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Sample records for intrinsically photoresponsive neurons

  1. A new photosensory function for simple photoreceptors, the intrinsically photoresponsive neurons of the sea slug Onchidium

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    Tsukasa Gotow

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Simple photoreceptors, namely intrinsically light-sensitive neurons without microvilli and/or cilia, have long been known to exist in the central ganglia of crayfish, Aplysia, Onchidium, and Helix. These simple photoreceptors are not only first-order photosensory cells, but also second-order neurons (interneurons, relaying several kinds of sensory synaptic inputs. Another important issue is that the photoresponses of these simple photoreceptors show very slow kinetics and little adaptation. These characteristics suggest that the simple photoreceptors of the Onchidium have a function in non-image-forming vision, different from classical eye photoreceptors used for cording dynamic images of vision. The cited literature provides evidence that the depolarizing and hyperpolarizing photoresponses of simple photoreceptors play a role in the long-lasting potentiation of synaptic transmission of excitatory and inhibitory sensory inputs, and as well as in the potentiation and the suppression of the subsequent behavioral outputs. In short, we suggest that simple photoreceptors operate in the general potentiation of synaptic transmission and subsequent motor output; i.e., they perform a new photosensory function.

  2. Extrinsic photoresponse enhancement under additional intrinsic photoexcitation in organic semiconductors

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    Kounavis, P., E-mail: pkounavis@upatras.gr [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Patras, 26504 Patras (Greece)

    2016-06-28

    Dual light beam photoresponse experiments are employed to explore the photoresponse under simultaneous extrinsic and intrinsic photoexcitation of organic semiconductors. The photoresponse of a red modulated light extrinsic photoexcitation is found that can be significantly enhanced under an additional blue bias-light intrinsic photoexcitation in two terminal pentacene films on glass substrates. From the frequency resolved photoresponse, it is deduced that the phenomenon of photoresponse enhancement can be attributed to an increase in the extrinsic photogeneration rate of the red modulated light and/or an improvement of the drift velocity of carriers under an additional blue light intrinsic photoexcitation. The possible predominant extrinsic photogeneration mechanism, which can be compatible with the observed dependence of the photoresponse enhancement on the frequency and on the light intensities of the red and blue light excitation, is the singlet exciton dissociation through electron transfer to acceptor-like traps. Moreover, an improvement in the drift velocity of carriers traversing grain boundaries with potential energy barriers, which may be reduced by trapping of minority carriers created from the intrinsic photoexcitation, may partly contribute to the photoresponse enhancement.

  3. Hot Carrier-Assisted Intrinsic Photoresponse in Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabor, Nathaniel; Song, Justin; Ma, Qiong; Nair, Nityan; Taychatanapat, Thiti; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Levitov, Leonid; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo

    2012-02-01

    Graphene is considered an excellent candidate for photodetection and energy harvesting applications due to its broadband optical response and high internal quantum efficiency, yet measurements have not clearly determined the photocurrent generation mechanism. Here, we report on the intrinsic photoresponse of dual-gated monolayer and bilayer graphene p-n junction devices. Local laser excitation of wavelength 850 nm at the p-n interface leads to striking six-fold photovoltage patterns as a function of bottom- and top-gate voltages. These patterns, together with the measured spatial and density dependence of the photoresponse, provide strong evidence that non-local hot carrier transport, rather than the photovoltaic effect, dominates the intrinsic photoresponse in graphene [1,2] The hot carrier regime manifests as a strong photo-thermoelectric effect in which the photogenerated carrier population remains hot while the lattice stays cool. [1] Science v. 334, p. 648-652 (2011). [2] Nano Lett. ASAP 10.1021/nl202318u (2011).

  4. Learning intrinsic excitability in medium spiny neurons.

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    Scheler, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    We present an unsupervised, local activation-dependent learning rule for intrinsic plasticity (IP) which affects the composition of ion channel conductances for single neurons in a use-dependent way. We use a single-compartment conductance-based model for medium spiny striatal neurons in order to show the effects of parameterization of individual ion channels on the neuronal membrane potential-curent relationship (activation function). We show that parameter changes within the physiological ranges are sufficient to create an ensemble of neurons with significantly different activation functions. We emphasize that the effects of intrinsic neuronal modulation on spiking behavior require a distributed mode of synaptic input and can be eliminated by strongly correlated input. We show how modulation and adaptivity in ion channel conductances can be utilized to store patterns without an additional contribution by synaptic plasticity (SP). The adaptation of the spike response may result in either "positive" or "negative" pattern learning. However, read-out of stored information depends on a distributed pattern of synaptic activity to let intrinsic modulation determine spike response. We briefly discuss the implications of this conditional memory on learning and addiction.

  5. Measure of synchrony in the activity of intrinsic cardiac neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longpré, Jean-Philippe; Salavatian, Siamak; Jacquemet, Vincent; Beaumont, Eric; Armour, J Andrew; Ardell, Jeffrey L

    2014-01-01

    Recent multielectrode array recordings in ganglionated plexi of canine atria have opened the way to the study of population dynamics of intrinsic cardiac neurons. These data provide critical insights into the role of local processing that these ganglia play in the regulation of cardiac function. Low firing rates, marked non-stationarity, interplay with the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems and artifacts generated by myocardial activity create new constraints not present in brain recordings for which almost all neuronal analysis techniques have been developed. We adapted and extended the jitter-based synchrony index (SI) to (1) provide a robust and computationally efficient tool for assessing the level and statistical significance of SI between cardiac neurons, (2) estimate the bias on SI resulting from neuronal activity possibly hidden in myocardial artifacts, (3) quantify the synchrony or anti-synchrony between neuronal activity and the phase in the cardiac and respiratory cycles. The method was validated on firing time series from a total of 98 individual neurons identified in 8 dog experiments. SI ranged from −0.14 to 0.66, with 23 pairs of neurons with SI > 0.1. The estimated bias due to artifacts was typically <1%. Strongly cardiovascular- and pulmonary-related neurons (SI > 0.5) were found. Results support the use of jitter-based SI in the context of intrinsic cardiac neurons. (paper)

  6. Intrinsic properties of larval zebrafish neurons in ethanol.

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    Ikeda, Hiromi; Delargy, Alison H; Yokogawa, Tohei; Urban, Jason M; Burgess, Harold A; Ono, Fumihito

    2013-01-01

    The behavioral effects of ethanol have been studied in multiple animal models including zebrafish. Locomotion of zebrafish larvae is resistant to high concentrations of ethanol in bath solution. This resistance has been attributed to a lower systemic concentration of ethanol in zebrafish when compared with bath solution, although the mechanism to maintain such a steep gradient is unclear. Here we examined whether the intrinsic properties of neurons play roles in this resistance. In order to minimize the contribution of metabolism and diffusional barriers, larvae were hemisected and the anterior half immersed in a range of ethanol concentrations thereby ensuring the free access of bath ethanol to the brain. The response to vibrational stimuli of three types of reticulospinal neurons: Mauthner neurons, vestibulospinal neurons, and MiD3 neurons were examined using an intracellular calcium indicator. The intracellular [Ca(2+)] response in MiD3 neurons decreased in 100 mM ethanol, while Mauthner neurons and vestibulospinal neurons required >300 mM ethanol to elicit similar effects. The ethanol effect in Mauthner neurons was reversible following removal of ethanol. Interestingly, activities of MiD3 neurons displayed spontaneous recovery in 300 mM ethanol, suggestive of acute tolerance. Finally, we examined with mechanical vibration the startle response of free-swimming larvae in 300 mM ethanol. Ethanol treatment abolished long latency startle responses, suggesting a functional change in neural processing. These data support the hypothesis that individual neurons in larval zebrafish brains have distinct patterns of response to ethanol dictated by specific molecular targets.

  7. Intrinsic properties of larval zebrafish neurons in ethanol.

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    Hiromi Ikeda

    Full Text Available The behavioral effects of ethanol have been studied in multiple animal models including zebrafish. Locomotion of zebrafish larvae is resistant to high concentrations of ethanol in bath solution. This resistance has been attributed to a lower systemic concentration of ethanol in zebrafish when compared with bath solution, although the mechanism to maintain such a steep gradient is unclear. Here we examined whether the intrinsic properties of neurons play roles in this resistance. In order to minimize the contribution of metabolism and diffusional barriers, larvae were hemisected and the anterior half immersed in a range of ethanol concentrations thereby ensuring the free access of bath ethanol to the brain. The response to vibrational stimuli of three types of reticulospinal neurons: Mauthner neurons, vestibulospinal neurons, and MiD3 neurons were examined using an intracellular calcium indicator. The intracellular [Ca(2+] response in MiD3 neurons decreased in 100 mM ethanol, while Mauthner neurons and vestibulospinal neurons required >300 mM ethanol to elicit similar effects. The ethanol effect in Mauthner neurons was reversible following removal of ethanol. Interestingly, activities of MiD3 neurons displayed spontaneous recovery in 300 mM ethanol, suggestive of acute tolerance. Finally, we examined with mechanical vibration the startle response of free-swimming larvae in 300 mM ethanol. Ethanol treatment abolished long latency startle responses, suggesting a functional change in neural processing. These data support the hypothesis that individual neurons in larval zebrafish brains have distinct patterns of response to ethanol dictated by specific molecular targets.

  8. Intrinsically active and pacemaker neurons in pluripotent stem cell-derived neuronal populations.

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    Illes, Sebastian; Jakab, Martin; Beyer, Felix; Gelfert, Renate; Couillard-Despres, Sébastien; Schnitzler, Alfons; Ritter, Markus; Aigner, Ludwig

    2014-03-11

    Neurons generated from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) self-organize into functional neuronal assemblies in vitro, generating synchronous network activities. Intriguingly, PSC-derived neuronal assemblies develop spontaneous activities that are independent of external stimulation, suggesting the presence of thus far undetected intrinsically active neurons (IANs). Here, by using mouse embryonic stem cells, we provide evidence for the existence of IANs in PSC-neuronal networks based on extracellular multielectrode array and intracellular patch-clamp recordings. IANs remain active after pharmacological inhibition of fast synaptic communication and possess intrinsic mechanisms required for autonomous neuronal activity. PSC-derived IANs are functionally integrated in PSC-neuronal populations, contribute to synchronous network bursting, and exhibit pacemaker properties. The intrinsic activity and pacemaker properties of the neuronal subpopulation identified herein may be particularly relevant for interventions involving transplantation of neural tissues. IANs may be a key element in the regulation of the functional activity of grafted as well as preexisting host neuronal networks.

  9. Dynamics of intrinsic electrophysiological properties in spinal cord neurones

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    Russo, R E; Hounsgaard, J

    1999-01-01

    The spinal cord is engaged in a wide variety of functions including generation of motor acts, coding of sensory information and autonomic control. The intrinsic electrophysiological properties of spinal neurones represent a fundamental building block of the spinal circuits executing these tasks. ....... Specialised, cell specific electrophysiological phenotypes gradually differentiate during development and are continuously adjusted in the adult animal by metabotropic synaptic interactions and activity-dependent plasticity to meet a broad range of functional demands....

  10. Inducing repetitive action potential firing in neurons via synthesized photoresponsive nanoscale cellular prostheses.

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    Lu, Siyuan; Madhukar, Anupam

    2013-02-01

    Recently we reported an analysis that examined the potential of synthesized photovoltaic functional abiotic nanosystems (PVFANs) to modulate membrane potential and activate action potential firing in neurons. Here we extend the analysis to delineate the requirements on the electronic energy levels and the attendant photophysical properties of the PVFANs to induce repetitive action potential under continuous light, a capability essential for the proposed potential application of PVFANs as retinal cellular prostheses to compensate for loss of photoreceptors. We find that repetitive action potential firing demands two basic characteristics in the electronic response of the PVFANs: an exponential dependence of the PVFAN excited state decay rate on the membrane potential and a three-state system such that, following photon absorption, the electron decay from the excited state to the ground state is via intermediate state(s) whose lifetime is comparable to the refractory time following an action potential. In this study, the potential of synthetic photovoltaic functional abiotic nanosystems (PVFANs) is examined under continuous light to modulate membrane potential and activate action potential firing in neurons with the proposed potential application of PVFANs as retinal cellular prostheses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Stochastic synchronization of neuronal populations with intrinsic and extrinsic noise.

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    Bressloff, Paul C

    2011-05-03

    We extend the theory of noise-induced phase synchronization to the case of a neural master equation describing the stochastic dynamics of an ensemble of uncoupled neuronal population oscillators with intrinsic and extrinsic noise. The master equation formulation of stochastic neurodynamics represents the state of each population by the number of currently active neurons, and the state transitions are chosen so that deterministic Wilson-Cowan rate equations are recovered in the mean-field limit. We apply phase reduction and averaging methods to a corresponding Langevin approximation of the master equation in order to determine how intrinsic noise disrupts synchronization of the population oscillators driven by a common extrinsic noise source. We illustrate our analysis by considering one of the simplest networks known to generate limit cycle oscillations at the population level, namely, a pair of mutually coupled excitatory (E) and inhibitory (I) subpopulations. We show how the combination of intrinsic independent noise and extrinsic common noise can lead to clustering of the population oscillators due to the multiplicative nature of both noise sources under the Langevin approximation. Finally, we show how a similar analysis can be carried out for another simple population model that exhibits limit cycle oscillations in the deterministic limit, namely, a recurrent excitatory network with synaptic depression; inclusion of synaptic depression into the neural master equation now generates a stochastic hybrid system.

  12. Intrinsic response of thoracic propriospinal neurons to axotomy

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    Stelzner Dennis J

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Central nervous system axons lack a robust regenerative response following spinal cord injury (SCI and regeneration is usually abortive. Supraspinal pathways, which are the most commonly studied for their regenerative potential, demonstrate a limited regenerative ability. On the other hand, propriospinal (PS neurons, with axons intrinsic to the spinal cord, have shown a greater regenerative response than their supraspinal counterparts, but remain relatively understudied in regards to spinal cord injury. Results Utilizing laser microdissection, gene-microarray, qRT-PCR, and immunohistochemistry, we focused on the intrinsic post-axotomy response of specifically labelled thoracic propriospinal neurons at periods from 3-days to 1-month following T9 spinal cord injury. We found a strong and early (3-days post injury, p.i upregulation in the expression of genes involved in the immune/inflammatory response that returned towards normal by 1-week p.i. In addition, several regeneration associated and cell survival/neuroprotective genes were significantly up-regulated at the earliest p.i. period studied. Significant upregulation of several growth factor receptor genes (GFRa1, Ret, Lifr also occurred only during the initial period examined. The expression of a number of pro-apoptotic genes up-regulated at 3-days p.i. suggest that changes in gene expression after this period may have resulted from analyzing surviving TPS neurons after the cell death of the remainder of the axotomized TPS neuronal population. Conclusions Taken collectively these data demonstrate that thoracic propriospinal (TPS neurons mount a very dynamic response following low thoracic axotomy that includes a strong regenerative response, but also results in the cell death of many axotomized TPS neurons in the first week after spinal cord injury. These data also suggest that the immune/inflammatory response may have an important role in mediating the early strong

  13. Somatostatin receptors in rat hippocampus: localization to intrinsic neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacios, J.M.; Reubi, J.C.; Maurer, R.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of neurotoxic chemical and electrolytical lesions on somatostatin (SS) receptor binding in the septo-hippocampal afferents, pyramidal and granule cells of the rat hippocampus was examined by autoradiography using the stable SS analogue 125 I-204-090 as radioligand. Electrolytical lesions of the septum did not result in modification of SS binding in the hippocampus. In contrast, both granule cell lesion with colchicine and pyramidal or pyramidal and granule cell lesions with increasing kainic acid doses did result in a specific decrease of binding in the dentate gyrus and hippocampus (CA 1 and CA 3 ). These results suggest that SS receptors in the hippocampus are probably associated with elements from intrinsic neurons. (Author)

  14. Respiratory neuron characterization reveals intrinsic bursting properties in isolated adult turtle brainstems (Trachemys scripta).

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    Johnson, Stephen M; Hedrick, Michael S; Krause, Bryan M; Nilles, Jacob P; Chapman, Mark A

    2016-04-01

    It is not known whether respiratory neurons with intrinsic bursting properties exist within ectothermic vertebrate respiratory control systems. Thus, isolated adult turtle brainstems spontaneously producing respiratory motor output were used to identify and classify respiratory neurons based on their firing pattern relative to hypoglossal (XII) nerve activity. Most respiratory neurons (183/212) had peak activity during the expiratory phase, while inspiratory, post-inspiratory, and novel pre-expiratory neurons were less common. During synaptic blockade conditions, ∼10% of respiratory neurons fired bursts of action potentials, with post-inspiratory cells (6/9) having the highest percentage of intrinsic burst properties. Most intrinsically bursting respiratory neurons were clustered at the level of the vagus (X) nerve root. Synaptic inhibition blockade caused seizure-like activity throughout the turtle brainstem, which shows that the turtle respiratory control system is not transformed into a network driven by intrinsically bursting respiratory neurons. We hypothesize that intrinsically bursting respiratory neurons are evolutionarily conserved and represent a potential rhythmogenic mechanism contributing to respiration in adult turtles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Learning Enhances Intrinsic Excitability in a Subset of Lateral Amygdala Neurons

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    Sehgal, Megha; Ehlers, Vanessa L.; Moyer, James R., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Learning-induced modulation of neuronal intrinsic excitability is a metaplasticity mechanism that can impact the acquisition of new memories. Although the amygdala is important for emotional learning and other behaviors, including fear and anxiety, whether learning alters intrinsic excitability within the amygdala has received very little…

  16. Integrity of Cerebellar Fastigial Nucleus Intrinsic Neurons Is Critical for the Global Ischemic Preconditioning

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    Eugene V. Golanov

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Excitation of intrinsic neurons of cerebellar fastigial nucleus (FN renders brain tolerant to local and global ischemia. This effect reaches a maximum 72 h after the stimulation and lasts over 10 days. Comparable neuroprotection is observed following sublethal global brain ischemia, a phenomenon known as preconditioning. We hypothesized that FN may participate in the mechanisms of ischemic preconditioning as a part of the intrinsic neuroprotective mechanism. To explore potential significance of FN neurons in brain ischemic tolerance we lesioned intrinsic FN neurons with excitotoxin ibotenic acid five days before exposure to 20 min four-vessel occlusion (4-VO global ischemia while analyzing neuronal damage in Cornu Ammoni area 1 (CA1 hippocampal area one week later. In FN-lesioned animals, loss of CA1 cells was higher by 22% compared to control (phosphate buffered saline (PBS-injected animals. Moreover, lesion of FN neurons increased morbidity following global ischemia by 50%. Ablation of FN neurons also reversed salvaging effects of five-minute ischemic preconditioning on CA1 neurons and morbidity, while ablation of cerebellar dentate nucleus neurons did not change effect of ischemic preconditioning. We conclude that FN is an important part of intrinsic neuroprotective system, which participates in ischemic preconditioning and may participate in naturally occurring neuroprotection, such as “diving response”.

  17. Statistics of neuronal identification with open and closed loop measures of intrinsic excitability

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    Ted eBrookings

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In complex nervous systems patterns of neuronal activity and measures of intrinsic neuronal excitability are often used as criteria for identifying and/or classifying neurons. We asked how well identification of neurons by conventional measures of intrinsic excitability compares with a measure of neuronal excitability derived from a neuron’s behavior in a dynamic clamp constructed two cell network. We used four cell types from the crab stomatogastric ganglion, the Pyloric Dilator (PD, Lateral Pyloric (LP, Gastric Mill (GM, and Dorsal Gastric (DG neurons. Each neuron was evaluated for six conventional measures of intrinsic excitability (Intrinsic Properties; IPs. Additionally, each neuron was coupled by reciprocal inhibitory synapses made with the dynamic clamp to a Morris-Lecar model neuron and the resulting network was assayed for four measures of network activity (network activity properties; NAPs. We searched for linear combinations of IPs that correlated with each NAP, and combinations of NAPs that correlated with each IP. In the process we developed a method to correct for multiple correlations while searching for correlating features. When properly controlled for multiple correlations, four of the IPs were correlated with NAPs, and all four NAPs were correlated with IPs. Neurons were classified into cell types by training a linear classifier on sets of properties, or using k-medoids clustering. The IPs were modestly successful in classifying the neurons, and the NAPs were more successful. Combining the two measures did better than either measure alone, but not well enough to classify neurons with perfect accuracy, thus reiterating the need to combine electrophysiology with another, independent criterion for cell identification.

  18. miR-155 Deletion in Mice Overcomes Neuron-Intrinsic and Neuron-Extrinsic Barriers to Spinal Cord Repair

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    Mandrekar-Colucci, Shweta; Hall, Jodie C.E.; Sweet, David R.; Schmitt, Philipp J.; Xu, Xinyang; Guan, Zhen; Mo, Xiaokui; Guerau-de-Arellano, Mireia

    2016-01-01

    Axon regeneration after spinal cord injury (SCI) fails due to neuron-intrinsic mechanisms and extracellular barriers including inflammation. microRNA (miR)-155–5p is a small, noncoding RNA that negatively regulates mRNA translation. In macrophages, miR-155-5p is induced by inflammatory stimuli and elicits a response that could be toxic after SCI. miR-155 may also independently alter expression of genes that regulate axon growth in neurons. Here, we hypothesized that miR-155 deletion would simultaneously improve axon growth and reduce neuroinflammation after SCI by acting on both neurons and macrophages. New data show that miR-155 deletion attenuates inflammatory signaling in macrophages, reduces macrophage-mediated neuron toxicity, and increases macrophage-elicited axon growth by ∼40% relative to control conditions. In addition, miR-155 deletion increases spontaneous axon growth from neurons; adult miR-155 KO dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons extend 44% longer neurites than WT neurons. In vivo, miR-155 deletion augments conditioning lesion-induced intraneuronal expression of SPRR1A, a regeneration-associated gene; ∼50% more injured KO DRG neurons expressed SPRR1A versus WT neurons. After dorsal column SCI, miR-155 KO mouse spinal cord has reduced neuroinflammation and increased peripheral conditioning-lesion-enhanced axon regeneration beyond the epicenter. Finally, in a model of spinal contusion injury, miR-155 deletion improves locomotor function at postinjury times corresponding with the arrival and maximal appearance of activated intraspinal macrophages. In miR-155 KO mice, improved locomotor function is associated with smaller contusion lesions and decreased accumulation of inflammatory macrophages. Collectively, these data indicate that miR-155 is a novel therapeutic target capable of simultaneously overcoming neuron-intrinsic and neuron-extrinsic barriers to repair after SCI. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Axon regeneration after spinal cord injury (SCI) fails

  19. Conditional intrinsic voltage oscillations in mature vertebrate neurons undergo specific changes in culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guertin, Pierre A; Hounsgaard, Jørn

    2006-01-01

    Although intrinsic neuronal properties in invertebrates are well known to undergo specific adaptive changes in culture, long-term adaptation of similar properties in mature vertebrate neurons remain poorly understood. To investigate this, we used an organotypic slice preparation from the spinal...... cord of adult turtles maintainable for several weeks in culture conditions. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced-tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant voltage oscillations in motoneurons were approximately 10 times faster in culture than in acute preparations. Oscillations in culture were abolished by NMDA...... to understanding further the potential for plasticity of mature vertebrate neurons....

  20. miR-155 Deletion in Mice Overcomes Neuron-Intrinsic and Neuron-Extrinsic Barriers to Spinal Cord Repair.

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    Gaudet, Andrew D; Mandrekar-Colucci, Shweta; Hall, Jodie C E; Sweet, David R; Schmitt, Philipp J; Xu, Xinyang; Guan, Zhen; Mo, Xiaokui; Guerau-de-Arellano, Mireia; Popovich, Phillip G

    2016-08-10

    Axon regeneration after spinal cord injury (SCI) fails due to neuron-intrinsic mechanisms and extracellular barriers including inflammation. microRNA (miR)-155-5p is a small, noncoding RNA that negatively regulates mRNA translation. In macrophages, miR-155-5p is induced by inflammatory stimuli and elicits a response that could be toxic after SCI. miR-155 may also independently alter expression of genes that regulate axon growth in neurons. Here, we hypothesized that miR-155 deletion would simultaneously improve axon growth and reduce neuroinflammation after SCI by acting on both neurons and macrophages. New data show that miR-155 deletion attenuates inflammatory signaling in macrophages, reduces macrophage-mediated neuron toxicity, and increases macrophage-elicited axon growth by ∼40% relative to control conditions. In addition, miR-155 deletion increases spontaneous axon growth from neurons; adult miR-155 KO dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons extend 44% longer neurites than WT neurons. In vivo, miR-155 deletion augments conditioning lesion-induced intraneuronal expression of SPRR1A, a regeneration-associated gene; ∼50% more injured KO DRG neurons expressed SPRR1A versus WT neurons. After dorsal column SCI, miR-155 KO mouse spinal cord has reduced neuroinflammation and increased peripheral conditioning-lesion-enhanced axon regeneration beyond the epicenter. Finally, in a model of spinal contusion injury, miR-155 deletion improves locomotor function at postinjury times corresponding with the arrival and maximal appearance of activated intraspinal macrophages. In miR-155 KO mice, improved locomotor function is associated with smaller contusion lesions and decreased accumulation of inflammatory macrophages. Collectively, these data indicate that miR-155 is a novel therapeutic target capable of simultaneously overcoming neuron-intrinsic and neuron-extrinsic barriers to repair after SCI. Axon regeneration after spinal cord injury (SCI) fails due to neuron-intrinsic

  1. Predictive features of persistent activity emergence in regular spiking and intrinsic bursting model neurons.

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    Kyriaki Sidiropoulou

    Full Text Available Proper functioning of working memory involves the expression of stimulus-selective persistent activity in pyramidal neurons of the prefrontal cortex (PFC, which refers to neural activity that persists for seconds beyond the end of the stimulus. The mechanisms which PFC pyramidal neurons use to discriminate between preferred vs. neutral inputs at the cellular level are largely unknown. Moreover, the presence of pyramidal cell subtypes with different firing patterns, such as regular spiking and intrinsic bursting, raises the question as to what their distinct role might be in persistent firing in the PFC. Here, we use a compartmental modeling approach to search for discriminatory features in the properties of incoming stimuli to a PFC pyramidal neuron and/or its response that signal which of these stimuli will result in persistent activity emergence. Furthermore, we use our modeling approach to study cell-type specific differences in persistent activity properties, via implementing a regular spiking (RS and an intrinsic bursting (IB model neuron. We identify synaptic location within the basal dendrites as a feature of stimulus selectivity. Specifically, persistent activity-inducing stimuli consist of activated synapses that are located more distally from the soma compared to non-inducing stimuli, in both model cells. In addition, the action potential (AP latency and the first few inter-spike-intervals of the neuronal response can be used to reliably detect inducing vs. non-inducing inputs, suggesting a potential mechanism by which downstream neurons can rapidly decode the upcoming emergence of persistent activity. While the two model neurons did not differ in the coding features of persistent activity emergence, the properties of persistent activity, such as the firing pattern and the duration of temporally-restricted persistent activity were distinct. Collectively, our results pinpoint to specific features of the neuronal response to a given

  2. Intrinsic and Extrinsic Neuronal Mechanisms in Temporal Coding: A Further Look at Neuronal Oscillations

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    Rémy Lestienne

    1999-01-01

    case to case. Also, the functions of oscillations in the brain are multiple and are not confined to synchronization. The paradigmatic instantiation of oscillation in physics is given by the harmonic oscillator, a device particularly suited to tell the time, as in clocks. We will thus examine first the case of oscillations or cycling discharges of neurones, which provide a clock or impose a “tempo” for various kinds of information processing. Neuronal oscillators are rarely just clocks clicking at a fixed frequency. Instead, their frequency is often adjustable and controllable, as in the example of the “chattering cells” discovered in the superficial layers of the visual cortex. Moreover, adjustable frequency oscillators are suitable for use in “phase locked loops” (PLL networks, a device that can convert time coding to frequency coding; such PLL units have been found in the somatosensory cortex of guinea pigs. Finally, are oscillations stricto sensu necessary to induce synchronization in the discharges of downstream neurones? We know that this is not the case, at least not for local populations of neurones. As a contribution to this question, we propose that repeating patterns in neuronal discharges production may be looked at as one such alternative solution in relation to the processing of information. We review here the case of precisely repeating triplets, detected in the discharges of olfactory mitral cells of a freely breathing rat under odor stimulation.

  3. Intrinsic and Extrinsic Neuronal Mechanisms in Temporal Coding: A Further Look at Neuronal Oscillations

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    Lestienne, Rémy

    1999-01-01

    Many studies in recent years have been devoted to the detection of fast oscillations in the Central Nervous System (CNS), interpreting them as synchronizing devices. We should, however, refrain from associating too closely the two concepts of synchronization and oscillation. Whereas synchronization is a relatively well-defined concept, by contrast oscillation of a population of neurones in the CNS looks loosely defined, in the sense that both its frequency sharpness and the duration of the oscillatory episodes vary widely from case to case. Also, the functions of oscillations in the brain are multiple and are not confined to synchronization. The paradigmatic instantiation of oscillation in physics is given by the harmonic oscillator, a device particularly suited to tell the time, as in clocks. We will thus examine first the case of oscillations or cycling discharges of neurones, which provide a clock or impose a “tempo” for various kinds of information processing. Neuronal oscillators are rarely just clocks clicking at a fixed frequency. Instead, their frequency is often adjustable and controllable, as in the example of the “chattering cells” discovered in the superficial layers of the visual cortex. Moreover, adjustable frequency oscillators are suitable for use in “phase locked loops” (PLL) networks, a device that can convert time coding to frequency coding; such PLL units have been found in the somatosensory cortex of guinea pigs. Finally, are oscillations stricto sensu necessary to induce synchronization in the discharges of downstream neurones? We know that this is not the case, at least not for local populations of neurones. As a contribution to this question, we propose that repeating patterns in neuronal discharges production may be looked at as one such alternative solution in relation to the processing of information. We review here the case of precisely repeating triplets, detected in the discharges of olfactory mitral cells of a freely

  4. Long-lasting modification of intrinsic discharge properties in subicular neurons following status epilepticus.

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    Wellmer, Jörg; Su, Hailing; Beck, Heinz; Yaari, Yoel

    2002-07-01

    A single episode of status epilepticus (SE) induces neuropathological changes in the brain that may lead to the development of a permanent epileptic condition. Most studies of this plasticity have focused on the hippocampus, where both synaptic function and intrinsic neuronal excitability have been shown to be persistently modified by SE. However, many other brain structures are activated during SE and may also be involved in the subsequent epileptogenic process. Here we have investigated whether SE, induced in rats with pilocarpine and terminated after 40 min with diazepam, persistently modifies the intrinsic excitability of pyramidal neurons in the subiculum. Subicular slices were prepared from control and SE-experienced rats (2-5 weeks after SE). In the control group, only 4% of the neurons fired bursts in response to intrasomatic, threshold-straddling depolarizing current pulses (low-threshold bursters). The remaining neurons either fired bursts in response to strong (3x threshold) depolarizations (35%; high-threshold bursters) or fired in a completely regular mode (61%; nonbursters). In the SE-experienced group, the fractions of low- and high-threshold bursters markedly increased to 29% and 53%, respectively. This change in firing behaviour was associated with a marked increase in the size of the spike after depolarization, particularly in low-threshold bursters. Experimental suppression of Ca2+ currents selectively blocked low-threshold bursting but did not affect high-threshold bursting, suggesting that a dual Ca2+- dependent and Ca2+- independent mechanism controls bursting in these neurons. The persistent up-regulation of intrinsic bursting in the subiculum, in concert with similar changes in the hippocampus, undoubtedly contributes to epileptogenesis following pilocarpine-induced SE.

  5. Vagal stimulation targets select populations of intrinsic cardiac neurons to control neurally induced atrial fibrillation.

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    Salavatian, Siamak; Beaumont, Eric; Longpré, Jean-Philippe; Armour, J Andrew; Vinet, Alain; Jacquemet, Vincent; Shivkumar, Kalyanam; Ardell, Jeffrey L

    2016-11-01

    Mediastinal nerve stimulation (MNS) reproducibly evokes atrial fibrillation (AF) by excessive and heterogeneous activation of intrinsic cardiac (IC) neurons. This study evaluated whether preemptive vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) impacts MNS-induced evoked changes in IC neural network activity to thereby alter susceptibility to AF. IC neuronal activity in the right atrial ganglionated plexus was directly recorded in anesthetized canines (n = 8) using a linear microelectrode array concomitant with right atrial electrical activity in response to: 1) epicardial touch or great vessel occlusion vs. 2) stellate or vagal stimulation. From these stressors, post hoc analysis (based on the Skellam distribution) defined IC neurons so recorded as afferent, efferent, or convergent (afferent and efferent inputs) local circuit neurons (LCN). The capacity of right-sided MNS to modify IC activity in the induction of AF was determined before and after preemptive right (RCV)- vs. left (LCV)-sided VNS (15 Hz, 500 μs; 1.2× bradycardia threshold). Neuronal (n = 89) activity at baseline (0.11 ± 0.29 Hz) increased during MNS-induced AF (0.51 ± 1.30 Hz; P neuronal synchrony increased during neurally induced AF, a local neural network response mitigated by preemptive VNS. These antiarrhythmic effects persisted post-VNS for, on average, 26 min. In conclusion, VNS preferentially targets convergent LCNs and their interactive coherence to mitigate the potential for neurally induced AF. The antiarrhythmic properties imposed by VNS exhibit memory. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Frequency-domain analysis of intrinsic neuronal properties using high-resistant electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Rössert

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Intrinsic cellular properties of neurons in culture or slices are usually studied by the whole cell clamp method using low-resistant patch pipettes. These electrodes allow detailed analyses with standard electrophysiological methods such as current- or voltage-clamp. However, in these preparations large parts of the network and dendritic structures may be removed, thus preventing an adequate study of synaptic signal processing. Therefore, intact in vivo preparations or isolated in vitro whole brains have been used in which intracellular recordings are usually made with sharp, high-resistant electrodes to optimize the impalement of neurons. The general non-linear resistance properties of these electrodes, however, severely limit accurate quantitative studies of membrane dynamics especially needed for precise modelling. Therefore, we have developed a frequency-domain analysis of membrane properties that uses a Piece-wise Non-linear Electrode Compensation (PNEC method. The technique was tested in second-order vestibular neurons and abducens motoneurons of isolated frog whole brain preparations using sharp potassium chloride- or potassium acetate-filled electrodes. All recordings were performed without online electrode compensation. The properties of each electrode were determined separately after the neuronal recordings and were used in the frequency-domain analysis of the combined measurement of electrode and cell. This allowed detailed analysis of membrane properties in the frequency-domain with high-resistant electrodes and provided quantitative data that can be further used to model channel kinetics. Thus, sharp electrodes can be used for the characterization of intrinsic properties and synaptic inputs of neurons in intact brains.

  7. Vagal stimulation targets select populations of intrinsic cardiac neurons to control neurally induced atrial fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salavatian, Siamak; Beaumont, Eric; Longpré, Jean-Philippe; Armour, J. Andrew; Vinet, Alain; Jacquemet, Vincent; Shivkumar, Kalyanam

    2016-01-01

    Mediastinal nerve stimulation (MNS) reproducibly evokes atrial fibrillation (AF) by excessive and heterogeneous activation of intrinsic cardiac (IC) neurons. This study evaluated whether preemptive vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) impacts MNS-induced evoked changes in IC neural network activity to thereby alter susceptibility to AF. IC neuronal activity in the right atrial ganglionated plexus was directly recorded in anesthetized canines (n = 8) using a linear microelectrode array concomitant with right atrial electrical activity in response to: 1) epicardial touch or great vessel occlusion vs. 2) stellate or vagal stimulation. From these stressors, post hoc analysis (based on the Skellam distribution) defined IC neurons so recorded as afferent, efferent, or convergent (afferent and efferent inputs) local circuit neurons (LCN). The capacity of right-sided MNS to modify IC activity in the induction of AF was determined before and after preemptive right (RCV)- vs. left (LCV)-sided VNS (15 Hz, 500 μs; 1.2× bradycardia threshold). Neuronal (n = 89) activity at baseline (0.11 ± 0.29 Hz) increased during MNS-induced AF (0.51 ± 1.30 Hz; P < 0.001). Convergent LCNs were preferentially activated by MNS. Preemptive RCV reduced MNS-induced changes in LCN activity (by 70%) while mitigating MNS-induced AF (by 75%). Preemptive LCV reduced LCN activity by 60% while mitigating AF potential by 40%. IC neuronal synchrony increased during neurally induced AF, a local neural network response mitigated by preemptive VNS. These antiarrhythmic effects persisted post-VNS for, on average, 26 min. In conclusion, VNS preferentially targets convergent LCNs and their interactive coherence to mitigate the potential for neurally induced AF. The antiarrhythmic properties imposed by VNS exhibit memory. PMID:27591222

  8. Synaptic and intrinsic homeostasis cooperate to optimize single neuron response properties and tune integrator circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Homeostatic processes that provide negative feedback to regulate neuronal firing rate are essential for normal brain function, and observations suggest that multiple such processes may operate simultaneously in the same network. We pose two questions: why might a diversity of homeostatic pathways be necessary, and how can they operate in concert without opposing and undermining each other? To address these questions, we perform a computational and analytical study of cell-intrinsic homeostasis and synaptic homeostasis in single-neuron and recurrent circuit models. We demonstrate analytically and in simulation that when two such mechanisms are controlled on a long time scale by firing rate via simple and general feedback rules, they can robustly operate in tandem to tune the mean and variance of single neuron's firing rate to desired goals. This property allows the system to recover desired behavior after chronic changes in input statistics. We illustrate the power of this homeostatic tuning scheme by using it to regain high mutual information between neuronal input and output after major changes in input statistics. We then show that such dual homeostasis can be applied to tune the behavior of a neural integrator, a system that is notoriously sensitive to variation in parameters. These results are robust to variation in goals and model parameters. We argue that a set of homeostatic processes that appear to redundantly regulate mean firing rate may work together to control firing rate mean and variance and thus maintain performance in a parameter-sensitive task such as integration. PMID:27306675

  9. Altered intrinsic excitability of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons in aged PDAPP mice

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    Francesco eTamagnini

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Amyloidopathy involves the accumulation of insoluble amyloid β (Aβ species in the brain’s parenchyma and is a key histopathological hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Work on transgenic mice that overexpress A suggests that elevated A levels in the brain are associated with aberrant epileptiform activity and increased intrinsic excitability of CA1 hippocampal neurons. In this study we examined if similar changes could be observed in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons from aged PDAPP mice (20-23 month old, Indiana mutation: V717F on APP gene compared to their age-matched WT littermate controls. Whole-cell current clamp recordings revealed that sub-threshold intrinsic properties, such as input resistance, resting membrane potential and hyperpolarization activated sag were unaffected, but capacitance was significantly decreased in the transgenic animals. No differences between genotypes were observed in the overall number of action potentials (AP elicited by 500 ms supra-threshold current stimuli. PDAPP neurons, however, exhibited higher instantaneous firing frequencies after accommodation in response to high intensity current injections. The AP waveform was narrower and shorter in amplitude in PDAPP mice: these changes, according to our in silico model of a CA1/3 pyramidal neuron, depended on the respective reduction and increase of Na+ and K+ voltage-gated channels maximal conductances. Finally, the after-hyperpolarization (AHP, seen after the first AP evoked by a +300 pA current injection and after 50 Hz AP bursts, was more pronounced in PDAPP mice.These data show that Aβ-overexpression in aged mice altered the capacitance, the neuronal firing and the AP waveform of CA1 pyramidal neurons. Some of these findings are consistent with previous work on younger PDAPP, they also show important differences that can be potentially ascribed to the interaction between amyloidopathy and ageing. Such a change of IE properties over time

  10. Intrinsic frequency response patterns in mechano-sensory neurons of the leech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Fischer

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Animals employ mechano-sensory systems to detect and explore their environment. Mechano-sensation encompasses stimuli such as constant pressure, surface movement or vibrations at various intensities that need to be segregated in the central nervous system. Besides different receptor structures, sensory filtering via intrinsic response properties could provide a convenient way to solve this problem. In leech, three major mechano-sensory cell types can be distinguished, according to their stimulus sensitivity, as nociceptive, pressure and touch cells. Using intracellular recordings, we show that the different mechano-sensory neuron classes in Hirudo medicinalis differentially respond supra-threshold to distinct frequencies of sinusoidal current injections between 0.2 and 20 Hz. Nociceptive cells responded with a low-pass filter characteristic, pressure cells as high-pass filters and touch cells as an intermediate band-pass filter. Each class of mechano-sensory neurons is thus intrinsically tuned to a specific frequency range of voltage oscillation that could help segregate mechano-sensory information centrally.

  11. Intrinsic frequency response patterns in mechano-sensory neurons of the leech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Linda; Scherbarth, Frank; Chagnaud, Boris; Felmy, Felix

    2017-07-15

    Animals employ mechano-sensory systems to detect and explore their environment. Mechano-sensation encompasses stimuli such as constant pressure, surface movement or vibrations at various intensities that need to be segregated in the central nervous system. Besides different receptor structures, sensory filtering via intrinsic response properties could provide a convenient way to solve this problem. In leech, three major mechano-sensory cell types can be distinguished, according to their stimulus sensitivity, as nociceptive, pressure and touch cells. Using intracellular recordings, we show that the different mechano-sensory neuron classes in Hirudo medicinalis differentially respond supra-threshold to distinct frequencies of sinusoidal current injections between 0.2 and 20 Hz. Nociceptive cells responded with a low-pass filter characteristic, pressure cells as high-pass filters and touch cells as an intermediate band-pass filter. Each class of mechano-sensory neurons is thus intrinsically tuned to a specific frequency range of voltage oscillation that could help segregate mechano-sensory information centrally. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Sulforhodamine 101 induces long-term potentiation of intrinsic excitability and synaptic efficacy in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kang, J.; Kang, N.; Yu, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Sulforhodamine 101 (SR101) has been extensively used for investigation as a specific marker for astroglia in vivo and activity-dependent dye for monitoring regulated exocytosis. Here, we report that SR101 has bioactive effects on neuronal activity. Perfusion of slices with SR101 (1 microM) for 10...... min induced long-term potentiation of intrinsic neuronal excitability (LTP-IE) and a long-lasting increase in evoked EPSCs (eEPSCs) in CA1 pyramidal neurons in hippocampal slices. The increase in intrinsic neuronal excitability was a result of negative shifts in the action potential (AP) threshold...... NMDAR currents, suggesting that SR101 enhances activation of synaptic NMDARs. SR101-induced LTP-IE and potentiation of synaptic transmission triggered spontaneous neuronal firing in slices and in vivo epileptic seizures. Our results suggest that SR101 is an epileptogenic agent that long-lastingly lowers...

  13. Characterization of neuronal intrinsic properties and synaptic transmission in layer I of anterior cingulate cortex from adult mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xiang-Yao

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The neurons in neocortex layer I (LI provide inhibition to the cortical networks. Despite increasing use of mice for the study of brain functions, few studies were reported about mouse LI neurons. In the present study, we characterized intrinsic properties of LI neurons of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, a key cortical area for sensory and cognitive functions, by using whole-cell patch clamp recording approach. Seventy one neurons in LI and 12 pyramidal neurons in LII/III were recorded. Although all of the LI neurons expressed continuous adapting firing characteristics, the unsupervised clustering results revealed five groups in the ACC, including: Spontaneous firing neurons; Delay-sAHP neurons, Delay-fAHP neurons, and two groups of neurons with ADP, named ADP1 and ADP2, respectively. Using pharmacological approaches, we found that LI neurons received both excitatory (mediated by AMPA, kainate and NMDA receptors, and inhibitory inputs (which were mediated by GABAA receptors. Our studies provide the first report characterizing the electrophysiological properties of neurons in LI of the ACC from adult mice.

  14. Contributions of intrinsic motor neuron properties to the production of rhythmic motor output in the mammalian spinal cord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiehn, O; Kjaerulff, O; Tresch, M C

    2000-01-01

    showing that the neonatal rat spinal cord can produce a stable motor rhythm in the absence of spike activity in premotor interneuronal networks. These coordinated motor neuron oscillations are dependent on NMDA-evoked pacemaker properties, which are synchronized across gap junctions. We discuss...... the functional relevance for such coordinated oscillations in immature and mature spinal motor systems.......Motor neurons are endowed with intrinsic and conditional membrane properties that may shape the final motor output. In the first half of this paper we present data on the contribution of I(h), a hyperpolarization-activated inward cation current, to phase-transition in motor neurons during rhythmic...

  15. Contributions of intrinsic motor neuron properties to the production of rhythmic motor output in the mammalian spinal cord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiehn, O; Kjaerulff, O; Tresch, M C

    2000-01-01

    Motor neurons are endowed with intrinsic and conditional membrane properties that may shape the final motor output. In the first half of this paper we present data on the contribution of I(h), a hyperpolarization-activated inward cation current, to phase-transition in motor neurons during rhythmic...... firing. Motor neurons were recorded intracellularly during locomotion induced with a mixture of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and serotonin, after pharmacological blockade of I(h). I(h) was then replaced by using dynamic clamp, a computer program that allows artificial conductances to be inserted into real...... neurons. I(h) was simulated with biophysical parameters determined in voltage clamp experiments. The data showed that electronic replacement of the native I(h) caused a depolarization of the average membrane potential, a phase-advance of the locomotor drive potential, and increased motor neuron spiking...

  16. Adiponectin regulates contextual fear extinction and intrinsic excitability of dentate gyrus granule neurons through AdipoR2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, D; Wang, X; Wang, B; Garza, J C; Fang, X; Wang, J; Scherer, P E; Brenner, R; Zhang, W; Lu, X-Y

    2017-07-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is characterized by exaggerated fear expression and impaired fear extinction. The underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms of PTSD are largely unknown. The current pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments for PTSD are either ineffective or temporary with high relapse rates. Here we report that adiponectin-deficient mice exhibited normal contextual fear conditioning but displayed slower extinction learning. Infusions of adiponectin into the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus in fear-conditioned mice facilitated extinction of contextual fear. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in brain slices revealed that intrinsic excitability of DG granule neurons was enhanced by adiponectin deficiency and suppressed after treatment with the adiponectin mimetic AdipoRon, which were associated with increased input resistance and hyperpolarized resting membrane potential, respectively. Moreover, deletion of AdipoR2, but not AdipoR1 in the DG, resulted in augmented fear expression and reduced extinction, accompanied by intrinsic hyperexcitability of DG granule neurons. Adiponectin and AdipoRon failed to induce facilitation of fear extinction and elicit inhibition of intrinsic excitability of DG neurons in AdipoR2 knockout mice. These results indicated that adiponectin action via AdipoR2 was both necessary and sufficient for extinction of contextual fear and intrinsic excitability of DG granule neurons, implying that enhancing or dampening DG neuronal excitability may cause resistance to or facilitation of extinction. Therefore, our findings provide a functional link between adiponectin/AdipoR2 activation, DG neuronal excitability and contextual fear extinction, and suggest that targeting adiponectin/AdipoR2 may be used to strengthen extinction-based exposure therapies for PTSD.

  17. TNF-α Mediates the Intrinsic and Extrinsic Pathway in Propofol-Induced Neuronal Apoptosis Via PI3K/Akt Signaling Pathway in Rat Prefrontal Cortical Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiaoyuan; Chen, Bo; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Junfang; Liu, Hongliang

    2017-10-01

    Propofol can cause developing neuronal apoptosis in both in vivo and in vitro studies, and the mechanism is unclear till now. Our previous study has demonstrated that propofol can increase the TNF-α expression in the prefrontal cortex in rat developing brain, the TNF-α antagonist, etanercept, can inhibit propofol-induced neuronal apoptosis, but little is known about how TNF-α mediates that process. This study reveals that propofol at clinically relevant concentrations increases the TNF-α synthesis and release in neurons, and induces neuronal apoptosis; etanercept significantly reduces neuronal apoptosis, the elevation of cleaved caspase-8 and cleaved caspase-9, or the Akt phosphorylation induced by propofol, while the selective PI3K antagonist blocks the neuroprotection of etanercept. Propofol does not change the expression of P2X7 receptor in neurons, and the P2X7 receptor antagonist cannot affect the TNF-α synthesis or release after propofol treatment. These results suggest that propofol can increase the synthesis and release of TNF-α in the primary cultured prefrontal cortical neurons, TNF-α contributes to the intrinsic and extrinsic pathway in propofol-induced neuronal apoptosis via PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, and P2X7R is not involved in the synthesis and release of TNF-α induced by propofol.

  18. Modulation of firing and synaptic transmission of serotonergic neurons by intrinsic G protein-coupled receptors and ion channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi eMaejima

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Serotonergic neurons project to virtually all regions of the CNS and are consequently involved in many critical physiological functions such as mood, sexual behavior, feeding, sleep/wake cycle, memory, cognition, blood pressure regulation, breathing and reproductive success. Therefore serotonin release and serotonergic neuronal activity have to be precisely controlled and modulated by interacting brain circuits to adapt to specific emotional and environmental states. We will review the current knowledge about G protein-coupled receptors and ion channels involved in the regulation of serotonergic system, how their regulation is modulating the intrinsic activity of serotonergic neurons and its transmitter release and will discuss the latest methods for controlling the modulation of serotonin release and intracellular signaling in serotonergic neurons in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Comparative anatomy of nitrergic intrinsic choroidal neurons (ICN) in various avian species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroedl, Falk; De Stefano, M Egle; Reese, Sven; Brehmer, Axel; Neuhuber, Winfried L

    2004-02-01

    Intrinsic choroidal neurons (ICN) represent a peculiar feature of eyes in higher primates and birds. They account for up to 2000 in human and duck eyes but are virtually absent or rare in all other mammalian species investigated so far. It has been suggested that ICN are involved in regulation of ocular blood supply, hence influencing intraocular pressure, and changes in choroidal thickness, thus influencing accommodation. The present study was undertaken in order to compare differences in various avian species with respect to ICN as well as to provide data on some avian species relevant for experimental ophthalmic research, i.e. chicken and quail. Choroids from 12 avian species were processed for NADPH-diaphorase histochemistry or, in some cases, neuronal nitric oxide synthase immunocytochemistry. ICN were quantified and normalized to mean choroidal area. Three choroids of each galliformes (i.e. chicken, quail, turkey) and anseriformes (i.e. Muscovy duck, Mallard duck, goose) were rastered in squares of 1 mm2 and x/y coordinates were transferred into a 3D-diagram with the amount of ICN represented in the z-axis. ICN were detected in all species investigated. They were predominantly small cells with soma diameters of 20-30 microm. In turkey, and to a lesser amount in chicken, a subpopulation of ICN with somal diameters of up to 70 microm was observed. Highest mean cell counts were found in goose (6195.4; turkey 3558.4; chicken 1681.4; Muscovy duck 785.4; Mallard duck 640.8; quail 440.2). Normalized to choroidal area, highest mean cell counts were (per mm2): 12.62 in goose, 4.42 in both chicken and turkey, 2.86 in quail, 2.66 in Mallard duck and 1.89 in Muscovy duck. In galliformes, ICN were found to be accumulated temporo-cranial, while in anseriformes they were arranged in a more belt-like fashion, passing from cranio-nasal to temporo-caudal. Our results show that besides Muscovy duck, other avian species appear as suitable models for further functional

  20. Calcium-sensing receptor antagonist NPS2390 attenuates neuronal apoptosis though intrinsic pathway following traumatic brain injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zhaoliang; Song, Zhengfei; Wan, Yingfeng; Wang, Kun; Mo, Lianjie; Wang, Yirong

    2017-04-29

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) initiates a complex cascade of neurochemical and signaling changes that leads to neuronal apoptosis, which contributes to poor outcomes for patients with TBI. Previous study indicates that calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) activation contributes to neuron death in focal cerebral ischemia-reperfusion mice, however, its role in neuronal apoptosis after TBI is not well-established. Using a controlled cortical impact model in rats, the present study was designed to determine the effect of CaSR inhibitor NPS2390 upon neuronal apoptosis after TBI. Rats were randomly distributed into three groups undergoing the sham surgery or TBI procedure, and NPS2390 (1.5 mg/kg) was infused subcutaneously at 30 min and 120 min after TBI. All rats were sacrificed at 24 h after TBI. Our data indicated that NPS2390 significantly reduced the brain edema and improved the neurological function after TBI. In addition, NPS2390 decreased caspase-3 levels and the number of apoptotic neurons. Furthermore, NPS2390 up-regulated anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 expression and down-regulated pro-apoptotic protein Bax, and reduced subsequent release of cytochrome c into the cytosol. In summary, this study indicated that inhibition of CaSR by NPS2390 attenuates neuronal apoptosis after TBI, in part, through modulating intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Photoresponsive nanostructured membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Madhavan, Poornima

    2016-07-26

    The perspective of adding stimuli-response to isoporous membranes stimulates the development of separation devices with pores, which would open or close under control of environment chemical composition, temperature or exposure to light. Changes in pH and temperature have been previously investigated. In this work, we demonstrate for the first time the preparation of photoresponsive isoporous membranes, applying self-assembly non-solvent induced phase separation to a new light responsive block copolymer. First, we optimized the membrane formation by using poly(styrene-b-anthracene methyl methacrylate-b-methylmethacrylate) (PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA) copolymer, identifying the most suitable solvent, copolymer block length, and other parameters. The obtained final triblock copolymer membrane morphologies were characterized using atomic force and electron microscopy. The microscopic analysis reveals that the PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA copolymer can form both lamellar and ordered hexagonal nanoporous structures on the membrane top layer in appropriate solvent compositions. The nanostructured membrane emits fluorescence due to the presence of the anthracene mid-block. On irradiation of light the PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA copolymer membranes has an additional stimuli response. The anthracene group undergoes conformational changes by forming [4 + 4] cycloadducts and this alters the membrane\\'s water flux and solute retention. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  2. Analysis of the role of the low threshold currents IT and Ih in intrinsic delta oscillations of thalamocortical neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yimy eAmarillo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Thalamocortical neurons are involved in the generation and maintenance of brain rhythms associated with global functional states. The repetitive burst firing of TC neurons at delta frequencies (1-4 Hz has been linked to the oscillations recorded during deep sleep and during episodes of absence seizures. To get insight into the biophysical properties that are the basis for intrinsic delta oscillations in these neurons, we performed a bifurcation analysis of a minimal conductance-based thalamocortical neuron model including only the IT channel and the sodium and potassium leak channels. This analysis unveils the dynamics of repetitive burst firing of TC neurons, and describes how the interplay between the amplifying variable mT and the recovering variable hT of the calcium channel IT is sufficient to generate low threshold oscillations in the delta band. We also explored the role of the hyperpolarization activated cationic current Ih in this reduced model and determine that, albeit not required, Ih amplifies and stabilizes the oscillation.

  3. Intrinsic Innate Immunity Fails To Control Herpes Simplex Virus and Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Replication in Sensory Neurons and Fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosato, Pamela C.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) establishes lifelong latent infections in the sensory neurons of the trigeminal ganglia (TG), wherein it retains the capacity to reactivate. The interferon (IFN)-driven antiviral response is critical for the control of HSV-1 acute replication. We therefore sought to further investigate this response in TG neurons cultured from adult mice deficient in a variety of IFN signaling components. Parallel experiments were also performed in fibroblasts isolated concurrently. We showed that HSV-1 replication was comparable in wild-type (WT) and IFN signaling-deficient neurons and fibroblasts. Unexpectedly, a similar pattern was observed for the IFN-sensitive vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Despite these findings, TG neurons responded to IFN-β pretreatment with STAT1 nuclear localization and restricted replication of both VSV and an HSV-1 strain deficient in γ34.5, while wild-type HSV-1 replication was unaffected. This was in contrast to fibroblasts in which all viruses were restricted by the addition of IFN-β. Taken together, these data show that adult TG neurons can mount an effective antiviral response only if provided with an exogenous source of IFN-β, and HSV-1 combats this response through γ34.5. These results further our understanding of the antiviral response of neurons and highlight the importance of paracrine IFN-β signaling in establishing an antiviral state. IMPORTANCE Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a ubiquitous virus that establishes a lifelong latent infection in neurons. Reactivation from latency can cause cold sores, blindness, and death from encephalitis. Humans with deficiencies in innate immunity have significant problems controlling HSV infections. In this study, we therefore sought to elucidate the role of neuronal innate immunity in the control of viral infection. Using neurons isolated from mice, we found that the intrinsic capacity of neurons to restrict virus replication was unaffected by the presence

  4. Morphology and intrinsic excitability of regenerating sensory and motor neurons grown on a line micropattern.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ouafa Benzina

    Full Text Available Axonal regeneration is one of the greatest challenges in severe injuries of peripheral nerve. To provide the bridge needed for regeneration, biological or synthetic tubular nerve constructs with aligned architecture have been developed. A key point for improving axonal regeneration is assessing the effects of substrate geometry on neuronal behavior. In the present study, we used an extracellular matrix-micropatterned substrate comprising 3 µm wide lines aimed to physically mimic the in vivo longitudinal axonal growth of mice peripheral sensory and motor neurons. Adult sensory neurons or embryonic motoneurons were seeded and processed for morphological and electrical activity analyses after two days in vitro. We show that micropattern-guided sensory neurons grow one or two axons without secondary branching. Motoneurons polarity was kept on micropattern with a long axon and small dendrites. The micro-patterned substrate maintains the growth promoting effects of conditioning injury and demonstrates, for the first time, that neurite initiation and extension could be differentially regulated by conditioning injury among DRG sensory neuron subpopulations. The micro-patterned substrate impacts the excitability of sensory neurons and promotes the apparition of firing action potentials characteristic for a subclass of mechanosensitive neurons. The line pattern is quite relevant for assessing the regenerative and developmental growth of sensory and motoneurons and offers a unique model for the analysis of the impact of geometry on the expression and the activity of mechanosensitive channels in DRG sensory neurons.

  5. Morphology and intrinsic excitability of regenerating sensory and motor neurons grown on a line micropattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzina, Ouafa; Cloitre, Thierry; Martin, Marta; Raoul, Cédric; Gergely, Csilla; Scamps, Frédérique

    2014-01-01

    Axonal regeneration is one of the greatest challenges in severe injuries of peripheral nerve. To provide the bridge needed for regeneration, biological or synthetic tubular nerve constructs with aligned architecture have been developed. A key point for improving axonal regeneration is assessing the effects of substrate geometry on neuronal behavior. In the present study, we used an extracellular matrix-micropatterned substrate comprising 3 µm wide lines aimed to physically mimic the in vivo longitudinal axonal growth of mice peripheral sensory and motor neurons. Adult sensory neurons or embryonic motoneurons were seeded and processed for morphological and electrical activity analyses after two days in vitro. We show that micropattern-guided sensory neurons grow one or two axons without secondary branching. Motoneurons polarity was kept on micropattern with a long axon and small dendrites. The micro-patterned substrate maintains the growth promoting effects of conditioning injury and demonstrates, for the first time, that neurite initiation and extension could be differentially regulated by conditioning injury among DRG sensory neuron subpopulations. The micro-patterned substrate impacts the excitability of sensory neurons and promotes the apparition of firing action potentials characteristic for a subclass of mechanosensitive neurons. The line pattern is quite relevant for assessing the regenerative and developmental growth of sensory and motoneurons and offers a unique model for the analysis of the impact of geometry on the expression and the activity of mechanosensitive channels in DRG sensory neurons.

  6. The age factor in axonal repair after spinal cord injury: A focus on neuron-intrinsic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoffroy, Cédric G; Meves, Jessica M; Zheng, Binhai

    2017-06-23

    Age is an important consideration for recovery and repair after spinal cord injury. Spinal cord injury is increasingly affecting the middle-aged and aging populations. Despite rapid progress in research to promote axonal regeneration and repair, our understanding of how age can modulate this repair is rather limited. In this review, we discuss the literature supporting the notion of an age-dependent decline in axonal growth after central nervous system (CNS) injury. While both neuron-intrinsic and extrinsic factors are involved in the control of axon growth after injury, here we focus on possible intrinsic mechanisms for this age-dependent decline. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Neurons derived from patients with bipolar disorder divide into intrinsically different sub-populations of neurons, predicting the patients' responsiveness to lithium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, S; Santos, R; Marchetto, M C; Mendes, A P D; Rouleau, G A; Biesmans, S; Wang, Q-W; Yao, J; Charnay, P; Bang, A G; Alda, M; Gage, F H

    2017-02-28

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a progressive psychiatric disorder with more than 3% prevalence worldwide. Affected individuals experience recurrent episodes of depression and mania, disrupting normal life and increasing the risk of suicide greatly. The complexity and genetic heterogeneity of psychiatric disorders have challenged the development of animal and cellular models. We recently reported that hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) neurons differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived fibroblasts of BD patients are electrophysiologically hyperexcitable. Here we used iPSCs derived from Epstein-Barr virus-immortalized B-lymphocytes to verify that the hyperexcitability of DG-like neurons is reproduced in this different cohort of patients and cells. Lymphocytes are readily available for research with a large number of banked lines with associated patient clinical description. We used whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of over 460 neurons to characterize neurons derived from control individuals and BD patients. Extensive functional analysis showed that intrinsic cell parameters are very different between the two groups of BD neurons, those derived from lithium (Li)-responsive (LR) patients and those derived from Li-non-responsive (NR) patients, which led us to partition our BD neurons into two sub-populations of cells and suggested two different subdisorders. Training a Naïve Bayes classifier with the electrophysiological features of patients whose responses to Li are known allows for accurate classification with more than 92% success rate for a new patient whose response to Li is unknown. Despite their very different functional profiles, both populations of neurons share a large, fast after-hyperpolarization (AHP). We therefore suggest that the large, fast AHP is a key feature of BD and a main contributor to the fast, sustained spiking abilities of BD neurons. Confirming our previous report with fibroblast-derived DG neurons, chronic Li treatment reduced

  8. Intrinsic Membrane Hyperexcitability of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Patient-Derived Motor Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J. Wainger

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a fatal neurodegenerative disease of the motor nervous system. We show using multielectrode array and patch-clamp recordings that hyperexcitability detected by clinical neurophysiological studies of ALS patients is recapitulated in induced pluripotent stem cell-derived motor neurons from ALS patients harboring superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1, C9orf72, and fused-in-sarcoma mutations. Motor neurons produced from a genetically corrected but otherwise isogenic SOD1+/+ stem cell line do not display the hyperexcitability phenotype. SOD1A4V/+ ALS patient-derived motor neurons have reduced delayed-rectifier potassium current amplitudes relative to control-derived motor neurons, a deficit that may underlie their hyperexcitability. The Kv7 channel activator retigabine both blocks the hyperexcitability and improves motor neuron survival in vitro when tested in SOD1 mutant ALS cases. Therefore, electrophysiological characterization of human stem cell-derived neurons can reveal disease-related mechanisms and identify therapeutic candidates.

  9. Intrinsic up-regulation of 2-AG favors an area specific neuronal survival in different in vitro models of neuronal damage.

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    Sonja Kallendrusch

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG acts as a retrograde messenger and modulates synaptic signaling e. g. in the hippocampus. 2-AG also exerts neuroprotective effects under pathological situations. To better understand the mechanism beyond physiological signaling we used Organotypic Entorhino-Hippocampal Slice Cultures (OHSC and investigated the temporal regulation of 2-AG in different cell subsets during excitotoxic lesion and dendritic lesion of long range projections in the enthorhinal cortex (EC, dentate gyrus (DG and the cornu ammonis region 1 (CA1.2-AG levels were elevated 24 h after excitotoxic lesion in CA1 and DG (but not EC and 24 h after perforant pathway transection (PPT in the DG only. After PPT diacylglycerol lipase alpha (DAGL protein, the synthesizing enzyme of 2-AG was decreased when Dagl mRNA expression and 2-AG levels were enhanced. In contrast to DAGL, the 2-AG hydrolyzing enzyme monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL showed no alterations in total protein and mRNA expression after PPT in OHSC. MAGL immunoreaction underwent a redistribution after PPT and excitotoxic lesion since MAGL IR disappeared in astrocytes of lesioned OHSC. DAGL and MAGL immunoreactions were not detectable in microglia at all investigated time points. Thus, induction of the neuroprotective endocannabinoid 2-AG might be generally accomplished by down-regulation of MAGL in astrocytes after neuronal lesions.Increase in 2-AG levels during secondary neuronal damage reflects a general neuroprotective mechanism since it occurred independently in both different lesion models. This intrinsic up-regulation of 2-AG is synergistically controlled by DAGL and MAGL in neurons and astrocytes and thus represents a protective system for neurons that is involved in dendritic reorganisation.

  10. The Sodium-Potassium Pump Controls the Intrinsic Firing of the Cerebellar Purkinje Neuron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Michael D.; Wall, Mark J.; Press, Daniel A.; Feng, Jianfeng

    2012-01-01

    In vitro, cerebellar Purkinje cells can intrinsically fire action potentials in a repeating trimodal or bimodal pattern. The trimodal pattern consists of tonic spiking, bursting, and quiescence. The bimodal pattern consists of tonic spiking and quiescence. It is unclear how these firing patterns are generated and what determines which firing pattern is selected. We have constructed a realistic biophysical Purkinje cell model that can replicate these patterns. In this model, Na+/K+ pump activity sets the Purkinje cell's operating mode. From rat cerebellar slices we present Purkinje whole cell recordings in the presence of ouabain, which irreversibly blocks the Na+/K+ pump. The model can replicate these recordings. We propose that Na+/K+ pump activity controls the intrinsic firing mode of cerbellar Purkinje cells. PMID:23284664

  11. Mechanisms of gain control by voltage-gated channels in intrinsically-firing neurons.

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    Ameera X Patel

    Full Text Available Gain modulation is a key feature of neural information processing, but underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In single neurons, gain can be measured as the slope of the current-frequency (input-output relationship over any given range of inputs. While much work has focused on the control of basal firing rates and spike rate adaptation, gain control has been relatively unstudied. Of the limited studies on gain control, some have examined the roles of synaptic noise and passive somatic currents, but the roles of voltage-gated channels present ubiquitously in neurons have been less explored. Here, we systematically examined the relationship between gain and voltage-gated ion channels in a conductance-based, tonically-active, model neuron. Changes in expression (conductance density of voltage-gated channels increased (Ca2+ channel, reduced (K+ channels, or produced little effect (h-type channel on gain. We found that the gain-controlling ability of channels increased exponentially with the steepness of their activation within the dynamic voltage window (voltage range associated with firing. For depolarization-activated channels, this produced a greater channel current per action potential at higher firing rates. This allowed these channels to modulate gain by contributing to firing preferentially at states of higher excitation. A finer analysis of the current-voltage relationship during tonic firing identified narrow voltage windows at which the gain-modulating channels exerted their effects. As a proof of concept, we show that h-type channels can be tuned to modulate gain by changing the steepness of their activation within the dynamic voltage window. These results show how the impact of an ion channel on gain can be predicted from the relationship between channel kinetics and the membrane potential during firing. This is potentially relevant to understanding input-output scaling in a wide class of neurons found throughout the brain and other

  12. Mechanisms of gain control by voltage-gated channels in intrinsically-firing neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ameera X; Burdakov, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Gain modulation is a key feature of neural information processing, but underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In single neurons, gain can be measured as the slope of the current-frequency (input-output) relationship over any given range of inputs. While much work has focused on the control of basal firing rates and spike rate adaptation, gain control has been relatively unstudied. Of the limited studies on gain control, some have examined the roles of synaptic noise and passive somatic currents, but the roles of voltage-gated channels present ubiquitously in neurons have been less explored. Here, we systematically examined the relationship between gain and voltage-gated ion channels in a conductance-based, tonically-active, model neuron. Changes in expression (conductance density) of voltage-gated channels increased (Ca2+ channel), reduced (K+ channels), or produced little effect (h-type channel) on gain. We found that the gain-controlling ability of channels increased exponentially with the steepness of their activation within the dynamic voltage window (voltage range associated with firing). For depolarization-activated channels, this produced a greater channel current per action potential at higher firing rates. This allowed these channels to modulate gain by contributing to firing preferentially at states of higher excitation. A finer analysis of the current-voltage relationship during tonic firing identified narrow voltage windows at which the gain-modulating channels exerted their effects. As a proof of concept, we show that h-type channels can be tuned to modulate gain by changing the steepness of their activation within the dynamic voltage window. These results show how the impact of an ion channel on gain can be predicted from the relationship between channel kinetics and the membrane potential during firing. This is potentially relevant to understanding input-output scaling in a wide class of neurons found throughout the brain and other nervous systems.

  13. Vagus nerve stimulation mitigates intrinsic cardiac neuronal remodeling and cardiac hypertrophy induced by chronic pressure overload in guinea pig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Eric; Wright, Gary L.; Southerland, Elizabeth M.; Li, Ying; Chui, Ray; KenKnight, Bruce H.; Armour, J. Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to determine whether chronic vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) mitigates pressure overload (PO)-induced remodeling of the cardioneural interface. Guinea pigs (n = 48) were randomized to right or left cervical vagus (RCV or LCV) implant. After 2 wk, chronic left ventricular PO was induced by partial (15–20%) aortic constriction. Of the 31 animals surviving PO induction, 10 were randomized to RCV VNS, 9 to LCV VNS, and 12 to sham VNS. VNS was delivered at 20 Hz and 1.14 ± 0.03 mA at a 22% duty cycle. VNS commenced 10 days after PO induction and was maintained for 40 days. Time-matched controls (n = 9) were evaluated concurrently. Echocardiograms were obtained before and 50 days after PO. At termination, intracellular current-clamp recordings of intrinsic cardiac (IC) neurons were studied in vitro to determine effects of therapy on soma characteristics. Ventricular cardiomyocyte sizes were assessed with histology along with immunoblot analysis of selected proteins in myocardial tissue extracts. In sham-treated animals, PO increased cardiac output (34%, P < 0.004), as well as systolic (114%, P < 0.04) and diastolic (49%, P < 0.002) left ventricular volumes, a hemodynamic response prevented by VNS. PO-induced enhancements of IC synaptic efficacy and muscarinic sensitivity of IC neurons were mitigated by chronic VNS. Increased myocyte size, which doubled in PO (P < 0.05), was mitigated by RCV. PO hypertrophic myocardium displayed decreased glycogen synthase (GS) protein levels and accumulation of the phosphorylated (inactive) form of GS. These PO-induced changes in GS were moderated by left VNS. Chronic VNS targets IC neurons accompanying PO to obtund associated adverse cardiomyocyte remodeling. PMID:26993230

  14. Purinergic modulation of adult guinea pig cardiomyocytes in long term cultures and co-cultures with extracardiac or intrinsic cardiac neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horackova, M; Huang, M H; Armour, J A

    1994-05-01

    To determine the capacity of ATP to modify cardiomyocytes directly or indirectly via peripheral autonomic neurones, the effects of various purinergic agents were studied on long term cultures of adult guinea pig ventricular myocytes and their co-cultures with extracardiac (stellate ganglion) or intrinsic cardiac neurones. Ventricular myocytes and cardiac neurones were enzymatically dissociated and plated together or alone (myocytes only). Myocyte cultures were used for experiments after three to six weeks. The electrical and contractile properties of cultured myocytes and myocyte-neuronal networks were investigated. The spontaneous beating frequency of ventricular myocytes co-cultured with stellate ganglion neurones increased by approximately 140% (p under control conditions, but when beta adrenergic receptors of tetrodotoxin sensitive neural responses were blocked, ATP induced greater augmentation (> 100%). In contrast, ATP induced much smaller effects in non-innervated myocyte cultures (approximately 26%, p UTP > MSATP > beta gamma ATP > alpha beta ATP. Adenosine (10(-4) M) attenuated the beating frequency of myocytes in both types of co-culture, while not significantly affecting non-innervated myocyte cultures. The experimental model used in this study showed that extrinsic and intrinsic cardiac neurones which possess P2 receptors can greatly enhance cardiac myocyte contractile rate when activated by ATP. Since adenosine reduced contractile rate in both types of co-cultures while not affecting non-innervated myocytes, it is concluded that some of these neurones possess P1 receptors.

  15. Dopamine Inhibits High-Frequency Stimulation-Induced Long-Term Potentiation of Intrinsic Excitability in CA1 Hippocampal Pyramidal Neurons

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    Chun-ling Wei

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of neural circuits is modified by changes not only in synaptic strength, but also in intrinsic excitability of neurons. In CA1 hippocampal pyramidal neurons, bidirectional changes in the intrinsic excitability are often presented after induction of synaptic long-term potentiation or depression. This plasticity of intrinsic excitability has been identified as a cellular correlate of learning. Besides, behavioral learning often involves action of reinforcement or rewarding mediated by dopamine (DA. Here, we examined how DA influences the intrinsic plasticity of CA1 hippocampal pyramidal neurons when high-frequency stimulation (HFS was applied to Schaffer collaterals. The results showed that DA inhibits the decrease in rheobase and increase in mean firing rate of pyramidal neurons induced by HFS, and that this inhibition was abolished by the D1-like receptor antagonist SCH23390 but not by the D2-like receptor antagonist sulpiride. The results suggest that DA inhibits the potentiation of excitability induced by presynaptic HFS, and that this inhibition depends on the activation of D1-like receptors.

  16. Dispersion of the intrinsic neuronal periods affects the relationship of the entrainment range to the coupling strength in the suprachiasmatic nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Changgui; Yang, Huijie; Wang, Man

    2017-11-01

    Living beings on the Earth are subjected to and entrained (synchronized) to the natural 24-h light-dark cycle. Interestingly, they can also be entrained to an external artificial cycle of non-24-h periods. The range of these periods is called the entrainment range and it differs among species. In mammals, the entrainment range is regulated by a main clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) which is composed of 10 000 neurons in the brain. Previous works have found that the entrainment range depends on the cellular coupling strength in the SCN. In particular, the entrainment range decreases with the increase of the cellular coupling strength, provided that all the neuronal oscillators are identical. However, the SCN neurons differ in the intrinsic periods that follow a normal distribution in a range from 22 to 28 h. In the present study, taking the dispersion of the intrinsic neuronal periods into account, we examined the relationship between the entrainment range and the coupling strength. Results from numerical simulations and theoretical analyses both show that the relationship is altered to be paraboliclike if the intrinsic neuronal periods are nonidentical, and the maximal entrainment range is obtained with a suitable coupling strength. Our results shed light on the role of the cellular coupling in the entrainment ability of the SCN network.

  17. Learning intrinsic excitability in medium spiny neurons [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/30b

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    Gabriele Scheler

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We present an unsupervised, local activation-dependent learning rule for intrinsic plasticity (IP which affects the composition of ion channel conductances for single neurons in a use-dependent way. We use a single-compartment conductance-based model for medium spiny striatal neurons in order to show the effects of parameterization of individual ion channels on the neuronal membrane potential-curent relationship (activation function. We show that parameter changes within the physiological ranges are sufficient to create an ensemble of neurons with significantly different activation functions. We emphasize that the effects of intrinsic neuronal modulation on spiking behavior require a distributed mode of synaptic input and can be eliminated by strongly correlated input. We show how modulation and adaptivity in ion channel conductances can be utilized to store patterns without an additional contribution by synaptic plasticity (SP. The adaptation of the spike response may result in either "positive" or "negative" pattern learning. However, read-out of stored information depends on a distributed pattern of synaptic activity to let intrinsic modulation determine spike response. We briefly discuss the implications of this conditional memory on learning and addiction.

  18. Trace Fear Conditioning Differentially Modulates Intrinsic Excitability of Medial Prefrontal Cortex–Basolateral Complex of Amygdala Projection Neurons in Infralimbic and Prelimbic Cortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chenghui; Ehlers, Vanessa L.

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal activity in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is critical for the formation of trace fear memory, yet the cellular mechanisms underlying these memories remain unclear. One possibility involves the modulation of intrinsic excitability within mPFC neurons that project to the basolateral complex of amygdala (BLA). The current study used a combination of retrograde labeling and in vitro whole-cell patch-clamp recordings to examine the effect of trace fear conditioning on the intrinsic excitability of layer 5 mPFC–BLA projection neurons in adult rats. Trace fear conditioning significantly enhanced the intrinsic excitability of regular spiking infralimbic (IL) projection neurons, as evidenced by an increase in the number of action potentials after current injection. These changes were also associated with a reduction in spike threshold and an increase in h current. In contrast, trace fear conditioning reduced the excitability of regular spiking prelimbic (PL) projection neurons, through a learning-related decrease of input resistance. Interestingly, the amount of conditioned freezing was (1) positively correlated with excitability of IL-BLA projection neurons after conditioning and (2) negatively correlated with excitability of PL-BLA projection neurons after extinction. Trace fear conditioning also significantly enhanced the excitability of burst spiking PL-BLA projection neurons. In both regions, conditioning-induced plasticity was learning specific (observed in conditioned but not in pseudoconditioned rats), flexible (reversed by extinction), and transient (lasted fear conditioning. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Frontal lobe-related function is vital for a variety of important behaviors, some of which decline during aging. This study involves a novel combination of electrophysiological recordings from fluorescently labeled mPFC-to-amygdala projection neurons in rats with acquisition and extinction of trace fear conditioning to determine how specific neurons change

  19. Photoresponsive Smart Coloration Electrochromic Supercapacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Tae Gwang; Kim, Donghyuk; Kim, Yong Ho; Park, Minkyu; Hyun, Seungmin; Han, Seung Min

    2017-08-01

    Electrochromic devices have been widely adopted in energy saving applications by taking advantage of the electrode coloration, but it is critical to develop a new electrochromic device that can undergo smart coloration and can have a wide spectrum in transmittance in response to input light intensity while also functioning as a rechargeable energy storage system. In this study, a photoresponsive electrochromic supercapacitor based on cellulose-nanofiber/Ag-nanowire/reduced-graphene-oxide/WO 3 -composite electrode that is capable of undergoing "smart" reversible coloration while simultaneously functioning as a reliable energy-storage device is developed. The fabricated device exhibits a high coloration efficiency of 64.8 cm 2 C -1 and electrochemical performance with specific capacitance of 406.0 F g -1 , energy/power densities of 40.6-47.8 Wh kg -1 and 6.8-16.9 kW kg -1 . The electrochromic supercapacitor exhibits excellent cycle reliability, where 75.0% and 94.1% of its coloration efficiency and electrochemical performance is retained, respectively, beyond 10 000 charge-discharge cycles. Cyclic fatigue tests show that the developed device is mechanically durable and suitable for wearable electronics applications. The smart electrochromic supercapacitor system is then integrated with a solar sensor to enable photoresponsive coloration where the transmittance changes in response to varying light intensity. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Regional and genotypic differences in intrinsic electrophysiological properties of cerebellar Purkinje neurons from wild-type and dystrophin-deficient mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Wanda M; Anderson, Judy E; Fry, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellar subregions are recognized as having specialized roles, with lateral cerebellum considered crucial for cognitive processing, whereas vermal cerebellum is more strongly associated with motor control. In human Duchenne muscular dystrophy, loss of the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin is thought to cause impairments in cognition, including learning and memory. Previous studies demonstrate that loss of dystrophin causes dysfunctional signaling at γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) synapses on Purkinje neurons, presumably by destabilization of GABAA receptors. However, potential differences in the intrinsic electrophysiological properties of Purkinje neurons, including membrane potential and action potential firing rates, have not been investigated. Here, using a 2×2 analysis of variance (ANOVA) experimental design, we employed patch clamp analysis to compare membrane properties and action potentials generated by acutely dissociated Purkinje neurons from vermal and lateral cerebellum in wild-type (WT) mice and mdx dystrophin-deficient mice. Compared to Purkinje neurons from WT mice, neurons from mdx mice exhibited more irregular action potential firing and a hyperpolarization of the membrane potential. Firing frequency was also lower in Purkinje neurons from the lateral cerebellum of mdx mice relative to those from WT mice. Several action potential waveform parameters differed between vermal and lateral Purkinje neurons, irrespective of dystrophin status, including action potential amplitude, slope (both larger in the vermal region), and duration (shorter in the vermal region). Moreover, the membrane potential of Purkinje neurons from the vermal region of WT mice exhibited a significant hyperpolarization and concurrent reduction in the frequency of spontaneous action potentials compared to Purkinje neurons from the lateral region. This regional hyperpolarization and reduction in spontaneous action potential frequency was abolished in mdx mice. These results from mice

  1. Reduced Hyperpolarization-Activated Current Contributes to Enhanced Intrinsic Excitability in Cultured Neonatal Hippocampal Neurons from PrP−/− Mice

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    Jing eFan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Genetic ablation of cellular prion protein (PrPC has been linked to increased neuronal excitability and synaptic activity in the hippocampus. We have previously shown that synaptic activity in hippocampi of PrP-null mice is increased due to enhanced N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR function. Here, we focused on the effect of PRNP gene knock-out (KO on intrinsic neuronal excitability, and in particular, the underlying ionic mechanism in hippocampal neurons cultured from P0 mouse pups. We found that the absence of PrPC profoundly affected the firing properties of cultured hippocampal neurons in the presence of synaptic blockers. The membrane impedance was greater in PrP-null neurons, and this difference was abolished by the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN channel blocker ZD7288 (100 µM. HCN channel activity appeared to be functionally regulated by PrPC. The amplitude of voltage sag, a characteristic of activating HCN channel current (Ih, was decreased in null mice. Moreover, Ih peak current was reduced, along with a hyperpolarizing shift in activation gating and slower kinetics. However, neither HCN1 nor HCN2 formed a biochemical complex with PrPC. These results suggest that the absence of PrP downregulates the activity of HCN channels through activation of a cell signaling pathway rather than through direct interactions. This in turn contributes to an increase in membrane impedance to potentiate neuronal excitability.

  2. Mid-Infrared Graphene Photoresponse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Allen; Herring, Patrick; Shin, Yong Cheol; Kim, Ki Kang; Kong, Jing; Marcus, Charlie; Gabor, Nathaniel; Palacios, Tomas; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo

    2013-03-01

    Graphene is a two-dimensional (2D) material that has attracted great interest for electronic devices since its discovery in 2004. Due to its zero band gap band structure, it has a broad-band optical absorption ranging from the far-infrared all the way to the visible making it potentially useful for infrared photodetectors. Electrostatically gated p-n junctions have demonstrated photocurrents in the near-IR (λ = 850nm), primarily due to hot carrier mechanisms. In order to study these mechanisms at longer wavelengths (λ = 10 μm), high quality chemically vapor grown (CVD) graphene is necessary to fabricate electrostatically controlled p-n junctions due to the longer optical length scales. Moreover, at these low energies (~ 125 meV), optical phonon scattering is suppressed and is predicted to lead to increased carrier lifetimes and enhanced photo-response. Using electrostatic gating, we are able to study the absorption mechanisms in graphene by selecting between conventional photovoltaic effects and photo-thermoelectric effects. Experiments suggest that the photocurrent signal is enhanced by electrostatic gating near the Dirac peak and reduced disorder in the graphene sample. Institute for Solder Nanotechnologies, GATE MURI, MSD Focus Center

  3. Orexin receptor activation generates gamma band input to cholinergic and serotonergic arousal system neurons and drives an intrinsic Ca2+-dependent resonance in LDT and PPT cholinergic neurons.

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    Masaru eIshibashi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A hallmark of the waking state is a shift in EEG power to higher frequencies with epochs of synchronized intracortical gamma activity (30-60 Hz - a process associated with high-level cognitive functions. The ascending arousal system, including cholinergic laterodorsal (LDT and pedunculopontine (PPT tegmental neurons and serotonergic dorsal raphe (DR neurons, promotes this state. Recently, this system has been proposed as a gamma wave generator, in part, because some neurons produce high-threshold, Ca2+-dependent oscillations at gamma frequencies. However, it is not known whether arousal-related inputs to these neurons generate such oscillations, or whether such oscillations are ever transmitted to neuronal targets. Since key arousal input arises from hypothalamic orexin (hypocretin neurons, we investigated whether the unusually noisy, depolarizing orexin current could provide significant gamma input to cholinergic and serotonergic neurons, and whether such input could drive Ca2+-dependent oscillations. Whole-cell recordings in brain slices were obtained from mice expressing Cre-induced fluorescence in cholinergic LDT and PPT, and serotonergic DR neurons. After first quantifying reporter expression accuracy in cholinergic and serotonergic neurons, we found that the orexin current produced significant high frequency, including gamma, input to both cholinergic and serotonergic neurons. Then, by using a dynamic clamp, we found that adding a noisy orexin conductance to cholinergic neurons induced a Ca2+-dependent resonance that peaked in the theta and alpha frequency range (4 - 14 Hz and extended up to 100 Hz. We propose that this orexin current noise and the Ca2+ dependent resonance work synergistically to boost the encoding of high-frequency synaptic inputs into action potentials and to help ensure cholinergic neurons fire during EEG activation. This activity could reinforce thalamocortical states supporting arousal, REM sleep and intracortical

  4. Neuronal correlates of "free will" are associated with regional specialization in the human intrinsic/default network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Ilan; Ullman, Shimon; Malach, Rafael

    2008-09-01

    Recently, we proposed a fundamental subdivision of the human cortex into two complementary networks-an "extrinsic" one which deals with the external environment, and an "intrinsic" one which largely overlaps with the "default mode" system, and deals with internally oriented and endogenous mental processes. Here we tested this hypothesis by contrasting decision making under external and internally-derived conditions. Subjects were presented with an external cue, and were required to either follow an external instruction ("determined" condition) or to ignore it and follow a voluntary decision process ("free-will" condition). Our results show that a well defined component of the intrinsic system-the right inferior parietal cortex-was preferentially activated during the "free-will" condition. Importantly, this activity was significantly higher than the base-line resting state. The results support a self-related role for the intrinsic system and provide clear evidence for both hemispheric and regional specialization in the human intrinsic system.

  5. Motor neuron intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms contribute to the pathogenesis of FUS-associated amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scekic-Zahirovic, Jelena; Oussini, Hajer El; Mersmann, Sina; Drenner, Kevin; Wagner, Marina; Sun, Ying; Allmeroth, Kira; Dieterlé, Stéphane; Sinniger, Jérôme; Dirrig-Grosch, Sylvie; René, Frédérique; Dormann, Dorothee; Haass, Christian; Ludolph, Albert C; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Storkebaum, Erik; Dupuis, Luc

    2017-06-01

    Motor neuron-extrinsic mechanisms have been shown to participate in the pathogenesis of ALS-SOD1, one familial form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). It remains unclear whether such mechanisms contribute to other familial forms, such as TDP-43 and FUS-associated ALS. Here, we characterize a single-copy mouse model of ALS-FUS that conditionally expresses a disease-relevant truncating FUS mutant from the endogenous murine Fus gene. We show that these mice, but not mice heterozygous for a Fus null allele, develop similar pathology as ALS-FUS patients and a mild motor neuron phenotype. Most importantly, CRE-mediated rescue of the Fus mutation within motor neurons prevented degeneration of motor neuron cell bodies, but only delayed appearance of motor symptoms. Indeed, we observed downregulation of multiple myelin-related genes, and increased numbers of oligodendrocytes in the spinal cord supporting their contribution to behavioral deficits. In all, we show that mutant FUS triggers toxic events in both motor neurons and neighboring cells to elicit motor neuron disease.

  6. Long-term modulation of the intrinsic cardiac nervous system by spinal cord neurons in normal and ischaemic hearts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Armour, JA; Linderoth, B; Arora, RC; DeJongste, MJL; Ardell, JL; Kingma, JG; Hill, M; Foreman, RD

    2002-01-01

    Electrical excitation of the dorsal aspect of the rostral thoracic spinal cord imparts long-term therapeutic benefits to patients with angina pectoris. Such spinal cord stimulation also induces short-term suppressor effects on the intrinsic cardiac nervous system. The purpose of this study was to

  7. Role of ongoing, intrinsic activity of neuronal populations for quantitative neuroimaging of functional magnetic resonance imaging-based networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyder, Fahmeed; Herman, Peter; Sanganahalli, Basavaraju G; Coman, Daniel; Blumenfeld, Hal; Rothman, Douglas L

    2011-01-01

    A primary objective in neuroscience is to determine how neuronal populations process information within networks. In humans and animal models, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is gaining increasing popularity for network mapping. Although neuroimaging with fMRI-conducted with or without tasks-is actively discovering new brain networks, current fMRI data analysis schemes disregard the importance of the total neuronal activity in a region. In task fMRI experiments, the baseline is differenced away to disclose areas of small evoked changes in the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal. In resting-state fMRI experiments, the spotlight is on regions revealed by correlations of tiny fluctuations in the baseline (or spontaneous) BOLD signal. Interpretation of fMRI-based networks is obscured further, because the BOLD signal indirectly reflects neuronal activity, and difference/correlation maps are thresholded. Since the small changes of BOLD signal typically observed in cognitive fMRI experiments represent a minimal fraction of the total energy/activity in a given area, the relevance of fMRI-based networks is uncertain, because the majority of neuronal energy/activity is ignored. Thus, another alternative for quantitative neuroimaging of fMRI-based networks is a perspective in which the activity of a neuronal population is accounted for by the demanded oxidative energy (CMR(O2)). In this article, we argue that network mapping can be improved by including neuronal energy/activity of both the information about baseline and small differences/fluctuations of BOLD signal. Thus, total energy/activity information can be obtained through use of calibrated fMRI to quantify differences of ΔCMR(O2) and through resting-state positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements for average CMR(O2).

  8. Role of Ongoing, Intrinsic Activity of Neuronal Populations for Quantitative Neuroimaging of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging–Based Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Peter; Sanganahalli, Basavaraju G.; Coman, Daniel; Blumenfeld, Hal; Rothman, Douglas L.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A primary objective in neuroscience is to determine how neuronal populations process information within networks. In humans and animal models, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is gaining increasing popularity for network mapping. Although neuroimaging with fMRI—conducted with or without tasks—is actively discovering new brain networks, current fMRI data analysis schemes disregard the importance of the total neuronal activity in a region. In task fMRI experiments, the baseline is differenced away to disclose areas of small evoked changes in the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal. In resting-state fMRI experiments, the spotlight is on regions revealed by correlations of tiny fluctuations in the baseline (or spontaneous) BOLD signal. Interpretation of fMRI-based networks is obscured further, because the BOLD signal indirectly reflects neuronal activity, and difference/correlation maps are thresholded. Since the small changes of BOLD signal typically observed in cognitive fMRI experiments represent a minimal fraction of the total energy/activity in a given area, the relevance of fMRI-based networks is uncertain, because the majority of neuronal energy/activity is ignored. Thus, another alternative for quantitative neuroimaging of fMRI-based networks is a perspective in which the activity of a neuronal population is accounted for by the demanded oxidative energy (CMRO2). In this article, we argue that network mapping can be improved by including neuronal energy/activity of both the information about baseline and small differences/fluctuations of BOLD signal. Thus, total energy/activity information can be obtained through use of calibrated fMRI to quantify differences of ΔCMRO2 and through resting-state positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements for average CMRO2. PMID:22433047

  9. Rapid eye movement sleep loss induces neuronal apoptosis in the rat brain by noradrenaline acting on alpha 1-adrenoceptor and by triggering mitochondrial intrinsic pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindu I Somarajan

    2016-03-01

    cytochrome c to activate intrinsic pathway for inducing neuronal apoptosis in REMS deprived rat brain.

  10. Role of the intraluminal contents and the continuity of intrinsic neurons in intracolonic capsaicin-induced contraction and defecation in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Daisuke; Shibata, Chikashi; Imoto, Hirofumi; Someya, Soutoku; Miyachi, Tomohiro; Miura, Koh; Naitoh, Takeshi; Unno, Michiaki

    2014-01-01

    We, herein, examined the role of the intraluminal contents and continuity of colonic intrinsic neurons in intracolonic capsaicin-induced enhancement of colonic motility and defecation. Five beagle dogs were equipped with three strain gauge force transducers throughout the colon. The colonic contractile activity in response to intracolonic capsaicin was studied in intact dogs, dogs after colonic cleansing and dogs with transection/re-anastomosis (T/R) between the proximal and middle colon. The effects of intravenous yohimbine, a α2 adrenergic antagonist, on the colonic motility and defecation were also studied in the same models. In intact dogs, capsaicin (10 mg) and yohimbine (2 mg/kg) immediately induced contractions throughout the colon, with defecation occurring in all experiments. In dogs after colonic cleansing and T/R, the capsaicin (10 mg)-induced enhancement of colonic motility was decreased in the middle and distal colon, and capsaicin-induced defecation was observed in 0-20 % of experiments (p continuity of the colonic intrinsic nerves as well as the intraluminal contents appear to play an important role in the colonic motor response to intracolonic capsaicin.

  11. A subpopulation of mushroom body intrinsic neurons is generated by protocerebral neuroblasts in the tobacco hornworm moth, Manduca sexta (Sphingidae, Lepidoptera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farris, Sarah M.; Pettrey, Colleen; Daly, Kevin C.

    2010-01-01

    Subpopulations of Kenyon cells, the intrinsic neurons of the insect mushroom bodies, are typically sequentially generated by dedicated neuroblasts that begin proliferating during embryogenesis. When present, Class III Kenyon cells are thought to be the first born population of neurons by virtue of the location of their cell somata, farthest from the position of the mushroom body neuroblasts. In the adult tobacco hornworm moth Manduca sexta, the axons of Class III Kenyon cells form a separate Y tract and dorsal and ventral lobelet; surprisingly, these distinctive structures are absent from the larval Manduca mushroom bodies. BrdU labeling and immunohistochemical staining reveal that Class III Kenyon cells are in fact born in the mid-larval through adult stages. The peripheral position of their cell bodies is due to their genesis from two previously undescribed protocerebral neuroblasts distinct from the mushroom body neuroblasts that generate the other Kenyon cell types. These findings challenge the notion that all Kenyon cells are produced solely by the mushroom body neuroblasts, and may explain why Class III Kenyon cells are found sporadically across the insects, suggesting that when present, they may arise through de novo recruitment of neuroblasts outside of the mushroom bodies. In addition, lifelong neurogenesis by both the Class III neuroblasts and the mushroom body neuroblasts was observed, raising the possibility that adult neurogenesis may play a role in mushroom body function in Manduca. PMID:21040804

  12. THE PHOTORESPONSE BEHAVIOR OF A MEH-PPV SENSITIZED ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    titanium dioxide (nc-TiO2) was constructed and studied for its photoresponse behavior. Poly[2- .... The photoresponse behavior of a meh-ppv sensitized TiO2 photoelectrochemical cell. Bull. Chem. Soc. Ethiop. 2007, 21(2). 283 ... rapid modifications in the electrical properties of the semiconducting polymer [28]. The short-.

  13. Photoresponse in graphene induced by defect engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ruxia; Wang, Wenhui; Du, Jianxin; Guo, Xitao; Liu, Er; Bing, Dan; Bai, Jing

    2016-11-01

    We present a photoresponse study on a lateral defect/pristine graphene junction device fabricated by a simple plasma irradiation method. The junction between pristine graphene and plasma-modified graphene was created by controlling the location of Ar+ plasma treatment. We found that a distinct photocurrent was generated at the junction by photocurrent line scanning measurements, and further analysis reveals that the photo-thermoelectric (PTE) effect, instead of the photovoltaic (PV) effect, dominates the photocurrent generation at the interface. Additionally, the obtained results suggest that tuning the defect density could be effective in modulating the optoelectronic performance of junctions in our device.

  14. Enhanced cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization and intrinsic excitability of NAc medium spiny neurons in adult but not in adolescent rats susceptible to diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oginsky, Max F; Maust, Joel D; Corthell, John T; Ferrario, Carrie R

    2016-03-01

    Basal and diet-induced differences in mesolimbic function, particularly within the nucleus accumbens (NAc), may contribute to human obesity; these differences may be more pronounced in susceptible populations. We examined differences in cocaine-induced behavioral plasticity in rats that are susceptible vs. resistant to diet-induced obesity and basal differences in striatal neuron function in adult and in adolescent obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats. Susceptible and resistant outbred rats were identified based on "junk-food" diet-induced obesity. Then, the induction and expression of cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization, which is mediated by enhanced striatal function and is associated with increased motivation for rewards and reward-paired cues, were evaluated. Basal differences in mesolimbic function were examined in selectively bred obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats (P70-80 and P30-40) using both cocaine-induced locomotion and whole-cell patch clamping approaches in NAc core medium spiny neurons (MSNs). In rats that became obese after eating junk-food, the expression of locomotor sensitization was enhanced compared to non-obese rats, with similarly strong responses to 7.5 and 15 mg/kg cocaine. Without diet manipulation, obesity-prone rats were hyper-responsive to the acute locomotor-activating effects of cocaine, and the intrinsic excitability of NAc core MSNs was enhanced by ∼60 % at positive and negative potentials. These differences were present in adult, but not adolescent rats. Post-synaptic glutamatergic transmission was similar between groups. Mesolimbic systems, particularly NAc MSNs, are hyper-responsive in obesity-prone individuals, and interactions between predisposition and experience influence neurobehavioral plasticity in ways that may promote weight gain and hamper weight loss in susceptible rats.

  15. Enhanced cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization and intrinsic excitability of NAc medium spiny neurons in adult but not adolescent rats susceptible to diet-induced obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oginsky, Max F.; Maust, Joel D.; Corthell, John T.; Ferrario, Carrie R.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Basal and diet-induced differences in mesolimbic function, particularly within the nucleus accumbens (NAc), may contribute to human obesity; these differences may be more pronounced in susceptible populations. Objectives We determined whether there are differences in cocaine-induced behavioral plasticity in rats that are susceptible vs. resistant to diet-induced obesity, and basal differences in the striatal neuron function in adult and adolescent obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats. Methods Susceptible and resistant outbred rats were identified based on “junk-food” diet-induced obesity. Then, the induction and expression of cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization, which is mediated by enhanced striatal function and is associated with increased motivation for rewards and reward-paired cues, were evaluated. Basal differences in mesolimbic function were examined in selectively bred obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats (P70-80 and P30-40) using both cocaine induced locomotion and whole-cell patch clamping approaches in NAc core medium spiny neurons (MSNs). Results In rats that became obese after eating “junk-food”, the expression of locomotor sensitization was enhanced compared to non-obese rats, with similarly strong responses to 7.5 and 15 mg/kg cocaine. Without diet manipulation, obesity-prone rats were hyper-responsive to the acute locomotor-activating effects of cocaine, and the intrinsic excitability of NAc core MSNs was enhanced by ~60% at positive and negative potentials. These differences were present in adult, but not adolescent rats. Post-synaptic glutamatergic transmission was similar between groups. Conclusions Mesolimbic systems, particularly NAc MSNs, are hyper-responsive in obesity-prone individuals; and interactions between predisposition and experience influence neurobehavioral plasticity in ways that may promote weight gain and hamper weight loss in susceptible rats. PMID:26612617

  16. Photoresponse of Natural van der Waals Heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Kyle; Yore, Alexander E; Mou, Tong; Jha, Sauraj; Smithe, Kirby K H; Wang, Bin; Pop, Eric; Newaz, A K M

    2017-06-27

    Van der Waals heterostructures consisting of two-dimensional materials offer a platform to obtain materials by design and are very attractive owing to unique electronic states. Research on 2D van der Waals heterostructures (vdWH) has so far been focused on fabricating individually stacked atomically thin unary or binary crystals. Such systems include graphene, hexagonal boron nitride, and members of the transition metal dichalcogenide family. Here we present our experimental study of the optoelectronic properties of a naturally occurring vdWH, known as franckeite, which is a complex layered crystal composed of lead, tin, antimony, iron, and sulfur. We present here that thin film franckeite (60 nm power-resolved and temperature-resolved photocurrent measurements reveal that the photocarrier generation and recombination are dominated by continuously distributed trap states within the band gap. To understand wavelength-resolved photocurrent, we also calculated the optical absorption properties via density functional theory. Finally, we have shown that the device has a fast photoresponse with a rise time as fast as ∼1 ms. Our study provides a fundamental understanding of the optoelectronic behavior in a complex naturally occurring vdWH, and may pave an avenue toward developing nanoscale optoelectronic devices with tailored properties.

  17. Thermal Stabilization of Biologics with Photoresponsive Hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, Balaji V; Janczy, John R; Hatlevik, Øyvind; Wolfson, Gabriel; Anseth, Kristi S; Tibbitt, Mark W

    2018-03-12

    Modern medicine, biological research, and clinical diagnostics depend on the reliable supply and storage of complex biomolecules. However, biomolecules are inherently susceptible to thermal stress and the global distribution of value-added biologics, including vaccines, biotherapeutics, and Research Use Only (RUO) proteins, requires an integrated cold chain from point of manufacture to point of use. To mitigate reliance on the cold chain, formulations have been engineered to protect biologics from thermal stress, including materials-based strategies that impart thermal stability via direct encapsulation of the molecule. While direct encapsulation has demonstrated pronounced stabilization of proteins and complex biological fluids, no solution offers thermal stability while enabling facile and on-demand release from the encapsulating material, a critical feature for broad use. Here we show that direct encapsulation within synthetic, photoresponsive hydrogels protected biologics from thermal stress and afforded user-defined release at the point of use. The poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogel was formed via a bioorthogonal, click reaction in the presence of biologics without impact on biologic activity. Cleavage of the installed photolabile moiety enabled subsequent dissolution of the network with light and release of the encapsulated biologic. Hydrogel encapsulation improved stability for encapsulated enzymes commonly used in molecular biology (β-galactosidase, alkaline phosphatase, and T4 DNA ligase) following thermal stress. β-galactosidase and alkaline phosphatase were stabilized for 4 weeks at temperatures up to 60 °C, and for 60 min at 85 °C for alkaline phosphatase. T4 DNA ligase, which loses activity rapidly at moderately elevated temperatures, was protected during thermal stress of 40 °C for 24 h and 60 °C for 30 min. These data demonstrate a general method to employ reversible polymer networks as robust excipients for thermal stability of complex

  18. A helical naphthopyran dopant for photoresponsive cholesteric liquid crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Yuna; Frigoli, Michel; Vanthuyne, Nicolas; Tamaoki, Nobuyuki

    2017-01-01

    The first photoresponsive cholesteric liquid crystal comprising a photoisomerizable helical naphthopyran derivative dopant and a nematic liquid crystal is reported. An unprecedented helical twisting power switching ratio of over 90% allowed us to demonstrate multi-cycle rotational motion of micro-objects by UV light irradiation.

  19. Intrinsic Motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    the activity. There has been very little research and theorizing which considers the topic of intrinsic motivation , yet there is a substantial amount...reported within the framework of intrinsic motivation , yet the paper reinterprets the work within that framework. It considers several approaches of

  20. Enhanced photoresponsivity in organic field effect transistors by silver nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnet, Jes; Runge Walther, Anders; Albrektsen, Ole

    2017-01-01

    Organic semiconductors (OSC) such as thiophene-based oligomers exhibit useful electronic and optical properties making them applicable in photo-sensing devices. Generally, thiophene-based photodetectors exhibit a decent responsivity with a spectral sensitivity determined by the OSC's absorption...... properties. We present a simple, yet efficient method to enhance and spectrally tune the photoresponsivity of organic phototransistors (OPTs) utilizing the plasmonic properties of embedded metallic nanoparticles. The ability to fabricate and characterize nanostructures with high accuracy allows for tailoring...... of the optical properties of metal nanoparticles (NPs) and thereby tuning of the spectral range of enhanced photoresponsivity. In this work we have investigated OPTs based on the molecule 5,5″-bis(naphth-2-yl)-2,2':5′,2″-terthiophene (NaT3). We have fabricated OPTs with electron beam lithography-defined arrays...

  1. Versatile Dual Photoresponsive System for Precise Control of Chemical Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Can; Bing, Wei; Wang, Faming; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2017-08-22

    A versatile method for photoregulation of chemical reactions was developed through a combination of near-infrared (NIR) and ultraviolet (UV) light sensitive materials. This regulatory effect was achieved through photoresponsive modulation of reaction temperature and pH values, two prominent factors influencing reaction kinetics. Photothermal nanomaterial graphene oxide (GO) and photobase reagent malachite green carbinol base (MGCB) were selected for temperature and pH regulation, respectively. Using nanocatalyst- and enzyme-mediated chemical reactions as model systems, we demonstrated the feasibility and high efficiency of this method. In addition, a photoresponsive, multifunctional "Band-aid"-like hydrogel platform was presented for programmable wound healing. Overall, this simple, efficient, and reversible system was found to be effective for controlling a wide variety of chemical reactions. Our work may provide a method for remote and sustainable control over chemical reactions for industrial and biomedical applications.

  2. Photoresponsive peptide azobenzene conjugates that specifically interact with platinum surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinçer, S.; Tamerler, C.; Sarıkaya, M.; Pişkin, E.

    2008-05-01

    The aim of this study is to prepare photoresponsive peptide-azobenzene compounds which interacts with platinum surfaces specifically, in order to create smart surfaces for further novel applications in design of smart biosensors and array platforms. Here, a water-soluble azobenzene molecule, 4-hydroxyazo benzene,4-sulfonic acid was synthesized by diazo coupling reaction. A platinum-specific peptide, originally selected by a phage display technique was chemically synthesized/purchased, and conjugated with the azobenzene compound activated with carbonyldiimidazole. Both azobenzene and its conjugate were characterized (including photoresponsive properties) by FTIR, NMR, and UV-spectrophotometer. The yield of conjugation reaction estimated by ninhydrin assay was about 65%. Peptide incorporation did not restrict the light-sensitivity of azobenzene. Adsorption of both the peptide and its azobenzene conjugate was followed by Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) system. The kinetic evaluations exhibited that both molecules interact platinum surfaces, quite rapidly and strongly.

  3. Ultrafast Photoresponsive Starburst and Dendritic Fullerenyl Nanostructures for Broadband Nonlinear Photonic Material Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-20

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2014-0197 ULTRAFAST PHOTORESPONSIVE STARBURST AND DENDRITIC FULLERENYL NOSTRUCTURES FOR BROADBAND NONLINEAR PHOTONIC MATERIAL...Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 03-01-2009 – 05-31-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ultrafast Photoresponsive Starburst and Dendritic Fullerenyl...photophysical properties of ultrafast photoresponsive starburst and dendritic C60/C70-light harvesting antenna-based organic nanostructures for broadband

  4. Photoresponsive lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles for controlled doxorubicin release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Cuiping; Wu, Ming; Zhang, Cecheng; Lin, Xinyi; Wei, Zuwu; Zheng, Youshi; Zhang, Da; Zhang, Zhenxi; Liu, Xiaolong

    2017-06-01

    Currently, photoresponsive nanomaterials are particularly attractive due to their spatial and temporal controlled drug release abilities. In this work, we report a photoresponsive lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticle for remote controlled delivery of anticancer drugs. This hybrid nanoparticle comprises three distinct functional components: (i) a poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) core to encapsulate doxorubicin; (ii) a soybean lecithin monolayer at the interface of the core and shell to act as a molecular fence to prevent drug leakage; (iii) a photoresponsive polymeric shell with anti-biofouling properties to enhance nanoparticle stability, which could be detached from the nanoparticle to trigger the drug release via a decrease in the nanoparticle’s stability under light irradiation. In vitro results revealed that this core-shell nanoparticle had excellent light-controlled drug release behavior (76% release with light irradiation versus 10% release without light irradiation). The confocal microscopy and flow cytometry results also further demonstrated the light-controlled drug release behavior inside the cancer cells. Furthermore, a CCK8 assay demonstrated that light irradiation could significantly improve the efficiency of killing cancer cells. Meanwhile, whole-animal fluorescence imaging of a tumor-bearing mouse also confirmed that light irradiation could trigger drug release in vivo. Taken together, our data suggested that a hybrid nanoparticle could be a novel light controlled drug delivery system for cancer therapy.

  5. Light sensing in a photoresponsive, organic-based complementary inverter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungyoung; Lim, Taehoon; Sim, Kyoseung; Kim, Hyojoong; Choi, Youngill; Park, Keechan; Pyo, Seungmoon

    2011-05-01

    A photoresponsive organic complementary inverter was fabricated and its light sensing characteristics was studied. An organic circuit was fabricated by integrating p-channel pentacene and n-channel copper hexadecafluorophthalocyanine (F16CuPc) organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) with a polymeric gate dielectric. The F16CuPc OTFT showed typical n-type characteristics and a strong photoresponse under illumination. Whereas under illumination, the pentacene OTFT showed a relatively weak photoresponse with typical p-type characteristics. The characteristics of the organic electro-optical circuit could be controlled by the incident light intensity, a gate bias, or both. The logic threshold (V(M), when V(IN) = V(OUT)) was reduced from 28.6 V without illumination to 19.9 V at 6.94 mW/cm². By using solely optical or a combination of optical and electrical pulse signals, light sensing was demonstrated in this type of organic circuit, suggesting that the circuit can be potentially used in various optoelectronic applications, including optical sensors, photodetectors and electro-optical transceivers.

  6. Intrinsic properties of lumbar motor neurones in the adult G127insTGGG superoxide dismutase-1 mutant mouse in vivo: evidence for increased persistent inward currents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meehan, Claire Francesca; Moldovan, Mihai; Marklund, Stefan L.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by a preferential loss of motoneurones. Previous publications using in vitro neonatal preparations suggest an increased excitability of motoneurones in various superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1) mutant mi...... of an increased PIC and less spike frequency adaptation which may contribute to excitotoxity of these neurones as the disease progresses.......Aim: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by a preferential loss of motoneurones. Previous publications using in vitro neonatal preparations suggest an increased excitability of motoneurones in various superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1) mutant mice...

  7. Photoresponsive Molecular Recognition and Adhesion of Vesicles in a Competitive Ternary Supramolecular System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nalluri, Siva Krishna Mohan; Bultema, Jelle B.; Boekema, Egbert J.; Ravoo, Bart Jan

    A competitive photoresponsive supramolecular system is formed in a dilute aqueous solution of three components: vesicles of amphiphilic alpha-cyclodextrin host 1a, divalent p-methylphenyl guest 2 or divalent p-methylbenzamide guest 3, and photoresponsive azobenzene monovalent guest 5. Guests 2 and 3

  8. Motor Neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hounsgaard, Jorn

    2017-01-01

    Motor neurons translate synaptic input from widely distributed premotor networks into patterns of action potentials that orchestrate motor unit force and motor behavior. Intercalated between the CNS and muscles, motor neurons add to and adjust the final motor command. The identity and functional...... properties of this facility in the path from synaptic sites to the motor axon is reviewed with emphasis on voltage sensitive ion channels and regulatory metabotropic transmitter pathways. The catalog of the intrinsic response properties, their underlying mechanisms, and regulation obtained from motoneurons...... in in vitro preparations is far from complete. Nevertheless, a foundation has been provided for pursuing functional significance of intrinsic response properties in motoneurons in vivo during motor behavior at levels from molecules to systems....

  9. Distinct photoresponse in graphene induced by laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen Hui; Nan, Hai Yan; Liu, Qi; Liang, Zheng; Yu, Zhi Hao; Liu, Feng Yuan; Hu, Wei Da; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Xin Ran; Ni, Zhen Hua

    2015-01-01

    The graphene-based photodetector with tunable p-p+-p junctions was fabricated through a simple laser irradiation process. Distinct photoresponse was observed at the graphene (G)-laser irradiated graphene (LIG) junction by scanning photocurrent measurements, and its magnitude can be modulated as a result of a positive correlation between the photocurrent and doping concentration in LIG region. Detailed investigation suggests that the photo-thermoelectric effect, instead of the photovoltaic effect, dominates the photocurrent generation at the G-LIG junctions. Such a simple and low-cost technique offers an alternative way for the fabrication of graphene-based optoelectronic devices.

  10. Single-layer tungsten oxide as intelligent photo-responsive nanoagents for permanent male sterilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen; Liu, Xianjun; Ran, Xiang; Ju, Enguo; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2015-11-01

    Permanent male sterilization has been recognized as useful tools for the development of neuter experimental animals and fattening livestock, as well as efficient control of pet overpopulation. Traditional routes such as surgical ways, chemical injections, and anti-fertility vaccines have addressed these crucial problems with idea outcomes. However, these routes usually bring out serious pain and infection towards animals, as well as induce long-term adverse reaction and immune suppression. Thus, a convenient, but non-surgical strategy for male sterilization under a mild manner is highly desirable. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate a novel platform for male sterilization by using single-layer WO2.72 nanosheets as smart photo-responsive sterilants. Upon a 980 nm irradiation, these nanoagents can possess intrinsic NIR-induced hyperthermia and sensitize the formation of singlet oxygen due to the cooperation of photothermal and photodynamic effects. Mechanism of cellular injury can be attributed to the denaturation of protein and apoptosis-related death. Moreover, long-term toxicity and possible metabolism route after testicular injection are discussed, indicating the neglectable systemic toxicity and high bio-compatibility of our nanoagents. Overall, our strategy can extremely overcome the shortcomings in various routine routes and suggest the new biological application of nanomaterials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. 3D Printed Photoresponsive Devices Based on Shape Memory Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Leow, Wan Ru; Wang, Ting; Wang, Juan; Yu, Jiancan; He, Ke; Qi, Dianpeng; Wan, Changjin; Chen, Xiaodong

    2017-09-01

    Compared with traditional stimuli-responsive devices with simple planar or tubular geometries, 3D printed stimuli-responsive devices not only intimately meet the requirement of complicated shapes at macrolevel but also satisfy various conformation changes triggered by external stimuli at the microscopic scale. However, their development is limited by the lack of 3D printing functional materials. This paper demonstrates the 3D printing of photoresponsive shape memory devices through combining fused deposition modeling printing technology and photoresponsive shape memory composites based on shape memory polymers and carbon black with high photothermal conversion efficiency. External illumination triggers the shape recovery of 3D printed devices from the temporary shape to the original shape. The effect of materials thickness and light density on the shape memory behavior of 3D printed devices is quantified and calculated. Remarkably, sunlight also triggers the shape memory behavior of these 3D printed devices. This facile printing strategy would provide tremendous opportunities for the design and fabrication of biomimetic smart devices and soft robotics. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Photoresponsive Amphiphilic Macrocycles Containing Main-Chain Azobenzene Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yadong; Wang, Zhao; Li, Yiwen; Zhang, Zhengbiao; Zhang, Wei; Pan, Xiangqiang; Zhou, Nianchen; Zhu, Xiulin

    2015-07-01

    Herein, the first example of photosensitive cyclic amphiphilic homopolymers consisting of multiple biphenyl azobenzene chromophores in the cyclic main chain tethered with hydrophilic tetraethylene glycol monomethyl ether units is presented. The synthetic approach involves sequentially performed thermal catalyzed "click" step-growth polymerization in bulk, and Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) intramolecular cyclization from α-alkyne/ω-azide linear precursors. It is observed that such amphiphilic macrocycles exhibit increased glass transition temperatures (Tg ), slightly faster trans-cis-trans photoisomerization, and enhanced fluorescence emission intensity compared with the corresponding linear polymers. In addition, the cyclic amphiphilic homopolymers self-assemble into spherical nanoparticles with smaller sizes which possess slower photoresponsive behaviors in a tetrahydrofuran/water mixture compared with those of the linear ones. All these interesting observations suggest that the cyclic topology has a great influence on the physical properties and self-assembly behavior of these photoresponsive amphiphilic macrocycles in general. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Photoresponsive Wettability in Monolayer Films from Sinapinic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleverson A. S. Moura

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sinapinic acid is an interesting material because it is both antioxidant and antibacterial agent. In addition, when illuminated with ultraviolet light, it can exhibit the so-called photodimerization process. In this paper, we report on the investigation of monolayer films from 3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (sinapinic acid, SinA deposited onto poly(allylamine hydrochloride, PAH, films. SinA monolayers were prepared by using the layer-by-layer (LbL self-assembly technique. Adsorption kinetics curves were well fitted by a biexponential function suggesting that the adsorption process is determined by two mechanisms: nucleation and growth of aggregates. By using wetting contact angle analysis, we have found that SinA monolayers exhibit photoresponsive wettability under UV irradiation (365 nm; that is, wettability decreases with increasing UV irradiation time. The photoresponse of wettability was attributed to photodimerization process. This hypothesis was supported by the dependence of surface morphological structure and absorption on UV irradiation time. The mechanism found in the well-known transcinnamic acid crystals is used to explain the photodimerization process in SinA monolayers.

  14. A photoresponsive Au25 nanocluster protected by azobenzene derivative thiolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negishi, Yuichi; Kamimura, Ukyo; Ide, Mao; Hirayama, Michiyo

    2012-06-01

    An Au25 cluster protected by azobenzene derivative thiolates (S-Az) ([Au25(S-Az)18]-) was synthesized with the aim of producing a photoresponsive Au25 cluster. The matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrum of the product revealed that [Au25(S-Az)18]- was synthesized in high purity. Optical absorption spectra of [Au25(S-Az)18]- obtained before and after photoirradiation suggest that the azobenzenes in the ligands of Au25(S-Az)18 isomerize with an efficiency of nearly 100%, both from the trans to cis conformation and from the cis to trans conformation. Furthermore, the redox potential and optical absorption of Au25(S-Az)18 were found to change reversibly due to photoisomerization of azobenzenes.An Au25 cluster protected by azobenzene derivative thiolates (S-Az) ([Au25(S-Az)18]-) was synthesized with the aim of producing a photoresponsive Au25 cluster. The matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrum of the product revealed that [Au25(S-Az)18]- was synthesized in high purity. Optical absorption spectra of [Au25(S-Az)18]- obtained before and after photoirradiation suggest that the azobenzenes in the ligands of Au25(S-Az)18 isomerize with an efficiency of nearly 100%, both from the trans to cis conformation and from the cis to trans conformation. Furthermore, the redox potential and optical absorption of Au25(S-Az)18 were found to change reversibly due to photoisomerization of azobenzenes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of the experimental procedure and characterization of the products. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30830d

  15. Enhanced UV photoresponse with Au nanoparticles incorporated rGO/Si heterostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrakalavathi, T.; Rao Peta, Koteswara; Jeyalakshmi, R.

    2018-02-01

    In this work, we demonstrated Au nanoparticles incorporated reduced graphene oxide (rGO)/Si heterostructure based UV photodetector. The pristine and Au nanoparticles incorporated heterostructure was analyzed and characterized by x-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS), Current- Voltage (I-V) characteristics and UV photo detective properties were examined by using UV light emitting diode (LED) with 382 nm wavelengths. The UV photoresponse properties revealed that the Au-rGO/Si heterostructure showed much better photoresponse activity toward UV light than pristine rGO/Si. The experimental results clearly revealed that the photoresponse of Au-rGO/Si heterostructure can be effectively enhanced by 30 times at 382 nm wavelength over pristine rGO/Si. The effect of rGO thickness on performance of UV photodetector was also examined. The improved photoresponse was attributed to localized surface plasmon resonance, in addition high electron transport capability of rGO number of photoexcited electrons collected at interface.

  16. Transient photoresponse of nitrogen-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond electrodes in saline solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahnood, Arman, E-mail: arman.ahnood@unimelb.edu.au; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Stacey, Alastair; Prawer, Steven [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Simonov, Alexandr N.; Spiccia, Leone [School of Chemistry and the ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Laird, Jamie S. [CSIRO, Minerals Resources Flagship, School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Maturana, Matias I. [National Vision Research Institute, Australian College of Optometry, Carlton, Victoria 3053 (Australia); NeuroEngineering Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Ibbotson, Michael R. [National Vision Research Institute, Australian College of Optometry, Carlton, Victoria 3053 (Australia); ARC Centre of Excellence for Integrative Brain Function, Department of Optometry and Vision Sciences, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2016-03-07

    Beyond conventional electrically-driven neuronal stimulation methods, there is a growing interest in optically-driven approaches. In recent years, nitrogen-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond (N-UNCD) has emerged as a strong material candidate for use in electrically-driven stimulation electrodes. This work investigates the electrochemical activity of N-UNCD in response to pulsed illumination, to assess its potential for use as an optically-driven stimulation electrode. Whilst N-UNCD in the as-grown state exhibits a weak photoresponse, the oxygen plasma treated film exhibits two orders of magnitude enhancement in its sub-bandgap open circuit photovoltage response. The enhancement is attributed to the formation of a dense network of oxygen-terminated diamond nanocrystals at the N-UNCD surface. Electrically connected to the N-UNCD bulk via sub-surface graphitic grain boundaries, these diamond nanocrystals introduce a semiconducting barrier between the sub-surface graphitic semimetal and the electrolyte solution, leading to a photovoltage under irradiation with wavelengths of λ = 450 nm and shorter. Within the safe optical exposure limit of 2 mW mm{sup −2}, charge injection capacity of 0.01 mC cm{sup −2} is achieved using a 15 × 15 μm electrode, meeting the requirements for extracellular and intercellular stimulation. The nanoscale nature of processes presented here along with the diamond's biocompatibility and biostability open an avenue for the use of oxygen treated N-UNCD as optically driven stimulating electrodes.

  17. Visible light guided manipulation of liquid wettability on photoresponsive surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Gibum; Panchanathan, Divya; Mahmoudi, Seyed Reza; Gondal, Mohammed A.; McKinley, Gareth H.; Varanasi, Kripa K.

    2017-04-01

    Photoresponsive titania surfaces are of great interest due to their unique wettability change upon ultraviolet light illumination. However, their applications are often limited either by the inability to respond to visible light or the need for special treatment to recover the original wettability. Sensitizing TiO2 surfaces with visible light-absorbing materials has been utilized in photovoltaic applications. Here we demonstrate that a dye-sensitized TiO2 surface can selectively change the wettability towards contacting liquids upon visible light illumination due to a photo-induced voltage across the liquid and the underlying surface. The photo-induced wettability change of our surfaces enables external manipulation of liquid droplet motion upon illumination. We show demulsification of surfactant-stabilized brine-in-oil emulsions via coalescence of brine droplets on our dye-sensitized TiO2 surface upon visible light illumination. We anticipate that our surfaces will have a wide range of applications including microfluidic devices with customizable wettability, solar-driven oil-water clean-up and demulsification technologies.

  18. Spatially resolved photoresponse on individual ZnO nanorods: correlating morphology, defects and conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandopadhyay, K; Mitra, J

    2016-06-23

    Electrically active native point defects have a significant impact on the optical and electrical properties of ZnO nanostructures. Control of defect distribution and a detailed understanding of their physical properties are central to designing ZnO in novel functional forms and architecture, which ultimately decides device performance. Defect control is primarily achieved by either engineering nanostructure morphology by tailoring growth techniques or doping. Here, we report conducting atomic force microscopy studies of spatially resolved photoresponse properties on ZnO nanorod surfaces. The photoresponse for super-band gap, ultraviolet excitations show a direct correlation between surface morphology and photoactivity localization. Additionally, the system exhibits significant photoresponse with sub-bandgap, green illumination; the signature energy associated with the deep level oxygen vacancy states. While the local current-voltage characteristics provide evidence of multiple transport processes and quantifies the photoresponse, the local time-resolved photoresponse data evidences large variations in response times (90 ms-50 s), across the surface of a nanorod. The spatially varied photoconductance and the range in temporal response display a complex interplay of morphology, defects and connectivity that brings about the true colour of these ZnO nanostructures.

  19. Photo-Responsive Soft Ionic Crystals: Ion-Pairing Assemblies of Azobenzene Carboxylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakado, Ryohei; Hara, Mitsuo; Nagano, Shusaku; Seki, Takahiro; Maeda, Hiromitsu

    2017-07-12

    This report delineates the design and synthesis of negatively charged azobenzene derivatives that form photo-responsive ion-pairing assemblies. The azobenzene carboxylates possessing aliphatic chains were prepared as photo-responsive anions that promote the formation of ion-pairing dimension-controlled assemblies, including mesophases, when used in conjunction with a tetrabutylammonium (TBA) cation. The photo-responsive properties of the ion pairs and the precursory carboxylic acids in the bulk state were examined by polarized optical microscopy (POM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), demonstrating that liquid crystal (LC)-liquid and crystal-liquid phase transitions occurred, depending on the number and lengths of the aliphatic chains of each assembly. An ion pair exhibited photo-induced crystal-crystal phase transitions upon switching between two irradiation wavelengths (365/436 nm). © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Uniform photoresponse in thermally oxidized Ni and MoS{sub 2} heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Wei [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha (China); National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, School of Physics, Nanjing University (China); Peng, Gang; Wang, Fei [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha (China); Miao, Feng [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, School of Physics, Nanjing University (China); Zhang, Xue-Ao; Qin, Shiqiao [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha (China); State Key Laboratory of High Performance Computing, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha (China)

    2017-09-15

    Non-uniform photocurrent is usually generated at the overlapped region of the heterostructures, and its potential applications may be hindered by the spatial uniformity issue of the device photoresponse. Here, nearly a uniform photoresponse at the overlapped region of the thermally oxidized Ni and molybdenum disulphide (MoS{sub 2}) heterostructures is obtained. Further characterizations reveal that several nanometers Ni is rightly under the NiO{sub x} layer formed at the surface of the film in the oxidation process. The heterostructures based on layered MoS{sub 2}/NiO{sub x}/Ni with highly conductive bottom Ni show a high uniform photoresponse with an external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 1.4% at 532 nm. Moreover, successful integration of multiple devices suggests a great priority for such a structure for highly integrated uniform photodetectors. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Photoresponse of the protonated Schiff-base retinal chromophore in the gas phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toker, Jonathan; Rahbek, Dennis Bo; Kiefer, H V

    2013-01-01

    The fragmentation, initiated by photoexcitation as well as collisionally-induced excitation, of several retinal chromophores was studied in the gas phase. The chromophore in the protonated Schiff-base form (RPSB), essential for mammalian vision, shows a remarkably selective photoresponse. The sel......The fragmentation, initiated by photoexcitation as well as collisionally-induced excitation, of several retinal chromophores was studied in the gas phase. The chromophore in the protonated Schiff-base form (RPSB), essential for mammalian vision, shows a remarkably selective photoresponse...... modifications of the chromophore. We propose that isomerizations play an important role in the photoresponse of gas-phase retinal chromophores and guide internal conversion through conical intersections. The role of protein interactions is then to control the specificity of the photoisomerization in the primary...

  2. Uniform photoresponse in thermally oxidized Ni and MoS2 heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Wei; Peng, Gang; Wang, Fei; Miao, Feng; Zhang, Xue-Ao; Qin, Shiqiao

    2017-01-01

    Non-uniform photocurrent is usually generated at the overlapped region of the heterostructures, and its potential applications may be hindered by the spatial uniformity issue of the device photoresponse. Here, nearly a uniform photoresponse at the overlapped region of the thermally oxidized Ni and molybdenum disulphide (MoS 2 ) heterostructures is obtained. Further characterizations reveal that several nanometers Ni is rightly under the NiO x layer formed at the surface of the film in the oxidation process. The heterostructures based on layered MoS 2 /NiO x /Ni with highly conductive bottom Ni show a high uniform photoresponse with an external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 1.4% at 532 nm. Moreover, successful integration of multiple devices suggests a great priority for such a structure for highly integrated uniform photodetectors. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Brominated methanes as photoresponsive molecular storage of elemental Br2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Kazumitsu; Tsuda, Akihiko

    2012-10-01

    The photochemical generation of elemental Br(2) from brominated methanes is reported. Br(2) was generated by the vaporization of carbon oxides and HBr through oxidative photodecomposition of brominated methanes under a 20 W low-pressure mercury lamp, wherein the amount and situations of Br(2) generation were photochemically controllable. Liquid CH(2)Br(2) can be used not only as an organic solvent but also for the photoresponsive molecular storage of Br(2), which is of great technical benefit in a variety of organic syntheses and in materials science. By taking advantage of the in situ generation of Br(2) from the organic solvent itself, many organobromine compounds were synthesized in high practical yields with or without the addition of a catalyst. Herein, Br(2) that was generated by the photodecomposition of CH(2)Br(2) retained its reactivity in solution to undergo essentially the same reactions as those that were carried out with solutions of Br(2) dissolved in CH(2)Br(2) that were prepared without photoirradiation. Furthermore, HBr, which was generated during the course of the photodecomposition of CH(2)Br(2), was also available for the substitution of the OH group for the Br group and for the preparation of the HBr salts of amines. Furthermore, the photochemical generation of Br(2) from CH(2)Br(2) was available for the area-selective photochemical bleaching of natural colored plants, such as red rose petals, wherein Br(2) that was generated photochemically from CH(2)Br(2) was painted onto the petal to cause radical oxidations of the chromophoric anthocyanin molecules. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Review of the recent progress in photoresponsive molecularly imprinted polymers containing azobenzene chromophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yu-bo; Tang, Qian; Gong, Cheng-bin; Lam, Michael Hon-Wah

    2015-11-05

    Photoresponsive molecularly imprinted polymers (PMIPs) containing azobenzene have received wide research attention in recent years and made notable achievements. This article reviews the recent developments on PMIPs containing azobenzene. Topics include the following: (i) brief introduction of azobenzene, molecularly imprinted polymers, and PMIPs containing azobenzene; (ii) progress in functional monomers, cross-linkers, and polymerization conditions; (iii) preparation methods, properties, applications, as well as advantages and disadvantages of conventional PMIPs; (iv) substrate, preparation method, and applications of photoresponsive surface molecularly imprinted polymers; and (v) some perspectives for further development of PMIPs containing azobenzene. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Impact of transparent electrode on photoresponse of ZnO-based phototransistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seunghyup; Ahn, Seung-Eon; Jeon, Yongwoo; Ahn, Ji-Hoon; Song, Ihun; Kim, Jungwoo; Choi, Hyung; Chung, U-in; Park, Jaechul; Jeon, Sanghun; Yun, Dong-Jin

    2013-01-01

    ZnO-based photo-thin film transistors with enhanced photoresponse were developed using transparent conductive oxide contacts. Changing the electrode from opaque Mo to transparent In-Zn-O increases the photocurrent by five orders of magnitude. By changing the opacity of each source and drain electrode, we could observe how the photoresponse is affected. We deduce that the photocurrent generation mechanism is based on an energy band change due to the photon irradiation. More importantly, we reveal that the photocurrent is determined by the energy barrier of injected electrons at the interface between the source electrode and the active layer

  6. Cell intrinsic control of axon regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mar, Fernando M; Bonni, Azad; Sousa, Mónica M

    2014-01-01

    Although neurons execute a cell intrinsic program of axonal growth during development, following the establishment of connections, the developmental growth capacity declines. Besides environmental challenges, this switch largely accounts for the failure of adult central nervous system (CNS) axons to regenerate. Here, we discuss the cell intrinsic control of axon regeneration, including not only the regulation of transcriptional and epigenetic mechanisms, but also the modulation of local protein translation, retrograde and anterograde axonal transport, and microtubule dynamics. We further explore the causes underlying the failure of CNS neurons to mount a vigorous regenerative response, and the paradigms demonstrating the activation of cell intrinsic axon growth programs. Finally, we present potential mechanisms to support axon regeneration, as these may represent future therapeutic approaches to promote recovery following CNS injury and disease. PMID:24531721

  7. Behavioral and physiological photoresponses to light intensity by intertidal microphytobenthos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Guoying; Yan, Hongmei; Liu, Chunrong; Mao, Yunxiang

    2017-03-01

    Behavioral and physiological responses to light are the two major mechanisms by which natural microphytobenthic assemblages adapt to the intertidal environment and protect themselves from light stress. The present study investigated these photoresponses with different light intensities over 8 h of illumination, and used a specific inhibitor (Latrunculin A, Lat A) for migration to compare migratory and non-migratory microphytobenthos (MPB). Photosynthetic activity was detected using rapid light curves and induction curves by chlorophyll fluorescence. It showed distinct variation in migratory responses to different light intensities; high light induced downward migration to avoid photoinhibition, and low and medium light (50-250 μmol/(m2·s)) promoted upward migration followed by downward migration after certain period of light exposure. No significant difference in non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) or PSII maximal quantum yield (Fv/Fm) was detected between low and medium light irradiance, possibly indicating that only high light influences the photosynthetic capability of MPB. Decreased photosynthetic activity, indicated by three parameters, the maximum relative electron transport rate (rETRmax), minimum saturating irradiance (E k) and light utilization coefficient (α), was observed in MPB after exposure to prolonged illumination under low and medium light. Lat A effectively inhibited the migration of MPB in all light treatments and induced lower Fv/Fmunder high light (500 and 100 μmol/(m2·s)) and prolonged illumination at 250 μmol/(m2·s), but did not significantly influence Fv/Fmunder low light (0-100 μmol/(m2·s)) or NPQ. The increase of NPQ in Lat A treatments with time implied that the MPB assemblages can recover their physiological photoprotection capacity to adapt to light stress. Non-migratory MPB exhibited lower light use efficiency (lower α) and lower maximum photosynthetic capacity (lower rETRmax) than migratory MPB under light intensities above

  8. Low temperature electrical and photo-responsive properties of MoSe2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Chao; Yue, Qu; Yang, Juehan

    2014-01-01

    MoSe2 was fabricated by a facile hydrothermal method, and a simple device based on it was prepared to investigate the low temperature electrical and photo-responsive (PR) properties. PR current of MoSe2 under 650 nm red illumination is 2.55 × 10−5 A and remains approximately at low temperatures, ...

  9. Distinct photoresponse in graphene induced by laser irradiation and interfacial gating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenhui; Guo, Xitao; Nan, Haiyan; Ni, Zhenhua; Spectroscopy; Optoelectronics Group Team

    Graphene-based photodetectors have recently received much attention due to its unique optical and electronic properties. The photoresponse modulation plays a crucial role in the study of photocurrent generation mechanism and optoelectronic applications. Here, the tunable p-p +-p junctions of graphene were fabricated through simple laser irradiation process. Distinct photoresponse was observed at the graphene (G)-laser irradiation graphene (LIG) junction. Detailed investigation suggests that the photo-thermoelectric effect, instead of the photovoltaic effect, dominates the photocurrent generation at the G-LIG junction. On the other hand, the localized interface states, existing at the silicon dioxide/lightly doped Si interface, would induce an interfacial gating mechanism, which will enhance the photoresponsivity to 1000 A/W. More important, the photoresponse time of our device has been pushed to 400ns. The current device structure does not need a complicated fabrication process and is fully compatible with silicon technology. This work will open up a route to graphene-based high-performance optoelectronic devices. This work was supported by Southeast University.

  10. In vitro selection of a photo-responsive peptide aptamer using ribosome display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingzhe; Tada, Seiichi; Ito, Mika; Abe, Hiroshi; Ito, Yoshihiro

    2012-12-18

    A photo-responsive peptide aptamer against microbeads immobilized streptavidin was isolated using in vitro selection combined with photo-manipulation. This is the first example of the introduction of a peptide aptamer in the photo-control of dynamic molecular recognition.

  11. ZnO/anthracene based inorganic/organic nanowire heterostructure: Photoresponse and photoluminescence studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhara, Soumen [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati 781039 (India); Giri, P. K. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati 781039 (India); Centre for Nanotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati 781039 (India)

    2012-02-15

    The effects of surface modification of vertically aligned ZnO nanowires (NWs) with anthracene for the improved photocurrent, photoresponse, and UV photoluminescence have been investigated in this work. The formation of ZnO/anthracene based inorganic/organic NWs heterostructure by surface capping with anthracene solution was confirmed from the high resolution transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transport infrared spectroscopy analyses. After the anthracene capping of ZnO NWs, despite an increase in dark current, we obtained a significant improvement in the photocurrent and photoresponsivity. A sixfold improvement in the UV photocurrent-to-dark current ratio is obtained with capping. Compared to the uncapped NWs, the photoresponse is significantly faster for the ZnO/anthracene system with response and reset times of 1.5 and 1.6 s, respectively. The room temperature photoluminescence spectra show threefold enhanced UV emission with large enhancement in the ratio of UV to green emission intensities. The faster photoresponse and enhanced photocurrent from the ZnO/anthracene heterostructure are explained on the basis of modification of surface defects and interfacial charge transfer process.

  12. Photoresponsive Cucurbit[8]uril-Mediated Adhesion of Bacteria on Supported Lipid Bilayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sankaran, S.; van Weerd, Jasper; Voskuhl, Jens; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes; Jonkheijm, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the development of a photoresponsive platform for the presentation of bioactive ligands to study receptor-ligand interactions has been described. For this purpose, supramolecular host-guest chemistry and supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) have been combined in a microfluidic device.

  13. Bulk and surface characterization of novel photoresponsive polymeric systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataramani, Shivshankar

    This dissertation presents a detailed characterization of two important classes of photoresponsive polymers-polydiacetylenes (PDAs) and azopolymers. Bulk and surface characterization techniques were used to evaluate the structure-property relationships of the PDAs and surface characterization, in particular-atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize the azopolymers. PDAs from bis-alkylurethanes of 5,7 dodecadiyn 1,12-diol (viz.,) ETCD, IPUDO and PUDO are of particular interest in view of reports of reversible thermochromic and photochromic phase transitions in these materials. Thermochromism in the above PDAs is associated with a first order phase transition involving expansion of the crystallographic unit cell, the preservation of the urethane hydrogen bonding and possibly some relief of mechanical strain upon heating. Insights into thermochromism obtained from studies of nonthermochromic forms of PDA-ETCD are discussed. Some of the bulk characterization experiments reported In the literature are repeated. The motivation to investigate the surface morphology of the PDA single crystals using AFM was derived from Raman spectroscopy studies of various PDAs in which dispersion of the Raman spectrum indicating surface heterogeneity was observed. Micron scale as well as molecularly resolved images were obtained The micron scale images indicated a variable surface of the crystals. The molecularly resolved images showed a well defined 2-D lattice and are interpreted in terms of known crystallographic data. The surface parameters obtained from AFM measurements are similar to those determined from X-ray diffraction. During an attempt of AFM imaging of IPUDO crystals exposed to 254 nm ultraviolet light, it was observed that these crystals undergo a "macroscopic shattering". In the interest of rigorously defining conditions for photochromism, this research has undertaken a combined study of the surface morphology of the above mentioned PDA crystals by AFM and the

  14. Dual origin of room temperature sub-terahertz photoresponse in graphene field effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandurin, D. A.; Gayduchenko, I.; Cao, Y.; Moskotin, M.; Principi, A.; Grigorieva, I. V.; Goltsman, G.; Fedorov, G.; Svintsov, D.

    2018-04-01

    Graphene is considered as a promising platform for detectors of high-frequency radiation up to the terahertz (THz) range due to its superior electron mobility. Previously, it has been shown that graphene field effect transistors (FETs) exhibit room temperature broadband photoresponse to incoming THz radiation, thanks to the thermoelectric and/or plasma wave rectification. Both effects exhibit similar functional dependences on the gate voltage, and therefore, it was difficult to disentangle these contributions in previous studies. In this letter, we report on combined experimental and theoretical studies of sub-THz response in graphene field-effect transistors analyzed at different temperatures. This temperature-dependent study allowed us to reveal the role of the photo-thermoelectric effect, p-n junction rectification, and plasmonic rectification in the sub-THz photoresponse of graphene FETs.

  15. Enhanced photoresponsivity in graphene-silicon slow-light photonic crystal waveguides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Hao, E-mail: zhoufirst@scu.edu.cn, E-mail: tg2342@columbia.edu, E-mail: cheewei.wong@ucla.edu [College of Electronics and Information Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Optical Nanostructures Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Gu, Tingyi, E-mail: zhoufirst@scu.edu.cn, E-mail: tg2342@columbia.edu, E-mail: cheewei.wong@ucla.edu; McMillan, James F. [Optical Nanostructures Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Yu, Mingbin; Lo, Guoqiang; Kwong, Dim-Lee [Institute of Microelectronics, Singapore, Singapore 117685 (Singapore); Feng, Guoying; Zhou, Shouhuan [College of Electronics and Information Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Wong, Chee Wei, E-mail: zhoufirst@scu.edu.cn, E-mail: tg2342@columbia.edu, E-mail: cheewei.wong@ucla.edu [Optical Nanostructures Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Mesoscopic Optics and Quantum Electronics Laboratory, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2016-03-14

    We demonstrate the enhanced fast photoresponsivity in graphene hybrid structures by combining the ultrafast dynamics of graphene with improved light-matter interactions in slow-light photonic crystal waveguides. With a 200 μm interaction length, a 0.8 mA/W photoresponsivity is achieved in a graphene-silicon Schottky-like photodetector, with an operating bandwidth in excess of 5 GHz and wavelength range at least from 1480 nm to 1580 nm. Fourfold enhancement of the photocurrent is observed in the slow light region, compared to the wavelength far from the photonic crystal bandedge, for a chip-scale broadband fast photodetector.

  16. Screen-Display-Induced Photoresponse Mapping for Large-Area Photovoltaics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gupta, Ritu; Kiruthika, S.; Rao, K. D. M.

    2013-01-01

    cells, is reported. The method requires only a conventional computer loaded with a software code that enables a light spot of defined size to raster scan across the cell area as the photogenerated voltage is read out by a voltmeter using a USB connection. Screen-display-induced photoresponse (SDIP......As solar cell modules are becoming larger, it is important to pay attention to defects originating from the fabrication process and degradation during operation in the ambient. In this article, a simple method of using computer screen display as a light source to map the photoresponse of the solar......) mapping is an enabling technique to reveal the defective regions in the active layer as well as at the electrode interface, which, in many instances, cannot be deciphered simply by visual examination. Spectral response mapping by using light spots of different colors is also possible....

  17. Enhanced Photoresponse from Phosphorene-Phosphorene-Suboxide Junction Fashioned by Focused Laser Micromachining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Junpeng; Carvalho, Alexandra; Wu, Jing; Liu, Hongwei; Tok, Eng Soon; Neto, Antonio H Castro; Özyilmaz, Barbaros; Sow, Chorng Haur

    2016-06-01

    Enhanced photoresponse is obtained from phosphorene-phosphorene-suboxide. A scanning focused laser beam is employed as a straightforward approach to convert part of a phosphorene film into phosphorene suboxide, creating a functional junction in situ on an optoelectronic device based on phosphorene. As a result, the photoelectrical properties of the optoelectronic device are significantly improved. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Photoresponses of the purple nonsulfur bacteria Rhodospirillum centenum and Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    OpenAIRE

    Sackett, M J; Armitage, J P; Sherwood, E E; Pitta, T P

    1997-01-01

    We have measured the photoresponse of two purple nonsulfur bacteria, Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Rhodospirillum centenum, under defined conditions in a light beam propagating at 90 degrees to the optical axis of the microscope. This beam presented cells with a steep gradient of intensity perpendicular to the direction of propagation and a shallow gradient in the direction of light propagation. R. centenum, a species that reverses to change direction, accumulated in the light beam, as expected...

  19. Electrical conduction and photoresponses of gamma-ray-irradiated single-stranded DNA/single-walled carbon nanotube composite systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, W.; Lee, E.M.; Kim, D.W.; Lee, Cheol Eui, E-mail: rscel@korea.ac.kr

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •Effects of gamma-ray irradiation on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)/single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) composite films. •Barrier for thermally activated conduction in the composite systems modified by the gamma-ray irradiation. •Photoresponses reveal photoexcitation and oxygen photodesorption modified by gamma-ray irradiation. -- Abstract: Effects of gamma-ray irradiation on the electrical conductivity and photoresponse have been studied for single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)/single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) composite films. The temperature-dependent electrical conductivity of the ssDNA/SWNT composite films, well described by a fluctuation-induced tunneling model, indicated modification of the barrier for thermally activated conduction by the gamma-ray irradiation. Besides, the photoresponse measurements indicated modified photoexcited charge carrier generation and oxygen photodesorption in the composite systems due to the gamma-ray irradiation.

  20. Effects of surface adsorbed oxygen, applied voltage, and temperature on UV photoresponse of ZnO nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Xian-Li; Zhu, Rong

    2015-10-01

    The ultraviolet (UV) photoresponses of ZnO nanorods directly grown on and between two micro Au-electrodes by using electric-field-assisted wet chemical method are measured comprehensively under different conditions, including ambient environment, applied bias voltage, gate voltage and temperature. Experimental results indicate that the photoresponses of the ZnO nanorods can be modulated by surface oxygen adsorptions, applied voltages, as well as temperatures. A model taking into account both surface adsorbed oxygen and electron-hole activities inside ZnO nanorods is proposed. The enhancement effect of the bias voltage on photoresponse is also analyzed. Experimental results shows that the UV response time (to 63%) of ZnO nanorods in air and at 59 °C could be shortened from 34.8 s to 0.24 s with a bias of 4 V applied between anode and cathode. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 91123017).

  1. Parvalbumin+ Neurons and Npas1+ Neurons Are Distinct Neuron Classes in the Mouse External Globus Pallidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Vivian M; Hegeman, Daniel J; Cui, Qiaoling; Kelver, Daniel A; Fiske, Michael P; Glajch, Kelly E; Pitt, Jason E; Huang, Tina Y; Justice, Nicholas J; Chan, C Savio

    2015-08-26

    Compelling evidence suggests that pathological activity of the external globus pallidus (GPe), a nucleus in the basal ganglia, contributes to the motor symptoms of a variety of movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Recent studies have challenged the idea that the GPe comprises a single, homogenous population of neurons that serves as a simple relay in the indirect pathway. However, we still lack a full understanding of the diversity of the neurons that make up the GPe. Specifically, a more precise classification scheme is needed to better describe the fundamental biology and function of different GPe neuron classes. To this end, we generated a novel multicistronic BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) transgenic mouse line under the regulatory elements of the Npas1 gene. Using a combinatorial transgenic and immunohistochemical approach, we discovered that parvalbumin-expressing neurons and Npas1-expressing neurons in the GPe represent two nonoverlapping cell classes, amounting to 55% and 27% of the total GPe neuron population, respectively. These two genetically identified cell classes projected primarily to the subthalamic nucleus and to the striatum, respectively. Additionally, parvalbumin-expressing neurons and Npas1-expressing neurons were distinct in their autonomous and driven firing characteristics, their expression of intrinsic ion conductances, and their responsiveness to chronic 6-hydroxydopamine lesion. In summary, our data argue that parvalbumin-expressing neurons and Npas1-expressing neurons are two distinct functional classes of GPe neurons. This work revises our understanding of the GPe, and provides the foundation for future studies of its function and dysfunction. Until recently, the heterogeneity of the constituent neurons within the external globus pallidus (GPe) was not fully appreciated. We addressed this knowledge gap by discovering two principal GPe neuron classes, which were identified by their nonoverlapping expression of the

  2. Kinetics of rhodopsin deactivation and its role in regulating recovery and reproducibility of rod photoresponse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Caruso

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The single photon response (SPR in vertebrate phototransduction is regulated by the dynamics of R* during its lifetime, including the random number of phosphorylations, the catalytic activity and the random sojourn time at each phosphorylation level. Because of this randomness the electrical responses are expected to be inherently variable. However the SPR is highly reproducible. The mechanisms that confer to the SPR such a low variability are not completely understood. The kinetics of rhodopsin deactivation is investigated by a Continuous Time Markov Chain (CTMC based on the biochemistry of rhodopsin activation and deactivation, interfaced with a spatio-temporal model of phototransduction. The model parameters are extracted from the photoresponse data of both wild type and mutant mice, having variable numbers of phosphorylation sites and, with the same set of parameters, the model reproduces both WT and mutant responses. The sources of variability are dissected into its components, by asking whether a random number of turnoff steps, a random sojourn time between steps, or both, give rise to the known variability. The model shows that only the randomness of the sojourn times in each of the phosphorylated states contributes to the Coefficient of Variation (CV of the response, whereas the randomness of the number of R* turnoff steps has a negligible effect. These results counter the view that the larger the number of decay steps of R*, the more stable the photoresponse is. Our results indicate that R* shutoff is responsible for the variability of the photoresponse, while the diffusion of the second messengers acts as a variability suppressor.

  3. Preparation of Photoresponsive Functionalized Acrylic Nanoparticles Cantaining Carbazole Groups for Smart Cellulosic Papers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaber Keyvan Rad

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Photoresponsive functionalized polymer nanoparticles were prepared as useful materials for preparation of smart papers. Such polymer nanoparticles have wide applications in several fields including papers, sensors, bioimaging and biomedicine. First, carbazole as a photosensitive compound was modified with 2-bromoethanol through substitution nucleation reaction to its hydroxyl derivative (N-(2-hydroxyethyl carbazole, CzEtOH. The synthesis of 2-N-carbazolylethyl acrylate (CzEtA monomer was carried out by modification reaction of CzEtOH with acryloyl chloride and the chemical structures of the products were characterized. Next, CzEtA, methyl methacrylate (MMA and butyl acrylate were copolymerized to prepare photoresponsive functionalized polymer nanoparticles through mini-emulsion polymerization in order to form a hydrophobic core. This was followed by copolymerization of MMA and glycidyl methacrylate by seeded emulsion polymerization to give a functionalized outer layer on the latex particles. Absorption characteristics, size, size distribution (narrow size distribution and morphology of the nanoparticles were studied by ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis spectroscopy, dynamic laser light scattering (DLS analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM micrographs, respectively. Finally, due to the importance of photoresponsive smart papers and their wide applications, cellulosic fibers were reacted with the prepared functionalized latex particles for preparation of smart papers. Morphology of the fibers was investigated with respect to the surface-immobilized polymers on the cellulosic paper and their smart behavior was evaluated by UV irradiation at 254 nm. The results revealed fast color changes and the obtained cellulosic papers became violet upon irradiation. This work shows some promising feature of these materials for preparation of anti-counterfeiting papers, where the safety becomes a major concern.

  4. High-efficiency omnidirectional photoresponses based on monolayer lateral p–n heterojunctions

    KAUST Repository

    Tsai, Meng-Lin

    2016-10-28

    Electrical and optical properties of lateral monolayer WSe2–MoS2 p–n heterojunctions were characterized to demonstrate a high responsivity of 0.26 A W−1 with an excellent omnidirectional photodetection capability. The heterojunction functioning as a diode exhibits a prominent gate-tuning behavior with an ideality factor of 1.25. In addition, ultrafast photoresponse, low-light detectability, and high-temperature operation have been achieved. These unique characteristics pave a way for the future development of sub-nano semiconductor devices.

  5. Photo-response of a nanopore device with a single embedded ZnO nanoparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Linh-Nam; Lin, Ming-Chou; Chen, Horng-Shyang; Lan, Yann-Wen; Wu, Cen-Shawn; Chang-Liao, Kuei-Shu; Chen, Chii-Dong

    2012-04-27

    The photo-response of a ZnO nanoparticle embedded in a nanopore made on a silicon nitride membrane is investigated. The ZnO nanoparticle is manipulated onto the nanopore and sandwiched between aluminum contact electrodes from both the top and bottom. The asymmetric device structure facilitates current-voltage rectification that enables photovoltaic capacity. Under illumination, the device shows open-circuit voltage as well as short-circuit current. The fill factor is found to increase at low temperatures and reaches 48.6% at 100 K. The nanopore structure and the manipulation technique provide a solid platform for exploring the electrical properties of single nanoparticles.

  6. Morphology-tunable and photoresponsive properties in a self-assembled two-component gel system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yifeng; Xu, Miao; Yi, Tao; Xiao, Shuzhang; Zhou, Zhiguo; Li, Fuyou; Huang, Chunhui

    2007-01-02

    Photoresponsive C3-symmetrical trisurea self-assembling building blocks containing three azobenzene groups (LC10 and LC4) at the rim were designed and synthesized. By introducing a trisamide gelator (G18), which can self-aggregate through hydrogen bonds of acylamino moieties to form a fibrous network, the mixture of LC10 (or LC4) and G18 forms an organogel with coral-like supramolecular structure from 1,4-dioxane. The cooperation of hydrogen bonding and the hydrophobic diversity between these components are the main contributions to the specific superstructure. The two-component gel exhibits reversible photoisomerization from trans to cis transition without breakage of the gel state.

  7. The infra-red photoresponse of erbium-doped silicon nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenyon, A.J.; Bhamber, S.S.; Pitt, C.W.

    2003-01-01

    We have exploited the interaction between erbium ions and silicon nanoclusters to probe the photoresponse of erbium-doped silicon nanocrystals in the spectral region around 1.5 μm. We have produced an MOS device in which the oxide layer has been implanted with both erbium and silicon and annealed to produce silicon nanocrystals. Upon illumination with a 1480 nm laser diode, interaction between the nanocrystals and the rare-earth ions results in a modification of the conductivity of the oxide that enables a current to flow when a voltage is applied across the oxide layer

  8. One-step aqueous synthesis of graphene-CdTe quantum dot-composed nanosheet and its enhanced photoresponses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhisong; Guo, Chun Xian; Yang, Hong Bin; Qiao, Yan; Guo, Jun; Li, Chang Ming

    2011-01-15

    Although CdTe nanocrystal has been applied in quantum dot (QD)-based solar cells, there is no report on a graphene-CdTe QD hybrid system and its photoresponses. In this work, graphene-CdTe QD composed nanosheets were one-step synthesized in aqueous solution using a hydrothermal method and demonstrated enhanced photoresponses, rendering potentials in optoelectronics applications. This work could provide an environmental-friendly and universal approach to fabricate graphene-based hybrid nanomaterials for various applications. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Intrinsic contractures of the hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paksima, Nader; Besh, Basil R

    2012-02-01

    Contractures of the intrinsic muscles of the fingers disrupt the delicate and complex balance of intrinsic and extrinsic muscles, which allows the hand to be so versatile and functional. The loss of muscle function primarily affects the interphalangeal joints but also may affect etacarpophalangeal joints. The resulting clinical picture is often termed, intrinsic contracture or intrinsic-plus hand. Disruption of the balance between intrinsic and extrinsic muscles has many causes and may be secondary to changes within the intrinsic musculature or the tendon unit. This article reviews diagnosis, etiology, and treatment algorithms in the management of intrinsic contractures of the fingers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Predicting Intrinsic Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Rob; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2004-01-01

    Intrinsic motivation can be predicted from participants' perceptions of the social environment and the task environment (Ryan & Deci, 2000)in terms of control, relatedness and competence. To determine the degree of independence of these factors 251 students in higher vocational education (physiotherapy and hotel management) indicated the…

  11. Frustration-induced protein intrinsic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Katsuyoshi; Kikuchi, Macoto

    2013-03-14

    Spontaneous folding into a specific native structure is the most important property of protein to perform their biological functions within organisms. Spontaneous folding is understood on the basis of an energy landscape picture based on the minimum frustration principle. Therefore, frustration seemingly only leads to protein functional disorder. However, frustration has recently been suggested to have a function in allosteric regulation. Functional frustration has the possibility to be a key to our deeper understanding of protein function. To explore another functional frustration, we theoretically examined structural frustration, which is designed to induce intrinsic disorder of a protein and its function through the coupled folding and binding. We extended the Wako-Saitô-Muñoz-Eaton model to take into account a frustration effect. With the model, we analyzed the binding part of neuron-restrictive silencer factor and showed that designed structural frustration in it induces intrinsic disorder. Furthermore, we showed that the folding and the binding are cooperative in interacting with a target protein. The cooperativity enables an intrinsically disordered protein to exhibit a sharp switch-like folding response to binding chemical potential change. Through this switch-like response, the structural frustration may contribute to the regulation function of interprotein interaction of the intrinsically disordered protein.

  12. Extrinsic and intrinsic determinants of nerve regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toby A. Ferguson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available After central nervous system (CNS injury axons fail to regenerate often leading to persistent neurologic deficit although injured peripheral nervous system (PNS axons mount a robust regenerative response that may lead to functional recovery. Some of the failures of CNS regeneration arise from the many glial-based inhibitory molecules found in the injured CNS, whereas the intrinsic regenerative potential of some CNS neurons is actively curtailed during CNS maturation and limited after injury. In this review, the molecular basis for extrinsic and intrinsic modulation of axon regeneration within the nervous system is evaluated. A more complete understanding of the factors limiting axonal regeneration will provide a rational basis, which is used to develop improved treatments for nervous system injury.

  13. Photo-Responsive Graphene and Carbon Nanotubes to Control and Tackle Biological Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardano, Francesca; Frasconi, Marco; Giordani, Silvia

    2018-04-01

    Photo-responsive multifunctional nanomaterials are receiving considerable attention for biological applications because of their unique properties. The functionalization of the surface of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene, among other carbon based nanomaterials, with molecular switches that exhibit reversible transformations between two or more isomers in response to different kind of external stimuli, such as electromagnetic radiation, temperature and pH, has allowed the control of the optical and electrical properties of the nanomaterial. Light-controlled molecular switches, such as azobenzene and spiropyran, have attracted a lot of attention for nanomaterial’s functionalization because of the remote modulation of their physicochemical properties using light stimulus. The enhanced properties of the hybrid materials obtained from the coupling of carbon based nanomaterials with light-responsive switches has enabled the fabrication of smart devices for various biological applications, including drug delivery, bioimaging and nanobiosensors. In this review, we highlight the properties of photo-responsive carbon nanomaterials obtained by the conjugation of CNTs and graphene with azobenzenes and spiropyrans molecules to investigate biological systems, devising possible future directions in the field.

  14. Photoresponse properties of large area MoS2 metal–semiconductor–metal photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Tsung-Shine; Huang, Yu-Jen; Lin, Der-Yuh; Lin, Chia-Feng; Hong, Bo-Syun; Chen, Hone-Zern

    2018-04-01

    In this study, a large-area molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) thin film was obtained by low pressure thermal sulfurization. Raman scattering spectrum shows that the peaks at 374 and 403 cm‑1 are from the MoS2 thin film. XRD result reveals peaks at 33 and 58.5° indicating MoS2(100) and (110) crystal planes. By using gold (Au), silver (Ag), and aluminum (Al) as contact materials on the MoS2 thin film, photoresponsivity results indicate that Ag is a suitable material for obtaining a high responsivity for a high-performance photodetector (PD). Photocurrent mapping measurements also reveal that Ag contacts have the best carrier transport characteristic with carrier diffusion length of 101 µm among these contacts. Furthermore, we investigated metal–semiconductor–metal MoS2 thin film PDs with interdigitated fingers of 300, 400, 500, and 600 µm contact widths, which showed that the large contact widths could produce a high photoresponse for PD application owing to low resistance.

  15. Photoresponsive biomaterials for targeted drug delivery and 4D cell culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruskowitz, Emily R.; Deforest, Cole A.

    2018-02-01

    Biological signalling is regulated through a complex and tightly choreographed interplay between cells and their extracellular matrix. The spatiotemporal control of these interactions is essential for tissue function, and disruptions to this dialogue often result in aberrant cell fate and disease. When disturbances are well understood, correct biological function can be restored through the precise introduction of therapeutics. Moreover, model systems with modifiable physiochemical properties are needed to probe the effects of therapeutic molecules and to investigate cell-matrix interactions. Photoresponsive biomaterials benefit from spatiotemporal tunability, which allows for site-specific therapeutic delivery in vivo and 4D modulation of synthetic cell culture platforms to mimic the dynamic heterogeneity of the human body in vitro. In this Review, we discuss how light can be exploited to modify different biomaterials in the context of photomediated drug delivery and phototunable cell culture platforms. We survey various photochemistries for their applicability in vitro and in vivo and for the biochemical and biophysical modification of materials. Finally, we highlight emerging tools and provide an outlook for the field of photoresponsive biomaterials.

  16. Calcium sets the physiological value of the dominant time constant of saturated mouse rod photoresponse recovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frans Vinberg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The rate-limiting step that determines the dominant time constant (τ(D of mammalian rod photoresponse recovery is the deactivation of the active phosphodiesterase (PDE6. Physiologically relevant Ca(2+-dependent mechanisms that would affect the PDE inactivation have not been identified. However, recently it has been shown that τ(D is modulated by background light in mouse rods. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used ex vivo ERG technique to record pharmacologically isolated photoreceptor responses (fast PIII component. We show a novel static effect of calcium on mouse rod phototransduction: Ca(2+ shortens the dominant time constant (τ(D of saturated photoresponse recovery, i.e., when extracellular free Ca(2+ is decreased from 1 mM to ∼25 nM, the τ(D is reversibly increased ∼1.5-2-fold. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that the increase in τ(D during low Ca(2+ treatment is not due to increased [cGMP], increased [Na(+] or decreased [ATP] in rod outer segment (ROS. Also it cannot be due to protein translocation mechanisms. We suggest that a Ca(2+-dependent mechanism controls the life time of active PDE.

  17. Ultrafast photoresponse of superconductor/ferromagnet Nb/NiCu heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pepe, Giovanni P.; Amanti, Maria; De Lisio, Corrado; Latempa, Rossella; Marrocco, Nicola; Parlato, Loredana; Peluso, Giuseppe; Barone, Antonio [Coherentia CNR-INFM (Italy); Napoli ' ' Federico II' ' Univ. (Italy). Dipt. Scienze Fisiche; Sobolewski, Roman; Taneda, Takahiro [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627-0231 (United States)

    2006-09-15

    We report on femtosecond optical pump-probe studies of proximized ferromagnet/superconductor (F/S) hybrids, consisting of Ni{sub 0.5}Cu{sub 0.5} layers deposited on top of Nb films. The weak ferromagnetic nature of the completely proximised Ni{sub 0.5}Cu{sub 0.5} film makes possible to observe the dynamics of the nonequilibrium superconductivity through the near-surface optical reflectivity change measurements. The time-resolved photoresponse transient of the NiCu(21 nm)/Nb bilayer in the superconducting state shows strongly suppressed slow bolometric component. The fast relaxation time is also discussed accordingly to current theories on S/F heterostructures. The proposed S/F nanobilayers represent a new, artificially designed superconductor with the features (sub-picosecond photoresponse with suppressed bolometric component) very desirable for superconducting photodetectors and photon counters. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. Well-defined and biocompatible hydrogels with toughening and reversible photoresponsive properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhiqiang; Liu, Shunli; Li, Kewen; Tan, Linhua; Cen, Lian; Fu, Guodong

    2016-02-21

    In the present study, novel hydrogels with extremely high strength, reversible photoresponsive and excellent biocompatible properties were prepared. The functional hydrogels were synthesized from a well-defined poly (ethylene glycol) polymer with spiropyran groups at a given position (PEG-SP) via a Cu(i)-catalyst Azide-Alkyne Cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction. The molecular structures of the sequential intermediates for PEG-SP hydrogel preparation were verified by (1)HNMR and FT-IR. The mechanical property, swelling ratio, compression strength, surface hydrophilicity, and biocompatibility of the resulting hydrogel were characterized. Since spiropyran is pivotal to the switch in hydrophilicity on the hydrogel surface, the swelling ratio of PEG-SP hydrogel under Vis irradiation has a major decrease (155%). Before and after UV light irradiation, the contact angle of the hydrogel has a change of 13.8°. The photoresponsive property of this hydrogel was thus demonstrated, and such a property was also shown to be reversible. The well-defined PEG-SP hydrogel can also sustain a compressive stress of 49.8 MPa without any macro- or micro-damage, indicating its outstanding mechanical performance. Furthermore, it possessed excellent biocompatibility as demonstrated by its performance in an in vivo porcine subcutaneous implantation environment. No inflammation was observed and it got along well with the adjacent tissue. The above features indicate that PEG-SP hydrogels are promising as an implantable matrix for potential applications in biomaterial.

  19. Tuning the photo-response in monolayer MoS2 by plasmonic nano-antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiu; Ji, Qingqing; Chu, Saisai; Zhang, Yanfeng; Li, Yan; Gong, Qihuang; Liu, Kaihui; Shi, Kebin

    2016-03-01

    Monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has recently attracted intense interests due to its remarkable optical properties of valley-selected optical response, strong nonlinear wave mixing and photocurrent/photovoltaic generation and many corresponding potential applications. However, the nature of atomic-thin thickness of monolayer MoS2 leads to inefficient light-matter interactions and thereby hinders its optoelectronic applications. Here we report on the enhanced and controllable photo-response in MoS2 by utilizing surface plasmonic resonance based on metallic nano-antenna with characteristic lateral size of 40 × 80 nm. Our nano-antenna is designed to have one plasmonic resonance in the visible range and can enhance the MoS2 photoluminescence intensity up to 10 folds. The intensity enhancement can be effectively tuned simply by the manipulation of incident light polarization. In addition, we can also control the oscillator strength ratio between exciton and trion states by controlling polarization dependent hot carrier doping in MoS2. Our results demonstrate the possibility in controlling the photo-response in broad two-dimensional materials by well-designed nano-antenna and facilitate its coming optoelectronic applications.

  20. [What mirror neurons have revealed: revisited].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Akira; Maeda, Kazutaka

    2014-06-01

    The first paper on mirror neurons was published in 1992. In the span of over two decades since then, much knowledge about the relationship between social cognitive function and the motor control system has been accumulated. Direct matching of visual actions and their corresponding motor representations is the most important functional property of mirror neuron. Many studies have emphasized intrinsic simulation as a core concept for mirror neurons. Mirror neurons are thought to play a role in social cognitive function. However, the function of mirror neurons in the macaque remains unclear, because such cognitive functions are limited or lacking in macaque monkeys. It is therefore important to discuss these neurons in the context of motor function. Rizzolatti and colleagues have stressed that the most important function of mirror neurons in macaques is recognition of actions performed by other individuals. I suggest that mirror neurons in the Macaque inferior pariental lobule might be correlated with body schema. In the parieto-premotor network, matching of corollary discharge and actual sensory feedback is an essential neuronal operation. Recently, neurons showing mirror properties were found in some cortical areas outside the mirror neuron system. The current work would revisit the outcomes of mirror neuron studies to discuss the function of mirror neurons in the monkey.

  1. Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation

    OpenAIRE

    Roland Bénabou; Jean Tirole

    2003-01-01

    A central tenet of economics is that individuals respond to incentives. For psychologists and sociologists, in contrast, rewards and punishments are often counterproductive, because they undermine "intrinsic motivation". We reconcile these two views, showing how performance incentives offered by an informed principal (manager, teacher, parent) can adversely impact an agent's (worker, child) perception of the task, or of his own abilities. Incentives are then only weak reinforcers in the short...

  2. Growth, Optical Absorption, and Photoresponse of Copper Oxide Thin Films and Nanocavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, James P.

    Copper oxide, Cu2O, is one of the most studied semiconductors having been used in devices dating back to the 1920's. The material received additional study recently as an absorbing material in solar cells and hydrogen evolution reactions. The thickness of Cu2O in those devices is often hundreds of nanometers to over one micron thick. This work studies the use of thin film interference to enhance the optical absorption and photoresponse in very thin Cu2O films. The first section focuses on the growth of single phase Cu2O by reactive sputtering. The impact of synthesis parameters including sputtering rate, substrate temperature, oxygen flow, and post-growth annealing on deposited copper oxide films were studied. Other copper oxide phases, Cu4O 3 and CuO were evident when oxygen was added to the post-deposition annealing chamber atmosphere. Very thin Cu2O films were deposited on sputtered Al films by reactively sputtering Cu with DC power at 50W, Ar/O 2 flow 30/16 sccm, substrate deposition temperature at 150°C, followed by vacuum annealing at 350°C. Thin film interference in Cu2O grown on Al films was observed to highly enhance the absorption of films below 100nm thickness. 70nm of Cu 2O on Al absorbed 96% of incident light at 548nm. The absorption resonance wavelength increased with increasing copper oxide thickness, demonstrating the tunability of the resonance maximum. Thin layers of Al2O 3, 15nm or less, between the Al and Cu2O films modified the total absorption but not in a coherent manner. The optical absorption of nanocavities consisting of Al/Al2O 3 50nm/Cu2O were synthesized, optical absorption and photoresponse measured. The photoresponse of the synthesized nanocavities to light from a solar simulator was enhanced for short and long time scales, 1-3 minutes and several hours respectively. The photocurrent of 60nm Cu2O nanocavities doubled during a 2.5hr light soak, which was not enough to saturate the photoconductivity. Persistent photoconductivity

  3. Intrinsic and extrinsic mortality reunited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koopman, Jacob J E; Wensink, Maarten J; Rozing, Maarten P

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsic and extrinsic mortality are often separated in order to understand and measure aging. Intrinsic mortality is assumed to be a result of aging and to increase over age, whereas extrinsic mortality is assumed to be a result of environmental hazards and be constant over age. However......, allegedly intrinsic and extrinsic mortality have an exponentially increasing age pattern in common. Theories of aging assert that a combination of intrinsic and extrinsic stressors underlies the increasing risk of death. Epidemiological and biological data support that the control of intrinsic as well...... as extrinsic stressors can alleviate the aging process. We argue that aging and death can be better explained by the interaction of intrinsic and extrinsic stressors than by classifying mortality itself as being either intrinsic or extrinsic. Recognition of the tight interaction between intrinsic and extrinsic...

  4. The effect of symmetry on resonant and nonresonant photoresponses in a field-effect terahertz detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, J. D.; Qin, H., E-mail: hqin2007@sinano.ac.cn; Yang, X. X.; Zhang, Z. P.; Li, X. X.; Zhang, X. Y.; Cai, Y.; Wu, D. M.; Zhang, B. S. [Key Laboratory of Nanodevices and Applications, Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 398 Ruoshui Road, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); Lewis, R. A. [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2522 (Australia); Sun, Y. F. [College of Electronic and Information Enging, Suzhou University of Sciences and Technology, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215011 (China)

    2015-01-19

    The effect of the symmetries in the terahertz (THz) field distribution and the field-effect channel on THz photoresponse is examined. Resonant excitation of cavity plasmon modes and nonresonant self-mixing of THz waves are demonstrated in a GaN/AlGaN two-dimensional electron gas with symmetrically designed nanogates, antennas, and filters. We found that the self-mixing signal can be effectively suppressed by the symmetric design and the resonant response benefits from the residual asymmetry. The findings suggest that a single detector may provide both high sensitivity from the self-mixing mechanism and spectral resolution from the resonant response by optimizing the degree of geometrical and/or electronic symmetries.

  5. The enhancement of photoresponse of an ordered inorganic-organic hybrid architecture by increasing interfacial contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Chen, Xudong; Ma, Shaohua; Chen, Yujie; Yang, Jin; Zhang, Mingqiu

    2010-02-10

    A modified ZnO quantum dot/polythiophene (ZnO/PTh) inorganic-organic hybrid architecture was fabricated by using ordered mesoporous silica (SBA-15) as the retaining template. First, a two-step strategy was developed to synthesize an ordered organic conducting polymer composite (PTh/SBA-15). Then, ZnO quantum dots were in situ formed on the pore walls of the ordered PTh/SBA-15 composite. Photoresponse of the inorganic-organic hybrid was studied with respect to its incident photon to collected electron conversion efficiency (IPCE) and morphology. The presence of SBA-15 proved to be critical for controlling the interfacial morphology and hence enlarging the interfacial area of the inorganic-organic heterojunction. The proposed approach may act as a key method to open up potential applications in photovoltaic devices.

  6. Photoresponsive Bridged Silsesquioxane Nanoparticles with Tunable Morphology for Light-Triggered Plasmid DNA Delivery

    KAUST Repository

    Fatieiev, Yevhen

    2015-09-25

    Bridged silsesquioxane nanocomposites with tunable morphologies incorporating o-nitrophenylene-ammonium bridges are described. The systematic screening of the sol-gel parameters allowed the material to reach the nanoscale –unlike most reported bridged silsesquioxane materials– with controlled dense and hollow structures of 100 to 200 nm. The hybrid composition of silsesquioxanes with 50% of organic content homogenously distributed in the nanomaterials endowed them with photoresponsive properties. Light irradiation was performed to reverse the surface charge of nanoparticles from +46 to -39 mV via the photoreaction of the organic fragments within the particles, as confirmed by spectroscopic monitorings. Furthermore, such NPs were ap-plied for the first time for the on-demand delivery of plasmid DNA in HeLa cancer cells via light actuation.

  7. Microwave nonlinearity and photoresponse of superconducting resonators with columnar defect micro-channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remillard, S K; Kirkendall, D; Ghigo, G; Gerbaldo, R; Gozzelino, L; Laviano, F; Yang, Z; Mendelsohn, N A; Ghamsari, B G; Friedman, B; Jung, P; Anlage, S M

    2014-01-01

    Micro-channels of nanosized columnar tracks were planted by heavy-ion irradiation into superconducting microwave microstrip resonators that were patterned from YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 − x thin films on LaAlO 3 substrates. Three different ion fluences were used, producing different column densities, with each fluence having a successively greater impact on the microwave nonlinearity of the device, as compared to a control sample. Photoresponse (PR) images made with a 638 nm rastered laser beam revealed that the channel is a location of enhanced PR and a hot spot for the generation of intermodulation distortion. The microwave PR technique was also advanced in this work by investigating the role of coupling strength on the distribution of PR between inductive and resistive components. (paper)

  8. Microwave nonlinearity and photoresponse of superconducting resonators with columnar defect micro-channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remillard, S. K.; Kirkendall, D.; Ghigo, G.; Gerbaldo, R.; Gozzelino, L.; Laviano, F.; Yang, Z.; Mendelsohn, N. A.; Ghamsari, B. G.; Friedman, B.; Jung, P.; Anlage, S. M.

    2014-09-01

    Micro-channels of nanosized columnar tracks were planted by heavy-ion irradiation into superconducting microwave microstrip resonators that were patterned from YBa2Cu3O7 - x thin films on LaAlO3 substrates. Three different ion fluences were used, producing different column densities, with each fluence having a successively greater impact on the microwave nonlinearity of the device, as compared to a control sample. Photoresponse (PR) images made with a 638 nm rastered laser beam revealed that the channel is a location of enhanced PR and a hot spot for the generation of intermodulation distortion. The microwave PR technique was also advanced in this work by investigating the role of coupling strength on the distribution of PR between inductive and resistive components.

  9. Photo-responsive carbon nanomaterials functionalized by azobenzene moieties: structures, properties and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wei; Luo, Wen; Feng, Yiyu

    2012-10-21

    The ability to tune the microstructures, bandgap, conductance, chemical environment and thermal storage of carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes, graphene and fullerenes by optical modulation or response is important to design and fabricate advanced optoelectronic nanodevices. This review is focused on optical control and regulation of structures, properties, interface and interaction of a new generation of photo-responsive carbon nanomaterials/azobenzene moieties (Carbon-AZO) hybrids. The optical switching properties of Carbon-AZO hybrids resulting from the photo-isomerization between trans and cis isomers are highlighted and discussed in terms of photo-energy conversion devices including switches, sensors, detectors, fuels and storage. A wide range of advanced energy conversion devices using Carbon-AZO hybrids can be developed in the future by the optimization of the chemical structure, steric conformation, electrostatic environment and functionalization of specific molecules.

  10. The effect of symmetry on resonant and nonresonant photoresponses in a field-effect terahertz detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, J. D.; Qin, H.; Yang, X. X.; Zhang, Z. P.; Li, X. X.; Zhang, X. Y.; Cai, Y.; Wu, D. M.; Zhang, B. S.; Lewis, R. A.; Sun, Y. F.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of the symmetries in the terahertz (THz) field distribution and the field-effect channel on THz photoresponse is examined. Resonant excitation of cavity plasmon modes and nonresonant self-mixing of THz waves are demonstrated in a GaN/AlGaN two-dimensional electron gas with symmetrically designed nanogates, antennas, and filters. We found that the self-mixing signal can be effectively suppressed by the symmetric design and the resonant response benefits from the residual asymmetry. The findings suggest that a single detector may provide both high sensitivity from the self-mixing mechanism and spectral resolution from the resonant response by optimizing the degree of geometrical and/or electronic symmetries

  11. Giant photoresponse in quantized SrRuO3 monolayer at oxide interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Heng-Jui

    2018-02-01

    The photoelectric effect in semiconductors is the main mechanism for most modern optoelectronic devices, in which the adequate bandgap plays the key role for acquiring high photoresponse. Among numerous material categories applied in this field, the complex oxides exhibit great possibilities because they present a wide distribution of band gaps for absorbing light with any wavelength. Their physical properties and lattice structures are always strongly coupled and sensitive to light illumination. Moreover, the confinement of dimensionality of the complex oxides in the heterostructures can provide more diversities in designing and modulating the band structures. On the basis of this perspective, we have chosen itinerary ferromagnetic SrRuO3 as the model material, and fabricated it in one-unit-cell thickness in order to open a small band gap for effective utilization of visible light. By inserting this SrRuO3 monolayer at the interface of the well-developed two-dimensional electron gas system (LaAlO3/SrTiO3), the resistance of the monolayer can be further revealed. In addition, a giant enhancement (>300%) of photoresponse under illumination of visible light with power density of 500 mW/cm2 is also observed. Such can be ascribed to the further modulation of band structure of the SrRuO3 monolayer under the illumination, confirmed by cross-section scanning tunneling microscopy (XSTM). Therefore, this study demonstrates a simple route to design and explore the potential low dimensional oxide materials for future optoelectronic devices.

  12. Photoresponse and trap characteristics of transparent AZO-gated AlGaN/GaN HEMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chong; Zhao, Meng-Di; He, Yun-Long; Zheng, Xue-Feng; Zhang, Kun; Wei, Xiao-Xiao; Mao, Wei; Ma, Xiao-Hua; Zhang, Jin-Cheng; Hao, Yue

    2016-10-01

    AZO-gated and Ni/Au-gated AlGaN/GaN HEMTs are fabricated successfully, and an excellent transparency of AZO-gated electrode is achieved. After a negative gate bias stress acts on two kinds of the devices, their photoresponse characteristics are investigated by using laser sources with different wavelengths. The effect of photoresponse on AZO-gated electrode device is more obvious than on Ni/Au-gated electrodes device. The electrons are trapped in the AlGaN barrier of AZO-gated HEMT after it has experienced negative gate bias stress, and then the electrons can be excited effectively after it has been illuminated by the light with certain wavelengths. Furthermore, the trap state density D T and the time constant τ T of the AZO-gated Schottky contact are extracted by fitting the measured parallel conductance in a frequency range from 10 kHz to 10 MHz. The constants of the trap range from about 0.35 μs to 20.35 μs, and the trap state density increased from 1.93 × 1013 eV-1·cm-2 at an energy of 0.33 eV to 3.07 × 1011 eV-1·cm-2 at an energy of 0.40 eV. Moreover, the capacitance and conductance measurements are used to characterize the trapping effects under different illumination conditions in AZO-gated HEMTs. Reduced deep trap states' density is confirmed under the illumination of short wavelength light. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61574110, 61574112, and 61106106).

  13. Photoresponse and trap characteristics of transparent AZO-gated AlGaN/GaN HEMT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chong; Zhao Meng-Di; He Yun-Long; Zheng Xue-Feng; Zhang Kun; Wei Xiao-Xiao; Mao Wei; Ma Xiao-Hua; Zhang Jin-Cheng; Hao Yue

    2016-01-01

    AZO-gated and Ni/Au-gated AlGaN/GaN HEMTs are fabricated successfully, and an excellent transparency of AZO-gated electrode is achieved. After a negative gate bias stress acts on two kinds of the devices, their photoresponse characteristics are investigated by using laser sources with different wavelengths. The effect of photoresponse on AZO-gated electrode device is more obvious than on Ni/Au-gated electrodes device. The electrons are trapped in the AlGaN barrier of AZO-gated HEMT after it has experienced negative gate bias stress, and then the electrons can be excited effectively after it has been illuminated by the light with certain wavelengths. Furthermore, the trap state density D T and the time constant τ T of the AZO-gated Schottky contact are extracted by fitting the measured parallel conductance in a frequency range from 10 kHz to 10 MHz. The constants of the trap range from about 0.35 μs to 20.35 μs, and the trap state density increased from 1.93 × 10 13 eV −1 ·cm −2 at an energy of 0.33 eV to 3.07 × 10 11 eV −1 ·cm −2 at an energy of 0.40 eV. Moreover, the capacitance and conductance measurements are used to characterize the trapping effects under different illumination conditions in AZO-gated HEMTs. Reduced deep trap states' density is confirmed under the illumination of short wavelength light. (paper)

  14. Photoresponsive nanocapsulation of cobra neurotoxin and enhancement of its central analgesic effects under red light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Q

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Qian Yang, Chuang Zhao, Jun Zhao, Yong Ye Department of Pharmaceutical Engineering, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Cobra neurotoxin (CNT, a peptide isolated from snake venom of Naja naja atra, shows central analgesic effects in our previous research. In order to help CNT pass through blood–brain barrier (BBB and improve its central analgesic effects, a new kind of CNT nanocapsules were prepared by double emulsification with soybean lecithin and cholesterol as the shell, and pheophorbide as the photosensitizer added to make it photoresponsive. The analgesic effects were evaluated by hot plate test and acetic acid-induced writhing in mice. The CNT nanocapsules had an average particle size of 229.55 nm, zeta potential of -53.00 mV, encapsulation efficiency of 84.81% and drug loading of 2.98%, when the pheophorbide content was 1% of lecithin weight. Pheophorbide was mainly distributed in outer layer of the CNT nanocapsules and increased the release of the CNT nanocapsules after 650 nm illumination. The central analgesic effects were improved after intraperitoneal injection of CNT at 25 and 50 µg·kg-1 under 650 nm irradiation for 30 min in the nasal cavity. Activation of pheophorbide by red light generated reactive oxygen species which opened the nanocapsules and BBB and helped the CNT enter the brain. This research provides a new drug delivery for treatment of central pain. Keywords: cobra neurotoxin, nanocapsules, photoresponsive, central analgesic effects, red light, drug delivery, photosensitizer

  15. Noisy Neurons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Nerves are fibres that conduct electrical signals and hence pass on information from and to the brain. Nerves are made of nerve cells called neurons (Figure 1). Instructions in our body are sent via electrical signals that present themselves as variations in the potential across neuronal membranes. These potential differences ...

  16. Non-invasive controlled release from gold nanoparticle integrated photo-responsive liposomes through pulse laser induced microbubble cavitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathiyazhakan, Malathi; Yang, Yuanxiang; Liu, Yibo; Zhu, Caigang; Liu, Quan; Ohl, Claus-Dieter; Tam, Kam Chiu; Gao, Yu; Xu, Chenjie

    2015-02-01

    Drug-carriers, capable of releasing the drug at the target sites upon external stimuli, are attractive for theranostic applications. In recent years, photo-responsive nanoparticles (NPs) have received considerable attention because of their potentials in providing spatial, temporal, and dosage control over the drug release. However, most of the relevant technologies are still in the process of development and are unprocurable by the clinics. Here, we demonstrated facile fabrication of these photo-responsive NPs by loading hydrophilic gold NPs within thermo-responsive liposomes. Calcein was used as a model drug to evaluate the encapsulation efficiency and the release kinetic profile upon heat/light stimulation. Furthermore, we characterized their size, morphology, phase transition temperature and stability. Finally, we demonstrated that this photo-triggered release might be due to the membrane disruption caused by microbubble cavitation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Photoresponse of CsPbBr3 and Cs4PbBr6 Perovskite Single Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Ji-Hyun; Han, Jae Hoon; Yin, Wenping; Park, Cheolwoo; Park, Yongmin; Ahn, Tae Kyu; Cho, Jeong Ho; Jung, Duk-Young

    2017-02-02

    High-quality and millimeter-sized perovskite single crystals of CsPbBr 3 and Cs 4 PbBr 6 were prepared in organic solvents and studied for correlation between photocurrent generation and photoluminescence (PL) emission. The CsPbBr 3 crystals, which have a 3D perovskite structure, showed a highly sensitive photoresponse and poor PL signal. In contrast, Cs 4 PbBr 6 crystals, which have a 0D perovskite structure, exhibited more than 1 order of magnitude higher PL intensity than CsPbBr 3 , which generated an ultralow photoresponse under illumination. Their contrasting optoelectrical characteristics were attributed to different exciton binding energies, induced by coordination geometry of the [PbBr 6 ] 4- octahedron sublattices. This work correlated the local structures of lead in the primitive perovskite and its derivatives to PL spectra as well as photoconductivity.

  18. Intrinsic Chevrolets at the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, S.J.; Collins, J.C.; Ellis, S.D.; Gunion, J.F.; Mueller, A.H.

    1984-01-01

    The possibility of the production at high energy of heavy quarks, supersymmetric particles and other large mass colored systems via the intrinsic twist-six components in the proton wave function is discussed. While the existing data do not rule out the possible relevance of intrinsic charm production at present energies, the extrapolation of such intrinsic contributions to very high masses and energies suggests that they will not play an important role at the SSC

  19. Highly Efficient Porphyrin-Based OPV/Perovskite Hybrid Solar Cells with Extended Photoresponse and High Fill Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ke; Zhu, Zonglong; Xu, Bo; Jo, Sae Byeok; Kan, Yuanyuan; Peng, Xiaobin; Jen, Alex K-Y

    2017-12-01

    Employing a layer of bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) organic semiconductors on top of perovskite to further extend its photoresponse is considered as a simple and promising way to enhance the efficiency of perovskite-based solar cells, instead of using tandem devices or near infrared (NIR)-absorbing Sn-containing perovskites. However, the progress made from this approach is quite limited because very few such hybrid solar cells can simultaneously show high short-circuit current (J SC ) and fill factor (FF). To find an appropriate NIR-absorbing BHJ is essential for highly efficient, organic, photovoltaics (OPV)/perovskite hybrid solar cells. The materials involved in the BHJ layer not only need to have broad photoresponse to increase J SC , but also possess suitable energy levels and high mobility to afford high V OC and FF. In this work, a new porphyrin is synthesized and blended with [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) to function as an efficient BHJ for OPV/perovskite hybrid solar cells. The extended photoresponse, well-matched energy levels, and high hole mobility from optimized BHJ morphology afford a very high power conversion efficiency (PCE) (19.02%) with high V oc , J SC , and FF achieved simultaneously. This is the highest value reported so far for such hybrid devices, which demonstrates the feasibility of further improving the efficiency of perovskite devices. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Photoresponsive surface molecularly imprinted polymer on ZnO nanorods for uric acid detection in physiological fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Qian [The Key Laboratory of Applied Chemistry of Chongqing Municipality, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Department of Science and Environmental Studies, The Hong Kong Institute of Education (Hong Kong); Li, Zai-yong; Wei, Yu-bo; Yang, Xia; Liu, Lan-tao [The Key Laboratory of Applied Chemistry of Chongqing Municipality, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Gong, Cheng-bin, E-mail: gongcbtq@swu.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Applied Chemistry of Chongqing Municipality, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Ma, Xue-bing [The Key Laboratory of Applied Chemistry of Chongqing Municipality, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Lam, Michael Hon-wah [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Chow, Cheuk-fai, E-mail: cfchow@ied.edu.hk [Department of Science and Environmental Studies, The Hong Kong Institute of Education (Hong Kong)

    2016-09-01

    A photoresponsive surface molecularly imprinted polymer for uric acid in physiological fluids was fabricated through a facile and effective method using bio-safe and biocompatible ZnO nanorods as a support. The strategy was carried out by introducing double bonds on the surface of the ZnO nanorods with 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane. The surface molecularly imprinted polymer on ZnO nanorods was then prepared by surface polymerization using uric acid as template, water-soluble 5-[(4-(methacryloyloxy)phenyl)diazenyl]isophthalic acid as functional monomer, and triethanolamine trimethacryl ester as cross-linker. The surface molecularly imprinted polymer on ZnO nanorods showed good photoresponsive properties, high recognition ability, and fast binding kinetics toward uric acid, with a dissociation constant of 3.22 × 10{sup −5} M in aqueous NaH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} buffer at pH = 7.0 and a maximal adsorption capacity of 1.45 μmol g{sup −1}. Upon alternate irradiation at 365 and 440 nm, the surface molecularly imprinted polymer on ZnO nanorods can quantitatively uptake and release uric acid. - Highlights: • Novel surface molecularly imprinted polymer on ZnO nanorods was synthesized. • ZnO-SMIP showed good selectivity toward uric acid in physiological fluids. • ZnO-SMIP displayed good photoresponsive properties.

  1. Hydrogen in hydrogenated amorphous silicon thick film and its relation to the photoresponse of the film in contact with molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sridhar, N.; Chung, D.D.L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that hydrogenated amorphous silicon films of thickness 0.5-7 μm on molybdenum substrates were deposited from silane by dc glow discharge and studied by mass spectrometric observation of the evolution of hydrogen upon heating and correlating this information with the photoresponse. The films were found to contain two types of hydrogen, namely weak bonded hydrogen, which evolved at 365 degrees C and was the minority, and strongly bonded hydrogen, which evolved at 460-670 degrees C and was the majority. The proportion of strongly bonded hydrogen increased with increasing film thickness and with increasing substrate temperature during deposition. The total amount of hydrogen increased when the substrate temperature was decreased from 350 to 275 degrees C. The strongly bonded hydrogen resided throughout the thickness of the film, whereas the weakly bonded hydrogen resided near the film surface. The evolution of the strongly bonded hydrogen was diffusion controlled, with an activation energy of 1.6 eV. The strongly bonded hydrogen enhanced the photoresponse, whereas the weakly bonded hydrogen degraded the photoresponse

  2. Photoresponsive Molecular Memory Films Composed of Sequentially Assembled Heterolayers Containing Ruthenium Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Takumi; Ozawa, Hiroaki; Suzuki, Takashi; Nakabayashi, Takuya; Kanaizuka, Katsuhiko; Haga, Masa-Aki

    2016-01-26

    Photoresponsive molecular memory films were fabricated by a layer-by-layer (LbL) assembling of two dinuclear Ru complexes with tetrapodal phosphonate anchors, containing either 2,3,5,6-tetra(2-pyridyl)pyrazine or 1,2,4,5-tetra(2-pyridyl)benzene as a bridging ligand (Ru-NP and Ru-CP, respectively), using zirconium phosphonate to link the layers. Various types of multilayer homo- and heterostructures were constructed. In the multilayer heterofilms such as ITO||(Ru-NP)m |(Ru-CP)n , the difference in redox potentials between Ru-NP and Ru-CP layers was approximately 0.7 V, which induced a potential gradient determined by the sequence of the layers. In the ITO||(Ru-NP)m |(Ru-CP)n multilayer heterofilms, the direct electron transfer (ET) from the outer Ru-CP layers to the ITO were observed to be blocked for m>2, and charge trapping in the outer Ru-CP layers became evident from the appearance of an intervalence charge transfer (IVCT) band at 1140 nm from the formation of the mixed-valent state of Ru-CP units, resulting from the reductive ET mediation of the inner Ru-NP layers. Therefore, the charging/discharging ("1"and "0") states in the outer Ru-CP layers could be addressed and interconverted by applying potential pulses between -0.5 and +0.7 V. The two states could be read out by the direction of the photocurrent (anodic or cathodic). The molecular heterolayer films thus represent a typical example of a photoresponsive memory device; that is, the writing process may be achieved by the applied potential (-0.5 or +0.7 V), while the readout process is achieved by measuring the direction of the photocurrent (anodic or cathodic). Sequence-sensitive multilayer heterofilms, using redox-active complexes as building blocks, thus demonstrate great potential for the design of molecular functional devices. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Intrinsically dynamic population models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Schoen

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Intrinsically dynamic models (IDMs depict populations whose cumulative growth rate over a number of intervals equals the product of the long term growth rates (that is the dominant roots or dominant eigenvalues associated with each of those intervals. Here the focus is on the birth trajectory produced by a sequence of population projection (Leslie matrices. The elements of a Leslie matrix are represented as straightforward functions of the roots of the matrix, and new relationships are presented linking the roots of a matrix to its Net Reproduction Rate and stable mean age of childbearing. Incorporating mortality changes in the rates of reproduction yields an IDM when the subordinate roots are held constant over time. In IDMs, the birth trajectory generated by any specified sequence of Leslie matrices can be found analytically. In the Leslie model with 15 year age groups, the constant subordinate root assumption leads to reasonable changes in the age pattern of fertility, and equations (27 and (30 provide the population size and structure that result from changing levels of net reproduction. IDMs generalize the fixed rate stable population model. They can characterize any observed population, and can provide new insights into dynamic demographic behavior, including the momentum associated with gradual or irregular paths to zero growth.

  4. Study on spin configuration in photoresponsive iron mixed-valence complexes by Mössbauer spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazawa, A.; Yoshida, J.; Kida, N.; Kashima, I.; Murata, W.; Enomoto, M.; Kojima, N.

    2014-04-01

    We have investigated magnetic properties in a series of photoresponsive dithiooxalato (dto)-bridged iron mixed-valence complexes, (SP-R)[FeIIFeIII(dto)3] (SP-R = R-substituted pyridospiropyran cation; R = Me, Et, and Pr; abbreviated as 1 Me, 1 Et, and 1 Pr, respectively). As for our previous reports, 1 Me and 1 Et show two-step succeeding ferromagnetic transitions at T C = 25 & 8 K and 22 & 5 K, respectively. However, 1 Et has no hysteresis in the magnetic susceptibility, while 1 Me undergoes the charge transfer phase transition with thermal hysteresis around 75 K. To elucidate the two-step transitions of them, we measured 57Fe Mössbauer spectra of 1 Et. The spectra of FeII ( S = 2) and FeIII ( S = 1/2) in the HTP were observed in the magnetically ordered state as well as the paramagnetic state, and revealed that only HTP exists in a temperature range up to 5 K. The result is consistent with that of 1 Pr, where one ferromagnetic phase transition occurs at T C = 10 K. 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy is useful to clarify the origin of the succeeding magnetic transition for these systems.

  5. Bactericidal Effect of a Photoresponsive Carbon Monoxide-Releasing Nonwoven against Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger-Strobel, Mareike; Gläser, Steve; Makarewicz, Oliwia; Wyrwa, Ralf; Weisser, Jürgen; Pletz, Mathias W; Schiller, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading pathogen in skin and skin structure infections, including surgical and traumatic infections that are associated with biofilm formation. Because biofilm formation is accompanied by high phenotypic resistance of the embedded bacteria, they are almost impossible to eradicate by conventional antibiotics. Therefore, alternative therapeutic strategies are of high interest. We generated nanostructured hybrid nonwovens via the electrospinning of a photoresponsive carbon monoxide (CO)-releasing molecule [CORM-1, Mn2(CO)10] and the polymer polylactide. This nonwoven showed a CO-induced antimicrobial activity that was sufficient to reduce the biofilm-embedded bacteria by 70% after photostimulation at 405 nm. The released CO increased the concentration of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the biofilms, suggesting that in addition to inhibiting the electron transport chain, ROS might play a role in the antimicrobial activity of CORMs on S. aureus The nonwoven showed increased cytotoxicity on eukaryotic cells after longer exposure, most probably due to the released lactic acid, that might be acceptable for local and short-time treatments. Therefore, CO-releasing nonwovens might be a promising local antimicrobial therapy against biofilm-associated skin wound infections. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Photoresponsive SAMs on gold fabricated from azobenzene-functionalised asparagusic acid derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemeling, Ulrich; Bruhn, Clemens; Bretthauer, Frauke; Borg, Marta; Träger, Frank; Vogel, Florian; Azzam, Waleed; Badin, Mihaela; Strunskus, Thomas; Wöll, Christof

    2009-10-28

    We have prepared a range of azobenzene derivatives equipped with an asparagusic acid-based 1,2-dithiolane headgroup suitable for chemisorption on solid gold substrates. The formation of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of the amide cyclo-S2C3H5-4-C(O)NH-p-C6H4-N=N-Ph (1) and the ester cyclo-S2C3H5-4-C(O)O-p-C6H4-N=N-Ph (2) on gold was monitored in situ and in real time by optical second harmonic generation (SHG). The structure and composition of these SAMs was investigated by a range of ex situ methods, viz. ellipsometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (FTIRRAS). Reversible, but moderate, photoswitchability was observed for these one-component SAMs by ellipsometry and dynamic contact angle measurements. Use of a second 1,2-dithiolane component for lateral dilution of the photoactive terminal groups resulted in a much more pronounced photoresponse.

  7. Artificial muscle-like function from hierarchical supramolecular assembly of photoresponsive molecular motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiawen; Leung, Franco King-Chi; Stuart, Marc C. A.; Kajitani, Takashi; Fukushima, Takanori; van der Giessen, Erik; Feringa, Ben L.

    2018-02-01

    A striking feature of living systems is their ability to produce motility by amplification of collective molecular motion from the nanoscale up to macroscopic dimensions. Some of nature's protein motors, such as myosin in muscle tissue, consist of a hierarchical supramolecular assembly of very large proteins, in which mechanical stress induces a coordinated movement. However, artificial molecular muscles have often relied on covalent polymer-based actuators. Here, we describe the macroscopic contractile muscle-like motion of a supramolecular system (comprising 95% water) formed by the hierarchical self-assembly of a photoresponsive amphiphilic molecular motor. The molecular motor first assembles into nanofibres, which further assemble into aligned bundles that make up centimetre-long strings. Irradiation induces rotary motion of the molecular motors, and propagation and accumulation of this motion lead to contraction of the fibres towards the light source. This system supports large-amplitude motion, fast response, precise control over shape, as well as weight-lifting experiments in water and air.

  8. Morphology and photoresponse of crystalline antimony film grown on mica by physical vapor deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafa Muhammad

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Antimony is a promising material for the fabrication of photodetectors. This study deals with the growth of a photosensitive thin film by the physical vapor deposition (PVD of antimony onto mica surface in a furnace tube. The geometry of the grown structures was studied via scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX and elemental diffraction analysis. XRD peaks of the antimony film grown on mica mostly matched with JCPDF Card. The formation of rhombohedral crystal structures in the film was further confirmed by SEM micrographs and chemical composition analysis. The Hall measurements revealed good electrical conductivity of the film with bulk carrier concentration of the order of 1022 Ω·cm-3 and mobility of 9.034 cm2/Vs. The grown film was successfully tested for radiation detection. The photoresponse of the film was evaluated using its current-voltage characteristics. These investigations revealed that the photosensitivity of the antimony film was 20 times higher than that of crystalline germanium.

  9. Crystalline orientation dependent photoresponse and heterogeneous behaviors of grain boundaries in perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chuanpeng; Zhang, Pengpeng

    2018-02-01

    Using photoconductive atomic force microscopy and Kelvin probe force microscopy, we characterize the local electrical properties of grains and grain boundaries of organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3) thin films on top of a poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS)/ITO substrate. Three discrete photoconductivity levels are identified among perovskite grains, likely corresponding to the crystal orientation of each grain. Local J-V curves recorded on these grains further suggest an anti-correlation behavior between the short circuit current (JSC) and open circuit voltage (VOC). This phenomenon can be attributed to diffusion-limited surface recombination at the non-selective perovskite-tip contact, where a higher carrier mobility established in the perovskite grain results in an enhanced surface recombination and thus a lower VOC. In addition, the photoresponse of perovskite films displays a pronounced heterogeneity across the grain boundaries, with the boundaries formed between grains of the same photoconductivity level displaying even enhanced photocurrent and open circuit voltage compared to those of the adjacent grain interiors. These observations highlight the significance of controlling the microstructure of perovskite thin films, which will be a necessary route for further improving the efficiency of perovskite solar cells.

  10. Photo-responsive polyethyleneimine microcapsules cross-linked by ortho-nitrobenzyl derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huiying; Tong, Weijun; Gao, Changyou

    2016-02-01

    Intelligent capsules are widely used as carriers for loading small molecules and particles for their capacity to respond to environmental stimuli. In this study, photo-responsive polyethyleneimine (PEI) microcapsules were fabricated using 4-bromomethyl-3-nitrobenzoic acid (BNBA) bearing a photodegradable ortho-nitrobenzyl group as a cross-linker. PEI-doped CaCO3 particles were used as the sacrificial templates, in which the PEI molecules were cross-linked by BNBA molecules under the activation of 4-(4,6-dimethoxy-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)-4-methylmorpholinium chloride (DMT-MM) and N,N-diisopropylethylamine (DIEA). After the removal of CaCO3 particles by hydrochloric acid, the PEI-BNBA capsules were obtained. Since the C-N bond that formed via reaction of benzyl bromide and amine is photo-cleavable, the capsules could be decomposed under UV irradiation at 365nm. The loaded macromolecules could be released upon UV irradiation, exhibiting the microcapsules' potential applications in the field of controlled release. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The photoresponse behavior of a MEH-PPV sensitized titanium dioxide photoelectrochemical cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assefa Sergawie

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A solid-state photoelectrochemical cell based on polymer-sensitized nanocrystalline titanium dioxide (nc-TiO2 was constructed and studied for its photoresponse behavior. Poly[2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethylhexyloxy-1,4-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV and Poly[oxymethylene-oligo(oxyethylene] (POMOE, complexed with I3-/I- redox couple were used as a polymer-sensitizer to TiO2 and as a solid polymer electrolyte, respectively. The device produced a short-circuit current of 0.145 mA/cm2, and an open-circuit voltage of 410 mV under the irradiance of 100 mW/cm2. The power conversion efficiency and the fill factor were 0.03 % and 0.5, respectively. The monochromatic induced photon-to-current conversion efficiencies for backside (ITO/nc-TiO2/MEH-PPV and for front side (ITO/PEDOT illuminations were 1.8 % and 1.4 %, respectively.

  12. Dynamics of globally coupled inhibitory neurons with heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golomb, David; Rinzel, John

    1993-12-01

    A model of many heterogeneous excitable neurons with a global slowly decaying inhibitory coupling is studied. When neuronal intrinsic excitability parameters are randomly distributed, the system exhibits four regimes of behavior. In addition to synchronized periodic and asynchronous regimes, we obtain two aperiodic regimes, with bursting rate a staircaselike function of neuron excitability. In one regime, the system is partially synchronized and in the second, partially antisynchronized. The transition between these two regimes is discontinuous as the disorder increases.

  13. A COMPUTATIONAL MODEL OF MOTOR NEURON DEGENERATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Masson, Gwendal; Przedborski, Serge; Abbott, L.F.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY To explore the link between bioenergetics and motor neuron degeneration, we used a computational model in which detailed morphology and ion conductance are paired with intracellular ATP production and consumption. We found that reduced ATP availability increases the metabolic cost of a single action potential and disrupts K+/Na+ homeostasis, resulting in a chronic depolarization. The magnitude of the ATP shortage at which this ionic instability occurs depends on the morphology and intrinsic conductance characteristic of the neuron. If ATP shortage is confined to the distal part of the axon, the ensuing local ionic instability eventually spreads to the whole neuron and involves fasciculation-like spiking events. A shortage of ATP also causes a rise in intracellular calcium. Our modeling work supports the notion that mitochondrial dysfunction can account for salient features of the paralytic disorder amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, including motor neuron hyperexcitability, fasciculation, and differential vulnerability of motor neuron subpopulations. PMID:25088365

  14. [Mirror neurons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubia Vila, Francisco José

    2011-01-01

    Mirror neurons were recently discovered in frontal brain areas of the monkey. They are activated when the animal makes a specific movement, but also when the animal observes the same movement in another animal. Some of them also respond to the emotional expression of other animals of the same species. These mirror neurons have also been found in humans. They respond to or "reflect" actions of other individuals in the brain and are thought to represent the basis for imitation and empathy and hence the neurobiological substrate for "theory of mind", the potential origin of language and the so-called moral instinct.

  15. Intrinsic gain modulation and adaptive neural coding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungho Hong

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available In many cases, the computation of a neural system can be reduced to a receptive field, or a set of linear filters, and a thresholding function, or gain curve, which determines the firing probability; this is known as a linear/nonlinear model. In some forms of sensory adaptation, these linear filters and gain curve adjust very rapidly to changes in the variance of a randomly varying driving input. An apparently similar but previously unrelated issue is the observation of gain control by background noise in cortical neurons: the slope of the firing rate versus current (f-I curve changes with the variance of background random input. Here, we show a direct correspondence between these two observations by relating variance-dependent changes in the gain of f-I curves to characteristics of the changing empirical linear/nonlinear model obtained by sampling. In the case that the underlying system is fixed, we derive relationships relating the change of the gain with respect to both mean and variance with the receptive fields derived from reverse correlation on a white noise stimulus. Using two conductance-based model neurons that display distinct gain modulation properties through a simple change in parameters, we show that coding properties of both these models quantitatively satisfy the predicted relationships. Our results describe how both variance-dependent gain modulation and adaptive neural computation result from intrinsic nonlinearity.

  16. Noisy Neurons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 1. Noisy Neurons: Hodgkin-Huxley Model and Stochastic Variants. Shurti Paranjape. General Article Volume 20 Issue 1 January 2015 pp 34-43. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  17. Intrinsically Passive Handling and Grasping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stramigioli, Stefano; Scherpen, Jacquelien M.A.; Khodabandehloo, Koorosh

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents a control philosophy called Intrinsically Passive Control, which has the feature to properly behave during interaction with any passive objects. The controlled robot will never become unstable due to the physical structure of the controller.

  18. Variation in nocturnality and circadian activity rhythms between photoresponsive F344 and nonphotoresponsive Sprague Dawley rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Cynthia E

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variation in circadian rhythms and nocturnality may, hypothetically, be related to or independent of genetic variation in photoperiodic mediation of seasonal changes in physiology and behavior. We hypothesized that strain variation in photoperiodism between photoperiodic F344 rats and nonphotoperiodic Harlan Sprague Dawley (HSD rats might be caused by underlying variation in clock function. We predicted that HSD rats would have more activity during the day or subjective day, longer free-running rhythms, poor entrainment to short day length, and shorter duration of activity, traits that have been associated with nonphotoperiodism in other laboratory rodent species, relative to F344 rats. An alternative hypothesis, that differences are due to variation in melatonin secretion or responses to melatonin, predicts either no such differences or inconsistent combinations of differences. Methods We tested these predictions by examining activity rhythms of young male F344 and HSD rats given access to running wheels in constant dark (DD, short day length (L8:D16; SD, and long day length (L16:D8; LD. We compared nocturnality (the proportion of activity during night or subjective night, duration of activity (alpha, activity onset and offset, phase angle of entrainment, and free running rhythms (tau of F344 and HSD rats. Results HSD rats had significantly greater activity during the day, were sometimes arrhythmic in DD, and had significantly longer tau than F344 rats, consistent with predictions. However, HSD rats had significantly longer alpha than F344 rats and both strains entrained to SD, inconsistent with predictions. Conclusion The ability of HSD rats to entrain to SD, combined with longer alpha than F344 rats, suggests that the circadian system of HSD rats responds correctly to SD. These data offer best support for the alternative hypothesis, that differences in photoresponsiveness between F344 and HSD rats are caused by non

  19. Photoresponse analysis of the CMOS photodiodes for CMOS x-ray image sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Soo; Ha, Jang Ho; Kim, Han Soo; Yeo, Sun Mok

    2012-01-01

    Although in the short term CMOS active pixel sensors (APSs) cannot compete with the conventionally used charge coupled devices (CCDs) for high quality scientific imaging, recent development in CMOS APSs indicate that CMOS performance level of CCDs in several domains. CMOS APSs possess thereby a number of advantages such as simpler driving requirements and low power operation. CMOS image sensors can be processed in standard CMOS technologies and the potential of on-chip integration of analog and digital circuitry makes them more suitable for several vision systems where system cost is of importance. Moreover, CMOS imagers can directly benefit from on-going technological progress in the field of CMOS technologies. Due to these advantages, the CMOS APSs are currently being investigated actively for various applications such as star tracker, navigation camera and X-ray imaging etc. In most detection systems, it is thought that the sensor is most important, since this decides the signal and noise level. So, in CMOS APSs, the pixel is very important compared to other functional blocks. In order to predict the performance of such image sensor, a detailed understanding of the photocurrent generation in the photodiodes that comprise the CMOS APS is required. In this work, we developed the analytical model that can calculate the photocurrent generated in CMOS photodiode comprising CMOS APSs. The photocurrent calculations and photo response simulations with respect to the wavelength of the incident photon were performed using this model for four types of photodiodes that can be fabricated in standard CMOS process. n + /p - sub and n + /p - epi/p - sub photodiode show better performance compared to n - well/p - sub and n - well/p - epi/p - sub due to the wider depletion width. Comparing n + /p - sub and n + /p - epi/p - sub photodiode, n + /p - sub has higher photo-responsivity in longer wavelength because of the higher electron diffusion current

  20. Rhodopsin expression level affects rod outer segment morphology and photoresponse kinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clint L Makino

    Full Text Available The retinal rod outer segment is a sensory cilium that is specialized for the conversion of light into an electrical signal. Within the cilium, up to several thousand membranous disks contain as many as a billion copies of rhodopsin for efficient photon capture. Disks are continually turned over, requiring the daily synthesis of a prodigious amount of rhodopsin. To promote axial diffusion in the aqueous cytoplasm, the disks have one or more incisures. Across vertebrates, the range of disk diameters spans an order of magnitude, and the number and length of the incisures vary considerably, but the mechanisms controlling disk architecture are not well understood. The finding that transgenic mice overexpressing rhodopsin have enlarged disks lacking an incisure prompted us to test whether lowered rhodopsin levels constrain disk assembly.The structure and function of rods from hemizygous rhodopsin knockout (R+/- mice with decreased rhodopsin expression were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and single cell recording. R+/- rods were structurally altered in three ways: disk shape changed from circular to elliptical, disk surface area decreased, and the single incisure lengthened to divide the disk into two sections. Photocurrent responses to flashes recovered more rapidly than normal. A spatially resolved model of phototransduction indicated that changes in the packing densities of rhodopsin and other transduction proteins were responsible. The decrease in aqueous outer segment volume and the lengthened incisure had only minor effects on photon response amplitude and kinetics.Rhodopsin availability limits disk assembly and outer segment girth in normal rods. The incisure may buffer the supply of structural proteins needed to form larger disks. Decreased rhodopsin level accelerated photoresponse kinetics by increasing the rates of molecular collisions on the membrane. Faster responses, together with fewer rhodopsins, combine to lower overall

  1. Uncovering intrinsic modular organization of spontaneous brain activity in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong He

    Full Text Available The characterization of topological architecture of complex brain networks is one of the most challenging issues in neuroscience. Slow (<0.1 Hz, spontaneous fluctuations of the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD signal in functional magnetic resonance imaging are thought to be potentially important for the reflection of spontaneous neuronal activity. Many studies have shown that these fluctuations are highly coherent within anatomically or functionally linked areas of the brain. However, the underlying topological mechanisms responsible for these coherent intrinsic or spontaneous fluctuations are still poorly understood. Here, we apply modern network analysis techniques to investigate how spontaneous neuronal activities in the human brain derived from the resting-state BOLD signals are topologically organized at both the temporal and spatial scales. We first show that the spontaneous brain functional networks have an intrinsically cohesive modular structure in which the connections between regions are much denser within modules than between them. These identified modules are found to be closely associated with several well known functionally interconnected subsystems such as the somatosensory/motor, auditory, attention, visual, subcortical, and the "default" system. Specifically, we demonstrate that the module-specific topological features can not be captured by means of computing the corresponding global network parameters, suggesting a unique organization within each module. Finally, we identify several pivotal network connectors and paths (predominantly associated with the association and limbic/paralimbic cortex regions that are vital for the global coordination of information flow over the whole network, and we find that their lesions (deletions critically affect the stability and robustness of the brain functional system. Together, our results demonstrate the highly organized modular architecture and associated topological properties in

  2. Phosphorene: Enhanced Photoresponse from Phosphorene-Phosphorene-Suboxide Junction Fashioned by Focused Laser Micromachining (Adv. Mater. 21/2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Junpeng; Carvalho, Alexandra; Wu, Jing; Liu, Hongwei; Tok, Eng Soon; Neto, Antonio H Castro; Özyilmaz, Barbaros; Sow, Chorng Haur

    2016-06-01

    On page 4090, B. Özyilmaz, C. H. Sow, and co-workers use a focused laser beam to modify the surface of a phosphorene device. With a simple focused laser beam, a part of the phosphorene can be scanned and converted into phosphorene-suboxide species, leaving behind a functional and active phosphorene-phosphorene suboxide junction in the device. Once the junction is formed, the photoresponsivity and photocurrent distribution of the device can be significantly altered with a qualitative difference in behavior. Photovoltaic-like behavior is observed, which is not found in the pristine sample. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Neuronal and glial purinergic receptors functions in neuron development and brain disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana edel Puerto

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Brain development requires the interaction of complex signalling pathways, involving different cell types and molecules. For a long time, most attention has focused on neurons in a neuronocentric conceptualization of CNS development, these cells fulfilling an intrinsic programme that establishes the brain’s morphology and function. By contrast, glia have mainly been studied as support cells, offering guidance or as the cells that react to brain injury. However, new evidence is appearing that demonstrates a more fundamental role of glial cells in the control of different aspects of neuronal development and function, events in which the influence of neurons is at best weak. Moreover, it is becoming clear that the function and organization of the nervous system depends heavily on reciprocal neuron-glia interactions. During development, neurons are often generated far from their final destination and while intrinsic mechanisms are responsible for neuronal migration and growth, they need support and regulatory influences from glial cells in order to migrate correctly. Similarly, the axons emitted by neurons often have to reach faraway targets and in this sense, glia help define the way that axons grow. Moreover, oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells ultimately envelop axons, contributing to the generation of Nodes of Ranvier. Finally, recent publications show that astrocytes contribute to the modulation of synaptic transmission. In this sense, purinergic receptors are expressed widely by glial cells and neurons, and recent evidence points to multiple roles of purines and purinergic receptors in neuronal development and function, from neurogenesis to axon growth and functional axonal maturation, as well as in pathological conditions in the brain. This review will focus on the role of glial and neuronal secreted purines, and on the purinergic receptors, fundamentally in the control of neuronal development and function, as well as in diseases of the

  4. Learning to learn - intrinsic plasticity as a metaplasticity mechanism for memory formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Megha; Song, Chenghui; Ehlers, Vanessa L; Moyer, James R

    2013-10-01

    "Use it or lose it" is a popular adage often associated with use-dependent enhancement of cognitive abilities. Much research has focused on understanding exactly how the brain changes as a function of experience. Such experience-dependent plasticity involves both structural and functional alterations that contribute to adaptive behaviors, such as learning and memory, as well as maladaptive behaviors, including anxiety disorders, phobias, and posttraumatic stress disorder. With the advancing age of our population, understanding how use-dependent plasticity changes across the lifespan may also help to promote healthy brain aging. A common misconception is that such experience-dependent plasticity (e.g., associative learning) is synonymous with synaptic plasticity. Other forms of plasticity also play a critical role in shaping adaptive changes within the nervous system, including intrinsic plasticity - a change in the intrinsic excitability of a neuron. Intrinsic plasticity can result from a change in the number, distribution or activity of various ion channels located throughout the neuron. Here, we review evidence that intrinsic plasticity is an important and evolutionarily conserved neural correlate of learning. Intrinsic plasticity acts as a metaplasticity mechanism by lowering the threshold for synaptic changes. Thus, learning-related intrinsic changes can facilitate future synaptic plasticity and learning. Such intrinsic changes can impact the allocation of a memory trace within a brain structure, and when compromised, can contribute to cognitive decline during the aging process. This unique role of intrinsic excitability can provide insight into how memories are formed and, more interestingly, how neurons that participate in a memory trace are selected. Most importantly, modulation of intrinsic excitability can allow for regulation of learning ability - this can prevent or provide treatment for cognitive decline not only in patients with clinical disorders but

  5. Neurons other than motor neurons in motor neuron disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffoli, Riccardo; Biagioni, Francesca; Busceti, Carla L; Gaglione, Anderson; Ryskalin, Larisa; Gambardella, Stefano; Frati, Alessandro; Fornai, Francesco

    2017-11-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is typically defined by a loss of motor neurons in the central nervous system. Accordingly, morphological analysis for decades considered motor neurons (in the cortex, brainstem and spinal cord) as the neuronal population selectively involved in ALS. Similarly, this was considered the pathological marker to score disease severity ex vivo both in patients and experimental models. However, the concept of non-autonomous motor neuron death was used recently to indicate the need for additional cell types to produce motor neuron death in ALS. This means that motor neuron loss occurs only when they are connected with other cell types. This concept originally emphasized the need for resident glia as well as non-resident inflammatory cells. Nowadays, the additional role of neurons other than motor neurons emerged in the scenario to induce non-autonomous motor neuron death. In fact, in ALS neurons diverse from motor neurons are involved. These cells play multiple roles in ALS: (i) they participate in the chain of events to produce motor neuron loss; (ii) they may even degenerate more than and before motor neurons. In the present manuscript evidence about multi-neuronal involvement in ALS patients and experimental models is discussed. Specific sub-classes of neurons in the whole spinal cord are reported either to degenerate or to trigger neuronal degeneration, thus portraying ALS as a whole spinal cord disorder rather than a disease affecting motor neurons solely. This is associated with a novel concept in motor neuron disease which recruits abnormal mechanisms of cell to cell communication.

  6. Neurosemantics, neurons and system theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breidbach, Olaf

    2007-08-01

    Following the concept of internal representations, signal processing in a neuronal system has to be evaluated exclusively based on internal system characteristics. Thus, this approach omits the external observer as a control function for sensory integration. Instead, the configuration of the system and its computational performance are the effects of endogenous factors. Such self-referential operation is due to a strictly local computation in a network and, thereby, computations follow a set of rules that constitute the emergent behaviour of the system. These rules can be shown to correspond to a "logic" that is intrinsic to the system, an idea which provides the basis for neurosemantics.

  7. A systematic approach to selecting task relevant neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Kevin; Saxena, Shreya; Eskandar, Emad; Thakor, Nitish; Schieber, Marc; Gale, John T; Averbeck, Bruno; Eden, Uri; Sarma, Sridevi V

    2015-04-30

    Since task related neurons cannot be specifically targeted during surgery, a critical decision to make is to select which neurons are task-related when performing data analysis. Including neurons unrelated to the task degrade decoding accuracy and confound neurophysiological results. Traditionally, task-related neurons are selected as those with significant changes in firing rate when a stimulus is applied. However, this assumes that neurons' encoding of stimuli are dominated by their firing rate with little regard to temporal dynamics. This paper proposes a systematic approach for neuron selection, which uses a likelihood ratio test to capture the contribution of stimulus to spiking activity while taking into account task-irrelevant intrinsic dynamics that affect firing rates. This approach is denoted as the model deterioration excluding stimulus (MDES) test. MDES is compared to firing rate selection in four case studies: a simulation, a decoding example, and two neurophysiology examples. The MDES rankings in the simulation match closely with ideal rankings, while firing rate rankings are skewed by task-irrelevant parameters. For decoding, 95% accuracy is achieved using the top 8 MDES-ranked neurons, while the top 12 firing-rate ranked neurons are needed. In the neurophysiological examples, MDES matches published results when firing rates do encode salient stimulus information, and uncovers oscillatory modulations in task-related neurons that are not captured when neurons are selected using firing rates. These case studies illustrate the importance of accounting for intrinsic dynamics when selecting task-related neurons and following the MDES approach accomplishes that. MDES selects neurons that encode task-related information irrespective of these intrinsic dynamics which can bias firing rate based selection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Statistics of Visual Responses to Image Object Stimuli from Primate AIT Neurons to DNN Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qiulei; Wang, Hong; Hu, Zhanyi

    2018-02-01

    Under the goal-driven paradigm, Yamins et al. ( 2014 ; Yamins & DiCarlo, 2016 ) have shown that by optimizing only the final eight-way categorization performance of a four-layer hierarchical network, not only can its top output layer quantitatively predict IT neuron responses but its penultimate layer can also automatically predict V4 neuron responses. Currently, deep neural networks (DNNs) in the field of computer vision have reached image object categorization performance comparable to that of human beings on ImageNet, a data set that contains 1.3 million training images of 1000 categories. We explore whether the DNN neurons (units in DNNs) possess image object representational statistics similar to monkey IT neurons, particularly when the network becomes deeper and the number of image categories becomes larger, using VGG19, a typical and widely used deep network of 19 layers in the computer vision field. Following Lehky, Kiani, Esteky, and Tanaka ( 2011 , 2014 ), where the response statistics of 674 IT neurons to 806 image stimuli are analyzed using three measures (kurtosis, Pareto tail index, and intrinsic dimensionality), we investigate the three issues in this letter using the same three measures: (1) the similarities and differences of the neural response statistics between VGG19 and primate IT cortex, (2) the variation trends of the response statistics of VGG19 neurons at different layers from low to high, and (3) the variation trends of the response statistics of VGG19 neurons when the numbers of stimuli and neurons increase. We find that the response statistics on both single-neuron selectivity and population sparseness of VGG19 neurons are fundamentally different from those of IT neurons in most cases; by increasing the number of neurons in different layers and the number of stimuli, the response statistics of neurons at different layers from low to high do not substantially change; and the estimated intrinsic dimensionality values at the low

  9. Differential Regulation of Apical-basolateral Dendrite Outgrowth by Activity in Hippocampal Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang eYuan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hippocampal pyramidal neurons have characteristic dendrite asymmetry, characterized by structurally and functionally distinct apical and basolateral dendrites. The ability of the neuron to generate and maintain dendrite asymmetry is vital, since synaptic inputs received are critically dependent on dendrite architecture. Little is known about the role of neuronal activity in guiding maintainance of dendrite asymmetry. Our data indicate that dendrite asymmetry is established and maintained early during development. Further, our results indicate that cell intrinsic and global alterations of neuronal activity have differential effects on net extension of apical and basolateral dendrites. Thus, apical and basolateral dendrite extension may be independently regulated by cell intrinsic and network neuronal activity during development, suggesting that individual dendrites may have autonomous control over net extension. We propose that regulated individual dendrite extension in response to cell intrinsic and neuronal network activity may allow temporal control of synapse specificity in the developing hippocampus.

  10. The influence of aqueous sodium dodecyl sulphate solution in the photoresponsivity of nitrogen doped graphene oxide photodetector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, H.; Thandavan, T. M. K.

    2017-11-01

    The homogeneity and agglomeration in graphene based photodetector plays an important role in the photoconduction. The influence of sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) solution in nitrogen doped graphene oxide (N-GO) is studied based on the photoresponsivity behaviour. One step hydrothermal method and drop casting technique are utilized to obtain N-GO photodetectors. High photoresponsivity about 1000 folds is achieved in N-GO prepared with SDS solution (N-GO/SDS) compared to the N-GO prepared without SDS solution. Raman spectrum also revealed a high intense D and G band as well as a slightly broaden 2D band due to sp2 hybridization. The fabricated device has exhibited wide range of responsivity to infrared (IR) laser 974 nm pulse and illumination. Real time current measurement in N-GO and current-voltage (I-V) characteristics in N-GO/SDS showed a significant photoconduction due to laser 974 nm illumination. The external quantum efficiency (EQE) in the N-GO/SDS solution is about 394830% compared to N-GO prepared without SDS, which is only 272%. The evaluated fall time at frequency modulation of 0.1 and 1 Hz for direct current (dc) bias voltage of 5.0 V found to be shorter compared to that of 2.5 V, whereas the fall time at high frequency modulation at 5000 Hz exhibited similar time around 77 μs.

  11. UV-Assisted Photochemical Synthesis of Reduced Graphene Oxide/ZnO Nanowires Composite for Photoresponse Enhancement in UV Photodetectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changsong Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The weak photon absorption and high recombination rate of electron-hole pairs in disordered zinc oxide nanowires (ZNWs limit its application in UV photodetection. This limitation can be overcome by introducing graphene sheets to the ZNWs. Herein we report a high-performance photodetector based on one-dimensional (1D wide band-gap semiconductor disordered ZNWs composited with reduced graphene oxide (RGO for ultraviolet (UV photoresponse enhancement. The RGO/ZNWs composites have been successfully synthetized through UV-assisted photochemical reduction of GO in ZNWs suspension. The material characterizations in morphology, Raman scattering, and Ultraviolet-visible light absorption verified the formation of graphene sheets attached in ZNWs network and the enhancement of UV absorption due to the introduction of graphene. In comparison with photodetectors based on pure ZNWs, the photodetectors based on RGO/ZNWs composite exhibit enhanced photoresponse with photocurrent density of 5.87 mA·cm−2, on/off current ratio of 3.01 × 104, and responsivity of 1.83 A·W−1 when a UV irradiation of 3.26 mW·cm−2 and 1.0 V bias were used. Theory analysis is also presented to get insight into the inherent mechanisms of separation and transportation of photo-excited carriers in RGO/ZNWs composite.

  12. UV-Assisted Photochemical Synthesis of Reduced Graphene Oxide/ZnO Nanowires Composite for Photoresponse Enhancement in UV Photodetectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Changsong; Zhou, Peng; Wang, Na; Ma, Yang; San, Haisheng

    2018-01-05

    The weak photon absorption and high recombination rate of electron-hole pairs in disordered zinc oxide nanowires (ZNWs) limit its application in UV photodetection. This limitation can be overcome by introducing graphene sheets to the ZNWs. Herein we report a high-performance photodetector based on one-dimensional (1D) wide band-gap semiconductor disordered ZNWs composited with reduced graphene oxide (RGO) for ultraviolet (UV) photoresponse enhancement. The RGO/ZNWs composites have been successfully synthetized through UV-assisted photochemical reduction of GO in ZNWs suspension. The material characterizations in morphology, Raman scattering, and Ultraviolet-visible light absorption verified the formation of graphene sheets attached in ZNWs network and the enhancement of UV absorption due to the introduction of graphene. In comparison with photodetectors based on pure ZNWs, the photodetectors based on RGO/ZNWs composite exhibit enhanced photoresponse with photocurrent density of 5.87 mA·cm -2 , on/off current ratio of 3.01 × 10⁴, and responsivity of 1.83 A·W -1 when a UV irradiation of 3.26 mW·cm -2 and 1.0 V bias were used. Theory analysis is also presented to get insight into the inherent mechanisms of separation and transportation of photo-excited carriers in RGO/ZNWs composite.

  13. Neuron Morphology Influences Axon Initial Segment Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulledge, Allan T; Bravo, Jaime J

    2016-01-01

    In most vertebrate neurons, action potentials are initiated in the axon initial segment (AIS), a specialized region of the axon containing a high density of voltage-gated sodium and potassium channels. It has recently been proposed that neurons use plasticity of AIS length and/or location to regulate their intrinsic excitability. Here we quantify the impact of neuron morphology on AIS plasticity using computational models of simplified and realistic somatodendritic morphologies. In small neurons (e.g., dentate granule neurons), excitability was highest when the AIS was of intermediate length and located adjacent to the soma. Conversely, neurons having larger dendritic trees (e.g., pyramidal neurons) were most excitable when the AIS was longer and/or located away from the soma. For any given somatodendritic morphology, increasing dendritic membrane capacitance and/or conductance favored a longer and more distally located AIS. Overall, changes to AIS length, with corresponding changes in total sodium conductance, were far more effective in regulating neuron excitability than were changes in AIS location, while dendritic capacitance had a larger impact on AIS performance than did dendritic conductance. The somatodendritic influence on AIS performance reflects modest soma-to-AIS voltage attenuation combined with neuron size-dependent changes in AIS input resistance, effective membrane time constant, and isolation from somatodendritic capacitance. We conclude that the impact of AIS plasticity on neuron excitability will depend largely on somatodendritic morphology, and that, in some neurons, a shorter or more distally located AIS may promote, rather than limit, action potential generation.

  14. Spectroscopic studies on chemical- and photo-responsive molecular machines and their bio-applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Yuen Agnes

    2011-07-01

    The four chapters presented in this dissertation describe how various spectroscopic techniques are used: 1) to study the operation of molecular machines in solution, 2) to track the operation of molecular machines inside a single cell, and 3) to investigate the photo-decomposition pathway of a biological chromophore. Recent advances in nanotechnology have enriched the development of nano-scale molecular assemblies to be used as delivery platforms for biologically relevant molecules. Among all the molecular assemblies, molecular machines that are incorporated onto various domains of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) hold considerable potential as a reliable delivery system. Because the ease of functionalization enables chemical or photo-responsive molecular moieties to be covalently attached to the silica framework, these molecular assemblies, with defined mechanized properties, can perform specific functions under external stimuli (pH, redox, or light). While the primary function of these molecular machines is to deliver stored cargo molecules, the means of activation and the motif in which they operate are different. In the first and second chapters of this dissertation, two types of molecular machines, nanovalves and nanoimpellers, and their operations are studied. The ability to continuously monitor and image progression of molecular-based biological events in real-time can enhance our understanding of intracellular processes upon drug, protein and nucleic acid delivery. Using the photo-activated nanoimpeller described in the second chapter, the third chapter explores how it can be used to transport a nuclear staining agent, PI, inside a single cell. Nanoimpellers are made by functionalizing azobenzene molecules to the internal pore surface of MSN. The continuous cis/trans isomerizations are set in motion upon laser illumination at optimal wavelength(s), which facilitate cargo molecules to be expelled from the pores to the surrounding medium. By refining a

  15. Linking Memories across Time via Neuronal and Dendritic Overlaps in Model Neurons with Active Dendrites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Kastellakis

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Memories are believed to be stored in distributed neuronal assemblies through activity-induced changes in synaptic and intrinsic properties. However, the specific mechanisms by which different memories become associated or linked remain a mystery. Here, we develop a simplified, biophysically inspired network model that incorporates multiple plasticity processes and explains linking of information at three different levels: (1 learning of a single associative memory, (2 rescuing of a weak memory when paired with a strong one, and (3 linking of multiple memories across time. By dissecting synaptic from intrinsic plasticity and neuron-wide from dendritically restricted protein capture, the model reveals a simple, unifying principle: linked memories share synaptic clusters within the dendrites of overlapping populations of neurons. The model generates numerous experimentally testable predictions regarding the cellular and sub-cellular properties of memory engrams as well as their spatiotemporal interactions.

  16. New photoresponsive (meth)acrylate (co)polymers containing azobenzene pendant sidegroups with carboxylic and dimethylamino substituents .2. Synthesis and characterization of polymers and copolymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haitjema, HJ; Buruma, R; VanEkenstein, GORA; Tan, YY; Challa, G

    1996-01-01

    The title (co)polymers, used for our investigations on their photoresponsive behaviour were obtained by free radical (co)polymerization. The monomer was either an acrylate or a methacrylate to which an azobenzene group, modified with a para-placed dimethylamino or a carboxylic pendant group, was

  17. Reliable activation of immature neurons in the adult hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas A Mongiat

    Full Text Available Neurons born in the adult dentate gyrus develop, mature, and connect over a long interval that can last from six to eight weeks. It has been proposed that, during this period, developing neurons play a relevant role in hippocampal signal processing owing to their distinctive electrical properties. However, it has remained unknown whether immature neurons can be recruited into a network before synaptic and functional maturity have been achieved. To address this question, we used retroviral expression of green fluorescent protein to identify developing granule cells of the adult mouse hippocampus and investigate the balance of afferent excitation, intrinsic excitability, and firing behavior by patch clamp recordings in acute slices. We found that glutamatergic inputs onto young neurons are significantly weaker than those of mature cells, yet stimulation of cortical excitatory axons elicits a similar spiking probability in neurons at either developmental stage. Young neurons are highly efficient in transducing ionic currents into membrane depolarization due to their high input resistance, which decreases substantially in mature neurons as the inward rectifier potassium (Kir conductance increases. Pharmacological blockade of Kir channels in mature neurons mimics the high excitability characteristic of young neurons. Conversely, Kir overexpression induces mature-like firing properties in young neurons. Therefore, the differences in excitatory drive of young and mature neurons are compensated by changes in membrane excitability that render an equalized firing activity. These observations demonstrate that the adult hippocampus continuously generates a population of highly excitable young neurons capable of information processing.

  18. Characterization of Partial Intrinsic Symmetries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shehu, Aurela; Brunton, Alan; Wuhrer, Stefanie; Wand, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We present a mathematical framework and algorithm for characterizing and extracting partial intrinsic symmetries of surfaces, which is a fundamental building block for many modern geometry processing algorithms. Our goal is to compute all “significant” symmetry information of the shape, which we

  19. Reading: Intrinsic versus Extrinsic Motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, Marlow

    Much debate centers on motivating student in reading achievement. Should students feel motivated from within (intrinsic motivation), or is it better to have extrinsic motivation whereby external stimuli are used to help learners achieve optimally in reading? This paper aims to analyze the two points of view about motivating students in reading…

  20. Intrinsic volumes of symmetric cones

    OpenAIRE

    Amelunxen, Dennis; Bürgisser, Peter

    2012-01-01

    We compute the intrinsic volumes of the cone of positive semidefinite matrices over the real numbers, over the complex numbers, and over the quaternions, in terms of integrals related to Mehta's integral. Several applications for the probabilistic analysis of semidefinite programming are given.

  1. Acoustic resonance spectroscopy intrinsic seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olinger, C.T.; Burr, T.; Vnuk, D.R.

    1994-01-01

    We have begun to quantify the ability of acoustic resonance spectroscopy (ARS) to detect the removal and replacement of the lid of a simulated special nuclear materials drum. Conceptually, the acoustic spectrum of a container establishcs a baseline fingerprint, which we refer to as an intrinsic seal, for the container. Simply removing and replacing the lid changes some of the resonant frequencies because it is impossible to exactly duplicate all of the stress patterns between the lid and container. Preliminary qualitative results suggested that the ARS intrinsic seal could discriminate between cases where a lid has or has not been removed. The present work is directed at quantifying the utility of the ARS intrinsic seal technique, including the technique's sensitivity to ''nuisance'' effects, such as temperature swings, movement of the container, and placement of the transducers. These early quantitative tests support the potential of the ARS intrinsic seal application, but also reveal a possible sensitivity to nuisance effects that could limit environments or conditions under which the technique is effective

  2. Intrinsic Motivation in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Benjamin; Nambiar, Nathan; Hemphill, Caroline; Devietti, Elizabeth; Massengale, Alexandra; McCredie, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    This article describes ways in which educators can use Harter's perceived competence motivation theory, the achievement goal theory, and self-determination theory to develop students' intrinsic motivation to maintain physical fitness, as demonstrated by the Sound Body Sound Mind curriculum and proven effective by the 2013 University of…

  3. Candidate glutamatergic neurons in the visual system of Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamprasad Varija Raghu

    Full Text Available The visual system of Drosophila contains approximately 60,000 neurons that are organized in parallel, retinotopically arranged columns. A large number of these neurons have been characterized in great anatomical detail. However, studies providing direct evidence for synaptic signaling and the neurotransmitter used by individual neurons are relatively sparse. Here we present a first layout of neurons in the Drosophila visual system that likely release glutamate as their major neurotransmitter. We identified 33 different types of neurons of the lamina, medulla, lobula and lobula plate. Based on the previous Golgi-staining analysis, the identified neurons are further classified into 16 major subgroups representing lamina monopolar (L, transmedullary (Tm, transmedullary Y (TmY, Y, medulla intrinsic (Mi, Mt, Pm, Dm, Mi Am, bushy T (T, translobula plate (Tlp, lobula intrinsic (Lcn, Lt, Li, lobula plate tangential (LPTCs and lobula plate intrinsic (LPi cell types. In addition, we found 11 cell types that were not described by the previous Golgi analysis. This classification of candidate glutamatergic neurons fosters the future neurogenetic dissection of information processing in circuits of the fly visual system.

  4. Genomic and biochemical approaches in the discovery of mechanisms for selective neuronal vulnerability to oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinkun; Zaidi, Asma; Pal, Ranu; Garrett, Alexander S; Braceras, Rogelio; Chen, Xue-wen; Michaelis, Mary L; Michaelis, Elias K

    2009-02-19

    Oxidative stress (OS) is an important factor in brain aging and neurodegenerative diseases. Certain neurons in different brain regions exhibit selective vulnerability to OS. Currently little is known about the underlying mechanisms of this selective neuronal vulnerability. The purpose of this study was to identify endogenous factors that predispose vulnerable neurons to OS by employing genomic and biochemical approaches. In this report, using in vitro neuronal cultures, ex vivo organotypic brain slice cultures and acute brain slice preparations, we established that cerebellar granule (CbG) and hippocampal CA1 neurons were significantly more sensitive to OS (induced by paraquat) than cerebral cortical and hippocampal CA3 neurons. To probe for intrinsic differences between in vivo vulnerable (CA1 and CbG) and resistant (CA3 and cerebral cortex) neurons under basal conditions, these neurons were collected by laser capture microdissection from freshly excised brain sections (no OS treatment), and then subjected to oligonucleotide microarray analysis. GeneChip-based transcriptomic analyses revealed that vulnerable neurons had higher expression of genes related to stress and immune response, and lower expression of energy generation and signal transduction genes in comparison with resistant neurons. Subsequent targeted biochemical analyses confirmed the lower energy levels (in the form of ATP) in primary CbG neurons compared with cortical neurons. Low energy reserves and high intrinsic stress levels are two underlying factors for neuronal selective vulnerability to OS. These mechanisms can be targeted in the future for the protection of vulnerable neurons.

  5. Modeling of inter-neuronal coupling medium and its impact on neuronal synchronization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Iqbal

    Full Text Available In this paper, modeling of the coupling medium between two neurons, the effects of the model parameters on the synchronization of those neurons, and compensation of coupling strength deficiency in synchronization are studied. Our study exploits the inter-neuronal coupling medium and investigates its intrinsic properties in order to get insight into neuronal-information transmittance and, there from, brain-information processing. A novel electrical model of the coupling medium that represents a well-known RLC circuit attributable to the coupling medium's intrinsic resistive, inductive, and capacitive properties is derived. Surprisingly, the integration of such properties reveals the existence of a natural three-term control strategy, referred to in the literature as the proportional integral derivative (PID controller, which can be responsible for synchronization between two neurons. Consequently, brain-information processing can rely on a large number of PID controllers based on the coupling medium properties responsible for the coherent behavior of neurons in a neural network. Herein, the effects of the coupling model (or natural PID controller parameters are studied and, further, a supervisory mechanism is proposed that follows a learning and adaptation policy based on the particle swarm optimization algorithm for compensation of the coupling strength deficiency.

  6. Intrinsic properties of mouse lumbar motoneurons revealed by intracellular recording in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meehan, Claire Francesca; Sukiasyan, Natalya; Zhang, Mengliang

    2010-01-01

    identified circuits in the spinal cord. Forty-one motoneurons with antidromic spike potentials (>50 mV) from the sciatic nerve were investigated. We recorded the intrinsic properties of the neurons, including input resistance (mean: 2.4 +/- 1.2 MOmega), rheobase (mean: 7.1 +/- 5.9 nA), and the duration...

  7. Nonlinear, anisotropic, and giant photoconductivity in intrinsic and doped graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ashutosh; Ghosh, Saikat; Agarwal, Amit

    2018-01-01

    We present a framework to calculate the anisotropic and nonlinear photoconductivity for two band systems with application to graphene. In contrast to the usual perturbative (second order in the optical field strength) techniques, we calculate photoconductivity to all orders in the optical field strength. In particular, for graphene, we find the photoresponse to be giant (at large optical field strengths) and anisotropic. The anisotropic photoresponse in graphene is correlated with polarization of the incident field, with the response being similar to that of a half-wave plate. We predict that the anisotropy in the simultaneous measurement of longitudinal (σx x) and transverse (σy x) photoconductivity, with four probes, offers a unique experimental signature of the photovoltaic response, distinguishing it from the thermal-Seebeck and bolometric effects in photoresponse.

  8. Regeneration-associated macrophages: a novel approach to boost intrinsic regenerative capacity for axon regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Jung Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Axons in central nervous system (CNS do not regenerate spontaneously after injuries such as stroke and traumatic spinal cord injury. Both intrinsic and extrinsic factors are responsible for the regeneration failure. Although intensive research efforts have been invested on extrinsic regeneration inhibitors, the extent to which glial inhibitors contribute to the regeneration failure in vivo still remains elusive. Recent experimental evidence has rekindled interests in intrinsic factors for the regulation of regeneration capacity in adult mammals. In this review, we propose that activating macrophages with pro-regenerative molecular signatures could be a novel approach for boosting intrinsic regenerative capacity of CNS neurons. Using a conditioning injury model in which regeneration of central branches of dorsal root ganglia sensory neurons is enhanced by a preceding injury to the peripheral branches, we have demonstrated that perineuronal macrophages surrounding dorsal root ganglia neurons are critically involved in the maintenance of enhanced regeneration capacity. Neuron-derived chemokine (C-C motif ligand 2 (CCL2 seems to mediate neuron-macrophage interactions conveying injury signals to perineuronal macrophages taking on a soley pro-regenerative phenotype, which we designate as regeneration-associated macrophages (RAMs. Manipulation of the CCL2 signaling could boost regeneration potential mimicking the conditioning injury, suggesting that the chemokine-mediated RAM activation could be utilized as a regenerative therapeutic strategy for CNS injuries.

  9. Temporal structure of neuronal population oscillations with empirical model decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaoli

    2006-01-01

    Frequency analysis of neuronal oscillation is very important for understanding the neural information processing and mechanism of disorder in the brain. This Letter addresses a new method to analyze the neuronal population oscillations with empirical mode decomposition (EMD). Following EMD of neuronal oscillation, a series of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) are obtained, then Hilbert transform of IMFs can be used to extract the instantaneous time frequency structure of neuronal oscillation. The method is applied to analyze the neuronal oscillation in the hippocampus of epileptic rats in vivo, the results show the neuronal oscillations have different descriptions during the pre-ictal, seizure onset and ictal periods of the epileptic EEG at the different frequency band. This new method is very helpful to provide a view for the temporal structure of neural oscillation

  10. A novel enteric neuron-glia coculture system reveals the role of glia in neuronal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Berre-Scoul, Catherine; Chevalier, Julien; Oleynikova, Elena; Cossais, François; Talon, Sophie; Neunlist, Michel; Boudin, Hélène

    2017-01-15

    Unlike astrocytes in the brain, the potential role of enteric glial cells (EGCs) in the formation of the enteric neuronal circuit is currently unknown. To examine the role of EGCs in the formation of the neuronal network, we developed a novel neuron-enriched culture model from embryonic rat intestine grown in indirect coculture with EGCs. We found that EGCs shape axonal complexity and synapse density in enteric neurons, through purinergic- and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor-dependent pathways. Using a novel and valuable culture model to study enteric neuron-glia interactions, our study identified EGCs as a key cellular actor regulating neuronal network maturation. In the nervous system, the formation of neuronal circuitry results from a complex and coordinated action of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. In the CNS, extrinsic mediators derived from astrocytes have been shown to play a key role in neuronal maturation, including dendritic shaping, axon guidance and synaptogenesis. In the enteric nervous system (ENS), the potential role of enteric glial cells (EGCs) in the maturation of developing enteric neuronal circuit is currently unknown. A major obstacle in addressing this question is the difficulty in obtaining a valuable experimental model in which enteric neurons could be isolated and maintained without EGCs. We adapted a cell culture method previously developed for CNS neurons to establish a neuron-enriched primary culture from embryonic rat intestine which was cultured in indirect coculture with EGCs. We demonstrated that enteric neurons grown in such conditions showed several structural, phenotypic and functional hallmarks of proper development and maturation. However, when neurons were grown without EGCs, the complexity of the axonal arbour and the density of synapses were markedly reduced, suggesting that glial-derived factors contribute strongly to the formation of the neuronal circuitry. We found that these effects played by EGCs were

  11. Enhanced Broadband Photoresponse in Plasmonic Nanoparticles decorated ZnO Nanowire Film fabricated by Laser Ablation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Rajib; Ghimire, Rishi Ram; Neogy, Rajesh Kr.; Raychaudhuri, Arup K.

    ZnO is a high band gap semiconductor which is widely used as an UV photo-detector. However, one of the draw backs of ZnO based photo-detectors is its lack of response in the visible, in particular above a wavelength (λ) of 450 nm which limits its use as broadband photodetector. Here, we report that the photoresponse of ZnO nanowire (NW) based photodetector can be significantly enhanced in wide spectral range (350 to 650nm) using ligand free attachment of plasmonic Au-nanoparticles (NP) on its surface by laser ablation process. This simple fabrication method increases responsitivity (R) (2 to 4 order) of Au-ZnO device in a window of 500financial support from Unit for Nanoscience, DST,India.

  12. Intrinsic disorder in the BK channel and its interactome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenling Peng

    Full Text Available The large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BK channel is broadly expressed in various mammalian cells and tissues such as neurons, skeletal and smooth muscles, exocrine cells, and sensory cells of the inner ear. Previous studies suggest that BK channels are promiscuous binders involved in a multitude of protein-protein interactions. To gain a better understanding of the potential mechanisms underlying BK interactions, we analyzed the abundance, distribution, and potential mechanisms of intrinsic disorder in 27 BK channel variants from mouse cochlea, 104 previously reported BK-associated proteins (BKAPS from cytoplasmic and membrane/cytoskeletal regions, plus BK β- and γ-subunits. Disorder was evaluated using the MFDp algorithm, which is a consensus-based predictor that provides a strong and competitive predictive quality and PONDR, which can determine long intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs. Disorder-based binding sites or molecular recognition features (MoRFs were found using MoRFpred and ANCHOR. BKAP functions were categorized based on Gene Ontology (GO terms. The analyses revealed that the BK variants contain a number of IDRs. Intrinsic disorder is also common in BKAPs, of which ∼ 5% are completely disordered. However, intrinsic disorder is very differently distributed within BK and its partners. Approximately 65% of the disordered segments in BK channels are long (IDRs (>50 residues, whereas >60% of the disordered segments in BKAPs are short IDRs that range in length from 4 to 30 residues. Both α and γ subunits showed various amounts of disorder as did hub proteins of the BK interactome. Our analyses suggest that intrinsic disorder is important for the function of BK and its BKAPs. Long IDRs in BK are engaged in protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions, contain multiple post-translational modification sites, and are subjected to alternative splicing. The disordered structure of BK and its BKAPs suggests one of the underlying

  13. Information transmission with spiking Bayesian neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lochmann, Timm; Deneve, Sophie

    2008-01-01

    Spike trains of cortical neurons resulting from repeatedpresentations of a stimulus are variable and exhibit Poisson-like statistics. Many models of neural coding therefore assumed that sensory information is contained in instantaneous firing rates, not spike times. Here, we ask how much information about time-varying stimuli can be transmitted by spiking neurons with such input and output variability. In particular, does this variability imply spike generation to be intrinsically stochastic? We consider a model neuron that estimates optimally the current state of a time-varying binary variable (e.g. presence of a stimulus) by integrating incoming spikes. The unit signals its current estimate to other units with spikes whenever the estimate increased by a fixed amount. As shown previously, this computation results in integrate and fire dynamics with Poisson-like output spike trains. This output variability is entirely due to the stochastic input rather than noisy spike generation. As a result such a deterministic neuron can transmit most of the information about the time varying stimulus. This contrasts with a standard model of sensory neurons, the linear-nonlinear Poisson (LNP) model which assumes that most variability in output spike trains is due to stochastic spike generation. Although it yields the same firing statistics, we found that such noisy firing results in the loss of most information. Finally, we use this framework to compare potential effects of top-down attention versus bottom-up saliency on information transfer with spiking neurons

  14. Detecting Nosocomial Intrinsic Infections through Relating Bacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sierra Leone Journal of Biomedical Research ... Surgical procedures often lead to both intrinsic and extrinsic infections. ... This study demonstrated surgical procedures as precursory to intrinsic infections and that bacterial pathogens found on wounds and endogenous indicators of surgery are links to intrinsic infection.

  15. Logarithmic distributions prove that intrinsic learning is Hebbian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheler, Gabriele

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present data for the lognormal distributions of spike rates, synaptic weights and intrinsic excitability (gain) for neurons in various brain areas, such as auditory or visual cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum, striatum, midbrain nuclei. We find a remarkable consistency of heavy-tailed, specifically lognormal, distributions for rates, weights and gains in all brain areas examined. The difference between strongly recurrent and feed-forward connectivity (cortex vs. striatum and cerebellum), neurotransmitter (GABA (striatum) or glutamate (cortex)) or the level of activation (low in cortex, high in Purkinje cells and midbrain nuclei) turns out to be irrelevant for this feature. Logarithmic scale distribution of weights and gains appears to be a general, functional property in all cases analyzed. We then created a generic neural model to investigate adaptive learning rules that create and maintain lognormal distributions. We conclusively demonstrate that not only weights, but also intrinsic gains, need to have strong Hebbian learning in order to produce and maintain the experimentally attested distributions. This provides a solution to the long-standing question about the type of plasticity exhibited by intrinsic excitability.

  16. Counting contacts between neurons in 3D in confocal laser scanning images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouterlood, F.G.; Boekel, A.J.; Kajiwara, R.; Belien, J.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Study of neuronal networks requires an inventory of the neurons, knowledge of fiber in- and output, and qualitative and quantitative data on the intrinsic connectivity. For this purpose we combined in rat hippocampus fluorescence neuroanatomical tracing and intracellular fluorochrome injection of

  17. Intrinsic cylindrical and spherical waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludlow, I K

    2008-01-01

    Intrinsic waveforms associated with cylindrical and spherical Bessel functions are obtained by eliminating the factors responsible for the inverse radius and inverse square radius laws of wave power per unit area of wavefront. The resulting expressions are Riccati-Bessel functions for both cases and these can be written in terms of amplitude and phase functions of order v and wave variable z. When z is real, it is shown that a spatial phase angle of the intrinsic wave can be defined and this, together with its amplitude function, is systematically investigated for a range of fixed orders and varying z. The derivatives of Riccati-Bessel functions are also examined. All the component functions exhibit different behaviour in the near field depending on the order being less than, equal to or greater than 1/2. Plots of the phase angle can be used to display the locations of the zeros of the general Riccati-Bessel functions and lead to new relations concerning the ordering of the real zeros of Bessel functions and the occurrence of multiple zeros when the argument of the Bessel function is fixed

  18. Ultrafast Gigantic Photo-Response in Charge-Ordered Organic Salt (EDO-TTF)2PF6 on 10-fs time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itatani, J.; Rini, M.; Cavalleri, A.; Onda, K.; Ishikawa, T.; Ogihara, S.; Koshihara, S.; Shao, X. F.; Nakano, Y.; Yamochi, H.; Saito, G.; Schoenlein, R. W.

    The initial dynamics of photo-induced phase transition in charge-ordered organic salt (EDO-TTF)2PF6 was investigated using 10-fs near-infrared laser pulses. We observed sub-20-fs gigantic photo-responses (|∆R/R|>100%) due to intra-molecular vibration and a clear signature of a structural bottleneck (~50 fs) for the first time.

  19. Development of myenteric cholinergic neurons in ChAT-Cre;R26R-YFP mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Marlene M; Bornstein, Joel C; Young, Heather M

    2013-10-01

    Cholinergic neurons are the major excitatory neurons of the enteric nervous system (ENS), and include intrinsic sensory neurons, interneurons, and excitatory motor neurons. Cholinergic neurons have been detected in the embryonic ENS; however, the development of these neurons has been difficult to study as they are difficult to detect prior to birth using conventional immunohistochemistry. In this study we used ChAT-Cre;R26R-YFP mice to examine the development of cholinergic neurons in the gut of embryonic and postnatal mice. Cholinergic (YFP+) neurons were first detected at embryonic day (E)11.5, and the proportion of cholinergic neurons gradually increased during pre- and postnatal development. At birth, myenteric cholinergic neurons comprised less than half of their adult proportions in the small intestine (25% of myenteric neurons were YFP+ at P0 compared to 62% in adults). The earliest cholinergic neurons appear to mainly project anally. Projections into the presumptive circular muscle were first observed at E14.5. A subpopulation of cholinergic neurons coexpress calbindin through embryonic and postnatal development, but only a small proportion coexpressed neuronal nitric oxide synthase. Our study shows that cholinergic neurons in the ENS develop over a protracted period of time. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Photoreversible switching of the lower critical solution temperature in a photoresponsive host-guest system of pillar[6]arene with triethylene oxide substituents and an azobenzene derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogoshi, Tomoki; Kida, Kanako; Yamagishi, Tada-aki

    2012-12-12

    A new water-soluble thermoresponsive pillar[6]arene with triethylene oxide groups was synthesized. The pillar[6]arene showed lower critical solution temperature behavior in aqueous solution. Its clouding point was photoreversibly switched based on a photoresponsive host-guest system. The trans form of an azobenzene guest formed a stable 1:1 complex with the pillar[6]arene. Complexation increased the clouding point. Irradiation with UV light induced a conformation change for the azobenzene guest from the trans to cis form, and dethreading occurred because of a size mismatch between the cis form and the pillar[6]arene cavity. This dethreading decreased the clouding point. The photoresponsive host-guest system was reversible, and the clouding point could be switched by alternating irradiation with UV or visible light. We demonstrated photoresponsive reversible clear-to-turbid and turbid-to-clear transitions for the solution based on the reversible switching of the clouding point using the photosensitive host-guest system.

  1. Selectively Enhanced UV-A Photoresponsivity of a GaN MSM UV Photodetector with a Step-Graded AlxGa1-xN Buffer Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang-Ju; Won, Chul-Ho; Lee, Jung-Hee; Hahm, Sung-Ho; Park, Hongsik

    2017-07-21

    The UV-to-visible rejection ratio is one of the important figure of merits of GaN-based UV photodetectors. For cost-effectiveness and large-scale fabrication of GaN devices, we tried to grow a GaN epitaxial layer on silicon substrate with complicated buffer layers for a stress-release. It is known that the structure of the buffer layers affects the performance of devices fabricated on the GaN epitaxial layers. In this study, we show that the design of a buffer layer structure can make effect on the UV-to-visible rejection ratio of GaN UV photodetectors. The GaN photodetector fabricated on GaN-on-silicon substrate with a step-graded Al x Ga -x N buffer layer has a highly-selective photoresponse at 365-nm wavelength. The UV-to-visible rejection ratio of the GaN UV photodetector with the step-graded Al x Ga 1-x N buffer layer was an order-of-magnitude higher than that of a photodetector with a conventional GaN/AlN multi buffer layer. The maximum photoresponsivity was as high as 5 × 10 - ² A/W. This result implies that the design of buffer layer is important for photoresponse characteristics of GaN UV photodetectors as well as the crystal quality of the GaN epitaxial layers.

  2. Spinal cord injury triggers an intrinsic growth-promoting state in nociceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedi, Supinder S; Lago, Michael T; Masha, Luke I; Crook, Robyn J; Grill, Raymond J; Walters, Edgar T

    2012-03-20

    Although most investigations of the mechanisms underlying chronic pain after spinal cord injury (SCI) have examined the central nervous system (CNS), recent studies have shown that nociceptive primary afferent neurons display persistent hyperexcitability and spontaneous activity in their peripheral branches and somata in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) after SCI. This suggests that SCI-induced alterations of primary nociceptors contribute to central sensitization and chronic pain after SCI. Does SCI also promote growth of these neurons' fibers, as has been suggested in some reports? The present study tests the hypothesis that SCI induces an intrinsic growth-promoting state in DRG neurons. This was tested by dissociating DRG neurons 3 days or 1 month after spinal contusion injury at thoracic level T10 and measuring neuritic growth 1 day later. Neurons cultured 3 days after SCI exhibited longer neurites without increases in branching ("elongating growth"), compared to neurons from sham-treated or untreated (naïve) rats. Robust promotion of elongating growth was found in small and medium-sized neurons (but not large neurons) from lumbar (L3-L5) and thoracic ganglia immediately above (T9) and below (T10-T11) the contusion site, but not from cervical DRG. Elongating growth was also found in neurons immunoreactive to calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), suggesting that some of the neurons exhibiting enhanced neuritic growth were nociceptors. The same measurements made on neurons dissociated 1 month after SCI revealed no evidence of elongating growth, although evidence for accelerated initiation of neurite outgrowth was found. Under certain conditions this transient growth-promoting state in nociceptors might be important for the development of chronic pain and hyperreflexia after SCI.

  3. Inhibition of Intrinsic Thrombin Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W. Stief MD

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background The contact phase of coagulation is of physiologic/pathophysiologic importance, whenever unphysiologic polynegative substances such as cell fragments (microparticles get in contact with blood. There are several clinically used inhibitors of intrinsic thrombin generation. Here the inhibitory concentrations 50% (IC50 of these anticoagulants are measured by the highly specific thrombin generation assay INCA. Methods Unfrozen pooled normal citrated plasma in polystyrole tubes was supplemented at 23°C in duplicate with 0–2 IU/ml low molecular weight heparin (dalteparin, 0–2 IU/ml unfractionated heparin, 0–500 KIU/ml aprotinin, or 0–40 mM arginine. 50 μl plasma or 1 IU/ml thrombin standard were pipetted into a polystyrole microtiter plate with flat bottom. 5 μl SiO 2 /CaCl 2 - reagent (INCA activator were added and after 0–30 min incubation at 37°C 100 μl 2.5 M arginine, pH 8.6, were added; arginine inhibits hemostasis activation and depolymerizes generated fibrin within 20 min at 23°C. The in the physiologic 37°C incubation phase generated thrombin was then chromogenically detected. The intra-assay CV values were < 5%. Results and Discussion The approximate IC50 were 0.01 IU/ml dalteparin, 0.02 IU/ml heparin, 25 KIU/ml aprotinin, and 12 mM arginine. The efficiency of any anticoagulant on intrinsic thrombin generation should be measured for each individual patient. Abbreviations IIa, thrombin; δA, increase in absorbance; APTT, activated partial thromboplastin time; CRT, coagulation reaction time (at 37°C in water-bath; F-wells, polystyrole microtiter plates with flat bottom; IC50, inhibitory concentration 50%; INCA, intrinsic coagulation activity assay; IU, international units; KIU, kallikrein inhibiting unis; LMWH, low molecular weight heparin; mA, milli-absorbance units; PSL, pathromtin SL®; RT, room temperature (23°C; U-wells, polystyrole microtiter plates with round bottom.

  4. Noise and neuronal populations conspire to encode simple waveforms reliably

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnas, B. R.

    1996-01-01

    Sensory systems rely on populations of neurons to encode information transduced at the periphery into meaningful patterns of neuronal population activity. This transduction occurs in the presence of intrinsic neuronal noise. This is fortunate. The presence of noise allows more reliable encoding of the temporal structure present in the stimulus than would be possible in a noise-free environment. Simulations with a parallel model of signal processing at the auditory periphery have been used to explore the effects of noise and a neuronal population on the encoding of signal information. The results show that, for a given set of neuronal modeling parameters and stimulus amplitude, there is an optimal amount of noise for stimulus encoding with maximum fidelity.

  5. Intrinsic rotation with gyrokinetic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parra, Felix I.; Barnes, Michael; Catto, Peter J.; Calvo, Iván

    2012-01-01

    The generation of intrinsic rotation by turbulence and neoclassical effects in tokamaks is considered. To obtain the complex dependences observed in experiments, it is necessary to have a model of the radial flux of momentum that redistributes the momentum within the tokamak in the absence of a preexisting velocity. When the lowest order gyrokinetic formulation is used, a symmetry of the model precludes this possibility, making small effects in the gyroradius over scale length expansion necessary. These effects that are usually small become important for momentum transport because the symmetry of the lowest order gyrokinetic formulation leads to the cancellation of the lowest order momentum flux. The accuracy to which the gyrokinetic equation needs to be obtained to retain all the physically relevant effects is discussed.

  6. Neuronal response impedance mechanism implementing cooperative networks with low firing rates and μs precision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardi, Roni; Goldental, Amir; Marmari, Hagar; Brama, Haya; Stern, Edward A; Sardi, Shira; Sabo, Pinhas; Kanter, Ido

    2015-01-01

    Realizations of low firing rates in neural networks usually require globally balanced distributions among excitatory and inhibitory links, while feasibility of temporal coding is limited by neuronal millisecond precision. We show that cooperation, governing global network features, emerges through nodal properties, as opposed to link distributions. Using in vitro and in vivo experiments we demonstrate microsecond precision of neuronal response timings under low stimulation frequencies, whereas moderate frequencies result in a chaotic neuronal phase characterized by degraded precision. Above a critical stimulation frequency, which varies among neurons, response failures were found to emerge stochastically such that the neuron functions as a low pass filter, saturating the average inter-spike-interval. This intrinsic neuronal response impedance mechanism leads to cooperation on a network level, such that firing rates are suppressed toward the lowest neuronal critical frequency simultaneously with neuronal microsecond precision. Our findings open up opportunities of controlling global features of network dynamics through few nodes with extreme properties.

  7. Volterra dendritic stimulus processors and biophysical spike generators with intrinsic noise sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Aurel A; Zhou, Yiyin

    2014-01-01

    We consider a class of neural circuit models with internal noise sources arising in sensory systems. The basic neuron model in these circuits consists of a dendritic stimulus processor (DSP) cascaded with a biophysical spike generator (BSG). The dendritic stimulus processor is modeled as a set of nonlinear operators that are assumed to have a Volterra series representation. Biophysical point neuron models, such as the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron, are used to model the spike generator. We address the question of how intrinsic noise sources affect the precision in encoding and decoding of sensory stimuli and the functional identification of its sensory circuits. We investigate two intrinsic noise sources arising (i) in the active dendritic trees underlying the DSPs, and (ii) in the ion channels of the BSGs. Noise in dendritic stimulus processing arises from a combined effect of variability in synaptic transmission and dendritic interactions. Channel noise arises in the BSGs due to the fluctuation of the number of the active ion channels. Using a stochastic differential equations formalism we show that encoding with a neuron model consisting of a nonlinear DSP cascaded with a BSG with intrinsic noise sources can be treated as generalized sampling with noisy measurements. For single-input multi-output neural circuit models with feedforward, feedback and cross-feedback DSPs cascaded with BSGs we theoretically analyze the effect of noise sources on stimulus decoding. Building on a key duality property, the effect of noise parameters on the precision of the functional identification of the complete neural circuit with DSP/BSG neuron models is given. We demonstrate through extensive simulations the effects of noise on encoding stimuli with circuits that include neuron models that are akin to those commonly seen in sensory systems, e.g., complex cells in V1.

  8. Volterra dendritic stimulus processors and biophysical spike generators with intrinsic noise sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurel A Lazar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We consider a class of neural circuit models with internal noise sources arising in sensory systems. The basic neuron model in these circuits consists of a nonlinear dendritic stimulus processor (DSP cascaded with a biophysical spike generator (BSG. The nonlinear dendritic processor is modeled as a set of nonlinear operators that are assumed to have a Volterra series representation. Biophysical point neuron models, such as the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron, are used to model the spike generator. We address the question of how intrinsic noise sources affect the precision in encoding and decoding of sensory stimuli and the functional identification of its sensory circuits.We investigate two intrinsic noise sources arising (i in the active dendritic trees underlying the DSPs, and (ii in the ion channels of the BSGs. Noise in dendritic stimulus processing arises from a combined effect of variability in synaptic transmission and dendritic interactions. Channel noise arises in the BSGs due to the fluctuation of the number of the active ion channels. Using a stochastic differential equations formalism we show that encoding with a neuron model consisting of a nonlinear DSP cascaded with a BSG with intrinsic noise sources can be treated as generalized sampling with noisy measurements.For single-input multi-output neural circuit models with feedforward, feedback and cross-feedback DSPs cascaded with BSGs we theoretically analyze the effect of noise sources on stimulus decoding. Building on a key duality property, the effect of noise parameters on the precision of the functional identification of the complete neural circuit with DSP/BSG neuron models is given. We demonstrate through extensive simulations the effects of noise on encoding stimuli with circuits that include neuron models that are akin to those commonly seen in sensory systems, e.g., complex cells in V1.

  9. Volterra dendritic stimulus processors and biophysical spike generators with intrinsic noise sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Aurel A.; Zhou, Yiyin

    2014-01-01

    We consider a class of neural circuit models with internal noise sources arising in sensory systems. The basic neuron model in these circuits consists of a dendritic stimulus processor (DSP) cascaded with a biophysical spike generator (BSG). The dendritic stimulus processor is modeled as a set of nonlinear operators that are assumed to have a Volterra series representation. Biophysical point neuron models, such as the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron, are used to model the spike generator. We address the question of how intrinsic noise sources affect the precision in encoding and decoding of sensory stimuli and the functional identification of its sensory circuits. We investigate two intrinsic noise sources arising (i) in the active dendritic trees underlying the DSPs, and (ii) in the ion channels of the BSGs. Noise in dendritic stimulus processing arises from a combined effect of variability in synaptic transmission and dendritic interactions. Channel noise arises in the BSGs due to the fluctuation of the number of the active ion channels. Using a stochastic differential equations formalism we show that encoding with a neuron model consisting of a nonlinear DSP cascaded with a BSG with intrinsic noise sources can be treated as generalized sampling with noisy measurements. For single-input multi-output neural circuit models with feedforward, feedback and cross-feedback DSPs cascaded with BSGs we theoretically analyze the effect of noise sources on stimulus decoding. Building on a key duality property, the effect of noise parameters on the precision of the functional identification of the complete neural circuit with DSP/BSG neuron models is given. We demonstrate through extensive simulations the effects of noise on encoding stimuli with circuits that include neuron models that are akin to those commonly seen in sensory systems, e.g., complex cells in V1. PMID:25225477

  10. Memristors Empower Spiking Neurons With Stochasticity

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Shedivat, Maruan

    2015-06-01

    Recent theoretical studies have shown that probabilistic spiking can be interpreted as learning and inference in cortical microcircuits. This interpretation creates new opportunities for building neuromorphic systems driven by probabilistic learning algorithms. However, such systems must have two crucial features: 1) the neurons should follow a specific behavioral model, and 2) stochastic spiking should be implemented efficiently for it to be scalable. This paper proposes a memristor-based stochastically spiking neuron that fulfills these requirements. First, the analytical model of the memristor is enhanced so it can capture the behavioral stochasticity consistent with experimentally observed phenomena. The switching behavior of the memristor model is demonstrated to be akin to the firing of the stochastic spike response neuron model, the primary building block for probabilistic algorithms in spiking neural networks. Furthermore, the paper proposes a neural soma circuit that utilizes the intrinsic nondeterminism of memristive switching for efficient spike generation. The simulations and analysis of the behavior of a single stochastic neuron and a winner-take-all network built of such neurons and trained on handwritten digits confirm that the circuit can be used for building probabilistic sampling and pattern adaptation machinery in spiking networks. The findings constitute an important step towards scalable and efficient probabilistic neuromorphic platforms. © 2011 IEEE.

  11. Reliable neuronal systems: the importance of heterogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Lengler

    Full Text Available For every engineer it goes without saying: in order to build a reliable system we need components that consistently behave precisely as they should. It is also well known that neurons, the building blocks of brains, do not satisfy this constraint. Even neurons of the same type come with huge variances in their properties and these properties also vary over time. Synapses, the connections between neurons, are highly unreliable in forwarding signals. In this paper we argue that both these fact add variance to neuronal processes, and that this variance is not a handicap of neural systems, but that instead predictable and reliable functional behavior of neural systems depends crucially on this variability. In particular, we show that higher variance allows a recurrently connected neural population to react more sensitively to incoming signals, and processes them faster and more energy efficient. This, for example, challenges the general assumption that the intrinsic variability of neurons in the brain is a defect that has to be overcome by synaptic plasticity in the process of learning.

  12. Recurrently connected and localized neuronal communities initiate coordinated spontaneous activity in neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonardoni, Davide; Amin, Hayder; Di Marco, Stefano; Maccione, Alessandro; Berdondini, Luca; Nieus, Thierry

    2017-07-01

    Developing neuronal systems intrinsically generate coordinated spontaneous activity that propagates by involving a large number of synchronously firing neurons. In vivo, waves of spikes transiently characterize the activity of developing brain circuits and are fundamental for activity-dependent circuit formation. In vitro, coordinated spontaneous spiking activity, or network bursts (NBs), interleaved within periods of asynchronous spikes emerge during the development of 2D and 3D neuronal cultures. Several studies have investigated this type of activity and its dynamics, but how a neuronal system generates these coordinated events remains unclear. Here, we investigate at a cellular level the generation of network bursts in spontaneously active neuronal cultures by exploiting high-resolution multielectrode array recordings and computational network modelling. Our analysis reveals that NBs are generated in specialized regions of the network (functional neuronal communities) that feature neuronal links with high cross-correlation peak values, sub-millisecond lags and that share very similar structural connectivity motifs providing recurrent interactions. We show that the particular properties of these local structures enable locally amplifying spontaneous asynchronous spikes and that this mechanism can lead to the initiation of NBs. Through the analysis of simulated and experimental data, we also show that AMPA currents drive the coordinated activity, while NMDA and GABA currents are only involved in shaping the dynamics of NBs. Overall, our results suggest that the presence of functional neuronal communities with recurrent local connections allows a neuronal system to generate spontaneous coordinated spiking activity events. As suggested by the rules used for implementing our computational model, such functional communities might naturally emerge during network development by following simple constraints on distance-based connectivity.

  13. Recurrently connected and localized neuronal communities initiate coordinated spontaneous activity in neuronal networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Lonardoni

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Developing neuronal systems intrinsically generate coordinated spontaneous activity that propagates by involving a large number of synchronously firing neurons. In vivo, waves of spikes transiently characterize the activity of developing brain circuits and are fundamental for activity-dependent circuit formation. In vitro, coordinated spontaneous spiking activity, or network bursts (NBs, interleaved within periods of asynchronous spikes emerge during the development of 2D and 3D neuronal cultures. Several studies have investigated this type of activity and its dynamics, but how a neuronal system generates these coordinated events remains unclear. Here, we investigate at a cellular level the generation of network bursts in spontaneously active neuronal cultures by exploiting high-resolution multielectrode array recordings and computational network modelling. Our analysis reveals that NBs are generated in specialized regions of the network (functional neuronal communities that feature neuronal links with high cross-correlation peak values, sub-millisecond lags and that share very similar structural connectivity motifs providing recurrent interactions. We show that the particular properties of these local structures enable locally amplifying spontaneous asynchronous spikes and that this mechanism can lead to the initiation of NBs. Through the analysis of simulated and experimental data, we also show that AMPA currents drive the coordinated activity, while NMDA and GABA currents are only involved in shaping the dynamics of NBs. Overall, our results suggest that the presence of functional neuronal communities with recurrent local connections allows a neuronal system to generate spontaneous coordinated spiking activity events. As suggested by the rules used for implementing our computational model, such functional communities might naturally emerge during network development by following simple constraints on distance-based connectivity.

  14. Neuron-Type-Specific Utility in a Brain-Machine Interface: a Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Garcia, Martha G; Bergquist, Austin J; Vargas-Perez, Hector; Nagai, Mary K; Zariffa, Jose; Marquez-Chin, Cesar; Popovic, Milos R

    2017-11-01

    Firing rates of single cortical neurons can be volitionally modulated through biofeedback (i.e. operant conditioning), and this information can be transformed to control external devices (i.e. brain-machine interfaces; BMIs). However, not all neurons respond to operant conditioning in BMI implementation. Establishing criteria that predict neuron utility will assist translation of BMI research to clinical applications. Single cortical neurons (n=7) were recorded extracellularly from primary motor cortex of a Long-Evans rat. Recordings were incorporated into a BMI involving up-regulation of firing rate to control the brightness of a light-emitting-diode and subsequent reward. Neurons were classified as 'fast-spiking', 'bursting' or 'regular-spiking' according to waveform-width and intrinsic firing patterns. Fast-spiking and bursting neurons were found to up-regulate firing rate by a factor of 2.43±1.16, demonstrating high utility, while regular-spiking neurons decreased firing rates on average by a factor of 0.73±0.23, demonstrating low utility. The ability to select neurons with high utility will be important to minimize training times and maximize information yield in future clinical BMI applications. The highly contrasting utility observed between fast-spiking and bursting neurons versus regular-spiking neurons allows for the hypothesis to be advanced that intrinsic electrophysiological properties may be useful criteria that predict neuron utility in BMI implementation.

  15. Effect of light attenuation on motion of photo-responsive polymer gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayal, Pratyush; Kuksenok, Olga; Balazs, Anna C.

    2009-03-01

    Nature has found an efficient way to utilize chemical reactions to produce mechanical work. Whenever the need for energy arises, the chemical reactions in our body produce energy, which is used to generate mechanical response. Scientists have been trying to replicate the same functionality in man-made systems. One of the recent approaches couples the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction and the mechanical properties of the gel to produce self-sustained oscillations. To study the effect of light on the mechanical behavior of the gel, we use our recently developed 3D gel lattice spring model (gLSM) which couples the BZ reaction kinetics to the gel dynamics. In order to include the effect of the polymer on the reaction kinetics, the Oregonator model for the photo-sensitive BZ reaction was modified. Using modeling and simulations, we have been able to control gel's shape and its locomotion using light as an external stimulus. Here we show that the intrinsic non-homogeneity in light intensity, created by gel can induce autonomous motion of the gel away from light.

  16. Motor neurons and the generation of spinal motor neurons diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas eStifani

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Motor neurons (MNs are neuronal cells located in the central nervous system (CNS controlling a variety of downstream targets. This function infers the existence of MN subtypes matching the identity of the targets they innervate. To illustrate the mechanism involved in the generation of cellular diversity and the acquisition of specific identity, this review will focus on spinal motor neurons (SpMNs that have been the core of significant work and discoveries during the last decades. SpMNs are responsible for the contraction of effector muscles in the periphery. Humans possess more than 500 different skeletal muscles capable to work in a precise time and space coordination to generate complex movements such as walking or grasping. To ensure such refined coordination, SpMNs must retain the identity of the muscle they innervate.Within the last two decades, scientists around the world have produced considerable efforts to elucidate several critical steps of SpMNs differentiation. During development, SpMNs emerge from dividing progenitor cells located in the medial portion of the ventral neural tube. MN identities are established by patterning cues working in cooperation with intrinsic sets of transcription factors. As the embryo develop, MNs further differentiate in a stepwise manner to form compact anatomical groups termed pools connecting to a unique muscle target. MN pools are not homogeneous and comprise subtypes according to the muscle fibers they innervate.This article aims to provide a global view of MN classification as well as an up-to-date review of the molecular mechanisms involved in the generation of SpMN diversity. Remaining conundrums will be discussed since a complete understanding of those mechanisms constitutes the foundation required for the elaboration of prospective MN regeneration therapies.

  17. NEURON and Python

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Hines; Andrew P Davison; Eilif Muller

    2009-01-01

    The NEURON simulation program now allows Python to be used, alone or in combination with NEURON's traditional Hoc interpreter. Adding Python to NEURON has the immediate benefit of making available a very extensive suite of analysis tools written for engineering and science. It also catalyzes NEURON software development by offering users a modern programming tool that is recognized for its flexibility and power to create and maintain complex programs. At the same time, nothing is lost because ...

  18. Incentives and intrinsic motivation in healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikel Berdud

    2016-11-01

    Conclusions: The conclusions could act as a guide to support the optimal design of incentive policies and schemes within health organisations when healthcare professionals are intrinsically motivated.

  19. Algebraic description of intrinsic modes in nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leviatan, A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

    1990-01-01

    We present a procedure for extracting normal modes in algebraic number-conserving systems of interacting bosons relevant for collective states in even-even nuclei. The Hamiltonian is resolved into intrinsic (bandhead related) and collective (in-band related) parts. Shape parameters are introduced through non-spherical boson bases. Intrinsic modes decoupled from the spurious modes are obtained from the intrinsic part of the Hamiltonian in the limit of large number of bosons. Intrinsic states are constructed and serve to evaluate electromagnetic transition rates. The method is illustrated for systems with one type of boson as well as with proton-neutron bosons. (author).

  20. Algebraic description of intrinsic modes in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leviatan, A.

    1990-01-01

    We present a procedure for extracting normal modes in algebraic number-conserving systems of interacting bosons relevant for collective states in even-even nuclei. The Hamiltonian is resolved into intrinsic (bandhead related) and collective (in-band related) parts. Shape parameters are introduced through non-spherical boson bases. Intrinsic modes decoupled from the spurious modes are obtained from the intrinsic part of the Hamiltonian in the limit of large number of bosons. Intrinsic states are constructed and serve to evaluate electromagnetic transition rates. The method is illustrated for systems with one type of boson as well as with proton-neutron bosons. (author)

  1. Enhancement of the Si p-n diode NIR photoresponse by embedding β-FeSi2 nanocrystallites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevlyagin, A V; Goroshko, D L; Chusovitin, E A; Galkin, K N; Galkin, N G; Gutakovskii, A K

    2015-10-05

    By using solid phase epitaxy of thin Fe films and molecular beam epitaxy of Si, a p(+)-Si/p-Si/β-FeSi2 nanocrystallites/n-Si(111) diode structure was fabricated. Transmission electron microscopy data confirmed a well-defined multilayered structure with embedded nanocrystallites of two typical sizes: 3-4 and 15-20 nm, and almost coherent epitaxy of the nanocrystallites with the Si matrix. The diode at zero bias conditions exhibited a current responsivity of 1.7 mA/W, an external quantum efficiency of about 0.2%, and a specific detectivity of 1.2 × 10(9) cm × Hz(1/2)/W at a wavelength of 1300 nm at room temperature. In the avalanche mode, the responsivity reached up to 20 mA/W (2% in terms of efficiency) with a value of avalanche gain equal to 5. The data obtained indicate that embedding of β-FeSi2 nanocrystallites into the depletion region of the Si p-n junction results in expansion of the spectral sensitivity up to 1600 nm and an increase of the photoresponse by more than two orders of magnitude in comparison with a conventional Si p-n junction. Thereby, fabricated structure combines advantage of the silicon photodiode functionality and simplicity with near infrared light detection capability of β-FeSi2.

  2. A photo-responsive F-box protein FOF2 regulates floral initiation by promoting FLC expression in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Reqing; Li, Xinmei; Zhong, Ming; Yan, Jindong; Ji, Ronghuan; Li, Xu; Wang, Qin; Wu, Dan; Sun, Mengsi; Tang, Dongying; Lin, Jianzhong; Li, Hongyu; Liu, Bin; Liu, Hongtao; Liu, Xuanming; Zhao, Xiaoying; Lin, Chentao

    2017-09-01

    Floral initiation is regulated by various genetic pathways in response to light, temperature, hormones and developmental status; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying the interactions between different genetic pathways are not fully understood. Here, we show that the photoresponsive gene FOF2 (F-box of flowering 2) negatively regulates flowering. FOF2 encodes a putative F-box protein that interacts specifically with ASK14, and its overexpression results in later flowering under both long-day and short-day photoperiods. Conversely, transgenic plants expressing the F-box domain deletion mutant of FOF2 (FOF2ΔF), or double loss of function mutant of FOF2 and FOL1 (FOF2-LIKE 1) present early flowering phenotypes. The late flowering phenotype of the FOF2 overexpression lines is suppressed by the flc-3 loss-of-function mutation. Furthermore, FOF2 mRNA expression is regulated by autonomous pathway gene FCA, and the repressive effect of FOF2 in flowering can be overcome by vernalization. Interestingly, FOF2 expression is regulated by light. The protein level of FOF2 accumulates in response to light, whereas it is degraded under dark conditions via the 26S proteasome pathway. Our findings suggest a possible mechanistic link between light conditions and the autonomous floral promotion pathway in Arabidopsis. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Characterization of Zebrafish Green Cone Photoresponse Recorded with Pressure-Polished Patch Pipettes, Yielding Efficient Intracellular Dialysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aquila

    Full Text Available The phototransduction enzymatic cascade in cones is less understood than in rods, and the zebrafish is an ideal model with which to investigate vertebrate and human vision. Therefore, here, for the first time, the zebrafish green cone photoresponse is characterized also to obtain a firm basis for evaluating how it is modulated by exogenous molecules. To this aim, a powerful method was developed to obtain long-lasting recordings with low access resistance, employing pressure-polished patch pipettes. This method also enabled fast, efficient delivery of molecules via a perfusion system coupled with pulled quartz or plastic perfusion tubes, inserted very close to the enlarged pipette tip. Sub-saturating flashes elicited responses in different cells with similar rising phase kinetics but with very different recovery kinetics, suggesting the existence of physiologically distinct cones having different Ca2+ dynamics. Theoretical considerations demonstrate that the different recovery kinetics can be modelled by simulating changes in the Ca2+-buffering capacity of the outer segment. Importantly, the Ca2+-buffer action preserves the fast response rising phase, when the Ca2+-dependent negative feedback is activated by the light-induced decline in intracellular Ca2+.

  4. Molecular characteristics of a fluorescent chemosensor for the recognition of ferric ion based on photoresponsive azobenzene derivative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Zhen; Ran, Xia; Shi, Lili; Lou, Jie; Kuang, Yanmin; Guo, Lijun

    2017-01-01

    Metal ion recognition is of great significance in biological and environmental detection. So far, there is very few research related to the ferric ion sensing based on photoresponsive azobenzene derivatives. In this work, we report a highly selective fluorescent "turn-off" sensor for Fe3 + ions and the molecular sensing characteristics based on an azobenzene derivative, N-(3,4,5-octanoxyphenyl)-N‧-4-[(4-hydroxyphenyl)azophenyl]1,3,4-oxadiazole (AOB-t8). The binding association constant was determined to be 6.07 × 103 M- 1 in ethanol and the stoichiometry ratio of 2:2 was obtained from Job's plot and MS spectra. The AOB-t8 might be likely to form the dimer structure through the chelation of ferric ion with the azobenzene moiety. Meanwhile, it was found that the photoisomerization property of AOB-t8 was regulated by the binding with Fe3 +. With the chelation of Fe3 +, the regulated molecular rigidity and the perturbed of electronic state and molecular geometry was suggested to be responsible for the accelerated isomerization of AOB-t8 to UV irradiation and the increased fluorescence lifetime of both trans- and cis-AOB-t8-Fe(III). Moreover, the reversible sensing of AOB-t8 was successfully observed by releasing the iron ion from AOB-t8-Fe(III) with the addition of citric acid.

  5. Comparison of near-infrared absorption and photoresponse of silicon doped with Se and Te via fs-laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lingyan; Wu, Zhiming; Shi, Yuanlin; Li, Siyu; Jiang, Yadong

    2017-12-01

    We compare the surface morphology, optical properties and infrared photoresponse of Se- and Te-doped silicon prepared by femtosecond-laser irradiation of Si coated with dopant thin films. Both the two samples show similar column structures and strong sub-band gap light absorption. Annealing the doped silicon leads to attenuation of the sub-band gap absorption. However, the attenuation degree of the Se-doped silicon is greater in comparison with that of Te-doped silicon. To explain the cause of the difference in the attenuation, we fit the attenuation of experimental absorption coefficient using an equation. Thermal activation energy and pre-exponential factor in the equation are considered to be associated with metastability of chalcogen-Si bonds and dopant diffusivity, respectively. We extract the thermal activation energy and pre-exponential factor of Se- and Te-doped silicon from the fitted data, and the results suggest that it is different dopant diffusivity instead of different chalcogens-Si bond energy causes difference in the attenuation. Furthermore, Te-doped silicon photodiode exhibits higher photocurrent response, which makes it possible to be more valuable candidate for fabricating Si-based photoelectric detector.

  6. Temporal dynamic of adrenocortical and gonadal photo-responsiveness in male Japanese quail exposed to short days.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominchin, M F; Marin, R H; Palme, R; Busso, J M

    2014-10-01

    The study evaluated whether different short-term endocrine testicular and adrenocortical responses to short photoperiod exposure can persist over time and particularly when birds exhibit spontaneous cloacal gland recovery. At 11 wk of age, 33 male Japanese quail exposed to long photoperiod were switched to short photoperiod (8L:16D). Another group of males was kept under long photoperiod (n = 11; LD quail). After 5 wk of short photoperiod exposure, quail were classified as nonresponsive or responsive to short photoperiod, depending on whether the cloacal gland volume was above or below 1,000 mm(3) and with or without foam production, respectively. Since 11 wk of age and during a 20-wk period, droppings of all quail were collected to determine corticosterone and androgen metabolites (AM) by enzyme immunoassays. Cloacal gland volume was also determined weekly. Both short photoperiod nonresponsive (SD-NR) and responsive quail showed overall significantly lower (P SD-NR: 133.1 ± 15.5 > short photoperiod responsive: 61.6 ± 17.9 ng/g, respectively). Testicular and adrenocortical glands showed different degrees of activity associated with cloacal gland photoresponsiveness to short photoperiod manipulation. Our findings suggest long-term effects of short photoperiod, both in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis activity of quail, including males that exhibited spontaneous cloacal gland recovery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Selective rab11 transport and the intrinsic regenerative ability of CNS axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koseki, Hiroaki; Donegá, Matteo; Lam, Brian Yh; Petrova, Veselina; van Erp, Susan; Yeo, Giles Sh; Kwok, Jessica Cf; Ffrench-Constant, Charles; Eva, Richard; Fawcett, James W

    2017-08-08

    Neurons lose intrinsic axon regenerative ability with maturation, but the mechanism remains unclear. Using an in-vitro laser axotomy model, we show a progressive decline in the ability of cut CNS axons to form a new growth cone and then elongate. Failure of regeneration was associated with increased retraction after axotomy. Transportation into axons becomes selective with maturation; we hypothesized that selective exclusion of molecules needed for growth may contribute to regeneration decline. With neuronal maturity rab11 vesicles (which carry many molecules involved in axon growth) became selectively targeted to the somatodendritic compartment and excluded from axons by predominant retrograde transport However, on overexpression rab11 was mistrafficked into proximal axons, and these axons showed less retraction and enhanced regeneration after axotomy. These results suggest that the decline of intrinsic axon regenerative ability is associated with selective exclusion of key molecules, and that manipulation of transport can enhance regeneration.

  8. Geochemical indicators of intrinsic bioremediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borden, R.C.; Gomez, C.A.; Becker, M.T.

    1995-01-01

    A detailed field investigation has been completed at a gasoline-contaminated aquifer near Rocky Point, NC, to examine possible indicators of intrinsic bioremediation and identify factors that may significantly influence the rae and extent of bioremediation. The dissolved plume of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) in ground water is naturally degrading. Toluene and o-xylene are most rapidly degraded followed by m-, p-xylene, and benzene. Ethylbenzene appears to degrade very slowly under anaerobic conditions present in the center of the plume. The rate and extent of biodegradation appears to be strongly influenced by the type and quantity of electron acceptors present in the aquifer. At the upgradient edge of the plume, nitrate, ferric iron, and oxygen are used as terminal electron acceptors during hydrocarbon biodegradation. The equivalent of 40 to 50 mg/l of hydrocarbon is degraded based on the increase in dissolved CO 2 relative to background ground water. Immediately downgradient of the source area, sulfate and iron are the dominant electron acceptors. Toluene and o-xylene are rapidly removed in this region. Once the available oxygen, nitrate, and sulfate are consumed, biodegradation is limited and appears to be controlled by mixing and aerobic biodegradation at the plume fringes

  9. Protein intrinsic disorder in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Florencio; Pietrosemoli, Natalia; García-Martín, Juan A; Solano, Roberto

    2013-09-12

    To some extent contradicting the classical paradigm of the relationship between protein 3D structure and function, now it is clear that large portions of the proteomes, especially in higher organisms, lack a fixed structure and still perform very important functions. Proteins completely or partially unstructured in their native (functional) form are involved in key cellular processes underlain by complex networks of protein interactions. The intrinsic conformational flexibility of these disordered proteins allows them to bind multiple partners in transient interactions of high specificity and low affinity. In concordance, in plants this type of proteins has been found in processes requiring these complex and versatile interaction networks. These include transcription factor networks, where disordered proteins act as integrators of different signals or link different transcription factor subnetworks due to their ability to interact (in many cases simultaneously) with different partners. Similarly, they also serve as signal integrators in signaling cascades, such as those related to response to external stimuli. Disordered proteins have also been found in plants in many stress-response processes, acting as protein chaperones or protecting other cellular components and structures. In plants, it is especially important to have complex and versatile networks able to quickly and efficiently respond to changing environmental conditions since these organisms cannot escape and have no other choice than adapting to them. Consequently, protein disorder can play an especially important role in plants, providing them with a fast mechanism to obtain complex, interconnected and versatile molecular networks.

  10. Protein intrinsic disorder in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florencio ePazos

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available To some extent contradicting the classical paradigm of the relationship between protein 3D structure and function, now it is clear that large portions of the proteomes, especially in higher organisms, lack a fixed structure and still perform very important functions. Proteins completely or partially unstructured in their native (functional form are involved in key cellular processes underlain by complex networks of protein interactions. The intrinsic conformational flexibility of these disordered proteins allows them to bind multiple partners in transient interactions of high specificity and low affinity. In concordance, in plants this type of proteins has been found in processes requiring these complex and versatile interaction networks. These include transcription factor networks, where disordered proteins act as integrators of different signals or link different transcription factor subnetworks due to their ability to interact (in many cases simultaneously with different partners. Similarly, they also serve as signal integrators in signalling cascades, such as those related to response to external stimuli. Disordered proteins have also been found in plants in many stress-response processes, acting as protein chaperones or protecting other cellular components and structures. In plants, it is especially important to have complex and versatile networks able to quickly and efficiently respond to changing environmental conditions since these organisms can not escape and have no other choice than adapting to them. Consequently, protein disorder can play an especially important role in plants, providing them with a fast mechanism to obtain complex, interconnected and versatile molecular networks.

  11. Sensory neuron regulation of gastrointestinal inflammation and bacterial host defence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, N Y; Mills, K; Chiu, I M

    2017-07-01

    Sensory neurons in the gastrointestinal tract have multifaceted roles in maintaining homeostasis, detecting danger and initiating protective responses. The gastrointestinal tract is innervated by three types of sensory neurons: dorsal root ganglia, nodose/jugular ganglia and intrinsic primary afferent neurons. Here, we examine how these distinct sensory neurons and their signal transducers participate in regulating gastrointestinal inflammation and host defence. Sensory neurons are equipped with molecular sensors that enable neuronal detection of diverse environmental signals including thermal and mechanical stimuli, inflammatory mediators and tissue damage. Emerging evidence shows that sensory neurons participate in host-microbe interactions. Sensory neurons are able to detect pathogenic and commensal bacteria through specific metabolites, cell-wall components, and toxins. Here, we review recent work on the mechanisms of bacterial detection by distinct subtypes of gut-innervating sensory neurons. Upon activation, sensory neurons communicate to the immune system to modulate tissue inflammation through antidromic signalling and efferent neural circuits. We discuss how this neuro-immune regulation is orchestrated through transient receptor potential ion channels and sensory neuropeptides including substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, vasoactive intestinal peptide and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide. Recent studies also highlight a role for sensory neurons in regulating host defence against enteric bacterial pathogens including Salmonella typhimurium, Citrobacter rodentium and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. Understanding how sensory neurons respond to gastrointestinal flora and communicate with immune cells to regulate host defence enhances our knowledge of host physiology and may form the basis for new approaches to treat gastrointestinal diseases. © 2017 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  12. Membrane Guanylyl Cyclase Complexes Shape the Photoresponses of Retinal Rods and Cones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Hong eWen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In vertebrate rods and cones, photon capture by rhodopsin leads to the destruction of cyclic GMP (cGMP and the subsequent closure of cyclic nucleotide gated (CNG ion channels in the outer segment plasma membrane. Replenishment of cGMP and reopening of the channels limit the growth of the photon response and are requisite for its recovery. In different vertebrate retinas, there may be as many as four types of membrane guanylyl cyclases (GCs for cGMP synthesis. Ten neuronal Ca2+ sensor proteins could potentially modulate their activities. The mouse is proving to be an effective model for characterizing the roles of individual components because its relative simplicity can be reduced further by genetic engineering. There are two types of guanylyl cyclase activating proteins (GCAPs and two types of GCs in mouse rods, whereas cones express one type of GCAP and one type of GC. Mutant mouse rods and cones bereft of both GCAPs have large, long lasting photon responses. Thus, GCAPs normally mediate negative feedback tied to the light-induced decline in intracellular Ca2+ that accelerates GC activity to curtail the growth and duration of the photon response. Rods from other mutant mice that express a single GCAP type reveal how the two GCAPs normally work together as a team. Because of its lower Ca2+ affinity, GCAP1 is the first responder that senses the initial decrease in Ca2+ following photon absorption and acts to limit response amplitude. GCAP2, with a higher Ca2+ affinity, is recruited later during the course of the photon response as Ca2+ levels continue to decline further. The main role of GCAP2 is to provide for a timely response recovery and it is particularly important after exposure to very bright light. The multiplicity of GC isozymes and GCAP homologs in the retinas of other vertebrates confers greater flexibility in shaping the photon responses in order to tune visual sensitivity, dynamic range and frequency response.

  13. LEADERSHIP STYLE AND EMPLOYEES' INTRINSIC JOB ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. This study investigates the impact of leadership style on employees' intrinsic job satisfaction in the Cross River State Newspaper Corporation, Calabar,. Nigeria. The study examined the problem of dissatisfaction in the work place as far as intrinsic factors of job satisfaction are concerned. Structured questionnaire ...

  14. Intrinsic bioremediation of landfills interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brigmon, R.L.; Fliermans, C.B.

    1997-01-01

    Intrinsic bioremediation is a risk management option that relies on natural biological and physical processes to contain the spread of contamination from a source. Evidence is presented in this report that intrinsic bioremediation is occurring at the Sanitary Landfill is fundamental to support incorportion into a Corrective Action Plan (CAP)

  15. Differential scanning microcalorimetry of intrinsically disordered proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permyakov, Sergei E

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasensitive differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is an indispensable thermophysical technique enabling to get direct information on enthalpies accompanying heating/cooling of dilute biopolymer solutions. The thermal dependence of protein heat capacity extracted from DSC data is a valuable source of information on intrinsic disorder level of a protein. Application details and limitations of DSC technique in exploration of protein intrinsic disorder are described.

  16. Intrinsic bioremediation of landfills interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States); Fliermans, C.B.

    1997-07-14

    Intrinsic bioremediation is a risk management option that relies on natural biological and physical processes to contain the spread of contamination from a source. Evidence is presented in this report that intrinsic bioremediation is occurring at the Sanitary Landfill is fundamental to support incorportion into a Corrective Action Plan (CAP).

  17. An Intrinsic Coordinate System for Fingerprint Matching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bazen, A.M.; Gerez, Sabih H.; Bigun, J.; Smeraldi, F.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, an intrinsic coordinate system is proposed for fingerprints. First the fingerprint is partitioned in regular regions, which are regions that contain no singular points. In each regular region, the intrinsic coordinate system is defined by the directional field. When using the

  18. Opposing Effects of Intrinsic Conductance and Correlated Synaptic Input on V-Fluctuations during Network Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolind, Jens; Hounsgaard, Jørn Dybkjær; Berg, Rune W

    2012-01-01

    Neurons often receive massive concurrent bombardment of synaptic inhibition and excitation during functional network activity. This increases membrane conductance and causes fluctuations in membrane potential (V(m)) and spike timing. The conductance increase is commonly attributed to synaptic...... conductance, but also includes the intrinsic conductances recruited during network activity. These two sources of conductance have contrasting dynamic properties at sub-threshold membrane potentials. Synaptic transmitter gated conductance changes abruptly and briefly with each presynaptic action potential...... input we find that the magnitude of the membrane fluctuations uniquely determines the relative contribution of synaptic and intrinsic conductance. We also quantify how V(m)-fluctuations vary with synaptic correlations for fixed ratios of synaptic and intrinsic conductance. Interestingly, the levels of V...

  19. Intrinsic innervation of the urinary bladder of kangaroo and albino rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, F A; Nassar, A M; MPAHRAN, Z Y; El-Mahallawi, M N

    1975-01-01

    A comparative study of the intrinsic innervation in desert rodents (kangaroo rats) and others (albino rats) was carried out in an attempt to understand the functional anatomy of the bladder in these animals which are known to sustain severe water restraint. The bladder of the albino rat was innervated by predominantly thin nerves, more numerous beaded endings and few ganglia. That of the kangaroo rat had more numerous thick nerves (pre-ganglionic), large verve trunks, and ganglia which were extensively distributed in the wall. These findings indicate that the bladder of the albino rat depends mainly on the intrinsic innervation and facilatory micturition reflexes, while that of the kangaroo rat is intrinsically regulated, depending on a short neuron system. It was concluded that all the structural differences found might be essential for constant urine retention.

  20. Intrinsic plasticity complements LTP in parallel fiber input gain control in cerebellar Purkinje cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmeguenai, Amor; Hosy, Eric; Bengtsson, Fredrik; Pedroarena, Christine; Piochon, Claire; Teuling, Eva; He, Qionger; Ohtsuki, Gen; De Jeu, Marcel T.G.; Elgersma, Ype; De Zeeuw, Chris I.; Jörntell, Henrik; Hansel, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Synaptic gain control and information storage in neural networks are mediated by alterations in synaptic transmission, such as in long-term potentiation (LTP). Here, we show using both in vitro and in vivo recordings from the rat cerebellum that tetanization protocols for the induction of LTP at parallel fiber (PF) to Purkinje cell synapses can also evoke increases in intrinsic excitability. This form of intrinsic plasticity shares with LTP a requirement for the activation of protein phosphatases 1, 2A, and 2B for induction. Purkinje cell intrinsic plasticity resembles CA1 hippocampal pyramidal cell intrinsic plasticity in that it requires activity of protein kinase A (PKA) and casein kinase 2 (CK2) and is mediated by a downregulation of SK-type calcium-sensitive K conductances. In addition, Purkinje cell intrinsic plasticity similarly results in enhanced spine calcium signaling. However, there are fundamental differences: first, while in the hippocampus increases in excitability result in a higher probability for LTP induction, intrinsic plasticity in Purkinje cells lowers the probability for subsequent LTP induction. Second, intrinsic plasticity raises the spontaneous spike frequency of Purkinje cells. The latter effect does not impair tonic spike firing in the target neurons of inhibitory Purkinje cell projections in the deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN), but lowers the Purkinje cell signal-to-noise ratio, thus reducing the PF readout. These observations suggest that intrinsic plasticity accompanies LTP of active PF synapses, while it reduces at weaker, non-potentiated synapses the probability for subsequent potentiation and lowers the impact on the Purkinje cell output. PMID:20943904

  1. Neurons under viral attack: victims or warriors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Swarupa; Nazmi, Arshed; Dutta, Kallol; Basu, Anirban

    2010-01-01

    When the central nervous system (CNS) is under viral attack, defensive antiviral responses must necessarily arise from the CNS itself to rapidly and efficiently curb infections with minimal collateral damage to the sensitive, specialized and non-regenerating neural tissue. This presents a unique challenge because an intact blood-brain barrier (BBB) and lack of proper lymphatic drainage keeps the CNS virtually outside the radar of circulating immune cells that are at constant vigilance for antigens in peripheral tissues. Limited antigen presentation skills of CNS cells in comparison to peripheral tissues is because of a total lack of dendritic cells and feeble expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins in neurons and glia. However, research over the past two decades has identified immune effector mechanisms intrinsic to the CNS for immediate tackling, attenuating and clearing of viral infections, with assistance pouring in from peripheral circulation in the form of neutralizing antibodies and cytotoxic T cells at a later stage. Specialized CNS cells, microglia and astrocytes, were regarded as sole sentinels of the brain for containing a viral onslaught but neurons held little recognition as a potential candidate for protecting itself from the proliferation and pathogenesis of neurotropic viruses. Accumulating evidence however indicates that extracellular insult causes neurons to express immune factors characteristic of lymphoid tissues. This article aims to comprehensively analyze current research on this conditional alteration in the protein expression repertoire of neurons and the role it plays in CNS innate immune response to counter viral infections. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of structure and oxygen flow rate on the photo-response of amorphous IGZO-based photodetector devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jun Tae; Ko, Daehyun; Choi, Sungju; Kang, Hara; Kim, Jae-Young; Yu, Hye Ri; Ahn, Geumho; Jung, Haesun; Rhee, Jihyun; Lee, Heesung; Choi, Sung-Jin; Kim, Dong Myong; Kim, Dae Hwan

    2018-02-01

    In this study, we investigated how the structure and oxygen flow rate (OFR) during the sputter-deposition affects the photo-responses of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO)-based photodetector devices. As the result of comparing three types of device structures with one another, which are a global Schottky diode, local Schottky diode, and thin-film transistor (TFT), the IGZO TFT with the gate pulse technique suppressing the persistent photoconductivity (PPC) is the most promising photodetector in terms of a high photo-sensitivity and uniform sensing characteristic. In order to analyze the IGZO TFT-based photodetectors more quantitatively, the time-evolution of sub-gap density-of-states (DOS) was directly observed under photo-illumination and consecutively during the PPC-compensating period with applying the gate pulse. It shows that the increased ionized oxygen vacancy (VO2+) defects under photo-illumination was fully recovered by the positive gate pulse and even overcompensated by additional electron trapping. Based on experimentally extracted sub-gap DOS, the origin on PPC was successfully decomposed into the hole trapping and the VO ionization. Although the VO ionization is enhanced in lower OFR (O-poor) device, the PPC becomes more severe in high OFR (O-rich) device because the hole trapping dominates the PPC in IGZO TFT under photo-illumination rather than the VO ionization and more abundant holes are trapped into gate insulator and/or interface in O-rich TFTs. Similarly, the electron trapping during the PPC-compensating period with applying the positive gate pulse becomes more prominent in O-rich TFTs. It is attributed to more hole/electron traps in the gate insulator and/or interface, which is associated with oxygen interstitials, or originates from the ion bombardment-related lower quality gate oxide in O-rich devices.

  3. Joint statistics of strongly correlated neurons via dimensionality reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniz, Taşkın; Rotter, Stefan

    2017-06-01

    The relative timing of action potentials in neurons recorded from local cortical networks often shows a non-trivial dependence, which is then quantified by cross-correlation functions. Theoretical models emphasize that such spike train correlations are an inevitable consequence of two neurons being part of the same network and sharing some synaptic input. For non-linear neuron models, however, explicit correlation functions are difficult to compute analytically, and perturbative methods work only for weak shared input. In order to treat strong correlations, we suggest here an alternative non-perturbative method. Specifically, we study the case of two leaky integrate-and-fire neurons with strong shared input. Correlation functions derived from simulated spike trains fit our theoretical predictions very accurately. Using our method, we computed the non-linear correlation transfer as well as correlation functions that are asymmetric due to inhomogeneous intrinsic parameters or unequal input.

  4. Neuron Morphology Influences Axon Initial Segment Plasticity123

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    In most vertebrate neurons, action potentials are initiated in the axon initial segment (AIS), a specialized region of the axon containing a high density of voltage-gated sodium and potassium channels. It has recently been proposed that neurons use plasticity of AIS length and/or location to regulate their intrinsic excitability. Here we quantify the impact of neuron morphology on AIS plasticity using computational models of simplified and realistic somatodendritic morphologies. In small neurons (e.g., dentate granule neurons), excitability was highest when the AIS was of intermediate length and located adjacent to the soma. Conversely, neurons having larger dendritic trees (e.g., pyramidal neurons) were most excitable when the AIS was longer and/or located away from the soma. For any given somatodendritic morphology, increasing dendritic membrane capacitance and/or conductance favored a longer and more distally located AIS. Overall, changes to AIS length, with corresponding changes in total sodium conductance, were far more effective in regulating neuron excitability than were changes in AIS location, while dendritic capacitance had a larger impact on AIS performance than did dendritic conductance. The somatodendritic influence on AIS performance reflects modest soma-to-AIS voltage attenuation combined with neuron size-dependent changes in AIS input resistance, effective membrane time constant, and isolation from somatodendritic capacitance. We conclude that the impact of AIS plasticity on neuron excitability will depend largely on somatodendritic morphology, and that, in some neurons, a shorter or more distally located AIS may promote, rather than limit, action potential generation. PMID:27022619

  5. Structural predictions of neurobiologically relevant G-protein coupled receptors and intrinsically disordered proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Giulia; Dibenedetto, Domenica; Calandrini, Vania; Giorgetti, Alejandro; Carloni, Paolo

    2015-09-15

    G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and intrinsic disordered proteins (IDPs) are key players for neuronal function and dysfunction. Unfortunately, their structural characterization is lacking in most cases. From one hand, no experimental structure has been determined for the two largest GPCRs subfamilies, both key proteins in neuronal pathways. These are the odorant (450 members out of 900 human GPCRs) and the bitter taste receptors (25 members) subfamilies. On the other hand, also IDPs structural characterization is highly non-trivial. They exist as dynamic, highly flexible structural ensembles that undergo conformational conversions on a wide range of timescales, spanning from picoseconds to milliseconds. Computational methods may be of great help to characterize these neuronal proteins. Here we review recent progress from our lab and other groups to develop and apply in silico methods for structural predictions of these highly relevant, fascinating and challenging systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The Endocannabinoid System and Its Role in Regulating the Intrinsic Neural Circuitry of the Gastrointestinal Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautmann, Samantha M; Sharkey, Keith A

    2015-01-01

    Endocannabinoids are important neuromodulators in the central nervous system. They regulate central transmission through pre- and postsynaptic actions on neurons and indirectly through effects on glial cells. Cannabinoids (CBs) also regulate neurotransmission in the enteric nervous system (ENS) of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The ENS consists of intrinsic primary afferent neurons, interneurons, and motor neurons arranged in two ganglionated plexuses which control all the functions of the gut. Increasing evidence suggests that endocannabinoids are potent neuromodulators in the ENS. In this review, we will highlight key observations on the localization of CB receptors and molecules involved in the synthesis and degradation of endocannabinoids in the ENS. We will discuss endocannabinoid signaling mechanisms, endocannabinoid tone and concepts of CB receptor metaplasticity in the ENS. We will also touch on some examples of enteric neural signaling in relation neuromuscular, secretomotor, and enteroendocrine transmission in the ENS. Finally, we will briefly discuss some key future directions. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Intrinsic dendritic filtering gives low-pass power spectra of local field potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindén, Henrik; Pettersen, Klas H; Einevoll, Gaute T

    2010-01-01

    The local field potential (LFP) is among the most important experimental measures when probing neural population activity, but a proper understanding of the link between the underlying neural activity and the LFP signal is still missing. Here we investigate this link by mathematical modeling...... of contributions to the LFP from a single layer-5 pyramidal neuron and a single layer-4 stellate neuron receiving synaptic input. An intrinsic dendritic low-pass filtering effect of the LFP signal, previously demonstrated for extracellular signatures of action potentials, is seen to strongly affect the LFP power...... spectra, even for frequencies as low as 10 Hz for the example pyramidal neuron. Further, the LFP signal is found to depend sensitively on both the recording position and the position of the synaptic input: the LFP power spectra recorded close to the active synapse are typically found to be less low...

  8. The rise of photoresponsive protein technologies applications in vivo: a spotlight on zebrafish developmental and cell biology [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renee Wei-Yan Chow

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The zebrafish (Danio rerio is a powerful vertebrate model to study cellular and developmental processes in vivo. The optical clarity and their amenability to genetic manipulation make zebrafish a model of choice when it comes to applying optical techniques involving genetically encoded photoresponsive protein technologies. In recent years, a number of fluorescent protein and optogenetic technologies have emerged that allow new ways to visualize, quantify, and perturb developmental dynamics. Here, we explain the principles of these new tools and describe some of their representative applications in zebrafish.

  9. Corticospinal mirror neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Kraskov, A.; Philipp, R.; Waldert, S.; Vigneswaran, G.; Quallo, M. M.; Lemon, R. N.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the properties of neurons with mirror-like characteristics that were identified as pyramidal tract neurons (PTNs) and recorded in the ventral premotor cortex (area F5) and primary motor cortex (M1) of three macaque monkeys. We analysed the neurons' discharge while the monkeys performed active grasp of either food or an object, and also while they observed an experimenter carrying out a similar range of grasps. A considerable proportion of tested PTNs showed clear mirror-like p...

  10. Algebraic description of intrinsic modes in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leviatan, A.

    1989-01-01

    We present a procedure for extracting normal modes in algebraic number-conserving systems of interacting bosons relevant for collective states in even-even nuclei. The Hamiltonian is resolved into intrinsic (bandhead related) and collective (in-band related) parts. Shape parameters are introduced through non-spherical boson bases. Intrinsic modes decoupled from the spurious modes are obtained from the intinsic part of the Hamiltonian in the limit of large number of bosons. Intrinsic states are constructed and serve to evaluate electromagnetic transition rates. The method is illustrated for systems with one type of boson as well as with proton-neutron bosons. 28 refs., 1 fig

  11. Algebraic description of intrinsic modes in nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leviatan, A.

    1989-01-01

    We present a procedure for extracting normal modes in algebraic number-conserving systems of interacting bosons relevant for collective states in even-even nuclei. The Hamiltonian is resolved into intrinsic (bandhead related) and collective (in-band related) parts. Shape parameters are introduced through non-spherical boson bases. Intrinsic modes decoupled from the spurious modes are obtained from the intinsic part of the Hamiltonian in the limit of large number of bosons. Intrinsic states are constructed and serve to evaluate electromagnetic transition rates. The method is illustrated for systems with one type of boson as well as with proton-neutron bosons. 28 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Selective neuronal vulnerability to oxidative stress in the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinkun Wang

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress (OS, caused by the imbalance between the generation and detoxification of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS, plays an important role in brain aging, neurodegenerative diseases, and other related adverse conditions, such as ischemia. While ROS/RNS serve as signaling molecules at physiological levels, an excessive amount of these molecules leads to oxidative modification and, therefore, dysfunction of proteins, nucleic acids, and lipids. The response of neurons to this pervasive stress, however, is not uniform in the brain. While many brain neurons can cope with a rise in OS, there are select populations of neurons in the brain that are vulnerable. Because of their selective vulnerability, these neurons are usually the first to exhibit functional decline and cell death during normal aging, or in age-associated neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease. Understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms of selective neuronal vulnerability (SNV to OS is important in the development of future intervention approaches to protect such vulnerable neurons from the stresses of the aging process and the pathological states that lead to neurodegeneration. In this review, the currently known molecular and cellular factors that contribute to SNV to OS are summarized. Included among the major underlying factors are high intrinsic OS, high demand for ROS/RNS-based signaling, low ATP production, mitochondrial dysfunction, and high inflammatory response in vulnerable neurons. The contribution to the selective vulnerability of neurons to OS by other intrinsic or extrinsic factors, such as deficient DNA damage repair, low calcium-buffering capacity, and glutamate excitotoxicity, are also discussed.

  13. Effects of Aβ exposure on long-term associative memory and its neuronal mechanisms in a defined neuronal network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Lenzie; Crossley, Michael; Williams, Thomas; Thorpe, Julian R; Serpell, Louise C; Kemenes, György

    2015-05-29

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) induced neuronal death has been linked to memory loss, perhaps the most devastating symptom of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although Aβ-induced impairment of synaptic or intrinsic plasticity is known to occur before any cell death, the links between these neurophysiological changes and the loss of specific types of behavioral memory are not fully understood. Here we used a behaviorally and physiologically tractable animal model to investigate Aβ-induced memory loss and electrophysiological changes in the absence of neuronal death in a defined network underlying associative memory. We found similar behavioral but different neurophysiological effects for Aβ 25-35 and Aβ 1-42 in the feeding circuitry of the snail Lymnaea stagnalis. Importantly, we also established that both the behavioral and neuronal effects were dependent upon the animals having been classically conditioned prior to treatment, since Aβ application before training caused neither memory impairment nor underlying neuronal changes over a comparable period of time following treatment.

  14. Physiological and morphological properties of Dbx1-derived respiratory neurons in the pre-Botzinger complex of neonatal mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picardo, Maria Cristina D; Weragalaarachchi, Krishanthi T H; Akins, Victoria T; Del Negro, Christopher A

    2013-05-15

    Breathing in mammals depends on an inspiratory-related rhythm that is generated by glutamatergic neurons in the pre-Bötzinger complex (preBötC) of the lower brainstem. A substantial subset of putative rhythm-generating preBötC neurons derive from a single genetic line that expresses the transcription factor Dbx1, but the cellular mechanisms of rhythmogenesis remain incompletely understood. To elucidate these mechanisms, we carried out a comparative analysis of Dbx1-expressing neurons (Dbx1(+)) and non-Dbx1-derived (Dbx1(-)) neurons in the preBötC. Whole-cell recordings in rhythmically active newborn mouse slice preparations showed that Dbx1(+) neurons activate earlier in the respiratory cycle and discharge greater magnitude inspiratory bursts compared with Dbx1(-) neurons. Furthermore, Dbx1(+) neurons required less input current to discharge spikes (rheobase) in the context of network activity. The expression of intrinsic membrane properties indicative of A-current (IA) and hyperpolarization-activated current (Ih) tended to be mutually exclusive in Dbx1(+) neurons. In contrast, there was no such relationship in the expression of currents IA and Ih in Dbx1(-) neurons. Confocal imaging and digital morphological reconstruction of recorded neurons revealed dendritic spines on Dbx1(-) neurons, but Dbx1(+) neurons were spineless. The morphology of Dbx1(+) neurons was largely confined to the transverse plane, whereas Dbx1(-) neurons projected dendrites to a greater extent in the parasagittal plane. The putative rhythmogenic nature of Dbx1(+) neurons may be attributable, in part, to a higher level of intrinsic excitability in the context of network synaptic activity. Furthermore, Dbx1(+) neuronal morphology may facilitate temporal summation and integration of local synaptic inputs from other Dbx1(+) neurons, taking place largely in the dendrites, which could be important for initiating and maintaining bursts and synchronizing activity during the inspiratory phase.

  15. Intrinsic endometriosis of ureter: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Myung Sun; Kim, Ho Chul; Yun, Ku Sup; Choi, Chul Soon; Bae, Sang Hoon; Kim, Sung Yong; Shin, Hyung Sik

    1995-01-01

    Endometriosis is a rare cause of an ureteral obstruction. We report a case of intrinsic ureteral endometriosis resulting in severe hydroureteronephrosis. The diagnosis of ureteral endometriosis may be considered in women with flank pain and ureteric obstruction within true pelvis

  16. The Intrinsic Dynamics of Psychological Process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vallacher, Robin R.; van Geert, Paul; Nowak, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Psychological processes unfold on various timescales in accord with internally generated patterns. The intrinsic dynamism of psychological process is difficult to investigate using traditional methods emphasizing cause–effect relations, however, and therefore is rarely incorporated into social

  17. Deuterium NMR, induced and intrinsic cholesteric lyomesophases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcantara, M.R.

    1982-01-01

    Induced and intrinsic cholesteric lyotropic mesophases were studied. Induced cholesteric lyomesophases based on potassium laurate (KL) system, with small amounts of cholesterol added, were studied by deuterium NMR and by polarizing microscopy. Order profiles obtained from deuterium NMR of KL perdenderated chains in both induced cholesteric and normal mesophases were compared. The intrinsic cholesteric lyotropic mesophases were based on the amphiphile potassium N-lauroyl serinate (KLNS) in the resolved levo form. The study of the type I intrinsic cholesteric mesophase was made by optical microscopy under polarized light and the type II intrinsic cholesteric lyomesophase was characterized by deuterium NMR. The new texture was explained by the use of the theory of disclinations developed for thermotropic liquid crystals, specially for cholesteric type. (M.J.C.) [pt

  18. Development of Chemosensitivity in Neurons from the Nucleus Tractus Solitarii (NTS) of Neonatal Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Susan C.; Nichols, Nicole L.; Ritucci, Nick A.; Dean, Jay B.; Putnam, Robert W.

    2009-01-01

    We studied the development of chemosensitivity during the neonatal period in rat Nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) neurons. We determined the percentage of neurons activated by hypercapnia (15% CO2) and assessed the magnitude of the response by calculating the chemosensitivity index (CI). There were no differences in the percentage of neurons that were inhibited (9%) or activated (44.8%) by hypercapnia or in the magnitude of the activated response (CI 164±4.9%) in NTS neurons from neonatal rats of all ages. To assess the degree of intrinsic chemosensitivity in these neurons we used chemical synaptic block medium and the gap junction blocker carbenoxolone. Chemical synaptic block medium slightly decreased basal firing rate but did not affect the percentage of NTS neurons that responded to hypercapnia at any neonatal age. However, in neonates aged neurons activated by hypercapnia in neonatal rats of any age. In summary, the response of NTS neurons from neonatal rats appears to be intrinsic and largely unchanged throughout early development. In young neonates (neurons that respond to hypercapnia or the magnitude of that response. PMID:19056522

  19. CAMKII activation is not required for maintenance of learning-induced enhancement of neuronal excitability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ori Liraz

    Full Text Available Pyramidal neurons in the piriform cortex from olfactory-discrimination trained rats show enhanced intrinsic neuronal excitability that lasts for several days after learning. Such enhanced intrinsic excitability is mediated by long-term reduction in the post-burst after-hyperpolarization (AHP which is generated by repetitive spike firing. AHP reduction is due to decreased conductance of a calcium-dependent potassium current, the sI(AHP. We have previously shown that learning-induced AHP reduction is maintained by persistent protein kinase C (PKC and extracellular regulated kinase (ERK activation. However, the molecular machinery underlying this long-lasting modulation of intrinsic excitability is yet to be fully described. Here we examine whether the CaMKII, which is known to be crucial in learning, memory and synaptic plasticity processes, is instrumental for the maintenance of learning-induced AHP reduction. KN93, that selectively blocks CaMKII autophosphorylation at Thr286, reduced the AHP in neurons from trained and control rat to the same extent. Consequently, the differences in AHP amplitude and neuronal adaptation between neurons from trained rats and controls remained. Accordingly, the level of activated CaMKII was similar in pirifrom cortex samples taken form trained and control rats. Our data show that although CaMKII modulates the amplitude of AHP of pyramidal neurons in the piriform cortex, its activation is not required for maintaining learning-induced enhancement of neuronal excitability.

  20. Intrinsic and acquired resistance mechanisms in enterococcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollenbeck, Brian L.; Rice, Louis B.

    2012-01-01

    Enterococci have the potential for resistance to virtually all clinically useful antibiotics. Their emergence as important nosocomial pathogens has coincided with increased expression of antimicrobial resistance by members of the genus. The mechanisms underlying antibiotic resistance in enterococci may be intrinsic to the species or acquired through mutation of intrinsic genes or horizontal exchange of genetic material encoding resistance determinants. This paper reviews the antibiotic resistance mechanisms in Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis and discusses treatment options. PMID:23076243

  1. The intrinsic resistome of bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Andrés Olivares Pacheco

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Intrinsically resistant bacteria have emerged as a relevant health problem in the last years. Those bacterial species, several of them with an environmental origin, present naturally a low-level susceptibility to several drugs. It has been proposed that intrinsic resistance is mainly the consequence of the impermeability of cellular envelopes, the activity of multidrug efflux pumps or the lack of appropriate targets for a given family of drugs. However, recently published articles indicate that the characteristic phenotype of susceptibility to antibiotics of a given bacterial species depends on the concerted activity of several elements, what has been named as intrinsic resistome. These determinants comprise not just classical resistance genes. Other elements, several of them involved in basic bacterial metabolic processes, are of relevance for the intrinsic resistance of bacterial pathogens. In the present review we analyse recent publications on the intrinsic resistomes of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We present as well information on the role that global regulators of bacterial metabolism, as Crc from P. aeruginosa, may have on modulating bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics. Finally, we discuss the possibility of searching inhibitors of the intrinsic resistome in the aim of improving the activity of drugs currently in use for clinical practice.

  2. Incentives and intrinsic motivation in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdud, Mikel; Cabasés, Juan M; Nieto, Jorge

    It has been established in the literature that workers within public organisations are intrinsically motivated. This paper is an empirical study of the healthcare sector using methods of qualitative analysis research, which aims to answer the following hypotheses: 1) doctors are intrinsically motivated; 2) economic incentives and control policies may undermine doctors' intrinsic motivation; and 3) well-designed incentives may encourage doctors' intrinsic motivation. We conducted semi-structured interviews à-la-Bewley with 16 doctors from Navarre's Healthcare Service (Servicio Navarro de Salud-Osasunbidea), Spain. The questions were based on current theories of intrinsic motivation and incentives to test the hypotheses. Interviewees were allowed to respond openly without time constraints. Relevant information was selected, quantified and analysed by using the qualitative concepts of saturation and codification. The results seem to confirm the hypotheses. Evidence supporting hypotheses 1 and 2 was gathered from all interviewees, as well as indications of the validity of hypothesis 3 based on interviewees' proposals of incentives. The conclusions could act as a guide to support the optimal design of incentive policies and schemes within health organisations when healthcare professionals are intrinsically motivated. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Kappe neurons, a novel population of olfactory sensory neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Ahuja, Gaurav; Nia, Shahrzad Bozorg; Zapilko, Veronika; Shiriagin, Vladimir; Kowatschew, Daniel; Oka, Yuichiro; Korsching, Sigrun I.

    2014-01-01

    Perception of olfactory stimuli is mediated by distinct populations of olfactory sensory neurons, each with a characteristic set of morphological as well as functional parameters. Beyond two large populations of ciliated and microvillous neurons, a third population, crypt neurons, has been identified in teleost and cartilaginous fishes. We report here a novel, fourth olfactory sensory neuron population in zebrafish, which we named kappe neurons for their characteristic shape. Kappe neurons ar...

  4. Corticospinal mirror neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraskov, A; Philipp, R; Waldert, S; Vigneswaran, G; Quallo, M M; Lemon, R N

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the properties of neurons with mirror-like characteristics that were identified as pyramidal tract neurons (PTNs) and recorded in the ventral premotor cortex (area F5) and primary motor cortex (M1) of three macaque monkeys. We analysed the neurons' discharge while the monkeys performed active grasp of either food or an object, and also while they observed an experimenter carrying out a similar range of grasps. A considerable proportion of tested PTNs showed clear mirror-like properties (52% F5 and 58% M1). Some PTNs exhibited 'classical' mirror neuron properties, increasing activity for both execution and observation, while others decreased their discharge during observation ('suppression mirror-neurons'). These experiments not only demonstrate the existence of PTNs as mirror neurons in M1, but also reveal some interesting differences between M1 and F5 mirror PTNs. Although observation-related changes in the discharge of PTNs must reach the spinal cord and will include some direct projections to motoneurons supplying grasping muscles, there was no EMG activity in these muscles during action observation. We suggest that the mirror neuron system is involved in the withholding of unwanted movement during action observation. Mirror neurons are differentially recruited in the behaviour that switches rapidly between making your own movements and observing those of others.

  5. Axonal sodium channel distribution shapes the depolarized action potential threshold of dentate granule neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Geraldine J; Dowling, Margaret J; Eisenman, Lawrence N; Mennerick, Steven

    2010-04-01

    Intrinsic excitability is a key feature dictating neuronal response to synaptic input. Here we investigate the recent observation that dentate granule neurons exhibit a more depolarized voltage threshold for action potential initiation than CA3 pyramidal neurons. We find no evidence that tonic GABA currents, leak or voltage-gated potassium conductances, or the expression of sodium channel isoform differences can explain this depolarized threshold. Axonal initial segment voltage-gated sodium channels, which are dominated by the Na(V)1.6 isoform in both cell types, distribute more proximally and exhibit lower overall density in granule neurons than in CA3 neurons. To test possible contributions of sodium channel distributions to voltage threshold and to test whether morphological differences participate, we performed simulations of dentate granule neurons and of CA3 pyramidal neurons. These simulations revealed that cell morphology and sodium channel distribution combine to yield the characteristic granule neuron action potential upswing and voltage threshold. Proximal axon sodium channel distribution strongly contributes to the higher voltage threshold of dentate granule neurons for two reasons. First, action potential initiation closer to the somatodendritic current sink causes the threshold of the initiating axon compartment to rise. Second, the proximity of the action potential initiation site to the recording site causes somatic recordings to more faithfully reflect the depolarized threshold of the axon than in cells like CA3 neurons, with distally initiating action potentials. Our results suggest that the proximal location of axon sodium channels in dentate granule neurons contributes to the intrinsic excitability differences between DG and CA3 neurons and may participate in the low-pass filtering function of dentate granule neurons. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. NEURON and Python.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Michael L; Davison, Andrew P; Muller, Eilif

    2009-01-01

    The NEURON simulation program now allows Python to be used, alone or in combination with NEURON's traditional Hoc interpreter. Adding Python to NEURON has the immediate benefit of making available a very extensive suite of analysis tools written for engineering and science. It also catalyzes NEURON software development by offering users a modern programming tool that is recognized for its flexibility and power to create and maintain complex programs. At the same time, nothing is lost because all existing models written in Hoc, including graphical user interface tools, continue to work without change and are also available within the Python context. An example of the benefits of Python availability is the use of the xml module in implementing NEURON's Import3D and CellBuild tools to read MorphML and NeuroML model specifications.

  7. Dramatic Enhancement in Photoresponse of β-In2S3 through Suppression of Dark Conductivity by Synthetic Control of Defect-Induced Carrier Compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Nilima; Mandal, Lily; Game, Onkar; Warule, Sambhaji; Phase, Deodatta; Jadkar, Sandesh; Ogale, Satishchandra

    2015-08-19

    We report on the synthesis of dense and faceted indium sulfide (β-In2S3) nano-octahedron films on fluorine-doped tin oxide-coated glass by the hydrothermal method and their photoresponse properties in a flip chip device configuration. We have examined the temporal evolution of the phase constitution, morphology, and optoelectronic properties for films obtained after growth interruption at specific intervals. It is noted that, initially, an In(OH)3 film forms, which is gradually transformed to the β-In2S3 phase over time. In the case of the film wherein most, but not all, of In(OH)3 is consumed, an exceptionally large photoresponse (light to dark current ratio) of ∼10(4) and response time(s) (rise/fall) of ∼88/280 ms are realized. This superior performance is attributed to nearly complete carrier compensation achievable in the system under high pressure growth leading to dramatic reduction of dark conductivity. It is argued that the temporally growth-controlled equilibrium between quasi-In interstitials and cation vacancies dictates the optoelectronic properties.

  8. Size-controlled in situ synthesis and photo-responsive properties of silver/poly(methyl methacrylate) nanocomposite films with high silver content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Cheng; Li Junguo [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Luo Guoqiang, E-mail: qhy2013@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Xiong Yuanlu; Zhang Qiang; Shen Lianmeng [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2012-10-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ag/PMMA nanocomposite films with high silver content are prepared by in situ synthesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The size of Ag nanoparticles can be controlled by reaction time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electrical properties of Ag/PMMA nanocomposites films shows enhancement compared with the pure PMMA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The recycle photo-responsive properties of Ag/PMMA nanocomposite films are proposed. - Abstract: Ag/PMMA nanocomposites have attracted much attention due to its superior mechanical, optical and electrical properties. In this article, Ag/PMMA nanocomposite films with high silver content (20 wt%) have been successfully in situ synthesized. UV-vis analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), current-voltage (I-V) analysis, hall effect measurement system and electrochemical workstation are used to characterize the nanocomposite films. The results reveal that silver nanoparticles (NPs) homogeneously distribute in PMMA films and the particles size of silver NPs which has been controlled from 1.68 to 6.98 nm. Ag/PMMA nanocomposite films show electrical properties due to the conduction paths created by Ag nanoparticles. With the increasing diameter of silver NPs, the current density decreases and resistivity increases, respectively. Photo-responsive properties of Ag/PMMA nanocomposite films indicate that conduction paths could be destroyed by illumination and rebuilt in dark condition.

  9. Size-controlled in situ synthesis and photo-responsive properties of silver/poly(methyl methacrylate) nanocomposite films with high silver content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Cheng; Li Junguo; Luo Guoqiang; Xiong Yuanlu; Zhang Qiang; Shen Lianmeng

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Ag/PMMA nanocomposite films with high silver content are prepared by in situ synthesis. ► The size of Ag nanoparticles can be controlled by reaction time. ► The electrical properties of Ag/PMMA nanocomposites films shows enhancement compared with the pure PMMA. ► The recycle photo-responsive properties of Ag/PMMA nanocomposite films are proposed. - Abstract: Ag/PMMA nanocomposites have attracted much attention due to its superior mechanical, optical and electrical properties. In this article, Ag/PMMA nanocomposite films with high silver content (20 wt%) have been successfully in situ synthesized. UV–vis analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), current–voltage (I–V) analysis, hall effect measurement system and electrochemical workstation are used to characterize the nanocomposite films. The results reveal that silver nanoparticles (NPs) homogeneously distribute in PMMA films and the particles size of silver NPs which has been controlled from 1.68 to 6.98 nm. Ag/PMMA nanocomposite films show electrical properties due to the conduction paths created by Ag nanoparticles. With the increasing diameter of silver NPs, the current density decreases and resistivity increases, respectively. Photo-responsive properties of Ag/PMMA nanocomposite films indicate that conduction paths could be destroyed by illumination and rebuilt in dark condition.

  10. Enhancement of the Ultraviolet Photoresponsivity of Al-doped ZnO Thin Films Prepared by using the Sol-gel Spin-coating Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wookbin; Leem, Jae-Young

    2018-03-01

    We report the structural, morphological, optical, and ultraviolet (UV) photoresponse properties of Al-doped ZnO (AZO) thin films prepared on silicon substrates with different Al doping concentrations by using the sol-gel spin-coating method. An analysis of the X-ray diffraction patterns of the AZO thin films revealed that the average grain size decreased and the c-axis lattice constant increased with Al content. The field-emission scanning electron microscopy images showed that with Al doping, the grain size decreased, but the film density increased with increasing Al doping concentration from 0% to 3%. These results indicate that the surface area of the film increased with increasing Al doping. The absorbance spectra revealed that the UV absorbance of the AZO thin films increased with increasing Al doping concentration and that the absorption onset shifted towards lower energies. The photoluminescence spectra revealed that with increasing Al doping, the intensity of the visible emission greatly decreased and the visible emission peak shifted forward lower energy (a red shift). The UV sensor based on the AZO thin films exhibited a higher responsivity than that based on the undoped ZnO thin film. Therefore, this study provides a facile method for improving the photoresponsivity of UV sensors.

  11. Neuronal-glial trafficking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachelard, H.S.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The name 'glia' originates from the Greek word for glue, because astro glia (or astrocytes) were thought only to provide an anatomical framework for the electrically-excitable neurones. However, awareness that astrocytes perform vital roles in protecting the neurones, which they surround, emerged from evidence that they act as neuroprotective K + -sinks, and that they remove potentially toxic extracellular glutamate from the vicinity of the neurones. The astrocytes convert the glutamate to non-toxic glutamine which is returned to the neurones and used to replenish transmitter glutamate. This 'glutamate-glutamine cycle' (established in the 1960s by Berl and his colleagues) also contributes to protecting the neurones against a build-up of toxic ammonia. Glial cells also supply the neurones with components for free-radical scavenging glutathione. Recent studies have revealed that glial cells play a more positive interactive role in furnishing the neurones with fuels. Studies using radioactive 14 C, 13 C-MRS and 15 N-GCMS have revealed that glia produce alanine, lactate and proline for consumption by neurones, with increased formation of neurotransmitter glutamate. On neuronal activation the release of NH 4 + and glutamate from the neurones stimulates glucose uptake and glycolysis in the glia to produce more alanine, which can be regarded as an 'alanine-glutamate cycle' Use of 14 C-labelled precursors provided early evidence that neurotransmitter GABA may be partly derived from glial glutamine, and this has been confirmed recently in vivo by MRS isotopomer analysis of the GABA and glutamine labelled from 13 C-acetate. Relative rates of intermediary metabolism in glia and neurones can be calculated using a combination of [1- 13 C] glucose and [1,2- 13 C] acetate. When glutamate is released by neurones there is a net neuronal loss of TCA intermediates which have to be replenished. Part of this is derived from carboxylation of pyruvate, (pyruvate carboxylase

  12. Delta-like 1 participates in the specification of ventral midbrain progenitor derived dopaminergic neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer, Matthias; Szulc, Jolanta; Meyer, Morten

    2008-01-01

    Delta-like 1 (Dlk1), a member of the Delta/Notch protein family, is expressed in the mouse ventral midbrain (VM) as early as embryonic day 11.5 (E11.5) followed by exclusive expression in tyrosine 3-monooxygenase (TH) positive neurons from E12.5 onwards. To further elucidate the yet unknown...... function of Dlk1 in VM neuron development, we investigated the effect of soluble Dlk1 protein as well as the intrinsic Dlk1 function in the course of VM progenitor expansion and dopaminergic (DA) neuron differentiation in vitro. Dlk1 treatment during expansion increased DA progenitor proliferation...... neuron markers, which was not accompanied with alteration of overall or local proliferation. Due to the latter finding in combination with the absence of Dlk1 negative DA neurons in differentiated cultures, we suggest that Dlk1 expression might have a permissive effect on DA neuron differentiation...

  13. Characterization of the chemosensitive response of individual solitary complex neurons from adult rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Nicole L.; Mulkey, Daniel K.; Wilkinson, Katherine A.; Powell, Frank L.; Dean, Jay B.; Putnam, Robert W.

    2009-01-01

    We studied the CO2/H+-chemosensitive responses of individual solitary complex (SC) neurons from adult rats by simultaneously measuring the intracellular pH (pHi) and electrical responses to hypercapnic acidosis (HA). SC neurons were recorded using the blind whole cell patch-clamp technique and loading the soma with the pH-sensitive dye pyranine through the patch pipette. We found that SC neurons from adult rats have a lower steady-state pHi than SC neurons from neonatal rats. In the presence of chemical and electrical synaptic blockade, adult SC neurons have firing rate responses to HA (percentage of neurons activated or inhibited and the magnitude of response as determined by the chemosensitivity index) that are similar to SC neurons from neonatal rats. They also have a typical response to isohydric hypercapnia, including decreased ΔpHi, followed by pHi recovery, and increased firing rate. Thus, the chemosensitive response of SC neurons from adults is similar to the chemosensitive response of SC neurons from neonatal rats. Because our findings for adults are similar to previously reported values for neurons from neonatal rats, we conclude that intrinsic chemosensitivity is established early in development for SC neurons and is maintained throughout adulthood. PMID:19144749

  14. Intrinsic Plasticity for Natural Competition in Koniocortex-Like Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peláez, Francisco Javier Ropero; Aguiar-Furucho, Mariana Antonia; Andina, Diego

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we use the neural property known as intrinsic plasticity to develop neural network models that resemble the koniocortex, the fourth layer of sensory cortices. These models evolved from a very basic two-layered neural network to a complex associative koniocortex network. In the initial network, intrinsic and synaptic plasticity govern the shifting of the activation function, and the modification of synaptic weights, respectively. In this first version, competition is forced, so that the most activated neuron is arbitrarily set to one and the others to zero, while in the second, competition occurs naturally due to inhibition between second layer neurons. In the third version of the network, whose architecture is similar to the koniocortex, competition also occurs naturally owing to the interplay between inhibitory interneurons and synaptic and intrinsic plasticity. A more complex associative neural network was developed based on this basic koniocortex-like neural network, capable of dealing with incomplete patterns and ideally suited to operating similarly to a learning vector quantization network. We also discuss the biological plausibility of the networks and their role in a more complex thalamocortical model.

  15. Single neuron computation

    CERN Document Server

    McKenna, Thomas M; Zornetzer, Steven F

    1992-01-01

    This book contains twenty-two original contributions that provide a comprehensive overview of computational approaches to understanding a single neuron structure. The focus on cellular-level processes is twofold. From a computational neuroscience perspective, a thorough understanding of the information processing performed by single neurons leads to an understanding of circuit- and systems-level activity. From the standpoint of artificial neural networks (ANNs), a single real neuron is as complex an operational unit as an entire ANN, and formalizing the complex computations performed by real n

  16. Mesmerising mirror neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyes, Cecilia

    2010-06-01

    Mirror neurons have been hailed as the key to understanding social cognition. I argue that three currents of thought-relating to evolution, atomism and telepathy-have magnified the perceived importance of mirror neurons. When they are understood to be a product of associative learning, rather than an adaptation for social cognition, mirror neurons are no longer mesmerising, but they continue to raise important questions about both the psychology of science and the neural bases of social cognition. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Dynamical analysis of Parkinsonian state emulated by hybrid Izhikevich neuron models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chen; Wang, Jiang; Yu, Haitao; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile; Li, Huiyan; Loparo, Kenneth A.; Fietkiewicz, Chris

    2015-11-01

    Computational models play a significant role in exploring novel theories to complement the findings of physiological experiments. Various computational models have been developed to reveal the mechanisms underlying brain functions. Particularly, in the development of therapies to modulate behavioral and pathological abnormalities, computational models provide the basic foundations to exhibit transitions between physiological and pathological conditions. Considering the significant roles of the intrinsic properties of the globus pallidus and the coupling connections between neurons in determining the firing patterns and the dynamical activities of the basal ganglia neuronal network, we propose a hypothesis that pathological behaviors under the Parkinsonian state may originate from combined effects of intrinsic properties of globus pallidus neurons and synaptic conductances in the whole neuronal network. In order to establish a computational efficient network model, hybrid Izhikevich neuron model is used due to its capacity of capturing the dynamical characteristics of the biological neuronal activities. Detailed analysis of the individual Izhikevich neuron model can assist in understanding the roles of model parameters, which then facilitates the establishment of the basal ganglia-thalamic network model, and contributes to a further exploration of the underlying mechanisms of the Parkinsonian state. Simulation results show that the hybrid Izhikevich neuron model is capable of capturing many of the dynamical properties of the basal ganglia-thalamic neuronal network, such as variations of the firing rates and emergence of synchronous oscillations under the Parkinsonian condition, despite the simplicity of the two-dimensional neuronal model. It may suggest that the computational efficient hybrid Izhikevich neuron model can be used to explore basal ganglia normal and abnormal functions. Especially it provides an efficient way of emulating the large-scale neuron network

  18. Functions of intrinsic disorder in transmembrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergaard, Magnus; Kragelund, Birthe B.

    2017-01-01

    mechanisms. (3) Trafficking of membrane proteins. (4) Transient membrane associations. (5) Post-translational modifications most notably phosphorylation and (6) disorder-linked isoform dependent function. We finish the review by discussing the future challenges facing the membrane protein community regarding......Intrinsic disorder is common in integral membrane proteins, particularly in the intracellular domains. Despite this observation, these domains are not always recognized as being disordered. In this review, we will discuss the biological functions of intrinsically disordered regions of membrane...... proteins, and address why the flexibility afforded by disorder is mechanistically important. Intrinsically disordered regions are present in many common classes of membrane proteins including ion channels and transporters; G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), receptor tyrosine kinases and cytokine...

  19. Management Control, Intrinsic Motivation and Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godt Gregersen, Mikkel

    of the conclusion is that intrinsic motivation and management control can coexist under the conditions that all three basic needs, i.e. autonomy, competence and relatedness, are supported. This can happen when control takes point of departure in the individual employee. The second part of the conclusion......This thesis consists of a cape and three papers. The overall research question is: How can intrinsic motivation and management control coexist in a creative environment and how can coordination be possible in such a context? The cape ties together the research done in the three papers....... It is divided into six sections. The first section introduces the concepts of intrinsic motivation, creativity and management control. This is followed by a section on management control in a creative context. These two sections frame the thesis and introduce the setting in which the research has been done...

  20. Label-free distinguishing between neurons and glial cells based on two-photon excited fluorescence signal of neuron perinuclear granules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Huiping; Jiang, Liwei; Wang, Xingfu; Liu, Gaoqiang; Wang, Shu; Zheng, Liqin; Li, Lianhuang; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-08-01

    Neurons and glial cells are two critical cell types of brain tissue. Their accurate identification is important for the diagnosis of psychiatric disorders such as depression and schizophrenia. In this paper, distinguishing between neurons and glial cells by using the two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) signals of intracellular intrinsic sources was performed. TPEF microscopy combined with TUJ-1 and GFAP immunostaining and quantitative image analysis demonstrated that the perinuclear granules of neurons in the TPEF images of brain tissue and the primary cultured cortical cells were a unique characteristic of neurons compared to glial cells which can become a quantitative feature to distinguish neurons from glial cells. With the development of miniaturized TPEF microscope (‘two-photon fiberscopes’) imaging devices, TPEF microscopy can be developed into an effective diagnostic and monitoring tool for psychiatric disorders such as depression and schizophrenia.

  1. Insulin aggregation tracked by its intrinsic TRES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Li Hung C.; Birch, David J. S.; Vyshemirsky, Vladislav; Ryadnov, Maxim G.; Rolinski, Olaf J.

    2017-12-01

    Time-resolved emission spectra (TRES) have been used to detect conformational changes of intrinsic tyrosines within bovine insulin at a physiological pH. The approach offers the ability to detect the initial stages of insulin aggregation at the molecular level. The data analysis has revealed the existence of at least three fluorescent species undergoing dielectric relaxation and significant spectral changes due to insulin aggregation. The results indicate the suitability of the intrinsic TRES approach for insulin studies and for monitoring its stability during storage and aggregation in insulin delivery devices.

  2. Intrinsic viscosity of a suspension of cubes

    KAUST Repository

    Mallavajula, Rajesh K.

    2013-11-06

    We report on the viscosity of a dilute suspension of cube-shaped particles. Irrespective of the particle size, size distribution, and surface chemistry, we find empirically that cubes manifest an intrinsic viscosity [η]=3.1±0.2, which is substantially higher than the well-known value for spheres, [η]=2.5. The orientation-dependent intrinsic viscosity of cubic particles is determined theoretically using a finite-element solution of the Stokes equations. For isotropically oriented cubes, these calculations show [η]=3.1, in excellent agreement with our experimental observations. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  3. Intrinsic entropy perturbations from the dark sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celoria, Marco; Comelli, Denis; Pilo, Luigi

    2018-03-01

    Perfect fluids are modeled by using an effective field theory approach which naturally gives a self-consistent and unambiguous description of the intrinsic non-adiabatic contribution to pressure variations. We study the impact of intrinsic entropy perturbation on the superhorizon dynamics of the curvature perturbation Script R in the dark sector. The dark sector, made of dark matter and dark energy is described as a single perfect fluid. The non-perturbative vorticity's dynamics and the Weinberg theorem violation for perfect fluids are also studied.

  4. A model of intrinsic symmetry breaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge, Li; Li, Sheng; George, Thomas F.; Sun, Xin

    2013-01-01

    Different from the symmetry breaking associated with a phase transition, which occurs when the controlling parameter is manipulated across a critical point, the symmetry breaking presented in this Letter does not need parameter manipulation. Instead, the system itself suddenly undergoes symmetry breaking at a certain time during its evolution, which is intrinsic symmetry breaking. Through a polymer model, it is revealed that the origin of the intrinsic symmetry breaking is nonlinearity, which produces instability at the instance when the evolution crosses an inflexion point, where this instability breaks the original symmetry

  5. Corticospinal mirror neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraskov, A.; Philipp, R.; Waldert, S.; Vigneswaran, G.; Quallo, M. M.; Lemon, R. N.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the properties of neurons with mirror-like characteristics that were identified as pyramidal tract neurons (PTNs) and recorded in the ventral premotor cortex (area F5) and primary motor cortex (M1) of three macaque monkeys. We analysed the neurons’ discharge while the monkeys performed active grasp of either food or an object, and also while they observed an experimenter carrying out a similar range of grasps. A considerable proportion of tested PTNs showed clear mirror-like properties (52% F5 and 58% M1). Some PTNs exhibited ‘classical’ mirror neuron properties, increasing activity for both execution and observation, while others decreased their discharge during observation (‘suppression mirror-neurons’). These experiments not only demonstrate the existence of PTNs as mirror neurons in M1, but also reveal some interesting differences between M1 and F5 mirror PTNs. Although observation-related changes in the discharge of PTNs must reach the spinal cord and will include some direct projections to motoneurons supplying grasping muscles, there was no EMG activity in these muscles during action observation. We suggest that the mirror neuron system is involved in the withholding of unwanted movement during action observation. Mirror neurons are differentially recruited in the behaviour that switches rapidly between making your own movements and observing those of others. PMID:24778371

  6. Understanding the Generation of Network Bursts by Adaptive Oscillatory Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanguy Fardet

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Experimental and numerical studies have revealed that isolated populations of oscillatory neurons can spontaneously synchronize and generate periodic bursts involving the whole network. Such a behavior has notably been observed for cultured neurons in rodent's cortex or hippocampus. We show here that a sufficient condition for this network bursting is the presence of an excitatory population of oscillatory neurons which displays spike-driven adaptation. We provide an analytic model to analyze network bursts generated by coupled adaptive exponential integrate-and-fire neurons. We show that, for strong synaptic coupling, intrinsically tonic spiking neurons evolve to reach a synchronized intermittent bursting state. The presence of inhibitory neurons or plastic synapses can then modulate this dynamics in many ways but is not necessary for its appearance. Thanks to a simple self-consistent equation, our model gives an intuitive and semi-quantitative tool to understand the bursting behavior. Furthermore, it suggests that after-hyperpolarization currents are sufficient to explain bursting termination. Through a thorough mapping between the theoretical parameters and ion-channel properties, we discuss the biological mechanisms that could be involved and the relevance of the explored parameter-space. Such an insight enables us to propose experimentally-testable predictions regarding how blocking fast, medium or slow after-hyperpolarization channels would affect the firing rate and burst duration, as well as the interburst interval.

  7. A Schwann cell mitogen accompanying regeneration of motor neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livesey, F J; O'Brien, J A; Li, M; Smith, A G; Murphy, L J; Hunt, S P

    1997-12-11

    Motor neurons are the only adult mammalian neurons of the central nervous system to regenerate following injury. This ability is dependent on the environment of the peripheral nerve and an intrinsic capacity of motor neurons for regrowth. We report here the identification, using a technique known as messenger RNA differential display, of an extracellular signalling molecule, previously described as the pancreatic secreted protein Reg-2, that is expressed solely in regenerating and developing rat motor and sensory neurons. Axon-stimulated Schwann cell proliferation is necessary for successful regeneration, and we show that Reg-2 is a potent Schwann cell mitogen in vitro. In vivo, Reg-2 protein is transported along regrowing axons and inhibition of Reg-2 signalling significantly retards the regeneration of Reg-2-containing axons. During development, Reg-2 production by motor and sensory neurons is regulated by contact with peripheral targets. Strong candidates for peripheral factors regulating Reg-2 production are cytokines of the LIF/CNTF family, because Reg-2 is not expressed in developing motor or sensory neurons of mice carrying a targeted disruption of the LIF receptor gene, a common component of the receptor complexes for all of the LIF/CNTF family.

  8. Stochastic optimal control of single neuron spike trains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iolov, Alexandre; Ditlevsen, Susanne; Longtin, Andrë

    2014-01-01

    stimulation of a neuron to achieve a target spike train under the physiological constraint to not damage tissue. Approach. We pose a stochastic optimal control problem to precisely specify the spike times in a leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) model of a neuron with noise assumed to be of intrinsic or synaptic...... to the spike times (open-loop control). Main results. We have developed a stochastic optimal control algorithm to obtain precise spike times. It is applicable in both the supra-threshold and sub-threshold regimes, under open-loop and closed-loop conditions and with an arbitrary noise intensity; the accuracy...... into account physiological constraints on the control. A precise and robust targeting of neural activity based on stochastic optimal control has great potential for regulating neural activity in e.g. prosthetic applications and to improve our understanding of the basic mechanisms by which neuronal firing...

  9. Simulating pancreatic neuroplasticity: in vitro dual-neuron plasticity assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Ihsan Ekin; Tieftrunk, Elke; Schäfer, Karl-Herbert; Friess, Helmut; Ceyhan, Güralp O

    2014-04-14

    Neuroplasticity is an inherent feature of the enteric nervous system and gastrointestinal (GI) innervation under pathological conditions. However, the pathophysiological role of neuroplasticity in GI disorders remains unknown. Novel experimental models which allow simulation and modulation of GI neuroplasticity may enable enhanced appreciation of the contribution of neuroplasticity in particular GI diseases such as pancreatic cancer (PCa) and chronic pancreatitis (CP). Here, we present a protocol for simulation of pancreatic neuroplasticity under in vitro conditions using newborn rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and myenteric plexus (MP) neurons. This dual-neuron approach not only permits monitoring of both organ-intrinsic and -extrinsic neuroplasticity, but also represents a valuable tool to assess neuronal and glial morphology and electrophysiology. Moreover, it allows functional modulation of supplied microenvironmental contents for studying their impact on neuroplasticity. Once established, the present neuroplasticity assay bears the potential of being applicable to the study of neuroplasticity in any GI organ.

  10. Transition to Chaos in Random Neuronal Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Kadmon

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Firing patterns in the central nervous system often exhibit strong temporal irregularity and considerable heterogeneity in time-averaged response properties. Previous studies suggested that these properties are the outcome of the intrinsic chaotic dynamics of the neural circuits. Indeed, simplified rate-based neuronal networks with synaptic connections drawn from Gaussian distribution and sigmoidal nonlinearity are known to exhibit chaotic dynamics when the synaptic gain (i.e., connection variance is sufficiently large. In the limit of an infinitely large network, there is a sharp transition from a fixed point to chaos, as the synaptic gain reaches a critical value. Near the onset, chaotic fluctuations are slow, analogous to the ubiquitous, slow irregular fluctuations observed in the firing rates of many cortical circuits. However, the existence of a transition from a fixed point to chaos in neuronal circuit models with more realistic architectures and firing dynamics has not been established. In this work, we investigate rate-based dynamics of neuronal circuits composed of several subpopulations with randomly diluted connections. Nonzero connections are either positive for excitatory neurons or negative for inhibitory ones, while single neuron output is strictly positive with output rates rising as a power law above threshold, in line with known constraints in many biological systems. Using dynamic mean field theory, we find the phase diagram depicting the regimes of stable fixed-point, unstable-dynamic, and chaotic-rate fluctuations. We focus on the latter and characterize the properties of systems near this transition. We show that dilute excitatory-inhibitory architectures exhibit the same onset to chaos as the single population with Gaussian connectivity. In these architectures, the large mean excitatory and inhibitory inputs dynamically balance each other, amplifying the effect of the residual fluctuations. Importantly, the existence of a

  11. Simple intrinsic defects in InAs :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, Peter Andrew

    2013-03-01

    This Report presents numerical tables summarizing properties of intrinsic defects in indium arsenide, InAs, as computed by density functional theory using semi-local density functionals, intended for use as reference tables for a defect physics package in device models.

  12. INTRINSIC AND EXTRINSIC MOTIVATION IN THE SELECTION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A psychological perspective is considered that applies intrinsic and extrinsic motivational concepts to communication phenomena. The paper also tries to develop an analytical understanding of human communication-related behavior with respect to the two types of motives. Proposals are also put forward to communication ...

  13. Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation among Collegiate Instrumentalists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Frank M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gather and compare information on measures of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation among instrumentalists enrolled in collegiate ensembles. A survey instrument was developed to gather information concerning demographic data and responses to questions on motivational preference. Participants were undergraduate and…

  14. A rotational integral formula for intrinsic volumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Eva Bjørn Vedel; Rataj, J.

    2008-01-01

    A rotational version of the famous Crofton formula is derived. The motivation for deriving the formula comes from local stereology, a new branch of stereology based on sections through fixed reference points. The formula shows how rotational averages of intrinsic volumes measured on sections...

  15. Original Paper Detecting Nosocomial Intrinsic Infections through ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-04-20

    Apr 20, 2011 ... Key Words: Bacterial pathogens, Endogenous indicators, NosocomiaI infection, Surgery. Received 30 October 2010/ Accepted 30 March 2011. INTRODUCTION. Micro-organisms from intrinsic and extrinsic sources have been known to cause nosocomial infections (CDC, 1991). The human body enables.

  16. Organisational Learning and Employees' Intrinsic Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remedios, Richard; Boreham, Nick

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the effects of organisational learning initiatives on employee motivation. Four initiatives consistent with theories of organisational learning were a priori ranked in terms of concepts that underpin intrinsic-motivation theory. Eighteen employees in a UK petrochemical company were interviewed to ascertain their experiences of…

  17. Intrinsic Motivation, Organizational Justice, and Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannam, Kalli; Narayan, Anupama

    2015-01-01

    For employees to generate creative ideas that are not only original, but also useful to their company, they must interact with their workplace environment to determine organizational needs. Therefore, it is important to consider aspects of the individual as well as their environment when studying creativity. Intrinsic motivation, a predictor of…

  18. Discovery of Intrinsic Primitives on Triangle Meshes

    KAUST Repository

    Solomon, Justin

    2011-04-01

    The discovery of meaningful parts of a shape is required for many geometry processing applications, such as parameterization, shape correspondence, and animation. It is natural to consider primitives such as spheres, cylinders and cones as the building blocks of shapes, and thus to discover parts by fitting such primitives to a given surface. This approach, however, will break down if primitive parts have undergone almost-isometric deformations, as is the case, for example, for articulated human models. We suggest that parts can be discovered instead by finding intrinsic primitives, which we define as parts that posses an approximate intrinsic symmetry. We employ the recently-developed method of computing discrete approximate Killing vector fields (AKVFs) to discover intrinsic primitives by investigating the relationship between the AKVFs of a composite object and the AKVFs of its parts. We show how to leverage this relationship with a standard clustering method to extract k intrinsic primitives and remaining asymmetric parts of a shape for a given k. We demonstrate the value of this approach for identifying the prominent symmetry generators of the parts of a given shape. Additionally, we show how our method can be modified slightly to segment an entire surface without marking asymmetric connecting regions and compare this approach to state-of-the-art methods using the Princeton Segmentation Benchmark. © 2011 The Author(s).

  19. Increased intrinsic brain connectivity between pons and somatosensory cortex during attacks of migraine with aura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Anders; Amin, Faisal Mohammad; Larsson, Henrik B W

    2017-01-01

    The neurological disturbances of migraine aura are caused by transient cortical dysfunction due to waves of spreading depolarization that disrupt neuronal signaling. The effects of these cortical events on intrinsic brain connectivity during attacks of migraine aura have not previously been...... investigated. Studies of spontaneous migraine attacks are notoriously challenging due to their unpredictable nature and patient discomfort. We investigated 16 migraine patients with visual aura during attacks and in the attack-free state using resting state fMRI. We applied a hypothesis-driven seed......-based approach focusing on cortical visual areas and areas involved in migraine pain, and a data-driven independent component analysis approach to detect changes in intrinsic brain signaling during attacks. In addition, we performed the analyses after mirroring the MRI data according to the side of perceived...

  20. Neuronal avalanches and learning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcangelis, Lucilla de, E-mail: dearcangelis@na.infn.it [Department of Information Engineering and CNISM, Second University of Naples, 81031 Aversa (Italy)

    2011-05-01

    Networks of living neurons represent one of the most fascinating systems of biology. If the physical and chemical mechanisms at the basis of the functioning of a single neuron are quite well understood, the collective behaviour of a system of many neurons is an extremely intriguing subject. Crucial ingredient of this complex behaviour is the plasticity property of the network, namely the capacity to adapt and evolve depending on the level of activity. This plastic ability is believed, nowadays, to be at the basis of learning and memory in real brains. Spontaneous neuronal activity has recently shown features in common to other complex systems. Experimental data have, in fact, shown that electrical information propagates in a cortex slice via an avalanche mode. These avalanches are characterized by a power law distribution for the size and duration, features found in other problems in the context of the physics of complex systems and successful models have been developed to describe their behaviour. In this contribution we discuss a statistical mechanical model for the complex activity in a neuronal network. The model implements the main physiological properties of living neurons and is able to reproduce recent experimental results. Then, we discuss the learning abilities of this neuronal network. Learning occurs via plastic adaptation of synaptic strengths by a non-uniform negative feedback mechanism. The system is able to learn all the tested rules, in particular the exclusive OR (XOR) and a random rule with three inputs. The learning dynamics exhibits universal features as function of the strength of plastic adaptation. Any rule could be learned provided that the plastic adaptation is sufficiently slow.

  1. Chronic Hypoxia Suppresses the Co2 Response of Solitary Complex (Sc) Neurons from Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Nicole L.; Wilkinson, Katherine A.; Powell, Frank L.; Dean, Jay B.; Putnam, Robert W.

    2009-01-01

    We studied the effect of chronic hypobaric hypoxia (CHx; 10-11% O2) on the response to hypercapnia (15% CO2) of individual solitary complex (SC) neurons from adult rats. We simultaneously measured the intracellular pH and firing rate responses to hypercapnia of SC neurons in superfused medullary slices from control and CHx-adapted adult rats using the blind whole cell patch clamp technique and fluorescence imaging microscopy. We found that CHx caused the percentage of SC neurons inhibited by hypercapnia to significantly increase from about 10% up to about 30%, but did not significantly alter the percentage of SC neurons activated by hypercapnia (50% in control versus 35% in CHx). Further, the magnitudes of the responses of SC neurons from control rats (chemosensitivity index for activated neurons of 166±11% and for inhibited neurons of 45±15%) were the same in SC neurons from CHx-adapted rats. This plasticity induced in chemosensitive SC neurons by CHx appears to involve intrinsic changes in neuronal properties since they were the same in synaptic blockade medium. PMID:19619674

  2. Chronic Alcohol, Intrinsic Excitability, and Potassium Channels: Neuroadaptations and Drinking Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannady, Reginald; Rinker, Jennifer A; Nimitvilai, Sudarat; Woodward, John J; Mulholland, Patrick J

    2018-01-28

    Neural mechanisms underlying alcohol use disorder remain elusive, and this lack of understanding has slowed the development of efficacious treatment strategies for reducing relapse rates and prolonging abstinence. While synaptic adaptations produced by chronic alcohol exposure have been extensively characterized in a variety of brain regions, changes in intrinsic excitability of critical projection neurons are understudied. Accumulating evidence suggests that prolonged alcohol drinking and alcohol dependence produce plasticity of intrinsic excitability as measured by changes in evoked action potential firing and after-hyperpolarization amplitude. In this chapter, we describe functional changes in cell firing of projection neurons after long-term alcohol exposure that occur across species and in multiple brain regions. Adaptations in calcium-activated (K Ca 2), voltage-dependent (K V 7), and G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying (K ir 3 or GIRK) potassium channels that regulate the evoked firing and after-hyperpolarization parallel functional changes in intrinsic excitability induced by chronic alcohol. Moreover, there are strong genetic links between alcohol-related behaviors and genes encoding K Ca 2, K V 7, and GIRK channels, and pharmacologically targeting these channels reduces alcohol consumption and alcohol-related behaviors. Together, these studies demonstrate that chronic alcohol drinking produces adaptations in K Ca 2, K V 7, and GIRK channels leading to impaired regulation of the after-hyperpolarization and aberrant cell firing. Correcting the deficit in the after-hyperpolarization with positive modulators of K Ca 2 and K V 7 channels and altering the GIRK channel binding pocket to block the access of alcohol represent a potentially highly effective pharmacological approach that can restore changes in intrinsic excitability and reduce alcohol consumption in affected individuals.

  3. Very high photoresponse towards low-powered UV light under low-biased condition by nanocrystal assembled TiO2 film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Sulakshana; Basak, Durga

    2018-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in harvesting photoejected electrons for highly sensitive photodetectors, by interfacial engineering rather than the classic semiconductors. However, the widely employed device structures involving a p-n junction that causes photogenerated electron-hole separation to enhance the response are usually complex with a high fabrication challenge. Here, we present TiO2-based highly efficient ultraviolet (UV) photodetection by achieving its nanocrystal assembled film having high surface defects. The sol-gel derived TiO2 films have been subjected to a post-growth annealing at 500 °C in air (SA) and vacuum (SB) and one subjected to UV treatment (SC) to tune the surface defects. The UV photoresponse results show that the nanocrystal assembled UV cured TiO2 film shows as high as 1.7 × 103 UV-to-visible rejection ratio and photo-to-dark current ratio of 1.2 × 104 under 10 V bias and 10 μW incident light power. Most interestingly, unprecedently high photo-to-dark current ratio of the order of ∼104 at as low as 1 V bias condition and only 10 μW incident light without device fabrication has been observed. Moreover, the films show stable response cyclibility under UV radiation. Therefore, simple UV curing improves UV photoresponse properties of TiO2 film enormously without the need to form conventional devices and opens the pathway for high-performance, low-cost, low-power consumption UV photodetector.

  4. trans-cis photoisomerization of azobenzene-conjugated dithiolato-bipyridine platinum(II) complexes: extension of photoresponse to longer wavelengths and photocontrollable tristability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Ryota; Kume, Shoko; Sugimoto, Manabu; Nishihara, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Azobenzene derivatives modified with dithiolato-bipyridine platinum(II) complexes were synthesized, revealing their highly extended photoresponses to the long wavelength region as well as unique photocontrollable tristability. The absorptions of trans-1 and trans-2 with one azobenzene group on the dithiolene and bipyridine ligands, respectively, cover the range from 300 to 700 nm. These absorptions are ascribed, by means of time-dependent (TD)DFT calculations, to transitions from dithiolene(pi) to bipyridine(pi*), namely, interligand charge transfer (CT), pi-pi*, and n-pi* transitions of the azobenzene unit, and pi-pi* transitions of the bipyridine ligand. In addition, only trans-1 shows distinctive electronic bands, assignable to transitions from the dithiolene(pi) to azobenzene(pi*), defined as intraligand CT. Complex 1 shows photoisomerization behavior opposite to that of azobenzene: trans-to-cis and cis-to-trans conversions proceed with 405 and 312 nm irradiation, which correspond to excitation with the intraligand CT, and pi-pi* bands of the azobenzene and bipyridine units, respectively. In contrast, complex 2 shows photoisomerization similar to that of azobenzene: trans-to-cis and cis-to-trans transformations occur with 365 and 405 nm irradiation, respectively. Irradiation at 578 nm, corresponding to excitation of the interligand CT transitions, results in cis-to-trans conversion of both 1 and 2, which is the longest wavelength ever reported to effect the photoisomerization of the azobenzene group. The absorption and photochromism of 4, which has azobenzene groups on both the dithiolato and bipyridine ligands, have characteristics quite similar to those of 1 and 2, which furnishes 4 with photocontrollable tristability in a single molecule using light at 365, 405, and 578 nm. We also clarified that 1 and 2 have high photoisomerization efficiencies, and good thermal stability of the cis forms. Complexes 3 and 5 have almost the identical photoresponse to those

  5. Photoresponsive smart surface of LC azo-dendrimer: photomanipulation of topological structures and real-time imaging at a nano-scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araoka, Fumito; Eremin, Alexey; Aya, Satoshi; Lee, Guksik; Ito, Atsuki; Nadasi, Hajnalka; Sebastian, Nerea; Ishikawa, Ken; Haba, Osamu; Stannarius, Ralf; Yonetake, Koichiro; Takezoe, Hideo

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we review some results on our recent studies on photo-induced phenomena of liquid crystals (LCs) by means of interfaces decorated with a photo-responsive azobenzene dendrimer (azo-dendrimer). The azo-dendrimer molecules doped in a LC are spontaneously segregated from bulk and adsorbed onto substrate/LC or solvent/LC interfaces, and their photo-isomerization can bring about the so-called anchoring transition, i.e. reversible switching between homeotropic and planar alignment states of the bulk LC, when exposed to UV/VIS light. In addition to photoinduced anchoring transition in a LC cell, several interesting photo-induced phenomena through the azo-dendrimerdecorated interfaces have been reported, such as photo-induced transformation of the interior topological structures of nematic, cholesteric and smectic droplets, photo-mechanical motion of the micro particles dispersed in a nematic matrix, and optical assistance of the athermal anchoring transition with the aid of a perfluoropolymer surface. In addition to such phenomena, we also discuss the conditions of such photo-responsive interfaces in terms of the polar anchoring energy at the interface upon photo-isomerization under illumination of UV and/or VIS lights. The anisotropy of the polar anchoring energy was evaluated experimentally by means of Polarization Microscopy (POM), Dielectric Spectroscopy (DS), Second Harmonic Generation (SHG), and Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-IR) Spectroscopy, and theoretically based on the simple Rapini-Papoular model. We also demonstrate the continuous bulk orientation change by the photo-dynamic process through the fine control of the polar anchoring energy. Besides, the state-of-the-art video-rate atomic force microscopy (ν-AFM) was carried out to visualize the dynamics of such interfaces at a nano-meter scale.

  6. State-dependent intrinsic predictability of cortical network dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Fakhraei

    Full Text Available The information encoded in cortical circuit dynamics is fleeting, changing from moment to moment as new input arrives and ongoing intracortical interactions progress. A combination of deterministic and stochastic biophysical mechanisms governs how cortical dynamics at one moment evolve from cortical dynamics in recently preceding moments. Such temporal continuity of cortical dynamics is fundamental to many aspects of cortex function but is not well understood. Here we study temporal continuity by attempting to predict cortical population dynamics (multisite local field potential based on its own recent history in somatosensory cortex of anesthetized rats and in a computational network-level model. We found that the intrinsic predictability of cortical dynamics was dependent on multiple factors including cortical state, synaptic inhibition, and how far into the future the prediction extends. By pharmacologically tuning synaptic inhibition, we obtained a continuum of cortical states with asynchronous population activity at one extreme and stronger, spatially extended synchrony at the other extreme. Intermediate between these extremes we observed evidence for a special regime of population dynamics called criticality. Predictability of the near future (10-100 ms increased as the cortical state was tuned from asynchronous to synchronous. Predictability of the more distant future (>1 s was generally poor, but, surprisingly, was higher for asynchronous states compared to synchronous states. These experimental results were confirmed in a computational network model of spiking excitatory and inhibitory neurons. Our findings demonstrate that determinism and predictability of network dynamics depend on cortical state and the time-scale of the dynamics.

  7. Sensory-Evoked Intrinsic Imaging Signals in the Olfactory Bulb Are Independent of Neurovascular Coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Vincis

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Functional brain-imaging techniques used in humans and animals, such as functional MRI and intrinsic optical signal (IOS imaging, are thought to largely rely on neurovascular coupling and hemodynamic responses. Here, taking advantage of the well-described micro-architecture of the mouse olfactory bulb, we dissected the nature of odor-evoked IOSs. Using in vivo pharmacology in transgenic mouse lines reporting activity in different cell types, we show that parenchymal IOSs are largely independent of neurotransmitter release and neurovascular coupling. Furthermore, our results suggest that odor-evoked parenchymal IOSs originate from changes in light scattering of olfactory sensory neuron axons, mostly due to water movement following action potential propagation. Our study sheds light on a direct correlate of neuronal activity, which may be used for large-scale functional brain imaging.

  8. Identifying the neural substrates of intrinsic motivation during task performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woogul; Reeve, Johnmarshall

    2017-10-01

    Intrinsic motivation is the inherent tendency to seek out novelty and challenge, to explore and investigate, and to stretch and extend one's capacities. When people imagine performing intrinsically motivating tasks, they show heightened anterior insular cortex (AIC) activity. To fully explain the neural system of intrinsic motivation, however, requires assessing neural activity while people actually perform intrinsically motivating tasks (i.e., while answering curiosity-inducing questions or solving competence-enabling anagrams). Using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging, we found that the neural system of intrinsic motivation involves not only AIC activity, but also striatum activity and, further, AIC-striatum functional interactions. These findings suggest that subjective feelings of intrinsic satisfaction (associated with AIC activations), reward processing (associated with striatum activations), and their interactions underlie the actual experience of intrinsic motivation. These neural findings are consistent with the conceptualization of intrinsic motivation as the pursuit and satisfaction of subjective feelings (interest and enjoyment) as intrinsic rewards.

  9. Homeostatic scaling of neuronal excitability by synaptic modulation of somatic hyperpolarization-activated Ih channels.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Welie, I.; van Hooft, J.A.; Wadman, W.J.

    2004-01-01

    The hyperpolarization-activated cation current (Ih) plays an important role in determining membrane potential and firing characteristics of neurons and therefore is a potential target for regulation of intrinsic excitability. Here we show that an increase in AMPA-receptor-dependent synaptic activity

  10. Diversity in Long-Term Synaptic Plasticity at Inhibitory Synapses of Striatal Spiny Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda-Orozco, Pavel E.; Mendoza, Ernesto; Hernandez, Ricardo; Aceves, Jose J.; Ibanez-Sandoval, Osvaldo; Galarraga, Elvira; Bargas, Jose

    2009-01-01

    Procedural memories and habits are posited to be stored in the basal ganglia, whose intrinsic circuitries possess important inhibitory connections arising from striatal spiny neurons. However, no information about long-term plasticity at these synapses is available. Therefore, this work describes a novel postsynaptically dependent long-term…

  11. A Subtype of Inhibitory Interneuron with Intrinsic Persistent Activity in Human and Monkey Neocortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A critical step in understanding the neural basis of human cognitive functions is to identify neuronal types in the neocortex. In this study, we performed whole-cell recording from human cortical slices and found a distinct subpopulation of neurons with intrinsic persistent activity that could be triggered by single action potentials (APs but terminated by bursts of APs. This persistent activity was associated with a depolarizing plateau potential induced by the activation of a persistent Na+ current. Single-cell RT-PCR revealed that these neurons were inhibitory interneurons. This type of neuron was found in different cortical regions, including temporal, frontal, occipital, and parietal cortices in human and also in frontal and temporal lobes of nonhuman primate but not in rat cortical tissues, suggesting that it could be unique to primates. The characteristic persistent activity in these inhibitory interneurons may contribute to the regulation of pyramidal cell activity and participate in cortical processing.

  12. Kappe neurons, a novel population of olfactory sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Gaurav; Bozorg Nia, Shahrzad; Zapilko, Veronika; Shiriagin, Vladimir; Kowatschew, Daniel; Oka, Yuichiro; Korsching, Sigrun I

    2014-02-10

    Perception of olfactory stimuli is mediated by distinct populations of olfactory sensory neurons, each with a characteristic set of morphological as well as functional parameters. Beyond two large populations of ciliated and microvillous neurons, a third population, crypt neurons, has been identified in teleost and cartilaginous fishes. We report here a novel, fourth olfactory sensory neuron population in zebrafish, which we named kappe neurons for their characteristic shape. Kappe neurons are identified by their Go-like immunoreactivity, and show a distinct spatial distribution within the olfactory epithelium, similar to, but significantly different from that of crypt neurons. Furthermore, kappe neurons project to a single identified target glomerulus within the olfactory bulb, mdg5 of the mediodorsal cluster, whereas crypt neurons are known to project exclusively to the mdg2 glomerulus. Kappe neurons are negative for established markers of ciliated, microvillous and crypt neurons, but appear to have microvilli. Kappe neurons constitute the fourth type of olfactory sensory neurons reported in teleost fishes and their existence suggests that encoding of olfactory stimuli may require a higher complexity than hitherto assumed already in the peripheral olfactory system.

  13. Stochastic neuron models

    CERN Document Server

    Greenwood, Priscilla E

    2016-01-01

    This book describes a large number of open problems in the theory of stochastic neural systems, with the aim of enticing probabilists to work on them. This includes problems arising from stochastic models of individual neurons as well as those arising from stochastic models of the activities of small and large networks of interconnected neurons. The necessary neuroscience background to these problems is outlined within the text, so readers can grasp the context in which they arise. This book will be useful for graduate students and instructors providing material and references for applying probability to stochastic neuron modeling. Methods and results are presented, but the emphasis is on questions where additional stochastic analysis may contribute neuroscience insight. An extensive bibliography is included. Dr. Priscilla E. Greenwood is a Professor Emerita in the Department of Mathematics at the University of British Columbia. Dr. Lawrence M. Ward is a Professor in the Department of Psychology and the Brain...

  14. Impairments in Motor Neurons, Interneurons and Astrocytes Contribute to Hyperexcitability in ALS: Underlying Mechanisms and Paths to Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do-Ha, Dzung; Buskila, Yossi; Ooi, Lezanne

    2018-02-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterised by the loss of motor neurons leading to progressive paralysis and death. Using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and nerve excitability tests, several clinical studies have identified that cortical and peripheral hyperexcitability are among the earliest pathologies observed in ALS patients. The changes in the electrophysiological properties of motor neurons have been identified in both sporadic and familial ALS patients, despite the diverse etiology of the disease. The mechanisms behind the change in neuronal signalling are not well understood, though current findings implicate intrinsic changes in motor neurons and dysfunction of cells critical in regulating motor neuronal excitability, such as astrocytes and interneurons. Alterations in ion channel expression and/or function in motor neurons has been associated with changes in cortical and peripheral nerve excitability. In addition to these intrinsic changes in motor neurons, inhibitory signalling through GABAergic interneurons is also impaired in ALS, likely contributing to increased neuronal excitability. Astrocytes have also recently been implicated in increasing neuronal excitability in ALS by failing to adequately regulate glutamate levels and extracellular K + concentration at the synaptic cleft. As hyperexcitability is a common and early feature of ALS, it offers a therapeutic and diagnostic target. Thus, understanding the underlying pathways and mechanisms leading to hyperexcitability in ALS offers crucial insight for future development of ALS treatments.

  15. Intrinsic Motivation in Open Source Software Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bitzer, J.; W., Schrettl,; Schröder, Philipp

    2004-01-01

    This papers sheds light on the puzzling evidence that even though open source software (OSS) is a public good, it is developed for free by highly qualified, young and motivated individuals, and evolves at a rapid pace. We show that once OSS development is understood as the private provision...... of a public good, these features emerge quite naturally. We adapt a dynamic private-provision-of-public-goods model to reflects key aspects of the OSS phenomenon. In particular, instead of relying on extrinsic motives for programmers (e.g. signaling) the present model is driven by intrinsic motives of OSS...... programmers, such as user-programmers, play value or \\emph{homo ludens} payoff, and gift culture benefits. Such intrinsic motives feature extensively in the wider OSS literature and turn out to add new insights to the economic analysis....

  16. Does Aerobic Exercise Influence Intrinsic Brain Activity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flodin, Pär; Jonasson, Lars S; Riklund, Katrin

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that aerobic exercise could reduce age related decline in cognition and brain functioning. Here we investigated the effects of aerobic exercise on intrinsic brain activity. Sixty sedentary healthy males and females (64-78 years) were randomized into either an aerobic...... exercise group or an active control group. Both groups recieved supervised training, 3 days a week for 6 months. Multimodal brain imaging data was acquired before and after the intervention, including 10 min of resting state brain functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) and arterial spin labeling...... group improved more. Contrary to our hypothesis, we did not observe any significant group by time interactions with regard to any measure of intrinsic activity. To further probe putative relationships between fitness and brain activity, we performed post hoc analyses disregarding group belongings...

  17. Documentation Requirements, Intrinsic Motivation, and Worker Absence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lotte Bøgh; Kristensen, Nicolai; Pedersen, Lene Holm

    2015-01-01

    Command systems are widely used to monitor public service provision, but little is known about unintended effects on individual workers’ motivation and work effort. Using insights from motivation crowding theory, we estimate a SEM model that captures how Danish childcare assistants and social...... and higher sickness absence. The association is statistically significant, but very small in substantive terms. The result is nevertheless consistent with the expectation in motivation crowding theory and contributes to the literature by including a new, reliable behavioral variable—sickness absence....../healthcare assistants perceive documentation requirements. We analyze how this perception relates to intrinsic motivation measured in a survey and sickness absence as reported in administrative registers, and find that individuals who perceive documentation requirements as controlling have lower intrinsic motivation...

  18. Intrinsic point defects in aluminum antimonide

    OpenAIRE

    Åberg, Daniel; Erhart, Paul; Williamson, Andrew J.; Lordi, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    Calculations within density functional theory on the basis of the local density approximation are carried out to study the properties of intrinsic point defects in aluminum antimonide. Special care is taken to address finite-size effects, band gap error, and symmetry reduction in the defect structures. The correction of the band gap is based on a set of GW calculations. The most important defects are identified to be the aluminum interstitial $Al_{i,Al}^{1+}$, the antimony antisites $Sb_{Al}^...

  19. Intrinsic luminescence of alkali silicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbuzov, V.I.; Grabovskis, V.Y.; Tolstoi, M.N.; Vitol, I.K.

    1986-09-01

    This study obtains additional information on L centers and their role in electron excitation and intrinsic luminescence of a whole series. (Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs) of alkali silicate glasses. The authors compare the features of the interaction with radiation of specimens of glass and crystal of a similar chemical composition, since silicates of alkali metals can be obtained in both the glassy and crystalline states.

  20. Intrinsic work motivation and pension reform acceptance

    OpenAIRE

    Heinemann, Friedrich; Hennighausen, Tanja; Moessinger, Marc-Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Although demographic change leaves pay-as-you-go pension systems unsustainable, reforms, such as a higher pension age, are highly unpopular. This contribution looks into the role of intrinsic motivation as a driver for pension reform acceptance. Theoretical reasoning suggests that this driver should be relevant: The choice among different pension reform options (increasing pension age, increasing contributions, cutting pensions) can be analyzed within the framework of an optimal job separatio...

  1. A structural model of intrinsic motivation

    OpenAIRE

    Aguilar, Javier; González, Daniel; Aguilar, Amira

    2017-01-01

    The main purpose of this research was to develop and test a structural model of intrinsic motivation among students of the University of Sonora to the curriculum of their careers. A secondary objective was to overcome the limitations of the model developed among students of the UNAM. Eight psychometric scales developed by the authors in previous studies were used, which showed satisfactory reliability and validity values. The model tested was similar to the sample of the UNAM, except for the ...

  2. Moral Distress, Workplace Health, and Intrinsic Harm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Elijah

    2016-05-01

    Moral distress is now being recognized as a frequent experience for many health care providers, and there's good evidence that it has a negative impact on the health care work environment. However, contemporary discussions of moral distress have several problems. First, they tend to rely on inadequate characterizations of moral distress. As a result, subsequent investigations regarding the frequency and consequences of moral distress often proceed without a clear understanding of the phenomenon being discussed, and thereby risk substantially misrepresenting the nature, frequency, and possible consequences of moral distress. These discussions also minimize the intrinsically harmful aspects of moral distress. This is a serious omission. Moral distress doesn't just have a negative impact on the health care work environment; it also directly harms the one who experiences it. In this paper, I claim that these problems can be addressed by first clarifying our understanding of moral distress, and then identifying what makes moral distress intrinsically harmful. I begin by identifying three common mistakes that characterizations of moral distress tend to make, and explaining why these mistakes are problematic. Next, I offer an account of moral distress that avoids these mistakes. Then, I defend the claim that moral distress is intrinsically harmful to the subject who experiences it. I conclude by explaining how acknowledging this aspect of moral distress should reshape our discussions about how best to deal with this phenomenon. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Intrinsic electron trapping in amorphous oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Jack; Kaviani, Moloud; Afanas’ev, Valeri V.; Lisoni, Judit G.; Shluger, Alexander L.

    2018-03-01

    We demonstrate that electron trapping at intrinsic precursor sites is endemic in non-glass-forming amorphous oxide films. The energy distributions of trapped electron states in ultra-pure prototype amorphous (a)-HfO2 insulator obtained from exhaustive photo-depopulation experiments demonstrate electron states in the energy range of 2–3 eV below the oxide conduction band. These energy distributions are compared to the results of density functional calculations of a-HfO2 models of realistic density. The experimental results can be explained by the presence of intrinsic charge trapping sites formed by under-coordinated Hf cations and elongated Hf–O bonds in a-HfO2. These charge trapping states can capture up to two electrons, forming polarons and bi-polarons. The corresponding trapping sites are different from the dangling-bond type defects responsible for trapping in glass-forming oxides, such as SiO2, in that the traps are formed without bonds being broken. Furthermore, introduction of hydrogen causes formation of somewhat energetically deeper electron traps when a proton is immobilized next to the trapped electron bi-polaron. The proposed novel mechanism of intrinsic charge trapping in a-HfO2 represents a new paradigm for charge trapping in a broad class of non-glass-forming amorphous insulators.

  4. Long descending cervical propriospinal neurons differ from thoracic propriospinal neurons in response to low thoracic spinal injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelzner Dennis J

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Propriospinal neurons, with axonal projections intrinsic to the spinal cord, have shown a greater regenerative response than supraspinal neurons after axotomy due to spinal cord injury (SCI. Our previous work focused on the response of axotomized short thoracic propriospinal (TPS neurons following a low thoracic SCI (T9 spinal transection or moderate spinal contusion injury in the rat. The present investigation analyzes the intrinsic response of cervical propriospinal neurons having long descending axons which project into the lumbosacral enlargement, long descending propriospinal tract (LDPT axons. These neurons also were axotomized by T9 spinal injury in the same animals used in our previous study. Results Utilizing laser microdissection (LMD, qRT-PCR, and immunohistochemistry, we studied LDPT neurons (located in the C5-C6 spinal segments between 3-days, and 1-month following a low thoracic (T9 spinal cord injury. We examined the response of 89 genes related to growth factors, cell surface receptors, apoptosis, axonal regeneration, and neuroprotection/cell survival. We found a strong and significant down-regulation of ~25% of the genes analyzed early after injury (3-days post-injury with a sustained down-regulation in most instances. In the few genes that were up-regulated (Actb, Atf3, Frs2, Hspb1, Nrap, Stat1 post-axotomy, the expression for all but one was down-regulated by 2-weeks post-injury. We also compared the uninjured TPS control neurons to the uninjured LDPT neurons used in this experiment for phenotypic differences between these two subpopulations of propriospinal neurons. We found significant differences in expression in 37 of the 84 genes examined between these two subpopulations of propriospinal neurons with LDPT neurons exhibiting a significantly higher base line expression for all but 3 of these genes compared to TPS neurons. Conclusions Taken collectively these data indicate a broad overall down

  5. Hypomorphic Smn knockdown C2C12 myoblasts reveal intrinsic defects in myoblast fusion and myotube morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafey, Dina; Cote, Patrice D.; Kothary, Rashmi

    2005-01-01

    Dosage of the survival motor neuron (SMN) protein has been directly correlated with the severity of disease in patients diagnosed with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). It is also clear that SMA is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the degeneration of the α-motor neurons in the anterior horn of the spinal cord and atrophy of the associated skeletal muscle. What is more controversial is whether it is neuronal and/or muscle-cell-autonomous defects that are responsible for the disease per se. Although motor neuron degeneration is generally accepted as the primary event in SMA, intrinsic muscle defects in this disease have not been ruled out. To gain a better understanding of the influence of SMN protein dosage in muscle, we have generated a hypomorphic series of myoblast (C2C12) stable cell lines with variable Smn knockdown. We show that depletion of Smn in these cells resulted in a decrease in the number of nuclear 'gems' (gemini of coiled bodies), reduced proliferation with no increase in cell death, defects in myoblast fusion, and malformed myotubes. Importantly, the severity of these abnormalities is directly correlated with the decrease in Smn dosage. Taken together, our work supports the view that there is an intrinsic defect in skeletal muscle cells of SMA patients and that this defect contributes to the overall pathogenesis in this devastating disease

  6. Salicylate selectively kills cochlear spiral ganglion neurons by paradoxically up-regulating superoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lili; Ding, Dalian; Su, Jiping; Manohar, Senthilvelan; Salvi, Richard

    2013-10-01

    Aspirin and its active ingredient salicylate are potent antioxidants that have been reported to be neuro- and otoprotective. However, when consumed in large quantities, these drugs can cause temporary hearing loss and tinnitus. Moreover, recent studies indicate that after several days of treatment, salicylate selectively destroys the spiral ganglion neurons and auditory nerve fibers that relay sounds from the sensory hair cells to the brain. Why salicylate selectively damages spiral ganglion neurons while sparing the hair cells and supports cells is unclear. Here we show that high dose of salicylate trigger an apoptotic response in spiral ganglion neurons characterized morphologically by soma shrinkage and nuclear condensation and fragmentation plus activation of extrinsic initiator caspase-8 and intrinsic initiator caspase-9 several days after the onset of drug treatment. Salicylate treatment triggered an upsurge in the toxic superoxide radical only in spiral ganglion neurons, but not in neighboring hair cells and support cells. Mn TMPyP pentachloride, a cell permeable scavenger of superoxide blocked the expression of superoxide staining in spiral ganglion neurons and almost completely blocked the damage to the nerve fibers and spiral ganglion neurons. NMDA receptor activation is known to increase neuronal superoxide levels. Since NMDA receptors are mainly found on spiral ganglion neurons and since salicylate enhances NMDA receptor currents, the selective killing of spiral ganglion neurons is likely a consequence of enhanced and sustained activation of NMDA receptors by salicylate.

  7. Simulation of Code Spectrum and Code Flow of Cultured Neuronal Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Shinichi; Nishitani, Yoshi; Hosokawa, Chie; Miyoshi, Tomomitsu; Sawai, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that, in cultured neuronal networks on a multielectrode, pseudorandom-like sequences (codes) are detected, and they flow with some spatial decay constant. Each cultured neuronal network is characterized by a specific spectrum curve. That is, we may consider the spectrum curve as a "signature" of its associated neuronal network that is dependent on the characteristics of neurons and network configuration, including the weight distribution. In the present study, we used an integrate-and-fire model of neurons with intrinsic and instantaneous fluctuations of characteristics for performing a simulation of a code spectrum from multielectrodes on a 2D mesh neural network. We showed that it is possible to estimate the characteristics of neurons such as the distribution of number of neurons around each electrode and their refractory periods. Although this process is a reverse problem and theoretically the solutions are not sufficiently guaranteed, the parameters seem to be consistent with those of neurons. That is, the proposed neural network model may adequately reflect the behavior of a cultured neuronal network. Furthermore, such prospect is discussed that code analysis will provide a base of communication within a neural network that will also create a base of natural intelligence.

  8. ULTRASTRUCTURAL CHANGES OF THE NEURONAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ULTRASTRUCTURAL CHANGES OF THE NEURONAL COMPONENT IN THE DETRUSOR MUSCLE FOLLOWING SACRAL ROOT STIMULATION OF DECENTRALIZED ... Early sacral root electric stimulation decreased the incidence of neuronal degeneration in decentralized detrusor muscle, together with improving the ...

  9. Neuronal survival in the brain: neuron type-specific mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfisterer, Ulrich Gottfried; Khodosevich, Konstantin

    2017-01-01

    Neurogenic regions of mammalian brain produce many more neurons that will eventually survive and reach a mature stage. Developmental cell death affects both embryonically produced immature neurons and those immature neurons that are generated in regions of adult neurogenesis. Removal of substantial...... for survival in a certain brain region. This review focuses on how immature neurons survive during normal and impaired brain development, both in the embryonic/neonatal brain and in brain regions associated with adult neurogenesis, and emphasizes neuron type-specific mechanisms that help to survive for various...

  10. Neuronal substrate of eating disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Timofeeva, Elena; Calvez, Juliane

    2014-01-01

    Eating disorders are devastating and life-threatening psychiatric diseases. Although clinical and experimental investigations have significantly progressed in discovering the neuronal causes of eating disorders, the exact neuronal and molecular mechanisms of the development and maintenance of these pathologies are not fully understood. The complexity of the neuronal substrate of eating disorders hampers progress in revealing the precise mechanisms. The present re...

  11. Cultures of Cerebellar Granule Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Authors: Parizad M. Bilimoria and Azad Bonni1 Corresponding author ([]()) ### INTRODUCTION Primary cultures of granule neurons from the post-natal rat cerebellum provide an excellent model system for molecular and cell biological studies of neuronal development and function. The cerebellar cortex, with its highly organized structure and few neuronal subtypes, offers a well-characterized neural circuitry. Many fundamental insight...

  12. Motor neuron disease in blacks

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1989-08-19

    Aug 19, 1989 ... We reported earlier that motor neuron disease occurs more commonly among blacks than Parkinson's disease, which is relatively rare in this race group.! The hypothesis that these conditions, and other neuronal abiotrophies, are the result of previous subclinical neuronal insult and subsequent age-related.

  13. Importance and challenges of measuring intrinsic foot muscle strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Intrinsic foot muscle weakness has been implicated in a range of foot deformities and disorders. However, to establish a relationship between intrinsic muscle weakness and foot pathology, an objective measure of intrinsic muscle strength is needed. The aim of this review was to provide an overview of the anatomy and role of intrinsic foot muscles, implications of intrinsic weakness and evaluate the different methods used to measure intrinsic foot muscle strength. Method Literature was sourced from database searches of MEDLINE, PubMed, SCOPUS, Cochrane Library, PEDro and CINAHL up to June 2012. Results There is no widely accepted method of measuring intrinsic foot muscle strength. Methods to estimate toe flexor muscle strength include the paper grip test, plantar pressure, toe dynamometry, and the intrinsic positive test. Hand-held dynamometry has excellent interrater and intrarater reliability and limits toe curling, which is an action hypothesised to activate extrinsic toe flexor muscles. However, it is unclear whether any method can actually isolate intrinsic muscle strength. Also most methods measure only toe flexor strength and other actions such as toe extension and abduction have not been adequately assessed. Indirect methods to investigate intrinsic muscle structure and performance include CT, ultrasonography, MRI, EMG, and muscle biopsy. Indirect methods often discriminate between intrinsic and extrinsic muscles, but lack the ability to measure muscle force. Conclusions There are many challenges to accurately measure intrinsic muscle strength in isolation. Most studies have measured toe flexor strength as a surrogate measure of intrinsic muscle strength. Hand-held dynamometry appears to be a promising method of estimating intrinsic muscle strength. However, the contribution of extrinsic muscles cannot be excluded from toe flexor strength measurement. Future research should clarify the relative contribution of intrinsic and extrinsic muscles

  14. Premature Ventricular Contraction Coupling Interval Variability Destabilizes Cardiac Neuronal and Electrophysiological Control: Insights From Simultaneous Cardioneural Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamon, David; Rajendran, Pradeep S; Chui, Ray W; Ajijola, Olujimi A; Irie, Tadanobu; Talebi, Ramin; Salavatian, Siamak; Vaseghi, Marmar; Bradfield, Jason S; Armour, J Andrew; Ardell, Jeffrey L; Shivkumar, Kalyanam

    2017-04-01

    Variability in premature ventricular contraction (PVC) coupling interval (CI) increases the risk of cardiomyopathy and sudden death. The autonomic nervous system regulates cardiac electrical and mechanical indices, and its dysregulation plays an important role in cardiac disease pathogenesis. The impact of PVCs on the intrinsic cardiac nervous system, a neural network on the heart, remains unknown. The objective was to determine the effect of PVCs and CI on intrinsic cardiac nervous system function in generating cardiac neuronal and electric instability using a novel cardioneural mapping approach. In a porcine model (n=8), neuronal activity was recorded from a ventricular ganglion using a microelectrode array, and cardiac electrophysiological mapping was performed. Neurons were functionally classified based on their response to afferent and efferent cardiovascular stimuli, with neurons that responded to both defined as convergent (local reflex processors). Dynamic changes in neuronal activity were then evaluated in response to right ventricular outflow tract PVCs with fixed short, fixed long, and variable CI. PVC delivery elicited a greater neuronal response than all other stimuli ( P <0.001). Compared with fixed short and long CI, PVCs with variable CI had a greater impact on neuronal response ( P <0.05 versus short CI), particularly on convergent neurons ( P <0.05), as well as neurons receiving sympathetic ( P <0.05) and parasympathetic input ( P <0.05). The greatest cardiac electric instability was also observed after variable (short) CI PVCs. Variable CI PVCs affect critical populations of intrinsic cardiac nervous system neurons and alter cardiac repolarization. These changes may be critical for arrhythmogenesis and remodeling, leading to cardiomyopathy. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Positive consequences of intrinsically rewarding work: A model to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study sought to empirically test a theoretical model outlining the relationships between intrinsic rewards, intrinsic motivation, work engagement and intention to quit, in an attempt to empirically assess whether intrinsic rewards result in improved levels of motivation, engagement and retention. Using a sample of 587 ...

  16. The value of nature: Economic, intrinsic, or both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    There has been a long standing argument that ecosystems have intrinsic value and therefore there is no need to put a price tag on Mother Nature. The concept of intrinsic value reflects the perspective that nature has value in its own right, independent of human uses. Intrinsic va...

  17. Personalizing Sample Databases with Facebook Information to Increase Intrinsic Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzo, Asier; Ardaiz, Oscar; Sanz de Acedo, María Teresa; Sanz de Acedo, María Luisa

    2017-01-01

    Motivation is fundamental for students to achieve successful and complete learning. Motivation can be extrinsic, i.e., driven by external rewards, or intrinsic, i.e., driven by internal factors. Intrinsic motivation is the most effective and must be inspired by the task at hand. Here, a novel strategy is presented to increase intrinsic motivation…

  18. Intrinsic Motivation: An Overlooked Component for Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustyniak, Robert A.; Ables, Adrienne Z.; Guilford, Philip; Lujan, Heidi L.; Cortright, Ronald N.; DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsic motivation to learn involves engaging in learning opportunities because they are seen as enjoyable, interesting, or relevant to meeting one's core psychological needs. As a result, intrinsic motivation is associated with high levels of effort and task performance. Students with greater levels of intrinsic motivation demonstrate strong…

  19. The Development of Intrinsic Motivation for Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-07-01

    The Development of Intrinsic Motivation for Physical Activity by James Dunigan Beaty Bachelor of Science Central Washington...2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Development of Intrinsic Motivation for Physical Activity 5a. CONTRACT...Government." 3 ABSTRACT The Development of Intrinsic Motivation for Physical Activity by James Dunigan Beaty Cynthia Carruthers, Ph.D

  20. Elements of the Competitive Situation That Affect Intrinsic Motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, Johnmarshall; Deci, Edward L.

    1996-01-01

    Explores the effects of three elements of the competitive situation (competitive set, competitive outcome, and interpersonal context) on intrinsic motivation in a sample of college students (n=100). Competitive outcome and interpersonal context affected intrinsic motivation: winning increased intrinsic motivation, while pressured interpersonal…

  1. Innate and intrinsic antiviral immunity in skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Tatsuyoshi; Ogawa, Youichi; Aoki, Rui; Shimada, Shinji

    2014-09-01

    As the body's most exposed interface with the environment, the skin is constantly challenged by potentially pathogenic microbes, including viruses. To sense the invading viruses, various types of cells resident in the skin express many different pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) such as C-type lectin receptors (CLRs), Toll-like receptors (TLRs), nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors (NLRs), retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLRs) and cytosolic DNA sensors, that can detect the pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) of the viruses. The detection of viral PAMPs initiates two major innate immune signaling cascades: the first involves the activation of the downstream transcription factors, such as interferon regulatory factors (IRFs), nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and activator protein 1 (AP-1), which cooperate to induce the transcription of type I interferons and pro-inflammatory cytokines. The second signaling pathway involves the caspase-1-mediated processing of IL-1β and IL-18 through the formation of an inflammasome complex. Cutaneous innate immunity including the production of the innate cytokines constitutes the first line of host defence that limits the virus dissemination from the skin, and also plays an important role in the activation of adaptive immune response, which represents the second line of defence. More recently, the third immunity "intrinsic immunity" has emerged, that provides an immediate and direct antiviral defense mediated by host intrinsic restriction factors. This review focuses on the recent advances regarding the antiviral immune systems, highlighting the innate and intrinsic immunity against the viral infections in the skin, and describes how viral components are recognized by cutaneous immune systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparison of the Upper Marginal Neurons of Cortical Layer 2 with Layer 2/3 Pyramidal Neurons in Mouse Temporal Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Huan; Hasegawa, Kayoko; Liu, Mingsheng; Song, Wen-Jie

    2017-01-01

    Layer 2/3 (L2/3) excitatory neurons in the neocortex make major contributions to corticocortical connections and therefore function to integrate information across cortical areas and hemispheres. Recent evidence suggests that excitatory neurons in L2/3 can have different properties. Sparse evidence from previous studies suggests that L2 neurons located at the border between L1 and L2 (referred to as L2 marginal neurons, L2MNs), have a morphology distinct from a typical pyramidal neuron. However, whether the membrane properties and input/output properties of L2MNs are different from those of typical pyramidal neurons in L2/3 is unknown. Here we addressed these questions in a slice preparation of mouse temporal cortex. We found that L2MNs were homogeneous in intrinsic membrane properties but appeared diverse in morphology. In agreement with previous studies, L2MNs either had oblique apical dendrites or had no obvious apical dendrites. The tufts of both apical and basal dendrites of these neurons invaded L1 extensively. All L2MNs showed a regular firing pattern with moderate adaptation. Compared with typical L2/3 pyramidal neurons that showed regular spiking (RS) activity (neurons), L2MNs showed a higher firing rate, larger sag ratio, and higher input resistance. No difference in the amplitude of excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs and IPSPs, respectively), evoked by stimulation of L1, was found between the two types of neurons, but the IPSPs in L2MNs had a slower time course than those in L2/3 RS cells. In paired recordings, unitary EPSPs showed no significant differences between synapses formed by L2MNs and those formed by L2/3 RS neurons. However, short-term synaptic depression (STSD) examined with a L2MN as the presynaptic neuron was greater when another L2MN was the postsynaptic neuron than when a L2/3 RS neuron was the postsynaptic neuron. The distinct morphological features of L2MNs found here have developmental implications, and the

  3. Comparison of the Upper Marginal Neurons of Cortical Layer 2 with Layer 2/3 Pyramidal Neurons in Mouse Temporal Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Luo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Layer 2/3 (L2/3 excitatory neurons in the neocortex make major contributions to corticocortical connections and therefore function to integrate information across cortical areas and hemispheres. Recent evidence suggests that excitatory neurons in L2/3 can have different properties. Sparse evidence from previous studies suggests that L2 neurons located at the border between L1 and L2 (referred to as L2 marginal neurons, L2MNs, have a morphology distinct from a typical pyramidal neuron. However, whether the membrane properties and input/output properties of L2MNs are different from those of typical pyramidal neurons in L2/3 is unknown. Here we addressed these questions in a slice preparation of mouse temporal cortex. We found that L2MNs were homogeneous in intrinsic membrane properties but appeared diverse in morphology. In agreement with previous studies, L2MNs either had oblique apical dendrites or had no obvious apical dendrites. The tufts of both apical and basal dendrites of these neurons invaded L1 extensively. All L2MNs showed a regular firing pattern with moderate adaptation. Compared with typical L2/3 pyramidal neurons that showed regular spiking (RS activity (neurons, L2MNs showed a higher firing rate, larger sag ratio, and higher input resistance. No difference in the amplitude of excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs and IPSPs, respectively, evoked by stimulation of L1, was found between the two types of neurons, but the IPSPs in L2MNs had a slower time course than those in L2/3 RS cells. In paired recordings, unitary EPSPs showed no significant differences between synapses formed by L2MNs and those formed by L2/3 RS neurons. However, short-term synaptic depression (STSD examined with a L2MN as the presynaptic neuron was greater when another L2MN was the postsynaptic neuron than when a L2/3 RS neuron was the postsynaptic neuron. The distinct morphological features of L2MNs found here have developmental implications

  4. Metacognitive mastery and intrinsic motivation in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vohs, Jenifer L; Lysaker, Paul H

    2014-01-01

    Deficits in intrinsic motivation (IM) have been linked to poorer outcome in schizophrenia, but its proximal mechanisms remain poorly understood. This study examined whether metacognitive mastery, or the capacity to use knowledge of self, others, and context to identify and cope with psychological difficulties, predicted levels of IM for 6 months among 75 participants with prolonged schizophrenia. Repeated-measures analysis of variance revealed that high metacognitive mastery predicted consistently higher levels of IM; however, intermediate and low mastery did not produce unique IM profiles. The findings suggest that metacognitive mastery may have an important role in IM over time and could be a meaningful treatment target.

  5. Symplectic Structure of Intrinsic Time Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyo Eyo Ita

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Poisson structure of intrinsic time gravity is analysed. With the starting point comprising a unimodular three-metric with traceless momentum, a trace-induced anomaly results upon quantization. This leads to a revision of the choice of momentum variable to the (mixed index traceless momentric. This latter choice unitarily implements the fundamental commutation relations, which now take on the form of an affine algebra with SU(3 Lie algebra amongst the momentric variables. The resulting relations unitarily implement tracelessness upon quantization. The associated Poisson brackets and Hamiltonian dynamics are studied.

  6. Intrinsically conductive polymer thin film piezoresistors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillemose, Michael; Spieser, Martin; Christiansen, N.O.

    2008-01-01

    We report on the piezoresistive effect in the intrinsically conductive polymer, polyaniline. A process recipe for indirect patterning of thin film polyaniline has been developed. Using a specially designed chip, the polyaniline thin films have been characterised with respect to resistivity...... and strain sensitivity using two- and four-point measurement method. We have found that polyaniline has a negative gauge factor of K = -4.9, which makes it a candidate for piezoresistive read-out in polymer based MEMS-devices. (C) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  7. Intrinsic chirp of single-cycle pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Qiang; Zheng Jian; Dai Jianming; Ho, I-Chen; Zhang, X.-C.

    2010-01-01

    The Fourier transform-limited electromagnetic pulse has been regarded to be free of chirps for a long time. This is no longer true if the pulse duration goes down to or less than one optical cycle. We report the experimental observation of intrinsic chirps in such pulses with the sub-single-cycle terahertz (THz) waveforms obtained with a standard THz time-domain spectroscopy system. The results confirm the break down of the carrier-envelope (CE) expression for single-cycle optical pulses, and may influence the experimental measurements and theoretical modeling with single-cycle pulses.

  8. A Unifying Framework of Synaptic and Intrinsic Plasticity in Neural Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leugering, Johannes; Pipa, Gordon

    2018-01-17

    A neuronal population is a computational unit that receives a multivariate, time-varying input signal and creates a related multivariate output. These neural signals are modeled as stochastic processes that transmit information in real time, subject to stochastic noise. In a stationary environment, where the input signals can be characterized by constant statistical properties, the systematic relationship between its input and output processes determines the computation carried out by a population. When these statistical characteristics unexpectedly change, the population needs to adapt to its new environment if it is to maintain stable operation. Based on the general concept of homeostatic plasticity, we propose a simple compositional model of adaptive networks that achieve invariance with regard to undesired changes in the statistical properties of their input signals and maintain outputs with well-defined joint statistics. To achieve such invariance, the network model combines two functionally distinct types of plasticity. An abstract stochastic process neuron model implements a generalized form of intrinsic plasticity that adapts marginal statistics, relying only on mechanisms locally confined within each neuron and operating continuously in time, while a simple form of Hebbian synaptic plasticity operates on synaptic connections, thus shaping the interrelation between neurons as captured by a copula function. The combined effect of both mechanisms allows a neuron population to discover invariant representations of its inputs that remain stable under a wide range of transformations (e.g., shifting, scaling and (affine linear) mixing). The probabilistic model of homeostatic adaptation on a population level as presented here allows us to isolate and study the individual and the interaction dynamics of both mechanisms of plasticity and could guide the future search for computationally beneficial types of adaptation.

  9. A Small Potassium Current in AgRP/NPY Neurons Regulates Feeding Behavior and Energy Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanlin He

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Neurons that co-express agouti-related peptide (AgRP and neuropeptide Y (NPY are indispensable for normal feeding behavior. Firing activities of AgRP/NPY neurons are dynamically regulated by energy status and coordinate appropriate feeding behavior to meet nutritional demands. However, intrinsic mechanisms that regulate AgRP/NPY neural activities during the fed-to-fasted transition are not fully understood. We found that AgRP/NPY neurons in satiated mice express high levels of the small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel 3 (SK3 and are inhibited by SK3-mediated potassium currents; on the other hand, food deprivation suppresses SK3 expression in AgRP/NPY neurons, and the decreased SK3-mediated currents contribute to fasting-induced activation of these neurons. Genetic mutation of SK3 specifically in AgRP/NPY neurons leads to increased sensitivity to diet-induced obesity, associated with chronic hyperphagia and decreased energy expenditure. Our results identify SK3 as a key intrinsic mediator that coordinates nutritional status with AgRP/NPY neural activities and animals’ feeding behavior and energy metabolism.

  10. Cholera Toxin Induces Sustained Hyperexcitability in Myenteric, but Not Submucosal, AH Neurons in Guinea Pig Jejunum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel C. Bornstein

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Cholera toxin (CT-induced hypersecretion requires activation of secretomotor pathways in the enteric nervous system (ENS. AH neurons, which have been identified as a population of intrinsic sensory neurons (ISNs, are a source of excitatory input to the secretomotor pathways. We therefore examined effects of CT in the intestinal lumen on myenteric and submucosal AH neurons.Methods: Isolated segments of guinea pig jejunum were incubated for 90 min with saline plus CT (12.5 μg/ml or CT + neurotransmitter antagonist, or CT + tetrodotoxin (TTX in their lumen. After washing CT away, submucosal or myenteric plexus preparations were dissected keeping circumferentially adjacent mucosa intact. Submucosal AH neurons were impaled adjacent to intact mucosa and myenteric AH neurons were impaled adjacent to, more than 5 mm from, and in the absence of intact mucosa. Neuronal excitability was monitored by injecting 500 ms current pulses through the recording electrode.Results: After CT pre-treatment, excitability of myenteric AH neurons adjacent to intact mucosa (n = 29 was greater than that of control neurons (n = 24, but submucosal AH neurons (n = 33, control n = 27 were unaffected. CT also induced excitability increases in myenteric AH neurons impaled distant from the mucosa (n = 6 or in its absence (n = 5. Coincubation with tetrodotoxin or SR142801 (NK3 receptor antagonist, but not SR140333 (NK1 antagonist or granisetron (5-HT3 receptor antagonist prevented the increased excitability induced by CT. Increased excitability was associated with a reduction in the characteristic AHP and an increase in the ADP of these neurons, but not a change in the hyperpolarization-activated inward current, Ih.Conclusions: CT increases excitability of myenteric, but not submucosal, AH neurons. This is neurally mediated and depends on NK3, but not 5-HT3 receptors. Therefore, CT may act to amplify the secretomotor response to CT via an increase in the

  11. Adenosine Inhibits the Excitatory Synaptic Inputs to Basal Forebrain Cholinergic, GABAergic and Parvalbumin Neurons in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun eYang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Coffee and tea contain the stimulants caffeine and theophylline. These compounds act as antagonists of adenosine receptors. Adenosine promotes sleep and its extracellular concentration rises in association with prolonged wakefulness, particularly in the basal forebrain (BF region involved in activating the cerebral cortex. However, the effect of adenosine on identified BF neurons, especially non-cholinergic neurons, is incompletely understood. Here we used whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in mouse brain slices prepared from two validated transgenic mouse lines with fluorescent proteins expressed in GABAergic or parvalbumin (PV neurons to determine the effect of adenosine. Whole-cell recordings were made BF cholinergic neurons and from BF GABAergic & PV neurons with the size (>20 µm and intrinsic membrane properties (prominent H-currents corresponding to cortically projecting neurons. A brief (2 min bath application of adenosine (100 μM decreased the frequency but not the amplitude of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents in all groups of BF cholinergic, GABAergic and PV neurons we recorded. In addition, adenosine decreased the frequency of miniature EPSCs in BF cholinergic neurons. Adenosine had no effect on the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in cholinergic neurons or GABAergic neurons with large H-currents but reduced them in a group of GABAergic neurons with smaller H-currents. All effects of adenosine were blocked by a selective, adenosine A1 receptor antagonist, cyclopentyltheophylline (CPT, 1 μM. Adenosine had no postsynaptic effects. Taken together, our work suggests that adenosine promotes sleep by an A1-receptor mediated inhibition of glutamatergic inputs to cortically-projecting cholinergic and GABA/PV neurons. Conversely, caffeine and theophylline promote attentive wakefulness by inhibiting these A1 receptors in BF thereby promoting the high-frequency oscillations in the cortex required for

  12. Apoptosis of Limb Innervating Motor Neurons and Erosion of Motor Pool Identity Upon Lineage Specific Dicer Inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun-An; Wichterle, Hynek

    2012-01-01

    Diversification of mammalian spinal motor neurons into hundreds of subtypes is critical for the maintenance of body posture and coordination of complex movements. Motor neuron differentiation is controlled by extrinsic signals that regulate intrinsic genetic programs specifying and consolidating motor neuron subtype identity. While transcription factors have been recognized as principal regulators of the intrinsic program, the role of posttranscriptional regulations has not been systematically tested. MicroRNAs produced by Dicer mediated cleavage of RNA hairpins contribute to gene regulation by posttranscriptional silencing. Here we used Olig2-cre conditional deletion of Dicer gene in motor neuron progenitors to examine effects of miRNA biogenesis disruption on postmitotic spinal motor neurons. We report that despite the initial increase in the number of motor neuron progenitors, disruption of Dicer function results in a loss of many limb- and sympathetic ganglia-innervating spinal motor neurons. Furthermore, it leads to defects in motor pool identity specification. Thus, our results indicate that miRNAs are an integral part of the genetic program controlling motor neuron survival and acquisition of subtype specific properties. PMID:22629237

  13. Imitation learning based on an intrinsic motivation mechanism for efficient coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triesch, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    A hypothesis regarding the development of imitation learning is presented that is rooted in intrinsic motivations. It is derived from a recently proposed form of intrinsically motivated learning (IML) for efficient coding in active perception, wherein an agent learns to perform actions with its sense organs to facilitate efficient encoding of the sensory data. To this end, actions of the sense organs that improve the encoding of the sensory data trigger an internally generated reinforcement signal. Here it is argued that the same IML mechanism might also support the development of imitation when general actions beyond those of the sense organs are considered: The learner first observes a tutor performing a behavior and learns a model of the the behavior's sensory consequences. The learner then acts itself and receives an internally generated reinforcement signal reflecting how well the sensory consequences of its own behavior are encoded by the sensory model. Actions that are more similar to those of the tutor will lead to sensory signals that are easier to encode and produce a higher reinforcement signal. Through this, the learner's behavior is progressively tuned to make the sensory consequences of its actions match the learned sensory model. I discuss this mechanism in the context of human language acquisition and bird song learning where similar ideas have been proposed. The suggested mechanism also offers an account for the development of mirror neurons and makes a number of predictions. Overall, it establishes a connection between principles of efficient coding, intrinsic motivations and imitation.

  14. Imitation Learning Based on an Intrinsic Motivation Mechanism for Efficient Coding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen eTriesch

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A hypothesis regarding the development of imitation learning is presented that is rooted in intrinsic motivations. It is derived from a recently proposed form of intrinsically motivated learning (IML for efficient coding in active perception, wherein an agent learns to perform actions with its sense organs to facilitate efficient encoding of the sensory data. To this end, actions of the sense organs that improve the encoding of the sensory data trigger an internally generated reinforcement signal. Here it is argued that the same IML mechanism might also support the development of imitation when general actions beyond those of the sense organs are considered: The learner first observes a tutor performing a behavior and learns a model of the the behavior's sensory consequences. The learner then acts itself and receives an internally generated reinforcement signal reflecting how well the sensory consequences of its own behavior are encoded by the sensory model. Actions that are more similar to those of the tutor will lead to sensory signals that are easier to encode and produce a higher reinforcement signal. Through this, the learner's behavior is progressively tuned to make the sensory consequences of its actions match the learned sensory model. I discuss this mechanism in the context of human language acquisition and bird song learning where similar ideas have been proposed. The suggested mechanism also offers an account for the development of mirror neurons and makes a number of predictions. Overall, it establishes a connection between principles of efficient coding, intrinsic motivations and imitation.

  15. Logarithmic distributions prove that intrinsic learning is Hebbian [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Scheler

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present data for the lognormal distributions of spike rates, synaptic weights and intrinsic excitability (gain for neurons in various brain areas, such as auditory or visual cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum, striatum, midbrain nuclei. We find a remarkable consistency of heavy-tailed, specifically lognormal, distributions for rates, weights and gains in all brain areas examined. The difference between strongly recurrent and feed-forward connectivity (cortex vs. striatum and cerebellum, neurotransmitter (GABA (striatum or glutamate (cortex or the level of activation (low in cortex, high in Purkinje cells and midbrain nuclei turns out to be irrelevant for this feature. Logarithmic scale distribution of weights and gains appears to be a general, functional property in all cases analyzed. We then created a generic neural model to investigate adaptive learning rules that create and maintain lognormal distributions. We conclusively demonstrate that not only weights, but also intrinsic gains, need to have strong Hebbian learning in order to produce and maintain the experimentally attested distributions. This provides a solution to the long-standing question about the type of plasticity exhibited by intrinsic excitability.

  16. Tinbergen on mirror neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Heyes, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Fifty years ago, Niko Tinbergen defined the scope of behavioural biology with his four problems: causation, ontogeny, survival value and evolution. About 20 years ago, there was another highly significant development in behavioural biology—the discovery of mirror neurons (MNs). Here, I use Tinbergen's original four problems (rather than the list that appears in textbooks) to highlight the differences between two prominent accounts of MNs, the genetic and associative accounts; to suggest that ...

  17. Cell swelling and ion redistribution assessed with intrinsic optical signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WITTE OTTO W.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell volume changes are associated with alterations of intrinsic optical signals (IOS. In submerged brain slices in vitro, afferent stimulation induces an increase in light transmission. As assessed by measurement of the largely membrane impermeant ion tetramethylammonium (TMA in the extracellular space, these IOS correlate with the extent and time course of the change of the extracellular space size. They have a high signal to noise ratio and allow measurements of IOS changes in the order of a few percent. Under conditions of reduced net KCl uptake (low Cl solution a directed spatial buffer mechanism (K syphoning can be demonstrated in the neocortex with widening of the extracellular space in superficial layers associated with a reduced light transmission and an increase of extracellular K concentration. The nature of the IOS under pathophysiological conditions is less clear. Spreading depressions first cause an increase of light transmission, then a decrease. Such a decrease has also been observed following application of NMDA where it was associated with structural damage. Pharmacological analyses suggest that under physiological conditions changes of extracellular space size are mainly caused by astrocytic volume changes while with strong stimuli and under pathophysiological conditions also neuronal swelling occurs. With reflected light usually signals opposite to those observed with transmitted light are seen. Recording of IOS from interface slices gives very complex signals since under these conditions an increase of light transmission has been reported to be superimposed by a decrease of the signal due to mechanical lensing effects of the slice surface. Depending on the method of measurement and the exact conditions, several mechanisms may contribute to IOS. Under well defined conditions IOS are a useful supplementary tool to monitor changes of extracellular volume both in space and time.

  18. Blueberries and neuronal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukitt-Hale, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    As the population of people in the United States over the age of 65 years continues to increase, so too will the incidence of age-related pathologies, including decreases in cognitive and motor function. In cases of severe deficits in memory or motor function, hospitalization and/or custodial care would be a likely outcome. This means that unless some way is found to reduce these age-related decrements in neuronal function, health care costs will continue to rise exponentially. Evidence is accumulating that consumption of blueberries may be one strategy to forestall or even reverse age-related neuronal deficits, as well as their subsequent behavioral manifestations, in order to increase healthy aging. Research suggests that the polyphenolic compounds found in blueberries exert their beneficial effects either through their ability to lower oxidative stress and inflammation or directly by altering the signaling involved in neuronal communication. These interventions, in turn, may protect against age-related deficits in cognitive and motor function. Appropriately, the US Department of Agriculture has figured prominently in these discoveries, through the efforts of two USDA researchers who worked for the department 100 years apart. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. The Neglected Intrinsic Resistome of Bacterial Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo, Alicia; Martínez-Martín, Nadia; Mercadillo, María; Galán, Juan C.; Ghysels, Bart; Matthijs, Sandra; Cornelis, Pierre; Wiehlmann, Lutz; Tümmler, Burkhard; Baquero, Fernando; Martínez, José L.

    2008-01-01

    Bacteria with intrinsic resistance to antibiotics are a worrisome health problem. It is widely believed that intrinsic antibiotic resistance of bacterial pathogens is mainly the consequence of cellular impermeability and activity of efflux pumps. However, the analysis of transposon-tagged Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants presented in this article shows that this phenotype emerges from the action of numerous proteins from all functional categories. Mutations in some genes make P. aeruginosa more susceptible to antibiotics and thereby represent new targets. Mutations in other genes make P. aeruginosa more resistant and therefore define novel mechanisms for mutation-driven acquisition of antibiotic resistance, opening a new research field based in the prediction of resistance before it emerges in clinical environments. Antibiotics are not just weapons against bacterial competitors, but also natural signalling molecules. Our results demonstrate that antibiotic resistance genes are not merely protective shields and offer a more comprehensive view of the role of antibiotic resistance genes in the clinic and in nature. PMID:18286176

  20. A tonoplast intrinsic protein in Gardenia jasminoides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lan; Li, Hao-Ming

    2017-08-01

    Physiological and molecular studies proved that plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) and tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs) subfamily of aquaporins play key functions in plant water homeostasis. Five specialized subgroups (TIP1-5) of TIPs have been found in higher plants, in which the TIP1 and TIP2 isoforms are the largest arbitrary groups. TIPs have high water-transport activity than PIPs, some TIPs can transport other small molecule such as urea, ammonia, hydrogen peroxide, and carbon dioxide. In this work, the structure of the putative tonoplast aquaporin from Gardenia jasminoides (GjTIP) was analyzed. Its transcript level has increased during fruit maturation. A phylogenetic analysis indicates that the protein belongs to TIP1 subfamily. A three-dimensional model structure of GjTIP was built based on crystal structure of an ammonia-permeable AtTIP2-1 from Arabidopsis thaliana. The model structure displayed as a homo-tetramer, each monomer has six trans-membrane and two half-membrane-spanning α helices. The data suggests that the GjTIP has tendency to be a mixed function aquaporin, might involve in water, urea and hydrogen peroxide transport, and the gating machanism founded in some AQPs involving pH and phosphorylation response have not been proved in GjTIP.

  1. Intrinsic regulation of enteroendocrine fate by Numb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallé, Jérémy; Gervais, Louis; Boumard, Benjamin; Stefanutti, Marine; Siudeja, Katarzyna; Bardin, Allison J

    2017-07-03

    How terminal cell fates are specified in dynamically renewing adult tissues is not well understood. Here we explore terminal cell fate establishment during homeostasis using the enteroendocrine cells (EEs) of the adult Drosophila midgut as a paradigm. Our data argue against the existence of local feedback signals, and we identify Numb as an intrinsic regulator of EE fate. Our data further indicate that Numb, with alpha-adaptin, acts upstream or in parallel of known regulators of EE fate to limit Notch signaling, thereby facilitating EE fate acquisition. We find that Numb is regulated in part through its asymmetric and symmetric distribution during stem cell divisions; however, its de novo synthesis is also required during the differentiation of the EE cell. Thus, this work identifies Numb as a crucial factor for cell fate choice in the adult Drosophila intestine. Furthermore, our findings demonstrate that cell-intrinsic control mechanisms of terminal cell fate acquisition can result in a balanced tissue-wide production of terminally differentiated cell types. © 2017 The Authors.

  2. Intrinsic position uncertainty impairs overt search performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semizer, Yelda; Michel, Melchi M

    2017-08-01

    Uncertainty regarding the position of the search target is a fundamental component of visual search. However, due to perceptual limitations of the human visual system, this uncertainty can arise from intrinsic, as well as extrinsic, sources. The current study sought to characterize the role of intrinsic position uncertainty (IPU) in overt visual search and to determine whether it significantly limits human search performance. After completing a preliminary detection experiment to characterize sensitivity as a function of visual field position, observers completed a search task that required localizing a Gabor target within a field of synthetic luminance noise. The search experiment included two clutter conditions designed to modulate the effect of IPU across search displays of varying set size. In the Cluttered condition, the display was tiled uniformly with feature clutter to maximize the effects of IPU. In the Uncluttered condition, the clutter at irrelevant locations was removed to attenuate the effects of IPU. Finally, we derived an IPU-constrained ideal searcher model, limited by the IPU measured in human observers. Ideal searchers were simulated based on the detection sensitivity and fixation sequences measured for individual human observers. The IPU-constrained ideal searcher predicted performance trends similar to those exhibited by the human observers. In the Uncluttered condition, performance decreased steeply as a function of increasing set size. However, in the Cluttered condition, the effect of IPU dominated and performance was approximately constant as a function of set size. Our findings suggest that IPU substantially limits overt search performance, especially in crowded displays.

  3. The neglected intrinsic resistome of bacterial pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Fajardo

    Full Text Available Bacteria with intrinsic resistance to antibiotics are a worrisome health problem. It is widely believed that intrinsic antibiotic resistance of bacterial pathogens is mainly the consequence of cellular impermeability and activity of efflux pumps. However, the analysis of transposon-tagged Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants presented in this article shows that this phenotype emerges from the action of numerous proteins from all functional categories. Mutations in some genes make P. aeruginosa more susceptible to antibiotics and thereby represent new targets. Mutations in other genes make P. aeruginosa more resistant and therefore define novel mechanisms for mutation-driven acquisition of antibiotic resistance, opening a new research field based in the prediction of resistance before it emerges in clinical environments. Antibiotics are not just weapons against bacterial competitors, but also natural signalling molecules. Our results demonstrate that antibiotic resistance genes are not merely protective shields and offer a more comprehensive view of the role of antibiotic resistance genes in the clinic and in nature.

  4. Intrinsic terminators in Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsch, Tiago Ebert; Siqueira, Franciele Maboni; Schrank, Irene Silveira

    2015-04-08

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, an important pathogen of swine, exhibits a low guanine and cytosine (GC) content genome. M. hyopneumoniae genome is organised in long transcriptional units and promoter sequences have been mapped upstream of all transcription units. These analysis provided insights into the gene organisation and transcription initiation at the genome scale. However, the presence of transcriptional terminator sequences in the M. hyopneumoniae genome is poorly understood. In silico analyses demonstrated the presence of putative terminators in 82% of the 33 monocistronic units (mCs) and in 74% of the 116 polycistronic units (pCs) considering different classes of terminators. The functional activity of 23 intrinsic terminators was confirmed by RT-PCR and qPCR. Analysis of all terminators found by three software algorithms, combined with experimental results, allowed us to propose a pattern of RNA hairpin formation during the termination process and to predict the location of terminators in the M. hyopneumoniae genome sequence. The stem-loop structures of intrinsic terminators of mycoplasma diverge from the pattern of terminators found in other bacteria due the low content of guanine and cytosine. In M. hyopneumoniae, transcription can end after a transcriptional unit and before its terminator sequence and can also continue past the terminator sequence with RNA polymerases gradually releasing the RNA.

  5. Intrinsically disordered proteins drive membrane curvature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, David J; Houser, Justin R; Hayden, Carl C; Sherman, Michael B; Lafer, Eileen M; Stachowiak, Jeanne C

    2015-07-24

    Assembly of highly curved membrane structures is essential to cellular physiology. The prevailing view has been that proteins with curvature-promoting structural motifs, such as wedge-like amphipathic helices and crescent-shaped BAR domains, are required for bending membranes. Here we report that intrinsically disordered domains of the endocytic adaptor proteins, Epsin1 and AP180 are highly potent drivers of membrane curvature. This result is unexpected since intrinsically disordered domains lack a well-defined three-dimensional structure. However, in vitro measurements of membrane curvature and protein diffusivity demonstrate that the large hydrodynamic radii of these domains generate steric pressure that drives membrane bending. When disordered adaptor domains are expressed as transmembrane cargo in mammalian cells, they are excluded from clathrin-coated pits. We propose that a balance of steric pressure on the two surfaces of the membrane drives this exclusion. These results provide quantitative evidence for the influence of steric pressure on the content and assembly of curved cellular membrane structures.

  6. Intrinsically secure fast reactors with dense cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slessarev, Igor

    2007-01-01

    Secure safety, resistance to weapons material proliferation and problems of long-lived wastes remain the most important 'painful points' of nuclear power. Many innovative reactor concepts have been developed aimed at a radical enhancement of safety. The promising potential of innovative nuclear reactors allows for shifting accents in current reactor safety 'strategy' to reveal this worth. Such strategy is elaborated focusing on the priority for intrinsically secure safety features as well as on sure protection being provided by the first barrier of defence. Concerning the potential of fast reactors (i.e. sodium cooled, lead-cooled, etc.), there are no doubts that they are able to possess many favourable intrinsically secure safety features and to lay the proper foundation for a new reactor generation. However, some of their neutronic characteristics have to be radically improved. Among intrinsically secure safety properties, the following core parameters are significantly important: reactivity margin values, reactivity feed-back and coolant void effects. Ways of designing intrinsically secure safety features in fast reactors (titled hereafter as Intrinsically Secure Fast Reactors - ISFR) can be found in the frame of current reactor technologies by radical enhancement of core neutron economy and by optimization of core compositions. Simultaneously, respecting resistance to proliferation, by using non-enriched fuel feed as well as a core breeding gain close to zero, are considered as the important features (long-lived waste problems will be considered in a separate paper). This implies using the following reactor design options as well as closed fuel cycles with natural U as the reactor feed: ·Ultra-plate 'dense cores' of the ordinary (monolithic) type with negative total coolant void effects. ·Modular type cores. Multiple dense modules can be embedded in the common reflector for achieving the desired NPP total power. The modules can be used also independently (as

  7. The Neuroscience of Growth Mindset and Intrinsic Motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Betsy

    2018-01-26

    Our actions can be triggered by intentions, incentives or intrinsic values. Recent neuroscientific research has yielded some results about the growth mindset and intrinsic motivation. With the advances in neuroscience and motivational studies, there is a global need to utilize this information to inform educational practice and research. Yet, little is known about the neuroscientific interplay between growth mindset and intrinsic motivation. This paper attempts to draw on the theories of growth mindset and intrinsic motivation, together with contemporary ideas in neuroscience, outline the potential for neuroscientific research in education. It aims to shed light on the relationship between growth mindset and intrinsic motivation in terms of supporting a growth mindset to facilitate intrinsic motivation through neural responses. Recent empirical research from the educational neuroscience perspective that provides insights into the interplay between growth mindset and intrinsic motivation will also be discussed.

  8. Local gene expression in axons and nerve endings: the glia-neuron unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuditta, Antonio; Chun, Jong Tai; Eyman, Maria; Cefaliello, Carolina; Bruno, Anna Paola; Crispino, Marianna

    2008-04-01

    Neurons have complex and often extensively elongated processes. This unique cell morphology raises the problem of how remote neuronal territories are replenished with proteins. For a long time, axonal and presynaptic proteins were thought to be exclusively synthesized in the cell body, which delivered them to peripheral sites by axoplasmic transport. Despite this early belief, protein has been shown to be synthesized in axons and nerve terminals, substantially alleviating the trophic burden of the perikaryon. This observation raised the question of the cellular origin of the peripheral RNAs involved in protein synthesis. The synthesis of these RNAs was initially attributed to the neuron soma almost by default. However, experimental data and theoretical considerations support the alternative view that axonal and presynaptic RNAs are also transcribed in the flanking glial cells and transferred to the axon domain of mature neurons. Altogether, these data suggest that axons and nerve terminals are served by a distinct gene expression system largely independent of the neuron cell body. Such a local system would allow the neuron periphery to respond promptly to environmental stimuli. This view has the theoretical merit of extending to axons and nerve terminals the marginalized concept of a glial supply of RNA (and protein) to the neuron cell body. Most long-term plastic changes requiring de novo gene expression occur in these domains, notably in presynaptic endings, despite their intrinsic lack of transcriptional capacity. This review enlightens novel perspectives on the biology and pathobiology of the neuron by critically reviewing these issues.

  9. Target-specific M1 inputs to infragranular S1 pyramidal neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanselow, Erika E.; Simons, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    The functional role of input from the primary motor cortex (M1) to primary somatosensory cortex (S1) is unclear; one key to understanding this pathway may lie in elucidating the cell-type specific microcircuits that connect S1 and M1. Recently, we discovered that a subset of pyramidal neurons in the infragranular layers of S1 receive especially strong input from M1 (Kinnischtzke AK, Simons DJ, Fanselow EE. Cereb Cortex 24: 2237–2248, 2014), suggesting that M1 may affect specific classes of pyramidal neurons differently. Here, using combined optogenetic and retrograde labeling approaches in the mouse, we examined the strengths of M1 inputs to five classes of infragranular S1 neurons categorized by their projections to particular cortical and subcortical targets. We found that the magnitude of M1 synaptic input to S1 pyramidal neurons varies greatly depending on the projection target of the postsynaptic neuron. Of the populations examined, M1-projecting corticocortical neurons in L6 received the strongest M1 inputs, whereas ventral posterior medial nucleus-projecting corticothalamic neurons, also located in L6, received the weakest. Each population also possessed distinct intrinsic properties. The results suggest that M1 differentially engages specific classes of S1 projection neurons, thereby regulating the motor-related influence S1 exerts over subcortical structures. PMID:27334960

  10. En masse in vitro functional profiling of the axonal mechanosensitivity of sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usoskin, Dmitry; Zilberter, Misha; Linnarsson, Sten; Hjerling-Leffler, Jens; Uhlén, Per; Harkany, Tibor; Ernfors, Patrik

    2010-09-14

    Perception of the environment relies on somatosensory neurons. Mechanosensory, proprioceptor and many nociceptor subtypes of these neurons have specific mechanosensitivity profiles to adequately differentiate stimulus patterns. Nevertheless, the cellular basis of differential mechanosensation remains largely elusive. Successful transduction of sensory information relies on the recruitment of sensory neurons and mechanosensation occurring at their peripheral axonal endings in vivo. Conspicuously, existing in vitro models aimed to decipher molecular mechanisms of mechanosensation test single sensory neuron somata at any one time. Here, we introduce a compartmental in vitro chamber design to deliver precisely controlled mechanical stimulation of sensory axons with synchronous real-time imaging of Ca(2+) transients in neuronal somata that reliably reflect action potential firing patterns. We report of three previously not characterized types of mechanosensitive neuron subpopulations with distinct intrinsic axonal properties tuned specifically to static indentation or vibration stimuli, showing that different classes of sensory neurons are tuned to specific types of mechanical stimuli. Primary receptor currents of vibration neurons display rapidly adapting conductance reliably detected for every single stimulus during vibration and are consistently converted into action potentials. This result allows for the characterization of two critical steps of mechanosensation in vivo: primary signal detection and signal conversion into specific action potential firing patterns in axons.

  11. Familiarity Detection is an Intrinsic Property of Cortical Microcircuits with Bidirectional Synaptic Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Humans instantly recognize a previously seen face as “familiar.” To deepen our understanding of familiarity-novelty detection, we simulated biologically plausible neural network models of generic cortical microcircuits consisting of spiking neurons with random recurrent synaptic connections. NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-dependent synaptic plasticity was implemented to allow for unsupervised learning and bidirectional modifications. Network spiking activity evoked by sensory inputs consisting of face images altered synaptic efficacy, which resulted in the network responding more strongly to a previously seen face than a novel face. Network size determined how many faces could be accurately recognized as familiar. When the simulated model became sufficiently complex in structure, multiple familiarity traces could be retained in the same network by forming partially-overlapping subnetworks that differ slightly from each other, thereby resulting in a high storage capacity. Fisher’s discriminant analysis was applied to identify critical neurons whose spiking activity predicted familiar input patterns. Intriguingly, as sensory exposure was prolonged, the selected critical neurons tended to appear at deeper layers of the network model, suggesting recruitment of additional circuits in the network for incremental information storage. We conclude that generic cortical microcircuits with bidirectional synaptic plasticity have an intrinsic ability to detect familiar inputs. This ability does not require a specialized wiring diagram or supervision and can therefore be expected to emerge naturally in developing cortical circuits. PMID:28534043

  12. Conditional induction of Math1 specifies embryonic stem cells to cerebellar granule neuron lineage and promotes differentiation into mature granule neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Rupali; Kumar, Manoj; Peineau, Stéphane; Csaba, Zsolt; Mani, Shyamala; Gressens, Pierre; El Ghouzzi, Vincent

    2013-04-01

    Directing differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) to specific neuronal subtype is critical for modeling disease pathology in vitro. An attractive means of action would be to combine regulatory differentiation factors and extrinsic inductive signals added to the culture medium. In this study, we have generated mature cerebellar granule neurons by combining a temporally controlled transient expression of Math1, a master gene in granule neuron differentiation, with inductive extrinsic factors involved in cerebellar development. Using a Tetracyclin-On transactivation system, we overexpressed Math1 at various stages of ESCs differentiation and found that the yield of progenitors was considerably increased when Math1 was induced during embryonic body stage. Math1 triggered expression of Mbh1 and Mbh2, two target genes directly involved in granule neuron precursor formation and strong expression of early cerebellar territory markers En1 and NeuroD1. Three weeks after induction, we observed a decrease in the number of glial cells and an increase in that of neurons albeit still immature. Combining Math1 induction with extrinsic factors specifically increased the number of neurons that expressed Pde1c, Zic1, and GABAα6R characteristic of mature granule neurons, formed "T-shaped" axons typical of granule neurons, and generated synaptic contacts and action potentials in vitro. Finally, in vivo implantation of Math1-induced progenitors into young adult mice resulted in cell migration and settling of newly generated neurons in the cerebellum. These results show that conditional induction of Math1 drives ESCs toward the cerebellar fate and indicate that acting on both intrinsic and extrinsic factors is a powerful means to modulate ESCs differentiation and maturation into a specific neuronal lineage. Copyright © 2012 AlphaMed Press.

  13. Synchronization stability and pattern selection in a memristive neuronal network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunni; Lv, Mi; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Ma, Jun

    2017-11-01

    Spatial pattern formation and selection depend on the intrinsic self-organization and cooperation between nodes in spatiotemporal systems. Based on a memory neuron model, a regular network with electromagnetic induction is proposed to investigate the synchronization and pattern selection. In our model, the memristor is used to bridge the coupling between the magnetic flux and the membrane potential, and the induction current results from the time-varying electromagnetic field contributed by the exchange of ion currents and the distribution of charged ions. The statistical factor of synchronization predicts the transition of synchronization and pattern stability. The bifurcation analysis of the sampled time series for the membrane potential reveals the mode transition in electrical activity and pattern selection. A formation mechanism is outlined to account for the emergence of target waves. Although an external stimulus is imposed on each neuron uniformly, the diversity in the magnetic flux and the induction current leads to emergence of target waves in the studied network.

  14. Astroglial networks promote neuronal coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chever, Oana; Dossi, Elena; Pannasch, Ulrike; Derangeon, Mickael; Rouach, Nathalie

    2016-01-12

    Astrocytes interact with neurons to regulate network activity. Although the gap junction subunits connexin 30 and connexin 43 mediate the formation of extensive astroglial networks that cover large functional neuronal territories, their role in neuronal synchronization remains unknown. Using connexin 30- and connexin 43-deficient mice, we showed that astroglial networks promoted sustained population bursts in hippocampal slices by setting the basal active state of neurons. Astroglial networks limited excessive neuronal depolarization induced by spontaneous synaptic activity, increased neuronal release probability, and favored the recruitment of neurons during bursting, thus promoting the coordinated activation of neuronal networks. In vivo, this sustained neuronal coordination translated into increased severity of acutely evoked epileptiform events and convulsive behavior. These results revealed that connexin-mediated astroglial networks synchronize bursting of neuronal assemblies, which can exacerbate pathological network activity and associated behavior. Our data thus provide molecular and biophysical evidence predicting selective astroglial gap junction inhibitors as anticonvulsive drugs. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  15. New photoresponsible polymers based on the polymerisable azo-diphenyldiacetylene (AZ-DPDA) liquid crystalline monomers for rewritable holograms (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinsoo; Ka, Jae-Won; Kim, Yun Ho; Kim, Yeong-Joon; Seo, Young Beom

    2017-02-01

    The development of high performance and large area photoresponsive materials for hologram have been one of the great challenges in order to realize holographic 3D display technology which needs no special eyewear. Desirable hologram materials should provide the high diffraction efficiency, fast response, high resolution, stable and reversible storage, low-energy consuming in the recording and reading processes as well as easy mass production. Azobenzene-containing polymers has been recognized as one of the promising candidate materials for holography because they can modulate effectively due to the photosensitivity and reversibility of azo moieties. In addition, polymer systems have several advantages such as simple fabrication, flexibility, thermal stability, and large scale production. It has been reported that highly birefringent azotolan-containing liquid crystalline polymer (LCP) film can induce a large change in refractive index upon exposure to actinic light. Analogously, we prepared new photochromic polymers based on the polymerisable liquid crystalline acrylate monomers (RMs) containing azo and highly birefringent diphenyldiacetylen (DPDA) mesogenic units connected directly. Evaluation of new polymers for rewritable hologram media will be discussed.

  16. Improved photoresponse performance of a self-powered Si/ZnO heterojunction ultraviolet and visible photodetector by the piezo-phototronic effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Bing; Qiu, Yu; Zhang, Heqiu; Luo, Yingmin; Zhao, Yu; Yang, Dechao; Hu, Lizhong

    2017-06-01

    In this work, we report the fabrication of self-powered Si/ZnO heterojunction ultraviolet and visible photodetectors (PDs) with different doping concentrations. The PDs have a fast response time (shorter than 0.13 s) to the ultraviolet and visible illumination at 0 V bias. The photocurrent of Sample A (high doping concentration) is more than 20 times larger than Sample B (low doping concentration) under 365 nm illumination and more than 150 times larger than Sample B under 450 nm illumination. The larger photoresponse is attributed to the stronger built-in electric field of Si/ZnO heterojunction. Furthermore, we demonstrate the impact of the piezo-phototronic effect for the self-powered Si/ZnO heterojunction ultraviolet and visible photodetector. Under a 0.7N compressive strain, the maximal UV and visible photocurrents are enhanced by about 33.7% and 13.9% for sample A (high doping concentration), about 67.3% and 74.5% for sample B (low doping concentration), respectively. The possible working principle is that the positive piezoelectric charges at the Si/ZnO interface lower the local energy band level of ZnO, thus strengthening the built-in electric field and shift the depletion region to the Si side leading to an increase in the photon-absorption volume. This work may provide a potential approach to enhance the performance of the self-powered Si/ZnO heterojunction ultraviolet and visible photodetector.

  17. Efficient perovskite/organic integrated solar cells with extended photoresponse to 930 nm and enhanced near-infrared external quantum efficiency of over 50.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qiang; Liu, Hao; Shi, Zhenzhen; Wang, Fuzhi; Zhou, Erjun; Bian, Xingming; Zhang, Bing; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Hayat, Tasawar; Tan, Zhan'ao

    2018-02-15

    Enhancing the light-harvesting activity is an effective way to improve the power conversion efficiency of solar cells. Although rapid enhancement in the PCE up to a value of 22.1% has been achieved for perovskite solar cells, only part of the sunlight, i.e., with wavelengths below 800-850 nm is utilized due to the limited bandgap of the perovskite materials, resulting in most of the near infrared light being wasted. To broaden the photoresponse of perovskite solar cells, we demonstrate an efficient perovskite/organic integrated solar cell containing both CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 perovskite and PBDTTT-E-T:IEICO organic photoactive layers. By integrating a low band gap PBDTTT-E-T:IEICO active layer on a perovskite layer, the maximum wavelength for light harvesting of the ISC increased to 930 nm, sharply increasing the utilization of near infrared radiation. In addition, the external quantum efficiency of the integrated device exceeded 50% in the near infrared range. The MAPbI 3 /PBDTTT-E-T:IEICO ISCs show an enhanced short-circuit current density of over 24 mA cm -2 , which is the highest existing value among perovskite/organic integrated solar cells and much higher than the traditional MAPbI 3 based perovskite solar cells. The results reveal that a perovskite/organic integrated structure is a promising strategy to extend and enhance sunlight utilization for perovskite solar cells.

  18. Slow Bursting Neurons of Mouse Cortical Layer 6b Are Depolarized by Hypocretin/Orexin and Major Transmitters of Arousal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger Combremont, Anne-Laure; Bayer, Laurence; Dupré, Anouk; Mühlethaler, Michel; Serafin, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Neurons firing spontaneously in bursts in the absence of synaptic transmission have been previously recorded in different layers of cortical brain slices. It has been suggested that such neurons could contribute to the generation of alternating UP and DOWN states, a pattern of activity seen during slow-wave sleep. Here, we show that in layer 6b (L6b), known from our previous studies to contain neurons highly responsive to the wake-promoting transmitter hypocretin/orexin (hcrt/orx), there is a set of neurons, endowed with distinct intrinsic properties, which displayed a strong propensity to fire spontaneously in rhythmic bursts. In response to small depolarizing steps, they responded with a delayed firing of action potentials which, upon higher depolarizing steps, invariably inactivated and were followed by a depolarized plateau potential and a depolarizing afterpotential. These cells also displayed a strong hyperpolarization-activated rectification compatible with the presence of an I h current. Most L6b neurons with such properties were able to fire spontaneously in bursts. Their bursting activity was of intrinsic origin as it persisted not only in presence of blockers of ionotropic glutamatergic and GABAergic receptors but also in a condition of complete synaptic blockade. However, a small number of these neurons displayed a mix of intrinsic bursting and synaptically driven recurrent UP and DOWN states. Most of the bursting L6b neurons were depolarized and excited by hcrt/orx through a direct postsynaptic mechanism that led to tonic firing and eventually inactivation. Similarly, they were directly excited by noradrenaline, histamine, dopamine, and neurotensin. Finally, the intracellular injection of these cells with dye and their subsequent Neurolucida reconstruction indicated that they were spiny non-pyramidal neurons. These results lead us to suggest that the propensity for slow rhythmic bursting of this set of L6b neurons could be directly impeded by hcrt

  19. Quantum synchronization effects in intrinsic Josephson junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machida, M.; Kano, T.; Yamada, S.; Okumura, M.; Imamura, T.; Koyama, T.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate quantum dynamics of the superconducting phase in intrinsic Josephson junctions of layered high-T c superconductors motivated by a recent experimental observation for the switching rate enhancement in the low temperature quantum regime. We pay attention to only the capacitive coupling between neighboring junctions and perform large-scale simulations for the Schroedinger equation derived from the Hamiltonian considering the capacitive coupling alone. The simulation focuses on an issue whether the switching of a junction induces those of the other junctions or not. The results reveal that the superconducting phase dynamics show synchronous behavior with increasing the quantum character, e.g., decreasing the junction plane area and effectively the temperature. This is qualitatively consistent with the experimental result

  20. Intrinsic thermal expansion of crystal defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganne, J.-P.

    1981-02-01

    Although the phenomenon of thermal expansion has long been known, the intrinsic thermal expansion coefficient (ITEC) βsub(d) of a point defect, derived from its formation volume vsub(d), has never been measured directly. The differential dilatometer by interferometry built by ASTY and GILDER is described. It has allowed βsub(d) to be measured for several defects. Vacancies and small interstitial loops were produced in aluminium by low temperature (20 K) fast neutron irradiation followed by an anneal up to the beginning of stage III (160 K). The very high value of the measured ratio βsub(d)/β 0 (12+-4) is comparable with a lattice statics calculated (42) value (11.5 0 [fr

  1. Intrinsic topological superfluidity - fluctuations and response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, K.; Wu, Chien-Te; Anderson, Brandon; Boyack, Rufus

    Recent interest in topological superconductivity is based primarily on exploiting proximity effects to obtain this important phase. However, in cold gases it is possible to contemplate ``intrinsic'' topological superfluidity produced with a synthetic spin-orbit coupling and Zeeman field. It is important for such future experiments to establish how low in temperature one needs to go to reach the ordered phase. Similarly, it will be helpful to have a probe of the normal (pseudogap) phase to determine if the ultimate superfluid order will be topological or trivial. In this talk, we address these issues by considering fluctuation effects in such a superfluid, and calculate the critical transition temperature and response functions. We see qualitative signatures of topological superfluidity in spin and charge response functions. We also explore the suppression of superfluidity due to fluctuations, and importantly find that the temperature scales necessary to reach topological superfluidity are reasonably accessible

  2. Major Intrinsic Proteins in Biomimetic Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helix Nielsen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    will generally have finite permeabilities to both electrolytes and non-electrolytes. The feasibility of a biomimetic MIP device thus depends on the relative transport contribution from both protein and biomimetic support matrix. Also the biomimetic matrix must be encapsulated in order to protect it and make....../separation technology, a unique class of membrane transport proteins is especially interesting the major intrinsic proteins (MIPs). Generally, MIPs conduct water molecules and selected solutes in and out of the cell while preventing the passage of other solutes, a property critical for the conservation of the cells...... it sufficiently stable in a final application. Here, I specifically discuss the feasibility of developing osmotic biomimetic MIP membranes, but the technical issues are of general concern in the design of biomimetic membranes capable of supporting selective transmembrane fluxes....

  3. Intrinsic densitometry: In-plant evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, K.; Kurosawa, A.; Masui, J.; Hsue, S.T.

    1994-11-01

    A measurement of the plutonium concentration in a sample is always necessary for nuclear material control and accounting. This report describes the testing of the intrinsic densitometry (ID) technique for implant applications. The authors found that the ID method can determine the plutonium concentrations to between 2 and 3% at concentrations of 100 g/l to 200 g/l with quartz cells and a measurement time of 3600 s. The precision can be improved to 1 to 2% with a higher counting rate. The authors also found that nitric acid concentration and the impurity level of uranium in the product plutonium solution do not affect the concentration measurement. When this technique is applied to plutonium solutions in stainless steel pipes, they found that similar precision in plutonium concentration can be achieved using a high-count-rate detector. The precision, however, is reduced with aged plutonium solutions

  4. On the intrinsic colours of cepheids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efremov, Yu.N.

    1979-01-01

    Some consequences from new data on the photometrically obtained intrinsic colours are considered. It is shown that the small amplitude and almost sinusoidal light-curve cepheids (Cs-subtype) increase their pulsation amplitude towards the red instability strip edge, differing from the other galactic cepheids. This feature is discussed in connection with Efremov's (1968) hypothesis that the Cs-cepheids first cross the instability strip from left to right. The galactic cepheid period-colour relation obtained by Dean, Warren and Cousins (1978) satisfies rather well the LMC cepheid observations and, consequently, considerations for the period-luminosity relations are made. The residuals from the PL relation proposed by us correlate with the colour residuals from the DWC period-colour relation ΔV/delta(B-V) being equal to 2.7. The luminosity effect as a possible cause of the discrepancy between the spectroscopic cepheid colours and the photometric colours is briefly discussed. (Auth.)

  5. Intrinsic Dynamics of Quantum-Dash Lasers

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Cheng

    2011-10-01

    Temperature-dependent intrinsic modulation response of InAs/InAlGaAs quantum-dash lasers was investigated by using pulse optical injection modulation to minimize the effects of parasitics and self-heating. Compared to typical quantum-well lasers, the quantum-dash lasers were found to have comparable differential gain but approximately twice the gain compression factor, probably due to carrier heating by free-carrier absorption, as opposed to stimulated transition. Therefore, the narrower modulation bandwidth of the quantum-dash lasers than that of quantum-well lasers was attributed to their higher gain compression factor. In addition, as expected, quantum-dash lasers with relatively long and uniform dashes exhibit higher temperature stability than quantum-well lasers. However, the lasers with relatively short and nonuniform dashes exhibit stronger temperature dependence, probably due to their higher surface-to-volume ratio and nonuniform dash sizes. © 2011 IEEE.

  6. Intrinsic thermoelectric power of group VB metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunadhor Singh Okram

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We have reinvestigated the thermopower of group VB metals in polycrystalline forms in the temperature range of 6-300K, taking into account the critical nature of the sample surface and heat treatment especially for niobium. Strikingly small magnitude, negative sign, phonon drag dip and superconductivity not reported previously were observed in surface-cleaned single crystalline Nb. However, while thermopower magnitudes are small, mixed signs were found in the polycrystalline V, Nb and Ta samples. These properties were therefore interpreted as their intrinsic properties and were briefly discussed taking into account of the existing theory by fitting also the data that give the Fermi energies of 10.94 eV, 5.08 eV and 1.86eV, respectively.

  7. Computer Simulations of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Song-Ho; Chatterjee, Prathit; Ham, Sihyun

    2017-05-01

    The investigation of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) is a new frontier in structural and molecular biology that requires a new paradigm to connect structural disorder to function. Molecular dynamics simulations and statistical thermodynamics potentially offer ideal tools for atomic-level characterizations and thermodynamic descriptions of this fascinating class of proteins that will complement experimental studies. However, IDPs display sensitivity to inaccuracies in the underlying molecular mechanics force fields. Thus, achieving an accurate structural characterization of IDPs via simulations is a challenge. It is also daunting to perform a configuration-space integration over heterogeneous structural ensembles sampled by IDPs to extract, in particular, protein configurational entropy. In this review, we summarize recent efforts devoted to the development of force fields and the critical evaluations of their performance when applied to IDPs. We also survey recent advances in computational methods for protein configurational entropy that aim to provide a thermodynamic link between structural disorder and protein activity.

  8. Intrinsic Ambipolarity and Rotation in Stellarators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helander, P.; Simakov, A. N.

    2008-01-01

    It is shown that collisional plasma transport is intrinsically ambipolar only in quasiaxisymmetric or quasihelically symmetric magnetic configurations. Only in such fields can the plasma rotate freely, and then only in the direction of quasisymmetry. In a non-quasi-symmetric magnetic field, the average radial electric field is determined by parallel viscosity, which in turn is usually governed by collisional processes. Locally, the radial electric field may be affected by turbulent Reynolds stress producing zonal flows, but on a radial average taken over several ion gyroradii, it is determined by parallel viscosity, at least if the turbulence is electrostatic and obeys the conventional gyrokinetic orderings. This differs from the situation in a tokamak, where there is no flow damping by parallel viscosity in the symmetry direction and the turbulent Reynolds stress may affect the global radial electric field

  9. IMPACT OF BARYONIC PHYSICS ON INTRINSIC ALIGNMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenneti, Ananth; Gnedin, Nickolay Y. [Particle Astrophysics Center, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Feng, Yu, E-mail: vat@andrew.cmu.edu [Berkeley Center for Cosmological Physics, Department of Physics, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2017-01-10

    We explore the effects of specific assumptions in the subgrid models of star formation and stellar and active galactic nucleus feedback on intrinsic alignments of galaxies in cosmological simulations of the “MassiveBlack-II” family. Using smaller-volume simulations, we explore the parameter space of the subgrid star formation and feedback model and find remarkable robustness of the observable statistical measures to the details of subgrid physics. The one observational probe most sensitive to modeling details is the distribution of misalignment angles. We hypothesize that the amount of angular momentum carried away by the galactic wind is the primary physical quantity that controls the orientation of the stellar distribution. Our results are also consistent with a similar study by the EAGLE simulation team.

  10. Effects of acetylcholine on neuronal properties in entorhinal cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James G Heys

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The entorhinal cortex receives prominent cholinergic innervation from the medial septum and the vertical limb of the diagonal band of Broca (MSDB. To understand how cholinergic neurotransmission can modulate behavior, research has been directed towards identification of the specific cellular mechanisms in entorhinal cortex that can be modulated through cholinergic activity. This review focuses on intrinsic cellular properties of neurons in entorhinal cortex that may underlie functions such as working memory, spatial processing and episodic memory. In particular, the study of stellate cells in medial entorhinal has resulted in discovery of correlations between physiological properties of these neurons and properties of the unique spatial representation that is demonstrated through unit recordings of neurons in medial entorhinal cortex from awake-behaving animals. A separate line of investigation has demonstrated persistent firing behavior among neurons in entorhinal cortex that is enhanced by cholinergic activity and could underlie working memory. There is also evidence that acetylcholine plays a role in modulation of synaptic transmission that could also enhance mnemonic function in entorhinal cortex. Finally, the local circuits of entorhinal cortex demonstrate a variety of interneuron physiology, which is also subject to cholinergic modulation. Together these effects alter the dynamics of entorhinal cortex to underlie the functional role of acetylcholine in memory.

  11. Relating neuronal firing patterns to functional differentiation of cerebral cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeru Shinomoto

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been empirically established that the cerebral cortical areas defined by Brodmann one hundred years ago solely on the basis of cellular organization are closely correlated to their function, such as sensation, association, and motion. Cytoarchitectonically distinct cortical areas have different densities and types of neurons. Thus, signaling patterns may also vary among cytoarchitectonically unique cortical areas. To examine how neuronal signaling patterns are related to innate cortical functions, we detected intrinsic features of cortical firing by devising a metric that efficiently isolates non-Poisson irregular characteristics, independent of spike rate fluctuations that are caused extrinsically by ever-changing behavioral conditions. Using the new metric, we analyzed spike trains from over 1,000 neurons in 15 cortical areas sampled by eight independent neurophysiological laboratories. Analysis of firing-pattern dissimilarities across cortical areas revealed a gradient of firing regularity that corresponded closely to the functional category of the cortical area; neuronal spiking patterns are regular in motor areas, random in the visual areas, and bursty in the prefrontal area. Thus, signaling patterns may play an important role in function-specific cerebral cortical computation.

  12. Acupuncture Points and Their Relationship with Multireceptive Fields of Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Quiroz-González

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In Traditional Chinese Medicine, acupuncture points (APs have been emphasized as key elements that generate the therapeutic effects of acupuncture. At the spinal cord or supraspinal level, sensory neurons located in the dorsal horn receive an extensive supply of sensory information from skin and muscle receptors through peripheral afferent nerves. The stimulated skin area that influences the activity of a spinal sensory neuron is known as the peripheral receptive field (RF of that neuron. By considering that a particular AP location involves the activation of one or various RFs, it can be assumed that several sensory central neurons are the site of convergence of the peripheral input generated by acupuncture stimulation. However, stimulation on nonacupoint sites could also activate skin areas with RFs that have been sensitized, and they could be involved in the generation of nonspecific effects of acupuncture, as seen in clinical practice. From the latter, it is suggested that effective APs, and even nonacupoints, are associated with a particular arrangement of RFs, and their study will be useful for understanding the intrinsic mechanisms of acupuncture and for the development and identification of more efficient sites and modes of acupuncture stimulation to evoke optimal therapeutic actions.

  13. Time-warp invariant pattern detection with bursting neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gollisch, Tim

    2008-01-01

    Sound patterns are defined by the temporal relations of their constituents, individual acoustic cues. Auditory systems need to extract these temporal relations to detect or classify sounds. In various cases, ranging from human speech to communication signals of grasshoppers, this pattern detection has been found to display invariance to temporal stretching or compression of the sound signal ('linear time-warp invariance'). In this work, a four-neuron network model is introduced, designed to solve such a detection task for the example of grasshopper courtship songs. As an essential ingredient, the network contains neurons with intrinsic bursting dynamics, which allow them to encode durations between acoustic events in short, rapid sequences of spikes. As shown by analytical calculations and computer simulations, these neuronal dynamics result in a powerful mechanism for temporal integration. Finally, the network reads out the encoded temporal information by detecting equal activity of two such bursting neurons. This leads to the recognition of rhythmic patterns independent of temporal stretching or compression

  14. Cellular Programming and Reprogramming: Sculpting Cell Fate for the Production of Dopamine Neurons for Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio C. Aguila

    2012-01-01

    success of clinical applications depends on our ability to steer pluripotent stem cells towards the right neuronal identity. In Parkinson disease, the loss of dopamine neurons is more pronounced in the ventrolateral population that projects to the sensorimotor striatum. Because synapses are highly specific, only neurons with this precise identity will contribute, upon transplantation, to the synaptic reconstruction of the dorsal striatum. Thus, understanding the developmental cell program of the mesostriatal dopamine neurons is critical for the identification of the extrinsic signals and cell-intrinsic factors that instruct and, ultimately, determine cell identity. Here, we review how extrinsic signals and transcription factors act together during development to shape midbrain cell fates. Further, we discuss how these same factors can be applied in vitro to induce, select, and reprogram cells to the mesostriatal dopamine fate.

  15. Modulation of SF1 Neuron Activity Coordinately Regulates Both Feeding Behavior and Associated Emotional States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulius Viskaitis

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Feeding requires the integration of homeostatic drives with emotional states relevant to food procurement in potentially hostile environments. The ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH regulates feeding and anxiety, but how these are controlled in a concerted manner remains unclear. Using pharmacogenetic, optogenetic, and calcium imaging approaches with a battery of behavioral assays, we demonstrate that VMH steroidogenic factor 1 (SF1 neurons constitute a nutritionally sensitive switch, modulating the competing motivations of feeding and avoidance of potentially dangerous environments. Acute alteration of SF1 neuronal activity alters food intake via changes in appetite and feeding-related behaviors, including locomotion, exploration, anxiety, and valence. In turn, intrinsic SF1 neuron activity is low during feeding and increases with both feeding termination and stress. Our findings identify SF1 neurons as a key part of the neurocircuitry that controls both feeding and related affective states, giving potential insights into the relationship between disordered eating and stress-associated psychological disorders in humans.

  16. Transgenic labeling of parvalbumin-expressing neurons with tdTomato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Tobias; Ting, Jonathan T.; Monteiro, Patrícia; Feng, Guoping

    2015-01-01

    Summary Parvalbumin (PVALB)-expressing fast-spiking interneurons subserve important roles in many brain regions by modulating circuit function and dysfunction of these neurons is strongly implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia and autism. To facilitate the study of PVALB neuron function we need to be able to identify PVALB neurons in vivo. We have generated a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenic mouse line expressing the red fluorophore tdTomato under the control of endogenous regulatory elements of the Pvalb gene locus (JAX # 027395). We show that the tdTomato transgene is faithfully expressed relative to endogenous PVALB expression throughout the brain. Furthermore, targeted patch clamp recordings confirm that the labeled populations in neocortex, striatum, and hippocampus are fast-spiking interneurons based on intrinsic properties. This new transgenic mouse line provides a useful tool to study PVALB neuron function in the normal brain as well as in mouse models of psychiatric disease. PMID:26318335

  17. Integrin-associated protein promotes neuronal differentiation of neural stem/progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiko Fujimura

    Full Text Available Neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs proliferate and differentiate depending on their intrinsic properties and local environment. During the development of the mammalian nervous system, NSPCs generate neurons and glia sequentially. However, little is known about the mechanism that determines the timing of switch from neurogenesis to gliogenesis. In this study, we established a culture system in which the neurogenic potential of NSPCs is decreased in a time-dependent manner, so that short-term-cultured NSPCs differentiate into more neurons compared with long-term-cultured NSPCs. We found that short-term-cultured NSPCs express high levels of integrin-associated protein form 2 (IAP2; so-called CD47 mRNA using differential display analysis. Moreover, IAP2 overexpression in NSPCs induced neuronal differentiation of NSPCs. These findings reveal a novel mechanism by which IAP2 induces neuronal differentiation of NSPCs.

  18. Functional architecture of reward learning in mushroom body extrinsic neurons of larval Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saumweber, Timo; Rohwedder, Astrid; Schleyer, Michael; Eichler, Katharina; Chen, Yi-Chun; Aso, Yoshinori; Cardona, Albert; Eschbach, Claire; Kobler, Oliver; Voigt, Anne; Durairaja, Archana; Mancini, Nino; Zlatic, Marta; Truman, James W; Thum, Andreas S; Gerber, Bertram

    2018-03-16

    The brain adaptively integrates present sensory input, past experience, and options for future action. The insect mushroom body exemplifies how a central brain structure brings about such integration. Here we use a combination of systematic single-cell labeling, connectomics, transgenic silencing, and activation experiments to study the mushroom body at single-cell resolution, focusing on the behavioral architecture of its input and output neurons (MBINs and MBONs), and of the mushroom body intrinsic APL neuron. Our results reveal the identity and morphology of almost all of these 44 neurons in stage 3 Drosophila larvae. Upon an initial screen, functional analyses focusing on the mushroom body medial lobe uncover sparse and specific functions of its dopaminergic MBINs, its MBONs, and of the GABAergic APL neuron across three behavioral tasks, namely odor preference, taste preference, and associative learning between odor and taste. Our results thus provide a cellular-resolution study case of how brains organize behavior.

  19. Efferent Vestibular Neurons Show Homogenous Discharge Output But Heterogeneous Synaptic Input Profile In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Miranda A.; Murray, Andrew; Wijesinghe, Rajiv; Cullen, Karen; Tung, Victoria W. K.; Camp, Aaron J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the importance of our sense of balance we still know remarkably little about the central control of the peripheral balance system. While previous work has shown that activation of the efferent vestibular system results in modulation of afferent vestibular neuron discharge, the intrinsic and synaptic properties of efferent neurons themselves are largely unknown. Here we substantiate the location of the efferent vestibular nucleus (EVN) in the mouse, before characterizing the input and output properties of EVN neurons in vitro. We made transverse serial sections through the brainstem of 4-week-old mice, and performed immunohistochemistry for calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), both expressed in the EVN of other species. We also injected fluorogold into the posterior canal and retrogradely labelled neurons in the EVN of ChAT:: tdTomato mice expressing tdTomato in all cholinergic neurons. As expected the EVN lies dorsolateral to the genu of the facial nerve (CNVII). We then made whole-cell current-, and voltage-clamp recordings from visually identified EVN neurons. In current-clamp, EVN neurons display a homogeneous discharge pattern. This is characterized by a high frequency burst of action potentials at the onset of a depolarizing stimulus and the offset of a hyperpolarizing stimulus that is mediated by T-type calcium channels. In voltage-clamp, EVN neurons receive either exclusively excitatory or inhibitory inputs, or a combination of both. Despite this heterogeneous mixture of inputs, we show that synaptic inputs onto EVN neurons are predominantly excitatory. Together these findings suggest that the inputs onto EVN neurons, and more specifically the origin of these inputs may underlie EVN neuron function. PMID:26422206

  20. Network feedback regulates motor output across a range of modulatory neuron activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Robert M; Blitz, Dawn M

    2016-06-01

    Modulatory projection neurons alter network neuron synaptic and intrinsic properties to elicit multiple different outputs. Sensory and other inputs elicit a range of modulatory neuron activity that is further shaped by network feedback, yet little is known regarding how the impact of network feedback on modulatory neurons regulates network output across a physiological range of modulatory neuron activity. Identified network neurons, a fully described connectome, and a well-characterized, identified modulatory projection neuron enabled us to address this issue in the crab (Cancer borealis) stomatogastric nervous system. The modulatory neuron modulatory commissural neuron 1 (MCN1) activates and modulates two networks that generate rhythms via different cellular mechanisms and at distinct frequencies. MCN1 is activated at rates of 5-35 Hz in vivo and in vitro. Additionally, network feedback elicits MCN1 activity time-locked to motor activity. We asked how network activation, rhythm speed, and neuron activity levels are regulated by the presence or absence of network feedback across a physiological range of MCN1 activity rates. There were both similarities and differences in responses of the two networks to MCN1 activity. Many parameters in both networks were sensitive to network feedback effects on MCN1 activity. However, for most parameters, MCN1 activity rate did not determine the extent to which network output was altered by the addition of network feedback. These data demonstrate that the influence of network feedback on modulatory neuron activity is an important determinant of network output and feedback can be effective in shaping network output regardless of the extent of network modulation. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Hyperactivity of Newborn Pten Knock-out Neurons Results from Increased Excitatory Synaptic Drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Michael R.; DeSpenza, Tyrone; Li, Meijie; Gulledge, Allan T.

    2015-01-01

    Developing neurons must regulate morphology, intrinsic excitability, and synaptogenesis to form neural circuits. When these processes go awry, disorders, including autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or epilepsy, may result. The phosphatase Pten is mutated in some patients having ASD and seizures, suggesting that its mutation disrupts neurological function in part through increasing neuronal activity. Supporting this idea, neuronal knock-out of Pten in mice can cause macrocephaly, behavioral changes similar to ASD, and seizures. However, the mechanisms through which excitability is enhanced following Pten depletion are unclear. Previous studies have separately shown that Pten-depleted neurons can drive seizures, receive elevated excitatory synaptic input, and have abnormal dendrites. We therefore tested the hypothesis that developing Pten-depleted neurons are hyperactive due to increased excitatory synaptogenesis using electrophysiology, calcium imaging, morphological analyses, and modeling. This was accomplished by coinjecting retroviruses to either “birthdate” or birthdate and knock-out Pten in granule neurons of the murine neonatal dentate gyrus. We found that Pten knock-out neurons, despite a rapid onset of hypertrophy, were more active in vivo. Pten knock-out neurons fired at more hyperpolarized membrane potentials, displayed greater peak spike rates, and were more sensitive to depolarizing synaptic input. The increased sensitivity of Pten knock-out neurons was due, in part, to a higher density of synapses located more proximal to the soma. We determined that increased synaptic drive was sufficient to drive hypertrophic Pten knock-out neurons beyond their altered action potential threshold. Thus, our work contributes a developmental mechanism for the increased activity of Pten-depleted neurons. PMID:25609613

  2. Efferent Vestibular Neurons Show Homogenous Discharge Output But Heterogeneous Synaptic Input Profile In Vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miranda A Mathews

    Full Text Available Despite the importance of our sense of balance we still know remarkably little about the central control of the peripheral balance system. While previous work has shown that activation of the efferent vestibular system results in modulation of afferent vestibular neuron discharge, the intrinsic and synaptic properties of efferent neurons themselves are largely unknown. Here we substantiate the location of the efferent vestibular nucleus (EVN in the mouse, before characterizing the input and output properties of EVN neurons in vitro. We made transverse serial sections through the brainstem of 4-week-old mice, and performed immunohistochemistry for calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT, both expressed in the EVN of other species. We also injected fluorogold into the posterior canal and retrogradely labelled neurons in the EVN of ChAT:: tdTomato mice expressing tdTomato in all cholinergic neurons. As expected the EVN lies dorsolateral to the genu of the facial nerve (CNVII. We then made whole-cell current-, and voltage-clamp recordings from visually identified EVN neurons. In current-clamp, EVN neurons display a homogeneous discharge pattern. This is characterized by a high frequency burst of action potentials at the onset of a depolarizing stimulus and the offset of a hyperpolarizing stimulus that is mediated by T-type calcium channels. In voltage-clamp, EVN neurons receive either exclusively excitatory or inhibitory inputs, or a combination of both. Despite this heterogeneous mixture of inputs, we show that synaptic inputs onto EVN neurons are predominantly excitatory. Together these findings suggest that the inputs onto EVN neurons, and more specifically the origin of these inputs may underlie EVN neuron function.

  3. From Neurons to Newtons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bjørn Gilbert

    2001-01-01

    proteins generate forces, to the macroscopic levels where overt arm movements are vol- untarily controlled within an unpredictable environment by legions of neurons¯ring in orderly fashion. An extensive computer simulation system has been developed for this thesis, which at present contains a neural...... of phenomena, ranging from the force-velocity and force-length relationships, to tetanic fusion, "catch-like" e®ects and the distinctions between fast and slow muscle ¯ber types. Furthermore the model incorporates su±cient neuromus-cular information as to permit orderly recruitment of motor units, exponential...

  4. Imitation, mirror neurons and autism

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Justin H.G.; Whiten, Andrew; Suddendorf, Thomas; Perrett, David I.

    2001-01-01

    Various deficits in the cognitive functioning of people with autism have been documented in recent years but these provide only partial explanations for the condition. We focus instead on an imitative disturbance involving difficulties both in copying actions and in inhibiting more stereotyped mimicking, such as echolalia. A candidate for the neural basis of this disturbance may be found in a recently discovered class of neurons in frontal cortex, 'mirror neurons' (MNs). These neurons show ac...

  5. Differential dynamic processing of afferent signals in frog tonic and phasic second-order vestibular neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfanzelt, Sandra; Rössert, Christian; Rohregger, Martin; Glasauer, Stefan; Moore, Lee E; Straka, Hans

    2008-10-08

    The sensory-motor transformation of the large dynamic spectrum of head-motion-related signals occurs in separate vestibulo-ocular pathways. Synaptic responses of tonic and phasic second-order vestibular neurons were recorded in isolated frog brains after stimulation of individual labyrinthine nerve branches with trains of single electrical pulses. The timing of the single pulses was adapted from spike discharge patterns of frog semicircular canal nerve afferents during sinusoidal head rotation. Because each electrical pulse evoked a single spike in afferent fibers, the resulting sequences with sinusoidally modulated intervals and peak frequencies up to 100 Hz allowed studying the processing of presynaptic afferent inputs with in vivo characteristics in second-order vestibular neurons recorded in vitro in an isolated whole brain. Variation of pulse-train parameters showed that the postsynaptic compound response dynamics differ in the two types of frog vestibular neurons. In tonic neurons, subthreshold compound responses and evoked discharge patterns exhibited relatively linear dynamics and were generally aligned with pulse frequency modulation. In contrast, compound responses of phasic neurons were asymmetric with large leads of subthreshold response peaks and evoked spike discharge relative to stimulus waveform. These nonlinearities were caused by the particular intrinsic properties of phasic vestibular neurons and were facilitated by GABAergic and glycinergic inhibitory inputs from tonic type vestibular interneurons and by cerebellar circuits. Coadapted intrinsic filter and emerging network properties thus form dynamically different neuronal elements that provide the appropriate cellular basis for a parallel processing of linear, tonic, and nonlinear phasic vestibulo-ocular response components in central vestibular neurons.

  6. Temperature manipulation of neuronal dynamics in a forebrain motor control nucleus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matías A Goldin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Different neuronal types within brain motor areas contribute to the generation of complex motor behaviors. A widely studied songbird forebrain nucleus (HVC has been recognized as fundamental in shaping the precise timing characteristics of birdsong. This is based, among other evidence, on the stretching and the "breaking" of song structure when HVC is cooled. However, little is known about the temperature effects that take place in its neurons. To address this, we investigated the dynamics of HVC both experimentally and computationally. We developed a technique where simultaneous electrophysiological recordings were performed during temperature manipulation of HVC. We recorded spontaneous activity and found three effects: widening of the spike shape, decrease of the firing rate and change in the interspike interval distribution. All these effects could be explained with a detailed conductance based model of all the neurons present in HVC. Temperature dependence of the ionic channel time constants explained the first effect, while the second was based in the changes of the maximal conductance using single synaptic excitatory inputs. The last phenomenon, only emerged after introducing a more realistic synaptic input to the inhibitory interneurons. Two timescales were present in the interspike distributions. The behavior of one timescale was reproduced with different input balances received form the excitatory neurons, whereas the other, which disappears with cooling, could not be found assuming poissonian synaptic inputs. Furthermore, the computational model shows that the bursting of the excitatory neurons arises naturally at normal brain temperature and that they have an intrinsic delay at low temperatures. The same effect occurs at single synapses, which may explain song stretching. These findings shed light on the temperature dependence of neuronal dynamics and present a comprehensive framework to study neuronal connectivity. This study, which

  7. Glutamatergic synaptic currents of nigral dopaminergic neurons follow a postnatal developmental sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edouard ePearlstein

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The spontaneous activity pattern of adult dopaminergic (DA neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc results from interactions between intrinsic membrane conductances and afferent inputs. In adult SNc DA neurons, low-frequency tonic background activity is generated by intrinsic pacemaker mechanisms, whereas burst generation depends on intact synaptic inputs in particular the glutamatergic ones. Tonic DA release in the striatum during pacemaking is required to maintain motor activity, and burst firing evokes phasic DA release, necessary for cue-dependent learning tasks. However, it is still unknown how the firing properties of SNc DA neurons mature during postnatal development before reaching the adult state. We studied the postnatal developmental profile of spontaneous and evoked AMPA and NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs in SNc DA neurons in brain slices from immature (postnatal days P4-10 and young adult (P30-50 tyrosine hydroxylase (TH-GFP mice. We found that somato-dendritic fields of SNc DA neurons are already mature at P4-10. In contrast, spontaneous glutamatergic EPSCs show a developmental sequence. Spontaneous NMDA EPSCs in particular are larger and more frequent in immature SNc DA neurons than in young adult ones and have a bursty pattern. They are mediated by GluN2B and GluN2D subunit-containing NMDA receptors. The latter generate long-lasting, DQP1105-sensitive, spontaneous EPSCs, which are transiently recorded during this early period. Due to high NMDA activity, immature SNc DA neurons generate large and long lasting NMDA receptor-dependent (APV-sensitive bursts in response to the stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus. We conclude that the transient high NMDA activity allows calcium influx into the dendrites of developing SNc DA neurons.

  8. The biophysics of neuronal growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franze, Kristian; Guck, Jochen

    2010-01-01

    For a long time, neuroscience has focused on biochemical, molecular biological and electrophysiological aspects of neuronal physiology and pathology. However, there is a growing body of evidence indicating the importance of physical stimuli for neuronal growth and development. In this review we briefly summarize the historical background of neurobiophysics and give an overview over the current understanding of neuronal growth from a physics perspective. We show how biophysics has so far contributed to a better understanding of neuronal growth and discuss current inconsistencies. Finally, we speculate how biophysics may contribute to the successful treatment of lesions to the central nervous system, which have been considered incurable until very recently.

  9. Personality traits associated with intrinsic academic motivation in medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Masaaki; Mizuno, Kei; Fukuda, Sanae; Tajima, Seiki; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2009-04-01

    Motivation is one of the most important psychological concepts in education and is related to academic outcomes in medical students. In this study, the relationships between personality traits and intrinsic academic motivation were examined in medical students. The study group consisted of 119 Year 2 medical students at Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine. They completed questionnaires dealing with intrinsic academic motivation (the Intrinsic Motivation Scale toward Learning) and personality (the Temperament and Character Inventory [TCI]). On simple regression analyses, the TCI dimensions of persistence, self-directedness, co-operativeness and self-transcendence were positively associated with intrinsic academic motivation. On multiple regression analysis adjusted for age and gender, the TCI dimensions of persistence, self-directedness and self-transcendence were positively associated with intrinsic academic motivation. The temperament dimension of persistence and the character dimensions of self-directedness and self-transcendence are associated with intrinsic academic motivation in medical students.

  10. Can intrinsic noise induce various resonant peaks?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, J J; Marro, J; Mejias, J F, E-mail: jtorres@ugr.es [Institute Carlos I for Theoretical and Computational Physics and Departamento de Electromagnetismo y Fisica de la Materia, University of Granada, Granada (Spain)

    2011-05-15

    We theoretically describe how weak signals may be efficiently transmitted throughout more than one frequency range in noisy excitable media by a sort of stochastic multiresonance. This helps us to reinterpret recent experiments in neuroscience and to suggest that many other systems in nature might be able to exhibit several resonances. In fact, the observed behavior happens in our model as a result of competition between (i) changes in the transmitted signals as if the units were varying their activation threshold, and (ii) adaptive noise realized in the model as rapid activity-dependent fluctuations of the connection intensities. These two conditions are indeed known to characterize heterogeneously networked systems of excitable units, e.g. sets of neurons and synapses in the brain. Our results may find application also in the design of detector devices.

  11. Sources of intrinsic rotation in the low-flow ordering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parra, Felix I.; Barnes, Michael; Catto, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    A low flow, δf gyrokinetic formulation to obtain the intrinsic rotation profiles is presented. The momentum conservation equation in the low-flow ordering contains new terms, neglected in previous first-principles formulations, that may explain the intrinsic rotation observed in tokamaks in the absence of external sources of momentum. The intrinsic rotation profile depends on the density and temperature profiles and on the up-down asymmetry.

  12. Increased intrinsic mitochondrial function in humans with mitochondrial haplogroup H

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Steen; Díez-Sánchez, Carmen; Rabøl, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    and determined their mitochondrial haplogroup, mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation capacity (OXPHOS), mitochondrial content (citrate synthase (CS)) and VO2max. Intrinsic mitochondrial function is calculated as mitochondrial OXPHOS capacity divided by mitochondrial content (CS). Haplogroup H showed a 30......% higher intrinsic mitochondrial function compared with the other haplo group U. There was no relationship between haplogroups and VO2max. In skeletal muscle from men with mitochondrial haplogroup H, an increased intrinsic mitochondrial function is present....

  13. The effects of extrinsic rewards on children's intrinsic motivation

    OpenAIRE

    大槻, 千秋

    1981-01-01

    An experiment was conducted with preschool children to test whether a person's intrinsic motivation in an activity may be decreased by extrinsic salient rewards in Japan like in America. Children solved some jigsaw puzzles and received assorted candies, then they were observed how long they did other jigsaw puzzles. The results showed that the effects of extrinsic rewards on intrinsic motivation in an activity varied with the subject's social background. In uptown children's intrinsic motivat...

  14. Do intrinsic and extrinsic motivation relate differently to employee outcomes?

    OpenAIRE

    Kuvaas, Bard; Buch, Robert; Weibel, Antoinette; Dysvik, Anders; Nerstad, Christina

    2017-01-01

    In most theories that address how individual financial incentives affect work performance, researchers have assumed that two types of motivation—intrinsic and extrinsic—mediate the relationship between incentives and performance. Empirically, however, extrinsic motivation is rarely investigated. To explore the predictive validity of these theories of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation in work settings, we tested how both intrinsic and extrinsic motivation affected supervisor-ra...

  15. A temperature rise reduces trial-to-trial variability of locust auditory neuron responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhard, Monika J B; Schleimer, Jan-Hendrik; Schreiber, Susanne; Ronacher, Bernhard

    2015-09-01

    The neurophysiology of ectothermic animals, such as insects, is affected by environmental temperature, as their body temperature fluctuates with ambient conditions. Changes in temperature alter properties of neurons and, consequently, have an impact on the processing of information. Nevertheless, nervous system function is often maintained over a broad temperature range, exhibiting a surprising robustness to variations in temperature. A special problem arises for acoustically communicating insects, as in these animals mate recognition and mate localization typically rely on the decoding of fast amplitude modulations in calling and courtship songs. In the auditory periphery, however, temporal resolution is constrained by intrinsic neuronal noise. Such noise predominantly arises from the stochasticity of ion channel gating and potentially impairs the processing of sensory signals. On the basis of intracellular recordings of locust auditory neurons, we show that intrinsic neuronal variability on the level of spikes is reduced with increasing temperature. We use a detailed mathematical model including stochastic ion channel gating to shed light on the underlying biophysical mechanisms in auditory receptor neurons: because of a redistribution of channel-induced current noise toward higher frequencies and specifics of the temperature dependence of the membrane impedance, membrane potential noise is indeed reduced at higher temperatures. This finding holds under generic conditions and physiologically plausible assumptions on the temperature dependence of the channels' kinetics and peak conductances. We demonstrate that the identified mechanism also can explain the experimentally observed reduction of spike timing variability at higher temperatures. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Interventions for primary (intrinsic tracheomalacia in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Goyal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUNDTracheomalacia, a disorder of the large airways where the trachea is deformed or malformed during respiration, is commonly seen in tertiary paediatric practice. It is associated with a wide spectrum of respiratory symptoms from life-threatening recurrent apnoea to common respiratory symptoms such as chronic cough and wheeze. Current practice following diagnosis of tracheomalacia includes medical approaches aimed at reducing associated symptoms of tracheomalacia, ventilation modalities of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP and bi-level positive airway pressure (BiPAP, and surgical approaches aimed at improving the calibre of the airway (airway stenting, aortopexy, tracheopexy.OBJECTIVESTo evaluate the efficacy of medical and surgical therapies for children with intrinsic (primary tracheomalacia.METHODSSearchThe Cochrane Airways Group searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, the Cochrane Airways Group's Specialized Register, Medline and Embase databases. The Cochrane Airways Group performed the latest searches in March 2012.Selection criteriaAll randomized controlled trials (RCTs of therapies related to symptoms associated with primary or intrinsic tracheomalacia.Data collection and analysisTwo reviewers extracted data from the included study independently and resolved disagreements by consensus.MAIN RESULTSWe included one RCT that compared nebulized recombinant human deoxyribonuclease (rhDNase with placebo in 40 children with airway malacia and a respiratory tract infection. We assessed it to be a RCT with overall low risk of bias. Data analyzed in this review showed that there was no significant difference between groups for the primary outcome of proportion cough-free at two weeks (odds ratio (OR 1.38; 95% confidence interval (CI 0.37 to 5.14. However, the mean change in night time cough diary scores significantly favoured the placebo group (mean difference (MD 1.00; 95% CI 0.17 to 1.83, P = 0

  17. Comparison of current-driven and conductance-driven neocortical model neurons with Hodgkin-Huxley voltage-gated channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiesinga, P H; José, J V; Sejnowski, T J

    2000-12-01

    Intrinsic noise and random synaptic inputs generate a fluctuating current across neuron membranes. We determine the statistics of the output spike train of a biophysical model neuron as a function of the mean and variance of the fluctuating current, when the current is white noise, or when it derives from Poisson trains of excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic conductances. In the first case, the firing rate increases with increasing variance of the current, whereas in the latter case it decreases. In contrast, the firing rate is independent of variance (for constant mean) in the commonly used random walk, and perfect integrate-and-fire models for spike generation. The model neuron can be in the current-dominated state, representative of neurons in the in vitro slice preparation, or in the fluctuation-dominated state, representative of in vivo neurons. We discuss the functional relevance of these states to cortical information processing.

  18. Bursting neurons and ultrasound avoidance in crickets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary eMarsat

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Decision making in invertebrates often relies on simple neural circuits composed of only a few identified neurons. The relative simplicity of these circuits makes it possible to identify the key computation and neural properties underlying decisions. In this review, we summarize recent research on the neural basis of ultrasound avoidance in crickets, a response that allows escape from echolocating bats. The key neural property shaping behavioral output is high-frequency bursting of an identified interneuron, AN2, which carries information about ultrasound stimuli from receptor neurons to the brain. AN2's spike train consists of clusters of spikes –bursts– that may be interspersed with isolated, non-burst spikes. AN2 firing is necessary and sufficient to trigger avoidance steering but only high-rate firing, such as occurs in bursts, evokes this response. AN2 bursts are therefore at the core of the computation involved in deciding whether or not to steer away from ultrasound. Bursts in AN2 are triggered by synaptic input from nearly synchronous bursts in ultrasound receptors. Thus the population response at the very first stage of sensory processing –the auditory receptor- already differentiates the features of the stimulus that will trigger a behavioral response from those that will not. Adaptation, both intrinsic to AN2 and within ultrasound receptors, scales the burst-generating features according to the stimulus statistics, thus filtering out background noise and ensuring that bursts occur selectively in response to salient peaks in ultrasound intensity. Furthermore AN2’s sensitivity to ultrasound varies adaptively with predation pressure, through both developmental and evolutionary mechanisms. We discuss how this key relationship between bursting and the triggering of avoidance behavior is also observed in other invertebrate systems such as the avoidance of looming visual stimuli in locusts or heat avoidance in beetles.

  19. Motor neuron disease in blacks

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1989-08-19

    Aug 19, 1989 ... A series of 86 black, Indian and white patients with motor neuron disease were analysed retrospectively. Although the material does not allow statistically valid conclusions, there are sufficient cases among blacks to allow two prima facie observations in this population group: (~ motor neuron disease.

  20. The Neuronal Ceroid-Lipofuscinoses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Michael J.; Rakheja, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    The neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinoses (NCL's, Batten disease) represent a group of severe neurodegenerative diseases, which mostly present in childhood. The phenotypes are similar and include visual loss, seizures, loss of motor and cognitive function, and early death. At autopsy, there is massive neuronal loss with characteristic storage in…

  1. Understanding Neuronal Mechanisms of Epilepsy ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Admin

    20 μM glutamate,. Recording epileptogenesis. Long term connectivity c. 10 min neuronal loss. (De Lorenzo et al., 2000) injury epileptogenesis. Neuronal loss .... decay. Control Condition. Relative Increase in τ decay. Values in. Epileptic Condition. The relative contribution of the Na+/Ca2+ exchangers in Ca2+ extrusion.

  2. Understanding oceanic migrations with intrinsic biogeochemical markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raül Ramos

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Migratory marine vertebrates move annually across remote oceanic water masses crossing international borders. Many anthropogenic threats such as overfishing, bycatch, pollution or global warming put millions of marine migrants at risk especially during their long-distance movements. Therefore, precise knowledge about these migratory movements to understand where and when these animals are more exposed to human impacts is vital for addressing marine conservation issues. Because electronic tracking devices suffer from several constraints, mainly logistical and financial, there is emerging interest in finding appropriate intrinsic markers, such as the chemical composition of inert tissues, to study long-distance migrations and identify wintering sites. Here, using tracked pelagic seabirds and some of their own feathers which were known to be grown at different places and times within the annual cycle, we proved the value of biogeochemical analyses of inert tissue as tracers of marine movements and habitat use. Analyses of feathers grown in summer showed that both stable isotope signatures and element concentrations can signal the origin of breeding birds feeding in distinct water masses. However, only stable isotopes signalled water masses used during winter because elements mainly accumulated during the long breeding period are incorporated into feathers grown in both summer and winter. Our findings shed new light on the simple and effective assignment of marine organisms to distinct oceanic areas, providing new opportunities to study unknown migration patterns of secretive species, including in relation to human-induced mortality on specific populations in the marine environment.

  3. Exploiting intrinsic fluctuations to identify model parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Christoph; Sahle, Sven; Pahle, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    Parameterisation of kinetic models plays a central role in computational systems biology. Besides the lack of experimental data of high enough quality, some of the biggest challenges here are identification issues. Model parameters can be structurally non-identifiable because of functional relationships. Noise in measured data is usually considered to be a nuisance for parameter estimation. However, it turns out that intrinsic fluctuations in particle numbers can make parameters identifiable that were previously non-identifiable. The authors present a method to identify model parameters that are structurally non-identifiable in a deterministic framework. The method takes time course recordings of biochemical systems in steady state or transient state as input. Often a functional relationship between parameters presents itself by a one-dimensional manifold in parameter space containing parameter sets of optimal goodness. Although the system's behaviour cannot be distinguished on this manifold in a deterministic framework it might be distinguishable in a stochastic modelling framework. Their method exploits this by using an objective function that includes a measure for fluctuations in particle numbers. They show on three example models, immigration-death, gene expression and Epo-EpoReceptor interaction, that this resolves the non-identifiability even in the case of measurement noise with known amplitude. The method is applied to partially observed recordings of biochemical systems with measurement noise. It is simple to implement and it is usually very fast to compute. This optimisation can be realised in a classical or Bayesian fashion.

  4. Does intrinsic motivation enhance motor cortex excitability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radel, Rémi; Pjevac, Dusan; Davranche, Karen; d'Arripe-Longueville, Fabienne; Colson, Serge S; Lapole, Thomas; Gruet, Mathieu

    2016-11-01

    Intrinsic motivation (IM) is often viewed as a spontaneous tendency for action. Recent behavioral and neuroimaging evidence indicate that IM, in comparison to extrinsic motivation (EM), solicits the motor system. Accordingly, we tested whether IM leads to greater excitability of the motor cortex than EM. To test this hypothesis, we used two different tasks to induce the motivational orientation using either words representing each motivational orientation or pictures previously linked to each motivational orientation through associative learning. Single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation over the motor cortex was applied when viewing the stimuli. Electromyographic activity was recorded on the contracted first dorsal interosseous muscle. Two indexes of corticospinal excitability (the amplitude of motor-evoked potential and the length of cortical silent period) were obtained through unbiased automatic detection and analyzed using a mixed model that provided both statistical power and a high level of control over all important individual, task, and stimuli characteristics. Across the two tasks and the two indices of corticospinal excitability, the exposure to IM-related stimuli did not lead to a greater corticospinal excitability than EM-related stimuli or than stimuli with no motivational valence (ps > .20). While these results tend to dismiss the advantage of IM at activating the motor cortex, we suggest alternative hypotheses to explain this lack of effect, which deserves further research. © 2016 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  5. Dynamic Neural Fields with Intrinsic Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strub, Claudius; Schöner, Gregor; Wörgötter, Florentin; Sandamirskaya, Yulia

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic neural fields (DNFs) are dynamical systems models that approximate the activity of large, homogeneous, and recurrently connected neural networks based on a mean field approach. Within dynamic field theory, the DNFs have been used as building blocks in architectures to model sensorimotor embedding of cognitive processes. Typically, the parameters of a DNF in an architecture are manually tuned in order to achieve a specific dynamic behavior (e.g., decision making, selection, or working memory) for a given input pattern. This manual parameters search requires expert knowledge and time to find and verify a suited set of parameters. The DNF parametrization may be particular challenging if the input distribution is not known in advance, e.g., when processing sensory information. In this paper, we propose the autonomous adaptation of the DNF resting level and gain by a learning mechanism of intrinsic plasticity (IP). To enable this adaptation, an input and output measure for the DNF are introduced, together with a hyper parameter to define the desired output distribution. The online adaptation by IP gives the possibility to pre-define the DNF output statistics without knowledge of the input distribution and thus, also to compensate for changes in it. The capabilities and limitations of this approach are evaluated in a number of experiments.

  6. Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma: poised for progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, Katherine E.

    2012-01-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPGs) are amongst the most challenging tumors to treat. Surgery is not an option, the effects of radiation therapy are temporary, and no chemotherapeutic agent has demonstrated significant efficacy. Numerous clinical trials of new agents and novel therapeutic approaches have been performed over the course of several decades in efforts to improve the outcome of children with DIPG, yet without success. The diagnosis of DIPG is based on radiographic findings in the setting of a typical clinical presentation, and tissue is not routinely obtained as the standard of care. The paradigm for treating children with these tumors has been based on that for supratentorial high-grade gliomas in adults as the biology of these lesions were presumed to be similar. However, recent pivotal studies demonstrate that DIPGs appear to be their own entity. Simply identifying this fact releases a number of constraints and opens opportunities for biologic investigation of these lesions, setting the stage to move forward in identifying DIPG-specific treatments. This review will summarize the current state of knowledge of DIPG, discuss obstacles to therapy, and summarize results of recent biologic studies.

  7. Toward a tripartite model of intrinsic motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonneau, Noémie; Vallerand, Robert J; Lafrenière, Marc-André K

    2012-10-01

    Intrinsic motivation (IM) refers to engaging in an activity for the pleasure inherent in the activity. The present article presents a tripartite model of IM consisting of IM to know (i.e., engaging in an activity to experience pleasure while learning and trying to understand something new), IM toward accomplishment (i.e., engaging in an activity for the pleasure experienced when attempting task mastery), and IM to experience stimulation (i.e., engaging in an activity for feelings of sensory pleasure). The tripartite model of IM posits that each type of IM can result from task, situational, and personality determinants and can lead to specific types of cognitive, affective, and behavioral outcomes. The purpose of this research was to test some predictions derived from this model. Across 4 studies (Study 1: N = 331; Study 2: N = 113; Study 3: N = 58; Study 4: N = 135), the 3 types of IM as well as potential determinants and consequences were assessed. Results revealed that experiencing one type of IM over the others depends in part on people's personality styles. Also, each type of IM was found to predict specific outcomes (i.e., affective states and behavioral choices). The implications of the tripartite model of IM for motivation research are discussed. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Personality © 2011, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Rates, intrinsic linkages, and multistate population dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoen, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Demographic analyses of multistate populations are commonplace, as are situations where population stocks are known but population flows are not. Still, demographic models for multistate populations with changing rates remain at an early stage of development, limiting dynamic analyses and analytical projections. Here, a new approach, the Intrinsic Linkage-Rate Ratio (IL-RR) model, is presented and explored. The key IL parameter, w , is a simple weight for projecting populations. Using the ultimate state composition implied by the prevailing rates, the IL-RR model provides new relationships that connect multistate populations over time and allow analytical population projections. Parameter w reflects population metabolism and scales the level of the transfer rates. Compositional change is driven by the sequence of implicit stable population compositions. The IL-RR approach also provides a new method for estimating transfer rates within an interval from population numbers at the beginning and end of the interval. The new relationships developed advance the ability of demographers to model multistate populations with changing rates and to relate population stocks and flows.

  9. All for One But Not One for All: Excitatory Synaptic Scaling and Intrinsic Excitability Are Coregulated by CaMKIV, Whereas Inhibitory Synaptic Scaling Is Under Independent Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Annelise; Turrigiano, Gina G

    2017-07-12

    Neocortical circuits use a family of homeostatic plasticity mechanisms to stabilize firing, including excitatory and inhibitory synaptic scaling and homeostatic intrinsic plasticity (Turrigiano and Nelson, 2004). All three mechanisms can be induced in tandem in cultured rat neocortical pyramidal neurons by chronic manipulations of firing, but it is unknown whether they are coinduced by the same activity-sensors and signaling pathways, or whether they are under independent control. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type IV (CaMKIV) is a key sensory/effector in excitatory synaptic scaling that senses perturbations in firing through changes in calcium influx, and translates this into compensatory changes in excitatory quantal amplitude (Ibata et al., 2008; Goold and Nicoll, 2010). Whether CaMKIV also controls inhibitory synaptic scaling and intrinsic homeostatic plasticity was unknown. To test this we manipulated CaMKIV signaling in individual neurons using dominant-negative (dn) or constitutively-active (ca) forms of nuclear-localized CaMKIV and measured the induction of all three forms of homeostatic plasticity. We found that excitatory synaptic scaling and intrinsic plasticity were bidirectionally coinduced by these manipulations. In contrast, these cell-autonomous manipulations had no impact on inhibitory quantal amplitude. Finally, we found that spontaneous firing rates were shifted up or down by dnCaMKIV or caCaMKIV, respectively, suggesting that uncoupling CaMKIV activation from activity generates an error signal in the negative feedback mechanism that controls firing rates. Together, our data show that excitatory synaptic scaling and intrinsic excitability are tightly coordinated through bidirectional changes in the same signaling pathway, whereas inhibitory synaptic scaling is sensed and regulated through an independent control mechanism. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Maintaining stable function in highly interconnected neural circuits is essential for

  10. Surgical Treatment Guidelines for Digital Deformity Associated With Intrinsic Muscle Spasticity (Intrinsic Plus Foot) in Adults With Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boffeli, Troy J; Collier, Rachel C

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsic plus foot deformity has primarily been associated with cerebral palsy and involves spastic contracture of the intrinsic musculature with resultant toe deformities. Digital deformity is caused by a dynamic imbalance between the intrinsic muscles in the foot and extrinsic muscles in the lower leg. Spastic contracture of the toes frequently involves curling under of the lesser digits or contracture of the hallux into valgus or plantarflexion deformity. Patients often present with associated pressure ulcers, deformed toenails, shoe or brace fitting challenges, and pain with ambulation or transfers. Four different patterns of intrinsic plus foot deformity have been observed by the authors that likely relate to the different patterns of muscle involvement. Case examples are provided of the 4 patterns of intrinsic plus foot deformity observed, including global intrinsic plus lesser toe deformity, isolated intrinsic plus lesser toe deformity, intrinsic plus hallux valgus deformity, and intrinsic plus hallux flexus deformity. These case examples are presented to demonstrate each type of deformity and our approach for surgical management according to the contracture pattern. The surgical approach has typically involved tenotomy, capsulotomy, or isolated joint fusion. The main goals of surgical treatment are to relieve pain and reduce pressure points through digital realignment in an effort to decrease the risk of pressure sores and allow more effective bracing to ultimately improve the patient's mobility. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Differential Sensitivity of Specific Neuronal Populations of the Rat Hypothalamus to Prolactin Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapsford, Tony J.; Kokay, Ilona C.; Östberg, Lovisa; Bridges, Robert S.; Grattan, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Prolactin stimulates dopamine release from neuroendocrine dopaminergic (NEDA) neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) to maintain low levels of serum prolactin. Elevated prolactin levels during pregnancy and lactation may mediate actions in other hypothalamic regions such as the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and rostral preoptic area (rPOA). We predicted that NEDA neurons would be more sensitive prolactin targets than neurons in other regions because they are required to regulate basal prolactin secretion. Moreover, differences in the accessibility of the ARC to prolactin in blood may influence the responsiveness of this population. Therefore, we compared prolactin-induced signaling in different hypothalamic neuronal populations following either systemic or intracerebroventricular (icv) prolactin administration. Phosphorylation of the signal transduction factor, STAT5 (pSTAT5), was used to identify prolactin-responsive neurons. In response to systemic prolactin, pSTAT5-labeled cells were widely observed in the ARC but absent from the rPOA and PVN. Many of these responsive cells in the ARC were identified as NEDA neurons. The lowest icv prolactin dose (10 ng) induced pSTAT5 in the ARC, but with higher doses (>500 ng) pSTAT5 was detected in numerous regions, including the rPOA and PVN. NEDA neurons were maximally labeled with nuclear pSTAT5 in response to 500 ng prolactin and appeared to be more sensitive than dopaminergic neurons in the rPOA. Subpopulations of oxytocin neurons in the hypothalamus were also found to be differentially sensitive to prolactin. These data suggest that differences in the accessibility of the arcuate nucleus to prolactin, together with intrinsic differences in the NEDA neurons, may facilitate homeostatic feedback regulation of prolactin release. PMID:21953590

  12. Sodium salicylate suppresses GABAergic inhibitory activity in neurons of rodent dorsal raphe nucleus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Jin

    Full Text Available Sodium salicylate (NaSal, a tinnitus inducing agent, can activate serotonergic (5-HTergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN and can increase serotonin (5-HT level in the inferior colliculus and the auditory cortex in rodents. To explore the underlying neural mechanisms, we first examined effects of NaSal on neuronal intrinsic properties and the inhibitory synaptic transmissions in DRN slices of rats by using whole-cell patch-clamp technique. We found that NaSal hyperpolarized the resting membrane potential, decreased the input resistance, and suppressed spontaneous and current-evoked firing in GABAergic neurons, but not in 5-HTergic neurons. In addition, NaSal reduced GABAergic spontaneous and miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents in 5-HTergic neurons. We next examined whether the observed depression of GABAergic activity would cause an increase in the excitability of 5-HTergic neurons using optogenetic technique in DRN slices of the transgenic mouse with channelrhodopsin-2 expressed in GABAergic neurons. When the GABAergic inhibition was enhanced by optical stimulation to GABAergic neurons in mouse DRN, NaSal significantly depolarized the resting membrane potential, increased the input resistance and increased current-evoked firing of 5-HTergic neurons. However, NaSal would fail to increase the excitability of 5-HTergic neurons when the GABAergic synaptic transmission was blocked by picrotoxin, a GABA receptor antagonist. Our results indicate that NaSal suppresses the GABAergic activities to raise the excitability of local 5-HTergic neural circuits in the DRN, which may contribute to the elevated 5-HT level by NaSal in the brain.

  13. Sodium salicylate suppresses GABAergic inhibitory activity in neurons of rodent dorsal raphe nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yan; Luo, Bin; Su, Yan-Yan; Wang, Xin-Xing; Chen, Liang; Wang, Ming; Wang, Wei-Wen; Chen, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Sodium salicylate (NaSal), a tinnitus inducing agent, can activate serotonergic (5-HTergic) neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) and can increase serotonin (5-HT) level in the inferior colliculus and the auditory cortex in rodents. To explore the underlying neural mechanisms, we first examined effects of NaSal on neuronal intrinsic properties and the inhibitory synaptic transmissions in DRN slices of rats by using whole-cell patch-clamp technique. We found that NaSal hyperpolarized the resting membrane potential, decreased the input resistance, and suppressed spontaneous and current-evoked firing in GABAergic neurons, but not in 5-HTergic neurons. In addition, NaSal reduced GABAergic spontaneous and miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents in 5-HTergic neurons. We next examined whether the observed depression of GABAergic activity would cause an increase in the excitability of 5-HTergic neurons using optogenetic technique in DRN slices of the transgenic mouse with channelrhodopsin-2 expressed in GABAergic neurons. When the GABAergic inhibition was enhanced by optical stimulation to GABAergic neurons in mouse DRN, NaSal significantly depolarized the resting membrane potential, increased the input resistance and increased current-evoked firing of 5-HTergic neurons. However, NaSal would fail to increase the excitability of 5-HTergic neurons when the GABAergic synaptic transmission was blocked by picrotoxin, a GABA receptor antagonist. Our results indicate that NaSal suppresses the GABAergic activities to raise the excitability of local 5-HTergic neural circuits in the DRN, which may contribute to the elevated 5-HT level by NaSal in the brain.

  14. UV and visible photoluminescence emission intensity of undoped and In-doped ZnO thin film and photoresponsivity of ZnO:In/Si hetero-junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zebbar, N.; Chabane, L.; Gabouze, N.; Kechouane, M.; Trari, M.; Aida, M.S.; Belhousse, S.; Hadj Larbi, F.

    2016-01-01

    Undoped zinc oxide (ZnO) and indium-doped (ZnO:In) thin films were grown at different temperatures (250–400 °C) on alkali-free borosilicate glass and n-Si (100) substrates by Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis method. The structural, compositional, optical and electrical properties of ZnO films were investigated by X-ray diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Rutherford Back Scattering Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, photoluminescence (PL) and the four-point probe technique. The predominance of ultraviolet (UV) and blue emission intensities was found to be closely dependent on the resistivity of the film. The visible emission band (peaking at 432 nm) prevails for low film resistivity, ranging from 10 −2 to 1 Ω·cm. By contrast, for higher resistivity (> 1 Ω·cm), there is a predominance of the UV band (382 nm). The PL and photoresponsivity results of fabricated ZnO:In/n-Si(100) heterojunctions prepared at different temperatures are discussed. The maximum spectral response of the ZnO:8%In/Si heterojunction diode fabricated at 250 °C was about 80 mA/W at zero bias. The highlighted results are attractive for the optoelectronic applications. - Highlights: • Properties of ZnO thin films grown by Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis at 350 °C. • Photoluminescence emission intensity in undoped ZnO film: effect of the resistivity • Photoluminescence emission intensity of In-doped ZnO film is resistivity dependent. • The spectral response of ZnO:In/Si hetero-junction deposited in the range (250–400 °C)

  15. UV and visible photoluminescence emission intensity of undoped and In-doped ZnO thin film and photoresponsivity of ZnO:In/Si hetero-junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zebbar, N., E-mail: nacbar2003@yahoo.fr [LCMS, Faculty of Physics, University of Sciences and Technology (USTHB), BP 32, El-Alia, Algiers (Algeria); Chabane, L. [LCMS, Faculty of Physics, University of Sciences and Technology (USTHB), BP 32, El-Alia, Algiers (Algeria); Gabouze, N. [CRTSE, 02 Bd. Frantz Fanon, BP 140, Algiers (Algeria); Kechouane, M. [LCMS, Faculty of Physics, University of Sciences and Technology (USTHB), BP 32, El-Alia, Algiers (Algeria); Trari, M. [Laboratory of Storage and Valorization of Renewable Energies, Faculty of Chemistry (USTHB), BP 32, El-Alia, Algiers (Algeria); Aida, M.S. [LCM et Interface, Faculty of Sciences, University of Constantine, 25000 (Algeria); Belhousse, S. [CRTSE, 02 Bd. Frantz Fanon, BP 140, Algiers (Algeria); Hadj Larbi, F. [MEMS & Sensors, Division Microélectronique et Nanotechnologie, Centre de Développement des Technologies Avancées (CDTA), BP 17, Baba Hassen, Algiers (Algeria)

    2016-04-30

    Undoped zinc oxide (ZnO) and indium-doped (ZnO:In) thin films were grown at different temperatures (250–400 °C) on alkali-free borosilicate glass and n-Si (100) substrates by Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis method. The structural, compositional, optical and electrical properties of ZnO films were investigated by X-ray diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Rutherford Back Scattering Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, photoluminescence (PL) and the four-point probe technique. The predominance of ultraviolet (UV) and blue emission intensities was found to be closely dependent on the resistivity of the film. The visible emission band (peaking at 432 nm) prevails for low film resistivity, ranging from 10{sup −2} to 1 Ω·cm. By contrast, for higher resistivity (> 1 Ω·cm), there is a predominance of the UV band (382 nm). The PL and photoresponsivity results of fabricated ZnO:In/n-Si(100) heterojunctions prepared at different temperatures are discussed. The maximum spectral response of the ZnO:8%In/Si heterojunction diode fabricated at 250 °C was about 80 mA/W at zero bias. The highlighted results are attractive for the optoelectronic applications. - Highlights: • Properties of ZnO thin films grown by Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis at 350 °C. • Photoluminescence emission intensity in undoped ZnO film: effect of the resistivity • Photoluminescence emission intensity of In-doped ZnO film is resistivity dependent. • The spectral response of ZnO:In/Si hetero-junction deposited in the range (250–400 °C)

  16. Orexin neurons receive glycinergic innervations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Hondo

    Full Text Available Glycine, a nonessential amino-acid that acts as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, is currently used as a dietary supplement to improve the quality of sleep, but its mechanism of action is poorly understood. We confirmed the effects of glycine on sleep/wakefulness behavior in mice when administered peripherally. Glycine administration increased non-rapid eye movement (NREM sleep time and decreased the amount and mean episode duration of wakefulness when administered in the dark period. Since peripheral administration of glycine induced fragmentation of sleep/wakefulness states, which is a characteristic of orexin deficiency, we examined the effects of glycine on orexin neurons. The number of Fos-positive orexin neurons markedly decreased after intraperitoneal administration of glycine to mice. To examine whether glycine acts directly on orexin neurons, we examined the effects of glycine on orexin neurons by patch-clamp electrophysiology. Glycine directly induced hyperpolarization and cessation of firing of orexin neurons. These responses were inhibited by a specific glycine receptor antagonist, strychnine. Triple-labeling immunofluorescent analysis showed close apposition of glycine transporter 2 (GlyT2-immunoreactive glycinergic fibers onto orexin-immunoreactive neurons. Immunoelectron microscopic analysis revealed that GlyT2-immunoreactive terminals made symmetrical synaptic contacts with somata and dendrites of orexin neurons. Double-labeling immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated that glycine receptor alpha subunits were localized in the postsynaptic membrane of symmetrical inhibitory synapses on orexin neurons. Considering the importance of glycinergic regulation during REM sleep, our observations suggest that glycine injection might affect the activity of orexin neurons, and that glycinergic inhibition of orexin neurons might play a role in physiological sleep regulation.

  17. A Role for SMN Exon 7 Splicing in the Selective Vulnerability of Motor Neurons in Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiu, Matteo; McGovern, Vicki L.; Lotti, Francesco; Saieva, Luciano; Li, Darrick K.; Kariya, Shingo; Monani, Umrao R.; Burghes, Arthur H. M.

    2012-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an inherited motor neuron disease caused by homozygous loss of the Survival Motor Neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. In the absence of SMN1, inefficient inclusion of exon 7 in transcripts from the nearly identical SMN2 gene results in ubiquitous SMN decrease but selective motor neuron degeneration. Here we investigated whether cell type-specific differences in the efficiency of exon 7 splicing contribute to the vulnerability of SMA motor neurons. We show that normal motor neurons express markedly lower levels of full-length SMN mRNA from SMN2 than do other cells in the spinal cord. This is due to inefficient exon 7 splicing that is intrinsic to motor neurons under normal conditions. We also find that SMN depletion in mammalian cells decreases exon 7 inclusion through a negative feedback loop affecting the splicing of its own mRNA. This mechanism is active in vivo and further decreases the efficiency of exon 7 inclusion specifically in motor neurons of severe-SMA mice. Consistent with expression of lower levels of full-length SMN, we find that SMN-dependent downstream molecular defects are exacerbated in SMA motor neurons. These findings suggest a mechanism to explain the selective vulnerability of motor neurons to loss of SMN1. PMID:22037760

  18. Ih equalizes membrane input resistance in a heterogeneous population of fusiform neurons in the dorsal cochlear nucleus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Celis Ceballos

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In a neuronal population, several combinations of its ionic conductances are used to attain a specific firing phenotype. Some neurons present heterogeneity in their firing, generally produced by expression of a specific conductance, but how additional conductances vary along in order to homeostatically regulate membrane excitability is less known. Dorsal cochlear nucleus principal neurons, fusiform neurons, display heterogeneous spontaneous action potential activity and thus represent an appropriate model to study the role of different conductances in establishing firing heterogeneity. Particularly, fusiform neurons are divided into quiet, with no spontaneous firing, or active neurons, presenting spontaneous, regular firing. These modes are determined by the expression levels of an intrinsic membrane conductance, an inwardly rectifying potassium current (IKir. In this work, we tested whether other subthreshold conductances vary homeostatically to maintain membrane excitability constant across the two subtypes. We found that Ih expression covaries specifically with IKir in order to maintain membrane resistance constant. The impact of Ih on membrane resistance is dependent on the level of IKir expression, being much smaller in quiet neurons with bigger IKir, but Ih variations are not relevant for creating the quiet and active phenotypes. Finally, we demonstrate that the individual proportion of each conductance, and not their absolute conductance, is relevant for determining the neuronal firing mode. We conclude that in fusiform neurons the variations of their different subthreshold conductances are limited to specific conductances in order to create firing heterogeneity and maintain membrane homeostasis.

  19. Autonomous Optimization of Targeted Stimulation of Neuronal Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sreedhar S; Wülfing, Jan; Okujeni, Samora; Boedecker, Joschka; Riedmiller, Martin; Egert, Ulrich

    2016-08-01

    Driven by clinical needs and progress in neurotechnology, targeted interaction with neuronal networks is of increasing importance. Yet, the dynamics of interaction between intrinsic ongoing activity in neuronal networks and their response to stimulation is unknown. Nonetheless, electrical stimulation of the brain is increasingly explored as a therapeutic strategy and as a means to artificially inject information into neural circuits. Strategies using regular or event-triggered fixed stimuli discount the influence of ongoing neuronal activity on the stimulation outcome and are therefore not optimal to induce specific responses reliably. Yet, without suitable mechanistic models, it is hardly possible to optimize such interactions, in particular when desired response features are network-dependent and are initially unknown. In this proof-of-principle study, we present an experimental paradigm using reinforcement-learning (RL) to optimize stimulus settings autonomously and evaluate the learned control strategy using phenomenological models. We asked how to (1) capture the interaction of ongoing network activity, electrical stimulation and evoked responses in a quantifiable 'state' to formulate a well-posed control problem, (2) find the optimal state for stimulation, and (3) evaluate the quality of the solution found. Electrical stimulation of generic neuronal networks grown from rat cortical tissue in vitro evoked bursts of action potentials (responses). We show that the dynamic interplay of their magnitudes and the probability to be intercepted by spontaneous events defines a trade-off scenario with a network-specific unique optimal latency maximizing stimulus efficacy. An RL controller was set to find this optimum autonomously. Across networks, stimulation efficacy increased in 90% of the sessions after learning and learned latencies strongly agreed with those predicted from open-loop experiments. Our results show that autonomous techniques can exploit quantitative

  20. Adolescents' Perceptions of Family Connectedness, Intrinsic Religiosity, and Depressed Mood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houltberg, Benjamin J.; Henry, Carolyn S.; Merten, Michael J.; Robinson, Linda C.

    2011-01-01

    Using a sample of 248 ninth and tenth grade students at public high schools, we examined adolescents' perceptions of family connectedness, intrinsic religiosity, and adolescents' gender in relation to depressed mood and whether intrinsic religiosity and gender moderated the association of aspects of family connectedness to adolescent depressed…

  1. Palatalization and Intrinsic Prosodic Vowel Features in Russian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordin, Mikhail

    2011-01-01

    The presented study is aimed at investigating the interaction of palatalization and intrinsic prosodic features of the vowel in CVC (consonant+vowel+consonant) syllables in Russian. The universal nature of intrinsic prosodic vowel features was confirmed with the data from the Russian language. It was found that palatalization of the consonants…

  2. Self-Determination Theory: Intrinsic Motivation and Behavioral Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannery, Marie

    2017-03-01

    Motivation is a central concept in behavioral change. This article reviews the self-determination theory with an emphasis on "intrinsic motivation," which is facilitated when three basic psychological needs (autonomy, competence, and relatedness) are met. Intrinsic motivation is associated with improved well-being and sustained behavioral change.

  3. Elderly Taiwanese's Intrinsic Risk Factors for Fall-related Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Fun Li

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: Elderly Taiwanese inpatients with existing intrinsic conditions of cancer, vertigo, and lower leg weakness were at high risk of falling, resulting in severe injuries. Additional research including controlled trials is necessary to further identify treatable, causal intrinsic risk factors for this elderly group.

  4. Intrinsic antecedents of academic research productivity of a large ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kirstam

    Intrinsic antecedents of academic research productivity of a large South African university. 175 influences as given, certain theory predicts that individual intrinsic differences can be associated with differences in individual job performance. Positive affectivity, or affect, can contribute to job satisfaction, as a result of the fit.

  5. Intrinsic religiosity reduces intergroup hostility under mortality salience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Zavala, Agnieszka Golec; Cichocka, Aleksandra; Orehek, Edward; Abdollahi, Abdolhossein

    Results of three studies indicate that intrinsic religiosity and mortality salience interact to predict intergroup hostility. Study 1, conducted among 200 American Christians and Jews, reveals that under mortality salience, intrinsic (but not extrinsic or quest) religiosity is related to decreased

  6. Extrinsic Rewards and Intrinsic Motivation in Children. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepper, Mark R.

    Three experiments were conducted to examine the effects of providing extrinsic rewards for engaging in an activity on children's subsequent intrinsic interest in that activity. In each study, preschool children were asked to engage in an activity of initial intrinsic interest in individual experimental sessions. The children agreed to engage in…

  7. Creativity as Mediator for Intrinsic Motivation and Sales Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodla, Mahmood A.; Naeem, Basharat

    2014-01-01

    Substantial theoretical and empirical literature indicates inconsistent performance implications of intrinsic motivation, suggesting the possibility of some explanatory mechanisms. However, little is known about the factors that might explain intrinsic motivation and sales force performance relation, particularly in highly competitive and…

  8. Intrinsic Motivation and Flow Condition on the Music Teacher's Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres Delgado, Gabriela

    2017-01-01

    The aim of these research is to identify if music teachers and teachers from other areas are intrinsically or extrinsically motivated, to identify the dimensions of the flow state, and to identify if there is a relationship between intrinsic motivation and flow state in these teachers. The sample was made up of 738 active teachers. The presence of…

  9. Intrinsic antecedents of academic research productivity of a large ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Across different contexts, the human resources literature suggests that a range of intrinsic factors – typically measured as psychographic, or intrinsic, variables – are antecedents of individual job performance. What is not clear from this literature, however, is the relative contribution of different dimensions of these factors to ...

  10. Senescence-associated intrinsic mechanisms of osteoblast dysfunctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kassem, Moustapha; Trinquier, Anne Marie-Pierre Emilie

    2011-01-01

    factors, and intrinsic mechanisms caused by the osteoblast cellular senescence. The aim of this review is to provide a summary of the intrinsic senescence mechanisms affecting osteoblastic functions and how they can be targeted in order to abolish age-related osteoblastic dysfunction and bone loss...

  11. Cooperative motion of intrinsic and actuated semiflexible swimmers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Llopis, I.; Pagonabarraga, I.; Lagomarsino, M.C.; Lowe, C.P.

    2013-01-01

    We examine the phenomenon of hydrodynamic-induced cooperativity for pairs of flagellated micro-organism swimmers, of which spermatozoa cells are an example. We consider semiflexible swimmers, where inextensible filaments are driven by an internal intrinsic force and torque-free mechanism (intrinsic

  12. Leadership style and employees' intrinsic job satisfaction in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigates the impact of leadership style on employees' intrinsic job satisfaction in the Cross River State Newspaper Corporation, Calabar, Nigeria. The study examined the problem of dissatisfaction in the work place as far as intrinsic factors of job satisfaction are concerned. Structured questionnaire was used ...

  13. Intrinsic motivation and sportsmanship: mediating role of interpersonal relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Juan L; Martín-Albo, José; Navarro, José G; Sánchez, Juana M; González-Cutre, David

    2009-06-01

    This study analyzed the mediating role of interpersonal relations between intrinsic motivation and sportsmanship. Athletes (98 men, 97 women), ages 11 to 43 years, completed measures of intrinsic motivation toward sports, self-concept of social and family relations, and sportsmanship orientation. A structural equation model indicated that self-concept of interpersonal relations mediated the relation between intrinsic motivation and sportsmanship. Also, intrinsic motivation was directly and positively associated with self-concept of interpersonal relations, which, in turn, was positively and significantly related to sportsmanship. Variances explained by self-concept of interpersonal relations and by sportsmanship were 32 and 56%, respectively. The motivational interaction between the context of interpersonal relations and the sports context proposed in the hierarchical model of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation was discussed.

  14. Motivating crowding theory - opening the black box of intrinsic motivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Christian Bøtcher

    2010-01-01

    Public employees work for many other reasons than because they are paid for it. In other words, intrinsic motivation is an important determinant for their performance. Nonetheless, public sector organizations increasingly rely on extrinsic motivation factors such as monetary incentives to motivate...... employees. Motivation crowding theory claims that this may be at the expense of intrinsic motivation, if the extrinsic motivation factor is perceived to be controlling. On the other hand, intrinsic motivation will be enhanced (crowded in), if the extrinsic motivation factor is perceived to be supportive....... Studies have found support for the motivation crowding claim, but have neglected intrinsic motivation. This study opens the black box of intrinsic motivation and finds a meaningful distinction between task motivation and public service motivation. Among 2,772 physiotherapists in the Danish public sector...

  15. Intrinsic Evaporative Cooling by Hygroscopic Earth Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra R. Rempel

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The phase change of water from liquid to vapor is one of the most energy-intensive physical processes in nature, giving it immense potential for cooling. Diverse evaporative cooling strategies have resulted worldwide, including roof ponds and sprinklers, courtyard fountains, wind catchers with qanats, irrigated green roofs, and fan-assisted evaporative coolers. These methods all require water in bulk liquid form. The evaporation of moisture that has been sorbed from the atmosphere by hygroscopic materials is equally energy-intensive, however, yet has not been examined for its cooling potential. In arid and semi-arid climates, hygroscopic earth buildings occur widely and are known to maintain comfortable indoor temperatures, but evaporation of moisture from their walls and roofs has been regarded as unimportant since water scarcity limits irrigation and rainfall; instead, their cool interiors are attributed to well-established mass effects in delaying the transmission of sensible gains. Here, we investigate the cooling accomplished by daily cycles of moisture sorption and evaporation which, requiring only ambient humidity, we designate as “intrinsic” evaporative cooling. Connecting recent soil science to heat and moisture transport studies in building materials, we use soils, adobe, cob, unfired earth bricks, rammed earth, and limestone to reveal the effects of numerous parameters (temperature and relative humidity, material orientation, thickness, moisture retention properties, vapor diffusion resistance, and liquid transport properties on the magnitude of intrinsic evaporative cooling and the stabilization of indoor relative humidity. We further synthesize these effects into concrete design guidance. Together, these results show that earth buildings in diverse climates have significant potential to cool themselves evaporatively through sorption of moisture from humid night air and evaporation during the following day’s heat. This finding

  16. Investigating Power Density and the Degree of Nonlinearity in Intrinsic Components of Anesthesia EEG by the Hilbert-Huang Transform: An Example Using Ketamine and Alfentanil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Fang Tsai

    Full Text Available Empirical mode decomposition (EMD is an adaptive filter bank for processing nonlinear and non-stationary signals, such as electroencephalographic (EEG signals. EMD works well to decompose a time series into a set of intrinsic mode functions with specific frequency bands. An IMF therefore represents an intrinsic component on its correspondingly intrinsic frequency band. The word of 'intrinsic' means the frequency is totally adaptive to the nature of a signal. In this study, power density and nonlinearity are two critical parameters for characterizing the amplitude and frequency modulations in IMFs. In this study, a nonlinearity level is quantified using degree of waveform distortion (DWD, which represents the characteristic of waveform distortion as an assessment of the intra-wave modulation of an IMF. In the application of anesthesia EEG analysis, the assessments of power density and DWD for a set of IMFs represent dynamic responses in EEG caused by two different anesthesia agents, Ketamine and Alfentanil, on different frequency bands. Ketamine causes the increase of power density and the decrease of nonlinearity on γ-band neuronal oscillation, which cannot be found EEG responses of group B using Alfentanil. Both agents cause an increase of power density and a decrease of nonlinearity on β-band neuronal oscillation accompany with a loss of consciousness. Moreover, anesthesia agents cause the decreases of power density and nonlinearity (i.e. DWD for the low-frequency IMFs.

  17. Neuronal migration and ventral subtype identity in the telencephalon depend on SOX1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antigoni Ekonomou

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the molecular mechanisms and intrinsic factors that are responsible for the emergence of neuronal subtype identity. Several transcription factors that are expressed mainly in precursors of the ventral telencephalon have been shown to control neuronal specification, but it has been unclear whether subtype identity is also specified in these precursors, or if this happens in postmitotic neurons, and whether it involves the same or different factors. SOX1, an HMG box transcription factor, is expressed widely in neural precursors along with the two other SOXB1 subfamily members, SOX2 and SOX3, and all three have been implicated in neurogenesis. SOX1 is also uniquely expressed at a high level in the majority of telencephalic neurons that constitute the ventral striatum (VS. These neurons are missing in Sox1-null mutant mice. In the present study, we have addressed the requirement for SOX1 at a cellular level, revealing both the nature and timing of the defect. By generating a novel Sox1-null allele expressing beta-galactosidase, we found that the VS precursors and their early neuronal differentiation are unaffected in the absence of SOX1, but the prospective neurons fail to migrate to their appropriate position. Furthermore, the migration of non-Sox1-expressing VS neurons (such as those expressing Pax6 was also affected in the absence of SOX1, suggesting that Sox1-expressing neurons play a role in structuring the area of the VS. To test whether SOX1 is required in postmitotic cells for the emergence of VS neuronal identity, we generated mice in which Sox1 expression was directed to all ventral telencephalic precursors, but to only a very few VS neurons. These mice again lacked most of the VS, indicating that SOX1 expression in precursors is not sufficient for VS development. Conversely, the few neurons in which Sox1 expression was maintained were able to migrate to the VS. In conclusion, Sox1 expression in precursors is not

  18. Increased intrinsic brain connectivity between pons and somatosensory cortex during attacks of migraine with aura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hougaard, Anders; Amin, Faisal Mohammad; Larsson, Henrik B W; Rostrup, Egill; Ashina, Messoud

    2017-05-01

    The neurological disturbances of migraine aura are caused by transient cortical dysfunction due to waves of spreading depolarization that disrupt neuronal signaling. The effects of these cortical events on intrinsic brain connectivity during attacks of migraine aura have not previously been investigated. Studies of spontaneous migraine attacks are notoriously challenging due to their unpredictable nature and patient discomfort. We investigated 16 migraine patients with visual aura during attacks and in the attack-free state using resting state fMRI. We applied a hypothesis-driven seed-based approach focusing on cortical visual areas and areas involved in migraine pain, and a data-driven independent component analysis approach to detect changes in intrinsic brain signaling during attacks. In addition, we performed the analyses after mirroring the MRI data according to the side of perceived aura symptoms. We found a marked increase in connectivity during attacks between the left pons and the left primary somatosensory cortex including the head and face somatotopic areas (peak voxel: P = 0.0096, (x, y, z) = (-54, -32, 32), corresponding well with the majority of patients reporting right-sided pain. For aura-side normalized data, we found increased connectivity during attacks between visual area V5 and the lower middle frontal gyrus in the symptomatic hemisphere (peak voxel: P = 0.0194, (x, y, z) = (40, 40, 12). The present study provides evidence of altered intrinsic brain connectivity during attacks of migraine with aura, which may reflect consequences of cortical spreading depression, suggesting a link between aura and headache mechanisms. Hum Brain Mapp 38:2635-2642, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. A single GABAergic neuron mediates feedback of odor-evoked signals in the mushroom body of larval Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liria Monica Masuda-Nakagawa

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Inhibition has a central role in defining the selectivity of the responses of higher order neurons to sensory stimuli. However, the circuit mechanisms of regulation of these responses by inhibitory neurons are still unclear. In Drosophila, the mushroom bodies (MBs are necessary for olfactory memory, and by implication for the selectivity of learned responses to specific odors. To understand the circuitry of inhibition in the calyx (the input dendritic region of the MBs, and its relationship with MB excitatory activity, we used the simple anatomy of the Drosophila larval olfactory system to identify any inhibitory inputs that could contribute to the selectivity of MB odor responses. We found that a single neuron accounts for all detectable GABA innervation in the calyx of the MBs, and that this neuron has presynaptic terminals in the calyx and postsynaptic branches in the MB lobes (output axonal area. We call this neuron the larval anterior paired lateral (APL neuron, because of its similarity to the previously described adult APL neuron. Reconstitution of GFP partners (GRASP suggests that the larval APL makes extensive contacts with the MB intrinsic neurons, Kenyon Cells (KCs, but few contacts with incoming projection neurons. Using calcium imaging of neuronal activity in live larvae, we show that the larval APL responds to odors, in a mannner that requires output from KCs. Our data suggest that the larval APL is the sole GABAergic neuron that innervates the MB input region and carries inhibitory feedback from the MB output region, consistent with a role in modulating the olfactory selectivity of MB neurons.

  20. Neuronal adaptation in the somatosensory system of rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampl, I; Katz, Y

    2017-02-20

    The sensory systems in animals constantly monitor the environment and process salient and relevant features while subtracting background activity. This process requires continuous recalibration of neuronal gain based on recent history. Adaptation has been postulated to be the key mechanism by which neurons rapidly tune their response curves to represent the entire dynamic range of external inputs. Rodents heavily rely on their vibrissa system while gathering information about their surroundings using whisking. Neuronal adaptation is observed in all stages of sensory processing, from the whisker follicle through the brainstem and thalamus up to the barrel cortex. In this review, we discuss the intrinsic, synaptic and network mechanisms of adaptation such as short-term synaptic depression, inhibitory suppression, balance between excitation and inhibition as well as the role of cascading adaptation. Furthermore, we describe recent findings about the different intensity dependent adaptation properties in the two major somatosensory pathways and their possible implications about coding. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Tinbergen on mirror neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyes, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Fifty years ago, Niko Tinbergen defined the scope of behavioural biology with his four problems: causation, ontogeny, survival value and evolution. About 20 years ago, there was another highly significant development in behavioural biology-the discovery of mirror neurons (MNs). Here, I use Tinbergen's original four problems (rather than the list that appears in textbooks) to highlight the differences between two prominent accounts of MNs, the genetic and associative accounts; to suggest that the latter provides the defeasible 'best explanation' for current data on the causation and ontogeny of MNs; and to argue that functional analysis, of the kind that Tinbergen identified somewhat misleadingly with studies of 'survival value', should be a high priority for future research. In this kind of functional analysis, system-level theories would assign MNs a small, but potentially important, role in the achievement of action understanding-or another social cognitive function-by a production line of interacting component processes. These theories would be tested by experimental intervention in human and non-human animal samples with carefully documented and controlled developmental histories.

  2. VELOCITY EVOLUTION AND THE INTRINSIC COLOR OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, Ryan J.; Sanders, Nathan E.; Kirshner, Robert P.

    2011-01-01

    To understand how best to use observations of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) to obtain precise and accurate distances, we investigate the relations between spectra of SNe Ia and their intrinsic colors. Using a sample of 1630 optical spectra of 255 SNe, based primarily on data from the CfA Supernova Program, we examine how the velocity evolution and line strengths of Si II λ6355 and Ca II H and K are related to the B – V color at peak brightness. We find that the maximum-light velocity of Si II λ6355 and Ca II H and K and the maximum-light pseudo-equivalent width of Si II λ6355 are correlated with intrinsic color, with intrinsic color having a linear relation with the Si II λ6355 measurements. Ca II H and K does not have a linear relation with intrinsic color, but lower-velocity SNe tend to be intrinsically bluer. Combining the spectroscopic measurements does not improve intrinsic color inference. The intrinsic color scatter is larger for higher-velocity SNe Ia—even after removing a linear trend with velocity—indicating that lower-velocity SNe Ia are more 'standard crayons'. Employing information derived from SN Ia spectra has the potential to improve the measurements of extragalactic distances and the cosmological properties inferred from them.

  3. DNA Damage Induced Neuronal Death

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kisby, Glen

    1999-01-01

    ... (nitrogen mustard or HN2) and the neurotoxic DNA-damaging agent methylazoxymethanol (MAM) using neuronal and astrocyte cell cultures from different brain regions of mice with perturbed DNA repair...

  4. Information processing by neuronal populations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hölscher, Christian; Munk, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    ... simultaneously recorded spike trains 120 Mark Laubach, Nandakumar S. Narayanan, and Eyal Y. Kimchi Part III Neuronal population information coding and plasticity in specific brain areas 149 7 F...

  5. Computational modeling of spiking neural network with learning rules from STDP and intrinsic plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiumin; Wang, Wei; Xue, Fangzheng; Song, Yongduan

    2018-02-01

    Recently there has been continuously increasing interest in building up computational models of spiking neural networks (SNN), such as the Liquid State Machine (LSM). The biologically inspired self-organized neural networks with neural plasticity can enhance the capability of computational performance, with the characteristic features of dynamical memory and recurrent connection cycles which distinguish them from the more widely used feedforward neural networks. Despite a variety of computational models for brain-like learning and information processing have been proposed, the modeling of self-organized neural networks with multi-neural plasticity is still an important open challenge. The main difficulties lie in the interplay among different forms of neural plasticity rules and understanding how structures and dynamics of neural networks shape the computational performance. In this paper, we propose a novel approach to develop the models of LSM with a biologically inspired self-organizing network based on two neural plasticity learning rules. The connectivity among excitatory neurons is adapted by spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) learning; meanwhile, the degrees of neuronal excitability are regulated to maintain a moderate average activity level by another learning rule: intrinsic plasticity (IP). Our study shows that LSM with STDP+IP performs better than LSM with a random SNN or SNN obtained by STDP alone. The noticeable improvement with the proposed method is due to the better reflected competition among different neurons in the developed SNN model, as well as the more effectively encoded and processed relevant dynamic information with its learning and self-organizing mechanism. This result gives insights to the optimization of computational models of spiking neural networks with neural plasticity.

  6. Trafficking of neuronal calcium channels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Weiss, Norbert; Zamponi, G. W.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 1 (2017), č. článku NS20160003. ISSN 2059-6553 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-13556S; GA MŠk 7AMB15FR015 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : calcium channel * neuron * trafficing Subject RIV: ED - Physiology OBOR OECD: Physiology (including cytology) http://www. neuron alsignaling.org/content/1/1/NS20160003

  7. Some chaotic features of intrinsically coupled Josephson junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolahchi, M.R.; Shukrinov, Yu.M.; Hamdipour, M.; Botha, A.E.; Suzuki, M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Intrinsically coupled Josephson junctions model a high-T c superconductor. ► Intrinsically coupled Josephson junctions can act as a chaotic nonlinear system. ► Chaos could be due to resonance overlap. ► Avoiding parameters that lead to chaos is important for the design of resonators. -- Abstract: We look for chaos in an intrinsically coupled system of Josephson junctions. This study has direct applications for the high-T c resonators which require coherence amongst the junctions

  8. Congenital hypertrophy of multiple intrinsic muscles of the foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Tomohiro; Park, Susam; Niu, Atushi; Hasegawa, Hiromi

    2014-12-01

    Congenital hypertrophy of a single intrinsic muscle of the foot is rare, and as far as we know, only six cases have been reported. We describe a case of congenital anomaly that showed hypertrophy of multiple intrinsic muscles of the foot; the affected muscles were all the intrinsic muscles of the foot except the extensor digitorum brevis or extensor hallucis. Other tissues such as adipose tissue, nervous tissue, or osseous tissue showed no abnormalities. To reduce the volume of the foot we removed parts of the enlarged muscles.

  9. Simple intrinsic defects in GaAs : numerical supplement.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, Peter Andrew

    2012-04-01

    This Report presents numerical tables summarizing properties of intrinsic defects in gallium arsenide, GaAs, as computed by density functional theory. This Report serves as a numerical supplement to the results published in: P.A. Schultz and O.A. von Lilienfeld, 'Simple intrinsic defects in GaAs', Modelling Simul. Mater. Sci Eng., Vol. 17, 084007 (2009), and intended for use as reference tables for a defect physics package in device models. The numerical results for density functional theory calculations of properties of simple intrinsic defects in gallium arsenide are presented.

  10. Helical propensity in an intrinsically disordered protein accelerates ligand binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iesmantavicius, Vytautas; Dogan, Jakob; Jemth, Per

    2014-01-01

    domain of the activator for thyroid hormone and retinoid receptors (ACTR) is intrinsically disordered and folds upon binding to the nuclear coactivator binding domain (NCBD) of the CREB binding protein. A number of mutants was designed that selectively perturbs the amount of secondary structure......Many intrinsically disordered proteins fold upon binding to other macromolecules. The secondary structure present in the well-ordered complex is often formed transiently in the unbound state. The consequence of such transient structure for the binding process is, however, not clear. The activation...... the notion of preformed secondary structure as an important determinant for molecular recognition in intrinsically disordered proteins....

  11. Intrinsic and collective structure in the interacting boson model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leviatan, A.

    1987-01-01

    A general non-spherical boson basis is introduced to study the excitation modes in the interacting boson model (IBM). A prescription for construction of intrinsic states is presented. The general IBM Hamiltonian is resolved exactly into intrinsic and collective parts. The limit of large boson number is discussed analytically for spectrum and transitions. The method of analysis reveals an underlying intrinsic and collective structure closely linked with symmetry considerations. The suggested new approach seems to be adequate as a tool to obtain the physical content and normal modes in any number conserving algebraic bosonic system. copyright 1987 Academic Press, Inc

  12. Intrinsic and collective structure in the interacting boson model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leviatan, A.

    1987-11-01

    A general non-spherical boson basis is introduced to study the excitation modes in the interacting boson model (IBM). A prescription for construction of intrinsic states is presented. The general IBM Hamiltonian is resolved exactly into intrinsic and collective parts. The limit of large boson number is discussed analytically for spectrum and transitions. The method of analysis reveals an underlying intrinsic and collective structure closely linked with symmetry considerations. The suggested new approach seems to be adequate as a tool to obtain the physical content and normal modes in any number conserving algebraic bosonic system. copyright 1987 Academic Press, Inc.

  13. Generation of Induced Neuronal Cells by the Single Reprogramming Factor ASCL1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soham Chanda

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Direct conversion of nonneural cells to functional neurons holds great promise for neurological disease modeling and regenerative medicine. We previously reported rapid reprogramming of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs into mature induced neuronal (iN cells by forced expression of three transcription factors: ASCL1, MYT1L, and BRN2. Here, we show that ASCL1 alone is sufficient to generate functional iN cells from mouse and human fibroblasts and embryonic stem cells, indicating that ASCL1 is the key driver of iN cell reprogramming in different cell contexts and that the role of MYT1L and BRN2 is primarily to enhance the neuronal maturation process. ASCL1-induced single-factor neurons (1F-iN expressed mature neuronal markers, exhibited typical passive and active intrinsic membrane properties, and formed functional pre- and postsynaptic structures. Surprisingly, ASCL1-induced iN cells were predominantly excitatory, demonstrating that ASCL1 is permissive but alone not deterministic for the inhibitory neuronal lineage.

  14. Corticothalamic Synaptic Noise as a Mechanism for Selective Attention in Thalamic Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béhuret, Sébastien; Deleuze, Charlotte; Bal, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    A reason why the thalamus is more than a passive gateway for sensory signals is that two-third of the synapses of thalamocortical neurons are directly or indirectly related to the activity of corticothalamic axons. While the responses of thalamocortical neurons evoked by sensory stimuli are well characterized, with ON- and OFF-center receptive field structures, the prevalence of synaptic noise resulting from neocortical feedback in intracellularly recorded thalamocortical neurons in vivo has attracted little attention. However, in vitro and modeling experiments point to its critical role for the integration of sensory signals. Here we combine our recent findings in a unified framework suggesting the hypothesis that corticothalamic synaptic activity is adapted to modulate the transfer efficiency of thalamocortical neurons during selective attention at three different levels: First, on ionic channels by interacting with intrinsic membrane properties, second at the neuron level by impacting on the input-output gain, and third even more effectively at the cell assembly level by boosting the information transfer of sensory features encoded in thalamic subnetworks. This top-down population control is achieved by tuning the correlations in subthreshold membrane potential fluctuations and is adapted to modulate the transfer of sensory features encoded by assemblies of thalamocortical relay neurons. We thus propose that cortically-controlled (de-)correlation of subthreshold noise is an efficient and swift dynamic mechanism for selective attention in the thalamus. PMID:26733818

  15. Time-scale invariance as an emergent property in a perceptron with realistic, noisy neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhusi, Catalin V; Oprisan, Sorinel A

    2013-05-01

    In most species, interval timing is time-scale invariant: errors in time estimation scale up linearly with the estimated duration. In mammals, time-scale invariance is ubiquitous over behavioral, lesion, and pharmacological manipulations. For example, dopaminergic drugs induce an immediate, whereas cholinergic drugs induce a gradual, scalar change in timing. Behavioral theories posit that time-scale invariance derives from particular computations, rules, or coding schemes. In contrast, we discuss a simple neural circuit, the perceptron, whose output neurons fire in a clockwise fashion based on the pattern of coincidental activation of its input neurons. We show numerically that time-scale invariance emerges spontaneously in a perceptron with realistic neurons, in the presence of noise. Under the assumption that dopaminergic drugs modulate the firing of input neurons, and that cholinergic drugs modulate the memory representation of the criterion time, we show that a perceptron with realistic neurons reproduces the pharmacological clock and memory patterns, and their time-scale invariance, in the presence of noise. These results suggest that rather than being a signature of higher order cognitive processes or specific computations related to timing, time-scale invariance may spontaneously emerge in a massively connected brain from the intrinsic noise of neurons and circuits, thus providing the simplest explanation for the ubiquity of scale invariance of interval timing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Corticothalamic Synaptic Noise as a Mechanism for Selective Attention in Thalamic Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béhuret, Sébastien; Deleuze, Charlotte; Bal, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    A reason why the thalamus is more than a passive gateway for sensory signals is that two-third of the synapses of thalamocortical neurons are directly or indirectly related to the activity of corticothalamic axons. While the responses of thalamocortical neurons evoked by sensory stimuli are well characterized, with ON- and OFF-center receptive field structures, the prevalence of synaptic noise resulting from neocortical feedback in intracellularly recorded thalamocortical neurons in vivo has attracted little attention. However, in vitro and modeling experiments point to its critical role for the integration of sensory signals. Here we combine our recent findings in a unified framework suggesting the hypothesis that corticothalamic synaptic activity is adapted to modulate the transfer efficiency of thalamocortical neurons during selective attention at three different levels: First, on ionic channels by interacting with intrinsic membrane properties, second at the neuron level by impacting on the input-output gain, and third even more effectively at the cell assembly level by boosting the information transfer of sensory features encoded in thalamic subnetworks. This top-down population control is achieved by tuning the correlations in subthreshold membrane potential fluctuations and is adapted to modulate the transfer of sensory features encoded by assemblies of thalamocortical relay neurons. We thus propose that cortically-controlled (de-)correlation of subthreshold noise is an efficient and swift dynamic mechanism for selective attention in the thalamus.

  17. Corticothalamic Synaptic Noise as a Mechanism for Selective Attention in Thalamic Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien eBéhuret

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A reason why the thalamus is more than a passive gateway for sensory signals is that two-third of the synapses of thalamocortical neurons are directly or indirectly related to the activity of corticothalamic axons. While the responses of thalamocortical neurons evoked by sensory stimuli are well characterized, with ON- and OFF-center receptive field structures, the prevalence of synaptic noise resulting from neocortical feedback in intracellularly recorded thalamocortical neurons in vivo has attracted little attention. However, in vitro and modeling experiments point to its critical role for the integration of sensory signals. Here we combine our recent findings in a unified framework suggesting the hypothesis that corticothalamic synaptic activity is adapted to modulate the transfer efficiency of thalamocortical neurons during selective attention at three different levels: First, on ionic channels by interacting with intrinsic membrane properties, second at the neuron level by impacting on the input-output gain, and third even more effectively at the cell assembly level by boosting the information transfer of sensory features encoded in thalamic subnetworks. This top-down population control is achieved by tuning the correlations in subthreshold membrane potential fluctuations and is adapted to modulate the transfer of sensory features encoded by assemblies of thalamocortical relay neurons. We thus propose that cortically-controlled (de-correlation of subthreshold noise is an efficient and swift dynamic mechanism for selective attention in the thalamus.

  18. Observation of Switchable Photoresponse of a Monolayer WSe 2 –MoS 2 Lateral Heterostructure via Photocurrent Spectral Atomic Force Microscopic Imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Son, Youngwoo

    2016-04-27

    In the pursuit of two-dimensional (2D) materials beyond graphene, enormous advances have been made in exploring the exciting and useful properties of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), such as a permanent band gap in the visible range and the transition from indirect to direct band gap due to 2D quantum confinement, and their potential for a wide range of device applications. In particular, recent success in the synthesis of seamless monolayer lateral heterostructures of different TMDCs via chemical vapor deposition methods has provided an effective solution to producing an in-plane p-n junction, which is a critical component in electronic and optoelectronic device applications. However, spatial variation of the electronic and optoelectonic properties of the synthesized heterojunction crystals throughout the homogeneous as well as the lateral junction region and the charge carrier transport behavior at their nanoscale junctions with metals remain unaddressed. In this work, we use photocurrent spectral atomic force microscopy to image the current and photocurrent generated between a biased PtIr tip and a monolayer WSe2-MoS2 lateral heterostructure. Current measurements in the dark in both forward and reverse bias reveal an opposite characteristic diode behavior for WSe2 and MoS2, owing to the formation of a Schottky barrier of dissimilar properties. Notably, by changing the polarity and magnitude of the tip voltage applied, pixels that show the photoresponse of the heterostructure are observed to be selectively switched on and off, allowing for the realization of a hyper-resolution array of the switchable photodiode pixels. This experimental approach has significant implications toward the development of novel optoelectronic technologies for regioselective photodetection and imaging at nanoscale resolutions. Comparative 2D Fourier analysis of physical height and current images shows high spatial frequency variations in substrate/MoS2 (or WSe2) contact that

  19. Anti-correlated cortical networks arise from spontaneous neuronal dynamics at slow timescales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Nathan X; Feng, Tianyi; Ullett, James J; Chiel, Hillel J; Sivakumar, Siddharth S; Galán, Roberto F

    2018-01-12

    In the highly interconnected architectures of the cerebral cortex, recurrent intracortical loops disproportionately outnumber thalamo-cortical inputs. These networks are also capable of generating neuronal activity without feedforward sensory drive. It is unknown, however, what spatiotemporal patterns may be solely attributed to intrinsic connections of the local cortical network. Using high-density microelectrode arrays, here we show that in the isolated, primary somatosensory cortex of mice, neuronal firing fluctuates on timescales from milliseconds to tens of seconds. Slower firing fluctuations reveal two spatially distinct neuronal ensembles, which correspond to superficial and deeper layers. These ensembles are anti-correlated: when one fires more, the other fires less and vice versa. This interplay is clearest at timescales of several seconds and is therefore consistent with shifts between active sensing and anticipatory behavioral states in mice.

  20. Development of Cortical GABAergic Neurons: Interplay of progenitor diversity and environmental factors on fate specification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Alves Brandão

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cortical GABAergic interneurons constitute an extremely diverse population of cells organized in a well-defined topology of precisely interconnected cells. They play a crucial role regulating inhibitory-excitatory balance in brain circuits, gating sensory perception and regulating spike timing to brain oscillations during distinct behaviors. Dysfunctions in the establishment of proper inhibitory circuits have been associated to several brain disorders such as autism, epilepsy and schizophrenia. In the rodent adult cortex, inhibitory neurons are generated during the second gestational week from distinct progenitor lineages located in restricted domains of the ventral telencephalon. However, only recently, studies have revealed some of the mechanisms generating the heterogeneity of neuronal subtypes and their modes of integration in brain networks. Here we will discuss some the events involved in the production of cortical GABAergic neuron diversity with focus on the interaction between intrinsically driven genetic programs and environmental signals during development.