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Sample records for intubation tracheal stenosis

  1. Post intubation tracheal stenosis in children

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    Marco Caruselli

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Many authors have reported that tracheal stenosis is a complication that can follow tracheal intubation in both adults and children. The symptoms, when they do appear, can be confused with asthma, with subsequent treatment providing only mild and inconsistent relief. We report here the case of an 8 year old girl admitted to our hospital for whooping cough that was not responding to therapy.

  2. Recurred Post-intubation Tracheal Stenosis Treated with Bronchoscopic Cryotherapy

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    Jung, Ye-Ryung; Taek Jeong, Joon; Kyu Lee, Myoung; Kim, Sang-Ha; Joong Yong, Suk; Jeong Lee, Seok; Lee, Won-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Post-intubation tracheal stenosis accounts for the greatest proportion of whole-cause tracheal stenosis. Treatment of post-intubation tracheal stenosis requires a multidisciplinary approach. Surgery or an endoscopic procedure can be used, depending on the type of stenosis. However, the efficacy of cryotherapy in post-intubation tracheal stenosis has not been validated. Here, we report a case of recurring post-intubation tracheal stenosis successfully treated with bronchoscopic cryotherapy that had previously been treated with surgery. In this case, cryotherapy was effective in treating web-like fibrous stenosis, without requiring more surgery. Cryotherapy can be considered as an alternative or primary treatment for post-intubation tracheal stenosis. PMID:27853078

  3. Circumferential tracheal resection with primary anastomosis for post-intubation tracheal stenosis: study of 24 cases.

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    Negm, Hesham; Mosleh, Mohamed; Fathy, Hesham

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the results of circumferential tracheal and cricotracheal resection with primary anastomosis for the treatment of post-intubation tracheal and cricotracheal stenosis. This is a retrospective analytical study. A total number of 24 patients were included in this study. The relevant preoperative, operative and postoperative records were collected and analyzed. Twenty patients were finally symptom-free reflecting an anastomosis success rate of 83.3 %. Variable grades of anastomotic restenosis occurred in 11 (45.8 %) patients, three patients were symptom-free and eight had airway obstructive symptoms. Four out of the eight patients with symptomatic restenosis were symptom-free with endoscopic dilatation while the remaining four patients required a permanent airway appliance (T-tube, tracheostomy) for the relief of airway obstruction and this group was considered as anastomotic failure. Cricoid involvement, associated cricoid resection and the type of anastomosis were the variables that had statistical impact on the occurrence of restenosis (P = 0.017, 0.017, 0.05; respectively). Tracheal resection with primary anastomosis is a safe effective treatment method for post-intubation tracheal stenosis in carefully selected patients. Restenosis does not always mean failure of the procedure since it may be successfully managed with endoscopic dilatation.

  4. Changes in Tracheostomy- and Intubation-Related Tracheal Stenosis: Implications for Surgery.

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    Kim, Samuel S; Khalpey, Zain; Hsu, Charles; Little, Alex G

    2017-09-01

    This study sought to identify the changing characteristic patterns and locations of stenosis after tracheostomy or intubation and to assess the risk factors associated with perioperative complication and restenosis after primary resection and reconstruction. A retrospective review was performed (January /2012 to March 2015) on patients treated at the University of Arizona Medical Center (Tucson, Arizona) who had symptomatic tracheal stenosis secondary to prolonged intubation or tracheostomy. Data on demographics, surgical approach, and outcome were obtained. Analysis was performed using the χ 2 test, Kaplan-Meier estimate of survival, Cox proportional hazards survival analysis, and univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Forty-eight patients were referred for surgical resection, and 36 patients underwent primary resection and reconstruction; 72% of patients had previous endobronchial treatments for stenosis. Fourteen patients had postintubation tracheal stenosis, and 22 had tracheostomy-related stenosis (16 percutaneous, 6 open tracheostomy). Among all patients, 52.8% had stenosis proximal to or involving the cricoid; 72.7% of patients with tracheostomy-related stenosis had stenosis at or proximal to the cricoid, whereas only 21.4% of the patients with intubation-related stenosis had a similar location. Nineteen patients underwent laryngotracheal resection, and 17 patients had tracheal resection. The mean length of resection was 3.6 cm. A body mass index greater than 35 was associated with increased perioperative complications (p = 0.012). In multivariate analysis, patients younger than 30 years of age at operation had an increased relative risk of recurrence. Recent advances in percutaneous tracheostomy have increased the numbers of patients presenting with proximal tracheal stenosis, thus necessitating more complex subglottic resection and reconstruction. The anastomotic and overall complication rate remains low despite these more complex operations

  5. [Argon plasma coagulation combined with cryotherapy via bronchoscopy for the treatment of one child with severe post-intubation tracheal stenosis and literature review].

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    Zhou, Kuo; Liang, Jun; Cui, Ai-hua; Fu, Ai-xia; Yang, Qiao-zhi

    2013-10-01

    To observe the short term effect of argon plasma coagulation (APC) combined with cryotherapy via bronchoscopy for treatment of severe post-intubation tracheal stenosis in a child. A 3-year old boy was admitted for cephalothorax abdominal compound trauma and dyspnea, who had severe post-incubation tracheal stenosis. The agreement about the operation risk was signed by the parents. Endotracheal APC procedure was performed with a bronchoscope under general anesthesia. The APC probe was put into the working channel of the bronchoscope. The stenotic lesion was endoscopically visualized and then coagulated by argon plasma. Such coagulation was carried out several times at the stenotic site until it gradually became dilated. The devitalized tissue was mechanically removed with grasping forceps. Thereafter, bronchoscopic cryosurgery was repeatedly performed at the stenotic site. Clinical symptoms, signs and bronchoscopic manifestations were observed right after operation, after 1 day, 10 days, 1 month and 6 months separately. Tracheal tissue hyperplasia and cyanosis disappeared, laryngeal stridor and dyspnea improved obviously right after the operation. General condition of the patient was well, there was no laryngeal stridor and dyspnea 10 days after operation. The mucosa of the surgical site was smooth and no tracheostenosis was seen under bronchoscope at 1 month and 6 months after the operation. Argon plasma coagulation combined with cryotherapy via bronchoscope is an effective method to treat tracheal stenosis of children, which needs further exploration for the application.

  6. and Non-Operable Tracheal Stenosis

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    Reza Bagheri

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available   Introduction: Tracheal stenosis is normally caused by trauma, infection, benign and malignant tumors, prolonged intubation or tracheostomy. The best treatment for tracheal stenosis is resection and anastomosis of trachea. Yet the major surgical complication of tracheal surgery is postoperative stenosis. The goal of this paper is to study the result of tracheal stenting as a replacement therapy for patients suffering from tracheal stenosis who are not good candidates for surgery.   Materials and Methods: This study presents the results of stenting in patients with: Inoperable tumoral stenosis,Non-tumoral stenosis being complicated due to prior surgeries,Inability to undergo a major surgery.The study was performed between September 2002 and July 2011 and poly flex stents were used by means of rigid bronchoscopy. Results: A total of 25 patients received stents during this study. Among them 15 patients suffered from benign and 10 suffered from malignant tracheal stenosis. The patients were followed up for at most 12 months after the stenting operation. The mean age of the patients was 35 years. The most common cause of stenosis was prolonged intubation (75%. The most common indication for stenting was the history of multiple tracheal operations. The most common complication of stenting and cause of stent removal was formation of granulation tissue. 30% of patients with benign tracheal stenosis were cured and about 10% improved until they could stand a major operation. Ten patients in benign group and 2 patients in malignant group (20% needed T-Tube insertion after stent removal but other patientcure by stenting. Conclusions: In benign cases stenting is associated with recurrence of symptoms which requires other therapeutic techniqus, so the stenting may not be named as a final solution in benign cases. However, this technique is the only method with approved efficacy for malignant cases with indication.

  7. Laryngeal morbidity after tracheal intubation

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    Sørensen, M K; Rasmussen, N; Kristensen, M S

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tracheal intubation may cause vocal fold damage. The trial was designed to assess laryngeal morbidity comparing the Endoflex(®) tube with a conventional endotracheal tube with stylet. We hypothesised that laryngeal morbidity within the first 24 h after extubation would be lower...... with the Endoflex tube than with the conventional endotracheal tube with stylet because of less rigidity. METHODS: This randomised trial included 130 elective surgical patients scheduled for general anaesthesia with endotracheal intubation. Pre- and post-operative assessment of hoarseness, vocal fold pathology......% with the Endoflex tube and 55% with the endotracheal tube with stylet at 24 h after extubation (P = 0.44). Post-operative vocal fold injury was present in 23% in the Endoflex tube group and in 36% in the endotracheal tube with stylet group (P = 0.13). The increase in shimmer, the voice analysis variable reflecting...

  8. Failed tracheal intubation using a laryngoscope and intubating laryngeal mask.

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    Asai, T; Hirose, T; Shingu, K

    2000-04-01

    To report unexpected failed tracheal intubation using a laryngoscope and an intubating laryngeal mask, and difficult ventilation via a facemask, laryngeal mask and intubating laryngeal mask, in a patient with an unrecognized lingual tonsillar hypertrophy. A 63-yr-old woman, who had undergone clipping of an aneurysm seven weeks previously, was scheduled for ventriculo-peritoneal shunt. At the previous surgery, there had been no difficulty in ventilation or in tracheal intubation. Her trachea remained intubated nasally for 11 days after surgery. Preoperatively, her consciousness was impaired. There were no restrictions in head and neck movements or mouth opening. The thyromental distance was 7 cm. After induction of anesthesia, manual ventilation via a facemask with a Guedel airway was suboptimal and the chest expanded insufficiently. At laryngoscopy using a Macintosh or McCoy device, only the tip of the epiglottis, but not the glottis, could be seen, and tracheal intubation failed. There was a partial obstruction during manual ventilation through either the intubating laryngeal mask or conventional laryngeal mask; intubation through each device failed. Digital examination of the pharynx, after removal of the laryngeal mask, indicated a mass occupying the vallecula. Lingual tonsillar hypertrophy (1 x 1 x 2 cm) was found to be the cause of the failure. Awake fibrescope-aided tracheal intubation was accomplished. Unexpected lingual tonsillar hypertrophy can cause both ventilation and tracheal intubation difficult, and neither the laryngeal mask nor intubating laryngeal mask may be helpful in the circumstances.

  9. First-line tracheal resection and primary anastomosis for postintubation tracheal stenosis.

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    Elsayed, H; Mostafa, A M; Soliman, S; Shoukry, T; El-Nori, A A; El-Bawab, H Y

    2016-07-01

    Introduction Tracheal stenosis following intubation is the most common indication for tracheal resection and reconstruction. Endoscopic dilation is almost always associated with recurrence. This study investigated first-line surgical resection and anastomosis performed in fit patients presenting with postintubation tracheal stenosis. Methods Between February 2011 and November 2014, a prospective study was performed involving patients who underwent first-line tracheal resection and primary anastomosis after presenting with postintubation tracheal stenosis. Results A total of 30 patients (20 male) were operated on. The median age was 23.5 years (range: 13-77 years). Seventeen patients (56.7%) had had previous endoscopic tracheal dilation, four (13.3%) had had tracheal stents inserted prior to surgery and one (3.3%) had undergone previous tracheal resection. Nineteen patients (63.3%) had had a tracheostomy. Eight patients (26.7%) had had no previous tracheal interventions. The median time of intubation in those developing tracheal stenosis was 20.5 days (range: 0-45 days). The median length of hospital stay was 10.5 days (range: 7-21 days). The success rate for anastomoses was 96.7% (29/30). One patient needed a permanent tracheostomy. The in-hospital mortality rate was 3.3%: 1 patient died from a chest infection 21 days after surgery. There was no mortality or morbidity in the group undergoing first-line surgery for de novo tracheal lesions. Conclusions First-line tracheal resection with primary anastomosis is a safe option for the treatment of tracheal stenosis following intubation and obviates the need for repeated dilations. Endoscopic dilation should be reserved for those patients with significant co-morbidities or as a temporary measure in non-equipped centres.

  10. The Role of Tracheal Stenting As an Alternative Treatment in Cicatricial and Non-Operable Tracheal Stenosis

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    Reza Bagheri

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tracheal stenosis is normally caused by trauma, infection, benign and malignant tumors, prolonged intubation or tracheostomy. The best treatment for tracheal stenosis is resection and anastomosis of trachea. Yet the major surgical complication of tracheal surgery is postoperative stenosis. The goal of this paper is to study the result of tracheal stenting as a replacement therapy for patients suffering from tracheal stenosis who are not good candidates for surgery. Materials and Methods: This study presents the results of stenting in patients with: Inoperable tumoral stenosis,Non-tumoral stenosis being complicated due to prior surgeries,Inability to undergo a major surgery.The study was performed between September 2002 and July 2011 and poly flex stents were used by means of rigid bronchoscopy. Results: A total of 25 patients received stents during this study. Among them 15 patients suffered from benign and 10 suffered from malignant tracheal stenosis. The patients were followed up for at most 12 months after the stenting operation. The mean age of the patients was 35 years. The most common cause of stenosis was prolonged intubation (75%. The most common indication for stenting was the history of multiple tracheal operations. The most common complication of stenting and cause of stent removal was formation of granulation tissue. 30% of patients with benign tracheal stenosis were cured and about 10% improved until they could stand a major operation. Ten patients in benign group and 2 patients in malignant group (20% needed T-Tube insertion after stent removal but other patientcure by stenting. Conclusions: In benign cases stenting is associated with recurrence of symptoms which requires other therapeutic techniqus, so the stenting may not be named as a final solution in benign cases. However, this technique is the only method with approved efficacy for malignant cases with indication.

  11. Cryopreserved irradiated tracheal homograft reconstruction for subglottic-tracheal stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somyos Kunachak; Yongyudh Vajaradul; Boonchu Kulapaditharom

    1999-01-01

    Subglottic-tracheal stenosis is a common clinical entity. Handling on severe case is often problematic. Various tracheal replacement techniques have been used with varying degree of success and dispute. In this study we worked on cryopreserved irradiated tracheal homograft, of which its use in human has not been reported. The tracheas were harvested from donor cadavers within 24 hours of death in a sterile condition. After 1-2 weeks of preservation at -70 degree C, the grafts were irradiated at 25 kGy, then stored at -70 degree C until used. Four patients, 2 males and 2 females (aged 2-40 years, mean 16 years) with severe subglottic-tracheal stenosis underwent segmental tracheal graft reconstruction using this graft. Immunosuppressant was not given in any patient. The follow up period ranged from 11-1 5 months. Three patients were successfully decapulated, 1 patient developed local infection and dislodgement of intraluminal stent with subsequent restenosis. Postoperative tracheal lumen appeared near normal with histologic evidence of normal respiratory epithelium at the grafted site. In conclusion, cryopreserved irradiated tracheal homograft is a valuable alternative for tracheal transplant or reconstruction, without the need of immunosuppression

  12. Two cases of severe tracheal stenosis due to advanced adenoid cystic carcinoma of the trachea

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    Yuasa, Hiroshi; Akaogi, Eiichi; Morita, Riichiro; Onizuka, Masataka; Mitsui, Kiyofumi [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Clinical Medicine; Tsuji, Hirohiko

    1991-12-01

    Two cases of severe tracheal stenosis due to advanced nonresectable adenoid cystic carcinoma of the trachea were reported. Case 1 was a 38-year-old male who underwent emergency {sup 60}Co irradiation following endoscopic YAG laser irradiation. This approach was quite effective. Proton irradiation was effective against tumor recurrence. Case 2 was a 28-year-old female in whom emergency treatment for tracheal obstruction due to edema after laser therapy necessitated transient tracheal intubation. The tracheal stenosis due to recurrent tumor after {sup 60}Co irradiation was improved by insertion of an intraluminal permanent stent. (author).

  13. A new retrograde transillumination technique for videolaryngoscopic tracheal intubation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biro, P; Fried, E; Schlaepfer, M

    2018-01-01

    This single-centre, prospective trial was designed to assess the efficacy of a new retrograde transillumination device called the 'Infrared Red Intubation System' (IRRIS) to aid videolaryngoscopic tracheal intubation. We included 40 adult patients, who were undergoing elective urological surgery......-10])), credibility (10 (8-10 [5-10])) and ease of use (10 (9-10 [8-10])). Tracheal intubation with the system lasted 26 (16-32 [6-89]) s. No alternative technique of securing the airway was necessary. The lowest SpO2 during intubation was 98 (97-99 [91-100])%. We conclude that this method of retrograde...

  14. Treatment of Benign Tracheal Stenosis Using Endoluminal Spray Cryotherapy.

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    Bhora, Faiz Y; Ayub, Adil; Forleiter, Craig M; Huang, Chyun-Yin; Alshehri, Khalid; Rehmani, Sadiq; Al-Ayoubi, Adnan M; Raad, Wissam; Lebovics, Robert S

    2016-11-01

    Tracheal stenosis is a debilitating disorder with heterogeneity in terms of disease characteristics and management. Repeated recurrences substantially alter patients' quality of life. There is limited evidence for the use of spray cryotherapy (SCT) in the management of benign airway disease. To report our early results for the use of SCT in patients with benign tracheal stenosis. Data were extracted from the medical records of a consecutive series of patients with benign airway stenosis secondary to granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) (n = 13), prior tracheotomy or tracheal intubation (n = 8), and idiopathic strictures (n = 5) treated from September 1, 2013, to September 30, 2015, at a tertiary care hospital. Airway narrowing was quantified on a standard quartile grading scale. Response to treatment was assessed by improvement in airway caliber and the time interval for reintervention. Delivery of 4 5-second SCT cycles and 2 balloon dilatations. Twenty-six patients (median [range] age, 53 [16-83] years; 20 [77%] female) underwent 48 SCT sessions. Spray cryotherapy was successfully used without any substantial intraoperative or postoperative complications in all patients. In a median (range) follow-up of 11 (1-26) months, all patients had improvement in symptoms. Before the institution of SCT, 23 patients (88%) had grade III or IV stenosis. At the last evaluation after induction of SCT, 4 (15%) had grade III or IV stenosis, with a mean (SD) change of 1.39 (0.51) (P benign tracheal stenosis. Although efficacy evidence is limited for SCT, it may be useful for patients who have experienced treatment failure with conventional modalities. Further analysis of this cohort will determine the physiologic durability of the reported short-term changes. Additional trials are warranted for further evaluation of this modality.

  15. Complete subglottic tracheal stenosis managed with rigid bronchoscopy and T-tube placement

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    Kuruswamy Thurai Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgery is the preferred treatment modality for benign tracheal stenosis. Interventional bronchoscopy is used as a bridge to surgery or in instances when surgery is not feasible or has failed. Stenosis in the subglottic trachea is particularly a treatment challenge, in view of its proximity to the vocal cords. Herein, we describe a patient with complete tracheal stenosis in the subglottic region, which developed after prolonged intubation and mechanical ventilation. The patient developed recurrent stenosis despite multiple surgical and endoscopic procedures. We were able to manage the patient successfully with rigid bronchoscopy and Montgomery T-tube placement.

  16. [The cause and efficacy of benign tracheal stenosis].

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    Su, Zhu-quan; Wei, Xiao-qun; Zhong, Chang-hao; Chen, Xiao-bo; Luo, Wei-zhan; Guo, Wen-liang; Wang, Ying-zhi; Li, Shi-yue

    2013-09-01

    To analysis the causes of benign tracheal stenosis and evaluate the curative effect of intraluminal bronchoscopic treatment. 158 patients with benign tracheal stenosis in our hospital from September 2005 to September 2012 were collected to retrospectively analysis the causes and clinic features of tracheal stenosis. Interventional treatments through bronchoscopy were used to treat the benign tracheal stenosis and the curative effects were evaluated. 158 cases of benign tracheal stenosis were recruited to our study, 69.6% of them were young and middle-aged. The main causes of benign tracheal stenosis were as follows: secondary to postintubation or tracheotomy in 61.4% (97/158), tuberculosis in 16% (26/158), benign tumor in 5.1% (8/158) and other 27 cases. 94.3% patients improved in symptoms with alleviation immediately after bronchoscopic treatment, the average tracheal diameter increased form (4.22 ± 2.06) mm to (10.16 ± 2.99) mm (t = 21.48, P benign tracheal stenosis were increasing year by year. The most common cause of benign tracheal stenosis was postintubation and tracheotomy. Interventional treatments through bronchoscopy is effective in treating benign tracheal stenosis, but repeated interventional procedures may be required to maintain the favorable long-term effects.

  17. Management of Tracheal Deformity During Intubation: A Case Report

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    Sheng-Hua Wu

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Failure or difficulty in intubating the trachea can be either due to inability to visualize the glottis or some pathology at the level of or below the cords. This report describes a case of difficult intubation suspected of being related to neck scarring from previous surgery. Computed tomography (CT was used to evaluate the patient's airway and revealed upper tracheal angulation. We describe a method to secure the airway in this patient with a two-person technique by rotating an oral endotracheal tube 180° counterclockwise to adjust to the curvature of the trachea. Problems with intubation should be anticipated in patients with scarring of the neck, and equipment for aiding intubation should be on hand. Furthermore, we found that CT contributed to the assessment of the difficulty of intubation in this kind of patient.

  18. Transoral tracheal intubation of rodents using a fiberoptic laryngoscope.

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    Costa, D L; Lehmann, J R; Harold, W M; Drew, R T

    1986-06-01

    A fiberoptic laryngoscope which allows direct visualization of the deep pharynx and epiglottis has been developed for transoral tracheal intubation of small laboratory mammals. The device has been employed in the intubation and instillation of a variety of substances into the lungs of rats, and with minor modification, has had similar application in mice, hamsters, and guinea pigs. The simplicity and ease of handling of the laryngoscope permits one person to intubate large numbers of enflurane anesthetized animals either on an open counter top or in a glove-box, as may be required for administration of carcinogenic materials. Instillation of 7Be-labeled carbon particles into the lungs of mice, hamsters, rats, and guinea pigs resulted in reasonably consistent interlobal distribution of particles for each test animal species with minimal tracheal deposition. However, actual lung tissue doses of carbon exhibited some species dependence.

  19. Difficult Tracheal Intubation in Obese Gastric Bypass patients

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    Dohrn, Niclas; Sommer, Thorbjørn; Bisgaard, J.

    2016-01-01

    Endotracheal intubation is commonly perceived to be more difficult in obese patients than in lean patients. Primarily, we investigated the association between difficult tracheal intubation (DTI) and obesity, and secondarily, the association between DTI and validated scoring systems used to assess...... the airways, the association between DTI and quantities of anesthetics used to induce general anesthesia, and the association between DTI and difficulties with venous and arterial cannulation. This is a monocentric prospective observational clinical study of a consecutive series of 539 obese patients...... was 3.5 % and the patients with DTI were more frequently males, had higher CLC, higher American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status classification (ASA), and noticeably, a lower BMI compared to the patients with easy tracheal intubation. After adjustment with multivariable analyses body mass...

  20. Idiopathic tracheal stenosis: a clinicopathologic study of 63 cases and comparison of the pathology with chondromalacia.

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    Mark, Eugene J; Meng, Fanqing; Kradin, Richard L; Mathisen, Douglas J; Matsubara, Osamu

    2008-08-01

    Tracheal stenosis in adults usually is the result of mechanical injuries either from direct trauma or intubation. Rarely do cases develop in patients without such a precedent history, and there are few reports of the pathology of idiopathic tracheal stenosis (ITS). We reviewed clinicopathologically, 63 tracheal resections for tracheal stenosis in patients who had no antecedent explanation for their stenosis. We contrasted these 63 cases with 34 cases of tracheal stenosis owing to chondromalacia (CM) after mechanical injury. All 63 cases occurred in females, with a mean age of 49 years. The most common symptom was dyspnea on exertion. The average duration of symptoms was greater than 2 years. One-third of the patients gave a history of gastroesophageal reflux. All but one of the cases occurred in the subglottic region and/or upper one-third of the trachea. Pathologically, most cases showed extensive keloidal fibrosis and dilation of mucus glands, a finding that was not obvious in most cases of CM. ITS has relatively normal cartilage with smooth inner and outer perichondrium, whereas CM has extensive degeneration of cartilage with irregular border of inner perichondrium observable at shirt sleeve magnification. Immunohistochemical staining for estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor was positive in fibroblasts cells in most cases. ITS is a rare disease and restricted to females. It may represent some form of fibromatosis. ITS can be distinguished histologically from CM in tracheal resection specimens in most cases.

  1. The therapeutic effects and experience of tracheal stent implantation in managing severe tracheal stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lv Weifu; Zhang Xingming; Zhang Xuebing; Wang Weiyu; Hou Changlong

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic effects and experience of the tracheal stent implantation for the management of severe tracheal stenosis. Materials: Thirteen patients with severe tracheal stenosis of various causes underwent high kilovoltage radiography and computed tomography for evaluating the site, form and extent of the stenosis including 10 at the trachea, 1 at the right main bronchus and 2 at left main bronchus. The C2 catheter assisted with ultra-slipping guide wire was inserted into the trachea under fluoroscopy and then a replaced high shoring guide wire was pushed through the stenotic segment and retained the stent. Results: All stents were implanted successfully with successful rate 100% together with dyspnoeic improvements. The mean survival time was 6.2 months for patients with malignant neoplasm. One patient with benign tracheal stenosis has been followed-up for 5 years without restenosis. Conclusions: The tracheal stent implantation is an effective means for severe tracheal stenosis. (authors)

  2. Management of benign dynamic "A-shape" tracheal stenosis: a retrospective study of 60 patients.

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    Plojoux, Jérôme; Laroumagne, Sophie; Vandemoortele, Thomas; Astoul, Philippe J; Thomas, Pascal A; Dutau, Hervé

    2015-02-01

    Benign tracheal stenosis complicates tracheal intubation or tracheostomy in 0.6% to 65% of cases. Surgical resection is the standard treatment. Endoscopic management is used for inoperable patients with 17% to 69% success. Dynamic "A-shape" tracheal stenosis (DATS) results in a dynamic stenosis with anterior fracture of tracheal cartilage and frequently associated posterior malacia. We report the results of our multidisciplinary management. Sixty patients with DATS were included. Management decision was made during initial bronchoscopy. When suitable, patients were referred to thoracic surgery for tracheal resection. Posterior localized tracheomalacia was treated with laser photocoagulation of the posterior tracheal wall. Tracheal stents were placed if the stenosis persisted after laser treatment. The choice of stent (straight silicone, hour-glass shaped silicone, T-tube, or fully-covered self-expandable metallic stent) was based on operator's judgment. After 12 to 18 months, stents were removed. If the stenosis persisted after stent removal, surgery was reconsidered. If surgery was not possible, a stent was replaced. In case of satisfactory result, a stent was replaced only after recurrence. Stable patients after treatment were considered as success, requirement of long-term tracheostomy or T tube as failure, and long-term stent as partial success. All patients developed DATS after tracheostomy. Thirty-three patients had posterior tracheomalacia. In 13 patients, mild stenosis required only endoscopic surveillance. Two patients were referred to thoracic surgery for tracheal resection surgery. Endoscopic management was the initial therapy in 45 patients (75%) and was considered successful in 23 patients (51%), partially successful in 10 (22%), and failed in 12 (27%). Five patients with successful outcomes required only laser therapy. Overall 70 stents were placed in 35 patients, with a migration rate of 31%. The DATS management was successful in 63%. Stent migration

  3. Intubação traqueal Tracheal intubation

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    Toshio Matsumoto

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Revisar os conceitos atuais relacionados ao procedimento de intubação traqueal na criança. FONTES DOS DADOS: Seleção dos principais artigos nas bases de dados MEDLINE, LILACS e SciELO, utilizando as palavras-chave intubation, tracheal intubation, child, rapid sequence intubation, pediatric airway, durante o período de 1968 a 2006. SÍNTESE DOS DADOS: O manuseio da via aérea na criança está relacionado à sua fisiologia e anatomia, além de fatores específicos (condições patológicas inerentes, como malformações e condições adquiridas que influenciam decisivamente no seu sucesso. As principais indicações são manter permeável a aérea e controlar a ventilação. A laringoscopia e intubação traqueal determinam alterações cardiovasculares e reatividade de vias aéreas. O uso de tubos com balonete não é proibitivo, desde que respeitado o tamanho adequado para a criança. A via aérea difícil pode ser reconhecida pela escala de Mallampati e na laringoscopia direta. A utilização da seqüência rápida de intubação tem sido recomendada cada vez mais em pediatria, por facilitar o procedimento e apresentar menores complicações. A intubação traqueal deve ser realizada de modo adequado em circunstâncias especiais (alimentação prévia, disfunção neurológica, instabilidade de coluna espinal, obstrução de vias aéreas superiores, lesões laringotraqueais, lesão de globo ocular. A extubação deve ser meticulosamente planejada, pois pode falhar e necessitar de reintubação. CONCLUSÕES: A intubação traqueal de crianças necessita conhecimento, aprendizado e experiência, pois o procedimento realizado por pediatras inexperientes pode resultar em complicações ameaçadoras da vida.OBJECTIVE: To review current concepts related to the procedure of tracheal intubation in children. SOURCES: Relevant articles published from 1968 to 2006 were selected from the MEDLINE, LILACS and SciELO databases, using the

  4. Awake fiberoptic or awake video laryngoscopic tracheal intubation in patients with anticipated difficult airway management

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    Rosenstock, Charlotte Vallentin; Thøgersen, Bente; Afshari, Arash

    2012-01-01

    Awake flexible fiberoptic intubation (FFI) is the gold standard for management of anticipated difficult tracheal intubation. The purpose of this study was to compare awake FFI to awake McGrath® video laryngoscope, (MVL), (Aircraft Medical, Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom) intubation in patients...... with an anticipated difficult intubation. The authors examined the hypothesis that MVL intubation would be faster than FFI....

  5. Bronchoscopic Treatment in the Management of Benign Tracheal Stenosis: Choices for Simple and Complex Tracheal Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalar, Levent; Karasulu, Levent; Abul, Yasin; Özdemir, Cengiz; Sökücü, Sinem Nedime; Tarhan, Merve; Altin, Sedat

    2016-04-01

    Bronchoscopic treatment is 1 of the treatment choices for both palliative and definitive treatment of benign tracheal stenosis. There is no consensus on the management of these patients, however, especially patients having complex stenoses. The aim of the present study was to assess, in the largest group of patients with complex stenoses yet reported, which types of tracheal stenosis are amenable to optimal management by bronchoscopic treatment. The present study was a retrospective cohort study including 132 consecutive patients with benign tracheal stenoses diagnosed between August 2005 and January 2013. The mean age of the study population was 52 ± 18 years; 62 (47%) were women and 70 (53%) were men. Their lesions were classified as simple and complex stenoses. Simple stenoses (n = 6) were treated with 12 rigid and flexible bronchoscopic procedures (mean of 2 per patient); 5 stents were placed. The total success rate was 100%. Among the 124 complex stenoses, 4 were treated directly with surgical intervention. In total, 481 rigid and 487 flexible bronchoscopic procedures were performed in these patients. In this group, the success rate was 69.8%. From the present study, we propose that after accurate classification, interventional bronchoscopic management may have an important role in the treatment of benign tracheal stenosis. Bronchoscopic treatment should be considered as first-line therapy for simple stenoses, whereas complex stenoses need a multidisciplinary approach and often require surgical intervention. However, bronchoscopic treatment may be a valid conservative approach in the management of patients with complex tracheal stenosis who are not eligible for operative treatment. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Indications and interventional options for non-resectable tracheal stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Jenny Louise; Patterson, Caroline Marie

    2014-01-01

    Non-specific presentation and normal examination findings in early disease often result in tracheal obstruction being overlooked as a diagnosis until patients present acutely. Once diagnosed, surgical options should be considered, but often patient co-morbidity necessitates other interventional options. Non-resectable tracheal stenosis can be successfully managed by interventional bronchoscopy, with therapeutic options including airway dilatation, local tissue destruction and airway stenting. There are common aspects to the management of tracheal obstruction, tracheomalacia and tracheal fistulae. This paper reviews the pathogenesis, presentation, investigation and management of tracheal disease, with a focus on tracheal obstruction and the role of endotracheal intervention in management. PMID:24624290

  7. Awake tracheal intubation using Pentax airway scope in 30 patients: A Case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payal Kajekar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Pentax airway scope (AWS has been successfully used for managing difficult intubations. In this case series, we aimed to evaluate the success rate and time taken to complete intubation, when AWS was used for awake tracheal intubation. Methods: We prospectively evaluated the use of AWS for awake tracheal intubation in 30 patients. Indication for awake intubation, intubation time, total time to complete tracheal intubation, laryngoscopic view (Cormack and Lehane grade, total dose of local anaesthetic used, anaesthetists rating and patient′s tolerance of the procedure were recorded. Results: The procedure was successful in 25 out of the 30 patients (83%. The mean (standard deviation intubation time and total time to complete the tracheal intubation was 5.4 (2.4 and 13.9 (3.7 min, respectively in successful cases. The laryngeal view was grade 1 in 24 and grade 2 in one of 25 successful intubations. In three out of the five patients where the AWS failed, awake tracheal intubation was successfully completed with the assistance of flexible fibre optic scope (FOS. Conclusion: Awake tracheal intubation using AWS was successful in 83% of patients. Success rate can be further improved using a combination of AWS and FOS. Anaesthesiologists who do not routinely use FOS may find AWS easier to use for awake tracheal intubation using an oral route.

  8. [Tracheal Intubation by Paramedics in a Local Community: Current Situation and Future Challenges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takinami, Yoshikazu

    2016-03-01

    As of April 2013, 164 paramedics are certified to perform tracheal intubation in Fukui Prefecture. This study investigated the current situation surrounding tracheal intubation performed by paramedics in prehospital care. Subjects were 58 paramedics who completed practical training at our hospital. Post-training duration, number of tracheal intubation cases, number of attempts before successful tracheal intubation, disease involved, rate of return of spontaneous circulation, and prognosis were examined. Tracheal intubation was successful on the first attempt in 92% of cases. Rate of return of spontaneous circulation was high in paramedics whose post-training duration was short. No return of spontaneous circulation occurred after a second attempt. Four patients survived asphyxia or aspiration. It is important to perform successful tracheal intubation on the first attempt, to recognize the probability of successful resuscitation in patients with exogenous disease, and to strengthen the medical control system.

  9. Tracheal stenosis after treatment with metallic stent: a situation worse than the initial problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barreto, Jaime; Mejia, Bibiana; Nino, Federico; Garavito, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    Stens are a tubular device for use in trachea, carina or main bronchus to provide a support and maintain the permeability of these structures. There are two groups: Metallic and Silicone stent. Either metallic and silicone stents has a special properties. Metallic stent are very attractive option due to relative easy in their placement. The accumulated experience in this therapy has allowed to recognize several complications to take into consideration mainly in patients with tracheal benign stenosis. FDA has recommended don't use metallic stents, covered and not covered in benign diseases. We report a case of a tracheal stenosis secondary to prolonged ortho tracheal intubation that required extensive interventions to control symptoms of central airway obstruction, between April and July of 2005.

  10. Tracheal resection and anastomosis after traumatic tracheal stenosis in a horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Timothy P; Hawkes, Claire S; Dixon, Padraic M

    2015-02-01

    To report a resection and anastomosis technique to treat trauma-induced tracheal stenosis. Case report. A 9-year-old Warmblood gelding. Endoscopy, radiography, and ultrasonography were used to diagnose a single ring tracheal stenosis; the stenotic region was resected and adjacent tracheal rings anastomosed with an end-to-end technique. The anastomosis healed completely despite formation of a unilateral partial mucosal stenosis "web," which was subsequently removed by transendoscopic laser surgery. During tracheal anastomosis, the left recurrent laryngeal nerve was damaged, causing laryngeal hemiplegia, later treated successfully by laryngoplasty. The horse returned to its previous level of work. This tracheal resection and anastomosis technique successfully provided the horse with a large tracheal lumen, and despite major complications, allowed a return to full athletic work. © Copyright 2014 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  11. Management of complex benign post-tracheostomy tracheal stenosis with bronchoscopic insertion of silicon tracheal stents, in patients with failed or contraindicated surgical reconstruction of trachea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Darwiche, Kaid; Visouli, Aikaterini N; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Christofis, Christos; Stylianaki, Aikaterini; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Mpakas, Andreas; Courcoutsakis, Nicolaos; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2012-11-01

    Tracheal stenosis is a potentially life-threatening condition. Tracheostomy and endotracheal intubation remain the commonest causes of benign stenosis, despite improvements in design and management of tubes. Post-tracheostomy stenosis is more frequently encountered due to earlier performance of tracheostomy in the intensive care units, while the incidence of post-intubation stenosis has decreased with application of high-volume, low-pressure cuffs. In symptomatic benign tracheal stenosis the gold standard is surgical reconstruction (often after interventional bronchoscopy). Stenting is reserved for symptomatic tracheal narrowing deemed inoperable, due to local or general reasons: long strictures, inflammation, poor respiratory, cardiac or neurological status. When stenting is decided, silicone stent insertion is considered the treatment of choice in the presence of inflammation and/or when removal is desirable. We inserted tracheal silicone stents (Dumon) under general anaesthesia through rigid bronchoscopy in two patients with benign post-tracheostomy stenosis: a 39-year old woman with failed initial operation, and continuous relapses with proliferation after multiple bronchscopic interventions, and a 20-year old man in a poor neurological status, with a long tracheal stricture involving the subglottic larynx (lower posterior part), and inflamed tracheostomy site tissues (positive for methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus). The airway was immediately re-establish, without complications. At 15- and 10-month follow-up (respectively) there was no stent migration, luminal patency was maintained without: adjacent structure erosion, secretion adherence inside the stents, granulation at the ends. Tracheostomy tissue inflammation was resolved (2(nd) patient), new infection was not noted. The patients maintain good respiratory function and will be evaluated for scheduled stent removal. Silicone stents are removable, resistant to microbial colonization and are

  12. Tracheal intubation in the ICU: Life saving or life threatening?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jigeeshu V Divatia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tracheal intubation (TI is a routine procedure in the intensive care unit (ICU, and is often life saving. However, life-threatening complications occur in a significant proportion of procedures, making TI perhaps one the most common but underappreciated airway emergencies in the ICU. In contrast to the controlled conditions in the operating room (OR, the unstable physiologic state of critically ill patients along with underevaluation of the airways and suboptimal response to pre-oxygenation are the major factors for the high incidence of life-threatening complications like severe hypoxaemia and cardiovascular collapse in the ICU. Studies have shown that strategies planned for TI in the OR can be adapted and extrapolated for use in the ICU. Non-invasive positive-pressure ventilation for pre-oxygenation provides adequate oxygen stores during TI for patients with precarious respiratory pathology. The intubation procedure should include not only airway management but also haemodynamic, gas exchange and neurologic care, which are often crucial in critically ill patients. Hence, there is a necessity for the implementation of an Intubation Bundle during routine airway management in the ICU. Adherence to a plan for difficult airway management incorporating the use of intubation aids and airway rescue devices and strategies is useful.

  13. Application of Electrocautery Needle Knife Combined with Balloon Dilatation versus Balloon Dilatation in the Treatment of Tracheal Fibrotic Scar Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Liyan; Li, Congcong; Chen, Min; Mu, Deguang; Jin, Faguang

    Electrocautery needle knives can largely reduce scar and granulation tissue hyperplasia and play an important role in treating patients with benign stricture. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of electrocautery needle knife combined with balloon dilatation versus balloon dilatation alone in the treatment of tracheal stenosis caused by tracheal intubation or tracheotomy. We retrospectively analysed the clinical data of 43 patients with tracheal stenosis caused by tracheotomy or tracheal intubation in our department from January 2013 to January 2016. Among these 43 patients, 23 had simple web-like stenosis and 20 had complex steno sis. All patients were treated under general anaesthesia, and the treatment methods were (1) balloon dilatation alone, (2) needle knife excision of fibrotic tissue combined with balloon dilatation, and (3) needle knife radial incision of fibrotic tissue combined with balloon dilatation. After treatment the symptoms, such as shortness of breath, were markedly improved immediately in all cases. The stenosis degree of patients who were treated with the elec-trocautery needle knife combined with balloon dilatation had better improvement compared with that of those treated with balloon dilatation treatment alone after 3 months (0.45 ± 0.04 vs. 0.67 ± 0.05, p knife combined with balloon dilatation is an effective and safe treatment for tracheal fibrotic stenosis compared with balloon dilatation alone. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Polyflex stenting of tracheomalacia after surgery for congenital tracheal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibballs, James; Fasulakis, Stephen; Robertson, Colin F; Berkowitz, Robert G; Massie, John; Brizard, Christian; Rose, Elizabeth; Bekhit, Elhamy; Eyres, Robert; Ragg, Philip

    2007-01-01

    Polyflex self-expanding stents (Rüsch, Germany) were used in three young children who had presented with life-threatening long-segment tracheal stenosis with bronchial stenosis in two cases. Two children had slide tracheoplasties and subsequently aortic homografts and another tracheal resection and autotracheoplasty. However, in all cases persistent lower tracheal malacia necessitated stenting. Complications of granuloma, stent migration or dislodgement occurred in all cases. A fatal tracheo-aortic fistula occurred in one child. Granuloma in one was treated successfully with steroids. One child survives.

  15. [Segmental tracheal resection and anastomosis for the treatment of cicatricial stenosis in cervical tracheal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, P C; Luo, J S; Liu, Z; Bian, K; Guo, Z H; Ma, R N

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of segmental tracheal resection with end-to-end anastomosis for cicatricial cervical tracheal stenosis. The clinical outcomes of 40 patients treated with tracheal resection were retrospectively reviewed. There were 28 male patients and 12 female patients with the age ranged from 6 to 64 years (mean 33.7 years). The degree of stenosis was classified according to Myer-Cotton classification as follows: grade Ⅱ (n=7), grade Ⅲ (n=22) and grade Ⅳ (n=11). The stenosis extension ranged from 1.0 to 4.3 cm (mean 2.5 cm). The causes of the stenosis were postintubation (n=33), cervical trauma (n=6) and resection of tracheal neoplasm (n=1). Thirty-four(85.0%) patients were decannulated and 6 failed. Of the 6 patients failed, 4 were decannulated after reoperation with the sternohyoid myocutaneous flap or thyroid alar cartilage graft. Complications occurred in 10 patients. In 8 patients granulation tissues formed at the site of the tracheal anastomosis, which needed endoscopic resction, and in 2 patients anastomosic dehiscence occurred. No injury to recurrent laryngeal nerve or trachoesophageal fistula occurred. Segmental tracheal resection with end-to-end anastomosis is an effective surgical method for tracheal stenosis, which has a higher successful rate for primary operation and shorter therapeutic period.

  16. Evaluation of the Airtraq and Macintosh laryngoscopes in patients at increased risk for difficult tracheal intubation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Maharaj, C H

    2008-02-01

    The Airtraq, a novel single use indirect laryngoscope, has demonstrated promise in the normal and simulated difficult airway. We compared the ease of intubation using the Airtraq with the Macintosh laryngoscope, in patients at increased risk for difficult tracheal intubation, in a randomised, controlled clinical trial. Forty consenting patients presenting for surgery requiring tracheal intubation, who were deemed to possess at least three characteristics indicating an increased risk for difficulty in tracheal intubation, were randomly assigned to undergo tracheal intubation using a Macintosh (n = 20) or Airtraq (n = 20) laryngoscope. All patients were intubated by one of three anaesthetists experienced in the use of both laryngoscopes. Four patients were not successfully intubated with the Macintosh laryngoscope, but were intubated successfully with the Airtraq. The Airtraq reduced the duration of intubation attempts (mean (SD); 13.4 (6.3) vs 47.7 (8.5) s), the need for additional manoeuvres, and the intubation difficulty score (0.4 (0.8) vs 7.7 (3.0)). Tracheal intubation with the Airtraq also reduced the degree of haemodynamic stimulation and minor trauma compared to the Macintosh laryngoscope.

  17. Resection and anastomosis for benign tracheal stenosis: Single institution experience of 18 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arvind; Asaf, Belal Bin; Puri, Harsh Vardhan; Abdellateef, Amr

    2017-01-01

    Tracheal stenosis is a complex condition caused by altered inflammatory response to injury and subsequent excessive circumferential scar formation. Surgical resection, wherever possible, offers the best long-term results. Nonsurgical methods provide immediate relief to all can be curative in few but mostly serve as an excellent bridge to surgery in majority. The purpose of this study is to retrospectively evaluate the outcome following surgery for benign tracheal stenosis at our center. This retrospective analysis was conducted on 18 patients who underwent resection and anastomosis for tracheal stenosis at our center between March 2012 and December 2015. Their records were analyzed for demography, history, clinical presentation, computed tomography, bronchoscopy details, preoperative interventions, indications for and details of surgery, the procedure performed, postoperative complications, and course during 6 months follow-up. The patients had a varied list of pathologies for which they were either intubated or tracheostomized. The length of stenosis ranged between 1 cm and 4 cm. The diameter of stenotic segment ranged between 0 mm and 10 mm. Average length of resected segment was 3 cm, and number of tracheal rings resected ranged from 2 to 9. Postoperative complications occurred in four patients (22.22%). All our patients were in the "excellent outcome" category at discharge as well as at 3 months follow-up. Surgical management of tracheal stenosis is challenging and requires multidisciplinary team approach. Thorough preoperative preparation and multidisciplinary planning regarding need for and timing of surgery, meticulous intraoperative technique, and aggressive postoperative care is key to successful surgery, which can provide long-lasting cure to these patients.

  18. Resection and anastomosis for benign tracheal stenosis: Single institution experience of 18 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tracheal stenosis is a complex condition caused by altered inflammatory response to injury and subsequent excessive circumferential scar formation. Surgical resection, wherever possible, offers the best long-term results. Nonsurgical methods provide immediate relief to all can be curative in few but mostly serve as an excellent bridge to surgery in majority. The purpose of this study is to retrospectively evaluate the outcome following surgery for benign tracheal stenosis at our center. Materials and Methods: This retrospective analysis was conducted on 18 patients who underwent resection and anastomosis for tracheal stenosis at our center between March 2012 and December 2015. Their records were analyzed for demography, history, clinical presentation, computed tomography, bronchoscopy details, preoperative interventions, indications for and details of surgery, the procedure performed, postoperative complications, and course during 6 months follow-up. Results: The patients had a varied list of pathologies for which they were either intubated or tracheostomized. The length of stenosis ranged between 1 cm and 4 cm. The diameter of stenotic segment ranged between 0 mm and 10 mm. Average length of resected segment was 3 cm, and number of tracheal rings resected ranged from 2 to 9. Postoperative complications occurred in four patients (22.22%. All our patients were in the “excellent outcome” category at discharge as well as at 3 months follow-up. Conclusions: Surgical management of tracheal stenosis is challenging and requires multidisciplinary team approach. Thorough preoperative preparation and multidisciplinary planning regarding need for and timing of surgery, meticulous intraoperative technique, and aggressive postoperative care is key to successful surgery, which can provide long-lasting cure to these patients.

  19. Nitinol memmo-alloy stents for benign and malignant tracheal stensis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhongmin; Wu Chaoxian; Gong Ju; Zheng Yunfeng; Gu Xuezhang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To observe the therapeutic and side effects of tracheal stents in tracheal stenosis caused by tracheal malacia and malignant tumours. Methods: Twenty-five patients treated with tracheal stents were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Tracheal stents have been implanted successfully in twenty-five patients through fiberbronchoscope or tracheal intubation, and dyspnoea improved greatly after the procedure. Conclusions: Tracheal stents can relieve symptoms and improve the life quality in patients with tracheal stenosis caused by malignant tumors or tracheal malacia. (authors)

  20. [Self-expanding nitinol stents in proximal tracheal stenosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, B; Mann, W; Heussel, C P; Scherhag, A; Schlegel, J; Kauczor, H U

    2000-03-01

    The use of silicone- or metal stents in stenosis of the distal trachea and the bronchial system is a customary procedure [1-4], for example after tumor invasion or cicatricial stenosis after transplantation. In the proximal part of the trachea, on smaller, short and soft strictures we try to stabilise the trachea by the implantation of rings. Other methods are tracheal plasty or transverse tracheal resectomy [5-7]. In the case of longer or nearer subglottal stenoses the positioning of self-expanding nitinol stents has proven a simple, gentle and well-tolerated alternative procedure even in very serious disorders [1, 8, 9]. These stents can be placed in short narcosis under endoscopic control without great strain on the patient. We placed nitinol-stents in the proximal part of the trachea in eleven cases. In five cases dyspnoea caused by a tracheal collapse improved. In two further cases a tracheal stenosis with massive granulation tissue and cicatricial pull under an inlaid tracheal cannula was removed and the tracheostoma was closed. In four cases a solid, scarred and cartilaginous stenosis in the area of the cricoid and the upper tracheal rings was widened with laser and later on stented. Over an observation time of two years no complications showed safe one case in which a directly postoperative dislocation was repositioned quickly. The patients live without restrictions through the tracheal stenosis or a tracheostoma. In the best possible case epithelialization over the metal meshes develops so that a nearly normal mucus transportation is possible [1, 10-12].

  1. Laryngeal mask airway guided tracheal intubation in a neonate with the Pierre Robin syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tom Giedsing; Joensen, Henning; Henneberg, Steen Winther

    1995-01-01

    Endotracheal intubation in infants with the Pierre Robin syndrome may sometimes be impossible to accomplish by conventional means. To aid difficult tracheal intubation many different techniques have been described. We present a case, in which we successfully intubated a small-for-date newborn boy...... with the Pierre Robin syndrome by using a modified laryngeal mask airway (no. 1) as a guide for the endotracheal tube. The technique is easy to perform, less traumatic and less time-consuming than multiple attempts at laryngoscopy or blind tracheal intubation....

  2. Balloon dilation and airway stenting for benign and malignant tracheal stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Jianhai; Yang Renjie; Zhang Hongzhi

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effectiveness of balloon dilation and airway stenting performed under fluoroscopic guidance for the treatment of benign and malignant tracheal stenosis. Methods: Under fluoroscopic guidance, balloon dilation and airway stenting were performed in 45 patients with tracheobronchial stricture. Of the 45 patients,malignant tracheal stenosis was seen in 37, including mediastinal nodal metastases (n=14), esophageal carcinoma (n=13), lung carcinoma (n= 4), adenocarcinoma of bronchus (n=3), lymphoma (n=2) and laryngocarcinoma (n=1), and benign tracheal stenosis was seen in 8, including endobronchial tuberculosis (n=6), retrosternal thyroid adenoma (n=1) and endotracheal intubation (n=1). Airway stenting with self-expandable metal stent was employed in 38 patients and balloon dilation in 7 patients. All the procedures were performed under fluoroscopic guidance. Results: A total of 53 self-expandable metal stents was implanted in 38 patients. The clinical symptoms were immediately relived after the procedure in all patients except for one patient who died from choking of sputum. No stent migration was observed. Restenosis developed in 4 patients, which was successfully treated with repeated stenting and balloon dilation. Nineteen times of balloon dilation procedure were accomplished in 7 patients. Marked remission of clinical symptoms was seen in most cases. During a follow-up period (ranged from 0 to 124 months with a mean of 24.5 months) 31 patients died. Conclusion: For both benign and malignant tracheal stenosis, balloon dilation with airway stenting performed under fluoroscopic guidance is a safe and efficient therapy with instant curative effect in relieving clinical symptoms. (authors)

  3. Efficacy of transoral intraluminal Wallstents for tracheal stenosis or tracheomalacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casiano, R R; Numa, W A; Nurko, Y J

    2000-10-01

    The efficacy and safety of intraluminal Wallstent Endoprosthesis (Boston Scientific/ Medi-Tech, Quincy, MA) placement to restore airway patency in patients with tracheal stenosis or tracheomalacia are unknown. Retrospective review in setting of tertiary, referral, and academic center. A retrospective review of 13 consecutive patients over a 2-year period who underwent transoral resection of tracheal stenosis and immediate transoral Wallstent placement. One patient had tracheomalacia. All of the patients were considered at high risk for transcervical surgery or had failed prior traditional open procedures. The average patient age was 54.2 years, with nine male and four female patients. All had Cotton/Myer stenoses (grades II to IV) with moderate to severe degrees of inspiratory stridor. Four patients were tracheotomy dependent. The length of stenosis varied from 1 to 4 cm. One patient had a 10-cm segment of tracheomalacia. At the time of writing, none of the patients has had a problem with significant migration or extrusion and most of the patients have incorporated the stent well without any short-term obstructive granulation tissue. After a mean follow-up of 15 months (range, 4-24 mo). 10 of the 12 patients with stenosis (83%) have remained free of any inspiratory noise during breathing. The one patient with tracheomalacia also has remained free of symptoms. Transoral Wallstents appear to be safe and may be a reasonable alternative in the restoration of airway patency in select patients with tracheal stenosis or tracheomalacia.

  4. Stent placement for tracheal stenosis in patients with esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, Keigo; Hata, Yoshinobu; Sasamoto, Shuichi; Takahashi, Shoji; Sato, Fumitomo; Tamaki, Kazuyoshi; Goto, Hidenori; Yuasa, Rena

    2011-01-01

    Tracheal invasion including tracheal bifurcation due to esophageal cancer can sometimes cause serious complications of the airway, but such cases sometimes improve quickly following chemoradiation treatment. The absolute indications for stent replacement in the airway for this disorder and the optimal choice of stent are herein discussed. Between 1992 and 2010, 28 patients with airway stenosis, including 7 patients with esophago-tracheal fistula, were treated by placement of various stents; namely, 12 patients received Dumon stents, 3 patients had Dynamic stents, 10 patients were given Ultraflex stents, while 3 other patients were treated without the use of stents. Severe dyspnea in the supine position was observed, which mainly originated from invasion to the membranous portion of the trachea. Airway patency was maintained after stent replacement, although the median survival time of such cases was only 4 months. Three patients with severe dyspnea who could lie in a supine position recovered after undergoing chemoradiation treatment without stent replacement. No cases of stent removal were observed after chemoradiation treatment. Chemoradiation treatment for esophageal cancer was found to be effective for the management of airway disturbances, and thus the absolute indications for stent replacement are restricted to patients who cannot lie in a supine position due to severe impairment of ventilation during radiation therapy, as well as patients presenting with tracheobroncho-esophageal fistula. Concerning stent selection, a metal stent should be the first choice for tracheal stenosis due to its ease of insertion, because there is no substantial difference between silicone and metal stents regarding the treatment of tracheal stenosis. However, it is important to note that a silicone Y stent is useful for the treatment of tracheal bifurcation. (author)

  5. Treatment of a case of tracheal stenosis in a dog with tracheal resection and anastomosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutlu, Z.; Acar, S.E.; Perk, C.

    2003-01-01

    A case of tracheal stenosis in the cervical portion of the trachea was encountered in a 5.5-month-old St. Bernard-Rottweiler cross dog. Breathing difficulty was seen in the clinical examination and presence of an obvious narrowing between the 3rd-5th cervical tracheal rings was determined in the radiological examination. Under general anesthesia the portion with stenosis was resected and the healthy trachea ends were anastomosed using the split cartilage technique. In the postoperative period the breathing difficulty disappeared and there was no development of a new stenosis in the anastomosis region. In the late period check-up the patient was seen to lead a healthy life

  6. Tracheal stenosis: our experience at a tertiary care centre in India with special regard to cause and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Satish; Mohan, Sharad; Mandal, Ghanashyam; Nilakantan, Ajith

    2014-01-01

    Tracheal stenosis (TS), a challenging problem, is a known complication of prolonged intubation and tracheostomy. The management involves a multidisciplinary approach with multiple complex procedures. In this study we discuss our experience with severe TS with regards to patient characteristics, cause and management. A retrospective analysis of 20 patients of severe TS treated at a tertiary care centre was evaluated. Inclusion criteria were all patients with severe TS who required surgical intervention. Exclusion criteria were patients with associated laryngeal stenosis and TS due to cancer. Demographic data was recorded and findings relating to aetiology, characteristics of stenosis and the various aspects of therapeutic procedures performed are discussed with review of literature. Descriptive analysis of data were performed SPSS 18. Results of the 20 patients, 17 patients (85 %) developed TS post tracheostomy, or post intubation and subsequent tracheostomy. 13 Patients (65 %) had true stenosis of which 7 patients (35 %) had simple web or circumferential fibrosis and 6 patients (30 %) had complex stenosis. Seven patients (35 %) had granulations causing severe TS which were mostly suprastomal (5 patients), stomal (5 patients) and combined stomal and suprastomal (3 patients). The average length of stenosis was 3.57 cm (0.5-8 cm). Montgomery t tube insertion was a common procedure in 18 patients (90 %) pre or post intervention. Each patient underwent an average of 3.4 procedures during their course of treatment which included rigid bronchoscopy and mechanical debulking, Nd YAG laser, KTP laser, balloon dilatation and use of stents. Among the 7 patients with granulations 100 % successful decanulation was noted with endoscopic management whereas in 13 patients with true stenosis, 10 patients (76.9 %) required open surgical management (8 tracheal resection and anastomosis and 2 tracheoplasty) with 80 % successful decanulation, 2 patients (15.4 %) were treated

  7. Tubeless tracheal resection and reconstruction for management of benign stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caronia, Francesco Paolo; Loizzi, Domenico; Nicolosi, Tommaso; Castorina, Sergio; Fiorelli, Alfonso

    2017-12-01

    We reported a tubeless tracheal resection and reconstruction for the management of benign posttracheostomy tracheal stenosis. A 34-year-old man with stridor, severe respiratory distress, and recurrent pneumonia was referred to our attention for treatment of benign posttracheostomy tracheal stenosis. As he refused general anesthesia, the procedure was performed while he was under local anesthesia and spontaneous ventilation. Sedation was started with infusion of dexmedetomidine 0.7 mg/kg/min and of remifentanil 0.5 mg/kg/h; also, 40%-50% oxygen was delivered using a laryngeal mask at a rate of 3.5 mL/min. An additional dose of 2% lidocaine was injected into the surgical site during the operation to achieve an adequate level of anesthesia. A standard resection and reconstruction of trachea was carried out and no recurrence was found in the follow-up of 41 months. Tubeless tracheal surgery seems to be a feasible and safe procedure. Larger prospective series should validate our results. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Laryngotracheal Injury following Prolonged Endotracheal Intubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mehdizadeh

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prolonged endotracheal intubation is a growing method for supporting ventilation in patients who require intensive care. Despite considerable advancement in endotracheal intubation, this method still has some complications; the most important is laryngo-tracheal injuries. Methods: Over a 2-year period, this retrospective study was conducted on 57 patients with history of prolonged intubation who were referred to the ENT Department of Amir Alam Hospital. For each patient, a complete evaluation including history, physical examination, and direct laryngoscopy and bronchoscopy was done under general anesthesia. Results: Fifty-seven patients (44 male; mean age, 23.014.7 years were studied. Mean intubation period was 15.88 days. The most common presenting symptom was dyspnea (62%. Head trauma was responsible for most cases of intubation (72.4%. The most common types of tracheal and laryngeal lesions were tracheal (56.9% and subglottic (55.2% stenosis, respectively. Mean length of tracheal stenosis was 0.810.83 cm. There was a statistically significant relationship between length of tracheal stenosis and intubation period (P=0.0001 but no relation was observed between tracheal stenosis and age, sex, and etiology of intubation (All P=NS. Among the glottic lesions, inter- arytenoids adhesion was the most common lesion (25.9%. No statistically significant relation was found between glottic and subglottic lesions and age, sex and intubation period (all P=NS. Length of stenosis and intubation period was significantly greater in tracheal/ subglottic lesions than those in glottic/ supraglottic lesions (all P=NS. Conclusion: After prolonged endotracheal intubation, laryngo-tracheal lesions had no relation with patient’s age, sex, and cause of intubation.There was direct relation between length of tracheal stenosis and intubation period. Glottic lesions were more commonly observed in head trauma patients. Lesion length and intubation

  9. [Circular tracheal resection for cicatrical stenosis and functioning tracheostomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parshin, V D; Titov, V A; Parshin, V V; Parshin, A V; Berikkhanov, Z; Amangeldiev, D M

    To analyze the results of tracheal resection for cicatricial stenosis depending on the presence of tracheostomy. 1128 patients with tracheal cicatricial stenosis were treated for the period 1963-2015. The first group consisted of 297 patients for the period 1963-2000, the second group - 831 patients for the period 2001-2015. Most of them 684 (60.6%) were young and able-bodied (age from 21 to 50 years). In the first group 139 (46.8%) out of 297 patients had functioning tracheostomy. For the period 2001-2015 tracheostomy was made in 430 (51.7%) out of 831 patients with cicatricial stenosis. Time of cannulation varied from a few weeks to 21 years. Re-tracheostomy within various terms after decanulation was performed in 68 (15.8%) patients. Tracheal resection with anastomosis was performed in 59 and 330 in both groups respectively. At present time these operations are performed more often in view of their standard fashion in everyday practice. In the second group tracheal resection followed by anastomosis was observed in 110 (25.6%) out of 430 patients with tracheostomy that is 4.4 times more often than in previous years. In total 2 patients died after 330 circular tracheal resections within 2001-2015 including one patient with and one patient without tracheostomy. Mortality was 0.6%. Moreover, this value was slightly higher in patients operated with a functioning tracheostomy compared with those without it - 0.9 vs. 0.5% respectively. The causes of death were bleeding into tracheobronchial lumen and pulmonary embolism. The source of bleeding after tracheal resection was innominate artery. Overall incidence of postoperative complications was 2 times higher in tracheostomy patients compared with those without it - 22 (20%) vs. 26 (11.8%) cases respectively. Convalescence may be achieved in 89.8% patients after circular tracheal resection. Adverse long-term results are associated with postoperative complications. So their prevention and treatment will improve the

  10. The results of surgical treatment of proximal long segment tracheal stenosis using bilateral hyoid bone cutting with suprahyoid release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    khadivi E

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Post-intubation tracheal stenosis is a serious problem and surgical resection is the method of choice in long segment tracheal stenosis treatment. The aim of this study was to review the results of surgical treatment of long segment post intubation tracheal stenosis and the role of bilateral hyoid bone cutting in supra- hyoid release technique."n"nMethods: Between 2004 to 2008, 14 patients with proximal long segment tracheal stenosis with resection of more than 40% of trachea length were evaluated regarding surgical technique and post-operative results."n"nResults: The mean age of patients was 22.2±0.4 years. Etiology in all patients were head trauma and prolonged intubation and all patients had tracheostomy at the time of trearment. Average time between surgery and first admission was 4.5±0.5 months. Average length of stenosis and resected segment were 3.6±0.5 and 4.3±0.5cm respectively. Average increased length of trachea after bilateral hyoid bone cutting was 1.1±0.3cm. Postoperative complications occurred in one patient with wound infection, and 4 patients had stenosis recurrence which was treated in 3 patients using multiple dilation. Quality of life 2 years after surgery in 71% of patients were

  11. Tracheal intubation by inexperienced medical residents using the Airtraq and Macintosh laryngoscopes--a manikin study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Maharaj, Chrisen H

    2006-11-01

    The Airtraq laryngoscope is a novel intubation device that may possess advantages over conventional direct laryngoscopes for use by personnel that are infrequently required to perform tracheal intubation. We conducted a prospective study in 20 medical residents with little prior airway management experience. After brief didactic instruction, each participant took turns performing laryngoscopy and intubation using the Macintosh (Welch Allyn, Welch Allyn, NY) and Airtraq (Prodol Ltd. Vizcaya, Spain) devices, in 3 laryngoscopy scenarios in a Laerdal Intubation Trainer (Laerdal, Stavanger, Norway) and 1 scenario in a Laerdal SimMan manikin (Laerdal, Kent, UK). They then performed tracheal intubation of the normal airway a second time to characterize the learning curve. In all scenarios tested, the Airtraq decreased the duration of intubation attempts, reduced the number of optimization maneuvers required, and reduced the potential for dental trauma. The residents found the Airtraq easier to use in all scenarios compared with the Macintosh laryngoscope. The Airtraq may constitute a superior device for use by personnel infrequently required to perform tracheal intubation.

  12. Tracheal intubation in the emergency department: the Scottish district hospital perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, A G M; Graham, C A; Hall, R; Korsah, P; McGuffie, A C

    2007-06-01

    Tracheal intubation is the accepted gold standard for emergency department (ED) airway management. It may be performed by both anaesthetists and emergency physicians (EPs), with or without drugs. To characterise intubation practice in a busy district general hospital ED in Scotland over 40 months between 2003 and 2006. Crosshouse Hospital, a 450-bed district general hospital serving a mixed urban and rural population; annual ED census 58,000 patients. Prospective observational study using data collection sheets prepared by the Scottish Trauma Audit Group. Proformas were completed at the time of intubation and checked by investigators. Rapid-sequence induction (RSI) was defined as the co-administration of an induction agent and suxamethonium. 234 intubations over 40 months, with a mean of 6 per month. EPs attempted 108 intubations (46%). Six patients in cardiac arrest on arrival were intubated without drugs. 29 patients were intubated after a gas induction or non-RSI drug administration. RSI was performed on 199 patients. Patients with trauma constituted 75 (38%) of the RSI group. 29 RSIs (15%) were immediate (required on arrival at the ED) and 154 (77%) were urgent (required within 30 min of arrival at the ED). EPs attempted RSI in 88 (44%) patients and successfully intubated 85 (97%). Anaesthetists attempted RSI in 111 (56%) patients and successfully intubated 108 (97%). Anaesthetists had a higher proportion of good views at first laryngoscopy and there was a trend to a higher rate of successful intubation at the first attempt for anaesthetists. Complication rates were comparable for the two specialties. Tracheal intubations using RSI in the ED are performed by EPs almost as often as by anaesthetists in this district hospital. Overall success and complication rates are comparable for the two specialties. Laryngoscopy training and the need to achieve intubation at the first (optimum) attempt needs to be emphasised in EP airway training.

  13. Retention of tracheal intubation skills by novice personnel: a comparison of the Airtraq and Macintosh laryngoscopes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Maharaj, C H

    2007-03-01

    Direct laryngoscopic tracheal intubation is a potentially lifesaving manoeuvre, but it is a difficult skill to acquire and to maintain. These difficulties are exacerbated if the opportunities to utilise this skill are infrequent, and by the fact that the consequences of poorly performed intubation attempts may be severe. Novice users find the Airtraq laryngoscope easier to use than the conventional Macintosh laryngoscope. We therefore wished to determine whether novice users would have greater retention of intubation skills with the Airtraq rather than the Macintosh laryngoscope. Twenty medical students who had no prior airway management experience participated in this study. Following brief didactic instruction, each took turns performing laryngoscopy and intubation using the Macintosh and Airtraq devices in easy and simulated difficult laryngoscopy scenarios. The degree of success with each device, the time taken to perform intubation and the assistance required, and the potential for complications were then assessed. Six months later, the assessment process was repeated. No didactic instruction or practice attempts were provided on this latter occasion. Tracheal intubation skills declined markedly with both devices. However, the Airtraq continued to provide better intubating conditions, resulting in greater success of intubation, with fewer optimisation manoeuvres required, and reduced potential for dental trauma, particularly in the difficult laryngoscopy scenarios. The substantial decline in direct laryngoscopy skills over time emphasise the need for continued reinforcement of this complex skill.

  14. Tracheal intubation with rocuronium using a "modified timing principle".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Min A; Song, Jaegyok; Kim, Ju-Ri

    2013-03-01

    Rapid sequence induction (RSI) is indicated in various situations. Succinylcholine has been the muscle relaxant of choice for RSI, and rocuronium has become an alternative medicine for patients who cannot be administered succinylcholine for various reasons. Although rocuronium has the most rapid onset time among non-depolarizing muscle relaxants, the standard dose of rocuronium (0.6 mg/kg) takes 60 seconds to achieve appropriate muscle relaxation. We evaluated intubating conditions using the "modified timing principle" with rocuronium and succinylcholine. In this prospective controlled blinded study, all patients received 1.5 µg/kg fentanyl intravenously with preoxygenation for 2 minutes and were randomized to receive 0.6 mg/kg rocuronium followed by 1.5 mg/kg propofol or 1.5 mg/kg propofol and 1.5 mg/kg succinylcholine. The rocuronium group was intubated just after confirming loss of consciousness, and the succinylcholine group was intubated 1 minute after injecting succinylcholine. Intubation condition, timing of events, and complications were recorded. All patients were successfully intubated in both groups. Apnea time of the rocuronium group (38.5 seconds) was significantly shorter than that in the succinylcholine group (100.7 seconds). No significant differences were observed in loss of consciousness time or intubation time. The succinylcholine group tended to show better intubation conditions, but no significant difference was observed. None of the patients complained awareness of the intubation procedure or had respiratory difficulty during a postoperative interview. The modified RSI with rocuronium showed shorter intubation sequence, acceptable intubation conditions, and a similar level of complications compared to those of conventional RSI with succinylcholine.

  15. Treatment of Benign Tracheal Stenosis Utilizing Self-Expanding Nitinol Stents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sesterhenn, Andreas M.; Wagner, Hans-Joachim; Alfke, Heiko; Werner, Jochen A.; Lippert, Burkard M.

    2004-01-01

    We assessed the results of self-expanding metallic stent insertion into benign proximal tracheal stenosis in patients not appropriate or unfit for surgical repair. Proximal benign tracheal stenoses had occurred in 11 patients (7 men, 4 women, mean age 68.8 years) after long-time intubation (n = 6), tracheostomy (n = 4), or chondropathia (n = 1). Fourteen self-expanding nitinol stents were placed in the patients under general anesthesia with endoscopical and fluoroscopical guidance. Stent insertion was successful in all cases and led to immediate relief of the morphological and functional airway obstruction. No immediate complications were noted. During the mean follow-up period of 67.5 weeks we observed one recurrent dyspnea 3 months after implantation and granuloma formation at the stent insertion site in another patient. Both complications were successfully treated with additional stent insertion in one case and laser resection of granulomas in the other. Self-expanding nitinol stents should be considered for the treatment of benign proximal tracheal obstruction in selected patients for whom surgical repair is contraindicated

  16. A Prospective Observational Study of Technical Difficulty With GlideScope-Guided Tracheal Intubation in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Gurnaney, Harshad G; Stricker, Paul A; Galvez, Jorge A; Isserman, Rebecca S; Fiadjoe, John E

    2018-05-09

    The GlideScope Cobalt is one of the most commonly used videolaryngoscopes in pediatric anesthesia. Although visualization of the airway may be superior to direct laryngoscopy, users need to learn a new indirect way to insert the tracheal tube. Learning this indirect approach requires focused practice and instruction. Identifying the specific points during tube placement, during which clinicians struggle, would help with targeted education. We conducted this prospective observational study to determine the incidence and location of technical difficulties using the GlideScope, the success rates of various corrective maneuvers used, and the impact of technical difficulty on success rate. We conducted this observational study at our quaternary pediatric hospital between February 2014 and August 2014. We observed 200 GlideScope-guided intubations and documented key intubation-related outcomes. Inclusion criteria for patients were the number of advancement maneuvers required to intubate the trachea, the location where technical difficulty occurred, the types of maneuvers used to address difficulties, and the tracheal intubation success rate. We used a bias-corrected bootstrapping method with 300 replicates to determine the 95% confidence interval (CI) around the rate of difficulty with an intubation attempt. After excluding attempts by inexperienced clinicians, there were 225 attempts in 187 patients, 58% (131 of 225; bootstrap CI, 51.6%-64.6%]) of the attempts had technical difficulties. Technical difficulty was most likely to occur when inserting the tracheal tube between the plane of the arytenoid cartilages to just beyond the vocal cords: "zone 3." Clockwise rotation of the tube was the most common successful corrective maneuver in zone 3. The overall tracheal intubation success rate was 98% (CI, 95%-99%); however, the first attempt success rate was only 80% (CI, 74%-86%). Patients with technical difficulty had more attempts (median [interquartile range], 2 [1

  17. Haemodynamic changes and intubating conditions during tracheal intubation in children under anaesthesia: a comparative study of two induction regiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Šakić

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim To compare the haemodynamic changes and intubation conditionsfollowing induction of anaesthesia with alfentanil-propofol-rocuronium with those following alfentanil-propofol combinationin children.Methods A prospective, non-randomized and non blinded trialwas performed in 208 children ( ASA I-II, both gender, aged 2-12years undergoing elective adenoidectomy with or without tonsillectomy.Children scheduled for tonsillectomy or adenotonsillectomyreceived alfentanil 0.02 mg kg-1, propofol 2 mg kg-1 androcuronium 0.45 mg kg-1 before tracheal intubation (R-group.Children scheduled for adenoidectomy received alfentanil 0.02mg kg-1and propofol 3 mg kg-1 before intubation (C-group. Haemodynamicvalues (heart rate, systolic arterial pressure, diastolicarterial pressure, mean arterial pressure were recorded at predeterminedtime intervals before surgical incision. The intubatingconditions were evaluated applying the Copenhagen Scoring System(excellent, good, poor.Results There was no statistical difference in haemodynamicbaseline values, neither prior nor after the intubation betweenthe two groups. There was a statistically significant increase inheart rate, systolic and diastolic arterial pressure after intubationin both groups (p<0.05. Mean arterial pressure after the intubationincreased statistically significantly only in R-group (p=0.001.There was no hypotension, bradycardia, hypoxemia or other complications.Overall intubation conditions were scored excellent in72.3%, good in 21.5% and poor in 6.2% patients. There were nosignificant differences in intubation conditions between the twogroups (p=0.244Conclusion Both induction regiments provided the clinically acceptablehaemodynamics and intubation conditions during trachealintubation in children.

  18. Comparative efficacy of Combination of Propofol or Thiopental with Remifentanil on Tracheal Intubation without Muscle Relaxants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    k Naseri

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: In some medical situations administration of muscle relaxants after intravenous anesthetics for tracheal intubation may be unnecessary or sometimes could be hazardous. In such situations, replacing an alternative drug for the facilitation of tracheal intubation is obvious. Remifentanil is a short acting opioid drug which may be useful in solving this problem. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of propofol or thiopental in combination with remifentanil in the absence of muscle relaxants on larengoscopy and intubation conditions in general anesthesia. Materials & Methods: This is a randomized double-blind clinical trial which was performed in 1386 in Be’sat hospital of Sanandaj. Forty two ASA 1 and 2 patients recruited to receive propofol, 2 Mg/Kg, or thiopental, 5Mg/K. All patients received lidocaine, 1.5 Mg/Kg, and remifentanil, 2.5 µg/Kg, 30 seconds before anesthetics administration. larengoscopy and tracheal intubation were done 90 seconds after induction of anesthesia. On the basis of mask ventilation, jaw relaxation, vocal cords position and patient's response to intubations and endotracheal tube cuff inflation the intubation conditions were assessed and recorded as excellent, good ,acceptable or poor. The mean arterial pressure and heart rate were measured before and after anesthetics administration and also 45 seconds and two and five minutes after intubations. Data were analyzed by X2, fisher exact test ant student T-test using SPSS software. Results: Excellent or good larengoscopy and intubation conditions were observed in 9 (%42.9 of thiopental patients and 20 (%95.2 of propofol patients (p<0.05. Mean arterial pressure and heart rate decreased more significantly in propofol group in comparison with the thiopental group (p<0.05. Conclusion: Combination of remifentanil and propofol or thiopental could facilitate ventilation via face mask in all patients. Although combination of propofol and

  19. Timing of tracheal intubation: monitoring the orbicularis oculi, the adductor pollicis or use a stopwatch?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koscielniak-Nielsen, Z J; Horn, A; Sztuk, F

    1996-01-01

    The most suitable time for tracheal intubation, following vecuronium 0.1 mg kg-1, was estimated in 120 patients. The trachea was intubated at cessation of the visually observed response of the orbicularis oculi muscle to facial nerve stimulation (group 1; n = 30), or of the manually detected...... response of the adductor pollicis to ulnar nerve stimulation (group 2; n = 30), or after waiting 3 min (group 3; n = 30), or 4 min (group 4; n = 30). There were no significant differences in intubation scores between the four groups of patients. Loss of response to train-of-four stimulation occurred...... significantly sooner in group 1 (orbicularis oculi) than in group 2 (adductor pollicis) P = 0.021). However, intubating conditions were poor in four patients (14%) in group 1, compared with none in group 2 and one in groups 3 and 4, respectively. Thus, contrary to expectations, the cessation of the response...

  20. Middle finger length-based tracheal intubation depth improves the rate of appropriate tube placement in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qing-he; Xiao, Wang-pin; Zhou, Hong-mei

    2015-11-01

    It is challenging for anesthetists to determine the optimal tracheal intubation depth in children. We hypothesize that a measure three times the length of the middle finger can be used for predicting tracheal tube depth in children. Eighty-six children (4-14 years of age) were included in this study. After the children were anesthetized, a fiberoptic bronchoscope (FOB) was inserted into the trachea, the lengths from the upper incisor teeth to carina and vocal cords were measured, and a suitably sized cuffed tracheal tube was inserted into the trachea. Age-based and middle finger length-based formulas were used to determine the tracheal intubation depth. All 86 children enrolled were included in this study. Compared with the age-based intubation, the rate of appropriate tube placement was higher for middle finger length-based intubation (88.37% vs 66.28%, P = 0.001). The proximal intubation rate was lower in middle finger length-based intubation (4.65% vs 32.56%, P tube depth was larger than that between age and optimal tracheal tube depth (0.883 vs 0.845). Our data indicate that the appropriate tube placement rate can be improved by using three times the middle finger length as the tracheal intubation depth in children. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Avoidance versus use of neuromuscular blocking agents for improving conditions during tracheal intubation or direct laryngoscopy in adults and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundstrøm, Lars Hyldborg; Duez, Christophe Hv; Nørskov, Anders Kehlet

    2017-01-01

    ) for adults and adolescents allocated to tracheal intubation with direct laryngoscopy. To look at various outcomes, conduct subgroup and sensitivity analyses, examine the role of bias, and apply trial sequential analysis (TSA) to examine the level of available evidence for this intervention. SEARCH METHODS......: We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, BIOSIS, International Web of Science, LILACS, advanced Google, CINAHL, and the following trial registries: Current Controlled Trials; ClinicalTrials.gov; and www.centerwatch.com, up to January 2017. We checked the reference lists of included trials and reviews...... the best conditions for tracheal intubation and may reduce the risk of upper airway discomfort or injury following tracheal intubation. Study results were characterized by indirectness, heterogeneity, and high or uncertain risk of bias concerning our primary outcome describing difficult tracheal intubation...

  2. Learning and performance of tracheal intubation by novice personnel: a comparison of the Airtraq and Macintosh laryngoscope.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Maharaj, C H

    2006-07-01

    Direct laryngoscopic tracheal intubation is taught to many healthcare professionals as it is a potentially lifesaving procedure. However, it is a difficult skill to acquire and maintain, and, of concern, the consequences of poorly performed intubation attempts are potentially serious. The Airtraq Laryngoscope is a novel intubation device which may possess advantages over conventional direct laryngoscopes for use by novice personnel. We conducted a prospective trial with 40 medical students who had no prior airway management experience. Following brief didactic instruction, each participant took turns in performing laryngoscopy and intubation using the Macintosh and Airtraq devices under direct supervision. Each student was allowed up to three attempts to intubate in three laryngoscopy scenarios using a Laerdal Intubation Trainer and one scenario in a Laerdal SimMan Manikin. They then performed tracheal intubation of the normal airway a second time to characterise the learning curve for each device. The Airtraq provided superior intubating conditions, resulting in greater success of intubation, particularly in the difficult laryngoscopy scenarios. In both easy and simulated difficult laryngoscopy scenarios, the Airtraq decreased the duration of intubation attempts, reduced the number of optimisation manoeuvres required, and reduced the potential for dental trauma. The Airtraq device showed a rapid learning curve and the students found it significantly easier to use. The Airtraq appears to be a superior device for novice personnel to acquire the skills of tracheal intubation.

  3. Management of postintubation tracheal stenosis: appropriate indications make outcome differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melkane, Antoine E; Matar, Nayla E; Haddad, Amine C; Nassar, Michel N; Almoutran, Homère G; Rohayem, Ziad; Daher, Mohammad; Chalouhy, Georges; Dabar, George

    2010-01-01

    Laryngotracheal stenosis is difficult to treat and its etiologies are multiple; nowadays, the most common ones are postintubation or posttracheostomy stenoses. To provide an algorithm for the management of postintubation laryngotracheal stenoses (PILTS) based on the experience of a tertiary care referral center. A retrospective study was conducted on all patients treated for PILTS over a 10-year period. Patients were divided into a surgically and an endoscopically treated group according to predefined criteria. The characteristics of the two groups were analyzed and the outcomes compared. Thirty-three consecutive patients were included in the study: 14 in the surgically treated group and 19 in the endoscopically treated group. Our candidates for airway surgery were healthy patients presenting with complex tracheal stenoses, subglottic involvement or associated tracheomalacia. The endoscopic candidates were chronically ill patients presenting with simple, strictly tracheal stenoses not exceeding 4 cm in length. Stents were placed if the stenosis was associated with tracheomalacia or exceeded 2 cm in total length. In the surgically treated group, 2/14 patients needed more than one procedure versus 8/19 patients in the endoscopically treated group. At the end of the intervention, 50% of the patients were decannulated in the surgically treated group versus 84.2% in the endoscopically treated group (p = 0.03). However, the decannulation rates at 6 months and the symptomatology at rest and on exertion on the last follow-up visit were comparable in the two groups. Our experience in the management of PILTS demonstrates that both surgery and endoscopy yield excellent functional outcomes if the treatment strategy is based on clear, predefined objective criteria. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Effect of rocuronium on the bispectral index under anesthesia and tracheal intubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Hui; Han, Jinyu; Liu, Ling; Wang, Kaiyuan; Li, Jincheng

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of various doses of rocuronium on bispectral index (BIS) responses to propofol induction and tracheal intubation, as well as the role of the non-depolarization muscle relaxant rocuronium on the depth of sedation. A total of 72 patients (American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I-II) were anaesthetized with propofol using a target-controlled infusion, and randomly divided into two sedation level groups (n=36). The patients were divided into 2 groups according to the BIS value: A normal sedation group (group 1), with a stable BIS value at 40-60, and a deep sedation group (group 2), with a BIS value rocuronium (0.3, 0.6, 0.9 and 1.2 mg/kg). Tracheal intubation was performed after 2 min of rocuronium administration. BIS, electromyography (EMG), heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were recorded continuously and averaged over 1 min during baseline (T1), steady state (T2), 2 min after rocuronium infusion (T3), and 0, 2 and 5 min after tracheal intubation. The results demonstrated that HR and MAP decreased significantly at T2 and T3 compared with T1. Following tracheal intubation (L0), HR and MAP significantly increased compared with T2 and T3, and returned to levels similar to those prior to intubation after 5 min. In group 1C and 1D, BIS was significantly decreased at T3 compared with T2; BIS was significantly increased at L0 compared with T3 in group 1A and 1B. EMG at earlier stages of anesthesia was significantly higher compared with other points, and was significantly increased at L0 compared with T3 in group 1A and 1B. These results demonstrated that BIS response may be associated with the dosage of rocuronium in the normal sedation group, although no association was observed with the deep sedation group. Tracheal intubation resulted in marked hemodynamic changes under both normal and deep sedation.

  5. The effect of lidocaine on neutrophil respiratory burst during induction of general anaesthesia and tracheal intubation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Swanton, B J

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Respiratory burst is an essential component of the neutrophil\\'s biocidal function. In vitro, sodium thiopental, isoflurane and lidocaine each inhibit neutrophil respiratory burst. The objectives of this study were (a) to determine the effect of a standard clinical induction\\/tracheal intubation sequence on neutrophil respiratory burst and (b) to determine the effect of intravenous lidocaine administration during induction of anaesthesia on neutrophil respiratory burst. METHODS: Twenty ASA I and II patients, aged 18-60 years, undergoing elective surgery were studied. After induction of anaesthesia [fentanyl (2 microg kg-1), thiopental (4-6 mg kg-1), isoflurane (end-tidal concentration 0.5-1.5%) in nitrous oxide (66%) and oxygen], patients randomly received either lidocaine 1.5 mg kg-1 (group L) or 0.9% saline (group S) prior to tracheal intubation. Neutrophil respiratory burst was measured immediately prior to induction of anaesthesia, immediately before and 1 and 5 min after lidocaine\\/saline. RESULTS: Neutrophil respiratory burst decreased significantly after induction of anaesthesia in both groups [87.4 +\\/- 8.2% (group L) and 88.5 +\\/- 13.4% (group S) of preinduction level (P < 0.01 both groups)]. After intravenous lidocaine (but not saline) administration, neutrophil respiratory burst returned towards preinduction levels, both before (97.1 +\\/- 23.6%) and after (94.4 +\\/- 16.6%) tracheal intubation. CONCLUSION: Induction of anaesthesia and tracheal intubation using thiopentone and isoflurane, inhibit neutrophil respiratory burst. This effect may be diminished by the administration of lidocaine.

  6. A systematic review and meta-regression analysis of mivacurium for tracheal intubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanlinthout, L E H; Mesfin, S H; Hens, N; Vanacker, B F; Robertson, E N; Booij, L H D J

    2014-12-01

    We systematically reviewed factors associated with intubation conditions in randomised controlled trials of mivacurium, using random-effects meta-regression analysis. We included 29 studies of 1050 healthy participants. Four factors explained 72.9% of the variation in the probability of excellent intubation conditions: mivacurium dose, 24.4%; opioid use, 29.9%; time to intubation and age together, 18.6%. The odds ratio (95% CI) for excellent intubation was 3.14 (1.65-5.73) for doubling the mivacurium dose, 5.99 (2.14-15.18) for adding opioids to the intubation sequence, and 6.55 (6.01-7.74) for increasing the delay between mivacurium injection and airway insertion from 1 to 2 min in subjects aged 25 years and 2.17 (2.01-2.69) for subjects aged 70 years, p < 0.001 for all. We conclude that good conditions for tracheal intubation are more likely by delaying laryngoscopy after injecting a higher dose of mivacurium with an opioid, particularly in older people. © 2014 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  7. Long-term outcome of conventional endotracheal tube balloon dilation of tracheal stenosis in a dog

    OpenAIRE

    Kahane, Nili; Segev, Gilad

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a successful dilation of tracheal stenosis in a 16-year-old dog using a conventional endotracheal tube balloon. This technique should be considered as palliative treatment when owners decline other therapeutic options.

  8. Long-term outcome of conventional endotracheal tube balloon dilation of tracheal stenosis in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahane, Nili; Segev, Gilad

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a successful dilation of tracheal stenosis in a 16-year-old dog using a conventional endotracheal tube balloon. This technique should be considered as palliative treatment when owners decline other therapeutic options.

  9. Tracheal intubation in critically ill patients: a comprehensive systematic review of randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrini, Luca; Landoni, Giovanni; Baiardo Radaelli, Martina; Saleh, Omar; Votta, Carmine D; Fominskiy, Evgeny; Putzu, Alessandro; Snak de Souza, Cézar Daniel; Antonelli, Massimo; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Pelosi, Paolo; Zangrillo, Alberto

    2018-01-20

    We performed a systematic review of randomized controlled studies evaluating any drug, technique or device aimed at improving the success rate or safety of tracheal intubation in the critically ill. We searched PubMed, BioMed Central, Embase and the Cochrane Central Register of Clinical Trials and references of retrieved articles. Finally, pertinent reviews were also scanned to detect further studies until May 2017. The following inclusion criteria were considered: tracheal intubation in adult critically ill patients; randomized controlled trial; study performed in Intensive Care Unit, Emergency Department or ordinary ward; and work published in the last 20 years. Exclusion criteria were pre-hospital or operating theatre settings and simulation-based studies. Two investigators selected studies for the final analysis. Extracted data included first author, publication year, characteristics of patients and clinical settings, intervention details, comparators and relevant outcomes. The risk of bias was assessed with the Cochrane Collaboration's Risk of Bias tool. We identified 22 trials on use of a pre-procedure check-list (1 study), pre-oxygenation or apneic oxygenation (6 studies), sedatives (3 studies), neuromuscular blocking agents (1 study), patient positioning (1 study), video laryngoscopy (9 studies), and post-intubation lung recruitment (1 study). Pre-oxygenation with non-invasive ventilation (NIV) and/or high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) showed a possible beneficial role. Post-intubation recruitment improved oxygenation , while ramped position increased the number of intubation attempts and thiopental had negative hemodynamic effects. No effect was found for use of a checklist, apneic oxygenation (on oxygenation and hemodynamics), videolaryngoscopy (on number and length of intubation attempts), sedatives and neuromuscular blockers (on hemodynamics). Finally, videolaryngoscopy was associated with severe adverse effects in multiple trials. The limited available

  10. Clinical application of self-expandable metallic stents in the treatment of malignant tracheal stenosis under general anesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Weitao; Shi Haibin; Yang Zhengqiang; Liu Sheng; Zhou Chungao; Zhao Linbo; Xia Jinguo; Li Linsun

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of self-expandable metallic stent placement for the treatment of malignant tracheal stenosis under general anesthesia and fluoroscopic guidance. Methods: Under general anesthesia the placement of self-expandable metallic stent was performed in 10 patients with malignant tracheal stenosis, the procedure was completed under fluoroscopic guidance in all patients. Results: Successful tracheal stenting was achieved in all 10 patients. In one patient, a Y-shaped stent was used as the tracheal carina was involved in the airway stenosis. The symptoms of dyspnea and asthma were markedly improved immediately after the implantation of stent in all patients. Conclusion: Tracheal implantation of self-expandable metallic stent under general anesthesia and fluoroscopic guidance is a safe and effective treatment for malignant tracheal stenosis, it can promptly relieve various symptoms caused by malignant tracheal stenosis and obviously improve patient's living quality, therefore,t his technique is of great value in clinical practice. (authors)

  11. [Vocal cord paralysis associated with tracheal intubation: incidence, risk analysis, and classification of severity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikura, Mutsuhito; Suzuki, Yuji; Itagaki, Taiga; Sato, Tsunehisa; Nishino, Junko

    2015-01-01

    Vocal cord paralysis after tracheal intubation is rare. It causes severe hoarseness and aspiration, and delays recovery and discharge. Arytenoid cartilage dislocation and recurrent nerve paralysis are main causes of vocal cord paralysis. Physical stimulation of the tracheal tube as well as patient and surgical characteristics also contribute. Vocal cord paralysis occurs in 1 (0.07%) of 1,500 general surgery patients and on the left side in 70% of cases. It is associated with surgery/anesthesia time (two-fold, 3-6 hours; 15-fold, over 6 hours), age (three-fold, over 50 years), and diabetes mellitus or hypertension (two-fold). Symptoms resolve in 2-3 months. In adult cardiovascular surgery, vocal cord paralysis occurs in 1 (0.7-2%) of 50-100 cardiac surgery patients and 1 (8.6-32%) of 3-10 thoracic aortic surgery patients. In pediatric cardiac surgery, vocal cord paralysis occurs in 1 (0.1-0.5%) of 200-1,000 patients. We classified the severity of vocal cord paralysis as I, severe hoarseness; II, aspiration or dysphagia; and III, bilateral vocal cord paralysis, aspiration pneumonia, or the need for tracheal re-intubation or tracheotomy. We discuss the importance of informed consent for the patient and family.

  12. Laryngoscope and a new tracheal tube assist lightwand intubation in difficult airways due to unstable cervical spine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai-neng Wu

    Full Text Available The WEI Jet Endotracheal Tube (WEI JET is a new tracheal tube that facilitates both oxygenation and ventilation during the process of intubation and assists tracheal intubation in patients with difficult airway. We evaluated the effectiveness and usefulness of the WEI JET in combination with lightwand under direct laryngoscopy in difficult tracheal intubation due to unstable cervical spine.Ninety patients with unstable cervical spine disorders (ASA I-III with general anaesthesia were included and randomly assigned to three groups, based on the device used for intubation: lightwand only, lightwand under direct laryngoscopy, lightwand with WEI JET under direct laryngoscopy.No statistically significant differences were detected among three groups with respect to demographic characteristics and C/L grade. There were statistically significant differences between three groups for overall intubation success rate (p = 0.015 and first attempt success rate (p = 0.000. The intubation time was significantly longer in the WEI group (110.8±18.3 s than in the LW group (63.3±27.5 s, p = 0.000 and DL group (66.7±29.4 s, p = 0.000, but the lowest SpO2 in WEI group was significantly higher than other two groups (p<0.01. The WEI JET significantly reduced successful tracheal intubation attempts compared to the LW group (p = 0.043. The severity of sore throat was similar in three groups (p = 0.185.The combined use of WEI JET under direct laryngoscopy helps to assist tracheal intubation and improves oxygenation during intubation in patients with difficult airway secondary to unstable spine disorders.Chinese Clinical Trial Registry ChiCTR-TRC-14005141.

  13. Novel use of laryngeal mask airway classic excel™ for bronchoscopy and tracheal intubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anusha Kannan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The usage frequency and scope of supraglottic airway devices in anesthesia has expanded since the original laryngeal mask airway (LMA prototype was invented by Dr Archie Brain in the early 1980s. Today, anesthesiologists are spoilt-for-choice with more than thirty options. The LMA Classic Excel™ was introduced to anesthesia practice in 2009; designed with an epiglottic elevating bar and a removable airway connector to facilitate tracheal intubation using the LMA as a conduit. We present a case report of a women diagnosed with papillary carcinoma of thyroid, who underwent bronchoscopic assessment of the trachea and subsequent intubation for an en-bloc dissection and removal of thyroid gland through the LMA Classic Excel™.

  14. Comparison of Ambu® AuraGain™ laryngeal mask and air-Q™ intubating laryngeal airway for blind tracheal intubation in adults: A randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Sameer Sethi; Souvik Maitra; Vikas Saini; Tanvir Samara

    2017-01-01

    Background: This study has been designed to compare the performance of Ambu® AuraGain™ laryngeal mask with the air-Q™ as a conduit for blind tracheal intubation in adult patients. Methods: In this prospective randomized controlled trial blind endotracheal intubation success rates were compared between Ambu® AuraGain™ and air-Q™ intubating laryngeal airway in 90 adult patients. Patients were randomized in two equal groups: Group Ambu® AuraGain™ (n = 45) and Group air-Q™ (n = 45). Results...

  15. Preanesthetic assessment data do not influence the time for tracheal intubation with Airtraq(tm video laryngoscope in obese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dante Ranieri Jr.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: this study investigated the influence of anatomical predictors on difficult laryngoscopy and orotracheal intubation in obese patients by comparing Macintosh and Airtraq(tm laryngoscopes. Methods: from 132 bariatric surgery patients (body mass index = 35 kg m-1, cervical perimeter, sternomental distance, interincisor distance, and Mallampati score were recorded. The patients were randomized into two groups according to whether a Macintosh (n = 64 or an Airtraq(tm (n = 68 laryngoscope was used for tracheal intubation. Time required for intubation was the first outcome. Cormack-Lehane score, number of intubation attempts, the Macintosh blade used, any need for external tracheal compression or the use of gum elastic bougie were recorded. Intubation failure and strategies adopted were also registered. Results: intubation failed in two patients in the Macintosh laryngoscope group, and these patients were included as worst cases scenario. The intubation times were 36.9 + 22.8 s and 13.7 + 3.1 s for the Macintosh and Airtraq(tm laryngoscope groups (p < 0.01, respectively. Cormack-Lehane scores were also lower for the Airtraq(tm group. One patient in the Macintosh group with intubation failure was quickly intubated with the Airtraq(tm. Cervical circumference (p < 0.01 and interincisor distance (p < 0.05 influenced the time required for intubation in the Macintosh group but not in the Airtraq(tm group. Conclusion: in obese patients despite increased neck circumference and limited mouth opening, the Airtraq(tm laryngoscope affords faster tracheal intubation than the Macintosh laryngoscope, and it may serve as an alternative when conventional laryngoscopy fails.

  16. Effects of premedication with oral gabapentin on intraocular pressure changes following tracheal intubation in clinically normal dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trbolova, Alexandra; Ghaffari, Masoud Selk; Capik, Igor

    2017-09-19

    Gabapentin is an antiepileptic drug widely approved as an add-on therapy for epilepsy treatment in human and dogs. There is a clinical impression that gabapentin is a suitable drug which attenuates the IOP elevation associated with tracheal intubation in humans. The present study performed to determine the effects of oral gabapentin on intraocular pressure (IOP) changes following tracheal intubation in dogs. Twenty adult healthy dogs were randomly assigned to treatment (n = 10) and control (n = 10) groups. Dogs in the treatment group received oral gabapentin (50 mg/kg) 2 h before induction of anesthesia and dogs in the control group received oral gelatin capsule placebo at the same time. The dogs were anesthetized with propofol 6 mg/kg, and anesthesia was maintained with a constant infusion of 0.2 mg/kg/min of propofol for 20 min. IOP were measured immediately before induction and then repeated immediately after induction, as well as 5 min, 10 min and 15 min following tracheal intubation in both groups. IOP was significantly higher immediately after induction, and 5 min after tracheal intubation when compared with IOP reading before induction in the control group. There was no statistically significant change in IOPs immediately after induction, and 5 min after tracheal intubation in comparison to the values before induction in the treatment group. Based on the findings of this study, preanesthetic oral administration of gabapentin significantly prevents an increase in the IOP associated with tracheal intubation in dogs anesthetized with propofol.

  17. The effect of nitroglycerin on response to tracheal intubation. Assessment by radionuclide angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, A.P.; Camporesi, E.M.; Sell, T.L.; Croughwell, N.; Silva, R.; Jones, R.H.; McIntyre, R.W.; Stanley, T.E.; Reves, J.G.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of intravenous (IV) nitroglycerin (NTG) on perioperative myocardial ischemia as detected by single pass radionuclide angiocardiography was studied in 20 patients scheduled for elective coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Ten patients, selected at random, received IV NTG 1 microgram.kg-1.min-1 (NTG group) and 10 others, IV saline (control group). Anesthetic induction consisted of midazolam 0.2 mg.kg-1, vecuronium 0.1 mg.kg-1, and 50% N 2 O in O 2 . ECG leads I, II, and V5 were monitored for ST segment changes. Single pass radionuclide angiocardiography (RNA) was performed at 5 times: prior to induction, prior to tracheal intubation, and at 1, 3.5, and 6 min following intubation. The presence of new regional wall motion abnormalities (RWMA) was determined from each RNA study as compared with the preinduction measurement. Apart from one patient in the control group who developed a new ''v'' wave after intubation, there was no evidence of ischemia by pulmonary capillary wedge pressure. No ECG evidence of ischemia was detected in any patient. Despite this, new regional wall motion abnormalities were observed in 3 patients in the control group and 1 patient in the NTG group. Blood pressure and heart rate responses of patients with new RWMA were not significantly different from other patients. The low incidence of ischemia in this population precludes a definitive statement regarding the efficacy of IV NTG, but the lower incidence of RWMA in the NTG group suggests a protective effect

  18. Effect of just-in-time simulation training on tracheal intubation procedure safety in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishisaki, Akira; Donoghue, Aaron J; Colborn, Shawn; Watson, Christine; Meyer, Andrew; Brown, Calvin A; Helfaer, Mark A; Walls, Ron M; Nadkarni, Vinay M

    2010-07-01

    Tracheal intubation-associated events (TIAEs) are common (20%) and life threatening (4%) in pediatric intensive care units. Physician trainees are required to learn tracheal intubation during intensive care unit rotations. The authors hypothesized that "just-in-time" simulation-based intubation refresher training would improve resident participation, success, and decrease TIAEs. For 14 months, one of two on-call residents, nurses, and respiratory therapists received 20-min multidisciplinary simulation-based tracheal intubation training and 10-min resident skill refresher training at the beginning of their on-call period in addition to routine residency education. The rate of first attempt and overall success between refresher-trained and concurrent non-refresher-trained residents (controls) during the intervention phase was compared. The incidence of TIAEs between preintervention and intervention phase was also compared. Four hundred one consecutive primary orotracheal intubations were evaluated: 220 preintervention and 181 intervention. During intervention phase, neither first-attempt success nor overall success rate differed between refresher-trained residents versus concurrent non-refresher-trained residents: 20 of 40 (50%) versus 15 of 24 (62.5%), P = 0.44 and 23 of 40 (57.5%) versus 18 of 24 (75.0%), P = 0.19, respectively. The resident's first attempt and overall success rate did not differ between preintervention and intervention phases. The incidence of TIAE during preintervention and intervention phases was similar: 22.0% preintervention versus 19.9% intervention, P = 0.62, whereas resident participation increased from 20.9% preintervention to 35.4% intervention, P = 0.002. Resident participation continued to be associated with TIAE even after adjusting for the phase and difficult airway condition: odds ratio 2.22 (95% CI 1.28-3.87, P = 0.005). Brief just-in-time multidisciplinary simulation-based intubation refresher training did not improve the resident

  19. Recurrent airway obstructions in a patient with benign tracheal stenosis and a silicone airway stent: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Sriram, KB; Robinson, PC

    2008-01-01

    Airway stents (silicone and metal stents) are used to treat patients with benign tracheal stenosis, who are symptomatic and in whom tracheal surgical reconstruction has failed or is not appropriate. However airway stents are often associated with complications such as migration, granuloma formation and mucous hypersecretion, which cause significant morbidity, especially in patients with benign tracheal stenosis and relatively normal life expectancy. We report a patient who had frequent critic...

  20. Tracheal intubation in patients with cervical spine immobilization: a comparison of the Airwayscope, LMA CTrach, and the Macintosh laryngoscopes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Malik, M A

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Pentax AWS, and the LMA CTrach, in comparison with the Macintosh laryngoscope, when performing tracheal intubation in patients with neck immobilization using manual in-line axial cervical spine stabilization.

  1. Tracheal intubation with a flexible fibreoptic scope or the McGrath videolaryngoscope in simulated difficult airway scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Cecilie H; Gätke, Mona R; Thøgersen, Bente

    2014-01-01

    Grath videolaryngoscope and FFE. The participants then performed tracheal intubation on a SimMan manikin once with the McGrath videolaryngoscope and once with the FFE in three difficult airway scenarios: (1) pharyngeal obstruction; (2) pharyngeal obstruction and cervical rigidity; (3) tongue oedema. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES...

  2. Effectiveness and safety of the Levitan FPS Scope™ for tracheal intubation under general anesthesia with a simulated difficult airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Tracy; George, Ronald B; McKeen, Dolores; Vakharia, Narendra; Pink, Aaron

    2012-08-01

    Studies show that the Levitan FPS (first pass success) Scope™ (LFS) is analogous to a bougie in simulated difficult airways with comparable tracheal intubation success rates. In this study, the efficacy and safety of tracheal intubation with the LFS was compared with that of the Macintosh laryngoscope utilizing manual in-line stabilization (MILS) to simulate difficult airways. Ninety-four subjects successfully completed the trial. Manual in-line stabilization of the cervical spine was applied and the initial laryngoscopy was performed using either the Macintosh or the LFS in conjunction with the Macintosh. Following the initial grading, a second laryngoscopy was repeated using the second randomized technique. Cormack-Lehane grades, percentage of glottic opening (POGO) scores, time to intubate, number of intubation attempts, and the use of alternate techniques were recorded. The anesthesiologist rated the subjective difficulty in using each technique with a numeric rating scale and a visual rating scale. There was no significant difference in the primary outcome "good laryngoscopic views" (Cormack-Lehane grade 1 and 2) compared with "poor laryngoscopic views" (Cormack-Lehane grade 3 and 4) between the LFS and the Macintosh. There were higher POGO scores with the LFS compared with the Macintosh (80% vs 20%, respectively; P < 0.0001), but this did not translate to easier intubations, as documented by the need for an alternate intubation technique or time to intubate (< 30 and < 60 sec, respectively). The incidence of mucosal trauma, sore throat, and hemodynamic responses did not differ significantly between the two techniques. The LFS in conjunction with the Macintosh laryngoscope does not improve the efficacy or safety of tracheal intubation in a simulated difficult airway.

  3. The usefulness of design of experimentation in defining the effect difficult airway factors and training have on simulator oral-tracheal intubation success rates in novice intubators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Frank; Carpenter, Judi; Rhoades, Carol; Holleran, Renee; Snow, Gregory

    2010-04-01

    This exploratory study examined novice intubators and the effect difficult airway factors have on pre- and posttraining oral-tracheal simulation intubation success rates. Using a two-level, full-factorial design of experimentation (DOE) involving a combination of six airway factors (curved vs. straight laryngoscope blade, trismus, tongue edema, laryngeal spasm, pharyngeal obstruction, or cervical immobilization), 64 airway scenarios were prospectively randomized to 12 critical care nurses to evaluate pre- and posttraining first-pass intubation success rates on a simulator. Scenario variables and intubation outcomes were analyzed using a generalized linear mixed-effects model to determine two-way main and interactive effects. Interactive effects between the six study factors were nonsignificant (p = 0.69). For both pre- and posttraining, main effects showed the straight blade (p = 0.006), tongue edema (p = 0.0001), and laryngeal spasm (p = 0.004) significantly reduced success rates, while trismus (p = 0.358), pharyngeal obstruction (p = 0.078), and cervical immobilization did not significantly change the success rate. First-pass intubation success rate on the simulator significantly improved (p = 0.005) from pre- (19%) to posttraining (36%). Design of experimentation is useful in analyzing the effect difficult airway factors and training have on simulator intubation success rates. Future quality improvement DOE simulator research studies should be performed to help clarify the relationship between simulator factors and patient intubation rates.

  4. Groningen Dilatation Tracheoscope in Treatment of Moderate Subglottic and Tracheal Stenosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halmos, Gyorgy; van der Laan, Bernard F. A. M.; Dikkers, Frederik G.

    Objectives: We describe our experience with the Groningen Dilatation Tracheoscope (Karl Storz GmbH & Co, Tuttlingen, Germany) in treating benign subglottic and tracheal stenosis. Methods: We performed a retrospective survey from a medical record analysis of 26 patients with different origins of

  5. Flexible bronchoscopic management of benign tracheal stenosis: long term follow-up of 115 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fox Benjamin D

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Management of benign tracheal stenosis (BTS varies with the type and extent of the disease and influenced by the patient's age and general health status, hence we sought to investigate the long-term outcome of patients with BTS that underwent minimally invasive bronchoscopic treatment. Methods Patients with symptomatic BTS were treated with flexible bronchoscopy therapeutic modalities that included the following: balloon dilatation, laser photo-resection, self-expanding metal stent placement, and High-dose rate endobronchial brachytherapy used in cases of refractory stent-related granulation tissue formation. Results A total of 115 patients with BTS and various cardiac and respiratory co-morbidities with a mean age of 61 (range 40-88 were treated between January 2001 and January 2009. The underlining etiologies for BTS were post - endotracheal intubation (N = 76 post-tracheostomy (N = 30, Wegener's granulomatosis (N = 2, sarcoidosis (N = 2, amyloidosis (N = 2 and idiopathic BTS (N = 3. The modalities used were: balloon dilatation and laser treatment (N = 98. Stent was placed in 33 patients of whom 28 also underwent brachytherapy. Complications were minor and mostly included granulation tissue formation. The overall success rate was 87%. Over a median follow-up of 51 months (range 10-100 months, 30 patients (26% died, mostly due to exacerbation of their underlying conditions. Conclusions BTS in elderly patients with co-morbidities can be safely and effectively treated by flexible bronchoscopic treatment modalities. The use of HDR brachytherapy to treat granulation tissue formation following successful airway restoration is promising.

  6. The All India Difficult Airway Association 2016 guidelines for tracheal intubation in the Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Nainan Myatra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tracheal intubation (TI is a routine procedure in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU and is often life-saving. In contrast to the controlled conditions in the operating room, critically ill patients with respiratory failure and shock are physiologically unstable. These factors, along with a suboptimal evaluation of the airway and limited oxygen reserves despite adequate pre-oxygenation, are responsible for a high incidence of life-threatening complications such as severe hypoxaemia and cardiovascular collapse during TI in the ICU. The All India Difficult Airway Association (AIDAA proposes a stepwise plan for safe management of the airway in critically ill patients. These guidelines have been developed based on available evidence; wherever robust evidence was lacking, recommendations were arrived at by consensus opinion of airway experts, incorporating the responses to a questionnaire sent to members of the AIDAA and the Indian Society of Anaesthesiologists. Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation during pre-oxygenation improves oxygen stores in patients with respiratory pathology. Nasal insufflation of oxygen at 15 L/min can increase the duration of apnoea before the occurrence of hypoxaemia. High-flow nasal cannula oxygenation at 60-70 L/min may also increase safety during TI in critically ill patients. Stable haemodynamics and gas exchange must be maintained during rapid sequence induction. It is necessary to implement an intubation protocol during routine airway management in the ICU. Adherence to a plan for difficult airway management incorporating the use of intubation aids and airway rescue devices and strategies is useful.

  7. A comparison of tracheal intubation using the Airtraq or the Macintosh laryngoscope in routine airway management: A randomised, controlled clinical trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Maharaj, C H

    2006-11-01

    The Airtraq laryngoscope is a novel single use tracheal intubation device. We compared the Airtraq with the Macintosh laryngoscope in patients deemed at low risk for difficult intubation in a randomised, controlled clinical trial. Sixty consenting patients presenting for surgery requiring tracheal intubation were randomly allocated to undergo intubation using a Macintosh (n = 30) or Airtraq (n = 30) laryngoscope. All patients were intubated by one of four anaesthetists experienced in the use of both laryngoscopes. No significant differences in demographic or airway variables were observed between the groups. All but one patient, in the Macintosh group, was successfully intubated on the first attempt. There was no difference between groups in the duration of intubation attempts. In comparison to the Macintosh laryngoscope, the Airtraq resulted in modest improvements in the intubation difficulty score, and in ease of use. Tracheal intubation with the Airtraq resulted in less alterations in heart rate. These findings demonstrate the utility of the Airtraq laryngoscope for tracheal intubation in low risk patients.

  8. Tracheal intubation in patients with anticipated difficult airway using Boedeker intubation forceps and McGrath videolaryngoscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøm, C; Barnung, S; Kristensen, M S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Videolaryngoscopes with sharp angulated blades improve the view of the vocal cords but this does not necessarily result in higher success rates of intubation The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of using Boedeker intubation forceps in conjunction with McGrath Series 5 Vi...... by using a styletted tube. CONCLUSION(S): Most patients with anticipated difficult intubation can be successfully intubated with Boedeker intubation forceps and MVL. However, endotracheal tube placement failed in 3/25 patients despite a good laryngeal view....

  9. I-gel Laryngeal Mask Airway Combined with Tracheal Intubation Attenuate Systemic Stress Response in Patients Undergoing Posterior Fossa Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaoliang Tang

    2015-01-01

    patients. In this study, we proposed that I-gel combined with tracheal intubation could reduce the stress response of posterior fossa surgery patients. Methods. Sixty-six posterior fossa surgery patients were randomly allocated to receive either tracheal tube intubation (Group TT or I-gel facilitated endotracheal tube intubation (Group TI. Hemodynamic and respiratory variables, stress and inflammatory response, oxidative stress, anesthesia recovery parameters, and adverse events during emergence were compared. Results. Mean arterial pressure and heart rate were lower in Group TI during intubation and extubation (P<0.05 versus Group TT. Respiratory variables including peak airway pressure and end-tidal carbon dioxide tension were similar intraoperative, while plasma β-endorphin, cortisol, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, malondialdehyde concentrations, and blood glucose were significantly lower in Group TI during emergence relative to Group TT. Postoperative bucking and serious hypertensions were seen in Group TT but not in Group TI. Conclusion. Utilization of I-gel combined with endotracheal tube in posterior fossa surgery patients is safe which can yield more stable hemodynamic profile during intubation and emergence and lower inflammatory and oxidative response, leading to uneventful recovery.

  10. Undersedation is a risk factor for the development of subglottic stenosis in intubated children,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Schweiger

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To analyze the level of sedation in intubated children as a risk factor for the development of subglottic stenosis. Methods: All patients between 30 days and 5 years of age who required endotracheal intubation in the pediatric intensive care unit between 2013 and 2014 were included in this prospective study. They were monitored daily and COMFORT-B scores were obtained. Flexible fiber-optic laryngoscopy was performed within eight hours of extubation, and repeated seven to ten days later if the first examination showed moderate to severe laryngeal injuries. If these lesions persisted and/or if the child developed symptoms in the follow-up period, microlaryngoscopy under general anesthesia was performed to evaluate for subglottic stenosis. Results: The study included 36 children. Incidence of subglottic stenosis was 11.1%. Children with subglottic stenosis had a higher percentage of COMFORT-B scores between 23 and 30 (undersedated than those who did not develop subglottic stenosis (15.8% vs. 3.65%, p = 0.004. Conclusion: Children who developed subglottic stenosis were less sedated than children who did not develop subglottic stenosis.

  11. Obstetric Anaesthetists' Association and Difficult Airway Society guidelines for the management of difficult and failed tracheal intubation in obstetrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushambi, M C; Kinsella, S M; Popat, M; Swales, H; Ramaswamy, K K; Winton, A L; Quinn, A C

    2015-11-01

    The Obstetric Anaesthetists' Association and Difficult Airway Society have developed the first national obstetric guidelines for the safe management of difficult and failed tracheal intubation during general anaesthesia. They comprise four algorithms and two tables. A master algorithm provides an overview. Algorithm 1 gives a framework on how to optimise a safe general anaesthetic technique in the obstetric patient, and emphasises: planning and multidisciplinary communication; how to prevent the rapid oxygen desaturation seen in pregnant women by advocating nasal oxygenation and mask ventilation immediately after induction; limiting intubation attempts to two; and consideration of early release of cricoid pressure if difficulties are encountered. Algorithm 2 summarises the management after declaring failed tracheal intubation with clear decision points, and encourages early insertion of a (preferably second-generation) supraglottic airway device if appropriate. Algorithm 3 covers the management of the 'can't intubate, can't oxygenate' situation and emergency front-of-neck airway access, including the necessity for timely perimortem caesarean section if maternal oxygenation cannot be achieved. Table 1 gives a structure for assessing the individual factors relevant in the decision to awaken or proceed should intubation fail, which include: urgency related to maternal or fetal factors; seniority of the anaesthetist; obesity of the patient; surgical complexity; aspiration risk; potential difficulty with provision of alternative anaesthesia; and post-induction airway device and airway patency. This decision should be considered by the team in advance of performing a general anaesthetic to make a provisional plan should failed intubation occur. The table is also intended to be used as a teaching tool to facilitate discussion and learning regarding the complex nature of decision-making when faced with a failed intubation. Table 2 gives practical considerations of how to

  12. Obstetric Anaesthetists' Association and Difficult Airway Society guidelines for the management of difficult and failed tracheal intubation in obstetrics*

    OpenAIRE

    Mushambi, M C; Kinsella, S M; Popat, M; Swales, H; Ramaswamy, K K; Winton, A L; Quinn, A C

    2015-01-01

    The Obstetric Anaesthetists' Association and Difficult Airway Society have developed the first national obstetric guidelines for the safe management of difficult and failed tracheal intubation during general anaesthesia. They comprise four algorithms and two tables. A master algorithm provides an overview. Algorithm 1 gives a framework on how to optimise a safe general anaesthetic technique in the obstetric patient, and emphasises: planning and multidisciplinary communication; how to prevent ...

  13. All India Difficult Airway Association 2016 guidelines for the management of unanticipated difficult tracheal intubation in obstetrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkateswaran Ramkumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The various physiological changes in pregnancy make the parturient vulnerable for early and rapid desaturation. Severe hypoxaemia during intubation can potentially compromise two lives (mother and foetus. Thus tracheal intubation in the pregnant patient poses unique challenges, and necessitates meticulous planning, ready availability of equipment and expertise to ensure maternal and foetal safety. The All India Difficult Airway Association (AIDAA proposes a stepwise plan for the safe management of the airway in obstetric patients. These guidelines have been developed based on available evidence; wherever robust evidence was lacking, recommendations were arrived at by consensus opinion of airway experts, incorporating the responses to a questionnaire sent to members of the AIDAA and the Indian Society of Anaesthesiologists (ISA. Modified rapid sequence induction using gentle intermittent positive pressure ventilation with pressure limited to ≤20 cm H 2 O is acceptable. Partial or complete release of cricoid pressure is recommended when face mask ventilation, placement of supraglottic airway device (SAD or tracheal intubation prove difficult. One should call for early expert assistance. Maternal SpO 2 should be maintained ≥95%. Apnoeic oxygenation with nasal insufflation of 15 L/min oxygen during apnoea should be performed in all patients. If tracheal intubation fails, a second- generation SAD should be inserted. The decision to continue anaesthesia and surgery via the SAD, or perform fibreoptic-guided intubation via the SAD or wake up the patient depends on the urgency of surgery, foeto-maternal status and availability of resources and expertise. Emergency cricothyroidotomy must be performed if complete ventilation failure occurs.

  14. Effects of Fentanyl-lidocaine-propofol and Dexmedetomidine-lidocaine-propofol on Tracheal Intubation Without Use of Muscle Relaxants

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    Volkan Hancı

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the effects of fentanyl or dexmedetomidine when used in combination with propofol and lidocaine for tracheal intubation without using muscle relaxants. Sixty patients with American Society of Anesthesiologists stage I risk were randomized to receive 1 mg/kg dexmedetomidine (Group D, n = 30 or 2 mg/kg fentanyl (Group F, n = 30, both in combination with 1.5 mg/kg lidocaine and 3 mg/kg propofol. The requirement for intubation was determined based on mask ventilation capability, jaw motility, position of the vocal cords and the patient's response to intubation and inflation of the endotracheal tube cuff. Systolic arterial pressure, mean arterial pressure, heart rate and peripheral oxygen saturation values were also recorded. Rate pressure products were calculated. Jaw relaxation, position of the vocal cords and patient's response to intubation and inflation of the endotracheal tube cuff were significantly better in Group D than in Group F (p < 0.05. The intubation conditions were significantly more satisfactory in Group D than in Group F (p = 0.01. Heart rate was significantly lower in Group D than in Group F after the administration of the study drugs and intubation (p < 0.05. Mean arterial pressure was significantly lower in Group F than in Group D after propofol injection and at 3 and 5 minutes after intubation (p < 0.05. After intubation, the rate pressure product values were significantly lower in Group D than in Group F (p < 0.05. We conclude that endotracheal intubation was better with the dexmedetomidine–lidocaine–propofol combination than with the fentanyl–lidocaine–propofol combination. However, side effects such as bradycardia should be considered when using dexmedetomidine.

  15. Metallic stent implantation in the treatment of malignant tracheal stenosis under general anaesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Xuming; Jin Yong; Xie Hong; Cheng Long; Gu Xingshi; Chang Liuhui

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety and feasibility of the tracheal stent implantation for treatment of malignant tracheal stenosis under general anaesthesia. Methods: Eighteen patients with malignant tracheal stenosis underwent preoperative 64-slice spiral CT scan and airway reconstruction. The stenotic sites were located in main tracheal trunk (5 patients), in right main bronchus (1 patient), in trachea and left main bronchus (4 patients), in trachea and right main bronchus (3 patients), in main tracheal trunk and bilateral main bronchus (5 patients). The degree of stenosis was rated 51% to 70% in 7 cases, 71% to 90% in 11 cases. All patients, 17 patients of ASA grade Ⅳ and 1 patient of grade Ⅲ, presented with severe dyspnea. Under general anaesthesia, implantation of metallic stent was performed through the sputum aspiration hole of the connecting tubing with DSA guidance. The NBP, ECG, RR, SaO 2 of the patients were recorded and compared with t test during the entire procedure. At the end of the procedure, relief of dyspnea, complications related to anesthesia and operation were recorded. Results: The success rate of stent placement was 18/18, and dyspnea was significantly relived in all patients. Slightly bloody sputum occurred in 7 cases. The stent was obstructed by sputum in 1 case,and the patient was treated with medication. There were no severe complications. The operative course were rated 11 to 9 in 17 cases, and 6 to 8 in 1 case. All 18 patients were cooperative during the procedure. Sixteen patients rated the procedure as very comfortable and 2 rated the procedure as comfortable. Respiratory rate (RR) and heart rate (HR) decreased in all patients after the operation [(37.1 ± 2.8)/min and (106.5 ± 14.2) bpm before the operation respectively, (18.6 ± 1.4)/min and (73.2 ± 7.6) bpm after the operation respectively], t=17.81 and 3.80, P<0.01. Pulse oxygen saturation (SaO 2 ) during the operation [(91.2 ± 1.8)%]increased [(76.3 ± 8.6 )% before the

  16. Anaesthesia care with and without tracheal intubation during emergency endoscopy for peptic ulcer bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohse, N; Lundstrøm, L H; Vestergaard, T R

    2015-01-01

    index score, BMI, age, sex, alcohol use, referral origin (home or in-hospital), Forrest classification, ulcer localization, and postoperative care. RESULTS: The study group comprised 3580 patients under anaesthesia care: 2101 (59%) for the TI group and 1479 (41%) for the MAC group. During the first 90...... with tracheal intubation (TI group) and without airway instrumentation (monitored anaesthesia care, MAC group) during emergency OGD. METHODS: This was a prospective, nationwide, population-based cohort study during 2006-13. Emergency OGDs performed under anaesthesia care were included. End points were 90 day...... days after OGD, 18.9% in the TI group and 18.4% in the MAC group died, crude odds ratio=1.03 [95% confidence interval (CI)=0.87-1.23, P=0.701], adjusted odds ratio=0.95 (95% CI=0.79-1.15, P=0.590). Patients in the TI group stayed slightly longer in hospital [mean 8.16 (95% CI=7.63-8.60) vs 7.63 days...

  17. Nitinol stents in the treatment of benign proximal tracheal stenosis or tracheomalacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isa, A Y; Macandie, C; Irvine, B W

    2006-01-01

    Nitinol stents have been used in the treatment of benign tracheal stenosis. A retrospective review of five patients treated at Stobhill Hospital over the last six and a half years is presented. Age at presentation ranged from 17 to 76 years. The minimum follow-up period was 23 months and the maximum was 78 months. All our patients were successfully decannulated, with none requiring recannulation. Four patients developed granulation tissue related to the stent at intervals ranging from three weeks to 41 months post stenting. Topical mitomycin C application has been useful after resection of granulations using the carbon dioxide (CO2) laser. Stent migration occurred in one patient three weeks after insertion. Nitinol stents are easy to insert and effective in the treatment of tracheal stenosis, but can have associated morbidity. Their use should be considered carefully, as insertion should be regarded as permanent. Publications reporting experience and outcome with the use of Nitinol stents in the trachea are reviewed.

  18. TO STUDY EFFECT OF GABAPENTIN ON ATTENUATION OF PRESSOR RESPONSE TO DIRECT LARYNGOSCOPY AND TRACHEAL INTUBATION AND ON PERIOPERATIVE PAIN

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    Sarita Chandapet

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Endotracheal intubation was first described by Rowbotham and Magill in 1921. 1 In 1940 Reid and Brace first described hemodynamic response to Laryngoscopy and Intubation due to Noxious stimuli. 2 The circulatory responses to laryngeal and tracheal stimulation are due to sympathoadrenal stimulation. 3 Laryngoscopy and Tracheal Intubation induces changes in circulating Catecholamine levels significantly. Norepinephrine, Epinephrine and Dopamine levels rise, but the raise in Norepinephrine levels is consistently associated with elevation of Blood pressure and Heart rate. 4 Even though the elevation in Blood pressure and Heart rate due to Laryngoscopy and Intubation are brief, they may have detrimental effects in high risk patients including Myocardial Infarction, Cardiac failure, Intracranial haemorrhage and increases in Intracranial pressure. 5 Many strategies have been advocated to minimize these hemodynamic adverse responses and aimed at different levels of the reflex arc. 6 Block of the peripheral sensory receptors and afferent input is by topical application and infiltration of Local Anaesthetic to Superior laryngeal nerve. Block of central mechanism of integration and sensory input by drugs like Fentanyl, Morphine etc. Block of efferent pathway and effector sites IV Lignocaine, Beta blockers, Calcium channel blockers, Hydralazine etc. No single drug or technique is satisfactory. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of Gabapentin in attenuating hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and intubation in a placebo controlled double blind study. MATERIALS AND METHODS A clinical comparative study of attenuation of sympathetic response to laryngoscopy and intubation was done in 150 patients posted for elective surgery divided into two groups and were randomly allocated Group 1 – placebo capsules with sugar and Group 2 – Gabapentin 300 mg capsules. Heart rate, systolic, diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure were

  19. Tracheal resections and anastomosis for benign tracheal stricture. A seven-year experience in a single tertiary institute

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    Ahmed Mostafa

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions: TRA proved to be a safe and reliable solution for post-intubation tracheal stenosis. This procedure should be considered first in developing countries where there is frequent rush for tracheostomies and tracheal stenting. Quality of life improved dramatically following this definitive surgery.

  20. [POSTRESUSCITATION CICATRICIAL TRACHEAL STENOSIS. CURRENT STATE OF THE PROBLEM - THE SUCCESSES, THE HOPES AND DISAPPOINTMENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parshin, V D; Vyzhigina, M A; Rusakov, M A; Parshin, V V; Titov, V A; Starostin, A V

    2016-09-01

    Currently, the trend continues to increase the number ofpatients with cicatricial tracheal stenosis (CTS). Therefore, prevention and treatment ofthis disease remains topical. The main cause ofcicatricial tracheal stenosis is damaging the trachea during mechanical ventilation. The scheme ofprevention of this disease in Russia hasn't brought the desired results. to clarify the modern etiology of cicatricial tracheal stenosis, to identify the trend in incidence rates, to determine whether there is an optimal safe alternative to tracheostomy including the use of minimally invasive techniques, to improve diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm at various stages of assistance, and also to study the results of innovative operations and new ways of maintaining gas exchange. 1128 patients with cicatricial tracheal stenosis was treated from 1963 to 2015 in Petrovsky National Research Centre of Surgery and IMSechenov First Moscow State Medical University. Over time methods of di- agnosis, methods of anesthesia and operations have been varied. In this regard all patients were divided into two groups depending on the period of time from 1963 to 2000 (297 patients) andfrom 2001 to 2015 (831 patients). In recent decades there is a steady increase in the number of treated patients. So, if in the first group during the year operational treatment about the CTS 8,0 patients were underwent, in the second - to 55.4. Cicatricial tracheal stenosis appeared after lung mechanical ventilation at 1025 (for 90.9%) patients. They have undergone both radical one-stage treatment and multi-stage and sequential intraluminal procedures. In general there is a clear trend towards more aggressive surgical tactics. So, if in thefirst group, the tracheal resection with anastomosis was performedin 59 patients only, the second-330. Thefrequency ofpostoperative complications and mortality in the second group ofpatients was 12.9 and 0.7 %, respectively. Only a reasonable combination of all treatment methods

  1. Recurrent airway obstructions in a patient with benign tracheal stenosis and a silicone airway stent: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriram, KB; Robinson, PC

    2008-01-01

    Airway stents (silicone and metal stents) are used to treat patients with benign tracheal stenosis, who are symptomatic and in whom tracheal surgical reconstruction has failed or is not appropriate. However airway stents are often associated with complications such as migration, granuloma formation and mucous hypersecretion, which cause significant morbidity, especially in patients with benign tracheal stenosis and relatively normal life expectancy. We report a patient who had frequent critical airway obstructions over 8 years due to granuloma and mucus hypersecretion in a silicone airway stent. The problem was resolved when the silicone stent was removed and replaced with a covered self expanding metal stent. PMID:18840299

  2. Cuff depth and continuous chest auscultation method for determination of tracheal tube insertion depth in nasal intubation: observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchi, Kentaro; Sugiyama, Kazuna

    2016-04-01

    Incorrect endobronchial placement of the tracheal tube can lead to serious complications. Hence, it is necessary to determine the accuracy of tracheal tube positioning. Markers are included on tracheal tubes, in the process of their manufacture, as indicators of approximate intubation depth. In addition, continuous chest auscultation has been used for determining the proper position of the tube. We examined insertion depth using the cuff depth and continuous chest auscultation method (CC method), compared with insertion depth determined by the marker method, to assess the accuracy of these methods. After induction of anesthesia, tracheal intubation was performed in each patient. In the CC method, the depth of tube insertion was measured when the cuff had passed through the glottis, and again when breath sounds changed in quality; the depth of tube insertion was determined from these values. In the marker method, the depth of tube insertion was measured and determined when the marker of the tube had reached the glottis, using insertion depth according to the marker as an index. Insertion depth by the marker method was 26.6 ± 1.2 cm and by the CC method was 28.0 ± 1.2 cm (P < 0.0001). The CC method indicated a significantly greater depth than the marker method. This study determined the safe range of tracheal tube placement. Tube positions determined by the CC method were about 1 cm deeper than those determined by the marker. This information is important to prevent accidental one-lung ventilation and accidental extubation. UMIN No. UMIN000011375.

  3. Effects of oral methylprednisolone and inhaled salbutamol in the decrease of wheezing in patients with asthma after tracheal intubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Airway instrumentation in patients with bronchial hyperreactivity, may evoke life-threatening asthma attack and a good strategy for the prevention of bronchospasm"nhas not been defined. In a randomized, prospective, placebo-controlled study, it was determined whether prophylaxis with either inhaled salbutamol-or combined inhaled salbutamol and oral methylprednisolone improves lung functions and prevents wheezing after intubation. Methods: Thirty one patients with partially reversible airway obstruction (airway resistance> 180%, forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1] < 70% of predicted value, and FEV1 increase> 12% after two puffs of salbutamol were randomized to receive daily either 3-2 puffs (0.2 mg of salbutamol (n =16 or 3-2 puffs (0.2 mg of salbutamol and 40 mg of methylprednisolone (n = 15 orally for 5 days. In all patients lung function was evaluated daily and wheezing changes was assessed before and 5 minutes after tracheal intubation. Results: Both salbutamol and combined inhaled salbutamol and oral methylprednisolone treatment significantly improved airway resistance and FEV1 to a steady state, with no difference between groups. When a single-dose of salbutamol pre-induction or prolonged salbutamol treatment was employed, most patients (8 of 10 and 7 of 9 experienced wheezing after intubation. In contrast, only one patient of those who received both salbutamol and methylprednisolone experienced wheezing (P = 0.0058. Conclusions: Pretreatment with either salbutamol or combined inhaled salbutamol and oral methylprednisolone significantly improves lung function and decreases the incidence of wheezing after tracheal intubation. Methylprednisolone decreases incidence of wheezing more than salbutamol. Therefore, in patients with bronchial hyper reactivity, preoperative treatment with both methylprednisolone and salbutamol minimizes intubation-evoked broncho-constriction.

  4. Promoters and Barriers to Implementation of Tracheal Intubation Airway Safety Bundle: A Mixed-Method Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn Davis, Katherine; Napolitano, Natalie; Li, Simon; Buffman, Hayley; Rehder, Kyle; Pinto, Matthew; Nett, Sholeen; Jarvis, J Dean; Kamat, Pradip; Sanders, Ronald C; Turner, David A; Sullivan, Janice E; Bysani, Kris; Lee, Anthony; Parker, Margaret; Adu-Darko, Michelle; Giuliano, John; Biagas, Katherine; Nadkarni, Vinay; Nishisaki, Akira

    2017-10-01

    To describe promoters and barriers to implementation of an airway safety quality improvement bundle from the perspective of interdisciplinary frontline clinicians and ICU quality improvement leaders. Mixed methods. Thirteen PICUs of the National Emergency Airway Registry for Children network. Remote or on-site focus groups with interdisciplinary ICU staff. Two semistructured interviews with ICU quality improvement leaders with quantitative and qualitative data-based feedbacks. Bundle implementation success (compliance) was defined as greater than or equal to 80% use for tracheal intubations for 3 consecutive months. ICUs were classified as early or late adopters. Focus group discussions concentrated on safety concerns and promoters and barriers to bundle implementation. Initial semistructured quality improvement leader interviews assessed implementation tactics and provided recommendations. Follow-up interviews assessed degree of acceptance and changes made after initial interview. Transcripts were thematically analyzed and contrasted by early versus late adopters. Median duration to achieve success was 502 days (interquartile range, 182-781). Five sites were early (median, 153 d; interquartile range, 146-267) and eight sites were late adopters (median, 783 d; interquartile range, 773-845). Focus groups identified common "promoter" themes-interdisciplinary approach, influential champions, and quality improvement bundle customization-and "barrier" themes-time constraints, competing paperwork and quality improvement activities, and poor engagement. Semistructured interviews with quality improvement leaders identified effective and ineffective tactics implemented by early and late adopters. Effective tactics included interdisciplinary quality improvement team involvement (early adopter: 5/5, 100% vs late adopter: 3/8, 38%; p = 0.08); ineffective tactics included physician-only rollouts, lack of interdisciplinary education, lack of data feedback to frontline clinicians

  5. Aspergillus Tracheobronchitis Causing Subtotal Tracheal Stenosis in a Liver Transplant Recipient

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    Sonia Radunz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasive aspergillosis is recognized as one of the most significant opportunistic infections after liver transplantation. Diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis in transplant recipients has been proven to be challenging, and optimal approach to the treatment of invasive aspergillosis is still controversial. We here present an unusual case of Aspergillus tracheobronchitis in the setting of liver transplantation. A 47-year-old female patient with persistent dry cough after liver transplantation developed respiratory insufficiency and was readmitted to the intensive care unit 55 days after liver transplantation. A CT scan revealed subtotal tracheal stenosis; bronchoscopy was performed, and extended white mucus coverings causative of the tracheal stenosis were removed. Microbiological assessment isolated Aspergillus fumigatus. The diagnosis was obstructive Aspergillus tracheobronchitis. The patient was started on a treatment of voriconazole 200 mg orally twice daily, adjusted to a trough level of 1–4 mg/L. For further airway management, a tracheal stent had to be implanted. The patient is alive and well 28 months after liver transplantation. Invasive aspergillosis should be considered a possible etiology in liver transplant patients presenting with unspecific symptoms such as persistent dry cough. Optimal strategies for improved and early diagnosis as well as prophylaxis need to be defined.

  6. Management of Benign Tracheal Stenosis by Small-diameter Tube-assisted Bronchoscopic Balloon Dilatation

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    Yi-Lin Liang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A limitation of bronchoscopic balloon dilatation (BBD is that airflow must be completely blocked for as long as possible during the operation. However, the patient often cannot hold his or her breath for a long period affecting the efficacy of the procedure. In this study, we used an extra-small-diameter tube to provide assisted ventilation to patients undergoing BBD and assessed the efficacy and safety of this technique. Methods: Bronchoscopic balloon dilatation was performed in 26 patients with benign tracheal stenosis using an extra-small-diameter tube. The tracheal diameter, dyspnea index, blood gas analysis results, and complications were evaluated before and after BBD. Statistical analyses were performed by SPSS version 16.0 for Windows (SPSS, Inc., Chicago, IL, USA. Results: Sixty-three BBD procedures were performed in 26 patients. Dyspnea immediately improved in all patients after BBD. The tracheal diameter significantly increased from 5.5 ± 1.5 mm to 13.0 ± 1.3 mm (P < 0.001, and the dyspnea index significantly decreased from 3.4 ± 0.8 to 0.5 ± 0.6 (P < 0.001. There was no significant change in the partial pressure of oxygen during the operation (before, 102.5 ± 27.5 mmHg; during, 96.9 ± 30.4 mmHg; and after, 97.2 ± 21.5 mmHg; P = 0.364, but there was slight temporary retention of carbon dioxide during the operation (before, 43.5 ± 4.2 mmHg; during, 49.4 ± 6.8 mmHg; and after, 40.1 ± 3.9 mmHg; P < 0.001. Conclusion: Small-diameter tube-assisted BBD is an effective and safe method for the management of benign tracheal stenosis.

  7. [Complications and the management of fully covered retrievable metal stent placement in benign tracheal stenosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng-yu; Wang, Yong-li; Chen, Guang-li; Liang, Xi-hong; Wang, Zhen-chang; Ma, Jian-zhong; Wu, Guang-zhong; Zhang, Xiao-ping

    2012-11-01

    To study complications and the management of the use of covered retrievable expandable metallic stents in the treatment of benign tracheal stenosis. Fully covered retrievable metal stents were placed in 21 patients with benign tracheal stenosis. Stent-related complications and the management were reviewed and analysed. Twenty-eight fully covered retrievable metallic stents were successfully placed fluoroscopically in 21 patients. Stents were removed 4 - 12 months [mean (5.5 ± 2.2) mouths] after placement in all patients. Stent-related complications included granulation tissue (n = 18), stent migration (n = 4), stent expectoration (n = 2), halitosis (n = 8), mucous retention (n = 21) and mucus plugging (n = 1). Granulation tissue was removed with a carbon dioxide laser in 2 patients. Stents were replaced for 2 times and 3 times respectively in 2 patients after stent migration and stent expectoration. An additional stent was placed in 2 patients after stent migration. Symptom of halitosis was relieved after prolonged course of systemic antibiotics treatment in 8 patients. Symptom of mucous retention was relieved with nebulized saline and N-acetylcysteine saline inhalation. Mucous plug was expelled after severe coughing after suctioning using an aspirator in one patient. There were statistically significant differences in stricture diameter, rank of tachypnea and pulmonary function (FEV(1)) in all 21 patients before stent insertion and after stents removal. No patient has experienced recurrence during the follow-up period of 1 - 36 months [mean (23.2 ± 8.0) months]. Fully covered retrievable metallic stent may be a safe and effective in benign tracheal stenosis. Stent-related complications may be effectively managed.

  8. Effects of Phenytoin Therapy on Bispectral Index and Haemodynamic Changes Following Induction and Tracheal Intubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parmod P Bithal

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation (LTI increase blood pressure and heart rate (HR. Intensity of these changes is influenced by the anaesthetic depth assessed by the bispectral index (BIS. We determined the effect of phenytoin on anaesthetic depth and its influence on haemodynamics following LTI. Fifty patients of ASA grades I and II on oral phenytoin 200 to 300mg per day for more than one week were compared with 48 control patients. Standard anaesthesia technique was followed. BIS, non invasive mean blood pressure (MBP and HR were recorded 30, 60, 90 and 120 sec after LTI. Phenytoin group needed lesser thiopentone for induction, 5 mg (1.1 vs. 4.3 mg (0.7 [p=0.036]. BIS was significantly lower in the phenytoin group vs. the control 30, 60, 90 and 120 sec after LTI [43.1 (16.0 vs. 48.9 (14.9, p=0.068, 56.3 (16.7 vs. 64.3 (14.4, p=0.013, 59.8 (15.8 vs. 67.5 (12.1, p=0.008, 62.6 (14 vs. 68.9 (11.2, p=0.017, and 64.2 (11.3 vs. 69 (11.7, p=0.033], respectively. MBP was also lower in the phenytoin group 30, 60, 90 and 120 sec after LTI [112.8 mmHg (13.8, vs. 117.9 mmHg (18 p=0.013, 108.6 (12.8 vs. 117.5 (16 p=0.003, 106.1 mmHg (14.1 vs. 113.2 mmHg (14.9, p=0.017, 101.8 mmHg (13.8 vs. 109.5 mmHg (14.1, p=0.007], respectively. HR was lower in phenytoin group at 30 sec. (p=0.027, 60 sec (p=0.219, and again at 120 sec (p=0.022. Oral phenytoin therapy for over a week results in greater anaesthetic depth as observed using BIS, which also attenuated haemodynamic response of LTI.

  9. Intravenous rocuronium 0.3 mg/kg improves the conditions for tracheal intubation in cats: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Daniel M; Zornow, Kailee Anne; Campoy, Luis; Cable, Christina; Appel, Leslie D; Putnam, Holly J; Martin-Flores, Manuel

    2018-01-01

    Objectives We evaluated the use of rocuronium 0.3 mg/kg intravenously (IV) to facilitate tracheal intubation in cats anesthetized for elective ovariohysterectomy. Methods Thirty female cats were randomly allocated to receive rocuronium 0.3 mg/kg IV or an equal volume of normal saline, following induction of anesthesia with ketamine and midazolam. Thirty seconds after induction, a single investigator, unaware of treatment allocation, attempted tracheal intubation. The number of attempts and the time to complete intubation were measured. Intubating conditions were assessed as acceptable or unacceptable based on a composite score consisting of five different components. Duration of apnea after induction was measured and cases of hemoglobin desaturation (SpO 2 rocuronium 12 s [range 8-75 s]; saline 60 s [range 9-120 s]) and with fewer attempts (rocuronium 1 [range 1-2]; saline 2 [range 1-3], both P = 0.006) in cats receiving rocuronium. Unacceptable intubating conditions on the first attempt occurred in 3/15 cats with rocuronium and in 10/15 with saline ( P = 0.01). Apnea lasted 4 ± 1.6 mins with rocuronium and 2.3 ± 0.5 mins with saline ( P = 0.0007). No cases of desaturation were observed. Conclusions and relevance Rocuronium 0.3 mg/kg IV improves intubating conditions compared with saline and reduces the time and number of attempts to intubate with only a short period of apnea in cats.

  10. Evaluation of a smartphone camera system to enable visualization and image transmission to aid tracheal intubation with the Airtraq(®) laryngoscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Delice Weishan; Thampi, Swapna; Yap, Eric Peng Huat; Liu, Eugene Hern Choon

    2016-06-01

    Using three-dimensional printing, we produced adaptors to attach a smartphone with camera to the eyepiece of the Airtraq(®) laryngoscope. This low-cost system enabled a team to simultaneously view the laryngoscopy process on the smartphone screen, and also enabled image transmission. We compared the Airtraq(®) with the smartphone Airtraq(®) system in a crossover study of trainee anesthesiologists performing tracheal intubation in a manikin. We also evaluated the smartphone Airtraq(®) system for laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation in 30 patients, including image transmission to and communication with a remote instructor. In the manikin study, the smartphone Airtraq(®) system enabled instruction where both trainee and instructor could view the larynx simultaneously, and did not substantially increase the time required for intubation. In the patient study, we were able to view the larynx in all 30 patients, and the remote instructor was able to receive the images and to respond on correctness of laryngoscopy and tracheal tube placement. Tracheal intubation was successful within 90s in 19 (63 %) patients. In conclusion, use of a smartphone with the Airtraq(®) may facilitate instruction and communication of laryngoscopy with the Airtraq(®), overcoming some of its limitations.

  11. Treatment of cuff-related tracheal stenosis with a fully covered retrievable expandable metallic stent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, G.; Wang, Z.; Liang, X.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Z.; Xian, J.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the clinical effectiveness, complications, and optimal duration of use of covered retrievable expandable metallic stents in the management of cuff-related tracheal stenosis. Materials and methods: Twenty-one patients with cuff-related tracheal stenosis, Meyer–Cotton grade II (29%) and III (71%), who underwent fluoroscopically guided placement of covered retrievable expandable metallic stents were studied. Sixty-four-section computed tomography (CT) and bronchovideoscopy were performed prior to stent insertion, 1 month after stent insertion, in the case of stent-related complications, and after stent removal. Clinical manifestations, Hugh–Jones classification, and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) were used to evaluate respiratory function before and after stent insertion and removal. The diameter of the stricture and FEV1 changes before insertion and after removal were analysed using the paired samples t-test. A p-value of ≤0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Twenty-one patients had 27 covered retrievable expandable metallic stents placed. Stents were electively removed from 20 patients. The median duration of stent placement was 5 months (range 4–12 months). One stent was not removed due to mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II or Hunter syndrome) with tracheomalacia. After stent removal, airway dimensions increased and airway occlusion was symptomatically relieved in all patients. CT and bronchovideoscopy showed patent lumens with increased dimensions. Stent-related complications occurred in 19 (91%) patients, including granulation tissue formation (n = 18, 86%), stent migration and stent expectoration (n = 2, 10%), mucus plugging (n = 1, 5%), and halitosis (n = 6, 29%). Some patients experienced multiple complications, which were all managed effectively while the stent was still in place. There was a statistically significant difference in the diameter of the stricture and FEV1 between the time of stent

  12. Treatment of cuff-related tracheal stenosis with a fully covered retrievable expandable metallic stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, G; Wang, Z; Liang, X; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Wang, Z; Xian, J

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the clinical effectiveness, complications, and optimal duration of use of covered retrievable expandable metallic stents in the management of cuff-related tracheal stenosis. Twenty-one patients with cuff-related tracheal stenosis, Meyer-Cotton grade II (29%) and III (71%), who underwent fluoroscopically guided placement of covered retrievable expandable metallic stents were studied. Sixty-four-section computed tomography (CT) and bronchovideoscopy were performed prior to stent insertion, 1 month after stent insertion, in the case of stent-related complications, and after stent removal. Clinical manifestations, Hugh-Jones classification, and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) were used to evaluate respiratory function before and after stent insertion and removal. The diameter of the stricture and FEV1 changes before insertion and after removal were analysed using the paired samples t-test. A p-value of ≤0.05 was considered statistically significant. Twenty-one patients had 27 covered retrievable expandable metallic stents placed. Stents were electively removed from 20 patients. The median duration of stent placement was 5 months (range 4-12 months). One stent was not removed due to mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II or Hunter syndrome) with tracheomalacia. After stent removal, airway dimensions increased and airway occlusion was symptomatically relieved in all patients. CT and bronchovideoscopy showed patent lumens with increased dimensions. Stent-related complications occurred in 19 (91%) patients, including granulation tissue formation (n = 18, 86%), stent migration and stent expectoration (n = 2, 10%), mucus plugging (n = 1, 5%), and halitosis (n = 6, 29%). Some patients experienced multiple complications, which were all managed effectively while the stent was still in place. There was a statistically significant difference in the diameter of the stricture and FEV1 between the time of stent insertion and removal. An improvement in

  13. Dose of rocuronium for rapid tracheal intubation following remifentanil 2 μg kg-1 and propofol 2 mg kg-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Ah-Young; Cho, Suk-Ju; Seo, Kwang-Suk; Ryu, Jung-Hee; Han, Sung-Hee; Hwang, Jung-Won

    2013-09-01

    Full relaxation is not mandatory for successful tracheal intubation. We tried to find the dose of rocuronium that gave acceptable intubation conditions in a rapid sequence intubation with remifentanil and propofol. A dose-finding study of rocuronium using a modified Dixon's up-and-down method. A single tertiary care teaching hospital. Patients undergoing elective surgery under general anaesthesia. After premedication with midazolam and glycopyrrolate, anaesthesia was induced using remifentanil 2 μg kg and propofol 2 mg kg, and a predetermined dose of rocuronium was administered. The dose of rocuronium was determined by a modified Dixon's up-and-down method starting from 0.8 mg kg with an interval of 0.1 or 0.05 mg kg. Intubation was performed 60 s after the start of the rocuronium injection. Intubation conditions were graded as excellent, good or poor. Excellent or good were regarded as clinically acceptable. A dose of rocuronium needed for acceptable intubation condition in 50% of patients (ED50) during rapid tracheal intubation after induction of anaesthesia with remifentanil and propofol. Twenty-eight patients were enrolled to obtain six crossovers. The ED50 of rocuronium was 0.20 mg kg (95% confidence interval, CI 0.17 to 0.23 mg kg) by a modified Dixon's up-and-down method. After induction of anaesthesia with remifentanil 2 μg kg and propofol 2 mg kg, the ED50 of rocuronium for acceptable intubation condition was 0.20 mg kg (95% CI, 0.17 to 0.23 mg kg) for rapid sequence intubation. Thus, we recommend that the intubation dose should be 0.8 mg kg. Clinical trial registration KCT0000094.

  14. Impact of tracheal cuff shape on microaspiration of gastric contents in intubated critically ill patients: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaillette, Emmanuelle; Brunin, Guillaume; Girault, Christophe; Zerimech, Farid; Chiche, Arnaud; Broucqsault-Dedrie, Céline; Fayolle, Cyril; Minacori, Franck; Alves, Isabelle; Barrailler, Stephanie; Robriquet, Laurent; Tamion, Fabienne; Delaporte, Emmanuel; Thellier, Damien; Delcourte, Claire; Duhamel, Alain; Nseir, Saad

    2015-09-25

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is the most common infection in intubated critically ill patients. Microaspiration of the contaminated gastric and oropharyngeal secretions is the main mechanism involved in the pathophysiology of VAP. Tracheal cuff plays an important role in stopping the progression of contaminated secretions into the lower respiratory tract. Previous in vitro studies suggested that conical cuff shape might be helpful in improving tracheal sealing. However, clinical studies found conflicting results. The aim of this study is to determine the impact of conical tracheal cuff shape on the microaspiration of gastric contents in critically ill patients. This prospective cluster randomized controlled crossover open-label trial is currently being conducted in ten French intensive care units (ICUs). Patients are allocated to intubation with a polyvinyl chloride (PVC) standard (barrel)-shaped or a PVC conical-shaped tracheal tube. The primary objective is to determine the impact of the conical shaped tracheal cuff on abundant microaspiration of gastric contents. Secondary outcomes include the incidence of microaspiration of oropharyngeal secretions, tracheobronchial colonization, VAP and ventilator-associated events. Abundant microaspiration is defined as the presence of pepsin at significant level (>200 ng/ml) in at least 30 % of the tracheal aspirates. Pepsin and amylase are quantitatively measured in all tracheal aspirates during the 48 h following inclusion. Quantitative tracheal aspirate culture is performed at inclusion and twice weekly. We plan to recruit 312 patients in the participating ICUs. BEST Cuff is the first randomized controlled study evaluating the impact of PVC tracheal-cuff shape on gastric microaspirations in patients receiving invasive mechanical ventilation. Enrollment began in June 2014 and is expected to end in October 2015. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01948635 (registered 31 August 2013).

  15. The feasibility of laryngoscope-guided tracheal intubation in microgravity during parabolic flight: A comparison of two techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groemer, Gernot E.; Brimacombe, Joseph; Haas, Thorsten

    2005-01-01

    We determined the feasibility of laryngoscope-guided tracheal intubation (LG-TI) in microgravity obtained during parabolic flight and tested the hypothesis that LG-TI is similarly successful in the free-floating condition, with the patient's head gripped between the anesthesiologist's knees......, as in the restrained condition, with the torso strapped to the surface. Three personnel with no experience in airway management or microgravity participated in the study. LG-TI of a sophisticated full-size manikin was attempted on seven occasions in each condition by each investigator after ground-based training...... by squeezing the bag and noting whether the manikin sensors indicated a tidal volume >= 300 mL. There were no differences in ventilation success (41% versus 33%) or time to successful insertion (both 18 s) between the free-floating and the restrained conditions. More than 90% of failures were caused...

  16. Use of a Nitinol Wire Stent for Management of Severe Tracheal Stenosis in an Eclectus Parrot (Eclectus roratus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia-Fava, Johanna; Holmes, Shannon P; Radlinsky, MaryAnn; Johnson, Dan; Ellis, Angela E; Mayer, Jörg; Schnellbacher, Rodney; Divers, Stephen J

    2015-09-01

    A 25-year-old, female eclectus parrot (Eclectus roratus) presented for dyspnea 3 weeks after anesthesia and surgery for egg yolk coelomitis. Radiography, computed tomography, and tracheoscopy revealed multiple tracheal strictures spanning a length of 2.6 cm in the mid to distal trachea. Histopathologic examination revealed mild fibrosis, inflammation, and hyperplasia consistent with acquired tracheal strictures. Tracheal resection was not considered possible because of the length of the affected trachea. The strictures were resected endoscopically, and repeated balloon dilation under fluoroscopic guidance over the course of 10 months resulted in immediate but unsustained improvement. Computed tomography was used to measure the stenotic area. A 4 × 36-mm, custom-made, nitinol wire stent was inserted into the trachea under fluoroscopic guidance. After stent placement, intermittent episodes of mild to moderate dyspnea continued, and these responded to nebulization with a combination of saline, acetylcysteine, and dexamethasone. Multiple attempts to wean the patient off nebulization therapy and to switch to a corticosteroid-free combination were unsuccessful. The parrot eventually developed complications, was euthanatized, and necropsy was performed. Histologically, the tracheal mucosa had widespread erosion to ulceration, with accumulation of intraluminal exudate and bacteria, severe degeneration of skeletal muscle and tracheal rings, prominent fibrosis, and mild to moderate, submucosal inflammation. Clinicopathologic findings in this case suggested tracheomalacia, which has not been previously described in birds. Custom-made tracheal stents can be used for severe tracheal stenosis in birds when tracheal resection and anastomosis is not possible. Complications of tracheal stent placement in birds may include tracheitis and tracheomalacia. To our knowledge, this is the first report of tracheal stent placement in an avian species.

  17. Undersedation is a risk factor for the development of subglottic stenosis in intubated children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Schweiger

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the level of sedation in intubated children as a risk factor for the development of subglottic stenosis. Methods: All patients between 30 days and 5 years of age who required endotracheal intubation in the pediatric intensive care unit between 2013 and 2014 were included in this prospective study. They were monitored daily and COMFORT-B scores were obtained. Flexible fiber-optic laryngoscopy was performed within eight hours of extubation, and repeated seven to ten days later if the first examination showed moderate to severe laryngeal injuries. If these lesions persisted and/or if the child developed symptoms in the follow-up period, microlaryngoscopy under general anesthesia was performed to evaluate for subglottic stenosis. Results: The study included 36 children. Incidence of subglottic stenosis was 11.1%. Children with subglottic stenosis had a higher percentage of COMFORT-B scores between 23 and 30 (undersedated than those who did not develop subglottic stenosis (15.8% vs. 3.65%, p = 0.004. Conclusion: Children who developed subglottic stenosis were less sedated than children who did not develop subglottic stenosis. Resumo: Objetivo: Analisar o nível de sedação em crianças intubadas como um fator de risco para o desenvolvimento de estenose subglótica (ES. Métodos: Todos os pacientes entre 30 dias e 5 anos de idades que necessitaram de intubação endotraqueal na Unidade de Terapia Intensiva Pediátrica entre 2013 e 2014 foram incluídos neste estudo prospectivo. Eles foram monitorados diariamente e foram obtidos os escores da escala COMFORT-B. Foi feita laringoscopia com tubo flexível de fibra óptica em 8 horas da extubação e repetida 7-10 dias depois, caso o primeiro exame tenha mostrado lesões laríngeas moderadas a graves. Caso essas lesões tenham persistido e/ou caso a criança tenha desenvolvido sintomas no período de acompanhamento, foi feita microlaringoscopia sob anestesia geral para avaliar a ES

  18. A systematic review and meta-regression analysis of mivacurium for tracheal intubation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanlinthout, L.E.H.; Mesfin, S.H.; Hens, N.; Vanacker, B.F.; Robertson, E.N.; Booij, L.H.D.J.

    2014-01-01

    We systematically reviewed factors associated with intubation conditions in randomised controlled trials of mivacurium, using random-effects meta-regression analysis. We included 29 studies of 1050 healthy participants. Four factors explained 72.9% of the variation in the probability of excellent

  19. The Effect of Tracheal Intubation-Induced Autonomic Response on Photoplethysmography

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    Pekka Talke

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Intraoperative stress responses and postoperative pain can be monitored using photoplethysmography (PPG. PPG signal has two components, AC and DC. Effects of noxious stimuli-induced stress responses have not been studied on the DC component of PPG. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a known noxious stimulus (endotracheal intubation on both the AC and DC components of PPG. Methods. 15 surgical patients having general anesthesia were enrolled into this clinical study. PPG was recorded electronically from a pulse oximeter. Maximum changes in the AC and DC components of the PPG and pulse rate were determined in response to endotracheal intubation from high frequency (62.5 Hz PPG recordings. Results. Endotracheal intubation-induced autonomic stress response resulted in a significant decrease in the AC component of the PPG and an increase in pulse rate in every subject (p<0.05 for all. The decrease in the AC component of the PPG was 50±12% (p<0.05 and the increase in pulse rate was 26±10 bpm (p<0.05. The response of the DC component was variable (p = NS. Conclusion. Endotracheal intubation-induced stress response resulted in a significant and consistent change in the AC, but not the DC component of the PPG. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT03032939.

  20. Failed obstetric tracheal intubation and postoperative respiratory support with the ProSeal laryngeal mask airway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keller, Christian; Brimacombe, Joseph; Lirk, Philipp; Pühringer, Fritz

    2004-01-01

    The ProSeal laryngeal mask airway (ProSeal LMA) provides a better seal and probably better airway protection than the classic laryngeal mask airway (classic LMA). We report the use of the ProSeal LMA in a 26-yr-old female with HELLP syndrome for failed obstetric intubation and postoperative

  1. Propofol for pediatric tracheal intubation with deep anesthesia during sevoflurane induction: dosing according to elapsed time for two age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politis, George D; Stemland, Christopher J; Balireddy, Ravi K; Brockhaus, Julie; Hughes, Kevin R; Goins, Matthew D; McMurry, Timothy L

    2014-02-01

    To determine, for two different age groups, the effect of duration of sevoflurane administration on the amount of propofol needed when performing tracheal intubation. Classic Dixon's Up-and-Down sequential method. University based operating rooms. 106 ASA physical status 1 and 2 patients aged one to 11 years. Patients were allocated to the 1-6 year (≥ 12 and age groups. Midazolam 0.5 mg/kg was given orally to the 1-6 year group, and all patients were induced with 8% dialed sevoflurane and 67% nitrous oxide (N2O), with N2O discontinued and sevoflurane dialed to 5% after one minute and 1.5 minutes for the younger and older age groups, respectively. Intravenous access was obtained and propofol was promptly administered. Propofol dose was determined according to age group and whether propofol was given 2-4, 4-6, or 6-8 minutes after the start of sevoflurane induction, with Dixon's Up and Down Method used separately for each specific age/time group. Tracheal intubation conditions one minute after propofol were evaluated. Isotonic regression determined propofol ED50 estimates for excellent tracheal intubation conditions, and linear regression determined the effect of propofol dose on change in systolic blood pressure (SBP). Estimated propofol ED50 doses for 1-6 year olds, with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), were 1.48 mg/kg (0.80, 2.03), 0.00 mg/kg (0.00, 0.38), and 0.07 mg/kg (0.00, 0.68) in the 2-4, 4-6, and 6-8 minute groups, respectively, with estimated differences between the 2-4 minute group versus the 4-6 and 6-8 minute groups being 1.47 mg/kg (95% CI = 1.04, 2.06) and 1.41 mg/kg (95% CI = 0.74, 2.04), respectively. Estimated propofol ED50 doses for 6-11 year olds, with 95% CIs, were 2.35 mg/kg (1.97, 2.45) and 2.33 mg/kg (1.59, 2.45) in the 2-4 and 4-6 minute groups, respectively. Diminutions in SBP at one minute and two minutes after propofol administration were dose dependent for children 1-6 years of age, decreasing 5.3% and 8.1% for each 1 mg/kg of propofol

  2. Associations of obesity with tracheal intubation success on first attempt and adverse events in the emergency department: An analysis of the multicenter prospective observational study in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakushiji, Hiromasa; Goto, Tadahiro; Shirasaka, Wataru; Hagiwara, Yusuke; Watase, Hiroko; Okamoto, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Kohei

    2018-01-01

    Obesity is deemed to increase the risk of difficult tracheal intubation. However, there is a dearth of research that examines the relationship of obesity with intubation success and adverse events in the emergency department (ED). We analyzed the data from a prospective, observational, multicenter study-the Japanese Emergency Airway Network (JEAN) 2 study from 2012 through 2016. We included all adults (aged ≥18 years) who underwent tracheal intubation in the ED. Patients were categorized into three groups according to their body mass index (BMI): lean (<25.0 kg/m²), overweight (25.0-29.9 kg/m²), and obesity (≥30.0 kg/m²). Outcomes of interest were intubation success on the first attempt and intubation-related adverse events. Of 6,889 patients who are eligible for the analysis, 5,370 patients (77%) were lean, 1,177 (17%) were overweight, and 342 (4%) were obese. Compared to the lean patients, the intubation success rates were significantly lower in the overweight and obese patients (70.9% in lean, 66.4% in overweight, and 59.3% in obese patients; P<0.001). In the multivariable analysis, compared to the lean patients, overweight (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 0.85; 95%CI, 0.74-0.98) and obese (adjusted OR, 0.62; 95%CI, 0.49-0.79) patients had a significantly lower success rate on the first attempt. Additionally, obesity was significantly associated with a higher risk of adverse events (adjusted OR, 1.62; 95%CI, 1.23-2.13). Based on the data from a multicenter prospectively study, obesity was associated with a lower success rate on the first intubation attempt and a higher risk of adverse event in the ED.

  3. C-MAC videolaryngoscope versus Macintosh laryngoscope for tracheal intubation: A systematic review and meta-analysis with trial sequential analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshijima, Hiroshi; Mihara, Takahiro; Maruyama, Koichi; Denawa, Yohei; Mizuta, Kentaro; Shiga, Toshiya; Nagasaka, Hiroshi

    2018-06-09

    The C-MAC laryngoscope (C-MAC) is a videolaryngoscope that uses a modified Macintosh blade. Although several anecdotal reports exist, it remains unclear whether the C-MAC is superior to the Macintosh laryngoscope for tracheal intubation in the adult population. Systematic review, meta-analysis. Operating room, intensive care unit. For inclusion in our analysis, studies had to be prospective randomised trials which compared the C-MAC with the Macintosh laryngoscope for tracheal intubation in the adult population. Data on success rates, intubation time, glottic visualisation and incidence of external laryngeal manipulations (ELM) during tracheal intubation were extracted from the identified studies. In subgroup analysis, we separated those parameters to assess the influence of the airway condition (normal or difficult) and laryngoscopists (novice or experienced). We conducted a trial sequential analysis (TSA). Sixteen articles with 18 trials met the inclusion criteria. The C-MAC provided better glottic visualisation compared to the Macintosh (RR, 1.08; 95% CI, 1.03-1.14). TSA corrected the CI to 1.01-1.19; thus, total sample size reached the required information size (RIS). Success rates and intubation time did not differ significantly between the laryngoscopes. TSA showed that total sample size reached the RIS for success rates. The TSA Z curve surpassed the futility boundary. The C-MAC required less ELM compared to the Macintosh (RR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.72-0.96). TSA corrected the CI to 0.67-1.03; 52.3% of the RIS was achieved. In difficult airways, the C-MAC showed superior success rates, glottic visualisation, and less ELM compared to the Macintosh. Among experienced laryngoscopists, the C-MAC offered better glottic visualisation with less ELM than the Macintosh. The C-MAC provided better glottic visualisation and less ELM (GRADE: Very Low or Moderate), with improved success rates, glottic visualisation, and less ELM in difficult airways. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier

  4. New CO2 laser waveguide systems: advances in surgery of tracheal stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasche, Norbert; Bernecker, Frank; Hoermann, Karl

    1996-01-01

    The carbon dioxide laser is a well established tool in the surgical treatment of laryngeal and tracheal stenosis. Usually the laser beam is applied by a microscope/micromanipulator device. Different types of rigid laryngoscopes and bronchoscopes provide access to nearly every area of larynx, trachea and main bronchi. In order to be treated with this equipment the target tissue has to be in a straight optical axis with the laser beam output at the micromanipulator. We report about one patient who presented with severe dyspnea due to granulation tissue directly below his left vocal cord. He was suffering from tracheomalacia for several years and was successfully treated by tracheostomy and a Montgomery's silicone T-tube as a stent. Then granulation tissue blocked the upper orifice of the Montgomery's T-tube. First removal by a carbon dioxide laser beam through the laryngoscope would have required sacrificing his intact left vocal cord. We removed the obstructing tissue by using the ArthroLaseTM System: the carbon dioxide laser beam was conducted through a 90 degree bent rigid probe, using the tracheostomy as an access. This ArthroLaseTM System was originally designed for arthroscopic surgery. In this special case however it successfully extends the use of the carbon dioxide laser in otolaryngology.

  5. Use of extraglottic airways in patients undergoing ambulatory laparoscopic surgery without the need for tracheal intubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Suhitharan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Second generation extraglottic airway devices with gastric access and separate breathing channels have ushered in a new era where their use is increasingly prevalent in surgical patients who would have been traditionally intubated for general anesthesia. New innovations like the i-gel, which is constructed of a thermoplastic elastomer, provide an airtight seal around patient′s perilaryngeal anatomy without the inflatable cuff mechanism found in the laryngeal mask airway supreme (LMAS. Methods: We conducted a randomized controlled trial comparing the LMAS with the i-gel in 70 anesthetized paralyzed patients undergoing laparoscopic female sterilization. Our primary outcome measure was the oropharyngeal leak pressure (OLP. We studied secondary outcomes of successful first attempt insertion rates, time and ease of the airway and gastric tube insertion, leak fractions and pharyngeal morbidity. Results: We found no difference in the OLP between LMAS and i-gel, 25.9 (4.2 versus 24.4 (4.3 s, P=0.153. Both devices had similar first attempt insertion rates (LMAS 94% vs. i-gel 91% with similar ease and comparable times to achieve an effective airway, LMAS 14.7 (2.7 versus i-gel 16.5 (9.6 s, P=0.306, although gastric tube insertion was easier and faster for the LMAS, 7.9 (1.9 versus i-gel 14.8 (7.7 s, P<0.005. Intraoperatively, there was a significantly greater leak fraction with the i-gel of 0.06 (0.03 versus 0.04 (0.02 with the LMAS, P=0.013. Three patients (8.6% with LMAS had mild sore throat; one patient (2.9% had mucosal injury. No complications were documented in the i-gel group. Conclusions: Both these extraglottic airway devices offer similar OLPs, high insertion success rates at the first attempt with similar ease and insertion times (albeit longer gastric tube insertion with i-gel. Both provided effective ventilation despite a higher leak fraction with i-gel that was clinically inconsequential.

  6. Tracheal intubation in patients with cervical spine immobilization: A comparison of McGrath(®) video laryngoscope and Truview EVO2(®) laryngoscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhola, Ruchi; Bhalla, Swaran; Gupta, Radha; Singh, Ishwar; Kumar, Sunil

    2014-05-01

    Literature suggests that glottic view is better when using McGrath(®) Video laryngoscope and Truview(®) in comparison with McIntosh blade. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of McGrath Video laryngoscope in comparison with Truview laryngoscope for tracheal intubation in patients with simulated cervical spine injury using manual in-line stabilisation. This prospective randomised study was undertaken in operation theatre of a tertiary referral centre after approval from the Institutional Review Board. A total of 100 consenting patients presenting for elective surgery requiring tracheal intubation were randomly assigned to undergo intubation using McGrath(®) Video laryngoscope (n = 50) or Truview(®) (n = 50) laryngoscope. In all patients, we applied manual-in-line stabilisation of the cervical spine throughout the airway management. Statistical testing was conducted with the statistical package for the social science system version SPSS 17.0. Demographic data, airway assessment and haemodynamics were compared using the Chi-square test. A P manual-in-line stabilisation with 100% success rate and good glottic view.

  7. Comparison between traditional and small-diameter tube-assisted bronchoscopic balloon dilatation in the treatment of benign tracheal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li-Hua; Liang, Yi-Lin; Li, Yu; Xu, Ming-Peng; Li, Wen-Tao; Liu, Guang-Nan

    2018-03-01

    To compare the safety and efficacy between using a small-diameter tube-assisted bronchoscopic balloon dilatation (BBD) and the traditional BBD in the treatment of benign tracheal stenosis. A retrospective study included 58 patients with benign tracheal stenosis from August 2009 to December 2014 was made. The patients who underwent traditional BBD were divided into group A, and who underwent a small-diameter tube-assisted BBD were divided into group B. The tracheal diameter, dyspnea index and blood gas analysis results were detected before and after BBD. Efficacy and complications were evaluated after BBD. There were significant differences in oxygen saturation (PaO 2 ) during the operations comparing with before and after operations in group A (P = .005), while there was no significant difference in group B (P = .079). The tracheal diameter obviously increased (in group A, from 4.16 ± 1.43 mm to 12.47 ± 1.41 mm, P = .000; in group B: from 4.94 ± 1.59 mm to 12.61 ± 1.41 mm, P = .000). Dyspnea index obviously decreased (group A: from 3.21 ± 0.93 to 0.50 ± 0.59, P = .000; group B: from 3.24 ± 0.89 to 0.65 ± 0.69, P = .000). The immediately cure rate in both groups was 100%. Long-term effect was significantly better in group B than that in group A (85.3% vs 59.1%, P = .021), at the end of the follow-up period. Small-diameter tube-assisted BBD obtains better safety and long-term efficacy than the traditional BBD in the treatment of benign tracheal stenosis. However, close attention should be given to the risk of the adverse effects caused by carbon dioxide retention. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Comparison of tracheal intubation using the Airtraq® and Mc Coy laryngoscope in the presence of rigid cervical collar simulating cervical immobilisation for traumatic cervical spine injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmaja Durga

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is difficult to visualise the larynx using conventional laryngoscopy in the presence of cervical spine immobilisation. Airtraq® provides for easy and successful intubation in the neutral neck position. Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of Airtraq in comparison with the Mc Coy laryngoscope, when performing tracheal intubation in patients with neck immobilisation using hard cervical collar and manual in-line axial cervical spine stabilisation. Methods: A randomised, cross-over, open-labelled study was undertaken in 60 ASA I and II patients aged between 20 and 50 years, belonging to either gender, scheduled to undergo elective surgical procedures. Following induction and adequate muscle relaxation, they were intubated using either of the techniques first, followed by the other. Intubation time and Intubation Difficulty Score (IDS were noted using Mc Coy laryngoscope and Airtraq. The anaesthesiologist was asked to grade the ease of intubation on a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS of 1-10. Chi-square test was used for comparison of categorical data between the groups and paired sample t-test for comparison of continuous data. IDS score and VAS were compared using Wilcoxon Signed ranked test. Results: The mean intubation time was 33.27 sec (13.25 for laryngoscopy and 28.95 sec (18.53 for Airtraq (P=0.32. The median IDS values were 4 (interquartile range (IQR 1-6 and 0 (IQR 0-1 for laryngoscopy and Airtraq, respectively (P=0.007. The median Cormack Lehane glottic view grade was 3 (IQR 2-4 and 1 (IQR 1-1 for laryngoscopy and Airtraq, respectively (P=0.003. The ease of intubation on VAS was graded as 4 (IQR 3-5 for laryngoscopy and 2 (IQR 2-2 for Airtraq (P=0.033. There were two failures to intubate with the Airtraq. Conclusion: Airtraq improves the ease of intubation significantly when compared to Mc Coy blade in patients immobilised with cervical collar and manual in-line stabilisation simulating cervical spine injury.

  9. Hippocrates (ca 460-375 bc), Introducing Thoracotomy Combined With a Tracheal Intubation for the Parapneumonic Pleural Effusions and Empyema Thoracis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoucalas, Gregory; Sgantzos, Markos

    2016-12-01

    Hippocrates was the first physician to describe in accuracy pleural effusion and pneumonia. To treat empyema thoracis he had introduced a combined method of tracheal intubation with a simultaneously thoracotomy. The surgical incision was used for the pus to be progressively drainaged. If the patient was too weak to eat, he had suggested for nutritional mixtures to be administered through an oral-gastric tube. Thus Hippocrates composed in his operating theatre, an icon similar to modern surgical operations. © The Author(s) 2016.

  10. “Manually Ventilating Test” in Anesthesia Management of Children with Massive Anterior Mediastinal Masses Requiring Tracheal Intubation.A case series

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    Mohammad Gharavi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The risk of life-threatening complications during induction of anesthesia in patients with anterior mediastinal mass is well recognized. Maintenance of spontaneous ventilation during anesthesia is an accepted standard goal in all published reports. However, the decision to paralyze the patient, which is really needed in most surgical procedures, is still a challenging event. In this study, “manually ventilating test” as a predictive test was assessed to make the decision to paralyze children with massive anterior mediastinal masses who needed tracheal intubation. . It seems that manually ventilating test may at least be a simple and reliable test to identify cases that could be paralyzed successfully

  11. Comparison of Pentax-AWS Airwayscope and Glidescope for Infant Tracheal Intubation by Anesthesiologists during Cardiopulmonary Arrest Simulation: A Randomized Crossover Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunsuke Fujiwara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Recent guidelines for infant cardiopulmonary resuscitation emphasize that all rescuers should minimize interruption of chest compressions, even for endotracheal intubation. We compared the utility of the Pentax-AWS Airwayscope (AWS with the Glidescope (GS during chest compressions on an infant manikin. Methods. Twenty-four anesthesiologists with more than two years of experience performed tracheal intubation on an infant manikin using the AWS and GS, with or without chest compressions. Results. In GS trials, none of the participants failed without compressions, while three failed with compressions. In AWS trials, all participants succeeded regardless of chest compressions. Intubation time was significantly longer with chest compressions with the GS (P<0.05, but not with the AWS. Difficulty of operation on a visual analog scale (VAS for laryngoscopy did not increase significantly with chest compressions with either the GS or the AWS, while the VAS for tube passage through the glottis increased with compressions with the GS, but not with the AWS. Conclusion. We conclude that in infant simulations managed by anesthesiologists, the AWS performed better than the GS for endotracheal intubation with chest compressions.

  12. Tracheal intubation in the emergency department: a comparison of GlideScope® video laryngoscopy to direct laryngoscopy in 822 intubations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakles, John C; Mosier, Jarrod M; Chiu, Stephen; Keim, Samuel M

    2012-04-01

    Video laryngoscopy has, in recent years, become more available to emergency physicians. However, little research has been conducted to compare their success to conventional direct laryngoscopy. To compare the success rates of GlideScope(®) (Verathon Inc., Bothell, WA) videolaryngoscopy (GVL) with direct laryngoscopy (DL) for emergency department (ED) intubations. This was a 24-month retrospective observational study of all patients intubated in a single academic ED with a level I trauma center. Structured data forms were completed after each intubation and entered into a continuous quality improvement database. All patients intubated in the ED with either the GlideScope(®) standard, Cobalt, Ranger, or traditional Macintosh or Miller laryngoscopes were included. All patients intubated before arrival were excluded. Primary analysis evaluated overall and first-attempt success rates, operator experience level, performance characteristics of GVL, complications, and reasons for failure. There were 943 patients intubated during the study period; 120 were excluded due to alternative management strategies. DL was used in 583 (62%) patients, and GVL in 360 (38%). GVL had higher first-attempt success (75%, p = 0.03); DL had a higher success rate when more than one attempt was required (57%, p = 0.003). The devices had statistically equivalent overall success rates. GVL had fewer esophageal intubations (n = 1) than DL (n = 18); p = 0.005. The two techniques performed equivalently overall, however, GVL had a higher overall success rate, and lower number of esophageal complications. In the setting of ED intubations, GVL offers an excellent option to maximize first-attempt success for airway management. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. In vitro pharmacokinetics of sirolimus-coated stent for tracheal stenosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Further increases in sirolimus: PLGA ratio did not improve stent drug loading. A slow release of ... tracheal stent can damage the airway mucosa, and cause .... Figure 3: Cumulative drug release from sirolimus-coated stents. DISCUSSION.

  14. A COMPARISON OF McC OY LARYNGOSCOPE AND MCGRATH VIDEO LARYNGOSCOPES FOR TRACHEAL INTUBATION IN PATIENTS WITH IMMOBILIZED CERVICAL SPINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annapurna Sarma

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION : Expert airway management is the most essential requirement of an anesthesiologist . Difficult and failed intubation is the leading causes of anesthetic related morbidity and mortality. AIM OF STUDY: The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of McCoy laryngoscope and McGrath video laryngoscope in tracheal intubation in patients using Manual in - line stabilization (MILS for cervical spine injury. MATERIALS AND METHODS : This study was condu cted in King George Hospital , Visakhapatnam, Andhra Pradesh on 60 patients aged 20 – 70, of American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I – III, posted for elective surgery for cervical spine injury under general anesthesia. The patients were assigne d to two groups. One group was named as MC where McCoy laryngoscope was used, other group named as MG, where McGrath video laryngoscope was used for laryngoscopy during tracheal intubation . Two groups were compared on the basis of demogr aphic data, airway examination, comparison of visualization of vocal cords with McC oy laryngoscope and video laryngoscope and comparison of laryngoscope time. RESULTS: There was no significant difference between male and female sex. Most of the patients falls into Mallampati score I (60%, followed by score II and III (25 and 14% respectively. Statistically highly significant improvement in laryngoscope view was noted with video laryngoscope than with McCoy laryngoscope with Chi - square value=49.52; DF= 10; p - value=0.000(highl y significant. Statistically highly significant difference was seen in effective laryngoscopy time of McCoy and Video laryngoscope. CONCLUSION: We conclude McGrath video laryngoscope is superior to McCoy laryngoscope in terms of providing better intubatin g conditions in patients requiring MILS, though there is a little prolongation of effective laryngoscope time .

  15. Change in quality of life of patients undergoing silicone stent intubation for nasolacrimal duct stenosis combined with dry eye syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jong Rok; Chang, Jee Ho; Yoon, Jin Sook; Jang, Sun Young

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the effect of silicone stent intubation (SI) on the quality of life of patients diagnosed with nasolacrimal duct stenosis and dry eye syndrome. This study is a prospective, interventional case series. Consecutive 30 patients diagnosed with nasolacrimal duct stenosis and reflex tearing due to dry eye syndrome were included. Eligible subjects underwent SI and were asked to complete the Glasgow Benefit Inventory (GBI) questionnaire. Surgical outcomes and GBI scores were investigated 6 months postoperatively. The surgical success rate determined by the patients' subjective symptoms was 76.7% (23/30). Mean total GBI score was +17.19 (95% CI 8.34 to 26.03). The general subscale score was +20.36 (95% CI 10.19 to 30.54), the social support scale score was +21.54 (95% CI 11.37 to 31.71) and the physical health score was -0.56 (95% CI -8.92 to 7.80). SI could be an effective treatment option for reflex tearing in patients diagnosed with dry eye syndrome and nasolacrimal duct stenosis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  16. High body mass index is a weak predictor for difficult and failed tracheal intubation: a cohort study of 91,332 consecutive patients scheduled for direct laryngoscopy registered in the Danish Anesthesia Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundstrøm, Lars H; Møller, Ann M; Rosenstock, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    by direct laryngoscopy was retrieved from the Danish Anesthesia Database. A four-point scale to grade the tracheal intubation was used. Age, sex, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status classification, priority of surgery, history of previous DTI, modified Mallampati-score, use...

  17. Photodocumentation of the Development of Type I Posterior Glottic Stenosis after Intubation Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Scott Howard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral vocal fold immobility may result from bilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis or physiologic insults to the airway such as glottic scars. The progression of mucosal injury to granulation tissue, and then posterior glottis stenosis, is an accepted theory but has not been photodocumented. This paper presents serial images from common postintubation injury to less common posterior glottic stenosis with interarytenoid synechia.

  18. To evaluate the effects of dexmedetomidine on intraocular pressure and haemodynamic changes in response to laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanuja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most important prerequisites for neurosurgeries are brain relaxation, need of stable haemodynamics with less fluctuation in intracranial pressure and speedy recovery from anaesthesia. Endotracheal intubation is the major stressful stimuli that can elicit a marked pressor response. Various drugs have been used to attenuate these reflexes. Dexmedetomidine, a highly selective alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist, have neuroprotective, cardioprotective, and sedative effects so it is potentially useful during neuroanaesthesia. This is a prospective randomised control trial carried out to see whether administration of Dexmedetomidine prior to intubation can attenuate the various haemodynamic responses, intraocular pressure (IOP and the requirement of induction dose of propofol in control and study group. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients (ASA grade 1, 2 scheduled for intracranial tumour surgeries were divided into two groups (25 each. Group D received Dexmedetomidine 0.8 μg/kg i.v. over 10 mins and group C received 20 ml saline. Anaesthesia induced with Propofol, dose adjusted using bispectral index monitor. The groups were compared with IOP, Heart rate (HR, Mean arterial pressure (MAP, and dose of Propofol required for induction. Results : Groups were well matched for their demographic data and pre-operative. IOP in both the eyes decreases significantly after premedication and remained below baseline even after 10 th min of intubation in group D while in Group C; it increased significantly after intubation and remained above baseline. The difference between groups was also statistically significant. HR and MAP decreased significantly in patients of group D compared to group C (P < 0.05. Patients were more haemodynamicaly stable at all time points after premedication in group D (P < 0.05. Propofol requirements for induction was lesser in group D (P < 0.05. Bradycardia and hypotension incidences were higher in group D. Conclusion

  19. Low-Dose or High-Dose Rocuronium Reversed with Neostigmine or Sugammadex for Cesarean Delivery Anesthesia: A Randomized Controlled Noninferiority Trial of Time to Tracheal Intubation and Extubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stourac, Petr; Adamus, Milan; Seidlova, Dagmar; Pavlik, Tomas; Janku, Petr; Krikava, Ivo; Mrozek, Zdenek; Prochazka, Martin; Klucka, Jozef; Stoudek, Roman; Bartikova, Ivana; Kosinova, Martina; Harazim, Hana; Robotkova, Hana; Hejduk, Karel; Hodicka, Zuzana; Kirchnerova, Martina; Francakova, Jana; Obare Pyszkova, Lenka; Hlozkova, Jarmila; Sevcik, Pavel

    2016-05-01

    Rocuronium for cesarean delivery under general anesthesia is an alternative to succinylcholine for rapid-sequence induction of anesthesia because of the availability of sugammadex for reversal of neuromuscular blockade. However, there are no large well-controlled studies in women undergoing general anesthesia for cesarean delivery. The aim of this noninferiority trial was to determine whether rocuronium and sugammadex confer benefit in time to tracheal intubation (primary outcome) and other neuromuscular blockade outcomes compared with succinylcholine, rocuronium, and neostigmine in women undergoing general anesthesia for cesarean delivery. We aimed to enroll all women undergoing general anesthesia for cesarean delivery in the 2 participating university hospitals (Brno, Olomouc, Czech Republic) in this single-blinded, randomized, controlled study. Women were randomly assigned to the ROC group (muscle relaxation induced with rocuronium 1 mg/kg and reversed with sugammadex 2-4 mg/kg) or the SUX group (succinylcholine 1 mg/kg for induction, rocuronium 0.3 mg/kg for maintenance, and neostigmine 0.03 mg/kg for reversal of the neuromuscular blockade). The interval from the end of propofol administration to tracheal intubation was the primary end point with a noninferiority margin of 20 seconds. We recorded intubating conditions (modified Viby-Mogensen score), neonatal outcome (Apgar score rocuronium for rapid-sequence induction is noninferior for time to tracheal intubation and is accompanied by more frequent absence of laryngoscopy resistance and lower incidence of myalgia in comparison with succinylcholine for cesarean delivery under general anesthesia.

  20. Iatrogenic tracheal tear.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dias, A

    2010-10-01

    Large post intubation tracheal tears are usually detected intra-operatively due to unstable signs namely impaired ventilation and mediastinal emphysema and often require surgical management. Smaller tracheal tears are often missed during anaesthesia and recognized during the postoperative period. Conservative management should be considered in these latter cases.

  1. Management of embedded metallic stents used in the treatment of grades III and IV subglottic, and upper tracheal stenosis in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendi, Khalil; Al-Khatib, Talal; Ahmed, Duha G; Tonkul, Al-Baraa

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the post-operative complications of using balloon-expandable metallic stents in treatment of benign, major subglottic and tracheal stenosis in adult patients whom conventional therapy has failed and to demonstrate how to deal with these complications in the long run. A retrospective review of five cases; adlut patiets with benign, major subglottic and upper tracheal stenosis whom were treated with balloon expandable metallic stents at King Abdulaziz University Hospital, in the years between 2008 and 2013. Granulation tissue formed in five of the four cases and restenosis occurred. Other complications encountered were stent infection and dislodgment. The complications were managed by removing the stents surgically via a laryngofissure incision and required the placement of a Montgomery T-tube. Managing the restenosis due to granulation tissue formation around the metallic stents is best achieved by removing the embedded metallic stents surgically via open technique and then by placement of a Montgomery T-tube as a bridging option to successful decannulation. Open surgical procedures remain the mainstay treatment for advanced airway stenosis.

  2. Learning from the Cardiologists and Developing Eluting Stents Targeting the Mtor Pathway for Pulmonary Application; A Future Concept for Tracheal Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarogoulidis, Paul; Darwiche, Kaid; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Teschler, Helmut; Yarmus, Lonny; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Freitag, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    Tracheal stenosis due to either benign or malignant disease is a situation that the pulmonary physicians and thoracic surgeons have to cope in their everyday clinical practice. In the case where tracheal stenosis is caused due to malignancy mini-interventional interventions with laser, apc, cryoprobe, balloon dilation or with combination of more than one equipment and technique can be used. On the other hand, in the case of a benign disease such as; tracheomalacia the clinician can immediately upon diagnosis proceed to the stent placement. In both situations however; it has been observed that the stents induce formation of granuloma tissue in both or one end of the stent. Therefore a frequent evaluation of the patient is necessary, taking also into account the nature of the primary disease. Evaluation methodologies identifying different types and extent of the trachea stenosis have been previously published. However; we still do not have an effective adjuvant therapy to prevent granuloma tissue formation or prolong already treated granuloma lesions. There have been proposed many mechanisms which induce the abnormal growth of the local tissue, such as; local pressure, local stress, inflammation and vascular endothelial growth factor overexpression. Immunomodulatory agents inhibiting the mTOR pathway are capable of inhibiting the inflammatory cascade locally. In the current mini-review we will try to present the current knowledge of drug eluting stents inhibiting the mTOR pathway and propose a future application of these stents as a local anti-proliferative treatment. PMID:24454525

  3. Learning from the Cardiologists and Developing Eluting Stents Targeting the Mtor Pathway for Pulmonary Application; A Future Concept for Tracheal Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarogoulidis, Paul; Darwiche, Kaid; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Teschler, Helmut; Yarmus, Lonny; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Freitag, Lutz

    2013-08-26

    Tracheal stenosis due to either benign or malignant disease is a situation that the pulmonary physicians and thoracic surgeons have to cope in their everyday clinical practice. In the case where tracheal stenosis is caused due to malignancy mini-interventional interventions with laser, apc, cryoprobe, balloon dilation or with combination of more than one equipment and technique can be used. On the other hand, in the case of a benign disease such as; tracheomalacia the clinician can immediately upon diagnosis proceed to the stent placement. In both situations however; it has been observed that the stents induce formation of granuloma tissue in both or one end of the stent. Therefore a frequent evaluation of the patient is necessary, taking also into account the nature of the primary disease. Evaluation methodologies identifying different types and extent of the trachea stenosis have been previously published. However; we still do not have an effective adjuvant therapy to prevent granuloma tissue formation or prolong already treated granuloma lesions. There have been proposed many mechanisms which induce the abnormal growth of the local tissue, such as; local pressure, local stress, inflammation and vascular endothelial growth factor overexpression. Immunomodulatory agents inhibiting the mTOR pathway are capable of inhibiting the inflammatory cascade locally. In the current mini-review we will try to present the current knowledge of drug eluting stents inhibiting the mTOR pathway and propose a future application of these stents as a local anti-proliferative treatment.

  4. Dose-reduced 16-slice multidetector-row spiral computed tomography in children with bronchoscopically suspected vascular tracheal stenosis - initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honnef, D.; Wildberger, J.E.; Das, M.; Hohl, C.; Mahnken, A.; Guenther, R.W.; Staatz, G.; Schnoering, H.; Vazquez-Jimenez, J.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced dose-reduced 16-slice multidetector-row CT (MDCT) in newborns and infants with fiberoptic bronchoscopically suspected vascular-induced tracheal stenosis. Materials and Methods: 12 children (4 days to 3 years, 1.2-13.5 kg body weight) were examined using i.v. contrast-enhanced 16-slice MDCT (SOMATOM Sensation 16, Forchheim, Germany) without breath-hold and under sedation (11/12). All MDCTs were performed with a dose reduction. The beam collimation was 16 x 0.75 mm, except in the case of one child. MPRs along the tracheal axis in the x-, y- and z-directions and volume-rendering-reconstructions (VRTs) were calculated based on a secondary raw data set in addition to conventional axial slices. 2 radiologists used a three-point grade scale to evaluate the image quality, motion, and contrast media artifacts as well as the usefulness of the 2D- and 3D-reconstructions for determining the diagnosis. Statistical analysis was performed on the basis of a Kappa test. Results: In all cases the cause of the fiberoptic bronchoscopically suspected tracheal stenosis was revealed: compression due to the brachiocephalic trunk (n=7), double aortic arch (n=2), lusorian artery (n=1), vascular compression of the left main bronchus (n=2). In 3 patients further thoracic anomalies, such as tracheobronchial (n=2), and vascular (n=2) and vertebral (n=1) anomalies were found. The attenuation in the anomalous vessels was 307±140 HU. The image noise was 9.8±1.9 HU. The mean dose reduction was 82.7±3.2% compared to a standard adult thoracic CT. All examinations were rated as diagnostically good (median 1, range 1, k=1). 3D images did not show any stair artifacts (median 2, range 1-2, k=1). The image noise was minor to moderate and hardly any motion artifacts were seen (median 1, range 1-2, k=0.8). Contrast media artifacts were rated zero to minor (median 1.5, range 1-2, k=0.676). MPRs (median 1, range 1, k=1) and VRTs (median 1

  5. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for laryngotracheal stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Kathrine Kronberg; Grønhøj, Christian; Jensen, David H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Laryngotracheal stenosis (LTS) can be either congenital or acquired. Laryngeal stenosis is most often encountered after prolonged intubation. The mechanism for stenosis following intubation is believed to be hypertrophic scarring. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) therapy has shown...

  6. Randomized controlled trial of the Pentax AWS, Glidescope, and Macintosh laryngoscopes in predicted difficult intubation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Malik, M A

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the potential for the Pentax AWS and the Glidescope to reduce the difficulty of tracheal intubation in patients at increased risk for difficult tracheal intubation, in a randomized, controlled clinical trial.

  7. A bispectral index guided comparison of target-controlled versus manually-controlled infusion of propofol and remifentanil for attenuation of pressor response to laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation in non cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser Yeganeh

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Target-controlled infusion is a new delivery system for intravenous anesthetic agents with which the anesthetist targets a plasma or effect-site drug concentration to achieve a predetermined effect. With this system, the tedious task of calculating the amount of administered drug required to achieve the target concentration is left in charge of a microprocessor which commands the infusion device. In this prospective study we compared alterations in blood pressure and heart rate from initiation of induction of anesthesia until 3 minutes after tracheal intubation in two methods of drug infusion, target-controlled infusion (TCI and manually controlled infusion (MCI. Total anesthetic drug used until 3 minutes after intubation and level of produced hypnosis also were compared between two methods. METHODS: 40 patients were enrolled in this clinical trial study and were allocated randomly in two groups, each group consisting of 20 patients. In TCI group, patients received propofol and remifentanil with TCI pump to achieve 7 µg/ml and 4 ng/ml as plasmatic target drug levels, respectively. In MCI group, patients received propofol 2 mg/kg and remifentanil 1 µg/kg of body weight with manually controlled infusion. Both groups received succinylcholine as muscle relaxant to facilitate laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation. Bispectral index (BIS was passively recorded in two groups to compare the level of hypnosis. Blood pressure (BP and heart rate (HR were recorded at 5 different times (T-1, T0, T1, T2 and T3. Independent t-test and paired t-test were used for data analysis. RESULTS: Systolic arterial pressure (SAP was not different at T-1 between two groups but systolic hypotension was seen in MCI group more than TCI group at T0 (P<0.05. Systolic hypertension was more common in MCI group after intubation; i.e. SAP showed significant differences in T1, T2 and T3 between two groups (P<0.05. Mean arterial pressure (MAP showed significant

  8. Effects of using the simplified airway risk index vs usual airway assessment on unanticipated difficult tracheal intubation - a cluster randomized trial with 64,273 participants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, A K; Wetterslev, J; Rosenstock, C V

    2016-01-01

    departments vs 1.00% (302) in Non-SARI departments. Adjusted OR was 1.26 (0.68-2.34). CONCLUSIONS: Using the SARI compared with usual airway assessment we detected no statistical significant changes in unanticipated difficult- or easy intubations. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT01718561.......BACKGROUND: Unanticipated difficult intubation remains a challenge in anaesthesia. The Simplified Airway Risk Index (SARI) is a multivariable risk model consisting of seven independent risk factors for difficult intubation. Our aim was to compare preoperative airway assessment based on the SARI...

  9. [The implantation of elastic metal endoprostheses in tracheal stenosis and tracheomalacia. The initial results with 4 patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, H; Gärtner, C; Kohz, P; Stäbler, A; Dienemann, H; Wilmes, E

    1993-07-01

    Narrowing of the trachea due to tracheomalacia or compression can lead to life-threatening asphyxia and may require tracheotomy with intubation or endoscopic introduction of a stent. The use of a self-expanding elastic metal prosthesis in 4 patients with airway obstruction has proved a satisfactory alternative to conventional plastic prostheses, both in the acute phase and over a long period of time. After 4 weeks total epithelium cover of the stent could be demonstrated; biopsies after 3 and 4 months showed differentiation into respiratory ciliated epithelium. Patient acceptance was excellent since there was no sensation of a foreign body, retention of secretions or cough. The physical properties of the wall stent made it a suitable mechanical replacement for an unstable or narrowed trachea during the period of observation.

  10. Thyroid abscess following traumatic intubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc A. Polacco, MD

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid abscess is a rare condition, and consequently diagnosis is often delayed. Causes include 3rd and 4th branchial cleft anomalies, hematogenous spread of infection, trauma from esophageal foreign body, and fine needle aspiration. Thyroid abscesses carry potential morbidity with thyroid and parathyroid gland destruction, tracheal compression, tracheal or esophageal fistula, internal jugular vein thrombophlebitis, and sepsis. The authors report a case of a 33-year old woman with a thyroid abscess following traumatic intubation. Thyroid abscess should be considered in patients presenting with anterior neck pain and swelling with a recent history of traumatic intubation, ultrasound or CT with contrast being the ideal diagnostic modalities.

  11. Postoperative discomfort and emergence delirium in children undergoing dental rehabilitation under general anesthesia: comparison of nasal tracheal intubation and laryngeal mask airway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keles S

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Sultan Keles,1 Ozlem Kocaturk2 1Department of Pediatric Dentistry, 2Deparment of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Division of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Adnan Menderes University, Aydin, Turkey Background: Several studies have identified side effects of general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation, such as laryngeal pain, dysphonia, and postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV. The laryngeal mask airway (LMAw is believed to decrease these side effects. The aim of this trial was to compare postoperative discomfort, emergence delirium, and recovery time of patients who received either an LMAw or nasotracheal intubation (NTI.Patients and methods: A total of 70 children were randomly assigned to the LMAw group (n=35 or the NTI group (n=35. Both groups underwent mask induction with 8% sevoflurane. The NTI group received muscle relaxant, whereas the LMAw group did not. Postoperative laryngeal pain, dental pain, dysphonia, and PONV were assessed immediately and at 1 hour and 6 hours postoperatively. The Wong–Baker Faces Scale was used to evaluate the patients’ self-reported pain. In addition, decayed, missing, and filled teeth (dft/DMFT values, dental procedure type, number of dental procedures, duration of the dental operation, duration of anesthesia, recovery time, emergence delirium, pediatric dentist’s access to the mouth, and parents’ satisfaction levels were recorded. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, chi-square tests, and two-sample t-tests.Results: The incidence of postoperative laryngeal pain was significantly higher in the NTI group immediately (97.2% vs. 8.5%, P=0.00, 1 hour (94.2% vs. 0%, P=0.00, and 6 hours postoperatively (25.7% vs. 0%, P=0.00. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups in dental pain scores, dft/DMFT values, duration of anesthesia, duration of the dental operation, number of dental procedures, the incidence of PONV, or pediatric dentist’s access to

  12. Endotracheal intubation in patients with cervical spine immobilization: a comparison of macintosh and airtraq laryngoscopes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Maharaj, Chrisen H

    2007-07-01

    The Airtraq laryngoscope (Prodol Ltd., Vizcaya, Spain) is a novel single-use tracheal intubation device. The authors compared ease of intubation with the Airtraq and Macintosh laryngoscopes in patients with cervical spine immobilization in a randomized, controlled clinical trial.

  13. [Cervical tracheal resection with primary anastomosis for benign tracheal stricture in adult].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jin; Hu, Yan-Ming; Liu, Hui; Li, Jing-Jia; Wang, Zhi-Yuan; Li, Yuan

    2013-07-01

    To introduce the outcomes of tracheal resection with primary end to end anastomosis for benign cervical tracheal stenosis, and to discuss the strategy for prevention of surgical complications. A retrospective analysis was performed in 12 patients diagnosed as benign cervical tracheal stenosis from October 2009 to June 2012. Laryngo-tracheal endoscopic examination and computed tomography (CT) were used to assess the degree of stenosis, the grade of inflammation and edema of the subglottis and trachea, and the extent of stenosis and the remaining linear amount of normal airway. The Meyer and Cotton grading system was used to categorise the clinical severity of the stenoses. All patients underwent tracheal resection with primary end to end anastomosis. The length of cervical tracheal stenosis ranged from 2.3 to 4.1 cm. Grade II stenosis was present in three patients, Grade III stenosis was present in seven patients and grade IV stenosis in two patients. Successful extubation was achieved in all 12 cases. After surgery, temporary hoarseness occurred in 1 patient (8.3%); unilateral pulmonary atelectasis with pleural effusion occurred in 1 patient (8.3%); subcutaneous emphysema with infection occurred in 1 patient (8.3%); mild dysphagia occurred in 3 patients (25.0%); a slight deepening of the tone of voice occurred in 5 patients (41.7%), granulation tissue growth near the suture occurred in 3 patients (25.0%), and suture dehiscence did not occur in any patient. The follow-up period ranged from 6 months to 38 months, no patient developed restenosis. It presents a high success rate and good functional result of tracheal resection with primary end-to-end anastomosis. Therefore, it is an effective and reliable approach for the management of benign cervical tracheal stenosis. To avoid complications, the preoperative assessment, patients selection and postoperative management should be emphasized.

  14. Tracheal resection and anastomosis in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, R E; Schwartz, A; Buergelt, C D

    1980-01-15

    Resection and end-to-end anastomosis of the trachea is a practical procedure for the correction of various forms of tracheal stenosis. Preplacing retention sutures facilitates manipulation of the trachea and rapid apposition of the tracheal ends. These same sutures then relieve tension on the primary suture line, assuring early epithelialization. Two dogs with tracheal stenosis were treated by use of this technique. Slight narrowing of the trachea was evident postoperatively in both dogs, but neither dyspnea nor coughing occurred during the follow-up period.

  15. Effects of quorum sensing system lasR/rhlR gene on the expression of Foxp3, TGF-β1 and IL-10 of lung tissue in tracheal intubation model rat with Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-qing XIANG

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate the effects of lasR/rhlR gene on Foxp3, TGF-β1 and IL-10 of lung tissue in rat tracheal intubation model with biofilm infection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Ps. aer wild strain (PAO1 and quorum sensing (QS deficient strain (ΔlasRΔrhlR. Methods  Twenty-one SD rats were randomly assigned into 3 groups (7 each: ΔlasRΔrhlR-treated group, PAO1-treated group and sterile control group. Biofilms (BF were cultured in vitro, and the BF coated tube (infected respectively with Ps. aer PAO1 strain, ΔlasRΔrhlR strain, or with asepsis was inserted into the trachea to establish the rat model. The rats were sacrificed on the 7th day after intubation. Colony count of lung tissue homogenate (cfu and lung HE staining were performed, and IL-10 content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF, TGF-β1 in lung tissue, and the expression of Foxp3 mRNA in lung cells were determined. Results  The bacterial counts were significantly higher in PAO1 and ΔlasRΔrhlR groups than that in sterile control group, and the counts were obviously higher in PAO1 group (10 400.00±6313.70/g lung tissue than that in ΔlasRΔrhlR group (975.00±559.97/g lung tissue, P<0.05. There was no significant pathological changes in lung tissue in sterile control group, while the bronchi and blood vessels in PAO1 group were infiltrated by a large number of inflammatory cells and complicated with alveolar septum thickening and local abscess and necrosis. The pathological changes were milder in ΔlasRΔrhlR group than in PAO1 group; the expression of Foxp3 mRNA was higher in the two Ps. aer infected groups than that in sterile control group (0.65±0.32, and it was significantly higher in PAO1 group (4.62±1.07 than in ΔlasRΔrhlR group (2.15±1.43, P<0.05. The accumulated optical density value of TGF-β1 was significantly higher in the two Ps. aer infected groups than in sterile control group (3721.66±1412.95, and significantly higher in PAO1 group (65 090.56±33

  16. Contemporary Management of Idiopathic Laryngotracheal Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahoe, Laura; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2018-05-01

    Idiopathic laryngotracheal stenosis is a rare but well-described indication for subglottic tracheal resection. Initially described by Pearson in 1975, the 1-stage subglottic tracheal resection with reconstruction of the airway ensures preservation of the recurrent laryngeal nerves while resulting in an effective and durable repair of the stenosis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of tracheal bronchus in Chinese children using multidetector CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ming, Zhu; Lin, Zhang

    2007-01-01

    Tracheal bronchus is a congenital bronchial anomaly. The diagnosis should be considered early in intubated patients. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is the newest modality for evaluating tracheal bronchus. To evaluate the utility of 16-slice MDCT in children with tracheal bronchus and to characterize the frequency of tracheal bronchus in children with congenital heart disease. From June 2005 to May 2007, 3,187 consecutive children (1,124 with congenital heart disease and 2,063 without congenital heart disease) underwent MDCT examination. Minimum-intensity projection reconstruction was performed to show the tracheobronchial tree in every case. Tracheal bronchus was found in 42 children (3.74%) with congenital heart disease but in only 6 children (0.29%) without congenital heart disease. Among the 48 children with tracheal bronchus, 45 had right-side tracheal bronchus and 3 had bilateral tracheal bronchi with heterotaxy syndrome. The diagnostic sensitivity of MDCT was 100% (48/48). MDCT is a reliable imaging technique for the diagnosis of tracheal bronchus. Our data showed that right-side tracheal bronchus was more common and bilateral tracheal bronchi usually occurred with heterotaxy syndrome. In addition, tracheal bronchus often occurred with congenital heart disease. The angle between the tracheal bronchus and the trachea is important and should be measured. (orig.)

  18. Tracheal web

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legasto, A.C.; Haller, J.O.; Giusti, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    Congenital tracheal web is a rare entity often misdiagnosed as refractory asthma. Clinical suspicion based on patient history, examination, and pulmonary function tests should lead to its consideration. Bronchoscopy combined with CT imaging and multiplanar reconstruction is an accepted, highly sensitive means of diagnosis. (orig.)

  19. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF ROCURONIUM AND SUXAMETHONIUM IN ENDOTRACHEAL INTUBATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dadichiluka Veeragouri Sankararao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Tracheal intubation is one of the best methods of securing a patent airway. Good intubating conditions minimise the risk of trauma associated with tracheal intubation. Intubating conditions (muscle tone, vocal cords position, reaction to laryngoscopy and tube positioning depend on depth of anaesthesia and kind of anaesthetic used. Tracheal intubation is commonly facilitated by muscle relaxation. Rocuronium has rapid onset of action, which is comparable to suxamethonium. It has been shown to produce intubating conditions similar to those produced by suxamethonium. This study compares rocuronium and suxamethonium in tracheal intubation. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 100 patients of ASA grade 1 and 2 for elective surgeries under general anaesthesia were recruited for this study after obtaining clearance from institutional ethics committee and informed consent from the patients. These 100 patients were divided into 2 groups, group R received rocuronium and group S received suxamethonium. All patients underwent through preanaesthetic checkup on the day before surgery. Thorough airway assesssment was done to rule out difficult intubation. Patients were advised to be nil orally from 10 p.m. onwards, the night before surgery. RESULTS The intubating conditions in the rocuronium group were found to be excellent in 50%, fair in 34% and satisfactory in 16% of the patients compared to excellent in 68%, fair in 32% in suxamethonium group. Clinically, acceptable intubating conditions were seen in 84% and 100% of patients administered rocuronium and suxamethonium, respectively. CONCLUSION Rocuronium in a dose of 0.6 mg/kg is a suitable alternative to suxamethonium in a dose of 1.5 mg/kg in premedicated and anaesthetised patients scheduled for elective surgeries.

  20. Tracheal replacement by autogenous aorta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anoosh Farhad

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tracheal defects may occur after trauma or prolonged intubation. Resection of tracheal tumors also poses a major challenge for substitution. In an effort to solve this problem, different techniques have been tried with little success. We report on a new animal model which showed acceptable results with fewer complications. Methods We replaced 5 cm of cervical trachea in 10 dogs with harvested infra-renal aorta and repaired the aortic defect with Dacron graft. Results Necropsy of the grafted aorta and anastomotic site revealed well healed anastomosis in all animals together with ciliated columnar epithelium coverage of grafted aorta and neovascularization of aortic wall. Conclusion Aortic graft is preferable to other substitutes because of less antigenicity, less vascularity, and no mucous secretions or peristalsis

  1. Tracheal replacement by autogenous aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anoosh, Farhad; Hodjati, Hossain; Dehghani, Seifollah; Tanideh, Nader; Kumar, Perikala V

    2009-06-09

    Tracheal defects may occur after trauma or prolonged intubation. Resection of tracheal tumors also poses a major challenge for substitution. In an effort to solve this problem, different techniques have been tried with little success. We report on a new animal model which showed acceptable results with fewer complications. We replaced 5 cm of cervical trachea in 10 dogs with harvested infra-renal aorta and repaired the aortic defect with Dacron graft. Necropsy of the grafted aorta and anastomotic site revealed well healed anastomosis in all animals together with ciliated columnar epithelium coverage of grafted aorta and neovascularization of aortic wall. Aortic graft is preferable to other substitutes because of less antigenicity, less vascularity, and no mucous secretions or peristalsis.

  2. Comparison of rocuronium at two different doses and succinylcholine for endotracheal intubation in adult patients for elective surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S G Chavan

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Rapid sequence induction of anesthesia with propofol and fentanyl, succinylcholine allowed a more rapid endotracheal intubation sequence and created superior intubation conditions than rocuronium. However, the technique of using a large dose of rocuronium to achieve perfect conditions for tracheal intubation may have application whenever succinylcholine is relatively contraindicated.

  3. Comparison of the reusable standard GlideScope® video laryngoscope and the disposable cobalt GlideScope® video laryngoscope for tracheal intubation in an academic emergency department: a retrospective review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakles, John C; Patanwala, Asad E; Mosier, Jarrod; Dicken, John; Holman, Nathan

    2014-04-01

    The objective was to compare the first-pass success and clinical performance characteristics of the reusable standard GlideScope® video laryngoscope (sGVL) and the disposable Cobalt GlideScope® video laryngoscope (cGVL). This was a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data recorded into a continuous quality improvement database at an urban academic emergency department (ED). The intent of the database is to evaluate operator performance and to track practice patterns used for intubation in the ED. Between July 1, 2007, and June 30, 2013, operators recorded all consecutive intubations performed in the ED. The database included patient demographics and detailed information about each intubation, such as device(s) used, reason for device selection, method of intubation, difficult airway characteristics, number of intubation attempts, and outcome of each attempt. The operator also evaluated the presence of lens fogging and extent of lens contamination. The primary outcome measure was first-pass success. Secondary outcome measures were ultimate success, Cormack-Lehane (CL) view of the airway, presence of lens fogging, and extent of lens contamination. Only adult patients age 18 years or older intubated with the sGVL or cGVL using a stylet, and who had data forms completed at the time of intubation, were included in this study. A total of 583 intubations were included in the study, 504 with the sGVL and 79 with cGVL. First pass success was achieved in 81.0% (95% confidence interval [CI]=77.3% to 84.3%) of patients in the sGVL group and in 58.2% (95% CI=46.6% to 69.2%) of patients in the cGVL group. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, the sGVL was associated with a higher first pass success than the cGVL (odds ratio [OR]=3.3, 95% CI=1.9 to 5.8). The ultimate success of the sGVL was 92.1% (95% CI=89.4% to 94.3%) and the cGVL was 72.2% (95% CI=60.9% to 81.7%). A CL grade I or II view was obtained in 93.2% (95% CI=90.7% to 95.3%) in the sGVL group

  4. Comparison of the Airtraq and Truview laryngoscopes to the Macintosh laryngoscope for use by Advanced Paramedics in easy and simulated difficult intubation in manikins.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nasim, Sajid

    2009-01-01

    Paramedics are frequently required to perform tracheal intubation, a potentially life-saving manoeuvre in severely ill patients, in the prehospital setting. However, direct laryngoscopy is often more difficult in this environment, and failed tracheal intubation constitutes an important cause of morbidity. Novel indirect laryngoscopes, such as the Airtraq and Truview laryngoscopes may reduce this risk.

  5. Estudo comparativo entre uma e duas doses efetivas (DE95 de rocurônio para a intubação traqueal Estudio comparativo entre una y de los dosis efectivas (DE95 de rocuronio para la intubación traqueal A comparative study between one and two effective doses (ED95 of rocuronium for tracheal intubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Carlos Gomes de Miranda

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: Os bloqueadores neuromusculares (BNM são fármacos utilizados para produzir relaxamento da musculatura esquelética e facilitar a intubação traqueal (IT. A literatura descreve como sendo necessárias duas doses efetivas (DE95 o ideal para a IT. O rocurônio é um BNM não-despolarizante do tipo esteróide, sintético e de duração intermediária. O objetivo desse estudo foi avaliar e comparar as condições de intubação traqueal (IT, utilizando uma e duas doses efetivas (DE95 do rocurônio, seguindo os critérios da Conferência de Consenso de Copenhague. MÉTODO: Foram avaliados 60 pacientes divididos aleatoriamente em dois grupos de 30, de ambos os sexos, idades entre 20 e 60 anos, estado físico ASA I e II, Mallampati 1 e 2, índice de massa corporal (IMC JUSTIFICATIVA Y OBJETIVOS: Los bloqueadores neuromusculares (BNM son fármacos utilizados para producir el relajamiento de la musculatura esquelética y facilitar la intubación traqueal (IT. La literatura describe que son necesarias de los dosis efectivas (DE95 lo ideal para la IT. El rocuronio es un BNM no despolarizador del tipo esteroide, sintético y de duración intermedia. El objetivo de este estudio fue evaluar y comparar las condiciones de intubación traqueal (IT, utilizando una y de los dosis efectivas (DE95 del rocuronio, secundando los criterios de la Conferencia de Consenso de Copenhague. MÉTODO: Se estudiaron 60 pacientes divididos aleatoriamente en 2 grupos de 30, de ambos sexos, edades entre 20 y 60 años, estado físico ASA I y II, Mallampati 1 y 2, índice de masa corporal (IMC BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Neuromuscular blockers (NMB are used to induce relaxation of skeletal muscles and facilitate tracheal intubation (TI. According to the literature, two effective doses (ED95 of NMB are ideal for TI. Rocuronium is a steroid-type, synthetic, non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocker of medium duration. The objective of this study was to evaluate

  6. TIME-COURSE OF ACTION AND INTUBATING CONDITIONS FOLLOWING VECURONIUM, ROCURONIUM AND MIVACURIUM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WIERDA, JMKH; HOMMES, FDM; NAP, HJA; VANDENBROEK, L

    The purpose of this study was to compare the time course of action and tracheal intubating conditions of vecuronium, rocuronium, and mivacurium in anaesthetised patients. Anaesthesia consisted of thiopentone, fentanyl, N2O/O-2 and isoflurane. After a 2 x ED(50) dose the first attempt at tracheal

  7. The usefulness of three-dimensional imaging with spiral CT in the evaluation of upper airway stenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Won Ho; Yoon, Dae Young; Bae, Sang Hoon; Rho, Young Soo; Jung, Yin Gyo [Hallym Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-01-01

    To assess the usefulness of three-dimensional (3D) spiral CT imaging in patients with upper airway stenosis. We performed 3D spiral CT imagings in ten patients in whom upper airway stenosis was clinically suspected. Eight of these patients had upper airway stenosis caused by intubation or tracheostomy (n-6), tuberculosis (n=1), or extrinsic compression by a thyroid mass (n=1). Spiral CT scanning (30-second continuous exposure and 90-mm length) was performed with a table speed of 3mm/sec and a section thickness of 3mm. The selected starting point was the epiglottis. The resulting data were reformatted by multiplanar reformation (MPR) and shaded surface display (SSD) with peeling after reconstruction of 2mm interval. In the evaluation of location and extent of stenosis, we compared fidings of 3D imaging with those of baseline axial images (n=10), endoscopy (n=9) and operation (n=4). The locations of stenosis in eight patients were as follows;tracheostoma (n=4), subglottic region (n=3), and larynx (n=1). In all eight, 3D imaging demonstrated the location and extent of stenosis, which exactly correlated with endoscopic and operative findings. In one patient, however, another stenotic area in the tracheal bifurcation was not discovered because this lesion was not included in the field of CT scan. In two patients, the diagnosis on 3D images of no 'stenosis' was comfirmed by clinical findings or operation. No differences in diagnostic accuracy were noted between axial images, MPR, and SSD when evalvating the location and extent of stenosis; vertical extent was shown more easily by 3D imaging than by axial images, however. 3D imaging with spiral CT may be an useful adjunctive method in the evaluation of upper airway stenosis with variable causes.

  8. The usefulness of three-dimensional imaging with spiral CT in the evaluation of upper airway stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Won Ho; Yoon, Dae Young; Bae, Sang Hoon; Rho, Young Soo; Jung, Yin Gyo

    1996-01-01

    To assess the usefulness of three-dimensional (3D) spiral CT imaging in patients with upper airway stenosis. We performed 3D spiral CT imagings in ten patients in whom upper airway stenosis was clinically suspected. Eight of these patients had upper airway stenosis caused by intubation or tracheostomy (n-6), tuberculosis (n=1), or extrinsic compression by a thyroid mass (n=1). Spiral CT scanning (30-second continuous exposure and 90-mm length) was performed with a table speed of 3mm/sec and a section thickness of 3mm. The selected starting point was the epiglottis. The resulting data were reformatted by multiplanar reformation (MPR) and shaded surface display (SSD) with peeling after reconstruction of 2mm interval. In the evaluation of location and extent of stenosis, we compared fidings of 3D imaging with those of baseline axial images (n=10), endoscopy (n=9) and operation (n=4). The locations of stenosis in eight patients were as follows;tracheostoma (n=4), subglottic region (n=3), and larynx (n=1). In all eight, 3D imaging demonstrated the location and extent of stenosis, which exactly correlated with endoscopic and operative findings. In one patient, however, another stenotic area in the tracheal bifurcation was not discovered because this lesion was not included in the field of CT scan. In two patients, the diagnosis on 3D images of no 'stenosis' was comfirmed by clinical findings or operation. No differences in diagnostic accuracy were noted between axial images, MPR, and SSD when evalvating the location and extent of stenosis; vertical extent was shown more easily by 3D imaging than by axial images, however. 3D imaging with spiral CT may be an useful adjunctive method in the evaluation of upper airway stenosis with variable causes

  9. Orotracheal Intubation Using the Retromolar Space: A Reliable Alternative Intubation Approach to Prevent Dental Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linh T. Nguyen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances in airway management, perianesthetic dental injury remains one of the most common anesthesia-related adverse events and cause for malpractice litigation against anesthesia providers. Recommended precautions for prevention of dental damage may not always be effective because these techniques involve contact and pressure exerted on vulnerable teeth. We describe a novel approach using the retromolar space to insert a flexible fiberscope for tracheal tube placement as a reliable method to achieve atraumatic tracheal intubation. Written consent for publication has been obtained from the patient.

  10. Rapid sequence induction and intubation with rocuronium-sugammadex compared with succinylcholine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M K; Bretlau, C; Gätke, M R

    2012-01-01

    An unanticipated difficult airway may arise during rapid sequence induction and intubation (RSII). The aim of the trial was to assess how rapidly spontaneous ventilation could be re-established after RSII. We hypothesized that the time period from tracheal intubation to spontaneous ventilation wo...... would be shorter with rocuronium-sugammadex than with succinylcholine....

  11. Treatment of tracheobronchial stenosis with a self-expandable metallic stents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Soo; Jeon, Seok Chol; Choi, Chul Seung; Choi, Yo Won; Hahm, Chang Kok [College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-07-15

    We analysed the role of modified Gianturco self-expandable stents in the treatment of tracheobronchial stenosis in 13 patients. We inserted modified Gianturco self-expandable stents under the fluoroscopic and bronchoscopic guidance. There were stenosis in the trachea(n=2), the right main bronchus(n=2), and the left main bronchus(n=9). The causes of the stenosis were endobronchial tuberculosis(n=10), intubation granuloma(n=1), restenosis after surgical reconstruction(n=2). Dyspnea or wheezing was improved within 1 or 2 days following the procedure. There were 32% and 22% respective increase in average FEV1 and FVC. Lung perfusion scan showed 9.6% increase of perfusion in the involved lung. No complications related to the procedure were encountered. During follow-up period of up to 31 months, 2 patients showed tracheal or bronchial restenosis, at 3 and 6 months, retrospectively. There was a distal migration of the stents in one case. During the follow up period after stent insertion, improvement of the obstructive changes and dyspnea persisted in 10 out of 13 patients. The modified Gianturco self-expandable metallic stents may be a good choice for the treatment of tracheobronchial stenosis, either as a primary treatment, or when the reconstruction failed.

  12. Errors and clinical supervision of intubation attempts by the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Tracheal intubation is an essential skill for anaesthetists and other disciplines that require emergency establishment of a secure airway. Early attempts in patients often meet with failure. Existing publications focus mainly on trainees in emergency settings and highlight the role of experience in success; most ...

  13. Tracheal resection for laryngotracheal stenosis: A retrospective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-08-03

    Aug 3, 2014 ... respiratory tract pathology and treated incorrectly. Also patients ... with a CD4+ count of 299/µl and not yet on ARV treatment. Three had brain .... ability to reduce scar formation, but it did not become part of our standard ...

  14. [Inductions and intubating conditions with sevoflurane and different doses of remifentanil without muscle relaxant in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ling-Xin; Deng, Xiao-Ming; Liu, Ju-Hui; Luo, Mao-Ping; Tong, Shi-Yi; Zhang, Yan-Ming; Liao, Xu; Xu, Kun-Lin

    2008-12-01

    To observe the clinical effectiveness of inductions and tracheal intubating conditions with 3% sevoflurane and different doses of remifentanil without muscle relaxant in children. Totally 120 peadiatric patients (aged 4-10 years, American Society of Anesthesiologists grade I for inhalational induction) were randomly allocated into group I (remifentanil 1 microg/kg), group II (remifentanil 2 microg/kg), group III (remifentanil 3 microg/kg), and control group (vecuronium bromide 0.1 mg/kg). After inhalational induction with 3% sevoflurane and 60% nitrous oxide in 40% oxygen for 2 minutes, remifentanil 1 microg/kg, 2 microg/ kg, and 3 microg/kg were intravenously injected over 1 minute into patients in group I , group II, and group III, respectively. After remifentanil administration and manual ventilation for 1 minute, the trachea was intubated. In the control group, 2 minutes after intravenous administration of vecuronium bromide 0.1 mg/kg, tracheal intubation was attempted. Agitation, intubating satisfactoriness, and the circulation changes after tracheal intubation and anesthesia induction were observed. In these four groups, agitation occurred in 37.5% of patients during sevoflurane induction. Satisfactory intubation rate was 70.0% in group I, 86.7% in group II, 90.0% in group III, and 93.3% in the control group. Compared with the control group, the impact of tracheal intubation on the circulatory system was smaller in group I , II , and III. Induction with 3% sevoflurane combined with remifentanil can be smoothly performed, followed by the successful tracheal intubation. The intubating conditions are more satisfactory with 3% sevoflurane combined with remifentanil 2 microg/kg or 3 microg/kg.

  15. Preparing to perform an awake fiberoptic intubation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, M E

    2012-02-03

    Fiberoptically guided tracheal intubation represents one of the most important advances in airway management to occur in the past thirty years. Perhaps its most important role is in management of the anticipated difficult airway. This is a situation in which the dangers of encountering the life-threatening "can\\'t intubate, can\\'t ventilate" situation can be avoided by placement of an endotracheal tube while the patient is awake. Although skill at the procedure of endoscopy is obviously necessary in this setting, these authors hold that success or failure of the technique frequently depends on the adequacy of preparation. These measures include 1) pre-operative assessment of the patient; 2) careful explanation of what lies in store; 3) "setting the stage"; 4) preparing the equipment to be used; and 5) preparing the patient (antisialogue, sedation, application of topical anesthesia to the upper airway). If these preparatory measures are carried out meticulously, the likelihood of performing a successful and comfortable awake fiberoptic tracheal intubation is greatly increased.

  16. A randomized controlled study to evaluate and compare Truview blade with Macintosh blade for laryngoscopy and intubation under general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timanaykar, Ramesh T; Anand, Lakesh K; Palta, Sanjeev

    2011-04-01

    The Truview EVO2™ laryngoscope is a recently introduced device with a unique blade that provides a magnified laryngeal view at 42° anterior reflected view. It facilitates visualization of the glottis without alignment of oral, pharyngeal, and tracheal axes. We compared the view obtained at laryngoscopy, intubating conditions and hemodynamic parameters of Truview with Macintosh blade. In prospective, randomized and controlled manner, 200 patients of ASA I and II of either sex (20-50 years), presenting for surgery requiring tracheal intubation, were assigned to undergo intubation using a Truview or Macintosh laryngoscope. Visualization of the vocal cord, ease of intubation, time taken for intubation, number of attempts, and hemodynamic parameters were evaluated. Truview provided better results for the laryngeal view using Cormack and Lehane grading, particularly in patients with higher airway Mallampati grading (P < 0.05). The time taken for intubation (33.06±5.6 vs. 23.11±57 seconds) was more with Truview than with Macintosh blade (P < 0.01). The Percentage of Glottic Opening (POGO) score was significantly higher (97.26±8) in Truview as that observed with Macintosh blade (83.70±21.5). Hemodynamic parameters increased after tracheal intubation from pre-intubation value (P < 0.05) in both the groups, but they were comparable amongst the groups. No postoperative adverse events were noted. Tracheal intubation using Truview blade provided consistently improved laryngeal view as compared to Macintosh blade without the need to align the oral, pharyngeal and tracheal axes, with equal attempts for successful intubation and similar changes in hemodynamics. However, the time taken for intubation was more with Truview.

  17. A randomized controlled study to evaluate and compare Truview blade with Macintosh blade for laryngoscopy and intubation under general anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh T Timanaykar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Truview EVO2 TM laryngoscope is a recently introduced device with a unique blade that provides a magnified laryngeal view at 42° anterior reflected view. It facilitates visualization of the glottis without alignment of oral, pharyngeal, and tracheal axes. We compared the view obtained at laryngoscopy, intubating conditions and hemodynamic parameters of Truview with Macintosh blade. Materials and Methods: In prospective, randomized and controlled manner, 200 patients of ASA I and II of either sex (20-50 years, presenting for surgery requiring tracheal intubation, were assigned to undergo intubation using a Truview or Macintosh laryngoscope. Visualization of the vocal cord, ease of intubation, time taken for intubation, number of attempts, and hemodynamic parameters were evaluated. Results: Truview provided better results for the laryngeal view using Cormack and Lehane grading, particularly in patients with higher airway Mallampati grading (P < 0.05. The time taken for intubation (33.06±5.6 vs. 23.11±57 seconds was more with Truview than with Macintosh blade (P < 0.01. The Percentage of Glottic Opening (POGO score was significantly higher (97.26±8 in Truview as that observed with Macintosh blade (83.70±21.5. Hemodynamic parameters increased after tracheal intubation from pre-intubation value (P < 0.05 in both the groups, but they were comparable amongst the groups. No postoperative adverse events were noted. Conclusion: Tracheal intubation using Truview blade provided consistently improved laryngeal view as compared to Macintosh blade without the need to align the oral, pharyngeal and tracheal axes, with equal attempts for successful intubation and similar changes in hemodynamics. However, the time taken for intubation was more with Truview.

  18. Securing the airway in a child with tracheal agenesis – an alternative perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavomir Nosal

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Tracheal agenesis is an extremely rare, typically fatal congenital anomaly characterised by typical clinical manifestation, failed endotracheal intubation and difficult emergency management. The prognosis and possibility of surgical correction rest on early diagnosis, anatomy, birth weight, and associated anomalies. Tracheal agenesis causes considerable resuscitation difficulties immediately after birth, as tracheal intubation is impossible. Although emergency management, by either bag and mask ventilation or oesophageal intubation, provides some pulmonary gas exchange through tracheo-oesophageal connection, they are associated with overdistension of the stomach and the risk of stomach perforation. We have performed selective intubation of the distal trachea in a child with tracheal agenesis through the tracheo-oesophageal connection with the help of a fibroendoscope. A standard guide wire was passed through the working port of the flexible endoscope and under direct vision was directed through the tracheo-oesophageal connection into the distal trachea. At this point, the endoscope was removed, leaving the guide wire in place. The endotracheal tube size 2 Fr was passed over the guide wire into the distal trachea. The infant showed dramatic improvement and maintained good saturations on mechanical ventilation. The infant was taken for a computed tomography (CT scan, which showed Floyd’s type II tracheal agenesis, the oesophagus connecting with the distal trachea before it bifurcates. The endotracheal tube was seen ending in the carina. Transoesophageal intubation of the short distal segment of the trachea through the tracheo-oesophageal connection might offer a new perspective for short-term securing of the airway in a child with tracheal agenesis and should be considered in any child with suspected tracheal agenesis to buy the time while evaluating the exact anatomy of the anomaly and the possibility of tracheal reconstruction in selected

  19. CT of tracheal agenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strouse, Peter J.; Hernandez, Ramiro J.; Newman, Beverley

    2006-01-01

    Tracheal agenesis is a rare and usually lethal anomaly. In the past, opaque contrast medium was injected via the esophagus to demonstrate the anatomy. To demonstrate the utility of helical and multidetector CT in delineating the aberrant anatomy in newborns with tracheal agenesis. Four newborns with tracheal agenesis were identified from three institutions. Imaging studies and medical records were reviewed. Each child was imaged with chest radiography. One child was imaged on a single-detector helical CT scanner and the other three on multidetector scanners. Helical and multidetector CT with 2D and 3D reconstructions clearly delineated the aberrant tracheobronchial and esophageal anatomy in each infant. Minimum intensity projection reformatted CT images were particularly helpful. One infant each had type I and type II tracheal agenesis. Two infants had type III tracheal agenesis. All four infants died. CT is a useful tool for delineating the aberrant anatomy of newborns with tracheal agenesis and thus helps in making rational clinical decisions. (orig.)

  20. Tracheal palpation to assess endotracheal tube depth: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, William P; Klonarakis, Jim; Pelivanov, Vladko; O'Brien, Jennifer M; Plewes, Chris

    2014-03-01

    Correct placement of the endotracheal tube (ETT) occurs when the distal tip is in mid-trachea. This study compares two techniques used to place the ETT at the correct depth during intubation: tracheal palpation vs placement at a fixed depth at the patient's teeth. With approval of the Research Ethics Board, we recruited American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I-II patients scheduled for elective surgery with tracheal intubation. Clinicians performing the tracheal intubations were asked to "advance the tube slowly once the tip is through the cords". An investigator palpated the patient's trachea with three fingers spread over the trachea from the larynx to the sternal notch. When the ETT tip was felt in the sternal notch, the ETT was immobilized and its position was determined by fibreoptic bronchoscopy. The position of the ETT tip was compared with our hospital standard, which is a depth at the incisors or gums of 23 cm for men and 21 cm for women. The primary outcome was the incidence of correct placement. Correct placement of the ETT was defined as a tip > 2.5 cm from the carina and > 3.5 cm below the vocal cords. Movement of the ETT tip was readily palpable in 77 of 92 patients studied, and bronchoscopy was performed in 85 patients. Placement by tracheal palpation resulted in more correct placements (71 [77%]; 95% confidence interval [CI] 74 to 81) than hospital standard depth at the incisors or gums (57 [61%]; 95% CI 58 to 66) (P = 0.037). The mean (SD) placement of the ETT tip in palpable subjects was 4.1 (1.7) cm above the carina, 1.9 cm (1.5-2.3 cm) below the ideal mid-tracheal position. Tracheal palpation requires no special equipment, takes only a few seconds to perform, and may improve ETT placement at the correct depth. Further studies are warranted.

  1. Influence of GlideScope assisted endotracheal intubation on intraocular pressure in ophthalmic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nauman Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traditional Macintoch laryngoscopy is known to cause a rise in intraocular pressure (IOP, tachycardia and hypertension. These changes are not desirable in patients with glaucoma and open globe injury. GlideScope is a video laryngoscope that functions independent of the line of sight, reduces upward lifting forces for glottic exposure and requires less cervical neck movement for intubation, making it less stimulating than Macintosh laryngoscopy. Aim: The aim was to assess the variations in IOP and hemodynamic changes after GlideScope assisted intubation. Materials and Methods: After approval of the local Institutional Research and Ethical Board and informed patient consent, 50 adult American Society of Anesthesiologist I and II patients with normal IOP were enrolled in a prospective, randomized study for ophthalmic surgery requiring tracheal intubation. In all patients, trachea was intubated using either GlideScope or Macintoch laryngoscope. IOP of nonoperated eye, heart rate and blood pressure were measured as baseline, 1 min after induction, 1 min and 5 min after tracheal intubation. Results: IOP was not significantly different between groups before and after anesthetic induction and 5 min after tracheal intubation (P = 0.217, 0.726, and 0.110 respectively. The only significant difference in IOP was at 1 min after intubation (P = 0.041. No significant difference noted between groups in mean arterial pressure (P = 0.899, 0.62, 0.47, 0.82 respectively and heart rate (P = 0.21, 0.72, 0.07, 0.29, respectively at all measurements. Conclusion: GlideScope assisted tracheal intubation shown lesser rise in IOP at 1 min after intubation in comparison to Macintoch laryngoscope, suggesting that GlideScope may be preferable to Macintosh laryngoscope.

  2. Efficacy of Surgical Airway Plasty for Benign Airway Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukioka, Takuma; Takahama, Makoto; Nakajima, Ryu; Kimura, Michitaka; Inoue, Hidetoshi; Yamamoto, Ryoji

    2016-01-01

    Long-term patency is required during treatment for benign airway stenosis. This study investigated the effectiveness of surgical airway plasty for benign airway stenosis. Clinical courses of 20 patients, who were treated with surgical plasty for their benign airway stenosis, were retrospectively investigated. Causes of stenosis were tracheobronchial tuberculosis in 12 patients, post-intubation stenosis in five patients, malacia in two patients, and others in one patient. 28 interventional pulmonology procedures and 20 surgical plasty were performed. Five patients with post-intubation stenosis and four patients with tuberculous stenosis were treated with tracheoplasty. Eight patients with tuberculous stenosis were treated with bronchoplasty, and two patients with malacia were treated with stabilization of the membranous portion. Anastomotic stenosis was observed in four patients, and one to four additional treatments were required. Performance status, Hugh-Jones classification, and ventilatory functions were improved after surgical plasty. Outcomes were fair in patients with tuberculous stenosis and malacia. However, efficacy of surgical plasty for post-intubation stenosis was not observed. Surgical airway plasty may be an acceptable treatment for tuberculous stenosis. Patients with malacia recover well after surgical plasty. There may be untreated patients with malacia who have the potential to benefit from surgical plasty.

  3. Degree of obesity is not associated with more than one intubation attempt: a large centre experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saasouh, W; Laffey, K; Turan, A; Avitsian, R; Zura, A; You, J; Zimmerman, N M; Szarpak, L; Sessler, D I; Ruetzler, K

    2018-05-01

    The role of obesity as a risk factor for difficult intubation remains controversial. We primarily assessed the association between body mass index (BMI) and difficult tracheal intubation. We analysed electronic records of more than 67 000 adults having elective non-cardiac surgery requiring tracheal intubation at the Cleveland Clinic between 2011 and 2015. The association between BMI and difficult intubation, defined as more than one intubation attempt, was assessed using multivariable logistic regression adjusting for pre-specified confounders. Amongst 40 183 patients with BMI <30 kg m -2 and 27 519 with BMI ≥30 kg m -2 , 9% required more than one intubation attempt. Increasing BMI up to 30 kg m -2 was significantly associated with increased odds of more than one intubation attempt [odds ratio (OR): 1.03; 97.5% confidence interval (CI): 1.02, 1.04] per unit increase in BMI, P < 0.001. However, the odds of difficult intubation remained unchanged once BMI exceeded 30 kg m -2 (P = 0.08). The results were similar when analysis was restricted to patients without history of airway abnormalities in whom intubation was attempted using a standard direct laryngoscope (OR: 1.03; 99.4% CI: 1.01, 1.04) per kg m -2 increase in BMI <30 kg m -2 ). Increasing BMI was associated with increasing odds of difficult intubation in the lean range. At higher BMI, the odds of difficult intubation remain elevated, but there is no additional increase in odds with further increase in BMI. Obese patients were thus harder to intubate than lean ones, but difficult intubation was no more likely in morbidly obese patients than in those who were only slightly obese. Copyright © 2018 British Journal of Anaesthesia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Endoscopically placed nitinol stents for pediatric tracheal obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Mukesh; Bent, John P; Ward, Robert F; April, Max M

    2002-11-11

    To provide preliminary clinical data regarding endoscopically placed nitinol stents for children with tracheal obstruction as a temporizing measure to allow for trach tube decannulation while awaiting growth to allow for tracheal resection. This case series describes the experiences of two children (ages 5 and 15) who were dependent upon tracheotomy because of acquired tracheal obstruction. Both patients had combined tracheomalacia and tracheal stenosis. After failing tracheoplasty with rib graft augmentation both patients suffered from extensive tracheal disease, which was too long to allow for immediate tracheal resection. Endoscopic placement of nitinol stents in the obstructed tracheal segment using fluoroscopic guidance. All tracheotomy tubes were removed immediately after successful stent deployment with the patient still under general anesthesia. Four stents were placed in total. The first patient's initial stent was too narrow and was, therefore, removed and replaced at a later date with a larger diameter stent. The second patient experienced distal migration of his initial stent requiring stent removal and replacement at a later date. Both patients remain successfully decannulated (follow-up, 25 and 26 months) and are currently living more normal lives as they grow and await tracheal resection. Preliminary use of nitinol stents for pediatric tracheal obstruction has enabled successful decannulation in two children with complicated airways. Our results with this series of patients suggest that nitinol stents can be safely used in children as a temporizing measure until tracheal resection can be safely performed. With this approach children can live free from the hassles of trach care, social isolation and peer ridicule. Limited pediatric experience exists in the literature about nitinol stents. Thus, our experience with stent selection and placement will help others avoid problems encountered in this initial series. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ireland

  5. Comparison of the air-Q intubating laryngeal airway and the cobra perilaryngeal airway as conduits for fiber optic-guided intubation in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girgis, Karim K; Youssef, Maha M I; ElZayyat, Nashwa S

    2014-10-01

    One of the methods proposed in cases of difficult airway management in children is using a supraglottic airway device as a conduit for tracheal intubation. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of the Air-Q Intubating Laryngeal Airway (Air-Q) and the Cobra Perilaryngeal Airway (CobraPLA) to function as a conduit for fiber optic-guided tracheal intubation in pediatric patients. A total of 60 children with ages ranging from 1 to 6 years, undergoing elective surgery, were randomized to have their airway managed with either an Air-Q or CobraPLA. Outcomes recorded were the success rate, time and number of attempts required for fiber optic-guided intubation and the time required for device removal after intubation. We also recorded airway leak pressure (ALP), fiber optic grade of glottic view and occurrence of complications. Both devices were successfully inserted in all patients. The intubation success rate was comparable with the Air-Q and the CobraPLA (96.7% vs. 90%), as was the first attempt success rate (90% vs. 80%). The intubation time was significantly longer with the CobraPLA (29.5 ± 10.9 s vs. 23.2 ± 9.8 s; P fiber optic grade of glottic view was comparable with the two devices. The CobraPLA was associated with a significantly higher incidence of blood staining of the device on removal and post-operative sore throat. Both the Air-Q and CobraPLA can be used effectively as a conduit for fiber optic-guided tracheal intubation in children. However, the Air-Q proved to be superior due to a shorter intubation time and less airway morbidity compared with the CobraPLA.

  6. A comparison of simple continuous versus simple interrupted suture patterns for tracheal anastomosis after large-segment tracheal resection in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fingland, R B; Layton, C I; Kennedy, G A; Galland, J C

    1995-01-01

    Two suture techniques for tracheal anastomosis after large-segment tracheal resection were compared. Eight cartilages were resected from the trachea of each of 12 dogs; anastomoses with 4-0 polydioxanone suture were created using a simple continuous suture technique in six dogs and a simple interrupted suture technique in six dogs. Surgical time was shorter but apposition of tracheal segments at the time of surgery was less precise with the simple continuous suture technique. The dogs were evaluated for 150 days after surgery. Clinical abnormalities after tracheal resection and anastomosis were not observed. Percent dorsoventral luminal stenosis was calculated by measuring the tracheal lumen diameter on lateral cervical radiographs. Percent luminal stenosis was calculated planimetrically using a computerized digitizing tablet. Anastomotic stenosis was mild in all dogs; however, the mean percent.luminal stenosis determined planimetrically was significantly greater for dogs that had the simple continuous suture technique. Planimetric measurements of cross-sectional area made before and after formalin fixation were not significantly different. Radiographic determination of percent dorsoventral luminal stenosis was a poor predictor of diminution of cross-sectional area determined planimetrically.

  7. Failed endotracheal intubation

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    Sheykhol Islami V

    1995-07-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of failed intubation is higher in obstetric than other surgical patients. Failed intubation was the 2nd commonest cause of mortality during anesthesia. Bearing in mind that failre to intubate may be unavoidable in certain circumstances, it is worth reviewing. The factors, which may contribute to a disastrous out come. Priorities of subsequent management must include maintaining oxygenation and preventing aspiration of gastric contents. Fiber optic intubation is now the technique of choice with a high success rate and with least trauma to the patient.

  8. Effects of nicardipine on the onset time and intubation conditions of rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun-Yeul; Kim, Yoon-Hee; Ko, Young-Kwon; Park, Sang-Il; Lee, Jung-Un; Chung, Woo-Suk; Lim, Chae-Seong

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the effects of nicardipine on neuromuscular blockade of rocuronium, such as the onset time and intubation conditions, using a nicardipine dose that attenuates cardiovascular responses during endotracheal intubation. Randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical comparison was used as the design of this study The study was conducted at the operating room of a university hospital. Participants of this study comprise 78 American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status 1 and 2 patients, aged 18 to 60 years who were undergoing elective surgery under general anesthesia. The nicardipine group was given an intravenous bolus of 20 μg/kg nicardipine before tracheal intubation: the control group was given an intravenous bolus of a comparable volume of normal saline before tracheal intubation. Using a TOF-Watch SX monitor, the time from the end of the injection of rocuronium to maximum depression of T1 (onset time) was measured. Intubation was performed 1 minute after rocuronium administration, and the status of the intubation conditions was assessed. The mean blood pressure and heart rate were each measured after endotracheal intubation. Rate pressure product values were also calculated. Intubation conditions were clinically acceptable in 37 (94.9%) of 39 patients in group N compared with 29 (74.4%) of 39 in group C (P rocuronium was significantly faster in group N than in group C (P .05). Pretreatment with 20 μg/kg nicardipine improves intubation conditions, shortens the onset time of rocuronium, and attenuates cardiovascular responses to tracheal intubation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Retrograde tracheal intubation in a patient with temporomaxillary joint ankylosis

    OpenAIRE

    Espinoza Mendoza, Freddy; Alvarado Rivera, Jesús; León Meléndez, María Elena

    2012-01-01

    La vía aérea difícil es uno de los mayores retos para el anestesiólogo y la técnica de intubación traqueal retrógrada es considerada una opción válida pero poco utilizada cuando se presenta una intubación difícil. Se comunica el caso de un paciente de 59 años, programado para amputación supracondílea de pierna, con antecedente de anquilosis de la articulación temporomaxilar secundaria a fractura de la rama ascendente del maxilar inferior. Al examen físico presentaba limitación marcada de la a...

  10. Prehospital Use of the Intubating Laryngeal Mask Airway in Patients with Severe Polytrauma: A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M. Mason

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A case series of five patients is described demonstrating the utility of the intubating laryngeal mask airway in the prehospital setting, both as a primary airway rescue device and as a bridge to tracheal intubation. All patients were hypoxaemic, had sustained severe polytrauma and were trapped in their vehicles following road traffic collisions. A probability of survival study showed better-than-predicted outcomes for the group as a whole.

  11. Avaliação das condições de intubação traqueal com rocurônio aos 60 segundos em crianças, adultos e idosos Evaluación de las condiciones de intubación traqueal con rocuronio a los 60 segundos en niños, adultos y ancianos Tracheal intubation conditions at 60 seconds in children, adults and elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Simões de Almeida

    2004-04-01

    : En las condiciones de ese estudio, la dosis de 0,6 mg.kg-1 fue suficiente para intubación traqueal en 60 segundos en adultos y ancianos. No obstante, fue insuficiente para obtención de condiciones de intubación traqueal clínicamente aceptables en 60 segundos en 100% de los niños.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Rocuronium has the fastest onset as compared to all other available nondepolarizing neuromuscular blockers, allowing tracheal intubation time similar to succinylcholine's. In addition to vocal cords relaxation, it is also important that there is no tube reactions (bucking or coughing after its placement, in order to achieve fast and safe tracheal intubation. This study aimed at comparing intubation conditions after 0.6 mg.kg-1 rocuronium at 60 seconds in children, adults and elderly patients. METHODS: Following premedication with midazolam, routine monitoring and induction with fentanyl and propofol, intubation conditions at 60s were evaluated according to clinical criteria in 60 ASA I-III patients aged 1 to 88 years who received 0.6 mg.kg-1 rocuronium in 5 seconds. Patients were divided in three groups according to age: Group 1 (G1 children up to 12 years of age; Group 2 (G2, adults aged 18 to 65 years; Group 3 (G3 patients above 65 years of age. The following parameters were evaluated: tracheal intubation conditions by clinical criteria, blood pressure and pulse measured before induction (control, after induction, after rocuronium injection, 3 and 5 minutes after tracheal intubation. RESULTS: All patients were successfully intubated in 60s, but clinically acceptable conditions in 100% of cases were only achieved in adults and elderly patients. Three children were classified as having unacceptable conditions due to sustained cough for more than 10 seconds. There were no significant changes in blood pressure or pulse during the study. CONCLUSIONS: In the conditions of our study, 0.6 mg.kg-1 rocuronium was sufficient for tracheal intubation in 60 seconds in

  12. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for laryngotracheal stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Kathrine Kronberg; Grønhøj, Christian; Jensen, David H

    2017-01-01

    studies addressing the effect of MSC therapy on the airway. We assessed effect on inflammation, fibrosis, and MSC as a component in tissue engineering for treating defects in the airway. RESULTS: We identified eleven studies (n = 256 animals) from eight countries evaluating the effect of MSCs......BACKGROUND: Laryngotracheal stenosis (LTS) can be either congenital or acquired. Laryngeal stenosis is most often encountered after prolonged intubation. The mechanism for stenosis following intubation is believed to be hypertrophic scarring. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) therapy has shown...... promising results in regenerative medicine. We aimed to systematically review the literature on MSC therapy for stenosis of the conductive airways. METHODS: PubMed, EMBASE, Google Scholar and the Cochrane Library were systematically searched from January 1980-January 2017 with the purpose of identifying all...

  13. Tracheal growth after resection and anastomosis in puppies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, H; Brochu, P; Bensoussan, A L; Lagacé, G; Khan, A H

    1986-09-01

    Tracheal morphology, morphometric changes, and growth and histologic changes were studied in puppies submitted to tracheal resection and anastomosis. Fifteen mongrel puppies about 12 weeks old and weighing on an average 5.5 kg were operated under general anesthesia using fluothane. A median cervicotomy incision was made in ten puppies (experimental group, EG) and the proximal 14 tracheal rings were resected (average length 5.08 cm or about 35% to 38% of total tracheal length). One layer anastomosis was done using vicryl 4.0 maintaining the average tension of 1,450 g. Five puppies (control group, CG) were submitted to tracheal transection and anastomosis and the following parameters were studied. Tracheal morphology the trachea of the EG was a rounded triangle whereas in the CG it was oval in shape, there was increase in the intercartilageneous spaces in the EG, no granulation tissue was present, two mucous webs were seen in the EG and one in the CG. Morphometric changes average tracheal length EG 13 cm, CG 17.7 cm, intercartilagenous space EG 3.08 mm, CG 1.3 mm, intercricothyroid space EG 1.2 cm, CG 0.53 cm, sagittal and transverse tracheal thickness at the anastomosis EG 2.6 and 3.3 mm, CG 2 and 1.5 mm, sagittal and transverse diameter reduced on an average 2 mm in EG. Histology Moderate fibrosis was found at the level of anastomosis with no modification of chondrocytes at the cartilagenous rings in the EG. Even with high anastomotic tension, the dogs had normal tracheal growth without stenosis; the sagittal and transverse growth at the anastomosis in the EG was 90% and 85%, respectively, when compared with the CG.

  14. Remifentanil: o regime de infusão faz diferença na prevenção das respostas circulatórias à intubação traqueal? Remifentanil: ¿el régimen de infusión es la diferencia en la prevención de las respuestas circulatorias a la intubación traqueal? Remifentanil: does the infusion regimen make a difference in the prevention of hemodynamic responses to tracheal intubation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Squeff Nora

    2007-06-01

    inició dos minutos antes de la inducción y, en el Grupo 2, conjuntamente con la inducción. Se evaluaron las presiones arteriales sistólica, diastólica y promedio (PAS, PAD, PAM, frecuencia cardiaca (FC, concentraciones en el local efector de propofol (CEF-prop y de remifentanil (CEF-remi en tres momentos: basal (M0; después de la pérdida del contacto verbal (M1; y después de la intubación traqueal (M2. RESULTADOS: Las presiones arteriales presentaron reducciones significativas en los dos grupos: M1 y M2. La CEF-remi fue mayor en el Grupo 1, en M1 y mayor en el Grupo 2, en M2 (p BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: High doses of opioids decrease the hemodynamic response to tracheal intubation. However, the slow recovery profile of traditional opioids may limit the use of high doses. Remifentanil has a fast time of onset and is short acting, which differentiates it from the other drugs in this class. The primary objective of this study was to verify the hypothesis that there is no need to initiate the administration of remifentanil before the induction with propofol. METHODS: Thirty patients, divided in two groups, who received total intravenous anesthesia, were evaluated. In Group 1, the infusion of remifentanil (0.3 µg.kg-1.min-1 was initiated two minutes before induction, and in Group 2, at the same time of the induction. Systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressure (SBP, DBP, MAP, heart rate (HR, concentration of propofol (CEF-prop and remifentanil (CEF-remi in the effector area in three moments: baseline (M0, after losing verbal contact (M1, and after tracheal intubation (M2 were evaluated. RESULTS: There were significant reductions in blood pressure in both groups at M1 and M2. CEF-remi was greater in Group 1, at M1, and greater in Group 2, at M2 (p < 0.05. There was a significant statistical correlation between the vascular overload index (VOI and the variation of the systolic pressure after the loss of verbal contact in Group 1 (r = -0.80; p < 0.01 and in

  15. Real-time tracheal ultrasonography for confirmation of endotracheal tube placement during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Hao-Chang; Chong, Kah-Meng; Sim, Shyh-Shyong; Ma, Matthew Huei-Ming; Liu, Shih-Hung; Chen, Nai-Chuan; Wu, Meng-Che; Fu, Chia-Ming; Wang, Chih-Hung; Lee, Chien-Chang; Lien, Wan-Ching; Chen, Shyr-Chyr

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of tracheal ultrasonography for assessing endotracheal tube position during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We performed a prospective observational study of patients undergoing emergency intubation during CPR. Real-time tracheal ultrasonography was performed during the intubation with the transducer placed transversely just above the suprasternal notch, to assess for endotracheal tube positioning and exclude esophageal intubation. The position of trachea was identified by a hyperechoic air-mucosa (A-M) interface with posterior reverberation artifact (comet-tail artifact). The endotracheal tube position was defined as endotracheal if single A-M interface with comet-tail artifact was observed. Endotracheal tube position was defined as intraesophageal if a second A-M interface appeared, suggesting a false second airway (double tract sign). The gold standard of correct endotracheal intubation was the combination of clinical auscultation and quantitative waveform capnography. The main outcome was the accuracy of tracheal ultrasonography in assessing endotracheal tube position during CPR. Among the 89 patients enrolled, 7 (7.8%) had esophageal intubations. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of tracheal ultrasonography were 100% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 94.4-100%), 85.7% (95% CI: 42.0-99.2%), 98.8% (95% CI: 92.5-99.0%) and 100% (95% CI: 54.7-100%), respectively. Positive and negative likelihood ratios were 7.0 (95% CI: 1.1-43.0) and 0.0, respectively. Real-time tracheal ultrasonography is an accurate method for identifying endotracheal tube position during CPR without the need for interruption of chest compression. Tracheal ultrasonography in resuscitation management may serve as a powerful adjunct in trained hands. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of intubation using the Airtraq or Macintosh laryngoscope by anaesthetists in easy and simulated difficult laryngoscopy--a manikin study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Maharaj, C H

    2006-05-01

    The Airtraq Laryngoscope is a novel intubation device which allows visualisation of the vocal cords without alignment of the oral, pharyngeal and tracheal axes. We compared the Airtraq with the Macintosh laryngoscope in simulated easy and difficult laryngoscopy. Twenty-five anaesthetists were allowed up to three attempts to intubate the trachea in each of three laryngoscopy scenarios using a Laerdal Intubation Trainer followed by five scenarios using a Laerdal SimMan Manikin. Each anaesthetist then performed tracheal intubation of the normal airway a second time to characterise the learning curve. In the simulated easy laryngoscopy scenarios, there was no difference between the Airtraq and the Macintosh in success of tracheal intubation. The time taken to intubate at the end of the protocol was significantly lower using the Airtraq (9.5 (6.7) vs. 14.2 (7.4) s), demonstrating a rapid acquisition of skills. In the simulated difficult laryngoscopy scenarios, the Airtraq was more successful in achieving tracheal intubation, required less time to intubate successfully, caused less dental trauma, and was considered by the anaesthetists to be easier to use.

  17. Inspection of the nasopharynx prior to fiberoptic-guided nasotracheal intubation reduces the risk epistaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Min A; Song, Jaegyok; Kim, Seokkon; Ji, Seong-Mi; Bae, Jeongho

    2016-08-01

    Various complications may occur during nasotracheal intubation. This may include epistaxis and damage to the nasopharyngeal airway. We tested the hypothesis that the use of fiberoptic bronchoscopy (FOB)-guided intubation is superior to endotracheal tube (ETT) obturated with an inflated esophageal stethoscope. Patients were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups (n=22 each): either an FOB-guided intubation group or ETT obturated with an inflated esophageal stethoscope group. After the induction of general anesthesia, patients in the FOB group received an FOB inspection through the nostril without advancement of ETT. Then, after confirming the placement of the bronchoscope tip in the trachea, the lubricated ETT was advanced via the nostril to the trachea along the bronchoscope. In the obturated ETT insertion group, the proximal opening of the ETT was blunted with an inflated esophageal stethoscope. The ETT was inserted into the selected nostril and advanced blindly into the posterior oropharynx. Then, the esophageal stethoscope was removed and tracheal intubation was performed with the bronchoscope. The number of attempts for successful tracheal intubation, the degree of difficulty during insertion, and bleeding during bronchoscopy were recorded. Another anesthesiologist, blinded to the intubation method, estimated the severity of epistaxis 5minutes after the intubation and postoperative complications. The FOB group had significantly less epistaxis during bronchoscopy, better navigability, and fewer intubation attempts and redirections. Fiberoptic-guided nasotracheal intubation was associated with less epistaxis. It also showed better navigability and less redirection rate. Therefore, FOB as an intubation guide is superior to ETT with an inflated esophageal stethoscope when intubating a patient via the nasotracheal route. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Does ultrasonographic volume of the thyroid gland correlate with difficult intubation? An observational study

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    Basak Ceyda Meco

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Preoperative ultrasonographic evaluation of the thyroid gland done by surgeons could let us foresee airway management challenges. The aim of this observational study was to evaluate the effects of thyroid-related parameters assessed preoperatively by surgeons via ultrasonography and chest X-ray on intubation conditions. METHODS: Fifty patients undergoing thyroid surgery were enrolled. Thyromental distance, Mallampati score, neck circumference and range of neck movement were evaluated before the operation. Thyroid volume, signs of invasion or compression and tracheal deviation on chest X-ray were also noted. The intubation conditions were assessed with Cormack and Lehane score and the intubation difficulty scale. Statistical analyses were done with SPSS 15.0 software. RESULTS: The mean thyroid volume of the patients was 26.38 ± 14 mL. The median intubation difficulty scale was 1 (0-2. Thyromental distance (p = 0.011; r = 0.36; 95% CI 0.582-0.088, Mallampati score (p = 0.041; r = 0.29; 95% CI 0.013-0.526, compression or invasion signs (p = 0.041; r = 0.28; 95% CI 0.006-0.521 and tracheal deviation on chest X-ray (p = 0.041; r = 0.52; 95% CI 0.268-0.702 were correlated with intubation difficulty scale. Also patients were classified into two groups related to their intubation difficulty scale (Group I, n = 19: intubation difficulty scale = 0; Group II, n = 31: 1 < intubation difficulty scale ≤ 5 and difficult intubation predictors and thyroid-related parameters were compared. Only Mallampati score was significantly different between groups (p = 0.025. CONCLUSION: The thyroid volume is not associated with difficult intubation. However clinical assessment parameters may predict difficult intubation.

  19. Surgical treatment of benign tracheo-oesophageal fistulas with tracheal resection and oesophageal primary closure: is the muscle flap really necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, José Jesus; Machuca, Tiago Noguchi; Camargo, Spencer Marcantônio; Lobato, Vivalde F; Medina, Carlos Remolina

    2010-03-01

    Nowadays, despite the advances of the low-pressure high-volume cuffs, post-intubation tracheo-oesophageal fistula (TEF) still poses a major challenge to thoracic surgeons. The original technique includes interposition of muscle flaps between suture lines to avoid recurrence. It is not clear if this manoeuvre is indispensable and, in fact, we and others have faced problems with it. Our aim is to present our experience with TEF management in a consecutive group with no muscle interposition. From June 1992 to November 2007, we evaluated 14 patients presenting with TEF, with a mean age of 44 years (from 18 to 79 years). Thirteen patients had a prolonged intubation history. The remaining case was a 40-year-old male with congenital TEF. Three patients had been previously submitted to failed repairs in other institutions. Ten patients had associated tracheal stenosis, which was subglottic in three of them. Regarding surgical technique, in all cases, we performed a single-staged procedure, which consisted of tracheal resection and anastomosis with double-layer oesophageal closure. In none of our cases was a muscle flap interposed between suture lines. All operations were performed through a cervical incision; however, in one case, an extension with partial sternotomy was required. There was no operative mortality. Thirteen patients were extubated in the first 24h after the procedure, while one patient required 48 h of mechanical ventilation. Four complications were recorded: one each of pneumonia and left vocal cord paralysis and two small tracheal dehiscences managed with a T-tube and a tracheostomy tube. After discharge, three patients returned to their native cities and were lost to follow-up. The remaining 11 patients have been followed up by a mean of 32 months (from three to 108 months), with 10 presenting excellent and one good anatomic and functional results. The single-staged repair with tracheal resection and anastomosis with oesophageal closure provides good

  20. Blind Naso-Endotracheal Intubation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Difficult endotracheal intubation techniques include, use of fiberoptic bronchoscope, intubating laryngeal mask airway, tracheostomy, blind nasotracheal and retrograde intubation. According to the Difficult Airway Society guidelines, intubating with the aid of a fiberoptic scope has taken its place as the standard adjuvant for.

  1. [The source and factors that influence tracheal pulse oximetry signal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiao-hua; Wei, Wei; Wang, Jian; Mu, Ling; Wang, Li

    2010-03-01

    To investigate the source and factors that influence tracheal pulse oximetry signal. The adult mongrel dog was intubated after anesthesia. The tracheal tube was modified by attaching a disposable pediatric pulse oximeter to the cuff. The chest of the dog was cut open and a red light from the tracheal oximeter was aligned with the deeper artery. The changes in tracheal pulse oxygen saturation (SptO2) signal were observed after the deeper artery was blocked temporarily. The photoplethysmography (PPG) and readings were recorded at different intracuff pressures. The influence of mechanical ventilation on the signal was also tested and compared with pulse oxygen saturation (SpO2). The SptO2 signal disappeared after deeper artery was blocked. The SptO2 signal changed with different intracuff pressures (P signal appeared under 20-60 cm H2O of intracuff pressure than under 0-10 cm H2O of intracuff pressure(P signal under a condition with mechanical ventilation differed from that without mechanical ventilation (P signal is primarily derived from deeper arteries around the trachea, not from the tracheal wall. Both intracuff pressures and mechanical ventilation can influence SptO2 signal. The SptO2 signal under 20-60 cm H2O of intracuff pressure is stronger than that under 0-10 em H2O of intracuff pressure. Mechanical ventilation mainly changes PPG.

  2. Association between pathogens from tracheal aspirate and oral biofilm of patients on mechanical ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Carneiro Diniz SOUZA

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to detect possible associations between respiratory pathogens from tracheal aspirate and oral biofilm samples in intubated patients in an intensive care unit (ICU, and to identify the most common respiratory pathogens in oral biofilm, particularly in patients that developed ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP. Two oral biofilm samples were collected from the tongue of intubated patients (at admission and after 48 hours and analyzed by culture with the Antibiotic Sensitivity Test. The results from the tongue biofilm samples were compared with the tracheal secretions samples. A total of 59.37% of patients exhibited the same species of pathogens in their tracheal aspirate and oral biofilm, of which 8 (42.1% developed VAP, 10 (52.63% did not develop pneumonia and one (5.26% had aspiration pneumonia. There was a statistically significant association between presence of microorganisms in the tracheal and mouth samples for the following pathogens: Klebsiella pneumoniae, Candida albicans, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacter gergoviae, Streptococcus spp and Serratia marcescens (p < 0.05. Pathogens that are present in tracheal aspirates of intubated patients can be detected in their oral cavity, especially in those who developed VAP or aspiration pneumonia. Thus, the results indicate that an improved oral care in these patients could decrease ICU pneumonia rates.

  3. Spinal stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beale, S.; Pathria, M.N.; Ross, J.S.; Masaryk, T.J.; Modic, M.T.

    1988-01-01

    The authors studied 50 patients who had spinal stenosis by means of MR imaging. All patients had undergone myelography and CT. Thirty patients underwent surgery. MR imaging included T1-weighted spin echo sequences with repetition time = 600 msec, echo time = 20 (600/20) sagittal and axial sections 4 mm thick with 2 mm gap. T2-weighted 2,000/60 axial images were obtained on 14 patients. Examinations were retrospectively evaluated for central stenosis, lateral recess narrowing, and foraminal encroachment. Measurements of sagittal, interpedicular, interfacet, and recess dimensions were made at L3-5. On MR images, 20 patients had single-level and 30 had multiple-level stenosis. There was excellent agreement between modalities with central canal stenosis, but a discrepancy in six patients with bony foraminal stenosis. MR imaging was an accurate method for assessment of lumbar stenosis, but CT appears marginally better for detection of bony foraminal stenosis in certain cases

  4. Surgery for postintubation tracheal and tracheosubglottic stenotic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashour, M.; Al-Kattan, K.; Rafay, M.A.; El-Bakry, A.K.; El-Dawlatly, A.; Naguib, M.; Seraj, M.; Joharjy, I.; Al-Serhani, A.

    1996-01-01

    Postintubation tracheal stenosis is a recognized problem. Although its incidence has recently decreased, it is still a difficult complication to treat. We have reviewed our experience with 10 patients with tracheal stenosis over the last five years between 1990 and 1995. There were seven male and three female patients with an average age of 14.2+-4 years (range 6 to 48 years). Resection and reconstruction with primary anastomosis was performed in seven patients, while conservative treatment with dilation was performed in two patients. One patient refused surgery. Operations performed included resection of tracheocricoid segment with tracheothyroid anastomosis (N=3) and tracheal resection with end-to-end anastomosis (N=4). The resected airway ranged from 3 cm to 6 cm. In view of the intense inflammatory and fibrotic process in and around stenotic segment, the practice of tracheostomy for the relief of postintubation acute tracheal obstruction should not be taken lightly, as it adds not only to the severity of the inflammatory process, but also increases the length of the tracheal segment to be resected. Postoperatively, all patients were extubated; this was accomplished by the end of surgery in six patients, while the seventh patient was extubated three weeks later. There was no mortality in this series. When normal functional activity and airway patency were taken as two parameters to judge the outcome of the surgery, results were good in six (86%) patients and satisfactory in one. These results support the validity of the one-stage reconstruction approach as one alternative for the treatment of postintubation tracheal and tracheosubglottic stenotic lesions. (author)

  5. Tracheal collapse in two cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, J.C.; O'Brien, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Two cats examined bronchoscopically to discover the cause of tracheal collapse were found to have tracheal obstruction cranial to the collapse. Cats with this unusual sign should be examined bronchoscopically to ascertain whether there is an obstruction, as the cause in these 2 cats was distinct from the diffuse airway abnormality that causes tracheal collapse in dogs

  6. Intubation learning curve: comparison between video and direct laryngoscopy by inexperienced students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghamohammadi, H; Massoudi, N; Fathi, M; Jaffari, A; Gharaei, B; Moshki, A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Direct laryngoscopy (DL) is considered the most common method of tracheal intubation. On the other hand, evidence shows the growing role of video laryngoscopy in danger airway administration. Objectives: Due to the importance of a proper training to accomplish an accurate and fast intubation by the student of anesthesia, this research was conducted to assess the effects of DL and video laryngoscopy (Glidescope VL) training on the success rate of tracheal intubation by low-skill students. Materials/Patients and styles: 50 undergraduate students of anesthesiology took part in this randomized control educational intervention. Having no considerable experience in intubation, they were selected and divided randomly into two equal groups (n = 25); video-laryngoscopy via GlideScope VL and direct laryngoscopy (DL) via a Macintosh blade were prepared by the same experienced anesthesiologist. All the participants practiced intubation six times on the same mannequin within a routine airway situation. The maximum acceptable time for each intubation was 3 minutes and three times of successful intubation was considered as an appropriate intubation skill. The required time for laryngoscopy and intubation at each stage, the grade of glottis view, the reasons for an unsuccessful intubation and the amount of successful intubations were recorded and compared between groups. Results: There was a clear variation between the 2 teams, in all the steps, based on the required time for laryngoscopy and intubation (p = 0.0001). Data analysis was performed by using repeated measures data which demonstrated that the necessary time for laryngoscopy and intubation during the study was clearly lower in the GlideScope VL team (p = .0001). In first five rounds of training, the glottis view in the DL group was significantly better than in the VL group (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Based on the result of today' study, routine airway intubation by using GlideScope VL is significantly faster than

  7. A bronchoscopic approach to benign subglottic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Tuhina; Chatterjee, Kshitij; Alzghoul, Bashar N; Innabi, Ayoub A; Tulunay, Ozlem; Bartter, Thaddeus; Meena, Nikhil K

    2017-01-01

    Subglottic stenosis is an abnormal narrowing of the tracheal lumen at the level of subglottis (the area in between the vocal cords and the cricoid cartilage). It can cause significant symptoms due to severe attenuation of airflow. We describe our experience in alleviating symptoms by addressing the stenosis using fibreoptic bronchoscopic methods. We report all concurrent cases performed between September 2015 and July 2016. We use a combination of balloon dilation, electro-surgery knife to dilate and incise stenotic segments followed by steroid injection to modulate healing. We treated 10 patients in the study period, 8 of which were women. A total of 39 procedures were performed on these patients during this period. Gastro-esophageal reflux was the most common comorbidity associated with stenosis. The majority of the patients required more than 2 therapeutic procedures, but none required more than 4 procedures. There were no complications. Tracheal stenosis and in particular subglottic stenosis is a recurrent process and its management requires extensive collaboration amongst treating specialties. Our technique of steroid injection after dilation of the stenosis was effective in symptom control and decreased the number of repeat procedures.

  8. Integration of point-of-care ultrasound during rapid sequence intubation in trauma resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Ranjan Mishra

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Airway and breathing management play critical role in trauma resuscitation. Early identification of esophageal intubation and detection of fatal events is critical. Authors studied the utility of integration of point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS during different phases of rapid sequence intubation (RSI in trauma resuscitation. Methods: It was prospective, randomized single-centered study conducted at the Emergency Department of a level one trauma center. Patients were divided into ultrasonography (USG and clinical examination (CE arm. The objectives were to study the utility of POCUS in endotracheal tube placement and confirmations and identification of potentially fatal conditions as tracheal injury, midline vessels, paratracheal hematoma, vocal cord pathology, pneumothorax, and others during RSI. Patient >1 year of age were included. Time taken for procedure, number of incorrect intubations, and pathologies detected were noted. The data were collected in Microsoft Excel spread sheets and analyzed using Stata (version 11.2, Stata Corp, Texas, U. S. A software. Results: One hundred and six patients were recruited. The mean time for primary survey USG versus CE arm was (20 ± 10.01 vs. 18 ± 11.03 seconds. USG detected four pneumothorax, one tracheal injury, and one paratracheal hematoma. The mean procedure time USG versus CE arm was (37.3 ± 21.92 vs. 58 ± 32.04 seconds. Eight esophageal intubations were identified in USG arm by POCUS and two in CE arm by EtCO2 values. Conclusion: Integration of POCUS was useful in all three phases of RSI. It identified paratracheal hematoma, tracheal injury, and pneumothorax. It also identified esophageal intubation and confirmed main stem tracheal intubation in less time compared to five-point auscultation and capnography.

  9. Primary tracheal adenocystic carcinoma and tracheal tumors during pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cem Gundogdu

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Cancer complicates approximately 0.1% of all pregnancies. Primary tracheal carcinoma is one of very rarely seen tumors and the rate of its being seen makes up approximately % 0,2 of all tumors of respiratory tract. The patient, 28 years old, who has 28-weeks-pregnant, was diagnosed with primary tracheal adenocystic carcinoma. Patient was made operation as thoracotomy and tracheal tumor was removed at the 28th week of pregnancy. Patient was delivered with sectio abdominale at the 39th week of pregnancy. Primary tracheal adenocystic carcinoma is very rarely seen tumors and it is the first tracheal ACC with pregnancy case in literature to have been detected and surgically treated during pregnancy. We discussed primary tracheal adenocystic carcinoma and tracheal tumors during pregnancy with literature.

  10. The value of MRI of the thorax in congenital stenosis of the trachea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogl, T.; Wilimzig, C.; Lissner, J.; Hofmann, U.; Hofmann, D.; Hecker, W.

    1989-01-01

    MRI of the thorax was performed in 24 children aged between six weeks and five years, in whom a tracheal stenosis had been demonstrated by bronchoscopy. Since bronchoscopy can only demonstrate the interior of the trachea, various imaging methods, such as CT and angiography, were used to demonstrate the topography and cause of the tracheal stenosis. MRI has shown that the most common cause of a stenosis in the central section of the trachea is focal compression by an aberrant bracheocephalic trunk (10 cases). Stenosis of the distal trachea could be due to anomalies of the aortic arch (5 cases), a dilated pulmonary artery (4 cases) or a soft tissue mass (3 cases). In all these patients, MRI was greatly superior to the conventional methods. By using a special technique, MRI made it possible to clarify the cause and localisation of a tracheal stenosis by a non-invasive examination. (orig.) [de

  11. Attenuation of Hemodynamic Responses to Intubation by Gabapentin in Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery: a Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mojtaba Marashi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A varieties of medications have been suggested to prevent hemodynamic instabilities following laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation. This study was conducted to determine the beneficial effects of gabapentin on preventing hemodynamic instabilities associated with intubation in patients who were a candidate for coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG. This double blinded randomized, parallel group clinical trial was carried out on 58 normotensive patients scheduled for elective CABG under general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation in Shariati Hospital. Patients were randomly allocated to two groups of 29 patients that received 1200 mg of gabapentin in two dosages (600 mg, 8 hours before anesthesia induction and 600 mg, 2 hours before anesthesia induction as gabapentin group or received talc powder as placebo (placebo group. Heart rate, mean arterial pressure, systolic and diastolic blood pressure were measured immediately before intubation, during intubation, immediately after intubation, 1 and 2 minutes after tracheal intubation. Inter-group comparisons significantly showed higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure and heart rate immediately before intubation, during intubation, immediately after intubation, 1 and 2 minutes after tracheal intubation in the placebo group in comparison to gabapentin group. The median of anxiety  verbal analog scale (VAS at the pre-induction room in gabapentin and placebo groups were 2 and 4,  respectively that was significantly lower in the former group (P. value =0.04 ; however, regarding median of pain score no difference was observed between them (P. value =0.07. Gabapentin (1200mg given preoperatively can effectively attenuate the hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy, intubation and also reduce preoperative related anxiety in patients who were a candidate for CABG.

  12. Prehospital rapid sequence intubation improves functional outcome for patients with severe traumatic brain injury: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Stephen A; Nguyen, Vina; Cameron, Peter; Masci, Kevin; Fitzgerald, Mark; Cooper, David J; Walker, Tony; Std, B Paramed; Myles, Paul; Murray, Lynne; David; Taylor; Smith, Karen; Patrick, Ian; Edington, John; Bacon, Andrew; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V; Judson, Rodney

    2010-12-01

    To determine whether paramedic rapid sequence intubation in patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) improves neurologic outcomes at 6 months compared with intubation in the hospital. Severe TBI is associated with a high rate of mortality and long-term morbidity. Comatose patients with TBI routinely undergo endo-tracheal intubation to protect the airway, prevent hypoxia, and control ventilation. In many places, paramedics perform intubation prior to hospital arrival. However, it is unknown whether this approach improves outcomes. In a prospective, randomized, controlled trial, we assigned adults with severe TBI in an urban setting to either prehospital rapid sequence intubation by paramedics or transport to a hospital emergency department for intubation by physicians. The primary outcome measure was the median extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSe) score at 6 months. Secondary end-points were favorable versus unfavorable outcome at 6 months, length of intensive care and hospital stay, and survival to hospital discharge. A total of 312 patients with severe TBI were randomly assigned to paramedic rapid sequence intubation or hospital intubation. The success rate for paramedic intubation was 97%. At 6 months, the median GOSe score was 5 (interquartile range, 1-6) in patients intubated by paramedics compared with 3 (interquartile range, 1-6) in the patients intubated at hospital (P = 0.28).The proportion of patients with favorable outcome (GOSe, 5-8) was 80 of 157 patients (51%) in the paramedic intubation group compared with 56 of 142 patients (39%) in the hospital intubation group (risk ratio, 1.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.00-1.64; P = 0.046). There were no differences in intensive care or hospital length of stay, or in survival to hospital discharge. In adults with severe TBI, prehospital rapid sequence intubation by paramedics increases the rate of favorable neurologic outcome at 6 months compared with intubation in the hospital.

  13. Dose preparatória de atracúrio: aferição da fadiga no músculo orbicular do olho e condições de intubação orotraqueal Dosis preparatoria de atracurio: comparación de la fatiga en el músculo orbicular del ojo y condiciones de intubación orotraqueal Priming dose of atracurium: measuring orbicularis oculi muscle fade and tracheal intubation conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovani de Figueiredo Locks

    2003-12-01

    és de un minuto. Fue considerada fatiga clínicamente importante la relación T4/T1 inferior a 0,9. RESULTADOS: Ningún paciente presentó fatiga durante el intervalo de monitorización. En 80% y 69% de los pacientes de G1 ó G2, respectivamente, las condiciones de intubación traqueal fueron consideradas clínicamente aceptables (p > 0,05. CONCLUSIONES: La dosis preparatoria de atracúrio (0,02 mg.kg-1 no causa fatiga en el músculo orbicular del ojo y no hay diferencia entre esperar 5 ó 7 minutos como intervalo entre las dosis del bloqueador neuromuscular.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The priming principle consists of administering a low neuromuscular blocker dose, minutes before the total dose for tracheal intubation, to shorten non-depolarizing blockers onset. There is, however, the risk for muscle fade and bronchoaspiration. Laryngeal muscles are of especial interest for tracheal intubation maneuvers and airway protection. Since their direct monitoring imposes technical difficulties, it has been reported that orbicularis oculi correlates with laryngeal muscles in terms of sensitivity to neuromuscular blocks. This study aimed at evaluating the presence of orbicularis oculi muscle fade after priming atracurium dose and at comparing clinical tracheal intubation conditions after two priming dose intervals. METHODS: Participated in this study 35 adult patients, physical status ASA I or II, without risk factors for bronchoaspiration and submitted to elective surgeries. General anesthesia was induced with alfentanil and propofol and patients were manually ventilated under mask. Surface electrodes were then positioned on the temporal branch of the facial nerve, and the acceleration transducer was placed on the orbicularis oculi. Priming atracurium dose (0.02 mg.kg-1 was administered and T4/T1 ratio was evaluated every minute during 5 minutes in 20 cases (G1 and during 7 minutes in 13 cases (G2. After this interval, complementary atracurium dose (0.5 mg.kg-1 was administered

  14. Cost effective oesophageal intubation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    with an ante-grade or retrograde approach for traction. In the latter cases railroading was done. Following placement, the tube was anchored with one or two stitches through the tube and the abdominal oesophagus. Results. Thirty-four patients were intubated during a twenty- four month study period (1988-1990). Eighteen ...

  15. Association between pathogens from tracheal aspirate and oral biofilm of patients on mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Luana Carneiro Diniz; Mota, Vanise Barros Rodrigues da; Carvalho, Alícia Valéria Dos Santos Zaranza de; Corrêa, Rita da Graça Carvalhal Frazão; Libério, Silvana Amado; Lopes, Fernanda Ferreira

    2017-06-05

    The aim of this study was to detect possible associations between respiratory pathogens from tracheal aspirate and oral biofilm samples in intubated patients in an intensive care unit (ICU), and to identify the most common respiratory pathogens in oral biofilm, particularly in patients that developed ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). Two oral biofilm samples were collected from the tongue of intubated patients (at admission and after 48 hours) and analyzed by culture with the Antibiotic Sensitivity Test. The results from the tongue biofilm samples were compared with the tracheal secretions samples. A total of 59.37% of patients exhibited the same species of pathogens in their tracheal aspirate and oral biofilm, of which 8 (42.1%) developed VAP, 10 (52.63%) did not develop pneumonia and one (5.26%) had aspiration pneumonia. There was a statistically significant association between presence of microorganisms in the tracheal and mouth samples for the following pathogens: Klebsiella pneumoniae, Candida albicans, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacter gergoviae, Streptococcus spp and Serratia marcescens (p aspirates of intubated patients can be detected in their oral cavity, especially in those who developed VAP or aspiration pneumonia. Thus, the results indicate that an improved oral care in these patients could decrease ICU pneumonia rates.

  16. Resection of pulmonary nodule in a patient with subglottic stenosis under modified spontaneous ventilation anesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Jianfei; Chen, Xuewei; Liang, Lixia

    2017-01-01

    . Here we present a case of pulmonary nodule resection in a patient with subglottic stenosis using uniportal thoracoscopy under spontaneous ventilation anesthesia (SVA). Compared with traditional double lumen endotracheal intubation, we believe this modified technique can significantly reduce airway...

  17. High levels of IGF-1 predict difficult intubation of patients with acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Guo, Xiaopeng; Pei, Lijian; Zhang, Zhuhua; Tan, Gang; Xing, Bing

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the characteristics of difficult intubation and identify novel efficient predictors in patients with acromegaly. Patients with either untreated acromegaly or non-functional pituitary adenomas were enrolled. Patients with acromegaly underwent hormone assays, upper airway computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging examinations and preoperative overnight polysomnography. The modified Mallampati classification, mouth opening, neck circumference, and neck extension were assessed, and the Cormack-Lehane grades and the time of tracheal intubation were recorded. Patients with acromegaly had a higher incidence of difficult intubation (62.5%). The time of tracheal intubation was prolonged, the neck circumference was enlarged, and the neck extension was confined. In patients with acromegaly and difficult intubation, the insulin-like growth factor 1 levels and apnea/hypoxia index were significantly higher compared to patients without difficult intubation (1115.40 ± 253.73 vs. 791.67 ± 206.62 ng/ml, P = 0.020; 22.17 ± 23.25 vs. 2.47 ± 2.84, P = 0.026, respectively). The bilateral regression analysis revealed that high levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 were an independent risk factor for developing difficult intubation (p = 0.042, Exp B = 1.006). The modified Mallampati classification was positively correlated with apnea/hypoxia index and could be calculated using the following logarithmic equation: MMC = 0.2982 * ln (AHI) + 2.1836. In patients with acromegaly, neck movement is confined, the time of tracheal intubation is prolonged, and the neck circumference is enlarged, and these patients suffer from an increased incidence of difficult intubation (62.5%) during anesthesia induction. The apnea/hypoxia index and insulin-like growth factor 1 levels are both increased in acromegalic patients with difficult intubation, and elevated insulin-like growth factor 1 levels are an independent risk factor of difficult

  18. Management of tracheal chondrosarcoma almost completely obstructing the airway: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andolfi, Marco; Vaccarili, Maurizio; Crisci, Roberto; Puma, Francesco

    2016-07-11

    Primary malignant tracheal tumors account for only 0.2 % of all malignancies of the respiratory tract. Tracheal chondrosarcoma is a rare condition and only 17 cases have been described in the literature from 1965 to date. Herein we report the very unusual case of a patient with a tracheal chondrosarcoma, electively treated by curative surgery despite the virtually complete obstruction of the airway. We present the case of a 79-year old Caucasian man with long-lasting wheezing misdiagnosed as asthma and affected by a tracheal chondrosarcoma almost completely obstructing the airway. Videobronchoscopy and imaging investigations revealed a well-circumscribed mass arising from the cartilaginous rings of the cervical trachea with a posterior residual respiratory space of about 1 mm. Because of the mobility and flaccidity of the uninvolved pars membranacea, the tiny respiratory space slightly expanded during inspiration and expiration allowing the patient to be treated without an essential emergency procedure. Standard tracheal intubation was impossible. Rigid bronchoscopy enabled placement of a small tracheal tube distally to the tumor. Successful cervical tracheal resection and reconstruction was then performed, achieving complete tumor excision. Histologically, the mass was characterized as a low-grade tracheal chondrosarcoma. Videobronchoscopy performed 9 months after surgery showed a wide, well healed tracheal anastomosis. Ten months after surgery, the patient is alive and disease free. Complete surgical resection is the treatment of choice for tracheal chondrosarcoma. Rigid bronchoscopy is an essential tool for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. It allows the palliative maneuvers for obstruction relief but also, in resectable patients, the intraoperative safe and straightforward management of the obstructed airway.

  19. Alternative intubation techniques vs Macintosh laryngoscopy in patients with cervical spine immobilization: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suppan, L.; Tramèr, M. R.; Niquille, M.; Grosgurin, O.; Marti, C.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Immobilization of the cervical spine worsens tracheal intubation conditions. Various intubation devices have been tested in this setting. Their relative usefulness remains unclear. Methods. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library for randomized controlled trials comparing any intubation device with the Macintosh laryngoscope in human subjects with cervical spine immobilization. The primary outcome was the risk of tracheal intubation failure at the first attempt. Secondary outcomes were quality of glottis visualization, time until successful intubation, and risk of oropharyngeal complications. Results. Twenty-four trials (1866 patients) met inclusion criteria. With alternative intubation devices, the risk of intubation failure was lower compared with Macintosh laryngoscopy [risk ratio (RR) 0.53; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.35–0.80]. Meta-analyses could be performed for five intubation devices (Airtraq, Airwayscope, C-Mac, Glidescope, and McGrath). The Airtraq was associated with a statistically significant reduction of the risk of intubation failure at the first attempt (RR 0.14; 95% CI 0.06–0.33), a higher rate of Cormack–Lehane grade 1 (RR 2.98; 95% CI 1.94–4.56), a reduction of time until successful intubation (weighted mean difference −10.1 s; 95% CI −3.2 to −17.0), and a reduction of oropharyngeal complications (RR 0.24; 95% CI 0.06–0.93). Other devices were associated with improved glottis visualization but no statistically significant differences in intubation failure or time to intubation compared with conventional laryngoscopy. Conclusions. In situations where the spine is immobilized, the Airtraq device reduces the risk of intubation failure. There is a lack of evidence for the usefulness of other intubation devices. PMID:26133898

  20. Endotracheal intubation: application of virtual reality to emergency medical services education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayrose, James; Myers, Jeffrey W

    2007-01-01

    Virtual reality simulation has been identified as an emerging educational tool with significant potential to enhance teaching of residents and students in emergency clinical encounters and procedures. Endotracheal intubation represents a critical procedure for emergency care providers. Current methods of training include working with cadavers and mannequins, which have limitations in their representation of reality, ethical concerns, and overall availability with access, cost, and location of models. This paper will present a human airway simulation model designed for tracheal intubation and discuss the aspects that lend itself to use as an educational tool. This realistic and dynamic model is used to teach routine intubations, while future models will include more difficult airway management scenarios. This work provides a solid foundation for future versions of the intubation simulator, which will incorporate two haptic devices to allow for simultaneous control of the laryngoscope blade and endotracheal tube.

  1. Monitoramento microbiológico seqüencial da secreção traqueal em pacientes intubados internados em unidade de terapia intensiva pediátrica Sequential microbiological monitoring of tracheal aspirates in intubated patients admitted to a pediatric intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cid E. Carvalho

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estudar seqüencialmente a flora traqueal em pacientes internados em unidade de terapia intensiva pediátrica e associar esta flora com o tempo de internação, a utilização prévia de antimicrobianos e o diagnóstico de pneumonia associada à ventilação mecânica. MÉTODOS: A população estudada foi constituída de pacientes pediátricos admitidos em uma unidade de terapia intensiva pediátrica entre novembro de 2002 e dezembro de 2003 e submetidos a ventilação mecânica. Foram coletadas três amostras seriadas de secreção traqueal de cada paciente. A primeira coleta foi realizada dentro das primeiras 6 horas após a admissão, e as amostras seguintes, depois de 48 e 96 horas. RESULTADOS: Foram estudados 100 pacientes com idade entre 1 dia e 14 anos. Nas três coletas realizadas, observou-se um aumento do percentual de culturas positivas para Pseudomonas aeruginosa, de 6 para 22% (p = 0,002, e também uma diminuição das culturas positivas para Staphylococcus aureus, de 23 para 8% (p = 0,009. No grupo com uso prévio de antimicrobianos, houve maior freqüência de isolamento de Candida spp (p OBJECTIVE: To evaluate, sequentially, tracheal aspirates from patients admitted to a pediatric intensive care unit and to associate these pathogens with length of hospital stay, previous use of antimicrobial therapy and diagnoses of ventilator-associated pneumonia. METHODS: The study population consisted of patients admitted to a pediatric intensive care unit, between November 2002 and December 2003, on ventilator support. Three tracheal aspirates were collected serially from each patient. The first tracheal aspirate sample was obtained 6 hours after admission to the intensive care unit and the remaining samples were collected after 48 and 96 hours. RESULTS: One hundred patients aged from one day to 14 years were assessed. Positive tracheal cultures were observed to have increased in the three tracheal aspirate samples collected from

  2. Expandable metal stents for tracheal obstruction: permanent or temporary? A cautionary tale.

    OpenAIRE

    Hind, C R; Donnelly, R J

    1992-01-01

    An expandable metal stent inserted via a long term tracheostomy successfully relieved life threatening respiratory obstruction due to benign tracheal stenosis. Later the patient's tracheostomy suction catheter became stuck on the stent and dislodged it. The stent was removed electively, without damaging the trachea, with a rigid biopsy forceps.

  3. Comparison of gabapentin, pregabalin and placebo as premedication for attenuation of hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Mahoori

    2017-08-01

    Conclusion: Oral gabapentin premedication is effective for control of hemodynamic pressor response of laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation. The study data showed that the pregabalin have the same effect. Pregabalin and gabapentin are both useful and safe for control of hemodynamic pressor response as premedication.

  4. Pediatric Intubation by Paramedics in a Large Emergency Medical Services System: Process, Challenges, and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prekker, Matthew E; Delgado, Fernanda; Shin, Jenny; Kwok, Heemun; Johnson, Nicholas J; Carlbom, David; Grabinsky, Andreas; Brogan, Thomas V; King, Mary A; Rea, Thomas D

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric intubation is a core paramedic skill in some emergency medical services (EMS) systems. The literature lacks a detailed examination of the challenges and subsequent adjustments made by paramedics when intubating children in the out-of-hospital setting. We undertake a descriptive evaluation of the process of out-of-hospital pediatric intubation, focusing on challenges, adjustments, and outcomes. We performed a retrospective analysis of EMS responses between 2006 and 2012 that involved attempted intubation of children younger than 13 years by paramedics in a large, metropolitan EMS system. We calculated the incidence rate of attempted pediatric intubation with EMS and county census data. To summarize the intubation process, we linked a detailed out-of-hospital airway registry with clinical records from EMS, hospital, or autopsy encounters for each child. The main outcome measures were procedural challenges, procedural success, complications, and patient disposition. Paramedics attempted intubation in 299 cases during 6.3 years, with an incidence of 1 pediatric intubation per 2,198 EMS responses. Less than half of intubations (44%) were for patients in cardiac arrest. Two thirds of patients were intubated on the first attempt (66%), and overall success was 97%. The most prevalent challenge was body fluids obscuring the laryngeal view (33%). After a failed first intubation attempt, corrective actions taken by paramedics included changing equipment (33%), suctioning (32%), and repositioning the patient (27%). Six patients (2%) experienced peri-intubation cardiac arrest and 1 patient had an iatrogenic tracheal injury. No esophageal intubations were observed. Of patients transported to the hospital, 86% were admitted to intensive care and hospital mortality was 27%. Pediatric intubation by paramedics was performed infrequently in this EMS system. Although overall intubation success was high, a detailed evaluation of the process of intubation revealed specific

  5. Aortic stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Images Aortic stenosis Heart valves References Carabello BA. Valvular heart disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil ... ACC guideline for the management of patients with valvular heart disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology/ ...

  6. Patients with cardiac arrest are ventilated two times faster than guidelines recommend : An observational prehospital study using tracheal pressure measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maertens, Vicky L.; De Smedt, Lieven E. G.; Lemoyne, Sabine; Huybrechts, Sofie A. M.; Wouters, Kristien; Kalmar, Alain F.; Monsieurs, Koenraad G.

    Aim: To measure ventilation rate using tracheal airway pressures in prehospitally intubated patients with and without cardiac arrest. Methods: Prospective observational study. In 98 patients (57 with and 41 without cardiac arrest) an air-filled catheter was inserted into the endotracheal tube and

  7. Anesthesia for subglottic stenosis in pediatrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eid Essam

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Any site in the upper airway can get obstructed and cause noisy breathing as well as dyspnea. These include nasal causes such as choanal atresia or nasal stenosis; pharyngeal causes including lingual thyroid; laryngeal causes such as laryngomalacia; tracheobronchial causes such as tracheal stenosis; and subglottic stenosis. Lesions in the oropharynx may cause stertor, while lesions in the laryngotracheal tree will cause stridor. Subglottic stenosis is the third leading cause of congenital stridors in the neonate. Subglottic Stenosis presents challenges to the anesthesiologist. Therefore, It is imperative to perform a detailed history, physical examination, and characterization of the extent and severity of stenosis. Rigid endoscopy is essential for the preoperative planning of any of the surgical procedures that can be used for correction. Choice of operation is dependent on the surgeon′s comfort, postoperative capabilities, and severity of disease. For high-grade stenosis, single-stage laryngotracheal resection or cricotracheal resection are the best options. It has to be borne in mind that the goal of surgery is to allow for an adequate airway for normal activity without the need for tracheostomy. Anesthesia for airway surgery could be conducted safely with either sevofl uraneor propofol-based total intravenous anesthesia.

  8. Diagnosis of tracheal instability: inspiratory and expiratory spiral CT and cine CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heussel, C.P.; Thelen, M.; Kauczor, H.U.; Hafner, B.; Lill, J.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: In tracheo- and bronchomalacia, localization and determination of collapse is necessary for planning a surgical procedure. We compared inspiratory and spiral CT, cine CT, and bronchoscopy and evaluated the relevance of each method. Methods: Seventeen patients with suspected or verified tracheal stonosis or collapse underwent paired inspiratory and exspiratory spiral CT and cine CT during continuous respiration (temporal increment 100 ms). The tracheal cross-sectional area was calculated and compared. Results: In addition to bronchoscopy, further information concerning localization, extent, collapse, stability of the tracheal wall, distal portions of the stenosis, and extraluminal compressions was obtained. A significantly higher degree of tracheal collapse was seen using cine CT compared to paired spiral CT (p [de

  9. [Usefullness of bronchofiberscopy for difficult intubation in patients with severe motor and intellectual disabilities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Yuji; Ukaji, Koutarou

    2005-11-01

    In 21 patients with severe motor and intellectual disabilities, bronchofiberoptic intubation was performed because of difficulty in tracheal intubation by direct laryngoscopy. The patients ranged from 3 to 35 years old (mean age: 20.2 years). Twenty patients (95.2%) were bedridden. Among the 21 patients, 15 had cerebral palsy and 20 had hypertonia. The reason for intubation were acute respiratory failure due to pneumonia in 17 cases, suffocation after aspiration of food in 2 cases, hypovolemic shock in 1 case, and laryngotracheomalacia in 1 case. Intubation was done pernasally in 15 patients and perorally in 10. It was successful in 20 cases without any significant complications. The Cormack score ranged from 3rd degree in 4 cases to 4th in 17 cases. The 20 cases of successful fiberoptic intubation were divided into 7 patients with and 13 without tracheostomy. The mortality rate was 14.3% in patients with tracheostomy and 30.8% in those without tracheostomy. When more than 4 intubation trials were needed, there was a significantly higher mortality rate. In neurologically handicapped patients with deformity or hypertonia of the oral, cervical, or airway structures, a bronchofiberoptic procedure may be recommended when there is difficulty with intubation.

  10. Nasal Cannula Apneic Oxygenation Prevents Desaturation During Endotracheal Intubation: An Integrative Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill R. Christian

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Patients requiring emergency airway management may be at greater risk of acute hypoxemic events because of underlying lung pathology, high metabolic demands, insufficient respiratory drive, obesity, or the inability to protect their airway against aspiration. Emergency tracheal intubation is often required before complete information needed to assess the risk of procedural hypoxia is acquired (i.e., arterial blood gas level, hemoglobin value, or chest radiograph. During pre-oxygenation, administering high-flow nasal oxygen in addition to a non-rebreather face mask can significantly boost the effective inspired oxygen. Similarly, with the apnea created by rapid sequence intubation (RSI procedures, the same high-flow nasal cannula can help maintain or increase oxygen saturation during efforts to secure the tube (oral intubation. Thus, the use of nasal oxygen during pre-oxygenation and continued during apnea can prevent hypoxia before and during intubation, extending safe apnea time, and improve first-pass success attempts. We conducted a literature review of nasal-cannula apneic oxygenation during intubation, focusing on two components: oxygen saturation during intubation, and oxygen desaturation time. We performed an electronic literature search from 1980 to November 2017, using PubMed, Elsevier, ScienceDirect, and EBSCO. We identified 14 studies that pointed toward the benefits of using nasal cannula during emergency intubation.

  11. Tracheoesophageal Fistula due to a Damaged Tracheal Stent

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    Masahiro Kimura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the management of a tracheoesophageal fistula due to a damaged tracheal stent, which was first inserted to treat tracheal stenosis. A 29-year-old woman with a history of treated epilepsy had a seizure and suffered from smoke inhalation during a fire. Breathing difficulties appeared and gradually worsened; consultation was obtained two years afterward. After undergoing a thorough examination, the patient was diagnosed with tracheal strangulation. A noncovered, metallic stent was inserted. When the patient was 37 years old, she was admitted to our hospital for the treatment of a tracheoesophageal fistula. We diagnosed it as a tracheoesophageal fistula due to the collapse of the damaged tracheal stent toward the esophageal side, and we decided to perform a mediastinal tracheostomy. Granulation may be formed in the circumference of a stent that has been present for a prolonged period, and removal of the stent may become difficult. This case suggests that insertion of a noncovered, metallic stent is contraindicated for a benign disease.

  12. Predictive value of α-amylase in tracheal aspirates for ventilator-associated pneumonia in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Ge-Ping; Fang, Xiang-Qun; Xu, Ya-Ping; Shi, Min; Wang, Yang; Gong, Mei-Liang; Fang, Hao-Ming

    2018-04-01

    This study aims to investigate the correlation between α-amylase in tracheal aspirates and risk factors of aspiration, as well as ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), in elderly patients undergoing mechanical ventilation and explore the clinical value of α-amylase for predicting VAP. Tracheal aspirates were collected from elderly patients within 2 weeks after tracheal intubation in mechanical ventilation, and α-amylase was detected. Patients were grouped according to the presence of VAP. The correlation between α-amylase and risk factors of aspiration before intubation, as well as VAP, were analyzed. The sample of this study comprised 147 patients. The average age of these patients was 86.9 years. The incidence of VAP was 21% during the study period. Tracheal aspirate α-amylase level increased with the increase in the number of risk factors for aspiration before intubation, α-amylase level was significantly higher in the VAP group than in the non-VAP group, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) of the diagnostic value of α-amylase for VAP was 0.813 (95% CI: 0.721-0.896), threshold value was 4,681.5 U/L, sensitivity was 0.801 and specificity was 0.793. Logistic multivariate analysis revealed the following risk factors for VAP: a number of risk factors before intubation of ≥3, a Glasgow score of aspiration of subglottic secretion and a tracheal aspirate α-amylase level of >4681.5 U/L. Tracheal aspirate α-amylase can serve as a biomarker for predicting VAP in elderly patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Traumatic tracheal diverticulum corrected with resection and anastomosis during one-lung ventilation and total intravenous anesthesia in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayre, Rebecca S; Lepiz, Mauricio; Wall, Corey; Thieman-Mankin, Kelley; Dobbin, Jennifer

    2016-11-01

    This report describes the clinical findings and diagnostic images of a traumatic intrathoracic tracheal avulsion with a tracheal diverticulum in a cat. Furthermore, a complete description of the tracheal resection and anastomosis using one-lung ventilation (OLV) with total and partial intravenous anesthesia is made. A 3-year-old neutered male domestic shorthair cat weighing 6.8 kg was presented to the University Teaching Hospital for evaluation of increased respiratory noise 3 months following unknown trauma. Approximately 12 weeks prior to presentation, the cat had been seen by the primary care veterinarian for respiratory distress. At that time, the cat had undergone a tracheal ballooning procedure for a distal tracheal stricture diagnosed by tracheoscopy. The tracheal ballooning had provided only temporary relief. At presentation to our institution, the cat had increased respiratory effort with harsh upper airway noise auscultated during thoracic examination. The remainder of the physical examination was normal. Diagnostics included a tracheoscopy and a thoracic computed tomographic examination. The cat was diagnosed with tracheal avulsion, pseudotrachea with a tracheal diverticulum, and stenosis of the avulsed tracheal ends. Surgical correction of the tracheal stricture via a thoracotomy was performed using OLV with total and partial intravenous anesthesia. The cat recovered uneventfully and at last follow-up was active and doing well. This case report describes OLV using standard anesthesia equipment that is available at most private practices. Furthermore, this case describes the computed tomographic images of the intrathoracic tracheal avulsion and offers a positive outcome for tracheal resection and anastomosis. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2015.

  14. Low tracheal tumor and airway management: An anesthetic challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richa Saroa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case presenting with tracheal tumor wherein a Microlaryngeal tube was advanced into the trachea distal to the tumor for primary airway control followed by cannulation of both endobronchial lumen with 5.5 mm endotracheal tubes to provide independent lung ventilation post tracheal transection using Y- connector attached to anesthesia machine. The plan was formulated to provide maximal surgical access to the trachea while providing adequate ventilation at the same time. A 32 yrs non smoker male, complaining of cough, progressive dyspnea and hemoptysis was diagnosed to have a broad based mass in the trachea on computed tomography of chest. Bronchoscopy of the upper airway confirmed presence of the mass at a distance of 9 cms from the vocal cords, obstructing the tracheal lumen by three fourth of the diameter. The patient was scheduled to undergo the resection of the mass through anterolateral thoracotomy. We recommend the use of extralong, soft, small sized microlaryngeal surgery tube in tumors proximal to carina, for securing the airway before the transection of trachea and bilateral endobronchial intubation with small sized cuffed endotracheal tubes for maintenance of ventilation after the transection of trachea in patients with mass in the lower trachea.

  15. Comparison of the effects of remifentanil and remifentanil plus lidocaine on intubation conditions in intellectually disabled patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Eyigor

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: This is a prospective, randomized, single-blind study. We aimed to compare the tracheal intubation conditions and hemodynamic responses either remifentanil or a combination of remifentanil and lidocaine with sevoflurane induction in the absence of neuromuscular blocking agents. METHODS: Fifty intellectually disabled, American Society of Anesthesiologists I-II patients who underwent tooth extraction under outpatient general anesthesia were included in this study. Patients were randomized to receive either 2 μg kg-1 remifentanil (Group 1, n = 25 or a combination of 2 μg kg-1 remifentanil and 1 mg kg-1 lidocaine (Group 2, n = 25. To evaluate intubation conditions, Helbo-Hansen scoring system was used. In patients who scored 2 points or less in all scorings, intubation conditions were considered acceptable, however if any of the scores was greater than 2, intubation conditions were regarded unacceptable. Mean arterial pressure, heart rate and peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2 were recorded at baseline, after opioid administration, before intubation, and at 1, 3, and 5 min after intubation. RESULTS: Acceptable intubation parameters were achieved in 24 patients in Group 1 (96% and in 23 patients in Group 2 (92%. In intra-group comparisons, the heart rate and mean arterial pressure values at all-time points in both groups showed a significant decrease compared to baseline values (p = 0.000 CONCLUSION: By the addition of 2 μg/kg remifentanil during sevoflurane induction, successful tracheal intubation can be accomplished without using muscle relaxants in intellectually disabled patients who undergo outpatient dental extraction. Also worth noting, the addition of 1 mg/kg lidocaine to 2 μg/kg remifentanil does not provide any additional improvement in the intubation parameters.

  16. Intubation conditions in young infants after propofol and remifentanil induction with and without low-dose rocuronium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelberg, J; Kongstad, L; Werner, O

    2014-08-01

    Bolus injections of intravenous propofol and remifentanil can be used in the tracheal intubation of infants and children, but relatively large doses are needed. We hypothesised that addition of a small bolus of rocuronium would ensure good intubation conditions when modest propofol and remifentanil doses were used. Seventy infants between 3 weeks and 4 months of age were randomised to receive either placebo or rocuronium. Anaesthesia was induced with IV propofol, 3 (3-5) mg/kg [median (range)]. Rocuronium (0.2 mg/kg) or placebo was then injected, followed 15 s later by 2 μg/kg remifentanil. One anaesthetist attempted tracheal intubation 1 min after the rocuronium/placebo injection and used the 'Copenhagen scoring system' to assess intubation conditions. The neuromuscular effect of 0.2 mg/kg rocuronium was recorded in another eight, already intubated, infants using thumb accelerometry during train-of-four stimulation of the ulnar nerve. Intubation conditions were classified as 'poor' in 14 of 34 (41%) patients given placebo and in 10 of 36 (28%) patients given rocuronium (P = 0.32). There were four failed first attempts at intubation in the placebo group and none in the rocuronium group (P = 0.051). Maximum neuromuscular depression occurred 4 (3-8) after injection of 0.2 mg/kg rocuronium. Intubation conditions were poor in almost one third of the patients receiving propofol-remifentanil. Adding a low-dose rocuronium did not significantly improve intubation conditions. © 2014 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Spinal stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the spine that was present from birth Narrow spinal canal that the person was born with Herniated or slipped disk, which ... when you sit down or lean forward. Most people with spinal stenosis cannot walk for a long ... During a physical exam, your health care provider will try to ...

  18. Intermittent subglottic secretion drainage may cause tracheal damage in patients with few oropharyngeal secretions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suys, E; Nieboer, K; Stiers, W; De Regt, J; Huyghens, L; Spapen, H

    2013-12-01

    Injurious prolapse of tracheal mucosa into the suction port has been reported in up to 50% of intubated patients receiving continuous aspiration of subglottic secretions. We investigated whether similar injury could be inflicted by automated intermittent aspiration. Six consecutive patients, intubated with the Mallinckrodt TaperGuard Evac™ endotracheal tube, were studied. A flow sensor was placed between the vacuum regulating system and the mucus collector. Intermittent suctioning was performed at a pressure of -125 mmHg with a 25s interval and duration of 15s. After 24h, a CT scan of the tracheal region was performed. Excessive negative suction pressure, a fast drop in aspiration flow to zero, and important "swinging" movements of secretions in the evacuation line were observed in all patients. Oral instillation of antiseptic mouthwash restored normal aspiration flow and secretion mobility. CT imaging showed marked entrapment of tracheal mucosa into the suction port in all patients. In patients with few oropharyngeal secretions, automated intermittent subglottic aspiration may result in significant and potential harmful invagination of tracheal mucosa into the suction lumen. A critical amount of fluid must be present in the oropharynx to assure adequate and safe aspiration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. An evaluation of the retromolar space for oral tracheal tube placement for maxillofacial surgery in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Suman; Rattan, Vidya; Bhardwaj, Neerja

    2006-11-01

    The eruption of the first and second permanent molar teeth may influence the size of the retromolar space. In this study we evaluated the adequacy of the retromolar space for retromolar intubation and any effect of eruption of the first and second permanent molar teeth on this space in children. Children 3-15 yr of age, undergoing surgery other than facial surgery were included for evaluation of the retromolar space. After standard oral tracheal intubation, the endotracheal tube was shifted to the retromolar space and the mandible was slowly closed to achieve centric occlusion. At the same time, any increase in airway resistance or decrease in oxygen saturation was noted. In the second part of the study, the feasibility of retromolar intubation in pediatric patients undergoing maxillofacial surgery with intraoperative maxillomandibular fixation was assessed. There was enough space for endotracheal tube placement in the retromolar region. The eruption of the first and second permanent molar teeth did not affect intubation. It was possible to achieve centric occlusion in 79 of 80 children with the endotracheal tube positioned in the retromolar space. Retromolar intubation was successfully accomplished in six pediatric patients undergoing maxillomandibular fixation and maxillofacial surgery. The retromolar space can be safely used for intubation in children when intraoperative maxillomandibular fixation, and simultaneous access to the nose and oral cavity are needed.

  20. Changes in the Flow-Volume Curve According to the Degree of Stenosis in Patients With Unilateral Main Bronchial Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jung-Geun; Yi, Chin A; Lee, Kyung Soo; Jeon, Kyeongman; Um, Sang-Won; Koh, Won-Jung; Suh, Gee Young; Chung, Man Pyo; Kwon, O Jung

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The shape of the flow-volume (F-V) curve is known to change to showing a prominent plateau as stenosis progresses in patients with tracheal stenosis. However, no study has evaluated changes in the F-V curve according to the degree of bronchial stenosis in patients with unilateral main bronchial stenosis. Methods We performed an analysis of F-V curves in 29 patients with unilateral bronchial stenosis with the aid of a graphic digitizer between January 2005 and December 2011. Results The primary diseases causing unilateral main bronchial stenosis were endobronchial tuberculosis (86%), followed by benign bronchial tumor (10%), and carcinoid (3%). All unilateral main bronchial stenoses were classified into one of five grades (I, ≤25%; II, 26%-50%; III, 51%-75%; IV, 76%-90%; V, >90% to near-complete obstruction without ipsilateral lung collapse). A monophasic F-V curve was observed in patients with grade I stenosis and biphasic curves were observed for grade II-IV stenosis. Both monophasic (81%) and biphasic shapes (18%) were observed in grade V stenosis. After standardization of the biphasic shape of the F-V curve, the breakpoints of the biphasic curve moved in the direction of high volume (x-axis) and low flow (y-axis) according to the progression of stenosis. Conclusion In unilateral bronchial stenosis, a biphasic F-V curve appeared when bronchial stenosis was >25% and disappeared when obstruction was near complete. In addition, the breakpoint moved in the direction of high volume and low flow with the progression of stenosis. PMID:26045916

  1. Bronchial intubation could be detected by the visual stethoscope techniques in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Tetsuro; Suzuki, Akira; Mimuro, Soichiro; Makino, Hiroshi; Sato, Shigehito

    2012-12-01

    We created a system that allows the visualization of breath sounds (visual stethoscope). We compared the visual stethoscope technique with auscultation for the detection of bronchial intubation in pediatric patients. In the auscultation group, an anesthesiologist advanced the tracheal tube, while another anesthesiologist auscultated bilateral breath sounds to detect the change and/or disappearance of unilateral breath sounds. In the visualization group, the stethoscope was used to detect changes in breath sounds and/or disappearance of unilateral breath sounds. The distance from the edge of the mouth to the carina was measured using a fiberoptic bronchoscope. Forty pediatric patients were enrolled in the study. At the point at which irregular breath sounds were auscultated, the tracheal tube was located at 0.5 ± 0.8 cm on the bronchial side from the carina. When a detectable change of shape of the visualized breath sound was observed, the tracheal tube was located 0.1 ± 1.2 cm on the bronchial side (not significant). At the point at which unilateral breath sounds were auscultated or a unilateral shape of the visualized breath sound was observed, the tracheal tube was 1.5 ± 0.8 or 1.2 ± 1.0 cm on the bronchial side, respectively (not significant). The visual stethoscope allowed to display the left and the right lung sound simultaneously and detected changes of breath sounds and unilateral breath sound as a tracheal tube was advanced. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Rapid duodenal and jejunal intubation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolan, D.J.

    1979-01-01

    A size 12 French radiopaque catheter, 135 cm long, suitable for rapid duodenal and jejunal intubation, is described. Its size and flexibility enable it to be passed with ease through the nose, stomach and duodenum. A guide wire is used to act as a stiffener as the catheter is passed through the stomach. The catheter is suitable for infusing barium directly into the small intestine and for performing hypotonic duodenography. The technique for duodenal and jejunal intubation is discussed. (author)

  3. Influência do corticóide na cicatrização da anastomose traqueal sob tensão em cães Effect of corticoid on the healing of tracheal under tension anastomosis in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Almeida de Araújo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Trabalho com o objetivo de analisar a freqüência e intensidade de estenose traqueal após ressecção e anastomose sob tensão; ação da metilprednisolona como agente profilático da estenose traqueal e a caracterização dos fenômenos da cicatrização com e sem o uso de corticóide. MÉTODOS: Foram utilidados 20 cães mestiços pesando 13± 5 Kg divididos aleatoriamente em dois grupos. No grupo A(n=10 não foi usado corticóide (controle. No grupo B foi usada a metilprednisolona IM na dose 10mg/Kg. Sob anestesia geral com intubação orotraqueal foram ressecados 3 anéis traqueais de todos animais, de modo que a força para aproximação das extremidades da traquéia foi uniformemente de 300gf. Após 30 dias de observação os animais foram tratados com dose letal de anestésico e KCl, quando foi ressecada a traquéia para medida dos diâmetros internos da anastomose e da traquéia normal, com auxílio de paquímetro digital. Na análise histopatológica com as colorações HE e tricrômico de Masson utilizou-se sistema digitalizado para quantificar as estruturas dos tecidos em cicatrização. RESULTADOS: Foi observado maior índice de estenose da traquéia no grupo A que não utilizou corticóide, do que no grupo B, com diferença significante (pOBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to analyze the incidence and intensity of stenosis in the anastomotic area, after tracheal resection and under tension anastomosis, with the use of methyl-prednisolone as a prophylactic agent of the tracheal stenosis. The wound healing with and without the use of corticoid was analyzed as well. METHODS: The experimental study was done in 20 mongrel dogs weighing 13± 5 Kg randomly separated into two groups. In group A (n=10 corticoid was not used and in the group B (n=10 it was used methyl-prednisolone IM 10mg/Kg. Under general anesthesia with orotracheal intubation, three tracheal rings were ressected from each animal. The force for approach the

  4. Lightwand-Guided Endotracheal Intubation Performed by the Nondominant Hand is Feasible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Wei Kuo

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of lightwand-guided endotracheal intubation (LWEI performed using either the right (dominant or left (nondominant hand. Two hundred and forty patients aged 21–64 years, with a Mallampati airway classification grade of I—II and undergoing endotracheal intubation under general anesthesia, were enrolled in this randomized and controlled study. Induction of anesthesia was initiated by intravenous administration of fentanyl (2 mg/kg and thiopentone (5mg/kg, and tracheal intubation was facilitated by intravenous atracurium (0.5 mg/kg. In the direct-vision laryngoscope group (group D; n = 80, the intubator held the laryngoscope in the left hand and inserted the endotracheal tube (ETT into the glottic opening with the right hand. In the group in which LWEI was performed with the right hand (group R; n = 80, the intubator lifted the patients' jaws with the left hand and inserted the ETT-LW unit into the glottic openings with the right hand. On the contrary, in the group in which LWEI was performed with the left hand (group L; n = 80, the intubator lifted the jaws with the right hand and inserted the ETT-LW unit with the left hand. Data including total intubation time, the number of intubation attempts, hemodynamic changes during intubation, and side effects following intubation, were collected. Regardless of whether lightwand manipulation was performed with the left hand (group L; 11.4 ± 9.3 s or the right-hand (group R; 12.4 ± 9.2 s, less time was consumed in the LWEI groups than in the laryngoscope group (group D; 17.9 ± 9.9s (p 95% on their first intubation attempts. The changes in mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate were similar among the three groups. A higher incidence of intubation-related oral injury and ventricular premature contractions (VPC was found in group D compared with groups L and R (oral injury: group D 8.5%, group L 1.3%, group R 0%, p = 0.005; VPC: group D 16

  5. Rescue ventilation: resolving a "cannot mask ventilate, cannot intubate" situation during exchange of a Combitube for a definitive airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, James M; Mason, Andrew M; Tillmann, H A; Foreman, Michael

    2009-10-01

    Our anesthesia care team was called to care for a patient who was admitted to the emergency department with the esophageal-tracheal double-lumen airway device (Combitube, Tyco Healthcare, Nellcor, Pleasanton, California) in place, which needed to be exchanged for a definitive airway because the patient required an extended period of mechanical ventilation. Several techniques were attempted to exchange the esophageal-tracheal Combitube (ETC) without success. First, we attempted direct laryngoscopy with the ETC in place after deflation of the No. 1 proximal cuff and sweeping the ETC to the left. We were prepared to use bougie-assisted intubation but could not identify any airway anatomy. After removal of the ETC, we unsuccessfully attempted ventilation/intubation with a laryngeal mask airway (LMA Fastrach, LMA North America, San Diego, California). Our third attempt was insertion of another laryngeal mask airway (LMA Unique, LMA North America) with marginal ventilation, but we again experienced unsuccessful intubation using a fiberscope. The ETC was reinserted after each intubation attempt because mask ventilation was impossible. Before proceeding with cricothyrotomy, we repeated direct laryngoscopy but without the ETC in place. We identified the tip of the epiglottis, which allowed for bougie-assisted intubation. This obviated the need for emergency cricothyrotomy.

  6. Tracheal reconstruction by re-inforced Gore-Tex in esophageal submuscular tunneling: An experimental study

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    Hodjati Hossein

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tracheal reconstructions are aimed at rearranging or replacing parts of the tracheal tissue by different techniques. Here we introduce a new technique for tracheal reconstruction. Methods: In 10 adult dogs, after intubation with an endotracheal tube, a segment of trachea including seven tracheal rings was resected circumferentially. A submuscular tunnel was induced between mucosal and muscular layers of the adjacent esophagus lying right next to the trachea. The esophageal submuscular tunnel starts and ends exactly at the level of distal and proximal ends of tracheal resection, respectively. Inforced Gore-Tex passed through the esophageal submuscular tunnel the distal segment of trachea and end-to-end anastomosis were made between distal ends of Gore-Tex and trachea, then endotracheal tube removed and the same procedure was made for proximal ends of Gore-Tex and trachea. Afterward, the proximal and distal ends of the esophageal tunnel were approximated to proximal and distal tracheal parts over the anastomosis. Results: All dogs, except one due to anesthetic problem, survived and tolerated the operation; the first two dogs experienced postoperative fever, aspiration pneumonia, and died due to tracheoesophageal fistula. All survived animals were eating and barking well. We started to scarify dogs at least 6 and 12 weeks after operation for microscopy and pathologic examination. The Gore-Texes were patent and supported externally with fibrous connective tissue in esophageal tunneling, with in growth of respiratory epithelium on inner surfaces. Conclusion: Air tightness, good re-epithelialization, and relatively no limitation of esophageal length and no risk of luminal collapse are advantages of tracheal reconstruction by submuscular esophageal tunneling. This new method is worthy of further investigation, as it is technically feasible and easy to implement.

  7. Wire-guided (Seldinger technique intubation through a face mask in urgent, difficult and grossly distorted airways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jake M Heier

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report two cases of successful urgent intubation using a Seldinger technique for airway management through an anesthesia facemask, while maintaining ventilation in patients with difficult airways and grossly distorted airway anatomy. In both cases, conventional airway management techniques were predicted to be difficult or impossible, and a high likelihood for a surgical airway was present. This technique was chosen as it allows tracheal tube placement through the nares during spontaneous ventilation with the airway stented open and oxygen delivery with either continuous positive airway pressure and/or pressure support ventilation. This unhurried technique may allow intubation when other techniques are unsuitable, while maintaining control of the airway.

  8. [Case report : usefulness of the airwayscope for difficult intubations in a pediatric patients with Coffin-Siris syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakugawa, Yoko; Kamizato, Kota; Miyata, Yuji; Kakinohana, Manabu; Sugahara, Kazuhiro

    2013-05-01

    We experienced management of general anesthesia in a patients with Coffin-Siris syndrome (CS syndrome) which is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by mental retardation, growth failure, hypoplasia of the fifth finger's distal phalanx and limb, and syndrome-specific facial appearance. Anesthesia was induced by sevoflurane by mask. After obtaining muscle relaxation by rocuronium, laryngoscopy by Machintosh #2 failed to reveal the vocal cord. However, the vocal cord was revealed by AirwayScope (AWS) for the pediatrics and then tracheal intubation was successful. Surgical procedures and anes-thetic management were performed uneventfully. This case demonstrates usefulness of AWS in pediatric patients with difficult intubation.

  9. Airway Management in a Patient With Tracheal Disruption due to Penetrating Neck Trauma With Hollow Point Ammunition: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Angela M; Hill, James L; Zagorski, Dave J; McClain, Joseph M; Maronian, Nicole C

    2018-05-01

    Rapid sequence induction and intubation was performed for a patient in respiratory distress after a gunshot wound to the neck. Resistance was noted distal to vocal cords. With a bronchoscope unavailable, the endotracheal tube was advanced with a corkscrew maneuver. Subcutaneous emphysema had developed. The endotracheal tube was advanced into the right mainstem with adequate ventilation. Imaging illustrated tracheoesophageal injury. The patient was emergently explored. An intraluminal bullet was removed, lateral wall tracheal defect was repaired, and a tracheostomy was placed. The intubating provider should secure the airway by the method they are most comfortable, have high suspicion of airway injury, and prepare to manage airway disruption.

  10. Use of the silicone tracheal T-tube for tracheostenosis or tracheomalacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H C; Wang, L S; Fahn, H J; Lee, Y C; Lu, C C; Chan, K H; Huang, M H

    1996-09-01

    Tracheobtenosib and tracheomalacia are trivial diseases. The conventional choice of managements with tracheostomy, either temporary or long-term usage, can only partially resolve the problems of airway obstruction. Silicone tracheal T-tube presents a substitute for it. We present 5 patients with tracheostenosis or tracheomalacia managed with nine procedures of long silicone Montgomery T-tube prothesis between 1984 and 1994 in VGH-Taipei. The primary diagnosis included tracheal injury (2), postintubation tracheal stenosis (2), and stenosis due to endotracheal tuberculosis (1). Three patients received a long segmental T-tube for permanent endotracheal stenting and the other two patients used T-tube insertion for temporary stenting of the trachea for 7 and 11 months, respectively, with satisfactory results. All patients got immediate benefit from the prothesis in respiration with simple postoperative care. Two patients with temporary T-tube placement had it successfully removed in 7 and 11 months, respectively. Placement of the T-tube for subglottic stenosis also protected the function of phonation. The tracheal T-tube restored airway patency reliably with good long-term results and could be the preferred management of chronic upper airway obstructive disease not amenable to surgical repair. The most common complication was airway obstruction caused by either granulations or sticky mucoid substance. Three patients and six tubes (60%) developed granulation obstruction and the average duration of granuloma formation was 7.7 months. Laser phototherapy or surgical intervention, such as tracheoplasty, with change of the T-tube was carried out for granuloma obstruction. T-tube is a good endoprothesis for tracheostenosis and tracheomalacia with minimal complication for cases of long tracheostenosis or complex tracheal injury.

  11. Experimental use of new absorbable tracheal stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopf, Luciano F; Fraga, José Carlos; Porto, Rodrigo; Santos, Luis A; Marques, Douglas R; Sanchez, Paulo R; Meyer, Fabíola S; Ulbrich, Jane M

    2017-11-16

    Silicone and metallic stents are not effective in children with tracheobronchial stenosis or tracheomalacia. Herein, we aimed to evaluate the clinical manifestations and histological reaction of rabbit trachea to the presence of a new poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) with polyisoprene (PLGA/PI) polymer absorbable stent. Fourteen adult white rabbits (weight, 3.0-3.5kg) were randomly assigned to three groups: Group I (n=6): PLGA/PI spiral stent; Group II (n=6): PLGA/PI fragment; and Group III (n=2): controls. After a longitudinal incision on three cervical tracheal rings, the stents and fragments were inserted into the trachea and fixed onto the lateral wall with nonabsorbable sutures. The stented group showed significantly more stridor at rest (p=0.0041), agitation (p=0.014), and use of accessory muscles (p=0.0002) and required more emergency endoscopies than the fragment group. Further, it showed significantly more remarkable histological inflammatory damage than the fragment and control groups (p=0.002). The new PLGA/PI polymeric stent implanted into the trachea of rabbits caused more clinical manifestations and histologically verified inflammatory reaction than the PLGA/PI polymeric fragment. Future studies should be aimed at reducing the stent-wall thickness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A visual stethoscope to detect the position of the tracheal tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hiromi; Suzuki, Akira; Nakajima, Yoshiki; Makino, Hiroshi; Sanjo, Yoshimitsu; Nakai, Takayoshi; Shiraishi, Yoshito; Katoh, Takasumi; Sato, Shigehito

    2009-12-01

    Advancing a tracheal tube into the bronchus produces unilateral breath sounds. We created a Visual Stethoscope that allows real-time fast Fourier transformation of the sound signal and 3-dimensional (frequency-amplitude-time) color rendering of the results on a personal computer with simultaneous processing of 2 individual sound signals. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the Visual Stethoscope can detect bronchial intubation in comparison with auscultation. After induction of general anesthesia, the trachea was intubated with a tracheal tube. The distance from the incisors to the carina was measured using a fiberoptic bronchoscope. While the anesthesiologist advanced the tracheal tube from the trachea to the bronchus, another anesthesiologist auscultated breath sounds to detect changes of the breath sounds and/or disappearance of bilateral breath sounds for every 1 cm that the tracheal tube was advanced. Two precordial stethoscopes placed at the left and right sides of the chest were used to record breath sounds simultaneously. Subsequently, at a later date, we randomly entered the recorded breath sounds into the Visual Stethoscope. The same anesthesiologist observed the visualized breath sounds on the personal computer screen processed by the Visual Stethoscope to examine changes of breath sounds and/or disappearance of bilateral breath sound. We compared the decision made based on auscultation with that made based on the results of the visualized breath sounds using the Visual Stethoscope. Thirty patients were enrolled in the study. When irregular breath sounds were auscultated, the tip of the tracheal tube was located at 0.6 +/- 1.2 cm on the bronchial side of the carina. Using the Visual Stethoscope, when there were any changes of the shape of the visualized breath sound, the tube was located at 0.4 +/- 0.8 cm on the tracheal side of the carina (P Stethoscope (not significant). During advancement of the tracheal tube, alterations of the shape of the

  13. An unusual salvage technique for posterior tracheal membranous laceration associated with transhiatal esophagectomy: A transcervical–transsternal approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ziaeddin Rasihashemi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Various surgical approaches may be employed for esophageal resection. Major airway injuries due to transhiatal esophagectomy include vertical tears in the membranous trachea. Tracheal injury is an uncommon but potentially fatal complication. This article describes the technique to repair the posterior membranous tracheal tear, extended just over the carina through a transcervical–transsternal approach, thereby avoiding a second thoracotomy. Six patients with posterior membranous tracheal injury underwent this procedure. The laceration ranged from 3 cm to 5 cm in length. Four patients had received neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The management of tracheal laceration added approximately 60 minutes to the total operation time. There was no mortality related to tracheal injury. Patients were followed up for 6 months after surgery, and both posterior tracheal wall and transverse tracheotomy remained intact without stenosis. The transcervical–transsternal approach decreases the need of thoracotomy and its complications in patients with tracheal laceration in any stage, even in cases of an extended tear down to the carina.

  14. Evaluation of Truview evo2® Laryngoscope In Anticipated Difficult Intubation-A Comparison To Macintosh Laryngoscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishwar Singh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to assess and compare laryngoscopic view of Truview evo2 laryngoscope with that of Macintosh laryngoscope in patients with one or more predictors of difficult intubation (PDI. Moreover ease of intubation with Truview evo2 in terms of absolute time requirement was also aimed at. Patients for elective surgery requiring endotracheal intubation were initially assessed for three PDI parameters - modified Mallampati test, thyro-mental distance& Atlanto-occipital (AO joint extension. Patients with cumulative PDI scores of 2 to 5 (in a scale of 0 to 8 were evaluated for Cormack& Lehane (CL grading by Macintosh blade after standard induction. Cases with CL grade of two or more were further evaluated by Truview evo2 laryngoscope and corresponding CL grades were assigned. Intubation attempted under Truview evo2 vision and time required for each successful tracheal intubation (i.e. tracheal intubation completed within one minute was noted. Total fifty cases were studied. The CL grades assigned by Macintosh blade correlated well with the cumulative PDI scores assigned preoperatively, confirming there predictability. Truview evo2 improved laryngeal view in 92 % cases by one or more CL grade. Intubation with Truview evo2 was possible in 88% cases within stipulated time of one minute and mean time of 28.6 seconds with SD of 11.23 was reasonably quick. No significant complication like oro- pharyngeal trauma or extreme pressor response to laryngoscopy was noticed. To conclude, Truview evo2 proved to be a better tool than conventional laryngoscope in anticipated difficult situations.

  15. Tracheal quadrifurcation associated with congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, Venkatraman; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Ahmad, Ozaire [Narayana Multispeciality Hospital and Mazumdar Shaw Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, Bangalore (India)

    2015-08-15

    Tracheal anomalies are known in association with congenital cardiac defects. Some of the well-described anomalies include accessory (displaced) tracheal bronchus with variants, tracheal trifurcation and accessory cardiac bronchus. Here we describe a case of tracheal quadrifurcation associated with complex congenital heart disease. Illustration of complex airway anatomy was simplified by the use of multidetector CT using a variety of image display options. Awareness of this complex anomaly will expand our knowledge of tracheal anomalies and equip the anesthesia and surgical team for better airway management. (orig.)

  16. [Use of the Pentax-AWS videolaryngoscope for bougie-assisted exchange of tracheal tubes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishii, Miki; Asai, Takashi; Nagata, Atsushi; Shingu, Koh

    2009-06-01

    A gum elastic bougie can be useful for tube exchange. One major problem with this technique is that it may not possible to pass a new tube over the bougie into the trachea, because the tip of the tube can collide with tissues around the glottis. We report a case in which tube exchange using the bougie was difficult, but the Pentax-AWS videolaryngoscope enabled tracheal intubation. In a 62-year-old trauma patient with head and neck stabilized using a Halo vest, was scheduled for emergency fixation of the neck. Exchange of a polyvinylchloride tube to a reinforced tube was planned. A bougie was passed through the old tube, removing the tube, and a new tube was advanced over the bougie, but it was impossible to advance the tube into the trachea. Insertion of a Macintosh laryngoscope did not enable intubation. The new tube was removed from the bougie, attached to the Pentax-AWS videolaryngoscope, and the tube (with the Pentax-AWS) was passed over the bougie. Although it was not possible to see the glottis with the Pentax-AWS, the tube was easily advanced over the bougie into the trachea. Operation went on uneventfully. We believe that, when it is difficult to advance a tracheal tube over a tube exchanger, the use of the Pentax-AWS may facilitate intubation.

  17. Comparison of the Glidescope and Pentax AWS laryngoscopes to the Macintosh laryngoscope for use by advanced paramedics in easy and simulated difficult intubation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nasim, Sajid

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intubation of the trachea in the pre-hospital setting may be lifesaving in severely ill and injured patients. However, tracheal intubation is frequently difficult to perform in this challenging environment, is associated with a lower success rate, and failed tracheal intubation constitutes an important cause of morbidity. Novel indirect laryngoscopes, such as the Glidescope and the AWS laryngoscopes may reduce this risk. METHODS: We compared the efficacy of these devices to the Macintosh laryngoscope when used by 25 Advanced Paramedics proficient in direct laryngoscopy, in a randomized, controlled, manikin study. Following brief didactic instruction with the Glidescope and the AWS laryngoscopes, each participant took turns performing laryngoscopy and intubation with each device, in an easy intubation scenario and following placement of a hard cervical collar, in a SimMan manikin. RESULTS: Both the Glidescope and the AWS performed better than the Macintosh, and demonstrate considerable promise in this context. The AWS had the least number of dental compressions in all three scenarios, and in the cervical spine immobilization scenario it required fewer maneuvers to optimize the view of the glottis. CONCLUSION: The Glidescope and AWS devices possess advantages over the conventional Macintosh laryngoscope when used by Advanced Paramedics in normal and simulated difficult intubation scenarios in this manikin study. Further studies are required to extend these findings to the clinical setting.

  18. Comparison of the Glidescope® and Pentax AWS® laryngoscopes to the Macintosh laryngoscope for use by Advanced Paramedics in easy and simulated difficult intubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O' Donnell John

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intubation of the trachea in the pre-hospital setting may be lifesaving in severely ill and injured patients. However, tracheal intubation is frequently difficult to perform in this challenging environment, is associated with a lower success rate, and failed tracheal intubation constitutes an important cause of morbidity. Novel indirect laryngoscopes, such as the Glidescope® and the AWS® laryngoscopes may reduce this risk. Methods We compared the efficacy of these devices to the Macintosh laryngoscope when used by 25 Advanced Paramedics proficient in direct laryngoscopy, in a randomized, controlled, manikin study. Following brief didactic instruction with the Glidescope® and the AWS® laryngoscopes, each participant took turns performing laryngoscopy and intubation with each device, in an easy intubation scenario and following placement of a hard cervical collar, in a SimMan® manikin. Results Both the Glidescope® and the AWS® performed better than the Macintosh, and demonstrate considerable promise in this context. The AWS® had the least number of dental compressions in all three scenarios, and in the cervical spine immobilization scenario it required fewer maneuvers to optimize the view of the glottis. Conclusion The Glidescope® and AWS® devices possess advantages over the conventional Macintosh laryngoscope when used by Advanced Paramedics in normal and simulated difficult intubation scenarios in this manikin study. Further studies are required to extend these findings to the clinical setting.

  19. Tracheal ceramic rings for tracheomalacia: a review after 17 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göbel, Gyula; Karaiskaki, Niki; Gerlinger, Imre; Mann, Wolf J

    2007-10-01

    Despite different support techniques, the surgical management of tracheomalacia is still a challenging problem. Satisfactory results after internal stenting are above 80%, whereas, when performing external stenting using biocompatible ceramic rings, results are reported at over 90%. The purpose of this study was to examine the efficiency of surgical treatment in patients with segmentary tracheomalacia using external ceramic ring grafts. In this retrospective study, we collected data from 12 patients who underwent surgery during the last 17 years for symptomatic segmentary tracheomalacia by use of biocompatible aluminum-oxide ceramic rings. All except one patient had undergone previous tracheostomy, six had a history of long-term intubation, two had previous trauma, and two patients had previous cancer treatment including radiotherapy. One of the patients still had an existing tracheostoma, which was closed when a ceramic ring was implanted. Tracheal wall collapse with pseudoglottis formation or flattened anterior-posterior tracheal diameter was documented with fiberoscopy at rest, and both pre- and postoperative airway resistance measurements were performed in all 12 patients using a spirometer. After malacic segments were found to be expandable using rigid tracheoscopy while the patient was under general anesthesia, preparation of the trachea was performed using a midline vertical incision in the neck. Subsequently, the malacic trachea was expanded by placing and suturing proper-sized ceramic ring(s) around it. In all patients, surgical expansion of the malacic segment using ceramic rings was successfully carried out without major complications while inspiratory stridor was resolved. Airway resistance decreased significantly from an average of 0.62 to 0.385 kPascal. Although the results of applying internal tracheal stents are encouraging, complications such as stent migration, granulation tissue and fistula formation, and mucociliary transport arrest are possible

  20. Experimental study of different nickel-titanium memory tracheal stents in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang Xu; He Nengshu; Fan Hailun

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Since membrane -covered metal tracheal stent was applied successfully to treat the airway stenosis, it has been widely used and obtained satisfactory result during the past years. The purpose of our study was provide theoretical rational for treatment with membrane-covered tracheal stent by using animal experiment. Methods: The nickel- titanium memory stents of 22 mm in diameter and 6 cm in length were deployed in 18 dogs. The dogs were grouped into full- length membrane-covered group (n=6), partial-length membrane-covered group (membrane was covered for 4 cm in the medial part of the stent, n=6), and naked stent group (n=6). After the stent placement dysphagia or dysphonia was monitored daily. Twenty-four weeks later, the dogs were executed. Speiments were taken from the cephalic, medial, and caudal trachea under the stent. HE stain and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were evaluated. Results: After the stent placement, no dyspnea, dysphagia or dysphonia but cough was present in each dog. There was no significant difference in symptom between the three groups. Inflammation reaction, metaplasia from low columnar epithelium to spuamous epithelium, and mild granulation tissue hyperplasia in the underlying mucosa were present in each group. However, fibrosis and tracheal straitness were present only in the non-membrane-covered area, but not in the membrane-covered area. More PCNA expression was observed in the non-membrane -covered area than in the membrane-covered area. Conclusion: Both membrane-covered and non-membrane-covered stents can cause similar symptoms. However, the membrane -covered tracheal stent has good biological compatibility and would not induce tracheal straitness. The non-membrane -covered tracheal stent could induce a severe pathologic reaction and tracheal straitness. (authors)

  1. Intubating conditions and side effects of propofol, remifentanil and sevoflurane compared with propofol, remifentanil and rocuronium: a randomised, prospective, clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Tracheal intubation without muscle relaxants is usually performed with remifentanil and propofol or sevoflurane. Remifentanil 1.0 to 4.0 μg·kg-1 and propofol 2.0-3.0 mg·kg-1 or sevoflurane up to 8.0 Vol% provide acceptable, i.e. excellent or good intubating conditions. We hypothesized that sevoflurane 1.0 MAC would provide acceptable intubating conditions when combined with propofol and remifentanil. Methods Eighty-three patients to be intubated were randomised to two groups. The SEVO group received propofol 1.5 mg kg-1, remifentanil 0.30 μg kg min-1 and sevoflurane 1.0 MAC; the MR group received the same doses of propofol and remifentanil plus rocuronium 0.45 mg kg-1. We evaluated intubation and extubation conditions, mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR) and bispectral index (BIS). The vocal cords were examined for injury by videolaryngoscopy before and 24 hours after surgery. Results Acceptable intubating conditions were seen more frequently with rocuronium than with sevoflurane: 97% versus 82%; p = 0.03; the subscore for vocal cords was comparable: 100% versus 98%. MAP before intubation decreased significantly compared with the MAP at baseline to the same extent in both groups; ephedrine IV was given in 15 (SEVO) versus 16 (MR) patients; p = 0.93. BIS at tracheal intubation was 27 (13-65) in the SEVO group, 29 (14-62) in the MR group; p = 0.07. Vocal cord injuries (oedema, haematoma) were similar: 4 patients in each group. Conclusions Overall intubating conditions were better when rocuronium was used; the subscore for vocal cords was comparable. The incidence of side effects was the same in the two groups. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.Gov: NCT 01591031. PMID:24860256

  2. Homologous tracheal transplantation with grafts previously exposed to high doses of gamma radiation in dogs without immunosuppressive agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokomise, Hiroyasu; Inui, Kenji; Kure, Toshio; Wada, Hiromi; Itomi, Shigeki

    1993-01-01

    The study was designed to determine whether previous high doses irradiation of gamma radiation would contribute to tracheal transplantation with no use of immunosuppressive agents. Twenty mongrel dogs were used as experimental animals. Five rings of thoracic tracheas, which were extracted from recipients, were exposed to 20000, 50000, or 100000 cGy in each 5 dogs. Five other non-irradiated dogs served as controls. Irradiated tracheal grafts were transplanted and covered with pedicled omentum. After transplantation, no immunosuppressive agents were given to dogs. All dogs in the control group died of tracheal stenosis due to graft-host rejection within one month. All but one long-term survivor died of tracheal stenosis, as well, in both the 20000 cGy and 50000 cGy groups. In the 100000 cGy group, grafts became viable in 4 dogs, and three of these survived one year or more. In conclusion, previous irradiation with high doses of 100000 cGy allowed homologous tracheal transplantation even when no immunosuppressive agents are given. (N.K.)

  3. A mannequin study of intubation with the AP advance and GlideScope Ranger videolaryngoscopes and the Macintosh laryngoscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodd, Jack A R; Doyle, D John; Gupta, Shipra; Dalton, Jarrod E; Cata, Juan P; Brewer, Edward J; James, Monyulona; Sessler, Daniel I

    2011-10-01

    The AP Advance (APA) is a videolaryngoscope with interchangeable blades: intubators can choose standard Macintosh blades or a difficult-airway blade with increased curvature and a channel to guide the tube to the larynx. The APA may therefore be comparably effective in both normal and difficult airways. We tested the hypotheses that intubation with the APA is no slower than Macintosh laryngoscopy for normal mannequin airways, and that it is no slower than videolaryngoscopy using a GlideScope Ranger in difficult mannequin airways. Medical professionals whose roles potentially include tracheal intubation were trained with each device. Participants intubated simulated (Laerdal SimMan) normal and difficult airways with the APA, GlideScope, and a conventional Macintosh blade. Speed of intubation was compared using Cox proportional hazards regression, with a hazard ratio >0.8 considered noninferior. We also compared laryngeal visualization, failures, and participant preferences. Unadjusted intubation times in the normal airway with the APA and Macintosh were virtually identical (median, 22 vs 23 seconds); after adjustment for effects of experience, order, and period, the hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) comparing APA with Macintosh laryngoscopy was 0.87 (0.65, 1.17), which was not significantly more than our predefined noninferiority boundary of 0.8 (P = 0.26). Intubation with the APA was faster than with the GlideScope in difficult airways (hazard ratio = 7.6 [5.0, 11.3], P APA, whereas 33% and 37% failed with the GlideScope and Macintosh, respectively. In the difficult airway, 99% of participants achieved a Cormack and Lehane grade I to II view with the APA, versus 85% and 33% with the GlideScope and Macintosh, respectively. When asked to choose 1 device overall, 82% chose the APA. Intubation times were similar with the APA and Macintosh laryngoscopes in mannequins with normal airways. However, intubation with the APA was significantly faster than with the Glide

  4. An incidentaloma at ileal intubation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donnellan, Fergal

    2012-02-01

    The authors report the case of a primary small bowel lymphoma discovered incidentally in a 33-year-old male following ileal intubation at colonoscopy. The patient subsequently underwent curative treatment with chemotherapy. This case not only highlights the importance of routine ileoscopy but also the successful use of chemotherapy in a disease for which the optimal treatment modality has not been well characterized.

  5. Nonstent Combination Interventional Therapy for Treatment of Benign Cicatricial Airway Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xiao-Jian; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Ting; Pei, Ying-Hua; Xu, Min

    2015-08-20

    Benign cicatricial airway stenosis (BCAS) is a life-threatening disease. While there are numerous therapies, all have their defects, and stenosis can easily become recurrent. This study aimed to investigate the efficacy and complications of nonstent combination interventional therapy (NSCIT) when used for the treatment of BCAS of different causes and types. This study enrolled a cohort of patients with BCAS resulting from tuberculosis, intubation, tracheotomy, and other origins. The patients were assigned to three groups determined by their type of stenosis: Web-like stenosis, granulation stenosis, and complex stenosis, and all patients received NSCIT. The efficacy and complications of treatment in each group of patients were observed. The Chi-square test, one-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA), and the paired t -test were used to analyze different parameters. The 10 patients with web-like stenosis and six patients with granulation stenosis exhibited durable remission rates of 100%. Among 41 patients with complex stenosis, 36 cases (88%) experienced remission and 29 cases (71%) experienced durable remission. When five patients with airway collapse were eliminated from the analysis, the overall remission rate was 97%. The average treatment durations for patients with web-like stenosis, granulation stenosis, and complex stenosis were 101, 21, and 110 days, respectively, and the average number of treatments was five, two, and five, respectively. NSCIT demonstrated good therapeutic efficacy and was associated with few complications. However, this approach was ineffective for treating patients with airway collapse or malacia.

  6. Incidence and endoscopic characteristics of acute laryngeal lesions in children undergoing endotracheal intubation

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    Eliandra da Silveira de Lima

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Acute laryngeal lesions after intubation appear to be precursors of chronic lesions. OBJECTIVE: To describe the incidence and type of acute laryngeal lesions after extubation in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU. METHODS: A cohort study involving children from birth to <5 years, submitted to intubation for more than 24 h in the PICU of an university hospital. In the first eight hours after extubation, a flexible fiberoptic laryngoscopy (FFL was performed at the bedside. Those with moderate to severe abnormalities underwent a second examination seven to ten days later. RESULTS: 177 patients were included, with a median age of 2.46 months. The mean intubation time was 8.19 days. Seventy-three (41.2% patients had moderate or severe alterations at the FFL, with the remaining showing only minor alterations or normal results. During follow-up, 16 children from the group with moderate to severe lesions developed subglottic stenosis. One patient from the normal FFL group had subglottic stenosis, resulting in an incidence of 9.6% of chronic lesions. CONCLUSION: Most children in the study developed mild acute laryngeal lesions caused by endotracheal intubation, which improved in a few days after extubation.

  7. A CLINICAL ASSESSMENT OF MACINTOSH BLADE, MILLER BLADE AND KING VISIONTM VIDEOLARYNGOSCOPE FOR LARYNGEAL EXPOSURE AND DIFFICULTY IN ENDOTRACHEAL INTUBATION

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    Apoorva Mahendera

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT Previous studies suggest glottic view is better achieved with straight blades while tracheal intubation is easier with curved blades and videolaryngoscope is better than conventional laryngoscope. AIMS Comparison of conventional laryngoscope (Macintosh blade and Miller blade with channelled videolaryngoscope (King Vision TM with respect to laryngeal visualisation and difficulty in endotracheal intubation. SETTINGS AND DESIGN This prospective randomised comparative study was conducted at a tertiary care hospital (in ASA I and ASA II patients after approval from the Institutional Ethics Committee. METHODS We compared Macintosh, Miller, and the King VisionTM videolaryngoscope for glottic visualisation and ease of tracheal intubation. Patients undergoing elective surgeries under general anaesthesia requiring endotracheal intubation were randomly divided into three groups (N=180. After induction of anaesthesia, laryngoscopy was performed and trachea intubated. We recorded visualisation of glottis (Cormack-Lehane grade-CL, ease of intubation, number of attempts, need to change blade, and need for external laryngeal manipulation. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS Demographic data, Mandibular length, Mallampati classification were compared using ANOVA, Chi-square test, Kruskal-Wallis Test, where P value <0.005 is statically significant. RESULTS CL grade 1 was most often observed in King Vision -TM VL group (90% which is followed by Miller (28.33%, and Macintosh group (15%. We found intubation was to be easier (grade 1 with King Vision -TM VL group (73.33%, followed by Macintosh (38.33%, and Miller group (1.67%. External manipulation (BURP was needed more frequently in patients in Miller group (71.67%, followed by Macintosh (28.33% and in King Vision -TM VL group (6.67%. All (100% patients were intubated in the 1 st attempt with King Vision -TM VL group, followed by Macintosh group (90% and Miller group (58.33%. CONCLUSIONS In patients with normal airway

  8. New Approaches to Airway Management in Tracheal Resections-A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

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    Schieren, Mark; Böhmer, Andreas; Dusse, Fabian; Koryllos, Aris; Wappler, Frank; Defosse, Jerome

    2017-08-01

    Although endotracheal intubation, surgical crossfield intubation, and jet ventilation are standard techniques for airway management in tracheal resections, there are also reports of new approaches, ranging from regional anesthesia to extracorporeal support. The objective was to outline the entire spectrum of new airway techniques. The literature databases PubMed/Medline and the Cochrane Library were searched systematically for prospective and retrospective trials as well as case reports on tracheal resections. No restrictions applied to hospital types or settings. Adult patients undergoing surgical resections of noncongenital tracheal stenoses with end-to-end anastomoses. Airway management techniques were divided into conventional and new approaches and analyzed regarding their potential risks and benefits. A total of 59 publications (n = 797 patients) were included. The majority of publications (71.2%) describe conventional airway techniques. Endotracheal tube placement after induction of general anesthesia and surgical crossfield intubation after incision of the trachea were used most frequently without major complications. A total of 7 new approaches were identified, including 4 different regional anesthetic techniques (25 cases), supraglottic airways (4 cases), and new forms of extracorporeal support (25 cases). Overall failure rates of new techniques were low (1.8%). Details on patient selection and procedural specifics are provided. New approaches have several theoretical benefits, yet further research is required to establish criteria for patient selection and evaluate procedural safety. Given the low level of evidence, it currently is impossible to compare methods of airway management regarding outcome-related risks and benefits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Reduced cerebral oxygen–carbohydrate index during endotracheal intubation in vascular surgical patients

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    Fabricius-Bjerre, Andreas; Overgaard, Anders; Winther-Olesen, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Brain activation reduces balance between cerebral consumption of oxygen versus carbohydrate as expressed by the so-called cerebral oxygen-carbohydrate-index (OCI). We evaluated whether preparation for surgery, anaesthesia including tracheal intubation and surgery affect OCI. In patients undergoing...... aortic surgery, arterial to internal jugular venous (a-v) concentration differences for oxygen versus lactate and glucose were determined from before anaesthesia to when the patient left the recovery room. Intravenous anaesthesia was supplemented with thoracic epidural anaesthesia for open aortic surgery...

  10. Nonstent Combination Interventional Therapy for Treatment of Benign Cicatricial Airway Stenosis

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao-Jian Qiu; Jie Zhang; Ting Wang; Ying-Hua Pei; Min Xu

    2015-01-01

    Background: Benign cicatricial airway stenosis (BCAS) is a life-threatening disease. While there are numerous therapies, all have their defects, and stenosis can easily become recurrent. This study aimed to investigate the efficacy and complications of nonstent combination interventional therapy (NSCIT) when used for the treatment of BCAS of different causes and types. Methods: This study enrolled a cohort of patients with BCAS resulting from tuberculosis, intubation, tracheotomy, and othe...

  11. Infrared Red Intubation System (IRRIS) guided flexile videoscope assisted difficult airway management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, M S; Fried, E; Biro, P

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tracheal intubation with a flexible scope is a cornerstone technique in patients with severely difficult airways, but may fail. We report on a technique, Infrared Red Intubation System (IRRIS), that seems to facilitate the identification of the glottis. METHODS: The IRRIS is placed over...... the patient's cricothyroid membrane and emits blinking infrared light through the patient's skin into the subglottic space. When a flexible videoscope (one that does not filter infrared light) is introduced into the airway, it will display this as a blinking white light emerging from the glottis, retrograde...... transillumination, showing the pathway to the trachea. We have introduced this as an adjunct when managing our patients with difficult airways. We describe the technique and retrospectively report on the first ten patients where it was used. RESULTS: All ten patients had significant pathology in the airway...

  12. Tracheal stoma necrosis: a case repor

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    Pak S

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute tracheal dilatation, due to an overinflated cuff, has been reported early in the course of mechanical ventilation through an endotracheal tube. Tracheal stoma necrosis is a rare complication, but such can accompany acute tracheal dilation. Herein, we report a case of tracheal necrosis 9 days following tracheostomy placement in a 71-year old woman associated with overinflation of the tracheal tube cuff. This case report aims to 1 add to the scant body of knowledge about the diagnosis and management for the patients with tracheal stoma necrosis and 2 raise awareness for error-traps in interpreting diagnostic images, specifically satisfaction of search error, inattentional blindness error, and alliterative error.

  13. INTUBATIONS CONDITIONS AND HOMODYNAMIC RESPONSES UNDER ANESTHESIA INDUCTION WITH THREE COMBINATION DRUGS: ALFENTANIL- MIDAZOLAM, ALFENTANIL- THIOPENTAL AND ALFENTANIL- KETAMINE

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    H SOLTANI NEZHAD

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Administration of alfentanil followed by propofol intravenously (IV without neuromuscular blockage for induction of anesthesia provides adaquate conditions for tracheal intubation. Other hypnotic drugs have not been thoroughly investigated in this regard. The aim of the present study was comparison of intubation conditions and hemodynamic responses of anesthesia induction with alfentanil/midazolam, alfentanil/Na thiopental and alfentanil/ ketamine. Methods. In a clinical trial study one hundred and twenty children were randomly allocated to four groups. Medication in these groups were alfentanil 40 µg/kg+ midazolam 200 µg/kg,alfentanil 40 µg/kg+Na thiopental 6 µg/kg, alfentanil 40 µg/kg+ketamin 2 mg/kg & Na thipental 6 mg/kg+suxamethonium 2 mg/kg (as control group. In all patients the ease of ventilation via face mask, jaw mobility, degree of exposure and position of vocal cords, patient's response to tracheal intubation, duration of time was needed for intubation and hemodynamic changes after intubation were assessed and recorded. Findings. There are significant differences between first three groups (interventional groups for jaw mebility, ventilation, vocal cord visuality, vocal cord position, patient movement during laryngoscopy and mean laryngoscopy time, (P < 0.05. There is significant difference between all groups of nesdonal+alfentanil except for patient movement. There is significant difference between mean SBP and PR before and after intubation in first and third group. Conclusion. Results represent that the group of Alfentanil plus Nesdonal had a better quality of ventilation rather than two other groups. It is recommended that administration of alfentanil plus thiopental combination is preferred in cases that using muscle relaxant is contraindicated.

  14. COMPARISON OF UPPER LIP BITE TEST WITH MODIFIED MALLAMPATI TEST AND THYROMENTAL DISTANCE FOR PREDICTING DIFFICULTY IN ENDOTRACHEAL INTUBATION: A PROSPECTIVE STUDY

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    Prakash T. S. N

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The significance of difficult or failed tracheal intubation was well recognised as a major cause of morbidity and mortality in anaesthetic practice as per ASA closed claim study. The need to predict potentially difficult tracheal intubation has received more importance, but with limited success. Unanticipated difficult intubation is a risk to patient’s life and a challenge to the skill of the anaesthesiologist. Many anatomical and pathological variables have been identified and have been suggested to be useful in anticipating a difficult airway. These factors have limitations because of wide variations in the incidence of difficult intubation, interobserver variability and inadequate statistical power of the currently measured variables. METHODS After obtaining institutional ethical committee clearance and written informed consent, the present study was conducted in 200 patients aged between 16 yrs. and 65 yrs. at King George Hospital, Andhra Medical College, Visakhapatnam, in the Department of Anaesthesiology. All the 200 patients undergoing elective surgical procedures under general anaesthesia were enrolled in the study. A thorough preanaesthetic evaluation was carried out in all the patients and the procedure was explained in detail to the patients. RESULTS Of the entire two hundred patients, a total of ten patients had difficult intubation, all of them had Cormack-Lehane class III on laryngoscopy. None of them had Cormack-Lehane class IV on laryngoscopy. The incidence of difficult intubation was 5% in the present study. There were no cases of failed intubation. One hundred and eighty seven patients predicted to be easy for intubation by ULBT (i.e. patients who had ULBT class I and II out of whom, however, we encountered difficult intubation in 5 patients. Out of the eight patients predicted to have difficult airway by ULBT III, only one patient had CL III difficult airway and subsequently difficult intubation. CONCLUSIONS MMT

  15. Diagnosis of tracheomalacia using tracheal dynamic respiratory-scan

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    Matsui, Teruo; Watabe, Hideki; Ikeda, Sadao

    1995-01-01

    We performed tracheal-dynamic respiratory scan (T-DRS) in 54 cases which were thought to be tracheomalacia clinically. T-DRS was performed by TOSHIBA TCT-900S at the level of the aortic arch under the condition of 120 kV (140 kV), 100 mA, 5 mm of slice width for 20 seconds when the patient was directed to breath rapidly or slowly. In 19 cases, which underwent both T-DRS and bronchoscopy, could evaluate the results. Only one case was overestimated by T-DRS than bronchoscopic findings, while 9 cases were underestimated and 9 cases were equal. Though T-DRS tended to underestimate the degree of the stenosis of tracheomalacia than bronchoscopic finding. T-DRS can do more objective evaluation than bronchoscopy non-invasively and thought to be useful for the evaluation of tracheomalalcia. (author)

  16. Effects of preoperative irradiation on primary tracheal anastomosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsubota, N.; Simpson, W.J.; Van Nostrand, A.W.P.; Pearson, F.G.

    1975-01-01

    Preoperative radiotherapy was used in the management of selected patients with cancer of the lung or trachea who might subsequently require segmental resection of bronchus or trachea and reconstruction by primary anastomosis. This study was designed to determine the effects of varying dosages of preoperative irradiation on anastomotic healing. Two rings were resected from the cervical trachea of 20 dogs following irradiation with varying doses of cesium. There were no important adverse effects on healing of the trachea or adjacent organs in dogs receiving up to 3,500 rads. All dogs receiving a higher dose than this developed some anastomotic stenosis, which was severe in 6 of 8 animals. Similar adverse effects were observed in 2 patients managed by preoperative radiotherapy (4,000 rads in three weeks) and tracheal resection with primary anastomosis

  17. Effects of preoperative irradiation on primary tracheal anastomosis

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    Tsubota, N.; Simpson, W.J.; Van Nostrand, A.W.P.; Pearson, F.G.

    1975-08-01

    Preoperative radiotherapy was used in the management of selected patients with cancer of the lung or trachea who might subsequently require segmental resection of bronchus or trachea and reconstruction by primary anastomosis. This study was designed to determine the effects of varying dosages of preoperative irradiation on anastomotic healing. Two rings were resected from the cervical trachea of 20 dogs following irradiation with varying doses of cesium. There were no important adverse effects on healing of the trachea or adjacent organs in dogs receiving up to 3,500 rads. All dogs receiving a higher dose than this developed some anastomotic stenosis, which was severe in 6 of 8 animals. Similar adverse effects were observed in 2 patients managed by preoperative radiotherapy (4,000 rads in three weeks) and tracheal resection with primary anastomosis.

  18. Survey of Accepted Practice following Failed Intubation for Emergency Caesarean Delivery

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    Daniel Soltanifar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There is no consensus on the optimum management of failed tracheal intubation in emergency cesarean delivery performed for fetal compromise. The decision making process on whether to wake the patient or continue anesthesia with a supraglottic airway device is an underexplored area. This survey explores perceptions and experiences of obstetric anesthetists managing failed intubation. Methods. Anesthetists attending the Group of Obstetric Anaesthetists London (GOAL Meeting in April 2014 were surveyed. Results. Ninety-three percent of anesthetists surveyed would not always wake the patient in the event of failed intubation for emergency cesarean delivery performed for fetal compromise. The median (interquartile range of perceived acceptability of continuing anesthesia with a well-fitting supraglottic airway device, assessed using a visual analogue scale (0–100; 0 completely unacceptable; 100 completely acceptable, was 90 [22.5]. Preoperative patient consent regarding the use of a supraglottic airway device for surgery in the event of failed intubation would affect the decision making of 40% of anaesthetists surveyed. Conclusion. These results demonstrate that a significant body of anesthetists with a subspecialty interest in obstetric anesthesia in the UK would not always wake up the patient and would continue with anesthesia and surgery with a supraglottic airway device in this setting.

  19. A simple method for accurate endotracheal placement of an intubation tube in Guinea pigs to assess lung injury following chemical exposure.

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    Nambiar, M P; Gordon, R K; Moran, T S; Richards, S M; Sciuto, A M

    2007-01-01

    ABSTRACT Guinea pigs are considered as the animal model of choice for toxicology and medical countermeasure studies against chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and toxic organophosphate pesticides because of the low levels of carboxylesterase compared to rats and mice. However, it is difficult to intubate guinea pigs without damaging the larynx to perform CWA inhalation experiments. We describe an easy technique of intubation of guinea pigs for accurate endotracheal placement of the intubation tube. The technique involves a speculum made by cutting the medium-size ear speculum in the midline leaving behind the intact circular connector to the otoscope. Guinea pigs were anesthetized with Telazol/meditomidine, the tongue was pulled using blunt forceps, and an otoscope attached with the specially prepared speculum was inserted gently. Insertion of the speculum raises the epiglottis and restrains the movements of vocal cord, which allows smooth insertion of the metal stylet-reinforced intubation tube. Accurate endotracheal placement of the intubation tube was achieved by measuring the length from the tracheal bifurcation to vocal cord and vocal cord to the upper front teeth. The average length of the trachea in guinea pigs (275 +/- 25 g) was 5.5 +/- 0.2 cm and the distance from the vocal cord to the front teeth was typically 3 cm. Coinciding an intubation tube marked at 6 cm with the upper front teeth accurately places the intubation tube 2.5 cm above the tracheal bifurcation. This simple method of intubation does not disturb the natural flora of the mouth and causes minimum laryngeal damage. It is rapid and reliable, and will be very valuable in inhalation exposure to chemical/biological warfare agents or toxic chemicals to assess respiratory toxicity and develop medical countermeasures.

  20. The effect of different doses of esmolol on hemodynamic, bispectral index and movement response during orotracheal intubation: prospective, randomized, double-blind study

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    Mensure Yılmaz Çakırgöz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: A prospective, randomized and double-blind study was planned to identify the optimum dose of esmolol infusion to suppress the increase in bispectral index values and the movement and hemodynamic responses to tracheal intubation. Materials and methods: One hundred and twenty patients were randomly allocated to one of three groups in a double-blind fashion. 2.5 mg kg-1 propofol was administered for anesthesia induction. After loss of consciousness, and before administration of 0.6 mg kg-1 rocuronium, a tourniquet was applied to one arm and inflated to 50 mm Hg greater than systolic pressure. The patients were divided into 3 groups; 1 mg kg-1 h-1 esmolol was given as the loading dose and in Group Es50 50 μg kg-1 min-1, in Group Es150 150 μg kg-1 min-1, and in Group Es250 250 μg kg-1 min-1 esmolol infusion was started. Five minutes after the esmolol has been begun, the trachea was intubated; gross movement within the first minute after orotracheal intubation was recorded. Results: Incidence of movement response and the ΔBIS max values were comparable in Group Es250 and Group Es150, but these values were significantly higher in Group Es50 than in the other two groups. In all three groups in the 1st minute after tracheal intubation heart rate and mean arterial pressure were significantly higher compared to values from before intubation (p < 0.05. In the study period there was no significant difference between the groups in terms of heart rate and mean arterial pressure. Conclusion: In clinical practise we believe that after 1 mg kg-1 loading dose, 150 μg kg-1 min-1 iv esmolol dose is sufficient to suppress responses to tracheal intubation without increasing side effects.

  1. EFFECTS OF PREANESTHETIC SINGLE DOSE INTRAVENOUS DEXMEDETOMIDINE VERSUS FENTANYL ON HEMODYNAMIC RESPONSE TO ENDOTRACHEAL INTUBATION-A CLINICAL COMPARATIVE STUDY

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    Chandita

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Many pharmacological agents have been evaluated in regards to their efficacy of blunting the adverse cardiovascular response to laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of dexmedetomidine compared to fentanyl in blunting the haemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and intubation. METHOD Sixty patients were randomly allocated into two groups (30 patients in each group. The group D received intravenously 1 µgm/kg dexmedetomidine infusion and group F received 2µgm/kg fentanyl infusion. The study drugs were prepared in an identical looking container and were infused fifteen minutes prior to induction of anaesthesia. The study drugs were infused over a period of ten minutes and all the patients underwent a similar anaesthetics technique. Heart rate (HR and blood pressure (systolic, diastolic and mean blood pressure were noted at baseline, at the end of infusion of the study drugs, after induction of anaesthesia, immediately after laryngoscopy and intubation and at 1, 3, 5, 7 and 10 minutes after laryngoscopy and intubation. RESULTS HR significantly decreased in the group D when compared to group F immediately after study drug infusion and there was statistically significant reduction in heart rate for up to 5 min after intubation in both the groups. Although HR increased after intubation in both the groups, the magnitude was lower in the group D. In both the groups, laryngoscopy and intubation led to an increase in systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressure; the magnitude was lower in the group D. CONCLUSION Dexmeditomidine (1µ/kg attenuates these untoward responses of laryngoscopy and intubation more effectively than fentanyl (2 µ/kg when administered as bolus dose in the pre-induction period of general anaesthesia.

  2. Auscultation versus Point-of-care Ultrasound to Determine Endotracheal versus Bronchial Intubation: A Diagnostic Accuracy Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsingh, Davinder; Frank, Ethan; Haughton, Robert; Schilling, John; Gimenez, Kimberly M; Banh, Esther; Rinehart, Joseph; Cannesson, Maxime

    2016-05-01

    Unrecognized malposition of the endotracheal tube (ETT) can lead to severe complications in patients under general anesthesia. The focus of this double-blinded randomized study was to assess the accuracy of point-of-care ultrasound in verifying the correct position of the ETT and to compare it with the accuracy of auscultation. Forty-two adult patients requiring general anesthesia with ETT were consented. Patients were randomized to right main bronchus, left main bronchus, or tracheal intubation. After randomization, the ETT was placed via fiber-optic visualization. Next, the location of the ETT was assessed using auscultation by a separate blinded anesthesiologist, followed by an ultrasound performed by a third blinded anesthesiologist. Ultrasound examination included assessment of tracheal dilation via cuff inflation with air and evaluation of pleural lung sliding. Statistical analysis included sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and interobserver agreement for the ultrasound examination (95% CI). In differentiating tracheal versus bronchial intubations, auscultation showed a sensitivity of 66% (0.39 to 0.87) and a specificity of 59% (0.39 to 0.77), whereas ultrasound showed a sensitivity of 93% (0.66 to 0.99) and specificity of 96% (0.79 to 1). Identification of tracheal versus bronchial intubation was 62% (26 of 42) in the auscultation group and 95% (40 of 42) in the ultrasound group (P = 0.0005) (CI for difference, 0.15 to 0.52), and the McNemar comparison showed statistically significant improvement with ultrasound (P auscultation in determining the location of ETT.

  3. Comparison of rocuronium at two different doses and succinylcholine for endotracheal intubation in adult patients for elective surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavan, S G; Gangadharan, S; Gopakumar, A K

    2016-01-01

    The effects of rocuronium at two different doses, that is, 0.6 mg/kg (2 × ED95) and 0.9 mg/kg (3 × ED95), were compared with succinylcholine (2 mg/kg) when used for endotracheal intubation in adult patients for elective surgeries under general anesthesia. Ninety patients were divided into three groups of 30 each. Groups A, B received injection rocuronium at 0.6 mg/kg, 0.9 mg/kg respectively and Group C received succinylcholine at 2 mg/kg. Onset of action of relaxant, intubation conditions, time taken to intubate and duration of action were compared. To compare the statistical difference in the age, weight, height of the study subjects, onset of action of relaxant, intubation conditions, time taken to intubate, and duration of action analysis of variance and unpaired t -test were used. The onset time was considerably shorter with rocuronium 0.9 mg/kg than 0.6 mg/kg. The onset time of rocuronium 0.9 mg/kg was found to be significantly longer than succinylcholine 2 mg/kg. Time taken to intubate was shortest with succinylcholine 2 mg/kg. The time taken to intubate with the rocuronium 0.9 mg/kg was found to be comparable to that of rocuronium 0.6 mg/kg. Intubation score of rocuronium 0.9 mg/kg was the best (17.75), which was comparable with succinylcholine. However, the intubation score obtained with rocuronium 0.6 mg/kg was inferior. Duration of action was shortest with succinylcholine. The duration of action is prolonged when the dose of rocuronium is increased from 0.6 to 0.9 mg/kg. Rapid sequence induction of anesthesia with propofol and fentanyl, succinylcholine allowed a more rapid endotracheal intubation sequence and created superior intubation conditions than rocuronium. However, the technique of using a large dose of rocuronium to achieve perfect conditions for tracheal intubation may have application whenever succinylcholine is relatively contraindicated.

  4. Tracheal anastomosis with the diode laser and fibrin tissue adhesive: an in vitro and in vivo investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleich, L L; Wang, Z; Pankratov, M M; Aretz, H T; Shapshay, S M

    1995-05-01

    Absorbable sutures have been advocated for tracheal anastomosis to reduce fibrosis and foreign body reaction leading to recurrent stenosis. Fibrin tissue adhesive (FTA) and diode laser welding with indocyanine green-dyed fibrinogen were evaluated in tracheal anastomosis to reduce the number of sutures and to improve healing. In vitro studies demonstrated strong anastomoses with a combination of laser welding and FTA with minimal tissue damage. In a controlled in vivo study, circumferential resections of canine tracheas were repaired with laser welding and FTA augmented with a few stay sutures. These anastomoses had less fibrosis and tissue damage than anastomoses in control animals repaired with sutures alone. This study supports investigation of laser welding and FTA in human beings for tracheal anastomosis and other procedures in which suturing may be difficult.

  5. A Comfortable Solution To Tracheal Anastomosis Protection: Tracheal Retention Sutures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karapolat, Sami; Turkyilmaz, Atila; Seyis, Kubra Nur; Tekinbas, Celal

    2018-04-01

    Fixation of the chin to the anterior chest wall is the most commonly used method of reducing anastomotic tension following a segmental resection of the trachea and reconstruction with primary anastomosis. However, the sutures required for this method may lead to various organic and psychological problems. In five patients who underwent tracheal resection and primary anastomosis, retention sutures were placed on the proximal and distal-lateral edges of the anastomotic line rather than placing a Guardian chin stitch. All patients were mobilised in the early postoperative period and were able to perform their routine daily activities without restrictions. During their average 14.4 months of follow-up, no complications were found in their anastomotic lines during their clinical, radiological, and bronchoscopic assessments. The placement of tracheal retention sutures proved an inexpensive and reliable method to reduce anastomotic tension without additional surgical burden, and was effective in terms of patient comfort. Copyright © 2017 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Upper cervical spine movement during intubation: fluoroscopic comparison of the AirWay Scope, McCoy laryngoscope, and Macintosh laryngoscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, K; Yamada, T; Kawakami, R; Kamata, T; Yokochi, M; Hara, K

    2008-01-01

    The AirWay Scope (AWS) is a new fibreoptic intubation device, which allows visualization of the glottic structures without alignment of the oral, pharyngeal, and tracheal axes, and thus may be useful in patients with limited cervical spine (C-spine) movement. We fluoroscopically evaluated upper C-spine movement during intubation with the AWS or Macintosh or McCoy laryngoscope. Forty-five patients, with normal C-spine, scheduled for elective surgery were randomly assigned to one of the three intubation devices. Movement of the upper C-spine was examined by measuring angles formed by adjacent vertebrae during intubation. Time to intubation was also recorded. Median cumulative upper C-spine movement was 22.3 degrees, 32.3 degrees, and 36.5 degrees with the AWS, Macintosh laryngoscope, and McCoy laryngoscope, respectively (Pmovement of the C-spine at C1/C2 in comparison with the Macintosh or McCoy laryngoscope (P=0.012), and at C3/C4 in comparison with the McCoy laryngoscope (P=0.019). Intubation time was significantly longer in the AWS group than in the Macintosh group (P=0.03). Compared with the Macintosh or McCoy laryngoscope, the AWS produced less movement of upper C-spine for intubation in patients with a normal C-spine.

  7. The effects of nicardipine or esmolol on the onset time of rocuronium and intubation conditions during rapid sequence induction: a randomized double-blind trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Heui; Kim, Yunkwang; Lee, Kye Hyeok; Rim, Sung Kyu; Lee, Ji Yeon; Lee, Cheong

    2015-06-01

    The main aims of rapid sequence induction (RSI) are prompt and adequate muscle relaxation for tracheal intubation and hemodynamic stability during and after intubation. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of nicardipine and esmolol on the action of rocuronium and intubation conditions during RSI. Adult patients (n = 82) were randomly allocated to one of three groups. One minute prior to the induction of sevoflurane-based general anesthesia, patients received 20 μg/kg of nicardipine (N group; n = 27) or 0.5 mg/kg of esmolol (E group; n = 27), or 5 ml of saline (C group; n = 28). Patients were assessed according to intubation conditions, the onset time of rocuronium, mean arterial pressure (MAP), and heart rate (HR) during RSI. The intubation conditions and score were significantly better in the C and N groups than in the E group (P rocuronium was shortened in the N group and prolonged in the E group when compared to the C group (P rocuronium and attenuated changes in MAP after intubation. Esmolol may disturb intubation conditions and the onset of action of rocuronium, despite being effective in alleviating responses of HR after RSI.

  8. Strategies to prevent ventilation-associated pneumonia: the effect of cuff pressure monitoring techniques and tracheal tube type on aspiration of subglottic secretions: an in-vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Eleanor L; Duguid, Alasdair; Ercole, Ari; Matta, Basil; Burnstein, Rowan M; Veenith, Tonny

    2014-03-01

    Ventilation-associated pneumonia (VAP) is the commonest nosocomial infection in intensive care. Implementation of a VAP prevention care bundle is a proven method to reduce its incidence. The UK care bundle recommends maintenance of the tracheal tube cuff pressure at 20 to 30  cmH₂O with 4-hourly pressure checks and use of tracheal tubes with subglottic aspiration ports in patients admitted for more than 72  h. To evaluate the effects of tracheal tube type and cuff pressure monitoring technique on leakage of subglottic secretions past the tracheal tube cuff. Bench-top study. Laboratory. A model adult trachea with simulated subglottic secretions was intubated with a tracheal tube with the cuff inflated to 25  cmH₂O. Experiments were conducted using a Portex Profile Soft Seal tracheal tube with three cuff pressure monitoring strategies and using a Portex SACETT tracheal tube with intermittent cuff pressure checks. Rate of simulated secretion leakage past the tracheal tube cuff. Mean ± SD leakage of fluid past the Profile Soft Seal tracheal tube cuff was 2.25 ± 1.49  ml  min⁻¹ with no monitoring of cuff pressure, 2.98 ± 1.63  ml  min⁻¹ with intermittent cuff pressure monitoring and 3.83 ± 2.17  ml  min⁻¹ with continuous cuff pressure monitoring (P aspiration port and aspirating the simulated secretions prior to intermittent cuff pressure checks reduced the leakage rate to 0.50 ± 0.48  ml  min⁻¹ (P aspiration port. Further evaluation of medical device performance is needed in order to design more effective VAP prevention strategies.

  9. Oral alimentation following intubation for esophageal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haffejee, A A; Angorn, I B

    1977-01-01

    The nutritional status of 15 patients suffering from unresectable carcinoma of the midthoracic esophagus was evaluated before and after palliative pulsion intubation. All patients showed evidence of protein-calorie malnutrition, prior to intubation. Oral alimentation using a formulated hospital ward diet with an elemental dietary supplement reversed the nutritional deficit. A mean daily positive nitrogen balance of seven grams was achieved three weeks following intubation. No episode of tube blockage was observed and the elemental diet supplement was well tolerated. PMID:74985

  10. Comparison of blind intubation through the I-gel and ILMA Fastrach by nurses during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a manikin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melissopoulou, Theodora; Stroumpoulis, Konstantinos; Sampanis, Michail A; Vrachnis, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Georgios; Chalkias, Athanasios; Xanthos, Theodoros

    2014-01-01

    To investigate whether nursing staff can successfully use the I-gel and the intubating laryngeal mask Fastrach (ILMA) during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Although tracheal intubation is considered to be the optimal method for securing the airway during cardiopulmonary resuscitation, laryngoscopy requires a high level of skill. Forty five nurses inserted the I-gel and the ILMA in a manikin, with continuous and without chest compressions. Mean intubation times for the ILMA and I-gel without chest compressions were 20.60 ± 3.27 and 18.40 ± 3.26 s, respectively (p < 0.0005). ILMA proved more successful than the I-gel regardless of compressions. Continuation of compressions caused a prolongation in intubation times for both the I-gel (p < 0.0005) and the ILMA (p < 0.0005). In this mannequin study, nursing staff can successfully intubate using the I-gel and the ILMA as conduits with comparable success rates, regardless of whether chest compressions are interrupted or not. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Severe hypoxaemia in field-anaesthetised white rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum and effects of using tracheal insufflation of oxygen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bush

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available White rhinoceros anaesthetised with etorphine and azaperone combination develop adverse physiological changes including hypoxia, hypercapnia, acidosis, tachycardia and hypertension. These changes are more marked in field-anaesthetised rhinoceros. This study was designed to develop a technique to improve safety for field-anaesthetised white rhinoceros by tracheal intubation and oxygen insufflation. Twenty-five free-ranging white rhinoceros were anaesthetised with an etorphine and azaperone combination for translocation or placing microchips in their horns. Once anaesthetised the rhinoceros were monitored prior to crating for transportation or during microchip placement. Physiological measurements included heart and respiratory rate, blood pressure and arterial blood gas samples. Eighteen rhinoceros were intubated using an equine nasogastric tube passed nasally into the trachea and monitored before and after tracheal insufflation with oxygen. Seven rhinoceros were not intubated or insufflated with oxygen and served as controls. All anaesthetised rhinoceros were initially hypoxaemic (percentage arterial haemoglobin oxygen saturation (% O2Sa = 49 % + 16 (mean + SD and PaO2 = 4.666 + 1.200 kPa (35 + 9 mm Hg, hypercapnic (PaCO2 = 8.265 + 1.600 kPa (62 + 12 mm Hg and acidaemic (pHa = 7.171 + 0.073 . Base excess was -6.7 + 3.9 mmol/ℓ, indicating a mild to moderate metabolic acidosis. The rhinoceros were also hypertensive (systolic blood pressure = 21.861 + 5.465 kPa (164 + 41 mm Hg and tachycardic (HR = 107 + 31/min. Following nasal tracheal intubation and insufflation, the % O2Sa and PaO2 increased while blood pHa and PaCO2 remained unchanged.Tracheal intubation via the nose is not difficult, and when oxygen is insufflated, the PaO2 and the % O2Sa increases, markedly improving the safety of anaesthesia, but this technique does not correct the hypercapnoea or acidosis. After regaining their feet following reversal of the anaesthesia, the animals

  12. Right hypoglossal nerve paralysis after tracheal intubation for aesthetic breast surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sammy Al-Benna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aesthetic and functional complications caused by general anesthesia have been rarely described after aesthetic surgery. We report a case of unilateral right hypoglossal nerve paralysis following the use of a cuffed endotracheal airway in a 24-year-old woman undergoing aesthetic breast surgery. Neurological examination and magnetic resonance imaging of the head failed to provide additional insights into the cause of the nerve injury. Postoperatively, the patient was carefully monitored and made a full recovery within 2 weeks without any pharmacological treatment. The transient hypoglossal nerve paralysis seemed to be due to neuropraxia. In this patient, we postulate that the right hypoglossal nerve was compressed between the endotracheal tube cuff and the hyoid bone, which was inflated with 30 cm H 2 O. Patients undergoing aesthetic surgery must be appropriately and adequately informed that postoperative aesthetic and functional deficits can occur due to anesthesia as well as the surgery.

  13. Onset and duration of action of rocuronium - from tracheal intubation, through intense block to complete recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, P.; Ibsen, M.; Østergaard, Doris

    2001-01-01

    pharmacodynamic, neuromuscular relaxant, rocuronium, neuromuscular transmission, nerve stimulator, post tetanic count......pharmacodynamic, neuromuscular relaxant, rocuronium, neuromuscular transmission, nerve stimulator, post tetanic count...

  14. Intubation Success in Critical Care Transport: A Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Ryan J; Gothard, Megan; Gothard, M David; Schwartz, Hamilton P; Bigham, Michael T

    2018-02-21

    Tracheal intubation (TI) is a lifesaving critical care skill. Failed TI attempts, however, can harm patients. Critical care transport (CCT) teams function as the first point of critical care contact for patients being transported to tertiary medical centers for specialized surgical, medical, and trauma care. The Ground and Air Medical qUality in Transport (GAMUT) Quality Improvement Collaborative uses a quality metric database to track CCT quality metric performance, including TI. We sought to describe TI among GAMUT participants with the hypothesis that CCT would perform better than other prehospital TI reports and similarly to hospital TI success. The GAMUT Database is a global, voluntary database for tracking consensus quality metric performance among CCT programs performing neonatal, pediatric, and adult transports. The TI-specific quality metrics are "first attempt TI success" and "definitive airway sans hypoxia/hypotension on first attempt (DASH-1A)." The 2015 GAMUT Database was queried and analysis included patient age, program type, and intubation success rate. Analysis included simple statistics and Pearson chi-square with Bonferroni-adjusted post hoc z tests (significance = p success was lowest in neonates (59.3%, 617 attempts), better in pediatrics (81.7%, 519 attempts), and best in adults (87%, 2900 attempts), p success versus pediatric- and neonatal-focused teams (86.9% vs. 63.5%, p success (86.5% vs. 75.3%, p success are higher in adult patients and adult-focused CCT teams. TI success rates are higher in CCT than other prehospital settings, but lower than in-hospital success TI rates. Identifying factors influencing TI success among high performers should influence best practice strategies for TI.

  15. Difficult intubation: are you prepared for it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcom, C

    1994-01-01

    The endotracheal intubation of a patient for surgery requires an anaesthetist who is aided by a skilled and experienced helper. This paper explores reasons why some patients are difficult to intubate. Some are predictable on pre-operative assessment and others are not. Suggestions are given on how the helper is useful to the anaesthetist in this potentially critical situation.

  16. Intubation of the morbidly obese patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ydemann, Mogens; Rovsing, Marie Louise; Lindekaer, A L

    2012-01-01

    Several potential problems can arise from airway management in morbidly obese patients, including difficult mask ventilation and difficult intubation. We hypothesised that endotracheal intubation of morbidly obese patients would be more rapid using the GlideScope(®) (GS) (Verathon Inc Corporate H...... Headquarters, Bothell, WA, USA) than with the Fastrach™ (FT) (The Laryngeal Mask Company Ltd, Le Rocher, Victoria, Mahe, Seychelles)....

  17. Complications following nasotracheal intubation using cuffed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 46.8% of nasal trauma were inferior turbinate trauma involving the inferior medial aspect. Conclusion: The use of untreated cuffed polyvinyl chloride tube for nasotracheal intubation in unprepared nostrils is associated with a high incidence of epistaxis and nasal trauma. Keywords: nasotracheal intubation, epistaxis ...

  18. The invention of fiberoptic videoguide intubation | Saadatmand ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Airway management is one of the most important medical priorities. Despite its benefits, intubation can be sometimes associated with many complications and hardships. Hard intubation can have dangerous consequences, including hypoxia, increased intracranial pressure, cardiac collapse-vascular, traumatic ...

  19. Treatment of tracheal mucoepidermoid carcinoma by argon plasma coagulation during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesrouani, Assaad; Dabar, Georges; Rahal, Samir; Ghorra, Claude

    2015-05-01

    Mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the tracheobronchial tree is a rare airway tumor (cesarean section. We report the first case to be treated by Argon-Plasma Coagulation (APC) in pregnancy. A 35-year-old Caucasian woman G1P0, at 27 weeks of gestation was admitted to the emergency department because of hemoptysis and severe dyspnea. Bronchoscopy and biopsies diagnosed primary tracheal mucoepidermoid carcinoma. Following an episode of tracheal bleeding, she was intubated. After thorough explanations to the family and obtaining informed consent, therapeutic bronchoscopy, under general anesthesia using a rigid bronchoscope, was performed. The tumor was cored out with the tip of the bronchoscope and removed with an alligator forceps. The tumor bed was coagulated with APC. The obstetrical team was ready to intervene in case of maternal emergency. Immediate follow-up was good, and she left the hospital 4 days later. She delivered at 39 weeks of gestation by cesarean section because of dystocia. Five years later, the patient is doing well without any signs or symptoms of recurrence. Pediatric follow-up is normal. Argon Plasma Coagulation for treatment of mucoepidermoid tracheal carcinoma is feasible during pregnancy. Reporting this case could lead to less aggressive management of mucoepidermoid carcinoma in pregnant patients.

  20. Renal Branch Artery Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Zarah; Thisted, Ebbe; Andersen, Ulrik Bjørn

    2017-01-01

    Renovascular hypertension is a common cause of pediatric hypertension. In the fraction of cases that are unrelated to syndromes such as neurofibromatosis, patients with a solitary stenosis on a branch of the renal artery are common and can be diagnostically challenging. Imaging techniques...... that perform well in the diagnosis of main renal artery stenosis may fall short when it comes to branch artery stenosis. We report 2 cases that illustrate these difficulties and show that a branch artery stenosis may be overlooked even by the gold standard method, renal angiography....

  1. External laryngeal manipulation done by the laryngoscopist makes the best laryngeal view for intubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Shaaban Ali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: External laryngeal manipulation (ELM is used to get better laryngeal view during direct laryngoscopy. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that ELM done by the intubating anesthetist (laryngoscopist offers the best laryngeal view for tracheal intubation. Materials and method: A total of 160 patients underwent different surgical procedures were included in this study. Percentage of glottic opening (POGO score and Cormack and Lehane scale were used as outcome measures for comparison between different laryngoscopic views. Four views were described; basic laryngoscopic view and then views after ELM done by the assistant, by the laryngoscopist and finally by the assistant after the guidance from the laryngoscopist respectively. The last three views compared with the basic laryngoscopic view. Results: ELM done by the laryngoscopist or by the assistant after guidance from the laryngoscopist showed significant improvement of Cormack grades and POGO scores compared with basic laryngoscopic view. Number of patients with Cormack grade1 increased from 39 after direct laryngoscopy to 97 and 96 patients (P < 0.001 by Fisher′s exact test, after ELM done by the laryngoscopist and that done by the assistant after guidance from the anesthetist respectively. Furthermore, the number of patients with POGO scores of 100% increased from 39 after direct laryngoscopy to 78 and 61 (P < 0.01 patients after ELM done by the laryngoscopist and that done by the assistant after guidance from the anesthetist respectively. Conclusion: It appeared from this study that ELM done by the anesthetist makes the best laryngeal view for tracheal intubation.

  2. Comparison of different tests to determine difficult intubation in pediatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Turan Inal

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The difficulties with airway management is the main reason for pediatric anesthesia-related morbidity and mortality. Objective: To assess the value of modified Mallampati test, Upper-Lip-Bite test, thyromental distance and the ratio of height to thyromental distance to predict difficult intubation in pediatric patients. Design: Prospective analysis. Measurements and results: Data were collected from 5 to 11 years old 250 pediatric patients requiring tracheal intubation. The Cormack and Lehane classification was used to evaluate difficult laryngoscopy. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and AUC values for each test were measured. Results: The sensitivity and specificity of modified Mallampati test were 76.92% and 95.54%, while those for ULBT were 69.23% and 97.32%. The optimal cutoff point for the ratio of height to thyromental distance and thyromental distance for predicting difficult laryngoscopy was 23.5 (sensitivity, 57.69%; specificity, 86.61% and 5.5 cm (sensitivity, 61.54%; specificity, 99.11%. The modified Mallampati was the most sensitive of the tests. The ratio of height to thyromental distance was the least sensitive test. Conclusion: These results suggested that the modified Mallampati and Upper-Lip-Bite tests may be useful in pediatric patients for predicting difficult intubation.

  3. 21 CFR 878.3720 - Tracheal prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) Identification. The tracheal prosthesis is a rigid, flexible, or expandable tubular device made of a silicone... of the trachea or trachealbronchial tree. It may be unbranched or contain one or two branches. The...

  4. Tracheal Compression Caused by a Mediastinal Hematoma After Interrupted Aortic Arch Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Qingwang; Lin, Zhiyong; Hu, Xingti; Zhao, Qifeng

    2017-08-03

    Congenital abnormalities of the aortic arch include interrupted aortic arch (IAA), coarctation of the aorta (CoA), and double aortic arch (DAA). Aortic arch repair is difficult and postoperative complications are common. However, postoperative tracheobronchial stenosis with respiratory insufficiency is an uncommon complication and is usually caused by increased aortic anastomotic tension. We report here a case of tracheal compression by a mediastinal hematoma following IAA surgery. The patient underwent a repeat operation to remove the hematoma and was successfully weaned off the ventilator.In cases of tracheobronchial stenosis after aortic arch surgery, airway compression by increased aortic anastomotic tension is usually the first diagnosis considered by clinicians. Other causes, such as mediastinal hematomas, are often ignored. However, the severity of symptoms with mediastinal hematomas makes this an important entity.

  5. Rapid-Sequence Intubation in the Left-Lateral Tilt Position in a Pregnant Woman with Premature Placental Abruption Utilizing a Videolaryngoscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenta Nakao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Case - A 24-year-old pregnant woman was admitted to our hospital with decreased fetal heart rate. Obstetric examination revealed premature placental abruption; emergent caesarean section was planned under general anesthesia. On entering the operating room, the patient showed severe vital sign deterioration (blood pressure, 75/45 mm Hg; heart rate, 142 beats per minute. As left uterine displacement may worsen the premature placental abruption, the patient was placed in the left-lateral tilt position by rotating the operating table to release compression on the inferior vena cava by theuterus. To avoid circulatory collapse, rapid-sequence intubation was performed in this position. Tracheal intubation was performed with the Pentax-AWS Airwayscope (AWS videolaryngoscope, AWS; HOYA, Japan to obtain a good laryngeal view and minimize stress from laryngoscopy. After sufficient oxygenation, 120 mg of thiopental was administered. A second anesthesiologist performed cricoid pressure and 50 mg of rocuronium was administered after confirming loss of consciousness. This was followed by insertion of the AWS with a thin intlock into the mouth. Tracheal intubation was performed uneventfully. Discussion - Rapid-sequence intubation in the left-lateral tilted position with the AWS videolaryngoscope may be beneficial for pregnant women with vital sign deterioration.

  6. Ho:YAG laser in reshaping tracheal cartilage: a pilot investigation using ex vivo porcine and rabbit cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Anthony; Protsenko, Dmitry E.; Carbone, Nicholas; Li, Chao; Jackson, Ryan; Wong, Brian J.

    2004-07-01

    Stenotic, collapsed, and flow-restricted tracheal airways may result from blunt trauma, chronic infection, and the prolonged endotracheal intubation. This pilot investigation characterizes the degree of shape change produced by Ho:YAG laser (λ=2.12 μm) irradiation of rabbit and pig trachea tissue as a function of laser dosimetry and application protocol. Force displacement curves were generated using fresh lagomorph and porcine tracheal cartilage rings secured in a modified single beam cantilever geometry. These specimens were then irradiated for varying amounts of time and power with the objective of straightening these curved specimens. The degree of shape change was documented photographically. Force and surface temperature were monitored. Confocal microscopy was then used in combination a vital staine ("live-dead assay") to determine the level of viability of straightened cartilage for selected exposure time-power pairs. Laser Cartilage Reshaping of the trachea may provide a new method to treat severe tracheal injuries without the need for classic open surgical techniques. This pilot investigation is the first step toward demonstrating the feasibility of this technique. Long-term, the design of stents combined with laser irradiation may provide a means to alter tracheal shape.

  7. Mitral Valve Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the left ventricle from flowing backward. A defective heart valve fails to either open or close fully. Risk factors Mitral valve stenosis is less common today than it once was because the most common cause, ... other heart valve problems, mitral valve stenosis can strain your ...

  8. Randomized intubation with polyurethane or conical cuffs to prevent pneumonia in ventilated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippart, François; Gaudry, Stéphane; Quinquis, Laurent; Lau, Nicolas; Ouanes, Islem; Touati, Samia; Nguyen, Jean Claude; Branger, Catherine; Faibis, Frédéric; Mastouri, Maha; Forceville, Xavier; Abroug, Fekri; Ricard, Jean Damien; Grabar, Sophie; Misset, Benoît

    2015-03-15

    The occurrence of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is linked to the aspiration of contaminated pharyngeal secretions around the endotracheal tube. Tubes with cuffs made of polyurethane rather than polyvinyl chloride or with a conical rather than a cylindrical shape increase tracheal sealing. To test whether using polyurethane and/or conical cuffs reduces tracheal colonization and VAP in patients with acute respiratory failure. We conducted a multicenter, prospective, open-label, randomized study in four parallel groups in four intensive care units between 2010 and 2012. A cohort of 621 patients with expected ventilation longer than 2 days was included at intubation with a cuff composed of cylindrical polyvinyl chloride (n = 148), cylindrical polyurethane (n = 143), conical polyvinyl chloride (n = 150), or conical polyurethane (n = 162). We used Kaplan-Meier estimates and log-rank tests to compare times to events. After excluding 17 patients who secondarily refused participation or had met an exclusion criterion, 604 were included in the intention-to-treat analysis. Cumulative tracheal colonization greater than 10(3) cfu/ml at Day 2 was as follows (median [interquartile range]): cylindrical polyvinyl chloride, 0.66 (0.58-0.74); cylindrical polyurethane, 0.61 (0.53-0.70); conical polyvinyl chloride, 0.67 (0.60-0.76); and conical polyurethane, 0.62 (0.55-0.70) (P = 0.55). VAP developed in 77 patients (14.4%), and postextubational stridor developed in 28 patients (6.4%) (P = 0.20 and 0.28 between groups, respectively). Among patients requiring mechanical ventilation, polyurethane and/or conically shaped cuffs were not superior to conventional cuffs in preventing tracheal colonization and VAP. Clinical trial registered with clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01114022).

  9. Learning From Experience: Improving Early Tracheal Extubation Success After Congenital Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winch, Peter D; Staudt, Anna M; Sebastian, Roby; Corridore, Marco; Tumin, Dmitry; Simsic, Janet; Galantowicz, Mark; Naguib, Aymen; Tobias, Joseph D

    2016-07-01

    The many advantages of early tracheal extubation following congenital cardiac surgery in young infants and children are now widely recognized. Benefits include avoiding the morbidity associated with prolonged intubation and the consequences of sedation and positive pressure ventilation in the setting of altered cardiopulmonary physiology. Our practice of tracheal extubation of young infants in the operating room following cardiac surgery has evolved and new challenges in the arena of postoperative sedation and pain management have appeared. Review our institutional outcomes associated with early tracheal extubation following congenital cardiac surgery. Inclusion criteria included all children less than 1 year old who underwent congenital cardiac surgery between October 1, 2010, and October 24, 2013. A total of 416 patients less than 1 year old were included. Of the 416 patients, 234 underwent tracheal extubation in the operating room (56%) with 25 requiring reintubation (10.7%), either immediately or following admission to the cardiothoracic ICU. Of the 25 patients extubated in the operating room who required reintubation, 22 failed within 24 hours of cardiothoracic ICU admission; 10 failures were directly related to narcotic doses that resulted in respiratory depression. As a result of this review, we have instituted changes in our cardiothoracic ICU postoperative care plans. We have developed a neonatal delirium score, and have adopted the "Kangaroo Care" approach that was first popularized in neonatal ICUs. This provision allows for the early parental holding of infants following admission to the cardiothoracic ICU and allows for appropriately selected parents to sleep in the same beds alongside their postoperative children.

  10. Late complications after percutaneous tracheostomy and oral intubation: Evaluation of 1,628 procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, Benjamin; Dybwik, Knut; Nielsen, Erik Waage

    2016-05-01

    In large international studies, upper airway-related stenosis, granulomas, malacias, and laryngeal nerve palsies following percutaneous tracheostomy have an estimated incidence of 6% to 31%. The incidence following prolonged oral intubation is estimated to be 10% to 22%. The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence of late complications in our unit. Retrospective search of a single-unit intensive care patient population. Patient records for a defined period were searched using a predefined search string, identifying those who received invasive mechanical ventilation and split in subgroups by orotracheal tube or tracheostomy tube. This search was cross-linked with the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th Revision (ICD-10) codes associated with recognized complications (J38.0, J38.3,J38.6, J38.7, J39.8, J39.9, J95.0, J95.5, J95.8, J95.9, J99, R04.8,S27.5). During the period January 1, 1997 to December 31, 2013, 32,852 patients were admitted to the intensive care unit. Of these, 1,620 patients received invasive mechanical ventilation. Out of this group, 519 had a tracheostomy and 1,109 were orally intubated. Four tracheostomized and zero orotracheally intubated patients had ICD-10 codes related to complications. From the patient records it became clear that three of four patients with tracheostomy had airway symptoms before being tracheostomized, and the fourth patient had her tracheostomy following a postintubation airway stenosis. Spanning a 17-year period, our study did not show any long-term symptomatic upper airway complications following tracheostomy and only one following orotracheal intubation. This contrasts the internationally estimated incidence. 4 Laryngoscope, 126:1077-1082, 2016. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  11. The intubating laryngeal mask produces less heart rate response to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pc

    We compared heart rate and blood pressure changes to intubation produced by conventional laryngoscopic-guided intubation to those produced by blind intubation through the intubating laryngeal mask (ILM) in normotensive adults with normal airways. Forty paralysed, anaesthetised adults undergoing elective surgery ...

  12. A COMPARATIVE CLINICAL STUDY BETWEEN IV ESMOLOL AND IV FENTANYL ON ATTENUATION OF HAEMODYNAMIC RESPONSES TO LARYNGOSCOPY AND INTUBATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abu Lais Mustaque

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Laryngoscopy and intubation is an integral part for providing general anaesthesia to patients undergoing various types of surgery. It also plays an important role in critical care units viz. for providing mechanical ventilation. It is a very essential tool in the hands of anaesthesiologist in maintaining airway. The present study is undertaken to determine and compare the efficacy of single bolus dose of IV esmolol 1 mg/kg and IV fentanyl 2 mcg/kg in attenuating the haemodynamic responses to laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation and to ascertain the effectiveness of esmolol hydrochloride and fentanyl citrate in suppressing sympathetic responses. MATERIAL & METHODS The study was conducted under the Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care, Assam Medical College and Hospital, Dibrugarh, during the period July 2013 to June 2014. For this purpose, 150 patients of either sex between 20-50 years of ASA I & II physical status were selected after obtaining informed and written consent and were divided into two groups namely, Group E receiving IV esmolol (1 mg/kg and Group F receiving IV fentanyl (2 mcg/kg. RESULTS Inj. fentanyl 2 mcg/kg IV administered 5 minutes before laryngoscopy and intubation was able to prevent adverse haemodynamic changes better than Inj. esmolol 1 mg/kg IV administered 3 minutes prior to laryngoscopy and intubation during elective surgeries under general anaesthesia. CONCLUSION Hence, from the findings of this study we can conclude that IV bolus dose of fentanyl 2 mcg/kg administered 5 minutes before laryngoscopy and intubation can attenuate the sympathetic response to laryngoscopy and intubation without any side effects of the drug in healthy patients undergoing elective surgeries under general anaesthesia.

  13. Review article: video-laryngoscopy: another tool for difficult intubation or a new paradigm in airway management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolini, Jean-Baptiste; Donati, François; Drolet, Pierre

    2013-02-01

    An adequate airway management plan is essential for patient safety. Recently, new tools have been developed as alternatives to direct laryngoscopy and intubation. Among these, video-laryngoscopy has enjoyed a rapid increase in popularity and is now considered by many as the first-line technique in airway management. This paradigm shift may have an impact on patient safety. Studies show that video-laryngoscopes are associated with better glottic visualization, a higher success rate for difficult airways, and a faster learning curve, resulting in a higher success rate for intubations by novice physicians. Thus, unanticipated difficult intubations may be less frequent if video-laryngoscopy is used as the first-line approach. In addition, on-screen viewing by the operator creates a new dynamic interaction during airway management. The entire operating room team can assess progress in real time, which enhances communication and improves teaching. However, if video-laryngoscopes become standard tools for tracheal intubation, these more costly devices will need to be widely available in all locations where airway management is conducted. Furthermore, algorithms for difficult intubation will require modification, and the question of selecting alternate devices will arise. If the incidence of difficult intubation decreases, the lack of motivation to teach and learn the use of alternative devices might adversely impact patient safety. The greater effectiveness of video-laryngoscopes associated with multi-person visualization could enhance overall patient safety during airway management. However, the routine use of video-laryngoscopy also introduces some issues that need to be addressed to avoid potentially dangerous pitfalls.

  14. Effects of successive tracheal resection and anastomosis on tracheal diameter and position of lobar bronchi in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mello Souza, Carlos Henrique; Reinero, Carol R

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effects of successive large-segment tracheal resection and anastomosis on tracheal diameter and position of lobar bronchi in dogs. ANIMALS 5 adult Beagles. PROCEDURES Right lateral radiographs were obtained for all dogs and used to measure tracheal length. Dogs were then euthanized, and successive segmental tracheal resections (intervals of 10% from 20% to 50% of the tracheal length), each of which was followed by anastomosis, were performed in each cadaver. Tracheobronchoscopy was performed before the first tracheal resection and after each of the anastomoses to evaluate tracheal diameter and changes in position of lobar bronchi. RESULTS Tracheal diameter was minimally affected by resections up to 50% of the tracheal length. Diameter of the trachea and position of bronchi were not affected by resection of 20% of the tracheal length. Changes in the position of various lobar bronchi were detected after resection of 30% of the tracheal length. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINCIAL RELEVANCE In this study, tracheal resections of 20% of the tracheal length were accommodated, possibly as a result of stretching of the annular ligament. Resections of ≥ 30% of the tracheal length altered the position of lobar bronchi. Clinical effects, if any, attributable to these changes in bronchial position remain to be elucidated.

  15. The diagnostic value of multi-slice spiral CT virtual bronchoscopy in tracheal and bronchial disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Ying; Ma Daqing

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To assess the diagnostic value of multi-slice spiral CT virtual bronchoscopy (CTVB) in tracheal and bronchial disease. Methods: Forty-two patients including central lung cancer (n=35), endobronchial tuberculosis (n=3), intrabronchial benign tumor (n=3), and intrabronchial foreign body (n=1) were examined by using multi-slice spiral CT examinations. All the final diagnosis were proved by pathology except 1 patient with endoluminal foreign body was proved by clinic. All patients were scanned on GE Lightspeed 99 scanner, using 10 mm collimation, pitch of 1.35, and reconstructed at 1 mm intervals and 1.25 mm thickness. The chest images of transverse CT and virtual bronchoscopy were viewed by two separate radiologists who were familiar with the tracheal and bronchial anatomy. Results: Among the 42 patients, the tumor of trachea and bronchial lumen appeared as masses in 22 of 35 patients with central lung cancer and bronchial stenosis was found in 13 of 35 patients with central lung cancer, and bronchial wall thickening was revealed on transverse CT in all 35 cases. 3 patients of endobronchial tuberculosis showed bronchial lumen narrowing on CTVB, the bronchial wall thickening was revealed on transverse CT, and the length of the wall thickening was long. 3 patients with intrabronchial benign tumor showed nodules in trachea and bronchial lumen on CTVB, and without wall thickening on transverse CT. CTVB could detect the occlusion of bronchial lumen in 1 patient with intrabronchial foreign body and CTVB was able to visualize the areas beyond stenosis, and the bronchial wall was without thickening on transverse CT. Conclusion: Multi- slice spiral CTVB could reflect the morphology of tracheal and bronchial disease. Combined with transverse CT, it could provide diagnostic reference value for bronchial disease. (authors)

  16. Endotracheal Tube Cuff Pressures in Patients Intubated Prior to Helicopter EMS Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Tennyson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Endotracheal intubation is a common intervention in critical care patients undergoing helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS transportation. Measurement of endotracheal tube (ETT cuff pressures is not common practice in patients referred to our service. Animal studies have demonstrated an association between the pressure of the ETT cuff on the tracheal mucosa and decreased blood flow leading to mucosal ischemia and scarring. Cuff pressures greater than 30 cmH2O impede mucosal capillary blood flow. Multiple prior studies have recommended 30 cmH2O as the maximum safe cuff inflation pressure. This study sought to evaluate the inflation pressures in ETT cuffs of patients presenting to HEMS. Methods We enrolled a convenience sample of patients presenting to UMass Memorial LifeFlight who were intubated by the sending facility or emergency medical services (EMS agency. Flight crews measured the ETT cuff pressures using a commercially available device. Those patients intubated by the flight crew were excluded from this analysis as the cuff was inflated with the manometer to a standardized pressure. Crews logged the results on a research form, and we analyzed the data using Microsoft Excel and an online statistical analysis tool. Results We analyzed data for 55 patients. There was a mean age of 57 years (range 18–90. The mean ETT cuff pressure was 70 (95% CI= [61–80] cmH2O. The mean lies 40 cmH2O above the maximum accepted value of 30 cmH2O (p120 cmH2O, the maximum pressure on the analog gauge. Conclusion Patients presenting to HEMS after intubation by the referral agency (EMS or hospital have ETT cuffs inflated to pressures that are, on average, more than double the recommended maximum. These patients are at risk for tracheal mucosal injury and scarring from decreased mucosal capillary blood flow. Hospital and EMS providers should use ETT cuff manometry to ensure that they inflate ETT cuffs to safe pressures.

  17. Optimizing oxygenation and intubation conditions during awake fibre-optic intubation using a high-flow nasal oxygen-delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badiger, S; John, M; Fearnley, R A; Ahmad, I

    2015-10-01

    Awake fibre-optic intubation is a widely practised technique for anticipated difficult airway management. Despite the administration of supplemental oxygen during the procedure, patients are still at risk of hypoxia because of the effects of sedation, local anaesthesia, procedural complications, and the presence of co-morbidities. Traditionally used oxygen-delivery devices are low flow, and most do not have a sufficient reservoir or allow adequate fresh gas flow to meet the patient's peak inspiratory flow rate, nor provide an adequate fractional inspired oxygen concentration to prevent desaturation should complications arise. A prospective observational study was conducted using a high-flow humidified transnasal oxygen-delivery system during awake fibre-optic intubation in 50 patients with anticipated difficult airways. There were no episodes of desaturation or hypercapnia using the high-flow system, and in all patients the oxygen saturation improved above baseline values, despite one instance of apnoea resulting from over-sedation. All patients reported a comfortable experience using the device. The high-flow nasal oxygen-delivery system improves oxygenation saturation, decreases the risk of desaturation during the procedure, and potentially, optimizes conditions for awake fibre-optic intubation. The soft nasal cannulae uniquely allow continuous oxygenation and simultaneous passage of the fibrescope and tracheal tube. The safety of the procedure may be increased, because any obstruction, hypoventilation, or periods of apnoea that may arise may be tolerated for longer, allowing more time to achieve ventilation in an optimally oxygenated patient. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Lumbar spinal stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    Spinal stenosis, which has attracted increasing attention in recent years, represents an important group of clinical and radiologic entities. Recognition and ultimate surgical management of the many abnormalities found in this group require precise preoperative delineation of the morbid anatomy. Conventional axial tomography provided the first accurate picture of the sagittal dimension, but it was limited by poor contrast resolution. Computerized tomography and ultrasound have finally provided the means for accurate measurement of midsagittal diameter and surface area. It is now possible to provide a preoperative assessment of bony and soft-tissue canal compression and to guide surgical decompression by objective anatomic measurements. True spinal stenosis of the lumbar vertebral canal is a form of compression produced by the walls of the vertebral canal. It involves the whole of the vertebral canal by exerting compression at two of its opposite surfaces. There are two types of stenosis: (1) transport stenosis, wherein the clinical manifestations are due to impeded flow of fluid, which is dependent on the available cross-sectional area of the canal surface of the stenotic structure, and (2) compressive stenosis, which includes abnormal compression of opposing surfaces only. According to these definitions, indentation on the spinal canal by disc protrusion or localized tumor is not considered true spinal stenoses. In this chapter the authors discuss only those conditions that produce true canal stenosis

  19. Trypsin as enhancement in cyclical tracheal decellularization: Morphological and biophysical characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giraldo-Gomez, D.M., E-mail: davidmauro2008@gmail.com [Posgrado en Ciencia e Ingeniería de Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Unidad de Posgrado Edificio “C” 1er Piso, Circuito de Posgrados, Avenida Universidad 3000, Ciudad Universitaria, Coyoacán, C.P. 04510, México D. F., México (Mexico); Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Circuito Exterior, Avenida Universidad 3000, Ciudad Universitaria, Coyoacán, C.P. 04510, México D.F., México (Mexico); Leon-Mancilla, B. [Departamento de Cirugía, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Edificio “D” Planta Baja, Circuito Interior, Avenida Universidad 3000, Ciudad Universitaria, Coyoacán, C.P. 04510, México D.F., México (Mexico); Del Prado-Audelo, M.L. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Circuito Exterior, Avenida Universidad 3000, Ciudad Universitaria, Coyoacán, C.P. 04510, México D.F., México (Mexico); and others

    2016-02-01

    There are different types of tracheal disorders (e.g. cancer, stenosis and fractures). These can cause respiratory failure and lead to death of patients. Several attempts have been made for trachea replacement in order to restore the airway, including anastomosis and implants made from synthetic or natural materials. Tracheal allotransplantation has shown high rejection rates, and decellularization has emerged as a possible solution. Decellularization involves the removal of antigens from cells in the organ or tissue, leaving a matrix that can be used as 3D cell-scaffold. Although this process has been used for tracheal replacement, it usually takes at least two months and time is critical for patients with tracheal disorders. Therefore, there is necessary to develop a tracheal replacement process, which is not only effective, but also quick to prepare. The aim of this research was to develop a faster trachea decellularization protocol using Trypsin enzyme and Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) as decellularization agents. Three protocols of cyclic trachea decellularization (Protocols A, B, and C) were compared. Following Protocol A (previously described in the literature), 15 consecutive cycles were performed over 32 days. Protocol B (a variation of Protocol A) — EDTA being added — with 15 consecutive cycles performed over 60 days. Finally, Protocol C, with the addition of Trypsin as a decellularization agent, 5 consecutive cycles being performed over 10 days. For the three protocols, hematoxylin–eosin (H&E) staining and DNA residual content quantification were performed to establish the effectiveness of the decellularization process. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was used to observe the changes in porosity and microarrays. To evaluate the structural matrices integrity, Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) and biomechanical test were used. None of the protocols showed significant alteration or degradation in the components of the extracellular matrix

  20. Tracheobronchial Amyloidosis Mimicking Tracheal Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Tanrıverdi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tracheobronchial amyloidosis is a rare presentation and accounts for about 1% of benign tumors in this area. The diagnosis of disease is delayed due to nonspecific pulmonary symptoms. Therapeutic approaches are required to control progressive pulmonary symptoms for most of the patients. Herein, we report a case of a 68-year-old man admitted with progressive dyspnea to our institution for further evaluation and management. He was initially diagnosed with and underwent management for bronchial asthma for two years but had persistent symptoms despite optimal medical therapy. Pulmonary computed tomography scan revealed severe endotracheal stenosis. Bronchoscopy was performed and showed endotracheal mass obstructing 70% of the distal trachea and mimicking a neoplastic lesion. The mass was successfully resected by mechanical resection, argon plasma coagulation (APC, and Nd-YAG laser during rigid bronchoscopy. Biopsy materials showed deposits of amorphous material by hematoxylin and eosin staining and these deposits were selectively stained with Congo Red. Although this is a rare clinical condition, this case indicated that carrying out a bronchoscopy in any patient complaining of atypical bronchial symptoms or with uncontrolled asthma is very important.

  1. Comparison of Effectiveness of Betamethasone gel Applied to the Tracheal Tube and IV Dexamethasone on Postoperative Sore Throat: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabari, Masumeh; Soltani, Ghasem; Zirak, Nahid; Alipour, Moammad; Khazaeni, Kamran

    2013-09-01

    Postoperative sore throat is a common complaint in patients with endotracheal intubation and has potentially dangerous complications. This randomized controlled trial study investigated the incidence of postoperative sore throat after general anesthesia when betamethasone gel is applied to a tracheal tube compared with when IV dexamethasone is prescribed. Two hundred and twenty five American Society of Anesthesiologist (ASA)-class I and II patients undergoing elective abdominal surgery with tracheal intubation were randomly divided into three groups: betamethasone gel, intravenous (IV) dexamethasone, and control groups. In the post-anesthesia care unit, a blinded anesthesiologist interviewed all patients regarding postoperative sore throat at 1,6, and 24 hours after surgery. The incidence of sore throat was significantly lower in the betamethasone gel group compared with the IV dexamethasone and control groups, 1, 6, and 24 hours after surgery. In the first day after surgery 10.7% of the betamethasone group had sore throat whereas 26.7% of the IV dexamethasone group and 30.7% of the control group had sore throat. Bucking before extubation was observed in 14(18.4%), 8(10.4%), and 9(12.2%) patients, in the IV dexamethasone, betamethasone gel, and control group, respectively. We concluded that wide spread application of betamethasone gel over tracheal tubes effectively mitigates postoperative sore throat, compared with IV dexamethasone application.

  2. Comparison of Effectiveness of Betamethasone gel Applied to the Tracheal Tube and IV Dexamethasone on Postoperative sore Throat: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoomeh Tabari

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Postoperative sore throat is a common complaint in patients with endotracheal intubation and has potentially dangerous complications. This randomized controlled trial study investigated the incidence of postoperative sore throat after general anesthesia when betamethasone gel is applied to a tracheal tube compared with when IV dexamethasone is prescribed.   Materials and Methods: Two hundred and twenty five American Society of Anesthesiologist (ASA-class I and II patients undergoing elective abdominal surgery with tracheal intubation were randomly divided into three groups: betamethasone gel, intravenous (IV dexamethasone, and control groups. In the post-anesthesia care unit, a blinded anesthesiologist interviewed all patients regarding postoperative sore throat at 1,6, and 24 hours after surgery.   Results: The incidence of sore throat was significantly lower in the betamethasone gel group compared with the IV dexamethasone and control groups, 1, 6, and 24 hours after surgery. In the first day after surgery 10.7% of the betamethasone group had sore throat whereas 26.7% of the IV dexamethasone group and 30.7% of the control group had sore throat. Bucking before extubation was observed in 14(18.4%, 8(10.4%, and 9(12.2% patients, in the IV dexamethasone, betamethasone gel, and control group, respectively.   Conclusion:  We concluded that wide spread application of betamethasone gel over tracheal tubes effectively mitigates postoperative sore throat, compared with IV dexamethasone application.

  3. Crisis management during anaesthesia: difficult intubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paix, A D; Williamson, J A; Runciman, W B

    2005-06-01

    Anaesthetists may experience difficulty with intubation unexpectedly which may be associated with difficulty in ventilating the patient. If not well managed, there may be serious consequences for the patient. A simple structured approach to this problem was developed to assist the anaesthetist in this difficult situation. To examine the role of a specific sub-algorithm for the management of difficult intubation. The potential performance of a structured approach developed by review of the literature and analysis of each of the relevant incidents among the first 4000 reported to the Australian Incident Monitoring Study (AIMS) was compared with the actual management as reported by the anaesthetists involved. There were 147 reports of difficult intubation capable of analysis among the first 4000 incidents reported to AIMS. The difficulty was unexpected in 52% of cases; major physiological changes occurred in 37% of these cases. Saturation fell below 90% in 22% of cases, oesophageal intubation was reported in 19%, and an emergency transtracheal airway was required in 4% of cases. Obesity and limited neck mobility and mouth opening were the most common anatomical contributing factors. The data confirm previously reported failures to predict difficult intubation with existing preoperative clinical tests and suggest an ongoing need to teach a pre-learned strategy to deal with difficult intubation and any associated problem with ventilation. An easy-to-follow structured approach to these problems is outlined. It is recommended that skilled assistance be obtained (preferably another anaesthetist) when difficulty is expected or the patient's cardiorespiratory reserve is low. Patients should be assessed postoperatively to exclude any sequelae and to inform them of the difficulties encountered. These should be clearly documented and appropriate steps taken to warn future anaesthetists.

  4. Comparison of the Laryngeal Mask Airway (CTrachTM and Direct Coupled Interface-Video Laryngoscope for Endotracheal Intubation: a Prospective, Randomized, Clinical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil Toker

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Video laryngoscopy was developed to facilitate tracheal intubation of difficult airways. We aimed to compare the efficacy of CTrach™ (CT and Direct Coupled Interface-Videolaryngoscope (DCI-VL in patients with normal airways. Material and Methods: Sixty ASA I–II (American Society of Anesthesiologists adult patients admitted for elective surgery were enrolled in this prospective study. The patients were randomly assigned to two groups, where intubation was performed via CT or DCI-VL. Time to obtain a good glottic view, total intubation time, success rates and the number of patients who required maneuvers for a good glottic view were recorded.Results: The mean time to obtaining a good glottic view was significantly longer with CT than with DCI-VL (29.4±20.3 seconds vs. 12.8±1.9 seconds, respectively; p=0.01. Intubation was achieved on the first attempt in 28 patients in the CT group (93.3% and in 24 in the DCI-VL group (80% (p=0.77. The total intubation time for CT was significantly longer compared to DCI-VL (99.9±36.0 seconds vs. 39.2±21.4 seconds, respectively; p=0.01. Optimization maneuvers were required in eight and two patients in the CT and DCI-VL groups, respectively (p=0.03.Conclusion: Although the normal airway endotracheal intubation success rates were similar in both groups, the time to obtain a good glottic view and the total intubation time were significantly shorter with DCI-VL.

  5. Viscoelastic Properties of Human Tracheal Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safshekan, Farzaneh; Tafazzoli-Shadpour, Mohammad; Abdouss, Majid; Shadmehr, Mohammad B

    2017-01-01

    The physiological performance of trachea is highly dependent on its mechanical behavior, and therefore, the mechanical properties of its components. Mechanical characterization of trachea is key to succeed in new treatments such as tissue engineering, which requires the utilization of scaffolds which are mechanically compatible with the native human trachea. In this study, after isolating human trachea samples from brain-dead cases and proper storage, we assessed the viscoelastic properties of tracheal cartilage, smooth muscle, and connective tissue based on stress relaxation tests (at 5% and 10% strains for cartilage and 20%, 30%, and 40% for smooth muscle and connective tissue). After investigation of viscoelastic linearity, constitutive models including Prony series for linear viscoelasticity and quasi-linear viscoelastic, modified superposition, and Schapery models for nonlinear viscoelasticity were fitted to the experimental data to find the best model for each tissue. We also investigated the effect of age on the viscoelastic behavior of tracheal tissues. Based on the results, all three tissues exhibited a (nonsignificant) decrease in relaxation rate with increasing the strain, indicating viscoelastic nonlinearity which was most evident for cartilage and with the least effect for connective tissue. The three-term Prony model was selected for describing the linear viscoelasticity. Among different models, the modified superposition model was best able to capture the relaxation behavior of the three tracheal components. We observed a general (but not significant) stiffening of tracheal cartilage and connective tissue with aging. No change in the stress relaxation percentage with aging was observed. The results of this study may be useful in the design and fabrication of tracheal tissue engineering scaffolds.

  6. Lumbar stenosis: clinical case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Sá

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar stenosis is an increasingly common pathological condition that is becoming more frequent with increasing mean life expectancy, with high costs for society. It has many causes, among which degenerative, neoplastic and traumatic causes stand out. Most of the patients respond well to conservative therapy. Surgical treatment is reserved for patients who present symptoms after implementation of conservative measures. Here, a case of severe stenosis of the lumbar spine at several levels, in a female patient with pathological and surgical antecedents in the lumbar spine, is presented. The patient underwent two different decompression techniques within the same operation.

  7. Foraminal stenosis in spondylolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greselle, J.F.; Grenier, N.; Douws, C.; Bernard, S.; Vital, J.M.; Caille, J.M.; Broussin, J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports eighteen patients with spondylolysis evaluated with sagittal MR imaging to correlate the factors and degree of faoraminal stenosis at the level of the lysis with clinical findings. Fifteen presented with low back pain, eight with radiculopathy and one with paresthesia in the lower limbs, and two were asymptomatic. The degree of foraminal stenosis, quantified in three grades, was not correlated with the onset of radiculopathy. Three foraminal herniations were responsible for radiculopathy. Presence of isthmic bony tip and fibrocartilage buildup were not correlated with symptoms. Foraminal compression can be demonstrated by MR imaging, but without clinical correlations

  8. Warming Endotracheal Tube in Blind Nasotracheal Intubation throughout Maxillofacial Surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamzeh Hosseinzadeh

    2013-12-01

    Conclusion: In conclusion, our study showed that using an endotracheal tube softened by warm water could reduce the incidence and severity of epistaxis during blind nasotracheal intubation; however it could not facilitate blind nasotracheal intubation.

  9. Mordified Submental Endotracheal Intubation Technique in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    over a two-year period. Each patient required maxillomandibular fixation following trauma.Acommon feature in these patients was depressed fracture of the frontonasal bone which could not permit nasal intubation. These patients were reluctant to have tracheostomy if there was an alternative option of securing their airway.

  10. Flexible Fiberoptic Endoscopy in Difficult Intubations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edens, E. Th.; Sia, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    Intubation problems sometimes occur very suddenly and can be divided into two groups. The expected ones include the patients with a short neck and long teeth, cellulitis of the tongue, large oropharyngeal tumors, obstructing laryngeal tumors, congenital and acquired maxillofacial deformities,

  11. Treatment of hypertension following endotracheal intubation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Treatment of hypertension following endotracheal intubation. A study comparing the efficacy of labetalol, practolol and placebo. R. J. MAHARAJ, M. THOMPSON, J. G. BROCK-UTNE,. J. W. DOWNING. R. WI LLlAMSON,. Summary. Labetalol, a new adrenergic receptor antagonist, has both a- and B-blocking properties.

  12. Massive aspiration past the tracheal tube cuff caused by closed tracheal suction system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Mital H; Frotzler, Angela; Madjdpour, Caveh; Koepfer, Nelly; Weiss, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Aspiration past the tracheal tube cuff has been recognized to be a risk factor for the development of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). This study investigated the effect of closed tracheal suctioning on aspiration of fluid past the tracheal tube cuff in an in vitro benchtop model. High-volume low pressure tube cuffs of 7.5 mm internal diameter (ID) were placed in a 22 mm ID artificial trachea connected to a test lung. Positive pressure ventilation (PPV) with 15 cm H₂O peak inspiratory pressure and 5 cm H₂O positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) was used. A closed tracheal suction system (CTSS) catheter (size 14Fr) was attached to the tracheal tube and suction was performed for 5, 10, 15, or 20 seconds under 200 or 300 cm H₂O suction pressures. Amount of fluid (mL) aspirated along the tube cuff and the airway pressure changes were recorded for each suction procedure. Fluid aspiration during different suction conditions was compared using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney test (Bonferroni correction [α = .01]). During 10, 15, and 20 seconds suction, airway pressure consistently dropped down to -8 to -13 cm H₂O (P aspiration was never observed under PPV + PEEP but occurred always during suctioning. Aspiration along the tube cuff was higher with -300 cm H₂O than with -200 cm H₂O suction pressure (P aspiration of fluid occurs along the tracheal tube cuff during suction with the closed tracheal suction system. © SAGE Publications 2011.

  13. Infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rikke Neess; Garne, Ester; Loane, Maria

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to present epidemiologic data on infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (IHPS) from seven well-defined European regions, and to compare incidence and changes in incidence over time between these regions. METHODS: This was a population-based study using ...

  14. Lumbar spinal stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønne, Greger; Fritzell, Peter; Hägg, Olle

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Decompression surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is the most common spinal procedure in the elderly. To avoid persisting low back pain, adding arthrodesis has been recommended, especially if there is a coexisting degenerative spondylolisthesis. However, this strategy remains con...

  15. Learning endotracheal intubation using a novel videolaryngoscope improves intubation skills of medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbstreit, Frank; Fassbender, Philipp; Haberl, Helge; Kehren, Clemens; Peters, Jürgen

    2011-09-01

    Teaching endotracheal intubation to medical students is a task provided by many academic anesthesia departments. We tested the hypothesis that teaching with a novel videolaryngoscope improves students' intubation skills. We prospectively assessed in medical students (2nd clinical year) intubation skills acquired by intubation attempts in adult anesthetized patients during a 60-hour clinical course using, in a randomized fashion, either a conventional Macintosh blade laryngoscope or a videolaryngoscope (C-MAC®). The latter permits direct laryngoscopy with a Macintosh blade and provides a color image on a video screen. Skills were measured before and after the course in a standardized fashion (METI Emergency Care Simulator) using a conventional laryngoscope. All 1-semester medical students (n = 93) were enrolled. The students' performance did not significantly differ between groups before the course. After the course, students trained with the videolaryngoscope had an intubation success rate on a manikin 19% higher (95% CI 1.1%-35.3%; P incidence of "difficult (manikin) laryngoscopy" was less frequent in the group trained with the videolaryngoscope (8% vs 34%; P = 0.005). Education using a video system mounted into a traditional Macintosh blade improves intubation skills in medical students.

  16. Comparisons of the Pentax-AWS, Glidescope, and Macintosh Laryngoscopes for Intubation Performance during Mechanical Chest Compressions in Left Lateral Tilt: A Randomized Simulation Study of Maternal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanghyun Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Rapid advanced airway management is important in maternal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR. This study aimed to compare intubation performances among Pentax-AWS (AWS, Glidescope (GVL, and Macintosh laryngoscope (MCL during mechanical chest compression in 15° and 30° left lateral tilt. Methods. In 19 emergency physicians, a prospective randomized crossover study was conducted to examine the three laryngoscopes. Primary outcomes were the intubation time and the success rate for intubation. Results. The median intubation time using AWS was shorter than that of GVL and MCL in both tilt degrees. The time to visualize the glottic view in GVL and AWS was significantly lower than that of MCL (all P<0.05, whereas there was no significant difference between the two video laryngoscopes (in 15° tilt, P=1; in 30° tilt, P=0.71. The progression of tracheal tube using AWS was faster than that of MCL and GVL in both degrees (all P<0.001. Intubations using AWS and GVL showed higher success rate than that of Macintosh laryngoscopes. Conclusions. The AWS could be an appropriate laryngoscope for airway management of pregnant women in tilt CPR considering intubation time and success rate.

  17. Radiation response of perfused tracheal sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, J.R.; Maslowski, A.J.; Braby, L.A.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: A model of respiratory tissue using a perfusion culture system is being developed. We are using this system to quantify the effects of normal tissue architecture and the interaction of epithelial cells with other cell types on radiation-induced bystander effects. Tracheal tissue taken from young adult male Fischer 344 rats is imbedded in a growth factor enriched agarose matrix. The chamber is designed to allow growth medium to periodically wash the epithelial surface of the tracheal lumen while maintaining the air-interface that is necessary for the normal differentiation of the epithelium. In preliminary experiments with rat trachea we have shown that a differentiated epithelial lining can be maintained for several days. Cells can be obtained for a number of different cell culture assays for endpoints such as survival and preneoplastic transformation after irradiation

  18. Tracheal Constriction In A Growing Dog

    OpenAIRE

    DeArmond, Christina; Niimura del Barrio, Maria Chie; Rosati, Tomasso; McAllister, Hester; Ryan, John

    2017-01-01

    A six-month-old castrated male German Shepherd/Husky cross was presented for investigation of a progressive dyspnoea and regurgitation. A circumferential cervical wound had been identified and closed following debridement by the primary care veterinarian when the dog was three months old. There was an extraluminal tracheal compression on radiographs. Surgical exploration revealed a plastic band tied and embedded in the dorsal musculature of the neck. The band had been increasingly constrictin...

  19. Type I anaphylactic reaction due to contrast induced angioedema causing neck swelling: the role of sitting fiberoptic bronchoscopy in emergent intubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Dabbagh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Contrast induced angioedema is a rapidly progressive state involving a number of organ systems including the upper airway tract; which is usually a type I anaphylactic reaction also known as immediate hypersensitivity reaction. Prompt preservation of the respiratory tract is the cornerstone of this situation. The use of fiberoptic bronchoscope for tracheal intubation though very helpful, has some special considerations due to the anatomic distortions created by edema.This manuscript describes a patient with contrast induced angioedema managed successfully. Serum levels of IgE were highly increased during the first hours after the event; while serum levels of complement were normal. However, rapid airway management and prophylactic intubation saved the patient and prevented the possible aftermath of airway obstruction.Keywords: airway management; type I anaphylactic reaction, angioedema; fiberoptic bronchoscope.Conflict of interest: none of the authors has any conflict of interest.

  20. Central and foraminal stenosis of the lumbar spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Major, N.M.; Helms, C.A.

    1995-01-01

    The discussion include clinical presentation, anatomy, imaging techniques, central canal stenosis, iatrogenic stenosis, post-traumatic stenosis, neural foraminal stenosis, facet joint disease, lateral recess disease (15 refs.)

  1. Central and foraminal stenosis of the lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Major, N M; Helms, C A [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1996-12-31

    The discussion include clinical presentation, anatomy, imaging techniques, central canal stenosis, iatrogenic stenosis, post-traumatic stenosis, neural foraminal stenosis, facet joint disease, lateral recess disease (15 refs.).

  2. Removal of self expandable metallic airway stent: A rare case report

    OpenAIRE

    Chawla, Rakesh K.; Madan, Arun; Singh, Ishwar; Mudoiya, Rahul; Chawla, Aditya; Gupta, Radha; Chawla, Kiran; Chhabra, Roopam

    2013-01-01

    Covered self expandable metallic airway stents (SEMS) have been used for benign tracheal stenosis, post intubation tracheal stenosis, tracheal burn or trauma, tracheo-broncho-malacia, and extrinsic compression of trachea. Their placement is considered to be permanent, with open surgery the only way to remove the stent, though there are few cases reports of their removal with the bronchoscope, but the complications after their removal are very high. In our patient, one and a half years after p...

  3. Efficacious and safe orotracheal intubation for laboratory mice using slim torqueable guidewire-based technique: comparisons between a modified and a conventional method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chieh-Shou; Lai, Hui-Chin; Wang, Chih-Yen; Lee, Wen-Lieng; Wang, Kuo-Yang; Yang, Ya-Ling; Wang, Li-Chun; Liu, Chia-Ning; Liu, Tsun-Jui

    2016-01-18

    Tracheal intubation of laboratory mice remains essential yet challenging for most researchers. The aim of this study was to investigate whether this procedure can be more efficiently and safely accomplished by a novel method using slim and torqueable guidewires to guide access to the trachea. This study was carried out in an animal laboratory affiliated to a tertiary medical center. Mice weighing 22 to 28 g were subjected to various open-chest experiments after being anesthetized with intraperitoneal ketamine (100 mg/kg) and lidocaine hydrochloride (10 mg/kg). The oropharyngeal cavity was opened with angled tissue forceps, and the trachea was transilluminated using an external light. The vocal cords were then crossed using either the Conventional method with a 38-mm-long, end-blunted stiff needle as a guide for insertion of a 22-gauge, 25-mm-long intravenous catheter into the trachea, or the Modified method utilizing using a 0.014-inch-thin torqueable wire as the guide to introduce an identical tube over it into the trachea. The epithelial integrity of the trachea was later examined histologically when the animals were sacrificed either immediately after the surgery or at 28 days post-surgery, depending on the corresponding research protocols. Orotracheal intubation was successfully completed in all mice using either the Conventional (N = 42) or the Modified method (N = 50). With the Modified method, intubation took less time (1.73 vs. 2.17 min, Modified vs. Conventional, p Conventional method. Histological analysis revealed a significantly lower incidence of immediate (0% vs. 39%, p Conventional method. Tracheal intubation for laboratory mice can be completed efficiently, safely and atraumatically using the proposed Modified method employing readily available inexpensive instruments.

  4. Dexmedetomidine as an adjunct to anesthetic induction to attenuate hemodynamic response to endotracheal intubation in patients undergoing fast-track CABG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menda Ferdi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available During induction of general anesthesia hypertension and tachycardia caused by tracheal intubation may lead to cardiac ischemia and arrhythmias. In this prospective, randomized study, dexmedetomidine has been used to attenuate the hemodynamic response to endotracheal intubation with low dose fentanyl and etomidate in patients undergoing myocardial revascularization receiving beta blocker treatment. Thirty patients undergoing myocardial revascularization received in a double blind manner, either a saline placebo or a dexmedetomidine infusion (1 µg/kg before the anesthesia induction. Heart rate (HR and blood pressure (BP were monitored at baseline, after placebo or dexmedetomidine infusion, after induction of general anesthesia, one, three and five minutes after endotracheal intubation. In the dexmedetomidine (DEX group systolic (SAP, diastolic (DAP and mean arterial pressures (MAP were lower at all times in comparison to baseline values; in the placebo (PLA group SAP, DAP and MAP decreased after the induction of general anesthesia and five minutes after the intubation compared to baseline values. This decrease was not significantly different between the groups. After the induction of general anesthesia, the drop in HR was higher in DEX group compared to PLA group. One minute after endotracheal intubation, HR significantly increased in PLA group while, it decreased in the DEX group. The incidence of tachycardia, hypotension and bradycardia was not different between the groups. The incidence of hypertension requiring treatment was significantly greater in the PLA group. It is concluded that dexmedetomidine can safely be used to attenuate the hemodynamic response to endotracheal intubation in patients undergoing myocardial revascularization receiving beta blockers.

  5. Mitral Stenosis: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    By C. Richard Conti, MD, MACC

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitral stenosis due to rheumatic heart disease is not common in the United States but is common in the developing world because rheumatic fever is still occurring frequently. Symptoms usually gradually occur in the young adult (most commonly female. Atrial fibrillation is a common accompanying rhythm in patients with proven mitral stenosis. The main physiologic event is a pressure gradient between the left atrium and the left ventricle. Diagnosis is relatively straight forward using physical exam and simple laboratory studies such as Chest X-Ray (elevated Left main stem bronchus, Double Density indicating enlarged left atrium and ECG (P-Mitrale. Cardiac ultrasound confirms the clinical diagnosis (Doming of mitral valve in diastole, Hockey stick deformity of the anterior mitral valve leaflet, large left atrium, Doppler estimation of valve gradient. Mitral commisurotomy (surgical or Balloon is warranted if the valve is pliable and not heavily calcified.

  6. Congenital pyriform aperture stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osovsky, Micky; Aizer-Danon, Anat; Horev, Gadi; Sirota, Lea

    2007-01-01

    Nasal airway obstruction is a potentially life-threatening condition in the newborn. Neonates are obligatory nasal breathers. The pyriform aperture is the narrowest, most anterior bony portion of the nasal airway, and a decrease in its cross-sectional area will significantly increase nasal airway resistance. Congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis (CNPAS) is a rare, unusual form of nasal obstruction. It should be considered in the differential diagnosis of any neonate or infant with signs and symptoms of upper airway compromise. It is important to differentiate this level of obstruction from the more common posterior choanal stenosis or atresia. CNPAS presents with symptoms of nasal airway obstruction, which are often characterized by episodic apnea and cyclical cyanosis. (orig.)

  7. The Comparison of the Influence of Thiopental and Propofol on Intraocular Pressure during Induction of Anesthesia in Intubated Patients under Cataracct Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Sahraei

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The prevention of the increase of intraocular pressure and the further decrease of it during eye surgery has an impressive effect on the success of surgery. Some of the phases of the induction of anesthesia like laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation result in the increase of intraocular pressure and its consequences are dangerous for penetrating injuries of eyeball. The goal of this research is the comparison of the changes of intraocular pressure during the induction of anesthesia in completely same conditions by using thiopental and propofol and also the careful investigation of their influences on intraocular pressure in order to select the medicine that effectively decrease the intraocular pressure and prevent the increase of it after laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation. In this research, 88 patients were selected and they were randomly divided into 2 groups. In the beginning of the patients' anesthesia, both groups were preoxygenated and they simultaneously receive initial dose of atracurium (0/5 mg/kg and then initial dose of fentanyl (1-2 µg/Kg. After prescription of fentanyl, the induction of anesthesia in the first group was done withthiopental (4 mg/kg and in the second group with propofol (2/5 mg/kg and after that, atracurium intubation (0/7 mg/kg was prescribed. Intraocular pressure is measured in two phases before induction of anesthesia (with tetracaine eyedrop and 3 minutes after intubation (with schiotz tonometer and 3±0/75 degree of accuracy and by a person who is not aware of the kind of anesthesia. The patients are replicated in 2 experimental and control groups in terms of age and gender. The results of independent t-test show that there is no significant difference between 2 groups of thiopental and propofol in terms of systolic and diastolic blood pressure, heart beat and eye pressure before the induction of anesthesia (p-value>0,05. The results of independent t-test show that there is a significant difference between2

  8. Use of nitinol self-expandable stents in 26 dogs with tracheal collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beranek, J; Jaresova, H; Rytz, U

    2014-02-01

    A study was designed to describe a novel approach to the treatment of tracheal collapse (TC) in dogs using self-expandable nitinol stents. Medical records were reviewed retrospectively for 26 client owned dogs in which nitinol stents were deployed. The entire length of trachea was supported independently of the extent of TC. Two overlapping stents were used instead of one in cases where one stent was not spanning the entire trachea adequately. The diameter of the cranial radiolucent portion of trachea, just behind the cricoid cartilage, was measured as a specific landmark to select the appropriate size of the stent. Two self-expandable nitinol stents were inserted in 9 of 26 dogs; the trachea in the rest of the cases was supported with only one stent. A follow up tracheoscopy was performed in 10 of 26 cases with recurrent clinical signs. Secondary tracheal stenosis in these cases was caused by stent fracture, granuloma or excessive stent shortening. Additional stents were placed successfully to expand the stenotic lumen. A support of the entire trachea may decrease risk of nitinol fracture at the end of the implant. Long term clinical improvement (25 of 26 dogs, 96 %) is comparable with the results of other studies.

  9. Effects of stellate ganglion block on cardiovascular reaction and heart rate variability in elderly patients during anesthesia induction and endotracheal intubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong-Quan; Jin, Xiao-Ju; Liu, Zhao-Fang; Zhu, Mei-Fang

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the effects of stellate ganglion block (SGB) on cardiovascular response and heart rate (HR) variability in elderly patients during anesthesia induction and endotracheal intubation. A randomized, double-blinded, and placebo-controlled study. University-affiliated teaching hospital. Eighty elderly patients (American Society of Anesthesiologists grades I and II) receiving elective surgery during general anesthesia. Right stellate ganglion injection (SGB) was performed in all patients using 10 mL of 1% lidocaine or normal saline. Systolic blood pressure (BP), diastolic BP, HR, and calculated rate pressure product. HR variability at the following time points: conscious status before induction (T0); immediately before intubation (T1); immediately after intubation (T2); and 1, 3, and 5 minutes postintubation (T3, T4, and T5). No significant differences in BP and HR were observed between the 2 groups. Rate pressure product values significantly increased in the control group compared with baseline and SGB group values. Low-frequency power (LF) and LF/high-frequency power (HF) significantly increased, and HF and normalized units of HF significantly decreased in the control group compared with baseline values. LF, normalized units of LF, and LF/HF in the SGB group significantly decreased compared with those of the control group. SGB protects the myocardium and effectively suppresses stress responses during anesthesia induction and tracheal intubation in elderly patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparing the effects of adaptive support ventilation and synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation on intubation duration and hospital stay after coronary artery bypass graft surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadreza Yazdannik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Different modes of mechanical ventilation are used for respiratory support after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG. This study aimed to compare the effect(s of using adaptive support ventilation (ASV and synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation (SIMV on the length of mechanical ventilation (intubation duration and hospital stay after coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Materials and Methods: In a randomized control trial, 64 patients were ventilated with ASV as the experiment group or with SIMV as the control group after CABG surgery in Chamran Hospital of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. The time of tracheal intubation and the length of hospital stay were compared between the two groups. Data were analyzed and described using statistical analysis (independent t-test. Results: The mean time of intubation duration was significantly lower in ASV group compared with SIMV group. (4.83 h vs 6.71 h, P < 0.001. The lengths of hospital stay in the ASV and the SIMV groups were 140.6 h and 145.1 h, respectively. This difference was significant between the two groups (P = 0.006. Conclusions: According to the results of this study, using ASV mode for mechanical ventilation after CABG led to a decrease in intubation duration and also hospital stay in comparison with the SIMV group. It is recommended to use ASV mode on ventilators for respiratory support of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery.

  11. Awake insertion of a Laryngeal Mask Airway-Proseal™ as alternative to awake fiberoptic intubation in management of anticipated difficult airway in ambulatory surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matilde Zaballos

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives The decision whether to manage an ambulatory patient with a previously documented difficult airway with a supraglottic device remain controversial. We report an awake insertion of a Laryngeal Mask Airway Proseal™ in a patient with known difficult airway scheduled for ambulatory surgery. Case report A 46-yr-old woman was programmed as a day case surgery for breast nodule resection. Her anesthetic record included an impossible intubation with cancelation of surgery and subsequent awake fibroscopic intubation. She reported emotional distress with the previous experience and declined this approach. In view of the previous experience, an awake airway control with a Laryngeal Mask Airway Proseal™ was planned after explaining and reassuring the patient. After adequate topicalisation, a size 4 Laryngeal Mask Airway Proseal™ was successfully inserted after two attempts, and their patency was confirmed by capnography. Anesthesia was induced intravenously and the surgery was uneventful. Conclusion We describe a feasible alternative strategy to awake intubation in a patient with known difficult airway undergoing ambulatory surgery. In this specific clinical situation, if tracheal intubation is deemed unnecessary, awake supraglottic airway might allow adequate ventilation and their use should be considered.

  12. Infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breivik, K.; Soereide, J.A.; Bland, J.

    1990-01-01

    During an eight-year period, 40 patients were operated consecutively for pyloric stenosis. The most common symptom was projectile vomiting, which occurred in 92.5% of the cases. On examination only three patients had a palpable hypertrophic pylorus. In 39 patients a preoperative X-ray examination with contrast was necessary to confirm the diagnosis. A pyleromyotomy was performed in all patients. The diagnosis routines and the results of the treatment are discussed. 16 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  13. The effects of dexmedetomidine on hemodynamic responses to tracheal ntubation in hypertensive patients: A comparison with esmolol and sufentanyl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hale Yarkan Uysal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypertension and tachycardia caused by tracheal intubation can be detrimental in hypertensive patients. This study was conducted in order to compare the effects of dexmedetomidine on hemodynamic response to tracheal intubation in hypertensive patients with esmolol and sufentanyl. Methods: Sixty hypertensive patients scheduled for noncardiac surgery under general anesthesia were randomly as-signed to receive one of the three drugs before induction of anesthesia. Groups I, II, and III respectively received esmo-lol (100 mg dexmedetomidine (1 μg/kg and sufentanyl (0.25 μg/kg. Heart Rate (HR, systolic (SAP and diastolic (DAP arterial pressures were recorded before drug administration (baseline; T1, after drug administration (T2, after induction of anesthesia (T3, immediately after intubation (T4 and 3, 5 and 10 minutes after intubation (T5, T6, and T7, respectively. The mean percentage variations from T1 to T4 were calculated for all variables (HR, SAP and DAP. Thiopental dose, onset time of vecuronium and intubation time were also assessed. Results: No differences were observed between the three groups regarding demographic data (p > 0.05. Median thi-opental dose was significantly lower in Group II (325 mg; range: 250-500 compared to Group I (425 mg; range: 325-500; p < 0.01 and Group III (375 mg; range: 275-500; p = 0.02. The onset time of vecuronium was longest in Group I (245.2 ± 63 s vs. 193.9 ± 46.6 s and 205.5 ± 43.5 s; p < 0.01 and p < 0.05. In Group I, HR significantly decreased after drug administration compared to baseline (83.8 ± 20.4 vs. 71.7 ± 14.8; p = 0.002. Compared to the baseline (90.4 ± 8.4, DAP decreased after induction and remained below baseline values at T5, T6 and T7 (71.3 ± 12.8, 76.2 ± 10.7, 68.9 ± 10.8 and 62.1 ± 8.7, respectively; p < 0.05 in Group II. According to the mean percen-tage variation, a significant reduction in HR was assessed in Group II compared to Group III (-13.4 ± 17.6% vs. 11

  14. Pneumomediastinum, Subcutaneous Emphysema, and Tracheal Tear in the Early Postoperative Period of Spinal Surgery in a Paraplegic Achondroplastic Dwarf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinan Kahraman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Achondroplasia was first described in 1878 and is the most common form of human skeletal dysplasia. Spinal manifestations include thoracolumbar kyphosis, foramen magnum, and spinal stenosis. Progressive kyphosis can result in spinal cord compression and paraplegia due to the reduced size of spinal canal. The deficits are typically progressive, presenting as an insidious onset of paresthesia, followed by the inability to walk and then by urinary incontinence. Paraplegia can be the result of direct pressure on the cord by bone or the injury to the anterior spinal vessels by a protruding bone. Surgical treatment consists of posterior instrumentation, fusion with total wide laminectomy at stenosis levels, and anterior interbody support. Pedicle screws are preferred for spinal instrumentation because wires and hooks may induce spinal cord injury due to the narrow spinal canal. Pedicle lengths are significantly shorter, and 20–25 mm long screws are appropriate for lower thoracic and lumbar pedicles in adult achondroplastic There is no information about the appropriate length of screws for the upper thoracic pedicles. Tracheal injury due to inappropriate pedicle screw length is a rare complication. We report an extremely rare case of tracheal tear due to posterior instrumentation and its management in the early postoperative period.

  15. A correção das estenoses traqueobrônquicas mediante o emprego de órteses Therapeutic management of tracheobronchial stenosis with stent application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAURÍCIO GUIDI SAUERESSIG

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available O tratamento cirúrgico do paciente com estenose traqueobrônquica exige uma avaliação individualizada em razão da complexidade de sua origem, sendo a traqueoplastia considerada a modalidade ideal. As causas mais comuns de estenose são devidas à intubação traqueal e ao desenvolvimento de neoplasias e estas condições são justamente as que mais se beneficiam com o tratamento endoscópico quando a correção cirúrgica não está indicada. Na atualidade, os meios endoscópicos incluem a aplicação de diversos tipos de laser e sondas de dilatação, habitualmente com o uso de broncoscópio rígido, e emprego de radioterapia e órteses, separadamente ou em associação. Basicamente, as órteses são de dois tipos: metálicas e de silicone. As metálicas têm sua indicação mais freqüente para os casos de traqueomalacia e estenoses por compressão neoplásica extrínseca. Nos casos de obstrução da via aérea por inflamação aguda, restrita à sua luz ou sem envolvimento mais profundo da parede traqueobrônquica, ou em presença de neoplasia endoluminal, é recomendável a órtese de silicone. Embora em algumas situações essas diversas formas de tratamento possam ser intercambiáveis, não costumam ser a regra. Portanto, a estratégia terapêutica visando à resolução mais eficaz da estenose traqueobrônquica baseia-se na seleção dos métodos empregados desde o primeiro tratamento.The surgical treatment of patients with tracheobronchial stenosis requires individualized attention due to the complexity of its origin though tracheoplasty is considered to be the ideal procedure. The most common causes of stenosis are tracheal intubation and the development of neoplasias. These are the very conditions that most benefit from endoscopic treatment when surgical correction is not indicated. Today, endoscopic procedures include the application of different kinds of laser and dilators usually delivered with a rigid bronchoscope, as well as

  16. Synchrotron imaging of the grasshopper tracheal system: morphological and physiological components of tracheal hypermetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenlee, K.J.; Henry, J.R.; Kirkton, S.D.; Westneat, M.W.; Fezzaa, K.; Lee, W.; Harrison, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    As grasshoppers increase in size during ontogeny, they have mass specifically greater whole body tracheal and tidal volumes and ventilation than predicted by an isometric relationship with body mass and body volume. However, the morphological and physiological bases to this respiratory hypermetry are unknown. In this study, we use synchrotron imaging to demonstrate that tracheal hypermetry in developing grasshoppers (Schistocerca americana) is due to increases in air sacs and tracheae and occurs in all three body segments, providing evidence against the hypothesis that hypermetry is due to gaining flight ability. We also assessed the scaling of air sac structure and function by assessing volume changes of focal abdominal air sacs. Ventilatory frequencies increased in larger animals during hypoxia (5% O 2 ) but did not scale in normoxia. For grasshoppers in normoxia, inflated and deflated air sac volumes and ventilation scaled hypermetrically. During hypoxia (5% O 2 ), many grasshoppers compressed air sacs nearly completely regardless of body size, and air sac volumes scaled isometrically. Together, these results demonstrate that whole body tracheal hypermetry and enhanced ventilation in larger/older grasshoppers are primarily due to proportionally larger air sacs and higher ventilation frequencies in larger animals during hypoxia. Prior studies showed reduced whole body tracheal volumes and tidal volume in late-stage grasshoppers, suggesting that tissue growth compresses air sacs. In contrast, we found that inflated volumes, percent volume changes, and ventilation were identical in abdominal air sacs of late-stage fifth instar and early-stage animals, suggesting that decreasing volume of the tracheal system later in the instar occurs in other body regions that have harder exoskeleton.

  17. Synchrotron imaging of the grasshopper tracheal system : morphological and physiological components of tracheal hypermetry.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenlee, K. J.; Henry, J. R.; Kirkton, S. D.; Westneat, M. W.; Fezzaa, K.; Lee, W.; Harrison, J. F.; North Dakota State Univ.; Arizona State Univ.; Union Coll.; Field Museum of Natural History

    2009-11-01

    As grasshoppers increase in size during ontogeny, they have mass specifically greater whole body tracheal and tidal volumes and ventilation than predicted by an isometric relationship with body mass and body volume. However, the morphological and physiological bases to this respiratory hypermetry are unknown. In this study, we use synchrotron imaging to demonstrate that tracheal hypermetry in developing grasshoppers (Schistocerca americana) is due to increases in air sacs and tracheae and occurs in all three body segments, providing evidence against the hypothesis that hypermetry is due to gaining flight ability. We also assessed the scaling of air sac structure and function by assessing volume changes of focal abdominal air sacs. Ventilatory frequencies increased in larger animals during hypoxia (5% O{sub 2}) but did not scale in normoxia. For grasshoppers in normoxia, inflated and deflated air sac volumes and ventilation scaled hypermetrically. During hypoxia (5% O{sub 2}), many grasshoppers compressed air sacs nearly completely regardless of body size, and air sac volumes scaled isometrically. Together, these results demonstrate that whole body tracheal hypermetry and enhanced ventilation in larger/older grasshoppers are primarily due to proportionally larger air sacs and higher ventilation frequencies in larger animals during hypoxia. Prior studies showed reduced whole body tracheal volumes and tidal volume in late-stage grasshoppers, suggesting that tissue growth compresses air sacs. In contrast, we found that inflated volumes, percent volume changes, and ventilation were identical in abdominal air sacs of late-stage fifth instar and early-stage animals, suggesting that decreasing volume of the tracheal system later in the instar occurs in other body regions that have harder exoskeleton.

  18. Welded tracheal stent removal in a child under cardiopulmonary bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, S C; Chang, W K; Pong, M W; Cheng, K W; Chan, K H; Tsai, S K

    2003-08-01

    Metallic tracheal stents have been used in the treatment of paediatric tracheomalacia for more than a decade. We describe a case in which critical airway obstruction occurred during removal of a welded tracheal stent using a rigid bronchoscope under general anaesthesia. Life-saving cardiopulmonary bypass was instituted urgently, and the welded stent was then removed successfully by directly opening the trachea.

  19. Tracheal schwannoma: Completely resected with therapeutic bronchoscopic techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barney Thomas Jesudason Isaac

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tracheal schwannomas are rare benign tumors of the trachea. There are only a few reported cases in the literature. Surgeons have generally resected these tumors, whereas bronchoscopists have attempted to remove them bronchoscopically. We report a case of tracheal schwannoma which was completely resected using bronchoscopic techniques.

  20. 21 CFR 868.5795 - Tracheal tube cleaning brush.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tracheal tube cleaning brush. 868.5795 Section 868.5795 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5795 Tracheal tube cleaning brush. (a...

  1. Renal artery stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desberg, A.; Paushter, D.M.; Lammert, G.K.; Hale, J.; Troy, R.; Novic, A.; Nally, J. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Renal artery disease is a potentially correctable cause of hypertension. Previous studies have suggested the utility of duplex sonography in accurately detecting and grading the severity of renal artery stenosis. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate color flow Doppler for this use. Forty-three kidneys were examined by color-flow Doppler and conventional duplex sampling in patients with suspected renovascular hypertension or those undergoing aortography for unrelated reasons. Doppler tracings were obtained from the renal arteries and aorta with calculation of the renal aortic ratio (RAR) and resistive index (RI). Results of Doppler sampling with color flow guidance were compared with aortograms in a blinded fashion

  2. Renal artery stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafur-Soto, Jose David; White, Christopher J

    2015-02-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (RAS) is the single largest cause of secondary hypertension; it is associated with progressive renal insufficiency and causes cardiovascular complications such as refractory heart failure and flash pulmonary edema. Medical therapy, including risk factor modification, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system antagonists, lipid-lowering agents, and antiplatelet therapy, is advised in all patients. Patients with uncontrolled renovascular hypertension despite optimal medical therapy, ischemic nephropathy, and cardiac destabilization syndromes who have severe RAS are likely to benefit from renal artery revascularization. Screening for RAS can be done with Doppler ultrasonography, CT angiography, and magnetic resonance angiography. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Composite cervical skin and cartilage flap provides a novel large airway substitute after long-segment tracheal resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabre, Dominique; Singhal, Sunil; De Montpreville, Vincent; Decante, Benoit; Mussot, Sacha; Chataigner, Olivier; Mercier, Olaf; Kolb, Frederic; Dartevelle, Philippe G; Fadel, Elie

    2009-07-01

    Airway replacement after long-segment tracheal resection for benign and malignant disease remains a challenging problem because of the lack of a substitute conduit. Ideally, an airway substitute should be well vascularized, rigid, and autologous to avoid infections, airway stenosis, and the need for immunosuppression. We report the development of an autologous tracheal substitute for long-segment tracheal resection that satisfies these criteria and demonstrates excellent short-term functional results in a large-animal study. Twelve adult pigs underwent long-segment (6 cm, 60% of total length) tracheal resection. Autologous costal cartilage strips measuring 6 cm x 2 mm were harvested from the chest wall and inserted at regular 0.5-cm intervals between dermal layers of a cervical skin flap. The neotrachea was then scaffolded by rotating the composite cartilage skin flap around a silicone stent measuring 6 cm in length and 1.4 cm in diameter. The neotrachea replaced the long segment of tracheal resection, and the donor flap site was closed with a double-Z plasty. Animals were killed at 1 week (group I, n = 4), 2 weeks (group II, n = 4), and 5 weeks (group III, n = 4). In group III the stent was removed 1 week before death. Viability of the neotrachea was monitored by means of daily flexible bronchoscopy and histologic examination at autopsy. Long-term morbidity and mortality were determined by monitoring weight gain, respiratory distress, and survival. There was no mortality during the study period. Weight gain was appropriate in all animals. Daily bronchoscopy and postmortem histologic evaluation confirmed excellent viability of the neotrachea. There was no evidence of suture-line dehiscence. Five animals had distal granulomas that were removed by using rigid bronchoscopy. In group III 1 animal had tracheomalacia, which was successfully managed by means of insertion of a silicon stent. Airway reconstruction with autologous cervical skin flaps scaffolded with costal

  4. What's in a name? Expiratory tracheal narrowing in adults explained

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leong, P.; Bardin, P.G.; Lau, K.K.

    2013-01-01

    Tracheomalacia, tracheobronchomalacia, and excessive dynamic airway collapse are all terms used to describe tracheal narrowing in expiration. The first two describe luminal reduction from cartilage softening and the latter refers to luminal reduction from exaggerated posterior membrane movement. Expiratory tracheal narrowing is a frequent occurrence that can cause symptoms of airway obstruction, such as dyspnoea, wheeze, and exercise intolerance. The accurate diagnosis and quantification of expiratory tracheal narrowing has important aetiological, therapeutic, and prognostic implications. The reference standard for diagnosis has traditionally been bronchoscopy; however, this method has significant limitations. Expiratory tracheal disorders are readily detected by four-dimensional dynamic volume multidetector computed tomography (4D-CT), an emerging, non-invasive method that will potentially enable detection and quantification of these conditions. This review discusses the morphological forms of expiratory tracheal narrowing and demonstrates the utility of 4D-CT in the diagnosis, quantification, and treatment of these important conditions

  5. Corrosion casting of the subglottis following endotracheal tube intubation injury: a pilot study in Yorkshire piglets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Subglottic stenosis can result from endotracheal tube injury. The mechanism by which this occurs, however, is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of angiogenesis, hypoxia and ischemia in subglottic mucosal injury following endotracheal intubation. Methods Six Yorkshire piglets were randomized to either a control group (N=3, ventilated through laryngeal mask airway for corrosion casting) or accelerated subglottic injury group through intubation and induced hypoxia as per a previously described model (N=3). The vasculature of all animals was injected with liquid methyl methacrylate. After polymerization, the surrounding tissue was corroded with potassium hydroxide. The subglottic region was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy looking for angiogenic and hypoxic or degenerative features and groups were compared using Mann–Whitney tests and Friedman’s 2-way ANOVA. Results Animals in the accelerated subglottic injury group had less overall angiogenic features (P=.002) and more overall hypoxic/degenerative features (P=.000) compared with controls. Amongst angiogenic features, there was decreased budding (P=.000) and a trend toward decreased sprouting (P=.037) in the accelerated subglottic injury group with an increase in intussusception (P=.004), possibly representing early attempts at rapid revascularization. Amongst hypoxic/degenerative features, extravasation was the only feature that was significantly higher in the accelerated subglottic injury group (P=.000). Conclusions Subglottic injury due to intubation and hypoxia may lead to decreased angiogenesis and increased blood vessel damage resulting in extravasation of fluid and a decreased propensity toward wound healing in this animal model. PMID:24401165

  6. Submental Intubation in Patients with Complex Maxillofacial Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Yuseon; Kang, Seong Sik; Kim, Minsoo; Son, Hee Jeong; Park, Jaewoo; Kim, Jeong-Mo

    2016-01-01

    Airway management in patients with complex maxillofacial injuries is a challenge to anesthesiologists. Submental intubation is a useful technique that is less invasive than tracheostomy in securing the airways where orotracheal and nasotracheal intubation cannot be performed. This procedure avoids the use of tracheostomy and bypasses its associated morbidities. A flexible and kink-resistant reinforced endotracheal tube with detachable universal connector is commonly used for submental intubation. Herein, we report cases involving submental intubation using a reinforced endotracheal tube with a non-detachable universal connector in patients with complex maxillofacial injuries. PMID:27924286

  7. Tracheal transplantation for carinal reconstruction in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, K; Inutsuka, K; Hiratsuka, M; Makihata, S; Okabayashi, K; Shiraishi, T; Shirakusa, T

    1998-09-01

    Experimental carinal allotransplantation has been performed with tracheocarinal Y-shaped allografts in dogs. In this study we tried canine carinal reconstruction with cylindrical allografts. Carinal reconstruction was performed with allotransplantation of cylindrical trachea in dogs, and graft healing was evaluated by bronchoscopic observation, mucosal blood flow measurement, and histologic examination. A section of the recipient carina containing five tracheal rings and two main stem bronchi was removed, and a donor trachea seven rings long was inserted between the recipient trachea and the left main stem bronchus; then side-to-end anastomosis was performed between the graft midportion and recipient right main stem bronchus (new carina). The grafts were wrapped with pedicled omentum. Fresh grafts were transplanted into one group of dogs (n=8 ), and grafts cryopreserved for 1 week were transplanted into another group (n=7). No anastomotic leakage occurred in any dog. Excellent healing of grafts and graft anastomoses was observed by fiberoptic bronchoscopy in six dogs (75%) in the fresh graft group and in four dogs (57%) in the cryopreserved graft group. The mucosal blood flow in the new carina decreased remarkably and, although it recovered, mucosal blood flow remained under the preoperative level on day 28 after the operation. Cylindrical tracheal allotransplantation is useful for carinal reconstruction, and the method of side-to-end anastomosis between the donor trachea and recipient bronchus is a feasible and accessible procedure in dogs.

  8. Spinal canal stenosis; Spinalkanalstenose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papanagiotou, P.; Boutchakova, M. [Klinikum Bremen-Mitte/Bremen-Ost, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Bremen (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    Spinal stenosis is a narrowing of the spinal canal by a combination of bone and soft tissues, which can lead to mechanical compression of spinal nerve roots or the dural sac. The lumbal spinal compression of these nerve roots can be symptomatic, resulting in weakness, reflex alterations, gait disturbances, bowel or bladder dysfunction, motor and sensory changes, radicular pain or atypical leg pain and neurogenic claudication. The anatomical presence of spinal canal stenosis is confirmed radiologically with computerized tomography, myelography or magnetic resonance imaging and play a decisive role in optimal patient-oriented therapy decision-making. (orig.) [German] Die Spinalkanalstenose ist eine umschriebene, knoechern-ligamentaer bedingte Einengung des Spinalkanals, die zur Kompression der Nervenwurzeln oder des Duralsacks fuehren kann. Die lumbale Spinalkanalstenose manifestiert sich klinisch als Komplex aus Rueckenschmerzen sowie sensiblen und motorischen neurologischen Ausfaellen, die in der Regel belastungsabhaengig sind (Claudicatio spinalis). Die bildgebende Diagnostik mittels Magnetresonanztomographie, Computertomographie und Myelographie spielt eine entscheidende Rolle bei der optimalen patientenbezogenen Therapieentscheidung. (orig.)

  9. Endotracheal intubation with airtraq® versus storz® videolaryngoscope in children younger than two years - a randomized pilot-study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sørensen Martin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background New laryngoscopes have become available for use in small children. The aim of the study was to compare the Storz® videolaryngoscope (SVL to the Airtraq® Optical laryngoscope (AOL for tracheal intubation in children younger than two years of age who had a normal airway assessment. Our hypothesis was that the SVL would have a better success rate than the AOL. Methods Ten children aged 2 years or younger scheduled for elective cleft lip/palate surgery were included. The anesthesia was standardized and a Cormack-Lehane (CL-score was obtained using a Macintosh laryngoscope. After randomization CL-score and endotracheal tube positioning in front of the glottis was performed with one device, followed by the same procedure and intubation with the other device. The video-feed was recorded along with real-time audio. The primary endpoint was the success rate, defined as intubation in first attempt. Secondary endpoints were the time from start of laryngoscopy to CL-score, tube positioning in front of the glottis, and intubation. Results Two intubation attempts were needed in two of five patients randomized to the SVL. The difference in time (SVL vs. AOL to CL-score was 4.5 sec (p = 0.0449. The difference in time (SVL vs. AOL to tube positioning was 11.6 sec (p = 0.0015. Time to intubation was 29.0 sec for SVL and 15.8 sec for AOL. Conclusion No difference in the success rate of endotracheal intubation could be established in this ten patient sample of children younger than two years with a normal airway assessment scheduled for elective cleft lip/palate surgery. However, the Airtraq® Optical videolaryngoscope showed a number of time related advantages over the Storz® videolaryngoscope. Because of the small sample size a larger trial is needed to confirm these findings. Both devices were considered safe in all intubations. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov; Identifier NCT01090726.

  10. [ANCA-negative subglottic laryngeal stenosis in childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittekindt, C; Lüers, J-C; Drebber, U; Guntinas-Lichius, O; Hüttenbrink, K-B

    2007-10-01

    A 15-year-old female, having developed recurrent infections of the upper airway, hoarseness, dyspnea, and nasal congestion, was referred to our department. There was no history of trauma or intubation. The subglottic space was circularly narrowed. The test for c-ANCA was negative. Chest X-ray and renal function were normal. A tracheotomy was performed; the histology showed infiltrating plasma cells, but no signs of vasculitis or granulomatous inflammation. One year later the patient developed acute renal failure. Biopsy of the kidney confirmed Wegener's disease. The laryngeal stenosis completely resolved after therapy with cyclophosphamide. Juvenile Wegener's granulomatosis is extremely rare; the larynx and trachea seem to be involved more frequently in children than in adults. The positive testing of c-ANCA can support the diagnosis; however, even when c-ANCA do not test positive, the disease can never be excluded. Surgical interventions within the larynx or trachea might only be considered after ineffective therapy with immunosuppressive drugs.

  11. "COMPARISON OF HEMODYNAMIC CHANGES AFTER INSERTION OF LARYNGEAL MASK AIRWAY, FACEMASK AND ENDOTRACHEAL INTUBATION"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Montazari

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Hemodynamic changes are major hazards of general anesthesia and are probably generated by direct laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation. We designed this prospective randomised study to assess the cardiovascular changes after either laryngeal mask airway (LMA, face mask (FM or endotracheal tube (ETT insertion in the airway management of adult patients anesthetised with nitrous oxide and halothane. A total of 195 healthy normotensive adult patients with normal airways were randomly assigned to one of the three groups according to their airway management (n= 65 each for transurethral lithotripsy procedures. Heart rate (HR, systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP values were recorded before the induction of anesthesia, and then every three minutes until 30 min thereafter. The mean maximum HR and MAP values obtained during 15 and 30 minutes after insertion of LMA were 81±13, 73±8 bpm and 82±14, 79 ±11 mmHg, respectively which were significantly smaller compared to those with FM (84±12, 80±6 bpm and 86±10, 83±13 mmHg and ETT (96±8, 88±7 bpm and 91±11, 82±9 mmHg (P< 0.05. Direct stimulation of the trachea appears to be a major cause of the hemodynamic changes associated with tracheal intubation during general anesthesia, but why hemodynamic changes in LMA were smaller than facemask needs further study. In healthy normotensive patients the use of LMA for the airway management during general anesthesia results in a smaller cardiovascular change than FM and ETT.

  12. Geospatial Analysis of Pediatric EMS Run Density and Endotracheal Intubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Hansen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The association between geographic factors, including transport distance, and pediatric emergency medical services (EMS run clustering on out-of-hospital pediatric endotracheal intubation is unclear. The objective of this study was to determine if endotracheal intubation procedures are more likely to occur at greater distances from the hospital and near clusters of pediatric calls. Methods: This was a retrospective observational study including all EMS runs for patients less than 18 years of age from 2008 to 2014 in a geographically large and diverse Oregon county that includes densely populated urban areas near Portland and remote rural areas. We geocoded scene addresses using the automated address locator created in the cloud-based mapping platform ArcGIS, supplemented with manual address geocoding for remaining cases. We then use the Getis-Ord Gi spatial statistic feature in ArcGIS to map statistically significant spatial clusters (hot spots of pediatric EMS runs throughout the county. We then superimposed all intubation procedures performed during the study period on maps of pediatric EMS-run hot spots, pediatric population density, fire stations, and hospitals. We also performed multivariable logistic regression to determine if distance traveled to the hospital was associated with intubation after controlling for several confounding variables. Results: We identified a total of 7,797 pediatric EMS runs during the study period and 38 endotracheal intubations. In univariate analysis we found that patients who were intubated were similar to those who were not in gender and whether or not they were transported to a children’s hospital. Intubated patients tended to be transported shorter distances and were older than non-intubated patients. Increased distance from the hospital was associated with reduced odds of intubation after controlling for age, sex, scene location, and trauma system entry status in a multivariate logistic

  13. Three-finger tracheal palpation to guide endotracheal tube depth in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Jonathan J; McKay, William P; Wang, Andrew F; Yip, Kinsha A; O'Brien, Jennifer M; Plewes, Christopher E

    2014-10-01

    Accurate endotracheal tube (ETT) depth is critical, especially in children. The current tools used to guide appropriate ETT depth have significant limitations. To evaluate the utility of tracheal palpation in the neck to guide appropriate ETT placement in children. A prospective observational study with a convenience sample of 50 children was conducted. During intubation, an investigator palpated the trachea with three fingertips side-by-side extending upward from the suprasternal notch. The anesthesiologist advanced the ETT slowly until palpated at the sternal notch. The investigator stated ETT palpation certainty as 'strongly felt', 'weakly felt', or 'not felt.' Final ETT position was determined by bronchoscopy and categorized as 'ETT too shallow' (tip in proximal ¼ of trachea), 'ETT too deep' (tip in distal ¼ of trachea), or 'ETT placement satisfactory' (between those extremes). Thirty boys and 20 girls undergoing dental surgery with nasal intubation were recruited (median age 4.4 years; range 2.0-10.8). The ETT (all ≥4 mm ID) was palpable at the sternal notch in all patients: 46 of 50 strongly palpable and 4 of 50 weakly palpable. The experimental methods led to satisfactory ETT placement in 49 of 50 patients, too deep in 1 of 50 patients. Compared with the Pediatrics Advanced Life Support (PALS) predictive formula, satisfactory placement would have been 41 of 50 patients (P guide ETT placement has excellent clinical performance and better guides appropriate ETT depth than the PALS formula in our study population. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. A survey of a population of anaesthesiologists from South India regarding practices for rapid sequence intubation in patients with head injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyen Parida

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Evidence and utility of the individual steps of the rapid sequence induction and tracheal intubation protocols have been debated, especially in the setting of traumatic brain injury. The purpose of this survey was to determine preferences in the current approach to rapid sequence intubation ( RSI in head injury patients among a population of anaesthesiologists from South India. Methods: A questionnaire was E-mailed to all the members of the Indian Society of Anaesthesiologists′ South Zone Chapter to ascertain their preferences, experience and comfort level with regard to their use of rapid sequence intubation techniques in adult patients with head injury. Participants were requested to indicate their practices for RSI technique for a head-injured patient upon arrival at the Emergency Medical Services department of their hospital. Results: The total response rate was 56.9% (530/932. Of the total respondents, 35% of the clinicians used cricoid pressure routinely, most respondents (68% stated that they pre-oxygenate the patients for about 3 min prior to RSI, thiopentone (61% and propofol (34% were commonly used prior to intubation. Rocuronium was the muscle relaxant of choice for RSI among the majority (44%, compared to succinylcholine (39%. Statistical analyses were performed after the initial entry onto a spreadsheet. Data were summarised descriptively using frequency distribution. Conclusion: In a rapid sequence intubation situation, the practice differed significantly among anaesthesiologists. Owing to disagreements and paucity of evidence-based data regarding the standards of RSI, it is apparent that RSI practice still has considerable variability in clinical practice.

  15. Effects of acute respiratory virus infection upon tracheal mucous transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerrard, C.S.; Levandowski, R.A.; Gerrity, T.R.; Yeates, D.B.; Klein, E.

    1985-01-01

    Tracheal mucous velocity was measured in 13 healthy non-smokers using an aerosol labelled with /sup 99m/Tc and a multidetector probe during respiratory virus infections. The movement of boluses of tracheal mucous were either absent or reduced in number in five subjects with myxovirus infection (four influenza and one respiratory syncytial virus) within 48 hr of the onset of symptoms and in four subjects 1 wk later. One subject with influenza still had reduced bolus formation 12-16 wk after infection. Frequent coughing was a feature of those subjects with absent tracheal boluses. In contrast, four subjects with rhinovirus infection had normal tracheal mucous velocity at 48 hr after the onset of symptoms (4.1 +/- 1.3 mm/min). Tracheal mucous velocity was also normal (4.6 +/- 1.1 mm/min) in four subjects in whom no specific viral agent could be defined but had typical symptomatology of respiratory viral infection. During health tracheal mucous velocity was normal (4.8 +/- 1.6 mm/min) in the eleven subjects who had measurements made. Disturbances in tracheal mucous transport during virus infection appear to depend upon the type of virus and are most severe in influenza A and respiratory syncytial virus infection

  16. ONSET TIME AND EVALUATION OF INTUBATING CONDITIONS - ROCURONIUM IN PERSPECTIVE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    AGOSTON, S

    The customary methods for assessment of intubating conditions, namely the onset time in the adductor pollicis muscle and qualitative rating scales of the conditions at intubation, are unsatisfactory. The onset time of neuromuscular block in the adductor pollicis is not a meaningful, quantifiable

  17. Molar Intubation for Intra Oral Swellings:Our Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenoti Potdar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Molar intubation is a technique of laryngoscopy that can be used for anticipated difficult intubation in cases where standard laryngoscopy technique is difficult due to presence of any intraoral mass that anatomically hampers laryngoscopy or that bleeds on touch. This technique is very easy, reliable and rewarding but should be practiced on normal patients for easy application in actual difficult cases.

  18. Intracranial arterial stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Marta; Oliveira, Ana; Azevedo, Elsa; Bastos-Leite, António J

    2014-04-01

    Intracranial arterial stenosis (IAS) is usually attributable to atherosclerosis and corresponds to the most common cause of stroke worldwide. It is very prevalent among African, Asian, and Hispanic populations. Advancing age, systolic hypertension, diabetes mellitus, high levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and metabolic syndrome are some of its major risk factors. IAS may be associated with transient or definite neurological symptoms or can be clinically asymptomatic. Transcranial Doppler and magnetic resonance angiography are the most frequently used ancillary examinations for screening and follow-up. Computed tomography angiography can either serve as a screening tool for the detection of IAS or increasingly as a confirmatory test approaching the diagnostic accuracy of catheter digital subtraction angiography, which is still considered the gold (confirmation) standard. The risk of stroke in patients with asymptomatic atherosclerotic IAS is low (up to 6% over a mean follow-up period of approximately 2 years), but the annual risk of stroke recurrence in the presence of a symptomatic stenosis may exceed 20% when the degree of luminal narrowing is 70% or more, recently after an ischemic event, and in women. It is a matter of controversy whether there is a specific type of treatment other than medical management (including aggressive control of vascular risk factors and antiplatelet therapy) that may alter the high risk of stroke recurrence among patients with symptomatic IAS. Endovascular treatment has been thought to be helpful in patients who fail to respond to medical treatment alone, but recent data contradict such expectation. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Snake Envenomation Causing Distant Tracheal Myonecrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amina Khimani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Snakebites are often believed to be poisonous. However, this is not always the case. In fact, each bite differs from snake to snake, depending on if the snake is poisonous and if there is envenomation. Venom in pit viper snakebites is often associated with local necrosis. The abundant literature selections and research articles justify local myonecrosis due to envenomation, but there is not much in the literature regarding myonecrosis at a site distant from the snakebite. We hereby present a case of a 42-year-old man who was transferred to our emergency department after a rattlesnake bit him twice. The patient, besides developing local myonecrosis at the site of the snakebite, developed necrosis of the scrotum as well as tracheal pressure myonecrosis at the site of the endotracheal tube balloon. In this review, we will attempt to discuss the myonecrosis pathophysiology and management related to the rattle snakebite.

  20. Esophageal trachealization: A feature of eosinophilic esophagitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlHussaini, Abdulrahman A; Semaan, Toufic; ElHag, Imad A

    2009-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EE) is an inflammatory condition characterized by intense eosinophilic infiltration of the esophagus. EE is frequently misdiagnosed as gastroesophageal reflux disease. Here, we present a child with EE and a characteristic endoscopic finding, r inged esophagus . An 11-year-old Saudi boy presented with dysphagia for 1 year. He had experienced an intermittent sensation of solid food sticking in his chest, which was relieved by drinking liquids. A barium swallow excluded anatomical causes of dysphagia, but revealed multiple-ringed esophagus. Endoscopy showed a furrowing and trachealizing appearance of the entire esophagus. Hisologically, extensive eosinophilic infiltration was a feature in biopsies obtained from the esophagus. The child responded well to a 2-month course of inhaled fluticasone. Symptoms recurred 3 months after discontinuation of therapy, which necessitated resumption of inhaled fluticasone. The endoscopic appearance of multiple esophageal rings should raise suspicion of EE and be confirmed by esophageal biopsies. (author)

  1. Prevalence of streptococcus group B in tracheal tube secretions of neonates with respiratory distress: a brief report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khosravi N

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infection with group B streptococcus (GBS can present with respiratory distress, Pneumonia, meningitis and Osteomyelitis in neonates. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of GBS colonization in trachea of intubated neonates.Methods: This observational analytic study was performed upon 33 intubated neonates due to respiratory distress in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU Rasoul Hospital in Tehran, Iran during 2010-2012. Tracheal secretions cultured upon TODD-HEWITT BROTH and sheep blood agar 5%., chi-square test was used for compare the qualitative variables. P<0.05 was considered meaningful.Results: Three cases had positive streptococcal culture (9.1% and four cases had posi-tive culture for non-streptococcal organisms. no meaningful relation observed between positive GBS culture and neonatal gender, kind of delivery, PROM.Conclusion: Prevalence of GBS positive results (9% in present study is very close to GBS colonization in pregnant women; although the higher colonization rate of pregnant women are expected.

  2. Degenerative lumbosacral stenosis in dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suwankong, N.

    2007-01-01

    Degenerative lumbosacral stenosis (DLS) is now recognized as a significant cause of caudal lumbar pain and pelvic limb lameness in dogs. The condition includes lumbosacral intervertebral disc degeneration and protrusion, spondylosis deformans, sclerosis of the vertebral end plates, osteoarthrosis of

  3. Subglottic stenosis in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's granulomatosis): Report of 4 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horta-Baas, Gabriel; Hernández-Cabrera, María Fernanda; Catana, Rocío; Pérez-Cristóbal, Mario; Barile-Fabris, Leonor Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Subglottic stenosis (SGS) in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) may result from active disease or from chronic recurrent inflammation. The objective of the study was to describe the clinical features and treatment of patients with subglottic stenosis. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all patients with SGS due to GPA diagnosed at Rheumatology deparment between January 2000 and June 2015. We present 4 cases of SGS at our department during a period of 15 years. The interval between the presentation of the GPA and SGS varied between 2 and 144 months. The leading symptoms of SGS were dyspnoea on exertion and stridor. Three patients presented SGS without evidence of systemic activity. Two patients presented SGS grade i and received tracheal dilatation; two recurred and three needed a tracheostomy due to severe airway-limiting stenosis. SGS presents high morbidity. Even though subglottic dilatation provides symptomatic relief, recurrences may present. Severe airway-limiting stenosis often requires tracheostomy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  4. The effects of preemptive pregabalin on attenuation of stress response to endotracheal intubation and opioid- sparing effect in patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayya Syama Sundar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical study was designed to evaluate and compare single preoperative dose of pregabalin to a placebo regarding hemodynamic responses to laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation, to assess perioperative fentanyl requirement and any side-effects. It was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel assignment, efficacy study. The study was done at a tertiary university hospital. This study was a comparison between two groups of 30 adult patients scheduled for elective off pump coronary artery bypass surgery. In the control group, the patients were given placebo capsules, and in the pregabalin group, the patients were given pregabalin 150 mg capsule orally 1 h before surgery. The patients were compared for hemodynamic changes before the start of the surgery, after induction, 1, 3, and 5 min after intubation. Additionally, fentanyl requirement during surgery and the first postoperative day was also compared. The present study shows that a single oral dose of 150 mg pregabalin given 1 h before surgery attenuated the pressor response to tracheal intubation in adults, but the drug did not show any effect on perioperative opioid consumption and was devoid of side-effects in the given dose.

  5. Contemporary management of pyloric stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobson, Matthew; Hall, Nigel J

    2016-08-01

    Hypertrophic pyloric stenosis is a common surgical cause of vomiting in infants. Following appropriate fluid resuscitation, the mainstay of treatment is pyloromyotomy. This article reviews the aetiology and pathophysiology of hypertrophic pyloric stenosis, its clinical presentation, the role of imaging, the preoperative and postoperative management, current surgical approaches and non-surgical treatment options. Contemporary postoperative feeding regimens, outcomes and complications are also discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The Efficacy of Polydioxanone Monofilament Absorbable Suture for Tracheal Anastomosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kawahara, Katsunobu; Yamasaki, Naoya; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Nagayasu, Takeshi; Kusano, Hiroyuki; Akamine, Shinji; Takahashi, Takao; Tomita, Masao

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of polydioxanon absorbable suture for tracheal anastomoses, we performed an experimental study using dose. Eight adult mongrel dogs underwent sleeve resection of the mediastinal trachea. A length of ten to twelve cartilage rings was resected. An end-to-end anastomosis was performed using either interrupted or continuous running 4-0 polydioxanone (PDS) suture. There was no detectable difference bronchoscopically, microangiografically, or histologically, in tracheal ana...

  7. Timing of intubation and ventilator-associated pneumonia following injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Heather L; Zonies, David H; Warner, Keir J; Bulger, Eileen M; Sharar, Sam R; Maier, Ronald V; Cuschieri, Joseph

    2010-11-01

    In an emergency medical system with established rapid-sequence intubation protocols, prehospital (PH) intubation of patients with trauma is not associated with a higher rate of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) than emergency department (ED) intubation. Retrospective observational cohort. Level I trauma center. Adult patients with trauma intubated in a PH or an ED setting from July 1, 2007, through July 31, 2008. Diagnosis of VAP by means of bronchoscopic alveolar lavage or clinical assessment when bronchoscopic alveolar lavage was impossible. Secondary outcomes included time to VAP, length of hospitalization, and in-hospital mortality. Of 572 patients, 412 (72.0%) underwent PH intubation. The ED group was older than the PH group (mean ages, 46.4 vs 39.1 years; P VAP (30 [18.8%] vs 71 [17.2%]; P = .66) or mean time to diagnosis (8.1 [1.2] vs 7.8 [1.0] days; P = .89). Logistic regression analysis identified history of drug abuse, lowest recorded ED systolic blood pressure, and injury severity score as 3 independent factors predictive of VAP. Prehospital intubation of patients with trauma is not associated with higher risk of VAP. Further investigation of intubation factors and the incidence and timing of aspiration is required to identify potentially modifiable factors to prevent VAP.

  8. Neonatal aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Nigel E; Veldtman, Gruschen R; Benson, Lee N

    2005-09-01

    Neonatal aortic stenosis is a complex and heterogeneous condition, defined as left ventricular outflow tract obstruction at valvular level, presenting and often requiring treatment in the first month of life. Initial presentation may be catastrophic, necessitating hemodynamic, respiratory and metabolic resuscitation. Subsequent management is focused on maintaining systemic blood flow, either via a univentricular Norwood palliation or a biventricular route, in which the effective aortic valve area is increased by balloon dilation or surgical valvotomy. In infants with aortic annular hypoplasia but adequately sized left ventricle, the Ross-Konno procedure is also an attractive option. Outcomes after biventricular management have improved in recent years as a consequence of better patient selection, perioperative management and advances in catheter technology. Exciting new developments are likely to significantly modify the natural history of this disorder, including fetal intervention for the salvage of the hypoplastic left ventricle; 3D echocardiography providing better definition of valve morphology and aiding patient selection for a surgical or catheter-based intervention; and new transcutaneous approaches, such as duel beam echo, to perforate the valve.

  9. Evaluating the utility of serological testing in laryngotracheal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, S Ryan; Allen, Clint T; Merati, Albert L; Mayerhoff, Ross M

    2017-06-01

    Whereas mechanical (traumatic) causes of laryngotracheal stenosis (LTS) are identified based on history, autoimmune laryngotracheal stenosis (aLTS) and idiopathic laryngotracheal stenosis (iLTS) are often more difficult to differentiate. The objective of this study was to evaluate serologic testing in a large cohort of nonmechanical LTS patients to determine which tests, if any, lead clinicians to the etiology of the LTS. Retrospective chart review. This study reviewed nonmechanical LTS patients seen at a tertiary medical center from 2007 to 2014. Data were obtained on patient demographics, associated preexisting autoimmune conditions, comorbidities, intubation history, and serologic testing. Ninety-two records were reviewed. Twenty-three (25%) patients were found to have autoimmune disease; 69 (75%) met criteria for iLTS. A history of cigarette smoking was more significant in the aLTS group than the iLTS group (P testing was equivocal between the two cohorts. Differentiating iLTS from aLTS has proven difficult. The lack of information about the two entities has resulted in variability in the diagnostic workup to distinguish them. This study's finding of a more significant smoking history in the aLTS group correlates with the literature, which suggests an inflammatory effect of smoking cigarettes and an association with autoimmune disease. The only significant cohort of patients in this study found to have positive serological testing correlated with a diagnosable condition responsible for LTS was GPA patients with positive ANCA. 4. Laryngoscope, 127:1408-1412, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  10. Canine tracheal epithelial cells are more sensitive than rat tracheal epithelial cells to transforming growth factor beta induced growth inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbs, A.F.; Hahn, F.F.; Kelly, G.; Thomassen, D.G.

    1988-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) markedly inhibited growth of canine tracheal epithelial (CTE) cells. Reduced responsiveness to TGFβ-induced growth inhibition accompanied neoplastic progression of these cells from primary to transformed to neoplastic. This was similar to the relationship between neoplastic progression and increased resistance to TGFβ-induced growth inhibition seen for rat tracheal epithelial (RTE) cells. The canine cells were more sensitive than rat cells to TGFβ-induced growth inhibition at all stages in the neoplastic process. (author)

  11. Oesophageal intubation can be undetected by auscultation of the chest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, K H; Schultz-Lebahn, T

    1994-01-01

    Prompt detection of oesophageal intubation is a primary concern in anaesthetic practice. This blind, randomised study evaluates three widely used tests of intubation. Forty patients had both their trachea and oesophagus intubated, each patient was studied twice. Auscultation of the epigastrium......, right and left axilla is more reliable than auscultation of the chest, and the anaesthetist's feeling when he squeezes the bag. P = 0.001 and P = 0.048, respectively. The tests were carried out after gastric distension with gas had occurred. We conclude that auscultation of epigastrium, right and left...

  12. State of the art: Rescue intubation through supraglottic airways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Hofmeyr*

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of supraglottic airways as rescue devices in failed intubation and resuscitation has become well accepted in emergency practice. Many offer or advertise the possibility of intubation through the device, but techniques and success rates vary greatly. Intubation can be achieved blindly, with the use a bougie or introducer, or with fiberoptic guidance. In this review, I examine the evidence behind different devices with various techniques, present the data from our on-going research, suggest further research directions and propose practical guidelines for clinical use in emergencies.

  13. Recurrent epistaxis following nasotracheal intubation--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y H; Chen, J Y; Hsu, C S; Huang, C T; So, E

    1996-06-01

    Epistaxis is one of the common complications of nasotracheal intubation. Clinical patterns of all nasal bleeding are mild and may stop spontaneously in most patients. Serious nasal bleeding requiring hospitalization are rare. Nasal bleeding occurs more frequently in children than in adults. Among adults, men have a higher incidence than women. Although numerous publications have reported the cases of initial epistaxis caused by nasotracheal intubation, recurrent epistaxis was reported rarely. We experienced a case of recurrent epistaxis occurring in the 6th, 8th, 15th and 18th day after nasotracheal intubation. Herein, we describe the clinical events and discuss the causes of epistaxis.

  14. Fetal MRI in experimental tracheal occlusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedegaertner, Ulrike [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20251 Hamburg (Germany)]. E-mail: wedegaer@uke.uni-hamburg.de; Schroeder, Hobe J. [Experimental Gynecology, Department of Obstetrics and Prenatal Medicine, Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Adam, Gerhard [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany)

    2006-02-15

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is associated with a high mortality, which is mainly due to pulmonary hypoplasia and secondary pulmonary hypertension. In severely affected fetuses, tracheal occlusion (TO) is performed prenatally to reverse pulmonary hypoplasia, because TO leads to accelerated lung growth. Prenatal imaging is important to identify fetuses with pulmonary hypoplasia, to diagnose high-risk fetuses who would benefit from TO, and to monitor the effect of TO after surgery. In fetal imaging, ultrasound (US) is the method of choice, because it is widely available, less expensive, and less time-consuming to perform than magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, there are some limitations for US in the evaluation of CDH fetuses. In those cases, MRI is helpful because of a better tissue contrast between liver and lung, which enables evaluation of liver herniation for the diagnosis of a high-risk fetus. MRI provides the ability to determine absolute lung volumes to detect lung hypoplasia. In fetal sheep with normal and hyperplastic lungs after TO, lung growth was assessed on the basis of cross-sectional US measurements, after initial lung volume determination by MRI. To monitor fetal lung growth after prenatal TO, both MRI and US seem to be useful methods.

  15. Treatment of multiple-level tracheobronchial stenosis secondary to endobronchial tuberculosis using bronchoscopic balloon dilatation with topical mitomycin-C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faisal, Mohamed; Harun, Hafaruzi; Hassan, Tidi M; Ban, Andrea Y L; Chotirmall, Sanjay H; Abdul Rahaman, Jamalul Azizi

    2016-04-14

    Tracheobronchial stenosis is a known complication of endobronchial tuberculosis. Despite antituberculous and steroid therapy, the development of bronchial stenosis is usually irreversible and requires airway patency to be restored by either bronchoscopic or surgical interventions. We report the use of balloon dilatation and topical mitomycin-C to successful restore airway patency. We present a 24-year old lady with previous pulmonary tuberculosis and laryngeal tuberculosis in 2007 and 2013 respectively who presented with worsening dyspnoea and stridor. She had total left lung collapse with stenosis of both the upper trachea and left main bronchus. She underwent successful bronchoscopic balloon and manual rigid tube dilatation with topical mitomycin-C application over the stenotic tracheal segment. A second bronchoscopic intervention was performed after 20 weeks for the left main bronchus stenosis with serial balloon dilatation and topical mitomycin-C application. These interventions led to significant clinical and radiographic improvements. This case highlights that balloon dilatation and topical mitomycin-C application should be considered in selected patients with tracheobronchial stenosis following endobronchial tuberculosis, avoiding airway stenting and invasive surgical intervention.

  16. Successful Treatment of Anterior Tracheal Necrosis after Total Thyroidectomy Using Vacuum-Assisted Closure Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grégory Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Total thyroidectomy involving the adjacent structures of the trachea can cause tracheal damage such as early tracheal necrosis. The authors describe the first case of anterior tracheal necrosis following total thyroidectomy treated using vacuum-assisted closure device. After two weeks of VAC  therapy, there was no evidence of ongoing infection and the trachea was partially closed around a tracheotomy cannula, removed after 3 months. The use of a VAC  therapy to reduce and close the tracheal rent and to create a rapid granulation tissue over tracheal structure appeared as a good opportunity after anterior tracheal necrosis.

  17. Intubation and mechanical ventilation: knowledge of medical officers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Linda van Deventer

    2014-08-20

    Aug 20, 2014 ... intubation is an effective means of ensuring a patent airway, as well as adequate .... appropriate initial tidal volume per kg of ideal body weight for a patient with acute ... oxygenation in diffuse lung injury or lung infiltration.

  18. Errors and clinical supervision of intubation attempts by the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Existing publications focus mainly on trainees in emergency settings and ... development in patients with anticipated straightforward airways in a controlled environment has received little attention. ..... Elements associated with failed intubation have been divided ... explicit training of supervisors, anaesthetic assistants and.

  19. Nasotracheal Intubation in Children for Outpatient Dental Surgery: Is ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-23

    Feb 23, 2018 ... groups, systolic blood pressure (SBP) and heart rate (HR) ... Hemodynamic responses to FOB-guided intubation .... head of the patient was the in supine position and an ... different between the two groups after the induction.

  20. Aerosol delivery in intubated, mechanically ventilated patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacIntyre, N.R.; Silver, R.M.; Miller, C.W.; Schuler, F.; Coleman, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    To study the effects of respiratory failure and mechanical ventilation on aerosol delivery to the lungs, nuclear scans were performed after aerosolization of 5 to 9 mCi of Tc-99m diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid in seven stable, intubated, and mechanically ventilated patients. The radioactivity reaching the lungs was 2.9 +/- .7% (mean +/- SD) of the administered dose, an amount significantly less than that in three healthy nonintubated subjects and also less than what would be expected in nonintubated subjects from other published reports. A subsequent study was performed in 15 additional mechanically ventilated patients who were receiving aerosolized bronchodilators through their endotracheal tube. In these patients, heart rate and lung mechanical function values before and after treatment were not significantly different. It is concluded from these studies that aerosol delivery in mechanically ventilated patients is significantly reduced and that this is probably due to a combination of suboptimal breathing pattern, intrinsic airway disease, and the endotracheal tube functioning as both a site for aerosol deposition through impaction as well as a barrier to gastrointestinal absorption

  1. Vardenafil inhibiting parasympathetic function of tracheal smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Fei-Peng; Chao, Pin-Zhir; Wang, Hsing-Won

    2018-07-01

    Levitra, a phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) inhibitor, is the trade name of vardenafil. Nowadays, it is applied to treatment of erectile dysfunction. PDE5 inhibitors are employed to induce dilatation of the vascular smooth muscle. The effect of Levitra on impotency is well known; however, its effect on the tracheal smooth muscle has rarely been explored. When administered for sexual symptoms via oral intake or inhalation, Levitra might affect the trachea. This study assessed the effects of Levitra on isolated rat tracheal smooth muscle by examining its effect on resting tension of tracheal smooth muscle, contraction caused by 10 -6  M methacholine as a parasympathetic mimetic, and electrically induced tracheal smooth muscle contractions. The results showed that adding methacholine to the incubation medium caused the trachea to contract in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of Levitra at doses of 10 -5  M or above elicited a significant relaxation response to 10 -6  M methacholine-induced contraction. Levitra could inhibit electrical field stimulation-induced spike contraction. It alone had minimal effect on the basal tension of the trachea as the concentration increased. High concentrations of Levitra could inhibit parasympathetic function of the trachea. Levitra when administered via oral intake might reduce asthma attacks in impotent patients because it might inhibit parasympathetic function and reduce methacholine-induced contraction of the tracheal smooth muscle. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Taiwan LLC.

  2. http://www.bioline.org.br/js 104 Penetrating Tracheal Injuries – A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    jen

    airway and prompt repair is the mainstay of management of penetrating tracheal injuries. Introduction ... tracheal injury was made in the 16th century ... Pearson 7 Harrington8 Sheely9 and Hood10 ..... Ed Am Col Surg (Chicago) .p.391. 12.

  3. Airway injury during emergency transcutaneous airway access: a comparison at cricothyroid and tracheal sites.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Salah, Nazar

    2009-12-01

    Oxygenation via the cricothyroid membrane (CTM) may be required in emergencies, but inadvertent tracheal cannulation may occur. In this study, we compared airway injury between the tracheal and CTM sites using different techniques for airway access.

  4. Ease of intubation: A randomized, double-blind study to compare two doses of rocuronium bromide for endotracheal intubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Aparna; Misra, Shilpi

    2016-01-01

    Clinical need for a nondepolarizing agent with a rapid onset time and a brief duration of action has led to the development of rocuronium bromide. The aim of this study was to evaluate optimal dose of rocuronium bromide for intubation and to compare the onset time, duration of action, intubating conditions, and hemodynamic effects of two doses of rocuronium bromide. A prospective, randomized, double-blind study. All the patients were divided in a randomized, double-blind fashion into two groups of twenty patients each. Group I patients received rocuronium bromide 0.6 mg/kg intravenously and intubated at 60 s, Group II patients received rocuronium bromide 0.9 mg/kg and intubated at 60 s. The neuromuscular block was assessed using single twitch stimulation of 0.1 Hz at adductor pollicis muscle of hand at every 10 s. The results were compiled and analyzed statistically using Chi-square test for qualitative data and Student's t -test for quantitative data. Time of onset was significantly shorter ( P Rocuronium bromide 0.9 mg/kg is a safer alternative to rocuronium bromide 0.6 mg/kg for endotracheal intubation with shorter time of onset and better intubating conditions.

  5. Bronchology Treatment Of The Malignant Airway Stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slivka, R. et al

    2007-01-01

    Central airway stenosis is benign or malignant etiology. Multidiscplinary approach is useful in treatment central airway stenosis. In inoperable cases, interventional bronchology is good therapeutic alternative. We can use NdYAG laser, argon plasma coagulation, elektrocautery, cryotherapy, photodynamic therapy and stents for obstruction release. In malignant stenosis, we combine often methods of the interventional bronchology with brachytherapy, chemotherapy and external radiotherapy. (author)

  6. The diastal urethral stenosis in female children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauer, W.

    1985-01-01

    The distal urethral stenosis in female children is a pathological reality. It is represented by the hymenal hood, the meatal stenosis and the distal urethral ring. Diagnosis and localisation of the stenosis is maintained by calibration with bougies a boule. Therapeutical consequences are: internal urethrotomy, bilateral meatotomy and excision of hymenal hoods. (Author)

  7. Laryngotracheal Stenosis in Children and Infants With Neurological Disorders: Management and Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicollas, Richard; Moreddu, Eric; Le Treut-Gay, Claire; Roman, Stéphane; Mancini, Julien; Triglia, Jean-Michel

    2016-12-01

    The goal of this retrospective study is to compare the management and outcome of surgical treatment of laryngotracheal stenosis in children and infants with and without an associated neurological disorder. In a series of children operated on for subglottic stenosis (SGS), patients with an associated neurological disorder were identified. The following criteria were compared in children with and without neurological disease: grade of stenosis, age, technique (Crico-Tracheal Resection (CTR), Laryngo-Tracheo-Plasty (LTP) in single and 2 stage, laser), analyzing duration, preoperative tracheostomy, decannulation rate, preoperative gastrostomy, and number of days in intensive care unit and in hospital. Two hundred twenty-three children were operated on for subglottic stenosis, of whom 68 (30.5%) had an associated neurological disorder. Some criteria were found to be statistically different between the 2 populations: mean age of 43 months in neurological population versus 13 months (P neurological disorder-66.6% versus 36.5% (P = .013); the median duration of stenting was 20 days in those with neurological disease versus 12 (P = .021). Preoperative tracheotomy was noted in 75% of neurological patients versus 47.7% of the others (P neurological disorder, as against 86.5% of neurologically unimpaired subjects. The difference in outcome of surgery was not statistically different (P = .392) between the 2 groups. It appears that subglottic stenosis in children with associated neurological disorder is not more severe than in neurologically normal patients. In three-quarters of the neurologically impaired cases, a preoperative tracheostomy was needed, but the rates of failure of postoperative decannulation are not statistically significant between the 2 groups. In our experience, 2-stage techniques are more often performed than single stage in this population in order to allow airway safety, for example after feeding. If properly managed, the final results are similar in the 2

  8. Endotracheal intubation skill acquisition by medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry E. Wang MD MS

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available During the course of their training, medical students may receive introductory experience with advanced resuscitation skills. Endotracheal intubation (ETI – the insertion of a breathing tube into the trachea is an example of an important advanced resuscitation intervention. Only limited data characterize clinical ETI skill acquisition by medical students. We sought to characterize medical student acquisition of ETI procedural skill.11Presented as a poster discussion on 17 October 2007 at the annual meeting of the American Society of Anesthesiologists in San Francisco, CA.The study included third-year medical students participating in a required anesthesiology clerkship. Students performed ETI on operating room patients under the supervision of attending anesthesiologists. Students reported clinical details of each ETI effort, including patient age, sex, Mallampati score, number of direct laryngoscopies and ETI success. Using mixed-effects regression, we characterized the adjusted association between ETI success and cumulative ETI experience.ETI was attempted by 178 students on 1,646 patients (range 1–23 patients per student; median 9 patients per student, IQR 6–12. Overall ETI success was 75.0% (95% CI 72.9–77.1%. Adjusted for patient age, sex, Mallampati score and number of laryngoscopies, the odds of ETI success improved with cumulative ETI encounters (odds ratio 1.09 per additional ETI encounter; 95% CI 1.04–1.14. Students required at least 17 ETI encounters to achieve 90% predicted ETI success.In this series medical student ETI proficiency was associated with cumulative clinical procedural experience. Clinical experience may provide a viable strategy for fostering medical student procedural skills.

  9. Congenital Complete Tracheal Ring in a Neonate: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra ARUN ÖZER

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abnormalities of the upper airway tract lead to congenital high airway obstruction and may complicate neonatal airway management in the delivery room. Congenital complete tracheal rings are a rare and unusual tracheal anomaly, usually presenting in the neonate or infant as respiratory distress. The clinical presentation can vary from almost asymptomatic patients to near-fatal airway obstruction. It may exist as an isolated entity, or in association with other congenital malformations, in particular, cardiac anomalies along with vascular rings and pulmonary slings. Other associated anomalies have also been reported, for example, chromosomal anomalies, malformation of other parts of the respiratory tract, esophagus and skeletal systems. Here, we report an extreme case of VACTERL/TACRD association presented with congenital complete tracheal ring, encephalocele, bilateral radial agenesis with absent thumbs, equinovalgus deformity on right foot, low-set ears and micrognathia.

  10. Two-piece cryopreserved tracheal allotransplantation: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyikesici, Tuncel; Tuncozgur, Bulent; Sanli, Maruf; Isik, Ahmet Feridun; Meteroglu, Fatih; Elbeyli, Levent

    2009-10-01

    For successful reconstruction with tracheal allotransplants following long tracheal resections, problems related to the preservation and vascularisation of the tracheal graft have to be solved. In this study, instead of using a long-segment single-piece graft, we used a graft that has been split into two. The aim was to use this graft after cryopreservation in order to ease neo-vascularisation and to maintain tracheal integrity by transplanting it to two separate regions of the dog cervical trachea. This experimental study was conducted in animal laboratories of the medical school on 11 half-blood dogs. The trachea obtained from the first dog was 8 cm in length; it was split into two pieces of 4 cm each and stored in the preservation solution at -80 degrees C for 4 weeks. Following this, the dog was sacrificed. Two 2 cm portions of cervical trachea were excised from the second dog. These parts were then reconstructed with two tracheal grafts of the same length as the cryopreserved ones. Ten dogs that were grouped into five groups of two dogs each underwent the same procedure. The subjects had a bronchoscopic evaluation on the third postoperative week. Anastomosis regions of the test tracheas were resected to be examined histopathologically. Seven subjects were found to have third-degree obstructions during bronchoscopy; two had close to fourth-degree obstructions. In the histopathological examination, contrary to the findings of the bronchoscopies, 75% of the anastomoses had intact epithelium. The cartilage was seen to have well-preserved structural characteristics in all the anastomoses. Twelve anastomoses had moderate, seven mild and one had severe inflammation. All anastomoses had either good or very good level of vascularisation. The integrity of the tracheal epithelium can be maintained with cryopreservation and split anastomosis technique. The cartilage preserves its structural characteristics despite losing its viability, thereby offering an advantage to

  11. Tracheal Self-Expandable Metallic Stents: A Comparative Study of Three Different Stents in a Rabbit Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Carolina; Lostalé, Fernando; Rodríguez-Panadero, Francisco; Blas, Ignacio de; Laborda, Alicia; de Gregorio, Miguel Angel

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess tracheal reactivity after the deployment of different self-expandable metal stents (SEMS). Forty female New Zealand rabbits were divided into four groups. Three groups received three different SEMS: steel (ST), nitinol (NiTi), or nitinol drug-eluting stent (DES); the fourth group was the control group (no stent). Stents were deployed percutaneously under fluoroscopic guidance. Animals were assessed by multi-slice, computed tomography (CT) scans, and tracheas were collected for anatomical pathology (AP) study. Data from CT and AP were statistically analyzed and correlated. The DES group had the longest stenosis (20.51±14.08mm vs. 5.84±12.43 and 6.57±6.54mm in NiTi and ST, respectively, day 30; Pstent. CT was more effective in detecting wall thickening (positive correlation of 68.9%; Pstent, while DES caused significant lesions that may be related to drug dosage. This type of DES stent is therefore not recommended for the treatment of tracheobronchial stenosis. Copyright © 2015 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Tracheal dimness as a sign of mediastinal pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiavon, F.; Nardini, S.; Giannico, S.

    1987-01-01

    Some cases of mediastinal pathology in which the only pathological pattern was a dimness of the tracheal transparency are described. This sign is not described in previous report and is described as a short break in the aerial tracheogram as seen on the frontal roentgenograph. This sign is produced by an increase in the structures outside the trachea or by a decrease in the air column inside the trachea. Conventional and CT anatomic findings which account for the sign are discussed. A short review of the normal causes of tracheal dimness is presented. This sign may be useful expecially in emergency radiology, since it provides additional information to a simple routine chest roentgenograph

  13. Tracheal Atresia with Segmental Esophageal Duplication: An Unusual Anatomic Arrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaerty, Kirsten; Thomas, Joseph T; Petersen, Scott; Tan, Edwin; Kumar, Sailesh; Gardener, Glenn; Armes, Jane

    2016-01-01

    An unusual anatomic configuration of segmental tracheal agenesis/atresia with esophageal duplication on autopsy in a fetus that demised in utero at 29 weeks is reported. The mother was scanned initially for a cardiac anomaly at 20 weeks and on follow-up scan at 27 weeks had polyhydramnios and underwent amnioreduction. The final autopsy diagnosis was vertebral, ano-rectal, cardiac, tracheoesophageal, renal, and limb malformations (VACTERL). We discuss the autopsy findings along with the embryological mechanisms and compare the configuration with Floyd's classification for tracheal agenesis. The difficulties in prenatal diagnosis are discussed.

  14. Congenital tracheal defects: embryonic development and animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenab Arooj Sher

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Tracheal anomalies are potentially catastrophic congenital defects. As a newborn begins to breathe, the trachea needs to maintain an appropriate balance of elasticity and rigidity. If the tracheal cartilages are disorganized or structurally weak, the airways can collapse, obstructing breathing. Cartilage rings that are too small or too rigid can also obstruct breathing. These anomalies are frequently associated with craniofacial syndromes, and, despite the importance, are poorly understood. In this review, we summarize the spectrum of pathological phenotypes of the trachea and correlate them with the molecular events uncovered in mouse models.

  15. Tracheal adenoid cystic carcinoma masquerading asthma: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurul Cuneyt

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tracheal tumors are often misdiagnosed as asthma and are treated with inhaled steroids and bronchodilators without resolution. Case Presentation Here, a patient with tracheal adenoid cystic carcinoma who had been previously diagnosed with difficult asthma was reported. The possibility of the presence of localized airway obstruction was raised when the flow-volume curve suggesting fixed airway obstruction, was obtained. Conclusion The presenting case report emphasizes the fact that not all wheezes are asthma. It is critical to bear in mind that if a patient does not respond to appropriate anti-asthma therapy, localized obstructions should be ruled out before establishing the diagnosis of asthma.

  16. [Successful Awake Nasal Endotracheal Intubation with the McGrath Videolaryngoscope and a Soft-tipped Extra Firm Exchange Catheter in a Patient with a Necrotic Mandible].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Matsunami, Sayuri; Nakao, Kenta; Minami, Toshiaki

    2015-03-01

    Here we report a case of successful awake nasal intubation with the McGrath videolaryngscope (McGrath) in conjunction with a soft-tipped extra firm exchange catheter in a patient with a necrotic mandible developing a hole. An 81-year-old woman underwent partial tongue resection and cervical lymph node dissection. After additional radiation therapy, she developed a necrotic mandible with a hole from the oral cavity to the neck region. She was scheduled for resection of the necrotic mandible under general anesthesia. Upon sedation with dexmedetomidine 1.0 μg xkg-(1 )-xhr-(1 )and applying topical anesthesia with lido-aine, we inserted the McGrath orally and the soft- ipped extra firm tube exchange catheter (TE) nasally. Under the guide of the McGrath's monitor, we inserted the TE, using Magill forceps, into her trachea. A 6.0 mm internal diameter spiral tracheal tube was inserted via the TE uneventfully.

  17. Fully Covered Metallic Stents for the Treatment of Benign Airway Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Dahlqvist

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. We herein report our experience with new fully covered self-expanding metallic stents in the setting of inoperable recurrent benign tracheobronchial stenosis. Methods. Between May 2010 and July 2014, 21 Micro-Tech® FC-SEMS (Nanjing Co., Republic of Korea were placed in our hospital in 16 patients for inoperable, recurrent (after dilatation, and symptomatic benign airway stenosis. Their medical files were retrospectively reviewed in December 2014, with focus on stent’s tolerance and durability data. Results. Twenty-one stents were inserted: 13 for posttransplant left main bronchus anastomotic stricture, seven for postintubation tracheal stenosis, and one for postlobectomy anastomotic stricture. Positioning was easy for all of them. Stents were in place for a mean duration of 282 days. The most common complications were granulation tissue development (35%, migration (30%, and sputum retention (15%. Fifty-five % of the stents (11/20 had to be removed because of various complications, without difficulty for all of them. None of the patients had life-threatening complications. Conclusion. Micro-Tech FC-SEMS were easy to position and to remove. While the rate of complications requiring stent removal was significant, no life-threatening complication occurred. Further studies are needed to better define their efficacy and safety in the treatment of benign airway disease.

  18. Fully Covered Metallic Stents for the Treatment of Benign Airway Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlqvist, Caroline; Ocak, Sebahat; Gourdin, Maximilien; Dincq, Anne Sophie; Putz, Laurie; d'Odémont, Jean-Paul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. We herein report our experience with new fully covered self-expanding metallic stents in the setting of inoperable recurrent benign tracheobronchial stenosis. Methods. Between May 2010 and July 2014, 21 Micro-Tech® FC-SEMS (Nanjing Co., Republic of Korea) were placed in our hospital in 16 patients for inoperable, recurrent (after dilatation), and symptomatic benign airway stenosis. Their medical files were retrospectively reviewed in December 2014, with focus on stent's tolerance and durability data. Results. Twenty-one stents were inserted: 13 for posttransplant left main bronchus anastomotic stricture, seven for postintubation tracheal stenosis, and one for postlobectomy anastomotic stricture. Positioning was easy for all of them. Stents were in place for a mean duration of 282 days. The most common complications were granulation tissue development (35%), migration (30%), and sputum retention (15%). Fifty-five % of the stents (11/20) had to be removed because of various complications, without difficulty for all of them. None of the patients had life-threatening complications. Conclusion. Micro-Tech FC-SEMS were easy to position and to remove. While the rate of complications requiring stent removal was significant, no life-threatening complication occurred. Further studies are needed to better define their efficacy and safety in the treatment of benign airway disease.

  19. One-stitch anastomosis through the skin with bicanalicular intubation:a modified approach for repair of bicanalicular laceration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Tao

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of one-stitch anastomosis through the skin with bicanalicular silicone tube intubation in repairing of bicanalicular laceration.METHODS:The clinical data of 15 consecutive patients with both superior and inferior canalicular laceration in one eye who underwent surgical repair using one-stitch anastomosis through the skin and bicanalicular stent were retrospective studied. All the operations were performed under surgical microscope, 5-0 silk sutures were used and were with bicanalicular silicone tube (diameter was 8mm intubation, for one lacerated canaliculi one-stitch anastomosis through the skin. The stents were left in place for 3 months postoperatively and then removed. The follow-up period was 3 - 36 months (average 14 months.RESULTS:In 15 patients, 13 patients were cured entirely, 1 patient was meliorated, 1 patient with no effects. All patients had got good recovery of eyelid laceration with no traumatic deformity in eyelid and canthus. Complication was seen in one case, for not followed the doctor’s guidance to come back to hospital to had the suture removed on the 7th day after operation, when he came at the 15th day, the inferior canalicular wall and eyelid skin were corroded by the suture caused 2mm wound, and the inside silicone tube was exposed, a promptly repair with 10-0 nylon suture was done, the wound healed in a week. There were no early tube protrusions and punctal slits in the patients.CONCLUSION:One-stitch anastomosis through the skin with bicanalicular silicone tube intubation is a good method in repair of bicanalicular laceration in one eye, the cut ends can be anastomosed directly, and with excellent cosmetic results, it is acceptable for the patients. For there is no suture remained in the wound permanently, so there is no suture-related granuloma which may cause obstruction or stenosis of canaliculi. It is simple, economical, effective and safe.

  20. Vicks VapoRub induces mucin secretion, decreases ciliary beat frequency, and increases tracheal mucus transport in the ferret trachea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abanses, Juan Carlos; Arima, Shinobu; Rubin, Bruce K

    2009-01-01

    Vicks VapoRub (VVR) [Proctor and Gamble; Cincinnati, OH] is often used to relieve symptoms of chest congestion. We cared for a toddler in whom severe respiratory distress developed after VVR was applied directly under her nose. We hypothesized that VVR induced inflammation and adversely affected mucociliary function, and tested this hypothesis in an animal model of airway inflammation. [1] Trachea specimens excised from 15 healthy ferrets were incubated in culture plates lined with 200 mg of VVR, and the mucin secretion was compared to those from controls without VVR. Tracheal mucociliary transport velocity (MCTV) was measured by timing the movement of 4 microL of mucus across the trachea. Ciliary beat frequency (CBF) was measured using video microscopy. [2] Anesthetized and intubated ferrets inhaled a placebo or VVR that was placed at the proximal end of the endotracheal tube. We evaluated both healthy ferrets and animals in which we first induced tracheal inflammation with bacterial endotoxin (a lipopolysaccharide [LPS]). Mucin secretion was measured using an enzyme-linked lectin assay, and lung water was measured by wet/dry weight ratios. [1] Mucin secretion was increased by 63% over the controls in the VVR in vitro group (p < 0.01). CBF was decreased by 35% (p < 0.05) in the VVR group. [2] Neither LPS nor VVR increased lung water, but LPS decreased MCTV in both normal airways (31%) and VVR-exposed airways (30%; p = 0.03), and VVR increased MCTV by 34% in LPS-inflamed airways (p = 0.002). VVR stimulates mucin secretion and MCTV in the LPS-inflamed ferret airway. This set of findings is similar to the acute inflammatory stimulation observed with exposure to irritants, and may lead to mucus obstruction of small airways and increased nasal resistance.

  1. Molecular identification of bacteria in tracheal aspirate fluid from mechanically ventilated preterm infants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter M Mourani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite strong evidence linking infections to the pathogenesis of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD, limitations of bacterial culture methods have precluded systematic studies of airway organisms relative to disease outcomes. Application of molecular bacterial identification strategies may provide new insight into the role of bacterial acquisition in the airways of preterm infants at risk for BPD. METHODS: Serial (within 72 hours, 7, 14, and 21 days of life tracheal aspirate samples were collected from 10 preterm infants with gestational age ≤34 weeks at birth, and birth weight of 500-1250 g who required mechanical ventilation for at least 21 days. Samples were analyzed by quantitative real time PCR assays for total bacterial load and by pyrosequencing for bacterial identification. RESULTS: Subjects were diagnosed with mild (1, moderate (3, or severe (5 BPD. One patient died prior to determination of disease severity. 107,487 sequences were analyzed, with mean of 3,359 (range 1,724-4,915 per sample. 2 of 10 samples collected 70copies/reaction. 72 organisms were observed in total. Seven organisms represented the dominant organism (>50% of total sequences in 31/32 samples with positive sequences. A dominant organism represented>90% of total sequences in 13 samples. Staphylococcus, Ureaplasmaparvum, and Ureaplasmaurealyticum were the most frequently identified dominant organisms, but Pseudomonas, Enterococcus, and Escherichia were also identified. CONCLUSIONS: Early bacterial colonization with diverse species occursafter the first 3 days of life in the airways of intubated preterm infants, and can be characterized by bacterial load and marked species diversity. Molecular identification of bacteria in the lower airways of preterm infants has the potential to yield further insight into the pathogenesis of BPD.

  2. Rocuronium versus succinylcholine for rapid sequence induction intubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Diem T T; Newton, Ethan K; Mount, Victoria A H; Lee, Jacques S; Wells, George A; Perry, Jeffrey J

    2015-10-29

    Patients often require a rapid sequence induction (RSI) endotracheal intubation technique during emergencies or electively to protect against aspiration, increased intracranial pressure, or to facilitate intubation. Traditionally succinylcholine has been the most commonly used muscle relaxant for this purpose because of its fast onset and short duration; unfortunately, it can have serious side effects. Rocuronium has been suggested as an alternative to succinylcholine for intubation. This is an update of our Cochrane review published first in 2003 and then updated in 2008 and now in 2015. To determine whether rocuronium creates intubating conditions comparable to those of succinylcholine during RSI intubation. In our initial review we searched all databases until March 2000, followed by an update to June 2007. This latest update included searching the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2015, Issue 2), MEDLINE (1966 to February Week 2 2015), and EMBASE (1988 to February 14 2015 ) for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or controlled clinical trials (CCTs) relating to the use of rocuronium and succinylcholine. We included foreign language journals and handsearched the references of identified studies for additional citations. We included any RCT or CCT that reported intubating conditions in comparing the use of rocuronium and succinylcholine for RSI or modified RSI in any age group or clinical setting. The dose of rocuronium was at least 0.6 mg/kg and succinylcholine was at least 1 mg/kg. Two authors (EN and DT) independently extracted data and assessed methodological quality for the 'Risk of bias' tables. We combined the outcomes in Review Manager 5 using a risk ratio (RR) with a random-effects model. The previous update (2008) had identified 53 potential studies and included 37 combined for meta-analysis. In this latest update we identified a further 13 studies and included 11, summarizing the results of 50 trials including 4151 participants

  3. Laryngeal Preservation in Managing Advanced Tracheal Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thavakumar Subramaniam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 37-year-old male athlete was diagnosed with primary tracheal adenoid cystic carcinoma following investigation for dyspnea, wheeze, and eventual stridor. Preoperative bronchoscopy revealed a highly vascular tumor 4 cm distal to the cricoid with no gross disease extending to the carina. Imaging revealed circumferential tracheal irregularity immediately inferior to the cricoid, with no definite cricoid invasion. Locoregional extension of disease was noted invading the thyroid and abutment of the carotid approximately 180°. Intraoperative findings identified tracheal mucosal disease extending distal to the carina and proximally at the cricothyroid joints where bilateral functional recurrent nerves were preserved. A decision made to preserve the larynx given the inability to fully resect distal tracheal disease. A 5 cm sleeve resection of the trachea was made with a cricotracheal anastomosis following suprahyoidal muscle release and laryngeal drop-down. The patient was treated with adjuvant radiotherapy including platinum based chemotherapy in an effort to maximise local control. PET scanning three months after therapy revealed no FDG uptake locally or distally.

  4. An ovine tracheal explant culture model for allergic airway inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abeynaike Latasha

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The airway epithelium is thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of asthmatic disease. However, much of our understanding of airway epithelial cell function in asthma has been derived from in vitro studies that may not accurately reflect the interactive cellular and molecular pathways active between different tissue constituents in vivo. Methods Using a sheep model of allergic asthma, tracheal explants from normal sheep and allergic sheep exposed to house dust mite (HDM allergen were established to investigate airway mucosal responses ex vivo. Explants were cultured for up to 48 h and tissues were stained to identify apoptotic cells, goblet cells, mast cells and eosinophils. The release of cytokines (IL-1α, IL-6 and TNF-α by cultured tracheal explants, was assessed by ELISA. Results The general morphology and epithelial structure of the tracheal explants was well maintained in culture although evidence of advanced apoptosis within the mucosal layer was noted after culture for 48 h. The number of alcian blue/PAS positive mucus-secreting cells within the epithelial layer was reduced in all cultured explants compared with pre-cultured (0 h explants, but the loss of staining was most evident in allergic tissues. Mast cell and eosinophil numbers were elevated in the allergic tracheal tissues compared to naïve controls, and in the allergic tissues there was a significant decline in mast cells after 24 h culture in the presence or absence of HDM allergen. IL-6 was released by allergic tracheal explants in culture but was undetected in cultured control explants. Conclusions Sheep tracheal explants maintain characteristics of the airway mucosa that may not be replicated when studying isolated cell populations in vitro. There were key differences identified in explants from allergic compared to control airways and in their responses in culture for 24 h. Importantly, this study establishes the potential for the

  5. Predictive factors for oropharyngeal dysphagia after prolonged orotracheal intubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Ana Carolina Martins de; Friche, Amélia Augusta de Lima; Salomão, Marina Silva; Bougo, Graziela Chamarelli; Vicente, Laélia Cristina Caseiro

    2017-09-13

    Lesions in the oral cavity, pharynx and larynx due to endotracheal intubation can cause reduction in the local motility and sensitivity, impairing the swallowing process, resulting in oropharyngeal dysphagia. To verify the predictive factors for the development of oropharyngeal dysphagia and the risk of aspiration in patients with prolonged orotracheal intubation admitted to an intensive care unit. This is an observational, analytical, cross-sectional and retrospective data collection study of 181 electronic medical records of patients submitted to prolonged orotracheal intubation. Data on age; gender; underlying disease; associated comorbidities; time and reason for orotracheal intubation; Glasgow scale on the day of the Speech Therapist assessment; comprehension; vocal quality; presence and severity of dysphagia; risk of bronchoaspiration; and the suggested oral route were collected. The data were analyzed through logistic regression. The level of significance was set at 5%, with a 95% Confidence Interval. The prevalence of dysphagia in this study was 35.9% and the risk of aspiration was 24.9%. As the age increased, the altered vocal quality and the degree of voice impairment increased the risk of the presence of dysphagia by 5-; 45.4- and 6.7-fold, respectively, and of aspiration by 6-; 36.4- and 4.8-fold. The increase in the time of orotracheal intubation increased the risk of aspiration by 5.5-fold. Patients submitted to prolonged intubation who have risk factors associated with dysphagia and aspiration should be submitted to an early speech-language/audiology assessment and receive appropriate and timely treatment. The recognition of these predictive factors by the entire multidisciplinary team can minimize the possibility of clinical complications inherent to the risk of dysphagia and aspiration in extubated patients. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  6. Implantation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Tracheal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Masakazu; Imaizumi, Mitsuyoshi; Yoshie, Susumu; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Otsuki, Koshi; Murono, Shigeyuki; Omori, Koichi

    2017-07-01

    Compared with using autologous tissue, the use of artificial materials in the regeneration of tracheal defects is minimally invasive. However, this technique requires early epithelialization on the inner side of the artificial trachea. After differentiation from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), tracheal epithelial tissues may be used to produce artificial tracheas. Herein, we aimed to demonstrate that after differentiation from fluorescent protein-labeled iPSCs, tracheal epithelial tissues survived in nude rats with tracheal defects. Red fluorescent tdTomato protein was electroporated into mouse iPSCs to produce tdTomato-labeled iPSCs. Embryoid bodies derived from these iPSCs were then cultured in differentiation medium supplemented with growth factors, followed by culture on air-liquid interfaces for further differentiation into tracheal epithelium. The cells were implanted with artificial tracheas into nude rats with tracheal defects on day 26 of cultivation. On day 7 after implantation, the tracheas were exposed and examined histologically. Tracheal epithelial tissue derived from tdTomato-labeled iPSCs survived in the tracheal defects. Moreover, immunochemical analyses showed that differentiated tissues had epithelial structures similar to those of proximal tracheal tissues. After differentiation from iPSCs, tracheal epithelial tissues survived in rat bodies, warranting the use of iPSCs for epithelial regeneration in tracheal defects.

  7. Risk factors for laryngeal trauma and granuloma formation in pediatric intubations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Minyoung; Basa, Krystyne; Levi, Jessica

    2018-04-01

    Intubation has been associated with laryngeal injury that often resolves spontaneously without complication. We present a case of a child intubated for less than 48 hours, who presented with dysphonia and intermittent dyspnea two months after intubation due to epiglottic and vocal process granulomas. This is unusual in that multiple granulomas were found in the posterior glottis and supraglottis after short-term intubation. Our objective was to determine if there are risk factors for developing persistent post-intubation sequelae, including the delayed presentation and unusual location of post-intubation granulomas in our case. Case report and systematic literature review. Pubmed database, which is inclusive of MEDLINE, was used to perform a literature review with the search terms ((pediatric OR children OR neonatal OR infant) AND (laryngeal OR supraglottic) AND intubation AND (granuloma OR injury OR complication)). Only English language results were reviewed. Titles and abstracts from 379 results were reviewed. Full text was reviewed from all original studies which included human pediatric subjects and endoscopic examinations after endotracheal intubation. In our case, laryngeal granuloma size reduced significantly after starting anti-reflux medications. The remainder was removed with laryngeal microdebrider with no recurrence at 3 weeks and 2.5 years post-operatively. Overall, 28 of the 379 studies reviewed identified evidence of laryngeal trauma due to intubation, however only 6 studies documented any type of supraglottic injury. Risk factors identified for developing post-intubation sequelae included intubation duration greater than 24 h; trauma to the larynx via various mechanisms including traumatic intubation, need for reintubation and tube changes, and increased movement while intubated; and presence of respiratory tract infection during intubation. Trauma to the larynx during intubation should be avoided to minimize post-intubation injury in pediatric

  8. Modified Technique of Retrograde Intubation in TMJ Ankylosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaila Kamat

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We are presenting a case report on the anaesthetic management of a case of ankylosis of temporomandibular joint for corrective surgery in a 7 year old child. Anticipated difficult airway in paediatric population has always been a perplexing problem, awake fibreoptic intubation almost impossible due to obvious difficulties with co-operation. Here we are describing a new approach to this problem, in which the patients were kept under GA with spontaneous ventilation while retrograde intubation was done quite comfortably by the conventional method.

  9. Guidelines for Induction and Intubation Sequence Fast in Emergency Service

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez Perilla, Patricia; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana-Hospital Universitario San Ignacio; Moreno Carrillo, Atilio; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana-Hospital Universitario San Ignacio; Gempeler Rueda, Fritz E.; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana-Hospital Universitario San Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    The rapid sequence intubation (RSI) is a procedure designed to minimize the time spent in securing the airway by endotracheal tube placement in emergency situations in patients at high risk of aspiration. Being clear about this situation, it is unquestionable the importance of education and training related to rapid sequence intubation to be made to the physicians responsible for the recovery rooms, emergency services and paramedics responsible for managing emergencies and disasters field . T...

  10. Parotid Duct Repair with Intubation Tube: Technical Note

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Muhammed Beşir; Barutca, Seda Asrufoğlu; Keskin, Elif Seda; Atik, Bekir

    2017-01-01

    The parotid duct can be damaged in traumatic injuries and surgical interventions. Early diagnosis and treatment of a duct injury is of great importance because complications such as sialocele and salivary gland fistula may develop if the duct is not surgically repaired. We think the cuff of an intubation tube is an ideal material in parotid duct repair, because of its technical characteristics, easiness of availability, and low-cost. In this paper, we described the use of the cuff cannula of an intubation tube for the diagnosis and treatment of parotid duct laceration, as a low-cost and easy to access material readily available in every operating room. PMID:28713751

  11. Problematic fine bore nasogastric intubation: A radiographer led service development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Developing from the intubation and performing of small bowel enteroclysis a consultant radiographer led service expanded to include problematic gastric, enteric and colonic intubations for diagnostic, therapeutic and interventional purposes. The radiographer led service has also extended to include 'hot reporting' chest images taken to check siting of ward placed nasogastric tubes as well as resiting those tubes that were misplaced. The service has demonstrated itself to be safe and efficient. It has also proven to be both cost and clinically effective. The protracted discomfort and distress to the patient are reduced by minimizing the delay in correctly relocating misplaced tubes

  12. Intubation simulation with a cross-sectional visual guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Chi-Hyoung; Kang, Chul Won; Lee, Chang Ha

    2013-01-01

    We present an intubation simulation with deformable objects and a cross-sectional visual guidance using a general haptic device. Our method deforms the tube model when it collides with the human model. Mass-Spring model with the Euler integration is used for the tube deformation. For the trainee's more effective understanding of the intubation process, we provide a cross-sectional view of the oral cavity and the tube. Our system also applies a stereoscopic rendering to improve the depth perception and the reality of the simulation.

  13. Association Between Gout and Aortic Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kevin; Yokose, Chio; Tenner, Craig; Oh, Cheongeun; Donnino, Robert; Choy-Shan, Alana; Pike, Virginia C; Shah, Binita D; Lorin, Jeffrey D; Krasnokutsky, Svetlana; Sedlis, Steven P; Pillinger, Michael H

    2017-02-01

    An independent association between gout and coronary artery disease is well established. The relationship between gout and valvular heart disease, however, is unclear. The aim of this study was to assess the association between gout and aortic stenosis. We performed a retrospective case-control study. Aortic stenosis cases were identified through a review of outpatient transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) reports. Age-matched controls were randomly selected from patients who had undergone TTE and did not have aortic stenosis. Charts were reviewed to identify diagnoses of gout and the earliest dates of gout and aortic stenosis diagnosis. Among 1085 patients who underwent TTE, 112 aortic stenosis cases were identified. Cases and nonaortic stenosis controls (n = 224) were similar in age and cardiovascular comorbidities. A history of gout was present in 21.4% (n = 24) of aortic stenosis subjects compared with 12.5% (n = 28) of controls (unadjusted odds ratio 1.90, 95% confidence interval 1.05-3.48, P = .038). Multivariate analysis retained significance only for gout (adjusted odds ratio 2.08, 95% confidence interval 1.00-4.32, P = .049). Among subjects with aortic stenosis and gout, gout diagnosis preceded aortic stenosis diagnosis by 5.8 ± 1.6 years. The age at onset of aortic stenosis was similar among patients with and without gout (78.7 ± 1.8 vs 75.8 ± 1.0 years old, P = .16). Aortic stenosis patients had a markedly higher prevalence of precedent gout than age-matched controls. Whether gout is a marker of, or a risk factor for, the development of aortic stenosis remains uncertain. Studies investigating the potential role of gout in the pathophysiology of aortic stenosis are warranted and could have therapeutic implications. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Radiologic spectrum of rectal stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, T.; Hayashi, N.; Ishii, Y.; Hayakawa, K.; Nishimura, K.

    2000-01-01

    Rectal stenosis is a common condition caused by a wide variety of diseases, including both intrinsic and extrinsic disorders, as well as both malignant and benign pathologies. Barium enema, CT, and MRI are the primary modalities for the evaluation of the disease, and careful observation of the characteristic radiologic features usually leads to correct diagnosis. However, some of the lesions looks very similar and are difficult to differentiate from each other. The purpose of this study is to review the literature on diseases that cause rectal stenosis, to clarify the characteristics of radiologic features, and to suggest the limitations in differential diagnosis. Deliberate analysis of these imaging features and correlation with clinical manifestations can facilitate a more specific diagnosis. (orig.)

  15. Radiologic spectrum of rectal stenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, T.; Hayashi, N.; Ishii, Y. [Department of Radiology, Fukui Medical University School of Medicine, Matsuoka-cho, Yoshida-gun, Fukui (Japan); Hayakawa, K.; Nishimura, K. [Department of Radiology, Kyoto City Hospital, Mibu, Nakagyo-ku, Kyoto (Japan)

    2000-08-01

    Rectal stenosis is a common condition caused by a wide variety of diseases, including both intrinsic and extrinsic disorders, as well as both malignant and benign pathologies. Barium enema, CT, and MRI are the primary modalities for the evaluation of the disease, and careful observation of the characteristic radiologic features usually leads to correct diagnosis. However, some of the lesions looks very similar and are difficult to differentiate from each other. The purpose of this study is to review the literature on diseases that cause rectal stenosis, to clarify the characteristics of radiologic features, and to suggest the limitations in differential diagnosis. Deliberate analysis of these imaging features and correlation with clinical manifestations can facilitate a more specific diagnosis. (orig.)

  16. Statins for aortic valve stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Thiago

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Aortic valve stenosis is the most common type of valvular heart disease in the USA and Europe. Aortic valve stenosis is considered similar to atherosclerotic disease. Some studies have evaluated statins for aortic valve stenosis. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of statins in aortic valve stenosis. METHODS: Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS - IBECS, Web of Science and CINAHL Plus. These databases were searched from their inception to 24 November 2015. We also searched trials in registers for ongoing trials. We used no language restrictions. Selection criteria: Randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs comparing statins alone or in association with other systemic drugs to reduce cholesterol levels versus placebo or usual care. Data collection and analysis: Primary outcomes were severity of aortic valve stenosis (evaluated by echocardiographic criteria: mean pressure gradient, valve area and aortic jet velocity, freedom from valve replacement and death from cardiovascular cause. Secondary outcomes were hospitalization for any reason, overall mortality, adverse events and patient quality of life. Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias. The GRADE methodology was employed to assess the quality of result findings and the GRADE profiler (GRADEPRO was used to import data from Review Manager 5.3 to create a 'Summary of findings' table. MAIN RESULTS: We included four RCTs with 2360 participants comparing statins (1185 participants with placebo (1175 participants. We found low-quality evidence for our primary outcome of severity of aortic valve stenosis, evaluated by mean pressure gradient (mean difference (MD -0.54, 95% confidence interval (CI -1.88 to 0.80; participants = 1935; studies = 2, valve area (MD -0.07, 95% CI -0.28 to 0.14; participants = 127; studies = 2

  17. Statins for aortic valve stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiago, Luciana; Tsuji, Selma Rumiko; Nyong, Jonathan; Puga, Maria Eduarda Dos Santos; Góis, Aécio Flávio Teixeira de; Macedo, Cristiane Rufino; Valente, Orsine; Atallah, Álvaro Nagib

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is the most common type of valvular heart disease in the USA and Europe. Aortic valve stenosis is considered similar to atherosclerotic disease. Some studies have evaluated statins for aortic valve stenosis. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of statins in aortic valve stenosis. Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS - IBECS, Web of Science and CINAHL Plus. These databases were searched from their inception to 24 November 2015. We also searched trials in registers for ongoing trials. We used no language restrictions.Selection criteria: Randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) comparing statins alone or in association with other systemic drugs to reduce cholesterol levels versus placebo or usual care. Data collection and analysis: Primary outcomes were severity of aortic valve stenosis (evaluated by echocardiographic criteria: mean pressure gradient, valve area and aortic jet velocity), freedom from valve replacement and death from cardiovascular cause. Secondary outcomes were hospitalization for any reason, overall mortality, adverse events and patient quality of life.Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias. The GRADE methodology was employed to assess the quality of result findings and the GRADE profiler (GRADEPRO) was used to import data from Review Manager 5.3 to create a 'Summary of findings' table. We included four RCTs with 2360 participants comparing statins (1185 participants) with placebo (1175 participants). We found low-quality evidence for our primary outcome of severity of aortic valve stenosis, evaluated by mean pressure gradient (mean difference (MD) -0.54, 95% confidence interval (CI) -1.88 to 0.80; participants = 1935; studies = 2), valve area (MD -0.07, 95% CI -0.28 to 0.14; participants = 127; studies = 2), and aortic jet velocity (MD -0.06, 95% CI -0.26 to 0

  18. Doppler evaluation of valvular stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisslo, J.; Krafchek, J.; Adams, D.; Mark, D.B.

    1986-01-01

    One of the reasons why use of Doppler echocardiography is growing rapidly is because of its utility in detecting the presence of valvular stenosis and in estimating its severity. Detection of the presence of stenotic valvular heart disease using Doppler echocardiography was originally described over 10 years ago. It has been demonstrated that Doppler blood velocity data could be used to estimate the severity of a stenotic lesion. This chapter discusses the evaluation of valvular stenois using Doppler

  19. Alkaptonuria-associated aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lok, Zoe S Y; Goldstein, Jacob; Smith, Julian A

    2013-07-01

    Alkaptonuria is an autosomal recessive disorder of tyrosine metabolism, which results in accumulation of unmetabolized homogentisic acid and its oxidized product in various tissues, including the heart. Cardiovascular involvement is a rare but serious complication of the disease. We present two patients who have undergone successful aortic valve replacement for alkaptonuria-associated aortic stenosis along with a review of the literature. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Tracheal and Crico-Tracheal Resection and Anastomosis for Malignancies Involving the Thyroid Gland and the Airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Cesare; Del Bon, Francesca; Barbieri, Diego; Grazioli, Paola; Paderno, Alberto; Perotti, Pietro; Lombardi, Davide; Peretti, Giorgio; Nicolai, Piero

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate outcomes in different malignancies involving the thyroid and infiltrating the airway submitted to tracheal (TRA) or crico-tracheal resection and anastomosis (CTRA). Retrospective charts review of 27 patients affected by thyroid malignancies involving the airway treated by TRA/CTRA in a single academic institution. Kaplan-Meier curves were used to evaluate the overall (OS) and disease-specific (DSS) survivals and local (LC) and loco-regional control (LRC). Impact on survival of age, comorbidities, previous radiotherapy, types of TRA/CTRA, Shin's stage (II, III, IV), grading (well vs poorly differentiated), and length of airway resected was calculated by the log-rank test. Overall survival and DSS at 3 and 5 years were 82.3% and 71.6%, respectively. Local control and LRC in the entire group were 82.3% at 3 and 5 years. Crico-tracheal resection and anastomosis involving the cricoid arch and plate (type C) and tumor differentiation significantly affected OS and DSS (both P < .001). Type C CTRA and tumor differentiation significantly impacted on LC (P = .002 and P = .009, respectively). Grading and extension of CTRA to the cricoid plate are the most important factors for oncologic outcomes in thyroid malignancies infiltrating the airway. Except for poorly differentiated tumors, TRA/CTRA allows adequate LC even in advanced stage lesions involving the crico-tracheal junction. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Temporary placement of metallic stent could lead to long-term benefits for benign tracheobronchial stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guo-Wu; Huang, Hai-Dong; Sun, Qin-Ying; Xiong, Ye; Li, Qiang; Dong, Yu-Chao; Zhang, Wei

    2015-12-01

    The permanent placement of metallic stent for benign tracheobronchial stenosis (BTS) was controversial. This study was conducted to evaluate the long-term outcomes of temporary placement of metallic stent for BTS. The BTS patients who received temporary placement of retrievable self-expanded metallic stents were included between 2008 and 2011. Pre-stenting and follow-up respiratory status was analyzed. And symptom recurrence-free survival (SRFS) was assessed. A total of 49 stents were successfully temporarily placed in 40 consecutive BTS patients whose etiologies included endobronchial tuberculosis (EBTB) (n=22), post-tracheostomy stenosis (n=10), post-intubation stenosis (n=6) and post radiotherapy stricture (n=2). All stents were removed integrally after a median 18 days' stenting period, without major complications. During the median 27 months follow-up period after stent removal, a total of 22 patients were free of recurrence. And the overall 3-year SRFS rate was 52.0%. According to the etiology, the 3-year SRFS rates were 59.1% and 42.9% in the patients with EBTB and non-EBTB, respectively. Compared with pre-stenting, the follow-up internal diameter of stricture, Hugh-Jones scale, 6-minute walk test (6MWT) and percentage of forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1%) were significantly improved. Multivariate analysis suggested that granulation tissue growth and tracheobronchial malacia might be independent factors of poor prognosis. Temporary placement of retrievable metallic stent may be an alternative treatment for BTS patients.

  2. True tracheal bronchus: Classification and anatomical relationship on multi-detector computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Jeong; Kim, Young Tong; Jou, Sung Shick; Lee, Woong Hee [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Cheonan Hospital, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    To propose the imaging classification of true tracheal bronchus (TTB) on multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT), and to evaluate its anatomical relationship with surrounding structures. This study included 44 patients who were diagnosed with TTB on MDCT for 6 years. We classified TTB into five types, based on the existence of the right upper lobe bronchus originating from the right main bronchus and the number of segmental bronchi of TTB. We analyzed the site of origin and the running direction of TTB based on its anatomical relationship with surrounding structures and some ancillary findings. The imaging classification of TTB included Type I (47.7%), Type II (13.6%), Type III (11.4%), Type IV (25.0%), and Type V (2.0%). According to the site of origin of TTB, below the aortic arch (52.3%) and at the level of the aortic arch (43.1%) were the two main sites of origin, whereas the frequency of the site of origin above the azygos arch, at the level of the azygos arch, and below the azygos arch was 27.3%, 38.6%, and 34.1%, respectively. Considering both aortic and azygos arches, below the aortic arch and below the azygos arch were the most common sites of origin (27.3%). With respect to the running direction of TTB, in all cases, TTB passed below the azygos arch to the right upper lobe. There was no statistically significant (p > 0.05) difference in age or sex between types of TTB. Ancillary findings included tracheal stenosis (n = 2), narrowing of the right main bronchus (n = 2), luminal narrowing of TTB and bronchiectasis at the distal portion (n = 1), and a highly located azygos arch above the aortic arch (n = 2). The proposed imaging classification of TTB and its anatomical relationship with surrounding structures will improve our understanding of various imaging features and embryological development of TTB. Radiologists should pay careful attention to evaluation of the airway including the trachea on thoracic imaging.

  3. True tracheal bronchus: Classification and anatomical relationship on multi-detector computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Jeong; Kim, Young Tong; Jou, Sung Shick; Lee, Woong Hee

    2017-01-01

    To propose the imaging classification of true tracheal bronchus (TTB) on multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT), and to evaluate its anatomical relationship with surrounding structures. This study included 44 patients who were diagnosed with TTB on MDCT for 6 years. We classified TTB into five types, based on the existence of the right upper lobe bronchus originating from the right main bronchus and the number of segmental bronchi of TTB. We analyzed the site of origin and the running direction of TTB based on its anatomical relationship with surrounding structures and some ancillary findings. The imaging classification of TTB included Type I (47.7%), Type II (13.6%), Type III (11.4%), Type IV (25.0%), and Type V (2.0%). According to the site of origin of TTB, below the aortic arch (52.3%) and at the level of the aortic arch (43.1%) were the two main sites of origin, whereas the frequency of the site of origin above the azygos arch, at the level of the azygos arch, and below the azygos arch was 27.3%, 38.6%, and 34.1%, respectively. Considering both aortic and azygos arches, below the aortic arch and below the azygos arch were the most common sites of origin (27.3%). With respect to the running direction of TTB, in all cases, TTB passed below the azygos arch to the right upper lobe. There was no statistically significant (p > 0.05) difference in age or sex between types of TTB. Ancillary findings included tracheal stenosis (n = 2), narrowing of the right main bronchus (n = 2), luminal narrowing of TTB and bronchiectasis at the distal portion (n = 1), and a highly located azygos arch above the aortic arch (n = 2). The proposed imaging classification of TTB and its anatomical relationship with surrounding structures will improve our understanding of various imaging features and embryological development of TTB. Radiologists should pay careful attention to evaluation of the airway including the trachea on thoracic imaging

  4. A Retrospective Study of Success, Failure, and Time Needed to Perform Awake Intubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Thomas T; Gal, Jonathan S; DeMaria, Samuel; Lin, Hung-Mo; Levine, Adam I; Hyman, Jaime B

    2016-07-01

    Awake intubation is the standard of care for management of the anticipated difficult airway. The performance of awake intubation may be perceived as complex and time-consuming, potentially leading clinicians to avoid this technique of airway management. This retrospective review of awake intubations at a large academic medical center was performed to determine the average time taken to perform awake intubation, its effects on hemodynamics, and the incidence and characteristics of complications and failure. Anesthetic records from 2007 to 2014 were queried for the performance of an awake intubation. Of the 1,085 awake intubations included for analysis, 1,055 involved the use of a flexible bronchoscope. Each awake intubation case was propensity matched with two controls (1:2 ratio), with similar comorbidities and intubations performed after the induction of anesthesia (n = 2,170). The time from entry into the operating room until intubation was compared between groups. The anesthetic records of all patients undergoing awake intubation were also reviewed for failure and complications. The median time to intubation for patients intubated post induction was 16.0 min (interquartile range: 13 to 22) from entrance into the operating room. The median time to intubation for awake patients was 24.0 min (interquartile range: 19 to 31). The complication rate was 1.6% (17 of 1,085 cases). The most frequent complications observed were mucous plug, endotracheal tube cuff leak, and inadvertent extubation. The failure rate for attempted awake intubation was 1% (n = 10). Awake intubations have a high rate of success and low rate of serious complications and failure. Awake intubations can be performed safely and rapidly.

  5. Comparing the effect of echinacea and chlorhexidine mouthwash on the microbial flora of intubated patients admitted to the intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Safarabadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Providing intubated patients admitted to the intensive care units with oral healthcare is one of the main tasks of nurses in order to prevent Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia (VAP. This study aimed at comparing the effects of two mouthwash solutions (echinacea and chlorhexidine on the oral microbial flora of patients hospitalized in the intensive care units. Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial, 70 patients aged between18 and 65 years undergoing tracheal intubation through the mouth in three hospitals in Arak, were selected using simple random sampling and were randomly divided into two groups: the intervention group and the control group. The oral health checklist was used to collect the data (before and after the intervention. The samples were obtained from the orally intubated patients and were then cultured in selective media. Afterwards, the aerobic microbial growth was investigated in all culture media. The data were analyzed using SPSS software. Results: The microbial flora in the echinacea group significantly decreased after the intervention (p < 0.0001 and it was also the case withmicrobial flora of the patients in the chlorhexidine group (p < 0.001. After 4 days, the oral microbial flora of the patients in the intervention group was lower than that of the patients in the control group (p < 0.001. Conclusions: The results showed that the echinacea solution was more effective in decreasing the oral microbial flora of patients in the intensive care unit. Given the benefits of the components of the herb Echinacea, it can be suggested as a viable alternative to chlorhexidine.

  6. Transient nerve damage following intubation for trans-sphenoidal hypophysectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, KA; Eindhoven, GB; Wierda, JMKH

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a case of transient lingual and hypoglossal nerve damage following intubation for a transsphenoidal hypophysectomy. Clinical features: A 56-yr-old acromegalic man was scheduled for trans-sphenoidal hypophysectomy. He had been treated with octreotide six months previously which

  7. Successful di cult airway intubation using the Miller laryngoscope ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    with the use of a Miller laryngoscope blade (straight blade) and paraglossal technique, achieving Cormack and Lehane views superior to those seen using Macintosh blades.7 As early as 1997,. Henderson8 questioned the role of curved blades for di cult airway intubation and proposed that paraglossal straight blade.

  8. Intubation without muscle relaxation for suspension laryngoscopy: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-11-12

    Nov 12, 2013 ... laryngoscopy under intubation with propofol and remifentanil alone for vocal fold nodule (VFN) excision. ... laryngological procedure, achieves a definitive treatment ... Hospital, Dongying, 4Department of Gastroenterology, The Second Hospital ..... on the dose and infusion rate of propofol and remifentanil.

  9. Intubation without muscle relaxation for suspension laryngoscopy: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective and Aim: The objective of the following study is to examine the effectiveness and safety of suspension laryngoscopy under intubation with propofol and remifentanil alone for vocal fold nodule (VFN) excision. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 patients were equally and randomly assigned to elective VFN excision ...

  10. Cecal Intubation Rate During Colonoscopy at a Tertiary Hospital in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-06-14

    Jun 14, 2016 ... diseases, and for colorectal cancer screening program. Complete colonoscopy is therefore crucial for the success of any screening program. One important measure of the quality of colonoscopy is the cecal intubation rate (CIR). Aim: This was to assess the CIR at our endoscopy unit and evaluate the factors ...

  11. Cecal intubation rate during colonoscopy at a tertiary hospital in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Colonoscopy is useful in the diagnosis, treatment of colorectal diseases, and for colorectal cancer screening program. Complete colonoscopy is therefore crucial for the success of any screening program. One important measure of the quality of colonoscopy is the cecal intubation rate (CIR). Aim: This was to ...

  12. Case report: Awake insertion of the intubating laryngeal mask ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Case report: Awake insertion of the intubating laryngeal mask airway using dexmedetomidine sedation. P Dhar, TR Tedore. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/22201173.2003.10872999.

  13. Dexmedetomidine versus Remifentanil for Sedation during Awake Fiberoptic Intubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Cattano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study compared remifentanil and dexmedetomidine as awake fiberoptic intubation (AFOI anesthetics. Thirty-four adult ASA I-III patients were enrolled in a double-blinded randomized pilot study to receive remifentanil (REM or dexmedetomidine (DEX for sedation during AFOI (nasal and oral. Thirty patients completed the study and received 2 mg midazolam IV and topical anesthesia. The REM group received a loading dose of 0.75 mcg/kg followed by an infusion of 0.075 mcg/kg/min. The DEX group received a loading dose of 0.4 mcg/kg followed by an infusion of 0.7 mcg/kg/hr. Time to sedation, number of intubation attempts, Ramsay sedation scale (RSS score, bispectral index (BIS, and memory recall were recorded. All thirty patients were successfully intubated by AFOI (22 oral intubations/8 nasal. First attempt success rate with AFOI was higher in the REM group than the DEX group, 72% and 38% (P=0.02, respectively. The DEX group took longer to attain RSS of ≥3 and to achieve BIS <80, as compared to the REM group. Postloading dose verbal recall was poorer in the DEX group. Dexmedetomidine seems a useful adjunct for patients undergoing AFOI but is dependent on dosage and time. Further studies in the use of dexmedetomidine for AFOI are warranted.

  14. Intubation using the Miller and Airtraq™ laryngoscopes: A paediatric manikin study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Castle

    2011-03-01

    Discussion: The Airtraq™ resulted in a 100% of all intubation attempts being successful and over half of all student paramedics believed it to be easier to use. The Airtraq™ was no faster that traditional intubation but intubation speed may have been affected by student familiarity with the Airtraq™.

  15. Familial aggregation and heritability of pyloric stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Camilla; Fischer, Thea K; Skotte, Line

    2010-01-01

    stenosis from monozygotic twins to fourth-generation relatives according to sex and maternal and paternal contributions and to estimate disease heritability. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS: Population-based cohort study of 1,999,738 children born in Denmark between 1977 and 2008 and followed up.......51-4.99) for half-cousins. We found no difference in rate ratios for maternal and paternal relatives of children with pyloric stenosis and no difference according to sex of cohort member or sex of relative. The heritability of pyloric stenosis was 87%. CONCLUSION: Pyloric stenosis in Danish children shows strong...... familial aggregation and heritability....

  16. Pre-hospital intubation factors and pneumonia in trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Heather L; Warner, Keir; Bulger, Eileen M; Sharar, Sam R; Maier, Ronald V; Cuschieri, Joseph

    2011-10-01

    We reported similar rates of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) previously in trauma patients intubated either in a pre-hospital (PH) venue or the emergency department. A subset of PH intubations with continuous quality assessment was re-examined to identify the intubation factors associated with VAP. The subgroup was derived from an existing data set of consecutive adult trauma patients intubated prior to Level I trauma center admission July 2007-July 2008. Intubation details recorded included bag-valve mask ventilation (BVM) and the presence of material in the airway. The diagnosis of VAP was made preferentially by quantitative bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cultures (≥ 10⁴ colony-forming units indicating infection). Baseline data, injury characteristics, and circumstances of intubation of patients with and without VAP were compared by univariable analysis. Detailed data were available for 197 patients; 32 (16.2%) developed VAP, on average 6.0±0.7 days after admission. Baseline characteristics were similar in the groups, but diabetes mellitus was more common in the VAP group (4 [12.5%] vs. 5 [3.0%]; p=0.02). There was a higher rate of blunt injury in the VAP patients (28 [87.5%] vs. 106 [64.2%]; p=0.01) and higher injury severity scores (33.1±2.8 vs. 23.0±1.0; p=0.0002) and chest Abbreviated Injury Scores (2.6±0.3 vs. 1.5±0.1; p=0.002). Lower Glasgow Coma Scale scores (7.9±0.9 vs. 9.9±0.4; p=0.04) and greater use of BVM (18 [56.3%] vs. 56 [34.0%]; p=0.02) were observed in patients who developed VAP. Among aspirations, 10 (31.3%) of patients with emesis developed VAP compared with only 4 (12.5%) with blood in the airway (p=0.003). Aspiration, along with depressed consciousness and greater injury severity, may predispose trauma patients to VAP. Prospective studies should focus on the quality and timing of aspiration relative to intubation to determine if novel interventions can prevent aspiration or decrease the risk of VAP after aspiration.

  17. Tracheal rupture after misplacement of Sengstaken-Blakemore tube ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The balloon were immediately deflated and a chest X-ray was performed, showing the tube in the right bronchus airway (A), so it was withdrawn. Right pneumothorax appeared and was treated with an intercostal drainage. The patient required orotracheal intubation and a CT scan was performed to show the rupture level ...

  18. A Very Rare Cause of Subglottic Stenosis: Non-Malignant Intratracheal Thyroid Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ümit Aydogmus

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of subglottic stenosis associated with benign thyroid tissue involvement due to relapse of multinodular goiter despite surgery 14 years ago.The patient had undergone bilateral subtotal thyroidectomy 14 years ago and the pathology report had been multinodular thyroid tissue at the time. The patient recently presented to an emergency service due to sudden development of respiratory distress and was then directed to our center. Cervical tomography showed bilateral thyroid tissue that narrowed the tracheal diameter by 80% by invading the trachea from the left wall at the level of the thyroid gland. The patient required urgent tracheostomy due to serious respiratory trouble. The trachea was incised vertically about 2.5 cm below the cricoid cartilage. A 2 cm endotracheal lesion with margins that could not be distinguished from the left vocal cord was observed and biopsies were taken from both this lesion and the tissue surrounding the trachea. A Montgomery T-tube extending from the subglottic area to the distal section was placed. Pathology evaluation revealed histopathological findings that matched normal thyroid tissue. Although infrequent, tracheal invasion associated with a thyroid cancer is known to occur. We present a case with postoperative intratracheal relapse due to a benign cause and the emergency treatment.

  19. Avoiding never events: Improving nasogastric intubation practice and standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, Robert L.; Pullyblank, Ann M.; Eveleigh, Mark; Slack, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To identify and rectify weaknesses in nasogastric (NG) intubation practice in the North Bristol NHS Trust that resulted in the occurrence of a National patient Safety Agency defined “never event”. Material and methods: Root-cause analysis identified that a change in culture was required. Recommendations divided into four categories: documentation, intubation, interpretation training, and radiology. A 6 month prospective audit covering all aspects of NG intubation practice preceded implementation of the recommendations. All patients whose tubes were mis-sited formed the cohort of the study. A re-audit was undertaken 12 months after the implementation of the recommended changes. Results: Re-audit suggested significant improvements had occurred in all categories, particularly junior doctor check image interpretation errors, which in the study group were reduced from seven to one, and documentation, which has so far improved by 22%. Protocols and guidelines associated with NG tube check imaging have now been developed for radiologists and radiographers with check imaging and image interpretation being made a priority and respiratory tract intubation treated as an emergency. Conclusion: The service is still not perfect, but there is a focal awareness of patient safety associated with intubation practice, and image interpretation by junior doctors significantly improved with the introduction of the e-learning package. However, it is considered that the responsibility for developing safe practice with respect to NG tube check image interpretation ultimately lies with the department of radiology, which should take the lead on reducing the risk of never events being caused by the misinterpretation of these images

  20. Effect of aging on tracheal mucociliary clearance in Beagle dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whaley, S.L.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Wolff, R.K.

    1985-01-01

    Tracheal mucous velocity measurements were made in 24 Beagle dogs, in 5 age groups, using a gamma camera to detect movement on instilled radiolabeled material. Age groups were defined as immature, young adult, middle-aged, mature, and aged dogs. Mean velocities (+/- SE) were 3.6 +/- 0.4 mm/min in the immature dogs, 9.8 +/- 0.7 mm/min in the young adults, 6.9 +/- 0.5 mm/min in the middle-aged dogs, 3.6 +/- 1.1 mm/min in the mature dogs, and 2.8 +/- 0.6 mm/min in the aged dogs. Tracheal mucous velocity was significantly faster in the young adult and middle-aged groups than in the immature, mature, and aged dog groups. 4 references, 1 figure, 1 table

  1. Fixed cord in spinal stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, L.M.; Wang, H.; Francomano, C.; Hurko, O.; Carson, B.; Heffez, D.S.; DiChiro, G.; Bryan, R.N.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates patients with cervical spinal canal compromise due to congenital anomalies (achondroplasia, Chiari malformation) and degenerative diseases using MR cord motion and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow studies. Pulsatile longitudinal motion of the cervical cord was determined by means of cardiac-gated velocity phase contrast methods, including cine. Pathology included dwarfism (n = 15), Chiari malformation (n = 10), spondylosis (n = 10), and acute cord compression (n = 9). Symptomatic cases of congenital cervical stenosis had decreased cord motion, although CSF flow was not always significantly compromised. Postoperative cases demonstrated good cord and CSF motion, unless compression or obstruction was present

  2. Idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kvam, G.

    1980-01-01

    Biplane left ventricular cineangiographies in 4 patients with typical obstructive idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis (IHSS) and in control patients with normal left ventricles were analysed. In the protruding hypertrophic muscular interventricular septum of IHSS a markedly reduced shortening occurs in either direction during the systolic contraction. It does not bend towards the right ventricle. It is suggested that the septum of IHSS acts as a suspender during the systolic contraction, thereby accounting for the fast stroke volume ejection and the high ejection fraction of IHSS. (Auth.)

  3. Mucus glycoprotein secretion by tracheal explants: effects of pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Last, J.A.; Kaizu, T.

    1980-01-01

    Tracheal slices incubated with radioactive precursors in tissue culture medium secrete labeled mucus glycoproteins into the culture medium. We have used an in vivtro approach, a combined method utilizing exposure to pneumotoxins in vivo coupled with quantitation of mucus secretion rates in vitro, to study the effects of inhaled pollutants on mucus biosynthesis by rat airways. In addition, we have purified the mucus glycoproteins secreted by rat tracheal explants in order to determine putative structural changes that might by the basis for the observed augmented secretion rates after exposure of rats to H2SO4 aerosols in combination with high ambient levels of ozone. After digestion with papain, mucus glycoproteins secreted by tracheal explants may be separated into five fractions by ion-exchange chromatography, with recovery in high yield, on columns of DEAE-cellulose. Each of these five fractions, one neutral and four acidic, migrates as a single unique spot upon cellulose acetate electrophoresis at pH values of 8.6 and 1.2. The neutral fraction, which is labeled with [3H] glucosamine, does not contain radioactivity when Na2 35SO4 is used as the precursor. Acidic fractions I to IV are all labeled with either 3H-glucosamine or Na2 35SO4 as precursor. Acidic fraction II contains sialic acid as the terminal sugar on its oligosaccharide side chains, based upon its chromatographic behavior on columns of wheat-germ agglutinin-Agarose. Treatment of this fraction with neuraminidase shifts its elution position in the gradient to a lower salt concentration, coincident with acidic fraction I. After removal of terminal sialic acid residues with either neuraminidase or low pH treatment, the resultant terminal sugar on the oligosaccharide side chains is fucose. These results are identical with those observed with mucus glycoproteins secreted by cultured human tracheal explants and purified by these same techniques

  4. Sonographic Findings of Primary Tracheal Lymphoma: Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min Sung; Ahn, Kook Jin; Kim, Jee Young; Kim, Hyo Lim; Park, Jeong Mi

    2010-01-01

    Primary lymphoma of the trachea is extremely rare and clinical presentation is nonspecific. CT findings are focal tracheal narrowing caused by a solitary mass or polypoid thickening of the tracheobronchial wall caused by diffuse infiltration of the submucosa. However, US finding of primary lymphoma of the trachea has been not reported. We experienced a case of primary lymphoma of the trachea presenting as a homogenous hypoechoic mass, and discuss ultrasonographic and CT findings of the case

  5. Regeneration of tracheal epithelium using mouse induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Masakazu; Imaizumi, Mitsuyoshi; Yoshie, Susumu; Otsuki, Koshi; Miyake, Masao; Hazama, Akihiro; Wada, Ikuo; Omori, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion The findings demonstrated the potential use of induced pluripotent stem cells for regeneration of tracheal epithelium. Objective Autologous tissue implantation techniques using skin or cartilage are often applied in cases of tracheal defects with laryngeal inflammatory lesions and malignant tumor invasion. However, these techniques are invasive with an unstable clinical outcome. The purpose of this study was to investigate regeneration in a tracheal defect site of nude rats after implantation of ciliated epithelium that was differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cells. Method Embryoid bodies were formed from mouse induced pluripotent stem cells. They were cultured with growth factors for 5 days, and then cultured at the air-liquid interface. The degree of differentiation achieved prior to implantation was determined by histological findings and the results of real-time polymerase chain reaction. Embryoid bodies including ciliated epithelium were embedded into collagen gel that served as an artificial scaffold, and then implanted into nude rats, creating an 'air-liquid interface model'. Histological evaluation was performed 7 days after implantation. Results The ciliated epithelial structure survived on the lumen side of regenerated tissue. It was demonstrated histologically that the structure was composed of ciliated epithelial cells.

  6. Myosin light chain kinase phosphorylation in tracheal smooth muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stull, J.T.; Hsu, L.C.; Tansey, M.G.; Kamm, K.E.

    1990-01-01

    Purified myosin light chain kinase from smooth muscle is phosphorylated by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase, protein kinase C, and the multifunctional calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. Because phosphorylation in a specific site (site A) by any one of these kinases desensitizes myosin light chain kinase to activation by Ca2+/calmodulin, kinase phosphorylation could play an important role in regulating smooth muscle contractility. This possibility was investigated in 32 P-labeled bovine tracheal smooth muscle. Treatment of tissues with carbachol, KCl, isoproterenol, or phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate increased the extent of kinase phosphorylation. Six primary phosphopeptides (A-F) of myosin light chain kinase were identified. Site A was phosphorylated to an appreciable extent only with carbachol or KCl, agents which contract tracheal smooth muscle. The extent of site A phosphorylation correlated to increases in the concentration of Ca2+/calmodulin required for activation. These results show that cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase and protein kinase C do not affect smooth muscle contractility by phosphorylating site A in myosin light chain kinase. It is proposed that phosphorylation of myosin light chain kinase in site A in contracting tracheal smooth muscle may play a role in the reported desensitization of contractile elements to activation by Ca2+

  7. Multimodal non-surgical treatment of a feline tracheal adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Azevedo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Case summary A 10-year-old, castrated male domestic shorthair cat presented with a 2–3 month history of weight loss, lethargy and coughing. Thoracic radiographs revealed a soft tissue opacity overlying the dorsal trachea from the first rib to second rib and the ventral aspect of the trachea extending from the second rib to approximately the fourth rib. CT confirmed a mass involving the dorsal, right lateral and ventral aspects of the trachea narrowing the lumen and extending from vertebra C7 through T4. Bronchoscopy revealed a partially circumferential irregular and multilobulated tracheal mass, which was biopsied. The histopathological diagnosis was tracheal adenocarcinoma. The cat was treated with a definitive course of external beam radiation therapy (RT; 3 Gy × 18, cytotoxic chemotherapy, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor and palliative RT. The cat remained asymptomatic for 2 months and the mass remained stable radiographically for 11 months after RT. Relevance and novel information With multimodal treatment the cat had a survival time of 755 days. Initial treatment included definitive RT, carboplatin and piroxicam, followed by toceranib phosphate and palliative RT when the mass recurred. This case report describes the first documented use of non-surgical treatment and long-term outcome of tracheal adenocarcinoma in a cat. This case report is an indication that prolonged survival can be achieved with multimodal therapy.

  8. A case of William's syndrome associated peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Kyung Hwa; Hwang, Mi Soo; Kim, Sun Yong; Chang, Jae Chun; Park, Bok Hwan

    1988-01-01

    William's syndrome, in order to more completely delineate the total spectrum of the disorder, indicates that 'infantile hypercalcemia', 'peculiar facies' and 'supravalvular aortic stenosis.' In has other many vascular anomalies, such as peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis, coronary arterial stenosis, celiac arterial stenosis, and renal aterial stenosis. Only 32% of the patients have evidence of supravalvular aortic stenosis. And it is very rare disease entity that has been reported rarely in Korea. Recently authors experienced a case that was questioned William's syndrome with peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis, clinically and preliminary radiologically and this case was confirmed by operation. Here we report a case of William's syndrome with peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis and reviewed literatures

  9. Severe aortic stenosis: diagnosis, treatment and prognosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.W.A. van Geldorp (Martijn)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractDegenerative aortic stenosis is the most common valvular heart disease in developed countries. The prevalence of severe aortic stenosis increases with age from 1% in people below 65 years of age to nearly 6% in people over the age of 85. Since the population life expectancy continues to

  10. Mitral stenosis in 15 dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmkuhl, L.B.; Ware, W.A.; Bonagura, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    Mitral stenosis was diagnosed in 15 young to middle-aged dogs. There were 5 Newfoundlands and 4 bull terriers affected, suggesting a breed predisposition for this disorder. Clinical signs included cough, dyspnea, exercise intolerance, and syncope. Soft left apical diastolic murmurs were heard only in 4 dogs, whereas 8 dogs had systolic murmurs characteristic of mitral regurgitation. Left atrial enlargement was the most prominent radiographic feature. Left-sided congestive heart failure was detected by radiographs in 11 dogs within 1 year of diagnosis. Electrocardiographic abnormalities varied among dogs and included atrial and ventricular enlargement, as well as atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. Abnormalities on M-mode and two-dimensional echocardiograms included abnormal diastolic motion of the mitral valve characterized by decreased leaflet separation, valve doming, concordant motion of the parietal mitral valve leaflet, and a decreased E-to-F slope. Increased mitral valve inflow velocities and prolonged pressure half-times were detected by Doppler echocardiography. Cardiac catheterization, performed in 8 dogs, documented a diastolic pressure gradient between the left atrial, pulmonary capillary wedge, or pulmonary artery diastolic pressures and the left ventricular diastolic pressure. Necropsy showed mitral stenosis caused by thickened, fused mitral valve leaflets in 5 dogs and a supramitral ring in another dog. The outcome in affected dogs was poor; 9 of 15 dogs were euthanatized or died by 2 1/2 years of age

  11. Renal Artery Stenosis (RAS) Case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaater, M.K.

    2012-01-01

    Renal Artery Stenosis (RAS), is one of the causes of secondary hypertension; there are many causes of renal artery stenosis, as atherosclerosis of the renal artery which account for 90% of cases of RAS; fibromuscular dysplasia accounts for 10% of RAS. Various causes of thrombophilia either due congenital causes or acquired causes and can lead to RAS. Our patient was presented by acute attack of epistaxis and hypertension. Angiography of the Renal Arteries,are showed no sign of renal artery stenosis. However, the right kidney showed upper pole infarction, and the left kidney showed evidence of functional lower pole renal artery stenosis, although there is no anatomical stenosis detected in angiography. Work up for the cause of thrombophilia did not help in the diagnosis, which may be due to an undiscovered cause of thrombophilia

  12. Use of the covered Y-shaped metallic stent in the treatment of airway stenoses involving the lower trachea and the tracheal carina: preliminary clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Ruimin; Li Fenbao; Zhang Mingqiu; Wu Gang; Han Xinwei

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To describe a new kind of Y-shaped metallic stent delivery system and evaluate its feasibility and preliminary effect for managing multiple airway stenoses involving the lower trachea and the tracheal carina. Methods: The Y-shaped metallic stent delivery system consisted of three-tier structure. The inner-tier was composed of four parallel guiding tubes, which was used for two guidewires and two threads passing through, the middle-tier was delivery catheter, which contained the four guiding tubes, and the outer-tier was introducer sheath. Under the fluoroscopic guidance, 15 patients with multiple stenoses involving the lower trachea and the tracheal carina were treated with the new covered self-expandable Y-shaped metallic stents. Results: Stent placement in the tracheo-bronchial tree was technically successful in all patients with obliteration of the dyspnea immediately after stent placement, and SaO2 was increased form preoperative 75%-89% to postoperative 96%-99%. During follow-up a period of 3-58 weeks (M 22 weeks), all stenosis were resolved without stent-related complications, and the general physical of all 15 patents was improved with no occurrence of obviously dyspnea and bleeding. Karnofsky performance status (KPS) was improved from preoperative 26%-45% to postoperative 72%-95%. Five patients died of the following causes unrelated to stent insertion: multiple organ failure (n=3), cachexia (n=1) and pulmonary infection caused by gastrobronehial fistula (n=1), and the remaining 10 patients were alive with no evidence of dyspnea at the time of this report. Conclusion: Deployment of the covered Y-shaped metallic stent with the use of Y metallic stent delivery system in the management of airway stenoses involving the lower trachea and the tracheal carina was a simple and safe procedure and with a good short-term clinical efficacy. (authors)

  13. Use of the covered Y-shaped metallic stent in the treatment of airway stenoses involving the lower trachea and the tracheal carina: preliminary clinical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruimin, Yang; Fenbao, Li; Mingqiu, Zhang [Department of Intervention, First Affiliated Hospital, Xinxiang Medical Univ., Xinxiang (China); Gang, Wu; Xinwei, Han

    2007-09-15

    Objective: To describe a new kind of Y-shaped metallic stent delivery system and evaluate its feasibility and preliminary effect for managing multiple airway stenoses involving the lower trachea and the tracheal carina. Methods: The Y-shaped metallic stent delivery system consisted of three-tier structure. The inner-tier was composed of four parallel guiding tubes, which was used for two guidewires and two threads passing through, the middle-tier was delivery catheter, which contained the four guiding tubes, and the outer-tier was introducer sheath. Under the fluoroscopic guidance, 15 patients with multiple stenoses involving the lower trachea and the tracheal carina were treated with the new covered self-expandable Y-shaped metallic stents. Results: Stent placement in the tracheo-bronchial tree was technically successful in all patients with obliteration of the dyspnea immediately after stent placement, and SaO2 was increased form preoperative 75%-89% to postoperative 96%-99%. During follow-up a period of 3-58 weeks (M 22 weeks), all stenosis were resolved without stent-related complications, and the general physical of all 15 patents was improved with no occurrence of obviously dyspnea and bleeding. Karnofsky performance status (KPS) was improved from preoperative 26%-45% to postoperative 72%-95%. Five patients died of the following causes unrelated to stent insertion: multiple organ failure (n=3), cachexia (n=1) and pulmonary infection caused by gastrobronehial fistula (n=1), and the remaining 10 patients were alive with no evidence of dyspnea at the time of this report. Conclusion: Deployment of the covered Y-shaped metallic stent with the use of Y metallic stent delivery system in the management of airway stenoses involving the lower trachea and the tracheal carina was a simple and safe procedure and with a good short-term clinical efficacy. (authors)

  14. Emergency Department Intubation Success With Succinylcholine Versus Rocuronium: A National Emergency Airway Registry Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    April, Michael D; Arana, Allyson; Pallin, Daniel J; Schauer, Steven G; Fantegrossi, Andrea; Fernandez, Jessie; Maddry, Joseph K; Summers, Shane M; Antonacci, Mark A; Brown, Calvin A

    2018-05-07

    Although both succinylcholine and rocuronium are used to facilitate emergency department (ED) rapid sequence intubation, the difference in intubation success rate between them is unknown. We compare first-pass intubation success between ED rapid sequence intubation facilitated by succinylcholine versus rocuronium. We analyzed prospectively collected data from the National Emergency Airway Registry, a multicenter registry collecting data on all intubations performed in 22 EDs. We included intubations of patients older than 14 years who received succinylcholine or rocuronium during 2016. We compared the first-pass intubation success between patients receiving succinylcholine and those receiving rocuronium. We also compared the incidence of adverse events (cardiac arrest, dental trauma, direct airway injury, dysrhythmias, epistaxis, esophageal intubation, hypotension, hypoxia, iatrogenic bleeding, laryngoscope failure, laryngospasm, lip laceration, main-stem bronchus intubation, malignant hyperthermia, medication error, pharyngeal laceration, pneumothorax, endotracheal tube cuff failure, and vomiting). We conducted subgroup analyses stratified by paralytic weight-based dose. There were 2,275 rapid sequence intubations facilitated by succinylcholine and 1,800 by rocuronium. Patients receiving succinylcholine were younger and more likely to undergo intubation with video laryngoscopy and by more experienced providers. First-pass intubation success rate was 87.0% with succinylcholine versus 87.5% with rocuronium (adjusted odds ratio 0.9; 95% confidence interval 0.6 to 1.3). The incidence of any adverse event was also comparable between these agents: 14.7% for succinylcholine versus 14.8% for rocuronium (adjusted odds ratio 1.1; 95% confidence interval 0.9 to 1.3). We observed similar results when they were stratified by paralytic weight-based dose. In this large observational series, we did not detect an association between paralytic choice and first-pass rapid sequence

  15. Tracheal Penetration and Tracheoesophageal Fistula Caused by an Esophageal Self-Expanding Metallic Stent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karan Madan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tracheal penetration of esophageal self-expanding metallic stents (SEMS with/without tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF formation is a rare occurrence. We report the case of a 66-year-old female patient with advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma who had undergone palliative esophageal stenting on three occasions for recurrent esophageal stent obstruction. On evaluation of symptoms of breathing difficulty and aspiration following third esophageal stent placement, tracheal erosion and TEF formation due to the tracheal penetration by esophageal stent were diagnosed. The patient was successfully managed by covered tracheal SEMS placement under flexible bronchoscopy.

  16. Fatal complication from a balloon-expandable tracheal stent in a child: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stotz, William H; Berkowitz, Ivor D; Hoehner, Jeff C; Tunkel, David E

    2003-01-01

    The use of airway stents in the pediatric population is uncommon, reflected in the few patient series reported in the literature. We describe a fatal complication of tracheal stent placement in an 18-month-old child with spondylothoracic dysplasia. Case report. Intensive care unit of a tertiary academic pediatric center. An 18-month-old child with spondylothoracic dysplasia who underwent tracheal stent placement for tracheomalacia. Management of an acute upper-airway hemorrhage. The patient died, despite aggressive interventions. Use of tracheal stents in pediatric patients with tracheomalacia is not without risks; tracheal erosion with severe hemoptysis is an infrequent but devastating complication of this intervention.

  17. Static end-expiratory and dynamic forced expiratory tracheal collapse in COPD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Donnell, C.R.; Bankier, A.A.; O'Donnell, D.H.; Loring, S.H.; Boiselle, P.M.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To determine the range of tracheal collapse at end-expiration among chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and to compare the extent of tracheal collapse between static end-expiratory and dynamic forced-expiratory multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT). Materials and methods: After institutional review board approval and obtaining informed consent, 67 patients meeting the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)/World Health Organization (WHO) Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) criteria for COPD were sequentially imaged using a 64-detector-row CT machine at end-inspiration, during forced expiration, and at end-expiration. Standardized respiratory coaching and spirometric monitoring were employed. Mean percentage tracheal collapse at end-expiration and forced expiration were compared using correlation analysis, and the power of end-expiratory cross-sectional area to predict excessive forced-expiratory tracheal collapse was computed following construction of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Results: Mean percentage expiratory collapse among COPD patients was 17 ± 18% at end-expiration compared to 62 ± 16% during forced expiration. Over the observed range of end-expiratory tracheal collapse (