerase mutations in gyrA (n = 25), parC (n = 46) and parE (n = 3) in varying combinations, arguing against clonal expansion of FQ-R. The impact of recombination with co-habiting commensal streptococci on FQ-R remains marginal (10.4%). Notably, we observed that a rare combination of DNA Gyrase mutations (GyrA_S81L/GyrB_P454S) suffices for high-level moxifloxacin resistance, contrasting current model. Interestingly, 85/422 pneumococcal strains display MICCIP values which were lowered by at least four dilutions by reserpine, pointing at involvement of efflux pumps in FQ-R. In contrast to susceptible strains, isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin significantly overexpressed the ABC pump PatAB in comparison to reference strain S. pneumoniae ATCC 49619, but this could only be linked to disruptive terminator mutations in a fraction of these. Conversely, no difference in expression of the Major Facilitator PmrA, unaffected by reserpine, was noted between susceptible and resistant S. pneumoniae strains. Finally, we observed that four isolates displayed intermediate to high-level ciprofloxacin resistance without any known molecular resistance mechanism. Focusing future molecular studies on these isolates, which are also commonly found in other studies, might greatly assist in the battle against rising pneumococcal drug resistance. PMID:27227336

  8. Molecular Analysis of Rising Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Belgian Non-Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates (1995-2014.

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    Pieter-Jan Ceyssens

    Full Text Available We present the results of a longitudinal surveillance study (1995-2014 on fluoroquinolone resistance (FQ-R among Belgian non-invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates (n = 5,602. For many years, the switch to respiratory fluoroquinolones for the treatment of (atypical pneumonia had no impact on FQ-R levels. However, since 2011 we observed a significant decrease in susceptibility towards ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin and levofloxacin with peaks of 9.0%, 6.6% and 3.1% resistant isolates, respectively. Resistance to moxifloxacin arised sporadically, and remained <1% throughout the entire study period. We observed classical topoisomerase mutations in gyrA (n = 25, parC (n = 46 and parE (n = 3 in varying combinations, arguing against clonal expansion of FQ-R. The impact of recombination with co-habiting commensal streptococci on FQ-R remains marginal (10.4%. Notably, we observed that a rare combination of DNA Gyrase mutations (GyrA_S81L/GyrB_P454S suffices for high-level moxifloxacin resistance, contrasting current model. Interestingly, 85/422 pneumococcal strains display MICCIP values which were lowered by at least four dilutions by reserpine, pointing at involvement of efflux pumps in FQ-R. In contrast to susceptible strains, isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin significantly overexpressed the ABC pump PatAB in comparison to reference strain S. pneumoniae ATCC 49619, but this could only be linked to disruptive terminator mutations in a fraction of these. Conversely, no difference in expression of the Major Facilitator PmrA, unaffected by reserpine, was noted between susceptible and resistant S. pneumoniae strains. Finally, we observed that four isolates displayed intermediate to high-level ciprofloxacin resistance without any known molecular resistance mechanism. Focusing future molecular studies on these isolates, which are also commonly found in other studies, might greatly assist in the battle against rising pneumococcal drug resistance.

  9. Molecular Analysis of Rising Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Belgian Non-Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates (1995-2014).

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    Ceyssens, Pieter-Jan; Van Bambeke, Françoise; Mattheus, Wesley; Bertrand, Sophie; Fux, Frédéric; Van Bossuyt, Eddie; Damée, Sabrina; Nyssen, Henry-Jean; De Craeye, Stéphane; Verhaegen, Jan; Tulkens, Paul M; Vanhoof, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of a longitudinal surveillance study (1995-2014) on fluoroquinolone resistance (FQ-R) among Belgian non-invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates (n = 5,602). For many years, the switch to respiratory fluoroquinolones for the treatment of (a)typical pneumonia had no impact on FQ-R levels. However, since 2011 we observed a significant decrease in susceptibility towards ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin and levofloxacin with peaks of 9.0%, 6.6% and 3.1% resistant isolates, respectively. Resistance to moxifloxacin arised sporadically, and remained topoisomerase mutations in gyrA (n = 25), parC (n = 46) and parE (n = 3) in varying combinations, arguing against clonal expansion of FQ-R. The impact of recombination with co-habiting commensal streptococci on FQ-R remains marginal (10.4%). Notably, we observed that a rare combination of DNA Gyrase mutations (GyrA_S81L/GyrB_P454S) suffices for high-level moxifloxacin resistance, contrasting current model. Interestingly, 85/422 pneumococcal strains display MICCIP values which were lowered by at least four dilutions by reserpine, pointing at involvement of efflux pumps in FQ-R. In contrast to susceptible strains, isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin significantly overexpressed the ABC pump PatAB in comparison to reference strain S. pneumoniae ATCC 49619, but this could only be linked to disruptive terminator mutations in a fraction of these. Conversely, no difference in expression of the Major Facilitator PmrA, unaffected by reserpine, was noted between susceptible and resistant S. pneumoniae strains. Finally, we observed that four isolates displayed intermediate to high-level ciprofloxacin resistance without any known molecular resistance mechanism. Focusing future molecular studies on these isolates, which are also commonly found in other studies, might greatly assist in the battle against rising pneumococcal drug resistance.

  10. Integrated molecular analysis of Tamoxifen-resistant invasive lobular breast cancer cells identifies MAPK and GRM/mGluR signaling as therapeutic vulnerabilities.

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    Stires, Hillary; Heckler, Mary M; Fu, Xiaoyong; Li, Zhao; Grasso, Catherine S; Quist, Michael J; Lewis, Joseph A; Klimach, Uwe; Zwart, Alan; Mahajan, Akanksha; Győrffy, Balázs; Cavalli, Luciane R; Riggins, Rebecca B

    2017-09-19

    Invasive lobular breast cancer (ILC) is an understudied malignancy with distinct clinical, pathological, and molecular features that distinguish it from the more common invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). Mounting evidence suggests that estrogen receptor-alpha positive (ER+) ILC has a poor response to Tamoxifen (TAM), but the mechanistic drivers of this are undefined. In the current work, we comprehensively characterize the SUM44/LCCTam ILC cell model system through integrated analysis of gene expression, copy number, and mutation, with the goal of identifying actionable alterations relevant to clinical ILC that can be co-targeted along with ER to improve treatment outcomes. We show that TAM has several distinct effects on the transcriptome of LCCTam cells, that this resistant cell model has acquired copy number alterations and mutations that impinge on MAPK and metabotropic glutamate receptor (GRM/mGluR) signaling networks, and that pharmacological inhibition of either improves or restores the growth-inhibitory actions of endocrine therapy. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Molecular markers of tumor invasiveness in ameloblastoma: An update

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    Zhong, Yi; Guo, Wei; Wang, Li; Chen, Xinming

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present article was to review the current new knowledge on the molecular markers of tumor invasion in ameloblastoma. In this review, tumor molecular markers were identified and allocated to the following six groups according to their functions: (I) Markers involved in extracellular matrix degradation, (II) Molecular markers involved in cell adhesion lost, (III) Molecular markers involved in bone remodeling, (IV) Cytokines involved in angiogenesis, (V) Molecular markers related ...

  12. Molecular analysis of ex-vivo CD133+ GBM cells revealed a common invasive and angiogenic profile but different proliferative signatures among high grade gliomas

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    Garcia Juan L

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gliomas are the most common type of primary brain tumours, and in this group glioblastomas (GBMs are the higher-grade gliomas with fast progression and unfortunate prognosis. Two major aspects of glioma biology that contributes to its awful prognosis are the formation of new blood vessels through the process of angiogenesis and the invasion of glioma cells. Despite of advances, two-year survival for GBM patients with optimal therapy is less than 30%. Even in those patients with low-grade gliomas, that imply a moderately good prognosis, treatment is almost never curative. Recent studies have demonstrated the existence of a small fraction of glioma cells with characteristics of neural stem cells which are able to grow in vitro forming neurospheres and that can be isolated in vivo using surface markers such as CD133. The aim of this study was to define the molecular signature of GBM cells expressing CD133 in comparison with non expressing CD133 cells. This molecular classification could lead to the finding of new potential therapeutic targets for the rationale treatment of high grade GBM. Methods Eight fresh, primary and non cultured GBMs were used in order to study the gene expression signatures from its CD133 positive and negative populations isolated by FACS-sorting. Dataset was generated with Affymetrix U133 Plus 2 arrays and analysed using the software of the Affymetrix Expression Console. In addition, genomic analysis of these tumours was carried out by CGH arrays, FISH studies and MLPA; Results Gene expression analysis of CD133+ vs. CD133- cell population from each tumour showed that CD133+ cells presented common characteristics in all glioblastoma samples (up-regulation of genes involved in angiogenesis, permeability and down-regulation of genes implicated in cell assembly, neural cell organization and neurological disorders. Furthermore, unsupervised clustering of gene expression led us to distinguish between two groups

  13. A Comparative Analysis of Biomarker Expression and Molecular Subtypes of Pure Ductal Carcinoma In Situ and Invasive Breast Carcinoma by Image Analysis: Relationship of the Subtypes with Histologic Grade, Ki67, p53 Overexpression, and DNA Ploidy

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    Venetia R. Sarode

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a paucity of data regarding molecular subtypes of pure ductal carcinoma in situ (pDCIS. We evaluated the expression of ER, PR, HER2, Ki67, and p53 and DNA ploidy in 118 pDCIS and 100 invasive breast carcinomas (IBCAs by routine IHC and classified them according to molecular subtypes. Quantification of biomarkers and DNA ploidy was performed by image analysis. Expression of ER, PR, and high ki67 was more frequent in pDCIS compared to IBCA. High-grade tumors had lower ER and PR expression, high Ki67, overexpression of HER2 and p53, and DNA aneuploidy. Luminal A and HER2 subtypes were more common in pDCIS, and triple negative was more prevalent in IBCA. In both groups, HER2 and triple negative subtypes were characterized by high ki67, overexpression of p53, and DNA aneuploidy compared to luminal subtypes. Molecular subtypes of IBCA are distinct from those of pDCIS. Invasion is characterized by change in phenotype in some tumors.

  14. Molecular and Genetic Determinants of Glioma Cell Invasion

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    Kenta Masui

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A diffusely invasive nature is a major obstacle in treating a malignant brain tumor, “diffuse glioma”, which prevents neurooncologists from surgically removing the tumor cells even in combination with chemotherapy and radiation. Recently updated classification of diffuse gliomas based on distinct genetic and epigenetic features has culminated in a multilayered diagnostic approach to combine histologic phenotypes and molecular genotypes in an integrated diagnosis. However, it is still a work in progress to decipher how the genetic aberrations contribute to the aggressive nature of gliomas including their highly invasive capacity. Here we depict a set of recent discoveries involving molecular genetic determinants of the infiltrating nature of glioma cells, especially focusing on genetic mutations in receptor tyrosine kinase pathways and metabolic reprogramming downstream of common cancer mutations. The specific biology of glioma cell invasion provides an opportunity to explore the genotype-phenotype correlation in cancer and develop novel glioma-specific therapeutic strategies for this devastating disease.

  15. Molecular aspects of tumor cell migration and invasion

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    Giuseppina Bozzuto

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Cell migration and invasion are crucial steps in many physiological events. However, they are also implicated in the physiopathology of many diseases, such as cancer. To spread through the tissues, tumor cells use mechanisms that involve several molecular actors: adhesion receptor families, receptor tyrosine kinases, cytoskeleton proteins, adapter and signalling proteins interplay in a complex scenario. The balance of cellular signals for proliferation and survival responses also regulates migratory behaviours of tumor cells. To complicate the scene of crime drug resistance players can interfere thus worsening this delicate situation. The complete understanding of this molecular jungle is an impossible mission: some molecular aspects are reviewed in this paper.

  16. The Correlation Between Candida Colonization of Distinct Body Sites and Invasive Candidiasis in Emergency Intensive Care Units: Statistical and Molecular Biological Analysis.

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    Li, Zhen; Jiang, Cen; Dong, Danfeng; Zhang, Lihua; Tian, Yuan; Ni, Qi; Mao, Enqiang; Peng, Yibing

    2016-08-01

    Both statistical and molecular biological methods were used to evaluate the association between Candida colonization of different body sites and invasive candidiasis (IC) and analyse the potential infection sources of IC. Candida surveillance cultures from the urine, sputum, rectum and skin were performed on patients admitted to an emergency intensive care units (EICU) of a tertiary care hospital in Shanghai, China, from February 2014 to January 2015. Specimens were collected once a week at admission and thereafter. The patients' clinical data were collected, and Candida isolates were genotyped using polymorphic microsatellite markers. A total of 111 patients were enrolled. Patients with positive urine (23.3 vs. 2.5 %, p = 0.001) and rectal swab (13.6 vs. 0 %, p = 0.010) cultures were more likely to develop IC. However, the risk for IC was not significantly different among patients with and without respiratory (10.0 vs. 5.8 %, p = 0.503) and skin (33.3 vs. 6.5 %, p = 0.056) colonization. Gene microevolution frequently occurred at rectal swab and urine sites, and IC with possible source of infection was caused by rectal isolates (2/7), urine isolates (4/7) and sputum isolate (1/7).The colonization of gut and urinary tract maybe more relevant indicators of IC, which should be taken into consideration when selecting practical body sites for Candida surveillance cultures.

  17. Molecular genetics and genomics generate new insights into invertebrate pest invasions.

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    Kirk, Heather; Dorn, Silvia; Mazzi, Dominique

    2013-07-01

    Invertebrate pest invasions and outbreaks are associated with high social, economic, and ecological costs, and their significance will intensify with an increasing pressure on agricultural productivity as a result of human population growth and climate change. New molecular genetic and genomic techniques are available and accessible, but have been grossly underutilized in studies of invertebrate pest invasions, despite that they are useful tools for applied pest management and for understanding fundamental features of pest invasions including pest population demographics and adaptation of pests to novel and/or changing environments. Here, we review current applications of molecular genetics and genomics in the study of invertebrate pest invasions and outbreaks, and we highlight shortcomings from the current body of research. We then discuss recent conceptual and methodological advances in the areas of molecular genetics/genomics and data analysis, and we highlight how these advances will further our understanding of the demographic, ecological, and evolutionary features of invertebrate pest invasions. We are now well equipped to use molecular data to understand invertebrate dispersal and adaptation, and this knowledge has valuable applications in agriculture at a time when these are critically required.

  18. Molecular Signature for Lymphatic Invasion Associated with Survival of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer.

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    Paik, E Sun; Choi, Hyun Jin; Kim, Tae-Joong; Lee, Jeong-Won; Kim, Byoung-Gie; Bae, Duk-Soo; Choi, Chel Hun

    2018-04-01

    We aimed to develop molecular classifier that can predict lymphatic invasion and their clinical significance in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients. We analyzed gene expression (mRNA, methylated DNA) in data from The Cancer Genome Atlas. To identify molecular signatures for lymphatic invasion, we found differentially expressed genes. The performance of classifier was validated by receiver operating characteristics analysis, logistic regression, linear discriminant analysis (LDA), and support vector machine (SVM). We assessed prognostic role of classifier using random survival forest (RSF) model and pathway deregulation score (PDS). For external validation,we analyzed microarray data from 26 EOC samples of Samsung Medical Center and curatedOvarianData database. We identified 21 mRNAs, and seven methylated DNAs from primary EOC tissues that predicted lymphatic invasion and created prognostic models. The classifier predicted lymphatic invasion well, which was validated by logistic regression, LDA, and SVM algorithm (C-index of 0.90, 0.71, and 0.74 for mRNA and C-index of 0.64, 0.68, and 0.69 for DNA methylation). Using RSF model, incorporating molecular data with clinical variables improved prediction of progression-free survival compared with using only clinical variables (p < 0.001 and p=0.008). Similarly, PDS enabled us to classify patients into high-risk and low-risk group, which resulted in survival difference in mRNA profiles (log-rank p-value=0.011). In external validation, gene signature was well correlated with prediction of lymphatic invasion and patients' survival. Molecular signature model predicting lymphatic invasion was well performed and also associated with survival of EOC patients.

  19. Direct-Conversion Molecular Breast Imaging of Invasive Breast Cancer: Imaging Features, Extent of Invasive Disease, and Comparison Between Invasive Ductal and Lobular Histology.

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    Conners, Amy Lynn; Jones, Katie N; Hruska, Carrie B; Geske, Jennifer R; Boughey, Judy C; Rhodes, Deborah J

    2015-09-01

    The purposes of this study were to compare the tumor appearance of invasive breast cancer on direct-conversion molecular breast imaging using a standardized lexicon and to determine how often direct-conversion molecular breast imaging identifies all known invasive tumor foci in the breast, and whether this differs for invasive ductal versus lobular histologic profiles. Patients with prior invasive breast cancer and concurrent direct-conversion molecular breast imaging examinations were retrospectively reviewed. Blinded review of direct-conversion molecular breast imaging examinations was performed by one of two radiologists, according to a validated lexicon. Direct-conversion molecular breast imaging findings were matched with lesions described on the pathology report to exclude benign reasons for direct-conversion molecular breast imaging findings and to document direct-conversion molecular breast imaging-occult tumor foci. Associations between direct-conversion molecular breast imaging findings and tumor histologic profiles were examined using chi-square tests. In 286 patients, 390 invasive tumor foci were present in 294 breasts. A corresponding direct-conversion molecular breast imaging finding was present for 341 of 390 (87%) tumor foci described on the pathology report. Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) tumor foci were more likely to be a mass (40% IDC vs 15% invasive lobular carcinoma [ILC]; p invasive disease in 79.8% of cases and was more likely to do so for IDC than for ILC (86.1% vs 56.7%; p invasive foci in 249 of 286 (87%) patients. Direct-conversion molecular breast imaging features of invasive cancer, including lesion type and intensity, differ by histologic subtype. Direct-conversion molecular breast imaging is less likely to show all foci of ILC compared with IDC.

  20. Molecular and Nonmolecular Diagnostic Methods for Invasive Fungal Infections

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    Arvanitis, Marios; Anagnostou, Theodora; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Caliendo, Angela M.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Invasive fungal infections constitute a serious threat to an ever-growing population of immunocompromised individuals and other individuals at risk. Traditional diagnostic methods, such as histopathology and culture, which are still considered the gold standards, have low sensitivity, which underscores the need for the development of new means of detecting fungal infectious agents. Indeed, novel serologic and molecular techniques have been developed and are currently under clinical evaluation. Tests like the galactomannan antigen test for aspergillosis and the β-glucan test for invasive Candida spp. and molds, as well as other antigen and antibody tests, for Cryptococcus spp., Pneumocystis spp., and dimorphic fungi, have already been established as important diagnostic approaches and are implemented in routine clinical practice. On the other hand, PCR and other molecular approaches, such as matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), have proved promising in clinical trials but still need to undergo standardization before their clinical use can become widespread. The purpose of this review is to highlight the different diagnostic approaches that are currently utilized or under development for invasive fungal infections and to identify their performance characteristics and the challenges associated with their use. PMID:24982319

  1. Analysis of molecular intra-patient variation and delineation of a prognostic 12-gene signature in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer; technology transfer from microarrays to PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt; Reinert, Thomas; Novoradovsky, A

    2012-01-01

    Background: Multiple clinical risk factors and genetic profiles have been demonstrated to predict progression of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer; however, no easily clinical applicable gene signature has been developed to predict disease progression independent of disease stage and grade. Meth...

  2. Comprehensive Molecular Portraits of Invasive Lobular Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciriello, Giovanni; Gatza, Michael L; Beck, Andrew H; Wilkerson, Matthew D; Rhie, Suhn K; Pastore, Alessandro; Zhang, Hailei; McLellan, Michael; Yau, Christina; Kandoth, Cyriac; Bowlby, Reanne; Shen, Hui; Hayat, Sikander; Fieldhouse, Robert; Lester, Susan C; Tse, Gary M K; Factor, Rachel E; Collins, Laura C; Allison, Kimberly H; Chen, Yunn-Yi; Jensen, Kristin; Johnson, Nicole B; Oesterreich, Steffi; Mills, Gordon B; Cherniack, Andrew D; Robertson, Gordon; Benz, Christopher; Sander, Chris; Laird, Peter W; Hoadley, Katherine A; King, Tari A; Perou, Charles M

    2015-10-08

    Invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) is the second most prevalent histologic subtype of invasive breast cancer. Here, we comprehensively profiled 817 breast tumors, including 127 ILC, 490 ductal (IDC), and 88 mixed IDC/ILC. Besides E-cadherin loss, the best known ILC genetic hallmark, we identified mutations targeting PTEN, TBX3, and FOXA1 as ILC enriched features. PTEN loss associated with increased AKT phosphorylation, which was highest in ILC among all breast cancer subtypes. Spatially clustered FOXA1 mutations correlated with increased FOXA1 expression and activity. Conversely, GATA3 mutations and high expression characterized luminal A IDC, suggesting differential modulation of ER activity in ILC and IDC. Proliferation and immune-related signatures determined three ILC transcriptional subtypes associated with survival differences. Mixed IDC/ILC cases were molecularly classified as ILC-like and IDC-like revealing no true hybrid features. This multidimensional molecular atlas sheds new light on the genetic bases of ILC and provides potential clinical options. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Immunophenotyping invasive breast cancer: paving the road for molecular imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vermeulen Jeroen F

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammographic population screening in The Netherlands has increased the number of breast cancer patients with small and non-palpable breast tumors. Nevertheless, mammography is not ultimately sensitive and specific for distinct subtypes. Molecular imaging with targeted tracers might increase specificity and sensitivity of detection. Because development of new tracers is labor-intensive and costly, we searched for the smallest panel of tumor membrane markers that would allow detection of the wide spectrum of invasive breast cancers. Methods Tissue microarrays containing 483 invasive breast cancers were stained by immunohistochemistry for a selected set of membrane proteins known to be expressed in breast cancer. Results The combination of highly tumor-specific markers glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1-R, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2, hepatocyte growth factor receptor (MET, and carbonic anhydrase 9 (CAIX 'detected' 45.5% of tumors, especially basal/triple negative and HER2-driven ductal cancers. Addition of markers with a 2-fold tumor-to-normal ratio increased the detection rate to 98%. Including only markers with >3 fold tumor-to-normal ratio (CD44v6 resulted in an 80% detection rate. The detection rate of the panel containing both tumor-specific and less tumor-specific markers was not dependent on age, tumor grade, tumor size, or lymph node status. Conclusions In search of the minimal panel of targeted probes needed for the highest possible detection rate, we showed that 80% of all breast cancers express at least one of a panel of membrane markers (CD44v6, GLUT1, EGFR, HER2, and IGF1-R that may therefore be suitable for molecular imaging strategies. This study thereby serves as a starting point for further development of a set of antibody-based optical tracers with a high breast cancer detection rate.

  4. Immunophenotyping invasive breast cancer: paving the road for molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vermeulen, Jeroen F; Brussel, Aram SA van; Groep, Petra van der; Morsink, Folkert HM; Bult, Peter; Wall, Elsken van der; Diest, Paul J van

    2012-01-01

    Mammographic population screening in The Netherlands has increased the number of breast cancer patients with small and non-palpable breast tumors. Nevertheless, mammography is not ultimately sensitive and specific for distinct subtypes. Molecular imaging with targeted tracers might increase specificity and sensitivity of detection. Because development of new tracers is labor-intensive and costly, we searched for the smallest panel of tumor membrane markers that would allow detection of the wide spectrum of invasive breast cancers. Tissue microarrays containing 483 invasive breast cancers were stained by immunohistochemistry for a selected set of membrane proteins known to be expressed in breast cancer. The combination of highly tumor-specific markers glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1-R), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), hepatocyte growth factor receptor (MET), and carbonic anhydrase 9 (CAIX) 'detected' 45.5% of tumors, especially basal/triple negative and HER2-driven ductal cancers. Addition of markers with a 2-fold tumor-to-normal ratio increased the detection rate to 98%. Including only markers with >3 fold tumor-to-normal ratio (CD44v6) resulted in an 80% detection rate. The detection rate of the panel containing both tumor-specific and less tumor-specific markers was not dependent on age, tumor grade, tumor size, or lymph node status. In search of the minimal panel of targeted probes needed for the highest possible detection rate, we showed that 80% of all breast cancers express at least one of a panel of membrane markers (CD44v6, GLUT1, EGFR, HER2, and IGF1-R) that may therefore be suitable for molecular imaging strategies. This study thereby serves as a starting point for further development of a set of antibody-based optical tracers with a high breast cancer detection rate

  5. Identification of molecular pathways facilitating glioma cell invasion in situ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ido Nevo

    Full Text Available Gliomas are mostly incurable secondary to their diffuse infiltrative nature. Thus, specific therapeutic targeting of invasive glioma cells is an attractive concept. As cells exit the tumor mass and infiltrate brain parenchyma, they closely interact with a changing micro-environmental landscape that sustains tumor cell invasion. In this study, we used a unique microarray profiling approach on a human glioma stem cell (GSC xenograft model to explore gene expression changes in situ in Invading Glioma Cells (IGCs compared to tumor core, as well as changes in host cells residing within the infiltrated microenvironment relative to the unaffected cortex. IGCs were found to have reduced expression of genes within the extracellular matrix compartment, and genes involved in cell adhesion, cell polarity and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT processes. The infiltrated microenvironment showed activation of wound repair and tissue remodeling networks. We confirmed by protein analysis the downregulation of EMT and polarity related genes such as CD44 and PARD3 in IGCs, and EFNB3, a tissue-remodeling agent enriched at the infiltrated microenvironment. OLIG2, a proliferation regulator and glioma progenitor cell marker upregulated in IGCs was found to function in enhancing migration and stemness of GSCs. Overall, our results unveiled a more comprehensive picture of the complex and dynamic cell autonomous and tumor-host interactive pathways of glioma invasion than has been previously demonstrated. This suggests targeting of multiple pathways at the junction of invading tumor and microenvironment as a viable option for glioma therapy.

  6. Non-invasive analysis of rat ovarian angiogenesis by MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempel-Brami, Catherine; Neeman, Michal

    2002-02-22

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was employed for non-invasive analysis of vascular remodeling during follicular maturation in the PMSG/hCG rat ovary model. Changes in water diffusion and in perfusion led us to suggest that hypoxic stress may be a component in the regulation of angiogenesis in the growing follicle. However, in contrast with solid tumors of similar size, the spatial and temporal pattern of expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), did not match the angiogenic response. The mismatch could be explained by the role of hyaluronan as a high molecular weight suppressor of angiogenesis maintaining an avascular follicular antrum.

  7. Comparative proteomic analysis of ductal and lobular invasive breast carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, N C S; Gomig, T H B; Milioli, H H; Cordeiro, F; Costa, G G; Urban, C A; Lima, R S; Cavalli, I J; Ribeiro, E M S F

    2016-04-04

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer worldwide and the first among women. Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) and invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) are the two major histological subtypes, and the clinical and molecular differences between them justify the search for new markers to distinguish them. As proteomic analysis allows for a powerful and analytical approach to identify potential biomarkers, we performed a comparative analysis of IDC and ILC samples by using two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Twenty-three spots were identified corresponding to 10 proteins differentially expressed between the two subtypes. ACTB, ACTG, TPM3, TBA1A, TBA1B, VIME, TPIS, PDIA3, PDIA6, and VTDB were upregulated in ductal carcinoma compared to in lobular carcinoma samples. Overall, these 10 proteins have a key role in oncogenesis. Their specific functions and relevance in cancer initiation and progression are further discussed in this study. The identified peptides represent promising biomarkers for the differentiation of ductal and lobular breast cancer subtypes, and for future interventions based on tailored therapy.

  8. Economic Analysis of Biological Invasions in Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomas P. Holmes; Julian Aukema; Jeffrey Englin; Robert G. Haight; Kent Kovacs; Brian Leung

    2014-01-01

    Biological invasions of native forests by nonnative pests result from complex stochastic processes that are difficult to predict. Although economic optimization models describe efficient controls across the stages of an invasion, the ability to calibrate such models is constrained by lack of information on pest population dynamics and consequent economic damages. Here...

  9. Molecular genetics and genomics generate new insights into invertebrate pest invasions

    OpenAIRE

    Kirk, Heather; Dorn, Silvia; Mazzi, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    Invertebrate pest invasions and outbreaks are associated with high social, economic, and ecological costs, and their significance will intensify with an increasing pressure on agricultural productivity as a result of human population growth and climate change. New molecular genetic and genomic techniques are available and accessible, but have been grossly underutilized in studies of invertebrate pest invasions, despite that they are useful tools for applied pest management and for understandi...

  10. Urinary high molecular weight matrix metalloproteinases as non-invasive biomarker for detection of bladder cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed, Mohammed A; Seleim, Manar F; Abdalla, Mohga S; Sharada, Hayat M; Abdel Wahab, Abdel Hady A

    2013-01-01

    Background Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMPs) are key molecules for tumor growth, invasion and metastasis. Over-expression of different MMPs in tumor tissues can disturb the homeostasis and increase the level of various body fluids. Many MMPs including high molecular weights (HMWs) were detected in the urine of prostate and bladder cancer patients. Our aim here is to assess the usefulness of HMW MMPs as non invasive biomarkers in bilharzial bladder cancer in Egyptian patients. Methods The activ...

  11. Genome-wide molecular dissection of serotype M3 group A Streptococcus strains causing two epidemics of invasive infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beres, Stephen B; Sylva, Gail L; Sturdevant, Daniel E; Granville, Chanel N; Liu, Mengyao; Ricklefs, Stacy M; Whitney, Adeline R; Parkins, Larye D; Hoe, Nancy P; Adams, Gerald J; Low, Donald E; DeLeo, Frank R; McGeer, Allison; Musser, James M

    2004-08-10

    Molecular factors that contribute to the emergence of new virulent bacterial subclones and epidemics are poorly understood. We hypothesized that analysis of a population-based strain sample of serotype M3 group A Streptococcus (GAS) recovered from patients with invasive infection by using genome-wide investigative methods would provide new insight into this fundamental infectious disease problem. Serotype M3 GAS strains (n = 255) cultured from patients in Ontario, Canada, over 11 years and representing two distinct infection peaks were studied. Genetic diversity was indexed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, DNA-DNA microarray, whole-genome PCR scanning, prophage genotyping, targeted gene sequencing, and single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping. All variation in gene content was attributable to acquisition or loss of prophages, a molecular process that generated unique combinations of proven or putative virulence genes. Distinct serotype M3 genotypes experienced rapid population expansion and caused infections that differed significantly in character and severity. Molecular genetic analysis, combined with immunologic studies, implicated a 4-aa duplication in the extreme N terminus of M protein as a factor contributing to an epidemic wave of serotype M3 invasive infections. This finding has implications for GAS vaccine research. Genome-wide analysis of population-based strain samples cultured from clinically well defined patients is crucial for understanding the molecular events underlying bacterial epidemics.

  12. Pushing the envelope in genetic analysis of species invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel A. Cushman

    2015-01-01

    How a species spreads once introduced into a new environment is a major question in landscape genetics. When the species in question is a potential disease vector, the findings are important not only for fundamental science, but can impact applied science and public health as well. In this issue of Molecular Ecology Medley et al. (2014) study, the invasion...

  13. Hypoxia-Targeting Fluorescent Nanobodies for Optical Molecular Imaging of Pre-Invasive Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Brussel, Aram S A; Adams, Arthur; Oliveira, Sabrina; Dorresteijn, Bram; El Khattabi, Mohamed; Vermeulen, J. F.; van der Wall, Elsken; Mali, Willem P Th M; Derksen, Patrick W B; van Diest, Paul J; van Bergen En Henegouwen, Paul M P

    PURPOSE: The aim of this work was to develop a CAIX-specific nanobody conjugated to IRDye800CW for molecular imaging of pre-invasive breast cancer. PROCEDURES: CAIX-specific nanobodies were selected using a modified phage display technology, conjugated site-specifically to IRDye800CW and evaluated

  14. Hypoxia-Targeting Fluorescent Nanobodies for Optical Molecular Imaging of Pre-Invasive Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Brussel, Aram S A; Adams, Arthur; Oliveira, Sabrina; Dorresteijn, Bram; El Khattabi, Mohamed; Vermeulen, Jeroen F.; van der Wall, Elsken; Mali, W.P.T.M.; Derksen, Patrick W B; van Diest, Paul J.; van Bergen En Henegouwen, Paul M P

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to develop a CAIX-specific nanobody conjugated to IRDye800CW for molecular imaging of pre-invasive breast cancer. Procedures: CAIX-specific nanobodies were selected using a modified phage display technology, conjugated site-specifically to IRDye800CW and evaluated

  15. Particular molecular and ultrastructural aspects in invasive mammary carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalcea, Corina Elena; Moroşanu, Ana Maria; Murăraşu, Daniela; Puiu, Liliana; Cinca, Sabin; Voinea, Silviu Cristian; Mirancea, Nicolae

    2015-01-01

    Electron microscopic investigations of invasive mammary carcinoma tumors revealed that intercellular junctions, namely desmosomes are severely altered; some desmosomes became internalized. Tumor cells, especially by their invadopodia, generate and disseminate membrane vesicles, including exosomes, inside of peritumoral stroma. Telocytes, a new described interstitial/stromal cell phenotype, considered to play important roles in cell signaling, exhibited a reduced number of hetero-cellular contacts, which suggests a possible perturbation of tissular homeostasis modulation. Signaling PIK3/Akt pathway plays an important role both in carcinogenesis and in proliferation, differentiation, and cell survival. Alteration of this pathway has been observed in many human cancers, often involving an increase in the activity of PIK3CA, p110α catalytic subunit of PI3K. Our study confirms the high prevalence of PIK3CA mutations in breast cancer. In accordance with the results of the largest previous studies, 87.5% of mutations detected by DNA direct sequencing were hot spot mutations, most of them located in the kinase domain. High percentage of mutations detected by high-resolution melting makes the assay an attractive choice for mutation scanning, especially, in samples with low percentage of tumor cell.

  16. Molecular basis of mammalian cell invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuko Yoshida

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Establishment of infection by Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas' disease, depends on a series of events involving interactions of diverse parasite molecules with host components. Here we focus on the mechanisms of target cell invasion by metacyclic trypomastigotes (MT and mammalian tissue culture trypomastigotes (TCT. During MT or TCT internalization, signal transduction pathways are activated both in the parasite and the target cell, leading to Ca2+ mobilization. For cell adhesion, MT engage surface glycoproteins, such as gp82 and gp35/50, which are Ca2+ signal-inducing molecules. In T. cruzi isolates that enter host cells in gp82-mediated manner, parasite protein tyrosine kinase as well as phospholipase C are activated, and Ca2+ is released from I P3-sensitive stores, whereas in T. cruzi isolates that attach to target cells mainly through gp35/50, the signaling pathway involving adenylate cyclase appears to be stimulated, with Ca2+ release from acidocalciosomes. In addition, T. cruzi isolate-dependent inhibitory signals, mediated by MT-specific gp90, may be triggered both in the host cell and the parasite. The repertoire of TCT molecules implicated in cell invasion includes surface glycoproteins of gp85 family, with members containing binding sites for laminin and cytokeratin 18, enzymes such as cruzipain, trans-sialidase, and an oligopeptidase B that generates a Ca2+-agonist from a precursor molecule.O estabelecimento da infecção por Trypanosoma cruzi, o agente da doença de Chagas, depende de uma série de eventos envolvendo interações de diversas moléculas do parasita com componentes do hospedeiro. Focalizamos aqui os mecanismos de invasão celular por tripomastigotas metacíclicos (TM e por tripomastigotas de cultura de tecido (TCT. Durante a internalização de TM ou TCT, vias de transdução de sinal são ativadas tanto no parasita como na célula alvo, acarretando a mobilização de Ca2+. Para adesão, TM utiliza as glicoprote

  17. Tissue invasion and metastasis: Molecular, biological and clinical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, W G; Sanders, A J; Katoh, M; Ungefroren, H; Gieseler, F; Prince, M; Thompson, S K; Zollo, M; Spano, D; Dhawan, P; Sliva, D; Subbarayan, P R; Sarkar, M; Honoki, K; Fujii, H; Georgakilas, A G; Amedei, A; Niccolai, E; Amin, A; Ashraf, S S; Ye, L; Helferich, W G; Yang, X; Boosani, C S; Guha, G; Ciriolo, M R; Aquilano, K; Chen, S; Azmi, A S; Keith, W N; Bilsland, A; Bhakta, D; Halicka, D; Nowsheen, S; Pantano, F; Santini, D

    2015-12-01

    Cancer is a key health issue across the world, causing substantial patient morbidity and mortality. Patient prognosis is tightly linked with metastatic dissemination of the disease to distant sites, with metastatic diseases accounting for a vast percentage of cancer patient mortality. While advances in this area have been made, the process of cancer metastasis and the factors governing cancer spread and establishment at secondary locations is still poorly understood. The current article summarizes recent progress in this area of research, both in the understanding of the underlying biological processes and in the therapeutic strategies for the management of metastasis. This review lists the disruption of E-cadherin and tight junctions, key signaling pathways, including urokinase type plasminogen activator (uPA), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene (PI3K/AKT), focal adhesion kinase (FAK), β-catenin/zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 1 (ZEB-1) and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β), together with inactivation of activator protein-1 (AP-1) and suppression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity as key targets and the use of phytochemicals, or natural products, such as those from Agaricus blazei, Albatrellus confluens, Cordyceps militaris, Ganoderma lucidum, Poria cocos and Silybum marianum, together with diet derived fatty acids gamma linolenic acid (GLA) and eicosapentanoic acid (EPA) and inhibitory compounds as useful approaches to target tissue invasion and metastasis as well as other hallmark areas of cancer. Together, these strategies could represent new, inexpensive, low toxicity strategies to aid in the management of cancer metastasis as well as having holistic effects against other cancer hallmarks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A novel minimally-invasive method to sample human endothelial cells for molecular profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen W Waldo

    Full Text Available The endothelium is a key mediator of vascular homeostasis and cardiovascular health. Molecular research on the human endothelium may provide insight into the mechanisms underlying cardiovascular disease. Prior methodology used to isolate human endothelial cells has suffered from poor yields and contamination with other cell types. We thus sought to develop a minimally invasive technique to obtain endothelial cells derived from human subjects with higher yields and purity.Nine healthy volunteers underwent endothelial cell harvesting from antecubital veins using guidewires. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS was subsequently used to purify endothelial cells from contaminating cells using endothelial surface markers (CD34/CD105/CD146 with the concomitant absence of leukocyte and platelet specific markers (CD11b/CD45. Endothelial lineage in the purified cell population was confirmed by expression of endothelial specific genes and microRNA using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR.A median of 4,212 (IQR: 2161-6583 endothelial cells were isolated from each subject. Quantitative PCR demonstrated higher expression of von Willebrand Factor (vWF, P<0.001, nitric oxide synthase 3 (NOS3, P<0.001 and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1, P<0.003 in the endothelial population compared to similarly isolated leukocytes. Similarly, the level of endothelial specific microRNA-126 was higher in the purified endothelial cells (P<0.001.This state-of-the-art technique isolates human endothelial cells for molecular analysis in higher purity and greater numbers than previously possible. This approach will expedite research on the molecular mechanisms of human cardiovascular disease, elucidating its pathophysiology and potential therapeutic targets.

  19. Molecular mechanisms that mediate invasion and egress of malaria parasites from red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaganan, Aditi; Singh, Pallavi; Chitnis, Chetan E

    2017-05-01

    Malaria parasites invade and multiply in diverse host cells during their complex life cycle. Some blood stage parasites transform into male and female gametocytes that are transmitted by female anopheline mosquitoes. The gametocytes are activated in the mosquito midgut to form male and female gametes, which egress from RBCs to mate and form a zygote. Here, we will review our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms that mediate invasion and egress by malaria parasites at different life cycle stages. A number of key effector molecules such as parasite protein ligands for receptor-engagement during invasion as well as proteases and perforin-like proteins that mediate egress have been identified. Interestingly, these parasite-encoded effectors are located in internal, vesicular organelles and are secreted in a highly regulated manner during invasion and egress. Here, we will review our current understanding of the functional roles of these effectors as well as the signaling pathways that regulate their timely secretion with accurate spatiotemporal coordinates. Understanding the molecular basis of key processes such as host cell invasion and egress by malaria parasites could provide novel targets for development of inhibitors to block parasite growth and transmission.

  20. Conformation analysis of trehalose. Molecular dynamics simulation and molecular mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnamaira, M.C.; Howard, E.I.; Grigera, J.R.

    1992-09-01

    Conformational analysis of the disaccharide trehalose is done by molecular dynamics and molecular mechanics. In spite of the different force fields used in each case, comparison between the molecular dynamics trajectories of the torsional angles of glycosidic linkage and energy conformational map shows a good agreement between both methods. By molecular dynamics it is observed a moderate mobility of the glycosidic linkage. The demands of computer time is comparable in both cases. (author). 6 refs, 4 figs

  1. Proteomic analysis of skin invasion by blood fluke larvae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Hansell

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available During invasion of human skin by schistosome blood fluke larvae (cercariae, a multicellular organism breaches the epidermis, basement membrane, and dermal barriers of skin. To better understand the pathobiology of this initial event in schistosome infection, a proteome analysis of human skin was carried out following invasion by cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni.Human skin samples were exposed to cercariae for one-half hour to two hours. Controls were exposed to water used to collect cercariae in an identical manner, and punctured to simulate cercarial tunnels. Fluid from both control and experimental samples was analyzed by LC/MS/MS using a linear ion trap in "triple play" mode. The coexistence of proteins released by cercariae and host skin proteins from epidermis and basement membrane confirmed that cercarial tunnels in skin were sampled. Among the abundant proteins secreted by cercariae was the cercarial protease that has been implicated in degradation of host proteins, secreted proteins proposed to mediate immune invasion by larvae, and proteins implicated in protection of parasites against oxidative stress. Components of the schistosome surface tegument, previously identified with immune serum, were also released. Both lysis and apoptosis of epidermal cells took place during cercarial invasion of the epidermis. Components of lysed epidermal cells, including desmosome proteins which link cells in the stratum granulosum and stratum spinosum, were identified. While macrophage-derived proteins were present, no mast cell or lymphocyte cytokines were identified. There were, however, abundant immunoglobulins, complement factors, and serine protease inhibitors in skin. Control skin samples incubated with water for the same period as experimental samples ensured that invasion-related proteins and host protein fragments were not due to nonspecific degeneration of the skin samples.This analysis identified secreted proteins from invasive larvae that

  2. Morphology delimits more species than molecular genetic clusters of invasive Pilosella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, Chandra E; Ensing, David J; Gaskin, John F; De Clerck-Floate, Rosemarie A; Pither, Jason

    2015-07-01

    • Accurate assessments of biodiversity are paramount for understanding ecosystem processes and adaptation to change. Invasive species often contribute substantially to local biodiversity; correctly identifying and distinguishing invaders is thus necessary to assess their potential impacts. We compared the reliability of morphology and molecular sequences to discriminate six putative species of invasive Pilosella hawkweeds (syn. Hieracium, Asteraceae), known for unreliable identifications and historical introgression. We asked (1) which morphological traits dependably discriminate putative species, (2) if genetic clusters supported morphological species, and (3) if novel hybridizations occur in the invaded range.• We assessed 33 morphometric characters for their discriminatory power using the randomForest classifier and, using AFLPs, evaluated genetic clustering with the program structure and subsequently with an AMOVA. The strength of the association between morphological and genotypic dissimilarity was assessed with a Mantel test.• Morphometric analyses delimited six species while genetic analyses defined only four clusters. Specifically, we found (1) eight morphological traits could reliably distinguish species, (2) structure suggested strong genetic differentiation but for only four putative species clusters, and (3) genetic data suggest both novel hybridizations and multiple introductions have occurred.• (1) Traditional floristic techniques may resolve more species than molecular analyses in taxonomic groups subject to introgression. (2) Even within complexes of closely related species, relatively few but highly discerning morphological characters can reliably discriminate species. (3) By clarifying patterns of morphological and genotypic variation of invasive Pilosella, we lay foundations for further ecological study and mitigation. © 2015 Botanical Society of America, Inc.

  3. ADAM33 gene silencing by promoter hypermethylation as a molecular marker in breast invasive lobular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Souza Emanuel M

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ADAM33 protein is a member of the family of transmembrane glycoproteins composed of multidomains. ADAM family members have different activities, such as proteolysis and adhesion, making them good candidates to mediate the extracellular matrix remodelling and changes in cellular adhesion that characterise certain pathologies and cancer development. It was reported that one family member, ADAM23, is down-regulated by promoter hypermethylation. This seems to correlate with tumour progression and metastasis in breast cancer. In this study, we explored the involvement of ADAM33, another ADAM family member, in breast cancer. Methods First, we analysed ADAM33 expression in breast tumour cell lines by RT-PCR and western blotting. We also used 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5azadCR treatment and DNA bisulphite sequencing to study the promoter methylation of ADAM33 in breast tumour cell lines. We evaluated ADAM33 methylation in primary tumour samples by methylation specific PCR (MSP. Finally, ADAM33 promoter hypermethylation was correlated with clinicopathological data using the chi-square test and Fisher's exact test. Results The expression analysis of ADAM33 in breast tumour cell lines by RT-PCR revealed gene silencing in 65% of tumour cell lines. The corresponding lack of ADAM33 protein was confirmed by western blotting. We also used 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dCR demethylation and bisulphite sequencing methodologies to confirm that gene silencing is due to ADAM33 promoter hypermethylation. Using MSP, we detected ADAM33 promoter hypermethylation in 40% of primary breast tumour samples. The correlation between methylation pattern and patient's clinicopathological data was not significantly associated with histological grade; tumour stage (TNM; tumour size; ER, PR or ERBB2 status; lymph node status; metastasis or recurrence. Methylation frequency in invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC was 76.2% compared with 25.5% in invasive ductal carcinoma

  4. ADAM33 gene silencing by promoter hypermethylation as a molecular marker in breast invasive lobular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seniski, Gerusa G; Zanata, Silvio M; Costa, Fabrício F; Klassen, Giseli; Camargo, Anamaria A; Ierardi, Daniela F; Ramos, Edneia AS; Grochoski, Mariana; Ribeiro, Enilze SF; Cavalli, Iglenir J; Pedrosa, Fabio O; Souza, Emanuel M de

    2009-01-01

    ADAM33 protein is a member of the family of transmembrane glycoproteins composed of multidomains. ADAM family members have different activities, such as proteolysis and adhesion, making them good candidates to mediate the extracellular matrix remodelling and changes in cellular adhesion that characterise certain pathologies and cancer development. It was reported that one family member, ADAM23, is down-regulated by promoter hypermethylation. This seems to correlate with tumour progression and metastasis in breast cancer. In this study, we explored the involvement of ADAM33, another ADAM family member, in breast cancer. First, we analysed ADAM33 expression in breast tumour cell lines by RT-PCR and western blotting. We also used 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5azadCR) treatment and DNA bisulphite sequencing to study the promoter methylation of ADAM33 in breast tumour cell lines. We evaluated ADAM33 methylation in primary tumour samples by methylation specific PCR (MSP). Finally, ADAM33 promoter hypermethylation was correlated with clinicopathological data using the chi-square test and Fisher's exact test. The expression analysis of ADAM33 in breast tumour cell lines by RT-PCR revealed gene silencing in 65% of tumour cell lines. The corresponding lack of ADAM33 protein was confirmed by western blotting. We also used 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dCR) demethylation and bisulphite sequencing methodologies to confirm that gene silencing is due to ADAM33 promoter hypermethylation. Using MSP, we detected ADAM33 promoter hypermethylation in 40% of primary breast tumour samples. The correlation between methylation pattern and patient's clinicopathological data was not significantly associated with histological grade; tumour stage (TNM); tumour size; ER, PR or ERBB2 status; lymph node status; metastasis or recurrence. Methylation frequency in invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) was 76.2% compared with 25.5% in invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), and this difference was

  5. Impact of Molecular Subtypes in Muscle-invasive Bladder Cancer on Predicting Response and Survival after Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Roland; Ashab, Hussam Al Deen; Erho, Nicholas; van Rhijn, Bas W G; Winters, Brian; Douglas, James; Van Kessel, Kim E; Fransen van de Putte, Elisabeth E; Sommerlad, Matthew; Wang, Natalie Q; Choeurng, Voleak; Gibb, Ewan A; Palmer-Aronsten, Beatrix; Lam, Lucia L; Buerki, Christine; Davicioni, Elai; Sjödahl, Gottfrid; Kardos, Jordan; Hoadley, Katherine A; Lerner, Seth P; McConkey, David J; Choi, Woonyoung; Kim, William Y; Kiss, Bernhard; Thalmann, George N; Todenhöfer, Tilman; Crabb, Simon J; North, Scott; Zwarthoff, Ellen C; Boormans, Joost L; Wright, Jonathan; Dall'Era, Marc; van der Heijden, Michiel S; Black, Peter C

    2017-10-01

    An early report on the molecular subtyping of muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) by gene expression suggested that response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) varies by subtype. To investigate the ability of molecular subtypes to predict pathological downstaging and survival after NAC. Whole transcriptome profiling was performed on pre-NAC transurethral resection specimens from 343 patients with MIBC. Samples were classified according to four published molecular subtyping methods. We developed a single-sample genomic subtyping classifier (GSC) to predict consensus subtypes (claudin-low, basal, luminal-infiltrated and luminal) with highest clinical impact in the context of NAC. Overall survival (OS) according to subtype was analyzed and compared with OS in 476 non-NAC cases (published datasets). Gene expression analysis was used to assign subtypes. Receiver-operating characteristics were used to determine the accuracy of GSC. The effect of GSC on survival was estimated by Cox proportional hazard regression models. The models generated subtype calls in expected ratios with high concordance across subtyping methods. GSC was able to predict four consensus molecular subtypes with high accuracy (73%), and clinical significance of the predicted consensus subtypes could be validated in independent NAC and non-NAC datasets. Luminal tumors had the best OS with and without NAC. Claudin-low tumors were associated with poor OS irrespective of treatment regimen. Basal tumors showed the most improvement in OS with NAC compared with surgery alone. The main limitations of our study are its retrospective design and comparison across datasets. Molecular subtyping may have an impact on patient benefit to NAC. If validated in additional studies, our results suggest that patients with basal tumors should be prioritized for NAC. We discovered the first single-sample classifier to subtype MIBC, which may be suitable for integration into routine clinical practice. Different molecular

  6. [Molecular markers: an important tool in the diagnosis, treatment and epidemiology of invasive aspergillosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frías-de León, María Guadalupe; Acosta-Altamirano, Gustavo; Duarte-Escalante, Esperanza; Martínez-Hernández, José Enrique; Martínez-Rivera, María de Los Ángeles; Reyes-Montes, María Del Rocío

    2014-01-01

    Increase in the incidence of invasive aspergillosis has represented a difficult problem for management of patients with this infection due to its high rate of mortality, limited knowledge concerning its diagnosis, and therapeutic practice. The difficulty in management of patients with aspergillosis initiates with detection of the fungus in the specimens of immunosuppressed patients infected with Aspergillus fumigatus; in addition, difficulty exists in terms of the development of resistance to antifungals as a consequence of their indiscriminate use in prophylactic and therapeutic practice and to ignorance concerning the epidemiological data of aspergillosis. With the aim of resolving these problems, molecular markers is employed at present with specific and accurate results. However, in Mexico, the use of molecular markers has not yet been implemented in the routine of intrahospital laboratories; despite the fact that these molecular markers has been widely referred in the literature, it is necessary for it to validated and standardized to ensure that the results obtained in any laboratory would be reliable and comparable. In the present review, we present an update on the usefulness of molecular markers in accurate identification of A. fumigatus, detection of resistance to antifugal triazoles, and epidemiological studies for establishing the necessary measures for prevention and control of aspergillosis.

  7. Distinct signatures of diversifying selection revealed by genome analysis of respiratory tract and invasive bacterial populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Patrick R; Beres, Stephen B; Flores, Anthony R; Ewbank, Amy L; Gonzalez-Lugo, Javier H; Martagon-Rosado, Alexandro J; Martinez-Gutierrez, Juan C; Rehman, Hina A; Serrano-Gonzalez, Monica; Fittipaldi, Nahuel; Ayers, Stephen D; Webb, Paul; Willey, Barbara M; Low, Donald E; Musser, James M

    2011-03-22

    Many pathogens colonize different anatomical sites, but the selective pressures contributing to survival in the diverse niches are poorly understood. Group A Streptococcus (GAS) is a human-adapted bacterium that causes a range of infections. Much effort has been expended to dissect the molecular basis of invasive (sterile-site) infections, but little is known about the genomes of strains causing pharyngitis (streptococcal "sore throat"). Additionally, there is essentially nothing known about the genetic relationships between populations of invasive and pharyngitis strains. In particular, it is unclear if invasive strains represent a distinct genetic subpopulation of strains that cause pharyngitis. We compared the genomes of 86 serotype M3 GAS pharyngitis strains with those of 215 invasive M3 strains from the same geographical location. The pharyngitis and invasive groups were highly related to each other and had virtually identical phylogenetic structures, indicating they belong to the same genetic pool. Despite the overall high degree of genetic similarity, we discovered that strains from different host environments (i.e., throat, normally sterile sites) have distinct patterns of diversifying selection at the nucleotide level. In particular, the pattern of polymorphisms in the hyaluronic acid capsule synthesis operon was especially different between the two strain populations. This finding was mirrored by data obtained from full-genome analysis of strains sequentially cultured from nonhuman primates. Our results answer the long-standing question of the genetic relationship between GAS pharyngitis and invasive strains. The data provide previously undescribed information about the evolutionary history of pathogenic microbes that cause disease in different anatomical sites.

  8. Invasive lobular breast cancer: the prognostic impact of histopathological grade, E-cadherin and molecular subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engstrøm, Monica J; Opdahl, Signe; Vatten, Lars J; Haugen, Olav A; Bofin, Anna M

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare breast cancer specific survival (BCSS) for invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) and, further, to evaluate critically the prognostic value of histopathological grading of ILC and examine E-cadherin as a prognostic marker in ILC. The study comprised 116 lobular and 611 ductal breast carcinomas occurring between 1961 and 2008. All cases had been classified previously according to histopathological type and grade, stained for oestrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), antigen Ki67 (Ki67), epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR), cytokeratin 5 (CK5) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and classified into molecular subtypes. For the present study, immunohistochemical staining for E-cadherin was performed. The Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards models were used in the analyses. Grade 2 tumours comprised 85.3% of the lobular tumours and 51.9% of the ductal tumours. BCSS in ILC grade 2 was comparable to that of IDC grade 3. E-cadherin-negative ILC had a poorer prognosis compared to E-cadherin positive ILC and to IDC regardless of E-cadherin status. The implication of histopathological grading may differ in ILC compared to IDC. E-cadherin may be useful in prognostication in ILC and thereby influence the determination of treatment strategies for this group of women. © 2014 The Authors. Histopathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Delimiting invasive Myriophyllum aquaticum in Kashmir Himalaya using a molecular phylogenetic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, M A; Ali, M A; Al-Hemaid, F M; Reshi, Z A

    2014-09-12

    Myriophyllum aquaticum (Vell.) Verdc. (family Haloragaceae) is one of the most invasive and destructive South American aquatic plant species and is present in a wide range of geographic regions, including the Kashmir Himalaya. Confusion regarding the taxonomic delimitation of M. aquaticum in the Himalayan region impedes effective and targeted management. Hence, our goal was improve the identification of M. aquaticum for exclusive delimitation from other related species in the study region using a molecular phylogenetic approach. A maximum parsimony tree recovered from phylogenetic analyses of the internal transcribed spacer sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA was used to authenticate the identification of M. aquaticum. The results of this study can be used for targeted management of this tropical invader into the temperate Kashmir Himalaya.

  10. The genetic and molecular basis of bacterial invasion of epithelial cells

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Invasion of epithelial cells was demonstrated to be triggered by invasion plasmid antigens B, C, and D ( IpaB, IpaC and IpaD ) which is accomplished by intracellular spread gene icsA. The invasion of epithelial cells by some individual species of bacteria were also reviewed.Yersinia enterocolitica invasiveness was shown ...

  11. An investigation on non-invasive fungal sinusitis; Molecular identification of etiologic agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolrasoul Mohammadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fungal sinusitis is increasing worldwide in the past two decades. It is divided into two types including invasive and noninvasive. Noninvasive types contain allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS and fungus ball. AFS is a hypersensitivity reaction to fungal allergens in the mucosa of the sinonasal tract in atopic individuals. The fungus ball is a different type of noninvasive fungal rhinosinusitis which is delineated as an accumulation of debris and fungal elements inside a paranasal sinus. Fungal sinusitis caused by various fungi such as Aspergillus species, Penicillium, Mucor, Rhizopus, and phaeohyphomycetes. The aim of the present study is to identify fungal species isolated from noninvasive fungal sinusitis by molecular methods. Materials and Methods: During 2015–2016, a total of 100 suspected patients were examined for fungal sinusitis. Functional endoscopic sinus surgery was performed using the Messerklinger technique. Clinical samples were identified by phenotypic and molecular methods. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR sequencing of ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism with Msp I restriction enzyme was performed for molecular identification of molds and yeasts, respectively. Results: Twenty-seven out of 100 suspected cases (27% had fungal sinusitis. Nasal congestion (59% and headache (19% were the most common clinical signs among patients. Fifteen patients (55.5% were male and 12 patients (44.5% were female. Aspergillus flavus was the most prevalent fungal species (26%, followed by Penicillium chrysogenum (18.5% and Candida glabrata species complex (15%. Conclusion: Since clinical manifestations, computed tomography scan, endoscopy, and histopathological findings are very nonspecific in AFS and fungus ball; therefore, molecular investigations are compulsory for precise identification of etiologic agents and appropriate management of these fungal infections.

  12. Risk analysis and bioeconomics of invasive species to inform policy and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    David M. Lodge; Paul W. Simonin; Stanley W. Burgiel; Reuben P. Keller; Jonathan M. Bossenbroek; Christopher L. Jerde; Andrew M. Kramer; Edward S. Rutherford; Matthew A. Barnes; Marion E. Wittmann; W. Lindsay Chadderton; Jenny L. Apriesnig; Dmitry Beletsky; Roger M. Cooke; John M. Drake; Scott P. Egan; David C. Finnoff; Crysta A. Gantz; Erin K. Grey; Michael H. Hoff; Jennifer G. Howeth; Richard A. Jensen; Eric R. Larson; Nicholas E. Mandrak; Doran M. Mason; Felix A. Martinez; Tammy J. Newcomb; John D. Rothlisberger; Andrew J. Tucker; Travis W. Warziniack; Hongyan. Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Risk analysis of species invasions links biology and economics, is increasingly mandated by international and national policies, and enables improved management of invasive species. Biological invasions proceed through a series of transition probabilities (i.e., introduction, establishment, spread, and impact), and each of these presents opportunities for...

  13. Global genetic analysis reveals the putative native source of the invasive termite, Reticulitermes flavipes, in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdereau, E; Bagnères, A-G; Bankhead-Dronnet, S; Dupont, S; Zimmermann, M; Vargo, E L; Dedeine, F

    2013-02-01

    Biological invasions are recognized as a major threat to both natural and managed ecosystems. Phylogeographic and population genetic analyses can provide information about the geographical origins and patterns of introduction and explain the causes and mechanisms by which introduced species have become successful invaders. Reticulitermes flavipes is a North American subterranean termite that has been introduced into several areas, including France where introduced populations have become invasive. To identify likely source populations in the USA and to compare the genetic diversity of both native and introduced populations, an extensive molecular genetic study was undertaken using the COII region of mtDNA and 15 microsatellite loci. Our results showed that native northern US populations appeared well differentiated from those of the southern part of the US range. Phylogenetic analysis of both mitochondrial and nuclear markers showed that French populations probably originated from southeastern US populations, and more specifically from Louisiana. All of the mtDNA haplotypes shared between the United States and France were found in Louisiana. Compared to native populations in Louisiana, French populations show lower genetic diversity at both mtDNA and microsatellite markers. These findings are discussed along with the invasion routes of R. flavipes as well as the possible mechanisms by which French populations have evolved after their introduction. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Cellular and Molecular Defects Underlying Invasive Fungal Infections—Revelations from Endemic Mycoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela P. Lee

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The global burden of fungal diseases has been increasing, as a result of the expanding number of susceptible individuals including people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, hematopoietic stem cell or organ transplant recipients, patients with malignancies or immunological conditions receiving immunosuppressive treatment, premature neonates, and the elderly. Opportunistic fungal pathogens such as Aspergillus, Candida, Cryptococcus, Rhizopus, and Pneumocystis jiroveci are distributed worldwide and constitute the majority of invasive fungal infections (IFIs. Dimorphic fungi such as Histoplasma capsulatum, Coccidioides spp., Paracoccidioides spp., Blastomyces dermatiditis, Sporothrix schenckii, Talaromyces (Penicillium marneffei, and Emmonsia spp. are geographically restricted to their respective habitats and cause endemic mycoses. Disseminated histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis, and T. marneffei infection are recognized as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS-defining conditions, while the rest also cause high rate of morbidities and mortalities in patients with HIV infection and other immunocompromised conditions. In the past decade, a growing number of monogenic immunodeficiency disorders causing increased susceptibility to fungal infections have been discovered. In particular, defects of the IL-12/IFN-γ pathway and T-helper 17-mediated response are associated with increased susceptibility to endemic mycoses. In this review, we put together the various forms of endemic mycoses on the map and take a journey around the world to examine how cellular and molecular defects of the immune system predispose to invasive endemic fungal infections, including primary immunodeficiencies, individuals with autoantibodies against interferon-γ, and those receiving biologic response modifiers. Though rare, these conditions provide importance insights to host defense mechanisms against endemic fungi, which can only be appreciated in unique

  15. Cellular and Molecular Defects Underlying Invasive Fungal Infections—Revelations from Endemic Mycoses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pamela P.; Lau, Yu-Lung

    2017-01-01

    The global burden of fungal diseases has been increasing, as a result of the expanding number of susceptible individuals including people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hematopoietic stem cell or organ transplant recipients, patients with malignancies or immunological conditions receiving immunosuppressive treatment, premature neonates, and the elderly. Opportunistic fungal pathogens such as Aspergillus, Candida, Cryptococcus, Rhizopus, and Pneumocystis jiroveci are distributed worldwide and constitute the majority of invasive fungal infections (IFIs). Dimorphic fungi such as Histoplasma capsulatum, Coccidioides spp., Paracoccidioides spp., Blastomyces dermatiditis, Sporothrix schenckii, Talaromyces (Penicillium) marneffei, and Emmonsia spp. are geographically restricted to their respective habitats and cause endemic mycoses. Disseminated histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis, and T. marneffei infection are recognized as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-defining conditions, while the rest also cause high rate of morbidities and mortalities in patients with HIV infection and other immunocompromised conditions. In the past decade, a growing number of monogenic immunodeficiency disorders causing increased susceptibility to fungal infections have been discovered. In particular, defects of the IL-12/IFN-γ pathway and T-helper 17-mediated response are associated with increased susceptibility to endemic mycoses. In this review, we put together the various forms of endemic mycoses on the map and take a journey around the world to examine how cellular and molecular defects of the immune system predispose to invasive endemic fungal infections, including primary immunodeficiencies, individuals with autoantibodies against interferon-γ, and those receiving biologic response modifiers. Though rare, these conditions provide importance insights to host defense mechanisms against endemic fungi, which can only be appreciated in unique climatic and

  16. Molecular Epidemiology of Invasive Listeriosis due to Listeria monocytogenes in a Spanish Hospital over a Nine-Year Study Period, 2006–2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Ariza-Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the pathogenicity, invasiveness, and genetic relatedness of 17 clinical Listeria monocytogenes stains isolated over a period of nine years (2006–2014. All isolates were phenotypically characterised and growth patterns were determined. The antimicrobial susceptibility of L. monocytogenes isolates was determined in E-tests. Invasion assays were performed with epithelial HeLa cells. Finally, L. monocytogenes isolates were subtyped by PFGE and MLST. All isolates had similar phenotypic characteristics (β-haemolysis and lecithinase activity, and three types of growth curve were observed. Bacterial recovery rates after invasion assays ranged from 0.09% to 7.26% (1.62 ± 0.46. MLST identified 11 sequence types (STs, and 14 PFGE profiles were obtained, indicating a high degree of genetic diversity. Genetic studies unequivocally revealed the occurrence of one outbreak of listeriosis in humans that had not previously been reported. This outbreak occurred in October 2009 and affected three patients from neighbouring towns. In conclusion, the molecular epidemiological analysis clearly revealed a cluster (three human cases, all ST1 of not previously reported listeriosis cases in northwestern Spain. Our findings indicate that molecular subtyping, in combination with epidemiological case analysis, is essential and should be implemented in routine diagnosis, to improve the tracing of the sources of outbreaks.

  17. The impact of new trends in POCTs for companion diagnostics, non-invasive testing and molecular diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huckle, David

    2015-06-01

    Point-of-care diagnostics have been slowly developing over several decades and have taken on a new importance in current healthcare delivery for both diagnostics and development of new drugs. Molecular diagnostics have become a key driver of technology change and opened up new areas in companion diagnostics for use alongside pharmaceuticals and in new clinical approaches such as non-invasive testing. Future areas involving smartphone and other information technology advances, together with new developments in molecular biology, microfluidics and surface chemistry are adding to advances in the market. The focus for point-of-care tests with molecular diagnostic technologies is focused on advancing effective applications.

  18. Molecular analysis and antibiotic resistance investigation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Molecular analysis and antibiotic resistance investigation of Staphylococcus aureus isolates associated with staphylococcal food poisoning and nosocomial infections. Y Zhang, S Cheng, G Ding, M Zhu, X Pan, L Zhang ...

  19. Signal analysis of behavioral and molecular cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Joel D; Funes, Pablo; Dowse, Harold B; Hall, Jeffrey C

    2002-01-01

    Background Circadian clocks are biological oscillators that regulate molecular, physiological, and behavioral rhythms in a wide variety of organisms. While behavioral rhythms are typically monitored over many cycles, a similar approach to molecular rhythms was not possible until recently; the advent of real-time analysis using transgenic reporters now permits the observations of molecular rhythms over many cycles as well. This development suggests that new details about the relationship between molecular and behavioral rhythms may be revealed. Even so, behavioral and molecular rhythmicity have been analyzed using different methods, making such comparisons difficult to achieve. To address this shortcoming, among others, we developed a set of integrated analytical tools to unify the analysis of biological rhythms across modalities. Results We demonstrate an adaptation of digital signal analysis that allows similar treatment of both behavioral and molecular data from our studies of Drosophila. For both types of data, we apply digital filters to extract and clarify details of interest; we employ methods of autocorrelation and spectral analysis to assess rhythmicity and estimate the period; we evaluate phase shifts using crosscorrelation; and we use circular statistics to extract information about phase. Conclusion Using data generated by our investigation of rhythms in Drosophila we demonstrate how a unique aggregation of analytical tools may be used to analyze and compare behavioral and molecular rhythms. These methods are shown to be versatile and will also be adaptable to further experiments, owing in part to the non-proprietary nature of the code we have developed. PMID:11825337

  20. Signal analysis of behavioral and molecular cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dowse Harold B

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Circadian clocks are biological oscillators that regulate molecular, physiological, and behavioral rhythms in a wide variety of organisms. While behavioral rhythms are typically monitored over many cycles, a similar approach to molecular rhythms was not possible until recently; the advent of real-time analysis using transgenic reporters now permits the observations of molecular rhythms over many cycles as well. This development suggests that new details about the relationship between molecular and behavioral rhythms may be revealed. Even so, behavioral and molecular rhythmicity have been analyzed using different methods, making such comparisons difficult to achieve. To address this shortcoming, among others, we developed a set of integrated analytical tools to unify the analysis of biological rhythms across modalities. Results We demonstrate an adaptation of digital signal analysis that allows similar treatment of both behavioral and molecular data from our studies of Drosophila. For both types of data, we apply digital filters to extract and clarify details of interest; we employ methods of autocorrelation and spectral analysis to assess rhythmicity and estimate the period; we evaluate phase shifts using crosscorrelation; and we use circular statistics to extract information about phase. Conclusion Using data generated by our investigation of rhythms in Drosophila we demonstrate how a unique aggregation of analytical tools may be used to analyze and compare behavioral and molecular rhythms. These methods are shown to be versatile and will also be adaptable to further experiments, owing in part to the non-proprietary nature of the code we have developed.

  1. [Triexponential diffusion analysis in invasive ductal carcinoma and fibroadenoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Masayuki; Miyati, Tosiaki; Hayashi, Tatsuya; Kanao, Syotaro; Taniguchi, Masahiro; Higashimura, Kyoji; Toi, Masakazu; Togashi, Kaori

    2014-03-01

    To simultaneously obtain information on diffusion and perfusion in breast lesions by diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI), we analyzed three diffusion components using a triexponential function. Eighteen subjects [10 with invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), 8 with fibroadenoma] were evaluated using DWI with multiple b-values. We derived perfusion-related diffusion, fast free diffusion, and slow restricted diffusion coefficients (Dp, Df, Ds) calculated from the triexponential function using the DWI data. Moreover, the triexponential analysis was compared with biexponential and monoexponential analyses. Each diffusion coefficient with a triexponential function was correlated to a relative enhancement ratio (RER) using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. In triexponential analysis, Dp and Ds in IDC were significantly higher than those for fibroadenoma. There was no correlation between each diffusion coefficient from the triexponential analysis in any of the groups (Dp, Df, and Ds), but biexponential analysis revealed a positive correlation between each diffusion coefficient in breast lesions. Strong correlations were found between Dp and RERs. Triexponential analysis thus makes it possible to obtain, in noninvasive fashion, more detailed diffusion and perfusion information in breast lesions.

  2. Who cites who in the invasion zoo: insights from an analysis of the most highly cited papers in invasion ecology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pyšek, Petr; Richardson, D. M.; Jarošík, Vojtěch

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 78, - (2006), s. 437-468 ISSN 0032-7786 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : citation analysis * biological invasions * Web of Science Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.119, year: 2006

  3. Non-invasive prenatal testing using massively parallel sequencing of maternal plasma DNA: from molecular karyotyping to fetal whole-genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Y M Dennis

    2013-12-01

    The discovery of cell-free fetal DNA in maternal plasma in 1997 has stimulated a rapid development of non-invasive prenatal testing. The recent advent of massively parallel sequencing has allowed the analysis of circulating cell-free fetal DNA to be performed with unprecedented sensitivity and precision. Fetal trisomies 21, 18 and 13 are now robustly detectable in maternal plasma and such analyses have been available clinically since 2011. Fetal genome-wide molecular karyotyping and whole-genome sequencing have now been demonstrated in a number of proof-of-concept studies. Genome-wide and targeted sequencing of maternal plasma has been shown to allow the non-invasive prenatal testing of β-thalassaemia and can potentially be generalized to other monogenic diseases. It is thus expected that plasma DNA-based non-invasive prenatal testing will play an increasingly important role in future obstetric care. It is thus timely and important that the ethical, social and legal issues of non-invasive prenatal testing be discussed actively by all parties involved in prenatal care. Copyright © 2013 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A Preclinical Evaluation of Antrodia camphorata Alcohol Extracts in the Treatment of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Using Non-Invasive Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeng-Feng Chiou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to provide a platform for the pre-clinical evaluation of anti-cancer properties of a unique CAM (complementary and alternative medicine agent, Antrodia camphorata alcohol extract (ACAE, in a mouse model with the advantageous non-invasive in vivo bioluminescence molecular imaging technology. In vitro analyses on the proliferation, migration/invasion, cell cycle and apoptosis were performed on ACAE-treated non-small cell lung cancer cells, H441GL and control CGL1 cells. In vivo, immune-deficient mice were inoculated subcutaneously with H441GL followed by oral gavages of ACAE. The effect of ACAE on tumor progression was monitored by non-invasive bioluminescence imaging. The proliferation and migration/invasion of H441GL cells were inhibited by ACAE in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, ACAE induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase and apoptosis in H441GL cells as shown by flow cytometric analysis, Annexin-V immunoflourescence and DNA fragmentation. In vivo bioluminescence imaging revealed that tumorigenesis was significantly retarded by oral treatment of ACAE in a dose-dependent fashion. Based on our experimental data, ACAE contains anti-cancer properties and could be considered as a potential CAM agent in future clinical evaluation.

  5. Integrative invasion science: model systems, multi-site studies, focused meta-analysis, and invasion syndromes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kueffer, C.; Pyšek, Petr; Richardson, D. M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 200, č. 3 (2013), s. 615-633 ISSN 1469-8137 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP504/11/1028; GA ČR GA206/09/0563 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : model systems * invasion syndromes * multi-site studies Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 6.545, year: 2013

  6. Invasive Group A Streptococcal Disease. National Epidemiology and Genetic Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlaminckx, B.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Infections with group A streptococci (GAS), or S. pyogenes, range from mild and superficial to very severe and lethal invasive disease. In severe invasive GAS infections, hypotension and multiorgan failure may develop rapidly resulting in the development of toxic shock-like syndrome (TSS). In the

  7. the genetic and molecular basis of bacterial invasion of epithelial cells

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    invasin. Salmonella typhi was found to have four invasion loci; inv A-D, but H genes are contained in 33kb DNA fragment. Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) achieve invasion by assembly of highly organized cytoskeletal structures in the epithelial cells just beneath the adherent bacteria, while. Shigella flexneri was found to ...

  8. Molecular analysis of mutations in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinchik, E.M.

    1987-01-01

    Understanding the molecular nature of mutations and the mechanisms by which mutations are translated into specific (and often complex) phenotypes is a major goal of mammalian biology. Molecular genetic analysis of heritable mouse mutations constitutes a significant, experimentally malleable strategy for relating genomic DNA structure to genic expression and function in mammals. Radiation-induced germ-line mutations, many of which are deletions or chromosomal rearrangements, have assumed important roles in strategies for (1) identifying new genetic loci in specific regions of the genome, (2) obtaining molecular access to these regions, (3) developing detailed molecular maps within regions, and (4) analyzing, at a functional level, the role(s) played by specific segments of genomic DNA in normal development as well as the effect(s) of mutation on biologically significant processes and phenotypes

  9. Fetal analysis with invasive method (FA-I) and fetal analysis with non-invasive method (FA-NI): replacing current, deceptively imprecise clinical nomenclature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervenak, Frank A; McCullough, Laurence B; Dudenhausen, Joachim

    2017-11-27

    There is a problem with the current nomenclature of prenatal evaluation. The current nomenclature of "prenatal testing" and "prenatal screening" - along with their subsets of "ultrasound testing," "ultrasound screening," "non-invasive prenatal testing," "non-invasive prenatal screening," and "prenatal diagnosis" - has become so imprecise that clinical misinterpretation and distortion of the informed consent process are increasingly difficult to avoid. To remedy this problem, we propose a new, precise nomenclature: "fetal analysis with invasive method" (FA-I) and "fetal analysis with non-invasive method," (FANI) using various techniques. This new nomenclature is designed to be precise and therefore facilitate effective communication among physicians and with pregnant women. For ease of use the new nomenclature can be formulated as an abbreviation: FA-I and FA-NI.

  10. Ecological consequences of genetic modifications - an invasion analysis approach

    OpenAIRE

    Valosaari, Kata-Riina

    2008-01-01

    Biological invasions are considered as one of the greatest threats to biodiversity, as they may lead to disruption and homogenization of natural communities, and in the worst case, to native species extinctions. The introduction of gene modified organisms (GMOs) to agricultural, fisheries and forestry practices brings them into contact with natural populations. GMOs may appear as new invasive species if they are able to (1) invade into natural habitats or (2) hybridize with their wild relativ...

  11. Optimal non-invasive diagnosis of fetal achondroplasia combining ultrasonography and circulating cell-free fetal DNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivanti, Alexandre J; Costa, Jean-Marc; Rosefort, Audrey; Kleinfinger, Pascale; Lohmann, Laurence; Cordier, Anne-Gael; Benachi, Alexandra

    2018-01-30

    To assess the performance of non-invasive prenatal testing of achondroplasia using high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis. To propose an optimal diagnosis strategy combining ultrasound scan and cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) analysis. Prospective multicenter study. CffDNA was extracted from maternal blood from women at risk for fetal achondroplasia (paternal achondroplasia, previous affected child or suspected rhizomelic shortening). The presence of one of the two main FGFR3 mutations was determined by HRM combined with confirmation by SNaPshot minisequencing. Results were compared with phenotypes obtained by 3D computed tomography, post-natal examination and/or molecular diagnosis by an invasive procedure. Fetal biometry was also analyzed (head circumference and femur length) in order to offer cffDNA for achondroplasia in selected cases. Eighty-six blood samples from women at risk were collected (and sixty-five from control women). The overall sensitivity and specificity of the test were respectively 1.00 (95% CI [0.87-1.00]) and 1.00 (95% CI [0.96-1.00]). Critical reduction of femur length for affected fetuses can be observed from 26 weeks of gestation. HRM combined with SNaPshot minisequencing is a reliable method for non-invasive prenatal testing of achondroplasia. Its implementation in routine clinical care combined with ultrasonography is an efficient strategy for non-invasive diagnosis of achondroplasia. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Molecular analysis of heritable mouse mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinchik, E.M.

    1987-01-01

    Germ-like mutations of the mouse have for years comprised one class of biological markers for mammalian reproductive and developmental toxicology. Understanding the molecular nature of mutations and the mechanisms by which mutations are translated into specific (and often complex) phenotypes, however, still looms as a major goal of mammalian biology. Molecular genetic analysis of heritable mouse mutations constitutes a significant, experimentally malleable strategy for relating genomic DNA structure to genic expression and function in mammals. The integrated use of recombinant DNA technology, which allows both the identification and analysis of expression of single genes, and classical genetic and cytogenetic analysis, which allow the important correlation between basic DNA defects and the organismic consequences of such defects, has been crucial to this strategy. Some of the approaches (e.g., specific-gene cloning, random-clone analysis of genomic regions, insertional mutagenesis) for studying the nature and effect of both mutations and their wild-type counterparts that have resulted from this integration of genetic analysis and molecular biology have been applied to many loci within the murine genome. Studies of the nature and effects of a complex set of radiation-induced mutations at the dilute-short ear (d-se) region of chromosome 9, a specific example of this type of integrated analysis, are discussed

  13. Comparative water use of native and invasive plants at multiple scales: a global meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaleri, Molly A; Sack, Lawren

    2010-09-01

    Ecohydrology and invasive ecology have become increasingly important in the context of global climate change. This study presents the first in-depth analysis of the water use of invasive and native plants of the same growth form at multiple scales: leaf, plant, and ecosystem. We reanalyzed data for several hundred native and invasive species from over 40 published studies worldwide to glean global trends and to highlight how patterns vary depending on both scale and climate. We analyzed all pairwise combinations of co-occurring native and invasive species for higher comparative resolution of the likelihood of an invasive species using more water than a native species and tested for significance using bootstrap methods. At each scale, we found several-fold differences in water use between specific paired invasive and native species. At the leaf scale, we found a strong tendency for invasive species to have greater stomatal conductance than native species. At the plant scale, however, natives and invasives were equally likely to have the higher sap flow rates. Available data were much fewer for the ecosystem scale; nevertheless, we found that invasive-dominated ecosystems were more likely to have higher sap flow rates per unit ground area than native-dominated ecosystems. Ecosystem-scale evapotranspiration, on the other hand, was equally likely to be greater for systems dominated by invasive and native species of the same growth form. The inherent disconnects in the determination of water use when changing scales from leaf to plant to ecosystem reveal hypotheses for future studies and a critical need for more ecosystem-scale water use measurements in invasive- vs. native-dominated systems. The differences in water use of native and invasive species also depended strongly on climate, with the greater water use of invasives enhanced in hotter, wetter climates at the coarser scales.

  14. Gravity-destabilized nonwetting phase invasion in macro-heterogeneous porous media: Experimental observations of invasion dynamics and scale analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GLASS JR.,ROBERT J.; CONRAD,STEPHEN H.; PEPLINSKI,WILLIAM J.

    1999-02-16

    The authors designed and conducted experiments in a heterogeneous sand pack where gravity-destabilized nonwetting phase invasion (CO{sub 2} and TCE) could be recorded using high resolution light transmission methods. The heterogeneity structure was designed to be reminiscent of fluvial channel lag cut-and-fill architecture and contain a series of capillary barriers. As invasion progressed, nonwetting phase structure developed a series of fingers and pools; behind the growing front they found nonwetting phase saturation to pulsate in certain regions when viscous forces were low. Through a scale analysis, they derive a series of length scales that describe finger diameter, pool height and width, and regions where pulsation occurs within a heterogeneous porous medium. In all cases, they find that the intrinsic pore scale nature of the invasion process and resulting structure must be incorporated into the analysis to explain experimental results. The authors propose a simple macro-scale structural growth model that assembles length scales for sub-structures to delineate nonwetting phase migration from a source into a heterogeneous domain. For such a model applied at the field scale for DNAPL migration, they expect capillary and gravity forces within the complex subsurface lithology to play the primary roles with viscous forces forming a perturbation on the inviscid phase structure.

  15. Clinical and Molecular Epidemiology of Childhood Invasive Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Disease in England and Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sarah; Vickers, Anna; Ladhani, Shamez N; Flynn, Sally; Platt, Steven; Ramsay, Mary E; Litt, David J; Slack, Mary P E

    2016-03-01

    In countries with established Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) immunization programs, nontypeable H. influenzae (NTHi) is now responsible for nearly all invasive H. influenzae cases across all age groups. Public Health England (PHE) conducts enhanced national surveillance of invasive H. influenzae disease in England and Wales. Invasive NTHi isolates submitted to Public Health England from children of ages 1 month to 10 years during 2003-2010 were characterized by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Detailed clinical information was obtained for all laboratory-confirmed cases of invasive NTHi disease in children during 2009-2013. In England and Wales, there were 7797 cases of invasive H. influenzae disease diagnosed during 2000-2013 and 1585 (20%) occurred in children aged 1 month to 10 years, where NTHi was responsible for 31-51 cases (incidence, 0.53-0.92/100,000) annually. Detailed clinical follow-up of 214 confirmed NTHi cases diagnosed in this age-group during 2009-2013 revealed that 52% (n = 111) occurred in <2-year-old and 52% (n=110) had comorbidity. Bacteremic pneumonia was the most common clinical presentation (n = 99, 46%), 16% (n = 34) required intensive care and 11% (n = 23) died. Characterization by biotyping and MLST of 316 NTHi strains from children with invasive disease during 2003-2010 revealed a genetically heterogeneous population (155 MLSTs) with diverse biotypes and no association with comorbidity status, clinical disease or outcome. The high level of genetic diversity in invasive NTHi strains highlights the difficulties in developing an effective vaccine against this pathogen.

  16. Analysis of intravesical recurrence after bladder-preserving therapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onozawa, Mizuki; Miyanaga, Naoto; Hinotsu, Shiro

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the pattern of recurrences after bladder-preserving therapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. The subjects were 77 patients with T2-3N0M0 bladder cancer whose bladder was preserved by intra-arterial chemotherapy and radiation. The patterns of the first recurrences were retrospectively analyzed. With a median follow-up of 38.5 months, 17 patients (22.1%) experienced intravesical recurrence without metastasis, 14 (82.4%) of which were cases of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer recurrence and 3 (17.6%) of which were muscle-invasive bladder cancer recurrences. Muscle-invasive bladder cancer recurred at the same site as the initial tumor site in all three cases, whereas non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer recurred at different sites in 64% of the patients in that group. The peak hazard of the non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer recurrence was observed at around a year after treatment. Recurrent non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer was of a significantly lower histological grade with lower Ki-67-labeling indices than the initial muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Twelve (85.7%) of 14 patients with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer recurrence achieved disease-free status. The multivariate analysis revealed that multiplicity, grade and tumor size were significantly correlated with the recurrence (P=0.0001, 0.0442 and 0.0412, respectively). Most of the recurrences after bladder-preserving therapy were cases of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. The recurrence pattern and characteristics of the tumors did not differ from those of primary non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Patients with high-risk factors would be candidates for prophylactic intravesical therapy for non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer recurrence. (author)

  17. Analysis of microtraces in invasive traumas using SEM/EDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeij, E J; Zoon, P D; Chang, S B C G; Keereweer, I; Pieterman, R; Gerretsen, R R R

    2012-01-10

    Scanning electron microscopy in combination with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDS) is a proven forensic tool and has been used to analyze several kinds of trace evidence. A forensic application of SEM/EDS is the examination of morphological characteristics of tool marks that tools and instruments leave on bone. The microtraces that are left behind by these tools and instruments on the bone are, however, often ignored or not noticed at all. In this paper we will describe the use of SEM/EDS for the analysis of microtraces in invasive sharp-force, blunt-force and bone-hacking traumas in bone. This research is part of a larger multi-disciplinary approach in which pathologists, forensic anthropologists, toolmark and microtrace experts work together to link observed injuries to a suspected weapon or, in case of an unknown weapon, to indicate a group of objects that could have been used as a weapon. Although there are a few difficulties one have to consider, the method itself is rather simple and straightforward to apply. A sample of dry and clean bone is placed into the SEM sample chamber and brightness and contrast are set such that bone appears grey, metal appears white and organic material appears black. The sample is then searched manually to find relevant features. Once features are found their elemental composition is measured by an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS). This method is illustrated using several cases. It is shown that SEM/EDS analysis of microtraces in bone is a valuable tool to get clues about an unknown weapon and can associate a specific weapon with injuries on the basis of appearance and elemental composition. In particular the separate results from the various disciplines are complementary and may be combined to reach a conclusion with a stronger probative value. This is not only useful in the courtroom but above all in criminal investigations when one have to know for what weapon or object to look for. Copyright © 2011

  18. Assessing stakeholder perspectives on invasive plants to inform risk analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conservation and land management decisions are often based primarily on natural science, but could be more successful if human influences were effectively integrated into decision-making. This is especially true for efforts to manage invasive plants, whose arrival is usually the product of delibera...

  19. Confronting challenges to economic analysis of biological invasions in forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas P Holmes

    2010-01-01

    Biological invasions of forests by non-indigenous organisms present a complex, persistent, and largely irreversible threat to forest ecosystems around the globe. Rigorous assessments of the economic impacts of introduced species, at a national scale, are needed to provide credible information to policy makers. It is proposed here that microeconomic models of damage due...

  20. Total RNA Sequencing Analysis of DCIS Progressing to Invasive Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Assay Kits respectively on the Qubit 2.0 Fluorometer (Life Technologies). The BioRad Experion Automated Electrophoresis System RNA kit was used to...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0080 TITLE: Total RNA Sequencing Analysis of DCIS Progressing to Invasive Breast Cancer. PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Aug 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Total RNA Sequencing Analysis of DCIS Progressing to Invasive Breast Cancer. 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT

  1. Molecular activation analysis for chemical species studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai Zhifang; Mao Xueying; Wang Yuqi; Sun Jingxin; Qian Qingfang; Hou Xiaolin; Zhang Peiqun; Chen Chunying; Feng Weiyu; Ding Wenjun; Li Xiaolin; Li Chunsheng; Dai Xiongxin

    2001-01-01

    The Molecular Activation Analysis (MAA) mainly refers to an activation analysis method that is able to provide information about the chemical species of elements in systems of interest, though its exact definition has remained to be assigned. Its development is strongly stimulated by the urgent need to know the chemical species of elements, because the bulk contents or concentrations are often insignificant for judging biological, environmental or geochemical effects of elements. In this paper, the features, methodology and limitation of MAA were outlined. Further, the up-to-date MAA progress made in our laboratory was introduced as well. (author)

  2. Molecular mechanisms responsive to dehydration may impact the invasiveness of perennial weeds under global climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leafy spurge is an invasive perennial weed in the great plains of the US and Canada. The ability of this herbaceous weed to regenerate new shoot growth from an abundance of crown and root buds after severe abiotic stress is critical for survival. Due to its adaptable and aggressive nature, global cl...

  3. Molecular mechanics conformational analysis of tylosin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Petko M.

    1998-01-01

    The conformations of the 16-membered macrolide antibiotic tylosin were studied with molecular mechanics (AMBER∗ force field) including modelling of the effect of the solvent on the conformational preferences (GB/SA). A Monte Carlo conformational search procedure was used for finding the most probable low-energy conformations. The present study provides complementary data to recently reported analysis of the conformations of tylosin based on NMR techniques. A search for the low-energy conformations of protynolide, a 16-membered lactone containing the same aglycone as tylosin, was also carried out, and the results were compared with the observed conformation in the crystal as well as with the most probable conformations of the macrocyclic ring of tylosin. The dependence of the results on force field was also studied by utilizing the MM3 force field. Some particular conformations were computed with the semiempirical molecular orbital methods AM1 and PM3.

  4. Size of Non-lepidic Invasive Pattern Predicts Recurrence in Pulmonary Mucinous Adenocarcinoma: Morphologic Analysis of 188 Resected Cases with Reappraisal of Invasion Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soohyun Hwang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background We reviewed a series of 188 resected pulmonary mucinous adenocarcinomas (MAs to clarify the prognostic significance of lepidic and non-lepidic patterns. Methods Non-lepidic patterns were divided into bland, non-distorted acini with uncertain invasiveness (pattern 1, unequivocal invasion into stroma (pattern 2, or invasion into alveolar spaces (pattern 3. Results The mean proportion of invasive patterns (patterns 2 and 3 was lowest in small (≤ 3 cm tumors, and gradually increased in intermediate (> 3 cm and ≤ 7 cm and large (> 7 cm tumors (8.4%, 34.3%, and 50.1%, respectively. Adjusted T (aT stage, as determined by the size of invasive patterns, was positively correlated with adverse histologic and clinical features including older age, male sex, and ever smokers. aTis tumors, which were exclusively composed of lepidic pattern (n = 9, or a mixture of lepidic and pattern 1 (n = 40 without any invasive patterns, showed 100% disease- free survival (DFS. The aT1mi tumors, with minimal (≤ 5 mm invasive patterns (n = 63, showed a 95.2% 5-year DFS, with recurrences (n = 2 limited to tumors greater than 3 cm in total size (n = 23. Both T and aT stage were significantly associated with DFS; however, survival within the separate T-stage subgroups was stratified according to the aT stage, most notably in the intermediatestage subgroups. In multivariate analysis, the size of invasive patterns (p = .020, pleural invasion (p < .001, and vascular invasion (p = .048 were independent predictors of recurrence, whereas total size failed to achieve statistical significance (p = .121. Conclusions This study provides a rationale for histologic risk stratification in pulmonary MA based on the extent of invasive growth patterns with refined criteria for invasion.

  5. Lysiphlebus orientalis (Hymenoptera, Braconidae), a new invasive aphid parasitoid in Europe – evidence from molecular markers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petrović, A.; Mitrović, M.; Starý, Petr; Petrović-Obradović, O.; Žikić, V.; Tomanović, Ž.; Vorburger, C.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 103, č. 4 (2013), s. 451-457 ISSN 0007-4853 Grant - others:Swiss National Science Foundation(CH) IZ73Z0_1_28174; Ministry of Education and Science of the Republic of Serbia(RS) 43001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : new invasive species * Serbia * DNA barcoding Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.895, year: 2013

  6. Molecular analysis of precursor lesions in familial pancreatic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Crnogorac-Jurcevic

    Full Text Available With less than a 5% survival rate pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC is almost uniformly lethal. In order to make a significant impact on survival of patients with this malignancy, it is necessary to diagnose the disease early, when curative surgery is still possible. Detailed knowledge of the natural history of the disease and molecular events leading to its progression is therefore critical.We have analysed the precursor lesions, PanINs, from prophylactic pancreatectomy specimens of patients from four different kindreds with high risk of familial pancreatic cancer who were treated for histologically proven PanIN-2/3. Thus, the material was procured before pancreatic cancer has developed, rather than from PanINs in a tissue field that already contains cancer. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling using such unique specimens was performed. Bulk frozen sections displaying the most extensive but not microdissected PanIN-2/3 lesions were used in order to obtain the holistic view of both the precursor lesions and their microenvironment. A panel of 76 commonly dysregulated genes that underlie neoplastic progression from normal pancreas to PanINs and PDAC were identified. In addition to shared genes some differences between the PanINs of individual families as well as between the PanINs and PDACs were also seen. This was particularly pronounced in the stromal and immune responses.Our comprehensive analysis of precursor lesions without the invasive component provides the definitive molecular proof that PanIN lesions beget cancer from a molecular standpoint. We demonstrate the need for accumulation of transcriptomic changes during the progression of PanIN to PDAC, both in the epithelium and in the surrounding stroma. An identified 76-gene signature of PDAC progression presents a rich candidate pool for the development of early diagnostic and/or surveillance markers as well as potential novel preventive/therapeutic targets for both familial and sporadic

  7. Quantitative CT analysis of pulmonary pure ground-glass nodule predicts histological invasiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qiong, E-mail: liqiongsmmu2008@qq.com [Department of Radiology, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, NO. 415, Fengyang Road, Shanghai 200003 (China); Fan, Li, E-mail: fanli0930@163.com [Department of Radiology, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, NO. 415, Fengyang Road, Shanghai 200003 (China); Cao, En-Tao, E-mail: cet123cs@126.com [Department of Radiology, Suzhou Municipal Hospital (East District), No.16 West Baita Road, Suzhu, Jiangsu Province 215001 (China); Li, Qing-Chu, E-mail: Wudi327@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, NO. 415, Fengyang Road, Shanghai 200003 (China); Gu, Ya-Feng, E-mail: 2528473557@qq.com [Department of Radiology, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, NO. 415, Fengyang Road, Shanghai 200003 (China); Liu, Shi−Yuan, E-mail: liusy1186@163.com [Department of Radiology, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, NO. 415, Fengyang Road, Shanghai 200003 (China)

    2017-04-15

    Objective: To assess whether quantitative computed tomography (CT) can help predict histological invasiveness of pulmonary adenocarcinoma appearing as pure ground glass nodules (pGGNs). Methods: A total of 110 pulmonary pGGNs were retrospectively evaluated, and pathologically classified as pre-invasive lesions, minimally invasive adenocarcinoma (MIA) and invasive pulmonary adenocarcinoma (IPA). Maximum nodule diameters, largest cross-sectional areas, volumes, mean CT values, weights, and CT attenuation values at the 0th,2th,5th, 25th, 50th,75th, 95th, 98th and100th percentiles on histogram, as well as 2th to 98th, 5th to 95th, 25th to 75th,and 0th to 100thslopes, respectively, were compared among the three groups. Results: Of the 110 pGGNs, 50, 28, and 32 were pre-invasive lesions, MIA, and IPA, respectively. Maximum nodule diameters, largest cross-sectional areas, andmass weights were significantly larger in the IPA group than in pre-invasive lesions. The 95th, 98th, 100th percentiles, and 2th to 98th, 25th to 75th, and 0th to 100thslopes were significantly different between pre-invasive lesions and MIA or IPA. Logistic regression analysis showed that the maximum nodule diameter (OR = 1.21, 95%CI: 1.071–1.366, p < 0.01) and 100th percentile on histogram (OR = 1.02, 95%CI: 1.009–1.032, p < 0.001) independently predicted histological invasiveness. Conclusions: Quantitative analysis of CT imaging can predict histological invasiveness of pGGNs, especiallythe maximum nodule diameter and 100th percentile on CT number histogram; this can instruct the long-term follow-up and selective surgical management.

  8. Molecular Testing of Nodules with a Suspicious or Malignant Cytologic Diagnosis in the Setting of Non-Invasive Follicular Thyroid Neoplasm with Papillary-Like Nuclear Features (NIFTP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Kyle C; Eszlinger, Markus; Paschke, Ralf; Angell, Trevor E; Alexander, Erik K; Marqusee, Ellen; Nehs, Matthew A; Jo, Vickie Y; Lowe, Alarice; Vivero, Marina; Hollowell, Monica; Qian, Xiaohua; Wieczorek, Tad; French, Christopher A; Teot, Lisa A; Cibas, Edmund S; Lindeman, Neal I; Krane, Jeffrey F; Barletta, Justine A

    2018-03-01

    Non-invasive follicular thyroid neoplasm with papillary-like nuclear features (NIFTP) is an indolent thyroid tumor characterized by frequent RAS mutations and an absence of the BRAF V600E mutation commonly seen in classical papillary thyroid carcinoma (cPTC). The ability to differentiate potential NIFTP/follicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma (FVPTC) from cPTC at the time of fine-needle aspiration (FNA) can facilitate conservative management of NIFTP. The aim of the current study was to investigate how molecular testing may add to cytologic assessment in the pre-operative differentiation of potential NIFTP/FVPTC and cPTC. We had previously evaluated cytologists' ability to prospectively distinguish potential NIFTP/FVPTC from cPTC in a cohort of 56 consecutive FNAs diagnosed as malignant or suspicious for malignancy. We utilized this cohort to perform molecular analysis. Detected molecular abnormalities were stratified into two groups: (1) those supporting malignancy and (2) those supporting a diagnosis of potential NIFTP/FVPTC. The cytologists' characterization of cases and the detected molecular alterations were correlated with the final histologic diagnoses. Molecular testing was performed in 52 (93%) of the 56 cases. For the 37 cases cytologists favored to be cPTC, 31 (84%) had a molecular result that supported malignancy (28 BRAF V600E mutations, 2 NTRK1 fusions, 1 AGK-BRAF fusion). For the 8 cases that were favored to be NIFTP/FVPTC by cytologists, 7 (88%) had a molecular result that supported conservative management (1 NRAS mutation, 6 wild-type result). Seven cases were designated as cytomorphologically indeterminate for NIFTP/FVPTC or cPTC, of which 6 (86%) had a molecular result that would have aided in the pre-operative assessment of potential NIFTP/FVPTC or cPTC/malignancy. These included 3 BRAF V600E mutations in nodules that were cPTC on resection, an HRAS mutation, and a wild-type result in the 2 nodules that were NIFTP, and a TERT promoter

  9. Precision analysis of a multi-slice ultrasound sensor for non-invasive 3D kinematic analysis of knee joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masum, Md Abdullah; Lambert, Andrew J; Pickering, Mark R; Scarvell, J M; Smith, P N

    2012-01-01

    Currently the standard clinical practice for measuring the motion of bones in a knee joint with sufficient precision involves implanting tantalum beads into the bones to act as fiducial markers prior to imaging using X-ray equipment. This procedure is invasive in nature and exposure to ionizing radiation imposes a cancer risk and the patient's movements are confined to a narrow field of view. In this paper, an ultrasound based system for non-invasive kinematic evaluation of knee joints is proposed. The results of an initial analysis show that this system can provide the precision required for non-invasive motion analysis while the patient performs normal physical activities.

  10. Molecular evidence for Lessepsian invasion of soritids (larger symbiont bearing benthic foraminifera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gily Merkado

    Full Text Available The Mediterranean Sea is considered as one of the hotspots of marine bioinvasions, largely due to the influx of tropical species migrating through the Suez Canal, so-called Lessepsian migrants. Several cases of Lessepsian migration have been documented recently, however, little is known about the ecological characteristics of the migrating species and their aptitude to colonize the new areas. This study focused on Red Sea soritids, larger symbiont-bearing benthic foraminifera (LBF that are indicative of tropical and subtropical environments and were recently found in the Israeli coast of the Eastern Mediterranean. We combined molecular phylogenetic analyses of soritids and their algal symbionts as well as network analysis of Sorites orbiculus Forskål to compare populations from the Gulf of Elat (northern Red Sea and from a known hotspot in Shikmona (northern Israel that consists of a single population of S. orbiculus. Our phylogenetic analyses show that all specimens found in Shikmona are genetically identical to a population of S. orbiculus living on a similar shallow water pebbles habitat in the Gulf of Elat. Our analyses also show that the symbionts found in Shikmona and Elat soritids belong to the Symbiodinium clade F5, which is common in the Red Sea and also present in the Indian Ocean and Caribbean Sea. Our study therefore provides the first genetic and ecological evidences that indicate that modern population of soritids found on the Mediterranean coast of Israel is probably Lessepsian, and is less likely the descendant of a native ancient Mediterranean species.

  11. Identification of Two Distinct Molecular Subtypes of Non-Invasive Follicular Neoplasm with Papillary-Like Nuclear Features by Digital RNA Counting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannini, Riccardo; Ugolini, Clara; Poma, Anello Marcello; Urpì, Maria; Niccoli, Cristina; Elisei, Rossella; Chiarugi, Massimo; Vitti, Paolo; Miccoli, Paolo; Basolo, Fulvio

    2017-10-01

    The follicular variant (FV) of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) is one of the most common variants of PTC. Clinically, non-infiltrative FVPTC is considered a low-risk variant of PTC, and the non-invasive encapsulated forms of FVPTC represent a group of thyroid tumors with a particularly good prognosis. Consequently, these neoplasms have been very recently reclassified as non-invasive follicular neoplasms with papillary-like nuclear features (NIFTP). From a molecular standpoint, NIFTP appears to be similar to follicular neoplasms. However, only limited data are currently available regarding their gene expression profile. The aim of this study was to identify specific molecular signatures of 26 NIFTPs compared to those of 19 follicular adenomas (FAs) and 18 infiltrative FVPTCs (IFVPTCs). A nanoString custom assay was used to perform mRNA expression analysis. All cases were also genotyped for BRAF, N-, H-, and K-RAS mutations. Samples were grouped on the basis of gene expression profiles by Pearson's correlation and non-negative matrix factorization clustering analysis. Finally, the uncorrelated shrunken centroid machine-learning algorithm was used to classify the samples. The results revealed distinct expression profiles of FAs and IFVPTCs. NIFTP samples can exhibit different expression profiles, more similar to FAs (FA-like) or to IFVPTCs (IFVPTC-like), and these different expression profiles largely depend on the presence of different mutations (RAS or BRAF). In conclusion, although further validation of the model is required by using a larger group of prospective cases, these data reinforce the hypothesis that IFVPTC-like NIFTPs might represent precursors of IFVPTC.

  12. Quantitative CT analysis of pulmonary ground-glass opacity nodules for distinguishing invasive adenocarcinoma from non-invasive or minimally invasive adenocarcinoma: the added value of using iodine mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Ji Ye; Lee, Ho Yun; Kim, Jae-Hun; Lee, Kyung Soo; Han, Joungho; Jeong, Ji Yun; Kwon, O.J.; Shim, Young Mog

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether quantitative analysis of iodine-enhanced images generated from dual-energy CT (DECT) have added value in distinguishing invasive adenocarcinoma from non-invasive or minimally invasive adenocarcinoma (MIA) showing ground-glass nodule (GGN). Thirty-four patients with 39 GGNs were enrolled in this prospective study and underwent DECT followed by complete tumour resection. Various quantitative imaging parameters were assessed, including virtual non-contrast (VNC) imaging and iodine-enhanced imaging. Of all 39 GGNs, four were adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) (10 %), nine were MIA (23 %), and 26 were invasive adenocarcinoma (67 %). When assessing only VNC imaging, multivariate analysis revealed that mass, uniformity, and size-zone variability were independent predictors of invasive adenocarcinoma (odds ratio [OR] = 19.92, P = 0.02; OR = 0.70, P = 0.01; OR = 16.16, P = 0.04, respectively). After assessing iodine-enhanced imaging with VNC imaging, both mass on the VNC imaging and uniformity on the iodine-enhanced imaging were independent predictors of invasive adenocarcinoma (OR = 5.51, P = 0.04 and OR = 0.67, P < 0.01). The power of diagnosing invasive adenocarcinoma was improved after adding the iodine-enhanced imaging parameters versus VNC imaging alone, from 0.888 to 0.959, respectively (P = 0.029). Quantitative analysis using iodine-enhanced imaging metrics versus VNC imaging metrics alone generated from DECT have added value in distinguishing invasive adenocarcinoma from AIS or MIA. (orig.)

  13. Modulation of Molecular Biomarker Expression in Response to Chemotherapy in Invasive Ductal Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Mana Oloomi; Neda Moazzezy; Saeid Bouzari

    2018-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) has varied morphological and biological features and is classified based on molecular and morphological examinations. Molecular classification of BC is based on biological gene-expression profiling. In this study, biomarker modulation was assessed during BC treatment in 30 previously untreated patients. Heterogeneity among patients was pathologically diagnosed and classified into luminal and basal-like immunohistochemical profiles based on estrogen, progesterone, and human ...

  14. Perirenal fat invasion on renal cell carcinoma: evaluation with multidetector computed tomography-multivariate analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsili, Athina C; Goussia, Anna C; Baltogiannis, Dimitrios; Astrakas, Loukas; Sofikitis, Nikolaos; Malamou-Mitsi, Vasiliki; Argyropoulou, Maria I

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the accuracy of multidetector computed tomography (CT) in diagnosing perinephric (PN) and/or renal sinus (RS) fat invasion in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC), with reference to the CT findings predictive for the diagnosis of invasion. This was a retrospective study of 48 RCCs. Examinations were performed on a 16-row CT scanner, including unenhanced and 3-phase contrast-enhanced CT scanning. Unenhanced transverse images and multiplanar reformations of each contrast-enhanced CT phase were evaluated. The predictive value of CT findings in diagnosing PN and/or RS fat invasion was determined using multivariate logistic regression analysis. The CT findings that were most predictive for the diagnosis of PN fat invasion were the presence of contrast-enhancing nodules in the PN fat and tumoral margins. Invasion of the pelvicaliceal system was the most significant predictor in the diagnosis of RS fat invasion. Multidetector CT provides satisfactory results in detecting PN and/or RS fat invasion in RCC.

  15. [Silencing of tumor metastasis suppressor gene 1 promotes invasion of prostate cancer cell in vitro and its molecular mechanisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao-yan; You, Jiang-feng; Pei, Fei; Zhang, Bo

    2011-12-18

    To explore the effect of small interference RNA (siRNA) targeting homosapiens longevity assurance homologue 2(LASS2, or TMSG1) on the invasion of PC-3M-2B4 (a variant subline of human prostate carcinoma cell line PC-3M with low metastatic potential) and its molecular mechanisms. PC-3M-2B4 cells were transfected with siRNA by using lipofectamine 2000. The expression of LASS2 mRNA and protein was detected after transfection by real-time fluorogentic quantitative PCR (RFQ-PCR) and Western blot to screen the effective siRNA fragment. The V-ATPase activity of PC-3M-2B4 cells was detected by V-ATPase activity assay kit. The concentration of extracellular hydrogen ion was measured by pH-sensitive fluorescence probe bis-carboxyethyl-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF). The matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) protein in the supernatant and cells was analyzed by Western blot. The activity of MMP-2 was examined by Gelatin zymography. Furthermore, the migration and invasion of cells were evaluated by in vitro wound migration assay and invasion assay. RFQ-PCR and Western blot revealed dramatic reduction (84.5% and 60% ) in the levels of LASS2 mRNA and protein after transfection of siRNA-2 in PC-3M-2B4 cells. The V-ATPases activity and extracellular hydrogen ion concentration were significantly increased in PC-3M-2B4 cells transfected with the siRNA-2 compared with other control groups (P<0.05); There were no differences in the expression and secretion of MMP-2 protein between LASS2-siRNA treated cells and other control groups. However, the activity of MMP-2 was up-regulated in LASS2-siRNA treated cells compared with other control groups( P<0.05); and the capacity for migration and invasion in LASS2-siRNA treated cells was significantly higher than in other control groups (P<0.05). Silencing of LASS2 can promote invasion of prostate cancer cells in vitro through the increase of the V-ATPases activity, extracellular hydrogen ion concentration and in turn the activation of secreted MMP-2

  16. Molecular DNA Analysis in Forensic Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumache, Raluca; Ciocan, Veronica; Muresan, Camelia; Enache, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Serological and biochemical identification methods used in forensics have several major disadvantages, such as: long time in processing biological sample and lack of sensitivity and specificity. In the last 30 years, DNA molecular analysis has become an important tool in forensic investigations. DNA profiling is based on the short tandem repeats (STR) and aids in human identification from biological samples. Forensic genetics, can provide information on the events which occurred at the crime scene or to supplement other methods of forensic identification. Currently, the methods used in identification are based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses. This method analyses the autosomal STRs, the Y-chromosome, and the mitochondrial DNA. Correlation of biological samples present at the crime scene with identification, selection, and the probative value factor is therefore the first aspect to be taken into consideration in the forensic genetic analysis. In the last decade, because of the advances in the field of molecular biology, new biomarkers such as: microRNAs (miR), messenger RNA (mRNA), and DNA methylation have been studied and proposed to be used in the forensic identifications of body fluids.

  17. A multilocus molecular phylogeny of combtooth blennies (Percomorpha: Blennioidei: Blenniidae): Multiple invasions of intertidal habitats

    KAUST Repository

    Hundt, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    The combtooth blennies (f. Blenniidae) is a diverse family of primarily marine fishes with approximately 387 species that inhabit subtidal, intertidal, supralittoral habitats in tropical and warm temperate regions throughout the world. The Blenniidae has typically been divided into six groups based on morphological characters: Blenniini, Nemophini, Omobranchini, Phenablenniini, Parablenniini, and Salariini. There is, however, considerable debate over the validity of these groups and their relationships. Since little is known about the relationships in this group, other aspects of their evolutionary history, such as habitat evolution and remain unexplored. Herein, we use Bayesian and maximum likelihood analyses of four nuclear loci (ENC1, myh6, ptr, and tbr1) from 102 species, representing 41 genera, to resolve the phylogeny of the Blenniidae, determine the validity of the previously recognized groupings, and explore the evolution of habitat association using ancestral state reconstruction. Bayesian and maximum likelihood analyses of the resulting 3100. bp of DNA sequence produced nearly identical topologies, and identified many well-supported clades. Of these clades, Nemophini was the only traditionally recognized group strongly supported as monophyletic. This highly resolved and thoroughly sampled blenniid phylogeny provides strong evidence that the traditional rank-based classification does not adequately delimit monophyletic groups with the Blenniidae. This phylogeny redefines the taxonomy of the group and supports the use of 13 unranked clades for the classification of blenniids. Ancestral state reconstructions identified four independent invasions of intertidal habitats within the Blenniidae, and subsequent invasions into supralittoral and freshwater habitats from these groups. The independent invasions of intertidal habitats are likely to have played an important role in the evolutionary history of blennies. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

  18. Expression profiling of in vivo ductal carcinoma in situ progression models identified B cell lymphoma-9 as a molecular driver of breast cancer invasion

    OpenAIRE

    Elsarraj, Hanan S.; Hong, Yan; Valdez, Kelli E.; Michaels, Whitney; Hook, Marcus; Smith, William P.; Chien, Jeremy; Herschkowitz, Jason I.; Troester, Melissa A.; Beck, Moriah; Inciardi, Marc; Gatewood, Jason; May, Lisa; Cusick, Therese; McGinness, Marilee

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: There are an estimated 60,000 new cases of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) each year. A lack of understanding in DCIS pathobiology has led to overtreatment of more than half of patients. We profiled the temporal molecular changes during DCIS transition to invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) using in vivo DCIS progression models. These studies identified B cell lymphoma-9 (BCL9) as a potential molecular driver of early invasion. BCL9 is a newly found co-activator of Wnt-stimulated β-...

  19. New methods for the analysis of invasion processes: multi-criteria evaluation of the invasion of Hydrilla verticillata in Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monterroso, I; Binimelis, R; Rodríguez-Labajos, B

    2011-03-01

    The study described in this article incorporates stakeholders' views on aquatic invasion processes and combines expert analysis with information from field work into an evaluation exercise. Management scenarios are designed based on available technical data and stakeholders' perceptions. These scenarios are evaluated using the Social Multi-Criteria Evaluation framework employing the NAIADE model. Two evaluations are carried out, technical and social. Social acceptance of different management scenarios, distribution of costs and benefits, and attribution of responsibility are discussed. The case study was carried out on Lake Izabal, a body of water connected to the Caribbean Sea in Northeastern Guatemala. In 2000, local fishermen reported the presence of an alien species in the lake, the macrophyte Hydrilla verticillata. Two years later, this alien species was established around the entire lakeshore, damaging the ecosystem, endangering native species and the subsistence of local inhabitants through impacts on transportation, fishing practices, and tourism. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Gynecologic melanomas: A clinicopathologic and molecular analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udager, Aaron M; Frisch, Nora K; Hong, Linda J; Stasenko, Marina; Johnston, Carolyn M; Liu, J Rebecca; Chan, May P; Harms, Paul W; Fullen, Douglas R; Orsini, Amy; Thomas, Dafydd G; Lowe, Lori; Patel, Rajiv M

    2017-11-01

    Melanoma originating from gynecologic sites (MOGS), including the vulva, vagina, and cervix, is a rare and aggressive form of melanoma with poor long-term clinical outcome. The clinicopathologic features of vulvar and non-vulvar tumors remain relatively understudied, and in contrast to cutaneous melanomas at non-sun-exposed sites, MOGS typically do not harbor BRAF mutations. Thus, we sought to analyze the clinicopathologic and molecular features of MOGS. A large retrospective cohort of patients with MOGS (n=59) at a single large academic institution over a 28-year period was identified. Associations among clinicopathologic characteristics were assessed via standard statistical approaches, and clinical outcome was examined using Cox regression analysis. Sanger sequencing was utilized to identify mutations in hotspot regions of BRAF, KIT, NRAS, and CTNNB1. Tumors involving the vagina and/or cervix (non-vulvar) are significantly associated with high-risk clinicopathologic features, including increased tumor thickness, ulceration, positive resection margins, lymph node metastasis, and poor long-term clinical outcome (with increased risk of death due to disease). The aggressive clinical behavior of non-vulvar tumors is independent of advanced clinical stage and lymph node metastasis in multivariate analysis. Targeted molecular analysis confirms an overall low rate of oncogenic mutations in our MOGS cohort, although KIT mutations (particularly in exon 11) are relatively enriched. Overall, our results show that non-vulvar MOGS are aggressive tumors with poor long-term clinical outcome and indicate that few targeted therapeutic options are currently available to patients with MOGS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. INSIDIA: A FIJI Macro Delivering High-Throughput and High-Content Spheroid Invasion Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriconi, Chiara; Palmieri, Valentina; Di Santo, Riccardo; Tornillo, Giusy; Papi, Massimiliano; Pilkington, Geoff; De Spirito, Marco; Gumbleton, Mark

    2017-10-01

    Time-series image capture of in vitro 3D spheroidal cancer models embedded within an extracellular matrix affords examination of spheroid growth and cancer cell invasion. However, a customizable, comprehensive and open source solution for the quantitative analysis of such spheroid images is lacking. Here, the authors describe INSIDIA (INvasion SpheroID ImageJ Analysis), an open-source macro implemented as a customizable software algorithm running on the FIJI platform, that enables high-throughput high-content quantitative analysis of spheroid images (both bright-field gray and fluorescent images) with the output of a range of parameters defining the spheroid "tumor" core and its invasive characteristics. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Molecular characterization of invasive Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis. Multicenter study: Argentina 2011-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, Fernando; Blanco, Alejandra; Villalón, Pilar; Beratz, Noelia; Sáez Nieto, Juan Antonio; Lopardo, Horacio

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (SDSE) has virulence factors similar to those of Streptococcus pyogenes. Therefore, it causes pharyngitis and severe infections indistinguishable from those caused by the classic pathogen. The objectives of this study were: to know the prevalence of SDSE invasive infections in Argentina, to study the genetic diversity, to determine the presence of virulence genes, to study antibiotic susceptibility and to detect antibiotic resistance genes. Conventional methods of identification were used. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion and the agar dilution methods and the E-test. Twenty eight centers from 16 Argentinean cities participated in the study. Twenty three isolates (16 group G and 7 group C) were obtained between July 1 2011 and June 30 2012. Two adult patients died (8.7%). Most of the isolates were recovered from blood (60.9%). All isolates carried speJ and ssa genes. stG62647, stG653 and stG840 were the most frequent emm types. Nineteen different PFGE patterns were detected. All isolates were susceptible to penicillin and levofloxacin, 6 (26.1%) showed resistance or reduced susceptibility to erythromycin [1 mef(A), 3 erm(TR), 1 mef(A)+erm(TR) and 1 erm(TR)+erm(B)] and 7 (30.4%) were resistant or exhibited reduced susceptibility to tetracycline [2 tet(M), 5 tet(M)+tet(O)]. The prevalence in Argentina was of at least 23 invasive infections by SDSE. A wide genetic diversity was observed. All isolates carried speJ and ssa genes. Similarly to other studies, macrolide resistance (26.1%) was mainly associated to the MLS B phenotype. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Molecular activation analysis for chemical speciation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai-Chifang

    1998-01-01

    The term of Molecular Activation Analysis (MAA) refers to an activation analysis method that is able to provide information about the chemical species of elements in system of interests, though its definition has remained to be assigned. Its development is strongly stimulated by the urgent need to know the chemical species of elements, because the total concentrations are often without any meaning when assessing health or environmental risks of trace elements.In practice, the MAA is a combination of conventional instrumental or radiochemical activation analysis and physical, chemical or biochemical separation techniques. The MAA is able to play a particular role in speciation studies. However, the critical point in the MAA is that it is not permitted to change the primitive chemical species of elements in systems, or the change has to be under control; in the meantime it is not allowed to form the 'new artifact' originally not present in systems. Some practical examples of MAA for chemical species research performed recently in our laboratory will be presented as follows: Chemical species of platinum group elements in sediment; Chemical species of iodine in marine algae; Chemical species of mercury in human tissues; Chemical species of selenium in corn; Chemical species of rare earth elements in natural plant, etc. The merits and limitations of MAA will be described as well. (author)

  4. Analysis of the Trojan Y-Chromosome eradication strategy for an invasive species

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Xueying

    2013-05-24

    The Trojan Y-Chromosome (TYC) strategy, an autocidal genetic biocontrol method, has been proposed to eliminate invasive alien species. In this work, we analyze the dynamical system model of the TYC strategy, with the aim of studying the viability of the TYC eradication and control strategy of an invasive species. In particular, because the constant introduction of sex-reversed trojan females for all time is not possible in practice, there arises the question: What happens if this injection is stopped after some time? Can the invasive species recover? To answer that question, we perform a rigorous bifurcation analysis and study the basin of attraction of the recovery state and the extinction state in both the full model and a certain reduced model. In particular, we find a theoretical condition for the eradication strategy to work. Additionally, the consideration of an Allee effect and the possibility of a Turing instability are also studied in this work. Our results show that: (1) with the inclusion of an Allee effect, the number of the invasive females is not required to be very low when the introduction of the sex-reversed trojan females is stopped, and the remaining Trojan Y-Chromosome population is sufficient to induce extinction of the invasive females; (2) incorporating diffusive spatial spread does not produce a Turing instability, which would have suggested that the TYC eradication strategy might be only partially effective, leaving a patchy distribution of the invasive species. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  5. Non-invasive Morphological and Elemental Analysis of Ivory Plate for Artworks\

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tihlaříková, Eva; Neděla, Vilém; Hradilová, J.; Hradil, David

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 23, S1 (2017), s. 1832-1833 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA ČR(CZ) GA17-25687S Institutional support: RVO:68081731 ; RVO:61388980 Keywords : ESEM * EDS * non-invasive morphological analysis * non-invasive elemental analysis Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering; CA - Inorganic Chemistry (UACH-T) OBOR OECD: Microbiology; Inorganic and nuclear chemistry (UACH-T) Impact factor: 1.891, year: 2016

  6. Transcriptome analysis between invasive Pomacea canaliculata and indigenous Cipangopaludina cahayensis reveals genomic divergence and diagnostic microsatellite/SSR markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Xidong; Hou, Guangyuan; Song, Hongmei; Xu, Peng; Luo, Du; Gu, Dangen; Xu, Meng; Luo, Jianren; Zhang, Jiaen; Hu, Yinchan

    2015-02-11

    Pomacea canaliculata is an important invasive species worldwide. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms behind species displacement, adaptational abilities, and pesticide resistance, partly because of the lack of genomic information that is available for this species. Here, the transcriptome sequences for the invasive golden apple snail P. canaliculata and the native mudsnail Cipangopaludina cahayensis were obtained by next-generation-sequencing and used to compare genomic divergence and identify molecular markers. More than 46 million high quality sequencing reads were generated from P. canaliculata and C. cahayensis using Illumina paired-end sequencing technology. Our analysis indicated that 11,312 unigenes from P. canaliculata and C. cahayensis showed significant similarities to known proteins families, among which a total of 4,320 specific protein families were identified. KEGG pathway enrichment was analyzed for the unique unigenes with 17 pathways (p-value < 10(-5)) in P. canaliculata relating predominantly to lysosomes and vitamin digestion and absorption, and with 12 identified in C. cahayensis, including cancer and toxoplasmosis pathways, respectively. Our analysis also indicated that the comparatively high number of P450 genes in the P. canaliculata transcriptome may be associated with the pesticide resistance in this species. Additionally, 16,717 simple sequence repeats derived from expressed sequence tags (EST-SSRs) were identified from the 14,722 unigenes in P. canaliculata and 100 of them were examined by PCR, revealing a species-specific molecular marker that could distinguish between the morphologically similar P. canaliculata and C. cahayensis snails. Here, we present the genomic resources of P. canaliculata and C. cahayensis. Differentially expressed genes in the transcriptome of P. canaliculata compared with C. cahayensis corresponded to critical metabolic pathways, and genes specifically related to environmental stress response

  7. Modulation of Molecular Biomarker Expression in Response to Chemotherapy in Invasive Ductal Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oloomi, Mana; Moazzezy, Neda; Bouzari, Saeid

    2018-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) has varied morphological and biological features and is classified based on molecular and morphological examinations. Molecular classification of BC is based on biological gene-expression profiling. In this study, biomarker modulation was assessed during BC treatment in 30 previously untreated patients. Heterogeneity among patients was pathologically diagnosed and classified into luminal and basal-like immunohistochemical profiles based on estrogen, progesterone, and human epidermal growth factor receptor (ER/PR/HER2) status. Marker heterogeneity was compared with mRNA biomarker expression in patients with BC before and after therapy. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed for molecular characterization. Expression and modulation of biological markers, CK19, hMAM, CEA, MUC, Myc, Ki-67, HER2/neu, ErbB2, and ER, were assessed after treatment, where the expression of the biomarkers CK19, Ki-67, Myc, and CEA was noted to be significantly decreased. Marker expression modulation was determined according to different stages and pathological characteristics of patients; coexpression of three markers (CK19, Ki-67, and Myc) was specifically modulated after therapy. In the histopathologically classified basal-like group, two markers (CK19 and Ki-67) were downregulated and could be considered as diagnostic biomarkers. In conclusion, pathological characteristics and marker variation levels can be evaluated to decide a personalized treatment for patients.

  8. Modulation of Molecular Biomarker Expression in Response to Chemotherapy in Invasive Ductal Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mana Oloomi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer (BC has varied morphological and biological features and is classified based on molecular and morphological examinations. Molecular classification of BC is based on biological gene-expression profiling. In this study, biomarker modulation was assessed during BC treatment in 30 previously untreated patients. Heterogeneity among patients was pathologically diagnosed and classified into luminal and basal-like immunohistochemical profiles based on estrogen, progesterone, and human epidermal growth factor receptor (ER/PR/HER2 status. Marker heterogeneity was compared with mRNA biomarker expression in patients with BC before and after therapy. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed for molecular characterization. Expression and modulation of biological markers, CK19, hMAM, CEA, MUC, Myc, Ki-67, HER2/neu, ErbB2, and ER, were assessed after treatment, where the expression of the biomarkers CK19, Ki-67, Myc, and CEA was noted to be significantly decreased. Marker expression modulation was determined according to different stages and pathological characteristics of patients; coexpression of three markers (CK19, Ki-67, and Myc was specifically modulated after therapy. In the histopathologically classified basal-like group, two markers (CK19 and Ki-67 were downregulated and could be considered as diagnostic biomarkers. In conclusion, pathological characteristics and marker variation levels can be evaluated to decide a personalized treatment for patients.

  9. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of human blastocysts andcytotrophoblasts by multi-color FISH and Spectra Imaging analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weier, Jingly F.; Ferlatte, Christy; Baumgartner, Adolf; Jung,Christine J.; Nguyen, Ha-Nam; Chu, Lisa W.; Pedersen, Roger A.; Fisher,Susan J.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2006-02-08

    Numerical chromosome aberrations in gametes typically lead to failed fertilization, spontaneous abortion or a chromosomally abnormal fetus. By means of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), we now can screen human embryos in vitro for aneuploidy before transferring the embryos to the uterus. PGD allows us to select unaffected embryos for transfer and increases the implantation rate in in vitro fertilization programs. Molecular cytogenetic analyses using multi-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of blastomeres have become the major tool for preimplantation genetic screening of aneuploidy. However, current FISH technology can test for only a small number of chromosome abnormalities and hitherto failed to increase the pregnancy rates as expected. We are in the process of developing technologies to score all 24 chromosomes in single cells within a 3 day time limit, which we believe is vital to the clinical setting. Also, human placental cytotrophoblasts (CTBs) at the fetal-maternal interface acquire aneuploidies as they differentiate to an invasive phenotype. About 20-50% of invasive CTB cells from uncomplicated pregnancies were found aneuploidy, suggesting that the acquisition of aneuploidy is an important component of normal placentation, perhaps limiting the proliferative and invasive potential of CTBs. Since most invasive CTBs are interphase cells and possess extreme heterogeneity, we applied multi-color FISH and repeated hybridizations to investigate individual CTBs. In summary, this study demonstrates the strength of Spectral Imaging analysis and repeated hybridizations, which provides a basis for full karyotype analysis of single interphase cells.

  10. Multicenter evaluation of molecular and culture-dependent diagnostics for Shigella species and Entero-invasive Escherichia coli in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Beld, Maaike J C; Friedrich, Alexander W; van Zanten, Evert; Reubsaet, Frans A G; Kooistra-Smid, Mirjam A M D; Rossen, John W A

    2016-12-01

    An inter-laboratory collaborative trial for the evaluation of diagnostics for detection and identification of Shigella species and Entero-invasive Escherichia coli (EIEC) was performed. Sixteen Medical Microbiological Laboratories (MMLs) participated. MMLs were interviewed about their diagnostic methods and a sample panel, consisting of DNA-extracts and spiked stool samples with different concentrations of Shigella flexneri, was provided to each MML. The results of the trial showed an enormous variety in culture-dependent and molecular diagnostic techniques currently used among MMLs. Despite the various molecular procedures, 15 out of 16 MMLs were able to detect Shigella species or EIEC in all the samples provided, showing that the diversity of methods has no effect on the qualitative detection of Shigella flexneri. In contrast to semi quantitative analysis, the minimum and maximum values per sample differed by approximately five threshold cycles (Ct-value) between the MMLs included in the study. This indicates that defining a uniform Ct-value cut-off for notification to health authorities is not advisable. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Molecular epidemiology of Klebsiella pneumoniae invasive infections over a decade at Kilifi County Hospital in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, Sonal P; Boinett, Christine J; Ellington, Matthew J; Kagia, Ngure; Mwarumba, Salim; Nyongesa, Sammy; Mturi, Neema; Kariuki, Samuel; Scott, J Anthony G; Thomson, Nicholas R; Morpeth, Susan C

    2017-10-01

    Multidrug resistant (MDR) Klebsiella pneumoniae is a common cause of nosocomial infections worldwide. Recent years have seen an explosion of resistance to extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and emergence of carbapenem resistance. Here, we examine 198 invasive K. pneumoniae isolates collected from over a decade in Kilifi County Hospital (KCH) in Kenya. We observe a significant increase in MDR K. pneumoniae isolates, particularly to third generation cephalosporins conferred by ESBLs. Using whole-genome sequences, we describe the population structure and the distribution of antimicrobial resistance genes within it. More than half of the isolates examined in this study were ESBL-positive, encoding CTX-M-15, SHV-2, SHV-12 and SHV-27, and 79% were MDR conferring resistance to at least three antimicrobial classes. Although no isolates in our dataset were found to be resistant to carbapenems we did find a plasmid with the genetic architecture of a known New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase-1 (NDM)-carrying plasmid in 25 isolates. In the absence of carbapenem use in KCH and because of the instability of the NDM-1 gene in the plasmid, the NDM-1 gene has been lost in these isolates. Our data suggests that isolates that encode NDM-1 could be present in the population; should carbapenems be introduced as treatment in public hospitals in Kenya, resistance is likely to ensue rapidly. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  12. Polymer Molecular Weight Analysis by [Superscript 1]H NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izunobi, Josephat U.; Higginbotham, Clement L.

    2011-01-01

    The measurement and analysis of molecular weight and molecular weight distribution remain matters of fundamental importance for the characterization and physical properties of polymers. Gel permeation chromatography (GPC) is the most routinely used method for the molecular weight determination of polymers whereas matrix-assisted laser…

  13. Non-invasive genetic sampling for molecular sexing and microsatellite genotyping of hyacinth macaw (Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presti, Flavia T; Meyer, Janaína; Antas, Paulo T Z; Guedes, Neiva M R; Miyaki, Cristina Y

    2013-03-01

    Molted feather sampling is a useful tool for genetic analyses of endangered species, but it is often very laborious due to the low quality and quantity of the DNA obtained. In the present study we show the parts of feathers that resulted in better yield of DNA. In descending order these were: blood clot outside the umbilicus, umbilicus (without blood clot), tip, inner membrane, and small calamus. Compared to DNA extracted from blood samples, DNA extracted from feathers produced microsatellite alleles of poorer quality and had to be processed immediately after extraction. As expected due to the level of DNA degradation, molecular sexing protocols that result in shorter PCR products were more efficient.

  14. Classical and molecular cytogenetics of Khawia sinensis (Cestoda: Caryophyllidea), invasive parasite of carp, Cyprinus carpio

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Orosová, Martina; Oros, A. M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 5 (2012), s. 1397-1944 ISSN 0932-0113 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC522; GA ČR GA524/08/0885 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : TAPEWORMS PLATYHELMINTHES * RIBOSOMAL DNA * CHROMOSOMES * EVOLUTION * FISH * RDNA * PSEUDOPHYLLIDEA * LOCATION * GENES * DIFFERENTIATION Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.852, year: 2012 http://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007%2Fs00436-011-2720-x

  15. Using non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques to detect unique aspects of protein Amide functional groups and chemical properties of modeled forage from different sourced-origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Cuiying; Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2016-03-01

    The non-invasive molecular spectroscopic technique-FT/IR is capable to detect the molecular structure spectral features that are associated with biological, nutritional and biodegradation functions. However, to date, few researches have been conducted to use these non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques to study forage internal protein structures associated with biodegradation and biological functions. The objectives of this study were to detect unique aspects and association of protein Amide functional groups in terms of protein Amide I and II spectral profiles and chemical properties in the alfalfa forage (Medicago sativa L.) from different sourced-origins. In this study, alfalfa hay with two different origins was used as modeled forage for molecular structure and chemical property study. In each forage origin, five to seven sources were analyzed. The molecular spectral profiles were determined using FT/IR non-invasive molecular spectroscopy. The parameters of protein spectral profiles included functional groups of Amide I, Amide II and Amide I to II ratio. The results show that the modeled forage Amide I and Amide II were centered at 1653 cm- 1 and 1545 cm- 1, respectively. The Amide I spectral height and area intensities were from 0.02 to 0.03 and 2.67 to 3.36 AI, respectively. The Amide II spectral height and area intensities were from 0.01 to 0.02 and 0.71 to 0.93 AI, respectively. The Amide I to II spectral peak height and area ratios were from 1.86 to 1.88 and 3.68 to 3.79, respectively. Our results show that the non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques are capable to detect forage internal protein structure features which are associated with forage chemical properties.

  16. Molecular approach to describing a seed-based food web: the post-dispersal granivore community of an invasive plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Jonathan G; Saska, Pavel; Honěk, Alois

    2013-06-01

    Communities of post-dispersal granivores can shape the density and dispersion of exotic plants and invasive weeds, yet plant ecologists have a limited perception of the relative trophic linkages between a seed species and members of its granivore community. Dandelion seeds marked with Rabbit IgG were disseminated into replicated plots in the recipient habitat (South Dakota) and the native range (Czech Republic). Arthropods were collected in pitfall traps, and their guts were searched for the protein marker using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Seed dishes were placed in each plot, and dandelion seed removal rates were measured. The entire experiment was repeated five times over the dandelion flowering period. Gut analysis revealed that approximately 22% of specimens tested positive for the seed marker. A more diverse granivore community had trophic linkages to seeds than has been previously realized under field conditions. This community included taxa such as isopods, millipedes, weevils, rove beetles, and caterpillars, in addition to the traditionally recognized ants, crickets, and carabid beetles. Rarefaction and Chao analysis estimated approximately 16 and 27 species in the granivore communities of the Czech Republic and South Dakota, respectively. Generalist granivore communities are diverse and polyphagous, and are clearly important as a form of biotic resistance to invasive and weedy plants. These granivore communities can be managed to limit population growth of these pests.

  17. The small conductance calcium-activated potassium channel 3 (SK3) is a molecular target for Edelfosine to reduce the invasive potential of urothelial carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinestel, Konrad; Eder, Stefan; Ehinger, Konstantin; Schneider, Juliane; Genze, Felicitas; Winkler, Eva; Wardelmann, Eva; Schrader, Andres J; Steinestel, Julie

    2016-05-01

    Metastasis is the survival-determining factor in urothelial carcinoma (UC) of the urinary bladder. The small conductance calcium-activated potassium channel 3 (SK3) enhances tumor cell invasion in breast cancer and malignant melanoma. Since Edelfosine, a glycerophospholipid with antitumoral properties, effectively inhibits SK3 channel activity, our goal was to evaluate SK3 as a potential molecular target to inhibit the gain of an invasive phenotype in UC. SK3 protein expression was analyzed in 208 tissue samples and UC cell lines. Effects of Edelfosine on SK3 expression and intracellular calcium levels as well as on cell morphology, cell survival and proliferation were assessed using immunoblotting, potentiometric fluorescence microscopy, and clonogenic/cell survival assay; furthermore, we analyzed the effect of Edelfosine and SK3 RNAi knockdown on tumor cell migration and invasion in vitro and in vivo. We found that SK3 is strongly expressed in muscle-invasive UC and in the RT112 cellular tumor model. Higher concentrations of Edelfosine have a strong antitumoral effect on UC cells, while 1 μM effectively inhibits migration/invasion of UC cells in vitro and in vivo comparable to the SK3 knockdown phenotype. Taken together, our results show strong expression of SK3 in muscle-invasive UC, consistent with the postulated role of the protein in tumor cell invasion. Edelfosine is able to effectively inhibit migration and invasion of UC cells in vitro and in vivo in an SK3-dependent way, pointing towards a possible role for Edelfosine as an antiinvasive drug to effectively inhibit UC cell invasion and metastasis.

  18. Minimally invasive surgery for lumbar disc herniation: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamper, S.J.; Ostelo, R.W.J.G.; Rubinstein, S.M.; Nellensteijn, J.M.; Peul, W.C.; Arts, M.P.; van Tulder, M.W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Assessing the benefits of surgical treatments for sciatica is critical for clinical and policy decision-making. To compare minimally invasive (MI) and conventional microdiscectomy (MD) for patients with sciatica due to lumbar disc herniation. Methods: A systematic review and meta-analysis

  19. Dispersal of Invasive Forest Insects via Recreational Firewood: A Quantitative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank H. Koch; Denys Yemshanov; Roger D. Magarey; William D. Smith

    2012-01-01

    Recreational travel is a recognized vector for the spread of invasive species in North America. However, there has been little quantitative analysis of the risks posed by such travel and the associated transport of firewood. In this study, we analyzed the risk of forest insect spread with firewood and estimated related dispersal parameters for application in...

  20. I-AbACUS: a Reliable Software Tool for the Semi-Automatic Analysis of Invasion and Migration Transwell Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortesi, Marilisa; Llamosas, Estelle; Henry, Claire E; Kumaran, Raani-Yogeeta A; Ng, Benedict; Youkhana, Janet; Ford, Caroline E

    2018-02-28

    The quantification of invasion and migration is an important aspect of cancer research, used both in the study of the molecular processes involved in this collection of diseases and the evaluation of the efficacy of new potential treatments. The transwell assay, while being one of the most widely used techniques for the evaluation of these characteristics, shows a high dependence on the operator's ability to correctly identify the cells and a low protocol standardization. Here we present I-AbACUS, a software tool specifically designed to aid the analysis of transwell assays that automatically and specifically recognizes cells in images of stained membranes and provides the user with a suggested cell count. A complete description of this instrument, together with its validation against the standard analysis technique for this assay is presented. Furthermore, we show that I-AbACUS is versatile and able to elaborate images containing cells with different morphologies and that the obtained results are less dependent on the operator and their experience. We anticipate that this instrument, freely available (Gnu Public Licence GPL v2) at www.marilisacortesi.com as a standalone application, could significantly improve the quantification of invasion and migration of cancer cells.

  1. Hyperspectral Time Series Analysis of Native and Invasive Species in Hawaiian Rainforests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory P. Asner

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The unique ecosystems of the Hawaiian Islands are progressively being threatened following the introduction of exotic species. Operational implementation of remote sensing for the detection, mapping and monitoring of these biological invasions is currently hampered by a lack of knowledge on the spectral separability between native and invasive species. We used spaceborne imaging spectroscopy to analyze the seasonal dynamics of the canopy hyperspectral reflectance properties of four tree species: (i Metrosideros polymorpha, a keystone native Hawaiian species; (ii Acacia koa, a native Hawaiian nitrogen fixer; (iii the highly invasive Psidium cattleianum; and (iv Morella faya, a highly invasive nitrogen fixer. The species specific separability of the reflectance and derivative-reflectance signatures extracted from an Earth Observing-1 Hyperion time series, composed of 22 cloud-free images spanning a period of four years and was quantitatively evaluated using the Separability Index (SI. The analysis revealed that the Hawaiian native trees were universally unique from the invasive trees in their near-infrared-1 (700–1,250 nm reflectance (0.4 > SI > 1.4. Due to its higher leaf area index, invasive trees generally had a higher near-infrared reflectance. To a lesser extent, it could also be demonstrated that nitrogen-fixing trees were spectrally unique from non-fixing trees. The higher leaf nitrogen content of nitrogen-fixing trees was expressed through slightly increased separabilities in visible and shortwave-infrared reflectance wavebands (SI = 0.4. We also found phenology to be key to spectral separability analysis. As such, it was shown that the spectral separability in the near-infrared-1 reflectance between the native and invasive species groups was more expressed in summer (SI > 0.7 than in winter (SI < 0.7. The lowest separability was observed for March-July (SI < 0.3. This could be explained by the

  2. Non-invasive genetic sampling for molecular sexing and microsatellite genotyping of hyacinth macaw (Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia T. Presti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Molted feather sampling is a useful tool for genetic analyses of endangered species, but it is often very laborious due to the low quality and quantity of the DNA obtained. In the present study we show the parts of feathers that resulted in better yield of DNA. In descending order these were: blood clot outside the umbilicus, umbilicus (without blood clot, tip, inner membrane, and small calamus. Compared to DNA extracted from blood samples, DNA extracted from feathers produced microsatellite alleles of poorer quality and had to be processed immediately after extraction. As expected due to the level of DNA degradation, molecular sexing protocols that result in shorter PCR products were more efficient.

  3. Molecular phylogeny of Enchytraeidae (Oligochaeta) indicates separate invasions of the terrestrial environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bent; Glenner, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    segregations of the two genera Enchytraeus and Lumbricillus leaving the remaining genera included in this study as a later segregated major monophyletic branch. Extant members of the two former genera dominate in decaying seaweed in the littoral zone along the sea although members of in particular the genus...... Enchytraeus have also invaded other habitats. Historically the littoral zone of the sea is undoubtedly the first terrestrial or semi-terrestrial habitat where dead plant material accumulates to any greater extent and Enchytraeus and Lumbricillus may represent early successful attempts to exploit this resource...... terrestrial branch and this may represent an adaptation to the unpredictable littoral zone compared to the more stable nature of inland habitats. In the older literature the genus Mesenchytraeus is considered to have a basic position within the entire family but our molecular data do not support...

  4. Molecular dynamics of wetting layer formation and forced water invasion in angular nanopores with mixed wettability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedghi, Mohammad, E-mail: msedghi@uwyo.edu; Piri, Mohammad; Goual, Lamia [Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Wyoming, 1000 East University Avenue, Laramie, Wyoming 82071 (United States)

    2014-11-21

    The depletion of conventional hydrocarbon reservoirs has prompted the oil and gas industry to search for unconventional resources such as shale gas/oil reservoirs. In shale rocks, considerable amounts of hydrocarbon reside in nanoscale pore spaces. As a result, understanding the multiphase flow of wetting and non-wetting phases in nanopores is important to improve oil and gas recovery from these formations. This study was designed to investigate the threshold capillary pressure of oil and water displacements in a capillary dominated regime inside nanoscale pores using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations. The pores have the same cross-sectional area and volume but different cross-sectional shapes. Oil and water particles were represented with a coarse grained model and the NEMD simulations were conducted by assigning external pressure on an impermeable piston. Threshold capillary pressures were determined for the drainage process (water replaced by oil) in different pores. The molecular dynamics results are in close agreements with calculations using the Mayer-Stowe-Princen (MS-P) method which has been developed on the premise of energy balance in thermodynamic equilibrium. After the drainage simulations, a change in wall particles’ wettability from water-wet to oil-wet was implemented based on the final configuration of oil and water inside the pore. Waterflooding simulations were then carried out at the threshold capillary pressure. The results show that the oil layer formed between water in the corner and in the center of the pore is not stable and collapses as the simulation continues. This is in line with the predictions from the MS-P method.

  5. Assessing invasion process through pathway and vector analysis: case of saltcedar (Tamarix spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelina Natale

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Biological invasions are one of the most pervasive environmental threats to native ecosystems worldwide. The spontaneous spread ofsaltcedar is a particular threat to biodiversity conservation in arid and semiarid environments. In Argentina, three species belonging to this genus have been recognized as invaders. The aim of the present study was to identify main dispersal vectors and pathways to refine risk analysis and increase our ability to predict new areas at risk of Tamarix establishment. We surveyed and categorized 223 populations, 39% as invasive, 26% as established, 21% as contained and 14% as detected in nature. Dispersion of saltcedar was found to be associated with watercourses and human-driven disturbances; in addition roads were found to be relevant for the introduction of propagules in newenvironments. Considering the potential impact of saltcedar invasion and that it is an easily wind-dispersed invasive, it is necessary toimplement strategies to monitor dispersal pathways and take actions to eliminate invasion foci, particularly in vulnerable and highconservation value areas.

  6. An ounce of prevention or a pound of cure: bioeconomic risk analysis of invasive species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Brian; Lodge, David M; Finnoff, David; Shogren, Jason F; Lewis, Mark A; Lamberti, Gary

    2002-12-07

    Numbers of non-indigenous species--species introduced from elsewhere - are increasing rapidly worldwide, causing both environmental and economic damage. Rigorous quantitative risk-analysis frameworks, however, for invasive species are lacking. We need to evaluate the risks posed by invasive species and quantify the relative merits of different management strategies (e.g. allocation of resources between prevention and control). We present a quantitative bioeconomic modelling framework to analyse risks from non-indigenous species to economic activity and the environment. The model identifies the optimal allocation of resources to prevention versus control, acceptable invasion risks and consequences of invasion to optimal investments (e.g. labour and capital). We apply the model to zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha), and show that society could benefit by spending up to US$324 000 year(-1) to prevent invasions into a single lake with a power plant. By contrast, the US Fish and Wildlife Service spent US$825 000 in 2001 to manage all aquatic invaders in all US lakes. Thus, greater investment in prevention is warranted.

  7. Quantitative genome-wide methylation analysis of high-grade non-muscle invasive bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, Mark O; Bryan, Richard T; Emes, Richard D; Glossop, John R; Luscombe, Christopher; Cheng, K K; Zeegers, Maurice P; James, Nicholas D; Devall, Adam J; Mein, Charles A; Gommersall, Lyndon; Fryer, Anthony A; Farrell, William E

    2016-03-03

    High-grade non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (HG-NMIBC) is a clinically unpredictable disease with greater risks of recurrence and progression relative to their low-intermediate-grade counterparts. The molecular events, including those affecting the epigenome, that characterize this disease entity in the context of tumor development, recurrence, and progression, are incompletely understood. We therefore interrogated genome-wide DNA methylation using HumanMethylation450 BeadChip arrays in 21 primary HG-NMIBC tumors relative to normal bladder controls. Using strict inclusion-exclusion criteria we identified 1,057 hypermethylated CpGs within gene promoter-associated CpG islands, representing 256 genes. We validated the array data by bisulphite pyrosequencing and examined 25 array-identified candidate genes in an independent cohort of 30 HG-NMIBC and 18 low-intermediate-grade NMIBC. These analyses revealed significantly higher methylation frequencies in high-grade tumors relative to low-intermediate-grade tumors for the ATP5G2, IRX1 and VAX2 genes (P<0.05), and similarly significant increases in mean levels of methylation in high-grade tumors for the ATP5G2, VAX2, INSRR, PRDM14, VSX1, TFAP2b, PRRX1, and HIST1H4F genes (P<0.05). Although inappropriate promoter methylation was not invariantly associated with reduced transcript expression, a significant association was apparent for the ARHGEF4, PON3, STAT5a, and VAX2 gene transcripts (P<0.05). Herein, we present the first genome-wide DNA methylation analysis in a unique HG-NMIBC cohort, showing extensive and discrete methylation changes relative to normal bladder and low-intermediate-grade tumors. The genes we identified hold significant potential as targets for novel therapeutic intervention either alone, or in combination, with more conventional therapeutic options in the treatment of this clinically unpredictable disease.

  8. Biodiversity of Soil Microbial Communities Following Woody Plant Invasion of Grassland: An Assessment Using Molecular Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantola, I. B.; Gentry, T. J.; Filley, T. R.; Boutton, T. W.

    2012-12-01

    Woody plants have encroached into grasslands, savannas, and other grass-dominated ecosystems throughout the world during the last century. This dramatic vegetation change is likely driven by livestock grazing, altered fire frequencies, elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations, and/or changes in atmospheric deposition patterns. Woody invasion often results in significant changes in ecosystem function, including alterations in above- and belowground primary productivity, soil C, N, and P storage and turnover, and the size and activity of the soil microbial biomass pool. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships and interactions between plant communities and soil microbial communities in the Rio Grande Plains region of southern Texas where grasslands have been largely replaced by woodlands. Research was conducted along a successional chronosequence representing the stages of woody plant encroachment from open grassland to closed-canopy woodland. To characterize soil microbial community composition, soil samples (0-7.5 cm) were collected in remnant grasslands (representing time 0) and near the centers of woody plant clusters, groves, and drainage woodlands ranging in age from 10 to 130 yrs. Ages of woody plant stands were determined by dendrochronology. Community DNA was extracted from each soil sample with a MoBio PowerMax Soil DNA isolation kit. The DNA concentrations were quantified on a NanoDrop ND-1000 spectrophotometer and diluted to a standard concentration. Pyrosequencing was performed by the Research and Testing Laboratory (Lubbock, TX) according to Roche 454 Titanium chemistry protocols. Samples were amplified with primers 27F and 519R for bacteria, and primers ITS1F and ITS4 for fungi. Sequences were aligned using BioEdit and the RDP Pipeline and analyzed in MOTHUR. Non-metric multidimensional scaling of the operational taxonomic units identified by pyrosequencing revealed that both bacterial and fungal community composition were

  9. Comparative genomic hybridization analysis of benign and invasive male breast neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ojopi, Elida Paula Benquique; Cavalli, Luciane Regina; Cavalieri, Luciane Mara Bogline

    2002-01-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis was performed for the identification of chromosomal imbalances in two benign gynecomastias and one malignant breast carcinoma derived from patients with male breast disease and compared with cytogenetic analysis in two of the three cases. CGH...... and CGH analysis. CGH analysis of the invasive ductal carcinoma confirmed a gain of 17p11.2 through qter previously detected by cytogenetic analysis. These regions showed some similarity in their pattern of imbalance to the chromosomal alterations described in female and male breast cancer....

  10. Molecular Composition Analysis of Distant Targets

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a system capable of probing the molecular composition of cold solar system targets such as asteroids, comets, planets and moons from a distant vantage....

  11. Algorithmic dimensionality reduction for molecular structure analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, W. Michael; Martin, Shawn; Pollock, Sara N.; Coutsias, Evangelos A.; Watson, Jean-Paul

    2008-01-01

    Dimensionality reduction approaches have been used to exploit the redundancy in a Cartesian coordinate representation of molecular motion by producing low-dimensional representations of molecular motion. This has been used to help visualize complex energy landscapes, to extend the time scales of simulation, and to improve the efficiency of optimization. Until recently, linear approaches for dimensionality reduction have been employed. Here, we investigate the efficacy of several automated alg...

  12. Transcriptomic analysis of the salivary glands of an invasive whitefly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yun-Lin; Li, Jun-Min; Li, Meng; Luan, Jun-Bo; Ye, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Xiao-Wei; Liu, Shu-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    Some species of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci complex cause tremendous losses to crops worldwide through feeding directly and virus transmission indirectly. The primary salivary glands of whiteflies are critical for their feeding and virus transmission. However, partly due to their tiny size, research on whitefly salivary glands is limited and our knowledge on these glands is scarce. We sequenced the transcriptome of the primary salivary glands of the Mediterranean species of B. tabaci complex using an effective cDNA amplification method in combination with short read sequencing (Illumina). In a single run, we obtained 13,615 unigenes. The quantity of the unigenes obtained from the salivary glands of the whitefly is at least four folds of the salivary gland genes from other plant-sucking insects. To reveal the functions of the primary glands, sequence similarity search and comparisons with the whole transcriptome of the whitefly were performed. The results demonstrated that the genes related to metabolism and transport were significantly enriched in the primary salivary glands. Furthermore, we found that a number of highly expressed genes in the salivary glands might be involved in secretory protein processing, secretion and virus transmission. To identify potential proteins of whitefly saliva, the translated unigenes were put into secretory protein prediction. Finally, 295 genes were predicted to encode secretory proteins and some of them might play important roles in whitefly feeding. The combined method of cDNA amplification, Illumina sequencing and de novo assembly is suitable for transcriptomic analysis of tiny organs in insects. Through analysis of the transcriptome, genomic features of the primary salivary glands were dissected and biologically important proteins, especially secreted proteins, were predicted. Our findings provide substantial sequence information for the primary salivary glands of whiteflies and will be the basis for future studies on whitefly

  13. Prognostic efficacy of nuclear morphometry at invasive front of oral squamous cell carcinoma: an image analysis microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedam, V K Vaishnavi; Boaz, Karen; Natarajan, Srikant

    2014-01-01

    Oral cancer is revisited on a pathologist perspective with advanced imaging technique. The present study assessed the new malignancy grading system at tumor proper (TP) and Bryne's grading system at invasive tumor front (ITF), morphometric features using software, to clarify their associations with prognosis of oral cancers. Histologically confirmed oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) with 5-year follow-up was assessed morphometrically using image analysis at TP and ITF, correlated with the prognosis of patient. On comparison of grading systems, a moderate agreement between both (Bryne and Anneroth) was seen. Among all histological parameters, we noted inverse correlation between degree of mitosis at invasive front and decrease in lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate at ITF with increase rate of recurrence and event of death. An increase in nuclear area, diameter, and perimeter along with decrease circularity in advancing OSCC was seen. Correlation of parameters showed higher values for maximum nuclear diameter, perimeter, and circularity at TP and ITF with recurrence. This study, while limited in sample size, concluded that a combined assessment of clinical TNM staging, histopathological grading system {excluding the parameter "mitotic activity" (due to its inverse relation)}, and nuclear morphometry at the ITF are better prognosticators. This combination proved to be an accurate predictive factor in eliciting the varied molecular characteristics of tumor heterogeneity.

  14. Prognostic Efficacy of Nuclear Morphometry at Invasive Front of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma: An Image Analysis Microscopic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. K. Vaishnavi Vedam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Oral cancer is revisited on a pathologist perspective with advanced imaging technique. Objective. The present study assessed the new malignancy grading system at tumor proper (TP and Bryne’s grading system at invasive tumor front (ITF, morphometric features using software, to clarify their associations with prognosis of oral cancers. Methods. Histologically confirmed oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC with 5-year follow-up was assessed morphometrically using image analysis at TP and ITF, correlated with the prognosis of patient. Results. On comparison of grading systems, a moderate agreement between both (Bryne and Anneroth was seen. Among all histological parameters, we noted inverse correlation between degree of mitosis at invasive front and decrease in lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate at ITF with increase rate of recurrence and event of death. An increase in nuclear area, diameter, and perimeter along with decrease circularity in advancing OSCC was seen. Correlation of parameters showed higher values for maximum nuclear diameter, perimeter, and circularity at TP and ITF with recurrence. Conclusion. This study, while limited in sample size, concluded that a combined assessment of clinical TNM staging, histopathological grading system {excluding the parameter “mitotic activity” (due to its inverse relation}, and nuclear morphometry at the ITF are better prognosticators. This combination proved to be an accurate predictive factor in eliciting the varied molecular characteristics of tumor heterogeneity.

  15. Morphometric and molecular identification of individual barnacle cyprids from wild plankton: an approach to detecting fouling and invasive barnacle species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsi-Nien; Høeg, Jens T; Chan, Benny K K

    2013-01-01

    The present study used DNA barcodes to identify individual cyprids to species. This enables accurate quantification of larvae of potential fouling species in the plankton. In addition, it explains the settlement patterns of barnacles and serves as an early warning system of unwanted immigrant species. Sequences from a total of 540 individual cypris larvae from Taiwanese waters formed 36 monophyletic clades (species) in a phylogenetic tree. Of these clades, 26 were identified to species, but 10 unknown monophyletic clades represented non-native species. Cyprids of the invasive barnacle, Megabalanus cocopoma, were identified. Multivariate analysis of antennular morphometric characters revealed three significant clusters in a nMDS plot, viz. a bell-shaped attachment organ (most species), a shoe-shaped attachment organ (some species), and a spear-shaped attachment organ (coral barnacles only). These differences in attachment organ structure indicate that antennular structures interact directly with the diverse substrata involved in cirripede settlement.

  16. Molecular analysis of pancreatic cyst fluid changes clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arner, David M; Corning, Brooke E; Ahmed, Ali M; Ho, Henry C; Weinbaum, Bradley J; Siddiqui, Uzma; Aslanian, Harry; Adams, Reid B; Bauer, Todd W; Wang, Andrew Y; Shami, Vanessa M; Sauer, Bryan G

    2018-01-01

    DNA molecular analysis has been suggested as a tool to evaluate pancreatic cysts. This study assesses whether the addition of DNA molecular analysis alters clinical management. This is a retrospective review of 46 consecutive patients who underwent EUS-FNA of pancreatic cysts with DNA molecular analysis at two major academic institutions. Cases were presented to two pancreaticobiliary surgeons first without and then with DNA molecular analysis data. The primary outcome was the frequency with which clinical management was altered with the addition of DNA molecular analysis. Forty-six patients with a mean age of 62.0 (±13.4) years and mean cyst size of 3.2 (±2.3) cm were included in the study. Cyst carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was available in 30 patients and ranged from 0.4 to 15,927 ng/mL. DNA molecular analysis was described as benign in 23 (50%), statistically indolent in 13 (28%), statistically higher risk in 9 (20%), and indeterminate in 1 (2%). Surgeon #1 changed the management in 13/46 cases (28%) and surgeon #2 changed the management in 12/46 cases (26%) with the addition of DNA molecular analysis. When organized by CEA concentration, those with an intermediate CEA (45-800 ng/mL) or without a CEA concentration had a management changed more frequently (40%) compared to all others (P molecular analysis alters the clinical management of pancreatic cystic lesions most often when CEA levels are intermediate (45-800 ng/mL) or when no CEA concentration is available. Use of DNA molecular analysis can be considered in this cohort. Further study of molecular markers in pancreatic cystic lesions is recommended.

  17. Analysis of a native whitefly transcriptome and its sequence divergence with two invasive whitefly species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xiao-Wei

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic divergence between invasive and native species may provide insight into the molecular basis underlying specific characteristics that drive the invasion and displacement of closely related species. In this study, we sequenced the transcriptome of an indigenous species, Asia II 3, of the Bemisia tabaci complex and compared its genetic divergence with the transcriptomes of two invasive whiteflies species, Middle East Asia Minor 1 (MEAM1 and Mediterranean (MED, respectively. Results More than 16 million reads of 74 base pairs in length were obtained for the Asia II 3 species using the Illumina sequencing platform. These reads were assembled into 52,535 distinct sequences (mean size: 466 bp and 16,596 sequences were annotated with an E-value above 10-5. Protein family comparisons revealed obvious diversification among the transcriptomes of these species suggesting species-specific adaptations during whitefly evolution. On the contrary, substantial conservation of the whitefly transcriptomes was also evident, despite their differences. The overall divergence of coding sequences between the orthologous gene pairs of Asia II 3 and MEAM1 is 1.73%, which is comparable to the average divergence of Asia II 3 and MED transcriptomes (1.84% and much higher than that of MEAM1 and MED (0.83%. This is consistent with the previous phylogenetic analyses and crossing experiments suggesting these are distinct species. We also identified hundreds of highly diverged genes and compiled sequence identify data into gene functional groups and found the most divergent gene classes are Cytochrome P450, Glutathione metabolism and Oxidative phosphorylation. These results strongly suggest that the divergence of genes related to metabolism might be the driving force of the MEAM1 and Asia II 3 differentiation. We also analyzed single nucleotide polymorphisms within the orthologous gene pairs of indigenous and invasive whiteflies which are helpful for

  18. Analysis of a native whitefly transcriptome and its sequence divergence with two invasive whitefly species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Wei; Zhao, Qiong-Yi; Luan, Jun-Bo; Wang, Yu-Jun; Yan, Gen-Hong; Liu, Shu-Sheng

    2012-10-04

    Genomic divergence between invasive and native species may provide insight into the molecular basis underlying specific characteristics that drive the invasion and displacement of closely related species. In this study, we sequenced the transcriptome of an indigenous species, Asia II 3, of the Bemisia tabaci complex and compared its genetic divergence with the transcriptomes of two invasive whiteflies species, Middle East Asia Minor 1 (MEAM1) and Mediterranean (MED), respectively. More than 16 million reads of 74 base pairs in length were obtained for the Asia II 3 species using the Illumina sequencing platform. These reads were assembled into 52,535 distinct sequences (mean size: 466 bp) and 16,596 sequences were annotated with an E-value above 10-5. Protein family comparisons revealed obvious diversification among the transcriptomes of these species suggesting species-specific adaptations during whitefly evolution. On the contrary, substantial conservation of the whitefly transcriptomes was also evident, despite their differences. The overall divergence of coding sequences between the orthologous gene pairs of Asia II 3 and MEAM1 is 1.73%, which is comparable to the average divergence of Asia II 3 and MED transcriptomes (1.84%) and much higher than that of MEAM1 and MED (0.83%). This is consistent with the previous phylogenetic analyses and crossing experiments suggesting these are distinct species. We also identified hundreds of highly diverged genes and compiled sequence identify data into gene functional groups and found the most divergent gene classes are Cytochrome P450, Glutathione metabolism and Oxidative phosphorylation. These results strongly suggest that the divergence of genes related to metabolism might be the driving force of the MEAM1 and Asia II 3 differentiation. We also analyzed single nucleotide polymorphisms within the orthologous gene pairs of indigenous and invasive whiteflies which are helpful for the investigation of association between

  19. Molecular evidence for the predation of Critically Endangered endemic Aphanius transgrediens from the stomach contents of world wide invasive Gambusia affinis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Emre

    2016-01-01

    Predation and competition among native and invasive species are difficult to study in aquatic environments. Identification of preys from semi-digested body parts sampled from stomach contents of the predator is very challenging. Recent studies were mainly based on use of DNA extracted from stomach content to identify the prey species. This study presents the molecular evidence that reveals the predation of critically endangered Aphanius transgrediens by world-wide invasive Gambusia affinis for a better understanding of the link between the invasion and the extinction of native species in freshwater ecosystems. DNA samples were extracted from semi-digested stomach contents of the invader and short fragments of mitochondrial NADH1 gene were amplified using species-specific primers designed in this study to make identification at species level. Existence of both the prey and the predator species were also confirmed using environmental DNA extracted from water samples.

  20. Statistical analysis of molecular signal recording.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua I Glaser

    Full Text Available A molecular device that records time-varying signals would enable new approaches in neuroscience. We have recently proposed such a device, termed a "molecular ticker tape", in which an engineered DNA polymerase (DNAP writes time-varying signals into DNA in the form of nucleotide misincorporation patterns. Here, we define a theoretical framework quantifying the expected capabilities of molecular ticker tapes as a function of experimental parameters. We present a decoding algorithm for estimating time-dependent input signals, and DNAP kinetic parameters, directly from misincorporation rates as determined by sequencing. We explore the requirements for accurate signal decoding, particularly the constraints on (1 the polymerase biochemical parameters, and (2 the amplitude, temporal resolution, and duration of the time-varying input signals. Our results suggest that molecular recording devices with kinetic properties similar to natural polymerases could be used to perform experiments in which neural activity is compared across several experimental conditions, and that devices engineered by combining favorable biochemical properties from multiple known polymerases could potentially measure faster phenomena such as slow synchronization of neuronal oscillations. Sophisticated engineering of DNAPs is likely required to achieve molecular recording of neuronal activity with single-spike temporal resolution over experimentally relevant timescales.

  1. Non invasive methods for genetic analysis applied to ecological and behavioral studies in Latino-America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana González

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Documenting the presence and abundance of the neotropical mammals is the first step for understanding their population ecology, behavior and genetic dynamics in designing conservation plans. The combination of field research with molecular genetics techniques are new tools that provide valuable biological information avoiding the disturbance in the ecosystems, trying to minimize the human impact in the process to gather biological information. The objective of this paper is to review the available non invasive sampling techniques that have been used in Neotropical mammal studies to apply to determine the presence and abundance, population structure, sex ratio, taxonomic diagnostic using mitochondrial markers, and assessing genetic variability using nuclear markers. There are a wide range of non invasive sampling techniques used to determine the species identification that inhabit an area such as searching for tracks, feces, and carcasses. Other useful equipment is the camera traps that can generate an image bank that can be valuable to assess species presence and abundance by morphology. With recent advances in molecular biology, it is now possible to use the trace amounts of DNA in feces and amplify it to analyze the species diversity in an area, and the genetic variability at intraspecific level. This is particularly helpful in cases of sympatric and cryptic species in which morphology failed to diagnose the taxonomic status of several species of brocket deer of the genus Mazama.

  2. Floristic analysis of perennial species on flowerbeds in Belgrade with special attention on invasiveness of the recorded species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović Marija

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Urban areas are among the most important centres of invasive plant species distribution due to their richness in alien species. Because of that, a detailed floristic analysis of perennial flowerbeds was conducted in the central parks of Belgrade. A total of 53 perennial species were found, of which 55% were the alien species planted on 75% of the research area. Among them, two species (Aster novi belgii and Solidago canadensis are invasive and six species are potentially invasive in Serbia. These are planted on 5% and 20% of the flowerbeds, respectively. We can conclude that both the experts and institutions should be informed about the invasive species and potential damages. In the meantime, planting of native decorative species should be encouraged, since they will not pose a threat to natural habitats. Also, detailed research should be conducted in order to eradicate invasive and potentially invasive species from the surfaces around the research area.

  3. Molecular diversity of rhizobia nodulating the invasive legume Cytisus scoparius in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafay, B; Burdon, J J

    2006-06-01

    To contribute to the understanding of Cytisus scoparius success at invading and establishing itself in Australia. Root-nodule bacteria isolated from C. scoparius, growing on five different sites and originally introduced to Australia, were compared with isolates from indigenous plants growing in France and isolates from native legumes growing on the same Australian sites as C. scoparius. Small-subunit rDNA from 251 isolates were analysed by PCR-RFLP and representatives from different genospecies were selected for sequencing. Phylogenetic analyses revealed a great diversity of lineages belonging to Bradyrhizobium, with one genospecies being specific for Cytisus both in Australia and in France, Rhizobium and Mesorhizobium and one falling outside the described genera of legume-nodulating bacteria. Principal component analysis showed that the Cytisus Australian rhizobial communities are more similar to each other than to their co-occurring native partners. Early established rhizobial symbionts may have an increased probability to contribute inoculum for the development of further nodules. This is a first report comparing rhizobia nodulating C. scoparius in its native and exotic environments. Cytisus scoparius symbionts were identified outside the Bradyrhizobium genus and a new lineage of legume-nodulating bacteria was identified.

  4. Raman spectroscopy and multivariate analysis for the non invasive diagnosis of clinically inconclusive vulval lichen sclerosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Jonathan; Ludeman, Linmarie; Hillaby, Kathryn; Gornall, Robert; Lloyd, Gavin; Kendall, Catherine; Shore, Angela C; Stone, Nick

    2017-04-10

    Vulval lichen sclerosus (LS) is a common inflammatory condition associated with an increased risk of developing vulval carcinoma. Diagnosis is usually clinical although biopsy is necessary if the diagnosis is uncertain or if there is a failure to respond to adequate initial treatment. Raman spectroscopy has the potential to be applied in vivo for near real time objective non-invasive optical diagnosis, avoiding the need for invasive tissue biopsies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of Raman spectroscopy for differentiating LS from other vulval conditions in fresh vulval biopsies. Biopsies were analysed from 27 women with suspected LS in whom the attending gynaecologist could not establish the diagnosis on clinical presentation alone. Spectral variance was explored using principal component analysis and in conjunction with the histological diagnoses was used to develop and test a multivariate linear discriminant classification model. This model was validated with leave one sample out cross validation and the diagnostic performance of the technique assessed in comparison with the pathology gold standard. After cross validation the technique was able to correctly differentiate LS from other inflammatory vulval conditions with a sensitivity of 91% and specificity of 80%. This study demonstrates Raman spectroscopy has potential as a technique for in vivo non-invasive diagnosis of vulval skin conditions. Applied in the clinical setting this technique may reduce the need for invasive tissue biopsy. Further in vivo study is needed to assess the ability of Raman spectroscopy to diagnose other vulval conditions before clinical application.

  5. An assessment of invasive plant species monitored by the Northern Research Station Forest Inventory and Analysis Program, 2005 through 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassandra M. Kurtz

    2013-01-01

    Invasive plant species are a worldwide concern due to the high ecological and economic costs associated with their presence. This document describes the plant characteristics and regional distribution of the 50 invasive plant species monitored from 2005 through 2010 on forested Phase 2 (P2) Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) plots in the 24 states of the Northern...

  6. Molecular marker analysis of 'Shatangju' and 'Wuzishatangju ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    'Wuzishatangju'(Citrus reticulata Blanco) is an excellent cultivar derived from a bud sport of a seedy 'Shatangju' cultivar found in Guangdong Province in the 1980s. In this study, six molecular markers including random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR), simple sequence repeat (SSR) ...

  7. Positive Analysis of Invasive Species Control as a Dynamic Spatial Process

    OpenAIRE

    Buyuktahtakin, Esra; Feng, Zhuo; Olsson, Aaryn; Frisvold, George B.; Szidarovszky, Ferenc

    2010-01-01

    This paper models control of invasive buffelgrass (Pennisetum ciliare), a fire-prone African bunchgrass spreading rapidly across the southern Arizona desert as a spatial dynamic process. Buffelgrass spreads over a gridded landscape. Weed carrying capacity, treatment costs, and damages vary over grid cells. Damage from buffelgrass depends on its spatial distribution in relation to valued resources. We conduct positive analysis of recommended heuristic strategies for buffelgrass control, evalua...

  8. Comparative Outer Membrane Protein Analysis of High and Low-Invasive Strains of Cronobacter malonaticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maha A. Aldubyan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Cronobacter are an important group of foodborne pathogens that has been linked to life-threatening infections in both infants and adults. The major infections associated with Cronobacter species are neonatal meningitis, necrotizing enterocolitis, and septicaemia. There are seven species in the Cronobacter genus, of which only three are of clinical importance; Cronobacter sakazakii, Cronobacter malonaticus, and Cronobacter turicensis. To date most studies have focussed on C. sakazakii as it is the major species associated with neonatal infections. However, recently C. malonaticus, in particular sequence type 7 (ST7, has been noted as being prevalent in adult infections and therefore warranting further investigation. In this study, eight strains of C. malonaticus ST7, that had been isolated from a wide range of sources and varied in their in vitro virulence, were chosen for proteomic analysis of their outer membrane proteins (OMPs. One-dimensional gel analysis revealed a ~29 kDa size band that was only present in the highly invasive strains. Subsequent mass spectrometric analysis identified several peptides that matched the flagellin protein. The presence of flagellin protein was confirmed in 2D gel spot. Mass spectrometry analysis of total OMPs revealed that the four highly invasive C. malonaticus strains expressed the main flagellum proteins that were absent from the four low invasive strains. These were the flagellar hook protein FlgE, flagellar hook-associated protein 1, flagellar hook-associated protein, flagellin, and flagellar hook-filament junction protein FlgL. This data indicates that C. malonaticus flagellar proteins may have an important role in the organism's invasion properties.

  9. Molecular analyses of Fusarium isolates recovered from a cluster of invasive mold infections in a Brazilian hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheel Christina M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Invasive fusariosis (IF is a rare but often fatal fungal infection in immunosuppressed patients. In 2007, cases of IF above the expected epidemiologic baseline were detected in the hematology ward of a hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Possible sources of infection were investigated by performing environmental sampling and patient isolate collection, followed by molecular typing. Isolates from dermatology patients with superficial fusariosis were included in the study for comparison to molecular types found in the community. Methods Environmental sampling focused on water-related sources in and around the hematology ward. Initially, we characterized 166 clinical and environmental isolates using the Fusarium translation elongation factor 1α (EF-1α genetic locus. Isolates included 68 collected from water-related sources in the hospital environment, 55 from 18 hematology patients, and 43 from the skin/nails of 40 outpatients seen at the hospital dermatology clinic. Multi-locus sequence typing was performed on Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC species 1 and 2 isolates to investigate their relatedness further. Results Most of the hematology samples were FSSC species 2, with species type FSSC 2-d the most commonly isolated from these patients. Most of the outpatient dermatology samples were also FSSC 2, with type 2-d again predominating. In contrast, environmental isolates from water sources were mostly Fusarium oxysporum species complex (FOSC and those from air samples mostly Fusarium incarnatum-equiseti species complex (FIESC. A third of the environmental samples were FSSC, with species types FSSC 1-a and FSSC 1-b predominating. Conclusions Fusarium isolate species types from hematology patient infections were highly similar to those recovered from dermatology patients in the community. Four species types (FSSC 1-a, 1-b, 2-d and 2-f were shared between hematology patients and the environment. Limitations in environmental

  10. Role of Molecular Genetics in Identifying ‘Fine Tuned’ Natural Enemies of the Invasive Brazilian Peppertree, Schinus terebinthifolius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazilian peppertree is a highly successful invasive species in the continental United States, Hawaiian archipelago, several Caribbean Islands, Australia, Bermuda, and a number of other countries worldwide. It also is one of only a few invasive intraspecific hybrids that has been well characterized ...

  11. MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF HUMAN SPERMATOZOA: POTENTIAL FOR INFERTILITY RESEARCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon Research Conference: Mammalian Gametogenesis and Embryogenesis New London, CT, July 1-6, 2000Molecular Analysis of Human Spermatozoa: Potential for Infertility ResearchDavid Miller 1, David Dix2, Robert Reid 3, Stephen A Krawetz 3 1Reproductive ...

  12. Phenotypic and molecular genetic analysis of Pyruvate Kinase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phenotypic and molecular genetic analysis of Pyruvate Kinase deficiency in a Tunisian family. Jaouani Mouna, Hamdi Nadia, Chaouch Leila, Kalai Miniar, Mellouli Fethi, Darragi Imen, Boudriga Imen, Chaouachi Dorra, Bejaoui Mohamed, Abbes Salem ...

  13. Hypofractionated radiation therapy for invasive thyroid carcinoma in dogs: a retrospective analysis of survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brearley, M J; Hayes, A M; Murphy, S

    1999-05-01

    Thirteen dogs with invasive thyroid carcinoma (WHO classification T2b or T3b) seen between January 1991 and October 1997 were treated by external beam irradiation. Four once-weekly fractions of 9 gray of 4 MeV X-rays were administered. Four of the dogs died of progression of the primary disease and four from metastatic spread. Of the remaining dogs, three died of unrelated problems, although two were still alive at the time of the censor. Kaplan-Meier analysis of the survival time from first dose to death from either primary or metastatic disease gave a median survival time of 96 weeks (mean 85 weeks, range six to 247 weeks). Radiographic evidence of pulmonary metastatic disease at presentation had no prognostic value whereas crude growth rate was a highly significant factor. The present series indicates that radiation therapy should be considered an important modality for the control of invasive thyroid carcinoma in the dog.

  14. Hypofractionated radiation therapy for invasive thyroid carcinoma in dogs: a retrospective analysis of survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brearley, M.J.; Hayes, A.M.; Murphy, S.

    1999-01-01

    Thirteen dogs with invasive thyroid carcinoma (WHO classification T2b or T3b) seen between January 1991 and October 1997 were treated by external beam Irradiation. Four once-weekly fractions of 9 gray of 4 MeV X-rays were administered. Four of the dogs died of progression of the primary disease and four from metastatic spread. Of the remaining dogs, three died of unrelated problems, although two were still alive at the time of the censor. Kaplan-Meier analysis of the survival time from first dose to death from either primary or metastatic disease gave a median survival time of 96 weeks (mean 85 weeks, range six to 247 weeks). Radiographic evidence of pulmonary metastatic disease at presentation had no prognostic value whereas crude growth rate was a highly significant factor. The present series Indicates that radiation therapy should be considered an important modality for the control of invasive thyroid carcinoma in the dog

  15. Biostatistical analysis of treatment results of bacterial liver abscesses using minimally invasive techniques and open surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Кipshidze A.A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Today bacterial abscesses remain one of the most difficult complications in surgical hepatology, both traditional and minimally invasive methods of their treatment are used. Bio-statistical analysis is used due to the fact that strong evidences are required for the effectiveness of one or another method of surgical intervention. The estimation of statistical significance of differences between the control and the main group of patients with liver abscesses is given in this paper. Depending on the treatment method patients were divided into two groups: 1 - minimally invasive surgery (89 cases; 2 – laporatomy surgery (74 patients. Data compa¬ri¬son was performed by means of Stjudent's criterion. The effectiveness of method of abscesses drainage using inter¬ventional sonography, outer nazobiliar drainage with reorganization of ductal liver system and abscess cavity with the help of modern antiseptics was considered. The percentage of cured patients was also estimated.

  16. Formalizing the definition of meta-analysis in Molecular Ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ArchMiller, Althea A; Bauer, Eric F; Koch, Rebecca E; Wijayawardena, Bhagya K; Anil, Ammu; Kottwitz, Jack J; Munsterman, Amelia S; Wilson, Alan E

    2015-08-01

    Meta-analysis, the statistical synthesis of pertinent literature to develop evidence-based conclusions, is relatively new to the field of molecular ecology, with the first meta-analysis published in the journal Molecular Ecology in 2003 (Slate & Phua 2003). The goal of this article is to formalize the definition of meta-analysis for the authors, editors, reviewers and readers of Molecular Ecology by completing a review of the meta-analyses previously published in this journal. We also provide a brief overview of the many components required for meta-analysis with a more specific discussion of the issues related to the field of molecular ecology, including the use and statistical considerations of Wright's FST and its related analogues as effect sizes in meta-analysis. We performed a literature review to identify articles published as 'meta-analyses' in Molecular Ecology, which were then evaluated by at least two reviewers. We specifically targeted Molecular Ecology publications because as a flagship journal in this field, meta-analyses published in Molecular Ecology have the potential to set the standard for meta-analyses in other journals. We found that while many of these reviewed articles were strong meta-analyses, others failed to follow standard meta-analytical techniques. One of these unsatisfactory meta-analyses was in fact a secondary analysis. Other studies attempted meta-analyses but lacked the fundamental statistics that are considered necessary for an effective and powerful meta-analysis. By drawing attention to the inconsistency of studies labelled as meta-analyses, we emphasize the importance of understanding the components of traditional meta-analyses to fully embrace the strengths of quantitative data synthesis in the field of molecular ecology. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Non- invasive in vivo analysis of a murine aortic graft using high resolution ultrasound microimaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowinska, Zuzanna; Zander, Simone; Zernecke, Alma; Jacobs, Michael; Langer, Stephan; Weber, Christian; Merx, Marc W.; Koeppel, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: As yet, murine aortic grafts have merely been monitored histopathologically. The aim of our study was to examine how these grafts can be monitored in vivo and non-invasively by using high-resolution ultrasound microimaging to evaluate function and morphology. A further aim was to prove if this in vivo monitoring can be correlated to immunohistological data that indicates graft integrity. Methods: Murine infrarenal aortic isografts were orthotopically transplanted into 14 female mice (C57BL/6-Background) whereas a group of sham-operated animals (n = 10) served as controls. To assess the graft morphology and hemodynamics, we examined the mice over a post-operative period of 8 weeks with a sophisticated ultrasound system (Vevo 770, Visual Sonics). Results: The non-invasive graft monitoring was feasible in all transplanted mice. We could demonstrate a regular post-transplant graft function and morphology, such as anterior/posterior wall displacement and wall thickness. Mild alterations of anterior wall motion dynamics could only be observed at the site of distal graft anastomosis (8 weeks after grafting (transplant vs. sham mice: 0.02 mm ± 0.01 vs. 0.03 mm ± 0.01, p < 0.05). However, the integrity of the entire graft wall could be confirmed by histopathological evaluation of the grafts. Conclusions: With regard to graft patency, function and morphology, high resolution ultrasound microimaging has proven to be a valuable tool for longitudinal, non-invasive, in vivo graft monitoring in this murine aortic transplantation model. Consequently, this experimental animal model provides an excellent basis for molecular and pharmacological studies using genetically engineered mice.

  18. Algorithmic dimensionality reduction for molecular structure analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, W Michael; Martin, Shawn; Pollock, Sara N; Coutsias, Evangelos A; Watson, Jean-Paul

    2008-08-14

    Dimensionality reduction approaches have been used to exploit the redundancy in a Cartesian coordinate representation of molecular motion by producing low-dimensional representations of molecular motion. This has been used to help visualize complex energy landscapes, to extend the time scales of simulation, and to improve the efficiency of optimization. Until recently, linear approaches for dimensionality reduction have been employed. Here, we investigate the efficacy of several automated algorithms for nonlinear dimensionality reduction for representation of trans, trans-1,2,4-trifluorocyclo-octane conformation--a molecule whose structure can be described on a 2-manifold in a Cartesian coordinate phase space. We describe an efficient approach for a deterministic enumeration of ring conformations. We demonstrate a drastic improvement in dimensionality reduction with the use of nonlinear methods. We discuss the use of dimensionality reduction algorithms for estimating intrinsic dimensionality and the relationship to the Whitney embedding theorem. Additionally, we investigate the influence of the choice of high-dimensional encoding on the reduction. We show for the case studied that, in terms of reconstruction error root mean square deviation, Cartesian coordinate representations and encodings based on interatom distances provide better performance than encodings based on a dihedral angle representation.

  19. Algorithmic dimensionality reduction for molecular structure analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, W. Michael; Martin, Shawn; Pollock, Sara N.; Coutsias, Evangelos A.; Watson, Jean-Paul

    2008-01-01

    Dimensionality reduction approaches have been used to exploit the redundancy in a Cartesian coordinate representation of molecular motion by producing low-dimensional representations of molecular motion. This has been used to help visualize complex energy landscapes, to extend the time scales of simulation, and to improve the efficiency of optimization. Until recently, linear approaches for dimensionality reduction have been employed. Here, we investigate the efficacy of several automated algorithms for nonlinear dimensionality reduction for representation of trans, trans-1,2,4-trifluorocyclo-octane conformation—a molecule whose structure can be described on a 2-manifold in a Cartesian coordinate phase space. We describe an efficient approach for a deterministic enumeration of ring conformations. We demonstrate a drastic improvement in dimensionality reduction with the use of nonlinear methods. We discuss the use of dimensionality reduction algorithms for estimating intrinsic dimensionality and the relationship to the Whitney embedding theorem. Additionally, we investigate the influence of the choice of high-dimensional encoding on the reduction. We show for the case studied that, in terms of reconstruction error root mean square deviation, Cartesian coordinate representations and encodings based on interatom distances provide better performance than encodings based on a dihedral angle representation. PMID:18715062

  20. Algorithmic dimensionality reduction for molecular structure analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, W. Michael; Martin, Shawn; Pollock, Sara N.; Coutsias, Evangelos A.; Watson, Jean-Paul

    2008-08-01

    Dimensionality reduction approaches have been used to exploit the redundancy in a Cartesian coordinate representation of molecular motion by producing low-dimensional representations of molecular motion. This has been used to help visualize complex energy landscapes, to extend the time scales of simulation, and to improve the efficiency of optimization. Until recently, linear approaches for dimensionality reduction have been employed. Here, we investigate the efficacy of several automated algorithms for nonlinear dimensionality reduction for representation of trans, trans-1,2,4-trifluorocyclo-octane conformation-a molecule whose structure can be described on a 2-manifold in a Cartesian coordinate phase space. We describe an efficient approach for a deterministic enumeration of ring conformations. We demonstrate a drastic improvement in dimensionality reduction with the use of nonlinear methods. We discuss the use of dimensionality reduction algorithms for estimating intrinsic dimensionality and the relationship to the Whitney embedding theorem. Additionally, we investigate the influence of the choice of high-dimensional encoding on the reduction. We show for the case studied that, in terms of reconstruction error root mean square deviation, Cartesian coordinate representations and encodings based on interatom distances provide better performance than encodings based on a dihedral angle representation.

  1. [Molecular structure and fractal analysis of oligosaccharide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen-long; Wang, Lu-man; He, Dong-qi; Zhang, Tian-lan; Gou, Bao-di; Li, Qing

    2014-10-18

    To propose a calculation method of oligosaccharides' fractal dimension, and to provide a new approach to studying the drug molecular design and activity. By using the principle of energy optimization and computer simulation technology, the steady structures of oligosaccharides were found, and an effective way of oligosaccharides fractal dimension's calculation was further established by applying the theory of box dimension to the chemical compounds. By using the proposed method, 22 oligosaccharides' fractal dimensions were calculated, with the mean 1.518 8 ± 0.107 2; in addition, the fractal dimensions of the two activity multivalent oligosaccharides which were confirmed by experiments, An-2 and Gu-4, were about 1.478 8 and 1.516 0 respectively, while C-type lectin-like receptor Dectin-1's fractal dimension was about 1.541 2. The experimental and computational results were expected to help to find a class of glycoside drugs whose target receptor was Dectin-1. Fractal dimension, differing from other known macro parameters, is a useful tool to characterize the compound molecules' microscopic structure and function, which may play an important role in the molecular design and biological activity study. In the process of oligosaccharides drug screening, the fractal dimension of receptor and designed oligosaccharides or glycoclusters can be calculated respectively. The oligosaccharides with fractal dimension close to that of target receptor should then take priority compared with others, to get the drug molecules with latent activity.

  2. Breath Analysis as a Potential and Non-Invasive Frontier in Disease Diagnosis: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, a small number of diseases, particularly cardiovascular (CVDs, oncologic (ODs, neurodegenerative (NDDs, chronic respiratory diseases, as well as diabetes, form a severe burden to most of the countries worldwide. Hence, there is an urgent need for development of efficient diagnostic tools, particularly those enabling reliable detection of diseases, at their early stages, preferably using non-invasive approaches. Breath analysis is a non-invasive approach relying only on the characterisation of volatile composition of the exhaled breath (EB that in turn reflects the volatile composition of the bloodstream and airways and therefore the status and condition of the whole organism metabolism. Advanced sampling procedures (solid-phase and needle traps microextraction coupled with modern analytical technologies (proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry, selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry, ion mobility spectrometry, e-noses, etc. allow the characterisation of EB composition to an unprecedented level. However, a key challenge in EB analysis is the proper statistical analysis and interpretation of the large and heterogeneous datasets obtained from EB research. There is no standard statistical framework/protocol yet available in literature that can be used for EB data analysis towards discovery of biomarkers for use in a typical clinical setup. Nevertheless, EB analysis has immense potential towards development of biomarkers for the early disease diagnosis of diseases.

  3. Dynamical analysis of highly excited molecular spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellman, M.E. [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is new methods for analysis of spectra and dynamics of highly excited vibrational states of molecules. In these systems, strong mode coupling and anharmonicity give rise to complicated classical dynamics, and make the simple normal modes analysis unsatisfactory. New methods of spectral analysis, pattern recognition, and assignment are sought using techniques of nonlinear dynamics including bifurcation theory, phase space classification, and quantization of phase space structures. The emphasis is chaotic systems and systems with many degrees of freedom.

  4. Cytological preparations for molecular analysis: A review of technical procedures, advantages and limitations for referring samples for testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha Santos, G; Saieg, M A; Troncone, G; Zeppa, P

    2018-04-01

    Minimally invasive procedures such as endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) must yield not only good quality and quantity of material for morphological assessment, but also an adequate sample for analysis of molecular markers to guide patients to appropriate targeted therapies. In this context, cytopathologists worldwide should be familiar with minimum requirements for refereeing cytological samples for testing. The present manuscript is a review with comprehensive description of the content of the workshop entitled Cytological preparations for molecular analysis: pre-analytical issues for EBUS TBNA, presented at the 40th European Congress of Cytopathology in Liverpool, UK. The present review emphasises the advantages and limitations of different types of cytology substrates used for molecular analysis such as archival smears, liquid-based preparations, archival cytospin preparations and FTA (Flinders Technology Associates) cards, as well as their technical requirements/features. These various types of cytological specimens can be successfully used for an extensive array of molecular studies, but the quality and quantity of extracted nucleic acids rely directly on adequate pre-analytical assessment of those samples. In this setting, cytopathologists must not only be familiar with the different types of specimens and associated technical procedures, but also correctly handle the material provided by minimally invasive procedures, ensuring that there is sufficient amount of material for a precise diagnosis and correct management of the patient through personalised care. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Molecular analysis of special type breast carcinomas

    OpenAIRE

    De Biase, Dario

    2010-01-01

    The project was developed into three parts: the analysis of p63 isoform in breast tumours; the study of intra-tumour eterogeneicity in metaplastic breast carcinoma; the analysis of oncocytic breast carcinoma. p63 is a sequence-specific DNA-binding factor, homologue of the tumour suppressor and transcription factor p53. The human p63 gene is composed of 15 exons and transcription can occur from two distinct promoters: the transactivating isoforms (TAp63) are generated by a promoter upstream...

  6. Correlation analysis of the Taurus molecular cloud complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleiner, S.C.

    1985-01-01

    Autocorrelation and power spectrum methods were applied to the analysis of the density and velocity structure of the Taurus Complex and Heiles Cloud 2 as traced out by 13 CO J = 1 → 0 molecular line observations obtained with the 14m antenna of the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory. Statistically significant correlations in the spacing of density fluctuations within the Taurus Complex and Heiles 2 were uncovered. The length scales of the observed correlations correspond in magnitude to the Jeans wavelengths characterizing gravitational instabilities with (i) interstellar atomic hydrogen gas for the case of the Taurus complex, and (ii) molecular hydrogen for Heiles 2. The observed correlations may be the signatures of past and current gravitational instabilities frozen into the structure of the molecular gas. The appendices provide a comprehensive description of the analytical and numerical methods developed for the correlation analysis of molecular clouds

  7. Fragrance analysis using molecular and biochemical methods in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    Biochemical analysis of aroma was performed with the 1.7% KOH solution and molecular analysis of aroma was carried out with microsatellite markers present on chromosome 8 (BAD2, BADEX7-5, SCUSSR1) to determine the extent of association between trait, marker and chromosome 8. Among these markers, BAD2 ...

  8. Evolution & Phylogenetic Analysis: Classroom Activities for Investigating Molecular & Morphological Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Wilfred A.

    2010-01-01

    In a flexible multisession laboratory, students investigate concepts of phylogenetic analysis at both the molecular and the morphological level. Students finish by conducting their own analysis on a collection of skeletons representing the major phyla of vertebrates, a collection of primate skulls, or a collection of hominid skulls.

  9. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of the cat myostatin gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... MEF3, MTBF, PAX3, SMAD, HBOX, HOMF and TEAF motifs. Comparative analysis for some motifs showed both conservations and differences among cat, horse, porcine and human. Key words: Cat, myostatin 5'-regulatory region, molecular cloning, sequence analysis and comparison, transcription factor binding sites.

  10. Experimental bifurcation analysis of an impact oscillator - Tuning a non-invasive control scheme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bureau, Emil; Schilder, Frank; Santos, Ilmar

    2013-01-01

    We investigate a non-invasive, locally stabilizing control scheme necessary for an experimental bifurcation analysis. Our test-rig comprises a harmonically forced impact oscillator with hardening spring nonlinearity controlled by electromagnetic actuators, and serves as a prototype...... for electromagnetic bearings and other machinery with build-in actuators. We propose a sequence of experiments that allows one to choose optimal control-gains, filter parameters and settings for a continuation method without a priori study of a model. Depending on the algorithm for estimating the Jacobian required...

  11. Interactive analysis of systems biology molecular expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhakar Sunil

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systems biology aims to understand biological systems on a comprehensive scale, such that the components that make up the whole are connected to one another and work through dependent interactions. Molecular correlations and comparative studies of molecular expression are crucial to establishing interdependent connections in systems biology. The existing software packages provide limited data mining capability. The user must first generate visualization data with a preferred data mining algorithm and then upload the resulting data into the visualization package for graphic visualization of molecular relations. Results Presented is a novel interactive visual data mining application, SysNet that provides an interactive environment for the analysis of high data volume molecular expression information of most any type from biological systems. It integrates interactive graphic visualization and statistical data mining into a single package. SysNet interactively presents intermolecular correlation information with circular and heatmap layouts. It is also applicable to comparative analysis of molecular expression data, such as time course data. Conclusion The SysNet program has been utilized to analyze elemental profile changes in response to an increasing concentration of iron (Fe in growth media (an ionomics dataset. This study case demonstrates that the SysNet software is an effective platform for interactive analysis of molecular expression information in systems biology.

  12. Associations and indications of Ki67 expression with clinicopathological parameters and molecular subtypes in invasive breast cancer: A population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jinzhong; Chen, Chuang; Wei, Wen; Zheng, Hongmei; Yuan, Jingping; Tu, Y I; Yao, Feng; Wang, Lijun; Yao, Xiaoli; Li, Juanjuan; Li, Yan; Sun, Shengrong

    2015-09-01

    Ki67 has potential prognostic and predictive values for breast cancer patients, and has become an important biomarker in routine clinical practice. The aims of the present study were to investigate the distribution of Ki67 expression and its correlation with other clinicopathological parameters in central China. In total, 1,259 patients with newly-diagnosed invasive breast cancer were included in the present study. The clinical information was obtained from the electronic medical records. The expression levels of Ki67, estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) were detected by immunohistochemical analysis. The associations between Ki67 scores and other prognostic factors were evaluated as continuous and categorical variables. The mean value of the Ki67 scores of all patients was 31%. In total, ~36% (456/1,259) of the patients demonstrated a low expression of Ki67. A statistically significant correlation was identified between the mean Ki67 scores and the lymph node status, tumor grade, ER, PR and HER2 status, and clinical stage or molecular subtypes (all PKi67 was categorized into high (>14%) and low (≤14%) level groups, the χ 2 test was used to verify these results. The Ki67 scores demonstrated no statistically significant differences between the HER2-positive (non-luminal) and three negative subtypes, with the exception of patients with a tumor size of >2 cm (P=0.02). In conclusion, the results revealed the presence of significant correlations between Ki67 and other clinicopathological parameters.

  13. Non-Invasive Ventilation in Patients with Heart Failure: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Souza Bittencourt

    Full Text Available Abstract Non-invasive ventilation (NIV may perfect respiratory and cardiac performance in patients with heart failure (HF. The objective of the study to establish, through systematic review and meta-analysis, NIV influence on functional capacity of HF patients. A systematic review with meta-analysis of randomized studies was carried out through research of databases of Cochrane Library, SciELO, Pubmed and PEDro, using the key-words: heart failure, non-invasive ventilation, exercise tolerance; and the free terms: bi-level positive airway pressure (BIPAP, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP, and functional capacity (terms were searched for in English and Portuguese using the Boolean operators AND and OR. Methodological quality was ensured through PEDro scale. Weighted averages and a 95% confidence interval (CI were calculated. The meta-analysis was done thorugh the software Review Manager, version 5.3 (Cochrane Collaboration. Four randomized clinical trials were included. Individual studies suggest NIV improved functional capacity. NIV resulted in improvement in the distance of the six-minute walk test (6MWT (68.7m 95%CI: 52.6 to 84.9 in comparison to the control group. We conclude that the NIV is an intervention that promotes important effects in the improvement of functional capacity of HF patients. However, there is a gap in literature on which are the most adequate parameters for the application of this technique.

  14. Molecular characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi SAP proteins with host-cell lysosome exocytosis-inducing activity required for parasite invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanforlin, Tamiris; Bayer-Santos, Ethel; Cortez, Cristian; Almeida, Igor C; Yoshida, Nobuko; da Silveira, José Franco

    2013-01-01

    To invade target cells, Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclic forms engage distinct sets of surface and secreted molecules that interact with host components. Serine-, alanine-, and proline-rich proteins (SAP) comprise a multigene family constituted of molecules with a high serine, alanine and proline residue content. SAP proteins have a central domain (SAP-CD) responsible for interaction with and invasion of mammalian cells by metacyclic forms. Using a 513 bp sequence from SAP-CD in blastn analysis, we identified 39 full-length SAP genes in the genome of T. cruzi. Although most of these genes were mapped in the T. cruzi in silico chromosome TcChr41, several SAP sequences were spread out across the genome. The level of SAP transcripts was twice as high in metacyclic forms as in epimastigotes. Monoclonal (MAb-SAP) and polyclonal (anti-SAP) antibodies produced against the recombinant protein SAP-CD were used to investigate the expression and localization of SAP proteins. MAb-SAP reacted with a 55 kDa SAP protein released by epimastigotes and metacyclic forms and with distinct sets of SAP variants expressed in amastigotes and tissue culture-derived trypomastigotes (TCTs). Anti-SAP antibodies reacted with components located in the anterior region of epimastigotes and between the nucleus and the kinetoplast in metacyclic trypomastigotes. In contrast, anti-SAP recognized surface components of amastigotes and TCTs, suggesting that SAP proteins are directed to different cellular compartments. Ten SAP peptides were identified by mass spectrometry in vesicle and soluble-protein fractions obtained from parasite conditioned medium. Using overlapping sequences from SAP-CD, we identified a 54-aa peptide (SAP-CE) that was able to induce host-cell lysosome exocytosis and inhibit parasite internalization by 52%. This study provides novel information about the genomic organization, expression and cellular localization of SAP proteins and proposes a triggering role for extracellular SAP

  15. A coherent and non-invasive open analysis architecture and framework with applications in CMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alverson, G.; Osborne, I.; Taylor, L.; Tuura, L.A.

    2001-01-01

    The CMS IGUANA project has implemented an open analysis architecture that enables the creation of an integrated analysis environment. In this 'analysis desktop' environment a physicist is able to perform most analysis-related tasks, not just the presentation and visualisation steps usually associated with analysis tools. The motivation behind IGUANA's approach is that physics analysis includes much more than just the visualisation and data presentation. Many factors contribute to the increasing importance of making analysis and visualisation software an integral part of the experiment's software: object oriented and ever more advanced data models, GRID, and automated hierarchical storage management systems to name just a few. At the the same time the analysis toolkits should be modular and non-invasive to be usable in different contexts within one experiment and generally across experiments. Ideally the analysis environment would appear to be perfectly customised to the experiment and the context, but would mostly consist of generic components. The authors describe how the IGUANA project is addressing these issues and present both the architecture and examples of how different aspects of analysis appear to the users and the developers

  16. Simple non-invasive analysis of embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes beating in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radaszkiewicz, Katarzyna Anna; Sýkorová, Dominika; Karas, Pavel; Kudová, Jana; Kohút, Lukáš; Binó, Lucia; Večeřa, Josef; Víteček, Jan; Kubala, Lukáš; Pacherník, Jiří

    2016-02-01

    The analysis of digital video output enables the non-invasive screening of various active biological processes. For the monitoring and computing of the beating parameters of cardiomyocytes in vitro, CB Analyser (cardiomyocyte beating analyser) software was developed. This software is based on image analysis of the video recording of beating cardiomyocytes. CB Analyser was tested using cardiomyocytes derived from mouse embryonic stem cells at different stages of cardiomyogenesis. We observed that during differentiation (from day 18), the beat peak width decreased, which corresponded to the increased speed of an individual pulse. However, the beating frequency did not change. Further, the effects of epinephrine modulating mature cardiomyocyte functions were tested to validate the CB Analyser analysis. In conclusion, data show that CB Analyser is a useful tool for evaluating the functions of both developing and mature cardiomyocytes under various conditions in vitro.

  17. Simple non-invasive analysis of embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes beating in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radaszkiewicz, Katarzyna Anna; Sýkorová, Dominika; Karas, Pavel; Kudová, Jana; Kohút, Lukáš; Binó, Lucia; Večeřa, Josef; Víteček, Jan; Kubala, Lukáš; Pacherník, Jiří

    2016-02-01

    The analysis of digital video output enables the non-invasive screening of various active biological processes. For the monitoring and computing of the beating parameters of cardiomyocytes in vitro, CB Analyser (cardiomyocyte beating analyser) software was developed. This software is based on image analysis of the video recording of beating cardiomyocytes. CB Analyser was tested using cardiomyocytes derived from mouse embryonic stem cells at different stages of cardiomyogenesis. We observed that during differentiation (from day 18), the beat peak width decreased, which corresponded to the increased speed of an individual pulse. However, the beating frequency did not change. Further, the effects of epinephrine modulating mature cardiomyocyte functions were tested to validate the CB Analyser analysis. In conclusion, data show that CB Analyser is a useful tool for evaluating the functions of both developing and mature cardiomyocytes under various conditions in vitro.

  18. Molecular markers for tracking the origin and worldwide distribution of invasive strains of Puccinia striiformis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walter, Stephanie; Ali, Sajid; Kemen, Eric

    2016-01-01

    .g., the spreading of two aggressive and high temperature adapted strains to three continents since 2000. The combination of sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers, which were developed from two specific AFLP fragments, differentiated the two invasive strains, PstS1 and PstS2 from all other P....... striiformis strains investigated at a worldwide level. The application of the SCAR markers on 566 isolates showed that PstS1 was present in East Africa in the early 1980s and then detected in the Americas in 2000 and in Australia in 2002. PstS2 which evolved from PstS1 became widespread in the Middle East...... as the most plausible origin of the two invasive strains. The SCAR markers developed in the present study provide a rapid, inexpensive, and efficient tool to track the distribution of P. striiformis invasive strains, PstS1 and PstS2....

  19. Molecular sieves analysis by elastic recoil detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salah, H.; Azzouz, A.

    1992-01-01

    The opportunity of water determination in zeolites via hydrogen detection using the elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) was investigated. The radiation effect upon the desorption rate of hydrogen in miscellaneous types of zeolites, e.g. Y-Faujasite, ZSM-5, SK, etc. and in a natural clay, e.g. an Algerian bentonite was discussed. Quantitative measurements were carried out in order to determine the amount and distribution shape of hydrogen in each material. Various explanations dealing with hydration and constitution water in such a crystalline framework were proposed. The experimental results are in a good agreement with the corresponding theoretical values

  20. Meta-analysis reveals evolution in invasive plant species but little support for Evolution of Increased Competitive Ability (EICA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felker-Quinn, Emmi; Schweitzer, Jennifer A; Bailey, Joseph K

    2013-03-01

    Ecological explanations for the success and persistence of invasive species vastly outnumber evolutionary hypotheses, yet evolution is a fundamental process in the success of any species. The Evolution of Increased Competitive Ability (EICA) hypothesis (Blossey and Nötzold 1995) proposes that evolutionary change in response to release from coevolved herbivores is responsible for the success of many invasive plant species. Studies that evaluate this hypothesis have used different approaches to test whether invasive populations allocate fewer resources to defense and more to growth and competitive ability than do source populations, with mixed results. We conducted a meta-analysis of experimental tests of evolutionary change in the context of EICA. In contrast to previous reviews, there was no support across invasive species for EICA's predictions regarding defense or competitive ability, although invasive populations were more productive than conspecific native populations under noncompetitive conditions. We found broad support for genetically based changes in defense and competitive plant traits after introduction into new ranges, but not in the manner suggested by EICA. This review suggests that evolution occurs as a result of plant introduction and population expansion in invasive plant species, and may contribute to the invasiveness and persistence of some introduced species.

  1. Invasive species' leaf traits and dissimilarity from natives shape their impact on nitrogen cycling: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Marissa R; Bernhardt, Emily S; van Bodegom, Peter M; Cornelissen, J Hans C; Kattge, Jens; Laughlin, Daniel C; Niinemets, Ülo; Peñuelas, Josep; Reich, Peter B; Yguel, Benjamin; Wright, Justin P

    2017-01-01

    Many exotic species have little apparent impact on ecosystem processes, whereas others have dramatic consequences for human and ecosystem health. There is growing evidence that invasions foster eutrophication. We need to identify species that are harmful and systems that are vulnerable to anticipate these consequences. Species' traits may provide the necessary insights. We conducted a global meta-analysis to determine whether plant leaf and litter functional traits, and particularly leaf and litter nitrogen (N) content and carbon: nitrogen (C : N) ratio, explain variation in invasive species' impacts on soil N cycling. Dissimilarity in leaf and litter traits among invaded and noninvaded plant communities control the magnitude and direction of invasion impacts on N cycling. Invasions that caused the greatest increases in soil inorganic N and mineralization rates had a much greater litter N content and lower litter C : N in the invaded than the reference community. Trait dissimilarities were better predictors than the trait values of invasive species alone. Quantifying baseline community tissue traits, in addition to those of the invasive species, is critical to understanding the impacts of invasion on soil N cycling. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  2. Molecular Eigensolution Symmetry Analysis and Fine Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William G. Harter

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spectra of high-symmetry molecules contain fine and superfine level cluster structure related to J-tunneling between hills and valleys on rovibronic energy surfaces (RES. Such graphic visualizations help disentangle multi-level dynamics, selection rules, and state mixing effects including widespread violation of nuclear spin symmetry species. A review of RES analysis compares it to that of potential energy surfaces (PES used in Born-Oppenheimer approximations. Both take advantage of adiabatic coupling in order to visualize Hamiltonian eigensolutions. RES of symmetric and D2 asymmetric top rank-2-tensor Hamiltonians are compared with Oh spherical top rank-4-tensor fine-structure clusters of 6-fold and 8-fold tunneling multiplets. Then extreme 12-fold and 24-fold multiplets are analyzed by RES plots of higher rank tensor Hamiltonians. Such extreme clustering is rare in fundamental bands but prevalent in hot bands, and analysis of its superfine structure requires more efficient labeling and a more powerful group theory. This is introduced using elementary examples involving two groups of order-6 (C6 and D3~C3v, then applied to families of Oh clusters in SF6 spectra and to extreme clusters.

  3. Molecular analysis of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyaya, M.; Maynard, J.; Osborn, M. [Institute of Medical Genetics, Cardiff (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by progressive muscle weakness. The disease locus maps to 4q35 and is associated with a de novo DNA rearrangement, detected by a probe p13E-11 (D4F104S1) which maps proximal to the disease locus. An informative distal flanking marker for this condition is still required. Using p13E-11, we have analyzed 35 FSHD families in which the disease is apparently associated with a new mutation. Twenty three of these cases were found to have a smaller rearranged DNA fragment which was not present in either of the parents. Pulsed-field gel analysis of 5 of these families also revealed evidence of DNA deletion. During the course of this study, we identified one case with a DNA rearrangement which was also present in the unaffected mother, but at very low intensity. This finding has been confirmed by pulsed-field gel analysis, and indicates that the mother is probably a gonosomal mosaic. In order to saturate the FSHD region with new DNA markers, a laser microdissection and microcloning technique was used to construct a genomic library from the distal end of chromosome 4. Of the 72 microclones analyzed, 42 mapped into the relevant 4q35 region. 4 sequences were conserved and may be considered potential candidate genes for FSHD. The microclones mapping to 4q35 are under study to identify additional polymorphic markers for the FSHD region.

  4. A human breast cell model of pre-invasive to invasive transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bissell, Mina J; Rizki, Aylin; Weaver, Valerie M.; Lee, Sun-Young; Rozenberg, Gabriela I.; Chin, Koei; Myers, Connie A.; Bascom, Jamie L.; Mott, Joni D.; Semeiks, Jeremy R.; Grate, Leslie R.; Mian, I. Saira; Borowsky, Alexander D.; Jensen, Roy A.; Idowu, Michael O.; Chen, Fanqing; Chen, David J.; Petersen, Ole W.; Gray, Joe W.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2008-03-10

    A crucial step in human breast cancer progression is the acquisition of invasiveness. There is a distinct lack of human cell culture models to study the transition from pre-invasive to invasive phenotype as it may occur 'spontaneously' in vivo. To delineate molecular alterations important for this transition, we isolated human breast epithelial cell lines that showed partial loss of tissue polarity in three-dimensional reconstituted-basement membrane cultures. These cells remained non-invasive; however, unlike their non-malignant counterparts, they exhibited a high propensity to acquire invasiveness through basement membrane in culture. The genomic aberrations and gene expression profiles of the cells in this model showed a high degree of similarity to primary breast tumor profiles. The xenograft tumors formed by the cell lines in three different microenvironments in nude mice displayed metaplastic phenotypes, including squamous and basal characteristics, with invasive cells exhibiting features of higher grade tumors. To find functionally significant changes in transition from pre-invasive to invasive phenotype, we performed attribute profile clustering analysis on the list of genes differentially expressed between pre-invasive and invasive cells. We found integral membrane proteins, transcription factors, kinases, transport molecules, and chemokines to be highly represented. In addition, expression of matrix metalloproteinases MMP-9,-13,-15,-17 was up regulated in the invasive cells. Using siRNA based approaches, we found these MMPs to be required for the invasive phenotype. This model provides a new tool for dissection of mechanisms by which pre-invasive breast cells could acquire invasiveness in a metaplastic context.

  5. Molecular thermal transistor: Dimension analysis and mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnia, S.; Panahinia, R.

    2018-04-01

    Recently, large challenge has been spent to realize high efficient thermal transistors. Outstanding properties of DNA make it as an excellent nano material in future technologies. In this paper, we introduced a high efficient DNA based thermal transistor. The thermal transistor operates when the system shows an increase in the thermal flux despite of decreasing temperature gradient. This is what called as negative differential thermal resistance (NDTR). Based on multifractal analysis, we could distinguish regions with NDTR state from non-NDTR state. Moreover, Based on dimension spectrum of the system, it is detected that NDTR state is accompanied by ballistic transport regime. The generalized correlation sum (analogous to specific heat) shows that an irregular decrease in the specific heat induces an increase in the mean free path (mfp) of phonons. This leads to the occurrence of NDTR.

  6. Molecular markers increase precision of the European Association of Urology non-muscle invasive bladder cancer progression risk groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Kessel, Kim E.; van der Keur, Kirstin A.; Dyrskjøt, Lars

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: The European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) recommend risk stratification based on clinicopathological parameters. Our aim was to investigate the added value of biomarkers to improve risk stratification of NMIBC. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN...

  7. Minimally invasive spine surgery in lumbar spondylodiscitis: a retrospective single-center analysis of 67 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschugg, Anja; Hartmann, Sebastian; Lener, Sara; Rietzler, Andreas; Sabrina, Neururer; Thomé, Claudius

    2017-12-01

    Minimally invasive surgical techniques have been developed to minimize tissue damage, reduce narcotic requirements, decrease blood loss, and, therefore, potentially avoid prolonged immobilization. Thus, the purpose of the present retrospective study was to assess the safety and efficacy of a minimally invasive posterior approach with transforaminal lumbar interbody debridement and fusion plus pedicle screw fixation in lumbar spondylodiscitis in comparison to an open surgical approach. Furthermore, treatment decisions based on the patient´s preoperative condition were analyzed. 67 patients with lumbar spondylodiscitis treated at our department were included in this retrospective analysis. The patients were categorized into two groups based on the surgical procedure: group (MIS) minimally invasive lumbar spinal fusion (n = 19); group (OPEN) open lumbar spinal fusion (n = 48). Evaluation included radiological parameters on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), laboratory values, and clinical outcome. Preoperative MRI showed higher rates of paraspinal abscess (35.5 vs. 5.6%; p = 0.016) and multilocular location in the OPEN group (20 vs. 0%, p = 0.014). Overall pain at discharge was less in the MIS group: NRS 2.4 ± 1 vs. NRS 1.6 ± 1 (p = 0.036). The duration of hospital stay was longer in the OPEN than the MIS group (19.1 ± 12 days vs. 13.7 ± 5 days, p = 0.018). The open technique is effective in all varieties of spondylodiscitis inclusive in epidural abscess formation. MIS can be applied safely and effectively as well in selected cases, even with epidural abscess.

  8. Prevalence and invasiveness of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: A meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shipeng Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reports suggest that the prevalence of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA has increased, and that CA-MRSA is more virulent than healthcare-associated (HA-MRSA. Aims: The aim of this study is to gain a better understanding of the invasiveness and prevalence of CA-MRSA in patients; we systematically reviewed the literature by conducting a meta-analysis. Materials and Methods: We searched the MEDLINE and PUBMED databases from the year these databases were established to January 2013. Results: The pooled CA-MRSA prevalence among 50,737 patients from 33 studies was 39.0% (range, 30.8-47.8%. The pooled CA-MRSA prevalence rates among pediatric and adult patients with MRSA infection were 50.2% (range, 37.5-62.8% and 42.3% (range, 16.4-73.3%, respectively. The pooled CA-MRSA prevalence rates of MRSA-infected patients in Asia, Europe, and North America were 23.1% (range, 12.0-39.8%, 37.4% (range, 21.1-56.4%, and 47.4% (range, 35.8-59.4%, respectively. Using the random effects model, we determined that the pooled odds ratio of invasive infections in CA- and HA-MRSA was 0.30 (95% confidence interval: 0.08-1.10; P = 0.07, test for heterogeneity P < 0.00001. Conclusions: The prevalence of CA-MRSA in MRSA infection varied with area and population. No difference in the ability to cause invasive infections was found between CA- and HA-MRSA. This finding challenges the view that CA-MRSA is more virulent than HA-MRSA.

  9. Molecular analysis of deep subsurface bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez Baez, L.E.

    1989-09-01

    Deep sediments samples from site C10a, in Appleton, and sites, P24, P28, and P29, at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, South Carolina were studied to determine their microbial community composition, DNA homology and mol %G+C. Different geological formations with great variability in hydrogeological parameters were found across the depth profile. Phenotypic identification of deep subsurface bacteria underestimated the bacterial diversity at the three SRS sites, since bacteria with the same phenotype have different DNA composition and less than 70% DNA homology. Total DNA hybridization and mol %G+C analysis of deep sediment bacterial isolates suggested that each formation is comprised of different microbial communities. Depositional environment was more important than site and geological formation on the DNA relatedness between deep subsurface bacteria, since more 70% of bacteria with 20% or more of DNA homology came from the same depositional environments. Based on phenotypic and genotypic tests Pseudomonas spp. and Acinetobacter spp.-like bacteria were identified in 85 million years old sediments. This suggests that these microbial communities might have been adapted during a long period of time to the environmental conditions of the deep subsurface

  10. Analysis of non-invasive FBG sensor for monitoring patient vital signs during MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedoma, Jan; Fajkus, Marcel; Martinek, Radek; Vasinek, Vladimir

    2017-10-01

    This article focuses on the analysis and verification of a non-invasive fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor used for the monitoring of a patient`s heart rate (HR) and respiratory rate (RR) in a magnetic resonance environment (MRI). Measuring heart and respiratory rate were carried out on a group of five volunteers with their written consent during MRI examinations. The type of the scanner used in the experiment was GE Signa HDxt 1.5T. The benefit of this article lies in the design of a sensor in the form of a sensor pad. The sensor is placed beneath a patient`s body lying supine. The purpose is to increase and improve the patient`s safety as well as to help doctors to predict panic and hyperventilation attacks of patients during MRI examinations. Provided Bland-Altman statistical analysis demonstrates the heart and respiratory rate detection with a satisfactory accuracy for all five volunteers.

  11. Molecular characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi SAP proteins with host-cell lysosome exocytosis-inducing activity required for parasite invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamiris Zanforlin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To invade target cells, Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclic forms engage distinct sets of surface and secreted molecules that interact with host components. Serine-, alanine-, and proline-rich proteins (SAP comprise a multigene family constituted of molecules with a high serine, alanine and proline residue content. SAP proteins have a central domain (SAP-CD responsible for interaction with and invasion of mammalian cells by metacyclic forms. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using a 513 bp sequence from SAP-CD in blastn analysis, we identified 39 full-length SAP genes in the genome of T. cruzi. Although most of these genes were mapped in the T. cruzi in silico chromosome TcChr41, several SAP sequences were spread out across the genome. The level of SAP transcripts was twice as high in metacyclic forms as in epimastigotes. Monoclonal (MAb-SAP and polyclonal (anti-SAP antibodies produced against the recombinant protein SAP-CD were used to investigate the expression and localization of SAP proteins. MAb-SAP reacted with a 55 kDa SAP protein released by epimastigotes and metacyclic forms and with distinct sets of SAP variants expressed in amastigotes and tissue culture-derived trypomastigotes (TCTs. Anti-SAP antibodies reacted with components located in the anterior region of epimastigotes and between the nucleus and the kinetoplast in metacyclic trypomastigotes. In contrast, anti-SAP recognized surface components of amastigotes and TCTs, suggesting that SAP proteins are directed to different cellular compartments. Ten SAP peptides were identified by mass spectrometry in vesicle and soluble-protein fractions obtained from parasite conditioned medium. Using overlapping sequences from SAP-CD, we identified a 54-aa peptide (SAP-CE that was able to induce host-cell lysosome exocytosis and inhibit parasite internalization by 52%. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides novel information about the genomic organization, expression and cellular localization of SAP

  12. Molecular analysis of Ku redox regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shatilla Andrea

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs can occur in response to ionizing radiation (IR, radiomimetic agents and from endogenous DNA-damaging reactive oxygen metabolites. Unrepaired or improperly repaired DSBs are potentially the most lethal form of DNA damage and can result in chromosomal translocations and contribute to the development of cancer. The principal mechanism for the repair of DSBs in humans is non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ. Ku is a key member of the NHEJ pathway and plays an important role in the recognition step when it binds to free DNA termini. Ku then stimulates the assembly and activation of other NHEJ components. DNA binding of Ku is regulated by redox conditions and evidence from our laboratory has demonstrated that Ku undergoes structural changes when oxidized that results in a reduction in DNA binding activity. The C-terminal domain and cysteine 493 of Ku80 were investigated for their contribution to redox regulation of Ku. Results We effectively removed the C-terminal domain of Ku80 generating a truncation mutant and co-expressed this variant with wild type Ku70 in an insect cell system to create a Ku70/80ΔC heterodimer. We also generated two single amino acid variants of Cys493, replacing this amino acid with either an alanine (C493A or a serine (C493S, and over-expressed the variant proteins in SF9 insect cells in complex with wild type Ku70. Neither the truncation nor the amino acid substitutions alters protein expression or stability as determined by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis. We show that the C493 mutations do not alter the ability of Ku to bind duplex DNA in vitro under reduced conditions while truncation of the Ku80 C-terminus slightly reduced DNA binding affinity. Diamide oxidation of cysteines was shown to inhibit DNA binding similarly for both the wild-type and all variant proteins. Interestingly, differential DNA binding activity following re-reduction was observed for the Ku70/80

  13. Molecular analysis and genetic diversity of Aedes albopictus (Diptera, Culicidae) from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiling, Zhang; Peien, Leng; Xuejun, Wang; Zhong, Zhang

    2018-05-01

    Aedes albopictus is one of the most invasive species, which can carry Dengue virus, Yellow fever virus and more than twenty arboviruses. Based on mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) and samples collected from 17 populations, we investigated the molecular character and genetic diversity of Ae. albopictus from China. Altogether, 25 haplotypes were detected, including 10 shared haplotypes and 15 private haplotypes. H1 was the dominant haplotype, which is widely distributed in 13 populations. Tajima'D value of most populations was significantly negative, demonstrating that populations experienced rapid range expansion recently. Most haplotypes clustered together both in phylogenetic and median-joining network analysis without clear phylogeographic patterns. However, neutrality tests revealed shallow divergences among Hainan and Guangxi with other populations (0.15599 ≤ F ST ≤ 0.75858), which probably due to interrupted gene flow, caused by geographical isolations. In conclusion, Ae. albopictus populations showed low genetic diversity in China.

  14. A non-invasive acoustic and vibration analysis technique for evaluation of hip joint conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Diana; Komistek, Richard D; Cates, Harold E; Mahfouz, Mohamed R

    2010-02-10

    The performance evaluation of THA outcome is difficult and surgeons often use invasive methods to investigate effectiveness. A non-invasive acoustic and vibration analysis technique has recently been developed for more-in-depth evaluation of in vivo hip conditions. Gait kinematics, corresponding vibration and sound measurement of five THA subjects were analyzed post-operatively using video-fluoroscopy, sound and accelerometer measurements while walking on a treadmill. The sound sensor and a pair of tri-axial accelerometers, externally attached to the pelvic and femoral bone prominences, detected frequencies that are propagated through the femoral head and acetabular cup interactions. A data acquisition system was used to amplify the signal and filter out noise generated by undesired frequencies. In vivo kinematics and femoral head sliding quantified using video fluoroscopy were correlated to the sound and acceleration measurements. Distinct variations between the different subjects were identified. A correlation of sound and acceleration impulses with separation has been achieved. Although, in vivo sounds are quite variable in nature and all correlated well with the visual images. This is the first study to document and correlate visual and audible effects of THA under in-vivo conditions. This study has shown that the development of the acoustic and vibration technique provides a practical method and generates new possibilities for a better understanding of THA performance. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Are Hybrid Liver Resections Truly Minimally Invasive? A Propensity Score Matching Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Fabricio Ferreira; Kruger, Jaime Arthur Pirola; Jeismann, Vagner Birk; Fonseca, Gilton Marques; Makdissi, Fábio Ferrari; Ferreira, Leandro Augusto; D'Albuquerque, Luiz Augusto Carneiro; Cecconello, Ivan; Herman, Paulo

    2017-12-01

    Hybrid liver resection is considered a modality of minimally invasive surgery; however, there are doubts regarding loss of benefits of laparoscopy due to the use of an auxiliary incision. We compared perioperative results of patients undergoing hybrid × open and hybrid × pure laparoscopic resections. Consecutive patients undergoing liver resection between June 2008 and January 2016 were studied. Study groups were compared after propensity score matching (PSM). Six hundred forty-four resections were included in the comparative analysis: 470 open, 120 pure laparoscopic, and 54 hybrids. After PSM, 54 patients were included in each group. Hybrid × open: hybrid technique had shorter operative time (319.5 ± 108.6 × 376.2 ± 155.8 minutes, P = .033), shorter hospital stay (6.0 ± 2.7 × 8.1 ± 5.6 days, P = .001), and lower morbidity (18.5% × 40.7%, P = .003). Hybrid × pure laparoscopic: hybrid group had lower conversion rate (0% × 13%, P = .013). There was no difference regarding estimated blood loss, transfusion rate, hospital stay, complications, or mortality. Hybrid resection has better perioperative results than the open approach and is similar to pure laparoscopy. The hybrid technique should be considered a minimally invasive approach.

  16. An Analysis of Oncotype DX Recurrence Scores and Clinicopathologic Characteristics in Invasive Lobular Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felts, Jesse L; Zhu, Junjia; Han, Bing; Smith, Stanley J; Truica, Cristina I

    2017-11-01

    The Oncotype DX breast cancer assay (Genomic Health, Redwood City, CA) is increasingly being used to guide treatment decisions for patients with early stage, hormone-positive, Her-2-negative breast cancer. The utility of the Oncotype DX in decision making for treatment of invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) has not been investigated as the results reported by Genomic Health are largely in a population with invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). The authors hypothesized that the Oncotype DX recurrence score (RS) distribution for ILC is different than that for IDC. We performed a retrospective analysis of early stage breast cancer patients treated at Penn State Cancer Institute from 2001 to 2011 and identified 102 patients with ILC. We also pulled RS data from our institution's prospective registry of consecutive patients with early stage IDC treated during the same time period. Median follow-up was 55 months. We found that the RS distribution for ILC differed significantly from that of IDC (p = 0.024). We also found a statistically significant difference in the RS distribution between the pure ILC and pleomorphic ILC subtypes (p = 0.027). The Oncotype DX RS distribution in ILC is unique, differing significantly from that in ductal carcinoma. Consequently, the clinical usefulness and cost-effectiveness of the Oncotype DX in guiding treatment for ILC should be further investigated. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Molecular analysis of glycogen storage disease type Ia in Iranian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    [Mahmoud S. K., Khorrami A., Rafeey M., Ghergherehchi R. and Sima M. D. 2017 Molecular analysis of glycogen storage disease type Ia in Iranian Azeri ... G6PC gene; Azeri Turkish; glycogen storage disease type Ia; novel mutation; Azeri Turkish sequencing. ... Approximately 5 ml of intravenous blood samples were col-.

  18. Molecular cloning, sequence analysis and structure prediction of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Molecular cloning, sequence analysis and structure prediction of the related to b 0,+ amino acid transporter (rBAT) in Cyprinus carpio L. ... The amplified product was 2370 bp, including a 42 bp 5'-untranslated region, a 288 bp 3'-untranslated region, and a 2040 bp open reading frame (ORF), which encoded 679 amino acids ...

  19. Laser-based molecular spectroscopy for chemical analysis: laser fundamentals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moore, D.S.; Vo-Dinh, T.; Velthorst, N.H.; Schrader, B.

    1996-01-01

    This report is 15th in a series on Spectrochemical Methods of Analysis issued by IUPAC Commission V.4. It is concerned with the fundamental properties of lasers as used in analytical molecular spectroscopy in the optical wavelength region. The present report has five main sections: Introduction to

  20. Analysis of Molecular Marker Compounds from Vitexagnus cactus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analysis of Molecular Marker Compounds from Vitexagnus cactus Using the High Performance Liquid Chromatography and Evaporative Light Scattering Detector ... ELS detector is regarded as a valuable alternative to UV detection system for identification of the compounds that do not contain strong chromophores.

  1. Molecular cloning, characterization and expression analysis of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecular cloning, characterization and expression analysis of the gene encoding 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase from Aquilaria sinensis (Lour ... Laboratory of Resources Conservation and Development of Southern Medicine), Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, ...

  2. Fragrance analysis using molecular and biochemical methods in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For molecular and biochemical analysis of aroma, a mapping population comprising 208 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from a diverse cross between CSR10 and Taraori Basmati through Single seed descent (SSD) method was used. RILs are among the best mapping populations, which provide a novel material ...

  3. Analysis of the normal optical, Michel and molecular potentials on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Analysis of the normal optical, Michel and molecular potentials on the. 40. Ca(. 6. Li, d). 44. Ti reaction. UTTAM K MAZUMDER1, ANOCK SOMADDER2, ENAMUL HOQUE2,. YASMEEN HAQUE2, SUSANTA K DAS2,∗ and H M SEN GUPTA3. 1Department of Physics, Chandina Redwan Ahmed College, Comilla 3500, ...

  4. Molecular genetic analysis of grain protein content and flour ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 95; Issue 2. Molecular genetic analysis of grain protein content and flour whiteness degree using RILs in common wheat. XIANYIN SUN KE WU YAN ZHAO ZHAOGUO QIAN FANMEI KONG YING GUO YINGYING WANG SISHEN LI. RESEARCH ARTICLE Volume 95 Issue 2 ...

  5. Molecular cloning, characterization and expression analysis of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-06-12

    Jun 12, 2015 ... ber: KF498704), which is also the first DXR gene cloned and characterized from Aquilaria ssp. Homologous alignments and molecular evolution analysis were performed to charac- terize the catalytic function of AsDXR and its evolutionary relationship with DXRs from other species. The expression.

  6. Molecular analysis of genetic diversity in elite II synthetic hexaploid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-07-20

    Jul 20, 2009 ... Full Length Research Paper. Molecular analysis of genetic diversity in elite II synthetic hexaploid wheat screened against Barley yellow dwarf virus. Huma Saffdar1 ... The history of cultiva- ted wheat and human .... and viewed under the UV light chamber using the computer pro- gram UVIPhotoMW.

  7. A Molecular Iodine Spectral Data Set for Rovibronic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, J. Charles; Kuntzleman, Thomas S.; Kafader, Rachael A.

    2013-01-01

    A data set of 7,381 molecular iodine vapor rovibronic transitions between the X and B electronic states has been prepared for an advanced undergraduate spectroscopic analysis project. Students apply standard theoretical techniques to these data and determine the values of three X-state constants (image omitted) and four B-state constants (image…

  8. Pancreatic invasion of gastric carcinoma in emaciated patients: The value of combined analysis with CT and upper gastrointestinal series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Mun; Kim, Hyun; Kim, Choon Yul; Bahk, Yong Whee

    1992-01-01

    The obliteration of a fat plane between the gastric carcinoma and the pancreas is a major criterion on CT scan for pancreatic invasion of gastric carcinoma. However, this sign is not always a reliable indicator of invasion, as the patients with gastric carcinoma are often emaciated, producing a false positive CT findings. The purpose of our study is to improve the diagnostic accuracy of pancreatic invasion of gastric carcinoma in cases which the fat plane between the gastric carcinoma and the pancreas is obliterated in conventional CT scan. The authors performed lateral decubitus as well as supine CT scans and upper gastrointestinal series(UGIS) in 49 pathologically proven cases in which the fat plane was obliterated between the gastric carcinoma and the pancreas on conventional supine CT scan. Pancreatic invasion was suggested when the fat plane was obliterated persistently in the lateral decubitus view as well as the spine CT images and the involved gastric wall and adjacent pancreas maintained constant approximation despite postural change(CT+), and when the gastric tumor moved downward on the erect view of the UGIS no more than 1.5 times the height of the first lumbar vertebral body(UGIS+). Among 49 cases in which the fat plane between the gastric carcinoma and the pancreas was obliterated on supine CT scan, pancreatic invasion was confirmed pathologically in 11 cases(22.4%). Eight of 11 cases proven as pancreatic invasion were correctly diagnosed as pancreatic invasion by this combined analysis(CT+/UGIS+, 72.7%). Twenty seven of 38 cases proven as no pancreatic invasion were correctly diagnosed as no pancreatic invasion(CT-/UGIS-, 71.1%). Twelve cases showed CT+/UGIS- or CT-/UGIS+, so it was inconclusive whether there was invasion or not. The overall diagnostic accuracy was 71.4%. In conclusion, combined analysis with supine and lateral decubitus CT and UGIS is useful for improving diagnostic accuracy for pancreatic invasion by gastric carcinoma in patients of

  9. Pancreatic invasion of gastric carcinoma in emaciated patients: The value of combined analysis with CT and upper gastrointestinal series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Mun; Kim, Hyun; Kim, Choon Yul; Bahk, Yong Whee [Catholic University Medical College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-03-15

    The obliteration of a fat plane between the gastric carcinoma and the pancreas is a major criterion on CT scan for pancreatic invasion of gastric carcinoma. However, this sign is not always a reliable indicator of invasion, as the patients with gastric carcinoma are often emaciated, producing a false positive CT findings. The purpose of our study is to improve the diagnostic accuracy of pancreatic invasion of gastric carcinoma in cases which the fat plane between the gastric carcinoma and the pancreas is obliterated in conventional CT scan. The authors performed lateral decubitus as well as supine CT scans and upper gastrointestinal series(UGIS) in 49 pathologically proven cases in which the fat plane was obliterated between the gastric carcinoma and the pancreas on conventional supine CT scan. Pancreatic invasion was suggested when the fat plane was obliterated persistently in the lateral decubitus view as well as the spine CT images and the involved gastric wall and adjacent pancreas maintained constant approximation despite postural change(CT+), and when the gastric tumor moved downward on the erect view of the UGIS no more than 1.5 times the height of the first lumbar vertebral body(UGIS+). Among 49 cases in which the fat plane between the gastric carcinoma and the pancreas was obliterated on supine CT scan, pancreatic invasion was confirmed pathologically in 11 cases(22.4%). Eight of 11 cases proven as pancreatic invasion were correctly diagnosed as pancreatic invasion by this combined analysis(CT+/UGIS+, 72.7%). Twenty seven of 38 cases proven as no pancreatic invasion were correctly diagnosed as no pancreatic invasion(CT-/UGIS-, 71.1%). Twelve cases showed CT+/UGIS- or CT-/UGIS+, so it was inconclusive whether there was invasion or not. The overall diagnostic accuracy was 71.4%. In conclusion, combined analysis with supine and lateral decubitus CT and UGIS is useful for improving diagnostic accuracy for pancreatic invasion by gastric carcinoma in patients of

  10. Molecular taxonomy of Plagioscion Heckel (Perciformes, Sciaenidae and evidence from mtDNA RFLP markers for an invasive species in the Paraná river, Southern Brazil Taxonomia molecular de Plagioscion Heckel (Perciformes, Sciaenidae e evidências de marcadores moleculares RFLPs de mtDNA para uma espécie invasora no rio Paraná, Sul do Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo A. Torres

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial RFLP markers were developed to examine whether Plagioscion squamosissimus (Heckel, 1840 is invasive in natural environments of the congener P. ternetzi in the Paraná river, in southern Brazil. Specimens of P. squamosissimus and of the putative P. ternetzi (Boulenger, 1895 were obtained from the Negro river (Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil and from Paraná river, respectively. Fragments of the cytochrome b gene (900bp were amplified by PCR and four restriction enzymes (Eco RI, Mbo I, Bam HI and Alu I yielded the mitochondrial markers. An additional RFLP analysis with a cytochrome b gene sequence of Plagioncion sp. from GeneBank was carried out to validate the prior analysis. No genetic differentiation was found among either sample. While molecular variation in the cytochrome b analysis was no substantial among individuals, the combined analysis was important for demonstrating that there is no evidence for differentiation of the putative sample P. ternetzi from that of P. squamosissimus. The ecological implications of the introduced occurrence of P. squamosissimus, as well as the role of molecular taxonomic approaches for biodiversity studies are discussed.Marcadores RFLPs mitocondriais foram desenvolvidos para verificar se Plagioscion squamosissimus (Heckel, 1840 é invasora nos ambientes naturais da espécie congênere P. ternetzi no rio Paraná, no sul do Brasil. Exemplares de Plagioscion squamosissimus e supostamente de P. ternetzi (Boulenger, 1895 foram obtidos, respectivamente, do rio Negro (Manaus, AM, Brasil e rio Paraná (Foz do Iguaçu, PR, Brasil. Foram amplificados, via PCR, fragmentos de cerca de 900pb do Citocromo b e foram utilizadas quatro enzimas de restrição (Eco RI, Mbo I, Bam HI e Alu I para os fins de geração dos marcadores moleculares. Foi desenvolvida, a partir de uma seqüência de Citocromo b de Plagioscion sp. (genebank, uma análise de RFLP adicional, objetivando validar a primeira análise acima mencionada

  11. Rapid molecular detection of invasive species in ballast and harbor water by integrating environmental DNA and light transmission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Scott P; Grey, Erin; Olds, Brett; Feder, Jeffery L; Ruggiero, Steven T; Tanner, Carol E; Lodge, David M

    2015-04-07

    Invasive species introduced via the ballast water of commercial ships cause enormous environmental and economic damage worldwide. Accurate monitoring for these often microscopic and morphologically indistinguishable species is challenging but critical for mitigating damages. We apply eDNA sampling, which involves the filtering and subsequent DNA extraction of microscopic bits of tissue suspended in water, to ballast and harbor water sampled during a commercial ship's 1400 km voyage through the North American Great Lakes. Using a lab-based gel electrophoresis assay and a rapid, field-ready light transmission spectroscopy (LTS) assay, we test for the presence of two invasive species: quagga (Dreissena bugensis) and zebra (D. polymorpha) mussels. Furthermore, we spiked a set of uninfested ballast and harbor samples with zebra mussel tissue to further test each assay's detection capabilities. In unmanipulated samples, zebra mussel was not detected, while quagga mussel was detected in all samples at a rate of 85% for the gel assay and 100% for the LTS assay. In the spiked experimental samples, both assays detected zebra mussel in 94% of spiked samples and 0% of negative controls. Overall, these results demonstrate that eDNA sampling is effective for monitoring ballast-mediated invasions and that LTS has the potential for rapid, field-based detection.

  12. Non-invasive differentiation of pancreatic lesions: is analysis of FDG kinetics superior to semiquantitative uptake value analysis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitzsche, E.U.; Hoegerle, S.; Mix, M.; Brink, I.; Otte, A.; Moser, E.

    2002-01-01

    The diagnostic utility of fluorine-18 2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) for the non-invasive differentiation of focal pancreatic lesions originating from cancer or chronic pancreatitis by combined visual image interpretation and semiquantitative uptake value analysis has been documented. However, in clinical routine some misdiagnosis is still observed. This is because there is potential overlap between the semiquantitative uptake values obtained for active inflammatory lesions and cancer. Therefore, this prospective study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that analysis of dynamic kinetics of focal pancreatic lesions based on FDG PET may more accurately determine the benign or malignant nature of such lesions. Thirty patients (56±17 years) were studied dynamically with FDG PET for a period of 60-90 min. Patients were assigned to one of four groups: control, acute pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis or pancreatic cancer. Two observers, blinded to the clinical data, analysed the time-activity curves of FDG kinetics based on region of interest analysis. The diagnosis predicted by FDG PET was compared with the result of histological examination of the surgical specimen. Analysis of FDG kinetics revealed significant differences in the shape of the time-activity curve for controls, pancreatic cancer and inflammatory disease. Surprisingly, there was no significant difference in the time-activity curve shape for chronic pancreatitis and acute pancreatitis; this is, however, not a clinical issue. Furthermore, acquisition time (60 min vs 90 min) did not affect interpretation of the time-activity curve, so that scanning time may be regularly shortened to 60 min. Interobserver agreement was 1. Based on these findings, non-invasive differentiation between pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis was correctly predicted in all cases, as confirmed by histology. In addition, the specificity was increased compared with that obtained from standardised

  13. Non-invasive differentiation of pancreatic lesions: is analysis of FDG kinetics superior to semiquantitative uptake value analysis?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitzsche, E.U.; Hoegerle, S.; Mix, M.; Brink, I.; Otte, A.; Moser, E. [Freiburg Univ. (Germany). Abt. Radiologie; Imdahl, A. [Division of Visceral Surgery, Department of Surgery, Albert Ludwigs University, Medical Center, Freiburg (Germany)

    2002-02-01

    The diagnostic utility of fluorine-18 2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) for the non-invasive differentiation of focal pancreatic lesions originating from cancer or chronic pancreatitis by combined visual image interpretation and semiquantitative uptake value analysis has been documented. However, in clinical routine some misdiagnosis is still observed. This is because there is potential overlap between the semiquantitative uptake values obtained for active inflammatory lesions and cancer. Therefore, this prospective study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that analysis of dynamic kinetics of focal pancreatic lesions based on FDG PET may more accurately determine the benign or malignant nature of such lesions. Thirty patients (56{+-}17 years) were studied dynamically with FDG PET for a period of 60-90 min. Patients were assigned to one of four groups: control, acute pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis or pancreatic cancer. Two observers, blinded to the clinical data, analysed the time-activity curves of FDG kinetics based on region of interest analysis. The diagnosis predicted by FDG PET was compared with the result of histological examination of the surgical specimen. Analysis of FDG kinetics revealed significant differences in the shape of the time-activity curve for controls, pancreatic cancer and inflammatory disease. Surprisingly, there was no significant difference in the time-activity curve shape for chronic pancreatitis and acute pancreatitis; this is, however, not a clinical issue. Furthermore, acquisition time (60 min vs 90 min) did not affect interpretation of the time-activity curve, so that scanning time may be regularly shortened to 60 min. Interobserver agreement was 1. Based on these findings, non-invasive differentiation between pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis was correctly predicted in all cases, as confirmed by histology. In addition, the specificity was increased compared with that obtained from standardised

  14. Genetic origin and dispersal of the invasive soybean aphid inferred from population genetic analysis and approximate Bayesian computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Fang; Chen, Jing; Jiang, Li-Yun; Qu, Yan-Hua; Qiao, Ge-Xia

    2018-01-09

    Biological invasion is considered one of the most important global environmental problems. Knowledge of the source and dispersal routes of invasion could facilitate the eradication and control of invasive species. Soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura, is one of the most destructive soybean pests. For effective management of this pest, we conducted genetic analyses and approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) analysis to determine the origins and dispersal of the aphid species, as well as the source of its invasion in the USA, using eight microsatellite loci and the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene. We were able to identify a significant isolation by distance (IBD) pattern and three genetic lineages in the microsatellite data but not in the mtDNA dataset. The genetic structure showed that the USA population has the closest relationship with those from Korea and Japan, indicating that the two latter populations might be the sources of the invasion to the USA. Both population genetic analyses and ABC showed that the northeastern populations in China were the possible sources of the further spread of A. glycines to Indonesia. The dispersal history of this aphid can provide useful information for pest management strategies and can further help predict areas at risk of invasion. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Pancreas-related complications following gastrectomy: systematic review and meta-analysis of open versus minimally invasive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Francesco; Giuliani, Giuseppe; Iacobone, Martina; Bianchi, Paolo Pietro; Coratti, Andrea

    2017-11-01

    Postoperative pancreas-related complications are quite uncommon but potentially life-threatening occurrences that may occasionally complicate the postoperative course of gastrectomy. A number of reports have described such conditions after both standard open and minimally invasive surgery. Our study has the purpose to systematically determine the pooled incidence of pancreatic events following radical gastrectomy. We also aimed to elucidate whether any difference in incidence exists between patients operated via conventional open or minimally invasive surgery. PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library were systematically searched for randomized or well-matched studies comparing conventional with minimally invasive oncological gastrectomy and reporting pancreas-related postoperative complications. We evaluated possible differences in outcomes between open and minimally invasive surgery. A meta-analysis of relevant comparisons was performed using RevMan 5.3. A total of 20 studies, whereby 6 randomized and 14 non-randomized comparative studies including a total of 7336 patients, were considered eligible for data extraction. Globally, more than 1% of patients experienced some pancreatic occurrences during the postoperative course. The use of minimally invasive surgery showed a trend toward increased overall pancreatic morbidity (OR 1.39), pancreatitis (OR 2.69), and pancreatic fistula (OR 1.13). Although minimally invasive radical gastrectomy is currently established as a valid alternative to open surgery for the treatment of gastric cancer, a higher risk of pancreas-related morbidity should be taken into account.

  16. In situ non-invasive EDXRF analysis to reconstruct stratigraphy and thickness of Renaissance pictorial multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonizzoni, L.; Poldi, G.; Milazzo, M.; Galli, A.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we report a few examples showing how energy dispersive XRF analysis (EDXRF) coupled with visible reflectance spectroscopy (vis-RS) can be successfully applied for the investigation of wood or canvas paintings by performing stratigraphic analyses with non-invasive techniques. The specific aim is to reconstruct layers and their thicknesses. The method has been tested in the laboratory on paint layers similar to traditional Renaissance ones. In situ analyses of a famous wood painting by Andrea Mantegna - 'Madonna col bambino e un coro di cherubini', Pinacoteca di Brera, Milan - were also carried out. While illustrating the results concerning the identification of pigments and the discrimination of layer stratigraphy, advantages and limitation of this method are pointed out. (authors)

  17. In situ non-invasive EDXRF analysis to reconstruct stratigraphy and thickness of Renaissance pictorial multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonizzoni, L.; Poldi, G.; Milazzo, M. [Istituto di Fisica Generale Applicata, Universita' degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Galli, A. [CNR-INFM, Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Universita' degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, via R. Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy)

    2007-03-15

    In this paper, we report a few examples showing how energy dispersive XRF analysis (EDXRF) coupled with visible reflectance spectroscopy (vis-RS) can be successfully applied for the investigation of wood or canvas paintings by performing stratigraphic analyses with non-invasive techniques. The specific aim is to reconstruct layers and their thicknesses. The method has been tested in the laboratory on paint layers similar to traditional Renaissance ones. In situ analyses of a famous wood painting by Andrea Mantegna - 'Madonna col bambino e un coro di cherubini', Pinacoteca di Brera, Milan - were also carried out. While illustrating the results concerning the identification of pigments and the discrimination of layer stratigraphy, advantages and limitation of this method are pointed out. (authors)

  18. An extensive field survey combined with a phylogenetic analysis reveals rapid and widespread invasion of two alien whiteflies in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jian; De Barro, Paul; Zhao, Hua; Wang, Jia; Nardi, Francesco; Liu, Shu-Sheng

    2011-01-21

    To understand the processes of invasions by alien insects is a pre-requisite for improving management. The whitefly Bemisia tabaci is a cryptic species complex that contains some of the most invasive pests worldwide. However, extensive field data to show the geographic distribution of the members of this species complex as well as the invasion by some of its members are scarce. We used field surveys and published data to assess the current diversity and distribution of B. tabaci cryptic species in China and relate the indigenous members to other Asian and Australian members of the complex. The survey covered the 16 provinces where indigenous B. tabaci occur and extends this with published data for the whole of China. We used molecular markers to identify cryptic species. The evolutionary relationships between the different Asian B. tabaci were reconstructed using Bayesian methods. We show that whereas in the past the exotic invader Middle East-Asia Minor 1 was predominant across China, another newer invader Mediterranean is now the dominant species in the Yangtze River Valley and eastern coastal areas, and Middle East-Asia Minor 1 is now predominant only in the south and south eastern coastal areas. Based on mtCO1 we identified four new cryptic species, and in total we have recorded 13 indigenous and two invasive species from China. Diversity was highest in the southern and southeastern provinces and declined to north and west. Only the two invasive species were found in the northern part of the country where they occur primarily in protected cropping. By 2009, indigenous species were mainly found in remote mountainous areas and were mostly absent from extensive agricultural areas. Invasions by some members of the whitefly B. tabaci species complex can be rapid and widespread, and indigenous species closely related to the invaders are replaced.

  19. An extensive field survey combined with a phylogenetic analysis reveals rapid and widespread invasion of two alien whiteflies in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Hu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To understand the processes of invasions by alien insects is a pre-requisite for improving management. The whitefly Bemisia tabaci is a cryptic species complex that contains some of the most invasive pests worldwide. However, extensive field data to show the geographic distribution of the members of this species complex as well as the invasion by some of its members are scarce. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used field surveys and published data to assess the current diversity and distribution of B. tabaci cryptic species in China and relate the indigenous members to other Asian and Australian members of the complex. The survey covered the 16 provinces where indigenous B. tabaci occur and extends this with published data for the whole of China. We used molecular markers to identify cryptic species. The evolutionary relationships between the different Asian B. tabaci were reconstructed using Bayesian methods. We show that whereas in the past the exotic invader Middle East-Asia Minor 1 was predominant across China, another newer invader Mediterranean is now the dominant species in the Yangtze River Valley and eastern coastal areas, and Middle East-Asia Minor 1 is now predominant only in the south and south eastern coastal areas. Based on mtCO1 we identified four new cryptic species, and in total we have recorded 13 indigenous and two invasive species from China. Diversity was highest in the southern and southeastern provinces and declined to north and west. Only the two invasive species were found in the northern part of the country where they occur primarily in protected cropping. By 2009, indigenous species were mainly found in remote mountainous areas and were mostly absent from extensive agricultural areas. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Invasions by some members of the whitefly B. tabaci species complex can be rapid and widespread, and indigenous species closely related to the invaders are replaced.

  20. Total abdominal hysterectomy versus minimal-invasive hysterectomy: a systemic review and meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aragon Palmero, Felipe Jorge; Exposito Exposito, Moises

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION. At the present time three types of hysterectomies are used: the vaginal hysterectomy and the minimal-invasive hysterectomy (MIH). The objective of present research was to compare the MIH and the total abdominal hysterectomy (TAH) in women presenting with benign uterine diseases. METHODS. A systemic review was made and a meta-analysis from the following databases: MEDLINE, EBSCO HOST AND The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Only the controlled and randomized studies were selected. The data of all studies were combined and also the relative risk (RR) with a 95% CI was used with the Mantel-Haenszel method as an effect measure for dichotomy variables. For the analysis of continuing variables the mean difference was used. In all the comparisons performed the results were obtained with the fix effect and randomized forms. RESULTS. A total of 53 transoperative complications were registered in the MIH hysterectomy versus 17 in the TAH group (RR: 1,78; 95% CI: 1,04-3.05). Postoperative complications evolved in a similar way in both groups without significant differences from the statistical point of view. The blood losses, the hospital stay and the patient's reincorporation to usual and work activities were lesser in the laparoscopy group; however, the operative time is higher when it is compared with TAH (mean difference: 37,36; 95% CI: 34,36-39,93). CONCLUSIONS. Both techniques have advantages and disadvantages. The indication of MIH must to be individualized according to the clinical situation of each patient and these not to be performed in those centers without a properly trained surgical staff and with experience in advanced minimal invasive surgery. (author)

  1. Diagnosis of vulvar lesions by non-invasive optical analysis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlastos, Anne-Therese; Charvet, Igor; Dellacasa, Ilaria; Capanna, Federica; Pelte, Marie-Françoise; Thueler, Philippe; Saint-Ghislain, Michel; Depeursinge, Christian; Meda, Paolo

    2009-07-22

    A procedure that could allow an early in vivo and non-invasive detection of vulvar lesions would be extremely useful. We tested an innovative optical method (Optiprobe), which uses a harmless, visible light source for the in vivo, on-line detection of minimal alterations in the structure of vulvar epithelium. A group of 3 female volunteers without gynecological symptoms were first screened to evaluate optical properties of normal vulvar tissue. Next, a group of 16 patients undergoing gynecological examination for vulvar lesions was evaluated by the Optiprobe at suspected sites before these sites were biopsied for histological analysis. Adjacent, non-involved sites were also measured to provide internal controls. Histological analysis of the biopsies identified one case that did not show obvious alterations, 4 cases of high-grade vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN), 5 cases of vulvitis, and 6 cases of lichen sclerosis (LS).The optical properties of the VIN cases were significantly different from those of controls, due to a decrease in the absorption spectra and an increase in the scattering spectra. In contrast, a significant increase in the absorption spectra and a decrease in the scattering spectra were observed in the cases of vulvitis. In the LS cases, the absorption spectra were as in controls, whereas the scattering spectra were significantly decreased. We conclude that the Optiprobe provides a useful tool for a rapid and non-invasive detection of vulvar alterations. The method should contribute to reduce the number of biopsies and to facilitate the long-term follow-up of vulvar lesions.

  2. Diagnosis of vulvar lesions by non-invasive optical analysis: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Meda

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available A procedure that could allow an early in vivo and non-invasive detection of vulvar lesions would be extremely useful. We tested an innovative optical method (Optiprobe, which uses a harmless, visible light source for the in vivo, on-line detection of minimal alterations in the structure of vulvar epithelium. A group of 3 female volunteers without gynecological symptoms were first screened to evaluate optical properties of normal vulvar tissue. Next, a group of 16 patients undergoing gynecological examination for vulvar lesions was evaluated by the Optiprobe at suspected sites before these sites were biopsied for histological analysis. Adjacent, non-involved sites were also measured to provide internal controls. Histological analysis of the biopsies identified one case that did not show obvious alterations, 4 cases of high-grade vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN, 5 cases of vulvitis, and 6 cases of lichen sclerosis (LS. The optical properties of the VIN cases were significantly different from those of controls, due to a decrease in the absorption spectra and an increase in the scattering spectra. In contrast, a significant increase in the absorption spectra and a decrease in the scattering spectra were observed in the cases of vulvitis. In the LS cases, the absorption spectra were as in controls, whereas the scattering spectra were significantly decreased. We conclude that the Optiprobe provides a useful tool for a rapid and non-invasive detection of vulvar alterations. The method should contribute to reduce the number of biopsies and to facilitate the long-term follow-up of vulvar lesions.

  3. [An analysis of 68 invasive lobular breast cancer cases in clinicopathological characteristics and the prognostic determinants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Q; Xiang, H Y; Ye, J M; Xu, L; Zhang, H; Zhang, S; Duan, X N; Liu, Y H

    2018-02-01

    Objective: To study the clinicopathological characteristics and the prognostic determinants of the invasive lobular carcinoma breast cancer. Methods: This was a retrospective single-center study of invasive lobular breast cancer cases diagnosed from January 2008 to December 2014 at Peking University First Hospital Breast Disease Center. The study enrolled 68 invasive lobular breast cancer patients, which represented 3.64% (68/1 870) of total invasive breast cancer. The median age of all selected patients was 46 years ranging from 36 to 83 years. All patients were restaged based on the 8(th) edition of AJCC cancer staging system and follow-up data including disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were analyzed to explore the prognostic determinants. The 5-year OS and DFS were calculated using Kaplan-Meier method; the significance of correlations between clinicopathological features and prognostic factors was estimated using log-rank test. Results: There were significant differences in OS between patients with different anatomic stage, prognostic stage, lymph node metastasis, progesterone receptor (PR) expression, lymphvascular invasion and perineural invasion (χ(2:) 4.318 to 32.394, all P invasion (χ(2:) 4.347 to 27.369, all P invasion are the prognostic factors of invasive lobular breast cancer. Regard to invasive lobular breast cancer patients, clinicians should pay close attention to the differences between prognostic stage and anatomic stage.

  4. Cluster analysis and subgrouping to investigate inter-individual variability to non-invasive brain stimulation: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Michael; Zoghi, Maryam; Jaberzadeh, Shapour

    2018-01-12

    Cluster analysis and other subgrouping techniques have risen in popularity in recent years in non-invasive brain stimulation research in the attempt to investigate the issue of inter-individual variability - the issue of why some individuals respond, as traditionally expected, to non-invasive brain stimulation protocols and others do not. Cluster analysis and subgrouping techniques have been used to categorise individuals, based on their response patterns, as responder or non-responders. There is, however, a lack of consensus and consistency on the most appropriate technique to use. This systematic review aimed to provide a systematic summary of the cluster analysis and subgrouping techniques used to date and suggest recommendations moving forward. Twenty studies were included that utilised subgrouping techniques, while seven of these additionally utilised cluster analysis techniques. The results of this systematic review appear to indicate that statistical cluster analysis techniques are effective in identifying subgroups of individuals based on response patterns to non-invasive brain stimulation. This systematic review also reports a lack of consensus amongst researchers on the most effective subgrouping technique and the criteria used to determine whether an individual is categorised as a responder or a non-responder. This systematic review provides a step-by-step guide to carrying out statistical cluster analyses and subgrouping techniques to provide a framework for analysis when developing further insights into the contributing factors of inter-individual variability in response to non-invasive brain stimulation.

  5. RNA-seq analysis of early enteromyxosis in turbot (Scophthalmus maximus): new insights into parasite invasion and immune evasion strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronza, Paolo; Robledo, Diego; Bermúdez, Roberto; Losada, Ana Paula; Pardo, Belén G; Sitjà-Bobadilla, Ariadna; Quiroga, María Isabel; Martínez, Paulino

    2016-07-01

    Enteromyxum scophthalmi, an intestinal myxozoan parasite, is the causative agent of a threatening disease for turbot (Scophthalmus maximus, L.) aquaculture. The colonisation of the digestive tract by this parasite leads to a cachectic syndrome associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. This myxosporidiosis has a long pre-patent period and the first detectable clinical and histopathological changes are subtle. The pathogenic mechanisms acting in the early stages of infection are still far from being fully understood. Further information on the host-parasite interaction is needed to assist in finding efficient preventive and therapeutic measures. Here, a RNA-seq-based transcriptome analysis of head kidney, spleen and pyloric caeca from experimentally-infected and control turbot was performed. Only infected fish with early signs of infection, determined by histopathology and immunohistochemical detection of E. scophthalmi, were selected. The RNA-seq analysis revealed, as expected, less intense transcriptomic changes than those previously found during later stages of the disease. Several genes involved in IFN-related pathways were up-regulated in the three organs, suggesting that the IFN-mediated immune response plays a main role in this phase of the disease. Interestingly, an opposite expression pattern had been found in a previous study on severely infected turbot. In addition, possible strategies for immune system evasion were suggested by the down-regulation of different genes encoding complement components and acute phase proteins. At the site of infection (pyloric caeca), modulation of genes related to different structural proteins was detected and the expression profile indicated the inhibition of cell proliferation and differentiation. These transcriptomic changes provide indications regarding the mechanisms of parasite attachment to and invasion of the host. The current results contribute to a better knowledge of the events that characterise the early

  6. Crime and Punishment Analysis: Land Invasion "Para-institutions" in Cali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Javier Burbano Valencia

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on the crime economics of Becker (1968 and Ehrlich (1973, including the impact of the migratory flow, this paper studies the reasons why some individuals choose to strategically, rationally, and contingently become involved in illegal land invasion "para-institutions" in Cali since the 1950s. This will be done by modeling the efficiency of justice in order to discourage invaders through simulations of sentences and arrest likelihood and deterrent punishment under three "para-institutions": invasive dynasty, organized invasion and contingent invasion (endogenous migratory flow. These simulations will be anchored to calibrated actual parameters of the relevant population. This will allow the calibration of the line of indifference (division among individuals with invasive (and incentives to illegality and non-invasive behaviors. Finally, a policy proposal will be devised to help correct the inefficiencies found in the sanctioning mechanisms, if applicable.

  7. Molecular Markers Increase Precision of the European Association of Urology Non-Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer Progression Risk Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kessel, Kim E M; van der Keur, Kirstin A; Dyrskjøt, Lars; Algaba, Ferran; Welvaart, Naeromy Y C; Beukers, Willemien; Segersten, Ulrika; Keck, Bastian; Maurer, Tobias; Simic, Tatjana; Horstmann, Marcus; Grimm, Marc-Oliver; Hermann, Gregers G; Mogensen, Karin; Hartmann, Arndt; Harving, Niels; Petersen, Astrid C; Jensen, Jørgen B; Junker, Kerstin; Boormans, Joost L; Real, Francisco X; Malats, Núria; Malmström, Per-Uno; Ørntoft, Torben F; Zwarthoff, Ellen C

    2018-01-24

    Purpose: The European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines for non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) recommend risk stratification based on clinicopathologic parameters. Our aim was to investigate the added value of biomarkers to improve risk stratification of NMIBC. Experimental Design: We prospectively included 1,239 patients in follow-up for NMIBC in six European countries. Fresh-frozen tumor samples were analyzed for GATA2, TBX2, TBX3 , and ZIC4 methylation and FGFR3, TERT, PIK3CA , and RAS mutation status. Cox regression analyses identified markers that were significantly associated with progression to muscle-invasive disease. The progression incidence rate (PIR = rate of progression per 100 patient-years) was calculated for subgroups. Results: In our cohort, 276 patients had a low, 273 an intermediate, and 555 a high risk of tumor progression based on the EAU NMIBC guideline. Fifty-seven patients (4.6%) progressed to muscle-invasive disease. The limited number of progressors in this large cohort compared with older studies is likely due to improved treatment in the past two decades. Overall, wild-type FGFR3 and methylation of GATA2 and TBX3 were significantly associated with progression (HR = 0.34, 2.53, and 2.64, respectively). The PIR for EAU high-risk patients was 4.25. On the basis of FGFR3 mutation status and methylation of GATA2 , this cohort could be reclassified into a good class (PIR = 0.86, 26.2% of patients), a moderate class (PIR = 4.32, 49.7%), and a poor class (PIR = 7.66, 24.0%). Conclusions: We conclude that the addition of selected biomarkers to the EAU risk stratification increases its accuracy and identifies a subset of NMIBC patients with a very high risk of progression. Clin Cancer Res; 1-8. ©2018 AACR. ©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. A holistic multimodal approach to the non-invasive analysis of watercolour paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogou, Sotiria; Lucian, Andrei; Bellesia, Sonia; Burgio, Lucia; Bailey, Kate; Brooks, Charlotte; Liang, Haida

    2015-11-01

    A holistic approach using non-invasive multimodal imaging and spectroscopic techniques to study the materials (pigments, drawing materials and paper) and painting techniques of watercolour paintings is presented. The non-invasive imaging and spectroscopic techniques include VIS-NIR reflectance spectroscopy and multispectral imaging, micro-Raman spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). The three spectroscopic techniques complement each other in pigment identification. Multispectral imaging (near-infrared bands), OCT and micro-Raman complement each other in the visualisation and identification of the drawing material. OCT probes the micro-structure and light scattering properties of the substrate, while XRF detects the elemental composition that indicates the sizing methods and the filler content. The multiple techniques were applied in a study of forty-six nineteenth-century Chinese export watercolours from the Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A) and the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) to examine to what extent the non-invasive analysis techniques employed complement each other and how much useful information about the paintings can be extracted to address art conservation and history questions. A micro-destructive technique of micro-fade spectrometry was used to assess the vulnerability of the paintings to light exposure. Most of the paint and paper substrates were found to be more stable than ISO Blue Wool 3. The palette was found to be composed of mostly traditional Chinese pigments. While the synthetic pigment, Prussian blue, made in Europe, was found on some of the paintings, none was found on the RHS paintings accurately recorded as being between 1817 and 1831 even though it is known that Prussian blue was imported to China during this period. The scale insect dyes, lac and cochineal, were detected on nearly every painting including those that fall within the identified date range. Cochineal is known to have

  9. The lipid-reactive oxygen species phenotype of breast cancer. Raman spectroscopy and mapping, PCA and PLSDA for invasive ductal carcinoma and invasive lobular carcinoma. Molecular tumorigenic mechanisms beyond Warburg effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surmacki, Jakub; Brozek-Pluska, Beata; Kordek, Radzislaw; Abramczyk, Halina

    2015-04-07

    Vibrational signatures of human breast tissue (invasive ductal carcinoma and invasive lobular carcinoma) were used to identify, characterize and discriminate structures in normal (noncancerous) and cancerous tissues by confocal Raman imaging, Raman spectroscopy and IR spectroscopy. The most important differences between normal and cancerous tissues were found in regions characteristic for vibrations of carotenoids, fatty acids, proteins, and interfacial water. Particular attention was paid to the role played by unsaturated fatty acids and their derivatives. K-means clustering and basis analysis followed by PCA and PLSDA is employed to analyze Raman spectroscopic maps of human breast tissue and for a statistical analysis of the samples (82 patients, 164 samples). Raman maps successfully identify regions of carotenoids, fatty acids, and proteins. The intensities, frequencies and profiles of the average Raman spectra differentiate the biochemical composition of normal and cancerous tissues. The paper demonstrates that Raman imaging has reached a clinically relevant level in regard to breast cancer diagnosis applications. The sensitivity and specificity obtained directly from PLSLD and cross validation are equal to 90.5% and 84.8% for calibration and 84.7% and 71.9% for cross-validation respectively.

  10. Rapid assessment of populations trends of invasive species: Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DANA, ED

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA is a powerful analytical approach for biodi-versity management. Its main advan-tages are due to its intuitive processing and visualization, since mathematical workflow is conceptually similar to the widely accepted Principal Components Analysis. Detailed analyses of popula-tion trends with mathematical tools are often difficult to achieve for managers by a number of reasons (large numbers or areas monitored, large number of species, insufficient statistics skills, strong knowledge level in demographic analyses, etc.. SSA has been used since the 1970’s in signal processing to clarify signal vs. noisy information, but it has also been used in climate change analy-sis and other developmental areas. Be-sides, SSA is a rapid-learning method for technicians and managers with medium level of mathematical knowledge. Free software in Unix environment is avail-able. Unfortunately, no free and friendly software is available for Win-dows SO. Although R package may offer solutions for really advanced users, it does not fit real work situations for managers of biological invasions. Cater-pillar (Gistat Group, Ltd is by now, the best option found by the author in terms of price, facility for results inter-pretation and time consumed in learn-ing. The main disadvantage is the poor content of tutorial files

  11. Non-invasive baroreflex sensitivity assessment using wavelet transfer function-based time–frequency analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keissar, K; Gilad, O; Maestri, R; Pinna, G D; La Rovere, M T

    2010-01-01

    A novel approach for the estimation of baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) is introduced based on time–frequency analysis of the transfer function (TF). The TF method (TF-BRS) is a well-established non-invasive technique which assumes stationarity. This condition is difficult to meet, especially in cardiac patients. In this study, the classical TF was replaced with a wavelet transfer function (WTF) and the classical coherence was replaced with wavelet transform coherence (WTC), adding the time domain as an additional degree of freedom with dynamic error estimation. Error analysis and comparison between WTF-BRS and TF-BRS were performed using simulated signals with known transfer function and added noise. Similar comparisons were performed for ECG and blood pressure signals, in the supine position, of 19 normal subjects, 44 patients with a history of previous myocardial infarction (MI) and 45 patients with chronic heart failure. This yielded an excellent linear association (R > 0.94, p < 0.001) for time-averaged WTF-BRS, validating the new method as consistent with a known method. The additional advantage of dynamic analysis of coherence and TF estimates was illustrated in two physiological examples of supine rest and change of posture showing the evolution of BRS synchronized with its error estimations and sympathovagal balance

  12. Dispersal of invasive forest insects via recreational firewood: a quantitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Frank H; Yemshanov, Denys; Magarey, Roger D; Smith, William D

    2012-04-01

    Recreational travel is a recognized vector for the spread of invasive species in North America. However, there has been little quantitative analysis of the risks posed by such travel and the associated transport of firewood. In this study, we analyzed the risk of forest insect spread with firewood and estimated related dispersal parameters for application in geographically explicit invasion models. Our primary data source was the U.S. National Recreation Reservation Service database, which records camper reservations at > 2,500 locations nationwide. For > 7 million individual reservations made between 2004 and 2009 (including visits from Canada), we calculated the distance between visitor home address and campground location. We constructed an empirical dispersal kernel (i.e., the probability distribution of the travel distances) from these "origin-destination" data, and then fitted the data with various theoretical distributions. We found the data to be strongly leptokurtic (fat-tailed) and fairly well fit by the unbounded Johnson and lognormal distributions. Most campers ( approximately 53%) traveled 500 km (and as far as 5,500 km). Additionally, we examined the impact of geographic region, specific destinations (major national parks), and specific origin locations (major cities) on the shape of the dispersal kernel, and found that mixture distributions (i.e., theoretical distribution functions composed of multiple univariate distributions) may fit better in some circumstances. Although only a limited amount of all transported firewood is likely to be infested by forest insects, this still represents a considerable increase in dispersal potential beyond the insects' natural spread capabilities.

  13. A thematic analysis of experiences of varicose veins and minimally invasive surgery under local anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Briony F; Ogden, Jane; Whiteley, Mark S

    2015-06-01

    To gain insight into the experience of living with varicose veins and undergoing minimally invasive surgery under local anaesthesia in a private clinic. Minimally invasive surgery under local anaesthesia is replacing traditional surgical stripping for the treatment for varicose veins. Conscious surgery has previously been associated with elevated levels of anxiety and some associated pain. There is limited research exploring the experiences of patients undergoing varicose vein surgery under local anaesthesia. Qualitative semi-structured interviews with 20 patients who took part in a mixed methods study exploring the effects of distraction on intra-operative pain and anxiety. Participants were interviewed eight weeks post surgery about their experiences before, during and after surgery. Interviews were analysed using thematic analysis. Four themes were captured (1) negative emotions associated with symptoms, (2) unpreparedness for the surgical process, (3) feeling cared for and (4) improvements in well-being. An overarching theme of relationships was identified. Overall, varicose veins had a detrimental impact on quality of life prior to surgery. Patients felt unprepared for their procedure and experienced the operation as anxiety provoking and uncomfortable. This was much helped by the support of nursing staff in the theatre. Post surgery, patients' quality of life was reported as improved. More emphasis needs to be placed on preparing patients for surgery under local anaesthesia. The role of the nurse is central to creating a caring, relaxed environment which could improve patient experience. Patients' experiences of varicose veins and their treatment both influence, and are influenced by relationships with others at all stages of the management process. Nurses play an important role in improving patient experience during surgery and care needs to be taken to ensure that patients understand and accept the processes of surgery and recovery. © 2015 John Wiley

  14. TREEFINDER: a powerful graphical analysis environment for molecular phylogenetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von Haeseler Arndt

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most analysis programs for inferring molecular phylogenies are difficult to use, in particular for researchers with little programming experience. Results TREEFINDER is an easy-to-use integrative platform-independent analysis environment for molecular phylogenetics. In this paper the main features of TREEFINDER (version of April 2004 are described. TREEFINDER is written in ANSI C and Java and implements powerful statistical approaches for inferring gene tree and related analyzes. In addition, it provides a user-friendly graphical interface and a phylogenetic programming language. Conclusions TREEFINDER is a versatile framework for analyzing phylogenetic data across different platforms that is suited both for exploratory as well as advanced studies.

  15. Antifungal treatment for invasive Candida infections: a mixed treatment comparison meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nachega Jean B

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Invasive fungal infections are a major cause of mortality among patients at risk. Treatment guidelines vary on optimal treatment strategies. We aimed to determine the effects of different antifungal therapies on global response rates, mortality and safety. Methods We searched independently and in duplicate 10 electronic databases from inception to May 2009. We selected any randomized trial assessing established antifungal therapies for confirmed cases of invasive candidiasis among predominantly adult populations. We performed a meta-analysis and then conducted a Bayesian mixed treatment comparison to differentiate treatment effectiveness. Sensitivity analyses included dosage forms of amphotericin B and fluconazole compared to other azoles. Results Our analysis included 11 studies enrolling a total of 965 patients. For our primary analysis of global response rates, we pooled 7 trials comparing azoles to amphotericin B, Relative Risk [RR] 0.87 (95% Confidence Interval [CI], 0.78–0.96, P = 0.007, I2 = 43%, P = 0.09. We also pooled 2 trials of echinocandins versus amphotericin B and found a pooled RR of 1.10 (95% CI, 0.99–1.23, P = 0.08. One study compared anidulafungin to fluconazole and yielded a RR of 1.26 (95% CI, 1.06–1.51 in favor of anidulafungin. We pooled 7 trials assessing azoles versus amphotericin B for all-cause mortality, resulting in a pooled RR of 0.88 (95% CI, 0.74–1.05, P = 0.17, I2 = 0%, P = 0.96. Echinocandins versus amphotericin B (2 trials for all-cause mortality resulted in a pooled RR of 1.01 (95% CI, 0.84–1.20, P = 0.93. Anidulafungin versus fluconazole resulted in a RR of 0.73 (95% CI, 0.48–1.10, P = 0.34. Our mixed treatment comparison analysis found similar within-class effects across all interventions. Adverse event profiles differed, with amphotericin B exhibiting larger adverse event effects. Conclusion Treatment options appear to offer preferential effects on response rates and mortality. When

  16. Parietal pleural invasion/adhesion of subpleural lung cancer: Quantitative 4-dimensional CT analysis using dynamic-ventilatory scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakuma, Kotaro, E-mail: ksakuma@ohara-hp.or.jp [Department of Radiology, Ohara General Hospital, 6-11 Omachi, Fukushima City, Fukushima 960-8611 (Japan); Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Fukushima Medical University, 1 Hikariga-oka, Fukushima City, Fukushima 960-1295 (Japan); Yamashiro, Tsuneo, E-mail: clatsune@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Radiology, University of the Ryukyus, 207 Uehara, Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0215 (Japan); Moriya, Hiroshi, E-mail: hrshmoriya@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Ohara General Hospital, 6-11 Omachi, Fukushima City, Fukushima 960-8611 (Japan); Murayama, Sadayuki, E-mail: sadayuki@med.u-ryukyu.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, University of the Ryukyus, 207 Uehara, Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0215 (Japan); Ito, Hiroshi, E-mail: h-ito@fmu.ac.jp [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Fukushima Medical University, 1 Hikariga-oka, Fukushima City, Fukushima 960-1295 (Japan)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • 4DCT can be used for assessment of pleural invasion/adhesion by lung cancer. • Quantitative 4DCT indices of lung cancer and adjacent structures are described. • An automatic analysis of pleural invasion/adhesion would be developed in the future. - Abstract: Purpose: Using 4-dimensional dynamic-ventilatory scanning by a 320-row computed tomography (CT) scanner, we performed a quantitative assessment of parietal pleural invasion and adhesion by peripheral (subpleural) lung cancers. Methods: Sixteen patients with subpleural lung cancer underwent dynamic-ventilation CT during free breathing. Neither parietal pleural invasion nor adhesion was subsequently confirmed by surgery in 10 patients, whereas the other 6 patients were judged to have parietal pleural invasion or adhesion. Using research software, we tracked the movements of the cancer and of an adjacent structure such as the rib or aorta, and converted the data to 3-dimensional loci. The following quantitative indices were compared by the Mann-Whitney test: cross-correlation coefficient between time curves for the distances moved from the inspiratory frame by the cancer and the adjacent structure, the ratio of the total movement distances (cancer/adjacent structure), and the cosine similarities between the inspiratory and expiratory vectors (from the cancer to the adjacent structure) and between vectors of the cancer and of the adjacent structure (from inspiratory to expiratory frames). Results: Generally, the movements of the loci of the lung cancer and the adjacent structure were similar in patients with parietal pleural invasion/adhesion, while they were independent in patients without. There were significant differences in all the parameters between the two patient groups (cross-correlation coefficient and the movement distance ratio, P < 0.01; cosine similarities, P < 0.05). Conclusion: These observations suggest that quantitative indices by dynamic-ventilation CT can be utilized as a

  17. Comparison of intraoperative frozen section analysis for sentinel lymph node biopsy during breast cancer surgery for invasive lobular carcinoma and invasive ductal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Povoski Stephen P

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sentinel lymph node (SLN biopsy is the standard of care for the surgical assessment of the axilla during breast cancer surgery. However, the diagnostic accuracy of intraoperative frozen section analysis for confirming metastatic involvement of SLNs in cases of invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC versus that of invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC has generated controversy secondary to a frequently low-grade cytologic appearance and an often discohesive pattern displayed by metastatic lymph nodes in ILC. In the current report, we present a comparison of intraoperative frozen section analysis for confirming the presence of metastatic disease within SLNs during breast cancer surgery for ILC and IDC. Methods We evaluated the results of 131 consecutive cases of ILC from 1997 to 2008 and 133 cases of IDC (selected by a random sequence generator program from amongst 1163 consecutive cases of IDC from the same time period. All cases had at least one SLN that had both intraoperative frozen section analysis and confirmatory permanent section analysis performed. Results No statistically significant difference was found in the sensitivity (67% vs. 75%, P = 0.385, specificity (100% vs. 100%, accuracy (86% vs. 92%, P = 0.172, false negative rate (33% vs. 25%, P = 0.385, negative predictive value (81% vs. 89%, P = 0.158, and positive predictive value (100% vs. 100% for frozen section analysis for confirming the presence of metastatic disease within SLNs during breast cancer surgery for ILC and IDC. Conclusion Since there was no statistically significant difference in sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, false negative rate, negative predictive value, and positive predictive value between frozen section analysis of SLNs for patients with ILC and IDC, the clinical accuracy of confirming metastatic involvement of SLNs on frozen section analysis for ILC should not be considered inferior to the clinical accuracy for IDC. Therefore, frozen section analysis

  18. Preoperative Prediction of Microvascular Invasion in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Using Quantitative Image Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jian; Chakraborty, Jayasree; Chapman, William C; Gerst, Scott; Gonen, Mithat; Pak, Linda M; Jarnagin, William R; DeMatteo, Ronald P; Do, Richard K G; Simpson, Amber L

    2017-12-01

    Microvascular invasion (MVI) is a significant risk factor for early recurrence after resection or transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Knowledge of MVI status would help guide treatment recommendations, but is generally identified after operation. This study aims to predict MVI preoperatively using quantitative image analysis. One hundred and twenty patients from 2 institutions underwent resection of HCC from 2003 to 2015 were included. The largest tumor from preoperative CT was subjected to quantitative image analysis, which uses an automated computer algorithm to capture regional variation in CT enhancement patterns. Quantitative imaging features by automatic analysis, qualitative radiographic descriptors by 2 radiologists, and preoperative clinical variables were included in multivariate analysis to predict histologic MVI. Histologic MVI was identified in 19 (37%) patients with tumors ≤5 cm and 34 (49%) patients with tumors >5 cm. Among patients with tumors ≤5 cm, none of the clinical findings or radiographic descriptors were associated with MVI; however, quantitative features based on angle co-occurrence matrix predicted MVI with an area under curve of 0.80, positive predictive value of 63%, and negative predictive value of 85%. In patients with tumors >5 cm, higher α-fetoprotein level, larger tumor size, and viral hepatitis history were associated with MVI, and radiographic descriptors were not. However, a multivariate model combining α-fetoprotein, tumor size, hepatitis status, and quantitative feature based on local binary pattern predicted MVI with area under curve of 0.88, positive predictive value of 72%, and negative predictive value of 96%. This study reveals the potential importance of quantitative image analysis as a predictor of MVI. Copyright © 2017 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A bioeconomic analysis of an emerald ash borer invasion of an urban forest with multiple jurisdictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent F. Kovacs; Robert G. Haight; Rodrigo J. Mercader; Deborah G. McCullough

    2014-01-01

    Bio-invasions occur in management mosaics where local control affects spread and damage across political boundaries. We address two obstacles to local implementation of optimal regional control of a bio-invasion that damages public and private resources across jurisdictions: lack of local funds to protect the public resource and lack of access to protect the private...

  20. A quantitative analysis of IRAS maps of molecular clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, Jennifer J.; Adams, Fred C.

    1994-01-01

    We present an analysis of IRAS maps of five molecular clouds: Orion, Ophiuchus, Perseus, Taurus, and Lupus. For the classification and description of these astrophysical maps, we use a newly developed technique which considers all maps of a given type to be elements of a pseudometric space. For each physical characteristic of interest, this formal system assigns a distance function (a pseudometric) to the space of all maps: this procedure allows us to measure quantitatively the difference between any two maps and to order the space of all maps. We thus obtain a quantitative classification scheme for molecular clouds. In this present study we use the IRAS continuum maps at 100 and 60 micrometer(s) to produce column density (or optical depth) maps for the five molecular cloud regions given above. For this sample of clouds, we compute the 'output' functions which measure the distribution of density, the distribution of topological components, the self-gravity, and the filamentary nature of the clouds. The results of this work provide a quantitative description of the structure in these molecular cloud regions. We then order the clouds according to the overall environmental 'complexity' of these star-forming regions. Finally, we compare our results with the observed populations of young stellar objects in these clouds and discuss the possible environmental effects on the star-formation process. Our results are consistent with the recently stated conjecture that more massive stars tend to form in more 'complex' environments.

  1. Application of atomic absorption in molecular analysis (spectrophotometry)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baliza, S.V.; Soledade, L.E.B.

    1981-01-01

    The apparatus of atomic absorption has been considered by all the experts in chemical analysis as one of the most important equipments in actual utilization in such field. Among its several applications one should emphasize direct and indirect metals analyses using flame, graphite furnace, cold vapor generator,... Besides such known applications, the authors have developed at the R and D Center of CSN a patent pendent method for the utilization of such equipment for molecular analysis, in substitution of a sophisticated and specific apparatus. (Author) [pt

  2. Proteomic analysis of human skin treated with larval schistosome peptidases reveals distinct invasion strategies among species of blood flukes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Ingram

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Skin invasion is the initial step in infection of the human host by schistosome blood flukes. Schistosome larvae have the remarkable ability to overcome the physical and biochemical barriers present in skin in the absence of any mechanical trauma. While a serine peptidase with activity against insoluble elastin appears to be essential for this process in one species of schistosomes, Schistosoma mansoni, it is unknown whether other schistosome species use the same peptidase to facilitate entry into their hosts.Recent genome sequencing projects, together with a number of biochemical studies, identified alternative peptidases that Schistosoma japonicum or Trichobilharzia regenti could use to facilitate migration through skin. In this study, we used comparative proteomic analysis of human skin treated with purified cercarial elastase, the known invasive peptidase of S. mansoni, or S. mansoni cathespin B2, a close homolog of the putative invasive peptidase of S. japonicum, to identify substrates of either peptidase. Select skin proteins were then confirmed as substrates by in vitro digestion assays.This study demonstrates that an S. mansoni ortholog of the candidate invasive peptidase of S. japonicum and T. regenti, cathepsin B2, is capable of efficiently cleaving many of the same host skin substrates as the invasive serine peptidase of S. mansoni, cercarial elastase. At the same time, identification of unique substrates and the broader species specificity of cathepsin B2 suggest that the cercarial elastase gene family amplified as an adaptation of schistosomes to human hosts.

  3. Systems Biology Analysis of Brucella Infected Peyer's Patch Reveals Rapid Invasion with Modest Transient Perturbations of the Host Transcriptome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Carlos A.; Drake, Kenneth L.; Siddavatam, Prasad; Lawhon, Sara D.; Nunes, Jairo E. S.; Gull, Tamara; Khare, Sangeeta; Everts, Robin E.; Lewin, Harris A.; Adams, Leslie Garry

    2013-01-01

    Brucella melitensis causes the most severe and acute symptoms of all Brucella species in human beings and infects hosts primarily through the oral route. The epithelium covering domed villi of jejunal-ileal Peyer's patches is an important site of entry for several pathogens, including Brucella. Here, we use the calf ligated ileal loop model to study temporal in vivo Brucella-infected host molecular and morphological responses. Our results document Brucella bacteremia occurring within 30 min after intraluminal inoculation of the ileum without histopathologic traces of lesions. Based on a system biology Dynamic Bayesian Network modeling approach (DBN) of microarray data, a very early transient perturbation of the host enteric transcriptome was associated with the initial host response to Brucella contact that is rapidly averted allowing invasion and dissemination. A detailed analysis revealed active expression of Syndecan 2, Integrin alpha L and Integrin beta 2 genes, which may favor initial Brucella adhesion. Also, two intestinal barrier-related pathways (Tight Junction and Trefoil Factors Initiated Mucosal Healing) were significantly repressed in the early stage of infection, suggesting subversion of mucosal epithelial barrier function to facilitate Brucella transepithelial migration. Simultaneously, the strong activation of the innate immune response pathways would suggest that the host mounts an appropriate protective immune response; however, the expression of the two key genes that encode innate immunity anti-Brucella cytokines such as TNF-α and IL12p40 were not significantly changed throughout the study. Furthermore, the defective expression of Toll-Like Receptor Signaling pathways may partially explain the lack of proinflammatory cytokine production and consequently the absence of morphologically detectable inflammation at the site of infection. Cumulatively, our results indicate that the in vivo pathogenesis of the early infectious process of Brucella is

  4. Systems biology analysis of Brucella infected Peyer's patch reveals rapid invasion with modest transient perturbations of the host transcriptome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A Rossetti

    Full Text Available Brucella melitensis causes the most severe and acute symptoms of all Brucella species in human beings and infects hosts primarily through the oral route. The epithelium covering domed villi of jejunal-ileal Peyer's patches is an important site of entry for several pathogens, including Brucella. Here, we use the calf ligated ileal loop model to study temporal in vivo Brucella-infected host molecular and morphological responses. Our results document Brucella bacteremia occurring within 30 min after intraluminal inoculation of the ileum without histopathologic traces of lesions. Based on a system biology Dynamic Bayesian Network modeling approach (DBN of microarray data, a very early transient perturbation of the host enteric transcriptome was associated with the initial host response to Brucella contact that is rapidly averted allowing invasion and dissemination. A detailed analysis revealed active expression of Syndecan 2, Integrin alpha L and Integrin beta 2 genes, which may favor initial Brucella adhesion. Also, two intestinal barrier-related pathways (Tight Junction and Trefoil Factors Initiated Mucosal Healing were significantly repressed in the early stage of infection, suggesting subversion of mucosal epithelial barrier function to facilitate Brucella transepithelial migration. Simultaneously, the strong activation of the innate immune response pathways would suggest that the host mounts an appropriate protective immune response; however, the expression of the two key genes that encode innate immunity anti-Brucella cytokines such as TNF-α and IL12p40 were not significantly changed throughout the study. Furthermore, the defective expression of Toll-Like Receptor Signaling pathways may partially explain the lack of proinflammatory cytokine production and consequently the absence of morphologically detectable inflammation at the site of infection. Cumulatively, our results indicate that the in vivo pathogenesis of the early infectious process

  5. A CONSORT analysis of randomised controlled trials for the treatment of invasive aspergillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Brian L; Richardson, Malcolm D; Ingram, Patricia M; Agrawal, Samir G

    2017-08-01

    There is no assessment of the reporting quality of antifungal randomized, controlled trials (RCT), upon which guidelines for the treatment of invasive aspergillosis (IA) in patients with hematological malignancy are based. Trial reports were identified through Trip, Cochrane, Medline, and Embase database searches. Report quality was assessed using the 25-item CONSORT checklist and a rating scale of 1 (strongly disagree) to 4 (strongly agree). The primary endpoint was quality as assessed by mean group-scores among papers published at the time of the most recent IA treatment guidelines. Seven RCTs were identified for analysis. Overall mean group-score for all seven papers was 2.44 (out of a total of four). There were significant differences between publications regarding overall reporting quality (P CONSORT analysis into the evidence-based grading systems in North American (IDSA), European (ECIL and ESCMID) IA guidelines could alter the value placed on these RCTs, thereby impacting on clinical recommendations. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. [Non invasive prenatal diagnosis. Fetal nucleic acid analysis in maternal blood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesarini, Carla; Argibay, Pablo; Otaño, Lucas

    2010-01-01

    Current prenatal diagnosis of monogeneic and chromosomal diseases, includes invasive procedures which carry a small but significant risk. For many years, analysis of fetal cells in maternal circulation has been studied, however it has failed its clinical use due to the scarcity of these cells and their persistance after delivery. For more than a decade, the presence of cell-free fetal DNA in maternal blood has been identified. These fetal DNA fragments would derive from the placenta and are not detected after delivery, making them a source of fetal material for carrying out diagnosis techniques using maternal blood. However, the vast majority of cell free DNA in maternal circulation is of maternal origin, with the fetal component contributing from 3% to 6% and rising towards term. Available methodologies do not allow separation of fetal from maternal cell free DNA, so current applications have been focused on the analysis of genes not present in the mother, such as Y chromosome sequences, or RHD gene in RhD-negative women, or paternal or de novo mutations. Also, the detection of cell-free fetal RNA in maternal blood offers the possibility of obtaining information regarding genetic expression profiles of embrionic tissues, and using genes expressed only at the feto-placental unit, controls for the presence of fetal material could be established, regardless of maternal genetic tissue. The present article describes the evidences regarding the passage of fetal nucleic acids to maternal circulation, its current prenatal diagnosis application and possible future perspectives.

  7. Hybrid model of arm for analysis of regional blood oxygenation in non-invasive optical diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowocień, Sylwester; Mroczka, Janusz

    2017-06-01

    The paper presents a new comprehensive approach to modeling and analysis of processes occurring during the blood flow in the arm's small vessels as well as non-invasive measurement method of mixed venous oxygen saturation. During the work, a meta-analysis of available physiological data was performed and based on its result a hybrid model of forearm vascular tree was proposed. The model, in its structure, takes into account a classical nonlinear hydro-electric analogy in conjunction with light-tissue interaction. Several geometries of arm vascular tree obtained from magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) image were analyzed which allowed to proposed the structure of electrical analog network. Proposed model allows to simulate the behavior of forearm blood flow from the vascular tree mechanics point of view, as well as effects of the impact of cuff and vessel wall mechanics on the recorded photoplethysmographic signals. In particular, it allows to analyze the reaction and anatomical effects in small vessels and microcirculation caused by occlusive maneuver in selected techniques, what was of particular interest to authors and motivation to undertake research in this area. Preliminary studies using proposed model showed that inappropriate selection of occlusion maneuver parameters (e.g. occlusion time, cuff pressure etc.), cause dangerous turbulence of blood flow in the venous section of the vascular tree.

  8. Automated image analysis of cyclin D1 protein expression in invasive lobular breast carcinoma provides independent prognostic information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Nicholas P; Lundgren, Katja L; Conway, Catherine; Anagnostaki, Lola; Costello, Sean; Landberg, Göran

    2012-11-01

    The emergence of automated image analysis algorithms has aided the enumeration, quantification, and immunohistochemical analyses of tumor cells in both whole section and tissue microarray samples. To date, the focus of such algorithms in the breast cancer setting has been on traditional markers in the common invasive ductal carcinoma subtype. Here, we aimed to optimize and validate an automated analysis of the cell cycle regulator cyclin D1 in a large collection of invasive lobular carcinoma and relate its expression to clinicopathologic data. The image analysis algorithm was trained to optimally match manual scoring of cyclin D1 protein expression in a subset of invasive lobular carcinoma tissue microarray cores. The algorithm was capable of distinguishing cyclin D1-positive cells and illustrated high correlation with traditional manual scoring (κ=0.63). It was then applied to our entire cohort of 483 patients, with subsequent statistical comparisons to clinical data. We found no correlation between cyclin D1 expression and tumor size, grade, and lymph node status. However, overexpression of the protein was associated with reduced recurrence-free survival (P=.029), as was positive nodal status (Pinvasive lobular carcinoma. Finally, high cyclin D1 expression was associated with increased hazard ratio in multivariate analysis (hazard ratio, 1.75; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-2.89). In conclusion, we describe an image analysis algorithm capable of reliably analyzing cyclin D1 staining in invasive lobular carcinoma and have linked overexpression of the protein to increased recurrence risk. Our findings support the use of cyclin D1 as a clinically informative biomarker for invasive lobular breast cancer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Molecular Characterization, Antimicrobial Resistance and Caco-2 Cell Invasion Potential of Campylobacter jejuni/coli from Young Children with Diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Haijian; Ge, Yanling; Xu, Hao; Zhang, Jianmin; Kuang, Dai; Yang, Xiaowei; Su, Xudong; Huang, Zheng; Shi, Xianming; Xu, Xuebin; Meng, Jianghong

    2016-03-01

    Campylobacter is a major cause of bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Young children represent a particular age group affected by Campylobacter infection because of their limited diets and weak immune systems. In this study, a total of 110 Campylobacter (80 Campylobacter jejuni and 30 Campylobacter coli) isolated from children younger than 5 years of age with diarrhea in Shanghai, China in 2011 were examined for their genetic relationship and antimicrobial susceptibility. The presence of virulence genes and its association with invasion potential in Caco-2 cell were also determined. Multilocus sequence typing revealed 62 sequence types (STs) under 14 clonal complexes from C. jejuni and 15 STs under 2 clonal complexes from C. coli. High resistance rates among the 110 isolates were observed to nalidixic acid (88.2%), ciprofloxacin (87.3%) and tetracycline (87.3%), followed by ampicillin (30.9%), gentamicin (28.2%), clindamycin (21.8%), erythromycin (21.8%) and chloramphenicol (8.2%). Compared with that of C. jejuni (32.5%), a larger proportion of C. coli (83.3%) were resistant to multiple antimicrobials, including 16 isolates of ST-828 complex resistant to 6 antimicrobials: ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, erythromycin, gentamicin, nalidixic acid and tetracycline. Furthermore, 57 Campylobacter isolates were selected based on their distinct STs and the presence of virulence genes to determine their abilities to adhere to and invade Caco-2 cells. The level of invasion varied widely among isolates and had relatively weak correlation with the genotype data. Our findings provided baseline data on Campylobacter among young children. Active surveillance of Campylobacter is needed to better understand the epidemiology and antimicrobial resistance trends of this significant pathogen to help control and protect young children from such infections.

  10. Inhibition of p38 MAPK activity leads to cell type-specific effects on the molecular circadian clock and time-dependent reduction of glioma cell invasiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Charles S; Kim, Sam Moon; Karunarathna, Nirmala; Neuendorff, Nichole; Gerard Toussaint, L; Earnest, David J; Bell-Pedersen, Deborah

    2018-01-10

    The circadian clock is the basis for biological time keeping in eukaryotic organisms. The clock mechanism relies on biochemical signaling pathways to detect environmental stimuli and to regulate the expression of clock-controlled genes throughout the body. MAPK signaling pathways function in both circadian input and output pathways in mammals depending on the tissue; however, little is known about the role of p38 MAPK, an established tumor suppressor, in the mammalian circadian system. Increased expression and activity of p38 MAPK is correlated with poor prognosis in cancer, including glioblastoma multiforme; however, the toxicity of p38 MAPK inhibitors limits their clinical use. Here, we test if timed application of the specific p38 MAPK inhibitor VX-745 reduces glioma cell invasive properties in vitro. The levels and rhythmic accumulation of active phosphorylated p38 MAPK in different cell lines were determined by western blots. Rhythmic luciferase activity from clock gene luciferase reporter cells lines was used to test the effect of p38 MAPK inhibition on clock properties as determined using the damped sine fit and Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. Nonlinear regression and Akaike's information criteria were used to establish rhythmicity. Boyden chamber assays were used to measure glioma cell invasiveness following time-of-day-specific treatment with VX-745. Significant differences were established using t-tests. We demonstrate the activity of p38 MAPK cycles under control of the clock in mouse fibroblast and SCN cell lines. The levels of phosphorylated p38 MAPK were significantly reduced in clock-deficient cells, indicating that the circadian clock plays an important role in activation of this pathway. Inhibition of p38 MAPK activity with VX-745 led to cell-type-specific period changes in the molecular clock. In addition, phosphorylated p38 MAPK levels were rhythmic in HA glial cells, and high and arrhythmic in invasive IM3 glioma cells. We show that inhibition of

  11. Thyroid gland invasion in total laryngectomy and total laryngopharyngectomy: a systematic review and meta-analysis of the English literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, R; Drinnan, M; Robinson, M; Meikle, D; Stafford, F; Welch, A; Zammit-Maempel, I; Paleri, V

    2013-10-01

    Advanced laryngeal and hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas carry an inherent risk of invading thyroid parenchyma leading to the incorporation of a hemithyroidectomy or total thyroidectomy as part of a total laryngectomy. In some centres, thyroid gland removal occurs routinely during surgery for T3 and T4 laryngopharyngeal carcinoma. However, the incidence of invasion is low, and therefore, thyroid-sparing surgery must be considered for select cases. The primary goal of the review is to assess the true incidence of thyroid gland invasion in laryngopharyngeal carcinoma. Utilising this data we aim to identify risk factors and clinical predictors of thyroid gland invasion to facilitate in a more targeted approach in the surgical management of advanced laryngopharyngeal carcinoma. A systematic review and meta-analysis of all published data and review of case series at Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals (NuTH). MEDLINE (1946-2012) and EMBASE (1980-2012) were searched. A single reviewer conducted the systematic review with a follow-up ancestry search. Studies publishing case series of T3 and T4 laryngeal and hypopharyngeal carcinoma treated by total laryngectomy or laryngopharyngectomy and partial or total thyroidectomy, with pathological assessment for thyroid gland invasion rates were selected. Articles published prior to 1977 were excluded due to the advent of whole organ sectioning. The literature search identified 16 studies suitable for inclusion, with 1180 cases. The NuTH case series identified 107 patients. The overall pooled incidence of thyroid gland invasion in 1287 patients is 10.7% (95% CI 7.6-14.2). Patients with primary subglottic tumours (relative risk 7.5; 95% CI 4.3-13.0) and disease extension into the subglottis (relative risk 4.3; 95% CI 2.5-7.2) have a significantly higher relative risk of thyroid gland invasion. Radiorecurrent tumours and hypopharyngeal tumours did not have an increased risk of thyroid gland invasion. Advanced laryngeal and

  12. Association of secondhand smoke exposure with pediatric invasive bacterial disease and bacterial carriage: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Chang Lee

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A number of epidemiologic studies have observed an association between secondhand smoke (SHS exposure and pediatric invasive bacterial disease (IBD but the evidence has not been systematically reviewed. We carried out a systematic review and meta-analysis of SHS exposure and two outcomes, IBD and pharyngeal carriage of bacteria, for Neisseria meningitidis (N. meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib, and Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae.Two independent reviewers searched Medline, EMBASE, and selected other databases, and screened articles for inclusion and exclusion criteria. We identified 30 case-control studies on SHS and IBD, and 12 cross-sectional studies on SHS and bacterial carriage. Weighted summary odd ratios (ORs were calculated for each outcome and for studies with specific design and quality characteristics. Tests for heterogeneity and publication bias were performed. Compared with those unexposed to SHS, summary OR for SHS exposure was 2.02 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.52-2.69 for invasive meningococcal disease, 1.21 (95% CI 0.69-2.14 for invasive pneumococcal disease, and 1.22 (95% CI 0.93-1.62 for invasive Hib disease. For pharyngeal carriage, summary OR was 1.68 (95% CI, 1.19-2.36 for N. meningitidis, 1.66 (95% CI 1.33-2.07 for S. pneumoniae, and 0.96 (95% CI 0.48-1.95 for Hib. The association between SHS exposure and invasive meningococcal and Hib diseases was consistent regardless of outcome definitions, age groups, study designs, and publication year. The effect estimates were larger in studies among children younger than 6 years of age for all three IBDs, and in studies with the more rigorous laboratory-confirmed diagnosis for invasive meningococcal disease (summary OR 3.24; 95% CI 1.72-6.13.When considered together with evidence from direct smoking and biological mechanisms, our systematic review and meta-analysis indicates that SHS exposure may be associated with invasive meningococcal disease. The

  13. Association of secondhand smoke exposure with pediatric invasive bacterial disease and bacterial carriage: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chien-Chang; Middaugh, Nicole A; Howie, Stephen R C; Ezzati, Majid

    2010-12-07

    A number of epidemiologic studies have observed an association between secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure and pediatric invasive bacterial disease (IBD) but the evidence has not been systematically reviewed. We carried out a systematic review and meta-analysis of SHS exposure and two outcomes, IBD and pharyngeal carriage of bacteria, for Neisseria meningitidis (N. meningitidis), Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib), and Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae). Two independent reviewers searched Medline, EMBASE, and selected other databases, and screened articles for inclusion and exclusion criteria. We identified 30 case-control studies on SHS and IBD, and 12 cross-sectional studies on SHS and bacterial carriage. Weighted summary odd ratios (ORs) were calculated for each outcome and for studies with specific design and quality characteristics. Tests for heterogeneity and publication bias were performed. Compared with those unexposed to SHS, summary OR for SHS exposure was 2.02 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.52-2.69) for invasive meningococcal disease, 1.21 (95% CI 0.69-2.14) for invasive pneumococcal disease, and 1.22 (95% CI 0.93-1.62) for invasive Hib disease. For pharyngeal carriage, summary OR was 1.68 (95% CI, 1.19-2.36) for N. meningitidis, 1.66 (95% CI 1.33-2.07) for S. pneumoniae, and 0.96 (95% CI 0.48-1.95) for Hib. The association between SHS exposure and invasive meningococcal and Hib diseases was consistent regardless of outcome definitions, age groups, study designs, and publication year. The effect estimates were larger in studies among children younger than 6 years of age for all three IBDs, and in studies with the more rigorous laboratory-confirmed diagnosis for invasive meningococcal disease (summary OR 3.24; 95% CI 1.72-6.13). When considered together with evidence from direct smoking and biological mechanisms, our systematic review and meta-analysis indicates that SHS exposure may be associated with invasive meningococcal disease. The epidemiologic

  14. High resolution Physio-chemical Tissue Analysis: Towards Non-invasive In Vivo Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guan; Meng, Zhuo-Xian; Lin, Jian-Die; Deng, Cheri X.; Carson, Paul L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Tao, Chao; Liu, Xiaojun; Wang, Xueding

    2016-02-01

    Conventional gold standard histopathologic diagnosis requires information of both high resolution structural and chemical changes in tissue. Providing optical information at ultrasonic resolution, photoacoustic (PA) technique could provide highly sensitive and highly accurate tissue characterization noninvasively in the authentic in vivo environment, offering a replacement for histopathology. A two-dimensional (2D) physio-chemical spectrogram (PCS) combining micrometer to centimeter morphology and chemical composition simultaneously can be generated for each biological sample with PA measurements at multiple optical wavelengths. This spectrogram presents a unique 2D “physio-chemical signature” for any specific type of tissue. Comprehensive analysis of PCS, termed PA physio-chemical analysis (PAPCA), can lead to very rich diagnostic information, including the contents of all relevant molecular and chemical components along with their corresponding histological microfeatures, comparable to those accessible by conventional histology. PAPCA could contribute to the diagnosis of many diseases involving diffusive patterns such as fatty liver.

  15. Prediction of Muscle Fatigue during Minimally Invasive Surgery Using Recurrence Quantification Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Keshavarz Panahi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to its inherent complexity such as limited work volume and degree of freedom, minimally invasive surgery (MIS is ergonomically challenging to surgeons compared to traditional open surgery. Specifically, MIS can expose performing surgeons to excessive ergonomic risks including muscle fatigue that may lead to critical errors in surgical procedures. Therefore, detecting the vulnerable muscles and time-to-fatigue during MIS is of great importance in order to prevent these errors. The main goal of this study is to propose and test a novel measure that can be efficiently used to detect muscle fatigue. In this study, surface electromyography was used to record muscle activations of five subjects while they performed fifteen various laparoscopic operations. The muscle activation data was then reconstructed using recurrence quantification analysis (RQA to detect possible signs of muscle fatigue on eight muscle groups (bicep, triceps, deltoid, and trapezius. The results showed that RQA detects the fatigue sign on bilateral trapezius at 47.5 minutes (average and bilateral deltoid at 57.5 minutes after the start of operations. No sign of fatigue was detected for bicep and triceps muscles of any subject. According to the results, the proposed novel measure can be efficiently used to detect muscle fatigue and eventually improve the quality of MIS procedures with reducing errors that may result from overlooked muscle fatigue.

  16. A Cost Analysis of Preoperative Breast MRI Use for Patients with Invasive Lobular Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedrosian, Isabelle; Xing, Yan; Abdel Rahman, Shereen; Allen, Lisa; Le-Petross, Huong; Whitman, Gary J; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Hunt, Kelly K; Babiera, Gildy V; Cormier, Janice N

    2016-01-01

    Whereas the impact of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast on the surgical management of breast cancer patients is well documented, less is known about its effect on health care costs. This study aimed to evaluate whether MRI use for women with invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) significantly changes the cost of care. Patients with ILC were recruited to a prospective registry study of breast MRI. Women who met the same inclusion criteria but had not undergone breast MRI were retrospectively identified for comparison. A micro-costing analysis using institutional billing records was conducted. Nonparametric bootstrapping was used to compare the unadjusted cost differences between the patients receiving MRI and those receiving no MRI. Of the patients in this study, 51 had preoperative MRI, and 60 did not. Method of diagnostic biopsy, disease stage, oncologic procedure, and rates of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy were similar between the two groups. The patients in the MRI group were younger (median age 55 vs. 64 years; p = 0.01) and more likely to undergo reconstruction (45.1 vs. 25 %; p = 0.03). The median costs of care were significantly higher in the MRI group ($24,781 vs. $18,921; p 1; p < 0.01), and use of reconstruction (p < 0.01). Preoperative breast MRI increases the median total cost of care per patient. However, the contribution to the overall cost of care is modest compared with the cost of other interventions.

  17. Psychomotor skills assessment by motion analysis in minimally invasive surgery on an animal organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstad, Erlend Fagertun; Våpenstad, Cecilie; Bø, Lars Eirik; Langø, Thomas; Kuhry, Esther; Mårvik, Ronald

    2017-08-01

    A high level of psychomotor skills is required to perform minimally invasive surgery (MIS) safely. To be able to measure these skills is important in the assessment of surgeons, as it enables constructive feedback during training. The aim of this study was to test the validity of an objective and automatic assessment method using motion analysis during a laparoscopic procedure on an animal organ. Experienced surgeons in laparoscopy (experts) and medical students (novices) performed a cholecystectomy on a porcine liver box model. The motions of the surgical tools were acquired and analyzed by 11 different motion-related metrics, i.e., a total of 19 metrics as eight of them were measured separately for each hand. We identified for which of the metrics the experts outperformed the novices. In total, two experts and 28 novices were included. The experts achieved significantly better results for 13 of the 19 instrument motion metrics. Expert performance is characterized by a low time to complete the cholecystectomy, high bimanual dexterity (instrument coordination), a limited amount of movement and low measurement of motion smoothness of the dissection instrument, and relatively high usage of the grasper to optimize tissue positioning for dissection.

  18. Fouling development in direct contact membrane distillation: Non-invasive monitoring and destructive analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Fortunato, Luca

    2017-12-26

    Fouling development in direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) for seawater desalination was evaluated combining in-situ monitoring performed using optical coherence tomography (OCT) together with destructive techniques. The non-invasive monitoring with OCT provided a better understanding of the fouling mechanism by giving an appropriate sampling timing for the membrane autopsy. The on-line monitoring system allowed linking the flux trend with the structure of fouling deposited on the membrane surface. The water vapor flux trend was divided in three phases based on the deposition and formation of different foulants over time. The initial flux decline was due to the deposition of a 50–70 nm porous fouling layer consisting of a mixture of organic compounds and salts. Liquid chromatography with organic carbon detection (LC-OCD) analysis revealed the abundance of biopolymer in the fouling layer formed at the initial phase. In the second phase, formation of carbonate crystals on the membrane surface was observed but did not affect the flux significantly. In the last phase, the water vapor flux dropped to almost zero due to the deposition of a dense thick layer of sulfate crystals on the membrane surface.

  19. Fouling development in direct contact membrane distillation: Non-invasive monitoring and destructive analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunato, Luca; Jang, Yongsun; Lee, Jung-Gil; Jeong, Sanghyun; Lee, Sangho; Leiknes, TorOve; Ghaffour, Noreddine

    2018-04-01

    Fouling development in direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) for seawater desalination was evaluated combining in-situ monitoring performed using optical coherence tomography (OCT) together with destructive techniques. The non-invasive monitoring with OCT provided a better understanding of the fouling mechanism by giving an appropriate sampling timing for the membrane autopsy. The on-line monitoring system allowed linking the flux trend with the structure of fouling deposited on the membrane surface. The water vapor flux trend was divided in three phases based on the deposition and formation of different foulants over time. The initial flux decline was due to the deposition of a 50-70 nm porous fouling layer consisting of a mixture of organic compounds and salts. Liquid chromatography with organic carbon detection (LC-OCD) analysis revealed the abundance of biopolymer in the fouling layer formed at the initial phase. In the second phase, formation of carbonate crystals on the membrane surface was observed but did not affect the flux significantly. In the last phase, the water vapor flux dropped to almost zero due to the deposition of a dense thick layer of sulfate crystals on the membrane surface. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. New aids for the non-invasive prenatal diagnosis of achondroplasia: dysmorphic features, charts of fetal size and molecular confirmation using cell-free fetal DNA in maternal plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chitty, L. S.; Griffin, D. R.; Meaney, C.; Barrett, A.; Khalil, A.; Pajkrt, E.; Cole, T. J.

    2011-01-01

    To improve the prenatal diagnosis of achondroplasia by constructing charts of fetal size, defining frequency of sonographic features and exploring the role of non-invasive molecular diagnosis based on cell-free fetal deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in maternal plasma. Data on fetuses with a confirmed

  1. Comparative analysis of dynamic cell viability, migration and invasion assessments by novel real-time technology and classic endpoint assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridha Limame

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cell viability and motility comprise ubiquitous mechanisms involved in a variety of (pathobiological processes including cancer. We report a technical comparative analysis of the novel impedance-based xCELLigence Real-Time Cell Analysis detection platform, with conventional label-based endpoint methods, hereby indicating performance characteristics and correlating dynamic observations of cell proliferation, cytotoxicity, migration and invasion on cancer cells in highly standardized experimental conditions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Dynamic high-resolution assessments of proliferation, cytotoxicity and migration were performed using xCELLigence technology on the MDA-MB-231 (breast cancer and A549 (lung cancer cell lines. Proliferation kinetics were compared with the Sulforhodamine B (SRB assay in a series of four cell concentrations, yielding fair to good correlations (Spearman's Rho 0.688 to 0.964. Cytotoxic action by paclitaxel (0-100 nM correlated well with SRB (Rho>0.95 with similar IC(50 values. Reference cell migration experiments were performed using Transwell plates and correlated by pixel area calculation of crystal violet-stained membranes (Rho 0.90 and optical density (OD measurement of extracted dye (Rho>0.95. Invasion was observed on MDA-MB-231 cells alone using Matrigel-coated Transwells as standard reference method and correlated by OD reading for two Matrigel densities (Rho>0.95. Variance component analysis revealed increased variances associated with impedance-based detection of migration and invasion, potentially caused by the sensitive nature of this method. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The xCELLigence RTCA technology provides an accurate platform for non-invasive detection of cell viability and motility. The strong correlations with conventional methods imply a similar observation of cell behavior and interchangeability with other systems, illustrated by the highly correlating kinetic invasion profiles on

  2. New concepts in molecular imaging: non-invasive MRI spotting of proteolysis using an Overhauser effect switch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Mellet

    Full Text Available Proteolysis, involved in many processes in living organisms, is tightly regulated in space and time under physiological conditions. However deregulation can occur with local persistent proteolytic activities, e.g. in inflammation, cystic fibrosis, tumors, or pancreatitis. Furthermore, little is known about the role of many proteases, hence there is a need of new imaging methods to visualize specifically normal or disease-related proteolysis in intact bodies.In this paper, a new concept for non invasive proteolysis imaging is proposed. Overhauser-enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (OMRI at 0.2 Tesla was used to monitor the enzymatic hydrolysis of a nitroxide-labeled protein. In vitro, image intensity switched from 1 to 25 upon proteolysis due to the associated decrease in the motional correlation time of the substrate. The OMRI experimental device used in this study is consistent with protease imaging in mice at 0.2 T without significant heating. Simulations show that this enzymatic-driven OMRI signal switch can be obtained at lower frequencies suitable for larger animals or humans.The method is highly sensitive and makes possible proteolysis imaging in three dimensions with a good spatial resolution. Any protease could be targeted specifically through the use of taylor-made cleavable macromolecules. At short term OMRI of proteolysis may be applied to basic research as well as to evaluate therapeutic treatments in small animal models of experimental diseases.

  3. Non-invasive analysis of water and carbon transport and plant growth by nuclear magnetic resonance and positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schurr, U.; Bluemler, P.; Jahnke, S.; Roeb, G.; Minchin, P.; Lindenmair, J.; Fuellner, K.; Ziemons, K.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Plant growth and transport processes are highly dynamic. They are characterized by plant-internal control processes and by strong interactions with the spatially and temporally varying environment. Analysis of structure-function relations of growth and transport in plants will strongly benefit from the development of non-invasive techniques. The paper will describe recent advances in the low and high-field NMR imaging of plant transport in xylem and phloem as well as on root growth analysis in artificial soils. Non-invasive functional analysis of the dynamics of carbon transport is possible by using the short-lived isotope 11 C. In addition to standard detection techniques, the recently developed positron emission tomography system for plants (PlanTIS) allows imaging the flow of 11 C-labelled compounds in two and three dimensions. These techniques will provide a real insight into the dynamic nature of growth and transport processes of plants in variable environments. (author)

  4. Analysis of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae in invasive disease reveals lack of the capsule locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lâm, T-T; Claus, H; Frosch, M; Vogel, U

    2016-01-01

    Among invasive Haemophilus influenzae, unencapsulated strains have largely surpassed the previously predominant serotype b (Hib) because of Hib vaccination. Isolates without the genomic capsule (cap) locus are designated non-typeable H. influenzae (NTHi). They are different from capsule-deficient variants that show deletion of the capsule transport gene bexA within the cap locus. The frequency of capsule-deficient variants in invasive disease is unknown. We analysed 783 unencapsulated invasive isolates collected over 5 years in Germany and found no single capsule-deficient isolate. Invasive unencapsulated strains in Germany were exclusively NTHi. A negative serotyping result by slide agglutination was therefore highly predictive for NTHi. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Minimally invasive versus open pancreatic enucleation. Systematic review and meta-analysis of surgical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Francesco; Giuliani, Giuseppe; Bencini, Lapo; Bianchi, Paolo P; Coratti, Andrea

    2018-03-25

    Parenchymal sparing procedures are gaining interest in pancreatic surgery and recent studies have reported that minimally invasive pancreatic enucleation may be associated with enhanced outcomes when compared with traditional surgery. By meta-analyzing the available data from the literature, minimally invasive surgery is not at higher risk of pancreatic fistula and offers a number of advantages over conventional surgery for pancreatic enucleation. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Prognostic Value of Perineural Invasion in Esophageal and Esophagogastric Junction Carcinoma: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiqin Gao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Here we aimed to clarify the prognostic significance of perineural invasion (PNI in esophageal and esophagogastric junction (EGJ carcinoma. Methods. A comprehensive literature search for relevant reports published up to July 2015 was performed using Pubmed and Embase databases. The pooled HR and 95% CI for overall survival (OS and disease-free survival (DFS were used to assess the prognostic value. The association of PNI with pathological characteristics was evaluated by OR and 95% CI. Results. A total of 13 cohorts were retrieved, covering 2770 patients treated by surgery. The cumulative analysis revealed a statistical correlation between PNI and poor OS (HR = 1.76, 95% CI: 1.54–2.20, and P<0.00001, as well as poor DFS (HR = 1.96, 95% CI: 1.42–2.71, and P<0.001. Moreover, analysis of 1475 patients showed improved PNI in T3 + T4 (OR = 0.39, 95% CI: 0.21–0.70, and P=0.002, N+ (OR = 0.52, 95% CI: 0.40–0.69, and P<0.00001, and G3 + G4 (OR = 0.66, 95% CI: 0.48–0.90, and P=0.008 patients compared with T1 + T2, N−, and G1 + G2 ones, respectively. No significant heterogeneity was found between the studies. Conclusions. PNI is an adverse prognostic biomarker in esophageal and EGJ carcinoma. Moreover, PNI implies advanced T, N stage and poor cell differentiation.

  7. Fish gut microbiota analysis differentiates physiology and behavior of invasive Asian carp and indigenous American fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lin; Amberg, Jon; Chapman, Duane; Gaikowski, Mark; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2014-03-01

    Gut microbiota of invasive Asian silver carp (SVCP) and indigenous planktivorous gizzard shad (GZSD) in Mississippi river basin were compared using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Analysis of more than 440 000 quality-filtered sequences obtained from the foregut and hindgut of GZSD and SVCP revealed high microbial diversity in these samples. GZSD hindgut (GZSD_H) samples (n=23) with >7000 operational taxonomy units (OTUs) exhibited the highest alpha-diversity indices followed by SVCP foregut (n=15), GZSD foregut (n=9) and SVCP hindgut (SVCP_H) (n=24). UniFrac distance-based non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) analysis showed that the microbiota of GZSD_H and SVCP_H were clearly separated into two clusters: samples in the GZSD cluster were observed to vary by sampling location and samples in the SVCP cluster by sampling date. NMDS further revealed distinct microbial community between foregut to hindgut for individual GZSD and SVCP. Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes were detected as the predominant phyla regardless of fish or gut type. The high abundance of Cyanobacteria observed was possibly supported by their role as the fish's major food source. Furthermore, unique and shared OTUs and OTUs in each gut type were identified, three OTUs from the order Bacteroidales, the genus Bacillariophyta and the genus Clostridium were found significantly more abundant in GZSD_H (14.9-22.8%) than in SVCP_H (0.13-4.1%) samples. These differences were presumably caused by the differences in the type of food sources including bacteria ingested, the gut morphology and digestion, and the physiological behavior between GZSD and SVCP.

  8. Fish gut microbiota analysis differentiates physiology and behavior of invasive Asian carp and indigenous American fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lin; Amberg, Jon J.; Chapman, Duane C.; Gaikowski, Mark P.; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2014-01-01

    Gut microbiota of invasive Asian silver carp (SVCP) and indigenous planktivorous gizzard shad (GZSD) in Mississippi river basin were compared using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Analysis of more than 440 000 quality-filtered sequences obtained from the foregut and hindgut of GZSD and SVCP revealed high microbial diversity in these samples. GZSD hindgut (GZSD_H) samples (n=23) with >7000 operational taxonomy units (OTUs) exhibited the highest alpha-diversity indices followed by SVCP foregut (n=15), GZSD foregut (n=9) and SVCP hindgut (SVCP_H) (n=24). UniFrac distance-based non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) analysis showed that the microbiota of GZSD_H and SVCP_H were clearly separated into two clusters: samples in the GZSD cluster were observed to vary by sampling location and samples in the SVCP cluster by sampling date. NMDS further revealed distinct microbial community between foregut to hindgut for individual GZSD and SVCP. Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes were detected as the predominant phyla regardless of fish or gut type. The high abundance of Cyanobacteria observed was possibly supported by their role as the fish’s major food source. Furthermore, unique and shared OTUs and OTUs in each gut type were identified, three OTUs from the order Bacteroidales, the genus Bacillariophyta and the genus Clostridium were found significantly more abundant in GZSD_H (14.9–22.8%) than in SVCP_H (0.13–4.1%) samples. These differences were presumably caused by the differences in the type of food sources including bacteria ingested, the gut morphology and digestion, and the physiological behavior between GZSD and SVCP.

  9. Application of environmental DNA analysis to inform invasive fish eradication operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Phillip I.; Copp, Gordon H.; Créach, Véronique; Vilizzi, Lorenzo; Britton, J. R.

    2017-04-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) detection of non-native species has considerable potential to inform management decisions, including identifying the need for population control and/or eradication. An invasive species of European concern is the Asian cyprinid fish, topmouth gudgeon ( Pseudorasbora parva) . Here, eDNA analyses were applied at a commercial angling venue in southern England to inform operations aiming to eradicate P. parva, which had only ever been observed in one of the venue's seven unconnected angling ponds. Eradication of P. parva was initially attempted by repeated depletion of the population using fish traps (crayfish traps fitted with 5 mm mesh netting) and the introduction of native predators over a 4-year period. The very low number of P. parva captured following these eradication efforts suggested a possible population crash. Conventional PCR analysis of water samples using species-specific primers was applied to all seven ponds to confirm that P. parva was present in only one pond, that the eradication attempt had indeed failed and that the species' distribution in the pond appeared to be restricted to three bankside locations. The continued presence of P. parva at these locations was confirmed by subsequent trapping. Water samples from an adjacent, unconnected stream were also analysed using the eDNA methodology, but no DNA of P. parva was detected. The results suggest that further management action to eradicate P. parva be focused on the pond shown to contain the isolated P. parva population and thereby eliminate the risk of further dispersal. This study is the first to apply eDNA analysis to assess the efficacy of an eradication attempt and to provide evidence that the species was unlikely to be present in the other ponds, thus reducing the resources needed to control the species.

  10. Incidental serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma and early invasive serous carcinoma in the nonprophylactic setting: analysis of a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Jane C; Blanco, Luis Z; Vang, Russell; Ronnett, Brigitte M

    2015-04-01

    A precursor for invasive ovarian/pelvic high-grade serous carcinoma, termed serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (STIC), has been identified and characterized through careful analysis of the fallopian tubes in both prophylactic salpingo-oophorectomy specimens obtained from women with either a family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer or germline mutations of BRCA1 and BRCA2 and in cases of pelvic high-grade serous carcinoma. Data on incidental STICs and clinically occult microscopic invasive high-grade serous carcinomas are limited. We analyzed the clinicopathologic features of 22 cases, including 15 pure STICs and 7 STICs associated with microscopic invasive high-grade serous carcinomas, identified incidentally in fallopian tubes removed for nonprophylactic indications. Patient age ranged from 39 to 79 years (mean: 62.7; median: 61), with only 1 patient under the age of 50. No patients were known to carry BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. Of the 12 pure STICs for which the location in the fallopian tube could be established, 9 were in the fimbriated portion, 1 was at the junction of the fimbria and infundibulum, and 2 were in the nonfimbriated tube. Of the 7 STICs with associated invasive high-grade serous carcinoma, 3 were located in the fimbriated portion, 2 were at the junction of the fimbria and infundibulum, and 2 were in the nonfimbriated tube. The invasive components were in the fallopian tube in 6 cases, 4 in subepithelial stroma of tubal mucosa, and 2 as an intramucosal (exophytic) luminal lesion without invasion of underlying subepithelial stroma (size range: 1 to 4 mm). The remaining case had a microscopic focus of high-grade serous carcinoma within the ipsilateral ovary (1.3 mm cortical focus) identified only on deeper sections, without an associated invasive component in the fallopian tube. The preferential finding of atypical epithelium with the cytologic features of high-grade serous carcinoma, namely STIC, in the fallopian tubes rather than the

  11. Non-Invasive Ventilation in Patients with Heart Failure: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, Hugo Souza; Reis, Helena França Correia Dos; Lima, Melissa Santos; Gomes, Mansueto

    2017-02-01

    Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) may perfect respiratory and cardiac performance in patients with heart failure (HF). The objective of the study to establish, through systematic review and meta-analysis, NIV influence on functional capacity of HF patients. A systematic review with meta-analysis of randomized studies was carried out through research of databases of Cochrane Library, SciELO, Pubmed and PEDro, using the key-words: heart failure, non-invasive ventilation, exercise tolerance; and the free terms: bi-level positive airway pressure (BIPAP), continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), and functional capacity (terms were searched for in English and Portuguese) using the Boolean operators AND and OR. Methodological quality was ensured through PEDro scale. Weighted averages and a 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated. The meta-analysis was done thorugh the software Review Manager, version 5.3 (Cochrane Collaboration). Four randomized clinical trials were included. Individual studies suggest NIV improved functional capacity. NIV resulted in improvement in the distance of the six-minute walk test (6MWT) (68.7m 95%CI: 52.6 to 84.9) in comparison to the control group. We conclude that the NIV is an intervention that promotes important effects in the improvement of functional capacity of HF patients. However, there is a gap in literature on which are the most adequate parameters for the application of this technique. Resumo A ventilação não invasiva (VNI) pode aperfeiçoar o desempenho cardíaco e respiratório dos pacientes com insuficiência cardíaca (IC). O objetivo do estudo é estabelecer, por meio de revisão sistemática e meta-análise, a influência da VNI na capacidade funcional (CF) de indivíduos com IC. Foi realizada uma revisão sistemática com meta-análise de estudos randomizados através da pesquisa nas bases de dados Biblioteca Cochrane, SciELO, Pubmed e PEDro, utilizando-se as palavras-chave: insuficiência cardíaca, ventilação n

  12. Molecular activation analysis for organo-halogen contaminants in yogurt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hong; Chai Zhifang

    2004-01-01

    The concentrations of total halogen (TX), extractable organo-halogen (EOX), extractable persistent organo-halogen (EPOX), organo-chlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in 18 different yogurt specimens of 14 brands from Beijing, Tianjin, Shanghai, Guangzhou and Shijiazhuang were determined by epithermal neutron activation analysis (ENAA), molecular activation analysis (MAA) and GC-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS), respectively. The results indicated that the halogen in yogurt mainly existed as inorganic species and non-extractable organo-halogen compounds. About 1/3 to 1/4 of EOX was EPOX. Further, EOCl and EPOCl were the main organo-halogen species in yogurt. The average concentration of the unknown organo-chlorine was 96% of the EPOCl. HCHs and DDTs were still the main contaminants of OCPs in the yogurt of interest. Also, PCB202, PCB103 and PCB208 were the main contaminants of PCBs. (authors)

  13. Molecular analysis of radiation-induced mutations in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kronenberg, A.

    1996-01-01

    This review will focus on the nature of specific locus mutations detected in mammalian cells exposed in vitro to different types of ionizing radiations. Ionizing radiation has been shown to produce a wide variety of heritable alterations in DNA. These range from single base pair substitutions to stable loss or translocation of large portions of whole chromosomes. Data will be reviewed for certain test systems that reveal different mutation spectra. Techniques for the analysis of molecular alterations include applications of the polymerase chain reaction, some of which may be coupled with DNA sequence analysis, and a variety of hybridization-based techniques. The complexity of large scale rearrangements is approached with cytogenetic techniques including high resolution banding and various applications of the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique. Radiation-induced mutant frequencies and mutation spectra are a function of the linkage constraints on the recovery of viable mutants for a given locus and test system. 44 refs

  14. New aids for the non-invasive prenatal diagnosis of achondroplasia: dysmorphic features, charts of fetal size and molecular confirmation using cell-free fetal DNA in maternal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitty, L S; Griffin, D R; Meaney, C; Barrett, A; Khalil, A; Pajkrt, E; Cole, T J

    2011-03-01

    To improve the prenatal diagnosis of achondroplasia by constructing charts of fetal size, defining frequency of sonographic features and exploring the role of non-invasive molecular diagnosis based on cell-free fetal deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in maternal plasma. Data on fetuses with a confirmed diagnosis of achondroplasia were obtained from our databases, records reviewed, sonographic features and measurements determined and charts of fetal size constructed using the LMS (lambda-mu-sigma) method and compared with charts used in normal pregnancies. Cases referred to our regional genetics laboratory for molecular diagnosis using cell-free fetal DNA were identified and results reviewed. Twenty-six cases were scanned in our unit. Fetal size charts showed that femur length was usually on or below the 3(rd) centile by 25 weeks' gestation, and always below the 3(rd) by 30 weeks. Head circumference was above the 50(th) centile, increasing to above the 95(th) when compared with normal for the majority of fetuses. The abdominal circumference was also increased but to a lesser extent. Commonly reported sonographic features were bowing of the femora, frontal bossing, short fingers, a small chest and polyhydramnios. Analysis of cell-free fetal DNA in six pregnancies confirmed the presence of the c.1138G > A mutation in the FGRF3 gene in four cases with achondroplasia, but not the two subsequently found to be growth restricted. These data should improve the accuracy of diagnosis of achondroplasia based on sonographic findings, and have implications for targeted molecular confirmation that can reliably and safely be carried out using cell-free fetal DNA. Copyright © 2011 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Long-term Non-Invasive Ventilation in Infants: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedi, Prabhjot K; Castro-Codesal, Maria Luisa; Featherstone, Robin; AlBalawi, Mohammed M; Alkhaledi, Bashar; Kozyrskyj, Anita L; Flores-Mir, Carlos; MacLean, Joanna E

    2018-01-01

    The use of long-term non-invasive ventilation (NIV) to treat sleep and breathing disorders in children has increased substantially in the last decade; however, less data exist about its use in infants. Given that infants have distinct sleep and breathing patterns when compared to older children, the outcomes of infants on long-term NIV may differ as well. The aim of this study is to systematically review the use and outcomes of long-term NIV in infants. Ovid Medline, Ovid Embase, CINAHL (via EbscoHOST), PubMed, and Wiley Cochrane Library were systematically searched from January 1990 to July 2017. Studies on infants using long-term NIV outside of an acute care setting were included. Data were extracted on study design, population characteristics, and NIV outcomes. A total of 327 studies were full-text reviewed, with final inclusion of 60. Studies were distributed across airway (40%), neuromuscular (28%), central nervous system (10%), cardio-respiratory (2%), and multiple (20%) disease categories. Of the 18 airway studies reporting on NIV outcomes, 13 (72%) reported improvements in respiratory parameters. Of the 12 neuromuscular studies exclusively on spinal muscular atrophy type 1 (SMA1), six (50%) reported decreased hospitalizations and nine (75%) reported on mortality outcomes. Risk of bias was moderate to serious, and quality of the evidence was low to very low for all studies. Most studies had an observational design with no control group, limiting the potential for a meta-analysis. The outcomes reported in studies differed by the disease category being studied. Studies on airway conditions showed improvements in respiratory parameters for infants using NIV. Studies on neuromuscular disorder, which were almost exclusively on SMA1, reported decreased hospitalizations and prolonged survival. Overall, it appears that NIV is an effective long-term therapy for infants. However, the high risk of bias and low quality of the available evidence limited strong

  16. Population Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Analysis of Voriconazole and Anidulafungin in Adult Patients with Invasive Aspergillosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mould, Diane R.

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the exposure-response relationships for efficacy and safety of voriconazole and anidulafungin in adult patients with invasive aspergillosis (IA), a population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) analysis was performed with data from a phase 3, prospective, double-blind, comparative study evaluating voriconazole and anidulafungin combination therapy versus voriconazole (and placebo) monotherapy. Anidulafungin/placebo treatment duration was 2 to 4 weeks, and voriconazole treatment duration was 6 weeks. Efficacy (6-week all-causality mortality and 6-week global response [n = 176]) and safety (hepatic [n = 238], visual [n = 199], and psychiatric [n = 183] adverse events [AEs]) endpoints were analyzed separately using a binary logistic regression model. In IA patients receiving voriconazole monotherapy, no positive associations between voriconazole exposure and efficacy or safety were identified. In IA patients receiving combination therapy, no positive associations between voriconazole or anidulafungin exposures and efficacy were identified. The 6-week survival rate tended to increase as anidulafungin treatment duration increased; this finding should be considered with caution. Additionally, in IA patients receiving combination therapy, a positive association between voriconazole and anidulafungin exposures (area under the curve [AUC] and trough concentration [Cmin]) and hepatic AEs was established; a weak positive association between voriconazole exposure (AUC and Cmin) and psychiatric AEs was also established, but no association between voriconazole exposure and visual AEs was identified. Besides the drug exposures, no other covariates (i.e., CYP2C19 genotype status, age, weight, body mass index, sex, race, or neutropenia status) were identified as significant predictors of the efficacy and safety endpoints in IA patients. This study was registered on ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00531479). PMID:24914120

  17. Integrating archaeology and ancient DNA analysis to address invasive species colonization in the Gulf of Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Catherine; Hofman, Courtney A; Ebbert, Steve; Martin, John; Shirazi, Sabrina; Dunning, Samantha; Maldonado, Jesus E

    2017-10-01

    The intentional and unintentional movement of plants and animals by humans has transformed ecosystems and landscapes globally. Assessing when and how a species was introduced are central to managing these transformed landscapes, particularly in island environments. In the Gulf of Alaska, there is considerable interest in the history of mammal introductions and rehabilitating Gulf of Alaska island environments by eradicating mammals classified as invasive species. The Arctic ground squirrel (Urocitellus parryii) is of concern because it affects vegetation and seabirds on Gulf of Alaska islands. This animal is assumed to have been introduced by historic settlers; however, ground squirrel remains in the prehistoric archaeological record of Chirikof Island, Alaska, challenge this timeline and suggest they colonized the islands long ago. We used 3 lines of evidence to address this problem: direct radiocarbon dating of archaeological squirrel remains; evidence of prehistoric human use of squirrels; and ancient DNA analysis of dated squirrel remains. Chirikof squirrels dated to at least 2000 years ago, and cut marks on squirrel bones suggested prehistoric use by people. Ancient squirrels also shared a mitochondrial haplotype with modern Chirikof squirrels. These results suggest that squirrels have been on Chirikof longer than previously assumed and that the current population of squirrels is closely related to the ancient population. Thus, it appears ground squirrels are not a recent, human-mediated introduction and may have colonized the island via a natural dispersal event or an ancient human translocation. © 2016 The Authors. Conservation Biology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society for Conservation Biology.

  18. Salinity adaptation of the invasive New Zealand mud snail (Potamopyrgus antipodarum) in the Columbia River estuary (Pacific Northwest, USA): Physiological and molecular studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Marshal; Boese, Bruce L.; Taylor, Louise; Reusser, Deborah; Rodriguez, Rusty

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we examine salinity stress tolerances of two populations of the invasive species New Zealand mud snail Potamopyrgus antipodarum, one population from a high salinity environment in the Columbia River estuary and the other from a fresh water lake. In 1996, New Zealand mud snails were discovered in the tidal reaches of the Columbia River estuary that is routinely exposed to salinity at near full seawater concentrations. In contrast, in their native habitat and throughout its spread in the western US, New Zealand mud snails are found only in fresh water ecosystems. Our aim was to determine whether the Columbia River snails have become salt water adapted. Using a modification of the standard amphipod sediment toxicity test, salinity tolerance was tested using a range of concentrations up to undiluted seawater, and the snails were sampled for mortality at daily time points. Our results show that the Columbia River snails were more tolerant of acute salinity stress with the LC50 values averaging 38 and 22 Practical Salinity Units for the Columbia River and freshwater snails, respectively. DNA sequence analysis and morphological comparisons of individuals representing each population indicate that they were all P. antipodarum. These results suggest that this species is salt water adaptable and in addition, this investigation helps elucidate the potential of this aquatic invasive organism to adapt to adverse environmental conditions.

  19. Breaking biogeographic barriers: Molecular and morphological evidences for the Lessepsian invasion of soritid foraminifers to the Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkado, G.; Abramovich, S.; Abdu, U.; Almogi-Labin, A.; Pawlowski, J.; Holzmann, M.

    2012-04-01

    In recent years we have been witnessing a large-scale invasion (tropicalization) into the Eastern Mediterranean of many alien tropical species. The main factors that promote this process includes: 1. The ongoing warming of sea surface temperatures in the last decades. 2. The opening of the Suez Canal in 1869 that created an artificial connection between the Mediterranean and the Indo-Pacific realm of the Red Sea. This connection resulted in an ongoing unidirectional migration (termed the Lessepsian migration) of hundreds of species from Red Sea to the Mediterranean Sea. 3. The closure of the Nile River by the High Aswan Dam that blocked its nutrient discharge and created hyper-oligotrophic conditions in the Eastern Mediterranean. Larger symbiont-bearing benthic foraminifera were chosen in this study as an ideal target group for documenting this process. Their main advantage is that some of these species are clearly Indo-Pacific migrants while others represent re-encountering of allopatric populations that were isolated for at least 5.5 m.y. The first stage of this study involved the genetic characterization of soritids. Living specimens of Sorites and Amphisorus morphospecies were collected from the Red Sea and the Mediterranean and their ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences were determined in order to see the genetic relation between these two "recently connected" locations. The morphological characteristics of each specimen were documented by Scanning Electron Microscope micrographs and digital imaging. In the Red Sea, the specimens were collected from two shallow stations (5-6 m water depth) in the Gulf of Elat, representing different habitats: 1. Tur-Yam, characterizes by abundant Halophila sea grass. 2. The Inter University Institution in Elat, characterizes by pebbles with no sea grass. In the Mediterranean, specimens were collected along the shore of Northern Israel at Shikmona, Haifa, one of the few locations along the Israeli Mediterranean coast where living

  20. An Economic Analysis of Cell-Free DNA Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing in the US General Pregnancy Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Benn

    Full Text Available Analyze the economic value of replacing conventional fetal aneuploidy screening approaches with non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT in the general pregnancy population.Using decision-analysis modeling, we compared conventional screening to NIPT with cell-free DNA (cfDNA analysis in the annual US pregnancy population. Sensitivity and specificity for fetal aneuploidies, trisomy 21, trisomy 18, trisomy 13, and monosomy X, were estimated using published data and modeling of both first- and second trimester screening. Costs were assigned for each prenatal test component and for an affected birth. The overall cost to the healthcare system considered screening costs, the number of aneuploid cases detected, invasive procedures performed, procedure-related euploid losses, and affected pregnancies averted. Sensitivity analyses evaluated the effect of variation in parameters. Costs were reported in 2014 US Dollars.Replacing conventional screening with NIPT would reduce healthcare costs if it can be provided for $744 or less in the general pregnancy population. The most influential variables were timing of screening entry, screening costs, and pregnancy termination rates. Of the 13,176 affected pregnancies undergoing screening, NIPT detected 96.5% (12,717/13,176 of cases, compared with 85.9% (11,314/13,176 by conventional approaches. NIPT reduced invasive procedures by 60.0%, with NIPT and conventional methods resulting in 24,596 and 61,430 invasive procedures, respectively. The number of procedure-related euploid fetal losses was reduced by 73.5% (194/264 in the general screening population.Based on our analysis, universal application of NIPT would increase fetal aneuploidy detection rates and can be economically justified. Offering this testing to all pregnant women is associated with substantial prenatal healthcare benefits.

  1. Tailor-made materials for tailor-made applications : application of molecular imprints in chemical analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ensing, K; de Boer, Theo

    The development of new selective analytical methods and sample enrichment techniques remains of interest. The implementation of molecular imprints in chemical analysis may offer advantages over existing methodologies. Criteria for the applicability of molecular imprints in separation methods,

  2. Molecular Evolution of the Rice Blast Resistance Gene Pi-ta in Invasive Weedy Rice in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seonghee; Jia, Yulin; Jia, Melissa; Gealy, David R.; Olsen, Kenneth M.; Caicedo, Ana L.

    2011-01-01

    The Pi-ta gene in rice has been effectively used to control rice blast disease caused by Magnaporthe oryzae worldwide. Despite a number of studies that reported the Pi-ta gene in domesticated rice and wild species, little is known about how the Pi-ta gene has evolved in US weedy rice, a major weed of rice. To investigate the genome organization of the Pi-ta gene in weedy rice and its relationship to gene flow between cultivated and weedy rice in the US, we analyzed nucleotide sequence variation at the Pi-ta gene and its surrounding 2 Mb region in 156 weedy, domesticated and wild rice relatives. We found that the region at and around the Pi-ta gene shows very low genetic diversity in US weedy rice. The patterns of molecular diversity in weeds are more similar to cultivated rice (indica and aus), which have never been cultivated in the US, rather than the wild rice species, Oryza rufipogon. In addition, the resistant Pi-ta allele (Pi-ta) found in the majority of US weedy rice belongs to the weedy group strawhull awnless (SH), suggesting a single source of origin for Pi-ta. Weeds with Pi-ta were resistant to two M. oryzae races, IC17 and IB49, except for three accessions, suggesting that component(s) required for the Pi-ta mediated resistance may be missing in these accessions. Signatures of flanking sequences of the Pi-ta gene and SSR markers on chromosome 12 suggest that the susceptible pi-ta allele (pi-ta), not Pi-ta, has been introgressed from cultivated to weedy rice by out-crossing. PMID:22043312

  3. Molecular evolution of the rice blast resistance gene Pi-ta in invasive weedy rice in the USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seonghee Lee

    Full Text Available The Pi-ta gene in rice has been effectively used to control rice blast disease caused by Magnaporthe oryzae worldwide. Despite a number of studies that reported the Pi-ta gene in domesticated rice and wild species, little is known about how the Pi-ta gene has evolved in US weedy rice, a major weed of rice. To investigate the genome organization of the Pi-ta gene in weedy rice and its relationship to gene flow between cultivated and weedy rice in the US, we analyzed nucleotide sequence variation at the Pi-ta gene and its surrounding 2 Mb region in 156 weedy, domesticated and wild rice relatives. We found that the region at and around the Pi-ta gene shows very low genetic diversity in US weedy rice. The patterns of molecular diversity in weeds are more similar to cultivated rice (indica and aus, which have never been cultivated in the US, rather than the wild rice species, Oryza rufipogon. In addition, the resistant Pi-ta allele (Pi-ta found in the majority of US weedy rice belongs to the weedy group strawhull awnless (SH, suggesting a single source of origin for Pi-ta. Weeds with Pi-ta were resistant to two M. oryzae races, IC17 and IB49, except for three accessions, suggesting that component(s required for the Pi-ta mediated resistance may be missing in these accessions. Signatures of flanking sequences of the Pi-ta gene and SSR markers on chromosome 12 suggest that the susceptible pi-ta allele (pi-ta, not Pi-ta, has been introgressed from cultivated to weedy rice by out-crossing.

  4. [Periprocedual management of vitamin K antagonist's with low molecular weight heparins during invasive procedures--Consensus of experts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watzke, Herbert; Metzler, Helfried; Weltermann, Ansgar; Marschang, Peter; Brodmann, Marianne; Lang, Wilfried; Pabinger-Fasching, Ingrid; Mahla, Elisabeth; Kozek-Langenecker, Sibylle; Guschmann, Michael; Huber, Kurt

    2013-07-01

    Interruption of an ongoing therapy with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) is necessary in almost all patients undergoing major surgery. The purpose of the following expert recommendations is to provide easy to use guidance for the periprocedural management of patients on VKAs based on current evidence from the literature. Management of anticoagulation during the time of interruption of VKAs is based on balancing the thromboembolic (TE) risk of underlying conditions against the bleeding risk of the surgical procedure. VKAs should be stopped 3–7days prior to surgery. Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) is used to cover (“bridge”) the progressive pre-operative loss of anticoagulation and the slow post-operative onset of anticoagulant activity of VKAs. Patients with high risk of TE should receive a therapeutic dose of LMWH, patients with a moderate risk of TE should receive half of this dose. Patients with a low risk of TE do not need bridging therapy with LMWH. In case of an uneventful postoperative course, patients with a therapeutic pre-operative dose should be treated post-operatively with the same dose, starting on day 4 in case of major surgery and on day 2 in case of minor procedures. Patients with a half-therapeutic preoperative dose should be treated post-operatively with the same dose, starting on day 3 in case of major surgery and on day 1 in case of minor procedures. Therapy with VKAs should be re-instituted on the second post-operative day based on the preoperative dosage. Procedure-related post-operative thromboprophylaxis should be given irrespective of these recommendations on days without “bridging” anticoagulation.

  5. Correlation of molecular subtypes of invasive ductal carcinoma of breast with glucose metabolism in FDG PET/CT: Based on the recommendations of the St. Gallen Consenesus Meeting 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Sang Kyun [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Haeundae Paik Hospital, University of Inje College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sun Seong; Park, Yun Soo; Park, Ji Sun; Kim, Tae Hyun; Yoon, Hye Kyoung; Ahn, Hyo Jung; Lee, Seok Mo [Busan Paik Hospital, University of Inje College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    This study aimed to investigate the relationship between the SUVmax of primary breast cancer lesions and the molecular subtypes based on the recommendations of the St. Gallen consensus meeting 2013. Clinical records of patients who underwent F-18 FDG PET/CT for initial staging of invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) of the breast were reviewed. A total of 183 patients were included. SUV{sub max} was correlated with the molecular subtypes defined by the St. Gallen Consensus Meeting 2013, i.e., luminal A-like (LA), luminal B-like HER2 negative (LBHER2-), luminal B-like HER2 positive (LBHER2+), HER2 positive (HER2+), and triple negative (TN), and with the clinicohistopathologic characteristics. The molecular subtype was LA in 38 patients, LBHER2- in 72, LBHER2+ in 21, HER2+ in 30, and TN in 22. The mean SUV{sub max} in the LA, LBHER2-, LBHER2+, HER2+, and TN groups were 4.5 ± 2.3, 7.2 ± 4.9, 7.2 ± 4.3, 10.2 ± 5.5, and 8.8 ± 7.1, respectively. Although SUV{sub max} differed significantly among these subtypes (p < 0.001), the values showed a wide overlap. Optimal cut-off SUV{sub max} to differentiate LA from LBHER2-, LBHER2+, HER2+ and TN were 5.9, 5.8, 7.5, and 10.2 respectively, with area under curve (AUC) of 0.648, 0.709, 0.833, and 0.697 respectively. The cut-off value of 5.9 yielded the highest accuracy for differentiation between the LA and non-LA subtypes, with sensitivity, specificity, and AUC of 79.4 %, 57.9 %, and 0.704 respectively. The SUV{sub max} showed a significant correlation with the molecular subtype. Although SUV{sub max} measurements could be used along with immunohistochemical analysis for differentiating between molecular subtypes, its application to individual patients may be limited due to the wide overlaps in SUV{sub max}.

  6. Inelastic neutron scattering analysis of the molecular motions in adrenaline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padureanu, I.; Aranghel, Dorina; Brzozowski, R.; Kozlov, Zh. A; Semenov, V.A.

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents an experimental study of the molecular motions in adrenaline by means of the inelastic neutron scattering. A high resolution and luminosity time of flight spectrometer was used to measure the molecular incoherent neutron scattering function S inc (Q,ℎω) at room temperature. This function is further used to obtain a complete vibration spectrum G(ℎω) in the low and intermediate frequency region. The experimental analysis of G(ℎω) allowed a very clear determination of the excitation located at the following energy transfers: ℎω = 0.16 meV; 3.58 meV; 5.20 meV; 8.62 meV; 11.40 meV; 15.05 meV; 21.84 MeV; 32.66 meV; 40.84 meV; 66.68 meV; 115.22 meV. Except the mode at 0.16 meV which could be assigned to the proton tunneling along the hydrogen bound, the ratio of the other frequencies ω n /ω n-1 within the experimental errors is found to be closed to a value between √2 and √3. (authors)

  7. ANALYSIS OF APOPTOSIS FACTORS IN PATIENTS WITH PREINVASIVE AND INVASIVE CERVICAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. I. Kovchur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article assesses the disturbance degree of apoptotic program in patients with preinvasive and invasive cervical cancer by investigating the expression level of genes of caspases-3, -6, -8 и -9 in mononuclear cells of periphery blood and in tumor tissue on the two regulating levels – on mRNA level (transcriptional and proteolytic activity (post transcriptional. 75 patients with stage III of cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CIN III  (middle age of 32,9 ± 7,4,45 patients with stage IA (31,3 ± 6,0, 21 – with stage II (43,6 ± 13,2, 15 – with stage III–IV (46,9 ± 11,1 have been examined. The control group has been formed from 30 almost healthy donors without any cervical pathology and papilloma human virus (control 1 and 30 patients with a preinvasive and microinvasive cervical cancer (control 2. It has been found that in proportion of progress of cervix cancer, the membranous expression of CD95 increases in MPB – fraction (peripheral blood monocytes when the a CIN and initial stages of cervix cancer, more than two times. Herewith number CD95+-lymphocytes is positively correlated with stage of cervical cancer (r = 0,91; R2  = 0,82; p << 0,01. It has been found out that the activity gain of caspase-8 (r = 0,92; R2  = 0,86; p << 0,01, caspase-6 (r = 0,77; R2 = 0,59; p << 0,01 and reduction activity of caspase-9 (r = –0,60;  R2 = 0,36; p < 0,01 in mononuclear cells of peripheral blood pointed out on the sensitivity increase to Fas-induced apoptosis. Opposite, in tumor tissue, beginning from CIN stage III, apoptosis-resistant phenotype is formed, it were defined by the expression of caspase-3 (r = –0,72; R2 = 0,52, p < 0,01, caspase-6 (r = –0,59; R2 = 0, 38; p < 0,01 и caspase-9 (r = –0,67; R2 = 0,45; p < 0,01 by mRNA level and proteolytic activity. It has been shown, that the cervical cancer development is accompanied by multilateral disturbances of apoptotic processes, which are realized in decreased function of

  8. Chromosomal rearrangement segregating with adrenoleukodystrophy: A molecular analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sack, G.H. Jr.; Morrell, J.C.; Chen, G.; Chen, W.; Moser, H.W. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)); Alpern, M. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)); Webster, T.; Caskey, C.T. (Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Houston, TX (United States) Baylore College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)); Feil, R.P. (Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale Unite Associatee, Strasbourg (France))

    1993-10-15

    The relationship between X chromosome-linked adrenoleukodystrophy and the red/green color pigment gene cluster on Xq28 was investigated in a large kindred. The DNA in a hemizygous male showed altered restriction fragment sizes compatible with at least a deletion extending from the 5[prime] end of the color pigment genes. Segregation analysis using a DNA probe within the color pigment gene cluster showed significant linkage with adrenoleukodystrophy (logarithm of odds score of 3.19 at [theta] = 0.0). These data demonstrate linkage, rather than association, between a unique molecular rearrangement in the color pigment gene cluster and adrenoleukodystrophy. The DNA changes in this region are thus likely to be helpful for determining the location and identity of the responsible gene. 33 refs., 4 figs.

  9. [Data analysis of non-invasive prenatal testing based on special loci in cell-free fetal DNA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Liming; Kong, Lingyin; Xia, Yingying; Mao, Yan; Shen, Jingjing; Zhu, Yijun; Xue, Yongfeng; Sun, Danfeng; Liu, Huimin; Liang, Bo

    2018-02-10

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the data of non-invasive prenatal testing based on specific loci of circulating cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA). METHODS Selected loci of target chromosomes were analyzed by sequence capture and sequencing. Meanwhile, 600 loci were selected from other chromosomes for determining the concentration of cffDNA. RESULTS A total of 768 specific loci were captured on chromosomes 21 and 18, and used to determine whether the two were abnormal. When the minimum concentration of detected cffDNA was set at 3% and the threshold of Z score was set to [-6,6], the specificity of the analysis was 99.37% and the sensitivity was 100%. CONCLUSION A reliable, convenient and low-cost analytical method has been developed. The method requires less sequencing data for non-invasive prenatal testing, and can accurately detect abnormalities of fetal chromosomes 21 and 18, and simultaneously determine the concentration of cffDNA.

  10. Predicting and explaining plant invasions through analysis of source area floras: some critical considerations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pyšek, Petr; Richardson, D. M.; Williamson, M.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 10, - (2004), s. 179-187 ISSN 1366-9516 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK6005114; GA ČR GA206/03/1216 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6005908 Keywords : archaeophytes * biological invasions * distribution ranges Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.109, year: 2002

  11. Does global warning increase establishment rates of invasive alien species? A centurial time series analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingcheng Huang; Robert A. Haack; Runzhi. Zhang

    2011-01-01

    The establishment rate of invasive alien insect species has been increasing worldwide during the past century. This trend has been widely attributed to increased rates of international trade and associated species introductions, but rarely linked to environmental change. To better understand and manage the bioinvasion process, it is crucial to understand the...

  12. Plastid DNA analysis reveals cryptic hybridization in invasive dalmatian toadflax populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew Boswell; Sharlene E. Sing; Sarah M. Ward

    2016-01-01

    Gene flow between Dalmatian toadflax (DT) and yellow toadflax (YT), both aggressive invaders throughout the Intermountain West, is creating hybrid populations potentially more invasive than either parent species. To determine the direction of gene flow in these hybrid populations, species-diagnostic cytoplasmic markers were developed. Markers were based on...

  13. Analysis of Contractility and Invasion Potential of Two Canine Mammary Tumor Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaisa Rajakylä

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells are surrounded by a mechanically and biochemically distinct microenvironment that undergoes dynamic changes throughout the neoplastic progression. During this progression, some cancer cells acquire abnormal characteristics that potentiate their escape from the primary tumor site, to establish secondary tumors in distant organs. Recent studies with several human cancer cell lines have shown that the altered physical properties of tumor cells, such as their ability to apply high traction forces to the surroundings, are directly linked with their potential to invade and metastasize. To test the hypothetical interconnection between actomyosin-mediated traction forces and invasion potential within 3D-microenvironment, we utilized two canine mammary tumor cell lines with different contractile properties. These cell lines, canine mammary tumor (CMT-U27 and CMT-U309, were found to have distinct expression patterns of lineage-specific markers and organization of actin-based structures. In particular, CMT-U309 carcinoma cells were typified by thick contractile actomyosin bundles that exerted high forces to their environment, as measured by traction force microscopy. These high contractile forces also correlated with the prominent invasiveness of the CMT-U309 cell line. Furthermore, we found high contractility and 3D-invasion potential to be dependent on the activity of 5′AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, as blocking AMPK signaling was found to reverse both of these features. Taken together, our findings implicate that actomyosin forces correlate with the invasion potential of the studied cell lines.

  14. A comparative analysis of minimally invasive and open spine surgery patient education resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Nitin; Feghhi, Daniel P; Gupta, Raghav; Hansberry, David R; Quinn, John C; Heary, Robert F; Goldstein, Ira M

    2014-09-01

    The Internet has become a widespread source for disseminating health information to large numbers of people. Such is the case for spine surgery as well. Given the complexity of spinal surgeries, an important point to consider is whether these resources are easily read and understood by most Americans. The average national reading grade level has been estimated to be at about the 7th grade. In the present study the authors strove to assess the readability of open spine surgery resources and minimally invasive spine surgery resources to offer suggestions to help improve the readability of patient resources. Online patient education resources were downloaded in 2013 from 50 resources representing either traditional open back surgery or minimally invasive spine surgery. Each resource was assessed using 10 scales from Readability Studio Professional Edition version 2012.1. Patient education resources representing traditional open back surgery or minimally invasive spine surgery were all found to be written at a level well above the recommended 6th grade level. In general, minimally invasive spine surgery materials were written at a higher grade level. The readability of patient education resources from spine surgery websites exceeds the average reading ability of an American adult. Revisions may be warranted to increase quality and patient comprehension of these resources to effectively reach a greater patient population.

  15. Genetic diversity analysis of common beans based on molecular markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homar R. Gill-Langarica

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A core collection of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., representing genetic diversity in the entire Mexican holding, is kept at the INIFAP (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agricolas y Pecuarias, Mexico Germplasm Bank. After evaluation, the genetic structure of this collection (200 accessions was compared with that of landraces from the states of Oaxaca, Chiapas and Veracruz (10 genotypes from each, as well as a further 10 cultivars, by means of four amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP +3/+3 primer combinations and seven simple sequence repeats (SSR loci, in order to define genetic diversity, variability and mutual relationships. Data underwent cluster (UPGMA and molecular variance (AMOVA analyses. AFLP analysis produced 530 bands (88.5% polymorphic while SSR primers amplified 174 alleles, all polymorphic (8.2 alleles per locus. AFLP indicated that the highest genetic diversity was to be found in ten commercial-seed classes from two major groups of accessions from Central Mexico and Chiapas, which seems to be an important center of diversity in the south. A third group included genotypes from Nueva Granada, Mesoamerica, Jalisco and Durango races. Here, SSR analysis indicated a reduced number of shared haplotypes among accessions, whereas the highest genetic components of AMOVA variation were found within accessions. Genetic diversity observed in the common-bean core collection represents an important sample of the total Phaseolus genetic variability at the main Germplasm Bank of INIFAP. Molecular marker strategies could contribute to a better understanding of the genetic structure of the core collection as well as to its improvement and validation.

  16. Genomic analysis reveals multi-drug resistance clusters in Group B Streptococcus CC17 hypervirulent isolates causing neonatal invasive disease in southern mainland China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmondo Campisi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal invasive disease caused by group B Streptococcus (GBS represents a significant public health care concern globally. However, data related to disease burden, serotype distribution and molecular epidemiology in China and other Asian countries are very few and specifically relative to confined regions. The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic characteristics of GBS isolates recovered from neonates with invasive disease during 2013-2014 at Guangzhou and Changsha hospitals in southern mainland China. We assessed the capsular polysaccharide (CPS type, pilus islands (PIs distribution and hvgA gene presence in a panel of 26 neonatal clinical isolates, of which 8 were recovered from Early Onset Disease (EOD and 18 from Late Onset Disease (LOD. Among 26 isolates examined, five serotypes were identified. Type III was the most represented (15 cases, particularly among LOD strains (n=11, followed by types Ib (n=5, V (n=3, Ia (n=2 and II (n=1. We performed whole-genome sequencing (WGS analysis and antimicrobial susceptibility testing on the 14 serotype III isolates belonging to the hypervirulent Clonal Complex 17 (serotype III-CC17.The presence of PI-2b alone was associated with 13 out of 14 serotype III-CC17 strains. Genome analysis led us to identify two multi-drug resistance gene clusters harbored in two new versions of integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs, carrying five or eight antibiotic resistance genes, respectively. These ICEs replaced the 16 kb-locus that normally contains the PI-1 operon. All isolates harboring the identified ICEs showed multiple resistances to aminoglycoside, macrolide and tetracycline antibiotic classes. In conclusion, we report the first whole-genome sequence analysis of 14 GBS serotype III-CC17 strains isolated in China, representing the most prevalent lineage causing neonatal invasive disease. The acquisition of newly identified ICEs conferring multiple antibiotic resistances could in part explain

  17. Mesoamerican tree squirrels evolution (Rodentia: Sciuridae): a molecular phylogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos, Federico; Gutierrez-Espeleta, Gustavo

    2014-06-01

    The tribe Sciurini comprehends the genera Sciurus, Syntheosiurus, Microsciurus, Tamiasciurus and Rheinthrosciurus. The phylogenetic relationships within Sciurus have been only partially done, and the relationship between Mesoamerican species remains unsolved. The phylogenetic relationships of the Mesoamerican tree squirrels were examined using molecular data. Sequence data publicly available (12S, 16S, CYTB mitochondrial genes and IRBP nuclear gene) and cytochrome B gene sequences of four previously not sampled Mesoamerican Sciurus species were analyzed under a Bayesian multispecies coalescence model. Phylogenetic analysis of the multilocus data set showed the neotropical tree squirrels as a monophyletic clade. The genus Sciurus was paraphyletic due to the inclusion of Microsciurus species (M. alfari and M. flaviventer). The South American species S. aestuans and S. stramineus showed a sister taxa relationship. Single locus analysis based on the most compact and complete data set (i.e. CYTB gene sequences), supported the monophyly of the South American species and recovered a Mesoamerican clade including S. aureogaster, S. granatensis and S. variegatoides. These results corroborated previous findings based on cladistic analysis of cranial and post-cranial characters. Our data support a close relationship between Mesoamerican Sciurus species and a sister relationship with South American species, and corroborates previous findings in relation to the polyphyly of Microsciurus and Syntheosciurus paraphyly.

  18. Mesoamerican tree squirrels evolution (Rodentia: Sciuridae: a molecular phylogenetic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Villalobos

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The tribe Sciurini comprehends the genera Sciurus, Syntheosiurus, Microsciurus, Tamiasciurus and Rheinthrosciurus. The phylogenetic relationships within Sciurus have been only partially done, and the relationship between Mesoamerican species remains unsolved. The phylogenetic relationships of the Mesoamerican tree squirrels were examined using molecular data. Sequence data publicly available (12S, 16S, CYTB mitochondrial genes and IRBP nuclear gene and cytochrome B gene sequences of four previously not sampled Mesoamerican Sciurus species were analyzed under a Bayesian multispecies coalescence model. Phylogenetic analysis of the multilocus data set showed the neotropical tree squirrels as a monophyletic clade. The genus Sciurus was paraphyletic due to the inclusion of Microsciurus species (M. alfari and M. flaviventer. The South American species S. aestuans and S. stramineus showed a sister taxa relationship. Single locus analysis based on the most compact and complete data set (i.e. CYTB gene sequences, supported the monophyly of the South American species and recovered a Mesoamerican clade including S. aureogaster, S. granatensis and S. variegatoides. These results corroborated previous findings based on cladistic analysis of cranial and post-cranial characters. Our data support a close relationship between Mesoamerican Sciurus species and a sister relationship with South American species, and corroborates previous findings in relation to the polyphyly of Microsciurus and Syntheosciurus’ paraphyly. Rev. Biol. Trop. 62 (2: 649-657. Epub 2014 June 01.

  19. Analysis of the Time Reversible Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Lin; Lu, Jianfeng; Shao, Sihong

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the time reversible Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (TRBOMD) scheme, which preserves the time reversibility of the Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics even with non-convergent self-consistent field iteration. In the linear response regime, we derive the stability condition as well as the accuracy of TRBOMD for computing physical properties such as the phonon frequency obtained from the molecular dynamic simulation. We connect and compare TRBOMD with the Car-Parrinello molecular...

  20. [Evaluation of the significance of molecular methods in the diagnosis of invasive fungal infections: comparison with conventional methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susever, Serdar; Yeğenoğlu, Yıldız

    2011-04-01

    Direct microscopy and culture methods are still valuable standard conventional methods for the diagnosis of infections caused by true or opportunistic fungal pathogens, especially in high risk patients. However, some of the problems concerning the application and interpretation of those methods, indicate a need for more rapid, practical and reliable tests with high sensitivity and specificity. This study was conducted to compare the results obtained by molecular methods with the results of conventional methods performed simultaneously for the detection and identification of causative fungi in clinical samples. Clinical samples [24 bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL); 14 blood; 5 peritoneal, 4 pleural and 1 pericardial fluids; 1 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), 1 urine] from 50 immunosuppressed patients were included in the study. All of the samples were cultivated on Sabouraud dextrose and brain-heart infusion agar media and incubated at 30°C and 37°C for 30 days. Samples other than blood were stained with 10-15% KOH + calcofluor white and examined by direct microscopy. Conventional identification of the isolates were performed by using basic morphological and biochemical characteristics. The isolation of fungal DNAs for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was achieved by classical phenol-chloroform-isoamylalcohol procedure (9-10 hours) and commercial DNA extraction kit (6-7 hours) and general and species-specific primers (multiplex) from ITS1, ITS2, ITS3, ITS4, 5.8S rDNA and 28S rDNA regions were chosen for amplification. In PCR results, 550 base-paired (bp) bands obtained with universal primers were evaluated as fungal DNA positivity, and 273 bp, 320 bp, 423 bp, 357 bp, 136 bp and 385 bp bands with species-specific primers were evaluated as Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, Cryptococcus neoformans and Aspergillus fumigatus positivities, respectively. Seventeen (34%) of the 50 samples yielded fungal growth on culture (C.albicans in 12

  1. A Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Erinacine A’s Inhibition of Gastric Cancer Cell Viability and Invasiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsing-Chun Kuo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background / Aims: Erinacine A, isolated from the ethanol extract of the Hericium erinaceus mycelium, has been demonstrated as a new alternative anticancer medicine. Drawing upon current research, this study presents an investigation of the molecular mechanism of erinacine A inhibition associated with gastric cancer cell growth. Methods: Cell viability was determined by Annexin V–FITC/propidium iodide staining and migration using a Boyden chamber assay to determine the effects of erinacine A treatment on the proliferation capacity and invasiveness of gastric cancer cells. A proteomic assay provided information that was used to identify the differentially-expressed proteins following erinacine A treatment, as well as the mechanism of its targets in the apoptotic induction of erinacine A. Results: Our results demonstrate that erinacine A treatment of TSGH 9201 cells increased cytotoxicity and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, as well as decreased the invasiveness. Treatment of TSGH 9201 cells with erinacine A resulted in the activation of caspases and the expression of TRAIL. Erinacine A induction of apoptosis was accompanied by sustained phosphorylation of FAK/AKT/p70S6K and the PAK1 pathways, as well as the generation of ROS. Furthermore, the induction of apoptosis and anti-invasion properties by erinacine A could involve the differential expression of the 14-3-3 sigma protein (1433S and microtubule-associated tumor suppressor candidate 2 (MTUS2, with the activation of the FAK/AKT/p70S6K and PAK1 signaling pathways. Conclusions: These results lead us to speculate that erinacine A may generate an apoptotic cascade in TSGH 9201 cells by activating the FAK/AKT/p70S6K/PAK1 pathway and upregulating proteins 1433S and MTUS2, providing a new mechanism underlying the anti-cancer effects of erinacine A in human gastric cancer cells.

  2. Molecular analysis of desmoid tumors with a high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism array identifies new molecular candidate lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Erben, Philipp; Nowak, Daniel; Sauer, Christian; Ströbel, Philipp; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Hofheinz, Ralf-Dieter; Hohenberger, Peter; Kasper, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Background: Desmoid tumors are neoplastic proliferations of connective tissues. The mutation status of the gene coding for catenin (cadherin-associated protein) beta 1 (CTNNB1) and trisomy 8 on the chromosomal level have been described to have prognostic relevance. Patients and Methods: In order to elucidate new molecular mechanisms underlying these tumors, we carried out a molecular analysis with a genome-wide human high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, in 9 patients. Resu...

  3. Invasive Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Invasive species have significantly changed the Great Lakes ecosystem. An invasive species is a plant or animal that is not native to an ecosystem, and whose introduction is likely to cause economic, human health, or environmental damage.

  4. Raman spectroscopy in biomedicine – non-invasive in vitro analysis of cells and extracellular matrix components in tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauchle, Eva; Schenke-Layland, Katja

    2013-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is an established laser-based technology for the quality assurance of pharmaceutical products. Over the past few years, Raman spectroscopy has become a powerful diagnostic tool in the life sciences. Raman spectra allow assessment of the overall molecular constitution of biological samples, based on specific signals from proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, carbohydrates, and inorganic crystals. Measurements are non-invasive and do not require sample processing, making Raman spectroscopy a reliable and robust method with numerous applications in biomedicine. Moreover, Raman spectroscopy allows the highly sensitive discrimination of bacteria. Rama spectra retain information on continuous metabolic processes and kinetics such as lipid storage and recombinant protein production. Raman spectra are specific for each cell type and provide additional information on cell viability, differentiation status, and tumorigenicity. In tissues, Raman spectroscopy can detect major extracellular matrix components and their secondary structures. Furthermore, the non-invasive characterization of healthy and pathological tissues as well as quality control and process monitoring of in vitro-engineered matrix is possible. This review provides comprehensive insight to the current progress in expanding the applicability of Raman spectroscopy for the characterization of living cells and tissues, and serves as a good reference point for those starting in the field. PMID:23161832

  5. A minimally-invasive method for sampling human petrous bones from the cranial base for ancient DNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirak, Kendra A; Fernandes, Daniel M; Cheronet, Olivia; Novak, Mario; Gamarra, Beatriz; Balassa, Tímea; Bernert, Zsolt; Cséki, Andrea; Dani, János; Gallina, József Zsolt; Kocsis-Buruzs, Gábor; Kővári, Ivett; László, Orsolya; Pap, Ildikó; Patay, Róbert; Petkes, Zsolt; Szenthe, Gergely; Szeniczey, Tamás; Hajdu, Tamás; Pinhasi, Ron

    2017-06-01

    Ancient DNA (aDNA) research involves invasive and destructive sampling procedures that are often incompatible with anthropological, anatomical, and bioarcheological analyses requiring intact skeletal remains. The osseous labyrinth inside the petrous bone has been shown to yield higher amounts of endogenous DNA than any other skeletal element; however, accessing this labyrinth in cases of a complete or reconstructed skull involves causing major structural damage to the cranial vault or base. Here, we describe a novel cranial base drilling method (CBDM) for accessing the osseous labyrinth from the cranial base that prevents damaging the surrounding cranial features, making it highly complementary to morphological analyses. We assessed this method by comparing the aDNA results from one petrous bone processed using our novel method to its pair, which was processed using established protocols for sampling disarticulated petrous bones. We show a decrease in endogenous DNA and molecular copy numbers when the drilling method is used; however, we also show that this method produces more endogenous DNA and higher copy numbers than any postcranial bone. Our results demonstrate that this minimally-invasive method reduces the loss of genetic data associated with the use of other skeletal elements and enables the combined craniometric and genetic study of individuals with archeological, cultural, and evolutionary value.

  6. A perioperative cost analysis comparing single-level minimally invasive and open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kern; Nandyala, Sreeharsha V; Marquez-Lara, Alejandro; Fineberg, Steven J; Oglesby, Mathew; Pelton, Miguel A; Andersson, Gunnar B; Isayeva, Darya; Jegier, Briana J; Phillips, Frank M

    2014-08-01

    Emerging literature suggests superior clinical short- and long-term outcomes of MIS (minimally invasive surgery) TLIFs (transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion) versus open fusions. Few studies to date have analyzed the cost differences between the two techniques and their relationship to acute clinical outcomes. The purpose of the study was to determine the differences in hospitalization costs and payments for patients treated with primary single-level MIS versus open TLIF. The impact of clinical outcomes and their contribution to financial differences was explored as well. This study was a nonrandomized, nonblinded prospective review. Sixty-six consecutive patients undergoing a single-level TLIF (open/MIS) were analyzed (33 open, 33 MIS). Patients in either cohort (MIS/open) were matched based on race, sex, age, smoking status, medical comorbidities (Charlson Comorbidity index), payer, and diagnosis. Every patient in the study had a diagnosis of either degenerative disc disease or spondylolisthesis and stenosis. Operative time (minutes), length of stay (LOS, days), estimated blood loss (EBL, mL), anesthesia time (minutes), Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores, and hospital cost/payment amount were assessed. The MIS and open TLIF groups were compared based on clinical outcomes measures and hospital cost/payment data using SPSS version 20.0 for statistical analysis. The two groups were compared using bivariate chi-squared analysis. Mann-Whitney tests were used for non-normal distributed data. Effect size estimate was calculated with the Cohen d statistic and the r statistic with a 95% confidence interval. Average surgical time was shorter for the MIS than the open TLIF group (115.8 minutes vs. 186.0 minutes respectively; p=.001). Length of stay was also reduced for the MIS versus the open group (2.3 days vs. 2.9 days, respectively; p=.018). Average anesthesia time and EBL were also lower in the MIS group (pFinancial analysis demonstrated lower total hospital direct

  7. Molecular-dynamics analysis of the diffusion of molecular hydrogen in all-silica sodalite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Berg, A.W.C.; Bromley, S.T.; Flikkema, E.; Wojdel, J.; Maschmeyer, T.; Jansen, J.C.

    2004-01-01

    In order to investigate the technical feasibility of crystalline porous silicates as hydrogen storage materials, the self-diffusion of molecular hydrogen in all-silica sodalite is modeled using large-scale classical molecular-dynamics simulations employing full lattice flexibility. In the

  8. Molecular Characterization and Expression Analysis of Equine ( Gene in Horse (

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki-Duk Song

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the molecular characteristics of the horse vascular endothelial growth factor alpha gene (VEGFα by constructing a phylogenetic tree, and to investigate gene expression profiles in tissues and blood leukocytes after exercise for development of suitable biomarkers. Using published amino acid sequences of other vertebrate species (human, chimpanzee, mouse, rat, cow, pig, chicken and dog, we constructed a phylogenetic tree which showed that equine VEGFα belonged to the same clade of the pig VEGFα. Analysis for synonymous (Ks and non-synonymous substitution ratios (Ka revealed that the horse VEGFα underwent positive selection. RNA was extracted from blood samples before and after exercise and different tissue samples of three horses. Expression analyses using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and quantitative-polymerase chain reaction (qPCR showed ubiquitous expression of VEGFα mRNA in skeletal muscle, kidney, thyroid, lung, appendix, colon, spinal cord, and heart tissues. Analysis of differential expression of VEGFα gene in blood leukocytes after exercise indicated a unimodal pattern. These results will be useful in developing biomarkers that can predict the recovery capacity of racing horses.

  9. MDAnalysis: a toolkit for the analysis of molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud-Agrawal, Naveen; Denning, Elizabeth J; Woolf, Thomas B; Beckstein, Oliver

    2011-07-30

    MDAnalysis is an object-oriented library for structural and temporal analysis of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation trajectories and individual protein structures. It is written in the Python language with some performance-critical code in C. It uses the powerful NumPy package to expose trajectory data as fast and efficient NumPy arrays. It has been tested on systems of millions of particles. Many common file formats of simulation packages including CHARMM, Gromacs, Amber, and NAMD and the Protein Data Bank format can be read and written. Atoms can be selected with a syntax similar to CHARMM's powerful selection commands. MDAnalysis enables both novice and experienced programmers to rapidly write their own analytical tools and access data stored in trajectories in an easily accessible manner that facilitates interactive explorative analysis. MDAnalysis has been tested on and works for most Unix-based platforms such as Linux and Mac OS X. It is freely available under the GNU General Public License from http://mdanalysis.googlecode.com. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Local Mode Analysis: Decoding IR Spectra by Visualizing Molecular Details.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massarczyk, M; Rudack, T; Schlitter, J; Kuhne, J; Kötting, C; Gerwert, K

    2017-04-20

    Integration of experimental and computational approaches to investigate chemical reactions in proteins has proven to be very successful. Experimentally, time-resolved FTIR difference-spectroscopy monitors chemical reactions at atomic detail. To decode detailed structural information encoded in IR spectra, QM/MM calculations are performed. Here, we present a novel method which we call local mode analysis (LMA) for calculating IR spectra and assigning spectral IR-bands on the basis of movements of nuclei and partial charges from just a single QM/MM trajectory. Through LMA the decoding of IR spectra no longer requires several simulations or optimizations. The novel approach correlates the motions of atoms of a single simulation with the corresponding IR bands and provides direct access to the structural information encoded in IR spectra. Either the contributions of a particular atom or atom group to the complete IR spectrum of the molecule are visualized, or an IR-band is selected to visualize the corresponding structural motions. Thus, LMA decodes the detailed information contained in IR spectra and provides an intuitive approach for structural biologists and biochemists. The unique feature of LMA is the bidirectional analysis connecting structural details to spectral features and vice versa spectral features to molecular motions.

  11. Analysis of Downs syndrome with molecular techniques for future diagnoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    May Salem Al-Nbaheen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Down syndrome (DS is a genetic disorder appeared due to the presence of trisomy in chromosome 21 in the G-group of the acrocentric region. DS is also known as non-Mendelian inheritance, due to the lack of Mendel’s laws. The disorder in children is identified through clinical symptoms and chromosomal analysis and till now there are no biochemical and molecular analyses. Presently, whole exome sequencing (WES has largely contributed in identifying the new disease-causing genes and represented a significant breakthrough in the field of human genetics and this technique uses high throughput sequencing technologies to determine the arrangement of DNA base pairs specifying the protein coding regions of an individual’s genome. Apart from this next generation sequencing and whole genome sequencing also contribute for identifying the disease marker. From this review, the suggestion was to perform the WES is DS children to identify the marker region. Keywords: Downs syndrome, Exome sequencing, Chromosomal analysis, Genes, Genetics

  12. Molecular analysis of radiation-induced experimental tumors in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwa, O.; Muto, M.; Suzuki, F.

    1992-01-01

    Molecular analysis was made on mouse tumors induced by radiation and chemicals. Expression of oncogenes was studied in 12 types of 178 mouse tumors. Southern blotting was done on tumors in which overexpression of oncogenes was noted. Amplification of the myc oncogene was found in chemically induced sarcomas, but not those induced by radiations. Radiogenic thymomas were studied in detail. These thymomas were induced in two different ways. The first was thymomas induced by direct irradiation of F1 mice between C57BL/6NxC3H/He. Southern analysis of DNA revealed deletion of specific minisatellite bands in these tumors. DNA from directly induced thymomas induced focus formation when transfected into normal Golden hamster cells. The mouse K-ras oncogene was detected in these transformants. The second type of thymomas was induced by X-irradiation of thymectomized B10.thy1.2 mice in which normal thymus from congenic B10,thy1.1. mice was grafted. Thymomas of the donor origin was analysed by transfection and the transformants by DNA from those indirectly induced thymomas did not contain activated ras oncogenes. (author)

  13. Mathematical analysis of compressive/tensile molecular and nuclear structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dayu

    Mathematical analysis in chemistry is a fascinating and critical tool to explain experimental observations. In this dissertation, mathematical methods to present chemical bonding and other structures for many-particle systems are discussed at different levels (molecular, atomic, and nuclear). First, the tetrahedral geometry of single, double, or triple carbon-carbon bonds gives an unsatisfying demonstration of bond lengths, compared to experimental trends. To correct this, Platonic solids and Archimedean solids were evaluated as atoms in covalent carbon or nitrogen bond systems in order to find the best solids for geometric fitting. Pentagonal solids, e.g. the dodecahedron and icosidodecahedron, give the best fit with experimental bond lengths; an ideal pyramidal solid which models covalent bonds was also generated. Second, the macroscopic compression/tension architectural approach was applied to forces at the molecular level, considering atomic interactions as compressive (repulsive) and tensile (attractive) forces. Two particle interactions were considered, followed by a model of the dihydrogen molecule (H2; two protons and two electrons). Dihydrogen was evaluated as two different types of compression/tension structures: a coaxial spring model and a ring model. Using similar methods, covalent diatomic molecules (made up of C, N, O, or F) were evaluated. Finally, the compression/tension model was extended to the nuclear level, based on the observation that nuclei with certain numbers of protons/neutrons (magic numbers) have extra stability compared to other nucleon ratios. A hollow spherical model was developed that combines elements of the classic nuclear shell model and liquid drop model. Nuclear structure and the trend of the "island of stability" for the current and extended periodic table were studied.

  14. Invasive plants have different effects on trophic structure of green and brown food webs in terrestrial ecosystems: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCary, Matthew A; Mores, Robin; Farfan, Monica A; Wise, David H

    2016-03-01

    Although invasive plants are a major source of terrestrial ecosystem degradation worldwide, it remains unclear which trophic levels above the base of the food web are most vulnerable to plant invasions. We performed a meta-analysis of 38 independent studies from 32 papers to examine how invasive plants alter major groupings of primary and secondary consumers in three globally distributed ecosystems: wetlands, woodlands and grasslands. Within each ecosystem we examined if green (grazing) food webs are more sensitive to plant invasions compared to brown (detrital) food webs. Invasive plants have strong negative effects on primary consumers (detritivores, bacterivores, fungivores, and/or herbivores) in woodlands and wetlands, which become less abundant in both green and brown food webs in woodlands and green webs in wetlands. Plant invasions increased abundances of secondary consumers (predators and/or parasitoids) only in woodland brown food webs and green webs in wetlands. Effects of invasive plants on grazing and detrital food webs clearly differed between ecosystems. Overall, invasive plants had the most pronounced effects on the trophic structure of wetlands and woodlands, but caused no detectable changes to grassland trophic structure. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  15. Pokemon and MEF2D co-operationally promote invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Xin; Hong, Xing-Yu; Li, Tao; He, Cheng-Yan

    2015-12-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most deadly human malignancy, and frequent invasion and metastasis is closely associated with its poor prognosis. However, the molecular mechanism underlying HCC invasion is still not completely elucidated. Pokemon is a well-established oncogene for HCC growth, but its contribution to HCC invasion has not been studied yet. In this paper, Pokemon was found to be overexpressed in MHCC-97H HCC cell line, which possesses higher invasiveness. Downregulation of Pokemon abolished the invasion of MHCC-97H HCC cell lines. Pokemon overexpression was able to enhance the invasion of MHCC-97L cells with lower invasiveness. MEF2D, an oncogene promoting the invasion of HCC cells, was further detected to be upregulated and downregulated when Pokemon was overexpressed and silenced, respectively. Online database analysis indicated that one Pokemon recognition site was located within the promoter of MEF2D. Chromatin co-precipitation, luciferase, and qPCR assays all proved that Pokemon can promote the expression of MEF2D in HCC cells. Restoration of MEF2D expression can prevent the impaired invasion of HCC cells with Pokemon silencing, while suppression of MEF2D abolished the effect of Pokemon overexpression on HCC invasion. More interestingly, MEF2D was also found to increase the transcription of Pokemon by binding myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) sites within its promoter region, implying an auto-regulatory circuit consisting of these two oncogenes that can promote HCC invasion. Our findings can contribute to the understanding of molecular mechanism underlying HCC invasion, and provided evidence that targeting this molecular loop may be a promising strategy for anti-invasion therapy.

  16. From data to decision - learning by probabilistic risk analysis of biological invasions

    OpenAIRE

    Sahlin, Ullrika

    2010-01-01

    Predicting an uncertain future with uncertain knowledge is a challenge. The success of efforts to preserve biodiversity, to maintain biosecurity and to reduce a negative impact from climate change, depend on scientifically based predictions of future events. The ongoing introduction of non-indigenous species threatens ecological systems for which empirical data is sparse and scientific knowledge is uncertain. Since biological invasions constitute a type of risk characterized by small probabil...

  17. Total RNA Sequencing Analysis of DCIS Progressing to Invasive Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    collaboration with Affymetrix scientists , we were able to determine Q/C measures that are predictive of subsequent array data quality, but at the cost... fact progress to invasive disease (IBC), and complements our multi-institutional, NIH-funded study of genetic and epigenetic alterations of pre...information we are seeking, because only the strongest signals were detectable in our data. In collaboration with Affymetrix scientists , we were able to

  18. Total RNA Sequencing Analysis of DCIS Progressing to Invasive Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT: This project is designed to complement a multi-institutional, NIH...the minority of cases of preinvasive breast cancer (DCIS), that do in fact progress to invasive disease (IBC), and complements our multi-institutional...Pathology & Laboratory Medicine Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center 125 Mason Farm Road The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Chapel

  19. Cell invasion in the spheroid sprouting assay: a spatial organisation analysis adaptable to cell behaviour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Blacher

    Full Text Available The endothelial cell spheroid assay provides a suitable in vitro model to study (lymph angiogenesis and test pro- and anti-(lymph angiogenic factors or drugs. Usually, the extent of cell invasion, observed through optical microscopy, is measured. The present study proposes the spatial distribution of migrated cells as a new descriptor of the (lymph angiogenic response. The utility of this novel method rests with its capacity to locally characterise spheroid structure, allowing not only the investigation of single and collective cell invasion but also the evolution of the spheroid core itself. Moreover, the proposed method can be applied to 2D-projected spheroid images obtained by optical microscopy, as well as to 3D images acquired by confocal microscopy. To validate the proposed methodology, endothelial cell invasion was evaluated under different experimental conditions. The results were compared with widely used global parameters. The comparison shows that our method prevents local spheroid modifications from being overlooked and leading to the possible misinterpretation of results.

  20. Role of minimally invasive surgery in the treatment of diverticular disease: an evidence-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissolati, Massimiliano; Orsenigo, Elena; Staudacher, Carlo

    2015-12-01

    The clinical spectrum of diverticular disease varies from asymptomatic diverticulosis to symptomatic disease with potentially fatal complications, such as perforation or bleeding. While the presence of diverticula is common, symptomatic diverticulitis is relatively uncommon, occurring in an estimated 10-30 % of patients. There is continued debate as to whether patients should undergo elective resection for diverticular disease and regarding the role of minimally invasive surgery. Since the first publication on laparoscopic colorectal procedures, the interest in minimally invasive surgery has kept growing. Laparoscopic sigmoid resection with restoration of continuity is currently the prevailing modality for treating acute and recurrent sigmoid diverticulitis. However, it still remains unclear whether laparoscopy should be recommended also for complicated sigmoid diverticulitis. The potential benefits of reduced pain and analgesic requirements, smaller scars, and shorter hospital stay but longer operative times are appealing to both patients and surgeons. Nevertheless, there many concerns regarding the time and the type of surgery. Although the role of minimally invasive surgery in the treatment of colonic diseases is progressively increased, current randomized controlled trials should demonstrate whether laparoscopic lavage, Hartmann's procedure or resection and anastomosis achieve the best results for patients. This review aimed to analyze the results of laparoscopic colonic resection for patients with uncomplicated and complicated forms of sigmoid diverticular disease and to determine what stages profit from a laparoscopic procedure and whether the approach can be performed with a low complication rate even for patients with complicated forms of the disease.

  1. Interstitial guidance of cancer invasion.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gritsenko, P.G.; Ilina, O.; Friedl, P.H.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer cell invasion into healthy tissues develops preferentially along pre-existing tracks of least resistance, followed by secondary tissue remodelling and destruction. The tissue scaffolds supporting or preventing guidance of invasion vary in structure and molecular composition between organs. In

  2. A potential method for non-invasive acute myocardial infarction detection based on saliva Raman spectroscopy and multivariate analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Gang; Chen, Maowen; Chen, Yuanxiang; Huang, Zufang; Lin, Jinyong; Lin, Jia; Xu, Zhihong; Wu, Shanshan; Huang, Wei; Weng, Guoxing; Chen, Guannan

    2015-12-01

    Raman spectroscopy (RS) was employed for human saliva biochemical analysis with the aim to develop a rapidly non-invasive test for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) detection. High-quality Raman spectra were obtained from human saliva samples of 46 AMI patients and 43 healthy controls. Significant differences in Raman intensities of prominent bands were observed between AMI and normal saliva. The tentative assignment of the observed Raman bands indicated constituent and conformational differences between the two groups. Furthermore, principal component analysis (PCA) combined with linear discriminant analysis (LDA) was employed to analyze and classify the Raman spectra acquired from AMI and healthy saliva, yielding a diagnostic sensitivity of 80.4% and specificity of 81.4%. The results from this exploratory study demonstrated the feasibility and potential for developing RS analysis of human saliva into a clinical tool for rapid AMI detection and screening.

  3. Outcome analysis of retrograde nailing and less invasive stabilization system in distal femoral fractures: A retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Hierholzer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Two major therapeutic principles can be employed for the treatment of distal femoral fractures: retrograde intramedullary (IM nailing (RN or less invasive stabilization on system (LISS. Both operative stabilizing systems follow the principle of biological osteosynthesis. IM nailing protects the soft-tissue envelope due to its minimally invasive approach and closed reduction techniques better than distal femoral locked plating. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare outcome of distal femur fracture stabilization using RN or LISS techniques. Materials and Methods: In a retrospective study from 2003 to 2008, we analyzed 115 patients with distal femur fracture who had been treated by retrograde IM nailing (59 patients or LISS plating (56 patients. In the two cohort groups, mean age was 54 years (17-89 years. Mechanism of injury was high energy impact in 57% (53% RN, 67% LISS and low-energy injury in 43% (47% RN, 33% LISS, respectively. Fractures were classified according to AO classification: there were 52 type A fractures (RN 31, LISS 21 and 63 type C fractures (RN 28, LISS 35; 32% (RN and 56% (LISS were open and 68% (RN and 44% (LISS were closed fractures, respectively. Functional and radiological outcome was assessed. Results: Clinical and radiographic evaluation demonstrated osseous healing within 6 months following RN and following LISS plating in over 90% of patients. However, no statistically significant differences were found for the parameters time to osseous healing, rate of nonunion, and postoperative complications. The following complications were treated: hematoma formation (one patient RN and three patients LISS, superficial infection (one patient RN and three patients LISS, deep infection (2 patients LISS. Additional secondary bone grafting for successful healing 3 months after the primary operation was required in four patients in the RN (7% of patients and six in the LISS group (10% of patients

  4. Molecular characterization of invasive meningococcal isolates from countries in the African meningitis belt before introduction of a serogroup A conjugate vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique A Caugant

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The serogroup A conjugate meningococcal vaccine, MenAfriVac, was introduced in mass vaccination campaigns in December 2010 in Burkina Faso, Mali and Niger. In the coming years, vaccination will be extended to other African countries at risk of epidemics. To document the molecular characteristics of disease-causing meningococcal strains circulating in the meningitis belt of Africa before vaccine introduction, the World Health Organization Collaborating Centers on Meningococci in Europe and United States established a common strain collection of 773 isolates from cases of invasive meningococcal disease collected between 2004 and 2010 from 13 sub-Saharan countries. METHODOLOGY: All isolates were characterized by multilocus sequence typing, and 487 (62% were also analyzed for genetic variation in the surface antigens PorA and FetA. Antibiotic susceptibility was tested for part of the collection. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Only 19 sequence types (STs belonging to 6 clonal complexes were revealed. ST-5 clonal complex dominated with 578 (74.8% isolates. All ST-5 complex isolates were remarkably homogeneous in their PorA (P1.20,9 and FetA (F3-1 and characterized the serogroup A strains which have been responsible for most epidemics during this time period. Sixty-eight (8.8% of the 773 isolates belonged to the ST-11 clonal complex which was mainly represented by serogroup W135, while an additional 38 (4.9% W135 isolates belonged to the ST-175 complex. Forty-eight (6.2% serogroup X isolates from West Africa belonged to the ST-181 complex, while serogroup X cases in Kenya and Uganda were caused by an unrelated clone, ST-5403. Serogroup X, ST-181, emerged in Burkina Faso before vaccine introduction. CONCLUSIONS: In the seven years preceding introduction of a new serogroup A conjugate vaccine, serogroup A of the ST-5 clonal complex was identified as the predominant disease-causing strain.

  5. Molecular genetic analysis of tumor suppressor genes in ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Je Ho; Park, Sang Yun

    1992-04-01

    To examine the loci of putative tumor suppressor genes in ovarian cancers, we performed the molecular genetic analysis with fresh human ovarian cancers and observed the following data. Frequent allelic losses were observed on chromosomes 4p(42%), 6p(50%), 7p(43%), 8q(31%), 12p(38%), 12q(33%), 16p(33%), 16q(37%), and 19p(34%) in addition to the previously reported 6q, 11p, and 17p in ovarian caroinomas. we have used an additional probe, TCP10 to narrow down the deleted region on chromosome 6q. TCP10 was reported to be mapped to 6q 25-27. Allelic loss was found to be 40% in epithelial ovarian caroinomas. This finding suggests that chromosome 6q 24-27 is one of putative region haboring the tumor suppressor gene of epithelial ovarian cancer (particularly serous type). To examine the association between FAL(Fractional Allelic Loss) and histopathological features, the FAL value on each phenotypically different tumor was calculated as the ratio of the number of allelic losses versus the number of cases informative in each chromosomal arm. The average FALs for each phenotypically different tumor were: serous cystoadenocarcinomas. FAL=0.31 : mucinous 0.12 : and clear cell carcinoma. FAL=0.20. (Author)

  6. Sex Change in Clownfish: Molecular Insights from Transcriptome Analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Casas, Laura

    2016-10-17

    Sequential hermaphroditism is a unique reproductive strategy among teleosts that is displayed mainly in fish species living in the coral reef environment. The reproductive biology of hermaphrodites has long been intriguing; however, very little is known about the molecular pathways underlying their sex change. Here, we provide the first de novo transcriptome analyses of a hermaphrodite teleost´s undergoing sex change in its natural environment. Our study has examined relative gene expression across multiple groups—rather than just two contrasting conditions— and has allowed us to explore the differential expression patterns throughout the whole process. Our analysis has highlighted the rapid and complex genomic response of the brain associated with sex change, which is subsequently transmitted to the gonads, identifying a large number of candidate genes, some well-known and some novel, involved in the process. The present study provides strong evidence of the importance of the sex steroidogenic machinery during sex change in clownfish, with the aromatase gene playing a central role, both in the brain and the gonad. This work constitutes the first genome-wide study in a social sex-changing species and provides insights into the genetic mechanism governing social sex change and gonadal restructuring in protandrous hermaphrodites.

  7. Matched molecular pair analysis of small molecule microarray data identifies promiscuity cliffs and reveals molecular origins of extreme compound promiscuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimova, Dilyana; Hu, Ye; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2012-11-26

    The study of compound promiscuity is a hot topic in medicinal chemistry and drug discovery research. Promiscuous compounds are increasingly identified, but the molecular basis of promiscuity is currently only little understood. Utilizing the matched molecular pair formalism, we have analyzed patterns of compound promiscuity in a publicly available small molecule microarray data set. On the basis of our analysis, we introduce "promiscuity cliffs" as pairs of structural analogs with single-site substitutions that lead to large-magnitude differences in apparent compound promiscuity involving between 50 and 97 unrelated targets. No substructures or substructure transformations have been detected that are generally responsible for introducing promiscuity. However, within a given structural context, small chemical replacements were found to lead to dramatic promiscuity effects. On the basis of our analysis, promiscuity is not an inherent feature of molecular scaffolds but can be induced by small chemical substitutions. Promiscuity cliffs provide immediate access to such modifications.

  8. microsatellite analysis of the correlation between molecular and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    correlation. The dissimilarity calculated using SSR markers had a mean morphological dissimilarity of 0.895403, an r value of -0.1421 and a p -0.9840. The dissimilarity between the molecular and morphological traits was. 0.860465. Comparison between the molecular and morphological data had a dissimilarity matrix with ...

  9. Mammographic findings predicting an extensive intraductal component in early stage invasive breast cancer : analysis on microcalcification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong Ah; Kim, Mi Hye; Lee, Mi Kyung; Oh, Ki Keun [College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun Kyung [Pundang CHA General Hospital, College of Medicine, Pochon CHA University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-05-01

    To analyze the mammographic findings of extensive intraductal component (EIC)-positive early invasive breast carcinoma and to determine the mammographic features which predict an EIC positivity in an invasive carcinoma. The mammographic and pathologic findings in 71 patients aged 34-79 (mean 50) years in whom stage I or II invasive breast carcinoma had been diagnosed were retrospectively analysed. The mammographic findings were assigned to one of three groups: mass, mass with microcalcification, or microcalcification only. The shape and distribution of a calcification were classified according to the BI-RADS lexicon, and its extent was classified as either more or less than 3 cm. To detect the presence or absence of EIC and the type of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), the findings were re-examined by means of slide mappings. Twenty-eight of 71 patients (39%) showed ECI positivity. The mammographic findings of EIC-positive invasive cancer (n=3D28) were mass with microcalcification (n=3D14), microcalcification only (n=3D7) and mass only (n=3D7). The mammographic finding which predicted EIC positivity was mass with microcalcification (PPV:0.67, NPV:0.33, p=3D0.02). A mammographic of mass only (n=3D39) showed a significantly high negative predictive value for EIC positivity. (PPV 0.18, NPV 0.82, P less than 0.01). A comparison of cases with or without calcification showed that those with microcalcifications (n=3D32) showed a significantly high PPV of 0.66 (NPV:0.34, p less than 0.01) while those without calcification (n=3D39) showed a significantly high NPV of 0.82 (PPV:0.18, p less than 0.01). There were no significant differences in positive predictive values for EIC between the shape, distribution and extent of calcifications. Whenever microcalcification with or without mass is seen on mammographs obtained during early breast cancer, we can predict EIC-positivity, regardless of shape or distribution according to the BI-RADS lexicon. (author)

  10. Analysis of virus susceptibility in the invasive insect pest Drosophila suzukii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwang-Zin; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2017-09-01

    The invasive insect pest Drosophila suzukii infests ripening fruits and causes massive agricultural damage in North America and Europe (Cini et al., 2012). Environmentally sustainable strategies are urgently needed to control the spread of this species, and entomopathogenic viruses offer one potential solution for global crop protection. Here we report the status of intrinsic and extrinsic factors that influence the susceptibility of D. suzukii to three model insect viruses: Drosophila C virus, Cricket paralysis virus and Flock house virus. Our work provides the basis for further studies using D. suzukii as a host system to develop viruses as biological control agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Implant survivorship analysis after minimally invasive sacroiliac joint fusion using the iFuse Implant System?

    OpenAIRE

    Cher, Daniel J; Reckling, W Carlton; Capobianco, Robyn A

    2015-01-01

    Daniel J Cher,1 W Carlton Reckling,2 Robyn A Capobianco1 1Department of Clinical Affairs, SI-BONE, Inc., 2Department of Medical Affairs, SI-BONE, Inc., San Jose, CA, USA Introduction: Surgical revision rate is a key outcome with all permanent implants. The iFuse Implant System® is a permanent implant used to perform minimally invasive sacroiliac joint fusion. The purpose of this study is to determine the surgical revision rate after sacroiliac joint fusion surgery with this system. M...

  12. Optimal timing of an invasive strategy in patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome: a meta-analysis of randomised trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobs, Alexander; Mehta, Shamir R; Montalescot, Gilles; Vicaut, Eric; Van't Hof, Arnoud W J; Badings, Erik A; Neumann, Franz-Josef; Kastrati, Adnan; Sciahbasi, Alessandro; Reuter, Paul-Georges; Lapostolle, Frédéric; Milosevic, Aleksandra; Stankovic, Goran; Milasinovic, Dejan; Vonthein, Reinhard; Desch, Steffen; Thiele, Holger

    2017-08-19

    A routine invasive strategy is recommended for patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE-ACS). However, optimal timing of invasive strategy is less clearly defined. Individual clinical trials were underpowered to detect a mortality benefit; we therefore did a meta-analysis to assess the effect of timing on mortality. We identified randomised controlled trials comparing an early versus a delayed invasive strategy in patients presenting with NSTE-ACS by searching MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Embase. We included trials that reported all-cause mortality at least 30 days after in-hospital randomisation and for which the trial investigators agreed to collaborate (ie, providing individual patient data or standardised tabulated data). We pooled hazard ratios (HRs) using random-effects models. This meta-analysis is registered at PROSPERO (CRD42015018988). We included eight trials (n=5324 patients) with a median follow-up of 180 days (IQR 180-360). Overall, there was no significant mortality reduction in the early invasive group compared with the delayed invasive group HR 0·81, 95% CI 0·64-1·03; p=0·0879). In pre-specified analyses of high-risk patients, we found lower mortality with an early invasive strategy in patients with elevated cardiac biomarkers at baseline (HR 0·761, 95% CI 0·581-0·996), diabetes (0·67, 0·45-0·99), a GRACE risk score more than 140 (0·70, 0·52-0·95), and aged 75 years older (0·65, 0·46-0·93), although tests for interaction were inconclusive. An early invasive strategy does not reduce mortality compared with a delayed invasive strategy in all patients with NSTE-ACS. However, an early invasive strategy might reduce mortality in high-risk patients. None. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Analysis of failure following definitive radiotherapy for invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mameghan, Hedy; Fisher, Richard; Mameghan, Jill; Brook, Susan

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To assess prognostic factors for bladder relapse and distant failure following definitive radiotherapy for invasive transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the bladder. Methods and Materials: Retrospective review of patients treated in the period 1977 to 1990 by definitive radiotherapy. The factors studied included age, sex, T stage, histological grade, tumor multiplicity, ureteric obstruction, total radiation dose, and use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The endpoints studied were bladder relapse and distant failure. Results: There were 342 patients with a mean follow-up time of 7.9 years. Bladder relapse was observed in 159 patients. The overall actuarial bladder relapse rate at 5 years was 55% (SE = 3%). Prognostic factors for a higher bladder relapse rate were: tumor multiplicity (p < 0.001), presence of ureteric obstruction (p = 0.001), and higher T stage (p 0.044). Distant failure occurred in 39 patients. The overall actuarial distant failure rate at 5 years was 28% (SE = 3%). Prognostic factors for a higher distant failure rate were: ureteric obstruction (p = 0.003) and higher T stage (p = 0.030). Conclusion: In our study, patients with invasive bladder TCC fell into distinct prognostic groups determined by the three independent factors, ureteric obstruction, tumor multiplicity, and T stage. These factors provided estimated risks of bladder relapse by 5 years which ranged from 34% to 91%. Knowledge of these prognostic factors can help in the selection of patients more suited for bladder preservation by definitive radiotherapy

  14. Kinematic, workspace and singularity analysis of a new parallel robot used in minimally invasive surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoica, Alin; Pisla, Doina; Andras, Szilaghyi; Gherman, Bogdan; Gyurka, Bela-Zoltan; Plitea, Nicolae

    2013-03-01

    In the last ten years, due to development in robotic assisted surgery, the minimally invasive surgery has greatly changed. Until now, the vast majority of robots used in surgery, have serial structures. Due to the orientation parallel module, the structure is able to reduce the pressure exerted on the entrance point in the patient's abdominal wall. The parallel robot can also handle both a laparoscope as well an active instrument for different surgical procedures. The advantage of this parallel structure is that the geometric model has been obtained through an analytical approach. The kinematic modelling of a new parallel architecture, the inverse and direct geometric model and the inverse and direct kinematic models for velocities and accelerations are being determined. The paper will demonstrate that with this parallel structure, one can obtain the necessary workspace required for a minimally invasive operation. The robot workspace was generated using the inverse geometric model. An indepth study of different types of singularity is performed, allowing the development of safe control algorithms of the experimental model. Some kinematic simulation results and the experimental model of the robot are presented in the paper.

  15. SNPs ANALYSIS AS A TOOL IN MOLECULAR GENETICS DIAGNOSTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Rusnita

    2015-05-01

    arrays is its ability in detecting low level mosaicism which was unidentified by conventional cytogenetic examination. Nowadays, SNP arrays are included in IVF process to obtain a healthy baby. It can be done by detecting the absence or the presence of disease-causing single gene in an embryo before it implanted to the womb. SNP analysis with SNP array has many advantages over other SNP analysis methods and is therefore expected can be widely used in the future in the field of molecular diagnostic.

  16. Raman microspectroscopy as a diagnostic tool for the non-invasive analysis of fibrillin-1 deficiency in the skin and in the in vitro skin models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauchle, Eva; Bauer, Hannah; Fernes, Patrick; Zuk, Alexandra; Schenke-Layland, Katja; Sengle, Gerhard

    2017-04-01

    Fibrillin microfibrils and elastic fibers are critical determinants of elastic tissues where they define as tissue-specific architectures vital mechanical properties such as pliability and elastic recoil. Fibrillin microfibrils also facilitate elastic fiber formation and support the association of epithelial cells with the interstitial matrix. Mutations in fibrillin-1 (FBN1) are causative for the Marfan syndrome, a congenital multisystem disorder characterized by progressive deterioration of the fibrillin microfibril/ elastic fiber architecture in the cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, ocular, and dermal system. In this study, we utilized Raman microspectroscopy in combination with principal component analysis (PCA) to analyze the molecular consequences of fibrillin-1 deficiency in skin of a mouse model (GT8) of Marfan syndrome. In addition, full-thickness skin models incorporating murine wild-type and Fbn1 GT8/GT8 fibroblasts as well as human HaCaT keratinocytes were generated and analyzed. Skin models containing GT8 fibroblasts showed an altered epidermal morphology when compared to wild-type models indicating a new role for fibrillin-1 in dermal-epidermal crosstalk. Obtained Raman spectra together with PCA allowed to discriminate between healthy and deficient microfibrillar networks in murine dermis and skin models. Interestingly, results obtained from GT8 dermis and skin models showed similar alterations in molecular signatures triggered by fibrillin-1 deficiency such as amide III vibrations and decreased levels of glycan vibrations. Overall, this study indicates that Raman microspectroscopy has the potential to analyze subtle changes in fibrillin-1 microfibrils and elastic fiber networks. Therefore Raman microspectroscopy may be utilized as a non-invasive and sensitive diagnostic tool to identify connective tissue disorders and monitor their disease progression. Mutations in building blocks of the fibrillin microfibril/ elastic fiber network manifest in disease

  17. Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials of Long-Term All-Cause Mortality in Patients With Non-ST-Elevation Acute Coronary Syndrome Managed With Routine Invasive Versus Selective Invasive Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgendy, Islam Y; Mahmoud, Ahmed N; Wen, Xuerong; Bavry, Anthony A

    2017-02-15

    Randomized trials and meta-analyses demonstrated that a routine invasive strategy improves outcomes in patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS) compared to a selective invasive strategy. Benefit was driven primarily by a reduction in the risk of myocardial infarction. However, the impact of either strategy on long-term mortality is unknown. Trials that compared a routine invasive strategy versus a selective invasive strategy in patients with NSTE-ACS and reported data on all-cause mortality ≥1 year were included. Summary odds ratios (OR) were constructed using Peto's model for all-cause mortality using the longest available follow-up data. Subgroup analysis was performed for follow-up at 1 to ≤5 years and >5 years. Eight trials with 6,657 patients were available for analysis. At a mean of 10.3 years, the risk of all-cause mortality was similar with both strategies (28.5% vs 28.5%; OR 1.00, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.90 to 1.12, p = 0.97). This effect was similar on subgroup analysis for follow-up at 1 to ≤5 years (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.77 to 1.04, p = 0.15) and >5 years (OR 1.02, 95% CI 0.90 to 1.14, p = 0.79). There was no difference in treatment effect across various study-level covariates such as age, gender, diabetes, and positive troponin (all P for interaction >0.05). In conclusion, in patients with NSTE-ACS, both routine invasive and selective invasive strategies have a similar risk of all-cause mortality at ∼10 years. This illustrates there are still opportunities to change the trajectory of mortality events among invasively treated patients with NSTE-ACS. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Molecular analysis of Korean patients with oculocutaneous albinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Shin Hae; Chae, Hyojin; Kim, Yonggoo; Kim, Myungshin

    2012-01-01

    To perform molecular analysis of five Korean patients with oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) and review the clinical and genetic characteristics of 21 Korean OCA patients. TYR, OCA2 and SLC45A2 were analyzed by direct DNA sequencing in five unrelated OCA patients who received thorough ophthalmic evaluation. We identified three different TYR mutations in three patients (c.929dupC, R278X, and R52I), among which the latter two had been previously reported in other populations, but are reported here for the first time in a Korean context. In one patient we identified two different mutations of OCA2 [c.1784+1G>A and c.1842G>T (K614N)]. One patient was confirmed to have OCA4 by detecting two SLC45A2 mutations [c.469G>A (D157N) and c.686G>A (C229Y)]. OCA1A (66.7%) was the most common subtype in 21 Korean albinism patients, and 70% of patients were heterozygotes for 2 different mutational alleles. c.929dupC (54.8%) and R77Q (16.1%) were the most frequent mutational alleles of TYR in Koreans. Three mutational alleles, R278X and R52I of the TYR gene and C229Y of the SLC45A2 gene, are added to the mutational spectra of Korean patients with OCA, and we report the first Korean case of OCA2 with the OCA2 gene mutations.

  19. External quality assurance of molecular analysis of haemochromatosis gene mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertzberg, M; Neville, S; McDonald, D

    2006-01-01

    Background The Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia Quality Assurance Programs has conducted an external quality assurance programme for the testing of the haemochromatosis gene (HFE) mutations C282Y and H63D. Methods A total of 10 surveys have been undertaken over a period of 6 years from 2000 to 2005. Results Of the 3016 responses received, the overall success rate was found to be 99.47% (3000/3016). A total of 16 errors were found, 6 for C282Y and 10 for H63D. Only one sample was associated with more than one error, in which 2 of 23 respondents classified a normal sample as heterozygotic for H63D. Overall performance was observed to vary minimally between surveys, from a low of 91.3% correct (21/23 responses) for a normal sample to 100% correct in most (85/100) samples. Of the 10 complete surveys, four returned a 0% error rate. In one survey in 2004, seven incorrect responses were returned by one laboratory, all of which were secondary to transcriptional errors. Overall success rates per assay were 99.61% (1532/1538) for C282Y and 99.32% (1468/1478) for H63D. Over a period of 6 years from 2000 to 2005, the proportion of respondents using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction enzyme analysis fell from 85% to around 30%, whereas the proportion of laboratories using real‐time PCR rose from 5% to around 55%, as indicated by the questionnaire surveys of methods used by participants. Discussion Encouraging levels of testing proficiency for two common genetic mutations are indicated by these data, but they also confirm the need for participation of molecular diagnostic laboratories in external quality assurance programmes to ensure the ongoing provision of high‐quality genetic testing services. PMID:16679356

  20. [Analysis and outlook on teaching status of Molecular Pharmacognosy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Yu-xia; Xu, Hai-yu; Tong, Yan; Cui, Shu-zhen; Li, Hai-yan; Liu, Chang-xiao

    2015-09-01

    The teaching status of Molecular Pharmacognosy in 28 institutions in China was investigated by questionnaire and the survey data was analyzed by SPSS. Research contents included course beginning years, majors, class hours, characteristics of the course, teaching ways, the theory and practice contents, evaluation modes, selection of teaching material, teaching achievements, teachers and so on for undergraduates and graduates. Research results showed that with 20 years' development, Molecular Pharmacognosy had been offered for both undergraduate and graduate students in at least 20 colleges and universities and Molecular Pharmacognosy education in China showed good development momentum. At the same time, to promote the development of Molecular Pharmacognosy further, investment for it should be increased and practical teaching condition should be improved.

  1. Genome wide molecular analysis of minimally differentiated acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.P.G. Silva (Fernando); I. Almeida (Inês); B. Morolli (Bruno); G. Brouwer-Mandema (Geeske); H. Wessels (Hans); R. Vossen (Rolf); H. Vrieling (Harry); E.W.A. Marijt (Erik); P.J.M. Valk (Peter); J.C. Kluin-Nelemans (Hanneke); W.R. Sperr (Wolfgang); W.D. Ludwig; M. Giphart-Gassler (Micheline)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Minimally differentiated acute myeloid leukemia is heterogeneous in karyotype and is defined by immature morphological and molecular characteristics. This originally French-American-British classification is still used in the new World Health Organization classification when

  2. Genome wide molecular analysis of minimally differentiated acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, Fernando P. G.; Almeida, Ines; Morolli, Bruno; Brouwer-Mandema, Geeske; Wessels, Hans; Vossen, Rolf; Vrieling, Harry; Marijt, Erik W. A.; Valk, Peter J. M.; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.; Sperr, Wolfgang R.; Ludwig, Wolf-Dieter; Giphart-Gassler, Micheline

    2009-01-01

    Background Minimally differentiated acute myeloid leukemia is heterogeneous in karyotype and is defined by immature morphological and molecular characteristics. This originally French-American-British classification is still used in the new World Health Organization classification when other

  3. Interactive analysis of systems biology molecular expression data

    OpenAIRE

    Prabhakar Sunil; Salt David E; Kane Michael D; Stephenson Alan; Ouyang Qi; Zhang Mingwu; Burgner John; Buck Charles; Zhang Xiang

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Systems biology aims to understand biological systems on a comprehensive scale, such that the components that make up the whole are connected to one another and work through dependent interactions. Molecular correlations and comparative studies of molecular expression are crucial to establishing interdependent connections in systems biology. The existing software packages provide limited data mining capability. The user must first generate visualization data with a preferr...

  4. Multicenter evaluation of molecular and culture-dependent diagnostics for Shigella species and Entero-invasive Escherichia coli in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Beld, Maaike J. C.; Friedrich, Alexander W.; van Zanten, Evert; Reubsaet, Frans A. G.; Kooistra-Smid, Mirjam A. M. D.; Rossen, John W. A.

    2016-01-01

    An inter-laboratory collaborative trial for the evaluation of diagnostics for detection and identification of Shigella species and Entero-invasive Escherichia coil (EIEC) was performed. Sixteen Medical Microbiological Laboratories (MMLs) participated. MMLs were interviewed about their diagnostic

  5. A molecular phylogenetic analysis of the Scarabaeinae (dung beetles).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, Michael T; Inward, Daegan J G; Hunt, Toby; Vogler, Alfried P

    2007-11-01

    The dung beetles (Scarabaeinae) include ca. 5000 species and exhibit a diverse array of morphologies and behaviors. This variation presumably reflects the adaptation to a diversity of food types and the different strategies used to avoid competition for vertebrate dung, which is the primary breeding environment for most species. The current classification gives great weight to the major behavioral types, separating the ball rollers and the tunnelers, but existing phylogenetic studies have been based on limited taxonomic or biogeographic sampling and have been contradictory. Here, we present a molecular phylogenetic analysis of 214 species of Scarabaeinae, representing all 12 traditionally recognized tribes and six biogeographical regions, using partial gene sequences from one nuclear (28S) and two mitochondrial (cox1, rrnL) genes. Length variation in 28S (588-621 bp) and rrnL (514-523 bp) was subjected to a thorough evaluation of alternative alignments, gap-coding methods, and tree searches using model-based (Bayesian and likelihood), maximum parsimony, and direct optimization analyses. The small-bodied, non-dung-feeding Sarophorus+Coptorhina were basal in all reconstructions. These were closely related to rolling Odontoloma+Dicranocara, suggesting an early acquisition of rolling behavior. Smaller tribes and most genera were monophyletic, while Canthonini and Dichotomiini each consisted of multiple paraphyletic lineages at hierarchical levels equivalent to the smaller tribes. Plasticity of rolling and tunneling was evidenced by a lack of monophyly (S-H test, p > 0.05) and several reversals within clades. The majority of previously unrecognized clades were geographical, including the well-supported Neotropical Phanaeini+Eucraniini, and a large Australian clade of rollers as well as tunneling Coptodactyla and Demarziella. Only three lineages, Gymnopleurini, Copris+Microcopris and Onthophagus, were widespread and therefore appear to be dispersive at a global scale. A

  6. High Definition Oscillometry: Non-invasive Blood Pressure Measurement and Pulse Wave Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egner, Beate

    2015-01-01

    Non-invasive monitoring of blood pressure has become increasingly important in research. High-Definition Oscillometry (HDO) delivers not only accurate, reproducible and thus reliable blood pressure but also visualises the pulse waves on screen. This allows for on-screen feedback in real time on data validity but even more on additional parameters like systemic vascular resistance (SVR), stroke volume (SV), stroke volume variances (SVV), rhythm and dysrhythmia. Since complex information on drug effects are delivered within a short period of time, almost stress-free and visible in real time, it makes HDO a valuable technology in safety pharmacology and toxicology within a variety of fields like but not limited to cardiovascular, renal or metabolic research.

  7. Using forest inventory and analysis data to understand biotic resistance to plant invasions across the Eastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basil V. III Iannone; Kevin M. Potter; Hao Zhang; Christopher M. Guo Oswalt; Christopher W. Woodall; Songlin. Fei

    2015-01-01

    Biological invasions and their impacts are likely to increase with the expansion of global commerce, making the need to identify key drivers and regulators of invasion perhaps greater than ever. One of the most enduring, and tested, hypotheses for explaining invasions is the “biotic resistance hypothesis.” Broadly, this hypothesis states that communities having greater...

  8. Microsatellite analysis and susceptibility to FCZ of Candida glabrata invasive isolates in Sfax Hospital, Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbes, S; Sellami, H; Sellami, A; Makni, F; Mahfoudh, N; Makni, H; Khaled, S; Ayadi, A

    2011-01-01

    We have noted that, during the last few years, there has been a redistribution of the most common Candida species with an increase in non-C. albicans Candida species, particularly Candida glabrata. In many countries, the high frequency of Candida glabrata shows the highest resistance rates. The main objective of this investigation was to analyze the genotypic variability of invasive C. glabrata isolates recovered over a period of six years and assess their in vitro susceptibility to fluconazole to determine the possible existence of relationships between genotype and susceptibility. We collected 50 invasive C. glabrata isolates (21.4%) from January 2001 to December 2007. The in vitro susceptibility profiles as determined by the E-test method showed that 8.3% of the isolates were resistant to fluconazole. The typing with three microsatellite markers RPM2, MTI and ERG3 demonstrated 12 multilocus genotypes distributed irregularly with a predominance of G1 (38%). A cluster (G9) was found among isolates collected in the same ward, at the same time period, suggesting cross transmission. Eleven of 13 patients who had previously been colonized by C. glabrata, were infected by their colonizing strains. However, we noted after prolonged treatment with fluconazole that there was an increase of the MIC for an isolate from one patient and in another patient, the selection of a more resistant variant. In our study, we didn't find an association between genotype and susceptibility to fluconazole. In conclusion, the predominance of some genotypes could be explained by nosocomial transmission or a selective ecological advantage rather than an emergence of a resistant isolate.

  9. Dynamic expression patterns of differential proteins during early invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rong-Xin; Song, Hai-Yan; Dong, Yin-Ying; Hu, Chao; Zheng, Qiong-Dan; Xue, Tong-Chun; Liu, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Yang; Chen, Jie; Ren, Zheng-Gang; Liu, Yin-Kun; Cui, Jie-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Tumor cell invasion into the surrounding matrix has been well documented as an early event of metastasis occurrence. However, the dynamic expression patterns of proteins during early invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are largely unknown. Using a three-dimensional HCC invasion culture model established previously, we investigated the dynamic expression patterns of identified proteins during early invasion of HCC. Highly metastatic MHCC97H cells and a liver tissue fragment were long-term co-cultured in a rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor to simulate different pathological states of HCC invasion. The established spherical co-cultures were collected on days 0, 5, 10, and 15 for dynamic expression pattern analysis. Significantly different proteins among spheroids at different time points were screened and identified using quantitative proteomics of iTRAQ labeling coupled with LC-MS/MS. Dynamic expression patterns of differential proteins were further categorized by K-means clustering. The expression modes of several differentially expressed proteins were confirmed by Western blot and qRT-PCR. Time course analysis of invasion/metastasis gene expressions (MMP2, MMP7, MMP9, CD44, SPP1, CXCR4, CXCL12, and CDH1) showed remarkable, dynamic alterations during the invasion process of HCC. A total of 1,028 proteins were identified in spherical co-cultures collected at different time points by quantitative proteomics. Among these proteins, 529 common differential proteins related to HCC invasion were clustered into 25 types of expression patterns. Some proteins displayed significant dynamic alterations during the early invasion process of HCC, such as upregulation at the early invasion stage and downregulation at the late invasion stage (e.g., MAPRE1, PHB2, cathepsin D, etc.) or continuous upregulation during the entire invasion process (e.g., vitronectin, Met, clusterin, ICAM1, GSN, etc.). Dynamic expression patterns of candidate proteins during the early invasion

  10. Chemical analysis of whale breath volatiles: a case study for non-invasive field health diagnostics of marine mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumeras, Raquel; Cheung, William H K; Gulland, Frances; Goley, Dawn; Davis, Cristina E

    2014-09-12

    We explored the feasibility of collecting exhaled breath from a moribund gray whale (Eschrichtius robustus) for potential non-invasive health monitoring of marine mammals. Biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) profiling is a relatively new field of research, in which the chemical composition of breath is used to non-invasively assess the health and physiological processes on-going within an animal or human. In this study, two telescopic sampling poles were designed and tested with the primary aim of collecting whale breath exhalations (WBEs). Once the WBEs were successfully collected, they were immediately transferred onto a stable matrix sorbent through a custom manifold system. A total of two large volume WBEs were successfully captured and pre-concentrated onto two Tenax®-TA traps (one exhalation per trap). The samples were then returned to the laboratory where they were analyzed using solid phase micro extraction (SPME) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). A total of 70 chemicals were identified (58 positively identified) in the whale breath samples. These chemicals were also matched against a database of VOCs found in humans, and 44% of chemicals found in the whale breath are also released by healthy humans. The exhaled gray whale breath showed a rich diversity of chemicals, indicating the analysis of whale breath exhalations is a promising new field of research.

  11. Chemical Analysis of Whale Breath Volatiles: A Case Study for Non-Invasive Field Health Diagnostics of Marine Mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Cumeras

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We explored the feasibility of collecting exhaled breath from a moribund gray whale (Eschrichtius robustus for potential non-invasive health monitoring of marine mammals. Biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC profiling is a relatively new field of research, in which the chemical composition of breath is used to non-invasively assess the health and physiological processes on-going within an animal or human. In this study, two telescopic sampling poles were designed and tested with the primary aim of collecting whale breath exhalations (WBEs. Once the WBEs were successfully collected, they were immediately transferred onto a stable matrix sorbent through a custom manifold system. A total of two large volume WBEs were successfully captured and pre-concentrated onto two Tenax®-TA traps (one exhalation per trap. The samples were then returned to the laboratory where they were analyzed using solid phase micro extraction (SPME and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS. A total of 70 chemicals were identified (58 positively identified in the whale breath samples. These chemicals were also matched against a database of VOCs found in humans, and 44% of chemicals found in the whale breath are also released by healthy humans. The exhaled gray whale breath showed a rich diversity of chemicals, indicating the analysis of whale breath exhalations is a promising new field of research.

  12. Coronin-1C is a novel biomarker for hepatocellular carcinoma invasive progression identified by proteomics analysis and clinical validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Liang-Dong

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To better search for potential markers for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC invasion and metastasis, proteomic approach was applied to identify potential metastasis biomarkers associated with HCC. Methods Membrane proteins were extracted from MHCC97L and HCCLM9 cells, with a similar genetic background and remarkably different metastasis potential, and compared by SDS-PAGE and identified by ESI-MS/MS. The results were further validated by western blot analysis, immunohistochemistry (IHC of tumor tissues from HCCLM9- and MHCC97L-nude mice, and clinical specimens. Results Membrane proteins were extracted from MHCC97L and HCCLM9 cell and compared by SDS-PAGE analyses. A total of 14 differentially expressed proteins were identified by ESI-MS/MS. Coronin-1C, a promising candidate, was found to be overexpressed in HCCLM9 cells as compared with MHCC97L cells, and validated by western blot and IHC from both nude mice tumor tissues and clinical specimens. Coronin-1C level showed an abrupt upsurge when pulmonary metastasis occurred. Increasing coronin-1C expression was found in liver cancer tissues of HCCLM9-nude mice with spontaneous pulmonary metastasis. IHC study on human HCC specimens revealed that more patients in the higher coronin-1C group had overt larger tumor and more advanced stage. Conclusions Coronin-1C could be a candidate biomarker to predict HCC invasive behavior.

  13. Molecular analysis of Aspergillus section Flavi isolated from Brazil nuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Juliana Soares; Ferracin, Lara Munique; Carneiro Vieira, Maria Lucia; Iamanaka, Beatriz Thie; Taniwaki, Marta Hiromi; Pelegrinelli Fungaro, Maria Helena

    2012-04-01

    Brazil nuts are an important export market in its main producing countries, including Brazil, Bolivia, and Peru. Approximately 30,000 tons of Brazil nuts are harvested each year. However, substantial nut contamination by Aspergillus section Flavi occurs with subsequent production of aflatoxins. In our study, Aspergillus section Flavi were isolated from Brazil nuts (Bertholletia excelsa), and identified by morphological and molecular means. We obtained 241 isolates from nut samples, 41% positive for aflatoxin production. Eighty-one isolates were selected for molecular investigation. Pairwise genetic distances among isolates and phylogenetic relationships were assessed. The following Aspergillus species were identified: A. flavus, A. caelatus, A. nomius, A. tamarii, A. bombycis, and A. arachidicola. Additionally, molecular profiles indicated a high level of nucleotide variation within β-tubulin and calmodulin gene sequences associated with high genetic divergence from RAPD data. Among the 81 isolates analyzed by molecular means, three of them were phylogenetically distinct from all other isolates representing the six species of section Flavi. A putative novel species was identified based on molecular profiles.

  14. Pathways of cryptic invasion in a fish parasite traced using coalescent analysis and epidemiological survey

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bouzid, W.; Štefka, Jan; Bahri-Sfar, L.; Beerli, P.; Loot, G.; Lek, S.; Haddaoui, N.; Hypša, Václav; Scholz, Tomáš; Dkhil-Abbes, T.; Meddour, R.; Hassine, O.K.B.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 9 (2013), s. 1907-1923 ISSN 1387-3547 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP506/12/1632 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA206/08/1019; Marie Curie Fellowship(XE) FP7-PEOPLE-IEF-2008 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Aquaculture * Coevolution * Directionality of migration * Population split * Ligula intestinalis * Parasite introduction Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.716, year: 2013

  15. [International research trends of pharmacognosy on molecular level --based on analysis of SCI literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Li, Hai-Yan; Liu, Xiao-Ting; Tang, Xiao-Li

    2016-02-01

    The techniques and methods of molecular biology have been widely applied in pharmacognosy fields. International development trends of pharmacognosy studies on molecular level were analyzed by bibliometric methods using the SCIE database on Web of Science, the literature distribution, national distribution, agency distribution, periodicals distribution, and hot research topics were described using multivariate statistical analysis and multidimensional scaling analysis method,etc. The number of international pharmacognosy literature on molecular level is increasing year by year. USA, China and Japan have close cooperation, and focus on molecular identification and genetic diversity. Chinese scientists issued high-impact factor journals papers and high citations amount in the international forefront. The international pharmacognosy research on molecular level has developed rapidly. Chinese research has a significant influence.The molecular mechanism of the formation of Dao-di Herbs may become the next hotspot. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  16. MRI kinetics with volumetric analysis in correlation with hormonal receptor subtypes and histologic grade of invasive breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Lester Chee Hao; Gombos, Eva C; Jagadeesan, Jayender; Fook-Chong, Stephanie Man Chung

    2015-03-01

    OBJECTIVE. The aim of this study was to assess whether computer-assisted detection-processed MRI kinetics data can provide further information on the biologic aggressiveness of breast tumors. MATERIALS AND METHODS. We identified 194 newly diagnosed invasive breast cancers presenting as masses on contrast-enhanced MRI by a HIPAA-compliant pathology database search. Computer-assisted detection-derived data for the mean and median peak signal intensity percentage increase, most suspicious kinetic curve patterns, and volumetric analysis of the different kinetic patterns by mean percentage tumor volume were compared against the different hormonal receptor (estrogen-receptor [ER], progesterone-receptor [PR], ERRB2 (HER2/neu), and triple-receptor expressivity) and histologic grade subgroups, which were used as indicators of tumor aggressiveness. RESULTS. The means and medians of the peak signal intensity percentage increase were higher in ER-negative, PR-negative, and triple-negative (all p ≤ 0.001), and grade 3 tumors (p = 0.011). Volumetric analysis showed higher mean percentage volume of rapid initial enhancement in biologically more aggressive ER-negative, PR-negative, and triple-negative tumors compared with ER-positive (64% vs 53.6%, p = 0.013), PR-positive (65.4% vs 52.5%, p = 0.001), and nontriple-negative tumors (65.3% vs 54.6%, p = 0.028), respectively. A higher mean percentage volume of rapid washout component was seen in ERRB2-positive tumors compared with ERRB2-negative tumors (27.5% vs 17.9%, p = 0.020). CONCLUSION. Peak signal intensity percentage increase and volume analysis of the different kinetic patterns of breast tumors showed correlation with hormonal receptor and histologic grade indicators of cancer aggressiveness. Computer-assisted detection-derived MRI kinetics data have the potential to further characterize the aggressiveness of an invasive cancer.

  17. [Analysis of non-invasive prenatal screening detection in fetal chromosome aneuploidy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, A J; Zhu, C F; Xue, S W; Cui, S Y; Qu, S Z; Liu, N; Kong, X D

    2017-11-25

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of non-invasive prenatal screening (NIPS) in the detection of fetal aneuploidies. Methods: Cell free DNA was sequenced in 5 566 pregnant women to identify the fetal aneuploidies in the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University from January 1(st), 2015 to March 15(th), 2016. Among them, 5 230 (93.96%, 5 230/5 566) were singleton pregnancies and 336 (6.04%, 336/5 566) were twin pregnancies. In singleton pregnancies, 1 809 (34.59%, 1 809/5 230) were women with advanced maternal age, and 3 421 (65.41%, 3 421/5 230) were young women. The positive results of NIPS were validated by karyotyping through invasive procedures and neonatal outcomes were followed up by telephone. Results: Among the 5 566 women, 69 (1.24%, 69/5 566) got positive NIPS results, with 66 in singleton pregnancies and 3 in twin pregnancies. Two were monochorionic diamniotic twins and 1 was dichorionic twin pregnancy. The positive predictive value of NIPS for trisomy 21, 18 and 13 were 100.0%, 90.9% and 100.0%, and was 55.6% for sex chromosome aneuploidies. There was no false negative case found during the follow-up. In the advanced maternal age group and young women group, the prevalence rates of fetal chromosomal aneuploidies were 1.11%(20/1 809) and 0.94%(32/3 421), respectively. In the young women with soft markers in fetal ultrasound, the prevalence of fetal chromosomal aneuploidies was 1.44% (7/487), and in serum high risk women, it was 0.94% (7/747). In women with the serum screening risk with cut-off value, 0.89%(9/1 016) had fetal aneuploidies, and the prevalence was 0.77%(9/1 171) in volunteers. There was no statistically significant difference among these groups ( P= 0.636). Conclusions: There is no difference in the detection rate of fetal aneuploidies between high-risk women in serum screening and volunteers in NIPS. NIPS is more suitable as a first line screening test for women without fetal ultrasound abnormalities. It should be used carefully

  18. X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction and analysis of molecular structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontecilla-Camps, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    The only method that is capable to show the atomic structure of most of macromolecules is the X ray diffraction; neutron diffraction is mostly used for the localization of hydrogen atoms, too light to be detected by X ray diffraction. With the growing number of known structures, the molecular crystallographic study may combine the molecular replacement technique and the co-crystallization method, or use the new Laue method, and leads to the functional and topological analysis of biological molecular structures

  19. A role for benzo[a]pyrene and Slug in invasive properties of fibroblast-like synoviocytes in rheumatoid arthritis: a potential molecular link between smoking and radiographic progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaejoon; Jeong, Hyemin; Park, Eun-Jung; Hwang, Ji Won; Bae, Eun-Kyung; Ahn, Joong Kyong; Ahn, Kwang-Sung; Koh, Eun-Mi; Cha, Hoon-Suk

    2013-12-01

    To investigate the effects of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), a major toxic component of cigarette smoke, on the expression of Slug and to determine the effect of B[a]P/Slug on the invasive properties of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS). The expression of Slug was measured by real-time PCR following the stimulation of FLS with different concentrations of B[a]P or EGF. The phosphorylation of the key enzymes in the signaling pathway was analyzed by western blots. Inhibitors of PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway were used to confirm the critical pathway for Slug expression. An in vitro cell invasion assay was performed using RA FLS treated with Slug cDNA, Slug small interference RNA, or control. Slug expression increased significantly following treatment with B[a]P or EGF in a dose-dependent manner. The stimulation of FLS with B[a]P or EGF induced the phosphorylation of Akt kinase, but not in ERK, JNK and p38. The Slug mRNA expression induced by B[a]P and EGF decreased significantly following the treatment with PI3K/Akt/mTOR inhibitors. Slug overexpression using Slug cDNA upregulated the invasive function of FLS, and Slug depletion using siRNA showed the opposite effect compared with the control. In addition, the stimulation with B[a]P increased the invasive function of the control siRNA-treated FLS but not in the Slug siRNA-treated FLS. Our data showed that B[a]P regulates the invasive properties of RA FLS through Slug expression. This mechanism may provide a novel molecular link underlying the association between smoking and increased radiographic progression in RA. Copyright © 2013 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of age on long-term outcomes after a routine invasive or selective invasive strategy in patients presenting with non-ST segment elevation acute coronary syndromes: a collaborative analysis of individual data from the FRISC II - ICTUS - RITA-3 (FIR) trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, Peter; Clayton, Tim; Wallentin, Lars; Lagerqvist, Bo; Fox, Keith A. A.; Hirsch, Alexander; Windhausen, Fons; Swahn, Eva; Pocock, Stuart J.; Tijssen, Jan G. P.; de Winter, Robbert J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To perform a patient-pooled analysis of a routine invasive versus a selective invasive strategy in elderly patients with non-ST segment elevation acute coronary syndrome. Methods A meta-analysis was performed of patient-pooled data from the FRISC IIeICTUSeRITA-3 (FIR) studies. (Un)adjusted

  1. Molecular analysis of Rv0679c and Rv0180c genes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from clinical isolates of pulmonary tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Rupa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Two novel proteins/genes Rv0679c and Rv0180c of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB H37Rv were classified as a hypothetical membrane and transmembrane proteins which might have a role in the invasion. Molecular analysis of these genes in human clinical isolates of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB patients was not well characterised. Aims: To assess the molecular diversity of Rv0679c and Rv0180c genes of MTB from clinical isolates of PTB patients. Settings and Design: DNA from 97 clinical isolates was extracted and subjected to amplification using selective primers by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. The PCR product obtained was sequenced commercially. Patients and Methods: Clinical isolates obtained from tuberculosis patients were investigated for polymorphisms in the Rv0679c and Rv0180c genes by PCR and DNA sequencing. Genomic DNA isolated by cetyltrimethylammonium bromide method was used for amplification of genes. Results: Rv0679c gene was highly conserved in 61 out of 65 clinical isolates assessed for sequence homology with wild-type H37Rv gene and was identical using ClustalW. Fifty-five out of 78 (70.5% clinical isolates assessed for Rv0180c were positive for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP at 258th position where the nucleotide G was replaced with T (G to T. In clinical isolates of untreated cases, the frequency was 54.5% for SNP at 258th position which is low compared to cases undergoing treatment where the frequency was 73.1%. Conclusions: Molecular analysis of Rv0180c in clinical isolates of PTB assessed in this study was the first report, where an SNP at 258th position G to T was identified within the gene. Rv0679c gene was highly conserved (94%, within Indian clinical isolates as compared to reports from other nations.

  2. Integrating molecular epidemiology and social network analysis to study infectious diseases: Towards a socio-molecular era for public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasylyeva, Tetyana I; Friedman, Samuel R; Paraskevis, Dimitrios; Magiorkinis, Gkikas

    2016-12-01

    The number of public health applications for molecular epidemiology and social network analysis has increased rapidly since the improvement in computational capacities and the development of new sequencing techniques. Currently, molecular epidemiology methods are used in a variety of settings: from infectious disease surveillance systems to the description of disease transmission pathways. The latter are of great epidemiological importance as they let us describe how a virus spreads in a community, make predictions for the further epidemic developments, and plan preventive interventions. Social network methods are used to understand how infections spread through communities and what the risk factors for this are, as well as in improved contact tracing and message-dissemination interventions. Research is needed on how to combine molecular and social network data as both include essential, but not fully sufficient information on infection transmission pathways. The main differences between the two data sources are that, firstly, social network data include uninfected individuals unlike the molecular data sampled only from infected network members. Thus, social network data include more detailed picture of a network and can improve inferences made from molecular data. Secondly, network data refer to the current state and interactions within the social network, while molecular data refer to the time points when transmissions happened, which might have happened years before the sampling date. As of today, there have been attempts to combine and compare the data obtained from the two sources. Even though there is no consensus on whether and how social and genetic data complement each other, this research might significantly improve our understanding of how viruses spread through communities. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Kinematics optimization and static analysis of a modular continuum robot used for minimally invasive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Fei; Ju, Feng; Bai, Dong Ming; Chen, Bai

    2018-02-01

    For the outstanding compliance and dexterity of continuum robot, it is increasingly used in minimally invasive surgery. The wide workspace, high dexterity and strong payload capacity are essential to the continuum robot. In this article, we investigate the workspace of a cable-driven continuum robot that we proposed. The influence of section number on the workspace is discussed when robot is operated in narrow environment. Meanwhile, the structural parameters of this continuum robot are optimized to achieve better kinematic performance. Moreover, an indicator based on the dexterous solid angle for evaluating the dexterity of robot is introduced and the distal end dexterity is compared for the three-section continuum robot with different range of variables. Results imply that the wider range of variables achieve the better dexterity. Finally, the static model of robot based on the principle of virtual work is derived to analyze the relationship between the bending shape deformation and the driven force. The simulations and experiments for plane and spatial motions are conducted to validate the feasibility of model, respectively. Results of this article can contribute to the real-time control and movement and can be a design reference for cable-driven continuum robot.

  4. Non-invasive single-cell biomechanical analysis using live-imaging datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Yanthe E; Lund, Amanda W; Lin, Alex W H; Ng, Chee P; Alsuwaidi, Aysha; Azzeh, Sara; Gater, Deborah L; Teo, Jeremy C M

    2016-09-01

    The physiological state of a cell is governed by a multitude of processes and can be described by a combination of mechanical, spatial and temporal properties. Quantifying cell dynamics at multiple scales is essential for comprehensive studies of cellular function, and remains a challenge for traditional end-point assays. We introduce an efficient, non-invasive computational tool that takes time-lapse images as input to automatically detect, segment and analyze unlabeled live cells; the program then outputs kinematic cellular shape and migration parameters, while simultaneously measuring cellular stiffness and viscosity. We demonstrate the capabilities of the program by testing it on human mesenchymal stem cells (huMSCs) induced to differentiate towards the osteoblastic (huOB) lineage, and T-lymphocyte cells (T cells) of naïve and stimulated phenotypes. The program detected relative cellular stiffness differences in huMSCs and huOBs that were comparable to those obtained with studies that utilize atomic force microscopy; it further distinguished naïve from stimulated T cells, based on characteristics necessary to invoke an immune response. In summary, we introduce an integrated tool to decipher spatiotemporal and intracellular dynamics of cells, providing a new and alternative approach for cell characterization. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. Studies of particle drying using non-invasive Raman spectrometry and particle size analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Peter; Littlejohn, David; Nordon, Alison; Sefcik, Jan; Slavin, Paul; Dallin, Paul; Andrews, John

    2011-05-21

    The evaporation of methanol from needle-shaped particles of cellobiose octaacetate (COA) has been studied directly in a jacketed vacuum drier using in situ measurements by Raman spectrometry. A design of experiments (DoE) approach was used to investigate the effects of three parameters (method of agitation, % solvent loss on drying and jacket temperature), with the intention of minimising the drying time and extent of particle attrition. Drying curves based on Raman signals for methanol and COA in the spectra of the wet particles indicated the end of drying and revealed three stages in the drying process that could be used to monitor the progress of solvent removal in real time. Off-line particle size measurements based on laser diffraction were made to obtain information on the extent of attrition, to compare with the trends revealed by the Raman drying curves. The study demonstrated that non-invasive Raman spectrometry can be used to study the progress of drying during agitation of particles in a vacuum drier, allowing optimisation of operating conditions to minimise attrition and reduce drying times. Although a correlation between particle size and off-line Raman measurements of COA was demonstrated, it was not possible to derive equivalent information from the in situ Raman spectra owing to the greater effects of particle motion or bulk density variations of the particles in the drier.

  6. Thermodynamic Models from Fluctuation Solution Theory Analysis of Molecular Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Steen; Peters, Günther H.j.; Hansen, Flemming Yssing

    2007-01-01

    Fluctuation solution theory (FST) is employed to analyze results of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of liquid mixtures. The objective is to generate parameters for macroscopic GE-models, here the modified Margules model. We present a strategy for choosing the number of parameters included...

  7. Cytogenetic and molecular analysis of cellular atypical mesoblastic nephroma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speleman, F.; van den Berg, E.; Dhooge, C.; Oosterhuis, W.; Redeker, B.; de Potter, C. R.; Tamminga, R. Y.; van Roy, N.; Mannens, M.

    1998-01-01

    Cytogenetic and molecular analyses were performed on three cellular (atypical) congenital mesoblastic nephromas (CMNs). Two cases had trisomy 11; in one, it was the sole karyotypic abnormality, and the other had additional numerical changes as well as an isochromosome for the long arm of chromosome

  8. Cytogenetic and molecular analysis of cellular atypical mesoblastic nephroma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speleman, F; van den Berg, E; Dhooge, C; Oosterhuis, W; Redeker, B; De Potter, CR; Tamminga, RYJ; Van Roy, N; Mannens, M

    Cytogenetic and molecular analyses were performed on three cellular (atypical) congenital mesoblastic nephromas (CMNs). Two cases had trisomy 11; in one, it was the sole karyotypic abnormality, and the other had additional numerical changes as well as an isochromosome for the long arm of chromosome

  9. Molecular cloning and functional analysis of the follicle-stimulating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-09-28

    Sep 28, 2011 ... Key words: Follicle-stimulating hormone receptor, gene promoter, Jintang black goat, molecular cloning, ... receptors, complex transmembrane proteins characterized by seven hydrophobic helices inserted in the plasmalemma. The intracellular portion of the ..... Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, NY.

  10. Molecular cloning, sequence analysis and tissue expression of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Proofreader

    2017-10-01

    Oct 1, 2017 ... 1 Animal Genetics and Genomics Laboratory, International Programs, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Cornell. University, Ithaca, NY, USA. 2 Laboratorio Genetica Molecular, IBB, Universidad de Oriente, Cumana, Venezuela. 3 Department of Animal Science, Berry College, Mount Berry, GA, USA.

  11. Molecular analysis of cross-bacterial contamination detected in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the isolate Delftia acidovorans BP(R2) and it is also coupled to protein with molecular weight 25-26 KDa. As well as, this bacterial contamination was the reason for the false positive results observed during the detection of HCV infections. Journal of Applied Sciences and Environmental Management Vol. 9(1) 2005: 5-10.

  12. Molecular cloning, sequence analysis and tissue expression of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dama cattle breeds was conducted, as well as a molecular cloning of the gene transcript from bovine placenta. Four site-specific motifs were identified in the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) domain that are highly conserved in cattle, humans and ...

  13. Molecular responses and expression analysis of genes in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Haloxylon ammodendron (C.A Mey.) Bunge is a xero-halophytic desert shrub with excellent drought resistance and salt tolerance. To decipher the molecular responses involved in its drought resistance, the cDNA-AFLP (amplified fragment length polymorphism) technique was employed to identify genes expressed ...

  14. Physiological response, molecular analysis and water use efficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With a view to study the effects of irrigation scheduling on the water use efficiency and physiological response and molecular basis of maize hybrids of different maturity groups, a field experiment was conducted at Water Management Research Center (WMRC), Belvatagi, University of Agricultural Sciences, Dharwad, India ...

  15. Comparative molecular analysis of old olive ( Olea europaea L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We compared the genetic profiles of six old olive cultivars from an Eastern Mediterranean Region of Turkey to 15 modern Turkish olive cultivars from different geographical origins. The RAPD profiles successfully clarified the molecular relationships among the genotypes tested. Seventeen RAPD primers generated 153 ...

  16. Molecular-genetic analysis of two cases with retinoblastoma ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Effective counselling and management of retinoblastoma families using genetic information is presently practised in many parts of the world. We studied histopathological, chromosomal and molecular-genetic data of two retinoblastoma pa- tients from India. The two patients, one with bilateral and the other with unilateral ...

  17. A molecular cytogenetic analysis of introgression in Alstroemeria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamstra, S.A.

    1999-01-01

    This thesis describes the results of a molecular cytogenetic investigation of the process of introgression in Alstroemeria . The aim of this study was to transfer chromosomes or genes from one Alstroemeria species into another. For this, two

  18. Molecular-genetic analysis of two cases with retinoblastoma ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Effective counselling and management of retinoblastoma families using genetic information is presently practised in many parts of the world. We studied histopathological, chromosomal and molecular-genetic data of two retinoblastoma patients from India. The two patients, one with bilateral and the other with unilateral ...

  19. Theoretical model analysis of molecular orientations in liquid protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, some theoretical model functions have been used to explain the molecular behaviour of four different types of proteins; human haemoglobin, Insulin, egg-white lysozyme and β - globulin molecules in solution. The results of the computational fitting procedures showed that the dielectric dispersion of the protein ...

  20. Molecular cloning, structural analysis and expression of a zinc ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results of prokaryotic expression of ZnBP and overexpression of the ZnBP gene in A. thaliana improve our understanding of the function of this gene. Future studies should investigate the molecular mechanisms involved in gland morphogenesis in cotton. Key words: Gossypium hirsutum, pigment gland, zinc binding ...

  1. Molecular analysis of glycogen storage disease type Ia in Iranian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    frequency of GSD Ia and clarified its molecular aspect in patients with the main clinical and biochemical characteristics of. GSD, including 37 unrelated patients ... clinical, biochemical and enzymatic examination of the liver tissue. Based on enzyme deficiency, ..... management guidelines. Genet. Med. 12, 446–463. Koshy A.

  2. RAPD-PCR molecular analysis of the threatened Cabrera's vole ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Optimal management and conservation programs of the threatened Cabrera's vole require investigating potential molecular genetic markers in the genomic background, if the few remaining fragile populations are to ... The results described Cabrera's vole populations as a single genetic unit with slightly restricted gene flow.

  3. Prediction of Anticancer Activity of 2-phenylindoles: Comparative Molecular Field Analysis Versus Ridge Regression using Mathematical Molecular Descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Subhash C; Zhu, Qianhong; Mills, Denise

    2010-09-01

    Topological indices (TIs) and atom pairs (APs) were used to develop quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) for anticancer activity for a set of 43 derivatives of 2-phenylindole. Results show that QSARs formulated using TI+AP outperform those using either TI or AP alone. The q2 of the ridge regression model using TI+AP was 0.867 as compared to 0.705 reported in the literature using the comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) method.

  4. Non-invasive diagnosis of stress urinary incontinence sub types using wavelet analysis, shannon entropy and principal component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufan, Kadir; Kara, Sadık; Latifoğlu, Fatma; Aydın, Sinem; Kırış, Adem; Ozkuvancı, Unsal

    2012-08-01

    Urinary incontinence is a common female disorder. Although generally not a serious condition, it negatively affects the lifestyle and daily activity of subjects. Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is the most versatile of several incontinence types and is distinguished by physical degeneration of the continence-providing mechanism. Some surgical treatment methods exist, but the success of the surgery mainly depends upon a correct diagnosis. Diagnosis has two major steps: subjects who are suffering from true SUI must be identified, and the SUI sub-type must be determined, because each sub-type is treated with a different surgery. The first step is straightforward and uses standard identification methods. The second step, however, requires invasive, uncomfortable urodynamic studies that are difficult to apply. Many subjects try to cope with the disorder rather than seek treatment from health care providers, in part because of the invasive diagnostic methods. In this study, a diagnostic method with a success rate comparable to that of urodynamic studies is presented. This new method has some advantages over the current one. First, it is noninvasive; data are collected using Doppler ultrasound recording. Second, it requires no special tools and is easy to apply, relatively inexpensive, faster and more hygienic.

  5. Minimally invasive surgical approaches and traditional total hip arthroplasty: a meta-analysis of radiological and complications outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baohui Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Minimally invasive total hip arthroplasty (MITHA remains considerably controversial. Limited visibility and prosthesis malposition increase the risk of post-surgical complications compared to those of the traditional method. METHODS: A meta-analysis was undertaken of all published databases up to May 2011. The studies were divided into four subgroups according to the surgical approach taken. The radiological outcomes and complications of minimally invasive surgery were compared to traditional total hip arthroplasty (TTHA using risk ratio, mean difference, and standardized mean difference statistics. RESULTS: In five studies involving the posterolateral approach, no significant differences were found between the MITHA groups and the TTHA groups in the acetabular cup abduction angle (p = 0.41, acetabular anteversion (p = 0.96, and femoral prosthesis position (p = 0.83. However, the femoral offset was significantly increased (WMD = 3.00; 95% CI, 0.40-5.60; p = 0.02. Additionally, there were no significant differences among the complications in both the groups (dislocations, nerve injury, infection, deep vein thrombosis, proximal femoral fracture and revision rate (p>0.05. In three studies involving the posterior approach, there were no significant differences in radiological outcomes or all other complications between MITHA or TTHA groups (p>0.05. Three studies involved anterolateral approach, while 2 studies used the lateral approach. However, the information from imaging and complications was not adequate for statistical analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Posterior MITHA seems to be a safe surgical procedure, without the increased risk of post-operative complication rates and component malposition rates. The posterolateral approach THA may lead to increased femoral offset. The current data are not enough to reach a positive conclusion that lateral and anterolateral approaches will result in increased risks of adverse effects

  6. Molecular analysis of MECP2 gene in Egyptian patients with Rett ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Molecular analysis of MECP2 gene in Egyptian patients with Rett syndrome. ... Egyptian Journal of Medical Human Genetics ... This study represents one of the limited MECP2 molecular analyses done on Egyptian patients with RTT, in which direct sequencing of MECP2 coding region in 10 female Egyptian patients ...

  7. Overweight, Obesity, and Postmenopausal Invasive Breast Cancer Risk: A Secondary Analysis of the Women's Health Initiative Randomized Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhouser, Marian L; Aragaki, Aaron K; Prentice, Ross L; Manson, JoAnn E; Chlebowski, Rowan; Carty, Cara L; Ochs-Balcom, Heather M; Thomson, Cynthia A; Caan, Bette J; Tinker, Lesley F; Urrutia, Rachel Peragallo; Knudtson, Jennifer; Anderson, Garnet L

    2015-08-01

    More than two-thirds of US women are overweight or obese, placing them at increased risk for postmenopausal breast cancer. To investigate in this secondary analysis the associations of overweight and obesity with risk of postmenopausal invasive breast cancer after extended follow-up in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) clinical trials. The WHI clinical trial protocol incorporated measured height and weight, baseline and annual or biennial mammography, and adjudicated breast cancer end points in 67 142 postmenopausal women ages 50 to 79 years at 40 US clinical centers. The women were enrolled from 1993 to 1998 with a median of 13 years of follow-up through 2010; 3388 invasive breast cancers were observed. Height and weight were measured at baseline, and weight was measured annually thereafter. Data were collected on demographic characteristics, personal and family medical history, and personal habits (smoking, physical activity). Women underwent annual or biennial mammograms. Breast cancers were verified by medical records reviewed by physician adjudicators. Women who were overweight and obese had an increased invasive breast cancer risk vs women of normal weight. Risk was greatest for obesity grade 2 plus 3 (body mass index [BMI], calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared, >35.0) (hazard ratio [HR] for invasive breast cancer, 1.58; 95% CI, 1.40-1.79). A BMI of 35.0 or higher was strongly associated with risk for estrogen receptor-positive and progesterone receptor-positive breast cancers (HR, 1.86; 95% CI, 1.60-2.17) but was not associated with estrogen receptor-negative cancers. Obesity grade 2 plus 3 was also associated with advanced disease, including larger tumor size (HR, 2.12; 95% CI, 1.67-2.69; P = .02), positive lymph nodes (HR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.46-2.45; P = .06), regional and/or distant stage (HR, 1.94; 95% CI, 1.52-2.47; P = .05), and deaths after breast cancer (HR, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.57-2.84; P risk (HR

  8. Spectroscopic analysis and molecular docking of imidazole derivatives and investigation of its reactive properties by DFT and molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Renjith; Hossain, Mossaraf; Mary, Y. Sheena; Resmi, K. S.; Armaković, Stevan; Armaković, Sanja J.; Nanda, Ashis Kumar; Ranjan, Vivek Kumar; Vijayakumar, G.; Van Alsenoy, C.

    2018-04-01

    Solvent-free synthesis pathway for obtaining two imidazole derivatives (2-chloro-1-(4-methoxyphenyl)-4,5-dimethyl-1H-imidazole (CLMPDI) and 1-(4-bromophenyl)-2-chloro-4,5-dimethyl-1H-imidazole (BPCLDI) has been reported in this work, followed by detailed experimental and computational spectroscopic characterization and reactivity study. Spectroscopic methods encompassed IR, FT-Raman and NMR techniques, with the mutual comparison of experimentally and computationally obtained results at DFT/B3LYP level of theory. Reactivity study based on DFT calculations encompassed molecular orbitals analysis, followed by calculations of molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and average local ionization energy (ALIE) values, Fukui functions and bond dissociation energies (BDE). Additionally, the stability of title molecules in water has been investigated via molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, while interactivity with aspulvinonedimethylallyl transferase protein has been evaluated by molecular docking procedure. CLMPDI compound showed antimicrobial activity against all four bacterial strain in both gram positive and gram negative bacteria while, BPCLDI showed only in gram positive bacteria, Staphylococcus Aureus (MTCC1144). The first order hyperpolarizability of CLMPDI and BPCLDI are 20.15 and 6.10 times that of the standard NLO material urea.

  9. Population Pharmacokinetic Analysis of Voriconazole and Anidulafungin in Adult Patients with Invasive Aspergillosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mould, Diane R.

    2014-01-01

    To assess the pharmacokinetics (PK) of voriconazole and anidulafungin in patients with invasive aspergillosis (IA) in comparison with other populations, sparse PK data were obtained for 305 adults from a prospective phase 3 study comparing voriconazole and anidulafungin in combination versus voriconazole monotherapy (voriconazole, 6 mg/kg intravenously [IV] every 12 h [q12h] for 24 h followed by 4 mg/kg IV q12h, switched to 300 mg orally q12h as appropriate; with placebo or anidulafungin IV, a 200-mg loading dose followed by 100 mg q24h). Voriconazole PK was described by a two-compartment model with first-order absorption and mixed linear and time-dependent nonlinear (Michaelis-Menten) elimination; anidulafungin PK was described by a two-compartment model with first-order elimination. For voriconazole, the normal inverse Wishart prior approach was implemented to stabilize the model. Compared to previous models, no new covariates were identified for voriconazole or anidulafungin. PK parameter estimates of voriconazole and anidulafungin are in agreement with those reported previously except for voriconazole clearance (the nonlinear clearance component became minimal). At a 4-mg/kg IV dose, voriconazole exposure tended to increase slightly as age, weight, or body mass index increased, but the difference was not considered clinically relevant. Estimated voriconazole exposures in IA patients at 4 mg/kg IV were higher than those reported for healthy adults (e.g., the average area under the curve over a 12-hour dosing interval [AUC0–12] at steady state was 46% higher); while it is not definitive, age and concomitant medications may impact this difference. Estimated anidulafungin exposures in IA patients were comparable to those reported for the general patient population. This study was approved by the appropriate institutional review boards or ethics committees and registered on ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00531479). PMID:24913161

  10. Micro-PIXE analysis in invasive ductal carcinoma tissues after treatment of astaxanthin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safaverdi, S.; Roshani, F.; Lamehi Rashti, M.; Golkhoo, Sh.; Hassan, Z. M.; Langroudi, L.

    2009-01-01

    Trace elements play an important role in a number of biological processes. Astaxanthin, a carotoid pigment found in certain marine plant and animals, has shown anti cancer and anti free radical properties. This work intended to understand the effect of Astaxanthin in breast cancer (invasive ductal carcinoma) by using micro-PIXE method. For this aim the concentration of trace elements were compared in healthy, cancerous and cancer treated with astaxanthin in the breast and liver tissues of breast cancer bearing mice, using proton induced X-ray emission. Materials and Methods: Proton induced X-ray emission was used In a study intending to compare the concentration of trace elements in breast and liver tissues of mice bearing tumor, three groups of mice: healthy, cancerous, and cancerous treated by astaxanthin, were considered. Astaxanthin was supplied from Research Institute of women, Alzahra University. Results: Comparing the untreated tumor tissue, treatment with Astaxanthm significantly decreased the amount Fe, P, S, and Ca elements level in tumor tissue of the breast cancer. It is also found that the concentrations of those elements in liver of the untreated mice and the liver of treated mice with astaxanthin were fairly equal. Astaxanthln significantly decrease the accumulation of elements in the site of tumor, and caused the breast cancer cell membrane to lose their desire to collect the elements from healthy tissues. Conclusion: The micro -PIXE technique could calculate elemental concentrations in tissues. Changes in metallic elements may affect microenvironment and cell functions, which might led lead to cell degeneration or death, the results shows that astaxanthin reduces vital element concentration in tumor site, thus it could be used as an anti tumor agent.

  11. Functional grouping and establishment of distribution patterns of invasive plants in China using self-organizing maps and indicator species analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Zi-Bo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we introduce two techniques - self-organizing maps (SOM and indicator species analysis (INDVAL - for understanding the richness patterns of invasive species. We first employed SOM to identify functional groups and then used INDVAL to identify the representative areas characterizing these functional groups. Quantitative traits and distributional information on 127 invasive plants in 28 provinces of China were collected to form the matrices for our study. The results indicate Jiangsu to be the top province with the highest number of invasive species, while Ningxia was the lowest. Six functional groups were identified by the SOM method, and five of them were found to have significantly representative provinces by the INDVAL method. Our study represents the first attempt to combine self-organizing maps and indicator species analysis to assess the macro-scale distribution of exotic species.

  12. Sequence-Based Analysis of Thermal Adaptation and Protein Energy Landscapes in an Invasive Blue Mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarman, Norah P; Kober, Kord M; Simison, W Brian; Pogson, Grant H

    2017-10-01

    Adaptive responses to thermal stress in poikilotherms plays an important role in determining competitive ability and species distributions. Amino acid substitutions that affect protein stability and modify the thermal optima of orthologous proteins may be particularly important in this context. Here, we examine a set of 2,770 protein-coding genes to determine if proteins in a highly invasive heat tolerant blue mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) contain signals of adaptive increases in protein stability relative to orthologs in a more cold tolerant M. trossulus. Such thermal adaptations might help to explain, mechanistically, the success with which the invasive marine mussel M. galloprovincialis has displaced native species in contact zones in the eastern (California) and western (Japan) Pacific. We tested for stabilizing amino acid substitutions in warm tolerant M. galloprovincialis relative to cold tolerant M. trossulus with a generalized linear model that compares in silico estimates of recent changes in protein stability among closely related congeners. Fixed substitutions in M. galloprovincialis were 3,180.0 calories per mol per substitution more stabilizing at genes with both elevated dN/dS ratios and transcriptional responses to heat stress, and 705.8 calories per mol per substitution more stabilizing across all 2,770 loci investigated. Amino acid substitutions concentrated in a small number of genes were more stabilizing in M. galloprovincialis compared with cold tolerant M. trossulus. We also tested for, but did not find, enrichment of a priori GO terms in genes with elevated dN/dS ratios in M. galloprovincialis. This might indicate that selection for thermodynamic stability is generic across all lineages, and suggests that the high change in estimated protein stability that we observed in M. galloprovincialis is driven by selection for extra stabilizing substitutions, rather than by higher incidence of selection in a greater number of genes in this lineage

  13. [Development of molecular pharmacognosy in China based on bibliometric analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Jun-Wen; Tong, Yuan-Yuan; Yang, Ce; Huang, Man-Ting; Lei, Lei; Li, Hai-Yan

    2016-03-01

    The method of bibliometrics was used to analyze the literature about the application of molecular biotechnique to pharmacognosy which were searched and obtained from the CNKI database and Shanghai intellectual property information platform from the year 1995 to 2015.It was found that 22 462 articles were published and the 63% were funded, 50 core institutions and 888 authors, 18 core journals were engaged in this subject.496 items of patents were authorized and 90 kinds of Chinese Materia Medica were involved.In the view of the quantity and quality of published literature, the scale and influence of journals, institutions, and the extent of subject categories have made remarkable achievement. Molecular pharmacognosy has completed the germination stage of a new subject, and has been in a relatively mature and stable development status. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  14. Bladder Carcinoma Data with Clinical Risk Factors and Molecular Markers: A Cluster Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Redondo-Gonzalez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer occurs in the epithelial lining of the urinary bladder and is amongst the most common types of cancer in humans, killing thousands of people a year. This paper is based on the hypothesis that the use of clinical and histopathological data together with information about the concentration of various molecular markers in patients is useful for the prediction of outcomes and the design of treatments of nonmuscle invasive bladder carcinoma (NMIBC. A population of 45 patients with a new diagnosis of NMIBC was selected. Patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH, muscle invasive bladder carcinoma (MIBC, carcinoma in situ (CIS, and NMIBC recurrent tumors were not included due to their different clinical behavior. Clinical history was obtained by means of anamnesis and physical examination, and preoperative imaging and urine cytology were carried out for all patients. Then, patients underwent conventional transurethral resection (TURBT and some proteomic analyses quantified the biomarkers (p53, neu, and EGFR. A postoperative follow-up was performed to detect relapse and progression. Clusterings were performed to find groups with clinical, molecular markers, histopathological prognostic factors, and statistics about recurrence, progression, and overall survival of patients with NMIBC. Four groups were found according to tumor sizes, risk of relapse or progression, and biological behavior. Outlier patients were also detected and categorized according to their clinical characters and biological behavior.

  15. Mesoamerican tree squirrels evolution (Rodentia: Sciuridae): a molecular phylogenetic analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Federico Villalobos; Gustavo Gutierrez-Espeleta

    2014-01-01

    The tribe Sciurini comprehends the genera Sciurus, Syntheosiurus, Microsciurus, Tamiasciurus and Rheinthrosciurus. The phylogenetic relationships within Sciurus have been only partially done, and the relationship between Mesoamerican species remains unsolved. The phylogenetic relationships of the Mesoamerican tree squirrels were examined using molecular data. Sequence data publicly available (12S, 16S, CYTB mitochondrial genes and IRBP nuclear gene) and cytochrome B gene sequences of four pre...

  16. Molecular malaria diagnostics: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Johanna M; Korevaar, Daniël A; Leeflang, Mariska M G; Mens, Pètra F

    2016-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of malaria is essential for identification and subsequent treatment of the disease. Currently, microscopy and rapid diagnostic tests are the most commonly used diagnostics, next to treatment based on clinical signs only. These tests are easy to deploy, but have a relatively high detection limit. With declining prevalence in many areas, there is an increasing need for more sensitive diagnostics. Molecular tools may be a suitable alternative, although costs and technical requirements currently hamper their implementation in resource limited settings. A range of (near) point-of-care diagnostics is therefore under development, including simplifications in sample preparation, amplification and/or read-out of the test. Accuracy data, in combination with technical characteristics, are essential in determining which molecular test, if any, would be the most promising to be deployed. This review presents a comprehensive overview of the currently available molecular malaria diagnostics, ranging from well-known tests to platforms in early stages of evaluation, and systematically evaluates their published accuracy. No important difference in accuracy was found between the most commonly used PCR-based assays (conventional, nested and real-time PCR), with most of them having high sensitivity and specificity, implying that there are no reasons other than practical ones to choose one technique over the other. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification and other (novel) diagnostics appear to be highly accurate as well, with some offering potential to be used in resource-limited settings.

  17. Molecular-beam epitaxial growth and ion-beam analysis systems for functional materials research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeshita, H.; Aoki, Y.; Yamamoto, S.; Naramoto, H.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental systems for molecular beam epitaxial growth and ion beam analysis have been designed and constructed for the research of inorganic functional materials such as thin films and superlattices. (author)

  18. Retrospective evaluation of histopathological examinations in invasive ductal breast cancer of no special type: an analysis of 691 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badowska-Kozakiewicz, Anna M; Liszcz, Anna; Sobol, Maria; Patera, Janusz

    2017-10-01

    Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) is the most common type of breast cancer in women and accounts for about 80% of all breast cancers. The material consisted of histological preparations derived from 691 patients treated for IDC-NST. In our own study material, invasive ductal breast cancer of no special type accounted for more than 60% of cases, with the largest percentage of tumors being classified as G2 (53.96%) and G3 (28.98%). In terms of tumor size, the most common IDC-NST tumors were those of stage T1c (34.59%) and T2 (35.31%). The incidence of lymph node involvement was also assessed to reveal that no lymph node metastases were present in 45.44% of IDC-NST tumors. In the histopathological analysis of IDC-NST, significant statistical correlation was demonstrated between the presence of lymph node metastases and the histological malignancy grade (N0/G1-G3 p = 0.0103; N1A/G1-G3 p = 0.0498; N1B/G1-G3 p < 0.001; N3/G1-G3 p = 0.0027; N4/G1-G3 p < 0.001), between the presence of lymph node metastases and the tumor size (N0/T1-T4 p = 0.00295; N1B/T1-T4 p < 0.001; N2/T1-T4 p < 0.001; N2A/T1-T2 p < 0.001; N4/T1-T4 p < 0.001; Nx/T1-T4 p = 0.0447), as well as between the histological malignancy grade and the tumor size (G1/T1-T4 p < 0.001; G1/2/T1-T4 p < 0.001; G2/3/T1-T4 p < 0.0267). Own research demonstrated that the most common histological type of breast cancer is invasive ductal carcinoma of no special type (IDC-NST); statistically significant correlations were demonstrated in IDC-NST patients between the lymph node involvement status and the histological malignancy grade or tumor size as well as between the histological malignancy grade and the tumor size.

  19. Comparative genomic hybridization analysis of benign and invasive male breast neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ojopi, Elida Paula Benquique; Cavalli, Luciane Regina; Cavalieri, Luciane Mara Bogline

    2002-01-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis was performed for the identification of chromosomal imbalances in two benign gynecomastias and one malignant breast carcinoma derived from patients with male breast disease and compared with cytogenetic analysis in two of the three cases. CGH analy...

  20. Application of Deep Learning in Automated Analysis of Molecular Images in Cancer: A Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yong; Chen, Shihui; Liu, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Molecular imaging enables the visualization and quantitative analysis of the alterations of biological procedures at molecular and/or cellular level, which is of great significance for early detection of cancer. In recent years, deep leaning has been widely used in medical imaging analysis, as it overcomes the limitations of visual assessment and traditional machine learning techniques by extracting hierarchical features with powerful representation capability. Research on cancer molecular images using deep learning techniques is also increasing dynamically. Hence, in this paper, we review the applications of deep learning in molecular imaging in terms of tumor lesion segmentation, tumor classification, and survival prediction. We also outline some future directions in which researchers may develop more powerful deep learning models for better performance in the applications in cancer molecular imaging. PMID:29114182

  1. Application of Deep Learning in Automated Analysis of Molecular Images in Cancer: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Xue

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imaging enables the visualization and quantitative analysis of the alterations of biological procedures at molecular and/or cellular level, which is of great significance for early detection of cancer. In recent years, deep leaning has been widely used in medical imaging analysis, as it overcomes the limitations of visual assessment and traditional machine learning techniques by extracting hierarchical features with powerful representation capability. Research on cancer molecular images using deep learning techniques is also increasing dynamically. Hence, in this paper, we review the applications of deep learning in molecular imaging in terms of tumor lesion segmentation, tumor classification, and survival prediction. We also outline some future directions in which researchers may develop more powerful deep learning models for better performance in the applications in cancer molecular imaging.

  2. Inspiratory muscle activation increases with COPD severity as confirmed by non-invasive mechanomyographic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Sarlabous

    Full Text Available There is a lack of instruments for assessing respiratory muscle activation during the breathing cycle in clinical conditions. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the usefulness of the respiratory muscle mechanomyogram (MMG for non-invasively assessing the mechanical activation of the inspiratory muscles of the lower chest wall in both patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and healthy subjects, and to investigate the relationship between inspiratory muscle activation and pulmonary function parameters. Both inspiratory mouth pressure and respiratory muscle MMG were simultaneously recorded under two different respiratory conditions, quiet breathing and incremental ventilatory effort, in 13 COPD patients and 7 healthy subjects. The mechanical activation of the inspiratory muscles was characterised by the non-linear multistate Lempel-Ziv index (MLZ calculated over the inspiratory time of the MMG signal. Subsequently, the efficiency of the inspiratory muscle mechanical activation was expressed as the ratio between the peak inspiratory mouth pressure to the amplitude of the mechanical activation. This activation estimated using the MLZ index correlated strongly with peak inspiratory mouth pressure throughout the respiratory protocol in both COPD patients (r = 0.80, p<0.001 and healthy (r = 0.82, p<0.001. Moreover, the greater the COPD severity in patients, the greater the level of muscle activation (r = -0.68, p = 0.001, between muscle activation at incremental ventilator effort and FEV1. Furthermore, the efficiency of the mechanical activation of inspiratory muscle was lower in COPD patients than healthy subjects (7.61±2.06 vs 20.42±10.81, respectively, p = 0.0002, and decreased with increasing COPD severity (r = 0.78, p<0.001, between efficiency of the mechanical activation at incremental ventilatory effort and FEV1. These results suggest that the respiratory muscle mechanomyogram is a good reflection of inspiratory

  3. Online molecular image repository and analysis system: A multicenter collaborative open-source infrastructure for molecular imaging research and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mahabubur; Watabe, Hiroshi

    2018-05-01

    Molecular imaging serves as an important tool for researchers and clinicians to visualize and investigate complex biochemical phenomena using specialized instruments; these instruments are either used individually or in combination with targeted imaging agents to obtain images related to specific diseases with high sensitivity, specificity, and signal-to-noise ratios. However, molecular imaging, which is a multidisciplinary research field, faces several challenges, including the integration of imaging informatics with bioinformatics and medical informatics, requirement of reliable and robust image analysis algorithms, effective quality control of imaging facilities, and those related to individualized disease mapping, data sharing, software architecture, and knowledge management. As a cost-effective and open-source approach to address these challenges related to molecular imaging, we develop a flexible, transparent, and secure infrastructure, named MIRA, which stands for Molecular Imaging Repository and Analysis, primarily using the Python programming language, and a MySQL relational database system deployed on a Linux server. MIRA is designed with a centralized image archiving infrastructure and information database so that a multicenter collaborative informatics platform can be built. The capability of dealing with metadata, image file format normalization, and storing and viewing different types of documents and multimedia files make MIRA considerably flexible. With features like logging, auditing, commenting, sharing, and searching, MIRA is useful as an Electronic Laboratory Notebook for effective knowledge management. In addition, the centralized approach for MIRA facilitates on-the-fly access to all its features remotely through any web browser. Furthermore, the open-source approach provides the opportunity for sustainable continued development. MIRA offers an infrastructure that can be used as cross-boundary collaborative MI research platform for the rapid

  4. FieldTrip: Open Source Software for Advanced Analysis of MEG, EEG, and Invasive Electrophysiological Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Oostenveld

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes FieldTrip, an open source software package that we developed for the analysis of MEG, EEG, and other electrophysiological data. The software is implemented as a MATLAB toolbox and includes a complete set of consistent and user-friendly high-level functions that allow experimental neuroscientists to analyze experimental data. It includes algorithms for simple and advanced analysis, such as time-frequency analysis using multitapers, source reconstruction using dipoles, distributed sources and beamformers, connectivity analysis, and nonparametric statistical permutation tests at the channel and source level. The implementation as toolbox allows the user to perform elaborate and structured analyses of large data sets using the MATLAB command line and batch scripting. Furthermore, users and developers can easily extend the functionality and implement new algorithms. The modular design facilitates the reuse in other software packages.

  5. Molecular Characterization of a Novel Family of Trypanosoma cruzi Surface Membrane Proteins (TcSMP) Involved in Mammalian Host Cell Invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Nadini Oliveira; Souza, Renata Torres de; Cordero, Esteban Mauricio; Maldonado, Danielle Cortez; Cortez, Cristian; Marini, Marjorie Mendes; Ferreira, Eden Ramalho; Bayer-Santos, Ethel; Almeida, Igor Correia de; Yoshida, Nobuko; Silveira, José Franco da

    2015-11-01

    The surface coat of Trypanosoma cruzi is predominantly composed of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins, which have been extensively characterized. However, very little is known about less abundant surface proteins and their role in host-parasite interactions. Here, we described a novel family of T. cruzi surface membrane proteins (TcSMP), which are conserved among different T. cruzi lineages and have orthologs in other Trypanosoma species. TcSMP genes are densely clustered within the genome, suggesting that they could have originated by tandem gene duplication. Several lines of evidence indicate that TcSMP is a membrane-spanning protein located at the cellular surface and is released into the extracellular milieu. TcSMP exhibited the key elements typical of surface proteins (N-terminal signal peptide or signal anchor) and a C-terminal hydrophobic sequence predicted to be a trans-membrane domain. Immunofluorescence of live parasites showed that anti-TcSMP antibodies clearly labeled the surface of all T. cruzi developmental forms. TcSMP peptides previously found in a membrane-enriched fraction were identified by proteomic analysis in membrane vesicles as well as in soluble forms in the T. cruzi secretome. TcSMP proteins were also located intracellularly likely associated with membrane-bound structures. We demonstrated that TcSMP proteins were capable of inhibiting metacyclic trypomastigote entry into host cells. TcSMP bound to mammalian cells and triggered Ca2+ signaling and lysosome exocytosis, events that are required for parasitophorous vacuole biogenesis. The effects of TcSMP were of lower magnitude compared to gp82, the major adhesion protein of metacyclic trypomastigotes, suggesting that TcSMP may play an auxiliary role in host cell invasion. We hypothesized that the productive interaction of T. cruzi with host cells that effectively results in internalization may depend on diverse adhesion molecules. In the metacyclic forms, the signaling induced by

  6. Early invasive vs conservative treatment strategies in women and men with unstable angina and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Donoghue, Michelle; Boden, William E.; Braunwald, Eugene; Cannon, Christopher P.; Clayton, Tim C.; de Winter, Robbert J.; Fox, Keith A. A.; Lagerqvist, Bo; McCullough, Peter A.; Murphy, Sabina A.; Spacek, Rudolf; Swahn, Eva; Wallentin, Lars; Windhausen, Fons; Sabatine, Marc S.

    2008-01-01

    CONTEXT: Although an invasive strategy is frequently used in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE ACS), data from some trials suggest that this strategy may not benefit women. OBJECTIVE: To conduct a meta-analysis of randomized trials to compare the effects of an

  7. The pathology of familial breast cancer: Immunohistochemistry and molecular analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osin, Pinchas P; Lakhani, Sunil R

    1999-01-01

    Extensive studies of BRCA1- and BRCA2-associated breast tumours have been carried out in the few years since the identification of these familial breast cancer predisposing genes. The morphological studies suggest that BRCA1 tumours differ from BRCA2 tumours and from sporadic breast cancers. Recent progress in immunohistochemistry and molecular biology techniques has enabled in-depth investigation of molecular pathology of these tumours. Studies to date have investigated issues such as steroid hormone receptor expression, mutation status of tumour suppressor genes TP53 and c-erbB2, and expression profiles of cell cycle proteins p21, p27 and cyclin D 1 . Despite relative paucity of data, strong evidence of unique biological characteristics of BRCA1-associated breast cancer is accumulating. BRCA1-associated tumours appear to show an increased frequency of TP53 mutations, frequent p53 protein stabilization and absence of imunoreactivity for steroid hormone receptors. Further studies of larger number of samples of both BRCA1- and BRCA2-associated tumours are necessary to clarify and confirm these observations

  8. Non-invasive assessment of in-vitro embryo quality to improve transfer success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højbøge, Tina Rødgaard; Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Callesen, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    embryos before the transfer to a recipient still remains challenging. Presently, the predominant non-invasive technique for selecting viable embryos is based on morphology, where parameters such as rates of cleavage and blastocyst formation as well as developmental kinetics are evaluated mostly...... subjectively. The simple morphological approach is, however, inadequate for the prediction of embryo quality, and several studies have focused on developing new non-invasive methods using molecular approaches based particularly on proteomics, metabolomics and most recently small non-coding RNA, including micro......RNA. This review outlines the potential of several non-invasive in-vitro methods based on analysis of spent embryo culture medium....

  9. State-of-the-Art Methods for Skeletal Muscle Glycogen Analysis in Athletes—The Need for Novel Non-Invasive Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Jacob; Louis, Julien; Korostynska, Olga; Mason, Alex

    2017-01-01

    Muscle glycogen levels have a profound impact on an athlete’s sporting performance, thus measurement is vital. Carbohydrate manipulation is a fundamental component in an athlete’s lifestyle and is a critical part of elite performance, since it can provide necessary training adaptations. This paper provides a critical review of the current invasive and non-invasive methods for measuring skeletal muscle glycogen levels. These include the gold standard muscle biopsy, histochemical analysis, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and musculoskeletal high frequency ultrasound, as well as pursuing future application of electromagnetic sensors in the pursuit of portable non-invasive quantification of muscle glycogen. This paper will be of interest to researchers who wish to understand the current and most appropriate techniques in measuring skeletal muscle glycogen. This will have applications both in the lab and in the field by improving the accuracy of research protocols and following the physiological adaptations to exercise. PMID:28241495

  10. State-of-the-Art Methods for Skeletal Muscle Glycogen Analysis in Athletes-The Need for Novel Non-Invasive Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Jacob; Louis, Julien; Korostynska, Olga; Mason, Alex

    2017-02-23

    Muscle glycogen levels have a profound impact on an athlete's sporting performance, thus measurement is vital. Carbohydrate manipulation is a fundamental component in an athlete's lifestyle and is a critical part of elite performance, since it can provide necessary training adaptations. This paper provides a critical review of the current invasive and non-invasive methods for measuring skeletal muscle glycogen levels. These include the gold standard muscle biopsy, histochemical analysis, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and musculoskeletal high frequency ultrasound, as well as pursuing future application of electromagnetic sensors in the pursuit of portable non-invasive quantification of muscle glycogen. This paper will be of interest to researchers who wish to understand the current and most appropriate techniques in measuring skeletal muscle glycogen. This will have applications both in the lab and in the field by improving the accuracy of research protocols and following the physiological adaptations to exercise.

  11. Cost-effectiveness analysis of interventions for prevention of invasive aspergillosis among leukemia patients during hospital construction activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combariza, Juan F; Toro, Luis F; Orozco, John J; Arango, Marcos

    2018-02-01

    Invasive Aspergillosis (IA) is a serious problem among hematological patients and it is associated with high mortality. This situation can worsen at times of hospital construction, however there are several preventive measures available. This work aims to define the cost-effectiveness of some of these interventions. A decision tree model was used, it was divided into four arms according to each 1 of the interventions performed. A cost-effectiveness incremental analysis comparing environmental control measures, high efficiency particulate absorption (HEPA) filter installation and prophylaxis with posaconazole was done. Probabilistic and deterministic sensitivity analyses were also carried out. Among 86 patients with 175 hospitalization episodes, the incidence of IA with environmental protection measures, antifungal prophylaxis and hospitalization in rooms with HEPA filters was 14.4%, 6.3% and 0%, respectively. An Incremental Cost Effectiveness Ratio analysis was performed and it was found that HEPA filtered rooms and environmental protection measures are cost saving interventions when compared with posaconazole prophylaxis (-$2665 vs -$4073 vs $42 531 US dollars, respectively) for IA episode prevented. The isolation of inpatients with acute leukemia during hospital construction periods in HEPA filtered rooms could reduce the incidence of IA and might be a cost-effective prevention strategy. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Minimally Invasive Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy versus Retrograde Intrarenal Surgery for Upper Urinary Stones: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyang Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Minimally invasive percutaneous nephrolithotomy (mini-PCNL and retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS are both alternatives for PCNL to treat renal calculi. This study is aimed at comparing the stone-free rate (SFR and other surgery parameters of two approaches for treating upper urinary calculi. We performed this meta-analysis in September 2016 by searching studies about mini-PCNL and RIRS for treating upper urinary calculi in various databases, and RevMan v.5.3 was applied. Three randomized controlled trials and ten nonrandomized trials were included, involving a total of 1317 patients. Meta-analysis showed that mini-PCNL group led to a higher SFR [odds ratio: 1.96; 95% confidence interval: 1.46–2.64; P<0.00001] but brought a larger postoperative decrease in hemoglobin levels compared with RIRS. RIRS provided a shorter hospital time. There was no significant difference in operation time. Higher postoperative complications were detected in the mini-PCNL, but the difference was not significant. Grade I and III complications did not vary between two procedures, but grade II complications were of lower incidence in RIRS group. In the light of these results, compared with RIRS, mini-PCNL provided significantly higher SFR and efficiency quotient for managing calculi; however, it resulted in higher incidence of postoperative complications, larger hemoglobin drops, and longer hospital stay.

  13. FieldTrip: Open source software for advanced analysis of MEG, EEG, and invasive electrophysiological data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostenveld, R.; Fries, P.; Maris, E.G.G.; Schoffelen, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes FieldTrip, an open source software package that we developed for the analysis of MEG, EEG, and other electrophysiological data. The software is implemented as a MATLAB toolbox and includes a complete set of consistent and user-friendly high-level functions that allow

  14. Uncharismatic Invasives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clark, Jonathan L.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Although philosophers have examined the ethics of invasive species management, there has been little research approaching this topic from a descriptive, ethnographic perspective. In this article I examine how invasive species managers think about the moral status of the animals they seek to manage. I do so through a case study of Oregon’s efforts to manage the invasive species that are rafting across the Pacific attached to tsunami debris in the wake of the Japanese tsunami of 2011. Focusing on the state’s response to a dock that washed ashore on Agate Beach with various marine invertebrates attached to it, I argue that these animals’ position on two intersecting scales of moral worth—the sociozoologic scale and the phylogenetic scale—rendered them unworthy of moral consideration.

  15. Regulation of in situ to invasive breast carcinoma transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polyak, Kornelia; Hu, Min; Yao, Jun; Carroll, Danielle K.; Weremowicz, Stanislawa; Chen, Haiyan; Carrasco, Daniel; Richardson, Andrea; Violette, Shelia; Gelman, Rebecca S.; Bissell, Mina J.; Schnitt, Stuart; Polyak, Kornelia

    2008-05-07

    The transition of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to invasive carcinoma is a key event in breast tumor progression that is poorly understood. Comparative molecular analysis of tumor epithelial cells from in situ and invasive tumors has failed to identify consistent tumor stage-specific differences. However, the myoepithelial cell layer, present only in DCIS, is a key distinguishing and diagnostic feature. To determine the contribution of non-epithelial cells to tumor progression, we analyzed the role of myoepithelial cells and fibroblasts in the progression of in situ carcinomas using a xenograft model of human DCIS. Progression to invasion was promoted by fibroblasts, but inhibited by normal myoepithelial cells. The invasive tumor cells from these progressed lesions formed DCIS rather than invasive cancers when re-injected into naive mice. Molecular profiles of myoepithelial and epithelial cells isolated from primary normal and cancerous human breast tissue samples corroborated findings obtained in the xenograft model. These results provide the proof of principle that breast tumor progression could occur in the absence of additional genetic alterations and that tumor growth and progression could be controlled by replacement of normal myoepithelial inhibitory signals.

  16. Regulation of In Situ to Invasive Breast CarcinomaTransition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Min; Carroll, Danielle K.; Weremowicz, Stanislawa; Chen,Haiyan; Carrasco, Daniel; Richardson, Andrea; Bissell, Mina; Violette,Shelia; Gelman, Rebecca S.; Schnitt, Stuart; Polyak, Kornelia

    2007-03-13

    The transition of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to invasive carcinoma is a key event in breast tumor progression that is poorly understood. Comparative molecular analysis of tumor epithelial cells from in situ and invasive tumors has failed to identify consistent tumor stage-specific differences. However, the myoepithelial cell layer, present only in DCIS, is a key distinguishing and diagnostic feature. To determine the contribution of non-epithelial cells to tumor progression, we analyzed the role of myoepithelial cells and fibroblasts in the progression of in situ carcinomas using a xenograft model of human DCIS. Progression to invasion was promoted by fibroblasts, but inhibited by normal myoepithelial cells. The invasive tumor cells from these progressed lesions formed DCIS rather than invasive cancers when re-injected into naive mice. Molecular profiles of myoepithelial and epithelial cells isolated from primary normal and cancerous human breast tissue samples corroborated findings obtained in the xenograft model. These results provide the proof of principle that breast tumor progression could occur in the absence of additional genetic alterations and that tumor growth and progression could be controlled by replacement of normal myoepithelial inhibitory signals.

  17. Cytogenetic and molecular analysis of cellular atypical mesoblastic nephroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speleman, F; van den Berg, E; Dhooge, C; Oosterhuis, W; Redeker, B; De Potter, C R; Tamminga, R Y; Van Roy, N; Mannens, M

    1998-03-01

    Cytogenetic and molecular analyses were performed on three cellular (atypical) congenital mesoblastic nephromas (CMNs). Two cases had trisomy 11; in one, it was the sole karyotypic abnormality, and the other had additional numerical changes as well as an isochromosome for the long arm of chromosome 1. Markers for the 11p13 and 11p15 loci were present in three copies in these two CMNs. In the third CMN, two apparently normal copies of chromosome 11 were present together with additional numerical and structural chromosome changes. Because loss of heterozygosity was observed for both 11p13 and 11p15 markers, we assume that mitotic recombination occurred. Duplication and loss of imprinting of genes at 11p15 has also been observed frequently in Wilms' tumor. We therefore propose that CMN and Wilms' tumor might share common genetic pathways.

  18. Infectious Bronchitis Virus Variants: Molecular Analysis and Pathogenicity Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Yi Lin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV variants constantly emerge and pose economic threats to poultry farms worldwide. Numerous studies on the molecular and pathogenic characterization of IBV variants have been performed between 2007 and 2017, which we have reviewed herein. We noted that viral genetic mutations and recombination events commonly gave rise to distinct IBV genotypes, serotypes and pathotypes. In addition to characterizing the S1 genes, full viral genomic sequencing, comprehensive antigenicity, and pathogenicity studies on emerging variants have advanced our understanding of IBV infections, which is valuable for developing countermeasures against IBV field outbreaks. This review of IBV variants provides practical value for understanding their phylogenetic relationships and epidemiology from both regional and worldwide viewpoints.

  19. In Vivo Analysis of Alternative Modes of Breast Cancer Cell Invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    Green fluorescent protein ( GFP ) labelling of MMTV-neu tumor cells will facilitate the future analysis of tumor cell...from MMTV-neu mice was accomplished by transduction with a lentiviral vector expressing green fluorescent protein ( GFP ) and the puromycin...expressing green fluorescent protein ( GFP ) can be imaged in vivo. (A) Monolayer culture of MMTV-neu cells stably expressing GFP . (B) Confocal image of

  20. Minimally-invasive Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry analysis of model ancient copper alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walaszek, Damian [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Chemistry, Biological and Chemical Research Centre, Żwirki i Wigury 101, 02-089 Warszawa (Poland); Laboratory for Analytical Chemistry, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Überlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Senn, Marianne; Wichser, Adrian [Laboratory for Analytical Chemistry, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Überlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Faller, Markus [Laboratory for Jointing Technology and Corrosion, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Überlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Wagner, Barbara; Bulska, Ewa [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Chemistry, Biological and Chemical Research Centre, Żwirki i Wigury 101, 02-089 Warszawa (Poland); Ulrich, Andrea [Laboratory for Analytical Chemistry, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Überlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland)

    2014-09-01

    This work describes an evaluation of a strategy for multi-elemental analysis of typical ancient bronzes (copper, lead bronze and tin bronze) by means of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS).The samples originating from archeological experiments on ancient metal smelting processes using direct reduction in a ‘bloomery’ furnace as well as historical casting techniques were investigated with the use of the previously proposed analytical procedure, including metallurgical observation and preliminary visual estimation of the homogeneity of the samples. The results of LA-ICPMS analysis were compared to the results of bulk composition obtained by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) and by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) after acid digestion. These results were coherent for most of the elements confirming the usefulness of the proposed analytical procedure, however the reliability of the quantitative information about the content of the most heterogeneously distributed elements was also discussed in more detail. - Highlights: • The previously proposed procedure was evaluated by analysis of model copper alloys. • The LA-ICPMS results were comparable to the obtained by means of XRF and ICPMS. • LA-ICPMS results indicated the usefulness of the proposed analytical procedure.

  1. Immunophenotypic and Molecular Analysis of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells Potential for Neurogenic Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Nikhat; Khan, Aleem A; Vishwakarma, Sandeep K

    2017-01-01

    Growing evidence shows that dental pulp (DP) tissues could be a potential source of adult stem cells for the treatment of devastating neurological diseases and several other conditions. Exploration of the expression profile of several key molecular markers to evaluate the molecular dynamics in undifferentiated and differentiated DP-derived stem cells (DPSCs) in vitro . The characteristics and multilineage differentiation ability of DPSCs were determined by cellular and molecular kinetics. DPSCs were further induced to form adherent (ADH) and non-ADH (NADH) neurospheres under serum-free condition which was further induced into neurogenic lineage cells and characterized for their molecular and cellular diversity at each stage. Statistical analysis used one-way analysis of variance, Student's t -test, Livak method for relative quantification, and R programming. Immunophenotypic analysis of DPSCs revealed >80% cells positive for mesenchymal markers CD90 and CD105, >70% positive for transferring receptor (CD71), and >30% for chemotactic factor (CXCR3). These cells showed mesodermal differentiation also and confirmed by specific staining and molecular analysis. Activation of neuronal lineage markers and neurogenic growth factors was observed during lineage differentiation of cells derived from NADH and ADH spheroids. Greater than 80% of cells were found to express β-tubulin III in both differentiation conditions. The present study reported a cascade of immunophenotypic and molecular markers to characterize neurogenic differentiation of DPSCs under serum-free condition. These findings trigger the future analyses for clinical applicability of DP-derived cells in regenerative applications.

  2. Expression microarray meta-analysis identifies genes associated with Ras/MAPK and related pathways in progression of muscle-invasive bladder transition cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan A Ewald

    Full Text Available The effective detection and management of muscle-invasive bladder Transition Cell Carcinoma (TCC continues to be an urgent clinical challenge. While some differences of gene expression and function in papillary (Ta, superficial (T1 and muscle-invasive (≥T2 bladder cancers have been investigated, the understanding of mechanisms involved in the progression of bladder tumors remains incomplete. Statistical methods of pathway-enrichment, cluster analysis and text-mining can extract and help interpret functional information about gene expression patterns in large sets of genomic data. The public availability of patient-derived expression microarray data allows open access and analysis of large amounts of clinical data. Using these resources, we investigated gene expression differences associated with tumor progression and muscle-invasive TCC. Gene expression was calculated relative to Ta tumors to assess progression-associated differences, revealing a network of genes related to Ras/MAPK and PI3K signaling pathways with increased expression. Further, we identified genes within this network that are similarly expressed in superficial Ta and T1 stages but altered in muscle-invasive T2 tumors, finding 7 genes (COL3A1, COL5A1, COL11A1, FN1, ErbB3, MAPK10 and CDC25C whose expression patterns in muscle-invasive tumors are consistent in 5 to 7 independent outside microarray studies. Further, we found increased expression of the fibrillar collagen proteins COL3A1 and COL5A1 in muscle-invasive tumor samples and metastatic T24 cells. Our results suggest that increased expression of genes involved in mitogenic signaling may support the progression of muscle-invasive bladder tumors that generally lack activating mutations in these pathways, while expression changes of fibrillar collagens, fibronectin and specific signaling proteins are associated with muscle-invasive disease. These results identify potential biomarkers and targets for TCC treatments, and

  3. Prognostic significance of lymphovascular invasion in radical cystectomy on patients with bladder cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwanik Kim

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The objective of the present study was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of published literature to appraise the prognostic value of lymphovascular invasion (LVI in radical cystectomy specimens. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Following the PRISMA statement, PubMed, Cochrane Library, and SCOPUS database were searched from the respective dates of inception until June 2013. RESULTS: A total of 21 articles met the eligibility criteria for this systematic review, which included a total of 12,527 patients ranging from 57 to 4,257 per study. LVI was detected in 34.6% in radical cystectomy specimens. LVI was associated with higher pathological T stage and tumor grade, as well as lymph node metastasis. The pooled hazard ratio (HR was statistically significant for recurrence-free survival (pooled HR, 1.61; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.26-2.06, cancer-specific survival (pooled HR, 1.67; 95% CI, 1.38-2.01, and overall survival (pooled HR, 1.67; 95% CI, 1.38-2.01, despite the heterogeneity among included studies. On sensitivity analysis, the pooled HRs and 95% CIs were not significantly altered when any one study was omitted. The funnel plot for overall survival demonstrated a certain degree of asymmetry, which showed slight publication bias. CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis indicates that LVI is significantly associated with poor outcome in patients with bladder cancer who underwent radical cystectomy. Adequately designed prospective studies are required to provide the precise prognostic significance of LVI in bladder cancer.

  4. Effects of age on long-term outcomes after a routine invasive or selective invasive strategy in patients presenting with non-ST segment elevation acute coronary syndromes: a collaborative analysis of individual data from the FRISC II - ICTUS - RITA-3 (FIR) trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damman, Peter; Clayton, Tim; Wallentin, Lars; Lagerqvist, Bo; Fox, Keith A A; Hirsch, Alexander; Windhausen, Fons; Swahn, Eva; Pocock, Stuart J; Tijssen, Jan G P; de Winter, Robbert J

    2012-02-01

    To perform a patient-pooled analysis of a routine invasive versus a selective invasive strategy in elderly patients with non-ST segment elevation acute coronary syndrome. A meta-analysis was performed of patient-pooled data from the FRISC II-ICTUS-RITA-3 (FIR) studies. (Un)adjusted HRs were calculated by Cox regression, with adjustments for variables associated with age and outcomes. The main outcome was 5-year cardiovascular death or myocardial infarction (MI) following routine invasive versus selective invasive management. Regarding the 5-year composite of cardiovascular death or MI, the routine invasive strategy was associated with a lower hazard in patients aged 65-74 years (HR 0.72, 95% CI 0.58 to 0.90) and those aged ≥75 years (HR 0.71, 95% CI 0.55 to 0.91), but not in those aged ICTUS), http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN07752711 (RITA-3).

  5. A first molecular phylogenetic analysis of Passiflora (Passifloraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschner, Valéria C; Lorenz, Aline P; Cervi, Armando C; Bonatto, Sandro L; Souza-Chies, Tatiana T; Salzano, Francisco M; Freitas, Loreta B

    2003-08-01

    Passiflora, a genus with more than 400 species, exhibits a high diversity of floral and vegetative structures and a complex taxonomy, which includes 23 subgenera and many sections and series. To better understand Passiflora's variability and interspecific relationships, the phylogeny of 61 species, classified in 11 of 23 suggested subgenera, was investigated. Three molecular markers were used, the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacers (nrITS), the plastid trnL-trnF spacer regions (∼1000 bp), and the rps4 plastid gene (∼570 bp). Three major clades were highly supported, independent of the marker and phylogenetic method used; one included the subgenera Distephana, Dysosmia, Dysosmioides, Passiflora, and Tacsonioides, a second, the subgenera Adopogyne, Decaloba, Murucuja, and Pseudomurucuja, and a third, the subgenus Astrophea. We call these the Passiflora, Decaloba, and Astrophea clades, respectively. The position of subgenus Deidamioides is undefined. The monophyly of Passiflora could not be statistically corroborated, and the relationships among the major clades and of these clades with the related genera remain unresolved. Our results indicate that a reevaluation of the monophyly of Passiflora and its infrageneric classification is necessary.

  6. Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of Fasciola gigantica from Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa-Seki, Madoka; Tokashiki, Minami; Opara, Maxwell Nwachukwu; Iroh, Gabriel; Hayashi, Kei; Kumar, Uday Mohanta; Itagaki, Tadashi

    2017-02-01

    Fasciola gigantica is considered the major pathogen causing fasciolosis in Africa; however, molecular characterization of this fluke has not been adequately elucidated. It is important to scientifically elucidate the dispersal history of F. gigantica by analyzing its genetic diversity. Fasciola flukes from Nigeria were analyzed using nuclear and mitochondrial DNA markers. A total of 172 Fasciola flukes collected from cattle were identified as F. gigantica because they displayed the F. gigantica fragment pattern in multiplex PCR for the nuclear marker, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (pepck). In total, 70 haplotypes were detected from Nigerian F. gigantica on the basis of the concatenated sequence of mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (nad1) and cytochrome c oxidase 1 (cox1). The index of neutrality (Fu's Fs) suggests rapid expansion of the Nigerian F. gigantica population. Although four haplogroups, Nigeria 1A, 1B, 2A, and 2B, were detected from Nigerian F. gigantica, a climate-specific genetic structure was not observed among F. gigantica populations from three agro-climatic regions (Sahel, Savannah, and Forest). This is probably because of the frequent transportation of livestock from one part of the country to the other. Nigeria 1A and 1B had close relationships with the Egyptian population of F. gigantica, whereas Nigeria 2A and 2B were comparatively related to the Zambian population. No haplotype was shared among the three countries, and it therefore is difficult to estimate the dispersal route of F. gigantica within the African continent. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  7. Molecular beacon biosensors for DNA/RNA analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiaohong; Schuster, Sheldon; Liu, Xiaojing; Correll, Tiffany; Zhang, Peng; Tapec, Ruby; Santra, Swadeshmukul; Qhobosheanne, Monde; Lou, Jane H.; Tan, Weihong

    2000-03-01

    We have developed a variety of novel DNA biosensors using a new class of oligonucleotide probe, molecular beacon (MB). MB has the fluorescence signal transduction mechanism built within the molecules. It can report the presence of specific nucleic acids with high sensitivity and excellent selectivity. Biotinylated MBs have been designed and synthesized for immobilization onto silica surface through avidin-biotin binding. The effect of the avidin-biotin bridge on the MB hybridization has been studied. Our result shows that using streptavidin has less effect than using avidin in MB hybridization. Two kinds of fiber optical DNA sensors have been prepared and characterized: a fiber optic evanescent wave sensor and a submicrometer optical fiber sensor. The sensors are rapid,stable, highly selective, reproducible and regenerable. They have been applied to detect specific DNA and mRNA sequences and to the study of the DNA hybridization kinetics. Silica nanoparticles have also been used for MB immobilization in order to prepare a large quantity of nanometer sized DNA/RNA biosensors.

  8. Genetic analysis of CHARGE syndrome identifies overlapping molecular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moccia, Amanda; Srivastava, Anshika; Skidmore, Jennifer M; Bernat, John A; Wheeler, Marsha; Chong, Jessica X; Nickerson, Deborah; Bamshad, Michael; Hefner, Margaret A; Martin, Donna M; Bielas, Stephanie L

    2018-01-04

    PurposeCHARGE syndrome is an autosomal-dominant, multiple congenital anomaly condition characterized by vision and hearing loss, congenital heart disease, and malformations of craniofacial and other structures. Pathogenic variants in CHD7, encoding adenosine triphosphate-dependent chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 7, are present in the majority of affected individuals. However, no causal variant can be found in 5-30% (depending on the cohort) of individuals with a clinical diagnosis of CHARGE syndrome.MethodsWe performed whole-exome sequencing (WES) on 28 families from which at least one individual presented with features highly suggestive of CHARGE syndrome.ResultsPathogenic variants in CHD7 were present in 15 of 28 individuals (53.6%), whereas 4 (14.3%) individuals had pathogenic variants in other genes (RERE, KMT2D, EP300, or PUF60). A variant of uncertain clinical significance in KDM6A was identified in one (3.5%) individual. The remaining eight (28.6%) individuals were not found to have pathogenic variants by WES.ConclusionThese results demonstrate that the phenotypic features of CHARGE syndrome overlap with multiple other rare single-gene syndromes. Additionally, they implicate a shared molecular pathology that disrupts epigenetic regulation of multiple-organ development.GENETICS in MEDICINE advance online publication, 4 January 2018; doi:10.1038/gim.2017.233.

  9. [Molecular, genetic and physiological analysis of photoinhibition and photosynthetic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    A major goal of this project is to use a combined molecular genetic, biochemical and physiological approach to understand the relationship between photosynthetic performance and the structure of the multifunctional D1 reaction center protein of Photosystem II encoded by the chloroplast psbA gene. Relative to other chloroplast proteins, turover of D1 is rapid and highly light dependent and de novo synthesis of D1 is required for a plant's recovery from short term exposure to irradiances which induce photoinhibitory damage. These observations have led to models for a damage/repair cycle of PSII involving the targeted degradation and replacement of photodamaged D1. To investigate the effects of perturbing the D1 cycle on photosynthesis and autotrophic growth under high and low irradiance, we have examined the consequences of site-specific mutations of the psbA and 16S rRNA genes affecting synthesis, maturation and function/stability of the D1 protein introduced into the chloroplast genome of wildtype strain of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using biolistic transformation.

  10. Molecular analysis of manufactured gas plant soils for naphthalene mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanseverino, J.; Werner, C.; Fleming, J.; Applegate, B.M.; King, J.M.H.; Sayler, G.S.; Blackburn, J.

    1991-01-01

    New molecular tools are being developed and tested to ascertain the biodegradability of hazardous wastes by soil bacterial population. The potential for manufactured gas plant (MGP) soil bacterial populations to degrade naphthalene, as a component mixture of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, was evaluated by the detection of a naphthalene biodegradative genotype by DNA probe hybridization with DNA extracts and colonies of cultured bacteria of the MGP soils. The activity of the naphthalene-degrading populations was evaluated by mineralization assays, 14 CO 2 production from 14 C-naphthalene. Direct messenger RNA (mRNA) extraction from MGP soil was evaluated as an instantaneous measure of naphthalene catabolic gene expression in MGP soil. The bioavailability of naphthalene for bacterial degradation within the MGP soils was assessed by measuring the bioluminescent response of a naphthalene-lux catabolic reporter strain Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44 (pUTK21). DNA extracted from 5 MGP soils and 1 creosote-contaminated soil and hybridized with a nahA gene probe indicated that the naphthalene degradative genes were present in all samples in the range of 0.06 to 0.95 ng/100 μl DNA extract which was calculated to represent 3.58 x 10 8 to 1.05 x 10 10 nahA positive cells/g soil. Phenanthrene, anthracene, and benzo(a)pyrene were mineralized also by some of the soils. NAH7 homologous messenger RNA transcripts were detectable in one MGP soil and in the creosote-contaminated soil

  11. Mesoscopic non-equilibrium thermodynamic analysis of molecular motors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjelstrup, S; Rubi, J M; Pagonabarraga, I; Bedeaux, D

    2013-11-28

    We show that the kinetics of a molecular motor fueled by ATP and operating between a deactivated and an activated state can be derived from the principles of non-equilibrium thermodynamics applied to the mesoscopic domain. The activation by ATP, the possible slip of the motor, as well as the forward stepping carrying a load are viewed as slow diffusion along a reaction coordinate. Local equilibrium is assumed in the reaction coordinate spaces, making it possible to derive the non-equilibrium thermodynamic description. Using this scheme, we find expressions for the velocity of the motor, in terms of the driving force along the spacial coordinate, and for the chemical reaction that brings about activation, in terms of the chemical potentials of the reactants and products which maintain the cycle. The second law efficiency is defined, and the velocity corresponding to maximum power is obtained for myosin movement on actin. Experimental results fitting with the description are reviewed, giving a maximum efficiency of 0.45 at a myosin headgroup velocity of 5 × 10(-7) m s(-1). The formalism allows the introduction and test of meso-level models, which may be needed to explain experiments.

  12. Using Molecular Modeling in Teaching Group Theory Analysis of the Infrared Spectra of Organometallic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lihua

    2012-01-01

    A new method is introduced for teaching group theory analysis of the infrared spectra of organometallic compounds using molecular modeling. The main focus of this method is to enhance student understanding of the symmetry properties of vibrational modes and of the group theory analysis of infrared (IR) spectra by using visual aids provided by…

  13. Near-infrared oxymeter biosensor prototype for non-invasive in vivo analysis of rat brain oxygenation: effects of drugs of abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi, F.; Donini, M.; Bandera, A.; Congestri, F.; Formenti, F.; Sonntag, V.; Heidbreder, C.; Rovati, L.

    2006-07-01

    The feasibility of non-invasive analysis of brain activities was studied in the attempt to overcome the major limitation of actual in vivo methodologies, i.e. invasiveness. Optic fibre probes were used as the optical head of a novel, highly sensitive near-infrared continuous wave spectroscopy (CW-NIR) instrument. This prototype was designed for non-invasive analysis of the two main forms of haemoglobin: oxy-haemoglobin (HbO2) and deoxy-haemoglobin (Hb), chromophores present in biological tissues. It was tested in peripheral tissue (human gastrocnemius muscle) and then reset to perform the measurement on rat brain. In animal studies, the optical head was firmly placed using stereotaxic apparatus upon the sagittal line of the head of anaesthetized adult rats, without any surgery. Then pharmacological treatments with saline (300 µl s.c.) amphetamine (2 mg kg-1) or nicotine (0.4 mg kg-1) were performed. Within 10-20 min amphetamine substantially increased HbO2 and reduced Hb control levels. Nicotine produced a rapid initial increase followed by a decrease in HbO2. In contrast to amphetamine, nicotine treatment also reduced Hb and blood volume. These results support the capacity of our CW-NIR prototype to measure non-invasively HbO2 and Hb levels in the rat brain, that are markers of the degree of tissue oxygenation, thus providing an index of blood levels and therefore of brain metabolism.

  14. High Levels of Sample-to-Sample Variation Confound Data Analysis for Non-Invasive Prenatal Screening of Fetal Microdeletions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianjiao Chu

    Full Text Available Our goal was to test the hypothesis that inter-individual genomic copy number variation in control samples is a confounding factor in the non-invasive prenatal detection of fetal microdeletions via the sequence-based analysis of maternal plasma DNA. The database of genomic variants (DGV was used to determine the "Genomic Variants Frequency" (GVF for each 50kb region in the human genome. Whole genome sequencing of fifteen karyotypically normal maternal plasma and six CVS DNA controls samples was performed. The coefficient of variation of relative read counts (cv.RTC for these samples was determined for each 50kb region. Maternal plasma from two pregnancies affected with a chromosome 5p microdeletion was also sequenced, and analyzed using the GCREM algorithm. We found strong correlation between high variance in read counts and GVF amongst controls. Consequently we were unable to confirm the presence of the microdeletion via sequencing of maternal plasma samples obtained from two sequential affected pregnancies. Caution should be exercised when performing NIPT for microdeletions. It is vital to develop our understanding of the factors that impact the sensitivity and specificity of these approaches. In particular, benign copy number variation amongst controls is a major confounder, and their effects should be corrected bioinformatically.

  15. A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of First Trimester Non-Invasive Prenatal Screening for Fetal Trisomies in the United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon S Walker

    Full Text Available Non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT is a relatively new technology for diagnosis of fetal aneuploidies. NIPT is more accurate than conventional maternal serum screening (MSS but is also more costly. Contingent NIPT may provide a cost-effective alternative to universal NIPT screening. Contingent screening used a two-stage process in which risk is assessed by MSS in the first stage and, based on a risk cutoff, high-risk pregnancies are referred for NIPT. The objective of this study was to (1 determine the optimum MSS risk cutoff for contingent NIPT and (2 compare the cost effectiveness of optimized contingent NIPT to universal NIPT and conventional MSS.Decision-analytic model using micro-simulation and probabilistic sensitivity analysis. We evaluated cost effectiveness from three perspectives: societal, governmental, and payer.From a societal perspective, universal NIPT dominated both contingent NIPT and MSS. From a government and payer perspective, contingent NIPT dominated MSS. Compared to contingent NIPT, adopting a universal NIPT would cost $203,088 for each additional case detected from a government perspective and $263,922 for each additional case detected from a payer perspective.From a societal perspective, universal NIPT is a cost-effective alternative to MSS and contingent NIPT. When viewed from narrower perspectives, contingent NIPT is less costly than universal NIPT and provides a cost-effective alternative to MSS.

  16. Tool Sequence Trends in Minimally Invasive Surgery: Statistical Analysis and Implications for Predictive Control of Multifunction Instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl A. Nelson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of 67 minimally invasive surgical procedures covering 11 different procedure types to determine patterns of tool use. A new graph-theoretic approach was taken to organize and analyze the data. Through grouping surgeries by type, trends of common tool changes were identified. Using the concept of signal/noise ratio, these trends were found to be statistically strong. The tool-use trends were used to generate tool placement patterns for modular (multi-tool, cartridge-type surgical tool systems, and the same 67 surgeries were numerically simulated to determine the optimality of these tool arrangements. The results indicate that aggregated tool-use data (by procedure type can be employed to predict tool-use sequences with good accuracy, and also indicate the potential for artificial intelligence as a means of preoperative and/or intraoperative planning. Furthermore, this suggests that the use of multifunction surgical tools can be optimized to streamline surgical workflow.

  17. Minimally Invasive Surgery Versus Open Surgery Spinal Fusion for Spondylolisthesis: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Victor M; Kerezoudis, Panagiotis; Gilder, Hannah E; McCutcheon, Brandon A; Phan, Kevin; Bydon, Mohamad

    2017-02-01

    Systematic review and meta-analysis. Compare minimally invasive surgery (MIS) and open surgery (OS) spinal fusion outcomes for the treatment of spondylolisthesis. OS spinal fusion is an interventional option for patients with spinal disease who have failed conservative therapy. During the past decade, MIS approaches have increasingly been used, with potential benefits of reduced surgical trauma, postoperative pain, and length of hospital stay. However, current literature consists of single-center, low-quality studies with no review of approaches specific to spondylolisthesis only. This first systematic review of the literature regarding MIS and OS spinal fusion for spondylolisthesis treatment was performed using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines for article identification, screening, eligibility, and inclusion. Electronic literature search of Medline/PubMed, Cochrane, EMBASE, and Scopus databases yielded 2489 articles. These articles were screened against established criteria for inclusion into this study. A total of five retrospective and five prospective articles with a total of 602 patients were found. Reported spondylolisthesis grades were I and II only. Overall, MIS was associated with less intraoperative blood loss (mean difference [MD], -331.04 mL; 95% confidence interval [CI], -490.48 to -171.59; P spondylolisthesis. Moreover, although prospective trials associate MIS with better functional outcomes, longer-term and randomized trials are warranted to validate any association found in this study. 2.

  18. Diagnostic value of (1 → 3)-β-D-glucan in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid for invasive fungal disease: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xin-Yu; Liu, Yao; Gu, Xian-Min; Hao, Sheng-Yu; Wang, Yu-Hong; Yan, Di; Jiang, Shu-Juang

    2016-08-01

    The serum (1 → 3)-β-D-glucan (BG) assay has been approved for diagnosing invasive fungal diseases (IFDs). However, the performance of (1 → 3)-β-D-glucan assay in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid is various among studies. The present study aimed to assess the accuracy of (1 → 3)-β-D-glucan assay in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid for the diagnosis of invasive fungal diseases by means of meta-analysis and systematic review of relevant studies. The sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio (PLR), negative likelihood ratio (NLR), diagnostic odds ratio (OR) and a summary receiver-operating characteristic curve of BAL-BG for diagnosing invasive fungal diseases were pooled using meta-analysis. We also performed meta-regression analysis. A total of 838 patients (138 with proven or probable invasive fungal diseases), included in 6 studies, were analyzed. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, PLR, NLR and diagnostic odds ratio were 0.52 (95%CI, 0.38-0.53), 0.58 (95%CI, 0.55-0.61), 1.34 (95%CI, 1.08-1.66), 0.82 (95% CI, 0.63-1.07) and 1.71 (95%CI, 1.01-2.92) respectively. The area under the summary receiver operating characteristic curve, with 95% confidence intervals was 0.61 (95%CI, 0.67-0.55). The accuracy of (1 → 3)-β-D-glucan test in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid is marginal, so that the results should not be interpreted alone but can be used as a part of full assessment with clinical features, image findings and other laboratory results for the diagnosis of invasive fungal diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Molecular characteristics of penicillin-binding protein 2b, 2x and 1a sequences in Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates causing invasive diseases among children in Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X; Liu, J; Zhang, Z; Liu, Y; Wang, Y; Liu, Y

    2016-04-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is one of the common pathogens causing severe invasive infections in children. This study aimed to investigate the serotype distribution and variations of penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) 2b, 2x and 1a in S. pneumoniae isolates causing invasive diseases in Northeast China. A total of 256 strains were isolated from children with invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) from January 2000 to October 2014. All strains were serotyped and determined for antibiotic resistance. The amplicons of penicillin-binding domains in pbp1a, pbp2b and pbp2x genes were sequenced for variation identification. The most prevalent serotypes of isolates in IPD children were 19A, 14, 19F, 23F and 6B. 19A and 19F were the most frequent serotypes of penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae (PRSP), which present with high resistance to amoxicillin, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone and meropenem. The numbers of amino acid substitutions of penicillin-non-susceptible S. pneumoniae (PNSP) isolates were higher than those of penicillin-sensitive S. pneumoniae isolates in all the PBP genes (p isolates carried 25 amino acid mutations, including Ala618 → Gly between positions 560 and 675 in PBP2b and Thr338 → Ala substitutions in PBP2x. The amino acid alterations in PBP2b, PBP2x and PBP1a from S. pneumoniae were closely associated with resistance to β-lactam antibiotics. This study provides new data for further monitoring of genetic changes related to the emergence and spread of resistance to β-lactam antibiotics in China.

  20. A genetic analysis of segregation distortion revealed by molecular ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    c Indian Academy of Sciences. RESEARCH NOTE. A genetic analysis of segregation ... 2College of Life Science, Northeast Forest University, Harbin 150040, People's Republic of China. [Cai J., Zhang X., Wang B., Yan M., Qi Y. and Kong L. ... elite agronomic traits (Zhang et al. 2011). However, there is still no report about ...

  1. Molecular characterization and expression analysis of fat mass and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-12-03

    Dec 3, 2013 ... The GenBank acc. nos. of the sequences used to build the phylogenetic tree are as follows: Oryctolagus cuniculus (FJ429175); ..... future. Further analysis revealed that, in commercial rabbits, FTO expression in cerebellum is higher compared to cerebral cortex, which is in agreement with pig studies ( ...

  2. Molecular genetic analysis of grain protein content and flour ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    is the most important trait for the nutritional value of grain and for the factors that influences the technological ... genotype–environment interaction. In a particular genetic background, quantitative trait locus ..... Triboï E. 2005 Genetic analysis of dry matter and nitrogen accu- mulation and protein composition in wheat kernels.

  3. Molecular analysis of genetic diversity in elite II synthetic hexaploid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was conducted to assess the genetic diversity of Elite-II synthetic hexaploid (SH) wheat by genome DNA fingerprinting as revealed by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. Ten decamer RAPD primers (OPG-1, OPG-2, OPG-3, OPG-4, OPG-5, OPA-3, OPA-4, OPA-5, OPA-8, and OPA-15) ...

  4. Molecular characterization and diversity analysis in chilli pepper ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    India is considered to be the secondary center of diversity of chilli pepper, especially of Capsicum annuum. Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are the most widely used marker system for plant variety characterization and diversity analysis especially in cultivated species which have low levels of polymorphism. The diversity ...

  5. Molecular cloning, expression analysis and sequence prediction of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta as an essential transcriptional factor, regulates the differentiation of adipocytes and the deposition of fat. Herein, we cloned the whole open reading frame (ORF) of bovine C/EBPβ gene and analyzed its putative protein structures via DNA cloning and sequence analysis. Then, the ...

  6. Molecular marker analysis to differentiate a clonal selection of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lalit Kumar

    2013-04-03

    Apr 3, 2013 ... Microsatellite and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers were used to differentiate. Manjari Naveen, a clonal selection of Centennial Seedless variety of grape. Twenty one (21) microsatellite primers could not detect variation between parent variety and its clone. AFLP analysis.

  7. Propranolol treatment of infantile hemangioma endothelial cells: A molecular analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    STILES, JESSICA; AMAYA, CLARISSA; PHAM, ROBERT; ROWNTREE, REBECCA K.; LACAZE, MARY; MULNE, ARLYNN; BISCHOFF, JOYCE; KOKTA, VICTOR; BOUCHERON, LAURA E.; MITCHELL, DIANNE C.; BRYAN, BRAD A.

    2012-01-01

    Infantile hemangiomas (IHs) are non-malignant, largely cutaneous vascular tumors affecting approximately 5–10% of children to varying degrees. During the first year of life, these tumors are strongly proliferative, reaching an average size ranging from 2 to 20 cm. These lesions subsequently stabilize, undergo a spontaneous slow involution and are fully regressed by 5 to 10 years of age. Systemic treatment of infants with the non-selective β-adrenergic receptor blocker, propranolol, has demonstrated remarkable efficacy in reducing the size and appearance of IHs. However, the mechanism by which this occurs is largely unknown. In this study, we sought to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the effectiveness of β blocker treatment in IHs. Our data reveal that propranolol treatment of IH endothelial cells, as well as a panel of normal primary endothelial cells, blocks endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and formation of the actin cytoskeleton coincident with alterations in vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2), p38 and cofilin signaling. Moreover, propranolol induces major alterations in the protein levels of key cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, and modulates global gene expression patterns with a particular affect on genes involved in lipid/sterol metabolism, cell cycle regulation, angiogenesis and ubiquitination. Interestingly, the effects of propranolol were endothelial cell-type independent, affecting the properties of IH endothelial cells at similar levels to that observed in neonatal dermal microvascular and coronary artery endothelial cells. This data suggests that while propranolol markedly inhibits hemangioma and normal endothelial cell function, its lack of endothelial cell specificity hints that the efficacy of this drug in the treatment of IHs may be more complex than simply blockage of endothelial function as previously believed. PMID:23170111

  8. Molecular analysis of the bacterial diversity in uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geissler, A.

    2003-04-01

    A culture-independent molecular approach has been applied to investigate the bacterial diversity in three uranium contaminated sites. The three analysed soil samples have been collected from the uranium waste pile Haberland near Johanngeorgenstadt (Germany), from the uranium mill tailings in Gunnison, Colorado (USA) and from the uranium mill tailings in Shiprock, New Mexico (USA). The 16S rDNA fragments which has been isolated through direct lysis of the whole-DNA were amplified by the use of the universal primers 16S 43f and 16S 1404r and cloned. With restriction fragment length polymorphismus (RFLP) were the clones screened and one representative of all RFLP types that occurred more than once in the clone library was sequenced and analysed. In spite of the contamination a considerable diversity and significant differences in the composition of the natural bacterial communities in these three sites have been found. In the sample collected from the waste pile Haberland near Johanngeorgenstadt α-Proteobacteria and representatives of the Holophaga/Acidobacterium were numerically predominant. The distribution of bacteria in the sample collected from uranium mill tailings Gunnison was very similar to those found in the Haberland waste pile, but there were found besides α-Proteobacteria and representatives of Holophaga/Acidobacterium a lot of γ-Proteobacteria. The structure of the bacterial community in the sample collected from the uranium mill tailings Shiprock was significantly different. Only some representatives of the Holophaga/Acidobacterium and α-Proteobacteria were represented. Large populations of Bacilli, γ-Proteobacteria and green non sulfur bacteria were dominant in this sample. (orig.)

  9. High excitation rovibrational molecular analysis in warm environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ziwei; Stancil, Phillip C.; Cumbee, Renata; Ferland, Gary J.

    2017-06-01

    Inspired by advances in infrared observation (e.g., Spitzer, Herschel and ALMA), we investigate rovibrational emission CO and SiO in warm astrophysical environments. With recent innovation in collisional rate coefficients and rescaling methods, we are able to construct more comprehensive collisional data with high rovibrational states (vibration up to v=5 and rotation up to J=40) and multiple colliders (H2, H and He). These comprehensive data sets are used in spectral simulations with the radiative transfer codes RADEX and Cloudy. We obtained line ratio diagnostic plots and line spectra for both near- and far-infrared emission lines over a broad range of density and temperature for the case of a uniform medium. Considering the importance of both molecules in probing conditions and activities of UV-irradiated interstellar gas, we model rovibrational emission in photodissociation region (PDR) and AGB star envelopes (such as VY Canis Majoris, IK Tau and IRC +10216) with Cloudy. Rotational diagrams, energy distribution diagrams, and spectra are produced to examine relative state abundances, line emission intensity, and other properties. With these diverse models, we expect to have a better understanding of PDRs and expand our scope in the chemical architecture and evolution of AGB stars and other UV-irradiated regions. The soon to be launched James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will provide high resolution observations at near- to mid-infrared wavelengths, which opens a new window to study molecular vibrational emission calling for more detailed chemical modeling and comprehensive laboratory astrophysics data on more molecules. This work was partially supported by NASA grants NNX12AF42G and NNX15AI61G. We thank Benhui Yang, Kyle Walker, Robert Forrey, and N. Balakrishnan for collaborating on the collisional data adopted in the current work.

  10. A comparative analysis of three non-invasive Human-Machine Interfaces for the disabled

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram eRavindra

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of rehabilitation robotics, a major role is played by theHuman-Machine Interface (HMI used to gather the patient's intent from biologicalsignals, and convert them into control signals for the robotic artifact. Surprisingly,decades of research haven't yet declared what the optimal HMI is in this context;in particular, the traditional approach based upon surface electromyography (sEMGstill yields unreliable results due to the inherent variability of the signal. Toovercome this problem, the scientific community has recently been advocating thediscovery, analysis and usage of novel HMIs to supersede or augment sEMG; a comparativeanalysis of such HMIs is therefore a very desirable investigation.In this paper we compare three such HMIs employed in the detection of finger forces,namely sEMG, ultrasound imaging and pressure sensing. The comparison is performed alongfour main lines: the accuracy in the prediction, the stability over time, the wearabilityand the cost. A psychophysical experiment involving ten intact subjects engaged ina simple finger-flexion task was set up. Our results show that, at least in thisexperiment, pressure sensing and sEMG yield comparably good prediction accuraciesas opposed to ultrasound imaging; and that pressure sensing enjoys a much better stabilitythan sEMG.Given that pressure sensors are as wearable as sEMG electrodes but way cheaper, we claimthat this HMI could represent a valid alternative /augmentation to sEMG to control amulti-fingered hand prosthesis.

  11. Serotype-Specific Changes in Invasive Pneumococcal Disease after Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine Introduction: A Pooled Analysis of Multiple Surveillance Sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feikin, Daniel R.; Kagucia, Eunice W.; Loo, Jennifer D.; Link-Gelles, Ruth; Puhan, Milo A.; Cherian, Thomas; Levine, Orin S.; Whitney, Cynthia G.; O'Brien, Katherine L.; Moore, Matthew R.; Adegbola, Claire A.; Agocs, Mary; Ampofo, Krow; Andrews, Nick; Barton, Theresa; Benito, Javier; Broome, Claire V.; Bruce, Michael G.; Bulkow, Lisa R.; Byington, Carrie L.; Camou, Teresa; Cook, Heather; Cotter, Suzanne; Dagan, Ron; de Wals, Philippe; Deceuninck, Geneviève; Denham, Barbara; Edwards, Giles; Eskola, Juhani; Fitzgerald, Margaret; Galanakis, Emmanouil; Garcia-Gabarrot, Gabriela; Garcia-Garcia, Juan J.; Gene, Amadeu; Gomez, Borja; Heffernan, Helen; Hennessy, Thomas W.; Heuberger, Sigrid; Hilty, Markus; Ingels, Helene; Jayasinghe, Sanjay; Kellner, James D.; Klein, Nicola P.; Kormann-Klement, Andrea; Kozakova, Jana; Krause, Vicki; Kriz, Paula; Lambertsen, Lotte; Lepoutre, Agnès; Lipsitch, Marc; Lopez-Vega, Mariana; Lovgren, Marguerite; Maraki, Sofia; Mason, Edward O.; McIntyre, Peter B.; Menzies, Robert; Messina, Allison; Miller, Elizabeth; Mintegi, Santiago; Motlova, Jitka; Moulton, Lawrence H.; Mühlemann, Kathrin; Muñoz-Almagro, Carmen; Murdoch, David R.; Park, Daniel E.; Reingold, Arthur L.; Sa-Leao, Raquel; Sanyal, Abanti; Smith, Peter G.; Spanjaard, Lodewijk; Techasaensiri, Chonnamet; Thompson, Richard E.; Thoon, Koh C.; Tyrrell, Gregory J.; Valentiner-Branth, Palle; van der Ende, Arie; Vanderkooi, Otto G.; van der Linden, Mark P. G.; Varon, Emmanuelle; Verhaegen, Jan; Vestrheim, Didrik F.; Vickers, Imelda; von Gottberg, Anne; von Kries, Rüdiger; Waight, Pauline; Weatherholtz, Robert; Weiss, Susanne; Yee, Arnold; Zaidi, Anita K. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Vaccine-serotype (VT) invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) rates declined substantially following introduction of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) into national immunization programs. Increases in non-vaccineserotype (NVT) IPD rates occurred in some sites, presumably

  12. LincRNA-p21 inhibits invasion and metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma through miR-9/E-cadherin cascade signaling pathway molecular mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding G

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Gangqiang Ding, Zhen Peng, Jia Shang, Yi Kang, Huibin Ning, Chongshan Mao Department of Infectious Diseases, People’s Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Henan Provincial People’s Hospital, Zhengzhou, China Abstract: In the previous study, it was found that long intergenic noncoding RNA-p21 (lincRNA-p21 was downregulated in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC and lincRNA-p21 overexpression inhibited tumor invasion through inducing epithelial–mesenchymal transition. However, the underlying mechanism was not fully elaborated. In this study, lincRNA-p21 expression was measured in 12 paired HCC and nontumor adjacent normal tissues by ­quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The effects of lincRNA-p21 on HCC cells were studied using lentivirus expressing lincRNA-p21 vector in vitro. The association between lincRNA-p21 level and miR-9 level was tested with the Spearman rank correlation. The effects of miR-9 on HCC cells were studied by using miR-9 inhibitor in vitro. Luciferase assay was used to validate the target of miR-9. The results showed that lincRNA-p21 was downregulated in human HCC tissues and cell lines. LincRNA-p21 overexpression significantly inhibited HCC cell migration and invasion in vitro. Besides, lincRNA-p21 negatively regulated miR-9 expression level, and miR-9 was upregulated in human HCC tissues and cells. MiR-9 knockdown inhibited HCC cell migration and invasion in vitro. Finally, the luciferase assay results showed that E-cadherin was a direct target of miR-9. The expression level of E-cadherin was found to be regulated by lincRNA-p21 and miR-9. Altogether, the results suggested that lincRNA-p21 inhibits migration and invasion of HCC cells through regulating miR-9-mediated E-cadherin cascade signaling pathway. Keywords: hepatocellular carcinoma, lincRNA-p21, miR-9, E-cadherin, epithelial–mesenchymal transition

  13. Chemical Analysis of Whale Breath Volatiles: A Case Study for Non-Invasive Field Health Diagnostics of Marine Mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Cumeras, Raquel; Cheung, William H.K.; Gulland, Frances; Goley, Dawn; Davis, Cristina E.

    2014-01-01

    We explored the feasibility of collecting exhaled breath from a moribund gray whale (Eschrichtius robustus) for potential non-invasive health monitoring of marine mammals. Biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) profiling is a relatively new field of research, in which the chemical composition of breath is used to non-invasively assess the health and physiological processes on-going within an animal or human. In this study, two telescopic sampling poles were designed and tested with the prim...

  14. Non-invasive volumetric analysis of asymptomatic hands using a 3-D scanner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Shinkai

    Full Text Available Hand swelling is one of the symptoms often seen in practice, but none of the available morphometric methods can quickly and efficiently quantify hand volume in an objective manner, and the current gold-standard volume measurement requires immersion in water, which can be difficult to use. Therefore, we aimed to analyze the accuracy of using 3-dimensional (3-D scanning to measure hand volume. First, we compared the hand volume calculated using the 3-D scanner to that calculated from the conventional method among 109 volunteers to determine the reliability of 3-D measurements. We defined the beginning of the hand as the distal wrist crease, and 3-D forms of the hands were captured by the 3-D scanning system. Second, 238 volunteers (87 men, 151 women with no disease or history of hand surgery underwent 3-D scanning. Data collected included age, height, weight, and shoe size. The wrist circumference (WC and the distance between distal wrist crease and tip of middle finger (DDT were measured. Statistical analyses were performed using linear regression to investigate the relationship between the hand volume and these parameters. In the first study, a significantly strong positive correlation was observed [R = 0.98] between the hand volume calculated via 3-D scanning and that calculated via the conventional method. In the second study, no significant differences between the volumes, WC or DDT of right and left hands were found. The correlations of hand volume with weight, WC, and DDT were strong. We created a formula to predict the hand volume using these parameters; these variables explained approximately 80% of the predicted volume. We confirmed that the new 3-D scanning method, which is performed without touching the hand and can record the form of the hand, yields an accurate volumetric analysis of an asymptomatic hand.

  15. Non-invasive volumetric analysis of asymptomatic hands using a 3-D scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinkai, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Michiro; Tatebe, Masahiro; Iwatsuki, Katsuyuki; Kurimoto, Shigeru; Hirata, Hitoshi

    2017-01-01

    Hand swelling is one of the symptoms often seen in practice, but none of the available morphometric methods can quickly and efficiently quantify hand volume in an objective manner, and the current gold-standard volume measurement requires immersion in water, which can be difficult to use. Therefore, we aimed to analyze the accuracy of using 3-dimensional (3-D) scanning to measure hand volume. First, we compared the hand volume calculated using the 3-D scanner to that calculated from the conventional method among 109 volunteers to determine the reliability of 3-D measurements. We defined the beginning of the hand as the distal wrist crease, and 3-D forms of the hands were captured by the 3-D scanning system. Second, 238 volunteers (87 men, 151 women) with no disease or history of hand surgery underwent 3-D scanning. Data collected included age, height, weight, and shoe size. The wrist circumference (WC) and the distance between distal wrist crease and tip of middle finger (DDT) were measured. Statistical analyses were performed using linear regression to investigate the relationship between the hand volume and these parameters. In the first study, a significantly strong positive correlation was observed [R = 0.98] between the hand volume calculated via 3-D scanning and that calculated via the conventional method. In the second study, no significant differences between the volumes, WC or DDT of right and left hands were found. The correlations of hand volume with weight, WC, and DDT were strong. We created a formula to predict the hand volume using these parameters; these variables explained approximately 80% of the predicted volume. We confirmed that the new 3-D scanning method, which is performed without touching the hand and can record the form of the hand, yields an accurate volumetric analysis of an asymptomatic hand.

  16. Novel markers for differentiation of lobular and ductal invasive breast carcinomas by laser microdissection and microarray analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srovnal Josef

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Invasive ductal and lobular carcinomas (IDC and ILC are the most common histological types of breast cancer. Clinical follow-up data and metastatic patterns suggest that the development and progression of these tumors are different. The aim of our study was to identify gene expression profiles of IDC and ILC in relation to normal breast epithelial cells. Methods We examined 30 samples (normal ductal and lobular cells from 10 patients, IDC cells from 5 patients, ILC cells from 5 patients microdissected from cryosections of ten mastectomy specimens from postmenopausal patients. Fifty nanograms of total RNA were amplified and labeled by PCR and in vitro transcription. Samples were analysed upon Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 Arrays. The expression of seven differentially expressed genes (CDH1, EMP1, DDR1, DVL1, KRT5, KRT6, KRT17 was verified by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays. Expression of ASPN mRNA was validated by in situ hybridization on frozen sections, and CTHRC1, ASPN and COL3A1 were tested by PCR. Results Using GCOS pairwise comparison algorithm and rank products we have identified 84 named genes common to ILC versus normal cell types, 74 named genes common to IDC versus normal cell types, 78 named genes differentially expressed between normal ductal and lobular cells, and 28 named genes between IDC and ILC. Genes distinguishing between IDC and ILC are involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition, TGF-beta and Wnt signaling. These changes were present in both tumor types but appeared to be more prominent in ILC. Immunohistochemistry for several novel markers (EMP1, DVL1, DDR1 distinguished large sets of IDC from ILC. Conclusion IDC and ILC can be differentiated both at the gene and protein levels. In this study we report two candidate genes, asporin (ASPN and collagen triple helix repeat containing 1 (CTHRC1 which might be significant in breast carcinogenesis. Besides E-cadherin, the proteins validated on tissue

  17. Novel markers for differentiation of lobular and ductal invasive breast carcinomas by laser microdissection and microarray analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turashvili, Gulisa; Srovnal, Josef; Hajduch, Marian; Murray, Paul; Kolar, Zdenek; Bouchal, Jan; Baumforth, Karl; Wei, Wenbin; Dziechciarkova, Marta; Ehrmann, Jiri; Klein, Jiri; Fridman, Eduard; Skarda, Jozef

    2007-01-01

    Invasive ductal and lobular carcinomas (IDC and ILC) are the most common histological types of breast cancer. Clinical follow-up data and metastatic patterns suggest that the development and progression of these tumors are different. The aim of our study was to identify gene expression profiles of IDC and ILC in relation to normal breast epithelial cells. We examined 30 samples (normal ductal and lobular cells from 10 patients, IDC cells from 5 patients, ILC cells from 5 patients) microdissected from cryosections of ten mastectomy specimens from postmenopausal patients. Fifty nanograms of total RNA were amplified and labeled by PCR and in vitro transcription. Samples were analysed upon Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 Arrays. The expression of seven differentially expressed genes (CDH1, EMP1, DDR1, DVL1, KRT5, KRT6, KRT17) was verified by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays. Expression of ASPN mRNA was validated by in situ hybridization on frozen sections, and CTHRC1, ASPN and COL3A1 were tested by PCR. Using GCOS pairwise comparison algorithm and rank products we have identified 84 named genes common to ILC versus normal cell types, 74 named genes common to IDC versus normal cell types, 78 named genes differentially expressed between normal ductal and lobular cells, and 28 named genes between IDC and ILC. Genes distinguishing between IDC and ILC are involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition, TGF-beta and Wnt signaling. These changes were present in both tumor types but appeared to be more prominent in ILC. Immunohistochemistry for several novel markers (EMP1, DVL1, DDR1) distinguished large sets of IDC from ILC. IDC and ILC can be differentiated both at the gene and protein levels. In this study we report two candidate genes, asporin (ASPN) and collagen triple helix repeat containing 1 (CTHRC1) which might be significant in breast carcinogenesis. Besides E-cadherin, the proteins validated on tissue microarrays (EMP1, DVL1, DDR1) may represent novel

  18. Fluconazole Doses Used for Prophylaxis of Invasive Fungal Infection in Neonatal Intensive Care Units: A Network Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonart, Letícia Paula; Tonin, Fernanda Stumpf; Ferreira, Vinicius Lins; Tavares da Silva Penteado, Suelem; de Araújo Motta, Fábio; Pontarolo, Roberto

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of different doses of fluconazole used for invasive prophylaxis of fungal infection in neonates. A systematic search was conducted with PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science. A manual search was performed as well. Only randomized controlled trials of neonates in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) who received fluconazole prophylaxis for invasive fungal infection, regardless of the dose or therapeutic regimen, were included in this review. Data on baseline characteristics, outcomes incidence of proven invasive Candida infection, overall mortality, and invasive Candida infection-related mortality were extracted. Eleven studies were included in the review, with fluconazole doses of 3, 4, or 6?mg/kg. When the incidence of invasive Candida and invasive Candida-related mortality were considered as outcomes, the 3 and 6?mg/kg fluconazole doses were found to be statistically superior to placebo (OR, 5.48 [95% credible interval, 1.81-18.94] and 2.63 [1.18-7.02], respectively, and 15.32 [1.54-54.31] and 9.14 [1.26-142.7], respectively), but data for the 3 doses were not statistically significantly different. Use of the lowest fluconazole dose (3?mg/kg) should be recommended for Candida prophylaxis in neonates, given that increasing the fluconazole dose is not associated with higher efficacy and has greater potential for toxicity and increased cost. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Minimally Invasive Surgery Combined with Regenerative Biomaterials in Treating Intra-Bony Defects: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Li, Wenyang; Song, Jinlin

    2016-01-01

    Background With the popularity of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) in periodontics, numerous publications have evaluated the benefits of MIS with or without various regenerative biomaterials in the treatment of periodontal intra-bony defects. However, it is unclear if it is necessary to use biomaterials in MIS. Thus, we conducted a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials in patients with intra-bony defects to compare the clinical outcomes of MIS with regenerative biomaterials for MIS alone. Methods The authors retrieved English publications on relevant studies from Cochrane CENTRAL, PubMed, Medline, Embase, Clinical Evidence, and ClinicalTrails.gov (up to June 30, 2015). The main clinical outcomes were the reduction of probing pocket depths (PPDs), gain of clinical attachment level (CAL), recession of gingival margin (REC) and radiographic bone fill. Review Manager 5.2 (Cochrane Collaboration, Oxford, England) was used to calculate the heterogeneity and mean differences of the main clinical outcomes. Results In total, 464 studies in the literature were identified but only four were ultimately feasible. The results showed no significant difference regarding CAL gain (P = 0.32) and PPD reduction (P = 0.40) as well as REC increase (P = 0.81) and radiographic bone fill (P = 0.64) between the MIS plus biomaterials group and the MIS alone group. Conclusions The meta-analysis suggested no significant difference in treatment of intra-bony defects between the MIS plus biomaterials group and the MIS alone group, indicating that it is important to take costs and benefits into consideration when a decision is made about a therapeutic approach. There needs to be an in-depth exploration of the induction of intrinsic tissue healing of MIS without biomaterials to achieve optimal outcomes. PMID:26785405

  20. Cost-benefit analysis for invasive species control: the case of greater Canada gooseBranta canadensisin Flanders (northern Belgium).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyns, Nikolaas; Casaer, Jim; De Smet, Lieven; Devos, Koen; Huysentruyt, Frank; Robertson, Peter A; Verbeke, Tom; Adriaens, Tim

    2018-01-01

    Sound decisions on control actions for established invasive alien species (IAS) require information on ecological as well as socio-economic impact of the species and of its management. Cost-benefit analysis provides part of this information, yet has received relatively little attention in the scientific literature on IAS. We apply a bio-economic model in a cost-benefit analysis framework to greater Canada goose Branta canadensis , an IAS with documented social, economic and ecological impacts in Flanders (northern Belgium). We compared a business as usual (BAU) scenario which involved non-coordinated hunting and egg destruction with an enhanced scenario based on a continuation of these activities but supplemented with coordinated capture of moulting birds. To assess population growth under the BAU scenario we fitted a logistic growth model to the observed pre-moult capture population. Projected damage costs included water eutrophication and damage to cultivated grasslands and were calculated for all scenarios. Management costs of the moult captures were based on a representative average of the actual cost of planning and executing moult captures. Comparing the scenarios with different capture rates, different costs for eutrophication and various discount rates, showed avoided damage costs were in the range of 21.15 M€ to 45.82 M€ under the moult capture scenario. The lowest value for the avoided costs applied to the scenario where we lowered the capture rate by 10%. The highest value occurred in the scenario where we lowered the real discount rate from 4% to 2.5%. The reduction in damage costs always outweighed the additional management costs of moult captures. Therefore, additional coordinated moult captures could be applied to limit the negative economic impact of greater Canada goose at a regional scale. We further discuss the strengths and weaknesses of our approach and its potential application to other IAS.

  1. Multidisciplinary analysis of invasive meningococcal disease as a framework for continuous quality and safety improvement in regional Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Kathryn A; Durrheim, David N; Merritt, Tony; Massey, Peter; Ferguson, John; Ryan, Nick; Hullick, Carolyn

    2018-01-01

    System factors in a regional Australian health district contributed to avoidable care deviations from invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) management guidelines. Traditional root cause analysis (RCA) is not well-suited to IMD, focusing on individual cases rather than system improvements. As IMD requires complex care across healthcare silos, it presents an opportunity to explore and address system-based patient safety issues. Baseline assessment of IMD cases (2005-2006) identified inadequate triage, lack of senior clinician review, inconsistent vital sign recording and laboratory delays as common issues, resulting in antibiotic administration delays and inappropriate or premature discharge. Clinical governance, in partnership with clinical and public health services, established a multidisciplinary Meningococcal Reference Group (MRG) to routinely review management of all IMD cases. The MRG comprised representatives from primary care, acute care, public health, laboratory medicine and clinical governance. Baseline data were compared with two subsequent evaluation points (2011-2012 and 2013-2015). Phase I involved multidisciplinary process mapping and development of a standardised audit tool from national IMD management guidelines. Phase II involved formalisation of group processes and advocacy for operational change. Phase III focused on dissemination of findings to clinicians and managers. Greatest care improvements were observed in the final evaluation. Median antibiotic delay decreased from 72 to 42 min and proportion of cases triaged appropriately improved from 38% to 75% between 2013 and 2015. Increasing fatal outcomes were attributed to the emergence of more virulent meningococcal serotypes. The MRG was a key mechanism for identifying system gaps, advocating for change and enhancing communication and coordination across services. Employing IMD case review as a focus for district-level process reflection presents an innovative patient safety approach

  2. Cost-benefit analysis for invasive species control: the case of greater Canada goose Branta canadensis in Flanders (northern Belgium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaas Reyns

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Sound decisions on control actions for established invasive alien species (IAS require information on ecological as well as socio-economic impact of the species and of its management. Cost-benefit analysis provides part of this information, yet has received relatively little attention in the scientific literature on IAS. Methods We apply a bio-economic model in a cost-benefit analysis framework to greater Canada goose Branta canadensis, an IAS with documented social, economic and ecological impacts in Flanders (northern Belgium. We compared a business as usual (BAU scenario which involved non-coordinated hunting and egg destruction with an enhanced scenario based on a continuation of these activities but supplemented with coordinated capture of moulting birds. To assess population growth under the BAU scenario we fitted a logistic growth model to the observed pre-moult capture population. Projected damage costs included water eutrophication and damage to cultivated grasslands and were calculated for all scenarios. Management costs of the moult captures were based on a representative average of the actual cost of planning and executing moult captures. Results Comparing the scenarios with different capture rates, different costs for eutrophication and various discount rates, showed avoided damage costs were in the range of 21.15 M€ to 45.82 M€ under the moult capture scenario. The lowest value for the avoided costs applied to the scenario where we lowered the capture rate by 10%. The highest value occurred in the scenario where we lowered the real discount rate from 4% to 2.5%. Discussion The reduction in damage costs always outweighed the additional management costs of moult captures. Therefore, additional coordinated moult captures could be applied to limit the negative economic impact of greater Canada goose at a regional scale. We further discuss the strengths and weaknesses of our approach and its potential application to other

  3. Multidisciplinary analysis of invasive meningococcal disease as a framework for continuous quality and safety improvement in regional Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Kathryn A; Durrheim, David N; Merritt, Tony; Massey, Peter; Ferguson, John; Ryan, Nick; Hullick, Carolyn

    2018-01-01

    Background System factors in a regional Australian health district contributed to avoidable care deviations from invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) management guidelines. Traditional root cause analysis (RCA) is not well-suited to IMD, focusing on individual cases rather than system improvements. As IMD requires complex care across healthcare silos, it presents an opportunity to explore and address system-based patient safety issues. Context Baseline assessment of IMD cases (2005–2006) identified inadequate triage, lack of senior clinician review, inconsistent vital sign recording and laboratory delays as common issues, resulting in antibiotic administration delays and inappropriate or premature discharge. Methods Clinical governance, in partnership with clinical and public health services, established a multidisciplinary Meningococcal Reference Group (MRG) to routinely review management of all IMD cases. The MRG comprised representatives from primary care, acute care, public health, laboratory medicine and clinical governance. Baseline data were compared with two subsequent evaluation points (2011–2012 and 2013–2015). Interventions Phase I involved multidisciplinary process mapping and development of a standardised audit tool from national IMD management guidelines. Phase II involved formalisation of group processes and advocacy for operational change. Phase III focused on dissemination of findings to clinicians and managers. Results Greatest care improvements were observed in the final evaluation. Median antibiotic delay decreased from 72 to 42 min and proportion of cases triaged appropriately improved from 38% to 75% between 2013 and 2015. Increasing fatal outcomes were attributed to the emergence of more virulent meningococcal serotypes. Conclusions The MRG was a key mechanism for identifying system gaps, advocating for change and enhancing communication and coordination across services. Employing IMD case review as a focus for district-level process

  4. Molecular cloning and functional analysis of the gene encoding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Here we report for the first time the cloning of a full-length cDNA encoding GGPPS (Jc-GGPPS) from Jatropha curcas L. The full-length cDNA was 1414 base pair (bp), with an 1110-bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a 370- amino-acids polypeptide. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that Jc-GGPPS is a member of the ...

  5. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of an Mnsuperoxide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs) play an important role in stress-tolerance in plants. In this study, for the first time, a full-length cDNA sequence of MnSOD gene, termed as Sc-MnSOD (GenBank accession number: GQ246460), was obtained in sugarcane. Sequence analysis revealed that Sc-MnSOD gene was 919 bp long, ...

  6. Minimally invasive procedure reduces adjacent segment degeneration and disease: New benefit-based global meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Chuan; Huang, Chun-Ming; Zhong, Cheng-Fan; Liang, Rong-Wei; Luo, Shao-Jian

    2017-01-01

    Adjacent segment pathology (ASP) is a common complication presenting in patients with axial pain and dysfunction, requiring treatment or follow-up surgery. However, whether minimally invasive surgery (MIS), including MIS transforaminal / posterior lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF/PLIF) decreases the incidence rate of ASP remains unknown. The aim of this meta-analysis was to compare the incidence rate of ASP in patients undergoing MIS versus open procedures. This systematic review was undertaken by following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Statement. We searched electronic databases, including PubMed, EMBASE, SinoMed, and the Cochrane Library, without language restrictions, to identify clinical trials comparing MIS to open procedures. The results retrieved were last updated on June 15, 2016. Overall, 9 trials comprising 770 patients were included in the study; the quality of the studies included 4 moderate and 5 low-quality studies. The pooled data analysis demonstrated low heterogeneity between the trials and a significantly lower ASP incidence rate in patients who underwent MIS procedure, compared with those who underwent open procedure (p = 0.0001). Single-level lumbar interbody fusion was performed in 6 trials of 408 patients and we found a lower ASP incidence rate in MIS group, compared with those who underwent open surgery (p = 0.002). Moreover, the pooled data analysis showed a significant reduction in the incidence rate of adjacent segment disease (ASDis) (p = 0.0003) and adjacent segment degeneration (ASDeg) (p = 0.0002) for both procedures, favoring MIS procedure. Subgroup analyses showed no difference in follow-up durations between the procedures (p = 0.93). Therefore, we conclude that MIS-TLIF/PLIF can reduce the incidence rate of ASDis and ASDeg, compared with open surgery. Although the subgroup analysis did not indicate a difference in follow-up duration between the two procedures, larger-scale, well

  7. Minimally invasive procedure reduces adjacent segment degeneration and disease: New benefit-based global meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Chuan Li

    Full Text Available Adjacent segment pathology (ASP is a common complication presenting in patients with axial pain and dysfunction, requiring treatment or follow-up surgery. However, whether minimally invasive surgery (MIS, including MIS transforaminal / posterior lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF/PLIF decreases the incidence rate of ASP remains unknown. The aim of this meta-analysis was to compare the incidence rate of ASP in patients undergoing MIS versus open procedures.This systematic review was undertaken by following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Statement. We searched electronic databases, including PubMed, EMBASE, SinoMed, and the Cochrane Library, without language restrictions, to identify clinical trials comparing MIS to open procedures. The results retrieved were last updated on June 15, 2016.Overall, 9 trials comprising 770 patients were included in the study; the quality of the studies included 4 moderate and 5 low-quality studies. The pooled data analysis demonstrated low heterogeneity between the trials and a significantly lower ASP incidence rate in patients who underwent MIS procedure, compared with those who underwent open procedure (p = 0.0001. Single-level lumbar interbody fusion was performed in 6 trials of 408 patients and we found a lower ASP incidence rate in MIS group, compared with those who underwent open surgery (p = 0.002. Moreover, the pooled data analysis showed a significant reduction in the incidence rate of adjacent segment disease (ASDis (p = 0.0003 and adjacent segment degeneration (ASDeg (p = 0.0002 for both procedures, favoring MIS procedure. Subgroup analyses showed no difference in follow-up durations between the procedures (p = 0.93.Therefore, we conclude that MIS-TLIF/PLIF can reduce the incidence rate of ASDis and ASDeg, compared with open surgery. Although the subgroup analysis did not indicate a difference in follow-up duration between the two procedures, larger-scale, well

  8. Non-invasive analysis of root-soil interaction using three complementary imaging approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Tötzke, Christian; Pohlmeier, Andreas; Rudolph-Mohr, Nicole; Kardjilov, Nikolay; Lehmann, Eberhard; Oswald, Sascha E.

    2016-04-01

    Plant roots are known to modify physical, chemical and biological properties of the rhizosphere, thereby, altering conditions for water and nutrient uptake. We aim for capturing the dynamic processes occurring at the soil-root interface in situ. A combination of neutron (NI), magnetic resonance (MRI) and micro-focus X-ray tomography (CT) is applied to monitor the rhizosphere of young plants grown in sandy soil in cylindrical containers (diameter 3 cm). A novel transportable low field MRI system is operated directly at the neutron facility allowing for combined measurements of the very same sample capturing the same hydro-physiological state. The combination of NI, MRI and CT provides three-dimensional access to the root system in respect to structure and hydraulics of the rhizosphere and the transport of dissolved marker substances. The high spatial resolution of neutron imaging and its sensitivity for water can be exploited for the 3D analysis of the root morphology and detailed mapping of three-dimensional water content at the root soil interface and the surrounding soil. MRI has the potential to yield complementary information about the mobility of water, which can be bound in small pores or in the polymeric network of root exudates (mucilage layer). We inject combined tracers (GdDPTA or D2O) to study water fluxes through soil, rhizosphere and roots. Additional CT measurements reveal mechanical impacts of roots on the local microstructure of soil, e.g. showing soil compaction or the formation of cracks. We co-register the NT, MRI and CT data to integrate the complementary information into an aligned 3D data set. This allows, e.g., for co-localization of compacted soil regions or cracks with the specific local soil hydraulics, which is needed to distinguish the contribution of root exudation from mechanical impacts when interpreting altered hydraulic properties of the rhizosphere. Differences between rhizosphere and bulk soil can be detected and interpreted in

  9. Realizations of highly heterogeneous collagen networks via stochastic reconstruction for micromechanical analysis of tumor cell invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Hanqing; Liang, Long; Chen, Guo; Liu, Liyu; Liu, Ruchuan; Jiao, Yang

    2018-03-01

    of cells are analyzed by considering a nonlinear fiber model incorporating strain hardening upon large stretching and buckling upon compression. Our analysis shows that oriented fibers can significantly enhance long-range force transmission in the network. Moreover, in the oriented-collagen-Matrigel system, the forces generated by a polarized cell in collagen can penetrate deeply into the Matrigel region. The stressed Matrigel fibers could provide contact guidance for the migrating cell cells, and thus enhance their penetration into Matrigel. This suggests a possible mechanism for the observed enhanced intravasation by oriented collagen.

  10. Interstitial guidance of cancer invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsenko, Pavlo G; Ilina, Olga; Friedl, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Cancer cell invasion into healthy tissues develops preferentially along pre-existing tracks of least resistance, followed by secondary tissue remodelling and destruction. The tissue scaffolds supporting or preventing guidance of invasion vary in structure and molecular composition between organs. In the brain, the guidance is provided by myelinated axons, astrocyte processes, and blood vessels which are used as invasion routes by glioma cells. In the human breast, containing interstitial collagen-rich connective tissue, disseminating breast cancer cells preferentially invade along bundled collagen fibrils and the surface of adipocytes. In both invasion types, physical guidance prompted by interfaces and space is complemented by molecular guidance. Generic mechanisms shared by most, if not all, tissues include (i) guidance by integrins towards fibrillar interstitial collagen and/or laminins and type IV collagen in basement membranes decorating vessels and adipocytes, and, likely, CD44 engaging with hyaluronan; (ii) haptotactic guidance by chemokines and growth factors; and likely (iii) physical pushing mechanisms. Tissue-specific, resticted guidance cues include ECM proteins with restricted expression (tenascins, lecticans), cell-cell interfaces, and newly secreted matrix molecules decorating ECM fibres (laminin-332, thrombospondin-1, osteopontin, periostin). We here review physical and molecular guidance mechanisms in interstitial tissue and brain parenchyma and explore shared principles and organ-specific differences, and their implications for experimental model design and therapeutic targeting of tumour cell invasion. Copyright © 2011 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Molecular Detection of Bladder Cancer by Fluorescence Microsatellite Analysis and an Automated Genetic Analyzing System

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    Sarel Halachmi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the ability of an automated fluorescent analyzing system to detect microsatellite alterations, in patients with bladder cancer. We investigated 11 with pathology proven bladder Transitional Cell Carcinoma (TCC for microsatellite alterations in blood, urine, and tumor biopsies. DNA was prepared by standard methods from blood, urine and resected tumor specimens, and was used for microsatellite analysis. After the primers were fluorescent labeled, amplification of the DNA was performed with PCR. The PCR products were placed into the automated genetic analyser (ABI Prism 310, Perkin Elmer, USA and were subjected to fluorescent scanning with argon ion laser beams. The fluorescent signal intensity measured by the genetic analyzer measured the product size in terms of base pairs. We found loss of heterozygocity (LOH or microsatellite alterations (a loss or gain of nucleotides, which alter the original normal locus size in all the patients by using fluorescent microsatellite analysis and an automated analyzing system. In each case the genetic changes found in urine samples were identical to those found in the resected tumor sample. The studies demonstrated the ability to detect bladder tumor non-invasively by fluorescent microsatellite analysis of urine samples. Our study supports the worldwide trend for the search of non-invasive methods to detect bladder cancer. We have overcome major obstacles that prevented the clinical use of an experimental system. With our new tested system microsatellite analysis can be done cheaper, faster, easier and with higher scientific accuracy.

  12. Introduction to basic molecular biologic techniques for molecular imaging researches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Joo Hyun

    2004-01-01

    Molecular imaging is a rapidly growing field due to the advances in molecular biology and imaging technologies. With the introduction of imaging reporter genes into the cell, diverse cellular processes can be monitored, quantified and imaged non-invasively in vivo. These processes include the gene expression, protein-protein interactions, signal transduction pathways, and monitoring of cells such as cancer cells, immune cells, and stem cells. In the near future, molecular imaging analysis will allow us to observe the incipience and progression of the disease. These will make us easier to give a diagnosis in the early stage of intractable diseases such as cancer, neuro-degenerative disease, and immunological disorders. Additionally, molecular imaging method will be a valuable tool for the real-time evaluation of cells in molecular biology and the basic biological studies. As newer and more powerful molecular imaging tools become available, it will be necessary to corporate clinicians, molecular biologists and biochemists for the planning, interpretation, and application of these techniques to their fullest potential. In order for such a multidisciplinary team to be effective, it is essential that a common understanding of basic biochemical and molecular biologic techniques is achieved. Basic molecular techniques for molecular imaging methods are presented in this paper

  13. Immediate/Early vs. Delayed Invasive Strategy for Patients with Non-ST-Segment Elevation Acute Coronary Syndromes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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    Yanda Li

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Invasive coronary revascularization has been shown to improve prognoses in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE-ACS, but the optimal timing of intervention remains unclear. This meta-analysis is to evaluate the outcomes in immediate (<2 h, early (<24 h, and delayed invasive group and find out which is the optimal timing of intervention in NSTE-ACS patients. Studies were identified through electronic literature search of Medline, PubMed Central, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and CNKI. Data were extracted for populations, interventions, outcomes, and risk of bias. All-cause mortality was the pre-specified primary end point. The longest follow-up available in each study was chosen. The odds ratio (OR with 95% CI was the effect measure. The fixed or random effect pooled measure was selected based on the heterogeneity test among studies. In the comparison between early and delayed intervention, we found that early intervention led to a statistical significant decrease in mortality rate (n = 6,624; OR 0.78, 95% CI: 0.61–0.99 and refractory ischemia (n = 6,127; OR 0.50, 95% CI: 0.40–0.62 and a non-significant decrease in myocardial infarction (MI, major bleeding and revascularization. In the analysis comparing immediate and delayed invasive approach, we found that immediate intervention significantly reduced major bleeding (n = 1,217; OR 0.46, 95% CI: 0.23–0.93 but led to a non-significant decrease in mortality rate, refractory ischemia and revascularization and a non-significant increase in MI. In conclusion, early invasive strategy may lead to a lower mortality rate and reduce the risk of refractory ischemia, while immediate invasive therapy shows a benefit in reducing the risk of major bleeding.

  14. Motuporamines, anti-invasion and anti-angiogenic alkaloids from the marine sponge Xestospongia exigua (Kirkpatrick): isolation, structure elucidation, analogue synthesis, and conformational analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David E; Craig, Kyle S; Patrick, Brian; McHardy, Lianne M; van Soest, Rob; Roberge, Michel; Andersen, Raymond J

    2002-01-11

    Extracts of the sponge Xestospongia exigua collected in Papua New Guinea were positive in a new assay for anti-invasion activity. Bioassay-guided fractionation led to the identification of the three known motuporamines A (1), B (2), and C (3) along with the new motuporamines D (4), E (5), and F (6) and a mixture of G, H, and I (15). Motuporamines A (1), B (2), and C (3) and the mixture of G, H, and I (15) were responsible for the anti-invasion activity of the crude extract. Motuporamine C (3) has also been found to be anti-angiogenic. A series of analogues of the motuporamines have been synthesized and evaluated for anti-invasive activity. These SAR results revealed that a saturated 15-membered cyclic amine fused to the natural motuporamine diamine side chain (13) represented the optimal structure for anti-invasive activity in this family. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis of one of the analogues 20 showed that in the solid state its 16-membered macrocyclic amine fragment adopted the [4444] quadrangular conformation predicted by calculations to be the lowest energy conformation for the corresponding cycloalkane, cyclohexadecane. These data along with literature X-ray data and conformational analysis for derivatives of azacyclotridecane have been used as precedents for predicting the lowest energy ring conformations of other motuporamines. The SAR data from the natural and synthetic motuporamines have been combined with the conformational analyses to provide an outline of the functionality and shape required for activity in this family of alkaloids and to design a new analogue 49 that showed good anti-invasion activity.

  15. Molecular analysis of the emergence of pandemic Vibrio parahaemolyticus

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    Binnewies Tim T

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vibrio parahaemolyticus is abundant in the aquatic environment particularly in warmer waters and is the leading cause of seafood borne gastroenteritis worldwide. Prior to 1995, numerous V. parahaemolyticus serogroups were associated with disease, however, in that year an O3:K6 serogroup emerged in Southeast Asia causing large outbreaks and rapid hospitalizations. This new highly virulent strain is now globally disseminated. Results We performed a four-way BLAST analysis on the genome sequence of V. parahaemolyticus RIMD2210633, an O3:K6 isolate from Japan recovered in 1996, versus the genomes of four published Vibrio species and constructed genome BLAST atlases. We identified 24 regions, gaps in the genome atlas, of greater than 10 kb that were unique to RIMD2210633. These 24 regions included an integron, f237 phage, 2 type III secretion systems (T3SS, a type VI secretion system (T6SS and 7 Vibrio parahaemolyticus genomic islands (VPaI-1 to VPaI-7. Comparative genomic analysis of our fifth genome, V. parahaemolyticus AQ3810, an O3:K6 isolate recovered in 1983, identified four regions unique to each V. parahaemolyticus strain. Interestingly, AQ3810 did not encode 8 of the 24 regions unique to RMID, including a T6SS, which suggests an additional virulence mechanism in RIMD2210633. The distribution of only the VPaI regions was highly variable among a collection of 42 isolates and phylogenetic analysis of these isolates show that these regions are confined to a pathogenic clade. Conclusion Our data show that there is considerable genomic flux in this species and that the new highly virulent clone arose from an O3:K6 isolate that acquired at least seven novel regions, which included both a T3SS and a T6SS.

  16. Geriatric information analysis of the molecular properties of mexidole

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    O. A. Gromova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: by using the pharmacoinformation profiling, to comprehensively assess all possible effects of the molecules of mexidol, choline alfoscerate, piracetam, glycine, and semax in accordance with the anatomical therapeutic and chemical (ATC classification system.Material and methods. Chemoreactomic, pharmacoinformation, and geriatric information analyses of the properties of the molecules are based on chemoreactomic methodology. The chemoreactomic analysis uses the information from the PubChem, HMDB, and String databases; the pharmacoinformation analysis applies the information from the international ATC classification and a combined sample of data from the Therapeutic Target Database (TTD, SuperTarget, Manually Annotated Targets and Drugs Online Resource (MATADOR, and Potential Drug Target Database (PDTD; geriatric information analysis employs the data on the geroprotective effect of individual substances from the PubChem database and the data available in the literature data on geroprotection from the PubMed database, which have been collected through the artificial intelligence system.Results and discussion. Mexidol is characterized by the maximum set of positive effects (the drug is used to treat CNS and cardiovascular diseases and metabolic disorders and has anti-inflammatory and anti-infective properties, etc.. Mexidol and glycine are predicted to cause the lowest frequency of adverse reactions, such as itching, constipation, paresthesia, vomiting, etc. Geriatric information assessments of changes in the life span of model organisms have shown that mexidol contributes to the higher life expectancy of C. elegans (by 22.7±10%, Drosophila (by 14.4±15%, and mice (by 14.6±3%; the control drugs do by no more than 6.1%.Conclusion. The results of the study indicate that mexidol has a high potential to be used as a geroprotector.

  17. Molecular analysis of desmoid tumors with a high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism array identifies new molecular candidate lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erben, Philipp; Nowak, Daniel; Sauer, Christian; Ströbel, Philipp; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Hofheinz, Ralf-Dieter; Hohenberger, Peter; Kasper, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Desmoid tumors are neoplastic proliferations of connective tissues. The mutation status of the gene coding for catenin (cadherin-associated protein) beta 1 (CTNNB1) and trisomy 8 on the chromosomal level have been described to have prognostic relevance. In order to elucidate new molecular mechanisms underlying these tumors, we carried out a molecular analysis with a genome-wide human high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, in 9 patients. Single samples showed numerical aberrations on chromosomes (Chrs) 20 and 6 with either trisomy 20 or monosomy 6. No trisomy 8 could be detected. Recurrent heterozygous deletions were found in Chr 5q (including the APC gene locus, n = 3) and Chr 8p23 (n = 4, containing coding regions for the potential tumor suppressor gene CSMD1). This novel deletion in 8p23 showed an association with local recurrence. In addition, structural chromosomal changes (gain of Chrs 8 and 20) were found in a minority of cases. The genomic alteration affecting the candidate gene CSMD1 could be important in the development of desmoid tumors.

  18. MOLECULARLY IMPRINTED SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION FOR TRACE ANALYSIS OF DIAZINON IN DRINKING WATER

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    M. Rahiminejad ، S. J. Shahtaheri ، M. R. Ganjali ، A. Rahimi Forushani ، F. Golbabaei

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Amongst organophosphate pesticides, the one most widely used and common environmental contaminant is diazinon; thus methods for its trace analysis in environmental samples must be developed. Use of diazinon imprinted polymers such as sorbents in solid phase extraction, is a prominent and novel application area of molecular imprinted polymers. For diazinon extraction, high performance liquid chromatography analysis was demonstrated in this study. During optimization of the molecular imprinted solid phase extraction procedure for efficient solid phase extraction of diazinon, Plackett-Burman design was conducted. Eight experimental factors with critical influence on molecular imprinted solid phase extraction performance were selected, and 12 different experimental runs based on Plackett-Burman design were carried out. The applicability of diazinon imprinted polymers as the sorbent in solid phase extraction, presented obtained good recoveries of diazinon from LC-grade water. An increase in pH caused an increase in the recovery on molecular imprinted solid phase extraction. From these results, the optimal molecular imprinted solid phase extraction procedure was as follows: solid phase extraction packing with 100 mg diazinon imprinted polymers; conditioning with 5 mL of methanol and 6 mL of LC-grade water; sample loading containing diazinon (pH=10; washing with 1 mL of LC-grade water, 1 mL LC- grade water containing 30% acetonitrile and 0.5 mL of acetonitrile, respectively; eluting with 1 mL of methanol containing 2% acetic acid. The percentage recoveries obtained by the optimized molecular imprinted solid phase extraction were more than 90% with drinking water spiked at different trace levels of diazinon. Generally speaking, the molecular imprinted solid phase extraction procedure and subsequent high performance liquid chromatography analysis can be a relatively fast and proper approach for qualitative and quantitative analysis of diazinon in

  19. Contribution of molecular analysis to the typification of the non-functioning pituitary adenomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Ortiga, Ruth; Aranda, Francisco Ignacio

    2017-01-01

    Aim The WHO Classification of Tumours of Endocrine Organs considers the inmunohistochemical characterization of pituitary adenomas (PA) as mandatory for patient diagnosis. Recent advances in the knowledge of the molecular patterns of these tumours could complement this classification with gene expression profiling. Methods Within the context of the Spanish Molecular Registry of Pituitary Adenomas (REMAH), a multicentre clinical-basic research project, we analysed the molecular phenotype of 142 PAs with complete IHC and clinical information. Gene expression levels of all pituitary hormones, type 1 corticotrophin-releasing hormone receptor, dopamine receptors and arginine vasopressin receptor 1b were measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. In addition, we used three housekeeping genes for normalization and a pool of nine healthy pituitary glands from autopsies as calibration reference standard. Results Based on the clinically functioning PA (FPA: somatotroph, corticotroph, thyrotroph and lactotroph adenomas), we established the interquartile range of relative expression for all genes studied in each PA subtype. That allowed molecularly the different PA subtypes, including the clinically non-functioning PA (NFPA). Afterwards, we estimated the concordance of the molecular and immunohistochemical classification with clinical diagnosis in FPA and between them in NFPA. The kappa values were higher in molecular than in immunohistochemical classification in FPA and showed a bad concordance in all NFPA subtypes. Conclusions According to these results, the molecular characterization of the PA complements the IHC analysis, allowing a better typification of the NFPA. PMID:28692683

  20. Molecular neutron activation analysis of selenium metabolites in urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blotcky, A.J.; Hansen, G.T.; Ebrahim, A.; Rack, E.P.

    1988-01-01

    Because of the biological importance of selenium in living biological systems, various analytical procedures have been developed for analysis of microquantities of elemental selenium, in urine, serum, and tissue. For urine selenium, these include atomic absorption spectrometry, solution absorption spectrometry, solution fluorescence spectrometry, volumetry, and neutron activation analysis. Of equal or greater importance is the determination of selenium metabolites present in urine for the purpose of describing the biological pathways for the metabolism of selenium in living organisms. While it is known from previous studies that trimethylselenonium ion (TMSe) is a major metabolite in urine, probably the result of reduction and methylation reaction, there are no definitive results in the literature indicating the nature or quantity of other selenium metabolic products in urine. Early techniques to measure TMSe levels in urine involved the use of the radiotracer 75 Se. Because of the long biological half-life of selenium and issues of radiation exposure, its use in humans has been limited. In this paper, the authors report the experimental procedure for the determination of total selenoamino acid concentration in urine and present total selenium values, and, where applicable, TMSe, SeO 2- 3 , and total selenoamino acid concentrations in the urine of normal and diseased subjects

  1. Molecular characterization and analysis of the porcine NURR1 gene

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    Knud Larsen

    2016-12-01

    Here we report the isolation and characterization of porcine NURR1 cDNA. The NURR1 cDNA was RT-PCR cloned using NURR1-specific oligonucleotide primers derived from in silico sequences. The porcine NURR1 cDNA encodes a polypeptide of 598 amino acids, displaying a very high similarity with bovine, human and mouse (99% NURR1 protein. Expression analysis revealed a differential NURR1 mRNA expression in various organs and tissues. NURR1 transcripts could be detected as early as at 60 days of embryo development in different brain tissues. A significant increase in NURR1 transcript in the cerebellum and a decrease in NURR1 transcript in the basal ganglia was observed during embryo development. The porcine NURR1 gene was mapped to chromosome 15. Two missense mutations were found in exon 3, the first coding exon of NURR1. Methylation analysis of the porcine NURR1 gene body revealed a high methylation degree in brain tissue, whereas methylation of the promoter was very low. A decrease in DNA methylation in a discrete region of the NURR1 promoter was observed in pig frontal cortex during pig embryo development. This observation correlated with an increase in NURR1 transcripts. Therefore, methylation might be a determinant of NURR1 expression at certain time points in embryo development.