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Sample records for intussusception

  1. Prolapsed ileocolic intussusception

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Resection and anastomosis were performed in six cases, sigmoid colostomy was performed in one case, and reduction by milking without resection was performed in three cases. All the patients recovered well. Conclusion Prolapsed intussusception is a rare presentation of intussusceptions; its diagnosis is easy but may be ...

  2. INTUSSUSCEPTION - A RARE ETIOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Branco

    2017-02-01

    Discussion / Conclusions: The clinical case described is intended to alert to the importance of investigating an underlying disease in some children and adolescents with intussusception. In this case the study led to the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis

  3. Complicated colonic intussusception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin James

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The manuscript deals with the case of a 53-year-old woman who developed large bowel obstruction. Per-rectal examination revealed a pedunculated lesion in the rectum; rigid sigmoidoscopy revealed a prolapsing pedunculated mass with a necrotic surface. The patient recovered well following anterior resection. Histology confirmed a pedunculated sub mucosal lipoma as the lead point for intussusception. Colonic intussusception is a rare cause of adult large bowel obstruction, and the preoperative clinical diagnosis of this condition can be difficult. Resection of the involved segment of the colon is the most appropriate choice of treatment in most such cases.

  4. Intussusception secondary to endometriosis of the cecum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Katagiri

    2014-01-01

    CONCLUSION: Intussusception in an adult is a rare cause of bowel obstruction and intussusception caused by endometriosis is also rare. Although rare, the diagnosis of endometriosis as a cause of intussusception must be considered as part of the differential diagnosis.

  5. The imaging of intussusception

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrne, A.T. [Adelaide and Meath Incorporating the National Children' s Hospital, Dublin, Eire (Ireland)]. E-mail: angelabyrenx@hotmail.com; Goeghegan, T. [Adelaide and Meath Incorporating the National Children' s Hospital, Dublin, Eire (Ireland); Govender, P. [Adelaide and Meath Incorporating the National Children' s Hospital, Dublin, Eire (Ireland); Lyburn, I.D. [Department of Radiology, Frenchay Hospital, Bristol (United Kingdom); Colhoun, E. [Adelaide and Meath Incorporating the National Children' s Hospital, Dublin, Eire (Ireland); Torreggiani, W.C. [Adelaide and Meath Incorporating the National Children' s Hospital, Dublin, Eire (Ireland)]. E-mail: william.torreggiani@amnch.ie

    2005-01-01

    Intussusception is defined as the telescoping of one segment of the gastrointestinal tract into an adjacent one. It is relatively common in children and is the second most common cause of an acute abdomen in this age group. It is much less common in adults and accounts for less than 5% of cases of mechanical small bowel obstruction. Whereas the diagnosis is usually already suspected in children before imaging, it is often made unexpectedly in adults. In addition, although in children there is usually no specific underlying cause, an underlying lead point is often present in adults. Plain film radiography, barium studies and ultrasound imaging play major roles in both the diagnosis and management of this condition, and it is increasingly common for the diagnosis to be made by CT and MRI, particularly in adults. This pictorial essay reviews the imaging features that may be found in patients with bowel intussusception. As well as describing the imaging features of the more commonly used tests, we also stress the role of emerging technologies such as MRI using ultrafast half-fourier sequences with single shot turbo spin echo.

  6. The imaging of intussusception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrne, A.T.; Goeghegan, T.; Govender, P.; Lyburn, I.D.; Colhoun, E.; Torreggiani, W.C.

    2005-01-01

    Intussusception is defined as the telescoping of one segment of the gastrointestinal tract into an adjacent one. It is relatively common in children and is the second most common cause of an acute abdomen in this age group. It is much less common in adults and accounts for less than 5% of cases of mechanical small bowel obstruction. Whereas the diagnosis is usually already suspected in children before imaging, it is often made unexpectedly in adults. In addition, although in children there is usually no specific underlying cause, an underlying lead point is often present in adults. Plain film radiography, barium studies and ultrasound imaging play major roles in both the diagnosis and management of this condition, and it is increasingly common for the diagnosis to be made by CT and MRI, particularly in adults. This pictorial essay reviews the imaging features that may be found in patients with bowel intussusception. As well as describing the imaging features of the more commonly used tests, we also stress the role of emerging technologies such as MRI using ultrafast half-fourier sequences with single shot turbo spin echo

  7. CT features of intussusception through an Ileostomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Mi Ran; Park, Mi Hyun; Jee, Keum Nahn; Namgung, Hwan [Dankook University School of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    Intussusception of the small bowel through an ileostomy is very rare; when it causes necrosis of the bowel, immediate surgery is required. Computed tomography (CT) features of intussusception through an ileostomy have not been reported in the literature. Herein, we report the typical CT features of intussusception through an ileostomy, followed by a brief literature review.

  8. Lymphangiectasia of small intestine presenting as intussusception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katoch Pervez

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Intussusception is defined as telescoping of a segment of gastrointestinal tract into an adjacent one. In small children, it is the commonest cause of intestinal obstruction. More than 90% of childhood intussusceptions are idiopathic. We report a rare case of localized small intestinal lymphangiectasia, presenting as intussusception in a 6-month-old male child. The child presented with features of acute intestinal obstruction for which he was later operated. The gross examination of excised ileocecal mass revealed intussusception. Histopathologic examination revealed lymphangiectasia of small intestine, which acted as a lead point for ileocecal intussusception. Postoperative period was uneventful.

  9. Lymphangiectasia of small intestine presenting as intussusception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoch, Pervez; Bhardwaj, Subhash

    2008-01-01

    Intussusception is defined as telescoping of a segment of gastrointestinal tract into an adjacent one. In small children, it is the commonest cause of intestinal obstruction. More than 90% of childhood intussusceptions are idiopathic. We report a rare case of localized small intestinal lymphangiectasia, presenting as intussusception in a 6-month-old male child. The child presented with features of acute intestinal obstruction for which he was later operated. The gross examination of excised ileocecal mass revealed intussusception. Histopathologic examination revealed lymphangiectasia of small intestine, which acted as a lead point for ileocecal intussusception. Postoperative period was uneventful.

  10. Intraoperative hydrostatic reduction of intussusception

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    Chatterjee Uday

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To find out an easier way of reduction of intussusception during open surgery to avoid unnecessary bowel injury. Materials and Methods: Under general anesthesia, before laparotomy, warm normal saline was infused into the rectum with a Foley catheter and an intravenous drip set maintaining the level of the bottle at 80 cm above the operating table. After opening the abdomen, pressure was applied on the colon filled with normal saline distal to the intussusceptum. The pressure was transmitted to the intussusceptum and the walls of the intussuscipient and caused reduction of intussusception without any injury to the intussuscipient and intussusceptum. This procedure was performed on those patients on whom laparotomy was performed as a primary procedure due to nonavailability of fluoroscopy or ultrasonography. Results: Between August 1998 and July 2005, we had six patients of mean (range age 11 months (7-17 months. In two cases, at laparotomy, the intussusceptions were found to have already reduced. Conclusions: Gentle finger pressure is necessary for reduction of intussusception. This subjective "gentleness" is dependant on experience of the surgeon and varies from person to person. Focal pressure on the intussuscipient and apex of the intussusceptum by the finger during reduction may be more damaging than the diffusely transmitted hydrostatic pressure even by a less-experienced surgeon. This will avoid the needless resection and anastomosis of the intestine on many occasions.

  11. Retrograde Jejuno‑gastric Intussusception

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bowel sounds were normal. Abdominal X‑ray showed dilated stomach with dilated small bowel loops ... This was reduced and fixed to the abdominal wall and transverse mesocolon. It should be ... reduction of intussusception, but it is contraindicated when signs of peritoneal irritation are present.[9] Due to a limited view on ...

  12. [Gastroduodenal intussusception causing gastric retention.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alamili, M.; Berg, J.O.; Lindstrom, C.

    2008-01-01

    A case of gastroduodenal intussusception caused by a duodenal lipoma is presented. The condition was characterized by severe upper gastrointestinal retention, epigastric pain and weight loss. The mass was diagnosed by CT scan. The diagnosis was confirmed by operation. The patient was treated succ...

  13. [Gastroduodenal intussusception causing gastric retention.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alamili, M.; Berg, J.O.; Lindstrom, C.

    2008-01-01

    A case of gastroduodenal intussusception caused by a duodenal lipoma is presented. The condition was characterized by severe upper gastrointestinal retention, epigastric pain and weight loss. The mass was diagnosed by CT scan. The diagnosis was confirmed by operation. The patient was treated...

  14. Management for intussusception in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluckman, Steven; Karpelowsky, Jonathan; Webster, Angela C; McGee, Richard G

    2017-06-01

    Intussusception is a common abdominal emergency in children with significant morbidity. Prompt diagnosis and management reduces associated risks and the need for surgical intervention. Despite widespread agreement on the use of contrast enema as opposed to surgery for initial management in most cases, debate persists on the appropriate contrast medium, imaging modality, pharmacological adjuvant, and protocol for delayed repeat enema, and on the best approach for surgical management for intussusception in children. To assess the safety and effectiveness of non-surgical and surgical approaches in the management of intussusception in children. We searched the following electronic databases: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 8) in the Cochrane Library; Ovid MEDLINE (1950 to September 2016); Ovid Embase (1974 to September 2016); Science Citation Index Expanded (via Web of Science) (1900 to September 2016); and BIOSIS Previews (1969 to September 2016).We examined the reference lists of all eligible trials to identify additional studies. To locate unpublished studies, we contacted content experts, searched the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) and ClinicalTrials.gov (September 2016), and explored proceedings from meetings of the British Association of Paedatric Surgeons (BAPS), the American Soceity of Pediatric Surgery, and the World Congress of Pediatric Surgery. We included all randomised controlled trials comparing contrast media, imaging modalities, pharmacological adjuvants, protocols for delayed repeat enema, and/or surgical approaches for the management of intussusception in children. We applied no language, publication date, or publication status restrictions. Two review authors independently conducted study selection and data extraction and assessed risk of bias using a standardised form. We resolved disagreements by consensus with a third review author when necessary. We reported

  15. Multiple Intussusceptions Associated with Polycythemia in an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intussusceptions are generally associated with mechanical lead points or localized inflammation that function as foci for intestinal telescoping. We present the case of a patient whose abuse of anabolic steroids resulted in the development of multiple simultaneous intussusceptions. Our patient had no additional identifiable ...

  16. Radiology residents' experience with intussusception reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateni, Cyrus; Stein-Wexler, Rebecca; Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L.; Li, Chin-Shang

    2011-01-01

    Residents should be exposed to adequate procedural volume to act independently upon completion of training. Informal inquiry led us to question whether residents encounter enough intussusception reductions to become comfortable with the procedure. We sought to determine radiology residents' exposure to intussusception reductions, and whether their experiences vary by region or institution. U.S. radiology residency program directors were asked to encourage their residents to complete a 12-question online survey describing characteristics of their pediatric radiology department, experiences with intussusception reduction, and confidence in their own ability to perform the procedure. Six hundred sixty-four residents responded during the study period. Of those, 308 (46.4%) had not experienced an intussusception reduction, and 228 (34%) had experienced only one or two. Twenty-two percent of fourth-year residents had never experienced an intussusception reduction, and 21% had experienced only one. Among second- through fourth-year residents, only 99 (18.3%) felt confident that they could competently reduce an intussusception (P < 0.0001), and 336 (62.2%) thought they would benefit from a computer-assisted training model simulating intussusception reduction (P < 0.0001). Radiology residents have limited opportunity to learn intussusception reduction and therefore lack confidence. Most think they would benefit from additional training with a computer-simulation model. (orig.)

  17. Recurrent intussusception in children and infants

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    Amine Ksia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recurrent intussusceptions in child and infants are problematic and there are controversies about its management. The aim of this study is to determine the details of the clinical diagnosis of recurrent intussusception and to determine the aetiology of recurrent intussusceptions. Patients and Methods: It′s a retrospective study of 28 cases of recurrent intussusception treated in the paediatric surgery department of Monastir (Tunisia between January 1998 and December 2011. Results: During the study period, 505 patients were treated for 544 episodes of intussusception; there were 39 episodes of recurrent intussusceptions in 28 patients; the rate of patients with recurrence was 5.5%. With comparison to the initial episode, clinical features were similar to the recurrent episode, except bloody stool that was absent in the recurrent group (P = 0,016. Only one patient had a pathologic local point. Conclusion: In recurrent intussusception, patients are less symptomatic and consult quickly. Systematic surgical exploration is not needed as recurrent intussusceptions are easily reduced by air or hydrostatic enema and are not associated with a high rate of pathologic leading points.

  18. Anaesthetic management of intussusception in pregnancy | Nwasor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Teamwork will win and effective communication between obstetrician, surgeon, anesthesiologist and neonatologist is obligatory. Good knowledge of the simplest and fastest anaesthetic techniques available will ensure a fruitful outcome. Keywords: anaesthesia, intussusception, obstetric patients. Annals of African Medicine ...

  19. Diagnosis and Treatment of Intussusception in Children

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    O.V. Spakhi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Intussusception is the most common form of acquired gastrointestinal obstruction in children. The aim is to study the features of clinical course and treatment strategy for intussusception in children and to analyze limitations of diagnostic, clinical and special research methods. Materials and methods of the study. The analysis of treatment outcomes has been carried out in 272 children in pediatric surgery clinic from 2004 to 2015. We have developed the objective criteria for evaluation of intussusception stages that correlate with the degree of endotoxemia, changes in respiratory function and circulation, the disorders of gut motility, as well as ultrasound of the abdominal organs. Results and discussion. Patients with intussusception stage I (233 children had no signs of endotoxemia or they were non-significant. In 10 children we performed surgery, in 4 cases — laporoscopically. Of the 32 patients with stage II, in 8 cases the intussusception was straightened conservatively on the first try. We don’t make a second attempt in children with intussusception stage II. Surgical straightening was perfomed in 24 patients. Intussusception stage III in children (7 patients had signs of third degree endotoxemia. All patients of the third stage of intussusception underwent median laparotomy. In 5 cases we have detected intussusceptum necrosis, and these children were made bowel resection followed by the imposition of final ileostomy and intubation of the small intestine. In the rest (2 of patients, we managed to straighten the intussusceptum, and the gut was recognized as vital. Imposing primary anastomosis after the bowel resection in peritonitis we consider unacceptable. Conclusions. 1. Comprehensive survey of children using laboratory and instrumental methods became the basis for the allocation of 3 stages of intussusception, which correlated with the degree of endotoxemia and impaired bowel functions: stage I — compensated; stage II

  20. Adult intussusception: A case series and review

    OpenAIRE

    Shenoy, Santosh

    2017-01-01

    AIM To identify factors differentiating pathologic adult intussusception (AI) from benign causes and the need for an operative intervention. Current evidence available from the literature is discussed. METHODS This is a case series of eleven patients over the age of 18 and a surgical consultation for ?Intussusception? at a single veteran?s hospital over a five-year period (2011-2016). AI was diagnosed on computed tomography (CT) scan and or flexible endoscopy (colonoscopy). Surgical referrals...

  1. Intussusception in dogs and cats: A review of 36 cases

    OpenAIRE

    Levitt, Lyndell; Bauer, Michael S.

    1992-01-01

    Intussusception is recognized as a common cause of bowel obstruction in small animals. This study documents the clinical and surgical findings in nine cats and 27 dogs diagnosed as having intussusception. The main purposes of the study were to define the predisposing causes and clinical signs of intussusception and to evaluate various surgical techniques commonly employed in its treatment. No common predisposing cause could be established. Diagnosis of intussusception was based most often on ...

  2. Clinical case definition for the diagnosis of acute intussusception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bines, Julie E; Ivanoff, Bernard; Justice, Frances; Mulholland, Kim

    2004-11-01

    Because of the reported association between intussusception and a rotavirus vaccine, future clinical trials of rotavirus vaccines will need to include intussusception surveillance in the evaluation of vaccine safety. The aim of this study is to develop and validate a clinical case definition for the diagnosis of acute intussusception. A clinical case definition for the diagnosis of acute intussusception was developed by analysis of an extensive literature review that defined the clinical presentation of intussusception in 70 developed and developing countries. The clinical case definition was then assessed for sensitivity and specificity using a retrospective chart review of hospital admissions. Sensitivity of the clinical case definition was assessed in children diagnosed with intussusception over a 6.5-year period. Specificity was assessed in patients aged clinical case definition accurately identified 185 of 191 assessable cases as "probable" intussusception and six cases as "possible" intussusception (sensitivity, 97%). No case of radiologic or surgically proven intussusception failed to be identified by the clinical case definition. The specificity of the definition in correctly identifying patients who did not have intussusception ranged from 87% to 91%. The clinical case definition for intussusception may assist in the prompt identification of patients with intussusception and may provide an important tool for the future trials of enteric vaccines.

  3. Ileocecocolic Intussusception Induced by Acute Appendicitis: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Bang Sil; Kim, Min Jeong; Jang, Kyung Mi; Lee, Hyun; Jeon, Eui Yong; Lee, Kwan Seop; Lee, Yul [Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-09-15

    Intussusception is a rare disease in adults. Moreover, appendiceal disease is very rarely the leading cause of adult intussusception. We report a case in which ileocecocolic intussusception is secondary to an acute appendicitis in an adult, and describe the radiologic, clinical, and pathologic findings.

  4. Pediatric radiology fellows' experience with intussusception reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein-Wexler, Rebecca; Bateni, Cyrus; Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L.; Li, Chin-Shang

    2011-01-01

    Intussusception reduction allows young children to avoid surgery. However, graduating residents have had relatively little training in intussusception reduction and, for the most part, consider themselves ill-prepared to perform this procedure. The goal of this study was to assess the extent of training in intussusception reduction during one year of a pediatric radiology fellowship and to determine whether graduating fellows consider themselves adequately trained in this technique. Pediatric radiology fellows were surveyed during June 2010 and asked to characterize their fellowship, to indicate the number of intussusception reductions performed (both the total number and those performed with faculty oversight but without active faculty involvement), and to assess the adequacy of their training. There were 31 responses, representing almost 1/3 of current fellows. Pediatric radiology fellows perform on average 6.9 reductions, 3.8 of which are with faculty oversight but without active faculty involvement. Ninety percent consider themselves well-trained in the technique, whereas 10% are uncertain (none consider their training inadequate). Almost all pediatric radiology fellows consider their training in intussusception reduction to be adequate. (orig.)

  5. Computed tomography of intussusception in adult

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Hae Jeong; Ahn, Byeong Yeob; Cha, Soon Joo; Seol, Hae Young; Chung, Kyoo Byung; Suh, Won Hyuck

    1984-01-01

    Intussusception is rare in adult and usually caused by organic lesions, although there is a significant number of so-called idiopathic cases. The diagnosis of intussusception have been made by plain abdomen, barium enema and small bowel series. But recently ultrasound and computed tomography make a contribution to diagnose intussusception. Computed tomography is not the primary means for evaluating a gastrointestinal tract abnormality but also provides valuable information in evaluating disorders affecting the hollow viscera of the alimentary tract. Computed tomography image of intussusception demonstrates a whirl like pattern of bowel loops separated by fatty stripe correlating of the intestinal walls. Abdominal ultrasonogram was used as the initial diagnostic test in 2 cases out of total 4 cases, with abdominal mass of unknown cause. It revealed a typical pattern, composed of a round or oval mass with central dense echoes and peripheral poor echoes. We report 4 all cases of intussusception in adult who were performed by computed tomography and/or ultrasound. All cases were correlated with barium enema examination and/or surgical reports.

  6. Preoperative Diagnosis of Adult Intussusception Caused by Small Bowel Lipoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Shiba

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Adult intussusception is rare, accounting for only 5% of all intussusceptions, for which preoperative diagnosis is difficult. We herein report a preoperatively diagnosed case of adult intussusception caused by a small bowel lipoma. A 33-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with three weeks history of colicky epigastric pain. Computed tomography revealed thickening of the ileal wall suggestive of intussusception. Colonoscopy revealed an ileocolic intussusception. Barium enema for reduction of ileocolic intussusception demonstrated a small bowel tumor in the ileum 15 cm proximal to the ileocecal valve. The intussusception was reduced, and the patient underwent partial resection of the ileum encompassing the small bowel tumor. Histological findings confirmed the diagnosis of lipoma of the small bowel. The patient made a satisfactory recovery and remains well.

  7. Adult Intussusception Caused by Heterotopic Pancreas

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    Va-Kei Kok

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Heterotopic pancreas causing small bowel intussusception is rare. We report the case of a 24-year-old woman who presented with intermittent episodes of abdominal cramping and pain that had persisted for 10 days. A target-shaped lesion consisting of multiple concentric rings was found on the left side on contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Surgical intervention demonstrated jejunal intussusception caused by a jejunal heterotopic pancreas. Microscopically, several nesidioblastoses of pancreas were identified. Although very rare, small intestinal pancreatic rests may cause subacute bowel obstruction.

  8. Intestinal schistosomiasis associated with intussusception: a case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 7-year-old boy presented with the history of abdominal pain and difficulties in passing stool for two months. Ultrasound examination revealed doughnut signs characterized with multiple concentric rings at the lateral abdomen, and the bowel loop appeared distended. Exploratory laparatomy confirmed intussusception of ...

  9. in diagnosis of secondary intussusception in children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ahmed Abougabal

    2014-12-02

    Dec 2, 2014 ... the most common cause of acute bowel obstruction and pain in infants. This leads to venous congestion and bowel wall edema. If intussusception is not diagnosed and treated adequately, reduced arterial blood supply, bowel infarction and perforation may follow, causing peritonitis and may even.

  10. Transanal protrusion of intussusceptions in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezomike Uchechukwu Obiora

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the following study is to report our management experience and outcome of transanal protrusion of intussusceptions. Patients and Methods: Retrospective analysis of all cases of intussusceptions protruding through the anal opening from January 2008 to June 2013. Results: Of 62 cases of intussusceptions, transanal protrusion occurred in 10 patients (16% anal protrusion rate with a male:female ratio of 2:3. They were aged 4-96 months (mean 22.6 ± 30.7, median 7.5 months. Six were infants while four were above 1 year. Duration of symptoms ranged from 2 to 14 days (mean 5.9 days ± 3.4 with only two patients presenting within 48 h. Clinical features included vomiting (100%, abdominal pains (100%, bloody mucoid stool (100%, abdominal distension (90%, and palpable left iliac fossa mass (70%. Three patients had preceding diarrhoea (30% and two had preceding upper respiratory tract infection (20%. Duration of hospital stay ranged from 5 to 23 days (mean 12 days ± 5.6. Findings at surgery included seven ileocolic and two colocolic intussusceptions (one patient died before surgery. Operative procedures were right hemicolectomy (5, operative manual reduction (3, left hemicolectomy (1 giving a 67% bowel resection rate. One patient died giving a 10% mortality rate. Conclusion: Transanal protrusion occurred more in females and is associated with late presentation, older age, high bowel resection rate, and high mortality.

  11. Gastrointestinal stromal tumour presenting as gastroduodenal intussusception.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wilson, Mark H

    2012-08-01

    Gastroduodenal intussusception secondary to gastrointestinal stromal tumour is a very rare cause for intestinal obstruction. The diagnosis of this condition can be challenging, as symptoms are often non-specific and intermittent. This article reports a case where the diagnosis was made preoperatively with abdominal imaging and was treated by a combination of endoscopic reduction and laparoscopic resection.

  12. Transient small-bowel intussusception in children on CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strouse, Peter J.; DiPietro, Michael A.; Saez, Fermin

    2003-01-01

    To determine the frequency and significance of small-bowel intussusception identified in children on CT. All abdomen CT reports between July 1995 and April 2002 were reviewed to identify patients with small-bowel intussusception. Intussusceptions were identified as an intraluminal mass with a characteristic layered appearance and/or continuity with adjacent mesenteric fat. Ileocolic intussusceptions and intussusceptions related to feeding tubes were excluded. Imaging studies and medical records were reviewed. Twenty-five pediatric patients (16 boys, 9 girls; mean age 11.2 years) were identified with small-bowel intussusception on CT. No patient had a persistent intussusception requiring surgery. Fourteen had limited immediate repeat CT images as part of the same examination, ten of which demonstrated resolution of the CT abnormality. Follow-up CT [n=13 (6 within 24 h)], ultrasound (n=3), small-bowel follow-through (n=4) and surgery (n=3) showed no intussusception. In four patients with persistent symptoms, underlying pathology was identified requiring treatment (giardiasis, 2; small-bowel inflammation/strictures, 1; abscess and partial small-bowel obstruction after perforated appendicitis, 1). In 21 other patients, direct correlation of symptoms to CT abnormality was absent or questionable, no treatment was required, and there was no clinical or imaging evidence of persistence or recurrence. Most small-bowel intussusceptions identified in children by CT are transient and of no clinical significance. (orig.)

  13. [Acute abdomen secondary to appendiceal intussusception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourth-Alvarenga, J E; Vázquez-Rueda, F; Murcia-Pascual, F J; Ayala-Montoro, J

    2015-01-01

    Appendiceal intussusception is a rare condition that can occur at any age. Only a few cases have been reported, and most are found during surgery. The therapeutic approach is usually surgical, ranging from an appendectomy to a hemicolectomy, primarily for biopsy and to rule out possible malignancy. Three cases of children under 14 years who underwent surgery for acute abdominal pain located in the right iliac fossa are presented; one with preoperative diagnosis by ultrasound, and the other two with positive intraoperative findings of intussusception of the cecal appendix, with acute appendicitis being histologically confirmed. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Ileal perineurioma as a cause of intussusception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Cristina Lordelo Wludarski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Perineuriomas are rare tumors composed of cells resembling those of the normal perineurium. It usually occurs in subcutaneous, soft-tissue or intraneural locations. Very few reports in the literature have described perineuriomas in the gastrointestinal tract, including the stomach, colon and jejunum. CASE REPORT: We report the clinicopathological and immunohistochemical features of a case of ileal perineurioma that was manifested clinically as intestinal obstruction due to intussusception. Ileal perineurioma has not previously been reported at this anatomical location

  15. Deep sedation during pneumatic reduction of intussusception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilivitzki, Anat; Shtark, Luda Glozman; Arish, Karin; Engel, Ahuva

    2012-05-01

    Pneumatic reduction of intussusception under fluoroscopic guidance is a routine procedure. The unsedated child may resist the procedure, which may lengthen its duration and increase the radiation dose. We use deep sedation during the procedure to overcome these difficulties. The purpose of this study was to summarize our experience with deep sedation during fluoroscopic reduction of intussusception and assess the added value and complication rate of deep sedation. All children with intussusception who underwent pneumatic reduction in our hospital between January 2004 and June 2011 were included in this retrospective study. Anesthetists sedated the children using propofol. The fluoroscopic studies, ultrasound (US) studies and the childrens' charts were reviewed. One hundred thirty-one attempted reductions were performed in 119 children, of which 121 (92%) were successful and 10 (8%) failed. Two perforations (1.5%) occurred during attempted reduction. Average fluoroscopic time was 1.5 minutes. No complication to sedation was recorded. Deep sedation with propofol did not add any complication to the pneumatic reduction. The fluoroscopic time was short. The success rate of reduction was high,raising the possibility that sedation is beneficial, possibly by smooth muscle relaxation.

  16. BARIUM REDUCTION OF INTUSSUSCEPTION IN INFANCY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denenholz, Edward J.; Feher, George. S.

    1955-01-01

    Barium enema reduction was used as the initial routine treatment in 29 infants with intussusception. In 22 of them the intussusception was reduced by this means. In three of eight patients operated upon the intussusception was found to be reduced. Four of the remaining five patients had clinical or x-ray evidence of complications before reduction by barium enema was attempted. Twenty-one of the patients, all of whom were observed in private practice, were treated without admission to the hospital. After reduction, these patients were observed closely by the clinician. None of these patients showed clinical or x-ray signs of complications before reduction. Certain clinical and roentgen criteria must be satisfied before it can be concluded that reduction by barium enema is complete. If there are clinical signs of complications with x-ray evidence of small bowel obstruction, only a very cautious attempt at hydrostatic reduction should be made. As the time factor is generally a reliable clinical guide to reducibility, the late cases should be viewed with greater caution. Long duration of symptoms, however, is not per se a contraindication to an attempt at hydrostatic reduction. PMID:13230908

  17. Delayed presentation of intussusception in children–a surgical audit

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    473–480. 2 Kaiser AD, Applegate KE, Ladd AP. Current success in the treatment of intussusception in children. Surgery 2007; 142:469–477. 3 Herwig K, Brenkert T, Losek JD. Enema-reduced intussusception management: is hospitalization ...

  18. An audit of paediatric intussusception radiological reduction at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods. This retrospective analytic cohort study assessed data from the records of all paediatric patients with the diagnosis of idiopathic intussusception discharged from the Department of Paediatric Surgery between 1 January 2003 and 30 September 2011. Results. Thirty-five children with intussusception were identified.

  19. Post-Myomectomy Intussusception: Report of Two Cases | Okafor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Exploratory laparotomies later revealed ileo-ileal and jejuno-ileal intussusceptions which were reduced without resection with good outcome. CONCLUSION: Intussusception is a rare but serious complication of myomectomy. High index of suspicion with prompt intervention and early team management optimize outcomes.

  20. a case of compound intussusceptions in a nigerian child

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    is a major contributor to morbidity and mortality in the treatment of intestinal obstruction. We report the first documented case of double compound intussusception in an. African child and reviewed relevant literature. Keywords: Antegrade and retrograde; Children; Compound; Intussusception. Annals of Ibadan Postgraduate ...

  1. Colo-colic intussusception associated with pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, O.; Daneman, A.; Alton, D.J. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital for Sick Children and the University of Toronto, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X8 (Canada); Thorner, P. [The Division of Pathology, Hospital for Sick Children and the University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    1998-07-01

    This paper describes pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis in association with colo-colic intussusception in a young teenager. The intussusception was easily reduced at barium enema. The recognition of the characteristic filling defects in the barium column facilitates a correct diagnosis. This association has only been reported previously in six adults. (orig.) With 2 figs., 9 refs.

  2. Ultrasonographic diagnosis and surgical management of double intestinal intussusception in 3 dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Atray, Mandeep; Raghunath, Mulinti; Singh, Tarunbir; Saini, Narinder Singh

    2012-01-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of double intestinal intussusception in 3 pups with persistent vomiting, diarrhea, dehydration, anemia, leucocytosis, and electrolyte imbalance are described. Ultrasonography confirmed intussusception and laparotomy revealed double intussusceptions. Intussusceptions were corrected by manual reduction in 1 pup and intestinal resection and anastomosis in 2 pups. Two pups survived and 1 pup died on the 4th day after surgery.

  3. Ultrasonographic diagnosis and surgical management of double intestinal intussusception in 3 dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atray, Mandeep; Raghunath, Mulinti; Singh, Tarunbir; Saini, Narinder Singh

    2012-08-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of double intestinal intussusception in 3 pups with persistent vomiting, diarrhea, dehydration, anemia, leucocytosis, and electrolyte imbalance are described. Ultrasonography confirmed intussusception and laparotomy revealed double intussusceptions. Intussusceptions were corrected by manual reduction in 1 pup and intestinal resection and anastomosis in 2 pups. Two pups survived and 1 pup died on the 4th day after surgery.

  4. Ultrasonographic findings of intestinal intussusception in seven cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patsikas, M N; Papazoglou, L G; Papaioannou, N G; Savvas, I; Kazakos, G M; Dessiris, A K

    2003-12-01

    The medical records of seven cats with intestinal intussusception that were diagnosed by abdominal ultrasonography and exploratory laparotomy were reviewed. In transverse ultrasonographic sections the intussusception appeared as a target-like mass consisting of one, two or more hyperechoic and hypoechoic concentric rings surrounding a C-shaped, circular or non-specific shaped hyperechoic centre. Part of the intestine representing the inner intussusceptum, located close to the hyperechoic centre and surrounded by concentric rings, was also detected. In longitudinal sections the intussusception appeared as multiple hyperechoic and hypoechoic parallel lines in four cases and as an ovoid mass in three cases. In one case the ovoid mass had a 'kidney' configuration. Additional ultrasonographic findings associated with intestinal intussusception included an intestinal neoplasm in one cat. The results of the present study demonstrate that the ultrasonographic findings of intestinal intussusception in cats bear some similarities to those described in dogs and humans, are relatively consistent, and facilitate a specific diagnosis.

  5. Intussusception. Part 1: A review of diagnostic approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daneman, Alan; Navarro, Oscar [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X8 (Canada)

    2003-02-01

    The vast majority of symptomatic intussusceptions in children arise in the ileum and are either ileocolic or ileoileocolic. The clinical diagnosis of these ''idiopathic'' intussusceptions may be difficult to make. Failure to make a prompt diagnosis and initiate appropriate treatment may lead to bowel ischemia, perforation, peritonitis, shock and even death. The clinician, therefore, may have to rely on imaging procedures to diagnose or exclude the presence of intussusception promptly and accurately. The imaging diagnosis of intussusception can be made with sonography or plain abdominal radiographs or by contrast (including air) enema examinations of the colon. This article highlights the current concepts and some controversial issues related to the imaging diagnosis of intussusception. (orig.)

  6. Intussusception in children: not only surgical treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Caruso

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Intussusception is the commonest cause of acute in­testinal obstruction in children. Failure of timely diagnosis and treatment results in a surgical emergency leading to fatal outcome. The classic triad of symptoms is seen in less than one-third of the children affected. Aim of this study was to evaluate the comprehensive management of intussusception in children, evaluating the outcome of conservative treatment with hydrostatic ultrasound reduction and surgery.Material and methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted including pediatric patients (up to 14 years old with diagnosis of bowel intussusception. The management and treatment depended on the patients’ situation: for children in good general conditions initial hydrostatic reduction under continuous ultrasonographic monitoring was attempted; if severe dehydration and/or septic shock was observed, the conservative treatment was contraindicated and direct surgical treatment was performed.Result: A total of 44 pediatric patients were included in the study. The most frequent symptoms observed were paroxysmal abdominal pain (100% of cases and vomiting (72%; only 29% of patients presented with the classic triad of symptoms (abdominal pain, palpable mass and blood stained stools. 28 patients (64% were managed conservatively with ultrasound hydrostatic reduction. 10 patients (23% required primary surgical intervention because of clinical conditions; 6 patients (14% were operated after failure of conservative approach. The total percentage of operated patients was 36%, with lead points identified in 12 cases.Conclusion: Our data confirm that hydrostatic reduction is a simple, real time procedure, free of radiations, non invasive and safe. Age had no impact on the reducibility whereas bloody stool, a prolonged duration of symptoms and the presence of lead point were risk factors of failure.

  7. Intussusception in adults: US and CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, Laura; Azulay, Guillermo; Pfister, Martin; Florenzano, Nestor V.; Vega, Alejandro de la; Serini, Veronica

    2002-01-01

    Ileocolic invagination is the penetration of an ileum segment into the right colon. Four cases of ileocolic intussisception are described by US and CT with its surgical pathologic confirmation. Three different patterns are described by CT which reflect its severity and duration. These are: target, in layers and kidney form. Ultrasound signs are: 'pseudo kidney', 'target' and 'donut crescent' being the latter the only distinctive sign. Flow suggests that the intussusception could be reductable. The presence of fluid in peritoneal cavity could mean ischemia and irreductibility. (author)

  8. Childhood intussusception in Uzbekistan: Analysis of retrospective surveillance data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flem Elmira

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estimates of baseline incidence of childhood intussusception could help safety monitoring after the introduction of rotavirus vaccines. We studied the incidence of intussusception in Uzbekistan, a GAVI-fund eligible state in Central Asia. Methods We retrospectively reviewed intussusception cases in children Results Over a 5-year study period, 67 confirmed cases were identified, of which 67% were boys. The median age was 12 months, and no seasonal trend in the distribution of cases was observed. The diagnostic methods used included abdominal radiography (87% and ultrasonography (57%. Intussusception reduction by air enema was successful in 33 (49% patients and 34 (50% cases underwent surgery. A total of 4 deaths occurred, including 3 deaths in infants aged 0-6 months. The median length of hospital stay was 7.3 (range 0-37 days. The incidence of intussusception is estimated at 23 (95% CI 13.6-32.4 cases per 100,000 child-years, corresponding to approximately 237 cases annually. Conclusions This is the first study to estimate the incidence of childhood intussusception prior to the introduction of the rotavirus vaccination in Uzbekistan. A prospective surveillance system using a standardized case definition is needed in order to better examine the occurrence of intussusception in developing countries.

  9. Intussusception in dogs and cats: A review of 36 cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, Lyndell; Bauer, Michael S.

    1992-01-01

    Intussusception is recognized as a common cause of bowel obstruction in small animals. This study documents the clinical and surgical findings in nine cats and 27 dogs diagnosed as having intussusception. The main purposes of the study were to define the predisposing causes and clinical signs of intussusception and to evaluate various surgical techniques commonly employed in its treatment. No common predisposing cause could be established. Diagnosis of intussusception was based most often on clinical signs of bowel obstruction in association with the palpable abdominal mass. The majority of the intussusceptions involved the enterocolic junction. Formation of adhesions was more frequent in cats. Surgical treatments included simple reduction, manual reduction with plication, intestinal resection/anastomosis, and intestinal resection/anastamosis with plication. There was no statistically significant difference (p>0.05) in the recurrence rate of the intussusceptions when the various surgical techniques were compared. Recurrence of an intussusception was not related to either the bowel segment involved or whether a simple reduction, bowel resection, or intestinal plication was performed at the initial surgery. PMID:17424091

  10. [Adult transient intestinal intussusception: can abdominal CT guide resolution?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabile Ianora, Amato Antonio; Telegrafo, Michele; Lorusso, Valentina; Rella, Leonarda; Niccoli Asabella, Artor; La Porta, Michele; Moschetta, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the adult transient intestinal intussusceptions on CT before and after the administration of gastrointestinal contrast material. We evaluated two different gastrointestinal contrast materials: hyperdense and hypodense. In all cases the gastrointestinal contrast agent solved the invaginations. In the group of patients treated with hypodense contrast medium relapses occurred in the short and long term; no recurrence was observed in the other group. CT is useful in the recognition of intestinal intussusception. The gastrointestinal contrast agent could define the real transience of intussusceptions and hyperdense contrast agent could be more effective in short and long term resolution.

  11. Adult ileocolic intussusception secondary to ileocaecal valve polyp.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chugthai, Saqib Zeeshan

    2012-01-31

    Intussusception is relatively common in children, but it is a rare cause of abdominal pain and intestinal obstruction in adults. The aetiology, clinical presentation and management of this condition differs in adults and children. Preoperative clinical diagnosis is usually difficult due to the non-specific and intermittent nature of the symptoms. Ultrasound and computed tomography can be helpful in establishing the diagnosis. We present a case of adult ileocolic intussusception with classical radiological signs and operative findings. In adults the diagnosis of intussusception should be considered in a case of intermittent abdominal pain, especially with clinical signs of intermittent bowel obstruction.

  12. Jejunojejunal Intussusception Induced by Lipomatous Polyp of Jejunum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayant Kumar Biswal

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Adult intussusception is rare unlike childhood variety where it is the leading cause of intestinal obstruction. Preoperative diagnosis is often difficult as the symptoms are nonspecific and so high index of suspicion is needed for early diagnosis by appropriate investigations. This is a case of 65-year-old man presented with acute intestinal obstruction whose laparotomy revealed a jejunojejunal intussusception secondary to a lipomatous lesion which was successfully treated with resection and primary anastomosis. When dealing with a case of chronic intermittent intestinal obstruction, intussusception must be kept in mind as one of the differential diagnosis.

  13. Ultrasound guided reduction of childhood intussusception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Chong Hyun; Kim, Han Suk

    1986-01-01

    Following on from diagnosis using ultrasound, hydrostatic reduction using saline enema under ultrasound guidance was tried in 20 cases of childhood intussusception. The conclusions were as follows: 1. Success rates of saline enema under ultrasound guidance during a first-8 month period (P1) and a second-10 month period (P2) were 55.6% (5/9) and 54.5% (6/11) respectively. Average success rate was 55% (11/20). 2. During the periods of P1 and P2, no case was reduced by barium enema in 6 cases of failed reduction with saline enema. 3. During the period of P2, 5 cases of successful reduction with saline enema were confirmed by clinical follow-up without barium enema. 4. During the periods of P1 and P2, 9 cases of failed reduction with saline enema were operated, resulting in 6 cases of segmental resection and 3 cases of manual reduction. 5. The obvious advantages of this method are: 1. No radiation hazard. 2. No fear of barium peritonitis. 3. Detection of leading point. 6. With above results, this method could completely replace barium enema. And ultrasonography should be the initial study in the evaluation of intussusception in children and then if necessary, saline enema under ultrasound guidance should be done.

  14. Chronic nonischemic ileo-ileo-colic intussusception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roic, G.; Posaric, V.; Boric, I.; Vrtar, Z.; Cigit, I.

    2005-01-01

    Background. Chronic intussusception is a prolapse of a portion of the bowel into the lumen of an immediately adjacent segment of the bowel; it lasts for 14 days or more. The aim of the article is to present a rare cause of nonacute abdominal pain. Case report. We report about 14-year-old girl who presented with a one-month history of intermittent cramping lower abdominal pain and change in bowel behavior. Plain abdominal x-ray, ultrasonography and CT were performed. Laparatomy revealed an ileo-ileo-colic intusussception (70 cm long); invaginated Meckel's diverticulum was a prevailing anomaly. Conclusions. Atypical clinical presentation of chronic intussusception often results in delayed or inadequate management of such cases because of the lack of suspicion of a correct diagnosis. Preoperative diagnosis of invagination was based on ultrasonography and computed tomography (CT) which proved again as the most effective and useful preoperative diagnostic method. Surgical intervention is always needed in adults and older children because of high incidence of underlying lesions in them. (author)

  15. Intussusception in children seen at Muhimbili National Hospital, Dar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intussusception in children seen at Muhimbili National Hospital, Dar es salaam. ... its magnitude of concern and any seasonal variation in our environment. ... majority of the children present late, >48 hours from the onset of symptoms and ...

  16. Retrograde Jejuno-Jejunal Intussusception after Total Gastrectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Yoneda

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available An eighty-year-old female was transferred to the hospital after experiencing abdominal pain and nausea. She had had a history of total gastrectomy for gastric cancer 14 years previously. Abdominal X-ray revealed a localized expansion of the small bowel. Computed tomography revealed a mass with a lamellar structure in a concentric circle. With a tentative diagnosis of small bowel obstruction due to intussusception, she underwent emergency operation. Laparotomy revealed a retrograde jejuno-jejunal intussusception. Bowel resection was performed due to the severe ischemic damage. All reported intussusception cases after total gastrectomy displayed retrograde characteristics and could occur both during the early and late period after surgery. It is important to consider the possibility of intussusception for patients presenting with acute abdomen who have previously undergone gastric resection.

  17. Intussusception in children: imaging evaluation and therapeutic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, Fabio Motta da; Figueiredo, Sizenildo da Silva; Nobrega, Bruno Barcelos da; Monteiro, Soraya Silveira; Lederman, Henrique Manoel; Oliveira, Galba Leite

    2005-01-01

    Intussusception is a medical emergency that occur with higher frequency in children under 2 years of age. Diagnosis can be difficult as the classical triad of abdominal pain, jelly stools and palpable abdominal mass is seen in less than 50% of the patients. However, the diagnosis of intussusception can be established with variable degree of accuracy using plain abdominal x-ray films, ultrasound, computed tomography or barium (or air/saline) enema. Some of these imaging methods are also useful during treatment of this condition. The authors present a review of the literature and a pictorial essay of the imaging findings in patients with intussusception. In addition, a discussion on the current and controversial issues related to the treatment of intussusception is presented. (author)

  18. Simultaneous intussusception and sigmoid volvulus in a child

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leeba, J.M.; Boas, R.N.

    1986-03-01

    This radiographically documented case of synchronous ileoileocolic intussusception and sigmoid volvulus is without apparent precedence. Etiological factors relevant to each of these conditions are discussed. Reasons for possible underdiagnosis of sigmoid volvulus and simultaneous lesions are included.

  19. Meckel's diverticulum: the lead point of intrauterine intussusception ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Meckel's diverticulum: the lead point of intrauterine intussusception with subsequent intestinal atresia in a newborn. Viet H. Le, Paul A. Perry, Allyson L. Hale, Robert L. Gates, John C. Chandler ...

  20. Recurrent intussusception, coeliac disease and cholelithiasis: A unique combination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinha C

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Authors report an 11-month-old female child, who presented with recurrent episodes of colicky abdominal pain and diarrhea. An abdominal ultrasound revealed small bowel intussusception. She was also noted to have a thick walled gall bladder and a solitary gallstone. Further investigations confirmed the diagnosis of coeliac disease. The combination of small bowel intussusception, coeliac disease and cholelithiasis is unique and has not been reported in the literature.

  1. Time requirement for barium reduction in intussusception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Hye Eun; Kim, Seung Ho; Kang, In Young; Park, Byoung Lan; Kim, Byoung Geun

    1988-01-01

    During the period between January 1985 and December 1987, barium reduction was performed in 146 cases of intussusception who were admitted to Kwangju Christian Hospital. The results were as follows: 1. Success rate to the symptom duration is relatively constant. 2. The success rate in infants with severe dehydration was 50% but it was gradually increased in infants with moderate dehydration and in infants with mild dehydration, 83.3% and 100% respectively. 3. The success rate of 12 cases in severely dehydrated infants with positive dissection sign was 16.7%. 4. The success rate of 15 cases in moderately dehydrated infants with positive dissection sign was 66.7%. 5. The average time requirement for barium reduction was 58.3 minutes. No serious complications were noted during barium reduction, except mild vomiting. 6. With above results, it is desirable that barium reduction should be performed according to the patient's physical status and radiologic findings.

  2. Emergency medicine physicians performed ultrasound for pediatric intussusceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Jung Chang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intussusception is the common acute abdomen in children with difficult clinical diagnosis. The routine ultrasound has recently been proposed as the initial diagnostic modality with high accuracy, but is not available for 24 h by gastroenterologists. We aimed to evaluate the validation of bedside ultrasound for intussusceptions performed by pediatric emergency physicians with ultrasound training during the night or holiday. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted in children with suspected intussusceptions when routine ultrasounds by gastroenterologists were not available over the period from July 2004 to July 2008. Patients were divided into two groups: those diagnosed by emergency physicians with ultrasound training and without training. The clinical characteristics and course for all patients were reviewed and compared for seeking the difference. Results: A total of 186 children were included. One hundred and thirteen (61% children were diagnosed by pediatric emergency physician with ultrasound training. The clinical symptoms were not statistically different between the two groups. The diagnostic sensitivity of the ultrasound training group was significantly higher (90% vs. 79%, p = 0.034. Children of the training group also had significantly shorter hospital stay duration at emergency departments before reduction (2.41 ± 2.01 vs. 4.58 ± 4.80 h, p = 0.002. Conclusion: Bedside ultrasound performed by pediatric emergency physicians with ultrasound training is a sensitive test for detecting intussusceptions. Knowledge and use of bedside ultrasound can aid the emergency physician in the diagnosis of pediatric intussusceptions with less delay in treatment.

  3. US features of transient small bowel intussusception in pediatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji Hye

    2004-01-01

    To describe the sonographic (US) and clinical features of spontaneously reduced small bowel intussusception, and to discuss the management options for small bowel intussusception based on US findings with clinical correlation. During a five years of period, 34 small bowel intussusceptions were diagnosed on US in 32 infants and children. The clinical presentations and imaging findings of the patients were reviewed. The clinical presentations included abdominal pain or irritability (n = 25), vomiting (n 5), diarrhea (n = 3), bloody stool (n = 1), and abdominal distension (n = 1), in combination or alone. US showed multi-layered round masses of small (mean, 1.5 ± 0.3 cm) diameters and with thin (mean, 3.5 ± 1 mm) outer rims along the course of the small bowel. The mean length was 1.8 ± 0.5 cm and peristalsis was seen on the video records. There were no visible lead points. The vascular flow signal appeared on color Doppler images in all 21 patients examined. Spontaneous reduction was confirmed by combinations of US (n = 28), small bowel series (n = 6), CT scan (n = 3), and surgical exploration (n 2). All patients discharged with improved condition. Typical US findings of the transient small bowel intussusception included 1) small size without wall swelling, 2) short segment, 3) preserved wall motion, and 4) absence of the lead point. Conservative management with US monitoring rather than an immediate operation is recommended for those patient with typical transient small bowel intussusceptions. Atypical US findings or clinical deterioration of the patient with persistent intussusception warrant surgical exploration

  4. Intussusception caused by dried apricot: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yana Puckett

    2014-01-01

    CONCLUSION: Bezoars are an extremely rare cause of intussusception in adults. A high level of suspicion needs to exist in the presence of a history of eating dried fruit, history of gastric surgery, diabetes mellitus, and problems with mastication. Various treatment modalities exist to treat obstructions secondary to bezoars, including open reduction and removal of bezoar via enterotomy.

  5. Retrograde pylorogastric intussusception – Case report and review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efrat Avinadav

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A case of gastric outlet obstruction in an infant due to retrograde intussusception of the pylorus into the stomach is presented. This anomaly is extremely rare, with almost no reports in the literature. The patient underwent formal Heineke-Mikulicz pyloroplasty with an uneventful recovery and resumed full enteral feeding.

  6. Endoscopic Diagnosis of Jejuno-Gastric Intussusception | Mwachiro ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jejunogastric intussusception is a rare complication of gastric surgery that is potentially life threatening if it is not diagnosed early. This condition is a surgical emergency and is most commonly seen after gastro-jejunostomy. The authors report a case of an elderly female patient who presented with hematemesis and ...

  7. Chronic Ileocecal Intussusception Secondary to Non-Hodgkins ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chronic intussusception is a distinct clinical entity which is unfortunately poorly recognized due to its atypical presentation. A 5½ year old female patient presented with a 5 month history of abdominal pain associated with occasional vomiting, anorexia and progressive weight loss. 5 days prior to admission she developed ...

  8. Retrograde jejunal intussusception after total gastrectomy: A case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Retrograde jejunal intussusception is a rare disease. A 60‑year‑old female patient was hospitalized due to vomiting for 2 days, with a history of radical gastrectomy plus esophagus jejunum Rouxs‑en‑Y. On examination, there was a palpable wax‑like mass on the left‑hand side underneath the umbilicus. Computerized ...

  9. Retrograde jejunal intussusception after total gastrectomy: A case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-11-02

    Nov 2, 2015 ... Retrograde jejunal intussusception is a rare disease. A 60-year-old female patient was hospitalized due to vomiting for 2 days, with a history of radical gastrectomy plus esophagus jejunum Rouxs-en-Y. On examination, there was a palpable wax-like mass on the left-hand side underneath the umbilicus.

  10. Hydrostatic reduction of intussusception with normal saline using the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hydrostatic reduction of intussusception with normal saline using the gravity aided method in a Nigerian teaching hospital. M.A. Abdulsalam, B.O. Balogun, R.I. Osuoji, O.O. Olofinlade, O.M. Faboya, M.A. Bankole ...

  11. Meckel's diverticulum: the lead point of intrauterine intussusception ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    management of a newborn with intrauterine intussusception of a Meckel's diverticulum as a cause of the vascular malformation leading to ileal atresia. To our knowledge, this is the fifth case report of this phenomenon. In all cases, definitive management required ... dense collection of small bowel and a small rim of proximal.

  12. Seasonality and surgical management of intussusception over 10 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    47.5%of patients had resection and primary anastomosis while 24.0% had manual reduction at laparotomy. Conclusion: Intussusception is one of the most common paediatric surgical emergencies at Harare Central Hospital. The age and sex of patients are the same as those found in literature. In contrast with previous data ...

  13. Acute intussusception in children seen at El Obeid Hospital, Western ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    54.2% of cases had resection and anastomosis for bowel ischaemia, while in 45.8% manual reduction was done. The post-operative mortality was 16.7%. Conclusions: Childhood intussusception was common in male infants from rural areas in the dry season. Late presentation to the surgeon necessitated major operative ...

  14. Jejuno-jejunal intussusception secondary to smallbowel lipomatosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intussusception is usually a disease of children aged between 6 months and 4 years, in which a part of a bowel telescopes into another part of the bowel. We report a case in a 60-year-old man who required resection and anastomosis. Although intussception is unusual in adults, awareness of the differences in symptoms ...

  15. Childhood intussusception at the Moi teaching and referral hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To review the management of childhood intussusception at the Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital, Eldoret and identify factors that require attention for improved outcome. Design: A retrospective descriptive study covering the period January 2000 to December 2003. Setting: Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital, ...

  16. Intussusception in children: Experience with 105 patients in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim. The aim of this study was to present our experience in patients with intussusception (IN). Materials and methods. One hundred and five cases of IN treated between 1991 and 2007 were analysed. Age, gender, symptoms, signs, diagnostic and treatment methods, types of IN including leading point, and postoperative ...

  17. Intussusception in childhood: the role of plain abdominal radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Joo Yun; Kim, Min Joong; Kim, Young Mook; Park, Won Gyu; Ko, Kang Seok; Kim, Se Jong; Park, Byung Ran; Kim, Byong Geun

    1995-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the plain radiologic findings of the childhood intussusception and to evaluate the role of plain abdominal films in predicting the success of air or barium reduction. We retrospectively reviewed 140 cases with the diagnosis of intussusception in childhood. The radiological signs that included soft tissue mass, dilatation of small bowel suggesting obstruction, crescent sign, and target sign were evaluated in terms of frequency. The relationship between radiological findings and outcome of reduction was analyzed. The site of soft tissue mass or crescent sign seen on plain radiographs was correlated with the position of the apex of the intussusceptum seen at the beginning of barium edema. The degree of dilated small bowel was evaluated by calculating the proportion of air-filled small bowel occupying peritoneal cavity and measuring the maximal diameter of dilated bowel lumen. The radiological finding for small bowel obstruction is determined by observation of the degree of small bowel dilatation and/or air-fluid levels. Ninety-two cases out of 140 showed one or more radiographic signs. Two most common signs were soft tissue mass and small bowel obstruction. The success rate of air or barium reduction was significantly lower in patients with most severe degree of dilatation of small bowel and/or more than 7 air-fluid levels on erect view. The suspected location of intussusception on plain radiographs correlated well with the true location of intussusception seen in the first few seconds of barium reduction. Plain abdominal radiography is useful in the diagnosis of intussusception and provides helpful information for the reduction procedure as well as for the exclusion of the contraindications such as bowel perforation

  18. Indications for repeated enema reduction of intussusception in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vujović Dragana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Intussusception is a common abdominal emergency in early childhood. It is idiopathic in more than 90% of cases with incidence of 1.5-4 per 1,000 live births. The treatment of choice is nonoperative hydrostatic or air enema reduction. Objective. The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of clinical presentation and symptom duration in non-operative treatment, considering the indications for delayed enema reduction and its efficacy. Methods. From the total number of 107 patients with intusussception, aged from 2 months to 14 years (median 9 months, 102 (95% patients with ileo-colic intussusceptions were treated initially by ultrasound guided saline enema. Records were reviewed for patients with failed initial treatment and delayed repeated enemas or operative procedure. The predictor variable included duration of presenting symptoms. Results. Successful treatment by hydrostatic saline enemas had 58/102 (57% patients. Success in reduction was greater if symptom duration was 24 hours, (4/45 cases; 9%. Despite failed initial attempts, enema reduction was reattempted in 12 patients, with success in 7/12 (60% patients. Children with symptom duration >24 hours had a greater risk of requiring surgery (41/45 cases; 91%, p<0.001, including 5 (5% patients with ileo-ileal intussusceptions. Conclusion. The accuracy of ultrasound guided saline enema in intussusception reduction is high. Delay in presentation decreases success of non-operative treatment. Delayed enema reduction is important therapeutic option for intussusceptions. Surgical treatment is indicated in cases of complications.

  19. Childhood intussusception in Ile-ife: What has changed?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ademola Olusegun Talabi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intussusception is one of the most common causes of intestinal obstruction in children. While the outcome has improved in the developed nations, the same cannot be said of the developing countries, more especially in the sub-Saharan region. This study aims to review our current experience in the management of childhood intussusception and factors affecting surgical outcome at the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex Ile-Ife. Patients and Methods: This was a retrospective study of 78 patients treated for intussusception at paediatric surgical unit of Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex Ile-Ife between January 1993 and December 2011. The case notes of the patients were retrieved and the following information was recorded: Demographic characteristics, month of occurrence, clinical presentation, investigations, and management as well as the post-operative outcome. The patients were divided into two groups in terms of outcome. Results: There were 58 males and 20 females (M:F = 2.9-1. The age of most of the patients was between 3 months and 9 months with peak incidence at 6 months. Most patients 46 (58.9% were seen during the dry season of December to April. Only six patients (7.7% presented within 24 hours of onset of illness. More than half of the patients presented after 24 hours. Passage of red currant stool, vomiting, abdominal pain, fever, and abdominal distension, passage of watery stool, anal protrusion and palpable abdominal mass in various combinations were the clinical features. All the patients had surgical operations. The most common type of intussusception was ileo-colic type in 64 patients (82.1%. Intestinal resection rate was 41%. The overall mortality rate was 15.4%. Conclusion: There was a delay in presentation of children with intussusception with high post-operative mortality.

  20. Intussusception in children: Comparison between ultrasound diagnosis and operation findings in a tropical developing country

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    Usang E Usang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intussusception is one of the more common causes of intestinal obstruction in children. The diagnosis may be based mainly on clinical features; however, there are no classic signs and symptoms that are common to all cases. This study reports our experience at US diagnosis and operation findings of children with intussusceptions in a tropical developing economy. Materials and Methods: This was an 8 years retrospective review of intussusceptions in children in a tertiary health facility in a tropical developing country from January 2004 to December 2011. Results: Twenty-five out of 41 children (M:F = 2.2:1 admitted with intussusceptions within the period were studied. The median age was 6.0 ± 5.57 months (range 3 months- 7 years. US positively diagnosed intussusceptions in 20 (80% cases. Conclusion: US can increase diagnostic confidence in intussusceptions.

  1. Intussusception due to Peutz-Jeghers syndrome - a case report and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grasso Filho, Luiz Eduardo; Albertotti, Flavio; Carvalho, Claudio Sobral de; Nersessian, Ana Carolina; Docema, Marcos F. Lima; Ogasawara, Aparecida M.; Peng Yong Sheng; Costacurta, Marco Antonio; Albertotti, Cesar Jose; Cerri, Giovanni Guido

    2000-01-01

    The authors report a case of a 28-year-old woman with ileocecocolic intussusception due to Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by hamartomatous polyposis of the gastrointestinal tract and mucocutaneous pigmentation. This condition frequently presents complications such as intestinal obstruction due to invagination or hemorrhage. In this patient, the diagnosis of intussusception was made preoperatively. The excised material revealed three large polyps which were considered to be the cause of the intussusception. (author)

  2. Adult jejunojejunal intussusception - a case report and review of the literature. Radiological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setubal, Roger; Souza, Ricardo Pires de; Endo, Erica; Kataoka, Kazumi; Soares, Aldemir Humberto

    1996-01-01

    The author report a case of jejunojejunal intussusception caused by an adenomatous polyp in an adult. The majority of intussusception's cases occur in children with less than 2 years of age, with only 5% to 15% of cases occurring in adults. In contrast to pediatrics group intussusception, which is idiopathic in 90% of cases, adult intussusception has a demonstrable cause in more than 90% of cases. The pre-operative diagnosis is made by the association between the clinical presentation and plain abdominal radiographs, barium study of small intestine, ultrasound and computed tomography, described and discussed in this paper. (author)

  3. Ileocolic intussusception mimicking the imaging appearance of midgut volvulus as a result of extrinsic duodenal obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasparini, Flavia F.; Navarro, Oscar M.; Manson, David E.; Dasgupta, Roshni; Gerstle, J. Ted; Thorner, Paul S.

    2005-01-01

    Duodenal obstruction caused by ileocolic intussusception in the absence of intestinal malrotation is extremely rare. We present and discuss the imaging findings in an infant with an intussusception secondary to a duplication cyst in whom sonography also showed inversion of the orientation of the mesenteric vessels and a distended stomach. A contrast medium study revealed a proximal duodenal obstruction with a beak appearance suggestive of midgut volvulus. At surgery, an ileocolic intussusception causing duodenal obstruction without concomitant malrotation or volvulus was found. The combination of duodenal obstruction and abnormal relationship of the mesenteric vessels as a result of ileocolic intussusception has not previously been reported in the literature. (orig.)

  4. Ileocolic intussusception mimicking the imaging appearance of midgut volvulus as a result of extrinsic duodenal obstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasparini, Flavia F.; Navarro, Oscar M.; Manson, David E. [University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Ont. (Canada); Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ont. (Canada); Dasgupta, Roshni; Gerstle, J. Ted [University of Toronto, Division of General Surgery, Ont. (Canada); Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ont. (Canada); Thorner, Paul S. [University of Toronto, Division of Pathology, Ont. (Canada); Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ont. (Canada)

    2005-12-01

    Duodenal obstruction caused by ileocolic intussusception in the absence of intestinal malrotation is extremely rare. We present and discuss the imaging findings in an infant with an intussusception secondary to a duplication cyst in whom sonography also showed inversion of the orientation of the mesenteric vessels and a distended stomach. A contrast medium study revealed a proximal duodenal obstruction with a beak appearance suggestive of midgut volvulus. At surgery, an ileocolic intussusception causing duodenal obstruction without concomitant malrotation or volvulus was found. The combination of duodenal obstruction and abnormal relationship of the mesenteric vessels as a result of ileocolic intussusception has not previously been reported in the literature. (orig.)

  5. Presentation of GIST as jejuno-jejunal intussusception

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    Anil Kumar

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs are rare tumour. It comprises 0.2% of gastrointestinal tumours and only 0.04% of small intestinal tumours. Usually this tumour is found in people in their 60s.These tumours can be found anywhere in the gastrointestinal tract but most commonly found in the stomach (40–60%. Patients with GISTs usually have vague and nonspecific symptoms. We present a 17year-old with complain of abdominal pain, distension, and few episodes of vomiting. All laboratory investigations were normal. The ultrasonography (USG and computed tomography (CT were suggestive of jejuno-jejunal intussusception. The patient had emergency exploratory laparotomy with resection of the segment with five cm healthy margin, and end to end anastomosis. Patient was discharged after 4 days and remains well. This case report highlights the rarity of GISTs in the concern of age (17 year old, site (Jejunum as well as presentation (intussusception.

  6. Jejuno-jejunal intussusception in a guinea pig (Cavia porcellus

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    Tara J. Fetzer

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available An approximately four-year-old male castrated guinea pig (Cavia porcellus was presented for painful defecation with a 24-hour history of hyporexia and intermittent episodes of rolling behavior. Upon presentation the patient was quiet, alert, and responsive, and mildly hypothermic. Abdominal palpation revealed an approximately 2-cm long oblong mass within the caudal abdomen. Abdominal radiographs revealed gastric dilation without volvulus and a peritoneal mass effect. The patient was euthanized following gastric reflux of brown malodorous fluid from his nares and oral cavity. A necropsy was performed and revealed a jejuno-jejunal intussusception causing mechanical gastrointestinal ileus, and gastric dilatation without volvulus. While non-obstructive gastrointestinal stasis is common and obstructive ileus is uncommon in guinea pigs, this report shows that intestinal intussusception is a differential in guinea pigs with ileus and gastric dilatation.

  7. Jejunogastric intussusception in a child: A case report

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    Nathan Smith

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Jejunogastric intussusception is a rare event following gastrointestinal reconstruction. We present a case report in which jejunogastric intussuception was diagnosed in a child four years after a gastrectomy with jejunogastric reconstruction for duodenal duplication. Prompt diagnosis and emergent resection of any non-viable bowel, and revision to a Roux-En-Y anastomosis with or without pexy of the Roux limb to the colon or Y-limb mesentery appear to be the appropriate treatment for this clinical entity.

  8. Perforated appendicitis: an underappreciated mimic of intussusception on ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Beverley; Schmitz, Matthew; Gawande, Rakhee; Vasanawala, Shreyas; Barth, Richard [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2014-05-15

    We encountered multiple cases in which the US appearance of ruptured appendicitis mimicked intussusception, resulting in diagnostic and therapeutic delay and multiple additional imaging studies. To explore the clinical and imaging discriminatory features between the conditions. Initial US images in six children (age 16 months to 8 years; 4 boys, 2 girls) were reviewed independently and by consensus by three pediatric radiologists. These findings were compared and correlated with the original reports and subsequent US, fluoroscopic, and CT images and reports. All initial US studies demonstrated a multiple-ring-like appearance (target sign, most apparent on transverse views) with diagnostic consensus supportive of intussusception. In three cases, US findings were somewhat discrepant with clinical concerns. Subsequently, four of the six children had contrast enemas; two were thought to have partial or complete intussusception reduction. Three had a repeat US examination, with recognition of the correct diagnosis. None of the US examinations demonstrated definite intralesional lymph nodes or mesenteric fat, but central echogenicity caused by debris/appendicolith was misinterpreted as fat. All showed perilesional hyperechogenicity that, in retrospect, represented inflamed fat ''walling off'' of the perforated appendix. There were four CTs, all of which demonstrated a double-ring appearance that correlated with the US target appearance, with inner and outer rings representing the dilated appendix and walled-off appendiceal rupture, respectively. All six children had surgical confirmation of perforated appendicitis. Contained perforated appendicitis can produce US findings closely mimicking intussusception. Clinical correlation and careful multiplanar evaluation should allow for sonographic suspicion of perforated appendicitis, which can be confirmed on CT if necessary. (orig.)

  9. Multidrug resistant shigella flexneri infection simulating intestinal intussusception

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    Srirangaraj Sreenivasan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Shigella enteritis remains an important cause of mortality and morbidity in all age groups, in developing as well as developed countries. Owing to the emerging resistance to multiple antibiotics among Shigella spp., it has been recognized as a major global public health concern and warrants constant monitoring of its resistance pattern. We report a case of segmental ileitis caused by non.-ESBL producing multidrug resistant Shigella flexneri in an infant clinically mimicking intussusception, which was effectively treated by ceftriaxone.

  10. Perforated appendicitis: an underappreciated mimic of intussusception on ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, Beverley; Schmitz, Matthew; Gawande, Rakhee; Vasanawala, Shreyas; Barth, Richard

    2014-01-01

    We encountered multiple cases in which the US appearance of ruptured appendicitis mimicked intussusception, resulting in diagnostic and therapeutic delay and multiple additional imaging studies. To explore the clinical and imaging discriminatory features between the conditions. Initial US images in six children (age 16 months to 8 years; 4 boys, 2 girls) were reviewed independently and by consensus by three pediatric radiologists. These findings were compared and correlated with the original reports and subsequent US, fluoroscopic, and CT images and reports. All initial US studies demonstrated a multiple-ring-like appearance (target sign, most apparent on transverse views) with diagnostic consensus supportive of intussusception. In three cases, US findings were somewhat discrepant with clinical concerns. Subsequently, four of the six children had contrast enemas; two were thought to have partial or complete intussusception reduction. Three had a repeat US examination, with recognition of the correct diagnosis. None of the US examinations demonstrated definite intralesional lymph nodes or mesenteric fat, but central echogenicity caused by debris/appendicolith was misinterpreted as fat. All showed perilesional hyperechogenicity that, in retrospect, represented inflamed fat ''walling off'' of the perforated appendix. There were four CTs, all of which demonstrated a double-ring appearance that correlated with the US target appearance, with inner and outer rings representing the dilated appendix and walled-off appendiceal rupture, respectively. All six children had surgical confirmation of perforated appendicitis. Contained perforated appendicitis can produce US findings closely mimicking intussusception. Clinical correlation and careful multiplanar evaluation should allow for sonographic suspicion of perforated appendicitis, which can be confirmed on CT if necessary. (orig.)

  11. Prognostic indicators for failed nonsurgical reduction of intussusception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khorana J

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Jiraporn Khorana,1 Jesda Singhavejsakul,1 Nuthapong Ukarapol,2 Mongkol Laohapensang,3 Jakraphan Siriwongmongkol,1 Jayanton Patumanond4 1Division of Pediatric Surgery, Department of Surgery, 2Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Pediatrics, Chiang Mai University Hospital, Chiang Mai, 3Division of Pediatric Surgery, Department of Surgery, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, 4Center of Excellence in Applied Epidemiology, Thammasat University Hospital, Pathumthani, Thailand Purpose: To identify the risk factors for failure of nonsurgical reduction of intussusception. Methods: Data from intussusception patients who were treated with nonsurgical reduction in Chiang Mai University Hospital and Siriraj Hospital between January 2006 and December 2012 were collected. Patients aged 0–15 years and without contraindications (peritonitis, abdominal X-ray signs of perforation, and/or hemodynamic instability were included for nonsurgical reduction. The success and failure groups were divided according to the results of the reduction. Prognostic indicators for failed reduction were identified by using generalized linear model for exponential risk regression. The risk ratio (RR was used to report each factor. Results: One hundred and ninety cases of intussusception were enrolled. Twenty cases were excluded due to contraindications. A total of 170 cases of intussusception were included for the final analysis. The significant risk factors for reduction failure clustered by an age of 3 years were weight <12 kg (RR =1.48, P=0.004, symptom duration >3 days (RR =1.26, P<0.001, vomiting (RR =1.63, P<0.001, rectal bleeding (RR =1.50, P<0.001, abdominal distension (RR =1.60, P=0.003, temperature >37.8°C (RR =1.51, P<0.001, palpable abdominal mass (RR =1.26, P<0.001, location of mass (left over right side (RR =1.48, P<0.001, poor prognostic signs on ultrasound scans (RR =1.35, P<0.001, and method of reduction (hydrostatic over pneumatic (RR =1

  12. Transient small-bowel intussusceptions in adults: significance of ultrasonographic detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maconi, G.; Radice, E.; Greco, S.; Bezzio, C.; Bianchi Porro, G.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the frequency, clinical significance, and outcome of small-bowel intussusceptions in adults detected using ultrasound in an outpatient setting. Patients and methods: In two different retrospective (January 2001 to April 2003) and prospective (May 2003 to June 2005) periods, 33 small-bowel intussusceptions were found in 32 patients (13 females; mean age: 38.1 years) with known or suspected intestinal disease. Patients underwent diagnostic work-up to assess any organic disease. Patients with self-limiting intussusception were submitted to clinical and ultrasonographic follow-up. Results: Of the 32 patients with small-bowel intussusception, 25 were identified in the prospective series of 4487 examinations (0.53%) and seven in the retrospective series of 5342 examinations (0.15%; p = 0.002). Four patients had persistent and 28 self-limiting intussusceptions. Self-limiting intussusceptions were idiopathic in 11 patients (39%) or associated with organic diseases in 17 (Crohn's disease in 11 patients, celiac disease in three, ulcerative colitis in one patient, and previous surgery for cancer in two). Self-limiting intussusceptions were asymptomatic in 25% of patients. Conclusion: Small-bowel intussusceptions in adults are not rare and are frequently self-limiting, idiopathic, or related to organic diseases, mainly Crohn's disease and coeliac disease

  13. Transient small-bowel intussusceptions in adults: significance of ultrasonographic detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maconi, G. [Chair of Gastroenterology, Department of Clinical Sciences, L. Sacco University Hospital, Milan (Italy)]. E-mail: giovanni.maconi@unimi.it; Radice, E. [Chair of Gastroenterology, Department of Clinical Sciences, L. Sacco University Hospital, Milan (Italy); Greco, S. [Chair of Gastroenterology, Department of Clinical Sciences, L. Sacco University Hospital, Milan (Italy); Bezzio, C. [Chair of Gastroenterology, Department of Clinical Sciences, L. Sacco University Hospital, Milan (Italy); Bianchi Porro, G. [Chair of Gastroenterology, Department of Clinical Sciences, L. Sacco University Hospital, Milan (Italy)

    2007-08-15

    Aim: To investigate the frequency, clinical significance, and outcome of small-bowel intussusceptions in adults detected using ultrasound in an outpatient setting. Patients and methods: In two different retrospective (January 2001 to April 2003) and prospective (May 2003 to June 2005) periods, 33 small-bowel intussusceptions were found in 32 patients (13 females; mean age: 38.1 years) with known or suspected intestinal disease. Patients underwent diagnostic work-up to assess any organic disease. Patients with self-limiting intussusception were submitted to clinical and ultrasonographic follow-up. Results: Of the 32 patients with small-bowel intussusception, 25 were identified in the prospective series of 4487 examinations (0.53%) and seven in the retrospective series of 5342 examinations (0.15%; p = 0.002). Four patients had persistent and 28 self-limiting intussusceptions. Self-limiting intussusceptions were idiopathic in 11 patients (39%) or associated with organic diseases in 17 (Crohn's disease in 11 patients, celiac disease in three, ulcerative colitis in one patient, and previous surgery for cancer in two). Self-limiting intussusceptions were asymptomatic in 25% of patients. Conclusion: Small-bowel intussusceptions in adults are not rare and are frequently self-limiting, idiopathic, or related to organic diseases, mainly Crohn's disease and coeliac disease.

  14. Duodenal intussusception secondary to web presenting as recurrent pancreatitis in a 7-year-old girl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, Long H. [University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Farmington, CT (United States); Kaweah Delta Healthcare District, Graduate Medical Education, Visalia, CA (United States); Villalona, Gustavo A. [Yale School of Medicine, Department of Surgery, Section of Pediatric Surgery, New Haven, CT (United States); SSM Health Cardinal Glennon Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Surgery, St. Louis, MO (United States); Cowles, Robert A. [Yale School of Medicine, Department of Surgery, Section of Pediatric Surgery, New Haven, CT (United States); Silva, Cicero T. [Yale School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Section of Pediatric Radiology, 333 Cedar St., P.O. Box 208042, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Duodenal intussusception is a rare entity in children, with 32 cases reported in the English literature to our knowledge. Most reported cases are associated with endoluminal tubes or polyps, and the presenting symptoms are chronic and nonspecific. We report a case of duodenal intussusception in a 7-year-old girl secondary to a duodenal web and review the imaging findings. (orig.)

  15. Experience with Sonogram-guided hydrostatic reduction of Intussusception in Children in South-West Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogundoyin, Oo; Lawal, Ta; Olulana, DI; Atalabi, Om

    2013-04-01

    Intussusception is a common cause of intestinal obstruction in young children. The diagnosis and treatment of intussusception has evolved over the years with ultrasound being the first choice imaging technique and a major player in the non-operative reduction of intussusception owing to its advantage of reduced morbidity and non-exposure to ionizing radiation when compared to other modalities of treatment. Aim & Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of ultrasound guided hydrostatic reduction in the management of intussusception in children and assess the predictors of reducibility. A prospective study of all infants and children who presented with uncomplicated intussusception was conducted between January, 2005 and September, 2013. The diagnosis of intussusception was made clinically and this was confirmed by an abdominal ultrasonography. Ultrasound guided hydrostatic reduction of intussusception was performed on the selected patients after they were adequately resuscitated. Failed reduction was abandoned in favour of operative reduction in some patients. Data collected included the age of the patients, duration of symptoms and the outcomes of the procedure and these were analyzed. Eighty-four patients with intussusception were treated over this period, 36(42.9%) patients were found suitable for hydrostatic reduction of intussusception. Twenty-four(66.7%) patients presented within 48 hours of onset of symptoms. Twenty-one(58.3%) patients had successful hydrostatic reduction of intussusception while 15(41.7%) patients had failed reduction. The procedure was successful in majority (58%) of the patients under the age of 1 year and one of the three (33%) patients older than one year. Hydrostatic reduction of intussusception was successful in 14 out of 24 patients (58.3%) who presented within 48 hours of onset of symptoms. Hydrostatic reduction of intussusception under ultrasound guidance is an effective and useful conservative method of

  16. Gastroduodenal Intussusception Caused by a Peutz- Jeghers Polyp in a Young Child: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Jae Eun; Cho, Bum Sang; Lee, Seung Young; Jeon, Min Hee; Lee, Ji Hyuk; Lee, Ho Chang; Koo, Ji Hae [Chungbuk National University College of Medicine, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-15

    Gastroduodenal intussusception is a rare condition caused by the prolapse of a gastric tumor with subsequent invagination of a portion of the gastric wall into the duodenum. Various gastric lesions including adenoma, lipoma, leiomyoma, hamartoma, adenocarcinoma, gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), and as in our case a Peutz- Jeghers polyp, can serve as a lead point of intussusception. Only three cases of gastroduodenal intussusception secondary to a Peutz-Jeghers polyp have been reported. We experienced a case of gastroduodenal intussusception in a 36-month-old boy who presented with intermittent nonbilious vomiting, abdominal pain, and anemia. An abdominal ultrasound and contrast enhanced CT scan showed gastrointestinal intussusception and a mass-like lesion in the second portion of duodenum. A laparotomy revealed a 7x8 cm sized mass at the gastric body, which was pathologically confirmed as a Peutz-Jeghers polyp

  17. Concurrent acute appendicitis and ileocolic intussusception in a 1-year-old child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Marjon, MD

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Intussusception and acute appendicitis are part of a differential diagnosis for acute abdominal pain and vomiting in the pediatric population. We describe a unique case combining appendiceal intussusception with concurrent acute appendicitis, or “appendi-sception.” A 1-year-old boy presented with 1 day of fussiness, vomiting, and red, gelatinous stool. Initial diagnosis on ultrasound was a routine ileocolic intussusception with nonvisualization of the appendix. However, after a failed air enema decompression, the patient was taken to the operating room where the appendix was discovered to be inflamed within the intussusceptum. This case is unique as few cases of both conditions occurring simultaneously have been previously described. It is important for radiologists to be aware of this combination of diagnoses as both require urgent evaluation and prompt treatment. Keywords: Intussusception, Appendicitis, Appendiceal intussusception, Pediatric radiology

  18. [A Case of Small Intestinal Metastasis with Intussusception Due to Barium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujio, Gen; Nagahara, Hisashi; Nakao, Shigetomi; Fukuoka, Tatsunari; Shibutani, Masatsune; Maeda, Kiyoshi; Matsutani, Shinji; Kimura, Kenjiro; Toyokawa, Takahiro; Amano, Ryosuke; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Muguruma, Kazuya; Yashiro, Masakazu; Hirakawa, Kosei; Ohira, Masaichi

    2017-11-01

    A 48-year-old man noticed nausea and took health examination. After chest X-ray and gastrointestinal barium study was underwent, he was referred to our hospital because of abnormal shadow in the chest X-ray. CT scan revealed about 4 cm tumor in the hilum of left lung and target sign in the small intestine. He was diagnosed with intussusception and emergency operation was performed. During the laparotomy, we found 2 intussusceptions in the small intestine and we performed manual reduction using Hutchinson's maneuver. We confirmed the mass in oral side of the intussusception site but we did not confirmed any tumor in anal of the intussusception. This suggests the intussusception was caused by barium. Finally 3 small intestine tumor was observed and we resected and reconstructed each of the tumor. Histopathological examination showed small intestinal metastasis from pleomorphic carcinoma of the lung.

  19. Ileocaecal Intussusception with a Lead Point: Unusual MDCT Findings of Active Crohn’s Disease Involving the Appendix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru Ozan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult intussusception is a rare entity accounting for 1% of all bowel obstructions. Unlike intussusceptions in children, which are idiopathic in 90% of cases, adult intussusceptions have an identifiable cause (lead point in the majority of cases. Crohn’s disease (CD may affect any part of the gastrointestinal tract, including the appendix. It was shown to be a predisposing factor for intussusception. Here, we report a rare case of adult intussusception with a lead point, emphasizing diagnostic input of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT in a patient with active CD that involves the appendix.

  20. Active surveillance for intussusception in a phase III efficacy trial of an oral monovalent rotavirus vaccine in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Jacob; Kawade, Anand; Rongsen-Chandola, Temsunaro; Bavdekar, Ashish; Bhandari, Nita; Taneja, Sunita; Antony, Kalpana; Bhatnagar, Veereshwar; Gupta, Arun; Kabra, Madhulika; Kang, Gagandeep

    2014-08-11

    Post licensure studies have identified an increased risk of intussusception following vaccination with currently licensed rotavirus vaccines, raising safety concerns generic to all rotavirus vaccines. We describe the surveillance for intussusception in a phase III clinical trial with an oral monovalent rotavirus vaccine developed from the neonatal 116E strain. Using broad screening criteria and active surveillance, the incidence of intussusception between 6 weeks and 2 years of age was measured in 4532 children who received three doses of vaccine and 2267 children who received a placebo in the clinical trial. Possible intussusceptions were evaluated with a screening ultrasonogram. An independent intussusception case adjudication committee reviewed all intussusceptions and graded them on Brighton Collaboration criteria for diagnostic certainty. We identified twenty-three intussusceptions on ultrasound from 1361 evaluated sentinel events. Eleven were of level 1 diagnostic certainty as determined by the independent intussusception case adjudication committee. None required surgical intervention, and the earliest identified intussusception was at 36 days following the third dose in a placebo recipient. Among vaccine recipients the first event of intussusception occurred 112 days after the third dose. The incidence of ultrasound-diagnosed intussusception was 200/100,000 child-years (95% CI, 120, 320) among those receiving the vaccine and 141/100,000 child-years (95% CI, 50, 310) among those receiving the placebo. The incidence rate of confirmed intussusception among vaccine recipients was 94/100,000 child-years (95% CI, 41, 185) and 71/100,000 child-years (95% CI, 15, 206) among those receiving the placebo. In this licensure study, 23 cases of intussusception were identified through an active surveillance system, but there was no temporal association with rotavirus vaccination. The use of active surveillance with broad criteria intended for ensuring safety of children

  1. Gastro-oesophageal intussusception in a young German Shepherd Dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werthern, C.J. von; Montavon, P.M.; Fluckiger, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    A gastro-oesophageal intussusception in a female, six-week-old German shepherd dog was treated surgically with success. The dog was presented with acute dyspnoea and signs of shock. After laparotomy, the herniated organs were reduced from the lumen of the oesophagus into the abdomen and an imbrication of the oesophageal hiatus, an appositional fundoplication and a left-sided incisional fundopexy were performed. The dog made an uneventful recovery. Eighteen months after surgery the dog is still alive, with no clinical signs despite the persistent presence of megaoesophagus

  2. Limited utility of plain abdominal radiographs in evaluating intussusceptions secondary to long indwelling feeding tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult intussusception (AI is relatively rare and can be a difficult clinical diagnosis, often requiring cross-sectional imaging for confirmation. Unfortunately, intussusceptions in the setting of indwelling long enteral feeding tubes have been predominantly characterized in the pediatric population with minimal investigation in adults. We report three cases of AI in patients with long feeding catheters serving as anatomic lead points leading to intussusception diagnosed on cross-sectional imaging. We highlight the limited utility of the supine plain films for detection of AI, and it behooves the radiologist to hold a high index of suspicion if the patient has a long enteral catheter. Since the majority of these patients tend to be fairly ill and unable to stand for upright abdominal radiographs, in the setting of percutaneous feeding tubes, decubitus abdominal radiographs should always be obtained. These cases also highlight the importance of having a high clinical suspicion of intussusceptions in a patient presenting with abdominal pain in the setting of an enteral feeding tube. In post-operative patients, other factors can predispose the patient to intussusception, including adhesions. Another interesting feature in tube related AI is the reverse intussusception that may be seen with indwelling enteral tubes. Reverse intussusception is where the distal bowel telescopes into the proximal segment over the tube.

  3. Fluoroscopy-guided hydrostatic reduction of intussusception in infancy: role of pharmacological premedication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Francesco; Ambrosio, Concetta; De Fronzo, Simona; Panico, Maria Rita; D'Aprano, Marilena; Giugliano, Anna Marcella; Noviello, Domenico; Oresta, Patrizia

    2015-06-01

    Intussusception is one of the most common causes of paediatric emergency. Fluoroscopy-guided hydrostatic reduction is a common nonoperative management strategy for the treatment of intussusception. The role of pharmacological premedication in increasing the success rate of hydrostatic reduction is still controversial. The purpose of this study was to verify the presence of a possible correlation between pharmacological premedication and the percentage of hydrostatic reduction of intussusception in paediatric patients. This study considered children with a diagnosis of idiopathic intussusception treated at our hospital between January 2007 and June 2013. One group of patients underwent hydrostatic reduction by barium enema without any preliminary therapy. A second group of patients received pharmacological premedication with both a sedative and an anti-oedematous agent before the procedure. A total of 398 patients were treated with barium enema for therapeutic purposes. In the group of patients who received no premedication (n = 254), 165 (65 %) children achieved hydrostatic reduction of the intussusception. Among the patients who received pharmacological premedication prior to barium enema (n = 144), 122 (85 %) children achieved resolution of the intussusception. Our study shows that the use of pharmacological premedication is effective for the reduction of the intussusception, as its limit patient stress, fluoroscopic time and radiation dose.

  4. [Post-licensure passive safety surveillance of rotavirus vaccines: reporting sensitivity for intussusception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Vilar, S; Díez-Domingo, J; Gomar-Fayos, J; Pastor-Villalba, E; Sastre-Cantón, M; Puig-Barberà, J

    2014-08-01

    The aims of this study were to describe the reports of suspected adverse events due to rotavirus vaccines, and assess the reporting sensitivity for intussusception. Descriptive study performed using the reports of suspected adverse events following rotavirus vaccination in infants aged less than 10 months, as registered in the Pharmacovigilance Centre of the Valencian Community during 2007-2011. The reporting rate for intussusception was compared to the intussusception rate in vaccinated infants obtained using the hospital discharge database (CMBD), and the regional vaccine registry. The adverse event reporting rate was 20 per 100,000 administered doses, with the majority (74%) of the reports being classified as non-serious. Fever, vomiting, and diarrhea were the adverse events reported more frequently. Two intussusception cases, which occurred within the first seven days post-vaccination, were reported as temporarily associated to vaccination. The reporting sensitivity for intussusception at the Pharmacovigilance Centre in the 1-7 day interval following rotavirus vaccination was 50%. Our results suggest that rotavirus vaccines have, in general, a good safety profile. Intussusception reporting to the Pharmacovigilance Centre shows sensitivity similar to other passive surveillance systems. The intussusception risk should be further investigated using well-designed epidemiological studies, and evaluated in comparison with the well-known benefits provided by these vaccines. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Type A Dissection Involving Intimo-Intimal Intussusception Through the Aortic Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Trygve; Armour, Sarah; Reddy, Pingle; Brinster, Derek

    2015-07-15

    The presentation, evaluation, management, and outcome of a case of type A circumferential dissection involving repeated retrograde intussusception of the intimal flap through the aortic valve is described in this case report. Fewer than 20 intimo-intimal intussusception cases have been described since the first report was published by Hufnagel in 1962, and outcomes have typically been poor because of delays in diagnosis. This case shows the potential for a positive outcome when the diagnosis of intimo-intimal intussusception is entertained and confirmed early in the course of treatment. Preoperative computed tomography and intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography were essential in diagnosis and operative planning.

  6. Intussusception secondary to Meckel's diverticulum in a 3-month-old girl. Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Camacho-Guerrero

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A 3-month-old female patient is presented, with ileo-ileal intussusception secondary to Meckel's diverticulum. The patient underwent emergency surgery due to a diagnosis of intestinal obstruction secondary to intussusception. Resumen: Se reporta caso de paciente femenino de 3 meses de edad, con una intususcepción intestinal íleo-ileal secundario a divertículo de Meckel, intervenida quirúrgicamente de urgencia por diagnóstico de obstrucción intestinal secundario a una invaginación intestinal. Keywords: Intussusception, Meckel's diverticulum, Palabras clave: Intususcepción intestinal, Divertículo Meckel

  7. Jejunal intussusception in a 10-year-old boy with blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beluffi, Giampiero [Section of Paediatric Radiology, Department of Radiodiagnosis, IRCCS Policlinico S. Matteo, Piazzale Golgi, 2, 27100, Pavia PV (Italy); Romano, Piero; Matteotti, Chiara; Minniti, Silvio; Ceffa, Franco [Division of Paediatric Surgery, IRCCS Policlinico S. Matteo, Pavia (Italy); Morbini, Patrizia [Department of Pathology, IRCCS Policlinico S. Matteo, Pavia (Italy)

    2004-09-01

    Jejunal intussusception in a Chinese 10-year-old boy affected by the blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome is presented and discussed. The syndrome is rare, sporadically found with possible dominant inheritance, and due to a gene mutation mapped on the short arm of chromosome 9. It presents with distinctive cutaneous and gastrointestinal malformations together with possible other organ involvement. Gastrointestinal malformations tend to bleed and lead to anaemia. Infrequent complications of the gastrointestinal malformations are volvulus, intestinal infarction and intussusception. The age of the patient and the jejunal intussusception precipitated by a vascular malformation containing calcifications (which were also found in different gut segments) make this case remarkable. (orig.)

  8. Jejunal intussusception in a 10-year-old boy with blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beluffi, Giampiero; Romano, Piero; Matteotti, Chiara; Minniti, Silvio; Ceffa, Franco; Morbini, Patrizia

    2004-01-01

    Jejunal intussusception in a Chinese 10-year-old boy affected by the blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome is presented and discussed. The syndrome is rare, sporadically found with possible dominant inheritance, and due to a gene mutation mapped on the short arm of chromosome 9. It presents with distinctive cutaneous and gastrointestinal malformations together with possible other organ involvement. Gastrointestinal malformations tend to bleed and lead to anaemia. Infrequent complications of the gastrointestinal malformations are volvulus, intestinal infarction and intussusception. The age of the patient and the jejunal intussusception precipitated by a vascular malformation containing calcifications (which were also found in different gut segments) make this case remarkable. (orig.)

  9. Tuberculosis in a renal allograft recipient presenting with intussusception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, A; Basu, G; Sen, I; Asirvatham, R; Michael, J S; Pulimood, A B; John, G T

    2012-01-01

    Extra-pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is more common in renal allograft recipients and may present with dissemination or an atypical features. We report a renal allograft recipient with intestinal TB presenting 3 years after transplantation with persistent fever, weight loss, diarrhea, abdominal pain and mass in the abdomen with intestinal obstruction. He was diagnosed to be having an ileocolic intussusception which on resection showed a granulomatous inflammation with presence of acid-fast bacilli (AFB) typical of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In addition, AFB was detected in the tracheal aspirate, indicating dissemination. He received anti-TB therapy (ATT) from the fourth postoperative day. However, he developed a probable immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) with multiorgan failure and died on 11(th) postoperative day. This is the first report of intestinal TB presenting as intussusception in a renal allograft recipient. The development of IRIS after starting ATT is rare in renal allograft recipients. This report highlights the need for a high index of suspicion for diagnosing TB early among renal transplant recipients and the therapeutic dilemma with overwhelming infection and development of IRIS upon reduction of immunosuppression and starting ATT.

  10. Intussusception in children: Hydrostatic reduction under US guidance - own experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roik, D.; Brzewski, M.; Biejat, A.; Marcinski, M.

    2008-01-01

    Intussusception in children is a common abdominal emergency. Recent years have brought a New promising method of nonsurgical invagination treatment, hydrostatic reduction under sonographic (US) guidance. The major advantage of this method is lack of the ionized radiation. The aim of our study is to asses the safety and effectiveness of hydrostatic reduction under US guidance used as a first choice method of invagination treatment in our department. >From July 2006 to December 2007, 33 procedures of hydrostatic reduction under US guidance were performed in 27 children, aged from 7 months to 6 years and 10 months. The procedure was performed in US room by radiologist and surgeon with the use of self-constructed set for saline enema. The sedation of patient was routinely performed. The initial procedure was effective in 23 patients (pts) (85%). In 5 pts the recurrence of intussusception occurred and in 3 of them next attempt of the reduction was successful. In 4 cases the initial procedures failed, and those children were operated. Total amount of 6 pts underwent an operation. We do not observe any complications connected with the procedure. Hydrostatic reduction of children intusussception under US-guidance is safe and effective method. Our initial results meet the recommended limits of successful reduction rates. It encouraged us to evaluation and further implementation of this method. Water enema is a first choice method of invagination treatment in our hospital. (authors)

  11. Intussusception of the small intestine caused by a primary melanoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoneveld, M; De Vogelaere, K; Van De Winkel, N; Hoorens, A; Delvaux, G

    2012-01-01

    Although the gastrointestinal tract is a fairly frequent site of melanoma metastases, reports of small bowel intussusception caused by melanoma are very rare. We report the case of a 77-year-old man who was admitted to our hospital with epigastric pain, melena and anaemia. After clinical examination, laboratory evaluation and radiological work-up the diagnosis of a jejunal intussusception was made. Exploratory laparoscopy revealed a large tumour arising from the jejunum, approximately 20 cm distal to the angle of Treitz. Small bowel resection with an end-to-end anastomosis was performed. Histological examination showed an intestinal melanoma. There are different theories concerning the origin of malignant melanoma in the small bowel. Although the small and large intestines normally contain no melanocytes, these cells have occasionally been found in the alimentary and respiratory tracts and even in lymph nodes, which supports the theory of a primary origin of melanoma at these sites. Since this was a solitary intestinal lesion and there was no history of cutaneous melanoma, we conclude that this could be an example of a very rare primary melanoma of the small intestine.

  12. Intussusception of the Small Intestine Caused by a Primary Melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schoneveld

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the gastrointestinal tract is a fairly frequent site of melanoma metastases, reports of small bowel intussusception caused by melanoma are very rare. We report the case of a 77-year-old man who was admitted to our hospital with epigastric pain, melena and anaemia. After clinical examination, laboratory evaluation and radiological work-up the diagnosis of a jejunal intussusception was made. Exploratory laparoscopy revealed a large tumour arising from the jejunum, approximately 20 cm distal to the angle of Treitz. Small bowel resection with an end-to-end anastomosis was performed. Histological examination showed an intestinal melanoma. There are different theories concerning the origin of malignant melanoma in the small bowel. Although the small and large intestines normally contain no melanocytes, these cells have occasionally been found in the alimentary and respiratory tracts and even in lymph nodes, which supports the theory of a primary origin of melanoma at these sites. Since this was a solitary intestinal lesion and there was no history of cutaneous melanoma, we conclude that this could be an example of a very rare primary melanoma of the small intestine.

  13. A Rare Cause of Acute Abdomen: Diagnosis and Management of Adult Colonic Intussusception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sertkaya, Mehmet; Emre, Arif; Pircanoglu, Eyüp Mehmet; Yazar, Fatih Mehmet; Tepe, Murat; Cengiz, Emrah; Isler, Ali; Vicdan, Halit

    2016-01-01

    Intussusception in adults is very rarely seen, and this cause acute abdomen. A computed tomography (CT) scan, clinical suspicion, history, and a physical examination are important for the diagnosis. We present two cases of colonic intussusceptions induced by lipoma. The cases had similar locations, diagnoses, and management. Both lipomas were located close to the cecum in the ascending colon, and a right segmental colon resection was performed in both cases. The follow-up of both cases was uneventful. Although benign lesions can cause colonic intussusception, the high incidence of malignancy in colonic lesions should always be considered. Therefore, oncologic surgical procedures should be applied. The definitive diagnosis can be made by histopathology. Sertkaya M, Emre A, Pircanoglu EM, Yazar FM, Tepe M, Cengiz E, Isler A, Vicdan H. A Rare cause of Acute Abdomen: Diagnosis and Management of Adult Colonic Intussusception. Euroasian J Hepato-Gastroenterol 2016;6(2):179-182.

  14. Ileocecal Burkitt's Lymphoma Presenting as Ileocolic Intussusception With Appendiceal Invagination and Acute Appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Mine Wang

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Intussusception is a common cause of abdominal pain in children. Although most cases are idiopathic, about 10% of cases have a pathologic lead point. Burkitt's lymphoma is not a common etiology. Burkitt's lymphoma might present primarily as intussusception in children but has rarely been associated with appendicitis. We report a case in which a 10-year-old obese boy who initially presented with acute appendicitis due to ileocolic intussusception with appendiceal invagination. He underwent one-trocar laparoscopy and antibiotic treatment. The symptoms recurred 10 days after discharge. Colonoscopy disclosed ileocecal Burkitt's lymphoma as the pathological lead point. This case emphasizes the importance of the age of the patient and the anatomic location of the intussusception related to possible etiology, and hence the most appropriate surgical procedure.

  15. Jejunojejunal Intussusception due to Metastatic Melanoma Seven Years after the Primer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Giakoustidis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal intussusception in adults is a rare medical condition accounting for less than 5% of all intussusceptions. Herein we present a 45-year-old patient with a history of abdominal pain and loss of weight. CT scan revealed jejunojejunal intussusceptions. The patient was subjected to exploratory operation and small intestine resection due to a mass causing intestinal intussusception. Pathology confirmed suspected diagnosis of metastatic melanoma to small intestine secondary to melanoma, 7 years after the initial manifestation. Postoperative evaluation with 18FDG-PET/CT revealed increased uptake in the thyroid gland. Subsequent total thyroidectomy revealed severe Hashimoto thyroiditis and no signs of metastasis. The patient received adjuvant immunotherapy and is healthy with no signs of recurrence 3 years after the initial diagnosis and treatment.

  16. Efficacy of US-guided Hydrostatic Reduction in Children with Intussusception

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Min; Chung, Tae Woong; Yoon, Woong; Chang, Nam Kyu; Heo, Suk Hee; Shin, Sang Soo; Lim, Hyo Sun; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Kang, Heoung Keun [Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-15

    To assess the success rate and efficacy of US-guided hydrostatic reduction in children with intussusception. We retrospectively evaluated the ultrasonographic findings and clinical features of 121 children (M:F=80:41, mean age= 18 months) who underwent US-guided hydrostatic reduction between November, 2002 and February, 2007 for the diagnosis and treatment of intussusception. The 121 patients underwent 147 procedures, including recurred cases. Successful reduction was achieved in 132 cases (89.8% success rate), as confirmed by post-procedure ultrasonography and clinical findings. Emergency operations were performed in the 10 (6.8%) cases of irreducible intussusceptions, 8 of ileocolic type and 2 of ileoileal type. Perforation occurred in 4 cases (2.7%), and seizure in 1 case during the procedure (0.7%). US-guided hydrostatic reduction is a safe and effective tool for the diagnosis and treatment of pediatric intussusception

  17. Validation of clinical case definition of acute intussusception in infants in Viet Nam and Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bines, Julie E; Liem, Nguyen Thanh; Justice, Frances; Son, Tran Ngoc; Carlin, John B; de Campo, Margaret; Jamsen, Kris; Mulholland, Kim; Barnett, Peter; Barnes, Graeme L

    2006-07-01

    To test the sensitivity and specificity of a clinical case definition of acute intussusception in infants to assist health-care workers in settings where diagnostic facilities are not available. Prospective studies were conducted at a major paediatric hospital in Viet Nam (the National Hospital of Pediatrics, Hanoi) from November 2002 to December 2003 and in Australia (the Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne) from March 2002 to March 2004 using a clinical case definition of intussusception. Diagnosis of intussusception was confirmed by air enema or surgery and validated in a subset of participants by an independent clinician who was blinded to the participant's status. Sensitivity of the definition was evaluated in 584 infants agedclinical features consistent with intussusception but for whom another diagnosis was established (234 infants in Hanoi; 404 in Melbourne). In both locations the definition used was sensitive (96% sensitivity in Hanoi; 98% in Melbourne) and specific (95% specificity in Hanoi; 87% in Melbourne) for intussusception among infants with sufficient data to allow classification (449/533 in Hanoi; 50/51 in Melbourne). Reanalysis of patients with missing data suggests that modifying minor criteria would increase the applicability of the definition while maintaining good sensitivity (96-97%) and specificity (83-89%). The clinical case definition was sensitive and specific for the diagnosis of acute intussusception in infants in both a developing country and a developed country but minor modifications would enable it to be used more widely.

  18. Intestinal Obstruction Caused by Ileocolic and Colocolic Intussusception in an Adult Patient with Cecal Lipoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana Casiraghi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Intussusception is a rare clinical entity in adults (<1% of intestinal obstructions. Colonic intussusception is even rarer, particularly when caused by lipomas. Case Presentation. A 47-year-old woman presented to our emergency department complaining of abdominal pain with vomiting and diarrhoea. X-ray and CT showed bowel obstruction due to ileocolonic and colocolonic intussusception; a giant colonic lipoma (9 × 4 × 4 cm was recognizable immediately distally to the splenic flexure of the colon. The patient underwent emergency laparotomy and right hemicolectomy. Assessment of the resected specimen confirmed the diagnosis of giant colonic polypoid lesion near to the ileocecal valve, causing a 12 cm long intussusception with moderate ischemic damage. Conclusion. Colonic obstruction due to intussusception caused by lipomas is a very rare condition that needs urgent treatment. CT is the radiologic modality of choice for diagnosis (sensitivity 80%, specificity near 100%; since the majority of colonic intussusceptions are caused by primary adenocarcinoma, if the etiology is uncertain, the lesion must be interpreted as malignant and extensive resection is recommended. At present, surgery is the treatment of choice and determines an excellent outcome.

  19. Intestinal Obstruction Caused by Ileocolic and Colocolic Intussusception in an Adult Patient with Cecal Lipoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casiraghi, Tiziana; Masetto, Alessandro; Beltramo, Massimo; Girlando, Mauro; Di Bella, Camillo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction . Intussusception is a rare clinical entity in adults (<1% of intestinal obstructions). Colonic intussusception is even rarer, particularly when caused by lipomas. Case Presentation . A 47-year-old woman presented to our emergency department complaining of abdominal pain with vomiting and diarrhoea. X-ray and CT showed bowel obstruction due to ileocolonic and colocolonic intussusception; a giant colonic lipoma (9 × 4 × 4 cm) was recognizable immediately distally to the splenic flexure of the colon. The patient underwent emergency laparotomy and right hemicolectomy. Assessment of the resected specimen confirmed the diagnosis of giant colonic polypoid lesion near to the ileocecal valve, causing a 12 cm long intussusception with moderate ischemic damage. Conclusion . Colonic obstruction due to intussusception caused by lipomas is a very rare condition that needs urgent treatment. CT is the radiologic modality of choice for diagnosis (sensitivity 80%, specificity near 100%); since the majority of colonic intussusceptions are caused by primary adenocarcinoma, if the etiology is uncertain, the lesion must be interpreted as malignant and extensive resection is recommended. At present, surgery is the treatment of choice and determines an excellent outcome.

  20. [Henoch-Schönlein Purpura Presenting as Intussusception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Keun Young

    2017-06-25

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is systemic vasculitis disease with various clinical manifestations. Gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with HSP are usually common, with an incidence rate of 62-90%. Most of these gastrointestinal symptoms occur after typical skin purpura, which is a very important clinical evidence for making a diagnosis of HSP. It is difficult to diagnose HSP without skin rash. About 25% of patients may experience gastrointestinal symptoms as their first symptoms. Herein, we report a case of ileo-colic intussusception associated with HSP in a 5-years-old girl presented with diffuse abdominal distension. Our patient did present any symptoms of HSP, such as purpura, arthralgia or arthritis, before surgery.

  1. Baseline incidence of intussusception in early childhood before rotavirus vaccine introduction, the netherlands, january 2008 to december 2012

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gadroen, Kartini; Kemmeren, Jeanet M.; Bruijning-Verhagen, P. C.; Straus, Sabine M J M; Weibel, Daniel; de Melker, Hester E.; Sturkenboom, M. C.

    2017-01-01

    Intussusception is a rare, potentially life-threatening condition in early childhood. It gained attention due to an unexpected association with the first rotavirus vaccine, RotaShield, which was subsequently withdrawn from the market. Across Europe, broad variations in intussusception incidence

  2. Baseline incidence of intussusception in early childhood before rotavirus vaccine introduction, the Netherlands, January 2008 to December 2012.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gadroen, Kartini; Kemmeren, Jeanet M; Bruijning-Verhagen, Patricia Cj; Straus, Sabine Mjm; Weibel, Daniel; de Melker, Hester E; Sturkenboom, Miriam Cjm

    2017-01-01

    Intussusception is a rare, potentially life-threatening condition in early childhood. It gained attention due to an unexpected association with the first rotavirus vaccine, RotaShield, which was subsequently withdrawn from the market. Across Europe, broad variations in intussusception incidence

  3. [An easy, safe and affective method for the treatment of intussusception: ultrasound-guided hydrostatic reduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ülger, Fatma Esra Bahadır; Ülger, Aykut; Karakaya, Ali Erdal; Tüten, Fatih; Katı, Ömer; Çolak, Mustafa

    2014-03-01

    Intussusception is one of the important causes of intestinal obstruction in children. Hydrostatic reduction under ultrasound guidance is a popular treatment method for intussusception. In the present study, we aimed to explain the demographic characteristics of and treatment approaches in patients diagnosed with intussusception by ultrasound. Forty-one patients diagnosed with intussusception by ultrasound between August 2011 and May 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. Twenty-four of these patients who had no contraindications had been treated with ultrasound-guided hydrostatic reduction. Twenty-four of the patients were male and 17 were female, a 1.4/1 male-to-female ratio. The majority of the patients were between the ages of 6-24 months and 2-5 years. The mean age was 31.12±26.32 months (range 3-125). Patients were more frequently diagnosed in April and May. Seventeen patients who had clinical contraindications enrolled directly for surgery. In 20 of the 24 patients who underwent ultrasound-guided hydrostatic reduction, reduction was achieved. Three experienced recurrence. In two of these patients, successful reduction was achieved with the second attempt. The remaining patient was enrolled for surgery. Hydrostatic reduction was performed 26 times on these 24 patients, and in 22, success was achieved (84.6%). No procedure-related complications occurred in the patients. Ultrasound-guided hydrostatic reduction, with its high success rates and lack of radiation risk, should be the first choice therapeutic approach for children diagnosed with intussusception.

  4. [Heterotopic pancreas as a cause of intussusception: first case reported in Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazán Zender, Carlos; Reyes Coloma, Luis; León Cueto, José Luis; Revoredo Palacios, Giancarlo; Arias Stella Castillo, Javier; Pezo, Alonso

    2015-01-01

    The heterotopic pancreas (HP) is a rare condition in the pediatric population. HP cases involving an ileal intussusception are rare in children and very rarely reported, usually presenting with symptoms of intestinal obstruction. We report the case of a one year old male patient with a chronic history of anorexia, irritability, abdominal pain, accompanied by intermittent episodes of "currant jelly" stools that evolved to rectal bleeding. The patient presented a concomitant diagnosis of allergic colitis, which prolonged the effective surgical treatment at an external health center. In the abdominal CT scan, the classic "target" sign was found. In the exploratory laparotomy an ileoileal intussusception was confirmed, a mass was found that the histopathology laboratory confirmed as HP. To our knowledge, it is the first case of pediatric intussusception by HP reported in Peru.

  5. Reduction of intussusception by air insufflation in children: recent three-year experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, In Jae; Lim, Hyo Keun; Lee, Kyung Hwan; Yun, Ku Sub; Seo, Gwy Suk; Bae, Sang Hoon

    1994-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate success and perforation rates of pneumatic reduction and to find the predictors of reduction failure. We reviewed 224 cases of pediatric intussusception diagnosed by air-enema between July, 1989 and June, 1992. The mean age was 9.8 months(range, 1 month to 3 years). Logistic regression analysis was used to find predictors of reduction failure. Successful reduction was achieved in 197 cases(87.9% of success rate). Bowel perforation occurred in two cases(0.9% of perforation rate). There were two statistically significant predictors of failure;(1) ileoileocolic intussusception(ρ < .001), (2) long duration of symptom (ρ < .001). Surgery was performed in 26 cases (11.6%), of which seven required bowel resection. Pneumatic reduction is a useful means in the management of pediatric intussusception with a high success rate and no mortality

  6. Synchronous adenocarcinomas of the colon presenting as synchronous colocolic intussusceptions in an adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chuang-Wei

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Intussusception is uncommon in adults. To our knowledge, synchronous colocolic intussusceptions have never been reported in the literature. Here we described the case of a 59-year-old female of synchronous colocolic intussusceptions presenting as acute abdomen that was diagnosed by CT preoperatively. Laparotomy with radical right hemicolectomy and sigmoidectomy was undertaken without reduction of the invagination due to a significant risk of associated malignancy. The final diagnosis was synchronous adenocarcinoma of proximal transverse colon and sigmoid colon without lymph nodes or distant metastasis. The patient had an uneventful recovery. The case also emphasizes the importance of thorough exploration during surgery for bowel invagination since synchronous events may occur.

  7. Invaginated meckel's diverticulum: A rare cause of small intestine intussusception in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rana, N. A.; Rathore, M. O.; Khan, M. U.

    2013-01-01

    Intussusception is commonly seen in infants. It is occasionally found in adults usually due to carcinomas, colonic diverticuli, polyps and rarely Meckel's diverticulum. An adult male presented with upper abdominal pain, nausea, anorexia and loose stools. The initial investigative workup was unremarkable and patient responded to treatment given for acute gastroenteritis. After 3 days, the pain recurred in right iliac fossa with rebound tenderness and leukocytosis. Surgery was performed with provisional diagnoses of acute appendicitis and/or acute Meckel's diverticulitis. Per-operative findings revealed invaginated Meckel's diverticulum causing non-obstructing intussusception. (author)

  8. Antegrade bowel intussusception after remote Whipple and Puestow procedures for treatment of pancreas divisum

    OpenAIRE

    Gigena, Manuel; Villar, Hugo V; Knowles, Negar G; Cunningham, John T; Outwater, Erik K; Leon Jr, Luis R

    2007-01-01

    To date, antegrade intussusception involving a Roux-en-Y reconstruction has been reported only once. We report a case of acute bowel obstruction due to an intussusception involving two Roux-en-Y limbs in a 40-year-old woman with a history of chronic pancreatitis due to pancreas divisum. Four years preceding this event, the patient had undergone a Whipple procedure, and three years prior to that, a Puestow operation. The patient was successfully treated with bowel resection and a side-to-side ...

  9. Antegrade bowel intussusception after remote Whipple and Puestow procedures for treatment of pancreas divisum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigena, Manuel; Villar, Hugo V; Knowles, Negar G; Cunningham, John T; Outwater, Erik K; Leon, Luis R

    2007-11-28

    To date, antegrade intussusception involving a Roux-en-Y reconstruction has been reported only once. We report a case of acute bowel obstruction due to an intussusception involving two Roux-en-Y limbs in a 40-year-old woman with a history of chronic pancreatitis due to pancreas divisum. Four years preceding this event, the patient had undergone a Whipple procedure, and three years prior to that, a Puestow operation. The patient was successfully treated with bowel resection and a side-to-side anastomosis between the most distal aspect of the bowel and the most distal Roux-en-Y reconstruction, which preserved both Roux-en-Y reconstructions.

  10. Ultrasound-guided hydrostatic reduction of intestinal intussusception: description of three cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Hanemann Kim

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available With the objective of reporting the technique of ultrasound-guided hydrostatic reduction of intestinal intussusception, three cases with confirmed diagnosis of the disease submitted to reduction with this technique are described. All cases had successful reductions with no complications. One patient experienced a recurrence of the invagination eight days after treatment, which was surgically corrected. The technique of hydrostatic reversal of intestinal intussusception guided by ultrasound may be used in place of the conventional barium enema, since it is a minimally invasive and safe method, with high rates of success and few complications.

  11. Effective dose at pneumatic reduction of paediatric intussusception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heenan, S.D.; Kyriou, J.; Fitzgerald, M.; Adam, E.J.

    2000-01-01

    AIM: The purpose of this study was to assess screening times and resulting dose implication at pneumatic reduction of intussusception in the paediatric age group and to examine the relationship with the outcome of the procedure. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the case notes and departmental records of 143 children who had undergone a total of 153 pneumatic reductions in our department over a 4-year period. Success rates, screening times and available dose-area products (DAP) were recorded. The DAPs were converted to effective dose (ED) for 77 procedures. RESULTS: A 76.5% (117/153) success rate was achieved with a recurrence rate of 6.5% and only one complication: a perforation. Screening times were recorded in 137 reductions and ranged from 15 s to 22.6 min. Although the longest screening time was associated with an unsuccessful outcome, the second longest time of 21 min was successful. This gave a DAP of 1278 cGy cm 2 and an ED of 12.73 mSv, which is equivalent to approximately 400 abdominal films for a 1-year-old. A lifetime risk of fatal cancer of one in 1000 was achieved, assuming the worst case, after a screening time of 30 min on our conventional fluoroscopy unit. CONCLUSION: Our success rate compares well with other centres. Our institution is a tertiary referral centre and the occasional long screening time may reflect the delay and complex nature of the patients referred. Persistence at air reduction may be successful and the success rate increases with delayed attempts but the risks of the increasing radiation burden must be weighed against the risks of emergency surgery and anaesthesia. Heenan, S.D. (2000)

  12. Understanding about diagnosis of acute small bowel retrograde intussusception in adults by means of 64-slice-spinal CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Ruizhou; Chen Jincheng

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To have a further study of the value of MSCT in diagnosing acute small bowel retrograde intussusception in adults by means of 64-slice-spinal CT. Methods: A 46-year-old female patient with the history of abdominal operation was found having acute mechanical small bowel obstruction through plain X-ray radiograph. 64-slice MSCT was performed afterwards (plain scan + 3 stage contrast scans). Hence, evidence is provided for operation. Results: Using the technique of MSCT for the patient can promptly approach the diagnosis of jejuno-jejunal intussusception with severe bowel obstruction; no small bowel tumor or other organic lesion found in this case. With the patient who has the history of abdominal operations, MSCT can predict the reason of adhesion causing bowel intussusception, and provide the evidence for operation; whereas MSCT with contrast media offers a further investigation of the blood supply to the bowels through SMA, and observation of blood circulation through the intussuscepting site, which represents venous congestion of intussusception. This case is a retrograde small bowel intussusception and confirmed with operation evidence. A greater amount of gas and fluid is accumulated between the dilated space of middle-distal portion of intussusceptum and intussuscipiens. Nevertheless, less gas at the proximal portion and that can be an important sign for retrograde intussusception. Conclusion: MSCT is a good choice of examination for diagnosis of adult's intussusception. As the literature mentioned the advantages of MSCT for observing the circulation of intussusceptum and whether the diagnosis is antegrade or retrograde intussusception is also essential. (authors)

  13. Intussusception due to a cecal duplication cyst: a rare cause of acute abdomen. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corroppolo, M; Zampieri, N; Erculiani, E; Cecchetto, M; Camoglio, F S

    2007-01-01

    Duplications of the alimentary tract are rare congenital anomalies. The ileum is the most common site, whereas rectal, duodenal, gastric and cecal duplications are extremely rare. Duplication cysts of the cecum, in a neonate, are even rarer, with only 19 cases reported in medical literature to date. We report a case of intestinal intussusception due to a cecal duplication cyst.

  14. [Intestinal intussusception due to ileal gastrointestinal stromal tumor--a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrei, S; Andrei, A; Tonea, A; Andronesi, D; Preda, C; Herlea, V; Popescu, I

    2011-01-01

    Intestinal occlusion due to intussusception produced by intestinal tumors is a very rare condition. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are also rare digestive neopasias, with an impredictable malignant behavior, which are usually growing outside the intestinal wall, being rarely the initiators of an intestinal intussusception. We present the case of a 59 years old female, admitted in our hospital to elucidate the etiology of her iron deficient anaemia, which developed an intestinal occlusion at the intestinal preparation for colonoscopy. The abdominal CT scan performed in emergency conditions highlighted occlusive intestinal tumor complicated with intestinal intussusception. We performed an emergency laparotomy that revealed intestinal occlusion due to ileo-ileal intussusception produced by an ileal tumor. The surgical intervention consisted in segmental ileal enterectomy including the tumor with latero-lateral entero-enteral anastomosis. The patient recovered without complications. The histopathological and immunohisto-chemical examinations established the diagnose of gastro-intestinal stromal tumor with high risk malignant behavior, therefore the patient was guided in the oncological department for specific treatment and oncological surveillance.

  15. Sarcomatoid Carcinoma of the lung: A rare case of three small intestinal intussusceptions and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Romano

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: There are rare reports of small intestinal intussusceptions caused by metastatic lung carcinosarcoma, this presentation shows the third case in literature. Physicians should be more alert to symptoms or signs indicating GI metastais in patients with a history of lung cancer.

  16. Ultrasound-guided hydrostatic reduction of intussusception with saline: Safe and effective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadağ, Çetin Ali; Abbasoğlu, Latif; Sever, Nihat; Kalyoncu, Meltem Kaba; Yıldız, Abdullah; Akın, Melih; Candan, Mustafa; Dokucu, Ali İhsan

    2015-09-01

    The study was undertaken to assess the efficacy of ultrasound-guided saline enema in reducing intussusception and to determine the role of age and duration of symptoms on this event. The case records of patients who were treated for intussusception at our institutions over the past 10 years were retrospectively analyzed. A total of 419 patients were treated for intussusception and 375 of them were included into the study. Patients were excluded if they had symptoms and signs of acute abdominal disease and required surgery as an initial treatment. Hydrostatic reduction was successful in 313 of the 375 patients (83.46%). The procedure-related complication rate was nil. There were 29 episodes of recurrences in 23 patients, and recurrence rates did not differ between patients who responded to hydrostatic reduction and those who required surgery. Younger age [median (range); 11 months (3-108 months) vs. 20 months (1-180 months); phydrostatic reduction. Ultrasound-guided hydrostatic reduction is an easy, safe and effective method for the treatment of intussusception in the absence of acute abdominal findings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Laparoscopy-assisted hydrostatic in situ reduction of intussusception: A reasonable alternative?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. S. S. Chandrasekharam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate an alternative way of reducing intussusceptions under laparoscopic guidance. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective observational study of children who underwent laparoscopy-assisted hydrostatic in situ reduction of intussusceptions (LAHIRI. Under general anesthesia with laparoscopic vision, warm saline was infused into the rectum with a 16-18 F Foley catheter and a drip set till the intussusception was reduced. Results: Eleven patients [age 7.8 (±2.8 months] were operated over a period of 1 year. Ten (90.9% patients had ileocolic intussusception, which got completely reduced, but one (9% had ileo-ileocolic intusussception, in whom manual reduction by extending the subumbilical incision was required to reduce the ileoileal part. The mean duration of surgery was 38.5 (±6.6 min. No patient had bowel ischemia and there were no intra- or postoperative complications. Conclusions: LAHIRI appears to be an effective and safe technique in children. Specific advantages are that it is performed in a controlled environment in the operating room, avoids patient apprehension and discomfort, avoids bowel handling, provides a safe opportunity to create higher intraluminal pressure, ensures visual assessment of bowel vascularity and completeness of reduction.

  18. Ileocolic intussusception due to a cecal endometriosis: Case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Rivkine

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cecal endometriosis and ileocolic intussusception due to a cecal endometriosis is extremely rare. We report a case of a woman who presented an ileocecal intussusception due to a cecal endometriosis. The patient gave two months history of chronic periombilical pain requiring regular hospital admission and analgesia. The symptoms were not related to menses. A laparotomy was performed and revealed an ileocolic intussusception. The abdominal exploration did not find any endometriosis lesion. Ileocaecal resection was performed. Microscopic examination showed a cystic component, lined by a regular cylindric epithelium. Foci of endometrial tissu were oberved in the cecal subserosa and muscularis mucosal, with irregular endometrial glands lined by cylindric epithelium without atypia immunostained with CK7, and characteristic endometrial stroma immunostained with CD10. Cecal endometriosis and ileocolic intussusception due to a cecal endometriosis is extremely rare. Diagnose of etiology remains challenging due to the absence of clinical and radiological specific characteristics. Virtual slide The virtual slide(s for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/2975867306869166

  19. A randomized trial of pneumatic reduction versus hydrostatic reduction for intussusception in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiaolong; Wu, Yang; Wang, Qi; Zhao, Yiyang; Chen, Guobin; Xiang, Bo

    2017-08-08

    Data of randomly controlled trials comparing the hydrostatic and pneumatic reduction for intussusception in pediatric patients as initial therapy are lacking. The aim of this study was to conduct a randomly controlled trial to compare the effectiveness and safety of the hydrostatic and pneumatic reduction techniques. All intussusception patients who visited West China Hospital of Sichuan University from January 2014 to December 2015 were enrolled in this study in which they underwent pneumatic reduction or hydrostatic reduction. Patients were randomized into ultrasound-guided hydrostatic or X-ray-guided pneumatic reduction group. The data collected includes demographic data, symptoms, signs, and investigations. The primary outcome of the study was the success rate of reduction. And the secondary outcomes of the study were the rates of intestinal perforations and recurrence. A total of 124 children with intussusception who had met the inclusion criteria were enrolled. The overall success rate of this study was 90.32%. Univariable analysis showed that the success rate of hydrostatic reduction with normal saline (96.77%) was significantly higher than that of pneumatic reduction with air (83.87%) (p=0.015). Perforation after reduction was found in only one of the pneumatic reduction group. The recurrence rate of intussusception in the hydrostatic reduction group was 4.84% compared with 3.23% of pneumatic reduction group. Our study found that ultrasound-guided hydrostatic reduction is a simple, safe and effective nonoperative treatment for pediatric patients suffering from intussusceptions, and should be firstly adopted in the treatment of qualified patients. Therapeutic study TYPE OF STUDY: Prospective study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The diagnostic role of abdominal CT imaging findings in adults intussusception: Focused on the vascular compromise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sung Bin; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Kim, Ah Young; Lee, Seung Soo; Kim, Hye Jin; Park, Beom Jin; Jin, Yong Hyun; Park, Seong Ho; Kim, Kyoung Won

    2007-01-01

    Intussusception is defined as telescoping of one segment of the gastrointestinal tract into an adjacent one. Unlike that in children, adult intussusception is a relatively rare condition. More than 90% of patients with adult intussusception have been reported to have an organic cause, with benign or malignant tumors for accounting for approximately 65% of the cases. In general, the diagnosis is easily made by means of computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The imaging appearance of a bowel-within-bowel configuration with or without contained fat and mesenteric vessels, is pathognomonic. As the intussusceptum enters into the intussuscipiens, the mesentery is carried forward and trapped between the overlapping layers of bowel. The twisting or severe constriction of the mesenteric vessels may result in vascular compromise with subsequent edematous thickening of the involved bowel. In these circumstances, ischemic necrosis may develop if timely intervention is not undertaken. Therefore, determination of the presence or absence of intestinal necrosis in intussusception is important in patient management. On CT, the presence of well-known diagnostic CT criteria for strangulated obstruction (especially severe engorgement or twisting of the mesenteric vessels) as well as evidence of loss of the layered pattern, accumulation of extraluminal fluid collection, and bowel perforation, may suggest the diagnosis of intestinal necrosis. CT and MR imaging are limited in determining the primary disease causing intussusception. However, CT and MR provide excellent pre-operative evaluation, including the possible extension and/or dissemination of a malignant tumor. CT and MR imaging may also be useful in suggesting the presence of vascular compromise

  1. Metastatic osteosarcoma to the small bowel with resultant intussusception: a case report and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L.; Stein-Wexler, Rebecca; West, Danel C.

    2003-01-01

    Intussusception resulting from osteosarcoma metastasis to the small bowel is a rare diagnosis. This case report describes a patient with this diagnosis, demonstrates the CT appearance of this lesion, and reviews the literature. (orig.)

  2. Intussusception in children: imaging evaluation and therapeutic approach; Intussuscepcao em criancas: avaliacao por metodos de imagem e abordagem terapeutica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, Fabio Motta da; Figueiredo, Sizenildo da Silva; Nobrega, Bruno Barcelos da; Monteiro, Soraya Silveira; Lederman, Henrique Manoel [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem]. E-mail: brunoradiol@hotmail.com; Oliveira, Galba Leite [Irmandade Santa Casa de Misericordia de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem

    2005-05-15

    Intussusception is a medical emergency that occur with higher frequency in children under 2 years of age. Diagnosis can be difficult as the classical triad of abdominal pain, jelly stools and palpable abdominal mass is seen in less than 50% of the patients. However, the diagnosis of intussusception can be established with variable degree of accuracy using plain abdominal x-ray films, ultrasound, computed tomography or barium (or air/saline) enema. Some of these imaging methods are also useful during treatment of this condition. The authors present a review of the literature and a pictorial essay of the imaging findings in patients with intussusception. In addition, a discussion on the current and controversial issues related to the treatment of intussusception is presented. (author)

  3. Compound double ileoileal and ileocecocolic intussusception caused by lipoma of the ileum in an adult patient: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Krasniqi, Avdyl S; Hamza, Astrit R; Salihu, Lulzim M; Spahija, Gazmend S; Bicaj, Besnik X; Krasniqi, Selvete A; Kurshumliu, Fisnik I; Gashi-Luci, Lumturije H

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Introduction The initial diagnosis of intussusception in adults very often can be missed and cause delayed treatment and possible serious complications. We report the case of an adult patient with complicated double ileoileal and ileocecocolic intussusception. Case presentation A 46-year-old Caucasian man was transferred from the gastroenterology service to the abdominal surgery service with severe abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. An abdominal ultrasound, barium enema, and abdom...

  4. Giant ileal inflammatory fibroid polyp: a rare cause of intestinal intussusception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Cury Ogata

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Ileal inflammatory fibroid polyp is a rare non-neoplastic lesion of the gastrointestinal tract. Intussusception caused by an inflammatory fibroid polyps is uncommon. The authors report a case of a 75 year-old female patient presenting with ileal obstruction due to intussusception of a polypoid lesion. The patient underwent surgical treatment and histopathology confirmed the diagnosis.Os pólipos fibroides inflamatórios são raras lesões não neoplásicas do trato gastrointestinal e a intussuscepção devido a essa entidade é incomum. Os autores relatam um caso de paciente do sexo feminino, 75 anos, que apresentou obstrução ileal devido a uma intussuscepção por lesão polipoide. A paciente foi submetida a tratamento cirúrgico, sendo diagnosticado pólipo fibroide inflamatório do íleo.

  5. A rare case of primary lymphoma of the caecum presenting as intussusception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leena Jayabackthan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphomas are rare neoplasms. They are most common in the stomach followed by small intestine and colon. The symptoms are nonspecific and generally do not present with intussusception. Here we report a rare clinical entity in which a 35-year-old female presented to the emergency with severe abdominal pain which was sudden in onset. History revealed that she had been having vague mild abdominal pain for 2 years. Ultrasonography showed ileocolic intussusception with hypoechoic lesion of 54 × 46 mm seen at the lead point. Emergency laparotomy with the right hemi-colectomy was done. The specimen was sent for histopathological examination which revealed a diagnosis of MALT lymphoma. Awareness of the varied clinical presentation helps in formulating the appropriate therapeutic strategy.

  6. Double Intussusception in a Shih-Tzu Puppy: The Triple-Circle Sign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Kim, S. S. Kang1, G. Kim and S. H. Choi*

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Intussusception is a common surgical disorder in puppies. Double intussusception (DI however, is an extremely rare form of this pathology. The authors report a case of a 3-month-old, Shih-Tzu puppy referred to Veterinary Medical Center of Chungbuk National University, Korea with symptoms of abdominal discomfort, intermittent vomiting and bloody diarrhea for 5 days. Ultrasonographic examination of the left mid-abdominal region revealed a mass with a ‘triple case’ sign completely different from the classic ‘target sign’. The surgical intervention confirmed it to be an ileocecal DI in ascending colon. The case emphasizes the rare ‘triple case’ sign as a descriptive finding on ultrasonography in DI presentations.

  7. Validation of clinical case definition of acute intussusception in infants in Viet Nam and Australia.

    OpenAIRE

    Bines, JE; Liem, NT; Justice, F; Son, TN; Carlin, JB; de Campo, M; Jamsen, K; Mulholland, K; Barnett, P; Barnes, GL

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the sensitivity and specificity of a clinical case definition of acute intussusception in infants to assist health-care workers in settings where diagnostic facilities are not available. METHODS: Prospective studies were conducted at a major paediatric hospital in Viet Nam (the National Hospital of Pediatrics, Hanoi) from November 2002 to December 2003 and in Australia (the Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne) from March 2002 to March 2004 using a clinical case definition ...

  8. Metastatic melanoma causing double small intestinal intussusception: diagnosis by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bortolucci, G.; Garcia, M.; Dalcim, L.; Dias, I.; Teshirogi, E.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Metastases from malignant melanoma to the gastrointestinal tract are uncommon. Often found in jejunum and ileum, they are responsible for up to 7% of complications pre mortem. These metastases manifest with bleeding, perforation, obstruction or intussusception and require immediate surgery. Intussusception is a rare finding in the report described and is presented in a double into distinct segments. History and Physical Examination: M.H.C.S, female, 50 years, presenting 3 cm ulcerated lesion in the calcaneous region of the right foot with two years of evolution, no signs of infection or neoplastic permeation shores. Surgical excision of the lesion was performed and histopathologic analysis showed non-classifiable malignant melanoma. Submitted material to immunohistochemistry showed that markers of antigens Melan A and HMB45 positive, favoring the diagnosis of malignant melanoma. Tumor resection with expanding margins and selective inguinal lymphadenectomy through the technique of sentinel node, with rates equal to V Clark and Breslow thickness of 1.3 cm. Patient presented with acute abdominal obstruction treated surgically. Despite an uneventful post-operative, brain metastases developed, and patient is currently undergoing chemotherapy. Complementary Exams: Contrasted abdominal CT showing distension of the small bowel and an image suggestive of double intussusception. Treatment and Results: Indicated that laparotomy confirmed the presence of double intussusception in small intestine, the first being 110 cm from the angle of Treitz with a palpable tumor mass and dilatation of the upstream and the second character equal to 220 cm of the same, treated with bowel resection followed by end anastomosis. The diagnosis of malignant melanoma was confirmed by immunohistochemical analysis of surgical specimens. Discussion/Conclusion: Metastatic lesions in the gastrointestinal tract are often asymptomatic or nonspecific. The diagnosis should be

  9. Idiopathic megaoesophagus and intermittent gastro-oesophageal intussusception in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Geffen, C; Saunders, J H; Vandevelde, B; Van Ham, L; Hoybergs, Y; Daminet, S

    2006-08-01

    An eight-month-old domestic shorthair cat was presented with chronic vomiting for three months, with an acute increase in frequency during the past two days. A diagnosis of megaoesophagus was made by chest radiography. Diagnostic work-up for megaoesophagus was performed. A gastro-oesophageal intussusception was identified during endoscopy. Medical and nutritional therapy was instituted with a good response to the treatment.

  10. Intussusceptions as acute abdomen caused by Burkitt lymphoma: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Hoxha, Faton T; Hashani, Shemsedin I; Krasniqi, Avdyl S; Kurshumliu, Fisnik I; Komoni, Driton S; Hasimja, Shpresa M; Maxhuni, Mehmet

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Burkitt's lymphoma is a highly malignant, aggressive and rapidly growing B-cell neoplasm, which has low long-term survival rates. The abdomen is the most frequent onset site of non endemic Burkitt's lymphoma. Symptoms are often misleading and make diagnosis difficult. Ileum intussusception as acute abdomen caused by Burkitt lymphoma is rare. Case presentation We are presenting a case of a 16 year-old male with acute abdomen, which three weeks prior initially has been surgically t...

  11. Simultaneous occurrence of intussusception and duodenal haematoma in a patient with Glanzmann's thrombasthenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iftikhar Ahmad Jan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Glanzmann's thrombasthenia (GT is a rare autosomal recessive disorder in which the platelets have anomalies of fibrinogen receptors causing bleeding tendencies. The disease usually presents with mucosal bleeding, petechial haemorrhages or gastrointestinal (GI bleeding. Only sporadic cases of intussusception or duodenal haematoma have been reported with GT. We present a case of 5-year-old girl admitted with non-bilious vomiting, watery diarrhoea and abdominal pain. She is a known patient of Glanzmann's thrombasthenia.

  12. Enema reduction of intussusception: the success rate of hydrostatic and pneumatic reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorana, Jiraporn; Singhavejsakul, Jesda; Ukarapol, Nuthapong; Laohapensang, Mongkol; Wakhanrittee, Junsujee; Patumanond, Jayanton

    2015-01-01

    Intussusception is a common surgical emergency in infants and children. The incidence of intussusception is from one to four per 2,000 infants and children. If there is no peritonitis, perforation sign on abdominal radiographic studies, and nonresponsive shock, nonoperative reduction by pneumatic or hydrostatic enema can be performed. The purpose of this study was to compare the success rates of both the methods. Two institutional retrospective cohort studies were performed. All intussusception patients (ICD-10 code K56.1) who had visited Chiang Mai University Hospital and Siriraj Hospital from January 2006 to December 2012 were included in the study. The data were obtained by chart reviews and electronic databases, which included demographic data, symptoms, signs, and investigations. The patients were grouped according to the method of reduction followed into pneumatic reduction and hydrostatic reduction groups with the outcome being the success of the reduction technique. One hundred and seventy episodes of intussusception occurring in the patients of Chiang Mai University Hospital and Siriraj Hospital were included in this study. The success rate of pneumatic reduction was 61% and that of hydrostatic reduction was 44% (P=0.036). Multivariable analysis and adjusting of the factors by propensity scores were performed; the success rate of pneumatic reduction was 1.48 times more than that of hydrostatic reduction (P=0.036, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.03-2.13). Both pneumatic and hydrostatic reduction can be performed safely according to the experience of the radiologist or pediatric surgeon and hospital setting. This study showed that pneumatic reduction had a higher success rate than hydrostatic reduction.

  13. Intussusception reduction: Effect of air vs. liquid enema on radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, Summer L.; Edgar, J.C.; Anupindi, Sudha A.; Zhu, Xiaowei [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Magill, Dennise; Felice, Marc A. [University of Pennsylvania, Environmental Health and Radiation Safety, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2017-10-15

    Both air and radiopaque liquid contrast are used to reduce ileocolic intussusception under fluoroscopy. Some suggest air lowers radiation dose due to shorter procedure times. However, air enema likely lowers radiation dose regardless of fluoroscopy time due to less density over the automatic exposure control cells. We test the hypothesis that air enema reduction of ileocolic intussusception results in lower radiation dose than liquid contrast enema independent of fluoroscopy time. We describe a role for automatic exposure control in this dose difference. We retrospectively evaluated air and liquid intussusception reductions performed on a single digital fluoroscopic unit during a 26-month period. We compared patient age, weight, gender, exam time of day and year, performing radiologist(s), radiographic image acquisitions, grid and magnification use, fluoroscopy time and dose area product. We compared categorical and continuous variables statistically using chi-square and Mann-Whitney U tests, respectively. The mean dose area product was 2.7-fold lower for air enema, 1.3 ± 0.9 dGy.cm{sup 2}, than for liquid, 3.5 ± 2.5 dGy.cm{sup 2} (P<0.005). The mean fluoroscopy time was similar between techniques. The mean dose area product/min was 2.3-fold lower for air, 0.6 ± 0.2 dGy.cm{sup 2}/min, than for liquid, 1.4 ± 0.5 dGy.cm{sup 2}/min (P<0.001). No group differences were identified in other measured dose parameters. Fluoroscopic intussusception reduction using air enema uses less than half the radiation dose of liquid contrast enema. Dose savings are independent of fluoroscopy time and are likely due to automatic exposure control interaction. (orig.)

  14. Gastrointestinal torsions and intussusception in northern koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) at San Diego Zoo (1976-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce-Zuniga, Nicole M; Roesler, Jennifer; Andrus, Chris Hamlin; Sutherland-Smith, Meg; Rideout, Bruce A; Pye, Geoffrey W

    2014-03-01

    The recent classification as threatened status of the northern koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) by the Australian Government highlights the importance of the conservation and health management of this iconic Australian marsupial. This case series describes gastrointestinal torsion and intussusception in six northern koalas (three males, three females, 2-11 yr old) at the San Diego Zoo from 1976 to 2012. Two koalas died shortly after presentation. Diagnoses of ileocecal intussusception, resulting from enteritis in one case and cecal torsion in the other, were made at postmortem examination. One koala died 4 days after an exploratory laparotomy, with negative findings, and an acute double colonic intussusception was diagnosed at postmortem examination. Two small intestinal mesenteric torsion and one proximal colon mesenteric torsion cases were successfully corrected surgically. In the case of colonic mesenteric torsion, the koala had recurrent clinical signs 2 wk later, and a second surgery requiring resection and anastomosis of ischemic jejunum was performed, with the koala dying shortly afterward. One koala with small intestinal torsion had a recurrence of torsion 22 mo later and subsequently died. The koala with the second case of small intestinal torsion remains alive 14 mo postsurgical correction. All six koalas presented with signs of colic that included anorexia, lethargy, depression, acute abdominal distension, abdominal stretching, decreased fecal output, open-mouth gasping, or a combination of symptoms. Abdominal radiographs may show stacked gastrointestinal linear gas patterns and contrast stasis. Prevalence of torsion and intussusception is low at this institution (2%), although recurrence in individuals is common (50%) and overall survival is poor (83%), which emphasizes the importance of timely recognition, surgical correction, and postoperative management. While inciting etiologies were unable to be determined in these cases, monitoring generalized

  15. Rectal intussusception and unexplained faecal incontinence: findings of a proctographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinson, R; Cunningham, C; D'Costa, H; Lindsey, I

    2009-01-01

    The aetiology of faecal incontinence is multifactorial, yet there remains an approach to assessment and treatment that focusses on the sphincter. Rectal intussusception (RI) is underdiagnosed and manifests primarily as obstructed defecation. Yet greater than 50% of these patients admit to faecal incontinence on closer questioning. We aimed to evaluate the incidence of RI at evacuation proctography selectively undertaken in the evaluation of patients with faecal incontinence. Patients with faecal incontinence seen in a pelvic floor clinic were evaluated with anorectal physiology and ultrasound. Where the faecal incontinence was not fully explained by physiology and ultrasound, evacuation proctography was undertaken. Studies were classified as 'normal', 'low-grade RI' (recto-rectal), 'high-grade RI' (recto-anal) or 'anismus'. Forty patients underwent evacuation proctography (33 women, 83%). Median age was 63 years (range 34-77 years). Seven patients (17%) had a normal proctogram. Three (8%) had recto-rectal RI. Twenty-five (63%) demonstrated recto-anal RI. Five patients (12%) had anismus. Recto-anal intussusception is common in patients undergoing selective evacuation proctography for investigation of faecal incontinence. The role of recto-anal intussusception in the multifactorial aetiology of faecal incontinence has been largely overlooked. Evacuation proctography should be considered as part of routine work-up of patients with faecal incontinence.

  16. Endoglin inhibition leads to intussusceptive angiogenesis via activation of factors related to COUP-TFII signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruslan Hlushchuk

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis is a highly coordinated, extremely complex process orchestrated by multiple signaling molecules and blood flow conditions. While sprouting mode of angiogenesis is very well investigated, the molecular mechanisms underlying intussusception, the second mode of angiogenesis, remain largely unclear. In the current study two molecules involved in vascular growth and differentiation, namely endoglin (ENG/CD105 and chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II (COUP-TFII were examined to unravel their specific roles in angiogenesis. Down- respectively up-regulation of both molecules tightly correlates with intussusceptive microvascular growth. Upon ENG inhibition in chicken embryo model, formation of irregular capillary meshwork accompanied by increased expression of COUP-TFII could be observed. This dynamic expression pattern of ENG and COUP-TFII during vascular development and remodeling correlated with formation of pillars and progression of intussusceptive angiogenesis. Similar findings could be observed in mammalian model of acute rat Thy1.1 glomerulonephritis, which was induced by intravenous injection of anti-Thy1 antibody and has shown upregulation of COUP-TFII in initial phase of intussusception, while ENG expression was not disturbed compared to the controls but decreased over the time of pillar formation. In this study, we have shown that ENG inhibition and at the same time up-regulation of COUP-TFII expression promotes intussusceptive angiogenesis.

  17. Acute enteritis or gastroenteritis in young dogs as a predisposing factor for intestinal intussusception: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rallis, T S; Papazoglou, L G; Adamama-Moraitou, K K; Prassinos, N N

    2000-10-01

    Various types of intestinal intussusception were diagnosed in 29 of 220 young dogs with acute enteritis or gastroenteritis, due to canine parvovirus (85 cases) or presumably to other infectious agents, inflammation or less common hypermotility and metabolic derangements (135 cases). As the other causes of the disease were excluded, acute enteritis or gastroenteritis was considered to be the most likely predisposing factor for the intestinal intussusception. The most common type of intussusception was found to be the ileocolic. Of the 21 dogs that underwent surgical resection and anastomosis of the intestine, 18 dogs recovered completely and three died due to complications. The high survival rate was due to the effective pre-operative, surgical and post-operative therapy.

  18. Incidentally detected small intestine intussusception caused by primary small intenstine carcinoma on {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun Jong; Oh, So Won; Kim, Yu Kyeong [Dept. of Nuclear MedicineSeoul Metropolitan Government - Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    Small intestine intussusception in adults is a rare condition mainly caused by primary or metastatic small intestine malignancy. Here, we present a 72-year-old male patient who was diagnosed with small intestine cancer that was presented as small intestine intussusception on hybrid {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT). The patient was initially referred for an abnormality on a chest radiography and severe anemia. FDG PET/CT showed the lung lesion in the right upper lobe of lung as a high FDG uptake mass. Accidentally, FDG PET demonstrated another intense hypermetabolic intraluminal lesion in the small intestine accompanied with intussusception shown as a circumferential hypermetabolic wall. By pathologic examination, the patient was diagnosed as primary small intestine cancer with lung metastasis. This case highlights usefulness of hybrid FDG PET/CT to identify unexpected malignancy.

  19. Retrospective hospital based surveillance of intussusception in children in a sentinel paediatric hospital: benefits and pitfalls for use in post-marketing surveillance of rotavirus vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd-Johnsen, C; Justice, F; Donath, S; Bines, J E

    2012-04-27

    Evaluation of the safety of rotavirus vaccines, particularly with respect to the risk of intussusception, is recommended for countries planning to introduce rotavirus vaccines into the National Immunisation Program. However, as prospective studies are costly, require time to conduct and may be difficult to perform in some settings, retrospective hospital based surveillance at sentinel sites has been suggested as an option for surveillance for intussusception following introduction of rotavirus vaccines. To assess the value of retrospective hospital based surveillance to describe clinical and epidemiological features of intussusception in children aged <24 months and to investigate any temporal association between receipt of a rotavirus vaccine and intussusception. A retrospective chart review of all patients diagnosed with intussusception at Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia over an 8-year period including before and after rotavirus vaccine introduction into the National Immunisation Program, was conducted using patients identified by a medical record database (ICD-10-CM 56.1). Patient profile, clinical presentation, treatment and outcome were analysed along with records of immunisation status obtained using the Australian Childhood Immunisation Register. A 9% misclassification rate of discharge diagnosis of intussusception was identified on critical chart review. The incidence rate of intussusception at the Royal Children's Hospital over the study period was 1.91 per 10,000 infants <24 months (95% CI 1.65-2.20). Intestinal resection was required in 6.5% of infants (95% CI 3.6%, 11.0%). Intussusception occurred within 30 days after vaccination in 2 of 27 patients who had received at least 1 dose of a rotavirus vaccine. Valuable data on the incidence, clinical presentation and treatment outcomes of intussusception can be obtained from data retrieved from hospital medical records in a sentinel paediatric hospital using standardised methodology. However

  20. Ultrasound guided reduction of an ileocolic intussusception by a hydrostatic method by using normal saline enema in paediatric patients: a study of 30 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digant, Shastri Mona; Rucha, Seth; Eke, Dessai

    2012-12-01

    The conventional hydrostatic reduction of an intussusception with barium enema or the pneumatic reduction of an intussusception is associated with considerable ionizing radiations and a risk of perforation; while the hydrostatic reduction of an intussusception under ultrasound guidance is a very safe method because the whole procedure is visualized with real time ultrasound. Also, being a non-invasive method with a high success rate, this procedure has emerged as a useful alternative to a surgical intervention. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of ultrasound and colour Doppler studies for the guidance of the hydrostatic reduction of a childhood intussusception by using normal saline. Among 41 children who were evaluated with ultrasonography for the confirmation of the presence of intussusceptions, hydrostatic reduction of intussusception were performed under a sonographic guidance in 30 patients, whereas 11 patients were excluded due to clinical contraindications. This disease was observed mostly at the ages of 6 months to 24 months. In 80% of the patients, there was a recent history of gastroenteritis and 40 % had a history of common cold. The most common site of the intussusception was the transverse colon near the hepatic flexor of the colon (90%), with a mean duration of 22.1±17.3 hours. The overall rate of a successful reduction was 87% and the mean reduction time was 14 minutes. None of the cases showed recurrence within 24 hrs. No complications were observed. We conclude that ultrasound with colour Doppler study is very useful for the diagnosis of intussusceptions, as well as for guided hydrostatic reductions by using normal saline enema. This is an optimal, simple, and a safe procedure for the treatment of intussusceptions in paediatric patients.

  1. A Rare Case of Intussusception Associated with Metastasize Small Cell Carcinoma of Lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razrim Rahim

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Intussusception is common cause of bowel obstruction in the paediatric age group compared to the elderly population. Many times, The diagnosis may be difficult because of asymptomatic nature of thisbowel disorder. We hereby describe the case of a 75-year-old male who presented with lethargy, weakness,loss of movement in the joints and was found to be anemic. The haemoglobin level was low so he wastransfused with packed cells. On gastrointestinal (GI endoscopy, upper GI bleed was observed. A mass was observed beyond ampulla at the 2nd and 3rd part of the duodenal junction. Computerized tomography (CTscan also showed a mass at the head of pancreas and the lesion at the left lung. In view of persistent bleed,‘Whipple’s procedure’ was performed. Histopathological examination showed small cell carcinoma of the lungs with metastasis to the pancreas and the jejunum. We here discuss the case of intussusception with intestinal metastasis which presented with gastrointestinal bleeding.

  2. Midgut pain due to an intussuscepting terminal ileal lipoma: a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Abbasakoor, Noormuhammad O

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The occurrence of intussusception in adults is rare. The condition is found in 1 in 1300 abdominal operations and 1 in 100 patients operated for intestinal obstruction. The child to adult ratio is 20:1. CASE PRESENTATION: A 52-year-old Irish Caucasian woman was investigated for a 3-month history of intermittent episodes of colicky midgut pain and associated constipation. Ileocolonoscopy revealed a pedunculated lesion in the terminal ileum prolapsing into the caecum. Computed tomography confirmed a smooth-walled, nonobstructing, low density intramural lesion in the terminal ileum with secondary intussusception. A laparoscopic small bowel resection was performed. Histology revealed a large pedunculated polypoidal mass measuring 4 x 2.5 x 2 cm consistent with a submucosal lipoma. She had complete resolution of her symptoms and remained well at 12-month follow-up. CONCLUSION: This case highlights an unusual cause of incomplete small bowel obstruction successfully treated through interdisciplinary cooperation. Ileal lipomas are not typically amenable to endoscopic removal and require resection. This can be successfully achieved via a laparoscopic approach with early restoration of premorbid functioning.

  3. Improving Quality and Efficiency for Intussusception Management After Successful Enema Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raval, Mehul V; Minneci, Peter C; Deans, Katherine J; Kurtovic, Kelli J; Dietrich, Ann; Bates, D Gregory; Rangel, Shawn J; Moss, R Lawrence; Kenney, Brian D

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this project was to implement a protocol facilitating discharge from the emergency department (ED) after successful radiologic ileocolic intussusception reduction in a pediatric referral center. A multidisciplinary team identified drivers for successful quality improvement including educational brochures, a standardized radiologic report, an observation period in the ER with oral hydration challenges, and follow-up phone calls the day after discharge. Patient outcomes were tracked, and quarterly feedback was provided. Of 80 patients identified over a 24-month period, 34 (42.5%) did not qualify for discharge home due to need for surgical intervention (n = 9), specific radiologic findings (n = 11), need for additional intravenous hydration (n = 4), or other reasons (n = 7). Of 46 patients who qualified for discharge, 30 (65.2%) were successfully sent home from the ED. One patient returned with recurrent symptoms that required repeat enema reduction. Sixteen patients were observed and discharged within 23 hours. Adherence with discharge from the ED improved over time. Discharge from the ED was associated with cost savings and improved net margins at the hospital level for each encounter. A sustainable multidisciplinary quality improvement project to discharge intussusception patients from the ED after air-contrast enema reduction was successfully integrated in a high-volume referral center through education, standardized radiologic reporting, and protocoled follow-up. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  4. Ileo-ceco-rectal Intussusception Requiring Intestinal Resection and Anastomosis in a Tawny Eagle (Aquila rapax).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabater, Mikel; Huynh, Minh; Forbes, Neil

    2015-03-01

    A 23-year-old male tawny eagle (Aquila rapax) was examined because of sudden onset of lethargy, regurgitation, and hematochezia. An intestinal obstruction was suspected based on radiographic findings, and an ileo-ceco-rectal intussusception was confirmed by coelioscopy. A 14.3-cm section of intestine was resected before an intestinal anastomosis was done. Coelomic endoscopic examination confirmed a postsurgical complication of adhesions between the intestinal anastomosis and the dorsal coelomic wall, resulting in a partial luminal stricture and requiring surgical removal of the adhesions. Rectoscopy was useful in diagnosing a mild luminal stricture related to the second surgery. Complete recovery was observed 2 months after surgery. Lack of further complications in the 2 years after surgery demonstrates good tolerance of intestinal resection and anastomosis of a large segment of bowel in an eagle. This report is the first reported case of intussusception in an eagle and emphasizes the potential use of endoscopic examination in the diagnosis as well as in the management of complications.

  5. A child with colo-colonic intussusception due to a large colonic polyp: Case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki Takahashi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Colo-colonic intussusception (CI due to a colonic polyp is a rarely reported cause of intestinal obstruction in school-aged children. Hydrostatic reduction (HR and endoscopic polypectomy are minimally invasive and technically feasible for treating CI. We report a case of CI and review the literature, focusing on the diagnosis and treatment.

  6. Compound double ileoileal and ileocecocolic intussusception caused by lipoma of the ileum in an adult patient: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bicaj Besnik X

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The initial diagnosis of intussusception in adults very often can be missed and cause delayed treatment and possible serious complications. We report the case of an adult patient with complicated double ileoileal and ileocecocolic intussusception. Case presentation A 46-year-old Caucasian man was transferred from the gastroenterology service to the abdominal surgery service with severe abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. An abdominal ultrasound, barium enema, and abdominal computed tomography scan revealed an intraluminal obstruction of his ascending colon. Plain abdominal X-rays showed diffuse air-fluid levels in his small intestine. A double ileoileal and ileocecocolic intussusception was found during an emergent laparotomy. A right hemicolectomy, including resection of a long segment of his ileum, was performed. The postoperative period was complicated by acute renal failure, shock liver, and pulmonary thromboembolism. Our patient was discharged from the hospital after 30 days. An anatomical pathology examination revealed a lipoma of his ileum. Conclusions Intussusception in adults requires early surgical resection regardless of the nature of the initial cause. Delayed treatment can cause very serious complications.

  7. Case of colonic intussusception secondary to mobile cecum syndrome repaired by laparoscopic cecopexy using a barbed wound suture device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tetsu; Tajima, Yoshitsugu; Hyakudomi, Ryoji; Hirayama, Takanori; Taniura, Takahito; Ishitobi, Kazunari; Hirahara, Noriyuki

    2017-09-21

    A 27-year-old man with recurrent right lower quadrant pain was admitted to our hospital. Ultrasonography and computed tomography examination of the abdomen revealed a target sign in the ascending colon, which was compatible with the diagnosis of cecal intussusception. The intussusception was spontaneously resolved at that time, but it relapsed 6 mo later. The patient underwent a successful colonoscopic disinvagination; there was no evidence of neoplastic or inflammatory lesions in the colon and terminal ileum. The patient underwent laparoscopic surgery for recurring cecal intussusception. During laparoscopy, we observed an unfixed cecum on the posterior peritoneum (i.e. a mobile cecum). Thus, we performed laparoscopic appendectomy and cecopexy with a lateral peritoneal flap using a barbed wound suture device. The patient's post-operative course was uneventful, and he continued to do well without recurrence at 10 mo after surgery. Laparoscopic cecopexy using a barbed wound suture device is a simple and reliable procedure that can be the treatment of choice for recurrent cecal intussusception associated with a mobile cecum.

  8. Intussusception due to Peutz-Jeghers syndrome - a case report and review of the literature; Sindrome de Peutz-Jeghers e intussuscepcao - relato de um caso e revisao da literatura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grasso Filho, Luiz Eduardo; Albertotti, Flavio; Carvalho, Claudio Sobral de; Nersessian, Ana Carolina; Docema, Marcos F. Lima; Ogasawara, Aparecida M.; Peng Yong Sheng [Hospital Sirio Libanes, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Diagnostico por Imagem; Costacurta, Marco Antonio [Hospital Sirio Libanes, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Servico de Radiologia Geral; Albertotti, Cesar Jose [Hospital Sirio Libanes, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Servico de Tomografia Computadorizada; Cerri, Giovanni Guido [Hospital Sirio Libanes, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Servico de Ultra-Som

    2000-02-01

    The authors report a case of a 28-year-old woman with ileocecocolic intussusception due to Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by hamartomatous polyposis of the gastrointestinal tract and mucocutaneous pigmentation. This condition frequently presents complications such as intestinal obstruction due to invagination or hemorrhage. In this patient, the diagnosis of intussusception was made preoperatively. The excised material revealed three large polyps which were considered to be the cause of the intussusception. (author)

  9. Jejunogastric intussusception presented with hematemesis: a case presentation and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papastratis George

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Jejunogastric intussusception (JGI is a rare but potentially very serious complication of gastrectomy or gastrojejunostomy. To avoid mortality early diagnosis and prompt surgical intervention is mandatory. Case presentation A young man presented with epigastric pain and bilous vomiting followed by hematemesis,10 years after vagotomy and gastrojejunostomy for a bleeding duodenal ulcer. Emergency endoscopy showed JGI and the CT scan of the abdomen was compatible with this diagnosis. At laparotomy a retrograde type II, JGI was confirmed and managed by reduction of JGI without intestinal resection. Postoperative recovery was uneventful. Conclusions JGI is a rare condition and less than 200 cases have been published since its first description in 1914. The clinical picture is almost diagnostic. Endoscopy performed by someone familiar with this rare entity is certainly diagnostic and CT-Scan of the abdomen could also help. There is no medical treatment for acute JGI and the correct treatment is surgical intervention as soon as possible.

  10. Intussusception - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... K. Kaneshiro, MD, MHA, Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Abdominal Pain Read more Intestinal Obstruction Read more Toddler Health ...

  11. Mantle cell lymphoma of the gastrointestinal tract presenting with multiple intussusceptions – case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abo Stephen M

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL is an aggressive type of B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma that originates from small to medium sized lymphocytes located in the mantle zone of the lymph node. Extra nodal involvement is present in the majority of cases, with a peculiar tendency to invade the gastro-intestinal tract in the form of multiple lymphomatous polyposis. MCL can be accurately diagnosed with the use of the highly specific marker Cyclin D1. Few cases of mantle cell lymphoma presenting with intussuception have been reported. Here we present a rare case of multiple intussusceptions caused by mantle cell lymphoma and review the literature of this disease. Case presentation A 68-year-old male presented with pain, tenderness in the right lower abdomen, associated with nausea and non-bilious vomiting. CT scan of abdomen revealed ileo-colic intussusception. Laparoscopy confirmed multiple intussusceptions involving ileo-colic and ileo-ileal segments of gastrointestinal tract. A laparoscopically assisted right hemicolectomy and extended ileal resection was performed. Postoperative recovery was uneventful. The histology and immuno-histochemistry of the excised small and large bowel revealed mantle cell lymphoma with multiple lymphomatous polyposis and positivity to Cyclin D1 marker. The patient was successfully treated with Rituximab-CHOP chemotherapy and remains in complete remission at one-year follow-up. Conclusion This is a rare case of intestinal lymphomatous polyposis due to mantle cell lymphoma presenting with multiple small bowel intussusceptions. Our case highlights laparoscopic-assisted bowel resection as a potential and feasible option in the multi-disciplinary treatment of mantle cell lymphoma.

  12. The risk of intussusception following monovalent rotavirus vaccination in England: A self-controlled case-series evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowe, Julia; Andrews, Nick; Ladhani, Shamez; Miller, Elizabeth

    2016-07-12

    To investigate the risk of intussusception after monovalent rotavirus vaccine (RV1) given to infants aged 2 and 3 months in England. Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) were used to identify infants aged 48-183 days admitted between 11/03/2013 and 31/10/2014 with intussusception. Diagnosis was confirmed from medical records and HES procedure codes. Vaccination status was obtained from general practitioners. The risk of admission within 1-7 and 8-21 days of vaccination was analysed using the self-controlled case-series (SCCS) method with age effect adjustment by including historical data before RVI introduction in July 2013. A total of 119 cases were identified during the study period and intussusception confirmed in 95 of whom 39 were vaccinated 1-21 days before onset. An increased relative incidence (RI) in this period was found, 4.53 (95% confidence interval 2.34-8.58) and 2.60 (1.43-4.81) respectively after the 1st and 2nd doses with an attributable risk of 1.91 and 1.49 per 100,000 doses respectively. The peak risk was 1-7 days after the first dose, RI 13.81 (6.44-28.32), with an estimated 93% of the 15 cases being vaccine-attributable. Mean interval between onset and admission, and clinical features were similar between vaccine-associated and background cases. Despite intussusception being a contraindication to rotavirus vaccination, 10 infants received a further dose; none had a recurrence. The RIs in a meta-analysis combing our results with Australia, Mexico, Brazil and Singapore using RV1, a 2, 4 month schedule and SCCS gave pooled RI estimates of 2.35 (1.45-3.8) and 1.77 (1.29-2.43) in the 21 day period after the 1st and 2nd doses, respectively. The earlier age at the 2nd dose in England did not affect the risk. We estimate that the RVI programme causes around 21 intussusception admissions annually in England but, since it prevents around 25,000 gastro-intestinal infection admissions, its benefit/risk profile remains strongly positive. Crown Copyright

  13. Jejunojejunal Intussusception as the Initial Presentation of Non-Hodgkin’s B-Cell Lymphoma in an Adult Patient: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Stohlner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Intussusception is a rare cause of bowel obstruction in adults and is usually associated with an underlying pathology, benign, or malignant. This is a report of a case of jejunojejunal intussusception secondary to non-Hodgkin’s B-cell lymphoma in an adult patient. Case Presentation. A 74-year-old male with no previous significant medical history presented with symptoms of acute intestinal obstruction. A CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis revealed 2 areas of jejunojejunal intussusception, which were surgically managed successfully. Histopathological examination of the specimen revealed the presence of high grade diffuse large B-cell-type non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, and the patient was referred to the oncology team for further management. Discussion. B-cell lymphoma is a rare but well-documented cause of intussusception in adults, with most cases being at the ileocolic region. We present a rare case of jejunojejunal intussusception as the initial presentation of non-Hodgkin’s B-cell lymphoma in an adult patient.

  14. UK intussusception audit: A national survey of practice and audit of reduction rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannon, Edward; Williams, Rhianydd; Allan, Rosemary; Okoye, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To define current UK reduction practice and the reductions rates achieved. Materials and methods: Electronic surveys were sent to radiologists at 26 UK centres. This assessed methods of reduction, equipment, personnel, and protocol usage. Standardized audit proforma were also sent to evaluate all reductions performed in 2011. Results: Twenty-two of 26 centres (85%) replied. All used air enema under fluoroscopic guidance. Equipment was not standardized but could be broadly categorized into hand-pumped air-supply systems (seven centres) and pressurized air systems (15 centres). Seventeen centres followed a protocol based on British Society of Paediatric Radiologists (BSPR) guidelines. In 21 of the 22 centres a consultant paediatric radiologist led reductions and only 12 centres reported a surgeon being present. Three hundred and ten cases were reported across 22 centres. Cases per centre ranged from 0–31 (median 14). Reduction rates varied from 38–90% (median 71%). The overall perforation rate was 2.5%. Caseload did not significantly correlate with reduction rate, and there was no significant difference between the two types of equipment used. Median reduction rates were 15% higher in centres with a surgeon present at reduction (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Intussusception care in the UK lacks standardization of equipment and personnel involved. National reduction rates are lower than in current international literature. Improved standardization may lead to an improvement in reduction rates and a surgeon should always be present at reduction

  15. Retrograde gastroesophageal intussusception after peroral endoscopic myotomy in a patient with achalasia cardia: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Samiullah; Su, Shuai; Jiang, Kui; Wang, Bang-Mao

    2018-01-01

    Retrograde gastroesophageal intussusception (RGEI) is a relatively rare gastrointestinal (GI) disorder in which a portion of the stomach wall invaginates into the esophagus. More recently, peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) has emerged as an endoscopic alternative to surgical myotomy for achalasia, and, to the best of our knowledge, our case is the first RGEI after POEM to be reported. A 22-year-old male was presented with a history of vomiting, intractable retching and hematemesis for 3 days. He had a history of achalasia and underwent POEM 3 years ago caused by symptoms of severe dysphagia to solid and liquid. Initially, the patient was diagnosed with a blood-filled esophagus, and the mid esophagus was occluded with a ball-like mass, however, the final diagnosis of RGEI was made by thoracotomy. A therapeutic strategy of conservative treatment and left transthoracic surgery were applied. The surgery and post operative course were uneventful, and he remained asymptomatic 1 year after operation. POEM is a reliable and minimally invasive endoscopic method for esophageal achalasia. Early recognition and severity of RGEI are essential to decrease the unwanted complications. Upper GI series, esophagogastroduodenoscopy and computed tomography scan are helpful for diagnostic purposes of RGEI. Conservative treatment, endoscopic intervention, and surgery are the mainstay of treatments for RGEI. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Anaesthetic Management of a patient with Myasthenia Gravis and Small Bowel Intussusception for Jejuno-Ileal Anastomoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawan Kumar Jain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia gravis is a chronic autoimmune disease affecting voluntary skeletal muscles. The altered sensitivity of acetylcholine receptors to muscle relaxants and concomitant treatment with anticholinesterase in these patients affect their anaesthetic management. Patients who have undergone bowel anastomosis and are on regular anticholinesterase treatment are susceptible to anastomotic leaks. We report successful anaesthetic management of class I myasthenic patient with coexisting small bowel intussusception operated for jejuno-ileal anastomoses using regional, inhalational and intravenous (i.v anaesthesia based on train of four responses, and avoiding the use of reversal (anticholinesterase.

  17. Comparison of pressure between barium reduction and air reduction of the intussusception in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Hwan; Park, Sang Gyu; Park, Choong Ki; Yoon, Jong Sup [Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-08-15

    There are many method of treatment of the intussusception in children, including surgery, barium reduction, air reduction, and saline enema under ultrasonographic monitoring. Among them, barium reduction and air reduction have been used widely as nonsurgical method of treatment in radiologic department. During barium reduction, the bottle filled with barium solution must not be elevated over a 3 feet from the operating table. In air reduction, diagnostic pressure is about 60 mmHg and pressure during reduction usually is maintained between 90 mmHg and 130 mmHg. The authors have studied about pressure difference of barium solution by changing height of the bottle filled with barium solution, and have compared with pressure in air reduction. The results are as follows; 1. Pressure of 20 w/v % barium solution at the 60 cm height is 44.4 mmHg, and 69.6 mmHg at the 90 cm height. 2. Pressure of 40 w/v % barium solution at the 60 cm height is 51.4 mmHg, and 80.1 mmHg at the 90 cm height. 3. Pressure of 40 w/v % barium solution at the 90cm height is much lower than the pressure maintained during air reduction, and this difference in pressure may be one of the causes of low reduction rate in barium reduction then air reduction. 4. The pressure gradient per 10 cm height is about 8.45 mmHg in 20 w/v % barium solution, about 9.21 mmHg in 30 w/v % barium solution, and about 9.72 mmHg 40 w/v % barium solution. 5. Intraluminal pressure difference between the barium reduction and the air reduction is probably of the major causes of rapid diagnosis and high reduction rate in the air reduction.

  18. Comparison of pressure between barium reduction and air reduction of the intussusception in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyung Hwan; Park, Sang Gyu; Park, Choong Ki; Yoon, Jong Sup

    1989-01-01

    There are many method of treatment of the intussusception in children, including surgery, barium reduction, air reduction, and saline enema under ultrasonographic monitoring. Among them, barium reduction and air reduction have been used widely as nonsurgical method of treatment in radiologic department. During barium reduction, the bottle filled with barium solution must not be elevated over a 3 feet from the operating table. In air reduction, diagnostic pressure is about 60 mmHg and pressure during reduction usually is maintained between 90 mmHg and 130 mmHg. The authors have studied about pressure difference of barium solution by changing height of the bottle filled with barium solution, and have compared with pressure in air reduction. The results are as follows; 1. Pressure of 20 w/v % barium solution at the 60 cm height is 44.4 mmHg, and 69.6 mmHg at the 90 cm height. 2. Pressure of 40 w/v % barium solution at the 60 cm height is 51.4 mmHg, and 80.1 mmHg at the 90 cm height. 3. Pressure of 40 w/v % barium solution at the 90cm height is much lower than the pressure maintained during air reduction, and this difference in pressure may be one of the causes of low reduction rate in barium reduction then air reduction. 4. The pressure gradient per 10 cm height is about 8.45 mmHg in 20 w/v % barium solution, about 9.21 mmHg in 30 w/v % barium solution, and about 9.72 mmHg 40 w/v % barium solution. 5. Intraluminal pressure difference between the barium reduction and the air reduction is probably of the major causes of rapid diagnosis and high reduction rate in the air reduction

  19. Intussusception as clinical presentation of primary non-Hodgkin lymphoma of the colon in a HIV-patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Corti

    Full Text Available Intestinal intussusception rarely occurs in the adult population and accounts only for 1% to 5% of all the causes of intestinal obstruction. This complication is more frequent in the small bowel and can be due to different aetiologies, including inflammatory, infectious or neoplastic diseases. Malignancies account for 50% to 60% of all cases of colon invagination. The gastrointestinal (GI tract is the most common site for extra-nodal non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL, representing 5% to 20% of all the cases. However, primary NHL of the GI tract is a very infrequent clinic-pathological entity and accounts only for 1% to 4% of all the neoplasms of the GI tract. Primary NHL of the colon is a rare disease and it comprises only 0.2% to 1.2% of all colonic malignancies. Here we describe a case of an AIDS adult patient who developed an intussusception secondary to a primary large B cell lymphoma of the transverse colon. English and Spanish literature was reviewed.

  20. Cystic colon duplication causing intussusception in a 25-year-old man: report of a case and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nährig Jörg

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colonic intussusception is a rare congenital abnormality, mostly manifesting before the age of two with abdominal pain and acute intestinal obstruction with or without bleeding. In adults it may occur idiopathically or due to an intraluminal tumor mass. Case presentation A 25-year-old man presented with an acute abdomen and severe crampy abdominal pain. The clinical picture mimicked acute appendicitis. Transabdominal ultrasound examination revealed a 5 cm circular mass in the right upper abdomen. The ensuing computed tomography suggested an intussusception in the ascending colon. Intraoperatively, no full thickness invagination was detected. Due to a hard, intraluminal tumor a standard right hemicolectomy with ileotransversostomy was performed. The histopathological analysis revealed a cystic colon duplication leading to mucosal invagination and obstruction. Conclusions In adults, colon intussusception is a rare event causing approximately 1% of all acute intestinal obstructions. Unlike its preferentially nonsurgical management in children, a bowel intussusception in adults should be operated because an organic, often malignant lesion is present in most cases.

  1. New-born born with patent vitellointestinal duct with prolapsed (intussusceptions of proximal and distal ileal loop: A case presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariha Akil Fazal

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Failure of obliteration of vitellointestinal duct (VID can present with a wide variety of congenital intestinal malformations. Patient can present with the anomaly itself or due to complications secondary to the anomaly like intestinal obstruction due to volvulus, intussusception or adhesions. Prolapsed ilial loops through a patent VID is a rare presentation of the above. To date only fourteen cases of this presentation have been reported in the English medical literature. We are reporting a case of the same in a new-born presenting with it from the time of birth, which to the best of our knowledge has not been reported before and therefore this the youngest reported case of its nature in the current English medical literature.

  2. Abdominal Hernias, Giant Colon Diverticulum, GIST, Intestinal Pneumatosis, Colon Ischemia, Cold Intussusception, Gallstone Ileus, and Foreign Bodies: Our Experience and Literature Review of Incidental Gastrointestinal MDCT Findings

    OpenAIRE

    Di Grezia, G.; Gatta, G.; Rella, R.; Donatello, D.; Falco, G.; Grassi, R.; Grassi, R.

    2017-01-01

    Incidental gastrointestinal findings are commonly detected on MDCT exams performed for various medical indications. This review describes the radiological MDCT spectrum of appearances already present in the past literature and in today’s experience of several gastrointestinal acute conditions such as abdominal hernia, giant colon diverticulum, GIST, intestinal pneumatosis, colon ischemia, cold intussusception, gallstone ileus, and foreign bodies which can require medical and surgical interven...

  3. Sonography-guided hydrostatic reduction of ileocolic intussusception in children: analysis of failure and success in consecutive patients presenting timely to the hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, Jan; Kahl, Fritz

    2015-03-01

    In children with ileocolic intussusception sonography is increasingly being used for diagnosis, whereas fluoroscopy is frequently used for guiding non-invasive reduction. This study assessed the success rate of radiation-free sonography-guided hydrostatic reduction in children with ileocolic intussusception, using novel well-defined success rate indices. All children were evaluated who presented from 2005 to 2013 to the local university hospital with ileocolic intussusception. The patients were treated with sonography-guided hydrostatic reduction unless primary surgery was clinically indicated. The according success rate was determined by indices of Bekdash et al. They represent the ratio of persistently successful non-surgical reductions versus four different denominators, depending on including/excluding cases with primary surgery and including/excluding cases requiring bowel resection/intervention. Fifty-six consecutive patients were included (age, 3 months to 7.8 years). About 80% of the patients presented until 24 h and 20% until 48 h after the onset of symptoms. Seven patients underwent primary surgery, with bowel resection required in three cases. Hydrostatic reduction was attempted in 49 patients, being permanently successful in 41 cases (selective reduction rate 41/49 = 83.7%; crude reduction rate 41/56 = 73.2%). The remaining eight patients underwent secondary surgery, with just two patients not requiring surgical bowel resection/intervention (corrected selective reduction rate 41/43 = 95.3%). The composite reduction rate was 87.2% (successful/feasible reductions, 41/47). Radiation-free sonography-guided hydrostatic reduction has a good success rate in children with ileocolic intussusception. It may be particularly valuable in centers that are already experienced with using sonography for the diagnosis.

  4. Molecular characterization of norovirus GII.17 detected in healthy adult, intussusception patient, and acute gastroenteritis children in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamrin, Pattara; Kumthip, Kattareeya; Yodmeeklin, Arpaporn; Supadej, Kanittapon; Ukarapol, Nuthapong; Thongprachum, Aksara; Okitsu, Shoko; Hayakawa, Satoshi; Ushijima, Hiroshi; Maneekarn, Niwat

    2016-10-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) have been recognized as a leading cause of sporadic cases and outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis in all age groups. During the surveillance of NoVs in Chiang Mai, Thailand, four cases of the novel GII.17 NoVs were sporadically detected by RT-PCR in 2014-2015. The first case of GII.17 was detected in a healthy adult who worked for a restaurant. The second case was found in a pediatric patient who admitted to the hospital with intussusception. The third and fourth cases were found in acute gastroenteritis children. Phylogenetic analysis clearly demonstrated that GII.17 NoVs detected in this study were genetically closely related with the novel GII.17 Kawasaki reference strains. These four GII.17 NoV positive specimens were also tested by two immunochromatographic test kits in order to evaluate the sensitivity for GII.17 NoV detection. The viral loads in those specimens were determined by real-time RT-PCR. The sensitivity of GII.17 NoV detection varies by individual test kits and also depending on the amount of the viruses contained in the fecal specimens. In summary, our study reported the detection of novel GII.17 NoVs in a wide range of subjects with and without diarrhea. Therefore, continued comprehensive screening and genetic molecular characterization of NoV strains circulating in this area need to be further investigated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A multi-country study of intussusception in children under 2 years of age in Latin America: analysis of prospective surveillance data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez-Llorens, Xavier; Velázquez, F Raúl; Lopez, Pio; Espinoza, Felix; Linhares, Alexandre C; Abate, Hector; Nuñez, Ernesto; Venegas, Guillermo; Vergara, Rodrigo; Jimenez, Ana L; Rivera, Maribel; Aranza, Carlos; Richardson, Vesta; Macias-Parra, Mercedes; Palacios, Guillermo Ruiz; Rivera, Luis; Ortega-Barria, Eduardo; Cervantes, Yolanda; Rüttimann, Ricardo; Rubio, Pilar; Acosta, Camilo J; Newbern, Claire; Verstraeten, Thomas; Breuer, Thomas

    2013-05-27

    Intussusception (IS) is a form of acute intestinal obstruction that occurs mainly in infants and is usually of unknown cause. An association between IS and the first licensed rotavirus vaccine, a reassortant-tetravalent, rhesus-based rotavirus vaccine (RRV-TV), led to the withdrawal of the vaccine. New rotavirus vaccines have now been developed and extensively studied for their potential association with IS. This study aimed to describe the epidemiology and to estimate the incidence of IS in Latin American infants prior to new vaccine introduction. Children under 2 years of age representing potential IS cases were enrolled in 16 centers in 11 Latin American countries from January 2003 to May 2005. IS cases were classified as definite, probable, possible or suspected as stated on the Brighton Collaboration Working Group guidelines. From 517 potential cases identified, 476 (92%) cases were classified as definite, 21 probable, 10 possible and 10 suspected for intussusception. Among the 476 definite IS cases, the median age at presentation was 6.4 months with 89% of cases aged days with a high prevalence of surgery as the primary treatment (65%). Most cases (88%) made a complete recovery, but 13 (3%) died. No clear seasonal pattern of IS cases emerged. This study describes the epidemiology and estimates the incidence of IS in Latin American infants prior to the introduction of new rotavirus vaccines. The incidence of IS was found to vary between different countries, as observed in previous studies. Clinical study identifier 999910/204 (SERO-EPI-IS-204).

  6. Abdominal Hernias, Giant Colon Diverticulum, GIST, Intestinal Pneumatosis, Colon Ischemia, Cold Intussusception, Gallstone Ileus, and Foreign Bodies: Our Experience and Literature Review of Incidental Gastrointestinal MDCT Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatta, G.; Rella, R.; Donatello, D.; Falco, G.; Grassi, R.

    2017-01-01

    Incidental gastrointestinal findings are commonly detected on MDCT exams performed for various medical indications. This review describes the radiological MDCT spectrum of appearances already present in the past literature and in today's experience of several gastrointestinal acute conditions such as abdominal hernia, giant colon diverticulum, GIST, intestinal pneumatosis, colon ischemia, cold intussusception, gallstone ileus, and foreign bodies which can require medical and surgical intervention or clinical follow-up. The clinical presentation of this illness is frequently nonspecific: abdominal pain, distension, nausea, fever, rectal bleeding, vomiting, constipation, or a palpable mass, depending on the disease. A proper differential diagnosis is essential in the assessment of treatment and in this case MDCT exam plays a central rule. We wish that this article will familiarize the radiologist in the diagnosis of this kind of incidental MDCT findings for better orientation of the therapy. PMID:28638830

  7. Abdominal Hernias, Giant Colon Diverticulum, GIST, Intestinal Pneumatosis, Colon Ischemia, Cold Intussusception, Gallstone Ileus, and Foreign Bodies: Our Experience and Literature Review of Incidental Gastrointestinal MDCT Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Di Grezia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Incidental gastrointestinal findings are commonly detected on MDCT exams performed for various medical indications. This review describes the radiological MDCT spectrum of appearances already present in the past literature and in today’s experience of several gastrointestinal acute conditions such as abdominal hernia, giant colon diverticulum, GIST, intestinal pneumatosis, colon ischemia, cold intussusception, gallstone ileus, and foreign bodies which can require medical and surgical intervention or clinical follow-up. The clinical presentation of this illness is frequently nonspecific: abdominal pain, distension, nausea, fever, rectal bleeding, vomiting, constipation, or a palpable mass, depending on the disease. A proper differential diagnosis is essential in the assessment of treatment and in this case MDCT exam plays a central rule. We wish that this article will familiarize the radiologist in the diagnosis of this kind of incidental MDCT findings for better orientation of the therapy.

  8. Abdominal Hernias, Giant Colon Diverticulum, GIST, Intestinal Pneumatosis, Colon Ischemia, Cold Intussusception, Gallstone Ileus, and Foreign Bodies: Our Experience and Literature Review of Incidental Gastrointestinal MDCT Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Grezia, G; Gatta, G; Rella, R; Donatello, D; Falco, G; Grassi, R; Grassi, R

    2017-01-01

    Incidental gastrointestinal findings are commonly detected on MDCT exams performed for various medical indications. This review describes the radiological MDCT spectrum of appearances already present in the past literature and in today's experience of several gastrointestinal acute conditions such as abdominal hernia, giant colon diverticulum, GIST, intestinal pneumatosis, colon ischemia, cold intussusception, gallstone ileus, and foreign bodies which can require medical and surgical intervention or clinical follow-up. The clinical presentation of this illness is frequently nonspecific: abdominal pain, distension, nausea, fever, rectal bleeding, vomiting, constipation, or a palpable mass, depending on the disease. A proper differential diagnosis is essential in the assessment of treatment and in this case MDCT exam plays a central rule. We wish that this article will familiarize the radiologist in the diagnosis of this kind of incidental MDCT findings for better orientation of the therapy.

  9. Adult intussusception: 14 case reports and their outcomes Intususcepción en el adulto: Revisión de 14 casos y su seguimiento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Guillén-Paredes

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: to analyze diagnostic and therapeutic options depending on the clinical symptoms, location, and lesions associated with intussusception, together with their follow-up and complications. Patients and methods: patients admitted to the Morales Meseguer General University Hospital (Murcia between January 1995 and January 2009, and diagnosed with intestinal invagination. Data related to demographic and clinical features, complementary explorations, presumptive diagnosis, treatment, follow-up, and complications were collected. Results: there were 14 patients (7 males and 7 females; mean age: 41.9 years-range: 17-77 who presented with abdominal pain. The most reliable diagnostic technique was computed tomography (8 diagnoses from 10 CT scans. A preoperative diagnosis was established in 12 cases. Invaginations were ileocolic in 8 cases (the most common, enteric in 5, and colocolic in 2 (coexistence of 2 lesions in one patient. The etiology of these intussusceptions was idiopathic or secondary to a lesion acting as the lead point for invagination. Depending on the nature of this lead point, the cause of the enteric intussusceptions was benign in 3 cases and malignant in 2. Ileocolic invaginations were divided equally (4 benign and 4 malignant, and colocolic lesions were benign (2 cases. Conservative treatment was implemented for 4 patients and surgery for 10 (7 in emergency. Five right hemicolectomies, 3 small-bowel resections, 2 left hemicolectomies, and 1 ileocecal resection were performed. Surgical complications: 3 minor and 1 major (with malignant etiology and subsequent death. The lesion disappeared after 3 days to 6 weeks in patients with conservative management. Mean follow-up was 28.25 months (range: 5-72 months. Conclusions: a suitable imaging technique, preferably CT, is important for the diagnosis of intussusception. Surgery is usually necessary but we favor conservative treatment in selected cases.Objetivos: analizar las opciones terap

  10. A very rare case of a small bowel leiomyosarcoma leading to ileocaecal intussusception treated with a laparoscopic resection: a case report and a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzel, Tomasz; Mech, Katarzyna; Mazurkiewicz, Michał; Dąbrowski, Bohdan; Lech, Gustaw; Chaber, Andrzej; Słodkowski, Maciej

    2016-02-24

    Small bowel tumours are rare and comprise less than 2% of all primary gastrointestinal neoplasms. Among these tumours, a leiomyosarcoma belonging to soft tissue sarcomas is extremely rare and accounts for about 1 % of malignant mesenchymal lesions in the gastrointestinal tract. Due to its aggressive nature and slow growth, it is often diagnosed at the late stage when curative treatment is impossible. Authors report a first case of leiomyosarcoma with chronic recurrent ileocaecal intussusception and literature review to analyse diagnosis and treatment features of the ileum mesenchymal tumours. We present a case of an 87-year-old Caucasian man suffering from cramp-like abdominal pain for months. Due to lack of clinical signs and unspecific complaints, a diagnosis was delayed. Despite a detailed in-hospital examination, a proper diagnosis was established as late as during an operation. The patient was treated by surgery with good results. An uncommon laparoscopic resection of the small bowel with a tumour was performed. A histopathological investigation confirmed a very rare mesenchymal lesion of the distal ileum. The patient is under control with no recurrence for 1 year of the follow-up period. Reported case indicates that a usually asymptomatic tumour can cause uncommon chronic recurrent ileus signs. CT and MRI scans are investigation of choice in such cases, but they are sometimes inconclusive. It might be worth highlighting the good results of laparoscopic leiomyosarcoma lesion resection with a very good outcome.

  11. Case report of severe Cushing's syndrome in medullary thyroid cancer complicated by functional diabetes insipidus, aortic dissection, jejunal intussusception, and paraneoplastic dysautonomia: remission with sorafenib without reduction in cortisol concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammami, Muhammad M; Duaiji, Najla; Mutairi, Ghazi; Aklabi, Sabah; Qattan, Nasser; Abouzied, Mohei El-Din M; Sous, Mohamed W

    2015-09-09

    Normalization of cortisol concentration by multikinase inhibitors have been reported in three patients with medullary thyroid cancer-related Cushing's syndrome. Aortic dissection has been reported in three patients with Cushing's syndrome. Diabetes insipidus without intrasellar metastasis, intestinal intussusception, and paraneoplastic dysautonomia have not been reported in medullary thyroid cancer. An adult male with metastatic medullary thyroid cancer presented with hyperglycemia, hypernatremia, hypokalemia, hypertension, acne-like rash, and diabetes insipidus (urine volume >8 L/d, osmolality 190 mOsm/kg). Serum cortisol, adrenocorticoitropic hormone, dehydroepiandrostenedione sulfate, and urinary free cortisol were elevated 8, 20, 4.4, and 340 folds, respectively. Pituitary imaging was normal. Computed tomography scan revealed jejunal intussusception and incidental abdominal aortic dissection. Sorafenib treatment was associated with Cushing's syndrome remission, elevated progesterone (>10 fold), normalization of dehydroepiandrostenedione sulfate, but persistently elevated cortisol concentration. Newly-developed proximal lower limb weakness and decreased salivation were associated with elevated ganglionic neuronal acetylcholine receptor (alpha-3) and borderline P/Q type calcium channel antibodies. Extreme cortisol concentration may have contributed to aortic dissection and suppressed antidiuretic hormone secretion; which combined with hypokalemia due cortisol activation of mineralocorticoid receptors, manifested as diabetes insipidus. This is the first report of paraneoplastic dysautonomia and jejunal intussusception in medullary thyroid cancer, they may be related to medullary thyroid cancer's neuroendocrine origin and metastasis, respectively. Remission of Cushing's syndrome without measurable reduction in cortisol concentration suggests a novel cortisol-independent mechanism of action or assay cross-reactivity. Normalization of dehydroepiandrostenedione

  12. Recurrent small intestine intussusception in a patient with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome Invaginación recurrente del intestino delgado en un paciente con síndrome de Pentz-Jeghers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orestis Ioannidis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Peutz-Jeghers syndrome is a rare hereditary autosomal dominant disease caused by a mutation of the tumor suppressor gene serine/threonine kinase 11 located in chromosome 19p13.3. It is characterized by the presence of extensive mucocutaneous pigmentation, especially of the lips and the occurrence of hamartomatous polyps throughout the gastrointestinal tract. Gastrointestinal hamartomas occur predominantly in the small intestine and can become symptomatic leading usually to intestinal obstruction and abdominal pain. We present a case of recurrent intestinal obstruction caused by small bowel intussusception treated by reduction, enterotomy and polypectomy and followed by intraoperative enteroscopy and endoscopic polypectomy.

  13. Heterotopic pancreas in Meckel′s diverticulum in a 7-year-old child with intussusception and recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding: Case report and literature review focusing on diagnostic controversies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanà Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Meckel′s diverticulum, the most common congenital abnormality of the small intestine, may be associated to heterotopic pancreas, often diagnosed incidentally on histopathological examination. Intussusception affects infants between the ages of 5 and 9 months, but it may also occur in older children, teenagers and adults, and in some cases can be derived by a Meckel′s diverticulum resulting in acute abdomen. We analyse the management and the recent literature on similar cases, describing diagnostic options. In May 2013, a 7-year-old girl admitted to our hospital with recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding, was discovered to have an ileoileal intussusception with a leading Meckel′s diverticulum with heterotopic pancreatic tissue. This association is rare evidence in children and its proper management can be controversial, in particular from a diagnostic point of view. In such cases, preoperative radiological diagnosis can be only suspected in the presence of suggestive signs, more often depicted by ultrasound or computed tomography scan. During laparotomy an accurate exploration of all ileum is recommended, for the possibility to find others heterotopic segments.

  14. 空气灌肠失败和晚期肠套迭的手术治疗%Surgical Treatment of Advanced Intussusceptions and Failure of Rectal Inflation Reduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐伟椿; 成守礼

    1983-01-01

    From Nov.,1975 to July,1982,80 cases(51 males and 29 females)of intussusceotion were operated on.Among them,31 rectal inflation reduction failed.49 cases were advanced intussusdeption including some small intestinal intussusception.66 cases were primary.62 children were aged under one.Most of them had either enlarged regional mesenteric lymph node or mobile cecum.14 had secondary intussusceptions,13 of whom aged over one.There were 5 cases of Meckel's diverticulum,4 polyps,4 ileal duplications and one allergic purpura complicated with hematoma in the anterior wall of the cecum.Manual reductions were accomplished in 58 patients,together with simultaneous appendectomy.No plication of the cecum was attempted nor relapse noted.Intestinal resection followed by anastomosis was performed in 22 cases for intestinal gangrene.While rectal inflation on two patients with intestinal perforation was not successful,surgical repair was performed immediately.Only one death due to preoperative pneumonia and chickenpox was recorded.Thus mortality rate was 1.25%.%@@ 肠套迭是婴儿常见的急腹症,自从应用空气灌肠治疗以来,早期肠套迭的整复治疗取得了肯定的疗效,显著地降低了手术率.但对于复杂型和晚期肠套迭的病例使用空气灌肠,不但难以奏效,而且往往发生危险,而仍需手术治疗.

  15. INTESTINAL INTUSSUSCEPTION DUE TO CONCURRENT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Hymenolepis nana and Dentostomella ... worms (H. nana and D. translucida) were observed in the lumen of the intestine with severe cellular infiltration .... helminthosis and Balantidosis in Red monkey (Erythrocebus patas) in Ibadan Nigeria Nigerian ...

  16. Stapled trans-anal rectal resection (STARR) by a new dedicated device for the surgical treatment of obstructed defaecation syndrome caused by rectal intussusception and rectocele: early results of a multicenter prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renzi, Adolfo; Talento, Pasquale; Giardiello, Cristiano; Angelone, Giovanni; Izzo, Domenico; Di Sarno, Giandomenico

    2008-10-01

    Obstructed defaecation syndrome (ODS) represents a very common clinical problem. The aim of the this prospective multicenter study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of stapler trans-anal rectal resection (STARR) performed by a new dedicated device, CCS-30 Contour Transtar, in patients with ODS caused by rectal intussusception (RI) and/or rectocele (RE). All the patients who underwent STARR for ODS caused by RI and/or RE at Colorectal Surgery Units of S. Stefano Hospital, Naples, Gepos Hospital, Telese, Benevento and S. Maria della Pietà Hospital, Casoria, Naples, Italy were prospectively introduced into a database. Preoperatively, all the patients underwent anorectal manometry and cinedefecography. The grade of ODS was assessed using a dedicated obstructed defaecation syndrome score (ODS-S). All the patients with a ODS-S >or=12 and RI and/or RE were enrolled. Patients were followed up clinically at 6 months. Thirty patients, 28 (93.3%) women, mean age 56.6+/-12.7 years, underwent STARR, by Transtar, between February and October 2006. Preoperatively, ODS-S was 15.8+/-2.4. RI was present in 26 (89.6%) and RE (34.4+/-15.2 mm) in 27 (93.1%) patients. No major postoperative complications occurred. The length of hospital stay was 2.5+/-0.6 days. At 6-month follow-up, ODS-S was 5.0+/-2.3 (P<0.001). Successful outcome was achieved in 25 (86.2%) patients. STARR, performed by the new dedicated device, CCS-30 Contour Transtar, seems to be an effective and safe procedure to treat ODS caused by RE and/or RI. A longer follow-up and a larger number of patients is needed to confirm these results.

  17. Multiple Intussusceptions Associated with Polycythemia in an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Androgens are hormones that are based on the structure ... physique (13.5%), as well as certain occupations (i.e., police ... Department of Medicine, St. Joseph's Regional Medical Center, Paterson, NJ, USA, 1Department of Gastroenterology,.

  18. Intestinal intussusception due to concurrent infections with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hymenolepis nana and Dentostomella translucida) was observed in an African giant rat (Cricetomys gambianus, Waterhouse, 1840). The condition was observed as an incidental finding before an experimental dissection of the animals in the ...

  19. in diagnosis of secondary intussusception in children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ahmed Abougabal

    2014-12-02

    Dec 2, 2014 ... adjusting the peak kilovoltage and tube current settings. (mAs) to ... The medical ethics were considered and the protocol of the research was .... principles to minimize the radiation exposure to children while maintaining ...

  20. Factors determining clinical outcomes in intussusception in the ...

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    di verti culum, intestinal duplication cysts, polyps and intestinal malignancy the most commonly occurring lead points.[2,3] If intuss usception is not rapidly reduced, congestion .... of palpable intussusceptum on rectal examination, serology results, radiological investigations including PR, surgical procedure and findings, and ...

  1. Chronic Ileocecal Intussusception Secondary to Non-Hodgkins ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to have visible peristalsis. The surgical review found non-contributory findings. A digital rectal exam was ... On digital rectal examination; the anal tone was normal with a palpable non-tender mass in the right iliac fossa. ... (10–12), duplication cysts, vascular malformations, inverted appendiceal stumps, parasites (eg, Ascaris.

  2. ILEOCOLIC INTUSSUSCEPTION IN A COCKER SPANIEL DOG: A CASE REPORT

    OpenAIRE

    M. A. Khan, M. M. Ali, S. Azeem, A. Safdar, Ijaz A. Ziaullah and M. T. Sajjad

    2011-01-01

    A four-years-old female cocker spaniel dog was presented with a history of vomiting and tenesmus for the last six days. There was no defecation, only fresh blood was coming from rectum and the animal was taking only a few sips of water for last two days. Physical examination revealed that the animal was dehydrated. Tenderness was appreciable on abdominal palpation while a firm, painful mass was felt in the mid-caudal abdomen. The clinical history and physical examination was suggestive of int...

  3. Adult intussusception: An unlikely diagnosis | Nicolaou | SA Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SA Journal of Radiology. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 21, No 1 (2017) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  4. Childhood intussusception at the Moi teaching and referral hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fullscreen Fullscreen Off. http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/eamj.v81i9.9218 · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of Use · Contact AJOL · News. OTHER RESOURCES... for Researchers · for Journals ...

  5. Intestinal intussusception and occlusion caused by small bowel polyps in the Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. Management by combined intraoperative enteroscopy and resection through minimal enterostomy: case report Intussuscepção intestinal e oclusão intestinal causada por pólipos em intestino delgado na síndrome Peutz-Jeghers. Tratamento com ressecção por enterotomia associado a enteroscopia intra-operatória: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim J. Gama-Rodrigues

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The Peutz-Jeghers syndrome is a hereditary disease that requires frequent endoscopic and surgical intervention, leading to secondary complications such as short bowel syndrome. CASE REPORT: This paper reports on a 15-year-old male patient with a family history of the disease, who underwent surgery for treatment of an intestinal occlusion due to a small intestine intussusception. DISCUSSION: An intra-operative fiberscopic procedure was included for the detection and treatment of numerous polyps distributed along the small intestine. Enterotomy was performed to treat only the larger polyps, therefore limiting the intestinal resection to smaller segments. The postoperative follow-up was uneventful. CONCLUSION: We point out the importance of conservative treatment for patients with this syndrome, especially those who will undergo repeated surgical interventions because of clinical manifestation while they are still young.A síndrome de Peutz-Jeghers é uma doença de caráter hereditário que freqüentemente requer intervenções endoscópicas e cirúrgicas repetidas, levando a complicações secundárias como, por exemplo, a síndrome do intestino curto. RELATO DE CASO: Relatamos neste artigo o caso de paciente de 15 anos, masculino, com história familiar para a doença, que foi submetido ao procedimento cirúrgico para tratar oclusão devido a intussucepção de intestino delgado. DISCUSSÃO: Associou-se método fibroscópico intra-operatório com a finalidade de detecção e ressecção de numerosos pólipos distribuídos em todo o intestino delgado. Realizaram-se enterotomias para a retirada dos pólipos maiores, restringindo-se, portanto, a ressecção intestinal a segmentos menores. A evolução clínica foi boa. CONCLUSÃO: Ressalta-se a importância do manejo de forma conservadora dos pacientes portadores desta síndrome, principalmente naqueles cujas manifestações clínicas de importância cirúrgica aparecem precocemente.

  6. CLINICAL CASES OF INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION WITH FOREIGN BODIES AND INTUSSUSCEPTION IN DOGS

    OpenAIRE

    KOIKE, Toshio; OTOMO, Kanjuro; KUDO, Tadaaki; SAKAI, Tamotsu

    1981-01-01

    The medical records of dogs treated in our veterinary hospital during a period of 15 years until 1978 were reviewed. Intestinal obstruction was diagnosed in 47 dogs, among which 51.06% were under 12 months of age and 80.85% were under 3 years. The period which elasped from the appearance of clinical signs to the operation of the obstructed intestines averaged about 5 days (ranging from 1 to 24 days). The presurgical hematological findings of 5 dogs with intestinal obstruction suggested hemoco...

  7. Perinatal survival of a fetus with intestinal volvulus and intussusception: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohuoba, Esohe; Fruhman, Gary; Olutoye, Oluyinka; Zacharias, Nikolaos

    2013-10-01

    Fetal intestinal volvulus is a rare life-threatening condition. Late diagnosis of volvulus contributes to high rate of morbidity and mortality. It has variable degrees of presentation and survival. Intrauterine volvulus may be complicated by intestinal atresia due to ischemic necrosis. To our knowledge, there are three reported cases of term fetal demise. We report a case of fetal intestinal volvulus with perinatal survival of the largest term infant described with this complication to date. The volvulus was associated with type 3A jejunal atresia and intestinal pathology was noted on prenatal ultrasound. The infant was born via urgent cesarean delivery at 37(6/7) weeks of gestation and underwent emergent exploratory laparotomy with resection of small bowel and primary end-to-end anastomosis. Intrauterine intestinal volvulus may be suspected on prenatal ultrasound but only definitively diagnosed postnatally. Signs of fetal distress and volvulus are rarely associated with reports of survival in the term fetus. We review reported cases of prenatally suspected volvulus in infants documented to survive past the neonatal period. As fetal volvulus and most intestinal atresias/stenoses manifest during the third trimester, we recommend that the limited fetal anatomical survey during growth ultrasounds at 32 to 36 weeks routinely include an assessment of the fetal bowel.

  8. PAEDIATRIC SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    vascular changes which occur with intussusception, and is possibly predictive of bowel necrosis.7 Nonoperative reduction is the primary aim once a ..... an alternative method of nonoperative treatment for childhood intussusception. J Pediatr ...

  9. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intussusception is usually a disease of children aged between 6 months and 4 ... In adults intussusceptions may be ileocolic, colocolic, entero- enteric or .... sions, suture lines, intestinal tubes) and Meckel's diverticulum, coeliac sprue, HIV ...

  10. Telescoping Intestine in an Adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaldoon Shaheen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Protrusion of a bowel segment into another (intussusception produces severe abdominal pain and culminates in intestinal obstruction. In adults, intestinal obstruction due to intussusception is relatively rare phenomenon, as it accounts for minority of intestinal obstructions in this population demographic. Organic lesion is usually identifiable as the cause of adult intussusceptions, neoplasms account for the majority. Therefore, surgical resection without reduction is almost always necessary and is advocated as the best treatment of adult intussusception. Here, we describe a rare case of a 44-year-old male with a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma involving the terminal ileum, which had caused ileocolic intussusception and subsequently developed intestinal obstruction requiring surgical intervention. This case emphasizes the importance of recognizing intussusception as the initial presentation for bowel malignancy.

  11. Recurrent small intestine intussusception in a patient with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome Invaginación recurrente del intestino delgado en un paciente con síndrome de Pentz-Jeghers

    OpenAIRE

    Orestis Ioannidis; Styliani Papaemmanouil; George Paraskevas; Anastasios Kotronis; Stavros Chatzopoulos; Athina Konstantara; Nikolaos Papadimitriou; Apostolos Makrantonakis; Emmanouil Kakoutis

    2012-01-01

    Peutz-Jeghers syndrome is a rare hereditary autosomal dominant disease caused by a mutation of the tumor suppressor gene serine/threonine kinase 11 located in chromosome 19p13.3. It is characterized by the presence of extensive mucocutaneous pigmentation, especially of the lips and the occurrence of hamartomatous polyps throughout the gastrointestinal tract. Gastrointestinal hamartomas occur predominantly in the small intestine and can become symptomatic leading usually to intestinal obstruct...

  12. Gastric invagination in adults as a rare cause of constitutional syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávila Arias, Cristina; Milena Muñoz, Ana; Valero González, María Ángeles; Céspedes Mas, Mariano

    2017-02-01

    This article describes and illustrates the case of an adult patient with clinical symptoms of constitutional syndrome, postprandial discomfort and a mass in the left lateral abdominal region caused by a gastric intussusception with a fundal adenoma as the head of the invagination. The intussusception was diagnosed by MRI (magnetic resonance imaging).

  13. Case series

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    1 juin 2012 ... ... Ren- Xuan Guo, and Ke-Jian Guo. Adult intussusception: A retrospective review of 41 cases. World J Gastroenterol. 2009 Jul 14;15(26):3303-8. This article on PubMed. 14. Abou-Nukta F, Gutweiler J, Khaw J, Yavorek G. Giant lipoma causing a colo-colonic intussusception. Am Surg. 2007;73(4):417. This.

  14. Chronic appendicitis and complete appendiceal invagination: UC, CT and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, Gabriel; Seehaus, Alberto; Ocantos, Jorge; Diaz, Claudia; Coccaro, Nicolas; Piccioni, Hector

    2003-01-01

    The appendiceal intussusception is a rare entity. Usually there is a predisposing factor such as a tumor, mucocele, etc. We report the case of a 61 years old female patient, with recurrent abdominal pain, localized in the right lower quadrant. We performed different diagnostic imaging exams including: double-contrast barium enema, enteroclysis, ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance. After endoscopy a surgical procedure removed the appendix. The pathological anatomy confirmed the diagnosis of an appendiceal intussusception, complicated with a chronic inflammatory process. Appendiceal intussusception and chronic appendicitis are infrequent; it is even more uncommon the association of both entities. In addition, it was not found a predisposing cause to intussusception. For the reasons described above, we conclude that this case is an unusual presentation of appendiceal intussusception, not previously reported. (author)

  15. [Appendectomy for appendicitis by colonoscopy after a cecal invagination of the appendix during childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, P; Delacoste, F; Chevassus, P; Espin, A; Kadam, A; Atger, J

    2007-01-01

    Appendiceal intussusception (the inside-out appendix) was often practiced in pediatric surgery when the appendectomy was performed during laparotomy. Complications are exceptional. We report the first case of appendiceal intussusception in an adult appendectomized by this procedure during childhood, reviewing the radiological aspect, pathogenesis, and treatment. This delayed complication of appendiceal intussusception should be known to the surgeon. Treatment during colonoscopy is possible. This inflammation of the vaginated appendix can be prevented by coagulating the appendicular vessels to the serous membrane before turning it inside-out.

  16. A classical case of Peutz–Jeghers syndrome with brief review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Santosh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available PJS is an autosomal dominant genetic disease associated with melanin pigment spots on the oral mucosa, lips, nasal alae, palm and soles, as well as hamartomatous polyps in the alimentary canal. Polyps are often a cause of intussusception in the affected patients. Cancers of gastrointestinal system, uterus and breast are common in patients with PJS. Long-term follow-up is required to prevent intussusception in children and cancer in adults. We report a classical case of Peutz–Jeghers syndrome presenting with jejunoileal intussusception in a 9 year old child.

  17. Pregnancy outcome following non-obstetric abdominal surgery in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-01-08

    Jan 8, 2016 ... abdominal surgeries in Jos University Teaching Hospital. ... each (2.0%) had a transverse colon injury, postoperative adhesion bands, ruptured uterus and urinary .... Anaesthetic management of intussusception in Pregnancy.

  18. Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy: Unusual Manifestations and Disturbing Sequelae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Gerald E.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    This study documents previously unreported findings in cases of Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy (in which a mother fabricates an illness in her child). In the reported case, esophageal perforation, retrograde intussusception, tooth loss, and bradycardia were found. (Author/DB)

  19. ISSN 2073-9990 East Cent Afr J Surg

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Appendicular perforation (25.4%) and gangrenous intussusception (23.8%) were the ... Successful management of peritonitis requires timely surgical intervention to ... perforations (especially peptic ulcer perforations) are more common in ...

  20. Vom work Book Journal, 2011 1st Edition PDF

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    Intestinal obstructive diseases are medical and surgical emergencies ... sequel to intussusception, volvulus, torsion, hernia .... patients (dogs and cats) presented intestinal volvulus .... LARSEN, L. H., and BELLENGER C. R (1974): Stomach.

  1. Intussuscepção em linfoma Não-Hodgkin Intussuception in Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra O. Ehrhardt

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Intussusception in adults is a rare condition and it can occur as a gastric complication from non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Such complications can be difficult to diagnose because of ill-defined symptoms. Methods of imaging such as abdominal X-rays, ultrasonography, tomography and colonoscopy are useful for its diagnosis. Here a female patient with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma that evolved to intussusception of bowels, the regression of which was achieved by clinical and chemotherapeutic treatment without surgical intervention.

  2. The influence of age on posterior pelvic floor dysfunction in women with obstructed defecation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murad-Regadas, S M; Rodrigues, L V; Furtado, D C; Regadas, F S P; Olivia da S Fernandes, G; Regadas Filho, F S P; Gondim, A C; de Paula Joca da Silva, R

    2012-06-01

    Knowledge of risk factors is particularly useful to prevent or manage pelvic floor dysfunction but although a number of such factors have been proposed, results remain inconsistent. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of aging on the incidence of posterior pelvic floor disorders in women with obstructed defecation syndrome evaluated using echodefecography. A total of 334 patients with obstructed defecation were evaluated using echodefecography in order to quantify posterior pelvic floor dysfunction (rectocele, intussusception, mucosal prolapse, paradoxical contraction or non-relaxation of the puborectalis muscle, and grade III enterocele/sigmoidocele). Patients were grouped according to the age (Group I = patients up to 50 years of age; Group II = patients over 50 years of age) to evaluate the isolated and associated incidence of dysfunctions. To evaluate the relationship between dysfunction and age-related changes, patients were also stratified into decades. Group I included 196 patients and Group II included 138. The incidence of significant rectocele, intussusception, rectocele associated with intussusception, rectocele associated with mucosal prolapse and 3 associated disorders was higher in Group II, whereas anismus was more prevalent in Group I. The incidence of significant rectocele, intussusception, mucosal prolapse and grade III enterocele/sigmoidocele was found to increase with age. Conversely, anismus decreased with age. Aging was shown to influence the incidence of posterior pelvic floor disorders (rectocele, intussusception, mucosa prolapse and enterocele/sigmoidocele), but not the incidence of anismus, in women with obstructed defecation syndrome.

  3. Complete invagination of vermiform appendix with adenocarcinoma: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Young Lan; Choi, Chul Soon; Kim, Ho Chul; Bae Sang Hoon; Kim, Duck Hwan

    2000-01-01

    Appendiceal intussusception is a very rare pathological condition, an incidence, as revealed by appendectomy specimens, of only 0.01 percent. There are various types among which complete invagination of the appendix is very rare. We encountered a case of intussusception of the appendix with complete invagination induced by appendiceal adenocarcinoma. A preoperative diagnosis of appendiceal adenocarcinoma and intussusception was not possible, but a final pathological report confirmed these conditions and retrospective analysis of a barium enema showed a finger-like filling defect of the cecum, a relatively specific finding in such cases. We describe a case involving a 39-year old man who one month earlier had noted the onset of pain in the right lower abdomen. (author)

  4. Acute appendicitis with unusual dual pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddiough, Georgina E; Bhatti, Imran; Ratliff, David A

    2012-01-01

    Meckel's diverticulum is a rare congenital abnormality arising due to the persistence of the vitelline duct in 1-3% of the population. Clinical presentation is varied and includes rectal bleeding, intestinal obstruction, diverticulitis and ulceration; therefore diagnosis can be difficult. We report a case of acute appendicitis complicated by persistent post operative small bowel obstruction. Further surgical examination of the bowel revealed an non-inflamed, inverted Meckel's diverticulum causing intussusception. Intestinal obstruction in patients with Meckel's diverticulum may be caused by volvulus, intussusception or incarceration of the diverticulum into a hernia. Obstruction secondary to intussusception is relatively uncommon and frequently leads to a confusing and complicated clinical picture. Consideration of Meckel's diverticulum although a rare diagnosis is imperative and this case raises the question "should surgeons routinely examine the bowel for Meckel's diverticulum at laparoscopy?"

  5. Complete invagination of vermiform appendix with adenocarcinoma: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Young Lan; Choi, Chul Soon; Kim, Ho Chul; Bae Sang Hoon; Kim, Duck Hwan [Kang Dong Sacred Heart Hospital, Collge of Medicine, Hallym University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-09-01

    Appendiceal intussusception is a very rare pathological condition, an incidence, as revealed by appendectomy specimens, of only 0.01 percent. There are various types among which complete invagination of the appendix is very rare. We encountered a case of intussusception of the appendix with complete invagination induced by appendiceal adenocarcinoma. A preoperative diagnosis of appendiceal adenocarcinoma and intussusception was not possible, but a final pathological report confirmed these conditions and retrospective analysis of a barium enema showed a finger-like filling defect of the cecum, a relatively specific finding in such cases. We describe a case involving a 39-year old man who one month earlier had noted the onset of pain in the right lower abdomen. (author)

  6. Influence of age, mode of delivery and parity on the prevalence of posterior pelvic floor dysfunctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sthela Maria Murad-Regadas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: The correlation between vaginal delivery, age and pelvic floor dysfunctions involving obstructed defecation is still a matter of controversy. OBJECTIVES: To determine the influence of age, mode of delivery and parity on the prevalence of posterior pelvic floor dysfunctions in women with obstructed defecation syndrome. METHODS: Four hundred sixty-nine females with obstructed defecation syndrome were retrospectively evaluated using dynamic 3D ultrasonography to quantify posterior pelvic floor dysfunctions (rectocele grade II or III, rectal intussusception, paradoxical contraction/non-relaxation of the puborectalis and entero/ sigmoidocele grade III. In addition, sphincter damage was evaluated. Patients were grouped according to age (50y and stratified by mode of delivery and parity: group I (50y: 251 patients, 60 nulliparous, 148 vaginal delivery and 43 only caesarean section. Additionally, patients were stratified by number of vaginal deliveries: 0 - nulliparous (n = 135, 1 - vaginal (n = 46, >1 - vaginal (n = 166. RESULTS: Rectocele grade II or III, intussusception, rectocele + intussusception and sphincter damage were more prevalent in Group II (P = 0.0432; P = 0.0028; P = 0.0178; P = 0.0001. The stratified groups (nulliparous, vaginal delivery and cesarean did not differ significantly with regard to rectocele, intussusception or anismus in each age group. Entero/sigmoidocele was more prevalent in the vaginal group 50y. No correlation was found between rectocele and the number of vaginal deliveries. CONCLUSION: Higher age (>50 years was shown to influence the prevalence of significant rectocele, intussusception and sphincter damage in women. However, delivery mode and parity were not correlated with the prevalence of rectocele, intussusception and anismus in women with obstructed defecation.

  7. Prospective assessment of interobserver agreement for defecography in fecal incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobben, Annette C; Wiersma, Tjeerd G; Janssen, Lucas W M; de Vos, Rien; Terra, Maaike P; Baeten, Cor G; Stoker, Jaap

    2005-11-01

    The primary aim of our study was to determine the interobserver agreement of defecography in diagnosing enterocele, anterior rectocele, intussusception, and anismus in fecal-incontinent patients. The subsidiary aim was to evaluate the influence of level of experience on interpreting defecography. Defecography was performed in 105 consecutive fecal-incontinent patients. Observers were classified by level of experience and their findings were compared with the findings of an expert radiologist. The quality of the expert radiologist's findings was evaluated by an intraobserver agreement procedure. Intraobserver agreement was good to very good except for anismus: incomplete evacuation after 30 sec (kappa, 0.55) and puborectalis impression (kappa, 0.54). Interobserver agreement for enterocele and rectocele was good (kappa, 0.66 for both) and for intussusception, fair (kappa, 0.29). Interobserver agreement for anismus: incomplete evacuation after 30 sec was moderate (kappa, 0.47), and for anismus: puborectalis impression was fair (kappa, 0.24). Agreement in grading of enterocele and rectocele was good (kappa, 0.64 and 0.72, respectively) and for intussusception, fair (kappa, 0.39). Agreement separated by experience level was very good for rectocele (kappa, 0.83) and grading of rectoceles (kappa, 0.83) and moderate for intussusception (kappa, 0.44) at the most experienced level. For enterocele and grading, experience level did not influence the reproducibility. Reproducibility for enterocele, anterior rectocele, and severity grading is good, but for intussusception is fair to moderate. For anismus, the diagnosis of incomplete evacuation after 30 sec is more reproducible than puborectalis impression. The level of experience seems to play a role in diagnosing anterior rectocele and its grading and in diagnosing intussusception.

  8. Influence of age, mode of delivery and parity on the prevalence of posterior pelvic floor dysfunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murad-Regadas, Sthela Maria; Regadas, Francisco Sergio P; Rodrigues, Lusmar Veras; Furtado, Débora Couto; Gondim, Ana Cecília; Dealcanfreitas, Iris Daiana

    2011-01-01

    The correlation between vaginal delivery, age and pelvic floor dysfunctions involving obstructed defecation is still a matter of controversy. To determine the influence of age, mode of delivery and parity on the prevalence of posterior pelvic floor dysfunctions in women with obstructed defecation syndrome. Four hundred sixty-nine females with obstructed defecation syndrome were retrospectively evaluated using dynamic 3D ultrasonography to quantify posterior pelvic floor dysfunctions (rectocele grade II or III, rectal intussusception, paradoxical contraction/non-relaxation of the puborectalis and entero/ sigmoidocele grade III). In addition, sphincter damage was evaluated. Patients were grouped according to age (≤50y x >50y) and stratified by mode of delivery and parity: group I (≤50y): 218 patients, 75 nulliparous, 64 vaginal delivery and 79 only cesarean section and group II (>50y): 251 patients, 60 nulliparous, 148 vaginal delivery and 43 only caesarean section. Additionally, patients were stratified by number of vaginal deliveries: 0 - nulliparous (n = 135), 1 - vaginal (n = 46), >1 - vaginal (n = 166). Rectocele grade II or III, intussusception, rectocele + intussusception and sphincter damage were more prevalent in Group II (P = 0.0432; P = 0.0028; P = 0.0178; P = 0.0001). The stratified groups (nulliparous, vaginal delivery and cesarean) did not differ significantly with regard to rectocele, intussusception or anismus in each age group. Entero/sigmoidocele was more prevalent in the vaginal group 50y. No correlation was found between rectocele and the number of vaginal deliveries. Higher age (>50 years) was shown to influence the prevalence of significant rectocele, intussusception and sphincter damage in women. However, delivery mode and parity were not correlated with the prevalence of rectocele, intussusception and anismus in women with obstructed defecation.

  9. A 16-Year-Old Female with Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mufti Munsurar Rahman

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Peutz-Jeghers syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disorder of hamartomatous polyposis of the gastrointestinal tract, with pigmentation around lips and macules on the buccal mucosa that typically manifests itself as recurrent colicky abdominal pain and intestinal obstruction due to intussusception. Here we report a case of a 16-year-old girl who presented with abdominal pain, vomiting and previous history of laparotomy for intussusception. Multiple well demarcated black pigmented macules on lips, perioral region, buccal mucosa, digits, palms and soles were noted. She was diagnosed as a case of Peutz-Jeghers syndrome and managed conservatively.

  10. Gastritis Cystica Polyposa with Gastroduodenal Intussuception: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwak, Soon Hyuk; Bae, Il Hun; Park, Kil Sun; Lee, Seung Young; Jeon, Min Hee; Cho, Bum Sang; Kamg, Min Ho; Ryu, Dong Hee; Lee, Ho Chang

    2011-01-01

    Gastritis cystica polyposa is an uncommon benign lesion that normally occurs on the gastric side of a gastroenterostomy site but is rarely found in patients without a prior history of stomach surgery. We report a case of a 41-year-old woman with gastrodeuodenal intussusception due to gastritis cystica polyposa that developed in an unoperated stomach. CT revealed gastroduodenal intussusception and a cystic and solid mass with fat density in the second portion of the duodenum. Surgery and a pathologic examination confirmed gastritis cystica polyposa.

  11. Gastritis Cystica Polyposa with Gastroduodenal Intussuception: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Soon Hyuk; Bae, Il Hun; Park, Kil Sun; Lee, Seung Young; Jeon, Min Hee; Cho, Bum Sang; Kamg, Min Ho [Dept. of Radilogy, College of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Chonbuk National University, Chonju (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Dong Hee [Dept. of Surergy, College of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Chonbuk National University, Chonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ho Chang [Dept. of Pathology, College of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Chonbuk National University, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    Gastritis cystica polyposa is an uncommon benign lesion that normally occurs on the gastric side of a gastroenterostomy site but is rarely found in patients without a prior history of stomach surgery. We report a case of a 41-year-old woman with gastrodeuodenal intussusception due to gastritis cystica polyposa that developed in an unoperated stomach. CT revealed gastroduodenal intussusception and a cystic and solid mass with fat density in the second portion of the duodenum. Surgery and a pathologic examination confirmed gastritis cystica polyposa.

  12. Sudan Journal of Medical Sciences - Vol 3, No 4 (2008)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute intussusception in children seen at El Obeid Hospital, Western Sudan. EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT ... Incidence of ventricular arrhythmias, brady-arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death in Sudanese Patients with acute Myocardial Infarction · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ...

  13. A single-institution experience with hydrostatic reduction for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background/purpose Hydrostatic reduction for intussusception has the benefit ... The v2-test was used to compare categorical variables, and a P value of 0.05 was ... Conclusion Although less than half of the patients presenting with childhood ...

  14. Appendiceal Endometriosis: A case Report and Literature Review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Appendiceal endometriosis is a very rare and usually asymptomatic condiction, but can result in severe complications such as intestinal perforation, massive gastrointestinal bleeding or intussusception. We report a case of endometriosis of the appendix presenting as acute appendicitis. The patient was a 36 year old ...

  15. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2016-05-10

    May 10, 2016 ... 34.5%) and resection and stoma (1, 3.4%). The median duration of stay was 6 days (range 1-25). Ascariasis was the most common cause of IO in .... intussusceptions at a tertiary care hospital in northwestern. Tanzania: a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge in resource- limited setting. Ital. J. Pediatr. 2014;.

  16. Diagnostic value of ultrasonography in evaluation and management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Common causes of acute abdominal emergencies in pediatric patients as noted on ultrasonography included nonspecifi c pain (28%), abdominal abscess (21%), acute appendicitis (7%) and intussusception (7%). Ultrasonography was diagnostic in 45.2% cases and supportive in 12.3% of the cases. As for as the fi ...

  17. Case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cqq1a

    2010-10-21

    Oct 21, 2010 ... Mucocele can also occur due to occlusion of the lumen by endometriosis or carcinoid tumour. The clinical presentation of ... intussusception or endometriosis. An intra-abdominal mass is palpated by the ... there is evidence of malignancy such as peritoneal deposits [9]. Some suggest that a frozen-section ...

  18. Value of post-licensure data on benefits and risks of vaccination to inform vaccine policy: The example of rotavirus vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parashar, Umesh D; Cortese, Margaret M; Payne, Daniel C; Lopman, Benjamin; Yen, Catherine; Tate, Jacqueline E

    2015-11-27

    In 1999, the first rhesus-human reassortant rotavirus vaccine licensed in the United States was withdrawn within a year of its introduction after it was linked with intussusception at a rate of ∼1 excess case per 10,000 vaccinated infants. While clinical trials of 60,000-70,000 infants of each of the two current live oral rotavirus vaccines, RotaTeq (RV5) and Rotarix (RV1), did not find an association with intussusception, post-licensure studies have documented a risk in several high and middle income countries, at a rate of ∼1-6 excess cases per 100,000 vaccinated infants. However, considering this low risk against the large health benefits of vaccination that have been observed in many countries, including in countries with a documented vaccine-associated intussusception risk, policy makers and health organizations around the world continue to support the routine use of RV1 and RV5 in national infant immunization programs. Because the risk and benefit data from affluent settings may not be directly applicable to developing countries, further characterization of any associated intussusception risk following rotavirus vaccination as well as the health benefits of vaccination is desirable for low income settings. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Gastrointestinal Kaposi Sarcoma Presenting In A Nigeria African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adult intussusception is a rare condition that is seen once in a while in surgical practice, 1. In this report we the case of a thirty –five year old Nigeria male on medical treatment of earlier diagnosed AIDS who had no evidence of cutaneous Kaposi sarcoma. He later presented with a palpable right lower quadrant mass and ...

  20. Prospective assessment of interobserver agreement for defecography in fecal incontinence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dobben, Annette C.; Wiersma, Tjeerd G.; Janssen, Lucas W. M.; de Vos, Rien; Terra, Maaike P.; Baeten, Cor G.; Stoker, Jaap

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The primary aim of our study was to determine the interobserver agreement of defecography in diagnosing enterocele, anterior rectocele, intussusception, and anismus in fecal-incontinent patients. The subsidiary aim was to evaluate the influence of level of experience on interpreting

  1. Intestinal inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour | Ntloko | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusions. Surgery with tumour-free resection margins is the gold standard of care of adult and paediatric I-IMFTs. Heightened recognition of I-IMFT, albeit rare, as a cause of intestinal obstruction, including intussusception, is necessary for preoperative suspicion of I-IMFT. SAJS, VOL 49, NO. 4, NOVEMBER 2011 ...

  2. Case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Raoul

    2009-10-15

    Oct 15, 2009 ... Meckel's diverticulum: a case report from the University Hospital Center ... The Pan African Medical Journal - ISSN 1937-8688. ... Usually discovered incidentally; it is often the cause of acute abdominal emergencies. It may present as intestinal obstruction with volvulus, intussusceptions or peritonitis due to ...

  3. Ileus bij kinderen zonder eerdere buikoperaties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Poll, Daan; de Beer, Sjoerd A.; de Jong, Justin R.; Heij, Hugo A.

    2015-01-01

    In children with no prior history of abdominal surgery and no signs of intussusception or incarcerated inguinal hernia, mechanical ileus may have a congenital cause such as malrotation with volvulus or a persistent omphalomesenteric duct. Acquired causes include sigmoid volvulus. We present two

  4. African Journal of Paediatric Surgery - Vol 3, No 1 (2006)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute Intussusception in childhood: Aspects of epidemiologic, Clinical Features and Management at Children's Hospital, Donka, Guinea Conakry · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. M Keita, O T Barry, N Doumbouya, A F Diallo, B M Toure, I Balde, 1-3 ...

  5. ISSN 2073-9990 East Cent. Afr. J. surg. (Online) 55

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hp 630 Dual Core

    (n 18) in patients with gangrenous bowel, manual reduction (n 12) and resection and primary anastomosis (n 3) in patients with viable bowel, and resection and anastomosis (n 7) in all patients with bowel perforation. The site of intussusception was ileo ileal in 2 (4.4%) cases, ileo ceacal in 7 (15.6%) cases, ileo colonic in 23 ...

  6. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    Gangrenous sigmoid. 6. 46.2. Colorectal cancer. 3. 23.1. Anorectal cancer. 1. 7.7. Ileosigmoid knotting. 1. 7.7. Penetrating abdominal injury. 1. 7.7. Intussusceptions. 1. 7.7. Total. 13 62.0%. Myocardial infarctions. Gangrenous sigmoid. 2. 66.7. Fournier's gangrene. 1. 33.3. Total. 3. 14.3. Respiratory failure. Colorectal cancer.

  7. Laparoscopic right hemicolectomy for intestinal intussuception.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kiernan, F

    2012-09-01

    Adult intussusception is rare and usually associated with carcinoma in 50% of the cases. These have traditionally been managed using an open technique. We herein describe a laparoscopic extended right hemicolectomy in a 62-year-old lady with an intussuception secondary to a transverse colonic tumor.

  8. Lipomatosis of the jejunum with volvulus: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Kyung A; Bae, Kyung Eun; Kim, Soo Hyun; Kang, Mi Jin; Lee, Ji Hae; Lee, Han Bee; Kim, Jae Hyun; Jeong, Myeong Ja; Kim, Hyun Jung

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal lipomatosis is an extremely rare disease that is characterized by numerous lipomas of the intestine. This condition is usually asymptomatic, but clinical presentation is determined by intussusceptions, volvulus, or ulceration. We report a case of intestinal lipomatosis of the jejunum with volvulus and describe the characteristic computed tomography findings that were used to make a preoperative diagnosis.

  9. Lipomatosis of the jejunum with volvulus: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Kyung A; Bae, Kyung Eun; Kim, Soo Hyun; Kang, Mi Jin; Lee, Ji Hae; Lee, Han Bee; Kim, Jae Hyun; Jeong, Myeong Ja; Kim, Hyun Jung [Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul, (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    Intestinal lipomatosis is an extremely rare disease that is characterized by numerous lipomas of the intestine. This condition is usually asymptomatic, but clinical presentation is determined by intussusceptions, volvulus, or ulceration. We report a case of intestinal lipomatosis of the jejunum with volvulus and describe the characteristic computed tomography findings that were used to make a preoperative diagnosis.

  10. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perry, Paul A. Vol 12, No 4 (2016) - Articles Meckel's diverticulum: the lead point of intrauterine intussusception with subsequent intestinal atresia in a newborn. Abstract PDF. ISSN: 1687-4137. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL ...

  11. Case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-09-03

    Sep 3, 2015 ... The biological test showed no hydro electrolytic disorders with normal hemoglobin and normal renal function. The abdominal CT-Scan showed signs of bowel obstruction due to a volvulus with intussusception without ischemia. The patient was operated urgently; the exploration has revealed a small bowel ...

  12. A rare cause of coffee-ground vomiting: Retrograde jejunogastric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Retrograde jejunogastric intussusception is a well-recognised, rare, but potentially fatal long-term complication of gastrojejunostomy or Billroth II reconstruction. Only about 200 cases have been reported in the literature to date. Diagnosis of this condition is difficult in most cases. To avoid mortality, earlydiagnosis and prompt ...

  13. Role of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in diagnosis of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim of the work: To assess the role of multidetector computed tomographic imaging in the diagnosis of secondary intussusception with pathological leading points in children. Materials and methods: This study is a retrospective study including 12 children referred to the radiodiagnosis department at Alexandria University ...

  14. East and Central African Journal of Surgery - Volume 14 Number 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    jen

    About 15 years ago caeco-colic intussusception was the leading cause of intestinal obstruction in adult patients seen at. Kibogora hospital1. The pattern of intestinal obstruction is an indirect indicator of how well surgical services are developed in a certain region. Holcombe2 compared the relative plethora of hernia and the.

  15. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    This is partly due to the fact that it is usually very difficult to differentiate benign from malignant causes in enteric intussusceptions non-operatively. (7). Other relatively rare causes like lipoma (5) and even parasitic infestation have been demonstrated by Yersinia enterocolitica (2). In our first case following Caesarean section, ...

  16. Surgical complications of Meckel\\'s diverticulae: a review of seven ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Out of the seven cases of Meckel\\'s diverticulae, six presented as surgical emergencies. There were three cases of diverticulitis, two of intestinal obstruction due to bands, and one case formed the apex of an intussusception, which presented as an appendix mass. There were no cases of gastro-intestinal bleeding, fistulae, ...

  17. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cruveilhier J. Anatomie pathologique du corps humain. Paris: JB Balliere, 1835. 3. Goldman RL. Hamartomatous polyp of Brunner's gland. Gastroenterology. 1963;44:57-62. 4. Kellogg EL. Intussusception of the duodenum caused by adenoma originating in Brunner's glands. Med J Record. 1931;134:440-2. 5. Lempke RE.

  18. Idiopathic incapacitates in infancy and childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crankson, Stanley J.; Al-Rabeeh, Abdulla A.; Fischer, James D.; Al-Jaddan, Saud A.

    2003-01-01

    Idiopathic intussusception is an important cause of abdominal pain, bleeding per rectum and intestinal obstruction in infancy and childhood. The main aim of this study was to undertake a retrospective review of all chidren who presented with idiopathic intussusception over a 17-year period. The medical record of children who presented idiopathic intussusception from January 1984 to December 2000 at King Fahad National Guard Hospital ,Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia were reviewed. The data obtained included age, sex clincal presentation, diagonstic investigations, mode of treatment, length of hospital stay and results. Thirty-three chidren (21 male, 12female) presented with 37 episodes of intussusception.Their mean age was 8.4 months (range 5 hours to 36 months ). Clinical features included rectal bleeding (81%), vomiting (78%), abdominal colic/pain (65%) and abdominal mass (62%) .All cases were ileocolic intussusception with no leading point. Barium enema was attempted in 36 cases with success in 20 (56%). Laparotomy was required in 16 csaes, manual reduction being successful in 11(30%) and 6 (16%) had bowel resection. At surgery, after attempted Barium reduction, 9(56%) cases had the intussusception already reduced to cecum. Seventy percent of the cases presented within 24 hours of onset of the symptoms.The 4 recurrences in 3 children had successful enema reduction. There was no mortality but 3 operative cases of this type required late surgery for adhesive intestinal obstruction including one requiring bowel resection. Idiopathic indussusception commonly presents as an ileo-colic type but is uncommon in our institution. The clinical features are classical, rectal bleeding being the most common. The majority presented within 24 hours of onset of symptoms and Barium enema reduction was sucessfull in 20 out of 36 cases in which it was attempted . Since most intussusception were already in the cecum at surgey after failed enema reduction could be considerd in stable

  19. Removing the age restrictions for rotavirus vaccination: a benefit-risk modeling analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish M Patel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To minimize potential risk of intussusception, the World Health Organization (WHO recommended in 2009 that rotavirus immunization should be initiated by age 15 weeks and completed before 32 weeks. These restrictions could adversely impact vaccination coverage and thereby its health impact, particularly in developing countries where delays in vaccination often occur. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a modeling study to estimate the number of rotavirus deaths prevented and the number of intussusception deaths caused by vaccination when administered on the restricted schedule versus an unrestricted schedule whereby rotavirus vaccine would be administered with DTP vaccine up to age 3 years. Countries were grouped on the basis of child mortality rates, using WHO data. Inputs were estimates of WHO rotavirus mortality by week of age from a recent study, intussusception mortality based on a literature review, predicted vaccination rates by week of age from USAID Demographic and Health Surveys, the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS, and WHO-UNICEF 2010 country-specific coverage estimates, and published estimates of vaccine efficacy and vaccine-associated intussusception risk. On the basis of the error estimates and distributions for model inputs, we conducted 2,000 simulations to obtain median estimates of deaths averted and caused as well as the uncertainty ranges, defined as the 5th-95th percentile, to provide an indication of the uncertainty in the estimates. We estimated that in low and low-middle income countries a restricted schedule would prevent 155,800 rotavirus deaths (5th-95th centiles, 83,300-217,700 while causing potentially 253 intussusception deaths (76-689. In contrast, vaccination without age restrictions would prevent 203,000 rotavirus deaths (102,000-281,500 while potentially causing 547 intussusception deaths (237-1,160. Thus, removing the age restrictions would avert an

  20. Imagenological behaviour in view of intestinal invagination in children under two years of age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morffi Gonzalez, Barbara Evelyn; Gonzalez Coba, Maria Isabel; Quintas Santana, Maria; Lopez Gonzalez, Saray Maria

    2010-01-01

    We performed an observational study with the aim of imaging to determine the behavior of intussusception in children under 2 years at the Provincial Teaching Hospital, Dr. Antonio Luaces Iraola 'Ciego de Avila', in the time period from January 1, 2006 to January 1, 2009. The sample consisted of 18 patients under 2 years with clinical and imaging diagnosis of intussusception treated at the Imaging department. Predominant age group younger than 4 months and the male was predominant topographic presentation ileocolic and idiopathic, ultrasound and radiographic examination was performed at 100% of the patients demonstrated decreased intestinal gas pattern as a dominant sign in simple test, the arrest of Contrast 'crab claws' in the colon by enema and the sign of the 'target' or 'pseudo kidney' in the abdominal ultrasonography, there were 12 surgical and 6 reductions reductions permanent imaging, 4 hydro colonic, with a recurrence and 2 for barium enema

  1. Inflammatory fibroid polyp of the ileum with the appearance of a Borrmann type II lesion, caused by colostomy irrigation: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojima, Y; Okajima, M; Asahara, T; Arita, M; Kobayashi, R; Nakahara, M; Masaoka, Y; Toyota, K; Fujitaka, T; Kawahori, K; Shimamoto, F; Dohi, K

    1997-01-01

    Inflammatory fibroid polyps (IFPs) are rarely found in the gastrointestinal tract. The majority of IFPs are sessile-pedunculated or pedunculated polypoid lesions, whereas a polyp presenting like a Borrmann type II lesion is extremely unusual. This report describes the case of a 74-year-old man with a history of intussusception, in whom a preoperative diagnosis of a cecal tumor of the ileocecal valve was made. A laparotomy subsequently revealed a lesion similar to a Borrmann type II tumor located 15 cm above the ileocecal valve, but not at the valve. The lesion was diagnosed as an IFP which had been caused by repeated colostomy irrigation. The aim of the present report is to draw attention to this entity, which should be included in the differential diagnosis of intussusception and small bowel obstruction.

  2. New approaches in oral rotavirus vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuate Defo, Zenas; Lee, Byong

    2016-05-01

    Rotavirus is the leading cause of severe dehydrating diarrhea worldwide, and affects primarily developing nations, in large part because of the inaccessibility of vaccines and high rates of mortality present therein. At present, there exist two oral rotaviral vaccines, Rotarix™ and RotaTeq™. These vaccines are generally effective in their actions: however, associated costs often stymie their effectiveness, and they continue to be associated with a slight risk of intussusception. While different programs are being implemented worldwide to enhance vaccine distribution and monitor vaccine administration for possible intussusception in light of recent WHO recommendation, another major problem persists: that of the reduced efficacy of the existing rotaviral vaccines in developing countries over time. The development of new oral rotavirus vaccine classes - live-attenuated vaccines, virus-like particles, lactic acid bacteria-containing vaccines, combination therapy with immunoglobulins, and biodegradable polymer-encapsulated vaccines - could potentially circumvent these problems.

  3. Rotavirus vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang G

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotavirus, the most common cause of severe diarrhea and a leading cause of mortality in children, has been a priority target for vaccine development for the past several years. The first rotavirus vaccine licensed in the United States was withdrawn because of an association of the vaccine with intussusception. However, the need for a vaccine is greatest in the developing world, because the benefits of preventing deaths due to rotavirus disease are substantially greater than the risk of intussusception. Early vaccines were based on animal strains. More recently developed and licenced vaccines are either animal-human reassortants or are based on human strains. In India, two candidate vaccines are in the development process, but have not yet reached efficacy trials. Many challenges regarding vaccine efficacy and safety remain. In addition to completing clinical evaluations of vaccines in development in settings with the highest disease burden and virus diversity, there is also a need to consider alternative vaccine development strategies.

  4. Differentiated results of defecography with a special view on the SRU syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauck, R.; Rath, M.; Geile, D.

    1988-01-01

    Eight hundred defecograms using a specially designed seat attached to the fluoroscopic table showed rectal intussusception in 78.3%, rectocele in 53.0%, enterocele in 19.7%, spastic pelvic floor in 15.1%, and normal findings in 2.1%. Pneumocolon in conjunction with defecograms showed whether enteroceles contained colon or small intestine. Because of the high incidence of enteroceles in descending pelvic floor syndrome, defecography is essential prior to pelvic surgery. In 20 patients, solitary rectal ulcer syndrome was diagnosed by means of same-day defecography, pneumocolon, and biopsy. Eighty percent showed intussusception. In two cases, the defeco gram traced the gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding to a rectal ulcer, indicating its usefulness in diagnostic workup for GI bleeding

  5. Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome Report of one case associated with Gastrointestin Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHARIAT F.

    1982-07-01

    Full Text Available The peutz-Jeghers syndrome is characterized by an association of gastrointestinal polyposis with rnelain spots on oral mucosa, lips, and skin. This symdrorne is inherited as a simple mendelian autosomal dominant trait. Intussusception is by far the most common complication. Although these polyps are widely regarded as hamartomas and rarely undergo malignant change, they have been reported to be associated with carcinoma of gastrointestin and ovary."nIn the case reported here, the cancer developed from hamartomatous polyps.

  6. Juvenile polyposis syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Hsiao, Yi-Han; Wei, Chin-Hung; Chang, Szu-Wen; Chang, Lung; Fu, Yu-Wei; Lee, Hung-Chang; Liu, Hsuan-Liang; Yeung, Chun-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Juvenile polyposis syndrome, a rare disorder in children, is characterized with multiple hamartomatous polyps in alimentary tract. A variety of manifestations include bleeding, intussusception, or polyp prolapse. In this study, we present an 8-month-old male infant of juvenile polyposis syndrome initially presenting with chronic anemia. To the best of our knowledge, this is the youngest case reported in the literature. Methods: We report a rare case of an 8-month-old male...

  7. Intraluminal duodenal diverticulum: CT and gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong Myeong; Lee, Nam Kyung; Kim, Suk; Kim, Dong Uk; Kim, Tae Un [Dept. of Radiology, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    Intraluminal duodenal diverticulum (IDD) is a rare congenital anomaly. IDD can become symptomatic in 20% to 25% of cases when complicated by intestinal obstruction, pancreatitis, or hemorrhage. We report the case of a 21-year-old female presenting with IDD mimicking duodenoduodenal intussusception. We describe the imaging features of IDD on the gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance image as well as computed tomography.

  8. Radiological features of Meckel's diverticulum and its complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thurley, P.D.; Halliday, K.E.; Somers, J.M.; Al-Daraji, W.I.; Ilyas, M.; Broderick, N.J.

    2009-01-01

    Meckel's diverticulum is the most common congenital abnormality of the small bowel. The majority of patients with this anomaly will remain asymptomatic; however, several complications may occur, including obstruction, intussusception, perforation, diverticulitis, and gastrointestinal haemorrhage. These complications may produce a variety of different clinical features and radiological appearances. The purpose of this article is to review the potential imaging manifestations of Meckel's diverticulum and its complications and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the imaging techniques available

  9. Radiological features of Meckel's diverticulum and its complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurley, P.D. [Departments of Radiology Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham University Hospitals, Nottingham (United Kingdom)], E-mail: pthurley@doctors.org.uk; Halliday, K E; Somers, J M [Departments of Radiology Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham University Hospitals, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Al-Daraji, W I; Ilyas, M [Histopathology, Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham University Hospitals, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Broderick, N J [Departments of Radiology Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham University Hospitals, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2009-02-15

    Meckel's diverticulum is the most common congenital abnormality of the small bowel. The majority of patients with this anomaly will remain asymptomatic; however, several complications may occur, including obstruction, intussusception, perforation, diverticulitis, and gastrointestinal haemorrhage. These complications may produce a variety of different clinical features and radiological appearances. The purpose of this article is to review the potential imaging manifestations of Meckel's diverticulum and its complications and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the imaging techniques available.

  10. 76 FR 60510 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Compositions and Method for Preventing Reactogenicity...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-29

    ... intussusception observed 3 to 7 days following administration of the initial dose of rotavirus vaccine at about 2... Application No. 60/178,689, filed January 28, 2000 [HHS Ref. No. E-088-2000/0-US-01], now expired; PCT Patent... WO/2001/54718 on August 2, 2001, now expired; U.S. Patent No. 7,431,931 [HHS Ref. No. E-088-2000/0-US...

  11. Defecography - analysis of qualitative findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schott, U.; Braunschweig, R.; Claussen, C.D.

    1994-01-01

    The defectography is an examination of the anorectal function in defecatory disorder. The defecography has a diagnostic impact on disease, which only emerge during defecation as intussusception, enterocele, prolapse or sphincter dysfunction. Other findings as rectocele or descending pelvic floor are ambiguous concerning clinical relevance. The interpretation of defecography should include patient's history and clinical findings and - if available -endoscopic and manometric findings. (orig.) [de

  12. CT findings in children with Meckel diverticulum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, Doug E.; Donnelly, Lane F.; Kim, Yong-Woo

    2009-01-01

    Approximately 0.04% of the general population will present with a complication related to Meckel diverticulum. The classic teaching is that symptomatic children with Meckel diverticulum present with painless rectal bleeding and are evaluated with a radionuclide scan. Our subjective experience is that we see children with Meckel diverticulum who present with abdominal pain and are evaluated by CT. We reviewed the findings on CT in children with pathologically proven Meckel diverticulum to identify characteristic patterns of presentation. Databases were searched (2004-2008) for all children who had a pathologic diagnosis of Meckel diverticulum and a CT scan performed prior to surgery. Demographics, pathology, and CT features were reviewed. CT features reviewed included: soft-tissue stranding, abnormal calcifications, bowel obstruction, free air, free peritoneal fluid, cystic mass, intussusception, obvious lead point, location, and whether a normal appendix was identified. The frequency of Meckel diverticulum encountered on CT scans was compared to that found during the same period of time on technetium pertechnetate studies. The review identified 16 subjects (mean age 9.5 years, M:F 9:7). CT findings included: soft-tissue stranding in nine (56%), small-bowel obstruction (SBO) in nine (56%), intussusception in three (19%), free fluid in ten (63%), cystic mass in four (25%), calcification in none (0%), free air in one (6%), and no abnormalities in two (13%). A normal appendix was identified in only five children (31%). There were three basic patterns of presentation of abnormalities: SBO only in five, intussusception with SBO in three, or cystic mass with inflammatory stranding in four (one with SBO). Also, 2.3 times more Meckel diverticulum was encountered on CT than on technetium pertechnetate studies. Meckel diverticulum is currently more commonly encountered in children on CT performed for abdominal pain than on technetium pertechnetate studies. There are three

  13. Laparoscopic management of terminal ileal volvulus caused by Meckel's diverticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xanthis, A; Hakeem, A; Safranek, P

    2015-04-01

    Complications from a Meckel's diverticulum include diverticulitis, bleeding, intussusception, bowel obstruction, a volvulus, a vesicodiverticular fistula, perforation or very rarely as a tumour. We report a case where a Meckel's diverticulum presented with a terminal ileal volvulus in a 32-year-old man without the presence of a typical vitelline band or axial torsion of the diverticulum causing the volvulus. It was successfully managed laparoscopically.

  14. Intussuscepção intestinal e oclusão intestinal causada por pólipos em intestino delgado na síndrome Peutz-Jeghers. Tratamento com ressecção por enterotomia associado a enteroscopia intra-operatória: relato de caso

    OpenAIRE

    Gama-Rodrigues, Joaquim J.; Silva, José Hyppolito da; Aisaka, Adilson A.; Jureidini, Ricardo; Falci Júnior, Renato; Maluf Filho, Fauze; Chong, A. Kim; Tsai, André Wan Wen; Bresciani, Cláudio

    2000-01-01

    The Peutz-Jeghers syndrome is a hereditary disease that requires frequent endoscopic and surgical intervention, leading to secondary complications such as short bowel syndrome. CASE REPORT: This paper reports on a 15-year-old male patient with a family history of the disease, who underwent surgery for treatment of an intestinal occlusion due to a small intestine intussusception. DISCUSSION: An intra-operative fiberscopic procedure was included for the detection and treatment of numerous polyp...

  15. A benefit-risk analysis of rotavirus vaccination, France, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamrani, Adnane; Tubert-Bitter, Pascale; Hill, Catherine; Escolano, Sylvie

    2017-12-01

    IntroductionTwo vaccines available for protection against rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE), Rotarix and RotaTeq, have contributed to a large decrease in the incidence of paediatric diarrhoea in countries where they have been used. However, they have also led to a small increase in the risk of intussusception. Methods: We compare the number of prevented hospitalisations for RVGE to the number of vaccine-induced hospitalised intussusceptions in France. Results: With 9.5% coverage (French 2015 estimation), vaccination was estimated to prevent, annually, a median of 1,074 hospitalisations (2.5th and 97.5th percentiles (2.5th-97.5th): 810-1,378) and 1.4 deaths (2.5th-97.5th: 1.2-1.6) from RVGE. It was also estimated to cause, annually, 5.0 hospitalisations (2.5th-97.5th: 3.2-7.7) and 0.005 deaths (2.5th-97.5th: 0.001-0.015) from intussusception. The benefit-risk ratio is therefore 214 (2.5th-97.5th: 128-362) for hospitalisations and 273 (2.5th-97.5th: 89-1,228) for deaths. Under a hypothetical 92% coverage, rotavirus vaccination with Rotarix would avoid 10,459 (2.5th-97.5th: 7,702-13,498) hospitalisations for RVGE and induce 47.0 (2.5th-97.5th: 25.1-81.4) hospitalisations for intussusception annually, thereby preventing 13.7 (2.5th-97.5th: 11.1-15.2) deaths and inducing 0.05 (2.5th-97.5th: 0.01-0.15) deaths. Conclusion: The benefit-risk ratio in France is similar to that of other European countries.

  16. Defecographic findings of young asymptomatic volunteers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Sang Wook; Park, Hyo Jin; Kim, Ki Whang; Ji, Hoon

    1994-01-01

    Defacography is a technique of examining the rectum and anal canal by using fluoroscopy during detection. This study was done to determine the range of normal findings of defecography in young asymptomatic Korean volunteers. Twenty nine asymptomatic young volunteers underwent defecography. Anorectal angle, perineal descent, length and width of anal, rectocele, rectal intussusception and incontinence were evaluated. The range of anorectal angle was 82 .deg- 149 .deg in resting state, compared to the 63 .deg-116 .deg in squeezing state, and 95 .deg- 116 .deg in straining state respectively. The pelvic floor in straining state descended on average of 1.62 cm from the inferior margin of ischial tuberosity that its broad range of position from-5.2 cm to 0.8 cm implies a wide variation of anorectal angle and perineal descent. Mild degree of rectocele with less than 2 cm of depth was found in 12 out of 29 cases. Rectal intussusception was noted in six and rectal incontinence was seen in one case. Formation of rectocele and intussusception during defecation was common in asymptomatic young volunteers. The wide range of defacographic measurements warrants the necessity of other complementary studies on anorectal function to improve the diagnostic accuracy. The interpretation of defecographic measurement should therefore be made with caution and should not be used as the sole criteria for selection of treatment modality

  17. Desenvolvimento pós-embrionário do intestino anterior de Dermatobia hominis (Linnaeus Jr. (Diptera, Cuterebridae Post-embryonic development of Dermatobia hominis (Linnaeus Jr. (Diptera, Cuterebridae foregut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Vieira

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Foregut in D. hominis (Linnaeus Jr., 1781 as the majority of the larval Diptera somatic tissue, is made up of polytenic cells, and grows at the expenses of the polytenization of its nuclei followed by the increase in size of each cell. The oesophagus, of ectodermic origem, is interiorly covered by a chitinous squamous epithelium that rests upon a very thin basal lamina. This sheet is surrounded by thick muscle bundles. The oesophagus intussuscepts the midgut forming the cardia. The cardia, with three epithelial layers: two internal ones, of ectodermal origin and one external of endodermic origin. At the anterior portion of the cardia, between these two types of epithelium, there is a cluster of small, non polytenic cells, forming the imaginal disk of the foregut. Metamoiphosis begins at the end of the larval period with signs of nuclear degeneration of all the polytenic cells, as well as the increase in number of the imaginal disk ones. The oesophagic portion intussuscepted into the cardia, everts; its cells suffer apoptosis and are replaced by the new cells growing from the imaginal disk. The external layer cells also degenerate and are pinched off into the lumen of the very anterior portion of the midgut. The newly formed oesophagus intussuscepts "de novo" to form the two internal layers of the adult cardia. At the same time the midgut regenerative cells grow anteriorly to form the new external layer of the adult cardia.

  18. Usefulness of colon transit time and defecography in patients with chronic constipation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Kyoung Seuk; Chung, Jae Joon; Kim, Myung Hyun; Park, Su Mi; Yang, Hee Chul

    2006-01-01

    We wanted to evaluate whether both the colonic transit time (CTT) and defecography are necessary for diagnosing constipated patients, and we also wanted to assess the defecographic findings of patients with outlet obstruction on CTT. Over the recent 3 years, 26 patients (21 women and 5 men, mean age: 59 years) underwent both CTT and defecography because of their chronic constipations or defecation difficulty. The mean interval between the 2 studies was 48 days. Colonoscopy, barium enema and manometry were performed in 22, 8 and all the patients, respectively. On CTT, 13 patients (50.0%) were normal and 13 patients (50.0%) were abnormal; the abnormal results were composed of outlet obstruction (n = 8, 30.8%), outlet obstruction and colon inertia (n = 2, 7.7%), colon inertia (n = 2, 7.7%), and outlet obstruction and hindgut dysfunction (n = 1, 3.8%). On defecography, 6 patients (23.1%) were normal and 20 patients (76.9%) were abnormal; the results were composed of rectocele (n = 8, 30.7%), rectocele and perineal descent syndrome (PDS; n = 4, 15.4%), PDS and rectal intussusception (n = 3, 11.5%), spastic pelvic floor syndrome (SPFS; n = 3, 11.5%), rectocele and SPFS (n = 1, 3.8%), and rectal intussusception (n = 1, 3.8%). Of the 11 patients with outlet obstruction on CTT, rectocele (n = 4, 36.4%), SPFS (n = 1, 9.1%), rectocele and PDS (n = 1, 9.1%), and PDS and rectal intussusception (n = 1, 9.1%) were demonstrated on defecography, except for the 4 normal cases. Both CTT and defecography were necessary for diagnosing the patients with chronic constipation in compensation, and 63.6% of the patients with pelvic outlet obstruction showed an abnormal pelvic defecation function

  19. Radiological evaluation of intestinal obstruction in neonate and infant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, D. S.; Lim, K. Y.; Kim, S. J.; Kim, J. D.; Rhee, H. S. [Presbyterian Medical Center, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1980-12-15

    281 cases of neonatal and infantile intestinal obstruction confirmed by clinical and surgical procedure from 1975 till 1979 were reviewed radiologically. The result was as follows; 1. Intussusception was the most common cause of intestinal obstruction under one year of age (173/281: 61.56%), and other causes of descending order were infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (20: 7.11%), congenital megacolon (19: 6.76%), anorectal malformation (17: 6.05%), meconium plug syndrome (17: 6.05%), hernia (12: 4.27%), band adhesion (8: 2.85%), rotation anomaly (5: 1.78%), small bowel atresia (3: 1.07%), Meckel's diverticulum (3: 1.07%), duodenal atresia (2: 0.71%), meconium ileus (1: 0.36%) and annular pancreas (1: 0.36%). Congenital type of intestinal obstruction (we classified intussusception acquired and others congenital) occupied 38.44%. 2. The ratio of male to female was 3: 1, congenital type 4.69 : 1 and acquired 2.39 : 1. 3. Vomiting, bloody stool, fever and abdominal distention were the most 4 symptoms. 4. The frequency of typical mechanical ileus pattern on plain abdomen films was 226 cases(80.43%) paralytic ileus or normal finding was 52 cases (18.51%) and pneumoperitoneum with ileus sign was 3 cases (1.06%). 5. Barium meal or enema was performed in 228 cases and narrowing or obstructed site was found in 213 cases of them (93.42%); intussusception 100% (173/173), infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis 93.33% (14/15) and congenital megacolon 82.35% (14/17). 6. Only 10 cases had associated disease such as Mongolism, thoracic kyphosis and scoliosis, microcolon, prematurity, ileocolic fistula, undescended testicle and hydrocele. 7. Meconium plug syndrome, duodenal atresia, small bowel atresia, mecondium ileus and annular pancreas were developed early after birth with average onset age of 3.6 days.

  20. The clinical and radiological observation of the intususception in infancy and children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Chee Jang; Kang, Heoung Keun; Chung, Hyon De

    1980-01-01

    Intussusception is the invagination of one portion of the intestine into the contiguous distal segment. During infancy and childhood it is the most common cause of acquired intestinal obstruction. This is a clinical and radiological study of 120 cases who visited our Chonnam National University Hospital from January 1975 to August 1979. The results were summarized as follows; 1. Age, sex and seasonal incidence. In 120 cases, 88.3% of the patients were under the one year of age and peak incidence occurred from 4 to 12 month of age. In sex distribution, male showed definitely higher incidence than in female patients with the ratio of 2.2 : 1. Although the disease occurs the year around, sprig and summer showed somewhat higher incidences. 2. The common symptoms and signs were vomiting (88.3%), bloody stool (81.7%), palpable mass (66.7%), and irritability (29.2%) in order of the frequency. 3. The common x-ray findings of plain abdomen were moderate dilatation of gas filled bowels loop (62.8%), obliteration of the gas shadow in the cecum ascending colon (5.0%), and soft tissue mass density (43%)> 4. The most common obstructing point found by barium enema was at the hepatic flexure. 5. The overall reduction rate by hydrostatic barium reduction was 69.4%, and this rate was increased in the following cases: 1) the duration of symptoms under the 12 hours (89.2%) and between 13 of 24 hour (70%). 2) no evidence of severe small bowel obstruction. 3) in the cases of ileocecal, ileocolic or colocolic of the type of intussusception. 6. Recurrence rate was 4.2%. 7. Mortality rate in 120 cases of intussusception was 2.5%.

  1. Radiological evaluation of intestinal obstruction in neonate and infant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, D. S.; Lim, K. Y.; Kim, S. J.; Kim, J. D.; Rhee, H. S.

    1980-01-01

    281 cases of neonatal and infantile intestinal obstruction confirmed by clinical and surgical procedure from 1975 till 1979 were reviewed radiologically. The result was as follows; 1. Intussusception was the most common cause of intestinal obstruction under one year of age (173/281: 61.56%), and other causes of descending order were infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (20: 7.11%), congenital megacolon (19: 6.76%), anorectal malformation (17: 6.05%), meconium plug syndrome (17: 6.05%), hernia (12: 4.27%), band adhesion (8: 2.85%), rotation anomaly (5: 1.78%), small bowel atresia (3: 1.07%), Meckel's diverticulum (3: 1.07%), duodenal atresia (2: 0.71%), meconium ileus (1: 0.36%) and annular pancreas (1: 0.36%). Congenital type of intestinal obstruction (we classified intussusception acquired and others congenital) occupied 38.44%. 2. The ratio of male to female was 3: 1, congenital type 4.69 : 1 and acquired 2.39 : 1. 3. Vomiting, bloody stool, fever and abdominal distention were the most 4 symptoms. 4. The frequency of typical mechanical ileus pattern on plain abdomen films was 226 cases(80.43%) paralytic ileus or normal finding was 52 cases (18.51%) and pneumoperitoneum with ileus sign was 3 cases (1.06%). 5. Barium meal or enema was performed in 228 cases and narrowing or obstructed site was found in 213 cases of them (93.42%); intussusception 100% (173/173), infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis 93.33% (14/15) and congenital megacolon 82.35% (14/17). 6. Only 10 cases had associated disease such as Mongolism, thoracic kyphosis and scoliosis, microcolon, prematurity, ileocolic fistula, undescended testicle and hydrocele. 7. Meconium plug syndrome, duodenal atresia, small bowel atresia, mecondium ileus and annular pancreas were developed early after birth with average onset age of 3.6 days

  2. Management of patients with rectocele, multiple pelvic floor dysfunctions and obstructed defecation syndrome

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    Sthela Maria Murad-Regadas

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Management of patients with obstructed defecation syndrome is still controversial. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the efficacy of clinical, clinical treatment followed by biofeedback, and surgical treatment in patients with obstructed defecation, rectocele and multiple dysfunctions evaluated with echodefecography. METHODS: The study included 103 females aged 26-84 years with obstructed defecation, grade-II/III rectocele and multiple dysfunctions on echodefecography. Patients were distributed into three treatment groups and constipation scores were assigned. Group I: 34 (33% patients with significant improvement of symptoms through clinical management only. Group II: 14 (14% with improvement through clinical treatment plus biofeedback. Group III: 55 (53% referred to surgery due to treatment failure. RESULTS: Group I: 20 (59% patients had grade-II rectocele, 14 (41% grade-III. Obstructed defecation syndrome was associated with intussusception (41%, mucosal prolapse (41%, anismus (29%, enterocele (9% or 2 dysfunctions (23%. The average constipation score decreased significantly from 11 to 5. Group II: 11 (79% grade-II rectocele, 3 (21% grade-III, associated with intussusception (7%, mucosal prolapse (43%, anismus (71% or 2 dysfunctions (29%. There was significant decrease in constipation score from 13 to 6. Group III: 8 (15% grade-II rectocele, 47 (85% grade-III, associated with intussusception (42%, mucosal prolapse (40% or 2 dysfunctions (32%. The constipation score remained unchanged despite clinical treatment and biofeedback. Twenty-three underwent surgery had a significantly decrease in constipation score from 12 to 4. The remaining 32 (31% patients which 22 refused surgery, 6 had low anal pressure and 4 had slow transit. CONCLUSIONS: Approximately 50% of patients with obstructed defecation, rectocele and multiple dysfunctions presented a satisfactory response to clinical treatment and/or biofeedback. Surgical repair was mainly required in

  3. Management of patients with rectocele, multiple pelvic floor dysfunctions and obstructed defecation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murad-Regadas, Sthela Maria; Regadas, Francisco Sergio P; Rodrigues, Lusmar Veras; Fernandes, Graziela Olivia da Silva; Buchen, Guilherme; Kenmoti, Viviane T

    2012-01-01

    Management of patients with obstructed defecation syndrome is still controversial. To analyze the efficacy of clinical, clinical treatment followed by biofeedback, and surgical treatment in patients with obstructed defecation, rectocele and multiple dysfunctions evaluated with echodefecography. The study included 103 females aged 26-84 years with obstructed defecation, grade-II/III rectocele and multiple dysfunctions on echodefecography. Patients were distributed into three treatment groups and constipation scores were assigned. Group I: 34 (33%) patients with significant improvement of symptoms through clinical management only. Group II: 14 (14%) with improvement through clinical treatment plus biofeedback. Group III: 55 (53%) referred to surgery due to treatment failure. Group I: 20 (59%) patients had grade-II rectocele, 14 (41%) grade-III. Obstructed defecation syndrome was associated with intussusception (41%), mucosal prolapse (41%), anismus (29%), enterocele (9%) or 2 dysfunctions (23%). The average constipation score decreased significantly from 11 to 5. Group II: 11 (79%) grade-II rectocele, 3 (21%) grade-III, associated with intussusception (7%), mucosal prolapse (43%), anismus (71%) or 2 dysfunctions (29%). There was significant decrease in constipation score from 13 to 6. Group III: 8 (15%) grade-II rectocele, 47 (85%) grade-III, associated with intussusception (42%), mucosal prolapse (40%) or 2 dysfunctions (32%). The constipation score remained unchanged despite clinical treatment and biofeedback. Twenty-three underwent surgery had a significantly decrease in constipation score from 12 to 4. The remaining 32 (31%) patients which 22 refused surgery, 6 had low anal pressure and 4 had slow transit. Approximately 50% of patients with obstructed defecation, rectocele and multiple dysfunctions presented a satisfactory response to clinical treatment and/or biofeedback. Surgical repair was mainly required in patients with grade-III rectocele whose constipation

  4. Usefulness of colon transit time and defecography in patients with chronic constipation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kyoung Seuk; Chung, Jae Joon; Kim, Myung Hyun; Park, Su Mi; Yang, Hee Chul [NHIC Ilsan Hospital, Ilsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-05-15

    We wanted to evaluate whether both the colonic transit time (CTT) and defecography are necessary for diagnosing constipated patients, and we also wanted to assess the defecographic findings of patients with outlet obstruction on CTT. Over the recent 3 years, 26 patients (21 women and 5 men, mean age: 59 years) underwent both CTT and defecography because of their chronic constipations or defecation difficulty. The mean interval between the 2 studies was 48 days. Colonoscopy, barium enema and manometry were performed in 22, 8 and all the patients, respectively. On CTT, 13 patients (50.0%) were normal and 13 patients (50.0%) were abnormal; the abnormal results were composed of outlet obstruction (n = 8, 30.8%), outlet obstruction and colon inertia (n = 2, 7.7%), colon inertia (n = 2, 7.7%), and outlet obstruction and hindgut dysfunction (n = 1, 3.8%). On defecography, 6 patients (23.1%) were normal and 20 patients (76.9%) were abnormal; the results were composed of rectocele (n = 8, 30.7%), rectocele and perineal descent syndrome (PDS; n = 4, 15.4%), PDS and rectal intussusception (n = 3, 11.5%), spastic pelvic floor syndrome (SPFS; n = 3, 11.5%), rectocele and SPFS (n = 1, 3.8%), and rectal intussusception (n = 1, 3.8%). Of the 11 patients with outlet obstruction on CTT, rectocele (n = 4, 36.4%), SPFS (n = 1, 9.1%), rectocele and PDS (n = 1, 9.1%), and PDS and rectal intussusception (n = 1, 9.1%) were demonstrated on defecography, except for the 4 normal cases. Both CTT and defecography were necessary for diagnosing the patients with chronic constipation in compensation, and 63.6% of the patients with pelvic outlet obstruction showed an abnormal pelvic defecation function.

  5. A novel germline mutation (c.A527G) in STK11 gene causes Peutz-Jeghers syndrome in a Chinese girl: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zi-Ye; Jiang, Yu-Liang; Li, Bai-Rong; Yang, Fu; Li, Jing; Jin, Xiao-Wei; Sun, Shu-Han; Ning, Shou-Bin

    2017-12-01

    Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is a Mendelian autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations in the tumor suppressor gene, serine/threonine kinase 11 (STK11). The features of this syndrome include gastrointestinal (GI) hamartomas, melanin spots on the lips and the extremities, and an increased risk of developing cancer. Early onset of disease is often characterized by mucocutaneous pigmentation and intussusception due to GI polyps in childhood. A girl with a positive family history grew oral pigmentation at 1 and got intussusception by small bowel hamartomas at 5. She was diagnosed with PJS based on oral pigmentation and a positive family history of PJS. Enteroscopy was employed to treat the GI polyps. Sanger sequencing was used to investigate STK11 mutation in this family. A large jejunal polyp together with other smaller ones was resected, and the girl recovered uneventfully. We discovered a heterozygous substitution in STK11, c.A527G in exon 4, in the girl and her father who was also a PJS patient, and the amine acid change was an aspartic acid-glycine substitution in codon 176. This mutation was not found in other healthy family members and 50 unrelated non-PJS controls, and it is not recorded in databases, which prove it a novel mutation. Evolutionary conservation analysis of amino acid residues showed this aspartic acid is a conserved one between species, and protein structure prediction by SWISS-MODEL indicated an obvious change in local structure. In addition, PolyPhen-2 score for this mutation is 1, which indicates it probably damaging. PJS can cause severe complication like intussusception in young children, and early screening for small bowel may be beneficial for these patients. The mutation of STK11 found in this girl is a novel one, which enlarges the spectrum of STK11. Our analysis supported it a causative one in PJS.

  6. Defecography: A study of normal volunteers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shorvon, P.; Stevenson, G.W.; McHugh, S.; Somers, P.

    1987-01-01

    This study of young volunteers was set up in an effort to establish true normal measurements for defecography with minimum selection bias. The results describe the mean (and the range) for the following: anorectal angle; anorectal junction position at rest; excursion on lift, strain, and evacuation; anal canal length and degree of closure; and the frequency and degree of features such as rectocele and intussusception which have previously been called abnormalities. The results indicate that there is a very wide range of normal appearances. Knowledge of these normal variations is important to avoid overreporting and unnecessary surgery

  7. CT Findings of Colonic Complications Associated with Colon Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang Won; Shin, Hyeong Cheol; Kim, Il Young; Kim, Young Tong; Kim, Chang Jin

    2010-01-01

    A broad spectrum of colonic complications can occur in patients with colon cancer. Clinically, some of these complications can obscure the presence of underlying malignancies in the colon and these complications may require emergency surgical management. The complications of the colon that can be associated with colon cancer include obstruction, perforation, abscess formation, acute appendicitis, ischemic colitis and intussusception. Although the majority of these complications only rarely occur, familiarity with the various manifestations of colon cancer complications will facilitate making an accurate diagnosis and administering prompt management in these situations. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to review the CT appearance of the colonic complications associated with colon cancer

  8. Inflammatory fibroid polyp of sigmoid colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifschitz, O; Lew, S; Witz, M; Reiss, R; Griffel, B

    1979-01-01

    A case of inflammatory fibroid polyp of the sigmoid colon is presented. This is the eight case of this type of polyp in the colon and, to the best of our knowledge, the first one involving the sigmoid and producing intussusception. Symptomatology of the inflamed fibroid polyp in this part of the gut closely simulates gastrointestinal malignancy. The treatment is surgical excision of the polyp, or colonoscopic resection when it is possible. Intraoperative colonoscopy helps the surgeon to localize the lesion and to role out the existence of other lesions.

  9. Cellulose synthesis inhibition, cell expansion, and patterns of cell wall deposition in Nitella internodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richmond, P.A.; Metraux, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    The authors have investigated the pattern of wall deposition and maturation and correlated it with cell expansion and cellulose biosynthesis. The herbicide 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB) was found to be a potent inhibitor of cellulose synthesis, but not of cell expansion in Nitella internodal cells. Although cellulose synthesis is inhibited during DCB treatment, matrix substances continue to be synthesized and deposited. The inhibition of cellulose microfibril deposition can be demonstrated by various techniques. These results demonstrate that matrix deposition is by apposition, not by intussusception, and that the previously deposited wall moves progressively outward while stretching and thinning as a result of cell expansion

  10. A case of asymptomatic ileal duplication cyst associated with acute appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hülya İpek

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Duplications of the alimentary tract are infrequent anomalies. They are most frequently located in the terminal ileum, and majority of them became symptomatic before the age of 2. Presenting symptoms may include abdominal mass, intestinal obstruction, intussusception, rectal bleeding, and abdominal pain. Preoperative diagnosis is usually difficult, intra-abdominal duplications are usually diagnosed during surgical explorations of above complications. We presented a 12-year-old girl with asymptomatic ileal duplication cyst associated with non-complicated acute appendicitis, whose imaging studies at admission were compatible with complicated perforated appendicitis.

  11. MR defecography for obstructed defecation syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravikumar B Thapar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with obstructed defecation syndrome (ODS form an important subset of patients with chronic constipation. Evaluation and treatment of these patients has traditionally been difficult. Magnetic resonance defecography (MRD is a very useful tool for the evaluation of these patients. We evaluated the scans and records of 192 consecutive patients who underwent MRD at our center between January 2011 and January 2012. Abnormal descent, rectoceles, rectorectal intussusceptions, enteroceles, and spastic perineum were observed in a large number of these patients, usually in various combinations. We discuss the technique, its advantages and limitations, and the normal findings and various pathologies.

  12. Torsion and volvulus of the transverse and descending colon in a German shepherd dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halfacree, Z J; Beck, A L; Lee, K C L; Lipscomb, V J

    2006-08-01

    A German shepherd dog was presented two months after surgery for correction of acute gastric dilatation volvulus. The dog had been diagnosed with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. Radiographs revealed marked gaseous distension of one loop of intestine with a generalised increase in intestinal gas content. A 360 degrees anticlockwise rotation of the descending and transverse colon, around the longitudinal axis of the mesocolon, was diagnosed at exploratory coeliotomy. The transverse and descending colon appeared uniformly necrotic and an end-to-end colo-colic resection and anastomosis was performed. The dog initially made satisfactory postoperative progress but was euthanased on the third postoperative day after it developed an intestinal intussusception.

  13. Mesenteric Torsion as a Cause of Late Abdominal Pain after Gastric Bypass Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederiksen, Sven G; Ekelund, Mikael

    2016-04-01

    Gastric bypass (GBP) has been the most common surgical way to treat obesity and its comorbidities. Late abdominal pain may occur by gastro-jejunal ulcers, gallstones, internal herniation or, rarely, intussusception. In an area with more than 1000 GBPs performed yearly, three patients with primary small bowel volvulus causing abdominal pain and requiring emergency or semi-urgent surgery were identified. Patients' histories, radiology, and surgery performed are presented. Weight loss followed by mesenteric narrowing of the root and thus relative elongation may make rotation of the small bowel mesentery possible. Such a torsion might be an overlooked differential diagnosis in obscure abdominal pain after GBP.

  14. Enterogastroesophageal reflux during barium enema: Report of a case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Hyoun Ja; Rhee, Hak Song

    1972-01-01

    Enterogastric reflux during barium enema examination has been ascribed to various causes including incompetence of the ilepcecal valve, shunt, fistula, excessive barium etc. Recently we have encountered a case of complete enterogastroesphageal regurgitation during barium enema examination performed for the reduction of the ileocolic intuosusception in 6 months old baby. The regurgitation occurred only in the first of two barium enema examinations conducted at one month interval for recurring intussusception. The barium-saline solution used in the present study was not more than 350 ml in quantity. No organic or physical causes of such a complete regurgitation could be determined

  15. Intestinal obstruction and other causes of abdominal pain in foals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, N.D.; Chaffin, M.K.

    1994-01-01

    There are numerous causes of colic in foals. Nearly all forms of obstructive gastrointestinal disorders that have been recognized in adultshave also been described in foals. Meconium impaction, intussusceptions, ascarid impactions, small intestinal volvulus, and hernias are evidently the most common causes of mechanical obstruction in foals. Other frequently recognized causes of colic in foals are gastric ulceration, uroperitoneum, and ileus. For some disorders, the history, signalment, and physical examination findings may lead to a presumptive diagnosis; in other disorders, ultrasonography and clinicopathologic examination of blood and peritoneal fluid may be required in the diagnostic evaluation. This article considers the causes of intestinal obstructionand abdominal pain in foals from birth to weaning

  16. A rare complication of Meckel's diverticulum: A fistula between Meckel's diverticulum and the appendix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Fu Yang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Meckel diverticulum is the most common congenital anomaly of the small intestine, occurring in about 2%–4% of the population. Meckel diverticulum results from incomplete closure of the omphalomesenteric duct. The presentation of symptomatic Meckel diverticulum includes gastrointestinal hemorrhage, intestinal obstruction, volvulus, intussusception, diverticulitis, and neoplasms. The development of fistula is an extremely rare complication. Previous literature has even shown an enterocolonic fistula, a vesicodiverticular fistula, ileorectal fistula, and fistula-in-ano. To the best of our knowledge, we present the first case of the fistula complicated between Meckel diverticulum and the appendix in a review of the English literature.

  17. CT Findings of Colonic Complications Associated with Colon Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Won; Shin, Hyeong Cheol; Kim, Il Young; Kim, Young Tong; Kim, Chang Jin [Cheonan Hospital, Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    A broad spectrum of colonic complications can occur in patients with colon cancer. Clinically, some of these complications can obscure the presence of underlying malignancies in the colon and these complications may require emergency surgical management. The complications of the colon that can be associated with colon cancer include obstruction, perforation, abscess formation, acute appendicitis, ischemic colitis and intussusception. Although the majority of these complications only rarely occur, familiarity with the various manifestations of colon cancer complications will facilitate making an accurate diagnosis and administering prompt management in these situations. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to review the CT appearance of the colonic complications associated with colon cancer.

  18. Juvenile polyposis syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Yi-Han; Wei, Chin-Hung; Chang, Szu-Wen; Chang, Lung; Fu, Yu-Wei; Lee, Hung-Chang; Liu, Hsuan-Liang; Yeung, Chun-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Juvenile polyposis syndrome, a rare disorder in children, is characterized with multiple hamartomatous polyps in alimentary tract. A variety of manifestations include bleeding, intussusception, or polyp prolapse. In this study, we present an 8-month-old male infant of juvenile polyposis syndrome initially presenting with chronic anemia. To the best of our knowledge, this is the youngest case reported in the literature. Methods: We report a rare case of an 8-month-old male infant who presented with chronic anemia and gastrointestinal bleeding initially. Panendoscopy and abdominal computed tomography showed multiple polyposis throughout the entire alimentary tract leading to intussusception. Technetium-99m-labeled red blood cell (RBC) bleeding scan revealed the possibility of gastrointestinal tract bleeding in the jejunum. Histopathological examination on biopsy samples showed Peutz-Jeghers syndrome was excluded, whereas the diagnosis of juvenile polyposis syndrome was established. Results: Enteroscopic polypectomy is the mainstay of the treatment. However, polyps recurred and occupied the majority of the gastrointestinal tract in 6 months. Supportive management was given. The patient expired for severe sepsis at the age of 18 months. Conclusion: Juvenile polyposis syndrome is an inherited disease, so it is not possible to prevent it. Concerning of its poor outcome and high mortality rate, it is important that we should increase awareness and education of the parents at its earliest stages. PMID:27631205

  19. Juvenile polyposis syndrome: An unusual case report of anemia and gastrointestinal bleeding in young infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Yi-Han; Wei, Chin-Hung; Chang, Szu-Wen; Chang, Lung; Fu, Yu-Wei; Lee, Hung-Chang; Liu, Hsuan-Liang; Yeung, Chun-Yan

    2016-09-01

    Juvenile polyposis syndrome, a rare disorder in children, is characterized with multiple hamartomatous polyps in alimentary tract. A variety of manifestations include bleeding, intussusception, or polyp prolapse. In this study, we present an 8-month-old male infant of juvenile polyposis syndrome initially presenting with chronic anemia. To the best of our knowledge, this is the youngest case reported in the literature. We report a rare case of an 8-month-old male infant who presented with chronic anemia and gastrointestinal bleeding initially. Panendoscopy and abdominal computed tomography showed multiple polyposis throughout the entire alimentary tract leading to intussusception. Technetium-99m-labeled red blood cell (RBC) bleeding scan revealed the possibility of gastrointestinal tract bleeding in the jejunum. Histopathological examination on biopsy samples showed Peutz-Jeghers syndrome was excluded, whereas the diagnosis of juvenile polyposis syndrome was established. Enteroscopic polypectomy is the mainstay of the treatment. However, polyps recurred and occupied the majority of the gastrointestinal tract in 6 months. Supportive management was given. The patient expired for severe sepsis at the age of 18 months. Juvenile polyposis syndrome is an inherited disease, so it is not possible to prevent it. Concerning of its poor outcome and high mortality rate, it is important that we should increase awareness and education of the parents at its earliest stages.

  20. Intestinal obstruction after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass by Higa's technique for treatment of morbid obesity: radiological aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labrunie, Ester Moraes [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia]. E-mail: emlabrunie@superig.com.br; Marchiori, Edson [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia

    2007-05-15

    Objective: The aim of this study is to describe the main radiological aspects of postoperative intestinal obstruction in patients submitted to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass by means of the Higa's technique. Materials and methods: A total of 10 patients presenting with postoperative intestinal obstruction following a gastric reduction procedure were evaluated in the period between November 2001 and April 2006, in seven different medical centers. Results: In the ten patients, the obstruction occurred in the small bowel, five of them because of internal hernias, three because of adhesions, one because of an umbilical hernia and one because of intussusception. Four patients presented obstruction early in the postoperative period (by the seventh post-op day), and six, late in the postoperative period (between the third month and the fifth year). Conclusion: All of the cases of intestinal obstruction were found in the small bowel. Internal hernia was the most frequent cause, followed by adhesion. Other causes included umbilical hernia and intussusception. (author)

  1. Continent cecostomy. An account of 30 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, N G; Myrvold, H E; Philipson, B M; Svaninger, G; Ojerskog, B

    1985-10-01

    In this paper, an account is given of our experience with continent colostomy in man. In five patients, the end-sigmoidostomy was provided with an intussusception valve. Evacuation of the bowel by irrigation through a catheter was laborious and time-consuming and this method was abandoned. In another group of 30 patients, the cecum was isolated from the rest of the colon and its distal end was provided with an intussusception valve. Of the 30 patients, eight were later given continent ileostomies, two were converted to conventional sigmoidostomies, and one patient with fecal incontinence preferred to have intestinal continuity reestablished. Thus, 19 patients still have continent cecostomies and are satisfied with their function. When comparing the function of the continent cecostomy with that of the continent ileostomy, however, it is obvious that the ileostomy function is superior. The experience obtained with this group of patients has resulted in a widening of the indications for constructing a continent ileostomy, including selected patients with various anorectal disorders.

  2. An unusual presentation of a malignant jejunal tumor and a different management strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parida Dillip K

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malignant small bowel tumors are very rare and leiomyosarcoma accounts for less than 15% of the cases. Management of these tumors is challenging in view of nonspecific symptoms, unusual presentation and high incidence of metastasis. In this case report, an unusual presentation of jejunal sarcoma and management of liver metastasis with radiofrequency ablation (RFA is discussed. Case presentation A 45-year-old male presented with anemia and features of small bowel obstruction. Operative findings revealed a mass lesion in jejunum with intussusception of proximal loop. Resection of bowel mass was performed. Histopathological findings were suggestive of leiomyosarcoma. After 3-years of follow-up, the patient developed recurrence in infracolic omentum and a liver metastasis. The omental mass was resected and liver lesion was managed with radiofrequency ablation. Conclusion Jejunal leiomyosarcoma is a rare variety of malignant small bowel tumor and a clinical presentation with intussusception is unusual. We suggest that an aggressive management approach using a combination of surgery and a newer technique like RFA can be attempted in patients with limited metastatic spread to liver to prolong the long-term survival in a subset of patients.

  3. Sonographic diagnosis of juvenile polyps in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yao; Li, Shi-Xing; Xie, Li-Mei; Shi, Bo; Ju, Hao; Bai, Yu-Zuo; Zhang, Shu-Cheng

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic value of ultrasonography for juvenile polyps in children and their sonographic characteristics. A retrospective analysis was performed of the ultrasound findings in 27 children who were diagnosed preoperatively with juvenile polyp within the intestinal tract by ultrasonography and then confirmed by colonoscopy, laparotomy and histopathology. The ultrasonic finding common to all polyps was an isolated intraluminal nodular or massive protrusion, associated with multiple mesh-like fluid areas of different sizes. In 25 children, surrounding pedicle-like low echoes of varying lengths were seen connecting with the polyps to form "mushroom" sign. The color Doppler showed abundant blood flow signals within all polyps and pedicles in a shape of a branch or an umbrella. For seven children with an intussusception, the polyp shadow was detected in the cervical part or interior of the intussusception. Ultrasonography is, thus, considered to be a feasible method for diagnosing intestinal juvenile polyp. Copyright © 2012 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Partial spontaneous anal expulsion of the right colon lipoma: An exceptional diagnostic circumstance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahmi Hamila

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lipomas are most common benign tumors of the colon. They are asymptomatic and fortuitously discovered on a morphological examination. Rarely, they cause complications such as acute intussusception. In this article, we reported an exceptional discovery mode of right colon lipoma. Case presentation: A 54-year-old woman has consulted for acute abdominal pain relieved by the anus emission of a fat ball that she brought back with her. Abdominal computed tomography scan showed the remaining part of a lipoma developed in her right colon. Laparoscopic right colonic resection was performed. Discussion: Colic lipomas are usually asymptomatic and surgical indication in these cases is debated, but it is indicated whenever complications occur such as acute intestinal intussusception. In this case, discovery mode was not considered as a complication because lipoma evacuation could have been complete. Radiological explorations and colonoscopy could evaluate the lesional state. When surgery is decided, intersecting therapeutic strategy of a short colonic resection guided by a colonization during colonoscopy should be considered. Conclusion: The spontaneous expulsion of a colonic lipoma is very rare. Our observation showed that this expulsion may be partial. +The changes that the lipoma undergoes can evoke a malignant cause. a supplement to take care of this eventuality is necessary. Keywords: Colonic lipoma, Spontaneous expulsion, Colectomy

  5. Rectal bladder-type: ileum-sigma-rectum pouch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krajka, K.; Mikszewicz, A.; Stachurski, L.; Perkowski, D.

    1994-01-01

    The paper presents a method of creating rectal bladder by using the proximal part of rectum, the distal part of sigma and a 40 cm long segment of detubularized ileum. Ureters were attached to the proximal end of ileal segment by Wallace-I technique. Initially the retrograde pyelonephritis was to be prevented by intussuscepting a 4 cm long part of the uretero-ilea anastomosis and by positioning isoperistaltically a 15-16 cm long part of the ileal segment. Because of the insufficiency of such a mechanism, in 4 latest cases the intussuscepted segment was increased to 8 cm. 8 patients suffering from stage T3a and T3b invasive carcinoma of the bladder were treated by this procedure. The ureteral stens were led out via the rectal tube. They were removed days after the operation. The whole post-operative period was uneventful. The patients were under close follow-up from 5 to 22 months. Three of them died due to a progression of the disease. All the patients had 3-4 watery stools a day and one at night. Check-ups performed three and six months after the operation revealed a proper out flow of contrast medium from kidneys and a reduction in the dilatation of ureters. In one case the kidney that failed to function before the procedure, restored its secretion afterwards. The contrast medium reached colon descendens only when more than 350 ml of it were infused into the rectal bladder. (author)

  6. Minimally Invasive Treatment of Sporadic Burkitt’s Lymphoma Causing Ileocaecal Invagination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Panaccio

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Primary NHL (non-Hodgkin lymphoma of the colon represents only 0.2% to 1.2% of all colonic malignancies. Burkitt’s lymphoma (BL is usually a disease reported in children and young people, most of them associated with EBV or HIV infection. We describe a rare case of intestinal obstruction due to sporadic Burkitt’s lymphoma causing ileocaecal invagination explaining our experience Methods. A 31-year-old man presented with diffuse colic pain and weight loss. Clinical examination revealed an abdominal distension with pain in the right iliac fossa. Colonoscopy documented a caecal large lesion with ulcerated mucosa. Computed tomography (CT have shown a 60 × 50 mm right colic parietal lesion with signs of ileocolic intussusception. Results. Laparoscopic right hemicolectomy was performed. Postoperative period was uneventful. CD20+ high-grade B-cell Burkitt’s lymphoma was confirmed by immunohistochemistry (CD20+, CD79+, and CD10+ and FISH test (t (8;14 (q24; q32. The patient was subsequently treated with adjuvant combination chemotherapy (Hyper-CVAD and is alive and disease-free at 8 months follow-up. Discussion. Adult sporadic Burkitt’s lymphoma (BL causing intestinal obstruction due to ileocaecal intussusception is an extremely rare occurrence and a diagnostic dilemma. Despite the surgical approach is selected based on patient’s conditions and surgeon’s expertise, minimally invasive method could be preferred.

  7. Efficacy, immunogenicity, and safety of two doses of a tetravalent rotavirus vaccine RRV-TV in Ghana with the first dose administered during the neonatal period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armah, George E; Kapikian, Albert Z; Vesikari, Timo; Cunliffe, Nigel; Jacobson, Robert M; Burlington, D Bruce; Ruiz, Leonard P

    2013-08-01

    Oral rhesus/rhesus-human reassortant rotavirus tetravalent vaccine (RRV-TV) was licensed in 1998 but withdrawn in 1999 due to a rare association with intussusception, which occurred disproportionately in infants receiving their first dose at ≥90 days of age. This study examined RRV-TV for the prevention of rotavirus gastroenteritis (RV-GE) in Ghana, West Africa, with infants receiving the first dose during the neonatal period and the second before 60 days of age. In a double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled trial in Navrongo, Ghana, we recruited neonates to receive 2 doses of RRV-TV or placebo and followed them to age 12 months. In the intention-to-treat population of 998 infants, we measured a vaccine efficacy of 63.1% against RV-GE of any severity associated with any of the 4 serotypes represented in the vaccine and 60.7% against RV-GE associated with any rotavirus serotype. RRV-TV in a 2-dose schedule with the first dose during the neonatal period is efficacious in preventing RV-GE in rural Ghana. Neonatal dosing results in early protection and may be the optimum schedule to avoid or significantly reduce intussusception, now reported to be associated in international settings with the 2 most widely marketed, licensed, live virus, oral rotavirus vaccines.

  8. Construction and characterization of human rotavirus recombinant VP8* subunit parenteral vaccine candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xiaobo; Cao, Dianjun; Jones, Ronald W; Li, Jianping; Szu, Shousun; Hoshino, Yasutaka

    2012-09-21

    Two currently licensed live oral rotavirus vaccines (Rotarix® and RotaTeq®) are highly efficacious against severe rotavirus diarrhea. However, the efficacy of such vaccines in selected low-income African and Asian countries is much lower than that in middle or high-income countries. Additionally, these two vaccines have recently been associated with rare case of intussusception in vaccinated infants. We developed a novel recombinant subunit parenteral rotavirus vaccine which may be more effective in low-income countries and also avert the potential problem of intussusception. Truncated recombinant VP8* (ΔVP8*) protein of human rotavirus strain Wa P[8], DS-1 P[4] or 1076 P[6] expressed in Escherichia coli was highly soluble and was generated in high yield. Guinea pigs hyperimmunized intramuscularly with each of the ΔVP8* proteins (i.e., P[8], P[4] or P[6]) developed high levels of homotypic as well as variable levels of heterotypic neutralizing antibodies. Moreover, the selected ΔVP8* proteins when administered to mice at a clinically relevant dosage, route and schedule, elicited high levels of serum anti-VP8* IgG and/or neutralizing antibodies. Our data indicated that the ΔVP8* proteins may be a plausible additional candidate as new parenteral rotavirus vaccines. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. CT findings of small bowel metastases from primary lung cancer

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    Kim, Jae Wook; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Kim, Ah Young; Kim, Gab Choul; Kim, Tae Kyoung; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Lee, Moon Gyu [Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-11-01

    To evaluate the CT findings of small bowel metastases from primary lung cancer. Of the 1468 patients with primary lung cancer between 1990 and 2000, 13 patients who had metastasis to the small intestine were collected. Of these 13 patients, nine who underwent CT scan were included for analysis. The pathologic diagnoses of primary lung cancer in these nine patients were squamous cell carcinoma in six, adenocarcinoma in two, and large cell carcinoma in one. CT scans were analyzed with regard to the site and patterns (intraluminal mass/bowel wall thickening/bowel implants) of metastatic masses, and the presence or absence of complication such as intussusception, obstruction, or perforation of the small bowel. The medical records of the patients were also reviewed retrospectively for evaluation of presenting abdominal symptom and time interval of metastases from initial diagnosis of lung cancer. Metastatic lesions were distributed throughout the small intestine: the duodenum in five, the jejunum in four, the ileum in six, and both jejunum and ileum in one patient. The size of metastatic masses of small bowel ranged from 1.3 cm to 5.0 cm (mean size, 2.6 cm) On CT, the small bowel was involved with intraluminal masses (mean size, 3.4 cm) in eight patients, diffuse wall thickening (mean thickness, 1.6 cm) in five, and bowel implants (mean size, 2.2 cm) in two. Complications occurred in seven patients, including intussusceptions without obstruction in two patients and with obstruction in two, obstruction without intussusceptions in two, and bowel perforation in one. Of 9 patients, 6 had at least one symptom referable to the small bowel including abdominal pain in 4, anemia in 3, vomiting in 1, and jaundice in 1. Lung cancer and small bowel lesions were detected simultaneously in four patients and the time interval of metastases from initial diagnosis of lung cancer ranged from 10 days to 30 months (median interval, 54 days) in patients. CT helps in defining the extent and

  10. CT findings of small bowel metastases from primary lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Wook; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Kim, Ah Young; Kim, Gab Choul; Kim, Tae Kyoung; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Lee, Moon Gyu

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the CT findings of small bowel metastases from primary lung cancer. Of the 1468 patients with primary lung cancer between 1990 and 2000, 13 patients who had metastasis to the small intestine were collected. Of these 13 patients, nine who underwent CT scan were included for analysis. The pathologic diagnoses of primary lung cancer in these nine patients were squamous cell carcinoma in six, adenocarcinoma in two, and large cell carcinoma in one. CT scans were analyzed with regard to the site and patterns (intraluminal mass/bowel wall thickening/bowel implants) of metastatic masses, and the presence or absence of complication such as intussusception, obstruction, or perforation of the small bowel. The medical records of the patients were also reviewed retrospectively for evaluation of presenting abdominal symptom and time interval of metastases from initial diagnosis of lung cancer. Metastatic lesions were distributed throughout the small intestine: the duodenum in five, the jejunum in four, the ileum in six, and both jejunum and ileum in one patient. The size of metastatic masses of small bowel ranged from 1.3 cm to 5.0 cm (mean size, 2.6 cm) On CT, the small bowel was involved with intraluminal masses (mean size, 3.4 cm) in eight patients, diffuse wall thickening (mean thickness, 1.6 cm) in five, and bowel implants (mean size, 2.2 cm) in two. Complications occurred in seven patients, including intussusceptions without obstruction in two patients and with obstruction in two, obstruction without intussusceptions in two, and bowel perforation in one. Of 9 patients, 6 had at least one symptom referable to the small bowel including abdominal pain in 4, anemia in 3, vomiting in 1, and jaundice in 1. Lung cancer and small bowel lesions were detected simultaneously in four patients and the time interval of metastases from initial diagnosis of lung cancer ranged from 10 days to 30 months (median interval, 54 days) in patients. CT helps in defining the extent and

  11. Accuracy of Four Imaging Techniques for Diagnosis of Posterior Pelvic Floor Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gruting, Isabelle M A; Stankiewicz, Aleksandra; Kluivers, Kirsten; De Bin, Riccardo; Blake, Helena; Sultan, Abdul H; Thakar, Ranee

    2017-11-01

    To establish the diagnostic test accuracy of evacuation proctography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), transperineal ultrasonography, and endovaginal ultrasonography for detecting posterior pelvic floor disorders (rectocele, enterocele, intussusception, and anismus) in women with obstructed defecation syndrome and secondarily to identify the most patient-friendly imaging technique. In this prospective cohort study, 131 women with symptoms of obstructed defecation syndrome underwent evacuation proctogram, MRI, and transperineal and endovaginal ultrasonography. Images were analyzed by two blinded observers. In the absence of a reference standard, latent class analysis was used to assess diagnostic test accuracy of multiple tests with area under the curve (AUC) as the primary outcome measure. Secondary outcome measures were interobserver agreement calculated as Cohen's κ and patient acceptability using a visual analog scale. No significant differences in diagnostic accuracy were found among the imaging techniques for all the target conditions. Estimates of diagnostic test accuracy were highest for rectocele using MRI (AUC 0.79) or transperineal ultrasonography (AUC 0.85), for enterocele using transperineal (AUC 0.73) or endovaginal ultrasonography (AUC 0.87), for intussusception using evacuation proctography (AUC 0.76) or endovaginal ultrasonography (AUC 0.77), and for anismus using endovaginal (AUC 0.95) or transperineal ultrasonography (AUC 0.78). Interobserver agreement for the diagnosis of rectocele (κ 0.53-0.72), enterocele (κ 0.54-0.94) and anismus (κ 0.43-0.81) was moderate to excellent, but poor to fair for intussusception (κ -0.03 to 0.37) with all techniques. Patient acceptability was better for transperineal and endovaginal ultrasonography as compared with MRI and evacuation proctography (P<.001). Evacuation proctography, MRI, and transperineal and endovaginal ultrasonography were shown to have similar diagnostic test accuracy. Evacuation proctography

  12. Prospective multicenter trial comparing echodefecography with defecography in the assessment of anorectal dysfunction in patients with obstructed defecation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regadas, F Sergio P; Haas, Eric M; Abbas, Maher A; Marcio Jorge, J; Habr-Gama, Angelita; Sands, Dana; Wexner, Steven D; Melo-Amaral, Ingrid; Sardiñas, Carlos; Lima, Doryane M; Sagae, Univaldo E; Sagae, Evaldo U; Murad-Regadas, Sthela M

    2011-06-01

    Defecography is the gold standard for assessing functional anorectal disorders but is limited by the need for a specific radiologic environment, exposure of patients to radiation, and inability to show all anatomic structures involved in defecation. Echodefecography is a 3-dimensional dynamic ultrasound technique developed to overcome these limitations. This study was designed to validate the effectiveness of echodefecography compared with defecography in the assessment of anorectal dysfunctions related to obstructed defecation. Multicenter, prospective observational study. Women with symptoms of obstructed defecation. Six centers for colorectal surgery (3 in Brazil, 1 in Texas, 1 in Florida, and 1 in Venezuela). Defecography was performed after inserting 150 mL of barium paste in the rectum. Echodefecography was performed with a 2050 endoprobe through 3 automatic scans. The κ statistic was used to assess agreement between echodefecography and defecography in the evaluation of rectocele, intussusception, anismus, and grade III enterocele. Eighty-six women were evaluated: median Wexner constipation score, 13.4 (range, 6-23); median age, 53.4 (range, 26-77) years. Rectocele was identified with substantial agreement between the 2 methods (defecography, 80 patients; echodefecography, 76 patients; κ = 0.61; 95% CI = 0.48-0.73). The 2 techniques demonstrated identical findings in 6 patients without rectocele, and in 9 patients with grade I, 29 with grade II, and 19 patients with grade III rectoceles. Defecography identified rectal intussusception in 42 patients, with echodefecography identifying 37 of these cases, plus 4 additional cases, yielding substantial agreement (κ = 0.79; 95% CI = 0.57-1.0). Intussusception was associated with rectocele in 28 patients for both methods (κ = 0.62; 95% CI = 0.41-0.83). There was substantial agreement for anismus (κ = 0.61; 95% CI = 0.40-0.81) and for rectocele combined with anismus (κ = 0.61; 95% CI = 0.40-0.82). Agreement for

  13. Efficacy of a Monovalent Human-Bovine (116E) Rotavirus Vaccine in Indian Infants: A Randomised Double Blind Placebo Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Nita; Rongsen-Chandola, Temsunaro; Bavdekar, Ashish; John, Jacob; Antony, Kalpana; Taneja, Sunita; Goyal, Nidhi; Kawade, Anand; Kang, Gagandeep; Rathore, Sudeep Singh; Juvekar, Sanjay; Muliyil, Jayaprakash; Arya, Alok; Shaikh, Hanif; Abraham, Vinod; Vrati, Sudhanshu; Proschan, Michael; Kohberger, Robert; Thiry, Georges; Glass, Roger; Greenberg, Harry B; Curlin, George; Mohan, Krishna; Harshavardhan, GVJA; Prasad, Sai; Rao, TS; Boslego, John; Bhan, Maharaj Kishan

    2015-01-01

    Background Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe dehydrating gastroenteritis in developing countries. Safe, effective, and affordable rotavirus vaccines are needed for developing countries. Methods In a double-blind placebo controlled multicentre trial, 6799 infants aged 6 to 7 weeks were randomised to receive three doses of an oral human-bovine natural reassortant vaccine (116E) or placebo at ages 6, 10, and 14 weeks. Primary outcome was severe (≥11 on the Vesikari scale) rotavirus gastroenteritis. Efficacy outcomes and adverse events were ascertained through active surveillance. Findings At analyses, the median age was 17·2 months; over 96% subjects received all three doses of the vaccine/placebo and ~1% were lost to follow up. 4532 and 2267 subjects were randomly assigned to receive vaccine and placebo, respectively. The per protocol analyses included 4354 subjects in the vaccine and 2187 subjects in the placebo group. 71 events of severe rotavirus gastroenteritis were reported in 4752 person years among the vaccinees compared to 76 events in 2360 person years in the placebo recipients; vaccine efficacy against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis was 53·6% (95% CI 35·0–66·9; Protavirus gastroenteritis episode was 55 (95% CI 37–97). The incidence of severe rotavirus gastroenteritis/100 person years was 1·5 in vaccine and 3·2 in placebo group and an incidence rate ratio of 0·46 (95% CI 0·33–0·65). The absolute rate reduction for severe rotavirus gastroenteritis was 1·7 (95% CI 2·5–0·9). Efficacy against severe gastroenteritis of any aetiology was 18·6% (95% CI 1·9–32·3); it was 24·1% (95% CI 5·8–38·7) in the first year of life. The prevalence of immediate, solicited, and serious adverse events were similar in both groups. There were six cases of intussusception amongst 4532 vaccinees and two amongst 2267 placebo recipients (P=0·73). All intussusception cases occurred after the third dose. Among vaccine and placebo recipients

  14. WHO informal consultation on quality, safety and efficacy specifications for live attenuated rotavirus vaccines Mexico City, Mexico, 8-9 February 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, David

    2005-12-01

    Rotavirus vaccines are at an advanced stage of development but there are as yet no WHO recommendations on production and quality control to provide regulatory guidance. A meeting of experts was convened by WHO and PAHO/AMRO to review the scientific basis for production and quality control of rotavirus vaccines, and to discuss specific measures to assure the safety and efficacy of rotavirus vaccines. The meeting was attended by 25 experts from 14 countries, drawn from academia, public health, national regulatory authorities and vaccine producers. It was agreed that existing guidance for other live virus vaccines provides a very good basis for product characterization, especially for source materials and control of production. The basis for attenuation of current vaccines or vaccine candidates is not known but, at least for the vaccines based on the Jennerian approach of using animal (bovine) rotaviruses, is likely to be multigenic. The risk of intussusception in humans is influenced by genetic background and age. Recent analyzes of large vaccine safety trials found that certain strains of vaccine virus were not associated with intussusception, although in these trials the first dose of vaccine was not administered to children over 3 months of age. Since age is a risk factor for intussusception, this may suggest that early delivery of the first dose of vaccine is desirable. However, maternal antibodies may mitigate against early delivery of the first vaccine dose. Factors which could affect vaccine efficacy or safety include strain diversity, malnutrition, other enteric infections, parasitic infection or immune suppression. It was concluded that data from clinical trials conducted in one part of the world would not necessarily be predictive of vaccine efficacy in other places. It was agreed that in nonclinical evaluations there was a need to use oral dosing for toxicity studies and, because rotavirus is non-neurovirulent, that there was no need for an animal

  15. Colitis with wall thickening and edematous changes during oral administration of the powdered form of Qing-dai in patients with ulcerative colitis: a report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Satoru; Araki, Toshimitsu; Okita, Yoshiki; Yamamoto, Akira; Hamada, Yasuhiko; Katsurahara, Masaki; Horiki, Noriyuki; Nakamura, Misaki; Shimoyama, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Takei, Yoshiyuki; Kusunoki, Masato

    2018-03-16

    Orally administered Qing-dai, called indigo naturalis in Latin, is reportedly useful for the treatment of ulcerative colitis. We herein describe two patients with ulcerative colitis who developed colitis with wall thickening and edematous changes during oral administration of the powdered form of Qing-dai. In Case 1, a 35-year-old man developed colitis similar to ischemic colitis with bloody stool that recurred each time he ingested Qing-dai. He had no signs of recurrence upon withdrawal of Qing-dai. In Case 2, a 43-year-old woman underwent ileocecal resection for treatment of an intussusception 2 months after beginning oral administration of Qing-dai. Edema and congestion but no ulceration were present in the mucosa of the resected specimen. Both patients exhibited abdominal pain with bloody diarrhea, and abdominal computed tomography showed marked wall edema affecting an extensive portion of the large bowel.

  16. Gastrointestinal complications of bariatric Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandrasegaran, Kumaresan; Rajesh, Arumugam; Lall, Chandana; Maglinte, Dean D.; Gomez, Gerardo A.; Lappas, John C.

    2005-01-01

    Obesity is rapidly becoming the most important public health issue in USA and Europe. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is now established as the gold standard for treating intractable morbid or super obesity. We reviewed the imaging findings following this surgery in 234 patients. In this pictorial essay we present the CT and upper gastrointestinal contrast study appearances of the expected postoperative anatomy as well as a range of abdominal complications. The complications are classified into leaks, fistula and obstruction. Postoperative gastric outlet and small bowel obstruction can be caused by anastomotic stenosis, mesocolic tunnel stenosis, adhesions, stomal ulcer, obturation, intussusception and internal or external hernia. Small bowel obstruction may be of a simple, closed loop and/or strangulating type. The radiologist should be able to diagnose the type and possible cause of obstruction. (orig.)

  17. Severe acute abdomen caused by symptomatic Meckel's diverticulum in three children with trisomy 18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Anri; Kumada, Tomohiro; Furukawa, Oki; Nozaki, Fumihito; Hiejima, Ikuko; Shibata, Minoru; Kusunoki, Takashi; Fujii, Tatsuya

    2015-10-01

    Meckel's diverticulum (MD) is the most prevalent congenital anomaly of the gastrointestinal tract and often presents a diagnostic challenge. Patients with trisomy 18 frequently have MD, but the poor prognosis and lack of consensus regarding management for neonates has meant that precise information on the clinical manifestations in infants and children with MD is lacking. We describe the cases of three children with trisomy 18 who developed symptomatic MD. Intussusception was diagnosed in Patient 1, intestinal volvulus in Patient 2, and gastrointestinal bleeding in Patient 3. All three patients underwent surgical treatment and only the Patient 1 died due to pulmonary hypertensive crisis. The other two patients experienced no further episodes of abdominal symptoms. In patients with trisomy 18, although consideration of postoperative complications and prognosis after surgical treatment is necessary, symptomatic MD should carry a high index of suspicion in patients presenting with acute abdomen. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Gastrointestinal complications of bariatric Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandrasegaran, Kumaresan; Rajesh, Arumugam; Lall, Chandana; Maglinte, Dean D. [Indiana University Medical Center, UH 0279, Department of Radiology, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Gomez, Gerardo A. [Wishard Memorial Hospital, Department of Surgery, Indianapolis (United States); Lappas, John C. [Wishard Memorial Hospital, Department of Radiology, Indianapolis (United States)

    2005-02-01

    Obesity is rapidly becoming the most important public health issue in USA and Europe. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is now established as the gold standard for treating intractable morbid or super obesity. We reviewed the imaging findings following this surgery in 234 patients. In this pictorial essay we present the CT and upper gastrointestinal contrast study appearances of the expected postoperative anatomy as well as a range of abdominal complications. The complications are classified into leaks, fistula and obstruction. Postoperative gastric outlet and small bowel obstruction can be caused by anastomotic stenosis, mesocolic tunnel stenosis, adhesions, stomal ulcer, obturation, intussusception and internal or external hernia. Small bowel obstruction may be of a simple, closed loop and/or strangulating type. The radiologist should be able to diagnose the type and possible cause of obstruction. (orig.)

  19. [Studies on the tolerance of the organism to X 5 CrNiMo 18.10 steel (Königsee). II. Light microscopic studies of the surrounding tissue of metal implants (X 5 CrNiMo 18.10 steel) in guinea pigs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höhndorf, H; Drössler, K; Stiehl, P

    1977-06-01

    The tissue around X 5 CrNiMo 18.10-steel implantates with different surfaces was examined in 72 guinea-pigs. Aside from controls, these animals were preoperatively sensibilized against chromium and nickel. The results can be summarized since the histologic findings showed no different peculiarities. The authors describe an intussusception of the implantate in connective tissue which evidently depends on time and surface. Further the spreading of alien material in the surrounding of the implantate, and morphologic findings are reported. The morphologic evidences are described and discussed in detail, since they are interpreted as signs of cell-mediated immune reactions. The presence of lymphocytes, lymphoblasts, histiocytes (mostly carrying alien material), and granulocytes, as well as proliferations at the arterioles suggest an overlapping of immune reactions.

  20. Defecography of rectal wall prolapse conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salzano, A.; Muto, M.; De Rosa, A.; Ginolfi, F.; Carbone, M.; Amodio, F.; Rossi, E.; Tuccillo, M.

    1999-01-01

    Pelvic floor and rectal prolapse conditions have greatly benefited by new imaging and instrumental diagnostic approaches, and especially defecography, for both pathophysiological interpretation and differential diagnosis. The authors investigated the efficacy of defecography in the assessment of rectal prolapse, and in particular the role of videproctography in diagnosis such dynamic disorders. The dynamic changes of ampulla are well depicted by videoproctography, which showed anorectum normalization and spontaneous reduction of invagination after intussusception. Defecography exhibited good capabilities in showing rectal wall function abnormalities. Finally, some features of videoproctography such as low radiation dose, non-invasiveness and ease of execution, make the examination acceptable to patients with anorectal disorders and for the follow-up of rectal prolapse [it

  1. Management of obstructed defecation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podzemny, Vlasta; Pescatori, Lorenzo Carlo; Pescatori, Mario

    2015-01-28

    The management of obstructed defecation syndrome (ODS) is mainly conservative and mainly consists of fiber diet, bulking laxatives, rectal irrigation or hydrocolontherapy, biofeedback, transanal electrostimulation, yoga and psychotherapy. According to our experience, nearly 20% of the patients need surgical treatment. If we consider ODS an "iceberg syndrome", with "emerging rocks", rectocele and rectal internal mucosal prolapse, that may benefit from surgery, at least two out of ten patients also has "underwater rocks" or occult disorders, such as anismus, rectal hyposensation and anxiety/depression, which mostly require conservative treatment. Rectal prolapse excision or obliterative suture, rectocele and/or enterocele repair, retrograde Malone's enema and partial myotomy of the puborectalis muscle are effective in selected cases. Laparoscopic ventral sacral colporectopexy may be an effective surgical option. Stapled transanal rectal resection may lead to severe complications. The Transtar procedure seems to be safer, when dealing with recto-rectal intussusception. A multidisciplinary approach to ODS provides the best results.

  2. Defecography - analysis of qualitative findings; Evakuationsproktographie - Analyse qualitativer Befunde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schott, U. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. Radiologische Diagnostik; Braunschweig, R. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. Radiologische Diagnostik; Claussen, C.D. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. Radiologische Diagnostik

    1994-12-31

    The defectography is an examination of the anorectal function in defecatory disorder. The defecography has a diagnostic impact on disease, which only emerge during defecation as intussusception, enterocele, prolapse or sphincter dysfunction. Other findings as rectocele or descending pelvic floor are ambiguous concerning clinical relevance. The interpretation of defecography should include patient`s history and clinical findings and - if available - endoscopic and manometric findings. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Evakuationsproktographie ist eine Funktionsuntersuchung des Anorektums beim Symptomenkreis der Defaekationsbeschwerden. Die Domaene der Evakuationsproktographie sind Erkrankungen, die sich nur unter den Provokationsbedingungen der Defaekation manifestieren, wie die Intussuzeption, Enterocele, temporaerer Wandprolaps oder Anismus. Andere Befunde wie eine Rektocele oder Beckenbodenschwaeche sind in ihrer klinischen Relevanz umstritten. Die Bewertung der Evakuationsproktographie im Rahmen des Beschwerdebildes des Patienten sollte in Zusammenschau von vollstaendiger anamnestischer und klinischer Information und - sofern vorhanden - Befunden von Rektoskopie und Rektummanometrie erfolgen. (orig.)

  3. Evacuation proctography - examination technique and method of evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunschweig, R.; Schott, U.; Starlinger, M.

    1993-01-01

    Evacuation proctography is the most important imaging technique to supplement findings of physical examination, manometry, and endoscopy in patients presenting with pathologies in anorectal morphology and function. Indications for evacuation proctography include obstructed defecation or incomplete evacuation, imaging of ileal pouches following excision of the rectum, and suspected anorectal fistulae. Evacuation proctography with thick barium sulfate is performed under fluoroscopy. Documentation of the study can either be done by single-shot X-rays, video recording, or imaging with a 100-mm spot-film camera. Evacuation proctography shows morphologic changes such as spastic pelvic floor, rectocele, enterocele, intussusception and anal prolapse. Measurements can be performed to obtain the anorectal angle, location and mobility of the pelvic floor, and size as well as importance of a rectocele. Qualitative and quantitative data can only be interpreted along with clinical and manometric data. (orig.) [de

  4. Trichobezoars in baboons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejido, Diana C.P.; Dick, Edward J.; Williams, Priscilla C.; Sharp, R. Mark; Andrade, Marcia C.R.; DiCarlo, C.D.; Hubbard, Gene B.

    2009-01-01

    Background There is little information available concerning trichobezoars in the nonhuman primate literature. Methods We evaluated 118 cases of trichobezoar in baboons over a 29 year period at the Southwest National Primate Research Center. Results The anatomic locations affected in decreasing order were the stomach, small intestine, cecum, esophagus, and colon. The most common clinical history was weight loss. The most frequent associated pathology included gastrointestinal inflammation and ulceration, emaciation, peritonitis, intussusception, pneumonia, and aspiration. Trichobezoars were the cause of death in 9 baboons and the reason for euthanasia in 12. Females were 2.14 times more likely than males to be affected. The greater the percentage of group housing time, the more likely the baboon was to develop trichobezoars. Conclusions The baboon may present a useful model to evaluate the etiology, genetic predisposition, physiopathology, neurobiology, and treatment response of trichobezoars. PMID:19457157

  5. Pathological study on treated and untreated dogs dead after γ-irradiation with 6 Gy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dewen; Guan Mingchen; Liu Xuetong

    1986-01-01

    Forty dogs γ-irradiated with 6 Gy were divided into three groups: control (8 cases), treated with antibiotics alone (8 cases) and with combined measures (24 cases). The death of dogs in these groups occurred between 8th-12th, 11th-14th and 12th-169th days after irradiation respectively. In the third group, regeneration of hematopoietic cells in sternal bone marrow was first observed in dog dead on 17.5th day after irradiation, and regeneration of lymphoid tissues in spleen on 14th day. The degree of recovery in both of these organs was worse than in dogs irradiated with 3.25 Gy. The complications were varied; for instance, in addition to infection and hemorrhage, there were intussusception, gastric dilation, necrosis and hemorrhage of pancrease, jaundice, cerebral edema, hemorrhage and hernia, cachexia during recovery and so on. The causes of death in these experimental animals were also varied

  6. Pathological study on treated and untreated dogs dead after. gamma. -irradiation with 6 Gy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewen, Wang; Mingchen, Guan; Xuetong, Liu

    1986-10-01

    Forty dogs ..gamma..-irradiated with 6 Gy were divided into three groups: control (8 cases), treated with antibiotics alone (8 cases) and with combined measures (24 cases). The death of dogs in these groups occurred between 8th-12th, 11th-14th and 12th-169th days after irradiation respectively. In the third group, regeneration of hematopoietic cells in sternal bone marrow was first observed in dog dead on 17.5th day after irradiation, and regeneration of lymphoid tissues in spleen on 14th day. The degree of recovery in both of these organs was worse than in dogs irradiated with 3.25 Gy. The complications were varied; for instance, in addition to infection and hemorrhage, there were intussusception, gastric dilation, necrosis and hemorrhage of pancrease, jaundice, cerebral edema, hemorrhage and hernia, cachexia during recovery and so on. The causes of death in these experimental animals were also varied.

  7. Videodefaecography combined with measurement of the anorectal angle and of perineal descent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skomorowska, E.; Henrichsen, S.; Christiansen, J.; Hegedues, V.; Glostrup Sygehus, Copenhagen

    1987-01-01

    Cineradiographic defaecography combined with measurement of the anorectal angle and descent of the pelvic floor is proposed. The method used in 73 women gave valuable information in 48 patients who complained of anal incompetence, rectal tenesmus, and chronic constipation. In these patients, high and low rectal intussusception, rectocele, and pathologic movement of the pelvic floor were detected. Some of these phenomena could only be diagnosed by the radiologic method here described. Quantitations of the anorectal angle and descent of the pelvic floor placed the group with constipation halfway between normal individuals and those with anal incompetence. The value of this finding is discussed. Recent improvements in anorectal surgery often make videodefaecography decisive for the choice of the optimal operative method. Therefore, videodefaecography together with measurement of the anorectal angle and pelvic floor descent is recommended whenever anorectal surgery for correction of functional disturbances is contemplated. (orig.)

  8. Qualitative assessment of anorectal junction levels and anorectal angles to investigate functional differences between constipation and fecal incontinence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shannon, S.I.; Somers, S.; Anvari, M.; Stevenson, G.W.; Waterfall, W.E.; Huizinga, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    Female patients consecutively referred for defecography, with either chronic constipation or incontinence, were assessed for posterior anorectal angle and anorectal junction level as measured from the ischial tuberosities. The clinical groups did not differ in grades of rectoceles, enteroceles, or intussusception. Both constipated and incontinent patients had a low resting anorectal junction position compared with that of volunteers, indicating a stretched pelvic floor. Despite this, the constipated patients achieved a similar degree of lift of the pelvic floor on squeezing as controls, and they also showed significant angle changes on lifting and straining. Incontinent patients showed a significantly smaller amount of lift than controls, a significantly larger descent than constipated patients, and no angle changes on lifting and straining. These data are consistent with significantly weaker pelvic floor muscles in incontinent compared with constipated patients, despite a similar degree of stretching

  9. Radiographic and pathologic observations of eosinophilic gastroenteritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Lae Won [Busan Nationa University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Sook Hee; Lee, Jung Dal [Busan Gospel Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    1974-10-15

    This report presents two cases with eosinophilic gastroenteritis in detail. The radiographic and pathologic features of eosinophilic gastroenteritis are summarized with emphasis on the differential diagnostic features. Radiographic eosinophilic gastritis should be differentiated from gastric carcinoma and lymphoma, and eosinophilic enteritis from intestinal tuberculosis and intussusception of the small bowel in Korea where these entities are prevent. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is pathologically characterized by diffuse infiltration of the submucosa and muscle coats with eosinophilic in conjunction with hypertrophy of individual muscle fibers. This leads to thickening of the gastrointestinal wall resulting in narrowing and obstruction of the lumen. Eosinophilic venulitis is another characteristic feature which is helpful for differentiation this entity from a parasitic infection.

  10. Anorectal function orientated surgery for rectal prolapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takao, Yoshihiko; Tsujizuka, Kazuyuki; Kikuchi, Kiyoshi; Okuda, Makoto

    2007-01-01

    Until quite recently, rectal prolapse was regarded as being a simple condition to treat. Surgical control of the prolapse was largely regarded as a successful outcome. However, recent detailed clinical assessment indicate that many patients have a rectal prolapse which is successfully controlled by surgical operation, yet suffer severe symptoms of disordered defecation, which either persists, or develops as a result of operative treatment. Difficulty with rectal evacuation, persistent incontinence and continuing mucus discharge are recognized as important, despite successful repair of the prolapse itself. There are two major theory of the pathology; circumferential intussusception and sliding hernia. However, many other multifarious factors are concomitant with the condition. These factors often need to be balanced against one another. Usually, a single surgical procedure will not be able to solve the problems. Therefore, the choice of treatment tailored for the individual patient. (author)

  11. The abdominal technetium scan (a decade of experience)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooney, D.R.; Duszynski, D.O.; Camboa, E.; Karp, M.P.; Jewett, T.C. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Out of 270 children with gastrointestinal symptoms, the indications for technetium scanning were: gastrointestinal tract bleeding (165 patients), abdominal pain (99 patients) and a history of intussusception (6 patients). Thirty children had abnormal findings, while the remaining 240 patients had normal scans. Four of the 30 children with positive scans were not explored, while the others underwent laparotomy. Of the 26 operated patients, 12 (46%) had a Meckel's diverticulum. Nine patients (34%) had other pathologic lesions that were detected by the scan. Five had true false positives as no pathologic lesions were found. Of the 240 children with negative scans, 19 were eventually explored because of persistent symptoms or clinical findings. Two of these had a Meckel's diverticulum. Eleven had a negative exploration while six had other surgical lesions. Technitium scan should reliably detect around 80%-90% of Meckel's diverticula. It will also accurately exclude the diagnosis of Meckel's diverticulum in over 90% of patients

  12. Perforated Meckel’s Diverticulum Lithiasis: An Unusual Cause of Peritonitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umasankar Mathuram Thiyagarajan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Meckel’s diverticulum is the commonest congenital malformation of gastrointestinal tract and represents a persistent remnant of the omphalomesenteric duct. Although it mostly remains silent, it can present as bleeding, perforation, intestinal obstruction, intussusception, and tumours. These complications, especially bleeding, tend to be more common in the paediatric group and intestinal obstruction in adults. Stone formation (lithiasis in Meckel’s diverticulum is rare. We report a case of Meckel’s diverticulum lithiasis which presented as an acute abdomen in an otherwise healthy individual. The patient underwent an exploratory laparotomy which revealed a perforated Meckel’s diverticulum with lithiasis; a segmental resection with end-to-end anastomosis of small bowel was performed. Patient recovery was delayed due to pneumonia, discharged on day 20 with no further complications at 6 months following surgery.

  13. Rectal prolapse as initial clinical manifestation of colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C-W; Hsiao, C-W; Wu, C-C; Jao, S-W

    2008-04-01

    Rectal prolapse as the initial clinical manifestation of colorectal cancer is uncommon. We describe the case of a 75-year-old woman who was diagnosed as having adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon after presenting with complete rectal prolapse. The tumor caused rectosigmoid intussusception and then it prolapsed out through the anus. She underwent rectosigmoidectomy and rectopexy. The postoperative course was uneventful. The relationship between colorectal cancer and rectal prolapse has not been clearly established. This case report describes an unusual presentation of colorectal cancer. It suggests that rectal prolapse can present as the initial symptom of colorectal cancer and may also be a presenting feature of the occult intra-abdominal pathology. The importance of adequate investigation such as colonoscopy should be emphasized in patients who develop a new onset of rectal prolapse.

  14. Small Bowel Obstruction Caused by Aloe vera Bezoars: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, In Taik; Cha, Jae Myung; Ki, Hye Jin; Kwak, Min Seob; Yoon, Jin Young; Shin, Hyun Phil; Jeoun, Jung Won; Choi, Sung Il

    2017-05-25

    Small bowel obstruction is a clinical condition commonly caused by postoperative adhesion, volvulus, intussusceptions, and hernia. Small bowel obstruction due to bezoars is clinically uncommon, accounting for approximately 2-4% of all obstructions. Computed tomography (CT) is a useful method in diagnosing the cause of small bowel obstruction. However, small bowel obstruction caused by bezoars may not be detected by an abdominal CT examination. Herein, we report a rare case of small bowel obstruction by Aloe vera bezoars, which were undetected by an abdominal CT. Phytobezoars should be included in the differential diagnosis of small bowel obstruction in patients with predisposing factors, such as excessive consumption of high-fiber food and diabetes.

  15. Radiologic findings of submucosal tumors of gastrointestinal tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Ja; Ahn, In Oak; You, Jin Jong [College of Medicine, Gyeongsang National University, Chinju (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-05-01

    Gastrointestinal submucosal tumors originate from submucosal histologic structures such as muscles, lymph nodes, nerves, fibers and vessels. Most patients are asymptomatic. Lesions that are large or ulcerated may cause abdominal pain or upper gastrointestinal bleeding, and those that grow intraluminally sometimes become pedunculated and occasionally prolapse to cause intussusception. Adenocarcinoma is the most common primary gastrointestinal tumor, accounting for approximately 90-95% of such lesions, while submucosal tumors account for approximately 2-6% of all gastrointestinal tumors. Because their overlying mucosa appears normal, submucosal tumors age after difficult to visualize endoscopically, and for this reason, barium studies or CT scans are helpful for diagnosis. In this paper, variable CT and barium study findings of the different types of gastrointestinal submucosal tumor are demonstrated, and a brief discussion of the respective disease entities is included. (author)

  16. Primary malignant small bowel tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Kyung Seung; Suh, Ho Jong; Kim, So Sun; Kim, Ho Joon; Chun, Byung Hee; Joh, Young Duk [Kosin College, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-07-15

    Small bowel tumors are rarely detected unless there is intestinal obstruction or bleeding. In the seven years 1982-1988, at Kosin Medical Center, 25 primary malignant small bowel tumors were studied radiographically with barium and / or computed tomography (CT). CT revealed gastrointestinal abnormalities in 20 patients. In ten, lesion were identified by upper G-I series, in 15 by small bowel series, and in addition, in 3 by colon enema. The most common malignant small bowel tumor was adenocarcinoma (N=15) and was next common lymphoma (N=7). On barium study, primary adenocarcinoma appeared as an irregular stricture (66.7%) and polypoid mass with intussusception was most prominent finding in lymphoma. Leiomyosarcoma appeared as an exophytic mass with excavation or ulceration. CT was found to be accurate in detecting wall thickening, complications and other associated findings. In conclusion, barium study was useful in the diagnosis of primary malignant small bowel tumor and CT was more accurate in detecting secondary findings.

  17. Primary malignant small bowel tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Kyung Seung; Suh, Ho Jong; Kim, So Sun; Kim, Ho Joon; Chun, Byung Hee; Joh, Young Duk

    1990-01-01

    Small bowel tumors are rarely detected unless there is intestinal obstruction or bleeding. In the seven years 1982-1988, at Kosin Medical Center, 25 primary malignant small bowel tumors were studied radiographically with barium and / or computed tomography (CT). CT revealed gastrointestinal abnormalities in 20 patients. In ten, lesion were identified by upper G-I series, in 15 by small bowel series, and in addition, in 3 by colon enema. The most common malignant small bowel tumor was adenocarcinoma (N=15) and was next common lymphoma (N=7). On barium study, primary adenocarcinoma appeared as an irregular stricture (66.7%) and polypoid mass with intussusception was most prominent finding in lymphoma. Leiomyosarcoma appeared as an exophytic mass with excavation or ulceration. CT was found to be accurate in detecting wall thickening, complications and other associated findings. In conclusion, barium study was useful in the diagnosis of primary malignant small bowel tumor and CT was more accurate in detecting secondary findings

  18. Radiologic findings of submucosal tumors of gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eun Ja; Ahn, In Oak; You, Jin Jong

    2000-01-01

    Gastrointestinal submucosal tumors originate from submucosal histologic structures such as muscles, lymph nodes, nerves, fibers and vessels. Most patients are asymptomatic. Lesions that are large or ulcerated may cause abdominal pain or upper gastrointestinal bleeding, and those that grow intraluminally sometimes become pedunculated and occasionally prolapse to cause intussusception. Adenocarcinoma is the most common primary gastrointestinal tumor, accounting for approximately 90-95% of such lesions, while submucosal tumors account for approximately 2-6% of all gastrointestinal tumors. Because their overlying mucosa appears normal, submucosal tumors age after difficult to visualize endoscopically, and for this reason, barium studies or CT scans are helpful for diagnosis. In this paper, variable CT and barium study findings of the different types of gastrointestinal submucosal tumor are demonstrated, and a brief discussion of the respective disease entities is included. (author)

  19. [Intestinal volvulus due to yeyunal duplication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Iglesias, P; Carazo Palacios, M E; Lluna González, J; Ibáñez Pradas, V; Rodríguez Caraballo, L

    2014-10-01

    Duplications of the alimentary tract are congenital malformations. The ileum is the most commonly affected organ. A lot of duplications are incidentally diagnosed but most of patients present a combination of pain or complications such as obstructive symptoms, intestinal intussusception, perforation or volvulus. We report the case of a 6-years-old girl, with intermittent abdominal pain and vomits for two months long. Laboratory work was completely normal and in the radiology analysis (abdominal sonography and magnetic resonance) a cystic image with intestinal volvulus was observed. The patient underwent laparotomy, Ladd's procedure was done and the cyst was resected. In conclusion, if a patient is admitted with abdominal pain and obstructive symptoms, it is important to consider duplication of the alimentary tract as a possible diagnosis.

  20. Involvement of the Reck tumor suppressor protein in maternal and embryonic vascular remodeling in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitayama Hitoshi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Developmental angiogenesis proceeds through multiple morphogenetic events including sprouting, intussusception, and pruning. Mice lacking the membrane-anchored metalloproteinase regulator Reck die in utero around embryonic day 10.5 with halted vascular development; however, the mechanisms by which this phenotype arises remain unclear. Results We found that Reck is abundantly expressed in the cells associated with blood vessels undergoing angiogenesis or remodelling in the uteri of pregnant female mice. Some of the Reck-positive vessels show morphological features consistent with non-sprouting angiogenesis. Treatment with a vector expressing a small hairpin RNA against Reck severely disrupts the formation of blood vessels with a compact, round lumen. Similar defects were found in the vasculature of Reck-deficient or Reck conditional knockout embryos. Conclusions Our findings implicate Reck in vascular remodeling, possibly through non-sprouting angiogenesis, in both maternal and embyornic tissues.

  1. Rapunzel syndrome: The unsuspected culprit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Ezzedien Rabie; Abdul Rahman Arishi; Ashraf Khan; Hussein Ageely; Gaffar Abbas Seif EI-Nasr; Mohammad Fagihi

    2008-01-01

    Trichobezoar is a rare intriguing disorder in which swallowed hairs accumulates in the stomach.Being indigestible and slippery,it could not be propulsed and becomes entrapped within the stomach.Large amounts can thus accumulate over the years forming a hair ball.Rapunzel syndrome is a variant where hair accumulation reaches the small gut and beyond in some cases.Although the syndrome has been known for many years,only 24 cases have been reported in the literature and the discovery of a new case is always surprising.In this report,we present two cases discovered within a period of three months.One of them was pregnant and had small bowel intussusception and perforation,a very rare combination.We hereby add two more cases to the literature.To our knowledge,this is the first report on two cases of Rapunzel syndrome,the diagnosis of which demands a high index of suspicion.

  2. Endometriosis of the mesoappendix mimicking appendicitis: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Mewa Kinoo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Although appendicitis is largely a clinical diagnosis, on occasions diagnostic modalities may be needed to aid with the diagnosis. Despite the use of adjuncts and exploratory surgery, the diagnosis may not be clear until a histological diagnosis is achieved. Endometriosis of the appendix mimicking appendicitis is one of these diagnoses described in several case reports. Endometriosis of the meso-appendix has been described in association with intussusception of the appendix in several case reports. However, to our knowledge, endometriosis of the meso-appendix mimicking appendicitis has not been reported to date. We present the case of a 33-year-old woman with classic clinical signs and symptoms of appendicitis endorsed on computed tomography imaging. The patient underwent a laparoscopic appendicectomy with the postoperative histology demonstrating a normal appendix with endometriosis of the meso-appendix.

  3. Radiographic and pathologic observations of eosinophilic gastroenteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Lae Won; Hong, Sook Hee; Lee, Jung Dal

    1974-01-01

    This report presents two cases with eosinophilic gastroenteritis in detail. The radiographic and pathologic features of eosinophilic gastroenteritis are summarized with emphasis on the differential diagnostic features. Radiographic eosinophilic gastritis should be differentiated from gastric carcinoma and lymphoma, and eosinophilic enteritis from intestinal tuberculosis and intussusception of the small bowel in Korea where these entities are prevent. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is pathologically characterized by diffuse infiltration of the submucosa and muscle coats with eosinophilic in conjunction with hypertrophy of individual muscle fibers. This leads to thickening of the gastrointestinal wall resulting in narrowing and obstruction of the lumen. Eosinophilic venulitis is another characteristic feature which is helpful for differentiation this entity from a parasitic infection

  4. Potential safety issues and other factors that may affect the introduction and uptake of rotavirus vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliabadi, N.; Tate, J.E.; Parashar, U.D.

    2018-01-01

    Rotavirus vaccines have demonstrated significant impact in reducing the burden of morbidity and mortality from childhood diarrhoea in countries that have implemented routine vaccination to date. Despite this success, in many countries, rotavirus vaccine coverage remains lower than that of other routine childhood vaccines. Several issues may potentially affect vaccine uptake, namely safety concerns related to intussusception with consequent age restrictions on rotavirus vaccination, contamination with porcine circovirus, vaccine-derived reassortant strains and hospitalization in newborn nurseries at time of administration of live oral rotavirus vaccine. In addition to these safety concerns, other factors may also affect uptake, including lower vaccine efficacy in the developing world, potential emergence of strains escaping from vaccine protection resulting in lower overall impact of a vaccination programme and sustainable vaccine financing. Although further work is needed to address some of these concerns, global policy bodies have reaffirmed that the benefits of rotavirus vaccination outweigh the risks, and vaccine use is recommended globally. PMID:27129416

  5. Maltomas and emergency surgery in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baeza Herrera Carlos

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The MALT tumor or maltoma, is a lymphoma type not yet well defined because it seems to be from the lymphatic tissue, but it is not included in that variety. It is more common in adults, the most frequent location is in the stomach. In children this tumor located in the small intestine is rare. We report our surgical experience in three patients who had a MALT tumor located one in the mucosa of the ileum and two in the serosa and mesentery of the small in- testine. Each one had a complication: intussusceptions, bleeding, bowel obstruction. They had to be operated urgently. All three patients are alive, two under surveillance and one under chemotherapy.

  6. Potential safety issues and other factors that may affect the introduction and uptake of rotavirus vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliabadi, N; Tate, J E; Parashar, U D

    2016-12-01

    Rotavirus vaccines have demonstrated significant impact in reducing the burden of morbidity and mortality from childhood diarrhoea in countries that have implemented routine vaccination to date. Despite this success, in many countries, rotavirus vaccine coverage remains lower than that of other routine childhood vaccines. Several issues may potentially affect vaccine uptake, namely safety concerns related to intussusception with consequent age restrictions on rotavirus vaccination, contamination with porcine circovirus, vaccine-derived reassortant strains and hospitalization in newborn nurseries at time of administration of live oral rotavirus vaccine. In addition to these safety concerns, other factors may also affect uptake, including lower vaccine efficacy in the developing world, potential emergence of strains escaping from vaccine protection resulting in lower overall impact of a vaccination programme and sustainable vaccine financing. Although further work is needed to address some of these concerns, global policy bodies have reaffirmed that the benefits of rotavirus vaccination outweigh the risks, and vaccine use is recommended globally. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Clinical characteristics and STK11 gene mutations in Chinese children with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhiheng; Miao, Shijian; Wang, Lin; Zhang, Ping; Wu, Bingbing; Wu, Jie; Huang, Ying

    2015-11-25

    Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is a rare autosomal dominant inherited disease characterized by gastrointestinal hamartomatous polyps and mucocutaneous melanin spots. Germline mutation of the serine/threonine kinase 11 (STK11) gene are responsible for PJS. In this study, we investigated the clinical characteristics and molecular basis of the disease in Chinese children with PJS. Thirteen children diagnosed with PJS in our hospital were enrolled in this study from 2011 to 2015, and their clinical data on polyp characteristics, intussusceptions events, family histories, etc. were described. Genomic DNA was extracted from whole-blood samples from each subject, and the entire coding sequence of the STK11 gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction and analyzed by direct sequencing. The median age at the onset of symptoms was 2 years and 4 months. To date, these children have undergone 40 endoscopy screenings, 17 laparotomies and 9 intussusceptions. Polyps were found in the stomach, duodenum, small bowel, colon and rectum, with large polyps found in 7 children. Mutations were found in eleven children, including seven novel mutations (c.481het_dupA, c.943_944het_delCCinsG, c.397het_delG, c.862 + 1G > G/A, c.348_349het_delGT, and c.803_804het_delGGinsC and c.121_139de l19insTT) and four previously reported mutations (c.658C > C/T, c.890G > G/A, c.1062 C > C/G, and c.290 + 1G > G/A). One PJS patient did not have any STK11 mutations. The polyps caused significant clinical consequences in children with PJS, and mutations of the STK11 gene are generally the cause of PJS in Chinese children. This study expands the spectrum of known STK11 gene mutations.

  8. Laparoscopic radical nephroureterectomy: dilemma of the distal ureter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Jordan R; Matin, Surena F

    2004-03-01

    Laparoscopic nephroureterectomy has recently emerged as a safe, minimally invasive approach to upper tract urothelial cancers. The most controversial and challenging feature of laparoscopic nephroureterectomy is the management of the distal ureter. We review the most common methods of managing the distal ureter, with emphasis on contemporary oncologic outcomes, indications, advantages, and disadvantages. There are currently in excess of five different approaches to the lower ureter. These techniques often combine features of endoscopic, laparoscopic, or open management. They include open excision, a transvesical laparoscopic detachment and ligation technique, laparoscopic stapling of the distal ureter and bladder cuff, the "pluck" technique, and ureteral intussusception. Each technique has distinct advantages and disadvantages, differing not only in technical approach, but oncological principles as well. While the existing published data do not overwhelmingly support one approach over the others, the open approach remains one of the most reliable and oncologically sound procedures. The principles of surgical oncology dictate that a complete, en-bloc resection, with avoidance of tumor seeding, remains the preferred treatment of all urothelial cancers. The classical open technique of securing the distal ureter and bladder cuff achieves this principle and has withstood the test of time. Transvesical laparoscopic detachment and ligation is an oncologically valid approach in patients without bladder tumors, but is limited by technical considerations. The laparoscopic stapling technique maintains a closed system but risks leaving behind ureteral and bladder cuff segments. Both transurethral resection of the ureteral orifice (pluck) and intussusception techniques should be approached with caution, as the potential for tumor seeding exists. Additional long-term comparative outcomes are needed to solve the dilemma of the distal ureter.

  9. 消化道重复畸形的急性并发症%Acute Abdomen Associated with Duplications of Alimentary Tract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王义; 张金哲

    1988-01-01

    Eighty-six cases of duplication of alimentary tract were operated on between 1955 and 1986. They were 53 boys and 33 girls,ages ranging from10 days to 13 yrs.There were 93 duplications in 86 patients located in ileum(57),ileocecum(16),colon and rectum (9),jejenum(2),stomach(2),retroperitoni-um (2) and duodenum (1). Pathological pat.tern comprised extraluminal cyst (47),intraluminal cyst (15),diverticulum(19),and double lumen (12). sixty-two cases came to emergency surgery with rectal bleeding (22),intestinal obstruction(19),intussusception(8),intestinal perforation(7),votvulus (4),and constipation with urinary obstruction(1).The other 24 cases presented with abdominal mass(22)and anorectal anomaly(2).This paper disciusses the relation between the clinical manifestations and the underlying pathology. Extraluminal cyst often causing intestinal obstruction,volvulus,or constipation and urinary reteasion,intraluminal cysts are likely to serve as the leading point of intussusception.Usually,patients with diverticulum or double-lumen containing gastric mucosa came with hemor rhage or perforation of intestine.Described in detail in the paper are the clinical manifestations and X-ray findings in acute abdomen associated with duplication of alimentary tract.%本文报告1955年至1986年收治的消化道重复畸形86例,多于婴幼儿期出现临床症状,其中72.1%表现为便血、肠梗阻、肠套叠、肠扭转、肠穿孔等急腹症.作者对该病的临床表现与病理解剖间的关系做了重点探讨.

  10. [Analysis of experience in the use of dynamic pelvic magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of obstructive defaecation syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Martín, Gonzalo; García Armengol, Juan; Roig Vila, José Vicente; García Coret, María José; Martínez Sanjuán, Vicente; Almela Notari, Pedro; Mínguez Pérez, Miguel

    2012-05-01

    The aetiological diagnosis of obstructive defaecation syndrome (ODS) requires, among others, imaging tests. The purpose of this study is to descriptively analyse and compare the findings of dynamic pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (DPMRI) with the clinical examinations in patients with ODS. A prospective comparative study was made between the physical examination and the DPMRI, with a descriptive analysis of the results. A total of 30 patients were included (2 males and 28 females), with a median age of 60 (range 23-76) years, with symptoms of ODS. An anamnesis and detailed physical examination and a DPMRI were performed on all of them. Functional (anismus) and morphological changes (rectocele, enterocele, intussusception, etc.), were analysed. The physical examination did not detect anomalies in 6 (20%) patients. A rectocele was diagnosed in 21 (70%) of the cases, and 2 (6.7%) a rectal mucosal prolapse. The DPMRI showed evidence of pelvic floor laxity in 22 (73.3%) cases, an enterocele in 4 (13.3%), a sigmoidocele in 2 (6.7%), intussusception in 8 (26.7%), rectal mucosal prolapse in 4 (13.3%), anismus in 3 (10%), and a cystocele in 4 (13.3%). The rectocele was the most frequent diagnosis, being given in 26 (86.6%) patients. Magnetic resonance imaging provides an overall pelvic assessment with good definition of the tissues, and does not use ionising radiation, is well tolerated, and provides us with complementary information to arrive at the diagnosis, and establish the best treatment for ODS. Larger studies comparing videodefaecography (VD), currently considered the Gold Standard technique, are needed to be able to demonstrate whether it is superior or not to DPMRI. Copyright © 2011 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Barium proctography vs magnetic resonance proctography for pelvic floor disorders: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilkington, S A; Nugent, K P; Brenner, J; Harris, S; Clarke, A; Lamparelli, M; Thomas, C; Tarver, D

    2012-10-01

    Accurate and reliable imaging of pelvic floor dynamics is important for tailoring treatment in pelvic floor disorders; however, two imaging modalities are available. Barium proctography (BaP) is widely used, but involves a significant radiation dose. Magnetic resonance (MR) proctography allows visualization of all pelvic midline structures but patients are supine. This project investigates whether there are measurable differences between BaP and MR proctography. Patient preference for the tests was also investigated. Consecutive patients referred for BaP were invited to participate (National Research Ethics Service approved). Participants underwent BaP in Poole and MR proctography in Dorchester. Proctograms were reported by a consultant radiologist with pelvic floor subspecialization. A total of 71 patients were recruited. Both tests were carried out on 42 patients. Complete rectal emptying was observed in 29% (12/42) on BaP and in 2% (1/42) on MR proctography. Anismus was reported in 29% (12/42) on BaP and 43% (18/42) on MR proctography. MR proctography missed 31% (11/35) of rectal intussusception detected on BaP. In 10 of these cases no rectal evacuation was achieved during MR proctography. The measure of agreement between grade of rectal intussusception was fair (κ=0.260) although MR proctography tended to underestimate the grade. Rectoceles were extremely common but clinically relevant differences in size were evident. Patients reported that they found MR proctography less embarrassing but harder to empty their bowel. The results demonstrate that MR proctography under-reports pelvic floor abnormalities especially where there has been poor rectal evacuation. © 2012 The Authors. Colorectal Disease © 2012 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  12. Types of pelvic floor dysfunctions in nulliparous, vaginal delivery, and cesarean section female patients with obstructed defecation syndrome identified by echodefecography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murad-Regadas, Sthela M; Regadas, Francisco Sérgio P; Rodrigues, Lusmar V; Oliveira, Leticia; Barreto, Rosilma G L; de Souza, Marcellus H L P; Silva, Flavio Roberto S

    2009-10-01

    This study aims to show pelvic floor dysfunctions in women with obstructed defecation syndrome (ODS), comparing nulliparous to those with vaginal delivery or cesarean section using the echodefecography (ECD). Three hundred seventy female patients with ODS were reviewed retrospectively and were divided in Group I-105 nulliparous, Group II-165 had at least one vaginal delivery, and Group III-comprised of 100 patients delivered only by cesarean section. All patients had been submitted to ECD to identify pelvic floor dysfunctions. No statistical significance was found between the groups with regard to anorectocele grade. Intussusception was identified in 40% from G I, 55.0% from G II, and 30.0% from G III, with statistical significance between Groups I and II. Intussusception was associated with significant anorectocele in 24.8%, 36.3%, and 18% patients from G I, II, and III, respectively. Anismus was identified in 39.0% from G I, 28.5% from G II, and 60% from G III, with statistical significance between Groups I and III. Anismus was associated with significant anorectocele in 22.8%, 15.7%, and 24% patients from G I, II, and III, respectively. Sigmoidocele/enterocele was identified in 7.6% from G I, 10.9% G II, and was associated with significant rectocele in 3.8% and 7.3% patients from G I and II, respectively. The distribution of pelvic floor dysfunctions showed no specific pattern across the groups, suggesting the absence of a correlation between these dysfunctions and vaginal delivery.

  13. Assessment of chronic constipation: colon transit time versus defecography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokesch, R.W.; Breitenseher, M.J.; Kettenbach, J.; Herbst, F.; Maier, A.; Lechner, G.; Mahieu, P.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the value of radiological colon transit time (CTT) measurements in relation to defecography (DFG) in chronically constipated patients. Materials and methods: In 30 patients with chronic constipation, total and segmental CTT was determined using radiopaque markers. In all of these patients defecography (DFG) was obtained. The patients were divided into three groups: In group I, 11 patients were classified with idiopathic constipation based on low stool frequency, normal DFG, or absence of symptoms of abnormal defecation. In group II, ten patients with rectal intussusception were diagnosed by DFG. In group III, there were nine patients with rectal prolapse or spastic pelvic floor syndrome, based on results of DFG. Results: Group I, idiopathic constipation (n=11), showed increased total CTT (mean, 93 h) and segmental CTT (right colon, 33 h (36%), left colon, 31 h (33%), rectosigmoid, 29 h (31%)). In group II, intussusception (n=10), patients had normal mean total CTT (54 h) and a relative decrease in rectosigmoid CTT (mean, 13 h (24%)). In group III (n=9), rectal prolapse (n=5) or spastic pelvic floor syndrome (n=4), patients showed elevated total (mean, 167 h) and rectosigmoidal CTT (mean, 95 h (57%)). Mean total CTT was significantly different between groups I and II and between groups II and III, and mean rectosigmoidal CTT was significantly different between all three groups (P<0.05). Conclusion: The use of total and rectosigmoidal CTT helps to identify the underlying pathophysiology of chronic constipation. Furthermore CTT helps to identify patients, who may benefit from DFG

  14. Assessment of chronic constipation: colon transit time versus defecography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokesch, R.W. E-mail: rupert.prokesch@univie.ac.at; Breitenseher, M.J.; Kettenbach, J.; Herbst, F.; Maier, A.; Lechner, G.; Mahieu, P

    1999-12-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the value of radiological colon transit time (CTT) measurements in relation to defecography (DFG) in chronically constipated patients. Materials and methods: In 30 patients with chronic constipation, total and segmental CTT was determined using radiopaque markers. In all of these patients defecography (DFG) was obtained. The patients were divided into three groups: In group I, 11 patients were classified with idiopathic constipation based on low stool frequency, normal DFG, or absence of symptoms of abnormal defecation. In group II, ten patients with rectal intussusception were diagnosed by DFG. In group III, there were nine patients with rectal prolapse or spastic pelvic floor syndrome, based on results of DFG. Results: Group I, idiopathic constipation (n=11), showed increased total CTT (mean, 93 h) and segmental CTT (right colon, 33 h (36%), left colon, 31 h (33%), rectosigmoid, 29 h (31%)). In group II, intussusception (n=10), patients had normal mean total CTT (54 h) and a relative decrease in rectosigmoid CTT (mean, 13 h (24%)). In group III (n=9), rectal prolapse (n=5) or spastic pelvic floor syndrome (n=4), patients showed elevated total (mean, 167 h) and rectosigmoidal CTT (mean, 95 h (57%)). Mean total CTT was significantly different between groups I and II and between groups II and III, and mean rectosigmoidal CTT was significantly different between all three groups (P<0.05). Conclusion: The use of total and rectosigmoidal CTT helps to identify the underlying pathophysiology of chronic constipation. Furthermore CTT helps to identify patients, who may benefit from DFG.

  15. Acute mechanical intestinal obstruction in children at zinder national hospital, Niger: Aetiologies and prognosis

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    Harissou Adamou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To describe the aetiological and prognostic aspects of acute mechanical intestinal obstruction (AMIO in children at Zinder National Hospital (Niger. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study on a period to January 2013–June 2015. The database included all children under 15 years of age with a surgical diagnosis of mechanical intestinal obstruction. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant for analysis. Results: AMIOs represent 21.78% (n = 78 of child digestive surgical emergencies (n = 358. Median age was 12 months (range: 1 day–15 years. Fifteen (19.23% were neonates and sixty children (76.92% had ≤60 months. The sex ratio (male/female was 2.8. The mean time from onset to presentation was 39.96 ± 36.22 h. Intussusception and strangulated hernias were the main causes of AMIO with, respectively, 43.59% (n = 34 and 29.48% (n = 23. Anorectal malformations represent 17.95% (n = 14 of cases of AMIO. Intestinal resection was made in 22.08% and colostomy in 19.23% of patients. The average length of hospital stay was 6.44 ± 4.30 days. The post-operative complications were recorded in 26 patients (33.33%, mostly surgical site infections. Overall mortality of AMIO was 15.38% (n = 12. It was higher in the neonates (33.33% (P = 0.032. Deaths were associated with delay of admission (P = 0.0005 and waiting time for surgery (P = 0.019. Conclusion: Intussusception and strangulated hernia are the most common cause of AMIO in children. Diagnostic and therapeutic delays, lack of paediatric intensive care and post-operative complications are prognostic factors.

  16. Indications and outcome of childhood preventable bowel resections in a developing country

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    Uchechukwu Obiora Ezomike

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: While many bowel resections in developed countries are due to congenital anomalies, indications for bowel resections in developing countries are mainly from preventable causes. The aim of the following study was to assess the indications for, morbidity and mortality following preventable bowel resection in our centre. Patients and Methods: Retrospective analysis of all cases of bowel resection deemed preventable in children from birth to 18 years from June 2005 to June 2012. Results: There were 22 preventable bowel resections with an age range of 7 days to 17 years (median 6 months and male:female ratio of 2.1:1. There were 2 neonates, 13 infants and 7 older children. The indications were irreducible/gangrenous intussusceptions (13, abdominal gunshot injury (2, gangrenous umbilical hernia (2, blunt abdominal trauma (1, midgut volvulus (1, necrotizing enterocolitis (1, strangulated inguinal hernia (1, post-operative band intestinal obstructions (1. There were 16 right hemicolectomies, 4 small bowel resections and 2 massive bowel resections. Average duration of symptoms before presentation was 3.9 days (range: 3 h-14 days. Average time to surgical intervention was 42 h for survivors and 53 h for non-survivors. Only 19% presented within 24 h of onset of symptoms and all survived. For those presenting after 24 h, the cause of delay was a visit to primary or secondary level hospitals (75% and ignorance (25%. Average duration of post-operative hospital stay is 14 days and 9 patients (41% developed 18 complications. Seven patients died (31.8% mortality which diagnoses were irreducible/gangrenous intussusceptions (5, necrotising enterocolitis (1, midgut volvulus (1. One patient died on the operating table while others had overwhelming sepsis. Conclusion: There is a high rate of morbidity and mortality in these cases of preventable bowel resection. Typhoid intestinal perforation did not feature as an indication for bowel resection in this

  17. The costs and effectiveness of large Phase III pre-licensure vaccine clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Prior to the 1980s, most vaccines were licensed based upon safety and effectiveness studies in several hundred individuals. Beginning with the evaluation of Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines, much larger pre-licensure trials became common. The pre-licensure trial for Haemophilus influenzae oligosaccharide conjugate vaccine had more than 60,000 children and that of the seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine included almost 38,000 children. Although trial sizes for both of these studies were driven by the sample size required to demonstrate efficacy, the sample size requirements for safety evaluations of other vaccines have subsequently increased. With the demonstration of an increased risk of intussusception following the Rotashield brand rotavirus vaccine, this trend has continued. However, routinely requiring safety studies of 20,000-50,000 or more participants has two major downsides. First, the cost of performing large safety trials routinely prior to licensure of a vaccine is very large, with some estimates as high at US$200 million euros for one vaccine. This high financial cost engenders an opportunity cost whereby the number of vaccines that a company is willing or able to develop to meet public health needs becomes limited by this financial barrier. The second downside is that in the pre-licensure setting, such studies are very time consuming and delay the availability of a beneficial vaccine substantially. One might argue that in some situations, this financial commitment is warranted such as for evaluations of the risk of intussusception following newer rotavirus vaccines. However, it must be noted that while an increased risk of intussusception was not identified in large pre-licensure studies, in post marketing evaluations an increased risk of this outcome has been identified. Thus, even the extensive pre-licensure evaluations conducted did not identify an associated risk. The limitations of large Phase III trials have also been

  18. Pediatric Gastrointestinal Diseases in Nigeria: Histopathologic Analysis of 74 Cases

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    Abudu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Children are vulnerable to a vast number of diseases including gastrointestinal disorders, which may be associated with life threatening complications that sometimes result in mortality especially if left untreated. OBJECTIVE: To establish the age and sex distribution of children in the study population as well as the histopathological characteristics of gastrointestinal diseases that occurred in those children who were aged 14years and below in Sagamu, Southwestern Nigeria. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Demographic data such as age, sex, and clinical summary of children in the study population were extracted from the medical records of Olabisi Onabanjo University Teaching Hospital, Sagamu, Ogun State from January 2003 to December 2009. Based on this information, a review of paraffin embedded blocks and slides as well as histopathological reports of gastrointestinal diseases that occurred in those children aged 14years and below was undertaken at the Morbid Anatomy Department of the hospital. RESULTS: Seventy–four cases of gastrointestinal diseases were seen in children aged 14years and below. The majority (39.2% of gastrointestinal diseases were accounted for by appendiceal lesions. Hirschsprung’s disease, intussusceptions, enterocolitis and jejunal atresia accounted for 29.7%, 10.8%, 6.8% and 4.1% of cases respectively. Adenocarcinoma of the intestine was the predominant gastrointestinal tumour, occurring in 5 out of 7 children. Two cases of non-Hodgkin lymphoma were also seen. The ages of the children ranged from 2 to 14 years, with a mean age of 8.6years and a peak age incidence of gastrointestinal disease in the 10-14year age group. Male children were more commonly affected with the exception of appendiceal lesions, which occurred more in females (M:F ratio= 1.6:1.0. Acute suppurative appendicitis was the most prevalent lesion of the appendix, occurring in 13 out of 29 appendiceal lesions. Moderately differentiated to poorly

  19. Prevalence, causes and management outcome of intestinal obstruction in Adama Hospital, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soressa, Urgessa; Mamo, Abebe; Hiko, Desta; Fentahun, Netsanet

    2016-06-04

    In Africa, acute intestinal obstruction accounts for a great proportion of morbidity and mortality. Ethiopia is one of the countries where intestinal obstruction is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. This study aims to determine prevalence, causes and management outcome of intestinal obstruction in Adama Hospital in Oromia region, Ethiopia. A hospital based cross-sectional study design was used. Data covering the past three years were collected from hospital medical records of sampled patients. The collected data were checked for any inconsistency, coded and entered into SPSS version 16.0 for data processing and analysis. Descriptive and logistic regression analyses were used. Statistical significance was based on confidence interval (CI) of 95 % at a p-value of acute abdomen surgery and total surgical admissions, respectively. The mortality rate was 2.5 % (6 of 262). The most common cause of small bowel obstruction was intussusceptions in 48 patients (30.9 %), followed by small bowel volvulus in 47 patients (30.3 %). Large bowel obstruction was caused by sigmoid volvulus in 60 patients (69.0 %) followed by colonic tumor in 12 patients (13.8 %). After controlling for possible confounding factors, the major predictors of management outcome of intestinal obstruction were: duration of illness before surgical intervention (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 0.49, 95 % CI: 0.25-0.97); intra-operative findings [Viable small bowel volvulus (SBV) (AOR = 0.08, 95 % CI: 0.01-0.95) and viable (AOR = 0.17, 95 % CI: 0.03-0.88)]; completion of intra-operative procedures (bowel resection & anastomosis (AOR = 3.05, 95 % CI: 1.04-8.94); and length of hospital stay (AOR = 0.05, 95 % CI: 0.01-0.16). Small bowel obstruction was more prevalent than large bowel obstruction. Intussusceptions and sigmoid volvulus were the leading causes of small and large bowel obstruction. Laparotomy was the most common methods of intestinal obstruction management. Bowel

  20. TRREMS procedure (transanal repair of rectocele and rectal mucosectomy with one circular stapler: a prospective multicenter trial

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    José Vinicius Cruz

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Since anorectocele is usually associated with mucosa prolapse and/or rectal intussusceptions, it was developed a stapled surgical technique using one circular stapler. OBJECTIVE: To report the results of Transanal Repair of Rectocele and Rectal Mucosectomy with one Circular Stapler (TRREMS procedure in the treatment of anorectocele with mucosa prolapse in a prospective multicenter trial. METHODS: It was conducted by 14 surgeons and included 75 female patients, mean aged 49.6 years, with symptoms of obstructed defecation due to grade 2 (26.7% and grade 3 (73.3% anorectocele associated with mucosa prolapse and/or rectal intussusception (52.0% and an average validated Wexner constipation score of 16. All patients were evaluated by a proctological examination, cinedefecography, anal manometry and colonic transit time. The TRREMS procedure consists of the manual removal of the rectocele wall with circumferential rectal mucosectomy performed with a circular stapler. The mean follow-up time was 21 months. RESULTS: All patients presented obstructed defecation and they persisted with symptoms despite conservative treatment. The mean operative time was 42 minutes. In 13 (17.3% patients, bleeding from the stapled line required hemostatic suture. Stapling was incomplete in 2 (2.6%. Forty-nine patients (65.3% required 1 hospitalization day, the remainder (34.7% 2 days. Postoperatively, 3 (4.0% patients complained of persistent rectal pain and 7 (9.3% developed stricture on the stapled suture subsequently treated by stricturectomy under anesthesia (n = 1, endoscopic stricturectomy with hot biopsy forceps (n = 3 and digital dilatation (n = 3. Postoperative cinedefecography showed residual grade I anorectoceles in 8 (10.6%. The mean Wexner constipation score decreased significantly from 16 to 4 (0-4: n = 68 (6: n = 6 (7: n = 1 (P<0.0001. CONCLUSION: Current trial results suggest that TRREMS procedure is a safe and effective technique for the treatment

  1. Has 4D transperineal ultrasound additional value over 2D transperineal ultrasound for diagnosing obstructed defaecation syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gruting, I M A; Kluivers, K; Sultan, A H; De Bin, R; Stankiewicz, A; Blake, H; Thakar, R

    2018-06-08

    To establish the diagnostic test accuracy of both two-dimensional (2D) and four-dimensional (4D) transperineal ultrasound, to assess if 4D ultrasound imaging provides additional value in the diagnosis of posterior pelvic floor disorders in women with obstructed defaecation syndrome. In this prospective cohort study, 121 consecutive women with obstructed defaecation syndrome were recruited. Symptoms of obstructed defaecation and signs of pelvic organ prolapse were assessed using validated methods. All women underwent both 2D transperineal ultrasound (Pro-focus, 8802 transducer, BK-medical) and 4D transperineal ultrasound (Voluson i, RAB4-8-RS transducer, GE). Imaging analysis was performed by two blinded observers. Pelvic floor disorders were dichotomised into presence or absence according pre-defined cut-off values. In the absence of a reference standard a composite reference standard was created from a combination of results of evacuation proctogram, magnetic resonance imaging and endovaginal ultrasound. Primary outcome measures were diagnostic test characteristics of 2D and 4D transperineal ultrasound for diagnosis or rectocele, enterocele, intussusception and anismus. Secondary outcome measures were interobserver agreement, agreement between the two techniques and correlation of signs and symptoms to imaging findings. For diagnosis of all four posterior pelvic floor disorders there was no difference in sensitivity and specificity between 2D and 4D TPUS (p= 0.131 - 1.000). A good agreement between 2D and 4D TPUS was found for the diagnosis of rectocele (ĸ 0.675) and a moderate agreement for diagnosis of enterocele, intussusception and anismus (ĸ 0.465 - 0.545). There was no difference in rectocele depth measurements between both TPUS techniques (19.9 mm vs 19.0 mm, p=0.802). Inter-observer agreement was comparable for both techniques, however 2D TPUS had an excellent interobserver agreement for diagnosis of enterocele and rectocele depth measurements. Diagnosis

  2. Abdominal emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raissaki, M.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: There are numerous conditions that affect mainly or exclusively the pediatric population. These constitute true emergencies, related to patient's health. Delay in diagnosis and treatment of abdominal non-traumatic emergencies may result in rapid deterioration, peritonitis, sepsis, even death or in severe complications with subsequent morbidity. Abdominal emergencies in children mostly present with pain, tenderness, occasionally coupled by vomiting, fever, abdominal distension, and failure to pass meconium or stools. Diarrhea, blood per rectum, abnormal laboratory tests and lethargy may also be manifestations of acute abdominal conditions. Abdominal emergencies have a different aetiology, depending on age and whether the pain is acute or chronic. Symptoms have to be matched with age and gender. Newborns up to 1 months of age may have congenital diseases: atresia, low obstruction including Hirschsprung's disease, meconium ileus. Meconium plug is one of the commonest cause of low obstruction in newborns that may also develop necrotizing enterocolitis, incarcerated inguinal hernia and mid-gut volvulus. Past the immediate postnatal period, any duodenal obstruction should be considered midgut volvulus until proven otherwise and patients should undergo ultrasonography and/or properly performed upper GI contrast study that records the exact position of the deduno-jejunal junction. Infants 6 months-2 years carry the risk of intussusception, mid-gut volvulus, perforation, acute pyelonephritis. Preschool and school-aged children 2-12 years carry the risk of appendicitis, genito-urinary abnormalities including torsion, urachal abnormalities, haemolytic uremic syndrome and Henoch-Schonlein purpura. Children above 12 years suffer from the same conditions as in adults. Most conditions may affect any age despite age predilection. Abdominal solid organ ultrasonography (US) coupled with gastrointestinal ultrasonography is the principle imaging modality in radiosensitive

  3. MR-defecography in obstructed defecation syndrome (ODS): technique, diagnostic criteria and grading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piloni, V; Tosi, P; Vernelli, M

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of a magnetic resonance (MR)-based classification system of obstructive defecation syndrome (ODS) to guide physicians in patient management. The medical records and imaging series of 105 consecutive patients (90 female, 15 male, aged 21-78 years, mean age 46.1 ± 5.1 years) referred to our center between April 2011 and January 2012 for symptoms of ODS were retrospectively examined. After history taking and a complete clinical examination, patients underwent MR imaging according to a standard protocol using a 0.35 T permanent field, horizontally oriented open-configuration magnet. Static and dynamic MR-defecography was performed using recognized parameters and well-established diagnostic criteria. Sixty-seven out of 105 (64 %) patients found the prone position more comfortable for the evacuation of rectal contrast while 10/105 (9.5 %) were unable to empty their rectum despite repeated attempts. Increased hiatus size, anterior rectocele and focal or extensive defects of the levator ani muscle were the most frequent abnormalities (67.6, 60.0 and 51.4 %, respectively). An MR-based classification was developed based on the combinations of abnormalities found: Grade 1 = functional abnormality, including paradoxical contraction of the puborectalis muscle, without anatomical defect affecting the musculo-fascial structures; Grade 2 = functional defect associated with a minor anatomical defect such as rectocele ≤ 2 cm in size and/or first-degree intussusception; Grade 3 = severe defects confined to the posterior anatomical compartment, including >2 cm rectocele, second- or higher-degree intussusception, full-thickness external rectal prolapse, poor mesorectal posterior fixation, rectal descent >5 cm, levator ani muscle rupture, ballooning of the levator hiatus and focal detachment of the endopelvic fascia; Grade 4 = combined defects of two or three pelvic floor compartments, including cystocele, hysterocele, enlarged urogenital

  4. Efficacy and safety of a pentavalent live human-bovine reassortant rotavirus vaccine (RV5) in healthy Chinese infants: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Zhaojun; Mo, Yi; Li, Mingqiang; Tao, Junhui; Yang, Xu; Kong, Jilian; Wei, Dingkai; Fu, Botao; Liao, Xueyan; Chu, Jianli; Qiu, Yuanzheng; Hille, Darcy A; Nelson, Micki; Kaplan, Susan S

    2017-10-13

    A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled multicenter trial was conducted in healthy Chinese infants to assess the efficacy and safety of a pentavalent live human-bovine reassortant rotavirus vaccine (RotaTeq™, RV5) against rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE). 4040 participants aged 6-12weeks were enrolled and randomly assigned to either 3 oral doses of RV5 (n=2020) or placebo (n=2020), administered ∼4weeks apart. The participants also received OPV and DTaP in a concomitant or staggered fashion. The primary objective was to evaluate vaccine efficacy (VE) against naturally-occurring RVGE at least 14days following the third dose. Key secondary objectives included: VE against naturally-occurring severe RVGE and VE against severe and any-severity RVGE caused by rotavirus serotypes contained in the vaccine, occurring at least 14days after the third dose. All adverse events (AEs) were collected for 30days following each dose. Serious AEs (SAEs) and intussusception cases were collected during the entire study. (ClinicalTrials.gov registry: NCT02062385). VE against RVGE of any-severity caused by any serotype was 69.3% (95% CI: 54.5, 79.7). The secondary efficacy analysis showed an efficacy of: 78.9% (95% CI: 59.1, 90.1) against severe RVGE caused by any serotype; 69.9% (95% CI: 55.2, 80.3) and 78.9% (95% CI: 59.1, 90.1) against any-severity and severe RVGE caused by serotypes contained in the vaccine, respectively. Within 30days following any vaccination, 53.5% (1079/2015) and 53.3% (1077/2019) of participants reported at least one AE, and 5.8% (116/2015) and 5.7% (116/2019) reported SAEs in the vaccine and placebo groups, respectively. No SAEs were considered vaccine-related in recipients of RV5. Two intussusception cases were reported in recipients of RV5 who recovered after receiving treatment. Neither was considered vaccine-related. In Chinese infants, RV5 was efficacious against any-severity and severe RVGE caused by any serotype and generally well

  5. CT and US demonstration of gastrointestinal involvement in children with rheumatoid purpura

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xin; Li Lin; Wang Chunxiang; Zhao Bin

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the usefulness of CT and US in the diagnosis of gastrointestinal involvement in children with rheumatoid purpura. Methods: Abdominal CT and US findings in 14 cases of clinical and laboratory confirmed of rheumatoid purpura were analyzed. There were 9 males and 5 females with the age ranged from 6 months to 14 years. All patients was hospitalized because of acute abdominal emergency, and the clinical presentations included paroxysm of abdomen pain, vomiting, without skin rashes and subcutaneous hemorrhage. CT examination was done in 7 cases, and contrast enhancement was performed in 1 case. Abdominal ultrasound was done in 9 cases. Both CT and US were done in 2 cases. Results: All patients demonstrated multiple or single areas of bowel-wall thickening, localized intraluminal narrowing, mesenteric edema, and liquid in abdominal cavity by CT and ultrasound. Conclusion: Abdominal CT and US examination have important values in differential diagnosis of acute abdominal disorders in children patients with rheumatoid purpura. Before appearing skin rashes, classical picture can help for the diagnosis and clinical treatment. Abdominal CT and US examination can also find the intussusception, bowel obstruction, and perforation in rheumatoid purpura

  6. Nodular typhlitis associated with the nematodes Heterakis gallinarum and Heterakis isolonche in pheasants: frequency and pathology with evidence of neoplasia

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    Menezes Rodrigo Caldas

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available An investigation related to the frequency and pathology of Heterakis gallinarum and pathology of Heterakis isolonche in pheasants from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil was conducted by means of clinical examinations, necropsies, and histopathological analysis in 50 ring-necked pheasants from backyard flocks of 11 localities; also, histological sections of caeca of golden pheasants deposited in the Helminthological Collection of the Oswaldo Cruz Institute (CHIOC have been considered in the present study. During necropsies, only specimens of H. gallinarum were recovered with a prevalence of 90%, mean intensity of 81.9 and range of infection of 1-413. Gross lesions were characterized by congestion, thickening, petechial haemorrhages of the mucosa, intussusception, and nodules in the cecal wall. Under microscopy, chronic difuse typhlitis, haemosiderosis, granulomas with necrotic center in the submucosa and leiomyomas in the submucosa, muscular and serosa associated with immature H. gallinarum worms were observed. The examination of histological sections previously deposited in the CHIOC, revealed more severe alterations associated with concomitant infections with H. gallinarum and H. isolonche in golden pheasants, and were characterized by several necrotic areas with cholesterol clefts in the submucosa, giant cell granulomas in the submucosa, and serosa centralized by necrosis and worm sections and neoplastic nodules in the muscular and submucosa.

  7. Small bowel obstruction in children: usefulness of CT for diagnosis and localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Cheol; Kim, Young Tong; Bae, Won Kyung; Kim, Il Young

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of CT for the diagnosis of the cause and localization of small bowel obstruction. Out of a group of children who underwent a CT examination for a suspected small bowel obstruction, 19 patients with confirmed underlying disorders were identified and included in the study. Neonates and patients with duodenal obstruction were excluded from the study. The CT findings were analyzed for the location of obstruction site, abnormalities of the mesentery and mesenteric vessels, bowel wall thickening, closed loop obstruction, and strangulation. The obstruction site was divided into five parts. The preoperative CT diagnosis was compared with the final diagnosis. Causes of small bowel obstruction were intussusception (n = 6), appendiceal perforation (n = 4), transmesenteric internal hernia (n = 2), postoperative bands (n = 1), idiopathic multiple bands (n = 1), a foreign body (n = 1), a small bowel adenocarcinoma (n = 1), Meckel's diverticulitis (n = 1), tuberculous peritonitis (n = 1) and Salmonella enteritis with bowel perforation (n = 1). The CT findings showed mesenteric vascular prominence (n = 13), omental or mesenteric infiltration (n = 10), localized bowel wall thickening (n = 7) closed loops obstruction (n = 3) and strangulation (n = 1). The obstruction site was identified in all cases. The causes of obstruction could be diagnosed preoperatively in 14 cases, but a preoperative diagnosis was difficult in 5 cases. The causes of small bowel obstruction in children are variable, and CT is useful for evaluating the cause and localization of small bowel obstruction

  8. Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction in adult patients: multidetector row helical CT features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merlin, Aurelie; Soyer, Philippe; Boudiaf, Mourad; Hamzi, Lounis; Rymer, Roland

    2008-01-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) is a rare condition due to severe gastrointestinal motility disorder. Adult patients with CIPO experience symptoms of mechanical obstruction, but reliable clinical signs that may help distinguish between actual mechanical obstruction and CIPO are lacking. Additionally, abdominal plain films that commonly show bowel dilatation with air-fluid levels do not reach acceptable degrees of specificity to exclude actual obstruction. Therefore, most adult patients with CIPO usually undergo multiple and often fruitless surgery, often leading to repeated bowel resections before diagnosis is made. In these patients who present with abdominal signs mimicking symptoms that would warrant surgical exploration, multidetector-row helical CT (MDCT) is helpful to resolve this diagnostic dilemma. MDCT shows a diffusely distended bowel and helps to rule out a mechanical cause of obstruction, thus suggesting CIPO and obviating the need for unnecessary laparotomy. In adult patients with CIPO, MDCT may show pneumatosis intestinalis, pneumoperitoneum or intussusception. However, these conditions generally do not require surgery in patients with CIPO. This pictorial essay presents the more and less common MDCT features of CIPO in adult patients, to make the reader more familiar with this disease. (orig.)

  9. Transabdominal Ultrasonography of the Small Bowel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf Kralik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the era of double balloon enteroscopy, capsule endoscopy, CT, and MRI enterography is transabdominal ultrasonography (TUS underestimated method for evaluation of small bowel pathology. As often initial imagine method in abdominal complaints, nowadays has TUS much better diagnostic potential than two decades ago. High-resolution ultrasound probes with harmonic imaging significantly improve resolution of bowel wall in real time, with possibility to asses bowel peristalsis. Color flow doppler enables evaluation of intramural bowel vascularisation, pulse wave doppler helps to quantificate flow in coeliac and superior mesenteric arteries. Small intestine contrast ultrasonography with oral contrast fluid, as well as contrast enhanced ultrasonography with intravenous microbubble contrast also improves small bowel imaging. We present a review of small intestine pathology that should be detected during ultrasound examinations, discuss technical requirements, advantages and limitations of TUS, typical ultrasound signs of Crohn's disease, ileus, celiac disease, intussusception, infectious enteritis, tumours, ischemic and haemorrhagic conditions of small bowel. In the hands of experienced investigator, despite some significant limitations(obesity, meteorism, is transabdominal ultrasonography reliable, noninvasive and inexpensive alternative method to computerised tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in small bowel examination.

  10. Skin Vaccination against Rotavirus Using Microneedles: Proof of Concept in Gnotobiotic Piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuhuan; Vlasova, Anastasia; Velasquez, Daniel E; Saif, Linda J; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Kochba, Efrat; Levin, Yotam; Jiang, Baoming

    2016-01-01

    Live-attenuated oral rotavirus (RV) vaccines have lower efficacy in low income countries, and additionally are associated with a rare but severe adverse event, intussusception. We have been pursuing the development of an inactivated rotavirus vaccine (IRV) using the human rotavirus strain CDC-9 (G1P[8]) through parenteral immunization and previously demonstrated dose sparing and enhanced immunogenicity of intradermal (ID) unadjuvanted IRV using a coated microneedle patch in comparison with intramuscular (IM) administration in mice. The aim of this study was to evaluate the immune response and protection against RV infection and diarrhea conferred by the administration of the ID unadjuvanted IRV using the microneedle device MicronJet600® in neonatal gnotobiotic (Gn) piglets challenged with virulent Wa G1P[8] human RV. Three doses of 5 μg IRV when administered intradermally and 5 μg IRV formulated with aluminum hydroxide [Al(OH)3] when administered intramuscularly induced comparable rotavirus-specific antibody titers of IgA, IgG, IgG avidity index and neutralizing activity in sera of neonatal piglets. Both IRV vaccination regimens protected against RV antigen shedding in stools, and reduced the cumulative diarrhea scores in the piglets. This study demonstrated that the ID and IM administrations of IRV are immunogenic and protective against RV-induced diarrhea in neonatal piglets. Our findings highlight the potential value of an adjuvant sparing effect of the IRV ID delivery route.

  11. Diagnostic imaging of digestive tract involvement in cystic fibrosis. Part 2: pancreatic and gastrointestinal disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berrocal, T.; Prieto, C.; Miralles, M.; Pozo, G. del; Martinez, A.; Manzanares, J.

    1998-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common fatal, autosomal recessive disease among the white population. Although recurrent pulmonary infections and pulmonary insufficiency are the major causes of morbidity and mortality, gastrointestinal symptoms generally present earlier and may suggest the diagnosis in the newborn or even prior to birth. The changes are attributed to the secretion of an abnormally thick mucous into the intestinal lumen, leading to the hallmark of diseases of the digestive tract: obstruction. This can be detected at birth in the form of mecanium ileus, ileal atresia, mecanium peritonitis and mecomiun plug, or present later on in childhood and adolescence as distal bowel obstruction syndrome or fibrosing colonopathy. This thick mucous can also trigger intussusception or acute appendicitis. Pancreatic insufficiency or pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is the direct cause of most of these disorders. Plain radiography is of the utmost utility in assessing the digestive tract in CF. When the disease is detected in a newborn, the recommended approach is to perform plain abdominal X-ray, followed by barium enema, always accompanied by ultrasound. In older children and adolescents, enema and ultrasound are usually sufficient, although computed tomography and magnetic resonance may sometimes be necessary. (Author) 52 refs

  12. Long-term outcome of simple inversion of the appendix as an alternativeto incidental appendectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Masad, J.K.; Daoud, Faiez S.

    2008-01-01

    Inversion of the appendix is an alternative to incidental appendectomy toprevent future appendicitis. This study investigated outcome andcomplications in a group of patients who underwent simple inversion of theappendix. Inversion of the appendix was performed in 41 patients, including21 women (51%) and 20 men (49%) (mean age, 48.7 year; range 12-85 years). Asimple inversion technique was used in 65% of patients. Twenty-nine patientshad colonoscopy between 3 to 44 months after surgery (mean, 8 months), nonefor the sake of study. During the follow-up, none of the patients developedintussusceptions or rectal bleeding. Colonoscopy demonstrated an absentappendix in 9 patients (31%). In the remaining 20 patients (69%), theinverted appendix persisted with no obvious change on visualized mucosa.Neither intussusception nor hemorrhage was observed after simple inversion.In our view, persistence of the appendix is a welcome event since thepresence of the appendix may carry several benefits as it continues to workas a specialized organ, exerting an important physiological role infacilitating forward passage of colon contents, providing antibacterialfunctions and possibly playing a preventive role against development of colonand other cancers. (author)

  13. Diagnostic value of ultrasonography in evaluation and management of acute abdominal conditions in the paediatric age group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Khalid

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aims of this study have been elaborated below: (1 to enumerate the common causes of acute abdominal emergencies by ultrasonography in paediatric patients; (2 to establish the diagnostic efficacy of ultrasonography in evaluation of acute abdominal conditions in children and to illustrate the associated ultrasonographic findings; (3 and, to discuss the role of ultrasonography in guiding the mode of intervention in these cases. Patients and Methods: This prospective study of ultrasonographic examination in 146 paediatric patients presenting with acute onset abdominal pain at the emergency/paediatric outpatient department section of Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College & Hospital, Aligarh, between June 2006 and December 2007, using 3.75 MHz and 8 MHz transducers of the ADARA (Siemens machine. Results : Common causes of acute abdominal emergencies in pediatric patients as noted on ultrasonography included nonspecific pain (28%, abdominal abscess (21%, acute appendicitis (7% and intussusception (7%. Ultrasonography was diagnostic in 45.2% cases and supportive in 12.3% of the cases. As for as the final outcome, ultrasonography prevented surgery in almost 20% cases and laparotomy was avoided in 7% of the patients as ultrasound guided interventions in the form of abscess aspiration were carried out. Conclusion: Ultrasonography evaluation of children with acute abdominal pain, helps in making significant changes in the management plan of the patients, and also reveals various clinically unsuspected diseases.

  14. Gastrointestinal linear foreign bodies in 32 dogs: a retrospective evaluation and feline comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, K.L.; Smeak, D.D.; Biller, D.S.

    1994-01-01

    Hospital records of 32 dogs undergoing surgery for gastrointestinal linear foreign bodies (LFBs) were reviewed to evaluate clinical signs, laboratory abnormalities, radiographic signs, surgical procedures, andcomplications associated with this condition. Information potentiallyrelating to prognosis was evaluated statistically. Clinical data derived from this study was compared to the information available in the literature regarding LFBs in cats. Linear foreign bodies were rarely discovered under the tongue during physical examination of affected dogs(2/32; 6%), and most were lodged at the pylorus (28/32; 87%). The types of LFB removed were more variable in the dog; fabric, carpet, pantyhose, string, and plastic were the most common. Fabric and plastic materials had an increased probability of causing peritonitis. Peritonitis was evident at surgery in 13/32 (41%) dogs; of these, 9/32 (31%) hadgross contamination through intestinal perforations. Intestinal resection and anastomosis was required in 13/32 dogs (41%). Intussusceptions concurrently were found in 8/32 (25%) dogs having LFBs. The presenceof perforations or peritonitis increased the probability of death. The probability of peritonitis and death as a result of LFB in dogs is nearly double that of cats as described in previous reports

  15. The “Endothelialized Muscularis Mucosae”: A Case Report Describing a Large Cavernous Hemangioma at the Terminal Ileum and a New Histologic Clue for Preoperative Diagnosis from Endoscopic Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy-Payne, Erin K.; Miner, Jean F.; Foles, Brandon; Tran, Tien-Anh N.

    2015-01-01

    Cavernous hemangiomas of the gastrointestinal tract are quite rare and, until now, have been difficult to diagnose preoperatively due their nonspecific presentations and imaging features, as well as a lack of histologic description pertaining to small superficial biopsies such as those obtained endoscopically. We report a unique case of a 4 cm transmural cavernous hemangioma in the terminal ileum with literature review and describe a new histologic finding—the “endothelialized muscularis mucosae,” which was discovered upon review of the endoscopic biopsy and could potentially facilitate preoperative diagnosis of these lesions from endoscopic biopsies in the future. These lesions have classically required surgical resection in order to make a definitive diagnosis and rule out malignancy, with which they share many historical and radiographic features. Due to their potential to cause bowel obstruction, intussusception, perforation, and hemorrhage, these lesions may ultimately require surgical resection to relieve symptoms or prevent or treat complications—however, surgical planning and patient counseling could be greatly improved by a preoperative diagnosis. Therefore, gastroenterologists, pathologists, and surgeons should be aware of the “endothelialized muscularis mucosae” which can be very helpful in diagnosing GI cavernous hemangiomas from endoscopic biopsies. PMID:26442160

  16. The “Endothelialized Muscularis Mucosae”: A Case Report Describing a Large Cavernous Hemangioma at the Terminal Ileum and a New Histologic Clue for Preoperative Diagnosis from Endoscopic Biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin K. Purdy-Payne

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cavernous hemangiomas of the gastrointestinal tract are quite rare and, until now, have been difficult to diagnose preoperatively due their nonspecific presentations and imaging features, as well as a lack of histologic description pertaining to small superficial biopsies such as those obtained endoscopically. We report a unique case of a 4 cm transmural cavernous hemangioma in the terminal ileum with literature review and describe a new histologic finding—the “endothelialized muscularis mucosae,” which was discovered upon review of the endoscopic biopsy and could potentially facilitate preoperative diagnosis of these lesions from endoscopic biopsies in the future. These lesions have classically required surgical resection in order to make a definitive diagnosis and rule out malignancy, with which they share many historical and radiographic features. Due to their potential to cause bowel obstruction, intussusception, perforation, and hemorrhage, these lesions may ultimately require surgical resection to relieve symptoms or prevent or treat complications—however, surgical planning and patient counseling could be greatly improved by a preoperative diagnosis. Therefore, gastroenterologists, pathologists, and surgeons should be aware of the “endothelialized muscularis mucosae” which can be very helpful in diagnosing GI cavernous hemangiomas from endoscopic biopsies.

  17. Gastrointestinal involvement of recurrent renal cell carcinoma: CT findings and clinicpathologic features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyo Jung; Kim, Hyun Jin; Park, Seung Ho; Lee, Jong Seok; Kim, Ah Young [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Hyun Kwon [Dept. of Radiology, Gangneung Asan Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    To retrospectively evaluate the CT findings and clinicopathologic features in patients with gastrointestinal (GI) involvement of recurrent renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The medical records were reviewed for 15 patients with 19 pathologically proven GI tract metastases of RCC. The CT findings were analyzed to determine the involved sites and type of involvement; lesion size, morphology, and contrast enhancement pattern; and occurrence of lymphadenopathy, ascites and other complications. The most common presentation was GI bleeding (66.7%). The average interval between nephrectomy and the detection of GI involvement was 30.4 ± 37.4 months. GI lesions were most commonly found in the ileum (36.8%) and duodenum (31.6%). A distant metastasis (80%) was more common than a direct invasion from metastatic lesions. The mean lesion size was 34.1 ± 15.0 mm. Intraluminal polypoid masses (63.2%) with hyperenhancement (78.9%) and heterogeneous enhancement (63.2%) were the most common findings. No patients had regional lymphadenopathy. Complications occurred in four patients, with one each of bowel obstruction, intussusception, bile duct dilatation, and pancreatic duct dilatation. GI involvement of recurrent RCC could be included in the differential diagnosis of patients with heterogeneous, hyperenhanced intraluminal polypoid masses in the small bowel on CT scans along with a relative paucity of lymphadenopathy.

  18. Computed tomographic findings of abdominal complications of Crohn's disease - pictorial essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zissin, R. [Tel-Aviv Univ., Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Sapir Medical Center, Kfar Saba, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel)]. E-mail: zisinrivka@clalit.org.il; Hertz, M. [Tel-Aviv Univ., Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Osadchy, A. [Tel-Aviv Univ., Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Sapir Medical Center, Kfar Saba, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Novis, B. [Tel-Aviv Univ., Dept. of Gastroenterology, Sapir Medical Center, Kfar Saba, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Gayer, G. [Tel-Aviv Univ., Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Assaf Harode Medical Center, Zrifin, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2005-02-15

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic, transmural, inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract (CIT) most often affecting the terminal ileum and colon. Diarrhea, abdominal pain, anorexia, nausea, and weight loss are the most common clinical symptoms. Abdominal complications of CD, both intestinal and extraintestinal, are frequent and variable. The most common intestinal complications include ileocolitis with external or internal fistulas and abscess formation, strictures, and bowel obstruction. Less common are free perforation, intussusception, and malignancy. The extraintestinal complications include nephrolithiasis, cholelithiasis, fatty liver, portal vein gas, and thromboembolic events. Nowadays, computed tomography (CT) provides superb anatomic detail and diagnostic accuracy of various intra-abdominal pathological processes, and it thus has become an essential diagnostic tool in the evaluation and management of patients wit known CD for the assessment of bowel wall involvement, the mesenteric extent of the disease, and inn-abdominal complications. In addition, as CT is frequently performed to evaluate patients with acute abdomen, it may encounter clinically unsuspected complications in patients with CD. This article reviews the CT features of various intra-abdominal complications of CD. (author)

  19. Computed tomographic findings of abdominal complications of Crohn's disease - pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zissin, R.; Hertz, M.; Osadchy, A.; Novis, B.; Gayer, G.

    2005-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic, transmural, inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract (CIT) most often affecting the terminal ileum and colon. Diarrhea, abdominal pain, anorexia, nausea, and weight loss are the most common clinical symptoms. Abdominal complications of CD, both intestinal and extraintestinal, are frequent and variable. The most common intestinal complications include ileocolitis with external or internal fistulas and abscess formation, strictures, and bowel obstruction. Less common are free perforation, intussusception, and malignancy. The extraintestinal complications include nephrolithiasis, cholelithiasis, fatty liver, portal vein gas, and thromboembolic events. Nowadays, computed tomography (CT) provides superb anatomic detail and diagnostic accuracy of various intra-abdominal pathological processes, and it thus has become an essential diagnostic tool in the evaluation and management of patients wit known CD for the assessment of bowel wall involvement, the mesenteric extent of the disease, and inn-abdominal complications. In addition, as CT is frequently performed to evaluate patients with acute abdomen, it may encounter clinically unsuspected complications in patients with CD. This article reviews the CT features of various intra-abdominal complications of CD. (author)

  20. Conservative Treatment for Cystic Duct Stenosis in a Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Gasparetto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Few cases of common bile duct stenosis have been reported in the literature, and observations of strictures in the cystic duct are even more rare. Surgical cholecystectomy is the treatment needed in most cases of gallbladder hydrops. This paper describes the diagnosis and successful medical treatment of a rare pediatric case of cystic duct stenosis and gallbladder hydrops. Case Report. A formerly healthy one-year-old girl was admitted with colicky abdominal pain. Blood tests were normal, except for an increase in transaminases. Abdominal ultrasound excluded intestinal intussusception and identified a distended gallbladder with biliary sludge. MR cholangiography revealed a dilated gallbladder containing bile sediment and no detectable cystic duct, while the rest of the intra- and extrahepatic biliary tree and hepatic parenchyma were normal. This evidence was consistent with gallbladder hydrops associated with cystic duct stenosis. The baby was treated with i.v. hydration, corticosteroids, antibiotics, and ursodeoxycholic acid. Her general condition rapidly improved, with no further episodes of abdominal pain and normalization of liver enzymes. This allowed to avoid cholecystectomy, and the child is well 1.5 years after diagnosis. Conclusions. Although cholecystectomy is usually necessary in case of gallbladder hydrops, our experience suggests that surgical procedures can be avoided when the distension is caused by a cystic duct stenosis.

  1. Effectiveness of the live attenuated rotavirus vaccine produced by a domestic manufacturer in China studied using a population-based case-control design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Shan-Shan; Li, Yue; Wang, Song-Mei; Zhang, Xin-Jiang; Hao, Zhi-Yong; Chen, Ying; Wang, Dan; Zhang, Yan-Hong; Zhang, Zhi-Yong; Ma, Jing-Chen; Zhou, Peng; Zhang, Zhen; Jiang, Zhi-Wei; Zhao, Yu-Liang; Wang, Xuan-Yi

    2015-10-01

    A universal rotavirus (RV) immunization program is a potentially cost-effective measure for preventing RV infection in China. However, the efficacy of the only licensed RV vaccine (Lanzhou lamb rotavirus vaccine, LLR), which is made by a domestic manufacturer, has not been proven by a properly designed clinical trial. In October 2011 to March 2012, to measure the potential protection provided by LLR, a case-control study nested in a population-based active diarrhea surveillance study of children control study comparing non-RV viral diarrheal cases with non-diarrheal controls in the same population found that the RV vaccine offered no protection against non-RV diarrhea. Even under a less ideal immunization schedule, the oral LLR conferred a certain level of protection against RV gastroenteritis. However, further studies are needed to understand the full characteristics of the LLR, including its efficacy when administered following the optimal regimen, the potential risk of inducing intussusception, and the direct and indirect protective effects of LLR.

  2. The postoperative stomach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodfield, Courtney A. [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Levine, Marc S. [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)]. E-mail: marc.levine@uphs.upenn.edu

    2005-03-01

    Gastric surgery may be performed for the treatment of a variety of benign and malignant diseases of the upper gastrointestinal tract, including peptic ulcers and gastric carcinoma. Radiographic studies with water-soluble contrast agents often are obtained to rule out leaks, obstruction, or other acute complications during the early postoperative period. Barium studies may also be obtained to evaluate for anastomotic strictures or ulcers, bile reflux gastritis, recurrent tumor, or other chronic complications during the late postoperative period. Cross-sectional imaging studies such as CT are also helpful for detecting abscesses or other postoperative collections, recurrent or metastatic tumor, or less common complications such as afferent loop syndrome or gastrojejunal intussusception. It is important for radiologists to be familiar not only with the radiographic findings associated with these various abnormalities but also with the normal appearances of the postoperative stomach on radiographic examinations, so that such appearances are not mistaken for pseudoleaks or other postoperative complications. The purpose of this article is to describe the normal postsurgical anatomy after the most commonly performed operations (including partial gastrectomy, esophagogastrectomy and gastric pull-through, and total gastrectomy and esophagojejunostomy) and to review the acute and chronic complications, normal postoperative findings, and major abnormalities detected on radiographic examinations in these patients.

  3. Clinical, serological and virological characteristics of an outbreak of paresis and neonatal foal disease due to equine herpesvirus-1 on a stud farm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCartan, C G; Russell, M M; Wood, J L; Mumford, J A

    1995-01-07

    An outbreak of equine herpesvirus-1 (EHV-1) occurred on a large stud farm with 133 mares, 54 foals and four stallions, and at least 85 mares, 22 foals and three stallions were infected. Clinical disease was observed in 16 mares, two stallions and 13 foals and the predominant clinical signs were scrotal oedema, ataxia and loss of libido in the stallions, ataxia and recumbency in the mares and uveitis and nasal discharge in the foals, although pneumonia and colic with intussusception were also recorded at autopsy. Neurological disease was more common in the mares nursing foals (12 of 38 infected) than in barren mares (one of 46 infected). Three mares died during the outbreak and no mares that had been recumbent bred again. Control procedures were based on virological and serological testing and stringent management practices to limit the spread of infection between groups of mares and foals and away from the stud farm. There were marked antibody responses in the adult horses, but they were generally poor in the foals; three of the nine viraemic foals did not develop significant increases in the levels of circulating antibody. Recommendations are made for the management of future outbreaks.

  4. Advances in point-of-care ultrasound in pediatric emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Rachel A; Levy, Jason A

    2014-06-01

    Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) has become an integral part of emergency medicine practice. Research evaluating POCUS in the care of pediatric patients has improved the understanding of its potential role in clinical care. Recent work has investigated the ability of pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) physicians to perform a wide array of diagnostic and procedural applications in POCUS ultrasound. Studies have demonstrated that PEM providers are able to identify an array of diseases, including intussusception, pyloric stenosis and appendicitis. Novel applications of ultrasound, such as a cardiac evaluation in the acutely ill patient or identification of skull fractures in the assessment of a patient with head injury, have shown excellent promise in recent studies. These novel applications have the potential to reshape pediatric diagnostic algorithms. Key applications in PEM have been investigated in the recent publications. Further exploration of the ability to integrate ultrasound into routine practice will require larger-scale studies and continued growth of education in the field. The use of ultrasound in clinical practice has the potential to improve safety and efficiency of care in the pediatric emergency department.

  5. Abdominal manifestations of cystic fibrosis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudry, Gulraiz; Navarro, Oscar M.; Levine, Daniel S.; Oudjhane, Kamaldine

    2006-01-01

    Pulmonary complications remain the main cause of mortality in cystic fibrosis, but the presenting symptoms in children are often related to gastrointestinal or pancreaticobiliary disease. Furthermore, abdominal manifestations are now seen throughout childhood, from infancy to adolescence. The child might present in the neonatal period with meconium ileus or its attendant complications. The older child might present with distal intestinal obstruction syndrome or colonic stricture secondary to high doses of pancreatic enzyme replacement. Less-common gastrointestinal manifestations include intussusception, duodenitis and fecal impaction of the appendix. Most children also show evidence of exocrine pancreatic deficiency. Radiologically, the combination of fat deposition and pancreatic fibrosis leads to varying CT and MR appearances. A higher than normal incidence of pancreatic cysts and calcification is also seen. Decreased transport of water and chloride also increases the viscosity of bile, with subsequent obstruction of the biliary ductules. If extensive, this can progress to obstructive cirrhosis, portal hypertension and esophageal varices. Diffuse fatty infiltration, hypersplenism and gallstones are also commonly seen in these patients. We present a pictorial review of the radiological appearance of these abdominal manifestations. The conditions are dealt with individually, together with typical appearances in various imaging modalities. (orig.)

  6. Lenalidomide combined with R-GDP in a patient with refractory CD5-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: A promising response and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaping; Wang, Xinfeng; Liu, Yifei; Sun, Chunfeng; Shi, Wenyu; Huang, Hongming

    2018-07-03

    CD5-positive (CD5+) diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is associated with poor survival compared with CD5-negative DLBCL. The clinical characteristics of CD5+ DLBCL are different from both CD5-negative DLBCL and other CD5+ B cell lymphomas. There is currently no promising chemotherapy for CD5+ DLBCL. Herein, we report a 49-year-old Asian male with refractory CD5+ DLBCL. He complained of aggravated abdominal pain and weight loss. Computed tomography scan revealed abdominal masses, widespread lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, and intussusception of the ileocecal junction with bowel wall thickening. Core needle aspiration biopsy of an abdominal mass was performed and immunohistochemistry revealed DLBCL of nongerminal center type. In this report, the dose-intensified R-Hyper CVAD (A) regimen as salvage therapy was introduced but failed to result in substantial improvement over the initially standard R-CHOP regimen. Next, the R-GDP regimen was administered as second-line treatment, but only resulted in a partial response. However, the addition of lenalidomide to R-GDP (R2-GDP) resulted in complete remission. The clinical features, pathogenesis, and possible mechanism of action of lenalidomide in CD5+ DLBCL have been described in the literature. The results of the present case report and literature searches indicate that CD5+ DLBCL may share a common pathway with activated B-cell like (ABC) DLBCL as determined by gene expression profiling. Lenalidomide is expected to induce favorable responses in patients with CD5+ DLBCL.

  7. Skin Vaccination against Rotavirus Using Microneedles: Proof of Concept in Gnotobiotic Piglets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhuan Wang

    Full Text Available Live-attenuated oral rotavirus (RV vaccines have lower efficacy in low income countries, and additionally are associated with a rare but severe adverse event, intussusception. We have been pursuing the development of an inactivated rotavirus vaccine (IRV using the human rotavirus strain CDC-9 (G1P[8] through parenteral immunization and previously demonstrated dose sparing and enhanced immunogenicity of intradermal (ID unadjuvanted IRV using a coated microneedle patch in comparison with intramuscular (IM administration in mice. The aim of this study was to evaluate the immune response and protection against RV infection and diarrhea conferred by the administration of the ID unadjuvanted IRV using the microneedle device MicronJet600® in neonatal gnotobiotic (Gn piglets challenged with virulent Wa G1P[8] human RV. Three doses of 5 μg IRV when administered intradermally and 5 μg IRV formulated with aluminum hydroxide [Al(OH3] when administered intramuscularly induced comparable rotavirus-specific antibody titers of IgA, IgG, IgG avidity index and neutralizing activity in sera of neonatal piglets. Both IRV vaccination regimens protected against RV antigen shedding in stools, and reduced the cumulative diarrhea scores in the piglets. This study demonstrated that the ID and IM administrations of IRV are immunogenic and protective against RV-induced diarrhea in neonatal piglets. Our findings highlight the potential value of an adjuvant sparing effect of the IRV ID delivery route.

  8. Inverted Meckel's diverticulum as a cause of occult lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Omar M Rashid; Joseph K Ku; Masayuki Nagahashi; Akimitsu Yamada; Kazuaki Takabe

    2012-01-01

    Meckel's diverticulum is a common asymptomatic congenital gastrointestinal anomaly,but rarely it can present with hemorrhage.Over the last few years inverted Meckel's diverticulum has been reported in the literature with increasing frequency as an occult source of lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage.Here,we report a case of a 54-year-old male,who was referred for surgical evaluation with persistent anemia and occult blood per rectum after a work up which failed to localize the source over 12 mo,including upper and capsule endoscopy,colonoscopy,enteroclysis,Meckel scan,and tagged nuclear red blood cell scan.An abdominal computed tomography scan showed a possible mid-ileal intussusception and intraluminal mass.During the abdominal exploration,inverted Meckel's diverticulum was diagnosed and resected.We review the literature,discuss the forms in which the disease presents,the diagnostic modalities utilized,pathological findings,and treatment.Although less than 40 cases have been reported in the English literature from 1978 to 2005,19 cases have been reported in the last 6 years alone (2006-2012) due to improved diagnostic modalities.Successful diagnosis and treatment of this disease requires a high index of clinical suspicion,which is becoming increasingly relevant to general gastroenterologists.

  9. Assessing colonic anatomy normal values based on air contrast enemas in children younger than 6 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppen, Ilan J N; Yacob, Desale; Di Lorenzo, Carlo; Saps, Miguel; Benninga, Marc A; Cooper, Jennifer N; Minneci, Peter C; Deans, Katherine J; Bates, D Gregory; Thompson, Benjamin P

    2017-03-01

    Contrast enemas with barium or water-soluble contrast agents are sometimes performed in children with severe intractable constipation to identify anatomical abnormalities. However there are no clear definitions for normal colonic size or abnormalities such as colonic dilation or sigmoid redundancy in children. To describe characteristics of colonic anatomy on air contrast enemas in children without constipation to provide normal values for colonic size ratios in children. We performed a retrospective chart review of children aged 0-5 years who had undergone air contrast enemas for intussusception. The primary outcome measures were the ratios of the diameters and lengths of predetermined colonic segments (lengths of rectosigmoid and descending colon; diameters of rectum, sigmoid, descending colon, transverse colon and ascending colon) in relation to the L2 vertebral body width. We included 119 children (median age 2.0 years, range 0-5 years, 68% boys). Colonic segment length ratios did not change significantly with age, although the differences for the rectosigmoid/L2 ratio were borderline significant (P = 0.05). The ratios that involved the rectal and ascending colon diameters increased significantly with age, while diameter ratios involving the other colonic segments did not. Differences by gender and race were not significant. These data can be used for reference purposes in young children undergoing contrast studies of the colon.

  10. Ultrasound in the investigation of posterior compartment vaginal prolapse and obstructed defecation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, H P; Beer-Gabel, M

    2012-07-01

    Recent developments in diagnostic imaging have made gynecologists, colorectal surgeons and gastroenterologists realize as never before that they share a common interest in anorectal and pelvic floor dysfunction. While we often may be using different words to describe the same phenomenon (e.g. anismus/vaginismus) or attributing different meanings to the same words (e.g. rectocele), we look after patients with problems that transcend the borders of our respective specialties. Like no other diagnostic modality, imaging helps us understand each other and provides new insights into conditions we all need to learn to investigate better in order to improve clinical management. In this review we attempt to show what modern ultrasound imaging can contribute to the diagnostic work-up of patients with posterior vaginal wall prolapse, obstructed defecation and rectal intussusception/prolapse. In summary, it is evident that translabial/perineal ultrasound can serve as a first-line diagnostic tool in women with such complaints, replacing defecation proctography and MR proctography in a large proportion of female patients. This is advantageous for the women themselves because ultrasound is much better tolerated, as well as for healthcare systems since sonographic imaging is much less expensive. However, there is a substantial need for education, which currently remains unmet. Copyright © 2012 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. The usefulness of MR defecography in the evaluation of pelvic floor dysfunction: our experience using 3T MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Najar, Mahasen S; Ghanem, Ahmed F; AlRyalat, Saif Aldeen S; Al-Ryalat, Nosaiba T; Alhajahjeh, Sultan O

    2017-09-01

    To assess the usefulness of MR defecography in evaluating pelvic floor dysfunction, and to correlate several pelvic organ abnormalities with each other and with patients' symptoms and characteristics. MR defecographic examinations performed in 3T MRI machine of 95 patients (70 females, 25 males; mean age 48) were retrospectively reviewed. Pelvic organ abnormalities from all three compartments were recorded, including the anorectal junction descent, anterior rectocele, and cystocele. These were graded according to the known HMO system in relation to the pubococcygeal line. The correlation between these different abnormalities and their relation to patient symptoms and characteristics were evaluated. Anorectal junction descent and anterior rectocele were most commonly observed, predominantly manifesting in female patients. Both were associated with abnormalities from all compartments. The middle compartment was the least affected, and its abnormality of uterine/vaginal descent tended to occur in association with the anterior compartment abnormality (cystocele). Anismus was low in incidence, and was not associated with other compartments abnormalities. Both enterocele/peritoneocele and intussusception were uncommon. MR defecography is the modality of choice in assessing pelvic floor dysfunction, because it can neatly show various pelvic organ abnormalities from all compartments in a dynamic fashion, which are frequently coexistent. It can even show clinically silent or unsuspected abnormalities which can impact the management of patients.

  12. [Imaging of pelvic organ prolapse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapray, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    Colpocystodefecography (CCD) and dynamic MRI with defecography (MRId) allow an alternation between filling and emptying the hollow organs and the maximum abdominal strain offered by the defecation. When applied in imaging these two principles reveal the masked or underestimated prolapses at the time of the physical examination. A rigorous application of the technique guarantees almost equivalent results from the two examinations. The CCD provides voiding views and improved analysis of the anorectal pathology (intussusception, anismus) but involves radiation and a more invasive examination. MRId has the advantage of providing continuous visibility of the peritoneal compartment, and a multiplanar representation, enabling an examination of the morphology of the pelvic organs and of the supporting structures, with the disadvantage of still necessitating a supine examination, resulting sometimes in an incomplete or impossible evacuation. The normal and abnormal results (cystoptosis, vaginal vault prolapse, enterocele, anorectal intussuception, rectocele, descending perineum, urinary and fecal incontinence) and the respective advantages and limits of the various imaging methods are detailed. Dynamic perineal and introital ultrasound remains more limited in the appreciation of posterior colpoceles and especially in anorectal disorders, than CCD or MRId. Endoanal ultrasound is the first line morphological evaluation of the anal sphincter. Transvaginal and introital ultrasound can detect some complications of suburethral tapes and meshes. Morphological and dynamic imaging are essential complementary tools to the physical examination, especially when a precise anatomic assessment is required to understand the functional complaint or when a reintervention is needed.

  13. Intrarectal pressures and balloon expulsion related to evacuation proctography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halligan, S; Thomas, J; Bartram, C

    1995-01-01

    Seventy four patients with constipation were examined by standard evacuation proctography and then attempted to expel a small, non-deformable rectal balloon, connected to a pressure transducer to measure intrarectal pressure. Simultaneous imaging related the intrarectal position of the balloon to rectal deformity. Inability to expel the balloon was associated proctographically with prolonged evacuation, incomplete evacuation, reduced anal canal diameter, and acute anorectal angulation during evacuation. The presence and size of rectocoele or intussusception was unrelated to voiding of paste or balloon. An independent linear combination of pelvic floor descent and evacuation time on proctography correctly predicted maximum intrarectal pressure in 74% of cases. No patient with both prolonged evacuation and reduced pelvic floor descent on proctography could void the balloon, as maximum intrarectal pressure was reduced in this group. A prolonged evacuation time on proctography, in combination with reduced pelvic floor descent, suggests defecatory disorder may be caused by inability to raise intrarectal pressure. A diagnosis of anismus should not be made on proctography solely on the basis of incomplete/prolonged evacuation, as this may simply reflect inadequate straining. PMID:7672656

  14. Colonic perforation with peritonitis in amoebiasis: a tropical disease with high mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Bhupendra Kumar; Garg, Pankaj Kumar; Kumar, Anjay; Mishra, Kiran; Mohanty, Debajyoti; Agrawal, Vivek

    2013-01-01

    Invasive colonic amoebiasis presents primarily with dysentery; colonic perforation occurs rarely. Cases of amoebic colonic perforations have been reported sporadically over the past 20 years. A retrospective study was done in the surgical unit of a tertiary care hospital in North India. The case records of those patients were reviewed who underwent exploratory laparotomy from January 2011 to September 2012 and were diagnosed with amoebic colonic perforation on histopathological examination. Details concerning the clinical presentation, investigations, intraoperative findings, operative procedures, and postoperative outcomes were retrieved. Amongst, a total of 186 emergency exploratory laparotomies carried out during the study, 15 patients of amoebic colonic perforation were identified. The median age of the patients was 42 years (IQR 32.0-58.0) and the male to female ratio was 13:2. Previous history of colitis was present in only 1 patient. The preoperative diagnosis was perforation peritonitis in 12 patients; and intussusception, intestinal obstruction and ruptured liver abscess in 1 patient each. Ten patients had single perforation while 5 had multiple colonic perforations. All the patients except one had perforations in the right colon. Bowel resection was performed depending upon the site and extent of the colon involved-right hemicolectomy (8), limited ileocolic resection (6) and sigmoidectomy (1). Bowel continuity could be restored only in 2 of the 15 patients and a stoma was constructed in the remaining 13 patients. The overall mortality rate was found to be 40% (6/15). Amoebic colonic perforation is associated with unusually high mortality.

  15. Clinical and ultrasonographic observations of functional and mechanical intestinal obstruction in buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arafat Khalphallah

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was designed for clinical and laboratory evaluation of intestinal obstruction (IO in buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis with special emphasis on the diagnostic value of ultrasonographic findings. Materials and Methods: A total number of 30 buffaloes were included in the study and divided into 2 groups: Healthy (n=10 and diseased group (n=20. Diseased buffaloes were admitted to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital at Assiut University, Egypt, with a history of anorexia, abdominal pain, various degrees of abdominal distention, and absence or presence of scanty mucoid faces. These animals were subjected to clinical and ultrasonographic as well as laboratory examinations. Results: Based on ultrasonographic findings, various forms of IO were diagnosed. Functional obstruction, paralytic ileus, was diagnosed in 17 cases (85% while mechanical IO was diagnosed only in 3 cases (15%. Out of 17 cases of paralytic ileus, both proximal and distal ileuses were successfully imaged in 8 and 9 cases, respectively. Proximal ileus was imaged from the right dorsal flank region as a single dilated loop of diameter >6 cm, while distal ileus was imaged as multiple dilated loops of diameter <6 cm. Mechanical obstruction due to duodenal intussusception was visualized as two concentric rings with outer echogenic wall and hypoechoic lumen. All cases of IO showed leukocytosis, hypoproteinemia, and increased activity of alkaline phosphatase and aspartate aminotransferase. Conclusion: Ultrasonography proved to be an essential tool for diagnosis and differential diagnosis of various forms of IO in buffaloes.

  16. Feline alimentary lymphosarcoma: radiographic, ultrasonographic, histologic, and viral findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hittmair, K.; Krebitz-Gressl, E.; Kuebber-Heiss, A.; Moestl, K.

    2000-01-01

    Sixty cats with clinical symptoms indicative of gastroin-testinal lymphosarcoma were examined radiographically and ultrasonographically. Clinical signs included lethargy, anorexia, weight loss, anemia, vomiting, diarrhea, and a palpable mid-abdominal mass. Radiographic findings with alimentary lymphosarcoma (LSA) showed diffuse decreased serosal detail, a mid-abdominal soft-tissue mass, cavernous lesions, and gas-filled bowel loops. Ultrasonographic features included marked stomach or intestinal wall thickening, loss of wall layering, decreased echogenicity, and a hyperechoic central reflection. Hypoechonic infiltration of mesenterial lymph nodes and other abdominal organs were visualized ultrasonographically. Alimentary LSA was diagnosed in thirty-six of the sixty cats. Ultrasonography was helpful in determining the cause of disease in the remaining twenty-four cats. Differential diagnosis included intussusception, foreign bodies, chronic gastroenteritis, granuloma (feline infectious peritonitis - FIP), and other gastrointestinal neoplasms. In ten of the thirty-six cats with alimentary lymphosarcoma, diagnosis was confirmed by ultrasound-guided fine-needle biopsies. Blood and/or saliva ELISA-tests determined feline leukemia virus or antigen in only eleven of the thirty-six cats. Histopathology revealed lymphoid infiltration of the stomach or intestinal wall in twenty-nine of the thirty-six cases. Additionally, the medical records of seventy-one cats with proven alimentary LSA were reviewed. Ultrasonographic findings showed intestinal LSA in sixty-two cats and LSA of the stomach in nine cats. Both studies indicate that ultrasonography is a valuable diagnostic tool for feline alimentary LSA. (author)

  17. Age and cellular context influence rectal prolapse formation in mice with caecal wall colorectal cancer xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommelein, Joke; Gremonprez, Félix; Verset, Laurine; De Vlieghere, Elly; Wagemans, Glenn; Gespach, Christian; Boterberg, Tom; Demetter, Pieter; Ceelen, Wim; Bracke, Marc; De Wever, Olivier

    2016-11-15

    In patients with rectal prolapse is the prevalence of colorectal cancer increased, suggesting that a colorectal tumor may induce rectal prolapse. Establishment of tumor xenografts in immunodeficient mice after orthotopic inoculations of human colorectal cancer cells into the caecal wall is a widely used approach for the study of human colorectal cancer progression and preclinical evaluation of therapeutics. Remarkably, 70% of young mice carrying a COLO320DM caecal tumor showed symptoms of intussusception of the large bowel associated with intestinal lumen obstruction and rectal prolapse. The quantity of the COLO320DM bioluminescent signal of the first three weeks post-inoculation predicts prolapse in young mice. Rectal prolapse was not observed in adult mice carrying a COLO320DM caecal tumor or young mice carrying a HT29 caecal tumor. In contrast to HT29 tumors, which showed local invasion and metastasis, COLO320DM tumors demonstrated a non-invasive tumor with pushing borders without presence of metastasis. In conclusion, rectal prolapse can be linked to a non-invasive, space-occupying COLO320DM tumor in the gastrointestinal tract of young immunodeficient mice. These data reveal a model that can clarify the association of patients showing rectal prolapse with colorectal cancer.

  18. Ileocolic junction resection in dogs and cats: 18 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Yordan; Seth, Mayank; Murgia, Daniela; Puig, Jordi

    2017-12-01

    There is limited veterinary literature about dogs or cats with ileocolic junction resection and its long-term follow-up. To evaluate the long-term outcome in a cohort of dogs and cats that underwent resection of the ileocolic junction without extensive (≥50%) small or large bowel resection. Medical records of dogs and cats that had the ileocolic junction resected were reviewed. Follow-up information was obtained either by telephone interview or e-mail correspondence with the referring veterinary surgeons. Nine dogs and nine cats were included. The most common cause of ileocolic junction resection was intussusception in dogs (5/9) and neoplasia in cats (6/9). Two dogs with ileocolic junction lymphoma died postoperatively. Only 2 of 15 animals, for which long-term follow-up information was available, had soft stools. However, three dogs with suspected chronic enteropathy required long-term treatment with hypoallergenic diets alone or in combination with medical treatment to avoid the development of diarrhoea. Four of 6 cats with ileocolic junction neoplasia were euthanised as a consequence of progressive disease. Dogs and cats undergoing ileocolic junction resection and surviving the perioperative period may have a good long-term outcome with mild or absent clinical signs but long-term medical management may be required.

  19. Mimics of Duplication Cysts: Intraperitoneal Nodules in a 14-Year-Old Boy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara E. Ohanessian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemangiomas are the most common primary hepatic tumors, but there are few reports of their occurrence elsewhere in the abdomen. The concurrent existence of multiple fibrous nodules of the omentum, mesentery, and porta hepatis, along with a gastric hemangioma, in a child raises the question of syndromic association. Our search of the English literature revealed only rare mentions of hemangiomas involving the stomach and mesentery or omentum. These lesions have attracted clinical attention by symptoms of obstruction, gastrointestinal bleeding, intussusception, infection, perforation, or vague abdominal pain. Although some tumors exist unnoticed for many decades and are identified only incidentally, others present emergently and require immediate surgical attention. We report the case of a 14-year-old boy who presented with symptoms similar to those for appendicitis or duplication cyst, who was found to have a torsed gastric hemangioma and multiple benign fibrous nodules in the abdomen. The presence of multiple vascular or fibrous lesions is associated with genetic syndromes that can have lifelong and reproductive repercussions; so it is imperative that these tumors be recognized by diagnosticians.

  20. Small bowel obstruction in children: usefulness of CT for diagnosis and localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Cheol; Kim, Young Tong; Bae, Won Kyung; Kim, Il Young [Cheonan Hospital, Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-12-15

    To evaluate the usefulness of CT for the diagnosis of the cause and localization of small bowel obstruction. Out of a group of children who underwent a CT examination for a suspected small bowel obstruction, 19 patients with confirmed underlying disorders were identified and included in the study. Neonates and patients with duodenal obstruction were excluded from the study. The CT findings were analyzed for the location of obstruction site, abnormalities of the mesentery and mesenteric vessels, bowel wall thickening, closed loop obstruction, and strangulation. The obstruction site was divided into five parts. The preoperative CT diagnosis was compared with the final diagnosis. Causes of small bowel obstruction were intussusception (n = 6), appendiceal perforation (n = 4), transmesenteric internal hernia (n = 2), postoperative bands (n = 1), idiopathic multiple bands (n = 1), a foreign body (n = 1), a small bowel adenocarcinoma (n = 1), Meckel's diverticulitis (n = 1), tuberculous peritonitis (n = 1) and Salmonella enteritis with bowel perforation (n = 1). The CT findings showed mesenteric vascular prominence (n = 13), omental or mesenteric infiltration (n = 10), localized bowel wall thickening (n = 7) closed loops obstruction (n = 3) and strangulation (n = 1). The obstruction site was identified in all cases. The causes of obstruction could be diagnosed preoperatively in 14 cases, but a preoperative diagnosis was difficult in 5 cases. The causes of small bowel obstruction in children are variable, and CT is useful for evaluating the cause and localization of small bowel obstruction.

  1. Retrospective evaluation of recurrent secondary septic peritonitis in dogs (2000-2011): 41 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barfield, Dominic M; Tivers, Michael S; Holahan, Matthew; Welch, Kristin; House, Arthur; Adamantos, Sophie E

    2016-01-01

    To describe the clinical characteristics of recurrent septic peritonitis in dogs. Multicenter retrospective observational study. Client-owned dogs with recurrent septic peritonitis. Three university emergency and referral hospitals. None. Medical records from 3 veterinary university teaching hospitals were reviewed and data were collected using a standardized data collection sheet for all cases of septic peritonitis during the study period (2000-2011). Forty one dogs met the inclusion criteria for recurrent peritonitis. All dogs underwent relaparotomy. The original cause of septic peritonitis in these cases included previous surgery for gastrointestinal foreign body removal (n = 26), gastrointestinal neoplasia (n = 3), gastric or duodenal ulceration (n = 3), biliary tract leakage (n = 2), and single instance for each of the following: penetrating foreign body, hernia strangulation, intussusception, mesenteric volvulus, infection of the laparotomy incision, prostatic abscess, and trauma. Eighteen animals survived to discharge. There was no difference detected between survivors and nonsurvivors with recurrent peritonitis in terms of inciting cause, serum albumin concentration, surgical management, or provision of appropriate initial antimicrobials. The survival rate for dogs having recurrent peritonitis was 43.9% (18/41 dogs). This retrospective study did not identify any significant prognostic indicators for dogs with recurrent peritonitis and that the mortality rate for dogs having more than one surgery for septic peritonitis is similar to that reported for a single surgery for septic peritonitis. ©Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2015.

  2. Abdominal manifestations of cystic fibrosis in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudry, Gulraiz; Navarro, Oscar M.; Levine, Daniel S.; Oudjhane, Kamaldine [University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2006-03-15

    Pulmonary complications remain the main cause of mortality in cystic fibrosis, but the presenting symptoms in children are often related to gastrointestinal or pancreaticobiliary disease. Furthermore, abdominal manifestations are now seen throughout childhood, from infancy to adolescence. The child might present in the neonatal period with meconium ileus or its attendant complications. The older child might present with distal intestinal obstruction syndrome or colonic stricture secondary to high doses of pancreatic enzyme replacement. Less-common gastrointestinal manifestations include intussusception, duodenitis and fecal impaction of the appendix. Most children also show evidence of exocrine pancreatic deficiency. Radiologically, the combination of fat deposition and pancreatic fibrosis leads to varying CT and MR appearances. A higher than normal incidence of pancreatic cysts and calcification is also seen. Decreased transport of water and chloride also increases the viscosity of bile, with subsequent obstruction of the biliary ductules. If extensive, this can progress to obstructive cirrhosis, portal hypertension and esophageal varices. Diffuse fatty infiltration, hypersplenism and gallstones are also commonly seen in these patients. We present a pictorial review of the radiological appearance of these abdominal manifestations. The conditions are dealt with individually, together with typical appearances in various imaging modalities. (orig.)

  3. Ultrasound imaging in urogynecology – state of the art 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Bogusiewicz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The role of ultrasound imaging in urogynecology is not clearly defined. Despite significant developments in visualization techniques and interpretation of images, pelvic ultrasound is still more a tool for research than for clinical practice. Structures of the lower genitourinary tract and pelvic floor can be visualized from different approaches: transperineal, introital, transvaginal, abdominal or endoanal. According to contemporary guidelines and recommendations, the role of ultrasound in urogynecology is limited to the measurement of post-void residue. However, in many instances, including planning and audit of surgical procedures, management of recurrences or complications, ultrasound may be proposed as the initial examination of choice. Ultrasound may be used for assessment of bladder neck mobility before anti-incontinence procedures. On rare occasions it is helpful in recognition of pathologies mimicking vaginal prolapse such as vaginal cyst, urethral diverticula or rectal intussusception. In patients subjected to suburethral slings, causes of surgery failure or postsurgical voiding dysfunctions can be revealed by imaging. Many reports link the location of a tape close to the bladder neck to unfavorable outcomes of sling surgery. Some postoperative complications, such as urinary retention, mesh malposition, hematoma, or urinary tract injury, can be diagnosed by ultrasound. On the other hand, the clinical value of some applications of ultrasound in urogynecology, for example measurement of the bladder wall thickness as a marker of detrusor overactivity, has not been proved.

  4. The Effectiveness of Ultrasonography in Detecting Emergent Pediatric Pathologies and Requirement for Additional Imaging Techniques: A Retrospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betül Tiryaki Baştuğ

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In emergency cases, ultrasonography is used in guiding resuscitation, to provide procedural guidance, and confirm a clinical diagnosis. In addition, it may prevent unnecessary exposure of the patient to ionizing radiation and risks caused by transporting the patient away from monitoring. This paper aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of ultrasonography in detecting emergent pediatric pathologies in a state hospital radiology unit, and to identify whether additional imaging techniques, such as computed tomography, were required. Methods: This study was designed as a retrospective investigation. A group of 536 patients were randomly selected from 1.401 pediatric patients who underwent ultrasonography for non-traumatic emergent pathologies between 2015 and 2016. Results: Of the 536 patients, 46 were diagnosed with appendicitis, 14 with pathologies of the urinary system, 1 with ileus, 29 with mesenteric lymphadenitis, 4 with intussusception, 3 with ovarian cyst rupture, 1 with ovarian torsion, and 32 with scrotal pathologies. Computed tomography was performed for 20 patients. Ureteral calculi and appendicitis were confirmed by computed tomography in 5 and 14 patients, respectively, after being identified as secondary findings by ultrasonography. In 1 patient, ileus was verified by computed tomography. The sensitivity of ultrasonography was determined to be 85.7%. Only 14% of patients were not given definite pathological diagnoses by ultrasonography alone. Subsequent computed tomography for verifying secondary findings detected by ultrasonography was essential in only 20 patients. Conclusion: Our results promote the use of ultrasonography as the initial imaging test for evaluating pediatric patients with suspected emergency pathologies.

  5. Corticosteroid therapy in Henoch-Schönlein gastritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović Momčilo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP is the most common vascular disease of childhood. It is a multisystem disease most commonly affecting the skin, joints, gastrointestinal tract, and kidneys, but other organs may be affected, too. Gastrointestinal involvement occurs in approximately 65-90% of patients, ranging from mild symptoms such as abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting, to more severe manifestations such as gastrointestinal bleeding and intussusception. In most cases, HSP spontaneously resolves without treatment. The use of corticosteroids is controversial and usually reserved for severe systemic manifestations. Some authors suggest that the abdominal pain and gastrointestinal hemorrhage of HSP may respond to steroids, with some suggesting that there is a benefit in their use and describing a regimen. Case outline. This is a case report of HSP in a fourteen year-old boy with abdominal pain and hematemesis. Upper endoscopy showed an edematous and erythematous change in the body of the stomach and purpuric lesions in the duodenum, while multiple erosions were found in the antral area. Parenteral corticosteroid therapy with gastric acid secretion inhibitor administration led to regression of gastrointestinal symptoms on the seventh day, with relapses on the fourth and sixth day. Peroral administration of corticosteroids and gradual decrease of daily doses started on the eighth day of abdominal symptoms. New purpuric skin rashes appeared during six weeks. Conclusion. Corticosteroid therapy with gastric acid secretion inhibitors showed a positive effect in our patient with a severe form of HSP accompanied by abdominal pain and gastrointestinal hemorrhage. .

  6. Early complications after stapled transanal rectal resection performed using the Contour® Transtar™ device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martellucci, J; Talento, P; Carriero, A

    2011-12-01

    This study evaluated the early results (with particular reference to complications) of stapled transanal rectal resection (STARR) carried out using the CCS-30 Contour® Transtar™ device. The procedure was performed in a single centre on patients with obstucted defecation caused by rectocele or rectal intussusception. From July 2007 to February 2009, 133 patients were treated. Preoperatively, all underwent clinical examination, transanal ultrasonography, anorectal manometry and cinedefaecography. Obstructed defaecation syndrome was assessed using the Cleveland Clinic Constipation Score (CCC-S). Early postoperative complications and those occurring within 6 months were recorded. The median follow-up period was 19 (range 12-30) months. The mean ± standard deviation preoperative CCC-S of 19.4 ± 7.1 decreased to 10.1 ± 9.0 postoperatively. The early complication rate was 15.7% and included rectovaginal fistula (n = 1), rectal perforation (n = 1), posterior dehiscence (n = 4), further surgery for retained staples (n = 2), postoperative bleeding (n = 2) and postoperative impaired continence (n = 11). STARR using the Contour Transtar device seems to be effective for treating obstructed defaecation. However, serious complications may occur. © 2011 The Authors. Colorectal Disease © 2011 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  7. Sonographic appearances of common gut pathology in paediatric patients: comparison with plain abdominal radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piotto, Lino; Gent, Roger

    2004-01-01

    Even with the advent of more specialised imaging modalities such as fluoroscopic contrast examinations, CT and MRI, the plain abdominal radiograph remains the initial imaging modality in investigating the signs and symptoms of suspected gut pathology. However, ultrasound is playing an increasing part in the detection of gut pathology in paediatric patients. At our hospital, when plain abdominal radiography does not provide a diagnosis, ultrasound is commonly requested to rule out conditions that require urgent attention, such as intussusception, appendicitis and midgut malrotation and volvulus. After these conditions have been excluded however, the ultrasound examination can frequently lead to the diagnosis of several other conditions, including gastroenteritis, Crohn's disease, mesenteric lymphadenopathy and less commonly, duplication cysts, bezoas, and haemolytic uraemic syndrome. Although plain radiography of the abdomen may be suggestive of gut pathology, the additional information provided by sonography often provides a specific diagnosis, leading to better patient care. This paper is a presentation of ten case studies demonstrating the use of ultrasound to augment plain X-ray findings, in order to obtain a final diagnosis. Copyright (2004) Australian Institute of Radiography

  8. Meckel's Diverticulum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treves, S.T.; Grand, R.

    1985-01-01

    The primary application of techetium-99m (Tc-99m) pertechnetate scintigraphy of the abdomen is in the diagnosis of Meckel's diverticulum. Some years ago the authors reviewed the records of all patients with Meckel's diverticulum under 2 years of age undergoing operation at the Children's Hospital in Boston between 1951 and 1972. Among 60 infants under 2 years of age, 32 had painless rectal bleeding. Of these 32,56% presented before reaching 1 year of age and the remaining 44% before 2 years of age. Among those symptomatic patients, 91% (29 of 32 patients) had ectopic gastric mucosa in their Meckel's diverticula. The differential diagnosis of rectal bleeding in infants <2 years of age includes Meckel'd diverticulum, anal fissure, volvulus, intussusception, peptic ulcer, and colonic polyp. Of these, only colonic polyp and Meckel's diverticulum usually cause painless bleeding. Radiologic studied using barium by mouth or by rectum only exceptionally demonstrate Meckel's diverticula, as this contrast material rarely enters the lesion

  9. The postoperative stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodfield, Courtney A.; Levine, Marc S.

    2005-01-01

    Gastric surgery may be performed for the treatment of a variety of benign and malignant diseases of the upper gastrointestinal tract, including peptic ulcers and gastric carcinoma. Radiographic studies with water-soluble contrast agents often are obtained to rule out leaks, obstruction, or other acute complications during the early postoperative period. Barium studies may also be obtained to evaluate for anastomotic strictures or ulcers, bile reflux gastritis, recurrent tumor, or other chronic complications during the late postoperative period. Cross-sectional imaging studies such as CT are also helpful for detecting abscesses or other postoperative collections, recurrent or metastatic tumor, or less common complications such as afferent loop syndrome or gastrojejunal intussusception. It is important for radiologists to be familiar not only with the radiographic findings associated with these various abnormalities but also with the normal appearances of the postoperative stomach on radiographic examinations, so that such appearances are not mistaken for pseudoleaks or other postoperative complications. The purpose of this article is to describe the normal postsurgical anatomy after the most commonly performed operations (including partial gastrectomy, esophagogastrectomy and gastric pull-through, and total gastrectomy and esophagojejunostomy) and to review the acute and chronic complications, normal postoperative findings, and major abnormalities detected on radiographic examinations in these patients

  10. CT features of appendiceal mucocele

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Won Jong; Byun, Jae Young; Jung, Jung Im; Lee, Hae Gyu; Park, Young Ha; Shin, Kyung Sub [Catholic University Medical College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-10-15

    To evaluate the usefulness of CT features of appendiceal mucocele in the diagnosis and evaluation of complications. We retrospectively reviewed CT findings and compared with operative findings in 7 cases of pathologically proven appendiceal mucocele. CT findings such as location and extent of the lesion, tissue density, thickness or calcification of the wall, presence of adjacent inflammatory infiltration, and visualization of normal vermiform appendix were analyzed. Appendiceal mucocele was found as homogeneous low density cystic mass adjacent to the cecum, which has no surrounding inflammatory infiltration except in one case of perforation and one case of intussusception. Mean CT number measured in 4 cases was 21 Hounsfield unit. Thin curvilinear calcifications were noted along the cystic wall in 2 cases. Normal vermiform appendix couldn't be demonstrated in all cases. Appendiceal mucocele is characterized by homogeneously low density and thin walled cystic tumor adjacent to cecum without surrounding inflammatory infiltration, and absence of normal vermiform appendix on CT. Therefore, CT is valuable in preventing operative complications of appendiceal mucocele.

  11. [Specificities in children wound healing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, J; Antonicelli, F; Tuton, D; Mazouz Dorval, S; François, C

    2016-10-01

    Children have specific characteristics of wound healing. The aim of this study was to describe the specific clinical characteristics of wounds healing in children and to present the current knowledge on the specific mechanisms with regard to infant age. The tissue insult or injury in fetus can heal without scar, mainly due to reduced granulation tissue associated to diminished or even no inflammatory phase, modified extracellular matrix such as the concentration of hyaluronic acid in amniotic liquid, expression and arrangement of collagen and tenascin. Thickness of children skin is a serious negative factor in case of trauma, whereas poor co-morbidities and efficient growth tissue mechanisms are beneficial to good evolution, even in cases of extensive damage and loss of tissue. The subsequent tissue mechanical forces, wound healing during childhood, spanning from the age of 2 until the end of puberty, is associated with more hypertrophic scars, both in duration and in intensity. Consequently, unnecessary surgery has to be avoided during this period when possible, and children with abnormal or pathologic wound healing should benefit from complementary treatments (hydration, massage, brace, silicone, hydrotherapy…), which represent efficient factors to minimize tissue scarring. After wound healing, the growth body rate can be responsible for specific complications, such as contractures, alopecia, and scar intussusceptions. Its evolutionary character implies the need of an attentive follow-up until adult age. Psychologic repercussions, as a consequence of pathologic scars, must be prevented and investigated by the surgeon. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Gastrointestinal tract sonography in fetuses and children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couture, Alain; Baud, Catherine; Ferran, Jean Louis; Saguintaah, Magali; Veyrac, Corinne [Hopital Arnaud de Villeneuve, 34 - Montpellier (France). Service de Radiologie Pediatrique

    2008-07-01

    Sonography of the gastrointestinal tract in fetuses, neonates and children entails no known biological risk, permits serial scanning and can provide information unobtainable with any other imaging modality. In experienced hands it can be used as the initial imaging technique in a number of gastrointestinal diseases and conditions. This book provides a comprehensive account of the current state of the art regarding sonography in this context. An introductory chapter compares the merits of sonography and magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal gastrointestinal tract. Subsequent chapters focus on the technique, pitfalls and findings in a wide variety of applications, including antropyloric diseases, bowel obstruction, bowel wall thickening, colitis, appendicitis, some types of intussusception, abdominal wall and umbilical abnormalities, intraperitoneal tumors, and trauma. In each case the sonographic morphology is considered in depth with the aid of high-quality illustrations. A concluding chapter comprises a quiz based on 15 case reports. Gastrointestinal Tract Sonography in Fetuses and Children will be of value to all with an interest in this field. (orig.)

  13. Heterotopic Pancreas: Histopathologic Features, Imaging Findings, and Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezvani, Maryam; Menias, Christine; Sandrasegaran, Kumaresan; Olpin, Jeffrey D; Elsayes, Khaled M; Shaaban, Akram M

    2017-01-01

    Heterotopic pancreas is a congenital anomaly in which pancreatic tissue is anatomically separate from the main gland. The most common locations of this displacement include the upper gastrointestinal tract-specifically, the stomach, duodenum, and proximal jejunum. Less common sites are the esophagus, ileum, Meckel diverticulum, biliary tree, mesentery, and spleen. Uncomplicated heterotopic pancreas is typically asymptomatic, with the lesion being discovered incidentally during an unrelated surgery, during an imaging examination, or at autopsy. The most common computed tomographic appearance of heterotopic pancreas is that of a small oval intramural mass with microlobulated margins and an endoluminal growth pattern. The attenuation and enhancement characteristics of these lesions parallel their histologic composition. Acinus-dominant lesions demonstrate avid homogeneous enhancement after intravenous contrast material administration, whereas duct-dominant lesions are hypovascular and heterogeneous. At magnetic resonance imaging, the heterotopic pancreas is isointense to the orthotopic pancreas, with characteristic T1 hyperintensity and early avid enhancement after intravenous gadolinium-based contrast material administration. Heterotopic pancreatic tissue has a rudimentary ductal system in which an orifice is sometimes visible at imaging as a central umbilication of the lesion. Complications of heterotopic pancreas include pancreatitis, pseudocyst formation, malignant degeneration, gastrointestinal bleeding, bowel obstruction, and intussusception. Certain complications may be erroneously diagnosed as malignancy. Paraduodenal pancreatitis is thought to be due to cystic degeneration of heterotopic pancreatic tissue in the medial wall of the duodenum. Recognizing the characteristic imaging features of heterotopic pancreas aids in differentiating it from cancer and thus in avoiding unnecessary surgery. © RSNA, 2017.

  14. Incorporation of a rotavirus vaccine into the national immunisation schedule in the United Kingdom: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagomi, Osamu; Iturriza-Gomara, Miren; Nakagomi, Toyoko; Cunliffe, Nigel A

    2013-11-01

    Rotavirus, the commonest cause of severe acute gastroenteritis in infants and young children worldwide, imposes a large health and economic burden on the British society, accounting for an estimated 14,300 hospitalisations and 133,000 general practitioner consultations each year among children aged rotavirus vaccine, Rotarix (GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, Belgium), was introduced into the UK childhood immunisation programme in 2013. This article provides a review of the product profile of the Rotarix vaccine for use in the national immunisation programme in the UK from an expert perspective. This single G1P[8] strain-based human rotavirus vaccine has demonstrated high efficacy in preventing severe rotavirus gastroenteritis in the first 3 years of life in middle- and high-income countries. In countries that have adopted rotavirus vaccine in childhood immunisation programmes, indirect benefits (herd protection) have been observed among older, unvaccinated children and adults. When the first dose is administered between 6 and 14 weeks of age and the last dose by 24 weeks of age, Rotarix carries a small risk of intussusception within the week of vaccination. However, this small risk may at most result in a negligible population attributable risk at the end of the first year of life. Overall, the rotavirus immunisation programme is expected to provide substantial health benefits to the UK population.

  15. The imaging of coeliac disease and its complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckley, O.; Brien, J.O.; Ward, E.; Doody, O.; Govender, P.; Torreggiani, W.C.

    2008-01-01

    Coeliac disease is a malabsorption syndrome in which dietary gluten damages the small bowel mucosa. Gluten contains gliadin, the primary toxic component that is primarily found in wheat, barley and rye products. The initial diagnosis of coeliac disease is usually made by endoscopic biopsy of the jejunum although sometimes imaging features can suggest the diagnosis. Once a diagnosis is made, patients need to be diet compliant and monitored for potential complications. Many complications are more common when dietary compliance is poor. Complications include intussusception (usually intermittent), ulcerative jejunitis, osteomalacia, cavitating lymph node syndrome and an increased risk of malignancies such as lymphoma, adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Radiological evaluation is central in the evaluation of these complications. Imaging may assist both in the diagnosis and staging of complications as well as enabling radiological guided percutaneous biopsy for complications of coeliac disease such as lymphoma. As coeliac disease is a relatively common disorder, it is likely that most radiologists will encounter the disease and its potential complications. The aim of this review article is to discuss and illustrate the role of modern radiology in evaluating the many presentations of this complex disease

  16. The imaging of coeliac disease and its complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, O.; Brien, J.O.; Ward, E.; Doody, O.; Govender, P. [Adelaide and Meath Incorporating the National Children' s Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Torreggiani, W.C. [Adelaide and Meath Incorporating the National Children' s Hospital, Dublin (Ireland)], E-mail: William.torreggiani@amnch.ie

    2008-03-15

    Coeliac disease is a malabsorption syndrome in which dietary gluten damages the small bowel mucosa. Gluten contains gliadin, the primary toxic component that is primarily found in wheat, barley and rye products. The initial diagnosis of coeliac disease is usually made by endoscopic biopsy of the jejunum although sometimes imaging features can suggest the diagnosis. Once a diagnosis is made, patients need to be diet compliant and monitored for potential complications. Many complications are more common when dietary compliance is poor. Complications include intussusception (usually intermittent), ulcerative jejunitis, osteomalacia, cavitating lymph node syndrome and an increased risk of malignancies such as lymphoma, adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Radiological evaluation is central in the evaluation of these complications. Imaging may assist both in the diagnosis and staging of complications as well as enabling radiological guided percutaneous biopsy for complications of coeliac disease such as lymphoma. As coeliac disease is a relatively common disorder, it is likely that most radiologists will encounter the disease and its potential complications. The aim of this review article is to discuss and illustrate the role of modern radiology in evaluating the many presentations of this complex disease.

  17. Ultrasound of selected pathologies of the small intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Smereczyński

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Intestines, especially the small bowel, are rarely subject to US assessment due to the presence of gases and chyme. The aim of this paper was to analyze ultrasound images in selected pathologies of the small intestine in adults, including the aspects of differential diagnosis. Material and methods: In 2001–2012, abdominal ultrasound examinations were conducted in 176 patients with the following small bowel diseases: Crohn’s disease (n=35, small bowel obstruction (n=35, yersiniosis (n=28, infectious diarrhea (n=26, bacterial overgrowth syndrome (n=25, coeliac disease (n=15 and small bowel ischemia (n=12. During examinations patients were fasting and no other particular preparations were needed. Convex transducers of 3.5–6 MHz and linear ones of 7–12 MHz were used. The assessment of the small intestine in four abdominal quadrants constituted an integral element of the examination. The following features of the small bowel ultrasound presentation were subject to analysis: thickness and perfusion of the walls, presence of thickened folds in the jejunum, reduction of their number, presence of fluid and gas contents in the intestine, its peristaltic activity, jejunization of the ileum and enteroenteric intussusception. Furthermore, the size of the mesenteric lymph nodes and the width of the superior mesenteric artery were determined and the peritoneal cavity was evaluated in terms of the presence of free fluid. Results: Statistically significant differences were obtained between the thickness of the small intestine in Crohn’s disease or in ischemic conditions and the thickness in the remaining analyzed pathological entities. Small bowel obstruction was manifested by the presence of distended loops due to gas and fluid as well as by severe peristaltic contractions occurring periodically. In the course of ischemic disease, the intestinal walls were thickened without the signs of increased perfusion and

  18. CLINICAL, EPIDEMIOLOGIC, AND ENDOSCOPIC PROFILE IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS WITH COLONIC POLYPS IN TWO REFERENCE CENTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise O ANDRADE

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background - The main goal of this paper is to investigate the frequency, clinical profile, and endoscopic findings of children and teenagers submitted to colonoscopies. Methods - Patients of below 18 years of age, diagnosed with polyps by means of colonoscopies at two reference centers of pediatric endoscopy were followed-up between 2002 and 2012. The clinical variables evaluated in this study included: gender, recommendation of colonoscopy, associated signs and symptoms, age of onset of symptoms, age at identification of the polyp, interval of time between the onset of symptoms and the endoscopic diagnosis of colonic polyps, and family history of intestinal polyposis and/or colorectal cancer. The characteristics of the polyps also included: number, morphological type, histology, and distribution. Polyposis syndromes were also investigated. Results - From the 233 patients submitted to colonoscopies, polyps were found in 74 (31.7% patients, with a median age of 6.6 years, of which 61% were male. Juvenile polyps were identified in 55 (74% patients, with 7 (9% characterized within the criteria for juvenile polyposis. Patients with intestinal polyposis syndromes were diagnosed in 35% of the patients. The most frequent clinical presentation was hematochezia. Abdominal pain with acute episodes of intestinal partial obstruction or intussusception with emergency laparotomy was observed in the majority of Peutz-Jeghers syndrome patients leading to an increased morbidity. Conclusions - Even though juvenile colonic polyps are the most frequent type of diagnosed polyps, the present study identified a significant level of children with polyposis syndromes (35%, associated with a higher morbidity of these individuals.

  19. The value of sonography, CT and air enema for detection of complicated Meckel diverticulum in children with nonspecific clinical presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daneman, A.; Lobo, E.; Alton, D.J.; Shuckett, B.

    1998-01-01

    Background. Complicated Meckel diverticulum (MD) in children does not always present with painless rectal bleeding and its presentation can then produce a difficult diagnostic dilemma. In this clinical setting, sonography (US), CT or even air enema may be the first modality chosen to evaluate these children rather than the radionuclide Meckel scan (RNMS). Purpose. To assess the value of US, CT and air enema for detection of complicated MD. Materials and methods. Review of clinical, imaging, surgical and pathological findings in 64 children (55 males, 9 females) aged 4 days -14 years (mean = 3.7 years) with MD seen during an 8-year period, 1990-1997. Results. (a) In 33 patients with rectal bleeding, MD was detected on RNMS in 32. Ten of these 32 had other imaging studies, all of which were negative. (b) The other 31 patients, with varied clinical presentations, did not undergo RNMS. In these 31 and the 1 with a negative RNMS, 14 (44 %) had imaging features highly suggestive for the diagnosis of MD on US in all 14, on CT in 1, and on air enema in 3. The radiological spectrum of the inflamed, hemorrhagic MD is illustrated. Conclusion. The inflamed, hemorrhagic and the inverted, intussuscepted MD have a spectrum of features recognizable on US, CT and air enema. Some of these appearances are specific, others are not. Knowledge of and recognition of these features will facilitate detection of complicated MD in larger numbers of children presenting with symptoms other than the classic history of painless rectal bleeding and also in those with normal RNMS. (orig.)

  20. Concomitant administration of diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis and inactivated poliovirus vaccine derived from Sabin strains (DTaP-sIPV) with pentavalent rotavirus vaccine in Japanese infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Yokokawa, Ruriko; Rong, Han Shi; Kishino, Hiroyuki; Stek, Jon E; Nelson, Margaret; Lawrence, Jody

    2017-06-03

    Rotavirus is the leading cause of severe acute gastroenteritis in infants and young children. Most children are infected with rotavirus, and the health and economic burdens of rotavirus gastroenteritis on healthcare systems and families are considerable. In 2012 pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (RV5) and diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis and inactivated poliovirus vaccine derived from Sabin strains (DTaP-sIPV) were licensed in Japan. We examined the immunogenicity and safety of DTaP-sIPV when administrated concomitantly with RV5 in Japanese infants. A total of 192 infants 6 to 11 weeks of age randomized to Group 1 (N = 96) received DTaP-sIPV and RV5 concomitantly, and Group 2 (N = 96) received DTaP-sIPV and RV5 separately. Antibody titer to diphtheria toxin, pertussis antigens (PT and FHA), tetanus toxin, and poliovirus type 1, 2, and 3 were measured at 4 to 6 weeks following 3-doses of DTaP-sIPV. Seroprotection rates for all components of DTaP-sIPV were 100% in both groups, and the geometric mean titers for DTaP-sIPV in Group 1 were comparable to Group 2. Incidence of systemic AEs (including diarrhea, vomiting, fever, and nasopharyngitis) were lower in Group 1 than in Group 2. All vaccine-related AEs were mild or moderate in intensity. There were no vaccine-related serious AEs, no deaths, and no cases of intussusception during the study. Concomitant administration of DTaP-sIPV and RV5 induced satisfactory immune responses to DTaP-sIPV and acceptable safety profile. The administration of DTaP-sIPV given concomitantly with RV5 is expected to facilitate compliance with the vaccination schedule and improve vaccine coverage in Japanese infants.

  1. CT enteroclysis in the diagnosis of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, T.P.; Gulati, M.S.; Makharia, G.K.; Bandhu, S.; Garg, P.K.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the usefulness of computed tomography (CT) enteroclysis in patients with obscure gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Materials and methods: In a prospective study, CT enteroclysis was performed in 21 patients (median age 50 years; range 13-71 years) with obscure GI bleeding in which the source of the bleeding could not be detected despite the patient having undergone both upper GI endoscopic and colonoscopic examinations. The entire abdomen and pelvis was examined in the arterial and venous phases using multisection CT after distending the small intestine with 2 l of 0.5% methylcellulose as a neutral enteral contrast medium and the administration of 150 ml intravenous contrast medium. Results: Adequate distension of the small intestine was achieved in 20 of the 21 (95.2%) patients. Potential causes of GI bleeding were identified in 10 of the 21 (47.6%) patients using CT enteroclysis. The cause of the bleeding could be detected nine of 14 (64.3%) patients with overt, obscure GI bleeding. However, for patients with occult, obscure GI bleeding, the cause of the bleeding was identified in only one of the seven (14.3%) patients. The lesions identified by CT enteroclysis included small bowel tumours (n = 2), small bowel intussusceptions (n = 2), intestinal tuberculosis (n = 2), and vascular lesions (n = 3). All vascular lesions were seen equally well in both the arterial and venous phases. Conclusions: The success rate in detection of the cause of bleeding using CT enteroclysis was 47.6% in patients with obscure GI bleeding. The diagnostic yield was higher in patients with overt, obscure GI bleeding than in those with occult obscure GI bleeding

  2. Small bowel obstruction in the virgin abdomen: time to challenge surgical dogma with evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Yvonne Ying-Ru; Ngu, James Chi-Yong; Wong, Andrew Siang-Yih

    2018-01-01

    Although adhesions account for more than 70% of small bowel obstruction (SBO), they are thought to be less likely aetiologies in patients without previous abdominal surgery. Expedient surgery has historically been advocated as prudent management in these patients. Emerging evidence appears to challenge such a dogmatic approach. A retrospective analysis was performed in all SBO patients with a virgin abdomen admitted between January 2012 and August 2014. Patients with obstruction secondary to abdominal wall hernias were excluded. Patient demographics, clinical presentation, management strategy and pathology involved were reviewed. A total of 72 patients were included in the study. The majority of patients were males (66.7%), with a median age of 58 years (range: 23-101). Abdominal pain (97%) and vomiting (86%) were the most common presentations while abdominal distention (60%) and constipation (25%) were reported less frequently. Adhesions accounted for the underlying cause in 44 (62%) patients. Other aetiologies included gallstone ileus (n = 5), phytobezoar (n = 5), intussusception (n = 4), internal herniation (n = 4), newly diagnosed small bowel tumour (n = 3), mesenteric volvulus (n = 3), stricture (n = 3) and Meckel's diverticulum (n = 1). Twenty-nine (40%) patients were successfully managed conservatively while the remaining 43 (60%) underwent surgery. The intraoperative findings were in concordance with the preoperative computed tomography scan in 76% of cases. Adhesions remain prevalent despite the absence of previous abdominal surgery. Non-operative management is feasible for SBO in a virgin abdomen. Computed tomography scan can be a useful adjunct in discerning patients who may be treated non-operatively by elucidating the underlying cause of obstruction. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  3. Pediatric abdominal radiograph use, constipation, and significant misdiagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Stephen B; Thull-Freedman, Jennifer; Manson, David; Rowe, Margot Follett; Rumantir, Maggie; Eltorki, Mohamed; Schuh, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    To determine the proportion of children diagnosed with constipation assigned a significant alternative diagnosis within 7 days (misdiagnosis), if there is an association between abdominal radiograph (AXR) performance and misdiagnosis, and features that might identify children with misdiagnoses. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of consecutive children constipation were eligible. Misdiagnosis was defined as an alternative diagnosis during the subsequent 7 days that resulted in hospitalization or an outpatient procedure that included a surgical or radiologic intervention. Constipation severity was classified employing text word categorization and the Leech score. 3685 eligible visits were identified. Mean age was 6.6 ± 4.4 years. AXR was performed in 46% (1693/3685). Twenty misdiagnoses (0.5%; 95% CI 0.4, 0.8) were identified (appendicitis [7%], intussusception [2%, bowel obstruction [2%], other [9%]). AXR was performed more frequently in misdiagnosed children (75% vs 46%; P = .01). These children more often had abdominal pain (70% vs 49%; P = .04) and tenderness (60% vs 32%; P =.01). Children in both groups had similar amounts of stool on AXR (P = .38) and mean Leech scores (misdiagnosed = 7.9 ± 3.4; not misdiagnosed = 7.7 ± 2.9; P = .85). Misdiagnoses in children with constipation are more frequent in those in whom an AXR was performed and those with abdominal pain and tenderness. The performance of an AXR may indicate diagnostic uncertainty; in such cases, the presence of stool on AXR does not rule out an alternative diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Exploratory laparotomy for acute intestinal conditions in children: A review of 10 years of experience with 334 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghritlaharey Rajendra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to review 10 years of experience in the management of children with acute intestinal conditions requiring exploratory laparotomy. Patients and Methods : This retrospective study included 334 children (244 boys and 90 girls who underwent laparotomy for acute intestinal conditions between Jan 1, 2000 to Dec 31, 2009. Patients were grouped into two categories: group A (n = 44 included patients who needed laparotomy with terminal ileostomy and group B (n = 290 included patients who needed laparotomy without terminal ileostomy. We excluded neonates and patients with jejunoileal and colonic atresias, anorectal malformations, congenital pouch colon, neonatal necrotising enterocolitis, Hirschsprung′s disease, appendicitis, abdominal trauma and gastrointestinal tumours. Results : During the last 10 years, 334 laparotomies were performed in children under 12 years: 59.88% for intestinal obstruction and 40.11% for perforation peritonitis. Causes in order of frequency were: ileal perforations 34.13%; intussusceptions 26.34%; Meckel′s obstruction 10.17%; congenital bands and malrotation 6.88%; postoperative adhesions 5.98%; miscellaneous peritonitis 5.68%; miscellaneous intestinal obstructions 4.79%; abdominal tuberculosis 4.19% and roundworm intestinal obstruction 1.79%. Ileostomy closures (n = 39 was tolerated well by all except one. The mortalities were 28 (8.38% in group B and 6 (1.79% in group A. Conclusions: The need for re-exploration not only increases the morbidity but also increases mortality as well. Diverting temporary ileostomy adds little cumulative morbidity to the primary operation and is a safe option for diversion in selected cases. The best way to further reduce the mortality is to create ileostomy at first operation.

  5. Inflammatory fibroid polyp of the gastrointestinal tract: 10 years of experience at the Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano-Munive, A F; Barreto-Zuñiga, R; Rumoroso-García, J A; Ramos-Martínez, P

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory fibroid polyp (lFP) is a rare, benign, and solitary neoplasm predominantly located in the gastric antrum and small bowel. Its clinical symptoms are heterogeneous and essentially depend on the location and size of the tumor. Definitive diagnosis is made through histopathology and this pathology has excellent long-term prognosis. To identify the cases of IFP seen at the Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán over a 10-year period. A retrospective, cross-sectional, descriptive, and observational study was conducted that included patients with histopathologic diagnosis of IFP within the time frame of January 2001 and December 2011. Six cases were found and 5/6 (83.3%) of them were women. The median age was 41 years (minimum-maximum range of 19-56 years). The most frequent symptoms were weight loss (n=3), fever (n=2), nausea (n=2), and vomiting (n=2). Three patients presented with iron deficiency anemia and 2 cases with intussusception. The IFPs were located at the following sites: esophagus (n=1), stomach (n=2), small bowel (n=2), and colon (n=1). Treatment was surgical in 5/6 (83.3%) of the patients. IFPs are extremely rare in our population. They usually present with weight loss and iron deficiency anemia and are more frequently located in the stomach and small bowel. This is the largest reported IFP case series in a Mexican population. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  6. MR enterography in nonresponsive adult celiac disease: Correlation with endoscopic, pathologic, serologic, and genetic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radmard, Amir Reza; Hashemi Taheri, Amir Pejman; Salehian Nik, Elham; Kooraki, Soheil; Kolahdoozan, Shadi; Mirminachi, Babak; Sotoudeh, Masoud; Ekhlasi, Golnaz; Malekzadeh, Reza; Shahbazkhani, Bijan

    2017-10-01

    To assess small bowel abnormalities on magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) in adult patients with nonresponsive celiac disease (CD) and investigate their associations with endoscopic, histopathologic, serologic, and genetic features. This prospective study was carried out between September 2012 and August 2013. After approval by the Ethics Committee of our institution, informed consent was acquired from all participants. Forty consecutive patients with nonresponsive CD, aged 17-76 years, underwent MRE using a 1.5T unit. Sequences included T 2 -HASTE, True-FISP, pre- and postcontrast VIBE to assess the quantitative (number of ileal and jejunal folds) and qualitative (fold pattern abnormalities, mural thickening, increased enhancement, bowel dilatation, or intussusception) measures. Endoscopic manifestations were categorized as normal/mild vs. severe. Histopathological results were divided into mild and severe. Genotyping of HLA-DQ2 and DQ8 was performed. Serum levels of tissue-transglutaminase, endomysial, and gliadin antibodies were also determined. Logistic regression analysis and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve were used. Twenty-nine (72.5%) cases showed abnormal MRE. Reversed jejunoileal fold pattern had significant association with severe endoscopic (odds ratio [OR] = 8.38, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.73-40.5) and pathologic features (OR = 7.36, 95% CI 1.33-40.54). An increased number of ileal folds/inch was significantly associated with severe MARSH score and positive HLA-DQ8. (P reversal on MRE is highly associated with endoscopic and pathologic features of refractory celiac disease (RCD). Increased ileal folds showed higher correlation with endoscopic-pathologic features, HLA-DQ8, and anti-transglutaminase level. MRE might be more sensitive for detection of increased ileal folds in CD rather than reduction of duodenal and jejunal folds due to better distension of ileal loops. 2 Technical Efficacy: Stage 3 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017

  7. Corrosion casting of the subglottis following endotracheal tube intubation injury: a pilot study in Yorkshire piglets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Subglottic stenosis can result from endotracheal tube injury. The mechanism by which this occurs, however, is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of angiogenesis, hypoxia and ischemia in subglottic mucosal injury following endotracheal intubation. Methods Six Yorkshire piglets were randomized to either a control group (N=3, ventilated through laryngeal mask airway for corrosion casting) or accelerated subglottic injury group through intubation and induced hypoxia as per a previously described model (N=3). The vasculature of all animals was injected with liquid methyl methacrylate. After polymerization, the surrounding tissue was corroded with potassium hydroxide. The subglottic region was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy looking for angiogenic and hypoxic or degenerative features and groups were compared using Mann–Whitney tests and Friedman’s 2-way ANOVA. Results Animals in the accelerated subglottic injury group had less overall angiogenic features (P=.002) and more overall hypoxic/degenerative features (P=.000) compared with controls. Amongst angiogenic features, there was decreased budding (P=.000) and a trend toward decreased sprouting (P=.037) in the accelerated subglottic injury group with an increase in intussusception (P=.004), possibly representing early attempts at rapid revascularization. Amongst hypoxic/degenerative features, extravasation was the only feature that was significantly higher in the accelerated subglottic injury group (P=.000). Conclusions Subglottic injury due to intubation and hypoxia may lead to decreased angiogenesis and increased blood vessel damage resulting in extravasation of fluid and a decreased propensity toward wound healing in this animal model. PMID:24401165

  8. Management of a child with vomiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhi, Sunit C; Shah, Ravi; Bansal, Arun; Jayashree, M

    2013-04-01

    Vomiting is a protective reflex that results in forceful ejection of stomach contents up to and out of the mouth. It is a common complaint and may be the presenting symptom of several life-threatening conditions. It can be caused by a variety of organic and nonorganic disorders; gastrointestinal (GI) or outside of GI. Acute gastritis and gastroenteritis (AGE) are the leading cause of acute vomiting in children. Important life threatening causes in infancy include congenital intestinal obstruction, atresia, malrotation with volvulus, necrotizing enterocolitis, pyloric stenosis, intussusception, shaken baby syndrome, hydrocephalus, inborn errors of metabolism, congenital adrenal hypoplasia, obstructive uropathy, sepsis, meningitis and encephalitis, and severe gastroenteritis, and in older children appendicitis, intracranial mass lesion, diabetic ketoacidosis, Reye's syndrome, toxic ingestions, uremia, and meningitis. Initial evaluation is directed at assessment of airway, breathing and circulation, assessment of hydration status and red flag signs (bilious or bloody vomiting, altered sensorium, toxic/septic/apprehensive look, inconsolable cry or excessive irritability, severe dehydration, concern for symptomatic hypoglycemia, severe wasting, Bent-over posture). The history and physical examination guides the approach in an individual patient. The diverse nature of causes of vomiting makes a "routine" laboratory or radiologic screen impossible. Investigations (Serum electrolytes and blood gases,renal and liver functions and radiological studies) are required in any child with dehydration or red flag signs, to diagnose surgical causes. Management priorities include treatment of dehydration, stoppage of oral fluids/feeds and decompression of the stomach with nasogastric tube in patients with bilious vomiting. Antiemetic ondansetron(0.2 mg/kg oral; parenteral 0.15 mg/kg; maximum 4 mg) is indicated in children unable to take orally due to persistent vomiting, post

  9. Pharmacological Modulation of Hemodynamics in Adult Zebrafish In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Brönnimann

    Full Text Available Hemodynamic parameters in zebrafish receive increasing attention because of their important role in cardiovascular processes such as atherosclerosis, hematopoiesis, sprouting and intussusceptive angiogenesis. To study underlying mechanisms, the precise modulation of parameters like blood flow velocity or shear stress is centrally important. Questions related to blood flow have been addressed in the past in either embryonic or ex vivo-zebrafish models but little information is available for adult animals. Here we describe a pharmacological approach to modulate cardiac and hemodynamic parameters in adult zebrafish in vivo.Adult zebrafish were paralyzed and orally perfused with salt water. The drugs isoprenaline and sodium nitroprusside were directly applied with the perfusate, thus closely resembling the preferred method for drug delivery in zebrafish, namely within the water. Drug effects on the heart and on blood flow in the submental vein were studied using electrocardiograms, in vivo-microscopy and mathematical flow simulations.Under control conditions, heart rate, blood flow velocity and shear stress varied less than ± 5%. Maximal chronotropic effects of isoprenaline were achieved at a concentration of 50 μmol/L, where it increased the heart rate by 22.6 ± 1.3% (n = 4; p < 0.0001. Blood flow velocity and shear stress in the submental vein were not significantly increased. Sodium nitroprusside at 1 mmol/L did not alter the heart rate but increased blood flow velocity by 110.46 ± 19.64% (p = 0.01 and shear stress by 117.96 ± 23.65% (n = 9; p = 0.03.In this study, we demonstrate that cardiac and hemodynamic parameters in adult zebrafish can be efficiently modulated by isoprenaline and sodium nitroprusside. Together with the suitability of the zebrafish for in vivo-microscopy and genetic modifications, the methodology described permits studying biological processes that are dependent on hemodynamic alterations.

  10. Bedside Ultrasound for the Diagnosis of Small Bowel Obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Anshus

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: An elderly female with no history of prior abdominal surgeries presented to the emergency department (ED with acute onset of abdominal pain and distention. Upon arrival, she began having large volume bilious emesis. While waiting for a computed tomography (CT scan of her abdomen and pelvis, a point of care ultrasound (POCUS was performed which showed evidence of a small bowel obstruction (SBO. The patient had a nasogastric tube placed that put out over two liters of bilious contents. A subsequent CT scan confirmed the diagnosis of SBO from a left inguinal hernia and the patient was admitted to the surgical service. Significant findings: The POCUS utilizing the low frequency curvilinear probe demonstrates fluid-filled, dilated bowel loops greater than 2.5cm with to-and-fro peristalsis, and thickened bowel walls greater than 3mm, concerning for SBO. Discussion: Gastrointestinal obstruction is a common diagnosis in the ED, accounting for approximately 15% of all ED visits for acute abdominal pain.1 SBO accounts for approximately 80% of all obstructions.2 In the diagnosis of SBO, studies show that abdominal x-rays have a sensitivity of 66-77% and specificity of 50-57%,3 CT scans have a sensitivity of 92% and specificity of 93%,4 and ultrasound has a sensitivity of 88% and specificity of 96%.5 While CT scan remains a widely accepted modality for diagnosing SBO, ultrasound is more cost effective, well tolerated, does not involve ionizing radiation, and can be done in a timely manner at the patient’s bedside. Ultrasound can also identify transition points as well as distinguish between functional and mechanical obstruction.6 In addition to SBO, ultrasound can be used to diagnose external hernias, intussusception, tumors, superior mesenteric artery (SMA syndrome, foreign bodies, bezoars, and ascariasis.7

  11. Value of computed tomography in diagnosis of intestinal diseases. CT findings in nontumoral bowel diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujikawa, Koichi; Yamane, Kosuke; Nakanishi, Tadashi; Miura, Yoshio; Kato, Yoshitaka; Yahata, Noriko; Iwamoto, Toshiyuki; Katayama, Hiroshi; Katsuta, Shizutomo

    1987-03-01

    CT findings of 46 cases with inflammatory and other nontumoral bowel diseases were retrospectively studied. Patients were given 500 to 1000 ml of lukewarm water orally or rectally to distend the intestinal lumen. In all cases water-soluble iodine contrast media was administered intravenously. The CT findings in Crohn's disease included mural thickening, luminal narrowing, bowel wall enhancement, wall rigidity, serration of intestinal border, dilatation of mesenteric vessels, periintestinal blurring (inflamatory reaction of mesentery), fibrofatty proliferation, effusion, abscess and fistula. Many of these findings suggested the transmural nature of the disease and gave diagnostic clues of the disease. In cases with ulcerative colitis, thickening of bowel wall was insignificant and extraintestinal complications were absent. CT appears to play an important role in distinguishing Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Luminal narrowing and mural thickening were also observed in a case with intestinal ischemia, but these mural changes were not accompanied by mesenteric abnormalities to the degree of Crohn's disease. In cases with penetrating peptic ulcer and diverticulitis, CT demonstrated inflammatory reactions of surrounding tissue such as thickening of neighboring fascia, increase in attenuation value of mesenteric fat, effusion and abscess. Even in cases with confusing clinical symptoms, appendicitis was easily diagnosed on CT which showed swelling of appendix and inflammatory changes of surrounding structures. Mechanical obstruction of the intestine could be identified on CT by a notable change of luminal sizes at the site of obstruction. CT appearances of intussusception were distinctive and a soft tissue mass (intussusceptum) and mesenteric fat was seen within a markedly dilated intussuscipiens. CT could also reveal pancreatitis and splenic infarction as the causes of clinically-undiagnosed paralytic ileus. (J.P.N.).

  12. Is non-operative management still justified in the treatment of adhesive small bowel obstruction in children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Abdulrasheed A; Abdur-Rahman, Lukman O; Bamigbola, Kayode T; Oyinloye, Adewale O; Abdulraheem, Nurudeen T; Adeniran, James O

    2013-01-01

    Adhesive small bowel obstruction (ASBO) is a feared complication after abdominal operations in both children and adults. The optimal management of ASBO in the pediatric population is debated. The aim of the present study was to examine the safety and effectiveness of non-operative management in ASBO. A retrospective review of 33 patients who were admitted for ASBO over a 5-year period was carried out. Follow-up data were available for 29 patients. Demographic, clinical, and operative details and outcomes were collected for these patients. Data analysis was done with SPSS version 15.0. P ≤ 0.05 was regarded as significant. Out of 618 abdominal surgeries within the 5-year period, 34 admissions were recorded from 29 patients at the follow-up period of 1-28 months. There were 19 boys (65.5%). The median age of patients was 4.5 years. Typhoid intestinal perforation (n = 7), intussusception (n = 6), intestinal malrotation (n = 5), and appendicitis (n = 4) were the major indications for a prior abdominal surgery leading to ASBO. Twenty-five patients (73.5%) developed SBO due to adhesions within the first year of the primary procedure. Of the 34 patients admitted with ASBO, 18 (53%) underwent operative intervention and 16 (47%) were successfully managed non-operatively. There were no differences in sex (P = 0.24), initial procedure (P = 0.12), age, duration of symptoms, and time to re-admission between the patients who responded to non-operative management and those who underwent operative intervention. However, the length of hospital stay was significantly shorter in the non-operative group (P operative management is still a safe and preferred approach in selected patients with ASBO. However, 53% eventually required surgery.

  13. Appendiceal Adenocarcinoma Presenting as a Rectal Polyp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Fitzgerald

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Appendiceal adenocarcinoma typically presents as an incidentally noted appendiceal mass, or with symptoms of right lower quadrant pain that can mimic appendicitis, but local involvement of adjacent organs is uncommon, particularly as the presenting sign. We report on a case of a primary appendiceal cancer initially diagnosed as a rectal polyp based on its appearance in the rectal lumen. The management of the patient was in keeping with standard practice for a rectal polyp, and the diagnosis of appendiceal adenocarcinoma was made intraoperatively. The operative strategy had to be adjusted due to this unexpected finding. Although there are published cases of appendiceal adenocarcinoma inducing intussusception and thus mimicking a cecal polyp, there are no reports in the literature describing invasion of the appendix through the rectal wall and thus mimicking a rectal polyp. The patient is a 75-year-old female who presented with spontaneous hematochezia and, on colonoscopy, was noted to have a rectal polyp that appeared to be located within a diverticulum. When endoscopic mucosal resection was not successful, she was referred to colorectal surgery for a low anterior resection. Preoperative imaging was notable for an enlarged appendix adjacent to the rectum. Intraoperatively, the appendix was found to be densely adherent to the right lateral rectal wall. An en bloc resection of the distal sigmoid colon, proximal rectum and appendix was performed, with pathology demonstrating appendiceal adenocarcinoma that invaded through the rectal wall. The prognosis in this type of malignancy weighs heavily on whether or not perforation and spread throughout the peritoneal cavity have occurred. In this unusual presentation, an en bloc resection is required for a complete resection and to minimize the risk of peritoneal spread. Unusual appearing polyps do not always originate from the bowel wall. Abnormal radiographic findings adjacent to an area of

  14. Soave transanal one-stage endorectal pull-through in the treatment of Hirschsprung′s disease of the child above two-year-old: A report of 20 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amine Ksia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The definitive treatment of Hirschsprung′s disease is the removal of the aganglionic bowel by a pull-through surgery. In most cases, this surgery is performed in infancy or in the neonatal period as presentation in older children and adulthood is uncommon. Materials and Methods: It is a retrospective study of 20 patients above two-year-old who underwent a transanal Soave one-stage endorectal pull-through procedure for Hirschsprung′s disease between January 2002 and December 2010. Results: Twenty patients were recruited in this study. Fourteen were males and six were females. Patient ages ranged from 2 to 14 years (median age: five years and three months. All patients presented with persistent constipation and abdominal distension. Two of them had an intestinal obstruction that required colostomy. Ten patients (50% had a recto-sigmoid Hirschsprung′s disease. All patients were operated on using a Soave one-stage endorectal pull-through procedure. The laparoscopy was necessary during the pull-through in three cases. The average duration of the intervention was 240 minutes. That represents almost the double of the duration of the same procedure in newborns and infants in our department (130 minutes. Early postoperative complications included one case of anastomosis leakage and one case of intussusception. Late postoperative complications were perineum irritation in five cases (25%, anal stenosis in four cases (20% and enterocolitis in one case (5%. None of our patients developed fecal incontinence. Soiling was reported in four cases (20%. There was no death. Conclusion: Soave transanal one-stage endorectal pull-through is safely feasible in children of more than two years of age. Laparoscopy may be necessary whenever there are difficulties in the pull-through.

  15. Defecography of rectal wall prolapse conditions; Defecografia nelle malattie parietali del retto da prolasso

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    Salzano, A.; Muto, M.; De Rosa, A. [Azienda Sanitaria di Rilievo Nazionale A. Cardarelli, Naples (Italy). Servizio di Neuroradiologia; Ginolfi, F.; Carbone, M.; Amodio, F.; Rossi, E. [Naples Univ. Federico 2. (Italy). Ist. di Scienze Radiologiche; Tuccillo, M. [Azienda Sanitaria di Rilirvo Nazionale A. Cardarelli, Naples (Italy). 2. Servizio di Radiologia

    1999-06-01

    Pelvic floor and rectal prolapse conditions have greatly benefited by new imaging and instrumental diagnostic approaches, and especially defecography, for both pathophysiological interpretation and differential diagnosis. The authors investigated the efficacy of defecography in the assessment of rectal prolapse, and in particular the role of videproctography in diagnosis such dynamic disorders. The dynamic changes of ampulla are well depicted by videoproctography, which showed anorectum normalization and spontaneous reduction of invagination after intussusception. Defecography exhibited good capabilities in showing rectal wall function abnormalities. Finally, some features of videoproctography such as low radiation dose, non-invasiveness and ease of execution, make the examination acceptable to patients with anorectal disorders and for the follow-up of rectal prolapse. [Italian] Le malattie del pavimento pelvico e dei prolassi del retto hanno tratto numerosi vantaggi da nuovi approcci di diagnostica per immagini e strumentali, specialmente dall'esame defecografico, sia nell'interpretazione fisiopatologica che nella diagnostica differenziale dei disordini anorettali. Scopo del lavoro: valutare l'efficacia della metodica defecografica nel riconoscimento delle malattie da prolasso del retto e in particolare il ruolo svolto dalla videoproctografia nella documentazione diagnostica e nel definire i principali elementi semeiologici riscontrabili in tali malattie in modo dinamico. Le fasi dinamiche della valutazione morfologica e posizionale dell'ampolla rettale sono ben evidenti nella viedeoproctografia, che documenta dopo l'intussuscezione la normalizzazione del complesso anorettale e la riduzione spontanea dell'invaginazione parietale. In questo studio si sottolineano le possibilita' diagnostiche della defecografia integrata da videoproctografia nel riconoscimento delle malattie parietali funzionali del retto e alcune peculiarita

  16. Ultrasonographic patterns in patients with obstructed defaecation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusciano, L; Limongelli, P; Pescatori, M; Napolitano, V; Gagliardi, G; Maffettone, V; Rossetti, G; del Genio, G; Russo, G; Pizza, F; del Genio, A

    2007-08-01

    Anal ultrasound is helpful in assessing organic anorectal lesions, but its role in functional disease is still questionable. The purpose of the present study is to assess anal-vaginal-dynamic perineal ultrasonographic findings in patients with obstructed defecation (OD) and healthy controls. Ninety-two consecutive patients (77 women; mean age 51 years; range 21-71) with symptoms of OD were retrospectively evaluated. All patients underwent digital exploration, endoanal and endovaginal ultrasound (US) with rotating probe. Forty-one patients underwent dynamic perineal US with linear probe. Anal manometry and defaecography were performed in 73 and 43 patients, respectively. Ultrasonographic findings of 92 patients with symptoms of OD were compared to 22 healthy controls. Anismus was defined on US when the difference in millimetres between the distance of the inner edge of the puborectalis muscle posteriorly and the probe at rest and on straining was less then 5 mm. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated by assuming defaecography as the gold standard for intussusception and rectocele and proctoscopy for rectal internal mucosal prolapse. Since no gold standard for the diagnosis of anismus was available in the literature, the agreement between anal US and all other diagnostic procedures was evaluated. The incidence of anismus resulted significantly higher (P anismus, anal ultrasonography resulted in agreement with perineal and vaginal US, manometry, defaecography, and digital exam (P < 0.05). Other lesions detected by US in patients with OD include solitary rectal ulcer, rectocele and enterocele. Damage of internal and/or external sphincter was diagnosed at anal US in 19/92 (20%) patients, all continent and with normal manometric values. Anal, vaginal and dynamic perineal ultrasonography can diagnose or confirm many of the abnormalities seen in patients with OD. The value of the information obtained by this non-invasive test and its role in the diagnostic algorithm

  17. Use of dynamic 3-dimensional transvaginal and transrectal ultrasonography to assess posterior pelvic floor dysfunction related to obstructed defecation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murad-Regadas, Sthela M; Regadas Filho, Francisco Sergio Pinheiro; Regadas, Francisco Sergio Pinheiro; Rodrigues, Lusmar Veras; de J R Pereira, Jacyara; da S Fernandes, Graziela Olivia; Dealcanfreitas, Iris Daiana; Mendonca Filho, Jose Jader

    2014-02-01

    New ultrasound techniques may complement current diagnostic tools, and combined techniques may help to overcome the limitations of individual techniques for the diagnosis of anorectal dysfunction. A high degree of agreement has been demonstrated between echodefecography (dynamic 3-dimensional anorectal ultrasonography) and conventional defecography. Our aim was to evaluate the ability of a combined approach consisting of dynamic 3-dimensional transvaginal and transrectal ultrasonography by using a 3-dimensional biplane endoprobe to assess posterior pelvic floor dysfunctions related to obstructed defecation syndrome in comparison with echodefecography. This was a prospective, observational cohort study conducted at a tertiary-care hospital. Consecutive female patients with symptoms of obstructed defecation were eligible. Each patient underwent assessment of posterior pelvic floor dysfunctions with a combination of dynamic 3-dimensional transvaginal and transrectal ultrasonography by using a biplane transducer and with echodefecography. Kappa (κ) was calculated as an index of agreement between the techniques. Diagnostic accuracy (sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values) of the combined technique in detection of posterior dysfunctions was assessed with echodefecography as the standard for comparison. A total of 33 women were evaluated. Substantial agreement was observed regarding normal relaxation and anismus. In detecting the absence or presence of rectocele, the 2 methods agreed in all cases. Near-perfect agreement was found for rectocele grade I, grade II, and grade III. Perfect agreement was found for entero/sigmoidocele, with near-perfect agreement for rectal intussusception. Using echodefecography as the standard for comparison, we found high diagnostic accuracy of transvaginal and transrectal ultrasonography in the detection of posterior dysfunctions. This combined technique should be compared with other dynamic techniques and

  18. A novel three-dimensional dynamic anorectal ultrasonography technique for the assessment of perineal descent, compared with defaecography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murad-Regadas, S M; dos Santos, D; Soares, G; Regadas, F S P; Rodrigues, L V; Buchen, G; Kenmoti, V T; Surimã, W S; Fernandes, G O da S

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe a novel three-dimensional dynamic anorectal ultrasonography technique (dynamic 3-DAUS) for assessment of perineal descent (PD) and establishment of normal range values, comparing it with defaecography. Secondarily, the study compares the ability of the two techniques to identify various pelvic floor dysfunctions. A prospective study was undertaken in 29 women (mean age 43 years) with obstructed defecation disorder. All patients underwent defaecography and dynamic 3-DAUS and the results were compared. Lee kappa coefficients (K) were used. On defaecography, PD > 3 cm was detected in 12 patients. On dynamic 3-DAUS, 10 of these patients had PD > 2.5 cm. Seventeen had normal PD on defaecography and PD ≤ 2.5 cm on dynamic 3-DAUS (K 0.85). Normal relaxation was observed in 10 patients and anismus in 14 with both techniques (K 0.65). Both techniques identified five patients without rectocele, two with grade I rectocele (K 0.89 and 1.00, respectively) and 10 with grade II and nine with grade III (K 0.72 and 0.77, respectively). Rectal intussusception was identified in six patients on defaecography. These were confirmed on dynamic 3-DAUS in addition to the identification of another seven cases indicating moderate agreement (K 0.46). Enterocele/sigmoidocele grade III was identified in one patient with both techniques, indicating substantial agreement (K 0.65). Dynamic 3-DAUS was shown to be a reliable technique for the assessment of PD and pelvic floor dysfunctions, identifying all disorders and confirming findings from defaecography. © 2011 The Authors. Colorectal Disease © 2011 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  19. Evacuation proctography - examination technique and method of evaluation; Evakuationsproktographie. Untersuchungstechnik und Auswertemethodik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braunschweig, R. [Abt. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet, Tuebingen (Germany); Schott, U. [Abt. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet, Tuebingen (Germany); Starlinger, M. [Abt. fuer Allgemeine Chirurgie, Eberhard-Karls-Universtaet, Tuebingen (Germany)

    1993-12-31

    Evacuation proctography is the most important imaging technique to supplement findings of physical examination, manometry, and endoscopy in patients presenting with pathologies in anorectal morphology and function. Indications for evacuation proctography include obstructed defecation or incomplete evacuation, imaging of ileal pouches following excision of the rectum, and suspected anorectal fistulae. Evacuation proctography with thick barium sulfate is performed under fluoroscopy. Documentation of the study can either be done by single-shot X-rays, video recording, or imaging with a 100-mm spot-film camera. Evacuation proctography shows morphologic changes such as spastic pelvic floor, rectocele, enterocele, intussusception and anal prolapse. Measurements can be performed to obtain the anorectal angle, location and mobility of the pelvic floor, and size as well as importance of a rectocele. Qualitative and quantitative data can only be interpreted along with clinical and manometric data. (orig.) [Deutsch] Neben klinischen, manometrischen und endoskopischen Untersuchungstechniken stellt die Evakuationsproktographie das wesentlichste bildgebende Verfahren zur Erfassung morphologischer und funktioneller Befunde am Anorektum dar. Einsatzgebiet sind zum einen klinische Befunde wie Obstipation und unvollstaendige Entleerung und zum anderen die Roentgenkontrolle eines Duenndarmpouches nach Rectumexstirpation sowie der Nachweis oder Ausschluss von Fisteln. Die Untersuchung wird unter Verwendung von Kontrastmittelsuspensionen durchleuchtungsgezielt durchgefuehrt. Zur Dokumentation stehen die Einzelbildtechnik im seitlichen Strahlengang, die Videotechnik bzw. 100mm-Kamera-Technik zur Verfuegung. Morphologisch koennen Befunde wie Anismus, Rectocele, Enterocele, Intussuszeption bzw. Schleimhautprolaps sowie der Analprolaps erfasst werden. Messtechnisch koennen u.a. der Anorektalwinkel und die Beweglichkeit bzw. Lage des Beckenbodens sowie die Groesse und funktionelle Bedeutung

  20. Rectocele--does the size matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Dan; Gabel, Marc Beer

    2012-07-01

    Large rectoceles (>2 cm) are believed to be associated with difficulty in evacuation, constipation, rectal pain, and rectal bleeding. The aim of our study was to determine whether rectocele size is related to patient's symptoms or defecatory parameters. We conducted a retrospective study on data collected on patients referred to our clinic for the evaluation of evacuation disorders. All patients were questioned for constipation, fecal incontinence, and irritable bowel syndrome and were assessed with dynamic perineal ultrasonography and conventional anorectal manometry. Four hundred eighty-seven women were included in our study. Rectocele was diagnosed in 106 (22%) women, and rectocele diameter >2 cm in 93 (87%) women. Rectocele size was not significantly related to demographic data, parity, or patient's symptoms. The severity of the symptoms was not correlated to the size or to the position of the rectocele. The diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome was neither related to the size of the rectocele. Rectocele location, occurrence of enterocele, and intussusception were not related to the size of the rectocele. Full evacuation of rectoceles was more common in small rectoceles (79% vs. 24%, p = 0.0001), and no evacuation was more common in large rectoceles (37% vs. 0, p = 0.01). Rectal hyposensitivity and anismus were not related to the size of the rectocele. In conclusion, only the evacuation of rectoceles was correlated to the size of the rectoceles, but had no clinical significance. Other clinical, anatomical factors were also not associated to the size of the rectoceles. Rectoceles' size alone may not be an indication for surgery.

  1. Magnetic resonance defecography versus videodefecography in the study of obstructed defecation syndrome: Is videodefecography still the test of choice after 50 years?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Martín, G P; García-Armengol, J; Roig-Vila, J V; Espí-Macías, A; Martínez-Sanjuán, V; Mínguez-Pérez, M; Lorenzo-Liñán, M Á; Mulas-Fernández, C; González-Argenté, F X

    2017-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance (MR) defecography and compare it with videodefecography in the evaluation of obstructed defecation syndrome. This was a prospective cohort test accuracy study conducted at one major tertiary referral center on patients with a diagnosis of obstructed defecation syndrome who were referred to the colorectal surgery clinic in a consecutive series from 2009 to 2012. All patients underwent a clinical examination, videodefecography, and MR defecography in the supine position. We analyzed diagnostic accuracy for MR defecography and performed an agreement analysis using Cohen's kappa index (κ) for each diagnostic imaging examination performed with videodefecography and MR defecography. We included 40 patients with Rome III diagnostic criteria of obstructed defecation syndrome. The degree of agreement between the two tests was as follows: almost perfect for anismus (κ = 0.88) and rectal prolapse (κ = 0.83), substantial for enterocele (κ = 0.80) and rectocele grade III (κ = 0.65), moderate for intussusception (κ = 0.50) and rectocele grade II (κ = 0.49), and slight for rectocele grade I (κ = 0.30) and excessive perineal descent (κ = 0.22). Eighteen cystoceles and 11 colpoceles were diagnosed only by MR defecography. Most patients (54%) stated that videodefecography was the more uncomfortable test. MR defecography could become the imaging test of choice for evaluating obstructed defecation syndrome.

  2. Dynamic translabial ultrasound versus echodefecography combined with the endovaginal approach to assess pelvic floor dysfunctions: How effective are these techniques?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murad-Regadas, S M; Karbage, S A; Bezerra, L S; Regadas, F S P; da Silva Vilarinho, A; Borges, L B; Regadas Filho, F S P; Veras, L B

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of dynamic translabial ultrasound (TLUS) in the assessment of pelvic floor dysfunction and compare the results with echodefecography (EDF) combined with the endovaginal approach. Consecutive female patients with pelvic floor dysfunction were eligible. Each patient was assessed with EDF combined with the endovaginal approach and TLUS. The diagnostic accuracy of the TLUS was evaluated using the results of EDF as the standard for comparison. A total of 42 women were included. Four sphincter defects were identified with both techniques, and EDF clearly showed if the defect was partial or total and additionally identified the pubovisceral muscle defect. There was substantial concordance regarding normal relaxation and anismus. Perfect concordance was found with rectocele and cystocele. The rectocele depth was measured with TLUS and quantified according to the EDF classification. Fair concordance was found for intussusception. There was no correlation between the displacement of the puborectal muscle at maximum straining on EDF with the displacement of the anorectal junction (ARJ), compared at rest with maximal straining on TLUS to determine perineal descent (PD). The mean ARJ displacement was similar in patients with normal and those with excessive PD on TLUS. Both modalities can be used as a method to assess pelvic floor dysfunction. The EDF using 3D anorectal and endovaginal approaches showed advantages in identification of the anal sphincters and pubodefects (partial or total). There was good correlation between the two techniques, and a TLUS rectocele classification based on size that corresponds to the established classification using EDF was established.

  3. Semi-closed bilateral partial miotomy of the puborectalis for anismus: a pilot study: Partial miotomy of the puborectalis for anismus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asciore, L; Pescatori, L C; Pescatori, M

    2015-12-01

    Anismus or non relaxing puborectalis muscle (PRM) may cause obstructed defecation (OD). Reported surgical treatment is partial miotomy, followed by sepsis, bleeding, and incontinence. The aim of the present study was to investigate on the feasibility and outcome of a modified mini-invasive operation. Consecutive patients with anismus and OD not responding to medical therapy, excluding multiparous females, patients with anal incontinence, recto-rectal intussusception, and disordered psychological pattern. Semi-closed bilateral partial division of PRM, pulled down through 1-cm perianal incisions, was performed. Concomitant significant rectal mucosal prolapse and rectocele, when present, were treated. OD was evaluated using a validated score and anal/vaginal ultrasound (US) was performed pre -and postoperatively. A control group of seven patients with normal bowel habit was also investigated. Eight patients (seven females), median age 48 years (range 29-71) were operated. Six also had significant mucosal prolapse and rectocele. All were followed up for a median of 12 months (range 2-40). None of them had postoperative sepsis or bleeding. One had just one occasional episode of mild anal incontinence. Symptoms improved in 6 or 75 % and, OD score decreased from 19.6 ± 1.0 to 9.2 ± 2.0 (mean ± s.e.m.), P = 0.007. No patient had anismus after surgery and PRM relaxation changed from 0 to 5.9 ± 0.8 mm being 6.6 ± 1.5 mm in controls. Semi-closed bilateral partial division of PRM achieves muscle's relaxation on straining in all patients without any significant postoperative complication. Further studies are needed prior to consider it a validated procedure.

  4. Appendiceal Mucocele in an Elderly Patient: How Much Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Kim-Fuchs

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Appendiceal mucoceles are rare cystic lesions with an incidence of 0.3–0.7% of all appendectomies. They are divided into four subgroups according to their histology. Even though the symptoms may vary – depending on the level of complication – from right lower quadrant pain, signs of intussusception, gastrointestinal bleeding to an acute abdomen with sepsis, most mucoceles are asymptomatic and found incidentally. We present the case of a 70-year-old patient with an incidentally found appendiceal mucocele. He was seen at the hospital for backache. The CT scan showed a vertebral fracture and a 7-cm appendiceal mass. A preoperative colonoscopy displayed several synchronous adenomas in the transverse and left colon with high-grade dysplasia. In order to lower the cancer risk of this patient, we performed a subtotal colectomy. The appendiceal mass showed no histopathological evidence of malignancy and no sign of perforation. The follow-up was therefore limited to 2 months. In this case, appendectomy would have been sufficient to treat the mucocele alone. The synchronous high-grade dysplastic adenomas were detected in the preoperative colonoscopy and determined the therapeutic approach. Generally, in the presence of positive lymph nodes, a right colectomy is the treatment of choice. In the histological presence of mucinous peritoneal carcinomatosis, cytoreductive surgery with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy is indicated. In conclusion, mucoceles of the appendix are detected with high sensitivity by CT scan. If there is no evidence of synchronous tumor preoperatively and no peritoneal spillage, invasion or positive sentinel lymph nodes during surgery, a mucocele is adequately treated by appendectomy.

  5. Safety of vaccines used for routine immunization of U.S. children: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglione, Margaret A; Das, Lopamudra; Raaen, Laura; Smith, Alexandria; Chari, Ramya; Newberry, Sydne; Shanman, Roberta; Perry, Tanja; Goetz, Matthew Bidwell; Gidengil, Courtney

    2014-08-01

    Concerns about vaccine safety have led some parents to decline recommended vaccination of their children, leading to the resurgence of diseases. Reassurance of vaccine safety remains critical for population health. This study systematically reviewed the literature on the safety of routine vaccines recommended for children in the United States. Data sources included PubMed, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices statements, package inserts, existing reviews, manufacturer information packets, and the 2011 Institute of Medicine consensus report on vaccine safety. We augmented the Institute of Medicine report with more recent studies and increased the scope to include more vaccines. Only studies that used active surveillance and had a control mechanism were included. Formulations not used in the United States were excluded. Adverse events and patient and vaccine characteristics were abstracted. Adverse event collection and reporting was evaluated by using the McHarm scale. We were unable to pool results. Strength of evidence was rated as high, moderate, low, or insufficient. Of 20 478 titles identified, 67 were included. Strength of evidence was high for measles/mumps/rubella (MMR) vaccine and febrile seizures; the varicella vaccine was associated with complications in immunodeficient individuals. There is strong evidence that MMR vaccine is not associated with autism. There is moderate evidence that rotavirus vaccines are associated with intussusception. Limitations of the study include that the majority of studies did not investigate or identify risk factors for AEs; and the severity of AEs was inconsistently reported. We found evidence that some vaccines are associated with serious AEs; however, these events are extremely rare and must be weighed against the protective benefits that vaccines provide. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  6. Tolerance of canine anastomoses to intraoperative radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tepper, J.E.; Sindelar, W.; Travis, E.L.; Terrill, R.; Padikal, T.

    1983-01-01

    Radiation has been given intraoperatively to various abdominal structures in dogs, using a fixed horizontal 11 MeV electron beam at the Armed Forces Radiobiologic Research Institute. Animals were irradiated with single doses of 2000, 3000 and 4500 rad to a field which extended from the bifurcation of the aorta to the rib cage. All animals were irradiated during laparotomy under general anesthesia. Because the clinical use of intraoperative radiotherapy in cancer treatment will occasionally require irradiation of anastomosed large vessels and blind loops of bowel, the tolerance of aortic anastomoses and the suture lines of blind loops of jejunum to irradiation were studied. Responses in these experiments were scored at times up to one year after irradiation. In separate experiments both aortic and intestinal anastomoses were performed on each animal for evaluation of short term response. The dogs with aortic anastomoses showed adequate healing at all doses with no evidence of suture line weakening. On long-term follow-up one animal (2000 rad) had stenosis at the anastomosis and one animal (4500 rad) developed an arteriovenous fistula. Three of the animals that had an intestinal blind loop irradiated subsequently developed intussusception, with the irradiated loop acting as the lead point. One week after irradiation, bursting pressure of an intestinal blind loop was normal at 3000 rad, but markedly decreased at 4500 rad. No late complications were noted after the irradiation of the intestinal anastomosis. No late complicatons were observed after irradiation of intestinal anastomoses, but one needs to be cautious with regards to possible late stenosis at the site of an irradiated vascular anastomosis

  7. Neonatal morbidity and mortality of 31 calves derived from somatic cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisville, A-C; Fecteau, G; Boysen, S; Desrochers, A; Dorval, P; Buczinski, S; Lefebvre, R; Hélie, P; Blondin, P; Smith, L C

    2013-01-01

    The neonatal period is associated with high morbidity and mortality in cloned calves. To describe morbidity and mortality in cloned calves from birth to 2 years of age. Thirty-one somatic cell-derived Holstein calves delivered at a veterinary teaching hospital. Medical files were retrospectively analyzed. Four calves were stillborn. Five calves born alive had physical congenital defects. Twenty-three calves had an enlarged umbilical cord. Laboratory abnormalities included acidemia, respiratory acidosis, hyperlactatemia, anemia, stress leukogram, decreased total protein, albumin and globulins, and increased creatinine. Twenty-five calves survived the 1st hour of life. Among them, 11 stood without assistance within 6 hours of birth, 10 calves took longer than 6 hours to stand, and 4 never stood. Twenty-two calves suffered from anorexia. Twelve calves had complications arising from umbilical cord infections. Three calves developed idiopathic hyperthermia (>40°C). Eight calves suffered from gastrointestinal problems, including ruminal distension, abomasal ulcers, neonatal enteritis, intussusception, and abomasal displacement. Mortality between birth and 3 weeks of age was 32% (10/31). Causes of death and reasons for euthanasia included stillbirths, respiratory failure, and limb deformities. Mortality between 3 weeks and 2 years of age was 19% (4/21), with deaths in this group attributed to generalized peritonitis and complications arising from umbilical infections. Overall, mortality rate within 2 years of age was 14/31 (45%). Respiratory problems, limb deformities, and umbilical infections were the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in these cloned calves. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  8. Reported provision of analgesia to patients with acute abdominal pain in Canadian paediatric emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poonai, Naveen; Cowie, Allyson; Davidson, Chloe; Benidir, Andréanne; Thompson, Graham C; Boisclair, Philippe; Harman, Stuart; Miller, Michael; Butter, Andreana; Lim, Rod; Ali, Samina

    2016-09-01

    Evidence exists that analgesics are underutilized, delayed, and insufficiently dosed for emergency department (ED) patients with acute abdominal pain. For physicians practicing in a Canadian paediatric ED setting, we (1) explored theoretical practice variation in the provision of analgesia to children with acute abdominal pain; (2) identified reasons for withholding analgesia; and (3) evaluated the relationship between providing analgesia and surgical consultation. Physician members of Paediatric Emergency Research Canada (PERC) were prospectively surveyed and presented with three scenarios of undifferentiated acute abdominal pain to assess management. A modified Dillman's Tailored Design method was used to distribute the survey from June to July 2014. Overall response rate was 74.5% (149/200); 51.7% of respondents were female and mean age was 44 (SD 8.4) years. The reported rates of providing analgesia for case scenarios representative of renal colic, appendicitis, and intussusception, were 100%, 92.1%, and 83.4%, respectively, while rates of providing intravenous opioids were 85.2%, 58.6%, and 12.4%, respectively. In all 60 responses where the respondent indicated they would obtain a surgical consultation, analgesia would be provided. In the 35 responses where analgesia would be withheld, 21 (60%) believed pain was not severe enough, while 5 (14.3%) indicated it would obscure a surgical condition. Pediatric emergency physicians self-reported rates of providing analgesia for acute abdominal pain scenarios were higher than previously reported, and appeared unrelated to request for surgical consultation. However, an unwillingness to provide opioid analgesia, belief that analgesia can obscure a surgical condition, and failure to take self-reported pain at face value remain, suggesting that the need exists for further knowledge translation efforts.

  9. Emergency management of acute abdomen in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, Binesh; Singhi, Sunit; Lal, Sadhna

    2013-03-01

    Acute abdomen can be defined as a medical emergency in which there is sudden and severe pain in abdomen with accompanying signs and symptoms that focus on an abdominal involvement. It accounts for about 8 % of all children attending the emergency department. The goal of emergency management is to identify and treat any life-threatening medical or surgical disease condition and relief from pain. In mild cases often the cause is gastritis or gastroenteritis, colic, constipation, pharyngo-tonsilitis, viral syndromes or acute febrile illnesses. The common surgical causes are malrotation and Volvulus (in early infancy), intussusception, acute appendicitis, and typhoid and ischemic enteritis with perforation. Lower lobe pneumonia, diabetic ketoacidosis and acute porphyria should be considered in patients with moderate-severe pain with little localizing findings in abdomen. The approach to management in ED should include, in order of priority, a rapid cardiopulmonary assessment to ensure hemodynamic stability, focused history and examination, surgical consult and radiologic examination to exclude life threatening surgical conditions, pain relief and specific diagnosis. In a sick patient the initial steps include rapid IV access and normal saline 20 ml/kg (in the presence of shock/hypovolemia), adequate analgesia, nothing per oral/IV fluids, Ryle's tube aspiration and surgical consultation. An ultrasound abdomen is the first investigation in almost all cases with moderate and severe pain with localizing abdominal findings. In patients with significant abdominal trauma or features of pancreatitis, a Contrast enhanced computerized tomography (CECT) abdomen will be a better initial modality. Continuous monitoring and repeated physical examinations should be done in all cases. Specific management varies according to the specific etiology.

  10. Comparative study of Contour Transtar and STARR procedure for the treatment of obstructed defecation syndrome (ODS)--feasibility, morbidity and early functional results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isbert, C; Reibetanz, J; Jayne, D G; Kim, M; Germer, C-T; Boenicke, L

    2010-09-01

    Stapled transanal rectal resection (STARR) is a promising new treatment for obstructed defecation syndrome (ODS). It may be performed using either a double-stapling technique (PPH-STARR) or with the new Contour Transtar (CT) device. The aim of this study was to evaluate the two techniques with respect to morbidity and functional outcomes. Patients presenting with ODS were evaluated using standardized clinical and radiological investigations and prospectively entered into a database. A total of 150 Patients were treated with either PPH-STARR (n = 68) or CT (n = 82) and further evaluated at 12 month postoperatively. The mean size of the resected specimen was 27 cm(2) (SD +/-4.86 cm(2)) in the PPH-STARR group and 46 cm(2) (SD +/-10.6 cm(2)) in the CT group [P < 0.001]. Morbidity was 7.3% (n = 5) in the PPH-STARR group and 7.5% (n = 6) in the CT group. The most common complication was minor postoperative bleeding in both groups (PPH-STARR: n = 2, 2.9%; CT: n = 2, 2.4%) Overall there were no septic complications and no surgical re-interventions. There was a tendency for more postoperative pain following CT (n = 3, 3.6%) as compared with PPH-STARR (n = 1, 1.4%). Constipation Scores (CCS) were 15.50 +/- 5.71 in the PPH-STARR group and 15.70 +/- 5.84 in the CT group preoperatively and decreased significantly to 8.25 (SD +/-1.45) and 8.01 (SD +/-2.31) 12-months after surgery. Values did not differ significantly between the two groups. Contour Transtar is as safe and effective as PPH-STARR and provides a true circumferential resection of rectal intussusception. This may benefit selected patients and result in improved long-term durability of the technique.

  11. Meckel's diverticulum in children: Our 12-year experience

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    Kamal Nain Rattan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Meckel's diverticulum (MD is the one of the most common congenital malformation of gastrointestinal tract and has varied clinical presentations. We are presenting here our 12-year experiences with MD in children at tertiary care hospital in North India. It highlights the fact that isolated gangrene of MD can occur, and it is associated with increased morbidity. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study is conducted by analysing the medical records of the patients who were operated for MD in the last 12 years in paediatric surgery department at our hospital. Results: Sixty-five patients were operated for MD in study period; in this 52 were males and 13 were females with mean age of presentation 3.2 years. The most common presentation was intestinal obstruction seen in 86.1% (56 cases. Intestinal haemorrhage was seen in 4.6% (3 cases and diverticulitis in 3% (2 cases. Perforation of the gut with peritonitis was present in 6.1% (four cases. Cause of obstruction was intussusception in 21.4% (12 cases, fibrous band connected to umbilicus in 17.8% (10 cases, volvulus in 17.8% (10 cases, kinking in 16.0% (9 cases, knotting in 14.2% (8 cases and herniation of gut below in 12.5% (7 cases. Isolated gangrene of MD was present in ten cases with intestinal obstruction. The ectopic gastric mucosa was seen in three and pancreatic mucosa in two cases. Mortality and morbidity during the study were one and three cases, respectively. Conclusion: MD may remain clinically silent for lifetime, or it may have life-threatening complications. In our series, intestinal obstruction and not the haemorrhage was the most common presentation. Isolated gangrene of MD with obstruction was present in significant numbers, which we failed to find in literature.

  12. Is nonoperative management of adhesive intestinal obstruction applicable to children in a resource-poor country?

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    Osifo Osarumwense

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nonoperative management of adhesive intestinal obstruction gives good results in adults but there are scant studies on its outcome in children. This study reports outcomes and experiences with nonoperative and operative management of adhesive intestinal obstruction in children in a resource-poor country. Patients and Methods: This is a retrospective analysis of records of children who were managed with adhesive intestinal obstruction at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital between January 2002 and December 2008. Results: Adhesive intestinal obstruction accounted for 21 (8.8% of 238 children managed with intestinal obstruction. They were aged between 7 weeks and 16 years (mean 3 ± 6.4 years, comprising 13 males and eight females (ratio 1.6:1. Prior laparotomy for gangrenous/perforated intussusception (seven, 33.3%, perforated appendix (five, 23.8%, perforated volvulus (three, 14.3%, penetrating abdominal trauma (two, 9.5% and perforated typhoid (two, 9.5% were major aetiologies. Adhesive obstruction occurred between 6 weeks and 7 years after the index laparotomies. All the 21 children had initial nonoperative management without success, owing to lack of total parenteral nutrition and monitoring facilities. Outcomes of open adhesiolysis performed between 26 and 48 h in six (28.6% children due to poor response to nonoperative management, 11-13 days in 12 (57.1% who responded minimally and 2-5 weeks in three (14.3% who had relapse of symptoms were encouraging. Exploration of the 21 adhesive obstructions confirmed small bowel obstruction due to solitary bands (two, 9.5%, multiple bands/adhesions (13, 61.9% and encasement, including one bowel gangrene (six, 28.6%. Postoperatively, the only child who had recurrence during 1-6 years of follow-up did well after a repeat adhesiolysis. Conclusion: Nonoperative management was unsuccessful in this setting. Open adhesiolysis may be adopted in children to prevent avoidable morbidities and

  13. CT enteroclysis in the diagnosis of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, T.P. [Department ofRadiodiagnosis, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India); Gulati, M.S. [Department of Imaging, Queen Elizabeth Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Makharia, G.K. [Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)]. E-mail: govindmakharia@aiims.ac.in; Bandhu, S. [Department ofRadiodiagnosis, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India); Garg, P.K. [Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)

    2007-07-15

    Aim: To evaluate the usefulness of computed tomography (CT) enteroclysis in patients with obscure gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Materials and methods: In a prospective study, CT enteroclysis was performed in 21 patients (median age 50 years; range 13-71 years) with obscure GI bleeding in which the source of the bleeding could not be detected despite the patient having undergone both upper GI endoscopic and colonoscopic examinations. The entire abdomen and pelvis was examined in the arterial and venous phases using multisection CT after distending the small intestine with 2 l of 0.5% methylcellulose as a neutral enteral contrast medium and the administration of 150 ml intravenous contrast medium. Results: Adequate distension of the small intestine was achieved in 20 of the 21 (95.2%) patients. Potential causes of GI bleeding were identified in 10 of the 21 (47.6%) patients using CT enteroclysis. The cause of the bleeding could be detected nine of 14 (64.3%) patients with overt, obscure GI bleeding. However, for patients with occult, obscure GI bleeding, the cause of the bleeding was identified in only one of the seven (14.3%) patients. The lesions identified by CT enteroclysis included small bowel tumours (n = 2), small bowel intussusceptions (n = 2), intestinal tuberculosis (n = 2), and vascular lesions (n = 3). All vascular lesions were seen equally well in both the arterial and venous phases. Conclusions: The success rate in detection of the cause of bleeding using CT enteroclysis was 47.6% in patients with obscure GI bleeding. The diagnostic yield was higher in patients with overt, obscure GI bleeding than in those with occult obscure GI bleeding.

  14. Managing neonatal bowel obstruction: clinical perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desoky SM

    2018-02-01

    , intestinal malrotation, intussusception, intestinal atresia, meconium ileus, functional immaturity of the colon, Hirschsprung disease, and anorectal malformation. The embryology, epidemiology, clinical presentation, and brief medical and surgical management of each is described. Keywords: neonatal, bowel, intestinal, obstruction

  15. CT studies of mesentery and related vascular findings in strangulating intestinal obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wenhua; Cao Qingxuan; Yang Shifeng; Li Jianhai; Lu Shenglin; Zhang Qiang; Wu Tian

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the CT appearance of mesentery and related vascular (MRV) findings in strangulating obstruction (SO) and evaluate the value of CT examination for diagnosing SO. Methods: Thirty patients with SO were included in the investigation. The diagnosis was confirmed by operation in 26 cases and 4 cases by clinic. The cause of SO included adhesion in 9 cases, volvulus in 8 cases, intussusception in 6 cases, infarction of mesenteric vesseles in 4 cases, and internal hernia in 3 cases, respectively. All patients was examined with CT and 20 of them with enhanced CT. Results: Eleven items of CT findings were revealed in these patients. The findings could be divided into 3 types: (1) direct signs: including embolism of mesenteric vasculature in 2 cases and mesenteric edema and related vascular enlargement in 19 cases. (2)indirect signs: including bowel wall edema and thickenning in 24 cases, abnormal enhancement of the wall in 6 cases, massive fluid in the bowel in 13 cases, abnormal form of loops in 10 cases, and hemorrhage of bowel wall and mesentery in 1 case each. (3) complicated signs: including intramural gas in 3 cases, intrahepatic portal veins gas in 1 case, gas in mesentery in 1 case, and ascites and pneumoperitoneum in 11 cases. Conclusion: The CT findings of mesenteric edema, ischemia and infarction are reliable and characteristic signs for diagnosing SO. The diagnosis of SO can be correctly made before operation if these signs are recognized, at the same time, CT may demonstrate some complications which can not be revealed by traditional X-ray examinations. (authors)

  16. Spectrum of diseases in acute intestinal obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masud, M.; Khan, A.; Gondal, Z.I.; Adil, M.

    2015-01-01

    To determine the etiological spectrum of acute intestinal obstruction in our clinical setup Military Hospital Rawalpindi. Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Surgical department of Military Hospital, Rawalpindi from Jul 2012 to Jul 2013, over a period of about 1 year. Material and Methods: A total of 120 patients with acute mechanical intestinal obstruction who underwent laparotomy were included in our study while those with non-mechanical intestinal obstruction like history of trauma and paralytic ileus were excluded from the study. All the patients were selected by non-probability purposive sampling technique. Emergency laparotomy was done and operative findings were recorded. Results: A total of 120 patients with mechanical intestinal obstruction were included in this study out of which 93 (69.17%) were female and remaining 27 (30.83%) were males. Male to female ratio was 1:2.24. Age range of patients was 22-85 years. Out of 120 patients operated for acute intestinal obstruction post-op adhesions were found in 37 (30.83%) patients followed by intestinal tuberculosis in 23 (19.17%) patients, obstructed inguinal hernias in 13 (10.83%), gut malignancies in 15 (12.5%) , Meckel's diverticulum with bands in 7 (5.83%), volvulus in 7 (5.83%), perforated appendix in 6 (5%), intussusception in 2 (1.7%), inflammatory bands in 5 (4.17%), trichobezoar and faecal impaction in 2 (1.7%) while in 3 (2.5%) patients no definite cause was found. Conclusion: Post-op adhesions are the commonest cause of mechanical intestinal obstruction in our setup followed by intestinal tuberculosis as second most common clinical pattern of presentation. (author)

  17. Roentogenologic diagnosis of an acute abdomen in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oka, Makio; Chiba, Nobuyuki; Miyagi, Tetsuo (Kanagawa Children' s Medical Center, Yokohama (Japan))

    1983-05-01

    An acute abdomen is one of the main topics among emergency practice for children. We have experienced about 300 acute abdomen cases per year at our Children's Hospital since 1970. Radiological technologists provide a 24-hour emergency service using special knowledge and techniques in our radiological investigation. In the noenatal period esophageal atresia should be diagnosed by plain up-right film with a coiled-up rubber tube, and a contrast examination is contraindicated to prevent severe aspiration pneumonia. In the cases with intestinal atresia, the contrast examination is not necessary again, because the findings of plain film such as the distribution of air-filled intestinal loops, dilated bowel with air-fluid level gives us enough information for the diagnosis of these congenital anomalies. On the contrary, barium enema is useful and harmless for the neonatal age group. It is practical for diagnosing Hirschsprung's disease, midgut malrotation with volvulus, ileal and colonic atresia and necrotizing enterocolitis. An imperforate anus should be classified into the high and low type in the neonatal period to define the treatment. Invertogram is an only way for the differentiation of a baby without external fistula, and we have established the technique for this. The level is diagnosed by the relationship between the gas-filled rectal pouch and ischiac bone. In the infant group intussusception is the most common and urgent acute abdomen. We use a special device to fix the bady, dilute the barium with warm saline (to avoid water intoxication), limit the water pressure to within one meter, and avoid abdominal manipulation and longtime exposure. The successful reduction rate that our team has obtained is almost 85%.

  18. Roentogenologic diagnosis of an acute abdomen in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Makio; Chiba, Nobuyuki; Miyagi, Tetsuo

    1983-01-01

    An acute abdomen is one of the main topics among emergency practice for children. We have experiencing about 300 acute abdomen cases per year at our Children's Hospital since 1970. We radiological technologists provide a 24-hour emergency service using special knowledge and techniques in our radiological investigation. In the noenatal period esophageal atresia should be diagnosed by plain up-right film with a coiled-up rubber tube, and a contrast examination is contraindicated to prevent severe aspiration pneumonia. In the cases with intestinal atresia, the contrast examination is not necessary again, because the findings of plain film such as the distribution of air-filled intestinal loops, dilated bowel with air-fluid level gives us enough information for the diagnosis of these congenital anomalies. On the contrary, barium enema is useful and harmless for the neonatal age group. It is practical for diagnosing Hirschsprung's disease, midgut malrotation with volvulus, ileal and colonic atresia and necrotizing enterocolitis. An imperforate anus should be classified into the high and low type in the neonatal period to define the treatment. Invertogram is an only way for the differentiation of a baby without external fistula, and we have established the technique for this. The level is diagnosed by the relationship between the gas-filled rectal pouch and ischiac bone. In the infant group intussusception is the most common and urgent acute abdomen. We use a special device to fix the bady, dilute the barium with warm saline (to avoid water intoxication), limit the water pressure to within one meter, and avoid abdominal manipulation and longtime exposure. The successful reduction rate that our team has obtained is almost 85 %. (author)

  19. Value of computed tomography in diagnosis of intestinal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujikawa, Koichi; Yamane, Kosuke; Nakanishi, Tadashi; Miura, Yoshio; Kato, Yoshitaka; Yahata, Noriko; Iwamoto, Toshiyuki; Katayama, Hiroshi; Katsuta, Shizutomo.

    1987-01-01

    CT findings of 46 cases with inflammatory and other nontumoral bowel diseases were retrospectively studied. Patients were given 500 to 1000 ml of lukewarm water orally or rectally to distend the intestinal lumen. In all cases water-soluble iodine contrast media was administered intravenously. The CT findings in Crohn's disease included mural thickening, luminal narrowing, bowel wall enhancement, wall rigidity, serration of intestinal border, dilatation of mesenteric vessels, periintestinal blurring (inflamatory reaction of mesentery), fibrofatty proliferation, effusion, abscess and fistula. Many of these findings suggested the transmural nature of the disease and gave diagnostic clues of the disease. In cases with ulcerative colitis, thickening of bowel wall was insignificant and extraintestinal complications were absent. CT appears to play an important role in distinguishing Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Luminal narrowing and mural thickening were also observed in a case with intestinal ischemia, but these mural changes were not accompanied by mesenteric abnormalities to the degree of Crohn's disease. In cases with penetrating peptic ulcer and diverticulitis, CT demonstrated inflammatory reactions of surrounding tissue such as thickening of neighboring fascia, increase in attenuation value of mesenteric fat, effusion and abscess. Even in cases with confusing clinical symptoms, appendicitis was easily diagnosed on CT which showed swelling of appendix and inflammatory changes of surrounding structures. Mechanical obstruction of the intestine could be identified on CT by a notable change of luminal sizes at the site of obstruction. CT appearances of intussusception were distinctive and a soft tissue mass (intussusceptum) and mesenteric fat was seen within a markedly dilated intussuscipiens. CT could also reveal pancreatitis and splenic infarction as the causes of clinically-undiagnosed paralytic ileus. (J.P.N.)

  20. Development of a rotavirus vaccine: clinical safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine, RotaTeq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarlet, Max; Schödel, Florian

    2009-12-30

    Initial approaches for rotavirus vaccines were based on the classical "Jennerian" approach and utilized simian and bovine rotavirus strains, which provided cross-protection against human rotavirus strains but did not cause illness in infants and young children because of their species-specific tropism. The demonstrated efficacy of these vaccines was not consistent across studies. Thus, human-animal reassortants containing an animal rotavirus backbone with human rotavirus surface G and/or P proteins were developed, which demonstrated more consistent efficacy than that observed with the non-reassortant rotavirus strains. The pentavalent rotavirus vaccine, RotaTeq, contains 5 human-bovine reassortant rotaviruses consisting of a bovine (WC3) backbone with human rotavirus surface proteins representative of the most common G (G1, G2, G3, G4) or P (P1A[8]) types worldwide. The present review focuses on the development of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine RotaTeq. Results of a large-scale Phase III clinical study showed that three doses of RotaTeq were immunogenic, efficacious, and well tolerated with no increased clinical risk of intussusception. RotaTeq was efficacious against rotavirus gastroenteritis of any severity (74%) and severe disease (98-100%), using a validated clinical scoring system. Reductions in rotavirus-associated hospitalizations and emergency department (ED) visits, for up to 2 years post-vaccination, were 95% in Europe, 97% in the United States, and 90% in the Latin American/Caribbean regions. RotaTeq was recently shown to be up to 100% effective in routine use in the US in reducing hospitalizations and ED visits and 96% effective in reducing physician visits. Additional studies in 8 different locations in the US have shown 85-95% reduction in rotavirus-associated hospitalizations and/or ED visits in the first 2-2.5 years of routine use.

  1. Efficacy, safety and immunogenicity of a human rotavirus vaccine (RIX4414) in Hong Kong children up to three years of age: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Yu-Lung; Nelson, E Anthony S; Poon, Kin-Hung; Chan, Paul K S; Chiu, Susan; Sung, Rita; Leung, Chi Wai; Ng, Daniel; Ma, Yee Man; Chan, Desmond; Lee, Tsz Leung; Tang, Joyce; Kwan, Yat Wah; Ip, Patricia; Ho, Marco; Fung, Lai-Wah Eva; Tang, Haiwen; Suryakiran, P V; Han, Htay Htay; Bock, Hans

    2013-04-26

    A phase III, double-blind, randomized, controlled trial was conducted in Hong Kong to evaluate the efficacy, safety and immunogenicity of a human rotavirus vaccine, RIX4414 (Rotarix) against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis in children up to three years of age. Healthy infants aged 6-12 weeks were enrolled between 08-December-2003 and 31-August-2005 and received two oral doses of either RIX4414 vaccine (N=1513) or placebo (N=1512) given 2 months apart. Vaccine efficacy was assessed from two weeks post-Dose 2 until the children were two and three years of age. Anti-rotavirus IgA seroconversion rate was calculated pre-vaccination and 1-2 months post-Dose 2 using ELISA (cut-off=20 U/mL) for 100 infants. Safety was assessed until the children were two years of age; serious adverse events (SAEs) were recorded throughout the study period. In children aged two and three years of life, vaccine efficacy against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis was 95.6% (95% CI: 73.1%-99.9%) and 96.1% (95% CI: 76.5%-99.9%), respectively. The seroconversion rate 1-2 months after the second dose of RIX4414 was 97.5% (95% CI: 86.8%-99.9%). At least one SAE was recorded in 439 and 477 infants who were administered RIX4414 and placebo, respectively (p-value=0.130). Six intussusception cases were reported (RIX4414=4; placebo=2) and none was assessed to be vaccine-related. RIX4414 was efficacious, immunogenic and safe in the prevention of rotavirus gastroenteritis for at least two years post-vaccination in Hong Kong children. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The clinical value of magnetic resonance defecography in males with obstructed defecation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piloni, V; Bergamasco, M; Melara, G; Garavello, P

    2018-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the relationship between symptoms of obstructed defecation and findings on magnetic resonance (MR) defecography in males with obstructed defecation syndrome (ODS). Thirty-six males with ODS who underwent MR defecography at our institution between March 2013 and February 2016 were asked in a telephone interview about their symptoms and subsequent treatment, either medical or surgical. Patients were divided into 2 groups, one with anismus (Group 1) and one with prolapse without anismus (Group 2). The interaction between ODS type and symptoms with MR findings was assessed by multivariate analysis for categorical data using a hierarchical log-linear model. MR imaging findings included lateral and/or posterior rectocele, rectal prolapse, intussusception, ballooning of levator hiatus with impingement of pelvic organs and dyskinetic puborectalis muscle. There were 21 males with ODS due to anismus (Group 1) and 15 with ODS due to rectal prolapse/intussusception (Group 2). Mean age of the entire group was 53.6 ± 4.1 years (range 18-77 years). Patients in Group 1 were slightly older than those in Group 2 (age peak, sixth decade in 47.6 vs 20.0%, p < 0.05). Symptoms most frequently associated with Group 1 patients included small volume and hard feces (85.0%, p < 0.01), excessive strain at stool (81.0%, p < 0.05), tenesmus and fecaloma formation (57.1 and 42.9%, p < 0.05); symptoms most frequently associated with Group 2 patients included mucous discharge, rectal bleeding and pain (86.7%, p < 0.05), prolonged toilet time (73.3%, p < 0.05), fragmented evacuation with or without digitation (66.7%, p < 0.005). Voiding outflow obstruction was more frequent in Group 1 (19.0 vs 13.3%; p < 0.05), while non-bacterial prostatitis and sexual dysfunction prevailed in Group 2 (26.7 and 46.7%, p < 0.05). At MR defecography, two major categories of findings were detected: a dyskinetic pattern (Type 1), seen in all Group 1

  3. Gastric Bezoar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samer Assaf

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 12-year-old female with no past medical history presented with abdominal pain for 3 months. The pain was intermittent, located at the epigastric region, non-radiating, fluctuating intensity up to 8/10, and had worsened over the past month. She did not have fever, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, or blood in her stool. The patient also endorsed hair loss over the same time period and noted that her previously long hair was now short and thin. On exam, patient was noted to have shoulder-length hair, a soft, non-distended abdomen with mild tenderness to the epigastric region, and a 5cm hard mass palpated at the epigastrium. Significant findings: In the abdominal radiograph, a nonspecific and non-obstructive bowel gas pattern with no air-fluid level was noted, however the stomach was distended with soft tissue. The CT abdomen/pelvis revealed a distended stomach with undigested heterogeneous contents (presumed bezoar. Discussion: A bezoar is a mass of incompletely digested material typically originating in the stomach and consisting of vegetable fibers, hair, or drugs.1 Bezoars develop after ingested foreign material accumulates in the gastrointestinal tract due to indigestibility, gastric outlet obstruction, or intestinal stasis. Trichobezoars are comprised of hair and classically form in young females with an underlying psychiatric disorder resulting in the urge to pull one’s hair out (trichotillomania and swallow it (trichophagia.2,3 Gastric bezoars are rare with an approximate incidence of 0.3 percent of patients undergoing upper endoscopy.4 Patients tend to remain asymptomatic for long periods, but may develop abdominal pain, nausea/vomiting, early satiety, anorexia, and weight loss.5 Complications may include gastrointestinal ulcerations, perforations, intussusception, pancreatitis, obstructive jaundice, and death.6-8 The diagnosis of a gastric bezoar can be made using plain films, ultrasound, or CT, and

  4. Gastric lactobezoar - a rare disorder?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinz-Erian Peter

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gastric lactobezoar, a pathological conglomeration of milk and mucus in the stomach of milk-fed infants often causing gastric outlet obstruction, is a rarely reported disorder (96 cases since its first description in 1959. While most patients were described 1975-1985 only 26 children have been published since 1986. Clinically, gastric lactobezoars frequently manifest as acute abdomen with abdominal distension (61.0% of 96 patients, vomiting (54.2%, diarrhea (21.9%, and/or a palpable abdominal mass (19.8%. Respiratory (23.0% and cardiocirculatory (16.7% symptoms are not uncommon. The pathogenesis of lactobezoar formation is multifactorial: exogenous influences such as high casein content (54.2%, medium chain triglycerides (54.2% or enhanced caloric density (65.6% of infant milk as well as endogenous factors including immature gastrointestinal functions (66.0%, dehydration (27.5% and many other mechanisms have been suggested. Diagnosis is easy if the potential presence of a gastric lactobezoar is thought of, and is based on a history of inappropriate milk feeding, signs of acute abdomen and characteristic features of diagnostic imaging. Previously, plain and/or air-, clear fluid- or opaque contrast medium radiography techniques were used to demonstrate a mass free-floating in the lumen of the stomach. This feature differentiates a gastric lactobezoar from intussusception or an abdominal neoplasm. Currently, abdominal ultrasound, showing highly echogenic intrabezoaric air trapping, is the diagnostic method of choice. However, identifying a gastric lactobezoar requires an investigator experienced in gastrointestinal problems of infancy as can be appreciated from the results of our review which show that in not even a single patient gastric lactobezoar was initially considered as a possible differential diagnosis. Furthermore, in over 30% of plain radiographs reported, diagnosis was initially missed although a lactobezoar was clearly

  5. Correlation Between Echodefecography and 3-Dimensional Vaginal Ultrasonography in the Detection of Perineal Descent in Women With Constipation Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murad-Regadas, Sthela M; Pinheiro Regadas, Francisco Sergio; Rodrigues, Lusmar V; da Silva Vilarinho, Adjra; Buchen, Guilherme; Borges, Livia Olinda; Veras, Lara B; da Cruz, Mariana Murad

    2016-12-01

    Defecography is an established method of evaluating dynamic anorectal dysfunction, but conventional defecography does not allow for visualization of anatomic structures. The purpose of this study was to describe the use of dynamic 3-dimensional endovaginal ultrasonography for evaluating perineal descent in comparison with echodefecography (3-dimensional anorectal ultrasonography) and to study the relationship between perineal descent and symptoms and anatomic/functional abnormalities of the pelvic floor. This was a prospective study. The study was conducted at a large university tertiary care hospital. Consecutive female patients were eligible if they had pelvic floor dysfunction, obstructed defecation symptoms, and a score >6 on the Cleveland Clinic Florida Constipation Scale. Each patient underwent both echodefecography and dynamic 3-dimensional endovaginal ultrasonography to evaluate posterior pelvic floor dysfunction. Normal perineal descent was defined on echodefecography as puborectalis muscle displacement ≤2.5 cm; excessive perineal descent was defined as displacement >2.5 cm. Of 61 women, 29 (48%) had normal perineal descent; 32 (52%) had excessive perineal descent. Endovaginal ultrasonography identified 27 of the 29 patients in the normal group as having anorectal junction displacement ≤1 cm (mean = 0.6 cm; range, 0.1-1.0 cm) and a mean anorectal junction position of 0.6 cm (range, 0-2.3 cm) above the symphysis pubis during the Valsalva maneuver and correctly identified 30 of the 32 patients in the excessive perineal descent group. The κ statistic showed almost perfect agreement (κ = 0.86) between the 2 methods for categorization into the normal and excessive perineal descent groups. Perineal descent was not related to fecal or urinary incontinence or anatomic and functional factors (sphincter defects, pubovisceral muscle defects, levator hiatus area, grade II or III rectocele, intussusception, or anismus). The study did not include a

  6. Retocele posterior em paciente do sexo masculino: qual o significado Posterior rectocele in a male patient: what does it mean?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Soares Campos

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A retocele é uma projeção sacular anormal da parede retal, de etiologia multifatorial e uma causa muito significativa de sintomas anorretais como plenitude retal, sensação de peso anal durante a defecação, evacuação incompleta e dor retoanal. Muito tem se discutido sobre retoceles em mulheres, mas poucas publicações têm mencionado a presença de retocele em pacientes do sexo masculino e somente um artigo discute os detalhes da retocele em homens com distúrbios de defecação. A retocele posterior em homens, em especial, é uma disfunção incomum e possivelmente apresenta como causas a constipação intestinal, o esforço evacuatório longo e excessivo, a síndrome do descenso perineal, a fraqueza do assoalho pélvico e a contração paradoxal do músculo puborretal. É apresentado o caso de um paciente com história de dor anorretal crônica e defecação obstruída associadas à retocele posterior, doença hemorroidária, prolapso e intussuscepção retal.Rectocele is an abnormal sac-like projection of the rectum wall with multiple etiologies and an important cause of anorectal symptoms like rectoanal weight sensation during evacuation, incomplete evacuation and anorectal pain. Many reports have discussed rectoceles in women, but few have mentioned rectoceles in male patients and only one report has discussed the details of rectoceles in men with defecation disorders. Posterior rectocele in men, in particular, is an unusual disturb and possible causes are intestinal constipation, long and excessive straining, descending perineum syndrome, weakness of the pelvic floor and puborectalis muscle syndrome. We report a case of a male patient with chronic anorectal pain and outlet obstruction associated with posterior rectocele, hemorrhoidal disease, rectal mucous prolapse and intussusception.

  7. Demographics and outcome in paediatric non-hodgkin lymphoma: single centre experience at the children hospital, lahore, pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faizan, M.; Khan, S.

    2018-01-01

    To describe the patient demographics and outcome analysis in paediatric non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) patients. Study Design:An observational study. Place and Duration of Study:The Hematology/Oncology Unit of The Children's Hospital and Institute of Child Health, Lahore, from January 2012 till December 2014. Methodology:Demographics including age, gender, histopathology, stage and outcome data, in biopsy proven NHL patients were analyzed. Burkitts/B Cell and Diffuse Large B Cell lymphoma patients were treated with MCP 842 Protocol while T/B-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma (LL) patients were treated with EURO-LB 02 protocol. Results:Ninety-one patients were treated during the study period at CHL. Data was insufficient in 18 patients, so they were excluded from the study. Patients included were 73. Males were 53 (72.6%). Thirty-seven (50.7%) were 5-10 years of age, and 22 (30.1%) 10-16 years old. Abdominal mass was the commonest presentation seen in 32 (43.8%), lymphadenopathy in 27 (37%), intussusception in 5 (6.8%), while intestinal obstruction, obstructive uropathy, nasopharyngeal mass, gastric mass, primary bone lymphoma, pericardial effusion, jaw swelling, cheek swelling and paraspinal mass present in one (1%) each. Histopathological subtypes consist of Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) in 32 (43.8%), B cell NHL in 10 (13.7%), lymphoblastic lymphoma (LL) in 26 (35.6%), diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) in 2 (2.8%), and anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) in 1 (1.4%). Sixty-seven (91%) presented in stage III, and six (8.4%) in stage IV. Forty-eight (65.8%) patients had completed treatment and are well to date, 16 (21.9%) died, 5 (6.8%) left against medical advice (LAMA), and 4 (5.5%) patients relapsed. Conclusion:Burkitt's lymphoma was the commonest type of NHL seen in this cohort that predominantly presented with an abdominal mass. Children usually presented in advanced stage with delayed diagnosis. Better supportive care can improve the prognosis

  8. The socioeconomic impact of a pediatric ostomy in Uganda: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzira, Arlene; Kakembo, Nasser; Kisa, Phyllis; Langer, Monica; Sekabira, John; Ozgediz, Doruk; Fitzgerald, Tamara N

    2018-04-01

    Multiple pediatric surgical conditions require ostomies in low-middle-income countries. Delayed presentations increase the numbers of ostomies. Patients may live with an ostomy for a prolonged time due to the high backlog of cases with insufficient surgical capacity. In caring for these patients in Uganda, we frequently witnessed substantial socioeconomic impact of their surgical conditions. The operative log at the only pediatric surgery referral center in Uganda was reviewed to assess the numbers of children receiving ostomies over a 3-year period. Charts for patients with anorectal malformations (ARM) and Hirschsprung's disease (HD) were reviewed to assess delays in accessing care. Focus group discussions (FGD) were held with family members of children with ostomies based on themes from discussions with the surgical and nursing teams. A pilot survey was developed based on these themes and administered to a sample of patients in the outpatient clinic. During the period of January 2012-December 2014, there was one specialty-certified pediatric surgeon in the country. There were 493 ostomies placed for ARM (n = 234), HD (N = 114), gangrenous ileocolic intussusception (n = 95) and typhoid-induced intestinal perforation (n = 50). Primary themes covered in the FGD were: stoma care, impact on caregiver income, community integration of the child, impact on family unit, and resources to assist families. Many patients with HD and ARM did not present for colostomy until after 1 year of life. None had access to formal ostomy bags. 15 caregivers completed the survey. 13 (86%) were mothers and 2 (13%) were fathers. Almost half of the caregivers (n = 7, 47%) stated that their spouse had left the family. 14 (93%) caregivers had to leave jobs to care for the stoma. 14 respondents (93%) reported that receiving advice from other caregivers was beneficial. The burden of pediatric surgical disease in sub-Saharan Africa is substantial with significant disparities

  9. [Umbilicus in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayyosi, L; Boudaoud, N; Okiemy, O; Correia, N; Alanio-Detton, E; Bory, J P; Liné, A; Poli-Merol, M L; Mazouz Dorval, S; Francois, C

    2016-10-01

    The umbilicus is our first scar. It is the last remain of our life in utero. Besides the umbilical hernia, a common pathology during the first three years of life that rarely requires surgery, there are some rare congenital abnormalities such as gastroschisis and omphalocele, which occur in about 1-5/10,000 births. Gastroschisis is a birth defect of the anterior abdominal wall, through which the fetal intestines freely protrude and are not covered by any membranes. During the 13th week prenatal ultrasound, the umbilical cord can be seen to be properly attached while the intestines float freely in the amniotic fluid. This defect is most common in young women who smoke and/or use cocaine and is not typically associated with genetic disorders. Omphalocele is an average coelosomy, in which a visceral hernia protrudes into the base of the umbilical cord. Omphalocele is typically diagnosed during the prenatal phase, and occurs most commonly in older mothers. It is frequently associated with genetic and morphologic abnormalities, therefore a karyotype should automatically be performed. For these two pathologies, the surgical problem lies in managing, during the reintegration, the conflict container/content responsible to lower vena cava syndrome and disorders ventilatory. Deciding on the technique will depend on the clinical form, and on the tolerance to reinsertion. The success of the surgery is directly linked to the postoperative emergence care for the pre-, per- and postnatal phases. The umbilical cord is preserved in the case of a gastroschisis. A primary or secondary umbilicoplasty will be performed for an omphalocele closure. The umbilicoplasty aims to create an umbilicus in a good position by giving it a shape, ideally oval, but also and especially an umbilication. The primary or secondary umbilicoplasty remains a challenge in a growing abdomen (change in position, deformation, loss of intussusception with growth). Many techniques are described: cutaneous flaps

  10. A randomized Phase III clinical trial to assess the efficacy of a bovine-human reassortant pentavalent rotavirus vaccine in Indian infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Prasad S; Desai, Sajjad; Tewari, Tushar; Kawade, Anand; Goyal, Nidhi; Garg, Bishan Swarup; Kumar, Dinesh; Kanungo, Suman; Kamat, Veena; Kang, Gagandeep; Bavdekar, Ashish; Babji, Sudhir; Juvekar, Sanjay; Manna, Byomkesh; Dutta, Shanta; Angurana, Rama; Dewan, Deepika; Dharmadhikari, Abhijeet; Zade, Jagdish K; Dhere, Rajeev M; Fix, Alan; Power, Maureen; Uprety, Vidyasagar; Parulekar, Varsha; Cho, Iksung; Chandola, Temsunaro R; Kedia, Vikash K; Raut, Abhishek; Flores, Jorge

    2017-10-27

    Rotavirus is the most common cause of moderate-to-severe infant diarrhoea in developing countries, resulting in enormous morbidity, mortality, and economic burden. A bovine-human reassortant pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (BRV-PV) targeting the globally most common strains was developed in India and tested in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled end-point driven Phase III efficacy clinical trial implemented at six sites across India. Infants 6 to 8weeks of age were randomized (1:1) to receive three oral doses of BRV-PV or placebo at 6, 10, and 14weeks of age along with routine vaccines. Home visit surveillance was conducted to detect severe rotavirus gastroenteritis (SRVGE) and safety outcomes until the children reached two years of age. A total of 3749 infants received BRV-PV while 3751 received placebo. At the time of the primary end-point (when the minimum number of cases needed for analysis were accrued) the vaccine efficacy against SRVGE was 36% (95% CI 11.7, 53.6, p=0.0067) in the per protocol (PP) analysis, and 41.9% (95% CI 21.1, 57.3, p=0.0005) in the intent to treat (ITT) analysis. Vaccine efficacy over the entire follow-up period (until children reached two years of age) was 39.5% (95% CI 26.7, 50, protavirus cases (VSRVGE, Vesikari score≥16) was 60.5% (95% CI 17.7, 81, p=0.0131) at the time of the primary analysis and 54.7% (95% CI 29.7, 70.8, p=0.0004) for the complete follow-period in the PP population. The incidence of solicited, unsolicited, and serious adverse events were similar in both the vaccine and placebo groups. Likewise, the number of intussusceptions and deaths were similar between both groups. Thus, BRV-PV is an effective, well tolerated and safe vaccine in Indian infants. (Trial registration: Clinical Trials.Gov [NCT 02133690] and Clinical Trial Registry of India [CTRI/2013/05/003667]). Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Efficacy, safety and effectiveness of licensed rotavirus vaccines: a systematic review and meta-analysis for Latin America and the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez, Raúl F; Linhares, Alexandre C; Muñoz, Sergio; Seron, Pamela; Lorca, Pedro; DeAntonio, Rodrigo; Ortega-Barria, Eduardo

    2017-01-13

    RotaTeq™ (RV5; Merck & Co. Inc., USA) and Rotarix™ (RV1, GlaxoSmithKline, Belgium) vaccines, developed to prevent rotavirus diarrhea in children under five years old, were both introduced into national immunization programs in 2006. As many countries in Latin America and the Caribbean have included either RV5 or RV1 in their routine childhood vaccination programs, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to analyze efficacy, safety and effectiveness data from the region. We conducted a systematic search in PubMed, EMBASE, Scielo, Lilacs and the Cochrane Central Register, for controlled efficacy, safety and effectiveness studies published between January 2000 until December 2011, on RV5 and RV1 across Latin America (where both vaccines are available since 2006). The primary outcome measures were: rotavirus-related gastroenteritis of any severity; rotavirus emergency department visits and hospitalization; and severe adverse events. The results of the meta-analysis for efficacy show that RV1 reduced the risk of any-severity rotavirus-related gastroenteritis by 65% (relative risk (RR) 0.35, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.25; 0.50), and of severe gastroenteritis by 82% (RR 0.18, 95%CI 0.12; 0.26) versus placebo. In trials, both vaccines significantly reduced the risk of hospitalization and emergency visits by 85% (RR 0.15, 95%CI 0.09; 0.25) for RV1 and by 90% (RR 0.099, 95%CI 0.012; 0.77) for RV5. Vaccination with RV5 or RV1 did not increase the risk of death, intussusception, or other severe adverse events which were previously associated with the first licensed rotavirus vaccine. Real-world effectiveness studies showed that both vaccines reduced rotavirus hospitalization in the region by around 45-50% for RV5 (for 1 to 3 doses, respectively), and, by around 50-80% for RV1 (for 1 to 2 doses, respectively). For RV1, effectiveness against hospitalization was highest (around 80-96%) for children vaccinated before 12 months of age, compared with 5

  12. Efficacy of a Low-Cost, Heat-Stable Oral Rotavirus Vaccine in Niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isanaka, Sheila; Guindo, Ousmane; Langendorf, Celine; Matar Seck, Amadou; Plikaytis, Brian D; Sayinzoga-Makombe, Nathan; McNeal, Monica M; Meyer, Nicole; Adehossi, Eric; Djibo, Ali; Jochum, Bruno; Grais, Rebecca F

    2017-03-23

    Each year, rotavirus gastroenteritis is responsible for about 37% of deaths from diarrhea among children younger than 5 years of age worldwide, with a disproportionate effect in sub-Saharan Africa. We conducted a randomized, placebo-controlled trial in Niger to evaluate the efficacy of a live, oral bovine rotavirus pentavalent vaccine (BRV-PV, Serum Institute of India) to prevent severe rotavirus gastroenteritis. Healthy infants received three doses of the vaccine or placebo at 6, 10, and 14 weeks of age. Episodes of gastroenteritis were assessed through active and passive surveillance and were graded on the basis of the score on the Vesikari scale (which ranges from 0 to 20, with higher scores indicating more severe disease). The primary end point was the efficacy of three doses of vaccine as compared with placebo against a first episode of laboratory-confirmed severe rotavirus gastroenteritis (Vesikari score, ≥11) beginning 28 days after dose 3. Among the 3508 infants who were included in the per-protocol efficacy analysis, there were 31 cases of severe rotavirus gastroenteritis in the vaccine group and 87 cases in the placebo group (2.14 and 6.44 cases per 100 person-years, respectively), for a vaccine efficacy of 66.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 49.9 to 77.9). Similar efficacy was seen in the intention-to-treat analyses, which showed a vaccine efficacy of 69.1% (95% CI, 55.0 to 78.7). There was no significant between-group difference in the risk of adverse events, which were reported in 68.7% of the infants in the vaccine group and in 67.2% of those in the placebo group, or in the risk of serious adverse events (in 8.3% in the vaccine group and in 9.1% in the placebo group); there were 27 deaths in the vaccine group and 22 in the placebo group. None of the infants had confirmed intussusception. Three doses of BRV-PV, an oral rotavirus vaccine, had an efficacy of 66.7% against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis among infants in Niger. (Funded by M

  13. Efficacy and safety of an oral live attenuated human rotavirus vaccine against rotavirus gastroenteritis during the first 2 years of life in Latin American infants: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase III study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linhares, Alexandre C; Velázquez, F Raúl; Pérez-Schael, Irene; Sáez-Llorens, Xavier; Abate, Hector; Espinoza, Felix; López, Pío; Macías-Parra, Mercedes; Ortega-Barría, Eduardo; Rivera-Medina, Doris Maribel; Rivera, Luis; Pavía-Ruz, Noris; Nuñez, Ernesto; Damaso, Silvia; Ruiz-Palacios, Guillermo M; De Vos, Béatrice; O'Ryan, Miguel; Gillard, Paul; Bouckenooghe, Alain

    2008-04-05

    Peak incidence of rotavirus gastroenteritis is seen in infants between 6 and 24 months of age. We therefore aimed to assess the 2-year efficacy and safety of an oral live attenuated human rotavirus vaccine for prevention of severe gastroenteritis in infants. 15 183 healthy infants aged 6-13 weeks from ten Latin American countries randomly assigned in a 1 to 1 ratio to receive two oral doses of RIX4414 or placebo at about 2 and 4 months of age in a double-blind, placebo-controlled phase III study were followed up until about 2 years of age. Primary endpoint was vaccine efficacy from 2 weeks after dose two until 1 year of age. Treatment allocation was concealed from investigators and parents of participating infants. Efficacy follow-up for gastroenteritis episodes was undertaken from 2 weeks after dose two until about 2 years of age. Analysis was according to protocol. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00140673 (eTrack444563-023). 897 infants were excluded from the according-to-protocol analysis. Fewer cases (protavirus gastroenteritis were recorded for the combined 2-year period in the RIX4414 group (32 [0.4%] of 7205; 95% CI 0.3-0.6) than in the placebo group (161 [2.3%] of 7081; 1.9-2.6), resulting in a vaccine efficacy of 80.5% (71.3-87.1) to 82.1% (64.6-91.9) against wild-type G1, 77.5% (64.7-86.2) against pooled non-G1 strains, and 80.5% (67.9-88.8) against pooled non-G1 P[8] strains. Vaccine efficacy for hospital admission for rotavirus gastroenteritis was 83.0% (73.1-89.7) and for admission for diarrhoea of any cause was 39.3% (29.1-48.1). No cases of intussusception were reported during the second year of follow-up. Two doses of RIX4414 were effective against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis during the first 2 years of life in a Latin American setting. Inclusion of RIX4414 in routine paediatric immunisations should reduce the burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis worldwide.

  14. Rotavirus vaccines and vaccination in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linhares Alexandre C.

    2000-01-01

    overcome by giving three doses of the rotavirus vaccine or by using a higher-titer formulation of it. Wild enteroviruses, however, may cause primary rotavirus vaccine failure in developing countries. Studies in Peru with RRV-TV have shown a trend towards higher vaccine efficacy rates against "pure" (rotavirus-only diarrheal episodes. Economic analyses made in the United States indicate that a vaccine that costs less than US$ 9 per dose would lead to a net savings in medical costs. To date, however, cost-benefit studies have not been done in developing countries. In the future, it is possible that some Latin American countries might adapt their polio production facilities to the preparation of rotavirus vaccines for human use. A year after RRV-TV was licensed for vaccination of infants in the United States, the occurrence of intussusception as an adverse event led to the vaccine's withdrawal from the market. The implications of that action, particularly for Latin America, will be addressed in this article, including the need to explore alternative rotavirus candidate vaccines, particularly through the conduct of parallel clinical trials in both developed and developing countries.

  15. Rotavirus vaccines and vaccination in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre C. Linhares

    2000-11-01

    overcome by giving three doses of the rotavirus vaccine or by using a higher-titer formulation of it. Wild enteroviruses, however, may cause primary rotavirus vaccine failure in developing countries. Studies in Peru with RRV-TV have shown a trend towards higher vaccine efficacy rates against "pure" (rotavirus-only diarrheal episodes. Economic analyses made in the United States indicate that a vaccine that costs less than US$ 9 per dose would lead to a net savings in medical costs. To date, however, cost-benefit studies have not been done in developing countries. In the future, it is possible that some Latin American countries might adapt their polio production facilities to the preparation of rotavirus vaccines for human use. A year after RRV-TV was licensed for vaccination of infants in the United States, the occurrence of intussusception as an adverse event led to the vaccine's withdrawal from the market. The implications of that action, particularly for Latin America, will be addressed in this article, including the need to explore alternative rotavirus candidate vaccines, particularly through the conduct of parallel clinical trials in both developed and developing countries.

  16. Nutritional status in relation to the efficacy of the rhesus-human reassortant, tetravalent rotavirus vaccine (RRV-TV in infants from Belém, Pará State, Brazil Relação entre o estado nutricional e a eficácia da vacina tetravalente contra rotavírus de origem símio-humana, geneticamente rearranjada (RRV-TV, em crianças de Belém, Pará, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre C. LINHARES

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available The rhesus-human reassortant, tetravalent rotavirus vaccine (RRV-TV was licensed for routine use in the United States of America but it was recently withdrawn from the market because of its possible association with intussusception as an adverse event. The protective efficacy of 3 doses of RRV-TV, in its lower-titer (4 x 10(4 pfu/dose formulation, was evaluated according to the nutritional status of infants who participated in a phase III trial in Belém, Northern Brazil. A moderate protection conferred by RRV-TV was related to weight-for-age Z-scores (WAZ greater than -1 only, with rates of 38% (p = 0.04 and 40% (p = 0.04 for all- and- pure rotavirus diarrhoeal cases, respectively. In addition, there was a trend for greater efficacy (43%, p = 0.05 among infants reaching an height-for-age Z-score (HAZ of > -1. Taking WAZ, HAZ and weight-for-height Z-score (WHZ indices 0.05 if both placebo and vaccine groups are compared. There was no significant difference if rates of mixed and pure rotavirus diarrhoeal cases are compared in relation to HAZ, WAZ and weight-for-height Z-score (WHZ indices. Although a low number of malnourished infants could be identified in the present study, our data show some evidence that malnutrition may interfere with the efficacy of rotavirus vaccines in developing countries.A vacina tetravalente contra rotavírus de origem símio-humana, geneticamente rearranjada (RRV-TV, foi licenciada para uso rotineiro nos Estados Unidos da América do Norte; entretanto, tal imunizante foi removido do mercado, uma vez que a intussuscepção emergiu como possível evento adverso vacinal. A eficácia da RRV-TV - em sua formulação menos concentrada (10 x 10(4 pfu/dose - foi avaliada no tocante ao estado nutricional das crianças que integraram estudo caracterizado como de fase III, levado a efeito em Belém, região norte do Brasil. Observou-se proteção (moderada apenas entre os indivíduos com escore "Z" (peso-por-idade, WAZ superior

  17. Epidemiologia das infecções por rotavírus no Brasil e os desafios para o seu controle Rotavirus infection in Brazil: epidemiology and challenges for control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre C. Linhares

    2000-09-01

    by the age of 4-5 years. The tetravalent rhesus-human rotavirus vaccine (RRV-TV conferred 35% protection according to a two-year follow-up study in Belém, Pará, Brazil, but reached an efficacy of 60% during the first year of life. RRV-TV was also shown to be 75% protective against very severe gastroenteritis in northern Brazil. Vaccination with RRV-TV has been suspended recently in the United States because of the detection of intussusception as a side effect. Therefore, further vaccine trials in Brazil will probably involve rotavirus candidate vaccines other than RRV-TV.

  18. Efficacy of a monovalent human-bovine (116E) rotavirus vaccine in Indian infants: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Nita; Rongsen-Chandola, Temsunaro; Bavdekar, Ashish; John, Jacob; Antony, Kalpana; Taneja, Sunita; Goyal, Nidhi; Kawade, Anand; Kang, Gagandeep; Rathore, Sudeep Singh; Juvekar, Sanjay; Muliyil, Jayaprakash; Arya, Alok; Shaikh, Hanif; Abraham, Vinod; Vrati, Sudhanshu; Proschan, Michael; Kohberger, Robert; Thiry, Georges; Glass, Roger; Greenberg, Harry B; Curlin, George; Mohan, Krishna; Harshavardhan, G V J A; Prasad, Sai; Rao, T S; Boslego, John; Bhan, Maharaj Kishan

    2014-06-21

    in the vaccine group and 3·2 in the placebo group, with an incidence rate ratio of 0·46 (95% CI 0·33-0·65). Prevalence of immediate, solicited, and serious adverse events was similar in both groups. One case of urticaria in the vaccine group and one each of acute gastroenteritis and suspected sepsis in the placebo group were regarded as related to the study product. We recorded six cases of intussusception in the vaccine group and two in the placebo group, all of which happened after the third dose. 25 (vaccine group and 17 (rotavirus vaccine is effective and well tolerated in Indian infants. Department of Biotechnology and the Biotechnology Industry Research Assistance Council, Government of India; Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to PATH, USA; Research Council of Norway; UK Department for International Development; National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, USA; and Bharat Biotech International, Hyderabad, India. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Anatomical and functional characteristics of the pelvic floor in nulliparous women submitted to three-dimensional endovaginal ultrasonography: case control study and evaluation of interobserver agreement Características anatômicas e funcionais do assoalho pélvico em nulíparas avaliadas por ultrassonografia tridimensional endovaginal: estudo caso-controle e avaliação da confiabilidade interobservador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sthela Maria Murad-Regadas

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To determine anatomical and functional pelvic floor measurements performed with three-dimensional (3-D endovaginal ultrasonography in asymptomatic nulliparous women without dysfunctions detected in previous dynamic 3-D anorectal ultrasonography (echo defecography and to demonstrate the interobserver reliability of these measurements. METHODS: Asymptomatic nulliparous volunteers were submitted to echo defecography to identify dynamic dysfunctions, including anatomical (rectocele, intussusceptions, entero/sigmoidocele and perineal descent and functional changes (non-relaxation or paradoxical contraction of the puborectalis muscle in the posterior compartment and assessed with regard to the biometric index of levator hiatus, pubovisceral muscle thickness, urethral length, anorectal angle, anorectal junction position and bladder neck position with the 3-D endovaginal ultrasonography. All measurements were compared at rest and during the Valsalva maneuver, and perineal and bladder neck descent was determined. The level of interobserver agreement was evaluated for all measurements. RESULTS: A total of 34 volunteers were assessed by echo defecography and by 3-D endovaginal ultrasonography. Out of these, 20 subjects met the inclusion criteria. The 14 excluded subjects were found to have posterior dynamic dysfunctions. During the Valsalva maneuver, the hiatal area was significantly larger, the urethra was significantly shorter and the anorectal angle was greater. Measurements at rest and during the Valsalva maneuver differed significantly with regard to anorectal junction and bladder neck position. The mean values for normal perineal descent and bladder neck descent were 0.6 cm and 0.5 cm above the symphysis pubis, respectively. The intraclass correlation coefficient ranged from 0.62-0.93. CONCLUSIONS: Functional biometric indexes, normal perineal descent and bladder neck descent values were determined for young asymptomatic nulliparous women

  20. Inactivated poliovirus vaccine given alone or in a sequential schedule with bivalent oral poliovirus vaccine in Chilean infants: a randomised, controlled, open-label, phase 4, non-inferiority study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Ryan, Miguel; Bandyopadhyay, Ananda S; Villena, Rodolfo; Espinoza, Mónica; Novoa, José; Weldon, William C; Oberste, M Steven; Self, Steve; Borate, Bhavesh R; Asturias, Edwin J; Clemens, Ralf; Orenstein, Walter; Jimeno, José; Rüttimann, Ricardo; Costa Clemens, Sue Ann

    2015-11-01

    , respectively, the proportions of children with seroconversion to type 1 poliovirus were 166 (98·8%) of 168, 95% CI 95·8-99·7; 178 (100%), 97·9-100·0; and 175 (100%), 97·9-100·0. Proportions with seroconvsion to type 3 poliovirus were 163 (98·2%) of 166, 94·8-99·4; 177 (100%), 97·9-100·0, and 172 (98·9%) of 174, 95·9-99·7. Non-inferiority was thus shown for the bOPV-containing schedules compared with the all-IPV schedule, with no significant differences between groups. In the IPV-bOPV-bOPV, IPV-IPV-bOPV, and IPV-IPV-IPV groups, respectively, the proportions of children with seroprotective antibody titres to type 1 poliovirus were 168 (98·8%) of 170, 95% CI 95·8-99·7; 181 (100%), 97·9-100·0; and 177 (100%), 97·9-100·0. Proportions to type 3 poliovirus were 166 (98·2%) of 169, 94·9-99·4; 180 (100%), 97·9-100·0; and 174 (98·9%) of 176, 96·0-99·7. Non-inferiority comparisons could not be done for this outcome because median titres for the groups receiving OPV were greater than the assay's upper limit of detection (log2 titres >10·5). The proportions of children seroconverting to type 2 poliovirus in the IPV-bOPV-bOPV, IPV-IPV-bOPV, and IPV-IPV-IPV groups, respectively, were 130 (77·4%) of 168, 95% CI 70·5-83·0; 169 (96·0%) of 176, 92·0-98·0; and 175 (100%), 97·8-100. IPV-bOPV schedules resulted in almost a 0·3 log reduction of type 2 faecal shedding compared with the IPV-only schedule. No participants died during the trial; 81 serious adverse events were reported, of which one was thought to be possibly vaccine-related (intestinal intussusception). Seroconversion rates against polioviruses types 1 and 3 were non-inferior in sequential schedules containing IPV and bOPV, compared with an all-IPV schedule, and proportions of infants with protective antibodies were high after all three schedules. One or two doses of bOPV after IPV boosted intestinal immunity for poliovirus type 2, suggesting possible cross protection. Additionally, there was

  1. Ecodefecografia tridimensional dinâmica: nova técnica para avaliação da Síndrome da Defecação Obstruída (SDO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sthela Maria Murad-Regadas

    2006-06-01

    (group I was 87,13º (range 78,9 - 90,8° (± 1,01 and 99,22º (range 84,9 - 114,5° (± 1,84 during evacuatory effort.. It was observed that the angle size increased in all normal women, demonstrating PR relaxation during the evacuatory effort. Concerning to anorectocele evaluation, the posterior vagina wall was kept at horizontal position during the evacuatory effort, except in patients with anorectocele. All patients from group II had anorectocele ( grade I = 1, grade II = 5, grade III = 4 demonstrated at clinical and defecography evaluation. All cases were also confirmed by echodefecography. Based on such results, it was established the reference parameters to classify anorectocele according to echodefecography. (grade I - distance of the vaginal wall positions until 5,0mm, grade II from 6,0 to 12,0mm, grade III above 12,0mm. Defecography identified anismus in one patient with anorectocele grade II and in another with grade III and both were confirmed at echodefecography by decreasing the PR angle when compared the resting with straining positions. Defecography showed also four cases of rectal intussusceptions while echodefecography confirmed such findings and identified two other cases. In conclusion, echodefecography can be used as an alternative method to assess patients with ODS because it identifies and quantifies all the anorectal dysfunctions associated with the obstructed defecation, with the advantage to evaluate also the continence disturbances, identifying sphincter injuries. It's minimally invasive, well tolerated, low cost, no radiation exposure and demonstrates precisely all the anatomic structures involved with defecation.

  2. Selected Abstracts of the 12th International Workshop on Neonatology; Cagliari (Italy; October 19-22, 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    --- Various Authors

    2016-10-01

    . Colella, A.M. D'Onofrio, E. Dusi, I. Falletti, A. Gabriele, R. Galiano, G. Gargano, R. Longo, C. Magnani, P. Mariotti, R. Marzolla, M. Mussap, G. Ottonello, P. Paladini, G. Parisi, M.G. Romeo, N.A. Romeo, L. Tegaldo, S. Vendemmia, M. Zaffanello, P.U. Zucchinetti, V. FanosABS 72. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE METABOLOME OF HUMAN MILK BY NMR METABOLOMICS • F. Cesare Marincola, S. Corbu, A. Dessì, A. Noto, T. Boutsikou, D.D. Briana, V. Fanos, A. Malamitsi-PuchnerABS 73. DOWN SYNDROME ASSOCIATED TO DISORDER OF SEXUAL DIFFERENTIATION: A CASE REPORT • F. Ayari, H. Mannai, H. Chourou, N. Ben Ameur, M. Cheour, I. Ksibi, S. KacemABS 74. GC-MS METABOLOMICS IDENTIFICATION OF NEW BIOMARKERS OF CHORIOAMNIONITIS: A PILOT STUDY • F. Palmas, D. Biggio, L. Pugni, A. Noto, L. Barberini, C. Fattuoni, A. Dessì, V. Fanos, F. MoscaABS 75. POLYCYSTIC OVARIAN SYNDROME, METABOLIC SYNDROME AND DYSBIOSIS OF GUT MICROBIOTA • S. Vendemmia, M.G. Schiavone, M. VendemmiaABS 76. MATERNAL OBESITY: INFLAMMATORY AND ANTIOXIDANT MARKERS IN SALIVA • G.M. Anelli, M. Zambon, C. Mandò, B. Bottazzi, C. Novielli, C. Garlanda, I. Cetin, S. AbatiABS 77. MONITORING AND SUPPORTING MATERNAL COMPETENCE IN PRETERM CONDITIONS: A LONGITUDINAL STUDY USING Q-SORT • C.M. Cacciatore, A. Dessì, R. Pintus, M.R. Morales, G. Perricone, C. PolizziABS 78. APPENDICITIS IN NEWBORN: TWO CASE REPORTS • A. Melis, E. Chicconi, O. Biasetti, M.C. Mannazzu, M. Ubertazzi, M. Iannucelli, A. Cualbu, G. OlzaiABS 79. THE ROLE OF PEDIATRICIANS IN CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE PREVENTION: FAMILY HISTORY AS A POWERFUL SCREENING TOOL TO DETECT HYPERCHOLESTEROLEMIC CHILDREN • M.E. Capra, G. BiasucciABS 80. METABOLOMICS STUDY ON NEC OCCURRENCE BY GC-MS • F. Palmas, A. De Magistris, A. Noto, L. Barberini, C. Fattuoni, A. Dessì, V. Fanos, J.-C. PicaudABS 81. A CASE REPORT OF INTESTINAL INTUSSUSCEPTION • V. RussoABS 82. DETECTION OF FAMILIES AT HIGH RISK FOR CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE: THE PEDIATRIC POINT OF VIEW • M.E. Capra, G